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Common Table needs diners as well as donors Truck Struggling nonprofit fears foodies misperceive it as soup kitchen By Duffie Taylor The Bulletin

The Bend nonprofit restaurant Common Table recently received good news, but good news may not be enough. A six-month fundraiser with

Police say man struck officer with didgeridoo

nonprofit Sagebrush brought Common Table more than $10,000 in donations. That sum does not include the funds Sagebrush has agreed to match at the end of the campaign on Aug. 30. It remains to be seen, however,

how much the fundraiser will affect the restaurant’s bottom line. Since its opening last September, Common Table has combined nonprofit work with entrepreneurship in an effort to provide everyone — even those who

can’t afford it — with a comfortable place to come, talk and eat. But as Common Table approaches the one-year mark, its owners say they’re struggling to bring in enough revenue and worry that the restaurant’s reputation as a good cause may be overshadowing its reputation for something else: good food.

Co-owner Bob Pearson said financial troubles stem from a lack of customers. And he’s concerned that slow business has to do with the way Common Table is perceived. “We have great visibility as a nonprofit, not a restaurant,” Pearson said. “The idea that we have great food didn’t sink in.” See Common Table / A6

Bottoms up at Bend Brewfest

A 7-year-old boy was killed early Thursday when he was struck by a truck while crossing a street in Madras. Madras Police identified the victim as Austin HollenbeakHatch of Madras. Officers were dispatched to the crash scene at the intersection of Fifth and D streets in downtown Madras at around 7:47 a.m. In a news release, police said Austin “darted” across the street and was struck by a 1999 Dodge pickup driven by Dennis Kluser, 64, of Madras. Kluser was turning left from eastbound D Street to northbound Fifth Street and struck Austin in the crosswalk on Fifth Street. Kluser had a green light, the release stated, and morning sun was a factor in the collision. Austin was transported to Mountain View Hospital in Madras and pronounced dead. Police cited Kluser for careless driving and failure to yield to a pedestrian in a crosswalk. A review of Kluser’s driving record through the state courts database indicates three prior citations — one for driving without headlights in 1989, and speeding tickets in 2001 and 2005. See Crash / A6

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By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

By Scott Hammers A man who Bend police say attacked an officer with a didgeridoo was shot with a stun gun and arrested Wednesday night near the Bend Farmers Market. We s t o n Coen, 20, reportedly was creating a disturbance with an unapproved performance on his Australian wind Weston Coen instr ument. Manager Katrina Wiest asked Coen to move his performance outside the market, and she says he initially complied. But he returned later and was contacted by a security guard patrolling the market area. According to Sgt. John Carlon, Coen swatted the phone from the hand of the security guard as he was attempting to call police. Carlon said Sgt. Ron Taylor was sent to the scene to meet Coen, who resisted Taylor’s attempts to arrest him, swinging and stabbing at the officer with his didgeridoo. Coen escaped briefly and ran to the nearby Mirror Pond Plaza, where Taylor caught him and deployed his Taser. Though Taylor was struck with the didgeridoo, said Carlon, the aboriginal instrument did not inflict a serious injury. Neither did the Taser. Coen was arrested for attempted assault on a public safety officer, interfering with making a report and resisting arrest. He was held overnight at the Deschutes County Jail and released without posting bail when the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office declined to file charges at his arraignment. Jail Deputy Robert Lucas said charges could still be filed at a later date once prosecutors have all reports related to the incident. Carlon said Taylor will be required to fill out a use-of-force report detailing the circumstances leading up to his decision to use the Taser. Taylor’s supervisor will review his account of the incident and determine whether it was justified under department policy, Carlon said, a decision he expects will be made by today. Bend police are constrained by reasonably strict policies on the use of Tasers, Carlon said. See Didgeridoo / A6

fatally strikes Madras boy, 7

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Julie Grobbel, of Bend, samples a beer at the Bend Brewfest at the Les Schwab Amphitheater on Thursday. The event continues today from 3 to 11 p.m. and Saturday from noon to 11 p.m. A $10 souvenir mug is required for tasting any of the more than 100 craft beers. The mug comes with four tasting tokens; additional tokens are available for a fee.

IN GO! MAGAZINE Your guide to the festival

Russian democracy, dead at 20 By Kathy Lally The Washington Post

COMING SUNDAY A look at the past and future

of Central Oregon’s beer industry

Customers feeling the effects of Verizon strike By Steven Greenhouse New York Times News Service

As a strike by 45,000 Verizon workers approaches the two-week mark, the company’s customers are beginning to feel the impact — and complaining about it. Verizon acknowledges “minor” disruptions since the strike began Aug. 7. But some customers of its landline telephone, Internet and cable television service are reporting significant delays getting current lines repaired and new ones installed. Craig Schiffer, chief executive of a boutique investment

bank in New York City, said his firm’s telephone service had been down for nine days, and he could not get an estimate from Verizon for when the phones would be working again — a big problem for a business that relies heavily on phone calls with clients. Joey Kreger, a recent college graduate moving from Illinois to Morristown, N.J., was stunned when he ordered Verizon’s FiOS television and Internet service for his new apartment — and the company wrote back that it could install the service Dec. 30. See Verizon / A4

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Ferdinand Hernandez a Verizon sales associate, holds a sign as he and co-worker Leyda Jimenez, a multilingual consultant, picket outside a Verizon store in Newark, N.J., last week. The Associated Press ile photo

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MOSCOW — Twenty years ago today, communist hard-liners staged a coup here, sending tanks rumbling to the Russian White House in an effort to preserve the Soviet Union. Instead, they touched off a powerful expression of democracy. Boris Yeltsin, the first democratically elected president in Russia’s thousand years, galvanized the resistance when he climbed atop one of the tanks and called on citizens to defend the freedoms he had promised to deliver. They mounted the barricades, unarmed, willing to risk their lives for democracy. The coup leaders lost their nerve. A few months later, the Soviet Union was dead. All these years later, so is democracy. Today, Vladimir Putin presides over an authoritarian government in that same White House, a bulky 20-story skyscraper on the edge of the Moscow River. Occasional demonstrations in favor of democracy are small and largely ignored, except by the police. See Russia / A4

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SYRIA: Obama tells Assad to step down, Page A3 STOCK WOES: American markets plunge, Page B1


A2 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Cancer’s secrets come into sharper focus By George Johnson New York Times News Service

Drug found to extend the lives of obese mice

For the last decade cancer research has been guided by a common vision of how a single cell, outcompeting its neighbors, evolves into a malignant tumor. Through a series of random mutations, genes that encourage cellular division are pushed into By Nicholas Wade New York Times News Service overdrive, while genes that normally send growth-restraining Sustaining the flickering signals are taken offline. hope that human aging might With the accelerator floored somehow be decelerated, reand the brake lines cut, the cell searchers have found they and its progeny are free to rapcan substantially extend the idly multiply. More mutations average life span of obese accumulate, allowing the cancer mice with a specially decells to elude other safeguards signed drug. and to invade neighboring tissue The drug, SRT-1720, proand metastasize. tects the mice from the usual These basic principles — laid diseases of obesity by reducout 11 years ago in a landmark ing the amount of fat in the paper, “The Hallmarks of Canliver and increasing sensicer,” by Douglas Hanahan and tivity to insulin. These and Robert Weinberg, and revisited other positive health effects in a follow-up article this year Bryce Vickmark / New York Times News Service enable the obese mice to live — still serve as the reigning par- Elinor Ng Eaton clones DNA at the Whitehead Institute in Cambridge, Mass. Researchers are finding 44 percent longer, on averadigm, a kind of Big Bang theory clues that pseudogenes lurking within “junk” DNA might play a role in cancer. age, than obese mice that for the field. did not receive the drug, say But recent discoveries have a team of researchers led by been complicating the picture presentation after another at the cer biology more like chemistry tumor’s own blood supply. Rafael de Cabo, a gerontolowith tangles of new detail. Can- Orlando meeting explored how or physics — sciences governed All these processes are so gist at the National Institute cer appears to be even more will- microRNAs are involved in the by precise, predictable rules. tightly intertwined that it is difon Aging. ful and calculating than previ- fine-tuning that distinguishes a Now there appear to be transis- ficult to tell where one leaves Drugs closely related to ously imagined. healthy cell from a malignant one. tors inside the transistors. “I still off and another begins. With so SRT-1720 are now undergoMost DNA, for example, was Ratcheting the complexity a think that the wiring diagram, or much internal machinery, maliging clinical trials. long considered junk — a nether- notch higher, Pandolfi, the Har- at least its outlines, may be laid nant tumors are now being comThe findings “demonstrate world of detritus that had no im- vard Medical School researcher, out within a decade,” Weinberg pared to renegade organs sproutfor the first time the feaportant role in cancer or anything laid out an elaborate theory in- said in an email. “MicroRNAs ing inside the body. sibility of designing novel else. Only about 2 percent of the volving microRNAs and pseudo- may be more like minitransismolecules that are safe and human genome carries genes. For every pseudo- tors or amplifiers, but however effective in promoting lonthe code for making gene there is a regular, one depicts them, they still must Unseen enemies gevity and preventing mulenzymes and other proprotein-encoding gene. be soldered into the circuit in one At a session in Orlando on the tiple age-related diseases in teins, the cogs and scafWhile normal genes way or another.” future of cancer research, Dr. mammals,” de Cabo and colfolding of the machinery express their will by In their follow-up paper, “Hall- Harold Varmus, the director of leagues wrote in Thursday’s that a cancer cell turns sending signals of mes- marks of Cancer: The Next Gen- the National Cancer Institute, deissue of the new journal Scito its own devices. senger RNA, the dam- eration,” he and Hanahan cited scribed the Provocative Questions entific Reports. These days “junk” aged pseudogenes ei- two “emerging hallmarks” that initiative, a new effort to seek out The drug is one of a set of DNA is referred to ther are mute or speak future research may show to be mysteries and paradoxes that chemicals designed by Sirtris, more respectfully as Robert in gibberish. crucial to malignancy — the abil- may be vulnerable to solution. a small pharmaceutical com“noncoding” DNA, and Weinberg, an Or so it was generally ity of an aberrant cell to repro“In our rush to do the things pany in Cambridge, Mass., researchers are find- author of “The believed. Little is wast- gram its metabolism to feed its that are really obvious to do, to mimic resveratrol — the ing clues that “pseudo- Hallmarks of ed by evolution, and wildfire growth and to evade de- we’re forgetting to pay attention trace ingredient of red wine genes” lurking within Cancer.” Pandolfi hypothesizes struction by the immune system. to many unexplained phenomthought to activate protective this dark region may that RNA signals from ena,” he said. proteins called sirtuins. play a role in cancer. both genes and pseuWhy, for example, does the The sirtuins help medi“We’ve been obsessively focus- dogenes interact through a lan- Unwitting allies Epstein-Barr virus cause differate the 30 percent extension ing our attention on 2 percent of guage involving microRNAs. Even if all the lines and boxes ent cancers in different popuof life span enjoyed by mice the genome,” said Dr. Pier Paolo His lab at Beth Israel Deaconess for the schematic of the cancer lations? Why do patients with and rats that are kept on very Pandolfi, a professor of medicine Medical Center in Boston is study- cell can be sketched in, huge com- certain neurological diseases low-calorie diets. Since few and pathology at Harvard Medi- ing how this arcane back channel plications will remain. Research like Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, people can keep to such an cal School. This spring, at the an- is used by genes called PTEN and is increasingly focused on the Alzheimer’s and Fragile X seem unappetizing diet, researchnual meeting of the American As- KRAS, commonly implicated in fact that a tumor is not a homoge- to be at a lower risk for most caners hoped that doses of resvesociation for Cancer Research in cancer, to confer with their pseu- neous mass of cancer cells. It also cers? Why are some tissues more ratrol might secure a painless Orlando, Fla., he described a new dotwins. The hypothesis is laid contains healthy cells that have prone than others to developing path to significantly greater “biological dimension” in which out in more detail this month in been conscripted into the cause. tumors? Why do some mutations health and longevity. signals coming from both regions an essay in the journal Cell. Cells called fibroblasts col- evoke cancerous effects in one But large doses of resveraof the genome participate in the In their original “hallmarks” pa- laborate by secreting proteins the type of cell but not in others? trol are required to show any delicate balance between normal per — the most cited in the history tumor needs to build its supportWith so many phenomena in effect, so chemical mimics cellular behavior and malignancy. of Cell — Hanahan and Weinberg ive scaffolding and expand into search of a biological explanation, like SRT-1720 were developed As they look beyond the ge- gathered a bonanza of emerging surrounding tissues. Immune “Hallmarks of Cancer: The Next to activate sirtuin at much nome, cancer researchers are research and synthesized it into system cells, maneuvered into be- Generation” may conceivably lower doses. also awakening to the fact that six characteristics. All of them, having as if they were healing a be followed by a second sequel Sirtuins have proved to be some 90 percent of the pro- they proposed, are shared by most wound, emit growth factors that — with twists as unexpected as highly interesting proteins, tein-encoding cells in our body and maybe all human cancers. embolden the tumor and stimu- those in the old “Star Trek” shows. but the goal of extending are microbes. We evolved with They went on to predict that in 20 late angiogenesis, the generation The enemy inside us is every bit as life span was set back when them in a symbiotic relationship, years the circuitry of a cancer cell of new blood vessels. Endothelial formidable as imagined invaders extensive trials of resverawhich raises the question of just would be mapped and understood cells, which form the lining of the from beyond. Learning to outwit trol showed it did not prowho is occupying whom. as thoroughly as the transistors circulatory system, are also en- it is leading science deep into the long mice’s lives, although it “We are massively outnum- on a computer chip, making can- listed in the construction of the universe of the living cell. seemed to do them no harm. bered,” said Jeremy Nicholson, chairman of biological chemistry and head of the department of surgery and cancer at Imperial College London. Altogether, he said, 99 percent of the functional genes in the body are microbial. 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THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 A3

T S SYRIA

Assad must go, Obama says By Scott Wilson and Joby Warrick The Washington Post

Mahesh Kumar A. / The Associated Press

A supporter of anti-corruption activist Anna Hazare displays his handcuffed hands in front of a portrait of Hazare during a protest against corruption in Hyderabad, India, on Thursday.

Indian activist wins right to fast in public, prepares to leave jail By Simon Denyer and Rama Lakshmi The Washington Post

NEW DELHI — India’s leading anti-corruption campaigner prepared to leave prison after winning an assurance from the government Thursday that he could continue his widely watched hunger strike and burgeoning protest against official graft at a park in central Delhi for at least 15 days. Anna Hazare, 74, was arrested Tuesday, hours before he planned to begin an indefinite fast to demand tougher laws against corruption, prompting protests across India by tens of thousands of people and putting the government on the defensive. Within 24 hours of his arrest, more than 120,000 Indians signed an online petition demanding his release. Although the government ordered Hazare’s release that evening, he refused to leave the prison until he was assured that he could continue his hunger strike on the outside. Crowds outside Delhi’s high-security Tihar Jail erupted in cheers at news of the deal, throwing rose petals in the air and shouting, “Anna has won!” But protest leaders said the struggle against cor-

ruption was only beginning. “We’ve just entered the battleground,” Arvind Kejriwal said as he emerged from Tihar. “There is more of this battle to come.” He said Hazare would leave the jail today, once government workers have filled monsoon puddles and cleared trash from the Ramlila grounds to ready it for the protest. Fellow campaign leader and former senior policewoman Kiran Bedi appeared to lower the stakes by saying Hazare would not fast until death, as he had previously threatened, but only as long as his health permits. “He will fast as long as he can sustain it,” Bedi said. “He will fast as long as there is no threat to his life.” Bedi released a video recording from inside the prison Thursday in which Hazare urged the government to resolve the impasse by accepting his demands. “The government should not delay any longer. It is not a question of Anna Hazare. Have they come out for Anna Hazare’s sake? Their lives have become difficult because of corruption. When their capacity to endure got over, they came on the street,” Hazare said.

W  B

After fatal attacks, Israel bombs Gaza JERUSALEM — Armed attackers, described by authorities as Gazans who had crossed into Israel from Egypt, carried out multiple deadly attacks near the popular Red Sea resort of Eilat on Thursday, prompting an Israeli bombing raid on Gaza and threatening to escalate tensions there. Eight Israelis were killed and more than 30 were wounded in the attacks near Eilat, the most serious on Israel from Egyptian territory in decades. The attacks highlighted how the fallout from the Egyptian revolution — lawlessness in the northern Sinai Peninsula and a softer line in Cairo toward Iran and the militant group Hamas — had frayed ties with Israel. The Israeli military said it had killed at least four of the attackers in the desert near the Egyptian border. Hours later, it retaliated with several airstrikes on Gaza. In the first such strike, six Palestinians, several of them members of a militant group, were killed, according to the group’s spokesman and medical officials in Gaza.

The Taliban claimed responsibility for the attack, which came on the day Afghans celebrate gaining independence from Britain in 1919. The British Council is a British government agency promoting education, culture and the arts in 110 countries.

Libyan rebels seize control of oil refinery ZAWIYAH, Libya — Rebel fighters claimed complete control of a sprawling oil refinery in this coastal town Thursday, seizing one of Moammar Gadhafi’s most important assets after just three days of fighting and delivering the latest in a string of small victories that have suddenly put the rebels at Tripoli’s door. Despite what rebel leaders described as fierce fighting, many of them expressed surprise that the Gadhafi loyalists were routed with relative ease. Some people even wondered whether the chaotic exit by about 50 of the Gadhafi fighters — who fled by boat before they were bombed by NATO warplanes, according to several fighters — was some sort of a ruse.

Deadly twin blasts rattle British Council

Turkish warplanes hit Kurdish targets in Iraq

KABUL, Afghanistan — Militants attacked the British Council in a residential neighborhood in the capital early Friday, British and Afghan officials said, leaving at least four people dead. A spokesman for the British Embassy, speaking anonymously in line with official policy, confirmed that the attack took place at the British Council compound in Kabul. “The British Embassy is coordinating with Afghan authorities who are dealing with the ongoing incident,” the spokesman said.

ISTANBUL — Turkish warplanes attacked 60 targets in the mountains and border areas of northern Iraq early Thursday in pursuit of Kurdish separatist rebels suspected of responsibility a day earlier for a deadly quadruple bombing ambush on a military convoy in southeast Turkey, the army headquarters said. Turkish news reports and Kurdish officials in northern Iraq reported more Turkish warplane sorties late Thursday. — From wire reports

President Barack Obama and European leaders called Thursday for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to resign, after months of his violent crackdown on protesters. The rhetorical escalation was backed by new U.S. sanctions designed to undermine Assad’s ability to finance his military operation. “The future of Syria must be determined by its people, but President Bashar al-Assad is standing in their way,” Obama said in a written statement. “For the sake of the Syrian people, the time has come for President Assad to step aside.” Obama’s first explicit call for Assad to resign — something critics have pressured him to do — culminated

months of calibrated diplomacy that has included three rounds of sanctions and a gradual policy shift toward regime change in a nation long at odds with U.S. policy in the Middle East. The president made his announcement hours before leaving on a 10-day vacation at Martha’s Vineyard, where he has little contact with journalists, and as Assad presses ahead with a broad military campaign that has killed hundreds of Syrian civilians. The crackdown is one of the most brutal government responses to protests during the tumultuous Arab Spring. As Obama issued his statement, the leaders of France, Germany and Britain joined him in calling on Assad “to face the reality of the complete rejection of his regime by the Syrian people and to step aside.” Obama had spoken to French

President Nicolas Sarkozy, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and British Prime Minister David Cameron over the past two weeks to discuss calling for Assad’s resignation and to coordinate steps on sanctions. Many of Obama’s critics, including Senate hawks and human rights groups, questioned his reluctance to call for Assad’s ouster, a move opposed until recently by key regional U.S. allies such as Turkey and Saudi Arabia. The critics have compared it unfavorably to Obama’s more rapid decision to end support for nowousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, a longtime U.S. ally. Human rights advocates estimate that more than 2,000 Syrian civilians have been killed in the Assad government’s fivemonth-old crackdown, which has spread from restive border areas in the south to many of the

country’s major cities. On Thursday, the top U.N. human rights agency issued a scathing account of the operation, urging the Security Council to consider authorizing the International Criminal Court to investigate possible crimes against humanity. Several Western nations also plan to draft a U.N. resolution that would demand that Syria halt its crackdown and would impose an arms embargo on Damascus. Syria’s U.N. ambassador, Bashar al-Jaafari, said the United States “is launching a humanitarian and diplomatic war against us.” The sanctions that the Obama administration announced Thursday freeze all Syrian government assets that are under U.S. jurisdiction and bar Americans from doing business with the government.

White House to suspend ls in America! * a e many deportations D t s Be By Robert Pear

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration announced Thursday that it would suspend deportation proceedings against many illegal immigrants who pose no threat to national security or public safety. The policy is expected to help thousands of illegal immigrants who came to the United States as young children, graduated from high school and want to go on to college or serve in the armed forces. White House and immigra-

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A4 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Russia Continued from A1 Those who defended the White House thought they had changed the course of history, that in standing up so assertively the people had shaken off their Soviet subservience to the state and that the state would begin to serve the people. But today, elections are not fair, courts are not independent, political opposition is not tolerated and the reformers are widely blamed for what has gone wrong. “The difference is this,” says Georgy Satarov, president of the INDEM Foundation and a former Yeltsin aide. “Then, people had hope. Now, they are disappointed and frustrated.” Yeltsin’s voters wanted him to take them in a new direction, says Satarov, but the operative word was take. “We saw the old train was taking us in the wrong direction,” he says, “but we thought all we had to do was change the conductor and we would have comfortable seats and good food. Democracy would take us where we wanted to go, not our own effort. Sometimes you have to get off and push.” Today, Russia works on bribes, and Putin’s opponents call his party the party of crooks and thieves. People can say whatever they want — unlike in Soviet times, when they feared the secret police knocking in the middle of the night — but television is controlled and any opposition is publicly invisible. “They cannot let people on television who will say Putin is a thief,” says Igor Klyamkin, a scholar and vice president of the Liberal Mission Foundation. Many Russians despair about their country, its prospects and their own, but they say little and do less. Not Satarov, whose life’s work is researching and writing about that corruption. “During the last 300 years, there has never been such an inefficient government,” he says. “The state is disappearing because those who have the job description of working for the state have much more important things to do. The problem is, the more they steal, the more they fear losing power.” In 1991, there were leaders who could inspire people to act, he says. “Now there are none, and anything can happen.” Only a tiny percentage of the population takes part in civil so-

C OV ER S T OR I ES

“There are no leaders who can become symbols of change. I don’t see any change for 15 to 20 years.” — Boris Dubin, Levada Center’s director of sociopolitical studies ciety, about 1.5 or 2 percent, at the level of statistical error. “Now, we can speak as much as we want,” says Sergei Kanayev, head of the Moscow office of the Russian Federation of Car Owners, “but they don’t listen. It’s useless and very sad.” “Ordinary people do not believe in anything, and they don’t trust anyone,” Kanayev says. “The entire society is silent and passive.”

Democracy blamed For years the Levada Center, an independent polling and analytical organization, has been studying Russian political and social behavior, watching disillusionment with democracy set in. “At the end of the 1980s, anything to do with the Soviet system was reviled,” says Boris Dubin, Levada’s director of sociopolitical studies. “Then people lost everything in the economic upheaval of 1992 and 1993. They lost all of their savings. They were threatened with unemployment. There was a bigger gap between the more successful and the less successful, and this was very painful for anyone brought up in Soviet times.” Instead of blaming the legacy of the unsustainable Soviet economy, Russians blamed the reformers. Democracy began to acquire a dubious reputation. Long-entrenched interests proved more difficult to subdue than coup plotters. The old legislature, still sympathetic to the bloated industries sustained on a rich diet of state subsidies, opposed many reforms and refused to disband. Yeltsin turned his own tanks on them as they holed up in the White House in 1993, traumatizing the nation. Later he made what he would describe as his biggest mistake, sending tanks into separatist Chechnya in 1994. “Yeltsin lost the support of most people,” Dubin says. “There was a question of whether he could win the next election in 1996, and he dropped democratic tools step by step, drawing closer to the power structures.” By the end of the 1990s, many were feeling nostalgic for Soviet

times. “They wanted a young strong leader who could create order,” Dubin says. “So most were ready for Putin, and they did not think they should be frightened because he was a man of the power structure,” the former KGB. Putin used state-controlled television to relentlessly send the message that life was better and Russia stronger under him than it was in the 1990s, a time of national humiliation. When he restored the old Soviet anthem, people hummed right along. He dispensed object lessons: Former oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky, who financed political opposition to Putin, was arrested on fraud charges in 2003. His jail term was recently extended to 2016. His business partner, Platon Lebedev, was recently denied parole because he had lost a pair of prison pants. In June, a liberal political party was refused the registration that would have allowed it to participate in the Duma elections in December. “There are no leaders who can become symbols of change,” Dubin says. “I don’t see any change for 15 to 20 years.” Today’s Russia is not the Soviet Union, says Grigori Golosov, a St. Petersburg political scientist. “But at the same time, it is an authoritarian regime that violates human and basic rights.” The next presidential election is in March, and Putin has not declared who will run — the decision is considered his. “If this regime is successful and Russia continues under the current system, it will be a threat to others. Even now it has visions of empire,” Klyamkin says.

Started with Putin Sergei Filatov, 75, sadly ponders the question of how it has come to this, sitting in his office on the Avenue of the Cos-

monauts, staring off as if fixing his mind’s eye on Aug. 19, 1991, when he rushed to the barricades. “Russia is turning into a state that exists for the bureaucracy, and in many ways a closed state. And it started with Putin’s election,” he says. Yeltsin, inaugurated as president of the Russian Federation in July 1991, became president of an independent Russia when the Soviet Union dissolved at the end of the year. He resigned in weakness and ill health at the end of 1999, clearing the way for Putin’s election. Putin has run Russia ever since, for eight years as president and since 2008 as prime minister, with Dmitry Medvedev as president. The future had looked so different in 1991, and Filatov’s voice grows strong as he describes how Russians rose against the three-day coup. Mikhail Gorbachev, president of the Soviet Union, was trying to save the communist state with a policy of more openness and freedom when die-hard Soviet officials who thought it was all going too far imprisoned him in his vacation home and declared themselves in charge. Everyone knew a coup was underway that Monday morning when normal broadcasting was suspended and Russians turned on their televisions and saw the ballet “Swan Lake,” the kind of calming fare Soviet authorities trotted out in times of crisis. “They danced and danced and danced,” Filatov said. Filatov, who runs the nonprofit Foundation for Social, Economic and Intellectual Programs, would go on to become an important Yeltsin-era official and an architect of democracy. He still savors the end of the three-day coup on Aug. 21, 1991. “We raised the Russian flag over the White House, and there was huge euphoria,” he says. But Filatov recalled a comment by Alexander Yakovlev, who had devised Gorbachev’s policies of perestroika and glasnost: “He said, ‘You are all very happy over your victory, but others will come and seize your victory.’ And that’s what happened.”

Verizon Continued from A1 Competitors like Time Warner Cable and Cablevision have mobilized to take advantage of Verizon’s problems. Time Warner, which operates in some of the East Coast markets affected by the Verizon strike, is running ads promising speedy service, and it has increased the number of field technicians so that it can do cable installations within 48 hours. “When folks are in a time when they might not be able to get service, we are emphasizing not just the price but our high level of service,” said Todd Townsend, chief marketing officer for Time Warner’s eastern region. Officials at the two unions on strike — the Communications Workers of America and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers — say they are certain that the walkout is causing delays in repairs and installations, but they acknowledge they do not know by how much. “Historically, we know that you can’t pull out of any system 45,000 people who are the hands and minds of the company’s product and expect to provide the same level of service as before,” said George Kohl, special assistant to the president of the CWA. “The managers who are replacing them don’t perform these functions nearly as efficiently.” Verizon said that problems for existing customers had been minimal. “We’re seeing some minor delays on a few repairs and installations,” said Christopher Creager, Verizon’s senior vice president for consumer and mass business markets. “The vast majority of our customers are not seeing any impact.” Verizon officials acknowledge, however, that they decided not to take any new orders for the first two weeks of the strike so they could focus on serving their current customers.

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“We are seeing some delays on the installation side if it’s a brand-new installation that requires technicians to come out,” Creager said. That has upset potential customers like Dylan Marsh, who are complaining about delays in obtaining FiOS service, which offers Internet, cable TV and phone service over high-speed fiber optic lines and competes with the services sold by cable companies like Time Warner and Comcast. Marsh, who just graduated from Buffalo State College with a degree in urban planning, wanted to order Verizon’s FiOS Internet and television services for his new apartment in Manhattan. “They let me go through the whole signup and then at the end they said, ‘There are no installation dates available. Someone will contact you,’ ” Marsh said. “That was probably a week ago. They were trying to make it seem like everything is OK, like the service is there but it’s not. I thought it would be a couple of weeks, but it might end up being a couple of months. I decided to go with Time Warner instead.” Verizon said efforts to keep up had also been set back by numerous incidents of sabotage and by the rainstorm that struck the East Coast last weekend. Verizon is pushing the unions to accept far-reaching concessions, including a pension freeze and fewer sick days, and asking that workers contribute far more toward their health coverage. Negotiations between the two sides are continuing, but at the same time, both are preparing for a protracted strike. In a recent move, Verizon has sought to step up pressure on the strikers by informing them that the company will cut off their medical, dental and optical benefits Aug. 31. If that occurs, the communications workers’ union has promised to tap a relief fund to help pay for strikers’ health needs.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 A5

Critics target Obama’s vacation By Michael Muskal Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — President Barack Obama headed to the island of Martha’s Vineyard on Thursday for a 10-day vacation. Along with his bathing suit, he probably should pack a flak jacket to protect himself from political attacks. Republicans for days have been berating Obama for planning to take time off instead of sitting in his office, working on the economic recovery. Some have suggested he call back Congress to help, though after the last round of bargaining about raising the debt ceiling, Obama may be just as happy that lawmakers are also out of Washington on vacation. In an email, the Republican National Committee on Thursday even coupled Obama’s break with a plea for funds. There are two key points to make about presidential vacations. First, beating up a president for going away is a time-honored tradition. As David McCullough noted in his Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of John Adams, the nation’s second president went back to his Quincy, Mass., farm for around seven months in the summer of 1798, as war fever with France raged on. This prompted some to wonder about whether Adams had abdicated. Adams was dealing with a sick wife and like everyone else was fleeing the usual summer pestilence and yellow fever outbreaks.

Carolyn Kaster / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama arrives at Cape Cod Coast Guard Air Station in Bourne, Mass., on Thursday, en route to a family vacation on Martha’s Vineyard. Which brings up the second point. Defending a president for leaving is just as much of a time-honored tradition as attacking him.

Taking a page from past disputes, the current White House has defended Obama for going to the island, noting that with modern communication devices he is never really off of the job even when he takes breaks to eat ice cream, buy books, bicycle and play golf. Still, there is the question of political optics, which has annoyed even some liberal critics. Obama will be resting and recreating on an island associated with the wealthy (though not everyone there is) at a time when unemployment has remained at 9.1 percent and how the administration has handled economic issues remains the heart of U.S. politics and policy through 2012 and probably beyond. Obama’s predecessor, George W. Bush, came under fire for taking far more vacation days, roughly 500 over his two terms, to visit his ranch in Crawford, Texas. He famously stayed at the ranch after Hurricane Katrina flooded New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. When he finally did visit the region, it was too late and way too little to overcome the political fallout. Perhaps the most vocal critic of Obama has been Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, who called on Obama to stay in Washington and to even call back Congress. Coincidentally, Romney has scheduled a fundraiser on Martha’s Vineyard during the time Obama is there.

Obama moves to regain Perry, Romney offer mantle of campaigner a stark contrast on jobs By Jeff Zeleny New York Times News Service

ALPHA, Ill. — On the final stop of his Midwestern bus tour, after President Barack Obama faced a rolling reality check about the precarious state of the nation’s economy, a young man offered a parting word of encouragement. “I just want to let you know one thing,” said Eric Palmer, who stood in the back of the crowd here at the Country Corner Farm. “I am not disappointed in you like Michele Bachmann wants everyone to believe.” “Thank you,” Obama replied, a slight smile spreading across his face. “I appreciate that.” In a three-day journey through the friendly terrain of Minnesota, Iowa and Illinois that ended Wednesday, there were few direct mentions of Mitt Romney, Rick Perry, Bachmann or any other Republican presidential hopefuls. But the trip offered the first real indication of how the president plans to confront his Republican opponent — whoever he or she is. As he did four years ago when he found his back against the wall in his Democratic primary fight with Hillary Clinton, Obama seemed intent on showing that he is the partisan fighter that some of his supporters fear he is not. He signaled that he intends to use the rising influence of the tea party movement as a chance to undermine Republicans with independent voters. And he bluntly asked voters to begin considering what he believes the consequences would be if Republicans won the White House. “There is a group of folks who think that I’d rather see my opponent lose than see America win,” Obama said. “There are folks who are willing to engage in political brinksmanship even if it costs the country.” Here in Alpha, the president received a warm and enthusiastic reception, after people waited for hours before dawn to get tickets and waited again in the afternoon sunshine for his arrival. But

a mood of hopeful optimism that hung in the air during his campaign appearances four years ago has given way to calls for patience, with tough questions and few immediate solutions. For now, the sense of energy that marked the Democrats’ 2008 effort to reclaim the White House is coursing with greater intensity through the Republican side of the campaign. A spirited nominating contest and a unified goal of defeating an incumbent president has awakened the party from its sleepy disposition in the 2008 presidential race when George W. Bush was leaving office. It is premature to suggest the enthusiasm gap is permanent. Democrats are confident that when the general election battle begins — with Obama matched against a single opponent — the fervor surrounding the 2008 campaign will return. But several voters who came to see the president Wednesday said they worried that Obama had become consumed by Washington and had not responded aggressively to Republican efforts to discredit him. “Everyone was so hopeful with him, but Washington grabbed him and here we are,” said LuAnn Lavine, a real estate agent from Geneseo, Ill. “I just want him to stay strong and don’t take the guff. We want a president who is a leader, and I want him to be a little bit stronger.” The president’s travels, which covered more than 350 miles, were billed as an official White House event, rather than a political trip. (Republicans roundly disagreed.) He strode onto the stage here in silence, rather than with a campaign anthem heralding his arrival. While he visited three states that he easily carried four years ago, including his home state of Illinois, a series of tough questions about lost jobs, the future of Social Security and government regulations made his visit anything but a pep rally.

By Philip Rucker The Washington Post

The opening days of Texas Gov. Rick Perry’s campaign for the Republican presidential nomination have revealed a stark contrast between his proposed approach to reviving the U.S. economy and that of presumed frontrunner Mitt Romney. On the issue that voters consider paramount, each candidate is pitching himself as the only one with the skills and experience necessary to create jobs. But their records as job creators are strikingly different, as are most other aspects of their personal biographies. Romney, a former Massachusetts governor, boasts of a 25year career in the private sector — he calls it “the real economy” — helping restructure businesses. Perry highlights his decade as governor, in particular the past two years in which Texas alone has accounted for at least a third of the new jobs created in the U.S. Romney’s view of the economy is shaped by his time as a management consultant and venture capitalist. Perry’s frame of reference is his family’s cotton farm and his state’s oil and gas boom. As Romney and Perry both campaigned Wednesday in New Hampshire, the question before Republican voters is which credential is a better match for this moment: growing a business yourself or shap-

ing an environment in which businesses can grow. Some experts said both experiences are valuable, but neither is the perfect fit. What matters more, they said, is whether the candidates have sound proposals to deal with the country’s big problems. And so far, neither has offered a detailed road map beyond the characteristic Republican platform of lowering taxes and loosening regulations. “Both private and public sector experience are helpful, but that’s the wrong debate,” said Allan Hubbard, a former director of the National Economic Council under President George W. Bush. “They’re both going to have very different hands if they’re elected in 2012. We all know what the hand is. What would they do? That’s what they need to be talking about.” Nigel Gault, chief U.S. economist for IHS Global Insight, said: “I’m not sure that what they have done in the past necessarily is exactly what you need to run the country. It’s very different to be governor of a state than it is to be president of the United States. ... And being successful in private business doesn’t necessarily translate into being a successful president.” In Perry, Romney now has a strong — and strongly credentialed — opponent with a history of being a tough campaigner who has vilified his rivals.

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A6 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

IBM pursues THE POPE ARRIVES IN SPAIN Protesters question cost of visit computer chips that mimic brains By Raphael Minder

Pope Benedict XVI puts on a hat presented to him by a young man representing the youth of Latin America in Madrid’s Cibeles Square on Thursday. The pope denounced the profitat-all-costs mentality that he says caused Europe’s current economic crisis as he arrived in hard-hit Spain on Thursday.

New York Times News Service

By Jordan Robertson The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — Computers, like humans, can learn. But when Google tries to fill in your search box based only on a few keystrokes, or your iPhone predicts words as you type a text message, it’s only a narrow mimicry of what the human brain is capable. The challenge in training a computer to behave like a human brain is technological and physiological, testing the limits of computer and brain science. But researchers from IBM Corp. say they’ve made a key step toward combining the two worlds. The company announced Thursday that it has built two prototype chips that it says process data more like how humans digest information than the chips that now power PCs and supercomputers. The chips represent a significant milestone in a six-year-long project that has involved 100 researchers and some $41 million in funding from the government’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA. That’s the Pentagon arm that focuses on long-term research and previously brought the world the Internet. IBM has also committed an undisclosed amount of money. The prototypes offer further evidence of the growing importance of “parallel processing,” or computers doing multiple tasks simultaneously. That is important for rendering graphics and crunching large amounts of data.

MADRID — Pope Benedict XVI began a four-day visit to Spain on Thursday, bringing what he hoped would be a message of faith and optimism to young people in an overwhelmingly Roman Catholic country where church attendance has declined and many citizens are worried about severe economic austerity, indebtedness and unemployment. Even before the pope’s arrival, the visit was overshadowed by violent clashes in Madrid late Wednesday between police and protesters furious over its cost to Spain, which they contended was excessive at a time when many Spaniards are scraping by. The protesters also condemned what they called the blurring of lines between a Catholic celebration and the secularism that is enshrined in Spain’s Constitution. Pope Benedict’s main reason for the visit to Spain, his third since becoming pope in 2005, was to attend World Youth Day, a gathering in Madrid of more than 1 million Catholics. A large and youthful crowd, waving national flags and flanked by the pope’s Swiss guards, welcomed Pope Benedict at Madrid-Barajas Airport. The pope, speaking in Spanish, called on his audience not to hide their Christian identity and instead “live together with other legitimate choices in a spirit of respect while at the same time demanding due respect for one’s own.” He said the event in Madrid would send “a message of hope” at a time when “a lot of young people are looking at the future with preoccupation.” After his opening remarks, the pope rode to the center of Madrid in his special vehicle, down avenues lined with cheering pilgrims. The pope will be giving nine speeches during his stay. The culmination of the visit will be a Mass in front of hundreds of thousands on Sunday. The pope was received at the airport by a delegation led by King Juan Carlos and Prime Minister Jose Luis Ro-

Armando Franca The Associated Press

driguez Zapatero. Since taking office in 2004, Zapatero has pushed through several changes that have been strongly condemned by the Roman Catholic Church, particularly the legalization of same-sex marriage and a law to make abortion more accessible. On his last visit, to Barcelona, the pope warned against “strong and aggressive secularism” developing in Spain. This time, the Vatican has offered few hints about whether the pontiff would reiterate such concerns. About 428,000 people officially registered for World Youth Day, although organizers said they expected the total to exceed 1 million by the weekend. The event has transformed

Madrid, which is normally deserted at this time of year, when its inhabitants escape the sweltering city for vacations at Spain’s beaches. The police said eight people were arrested and 11 injured Wednesday night in protests around Puerta del Sol, the central square that since May 15 has been the center of a youth-led protest movement that has accused traditional parties and institutions of putting their interests ahead of those of citizens struggling with a 21 percent jobless rate. Some protesters there insisted that their grievances were not aimed at the pope but at wasteful or preferential spending at a time of austerity.

Common Table Continued from A1 The restaurant relies mostly on organic, local meat and produce, with options ranging from sushi bowl salads with tofu to honey-bourbon pulled pork on brioche. It also offers wines, cocktails and local beer. But Pearson and staff members say that despite the sophisticated menu, people mistake the restaurant for a soup kitchen because of its mission to serve food to all, regardless of income or status. Nate Bettger, a manager and longtime supporter, said its approach to dining is misunderstood. “It’s like people have two boxes in their brain — either we’re a soup kitchen or a restaurant,” Bettger said. “What people don’t get is that we’re trying to do both in our own unique way.” The restaurant offers mostly traditional seating, though its centerpiece is a 20-foot walnut table that offers communal seating. The staff’s commitment to serving healthy, fresh, high-quality food doesn’t compromise its nonprofit status, Bettger said. “Sure, we could save a lot of money if we imported food from Mexico,” he said. “But we’d have to sacrifice some pretty significant values we have, and we’re not going to do that.” Another value Common Table supporters say they won’t compromise on is their mission to include the homeless and underprivileged. The restaurant distributes $10 food tokens to low-income customers and offers food to those who can’t afford a meal. Bettger added that all tips go directly back to the community in the form of food or token donations. Jack Langhouser, who is homeless, appreciates the social entrepreneurship’s underlying premise. He often drops by the restaurant to do community service and grab a bite to eat. “It’s wonderful here,” Langhouser said. “It’s as close as I get to a home. These people are my family.” Since its opening, Common Table has seen changes. The staff has been reduced from 20 to 14, the breakfast menu has been eliminated and the restaurant is now closed on Mondays. Elements have been added as well. The restaurant has set up a booth at the local farmers market, begun a catering service and hosted talks by local farmers and community leaders. To ease the financial strain, Pearson said Common Table will hold another fundraiser in September, raffling off two bikes and gear from the former pro cycling team Toyota United. Looking forward, Pearson said he plans to focus on promotion and find new ways to trim costs. And he still believes the enterprise has what it takes to sustain itself. “New places are harder to break in,” Pearson said. “We’re looking to increase our revenue, cut costs and enhance our positioning in the community. We will balance it out.” Duffie Taylor can be reached at 541-383-0376 or at dtaylor@bendbulletin.com.

Didgeridoo Continued from A1 A suspect who simply pulls away from an officer would likely be resisting arrest, he said, and should not be subjected to a Taser under department policy. If a suspect’s resistance involves physical force that could result in injury, a Taser can be considered, he said. “If you slap the front of my shirt and it doesn’t hurt, that’s not going to be an assault on an officer,” Carlon said. “If you take a didgeridoo and thrust it into an officer’s chest, that’s going to be an assault or an attempted assault.” Coen has no prior criminal record in Oregon, according to state court records. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,380.43 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -131.05 -5.22%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Summit 1031 partner loses CPA license One of the founders of Summit 1031 Exchange, a Bendbased real estate services company, has lost his Oregon certified public accountant’s license, the state announced Thursday. The Oregon Board of Accountancy on Monday revoked the license of Brian Stevens, of Bend, for professional misconduct: defrauding and obtaining money and property from clients through fraudulent representations, according to a news release. Stevens pleaded guilty in April in federal court to conspiracy to commit wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering. Three others, Mark Neuman and Lane Lyons, both of Bend, and Redmond resident Timothy Larkin, have been indicted by a federal grand jury on charges of wire fraud and money laundering conspiracies — all related to the operation of Summit 1031, which takes its name from Section 1031 of the federal tax code, which involves the deferral of capital gains taxes. Stevens’ sentencing has been scheduled for Jan. 23, according to electronic court records. Trial for the others has been scheduled for Nov. 22.

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$1818.90 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$27.70

Fearful U.S. market stumbles By Cezary Podkul and Peter Whoriskey The Washington Post

Stock prices plunged in a broad sell-off Thursday amid renewed fears about the finances of countries and banks in Europe in a return of the investor skittishness that led to last week’s wild market swings. While there was no one trigger for the market plunge, a spate of gloomy numbers and the return of panic selling reawakened fears of another recession. Bleak numbers for U.S. jobs, housing and manufacturing com-

pounded the anxiety over European woes, rattling share prices in every industry, and indicated again that the economic recovery remains fragile. All three major stock indices more than wiped out their gains from earlier this week. For the year, the Dow Jones industrial average is down 5 percent, the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index is down 9 percent, and the Nasdaq is down 10 percent. The sell-off continued in Asian markets early today. Japan’s bluechip Nikkei 225 opened down nearly 2 percent, more than 200 points

“I think the risks have just changed very dramatically in the last couple of months. People are spooked.”

below the key 9,000 benchmark. “I think the risk now is that we fall into another recession,” said Patrick Newport, economist at IHS Global Insight in Lexington, Mass. “I think the risks have just changed very dramatically in the last couple of months. People are spooked.” Data from the National Association of Realtors, a trade group, painted a disappointing picture of the housing market, with sales of existing homes falling 3.5 percent in July to 4.67 million, the lowest rate in eight months. See Market / B5

— Patrick Newport, economist, IHS Global Insight

More business briefing on Page B5.

Consumer prices Changes from the previous month in the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers: 0.6 percent

0.5%

0.4 0.2 0.0 -0.2 -0.4 J A S OND J FMAMJ J 2010 2011 Note: Seasonally adjusted figures Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics AP

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FIDELITY REPORT

Those who held on to 401(k) fared better than most sellers By Margaret Collins Bloomberg News

NEW YORK — Investors who sold equities in their retirement accounts during market volatility in 2008 and 2009 did worse than those who stayed in stocks, Fidelity Investments says. Participants in 401(k) savings plans who dumped stocks from Oct. 1, 2008, to March 31, 2009, when the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index fell 31 percent, and hadn’t returned to equities as of June 30, 2011, had an average account balance increase of 2 percent, according to the study released Thursday. Those who maintained some equity allocation during that period saw their balances rise 50 percent on average. “Staying the course does prove to be an effective strategy in the long term,” said Beth McHugh, vice president of market insights for the Boston-based mutual-fund company. “Any move can have a dramatic long-term effect.” Fidelity, the largest provider of employer-sponsored 401(k) plans, based its data on 7.1 million worker accounts. About 117,000 participants sold all their equities between October 2008 and March 2009, McHugh said. About half of them hadn’t reinvested in stocks as of the end of the second quarter this year, she said. From March 31, 2009 through June 30, the S&P 500 gained about 66 percent, according to Bloomberg data.

Central Oregon real estate: Firms expand offices, add brokers

HP may spin off PC business SAN FRANCISCO — In a sweeping change for HewlettPackard, Leo Apotheker, the technology giant’s chief executive, said Thursday that he was considering spinning off the company’s personal computer business into a separate company and spend $10 billion on a business software maker. By acquiring Autonomy, based in Britain, Apotheker would sharply refocus the company on business services and products. He has been trying to speed the company’s growth, which has stagnated amid internal missteps, a sour economy and shifting consumer tastes. Apotheker’s plan also includes killing off the TouchPad tablet, introduced into stores only weeks ago, Pre smartphones and other WebOS products it acquired last year when it bought Palm for $1.2 billion. The spinoff of the PC unit would also reverse HP’s $25 billion acquisition of Compaq in 2002. In its earnings report Thursday, HP showed that it was continuing to struggle with slow growth. It reported net income in the quarter that ended July 31 grew 9 percent to $1.93 billion, or 93 cents a share, versus $1.77 billion, or 75 cents in the year-ago quarter. — Staff and wire reports

s

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Lessons for investors

Bill Duffey, principal broker and co-owner of RE/MAX Key Properties, stands in front of the company’s growing office at 431 N.W. Franklin Ave. in Bend on Thursday. A house at the rear of the building has been demolished and a new section is being built to accommodate more brokers.

The average balance of Fidelity’s 401(k) plans was $75,200 as of June 30, compared with $74,900 at the end of the first quarter, the company said. The study may hold lessons for savers during the current market turmoil. Participants in 401(k)s transferred almost 1 percent of assets this month, or about $1.2 billion, mainly from equities to fixed income, according to an index that tracks daily transfers in some 401(k) plans administered by Aon Hewitt. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 6 percent from Aug. 1 through Aug. 17. Stocks declined in response to Standard & Poor’s downgrade of the nation’s credit rating and concern that the U.S. economy may lapse into another recession. See 401(k) / B5

Preparing for a comeback By Tim Doran The Bulletin

W

hile the region’s real estate market may still be in recovery, several brokers in Bend are expanding, adding agents and building new offices. At the RE/MAX Key Properties office — at 431 N.W. Franklin Ave. in downtown Bend — on Thursday, mem-

bers of a construction crew cut through concrete floor, framed walls and created the exposed ceiling supports and other features for the building’s urban industrial look. When complete, the project will add nearly 2,500 square feet to the building and provide space for more than 30 brokers.

Less than a block away, Bend Premier Real Estate has grown from 13 to 25 brokers since it opened in January, according to Lynnea Miller, principal broker. The real estate crash sent home sales plummeting, with single-family home sales in Bend last year down nearly 19 percent from 2006. They increased nearly 8 percent

last year over 2009, however. Building the brokerage now will put it in a good position when the recovery picks up, said Bill Duffey, principal broker of RE/MAX Key Properties, and it will, he said. The features that made Central Oregon attractive during the boom years remain. See Real estate / B5

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WORKFORCE OF THE FUTURE

Manufacturing camp introduces girls to new career opportunities By Motoko Rich

Brittnay Orr, 15, left, looks over a piece of equipment at MSi Testing and Engineering Inc. during a Gadget camp field trip in Melrose Park, Ill.

New York Times News Service

RIVER GROVE, Ill. — Forget tie-dyed shirts, lanyards and water games. At summer camp this year, Nautika Kotero, 13, learned to use a drill press, solder electrical wires and build a lamp. Though the slim, 5-foot5 teenager dreams of becoming a basketball star, Nautika now has a backup plan after her weeklong immersion course: a career in manufacturing. Just over a quarter of the 11.7 million workers in manufacturing are women. But Gadget, a camp for girls in this suburb west of Chicago, is part of an effort to change that. Although the economy is wobbling and nearly 14

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B2 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

ECONOMIC INTERVENTION IN GREECE

3 European nations seek collateral on bailouts By Stephen Castle New York Times News Service

Peter Wynn Thompson / New York Times News Service

Nautika Kotero, 13, left, and Mikayla Clayton, 13, right, work with camp coordinator Antigone Sharris on a lamp project during Gadget camp at Triton College in River Grove, Ill.

Factory camp Continued from B1 The Gadget camp — sponsored in part by a foundation affiliated with the Fabricators and Manufacturers Association, which is providing financing to nine other camps this summer — is intended to help over the long haul in part by exposing girls to an occupation they might previously have considered unappealing, if they considered it at all. By the last day of camp, Nautika had told her parents that manufacturing was “cool.” Fashioning a lamp shade out of a thin piece of cardboard, she mused, “I have two good careers ahead of me.”

Manufacturing sector is adding jobs Since the fragile recovery began, manufacturing is one of the few sectors that have added jobs. But the image of manufacturing as an occupation of the future has been tarnished by the exodus of factory jobs to foreign sites and the use of machinery to replace workers. Younger people, especially, see more alluring opportunities in digital technology, finance or health care. “The perception is that there are no jobs in manufacturing,” said Susan Palisano, director of education and training at the Connecticut Center for Advanced Technology, a nonprofit group in East Hartford, Conn., that promotes manufacturing employment and has run summer programs for middle-school students for the past three years. “It seems that everybody had an uncle or grandfather that got laid off.” Across the country, a handful of companies, nonprofit groups, public educational agencies and even science museums are trying to make manufacturing seem, well, fun. Focusing mainly on children ages 10 to 17, organizations including the Da Vinci Science Center in Allentown, Pa.; and Stihl, a maker of chain saws and other outdoor power equipment in Virginia Beach, Va., run camps that let students operate basic machinery, meet workers and make things. Nuts, Bolts & Thingamajigs, the foundation that helped sponsor the Gadget camp in River Grove, has awarded $2,500 grants to 112 manufacturing-themed camps — most of them for boys and girls — around the country since 2004. “It’s not easy getting people into the career field,” said Marcia Arndt, a board member of the foundation. “I think there’s a myth out there that manufactur-

ing is dirty and undesirable, but it’s really highly technological.” Impressions also persist that manufacturing is a man’s job. Technical fields in general, and those that require scientific or mathematical backgrounds, are indeed dominated by men. Yet a Commerce Department report released early this month showed that women in such fields earn 33 percent more, on average, than women working outside of scientific and technical fields, a higher premium than men enjoy in similar occupations. Antigone Sharris, who came up with the idea for the all-girls Gadget camp, had worked extensively in manufacturing before becoming an instructor in electronics, welding and computer-aided machinery at Triton College, a twoyear public school here that provided some funding for the camp. Sharris is a mentor to high school robotics teams and wants to encourage young women to consider a range of technically oriented careers. “Girls don’t naturally gravitate toward engineering,” said Sharris, a jolly and patient instructor who interspersed practical tips on using a band saw or a drill press with casual explanations of fractions, the concept of leverage and Newton’s laws. In a windowless classroom and shop on Triton’s scruffy campus, 16 girls ages 11 to 15 designed and constructed a cat feeder, a candy dispenser and various pieces of jewelry and music boxes, using foam board, wood, metal, fiberglass and PVC pipe.

‘Stop giving kids books’ “Not letting your children learn the hands-on component of the theory of science is killing us as a nation,” Sharris said. “You have to stop giving kids books and start giving them tools.” To give the girls a concrete sense of what such skills could mean in the workplace, Sharris invited a human resources coordinator from a local manufacturer to tell them about salaries — starting in the $40,000 range and moving up to six digits, including overtime. Several of the campers came from low-income and minority communities near the college. Only five of the 16 girls at the camp had paid the $99 fee; the rest were subsidized. While Sharris focused mostly on basic technical skills, factory tours aimed at introducing the girls to modern manufacturing work brought out talk that might have fit at a nationalist rally. During a tour of Tru-Way, which produces precision metal

parts, Stan Mastalerz, the company’s president, showed the girls a tiny component used in electronic circuit boards. Sharris jumped in. “See that?” she asked. “This is something that might be in your Game Boy that you don’t even know about. The game may be made in China, but there are pieces that are made right here in your backyard.”

Reality of factory life The reality of factory life gave a few girls pause. Visiting Tru-Way on a scorching summer afternoon, they noted the extreme heat and noise of the shop floor. Brittany Orr, 15, who asked questions and jotted notes, said she liked the tasks that involved some thought and analysis. But “I would not want to do a job where you just do the same thing again,” she said. “It seems tedious.” A tour of MSi Testing & Engineering, a small company in Melrose Park, Ill., that evaluates the strength and quality of metal materials used by manufacturers, showed that it offered more of the work she preferred. In the end, the campers learned lessons in persistence and problem-solving as well as technical skills. When Nautika began building the lamp she had designed, she wanted to install a rotating shade. Sharris brought out a tiny motor. “What you are trying to figure out is what to use to make your lampshade so that it will spin,” she said. Sharris rejected Nautika’s first suggestion of foam board: too heavy. Sharris recommended a simple piece of copier paper, then spied a paper plate on a table. “Humor me,” she said, showing Nautika how to affix the motor to the plate with generous daubs from a glue gun. Next came wiring a battery. To tutor Nautika in basic electronics, Sharris recruited Ariana Vargas, a 17-year-old counselor who has competed on her robotics team. Ariana demonstrated how to strip the green coating from the electrical wires with pliers. On Nautika’s first try, the whole tip broke off. A few fumbles later, Nautika was frustrated. “I don’t know how you did it!” she said. Ariana replied, “Practice, practice and more practice.” Finally, the coating came off, exposing bare wire. Her confidence building, Nautika stripped another wire and slid both ends through a PVC pipe and connected them to the battery. The plate began to spin. “Yea!” Nautika exclaimed. “I did it.”

LONDON — Greece’s international bailout hit a new obstacle Thursday after three eurozone countries were likely to seek collateral in exchange for their loan. The move comes after a similar deal Finland reached with the debt-laden government in Athens. Although the three countries — Austria, the Netherlands and Slovakia — are small and midsize economies, accounting for little more than 10 percent of the new bailout of 109 billion euros ($156 billion), their intervention presents a headache for policymakers. “If this spreads as we fear it could, it is not a minor complication,” said one European official who requested anonymity because of the sensitivity

of the issue. The effort threatens to complicate negotiations on the second package of aid agreed to by eurozone leaders in July, creating an additional problem for officials seeking to bring the Continent’s debt crisis under control.

Following Finland During negotiations on July’s bailout deal, Finland insisted on collateral being offered by the Greeks, and the country has negotiated a bilateral arrangement with Athens. That plan is now being discussed by officials from the other eurozone nations, who must approve it. In a statement, Amadeu Altafaj Tardio, a European Commission spokesman, highlighted “the importance of rapid and full implementation” of the July deal “to safeguard financial stability in Europe.”

“The euro area member states also agreed that a collateral arrangement will be put in place where appropriate,” the statement said. “The euro area member states will now have to assess the outcome of these bilateral discussions between the Finnish and Greek finance ministers in light of these conclusions.” He added that the commission had not been formally informed about any other requests by countries for a deal similar to that offered to Finland. In the deal between Athens and Helsinki, Greece is offering Finland a deposit to back loans, and Finland has said that this cash plus interest would be comparable to its contribution to the rescue. It is likely that Athens would struggle to find the capital for similar deals with other countries.

S&P facing increasing scrutiny in Washington, D.C. Los Angeles Times WASHINGTON — The backlash against Standard & Poor’s for downgrading the U.S. credit rating adds to the company’s problems in the nation’s capital, where it faces investigations for its role in fueling the financial crisis with faulty assessments of mortgage-backed securities. S&P and the other creditrating companies are widely believed to have enabled the near market meltdown by giving AAA ratings to many securities backed by risky subprime mortgages. The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission called the credit-rating companies “essential cogs in the wheel of financial destruction.” And a report by a Senate subcommittee criticized S&P and Moody’s Investors Service for giving overly optimistic

assessments on tens of thousands of high-risk securities so it wouldn’t lose the business of financial firms that paid for the ratings. The Justice Department is investigating whether rating decisions by S&P analysts had been overruled by other company managers who were concerned about a loss of business, The New York Times reported. The Securities and Exchange Commission also is investigating S&P’s activities leading up to the financial crisis, the newspaper reported. Justice and SEC officials would not confirm the investiga-

tions Thursday. An S&P spokesman would not comment on the report. The company has said in SEC filings that it has received “numerous subpoenas and other government inquiries” about its ratings of mortgage-backed securities. “We have cooperated and will continue to cooperate with these requests,” company spokesman Ed Sweeney said Thursday.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 B3

A N Convertible sales slip as car U.S. automakers slipping in consumer popularity buyers opt for more glass By Vicki Vaughan

San Antonio Express-News

By Jerry Hirsch Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Auto buyers are trading the open air for high-tech glass. Ford Motor Co. reported that sales of vehicles with “vista” or “panoramic” roofs are soaring. About half the buyers of its Explorer and Edge sport utility vehicles and about a third of its Flex upright station wagon buyers are purchasing the option — essentially a long, sweeping sunroof or two skylight-like panels. The glass roof upgrade can cost as much as $1,600. Meanwhile, sales of convertible cars are lagging behind the rest of the market, auto information firm R.L. Polk & Co. reported. Sales of convertible cars have typically accounted for 1.8 percent to 2 percent of the auto market. But now they are running at 1.2 percent to 1.4 percent, according to Polk. The Chevrolet Camaro has been the top-selling convertible through May of this year, accounting for 7,530 car registrations, according to Polk. The Ford Mustang is second, with convertible sales of 6,645. After that there’s a big drop. The Mercedes-Benz E-Class convertible had sales of 3,446, followed by the BMW 328 convertible with 2,867 cars sold. Sales of 2011 Ford Explorers equipped with the vista roof reached almost 25,000 during that time period. The convertible numbers could improve if the economy picks up, said Mark Pauze, a Polk consultant.

St. Petersburg Times photo ile photo

A 2010 BMW 650i convertible is seen in St. Petersburg, Fla. According to a recent report from R.L. Polk & Co., convertible sales are lagging as drivers opt for sunroofs and skylights. “Currently there is a real focus in the market on fuel-efficient, economical and practical vehicles — not a recipe for a convertible revival,” Pauze said. But it may be that consumers are turning to more practical vehicles and finding that the panoramic roof is a good compromise. Ford thinks it knows why people are opting for the vista roofs. “We are seeing more buildings utilizing glass structures because letting natural light in is a popular architectural trend,” said Sheryl Connelly, Ford’s manager of global trends. “This trend has crossed over to the automotive industry, and Ford’s vista roofs open the car

to more sunlight, which keeps drivers energized and gives the luxurious feel customers desire,” she said. The Ford vista roof is made up of two panels. The first can be opened like a standard sun roof, and the second, which sits farther back in the vehicle, is stationary. Although drivers will never feel that convertible exhilaration and the rush of wind in their hair driving along in a large SUV, the panoramic roofs do have some advantages — you won’t get hot, sweaty or sunburned. Ford’s panoramic glass filters the sun’s heat-generating infrared rays and burn-causing ultraviolet rays.

While Americans are slightly more satisfied with all automakers, they’ve become less satisfied with vehicles made by Detroit’s Big Three, a new survey shows. The American Customer Satisfaction Index found that U.S. automakers are losing ground to Asian and European competitors. “That’s not good news in a tight economy where competition for consumer dollars is fierce,” said David VanAmburg, managing director of the American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI), which conducted the survey. The decline could hurt Detroit’s comeback, he said. The American Customer Satisfaction Index is based on 5,000 customer surveys collected in the second quarter. While some U.S. automakers had vehicles that scored well — Cadillac led the pack — four of the six nameplates with scores that declined in the survey compared to last year were domestic autos: Lincoln, Buick, GMC and Chrysler. General Motor’s Cadillac, along with Toyota and its Lexus luxury brand, earned the highest customer satisfaction scores. Toyota was the only non-luxury brand among these top scorers. Toyota also made the largest gains in the survey compared to its score of last year,

The top 5 in U.S. T he top five brands from the American Customer Satisfaction Index and their scores. Cadillac: 87 Lexus: 87 Toyota: 87 Lincoln: 86 Mercedes-Benz: 86 Source: American Customer Satisfaction Index

earning a score of 87 out of 100. GM’s Cadillac earned the same score. Mercedes-Benz earned a score of 86, while Honda earned 85. VanAmburg said Toyota’s performance signals that the Japanese automaker has overcome the damaging recalls of last year. “Toyota and Lexus took a downturn as a result of the high-profile recalls,” he said. “But a year out, we thought they were bound to bounce back, and they did.” Both Toyota and Honda’s satisfaction scores are up, he said. VanAmburg said he expects to see even more favorable results for the two automakers. U.S. automakers could be faced with sluggish sales be-

cause Asian automakers “have improved not just in terms of quality, but in terms of value,” VanAmburg said. Asian automakers are offering more incentives to lure buyers, while “I don’t think Detroit can squeeze a lot more out of incentives.” At GM, spokesman Craig Eppling said, “We value customer feedback in all manners, and while we haven’t seen the survey, we’re interested to read it and see what it has to say.” At Chrysler Group LLC, spokesman Ralph Kisiel said the company’s hasn’t seen the survey. But he noted that Chrysler’s Dodge Charger, Dodge Challenger and Dodge Durango earned top spots in their segments in a recent ranking by J.D. Power and Associates. Officials with Ford Motor Co. and Toyota Motor Co. could not be reached for comment.

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Analysts ratchet down ’11 auto sales forecasts By Jerry Hirsch Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The sluggish economy is pushing analysts to slash their forecasts for auto sales this year. “Without a significant increase in incentive levels or a reversal of the economic woes, there isn’t a compelling reason for those consumers sitting on the fence to return to dealer showrooms and purchase a vehicle,” said Jeff Schuster, chief forecaster at J.D. Power & Associates. Schuster said plenty of people who have delayed purchases either need or want to buy new cars but are spooked by “economic and financial uncertainty.”

J.D. Power has cut its 2011 sales forecast to 12.6 million light vehicles from 12.9 million. The lower figure would still be a 9 percent gain from last year. For next year, J.D. Power reduced its sales projection to 14.1 million units from 14.7 million. IHS Automotive also has pared its forecast for sales by 200,000 autos, to 12.5 million this year. It slashed next year’s forecast to 13.5 million from 14.6 million vehicles. Earlier this year, Ford Motor Co. projected sales industrywide this year at 12.7 million to 13.3 million. The company now says it expects sales will be closer to the bottom of that range and unlikely to exceed 13 million.

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Data provider Edmunds.com is sticking with an estimate of 12.9 million vehicle sales this year. Edmunds economist Lacey Plache said increased inventory — a result of the recovery of Japanese automakers from the devastating quake and subsequent disruptions — and lower car prices in the last quarter of the year will recapture sales lost earlier in 2011. “This is another sign of underlying demand strength,” Plache said. “Since the industry maintained sales in the face of last week’s turmoil and uncertainty, then it is likely that confidence has not been undermined enough to prevent the release of pent-up demand this fall.”

