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Deschutes poised to tap energy potential of landfill

Bend South Little League All-Stars

Everybody’s pitching in

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

For years, Deschutes County officials have discussed how best to tap into the revenue and energy-producing potential of methane and other gases at Knott Landfill. Now, county commissioners are closer than ever to starting a landfill gas-to-energy project and could vote on a contract to do so in the next month. The technology they are considering is so new that most of the halfdozen landfills trying it out across the western United Inside States are still install• A loook at ing it. the gasThe counto-energy ty is workconversion ing with system, the Irvine, Page A4 Calif.-based company Waste to Energy Group LLC. If the county signs a contract with Waste to Energy Group, the company would cover all the costs associated with the project, and the county would receive a portion of the profits. Waste to Energy Group proposes to do two things at Knott Landfill on Bend’s east side: inject steam to speed up decomposition and the creation of gas, and convert the gas into methanol, hydrogen or another liquid, such as synthetic crude oil. “This is definitely out of the box,â€? said Timm Schimke, director of Deschutes County’s Department of Solid Waste. “We’re kind of going to be leading the pack here.â€? See Energy / A4

There are scores of categories, and failing just 1 means failure By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

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Schools and AYP: It’s all or nothing

Photos by Rachel Luna / For The Bulletin

Ian Harding, 10, left, and Gianna Viola, 10, bottom left, react to Bend South player Cam Baker’s three-run homerun Saturday during the team’s second game in the Northwest Regional Tournament in San Bernardino, Calif. The 12-player team raised more than $12,000 in just three days last week before heading to the tourna-

By Beau Eastes • The Bulletin SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. —

C

entral Oregon’s support for the Bend South Little League All-Stars has gone above and beyond a “Go get ’em!� and a token donation at a benefit carwash. The 12-player baseball team raised more than $12,000 in just three days last week before heading south to the Little League Northwest Regional Tournament (11-12 age division) in San Bernardino. Winning the eight-day, six-state regional tournament would put Bend South in the 2011 Little League World Series in South Williamsport, Pa. While Little League Baseball paid for Bend South’s travel costs — lodging is free for the team at the Little League West Headquarters barracks near Al Houghton Stadium in San Bernardino — parents were faced

with the difficult choice between last-minute airfare and steep gas prices. With the fast and furious fundraising efforts of the team, though, each player’s immediately family received a check for $1,011 last week before the start of the tournament. And for each Bend South player, at least one parent has been able to make it to the tournament. “It’s just been an amazing show of support,� Bend South coach Brad Waterman says about the outpouring of assistance provided by fans and merchants in Bend and around Central Oregon. See Baseball / A4

Bend South parents react to the team’s fifth-inning comeback in their first game at the regionals. Thanks to the players’ fundraising efforts and an outpouring of support from Central Oregonians, each player has at least one parent who was able to make it to the tournament.

Bloomberg News Service

More inside • Little League play is bound by a different set of rules, Page D1

U.S. drama fuels eurozone panic New York Times News Service

PARIS — European political leaders have garnered much of the blame for the continuing crisis of the euro, consistently failing to act with enough speed or severity to calm the markets. But the current panic has been partly produced by U.S. politicians, whose noisy squabbling over the debt ceiling has combined with the prospect of another U.S. recession to undermine the potential for global growth. It is that prospect — that Americans will again retrench and stop

buying goods from China and Europe and everywhere else — that is putting new pressure on debtridden eurozone economies, most recently Italy and Spain. Telephone lines were buzzing Sunday, with heads of government, economic ministers and central bankers from Asia to Europe to the U.S. discussing what might be usefully said before the markets’ opening today. They all seem to agree about one thing, however: the need to defend the idea that the U.S. remains a reliable credit risk. See Eurozone / A4

Hackers take $1B a year, and banks blame their clients By Greg Farrell and Michael A. Riley

CREDIT CRISIS

By Steven Erlanger

The way federally mandated academic progress standards are presented — as met or not met — can cloak successful schools as failures. Though there are a handful of basic categories in the adequate yearly progress (AYP) standards, schools may have to meet more than 80 measurements to succeed in AYP. Under math AYP, for instance, a school must meet standards for “economically disadvantaged� students, special education students, English language learners and on and on. “We’re Failure in just one category pretty much means an entire school does convinced not meet AYP. there isn’t AYP was designed to show a way to how schools were progress- make (AYP) ing, but the system has not understandmet that goal, according to able to the Bend-La Pine Superintendent general public.� Ron Wilkinson. — Ron “We’re pretty much con- Wilkinson, vinced there isn’t a way to Bend-La Pine make (AYP) understandable Schools to the general public,� Wilkin- superintendent son said of the data that was released Tuesday. Ten schools in Bend-La Pine Schools did not meet AYP, for the most part because one or two groups barely fell short. Ponderosa Elementary did not meet math AYP for “limited English proficient� students, and so did not meet overall AYP. At Summit High School, special education students missed meeting math AYP by 3 percent. Other schools in Bend-La Pine appear to have deeper problems, according to the data. See Schools / A4

Thanassis Stavrakis / The Associated Press

A Greek Stock Exchange employee passes stock charts in Athens on Friday, a day that saw the eurozone’s debt crisis batter markets.

NEW YORK — Valiena Allison got a call from her bank on a busy morning two years ago about a wire transfer from her company’s account. She told the manager she hadn’t approved the transfer. The problem was, her computer had. As Allison, chief executive officer of Sterling Heights, Mich.-based Experi-Metal Inc., was to learn, her company computer was approving other transfers as she spoke. During hours of frantic phone calls with her bank, Allison, 45, was Related unable to stop this cybercrime • Smartphones in progress as transfer followed becoming transfer. By day’s end, $5.2 mila popular lion was gone. target for She turned to her bank, a hackers, branch of Comerica Inc., to help Page A2 recover the money. It got all but $561,000 of the funds. Then came the surprise: The bank said the loss was Experi-Metal’s problem because it had allowed Allison’s computer to be infected by the hackers. “At the end of the day, the fraud department at Comerica said: ‘What’s wrong with you? How could you let this happen?’â€? Allison said. In increments of a few thousand dollars to a few million per theft, cyber-crooks are stealing as much as $1 billion a year from small and midsized bank accounts in the U.S. and Europe like Experi-Metal, according to Don Jackson, a security expert at Dell SecureWorks. See Hackers / A2


A2 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Smartphones: a new frontier for hackers By Jordan Robertson

As smartphones become more popular, they’re increasingly being targeted by hackers. “We’re in the experimental stage of mobile malware where the bad guys are starting to develop their business models,” said Kevin Mahaffey of security software maker Lookout Inc.

The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — Hackers are out to stymie your smartphone. Last week, security researchers uncovered yet another strain of malicious software aimed at smartphones that run Google’s popular Android operating system. The application not only logs details about incoming and outgoing phone calls, it also records those calls. That came a month after researchers discovered a security hole in Apple Inc.’s iPhones, which prompted the German government to warn Apple about the urgency of the threat. Security experts say attacks on smartphones are growing fast — and attackers are becoming smarter about developing new techniques.

A tempting target “We’re in the experimental stage of mobile malware where the bad guys are starting to develop their business models,” said Kevin Mahaffey, co-founder of Lookout Inc., a San Franciscobased maker of mobile security software. Wrong-doers have infected PCs with malicious software, or malware, for decades. Now, they are fast moving to smartphones as the devices become a vital part of everyday life. Some 38 percent of American adults now own an iPhone, BlackBerry or other mobile phone that runs the Android, Windows or WebOS operating systems, according to data from Nielsen. That’s up from just 6 percent who owned a smartphone in 2007 when the iPhone was released and catalyzed the industry. The smartphone’s usefulness, allowing people to organize their digital lives with one device, is also its allure to criminals. All at once, smartphones have become wallets, e-mail lockboxes,

The Associated Press ile photo

photo albums and Rolodexes. And because owners are directly billed for services bought with smartphones, they open up new angles for financial attacks. The worst programs cause a phone to rack up unwanted service charges, record calls, intercept text messages and even dump e-mails, photos and other private content directly onto criminals’ servers.

A hacker invasion Evidence of this hacker invasion is starting to emerge. • Lookout says it now detects thousands of attempted infections each day on mobile phones running its security software. In January, there were just a few hundred detections a day. The number of detections is nearly doubling every few months. As many as 1 million people were hit by mobile malware in the first half of 2011. • Google Inc. has removed about 100 malicious applications from its Android Market app store. One particularly harm-

ful app was downloaded more than 260,000 times before it was removed. Android is the world’s most popular smartphone operating software with more than 135 million users worldwide. • Symantec Corp., the world’s biggest security software maker, is also seeing a jump. Last year, the company identified just five examples of malware unique to Android. So far this year, it’s seen 19. Of course, that number pales compared with the hundreds of thousands of new strains targeting PCs every year, but experts say it’s only a matter of time before criminals catch up. “Bad guys go where the money is,” said Charlie Miller, principal research consultant with the Accuvant Inc. security firm, and a prominent hacker of mobile devices. “As more and more people use phones and keep data on phones, and PCs aren’t as relevant, the bad guys are going to follow that. The bad guys are smart. They know when it makes sense to switch.” When it comes to security, smartphones share a problem

with PCs: Infections are typically the responsibility of the user to fix, if the problem is discovered at all.

iPhones and Androids The emergence in early July of a previously unknown security hole in Apple Inc.’s iPhones and iPads cast a spotlight on mobile security. Users downloaded a program that allowed them to run unauthorized programs on their devices. But the program could also be used to help criminals coopt iPhones. Apple has since issued a fix. It was the second time this year that the iPhone’s security was called into question. In April the company changed its handling of location data after a privacy outcry that landed an executive in front of Congress. Researchers had discovered that iPhones stored the data for a year or more in unencrypted form, making them vulnerable to hacking. Apple CEO Steve Jobs emerged from medical leave to personally

address the issue. The iPhone gets outsize attention because it basically invented the consumer smartphone industry when it was introduced in 2007. But Apple doesn’t license its software to other phone manufacturers. Google gives Android to phone makers for free. So, Android phones are growing faster. As a result, Google’s Android Market is a crucial pathway for hacking attacks. The app store is a lightly curated online bazaar for applications that, unlike Apple’s App Store, doesn’t require that developers submit their programs for pre-approval. Lookout says it has seen more unique strains of Android malware in the past month than it did in all of last year. One strain seen earlier this year, called DroidDream, was downloaded more than 260,000 times before Google removed it, though additional variants keep appearing. Lookout says about 100 apps have been removed from the Android Market so far, a figure Google didn’t dispute.

The masquerade Malicious applications often masquerade as legitimate ones, such as games, calculators or pornographic photos and videos. They can appear in advertising links inside other applications. Their moneymaking schemes include new approaches that are impossible on PCs. One recent malicious app secretly subscribed victims up to a service that sends quizzes via text message. The pay service was charged to the victims’ phone bills, which is presumably how the criminals got paid. They may have created the service or been hired by the creator to sign people up. Since malware can intercept text messages, it’s likely the victims never saw the messages — just the charges.

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Bloomberg News Service ile photo

Small- and medium-size banks are targets of cyber-crooks using advanced hacking techniques to steal funds. “I think they’re losing more now than to the James Gang and Bonnie and Clyde and the rest of the famous gangs combined,” said Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., right, shown talking to Sen. Ben Cardin, D-Md.

Hackers Continued from A1 And account holders are the big losers. “I think they’re losing more now than to the James Gang and Bonnie and Clyde and the rest of the famous gangs combined,” said Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., who chaired a Select Committee on Intelligence task force on U.S. cyber-security in 2010. Organized criminal gangs, operating mostly out of Eastern Europe, target small companies, school districts and local governments that maintain fat commercial bank accounts protected by rudimentary security measures at community or regional banks. The accounts typically aren’t covered by insurance as individual accounts are. “If everyone knew their money was at risk in small and medium-sized banks, they would move their accounts to JPMorgan Chase,” said James Woodhill, a venture capitalist who is leading an effort to get smaller banks to upgrade anti-fraud security for their online banking programs. JPMorgan Chase, the secondlargest U.S. bank, is the only major U.S. bank that insures commercial deposits against the type of hacking that plagues smaller banks, Woodhill said. JPMorgan spokesman Patrick Linehan declined to comment. Smaller banks as well as many of the victims tend not to make the thefts public, according to in-

terviews with the customers and experts such as Woodhill. As the threat becomes better known, small-business customers and other target entities may shift their business to large, national banks, which can better absorb the losses to maintain customer relations and which have better security policies to protect clients from such crimes. “It’s frightening for small businesses because they have no clue about this,” said Avivah Litan, an analyst at Stamford, Conn.-based Gartner Inc., which does computer analysis. “They just don’t have any clue, and everyone expects their bank to protect them. Businesses are not equipped to deal with this problem, and banks are barely equipped.” Customers used to being made whole when they are victims of credit-card fraud or ATM thefts have had to sue small- and medium-sized banks to recover losses after being blamed by their branches for permitting the crime, as Allison was. The traditional help of law enforcement also hasn’t been there for such customers. In the heyday of bank robberies in the 1930s, the FBI became famous for Tommy-gun shootouts with the bad guys, who were put on the Most Wanted list. But in most cases, the identities of the John Dillingers and Pretty Boy Floyds of the 21st century aren’t known because of online anonymity, and the bureau doesn’t disclose statistics on how much these cyber-crooks are stealing.

Jeff Reed Mortgage Loan Officer 541.693.0003 jeffrey.reed@bankofamerica.com

2955 N. Hwy 97, Suite 100, Bend, OR 97701


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 A3

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Yemeni president leaves Saudi hospital Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh was discharged from the hospital where he was being treated in Saudi Arabia and has moved into a government residence there, Yemen’s SABA news agency reported Sunday. Saleh was severely wounded in a bomb attack in June but has refused to step down, despite months of protests demanding his ouster. Yemeni and Saudi officials said they were trying to arrange rehabilitation services for him. A Yemeni official also said Saleh was not well enough to function as president. There was no word on how long Saleh’s treatment would take or when he might return to Yemen.

Verizon workers strike as negotiations stall By Steven Greenhouse New York Times News Service

The decision by 45,000 workers at Verizon Communications businesses to go on strike Sunday over proposed benefit cuts reflects sharp battle lines. On one side is a highly profitable telecommunications company that is eager to trim costs in its declining businesses; on the other are unionized workers who fear that the many concessions demanded by their employer will force them to give up decades of hard-won gains. The walkout is unusual at a time when unemployment is steep and organized labor has lost

several high-profile battles. But union leaders are angry that Verizon has budged little from its long list of demands during six weeks of negotiations. The unions have resisted Verizon’s requests for concessions on scores of issues because the company has been very profitable overall, with net income of $6.9 billion in the first six months of this year. Verizon notes that most of its lines of business that deliver services over wires — the part of the company where the striking workers are employed — are in decline. The bulk of the company’s profits come from Verizon

Wireless, a thriving, nonunion joint venture that is majorityowned by Verizon. Union leaders and workers said the walkout would inevitably cause significant delays in phone repairs and in installations of its fast-growing FiOS television and Internet services in customers’ homes. But Verizon officials said the company had tens of thousands of managers ready to step in to do the work normally done by the striking workers. The strike involves Verizon repair technicians, FiOS installers and call center workers from Massachusetts to Virginia.

India’s coast guard cleaning up oil leak NEW DELHI — The Indian coast guard on Sunday began cleaning up oil leaking from a merchant ship that sank off Mumbai three days ago. Two coast guard ships were using chemicals to clean up the oil spread over an area of 7 nautical miles, Navy spokesman Capt. Manohar Nambiar said. “We have estimated that between 1.5 to 2 tons per hour of oil is leaking,” he said. The 740-foot vessel, which had been transporting coal from Indonesia to the western Indian state of Gujarat, was estimated to be carrying 325 tons of fuel oil and 56 tons of diesel, the coast guard said. The navy rescued 30 crew members from Indonesia, Jordan and Romania after receiving a distress signal from the ship before it sank Thursday. Local fishermen discovered the leak Saturday, prompting coast guard and navy helicopters to survey the area Sunday morning before launching the cleanup.

Israeli official foresees ‘bloodshed’ JERUSALEM — Israel’s foreign minister warned Sunday that the Palestinian Authority plans “unprecedented bloodshed” next month after an expected symbolic U.N. endorsement of Palestinian independence. Accenting his warning, Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman called for Israel to sever ties with the West Bank-based government. The allegation runs counter to other Israeli assessments and stands in stark contrast to public and private statements by the Palestinians. Lieberman did not provide evidence for his claim that Palestinians were getting ready for violent demonstrations. Moshe said Lieberman drew his conclusions from intelligence reports and public statements by Palestinian officials. Palestinian spokesman Ghassan Khatib denied the Palestinians were preparing for violence. — From wire reports

In London, twin perils converge to fuel a riot By Ravi Somaiya New York Times News Service

AFGHANISTAN

Asian typhoon heads for landfall BEIJING — Typhoon Muifa has been downgraded to a tropical storm and will make landfall this evening somewhere between northeastern China and western North Korea, China’s weather agency said. The typhoon had already moved along China’s eastern coast and downed power lines, billboards and trees in Shanghai and brought heavy rain to coastal Shandong province on Sunday. The Central Meteorological Station said Muifa was creating sea gusts of up to 63 mph and traveling at a speed of 1518 mph. Muifa will weaken after making landfall somewhere between Zhuanghe in Liaoning province and western North Korea this evening, the agency said. Muifa will bring heavy rain to Liaoning, it said.

Akira Suemori / The Associated Press

A police officer stands guard near a burned police car in Tottenham, North London, on Sunday after a protest over the death of a local man turned violent and cars and shops were set ablaze.

New York Times News Service ile photo

Day laborers gather at a safe point along an increasingly perilous road where security is worsening, outside of Maidan Shar, Wardak Province, Afghanistan. Wardak and Logar provinces share a border and have seen a rise in violence as insurgent groups have grown.

Helicopter attack another sign of region slipping into chaos By Alissa J. Rubin New York Times News Service

PORAK, Afghanistan — The devastating attack on an American helicopter in eastern Afghanistan over the weekend has heightened attention on the harsh reality that even now, at the height of the NATO troop presence and not far from Afghanistan’s capital, large stretches of the country are perilous and heavily infiltrated by insurgents. Logar Province, which lies to the south of the capital, and Wardak Province, which lies to the west, are gateways to the capital, Kabul. Yet it was there, in a valley traversing the two provinces, that insurgents shot down a Chinook helicopter in the early hours of Saturday morning, killing 30 Americans, including 22 members of an elite Navy SEAL team, seven Afghan commandos and an interpreter.

’It has deteriorated dramatically’ Both provinces, much like Kunar and Nangahar in the east, have become increasingly insecure even as NATO has stepped up its troop numbers nationwide. “It was not as bad in Logar two years back, but recently it has deteriorated dramatically,” said Nafisa Hejran, a member of the Logar Provincial Council, who two

SEALs killed in crash were on a rescue mission The 30 American service members — most of them elite Navy SEALs — who died when their helicopter was shot down had rushed to help Army Rangers who had come under fire, two U.S. officials said Sunday. There were conflicting accounts late Sunday as to whether the SEAL team had subdued the attackers who had pinned down the Rangers and were departing, or whether they were hit as they tried to land. One official said they had accomplished their mission, but another said the aircraft, a Chinook helicopter, was hit as it approached. Both officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still ongoing. — The Associated Press

weeks ago received a death threat from insurgents telling her to quit her job. She said most members of the provincial council in Logar no longer attended council meetings either because the journey

from their homes was dangerous or they had nowhere safe to stay once they arrived.