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B4 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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A-B-C-D AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFC Ent AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMR AOL APACC ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AbitibiB n AboveNet Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AdventSft s Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeroflex n Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom AlbnyIn Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexREE Alexion s Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AlldHlthcr AldIrish rs AlldNevG AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlmostFam AlonUSA AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria AlumChina AmBev s AmTrstFin Amarin Amazon AMCOL Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL s AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AmIntlGrp AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ameron Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Amyris n Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach ApricusBio AquaAm ArQule ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCh ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaEntRs AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk

0.30 0.64 0.56 1.36

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Nm Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BabckWil Baidu BakrHu BallCp s BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g Banner rs BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BarcBk prD Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biodel BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BlkRKelso Blckbaud Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BdwlkPpl BodyCen n Boeing Boise Inc BonTon BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BttmlnT BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSoft Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldOfPr BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE CBS B CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CPFL En s CSX s CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care Cabelas CblvsNY s Cabot CabotO&G CACI Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CalifWtr s CaliperLSc Calix CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInfo Cameron CampSp CIBC g CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar Canon CapellaEd CapOne CapitlSrce CapFdF rs Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer Cardero g CardnlHlth Cardiom g Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CashAm CasualMal CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen Cavium CedarSh CelSci Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Celsion Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBras lf

D 1.80 50.59 -3.90 1.44 46.42 -1.42 289.16 +.68 15.39 -.10 0.36 28.61 -2.09 4.10 -.28 3.57 128.18 -5.32 2.71 -.24 1.00 26.27 -1.18 2.76 -.24 11.73 -.94 1.10 23.57 -.53 25.67 -1.65 0.92 20.96 -.78 1.32 -.08 0.92 28.10 -1.24 0.84 17.08 -.50 0.64 19.79 -1.19 2.07 38.51 -.68 30.39 -3.95 0.68 6.31 -.39 1.82 78.94 -4.55 1.82 62.39 -4.40 40.93 -2.64 50.21 -.28 38.08 -1.61 1.68 39.32 -1.58 3.01 -.28 1.50 46.89 -2.23 0.35 18.45 -1.01 21.00 -1.70 128.77 -9.19 0.60 58.28 -5.45 0.28 34.43 -1.29 29.38 -1.44 0.59 8.79 -.54 0.80 16.78 -.96 0.82 9.09 -.20 1.65 8.98 -.58 0.04 10.29 -.55 0.04 7.01 -.45 2.05 23.21 -.59 3.26 -.22 1.04 -.16 2.16 23.79 -.58 1.80 39.05 -2.20 1.23 -.09 2.80 59.56 -1.83 0.52 19.57 -1.22 2.08 52.93 -2.28 0.04 14.25 -.72 47.07 -1.00 20.69 -1.56 51.51 -1.30 2.03 24.07 -1.22 0.36 10.27 -1.31 40.47 +6.94 60.48 +5.63 0.76 87.63 -3.00 12.09 -.90 0.32 20.33 -1.45 0.48 49.88 -.55 21.85 -2.88 1.24 51.99 -1.77 2.40 48.10 -3.11 15.50 -.70 1.58 -.23 0.10 6.05 -.12 1.64 77.47 -2.34 51.01 -2.32 0.20 28.02 -2.00 0.24 5.27 -.26 0.96 28.91 -1.30 12.52 -1.09 0.32 29.26 -.36 69.56 -2.82 0.30 46.27 -4.33 0.64 24.02 -.79 30.13 -1.57 45.80 -2.34 1.11 -.10 88.46 -1.57 0.10 2.72 -.12 26.43 -1.44 0.80 17.28 -.95 2.35 -.29 1.04 8.15 -.57 0.48 22.92 -1.16 41.77 -.81 5.50 152.28 -8.90 1.42 19.26 -.03 0.32 3.94 -.06 1.36 8.77 -.34 0.40 12.19 -1.55 0.60 13.42 -.62 13.18 -.13 2.10 25.25 -.51 16.49 -1.20 1.68 58.93 -3.25 0.80 5.42 -.43 0.20 6.12 -.23 66.04 -2.94 0.04 5.65 -.31 2.00 100.04 -4.05 6.06 -.42 21.78 -.65 5.58 -.56 0.72 25.22 -1.71 0.60 9.72 -.38 1.05 21.49 -1.30 1.69 18.00 -.74 21.15 -1.32 0.44 13.98 -.58 28.07 -2.93 7.99 -.79 1.52 -.03 0.56 22.50 -1.09 0.40 22.29 -1.82 1.32 27.85 -.66 0.60 39.76 -1.95 0.36 32.25 -2.19 0.64 20.08 -1.02 26.38 -5.01 .75 -.04 3.32 -.41 14.01 -.98 0.52 28.79 -1.17 0.56 16.64 -.82 0.34 7.41 -.43 0.32 8.57 -.69 0.32 19.16 -.91 0.28 7.11 -.80 1.28 68.31 -.81 12.95 -1.08 0.05 14.20 -1.69 0.24 25.02 -1.51 0.80 34.49 -2.91 0.49 42.79 +.08 55.14 -3.63 1.00 60.81 -2.77 0.20 18.99 -.94 14.60 -1.47 6.64 -.22 0.84 15.07 -.95 0.48 22.88 -.90 0.40 22.46 -2.46 1.60 164.20 -7.71 18.86 -.91 1.16 64.24 -2.96 0.04 42.37 -1.75 31.46 -1.99 1.12 33.90 -.91 5.60 240.70-13.42 0.84 19.00 -.03 27.44 -2.92 6.05 -.15 5.91 183.13-12.34 1.52 25.48 -.68 0.48 21.18 -1.38 0.91 15.60 -1.30 0.34 7.86 -.37 24.32 -1.05 0.41 22.60 -.76 0.50 32.95 -1.43 20.88 -1.29 0.60 17.17 -1.49 0.72 30.16 -2.62 0.12 67.97 -4.13 48.81 -.01 8.40 -.55 2.98 -.02 0.63 8.25 -.31 15.27 -.35 0.62 17.85 -.48 6.59 -.42 13.65 -1.85 0.04 5.28 -.46 4.69 -.03 5.65 -.41 13.60 -.49 1.96 63.39 -3.17 0.40 21.53 -1.07 6.32 -2.24 45.87 -3.09 1.16 30.43 -.88 3.48 72.39 -2.39 1.30 68.89 -2.63 0.36 34.26 -2.59 1.20 55.85 -3.18 6.67 -.75 45.16 -1.95 31.38 -1.99 0.20 41.93 -2.54 0.04 5.72 -.30 0.30 10.83 -.21 0.26 3.75 -.23 1.64 12.79 -.44 1.05 -.11 0.96 134.73-11.67 1.07 -.14 0.86 40.34 -1.54 3.45 -.23 21.29 -.81 24.21 -1.28 14.81 -1.24 13.50 -1.25 0.72 34.20 -3.17 25.92 -1.17 1.00 30.03 -1.39 0.72 44.32 -3.21 27.48 -2.48 28.44 -1.59 0.14 51.70 -3.26 4.02 +.57 49.80 -2.63 1.84 83.33 -4.31 0.04 11.61 -.81 26.26 -3.06 0.36 3.55 -.26 .41 -.02 0.24 39.31 -3.69 7.51 -.79 54.55 -1.78 1.20 -.15 2.97 -.13 5.14 -.43 1.89 17.32 -.69 0.80 33.27 -2.87 28.69 -1.75 0.79 18.85 -.59 1.56 10.32 -.40

Nm CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Ceradyne Cerner s Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaInfo ChinaLife ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaSecur ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita ChoiceHtls Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp rs Citigp wtA CitzRpB rs CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH s Clearwire CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CoffeeH CogdSpen CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg ColumLabs ColSprtw Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwREIT CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold Copart Copel CoreLabs CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp Cntwd pfB CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp Crane Credicp CSVS2xVxS +15.66 CSVelIVSt s CredSuiss Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CumMed Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurrCda CurSwiss CurtisWrt Cyclacel CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytori DARA Bio DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling Datalink DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckrsOut Deere Delcath Delek Dell Inc DeltaAir Deluxe DemMda n DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB Cap pf DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDGldBll DrxEMBull DrxTcBear DRE Bear DrxEnBear DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear

D 5.65 -.40 12.67 -1.06 0.01 25.21 +.87 10.21 -.81 2.90 34.07 -1.24 4.00 -.30 80.00 -.10 30.72 -2.77 28.44 -1.27 55.39 -2.56 35.82 -3.33 31.65 -1.92 2.75 -.20 40.97 -3.97 45.98 -2.47 52.22 -4.45 14.15 -.98 26.14 -1.25 3.80 -.36 11.97 -1.30 7.37 -.82 0.35 29.82 -1.88 3.12 93.24 -4.44 0.20 30.77 -2.89 0.20 12.19 -.11 39.60 -.99 0.62 3.04 -.19 1.48 -.08 0.91 42.19 -2.61 3.40 -.35 1.93 47.80 -.74 5.96 -.01 2.84 -.15 0.12 18.25 -.60 1.50 15.98 -.12 284.50-24.94 9.57 -.20 0.74 27.57 -1.06 1.56 59.64 -1.98 1.91 33.73 -.44 0.68 40.42 -.94 3.03 -.28 10.95 -1.27 0.40 62.47 -5.19 3.11 -.17 1.61 25.71 -.70 0.84 19.25 -.66 0.49 28.86 -1.38 13.20 -1.25 0.24 15.01 -.84 2.13 25.19 -.33 0.04 27.98 -1.87 .48 -.03 6.91 -.15 51.96 -6.74 0.80 40.62 -2.25 1.90 -.07 11.71 -.87 47.45 -3.81 2.31 -.02 1.12 70.05 -5.28 2.40 64.12 -2.73 18.37 -1.18 0.90 46.63 -4.37 9.11 -.98 1.88 67.76 -1.52 0.52 26.42 -1.24 24.79 -1.58 0.12 15.64 -1.63 0.40 4.18 -.25 54.46 -7.86 2.35 -.33 0.72 8.42 -.36 40.74 -3.16 .94 -.13 2.32 85.04 -1.27 9.35 -.59 0.60 19.18 -1.24 0.24 14.88 -.91 2.27 -.17 0.88 48.09 -3.57 0.45 20.28 -1.05 0.45 20.07 -.95 0.40 23.31 -1.49 0.92 36.12 -1.59 0.48 10.95 -.81 6.40 -1.22 2.00 20.13 -.31 0.96 22.07 -1.07 19.53 -1.68 32.57 -5.84 0.39 38.20 -.35 1.44 12.25 -.63 25.99 -3.36 0.80 28.28 -1.41 7.67 -.49 14.41 -.81 21.90 -2.52 1.00 25.26 -1.17 0.40 23.45 -2.24 0.92 23.39 -.36 82.27 -3.03 35.41 -3.15 2.64 63.79 -3.03 0.40 42.59 +.17 2.40 54.37 -.13 16.73 -.26 19.00 -.17 0.96 36.90 -.50 53.82 -5.96 6.17 -.05 9.66 -.59 0.06 66.78 -3.86 1.16 43.24 -4.00 0.42 11.15 -1.23 1.64 63.70 -3.83 39.08 -1.62 1.00 22.64 -.56 1.00 106.03 -5.54 8.34 -.65 2.52 -.31 0.64 45.49 -1.94 0.20 14.40 -.67 0.60 30.82 -1.95 1.65 25.06 -1.24 20.28 -.82 0.28 11.10 -.82 0.96 74.36 -1.76 7.34 -.51 1.75 21.14 -.41 0.18 6.82 -.46 50.50 -1.14 0.30 15.18 -.45 30.41 -.83 0.80 48.59 -1.84 3.23 -.26 1.04 37.58 -2.16 1.95 91.07 -.72 54.05 7.73 -1.93 1.40 26.67 -2.65 31.25 -3.49 0.87 9.19 -.79 25.41 -1.94 0.40 9.23 -.83 39.97 -1.43 34.27 -1.23 38.57 -1.80 32.59 -1.05 1.84 47.77 -2.17 1.60 83.34 -8.19 2.86 2.84 -.20 0.16 142.83 -.98 3.74 104.19 -1.54 0.10 100.64 -.86 124.65 -.76 0.32 27.09 -1.17 .76 -.04 0.36 17.15 -1.48 2.40 13.11 -.54 .36 -.02 0.50 42.53 -4.02 3.26 -.21 2.47 +.19 0.28 4.22 -.24 18.37 -1.67 0.40 2.89 -.14 0.78 9.68 -.19 1.33 29.93 0.15 9.13 -.61 0.70 44.70 -2.88 0.60 39.82 -3.48 2.35 47.76 -.68 12.11 -1.17 0.08 41.12 -2.52 1.72 45.36 -3.10 14.79 -1.05 8.42 -1.03 70.59 -2.85 0.24 41.12 -2.46 8.20 -.49 75.02 -8.35 1.64 70.15 -4.11 3.60 -.36 0.15 13.41 -.73 13.76 -.44 7.39 -.41 1.00 19.53 -1.29 7.97 -.52 5.67 -.54 14.93 -.94 11.97 -1.24 1.50 -.09 3.45 -.27 0.20 31.81 -1.39 5.06 -.32 1.07 39.90 -3.00 1.90 23.53 -.74 67.61 +2.33 4.35 -.23 0.16 11.89 -.72 0.68 64.57 -4.11 10.74 -.57 2.46 75.78 -2.09 0.50 58.81 -3.49 0.32 7.55 -.71 8.16 -.62 9.05 -1.22 30.70 -1.78 1.12 25.63 -1.34 2.72 55.41 -2.18 19.87 -.72 0.20 39.77 -3.15 40.03 -1.25 18.20 -1.52 42.71 -1.61 0.84 29.03 -5.44 55.24 +8.25 65.79 +8.23 48.03 +5.63 34.98 -1.22 1.20 21.18 -3.13 26.96 +3.58 13.54 +1.61 19.87 +2.92 0.01 22.75 -4.76 24.80 +3.04 12.64 -2.13 21.76 -1.42

Nm

D

Dir30TrBull DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DollarTree DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad Dunkin n DurectCp DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy DynexCap

Nm

1.39 55.93 +3.25 0.05 47.74 -7.57 38.17 -8.03 0.10 49.49 -7.52 42.25 -8.52 0.24 22.82 -1.18 36.47 -2.69 33.76 -2.57 22.22 -1.30 0.40 32.55 -.82 0.65 31.63 -1.63 32.39 -1.25 10.95 -.49 18.35 -1.69 32.55 -.22 64.37 -1.40 65.54 -.93 1.97 49.08 -1.04 25.27 -.74 1.40 70.09 -3.20 0.60 50.46 -2.88 1.04 13.92 -.76 1.27 -.12 1.57 -.17 0.52 18.02 -.73 1.26 50.94 -3.41 1.00 26.89 -2.66 1.28 36.27 -.91 3.76 -.30 19.30 -.75 37.91 -1.75 0.52 4.41 -.10 56.14 -3.82 2.95 -.15 1.64 44.40 -2.33 0.48 21.77 -.90 1.00 18.37 -.10 0.68 11.39 -.52 1.44 62.77 -4.38 26.88 -.77 1.56 -.14 1.24 -.10 2.22 -.25 3.77 -.33 1.08 8.93 -.40

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House E-Trade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EV Engy EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton s EatnVan EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc Ecolab Ecopetrol Edgewater EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElizArden Embraer Emcore lf Emdeon EmersonEl EmpDist EmpIca Emulex EnbrdEM s EnbrEPt s Enbridge s EnCana g EndvrInt rs EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyPtrs EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzoBio EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EthanAl Evercore EverestRe vjEvrgnSlr ExactSci h ExamWk n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts Express-1 ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FTI Cnslt FX Ener FXCM n FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal s FedExCp FedMogul FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBusey FstCashFn FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTNDXTc FTDJInet FT ConDis FT ConStap FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstBcp Flextrn Flotek FlowrsFd s Flowserve Fluor FlushFn FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil Forestar FormFac Fortinet s Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrkStPrp FredsInc FMCG s

8.10 0.25 6.10 10.86 27.94 20.59 21.48 2.67 36.49 0.64 87.63 0.88 54.07 3.04 62.99 1.76 0.40 18.04 0.75 10.54 0.20 7.12 0.20 15.33 2.08 77.41 3.05 1.36 38.70 0.72 21.53 1.16 9.41 1.14 8.98 1.21 10.57 1.33 11.17 15.75 0.70 44.68 1.39 40.37 2.63 1.28 35.90 0.28 8.25 67.20 3.31 0.04 17.75 0.88 33.82 1.92 35.25 10.04 0.12 19.14 18.87 31.72 0.72 22.56 1.55 18.35 1.38 42.95 19.29 5.85 6.78 2.13 27.50 2.13 27.20 0.98 31.04 0.80 24.02 8.66 10.40 30.05 8.86 1.20 35.42 .40 9.83 0.54 46.75 72.52 .71 11.92 2.50 39.12 3.58 44.16 25.16 3.17 2.16 27.96 0.79 19.18 20.82 37.69 1.40 43.49 6.84 3.32 62.48 2.42 40.73 2.80 38.89 3.77 2.67 7.80 0.64 29.00 84.47 1.50 61.81 0.88 17.30 1.47 57.54 0.37 10.23 4.16 134.30 0.75 91.50 40.48 0.28 14.80 0.72 22.87 1.92 79.54 .16 7.05 14.03 1.76 0.16 12.95 6.18 2.10 41.92 4.68 0.28 27.05 0.50 41.20 16.48 45.59 2.77 11.28 0.56 19.72 2.72 1.88 70.94 29.46 29.63 71.30 29.12 0.24 22.31 0.60 68.18 38.61 0.48 8.53 34.46 5.06 0.24 11.13 1.08 81.17 0.08 25.23 12.27 0.72 49.13 0.52 29.97 0.52 74.46 15.17 2.76 84.85 0.24 4.47 0.96 16.58 2.75 8.12 8.91 0.48 15.97 0.20 26.92 1.28 9.43 0.24 9.60 18.67 14.89 0.20 17.13 0.24 14.23 0.16 4.58 43.05 0.12 4.01 0.48 14.57 0.04 6.58 8.55 20.67 0.04 8.30 0.64 10.25 94.77 0.16 21.06 0.05 29.24 0.08 17.73 0.18 22.54 0.05 18.39 2.20 42.14 0.64 11.72 52.07 2.99 .63 5.19 6.36 0.60 18.83 1.28 83.80 0.50 55.14 0.52 10.92 28.44 1.16 67.81 0.66 17.56 3.51 10.38 2.77 12.99 33.18 19.22 11.55 7.69 18.70 3.34 0.76 52.54 74.24 22.41 2.02 18.25 1.00 109.72 0.76 11.85 0.20 10.53 1.00 42.85

-.31 -.24 -.87 -2.31 -1.92 -1.60 -2.09 -6.37 -2.39 -2.53 -.11 -.72 -.29 -.22 -1.19 -6.01 +.36 -2.84 -1.52 -.41 -.37 -.43 -.50 -1.32 -1.85 -1.75 -.10 -.58 -.33 -1.82 -.26 -1.65 -.98 -.54 -.27 -1.03 -1.56 -1.24 -.18 -.17 -2.94 -.70 -.32 -.30 -1.66 -1.40 -1.11 -1.83 -.36 -.24 -1.76 -.31 -1.93 -.03 -.68 -3.09 -2.21 -.11 -1.15 -.94 -.78 -1.87 -.27 -1.57 -.73 -1.16 -1.72 -2.24 -.41 -1.10 -1.69 -1.99 -.35 -.24 -.26 -1.78 -7.53 -2.65 -.82 -3.02 -.76 -5.53 -3.59 +.36 -1.33 -.68 -2.82 +.02 -.54 -.87 -.14 -1.44 -.49 -.59 -.44 -1.87 -2.23 -1.42 -2.11 -.06 -1.24 -1.13 -.23 -3.22 -1.94 -2.23 -7.42 -2.08 -1.47 -4.72 -2.57 -.49 -.93 -.55 -.82 -4.91 -1.51 -1.26 -.77 -2.06 -4.67 -1.77 -2.29 -.44 -.69 -.29 -1.02 -.68 -.35 -.95 -.55 -.65 -1.60 -.74 -1.35 -.14 -.11 -1.71 -.21 -.76 -.42 -.76 -.29 -.69 -.57 -4.69 -1.39 -2.08 -1.02 -.81 -1.19 -.92 -.77 -2.53 -.37 -.06 -.46 -1.18 -.45 -6.72 -5.41 -.63 -1.19 -.83 -1.12 -.27 -.73 -.32 -1.04 -1.27 -1.35 -.90 -.49 -2.14 -.23 -3.39 -9.83 -1.82 -.84 -6.03 -.67 -.46 -3.76

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Freescale n FDelMnt FreshMkt n FrontierCm Frontline FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Furmanite FurnBrds Fusion-io n GFI Grp GMAC CpT GMX Rs GT AdvTc GTx Inc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenComm GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenMot n GMot wtB GM cvpfB GenSteel Gensco GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentium Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec rs Genworth GeoGrp GeoEye Geores GaGulf GerberSci Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr GranTrra g GCanyEd h GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenMtC GreenbCos GrifolsSA n Group1 GpTelevisa Guess GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk s HMS Hld s HNI Corp HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HigherOne HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HiSoftTech HollyFront Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HHughes n

D 12.14 -.58 0.40 22.47 -.32 31.90 -1.33 0.75 7.17 -.14 1.20 6.87 -.64 1.08 -.09 0.30 20.02 -1.05 0.20 8.08 -.40 5.01 -.70 2.51 -.25 25.07 -2.31 0.20 4.20 -.10 19.80 -1.38 2.69 -.21 11.06 -.85 3.32 -.22 0.56 5.00 -.22 1.68 16.78 -.32 0.29 8.72 -.40 1.32 26.06 -.89 21.43 +.97 0.32 9.99 -.93 0.45 15.52 -.90 0.20 67.70 -4.79 2.00 30.88 -1.11 32.98 -3.06 .24 -.01 3.88 -.14 24.13 -1.65 56.15 -4.31 5.62 -.48 4.25 -.19 26.43 -2.99 8.14 -.55 1.88 58.23 -3.65 0.60 15.34 -.89 0.40 13.19 -1.01 .56 -.04 1.22 36.30 -.43 3.67 -.14 23.60 -1.34 10.12 -1.05 2.38 38.97 -1.73 1.62 -.11 43.13 -2.45 2.92 -.17 0.18 15.16 -.63 0.48 23.01 -1.45 6.85 -1.94 6.85 -.54 1.80 49.35 -1.56 2.75 -.02 6.32 -.36 19.23 -1.20 33.10 -1.42 21.34 -1.50 17.75 -.62 10.97 -.01 0.25 7.81 -.46 2.51 -.21 0.18 7.80 -.17 0.30 24.92 -1.37 37.29 -1.17 0.52 10.69 -.76 2.17 41.28 -.92 0.40 8.28 -.72 26.84 -3.22 3.78 +.03 0.08 42.08 -2.13 0.40 10.31 -.50 0.25 25.16 -.97 .61 -.09 0.15 17.30 -1.68 2.85 -.31 0.12 6.41 -.32 1.00 30.04 -2.59 0.24 16.44 -.33 0.41 49.90 -1.30 2.06 -.21 1.40 113.14 -4.11 1.16 81.14 -5.67 15.16 -1.69 11.75 -1.59 504.88-28.27 1.68 22.10 -.78 36.65 -2.61 0.84 35.56 -2.28 13.57 -1.25 2.64 130.95 -6.13 5.67 -.28 14.81 -.92 0.52 17.63 -1.19 3.91 -.45 1.87 -.13 0.08 4.73 -.42 2.85 +.10 0.83 18.36 -.41 87.69-11.04 13.53 -1.53 6.90 -.21 0.52 37.47 -2.03 0.15 19.44 -.66 0.80 31.13 -2.21 1.88 -.24 25.77 -2.18 19.96 -1.03 0.58 27.42 -.88 1.92 33.41 -1.29 0.22 31.41 -1.49 22.94 -.81 0.92 16.49 -1.33 1.90 42.12 -2.67 2.00 26.42 -.26 29.76 -1.47 29.35 -1.78 0.36 40.85 -4.60 6.30 -.29 0.96 27.45 -1.78 24.81 -2.11 .87 -.08 2.85 -.33 80.61 -.30 3.95 -.50 17.85 -.07 0.50 33.71 -3.35 0.30 31.88 -2.48 4.94 -.35 0.07 12.52 -.50 1.12 34.71 -2.27 12.95 -.78 0.82 20.54 -1.57 0.40 18.25 -1.95 9.25 -.60 1.20 35.72 -1.80 4.10 27.50 -.74 1.24 22.91 -.38 4.09 -.25 1.91 -.07 2.86 46.07 -1.85 0.64 13.33 -.63 7.29 -.39 1.20 16.07 -.74 21.89 -1.09 19.05 -.98 34.42 -1.71 0.08 13.03 -.59 0.04 19.24 -.87 5.46 -.16 7.03 -.08 1.92 52.07 -.24 15.10 -1.36 0.28 52.25 -4.81 .28 -.03 60.48 -2.37 0.80 51.48 -2.86 3.31 -.39 0.24 3.77 -.40 1.38 55.49 -1.30 10.19 -1.01 0.40 55.60 -3.95 0.48 29.51 -1.88 19.55 -1.64 10.64 -.25 32.97 -2.53 14.91 -.72 1.70 30.90 -1.07 0.45 28.02 -2.03 0.76 19.34 -.73 9.20 -1.29 1.00 66.38 -3.96 5.69 -.24 15.63 -.99 1.00 32.16 -1.25 34.43 -3.28 2.48 61.67 -2.97 31.43 -1.96 1.33 42.76 -3.23 0.51 28.04 -.55 21.89 -1.66 9.08 -.73 42.93 -1.91 1.80 21.45 -1.38 0.12 11.29 -1.08 0.28 7.39 +.44 1.59 -.24 50.70 -4.93

Nm HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn Hyatt Hyperdyn

D 0.32 1.00 0.52 0.16 0.40

5.86 14.19 72.04 37.21 4.74 28.64 12.48 31.73 4.01

-.22 -1.32 -2.25 -2.24 -.36 -.85 -1.04 -2.16 -.48

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IdexxLabs iGateCorp II-VI s ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iRobot iShGold iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwitz iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShBRIC iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShACWX iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSEafeSC iShIndones iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShs SOX iShNetw iShMtg iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iShPoland iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShREst iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShDJOE iShEur350 iShSCGrth iStar ITC Hold ITT Corp ITT Ed Iberiabnk IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh IDEX ITW Illumina Imation Imax Corp Immersion Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs ImperlSgr Incyte IndiaGC IndoTel Inergy Infinera InfoSpace Informat Infosys IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InlandRE InovioPhm Inphi n InsightEnt InsitTc Insulet IntgDv IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntcntlEx IntCtlHtl InterDig Intermec InterMune IntlBcsh IBM IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntervalLs IntraLinks IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvBncp InvRlEst iPInv1-21Vx IridiumCm IronMtn IronwdPh Isis iSoftStn n ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia j2Global JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacobsEng Jaguar g

35.10 -1.24 0.20 18.75 -.50 0.63 37.02 -3.48 74.17 -3.22 0.15 9.99 -.91 17.95 -1.43 1.20 9.72 -.34 8.00 -.83 0.31 5.26 -.07 6.11 -.47 52.80 -4.48 26.84 -2.50 17.82 +.33 1.06 22.61 -1.12 3.42 61.20 -2.71 0.53 28.23 -1.21 1.15 29.87 -1.75 0.67 21.12 -1.36 0.67 20.17 -1.29 0.42 16.80 -.43 0.17 9.52 -.34 0.50 52.69 -3.52 0.39 14.33 -.26 0.71 54.72 -1.80 0.50 12.38 -.53 1.73 41.68 -1.97 2.41 62.68 -2.66 1.92 33.89 -1.64 0.53 23.49 -1.04 0.29 13.09 -.52 0.48 15.71 -.75 1.55 66.41 -1.82 0.96 39.57 -2.12 1.33 43.93 -2.47 39.66 +.33 1.14 52.03 -2.11 1.80 47.81 -1.40 4.72 115.68 -.89 1.27 53.72 -2.25 0.85 36.20 -1.47 1.08 77.59 -4.70 2.45 114.85 -5.28 3.85 109.98 +.16 0.84 40.18 -1.99 1.13 38.13 -1.72 5.10 113.55 +.15 1.02 41.35 -1.96 1.48 37.17 -1.70 0.18 32.38 -.50 1.24 61.42 -2.83 0.58 37.68 -2.25 1.10 43.76 -2.07 1.31 52.81 -2.24 4.02 110.31 +2.22 3.16 103.99 +.54 0.77 84.70 -.01 1.68 51.04 -2.61 0.99 39.59 -1.91 0.53 50.50 -3.02 1.64 90.13 -4.82 1.03 80.37 -4.55 7.34 86.11 -1.06 0.21 45.15 -2.77 0.03 25.60 -1.93 1.44 13.44 -.48 0.51 88.38 -4.36 1.97 65.67 -3.08 1.38 57.94 -2.51 0.44 27.23 -2.55 0.72 91.48 -5.54 0.77 52.87 -2.61 1.25 63.50 -2.89 1.31 59.34 -3.25 2.62 104.46 -.32 0.52 75.38 -5.07 0.94 66.45 -4.01 2.66 36.87 -.59 1.27 67.69 -3.21 2.09 54.07 -2.43 0.70 46.19 -2.34 0.52 36.92 -2.28 0.75 59.80 -3.56 1.06 64.54 -3.98 0.24 51.95 -4.29 1.15 34.40 -1.96 0.62 65.53 -3.85 6.06 -.28 1.41 71.61 -1.39 1.00 43.84 -2.62 70.06 -5.01 1.36 45.12 -1.23 17.59 -1.20 1.20 36.22 -1.09 4.65 -.14 0.68 33.82 -2.32 1.44 41.42 -2.63 47.10 -4.25 6.90 -.28 15.24 -1.27 6.92 -.08 26.81 -.13 10.06 -.88 3.01 -.20 18.00 -.55 0.44 39.94 -2.38 0.08 6.86 -.60 14.67 -.89 .18 -.02 1.50 34.52 +.34 2.82 27.23 -1.24 6.47 -.32 9.02 -.35 41.08 -4.85 1.35 47.88 -6.18 0.48 27.80 -2.22 16.62 -.66 3.51 -.29 0.57 7.67 -.34 .69 -.04 9.54 -.63 15.66 -1.20 13.67 -1.48 16.58 -1.28 5.41 -.33 2.72 48.23 -.99 0.84 19.77 -.90 0.40 14.86 -.17 105.73 -5.41 0.35 16.56 -.90 0.40 64.69 -4.87 6.62 -.51 22.91 -1.70 0.38 14.01 -.81 3.00 163.83 -7.65 1.24 53.15 -2.14 0.24 14.11 -1.51 1.05 24.06 -2.06 20.35 -2.49 61.13 -5.48 0.24 7.85 -.76 0.48 10.29 -.59 11.36 -.44 6.80 -.72 29.51 -1.38 40.30 -2.08 334.35-13.16 0.49 16.22 -1.51 3.94 17.25 -2.04 0.29 4.37 -.11 10.63 -.64 13.12 -.49 0.69 7.46 -.29 15.29 -4.18 7.44 -.34 1.00 30.22 -1.71 12.02 -.96 6.80 -.32 10.23 -.99 0.84 17.12 -.96 35.45 -3.19 1.61 -.10 1.48 19.02 -1.80 7.66 -.91 0.80 27.95 -.66 3.65 -.20 23.85 -1.14 10.21 -1.49 1.00 35.19 -1.38 12.00 -.26 1.95 34.89 -1.00 0.28 14.27 -1.91 0.42 26.25 -2.02 18.57 -1.30 32.56 -2.39 5.37 -.23

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1.12 27.69 -1.66 ProShtDow 44.62 +1.46 ProShtQQQ 35.55 +1.64 ProShtS&P 46.23 +1.87 PrUShS&P 25.89 +2.00 ProUltDow 0.28 49.30 -3.73 PrUlShDow 20.74 +1.40 PrUShMC rs 53.04 +5.13 ProUltQQQ 69.23 -7.47 PrUShQQQ rs 59.59 +5.20 ProUltSP 0.35 38.97 -3.71 PrUShtFn rs 82.35 +7.35 ProSShFn 42.94 +2.08 ProUShL20 24.15 -1.06 ProShtEafe 53.13 +2.43 PrUltSCh25 35.42 +2.67 ProUltSEM 37.76 +3.21 ProUltSRE 16.15 +1.27 ProUltSOG 35.32 +3.61 ProUltSBM 23.25 +2.41 ProUltRE 0.36 46.61 -4.43 ProUltFin 0.05 41.01 -4.38 PrUPShQQQ 31.08 +3.91 ProUPShD30 41.08 +4.11 PrUPShR2K 27.29 +4.13 ProUltO&G 0.16 39.32 -5.01 ProUBasM 0.01 33.53 -4.44 PrUPR2K s 42.23 -8.52 ProShtR2K 35.60 +1.97 PrUltPQQQ s 55.48 -9.41 ProUltR2K 0.01 29.51 -3.77 ProSht20Tr 35.67 -.78 ProUSSP500 21.27 +2.38 PrUltSP500 s 0.05 48.15 -7.22 ProSUltGold 112.83 +4.08 ProUSSlv rs 12.57 -.23 PrUltCrde rs 29.87 -4.52 PrUShCrde rs 63.15 +7.54 ProVixSTF 86.96 +14.90 ProUltSGld 15.98 -.63 ProSUltSilv 219.25 +3.63 ProUltShYen 13.61 +.03 ProUShEuro 16.97 +.24 ProctGam 2.10 60.86 -.81 ProgrssEn 2.48 46.87 -.15 ProgrsSft s 19.24 -1.62 ProgsvCp 1.40 17.71 -.58 ProgWaste 0.50 21.11 -.44 ProUSR2K rs 58.89 +6.26 PrUShEu rs 56.88 +5.69 ProspctCap 1.21 8.49 -.45 ProspBcsh 0.70 35.43 -1.62 ProtLife 0.64 17.50 -1.24

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0.08 33.82 -2.35 14.53 -.69 24.72 +1.47 25.83 -1.98 12.84 -.51 0.86 47.95 -3.06 0.16 11.09 -1.08 16.27 -1.24 1.83 -.18 4.69 -.57 0.40 47.01 -1.61 15.80 -1.25 0.61 18.00 -.41 27.80 -2.21 2.52 -.19 9.65 -.41 3.66 -.41 11.61 -.66 0.24 3.91 -.31 5.24 -.40 0.60 12.50 -1.29 0.32 22.23 -1.69 0.84 18.87 -.99 7.40 -1.00 3.57 +.04 24.21 -.09 32.32 -3.02 2.41 -.26 0.01 2.33 -.25 27.97 +.01 0.25 11.76 -.56 82.75 -.75 0.80 126.94 -6.80 10.85 -.90 0.20 104.20 -1.81 0.16 58.05 -4.67 8.37 -.86 0.52 24.96 -2.05 2.40 58.35 -1.63 1.72 40.15 -1.21 12.74 -.20 1.00 2.90 -.21 23.30 -.70 1.74 32.31 -.53 33.33 -3.25 29.36 -1.92 7.64 -.70 1.00 12.13 -.26 0.72 50.96 -2.07 0.84 12.72 -.21 1.85 38.96 -1.57 53.20 -2.72 0.04 4.19 -.35 0.24 13.70 -.73 0.72 48.93 -2.90 0.48 37.45 -2.89 0.32 14.51 -.05 1.04 61.97 -2.38 3.10 -.29 7.08 -.31 0.64 23.60 -.66 .87 -.07 3.35 -.28 0.88 27.43 -.74 25.76 -1.03 27.55 -1.50 12.77 -.42 1.00 5.39 -.28 0.20 9.91 -.72 2.22 98.61 -2.85 11.55 -1.02 2.12 35.49 +.14 9.13 -.25 7.25 -.43 27.77 -2.43 1.17 57.60 -4.06 0.45 21.46 -1.31 1.00 -.07 20.66 -3.71 0.18 40.62 -3.50 0.56 21.46 -1.28 0.80 48.04 -4.39 1.70 55.73 -6.26 0.96 44.92 -2.55 45.71 -4.80 1.42 37.04 -.61 0.28 17.19 -1.03 0.44 67.53 -3.10 42.87 -4.28 0.88 70.84 -.96 44.23 -2.42 32.56 -1.90 2.16 50.93 -1.77 7.32 -.90 0.40 23.29 -1.89 3.36 63.88 -2.36 3.36 63.59 -2.38 0.44 68.18 -.56 0.76 11.93 -.71 3.92 -.12 12.80 -.89 7.56 -.66 0.52 37.97 -2.04 4.54 -.43 2.29 26.16 -.89 1.16 42.34 -3.30 0.69 42.21 -2.15 0.12 10.31 -.50 8.90 -.12 13.74 -.68 0.82 48.90 -3.45 34.40 -1.56 1.94 39.15 +.53 0.24 16.13 -1.01 13.94 -.01 15.85 +.24 0.40 68.25 -4.36 0.40 12.92 -.94 0.10 72.51 -7.29 3.08 110.07 -4.19 177.72 +3.30 3.54 35.63 -1.22 1.65 145.93 -8.58 2.44 114.51 -5.16 58.28 -3.12 1.74 48.33 -1.55 0.31 13.47 -.86 0.20 18.22 -1.06 0.72 33.00 -1.77 0.12 39.51 -.25 1.63 36.48 -1.00 4.28 38.05 -.39 0.40 24.39 -.04 45.84 -.02 0.37 20.18 -1.18 0.46 44.33 -2.35 0.47 49.63 -3.75 0.42 53.57 -3.16 1.00 49.63 -5.16 8.88 -.61 0.40 6.14 -.65 11.19 -.56 42.93 -2.76 49.23 -3.46 1.28 10.93 -.64 0.58 17.49 -.94 16.40 -.79 0.84 40.93 -2.30 7.81 -.57 114.06-12.25 29.06 -2.20 15.45 -.72 2.30 -.20 33.64 -2.62 7.01 -.87 18.36 -.45 4.71 -.42 7.60 -.95 1.82 34.66 -1.34 1.03 2.49 -.13 0.35 10.10 -.98 0.46 17.60 -.66 1.53 42.59 -2.83 1.02 -.09 4.05 -.21 0.32 10.81 -1.21 1.00 74.41 -5.11 0.51 27.50 -1.32 0.54 27.26 -1.25 0.39 29.49 -1.81 0.23 24.52 -1.15 0.24 11.80 -.75 4.69 -.24 8.31 -.73 1.20 44.50 -1.05 0.40 39.84 -2.51 1.36 -.09 2.89 29.06 -1.81 0.72 10.59 -1.11 0.52 17.66 -1.18 55.23 -4.91 13.95 -.85 12.93 -1.23 6.26 -.35 0.52 14.60 -.31 19.70 -.81 0.64 27.91 -1.45 1.92 49.29 -.66 19.55 -1.35 1.48 21.17 -1.20 30.01 -3.07 0.84 32.69 -1.29 5.39 -.38 0.20 9.36 -.33 14.78 -2.47 .80 -.11 4.63 -.36 21.19 -1.62 1.46 71.03 -2.52 1.56 12.84 -.74 0.39 93.93 -3.90 7.09 -.84 7.68 -.40 43.48 -3.21 0.81 8.92 -.56 3.72 100.12 -6.56 4.37 -.16 5.28 -.50 0.72 59.58 -3.59 32.40 -2.26 0.44 36.55 -.78 11.93 -.94 5.01 -.43 31.76 -1.63 10.21 -.93 0.28 4.04 -.24 25.44 -1.44 0.12 36.81 -1.07 0.08 8.43 -.50 3.20 112.71 -4.87

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D 0.48 0.24

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0.05

0.36 0.86 1.30 0.63 0.83 0.59 1.06 0.18 0.67 0.35 1.33 1.64 0.40 0.20 0.52 0.30 1.76 0.72 1.10 0.40 0.24 0.68 0.10 0.14

4.00 0.72 1.44 0.44 0.60

0.20 0.35 0.08

0.24 1.57 0.04 1.04 2.08 0.72 0.20 0.20 0.72 0.85 1.00 0.76

0.52

0.27 0.80 1.20 0.45 1.75 0.60 1.27 0.99 0.52 0.67 0.81 3.03 1.98 0.83 0.47 0.08 0.52 0.68

0.75

0.88 0.52 0.32 0.08

1.24 0.60 2.20 1.00 1.16 1.92 0.94 0.20 0.02 0.30 0.48 0.80 2.64 2.38 0.28 0.75 0.40 0.58 0.48 1.68 0.88 0.79 1.64

0.36 0.16 0.26 0.92

Nm 96.20 +3.30 7.74 -.47 1.78 -.14 41.93 -3.33 30.89 -.90 14.62 -.79 4.87 -.29 14.88 -1.84 5.27 -.44 12.88 -.13 19.42 -1.94 9.14 -.01 34.86 -2.03 1.76 -.14 19.89 -.56 70.02 -5.54 46.41 -3.22 59.11 -2.35 39.72 +.92 70.53 -5.72 21.02 -1.09 21.90 -.80 14.30 -2.15 53.17 -2.97 15.82 -1.34 .92 -.01 12.24 -.87 8.92 -.70 28.28 -1.40 2.28 -.17 20.69 -1.21 32.09 -3.07 17.44 -1.56 24.63 -2.69 40.21 -.40 30.22 -.88 41.97 -.68 8.04 -.43 34.32 -1.21 36.70 -2.28 14.81 -1.15 24.26 -1.03 25.17 -1.05 8.38 -.55 14.73 -1.08 16.17 +.44 3.49 -.23 18.99 +.17 16.13 +.36 1.60 13.34 -2.84 28.89 -.96 32.52 -2.01 31.11 -1.06 29.69 -.54 34.55 -1.80 64.38 -3.96 12.38 -.63 29.59 -1.74 23.08 -1.18 32.59 -.39 2.20 -.23 56.75 -3.97 13.57 -.72 1.46 -.09 2.87 -.34 34.75 -3.95 40.24 -4.02 17.84 -1.03 32.67 -2.14 22.40 -1.68 11.76 -.84 6.75 -.59 .99 -.04 79.23 -1.58 28.80 -1.76 11.05 -1.01 31.25 -2.09 5.53 -.34 27.51 -2.30 13.66 -1.20 23.85 -2.45 22.12 -3.15 4.50 -.55 91.41 -8.42 44.57 -3.00 20.79 -2.17 3.50 -.16 26.17 -1.01 30.06 -2.27 33.72 -1.79 4.93 -.38 14.43 -1.14 6.64 -.67 5.80 -.60 5.59 -.52 17.71 -1.33 2.18 -.12 32.16 -3.14 6.95 -.48 2.74 -.17 6.04 -.28 10.23 -.18 8.93 -.27 30.06 -3.10 7.08 -1.11 3.95 -.36 13.44 -.70 15.81 -.97 10.05 -.64 23.32 -.97 58.11 -2.49 23.72 +.28 1.37 -.02 1.03 -.08 27.30 -.58 26.41 -1.70 18.13 -.16 9.78 -.65 14.29 -.81 28.56 -2.24 17.33 -.23 8.32 -.52 1.76 -.09 8.74 -.61 27.26 -1.21 52.88 -1.63 38.25 -4.25 10.09 -1.00 17.62 -1.02 11.05 -.46 10.94 -.66 2.74 -.29 22.47 -1.71 16.02 -1.14 25.73 -.88 9.25 -.79 15.00 -.49 50.64 +.09 3.38 -.17 3.82 -.25 16.16 -1.19 55.04 -2.68 17.30 -1.57 41.46 -1.05 39.83 -3.37 22.98 -1.15 6.37 -.40 6.79 -.41 3.71 -.39 12.97 -.67 10.48 -.50 11.88 -.58 28.81 -.69 19.95 -1.07 17.07 -.19 22.91 -1.01 3.72 -.26 25.44 -1.96 53.77 -3.62 32.21 -2.19 4.74 -.37 30.93 -2.92 45.42 -6.98 11.04 -.87 14.29 -1.69 22.91 -1.20 14.66 -.68 24.26 -1.57 19.39 -1.46 13.30 -.32 18.35 -1.15 9.61 -.65 38.80 -1.31 23.13 -1.61 25.39 -1.54 13.10 -1.28 15.47 -1.27 17.54 -1.72 51.07 -3.30 38.95 -3.05 2.48 -.15 7.58 -.29 30.37 -1.05 19.45 -.60 31.00 -.93 15.94 -1.46 77.42 -3.51 19.07 -2.89 50.15 -2.31 59.21 -5.06 42.77 -.03 .78 -.01 62.32 -2.64 28.58 -1.89 33.92 -3.43 18.15 -2.05 21.36 -1.76 13.83 -.46 8.02 -.57 15.52 -1.14 35.32 -.98 47.22 -2.36 74.69 -3.41 46.64 -2.15 16.50 -.71 22.43 -.69 .78 -.04 55.83 -2.53 3.04 -.21 71.57 -3.11 55.22 -2.97 41.18 -1.60 50.26 -.53 1.06 -.09 85.63 -5.60 52.73 -3.77 49.79 -2.41 33.70 -3.13 4.96 -.90 .48 -.04 33.25 -2.84 13.58 -1.44 22.15 -2.04 6.95 -.57 45.96 -3.41 12.46 -.92 27.71 -2.30 4.10 -.21 19.74 -.91 20.81 -4.75

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Real estate

B B

A Klamath Falls contractor was one of 15 Oregon businesses and individuals to receive a combined $206,000 in rural energy grants, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced Wednesday. Eco Solar and Electric will use its $14,850 Rural Energy for America Program grant to offset the cost of installing solar panels on its headquarters, according to a news release from USDA Rural Development. Eleven of the 15 grants will help pay for solar projects, according to the release. Three will be used for energy efficiency and one for wind. The agency expects to announce more grant awards in the coming weeks.

Continued from B1 “They’re not going to take away the mountains. They’re not going to take the river away from us,” he said. “People are still going to come to Bend.” A joint effort by Duffey and Patricia Huber, co-owners of the RE/MAX office, and building owner Mikel Lomsky led to the renovations at 431 N.W. Franklin — previously the home of En Vogue, a women’s clothing store. Along with the retail storefront, the property included an attached older home, which has been torn down to make room for the back portion of the real estate office and another business. Lomsky bought the building for $350,000 in November 2009 from LibertyBank, according to Deschutes County property records. LibertyBank, which had written a $960,000 mortgage on the building in 2007, foreclosed on the property. Buying at such high prices during the real estate boom didn’t make financial sense to Lomsky, he said Thursday. A landlord would have to charge so much rent for the project to make it work financially, the tenants would not be able to make a living. “I think landlord and tenant is more of a partnership than anything,” he said. “They have to be able to make a living … in order for the landlord to make a living.” The timing also worked out for Huber and Duffey, who previously jointly operated Taft Dire Real Estate Resourc-

But Rankin and other economists said that what sent stock prices into decline on Thursday had less to do with conditions in the United States, which have been well known, than with signs of worsening conditions in Europe. The decline in U.S. markets came after sharp sell-offs overnight in Europe. Germany’s blue-chip DAX index tumbled 5.8 percent, Britain’s FTSE 100 fell 4.5 percent, and France’s CAC 40 was down 5.5 percent. Major European bank stocks ranked among the biggest losers as investors showed their doubts about their health and the continued debt crises on the continent. The stability of the European banking system has been a persistent concern — one that the International Monetary Fund, the

United States and others have encouraged officials in the region to tend to more quickly. But progress has been slow. The 17 banking systems are overseen by 17 different countries, each with their own problems, such as bad housing loans made by Spain’s “cajas,” or savings banks; the overseas investments of Germany’s regional Landesbank; and an Irish banking system that grew to be several times larger than the country’s economy. A regional analysis released in July showed that the capital buffers of 21 of 90 banks studied would, in another economic downturn, fall below or close to what was considered a safe level. Some major ones cleared the threshold only narrowly. Bank investments in government bonds, meanwhile, remain

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Bend marketing firm sold to Va. company

owns the Duck Store bought a building at 80 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive, in the former retail outlet for Unicel. The Duck Store expects to move into it next year, according to a news release. Along with more retail space, the new building will serve other university activities and offices, such as the alumni association, the UO Foundation and the university’s retirement learning program — the Oscher Living Institute. Until renovations are complete, the Bend branch of the Duck Store will continue to operate in the Old Mill District, where it has been located since 2006.

AudetteMedia, a Bend-based Internet marketing firm, has been sold to Rimm-Kaufman Group (RKG), a Charlottesville, Va., company that has made Inc. Magazine’s list of top 500 fastestgrowing private firms. Both companies announced the sale Wednesday, although terms were not disclosed. For RKG, adding AudetteMedia’s search-engine optimization expertise will strengthen the company, according to its news release. The sale also will give RKG, which has an office in Boston, a West Coast presence, according to the release. AudetteMedia’s employees will join RKG, and Adam Audette, co-founder, will become president, according to AudetteMedia’s website. Meg Thompson, co-founder will become vice president of search engine optimization, according to the website. The Bend offices will remain and operate as RKG’s West Coast division.

Oregon businesses get energy grants

Bend Duck Store to move across town The Bend Duck Store — Central Oregon’s outlet for University of Oregon merchandise — will be moving to a larger location near the Bend River Promenade, according to officials from the Eugene-based stores. The nonprofit corporation that

Market Continued from B1 Economists had been expecting sales closer to 5 million. “Just as mortgage rates are dropping, people are not applying to buy homes,” Newport said. The latest figures on unemployment, considered another key piece in any recovery, also proved disconcerting. The Labor Department said Thursday that weekly unemployment benefits again rose above the 400,000 level last week, a benchmark figure that many economists take as a sign of a declining economic trajectory. “Right now, it’s all about jobs in the U.S.,” said Kurt Rankin, an economist at PNC Financial Services Group. “Nothing is going to happen in the U.S. until some jobs are created.”

THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 B5

“ They’re not going to take away the mountains. They’re not going to take the river away from us. People are still going to come to Bend.” — Bill Duffey, principal broker, RE/MAX Key Properties

es, a boutique firm in Bend. “What makes it feasible is working with Mikel,” Duffey said. “He’s provided a platform for us to actually grow a business.”

National branding, local ownership RE/MAX closed down its corporately owned office in Bend in 2008, and Duffey and Huber became a RE/MAX franchise Dec. 1. The move gives the office immediate national reach, branding, educational and other resources that allow brokers to increase their knowledge and education, Duffey said. Its downtown location also gives it good visibility. When Duffey tells people he owns the RE/MAX franchise, they know he’s in real estate, he said. That wasn’t necessarily the case when he operated Taft Dire. And as the business owners, they can set the rules, he said. RE/MAX Key Properties has signed up about 20 agents, and plans to provide space for about 35, Duffey said. The office wants experienced brokers, and has received a lot of interest. The real estate crash has

a major source of doubt. Banks in France, Germany and elsewhere now hold tens of billions of dollars of government debt that might not be worth what they paid for it. The holdings can be sizable. According to data released as part of the stress test, French bank Societe Generale, for example, holds $2.8 billion of Greek bonds, $4.7 billion of Spanish bonds, $8.8 billion of Italian bonds and nearly $20 billion of French bonds. In Thursday’s trading, shares of Societe Generale shed more than 12 percent; its peers Credit Agricole and BNP Paribas were each down about 7 percent. In Germany, investors sheared 10 percent off of CommerzBank and nearly 7 percent off Deutsche Bank. Italy’s UniCredit was down 7 percent. The slump in European banking led to a similar sell-off in the

401(k)

stressed out nearly everyone in the industry, particularly those working at firms that ramped up as the bubble grew and had to contract after it burst. But at a growing firm like RE/MAX Key properties, the stress is positive, said Colleen McNally, broker and marketing representative for the office. Duffey and Huber also plan to make RE/MAX Key Properties a full-service brokerage, adding commercial real estate sales and property management to the mix. A down market makes it a good time to recruit agents, he said, and it’s not as if home sales have stopped. When homes are priced correctly and buyers meet the loan criteria — a job, a down payment and a good credit score — homes sell, he said. Total home sales in Bend increased about 3 percent in the first half of this year over the same period last year, according to figures from the Central Oregon Association of Realtors. In both years, however, nearly 60 percent of those sales were either short sales or bank-owned. Once those distressed sales get through the system, Duffey said, the market will return to normal, whatever that is. “If you’re a Realtor (in Bend) over the last eight or nine years, you haven’t been in a normal market,” he said. “I think we’re trending back to a normal market.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from B1 Aon Hewitt’s index, which represents 1.5 million workers and $123 billion in assets, reported its fifth-highest trading volume on Aug. 8. That day the S&P 500 plunged 6.7 percent, its biggest slump since December 2008. The amount of funds transferred is “significant” given that it was only a two-week time period, said Pamela Hess, director of retirement research for Aon Hewitt, a unit of Chicago-based Aon Corp. During the financial crisis in 2008 through the first quarter of 2009, about 6 percent of 401(k) assets moved out of stocks, Hess said. Participants had an average of 67 percent in equities before the market decline in 2008, said Hess. This month the average equity allocation is 58 percent, she said. “Plan participants aren’t rushing to jump out of, or into, the stock market,” Steve Utkus, director of Vanguard Group’s Center for Retirement Research, said in an Aug. 12 report. “The percentage of participants actually moving money remains small.” Investors should be aware that they’ll get end-of-day pricing when moving money in their 401(k)s while the market is open, Hess said. People often sell at the bottom and if they buy back stocks at all it’s after the market rallies, she said. “Timing the market doesn’t work,” Hess said. “If it did, people would be on the beach somewhere.”

United States. Shares of Bank of America tumbled more than 6 percent. Other major banks, including Morgan Stanley, Citigroup and Wells Fargo, were down more than 4 percent. “It’s a harsher day than I would have expected,” said Matthew Czepliewicz, a banking analyst at Collins Stewart Hawkpoint in London. He said markets were probably reacting to the lack of progress on Europe’s debt woes rather than speculation about individual banks. Bank stocks are also being hurt by Europe’s dwindling economic prospects, Czepliewicz said. Earlier this week, the European Union’s statistical office reported only a 0.2 percent rise in gross domestic product, the broadest measure of economic growth, across its 27 member countries in

the second quarter. Of the greatest concern was news that Germany’s GDP had slowed to 0.1 percent growth during the quarter. “Germany has been the driver of growth over here,” Czepliewicz said. The S&P 500 closed down about 53 points, or 4.5 percent; the Dow Jones industrial average fell about 420 points, or 3.7 percent; and the tech-heavy Nasdaq composite slid more than 131 points, or 5.2 percent. Jason Schenker, president of Prestige Economics, a forecasting firm in Austin, Texas, said the odds of a second recession are 50 percent. “The data today continues to indicate that the U.S. economy is hobbling along,” he said. “Now we’ve got a much more significant slowdown.”

Market update Northwest stocks Name

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... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... .80 .88 .96 ... .24 .48 .22 .84f .12 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

7 13 ... 9 12 11 14 21 23 14 17 7 ... 9 6 12 12 ... 15 21 9

YTD Last Chg %Chg 53.87 23.57 7.01 13.49 58.93 7.57 37.98 48.09 74.36 5.84 22.31 29.51 9.60 19.77 6.25 22.93 5.12 6.05 19.87 8.85 24.67

-3.43 -.53 -.45 -.76 -3.25 -.50 -3.32 -3.57 -1.76 -.37 -1.47 -1.88 -.50 -.90 -.44 -.45 -.28 -.56 -.73 -.52 -.58

-5.0 +4.7 -47.5 -13.2 -9.7 -10.4 -19.7 -20.2 +3.0 -21.0 -25.0 -29.9 -21.8 -6.0 -29.4 +2.5 -15.5 -36.0 -2.0 -26.3 -11.6

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58f .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50 .24 .48 ... .60

18 12 17 10 18 ... 33 19 11 12 16 8 23 6 22 10 16 9 15 4

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1826.00 $1818.90 $40.687

Pvs Day $1792.00 $1791.20 $40.350

Market recap NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg 79.92 38.30 42.59 5.52 34.88 2.27 34.98 140.77 17.49 40.76 71.03 28.89 34.75 6.95 9.20 21.07 14.06 23.72 13.47 16.15

-2.63 -3.12 -1.16 -.69 -2.38 +.02 -1.34 -11.12 -.94 -2.11 -2.52 -.96 -3.95 -.57 -.65 -1.36 -.89 -1.16 -.68 -.95

-6.4 -9.6 -8.3 -68.8 -39.2 +9.7 -6.6 +1.1 -22.2 -38.6 -15.2 -36.0 +8.2 -40.5 -24.5 -21.9 -16.9 -23.5 -4.5 -14.7

Prime rate Time period

Vol (00)

S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl GenElec iShEMkts

4426204 3237488 1658290 1158800 1000030

Last Chg 114.51 7.01 12.38 15.34 40.18

-5.16 -.45 -.63 -.89 -1.99

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CSVS2xVxS C-TrCVOL CSVSVixST Bar iPVix rs ProVixSTF

Last

Chg %Chg

54.05 +15.66 53.74 +14.30 87.60 +15.07 40.47 +6.94 86.96 +14.90

+40.8 +36.3 +20.8 +20.7 +20.7

Losers ($2 or more) Name CameltInfo Aeroflex n iPInv1-21Vx CSVelIVSt s TrnsRty

Last

-2.24 -2.21 -4.18 -1.93 -.70

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

NwGold g NovaGld g GoldStr g CFCda g CheniereEn

Last Chg

56502 12.35 +.16 53945 9.41 -.46 38878 2.06 -.21 33248 25.21 +.87 30869 7.37 -.82

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Last Chg

PwShs QQQ SiriusXM Microsoft Cisco Intel

1168283 1156268 1034269 1025396 893236

50.95 1.78 24.67 15.01 19.77

Gainers ($2 or more) Name SaratogaRs GoldRsv g AvinoSG g Espey HMG

Last

+7.8 +5.6 +5.3 +4.6 +4.6

Name

Last

CasualMal Koss PrUPShQQQ PrincNtl GlobTcAdv

Chg %Chg

4.02 +.57 +16.5 6.75 +.91 +15.6 31.08 +3.91 +14.4 4.05 +.42 +11.6 3.89 +.35 +9.9

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

-26.2 -22.3 -21.5 -20.0 -19.7

TriangPet AdcareH wt B&HO CTPtrs n Arrhythm

4.96 2.75 4.41 5.70 3.51

-.90 -.42 -.58 -.73 -.44

-15.4 -13.2 -11.6 -11.4 -11.1

Gentium TudouH n ZionsBc wt AcmePkt ArubaNet

Last

194 2,917 51 3,162 2 206

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

74 424 12 510 3 15

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

6.85 20.81 2.85 41.35 17.10

Chg %Chg -1.94 -4.75 -.63 -8.70 -3.56

12,876.00 9,936.62 Dow Jones Industrials 5,627.85 4,010.52 Dow Jones Transportation 442.01 381.43 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,594.95 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,830.65 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,099.29 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,039.70 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,877.63 Wilshire 5000 868.57 588.58 Russell 2000

World markets Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday. Market

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-2.63 -.14 -.58 -.84 -.90

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

6.19 +.45 2.45 +.13 2.57 +.13 24.99 +1.10 3.40 +.15

52-Week High Low Name

Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

6.32 7.69 15.29 7.73 2.85

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Indexes

-22.1 -18.6 -18.1 -17.4 -17.2

Diary 236 2,396 55 2,687 2 256

Close

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Net Chg

10,990.58 4,299.55 419.89 7,079.41 2,227.39 2,380.43 1,140.65 11,988.67 662.51

-419.63 -277.63 -7.68 -339.53 -73.90 -131.05 -53.24 -585.02 -41.52

YTD %Chg %Chg -3.68 -6.07 -1.80 -4.58 -3.21 -5.22 -4.46 -4.65 -5.90

52-wk %Chg

-5.07 -15.81 +3.68 -11.11 +.86 -10.27 -9.30 -10.27 -15.46

+7.00 +1.96 +9.42 +3.34 +18.73 +9.25 +6.04 +6.51 +8.44

Currencies Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

% Change

279.58 2,151.96 3,076.04 5,092.23 5,602.80 20,016.27 33,245.14 14,970.42 3,286.22 8,943.76 1,860.58 2,824.96 4,319.40 4,727.20

Last

-4.47 t -4.56 t -5.48 t -4.49 t -5.82 t -1.34 t -2.36 t -6.15 t -.12 t -1.25 t -1.70 t -.13 t -1.20 t -4.15 t

Dollar vs:

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0362 1.6496 1.0093 .002127 .1564 1.4319 .1283 .013065 .081058 .0344 .000929 .1551 1.2621 .0345

1.0560 1.6566 1.0199 .002118 .1565 1.4451 .1284 .013075 .082112 .0347 .000937 .1582 1.2666 .0345

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 16.41 -0.73 -11.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 6.65 -0.20 -6.8 GrowthI 23.36 -1.28 -9.6 Ultra 21.15 -1.16 -6.6 American Funds A: AmcpA p 17.28 -0.75 -7.9 AMutlA p 23.55 -0.87 -5.9 BalA p 17.16 -0.52 -3.3 BondA p 12.61 +0.01 +5.6 CapIBA p 48.12 -1.16 -1.8 CapWGA p 31.86 -1.39 -9.4 CapWA p 21.50 -0.02 +7.1 EupacA p 36.87 -1.79 -10.9 FdInvA p 32.94 -1.61 -9.7 GovtA p 14.58 +0.03 +6.1 GwthA p 27.38 -1.31 -10.1 HI TrA p 10.84 -0.06 +0.5 IncoA p 15.95 -0.39 -1.7 IntBdA p 13.70 +3.5 ICAA p 25.30 -1.05 -9.3 NEcoA p 23.42 -1.01 -7.5 N PerA p 25.82 -1.27 -9.8 NwWrldA 49.37 -1.81 -9.6 SmCpA p 33.89 -1.59 -12.8 TxExA p 12.32 +0.03 +6.9 WshA p 25.63 -1.03 -4.8 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 26.05 -1.24 -13.6 IntEqII I r 10.76 -0.54 -13.6 Artisan Funds: Intl 20.49 -0.98 -5.6 IntlVal r 24.26 -1.13 -10.5 MidCap 30.34 -2.08 -9.8 MidCapVal 19.07 -0.81 -5.0 Baron Funds: Growth 47.33 -2.62 -7.6 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 14.27 +0.02 +6.5 DivMu 14.72 +0.03 +5.3 TxMgdIntl 13.49 -0.68 -14.2 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 16.55 -0.59 GlAlA r 18.69 -0.47 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.43 -0.44 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 16.59 -0.59 GlbAlloc r 18.77 -0.48 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 46.87 -3.15 Cohen & Steers: RltyShrs 57.16 -2.76 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 25.29 -1.59 DivEqInc 8.83 -0.43 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 26.11 -1.64 AcornIntZ 36.68 -1.52 LgCapGr 11.50 -0.78 ValRestr 43.14 -2.36 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.15 -0.15 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 9.80 -0.49 USCorEq1 9.77 -0.51 USCorEq2 9.59 -0.52 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 30.50 -1.38 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 30.87 -1.39 NYVen C 29.36 -1.33 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.48 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 19.17 -0.74 EmMktV 30.16 -1.17 IntSmVa 14.89 -0.73 LargeCo 9.02 -0.42 USLgVa 17.63 -0.98 US Small 18.31 -1.13 US SmVa 21.17 -1.30 IntlSmCo 15.29 -0.67 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 15.57 -0.85 Glb5FxInc 11.48 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.24

-4.7 -3.0 -3.5 -4.6 -2.9 -12.2 -1.5 -12.6 -12.0 -12.4 -8.1 -7.4 -14.2 -2.0 -11.5 -10.7 -12.1 -11.2 -11.0 -11.6 +5.8 -13.0 -16.2 -12.4 -8.2 -11.8 -14.1 -17.1 -10.0 +0.7 -13.6 +5.5 +0.9

Dodge&Cox: Balanced 64.70 -2.35 Income 13.54 IntlStk 30.78 -1.50 Stock 95.35 -4.78 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.24 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 15.95 -0.70 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 8.65 -0.02 GblMacAbR 10.05 -0.02 LgCapVal 16.00 -0.70 FMI Funds: LgCap p 14.45 -0.62 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.85 +0.01 FPACres 25.76 -0.66 Fairholme 25.93 -1.45 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 18.46 -0.89 StrInA 12.53 -0.03 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 18.66 -0.91 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.21 -0.31 FF2015 11.02 -0.26 FF2015K 12.23 -0.29 FF2020 13.23 -0.37 FF2020K 12.51 -0.35 FF2025 10.88 -0.35 FF2025K 12.50 -0.40 FF2030 12.92 -0.44 FF2030K 12.60 -0.42 FF2035 10.58 -0.42 FF2040 7.38 -0.29 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 11.14 -0.56 AMgr50 14.81 -0.36 Balanc 17.45 -0.51 BalancedK 17.45 -0.51 BlueChGr 41.51 -2.44 Canada 53.01 -2.09 CapAp 22.45 -1.10 CpInc r 8.87 -0.12

-6.8 +4.5 -13.8 -10.8 NA -12.0 -1.0 +0.5 -11.9 -7.4 +2.1 -3.0 -27.1 -7.4 +4.2 -7.2 -2.4 -2.5 -2.5 -3.7 -3.6 -5.2 -5.1 -5.8 -5.7 -7.4 -7.5 -9.9 -3.2 -3.5 -3.4 -8.5 -8.8 -11.4 -2.6

Contra ContraK DisEq DivIntl DivrsIntK r DivGth Eq Inc EQII Fidel FltRateHi r GNMA GovtInc GroCo GroInc GrowthCoK HighInc r Indepn IntBd IntmMu IntlDisc InvGrBd InvGB LgCapVal LevCoStk LowP r LowPriK r Magelln MidCap MuniInc NwMkt r OTC 100Index Puritn SCmdtyStrt SrsIntGrw SrsIntVal SrInvGrdF STBF SmllCpS r StratInc StrReRt r TotalBd USBI Value

62.86 62.88 20.26 26.89 26.90 24.60 38.32 15.80 29.58 9.40 11.99 10.95 77.34 16.41 77.37 8.60 21.18 10.94 10.37 29.27 11.92 7.73 9.98 23.57 35.79 35.80 61.77 24.33 12.84 16.06 50.08 8.09 17.04 12.18 10.24 8.62 11.93 8.54 15.31 11.21 9.61 11.11 11.82 59.07

-3.11 -3.11 -1.06 -1.31 -1.31 -1.35 -1.79 -0.75 -1.49 -0.04 +0.03 -4.80 -0.74 -4.79 -0.05 -1.46 +0.03 -1.47

-0.49 -1.54 -1.47 -1.47 -3.48 -1.44 +0.03 -0.03 -3.57 -0.34 -0.53 -0.21 -0.50 -0.46 +0.01 -1.04 -0.03 -0.13 +0.01 -3.24

-7.1 -7.0 -10.1 -10.8 -10.7 -13.5 -12.7 -12.8 -7.8 -2.4 +6.7 +6.4 -7.0 -9.7 -6.9 -0.1 -13.0 +5.7 +5.8 -11.4 +6.5 +6.7 -12.9 -17.1 -6.7 -6.7 -13.7 -11.3 +7.4 +6.2 -8.8 -7.4 -4.0 -3.6 -9.3 -13.3 +6.6 +1.8 -21.9 +4.3 +1.7 +5.9 +6.3 -14.0

Fidelity Selects: Gold r 50.21 -1.01 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 32.92 -1.95 500IdxInv 40.48 -1.88 IntlInxInv 31.55 -1.58 TotMktInv 33.06 -1.63 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 40.48 -1.88 TotMktAd r 33.07 -1.62 First Eagle: GlblA 45.16 -1.14 OverseasA 22.23 -0.41 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.98 +0.04 FoundAl p 9.93 HYTFA p 10.11 +0.03 IncomA p 2.08 USGovA p 6.96 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.63 -0.13 IncmeAd 2.07 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.10 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 18.74 -0.75 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.27 -0.34 GlBd A p 13.67 -0.13 GrwthA p 16.11 -0.84 WorldA p 13.41 -0.66 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.70 -0.13 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 36.29 -1.75 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.94 -0.64 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 12.20 -0.45 Quality 19.95 -0.63 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 6.94 -0.05 MidCapV 31.28 -1.65 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.40 -0.03

-1.7 -12.7 -8.2 -10.0 -9.0 -8.2 -9.0 -2.6 -1.9 +8.6 NA +8.4 NA +5.8 +3.7 NA NA -9.2 -10.2 +3.6 -9.4 -9.6 +3.3 -9.8 +0.2 -9.9 +0.3 -0.2 -13.5 +3.8

CapApInst 34.26 -2.10 IntlInv t 54.02 -2.89 Intl r 54.64 -2.92 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 28.52 -1.60 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 28.57 -1.60 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 35.83 -2.03 Div&Gr 17.76 -0.77 TotRetBd 11.50 +0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.60 +0.20 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 16.22 -0.43 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.18 -0.64 CmstkA 14.05 -0.64 EqIncA 7.86 -0.24 GrIncA p 16.96 -0.76 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 22.43 -1.31 AssetStA p 23.19 -1.35 AssetStrI r 23.41 -1.36 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.89 +0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.88 +0.02 HighYld 7.80 -0.05 ShtDurBd 11.03 USLCCrPls 18.37 -0.91 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 38.04 -1.61 PrkMCVal T 20.57 -0.87 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 12.45 LSGrwth 12.18 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 19.10 -0.62 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 19.48 -0.64 Longleaf Partners: Partners 26.27 -1.35 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.56 -0.11

-6.7 -10.0 -9.8 -17.6 -17.5 -15.4 -8.9 +5.5 +2.5 -3.0 -6.1 -10.1 -7.7 -11.3 -5.5 -5.0 -4.9 +5.8 +6.0 -0.2 +1.5 -11.1 -24.9 -8.9 NA NA -11.9 -12.1 -7.0 +5.2

StrInc C 15.01 -0.17 LSBondR 14.50 -0.11 StrIncA 14.93 -0.17 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.56 -0.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 9.75 -0.50 BdDebA p 7.60 -0.06 ShDurIncA p 4.57 -0.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.60 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.48 -0.34 ValueA 20.61 -0.90 MFS Funds I: ValueI 20.71 -0.90 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 7.69 -0.40 MergerFd 15.56 -0.15 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.56 TotRtBdI 10.56 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 35.55 -1.99 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 26.45 -0.98 GlbDiscZ 26.81 -0.99 QuestZ 16.44 -0.51 SharesZ 18.92 -0.75 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 43.51 -2.15 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.06 -0.04 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 26.18 -0.95 Intl I r 16.54 -0.76 Oakmark 37.80 -1.80 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.33 -0.19 GlbSMdCap 13.72 -0.66 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 31.28 -1.10 GlobA p 53.57 -2.92 GblStrIncA 4.24 -0.02 IntBdA p 6.76 -0.02

+3.6 +5.0 +4.1 +6.7 -15.4 +1.0 +2.1 +1.6 -3.2 -9.0 -8.9 -10.7 -1.4 +4.6 +4.8 -4.8 -9.4 -9.2 -7.1 -9.0 -5.3 +1.2 -5.6 -14.8 -8.5 -3.7 -9.6 -14.2 -11.3 +2.7 +5.5

MnStFdA 28.91 -1.38 -10.7 RisingDivA 14.36 -0.68 -6.9 S&MdCpVl 27.89 -1.46 -13.0 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.01 -0.61 -7.4 S&MdCpVl 23.80 -1.24 -13.4 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 12.96 -0.61 -7.3 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.88 +0.01 +8.9 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 31.00 -1.09 -14.1 IntlBdY 6.76 -0.02 +5.7 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.07 -0.03 +4.0 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.88 -0.11 +4.7 AllAsset 12.24 -0.14 +3.1 ComodRR 8.85 -0.18 +3.1 DivInc 11.41 -0.04 +3.3 EmgMkCur 10.79 -0.10 +2.9 HiYld 8.95 -0.06 +0.7 InvGrCp 10.76 +6.1 LowDu 10.47 -0.02 +2.2 RealRtnI 12.18 -0.07 +10.4 ShortT 9.83 +0.5 TotRt 11.07 -0.03 +4.2 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 12.18 -0.07 +10.1 TotRtA 11.07 -0.03 +3.9 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.07 -0.03 +3.4 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.07 -0.03 +4.0 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.07 -0.03 +4.1 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.88 -0.54 +6.7 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 35.91 -1.77 -12.0 Price Funds: BlChip 35.17 -2.09 -7.8 CapApp 19.18 -0.68 -5.6 EmMktS 30.93 -1.19 -12.3 EqInc 21.00 -0.91 -10.6

EqIndex 30.81 Growth 29.07 HlthSci 29.70 HiYield 6.49 IntlBond 10.62 Intl G&I 12.08 IntlStk 12.75 MidCap 52.31 MCapVal 21.12 N Asia 18.00 New Era 44.82 N Horiz 30.89 N Inc 9.77 R2010 14.87 R2015 11.37 R2020 15.51 R2025 11.23 R2030 15.94 R2035 11.19 R2040 15.89 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 30.07 SmCapVal 31.61 SpecIn 12.33 Value 20.75 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 11.72 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 10.26 PremierI r 18.80 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 33.94 S&P Sel 17.97 Scout Funds: Intl 28.74 Selected Funds: AmShD 36.94 Sequoia 130.07 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 17.84 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 44.29 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 24.94 IntValue I 25.50

-1.43 -1.73 -1.51 -0.03 -0.03 -0.61 -0.62 -2.82 -0.95 -0.47 -2.90 -1.91 +0.01 -0.39 -0.36 -0.56 -0.45 -0.70 -0.52 -0.75 -1.87 -1.70 -0.09 -1.00

-8.3 -9.6 -1.9 +0.2 +8.5 -9.2 -10.4 -10.6 -10.9 -6.2 -14.1 -7.8 +5.2 -3.1 -4.4 -5.7 -6.7 -7.8 -8.5 -8.8 +1.7 -12.7 -12.5 +2.3 -11.1

-0.57 -13.1 -0.58 -11.9 -0.99 -7.6 -1.63 -8.7 -0.84 -8.2 -1.39 -10.8 -1.62 -10.8 -4.66 +0.6 -0.90 -11.0 -1.75 -14.4 -1.09 -10.4 -1.11 -10.2

Tweedy Browne: GblValue 22.15 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 20.58 CAITAdm 11.21 CpOpAdl 65.48 EMAdmr r 34.47 Energy 113.59 ExtdAdm 36.08 500Adml 105.38 GNMA Ad 11.21 GrwAdm 29.02 HlthCr 52.69 HiYldCp 5.60 InfProAd 27.91 ITBdAdml 11.94 ITsryAdml 12.12 IntGrAdm 54.74 ITAdml 13.85 ITGrAdm 10.23 LtdTrAd 11.17 LTGrAdml 10.16 LT Adml 11.15 MCpAdml 82.14 MuHYAdm 10.53 PrmCap r 61.10 ReitAdm r 76.76 STsyAdml 10.87 STBdAdml 10.71 ShtTrAd 15.96 STIGrAd 10.76 SmCAdm 30.15 TtlBAdml 11.05 TStkAdm 28.51 WellslAdm 53.44 WelltnAdm 51.26 Windsor 39.50 WdsrIIAd 41.39 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 22.34 CapOpp 28.34 DivdGro 13.68 Energy 60.48 EqInc 19.44

-0.58 -7.0 -0.57 -2.7 +0.03 +7.2 -3.37 -14.7 -1.50 -13.5 -6.67 -6.1 -2.17 -12.6 -4.91 -8.2 +0.01 +6.6 -1.51 -7.6 -1.62 +2.8 -0.02 +2.8 -0.16 +11.5 +0.02 +9.5 +0.02 +8.6 -2.97 -11.0 +0.04 +6.9 +0.01 +7.1 +0.01 +3.0 +0.10 +12.7 +0.03 +7.4 -4.66 -10.9 +0.03 +7.4 -2.93 -10.5 -3.71 -0.6 +2.3 -0.01 +2.9 +0.01 +1.5 +2.1 -1.86 -13.3 +0.02 +6.4 -1.40 -8.9 -0.58 +3.5 -1.44 -3.2 -1.91 -12.7 -1.79 -8.2 -0.87 -1.46 -0.49 -3.55 -0.68

-8.1 -14.7 -3.9 -6.1 -3.3

Explr 63.41 GNMA 11.21 GlobEq 16.08 HYCorp 5.60 HlthCre 124.84 InflaPro 14.21 IntlGr 17.19 IntlVal 28.04 ITIGrade 10.23 LifeCon 15.90 LifeGro 20.29 LifeMod 18.59 LTIGrade 10.16 Morg 16.11 MuInt 13.85 PrecMtls r 24.07 PrmcpCor 12.39 Prmcp r 58.86 SelValu r 16.91 STAR 18.14 STIGrade 10.76 StratEq 16.68 TgtRetInc 11.39 TgRe2010 22.20 TgtRe2015 12.09 TgRe2020 21.21 TgtRe2025 11.96 TgRe2030 20.29 TgtRe2035 12.10 TgtRe2040 19.80 TgtRe2045 12.44 USGro 16.63 Wellsly 22.06 Welltn 29.68 Wndsr 11.71 WndsII 23.32 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 23.47 TotIntlInst r 93.91 500 105.36 MidCap 18.08 SmCap 30.09 SmlCpGth 19.17 SmlCpVl 13.71

-4.18 -13.0 +0.01 +6.5 -0.72 -10.0 -0.02 +2.7 -3.83 +2.8 -0.08 +11.5 -0.94 -11.1 -1.38 -12.8 +0.01 +7.0 -0.31 -1.8 -0.82 -7.4 -0.55 -4.2 +0.10 +12.6 -0.97 -10.6 +0.04 +6.8 -1.27 -9.8 -0.60 -10.0 -2.82 -10.5 -0.83 -9.9 -0.55 -4.1 +2.1 -1.01 -9.0 -0.16 +2.2 -0.49 -0.5 -0.33 -2.7 -0.66 -4.0 -0.41 -5.2 -0.78 -6.4 -0.51 -7.6 -0.86 -7.9 -0.54 -7.9 -1.04 -8.9 -0.23 +3.5 -0.83 -3.2 -0.56 -12.7 -1.01 -8.2

STBnd

10.71 -0.01 +2.8

TotBnd

11.05 +0.02 +6.4

TotlIntl

14.03 -0.67 -11.0

TotStk

28.49 -1.41 -9.0

-1.11 -4.45 -4.91 -1.03 -1.87 -1.30 -0.77

Western Asset:

-10.9 -10.9 -8.2 -11.0 -13.4 -12.5 -14.4

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst DevMkInst ExtIn

20.58 -0.57 -2.7 8.96 -0.45 -10.2 36.08 -2.17 -12.6

FTAllWldI r

83.64 -3.99 -10.9

GrwthIst

29.02 -1.51 -7.6

InfProInst

11.37 -0.06 +11.6

InstIdx

104.67 -4.87 -8.2

InsPl

104.68 -4.87 -8.1

InsTStPlus

25.79 -1.26 -8.9

MidCpIst

18.15 -1.03 -10.8

SCInst

30.15 -1.86 -13.3

TBIst

11.05 +0.02 +6.5

TSInst

28.51 -1.40 -8.9

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

87.05 -4.05 -8.2

MidCpIdx

25.92 -1.47 -10.9

STBdIdx

10.71 -0.01 +2.9

TotBdSgl

11.05 +0.02 +6.4

TotStkSgl

27.51 -1.36 -9.0

CorePlus I

11.13 +0.01 +5.6

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

16.40 -0.55 -0.8


B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  D I SPATC H E S Child care provider The Whole Kid and Kaboodle has received national accreditation from the National Association for Family Child Care. The National Association for Family Child Care is an accreditation system designed specifically for family child care providers. The Whole Kid and Kaboodle is the first and only family child care business in Central Oregon to achieve accreditation. It is a participant in NeighborImpact’s Child Care Resources’ Child Care Provider Network of Bend. NeighborImpact provides services to help individuals and families meet basic human needs for food and shelter while providing access to increased education and skills. Bend-based Pahlisch Homes is participating in the 2011 N.W. Natural Street of Dreams home tour with a 3,654-square-foot home, in partnership with Interior Motives Accents and Design. The home, named Paula Deen’s Northwest Retreat, has an interior theme designed around cooking and celebrity chef Paula Deen. The Street of Dreams is currently under way and continues through Aug. 28. More information is available at www.streetof dreamspdx.com. Eberhard’s Dairy Products celebrated 60 years of operating its family business in Redmond. Eberhard’s started Aug. 15, 1951, by Jack and Nelda Eberhard. Today, Eberhard’s Dairy employs 47 people producing milk, half and half, whipping cream, cottage cheese, sour cream, butter and 20 flavors of ice cream which are distributed throughout Deschutes, Crook, Jefferson, North Klamath, Grand and Harney counties.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. WHAT THE BOSS NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT SELLING, MANAGING AND MOTIVATING YOUR SALESPEOPLE: Presented by Dennis Hungerford of Sandler Training. Registration encouraged; free; 8:30-11 a.m.; Phoenix Inn Suites Bend, 300 N.W. Franklin Ave.; 541-382-4316 or www.hcc.sandler.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB. COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY TOWN HALL FORUM, TOURISM AND THE ECONOMY: $30 for Bend Chamber members, $40 for others; 7:30 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E.

Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BUSINESS SUCCESS PROGRAM, REBUILDING YOUR CAPITAL: David Rosell, president of Rosell Wealth Management in Bend, shares investment lessons: recovering from financial damage, what the fragile risk zone means, thoughts on Social Security, how to achieve financial goals, the invisible enemy and how to win the battle, how to survive recessions and setting goals. Registration required; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Tour The Nature of Words storefront location and enjoy beverages and appetizers at Looney Bean Coffee Roasters; free; 5 p.m.; The Nature of Words, 224 N.W. Oregon Ave.; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. SAVING AND INVESTING: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY Aug. 26 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY Aug. 29 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

Aug. 31

Aug. 25

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. COLLEGE SAVINGS OPTIONS: Learn how to develop a plan for your college savings. Registration required; free; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT: NorthWest Crossing businesses and restaurants will offer specials, entertainment and giveaways. Held the last Wednesday of each month; free; 5-8 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend. HOME BUYING BASICS, FINANCING YOUR HOME: Cathy Freyberg, a mortgage specialist with Bank of America, will present what you need to know to be approved for a home loan before you start looking; free; 6-7 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-5009 or cathy.freyberg@bankoforegon.net.

THURSDAY Sept. 1 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab .com or www.schwab.com. CENTRAL OREGON INTERGOVERNMENTAL COUNCIL BOARD MEETING: Purpose of meeting is to discuss an opportunity for COIC to participate in a Regional Economic Opportunity Analysis process and a Clean Energy Works residential program as well as to propose the addition of a Bend bus route; free; 5:30 p.m.; Redmond COIC, 2363 S.W. Glacier Place; 541-548-9523.

FRIDAY Sept. 2 FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY Sept. 3 OREGON CENTURY FARM AND RANCH AWARDS: Annual awards ceremony in which families receive recognition for operating as either a century or sesquicentennial farm. Ceremony held in the corporate tent on the west side of the fairgrounds; free; 1 p.m.; Oregon State Fair, 2330 17th Street N.E., Salem; 503-947-3247 or www.oregonstatefair.org.

WEDNESDAY Sept. 7 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603.

THURSDAY Sept. 8 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. ETFs EXPLAINED: Better understand ETFs: what they are, how they work and how they can be useful investments. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

High Lakes Health Care Internal & Family Medicine

Bend • Sisters

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In

www.highlakeshealthcare.com

541-388-4418


L

Inside

New stations will extend electric cars’ reach, see Page C3.

OBITUARIES Edie Wasserman, Hollywood philanthropist, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

DESCHUTES COUNTY

IN BRIEF Bend roundabout to reopen Aug. 25

Nearly 250,000 attend the fair

The recently reconstructed roundabout at the intersection of Mt. Washington and Century drives is scheduled to reopen Thursday, Aug. 25, after nearly a month of detours. The city of Bend hired a contractor to rebuild the busy roundabout, which leads to Mt. Bachelor and Reed Market Road, and fix the many potholes that pocked its surface. Instead of asphalt, the contractor, Taylor Northwest, used concrete for the road surface. According to city officials, concrete, which can last up to 40 years, has a much longer lifespan than asphalt. The city’s $273,575 contract with Taylor Northwest includes a provision requiring the contractor to pay $1,500 for each additional day if the roundabout isn’t open by Sept. 2.

Good weather, free concerts, dog jumping help in event’s success By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Signup ends today for government class The deadline to register for the Deschutes County College, a program geared at educating the community about county government, is today. Deschutes County College is a free program that will be held from 5 p.m to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesdays from Sept. 6 to Nov. 8. Sessions will cover topics such as property assessment and taxation, the county budget, and public safety among others. Those interested in attending must register by 5 p.m. on Friday. To obtain an application, call 541-330-4640 or send an e-mail to annaj@ deschutes.org. Those who apply will be subject to a background check. — Bulletin staff reports

News of Record on Page C2.

HOW TO SUBMIT Letters and submissions: • Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: bulletin@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section. Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendarâ€? in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number. School news and Teen Feats: • E-mail notices of general interest to pcliff@bendbulletin.com. • E-mail announcements of a student’s academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. • More details: The Bulletin’s Local Schools page publishes Wednesday in this section. Births, engagements, marriages and anniversaries: • Mail information to Milestones, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, within one month of the celebration. • More details: Milestones publishes in Sunday’s Community Life section.

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators SENATE Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

HOUSE Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

C

OREGON Lawmaker wants to split up state’s timber lands, see Page C2.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Redmond Smoke jumper Aaron Alpe, 28, practices folding a reserve parachute in the paraloft at the Redmond Air Center as another jumper has his chute looked over Wednesday afternoon. Alpe, in his second year, said that last year he had six jumps into fires but has not jumped on one yet in 2011.

Gearing up for the ‌

Hottest season

Although officials say this year will likely see fewer fires, the danger is still high

By Dylan J. Darling

The carnival rides are long gone from the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, and the 4H animals have been auctioned off. Yet county fair officials have been waiting for a crucial piece of information before declaring this year’s fair a success. This week, Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center Director Dan Despotopulos tallied up attendance and learned this year’s fair and rodeo had the highest paid attendance since at least 2008. “We’ve tried to make it as affordable as we can,� he said Thursday. “The goal is with fairs, we don’t want to lose money.� More than 73,600 people paid to go to the fair this year. Total attendance at the event was about 245,000, a number that includes people who received free admission because they worked at booths or had exhibits. The county’s goal is for the fair and rodeo event to pay approximately $200,000 in rent, the same amount that a private organization would typically pay the county to rent out the facility, Despotopulos said. “It appears that the fair will be able to pay its rent, so to speak, and things were pretty good this year,� Despotopulos said. See Fair / C5

The Bulletin

lthough it was slow in coming, fire season has arrived in Central Oregon. The Oregon Department of Forestry, the Bend Fire Department and Deschutes County Rural Fire District No. 2 all increased the level of fire danger to extreme this week. “Things are ready to burn,� said George Ponte, ODF’s Central Oregon district forester. While also wary of wildfire, federal land managers in Central Oregon aren’t as quick to ratchet up their warnings. Warmer weather in the next week should continue to dry out wild lands near Bend. However, “the fire danger is still relatively low in Central Oregon,� said John Saltenberger, fire weather program manager at the Northwest Coordination Center in Portland. The various agencies assess fire danger differently because they cover different lands, Ponte said. The ODF and the city are focused on lower-elevation lands that dry out sooner than the higher-elevation lands managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. Saltenberger and other meteorologists at the Northwest Coordination Center study weather patterns and forest conditions to predict wildfire around Oregon and Washington for the BLM and Forest Service. See Fire season / C5

A

.PSFQBZJOH UPBUUFOEGBJS Paid attendance at the Deschutes County Fair and Rodeo this summer reached its highest point since 2008. Overall attendance, which includes people who receive free entrance because they work or have exhibits at the fair, also increased.

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“I don’t remember it being this slow,� said West Yellowstone, Mont., smoke jumper Dean Chambers, 38, as he sharpened a crosscut saw Wednesday. Chambers, whose West Yellowstone group does not sharpen its own saws, was training in Redmond to learn about the hand-sharpening craft, which the Redmond crew does on its own. Ray Rubio, a smoke jumper operations spotter, said the smoke jumpers have been keeping active by packing parachutes, designing and sewing jump gear and sharpening saws.

Assessing fire danger The U.S. Forest Service uses these four fire danger level classifications: • Low — Forest fires spread slowly, little danger of emitting embers that start new fires. • Moderate — Fires not likely to become serious, firefighters able to control relatively easily. • High — Fires spread rapidly, control is difficult unless firefighters hit them hard and fast as they begin. • Extreme — Fires start quickly, burn intensely and spread furiously.

At the ready On an average day this time of year, the following resources are prepared to fight wildfires in the Deschutes and Ochoco national forests, the Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management and Central Oregon district of the Oregon Department of Forestry: • 25 engines with about 75 firefighters • Four 10-person hand crews • One midsized helicopter with five firefighters trained in rappelling • One small helicopter with three crew members • 14 smoke jumpers • One air tanker

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Boys & Girls Club moving during repairs By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

The Bend branch of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon will move to a temporary location starting Monday while storm damage is repaired at the old Bend gym. “It’s a difficult situation, but we’re making the best of it,� said Derek Beauvais, club director of the Bend branch. “There’s definitely been an outpouring of support by people and groups in the community.� The club’s programs will be held at the United Methodist Church at 680 N.W. Bond St. — a short distance from the club’s building at 500 N.W. Wall St. See Club / C5


C2 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Homeless program draws ire

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF BUBBLES

OREGON FORESTS

DeFazio’s plan would split land to help counties

The Associated Press MEDFORD — The Salvation Army’s program in a Medford park to feed homeless people has drawn the ire of city leaders who say the food giveaway draws in the wrong element. The Salvation Army says 70 percent of the people its program serves are younger than 21. The Medford Mail Tribune reported the city has already begun to take steps to limit food distribution programs. City staff has been asked to form recommendations that would regulate food distribution in parks. Salvation Army spokeswoman Jackie Agee says the giveaway’s clientele are polite and do not cause problems. The city’s police chief says he doesn’t think the majority of those who use the food handout programs cause trouble. Homeless people have been involved in three violent park incidents since May.

The Associated Press

Larry Steagall / Kitsap Sun

Reanne Eames, of Gig Harbor, Wash., blows bubbles under a cloudy sky at dusk in Silverdale, Wash., earlier this week. Skies should be mostly clear throughout the Northwest today. Central Oregon is expected to be sunny all week. For more details on the area’s weather, turn to Page C6.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 7:09 a.m. Aug. 16, in the 21300 block of Livingston Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 8:30 a.m. Aug. 16, in the 3000 block of Northeast Fairmont Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:53 a.m. Aug. 16, in the 21300 block of Bartlett Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 10:51 a.m. Aug. 16, in the 3100 block of Northeast Richmond Court. Theft — A laptop was reported stolen at 12:16 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 800 block of Northwest Brooks Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 12:35 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 3000 block of Northeast Royal Court. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 12:56 p.m. Aug. 16, in the area of Northeast Elk Court and Northeast Lotus Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:15 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 800 block of Northeast Watt Way. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 1:41 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 2000 block of Northwest First Street. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 3:13 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 600 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 4:21 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 300 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an

arrest made at 5:09 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 20600 block of Hawkin Place. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:25 p.m. Aug. 16, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Revere Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and gasoline stolen at 7:30 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 1700 block of Northeast Providence Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 7:40 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:10 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 61100 block of Parrell Road. DUII — Breanna Beverly Jones, 20, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:26 p.m. Aug. 16, in the area of Empire Avenue and U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Daniel Dean Dolf, 44, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:39 p.m. Aug. 16, in the 1100 block of Southeast Third Street. DUII — Ryan Deraldine Butler, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:26 a.m. Aug. 17, in the area of Northwest Harriman Street and Northwest Oregon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 8:36 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 900 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:21 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 2300 block of Northeast Mary Rose Place. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 9:30 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 61000 block of Brosterhous Road. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:08 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 3200 block of Northeast Manchester Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:06 a.m. Aug. 17, in the

60800 block of Zircon Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:02 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 2500 block of Northeast Butler Market Road. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 4:36 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 500 block of Northeast 15th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:33 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 1600 block of Northeast Canyon Park Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:56 a.m. Aug. 18, in the 1000 block of Northeast Fifth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 6:06 a.m. Aug. 18, in the 100 block of Northwest Greeley Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:13 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 200 block of Southwest 17th Street. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:05 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 2100 block of Northwest Quince Place. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:17 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 1500 block of Northwest Fir Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:59 p.m. Aug. 17, in the area of Southwest 28th Street and Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:11 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 3000 block of Southwest 32nd Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:09 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 1:48 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 2300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:07 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 100 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 12:02 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 2500

Hitler given sole executive power in 1934 The Associated Press Today is Friday, Aug. 19, the 231st day of 2011. There are 134 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Aug. 19, 1991, Soviet hard-liners made the stunning announcement that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev had been removed from power. (The coup attempt collapsed two days later with Gorbachev temporarily restored as leader until the dissolution of the Soviet Union in December 1991.) ON THIS DATE In 1812, the USS Constitution defeated the British frigate Guerriere off Nova Scotia during the War of 1812. In 1934, a plebiscite in Germany approved the vesting of sole executive power in Adolf Hitler. In 1936, the first of a series of show trials orchestrated by Soviet leader Josef Stalin began in Moscow as 16 defendants faced charges of conspiring against the government (all were convicted and executed). In 1951, the owner of the St. Louis Browns, Bill Veeck, sent in Eddie Gaedel, a 3-foot-7 dwarf, to pinch-hit in a game against Detroit. (In his only major league at-bat, Gaedel walked on four pitches and was replaced at first

T O D AY IN HISTORY base by a pinch-runner.) In 1960, a tribunal in Moscow convicted American U2 pilot Francis Gary Powers of espionage. (Powers was returned to the United States in 1962 as part of a prisoner exchange.) In 1980, 301 people aboard a Saudi Arabian L-1011 died as the jetliner made a fiery emergency return to the Riyadh airport. In 1991, rioting erupted in the Brooklyn, N.Y., Crown Heights neighborhood after a black 7-yearold, Gavin Cato, was struck and killed by a Jewish driver from the ultra-Orthodox Lubavitch community; three hours later, a gang of blacks fatally stabbed Yankel Rosenbaum, a rabinnical student. TEN YEARS AGO An underground methane and coal dust explosion in Ukraine killed 55 miners. FIVE YEARS AGO Israeli commandos raided a Hezbollah stronghold deep in Lebanon. (Israel said the raid was launched to stop arms smuggling from Iran and Syria to the militant Shiite fighters; Lebanon called the operation a “flagrant violation” of a U.N. truce.)

ONE YEAR AGO The last American combat brigade exited Iraq, seven years and five months after the U.S.led invasion began. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Rock musician Ginger Baker (Cream, Blind Faith) is 72. Actress Jill St. John is 71. Actor and former U.S. Sen. Fred Thompson is 69. Country singer-songwriter Eddy Raven is 67. Rock singer Ian Gillan (Deep Purple) is 66. Former President Bill Clinton is 65. Rock musician John Deacon (Queen) is 60. Political consultant Mary Matalin is 58. Actor Peter Gallagher is 56. Rhythm-and-blues singer Ivan Neville is 52. Actor John Stamos is 48. Actress Kyra Sedgwick is 46. Country singer Lee Ann Womack is 45. Country singersongwriter Mark McGuinn is 43. Actor Matthew Perry is 42. Country singer Clay Walker is 42. Rapper Fat Joe is 41. Actress Tracie Thoms is 36. Country singer Rissi Palmer is 30. Actress Erika Christensen is 29. Pop singer Missy Higgins is 28. Country singer Karli Osborn is 27. Rapper Romeo is 22. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Cheer up! The worst is yet to come!” — Philander Chase Johnson, American author (1866-1939)

block of Southwest 27th Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 9:29 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 1400 block of Northeast Third Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:20 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 600 block of Northwest Hemlock Avenue.

EUGENE — An Oregon congressman has proposed a plan he said will keep logging and conservation interests happy while clearing the legal logjam that has stopped progress on talks among those groups and left timber-dependent counties nervous. They need to find a solution soon, as federal payments to counties are set to end this year and Congress is unlikely to renew them. The timber industry says the current proposed federal solution doesn’t allow enough logging on the 2.2 million acres of Oregon forests administered by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Conservation interests argue it doesn’t meet federal environmental requirements. The most recent management strategy is bogged down in lawsuits from both sides, while counties eye the looming expiration of the timber money that pays for roads and schools. The Eugene RegisterGuard reported U.S. Rep. Peter DeFazio says splitting Western Oregon lands in half will solve the problem. Half would be managed for timber revenue, and the other half would be given to environmental interests. Each half would be man-

aged by a three-person board selected by the U.S. secretary of the Interior. The idea was first proposed by longtime environmental activist Andy Stahl in 2006. Among the benefits of such a plan would be money to the state from land leased to a timber company, money saved by the Bureau of Land Management to manage the area and initial money sent back to Congress in exchange for extending the benefits plans to the 18 timber-dependent O&C Counties of Western Oregon. The Secure Rural Schools Act authorized five annual payments to timber counties around the country that have seen declining revenue coming from national forests. The O&C Counties in Oregon get additional money because they also received a share of revenues from timber cut on lands managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. The O&C Counties of Western Oregon learned in June that they will be sharing only $40 million in their final payment under a federal safety net program. They had been told it would be $51.6 million.

Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 12:41 p.m. Aug. 17, in the area of state Highway 126. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported and a vehicle was reported stolen at 9:19 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 21500 block of Morrill Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:42 p.m. Aug. 17, in the 53300 block of Pole Pine Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:33 a.m. Aug. 17, in the 100 block of West Cascade Avenue in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:09 a.m. Aug. 17, in the area of Northwest 43rd Street and Northwest Chinook Drive in Terrebonne.

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

SHERIFF’S CITIZENS’ ACADEMY ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS NOW

Oregon State Police

DUII — Christopher T. Rosales, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:36 p.m. Aug. 17, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Robal Road.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 8:26 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 145 Northwest Jefferson Place. 14 — Medical aid calls. Wednesday 1:22 p.m. — Passenger vehicle fire, 2500 Northeast U.S. Highway 20. 18 — Medical aid calls.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office invites you to attend the next Citizens’ Academy. Wednesday Nights, September 14 - November 16, 2011 6:00 - 9:00 pm at the main Sheriff’s Office in Bend. Applications and additional information can be obtained at the Sheriff’s Office in Bend, 63333 West Highway 20, or from our Web site: www.sheriff.deschutes.org (Select the link for “Community” and then click on “Citizens’ Academy”)

Deadline for applications: August 31, 2011


THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 C3

O I B Salem shutters cancer patient’s garage sales SALEM — A Salem woman who held backyard garage sales to help pay her bills for terminal bone marrow cancer has received a shutdown notice from the city of Salem. KATU-TV reported Jan Cline lost her job and was looking for extra income after her cancer diagnosis. Her illness causes holes in her bones that leave them vulnerable to fractures. Cline says the garage sales were bringing in several hundred dollars each weekend until a neighbor complained. The city says its rules are intended to prevent permanent flea market-type sales on residential properties. It limits residents to three yard sales per year.

Man who threw rocks at girls is released MEDFORD — A homeless man who is believed to have set off an Oregon town’s worst fire in a century has been released from jail after serving two weeks of an eight-month sentence on unrelated charges. The Medford Mail Tribune reported 41-year-old John Thiry was released from the Jackson County Jail because of overcrowding. He was serving a sentence for throwing rocks at two middle school girls in May. In a previous trial, a judge said that Thiry was in all likelihood responsible for a 2010 fire that burned 11 homes, but that prosecutors did not prove he was consciously aware of the damage that would result. Thiry was acquitted of the charges. A prosecutor says Thiry likely suffers from alcoholism and mental illness, but the county cannot require treatment.

Police explode suspect device in Portland park PORTLAND — The Portland police bomb squad detonated a suspicious device in a north Portland park and is searching for evidence of other potential explosives. Portland police say they found a soda bottle wrapped in tape Thursday morning that appeared to have exploded. They also found two tennis balls wrapped in tape with an exposed wire. One of the tennis balls appeared to have been set off. The bomb squad detonated the second tennis ball. No one was injured.

Charging stations expand to rural sites Installation in smaller cities will allow electric car users to take faster trips By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

Charging stations that can fill up the batteries of an electric car in 30 minutes or faster are moving from the city to the country. The Oregon Department of Transportation announced Thursday that a $2 million federal stimulus grant will finance 22 fast-charging stations to be built next year in smaller cities in the northwestern corner of the state that will allow electric car owners to go on vacation to the coast or the mountains and home again without having to stop overnight to charge up. This comes on top of plans to build fast-charging stations along Interstate 5 the length of Oregon and Washington by the end of this year. “Electric cars are often seen as city vehicles,” said Kristen Helsel, vice president of EV solutions for AeroVironment Inc., the Monrovia, Calif., company that is building the fast-charging stations. “What this does is it extends the range so you can go from one corridor to another. It completely changes how EVs can be used.”

Oregon the first Oregon is the first state to get this kind of grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation, said spokesman Bill Adams.

So far, there are only two fastchargers in the state, both in Portland. Eight more are slated to go online by the end of October along Interstate 5 between Eugene and the California border. The stations are gathering key data on how people use their electric cars, to plan for the future. This new group of fast-charging stations will cover an area radiating out from Portland, stretching 80 miles to the northwest, 50 miles to the east, and 120 miles south. Stations will be no more than 50 miles apart, well within the 70- to 100-mile range of the Nissan Leaf. Each station will be located at a place offering restrooms and a convenience store. They will be able to handle only one car at a time. But with just an estimated 800 electric cars of various stripes spread among the nearly 4 million people in Oregon, the prospect for waiting lines is small for now. Analysts expect the numbers of electric vehicles to grow quickly as the charging infrastructure expands, making the technology more convenient. “I think we are either idling at the green light or just breaking off the starting line in this grand enterprise,” said George Beard, a Portland State University instructor who works on electric car issues. “Oregon is arguably

OPEN SAT & SUN 11-3

the U.S. Department of Energy, said current plans by car manufacturers for ramping up production of electric vehicles put the nation on track to top President Obama’s goal of 1 million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. Davis said there are very few fast-charging stations operating, but more than 4,000 Level 2 medium-fast chargers in private homes and public places. That number is growing by 1,000 a month in a program designed to build a total of 22,000.

Faster family trips

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

A Nissan Leaf charges at an electric vehicle charging station Thursday in Portland. With a $2 million federal grant to the Oregon Department of Transportation, more electric car fast-charging stations will be installed in the state’s northwestern corner. at the front of the wave.” Level 1 car chargers use 110 volts, like a regular home outlet, and will charge a vehicle overnight. Level 2 uses 240 volts, like a home dryer or range, and will charge a car in three or four

hours. Level 3 uses 480 volts and can take a Nissan Leaf’s 45 kilowatt battery from a 20 percent charge to 80 percent in under 30 minutes. Pat Davis, who heads the vehicle technologies program for

Justin Denley is an information technology specialist for a credit union in Medford. He and his wife traded in a four-wheel drive pickup truck and bought a Nissan Leaf this year to cut their spending on gasoline. He mostly uses it to commute about four miles to work, but recently piled the family in for the 125-mile drive to the coast to show the car to relatives. To make what is a three-hour trip in a conventional car, they had to stop overnight at an RV park, where they slept in a teepee while the car charged. He can’t wait for the fastcharging stations to go online along Interstate 5 this fall. “That’s a key thing that has to happen for most people who want to adopt this technology,” he said. “Range anxiety (the fear of getting stranded) is a real thing. “People want to be able to go farther.”

OPEN SAT 1-4 & SUN 2-6

OPEN SATURDAY 1-4

5 Tour of Home™ Awards Winner! Move in Ready. Earth Advantage & Energy Star 3 bedroom, 2 bath single level. 3-sided gas fireplace, hardwood flooring & Alder cabinetry. Covered porches, 2-car garage. MLS# 201104044 $299,900 DIRECTIONS: West on Shevlin Park Rd. south on NW Crossing Dr. 2475 NW Crossing Dr.

NW Crossing, 3500+ sq. ft. with unique open floor plan, 4 bedroom suites, office, open kitchen, dining & living space. Private back patio. Guest suite with full kitchen. MLS# 201106794 $759,000 DIRECTIONS: Newport to Shevlin Park Rd, left on Mt. Washington, left on NW Shields. 2572 NW Shields Drive.

Single level home on 4.71 acres. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2124 sq. ft. 5-stall barn, close to BLM land. Recently remodeled. MLS# 201008335 $549,900

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DIANE ROBINSON, BROKER, ABR 541-419-8165

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OPEN SAT & SUN 11-3

Sunrise Village home with Cascade views. Easy access to recreation, shopping & dining. Spacious open floor plan. Nicely landscaped .48 acre lot. MLS# 201103322 $449,000 DIRECTIONS: Century Dr, Left on Mammoth, Left on Sunshine Way. 19676 Sunshine Way.

Great horse ready home a block away from BLM land. This home has new roof, new flooring, windows, doors, light fixtures and interior paint and sits on 2 acres. MLS# 201104068 $174,900 DIRECTIONS: Powell Butte Hwy, right on McGrath Rd., left on Chaparrel Dr., right to 23060 Tumbleweed Dr.

Dungeness crab haul is 2nd-most valuable COOS BAY — The annual Dungeness crab harvest on the Oregon Coast was down a bit from last year but higher prices made it the second-most valuable crab season in state history. The Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission says the 325-boat fleet landed more than 21 million pounds of the crabs in the ninemonth season that ended Sunday. The average annual harvest over the past 30 years is about 12 million pounds. The commission says this year’s harvest is worth nearly $49 million to crabbers, second only to the record harvest in 2005 when crabbers landed nearly 34 million pounds worth $53 million.

Climber rescued from site of teen’s fatal fall PORTLAND — A Portland fire rescue team plucked a weary climber from a ledge on a cliff from which two nights earlier a teenager fell and later died. The fire bureau says 40-yearold Daniel Martinek got tired Wednesday rappelling from Rocky Butte, a 600-foot rise where mountain climbers practice on quarried faces. The bureau says Martinek’s climbing partner, at the top of the cliff, lowered him to the ledge 50 feet below as darkness fell and then summoned help. Seventeen firefighters, including members of a rope rescue team, spent two hours getting him down. The bureau says the climbers were not aware of the death Monday night of a 16-year-old who was hanging out with a friend and fell 80 feet. In May, a climber died in a fall from the cliff. — From wire reports

JOHN KELLEY, BROKER 541-948-0062

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BROKEN TOP - Wonderful home on 17th fairway. Expansive deck with views of golf course, lake & mountains. Many upgrades!! 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 4100 sq. ft. Master on main, bonus/game room. MLS# 201104488 $849,000 DIRECTIONS: Pick up map at gatehouse. 19502 Green Lakes Loop.

Unsurpassed & unobstructed Cascade views high up on Awbrey Butte. 1.05 acres. Very quiet, private setting. 2400 sq. ft. of deck on 2 levels. 4 bedroom suites, master on the main, 4881 sq. ft. MLS# 201105004 $1,100,000 DIRECTIONS: Summit Dr. to Promontory to Three Sisters Dr. 2819 Three Sisters Dr.

NW CROSSING, captures mountain views! 2801 sq. ft. 4 bedroom, 3 bath, granite, wood floors & cabinets, stainless steel appliances, with 3-car garage. MLS# 201106672 $449,900 DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington Dr. to NW Lemhi Pass Dr., right to NW Silas Pl., left to NW 2432 Sacagawea Lane

Home for All Seasons - 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1 level-no steps. Huge master, great kitchen. Water feature, covered patio, 3-car garage, RV pad, power & dump. A/C. MLS# 201106468 $299,000 DIRECTIONS: East on Reed Market, north on Pettigrew Rd, left on Airpark Dr, R on Harley Ln, right to 346 SE Sena Court.

SUSAN AGLI, BROKER, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

JOHN KELLEY, BROKER 541-948-0062

BONNIE SAVICKAS, BROKER 541-408-7537

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C4 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Questionable change for Bend neighborhoods

S

ome of Bend’s neighborhood associations want to start getting political, perhaps endorsing City Council candidates or ballot measures. Problem is, as quasi-government

agencies, they cannot legally do so. Thus the Bend City Council on Wednesday began what it says is the process of separating the neighborhoods from the city government that created them. A final vote on the matter will come this fall. In reality, almost nothing about the relationship will change, and what does actually change is legally questionable. The things the city will do: The city will continue to pay the associations to communicate with those who live within the neighborhoods and has allotted $38,000 in its current two-year budget for doing so. The city will continue to do the budgeting for the associations, continue to mail out their bills and reimburse them for their expenses. It will continue to provide communications support, and the associations will continue to be a formal part of the city’s land-use process. The things it won’t do: It won’t have a half-time employee working for the associations, and it won’t provide leadership training. As for the associations, they get two things out of the shift. Their public records will become secret, even though their money comes from the city. That’s a legally questionable proposition, one that may be chal-

lenged in the months ahead. And they will be able to endorse candidates and measures. We truly wonder if the city has thought that latter part through very carefully. Does it really want groups funded by the city picking favorites? We cannot believe it does. If the associations are truly independent, if the city quits paying them to communicate, quits giving them special recognition at City Council meetings and in the land use process, quits giving them communications advice, even charges them for the neighborhood signs the city has paid for, cuts every single tie it has to the associations, then their involvement in politics is no big deal. They cannot gain that independence by the kind of change the city is using now, however. Until city officials get real about the change and really change the relationship between neighborhoods and city government, their “independence” is far more a matter of appearance than fact.

Renewable triumph at a cost for O. Tech G

ov. John Kitzhaber helped the Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls celebrate Thursday a step toward making the campus 100 percent renewable. It’s part of a $27 million project of solar systems at OIT, Oregon State University and Eastern Oregon University. Kitzhaber didn’t have to stretch to come up with all sorts of reasons why it’s worth it. Don’t kid yourself that if measured in purely financial terms that it would make sense. But let’s focus first on what it does do. When the solar project is done at OIT, it will be a first-in-the-nation renewable accomplishment for a public university. Combining the solar energy and its current geothermal energy, OIT will be able to produce 100 percent of its electricity and heating needs. The school can couple that triumph with its four-year renewable engineering degree to make OIT one of the best places to go to study renewable energy. That’s a proud achievement for Oregon’s higher education system. There are other benefits, of course.

Chief among them are the benefits of using renewable energy. No exhaustible resources get tapped. OIT gets energy independence. And investing in a solar project may contribute to more innovation to bring costs down and efficiency up. The projects helps out Oregon workers, too. The panels are built in Hillsboro, the inverters in Bend at PV Powered, and a Portland contractor is doing installation. Across the three schools, the solar projects are also estimated to save $6.6 million in energy costs over the minimum life of the solar project — 25 years. It’s only when you collapse the focus to the financial costs and the savings that the benefits are not as clearcut. The total cost was $27 million. State energy tax credits chipped in $13.5 million. Federal credits chipped in more. Savings will only be the $6.6 million. That doesn’t mean the project should have been canceled. Not at all. We hope this project moves us closer to when the savings on projects like these eclipse the investment.

My Nickel’s Worth Sweetheart deal for Prince The deal reached by Larry Prince’s attorney with the Deschutes County District Attorney’s office is a real sweetheart for the defendant but is a smack in the face to the citizens of Redmond. This man breached his duty of trust to his department and our community. In the past, we have seen citizens like the young man David Black sentenced to five years under measure 11 crimes — and the young mother who accidently rolled over on her newborn infant sentenced to an extended prison sentence. I have to ask: Where is the justice here when all Mr. Prince gets is $27,500 restitution, 100 hours of community service and 60 days in jail and he still gets his PERS retirement? One more nice concession to the unions, I’m sure. Did the prosecutors make a sweet deal because of the defendant’s former police status? One must ponder how such a sweet deal was reached when most other folks would have been thrown in the pokey for a lot longer. I hope Circuit Court Judge Barbara Haslinger considers the offer unacceptable and imposes a sentence more fitting to the crime. Patricia Oliver Redmond

Stick to teaching at COCC Central Oregon Community College is planning on expanding on-campus student housing from 100 beds to 300 in the next few years. There are very few community colleges in the U.S. that offer housing and only two in Oregon. The reason that

most community colleges do not offer on-campus housing is that community colleges were established to provide low-cost education for students who commute from their homes. COCC is no different; its stated mission is to provide postsecondary education for Central Oregon. Issues arise if COCC expands its student housing: 1. COCC will directly compete with rental property owners for the limited number of renters. Currently COCC charges about $515 for a 150-squarefoot shared room, excluding food. Reviewing the “roommates wanted” section of The Bulletin suggests that there is no shortage of inexpensive shared housing, even on the town’s west side. 2. Congregating 18- to 21-year-olds in one location may cause neighborhood problems. COCC has had issues with student housing in the past. In 2008, COCC took over management of its student housing in part because of dorm drug dealing arrests. 3. Educating is COCC’s core function. Anything that deviates from this is a potential distraction. COCC is not structured to be a landlord. It is organized to provide education. Given that COCC believes that Juniper Hall is reaching its end of life, maybe we should consider allowing the hall to revert to much-needed office space. Let COCC administrators know what you think. Sam Handelman Bend

Ugly labels for tea party Strong-arm, gangster-government tactics have begun. How interesting to see Central Oregon is not immune to Alinsky tactics.

The radical left is so intent on dominating America it has infiltrated every American community, even ours. We’re now witnessing the first step in what is to come. Saul Alinsky’s 13th tactical rule is “Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it and polarize it.” (“Rules for Radicals,” 1989.) It starts by threatening those who won’t succumb to the radical left’s beliefs. When threats fail, they marginalize, intimidate, demonize and finally use the courts. Let’s hope they end there. It doesn’t matter that conservatives believe in the exceptionalism of America, our Constitution and Bill of Rights. Nor does it matter that conservatives are our neighbors and friends working hard so everyone’s children can inherit the American dream. Conservatives are our community’s doctors, lawyers, business people, ministers, soldiers and Marines, day care providers, grocery clerks, nurses, conservationists and loggers — people providing us needed goods and services. Conservatives volunteer and give money generously to our community organizations like Hospice, Boys & Girls Clubs, Red Cross, search and rescue, and the Humane Society. Instead this administration labels conservatives terrorists, jihadists and racists and blames the tea party for its own failed policies. Locally, conservatives have been labeled “children” and idiots. What happened to the president’s call for civility in our discourse? Unfortunately, expect it to become uglier throughout 2012. I urge you to not fall victim to believing these gangster political tactics. Gladys I. Biglor Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Tea party extremists apt to block a deal on national debt By Richard Z. Belzer Bulletin guest columnist

B

y now, everyone in this country should certainly have a grip on how damaging religious extremism — of the Muslim variety — has been to our country. Is there any rational person who would believe that it is possible for us to hold a logical discussion with religious extremists? Take the Taliban — can you conceive a reasonable discussion of their treatment of women when God has told them (in their opinion) what a woman’s role should be? In observing the machinations of Congress over the past month as they tried (unsuccessfully, for the most part) to wrestle with our country’s growing deficit, it became readily obvious that religious extremists — of the tea party variety — were holding the entire coun-

try hostage to their belief that increasing revenue, even when combined with severe budget cuts, was completely and totally unacceptable. Cutting benefits of all kinds to the middle and lower class, a form of indirect taxation, was no problem. Increasing taxes on individuals earning over $250,000 a year? Absolutely and totally unacceptable. If you’re angry about the recent drop in the stock market and the first-ever downgrading of U.S. bonds by Standard & Poor’s, don’t blame the leaders of the House and Senate or the president. What [House Speaker] John Boehner was up against within his own party in the House of Representatives is exactly what we are fighting in Afghanistan — extremists who are willing to sacrifice anything to prove that they are right. So now Congress has established a bipartisan committee of 12 individuals

IN MY VIEW who are to craft a budget agreement that will stem the tide of increasing debt and put the country on a track of fiscal responsibility. The world will be watching and our economic recovery is, without a doubt, dependent on a deal being reached that will significantly reduce our deficit over the next 10 years. Perhaps this committee can find areas of compromise and accomplish its task by the November deadline. But that is just the first step; for such an agreement to become law, it will have to pass both the Democraticcontrolled Senate and the Republicancontrolled House and be signed by our Democratic president. But let’s not forget that we have been here before. First the president estab-

lished a bipartisan committee to address the budget and deficit. Its solution addressed structural issues with Social Security and Medicare and cut programs that were close to the hearts of both parties. It also recommended revenue increases. All in all, the committee did wonderful work on a difficult task, but its plan went absolutely nowhere in Congress. During the recent negotiations, the bipartisan Senate “Gang of Six” came up with the beginnings of a plan that would have cut roughly $4 trillion from the deficit over the coming decade. But it included revenue increases and was dead on arrival in the House. There is a saying that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. So now another bipartisan committee has been assigned the same

task — this time by law. I have already heard a statement by a House Republican leader to the effect that no Republican assigned to this new committee will be willing to negotiate when it comes to revenue increases — not a good beginning for a committee that must reach a consensus. But let’s assume that this committee achieves compromise on a plan that significantly cuts spending but combines it with some form of revenue increase. From what we have seen thus far, the fanatics of the “tea party religion” in the House are unlikely to allow such a compromise bill to pass. In all likelihood, Americans will be forced to stand by and watch as the tea party stands tall and throws the rest of us off a cliff. Richard Z. Belzer lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 C5

O    Pierre Louis Inghels

D N Doris Genelle Satterfield Larison, of Prineville Oct. 31, 1925 - Aug. 14, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A Graveside service was held on Thursday, August 18, 2011 at 1:00 p.m. at Hillcrest Memorial Park in Medford, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, Oregon, 97754.

Judith Ann Satow, of Prineville May 27, 1948 - Aug. 14, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: In accordance with her wishes, no service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Leo Stanely Biedron, of Redmond June 28, 1922 - Aug. 14, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Redmond Humane Society.

Marian Ruth Wright, of Bend Jan. 21, 1921 - Aug. 15, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Graveside Services will be held Monday, August 22, 2011 11:00 A.M. at Pilot Butte Cemetery.

Rinhold Henry Wirth, of Madras May 10, 1929 - Aug. 17, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals-Redmond 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Graveside: 11am, Sat., August 20, 2011, Terrebonne Pioneer Cemetery, Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne, Oregon.

Sister Martha Garber, formerly of Bend April 9, 1925 - Aug. 15, 2011 Arrangements: Young-Nichols Funeral Home, 216 W. Jefferson St., Tipton, Indiana 46072, is in charge of arrangements. 765-675-4780 Services: Visitation is at St. Joseph Center Chapel, Tipton, Indiana, Sunday, August 21, beginning at 4:00 p.m. with a Prayer Service at 6:00 p.m. Visitation will continue on Monday morning preceding the Mass of Christian Burial at 11:00 a.m., at which Fr. Keith Hosey will preside. Burial will be in the Cemetery at St. Joseph Center.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

June 5, 1920 - August 8, 2011 Pierre Inghels passed away peacefully in the presence of his wife, Leen and his daughter, Marlena InghelsBellavia on August 8, 2011. He was born in Ghent, Belgium. On June 8, 1950, he married Leen de Boevé. They spent the next 61 years in Belgium, the Congo and Oregon, moving to Bend in the Pierre Louis summer of Inghels 1996. Pierre was an Automotive Engineer and later worked as a contractor in La Grande, Oregon. Pierre was an avid genealogist, president of "The Belgian Researchers" and translated legal and official documents in nearly all the languages of Western and Central Europe. In Bend, he volunteered at Ronald McDonald House, was "Grandpa" to many of the babies at Grandma's House and distributed food through St. Vincent on a weekly basis. As a member of Red Cross International, he donated a total of 22 gallons of blood during his lifetime. He was an active member of Bend Kiwanis and a 4th degree member of the Knights of Columbus at St. Francis of Assisi, where he was also Eucharistic Minister. Pierre is survived by his wife, Leen, daughter, Marlena, son-in-law, Carmelo Bellavia of Bend, son, Peter Inghels, of Bisbee, Arizona and Patty Davey, of Omaha, Nebraska; four grandchildren, Heith Inghels, Sonja Golembiewski, Nicole McGowan, and Antoni Bellavia; two beautiful little great-granddaughters, Karyssa Inghels and Isabella McGowan, and one bonus great-grandson, John HurlesInghels. Also surviving are three sisters, Geneviève Inghels, Chantal VandenBosch, and Huguette Frusca, and was preceded in death by his siblings, Jean-Michel, Rev. Marcel Inghels, and Margot Watelet, all of Belgium. We extend our appreciation to Dr. Eric Schneider, Silver Crest Adult Family Home, and Partners In Care. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Partners In Care, Bend (Hospice) 541-383-3910. Holy Mass will be offered at Vespers on Saturday, August 27, at 5 p.m., St. Francis of Assisi, 2450 NE 27th, Bend, OR 97701. Celebration of Life will be held at Hospice House of Bend, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701, on September 18, 2011 at 2 p.m.

Marian Ruth Wright Jan. 21, 1921 – August 15, 2011 Marian Ruth Wright of Bend died Monday of natural causes, she was 90. A private graveside service will be held Monday August 22, 11:00 a.m. Mrs. Wright was born January 21, 1921, in Rush City, Minnesota, to Gustaf and Ellen Marian Wright Lindgren. She married Alvin Wright on April 26, 1951, in Redmond. Mrs. Wright was a loving homemaker, and enjoyed spending time with family and friends. Survivors include a son, Richard Wright of Bend; a daughter, Allura Moore of Alabama; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, and six brothers and sisters. Autumn Funerals of Bend is handling arrangements, 541-318-0842.

Edie Wasserman, 95, Gualtiero fervent philanthropist Jacopetti,

‘Mondo Cane’ filmmaker

By Valerie J. Nelson and Barbara Thomas Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Edie Wasserman, who was the widow of Hollywood powerhouse Lew Wasserman and who was known as a tireless benefactor for charitable causes, especially the Motion Picture and Television Fund, has died. She was 95. Wasserman died Thursday in Beverly Hills of natural causes, said her grandson, Casey Wasserman. “She was an incredible woman, sort of once in a lifetime,” he said. “She had very strong convictions and was dogged in her pursuit of those. And they usually involved helping others.” Actress Jamie Lee Curtis, who was her goddaughter, said in a statement: “The world lost a dynamic force for good in Hollywood. Her partnership and marriage to Lew Wasserman is one for the history books. “Her great philanthropic endeavors. … will bear beautiful fruit long after her passing,” Curtis said. “She was sweet and sharp, tough and tender. She was a unique and fascinating woman.” With her husband, Wasserman helped raise millions for the fund, which cares for aging actors and others in the industry. The fund publicly thanked the couple by naming its 40acre campus in the San Fernando Valley after them in 1998. In typical fashion, Edie — who preferred to stay out of the limelight — privately told the fund’s board: “If you find somebody to give more money than I’m giving, then change the name.” Decades after arriving in Los Angeles in the late 1930s, the Wassermans had become “the undisputed king and queen of Hollywood among the baroque society of Rodeo Drive,” Kathleen Sharp, author of a biography about the couple, told the Los Angeles Times in 2004. He was the longtime chief executive of MCA and president of Universal Studios, a former talent agent who emerged as the most powerful mogul in postWorld War II Hollywood. They were married for almost 66 years when he died at 89 in 2002. “Madame,” as her husband called her in their twilight years, was self-confident, spirited and politically astute, said Sharp, who titled the 2003 biog-

Fire season Continued from C1 Fire season on BLM- and Forest Service-managed lands in Central Oregon looks to remain slow at least until the end of the month, Saltenberger said. From Wednesday until next Friday, Saltenberger said there will likely be 15 wildfires in Central Oregon — fewer than the half of the 36 fires typically expected for the same stretch in late August. And he said there’s no reason to think any of those fires will become “large” fires, those that burn up to 1,200 acres of grassland or timber. “At this point Central Oregon doesn’t look like it is at risk for many large or costly wildfires,” Saltenberger said. There is a possibility of lightning next week, which probably will cause federal land managers to increase their fire danger warnings, he said. As of this week, the Central Oregon Interagency Dispatch

Fair Continued from C1 Despotopulos attributed the increase in paid and overall attendance to the good weather, the four concerts that were free to anyone who bought a ticket to the fair and a popular jumping dog competition. Fair attendance dipped during the recession, although

By Douglas Martin New York Times News Service

Los Angeles Times

Edie Wasserman at her home in Beverly Hills, Calif., in 1998. Wasserman, philanthropist and widow of Hollywood mogul Lew Wasserman, has died. She was 95. raphy “Mr. & Mrs. Hollywood.” Through her fundraising skills, Wasserman was instrumental in shaping the Music Center, CalArts and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, “helping to turn Los Angeles from a cow town to a cosmopolitan city,” Sharp said in 2004. The couple lived modestly despite their wealth, which only increased after entertainment conglomerate MCA was sold in 1990. Forbes magazine estimated his net worth at $500 million in 1998. Their Beverly Hills home was a rare extravagance they bought in 1960 for $400,000. From its living room, Wasserman formed the first Hollywood wives club long before the term had any negative connotation. Stars such as Janet Leigh, Polly Bergen and Rosemary Clooney shared back-lot secrets that Edie would pass on to Lew. With such social ties, Edie became — as actress Sharon Stone put it in 1998 — “the matriarch of the business in this town.” Edith Beckerman was born Nov. 4, 1915, in Cleveland. Her father was a lawyer with such show-business clients as Sophie Tucker and Guy Lombardo. Edie, who grew up in a tony part of Cleveland, liked to tell people that Lew was from the wrong side of the tracks but they “met in the middle because

my father was broke,” a reference to the Depression. She was making $18 a week at the May Co., and he was hiring bands for a local nightclub. Soon after they married in 1936, Lew was hired by Jules C. Stein, an ophthalmologist who founded the Music Corp. of America. Eventually, Lew became president and chief executive of MCA, spawning an empire that included movies, music, Universal Studios, theme parks and more. The Wassermans’ only child, Lynne Wasserman, carries on the family tradition of charity with her son, Casey, and daughter, Carol Leif, through the Wasserman Foundation, established in 1952. Casey, who serves as the foundation’s president, owns a sports management and marketing agency. He is involved in the effort to build an NFL stadium near Staples Center and bring a pro football team to Los Angeles. Edie and Lew’s tight circle of friends included Kirk and Anne Douglas and the late Roddy McDowall. Yet the guest list for their 50th anniversary bash in 1986 was a virtual “Who’s Who” of celebrity and power. Among the 700 attendees were Johnny Carson, Lucille Ball, California Sens. Alan Cranston and Pete Wilson, and one of Edie’s closest friends — Lady Bird Johnson.

Bend transients’ cook fire starts brush fire Windblown pieces of burning paper from a transient cook fire started a brush fire Thursday afternoon in east Bend that briefly caused the closure of Highway 20 and threatened a nearby church and power substation. The people who started the fire called 911 to report it at about 2:20 p.m. and tried to stop its spread, said T.J. Johannsen, a deputy fire marshal with the Bend Fire Department. With about 10 minutes of work, firefighters from Bend, the Oregon Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service stopped the blaze, which had consumed about two acres. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office closed the highway for about the same amount of time. The fire threatened the Christian Life Center and the east Bend substation, as well as power lines, Johannsen said. Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies cited the transients for reckless burning. — The Bulletin

Gualtiero Jacopetti, a filmmaker who titillated and disgusted moviegoers by roaming the globe to document bizarre, not to say creepy, phenomena — a chicken that smokes cigarettes, for instance — in the movie “Mondo Cane” and its sequels, died Wednesday at his home in Rome. He was 91. His death was widely reported in the Italian press. Jacopetti liked to say he had invented the “anti-documentary” or the “shockumentary” with “Mondo Cane,” which was unveiled, and well-received, at the 1962 Cannes Film Festival. He showed Italian villagers slicing themselves with glass in observance of Good Friday; the French painter Yves Klein using naked women as paintbrushes; and New Yorkers dining on insects in a posh restaurant. The narration was droll and the images were ironic: A bereaved mother in New Guinea nurses a suckling pig, immediately followed by the wholesale slaughter of pigs for an orgy of feasting in the same region. Jacopetti called such transitions “shock cuts.” Another scene shows people mourning in a pet cemetery in Pasadena, Calif. Cut to shots of customers savoring roast dog at a Taiwanese restaurant. Jacopetti made “Mondo Cane,” which translates as “a dog’s world,” with Franco Prosperi and Paolo Cavara, who also collaborated with him on other films. It was distinguished by a jazzy score by Nino Oliviero and Riz Ortolani, whose theme song, “More,” was nominated for an Academy Award. Bosley Crowther of The New York Times called it a “gigantic motion picture.” Judith Crist of The New York Herald Tribune called it pretty much everything: “Bizarre and barbaric, macabre and gruesome, ironic, hilarious, bloodstained, unconventional, provocative and controversial.”

Club

Center only had extreme fire danger listed for the Deschutes River, which is lined by grassland that typically dries out in early summer. The center handles fires on the Bureau of Land Management’s Prineville District, the Deschutes and Ochoco national forests and land near Bend managed by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

By this time of year there usually is a higher fire danger, said Juanita Johnson, acting assistant center manager. “It’s definitely not your average fire season for Central Oregon,” she said.

the low point in 2009 was also the result of lightning, wind and rain that forced the fair to close early on two days. The wind blew apart tents, and rain flooded the rodeo grounds. Mike Schiel, a member of the Deschutes County Fair Association board, cited affordability and good weather as two reasons for this year’s success. Schiel is also a member of the county board that oversees the Deschutes

County fairgrounds facilities. “We made real efforts to keep costs down,” Schiel said Thursday. “I know we haven’t yet recovered fully, but I think people understand the fair is something special, and there’s a real value to so much free stuff that happens at the fair.”

Continued from C1 On Aug. 4, the building was severely damaged during a torrential storm. The roof was being repaired at the time, and rainwater seeped in. The club decided to move its programs temporarily in order to speed up repair work. Programming will continue as usual at the new location. Beauvais said the church, which offers a gym and rooms for art and games, will fully accommodate the 210 children in the program. The club will continue to meet at the church through the end of September. However, it is not yet known how long repairs will take and when, exactly, the club will be able to return to the old Bend gym, Beauvais said. “Our hopes are optimistic,” Beauvais said. “We’re hoping to get back into our building as soon as possible.” Parents are asked to drop off and pick up their children at the new location starting Monday. Parking will be available on the church’s south side in the main lot. The club needs volunteers to help move equipment and supplies to the new location today from 3 to 6 p.m. Those interested in helping can contact Lisa Burbidge at 541-617-2877.

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Dylan J. Darling can be reached at 541-617-7812 or at ddarling@bendbulletin.com.


WE

C6 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A T H ER

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, AUGUST 19

SATURDAY

Today: Sunny.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

85

46

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

87/49

80/53

87/53

66/48

80s Warm Springs

Marion Forks

88/53

81/53

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

88/48

86/51

Camp Sherman 80/43 Redmond Prineville 85/46 Cascadia 87/47 84/57 Sisters 83/45 Bend 70s Post 85/46

Oakridge Elk Lake 82/55

73/34

Expect morning clouds along the coast, but it will be sunny inland. Central

87/52

82/42

83/44

83/42

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

81/41

Fort Rock

Chemult 81/40

Vancouver 73/54

70/45

Seattle Missoula 81/44

80/43

Helena Bend

80s

85/50

93/51

Reno

80s

85/45

Idaho Falls Elko

97/65

84/45

Silver Lake

70s

88/52

Redding Christmas Valley

79/47

Boise

85/46

91/56

Mostly sunny skies will be San Francisco 63/55 the rule today.

Crater Lake 72/45

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:13 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:04 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:15 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:02 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 10:21 p.m. Moonset today . . . 12:18 p.m.

City

76/56

Eugene Look for abundant 81/52 sunshine and warm temGrants Pass peratures. 88/54 Eastern

Salt Lake City

90s

LOW

91/68

HIGH

Last

New

First

Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Full

Sept. 12

HIGH

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 68/59/0.00 . . . . . 75/54/pc. . . . . . . 71/56/c Baker City . . . . . . 82/40/0.00 . . . . . . 83/47/s. . . . . . . 88/51/s Brookings . . . . . . 64/52/0.00 . . . . . 66/54/pc. . . . . . 64/54/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 86/49/0.00 . . . . . . 85/54/s. . . . . . . 90/57/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 82/44/0.00 . . . . . . 81/52/s. . . . . . . 87/56/s Klamath Falls . . . 84/47/0.00 . . . . . . 84/51/s. . . . . . . 90/52/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 84/48/0.00 . . . . . . 88/53/s. . . . . . 90/55/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 88/32/0.00 . . . . . . 83/42/s. . . . . . . 84/41/s Medford . . . . . . . 91/55/0.00 . . . . . . 93/58/s. . . . . . . 99/61/s Newport . . . . . . . 64/43/0.00 . . . . . 60/56/pc. . . . . . 62/56/pc North Bend . . . . . 64/46/0.00 . . . . . . 66/53/c. . . . . . 65/53/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 93/62/0.00 . . . . . . 89/57/s. . . . . . . 92/61/s Pendleton . . . . . . 85/50/0.00 . . . . . . 88/51/s. . . . . . . 89/55/s Portland . . . . . . . 78/56/0.00 . . . . . . 80/58/s. . . . . . . 86/59/s Prineville . . . . . . . 81/45/0.00 . . . . . . 87/47/s. . . . . . . 86/47/s Redmond. . . . . . . 84/41/0.00 . . . . . . 84/48/s. . . . . . . 87/48/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 84/52/0.00 . . . . . . 86/55/s. . . . . . . 92/56/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 80/52/0.00 . . . . . . 83/53/s. . . . . . . 87/56/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 81/43/0.00 . . . . . . 83/45/s. . . . . . . 82/49/s The Dalles . . . . . . 86/56/0.00 . . . . . . 87/59/s. . . . . . . 90/60/s

TEMPERATURE

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

7

MEDIUM 2

HIGH

4

6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81/47 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 in 1977 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.01” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 in 1973 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.36” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.66” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 7.14” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.07 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.51 in 1975 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.......Ext. Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine.................................Ext. Redmond/Madras..........High Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

89 48

FIRE INDEX

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Sunny.

90 49

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:55 a.m. . . . . . .7:23 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .6:19 a.m. . . . . . .8:11 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .2:17 a.m. . . . . . .5:43 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .10:44 p.m. . . . . .12:41 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:16 a.m. . . . . . .9:54 p.m. Uranus . . . . . . .9:18 p.m. . . . . . .9:33 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Portland

84/44

76/36

Yesterday’s state extremes • 93° Ontario • 32° La Pine

Mostly sunny.

90 50

BEND ALMANAC

80/58

Burns

La Pine

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

83/43

Brothers

82/43

LOW

89 48

NORTHWEST

Paulina

83/44

Sunriver

HIGH

TUESDAY

Sunny.

A ridge of high pressure will promote sunny skies over most of the region today. 60s

MONDAY

Sunny.

Tonight: Clear.

HIGH

STATE

SUNDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,005 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126,826 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 84,637 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 32,990 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123,410 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,620 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89.3 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,990 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.2 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 73/54

S

S

Calgary 70/45

S

Saskatoon 67/47

Seattle 76/56

S

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 77/57

Winnipeg 72/46

Halifax 81/61 Portland Billings (in the 48 To ronto Portland 80/61 79/53 contiguous states): 84/63 80/58 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 83/52 82/58 Boise 84/70 Buffalo Rapid City 88/52 • 114° 81/67 New York 77/58 Detroit 85/70 83/67 Des Moines Needles, Calif. Cheyenne Philadelphia 86/65 Chicago 83/56 Columbus 88/68 • 31° 84/69 Omaha 86/65 San Francisco Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. 87/67 Stanley, Idaho 63/55 City 89/71 Las Louisville Denver 91/68 • 3.77” Kansas City Vegas 93/73 88/65 St. Louis 91/73 104/80 Sanford, Fla. Charlotte 90/71 91/67 Albuquerque Los Angeles Nashville Oklahoma City Little Rock 93/67 75/64 93/72 107/78 99/77 Phoenix Atlanta 110/88 Honolulu 92/71 Birmingham 88/73 Dallas Tijuana 94/73 106/86 84/62 New Orleans 95/77 Orlando Houston 94/77 Chihuahua 102/80 93/65 Miami 89/79 Monterrey La Paz 100/75 96/76 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/77 60/52 Juneau 56/53 Bismarck 72/50

Thunder Bay 82/54

FRONTS

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .100/77/0.00 . .103/78/s . 102/78/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .83/63/0.00 . 82/62/pc . . . .85/60/t Albany. . . . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .85/62/t . . 85/63/pc Albuquerque. . . .92/67/0.00 . 93/67/pc . . . .93/66/t Anchorage . . . . .63/52/0.01 . . .60/52/r . . . .62/51/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .92/72/0.00 . 92/71/pc . . 94/70/pc Atlantic City . . . .85/71/0.00 . . .84/71/t . . 88/70/pc Austin . . . . . . . .104/68/0.00 . .102/75/s . 102/73/pc Baltimore . . . . . .88/70/0.32 . . .89/73/t . . . .89/73/t Billings. . . . . . . . .86/59/0.00 . 79/53/pc . . 84/56/pc Birmingham . . . .95/71/0.00 . 94/73/pc . . 95/74/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . 72/50/pc . . 75/55/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .92/59/0.00 . . .88/52/s . . . 91/56/s Boston. . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . 84/70/pc . . 85/67/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .81/70/0.00 . . .83/67/t . . 82/68/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 81/67/pc . . . .81/66/t Burlington, VT. . .84/60/0.00 . 85/58/pc . . 84/60/pc Caribou, ME . . . .81/51/0.00 . 81/56/pc . . 81/58/pc Charleston, SC . .90/73/0.00 . 91/74/pc . . 92/74/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .91/67/t . . . .93/70/t Chattanooga. . . .96/69/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . 96/72/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .91/55/0.00 . . .83/56/t . . 78/56/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . . .84/69/t . . 79/67/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .89/63/0.00 . . .87/65/t . . . .85/68/t Cleveland . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . 82/66/pc . . 83/66/pc Colorado Springs 93/58/0.00 . 88/59/pc . . . .82/59/t Columbia, MO . .91/64/0.00 . . .90/70/t . . . .87/68/t Columbia, SC . . .93/67/0.00 . 94/71/pc . . . .95/71/t Columbus, GA. . .94/74/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . . 96/75/s Columbus, OH. . .87/65/0.00 . 86/65/pc . . 84/68/pc Concord, NH . . . .87/53/0.00 . 86/58/pc . . 86/61/pc Corpus Christi. .100/75/0.00 . 99/76/pc . . . 98/77/s Dallas Ft Worth 106/81/0.00 . .106/86/s . 105/81/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . 85/65/pc . . 85/67/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .98/64/0.00 . 88/65/pc . . . .86/66/t Des Moines. . . . .87/67/0.11 . . .86/65/t . . 80/63/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .84/64/0.06 . . .83/67/s . . 83/68/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .79/56/0.00 . 73/50/pc . . . 73/52/s El Paso. . . . . . . . .98/74/0.00 . 97/73/pc . . 96/73/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .67/52/0.03 . 71/50/pc . . 61/48/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .86/61/0.00 . 77/54/pc . . 77/55/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .81/53/t . . . .81/53/t

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Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .83/64/0.01 . 82/62/pc . . . .80/61/t Rapid City . . . . . .94/58/0.00 . 77/58/pc . . 77/61/pc Savannah . . . . . .92/73/0.14 . 93/73/pc . . 95/73/pc Green Bay. . . . . .83/55/0.04 . . .82/58/t . . . .76/58/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .94/56/0.00 . . .91/56/s . . . 92/57/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .76/56/s . . . 81/57/s Greensboro. . . . .89/68/0.00 . . .87/67/t . . 89/68/pc Richmond . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . . .88/68/t . . . .90/67/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .81/64/0.07 . 77/55/pc . . 76/57/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . .85/65/t . . 85/66/sh Rochester, NY . . .83/61/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . 84/66/pc Spokane . . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . .83/50/s . . . 87/55/s Hartford, CT . . . .84/65/0.00 . . .85/67/t . . 86/65/pc Sacramento. . . . .94/59/0.00 . . .86/57/s . . . 89/57/s Springfield, MO. .96/73/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . 91/71/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .85/51/0.00 . . .79/47/s . . . 85/53/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .94/72/0.00 . 90/71/pc . . . .90/70/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .92/78/0.00 . 93/75/pc . . . .93/76/t Honolulu . . . . . . .89/75/0.00 . . .88/73/s . . . 88/74/s Salt Lake City . . .93/62/0.00 . 91/68/pc . . 92/67/pc Tucson. . . . . . . .104/75/0.01 . . .99/77/t . . . .98/76/t Houston . . . . . .104/81/0.00 102/80/pc . 101/79/pc San Antonio . . .102/76/0.00 . .101/77/s . . 100/77/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . .102/76/0.04 . .108/78/s . 103/75/pc Huntsville . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . 94/72/pc San Diego . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . 76/64/pc . . 70/64/pc Washington, DC .91/74/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . . .90/72/t Indianapolis . . . .91/71/0.00 . . .88/68/t . . 88/69/pc San Francisco . . .66/55/0.00 . . .66/54/c . . 67/55/pc Wichita . . . . . . .101/74/0.00 . .102/75/s . . 90/75/pc Jackson, MS . . . .97/72/0.41 . 96/76/pc . . 97/75/pc San Jose . . . . . . .79/60/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 80/58/s Yakima . . . . . . . .88/46/0.00 . . .85/52/s . . . 90/54/s Jacksonville. . . . .90/73/0.10 . 93/76/pc . . . .94/79/t Santa Fe . . . . . . .91/58/0.00 . . .84/60/t . . 83/60/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .113/88/0.00 111/80/pc . . 107/80/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . . .56/53/r . . . .58/51/r Kansas City. . . . .90/68/0.00 . . .91/73/s . . . .85/70/t Lansing . . . . . . . .83/64/0.05 . 84/62/pc . . . .82/61/t Amsterdam. . . . .63/57/0.00 . . .65/53/s . . 73/55/pc Mecca . . . . . . . .108/84/0.00 108/86/pc . . 108/85/s Las Vegas . . . . .109/83/0.00 104/80/pc . . 101/78/s Athens. . . . . . . . .91/80/0.00 . . .89/72/s . . . 88/71/s Mexico City. . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .80/56/t . . . .80/58/t Lexington . . . . . .88/65/0.04 . . .87/69/t . . . .88/69/t Auckland. . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . .51/40/sh . . 52/40/pc Montreal. . . . . . .82/64/0.00 . . .82/64/s . . . 86/68/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .90/67/0.00 . 89/67/pc . . . .80/65/t Baghdad . . . . . .109/82/0.00 . .109/83/s . . 108/81/s Moscow . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . .71/56/sh . . 68/54/sh Little Rock. . . . . .86/78/0.00 . 99/77/pc . 100/75/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . . .88/76/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . 76/53/pc . . . 77/52/s Los Angeles. . . . .72/62/0.00 . 75/64/pc . . 71/64/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . .80/67/sh . . . 82/66/s Nassau . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .91/81/t . . . .91/80/t Louisville . . . . . . .92/70/0.05 . . .93/73/t . . . .93/72/t Beirut. . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .87/77/s . . . 87/78/s New Delhi. . . . . .93/79/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . . .90/79/t Madison, WI . . . .83/51/0.00 . . .83/60/t . . 78/58/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .71/57/t . . . 69/53/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . 86/75/sh Memphis. . . . . . .85/72/0.60 . 98/78/pc . . 97/75/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .65/51/t . . . .64/50/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . .57/51/r . . 65/50/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .92/81/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .91/79/t Budapest. . . . . . .86/55/0.00 . . .89/62/s . . . 84/57/s Ottawa . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 86/63/s Milwaukee . . . . .80/65/0.00 . . .80/64/t . . 76/64/pc Buenos Aires. . . .59/54/0.00 . .51/38/sh . . 49/36/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .77/61/0.00 . . .77/59/s . . . 84/58/s Minneapolis . . . .84/61/0.00 . 83/52/pc . . 77/52/pc Cabo San Lucas .90/82/0.00 . 94/78/pc . . 91/78/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .79/66/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . 87/67/pc Nashville . . . . . . .95/67/0.00 . 93/72/pc . . 95/73/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .91/73/0.00 . . .93/74/s . . . 93/73/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . .91/70/s . . . 92/69/s New Orleans. . . .98/82/0.00 . 95/77/pc . . 93/78/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . . 75/48/s Santiago . . . . . . .45/39/0.00 . 53/36/pc . . 59/38/pc New York . . . . . .83/67/0.07 . . .85/70/t . . 86/71/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . .89/72/t . . . .88/73/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .77/59/0.00 . .79/63/sh . . 66/55/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .86/70/0.04 . . .86/70/t . . . .86/68/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . .62/50/sh . . 66/53/sh Sapporo. . . . . . not available . 77/63/pc . . 74/62/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .86/70/t . . . .88/71/t Edinburgh . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . 63/48/pc . . 63/49/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . .79/70/sh . . 79/68/sh Oklahoma City .103/73/0.00 . .107/78/s . 103/75/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .88/64/0.00 . . .85/63/t . . . 88/62/s Shanghai. . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .91/80/t . . . .92/81/t Omaha . . . . . . . .88/66/0.41 . 87/67/pc . . . .80/64/t Harare . . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . .68/45/s . . . 70/46/s Singapore . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .87/78/t Orlando. . . . . . . .94/74/0.00 . 94/77/pc . . . .93/76/t Hong Kong . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .90/82/t . . . .90/81/t Stockholm. . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .69/55/sh . . 68/55/sh Palm Springs. . .114/78/0.00 . .108/76/s . . 104/73/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .81/63/s . . . 85/67/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .60/53/sh . . 61/53/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .89/66/0.00 . . .86/66/t . . . .84/68/t Jerusalem . . . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .87/67/s . . . 89/68/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .99/82/0.00 . 94/81/pc . . . .92/81/t Philadelphia . . . .87/66/1.28 . . .88/68/t . . 89/70/pc Johannesburg . . .59/34/0.00 . . .64/43/s . . . 67/46/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . .89/77/s . . . 90/77/s Phoenix. . . . . . .112/93/0.00 110/88/pc . 107/86/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/59/0.00 . . .64/59/s . . . 64/60/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .95/84/0.00 . . .87/77/t . . 83/74/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .85/61/0.00 . 84/61/pc . . 85/64/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . 88/65/pc . . . .86/68/t Toronto . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . .84/63/s . . . 86/61/s Portland, ME. . . .82/54/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . 81/64/pc London . . . . . . . .61/54/0.00 . 70/54/pc . . 75/56/pc Vancouver. . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .73/54/s . . . 75/57/s Providence . . . . .85/63/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . 84/65/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .97/64/0.05 . 98/68/pc . 100/68/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .86/67/t . . 84/62/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .89/69/0.00 . . .88/67/t . . . .91/69/t Manila. . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .91/77/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . . .83/60/t . . . 67/52/s

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S

Golf Inside Eugene’s Jeff Quinney leads a PGA Tour event, see Page D5.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

ADVENTURE SPORTS

L O C A L LY

WEST COAST LEAGUE BASEBALL

Roller hockey tournament this weekend in Bend

Elks take stock after successful campaign

The 18th annual Northwest Cup Roller Hockey Tournament is set for this weekend in Bend. The two-day event includes teams from Central Oregon and beyond and will take place at Cascade Indoor Sports. Competition divisions range from age 8 and under to adult. Games are scheduled to begin Saturday at 8:30 a.m. and will start every 45 minutes throughout the day and into the night — the final contest Saturday is set for 10:45 p.m. Games Sunday start at 8:30 a.m., and the final match of the tournament is set for 3 p.m. In addition to the host Bullets squads and several teams representing Cascade Indoor Sports, the 16-team Northwest Cup field is expected to include teams from Portland, Salem and Seattle. Spectators are welcome and admission is free at Cascade Indoor Sports, located at 20775 High Desert Lane in northeast Bend. For more information, go to www.cascadeindoorsports. com. — Bulletin staff report

In the franchise’s 12th season, the summer collegiate team in Bend was a hit on the field and a home run at the gate By Robert Husseman The Bulletin

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Beaver fans can buy prime parking pass for OSU games Oregon State University football fans in Central Oregon can get a good deal on a prime parking pass for home games at Reser Stadium in Corvallis this season and at the same time help raise money for the local Beaver Athletic Student Fund. A Bumper Parking Pass for a space located between the Valley Football Center and the Truax Indoor Center at the northwest end of Reser Stadium is being sold for $150 per game by the Central Oregon BASF. According to Carol Connolly, president of the local BASF organization, the only other way to secure reserved Bumper Parking is to donate more than $4,500 per year to the BASF. Connolly reports that the parking pass has already been sold for the Oct. 15 game against BYU. But as of Wednesday, it remained available for all other 2011 OSU home games: Sept. 3 vs. Sacramento State, Sept. 24 vs. UCLA, Oct. 8 vs. Arizona, Nov. 5 vs. Stanford, and Nov. 19 vs. Washington. The parking pass will be sold on a first-come, firstserved basis. For more information or to purchase the pass, contact Connolly at 541-410-4094 or via e-mail at beaverbeliever@ crestviewcable.com. — Bulletin staff report

Mark Morical / The Bulletin

Suttle Lake can be seen below the burned forest from atop Cache Mountain.

The 5,577foot summit of Cache Mountain is a perfect location from which to glimpse some of Central Oregon’s most prominent mountains: the Three Sisters to the south, Mount Washington to the southwest, Mount Jefferson and Three Fingered Jack to the north, Hayrick and Hoodoo buttes to the northwest, and Black Butte to the east.

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL GUIDE

Cache Mountain The grueling ride includes a long climb and a harrowing descent, but bikers should wait a few weeks before trying the loop’s singletrack Editor’s note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoor writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears in Adventure Sports on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

MARK MORICAL

W

e live in a singletrack trail paradise, but sometimes it’s best to just settle for a plain old dirt road. I found that out the hard way last week during a ride up and down Cache Mountain, about 15 miles northwest of Sisters. I had been meaning to try this ride for nearly two years, but kept putting

it off mostly because my Adventure Maps resource lists the loop as aerobically strenuous and technically advanced. Add to that an uncleared trail and, well, it gets pretty ugly. The 13-mile Cache Mountain loop includes a tough climb up forest roads and a harrowing singletrack descent. The ride started out innocently enough from the trailhead at Scout Lake. The singletrack, blocked in places by fallen trees, climbed to Dark Lake. It was hard to follow the trail, as plants and shrubs grew over the narrow path. I was actually relieved to reach Forest Road 2068 and begin the unobstructed climb up Cache Mountain. See Cache / D6

INSIDE NBA

Breaking down the trail: Cache Mountain

Story, see Page D4

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Cycling ......................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 Sports in brief........................... D4 Basketball ................................. D4 Golf ............................................D5 College football .........................D5 Adventure Sports...................... D6

From Sisters, head west on U.S. Highway 20 for about 13.5 miles. Turn left on the Suttle Lake access road. After one mile, turn left on Forest Road 2066. Park at the Scout Lake dayuse area on the left. The singletrack trail heads south along the shoreline. Ride FR 2066 to skip the singletrack. Continue along Forest Road 2068, FR 800 and FR 900 to the top of Cache Mountain. To skip the singletrack descent, return down the forest roads.

12 20

e e Lak Suttl

126

Single track

20

Forest roads (double track)

Area of detail 20 126

242

Redmond

Sisters

The loop is about 13 miles Aerobically strenuous and technically advanced

2067

126 2068

LENGTH RATING

2070

Trailhead Scout Lake 2066 Dark Lake

Blue Lake

Cache Mountain 900

On and off the field, the 12th season of Bend Elks baseball was a success. The Elks finished with a 29-25 record in the West Division of the summer collegiate West Coast League, eight games behind the firstplace Corvallis Knights. Bend won the first game of the West Division playoff series against Corvallis, 3-1, last week at Vince Genna Stadium before losing the next two games in the bestof-three series in Corvallis, ending its season. At Genna Stadium, the grandstands were filled to the tune of 49,130 fans over the course of 27 WCL home games. The Elks broke their own season attendance record, set in 2010, by more than 11,000 fans. That number does not include the Aug. 12 playoff game at home or four popular “$2 Tuesday” games played against nonleague opponents, according to Elks owner and general manager Jim Richards. Richards estimated that, including the playoff game and the Tuesday nonleague dates, the final attendance number tops 60,000. “It was an outstanding year at the gate,” Richards said this week. “In our 12th season, we’ve learned a lot about what works (in getting fans to the ballpark). We had some great nights.” See Elks / D5

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bend shortstop Ryan Dunn fields a ground ball during a West Coast League playoff game last week. The Elks reached the postseason for the fourth consecutive season.

LOCAL GOLF

Southern Oregon golfers to meet in PNGA Junior final Bulletin staff report

DIRECTIONS

Portland welcomes back Sabonis

D

20

800

Bend MILES 0

1

2

TRAIL FEATURES Greg Cross / The Bulletin

A challenging climb up singletrack and forest roads through a burn area. Spectacular views of Cascade peaks await on top of Cache Mountain. The singletrack descent is extremely steep and technical and will not be cleared for another few weeks. Until then, the best way to descend is back down the forest roads.