Insurgency is entrenched The attack on the helicopter was a reminder of the insurgency’s ability to entrench itself almost anywhere that the Afghan government is weak, absent or hated for its corruption. Despite all the increases in NATO forces, those troops cannot assert themselves in every village and valley, and too often when they do, their night raids and intrusions into peoples homes stir up resentment, said a number of people interviewed in Logar in the past week. Afghan government officials, American military officers and residents in Logar and Wardak repeatedly said that several districts in both provinces — including Wardak Province’s Saydabad district, where the helicopter went down — were no longer under government control, except in the district centers. Adolescent girls cannot attend school in many areas, and attacks are routine. In a June 27 report on the rising insurgency around Kabul, the International Crisis Group described insurgents as having “a stronger hold” in Logar, Wardak and Ghazni than in any other provinces around the capital.

AIG planning to sue Bank of America New York Times News Service The American International Group is planning to sue Bank of America over hundreds of mortgage-backed securities, adding to the surge of investors seeking compensation for the troubled mortgages that led to the financial crisis. The suit seeks to recover more than $10 billion in losses on $28 billion of investments, in possi-

bly the largest mortgage-security-related action filed by a single investor. It claims that Bank of America and its Merrill Lynch and Countrywide Financial units misrepresented the quality of the mortgages placed in securities and sold to investors, according to three people with knowledge of the complaint. AIG, still largely taxpayer-

owned as a result of its 2008 government bailout, is among a growing group of investors pursuing private lawsuits because they believe banks misled them into buying risky securities during the housing boom. At least 90 suits related to mortgage bonds have been filed, demanding at least $197 billion, according to McCarthy Lawyer Links, a legal consulting firm.

LONDON — As London surveyed the damage Sunday after a small anti-police demonstration spiraled into looting and violence that left 26 police officers injured and led to 55 arrests, many sought to cast the blame beyond the rioters themselves. In Tottenham, the northern London neighborhood at the center of the rioting, residents spoke of twin perils that had converged to leave their streets scarred and smoldering on Sunday. Frustration in this impoverished neighborhood, as in many others in Britain, has mounted as the government’s austerity budget has forced deep cuts in social services. At the same time, a widely held disdain for law enforcement here, where a large Afro-Caribbean population has felt singled out by the police for abuse, has only intensified through the drumbeat of scandal that has racked Scotland Yard in recent weeks and led to the resignation of the force’s two top commanders. The riot was the latest in what has turned out to be a season of unrest in Britain, with multiple demonstrations escalating into violence in recent months. And there was not long to wait until a new one erupted: Across London, skirmishes broke out Sunday between groups of young people and large numbers of riot police, which one officer said were drawn from forces

around London. In Enfield, a usually calm suburb, shop windows were smashed and debris lay in the street. In nearby Edmonton, groups of young people gathered near damaged storefronts. In Tottenham itself, roads were closed, a helicopter hovered overhead and squads of police vans swooped in to make arrests in side streets. The episode in Tottenham began as a small and peaceful march, in which residents gathered outside a police station to protest the killing of a local man, Mark Duggan, in a shooting by police officers last week. Scotland Yard has said that Duggan, who was riding in a taxi at the time of the shooting, was the subject of a “preplanned operation” by officers. The police officers involved in the shooting have been quoted in newspapers as saying that they had come under fire, which slightly wounded one of the officers, before they began to shoot. The march turned into a pitched battle between hundreds of officers, some on horses, and equal numbers of rioters, wearing bandanas and armed with makeshift weapons that included table legs and an aluminum crutch. Looting throughout northern London continued past dawn, leaving streets littered with glass. In daylight, residents emerged to survey buildings, many considered landmarks, that had been left gutted and smoldering.

Syrian troops attack town near Iraqi border Los Angeles Times BEIRUT — Syrian forces targeting areas that are in open revolt against the government launched a major assault on an agricultural hub near the Iraqi border on Sunday, as neighbors in the Middle East unleashed withering criticism of the crackdown. Saudi Arabia joined other Arab countries in condemning the violence. In a statement read on television, King Abdullah said the bloodshed was unacceptable and that his country was withdrawing its ambassador to Damascus. Saudi Arabia followed the Arab League and the Gulf Cooperation Council, which represents oil-rich monarchies on the Arabian Peninsula. Both groups condemned the violence in Syria for the first time over the weekend. Witnesses reached by telephone in Dair Alzour, located

in a largely tribal area with strong ties to Iraq, described scenes of violence similar to past clashes in the five-month confrontation between President Bashar Assad’s security forces and a protest movement inspired by uprisings throughout the Arab world. They told of tanks firing shells into residential neighborhoods, panicked residents scurrying for cover and a near-constant barrage of gunfire. According to accounts compiled by the activist network Local Coordinating Committees of Syria, at least 11 people were killed in the city of 500,000, and 18 were killed elsewhere in the country—including at least 12 in the western town of Hawleh.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Energy Continued from A1 The project could produce a significant amount of revenue for the county, extend the life of the current landfill and stabilize an older, closed county landfill, if the project is later expanded there. At the same time, county staff anticipate the project could run up against opposition from neighbors concerned about noise and other potential impacts. Waste to Energy Group’s financing comes from a Florida investment group called Cornerstone Capital, said L. Randall Lutz, CEO of Waste to Energy Group, in an interview Friday. Waste to Energy Group might use energy credits to help finance the project, although Lutz said credits are not available in Oregon to the degree they are in California. Waste to Energy Group has a patent for its steam injection process that gives it sole rights to the technology, Schimke told the county commissioners on Wednesday. As a result, Schimke plans to award a 20-year, sole-source contract to the company. The contract would allow the parties to review their revenue-sharing agreement in the future, so the initial split is not locked in for the full 20 years. For the county, the deal under consideration could bring in $200,000 to $300,000 annually, Schimke estimated. “That’s much more than we could get from anybody else, at the rate the landfill produces gas,�

Baseball Continued from A1 “We’ve done fundraisers before (in previous years), when the state tournament wasn’t in Bend, and we’d be lucky to amass $1,000. And that’s out busting our humps at carwashes.â€? By whatever means, the trip to San Bernardino from Central Oregon is costly. One of the main communities in Southern California’s Inland Empire, San Bernardino is approximately 880 miles from Bend and 80 miles east of Los Angeles International Airport. Regional airports in Ontario (25 miles) and Palm Springs (55 miles) are closer, but they are also more expensive to fly into. Then there’s the cost of renting a car. “When we were preparing budgets for parents, we estimated it’d be about $1,500 per family just for travel and hotels,â€? says Mike Yunker, who, along with his wife, Vandy, drove to San Bernardino with their van filled with the Bend South team’s equipment. “That’s not including food. For the whole 10 days, families will probably be dropping $2,000.â€? When Bend South defeated Ashland 14-1 on July 30 to secure the Oregon state championship, the team and its supporters had just four days to raise money to help defray costs for the regional tournament, which started this past Friday and runs through this week. Last Monday, in Bend, Pappy’s Pizzeria hosted a fundraiser in which 50 percent of food sales that day went to the team. The next night, Bend South players autographed baseballs for donations at the Bend Elks game at Genna Stadium. Additionally, accounts were set up on the team’s website (www.eteamz. com/bendsouth) and Facebook page, into which supporters could — and can still — donate money. “A lot of families took time off from work and they’re not getting paid while they’re down here,â€? says Yunker, a pastor at Real Life Christian Church in Bend. “The community’s been awesome. ‌ Everybody’s kind of living vicariously through these kids.â€? Last week, Yunker’s son Noah and another Bend South player, Justin Parsons, spoke at Jake’s Diner to a group of military veterans who regularly gather at the popular east-side Bend restaurant. The two Little Leaguers talked about their season and their upcoming trip to the Northwest Regional Tournament. “It was heartwarming,â€? Mike Yunker says about the response the boys received from the veterans. “They stood up and applauded after the kids were done speaking. Everyone was crying a little. And then they passed the hat around.â€? Waterman and Mike Yunker are both quick to praise the coaches and parents who came before them and laid the foundation for a community that rallies around Little League and youth athletics in general. “It just shows we haven’t gotten so big as a city that this kind of stuff doesn’t matter,â€? Yunker says about Bend’s support of the Bend South team. “Our kids are all the way down in San Bernardino and they’re still on the front page of the paper.â€? Beau Eastes can be reached at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

$POWFSUJOHMBOEGJMMHBTFTUPQSPEVDUT Most landfills, including Knott Landfill in Bend, produce gases from biodegrading waste. In some cases, this gas can be collected and converted into useful products. A system proposed for Knott Landfill would inject steam into the layers of waste to boost decomposition and gas production.

)PXUIFTZTUFNXPSLT Steam from a boiler is injected into buried layers of waste Boiler at the landfill. 1

5ZQFTPGQSPEVDUTUIBUDBOCFQSPEVDFE A reformer collects the gas and converts it into products. 2

Methanol • Acetic acid • Fuels and olefins

Reformer

Synthetic crude oil • Clean diesel • Lubricants

Layers of waste Steam

• Dimethyl ether, for transportation fuels, cooking fuels and power

• Jet fuel • Naphtha

Hydrogen • Refinery products • Fuel cells

Gas

4PVSDF8BTUFUP&OFSHZ(SPVQ --$  45*&OHJOFFSJOH

Schimke said. Waste breaks down more slowly in Central Oregon’s arid climate, which means the landfill does not produce as much gas as landfills in wetter areas. The steam-injection technology could help the county to produce more gas. “That takes us from a marginal project to a very, very lucrative project,� Schimke said. The Department of Solid Waste has struggled financially since the housing market slump and recession reduced waste. The revenue could help the county delay future

• Ammonia

"OEZ;FJHFSU5IF#VMMFUJO

increases in the price to the public and garbage haulers of depositing waste at the landfill. Another benefit of the technology is it could shrink the volume of waste at the landfill by accelerating decomposition, Schimke said. That could extend the life of the landfill, and save money by delaying the creation of the county’s next landfill. County Commissioner Alan Unger said he likes this idea. “The big deal is, if we can continue to use our landfill longer, that’s going to be a real savings to us in the

future,� Unger said. Commissioner Tammy Baney was also receptive. “This is very exciting.� Waste to Energy Group wants to eventually tap into gas at the county’s old demolition landfill on Bend’s west side at Southwest Mt. Washington Drive and Simpson Avenue. The company has offered to install groundwater monitoring wells at the landfill to collect data for the Department of Environmental Quality, which has to sign off on any project there. The demolition landfill con-

tains wood waste that has fueled underground hot spots, which destabilize the ground. In 2009, a county employee fell into a hole at the landfill and sustained minor injuries. Lutz said that by breaking down materials in the landfill more quickly, the company can get the landfill to an inert state sooner and get rid of the hot spots. If the County Commission approves a contract with Waste to Energy Group, it would take six to eight months to get the project running, Lutz said.

Eurozone

Adequate Yearly Progress at Bend-La Pine Schools School Name

Overall AYP

ELA Limited English

ELA Disabled

Math Limited Math English Disabled

Amity Creek Elementary School

MET

NA

NA

NA

NA

Bear Creek Elementary School

MET

MET

MET

MET

MET

Bend Senior High School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

Buckingham Elementary School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

Cascade Middle School

MET

MET

MET

MET

MET

Elk Meadow Elementary School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

Ensworth Elementary School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

High Desert Middle School

NOT MET

MET

NOT MET

NOT MET

NOT MET

High Lakes Elementary School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

Highland School at Kenwood Elementary School

MET

NA

NA

NA

NA

Juniper Elementary School

NOT MET

MET

MET

MET

NOT MET

LaPine Elementary School

NOT MET

NA

MET

NA

NOT MET

LaPine Middle School

NOT MET

NA

NOT MET

NA

NOT MET

LaPine Senior High School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

Lava Ridge Elementary School

NOT MET

NA

NOT MET

NA

NOT MET

Marshall High School

MET

NA

NA

NA

NA

Mountain View Senior High School

MET

NA

NA

NA

MET

Pilot Butte Middle School

NOT MET

NOT MET

MET

NOT MET

NOT MET

Pine Ridge Elementary

MET

MET

MET

MET

MET

Ponderosa Elementary

NOT MET

MET

MET

NOT MET

MET

R E Jewell Elementary School

MET

MET

MET

MET

MET

REALMS (Rimrock Expeditionary MET Alternative Learning Middle School)

NA

MET

NA

MET

Rosland Elementary

NOTE

NOTE

NOTE

NOTE

NOTE

Sky View Middle School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

Summit High School

NOT MET

NA

MET

NA

NOT MET

Three Rivers Elementary School

NOT MET

NA

MET

NA

NOT MET

Westside Village Magnet School at Kingston Elementary School

MET

NA

MET

NA

MET

William E Miller Elementary

NOT MET

NA

NOT MET

NA

MET

Continued from A1 But America’s problems, including a credit downgrade of a notch by Standard & Poor’ and the probability of a double-dip recession, have depressed forecasts for growth. “There is a real psychosis, but everything is mixed, and that creates the problem,� said Cedric Thellier, an economist at the French investment bank Natixis. “It’s the fear of the markets, so the rates climb and a negative spiral begins.� It is less clear how Europe can stop the spiral. The European Central Bank can buy some Italian and Spanish bonds, but Italy and Spain together are too big to bail out. Markets now see growth sputtering further, making Spain’s and Italy’s large debts larger and harder to finance, and putting at risk a number of banks holding sovereign debt. Italy can manage its debt at a 4 percent interest rate, but it becomes unaffordable when the rate is 6.5 percent on a debt that is 120 percent of gross domestic product. As much as the U.S. drama and talk of a new recession added to Europe’s ills, Europeans themselves must accept most of the blame. The last in a series of emergency summit meetings, all intended to calm markets and end the crisis,

Source: Oregon Education Association

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS

Schools Continued from A1 La Pine Middle School, for example, was the only district school to not meet math AYP for all students. Even there, however, the school was .23 percent shy of the goal. Had the school been 20 percent short of the target, the result would have been essentially the same under AYP. Pilot Butte Middle School did not meet standards in several subgroups. In math AYP, for example, four subgroups did not meet standards, missing by as much as 16 percent and as little as 1.25 percent. AYP data can be complex at even the smallest and least diverse schools. The AYP report, though, hides that complexity and is essentially a pass-fail system. If a school fails one measurement, it does not meet overall AYP. Another school could not meet AYP because of broad, endemic failures in math and English. Without digging into the data, both schools appear the same. The single “not met� desig-

nation can come to represent whether or not a school is a good one. “It’s probably not common for most parents to go out and print out the (data) and pore over the details,� said Oregon Department of Education spokeswoman Crystal Greene. Wilkinson said meeting AYP can be particularly difficult because the targets — percentage of students performing at a certain level — and standards shift. For the 2009-10 year, students were required to understand more difficult math and more students than ever were required to meet that standard. For the current year, English and language arts standards will become more stringent. The result of that is a group who had cleared a previously acceptable level has the carrot moved further away. Lava Ridge Elementary, for example, did not meet AYP in part because 65 percent of special education students met the math standard, missing the 70 percent target. Last year, that would have been a pass; this year, it meant the school did

not meet math AYP. Greene agreed that the picture AYP offers can be incomplete. “It’s not a particularly holistic view of a school. It’s one view of accountability,� Greene said. AYP results, though, can be helpful, Greene said. The data can show if a school is improving or if one area needs more attention. Whether or not every subgroup should be held to the same AYP goals can be a contentious issue. The special education subgroup, for instance, has a range of students with disabilities of various severities, according to Greene. In other cases, students for whom English is a second language are held to the same measure as native speakers. “I would prefer a system that acknowledged the reality that there would probably be a smaller percentage of those students who are going to achieve that standard,� Wilkinson said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

541-389-7365 CCB# 18669

www.bobcatsun.com

Currently, the county burns gas from wells at the landfill to keep it from migrating out of the landfill and because methane, a component of landfill gas, is a highly potent greenhouse gas. Methane is roughly 20 times more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. When landfill operators burn methane, they create carbon dioxide and although both are greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide traps less heat in the atmosphere than methane. There is likely to be disagreement over whether a gas-to-energy project would be a good thing. “This has the potential for some significant controversy from our neighbors,� Schimke said, referring to people who live near Knott Landfill. Any noise associated with the project would come from the machinery used to turn landfill gas into methanol or other liquid products. “I just can’t guarantee that it’s going to be absolutely quiet at the residents’ houses,� Schimke said. “It won’t be loud or obnoxious, but they’re concerned about any level of noise.� If the county contracts with Waste to Energy Group, the company would put up a bond to guarantee the project and if the company did not follow through, the county could seize the bond, Schimke said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

was less than three weeks ago, on July 21. Steps taken then — including an effective though modest restructuring of Greek debt and new powers for the bailout fund, called the European Financial Stability Facility — seemed to calm the markets. But everyone knew that the problem was not really solved, and that the fund’s new powers had to be drafted and ratified by member parliaments, which would take until autumn, and that Spain and Italy remained vulnerable. But then came the U.S. debtceiling crisis and negative growth projections. Leaders are on vacation, summer markets are thin and speculators have a larger impact. On Thursday, the European Central Bank reluctantly began to buy sovereign debt again, but not from Italy or Spain, and JeanClaude Trichet, the president of the central bank, acknowledged that the board was split. Some on the board suggested that not buying Spanish and Italian debt was a way to force those countries to cut deficits and enact structural reform. But even when Italy said it would balance its budget in 2013 instead of 2014, it made little difference to the markets.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 A5


A6 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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L

Inside

With deal, state workers break even at best, report says, see Page B3.

OBITUARIES Former U.S. Sen. Mark Hatfield, R-Ore., dies at 89, see Page B5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2011

DESCHUTES COUNTY FAIR AND RODEO

LILY RAFF McCAULOU

T

en years ago, a free daily lunch offered to seniors at a former church off Greenwood Avenue was moved into a bright new building on Reed Market Road. At the start of this month, it moved back. A nonprofit, United Senior Citizens of Bend, worked with the city and county to raise funds for the center. Once it was built, the deed was transferred to the Bend Park & Recreation District. Seniors took out a lease on the building, which they let expire this summer. Park officials had re-evaluated the building and decided that at least part of it should target a younger, more active audience. The seniors opted to return to Bend’s Community Center, where a commercial kitchen meant more meal options. And looser scheduling allowed for two hours instead of just 45 minutes for lunch. “The food is a lot better here,” said Jay Kernohan, 80, as he ate lunch last week. “You get more of it, too.” Word spread quickly. On Friday, still the first week back at Bend’s Community Center, more than 36 seniors showed up for a buffet that included a salad bar, hot casseroles, kielbasa and baked potatoes with a slew of fixin’s. A typical Friday lunch at the Bend Senior Center drew 25 to 30 people. Still, the change means services are now spread out between two sites. Verna Bellus, 75, doesn’t drive. So she must arrange for transportation to Bend’s Community Center for lunch, then to the Bend Senior Center for her bridge game. Then she has to find a ride home. “It’s an inconvenience,” she said. Officials plan to run a shuttle between the Bend Senior Center and Bend’s Community Center. Despite the hassle, they anticipate the move will mean more offerings overall. Some plan to take advantage. Dianne Maffia, 68, for example, enjoyed lunch at Bend’s Community Center last week and said she was looking forward to trying a Zumba exercise class now offered at newly cleared space in the Bend Senior Center. USCB President Virginia Reddick, 80, said the park district’s effort to attract younger seniors isn’t surprising. Members of her organization “are dying off,” she said. “And the younger seniors aren’t really joiners.” Discounts and government programs define seniors as 62 or older. As Americans live longer, this population is expected to balloon. Today, seniors represent three different generations. The Greatest Generation, born between 1901 and 1924, are 87 and older. The Silent Generation, born between 1925 and 1945, are 66 through 86. Baby boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, are 47 through 65. Social and cultural differences between these groups can be enormous and affect all different services targeting seniors. Last year, for example, the first baby boomer moved into Aspen Ridge Alzheimer’s Care in Bend. Terrye Alexander, executive director of the care facility, said the boomer’s arrival immediately illustrated a generation gap. While the older residents want to listen to jazz musician Glenn Miller, she said, the baby boomer prefers Led Zeppelin. Others play organ or piano; the boomer plays electric guitar. “Residential care will have to become more individualized,” Alexander said, to match the eclectic hobbies and tastes of baby boomers. She predicts, for example, that boomers will want more varied ethnic foods — like sushi — in the cafeteria. For some seniors, age — and, by extension, generation — means little. After all, it’s not uncommon in Bend to see an octogenarian whiz by on a road bike. Still, Reddick’s organization remains primarily concerned with those she calls “the older seniors.” “Somebody,” she said, “has to look out for them.” Lily Raff McCaulou can be reached at 541-617-7836 or lraff@bendbulletin.com.

IN BRIEF

Attendance expected to be up By Hillary Borrud

Dynamic shifting in senior centers

B

OREGON Interstate 5 bridge may fall victim to federal budget cuts, see Page B3.

The Bulletin

REDMOND — On Sunday, Sharon Hunt and her family were waiting in line for the Ferris wheel at the Deschutes County Fair and Rodeo. They had skipped the fair last year because of the cost. “It’s not totally affordable,” said Hunt, of Bend. But this year, the fair offered a

variety of deals, including a $25 pass for unlimited rides on Sunday. The deal “makes it totally worth it,” Hunt said. The five-day fair ended at 5 p.m. Sunday and, by afternoon, Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center Director Dan Despotopulos expected his attendance tally to show that more people went to the fair

this year. Attendance dropped to 169,000 in 2009 because of the recession and the lightning, wind and rain that hit the fair, Despotopulos said. The weather blew apart tents, flooded the rodeo grounds and forced the fair to close early on two days. See Fair / B2

Oregon’s silver-haired beauty

Law enforcement and search and rescue personnel helped a 64-year-old Redmond woman who fell and injured herself at Shevlin Park on Sunday morning. Claudia Lynn Buchmiller, 64, was hiking the “Loop Trail” — less than a mile away from Fremont Meadows parking area — when she fell, according to a news release from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office. Buchmiller could not continue walking, and someone called 911 at approximately 10:20 a.m. to ask for help. Emergency responders had difficulty finding Buchmiller, because the person who reported the incident to 911 had bad cellphone reception. However, three sheriff’s deputies, one search and rescue volunteer and three Bend Fire Department paramedics were ultimately met by Buchmiller’s husband, who guided them to her, according to the Sheriff’s Office. Buchmiller was taken on a stretcher to an ambulance, and then to St. Charles Bend, where she was treated for non-life threatening injuries. — Bulletin staff reports

By Leon Pantenburg • For The Bulletin

P

aula Sorvillo of La Pine may be retired, but she’s keeping plenty busy. The 67-year-old will travel to Atlantic City in October to rep-

resent Oregon in the Ms. Senior America Pageant. “This is a totally different lifestyle,” Sorvillo said. “La Pine is a small town with a huge community involvement.” Her pageant participation predates her move from the big city. Sorvillo got started in pageant competition because she enjoyed performing dance routines for charity benefits. She has a degree in deaf studies and sign language interpreting from Pierce College in Woodland Hills, Calif. See Ms. Senior / B2

Paula Sorvillo — the 2011 Ms. Oregon Senior America winner — wears her sash and tiara outside the La Pine Senior Center. Sorvillo will compete for the title of Ms. Senior America in October.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Bend-La Pine revises supply list, removing request for donations By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Supply lists should not include cash requests at Bend-La Pine Schools this year and families are not required to give money for basic classroom supplies, On the Web according to the disTo find current trict staff. school supply lists, A few years ago, visit www.bend.k12.or.us schools added the and click on the “Parents” requests to help tab near the top of the cover costs for supwebsite. Supply lists plies and activities. are on the bottom of the Schools, however, “Parents” page. were supposed to remove those requests from supply lists for the 2011-12 year. But earlier this week, supply lists posted on the district website included requests for up to $60. It appears the same lists as last year were posted again for the coming year, district spokeswoman Julianne Repman said. See Supplies / B2

Central Oregon is set for another week of sunny weather, with high temperatures in the 80s. There’s just one caveat: Thunderstorms could hit Deschutes and Crook counties today and continue through tonight, according to the National Weather Service. The stormy weather is not expected to affect Jefferson County. In Bend, the thunderstorms could begin after 11 a.m. today and continue through the evening, according to the National Weather Service website. For the rest of the week, the weather is expected to be sunny, with high temperatures in the 80s and low temperatures in the 40s. Prineville is also forecast to have thunderstorms roll through after 11 a.m. today. For the rest of the week, Prineville is expected to have sunny weather, with highs in the 80s and overnight lows in the 40s. In Madras, the forecast is for sunny skies and high temperatures in the mid-80s to low 90s all week, according to the National Weather Service. Overnight lows are expected to be in the mid-40s.

Hiker injured in Shevlin Park

La Pine woman competing for Ms. Senior America title

The pageant, which runs from Oct. 2 to 7, will have representatives from 41 states, says Sorvillo, and all of them must have reached what the Ms. Senior America Inc. calls the “Age of Elegance,” which begins at 60. The winner will go home with $1,000, bragging rights and a chance to promote the positive aspects of aging for a one-year reign. Sorvillo and her husband, Carmen, moved to La Pine about two years ago from Las Vegas.

Thunderstorms forecast for today

July 2011 weather for Bend Daily highs and lows

Average temperature for July 61.6° (2° below normal)

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 69 81 82 80 82 85 90 81 80 79 80 79 70 70 70 81 80 72 66 67 73 73 88 84 88 79 76 77 83 89 89 High temperatures averaged 78.8°F H 90

DAY High temp.

80

Oregon wildfires Fires reported in Central and Eastern Oregon. For updates, go to www.nwccweb.us/information/ firemap.aspx.

BROWN ROAD FIRE • Acres: 5,650 • Containment: 80 percent • Threatened structures: 0 • Cause: Under investigation

DEADMAN CANYON FIRE • Acres: 3,869 • Containment: 100 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

70 60 50

SUTTON MOUNTAIN FIRE

40 30 L 20

Low temperatures averaged 44.5°F

32° F freezing point of water

10 Low temp.

37 40 51 46 40 48 50 38 41 46 41 49 41 39 44 47 44 46 50 40 41 43 45 45 46 44 44 43 45 52 53

DAY

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

Precipitation total...0.51” (Average precipitation for the month.....0.47") .19 .32A

• Acres: 4,000 • Containment: 10 percent • Threatened structures: None • Cause: Lightning

Pendleton

Bend

T = Trace

Burns

O R E G O N

T

Lakeview

Highest temperature

90° July 7

Lowest temperature

37° July 1

Highest recorded maximum for the month....104° (1928)

Lowest recorded minimum for the month ......27°(1955)

Average maximum 78.8°

Average minimum 44.5°

Monthly average maximum through the years*.................82.1°

Monthly average minimum through the years*..................45.6°

Brown Road Fire

Sutton Mountain Fire

Deadman Canyon Fire

Mitchell Madras Sisters Prineville Dayville Bend MILES

La Pine 0

* Monthly averages calculated from 1928 through 2005, Western Regional Climate Center Sources: NOAA, Western Regional Climate Center, Bend Public Works Department

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Chemult

50

Christmas Valley Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin


B2 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

California woman disappears during hippie gathering

Fair

The Associated Press YAKIMA, Wash. — Authorities are searching for a 54-year-old woman who went missing during an annual hippie gathering in a Washington forest. Marie Hanson’s family fears she may have been a victim of foul play. The South Lake Tahoe, Calif., woman was last seen July 6. She had traveled with neighbors to the Gifford Pinchot National Forest — across the Columbia River from Hood River — to attend the annual gathering of the Rainbow Family of Living Light. The Rainbow Family is a group of peace activists borne from the 1960s counter-culture movement. Her family reported her missing after the neighbors called to say they hadn’t seen her.

Supplies Continued from B1 The district has posted revised supply lists without money requests, according to Lora Nordquist, the district’s chief academic officer for elementary programs. “I apologize for (the old lists). We have corrected that and are making sure our communication is clear,” Nordquist said. After considering the requests, district staff decided to stop them because of financial pressure families were likely suffering, Nordquist said. “Even though (giving money) was voluntary, it may not have felt as though it was voluntary,” Nordquist said. Parents interested in getting updated supply lists can find the information on the district website, Repman said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Paula Sorvillo participates in line dancing class at the La Pine Senior Center, where she volunteers. Sorvillo is forming a line dancing troupe — “La Pine Desert Spurs” — to perform at local benefits and functions.

Ms. Senior Continued from B1 In 2004, she combined her musical and signing skills at the Ms. Senior Nevada pageant and finished first runner-up. Sorvillo didn’t have to compete for her 2011 Oregon title because the state doesn’t have a pageant. The national organization awarded her the Oregon crown based on her past performances. Sorvillo and her fellow contestants in Atlantic City will compete in the following categories: talent, interview, evening gown and philosophy. After completing a private interview with a panel of judges, each contestant has about three minutes to demonstrate her talent, Sorvillo said. For her talent presentation, Sorvillo will perform “Don’t Cry For Me, Argentina” from “Evita” in sign language. A 30-second philosophy portion follows, where “you tell everything you can about yourself.” “The interview carries the most weight, and the judges really home in on the community service aspect and hours,” Sorvillo said. “There are doctors and lawyers competing, and some of their community service projects and work are incredible.” Last year’s winner, Dr. Kimberly Moore, from the U.S. Virgin Islands, established a free dental care program for needy children in her community. Other contestants have been active in social, health and other community projects. Sorvillo has been active in

Today is Monday, Aug. 8, the 220th day of 2011. There are 145 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Aug. 8, 1911, President William Howard Taft signed a measure raising the number of members in the U.S. House of Representatives from 391 to 433, effective with the next Congress, with a proviso to add two more members when New Mexico and Arizona became states. (The number of House seats has remained at 435 ever since, except for a temporary increase to 437 after Alaska and Hawaii were admitted to the Union.) ON THIS DATE In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte set sail for St. Helena to spend the remainder of his days in exile. In 1861, biologist William Bateson, founder of the science of genetics, was born in Whitby, Yorkshire, England. In 1942, six convicted Nazi saboteurs who’d landed in the U.S. were executed in Washington, D.C.; two others were spared. In 1953, the United States and South Korea initialed a mutual security pact. In 1963, Britain’s “Great Train Robbery” took place as thieves made off with 2.6 million pounds in banknotes. In 1968, the Republican national convention in Miami Beach nominated Richard Nixon for president on the first ballot. In 1973, Vice President Spiro Agnew branded as “damned lies” reports he had taken kickbacks from government contracts in Maryland, and vowed not to resign — which he ended up doing.

T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1974, President Richard Nixon announced his resignation, effective the next day, following damaging new revelations in the Watergate scandal. In 1978, the U.S. launched Pioneer Venus 2, which carried scientific probes to study the atmosphere of Venus. In 1994, Israel and Jordan opened the first road link between the two once-warring countries. TEN YEARS AGO Former President Ronald Reagan’s daughter Maureen died in Granite Bay, Calif., at age 60. Mohammad Khatami was sworn in for a second term as Iran’s president. FIVE YEARS AGO Sen. Joe Lieberman lost the Connecticut Democratic primary to political newcomer Ned Lamont (however, Lieberman ended up winning re-election to the Senate by running as an independent). The Federal Reserve left a benchmark interest rate unchanged after 17 consecutive rate hikes over more than two years. Roger Goodell was chosen as the NFL’s next commissioner. ONE YEAR AGO Flooding in Gansu province in China resulted in mudslides that killed more than 1,400 people. Academy Award-winning actress Patricia Neal died in Edgartown, Mass., at 84. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Esther Williams is 90. Actor Richard Anderson is 85.

2010: 234,000 2009: 169,000 2008: 245,000 2007: 236,000 *Includes paid and unpaid admission, such as people who work at booths and receive free passes. Sources: Deschutes County and The Bulletin archives

It will take a couple of weeks for Despotopulos to tally this year’s attendance, because he is waiting for ticket sales information from Les Schwab stores and the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District. “I can already tell you today, by the feel of the people coming in, that it’s going to be very successful,” Despotopulos said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Contact your public officials Find an easily searchable list of contact information for federal, state, legislative, county and city officials at www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

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Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Courtesy of Paula Sorvillo

Paula Sorvillo performs “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina” in sign language during a pageant in Reno, Nev. Sorvillo was first runner-up.

541-322-CARE the La Pine community since she arrived. She teaches dance on a volunteer basis at the Senior Center and at La Pine Parks and Recreation. She is in the process of forming her own line dance troupe, “La Pine Desert Spurs,” and intends for the group to perform at benefits and local functions. She also volunteers at Newberry Hospice and knits hats and scarves for cancer patients and homeless people. She also started a deaf/hearing social group in La Pine. So far, the group meets about once a month, and attracts between eight to 10 people. “The idea is to have a meet-up group for deaf people and anyone who is interested in learning to sign,” Sorvillo said. Most recently, Sorvillo was

Thieves make off with 2.6M pounds in the ‘Great Train Robbery’ in 1963 The Associated Press

Continued from B1 This year, the weather was generally hot and sunny, and so is Despotopulos’ outlook for ticket sales. Last year was the third-highest year for paid attendance since the fair’s current facility opened in 1999. “I’m assuming — looking at the numbers so far — this year is going to beat last year,” Despotopulos said. The county and the Deschutes County Fair Association began an “affordability and awareness” campaign seven years ago, which has drawn more people to the fair, Despotopulos said. The initiative led to free concerts with fair admission — four were offered this year — and bus rides from locations throughout the county to the fair. “We tried to create as much affordability as we could, to get more people,” Despotopulos said.

Deschutes County Fair attendance*

Joan Mondale, wife of former Vice President Walter Mondale, is 81. Actress Nita Talbot is 81. Singer Mel Tillis is 79. Actor Dustin Hoffman is 74. Actress Connie Stevens is 73. Country singer Phil Balsley (The Statler Brothers) is 72. Actor Larry Wilcox is 64. Actor Keith Carradine is 62. Rhythm-and-blues singer Airrion Love (The Stylistics) is 62. Country singer Jamie O’Hara is 61. Movie director Martin Brest is 60. Radio-TV personality Robin Quivers is 59. Actor Donny Most is 58. Rock musician Dennis Drew (10,000 Maniacs) is 54. TV personality Deborah Norville is 53. Actor-singer Harry Crosby is 53. Rock musician The Edge (U2) is 50. Rock musician Rikki Rockett (Poison) is 50. Rapper Kool Moe Dee is 49. Rock musician Ralph Rieckermann is 49. Middle distance runner Suzy FavorHamilton is 43. Rock singer Scott Stapp is 38. Country singer Mark Wills is 38. Actor Kohl Sudduth is 37. Rock musician Tom Linton (Jimmy Eat World) is 36. Singer JC Chasez (‘N Sync) is 35. Actress Tawny Cypress is 35. Rhythmand-blues singer Drew Lachey (98 Degrees) is 35. Rhythm-andblues singer Marsha Ambrosius is 34. Actress Lindsay Sloane is 34. Actress Countess Vaughn is 33. Actor Michael Urie is 31. Tennis player Roger Federer is 30. Actress Meagan Good is 30. Britain’s Princess Beatrice of York is 23. Actor Ken Baumann (TV: “The Secret Life of the American Teenager”) is 22. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Man adjusts to what he should not; he is unable to adjust to what he should.” — Jean Toomer, African-American author-poet (1894-1967)

named state director for the Ms. Senior Oregon Pageant, which she will start and promote. “The pageant has been around for 40 years, and it’s getting bigger all the time,” said Sorvillo of the Ms. Senior America competition. “I think there will be more interest as time goes on. The idea is to show a positive aspect of aging, and the pageant does that.” Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at lpantenburg@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 B3

O State worker deal allows employees to break even at best, report says

CONNECTING OREGON AND WASHINGTON

By Dennis Thompson Jr. Salem Statesman Journal

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

The Interstate 5 bridge spans the Columbia River between Oregon and Washington. The federal debt deal may bring cuts to much-needed funding for a new bridge.

I-5 bridge: ‘Will there be money to build it?’ By Tim Fought and Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

PORTLAND — One casualty of the coming federal budget crunch could be a new $3 billion bridge carrying Interstate 5 across the Columbia River. At best, its sponsors acknowledge, the bridge project is going to take another whack. At worst, the sponsors say, are options they’re not ready to consider, including shelving $130 million worth of plans until the nation’s balance sheet looks better or scaling back the project. The current I-5 bridge linking Oregon and Washington is considered at risk in an earthquake, and its tie-ups infuriate commuters and truckers. Proponents of a replacement say the nation can’t afford the delays and risk at a critical transportation link: I-5 from Mexico to Canada is the economic spine of the West Coast, not only moving goods and people but also serving as a magnet for new jobs. However, hours after the House voted last week for the debt ceiling bill, Oregon Rep. Peter DeFazio, a senior Democrat on the House transportation committee, was angry at Republicans as well as the Democratic president. And he was pessimistic about the chances for the one-third share of the bridge costs the federal government was expected to bear. “I would say that there is a very, very, very, very grim prospect for transportation investment with these people in charge and Obama in the White House, since he won’t stand up to them,” DeFazio told The Associated Press. He said Republicans want to cut current transportation spending by about a third, leaving little room, if any, for new projects. In the Northwest, sponsors said they were confident that the bridge wouldn’t be shut out entirely, and that little about a new transportation bill is settled. But, said Gov. John Kitzhaber, “I think we need to assume there’s going to be fewer resources.”

“I would say that there is a very, very, very, very grim prospect for transportation investment with these people in charge and Obama in the White House, since he won’t stand up to them.” — Rep. Peter DeFazio, D-Ore.

Kitzhaber has called for bridge construction to begin in 2013. He was elected with strong support from trade unions eager to build it. He’s also courted business interests, who are pushing the project, and he has long ties to officials at the Port of Portland, a key proponent. “The starting point is: Nothing looks good,” said Mark Rupp, who directs operations for Washington Gov. Chris Gregoire in the nation’s capital. “But we don’t know at the end of the day where the cuts are going to be taken from.” Aides to the House transportation committee chairman, Republican Rep. John Mica of Florida, didn’t return phone calls. The current bridge consists of two spans, one dating to 1917, the other to 1958.

Ambitious plans Plans for replacing them are ambitious. Six lanes of vehicle traffic would be expanded to 10. Portland’s light-rail mass transit would be extended into Vancouver in Washington state. Pedestrians and bicycles would get more space. The price tag reflects the ambitions, and has long been in question. One round of budget cutting got the cost under $4 billion. This spring, to cut more and resolve a divisive aesthetic question, Kitzhaber and Gregoire

stepped in to declare the bridge’s design would be functional and proven rather than striking and innovative. Most recently, in an analysis Kitzhaber requested, Oregon State Treasurer Ted Wheeler found formally what project critics had said for years: The traffic assumptions the project’s planners relied on were too optimistic. That means, said Wheeler, the toll revenues expected to cover about a third of the bridge’s cost would be way lower than forecast — by $500 million or so. Kitzhaber responded by asking for options to stretch out the construction timetable, a solution he and aides turned to again last week. The project can’t be built without federal money, and given the money already spent, it’s not time to start scaling back, said Patricia McCaig, Kitzhaber’s campaign director and now his top adviser on the bridge. “We still have to fundamentally move forward with a project that looks like this,” McCaig said. The federal dollars aren’t the only sources of uncertainty about the financing. Neither state legislature has figured out how to raise the $450 million each state is expected to pony up. There’s also an important vote next year in Clark County on mass-transit financing. Although commuters on the Washington side face some of the worst delays, opposition is strong to two key elements of the bridge, tolls and the light-rail expansion. Portland economist Joe Cortright was prominent among critics pointing out flaws in the toll projections. He says the bridge can’t be built as designed, but it’s not evident what sort of fallback plan could satisfy all the interests that have signed on. “It strikes me as very interesting that nobody has appropriated the first dollar for actual construction,” Cortright said. “At some point, you have to ask: Will there be money to build it?”