SUNRIVER — A pair of Southern Oregon golfers will meet in today’s 36-hole final match of the Pacific Northwest Junior Boys Amateur Championship. Dylan Wu, of Medford, and Kevin Murphy, of Rogue River, each won their quarterfinal and semifinal matches Thursday to advance to the championship match today at Sunriver Inside Resort’s Meadows course. • Results, Wu, the tournament’s No. 5 Scoreboard, seed and a sophomore-to-be Page D2 at Medford’s St. Mary’s High School, beat Chris Babcock, of Shoreline, Wash., in the quarters and then dispatched Nigel Lett, of Tigard, 3 and 2. Murphy, the No. 2 seed and a junior-to-be at Rogue River High, won his quarterfinal match against University of Oregon golf signee Sulman Raza, of Eugene. Murphy then outlasted Andrew Whalen, of Ephrata, Wash., in 19 holes to advance to the finals. Two Bend golfers were able to survive matches in their respective consolation brackets: Dylan Cramer beat Garret Foss, of Redmond, Wash., 3 and 2 to advance to the final match of the fourth flight, and Riley Goldstein beat Bishop Dean, of Eugene, 3 and 2. See PNGA / D5


D2 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

CYCLING

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6 a.m. — European Tour, Czech Open, second round, Golf Channel. 9:30 a.m. — Champions Tour, Senior Players Championship, second round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Safeway Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — Little League World Series, Canada vs. Saudi Arabia, ESPN. Noon — Little League World Series, West vs. Mid-Atlantic, ESPN. 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Cleveland Indians at Detroit Tigers or Milwaukee Brewers at New York Mets, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — Little League World Series, Netherlands vs. Venezuela, ESPN.

TENNIS 10 a.m. — ATP Tour, Western and Southern Open, quarterfinals, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — ATP Tour, Western and Southern Open, quarterfinals, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — NFL preseason, Atlanta Falcons at Jacksonville Jaguars, Fox.

BOXING 6 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Demetrius Andrade vs. Grady Brewer, junior welterweights, ESPN2.

SATURDAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — European Tour, Czech Open, third round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, third round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, third round, CBS. Noon — Champions Tour, Senior Players Championship, third round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Safeway Classic, second round, Golf Channel.

SOCCER 4:30 a.m. — English Premier League, Arsenal vs. Liverpool, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — Women’s Professional Soccer, playoffs, semifinals, Root Sports. 8:30 p.m. — MLS, Seattle Sounders at FC Dallas (same-day tape), Root Sports.

BASEBALL 8 a.m. — Junior League, final, ESPN2. 9 a.m. — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ESPN. Noon — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ABC. 1 p.m. — MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs, Fox. 3 p.m. — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ESPN. 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Arizona Diamondbacks at Atlanta Braves or New York Yankees at Minnesota Twins, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ESPN.

TENNIS 10 a.m. — ATP Tour, Western and Southern Open, semifinals, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — WTA Tour, Western and Southern Open, semifinals, ESPN2.

MOTOR SPORTS 11:30 a.m. — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, NAPA Auto Parts 200, ESPN. 8 p.m. — NHRA drag racing, Lucas Oil Nationals, qualifying, (same-day tape), ESPN2.

HORSE RACING 2 p.m. — Alabama Stakes, NBC.

SOFTBALL 2 p.m. — Junior League, final, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — NFL preseason, New Orleans Saints at Houston Texans, NFL Network. 6:30 p.m. — NFL preseason, Minnesota Vikings vs. Seattle Seahawks, Fox.

GYMNASTICS 8 p.m. — U.S. Championships (same-day tape), NBC.

SUNDAY GOLF 5:30 a.m. — European Tour, Czech Open, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, final round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Wyndham Championship, final round, CBS. Noon — Champions Tour, Senior Players Championship, final round, Golf Channel. 4 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Safeway Classic, final round, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 9 a.m. — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ESPN2. 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays, Root Sports. 11 a.m. — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ABC. 11 a.m. — MLB, New York Yankees, at Minnesota Twins, TBS. 3 p.m. — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — MLB, St. Louis Cardinals at Chicago Cubs, ESPN. 5 p.m. — Little League World Series, teams TBA, ESPN2.

TENNIS 9:30 a.m. — ATP Tour, Western and Southern Open, final, CBS. 1 p.m. — WTA Tour, Western and Southern Open, final, ESPN2.

MOTOR SPORTS 10 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Pure Michigan 400, ESPN. 1:30 p.m. — American Le Mans Series at Road America, ABC. 7 p.m. — NHRA drag racing, Lucas Oil Nationals, (same-day tape), ESPN2.

SOFTBALL 11 a.m. — National Pro Fastpitch Championship, Game 2, ESPN2.

CYCLING 12:30 p.m. — BMX racing, from London (taped), NBC.

GYMNASTICS 1:30 p.m. — U.S. Championships (taped), NBC.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — NFL preseason, San Diego Chargers at Dallas Cowboys, NBC.

RODEO 5 p.m. — PBR San Antonio Invitational (taped), Versus network.

SOCCER 6 p.m. — MLS, Vancouver Whitecaps at Portland Timbers (taped), Root Sports. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

GOLF Local

Third Round Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, 6-2, 7-5. Rafael Nadal (2), Spain, def, Fernando Verdasco, Spain, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 7-6 (9). Mardy Fish (7), United States, def. Richard Gasquet (12), France, 7-5, 7-5. Tomas Berdych (8), Czech Republic, def. Nicolas Almagro (9), Spain, 6-2, 6-2. Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3. Gilles Simon (10), France, def. David Ferrer (5), Spain, 6-4, 6-7 (3), 6-4. Gael Monfils (6), France, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 6-2, 6-2. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. James Blake, United States, 6-4, 6-1.

IN THE BLEACHERS

PACIFIC NORTHWEST JUNIOR BOYS’ AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP Thursday at Sunriver Resort Meadows Par 71 Single-Elimination Match Play Championship Bracket Quarterfinals Nigel Lett (Tigard) def. Kelly Campbell (Auburn, Wash.), 2 and 1 Dylan Wu (Medford) def. Chris Babcock (Shoreline, Wash.), 3 and 1 Kevin Murphy (Rogue River) def. Sulman Raza (Eugene), 3 and 2 Andrew Whalen (Ephrata, Wash.) def. Tyler Salsbury (Enumclaw, Wash.), 1 up Semifinals Dylan Wu def. Nigel Lett, 3 and 2 Kevin Murphy def. Andrew Whalen, 19 holes Consolation Brackets First Flight Logan Iverson (Kalispell, Mont.) def. James Feutz (University Place, Wash.), 2 up Tanner Martin (Richland, Wash.) def. Hunter Thompson (Richland, Wash.), 3 and 2 Second Flight Nick Atkin (Kennewick, Wash.) def. Sam Warkentin (Bainbridge Island, Wash.), 7 and 5 Nolan Cull (Lake Tapps, Wash.) def. Colby Dean (Eagle, Idaho), 4 and 3 Third Flight Anthony Allen (Arlington, Wash.) def. Vinnie Murphy III (Edgewood, Wash.), 4 and 3 Alistair Docherty (Vancouver, Wash.) def. Howard Lee (Port Coquitlam, B.C.), 1 up Fourth Flight Dylan Cramer (Bend) def. Garrett Foss (Redmond, Wash.), 3 and 2 Thomas Hoffman (Salem) def. Mark Puffinburger (Springfield), 4 and 2 Fifth Flight Ryan Books (Seattle, Wash.) def. Ryan Blackwell (Bend), 7 and 6 Eric Ansett (Spokane, Wash.) def. Jake Ryerson (Seattle), 3 and 2 Sixth Flight Kyle Hargrave (Happy Valley) def. Declan Watts (Bend), 3 and 2 Brendan McCauley (Olympia, Wash.) def. Tanner Comes (Spokane, Wash.), 19 holes Seventh Flight Jacob Vanderpas (Vancouver, B.C.) def. Conner Denessen (Snohomish, Wash.), 1 up Blake Netter (Canby) def. Stephen Thoen (Spokane, Wash.), 3 and 1 Eighth Flight Ian Briske (Spanaway, Wash.) def. Kellen McCauley (Olympia, Wash.), 19 holes Cole Lorenzo (Richland, Wash.) def. Christopher Hatch (Mukilteo, Wash.), 1 up Ninth Flight Max Valade (Vancouver, B.C.) def. Nick Friend (Lakewood, Wash.), 5 and 4 Connor Tallman (Lake Oswego) def. Alec Charles (Gig Harbor, Wash.), 5 and 4 10th Flight Cole Hublou (Kenmore, Wash.) def. Eric Dahl (Richland, Wash.), 3 and 2 Brandon Allen (Meridian, Idaho) def. Jack Strickland (Sammamish, Wash.), 3 and 2 11th Flight Chan Lee (Wilsonville) def. Cody Stoffel (Grants Pass), 2 and 1 Nick Strebin (Troutdale) def. Thomas Thongmee (Lake Forest Park, Wash.), 5 and 4 12th Flight Tanner Chambers (Brightwood) def. Joe Highsmith (Lakewood, Wash.), forfeit Ian Carlson (Pocatello, Idaho) def. Jake Verlin (Moscow, Idaho), 2 up 13th Flight Wyatt Dean (Eugene) def. Jared Sanders (Rathdrum, Idaho), 7 and 6 Luke Doss (Seatac, Wash.) def. Daniel Hettman Jr. (Ridgefield, Wash.), 5 and 3 14th Flight Robert Ihlanfeldt (Chelan, Wash.) def. 19 holes Riley Goldstein (Bend) def. Bishop Dean (Eugene), 3 and 2

PGA Tour Wyndham Championship Thursday At Sedgefield Country Club Course Greensboro, N.C. Purse: $5.2 million Yardage: 7,117; Par: 70 (35-35) (a-amateur) First Round Jeff Quinney 32-31—63 Tommy Gainey 29-34—63 Stuart Appleby 33-31—64 Paul Casey 32-33—65 Carl Pettersson 32-33—65 Ernie Els 31-34—65 Jason Bohn 35-30—65 Jimmy Walker 31-34—65 Tim Herron 33-32—65 Lee Janzen 31-34—65 Jim Furyk 30-35—65 Vijay Singh 32-33—65 George McNeill 32-33—65 Greg Chalmers 32-34—66 Chez Reavie 33-33—66 Justin Leonard 34-32—66 David Toms 33-33—66 Webb Simpson 34-32—66 Jason Dufner 33-33—66 Vaughn Taylor 32-34—66 Jim Renner 32-34—66 Alexandre Rocha 32-34—66 Daniel Summerhays 33-33—66 Patrick Reed 34-32—66 D.J. Brigman 33-33—66 Steve Marino 32-35—67 Hunter Haas 32-35—67 Anthony Kim 31-36—67 Retief Goosen 33-34—67 Nathan Green 33-34—67 David Duval 34-33—67 Charles Warren 32-35—67 Billy Horschel 33-34—67 Woody Austin 35-32—67 John Rollins 35-32—67 Jerry Kelly 33-34—67 Angel Cabrera 34-33—67 Bill Lunde 34-33—67 Joe Durant 34-33—67 John Merrick 32-36—68 Frank Lickliter II 36-32—68 Blake Adams 35-33—68 Pat Perez 35-33—68 Michael Bradley 33-35—68 Rocco Mediate 34-34—68 Chad Campbell 34-34—68 Michael Thompson 34-34—68 Kent Jones 33-35—68 Briny Baird 35-33—68 Nick O’Hern 33-35—68 Andres Gonzales 31-37—68 Fabian Gomez 32-36—68 Cameron Percy 34-34—68 a-Olafur Loftsson 34-34—68 Jarrod Lyle 34-34—68 Rod Pampling 33-35—68 Will MacKenzie 35-33—68 Tim Petrovic 34-34—68 John Mallinger 33-35—68 Bill Haas 34-34—68 Tom Gillis 32-36—68 Shaun Micheel 36-32—68 Billy Mayfair 34-34—68 Marc Leishman 35-33—68 Scott McCarron 34-34—68 Sunghoon Kang 32-36—68 Ryuji Imada 34-35—69 John Daly 35-34—69 Scott Gutschewski 34-35—69 Kevin Stadler 33-36—69 Johnson Wagner 33-36—69 Padraig Harrington 37-32—69 Kyung-tae Kim 34-35—69 Trevor Immelman 36-33—69 Brendon de Jonge 35-34—69 David Hearn 33-36—69 Charles Howell III 35-34—69 Cameron Tringale 33-36—69 Chris Baryla 33-36—69 Martin Piller 35-34—69 Chris Tidland 35-34—69 Kris Blanks 35-34—69 Troy Merritt 36-33—69 Brandt Jobe 36-33—69 Chris Kirk 33-36—69 Ian Poulter 35-34—69 Ben Crane 33-36—69 Kyle Stanley 35-34—69 Chris Couch 32-37—69 William McGirt 33-36—69 Matt McQuillan 35-34—69 Bud Cauley 35-34—69

WTA

Joseph Bramlett Bobby Gates Richard S. Johnson Michael Letzig Kevin Chappell Camilo Villegas Heath Slocum Derek Lamely Steven Bowditch David Mathis a-Billy Kennerly Darron Stiles Boo Weekley Josh Teater Tag Ridings Lucas Glover Davis Love III Ben Curtis Matt Jones Paul Stankowski Fran Quinn Kevin Kisner Jim Herman Chris Riley Marc Turnesa Rich Beem Shane Bertsch Garrett Willis Carl Paulson Zack Miller Jerry Richardson, Jr. Todd Hamilton Chris DiMarco J.J. Henry Aron Price Colt Knost Joe Ogilvie Michael Connell Chris Stroud Brandt Snedeker Troy Matteson Bob Estes Nate Olivo Cameron Beckman Henrik Stenson James Driscoll Ben Martin Skip Kendall Alex Prugh Arjun Atwal Steve Flesch Jerod Turner Savio Nazareth Nathan Stamey Roland Thatcher Tom Pernice, Jr. D.J. Trahan Nate Smith Will Strickler Justin Hicks Nyasha Mauchaza Scott Gordon Morgan Hoffmann Dean Wilson

32-37—69 34-36—70 35-35—70 34-36—70 33-37—70 33-37—70 35-35—70 32-38—70 35-35—70 34-36—70 34-36—70 36-34—70 36-34—70 36-34—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 35-35—70 36-34—70 37-33—70 31-39—70 35-35—70 33-37—70 34-36—70 37-34—71 35-36—71 34-37—71 30-41—71 36-35—71 35-36—71 38-33—71 34-37—71 34-38—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 33-39—72 35-37—72 35-37—72 37-35—72 36-36—72 35-37—72 37-35—72 37-35—72 34-38—72 37-36—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 40-33—73 34-39—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 36-37—73 35-39—74 36-38—74 37-37—74 35-39—74 37-37—74 36-39—75 38-37—75 34-41—75 38-39—77 37-41—78 WD

Champions Tour Senior Players Championship Thursday At Westchester CC-West Harrison, N.Y. Purse: $2,700,000 Yardage: 6,980; Par 71 (36-35) First Round Jeff Sluman 32-33—65 Gary Hallberg 32-34—66 Peter Senior 34-32—66 Jay Haas 33-34—67 Corey Pavin 33-34—67 Michael Allen 32-35—67 Fred Couples 32-36—68 Mark O’Meara 33-35—68 Tommy Armour III 35-33—68 Russ Cochran 35-33—68 Mark Calcavecchia 34-35—69 Mark Wiebe 34-35—69 Jay Don Blake 34-35—69 John Cook 35-34—69 Nick Price 32-37—69 Keith Clearwater 38-32—70 Tim Simpson 33-37—70 Mark McNulty 37-33—70 Olin Browne 35-35—70 David Eger 35-35—70 Steve Pate 35-35—70 Tom Purtzer 34-36—70 Bobby Clampett 35-35—70 David Peoples 35-35—70 D.A. Weibring 35-35—70 Bernhard Langer 36-35—71 Morris Hatalsky 37-34—71 Phil Blackmar 36-35—71 Tom Kite 38-33—71 Ted Schulz 35-36—71 Bob Tway 36-35—71 Joey Sindelar 36-35—71 Brad Bryant 37-34—71 Bruce Fleisher 35-37—72 Bill Glasson 34-38—72 Peter Jacobsen 37-35—72 Robert Thompson 34-38—72 John Huston 34-38—72 Mike Goodes 36-37—73 Kenny Perry 36-37—73 Gil Morgan 35-38—73 Jim Gallagher, Jr. 37-36—73 Chip Beck 38-35—73 Ben Crenshaw 36-37—73 Tom Lehman 38-35—73 Hale Irwin 36-37—73 J.L. Lewis 37-36—73 Lonnie Nielsen 38-35—73 Tom Jenkins 36-37—73 Scott Simpson 37-36—73 Hal Sutton 39-34—73 Keith Fergus 38-35—73 Steve Haskins 39-34—73 Loren Roberts 36-37—73 Bobby Wadkins 36-37—73 Mark Brooks 38-35—73 Fuzzy Zoeller 37-37—74 James Mason 36-38—74 Jim Rutledge 39-35—74 Rod Spittle 37-37—74 Bruce Vaughan 38-36—74 Wayne Levi 34-40—74 Larry Nelson 39-36—75 Jim Thorpe 39-36—75 Trevor Dodds 38-37—75 Mike Reid 38-37—75 Joe Ozaki 38-37—75 Chien Soon Lu 36-39—75 Dan Forsman 37-38—75 Lee Rinker 38-37—75 Tom Watson 38-38—76 Bob Gilder 39-37—76 Steve Lowery 36-40—76 David Frost 36-40—76 Eduardo Romero 37-40—77 Brad Faxon 36-41—77 Craig Stadler 38-40—78

John Morse

36-42—78

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— Championship Best of three Corvallis 2, Walla Walla 0 ——— Tuesday: Corvallis 14, Walla Walla 3 Thursday: Corvallis 11, Walla Walla 4

Little League Little League World Series At South Williamsport, Pa. All Times PDT Double Elimination UNITED STATES GREAT LAKES, LaGrange, Ky.; MID-ATLANTIC, Clinton County, Pa.; MIDWEST, Rapid City, S.D.; NEW ENGLAND, Cumberland, R.I.; NORTHWEST, Billings, Mont.; SOUTHEAST, Warner Robins, Ga.; SOUTHWEST, Lafayette, La.; WEST, Huntington Beach, Calif. INTERNATIONAL ASIA-PACIFIC, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; CANADA, Langley, British Columbia; CARIBBEAN, Oranjestad, Aruba; EUROPE, Rotterdam, Netherlands; JAPAN, Hamamatsu City; LATIN AMERICA, Maracay, Venezuela; MEA, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia; MEXICO, Mexicali. Thursday, Aug. 18 Game 1 — Mexicali, Mexico 3, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 0 Game 2 — Billings, Mont. 6, Rapid City, S.D. 4 Game 3 — Hamamatsu City, Japan 12, Oranjestad, Aruba 1, 4 innings Game 4 — Lafayette, La. 2, Warner Robins, Ga. 0 Today, Aug. 19 Game 5 — Dhahran, Saudi Arabia vs. Langley, British Columbia, 1 p.m. Game 6 — Cumberland, R.I. vs. Huntington Beach, Calif., 3 p.m. Game 7 — LaGrange, Ky. vs. Clinton County, Pa., 8 p.m. Game 8 — Rotterdam, Netherlands vs. Maracay, Venezuela, 5 p.m.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE ——— Preseason All Times PDT ——— Thursday’s Games New England 31, Tampa Bay 14 Pittsburgh 24, Philadelphia 14 Today’s Games Washington at Indianapolis, 4 p.m. Carolina at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Detroit at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. Kansas City at Baltimore, 4:30 p.m. Arizona at Green Bay, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Jacksonville, 5 p.m. Saturday’s Games Oakland at San Francisco, 5 p.m. Tennessee at St. Louis, 5 p.m. New Orleans at Houston, 5 p.m. Buffalo at Denver, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at Seattle, 7 p.m. Sunday’s Games Cincinnati at N.Y. Jets, 4 p.m. San Diego at Dallas, 5 p.m. Monday’s Game Chicago at N.Y. Giants, 5 p.m.

Betting Line COLLEGE (Home teams in Caps) Thursday, Sept. 1 Favorite Opening Current Underdog WISCONSIN 35 35 Unlv Mississippi St 28 28 MEMPHIS SYRACUSE 6 6 Wake Forest IDAHO 8 8 Bowling Green FLORIDA INT’l 14 14 N. Texas n-Kentucky 19.5 19.5 W. Kentucky Friday, Sept. 2 Tcu 6.5 6.5 BAYLOR Saturday, Sept. 3 BOSTON COL 3 3 Northwestern AUBURN 22 22 Utah St OHIO ST 32.5 32.5 Akron MISSOURI 16.5 16.5 Miami-Ohio ALABAMA 36.5 36.5 Kent St HOUSTON 3.5 3.5 Ucla MICHIGAN 14.5 14.5 W. Michigan USC 21 21 Minnesota NOTRE DAME 10.5 10.5 S. Florida Byu 2.5 2.5 MISSISSIPPI STANFORD 27 27 San Jose St Colorado St 4.5 4.5 NEW MEXICO PITTSBURGH 29.5 29.5 Buffalo c-S. Carolina 20.5 20.5 E. Carolina s-California 10 10 Fresno St N. ILLINOIS 9 9 Army TEXAS 22 22 Rice i-Indiana 6.5 6.5 Ball St OKLAHOMA 21 21 Tulsa Ohio U 7 7 NEW MEXICO ST a-Boise St 3 3 Georgia ar-Oregon 1 1 Lsu S. Mississippi 13 13 La Tech HAWAII 6.5 6.5 Colorado PURDUE 18 18 Mid Tenn St ILLINOIS 20 20 Arkansas St FLORIDA ST 29 29 UL-Monroe CLEMSON 15 15 Troy FLORIDA 31 31 Florida Atl. OKLAHOMA ST 36.5 36.5 UL-Lafayette Sunday, Sept. 4 W. VIRGINIA 20.5 20.5 Marshall TEXAS A&M 15.5 15.5 Smu Monday, Sept. 5 Miami (Fla.) 5.5 5.5 MARYLAND c-Charlotte, NC s-San Francisco i-Indianapolis a-Atlanta ar-Arlington, Texas n-Nashville

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Western & Southern Open Thursday At The Lindner Family Tennis Center Mason, Ohio Purse: Men, $3.2 million (Masters 1000); Women, $2.05 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles

By Graham Dunbar

WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Western & Southern Open Thursday At The Lindner Family Tennis Center Mason, Ohio Purse: Men, $3.2 million (Masters 1000); Women, $2.05 million (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Third Round Sam Stosur (10), Australia, def. Li Na (5), China, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Daniela Hantuchova, Slovakia, def. Marion Bartoli (8), France, 6-3, 5-7, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Petra Martic, Croatia, 6-2, 6-2. Nadia Petrova, Russia, def. Christine McHale, United States, 6-3, 6-3. Maria Sharapova (4), Russia, def. Svetlana Kuznetsova (14), Russia, 6-2, 6-3. Andrea Petkovic (9), Germany, def. Petra Kvitova (6), Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-3. Peng Shuai (16), China, vs. Shahar Peer, Israel, 6-3, 6-2. Jelena Jankovic (13), Serbia, def. Francesca Schiavone (7), Italy, 6-3, 5-7, 6-4.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 10 7 7 37 27 Philadelphia 8 5 10 34 29 Sporting Kansas City 8 7 9 33 35 Houston 7 7 11 32 31 New York 6 6 13 31 39 D.C. 7 6 10 31 34 Toronto FC 4 11 11 23 25 New England 4 11 10 22 24 Chicago 2 7 15 21 26 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 13 3 9 48 35 FC Dallas 12 6 7 43 33 Seattle 11 5 9 42 35 Colorado 10 6 10 40 37 Real Salt Lake 10 6 6 36 30 Chivas USA 7 8 9 30 30 Portland 7 12 5 26 30 San Jose 5 9 10 25 26 Vancouver 3 12 9 18 25 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Game Chicago 1, D.C. United 1, tie Saturday’s Games Philadelphia at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. New York at New England, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Seattle FC at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Chivas USA at Colorado, 6 p.m. Vancouver at Portland, 7 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Toronto FC at Chicago, 4 p.m. D.C. United at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m.

GA 23 22 31 30 35 34 46 37 33 GA 20 26 27 32 17 26 40 32 40

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Indiana 18 8 .692 Connecticut 16 9 .640 New York 15 11 .577 Atlanta 12 12 .500 Chicago 11 14 .440 Washington 5 18 .217 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 19 6 .760 Phoenix 14 10 .583 San Antonio 13 11 .542 Seattle 13 12 .520 Los Angeles 10 14 .417 Tulsa 1 22 .043 ——— Thursday’s Games New York 84, Connecticut 81, OT Minnesota 81, Washington 62 Los Angeles 75, Indiana 70 Today’s Game Connecticut at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.

President of UCI thinks ‘golden era’ is on tap for cycling

GB — 1½ 3 5 6½ 11½ GB — 4½ 5½ 6 8½ 17

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended minor league 1B Mike Jacobs (Colorado Springs-PCL) 50 games for a positive HGH test. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Placed 3B Kevin Youkilis on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of C Ryan Lavarnway from Pawtucket (IL). Designated LHP Randy Williams for assignment. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Signed OF Jeff Francoeur to a two-year contract extension through 2013. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Optioned RHP Tyler Chatwood to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled C Hank Conger from Salt Lake. MINNESOTA TWINS—Recalled INF Luke Hughes from Rochester (IL). Placed OF Denard Span on the 15day DL, retroactive to Aug. 14. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Placed RHP Trystan Magnuson on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Jordan Norberto from Sacramento (PCL). TEXAS RANGERS—Acquired RHP Tim Wood from Pittsburgh for a player to be named and optioned him to Round Rock (PCL). TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Optioned LHP Brad Mills to Las Vegas (PCL). National League FLORIDA MARLINS—Placed LHP Randy Choate on the 15-day DL. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Announced QB Terrelle Pryor is eligible for the supplemental draft, but announced he won’t be allowed to practice for the team that selects him until Week 6 after breaking NCAA rules while at Ohio St. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released CB Marcus Brown. Signed FB Dorson Boyce. HOCKEY National Hockey League PHOENIX COYOTES—Re-signed F Mikkel Boedker to a two-year contract. COLLEGE SAN DIEGO STATE—Announced men’s basketball C Brian Carlwell was denied a sixth year of eligibility by the NCAA. VILLANOVA—Announced junior basketball F Isaiah Armwood will transfer.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,285 240 5,988 1,788 The Dalles 756 235 3,934 1,281 John Day 468 201 2,699 911 McNary 459 87 2,557 868 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 287,370 105,763 219,251 90,116 The Dalles 213,007 82,301 147,152 64,043 John Day 182,863 77,042 103,661 47,424 McNary 179,150 60,777 75,326 30,880

The Associated Press

AIGLE, Switzerland — After years of doping scandals in which the very legitimacy of his sport was questioned, Pat McQuaid says cycling’s best days await. The president of cycling’s governing body points to this year’s “superb” Tour de France with young riders competing free of drugs, developments that will help attract new sponsors and race organizers worldwide. “We are looking towards a golden era,” McQuaid told The Associated Press. “We are certainly coming out of a dark period, and we’re not yet through everything. From the anti-doping point of view, we must not take our foot off the pedal.” McQuaid urged professional teams, with whom he has sparred this season, to back the International Cycling Union’s leadership and its strategy of taking cycling to such countries as China, Russia and Brazil. “It needs everybody working in that direction, but it has to be led by the UCI, working with governments to deliver the products that we want,” he said. McQuaid reflected on the season in road racing, the discipline that largely shapes public perception of cycling, after overseeing the 2012 Olympic test event in London last Sunday. The dress rehearsal road race was won by home favorite Mark Cavendish. The British sprint star has helped ensure that riders — like Philippe Gilbert, Tour winner Cadel Evans and Thomas Voeckler — rather than dopers have dominated the headlines. “This year has been a very good year so far,” McQuaid said. “We had excellent racing in the (spring) classics and everything about the Tour de France was superb.” McQuaid said the sport is gradually regaining its credibility. “You get a lot of young riders coming through and believing each other that they are clean — which gives them the confidence that they won’t come under pressure to go into a doping program.” The only doping blight on the Tour, Russian rider Alexandr Kolobnev’s positive test for a banned diuretic, proved a distraction ahead of stage 10 rather than a crisis. McQuaid, however, is not celebrating victory yet. “You don’t change the culture overnight. It takes a couple of years and it’s still a work in progress,” the Irishman acknowledged. “We must continue to do targeted, intelligent testing.” Eventually, riders’ confidence in each other will be shared by the fans, media and finally major companies wanting to invest in cycling, McQuaid said. The UCI leader has staked much of his credibility since 2005 on taking a global view of the sport’s future beyond Europe — a strategy he believes is justified by the continent’s economic problems. McQuaid was elected to the International Olympic Committee last year, allowing him to help develop new cycling markets in such countries as Brazil and Colombia. “I need my IOC colleagues to open the doors for me and he will do that because he trusts the UCI and trusts the credibility of the sport,” he said. But cycling’s brighter future must still confront its past. There are investigations involving winners of 10 of the past 13 Tours de France, Lance Armstrong and Alberto Contador. He says a U.S. federal investigation into alleged doping by Armstrong’s teams has contacted cycling’s governing body just once in 16 months.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 D3

M AJ O R L E AGUE BA SE BA L L A ROYAL HEADACHE

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division New York Boston Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Detroit Cleveland Chicago Minnesota Kansas City West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 75 75 66 64 47 W 65 62 61 54 51 W 72 66 55 53

L 47 48 56 60 74 L 58 58 62 69 74 L 53 59 69 69

Pct .615 .610 .541 .516 .388 Pct .528 .517 .496 .439 .408 Pct .576 .528 .444 .434

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — ½ 9 12 27½ GB — 1½ 4 11 15 GB — 6 16½ 17½

Thursday’s Games Boston 4, Kansas City 3 Cleveland 4, Chicago White Sox 2 N.Y. Yankees 8, Minnesota 4 L.A. Angels 2, Texas 1 Toronto 7, Oakland 0

WCGB — — 8½ 11½ 27 WCGB — 11½ 14 21 25 WCGB — 10 20½ 21½

L10 6-4 5-5 7-3 6-4 3-7 L10 4-6 7-3 6-4 3-7 2-8 L10 8-2 3-7 4-6 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 W-2 W-3 L-2 Str L-1 W-2 L-2 L-1 L-1 Str L-1 W-1 L-1 L-2

Home 40-24 38-24 31-28 31-29 29-35 Home 34-27 33-25 27-35 27-31 32-35 Home 39-23 33-28 33-29 32-32

Away 35-23 37-24 35-28 33-31 18-39 Away 31-31 29-33 34-27 27-38 19-39 Away 33-30 33-31 22-40 21-37

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Florida Central Division Milwaukee St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division Arizona San Francisco Colorado Los Angeles San Diego

Today’s Games Cleveland (Tomlin 12-5) at Detroit (Scherzer 12-7), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 11-10) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 8-7), 4:10 p.m. Boston (A.Miller 4-1) at Kansas City (Francis 4-13), 5:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 3-4) at Minnesota (Slowey 0-0), 5:10 p.m. Texas (M.Harrison 10-8) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 5-5), 5:10 p.m. Baltimore (Jo-.Reyes 6-9) at L.A. Angels (Haren 12-6), 7:05 p.m. Toronto (Cecil 4-5) at Oakland (Harden 3-2), 7:05 p.m.

W 80 73 60 59 57 W 73 66 60 58 54 40 W 69 67 58 56 56

L 42 52 63 63 67 L 52 58 64 64 70 84 L 55 58 67 67 70

Thursday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 5, Milwaukee 1 Philadelphia 4, Arizona 1 Washington 3, Cincinnati 1 Atlanta 1, San Francisco 0 San Diego 3, Florida 1

Pct .656 .584 .488 .484 .460 Pct .584 .532 .484 .475 .435 .323 Pct .556 .536 .464 .455 .444

GB — 8½ 20½ 21 24 GB — 6½ 12½ 13½ 18½ 32½ GB — 2½ 11½ 12½ 14

WCGB — — 12 12½ 15½ WCGB — 6½ 12½ 13½ 18½ 32½ WCGB — 6 15 16 17½

L10 7-3 7-3 4-6 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 4-6 5-5 3-7 L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 4-6 5-5

Str W-2 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-2 Str L-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-2 W-2 Str L-2 L-1 W-1 W-1 W-1

Home 44-20 38-25 25-32 34-24 24-39 Home 47-16 32-27 34-30 28-33 29-33 21-41 Home 36-26 35-25 30-32 31-34 25-38

Away 36-22 35-27 35-31 25-39 33-28 Away 26-36 34-31 26-34 30-31 25-37 19-43 Away 33-29 32-33 28-35 25-33 31-32

Today’s Games St. Louis (J.Garcia 10-6) at Chicago Cubs (R.Wells 4-4), 11:20 a.m. Cincinnati (H.Bailey 7-5) at Pittsburgh (Correia 12-11), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Oswalt 5-7) at Washington (L.Hernandez 7-11), 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Marcum 10-3) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 6-9), 4:10 p.m. Arizona (D.Hudson 12-8) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 7-11), 4:35 p.m. San Francisco (Vogelsong 10-2) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 8-9), 5:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 8-14) at Colorado (Hammel 7-11), 5:40 p.m. Florida (Volstad 5-9) at San Diego (LeBlanc 1-2), 7:05 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Yankees 8, Twins 4: MINNEAPOLIS — CC Sabathia stopped his two-start losing streak with nine strikeouts over seven innings, and New York hit three home runs to support him against depleted Minnesota. Mark Teixeira hit his 33rd home run, a two-run shot in the third, and Nick Swisher and Andruw Jones hit back-to-back deep balls in the fifth inning against Brian Duensing (8-12). Sabathia (17-7) gave up four runs — three earned — and walked only one. • Red Sox 4, Royals 3: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Dustin Pedroia drove in three runs with a pair of well-timed singles, Josh Beckett survived a shaky start to go seven innings and Boston got back on the winning track. Jason Varitek drove in the other run for the Red Sox, who had lost five of their last seven games. Beckett (10-5) and the Royals proved to be the perfect matchup to turn things around. The right-hander allowed all three runs in the first three innings to improve to 7-1 in his career against them — his only loss came July 28 in Boston. • Indians 4, White Sox 2: CHICAGO — Justin Masterson pitched six effective innings, Kosuke Fukudome had a tiebreaking RBI triple and the Indians inched closer to the top of the AL Central with a victory over the White Sox. Matt LaPorta hit a two-run homer for Cleveland, which pulled within 1½ games of idle Detroit for the division lead. The Tribe opens a three-game series at Detroit today. • Angels 2, Rangers 1: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Rookie Mark Trumbo hit a game-ending two-run homer down the left-field line, and the Angels beat Texas to avoid a four-game sweep. After Torii Hunter led off the ninth with a single, Trumbo hit his 23rd homer of the season off Mike Adams (1-2), snapping the Angels’ five-game skid and ending Texas’ six-game winning streak with one dramatic swing. • Blue Jays 7, Athletics 0: OAKLAND, Calif. — Ricky Romero pitched a three-hitter to extend his career-high winning streak to five games, Colby Rasmus homered and scored three times and Toronto beat the Athletics.

• Phillies 4, Diamondbacks 1: PHILADELPHIA — John Mayberry Jr. hit a two-run homer, David Herndon tossed three scoreless innings in relief and Philadelphia beat Arizona in a matchup of division leaders. The major league-leading Phillies took two of three in a potential playoff preview, improving to 14-1-1 in their last 16 series. A thunderstorm delayed the game for 2 hours, 17 minutes after three innings. Neither starting pitcher returned when play resumed. Herndon (1-2) gave up one hit and struck out four to earn his second career win. Ryan Madson finished for his 23rd save in 24 tries. • Braves 1, Giants 0: ATLANTA — Mike Minor pitched six crisp innings to outduel Tim Lincecum, and Atlanta’s Chipper Jones homered for the only run. The Braves appeared to be at a distinct disadvantage with Minor, filling in with Tommy Hanson on the DL, going against the two-time NL Cy Young Award winner. But Minor (3-2) pitched brilliantly, allowing just four hits and one intentional walk while striking out a season-high nine. • Dodgers 5, Brewers 1: MILWAUKEE — Clayton Kershaw throttled the streaking Brewers with eight scoreless innings and Rod Barajas homered, leading the Dodgers to the victory. The NL Centralleading Brewers came in winners of 19 of 21 and were looking to complete a 7-0 homestand. But Kershaw (15-5) was tremendous, retiring 13 of his final 14 batters and never facing serious trouble after the third inning. • Nationals 3, Reds 1: WASHINGTON — Jonny Gomes hit a two-run single against his former team and Jordan Zimmermann pitched shutout ball into the sixth inning to lead Washington to the victory. Nationals catcher Jesus Flores also had his first home run in more than two years. • Padres 3, Marlins 1: SAN DIEGO — Tim Stauffer tossed seven strong innings to rebound from his worst start of the season and lead San Diego to the win. Stauffer (8-9) allowed one run — John Buck’s 15th homer in the seventh inning — and five hits. The right-hander struck out five and walked one.

NL BOXSCORES Padres 3, Marlins 1 Florida Bonifacio ss Petersen lf-rf Stanton rf Amezaga lf Dobbs 3b G.Sanchez 1b Cameron cf J.Buck c Jo.Lopez 2b Vazquez p a-Wise ph Cishek p Totals

AB 4 4 2 0 4 4 4 4 4 2 1 0 33

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 2

SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

Avg. .288 .280 .263 .188 .288 .268 .209 .229 .194 .200 .238 ---

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Venable rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Bartlett ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .251 Maybin cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .275 Guzman 1b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .338 O.Hudson 2b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .249 Blanks lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .263 Hundley c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .259 Forsythe 3b 2 0 0 1 0 0 .219 Stauffer p 2 0 1 0 0 1 .167 b-Cunningham ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 3 6 3 0 6 Florida 000 000 100 — 1 6 0 San Diego 210 000 00x — 3 6 0 a-grounded out for Vazquez in the 7th. b-popped out for Stauffer in the 7th. LOB—Florida 7, San Diego 3. 2B—Petersen (7), Stanton (22), Bartlett (15). 3B—Guzman (2), Hundley (4). HR—J.Buck (15), off Stauffer. RBIs—J.Buck (47), Guzman 2 (33), Forsythe (10). SB—Maybin (32). SF—Forsythe. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 3 (Dobbs, J.Buck, G.Sanchez); San Diego 2 (Bartlett, Cunningham). Runners moved up—Venable, Hundley, Forsythe. DP—Florida 1 (J.Buck, J.Buck). Florida IP H R ER Vazquez L, 7-11 6 5 3 3 Cishek 2 1 0 0 San Diego IP H R ER Stauffer W, 8-9 7 5 1 1 Gregerson 1 1 0 0 H.Bell S, 33-36 1 0 0 0 HBP—by Vazquez (O.Hudson). T—2:17. A—18,403 (42,691).

BB 0 0 BB 1 1 0

SO 5 1 SO 5 0 0

NP 83 20 NP 95 22 13

ERA 4.67 2.84 ERA 3.43 2.80 2.54

Phillies 4, Diamondbacks 1 Arizona AB R Bloomquist ss 4 0 R.Roberts 3b 4 0 J.Upton rf 4 0 Montero c 4 0 C.Young cf 2 0 K.Johnson 2b 3 0 Goldschmidt 1b 3 1 G.Parra lf 3 0 I.Kennedy p 0 0 Owings p 1 0 Shaw p 0 0 b-Cowgill ph 1 0 Paterson p 0 0 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 Totals 29 1

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 1 10

Avg. .265 .259 .300 .269 .236 .208 .298 .290 .087 .222 --.171 -----

Philadelphia Rollins ss Mayberry cf Utley 2b Pence rf Ibanez lf Gload 1b

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0

Avg. .267 .263 .283 .311 .238 .238

AB 3 4 4 3 4 4

R 1 1 1 0 1 0

SO 1 0 1 2 1 1

Schneider c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .179 W.Valdez 3b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .238 Worley p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .188 Herndon p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-B.Francisco ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .221 Stutes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 4 7 4 4 9 Arizona 000 000 010 — 1 3 1 Philadelphia 012 010 00x — 4 7 0 a-struck out for Herndon in the 6th. b-struck out for Shaw in the 8th. E—Paterson (1). LOB—Arizona 3, Philadelphia 7. 2B—Montero (26), Utley (16), Ibanez 2 (25), W.Valdez (10). HR—Goldschmidt (4), off Stutes; Mayberry (10), off I.Kennedy. RBIs—Goldschmidt (10), Mayberry 2 (34), Ibanez (65), W.Valdez (20). CS—W.Valdez (3). S—I.Kennedy. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 2 (Bloomquist, C.Young); Philadelphia 6 (Worley 2, Schneider, Gload, Pence, W.Valdez). Runners moved up—Utley, Schneider. DP—Arizona 1 (Montero, Montero, K.Johnson). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kenndy L, 15-4 3 5 3 3 2 4 60 3.22 Owings 3 2 1 1 1 4 50 2.65 Shaw 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 2.70 Paterson 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 15 2.83 Da.Hernandez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.82 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Worley 3 1 0 0 0 2 30 2.76 Herndon W, 1-2 3 1 0 0 0 4 39 3.79 Stutes 1 1 1 1 1 1 18 3.40 Bastardo H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 1.35 Madson S, 23 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.06 Stutes pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Da.Hernandez 1-0. T—2:30 (Rain delay: 2:17). A—45,633 (43,651).

Nationals 3, Reds 1 Cincinnati AB B.Phillips 2b 4 Sappelt lf 5 Votto 1b 4 Bruce rf 4 Cairo 3b 3 Stubbs cf 3 Hanigan c 4 Janish ss 3 c-Alonso ph 1 Arroyo p 2 a-F.Lewis ph 1 Arredondo p 0 Bray p 0 Masset p 0 d-R.Hernandez ph 1 Totals 35

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 2

SO 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .286 .195 .320 .271 .266 .248 .263 .223 .417 .136 .245 1.000 ----.295

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Desmond ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .228 Ankiel cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .248 Zimmerman 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .300 Morse 1b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .319 Werth rf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .227 Espinosa 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .226 J.Gomes lf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .211 Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Flores c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .244 Zimmermann p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .205 Mattheus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --H.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-L.Nix ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .252 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Bixler lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .193 Totals 29 3 8 3 5 3 Cincinnati 000 000 100 — 1 8 0 Washington 000 012 00x — 3 8 1 a-reached on error for Arroyo in the 7th. b-walked for H.Rodriguez in the 7th. c-struck out for Janish in the 9th. d-lined out for Masset in the 9th.

E—Desmond (19). LOB—Cincinnati 10, Washington 8. 2B—Hanigan (6). HR—Flores (1), off Arroyo. RBIs—B.Phillips (64), J.Gomes 2 (37), Flores (1). CS—Desmond (8). S—Desmond. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 6 (Bruce 2, Janish 3, Sappelt); Washington 3 (Flores, Morse 2). Runners moved up—B.Phillips, Votto. GIDP—Janish, Morse. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Janish, B.Phillips, Votto); Washington 1 (Zimmermann, Desmond, Morse). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo L, 7-10 6 7 3 3 2 3 97 5.28 Arredondo 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.25 Bray 0 0 0 0 1 0 6 2.33 Masset 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 16 3.68 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zmrmn W, 8-10 5 2-3 6 0 0 2 1 102 3.11 Mattheus H, 5 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 2.67 Rodriguez H, 6 1 0 1 0 0 2 14 4.47 Clippard H, 32 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.58 Storen S, 33-37 1 2 0 0 0 1 25 2.72 Bray pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Bray 1-0, Masset 2-0, Mattheus 2-0. HBP—by Zimmermann (Cairo). WP— H.Rodriguez. PB—Flores. T—3:09. A—19,508 (41,506).

Braves 1, Giants 0 San Francisco C.Ross lf O.Cabrera 2b P.Sandoval 3b A.Huff 1b M.Tejada ss Schierholtz rf Rowand cf C.Stewart c Lincecum p a-DeRosa ph R.Ramirez p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 2 1 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1 12

Avg. .242 .221 .307 .245 .239 .283 .239 .212 .087 .167 ---

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .301 Prado lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McCann c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .301 Uggla 2b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .230 Freeman 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .293 C.Jones 3b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .271 Heyward rf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .220 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Minor p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .176 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Constanza ph-lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .394 Totals 28 1 6 1 3 8 San Francisco 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Atlanta 000 010 00x — 1 6 0 a-grounded out for Lincecum in the 8th. b-singled for Venters in the 8th. LOB—San Francisco 4, Atlanta 6. 2B—C.Ross (19), McCann (16), C.Jones (26). HR—C.Jones (11), off Lincecum. RBIs—C.Jones (55). SB—Constanza (6). CS—Uggla (3). Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 2 (A.Huff, Lincecum); Atlanta 4 (Freeman 2, Ale.Gonzalez, Uggla). GIDP—P.Sandoval, Ale.Gonzalez. DP—San Francisco 2 (C.Stewart, C.Stewart, M.Tejada), (O.Cabrera, M.Tejada, A.Huff); Atlanta 1 (Uggla, Ale.Gonzalez, Freeman). San Fran. IP Lnccm L, 11-10 7 R.Ramirez 1 Atlanta IP Minor W, 3-2 6 O’Flaherty H, 22 1 Venters H, 25 1 Kimbrel S, 37 1

H 5 1 H 4 1 0 0

R 1 0 R 0 0 0 0

ER 1 0 ER 0 0 0 0

BB 2 1 BB 1 0 0 0

SO 7 1 SO 9 1 0 2

NP 101 15 NP 98 15 12 14

ERA 2.53 2.84 ERA 4.26 1.29 1.15 1.78

Reed Hoffmann / The Associated Press

Kansas City catcher Salvador Perez holds onto the ball for the out against Boston’s Carl Crawford in the fourth inning Thursday in Kansas City, Mo. Crawford was trying to score from third base on a sacrifice fly Mike Aviles. IBB—off R.Ramirez (McCann), off Lincecum (Heyward), off Minor (C.Stewart). WP—Minor. T—2:30. A—30,720 (49,586).

Dodgers 5, Brewers 1 Los Angeles Gwynn Jr. lf Sellers ss Ethier rf Oeltjen rf Kemp cf J.Rivera 1b Miles 3b Barajas c J.Carroll 2b Kershaw p a-Loney ph Guerra p Totals

AB 5 5 3 0 4 3 3 4 4 3 1 0 35

R 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 5

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 4 2 10

Avg. .260 .190 .295 .214 .319 .333 .288 .222 .293 .228 .255 ---

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. C.Hart rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .267 Hairston Jr. cf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .261 Braun lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .329 Fielder 1b 3 0 0 1 0 1 .302 McGehee 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .239 Y.Betancourt ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Dillard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --De La Cruz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .260 Lucroy c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Jo.Wilson 2b-ss 3 0 1 0 0 2 .257 Estrada p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Loe p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --F.Lopez 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .186 Totals 31 1 7 1 0 7 Los Angeles 010 000 220 — 5 9 0 Milwaukee 000 000 001 — 1 7 2 a-struck out for Kershaw in the 9th. b-fouled out for De La Cruz in the 9th. E—Loe (1), McGehee (17). LOB—Los Angeles 6, Milwaukee 5. 2B—J.Rivera (7), Barajas (8), Hairston Jr. 2 (14). 3B—Braun (4). HR—Barajas (11), off Estrada. RBIs—J.Rivera (15), Miles (33), Barajas (29), J.Carroll (11), Fielder (90). SB—Kemp (33). S—Estrada. SF— J.Rivera, Fielder. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (Ethier, Barajas); Milwaukee 4 (Fielder 2, Hairston Jr., Kotsay). Runners moved up—Braun. GIDP—Ethier, Barajas, Hairston Jr.. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Miles, J.Carroll, J.Rivera); Milwaukee 2 (Fielder, Lucroy), (Y.Betancourt, Jo.Wilson, Fielder). Los Angeles IP H R Kershw W, 15-5 8 5 0 Guerra 1 2 1 Milwaukee IP H R Estrada L, 3-8 5 3 1 Loe 2 2 2 Dillard 1 3 2 De La Cruz 1 1 0 T—2:58. A—42,873 (41,900).

ER 0 1 ER 1 1 2 0

BB 0 0 BB 2 0 0 0

SO 6 1 SO 5 2 2 1

NP 104 20 NP 94 32 22 23

ERA 2.60 1.82 ERA 4.28 3.92 4.98 0.00

AL BOXSCORES Blue Jays 7, Athletics 0 Toronto AB R H Y.Escobar ss 5 0 0 E.Thames lf 4 1 1 Bautista rf 4 1 1 Lind 1b 4 0 1 a-Teahen ph-1b 1 0 0 Encarnacion dh 4 1 1 Rasmus cf 4 3 3 McCoy cf 0 0 0 Lawrie 3b 3 1 2 A.Hill 2b 4 0 1 Arencibia c 4 0 1 Totals 37 7 11

BI 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 2 7

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

SO 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .292 .272 .314 .265 .197 .286 .253 .231 .378 .227 .211

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. J.Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .294 Pennington ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .261 Crisp cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .271 Sweeney cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .285 Willingham dh 2 0 0 0 2 1 .248 Allen 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .474 C.Jackson lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .261 K.Suzuki c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .228 DeJesus rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .231 S.Sizemore 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Totals 31 0 3 0 2 6 Toronto 010 312 000 — 7 11 1 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 a-flied out for Lind in the 9th. E—Y.Escobar (12), Allen (1). LOB—Toronto 6, Oakland 6. 2B—Bautista (20), Rasmus (7), Lawrie (4), Pennington (16). HR—Rasmus (3), off Cahill. RBIs—Lind (72), Encarnacion (38), Rasmus 2 (12), Lawrie (10), Arencibia 2 (57). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 1 (Encarnacion); Oakland 3 (DeJesus, Allen 2). Runners moved up—Lind. GIDP—Lind, Encarnacion. DP—Oakland 2 (Pennington, J.Weeks, Allen), (J.Weeks, Pennington, Allen).

Toronto IP H R ER BB SO Romro W, 12-9 9 3 0 0 2 6 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO Cahill L, 9-12 5 1-3 9 7 7 2 2 Billings 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 3 Norberto 1 1 0 0 0 2 Breslow 1 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Billings 1-0. T—2:20. A—12,220 (35,067).

NP 111 NP 93 21 16 14

ERA 2.73 ERA 4.17 0.00 3.00 4.12

SO 0 0 1 0 3 1 0 0 0 3 8

Avg. .242 .279 .302 .342 .264 .293 .246 .262 .284 .308

Angels 2, Rangers 1 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss J.Hamilton dh Mi.Young 3b N.Cruz rf Napoli 1b Dav.Murphy lf 1-Gentry pr-cf Torrealba c En.Chavez cf-lf Totals

AB 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 0 3 4 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 7 1 2

Robertsn H, 27 1 0 0 0 0 Wade 1 0 0 0 0 Minnesota IP H R ER BB Dnsng L, 8-12 5 10 6 6 1 Mijares 2 1 0 0 2 Al.Burnett 2-3 1 0 0 0 Perkins 1 1 0 0 0 Capps 1-3 2 2 2 1 Inherited runners-scored—Perkins Capps. T—3:09. A—41,126 (39,500).

1 15 1.27 1 12 2.22 SO NP ERA 1 92 4.75 0 29 5.00 0 13 5.77 2 14 2.34 0 20 4.62 1-0. WP—

Red Sox 4, Royals 3 Boston AB R Ellsbury cf 3 1 Lowrie 3b 4 1 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 Pedroia 2b 4 0 Reddick rf 3 1 C.Crawford lf 4 0 Lavarnway dh 4 0 Varitek c 3 0 Aviles ss 4 1 Totals 33 4

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 3 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 9 4 3

SO 0 1 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 8

Avg. .313 .256 .343 .309 .307 .249 .000 .228 .233

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Izturis 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .269 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .290 Abreu lf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .252 V.Wells lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Tor.Hunter rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .257 Trumbo 1b 4 1 2 2 0 1 .259 Branyan dh 2 0 0 0 1 0 .186 Bourjos cf 3 0 2 0 0 0 .274 Aybar ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .259 Mathis c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .176 a-Callaspo ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Bo.Wilson c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .176 Totals 30 2 6 2 2 9 Texas 000 000 100 — 1 7 1 Los Angeles 000 000 002 — 2 6 0 No outs when winning run scored. a-popped out for Mathis in the 7th. 1-ran for Dav.Murphy in the 9th. E—C.Lewis (4). LOB—Texas 8, Los Angeles 6. 2B— Andrus (19), Abreu (21). HR—Napoli (20), off Weaver; Trumbo (23), off M.Adams. RBIs—Napoli (50), Trumbo 2 (68). SB—Andrus (32), Gentry (14), Bourjos (16). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 4 (N.Cruz, J.Hamilton, Kinsler, En.Chavez); Los Angeles 4 (Aybar, Mathis, Tor.Hunter, Callaspo). Runners moved up—En.Chavez.

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .297 Me.Cabrera cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .309 Butler dh 3 0 3 1 0 0 .293 1-Getz pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .256 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .268 Francoeur rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .275 Giavotella 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .288 S.Perez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .200 Moustakas 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .195 A.Escobar ss 2 1 1 0 0 0 .253 Totals 32 3 8 3 0 7 Boston 012 010 000 — 4 9 0 Kansas City 102 000 000 — 3 8 0 1-ran for Butler in the 8th. LOB—Boston 5, Kansas City 5. 2B—Lowrie (12), Pedroia (28), Reddick (10), A.Gordon (37). HR—A.Gordon (16), off Beckett. RBIs—Pedroia 3 (65), Varitek (25), A.Gordon 2 (64), Butler (69). SB—Ellsbury (33), Pedroia (24), C.Crawford 2 (17). S—Me.Cabrera, A.Escobar. SF—Butler. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 3 (Pedroia, Reddick, C.Crawford); Kansas City 3 (Hosmer, Me.Cabrera, S.Perez). Runners moved up—Ad.Gonzalez 2. DP—Kansas City 1 (Me.Cabrera, Me.Cabrera, S.Perez).

Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP C.Lewis 7 4 0 0 2 7 112 M.Lowe H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 M.Adams L, 1-2 0 2 2 2 0 0 5 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP Weaver 7 6 1 1 1 5 115 Cassevah 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 2 26 Ramirez W, 1-0 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 M.Adams pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Ho.Ramirez 1-0. T—2:47. A—41,123 (45,389).

Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beckett W, 10-5 7 7 3 3 0 4 110 2.46 D.Bard H, 29 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 2.17 Papelbon S, 29 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.96 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochvr L, 8-10 6 8 4 4 2 6 114 4.93 Bl.Wood 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 23 3.61 Collins 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 3.56 Crow 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.29 Inherited runners-scored—Collins 1-0. WP—Beckett, Hochevar. T—3:13. A—20,547 (37,903).

ERA 3.83 3.13 3.24 ERA 2.10 2.28 9.00

Yankees 8, Twins 4 New York Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Cano 2b Swisher dh An.Jones rf E.Nunez 3b Cervelli c Gardner lf Totals

AB 5 5 3 5 4 4 5 5 4 40

R H 0 2 1 3 2 2 0 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 8 15

BI 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 2 1 8

BB 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .291 .281 .249 .305 .269 .246 .266 .253 .281

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Revere cf 5 0 2 1 0 0 .255 Plouffe 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .214 Mauer rf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .282 Morneau 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .223 Thome dh 3 1 0 0 1 1 .255 Valencia 3b 4 1 2 0 0 1 .246 Tosoni lf 4 0 0 0 0 4 .205 Nishioka ss 4 1 2 1 0 0 .220 Butera c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .170 a-L.Hughes ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Totals 36 4 10 4 1 11 New York 012 030 002 — 8 15 1 Minnesota 020 000 200 — 4 10 0 a-struck out for Butera in the 9th. E—E.Nunez (16). LOB—New York 10, Minnesota 7. 2B—Teixeira (19), E.Nunez (11), Valencia (24). 3B—Granderson (10). HR—Teixeira (33), off Duensing; Swisher (15), off Duensing; An.Jones (8), off Duensing. RBIs—Teixeira 2 (91), Swisher 2 (67), An.Jones (25), Cervelli 2 (17), Gardner (31), Revere (18), Mauer (24), Nishioka (19), Butera (16). SF—Gardner, Mauer. Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Swisher, Cervelli, Cano, Teixeira, Gardner); Minnesota 2 (Mauer, Thome). Runners moved up—Granderson, Cano, Morneau. GIDP—E.Nunez. DP—Minnesota 1 (Plouffe, Nishioka, Morneau). New York IP Sabthia W, 17-7 7

H R ER BB SO NP ERA 10 4 3 1 9 106 2.96

Indians 4, White Sox 2 Cleveland AB R Brantley lf 4 0 Donald 2b 4 0 A.Cabrera ss 4 0 Hafner dh 4 0 1-Carrera pr-dh 0 0 C.Santana c 5 0 Choo rf 5 1 Fukudome cf 4 2 LaPorta 1b 4 1 Hannahan 3b 2 0 Totals 36 4

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 3 3 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 9 4 4 13

Avg. .273 .207 .291 .288 .236 .239 .246 .280 .241 .220

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .283 De Aza rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .289 a-Quentin ph-rf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Konerko dh 4 1 2 1 1 1 .316 A.Dunn 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .168 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Rios cf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .213 Vizquel 3b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .252 Flowers c 1 0 1 1 3 0 .321 Beckham 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .238 Totals 35 2 9 2 4 5 Cleveland 000 202 000 — 4 9 0 Chicago 001 100 000 — 2 9 0 a-grounded out for De Aza in the 7th. 1-ran for Hafner in the 9th. LOB—Cleveland 11, Chicago 10. 2B—Brantley (22), C.Santana (25), Vizquel (6). 3B—Fukudome (1). HR— LaPorta (11), off Z.Stewart; Konerko (28), off Masterson. RBIs—A.Cabrera (74), Fukudome (7), LaPorta 2 (43), Konerko (84), Flowers (3). SB—Donald (1). Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 7 (Brantley 2, Donald 2, Hafner 2, Choo); Chicago 5 (Al.Ramirez, Beckham 4). GIDP—De Aza. DP—Cleveland 1 (Donald, A.Cabrera, LaPorta). Cleveland IP Mstrsn W, 10-7 6

H R ER BB SO NP ERA 7 2 2 3 2 108 2.71

R.Perez H, 11 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 2.20 J.Smith H, 10 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.66 Pestano H, 17 1 2 0 0 1 2 26 2.68 Perez S, 27-30 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 3.06 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Humber 1 1-3 3 0 0 0 3 26 3.63 Z.Stewart 2 2-3 4 2 2 1 2 48 3.74 Ohman L, 0-3 1 1-3 2 2 2 1 1 27 4.14 Frasor 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 14 3.44 Thornton 2 0 0 0 0 3 24 3.38 S.Santos 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 2.79 Inherited runners-scored—Z.Stewart 2-0, Frasor 3-1. IBB—off S.Santos (Hafner). HBP—by Ohman (Brantley), by S.Santos (Donald). WP—Masterson. T—3:05. A—27,079 (40,615).

LEADERS Through Thursday’s Games AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .343; MiYoung, Texas, .342; Kotchman, Tampa Bay, .332; VMartinez, Detroit, .325; MiCabrera, Detroit, .323; Konerko, Chicago, .316; Bautista, Toronto, .314. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 112; Bautista, Toronto, 90; Ellsbury, Boston, 88; Kinsler, Texas, 84; AdGonzalez, Boston, 81; Cano, New York, 80; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 80. RBI—Granderson, New York, 95; AdGonzalez, Boston, 92; Teixeira, New York, 91; Cano, New York, 86; MiYoung, Texas, 85; Konerko, Chicago, 84; MiCabrera, Detroit, 80. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 169; MiYoung, Texas, 169; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 158; Ellsbury, Boston, 157; Pedroia, Boston, 147; Cano, New York, 145; AGordon, Kansas City, 145. DOUBLES—Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 40; AGordon, Kansas City, 37; AdGonzalez, Boston, 36; MiYoung, Texas, 36; Francoeur, Kansas City, 35; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 33; MiCabrera, Detroit, 32. TRIPLES—Granderson, New York, 10; Bourjos, Los Angeles, 9; AJackson, Detroit, 8; JWeeks, Oakland, 8; Gardner, New York, 7; Cano, New York, 6; RDavis, Toronto, 6; AEscobar, Kansas City, 6; MiYoung, Texas, 6; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 6. HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 35; Granderson, New York, 34; Teixeira, New York, 33; Konerko, Chicago, 28; MarReynolds, Baltimore, 27; NCruz, Texas, 26; DOrtiz, Boston, 24; Quentin, Chicago, 24. STOLEN BASES—Crisp, Oakland, 37; Gardner, New York, 36; RDavis, Toronto, 34; Ellsbury, Boston, 33; Andrus, Texas, 32; ISuzuki, Seattle, 30; Aybar, Los Angeles, 25. PITCHING—Verlander, Detroit, 18-5; Sabathia, New York, 17-7; Weaver, Los Angeles, 14-6; 8 tied at 12. STRIKEOUTS—Verlander, Detroit, 204; Sabathia, New York, 184; FHernandez, Seattle, 176; Shields, Tampa Bay, 173; Price, Tampa Bay, 164; CWilson, Texas, 159; Weaver, Los Angeles, 158. SAVES—Valverde, Detroit, 35; MaRivera, New York, 32; League, Seattle, 30; Papelbon, Boston, 29; CPerez, Cleveland, 27; Walden, Los Angeles, 26; SSantos, Chicago, 25. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .336; Braun, Milwaukee, .329; Votto, Cincinnati, .320; DanMurphy, New York, .320; Morse, Washington, .319; Kemp, Los Angeles, .319; Victorino, Philadelphia, .314. RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 82; Braun, Milwaukee, 81; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 81; Votto, Cincinnati, 81; JosReyes, New York, 80; JUpton, Arizona, 80; Rollins, Philadelphia, 78. RBI—Howard, Philadelphia, 95; Fielder, Milwaukee, 90; Kemp, Los Angeles, 89; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 85; Bruce, Cincinnati, 80; Braun, Milwaukee, 78; Berkman, St. Louis, 77. HITS—SCastro, Chicago, 160; Bourn, Atlanta, 149; Votto, Cincinnati, 145; Kemp, Los Angeles, 144; Pence, Philadelphia, 144; JosReyes, New York, 144; JUpton, Arizona, 142. DOUBLES—JUpton, Arizona, 34; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 32; Beltran, San Francisco, 31; Holliday, St. Louis, 30; AMcCutchen, Pittsburgh, 30; Pence, Philadelphia, 30; Fielder, Milwaukee, 29; Morse, Washington, 29; Votto, Cincinnati, 29. TRIPLES—JosReyes, New York, 16; Fowler, Colorado, 12; Victorino, Philadelphia, 12; SCastro, Chicago, 8; Bourn, Atlanta, 7; SSmith, Colorado, 7; Infante, Florida, 6; Maybin, San Diego, 6; Morgan, Milwaukee, 6; Rasmus, St. Louis, 6. HOME RUNS—Pujols, St. Louis, 30; Stanton, Florida, 29; Berkman, St. Louis, 28; Kemp, Los Angeles, 28; Fielder, Milwaukee, 27; Uggla, Atlanta, 27; Bruce, Cincinnati, 26; Howard, Philadelphia, 26. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Atlanta, 45; JosReyes, New York, 34; Kemp, Los Angeles, 33; Maybin, San Diego, 32; Bonifacio, Florida, 29; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 29; Rollins, Philadelphia, 28. PITCHING—IKennedy, Arizona, 15-4; Halladay, Philadelphia, 15-5; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 15-5; Hamels, Philadelphia, 13-7; ClLee, Philadelphia, 13-7; Gallardo, Milwaukee, 13-8; 5 tied at 12. STRIKEOUTS—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 199; ClLee, Philadelphia, 184; Lincecum, San Francisco, 182; Halladay, Philadelphia, 177; AniSanchez, Florida, 160; Hamels, Philadelphia, 155; Greinke, Milwaukee, 151. SAVES—Kimbrel, Atlanta, 37; Axford, Milwaukee, 36; BrWilson, San Francisco, 35; LNunez, Florida, 33; HBell, San Diego, 33; Storen, Washington, 33; Putz, Arizona, 30; Hanrahan, Pittsburgh, 30.


D4 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NBA

S  B

Football • Pryor included in NFL draft, must sit out five: Terrelle Pryor will have an opportunity to pursue his NFL dreams, with one significant caveat: The former Ohio State star must still pay for breaking NCAA rules while he was in college. The league announced Thursday that Pryor is eligible for its supplemental draft, but he won’t be allowed to practice for the team that selects him until Week 6. Pryor gave up his final season with the Buckeyes following an investigation into the team’s memorabilia-for-cash scandal. He would have had to sit out five games had he chosen to return to Ohio State. • Miami trying to move forward amid scandal: Speaking out for the first time since Miami football players were accused of getting cash, gifts and prostitutes from an ex-booster, athletic director Shawn Eichorst vowed Thursday that “a better day” would be coming for the Hurricanes. Some players also ended their silence to say the team is hurting because of the allegations. Those messages came as the attorney for Nevin Shapiro, a convicted Ponzi scheme architect, defended her client’s accusations that he bankrolled a wild lifestyle for Hurricane players. In a statement, Eichorst said the subjects of the NCAA and university investigation have his unconditional support. He urged a skeptical fan base to remain patient with a process that went on quietly for five months, then burst into the public eye Tuesday when Shapiro’s claims were published by Yahoo Sports. • Vick stands by decision to come to Eagles: Michael Vick is glad he chose the Philadelphia Eagles, even if he had more attractive options. After telling GQ magazine that he didn’t want to come to Philadelphia to be a third-string quarterback following his release from federal prison two years ago, Vick clarified his remarks on Thursday. “I did speak with many people, but the decision to sign in Philadelphia was based on my discussions with my agent, my family and with Coach (Andy) Reid,” Vick said in a statement released hours before the Eagles played the Steelers in a preseason game. Vick, who rejuvenated his career with the Eagles and started in the Pro Bowl last year, said in the September issue that commissioner Roger Goodell was among those who convinced him Philadelphia was the right destination. • Current, former players sue NFL over concussions: Six former players and one current player have sued the NFL in Philadelphia over the league’s handling of concussion-related injuries, the first potential classaction lawsuit of its kind. The players accuse the league of training players to hit with their heads, failing to properly treat them for concussions and trying to conceal for decades any links between football and brain injuries. The plaintiffs include two-time Super Bowl champion Jim McMahon, who has said he played through five concussions but now frequently walks around “in a daze” and forgets why he entered a room. The suit accuses the NFL of negligence and intentional misconduct in its response to the headaches, dizziness and dementia that former players have reported. • Longhorn network won’t hurt Big 12?: The University of Texas and ESPN defended the $300 million Longhorn Network on Thursday amid uncertainty over whether Texas A&M will remain in the Big 12 after expressing concern over its archrival’s exclusive television outlet. The Longhorn Network launches next week. Although Texas is not the first school to have its own sports network, it’s the first time ESPN will be behind one. “The opportunities are just huge for each (Big 12) institution,” Texas athletic director DeLoss Dodds said. “I think as time goes by we’ll all learn how to better use those opportunities and get past somebody having a network.” • Vermeil does not like new NFL practice rules: Former St. Louis coach Dick Vermeil says his Rams would not have won the Super Bowl back in 1999 under the new, limited practice rules of the NFL. Vermeil, who visited the Rams on Thursday, was famous for his tough training camps. Under the new collective bargaining agreement, the mandatory veteran reporting date is no earlier than 15 days before the first preseason game. The first day is limited to physicals and meetings, and the second and third day workouts have no pads or contact. Teams can have

only one padded practice per day in camp.

Baseball • Montana wins LLWS debut: The boys from Billings keep making Montana Little League history. The first team from the state to advance to South Williamsport, Pa., overcame a shaky start and three solo homers Thursday by the sluggers from Rapid City, S.D., to win its Little League World Series debut, 6-4. Montana took control with a five-run fourth inning highlighted by Connor Kieckbusch’s two-run single and Cole McKenzie’s two-RBI double with two outs. Mexicali, Mexico, shut out Kaoshiung, Taiwan, 3-0, in the series’ first game behind a twohitter by flame-throwing righty Jorge Jacobo. Hamamatsu City, Japan, beat Oranjestad, Aruba, 12-1. Lafayette, La., shut out Warner Robins, Ga., 2-0. • Corvallis wins WCL title: The Corvallis Knights won the West Coast League Thursday night, taking Game 2 of a bestof-three championship series against the Walla Walla Sweets, 11-4, in Corvallis. Corvallis won the first game of the series Tuesday, 14-3. Ryan Gorton, Jimmy Allen and Kramer Scott all homered for Corvallis. The Knights eliminated the Bend Elks from the postseason in three games in the West Division series. • First MLB player suspended for HGH: Mike Jacobs has become the first player suspended by Major League Baseball for a positive HGH test under the sport’s minor league drug testing procedures. The 30-year-old minor league first baseman, who was in the big leagues from 2005-10, received a 50-game suspension Thursday for taking the banned performanceenhancing substance and was subsequently released by the Colorado Rockies. Jacobs said he took human growth hormone to overcome knee and back ailments. Jacobs is the first North American pro athlete punished for taking HGH. • A-Rod back with Yankees, not in lineup: Alex Rodriguez has rejoined the New York Yankees — but he’s not quite ready to play. Rodriguez was not in the lineup Thursday night against the Twins, and manager Joe Girardi said the earliest he would come off the disabled list and play would be Saturday night. In the afternoon at Target Field, Rodriguez did some running in the outfield with strength and conditioning coordinator Dana Cavalea, took grounders at third base and ran at full speed to first and second, the fastest he’s tried to move since surgery July 11 to repair torn meniscus cartilage in his right knee. • Selig says no action on Astros sale: Major League Baseball has concluded two days of meetings with no action on the proposed sale of the Houston Astros. Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig says the Astros sale wasn’t even addressed by the owners in their annual summit. Selig announced Monday that the vote to approve the club’s sale for $680 million from Drayton McLane to Jim Crane was going to be delayed. He says his office is doing its due diligence and would not comment further. • Torre says umpires wrong on home run call: Major League Baseball says Dana DeMuth’s umpiring crew for the New York Yankees at Kansas City Royals game Wednesday night made a mistake on a call on a home run. Former Yankees manager Joe Torre, who now serves as executive vice president in charge of baseball operations for Major League Baseball, says “there really was a misunderstanding as to what the ground rule represented.” Billy Butler’s long hit appeared to strike the upper railing behind left field before bouncing back onto the field. Umpires ruled it a home run but went in to look at a review after talking to New York manager Joe Girardi. DeMuth ruled the hit a home run even after the video review. It should have been a double. • Victorino’s suspension reduced: Phillies All-Star center fielder Shane Victorino’s suspension for his part in a benchesclearing brawl at San Francisco on Aug. 5 has been reduced and he will miss the next two games. Victorino appealed the original suspension of three games and it was dropped to two games. He wasn’t in Philadelphia’s lineup against Arizona on Thursday and won’t play at Washington today. Victorino was the only player suspended for his actions during the brawl. • Red Sox put Youkilis on DL with bad back: The Boston Red Sox have placed third baseman Kevin Youkilis on the disabled

list because of a back injury and called up catching prospect Ryan Lavarnway from Triple-A Pawtucket. Red Sox manager Terry Francona announced the moves before Thursday night’s game against the Kansas City Royals. Lavarnway will remain the designated hitter for now with David Ortiz sideline by a sore foot. The 24-year-old was batting a combined .293 with 30 homers and 85 RBIs at DoubleA and Triple-A.

Basketball • Former Jazz coach Robertson dies: Scotty Robertson, a former Louisiana Tech coach and the first coach of the NBA’s New Orleans Jazz, has died. Louisiana Tech athletic director Bruce Van De Velde confirmed Robertson’s death on Thursday. Robertson, who had battled cancer in addition to a stroke last year, was 81. During his years in the NBA, Robertson also served as head coach with the Chicago Bulls and Detroit Pistons. • Georgetown, Chinese basketball teams brawl: A wild brawl broke out between Georgetown and a Chinese men’s basketball team Thursday night in Beijing, putting an immediate end to a supposed goodwill game that coincided with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden’s visit to the country. The benches cleared and fights erupted all over the court with about 9½ minutes left in the fourth quarter. The rest of the exhibition between Georgetown and the Bayi Rockets was called off. The Washington Post reported Georgetown and Bayi players tackled and threw punches at each another. Chairs and water bottles were tossed as the Hoyas headed to the locker room with the score 64-all in a testy, foulplagued matchup. • USC’s Jio Fontan out for season with knee injury: Southern California guard Jio Fontan will miss the upcoming season after tearing a ligament in his left knee during the Trojans’ exhibition tour in Brazil. USC confirmed Fontan’s injury on Thursday, two days after he landed awkwardly on the way to the basket during an exhibition against a Brazilian pro team. Fontan will undergo surgery soon. The 6-foot Fontan was the Trojans’ second-leading scorer and top playmaker as a junior last season, leading USC (19-15) to the NCAA tournament.