SALEM — Michel Miller works two jobs to support herself and her disabled husband. Susan LaCross can’t afford to send her grandson to Little League this year. Jodi Jostmeyer is her home’s sole breadwinner, going to the office every day even though she suffers a brain condition that causes daily migraines. All three are Oregon state employees, struggling to get by in a tough economy and preparing to vote on a proposed union contract for the 2011-13 biennium that gives them cause for no great hope. Tens of thousands of workers represented by Oregon’s top two state employees’ unions are in the process of voting on ratification of the contract deal the unions made last month with Gov. John Kitzhaber. An analysis of the deals using a pay calculator created by the Statesman Journal finds that the contracts would protect workers’ current pay levels, as officials from SEIU Local 503 and AFSCME Council 75 have promised. However, it is unlikely any state employees will end the biennium on a vastly improved financial footing. Workers will tread water in the 2011-12 fiscal year, making about the same amount of money they made the year before, according to pay calculations based on the terms of the tentative contract agreements. A set of pay increases will allow workers to make a little more money in the second half of the biennium, but employees fear the small increases could easily be swal-

lowed up by inflation, rising out-of-pocket medical expenses and other side effects from the nation’s economic turmoil. Despite this, Miller, LaCross and Jostmeyer all plan to vote for their unions’ tentative contract agreements, even as they express disappointment over the deals. “I have some folks in my building who are very upset, and they will vote no,” Miller said. “I’m hearing the majority say, ‘I don’t like it, but it’s the best we can do, given the economy.’ That’s how I feel.” The two unions’ tentative contract agreements for the 2011-13 biennium are nearly identical. Both would have workers take 10 to 14 furlough days and begin paying for 5 percent of their health insurance premiums, in exchange for a package of costof-living and step pay increases. The differences come in the way COLAs and a health insurance subsidy provided to low-income workers is handled: • AFSCME bargained a $30 monthly subsidy available to people making less than $2,696 per

month. The union’s members will receive two COLAs, a 1.5 percent raise this December and another 1.45 percent raise in December 2012. • SEIU wanted a richer subsidy for low-income workers, so it agreed to delay the second COLA to January 2013. In exchange, the union got a $40 monthly subsidy for people making less than $2,816 per month. The swapping of money back and forth can make it hard to estimate how the contract deals would affect workers’ paychecks. The Statesman Journal’s pay calculator performs a month-bymonth tally, adding money from pay raises and subsidies and subtracting pay lost to furloughs and health insurance premiums. The calculator takes into account the differences between the two unions’ tentative agreements.

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B4 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Oregon pays to fight business

O

regon was singled out for praise in a hearing by U.S. senators last week for how it regulates health insurance rates. But some of what Oregon is doing deserves ques-

tions, not praise. What do you think of the state paying a group to fight rate increases? Or the state requiring an insurer to charge less for health insurance than it costs? The state has had the authority for years to review rate increases. Recently, the Oregon Insurance Division has ramped up its reviews to help the public understand the process. It’s revised the way it presents decisions to explain them in plain language — more than just an actuary could understand. It took part of a federal grant and made a short animated movie explaining how health insurance works. It held an open public meeting for people to comment on one rate increase. And it has been changing more of the rate increases requested by health insurers. As The Bulletin reported last week, just two of the 14 premium increases proposed by insurers in 2008 were reduced. In 2011, only 12 of 33 proposed rate increases did not get changed. One contributing factor is that the state invested in opposition to rate increases. It awarded a consumer group, OSPIRG, a maximum of $100,000 to challenge and investigate rate proposals. It gives consumers a throatier, more technically qualified voice in the process. We understand why that was done — to help consumers by creating a more vigorous debate. It also means

that the state is paying a private group to fight Oregon businesses. Then it’s using that testimony to help it make decisions on rate increases. The Oregon Public Utility Commission has a similar arrangement. Consumer and industrial groups can apply for PUC funds for utility rate fights. But couldn’t the Insurance Division have just used the money itself to better investigate the rate increases? Must the state subsidize opposition? The most prominent of the state’s recent rate reduction decisions was that for Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon. Regence asked for a 22 percent rate hike. The state approved 12.8 percent. The state knew its decision means Regence must charge customers who buy individual health plans less than it costs to provide that service. The state factored in Regence’s reserves and overall financial health. It also said it was concerned that Regence may lose too many customers if it raised its rates too much. Of course, customers may lose Regence and other health insurers if holding down insurance rates in Oregon means insurers must charge less than their costs.

State battles to keep taxing the deceased O

regon’s death tax is in a fight to the death. There’s an effort to stick a measure on next year’s November ballot to prohibit the state from having any sort of death or inheritance tax. The death tax should die. Oregon’s death tax works like this: When a person dies and leaves an estate worth $1 million or more, the tax kicks in. The Legislature changed the death tax formula this past session. The tax rate used to start at 6 percent and increase gradually to the maximum rate of 16 percent, depending on the size of the estate. And the state used to tax the full amount. Under the change of House Bill 2541, signed into law by Gov. John Kitzhaber, the state taxes only the amount that exceeds $1 million at a starting rate of 10 percent and that tops out at 16 percent. Why make that change? The argument was it’s a more gradual impact and brings in about the same amount of money — about $100 million a year. That whole discussion was more distraction than anything else. What needed to happen was for the Legislature to get rid of the death tax altogether. Now, there is that ballot initiative to do just that. It’s true that the death tax only hits a small percentage of Oregonians, about 1 percent. But an unfair tax is not any less unfair because it hits fewer people.

A death tax taxes people twice. Income gets taxed. Income builds estates. And so then the government wants to come in and tax the estate after it already taxed the income? What’s worse is that the state is coming after that double tax just as a family has lost someone. And their farm or business or property may have to be broken up to pay the tax. The death tax is revenue for the state. And that’s perhaps one of the reasons that legislators have been reluctant to kill it. And that’s perhaps why two members of the leadership of the Oregon Education Association, the state teacher’s union, have scrutinized the proposed ballot measure. They filed objections to the ballot title for this new initiative, asserting it is misleading. The Oregon Supreme Court recently decided they were right, in part. The court said the language for the ballot measure needs to be changed to make it more clear that only people with estates valued at more than $1 million are subject to the tax. While the death tax brings in revenue, we don’t know what the possible benefits might be if Oregon didn’t have a death tax. That might make a money difference, too. It may influence where people choose to live. It might make a difference in Oregon’s reputation for its attitude toward business and taxes. It would give people another reason to live in Oregon, instead of a reason to operate a business somewhere else.

Engineering a stronger workforce By Paul Otellini Special to The Washington Post

A

chronic shortage of engineering students threatens America’s role as the world’s leading innovator and continues to impede our nation’s fragile economic recovery. Over the past 20 years, the percentage of engineers graduating in the United States has stagnated, while India and China surpass us with rapid progress. For this and other critical issues shaping our nation’s future, President Obama convened the Council on Jobs and Competitiveness. I serve on the council and co-lead a task force to address the need for more American engineers — the people behind the inventions and advancements that improve our quality of life and our nation’s wealth and competitiveness. The council’s high-tech education task force is focused on programs that will yield 10,000 more engineering graduates in the United States each year and begin to address the longterm threat of our nation’s growing skills crisis. This goal requires a commitment, starting at the top, from of all U.S. firms that employ engineers. We will be calling on U.S.-based firms to help sponsor mentoring programs, internships and permanent job commitments for students in engineering programs nationwide. While the government can provide a framework for success and recognition for the best of our engineering programs, it is up to us in the private sector to back up our rhetoric with actions and commit to the future workforce we all so desperately need. Education Department data show that overall college graduation levels the past two decades have grown about 50 percent, with the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded increasing from 1.1 million in 1990 to 1.6 million in 2010. During that same period, however, the National Center for Education Statistics has found that the number of engineers U.S. colleges and universities annually send into the workforce has virtually stagnated at around 120,000.

While the government can provide a framework for success and recognition for the best of our engineering programs, it is up to us in the private sector to back up our rhetoric with actions and commit to the future workforce we all so desperately need. By contrast, roughly 1 million engineers a year graduate from universities in India and China. This education disparity threatens to slow our economic recovery, stunts our longterm competitiveness and leaves technology firms in a skills crisis. Four decades ago, a relatively unknown Intel Corp. launched its first microprocessor in the commercial market, with approximately 450 engineers on board. Those highly skilled and motivated engineers ultimately contributed to the personal computing boom a decade later — and the ubiquitous advancement of computing technology ever since. Today, Intel employs 52,000 people in the United States. I am proud of Intel’s contribution to our nation’s sustained growth. But from a personnel perspective, supporting a similar growth pattern would be difficult for a promising young company starting out today. American universities are simply not producing enough engineers. A McKinsey Global Institute survey released in June found that nearly twothirds of U.S. employers reported that engineering and science-related jobs were the hardest jobs to fill. If we do not produce suitable candidates for these jobs, companies will go elsewhere in the world to find them. Forty percent of students enrolled in science, technology, engineering and mathematics leave their program after the first year, according to the

American Society for Engineering Education. Engineering programs are tough, but this rate of attrition is unacceptable. Fortunately, it can be reversed. There are lucrative career opportunities for engineering students with specialized skills. If we can simply increase the retention and graduation rates of these qualified, interested students, we can move a long way toward solving our shortage while creating momentum in making engineering a valued and even “cool” area of study for our best and brightest students. As our task force mobilizes, we will be calling on U.S. companies to take concrete steps to inspire and encourage young engineers. Intel plans to double its number of engineering internships. Along with other companies, we can create opportunities for hands-on learning that makes a difference and helps employers discover new talent. In the coming months, the task force will roll out critical elements for success — a plan for direct student engagement and university incentives, and the formation of a consortium of companies committed to making a difference. The President’s Jobs Council plans to hold a listening-and-action session in Portland at the end of this month at which deans from America’s top engineering colleges, students pursuing degrees in math and science, and representatives from innovative U.S. companies can share perspectives and determine next steps. As President Obama said at the jobs council meeting in June, this is an “all-hands-on-deck” effort, because “our best companies need the world’s brightest workers — American workers.” If we want the next Intel, GE, Google or Facebook to be born and grow up in America, we must begin producing more engineers. These jobs support our future. Paul Otellini is president and chief executive of Intel Corp. and is a member of the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness.

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Coming lobbyist brawl has potential to create a simpler tax code By Jonathan Alter Bloomberg News

L

obbyists, of all people, may soon inadvertently bring us what lobbyists have long fought against — a flatter, simpler tax code that offers fewer gifts for special interests. As a bonus, it would also help bring down the deficit. To understand why this happy result may be in reach, we must return to a subject you’re sick of: the much-maligned deal Congress struck to lift the debt ceiling. That deal set up a process that might not advantage the forces of extortion in the same way the old one did. The new law cuts about $900 billion in discretionary spending and establishes

a 12-person “supercommittee” to find $1.5 trillion in additional savings over 10 years. At least they’ll be looking in the right places: tax reform and entitlement reform. With a mere majority of the 12 required, they must present a bill to Congress for an up-or-down vote (no amendments) by Christmas. If the bill fails, the now-famous triggers will automatically cut $1.2 trillion, half from defense and half from nondefense programs, including Medicare. Lobbyists will face a tough choice: accept either drastic cuts to programs they care about or an end to loopholes that benefit their clients. Usually, when it comes to simplifying the tax code, all the lobbying

muscle lines up in united opposition. This time, a big chunk of special interests will fight in favor of reform — because the alternative will be worse. Both in public and private, the committee will hear from defense contractors and the Pentagon about the devastating effects that $600 billion in across-the-board defense cuts would have on the armed forces and on the communities in all 50 states that depend on military spending. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta warned in a letter posted online Wednesday that such cuts “would do real damage to our security, our troops and their families.” So, with the threat of these cuts looming, the incentive is actually there for

progress on entitlement and tax reform. To show they aren’t intransigent like Republicans, Democrats on the supercommittee might agree to some adjustments in the way the Consumer Price Index is calculated. The so-called chained CPI issue is complicated enough that it could slide through without being denounced as an unconscionable cut in benefits. It would save $300 billion over 10 years. The greater action will probably be on taxes. As much as $1 trillion could be saved by eliminating deductions and credits. The Bowles-Simpson deficit-reduction commission estimated that if all tax favors were eliminated, income-tax brackets of 12 percent, 18 percent and 22

percent would yield the same revenue as today’s code. That’s not going to happen. The mortgage-interest deduction won’t be repealed or even much adjusted in the middle of a housing meltdown. Nor will the tax break for charity. But the larger idea of lowering some rates and simplifying the tax code in exchange for eliminating deductions “is the only tax reform that has legs,” says Maya MacGuineas of the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget. “You could get into serious, significant revenue that way.” Jonathan Alter is a Bloomberg columnist.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 B5

O Light-skinned black actress who fought typecasting dies at 88

Troubled sci-fi writer William Sleator dies at 66 in Thailand

FORMER U.S. SEN. MARK HATFIELD, R-ORE.

By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

By Paul Vitello New York Times News Service

Jane White, an actress who made her reputation in the 1960s and ’70s in Shakespearean and classical Greek drama in New York but who felt hampered by the racial attitudes of casting directors toward lightskinned black performers like herself, died July 24 at her home in Greenwich Village. She was 88. The cause was cancer, said Joan Harris, her friend and executor. White, who also employed a rich mezzo-soprano voice as a cabaret singer, spoke openly about the peculiar racial challenge she faced in the 1960s: Though roles for black performers were increasing, casting agents were continuing to think mainly in terms of “black” parts and “white” parts. “I’ve just always been too ‘white’ to be ‘black’ and too ‘black’ to be ‘white,’ which, you know, gets to you after a while, particularly when the roles keep passing you by,” she told an interviewer in 1968. In her first major Broadway role, in 1959, as Queen Aggravain (to a young Carol Burnett’s princess) in “Once Upon a Mattress,” White was asked to lighten her complexion — or “white up” in the terminology of the day — so as not to confuse the audience with what a production staff member called her “Mediterranean” looks. White never achieved the stardom she hoped for and believed she deserved. One issue — the larger one — was a paucity of roles for black actors, period, no matter the shade of their skin, she told The New York Times in 1968. “We have one Sidney Poitier and one Diana Sands, and bang! — the door closes,” she said. The situation became only more complicated for mixedrace actors like herself, she said. As she wrote in a 1992 essay, light-skinned actors of her time were still routinely dismissed as too white for black parts. They had to lighten their complexions for white parts and, in the case of lightskinned women appearing opposite black men, darken their appearance lest the black man “seem to be involved with a white girl — horrors!”

‘I don’t want to be disguised anymore’ In the 1968 Times interview, White vented her frustration. “I don’t want to be disguised anymore,” she said. Jane White was born in Harlem on Oct. 30, 1922, the first child of Leah Gladys Powell, whose heritage was black, white and Cherokee, and Walter Francis White, who identified himself as black but who calculated that he was only 1/64 African-American. A younger brother, Walter Jr., died in 1975. White’s father, a civil rights advocate whose blue eyes and light skin helped him cross the color line to investigate lynchings in the 1920s in the South, served as executive secretary of the NAACP from 1931 to 1955. White graduated from Smith College in 1944. Paul Robeson, the legendary actor and singer, who was a friend of her father’s, helped White get her first stage role the next year, as the lead in Lillian Smith’s “Strange Fruit,” a short-lived Broadway play about a doomed interracial love affair. She played many more stage roles after that, had recurring parts in soap operas, was cast in the movie “Beloved,” made cameo appearances in spoken-part roles at the Metropolitan Opera and performed as a cabaret singer at Alfredo’s Settebello, the restaurant in the Village that she and her husband opened in 1976.

The Associated Press ile photos

Sen. Mark Hatfield, R-Ore., and his wife, Antoinette, are seen in Silverton in Dec. 1995. Hatfield — Oregon’s longest serving U.S. senator — died Sunday. He was 89.

Oregon’s longest serving senator dies sanctity of life. A devout Baptist, Hatfield frequently spoke out for the sick, the homeless and others in need of an advocate. In a hushed congressional hearing room in 1990, he pleaded for increased money for Alzheimer’s research while describing how the disease had reduced his father, a powerfully built former blacksmith, to a “vegetable.” In an effort to make his point about the death penalty in a 1991 Senate floor speech, he proposed public executions to show the “barbaric” nature of the government-sanctioned killings.

By Terrence Petty The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Former Sen. Mark Hatfield, an outspoken critic of war whose liberal views often put him at odds with fellow Republicans but endeared him to Oregonians, died Sunday. He was 89. Hatfield, who had become increasingly frail in recent years, died at a Portland residence, said Gerry Frank, a longtime friend and former aide. Also a former governor, Hatfield was the longest serving U.S. senator in Oregon history, serving five terms from 1967 to 1997. He gained fame for key efforts against American involvement in Vietnam and the Persian Gulf war, but also spoke in favor of President George W. Bush’s decision to invade Iraq. Hatfield was a Republican in a predominantly Democratic state. But his causes — championing the environment, the needy and human rights — won him admirers across the political spectrum. “No one has had a more profound impact on Oregon in the last half century than Mark Hatfield,” said Gov. John Kitzhaber, a Democrat. “We’ve lost a true statesman whose legacy lives on in his countless contributions to Oregon’s quality of life. Senator Hatfield’s moral compass, independence and willingness to reach across the aisle are an inspiration to me and countless Oregonians.” Similar words were spoken by U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, another Democrat: “He was a giant and the kind of senator America needs now more than ever. He was the person who brought the Senate together on issue after issue.” Former Gov. Barbara Roberts, also a Democrat, said Hatfield “made his decisions not based on his party, but on what he believed was the right thing to do. He gave us a role model.”

Anti-nuclear arms One of the first American servicemen to enter Hiroshima following the atomic bombing, he once said one of his major accomplishments was helping usher through Congress a ban on U.S. nuclear weapons testing in 1987. “Every president other than Eisenhower has been seduced by the military concept that that is our sole measurement of our national security and the more bombs we build, the more secure we are,” Hatfield said a decade later. “That’s just not true. We are vulnerable in our national security today and we are vulnerable in many ways we are not addressing — the needs of education, the needs of housing, the needs of nutrition, the needs of health, the

Then Gov.-elect Mark Hatfield of Oregon receives a phone call from Vice President Richard Nixon congratulating him on his victory over Gov. Robert D. Holmes in November 1958.

“We’ve lost a true statesman whose legacy lives on in his countless contributions to Oregon’s quality of life. Senator Hatfield’s moral compass, independence and willingness to reach across the aisle are an inspiration to me and countless Oregonians.” — Gov. John Kitzhaber, D-Ore. needs of infrastructure.” As chairman and later ranking Republican on the Senate Appropriations Committee, Hatfield steered millions of dollars to public works projects in his home state. They ranged from national scenic areas and hydropower dams to the state university system and the Marine Science Center that bears his name in Newport. “You can’t travel anywhere in Oregon without seeing the difference Mark Hatfield has made,” former Oregon Secretary of State Norma Paulus once said.

Crossed party lines Hatfield was known to vote across party lines. In 1995, he was the only Republican senator to oppose a balanced budget amendment, which left it just one vote short of passing the Senate. He also criticized the death penalty and opposed abortion, though he never actively sought to place legal limits on abortion. He said his views on both issues were based on his belief in the

Retired frustrated As he prepared to retire in late 1996, Hatfield said in an interview that he was leaving a Congress that is more partisan and less collegial, and admitted he was frustrated with hard-line GOP conservatives who pressed for his ouster as Appropriations Committee chairman. “I’m going to miss the people, but not the process,” Hatfield said. “Today, unlike the past, politics and campaigning has become a year-round experience. They still are in campaign mode after the election.” Political solutions, he said, “are found not on the left wing or the right wing, but in the center.” Hatfield never lost an election, except in his college days when he was defeated in his bid to become student body president at Willamette University in Salem. He was elected governor of Oregon in 1958 and re-elected in 1962 before winning his first U.S. Senate campaign in 1966. Earlier, he was Oregon’s secretary of state and served in the state Legislature. At the 1965 National Governors Conference in Los Angeles, he was denounced as a traitor for casting the lone “no” vote among 50 governors on a resolution supporting President Johnson’s policy in Vietnam. Hatfield was one of only two Republican senators who voted against U.S. military force against Iraq in January 1991. “War isn’t quick and easy and clean. It’s horrible. It’s agonizing,” Hatfield said in a floor speech. However, Hatfield said in a 2002 interview that he could back a war against Iraq. He said he was convinced that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction and that Iraq already was part of the nation’s war on terrorism, started by the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

William Sleator, a writer for young people whose books pitted their heroes against aliens, ghouls and slimy things, not to mention the most malevolent rivals of all — siblings — died Wednesday in Bua Chet, Thailand. He was 66. The cause had not been determined, his brother Daniel said Friday. He added that Sleator, who had struggled with alcoholism for many years, had been having seizures recently. Working in a genre that straddled fantasy, science fiction, horror and suspense, Sleator wrote more than 30 books. Most were for young adults, though some were aimed at middle-grade readers. Critics praised his spare, stylish, often darkly comic prose; hurtling plots; and deliciously strange characters, among them a gasbag-like flying octopus. Moody, psychologically probing and sometimes terrifying, Sleator’s work chronicled young people’s passage through all manner of dystopias. It was a fitting juxtaposition of age group and subject matter, for what, after all, is more dystopian than adolescence?

‘Interstellar Pig’ In confronting the grotesque, the menacing and the outright evil, Sleator’s protagonists simultaneously confront their own identities and their relationship to their families, especially to brothers and sisters. His best-known novels include “Interstellar Pig” (1984), involving a youth who is drawn into an all-too-real role-playing game — here enters the octopus — in which the losers and their

civilizations are destroyed, and “House of Stairs” (1974), about teenagers trapped in a malign behavioral experiment. He was also known for “The Green Futures of Tycho” (1981), in which a boy travels forward in time and meets his adult self. The protagonist was named for Sleator’s youngest brother, Tycho; early on, he often co-opted family and friends as characters until, he later said, he had run out of friends in every sense.

Physiologist father; mother studied ADD William Warner Sleator III was born on Feb. 13, 1945, in Havre de Grace, Md., and reared in University City, Mo., a St. Louis suburb. His father, William Jr., was a physiologist; his mother, Esther Kaplan Sleator, was a pediatrician who did early research on attention deficit disorder. Billy, as he was known, grew up amid art, intellectual ferment and a laissez-faire approach to child rearing that would give helicopter parents the fantods. He captured the milieu in “Oddballs” (1993), an autobiographical volume centering on his life with his brothers and sister, Vicky. “As teenagers, Vicky and I talked a lot about hating people,” he wrote. “At the dinner table, we would go on and on about all the popular kids we hated at high school. Dad, who has a very logical mind, sometimes cautioned us about this. ‘Don’t waste your hate on them,’ he would say. ‘Save it up for important people, like the president.’ We responded by quoting the famous line from ‘Medea’: ‘Loathing is endless. Hate is a bottomless cup; I pour and pour.’”

Dallas billionaire Wyly dies in car accident The Dallas Morning News DALLAS — Dallas billionaire Charles Wyly, whose $20 million gift to the AT&T Performing Arts Center helped build the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre, but who was facing insider trading charges, was killed Sunday in a car wreck in Colorado. Wyly, 77, was trying to turn his Porsche onto a highway near the Aspenitkin County Airport around 11 a.m. when another car struck him, according to the Colorado State Patrol. He was declared dead at a hospital about an hour later. The news stunned the Dallas arts community, where Wyly’s philanthropy had helped solidify the dreams of the Dallas Arts District. “Charles was a critically important force,” said Bill Lively, who in 2000 launched the campaign to build the $354 million AT&T Performing Arts Center, whose centerpieces include the Winspear Opera House and Wyly Theatre. The Wyly Theatre’s resident company is the Dallas Theater Center, which also benefited from Wyly’s largesse. “He was always positive,” Lively said. “He was always optimistic.” Soon after the campaign launched, Wyly spoke of “wanting to build a theater that would be world-class,” said Lively, ATTPAC’s former president and CEO. His contribution “was a gift that set the standard for all of those that would follow,” Lively said. “This is just a very, very sad thing to hear. I just don’t know what to say.” Raised on a Louisiana cotton farm, Wyly and his business partner, brother Sam Wyly, compiled a half-century track record of amassing a massive fortune by

buying, growing and selling such enterprises as the Bonanza and Ponderosa steakhouses, the arts-and-craftsy Michaels Stores, Green Mountain Energy and Sterling Software. The latter company, sold in 2000, prompted a Securities and Exchange Commission allegation of insider trading. Both brothers vigorously disputed the 2010 SEC lawsuit. “I think it’s good politics to beat up on big companies and rich people,” Sam Wyly said of the government allegations.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

B6 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, AUGUST 8

TUESDAY

Today: Mostly sunny.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

86

48

STATE Western

66/48

80s

70s Willowdale

Warm Springs

Mitchell

Madras

90/48

88/51

Camp Sherman 82/43 Redmond Prineville 87/46 Cascadia 89/47 86/57 Sisters 85/45 Bend 80s Post 86/48

Oakridge Elk Lake 84/55

75/34

Morning clouds will give way to mainly sunny skies. Central

89/52

90/53

83/53

88/50

83/52

88/52

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

Sunriver 84/43

84/42

Burns 85/44

85/42

Crescent Lake

Hampton

Crescent 83/41

Fort Rock

82/43

80s

70s Chemult 83/40

Vancouver 72/57

Seattle 74/56

Missoula

Portland Eugene Sunny to partly cloudy 80/50 with a chance of thunderGrants Pass storms. 87/55 Eastern

87/49

Helena 80s Bend

91/57

Idaho Falls

84/43

Elko

96/61

90s

69/40

81/50

92/50

Reno

90/56

Chance of thunderstorms, San Francisco 64/55 mainly over the mountains.

Crater Lake

82/52

Boise

86/48

Redding 86/45

70s

80s

Lake City 80s Salt 90/66

90s

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:01 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:20 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:02 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:19 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:45 p.m. Moonset today . . . 12:52 a.m.

LOW

City

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Full

LOW

Last

New

First

Aug. 13 Aug. 21 Aug. 27 Sept. 4

Monday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 65/52/0.00 . . . . . 69/52/pc. . . . . . . 71/54/c Baker City . . . . . . 87/40/0.00 . . . . . . 86/52/t. . . . . . . 85/47/s Brookings . . . . . .59/53/trace . . . . . . 64/53/s. . . . . . 65/53/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 89/50/0.00 . . . . . 88/55/pc. . . . . . . 86/52/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 81/47/0.00 . . . . . . 80/50/s. . . . . . . 79/51/s Klamath Falls . . . 82/50/0.00 . . . . . . 82/49/t. . . . . . . 84/48/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 82/45/0.00 . . . . . . 87/50/s. . . . . . . 88/50/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 83/38/0.00 . . . . . 85/42/pc. . . . . . . 82/40/s Medford . . . . . . . 93/60/0.00 . . . . . . 92/58/s. . . . . . . 92/58/s Newport . . . . . . . 61/46/0.00 . . . . . 62/54/pc. . . . . . . 61/54/c North Bend . . . . . 66/52/0.00 . . . . . 66/53/pc. . . . . . 66/53/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 94/62/0.00 . . . . . . 92/63/s. . . . . . . 91/61/s Pendleton . . . . . . 89/48/0.00 . . . . . . 88/54/s. . . . . . . 88/52/s Portland . . . . . . . 78/59/0.00 . . . . . . 78/56/s. . . . . . 77/57/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 85/47/0.00 . . . . . . 89/47/s. . . . . . . 83/45/s Redmond. . . . . . . 88/43/0.00 . . . . . . 87/47/t. . . . . . . 86/43/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 82/61/0.00 . . . . . . 80/54/s. . . . . . . 85/52/s Salem . . . . . . . . . 80/51/0.00 . . . . . . 81/52/s. . . . . . . 81/53/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 85/49/0.00 . . . . . . 85/45/s. . . . . . . 80/43/s The Dalles . . . . . . 84/57/0.00 . . . . . . 88/57/s. . . . . . . 85/55/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

8V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85/49 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . .100 in 1972 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.00” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 in 1944 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.14” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.65” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 6.92” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.96 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.48 in 1962 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters................................High Bend, east of Hwy. 97......High La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras.........Mod. Prineville ..........................High

LOW

LOW

84 49

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Sunny.

HIGH

83 48

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .7:22 a.m. . . . . . .8:22 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:50 a.m. . . . . . .8:19 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .2:28 a.m. . . . . . .5:57 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:26 p.m. . . . . . .1:21 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .10:54 a.m. . . . . .10:35 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .10:02 p.m. . . . . .10:17 a.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 72/52

Christmas Valley

Silver Lake

Yesterday’s state extremes • 94° Ontario • 35° Meacham

FRIDAY Sunny.

81 48

BEND ALMANAC

70s

86/44

78/36

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

78/56

Brothers

LOW

84 44

NORTHWEST

85/43

La Pine

HIGH

THURSDAY

Sunny.

Thunderstorms will be possible over the mountains of Oregon. Skies will be mainly sunny elsewhere.

Paulina

85/44

Sunny.

Tonight: Mostly clear.

HIGH

WEDNESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36,775 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137,604 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 85,972 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 35,510 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129,893 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 876 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,360 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,856 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.9 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 72/57

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 72/52

S

Saskatoon 73/50

Seattle 74/56

S

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 73/55

Winnipeg 68/57

Halifax 66/59 Portland Bismarck To ronto Billings P ortland 80/62 (in the 48 77/51 Green Bay 79/61 78/56 85/56 St. Paul contiguous states): Boston 81/64 84/62 Boise 83/69 Buffalo Rapid City 91/57 80/69 Chicago Detroit New York 82/55 • 110° 82/69 82/67 92/71 Cheyenne Vernon, Texas Philadelphia Columbus 83/54 Des Moines 86/68 92/72 • 32° San Francisco Omaha 84/67 Salt Lake Washington, D. C. Louisville 64/55 87/66 Truckee, Calif. City 94/74 90/75 Las Kansas City Denver St. Louis 90/66 Vegas 88/70 • 3.15” 90/61 89/77 104/80 Charlotte Willimantic, Conn. 99/73 Albuquerque Los Angeles Nashville Little Rock 99/64 75/62 94/75 102/80 Phoenix Oklahoma City Atlanta 105/86 110/77 Honolulu 95/76 Birmingham 89/74 Dallas Tijuana 93/76 106/82 73/63 New Orleans 93/80 Orlando Houston 95/78 Chihuahua 99/79 97/66 Miami 90/78 Monterrey La Paz 95/79 93/73 Mazatlan Anchorage 88/77 58/51 Juneau 64/48 Thunder Bay 77/57

FRONTS

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .104/81/0.00 . .106/78/s . . 107/81/s Akron . . . . . . . . .86/73/0.01 . 84/66/pc . . 82/60/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .88/69/0.00 . . .83/62/t . . . .82/64/t Albuquerque. . . .99/71/0.00 . . .99/64/s . . 98/68/pc Anchorage . . . . .58/50/0.06 . .58/51/sh . . 60/49/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .93/74/0.06 . 95/76/pc . . . .94/74/t Atlantic City . . . .93/78/0.00 . 94/73/pc . . . .83/73/t Austin . . . . . . . .102/77/0.00 102/77/pc . . 102/78/s Baltimore . . . . . .93/75/0.02 . 95/76/pc . . . .94/72/t Billings. . . . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . . .85/56/t . . . .83/57/t Birmingham . . . .95/78/0.00 . . .93/76/t . . . .93/76/t Bismarck . . . . . . .82/51/0.00 . 77/51/pc . . 76/53/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .94/67/0.00 . 91/57/pc . . . 89/55/s Boston. . . . . . . . .77/71/1.06 . . .83/69/t . . . 78/66/c Bridgeport, CT. . .88/75/1.02 . . .86/69/t . . . .82/69/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .83/73/0.52 . . .80/69/t . . . .82/64/t Burlington, VT. . .83/69/0.03 . . .81/59/t . . . 81/66/c Caribou, ME . . . .73/62/0.15 . . .75/57/t . . 76/59/pc Charleston, SC . .95/75/0.00 . 96/79/pc . . . .97/79/t Charlotte. . . . . . .95/73/0.00 . 99/73/pc . . . .95/71/t Chattanooga. . . .99/74/0.00 . . .97/74/t . . . .93/72/t Cheyenne . . . . . .88/51/0.00 . . .83/54/t . . . .81/54/t Chicago. . . . . . . .86/68/0.38 . 82/69/pc . . 83/63/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .88/72/0.84 . . .88/68/t . . . .84/66/t Cleveland . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 83/67/pc . . . .83/63/t Colorado Springs 91/59/0.00 . . .88/56/s . . . 84/55/s Columbia, MO . .97/73/0.10 . . .88/69/t . . 86/66/pc Columbia, SC . . .97/75/0.00 100/77/pc . . . .98/75/t Columbus, GA. . 95/77/trace . . .94/76/t . . . .94/75/t Columbus, OH. . .88/72/0.28 . 86/68/pc . . . 84/64/c Concord, NH . . . .86/66/0.57 . . .80/61/t . . . 82/61/c Corpus Christi. . .99/80/0.00 . 90/84/pc . . 89/84/pc Dallas Ft Worth 104/85/0.00 . .106/82/s . 109/82/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .91/68/0.17 . 86/66/pc . . 83/65/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .95/60/0.00 . . .90/61/s . . . 89/61/s Des Moines. . . . .89/67/0.00 . . .84/67/t . . . 83/60/s Detroit. . . . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . 82/67/pc . . . .84/68/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .74/60/0.00 . . .74/57/t . . 72/54/pc El Paso. . . . . . . .103/78/0.00 . .102/79/s . 103/79/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .56/47/0.05 . . .62/45/c . . 58/44/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . 79/57/pc . . . 78/56/s Flagstaff . . . . . . .84/48/0.00 . 81/52/pc . . . .80/53/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .83/68/0.02 . 82/66/pc . . 80/61/pc Green Bay. . . . . .78/64/0.00 . 81/64/pc . . 79/56/pc Greensboro. . . . .92/72/0.00 . 97/71/pc . . . .94/70/t Harrisburg. . . . . .87/73/0.17 . 91/65/pc . . 87/65/pc Hartford, CT . . . .90/71/2.01 . . .88/66/t . . . .84/68/t Helena. . . . . . . . .87/52/0.00 . 82/52/pc . . . .82/52/t Honolulu . . . . . . .87/77/0.00 . . .89/74/s . . . 88/75/s Houston . . . . . .101/81/0.00 . 99/79/pc . . 99/79/pc Huntsville . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . . .94/74/t . . . .93/71/t Indianapolis . . . .94/75/0.26 . 87/69/pc . . . .86/65/t Jackson, MS . . . .98/77/0.00 . . .97/77/t . . . .96/76/t Jacksonville. . . . .97/77/0.00 . . .95/79/t . . . .96/79/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .62/50/0.00 . . .64/48/c . . . 63/48/c Kansas City. . . . .94/68/0.92 . . .88/70/t . . 87/67/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . 81/64/pc . . 80/60/pc Las Vegas . . . . .105/80/0.00 . .104/80/s . . 104/82/s Lexington . . . . . .87/72/0.67 . . .90/72/t . . . .86/67/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .88/68/0.05 . . .89/66/t . . 84/63/pc Little Rock. . . . .108/73/0.55 102/80/pc . . 99/77/pc Los Angeles. . . . .70/60/0.00 . 75/62/pc . . 74/63/pc Louisville . . . . . . .93/73/1.34 . . .90/75/t . . . .88/72/t Madison, WI . . . .85/66/0.89 . 83/64/pc . . 81/57/pc Memphis. . . . . . .99/81/0.00 . .100/79/t . . . .95/75/t Miami . . . . . . . . .91/75/2.41 . . .90/78/t . . . .92/81/t Milwaukee . . . . .87/69/0.13 . 79/67/pc . . 82/62/pc Minneapolis . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .84/62/t . . 77/58/pc Nashville . . . . . . .95/74/0.05 . . .94/75/t . . . .93/71/t New Orleans. . . .95/80/0.06 . . .93/80/t . . 92/79/pc New York . . . . . .89/73/0.17 . 92/71/pc . . . .86/72/t Newark, NJ . . . . .94/76/0.09 . 93/70/pc . . . .86/70/t Norfolk, VA . . . . .95/77/0.00 100/76/pc . . . .93/73/t Oklahoma City . .95/78/0.09 . .110/77/s . 102/75/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . . .87/66/t . . 82/63/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .93/75/0.19 . . .95/78/t . . . .94/78/t Palm Springs. . .108/72/0.00 . .107/78/s . . 102/76/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .91/69/0.00 . 83/66/pc . . 84/62/pc Philadelphia . . . .90/75/0.01 . 92/72/pc . . . .89/69/t Phoenix. . . . . . .108/88/0.00 105/86/pc . 108/87/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . . .81/63/t Portland, ME. . . .72/66/0.35 . . .80/62/t . . 78/61/pc Providence . . . . .78/70/2.25 . . .86/68/t . . . .81/66/t Raleigh . . . . . . . .96/75/0.00 100/73/pc . . . .95/72/t

Yesterday Monday Tuesday Yesterday Monday Tuesday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .88/57/0.45 . . .82/55/t . . . .79/57/t Savannah . . . . . .98/76/0.00 . 96/79/pc . . . .96/77/t Reno . . . . . . . . . .90/55/0.00 . . .90/56/s . . . 90/59/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .74/57/0.00 . 74/56/pc . . 70/56/pc Richmond . . . . . .99/77/0.05 . 99/71/pc . . . .95/70/t Sioux Falls. . . . . .82/66/0.00 . 81/59/pc . . . 76/55/s Rochester, NY . . .83/69/0.23 . . .78/64/t . . . .83/63/t Spokane . . . . . . .85/56/0.00 . . .87/54/s . . . 85/53/s Sacramento. . . . .86/57/0.00 . . .86/59/s . . . 88/60/s Springfield, MO 102/73/0.00 . . .93/71/t . . 89/69/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .98/80/0.00 . . .89/77/t . . 87/67/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .94/83/0.00 . . .93/77/t . . . .93/79/t Salt Lake City . . .92/64/0.00 . . .90/66/s . . . 89/67/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .99/77/0.43 . . .98/77/t . . . .99/78/t San Antonio . . .101/79/0.00 101/79/pc . . 101/78/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . .103/77/0.00 . .109/76/s . 101/74/pc San Diego . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . 73/64/pc . . 73/66/pc Washington, DC .97/77/0.67 . 94/74/pc . . . .93/72/t San Francisco . . .64/56/0.00 . 67/54/pc . . 69/54/pc Wichita . . . . . . .102/73/0.00 . . .99/70/s . . 93/71/pc San Jose . . . . . . .73/60/0.00 . . .80/58/s . . . 82/58/s Yakima . . . . . . . .93/60/0.00 . . .87/55/s . . . 86/52/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .95/57/0.00 . 90/52/pc . . 88/57/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .108/85/0.00 107/83/pc . 107/83/pc

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .68/57/0.00 . .65/55/sh . . 63/52/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .90/78/0.00 . . .91/75/s . . . 91/77/s Auckland. . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . . .57/45/s . . 57/46/pc Baghdad . . . . . .111/87/0.00 . .110/83/s . . 111/84/s Bangkok . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .93/79/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .88/73/0.00 . . .82/72/r . . . 90/72/c Beirut. . . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . . .89/78/s . . 88/79/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .67/56/sh . . 64/55/sh Bogota . . . . . . . .84/52/0.00 . 69/48/pc . . . .68/48/t Budapest. . . . . . .88/63/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . 77/57/pc Buenos Aires. . . .63/46/0.00 . 66/51/pc . . 70/54/pc Cabo San Lucas .90/82/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .91/77/t Cairo . . . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .96/75/s . . . 95/75/s Calgary . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . 72/52/pc . . 72/54/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .88/79/0.00 . 88/73/pc . . 90/73/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .63/50/0.00 . .63/50/sh . . . 61/50/c Edinburgh . . . . . .57/50/0.00 . .61/49/sh . . . 61/50/c Geneva . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . .71/55/sh . . 64/50/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . . .69/43/s . . . 75/48/s Hong Kong . . . . .93/86/0.00 . . .91/81/t . . . .90/82/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .89/69/s . . 88/73/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .87/67/0.00 . . .90/70/s . . . 88/68/s Johannesburg . . .59/39/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . . 66/39/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .64/61/0.00 . . .68/62/s . . 66/61/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .80/62/s . . . 81/64/s London . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .65/54/sh . . 70/50/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .92/61/s . . . 93/66/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . . .84/76/t . . . .86/77/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .104/86/0.00 106/87/pc . 115/88/pc Mexico City. . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .73/54/t . . . .70/54/t Montreal. . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . 79/61/pc . . . 79/68/s Moscow . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . 79/60/pc . . . 82/63/c Nairobi . . . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . .73/55/c . . . .72/55/t Nassau . . . . . . . .95/81/0.00 . . .93/81/t . . 91/82/pc New Delhi. . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .89/79/t . . . .91/81/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . 91/77/pc . . . 93/77/c Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .57/52/0.00 . .61/51/sh . . . .66/50/r Ottawa . . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . 79/57/pc . . . 79/61/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . .67/55/sh . . 70/50/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .81/64/0.00 . 85/69/pc . . 79/63/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . 89/67/pc . . . 90/66/s Santiago . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . 68/39/pc . . 59/43/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . .81/65/sh . . . .79/61/t Sapporo. . . . . . not available . . .81/66/t . . 79/68/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .85/75/t . . . .85/79/t Shanghai. . . . . . .84/77/0.00 . . .90/80/t . . . 93/81/c Singapore . . . . . .84/75/0.00 . . .88/79/t . . . .88/79/t Stockholm. . . . . .68/55/0.00 . .69/53/sh . . . .70/54/t Sydney. . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . .64/49/sh . . 63/46/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . . .90/80/t . . . .90/81/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .91/78/s . . 91/79/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .87/75/t . . . .88/77/t Toronto . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . 79/61/pc . . 79/63/pc Vancouver. . . . . .72/57/0.00 . 72/57/pc . . 68/57/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . .71/59/sh . . 66/57/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . .72/61/sh . . 70/52/pc


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GREEN LIVING, TECHNOLOGY & SCIENCE IN OREGON

G

GREEN, ETC.