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Newly enshrined Hall of Famer Arvydas Sabonis arrives at a rally in his honor, Thursday in Portland.

Portland honors Sabonis after his Hall of Fame enshrinement By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Newly enshrined Hall of Famer Arvydas Sabonis was taken aback by the cheers he garnered at a downtown rally Thursday in his honor. “I’m very surprised,” he told nearly 3,000 fans gathered in Portland’s Pioneer Courthouse Square. “I don’t know what to say. I appreciate you remember me.” Sabonis was visiting Portland after being inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame last Friday. The 7-foot-3, 300-pound Lithuanian center was a star in Europe before coming to the NBA at age 31 to play for the Trail Blazers. He spent seven seasons in Portland. Sabonis had not returned to the city in the eight years since his retirement. But it was evident Thursday he was still beloved, with fans chanting his nickname, Sabas. Former teammates Brian Grant and Chris Dudley took part in the celebration. One boy who appeared to be too young to have seen Sabonis play held a sign that read” “Sabas Rocks!” “I feel honored to have played with Arvydas Sabonis — one of

Mixed martial arts • UFC headed to Fox networks in landmark 7-year deal: The UFC has made it to network prime-time. Mixed martial arts’ dominant promotional company announced a landmark sevenyear deal with Fox on Thursday, putting four UFC shows on the main network each year and an extensive array of programming on its cable networks. The UFC will become a prominent feature on FX, with live fights on most Friday nights and a revamped version of “The Ultimate Fighter,” the UFC’s popular reality show. UFC President Dana White said the deal is the biggest step yet in MMA’s transformation from a banned fringe sport into a mainstream entertainment property. The UFC already is wildly popular among young men, but Fox will put the sport in front of an enormous new audience with its first regular slot on a broadcast network. “This is what I always wanted, what I always thought was the pinnacle for us,” White said. “This partnership is going to take this sport to the next level.”

Tennis • Nadal needs three-tiebreaker match to advance: Rafael Nadal wanted to play a lot of tennis at the Western & Southern Open, though maybe not all in one day. Nadal survived a three-set, three-tiebreaker match against fellow Spaniard Fernando Verdasco on Thursday in Cincinnati, advancing to the quarterfinals with a 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 7-6 (9) victory that kept him on court for 3 hours, 38 minutes. The top three players in the men’s bracket advanced Thursday. Djokovic beat qualifier Radek Stepanek 63, 6-3 in a ragged match, improving to 31-0 on hard courts this year and 55-1 overall. Federer knocked off James Blake 6-4, 61 in the evening. in the women’s bracket, Serena Williams’ premature departure cleared the way for Samantha Stosur, who got an extra day of rest and looked refreshed on Thursday, beating fifth-seeded Li Na of China 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Second-seeded Vera Zvonareva of Russia advanced to the quarterfinals with a 6-2, 62 win over Petra Martic. Fourthseeded Maria Sharapova beat Svetlana Kuznetsova 6-2, 6-3. — From wire reports

the best players ever,” Dudley said. “There was a time he was considered the best player in the world.” Sabonis, a native of Kaunas, Lithuania, helped the Soviet Union win the 1988 Olympic gold medal, which included a semifinal win over the United States. He led Lithuania to bronze medals in the 1992 and 1996 Olympics. He was drafted in 1986 but didn’t come to the NBA until 1995. He retired in 2001, but returned to the Blazers for one additional season in 2002-03. In 470 regular season games with the Blazers, Sabonis averaged 12 points and 7.3 rebounds per game. He was dogged by various injuries in his later years, so NBA fans never really saw how good he was — the elegant passing, his skillful three-pointer and dangerous hook shot. Outside the game, Sabonis was an unassuming personality,

541-322-CARE

shy about using English. Grant recalled that he thought Sabonis didn’t speak until one day after a fall he asked “You OK?” Asked to characterize his NBA career, Sabonis said: “First, good. Second, not good. And third, good again.” Sabonis, 46, finally retired from professional basketball in 2005 after playing with his hometown Lithuanian team, Zalgiris. He is now a part owner of the Euroleague team. After the rally, Sabonis was the guest of honor at an evening reception hosted by the Trail Blazers. Mayor Sam Adams officially proclaimed Thursday “Arvydas Sabonis Day.”

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 D5

Elks Continued from D1 One-time promotional events such as an appearance by the San Diego Chicken and Jacoby Ellsbury Bobblehead Night (in honor of the Madras native, former Bend Elk and current Boston Red Sox All-Star outfielder) were characterized as hits by Richards, as was an openingnight fundraiser to send several local World War II veterans to Washington, D.C., to see the National World War II Memorial. “That was just a phenomenal opening event,” Richards said of the Elks’ June 10 home debut, attended by 1,874 fans. “That really kicked off our season.” The on-field product was inconsistent early, as several players arrived late from their colleges and the team gradually meshed. Players leaving the team at different times toward the end of the season left head coach Sean Kinney and the Bend coaching staff in tight spots. Five regular starting position players were absent for the WCL playoffs. “It’s frustrating as a general manager to basically have three seasons (in one),” Richards said. The 2011 Elks lacked the offensive potency of the 2010 team, which set seven WCL team records. Bend batted 30 points below its 2010 average (.263) and trailed its totals from last year in every offensive category but home runs and walks. On the mound, the Elks were sixth in the nine-team league in team earned run average (2.94), a significant improvement over last season’s 3.91, and registered 14 saves to the 2010 team’s six. Infielder Tyler Christian, of San Jose State University, set an individual WCL record in 2011 with 18 doubles. More ominously, Elks players committed 90 errors in 43 games — a team record, according to Richards. “That’s one record we certainly want to find the root cause of,” the general manager said. Now Richards begins catching up on his to-do list: recruiting players for the 2012 Elks, firming up the coaching staff for next year, and making improvements to Genna Stadium. The overarching task is building upon another successful season, on and off the field. Robert Husseman can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at rhusseman@bendbulletin.com.

A look back at the Bend Elks The statistical leaders for the Elks this season:

HITTING Batting average: Bo Walter, .304 Hits: Tyler Christian, 43 Doubles: Christian, 18 (WCL record) Home runs: Christian and Michael Benjamin Jr., 4 RBI: Christian, 35

GOLF ROUNDUP

GOLF: LPGA TOUR

Eugene’s Quinney tied for lead in Wyndham

Playing in Oregon, Norway’s Pettersen talks about tragedy in her home country

The Associated Press GREENSBORO, N.C. — If Jeff Quinney keeps this up, he might soon have a new PGA Tour card — and a spot in the playoffs. Quinney and Tommy Gainey shot 7-under 63s on Thursday to share the lead after one round in the Wyndham Championship. Quinney, who went to South Eugene High School, had eight birdies, including five in a row early in his round, to start strong in his last chance to qualify for golf’s postseason. Gainey had five birdies and an eagle in matching his career-best round. Both players are chasing their first PGA Tour victory. Stuart Appleby had a 64. Ten players — Paul Casey, Carl Pettersson, Ernie Els, Jason Bohn, Jimmy Walker, Tim Herron, Lee Janzen, Jim Furyk, Vijay Singh and George McNeill — shot 65s during another low-scoring day at Sedgefield Country Club. Quinney arrived in 215th place in the FedEx Cup standings. A win — and the 500 points that accompany it — would put him in The Barclays. “The only chance I get in the playoffs is probably winning this week, and coming with the attitude of ‘allin,’ ” Quinney said. “Basically, just push all your chips in, and this is what I got.” A year ago, a close-but-not-enough finish on this course left Quinney outside the playoff field. He wound up in 126th place, falling short of the postseason by three points. He spent most of the first day of his return to the par-70 Sedgefield layout near the top of the leaderboard after his early flurry of birdies. Starting on the back nine, Quinney birdied Nos. 12-16 to move to 5 under. After a bogey on No. 18, he added three more birdies on his final nine holes and closed by sticking his 140-yard approach shot within 3 feet and sinking that putt for his eighth birdie. “It’s my last chance, and don’t hold back, try to get out of my own way,” Quinney said. Quinney, who has conditional status on the tour, is playing just his 11th tournament of the year. “Once you do get in, you put a little pressure on yourself,” Quinney said. “It’s been frustrating. This is my first year I’ve been non-exempt for five years, and so I think you just expect it to be somewhere else, and it’s a struggle mentally to fight that. I still got the game. I just need the opportunities and not to get in your own way and try to force things.” Gainey caught him during the afternoon, with four birdies and the eagle coming during the South Carolina native’s front nine. He moved to 7 under with a birdie on the par-4 13th, but ran into trouble on No. 15 when he sent his tee shot into a creek and closed his round with five pars. “I hit it terrible off the tee, hit my irons really good, made a lot of putts,

By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

Chuck Burton / The Associated Press

Tommy Gainey watches his shot from a sand trap on the 15th hole during the first round of the Wyndham Championship in Greensboro, N.C., Thursday. Gainey shot a 63 and is tied for the lead. but I left quite a few shots out there, so I’ve got to definitely work on the tee ball here, because it’s starting to really frustrate me,” Gainey said. “Any time you play and shoot 63 ... when you have no blemishes on a golf course like this — or any golf course, for that matter — it’s a good day.” Gainey — who’s at No. 40 on the points list — is safely in the playoff field. Some others here this week aren’t quite that secure. Once again, the prevailing storyline was the list of players who came in search of a push into the playoffs. The Wyndham annually marks the final chance to crack the top 125 on the points list and qualify for the postseason, which starts next week in New Jersey. Els, who arrived at No. 126, was part of a morning threesome of bubble players that also included No. 124 Cameron Beckman and No. 125 Camilo Villegas. “I said to the guys, ‘My playoffs started this week. If I don’t play well this week, I’m not advancing,’” Els said. “Most of the other guys have four playoff events. I have five. I feel like I need to do well (to go to) The Barclays and keep going. It’s hard not to think about it. There’s quite a bit of pressure on us guys lower down the field. We need to perform well.” Fabian Gomez delivered the shot of the day — a double eagle on the par-5 No. 15. His 5-wood shot from 250 yards out went into the hole on the fly for the tour’s third albatross of the year. And Furyk had two eagles in a span of four holes, his second multieagle round this year. Indeed, low scores once again

were the norm at the Donald Rossdesigned course. Since the tournament moved back here in 2008, two of the three winners have finished at 20 under or better. “My caddie said 5 under every day is sort of the goal,” Casey said. Also on Thursday: Sluman shoots 65 to take Champions Tour lead HARRISON, N.Y. — Jeff Sluman shot a 6-under 65 to take a onestroke lead after the first round of the Senior Players Championship, the Champions Tour’s final major of the season. Sluman, the winner last month at Pebble Beach, had seven birdies and a bogey on Westchester Country Club’s tree-lined West Course. Gary Hallberg and Peter Senior opened with 66s. Jay Haas, the 2009 winner, Corey Pavin and Michael Allen were two strokes back at 67, and Fred Couples, defending champion Mark O’Meara and Tommy Armour III had 68s. Sluman holed a 45-foot putt on the 12th, chipped in from 25 feet with a 9-iron on 13, then made a 3-footer on 14. “I made one of those bombs,” Sluman said. “I was just trying to two-putt and it fell into the hole. I followed it up on 13 from 25 feet. Making a 45-footer and following it up with a 25-footer is not something I’m used to.” Lawrie in front at Czech Open CELADNA, Czech Republic — Ireland’s Peter Lawrie shot a 6-under 66 to take a one-stroke lead after the first round of the Czech Open. Ireland’s Damien McGrane, France’s Victor Dubuisson and Spain’s Pedro Oriol opened with 67s.

NORTH PLAINS — Following the Women’s British Open, Suzann Pettersen returned again to her native Norway to join in the healing process after the horrific attacks on July 22 left 77 dead and shook her homeland. Pettersen has been humbled in the face of the tragedy. “The incredible thing is just how everyone’s kind of worked around this together. Everyone’s just been supporting each other,” she said. “I mean, you heard stories of people who survived. It’s just dreadful, to be honest, to hear the stories. You get goose bumps.” Pettersen was playing in the Evian Masters in France when the attacks occurred. Anders Behring Breivik has admitted detonating a bomb that killed eight people in central Oslo and fatally shooting 69 others at an island youth camp. After a trip home in the aftermath of the attacks, she played in the British Open the final weekend in July before returning to Norway again. “It’s just I never expected to get those messages that stuff like that had happened at home. I think that was the most shocking one. For that many young people to lose their lives is dreadful,” she said. At the last minute, Pettersen decided to take part in last weekend’s Irish Ladies Open on the women’s European tour, and came away with a win. The No. 3-ranked golfer in the world finished the event at 18 under, six strokes in front of Azahara Munoz Guiarro, of Spain. The victory at Killeen Castle sealed Pettersen’s spot on the European Solheim Cup team that will compete against the United States Sept. 23-25 — at Killeen Castle. Pettersen will get a good look at some of her Solheim competition this weekend at the LPGA Safeway Classic. The final spot on the U.S. team will be determined following the event at Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club just west of Portland. The team already includes Cristie Kerr, Morgan Pressel, Stacy Lewis, Angela Stanford, Paula Creamer, Michelle Wie, Brittany Lincicome, Brittany Lang and Juli Inkster. Katie Futcher, Kristy McPherson and Vicky Hurt are vying to edge Christina Kim out of the last spot. Captain Rosie Jones will add two additional teammates on Sunday following the tournament. Ai Miyazato, of Japan, won last year’s Safeway Classic, besting Kerr and Na Yeon Choi by two shots on the Ghost Creek course at Pumpkin Ridge. The win was Miyazato’s fifth of the 2010 season. Miyazato is again in the 150-player field this year for the tournament’s 40th anniversary in the Portland area. So is world No. 1 Yani Tseng, who won this year’s British Open for her fifth career major. Kerr, second-ranked in the world, is also playing in the 54-hole event that starts today. She won the Safeway Classic in 2008 when it was still at Columbia Edgewater Country Club, then finished in a tie for second last year. Kerr is still looking for her first win this season. “I’ve worked really hard on my game and I’ve been close a number of times. Even at the end of last year I was close to winning again,” Kerr said this week. “So it’s not a good feeling not to have any wins on the board at this point in the season, but I still have 10 or 12 events left, and I have to focus all my energy on getting that win.” In 2009, Pettersen came close to winning the Safeway Classic, but settled for runner-up after M.J. Hur birdied on the second hole of a playoff for her first LPGA victory. “I guess I’ve been lucky. I guess I’ve been unlucky,” Pettersen said about Portland. “I’ve been close, but not too close at the end here.”

PITCHING Innings pitched: Daniel Chavez, 68.1 Wins: Chavez, 6 Era (10+ innings pitched): Jeff Brigham, 0.95 Strikeouts: Jason Wilson, 38 Saves: Brigham, 5 The players from Bend that made the West Coast League All-Star team: OF Royce Bollinger, IF Michael Benjamin Jr., P Stephen Ostapeck, P Daniel Chavez

PNGA Continued from D1 Bend golfers Ryan Blackwell (fifth flight) and Declan Watts (sixth flight) were eliminated Thursday. The PNGA Junior Amateur attracts the best 17-and-younger golfers in the Pacific Northwest. Thirty-two out of 144 golfers in the field advanced from 36 holes of stroke play into the championship bracket, which began Wednesday. Those who did not make the cut, including all 10 Central Oregon golfers entered into the tournament, advanced to eightplayer consolation brackets. The championship match’s morning round is scheduled for today at 7:30 a.m. After a short break, Wu and Murphy are scheduled to tee it up again at noon. Spectators are welcome and admission is free.

Pac-12’s commish, those connected to USC react to Miami investigation By Gary Klein Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Larry Scott, commissioner of the Pacific 12 Conference, has quickly gained a reputation for making bold moves. And bold statements too. That was evident again Wednesday when Scott reflected on a Yahoo! Sports report detailing how a nowimprisoned University of Miami booster allegedly provided impermissible benefits to more than 70 Hurricanes athletes from 2002 to 2010. Paul Dee was Miami’s athletic director from 1993 to 2008. Last year, he was chairman of the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions, overseeing USC’s receiving sanctions that ranked among the most severe in college sports history. In a telephone interview, Scott was asked whether he agreed with national college football columnists who had described Dee as hypocritical. “If the allegations prove true,” he said, “the words irony and hypocrisy don’t seem to go far enough.” Scott said that, if allegations prove true, the Yahoo Sports! story was “a real indictment of some of the problems that exist in college

COLLEGE FOOTBALL sports and college football and underscores the need for dramatic reform in rules, culture and the enforcement process.” An advocate for change, he noted: “I like considering bold, new ideas in terms of reform. If I worry about anything, it’s that the reform effort moves too slowly and does not go far enough.” Scott emphasized he was not advocating for the NCAA to move the enforcement and penalty process outside the organization. But he endorses considering it. “I think we need to step back and consider bold new ideas, including the possibility of bringing in outside resources,” he said. Dee raised the ire of USC ad-

ministrators and fans in June 2010 when he said high-profile players “demand high-profile compliance,” while announcing the sanctions. On Wednesday, former USC center Ryan Kalil, a 2006 AllAmerican who plays for the Carolina Panthers, posted the quote on his Twitter feed. In a telephone interview, Cincinnati Bengals linebacker Keith Rivers, an All-American at USC in 2007, referenced the same quote. “It’s unfortunate that he was so harsh on SC when his school was doing way more than what you found USC to be guilty of,” Rivers said. USC coach Lane Kiffin refrained from weighing in on the Miami situation. When asked for a short response to the scandal, he said: “It would take me a lot more than one or two words.”

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D6 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A D V EN T U R E S P ORT S

Cache Continued from D1 The road climbed steadily through the forest, which eventually gave way to jaw-dropping vistas of nearby Mount Washington. Along the way, other peaks popped pleasantly into view. The 5,577-foot summit of Cache Mountain is a perfect location from which to glimpse some of Central Oregon’s most prominent mountains: the Three Sisters to the south, Mount Washington to the southwest, Mount Jefferson and Three Fingered Jack to the north, Hayrick and Hoodoo buttes to the northwest, and Black Butte to the east. The Cache Mountain ride, which includes 2,380 feet of elevation gain, is all about the views and the location, not so much the trail. The trail sucks — literally and figuratively — or at least it did last week. What is not overrun with snowbush, prickly weeds or fallen trees is like quicksand beneath your tires. And even without all that, it is not exactly the most rideable trail, as the top of the singletrack descent is extremely steep. Consider this excerpt from a review of the Cache Mountain loop by www.rei.com: “… the views from the top seem to confirm your good judgment in choosing this ride. However, the descent is so torturous that you may be tempted to blame the selection of this ride on your riding partner.” And this is how that same website rated the trail: “Aerobically difficult and technically absurd and treacherous.” That may be a bit of hyperbole, but it’s not too far off the mark. Wildfires in 2002 and 2003 burned much of the forest on and around Cache Mountain, resulting in countless downed trees and many incredible mountain views. But those fires also made the area susceptible to blowdown. Maintenance on the trail by the Central Oregon Trail Alliance is scheduled to begin this Saturday, according to Kent Howes, a COTA board member. The organization is looking for more volunteers to help with the project (www.cotamtb.com), which Howes says will take two to three weeks to complete.

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

Photos by Mark Morical / The Bulletin

The singletrack trail descent from the top of Cache Mountain is extremely steep and technical. Much of the trail is still covered by downed trees and snowbush.

Mount Washington is pictured from just below the summit of Cache Mountain. “I’ve never seen an area with that much brush and leaves,” Howes said. “It’s quite thick. It’s not getting ridden as much because of that.” COTA is hoping to have the trail cleared in time for the Sisters Mountain Bike Festival, scheduled Sept. 24-25. The event includes a ride up and down Cache Mountain, as does the Big Fat Tour, a mountain biking

event set for Oct. 14-16. With a cleared trail and fall conditions (less quicksand), the singletrack ride down the mountain will no doubt be more ridable and more fun. Until then, riders can enjoy the forest roads to the summit and the view from the top — and they have the wise option of riding forest roads back down to the trailhead at Scout Lake.

The singletrack descent begins a few hundred feet below the summit, and it was barely discernible when I rode there last week. I walked the first portion of the route down the hill because it was just too steep. A few sections were ridable, but after that, I spent most of the time carrying my bike over downed trees and picking thorns from snowbush off my legs. “When (snowbush) starts growing, it just starts going gangbusters,” said Chris Sabo, trails supervisor for the Deschutes National Forest. “We’re dealing with that on dozens of miles of trail right now.” When I finally reached Forest Road 2068, I had never been so excited to ride doubletrack. Rather than continue on the singletrack, I took a left and rode down the red-gravel road a few more miles back to Scout Lake. The ride lasted more than four hours, and I was happy to be done. But I learned a valuable lesson: Singletrack is not always the best option. Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

CYCLING

HIKING

COG WILD WINDELL’S YOUTH BIKE CAMP: A camping trip for boys and girls ages 10-18 who want an introduction to jumping and riding in a skills park; $165; Aug. 23-24 at Windell’s Camp in Welches near Mount Hood; 541385-7002; info@cogwild.com. LOCAL EVENING MOUNTAIN BIKE SHUTTLE: Leaves Cascade Lakes Lodge on Tuesdays at 5:30 p.m.; $10 per person; call 541-385-7002 for booking and more info. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Include options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, camps, races and shuttles; ages 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling and cyclocross; info@ bendenduranceacdemy.org; www. bendenduranceacdemy.org. MBSEF CYCLING PROGRAM: Classes in both mountain and road biking are offered through August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; 541-923-5650; www.trinitybikes.com. WEEKLY ROAD RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675.

GUIDED HIKES: Geared for those age 50 and older; two to three hikes per week in four national forests and four state parks; through Oct. 31; $20 per person; contact Silver Striders guide service at 541-383-8077, strideon@silverstriders. com or www.silverstriders.com.

DOWNHILL SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING MBSEF ALPINE SKIING SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Now through August for ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF FREE-RIDE SKIING AND SNOWBOARD SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Now through August for ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; visit www.mbsef.org.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

NORDIC SKIING MBSEF SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Now through August for ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

PADDLING KAYAKING CLASSES: Sundays, 4-6 p.m.; for all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

RUNNING REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at rundanorun1985@ gmail.com or 541-419-0889. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Distances and locations vary; paces between 7- and 11minute miles can be accommodated; Mondays at 5:30 p.m.; locations vary, Bend; free; 541-317-3568 or jenny@footzonebend.com.


F

E

HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE What stars watch

Inside

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

Michael C. Hall and others reveal their must-watch shows, Page E2

FAMILY

www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

INSIDE Dear Abby Bigger apartment may not be better with a roommate, Page E2

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, Page E3

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Kindergartners invited to area library events Local libraries will host special story times for children entering kindergarten. The events will include silly songs and stories about starting school. Kids will also make crafts and get to take home something to put in their school backpacks. The program is free, and registration is not required. The story times will take place at the following locations: • Redmond Public Library: 10:15 a.m. Wednesday • Downtown Bend Public Library: 10:15 a.m. Thursday • Sisters Public Library: 11 a.m. Thursday • East Bend Public Library: 9:30 a.m. Aug. 30 • Sunriver Area Public Library: 10:30 a.m. Aug. 31 Contact: www.deschutes library.org or 541-617-7099.

Special-needs nutrition focus of workshop Local nutritionist Lori Brizee is offering a class aimed at parents of children with special needs. The event will take place from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Aug. 30 at David Evans and Associates, 320 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Suite 101, Bend. Brizee will address finicky eaters and methods parents can use to try to get kids to accept more foods. She will also talk about issues involving kids who have difficulty with certain textures and consistencies of foods, kids who have difficulty chewing or swallowing, and kids who struggle to eat in a reasonable amount of time. The event will include time for questions. The event is sponsored by Central Oregon Disability Support Network. Free child care is provided. Those interested should register at dianna@ codsn.org or 541-548-8559.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Emmalee Cron, 18, is a recent graduate of Redmond High School. She was president of her senior class. She will attend Oregon State University this fall. She hopes to become a teacher one day.

Making the connection

Won’t you be my

neighbor? Getting to know folks next door provides sense of security, curbs isolation for Central Oregon families By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

F

Harry Potter bingo at Bend library Downtown Bend Public Library will host a Harry Potter bingo event at 3 p.m. Thursday. The game will include trivia questions from the first five books in the series. Heather McNeil, youth services manager, will host the game dressed as Professor Minerva McGonagall and will use a Scottish accent. Participants are encouraged to wear a costume, although it is not required. Prizes will be awarded. The event is for people ages 6 and older and is free. Contact: heatherm@deschutes library.org or 541-617-7099.

Inside A few tips on how to get to know your neighbors, Page E6

Museum has shorter hours Saturday The High Desert Museum will be open for shortened hours on Saturday, closing at 2 p.m. The closure is to accommodate the High Desert Rendezvous, an annual fundraising gala that begins at 5 p.m. The museum will remain open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. throughout the remainder of the summer. Contact: www.highdesert museum.org or 541-382-4754. — Alandra Johnson, The Bulletin

inding the right neighborhood was critically important to Cricket Kadoch when she and her family moved to Bend six years ago. While they could have chosen a house with lots of land, they opted for the River Rim development in southwest Bend, where the new homes were built cozily close together. Kadoch says it has been a great place to raise their kids, now 7 and 5. She feels like she knows her neighbors, from families with similar-age kids to couples who have been married for more than 50 years. Kadoch and her neighbors help provide a sense of security for one another. She feels comfortable letting her kids ride their bikes around the neighborhood. In turn, she watches out for other children. Kadoch has been known to bring over meals or shovel driveways when her neighbors are in need. “We can all use each other,” said Kadoch. “It lends to a feeling of safety.” Kadoch, however, is in the minority when it comes to neighborhood connections. Just 19 percent of Americans surveyed in 2009 by the Pew Research Center said they knew all of their neighbors; 24 percent said they knew most, 29 percent said they knew some and 28 percent said they knew none. Getting to know neighbors takes effort. It can be more difficult than it was a generation or two ago, when people spent less time watching TV and parents encouraged kids to go outside to play and not come home until dark. Those days are gone, but neighborhood connections can still be vitally important, especially for families. See Neighbors / E6

Illustrations by Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Independent Living program helped inspire Redmond High grad to want to be a teacher Editor’s Note: Standout Students, which runs every other week in The Bulletin, highlights outstanding teenagers in Central Oregon. To suggest a student for consideration, e-mail Megan Kehoe at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

For Emmalee Cron, 18, helping others started out as a way to fill a leadership requirement for school. Now, almost a year since she started giving back to students at her school, helping others is something that she wants to dedicate her life to. “It changed my attitude,” Emmalee said. “I realized that I don’t want to do this just once a week. I want to do this all the time.” Emmalee is a recent graduate of Redmond High School who spent a good part of her senior year volunteering in the school’s Independent Living Skills program, a program for students with mental and physical disabilities. Emmalee was also her senior class president, participated in Redmond High’s tennis and soccer teams, and maintained a GPA of 3.6 while taking a rigorous course load. See Standout / E6

STANDOUT STUDENTS

Day care change can be toughest on the parents By Gregory Ramey Cox Newspapers

DAYTON, Ohio — For the first several weeks of his life, Nathan was cared for almost exclusively by his parents, George and Susan. Things changed a bit for Nathan when he turned 11 weeks old and was brought to a day care center while his parents worked. This ended up being an easier transition for him than for his mom. Susan enjoyed being home with her son, but was also very comfortable bringing him to day care. However, Susan began having all the normal feelings of a mom about to trust the care of her child to nonfamily members. “I started crying the day before,” said Susan. “It turned into a panic when I realized that I can’t stay home with my baby and play with him and kiss him and make sure he is safe.” Susan was teary as she got her son ready for his first morning at day care. Although she was extremely pleased by the supportive reaction of the day care staff, she walked out of the building feeling that “I don’t think I can do this again.” As time passed, Nathan continued to do fine and his parents, particularly his mom, made the adjustment.

Surviving the transition Here are some things that can make such transitions a bit easier: • Pick a good day care center. Visit several centers, talk with teachers, ask questions, and speak with several of the parents who use the center. See Day care / E3


T EL EV ISI ON

E2 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Bigger apartment may not be better with a roommate Dear Abby: My fiancee and I are living in a studio apartment owned by her mother. We’re currently looking for another place to live, and can’t decide whether or not to get a two-bedroom and a roommate. We both know the pros and cons of living with other people, and I have a potential roommate I trust completely. But I’m apprehensive because I had a roommate once before and it wasn’t a great experience. We’re still friends, but I would never live with him again. We’re trying to get out soon. I don’t want to make the wrong decision and lose either a friend or a future wife because of money, hurt feelings or anything else. — Mike in Florida Dear Mike: Living together, as you have probably already learned, requires adjustment on the part of all of the parties concerned. While you trust this friend to be a responsible roommate, what if something unforeseeable were to happen and the person should have to unexpectedly move out? Would he or she be on the lease with you? Could you pay the rent without the help of another roommate? How would you manage if the roommate were to have a live-in, too? Because of these questions, it might be better to take a place with one bedroom to avoid possible complications. Dear Abby: Is it appropriate to send anniversary flowers to a widow? My husband’s grandfather just passed away, and this will be his grandmother’s first wedding anniversary as a widow. Etiquette guides conflict in their advice regarding sending anniversary cards and flowers to widows. Would flowers be inappropriate? If not, what should the delivery card say? — Sentimental in Keller, Texas Dear Sentimental: Sending flowers would be a kind and thoughtful gesture. The card could read, “You’re in our thoughts and in our

DEAR ABBY hearts. With love ...” because this will be anything BUT a happy anniversary. If you live near your husband’s grandmother, offer to invite her over or take her out to dinner so she won’t be alone. Dear Abby: I’m a 21-year-old guy who needs to know how to properly introduce myself to a lady. My first instinct is to shake her hand — that’s how I introduce myself to guys. I’m always uneasy shaking a girl’s hand because I am not sure if it is appropriate. If I am seated, I will stand to introduce myself, but then there’s an awkward pause afterward. Please advise. — A Proper Gentleman Dear Gentleman: According to the rules of etiquette, it’s the woman who dictates whether or not to shake hands. If she extends her hand, you should shake it. If not, keep your hands at your sides — smile, tell her your name and say, “It’s nice to meet you.” Dear Abby: I live in a nice, quiet neighborhood. A few months ago, however, a young woman who lived across the street from me was brutally stabbed to death by her jealous boyfriend. After a few months of getting the rental home cleaned up, there are new people moving in. Should I make sure they’re aware of what happened or should I keep quiet? — Concerned in Missouri Dear Concerned: Exactly what are you concerned about — that the boyfriend will come back and stab the new renters? They should have already been informed about the history of the place by the person renting the property. I see little to be gained by your being the bearer of those bad tidings. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

What are the stars watching? Betty White, Michael C. Hall and others reveal their must-watch shows Los Angeles Times

now. Time is a strange thing.

LOS ANGELES — Beach reading recommendations are a summer tradition: With vacations offering extra leisure time, everyone wants to know what books will help them pass the hours. But many pop culture fans now devour television with the same kind of intensity: They buy box sets, Netflix or download whole seasons, treating TV series like “The Wire” and “Breaking Bad” as if they were meant to be watched in five-hour stretches. Claire Danes, who began her career in “My So-Called Life” and returns to TV this fall in “Homeland,” pinpointed the phenomenon recently. “In my experience as a viewer of television, I’ve started watching TV in bulk,” she told reporters recently. “I watch television like I read a novel.” We asked a handful of TV folks for late-summer viewing suggestions, old and new: Ryan Murphy “Glee” creator My favorite show of the past year was “The Walking Dead.” Even though I watched every episode as it aired, religiously, I went out and got the DVDs and I watch one a week. It’s a treat. I love what that show did. I thought it was sort of intellectual horror. I was really impressed with it. And if you haven’t joined the bandwagon already, I think “Justified” on FX is a brilliant show with a great cast. I love Margo (Martindale) and Timothy (Olyphant) on that show.

fect, it’s perfectly structured, the characters ... it’s great. In this day and age it’s a borderline museum piece. As far as a show I just devour, it’s “The Wire.”

and that’s marvelous. It’s just great comedy. You know, actors take all the credit for things, but unless it’s well written they don’t laugh. I don’t think writers get enough credit. And “Frasier” is well written — oh, goodness, yes. I just love it. I’m also a big “30 Rock” fan. Tina Fey is just pure gold.

Kristen Bell “Veronica Mars” and “Homeland” No. 1, and I’m being honest: You will not be disappointed if you watch any of “America’s Funniest Home Videos.” It without fail puts me in a good mood. They are on Season 17 or something. I particularly recommend the animal extravaganzas episodes. I have all the seasons on DVD — not all 17 years but a couple of seasons. If I’m talking serious TV, the first season of “Damages” from start to finish is one of the best television experiences I’ve ever had. I’ve never seen a thriller executed that way on television. Betty White “Hot in Cleveland” I just love “Frasier,” and now I’m working with Jane (Leeves),

Julian Fellowes “Downton Abbey” creator For some curious reason, I missed the beginning of “Mad Men.” And the longer it went on, the more I realized I should be watching this show. So that’s gonna be my own treat. I want to go back to the start. But if I had to get a show out of the trunk and watch it, it’d be “thirtysomething.” I thought it was so great. I think shows on TV work if you care about the characters in them. If you don’t care about that, then the special effects don’t matter. It was the end of the ’80s, early ’90s. But even that — that’s nearly 20 years ago. It’s a period drama

Brooke Elliott “Drop Dead Diva” This summer I will be catching up on one of my favorite shows, “Damages.” It has such a talented cast, smart writing and is so captivating. Anyone who hasn’t seen this show should check it out! Evan Rachel Wood “Mildred Pierce” I love “Freaks and Geeks.” It was so ahead of its time, and I think that’s why it got canceled so quickly. It was so brilliant. All our favorite comedians now were rocking it back then — Seth Rogen, Jason Segel and James Franco. When no one knew who they were. And they were hilarious.

Join us for an evening of fun and games featuring Improv and Stand Up Comedy! Tickets are $8 available in advance at www.2ndstreetheater.com 220 NE Lafayete Bend OR 541-312-9626

Susan Gorman, M.D. Gynecologist

Serving Central Oregon Since 1975

7:30 AM - 5:30 PM MON-FRI 8 AM - 3 PM SAT.

(541) 504-7635

541-382-4171 541-548-7707 2121 NE Division Bend

The Associated Press ile photo

“Hot in Cleveland” star Betty White is a big fan of “30 Rock.” “Tina Fey is just pure gold.”

Michael C. Hall “Dexter” “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” — that’s a great show. It’s available on box set, I have one. The writing is per-

ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD

Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

The Associated Press ile photo

Michael C. Hall, of Showtime’s “Dexter,” is a fan of the HBO series “The Wire.”

Kristin Bauer “True Blood” “Deadwood!” I am a Western fanatic, and for me this show was and is an obsession. The writing, the acting, the characters, the sets, the costumes are all so authentic-seeming, one can almost feel the dirt. I have watched it three times through and can’t wait for the fourth. It just gets better as you watch it!

641 NW Fir Redmond

www.womenthatcare.com

www.denfeldpaints.com

May contain adult content & language

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

FRIDAY PRIME TIME 8/19/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM ^ %% & )) *`

SR L

KATU % % KTVZ KBNZ ) ) KOHD ` ` KFXO KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW KTVZDT2 , _ # / CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2

5:00

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6:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å News Nightly News NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 5 News KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å KEZI 9 News ABC World News NFL Preseason Football Atlanta Falcons at Jacksonville Jaguars (N) ’ (Live) Å Old Christine Old Christine The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘14’ Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff Wonders-West Nightly Business News Nightly News News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Primal Grill Steves Europe Music Voyager

7:00 Jeopardy! ‘G’ Jeopardy! ‘G’ Old Christine Entertainment

7:30 Wheel of Fortune Wheel of Fortune Scrubs ‘14’ Å The Insider ‘PG’

The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Garden Home This Old House

8:00

8:30

Shark Tank ’ ‘PG’ Å Friends-Ben. Friends-Ben. Flashpoint Shockwave (N) ’ ‘PG’ Shark Tank ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos News on PDX-TV Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Friends-Ben. Friends-Ben. Nikita Girl’s Best Friend ‘14’ Å Hometime ‘G’ organic-michele

9:00

9:30

Karaoke Battle USA (N) ’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å CSI: NY Out of the Sky ’ ‘14’ Å Karaoke Battle USA (N) ’ Å Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å Supernatural Mommy Dearest ‘14’ Sewing Room Painting

10:00

10:30

20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å Blue Bloods Little Fish ’ ‘14’ Å 20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Oregon Lens Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å House of Payne Meet the Browns Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman KEZI 9 News (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Masterpiece Classic ‘PG’ News Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Primal Grill

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Criminal Minds Derailed ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Blood Hungry ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Catching Out ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Public Enemy ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Mosley Lane ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Solitary Man ’ ‘14’ 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å (3:30) ›› “Trading Places” (1983) Dan ›› “The Cowboy Way” (1994, Comedy) Woody Harrelson, Kiefer Sutherland. Two ›› “Caddyshack” (1980, Comedy) Chevy Chase, Rodney Dangerfield, Bill Murray. A ›› “Summer Rental” (1985, Comedy) John Candy, Richard Crenna, Karen Austin. 102 40 39 Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy. Å cowboys ride into Manhattan to find a missing compadre. vulgar newcomer clashes with the country club set. Å Stressed air-traffic controller takes family to Florida. Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ Å Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ Tanked (N) ’ ‘PG’ Tanked Brett Takes a Dive ’ ‘PG’ Rat Busters NYC (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition (6:57) CMT Made ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Fried Green Tomatoes” (1991) Kathy Bates. Fannie Flagg’s tale of friendship between Alabama women. Country Fried Are You Smarter? 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition How I, Millions How I, Millions Haynesville Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC How I, Millions How I, Millions Internet Riches! Wealth-Trading 51 36 40 52 60 Minutes on CNBC Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Å John King, USA Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å John King, USA 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å (6:27) Scrubs ’ Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å (8:31) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Chappelle Show Chappelle Show 135 53 135 47 (4:56) South Park (5:26) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:57) Scrubs ’ Journal Joy of Fishing The Yoga Show Visions of NW The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Politics & Public Policy Today 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb My Babysitter So Random! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Man vs. Wild Guatemala ‘PG’ Å Man vs. Wild Red Rock Country ‘PG’ Man vs. Wild Land of the Maori ‘PG’ Surviving the Cut (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Man vs. Wild Land of the Maori ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Cash-Chicago Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å NFL Live (N) Baseball Tonight SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Little League Baseball Boxing Friday Night Fights (N) (Live) Å MMA Live (N) Championships Championships NASCAR Now (N) NFL Live (N) NFL Yearbook NFL Yearbook NFL Yearbook 22 24 21 24 ATP Tennis Friday Night Lights ‘PG’ ››› “Step Into Liquid” (2003) Premiere. (8:45) ››› “Step Into Liquid” (2003, Documentary) ››› “The Endless Summer” (1966) Michael Hynson. 23 25 123 25 Friday Night Lights Full Hearts ‘PG’ 24 63 124 203 SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Secret Life of American Teen Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Best Dishes Iron Chef America Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Heat Seekers Sugar High (N) Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (3:00) ››› “X2: X-Men United” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Hitman” (2007, Action) Timothy Olyphant, Dougray Scott. › “12 Rounds” (2009, Action) John Cena, Aidan Gillen, Ashley Scott. 131 Room Crashers My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Room Crashers Modern Marvels Dams ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Mold & Fungus ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Nostradamus: 500 Years Later How I Met How I Met Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Against the Wall ‘14’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup Boston Inside Anamosa Lockup Boston Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Twinning ’ ‘14’ Å Thumbs (N) ’ Awkward. ’ ‘14’ Awkward. ’ ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show SpongeBob U-Pick ’ Å SpongeBob SpongeBob SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å Victorious ’ ‘G’ My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids That ’70s Show That ’70s Show My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids 82 46 24 40 iCarly ‘G’ Å Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays From Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg, Fla. The Dan Patrick Show (N) Boxing 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Tampa Bay Rays (N) (Live) (5:53) Gangland Maniacal ‘14’ Å Gangland Die, Snitch, Die ‘14’ Å Gangland Gangster, Inc. ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 (4:46) Gangland Devil’s Fire ’ ‘14’ WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Haven Audrey Parker’s Day off (N) Alphas 133 35 133 45 (4:30) ›› “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End” (2007, Action) Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom. Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Grant Jeffrey Best of Praise Praise the Lord Å Inc’sing Faith Life Focus ‘PG’ Kim Clement Changing-World Journey of Light 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ ›› “Fun With Dick & Jane” (2005, Comedy) Jim Carrey, Téa Leoni. (11:10) “The Whole Nine Yards” 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond (11:15) ›››› “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952) ››› “The Gazebo” (1959, Comedy) Glenn Ford, Debbie Reynolds, Carl Reiner. TV ››› “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” (1964) Debbie Reynolds, Harve Presnell. A nou- (9:15) ››› “Divorce American Style” (1967) Dick Van Dyke, Debbie Reynolds. A 101 44 101 29 writer hides corpse on backyard gazebo site. Å veau riche couple are snubbed by high society. Å couple decides on divorce after 17 years of marriage. Å Gene Kelly. Å (DVS) LA Ink Aubry is on thin ice. ’ ‘PG’ Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes: ATL Say Yes: ATL 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å Law & Order Good Faith ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Rubber Room ’ ‘14’ ›››› “The Dark Knight” (2008) Christian Bale. Batman battles a vicious criminal known as the Joker. Å (11:15) ›› “The Hulk” (2003) Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Shrunk ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Would Happen Batman: Brave Young Justice Generator Rex Ben 10 Ult. Star Wars: Clone Thundercats ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Weird Travels Signs ‘PG’ Å Ghost Stories Ghost Stories Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Paranormal Challenge (N) ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:42) Sanford & Son ‘PG’ Å Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family M*A*S*H ‘PG’ M*A*S*H ‘PG’ Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Happily Divorced 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons NCIS Honor Code ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Probie ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Iced ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS A missing Navy lieutenant. ‘PG’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Royal Pains A runner struggles. ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 NCIS Switch ’ ‘14’ Å Ton of Cash ’ ‘14’ ››› “Back to the Future” (1985, Comedy) Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd. ’ ››› “Back to the Future Part II” (1989, Comedy) Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd. ’ 191 48 37 54 (4:00) › “Billy Madison” (1995) ’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(6:15) ›› “The Scout” 1994 Albert Brooks. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “The Bourne Identity” 2002 Matt Damon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 Dylan Walsh. ‘PG-13’ Å Passenger 57 ‘R’ ENCR 106 401 306 401 (4:00) ›› “Legends of the Fall” ››› “The War of the Roses” 1989, Comedy Michael Douglas. ‘R’ Å ››› “Blood & Wine” 1996, Suspense Jack Nicholson. ‘R’ Å ›› “Word of Honor” 1980 Å FMC 104 204 104 120 ››› “Blood & Wine” 1996, Suspense Jack Nicholson. ‘R’ Å Bruce Lee Lives! Bruce Lee Lives! Legend Fighting Championship Legend Fighting, Reloaded III The Daily Habit Built to Shred Legend Fighting Championship Legend Fighting, Reloaded III The Daily Habit Built to Shred FUEL 34 PGA Tour Golf Wyndham Championship, Second Round From Sedgefield Country Club in Greensboro, N.C. Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf LPGA Tour Golf GOLF 28 301 27 301 LPGA Tour Golf Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘14’ Å HALL 66 33 175 33 The Waltons The Collision ‘G’ Å (4:30) ›› “Head of State” 2003, Comedy (6:15) ›› “Daredevil” 2003, Action Ben Affleck, Jennifer Garner, Michael Clarke Dun- ››› “The Blind Side” 2009, Drama Sandra Bullock, Tim McGraw. A well-to-do white Face Off With Max ›› “Sherlock Holmes” 2009 Robert Downey Jr. The detective HBO 425 501 425 501 Chris Rock. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å can. A blind attorney fights crime at night. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å couple adopts a homeless black teen. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Kellerman and his astute partner face a strange enemy. (4:45) ›› “The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” 2005 Martin Freeman. Rhett & Link Whisker Wars Whisker Wars (N) ››› “Evil Dead 2” 1987 Bruce Campbell. ‘R’ Å Rhett & Link Whisker Wars Young Broke The Making Of IFC 105 105 (4:20) ››› “Never Let Me Go” 2010 (6:05) ›› “The Time Traveler’s Wife” 2009 Rachel McAdams. A time-traveler keeps ›› “Machete” 2010, Action Danny Trejo. The victim of a double- (9:45) MAX on Set Strike Back The hotel siege in New Delhi Chemistry Upside Skin to the Max (N) MAX 400 508 508 Carey Mulligan. ’ ‘R’ Å ’ ‘PG’ Å moving in and out of the life of his true love. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å cross seeks revenge. ’ ‘R’ Å escalates. (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å Down (N) ’ ‘MA’ Jurassic CSI Megasaurus (N) ‘PG’ Monster Fish ‘PG’ Monster Fish (N) ‘PG’ Jurassic CSI Megasaurus ‘PG’ Monster Fish ‘PG’ Monster Fish ‘PG’ Dog Whisperer No Man’s Land ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Danny Phantom Reality Trip ’ ‘Y7’ Danny Phantom Danny Phantom OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ NTOON 89 115 189 115 Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Danny Phantom ’ ‘Y7’ Å Spanish Fly Bill Dance Salt. Wanna Fish Match Fish. Speargun Hunter Western Extreme Hunting, Country Bone Collector Profess. Gold Tips 4CE Game Chasers Ducks Unlimited OUTD 37 307 43 307 Bassmasters (4:00) ›› “Wild (5:45) ›› “Knowing” 2009, Science Fiction Nicolas Cage, Rose Byrne, Chandler Canterbury. iTV. A note (7:55) ›› “The Twilight Saga: Eclipse” 2010, Romance Kristen Stewart. iTV. Bella “The Freebie” 2010 ››› “Kaboom” 2010 Thomas Dekker. A sexually ambivalent SHO 500 500 Target” 2010 found in a time capsule predicts disastrous events. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å must choose between Edward and Jacob. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å college student makes a terrifying discovery. ‘R’ Å NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Michigan 400, Qualifying NASCAR Perfor. Trackside At... NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Michigan 400, Practice NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Michigan 400, Qualifying SPEED 35 303 125 303 SPEED Center (6:20) ›› “You Again” 2010 Kristen Bell, Jamie Lee Curtis. ’ ‘PG’ Å (8:16) › “Grown Ups” 2010 Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Torchwood: Miracle Day (N) ’ ‘14’ Torchwood: Miracle Day ‘14’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 408 (4:30) ›› “Little Black Book” 2004 Brittany Murphy. ›› “War, Inc.” 2008, Comedy John Cusack, Hilary Duff, Marisa Tomei. An undercover ›› “Tunnel Rats” 2008 Michael Paré. The Viet Cong traps U.S. (11:40) ›› “Color of (4:10) “School of Life” 2005 David Pay- (6:05) ›› “What Just Happened?” 2008, Comedy-Drama Robert De Niro. A movie TMC 525 525 mer. ’ ‘PG’ Å producer picks his way through the Hollywood jungle. ’ ‘R’ Å hit man must organize a pop star’s wedding. ’ ‘R’ soldiers in underground tunnels. ’ ‘R’ Å Night” Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies Gun It w/Spies VS. 27 58 30 209 Gun It w/Spies Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer Voices ‘PG’ Å ››› “While You Were Sleeping” WE 143 41 174 118 Frasier ’ ‘PG’


THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P’ G   M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance. Compiled by St. Petersburg Times film critic Steve Persall.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine.

Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgess star as lifelong friends in “One Day.” See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine.

FRIDAY UKC ALL-BREED DOG SHOW: Dog show features two shows per day; free; noon; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-788-4315 or deserthighratterriers@msn.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $15; 2:45-9 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www.hadbf.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. RIM ROCK MULES DAYS: A show of mules, donkeys and mini donkeys; proceeds benefit the Rim Rock Riders Horse Club, Equine Outreach and military care packages; free; 3-9 p.m.; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-2808668. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. HARVEST RUN: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music; proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon, Redmond-Sisters Hospice and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 6 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-548-6329. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Gnomeo & Juliet”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; www.nwxevents.com. SCREEN ON THE GREEN: Hula hooping and juggling performances, followed by a screening of the G-rated film “Toy Story 3”; free; 7:30 p.m., 8:30 p.m. movie; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY RIM ROCK MULES DAYS: A show of mules, donkeys and mini donkeys; followed by a silent auction and spaghetti feed; proceeds benefit the Rim Rock Riders Horse Club, military care packages, Equine Outreach and the riders’ princess fund; free, $8 for feed; 8 a.m.-6 p.m., 7 p.m. dinner; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-2808668. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503739-0643. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. HARVEST RUN: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music, a show and shine and more; proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon, Redmond-Sisters Hospice and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 10 a.m.; downtown Redmond; 541548-6329. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tumalo

Courtesy Giles Keyte

By Roger Moore Touchstone Pictures via The Associated Press

Local families can catch a free showing of “Gnomeo & Juliet” at Compass Park in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing tonight as part of the Munch & Movies series.

Story times, library youth events for Aug. 19-25 BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. BETWEEN THE COVERS: 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766: • STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097: • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday. C.E. LOVEJOY’S BROOKSWOOD MARKET; 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-388-1188: • STORYTIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Thursday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday.

• PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St.; 541-312-1090: • Story times resume Sept. 6. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054: • Story times resume Sept. 6. RIVER RIM COFFEEHOUSE; 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, Suite 190, Bend; 541-728-0095: • SING AND DANCE WITH JANELLYBEAN: Ages 1-7; 10:15 to 10:45 a.m. Thursday. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070: • Story times resume Sept. 6.

EAST BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 62080 Dean Swift Road, Bend; 541-330-3760 • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10 a.m. Saturday.

SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080: • Story times resume Sept. 6.

JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351:

* Story times are free unless otherwise noted.

Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088. UKC ALL-BREED DOG SHOW: Dog show features two shows per day; free; 10 a.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-788-4315 or deserthighratterriers@msn.com. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $15; 12:30-9 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www.hadbf.com. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Country Strong”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-389-0995 or www. c3events.com.

HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $15; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www.hadbf.com. SHANGHAI WOOLIES: The ensemble band performs jazz and pop from the 1920s-30s; part of the Live at the Ranch summer concert series; $15$22; 5 p.m.; Lakeside Lawn at Black Butte Ranch, 12934 Hawks Beard, Sisters; www.bendticket.com. “GUATEMALA ‘11”: A screening of the documentary about student athletes constructing a home in Guatemala; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-549-8800 or www. beaverswithoutborders.com.

MONDAY SUNDAY DESCHUTES DOG DAYS: With dog games, a raffle and vendors; proceeds benefit DogPAC; free; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; happytails@dogpac.org or www.dogpac.org. RIM ROCK MULES DAYS: A show of mules, donkeys and mini donkeys; proceeds benefit the Rim Rock Riders Horse Club, Equine Outreach and military care packages; free; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-280-8668. UKC ALL-BREED DOG SHOW: Dog show features two shows per day; free; 10 a.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-788-4315 or deserthighratterriers@msn.com.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern

Day care Continued from E1 • Clarify the day care’s policies. Susan selected a center that was very sensitive to both Nathan and her needs. They allowed her to stay as long as she wanted, and they assigned a particular teacher to Nathan. Susan was reassured that her son’s care was done primarily by one person. • Arrange to have others care for your baby for short periods of time before your child starts day care. It was a significant change for Susan to go from nearly the exclusive caretaker of Nathan to leaving him with others for eight hours a day. • Consider alternative arrangements. It was hard for Susan to leave her child at day care, so her husband adjusted his schedule so that he dropped Nathan off and Susan picked him up. This

end; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring covers from the ‘50s-’80s by 41 East; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or redmondsummerconcerts.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a country pop-rock performance by Rhonda Hart and band; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-1209 or recreation@ccprd.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1074 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar.

THURSDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www. localharvest.org/redmond-farmersmarket-M31522. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com.

HARRY POTTER BINGO: Ages 6 and older answer Harry Potter trivia; costumes encouraged; free; 3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7099 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BLACK BEAR POPULATIONS IN CRATER LAKE: Greg Holm talks about his research project investigating how and when black bears use habitats at Crater Lake National Park; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar.

Ellen Korbonski picks up her daughter Sofia Alves at the McBurney YMCA day care center in New York. Transitioning to a day care can be tougher on the parents. The Associated Press ile photo

worked great for everyone. • Stay busy. Keep yourself active at work, particularly those first few days of the transition. • Check in during the day. It’s normal to wonder what is going on with your baby, so don’t be re-

luctant to call and see how your child is doing. • Reassure yourself. Kids who are cared for in a quality day care do absolutely fine. Remind yourself of that when you wonder if you are doing the right thing.

‘One Day’ Rating: PG-13 for sexual content, partial nudity, language, some violence and substance abuse. What it’s about: Girl meets boy in college and they flirt with the idea of becoming a couple — for decades. The kid attractor factor: Anne Hathaway in love. Good lessons/bad lessons: Carry a torch too long, you’ll get burned. Violence: None Language: Quite a bit of Brit-swearing. Sex: Almost Drugs: Drugs and alcohol are abused. Parents’ advisory: Not a romantic comedy, so it won’t really appeal to those 13 and younger, but certainly suitable for 13 and older.

‘Fright Night’

No Family event listings.

TUESDAY

The Orlando Sentinel

Gregory Ramey, Ph.D., is a child psychologist and vice president for outpatient services at The Children’s Medical Center of Dayton, Ohio.

Rating: R for bloody horror violence and language including some sexual references. What it’s about: A teenager notices classmates and neighbors disappearing. Could it be vampires? The kid attractor factor: Did I mention the vampires? None of these bedazzled ones with the big hair, either. Good lessons/bad lessons: Don’t ditch your nerd friends. They have all the answers. Violence: Quite a bit and bloody, too. Language: Some profanity, crude sexual come-ons Sex: Pursued, rejected, discussed with some Vegas stage act skin. Drugs: One character appears to stay blitzed on absinthe. Parents’ advisory: The violence, in 3-D, is entirely too intense for small fry. OK for 14 and older.

‘The Help’ Rating: PG-13 for thematic material What it’s about: The civil rights era as seen by black maids working for rich white people in 1960s Jackson, Miss. The kid attractor factor: This subject is coming up in school this year, might as well see the movie before reading the book. Good lessons/bad lessons:

Ignorance and intolerance can be passed down, generation to generation. Violence: Off-camera spousal abuse, old TV news coverage. Language: A smattering of Old South profanity, racial epithets. Sex: None Drugs: A drunk scene, cigarettes Parents’ advisory: Profanity and adult themes aside, this is a must-see for school-age children in need of a history lesson. OK for 12 and older.

‘Glee: The 3D Concert Movie’ Rating: PG for thematic elements, brief language and some sensuality. What it’s about: The kids from the hit TV show appear, in character, in a concert of their greatest hits. The kid attractor factor: It’s your favorite actors playing high school underdogs, singing their little hearts out. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Don’t stop. Believing. Hold on to that feeling.” Violence: Nope Language: Pretty clean Sex: One fleshy bump-andgrind number, lots of talk about sexuality. Drugs: Not in this high school — or this concert. Parents’ advisory: If they’re watching the show, they have already seen more sensuality and sexuality than this. Suitable for 8 and older.

‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’ Rating: PG-13 for intense and frightening sequences of action and violence. What it’s about: The apes break free from their cages and revolt against humanity. The kid attractor factor: Action — and lots of it — and the presence of the eternally boyish James Franco. Good lessons/bad lessons: “It is appropriate to be afraid of chimpanzees.” Violence: Animal cruelty, shootings, beatings, a little blood Language: Pretty clean for an action film. Sex: None Drugs: Beer is consumed. Parents’ advisory: A violent, thoughtful and somewhat family friendly action film, this one may be too intense for 10 and younger.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H B Y JACQ U ELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Aug. 19, 2011: This year, you greet change in a positive and upbeat manner. Often, you are unsure of your choices. A key adviser will help you make the right decision. Understand, as only you can, the role of being in the limelight. Carry the attention and responsibility with awareness. If you are single, you rarely have difficulty meeting people. Choosing the right person could be another issue. If you are attached, involve yourself much more in your sweetie’s life, and he or she in yours. TAURUS has a steady, even attitude. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You manifest immense practicality. Your creativity takes on a different role than usual. Let it inspire you past any rigidity. A boss or partner could push you into an uncomfortable zone. Tonight: Indulge and relax. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You flow with conservative energy, even if there is an implicit demand for change. Friends spout many different ideas and thoughts. If one appeals to you, don’t hesitate to run with it. Notice where rigidity is preventing you from living. Tonight: Whatever knocks your socks off. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Take your time responding to a difficult and possibly overly personal inquiry. You might choose to have a one-on-one chat with the individual in question. Follow through on expanding your knowledge via

education, travel or a discussion. Tonight: A must appearance. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Eye your objective and follow through. It doesn’t have to be a substantial goal; it can be something as simple as clearing your desk before the weekend. You might feel inspired by a close friend or loved one. Tonight: Join friends for a typical TGIF. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Stay direct in your dealings. Others look to you as a role model. You have that pizazz and extra energy that carries you to the finish line. Express your willingness to make an adjustment. Consider a change in your diet or exercise program. Tonight: You could go till the wee hours. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You could be questioning which path is the best. Detach and get some expert advice, then you will know which way to go. Ask those people who will be immediately affected for their opinions. The answers reveal yet another way to look at an issue. Tonight: Follow the music. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Others see greater implications than you deem likely. They are looking at every possibility. Understand their process. Both ways -- yours and theirs -- work. Avoid the judgment game. Open up. Tonight: Interact with a key friend. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH You might want to do something differently but might not be exactly sure what. Someone gives a powerful commentary about your

options. You might not agree with everything you hear. There is a lot to be said about the suggestions. Tonight: Do absolutely what you want. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You might need or want to rethink a work-related matter. Be sure of your choices. Realize you might need a break, as you have pushed very hard. Juggle different concerns with family and/or a roommate. Tonight: Take care of yourself first. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Your intuition comes in handy, especially with communication. You tend to zero in on what the person is really saying or what hasn’t been said. Your ability to integrate valuable information and move to the next step proves to be unusually important. Tonight: Let off steam. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Much is happening on a deep and personal level. You might not chose to share everything that you are feeling at this point. Open up to new possibilities quietly in your mind, where you feel comfortable. Tonight: Happiest close to home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You might want to understand what is happening within your immediate circle. Discussions, even at work, could transform into “What is new? How are you?” conversations. You will find this process of catching up to be important. Tonight: Where your friends are.

© 2011 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Standout Continued from E1 Being class president meant Emmalee spent a large portion of her time planning events, such as winter formal, homecoming, prom and assemblies. In addition, she took leadership classes all four years of high school. She also became heavily involved with the school’s ILS program. Once a week, she would attend her school’s adaptive physical education class for students with disabilities. She got to know the students and helped them with aerobics and dance. “I’ve always had a connection

Neighbors Continued from E1

Less close Lanora Bloxham, who lives near Sky View Middle School, probably has a typical experience. She likes her neighborhood, but wouldn’t say she is close with her neighbors. “Sure, if our house caught on fire, they would help put it out,” said Bloxham. Mostly, they all keep to themselves. But even though they aren’t all best friends, one of Bloxham’s neighbors mowed her grass while her family was on vacation and she passes out cookies to her neighbors at Christmas. Cheryl Howard, a board member for the Orchard Neighborhood Association in Bend, met one elderly man who had lived on the same street his whole life. He told her he had recently started to hate it because people now just came home, opened their garages, drove in, closed the door and never spoke to each other anymore. New York author Peter Lovenheim set out to get to know his neighbors better several years ago after a murder-suicide on his street made him realize how little he knew about those around him. He asked the people on his street to let him sleep over at their homes. Many families agreed, and he collected those stories into a book, “In the Neighborhood: The Search for Community on an American Street, One Sleepover at a Time.” Since its publication, Lovenheim has spoken with people around the country about the issue of neighbors and neighborhoods. He says many people feel as he did and longed for a neighborhood connection. “There’s a sense of social isolation,” said Lovenheim. It was much more widespread than he’d anticipated. He believes several factors have changed the landscape. People spend more time inside watching TV. There are more dual-income families, which means there are simply fewer people in the neighborhood during the day. Also, he says, the environment itself is different. Homes tend to be larger and more spread apart. Front porches also disappeared from many newly built homes (although they are back in many Bend neighborhoods). “Beyond all that, there’s a pervasive fear of strangers,” Lovenheim said. According to Mary Margaret Reagan-Montiel, the parenting initiative manager for the nonprofit Search Institute, which focuses on

Emmalee Cron, 18 Redmond High School graduate TV Show: “House” Movie: “Bridesmaids” Book: Harry Potter series Music: Blink 182, Sum 41

with those students,” Emmalee said. “But I didn’t realize that this was a passion for me until this year. It’s something I want to do for the rest of my life.” Emmalee said that mentoring the ILS students wasn’t just beneficial for them, but for her as well. She said it made her realize that everyone wants to be includ-

Connecting with neighbors People who are interested in getting to know their neighbors better may want to consider trying a few of these tips, which come from ParentFurther and author Peter Lovenheim. • Contact your local neighborhood association and see what kind of activities and events are already happening and join in. Bend residents can find information about local associations at www. bendneighborhoods.com. • Talk to the people you see outside, young and old. • Find a park nearby and try to go daily at a certain time. • Consider being an instigator for neighborhood activities: picnics, garage sales, pot lucks, barbecues, ice cream socials, etc. • Celebrate holidays together. • Consider a community garden. • Create a sign to welcome people to the neighborhood. • Try to come up with a regular monthly or weekly activity, such as a women’s night out or a porch party. • Shift backyard activities — such as playing in the sprinkler, planting a vegetable garden or swinging on play equipment — to the front yard. • Consider volunteering for something you are interested in, such as helping to walk a group of kids to school or shoveling driveways for the elderly. • Create a map with contact information for everyone in the neighborhood, so you can reach people when needed.

creating healthy communities for kids, says our connection to our neighbors has diminished. People are much more engaged and involved in technology and media, which can be very time-consuming. “Kids spend much less time outside,” said Reagan-Montiel. When they are active, it is often in some sort of organized group that takes place away from home. She says many parents feel a heightened sense of danger and worry about safety. ReaganMontiel says some parents want to keep their kids “inside and behind a locked door.”

Importance of neighbors Living in a close-knit community, however, has many ben-

ed, and that encouragement and kindness can make a world of a difference to a student. Emmalee will be attending Oregon State University this year and is planning to explore some of the school’s education class offerings. Part of what made college a possibility for Emmalee was all the hard work she put into scholarship applications throughout the year. Emmalee dedicated her weekends to the lengthy process, finding a variety of scholarships to apply for, and spending hours filling out applications and writing essays. Her hard work paid off. Emmalee won more than 11 scholarships, collecting a total

of $6,500 for college. Ultimately, Emmalee wants to become a teacher. Her mom, Cathy Cron, is a first-grade teacher at Tom McCall Elementary in Redmond. However, Emmalee says that she doesn’t want to become a teacher just because her mom is one. “I wanted to make my own decisions,” Emmalee said. “But I found out that I actually really like teaching.” Her dad, Joseph Cron, is an IT tech for the city of Redmond. She also has a brother who is 16. Emmalee says that she looks up to her parents. “I’ve seen how they built a good life for my brother and me,” Emmalee said. “They’ve worked

hard for what they have. And that motivates me.” Throughout the years, Emmalee has also been dedicated to her church youth group. Meeting every Tuesday night, the group worked on community service projects. Emmalee’s high school leadership teacher, Maegan MacKelvie, says that it’s this generous aspect of Emmalee’s character that is most impressive. “She was an ILS mentor, and she sat with those students at lunch every day,” said MacKelvie. “She always made time for them, and made them feel welcome, which is a really special quality for a teenager to have.” MacKelvie also described Emmalee as genuine, honest and

loving. “She’s the kind of person who makes the people around her better,” MacKelvie said. “She doesn’t do the right the thing to be popular. She does it because it’s the right thing to do.” Emmalee says she wants to travel at some point in her future, either through a study-abroad program or through missionary work. “We only have one life to live,” said Emmalee. “And I think you have to make the most of it. You have to take advantage of what you have.”

efits, according to Reagan-Montiel. Through extensive research, the Search Institute identified 40 developmental assets which help children become positive, successful adults. One of these assets is for kids to receive support from three adults who are not their parents. Neighbors would be a great option. “Young people need other caring adults,” said Reagan-Montiel. They can help reinforce dreams and goals. Neighbors can also teach kids things, such as gardening. Reagan-Montiel says kids also benefit from growing up in a place where they feel like part of the community and as if they are contributing something. “The benefits are tremendous,” Lovenheim said of having a close-knit neighborhood. He wonders what would have happened in his own neighborhood if the woman who was killed by her husband had felt comfortable seeking help from her neighbors. While this scenario is extreme, Lovenheim said neighbors can help in other important situations. “We’re all mortal and subject to emergencies.” Sometimes, even 10 minutes away might be too far. Beyond emergencies, Lovenheim says neighbors can help in a pinch, by supplying vanilla extract when you run out or a lawn mower when yours breaks. In addition, neighbors can “enrich our lives,” Lovenheim said. Neighbors may have skills we don’t. Deschutes River Woods resident Misha Williams, for instance, sought help from a neighbor to finish a do-it-yourself project that went awry. She also thinks neighbors look out for each other in situations such as wildfire evacuations. Sometimes, Reagan-Montiel says, the definition of neighborhood has to be expanded — say for those who live in a rural area. “Neighborhood is not necessarily limited to where you live.” People can form close connections with the parents of the children on a soccer team or in a club, for example.

important. Neighbors should celebrate together. One easy way to get to know neighbors is to start talking, says Reagan-Montiel. Parents can also show an interest in the other children in the neighborhood. “Make them understand you care not only about your kids, but also others.” Howard helped people get

involved in a winter assistance program to keep older residents’ driveways and sidewalks clear of snow. She thinks a great way to get to know neighbors is to volunteer for something, say fixing something on your street, and then meet like-minded folks. Picnics, barbecues, pot lucks, ice cream socials — even renting bouncy houses as a neigh-

borhood — are all great ways Kadoch has heard of people connecting in her neighborhood. She also likes the idea of just putting a sign on your door that says “sprinkler is on in the backyard, come on in.”

Connecting Reagan-Montiel believes people need to be very intentional about making connections; they cannot expect them to just happen naturally. That said, “It doesn’t have to be hard; it doesn’t have to be scary.” Lovenheim says an annual picnic isn’t enough to build a connection. He thinks weekly porch parties or holiday gatherings are

Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 F1

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Elizabeth, 541-633-7006

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Items for Free Free Alpacas (5) to good home, all are gelded, 8 yrs. old, 541-977-8013

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie Shepherd/Border Collie Pups 6 weeks, 4 males, 1 female, $200, 541-548-0183

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com Free Cats, friendly rescued adults, seek quiet, only-pet homes, altered, shots, to approved Senior homes, delivery avail., 541-383-4156.

Frenchie/ Pug puppies. Beautiful colors. Puppy package incl. $100 deposit . $700 to $650 OBO ea. 541-548-0747 or 541-279-3588. German Shorthair AKC pups. Champion hunters/pets. M’s, $200; F’s $300. 541-330-0277

German Shorthair unspayed female, 3 yrs, good dispostion, friendly, energetic, free to good home. 541-388-7510

Belgian Malinois, papered female pup, up to date shots. Need to sell due to move. $500 cash. 541-598-7996 Border Collie Pups, nice dogs, working parents, first shots, $150. 541-546-6171 Boxer, Purebred, Male. Born 6-19. Fawn color. Very sweet. $575 OBO. 541-410-0588 or bbabcock@cocc.edu Cats, friendly rescued adults, seek quiet, only-pet homes, altered, shots, $20 fee, waived for Seniors, delivery avail., 541-383-4156.

Golden Retriever English Creams, AKC, 2 mos. $600. Shots, wormed, vet-checked. More pix avail. 509-281-0502 Golden Retriever Puppies, Purebred, born 7/6, 5 males $400, 1 female $450. Call 541-788-2005.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Lhasa Apso/Shih Tzu pups, gorgeous, $300/ea. Linda 503-888-0800 Madras.

Lots of kittens/cats available to adopt thru rescue group. Sat/Sun 1-5 at main sanctuary, 65480 78th St., Bend; also at Larry's RV on N. Hwy 97, north of Cooley Rd. (388-7552) All are altered. Shots, ID chip, vet visit & carrier incl. Low adoption fee, and discount for 2! 541-389-8420 or 647-2181 for details. www.craftcats.org for photos, map & more. Olde English Bulldog puppies. 3 males available. $1800 legendarybulldog.com, call/txt 208-230-3517. Delivery available. Pomeranian, AKC/small Golden retriever mix puppies born 6/25. 4 males, $150 each, 1 female, $200. 541-516-8633 Poodle pups, 3 toy females, red cinnamon, 11 wks, 1st shots, $225. 541-306-1807.

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Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Mattress-Box Springs in plastic, frame, mattress pad, comforters sheets pillows. All new, $225. 541-350-4656. Maytag Neptune washer/ dryer sold as set, front load, large capacity, white, $500. 541-388-6854, lve message. NEED TO CANCEL YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad!

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541-330-0420

Washing Machine, Admiral, 5 yrs old, used 1 yr, $150, 1800’s Fainting Couch, orig. cond., $150, 541-389-5137. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Carry concealed in 33 states. Sun. August 28th 8am, Red mond Comfort Suites. Qualify For Your Concealed Hand gun Permit. Oregon & Utah permit classes, $50 for Or egon, $60 for Utah, $100 for both. www.PistolCraft.com. Call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) to Pre-Register. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. Cobra 380 Stainless semi-auto pistol w/box & ammo, like new, $200. 541-647-8931 Custom precision/tactical AR15 with Black Dog 18" stainless free-float 1:8" barrel, flat top upper, Magpul grip. $800. Jack 541-854-0146 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

Oregon’s Largest 3 Day Gun & Knife Show AUG. 19-20-21 Portland Expo Center I-5 exit #306B Admission $9 Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4 1-800-659-3440 CollectorsWest.com

Remington 30.06, Semi-auto, Model 742, with scope, $375; Please call 541-408-7169. Romanian SKS, 2 ~ 30 round mags, 4x29 scope, Dragunov stock, bayonet & 240 rounds. $450 OBO. Jeff, 541-410-0681 Ruger 7 mm Remington Mag., $450; Black Powder Rifle, Knight 50 cal LT2, $125, both w/extras, 541-526-1723. Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

H & H FIREARMS Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352 High Standard 22LR Alum 9-shot revolver, leather holster inc $200. 541-647-8931

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

Belly Fat A Problem? FREE DVD Reveals weight loss myths. Get ANSWERS to lasting weight loss. Call 866-700-2424

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Art, Jewelry and Furs Mink Coat,full length, Koslows of Dallas, TX, hat to match, never worn, tags attached, $1500 firm, 541-595-0191

Travel/Tickets

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Kimber .45 cal. Pro Carry II, $750; Glock 19, w/crimson trace laser grip, $700. Remington 22 long rifle model 597, stainless, $275. Call Tim, 541-350-5674.

Ready to camp: tent, stove, lantern, airbed & more, $85. 541-350-4656

OR Carry Concealed Handgun License Class Sat. 8/27 12-4 pm, St. Francis School Bend. Pre-register $30; at door, $35. 541-788-5667 or 541-848-8999

Single Person Fishing Float, Hobie Cat, w/oars, stripping net, etc., paid $1400, asking $600, 541-923-0285.

DIRECTV Summer Special! 1Year FREE Showtime! 3 mos FREE HBO|Starz|Cinemax! NFL SUNDAY TICKET Free Choice Ultimate|Premier – Pkgs from $29.99/mo. Call by 8/29! 800-363-3755. (PNDC) FAST TREES grow 6-10’ yearly. $13.95-$18.95 delivered. Potted. Brochure on line: www.fasttrees.com or 1-800-615-3405

GENERATE SOME EXCITEMENT IN YOUR NEIGBORHOOD. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

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Sporting Goods - Misc.

Computer Desk, w/upper shelf, exc. cond, Sauder, $25, 541-923-0041.

Pendleton Roundup Rodeo tickets for 2 days, and a motel for 3 days, Sept. 15th, 16th, 17th, 541-573-1100.

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Misc. Items 2 plots Redmond Memorial Gardens Sect. L, #867 & #868, $1000 both. 903-799-7842 BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

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Medical Equipment Breezy Wheel chair, for small person, paid $1100, asking $300, 541-388-1783. POWER CHAIR: Jet 10 Ultra 2006, like new. Sell for $600 OBO. 541-633-7017

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Tools 13” Drill press, 3/4 HP, 16-spd, $40; 2 ton pallet jack, $50; Banding dispenser, $35; Warehouse shelving 2x20, 2 shelves, 2000 lb capacity, $100, & much more! Storage trailers open on Sat. 8/20 10 am. - 3 pm. at Redmond impound lot next to Rogers towing, 463 E Antler. Going N. on Hwy 97 take Antler exit and go 0.3 mi.