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Waste not Some tips for reducing food waste, Page C3

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THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2011

Is woody biomass the new timber?

It may be redundant, but there’s an allure to Google+ By Meghan Daum Los Angeles Times

Google+, which launched a month ago to great fanfare, is so far feeling more like Google nonplussed. Reported to have crossed the 20-million-user mark last weekend, the new social networking site is designed to correct one of Facebook’s major drawbacks: the problem of too much i n fo r m a t io n being shared with too many people. Instead of all social contacts being lumped into one huge group (meaning that your boss and your mother and your best friend from clown college all see the same posts), Google+ lets you compartmentalize people into circles: friends, family, acquaintances and a category called “following,” which appears to be for people whose updates you’re interested in but who you don’t care to have any real life interaction with. You can also create customized circles that narrow your contacts even more: knitting group, people from dog park, people from high school you vaguely remember, people from high school you have no recollection of whatsoever. The possibilities are apparently endless. There’s a video-conferencing feature called “hang out,” a group-texting service called Huddle and plenty of other stuff guaranteed to suck even more time out of your day than you thought you had, but so far no one seems to be using much of it. My feed, or “content stream,” (yes, I joined up) shows a lot of people saying, in effect, “Is this thing on?” Sure, there’s a sense of excitement in being an early adopter and, in this case, an air of exclusivity that comes from the fact that membership, at this point, is “by invitation only” (though invites aren’t too hard to come by). But with so many people’s Web browsers bookmarked with so many different online versions of the high school dance (if Facebook is like homecoming, Twitter is like the prom and MySpace is a freshmen ice cream social that somehow turned into a rave), it’s no surprise that the question that comes after “Is this thing on?” is often “What am I doing here?” See Google+ / C3

TECH

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin ile photo

A program recently renewed by the Legislature gives tax credits to those who produce or collect woody biomass from forest thinning operations, like this 2006 project near Sisters High School conducted by Melcher Logging Co., of Sweet Home. The credit is an effort to help build a biomass industry.

New legislation creates a tax credit for nascent industry that proponents say could bring badly needed jobs to struggling communities

By Tim Doran • The Bulletin

G

athering the brush and slash from Central and Eastern Oregon forests has been pitched by government, contractors and environmentalists as a way to restart a timber economy in communities that once depended on the trees for their livelihoods.

The overgrown forest undergrowth — now called woody biomass — can generate electricity,

heat and jobs in small towns populated by residents who used to work at nearby sawmills, according to the pitch. But before the brush can fuel an economic upswing, it must be collected and hauled out of the forests. That can be an expensive and labor-intensive task, although one that can generate nearly 24 jobs for each $1 million invested, according to one study. It also provides $2.2 million in economic output, according to the Ecosystem Workforce Program at the University of Oregon. Then the material also needs a market, or an industry, to make use of it.

That’s where the government is stepping in, with the Oregon Legislature reauthorizing the Biomass Producer and Collector Tax Credit on June 30, the last day of the 2011 session. As of Thursday, the bill was awaiting the governor’s signature. A committee that advises state officials about rules governing the credit has a hearing scheduled at 9 a.m. Aug. 16 at the department’s Salem offices to discuss a draft. The revamped legislation will provide

GREEN

the landowner or company collecting the biomass a $10 credit for each dry ton, one of the changes made by lawmakers. Previously, the state offered the same amount for each green ton, which contains more moisture. The Oregon Department of Energy estimated the tax credit would cost the state about $6.6 million for the 2010 tax year, as of March 3, 2011, if all pending applicants were approved, according to a report submitted to a legislative committee in May. See Biomass / C6

AUSTRALIAN WILDLIFE

Following the call of the thylacine, a predator with a cautionary tale By Sean B. Carroll New York Times News Service

KAKADU NATIONAL PARK, Australia — Eleven thousand miles from my home in Wisconsin, this national park is one of my favorite places on the planet — a vast area of wetlands, woodlands and rock formations that is home to a fantastic array of wildlife. Kakadu (pronounced KACK-a-doo), one of Unesco’s World Heritage sites, has almost 300 bird species (more than a third of Australia’s birds), more than 60 mammals and more than 120 reptiles, including large saltwater crocodiles, monitor lizards and, oh yes, lots of snakes, the

object of one of my earliest boyhood fascinations. In addition to seeing some of its dangerous residents — from a respectful distance — I am hoping to rediscover the image of a magnificent marsupial, the thylacine, that I first saw on a visit more than 20 years ago. The image is still etched in my memory — not because I saw it in the flesh, but because it was painted on a rock. You see, the species went extinct on the Australian mainland about 3,000 years ago. The rock painting, at one of more than 5,000 art sites in Kakadu, must have been made by an Aborigine hunter-gatherer about that time, pre-

SCIENCE

serving for posterity the image of an animal now long gone from Kakadu. And what a creature it was. Weighing about 60 pounds and bearing powerful jaws, the thylacine had a doglike skull, was about the height and shape of a Doberman and had tigerlike stripes on its back that may have helped conceal it in the bush from its prey. Recent studies of thylacine skeletons suggest that it was a solitary ambush predator like a tiger, and not a pack hunter like a wolf. Even after extinction on the mainland, thousands of thylacines were still roaming the island of Tasmania when European settlers arrived in the 19th century. See Australia / C6

Will van Boldrik via New York Times News Service

An aboriginal rock painting of a thylacine was made several thousand years ago in what is now Kakadu National Park in northern Australia. The extinct marsupial serves as a reminder of how fragile species are; the last thylacine died in captivity in 1936.


T EL EV IS IO N

C2 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

In-laws’ meal etiquette has gone to the dogs

Furry egos clash in ‘Whisker Wars’ By Robert Lloyd

‘Whisker Wars’

Los Angeles Times

Dear Abby: My in-laws have a small dog, “Fluffy,” who has come to rule their lives. That’s OK, because it doesn’t really affect me. However, we frequently have them over for dinner, and they insist on taking home a large portion of whatever meat was served to give to their dog. I’m not talking about scraps from everyone’s plates — the amount they take would be a serving for another meal. I have objected to this practice in the past, but each time they come for dinner they seem to have “forgotten” the lesson. I don’t like it! How can I tactfully tell them not to take meat from my table for Fluffy? — “Steaking” My Claim, St. Petersburg, Fla. Dear “Steaking”: You already have told your in-laws not to take the meat you are serving for their dog. Either their memories are failing, or your feelings aren’t important to them. Suggestion: When you have them to dinner, set up the plates in your kitchen rather than have dishes on the table, and immediately refrigerate any meat you haven’t served. Or consider serving your in-laws a meatless dinner. (I can hear them now, asking, “Where’s the BEEF?”) Dear Abby: My husband, “Bud,” retired a year ago and now does almost nothing with his life. He calls himself a “house husband,” but that’s a lie. All he does is watch TV or play on his computer all day while I work full time outside the home. Our house has become a pigsty. If I try to do some cleaning,

DEAR ABBY Bud gets mad and says he’ll do it “later.” Later comes and goes. Returning to a filthy house after work is driving me crazy. He doesn’t even do the grocery shopping; I have to do it on my lunch hour. Any advice on how I can get his rear end off the couch and get him to assume some responsibilities? I don’t usually nag, but I’m so mad I’m taking out my frustrations on my exercise bike. It’s making me very fit, but I’m still upset about his lack of ambition. — Wife of a Lazy Slob Dear Wife: You and Bud have a communication problem. Rather than scold him about his inactivity, try to get him to tell you (calmly) what his “vision” of retirement is. You may find that it’s very different from yours. He may also be depressed at the changes that have occurred in his life. If Bud was always a “lazy slob,” then face it — that’s the person you married. However, if this is a recent, radical change in his behavior, you should insist he be examined by his doctor. But taking out your frustrations on your exercise bike is not a solution, and you may have to decide if this is how you want to live the rest of your life. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

LOS ANGELES — I suppose there is nothing that can be done in this world that can’t be turned into a contest: Whatever the product or practice, there will always be a first, a biggest or, subject to judges’ ruling, a best. “Whisker Wars,” which began Friday on IFC, is a “docu-comedy” — to use the provided description — about the world of competitive beardgrowing, or bearding. The main players are Jack Passion, two-time Natural Full Beard world champion and author of “The Facial Hair Handbook”; his coach, mentor and tireless partisan Phil Olsen, self-described as “the founder and self-appointed captain of Beard Team USA,” a federation of beard-growing societies; Aarne Bielefeldt, a rangy, grayhaired Scandinavian living off the grid in Northern California, where he looks after the forest and plays the harpsichord; Myk O’Connor, a likable young Brooklynite who wants to establish New York “as a major stop on the beard circuit”; and various members of Texas’ Austin Facial Hair Club, who are generally set against Passion and Olsen, whom they see as

Wh e re : IFC When: 11 p.m. Fridays

The Associated Press

Whisker Warriors Miletus Callahan-Barile, from left, Myk O’Connor, Alex LaRoche, Phil Olsen and Jack Passion attend the premiere party last week for IFC’s “Whisker Wars,” a new reality series about competitive beard growing. too interested in personal gain and glory, and who regard their own Bryan Nelson as the man to beat Passion. Schooled in the European tradition, Passion, whose beard is “renowned for color and density,” does indeed seem a little full of himself: “My name is Jack Passion, world beard champion, not Jack Passion, awesome guy with a beard,” he

say. It grows. Let it grow.” Thom Beers, who is behind such hits as “Deadliest Catch,” “Ice Road Truckers” and “Storage Wars,” is an executive producer here, as well as the series’ highly emphatic narrator. And indeed, this is reality TV, not documentary film; everything is crafted to underline conflict, to redouble the drama. “Whisker Wars,” as the name betokens, concentrates on the grinding gears of rivalry, a series of local and national pageants leading to a climactic world championship in Trondheim, Norway.

says, and he stands apart from his fellow beardsmen (that’s the word), a lone wolf isolated by his own ambition and the disdain of the competition. Where he casts himself as the Muhammad Ali of facial hair: “I talk a lot of trash and rhyme a lot.” Bielefeldt, who is cast as the natural man to Passion’s sophisticate, says of his own facial hair, “There’s nothing much to

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6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News KEZI 9 News ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News King of Queens King of Queens Steves’ Europe Music Voyager

7:00

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Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

Bachelor Pad The contestants move into the mansion. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å America’s Got Talent Twelve of the top 48 acts compete. ’ ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met Two/Half Men Mike & Molly ‘14’ Bachelor Pad The contestants move into the mansion. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Hell’s Kitchen (N) ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å MasterChef Top 6 Compete (N) ‘14’ News on PDX-TV Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å Antiques Roadshow ‘G’ Å America’s Got Talent Twelve of the top 48 acts compete. ’ ‘PG’ Å Gossip Girl ’ ‘14’ Å One Tree Hill Quiet Little Voices ‘PG’ Hometime ‘G’ organic-michele Sewing Room Painting

10:00

10:30

11:00

KATU News at 11 Harry’s Law A Day in the Life ‘PG’ News Hawaii Five-0 Ke Kinohi ‘14’ Å News KEZI 9 News News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ King of Queens American Experience My Lai ’ ‘MA’ Å (DVS) Harry’s Law A Day in the Life ‘PG’ News House of Payne Meet the Browns Roseanne ‘PG’ Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens PBS-Prohibition Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Primal Grill

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Hoarders Billy Bob; Jean ‘PG’ Å Hoarders Becky; Clare (N) ‘PG’ Intervention Tiffany D (N) ‘14’ Å Intervention Brittany ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds The Crossing ’ ‘14’ (3:30) ›› “Trading Places” (1983) Dan ›› “The Cowboy Way” (1994, Comedy) Woody Harrelson, Kiefer Sutherland. Two ››› “Blazing Saddles” (1974, Comedy) Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder. Gucci-saddle- ››› “Blazing Saddles” (1974, Comedy) Cleavon Little, Gene Wilder. Gucci-saddle102 40 39 Aykroyd, Eddie Murphy. Å cowboys ride into Manhattan to find a missing compadre. bagged Sheriff Bart teams up with the drunken Waco Kid. Å bagged Sheriff Bart teams up with the drunken Waco Kid. Å Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Swamp Wars Killer Pythons ’ ‘PG’ Hillbilly Handfishin’ ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Wars Killer Pythons ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 The Most Extreme Psychics ’ ‘G’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Housewives/NJ Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ››› “Steel Magnolias” (1989) Sally Field. Six iron-willed women gather at a Louisiana beauty parlor. ’ Å Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? 190 32 42 53 Texas Women ’ ‘PG’ Å How I, Millions How I, Millions Biography on CNBC Ben & Jerry. Mad Money How I, Millions How I, Millions Biography on CNBC Ben & Jerry. Ck 3x Faster 1 Minute-Makeup 51 36 40 52 Cruise Inc.: Big Money/High Seas Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Å John King, USA Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Always Sunny Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (4:55) South Park (5:25) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:56) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:26) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:57) ›› “Just Friends” (2005) Ryan Reynolds, Amy Smart. Å Journal Joy of Fishing The Yoga Show Visions of NW Talk of the Town Cooking Oregon Journal Desert Word Travels ’ Talk of the Town Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Politics & Public Policy Today 58 20 12 11 Politics & Public Policy Today Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie My Babysitter A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ “Phineas and Ferb: The Movie” Good-Charlie A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ My Babysitter 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Dual Survival Split Up ’ ‘14’ Å Secrets of SEAL Team 6 ‘14’ Å Norway Massacre: The Killer’s Mind Secrets of the Secret Service ‘PG’ Norway Massacre: The Killer’s Mind 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) MLB Baseball Boston Red Sox at Minnesota Twins (N) (Live) Å E:60 2011 World Series of Poker 2011 World Series of Poker SportsNation Å NASCAR Now Å SportsNation Å 22 24 21 24 SportsNation Å PBA Bowling: 1993 Brunswick Open PBA Bowling AWA Wrestling Å College Football 1985 Rose Bowl -- Ohio State vs. USC From Jan. 1, 1985. 23 25 123 25 College Football From Jan. 1, 1996. (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Switched at Birth Pandora’s Box ‘14’ Switched at Birth Paradise Lost Secret Life of American Teen Switched at Birth The Homecoming Secret Life of American Teen The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Switched at Birth The Stag Hunt ‘14’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The Five 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Best Dishes Iron Chef America Chris Cosentino. Unwrapped Unwrapped Unwrapped Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Best Thing Ate Sugar High (N) Challenge 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “The Devil Wears Prada” (2006, Comedy) Meryl Streep, Anne Hathaway, Adrian Grenier. ››› “The Devil Wears Prada” ›› “Lara Croft: Tomb Raider” (2001) Angelina Jolie, Jon Voight. 131 For Rent ’ ‘G’ For Rent ’ ‘G’ For Rent Lani ‘G’ Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Design Star (N) ‘G’ Å Donna Decorates Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 For Rent ’ ‘G’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers Easy Riders ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers (N) ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Top Gear ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å “Question of Privilege” (1999, Drama) Jessica Steen, Nick Mancuso. Å “Bond of Silence” (2010) Kim Raver, Charlie McDermott. ‘PG’ Å The Protector Bangs (N) ‘PG’ Å 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word Disaster Date ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show (6:54) True Life ’ True Life ’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Teen Wolf (N) ’ ‘PG’ Teen Wolf ’ ‘PG’ 192 22 38 57 Disaster Date ’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å BrainSurge My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. Dan Patrick 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. (N) (Live) Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die 132 31 34 46 Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Eureka Glimpse ’ Å Eureka Up in the Air ’ Å Eureka Omega Girls (N) ’ Å Warehouse 13 3...2...1 (N) ’ Å Alphas Never Let Me Go (N) Eureka Omega Girls ’ Å 133 35 133 45 Warehouse 13 Queen for a Day ’ Behind Scenes Mark Chironna J. Franklin Jesse Duplantis Macedonian Call Annual fundraising event. Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Perry Stone Best of Praise Changing-World Macedonian Call 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond (9:15) ›››› “Touch of Evil” (1958, Crime Drama) Charlton Heston, Orson Welles. An (11:15) ››› “The Lady From Shanghai” ›››› “The Third Man” (1949, Suspense) Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten. Visiting post- ›››› “Citizen Kane” (1941, Drama) Orson Welles, Joseph Cotten. Orson Welles’ 101 44 101 29 war Vienna, Austria, a writer probes a friend’s death. classic about a publisher’s rise to power. Å (DVS) inspector and his wife get mixed up in a murder case. Å (1948) Rita Hayworth. Kate Plus 8 Philly Fun! ‘PG’ Å Kate Plus 8 Kate’s Night Out ’ ‘PG’ Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å Kate Plus 8 ‘PG’ Kate Plus 8 ‘PG’ Surprise Homecoming (N) ‘PG’ Å Undercover Boss ’ ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Kate Plus 8 New Zealand ‘PG’ Å Law & Order Juvenile ’ ‘14’ Law & Order All My Children ’ ‘14’ The Closer Under Control ‘14’ Å The Closer (N) ‘14’ Å Rizzoli & Isles (N) ‘14’ Å The Closer ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Thin Ice ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Looney Tunes Looney Tunes Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ World of Gumball Adventure Time MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:43) Sanford & Son Whiplash ‘PG’ Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (10:42) Everybody Loves Raymond The Nanny ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons NCIS Sea Dog ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS My Other Left Foot ‘PG’ Å NCIS One Shot, One Kill ‘PG’ Å WWE Monday Night RAW (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å (11:05) Suits Play the Man ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives (N) ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies Malcolm’s past. ‘PG’ (10:01) Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Single Ladies Malcolm’s past. ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) “The Fast and the Furious” (6:10) ›› “D3: The Mighty Ducks” 1996 Emilio Estevez. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Santa Clause 2” 2002, Comedy Tim Allen. ’ ‘G’ Å (9:50) ›› “Blue Crush” 2002 Kate Bosworth. ‘PG-13’ Red Dragon 2002 ››› “Seven Thieves” 1960, Suspense Edward G. Robinson. ‘NR’ Å ››› “The Fabulous Baker Boys” 1989 Jeff Bridges. ‘R’ Å ›› “A Wedding” 1978 ‘PG’ Å ››› “Seven Thieves” 1960, Suspense Edward G. Robinson. ‘NR’ Å Nike 6.0 HB BMX Pro The Daily Habit Insane Cinema ‘PG’ Bubba’s World Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Amer. Misfits The Daily Habit Road to the PGA Championship PGA Championship Highlights The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center PGA Championship Highlights The Golf Fix Golf Central Learning Center The Waltons The Song ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ (4:30) ›› “Robin Hood” 2010, Adventure Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett. Robin and Breaking the Huddle: The Integration of Real Time With Bill Maher Film producer ››› “Superheroes” 2011 Premiere. Citizens dress like superhe- (10:45) ››› “The Blind Side” 2009 Sandra Bullock. A well-to-do HBO 425 501 425 10 his men battle the Sheriff of Nottingham. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å College Football ‘PG’ Å Stephen K. Bannon. ’ ‘MA’ roes to patrol the city streets. ’ ‘NR’ Å white couple adopts a homeless black teen. ››› “Apocalypto” 2006, Adventure Rudy Youngblood. The end of the Mayan civilization draws near. ‘R’ Å ›› “8 Million Ways to Die” 1986, Crime Drama Jeff Bridges, Rosanna Arquette. ‘R’ Å ››› “Apocalypto” 2006 Rudy Youngblood. ‘R’ Å IFC 105 105 (4:15) › “Half (5:40) ››› “The Informant!” 2009, Comedy-Drama Matt Damon. An ADM executive ››› “Face/Off” 1997, Action John Travolta, Nicolas Cage, Joan Allen. An FBI agent and a violent terrorist ››› “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World” 2010 Michael Cera. Premiere. A slacker contends MAX 400 508 7 Baked” 1998 ‘R’ informs on price fixing by agribusinesses. ’ ‘R’ Å switch identities. ’ ‘R’ Å with his new girlfriend’s exes. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Drain the Ocean ‘G’ Big Sur: Wild California ‘PG’ Drain the Ocean ‘G’ Big Sur: Wild California ‘PG’ Border Wars ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Power Rangers Power Rangers Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Power Rangers Dragon Ball Z Kai Power Rangers Power Rangers OddParents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Dragon Ball Z Kai Power Rangers NTOON 89 115 189 Bone Collector Primitive Instinct Fisher’s ATV Destination Pol. Dirt Trax TV Mudslingers NASCAR Outd. Best of West Headhunters TV Grateful Nation Fisher’s ATV Dirt Trax TV Destination Pol. Mudslingers OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) ››› “The Messenger” 2009 Ben ››› “The Road” 2009, Drama Viggo Mortensen, Kodi Smit-McPhee. iTV. A father and › “The Back-up Plan” 2010 Jennifer Lopez, Alex O’Loughlin. iTV. A single woman Weeds Vehement v. The Big C (N) ’ Weeds Vehement v. The Big C ’ ‘MA’ Å SHO 500 500 Foster. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å son wander through a post-apocalyptic world. ’ ‘R’ Å becomes pregnant, then meets her ideal man. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Vigorous ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Vigorous ‘MA’ The 10 (N) ‘PG’ The 10 ‘14’ The Car Show Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 ‘14’ The Car Show Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (5:05) ››› “Secretariat” 2010, Drama Diane Lane. ’ ‘PG’ Å (7:10) ›› “The Last Song” 2010, Drama Miley Cyrus. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Salt” 2010 Angelina Jolie. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:45) ›› “Daddy Day Care” 2003 Eddie Murphy. ’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ›› “Tennessee” 2008 Adam (6:15) “The Least Among You” 2009, Drama Cedric Sanders, Lauren Holly. Premiere. ›› “War, Inc.” 2008, Comedy John Cusack, Hilary Duff, Marisa Tomei. An undercover ›› “K-19: The Widowmaker” 2002, Suspense Harrison Ford. A nuclear reactor malTMC 525 525 Rothenberg, Ethan Peck. ’ ‘R’ Å A black student enrolls in an all-white seminary. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å hit man must organize a pop star’s wedding. ’ ‘R’ functions aboard a Russian submarine. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Adv. Sports ››› “Tin Cup” (1996, Comedy) Kevin Costner, Rene Russo, Cheech Marin. Heads-Up Poker ››› “Tin Cup” (1996, Comedy) Kevin Costner, Rene Russo, Cheech Marin. Adv. Sports VS. 27 58 30 The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer Pilot ’ ‘PG’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 C3

CALENDAR TODAY

THURSDAY

MOUNT EVEREST SLIDE SHOW: Eric Plantenberg talks about climbing Everest and shares photos; free; 6:30 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-385-3062. SUMMER CONCERTS ON THE LAWN: Featuring a performance by folk artist Eilen Jewell; $15, $10 students; 6:30 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541549-4979, info@sistersfolkfestival .org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. OK SWEETHEART: The throwback pop-rock band performs, with Rural Demons; $3 suggested donation; 9 p.m.; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@gmail.com.

CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring a barbecue carnival, animals, bull riding, concerts, exhibitions, a kids zone and more; free; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.crookcountyfairgrounds.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. HOLLY GORDON GOLF BENEFIT: Play a round of golf; registration required; proceeds benefit cancer patient Holly Gordon’s medical bills and her son’s education fund; $100; 3 p.m.; Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541549-4653 or http:// teamholly.eventbrite .com. MUNCH & MUSIC: Event includes a performance by blues act Shemekia Copeland, food and arts and crafts booths, children’s area and more; dogs prohibited; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; Drake Park, 777 N.W. Riverside Blvd., Bend; www.munchandmusic.com. “BANG, BANG, YOU’RE DEAD!”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of ghosts who visit a young man who has killed his parents and five classmates; $15, $10 students ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beattickets.org. EUFORQUESTRA: The Coloradobased reggae band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www .mcmenamins.com. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CLASSICAL CONCERT I: Featuring selections from Jay Ungar, Copland and Conni Ellisor, with Stephen Seifert; $10-$60; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org.

TUESDAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www.local harvest.org/redmond-farmersmarket-M31522. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541-633-9637 or info@sustainableflame.com. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Northwest Star Academy; $5-$9; 4 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “I AM”: A screening of the film by Tom Shadyac, with discussion; donations accepted; 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Historic Redmond Church, 641 S.W. Cascade Ave.; 541-504-4623 or www.aspiritualgathering.com. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL POPS CONCERT: The Sunriver Music Festival Orchestra performs Pops classics, including selections from George Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein, with Thomas Lauderdale of Pink Martini; $10$40; 7:30 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-593-9310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org. THE SHINS: The acclaimed indie rockers perform; $25 in advance, $28 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541408-4998 or www.bendfarmers market.com. CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring a barbecue carnival, animals, bull riding, concerts, exhibitions, a kids zone and more; free; 5-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.crookcountyfairgrounds.com. MUSIC ON THE GREEN: Featuring Americana music by CinderBlue; food vendors available; free; 6-7:30 p.m.; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or redmondsummerconcerts.com. PICNIC IN THE PARK: Featuring a country performance by Earl Wear & Haywire; free; 6-8 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-1209 or recreation@ccprd.org. DIERKS BENTLEY: The country musician performs; $37 or $59 reserved, plus fees; 6:30 p.m., gates open 5 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-318-5457 or www.bendconcerts.com. JOHN SHIPE TRIO: The Los Angeles-based indie pop act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring a barbecue carnival, animals, bull riding, concerts, exhibitions, a kids zone and more; free; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.crookcountyfairgrounds.com. SUNRIVER ART FAIRE: A juried art show with art demonstrations, dancing, kids activities and more; proceeds benefit the Sunriver Womens Club; free admission; noon8 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-593-8704 or www.sunriverartfaire.pbworks.com. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www.sistersfarmers market.com. COUNTRY FAIR & ART SHOW: An art show and reception; proceeds benefit community support agencies; free; 5-8 p.m.; Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; 541-549-7087. ESTATE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Jewish Community of Central Oregon; free admission; 5 p.m.; Shalom Bayit, 21555 Modoc Road, Bend; 541-815-

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

6545 or www.jccobend.com. “BANG, BANG, YOU’RE DEAD!”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of ghosts who visit a young man who has killed his parents and five classmates; $15, $10 students ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beattickets.org. A MIDSUMMER’S NIGHT SOIREE: Featuring an open house and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the center; free; 7-10 p.m.; Center for Compassionate Living, 828 N.W. Hill St., Bend; 541-788-7331, info@ compassionatecenter.org or www.compassionatecenter .org. SHOW US YOUR SPOKES: Featuring a performance by Taarka; proceeds benefit Commute Options; $5; 7 p.m.; Parrilla Grill, 635 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541617-9600. A STARRY SUMMER NIGHT: High Street performs, with a barbecue and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit the Sisters Schools Foundation; $50 in advance, $60 at the door; 7:30-10:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Lakes Golf & Country Club, 16900 Aspen Lakes Drive, Sisters; 541549-4653 or www.sistersstarry nights.org. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL CLASSICAL CONCERT II: Featuring “Night at the Opera,” with performances by Sarah Mattox and Courtney Huffman; $10-$60; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-593-9310, tickets@ sunrivermusic.org or www.sunriver music.org.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON GREAT GIVEAWAY: Pick up clothing and household items; free; 8 a.m.-1 p.m.; Church of Jesus Christ of Latterday Saints, 2555 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-598-6584 or www.cogga.org. ESTATE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit the Jewish Community of Central Oregon; free admission; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Shalom Bayit, 21555 Modoc Road, Bend; 541815-6545 or www.jccobend.com. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503739-0643. TUMALO FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Tumalo Garden Market, off of U.S. Highway 20 and Cook Avenue; 541-7280088. RACE FOR THE RIVER: Featuring races on watercraft in various categories or an open swim; followed by a celebration with live music, food, activity booths and more; proceeds benefit the Deschutes River Conservancy; $20, $30 with a dog in advance; $25, $35 with a dog day of race; free for spectators; 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; www.deschutesriver.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www.central oregonsaturdaymarket.com. COUNTRY FAIR & ART SHOW: An art show and sale, with a silent auction, music, food, a petting zoo and more; proceeds benefit community support agencies; free admission; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; 541549-7087. CRAWDAD FESTIVAL: Featuring a

parade, entertainment, music, dinner and games; free admission, $7.50 for crawdad feed; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Culver City Park, East D Street and Lakeshore Drive; 541-546-6494 or cityhall@cityofculver.net. CROOK COUNTY FAIR: Featuring a barbecue carnival, animals, bull riding, concerts, exhibitions, a kids zone and more; free; 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; 541-447-6575 or www.crookcountyfairgrounds.com. CRR SUMMER OLYMPICS: Play bean-bag toss, throw discs, darts and more; proceeds benefit local charities; $2.50 registration; 10 a.m., 9 a.m. registration; MacPherson Park, Clubhouse Road, Crooked River Ranch; 541-504-5638 or burt. thomson@gmail.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxfarmersmarket.com. QUILTS IN THE PARK: Mount Bachelor Quilters Guild presents an outdoor quilt show; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Pioneer Park, 1525 Hill St., Bend; 541-389-7275, mbqginfo@ gmail.com or www.quiltsqq.com. SUNRIVER ART FAIRE: A juried art show with art demonstrations, kids activities, a talent show and more; proceeds benefit the Sunriver Womens Club; free admission; 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; talent show at 2 p.m.; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-593-8704 or www.sunriverartfaire.pbworks.com. DISC GOLF TOURNAMENT: Tournament for players of all abilities; registration required; proceeds benefit the Opportunity Foundation of Central Oregon; $35; 11 a.m., 9 a.m. registration; American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-5482611, smichaels@ofco.org or www.ofco.org. PROSPECTING AND PANNING: Pan for gold at a re-created placer mine; $2 plus museum admission; 11 a.m.4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754 or www.highdesertmuseum. org. KNOW LOCAL AUTHORS: Local authors read from their works; free; noon-4 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. “BANG, BANG, YOU’RE DEAD!”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of ghosts who visit a young man who has killed his parents and five classmates; $15, $10 students ages 18 and younger; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-4195558 or www.beat tickets.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Judy Trego talks about her book “Gain the World and Keep Your Soul: A Guide on ValuesBased Philanthropy”; free; 2:20 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-330-3760. VFW DINNER: A dinner of spare ribs; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. SHANNON BEX AND “BEX”: The country soul act performs; free; 6-8 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-280-1110. “BANG, BANG, YOU’RE DEAD!”: Bend Experimental Art Theatre presents the story of ghosts who visit a young man who has killed his parents and five classmates; $15, $10 students ages 18 and younger; 7 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-419-5558 or www.beattickets.org. GREEK TAVERNA NIGHT: Featuring Greek food, music, dancing and performances by Kumpania Folk Dancers of Bend; proceeds benefit Common Table; free admission; 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546.

M T For Monday, Aug. 8

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BUCK (PG) 2:30, 5, 7:20 THE CHANGE-UP (R) 2:15, 4:35, 7 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG13) 2, 4:45, 7:30 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG-13) 2:05, 4:40, 7:15 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) 2:25, 4:55, 7:10 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG13) 2:20, 4:30, 7:05

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER 3-D (PG-13) Noon, 3, 6:30, 9:15 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) 1:05, 4:05, 7:35, 10:25 CARS 2 (G) 12:05, 2:50, 6:10, 9:05 THE CHANGE-UP (R) 1:10, 3:55, 7:20, 10 COWBOYS & ALIENS (DP — PG13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:45, 9:40 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG13) 1:20, 4:20, 7:50, 10:30

CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG13) 12:20, 3:20, 7:05, 9:50 FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS (R) 1:30, 4:10, 7:55, 10:30 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 3-D (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 6:15, 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 7:15, 10:15 HORRIBLE BOSSES (R) 12:35, 4:30, 7:40, 10:20 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 11:55 a.m., 12:55, 2:35, 3:35, 6:35, 7:30, 9:10, 10:05 THE SMURFS (PG) 2:30, 9 THE SMURFS (DP — PG) 12:30, 7 THE SMURFS 3-D (PG) 3:30, 9:35 TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON 3-D (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 3:05, 6:50, 10:10 ZOOKEEPER (PG) 11:35 a.m., 6:20 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of

scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BRIDESMAIDS (R) 9:15 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13) 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:30 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG13) 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG13) 1:15, 3:45, 6:15, 8:45 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE CHANGE-UP (R) 5:30, 8

COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG-13) 5, 7:45 FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS (R) 7:30 THE SMURFS (PG) 5:15

MADRAS CINEMA 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER 3-D (PG-13) 1:10, 4, 6;45, 9:30 COWBOYS & ALIENS (PG13) 2, 4:30, 7, 9:35 CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG13) 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) Noon, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45, 9:05 THE SMURFS (PG) 12:20, 2:35, 4:50, 7:15, 9:25

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

COWBOYS & ALIENS (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 4:15, 7:15 RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13) 4, 7 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

5 ways to reduce your food waste By Terri Bennett McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Stop and think about all the food in your fridge that will end up in the garbage can. Between food that goes bad, extra helpings left on the plate, or unused leftovers — it’s a lot. In fact, more than 30 percent of the food we buy ends up in the trash and eventually, a landfill. That’s like taking money right out of your wallet and throwing it away. Here are my Top 5 Ways to Waste Less Food.

Take stock of the situation Knowing exactly what food you have is your first line of defense. Store leftovers in clear containers to help you keep track of them. Move foods with approaching use-by dates up to the front of your fridge so you use them first.

The freezer is your friend The freezer can make almost any food last months longer. If you just don’t feel like heating up leftovers on the second day — freeze them instead. The freezer is also good for stocking up on staples. For instance, I’ll freeze an extra batch of meat sauce in several containers that are each the right proportion for my family. Also, freezing seasonal produce such as strawberries, blueberries, and corn allows you to enjoy healthy foods all year long.

Save the small stuff Did you not wrap up the half a

Google+ Continued from C1 My first instinct is to say that what we’re doing primarily is wasting our time and worse. As my husband wisely points out, there is nothing anyone can post on Facebook that makes you like or respect them more than you did before. Your reputation can only lose luster or remain the same. (Indeed, that is why I have blocked my husband from viewing my Facebook page.) When it comes to Twitter (which I also initially mocked but ended up joining), I’ve noticed that the more tweets I see from folks in a short period of time, the more I begin to wonder whether they’re receiving the proper psychiatric care. When I see that someone’s on MySpace, LinkedIn or Foursquare, I assume he or she is in a band, have some really boring job or are incapable of going anywhere alone, respectively. I know these are unfair assumptions, and I know I’m doing some big-time generalizing here (though I have yet to hear a compelling argument for the GPS-driven, friend-locating service that is Foursquare, which seems useful primarily if you want to avoid running into someone). In simpler times we judged people according to the crowds they ran with; we now must form

sandwich you got too busy to eat at lunch? What about that extra helping of lasagna at dinner? Even if it’s not a full serving, it can be a side item tomorrow. Or, it can become a kid-sized portion for dinner. Here’s another useful tip. If you have extra stock, wine, or the like, freeze it in an ice cube tray for use in a sauce or stew later.

Shop smarter My best advice is to make a list and stick to it when you head to the grocery store. It’s too easy to be swayed by sale items or foods you may not really need. Planning out your meals in advance will help you create a list of ingredients and curb impulse buys that can easily go to waste. And you won’t need to make extra trips to the store to get items you forgot.