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Building Materials

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802 Trampoline, round, 12’, exc. cond., $80 OBO, call Robin 541-388-5743.

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261

MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K. St. 541 475-9722 Open to the public. Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541 447-6934 Open to the public.

Show Your Stuff.

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Antiques & Collectibles Dresser,3 drawer,birds eye maple dovetail joints, orig. brass, very old. $175. 541-350-1711.

Poodle Pups, toy or teacup. Also, older pups & adults, loving, friendly, 541-475-3889 Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/

Siberian Husky AKC puppy. Great temperament. $695. 541-330-8627 Yorkie Puppies, 11 wks, 2 males, vet checked. $600. Will deliver to Central OR. 1-541-792-0375, Mt. Vernon.

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Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

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Bicycles and Accessories

Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online.

Mountain Bike, Mens Giant, like new, $300 OBO, 541-504-9879.

To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

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Golf Equipment Golf Cart

No more room! $325. Call 541-279-9538

1. Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your ad package.

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Guns, Hunting and Fishing

Lab and german short hair mix puppies (2). Superb temper- Dining Room Table, made in Mexico, needs some work, ment mother and father. Bend local, buys GUNS! $300. 541-475-4461 puppies are black with some Call for info: white $200 call Dining Table & 4 Chairs, hunter 541-526-0617 541-420-5895 Thanx green with light oak top & 22LR Mossberg semi-auto rifle seats, $165. 541-330-4087 Lab puppies, black, AKC, M/F, w/2 mags, scope, ammo, like shots/wormed, seeking good GENERATE SOME excitement in new, $200. 541-647-8931 homes! $250. 541-447-8958 your neighborhood! Plan a Chihuahua Pups, assorted 22LR Winchester m250 lever garage sale and don't forget action rifle, $260. Ruger colors, teacup/toy, 1st shots, LAB PUPS AKC Black, 1st shots, to advertise in classified! dewclaws & dewormed. Mom 10/22, $240. 541-647-8931 wormed, $250,541-977-4686 541-385-5809. has OFA hip and EIC clear. 40cal S&W 908 SS pistol, mags, Dachshund, AKC Miniature, 6 $350 each. 541-633-6591 Lift Chair, brown, elec., paid $525. Ruger 380 LCP, like wks choc & tan female, $375. $1000 new, will sell for $500, LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, new, $325. 541-647-8931 Pics available. 541-420-6044 541-382-6865 titled parents, performance Dog Door, large, new in box, pedigree, OFA cert hips & el- Love Seat, beige & brown 7mm Mauser, Chileno 1895, with scope, 375, paid $140, sell for $60, bows, $500. 541-771-2330 tweed, perfect cond., $85 541-408-7169. 541-350-4656. www.royalflushretrievers.com cash, 541-330-8349.

2. Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

3. Create your account with any major credit card. All ads appear in both print and online. Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

S0305 5X6 kk

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

To place your photo ad, visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com or call with questions, 541-385-5809

www.bendbulletin.com


F2 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 265

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Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 267

Fuel and Wood All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484 Central Oregon Mix, semi-dry, split, delivered, Bend. $125 for one cord or $240 for two. Cash, Check or Credit. 541-420-3484 Dry Lodgepole For Sale $150/cord rounds; $175/cord split. 1.5 Cord Minimum 36 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-350-2859 Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $135; 2@$129ea; 3@ $125ea. Split: 1 cord $165; 2 @ $159 ea; 3@$155 ea. Cash Delivery avail. 541-771-0800

Order Premium Firewood early and save! $117/cord, 3 cord minimum. 541-420-4418 or 541-728-7260. SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

Out of Business - Over 400 items - most new, incl. elec. rototillers, grass trimmers, wheel barrels, organic pest control products, warehouse & office equip. Everything must go incl. 2 48’ Great Dane trailers things are stored in. Storage trailers open on Sat. 8/20 10 am. - 3 pm. at Redmond impound lot next to Rogers towing, 463 E Antler. Going N. on Hwy 97 take Antler exit and go 0.3 mi

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Estate Sales Antiques & More: If you like old stuff this is the yard sale for you. Aug, 18-19-20. 10:00-4:00 66929 Fryrear Rd. 541-382-7964 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

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Farm Market

300 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Livestock & Equipment Barrow, FFA back-up $1.50 hanging wt. + kill/cut/wrap. Message: 541-306-1961

347 Alpaca dispersal sale, all reg., quality breeding stock to ribbon winners. All Reasonable offers considered. For info call 541-385-4989.

Farmers Column

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Lost and Found Lost Camera: Sony, small, digital, in black case, in Bend area, precious photos of children, 541-550-1452. Lost I-Pod, 32g 4th generation, Forum Shopping Ctr, Fri 8/12 Reward! 541-815-4052 Lost Siamese Cat, blind, in Newport Hills area, call 541-317-1524. Lost white cat Female short hair, “Lucy”, ran away from car accident at Hwy 97 & Highland in Redmond, 8/11. 541-504-4194; 541-604-1592

Missing cat

1948 Ferguson T20. New 12V batt, good hydraulics, 3-pt hitch, power take-off, new paint. $1350. 541-382-1365 Premium orchard grass 3x3 mid-size bales, no rain, no weeds. $90 per bale. 541-419-2713.

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Hay, Grain and Feed Partners LLC Landscape Maintenance. Hay pick-up & delivery, firewood sales & delivery, hay pick $.75 a bale. #901360. 541-777-0128 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

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Meat & Animal Processing GRASS FED BEEF, quick sale special. $1.85/lb. hanging weight+kill, cut & wrap. Order now with deposit. Call 541-388-4687,541-610-6408

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Produce and Food

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Horses, 4 yr. & 6 Palomino Fillies, Halter broke only & friendly, 11 yr. Dapple Grey Brood mare, $200 ea. OBO, 541-548-9645.

THOMAS ORCHARDS Kimberly, OR: We will be at Farmer’s Market Wed. & Fri. in Bend, every week all summer! U-Pick: Semi-Cling Peaches, $.70/lb, Early nectarine, $0.75/lb., Call to see if ready by Sat. Aug. 20: Freestone Canning Peaches - Sunbright, $0.70/lb. Ready picked: Sweet Cherries, Apricots Bring Containers Look for us on Facebook. Open 7 Days a week,8 am-6 pm Ready Picked avail also. 541-934-2870

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since May, mostly white with blackish brown on back tail and face - see picture on craigslist- pets posting August 17th “still missing CAT". Redmond area. Call 541-633-6072

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies Free Ducks (3), white, you pick up, please call 541-388-9254 for more info.

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Horses and Equipment

400

Llamas/Exotic Animals

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Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

Employment

421

Schools and Training

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation 476 Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial Employment aid if qualified - Housing Opportunities available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. Cabinet shop hiring experi1-877-804-5293. (PNDC) enced plastic laminate countertop Fabricator / InALLIED HEALTH CAREER staller. Must have ODL and Training - Attend college pass drug test. Fax resume to 100% online. Job placement 541-330-3958 / e-mail: assistance. Computer availcabinets@qwestoffice.net able. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 800-491-8370. www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE Call 541-385-5809 today! from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Com- Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal inputer available. Financial Aid jured female, part-time. if qualified. Call Transportation & references 866-688-7078 www.Cenrequired. 541-610-2799. turaOnline.com (PNDC) TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Employment Opportunities Automotive Technician Rare opportunity to work in a very busy, growing, fast paced environment. Subaru/ Japanese vehicle experienced preferred. Automotive experience mandatory. Valid ODL and own tools a must. Pay DOE. Call Subaguru at 541-382-6067.

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CUSTOMER SERVICE

Needed Immediately Entry-level customer service reps. F-T positions available for those who qualify. North American Holdings is currently seeking CSRs in our display dept. Full time corp training. Must be available immediately. Call for consideration. $1800/mo based on appts set. 541-617-6109

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Part-Time Graphic Designer Position Available

Graphic Designers work in a fast paced production environment with account executives and local businesses to design and produce advertisements that get results for that advertiser. Proficiency using InDesign, Illustrator, and Photoshop softwares to create basic and advanced ad layouts and designs is a must. This is a 20 hour per week position, eligible for benefits. The Bulletin is an equal opportunity employer. Send a resume with qualifications, skills, experience and past employment history to The Bulletin, Attention: James Baisinger, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR, 97701, by 8/31/11

Full Time Prepress Technician Position Available

Prepress Technicians receive press ready PostScript files from other departments within the company, impose pages, and output to plate using Computer-To-Plate software systems and equipment. This includes finishing work by bending and punching plates for the press. Familiarity with CMYK prepress workflows preferred and a fundamental proficiency using Macintosh and PC operating systems is a must. This is a full time position with benefits. The Bulletin is an equal opportunity employer. Send a resume with qualifications, skills, experience and past employment history to The Bulletin, Attention: James Baisinger, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR, 97701, by 8/31/11

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

9th Annual Congress St. Flea Mkt. 210 NW Congress St, SAT. 8/20, starts 10 am, Great vendors, lots to choose from.New look at Iron Horse w/more space for treasures.Big sale on garden decor. Questions & vendor info, Kristen, 541-420-7328 or Iron Horse, 541-382-5175.

1617 NW 22nd, Fri. and Sat. 8-4. Home decor, seasonal decorations, silk flowers, small appl., bedding and more. Most things under $10.

YARD / ESTATE SALE SAT. & SUN., 9-4, 5219 NW 49th St., Tetherow - Trundle & Bunkbeds, Washer & Dryer, Furniture, Books, Bikes, Garden, Kitchen, Movies, Games. Also...1985 Ford F250 Truck & 1996 Nash 21’ Fifth Wheel.

Don’t Miss This One! Sat. 9-4, 63811 OB Riley Rd., 1972 Chevy Chevelle, 1960’s Pinball machine, antique phone, badges, boat motor, motorcross gear, 2 riding mowers, shotguns, MANY KIDS ITEMS, 541-382-0966. ESTATE SALE: Books, clothes, furn. hand and power construction tools. Everything goes! Fri. 8/19 8-5. 1731 NW Rimrock Rd.

Sat. Only Sale: 8-4 pm., clothes, books, computer equipment, tools, 63698 Hunters Cir.

Estate Sale: Fri. & Sat., 10-5, 344 NE Marshall Ave, Everything imaginable, some furniture, china & collectibles!

Saturday Only Sale, 8am-2pm, Final moving sale, all must Fantastic Garage Sale. Sat. 8-4, 2224 NE Shepard Rd. go! Antiques, large aquarium, piano, lots more, 20590 Ar- Teaching items (K-2), clothes, craft and household items, rowhead Dr., off Swalley Rd, toys, CD's, DVD's, books and follow signs & balloons. sports equipment. The Good, the Bad, & the Ugly, Everything Goes! Lots of petite women’s sizes, HH FREE HH household items & furniture. Sat. 9-1, 1373 NW Fort Garage Sale Kit Clatsop, in the alley. Place an ad in The Bulletin Tumalo Estate Sale: Sat. 6 for your garage sale and a.m-4 p.m. Appl., truck, van, receive a Garage Sale Kit saddle & tack, bike, Toyota FREE! wheels, desk, furniture, mens XL clothes, misc. 19854 KIT INCLUDES: Connarn Rd, 541-480-6559 • 4 Garage Sale Signs 284 • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad Sales Southwest Bend • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” Multi-Family Sale: Baby • And Inventory Sheet items, tools, furniture, & much more! Fri. & Sat. 8-4, PICK UP YOUR 20040 Badger Rd. GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 286 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Sales Northeast Bend Bend, OR 97702

Annual Non-profit Fundraising Garage Sale for Childrens Home in Zambia, Africa, at Vima Lupwa Home. Sat. Aug. GARAGE SALE - Hutch, canoe, Look What I Found! 20th, 8:30am -3pm. 440 NW many quality items! 810 NW Congress St. Furniture, toys, You'll find a little bit of everyFort Clatsop, Bend. Sat. only, sporting goods, art, garden thing in The Bulletin's daily 7am-2pm - sale is in alley. supplies, plants. Quality drop garage and yard sale section. GREAT SALE in TUMALO! offs welcome! 541-420-9634. From clothes to collectibles, Aug. 19/20, 9am-5pm Jewelry, www.lupwahomes.org from housewares to hardCrystal, Glassware, Brass, ware, classified is always the Art, Books, Toys, Furniture, first stop for cost-conscious Asian, Indonesian & African treasures, vintage linens, fishing Housewares & Hardware. consumers. And if you're gear, cookware, & furniture, 65765 Hwy 20 • 541-420-3400 planning your own garage or Sat 8-4, 2122 NW Awbrey Rd yard sale, look to the classiHigh Quality Sale: Wide fieds to bring in the buyers. Boutique Yard Sale range of goods + antiques! You won't find a better place Fund-raiser for Women’s Sat. 9-3, 720 NW Silver for bargains! Buckle. Scholarships (PEO) Sat. 9-4, Call Classifieds: handmade hats, jam, baked Huge Sale, Sat. only, 8-4, 541-385-5809 or email goods, quality purses, jew64230 Schibel Rd., off Old classified@bendbulletin.com elry & decor, 1st aid kits, Bend-Redmond Hwy. House1001 NW Harmon Blvd. hold, furniture, clothes, games, books, electronics, bikes, BBQ, radial arm & table saws, skates, shoes, 2 cars 2752 NE Sycamore Ct. Sat 9-3 Beautiful home full of quality items, 2 queen beds, dressers, for parts, and lots of misc.!! Name brand girls clothes Bombay chests, several chests with small drawers, 2 fainting (12mo - 4T). Baby items Old & Purging Garage couches & settees, large sectional sofa, carved chairs, carved (stroller, high chairs, etc.), Sale: Antiques, African drum game table, 19 large framed mirrors, 4 flat screen and large Little Tikes & Fisher Price Sat. Only 8/20, 8-3, camping table, furniture, tools, Star screen TVs, 2 kitchens full, loads of quality bedding and towtoys, lots more! equip, tools, kitchen items, Wars/Star Trek and “Stuff”. els from a bed & breakfast, many Buddha and oriental statues, etc., 1223 NE 10th St, no Sat Aug. 20 11-4, 1900 NW 2 Family Garage Sale: Fri. & lots of small size ladies clothing & access. & furs, doll collecearly birds! Newport Hills in Bend. Sat. 8-5, Bowflex, Nautilus tion, die-cast toy collection, sewing items, lots of tools and machine, misc. household, hardware, shelving, also antique carved cabinet, oriental P.E.O. Garage Sale some furniture, nice leather Three Family Garage Sale cabinet, dining table made from a monastery door, antique Sat., Aug 20, 8am-2pm, Parking lot at 1205 NE 2nd St, coats, 63578 Boyd Acres. dolls, antique dining set, paintings and artwork, lots of 1837 NW Duniway Ct. next door to Cathy’s Cleancandles and decor, crystal chandeliers, and lots of misc. Furniture, tools, sporting 3-Family Garage Sale: Sat. ers. Tools, new tires Fri. & Sat., 9-4, numbers Friday 8 a.m. goods, hardware, household Only 9-2, somes antiques, (P215/60R1694T fits Altima) items, office supplies/equip., some tools, some furniture, furniture, clothes, bedding, 19080 Saddleback Lane linens, men’s, women’s & 20840 Cassin Dr off 18th recliner, decorations for Take Newport Ave go past Shevlin Park, turn right on Sadchildren’s clothing & more. & Morning star. home. Saturday only, 8-3 dleback Drive, left on Saddleback Lane. Good quality! Helps fund 3 family sale. Collectibles, conscholarships for women. ATTIC ESTATES & APPRAISALS Solid wood certina old post cards lots of YARD SALE: 541-350-6822 SALE! Chaise, dressers, colkids clothes, many other desk, Riviera Bike, houselectibles, creels, bistro set, items. Friday 19th 8 to 5 Sat wares, clothing & much for pics & info go to yard art... Fri-Sat, 8-5; Sun., 20th 8 to 3. 2021 NE Bluemore! Sat. Only 8-3, 20963 www.atticestatesandappraisals.com free! 4th & Cook, in Tumalo. bird Ct. Follow the signs Marsh Orchid Ct..

ESTATE SALE

2 FAMILY SALE - Some antiques, and a variety of other things. Friday 8-4, Saturday 8-? 1728 SE Virginia Rd.

3-Family Sale, Sat. only, 8-2, 20383 Pine Vista Dr. Furniture, collectibles, household, ALL IN ONE PLACE SALE: 4-family garage sale, w/ clothing, & more - no junk! motor scooter, antiques, over Big Moving Sale Sat., 5 hrs only, 700 collectible LP’s, Saber8-1. Tools, furn., too much to craft boat/motor/trailer, drum list - worth the drive! Follow set, guitar, karaoke, golf green signs at SE 27th & Rickclubs, saws/tools, beautiful ard to 21180 Butte Ranch Rd. clothes, books, bikes, toys, motorhome, Priefert 15 piece Garage Sale: Sat. 8-2, 1001 SE horse corral. 7067 SW Canal 15th St #141, main entrance Blvd. (Park at Pleasant Ridge past office, rec hall, right community hall) Where turn, straight ahead to #141 Quarry Ave., 61st & the Old Garage Sale: Sat. 9-5, lawn Bend Redmond Hwy come equip, tools, toolboxes, gen., together. Fri. & Sat. 8-3. electronics, elec. heaters, DVD’s, 60879 Parrell Rd., Huge Garden Equipment between Murphy & China Hat & Supplies Sale! HUGE Multi Family Estate Most is new stuff. Impound lot, 463 E. Antler, Redmond. Sale: THOUSANDS of items! Sat. Only! 10am-3pm. Home decor, linens, antiques, camping equip., tons more! 21119 Bear Creek HUGE SALE/Liquidation: Rd., Fri.-Sun., 8-5. 8/19-20-21 and 8/26-27-28, Fri. & Sat. 10-5, Sun. 10-3, HUGE Multi-Family Sale - Toys, furniture-all, framed wall camp supplies, luggage, pics, bikes, skis, other sports, strollers, bedding, TONS decor, dishes, kitchen, 15’ more, priced to go! Sat. Aug. ski/fishing boat w/trailer, 20th, 8am-3pm. lots more! New Stuff Every 20526 Prospector Loop Day! 4270 SW Canal Blvd., Redmond accross Toys, Dog Crates, Truck, Mtn. bike, and much more! from new High School. Friday 8/19, 9-2, 751 SE Airpark Drive Large Multi-Family Yard Sale Sat., 8/20 8am-3pm. HouseFIND IT! hold items, tools, furniture, BUY IT! clothes, & much more! 4470 SELL IT! SW Trevino Ct. (The Greens) The Bulletin Classiieds

USED TOOL SALE Bobcat w/bucket & hammer; power tools, fencing materials, much more. Fri., Aug. 19, 3-6 pm; Sat., Aug 20th, 9-1. Sale located at 9th Street RV Storage Center, 169 SE 9th.

YARD SALE - Saturday, 10-6 61445 SE 27th St. Space 60. Tons of items from A to Z don’t miss this one!

Yard Sale: Farm, tools, household, kangaroo golf caddies & more. 1997 NE O’Neil, Fri. & Sat. 9-3 - No earlies please!

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Yard Sale Fri & Sat, 8/19 & 20, 8am-5pm. 5548 Rim Road. CRR. Collectibles, golf set, lots of other good stuff! Yard Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-3, just moved - way too much stuff. Older than dirt, just a little odd- Canoe & extras, antique radios, furniture, glassware, new sewing machine, household, barn, garage stuff, 9140 NE Crooked River Dr, Terrebonne (Rd to Smith Rock)

Garage/Yard/Barn Sale 8-19, 8-20 • 9am-4pm 69350 Deer Ridge Lane/off Camp Polk Rd-Sisters Antiques, china, clothes, dog crates, shoes, boots, bedding, winter coats, tools, horse tack/saddle, furniture, books, washer/ dryer, accordian and misc. 503-313-3119 HUGE Garage Sale in Sisters: Thur.-Sun., 9-5, Solid oak dining table w/6 chairs, solid oak furniture, recliner, other chairs & ottomans, top of the line kitchen appl., 2 GE Advantium ovens, 1 Miele 220 oven, GE Profile Arctica Side/Side fridge, small appl., incl. Saceo espresso machine, antique collector china & glass, Model A Ford parts, way too much to list, come and see! 14427 Trout Ct., from Sisters take Hwy. 242 off Hwy 20, past High School to cross roads. Follow big signs. 541-549-1577.

Huge Prineville Garage Sale: Military & horse driving bits, spurs, furniture, books, toys, YARD SALE Saturday only, from linens, lots more, 307 SE 2nd 8 until 4, 1713 SW Lava Ave. St, Fri. & Sat. 9-4. Mics, collectibles, housewares and much more. La Pine Multi Family Sale: Fri. - Sun. 9-5, Early birds pay 292 double! 15914 Lava Dr, Sales Other Areas something for everyone!

BIG SALE! Restaurant equipment: freezer, espresso machine, coffee grinder/maker, Moving/Garage Sale: Fri. & dishes, glasses, lots more! Sat. 8-3, tools, crafts, tapes, ‘46 Willys Jeep, Suzuki moCD’s, books, scanner, fridge/ torcycle like new. Antiques: freezer & much more! Must sleigh bed, dressers, ice sell. Follow orange signs, cream cart, etc. Sat-Sun 8-4, 3721 NW 25th St. 69065 Barclay Dr., in Sisters. Skis & ski-pod, clothing, nonquilting fabric. kitchenware, Garage Sale, Fri & Sat, 9-4, 3014 NE Yellowpine Rd, off treadmill, 15K 5th wheel Peters Rd in Prineville. Lots hitch, & lots more! Fri-Sat, of misc. including Troll dolls! 8-2, 5755 Haddock Rd, CRR.

Moving/Estate Sale - 4 Families. Antiques/collectibles, fishing/boat items, furniture, artwork, kitchenware, too much to list! Fri.-Sat., 9-5. 54460/54659 Silver Fox Dr., State Rec. Rd. to Foster Rd. Moving Sale Near Camp Sherman: Sat. & Sun., 9-4, At Wizard Falls Hatchery - furniture, fishing & camping gear, and lots more!


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 F3

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Drug & Alcohol Counselor, full-time. CADC /experience required. Madras & Bend area. Salary DOE. Please fax resume to 541-383-4935 or email pfeifera@opusnet.com

OnPoint Community Credit Union has a job opportunity in our Bend South Branch. Opening for a Member Relationship Officer with these responsibilities: Under direction Branch Management Team, opens, builds and maintains personal and business member relationships by providing a full range of products and services. Two years of previous experience in consumer lending and sales with underwriting skills preferred. Bilingual skills a plus. High School diploma or GED required. Apply online to www.onpointcareers.com.

Customer Service (Part Time)

Reps

Come join our team! Standard Need Seasonal help? TV & Appliance is the largest, Need Part-time help? independently owned appliNeed Full-time help? ance retailer in the Pacific Advertise your open positions. Northwest. We need profesThe Bulletin Classifieds sionals who have experience delivering excellent cus- Extreme Value Advertising! 30 Daily newspapers tomer service both in person $525/25-word classified, and on the phone. Must have 3-days. Reach 3 million Pastrong ten key and data encific Northwesterners. For try skills, great attitude and more information call (916) professional appearance. 288-6010 or email: Varying shifts including maria@cnpa.com for the Panights and weekends, workcific Northwest Daily Coning 16-21 hours per week. nection. (PNDC) Wages are competitive and come with a monthly bonus. Freight Dispatcher Trainee Must pass a background We are looking for a person check and drug screen. with great communication Apply online at standardtvanand sales skills to join our dappliance.com or in person team at a busy freight broat: kerage company. Job duties 63736 Paramount Drive include developing new cusBend, OR 97701 tomers, negotiating rates with shippers and truckers, providing superior customer DO YOU NEED A service to our customers, and GREAT EMPLOYEE monitoring the position and RIGHT NOW? status of all trucks and loads Call The Bulletin before 11 under one's direction. Suca.m. and get an ad in to cessful applicants will need publish the next day! to be good working under 385-5809. pressure and multitasking in VIEW the Classifieds at: a busy environment. Experiwww.bendbulletin.com ence in freight dispatching not required. Please send resume to hr@taurusfreight.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. Sales - OVER 18? A can’t miss limited opportunity to travel with a successful business group. Paid training. Transportation/Lodging Provided. Unlimited income potential. Call 1-877-646-5050. (PNDC)

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Madras,

H

Prineville and Bend

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Truck Drivers needed to run out of Central Oregon area. Home every day. Requires CDL with doubles endorsement. Seeking drivers with winter driving experience on mountain passes. Contact 541-419-1125; 541-546-6489

The Colorado Cat Clinic is seeking an experienced LVT who is detailed oriented and has a great attitude. Must work very well with others, but also be able to self-motivate and take initiative. Consistency & positive communication skills are necessary. Would prefer a licensed tech, but will consider a seasoned assistant. Salary commensurate with experience. Please bring resume and references to clinic (655 NW York Dr.) or e-mail info to catclinic@bendbroadband.com NO CALLS, PLEASE. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

CAUTION

Building/Contracting

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Russ Peterson Builder / Contractor 40 years experience Home Repairs & Remodels 541-318-8789 • CCB 50758

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Deck Refinishing Time! Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Concrete Construction

Home Improvement

JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways... Call Grant, 541-279-3183 • CCB190612

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Domestic Services Tami’s Cleaning Service “Let’s Keep it Clean!” Both Residential & Business References upon Request Call Tami - 541-610-9249 Home is where the dirt is! 9 years exp. in housekeeping. Refs, & rates to fit your needs Call Julie & Jobana today! 541-728-1800; 541-410-0648

Landscaping, Yard Care NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Roommate to share nice home on golf course in Redmond. All amenities, owner absent 80% of time, $400/mo. Small deposit? + 1/2 utilities. Call 541-279-9538

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Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 1 Bdrm. Condo, 7th Mountain Resort, incl. all utils. & cable, all amenities of resort, fully furnished, $745/mo., 541-686-9285,541-913-6313

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

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Apt./Multiplex General

634 #1 Good Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S paid, $625+ dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13. PRIVATE PARTY LOANS: On Real Estate Equity. No credit or income requirements. No Points. Call today. 858-292-1991.

573

Business Opportunities

Loans & Mortgages BANKRUPTCY - $399

everything! 541-815-9256

Painting, Wall Covering

Don’t Wait! Paint! Ignoring your home’s paint leads to costly repairs. Protect your investment! Call us for interior/exterior painting options to fit your budget! A L S O Deck refinish/sanding. Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. 541-388-6910. ccb#5184

Remodeling, Carpentry

Arcata Development Company CB License 180888

Rental Preservation

• Sprinkler installation & repair • Aerate • Trimming • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Painting & Pressure Washing Remodels/Carpentry Repair Roofing/Kitchen & Bath Free Estimates Small Jobs OK

Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Call Mike Holm, 541-977-6448

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Tile, Ceramic

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $625$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

Call for Specials! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

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Houses for Rent Redmond 2 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, dbl. garage, $850/mo. + dep. 9199 SW Panarama, CRR. 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, $900/mo. + dep. 14920 SW Maverick, CRR. No smoking. 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 A Newer 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath, 1385 sq.ft., family room, nice yard, dbl garage w/opener, quiet, cul-de-sac, $995, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 Clean 3 Bedroom 2 bath, dbl garage & shop. No smoking. 12736 SW Wheatgrass, CRR. $1000/mo + deposits. 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660

A Classified ad is an EASY WAY TO REACH over 3 million Pacific Northwesterners. 687 $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for Commercial for 3-days. Call the Pacific Rent/Lease Northwest Daily Connection 636 (916) 288-6019 or email Office / Warehouse Apt./Multiplex NW Bend elizabeth@cnpa.com for 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. more info(PNDC) spaces, 827 Business Way, Redmond - $625 Spacious 2 Advertise VACATION SPEBend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + bdrm., 1 bath apt, in quiet well CIALS to 3 million Pacific $300 dep. 541-678-1404 maint. 4-plex in desirable NW Northwesterners! 30 daily neighborhood. Newly remodnewspapers, six states. eled kitchen w/granite Office/Warehouse located in 25-word classified $525 for a SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., counters, dishwasher, hard3-day ad. Call (916) competitive rate, wood floors, tile floor in 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or 541-382-3678. kitchen & bath, laundry equip. visit hookups, secure 2-car garage www.pnna.com/advertising_ parking, pets OK w/dep. The Bulletin offers a LOWER, pndc.cfm for the Pacific MORE AFFORDABLE Rental lawn/landscape maint. incl. Northwest Daily Connection. rate! If you have a home to 1st mo.+security dep re(PNDC) rent, call a Bulletin Classified quired for move in. Avail 9/1. Rep. to get the new rates and Contact Bruce, 541-480-3666. get your ad started ASAP! Looking for your next 638 541-385-5809 employee? Place a Bulletin help Apt./Multiplex SE Bend wanted ad today and 693 reach over 60,000 STONE CREEK Ofice/Retail Space readers each week. APARTMENTS Your classified ad will for Rent 2 bdrm., 2 bath apartments also appear on W/D included, gas fireplaces bendbulletin.com which An Office with bath, various 339 SE Reed Mkt. Rd., Bend currently receives over sizes and locations from Call about Move-In Specials 1.5 million page views $200 per month, including 541-312-4222 every month at utilities. 541-317-8717 no extra cost. 642 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., Bulletin Classifieds perfect for office or Get Results! Apt./Multiplex Redmond church south end of Bend. Call 385-5809 or place Ample parking. $675. your ad on-line at Large 2 bdrm., 1 bath, up541-408-2318. bendbulletin.com stairs unit, W/S/G+gas paid, onsite laundry, no smoking/ pets, $500/mo. 358 NW 17th St., Gael, 541-350-2095. Executive

Houses for Rent General

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or 3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1008 sq. ft., woodstove, fenced yard, rear apt. to rent, call a Bulletin deck, sgl. garage w/opener, Classified Rep. to get the quiet cul-de-sac $895. new rates and get your ad 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Chad L. Elliott Construction

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

648

Quality Builders Electric

Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

605

Roommate Wanted

Masonry

Window & Door Replacement

Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

Advertising Account

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Excavating

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

541-383-0398

Electrical Services • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

528

Loans and Mortgages

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly.

Rentals

500 600

Veterinary Techncian, Licensed, Full-time

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Finance & Business

The Bulletin is looking for a goal-driven and energetic sales professional that understands the importance of closing as well as consulting. If you believe in hard work, aggressive prospecting, the freedom of commissioned sales and your own ability to make things happen, we'd like to hear from you. This is a full time sales position that offers medical & dental benefits and well as a 401K. It also offers income potential commensurate with your hard work and closing abilities. The position responsibilities include sales and service of existing customers, aggressive representation of our multitude of advertising products, and aggressive prospecting and closing. The ability to juggle multiple customers, projects and deadlines every day will be key to your success, and a pre-employment drug screen is required. The Bulletin is Central Oregon's daily newspaper, with a strong circulation base and stable readership. We create and deliver an ever-expanding list of award-winning advertising solutions and reader content that gets results for our customers. From our targeted niche products to comprehensive daily local news coverage, no one provides better advertising access to Central Oregon consumers. If you think you have what it takes to help others grow their business and be successful in our environment, please send your resume, cover letter and salary history via e-mail to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You can also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: The Bulletin Attention Sean Tate 1777 SW Chandler Bend OR 97701 No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace

Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad!

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Why Rent? When you Can own! For as low as $1295 Down. 541- 548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend A Nice 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath 1428 sq. ft., woodstove, fenced yard, RV parking, 2.5 acres, horse OK. $995. 541480-3393 or 541-610-7803. When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend 3 Bdrm + office, 2 Bath with barn on 1 fenced acre. Large garden area & RV parking. $875. 1st/last/deposit; pets negotiable. 541-388-3609 GREAT LOCATION 2 bdrm, 1 bath on quiet street between Old Mill & Downtown, 113 Adams Pl, (off Delaware) $700 541-647-4135

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Real Estate For Sale

700

762

Homes with Acreage 2000 sq ft home, 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, attached garage, lg shop w/2 bays + 3 outbuildings. 7 acres irrigated, north of Madras. $250,000. 541-815-1993

Tuscan Estate 745

Homes for Sale BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com

3000 sq. ft. new home, sep. guest house, Bend area, 20 acres, $929k. Owner contract, no interest $250k down. James 503-632-4422.

773

steve scott realtors 685 se 3rd, bend, or

Acreages

NOTICE:

Lowe Lane Estates - 3 miles N. of Bend. Rare, secluded 10 acres w/cabin and mtn views. Fenced with unique weather resistant steel, surrounded by old growth junipers, rock outcroppings, and wildlife. Swalley irrigation rights for your use. CC&R's, equestrian and hiking trails that back up to public lands. Owner terms available. $297,000 541-233-3227,

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

748

Northeast Bend Homes

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Private gated community of Mt. View Park! A well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bath Owned/Private 1558 sq. ft. home, ideal floor Bank Owned Silvercrest/Marplan, separate master, lette/Palm Harbor/Golden vaulted ceilings, skylights, west/Home Builder’s, 3 loads of custom built ins! All bdrm, 2 bath, start at appliances, new central air, $14,500, move fast, priced to hot tub, and best of all NO sell, J & M Homes RENT!!! You own your lot!! 541-548-5511 Neighborhood offers, pool, www.jandmhomes.com sports court, boat/RV parking, and a gated community. Recently reduced to NE BEND - $46,000, Fuqua 1200+/- sq.ft., upscale park, $154,900. Call Mary Stratton, deck, mtn. view, dbl. garage, Broker, Alpine Real Estate consider trade for Salem (541) 419-6340 Easy to home/RV, 951-259-5093. show!

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Sisters Homes Seller Financing Available! NOT BANK OWNED, NOT A SHORT SALE! 14867 Bluegrass Lp., Sisters 2 Bdrm, 2 Bath, 1,388 sq ft home. 6-Car Detached Shop. On 1.06 acres. Borders National Forest. Move-in Ready! $119,900. Call Peter 541-419-5391, for info. www.GorillaCapital.com

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F4 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE La PINE RURAL FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 51590 Huntington Road P.O. Box 10 La Pine, Oregon 97739 Advertisement for: Rapid Intervention Team Equipment RFP 11-01 Sealed proposals will be received by the La Pine Rural Fire Protection District beginning August 19, 2011and closing at 10:00 a.m. September 6, 2011 at the office of Assistant Chief, 51590 Huntington Road, La Pine, Oregon 97739 for providing rapid intervention team equipment. Proposals will be opened publicly at 8:00 a.m. on September 7, 2011 at the office of the Assistant Chief. Proposals received after the closing period will be returned unopened. Only names of the responsive proposers will be read. Equipment listings and specifications will be available through the Assistant Chief's office. The La Pine Rural Fire Protection District may cancel this procurement or, reject any or all proposals in whole or in part, when cancellation or rejection is in the best interest of the La Pine Rural Fire Protection District. LEGAL NOTICE NATIONAL FOREST TIMBER FOR SALE DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST The Baldy Sale is located within T.22S., R.7E., Section 36., T.22S., R.8E., Sections 14,15,16,21,22,23,30,31., T.23S., R.7E. Section 1., T.23S., R.8E. Section 6. The Forest Service will receive sealed and oral bids in public at Deschutes National Forest Supervisor's Office, 1001 SW Emkay Drive, Bend, OR, 97702 at 11:00 AM local time on 09/20/2011 for an estimated volume of 1493 CCF of Douglas-fir sawtimber, 508 CCF of Lodgepole Pine and other coniferous species sawtimber, 1700 CCF of Ponderosa Pine sawtimber, and 3001 CCF of White Fir sawtimber marked or otherwise designated for cutting. In addition, there is within the sale area an unestimated volume of White Fir and other coniferous species (standing) grn bio cv, and Landing Piles grn bio cv that the bidder may agree to remove at a fixed rate. The Forest Service reserves the right to reject any and all bids. Interested parties may obtain a prospectus from the office listed below. A prospectus, bid form, and complete information concerning the timber, the conditions of sale, and submission of bids is available to the public from the Crescent Ranger District, 136471 Hwy 97 N., PO Box 208, Crescent OR 97733, 541-433-3246; or the Deschutes National Forest Supervisor's Office, 1001 SW Emkay Drive, Bend, OR, 97702, 541-383-5586. The USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-11204 T-11204 filed by Patrick and Frances Drennen, 17461 SE Forked Horn Drive, Sisters, OR 97759, proposes a change in point of appropriation and a change in place of use under Certificate 86873. The right allows the use of 0.025 cubic foot per second (priority date August 11, 1993) from a well in Sec. 7, T 16 S, R 11 E, W.M. (Deschutes Basin) for irrigation in Sec. 7. The applicant proposes to move the point of appropriation approximately 3¾ miles north to within Sec. 19, T 15 S, R 11 E, W.M. and to change the place of use to within Sec. 19, T 15 S, R 11 E, W.M. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice,

whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is August 19, 2011. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Lisa D.T. Klemp, Bryant, Emerson & Fitch, LLP, P.O. Box 457, Redmond, OR 97756. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). 1. IN THE MATTER OF: 2006 Subaru Legacy, Plate 713EYE, VIN 4S4BP61C667318572, Case No. 11-32802, seized on or about 7/08/11 from James A. Klomp; 2. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $1260, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/06/11 from James A. Klomp; 3. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $686, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/06/11 from James A. Klomp; 4. IN THE MATTER OF: Savings Bond in the amount of $100, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/06/11 from James A. Klomp; 5. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $41, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/06/11 from James A. Klomp; 6. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $108, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/06/11 from James A. Klomp; 7. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $5,000, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/06/11 from Wall Street Storage, Unit #G14; 8. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $73,000, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/06/11 from Wall Street Storage, Unit #G14; 9. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $11701.78, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/07/11 from Bank of America James A. Klomp Acct #2662018102; 10. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $3,185.71, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/07/11 from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. from James A. Klomp Acct #3102282534; 11. IN THE MATTER OF:U.S. Currency in the amount of $4,956.19, Case No. 11-32802, seized on 7/07/11 from Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. from James A. Klomp Acct #3102282534; 12. IN THE MATTER OF:Real Property described as Lot One (1), in Block One (1), of CORK’S WESTSIDE

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ADDITION, recorded December 26, 1969, in Cabinet A, Page 361, Deschutes County, Oregon, commonly known as 235 SW 23rd Street, Redmond, OR 97756, seized on 7/6/11 from James A. Klomp. 13. IN THE MATTER OF:Real Property described as LOT 3, BLOCK 31, OF WIESTORIA, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, EXCEPT BEGINNING AT THE SW CORNER OF SAID LOT 3 OF BLOCK 31; THENCE NORTH, 30 FEET; THENCE EAST, 25 FEET; THENCE SOUTH, 30 FEET; THENCE WEST, 25 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, commonly known as 725 NE Revere Avenue, Bend, OR 9770, seized on 7/6/11 from James A. Klomp. 14. IN THE MATTER OF:Real Property described as Lot Twelve (12), Block Five (5), MEADOWBROOK ESTATES, Deschutes County, Oregon, commonly known as 3489 SW Forest Ct., Redmond, OR 97756, seized from 7/6/11 from James A. Klomp. LEGAL NOTICE OREGON AUCTION AD Wall Street Storage, LLC at 1315 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701 will be accepting sealed bids on 9/10/2011 from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. for the following units: Joseph Level, Unit K-9 Sean Mcclellan, Unit E-21A Julie Steen, Unit U-11 LEGAL NOTICE Request for Proposals: Community Water Operator The Klamath Tribes Housing Department seeks a certified Small Water System Operator to be responsible for operations, maintenance, reporting and State compliance of the water system in our Pine Grove Development near Chiloquin. Please contact Errin Walker 541-783-2219 ext. 135. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1274 T.S. No.: 1329445-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Howard E. Morgan and Carol L. Morgan Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of Commonwealth United Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated May 12, 2005, recorded May 18, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-30616* covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4, block 1, Tall Pines, First Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon.

*re-recorded dot recorded on 10/11/2007 doc# 2007-54643 Commonly known as: 53355 Big Timber Dr. Lapine OR 97739 . Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2010 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $502.45 Monthly Late Charge $18.74. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $58,619.77 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from September 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 14, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance re-

quired under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 06, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-386300 08/05, 08/12, 08/19, 08/26 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx5109 T.S. No.: 1330070-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Rodney A. Mustrud and Susan L. Mustrud, An Estate In Fee Simple, As Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Discover Mortgage, as Beneficiary, dated September 22, 2002, recorded October 04, 2002, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2002-54701* covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 9, block 5 of Mountain Village East II, Deschutes County, Oregon * modification recorded 10-2-09 instrument# 2009-42319 Commonly known as: 17848 Pine Ridge Ln. Sunriver OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due March 1, 2011 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $992.75 Monthly Late Charge $49.63. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $149,003.69 together with interest thereon at 5.625% per annum from February 01, 2011 until paid; plus all ac-

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L527226 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018781/SMITH Investor No: 4004985207 AP #1: 248565 Title #: 110218743 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MICHAEL S. SMITH, SUSAN M. SMITH as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated August 23, 2006, Recorded August 25, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-58633 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 20, PROMISE LANE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 05/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,454.76 $7,273.80 1 PYMT DUE 10/01/10 @ 1,419.95 $1,419.95 7 PYMTS FROM 11/01/10 TO 05/01/11 @ 1,445.67 $10,119.69 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $209.62 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $120.00 $120.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$19,143.06 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 3064 NE WELLS ACRES ROAD, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $257,956.73, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 04/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on September 19, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales TAC# 942048W PUB: 08/05/11, 08/12/11, 08/19/11, 08/26/11 DATED: 05/12/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260

crued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 28, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said

described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire

amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the perfor-

mance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 20, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-387422 08/19, 08/26, 09/02, 09/09 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx1106 T.S. No.: 1323522-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert L. Laughlin and Susan Laughlin, Trustees Of The Bob And Susan Laughlin Trust Dated October 13, 2004, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated November 08, 2006, recorded November 13, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-75111 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: AN UNDIVIDED 1/60th INTEREST IN AND TO THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PARCELS: PARCEL I: The South Ball of [he Southwest Quarter (5 ½ SW ¼) and the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NW ¼ SW ¼) of Section 2, EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the United Stifles of America by donation Deed recorded My 10, 1941 in Volume 60, Page 54, Deed Records, arid that part of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW ¼ NW 'A) of Section 11 lying North and East of the rimrock on the North and East side of the Crooked River Canyon, all in Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. PARCEL II: The Northwest Quarter (NW ¼) of Section 1, and the Southeast Quarter of the Northeast. Quarter (SE 1/4 NE ¼), and the North Hall of the Southeast Quarter (N ½ SE ¼) of section 2, all N Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County. Oregon. PARCEL III: The Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW ¼ SE ¼) of Section 2, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. PARCEL IV The East Hull (E ½) of Section 3, Township 14 South, range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the United States of America by donation deed recorded May 10, 1941 in Book 60, page 56, deed Records PARCELV: The West Hall (W ½) of Section 3, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed on Everett Thornhurgh and Eva Thornhurgh by Warranty Deed recorded January 25, 1983 in Book 3, Page 41, Official Records, PARCEL VI: The South HaLF of the Southeast Quarter (5 '½ SE ¼) of Section 4, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion lying within the right of way of U.S. Highway 97 arid the Oregon Think Railway as located July 1, 1966. Parcel VII: That portion of [he Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of Section 9, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, lying and being East of the Burlington Northern Railroad Tracks. PARCEL VII: A parcel of land situated in a portion of the East Hair of the Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE ¼) of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a 3-1/4 inch aluminum cap monumenting the East Quarter corner of Section 10, the initial as well as the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. a point from which a 5/8 inch rebar monumenting the Center Quarter corner of said Section 10 bears South 89°37'23" west, 2628.07 feet; thence South 89°37'23" west along the South line of said last Half of Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE 1/4), Kfl4.04 feet to the boundary of a parcel of land described in Volume 150, Page 530, Deed Records; thence North 00°04'01"East along said boundary, 515.00 feet; thence North 89°37'23" East along said boundary, 307.00 feet; thence North 00°04'01"' East along said boundary, 185.00 feet; thence South 89°37'31" West along said boundary, 537.00 feet to the West line of said East half of Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE 1/4); thence North 00°04'01" East along said West line, 339.11 feet to the prolongation of an existing fence; thence North 89°15'55" East along Said fence and its prolongation, 214.92 feet: thence North 02°25'34"" West along said existing fence, 271.32 feet; thence North 01l°33'41" West along said existing fence, 165.78 feet; thence North 85°06'20" East along said existing fence, 366.98 feet; thence North 07°10'37" West along said existing fence, 1Xi.98 feet; thence Easterly along said existing fence approximately 10 feet to the brink of the West canyon rim of the Crooked River; thence Northeasterly along said brink approximately 970 feet to the North line of said East Half of the Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE 1/4) thence Easterly along said North line approximately 534 feet to the Northeast corner of said Section 10; thence Southerly along the East line of said Section 10 approximately 2632 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion lying North and East of the centerline of the Crooked River, PARCEL IX: A portion of the East Half of the Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE ¼) of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said East Hall of the Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE 1/i); thence Northerly long the West edge of said tract, a distance of 700 feet; thence Easterly and parallel to the South line of said tract, a distance of 537 feet; thence Southerly and parallel to the West line of said tract, a distance of 185 feet; thence Westerly and parallel to the Southerly edge of said tract a distance of 307 feet; thence Southerly and parallel to the West edge of said tract, a distance of 515 feet to the South line of said tract; thence Westerly along the South edge of said tract, a distance of 230 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL X: Commencing at a 3-1/4 inch aluminum cap monumenting the East Quarter corner of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, the initial point, a point from which a 5/8 inch re-bar monumenting the Center quarter corner o said Section 10 hears South 89°37'23" West, 2628.07 feet; thence South 89°37'23" West along the South line of the East half of the Northeast quarter (E ½ NE ¼) of said Section 10, 1314.04 feet to the West line of said East Half of Northeast quarter (E ½ NE ¼); thence North 00°04'01" East along said west line, 1305.64 feet to an existing fence and (he TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 87°55'28" East along said existing fence. 2(13.24 feet; thence South 02°25'34" West along said existing fence, 271.32 feet; thence South 89°15'55" West along said existing fence and its prolongation, 214.92 feet to the West line of said East Hall of the Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE ¼); thence North 00°04'01" East along said West line, 266.47 feet to the POINT ON BEGINNING. PARCEL Xl: Commencing at a 3-1/4 inch aluminum cap monumenting the East Quarter corner of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, the initial point, a point from which a 5/8 inch re-bar monumenting the Center Quarter corner of said Section 10 bears South 89°37'23" West, 2628.07 feet; thence South 89°37'23" West along the South line of the Fast Half of the Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE ¼) of said Section 10, 1314.04 feet to the West line of said East Half of flit Northeast Quarter (S ½ NE ',4); thence North 00°04'01" East along said West line, 1305.64 feet to an existing fence and the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; thence North 87°55'28" East along said existing fence, 203.24 feet; thence North 01°33'41" West along said existing fence, 165.78 feet; thence North 85°06'20" East along said existing fence, 366.98 feet; thence North 07°10'37" West along said existing fence, 181.98 feet; thence Easterly along said existing fence approximately 10 feet to the bunk of the West canyon rim of the Crooked River; thence Northeasterly along said brink approximately 970 feet to the North line of said East Hall of Northeast Quarter ([½ NE ¼); thence Westerly along said North line approximately 780 feet to the West line of said East Half of Northeast Quarter (E ½ NE 1/4); thence South 00°04'01" West, along said West line, 1312.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL XII The Northwest Quarter (NW ¼); the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NW ¼ NE ¼); the West Half of the Southeast Quarter (W ½ SE 1/4); and the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NE ¼ SE ¼) of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the East Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (E ½ NE ¼ NE 14 SE ¼) of Section 10. AND The South Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (S1/2 NW1/4 SW1/4) of section 11, Township 14 South, Range 13 east of the willamette Meridian, Deschutes County. Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the portions lying East of the centerline of the Crooked River. PARCEL XIII: The Southwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW 1/4 NE 1/4) and the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE ¼ SW '/s) of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East u the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the East 20 feet of the Southwest quarter of the Northeast Quarter (SW ¼ NE ¼) heretofore conveyed to Deschutes County for road purposes. PARCEL XIV: That portion of the Northwest quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NW ¼ NW ¼) of Section 11, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, lying South and West of the Crooked River. PARCEL XV: The Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW ¼ NW 1/4) and the North Half of the Northwest Quarter of the southwest Quarter (N ½ NW 1/4 SW ¼) of Section 11, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. excepting therefrom those portions lying East of the centerline of Crooked River. AND the East Half of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (E ½ NE ¼ NE ¼ SE 1/4) of Section 10, Township 14 South Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian. Deschutes County, Oregon. PARCEL XVI: Lots 5 and 6, Block 1, ARROWDALE, Deschutes county, Oregon. PARCEL XVII: The portion of the Northeast quarter of the Southeast Quarter (NS1/4 SE1/4) of Section 9, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: commencing at the last Quarter corner of said Section 9; thence Noah 89° 20' West, a distance of 512.0 feet to a point in the centerline of the Austin Road (now known as NW Eby Avenue); thence South a distance of 20.0 feet to a point in the South right of way line of said Austin Road (now known as NW Eby Avenue), )marked by a one inch steel bar, THE POINT OF beginning; thence North 88° 20' West along said South right of way line, a distance of 582.4 feet to a corner fence post at the intersection of said South right of way line of said Austin Road (now known as NW Eby Avenue and the easterly right of way line of the Oregon Trunk Railway; thence South 22° 20' East along said Easterly right of way line of said Railroad, a distance of 629.3 feet lo a point in said Easterly right of way line of said Railroad marked by a one inch steel bar; thence North 75° 48' East, a distance of 374.8 feet to a point marked by a one inch sled bar; thence North 02° 40' West. a distance of 474.1 feet to the point of beginning. PARCEL XVIII: That portion of the Northeast Quarter (NE1/4) of Section 9, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, lying and being Westerly of the right of way of the Oregon Trunk Railway. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the State of Oregon, by and through its State of Oregon Highway commission, by Warranty Deed recorded November 14, 1953 in Bock 105 at Page 461, Deed Records. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM beginning at a point 1055.24 feet South and 100 feet East of the Quarter corner between Section 4 and 9; thence South along the East side of the now existing highway, 1122 feet; thence South 89° 45' Past, 396 feet: thence North, 1122 feet; thence North 89° 45' West, 396 feet to the point o1 beginning. EXCEPTING from all of the above parcels, that portion dedicated to the public through dedication deed recorded March 28, 2005 in volume 2005, Page 18069, Official Records. TOGETHER WITH those parcels of land described above which are also described as PARTITION PLAT NO. 2005-66, PARTITION PLAT NO. 2006-30 AND PARTITION PLAT NO. 200643. ALSO EXCEPTING from all of the above parcels that tract of land described as follows: A tract land located in the West Half (W1/2) of Section 3, and in the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quartet (NE 1/4 NE1/4) of Section 9, and in the North Half of the Northwest Quarter (NW 114 NWI/4) arid in the Northwest Quarter of the Northeast Quarter (NW1/4 NE1/4) of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described s follows: BEGINNING at the Southwest corner of said Section 3; thence along the West line of said Section 3, North 00°20'30" Last 1203.06 feet; thence leaving said West. line South 89°36'41" East 99,36 feet; thence North 00°21'07" East 139850 led; thence North 01°20'29" East 2005.77 feet; thence South 89°41'12"" East 821.29 feet; thence South 84°06'22" east 242.79 feet; thence North 89°55'19" Last 850.98 feet; thence South 06°51 05" East 1195.74 feet; thence South 21°55'19" Fast 1246.30 feet to a point on the North-south centerline of said Section 3; thence South 01°01'01' West along said North-South law 2238.01 feet to the South Quarter corner of said Section 3; thence along the South line of said Section 3, North 89°19'00" East 511.95 feet; thence leaving said South line of said Section 3, South 40°23'26" East 277.81 feet; thence North 56°15'26" East 299.43 feet.; thence South 69°54'51 East 132.43 feet; thence South 00°03'23" West 217.56 feet; thence South 14°16'12" West 178.21 feet; thence South 29°20'55" West 168.14 feet; thence South 60°48'15" West 123.82 feet; thence North 81°15'48" West 153.62 feet; thence North 00°02'30" East 429.73 Feet; thence North 40°23'26" West 276.96 feet; thence South 89°19'00' West 499.68 feet to a point on the Northerly right-of-way of good pasture Loop; thence along said Northerly right-of-way along the following courses; thence 87.14 feet along the arc of a non-tangent 491 .00-foot radius curve left, the chord of which bears North 78°57'30" West 87.03 feet; thence 55.35 feet along the arc of a 970.00-foot radius curve right, the chord of which bears North 82°24'28" West 55.35 feet to a point on the South section line of said Section 3; thence along said South line & said Section 3, North 89°55'57" West 2479.29 feet.; thence leaving said South line South 0000532 West 25.67 feet; thence North 89°53' 17" West 841.41 feet; thence South 00°08'06" West 132.28 feet; thence South 45°04'35" West 124.89 feet; thence South 00°09'20" West 104.27 feet; thence North 89°53'05" West 400.01 feet; thence North 00°06'52" East 351.28 feet to a point on the north line of said Section 9; thence along said North line South 89°51 '20" East 1305.12 feet to the Southwest corner of said Section 3 and the true point of beginning. TOGETHER WITH the Co-Tenancy Rights under the Amended and Restated Tenancy in Common Agreement dated May 22, 2003, and recorded June 4, 2003 in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon at 2003-37141 (as the same is amended from time to time, the "agreement") and certain contractual rights in and to that portion of property generally referred to as landholding No. 38, which tights and landholding are more particularly described in the Agreement and as follows: LAND HOLDING AREA #38: A tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4) of Section 10, Township 14 South Range 13 East, of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the center one-quarter corner of said Section 10, thence along the East-West centerline of said Section 10, South 89°38'46" West 546.61 feet to the point of beginning; thence leaving said East-West centerline of said Section 10, South 58°24'04" East 169.32 feet; thence South 42°23'20" East 317.92 feet; thence Smith 26°20'03" West 9.08 feet; thence South 25°22'23" East 513.78 feet; thence South 16°34'37" West 88.08 feet; thence South 62°3121" West 59.78 feet; thence South 12°20'53' West 15.27 feet; thence South 35°32'21" East 8.96 feet; thence West 377.61 feel; thence 222.21 feet along the arc of a 185.00 foot radius curve left, the chord of which bears North 22°01'01" West. 209.09 feet; thence North 215.18 feet; thence North 89°38'46" East 248.38 feet to the point of beginning. BUILDING ENVELOPE A tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4) of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East, of the willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Center Quarter corner of said Section 10, thence along the .EastWest centerline of said Section 10 South 89°38'46" West 546.61 feet; thence leaving said East -West centerline of said section 10 South 58°24'04" East 169.32 feet; thence South 05°43'32" West 53.73 feet to the point of beginning; thence South 60°04'52" West, 106.29 feet; thence South 07°13'10" east 176.77 feet; thence east 88.05 feet; thence North 62°04'29" East 52.10 feet; thence north 16°56'28" East 93.34 feet; thence North 26°03' 13" West 35.01 feet; thence 42°23'20" West 112.71 feet to the point of beginning. LANDSCAPE AREA. A tract of land located in the Northeast, Quarter of the southwest Quarter (NE1/4 SW1/4) of Section 10, Township 14 South, Range 13 East., of the willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Center Quarter corner of said Section 10, thence along the East-West centerline of said Section 10, South 89°38'46" West 546.61 feet; thence leaving said East-West centerline of said Section 10, South 58°24'04" East 169.32 feet to the point of beginning; thence north 65°18'29" West 161.82 feet; thence South 37°26'08" West 62.42 feet; thence South 38°53'40" East 116.44 feet; thence South 07°13'10" East 251.25 feet, thence East 143.76 feet; thence North 35°32'21" West 8.96 feet; thence North 12°20'53" East 15.27 feet; thence North 62°31'21" East 59.78 feet; thence North 16°34'37" East 88.08 feet; thence North 25°22'23" West 50.78 feet; thence North 26°20'03" East 9.08 feet; thence North 42°23'20" West 180.91 feet to the point of beginning. Commonly known as: 38 Sage Point Terrebonne Or 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due december 1, 2008 of interest only and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $9,112.51 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $1,620,000.00 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from November 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 18, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: July 13, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-386936 08/12, 08/19, 08/26, 09/02


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 860

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

860

Motorcycles And Accessories Motorcycles And Accessories

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008 Too many upgrades to list, immaculate cond., clean, 15K miles. Make offer 541-693-3975

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

865

865

870

ATVs

ATVs

Boats & Accessories

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

KAWASAKI 750 2005 like new, 2400 miles, stored 5 years. New battery, sports shield, shaft drive, $3400 firm. 541-447-6552. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Summer Price Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, August 19, 2011 F5

2010 Custom Pro-street Harley DNA Pro-street swing arm frame, Ultima 107, Ultima 6-spd over $23,000 in parts alone; 100s of man hours into custom fabrication. Past show winner & a joy to ride. $23,000 obo 541-408-3317

Rebates up to $1000 AND financing as low as 2.99% APR on select models VESPA 2005 Gran Turismo 200 Perfect Cond., rare vintage green color, top box for extra storage, 2 helmets, incl. $3250. 541-419-9928.

865

ATV's can be hazardous to operate. All riders under 16 should ride only with adult supervision. Always wear a helmet and be sure to take a safety training course. Financing on approval of credit. See dealer for details.

870

Boats & Accessories

18’3” Bluewater 1984, 1 owner, 289 fishing motor & water skis, Calkins trailer, fish finder, sun cover, boat cover, well taken care of, $3500. Call 541-815-7367

ATVs Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

HARLEY CUSTOM 2007 Dyna Super Glide FXDI loaded, all options, bags, exhaust, wheels, etc., low mi., beautiful, $11,600 OBO, 541-408-7908

Honda Trail 90 1969, Yellow, very nice, dual spd. trans, rack, street legal, $1995 OBO, 541-318-5010

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

Polaris 330 Trail Bosses (2), used very little, like new, $1800 ea. OBO, 541-420-1598

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

1776 S. Hwy 97, Redmond 541-526-5931

Rhino 4x4 Side x Side, 2004 Special Ed., camo, digital dash, only 296 miles, always garaged, 1 owner, $5645 firm. 541-549-0695

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $10,000, call for details, 541-480-8060

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

2007 Bayliner Discovery 195 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a gaGreat condition, Low hours, rage sale and don't forget to 135 HP, Bimini top, boat and advertise in classified! bow cover, AM/FM/CD, fish 385-5809. finder, folding tongue trailer, life vests Priced to sell $12,900. Call 541-678-1288

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 870

880

881

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-09-310201-SH

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-450521-NH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TROY E. GRANT as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HORIZON HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF FIRST TENNESSEE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 8/29/2007, recorded 8/31/2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2007-48053,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251692 LOT NINETY-EIGHT (98), HUNTINGTON MEADOWS PHASES 5 AND 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 16447 RILEY DRIVE LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 8/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,420.81 Monthly Late Charge $57.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $177,508.67 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.2500 per annum from 7/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/5/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/5/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/5/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 8/1/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 818 Stewart Street, Suite 800 Seattle, WA 98101 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DONALD E HUNDT, SHIRLEY A HUNDT, HUSBAND & WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 10/18/2006, recorded 10/24/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-71071,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 209386 LOT NINETY-ONE (91), QUAIL PINE ESTATES, PHASE VII, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61286 COLUMBINE LN. BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 3/1/2011, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,071.86 Monthly Late Charge $53.59 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $205,796.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.2500 per annum from 2/1/2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 12/7/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 12/7/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 11/7/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 8/1/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax:619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# FNMA4061336 08/19/2011, 08/26/2011, 09/02/2011, 09/09/2011

ASAP# FNMA4061330 08/19/2011, 08/26/2011, 09/02/2011, 09/09/2011

Jayco 1994, 22’, 50K, full bath, kitchen, bed, dinette, gen, selfcontained, lots more, immaculate! $10,500. 541-385-5682

Komfort 28’ 2002, 12’ slide, exc. cond. inside & out, A/C,micro, 2-dr. fridge, rear bdrm. & bath, dinette, all hardwood cabinets, lots of storage, elec. hitch lift, equalizer hitches incl. $11,200 OBO, 541-549-0805

875

Watercraft Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Jayco Greyhawk 2004, 31’ Class C, 6800 mi., hyd. jacks, new tires, slide out, exc. cond, $54,000, 541-480-8648

R-POD 173 2012, New! Never Used! Fully equip. A/C, fridge/ freezer,TV/DVD,sleeps 3,micro, shower, $13,900, 541-604-4028

Skyline Layton 25’ 880

Motorhomes

Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge with ice-maker. $98,000. 541-610-9985

Legal Notices

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi., Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, low book $59,900, 541-548-5216.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Four Winds Chateau M-31F 2006, 2 power slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, great cond. $43,900. 541-419-7099

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $97,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $35,500 OBO. 541-923-4211 TOW BAR Blue Ox fits motorhome, $199 541-389-1582

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11½’ overall height, perfect cond, NOW $36,000. 541-312-8974

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Springdale 20’ 179RD 2007, like new, new tires, A/C, 3 burner stove,oven,micro, tub/ shower,dinette w/rear window to view outdoors, 2 propane tanks, outside shower, weather cover, $9200, 503-639-3355

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179. Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

Gulfstream 36’ 2003, 330 Cat diesel, with 2 slides, 12,300 miles. Nice, no pets/smoke. $70,000. 541-848-9225

2008, Model 208 LTD. Like brand new. Used 4x Bend to Camp Sherman. Winterized, in storage. 3855 lbs Sleeps 5. Queen walk around bed w/storage, full bathroom, full kitchen & lrg fridge. Dual batteries & propane tanks, awning,corner-leveling jacks, Easylift Elite load hitch w/ bars, furnace, AC, AM/FM stereo. Couch & dining table fold out for extra sleeping. $11,795 OBO. 760-699-5125.

881

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Travel Trailers

Coleman Chesapeake 1993, mint cond., garaged, 22 ’8” open, awning/screen encl. best buy on mkt. $3,900. 619-971-4225, NW Bend.

STILL SMELLS NEW! 27' Wil derness Extreme Edition pkg. Upgraded options. Queen walk around w/ bunks in the rear. LCD TV, large slide out, too much to list. Asking $18,000. Brian 541-749-0573

541-385-5809


F6 Friday, August 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

881

885

925

932

933

940

975

975

975

Travel Trailers

Canopies and Campers

Utility Trailers

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Vans

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van, 1999, with tow pkg., good condition, $3500. 541-419-5693

BMW 323i convertible, 1999. 91K miles. Great condition, beautiful car, incredibly fun ride! $9300. 541-419-1763

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Volkswagen Jetta 2003, 82k. Automatic, very clean. Free chains.$6,500. 541-261-2213

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Leer 8-ft. Dodge Canopy for 3/4-ton pickup, like new, $425. Call 541-279-9538

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

6x10 hydraulic dump trailer, $3,500. 541-388-6854 When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Autos & Transportation 29’ Alpenlite Riviera 1997 5th whl. 1 large slide-out. New carpeting, solar panel, AC & furnace. 4 newer batteries & inverter. Great shape. Must see to appreciate. $13,900 541-389-8315 541-728-8088

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Military Trailer, converted to ATV/wood hauler trailer, brown colored, with winch, $500 OBO, 541-419-6295. Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $3995. Call 541-420-1846.

931

International Travel All 1967,

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Cardinal 34.5 RL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $50,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

935

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

Pontiac Trans Am, 1976 455 4-spd, all original, black on black. 63,000 actual miles. $6500. 541-364-1175

Aircraft Hangar for rent, Redmond Airport (RDM) , north side. 41' wide x 33'-6"deep with 41' wide x 13'-5" high power bi-fold door. 120v lighting & receptacles. $400/ month. 541-548-0810, days. AIRCRAFT HANGARS For Rent

Prineville Large rectangular 45’W x 36’D 12’H w/elec. bifold doors, exc. access, location, fuel prices, 541-350-9729

Executive Hangar at Bend Airport (KBDN).

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 541-480-3923

COACHMAN 1997 Catalina 5th wheel 23’, slide, new tires, extra clean, below book. $6,500. 541-548-1422.

Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Antique and Classic Autos

MUST SELL

For Memorial 70 Monte Carlo 60’ wide x 50’ deep, with 55’ All original, beautiful, car, wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. completely new suspension Natural gas heat, office & bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. and brake system, plus extras. $4000 OBO. 541-593-3072 Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation Chevy Camero LT 1987, 4-spd, bus. $235K 541-948-2126 many extras, needs TLC, $2000 OBO, 541-388-5743 916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank with pump and hose. Everything works, $8,500 OBO. 541-977-8988

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Porsche 1983 911SC Cabriolet. Info: www.83porsche911sccabriolet. com

933

Pickups *** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 72,000 miles, new shocks, rear brakes, one owner, $18,250, 541-480-0828.

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. call

Honda Element SE 2007, exc. cond, low mileage, rare root beer color, $17,900, private party, 541-480-6900.

Jeep 4-dr Wagon, 1987 4WD, silver, nice wheels, 183K, lots of miles left yet! Off-road or on-road, it’s dependable, and all yours for just $2195. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639

Lexus 400h Hybrid, 2007, exceptional car/condition, 43k mostly hwy mi, new tires, orig owner, all records, purchased with premium pkg incl navigation, avg 25+ mpg, always garaged. $30,900 541-617-9365 People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Lexus RX350 2010, All wheel drive, Navigation. 800 miles Vin#009206 $43,977 541-598-3750 West of 97 & Empire, Bend Check out other inventory at www.aaaoregonautosource.com

(2) 1988 Great Dane Trailers, Nissan Armada 2004 LE - V8, $1200 each, tires breaks & Excellent cond. & loaded hoses good to go, being used Chevy Wagon 1957, seats 7, multi-CD, DVD, for secure dry storage, trail4-dr., complete, $15,000 leather, tow pkg., great in ers open for review on Sat. OBO, trades, please call Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 the snow. Beautiful! 8/20 10 am. - 3 pm. at Red541-420-5453. with 3 slide-outs, king bed, $15,000. 541-383-8855 mond impound lot next to ultimate living comfort, Rogers towing, 463 E Antler. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 NISSAN MURANO SL quality built, large kitchen, Going N. on Hwy 97 take engine, auto. trans, ps, air, Chevy 4X4 1976, camper spe2005 all wheel drive, 35000 fully loaded, well insulated, Antler exit and go 0.3 mi. frame on rebuild, repainted actual miles, leather-moon cial, 173K, 4” lift, winch, dehydraulic jacks and so much original blue, original blue tailed, nice cond, records, 2nd VIN #437872 $19,995 more.$59,500. 541-317-9185 Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, interior, original hub caps, owner, $2400. 541-923-2123 541-598-3750 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft exc. chrome, asking $9000 or DLR# 0225 storage bed. Liftgate, comChevy Silverado 2003, 2500 HD make offer. 541-385-9350. pressor & generator shelf inWest of 97 & 4WD, white, turbo diesel, exside box, locked storage Empire, Bend clnt cond, 60K mi, 4-dr exCheck out other inventory at boxes both sides of bed, new tended cab, 8’ bed, camper www.aaaoregonautosource.com tires, regular maintenance & shell, digital OnStar, all exservice every 3K miles, set up Chrysler SD 4-Door tras $24,000. 541-536-9798 Montana 33’ 2008, loaded w/ for towing heavy equip. 1930, CDS Royal Stan3 slides, 1-owner, rarely used, $3995. 541-420-1846 dard, 8-cylinder, body is $33,500 OBO, 541-389-2147. good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318 Ford F-250 1986, Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, Nissan Xterra S - 4x4 2006, gas or propane, 20K orig. AT, 76K, good all-weather mi., new tires, $5000, tires, $13,500 obo. Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed 1975, 454 541-480-8009. 858-345-0084 MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. eng., 2-spd trans, tires 60%, cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg Runs/drives well, motor runs LR, Arctic insulation, all opgreat, $1650. 541-771-5535 FORD Pickup 1977, tions $37,500. 541-420-3250 step side, 351 Windsor, Corvette 1956, 115,000 miles, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., MUST SELL MUST SEE! 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. GMC 6000 dump truck $3800. Matching numbers Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, 1990. 7 yard bed, low 541-350-1686 $58,500, 541-280-1227. immac.,loaded, dealer maint, miles, good condition, $19,500. 503-459-1580. new tires! Ford Ranger 1993, V-6, ONLY $3500 OBO. Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 3.0L, 2WD, good tires, 541-593-3072 slide, AC, TV, full awning, excanopy, x-cab, A/C, neat incellent shape, $23,900. terior, $1495. 541-548-6903. 541-350-8629 Dodge pickup 1962 D100 clasWilderness Advantage Extreme, sic, original 318 wide block, 31’, 2004, 2 slides. 2 TVs, Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly push button trans, straight, micro, air, solar system, nice every option: 20" wheels, GMC Ventura 3500 1986, runs good, $1250 firm. cond. $18,950. 2003 Ford navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ Bend, 831-295-4903 F250 Diesel Extra Cab also thermally insulated glass, tow box, has 2 sets tires available. 541-385-5077 pkg, stainless steel nose trim, Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, Ford Sport Trac Limited w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, Edition 2007, 4x4, many moonroof, Bose sys, heated original owner, V8, autonew engine, $5500, 885 extras incl. new tires, 107k, seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over matic, great shape, $9000 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. $15,995, 541-306-7546 $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230 Canopies and Campers OBO. 530-515-8199 Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $9500. Bend, 541.279.0458

Truck with Snow Plow!

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $6500 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Ford Taurus GL Wagon 1996, 84K orig., mi, $900 Firm, Cash only 541-536-9879.

Hyundai Genesis 4.6, 2009 Buick Century 2003, 93K mi, good cond, extra snow tires/ wheels. Blue Book: $6500; sell $4500. 541-385-6211

BUICKS - I have a nice 1995 LeSabre, limited model, and a nice 1998 LeSabre, custom model -- either of these cars will provide someone fine wheels for a long time, plus 30mpg hwy. Bring 39 $100 bills! Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

CADILLAC CONCOURSE 1994, black, 130k mi., sun/moonroof, cruise, tilt, bucket seats, leather, keyless entry alarm. $1900. 541-389-3151 ***

DLR# 0225

Chevy 2500 Heavy Duty, 2003 Short-box Crew Cab, Canopy, PW, PDL, AC, snow tires/whls, 85K, $13,500. 541-923-8010

CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

cond., $24,000, 541-923-0231.

1989-1995 Chevy pickup tailgate, like brand new, $100. 541-923-4174 Tailgate, 1996 Ford, exc. cond., Burgandy, $200, 541-382-8973

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

CHECK YOUR AD

Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 2005: StoNGo, 141k miles, power doors/trunk $7850. Call 541-639-9960

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Ford Windstar Mini Van, 1995, 138K, nice inside & out, only half worn out! Seats 7, Michelins, nice wheels, drives excellent 1 look is worth 1000 words! $2495. 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $30,000. 541-548-1422

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

1980 Classic Mini Cooper All original, rust-free, classic Mini Cooper in perfect cond. $12,000 OBO. 541-408-3317

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. Need to sell a Vehicle? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 541-385-5809

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Moving - Must Sell

The Bulletin Classified

Toyota Privia 1992, 154,000 miles, runs good, is clean, $2000. 541-815-4121

Chevy Corvette 1988 4-spd manual with 3-spd O/D. Sharp, loaded, 2 tops, (tinted & metal. New AC, water pump, brake & clutch, mas- Porsche Boxter 1999, exc cond 88K, $10,495. 541-350-1379 ter cylinder & clutch slave cyl. $7500 obo. 541-419-0251. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

975

Automobiles Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!!

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3200, 541-416-9566

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

! E L A S E N O Z N IO T C U R T S N O C 2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5X PREMIUM Certified Pre-Owned

$

VIN:796536

Certified Pre-Owned

2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2.5 PREMIUM

Certified Pre-Owned

Low Miles, Moonroof

24,999

2008 SUBARU TRIBECA AWD 5-PASSENGER PREMIUM

Auto, Moonroof, Heated Seats, Roof Rack, Alloy Wheels, 7,087 miles

$

20,999

VIN:411956

2010 SUBARU OUTBACK PREMIUM Heated Seats, Roof Rack, Alloy Wheels

Certified Pre-Owned

$

25,488

VIN:A3334877

Certified Pre-Owned

All Weather, Moonroof

$ VIN:785127

$

PW, PL, Cruise, Tilt, Auto, CD

Certified Pre-Owned

Leather, Moonroof, Premium Wheels

$

20,988

2006 TOYOTA TACOMA 4X4

$

17,888

2001 TOYOTA HIGHLANDER LTD

Heated Seats, Roof Rack, Alloy Wheels

$ VIN:A3335992

14,888

24,888

2006 SUBARU TRIBECA LIMITED Navigation, Leather, Moonroof, DVD

$ VIN:406044

15,988

2003 TOYOTA RAV4 4X4 Automatic, Roof Rack, Two-Tone Paint, Alloy Wheels

$ VIN:074061

15,888

2008 PONTIAC TORRENT Low Miles, Very Clean

Leather, Loaded, Roof Rack, Alloy Wheels

$

20,788

Certified Pre-Owned

Access Cab, Manual, Very Nice

VIN:288706

$

2010 SUBARU OUTBACK PREMIUM

16,999

2008 SUBARU TRIBECA LIMITED 5-PASSENGER

VIN:414350

24,788

2008 SUBARU OUTBACK WAGON 2.5i Base

Moonroof, Alloy Wheels, Heated Seats

VIN:508300

23,998

2009 SUBARU FORESTER XT TURBO PREMIUM

VIN: 330628

2009 SUBARU IMPREZA PREMIUM Certified Pre-Owned

$

VIN:766613

All Weather, Low Miles

2004 CHEVROLET AVALANCHE 4WD Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

Classic Mini Coopers Anyone interested in forming a social Classic Mini Cooper Club, contact 541-408-3317.

541-385-5809

VIN:024991

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

“2009 Car of the Year.” Technology package, 528-watt 17-speaker Lexicon audio system, navigation system, Bluetooth, more. Light blue, like new, only 4,500 miles. $29,500. Call 541-598-7737

$ VIN:304437

16,999

2006 JEEP LIBERTY 4WD

Loaded, Leather, DVD, Low Miles

$ VIN: 337978

16,999

2008 DODGE 3500 QUAD CAB 4X4 DUALLY

Automatic

$ VIN:228887

2006 NISSAN XTERRA 4X4

Laramie, Low Miles, Very Clean, Leather, Loaded

$ VIN:102465

35,999

2006 DODGE 2500 QUAD CAB SLT 4X4 LONG BOX

Roof Rack, Running Boards, Low Miles

$

29,999

2002 NISSAN FRONTIER CREW CAB 4X4 Running Boards, Bedliner, Roof Rack, Off-Road

$ VIN:322614

8,999

2007 FORD ESCAPE HYBRID Great MPG!

$ VIN: B59443

13,995

2001 TOYOTA SEQUOIA 4X4 Leather, Multi-Disc, Moonroof, Auto

$ VIN: 038457

14,999

$

VIN:519476

16,999

2004 DODGE DURANGO LIMITED 3rd Seat, Moonroof, DVD, Leather, Loaded

5.9L Diesel, Hard to Find, Low Low Miles-30K

VIN:88589

13,999

$ VIN:142655

13,995

2007 GMC YUKON 4X4 Auto, 3rd Seat, Leather, Premium Wheels, Loaded, Low Miles

$ VIN: 267816

27,999

2004 MERCEDES ML 350 Auto, Leather, Moonroof, Nav., Very Very Nice, AWD

$ VIN:500526

15,999

1999 VOLVO XC-70 WAGON AWD Leather, Moonroof, Auto

$ VIN: 548062

10,999

Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through August 22, 2011.


F I N E A R T S : Sculptor Robb ‘Dale’ Nelson, PAGE 12

EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN AUGUST 19, 2011

8 E G A P

M O V I E S : ’Conan the Barbarian’ and five others open, PAGE 26


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

inside

REPORTERS Heidi Hagemeier, 541-617-7828 hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING 541-382-1811

Cover photo by Rob Kerr, design by Althea Borck / The Bulletin

COVER STORY • 8

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• Bend Brewfest at Les Schwab Amphitheater

• Make your plans for later on

RESTAURANTS • 10 • A review of Toomie’s Thai Cuisine

FINE ARTS • 12 MUSIC • 3 • High & Dry Bluegrass Festival features Great Northern Planes • Kottonmouth Kings return to Bend • Moon Mountain Ramblers have GoodLife residency • Larry and His Flask home from Warped Tour • Sallie Ford & the Sound Outside at McMenamins • Jared Mees and band in town • Jay Tablet barbecue show • Head to Kimberly for some Americana • Angeline’s Bakery has busy week

• Redmond sculptor has first show • High Desert Rendezvous at High Desert Museum • Bend City Hall seeks art • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

TALKS, CLASSES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES • 20 • Learn something new

OUT OF TOWN • 21 • “Shrek the Musical” in Portland • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 24 • Review of “Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 26

AREA 97 CLUBS • 6

OUTDOORS • 15

• Guide to area clubs

• Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

MUSIC RELEASES • 7

CALENDAR • 16

• Take a look at recent releases

• A week full of Central Oregon events

• “Conan the Barbarian,” “Fright Night,” “One Day,” “The Future,” “Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World” and “Sarah’s Key” open in Central Oregon • “The Conspirator,” “Jane Eyre,” “Something Borrowed,” “Priest” and “Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs. Evil” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon


G O ! M A G A ZI N E •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

PAG E 3

music

Su b mitted p hoto

Gre a t Northern Planes are, from left, Doug Hancock, guitar; Jered Widman, bass; Jim Hancock, banjo; Rob Hakanson, mandolin. The band will co-headline the High & Dry Bluegrass Festival this weekend in Bend.

B luegrass brothers Great Northern Planes joins lineup for High & Dry Bluegrass Festival By David Jasper T h e B u llet in

B

luegrass band Great Northern Planes, performing at this weekend’s High & Dry Bluegrass Festival in Bend, came into being from the remains of a group called “The Punks.” That was back in the 1980s, a decade when bluegrass wasn’t exactly blaring from anybody’s Walkman. “At the time, they called us ‘The Punks’ because the name

of the band was Pumpkin Ridge, and it sounds like ‘punks,’” explained banjo player Jim “Jimbo” Hancock. “It was the same basic instrumentation; we were just younger,” he added. “We did … share the stage with punk-type bands, but we never hawked loogies out into the audience with our shirts off.” According to a short but hilarious online bio, Pumpkin Ridge “was forced to split after too many people called at 6 a.m. on week-

ends to ask for a tee-time.” Thus, Great Northern Planes was born. Along with Hancock, the group includes his brother Doug Hancock on guitar; Jered Widman on bass and Rob Hakanson on mandolin. The festival, in fact, takes place at brother Jack Hancock’s Runway Ranch adjacent to Bend Airport today through Sunday (see “If you Go”). There are five Hancock boys in all, and, clearly, they are a musical bunch. “I grew up in a house that had at least one of every instrument,” said Jim Hancock, who’s originally from New York, not Appalachia. “My dad believed that there was some kind of lodestone

— that if he just did the right thing and got the right instrument that he’d be able to just play it.” Their father never did find such an instrument. “You actually have to put lots of hours in on these things and get a book,” Hancock said. “So he basically got stuff and just dinked around with it until he was frustrated with it and got another one.” That approach didn’t lead to masterful musicianship for father Hancock, but it did lead to a collection of instruments for Jim and his brothers to play: “Bass, mandolins, fiddles, guitars, banjos. We had everything with strings on it. There were five boys, and

If you go What: High & Dry Bluegrass Festival When: 2:45 p.m. today through 3 p.m. Sunday Where: Runway Ranch, 22665 Peacock Lane, Bend Cost: $15 for entire weekend; additional $10 fee for camping Contact: www.hadbf.com See Page 5 for a full schedule.

it became kind of a competitive thing. You’d learn something, then something else. But it wasn’t until I went off to college that I went at it seriously,” he said. In certain circles, said Hancock, the term “folk music” “can be derogatory, but what it means is that you’ve learned how to play, well, from folks. It’s music that’s taught by people to other people.” Cont i nued Page 5


P A G E 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

music Kottonmouth Kings in Dirtball’s home turf The “Info” section of Kottonmouth Kings’ Facebook profile touts a “metamorphosis” happening in the California-based rap/ rock band’s camp over the past few years. That fuel for that change? According to the same page, it’s Central Oregon’s own The Dirtball, aka David Alexander, a rapid-fire rapper and drummer who joined the Kings last year after releasing a handful of solo albums on KMK’s label. The result? A newfound “creative firepower” in the Kings and a sound that’s “now constantly evolving.” As evidence, the band points to its newest album “The Sunrise Sessions,” which features more reggae influence than previous KMK albums and a heavy dose of dubstep’s wobbly whomp. Not all is evolving in the Kings’ world, however. The group is still as weed-focused as ever; www. kottonmouthkings.com is almost comically packed with references to marijuana, both in its appearance and text. And KMK is still one of the most successful independent music acts of the past 15 years, with more than two million albums sold and a huge, loyal fan base. Kottonmouth Kings, with The Dirtball, Kingspade, Johnny Richter, D-Loc and more; 8 p.m. Monday, doors open 7 p.m.; $16 plus fees in advance, $19 at the door. Advance ticket outlets listed at the website below; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; www.randompresents.com.

The Ramblers are living the GoodLife Cool idea alert! Earlier this week, local Americana supergroup the Moon Mountain Ramblers started a five-week

meesandthegrownchildren.com. Jared Mees & The Grown Children; 7 p.m. Wednesday; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.mcmenamins.com.

Upcoming Concerts Aug. 26 — Ben Harper (rock), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www. bendconcerts.com. Sept. 24 — Soul Jelly and Ty Curtis Band (soul/blues), Black Butte Ranch, Sisters, www.blackbutteranch.com. Sept. 6 — Ray LaMontagne (beard-folk), Les Schwab Amphitheater, Bend, www. bendconcerts.com. Sept. 8 — Reverend Horton Heat (psychobilly), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Sept. 9-11 — Sisters Folk Festival (folk), throughout Sisters, www. sistersfolkfestival.org. Sept. 21 — The Defibulators (roots-rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174.

residency at GoodLife Brewing Co.’s biergarten, which just opened outside the Century Center brewery. Residencies aren’t new, but MMR is giving this one a little extra oomph by offering a themed set each Tuesday through Sept. 13. That’s a nifty idea that will not only add variety to the shows but will also showcase the band’s encyclopedic repertoire. Here are the themes for the next four weeks: • Tuesday — “That High Lonesome Sound” (a tribute to great bluegrass singers) • Aug. 30 — “Dawg Music” (eclectic ’grass by and inspired by David Grisman) • Sept. 6 — “British Invasion” (music of the 1960s, including the Beatles and Stones) • Sept. 13 — “Happy Birthday, Bill Monroe” (tunes by the man who invented bluegrass)

Bookstore Going Out of Business THING

EVERY

45-90% OFF

All Bookshelves & Fixtures for Sale

FINAL DAY: FRIDAY, AUG. 26 OPEN Monday-Friday 10:00-6:00 1288 SW Simpson Avenue, Suite C, Bend, OR 97702 541-323-6134 No credit cards accepted for purchases under $15.00

Sallie Ford & the Sound Outside return

Sallie Ford & the Sound Outside Courtesy Melani Brown

Visit www.moonmountain ramblers.com for more info. Moon Mountain Ramblers; 7-9 p.m. Tuesday; free; GoodLife Brewing Co., 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.goodlife brewing.com.

Welcome the Flask home from Warped As you probably know by now, the fun-lovin’ local fellas in Larry and His Flask are spending this summer on that rolling punk-rock circus known as the Warped Tour. And you can tell by the chatter on the Internet that they’ve made a few fans along the way with their hell-bent, hillbilly punk-grass sound. Well, the final Warped happened last week in Hillsboro, which makes Saturday night’s Flask show at Parrilla Grill the official “welcome back” party for the band and their beards. Warm weather. Outdoor show. A highly visible location. And one of Bend’s best and most fun bands. This one’s gonna be a good time, folks. Be there. Larry and His Flask; 7 p.m. Saturday; $5; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600.

Jared Mees and band come to McMenamins Does the well of indie/folk/rock talent in Portland have no bottom? Or are great bands just going to keep floating to the surface faster there than any other town? A boatload of fine Rose City acts have played Bend over the years, but Wednesday brings a new one: Jared Mees & The Grown Children. Mees isn’t new to Portlanders, of course. He and his sound — punchy pop-rock with a hint of folksy twang and hefty sonic ambition — have been part of that city’s cultural fabric for years. But with a solid new album out now, it seems the band’s profile is rising. “Only Good Thoughts Can Stay” is a joyous occasion (musically, if not always lyrically) where no instrument is left on the shelf. The band builds on a jangling acoustic guitar foundation with keys, horns and choral vocals that’ll make you feel like you stepped into a blissful jam session among friends. This stuff sounds like it’ll be a blast live. Be sure to catch Mees and company next week, and prep for the show by listening to the album at www.jared

Last time Sallie Ford brought her Sound Outside crew to Central Oregon, you kind of got the feeling the band was on the verge of big things. Since then, Portland’s reigning queen (and kings) of bespectacled vintage pop have released a terrific album, played a much-hyped set at the massive Bonnaroo festival, and, just a couple weeks ago, performed on “The Late Show with David Letterman.” The band will be back in Bend on Saturday to play McMenamins Old St. Francis School, and unlike most shows there, this one has a $10 cover. But it’s worth it. The Sound Outside puts on a killer show, mining early rock ’n’ roll, classic jazz, rootsy blues and a dash of snotty punk attitude to crank out a unique and irresistible sound. Roll in Ford’s spicy-sweet voice and you can see why this band has taken off so quickly. Go listen to “Dirty Radio” at www.sallieford.com. So good. Sallie Ford & the Sound Outside; 8 p.m. Saturday; $10; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.mcmenamins.com.

Jay Tablet celebrates b-day with BBQ, show Happy birthday Jay Tablet! The local MC, Cloaked Character and all-around hip-hop hustle machine turns … well, we don’t know how old or when exactly, but presumably he turns some age at some point soon, because he’s going on a tour to celebrate his whole birth week. Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

music

High & Dry From Page 3 Hancock said that if classically trained musicians performing in ensembles are at one end of the spectrum — waiting in a chair, their sheet music and conductor before them — “At the other end, (anyone) can whistle. If you’ve never played anything before, you can probably whistle ‘Happy Birthday.’ “You don’t get sheet music out and go, ‘It goes to the fifth now, and if you go to this note next, it’ll sound better,’” Hancock said. As a folk form, bluegrass survived the decades even as other genres became dominant because it’s “a sort of rock ’n’ roll version of homegrown music,” said Hancock. “It really works itself well into people who are just experimenting with music but may not be classically trained,” he said,

From previous page That tour stops at the Madhappy Lounge Saturday, where Tablet will perform with some of his closest buds on the local scene. See below for the list, and be sure to get there in time for the Southern style barbecue. Because mmmmmmm. Jay Tablet, with Amsterdam, Rory Oneders, Caitlin Cardier, Harlo, barbecue and more; 9 p.m. Saturday; free; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; madhappylounge@gmail .com or 541-388-6868.

Up for a drive? See Blame Sally in Kimberly If it’s a different live-music experience you want this weekend, head to Google Maps, find out how to get to Kimberly, and then go there and see Blame Sally play a concert. Blame Sally is an all-female quartet from San Francisco that basically takes acoustic Americana and folk music and isn’t afraid to experiment with it, either by electrifying things or dousing it in Southwestern flavor or employing unconventional rhythmic or melodic ideas. It’s pretty cool stuff. Check it out at www.blamesally.com. When you get out there in the Kimberly area (northeast of Mitchell, which is northeast of Prineville), you’re looking for Jody Foss’ mule ranch, which is at milepost 107 on state Highway 19. Watch for signs! Blame Sally, with Yarrow; 6 p.m. Sunday, 4 p.m. barbecue; $20 ($8 for barbecue); Diamond Hitch Mule Ranch, Highway 19,

adding with a chuckle, “Unfortunately, in our band, everybody has taken music, so they all know what they’re doing.” Meaning Hancock and company can talk technical if you’d like, but “the very edgy, emotional nature of the music (is what) speaks to a lot of people.” Including his brother and festival host, Jack Hancock, a onetime, and once-again, guitar player. “He himself now, after sort of sitting on the sidelines going, ‘Dude, that looks like a good idea,’ actually is doing it himself. He’s been playing with a bunch of friends for about five years. Which is really neat, you know. He started playing when he was 16. What other kind of music allows you to do that?” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

Kimberly; diamondhitch@otcwb .com or 541-934-2140.

Plenty to see and hear at Angeline’s Bakery This is the busiest week all summer at Angeline’s Bakery (121 W. Main St., Sisters), so let’s dive right in … after I tell you these shows all start at or around 7 p.m. • Tonight, longtime local fave Dennis McGregor will take to the stage in Angeline’s back yard. McGregor is probably best known for his visual art, but his songs are folksy wonders, full of feeling and laughs. He’s online at www.dennis mcgregor.com. $5. • Saturday brings a return visit from Sassparilla, a Portland-based band that kicks up a rowdy blend of blues and rootsrock. This one’s gonna inspire some dancing out there under the stars. Find them at www .sassparillapdx.com. $10. • Wednesday: Anyone who saw any of their sets at last year’s folk fest knows that The Makepeace Brothers charmed their way deep into Sisters’ heart. These dudes are handsome, personable and their six-stringed roots-pop is mighty fun. Visit www.makepeace brothers.com. $10. • Thursday: Here’s another dance party: Eugene’s Conjugal Visitors are a gang of acoustic adventurers whose sound knows (almost) no bounds: bluegrass, classic country, jazz, rock, blues and beyond. Find ’em at www.sonic bids.com/conjugalvisitors. $5. Last but not least, you can keep up with Angeline’s at www .angelinesbakery.com. — Ben Salmon

High & Dry Bluegrass Festival schedule MAIN STAGE Today 2:45 p.m. — Prairie Rockets 3:50 p.m. — Wild Rye 4:45 p.m. — Bitterbrush 6 p.m. — Powder Monkey 7 p.m. — Anvil Blasters 8:05 p.m. — Great Northern Planes 9:10 p.m. — Oly Mountain Boys Saturday 12:30 p.m. — High And Dry Workshop Megaband 12:45 p.m. — Bend’N Strings 1:50 p.m. — Noisy Neighbors 2:55 p.m. — Sequoia 4 p.m. — Quincy Street 5:05 p.m. — Runway Ranch 6:05 p.m. — Back From The Dead 7:10 p.m. — Oly Mountain Boys 8:15 p.m. — bass+mandolin 9:20 p.m. — Great Northern Planes Sunday 11 a.m. — Sonshine Gospel Band 12:05 p.m. — Banjo Gallimaufry 1:10 p.m. — CinderBlue 2:15 p.m. — bass+mandolin 3:10 p.m. — Pitchfork Revolution

BONUS STAGE Today 3:30 p.m. — Nancy & Jennifer 4:35 p.m. — Long Lost Cousins 5:40 p.m. — Organic Music Farm 7:45 p.m. — Greg & Glenn Topliff 8:50 p.m. — Long Mountain Revival Saturday 1:30 p.m.— BarberGrass 2:35 p.m. — Brenda Kay & Mark 3:40 p.m. — Code 7 String Band 4:45 p.m. — Hakanson Family Band 6:50 p.m. — Ko’olau Kounty 7:55 p.m. — Fellow Travelers Sunday 11:45 a.m. — Kelly Riley 12:50 p.m. — Fellow Travelers 1:55 p.m. — Hancock Family Band

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PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

SUNDAY

MONDAY

MUSIC TYPE: b c

Blues Country

dj f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328

10 Barrel Brewing 1135 N.W. Galveston Ave., 541-678-5228 939 N.W. Bond St., 541-388-0116 235 S.W. Century Drive, 541-385-7427

3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

One Hot Mess, 5 pm r/p Bobby Lindstrom Band, 9 pm b

Moon Mountain Ramblers, 7 pm a (P. 4) Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

GoodLife Brewing Co. 70 S.W. Century Drive, 541-728-0749

Karaoke with Rockin’ Robin, 7 pm

Bend Brew Fest, 3-11 pm (P. 8)

Malibu Beach Party, 4-8 pm r/p Bend Brew Fest, noon-11 pm Jay Tablet birthday show, 9 pm h (P. 5)

Sallie Ford/Sound Outside, 7 pm j (P. 4) Out of the Blue Dance Band, 8:30 pm r/p

Jared Mees/Grown Children, 7 pm r/p (P. 4)

Cadence, 7 pm r/p

Bobby Lindstrom & Scott Wyatt, 7 pm b

Open mic, 8 pm

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar 1012 S.E. Cleveland, 541-389-5625

Madhappy Lounge 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

Maragas Winery Taverna 634 N.W. Colorado Ave.

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm Live comedy, 7 pm, $5

Allan Byer, 6 pm r/p

McMenamins Old St. Francis 700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174

Northside Bar & Grill 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

Out of the Blue Dance Band, 8:30 pm r/p

Charity and Chuckles, 8 pm, $3

Old Mill Brew Werks 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive

Larry and His Flask, 7 pm, $5 r/p (P. 4)

Parrilla Grill 635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600

Duncan McNeill, 5-8 pm j

The Phoenix 594 N.E. Bellevue Drive, 541-317-0727 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, 541-728-0095

Duncan McNeill, 5-8 pm j

Laurel Brauns, 7-9 pm f

portello winecafe River Rim Coffeehouse

Raise The Vibe, 9 pm r/p

3 Up 2 Down, 8 pm r/p

Kayo’s Dinner House

344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, 541-318-5457

THURSDAY

Another Flippin Rock Show, 9 pm-1 am r/p

415 N.E. Third St., 541-323-2520

Les Schwab Amphitheater

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

Kottonmouth Kings, 8 pm, $19 h (P. 4)

51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

WEDNESDAY

r/p

Bobby Lindstrom Band, 9 pm b

Domino Room

Grover’s Pub

p

Metal Punk

Boxcar Stringband, 6-8 pm a

Baldy’s BBQ

Crossings Lounge

m

Reggae night w/ MC Mystic, 9 pm, $3 dj

Astro Lounge

900 S.E. Wilson Ave., 541-383-5014

j

Hip-hop Jazz

Two Thirds Trio 5:30 pm j Bobby Lindstrom, 4 pm b

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar

Country Catering

h

The Quons, 6:30 pm r/p Little Fish, 6:30-8:30 pm Tim Coffey, 8:30 pm j

Scanlon’s 61615 Athletic Club Drive, 541-385-3062

Velvet 805 N.W. Wall St.

c

REDMOND Eric Staples, 6:30 pm r/p

750 Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Boxcar Stringband, 6-8 pm a

Baldy’s BBQ 950 S.W. Veterans Way, 541-923-2271

Pamela McGuire Trio, 6-8 pm j

Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Crave 614 N.W. Cedar, 541-504-6006

Bellavia, 6:30-9 pm

j

Bellavia, 6:30-9 pm

j

Music on the Green w/41 East, 7:30 pm r/p

Sam Johnson Park Southwest 15th Street

Maryoke DJ 9 pm dj

Twins JJ 535 S.W. Sixth St.

Maryoke DJ 9 pm dj

Karaoke, 9 pm

Karaoke, 9 pm

Karaoke, 9 pm

Make Peace Brothers, 7 pm, $5-$10 r/p (P. 5)

Conugal Visitors, 7 pm, $5-$10 r/p (P. 5)

SISTERS Angeline’s Bakery 121 Main St., 541-549-9122

Dennis McGregor, 7 pm, $5-$10 r/p (P. 5)

Lindy Gravelle, 7-9 pm c Shanghai Woolies, 5 pm, $15-$22 j

Aspen Lakes Golf Course 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, 541-549-4653

Lakeside Lawn Black Butte Ranch

Slick’s Que Co. 240 E. Cascade Ave., 541-719-0580

Sassparilla Jug Band, 7 pm, $5-$10 a (P. 5)

Two Thirds Trio 6 pm j


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

PAGE 7

music releases The Wood Brothers

Boston Spaceships

SMOKE RING HALO Southern Ground Records Five years ago, when the Wood Brothers released their first fulllength album, “Ways Not to Lose,” the group seemed like a side project, sweet and sensible but probably not built for the long run. Oliver Wood, formerly of the Atlanta roots-rock band King Johnson, took the singer-songwriter lead; Chris Wood played upright bass and sang backup harmony. The album was produced by John Medeski and released on Blue Note, which has been a home both to Medeski Martin and Wood — as in Chris Wood — and, in a more recent development, to lightly countrified folksters like Amos Lee. The Wood Brothers put out another Blue Note album, “Loaded,” in 2008, gradually seeming less and less like a digression, and more and more like the main point. But the group still hadn’t delivered a consistently satisfying album before “Smoke Ring Halo.” Produced and engineered by Jim Scott, it sounds both tossed off and impeccably balanced, which is the smart move for a band of this sort. The bass playing comes across as a physical force, and the vocals sound close

LET IT BEARD Guided by Voices Inc. It’s easy to make the argument that Robert Pollard is enjoying a career renaissance. His seminal indie-rock band, Guided by Voices, is taking its victory lap at music festivals around the country after reuniting its “classic” early ’90s lineup last fall. His prolific string of solo albums and collaborations has seen a marked uptick in quality the past couple years. And now, side project Boston Spaceships — with Decemberists’ drummer Jon Moen and ex-GBV bassist Chris Slusarenko — is a side project no longer. The hugely ambitious, 26song “Let It Beard” is the concept album Pollard has been threatening to make for years,

at hand. The band’s drummer, Tyler Greenwell, lays deep into every groove, keeping things simple and taut. Medeski plays organ on a few tracks, and Clay Cook sings background vocals on a few others. There are an occasional cohort of horns, and more electric guitar than before. The songs, credited to both brothers, give off an old-timey musk even at their jauntiest: “Shoofly Pie” could pass for a rejuvenated front-porch blues, and “Mary Anna” shifts from a talky verse to a country-waltz chorus, voices blended with a hint of grit. The root-level rapport of the Wood Brothers no longer sounds casual, or merely natural. This band has been working at something, and it shows. — Nate Chinen, The New York Times

Here and there Tonight — Bunk Bar, Portland; www.portlandmercury.com or 503-894-9708.

Richard Buckner OUR BLOOD Merge Records Richard Buckner has a polarizing voice. But while his gristled vocals are an acquired taste, his songs are universally likable. Sure, he’s a cult hero with an underground following that adores his ’90s output, but after a very rough couple of years, Buckner is back with the brawny, yet modest, “Our Blood,” out today. Just how rough have the last few years been on Buckner? Legendarily bad, it seems, with a busted film score, a broken tape

machine, a stolen laptop and a random run-in with Johnny Law that was quickly resolved. But Buckner is now back and in fine form. On tracks like “Escape,” he’s as meditative as usual, capturing poetic pictures via his jagged, uneven singing. “Confession” is a straightforward, driving song that gives Buckner plenty of room to weave a story that resides somewhere between the worlds of country, folk and rock. It’s a treat to have Buckner back, especially since we hadn’t heard much from him since 2006’s “Meadow.” Fans of Gram Parsons, Kris Kristofferson or Joseph Arthur might very well find their next favorite artist in “Our Blood.” — Ricardo Baca, The Denver Post

and it’s a doozy. Never mind the who’s-who of post-punk and indie-rock guests, including Wire’s Colin Newman, Dinosaur Jr.’s J Mascis, Dream Syndicate’s Steve Wynn and Mick Collins of the Dirtbombs and the Gories. The core of the band is the star here. Boston Spaceships has always been a strong act, but “Let It Beard” is the first

time since Guided By Voices’ 2004 swan song that all of Pollard’s considerable strengths have come together so well. His prog-addled melodies and psychedelic-poetry lyrics are particularly honed on songs like “The Vicelords” and the darkly majestic “I Took on the London Guys.” His vocal turns on “Tourist UFO” and “Tabby and Lucy” are as sweet and affecting as the best of GBV’s work. But it would mean little without Moen’s snappy, propulsive drumming and Slusarenko’s textured, instantly ingratiating instrumental work. “Let It Beard” is a massive statement from the inexhaustible mind of Pollard, indie-rock’s mad musical scientist, and a testament to the chemistry and talent of his rock-ready bandmates. — John Wenzel, The Denver Post

to be as sharp as ever. Amid another earthy amalgam of rock, soul, blues and country, Hiatt still writes about restless, haunted, and on-the-edge souls with the penetrating power

of someone who’s been there. (“Have you ever been broken, really broken?” he asks on “All the Way Under.”) “Down Around My Place,” meanwhile, sounds like an allegorical State of the Union that’s all dark and foreboding. But “I Love That Girl” is unabashedly upbeat, and the somber remembrance of 9/11 that closes the album, “When New York Had Its Heart Broke,” ends on a note of stubborn resilience. It’s a trait that applies to many of the characters here — and to the artist himself. — Nick Cristiano, The Philadelphia Inquirer

John Hiatt DIRTY JEANS AND MUDSLIDE HYMNS New West Records “I got me a deuce and a quarter, babe/ She will ride you right,” John Hiatt boasts on “Detroit Made,” singing of General Motors’ Buick Electra 225. The celebration of automotive style, craftsmanship and durability is fitting, since these qualities continue to mark the work of the 58-yearold Indiana-born singer and songwriter. “Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns” shows Hiatt’s muse

Mat Kearney YOUNG LOVE Universal Republic Record There’s a giddiness to much of Mat Kearney’s “Young Love” that’s infectious. Though we’ve gotten used to the oh-so-serious singer-songwriter sounding a certain way in recent years, Kearney busts that convention,

adding a touch of island rhythm to the acoustic-guitar base of “Hey Mama” and “She Got the Honey,” a bit of hip-hop in “Chasing the Light” and “Ships in the Night.” Then, on “Learning to Love Again,” Kearney shows he can still beat the sad sacks at their own game, too. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

cover story S! R E E CH

Rob Kerr, Althea Borck / The Bulletin

Raise your mug! Bend Brewfest returns to Les Schwab Amphitheater with more than 100 craft beers If you go

By Anne Aurand • The Bulletin

T

he Bend Brewfest is back with more beer and breweries than ever. You have through Saturday night to taste 105 craft beers made by 45 brewers. To help people sort through that daunting number of selections, Central Oregon Homebrewers and The Brewshop Boys will be on site offering expert advice, said Marney Smith, director of the Les Schwab Amphitheater and one of many festival organizers. Look for people wearing “ASK ME ABOUT BEER” shirts. A Brewfest guide will also be available at the festival with recommendations. Ten dollars will get you a souvenir mug, required for tasting, and four tasting tokens. Additional tokens cost $1 each and are sold in packs of five. Each token gets you 4 ounces of ale or lager. Don’t forget to bring valid identification. Now in its eighth year, (there was a one-year hiatus because of Oregon Liquor Control Commission complications), the Bend Brewfest started with “our genuine love of beer and appreciation of the robust microbrewery culture

in Central Oregon,” said Smith. “Our thought is that combining a beautiful venue with amazing beers, great people and great causes would make for one awesome event.” Last year, the two-day event drew about 14,000 attendees who emptied roughly 230 kegs. Bend is home to nine breweries. There’s another one in Sisters and two in Redmond. And more are scheduled to open next year, said Tawna Fenske, with Visit Bend. In Bend, there’s one brewery for every 9,111 residents, beating out Portland’s number of microbreweries per capita, according to Visit Bend. But for Central Oregon aficionados who have already tapped the local beer selection, the Brewfest also drew out-of-region producers. Most participating breweries will offer a couple of their staples, plus an X-TAP. The X-TAPs will feature “very low production, hard-tofind beers from various breweries,” explained Smith. When an X-TAP keg is tapped, it will be announced over the public-address system, she said.

The festival also features plenty of food from Parilla Grill, The Pizza Cart, Spork, Soupcon & Sancho Street Food, Nutlove, Cuppa Yo, Kent Koolers, Demetri’s Greek Cuisina, King Weenie, Cameron’s Smokeshack, Marz Cart, Tornado Fries and Gourmet Salsas. The festival is a cash-only event. There’s an ATM on site. Other entertainment includes continual DJ music, a ride simulator provided by Wildhorse Harley-Davidson, games and face painting, Smith said. Children and dogs are welcome until 7 p.m. nightly, if accompanied by a responsible parent or guardian. Parents/guardians must sign a pledge that their children will not consume alcohol, and that their pets will be under control, safe and hydrated. The Brewfest has donated proceeds to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon since its inception and this year will also donate to NeighborImpact. Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or aaurand@bendbulletin.com.

What: Bend Brewfest When: 3 to 11 p.m. today and noon to 11 p.m. Saturday Where: Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin-Hixon Drive, Bend Cost: Admission to the Brewfest is free, but a one-time purchase of a $10 souvenir mug is required for tasting. That comes with four tasting tokens. Additional tokens are available for $1 per 4-ounce taste, and tokens come in packets of five. Mugs from previous years will not be filled. Contact: www.bendbrew fest.com or 541-312-8510


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

co v er sto ry Local X-TAPs and beers of note Some Central Oregon breweries will be offering X-TAPs, special kegs of rare offerings: 10 Barrel: One in the Sun. This is a raspberry sour beer, a pale ale that has been soured for six months using lactobacillus then infused with raspberries. Brewmaster Jimmy Seifrit said he may serve it with a syrup to cut the sour flavor. The fest will mark the beer’s official debut, and there are only six kegs. 30 IBU*, 6 percent ABV** Bend Brewing Co.: Ching Ching. This is a German Berliner Weisse, a light, sour beer brewed with pomegranate and hibiscus. Brewmaster Tonya Cornett said she was inspired to create something like pink champagne, but tart and fruity. The beer should be back on tap at the brewery in September. 5 IBU, 4.5 percent ABV. Boneyard Beer: Bourbon Barrel Backbone. This is a rich, creamy stout with flavors of chocolate and espresso (from Backporch Coffee). The beer has been aged in bourbon barrels. The brew fest will be the first time the public in Central Oregon will get the chance to taste this beer. 20 IBU, 4.7 percent ABV. Cascade Lakes Brewing Co.: Cyclops IPA. This is a beer for the hop lover. It is dry hopped and contains five hop varieties. The brewery first brewed the beer this winter, and it has been on tap at the brewery on and off since. 65 IBU, 6.9 percent ABV. Deschutes Brewery: Chainbreaker. This is a white IPA named after the Cascade Chainbreaker bike race. It is a hoppy wheat ale with coriander and ground sweet orange peel and characteristics of a Belgian-style wit. The brewery is developing it to be bottled. The beer is available now at the pub. 50 IBU, 5.1 percent ABV. McMenamins: Wildflower Wheat. This is an American wheat ale with pilsner and light malt flavors featuring wild camomile. The beer has earthy tones and some wheat chewiness. Head brewer Michael “Curly” White said it is a great summer beer with an orange wedge. 25 IBU, 4.8 percent ABV.

Brewers and brews of the 2011 Bend Brewfest * X-TAPs are very low production, hard-to-find beers. When a new keg is tapped, it will be announced over the PA.

Silver Moon Steelhead Three Creeks

Apocalypse IPA India Session Ale *X-TAP One in the Sun Brew Free or Die IPA Hell or High Watermelon Wheat El Torero IPA Klickitat Pale Ale Hop Ottin’ IPA Summer Solstice *X-TAP Nettied Madge Cascadian Dark Ale Breath Dark Heff Dump Truck Summer Bock Hophead Ludwig Pilsner *X-TAP Ching Ching Trout Slayer Moose Drool Girl Beer RPM IPA *X-TAP Bourbon Barrel Backbone Paranoia Pale Ale Kleptomania Kingpin Summer Squeeze Dry Hop Orange Vienna Lager *X-TAP Vas Deferens 20" Brown Paulina Lake Pilsner *X-TAP Cyclops IPA Oregon Export Lager Collaberative (with Silver Moon) Original Fox Barrel Blackberry Pear Mirror Pond Pale Ale Twilight Ale *X-TAP Chainbreaker Kolsch Hop Lava IPA Acai Berry Wheat Ale Certified Organic IPA Avatar Jasmine IPA Night Owl Pumpkin Ale Country Boy IPA Summer Lovin' Seasonal Bogart IPA Oregon Pale Ale *X-TAP Steam Fired Stout Double Barrel Ale Union Jack *X-TAP Double Jack LTD 03 Elevation Imperial IPA Mamba Ridgeway IPA *X-TAP Mint Kolsch Summer Seasonal Mountain Rescue Black Star Organic Hub Lager Rise Up Red Longboard Lager Wailua Wheat A Little Sumpin Sumpin Lagunitas Pils Organic Free Range Red Organic Pale Ale Lompoc Strong Draft Proletariat Red *X-TAP Sour Cherry Wheat Great White Tangerine Wheat Bikini Blond Lager Mana Wheat Copper Moon Father D’s Kolsch *X-TAP Wildflower Wheat Maiden the Shade Radiant Ale Line Dry Rye Watershed IPA Ankle-Buster Ale Surfer's Summer Ale *X-TAP Winema Wit Phat Matt’s Golden Ale Phat Matt’s IPA Pilsner Wit Frankenlou’s IPA Lil’s Pils *X-TAP Port Barrel Aged Weezin-ator Hop Fury IPA Tail Gator Cream Ale Raging Rhino Red Twisted Meniscus IPA Hoodoo Voodoo IPA Knotty Blonde

Walkabout Widmer Brothers Woodchuck Hard Cider

Jabberwocky Strong Ale Citra Blonde Summer Brew Amber

10 Barrel 21st Amendment Alameda Brew House Anderson Valley Bayern Dragon Bend Brewing Big Sky Brewing Boneyard Beer Brew Werks Bridgeport Caldera Cascade Lakes Central Oregon Homebrewers Crispin Cider Deschutes Double Mountain Eel River Elysian Everybody's Fire Mountain Firestone Walker Full Sail Gilgamesh GoodLife Great Northern Hopworks Urban Kona Lagunitas Laurelwood Lompoc Lost Coast Maui Brewing McMenamins (OSF)

OTHER BEERS OF NOTE Central Oregon Homebrewers: This local home brewing club will serve up an Oregon Expert Lager Collaborative brewed with the help of Silver Moon Brewing. Pelican Pub & Brewery: This brewery out of Pacific City will serve up a Winema Wit — a Belgian-style wit beer. This beer has earned a grade of A- on Beer Advocate’s website and features coriander, orange peel and cardamom. Gilgamesh and Fire Mountain: These two lesser-known breweries both hail from small Oregon towns, Turner and Carlton respectively, and will be serving beers that are very hard to find locally. — Alandra Johnson *International Bittering Units (the higher the number, the hoppier or more bitter the beer); **Alcohol by volume

Ninkasi Oakshire Pelican Pub Phat Matt’s Redhook Seven Brides

Source: www.bendbrewfest.com, Image: Thinkstock Beer selection subject to change.

Worker’s Pale Ale Rotator IPA Granny Smith Gre g Cross / The Bulletin

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PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

restaurants

Bend’s

old standby Veteran downtown Thai restaurant has great lunch barg ains but a lot of new competition By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

T

oomie’s Thai Cuisine has been a part of the downtown Bend dining scene since the mid-1990s — and that may be its biggest problem. When Pantip “Toomie” Staver opened the restaurant with her late husband, George, a Thai restaurant was something of a curiosity. That is no longer the case. Today, there’s plenty of competition in the category of Thai dining in Central Oregon: Typhoon!, Angel Thai, Thai Thai, A Taste of Thailand and Thai O, not to mention individual Thai curries and

various dishes offered by fusion restaurants and mobile kitchens. Toomie’s continues to serve a menu that is much the same as it was a decade ago. Its extensive lunch menu — more than three dozen, generous one-plate dishes priced at $6.50 and $6.95 — offers one of the region’s best bargains for ethnic cuisine. But its dinner plates are overpriced; service is steady but far from memorable; and the quality of the dishes, at least in comparison to other area Thai restaurants, is not what I remember it having been a few years ago. Continued next page

A n d y Tullis / The Bulletin

Patrons enjoy the atmosphere at Toomie’s Thai Cuisine in downtown Bend.

Toomie’s Thai Cuisine Location: 119 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend Hours: Lunch 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. every day; dinner 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. Sunday to Thursday, 5:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday Price range: Lunch $6.50 to $6.95; dinner appetizers $6.50 to $9.95, entrees $9.50 to $18.95 Credit cards: American Express, Diners Club, Discover, MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: On request Vegetarian menu: Numerous choices; tofu can be substituted for meat in many dishes Alcoholic beverages: Beer and wine

Outdoor seating: Sidewalk tables Reservations: Accepted for parties of five or more Contact: 541-388-5590

Scorecard OVERALL: B Food: B. Good flavors, but dishes can be very spicy and ingredients may be undercooked. Service: B. Provided by black-clad waiters, service is steady, courteous but far from memorable. Atmosphere: B+. Clean, simple decor; picture windows can be both a blessing and a curse. Value: B. Excellent prices for generous portions at lunch, but dinner entrees are overpriced.


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

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PAGE 11

restaurants From previous page

Next week: Pump House Bar & Grill

Midday meal As much as I like Toomie’s lunch menu, I chose to order a couple of smaller plates off the dinner menu when I came at midday. The Thai egg roll was not what I expected. In fact, it was different than anything else I remember having been served in a Thai restaurant. Two chilled, French-style crepes were wrapped around slices of chicken and barbecued pork, omelet, tofu and cucumber; one of the crepes also had cooked bean sprouts. A light tamarind gravy was spooned over the top, and a few fingers of crab meat offered garnish on top. In the four corners of the eggroll plate, an eclectic variety of condiments was presented. Chopped green onions were appropriate to the dish. Thickly sliced jalapeno peppers and a spicy Chinese mustard were far too overpowering for the subtle flavors. Shredded cabbage added nothing. I much preferred laab gai, a warm salad of minced chicken (also available as minced pork) that is found on the menus of many Thai restaurants. Here, as elsewhere, the meat is sauteed with mint leaves and diced red onions, and served with a cold side salad of white cabbage, carrots, cucumbers, tomato slices and Chinese parsley. My only complaint about the presentation was that the cabbage was sliced too thinly to be used for wrapping the meat mixture. Instead, I was inclined to spoon the laab upon sticky white rice and wash it down with a glass of Thai iced tea, topped with sweetened condensed milk. All in all, it was a very satisfying dish.

Evening trio At a more standard dinner, a companion and I ordered three dinner entrees to share with steamed rice. We ordered the trio of dishes “three stars” on a spiciness scale of five, and even at that mid-range level found them almost too hot for our Asian-trained palates. If you don’t know what spice level you’re comfortable with, I strongly recommend erring on the side of conservatism. In two of the dishes, there were ingredients that were undercooked. This was especially notable in the Massaman beef dish; chunks of potato are a key element, and they were still crunchy in the middle. But the beef itself was very tasty and

Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

HAIR LOSS? THERE’S HELP. 541-585-4247(HAIR)

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

A plate of “drunken noodles,” right, and chicken satay at Toomie’s Thai Cuisine in downtown Bend. tender, stewed with peanuts in coconut milk with red chili sauce. In a green curry entree, made with pork and coconut milk, I found the ample slices of Asian eggplant to be insufficiently cooked. Again, however, the other ingredients were fine. The meat was tender, while whole basil leaves and slivers of green and red bell pepper added zest. Our third dish was a blackboard special. Skin-on slices of duck breast were stir-fried with onions, bell peppers and basil, along with a generous amount of chili flakes and minced garlic. As much as I enjoyed the bird, I would have preferred it with a more subtle application of herbs and spices. The most notable feature of Toomie’s decor is the restaurant’s large picture windows facing Minnesota Avenue. While this makes for excellent people watching, diners who don’t want to be gawked at by pedestrians might choose tables further inside, beneath the Thai masks or among the scattered greenery.

541-526-7209. The Bond Street Grill closed July 30 in downtown Bend. Owner Chris Nardella had purchased the former Decoy Bar & Grill in October 2010 and made subtle changes to menu and decor, but struggled in the down economy.

RECENT REVIEWS Planker Sandwiches (A-): A career restaurateur opened this top-value, gourmet sandwich shop in May in the former location of a downtown Bend creperie. Patrons order tasty, hearty sandwiches, paninis, crepes, soups and breakfast items from a trio of blackboard menus. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day. 824 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www. plankersandwiches.com or 541-317-5717. El Jimador (A-): A partnership between Baltazar Chavez of Baltazar’s and Roberto Anaya of El Caporal has resulted in a fine renovation of a corner restaurant in downtown Bend. Seafood and other dishes are outstanding,

even if service slips when the owners are away. Open 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. Sunday to Thursday, 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. 801 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-318-1333. Riverside Market & Pub (B+): An Old Bend neighborhood hangout, the Riverside offers good, casual, deli-style breakfasts, sandwiches and salads. A hip young staff takes orders at the counter and provides table service. Open 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Wednesday, 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. Sunday. 285 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www. riversidemarketbend.com or 541-389-0646. Chan’s (B): A major renovation after a disastrous fire has given this 25-year-old restaurant a new look, with more space for dining and exhibiting art. But the menu remains the same as before, with Westernized variations of Chinese regional dishes. Open 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 11:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday, noon to 10 p.m. Saturday, noon to 9 p.m. Sunday. 1005 S.E. Third St., Bend; www.chanschinese.com or 541-389-1725.

BAR & GRILL EST. 1943

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THURSDAY MENS’ NIGHT 4 to close. $1 off all Food & Bev Items

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John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

SMALL BITES The Red Rooster Restaurant and Omelet House has opened in Redmond in the former location of Chloe North Redmond Station — next to the Sleep Inn motel and across U.S. Highway 97 from Wal-Mart. The menu includes 38 omelets and two dozen dinner entrees priced under $10, as well as $16.99 rib-eye and Tbone steaks. Open 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Thursday and 6 a.m. Friday to 10 p.m. Sunday. 1857 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond;

Our bicycle trade-in policy lets you save money by trading in your old bike. Now that’s recycling. No extra charge, just extra service.

BEND EAST: 541-382-6248 • 820 N.E. 3RD ST. BEND WEST: 541-382-9253 • 725 N.W. COLUMBIA ST. REDMOND: 541-548-8200 • 341 SW 6TH ST.


PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

f in e a r ts

Outside looking in

Redmond sculptor has first show of his detailed wax models

Submitted photo

By David Jasper The Bulletin

I

f their works are ever to be seen by the public, every artist will have to go through first-show jitters. For Robb “Dale” Nelson, a cabinet maker and sculptor from Redmond, that first exhibit comes at age 61. Nelson is “extremely, extremely nervous” he said, sitting on a corner sofa at Atelier 6000, or A6. The Bend printmaking studio is hosting “Central Oregon Raw Vision,” his show of wax “maquettes,” or models, through the month (see “If you go”). His foray into the art world came about due to a 1997 horseback riding accident. Said Nelson, “The horse was acting pretty rank and I tried to dismount. He dropped me first, and then he came back on top of me, and I couldn’t escape. I was trapped by some logs. “Then he rolled up on top of me and, you know, it really felt like I was wrestling him, but I know I wasn’t. When he went off of me, I felt like I’d thrown him about 20 feet, which I know wasn’t the case.” His liver was cut “like a piece of pie.” He credits a bow hunter with rescue equipment in the back of his rig for saving his life: “There was quite a group of people up there, and he started shouting orders, and everyone took his command.” He was flown by Air Life of Oregon (now AirLink Critical Care Transport) to St. Charles Bend, “and here I am today,” he said. Back then, however, he found himself looking at a six-month recovery and plenty of time on his hands — and soon enough, wax. “I bought some wax and started,” Nelson said. “It was just fun to play with. My grandma used to knit doilies. It’s kind of like that. It’s pretty relaxing, and it makes you feel like you’re doing something,” Continued next page

If you go What: “Central Oregon Raw Vision,” works by Robb “Dale” Nelson When: Through August Where: Atelier 6000, 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.atelier6000.com or 541-330-8759

Robb “Dale” Nelson said that over the years he’s destroyed numerous sculptures in order to reuse the wax.

“What I’ve tried to do is make it look like it’s moving, like it’s in motion. ... I’m telling you a story.” — Robb “Dale” Nelson, sculptor


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

PAGE 13

fine arts

dad’s sculptures,” said Shane Nelson. “She said, ‘Oh, my sisterin-law Pat has to see them.’ So that was it.” Said Clark, “This area … embraces the whole idea of how people are so in tune with their environments and the landscape.” Artists who capture said environment “don’t care if anybody sees it or not. But I care.” “I just thought it was such a beautiful thing,” she said of Nelson’s hot-knife sculpting. “You can go to any big museum and see these things bronzed and (looking) absolutely incredible, but people don’t know what it takes to do that. So in the spirit of our workshop, I wanted people to see a bit of the process.” She had to convince him to have a show. “I told him this place is about process. God knows we’re not into sales,” she said. However, if people see one of the models and want to “see it to the next stage, then they could talk to him and we could get some bids on what it would take.” Nelson said he’s never considered selling his work before now. “Never even thought about it. I’m just trying to tell a story in as short of strokes as possible.” He should count himself among the lucky, said Clark. “Not many people generate, or work for, their passions. But the

ones that do are the happiest.” And thanks to his son, he won’t be taking a hammer to any more sculptures. “He forced me to buy more wax,” Nelson said. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

City Hall seeks artists for new show The ongoing City Walls at City Hall art show seeks painters, photographers, clay, textile and multi-media artists for its third installment, slated to open Dec. 2.

Fine Art & Contemporary Craft

Open Every Day

Open until 7pm, August 23rd Please join us for refreshments that night. Ceramics Fiber Art Glass Art Jewelry Photography Woodworking and more ... 103 NW Oregon Ave • Bend • 541-306-3176

redchairgallerybend.com

— David Jasper

CENTRAL OREGON

Submitted photo

“I modif y a soldering iron and I put a copper knife on it, and I just start working,” said Robb “Dale” Nelson, who’s having his first art show this month at Atelier 6000 in Bend.

The 22nd annual High Desert Rendezvous starts at 5 p.m. Saturday at the High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend. The event features an open bar, cowboy supper, dancing to live music by the Cloverdayle Country Band, and a live and silent auction to benefit the museum’s educational programs. Available for auction are a variety of paintings and sculptures inspired by the landscape of the West, including works by regional and local artists including Cindy Briggs, Marty Stewart, Vivian Olsen, Joren Traveller, Barbara Slater, Michael Cassidy, Susan Luckey Higdon and Janice Druian. Tickets are $350 per couple, which includes a museum family membership (a value of $75), or $200 for one person, which includes a museum individual membership (a value of $50). Tickets for museum members are $150 per person. Contact: www.highdesert rendezvous.org, hdr@high desertmuseum.org or 541382-4754, ext. 365.

Taking inspiration from downtown Bend, organizers seek artists who will be assigned a block of Bond or Wall streets “to interpret as their artwork,” according to the press release. “Bond Street artwork will hang in their natural order on one side of City Hall, Wall Street on the other, re-creating Bond and Wall inside City Hall.” The show will hang through March 29. The deadline for applications and art samples is 5 p.m. Sept. 12. Contact: www.ci.bend.or.us/ city_walls_at_hall.html.

centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM

Museum event set for Saturday evening

centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM • centraloregonsaturdaymARKET.COM

From previous page Billing “Raw Vision” as Nelson’s introduction to the arts community, A6’s press release for the show says that the wax forms “represent the first stages of the sculptural process — sketches in three-dimensional wax. The wax sculptures are worked on for several months before the finished bronze state is implemented.” Nelson said, “I’ve never had any experience at this, so I’m going to be a blank slate, just observing everything.” With no formal training — not even matchbook art courses, he jokes — Nelson qualifies as an outsider artist, explains A6 founder Pat Clark. And it’s that power of observation, and ability to render it in wax, that landed him his first show. “His tremendous internal vision of life as he experiences or is experiencing it (is) an insight into process and beauty,” Clark said. “When I first saw his work, I was moved by the enormous detail, achieved with the simplest of tools.” Nelson explained that he uses a mix of pattern-makers wax and sculpting wax to get the right texture. “I modify a soldering iron and I put a copper knife on it, and I just start working.” But there’s more to it than that. When he carves a goat, an antelope or a cowboy, he’s not attempting a still life. He’s capturing movement. “With the butter knife, what I’m really doing is creating a lot of little facets so that it reflects light. What I’ve tried to do is make it look like it’s moving, like it’s in motion,” he said. “I’ll sometimes look at a photograph, but I get to take some liberties. I get to do some exaggerations. I’m telling you a story.” Nelson might spend a month working on a sculpture. Only one of his works has ever been bronzed. “I’d do it, and I’d step back, and I’d look at it, savor it a little bit, and then I’d go back and do it some more because it turned out better than I expected.” Here’s the kicker though: Nelson has only six complete sculptures at the moment. And not due to lack of productivity. “That’s it. The rest of them are all in pieces,” he said. “I would do a piece and then I’d take a hammer to it and take the wax and do something else. “ He doesn’t know how many of his sculptures he destroyed in order to reuse the wax. “I hammered a lot,” he said. “Shane didn’t like that.” Shane would be his son, who is friends with Pat Clark’s sister-in-law. “I was telling (her) about my

er is he Sienlcle 1974 t e r e h W er s the Mak

OPEN EVERY SATURDAY THROUGH SEPT. 4 DON’T MISS IT! OPEN AT 10 am

DOWNTOWN BEND (across from the PUBLIC library)

• fun to shop •

THE LARGEST SELECTION OF

LOCAL ARTISANS & CRAFTMASTERS east of the

CASCADES • fun to browse • VENDOR INFO: 541-420-9015


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-6337488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring works by six artists; through August; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19, Sunriver; 541-593-4382. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring works by the ALT Group; through August; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Three Visions — Three Worlds”; through Aug. 29; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-3308759 or www.atelier6000.com. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. CORK CELLARS: Featuring photography by Hilloah Rohr from the Italian wine region; reception from 5-8 tonight; 161 E. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-2675. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOWNTOWN BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Far Out”; through Oct. 30; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. DUDLEY’S BOOKSHOP CAFE: Featuring works by Sebastian Foltz; through August; 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” works by Sandy Brooke and Alan Montgomery; through Aug. 27; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398.

Submitted photo

“Tee Time Sunriver Meadows,” by Pat Cross, will be on display through August at Artists’ Gallery Sunriver. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT GALLERY: Featuring “Uncelebrated Landmarks,” works by Donald Yatomi and Bill More; through Aug. 30; also featuring “Rhythms of Nature,” works by Jeremy Newman and Allison Ciancibelli; through Oct. 12; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring the Art of the West Show, Western art from American artists; through Saturday; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. HOME FEDERAL BANK: Featuring

intarsia wood projects; through August; 821 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-548-9977. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Vibrant Earth,” works by Karen Bandy; through August; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road,

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING & GALLERY Where our quality and customer service is number one. 834 NW Brooks Street Behind the Tower Theatre

541-382-5884

Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Sacred Spaces,” works by Dawn Emerson and Ken Roth; through August; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www. mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. PARTNERS IN CARE: Featuring works by the Mount Bachelor Quilters Guild; through Sept. 10; 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; 541-382-5882. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts by JoAnn Marshall, and a group show of the Material Girls 2011 Challenge; through August; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “Color of Imagination,” works by Shelly Wierzba and Julia Kennedy; through August; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND AIRPORT: Featuring “Critters of Central Oregon”; through August; 2522 S.E. Jesse Butler Circle; 541-548-0646. RUUD GALLERY: Featuring works by local and regional contemporary artists; 50 S.E. Scott St., Suite 2, Bend; www. ruudgallery.com or 541-323-3231. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring artists who participated in “Musical Easels,” and works by Scott Mason and Lee August; through August; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring works by Beryl Hovey and Rhonda Conley; through Aug. 27; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E. Main

Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0251. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “The Dog Show,” works with canine imagery; through Sept. 23; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Martha Ann Rourke and Carolyn Waissman; through Sept. 9; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring photography by Vern Bartley; through Wednesday; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: We Need,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www.wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring “Noun … Revisited,” works by Brian Bulemore; through August; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TOWNSHEND’S BEND TEAHOUSE: Featuring works by Megan McGuinness; through August; 835 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-312-2001 or www.townshendstea.com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Garden Party,” works by Annie Ferder and Nancy Becker; through August; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-3859144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Paulina and Davis lakes

Sky Lakes Traverse

F

If you go

or a great outdoors stay-

Getting there: For Newberry National Volcanic Monument, take U.S. Highway 97 for 22 miles south to the turn for Paulina Lake. Continue about 13 miles. For Davis Lake, take Cascade Lakes Highway approximately 62 miles southwest from Bend. Difficulty: Easy to moderate Cost: Northwest Forest Pass or $5 day pass Contact: 541-383-5300

cation, you can’t beat

Central Oregon. Day trips to Paulina Lake in the Newberry National Volcanic Monument and to Davis Lake remind us why we live here. — Bulletin staff

Peter Skene Ogden Trail Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin ile photo

A view of the route from Venus to Jupiter to Lucifer, part of the Sky Lakes Traverse.

T

McKay Crossing campground

Sev

3780

en

L ak

es T r a il

21

SKY LAKES WILDERNESS

day. — Bulletin staff

Jupiter

O

R

E

Sunriver

O

Crane Prairie Reservoir

N

46 Prospect Medford

Wickiup Reservoir

Paulina Peak Pauli Paulin Greg Cross / The Bulletin

40

Bend

Bessie Creek Rd. 37

G

Newberry National Volcanic Monument Area of detail East Lake Lak P Paulina li Lake Lk 21

7,508 ft.

7,592 ft.

MILES

46

Elk Lake

Devils Peak

Pacific Crest Trail

Prospect

Cascade Lakes Hwy.

Lee Peak

Lucifer

62

Bend

Devils Peak Trail

Venus

Paulina Peak 97

SEVEN LAKES BASIN

peakbagger’s dream — a chance to reach five summits in a single

Little Crater Trail

To Hwy. 97

Basin in southern Oregon is a

97 43

La Pine

Klamath Falls

Davis Lake

Ro

Red Blanket Rd.

er

er

Riv

3785

DESCHUTES COUNTY KLAMATH COUNTY

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Getting there: Drive south on U.S. Highway 97, past Chemult, and turn right on state Highway 138. At Diamond Lake, turn south onto state Highway 230 toward Union Creek. Continue southward on state Highway 62, to the turnoff for Prospect. In the center of town, turn east on Red Blanket Road for three miles, then turn left on Forest Road 37. Continue for 13 miles, passing the Imnaha Campground, to a T in the road, then turn left on Forest Road 2730. The trailhead is about four miles ahead on the right, with a parking area farther up on the left. Difficulty: Strenuous Cost: Free Contact: Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest, Butte Falls Ranger District, 541-865-2700

East Newberry Lake Crater

Paulina Lake

21

Sky Lakes Traverse

summits positioned along

If you go

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

Paulina Creek

his enchainment of five

a cirque above the Seven Lakes

Hot Springs Beach

SEVEN LAKES BASIN 3780 37

Area of detail Greg Cross / The Bulletin Laser Resurfacing | Fraxel | Restylane Precision Liposuction | Botox

Call 541.330.6160 www.aesthetics-md.com


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST THE19, BULLETIN 2011 • FRID

this w

HARVEST RUN

TODAY & SATURDAY What: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music; Saturday’s event includes a show and shine; proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon, Redmond-Sisters Hospice and

TODAY YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit TheTradeNicaragua; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; City Center Foursquare Church , 549 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-598-6759. UKC ALL-BREED DOG SHOW: Dog show features two shows per day; free; noon; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-7884315 or deserthighratterriers@msn.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $15; 2:45-9 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www.hadbf.com. (Story, Page 3) BEND BREWFEST: Event includes tastings from multiple brewers, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for entry; proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon and NeighborImpact; free admission, must purchase mug and tasting tokens; 3-11 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510 or www. bendbrewfest.com. (Story, Page 8) REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or

Sparrow Clubs USA. This model was on display at last year’s event. When: 6 p.m. today, 10 a.m. Saturday Where: Downtown Redmond Cost: Free admission Contact: 541-548-6329

redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. RIM ROCK MULES DAYS: A show of mules, donkeys and mini donkeys; proceeds benefit the Rim Rock Riders Horse Club and military care packages; free; 3-9 p.m.; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-280-8668. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www.sistersfarmersmarket.com. HARVEST RUN: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music; proceeds benefit MakeA-Wish Foundation of Oregon, Redmond-Sisters Hospice and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 6 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-548-6329. MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Gnomeo & Juliet”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; www. nwxevents.com. (Story, Page 29) SCREEN ON THE GREEN: Hula hooping and juggling performances, followed by a screening of the G-rated film “Toy Story 3”; free; 7:30 p.m., 8:30 p.m. movie; Sahalee Park, B and Seventh streets, Madras; www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY Aug. 20 RIM ROCK MULES DAYS: A show of mules, donkeys and mini donkeys;

RIM ROCK MULES DAYS

DESCHUTES DOG

TODAY THROUGH SUNDAY

SUNDAY

What: A show of mules, donkeys and mini donkeys; followed by a silent auction and spaghetti feed on Saturday; proceeds benefit the Rim Rock Riders Horse Club and military care packages. A mini donkey named Ella looks out of the barn at a ranch in Powell Butte. When: 3-9 p.m. today, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, 7 p.m. dinner on Saturday Where: Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte Cost: Free, $8 for dinner Contact: 541-2808668

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 6. followed by a silent auction and spaghetti feed; proceeds benefit the Rim Rock Riders Horse Club, military care packages and the riders’ princess fund; free, $8 for feed; 8 a.m.-6 p.m., 7 p.m. dinner; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-280-8668. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit TheTradeNicaragua; free admission; 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; City Center Foursquare Church , 549 S.W. Eighth St., Redmond; 541-598-6759. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: With free lead testing; proceeds benefit Bethlehem Inn and Unity Community of Central Oregon; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Community Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Road, Bend; 541-388-1269. SISTERS ANTIQUE FAIRE: Dealers from throughout the Northwest present quality antiques and collectibles; free admission; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-5490251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com.

What: With dog games, a raffle and vendors; proceeds benefit DogPAC. Attendees stroll through last year’s event. When: 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Where: Riverbend Park, Southwest

YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Philanthropic Educational Organization; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 1000 N.W. Harmon Blvd., Bend; 541-306-3242. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. CRAFT SHOW: Local crafters display and sell their wares; free; 10 a.m.3 p.m.; La Pine Little Deschutes Grange Hall #939, Morson Road and Third Street; 541-977-7098. HARVEST RUN: Drifters Car Club presents a car show with approximately 200 autos, hot rods and more; with live music, a show and shine and more; proceeds benefit Make-A-Wish Foundation of Oregon, RedmondSisters Hospice and Sparrow Clubs USA; free admission; 10 a.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-548-6329. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-728-0088. UKC ALL-BREED DOG SHOW: Dog

show features two shows per day; free; 10 a.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-788-4315 or deserthighratterriers@msn.com. BEND BREWFEST: Event includes tastings from multiple brewers, food vendors and more; children admitted until 7 p.m.; ID required for entry; proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon and NeighborImpact; free admission, must purchase mug and tasting tokens; noon-11 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541-312-8510 or www.bendbrewfest.com. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $15; 12:30-9 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www.hadbf.com. HIGH DESERT RENDEZVOUS: A Western auction and gala, featuring live music and dinner; proceeds benefit the museum’s educational programs; $200, $150 for museum members; 5 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 365, or www.highdesertrendezvous. org. (Story, Page 13) MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Country Strong”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-389-


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DAY, AUGUST THE BULLETIN 19, 2011• FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

week

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Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

G DAYS

‘A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION’

THURSDAY What: Garrison Keillor, pictured, delivers all the latest news from Lake Wobegon. When: 7 p.m., doors open 5 p.m. Where: Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend Cost: $40, $79 reserved, plus fees Contact: www.bendconcerts .com or 541-318-5457

BLACK BEAR POPULATIONS IN CRATER LAKE

THURSDAY

Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend Cost: Free Contact: happytails@dogpac.org or www.dogpac.org

0995 or www.c3events.com. SASSPARILLA: The Portland-based blues-punk band performs; $10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-5499122 or www.angelinesbakery. com. (Story, Page 5) SHOW US YOUR SPOKES: Featuring a performance by Larry and His Flask; proceeds benefit Commute Options; $5; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. (Story, Page 4) SALLIE FORD & THE SOUND OUTSIDE: The Portland-based soul act performs; $10; 8 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 4)

SUNDAY Aug. 21 DESCHUTES DOG DAYS: With dog games, a raffle and vendors; proceeds benefit DogPAC; free; 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; happytails@ dogpac.org or www.dogpac.org. RIM ROCK MULES DAYS: A show of mules, donkeys and mini donkeys; proceeds benefit the Rim Rock Riders Horse Club and military care packages; free; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Rim Rock Riders Arena, 17037 S.W. Alfalfa Road, Powell Butte; 541-280-8668. SISTERS ANTIQUE FAIRE: Dealers from

What: Greg Holm, pictured, talks about his research project investigating how and when black bears use habitats at Crater Lake National Park. When: 6:30 p.m. Where: East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road Cost: Free Contact: www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar or 541-312-1032

throughout the Northwest present quality antiques and collectibles; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Village Green Park, 335 S. Elm St.; 541-5490251 or jeri@sisterscountry.com. UKC ALL-BREED DOG SHOW: Dog show features two shows per day; free; 10 a.m.; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-788-4315 or deserthighratterriers@msn.com. HIGH & DRY BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL: Festival includes live music, instrument workshops, food and more; $15; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Runway Ranch, 22655 Peacock Lane, Bend; www.hadbf.com. CHUKKERS FOR CHARITY: A USPA Players Cup event; proceeds benefit the Deschutes Land Trust, Redmond Humane Society, Equine Outreach and Sparrow Clubs USA; $10, free ages 12 and younger; 2 p.m., gates open noon; Camp Fraley Ranch, 60580 Gosney Road, Bend; 541-312-8113 or www.campfraleyranch.com. SHANGHAI WOOLIES: The ensemble band performs jazz and pop from the 1920s-30s; part of the Live at the Ranch summer concert series; $15-$22; 5 p.m.; Lakeside Lawn at Black Butte Ranch, 12934 Hawks Beard, Sisters; www.bendticket.com. “GUATEMALA ‘11”: A screening of the documentary about student athletes constructing a home in Guatemala; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-549-8800 or www.beaverswithoutborders.com.

MONDAY Aug. 22 KOTTONMOUTH KINGS: The psychedelic hip-hop band performs, with Kingspade, Johnny Richter, D-Loc, The Dirtball and DJ Bobby B; $16 plus fees in advance, $19 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com. (Story, Page 4)

TUESDAY Aug. 23 REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www.localharvest. org/redmond-farmers-market-M31522. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Little Bee” by Chris Cleave; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com.

WEDNESDAY Aug. 24 BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998

or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring covers from the ’50s-’80s by 41 East; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or redmondsummerconcerts.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a country pop-rock performance by Rhonda Hart and band; free; 6-8 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 450 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541447-1209 or recreation@ccprd.org. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1074 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. JARED MEES & THE GROWN CHILDREN: The Portland-based folk-rock act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 4) THE MAKEPEACE BROTHERS: The California-based roots-pop band performs; $10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122. (Story, Page 5)

THURSDAY Aug. 25 HARRY POTTER BINGO: Ages 6 and older answer Harry Potter trivia; costumes encouraged; free; 3 p.m.; Downtown Bend Public Library, Brooks Room,

601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7099 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BLACK BEAR POPULATIONS IN CRATER LAKE: Greg Holm talks about his research project investigating how and when black bears use habitats at Crater Lake National Park; free; 6:30 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. READERS SHOWCASE: Central Oregon Writers Guild members read from works in a variety of genres; free; 6:30-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-923-0896, elsiemariewrites@gmail.com or www. centraloregonwritersguild.com. “A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION”: Garrison Keillor delivers all the latest news from Lake Wobegon; $40, $79 reserved, plus fees; 7 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. CASCADES THEATRICAL COMPANY’S SNEAK PEEK: Preview the upcoming 33rd season with readings; appetizers and drinks available; reservations recommended; free; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or ticketing@cascadestheatrical.org. CONJUGAL VISITORS: The Eugene-based acoustic blues band performs; $5; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122 or www. angelinesbakery.com. (Story, Page 5)


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

planning ahead

Submitted photo

The Moon Mountain Ramblers will perform Aug. 31 at the Pickin’ and Paddlin’ Music Series.

Right Around the Corner AUG. 26-27 — PARKING LOT SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit church programs; free admission; 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Aug. 26, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug. 27; Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond; 541-548-3367. AUG. 26-28 — ART IN THE HIGH DESERT: Juried fine arts and crafts festival showcases art from nationally recognized artists; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Aug. 26-27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 28; banks of the Deschutes River, across the footbridge from the Old Mill District, Bend; info@artinthehighdesert.com or www.artinthehighdesert.com. AUG. 26-28 — HIGH DESERT SECTIONAL BRIDGE TOURNAMENT: Bridge clubs present a bridge tournament; $9 or $8 ACBL members per session; 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Aug. 26-27, 10 a.m. Aug. 28; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, South Sister, Three Sisters Conference and Convention Center, 3800 SW Airport Way, Redmond; 541-3229453 or www.bendbridge.org.

AUG. 26-27 — AIRSHOW OF THE CASCADES: Event includes a display of classic cars and aircraft, an aerobatics show, a kids area, aircraft rides and more; $8, free ages 12 and younger; 4-9 p.m. Aug. 26, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 27; Madras Airport, 2028 N.W. Airport Way; 541-475-6947 or www.cascadeairshow.com. AUG. 26-27 — SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK: Featuring a performance of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by Portland’s Northwest Classical Theatre Company; preceded by short performances by local theater companies; proceeds benefit Arts Central; $20-$75; 5 p.m. both days and noon Aug. 27; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; 541-3230964 or www.shakespearebend.com. AUG. 26-28 — CASCADES THEATRICAL COMPANY’S SNEAK PEEK: Preview the upcoming 33rd season with readings; appetizers and drinks available; reservations recommended; free; 7 p.m. Aug. 26-27, 1:30 p.m. Aug. 28; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or ticketing@cascadestheatrical.org. AUG. 26 — MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Field

of Dreams”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; www.nwxevents.com. AUG. 26 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Brian Doyle talks about his book “Mink River”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. AUG. 26 — BEN HARPER: The Grammy-winning funk rocker performs; a portion of proceeds benefits BendAid; $39 plus fees; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3185457 or www.bendconcerts.com. AUG. 27-28 — BACKYARD FARM TOUR: Tour more backyard farms and gardens throughout Bend and speak with owners; tickets must be purchased in advance at Celebrate the Season or through email; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $10 per car; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; 541211-2536, erin.schiedler@gmail. com or www.neighborimpact. org/backyardfarmtour. AUG. 27 — GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER AND SOUP FEED:

Proceeds benefit the center; $7 for soup lunch; 7 a.m.-3 p.m., lunch 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-3207. AUG. 27 — TERREBONNE CRUZ IN: A display of more than 200 vintage, specialty and custom vehicles; with food and more; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Terrebonne; 541-548-2603. AUG. 27 — VFW DINNER: A dinner of chicken-fried steak; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. AUG. 27 — MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “Toy Story 3”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-3890995 or www.c3events.com. AUG. 27 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Brian Doyle talks about his book “Mink River”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. AUG. 27 — SHOW US YOUR SPOKES: Featuring a performance by The Mostest and Shireen Amini; proceeds

benefit Commute Options; $5; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-617-9600. AUG. 28 — THE RAINSHADOW EFFECT: Featuring a dinner of local food and music; purchase tickets via website; proceeds benefit placebased education projects in Central Oregon; $20; 4-8 p.m.; Rainshadow Organics, 70955 N.W. Lower Bridge Way, Terrebonne; 541-279-0841 or www.restorethedeschutes.org. AUG. 30 — VOLUNTEER EXPO: Community organizations will be on hand to answer questions about volunteering options; free; 2-4 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUG. 31 — PICKIN’ AND PADDLIN’ MUSIC SERIES: Includes boat demonstrations in the Deschutes River, and music by Americana act Moon Mountain Ramblers; proceeds benefit Bend Paddle Trail Alliance; donations accepted; 4 p.m. demonstrations, 7 p.m. music; Tumalo Creek Kayak & Canoe, 805 S.W. Industrial Way, Suite 6, Bend; 541-317-9407. AUG. 31 — MUSIC IN THE CANYON:


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

planning ahead The Mos t est will perform Aug. 27 at Parrilla Grill in Bend. Submitted photo

Eric Tollefson and the World’s Greatest Lovers perform acoustic and blues music; free; 5:30-8 p.m.; Redmond Rotary Arts Pavilion, American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way; http://musicinthecanyon.com. AUG. 31 — END OF SUMMER CRUZ: Event features classic cars, live music by the Taelour Project and a barbecue; proceeds benefit the High Desert A’s COCC automotive scholarship fund; free admission; 6-8 p.m., barbecue begins at 5:30 p.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-419-6021.

Fart her Down the Road SEPT. 2 — MUNCH & MOVIES: An outdoor screening of “E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial”; with food vendors and live music; free; 6 p.m., movie begins at dusk; Compass Park, 2500 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; www.nwxevents.com. SEPT. 2 — TAARKA: The Coloradobased jazzy world-folk band performs; $10; 7 p.m.; Angeline’s Bakery & Cafe, 121 W. Main St., Sisters; 541-549-9122. SEPT. 3-4 — SUNRIVER MARATHON FOR A CAUSE: A 5K run/walk Sept. 3 and half- and full-marathon run/walks Sept. 4, starting in front of the lodge; proceeds benefit Susan G. Komen for the Cure; free for spectators; 9 a.m. Sept. 3, 7 a.m. Sept. 4; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 541-593-4609 or www.sunrivermarathon.com. SEPT. 3-4 — SUNRIVER SUNFEST WINE FESTIVAL: Featuring wines from more than 40 wineries, art vendors, live music, food and more; part of proceeds will benefit Newberry Habitat for Humanity and the Sunriver Area Chamber of Commerce; free admission, signature glass required for tastings; noon-7 p.m. Sept. 3, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sept. 4; Fort Rock Park, East Cascade Drive; 541-385-7988 or www.sunriversunfest.com. SEPT. 3 — SUNRISE TO SUMMIT: Runners race from the West Village Lodge to the Northwest Chair; registration required to run; proceeds benefit the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation; free for spectators; 10:30 a.m.; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-

388-0002 or www.mbsef.org. SEPT. 3 — GRAPE STOMP: Stomp grapes for wine; with live music and wine tastes; a portion of proceeds from wine produced will benefit the Partnership to End Poverty; $10, free for children; 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Maragas Winery, 15523 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Culver; 541-546-5464 or www.maragaswinery.com. SEPT. 3 — CASINO NIGHT: Featuring blackjack, craps, Texas hold ‘em, an auction and more; Western themed; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch Lions Club Sight and Hearing Foundation, scouting organizations and children with diabetes; $15; 7-11 p.m.; Crooked River Ranch Administration Building, 5195 S.W. Clubhouse Drive; 541-570-5565 or jay.nordin@hotmail.com. SEPT. 6 — RAY LAMONTAGNE & THE PARIAH DOGS: The acoustic folk act performs, with Brandi Carlile and Vusi Mahlasela; $34, $64 reserved, plus fees; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. SEPT. 8 — RUN TO THE CASCADES MOTORCYCLE RALLY: The rally includes camping, music, racing and more; $25 day pass, $60 event pass; 3 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.runtothecascades.com. SEPT. 8 — “FUDDY MEERS”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of the dark comedy about a woman’s attempt to regain the memories she loses each night; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.

Event calendar

June

30 Friday

Find out what’s going on around Central Oregon at www.bend bulletin.com/events. Easily searchable by date, city or keyword.

The Bulletin

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION Available on our website at

www.oregonfreshstart.com 541-382-3402 Dale L. Smith, Attorney 622 NE 4th St., Bend, OR 97701 We are a debt relief agency. We proudly help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code.

PAGE 19


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

talks, classes, museums & libraries Education DEMONSTRATION GARDEN OPEN HOUSE: Tour the gardens, attend gardening “universities” and ask questions; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday; OSU Demonstration Garden at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; http://extension. oregonstate.edu/deschutes. FALL GARDENING TIPS: A handson class about preparing your garden for fall and winter, including mulching and fertilization; free; 11 a.m. Saturday; Madras Garden Depot, 60 N.W. Depot Road, Madras; www. madrasgarden.com or 541-475-2068. STAR PARTY: Explore the night sky with Jim Hammond; registration required; free; 7-10 p.m. Saturday; Rimrock Ranch, 69177 Butcher Block Blvd., Sisters; www. deschuteslandtrust.org/events. BLOOMS AND BUTTERFLIES: Children ages 5-12 learn about butterflies and take home a crazy critter; free; 10 a.m. Wednesday; Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center, 850 N.W. Dogwood Lane, Madras; 541-475-7107. OCH CONVERSATION PROJECT: A discussion about the challenges of global interdependence in relation to the way we do things; free; 6:30 p.m. Wednesday; Downtown Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar or 541-312-1032. GARDEN DESIGN WITH COLOR AND TEXTURE: Learn about plant combinations that combine color and texture and are suitable for local gardening conditions; free; 6:30 p.m. Thursday; Central Oregon Agricultural Research Center, 850 N.W. Dogwood Lane, Madras; 541-475-7107. SPIRIT WARRIOR CAMP OUT: Young men ages 13-19 can attend a mentoring weekend with safe and empowering adventures; registration required by Tuesday; $200; 1 p.m. Aug. 26-2 p.m. Aug. 29; Deer Haven, 71140 N.W. Lower Bridge Way, Terrebonne; http://teenspiritwarrior. wordpress.com, lucius_wheeler@ yahoo.com or 541-977-1717. SOIL CLASS: Learn about soil testing; free; 11 a.m. Aug. 27; Northwest Crossing Community Garden, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-322-0236. AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM: 541-317-0610. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: www.cocc. edu or 541-383-7270. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION: www.katyelliottmft.com or 541-633-5704. KINDERMUSIK: www.developmusic. com or 541-389-6690. LATINO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION: 541-382-4366 or www.latca.org. METAPHYSICAL STUDY GROUP: 541-549-4004. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY: http:// teamoregon.orst.edu. NEIL KELLY CO. REMODELING SEMINARS: 541-382-7580. SPIRITUAL AWARENESS COMMUNITY

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

A painted lady comes to rest on a leaf. See the Education section for details on butterfly classes. OF THE CASCADES: www. spiritualawarenesscommunity. com or 541-388-3179. THE STOREFRONT PROJECT: Creative writing workshops for middle- and high-school students; 541-330-4381 or www.thenatureofwords.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER CLASSES: www.wrcco. org or 541-385-0750. WRITERS GUILD: 541-923-0896.

PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: pmo-sun.uoregon.edu. SILVER STRIDERS: strideon@ silverstriders.com or 541-383-8077. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: www. sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4442. WANDERLUST TOURS: www.wanderlusttours. com or 541-389-8359.

Parks & Recreation

Arts & Crafts

BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT: www.bendparksandrec. org or 541-389-7275. BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. CAMP TUMALO: www.camptumalo. com or 541-389-5151. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: www. raprd.org or 541-548-7275. SISTERS ORGANIZATION FOR ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION: www.sistersrecreation. com or 541-549-2091.

Outdoor Recreation OWL PROWL: A naturalist leads a walk at dusk to see nocturnal creatures; registration required; $4, $3 ages 2-12, free for nature center members; 8-9 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays through August; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394. BAT TALK AND WALK: Join bat biologists and learn about using nets to capture bats, then look for bats; $20, free for museum members; 7-9 p.m. Aug. 27; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754, ext. 241 to register. DESCHUTES LAND TRUST: www.deschuteslandtrust. org or 541-330-0017. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER: www. envirocenter.org or 541-322-4856. OREGON PALEO LANDS INSTITUTE OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS: www. paleolands.org or 541-763-4480. OUTDOORS SKILLS WORKSHOPS: 800-720-6339, ext. 76018.

ART STATION: www. artscentraloregon.org or 541-617-1317. ATELIER 6000: www.atelier6000. com or 541-330-8759. CINDY BRIGGS WATERCOLORS: www. CindyBriggs.com or 541-420-9463. CREATIVITY RESOURCE FOUNDATION: 541-549-2091. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY ART ACADEMY: 541-549-7200. KEN ROTH STUDIO: www. kenrothstudio.com or 541-317-1727. KINKER ART STUDIO: 541-306-6341. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: http://sagebrushersartofbend. com or 541-617-0900.

Performing Arts GOOD BREATHING FOR VOCAL PRODUCTION: Learn about the anatomy of breathing, body maps and more; registration required; $25; 6:30 p.m. Thursday; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; catcallproductions@gmail.com. FROM THE PAGE TO THE STAGE: An introduction to viewing and comprehending Shakespeare; attendees should have a ticket for the Aug. 27 Shakespeare in the Park matinee; registration required; $15; 9 a.m. Aug. 27; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; catcallproductions@gmail.com. SHAKESPEARE MASTER CLASS: Learn to unlock the meaning of Shakespeare, with tricks for actors to make language

accessible; registration required; $100; 10 a.m. Aug. 28; Mountain View High School auditorium, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; catcallproductions@gmail.com. ACADEMIE DE BALLET CLASSIQUE: 541-382-4055. ACTOR’S REALM: 541-410-7894 or volcanictheatre@bendbroadband.com. ADULT MODERN DANCE: 541-788-0725. AN DAIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE: www.irishdancecentraloregon.com. BARBERSHOP HARMONY: www. showcasechorus.org or 541447-4756 or 541-526-5006. BEND EXPERIMENTAL ART THEATRE: www.beatonline.org or 541-419-5558. CASCADE SCHOOL OF MUSIC: www. ccschoolofmusic.org or 541-382-6866. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE COMPANY: www.centraloregondance.com or 541-419-8998 or 541-388-9884. CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL OF BALLET: www.centraloregonschoolofballet. com or 541-389-9306. CHILDREN’S MUSIC THEATRE GROUP: www.cmtg.org or 541-385-6718. THE CLOG HOUSE: 541-548-2062. CUBAN STYLE DRUMMING CLASSES: 541-550-8381. DANCE CENTRAL: danceforhealth. dance@gmail.com or 541-639-6068. GOTTA DANCE STUDIO: 541-322-0807. GYPSY FIRE BELLYDANCE: 541-420-5416. HAND DRUMMING: 541-350-9572. INDONESIAN ORCHESTRA: 541-408-1249. JAZZ DANCE COLLECTIVE: www.jazzdancecollective. org or 541-408-7522. LINE DANCE CLASSES: 541-639-6068 or danceforhealth.dance@gmail.com. MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLASSES: 541-385-8074. REDMOND SCHOOL OF DANCE: www.redmondschoolofdance. com or 541-548-6957. SCENE STUDY WORKSHOP: 541-9775677 or brad@innovationtw.org. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 541-549-7511 or 541-848-7523. SQUARE DANCING: 541-548-5743. TANGO DANCE: 541-330-4071. TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: 541-389-5351. WEST AFRICAN DRUM: 541-760-3204.

Museums A.R. BOWMAN MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Exhibits about Crook County, the City of Prineville Railroad and the local timber industry; free; 246 N. Main St., Prineville; www. bowmanmuseum.org or 541-447-3715. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Explores the history of Deschutes County; $5 adults, $2 ages 13-17, children ages 12 and younger free with adult; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www. deschuteshistory.org or 541-389-1813. FORT ROCK HOMESTEAD VILLAGE MUSEUM: A collection of original buildings from the early 1900s homestead era; open Memorial

Day through Labor Day; $4; Fort Rock; http://fortrockoregon. com or 541-576-2251. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring exhibits, wildlife and art of the High Desert, plus “Year of the River Part II: Exploring Balance in the Basin” through Sept. 11, “Scat and Tracks” through Sept. 25 and “Art of the West Show,” through Saturday; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and members. Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through October; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.highdesertmuseum. org or 541-382-4754. THE MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Cultural, traditional and artistic Heritage of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs; also featuring “Canoe Journeys: Our Life on the Big River” through Sept. 18; $7 adults, $6 seniors, $3.50 ages 5-12, $4.50 students; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; www.museumatwarmsprings. org or 541-553-3331. REDMOND MUSEUM: Featuring displays highlighting 100 years of Redmond history; $2; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-504-3038. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: Featuring live birds of prey, hands-on exhibits, nature trail, telescopes, night sky viewing and more; $4 adults, $3 ages 12 and younger; 57245 River Road, Sunriver; www.sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4394. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: Featuring lectures, star gazing, instructional sky navigation demonstrations and sci-fi movie nights; $5 suggested donation Friday and Saturday; Sunday-Thursday large groups only; 541-382-8331.

Libraries BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY: Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7040. CROOK COUNTY LIBRARY: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. EAST BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY: 1260 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend; 541-382-9947. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: 1642 51st St., La Pine; 541-312-1091. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY: 241 S.E. 7th St., Madras; 541-475-3351. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050. ROBERT L. BARBER LIBRARY: 2600 N.W. College Way (COCC), Bend; 541-383-7560. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080.


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out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

It’s all ogre Touring Broadway production of ‘Shrek the Musical’ hits Portland in September By Jenny Wasson The Bulletin

I

t’s not easy being green, unless you are everyone’s favorite ogre, Shrek. With four feature films under his belt, the affable green giant has come a long way since being introduced in William Steig’s children’s book “Shrek!” in 1990. The award-winning “Shrek the Musical” gives the popular franchise a theatrical twist. Presented by the Portland Opera and Broadway Across America, the national touring production runs Sept. 13-18 at the Keller Auditorium in Portland. Blending twisted fairy tales and pop culture references, the original DreamWorks film “Shrek” was released in 2001. Using the voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz and John Lithgow, the film won an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. The musical follows the film’s story line and uses a lot of the same dialogue. With book and lyrics by David Lindsay-Abaire (“Rabbit Hole”) and music by Jeanine Tesori (“Thoroughly Modern Millie” and “Caroline, or Change”), the score includes 19 new songs such as “I Know It’s Today,” “Freak Flag,” “What’s Up, Duloc!” and “Who I’d Be,” according to the show’s website. Nominated for seven Tony Awards, “Shrek the Musical” won for Best Costume Design by Tim Hatley. Ticket prices range from $21 to $71 (plus service charges), depending on seat location and day of performance. To purchase tickets, visit www.ticketmaster.com or contact 800-745-3000. For more information on “Shrek the Musical,” visit www.portlandopera. com/broadway/2011_2012.

Jenny Wasson can be reached at 541-383-0350 or jwasson@bendbulletin.com.

Based on the character created by William Steig and the popular DreamWorks film, “Shrek the Musical” will run Sept. 13-18 at the Keller Auditorium in Portland. Courtesy Jason Bell

Concerts Through Aug. 20 — Loretta Lynn, Chinook Winds Casino, Lincoln City; www.chinookwindscasino. com or 1-888-624-6228. Through Aug. 21 — Mountain Stomp: Featuring The Motet, Kyle Hollingsworth Band, The Banjo Killers, Piano Throwers, Baby Gramps and several Bend bands; Prindel Creek Farm, Tidewater; www.mountainstomp.com. Through Aug. 21 — Willamette Country Music Festival: Featuring Alan Jackson, Little Big Town, Phil Vassar and Blake Shelton; Brownsville; www. willamettecountrymusicfestival. com or contact 541-345-9263. Aug. 19 — Carolina Chocolate Drops/The Be Good Tanyas, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 19 — 2011 Jazz in the Valley: Featuring Billy Childs and Steve Wilson; LaSells Stewart Center, Corvallis; www.ticketsoregon. com or 800-820-9884. Aug. 20 — Aimee Mann/The Weepies, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 21 — 100 Monkeys, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 21 — Blame Sally, Diamond Hitch Mule Ranch, Kimberly; 541-934-2140. Aug. 23 — Aimee Mann/The Weepies, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 23 — Brandi Carlile, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; Aug. 24 — Sergent Garcia, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 24 — Tapes ‘N Tapes, Doug Fir Lounge, Portland; TF* Aug. 25 — 311/Sublime, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Aug. 25 — Dave Alvin & The Guilty Ones, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Aug. 25 — The Decemberists, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Aug. 26 — Josh Groban, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. Aug. 26 — Cloud Cult, Mission Theatre, Portland; CT* Aug. 26 — Daniel Johnston, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 26-28 — BurntWoodsStock 2011: Featuring Cloud Cult, Alice DiMicele and more; Blodgett; www.burntwoodsstock.com. Aug. 27 — Cheap Trick, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Aug. 27 — Huey Lewis and the News, Oregon Zoo, Portland; TM* Aug. 27 — Reverend Horton Heat, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TF* Aug. 29 — Cheap Trick, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488.

Aug. 30 — Janet Jackson, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 1 — John Butler Trio, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 1 — SessionFest, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 2 — The Band Perry, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 2 — Butthole Surfers, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 2 — Dispatch, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 2 — Rockapella/The Coats, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 3 — The Naked and Famous, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 3 — Chris Botti, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 3 — Hall & Oates: A benefit concert for Friends of the Children; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 3 — The Judds, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 4 — Ray Lamontagne, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 5 — Selena Gomez & The Scene, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair. org or 800-833-0011. Sept. 6 — Taylor Swift, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 7 — The Kills, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; CT* Sept. 7 — Reverend Horton Heat, WOW Hall, Eugene; www. wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. Sept. 7-11 — MusicfestNW: Featuring Band of Horses, Iron & Wine, Explosions in the Sky, The Kills, Butthole Surfers and more; various locations in Portland; TW* Sept. 8 — Butthole Surfers, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 8 — Little Dragon: Part of MusicFestNW; Hawthorne Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 9 — B-52s/Human League/ Men Without Hats, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest. org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 9 — Macklemore & Ryan Lewis, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 9 — Pretty Lights/ Mimosa/Vibesquad, Cuthbert Amphitheater, Eugene; TW* Sept. 10 — Arkayik Revival: Featuring Alcyon Massive; Rogue Bowl, Grants Pass; www.arkayikrevival.com. Sept. 10 — John Prine/Ani Difranco, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 10 — Neurosis, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 11 — Ke$ha/LMFAO/Spank

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out of town From previous page Rock, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 12 — John Prine, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Sept. 14 — Colin Hay, Alberta Rose Theatre, Portland; 503-719-6055. Sept. 14 — Deva Premal & Miten, Newmark Theatre, Portland; TM* Sept. 14 — Thievery Corporation, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 15 — Cecilio & Kapono, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 16 — Cake, McMenamins Edgefield, Troutdale; CT* Sept. 16 — David Bromberg Quartet, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 16 — Michael McDonald and Boz Scaggs, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 16 — The Temptations, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.criterian. org or 541-779-3000. Sept. 17 — Blue October, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Sept. 17 — Low, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 17 — Michael McDonald with Boz Scaggs, Maryhill Winery, Goldendale, Wash.; www. maryhillwinery.com/concerts.asp. Sept. 17 — Smokey Robinson, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.

brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 18 — Montrose, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 19 — UFO, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 20 — James McMurtry, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Sept. 22 — Pat Metheny/ Larry Grenadier, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM*

Lectures & Comedy Aug. 20 — “Horticulture in Biblical Times”: Lecture by Lytton John Musselman; The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www.oregongarden. org or 503-874-8100. Aug. 22 — “The Theatre of Cultural Diplomacy: A Theatre Artist in Pakistan”: Lecture by Allen Nause; Morrison Stage, Artists Reportory Theatre, Portland; www. artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278. Aug. 26 — Bill Maher, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 27 — Michael Schlicting: Part of “Mingle, Muse and Munch” series; Sitka Center for Art and Ecology, Otis; www.sitkacenter. org or 541-994-5485. Sept. 9 — John Oliver, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 10 — “Cooking Green”:

Lecture by Eric Nelson; The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www. oregongarden.org or 503-874-8100. Sept. 10 — An Evening with Cesar Millan, Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 15 — “Madame Marie Dorion”: Lecture by Jane Kirkpatrick; part of the “Adventure in History Lecture Series V”; Liberty Theater, Astoria; www. astoria200.org or 503-325-5922. Sept. 17 — “Pronghorn, Bighorn Sheep and Mule Deer ... Oh, My!”: Lecture by Gail Collins; Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge, Plush; 541-947-5604.

Symphony & Opera Aug. 19 — Festival Favorites/Britt Orchestra, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 20 — Family Concert/Britt Orchestra/Christopher O’Riley, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www. brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Aug. 21 — Britt Orchestra/Christopher O’Riley, Britt Pavilion, Jacksonville; www.brittfest.org or 800-882-7488. Sept. 10 — Chris Botti: Performing with the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony. org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 11-13 — Pink Martini:

*Tickets TM: Ticketmaster, www.ticket master.com or 800-745-3000 TW: TicketsWest, www.tickets west.com or 800-992-8499 TF: Ticketfly, www.ticketfly.com or 877-435-9489 CT: Cascade Tickets, www. cascadetickets.com or 800514-3849

Performing with the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Sept. 22 — “Opening Night”: Featuring music by Ravel, Canteloube, Golijov and Respighi; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.com or 541-682-5000. Sept. 24 — Big Night Gala Concert: Presented by the Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM*

Theater & Dance Through Oct. 7 — Oregon Shakespeare Festival: The following plays are in production at the Angus Bowmer Theatre: “August: Osage County” (through Nov. 5), “The African Company Presents Richard III” (through Nov. 5), “The Imaginary Invalid” (through Nov. 6) and “Measure for Measure” (through Nov. 6). “Ghost Light” (through Nov. 5) and “Julius Caesar” (through Nov. 6) are playing at the New Theatre. “Henry IV, Part Two” (through Oct. 7), “The Pirates of Penzance” (through Oct. 8) and “Love’s Labor’s Lost” (through Oct. 9) are playing at the Elizabethan Stage; Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Aug. 23-28 — “Mamma Mia!”: Smash-hit musical featuring ABBA’s greatest hits; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 13-18 — “Shrek the Musical”: Based on the Oscarwinning DreamWorks film; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Sept. 16-Oct. 8 — “Avenue Q”: The Tony Award-winning Best Musical; Lord Leebrick Theatre Company, Eugene; www. lordleebrick.com or 541-465-1506. Sept. 29-Oct. 10 — “Once on This Island”: A Caribbean song and dance musical; presented by Stumptown Stages; Portland Center for the Performing Arts, Portland; www.stumptownstages. com or 503-381-8686. Oct. 4-Nov. 6 — “No Man’s Land”: Comedy by Harold Pinter; starring William Hurt; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Morrison Stage, Portland; www. artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278.

Exhibits Through Aug. 25 — Kelsey Bunker, Jupiter Hotel, Portland; www. kelseybunker.com or 877-800-0004. Through Aug. 28 — Bush Barn Art Center: The following exhibits are

currently on display: “In the Bush Family’s Footsteps” (through Aug. 28), “Art Squared” (through Sept. 3) and “Salem Art Fair & Festival Poster Semi-Finalists” (through Sept. 3). Upcoming exhibits include “A Stitch in Time: Rediscovering Heirloom Utilitarian Quilts” (Sept. 9-Oct. 15), “Parks for People: The Art of Stewardship” (Sept. 9-Oct. 1) and “Bits and Pieces: Intuitive Quilts from the Northwest” (Sept. 9-Oct. 15); Bush Barn Art Center, Salem; www.salemart.org or 503-581-2228. Through Aug. 28 — “The Last Polar Bear: Facing the Truth of a Warming World”: More than 40 photos by photographer Steven Kazlowski; University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History Galleria, Eugene; http:// natural-history.uoregon.edu. Through Aug. 31 — “From Top Hats to Bell Bottoms, Men’s 20th Century Fashions,” North Lincoln County Historical Museum, Lincoln City; 541-996-6614. Through Aug. 31 — JM Brodrick, Lawrence Gallery Salishan, Gleneden Beach; www.lawrencegallery. net or 541-764-2318. Through Aug. 31 — “KidsBuild”: Kids can plan, build and create their own model cities; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www. portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Through Aug. 31 — Steve Henderson, Lawrence Gallery, Sheridan; www.lawrencegallery. net or 503-843-3633. Through Aug. — “Here — Now, Artists from the Waterstone Gallery, Portland, Oregon,” Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; www.zeekgallery. com or 503-581-3229. Through Aug. — Karoyln Kaseberg, Sherman County Historical Museum, Moro; www.co.sherman. or.us or 541-565-3232. Through Sept. 2 — CJ Hurley, Architectural Heritage Center, Portland; www.visitahc. org or 503-231-7264. Through Sept. 5 — “Dinosaurs!”: An outdoor exhibit of life-size animatronic dinosaurs, Oregon Zoo, Portland; www.oregonzoo. org or 503-226-1561. Through Sept. 11 — Oregon Jewish Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “That’s All Folks! The Mel Blanc Story,” “Transformations–A Collaboration Between Bill Aron and Victor Raphael” and “The Heavens Spread Out Like a Prayer Shawl” (Through Sept. 4), Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; www. ojm.org or 503-226-3600. Through Sept. 11 — “The Allure of the Automobile”: Featuring 16 of the world’s most luxurious, rare and brilliantly conceived automobiles designed between 1930 and the mid-1960s; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www.portlandartmuseum. org or 503-226-2811. Through Sept. 18 — “Game On 2.0”: A hands-on experience of video game history and culture; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www. omsi.edu or 503-797-4000. Through Sept. 30 — “Brain Builders


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out of town Bonanza”: Featuring hands-on activities on a range of science and engineering topics; The Science Factory, Eugene; www. sciencefactory.org or 541-682-7888. Through Sept. 30 — “Cleveland Rockwell Fine Art Exhibit”: Featuring maritime fine art by Pacific Northwest painter Cleveland Rockwell (1837-1907); Columbia River Maritime Museum, Astoria; www.astoria200. org or 503-325-2323. Through September — Contemporary Northwest Art Awards: Honoring five to seven leading Northwest artists; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www.portlandartmuseum. org or 503-226-2811. Through Oct. 1 — “Northwest Touchstones”: Group exhibition highlighting quintessential elements of the Pacific Northwest; Bush Barn Art Center, Salem; www. salemart.org or 503-581-2228. Through Oct. 2 — “Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition”: Featuring Pacific Northwest sculptors; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum. org or 509-773-3733. Through Oct. 29 — “Cutting Her Own Path: Papercuts by Nikki McClure, 1996-2011”: A retrospective exhibition of Nikki McClure’s original papercuts, made with black paper and an X-ACTO blade; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Through Oct. 30 — “Caravanning and Collecting”: An exhibit on Airstream creator Wally Byam; Baker Heritage Museum, Baker City; www.bakerheritagemuseum. com or 541-523-9308. Through Nov. 1 — “Beside the Big River: Images and Art of the MidColumbia Indians”: Featuring 40 photographs by Lee Moorhouse, Thomas H. Rutter and J.W. Thompson, as well as select examples of Indian art; Maryhill Museum of Art, Goldendale, Wash.; www.maryhillmuseum. org or 509-773-3733. Through Feb. 25 — Museum of Contemporary Craft: The following exhibits are on display: “75 Gifts for 75 Years” (through Feb. 25) and “Northwest Modern: Revisiting the Annual Ceramic Exhibitions of 1950-64” (Aug. 18-Feb. 25); Museum of Contemporary Craft: Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Through Feb. 25 — “Northwest Modern: Revisiting the Annual Ceramic Exhibitions of 195064”: An examination of juried exhibitions held at the Oregon Ceramic Studio; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Through Dec. 31, 2012 — “Astor Party & the Founding of Astoria”: Explores the history of the fur trade, John Jacob Astor’s story, the Tonquin, Fort George and the War of 1812; Heritage Museum, Astoria; www. astoria200.org or 503-338-4849. Aug. 20-Sept. 25 — Pacific Northwest Plein Art 2011, Columbia River Gorge; www.columbiaarts.

org or 541-387-8877. Aug. 27 — Baby Woodstock, Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www. portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Aug. 27 — Quilts in the Garden: Tour seven gardens showcasing hand-crafted quilts; Corvallis; www.quiltcounty.org. Sept. 1-30 — “Hans Schiebold,” Lawrence Gallery Salishan, Gleneden Beach; www.lawrencegallery. net or 541-764-2318. Sept. 2-Oct. 1 — “Art at the Crossroads,” Baker City; www.crossroads-arts. org or 541-523-5369. Sept. 6-Oct. 1 — “Emerge”: Artwork by recent Western Oregon University graduates; Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; www. zeekgallery.com or 503-581-3229. Sept. 8-18 — Time-Based Art Festival: Presented by the Portland Institute for Contemporary Art; Portland; www.pica.org or 503-242-1419. Sept. 16-Oct. 29 — “Viewpoints”: Featuring members of the High Desert Art League; Umpqua Valley Arts Association, Roseburg; www. uvarts.com or 541-672-2532. Sept. 17 — I Heart Art: Portland: A one-day conference on small business and sustainability; Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland; www.iheartartpdx.com. Sept. 17 — Jellyfish Jubilee: A Celebration of Food and Wine, Oregon Coast Aquarium, Newport; www.aquarium.org. Sept. 24-25 — Corvallis Fall Festival, Central Park, Corvallis; www.corvallisfallfestival. com or 541-752-9655.

Miscellany Through Aug. 20 — 2011 We Like ’Em Short Film Festival, Eltrym Theater, Baker City; http://www.eltrym. com/schedule/filmfestival.htm Through Aug. 21 — Oregon International Air Show, Hillsboro Airport, Hillsboro; www.oregonairshow. com or 503-629-0706. Through Aug. 21 — RiverFest: Featuring river tours, live music and cruises; Tom McCall Waterfront Park, Portland; www.portlandriverfest.org. Through Aug. 27 — Historic Trolley Tours: Enjoy Corvallis’ historic homes on the Corvallis Trolley; every Saturday; Corvallis; 800-334-8118. Through Aug. 28 — Bike Oregon Wine Country: Sunday bike rides through wine country; Eola Hills Wine Cellars, Rickreall; www.eolahillswinery. com or 503-623-2405. Through Oct. 15 — Eagle Cap Excursion Train: Trips on Saturdays; Elgin; www.eaglecaptrain. com or 800-323-7330. Aug. 20 — 6th Annual Depoe Bay Pirate Treasure Hunt, Depoe Bay; www.treasuredepoebay. org or 541-765-4373. Aug. 20 — Stillpoint Farm Mother Earth Festival, Veneta; www.stillpointfarmsfestival. com or 541-968-1999. Aug. 20-21 — Columbia Gorge Paddle Challenge, Waterfront Park, Hood

River; www.gorgepaddlechallenge. com or 541-386-6086. Aug. 20-21 — Gravenstein Apple Celebration, Hood River County Fruit Loop, Hood River; www.hoodriverfruitloop. com or 541-386-7697. Aug. 23-28 — Sherman County Fair & Rodeo, Moro; 541-565-3510. Aug. 24 — STIHL TIMBERSPORTS Preview: Featuring Mike Forrester, David Moses and David Green; World Forestry Center, Portland; www. worldforestry.org or 503-228-1367. Aug. 24-27 — World of Wine Festival, Jacksonville; www. worldofwinefestival.com. Aug. 26 — “Pairings! A Celebration of Oregon Wines, Cuisine & Music”: Part of the Oregon State Fair; Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www. oregonstatefair.org or 503-947-3214. Aug. 26-Sept. 5 — Oregon State Fair, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem; www.oregonstatefair. org or 800-833-0011. Aug 27-28 — Oregon Open Ocean Classic Stand Up Paddleboard Race, Nye Beach, Newport;

www.oregonopenocean. com, annfinlay404@yahoo. com or 425-530-0388. Aug. 28 — Stop and Smell the Roadsters Outdoor Auto Show, The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www. oregongarden.org or 503-874-8100. Sept. 5 — 69th Annual Roy Webster Columbia River Cross-Channel Swim, Hood River; 541-386-2000. Sept. 9-11 — Grandparents’ Weekend, Lincoln City; www. oregoncoast.org or 800-452-2151. Sept. 15 — “Wait... Wait... Don’t Tell Me”: Presented by National Public Radio; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Sept. 16-Oct. 1 — La Luna Nueva: A festival of Hispanic arts and culture; El Centro Milagro, Portland; www. milagro.org or 503-236-7253. Sept. 15-18 — Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. Sept. 17-18 — Surf City Classic Car Weekend, Chinook Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; www.chinookwindscasino.

com or 541-996-5825. Oct. 1 — Hood River Hops Fest: Fresh-hopped beers from more than 25 Northwest craft brewers, local culinary food, arts and crafts vendors and more; downtown Hood River; www.facebook.com/pages/HoodRiver-Hops-Fest/127886120593522 or 541-386-2000, ext. 227. Oct. 1-2 — Yaquina Bay Bridge’s 75th Anniversary: Featuring bridge walks, gallery showings, entertainment and a 1930s-style community picnic; Newport; www.newportchamber.org. Oct. 4 — GoGreen Conference 2011: An all-day sustainable business conference; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; http://portland.gogreenconference. net or 503-226-2377. Oct. 14-16 — Hood River Valley Harvest Fest: Old-fashioned harvest festival with local produce and food products, arts and crafts, wine and beer tastings; info@ hoodriver.org or 541-386-2000. Oct. 26 — The EcoDistrict Summit, Portland; www.ecodistrictssummit. com or 503-226-2377.

18-20 THURSDAY& FRIDAY 3-11 P.M. & SATURDAY NOON-11 P.M.


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gaming TOP 10 DOWNLOADS The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top 10 downloadable games for August: 1. “Bastion” (X360) 2. “From Dust” (X360, PC) 3. “Ms. Splosion Man” (X360) 4. “Call of Duty: Black Ops Annihilation Map Pack” (X360, PS3, PC) 5. “Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet” (X360) 6. “Limbo” (PS3, X360, PC) 7. “Half-Minute Hero: Super Mega Neo Climax” (X360) 8. “Dragon Age II: Legacy” (PS3, X360, PC) 9. “The Adventures of Shuggy” (X360) 10. “Trenched” (X360) McClatchy-Tribune News Service McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Fol l o w in the footsteps of Samus Aran without having to leave the comfort of your spaceship in “Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet.”

Explore a twisted new world By Joe Juba Game Informer Magazine

D

on’t listen to those egghead astrophysicists who tell you that the cosmos is full of wondrous marvels. One thing I learned from video games years ago is that space is only filled with hideous creatures, perilous worlds and weapon upgrades. “Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet” reinforces these lessons constantly as it follows the formula for exploration popularized by “Metroid” and carried on by the likes of “Castlevania” and “Shadow Complex.” Guiding a tiny spacecraft through nightmarish passages, you gain new tools, blast through hostile alien life, and uncover a sprawling map. I loved observing the bizarre areas and enemies, and the confrontations with the

huge bosses are intense and entertaining. The team at Fuel Cell nails these fundamentals, and the fascinating art direction keeps the adventure stylish from beginning to end. Don’t be fooled by the fact that this is a downloadable title; beating the game will take at least a few hours, and even more if you’re driven to uncover the entire map. While the game gets the basics right, it stumbles on delivering a satisfying sense of progression. The weapons like the buzzsaw and telekinetic beam are unconventional and interesting, but most of these accessories function primarily as keys to open particular doors. You need missiles to open gates blocking parts of the map, lightning to open others, and so forth. They also have combat applications, but most of the weapons feel like

EW RE V I

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of Aug. 21: • “Toy Soldiers: Cold War” (X360) • “Fighting Fantasy: Talisman of Death” (PSP)

‘INSANELY TWISTED SHADOW PLANET’ 8 (out of 10) Xbox 360 Microsoft Game Studios, Fuel Cell Games ESRB rating: E for Everyone pegs designed to fit into specific holes. Even if your ship is packed with weapons, they don’t make you feel powerful because they don’t stack or work together: You always use them independently. This segregation of weaponry wouldn’t be a problem if they improved along the way. Apart from your shields and main gun, however, none of your abilities can be upgraded. Your buzzsaw never gets stronger, or bigger, or longer, and you won’t find any

• “Puzzler World 2” (DS) • “Junior Mystery Stories” (DS) • “Jerry Rice and Nitus’ Dog Football” (Wii, PC) • “Get Up Family Game Sports” (Wii) • “No More Heroes: Heroes Paradise” (PS3)

mobility powers that improve your ability to navigate the environment. This also means that shield and gun upgrades are the only worthwhile trinkets to seek out on the map, though you can go out of your way to collect a bunch of concept art highlighting the striking visuals. I don’t mean to imply that “Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet” isn’t fun or well-made, but it isn’t as full-bodied an experience as exploring Zebes or Dracula’s castle. I wanted more goals to pursue, and more ways to showcase my growing power. In the absence of another great game in the vein of “Super Metroid” or “Castlevania: Symphony of the Night,” “ITSP” deftly scratches the itch that many gamers have for this breed of 2-D exploration and combat. It’s worth playing for any fan of the genre, but it isn’t the brightest star in the sky.

• “El Shaddai: Ascension of the Metatron” (X360, PS3) • “Junior Island Adventure” (DS) • “Junior Mystery Quest” (DS) — Gamespot.com

Weekly download ‘FRUIT NINJA KINECT’ For: Xbox 360 (via Xbox Live Arcade, Kinect required) From: Halfbrick Studios ESRB Rating: Everyone Price: $10 It took nine months for Kinect to get Xbox Live Arcade representation, but the first game it gets is, while not overly adventurous, a perfect fit. “Fruit Ninja Kinect” migrates the massively popular mobile game (and somewhat obscure arcade port) to Kinect, and it’s exactly what you expect: Instead of swiping your finger across a tiny screen, you’re viciously chopping the air to slice fruit as it flies into view all around you. If that sounds mindless, bite your tongue: There’s a science to maximizing your score by slicing three or more fruits in one chop without hitting fatal bombs or letting stray fruit drop, and “FNK’s” multiple modes — Classic, a bombs-free Zen mode, an Arcade mode laden with powerups and score multipliers, a Challenge mode that shuffles all three — each utilize that science in maddeningly addictive ways. The short length per game — a minute to 90 seconds, typically — makes it easy to keep replaying for better scores, and all those replays add up to a much better workout than the mobile game can provide. As with all Kinect games, “FNK” occasionally misreads a motion, but the slipups are surprisingly infrequent considering the chaos. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


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movies

A decent vampire film CGI, acting are pretty good in ‘Fright Night’

“F

right Night” makes use of an ideal location: Las Vegas, a city of the night. It takes place in a suburban housing development of eerie isolation. Seen from the air, it is several square blocks of homes and streets entirely surrounded by barren desert. Whoever bought the first house here was an optimist. Perhaps it was Jerry (Colin Farrell). He is a single man, handsome and charming, who lives next door to the Brewsters. Charley Brewster (Anton Yelchin) is a teen-something with the usual expertise about vampires, which is why he’s sensitive to certain vibes from the neighbor. His divorced mother Jane (Toni Collette) picks up more on the testosterone vibe. They both wonder why Jerry has an unsightly dumpster in his front yard, and where all those chunks of debris come from. The exterior of his house remains unchanged. To be sure, all of Jerry’s windows are blacked out, but we’re told that’s not uncommon in Vegas, where so many people work the night shift and sleep all day. Sounds reasonable. The two houses are close together (especially considering the empty miles of desert surrounding the development), and Charley finds it easy to monitor Jerry’s suspicious movements from his second-floor bedroom window. Charley’s friend Ed (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) notices that students are going missing from their classroom and begins to suspect Jerry may be a vampire. “Fright Night” was inspired by a somewhat similar 1985 vampire movie of the same name, which was actually pretty good and contained a rich performance by Roddy McDowall as an unemployed TV horror movie host named Peter Vincent, who was recruited by a teenager to advise on vampire killing. (The name is obviously a play on Pe-

The Associated Press

Toni Collett, from left, Imogen Poots and Anton Yelchin are suspicious of their neighbor in “Fright Night.”

ROGER EBERT

“Fright Night” 106 minutes R, for bloody horror violence, language, some sexual references ter Cushing and Vincent Price, although a diminishing number of movie fans may pick up on that.) This time Peter Vincent (David Tennant) is a Brit magician who headlines at a Vegas casino and claims to be a vampire expert. Setting plot details aside, I can

reveal that Charley has a hot girlfriend named Amy (Imogen Poots), that his mom Jane is a sturdy and grown-up character, and that no one will listen to Charley’s suspicions about Jerry — especially not the cops, who, judging by the apparent size of the housing development, must have to commute from downtown Vegas. David Tennant is droll and dissolute as Peter Vincent, occupying a penthouse filled with vampire artifacts and guzzling booze as if fighting chronic thirst. He is egotistical, rude and aggressive, and not charmed by Charley’s pleas for help. But … well, he does know a lot about vampires. “Fright Night,” directed by Craig Gillespie and written by Marti Noxon, is several degrees superior to “Final Destination 5,” which opened a week earlier. I say

this despite my dread certainty As in the earlier film, this that it will be followed by “Fright one dances always at the edge Nights” 2, 3, 4 and 5, in which a of comedy. It especially has fun series of increasingly suspicious with the Rules of Vampire Beneighbors will be introduced in havior, which Jerry even teases increasingly exotic Charley about. Withlocations. My own out spoiling a single needs are modest. As in the thing, I can tell you Two movies based earlier film, that one of the inevion this premise in 26 table stakes through this one years are sufficient. the heart in this movThe movie has com- dances ie is an inspired use petent acting by the of product placement. principals, who make always at As vampire movies an effort to surpass the edge of go, “Fright Night” is a the generic requirepretty good one. ments of their char- comedy. Note: See the movie acters. It has decent in 2-D if you can. The CGI (including quite 3-D process diminishpossibly most of the subdivision). es a film’s light level by at least The technical credits are first 20 percent, and this vampire film rate: production design (Richard of course depends on many night Bridgland), art direction (Randy scenes and dimly lit interiors. Moore), prosthetic makeup (AuRoger Ebert is a film critic for rora Bergere) and cinematograThe Chicago Sun-Times. phy (Javier Aguirresarobe).


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

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movies

Don’t waste your money on ‘Conan’ Courtesy Giles Keyte

Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgess star as lifelong friends in “One Day.”

‘One Day’ is witty and cleverly acted W

ith some people we are destined to become lifelong friends. It can’t be planned that way. Chance plays a role. There is an underlying harmony that persists in spite of the whims of fate. When childhood sweethearts marry after not seeing one another for 30 or 40 years, it makes perfect sense to me. The instinctive understanding is there. “One Day” is a film based on the David Nicholls best-seller about a boy and girl who graduate from the University of Edinburgh on July 15, 1988, and spend the night together. The story follows them by dropping in on July 15 of their lives for year after year, which is a useful device, because it eliminates the need to show us the events of the other days of their years. Success, failure, marriages, divorce can take place off-screen if necessary. What matters is their accumulating effects. Dexter (Jim Sturgess) is a twit. In the 1970s he might have been known as a Hooray Henry. Emma (Anne Hathaway) is an earnest, hard-working girl. Dexter is upper class. Emma is middle class. Dexter goes into television production. Emma gets a job as a waitress in a Tex-Mex restaurant in London I believe I have actually dined at. It wasn’t bad. Dexter becomes famous quickly, and fades inexorably because there is really nothing there. Emma becomes obscure quickly, and only gradually becomes successful because she

RO G E R EBERT

“One Day” 108 minutes PG-13, for sexual content, partial nudity, language, some violence and substance abuse persists in believing in herself and her gift for writing. Life has its way of bringing them together for periodic updates. Some of these meetings are intentional, some accidental. The thread is never broken, not even after Dexter marries and Emma takes up with Ian (Rafe Spall, son of Timothy). Since Emma and Dexter are both beautiful people, there is no imbalance there. It is all in character. Emma has it. The film depends on a reliable fictional element, the redeeming power of the love of a good woman. Dexter is a superficial fool who descends through everlowering levels of humiliation on TV, cable and the Internet, until he has been reduced to a punch line. Emma stays her course. Her persistence and success are like a rebuke to Dexter. But it is important for us, and Emma, to realize that he is fundamentally a good

person at heart — potentially. The movie tells their story in a palatable rom-com manner, much enriched by its locations in Edinburgh, London, Paris and elsewhere. Such characters never live in forlorn places. The film is carefully crafted to make even its sad moments seem not all that bad, and it modulates its progress toward happiness without unseemly haste. But it unfolds as it must: A film cannot begin with two such attractive people and follow them for years into unhappiness and misery. Every single joyous love story ends in death if you follow it long enough. The movies make life easier for us by usually stopping in the middle. In a season of movies dumb and dumber, “One Day” has style, freshness and witty bantering dialogue. Anne Hathaway is so attractive that would be advised to sometimes play against type (her eyeglasses at the beginning are a bit over the top). Jim Sturgess contributes the film’s most versatile performance, one that depends on exact timing and control of the balance between pathos and buffoonery. It’s a decent night at the movies, if however a letdown after “An Education,” the previous film by Lone Scherfig. Why July 15? That’s St. Swithin’s Day, although Dexter and Emma eventually find it has a more direct relevance. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

‘C

onan the Barbarian” involves the clash of civilizations whose vocabularies are limited to screams, oaths, grunts, howls, ejaculations, exclamations, vulgarities, screeches, wails, bellows, yelps and woofs. I’d love to get my hands on the paycheck for subtitling this movie. The plot involves — oh, never mind. You have your Barbarians and they kill each other in an unending series of battle scenes. I guess Conan is the good guy, but what difference does it make? He has no cause or belief. He’s driven by revenge against the sadistic Khalar Zym (Stephen Lang), who trapped Conan’s father under a vat of molten iron, assigned young Conan to exert his little muscles to try to keep it from tipping, and screamed at the old man: “You will watch your child die trying to save you!” Luckily, Conan (the muscular Jason Momoa) survives and grows up with no worse than a photogenic scar on his face, where some wayward molten iron dripped. He and his father Corin (Ron Perlman) had earlier forged his sword at the steel moltery; earlier still, the infant Conan was delivered on a battlefield by an emergency cesarean performed by Corin’s own sword on his mother, who survives long enough to say, “He shall be named Conan.” She was so weak she lacked the breath to say, “Conan the Barbarian.” The movie is a series of violent conflicts. People who despair of convincing me to play video games tell me, “Maybe if you could just watch someone else playing one!” I feel as if I now have. Conan carves, beheads, disembowels and otherwise inconveniences the citizens of several improbable cities, each time in a different fanciful situation. The evil

RO G E R EBERT

“Conan the Barbarian” 102 minutes R, for strong bloody violence, some sexuality and nudity Khalar Zym and his girlfriend Marique (Rose McGowan) turn up regularly, uttering imprecations, with Marique especially focused on Conan’s warrior gal pal Tamara (Rachel Nichols). This Marique, she’s a piece of work. She has white pancake makeup, blood-red lips, cute little facial tattoos, and wickedly sharp metal talons on her fingers. At one point she blows some magic dust at Conan, and the dust turns into a team of warriors made of sand. This is a neat special effect, although it raises the question, if you turn back to sand when Conan slices you, what kind of a life is that? The film ends with a very long battle involving Conan, Khalar Zym, Tamara and Marique, a sentence I never thought I’d write. It takes place largely with Tamara strapped to a revolving wheel above a vertiginous drop to flames far below. The entire cavern crumbles around them, big chunks of rock falling everywhere except, luckily, upon them. “Conan the Barbarian” is a brutal, crude, witless high-tech CGI contrivance, in which no artificial technique has been overlooked, including 3-D. The third dimension once again illustrates the principle that when a movie largely takes place indoors in dimly lit spaces, the last thing you need is a pair of dark glasses. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


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movies ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 31.

HEADS UP “God Bless Ozzy Osbourne” — Shot over the course of three years, audiences will experience the life story of Ozzy, as seen through the eyes of his youngest child, producer/filmmaker, Jack Osbourne, who worked alongside directors Mike Fleiss and Mike Piscitelli. The documentary includes never-before-seen Black Sabbath footage, recent solo tour clips and interviews with fellow musicians and the Osbourne family. The event screens at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. Cost is $12.50. 120 minutes. (no MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from National CineMedia The Associated Press

Hamish Linklater, left, stars as Jason and Miranda July stars as Sophie in the drama “The Future.”

‘The Future’ is bright, fun Miranda July’s film is enchanting but has a deeper, more individual purpose

I

suppose to some degree Miranda July’s characters are autobiographical. Not literally; a woman like the heroine of “The Future” could never have written and directed “The Future.” Perhaps they’re autobiographical more in the Woody Allen mode: characters created as avatars of fanciful whimsy. Christine, July’s character in “Me and You and Everyone We Know,” was a 30ish woman with life still ahead of her. Sophie, her character in “The Future,” is a 30ish woman with life behind her — or, at very best, on hold. Both women draw men into their vortex. These men tend to be male versions of herself, nice, sensitive, feckless, uncertain, tentative. In “The Future,” Sophie and Jason (Hamish Linklater) have been together about four years. They live in a sort of indefinitely attenuated present tense. They occupy a small apartment furnished by the accumulation of playful and ironic possessions. They have low-maintenance jobs adequate to support their undemanding lifestyle. He works on a help line for a tech company. She teaches dance to children,

and when she dances, her style seems to have been learned from her students. Children seem to be out of the picture. They are held together by habit, by familiarity with each other’s peculiarities, by fond inertia. They’re both easy to get along with. If she obsessively clings to a yellow “security Tshirt,” perhaps an affection borrowed from old “Peanuts” strips, Jason accepts it. There are a lot of obsessions that are harder to live with. My friend Severn Darden used to gnaw on table napkins. Change comes. They decide to adopt a sick cat. Caring for this cat will be a full-time task. Its illness is almost a requirement; seeking something to commit to, they prefer a sick cat to a well one. The cat cannot come home with them for 30 days. In that month, they budge from their inertia; Jason gets a job selling trees, and Sophie starts an affair with Marshall (David Warshofsky), a man who has no greater purpose in the story than that she can have the affair. Jason becomes friends with an old guy named Joe (Joe Putterlik), whose

ROGER EBERT

“The Future” 91 minutes R, for sexual content purpose is to be an old guy Jason becomes friends with. In the world of Miranda July, magic is possible. Did I mention that some of “The Future” is narrated by the sick cat? In her films, the passage of time is not allowed to become routine. In an extraordinary scene in “Me and You and Everyone We Know,” the Christine character walks down a long block with a man she has just met, and she makes their passage down the block into a metaphor for their passage through life. In “The Future,” Jason is able to arrest the aimless meandering of his life by stopping time himself. He moves sideways from the time stream. The moon begins to speak to him. This fantastical whimsy is

delicate and fragile, and much depends on the personalities of Sophie and Jason, who despite all their self-conscious drifting are collaborating on a rather elaborate and defined idea of how to live. We are all on a voyage through life, but sometimes we even forget we’re on a ship. Not these two. I see them standing side by side, leaning on a rail at the stern, focusing on the departure of the waves. I suggested that Miranda July’s characters are avatars, projections she invites us to focus on. I’ve met her, don’t know her, but can guess something from her films. It takes a great deal of will to get an independent film made, particularly one that inhabits no known genre. If you direct it and star in it, it takes much more. If you make two of them, you are a focused and driven person. You are not a twee sprite like Sophie or Christine. You do not require a sick cat to provide meaning in your life. If you cling to a T-shirt (and July apparently sometimes really does), you must do it not out of weakness but from fierce determination. On the surface, this film is an enchanting meditation. At its core is the hard steel of individuality. Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

Beavers without Borders — Oregon State University’s Beavers without Borders program presents “Guatamala ’11,” a documentary on 14 Oregon State student/athletes spending their 2011 spring break building a home for a family in Alotenango, Guatemala. The film will screen at 7:30 p.m. Sunday at the Sisters Movie House. The event will feature an introduction with the producer, director and student/athlete team members. Cost is $10. Proceeds benefit the Beavers without Borders program. (no MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from www.osubeavers .com/beaverswithoutborders

WHAT’S NEW “Conan the Barbarian” — Involves the clash of civilizations whose vocabularies are limited to screams, oaths, grunts, howls, ejaculations, exclamations, vulgarities, screeches, wails, bellows, yelps and woofs. I’d love to get my hands on the paycheck for subtitling this movie. Conan carves, beheads, disembowels and otherwise inconveniences the citizens of several improbable cities, in a brutal, crude, CGI contrivance, made dimmer with 3-D. Rating: One and a half stars. 102 minutes. (R) “Fright Night” — Set in Las Vegas, a city of the night. A teenager (Anton Yelchin) suspects his neighbor (Colin Farrell) is a vampire. The kid’s mother (Toni Collette), attracted by the charmer, pooh-poohs the notion. A Vegas entertainer (David Tennant), who does vampires in his magic act, is recruited despite great reluctance to advise on vampire killing, in a well-made thriller that makes one of its stakes through the heart an unforgettable use of product placement. Rating: Three stars. 106 minutes. (R)

Continued next page


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PAGE 29

movies From previous page “The Future” — Sophie (Miranda July) and Jason (Hamish Linklater) have been together about four years. They live in a sort of indefinitely attenuated present tense. They decide to adopt a sick cat. Caring for this cat will be a full-time task. Seeking something to commit to, they prefer a sick cat to a well one. An enchanting whimsy about two people playing with the timelines of their lives. Rating: Three and a half stars. 91 minutes. (R) “One Day” — Based on the David Nicholls best-seller about a boy and girl who graduate from the University of Edinburgh on July 15, 1988, and spend the night together. The story follows them by dropping in on July 15 of their lives for year after year. Dexter (Jim Sturgess) is an upper-class twit. Emma (Anne Hathaway) is an earnest, hardworking girl. Somehow they have a bond that endures. A decent enough rom-com, if a letdown after “An Education,” the previous film by Lone Scherfig. Rating: Three stars. 108 minutes. (PG-13) “Sarah’s Key” — Cuts back and forth between a tragic story involving the Holocaust and a more trivial, feel-good story about a modern-day reporter. It’s an awkward fit and diminishes the impact of the story set earlier. A modern-day writer (Kristin Scott Thomas) investigates the Nazi roundup of Jews in Paris, and discovers an unexpected personal connection. Rating: Two and a half stars. 111 minutes. (PG-13) “Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World” — A retired secret agent who has her hands full with a new baby and twin step-kids is called back into action to battle a supervillain and gets help from her family. With Jessica Alba, Rowan Blanchard, Mason Cook and Joel McHale. Written and directed by Robert Rodriguez. In 3-D. This film was not screened in advance for critics. 88 minutes. (PG)

STILL SHOWING “30 Minutes or Less” — Jesse Eisenberg plays a pizza delivery man who is forced to rob a bank while strapped to a bomb to raise money so a couple of boozy layabouts (Danny McBride and Nick Swardson) can pay a hit man to kill one of their fathers for his lottery winnings. With Aziz Ansari as Eisenberg’s best buddy. Slapdash. It’s oddly distracting to see Eisenberg, who played so smart in “The Social Network,” play so dumb here. Rating: Two stars. 83 minutes. (R) “Bridesmaids” — Kristen Wiig’s new comedy is about a group of women friends who are as cheerfully vulgar as the guys in “The Hangover.” Wiig plays Annie, whose Milwaukee bakery shop has just gone bust, and whose longtime friend Lillian (Maya Rudolph) is getting married. Naturally, she expects to be maid of honor, but begins to fear a rival in Helen (Rose Byrne), the rich and overconfident trophy wife of the groom’s boss. Gifted with getting in her own way, she creates havoc during a bachelorette trip to Vegas; the level of raunch approaches “The Hangover,” and is sometimes sort of brilliant. Rating: Three and

Munch & Movies returns! The dog days of summer are upon us and that means the Munch & Movies series is back. The event features live music, food and family films. Starting tonight, films will be screened every Friday through Sept. 9 at Compass Park in the NorthWest Crossing neighborhood in Bend and every Saturday through Sept. 10 at Sam Johnson Park in Redmond. Free to the public, the event begins at 6 p.m. and Buttercup from “Toy Story 3” movies start at dusk. Courtesy Disney Here is the 2011 schedule:

Julien Bonet / The Weinstein Company

Kristin Scott Thomas and Aidan Quinn star in the film “Sarah’s Key,” based on the book by Tatiana de Rosnay. a half stars. 128 minutes. (R) “Captain America: The First Avenger” — A real movie, not a noisy assembly of incomprehensible special effects. Of course it’s loaded with CGI, but it has texture and properly tells a full story. Chris Evans stars as Steve Rogers, a puny kid who is transformed into a muscular superhero and battles a Nazi uber-villain known as the Red Skull (Hugo Weaving). With Hayley Atwell as a sultry WAC, Tommy Lee Jones as an Army colonel, Stanley Tucci as a scientist and Dominic Cooper as Howard Stark, who will go on to father Iron Man. Rating: Three stars. 125 minutes. (PG-13) “The Change-Up” — One of the dirtiest-minded mainstream releases in history. It has a low opinion of men, a lower opinion of women, and the lowest opinion of the intelligence of its audience. It is obscene, foul-mouthed, scatological, creepy and perverted. Starring Ryan Reynolds and Jason Bateman as best buddies whose minds are switched between their bodies, providing the occasion for them to act as crude beings with no respect for decency. The film goes out of its way to be vulgar and offensive. Rating: One and a half stars. 101 minutes. (R) “Cowboys & Aliens” — Without any doubt the most cockamamie plot I’ve witnessed in many a moon. Daniel Craig is a stagecoach robber with amnesia, Harrison Ford is a tyrannical rancher, Sam Rockwell is a saloon keeper, Olivia Wilde is a pretty lady who’s not from around these parts. The aliens are throwbacks to classic bug-eyed monsters. I liked the Western material more than the aliens, but then, that’s the way I am. As preposterous moneymakers go, it’s wildly inventive. Directed by Jon Favreau. Rating: Three stars. 118 minutes. (PG-13) “Crazy, Stupid, Love.” — A sweet romantic comedy about good-hearted people. Imagine that. No snark. No raunch. Steve Carell and Julianne Moore balance on the edge of divorce, Emma Stone plays a sweetheart, Marisa Tomei steals scenes, and

Analeigh Tipton and Jonah Bobo are cute as an impossible teenage couple. Oh, and Ryan Gosling plays a lounge lizard and lady-killer. Yes. Ryan Gosling. And very well, too. Rating: Three stars. 117 minutes. (PG-13) “Final Destination 5” — One of those rare movies where the title itself is a spoiler. Yes, everyone in the movie dies, except for Coroner Bludworth. But you knew that because of the previous four films. The increasingly challenging task of the filmmakers is to devise ever more horrible and gruesome methods for them to be slaughtered. They do. Rating: Two stars. 92 minutes. (R) “Glee: The 3-D Concert Movie” — Haters, head for the door. But Gleeks? Get your “Glee” on. “Glee: The 3-D Concert Movie” may be as spontaneous as a Pringles commercial, with cast members of the hit TV series re-creating — on stage — their biggest musical moments, sometimes in exactly the same costume they wore on TV. You may not be able to tell how much of the music is live and how much is prerecorded, from the singing-dancers who never take a breath or miss a note to the Robert Palmer-pretty backup band. But this film perfectly — and I have to say entertainingly — captures America’s moment of “Glee.” Rating: Two and a half stars. 95 minutes. (PG)

Bend

Redmond

Aug. 19 — “Gnomeo & Juliet” (G); live music by Mark McKay Aug. 26 — “Field of Dreams” (PG); live music by Tim Howe Sept. 2 — “E.T. The Extra Terrestrial” (PG); live music by Overdub the Radio and The Quons Sept. 9 — “Coraline” (PG); live music by Apple Siders

Aug. 20 — “Country Strong” (PG-13); live music by Tim Coffey Aug. 27 — “Toy Story 3” (G); live music by Chris Beland Sept. 3 — “The Goonies” (PG); live music by Mark Ransom Sept. 10 — “Rudy” (PG); live music by Five Pint Mary For more information, visit www.c3events.com. — Bulletin staff

it is equally the story of how they empowered a young white woman to write a best-seller about them. At the end, the story has punished the racist and redeemed those who have changed, but it’s still Jackson, Miss. Still, this is a good film, involving and wonderfully acted. I was drawn to the characters and moved. Wonderful performances by Viola Davis, Emma Stone, Octavia Spencer, Bryce Dallas Howard and Jessica Chastain. Rating: Three stars. 146 minutes. (PG-13) “Horrible Bosses” — Very funny

and very dirty, in about that order. Involves three horrible bosses and three employees who vow to murder them. The movie works because of how truly horrible the bosses are, what pathetic victims the employees are, and how bad the employees are at killing. Kevin Spacey and Jennifer Aniston stand out in a strong cast including Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, Colin Farrell, Jamie Foxx and Charlie Day. Rating: Three and a half stars. 100 minutes. (R)

Continued next page

Family Rafting Tubing Kayaking Stand Up Paddle

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2” — After seven earlier films reaching back a decade, the Harry Potter saga comes to a solid and satisfying finale. The time has come for Harry to face Lord Voldemort in their final showdown, and their conflict is staged in a series of dramatic sequences containing power and conviction. Many of the familiar characters from earlier in the series are brought back onstage for a last hurrah. Rating: Three and a half stars. 131 minutes. (PG-13) “The Help” — A safe film about a volatile subject. Presenting itself as the story of how African-American maids in the South viewed their employers during Jim Crow days,

O T R U O H O W T S P I R T Y A D L L A TRIPS IN BEND, SUNRIVER, SISTERS & REDMOND Experience the Deschutes, McKenzie & Umpqua Rivers CALL TO BOOK YOUR TRIP

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We’ve been making memorable Central Oregon vacations since 1979


PAGE 30 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

movies NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES

From previous page “Midnight in Paris” — Woody Allen’s enchanting new comedy stars Owen Wilson as an American who visits Paris with his fiancee (Rachel McAdams), and finds himself seduced by dreams of living there in the 1920s when Hemingway and Fitzgerald hung out at Gertrude Stein’s fabled salon. With charm and whimsy, Allen tickles the fantasies of everyone who ever loved an American lit class. Rating: Three and a half stars. 94 minutes. (PG-13) “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” — James Franco stars as a scientist who tests an anti-Alzheimer’s drug on chimpanzees and finds it dramatically increases their intelligence. After the experiment is called off, he brings a baby chimp home, and Caesar (a motion-capture performance by Andy Serkis) flourishes until he rebels after being sent to an unkind primate shelter. With Freida Pinto as a beautiful primatologist, John Lithgow as an Alzheimer’s victim. The movie has its pleasures, although the chimps seem smarter than the humans. Rating: Three stars. 105 minutes. (PG-13) “The Smurfs” — Raja Gosnell’s “The Smurfs” is the smurfiest movie I’ve ever smurfed. No, wait. That sounds too positive. How about, “I wouldn’t smurf Gosnell’s ‘The Smurfs’ on my smurfiest enemy.” There, that’s better. Gosnell, who plundered our Saturday morning memories for back-to-back, live-action “Scooby-Doo” adventures, relies on cutting-edge CGI and unnecessary 3-D wizardry to transport the pint-size heroes of our childhood from their native enchanted forest to a noisy New York City. Once here, the Smurfs interact with incredulous humans, impart a little homespun wisdom and help make our grungy

T he following movies were released the week of Aug. 16.

The Associated Press

Freida Pinto and James Franco star in “Rise of the Planet of the Apes.” existence a tad more animated. This film was not given a star rating.

— Sean O’Connell, The Washington Post “Super 8” — Young teenagers in a small 1970s Ohio town are making an 8mm zombie film when they witness a spectacular train wreck and suspect something very strange is happening. When Air Force troops pour into town, they continue their snooping. Directed by J.J. Abrams (“Star Trek”) and produced by Steven Spielberg, it evokes the spirit and innocence of Spielberg’s magical early films, although the last act is a little shaky. Good acting by the young cast. Rating: Three and a half stars. 112 minutes. (PG-13) “Terri” — The story of a smart and gentle fat kid who is mocked in high school, cares for a senile uncle, and develops an important

mentor relationship with the complex assistant principal. Newcomer Jacob Wysocki brings quiet confidence to the role. John C. Reilly as the mentor is masterful as a flawed but sincere man. Director Azazel Jacobs moves at a human pace, not prodded by impatience or a desire to rush through the story. I admire this film. Rating: Four stars. 105 minutes. (R) “Winnie the Pooh” — A sweet, innocuous children’s movie based on the enduring tale of goings-on in Hundred Acre Wood. Obviously intended for gradeschoolers and below, it may be appreciated by adults who grew up reading the A.A. Milne books with drawings by E.H. Shepard. This could make a nice introduction to moviegoing for a small child. Rating: Three stars. 69 minutes. (G)

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (unless otherwise noted)

“The Conspirator” — Robert Redford’s new film stars Robin Wright as the half-forgotten Mary Surratt, the only woman defendant tried after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. John Wilkes Booth and his conspirators, including her son, held meetings in the Washington boardinghouse she ran. Was she a co-conspirator? James McAvoy co-stars as the young attorney required to argue her defense against his will (and his opinion she was guilty). Constitutional issues are involved as she’s tried before a military tribunal and not a jury of her peers. An absorbing historical drama. DVD Extras: Several featurettes and audio commentary; Blu-ray Extras: Additional “BonusView” commentary. Rating: Three stars. 121 minutes. (PG-13) “Jane Eyre” — A voluptuous adaptation of the 1847 novel that remains enormously popular, expressing a forbidden attraction between a powerless young woman and her fierce and distant employer. Mia Wasikowska and Michael Fassbender embody Jane and Rochester with a firm sense of who they are; neither is unattractive, although the novel says they are, but then this is the movies. Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga, a rising star whose “Sin Nombre” was one of the best films of 2009. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: Three featurettes, deleted scenes and audio commentary. Rating: Three

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Mia Wasikowska stars as the title character in “Jane Eyre.” and a half stars. 118 minutes. (PG-13) “Something Borrowed” — Kate Hudson plays Darcy, the lifelong best friend of the heroine, Rachel (Ginnifer Goodwin). Blond, rich and headstrong, Darcy’s about to be married to Dex (Colin Egglesfield), whom Rachel has had a crush on since law school. No good can come of this. Also involved are party animal Marcus (Steve Howey) and Rachel’s confidant, Ethan (John Krasinski). The movie is about how none of these people seem able to express their true feelings, and finally we can’t admire them enough to like them as we should. DVD Extras: Additional scenes; Blu-ray Extras: Additional featurettes and gag reel. Rating: Two stars. 112 minutes. (PG-13) ALSO OUT THIS WEEK: “Priest” and “Hoodwinked Too! Hood vs Evil” COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release Aug. 23 include “The Beaver, “Win Win” and “The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.” Check with local video stores for availability.

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 31

movies M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of Aug. 19

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Movie times in bold are opencaptioned showtimes. • There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6

MISSED THE MOVIE? NEVER AGAIN! Coming to Video on Demand

AUGUST

2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:10 a.m., 1:55, 4:35, 7:20, 10 Sun: 11:10 a.m., 1:55, 4:35, 7:20 Mon-Thu: 2, 4:40, 7:20 THE FUTURE (R) Fri-Sat: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:15, 9:55 Sun: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 2:30, 5:05, 7:35 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:10, 9:50 Sun: 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:10 Mon-Thu: 2:25, 5, 7:10 ONE DAY (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:25 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 6:55, 9:40 Sun: 11:25 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 6:55 Mon-Thu: 2:15, 4:50, 7:30 SARAH’S KEY (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:35 Sun: 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:20, 6:50 Mon-Thu: 2:05, 4:35, 7:05 TERRI (R) Fri-Sat: 11:30 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:05, 9:45 Sun: 11:30 a.m., 1:50, 4:40, 7:05 Mon-Thu: 2:20, 4:55, 7:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

30 MINUTES OR LESS (R) Fri-Mon: 1:20, 4:25, 8, 10:05 Tue, Thu: 1:20, 4:25, 8, 10:05 Wed: 1:20, 4:25, 8, 10:05 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Tue, Thu: 4:35, 10:25 Wed: 10:25 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) Fri-Tue, Thu: 1:40, 7:25 Wed: 1:40 THE CHANGE-UP (R) Fri-Thu: 4:40, 9:40 CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) Fri-Thu: 3:20 CONAN THE BARBARIAN 3-D (R) Fri-Thu: 12:35, 7:05, 10 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:45, 3:50, 7:30, 10:15 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:05, 4, 7:35, 10:20 FINAL DESTINATION 5 3-D (R) Fri-Thu: 1:15, 4:20, 7:55, 10:30 FRIGHT NIGHT (R) Fri-Thu: 3:55 FRIGHT NIGHT 3-D (R) Fri-Thu: 1:25, 7:45, 10:15 GLEE: THE 3-D CONCERT MOVIE (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:15, 3, 6:40, 9:20 GOD BLESS OZZY OSBOURNE (no MPAA rating) Wed: 7:30 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13)

MADRAS CINEMA 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

Courtesy Disney

Eeyore, who lost his tail, makes do with an umbrella in the animated film “Winnie the Pooh.” Fri-Thu: 12:20, 3:30, 6:50, 9:50 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) Fri-Thu: 1:30, 7:20 THE HELP (PG-13) Fri, Mon: Noon, 1, 3:10, 4:10, 6:20, 7:15, 9:30, 10:25 Sat: Noon, 1, 3:10, 4:10, 6:20, 7:15, 9:30, 10:25 Sun: Noon, 1, 3:10, 4:10, 6:20, 7:15, 9:30, 10:25 Tue-Thu: Noon, 1, 3:10, 4:10, 6:20, 7:15, 9:30 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:50, 3:40, 7, 9:45 THE SMURFS (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:05, 2:45, 6:15, 9:05 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:30, 6:30 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 2:50, 9:10

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BRIDESMAIDS (R) Fri-Thu: 9 SUPER 8 (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 6 WINNIE THE POOH (G) Sat-Sun: Noon, 3 Wed: 3

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 Sat-Sun: 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9

FRIGHT NIGHT (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 Sat-Sun: 10:15 a.m., 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: Noon, 2, 4, 6:15, 8:30 Sat-Sun: 10 a.m., noon, 2, 4, 6:15, 8:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

30 MINUTES OR LESS (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 8 Sat-Sun: 6:30, 8:30 BEAVERS WITHOUT BORDERS (no MPAA rating) Sun: 7:30 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:30 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 4 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5:15 Sat-Sun: 2:45 FRIGHT NIGHT (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 8 Sat-Sun: 5:30, 8 THE HELP (PG-13) Fri, Mon-Fri: 4:30, 7:30 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30 SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 5, 7:15 Sat: 2:45, 5, 7:15 Sun: 2:45, 5

Food, Home & Garden In AT HOME Every Tuesday

CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R) Fri-Sun: 1:35, 4:15, 6:50, 9:30 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 6:50, 9:30 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 2, 9:05 FINAL DESTINATION 3-D (R) Fri-Sun: 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:10, 9:25 Mon-Thu: 2:50, 5, 7:10, 9:25 FRIGHT NIGHT (R) Fri-Sun: 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:50 Mon-Thu: 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:50 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 11:45 a.m., 4:30, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 4:30, 6:45 THE SMURFS (PG) Fri-Sun: 12:20, 2:35, 4:50, 7:15, 9:25 Mon-Thu: 2:35, 4:50, 7:15, 9:25

PINE THEATER

Rio – Aug. 9

Priest – Aug. 16

The Conspirator – Aug. 16

214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4:15, 7:15 Sat-Sun: 1:10, 4:15, 7:15 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) Fri, Mon-Thu: 4, 7 Sat-Sun: 1, 4, 7

Something Borrowed – Aug. 16

EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Hoodwinked Too! – Aug. 16

The only movie schedule that matters is yours! Catch these movies and hundreds more - including thousands of FREE titles - on VOD from BendBroadband.

Call 541-382-5551

w w w. b e n d b r o a d b a n d . c o m


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, AUGUST 19, 2011

McMenamins was a dream that began humbly more than 25 years ago in the hearts of brothers Mike and Brian McMenamin, now considered two of the pioneers of the Northwest microbrew and historic hotels industries. Today, McMenamins is the fourth largest producer of microbrewed beer in the region. They only sell their fine handmade beer in their own pubs, restaurants, hotels, and movie theaters.

What used to be a shop where Henry Gorgas built airplanes is now the brewery where Henry produces three year-round beers, including the Steam Fired Stout, Oregon Pale Ale, and Bad Henry IPA, along with one winter seasonal–the Hangman Strong Ale.

Don’t miss the hop, yeast and barley bliss!

Come join the Celebration going on Today & Tomorrow Here at Brew Werks, we offer a one-of-a-kind beer experience. Along with our own meticulously crafted brews, we bring you a deliberately selected, distinctive list of beers from around the world. Our mission is to keep our twelve taps flowing with a constantly evolving variety of fun choices you won’t find anywhere else in Bend. Together with our ale infused menu, it all adds up to a great time. A beer experience. Cheers.

AT THE LES SCHWAB AMPHITHEATER. SAMPLE THE FINEST BREWS IN THE STATE INNCLUDING BEERS FROM THESE QUALITY BREWERS!

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As brewers of hand crafted ales, we are outdoor enthusiasts who look forward to sharing our craft beer that is most balanced and highest quality. Play hard, live easy and enjoy GoodBeer for GoodLife. Whether at the tee box, at the top of South Sister, or in the backyard hammock, your GoodLife should be paired with our GoodLife. Tap the GoodLife and say Cheers to your GoodLife.

Behind the Scenes at a Bevy of Bend’s Best Breweries!

384 SW Upper Terrace Dr. 541-633-7670

Reservations Required

541-389-8359 $45 per person

www.BendBrewBus.com

MOVING SOON! To: 1203 NE 3rd St. (Ernesto’s Building)

Bend’s Largest Selection of Bottled Beers

www.homesuds.com

Laurelwood founded in 2001 by husband and wife team of Mike De Kalb and Cathy Woo-De Kalb. The original Laurelwood Public House & Brewery opened in the Hollywood district in NE Portland, Oregon with a 7 barrel brewery. Laurelwood launched its newest beer outlet within Portland’s Rose Garden Arena, where we are proudly bringing our handcrafted ales to sports fans and concert goers alike. In addition, we stopped operating our pub in NW Portland in order to focus on our brewing business and featured brewpub locations.

Bulletin Daily Paper 08/19/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday August 19, 2011

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