Give composting a go Composting is the perfect way to turn food scraps into free fertilizer for your lawn and garden. And there is more than one way to compost. You can set up a bin in your backyard, you can use an electric unit for small jobs or you could take your food scraps to a composting center. You can learn more about all of these options at DoYourPart. com/Columns. These days, it just doesn’t make sense to waste food or your hard-earned money. Incorporating a few of these ideas will help you Do Your Part to save both! Now, that’s an appetizing thought.

opinions based not only on people’s “friends” but the platforms on which they choose to collect them. Google+, on the other hand, is so far largely impervious to such judgments. It’s so new that it has no identity and therefore no stigma. I haven’t yet posted something to lower my husband’s estimation of me because, like 99 percent of people I know, he’s not on it. That will change, of course; users are believed to be increasing at a rate of 1 million a day. For now, though, I have to admit I kind of like it. There’s mystery and potential here, a little like the allure and do-over possibilities of moving to a new town in ninth grade. Not that I don’t still think all of these social networking sites are hijacking our lives. Surely even the most ardent Facebookers won’t lie on their deathbeds one day saying, “I should have ‘liked’ more posts.” But given the choice between the homecoming dance and this awkward new dance that is Google+, I’ll choose awkwardness. Besides, right now all anyone’s doing is getting drunk in the parking lot. And that can be the best part. Weekly Arts & Entertainment Inside

Every Friday


C4 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 C5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO SATURDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Monday, Aug. 8, 2011: This year, your creativity shoots upward to a new level. You have a lot to be happy about, as you will be welcoming many new opportunities into your life. If you are single, you very well might wave goodbye to that status. If you are attached, the two of you could start acting like newlyweds once more. Your intuition is strong, but also learn to appreciate and understand that others have a similar sense. At times you might attempt to rope yourself in and be more serious. Worry less about impressions, and just be yourself. SAGITTARIUS piques your interest. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Your fiery side emerges no matter what you do. Understand which direction you are heading in. Someone reacts and closes off. Could this be a power play? Your imagination fires up in a discussion, attracting many. Tonight: Beam in what you want. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Stay centered when dealing with family or a personal issue. The sooner you put this issue on the back burner, the more involved you can become in what is happening around you. A good feeling emanates from a one-on-one discussion. Tonight: Go with a suggestion. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You might have all the suggestions you need, but they keep coming in. One of the major

sources of these ideas might need to take the lead. Let him or her, and go off and do what pleases you. Make time for a loved one later on. Tonight: Just not alone. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You might want to let someone know what is ailing you. Together you can find easy solutions to take some of the heat off you. Relaxed, you won’t see the situation in question the same way. Tonight: Squeeze in some exercise. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH It might be Monday, but you have the enthusiasm and energy associated with a fun adventure. Your vagueness about a financial or partnership matter could be getting the best of you. Communication opens up. Tonight: Be your carefree self. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH You could be vested in handling someone in a certain manner. You wonder which way to go with a key interaction. You rotate between trusting this person and feeling vaguely deceived. Your instincts might not serve you right now. Tonight: Head home. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Keep communication flowing. You could be unusually severe with a friend or sibling. Recognize your attitude, and you might not be surprised by the other party’s reaction. A meeting could turn into a social happening. Tonight: Catch up on a friend’s news. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Curb a possessive streak, which you might not even be aware of. Note others’ reactions if they

tend to back off sometimes. Listen to feedback. No one wants to be another person’s possession. Would you? Tonight: Buy a token of affection for a loved one. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Understand what is happening with others, but don’t slow down for too long. Keep on schedule, as you have much on your plate. Whatever you do, you do very well. Trust yourself. A meeting could be a drag. Tonight: Whatever makes you smile. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HH Step back if you must understand exactly what is going on with you. A tendency to be overly sensitive and demanding could be at the root of this issue. Express your caring toward another person. Tonight: Work late if you are feeling overwhelmed. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH A friend or several associates could be pointing in the direction they believe you should go. By now you must know it is important to respond to your own inner voice. Otherwise, a backfire is likely. Tonight: Where your friends are. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Take a stand and handle what you must with certitude and directness. You might need a timeout from the hectic pace you are keeping. A boss, parent or some other authority figure is certainly very demanding. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C6 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Biomass

On the Web

Continued from C1 Phil Chang, biomass proponent and program administrator for the Central Oregon Intergovernmental Council, says the tax credit is money well-spent. “We’re talking about providing a tax credit to a contractor or trucking company ... that is causing a very direct and immediate local economic stimulus,” he said. And the money goes to local contractors whose workers spend their pay in their communities, Chang said. “It’s not like putting that money in an out-of-state bank account,” he said. “That money would go into contractors’ bank account and get spent in the local community.” But with two green tons equaling one dry ton, Chang said, lawmakers essentially chopped the credit in half. Matt Krumenauer, senior policy analyst with the Oregon Department of Energy, provided a more benign reason for the change. He said it brings the biomass industry in line with the rest of the timber industry. Either way, lawmakers reauthorized the tax credit during a session in which they formed a special committee to examine many such programs. They also began the session in January facing a roughly $3 billion gap.

Developing market Along with changing the tonnage definition that qualifies for the credit, the Legislature also required applicants to provide more information and keep better records to ensure accountability, said Chang, who also serves on

Australia Continued from C1 The fate of the Tasmanian thylacines is all too familiar. Despite scant evidence of any real threat to livestock, the settlers placed bounties on thylacines and their pups and hunted their natural prey. In just 130 years, the combined pressures led to the disappearance of the thylacine in the wild. The last thylacine died in the Hobart Zoo in 1936. I want to find that Kakadu thylacine again. To help me, I have spotters: my sons, Chris, a filmmaker; Patrick, an aspiring screenwriter; and Will, a music student. They filmed our journey in Kakadu and what we saw along the way.

Reptile thrills The drive from Darwin to Kakadu is one of my favorite stretches of road anywhere. Besides passing through such colorfully named hamlets as Humpty Doo, it offered great wildlife spotting as we entered the wetlands of this tropical region. After entering the park, we crossed our first big river. On the east bank we saw two large saltwater crocodiles sunning themselves. The river is named the South Alligator because that’s what an early an explorer thought these creatures were. Big mistake. The crocs are larger and much more dangerous than American alligators. Every body of water in Kakadu is lined with warning signs, and some who have ignored them have paid with their lives. With a cloudless sky, tempera-

• For more information about the Ecosystem Workforce Program, visit http://ewp .uoregon.edu/home. • For more information about the Biomass Producer and Collector Tax Credit, visit http:// oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/ Biomass/TaxCdt.shtml, or www .oregon.gov/ENERGY/RENEW/ Biomass/Biomass-Producer_ Advisory_Committee.shtml, for information about changes to the tax credit rules.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

Wood pellets and bricks like those made at the Malheur Lumber Co. pellet plant in John Day represent products produced for the biomass market. The state uses tax credits and other programs to help build the market, which supporters say brings jobs to rural communities. the advisory committee. But collecting the brush and slash in the woods represents only half the equation. To generate renewable energy, it must be delivered to a power plant, boiler or pellet plant where it can be burned or ground up and converted to a fuel source. In other words, a market needs to exist to take the product. One is developing, and the state also provides property tax breaks, loan programs and grants to build renewable energy generating facilities or study them. Those incentives are helping to build a small, but growing, biomass industry that is pulling together a diverse group of businesses. For example, locally, Sisters High School, the Gilchrist and Prineville sawmills and the new

Deschutes National Forest headquarters building use biomass, or soon will, to generate heat. Mt. Bachelor ski area included a biomass cogeneration plant to provide electricity and steam heat as part of its master plan upgrades. Pellet plants have opened in Redmond and John Day, and HM3 Energy of Gresham has proposed building a plant in Prineville to make biomass briquettes that could be burned in a power plant in place of, or along with, coal to generate electricity. While Oregon’s biomass industry is getting tax credits and support from industry and environmentalists, the Cascade Policy Institute in Portland cautions about announcements trumpeting the growth of green jobs. Many of them require subsidies from

tures in the high 80s and low humidity, the landscape seemed unusually green for the dry season. I have been told that the wet season lasted later than usual this year, which should bode well for wildlife. Many of Kakadu’s mammal and reptile residents are nocturnal, so some of the best action unfolds after dark. Sure enough, as dusk fell on our first day in Kakadu, my headlights picked up the reflection of a snake on the road. Approaching very carefully, I saw from its spotted pattern and head that it was a young Children’s python, about 30 inches long. While Australia is notorious for its many species of venomous snakes, this was not one of them. The 20 species of pythons can get much bigger than this little guy; on previous visits I have seen pythons pushing 10 feet. Still, I was thrilled. This is a big part of what we came for. A hike the next day to the Nourlangie art site did not turn up any thylacines, but park rangers calmly pointed out a small snake curled up near one beautifully painted rock face. They seemed reluctant to identify it. No wonder. I recognized the striped camouflage of the death adder — a name that would not inspire comfort among other onlookers.

only was the measure an abject failure, the introduction of this prolific and hardy invasive species has been an ecological catastrophe. Throughout their life cycle, the toads produce potent toxins that are fatal to most mammals, snakes and lizards. The toads have advanced across northern Australia at a rate of about 15 miles per year and reached Kakadu’s southern boundary in 2000-01. When I visited six years ago, I saw nowhere near as many toads. And my worry was compounded when I failed to spot two species that were once common here: the large monitor lizard called the goanna and a small, spotted carnivorous marsupial, the quoll. My fears were confirmed when I met with Michelle Ibbett, an Australian mammal expert. Ibbett explained that Kakadu’s mammals have been severely stressed, not just by the arrival of the toads, but also by questionable fire-management practices. While the aboriginal residents of Kakadu used patchwork burning to clear space and to reduce the risk of major fires, large parts of the park are now being burned deliberately and repeatedly without adequate consideration of the effects on wildlife. And because the goanna population has been decimated by toads, the many burrows they would normally dig are not available to serve as refuge for other species — snakes, lizards and mammals. The scientific data are heartbreaking. A recent study by John Woinarski and colleagues at Charles Darwin University in the Northern Territory revealed a very recent, rapid and severe decline of native mammals in

Invaders The second night, we saw another small Children’s python, a few very small legless lizards — and, to my dismay, cane toads by the dozens. This species is not native to Australia. It was brought to Queensland in 1935 to control a pest called the cane beetle. Not

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governments that cannot afford them, although the institute did not specifically mention biomass in its July commentary. State budget analysts estimated total tax credits for all programs cost the state about $30.9 billion during the 2009-11 budget cycle, about $4 billion more state and local taxing districts would collect to pay for their programs.

‘A pretty good deal’ In a 2010 report looking at experiences in several European countries, the Texas-based National Center for Policy Analysis said as the energy sector became more efficient, it lost more jobs than it gained from employment in the green sector, although not specifically focused on biomass. Many of the jobs also were not permanent, according to the center, which supports the free market over government regulation. And an environmental consulting firm hired to review the Oregon Business Energy Tax Credit program said in a May report that developers of some large wind

Kakadu. The biologists surveyed 25 species in more than 130 plots over 13 years. They observed that the number of species declined by 54 percent per plot, and the number of animals by 71 percent. Moreover, plots with no mammals at all increased to 55 percent in 2009, from 13 percent in 1996. Of 19 native species recorded from multiple plots, 10 showed declines and none showed any increase. Several are on the road to extinction. The scientists said the smallmammal populations of Kakadu were in “collapse,” and they placed the blame largely on cane toads and fire-control practices. In a large conservation reserve, such a collapse is nothing less than a catastrophe.

A painful reminder On our last full day in Kakadu, we hiked around the sandstone formations of the Ubirr region and visited the art sites in northern end of the park. There, on the west face of a great gallery, about 30 feet off the ground, I finally spotted that image of the thylacine I had first seen long ago, created in about 12 B.C. (before cane toads). I now see the image on the rock not as a cultural relic but as a warning call. It was a few thousand years after that painting was made at Ubirr that a naturalist, David Fleay, entered the zoo enclosure in Hobart to film a male thylacine. He did not know that his 62-second black-and-white film would be the final, poignant record of the last thylacine to walk

projects would likely have built them even if they had not received the credits. Even proponents say biomass will not completely revive rural economies to the level when timber was king. “The emerging biomass industry is not going to replace the timber industry as it once was,” said Krumenauer, of the state Energy Department. But it can help in three separate areas: creating jobs, generating renewable energy and improving forest health, which means reducing wildfire risk. “It’s pretty good when you can deal with three things at once,” he said.

An abundant resource Presently, the U.S. Forest Service has three options for removing the brush and undergrowth generated by thinning, Chang said. It can pay someone to take it away; burn it or leave a big pile and hope someone takes it away. Burning it costs $200-$300 an acre, he said, along with sending emissions into the air. So even if the agency gave away the piles of brush it would be saving money. Jobs generated by biomass collection may not last forever, he said, but the work in the woods won’t run out anytime soon. The region’s forests have hundreds of thousands of acres that need thinning. “The volume of biomass in this area right now is phenomenal,” Chang said. “It will take us a long, long time to get through (it).” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360, or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

the planet. But that thylacine made perhaps the most fitting gesture offcamera, one that served as its own final commentary on the entire history of human-thylacine relations and on our failure to act in time to save the species. Fleay, operating the camera with his head under a black cloth, did not notice that the thylacine had sneaked up behind him. The carnivore then bit him squarely on the buttocks. Kakadu was until very recently thought to be immune from the extinctions that have plagued much of Australia’s native fauna. That bite needs to be felt by many more buttocks — not just in Australia but across the globe, where invasive species, ineffective management and wishful thinking imperil the wild places and creatures that still remain.

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With human at the wheel, a Google self-driving car crashes By David Sarno Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Google Inc.’s quest to popularize cars that drive themselves seemed to hit a roadblock Friday when news emerged that one of the vehicles was in an accident. But in an ironic twist, the company said the car was not driving itself; a human was. Auto blog Jalopnik posted a photo apparently showing a Google car pulled to the side of the road after banging into another Prius near Google’s Mountain View, Calif., headquarters. In the photo, the Google car, with its telltale rack of roof electronics, is parked behind the other vehicle as a policeman and other drivers look on. Self-driving cars must legally have a human at the wheel, ready to assume control if anything goes wrong. Google says that in this case, the human driver was operating the car in manual mode at the time of the accident. “Safety is our top priority. One of our goals is to prevent fender-benders like this one, which occurred while a person was manually driving the car,” according to a Google spokesperson, adding that the cars have now traveled more than 160,000 miles autonomously “without incident.”

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D

Sports Inside Adam Scott wins the Bridgestone Invitational, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • MONDAY, AUGUST 8, 2011

WCL BASEBALL

YOUTH SOCCER

Elks lose to Gems in regular season finale

Bend Premier Cup crowns champs

KLAMATH FALLS — Bend ended its regular season in the West Coast League on Sunday with a 5-4 loss to Klamath Falls, but the team’s playoff hopes continue depending on how Cowlitz competes against Corvallis over the next three days. Bend (29-25 WCL) needs Cowlitz (27-24) to fall to Corvallis when their three-game series begins today. If the Knights win two of three over the Black Bears, the Elks will host the first game of the playoffs starting Friday. Two wins by the Black Bears and the Elks’ season comes to a close. On Sunday, Bend fell behind 3-0 after the fifth inning, but evened the score with three runs in the sixth. The Gems regained the lead in the bottom of the eighth with a run, but Bend’s Donald Collins drove in Justin Maffei to make the score 4-4 after the top of the ninth. Klamath Falls took the decisive lead in the bottom of the ninth after Drew Sandler drove home Rich Sanguinetti. Donald Collins, Michael Benjamin Jr. and Toby Demello each had a double for Bend. — Bulletin staff report

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Buffs insist they have upper hand in Pac-12 move BOULDER, Colo. — The University of Colorado Buffaloes have switched leagues, own one of the toughest schedules in the country and have a slew of new schools and stadiums to learn. Advantage Colorado? New coach Jon Embree, who returned to his alma mater to replace Dan Hawkins, figures the Buffs might just be the ones with the upper hand as they join the Pac-12 and leave the Big 12 behind. He’s eager for schools such as USC and Arizona to visit Folsum Field in November and see what it’s like to play in the Rocky Mountains. And he said that while his coaching staff needs to learn a lot of new programs, Colorado’s opponents will be facing a bigger mystery in a Buffaloes program that sports new coaches and concepts. “Well, let me ask you this question, don’t they have to watch us?� Embree said. “They don’t know anything about us. If anything, we probably have an advantage because they don’t know what we’re doing. “We can watch tape on Stanford and know what they’re doing. David Shaw’s still there. We can watch tape on Washington and know what they’re doing. So, I think it’s an advantage for us. We’re the unknown in a good way. Because we know what they’re going to do.� — The Assocated Press

Bulletin staff report

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Jamie McCool, of Oregon Rush 97 Girls Nike, center, kicks the ball to a teammate during a Bend Premier Cup U14 girls gold division semifinal game at Mountain View High School on Sunday.

cluding on multiple fields in Pine NursInside The second year of the Bend Premier ery Community and Big Sky parks, Cup youth soccer tournament turned • Results, among others. Page D2 out to be twice the fun. A total of 24 division winners were “For doubling in size, basically, evcrowned on Sunday, the third and fierything ran smoothly,â€? Oregon Rush nal day of the tournament. Rush teams executive director John O’Sullivan said. “Our won their fair share of tournament hardware, staff and volunteers did a great job, and the with championships in the U13 and U16 girls quality of the tournament was much better.â€? gold divisions. And Rush boys teams in the U11, The Rush is a Bend-based youth soccer club U12 and U19 divisions advanced to their respecthat puts on the Premier Cup, which drew 145 tive finals. teams — compared with about 85 in 2010 — “I got to watch a lot of finals (Sunday),â€? from across the state as well as from Washing- O’Sullivan said. “Some great games, really ton, Idaho, Nevada and California. Games were exciting games ... some really good players on staged on fields located throughout Bend, in- display.â€?

CYCLING CENTRAL

LOCAL RUNNING

A big ride Bend’s Chris Horner, a five-time participant in the Tour de France, will be putting on the Cascade Gran Fondo later this month

J

uly 2011 was not the kindest month to Chris Horner. He hopes August will be better. For local cycling fans, it should be pretty good. Next week, biking enthusiasts will have the opportunity to get up close and personal with Horner, a professional cyclist and longtime Bend resident, during the Cascade Gran Fondo, a three-day cycling event that culminates in a bike ride around Central Oregon. “Bike racing’s done everything for me during my career, and so it’s just a way to give back,� the five-time Tour

AMANDA MILES

de France rider explains of his decision to start, along with fiancee Megan Elliott, the Gran Fondo. “You’ve got to give back something.� On Aug. 18, a Thursday, Horner will regale an audience at the Tower Theatre in downtown Bend with stories from his 17-year professional career, including some glimpses behind the scenes at the Tour de France — insights that the Team RadioShack rider says are hard to get from watching the race on television. See Gran Fondo / D5

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Haulin’ Aspen runners take off down a dirt road, just after the start of the race at Miller Elementary School in Bend Sunday morning.

Nearly 700 complete Haulin’ Aspen Bulletin staff report

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Chris Horner and his fiancee, Megan Elliott, have been working together to organize the Cascade Gran Fondo being held in Bend later this month. The Cascade Gran Fondo was designed by Horner to be a fun ride through the Cascade Mountains that suits every type of rider.

Almost 700 runners and walkers completed races at the Haulin’ Aspen, which was staged on trails around Bend on Sunday. In the marathon, a pair of Bend runners were victorious. Rod Bien was the co-winner in the men’s race in 2 hours, 58 minutes, and 3 seconds. He finished in the same time as Stuart Gil- Inside lespie, of Denver. Garrette Mc• Results, Intire was first for the women Page D4 in 3:16:23. In the half marathon, which featured nearly half of the participants in the Haulin’ Aspen, Jesse Stevick of Olympia, Wash., won the men’s race in 1:21:15. Ulrike Krotscheck, also of Olympia, took the women’s race in 1:43:03. Zoe Roy, of Bend, won the women’s 7-mile race (46:11), while Jeff Oswalt, of Spokane, Wash., won the race for the men (44:39). All races started at William E. Miller Elementary School, located just off Skyliners Road in west Bend, and ended in Shevlin Park. PAID ADVERTISEMENT

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LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL: NORTHWEST REGIONALS

Bend South is looking ahead at tourney By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Colorado coach Jon Embree

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Auto racing ................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 Local sports.............................. D4 Golf ........................................... D4 Cycling Central..........................D5

SAN BERNARDINO, Calif. — Bend South All-Stars coach Brad Waterman is refreshingly honest when talking about playing in the Little League Northwest Regional Tournament. “You have to eyeball the rest of the games on your schedule,� says Waterman, breaking one of the cardinal unwritten rules in sports: Never look past your next opponent. “You don’t want to, but with pitch counts, you have to.� Welcome to the somewhat complex world of Little League Baseball. The United States’ most well-known youth baseball organization, Little League has multiple rules regarding participation and pitching limits that can sometimes leave a coach scratching his head. “If you watch me, you can see the stress on my face about the third inning,� Waterman

At a glance A quick look at the Little League Northwest Regional Tournament in San Bernardino, Calif. For more information, see Page D4. Sunday: Off day for Bend South Today: Bend South vs. North Bothell, Wash., 7:30 p.m. (game broadcast on radio at KICE-AM 940)

says half joking, half serious. In Little League’s 11-12 age division, every player on a team’s roster must play in the field for six consecutive outs and have at least one turn at bat. Waterman, who carries 12 players on his team, usually makes sure all of his starters get their first at-bat in and then puts in his substitutes after the third inning. See Bend South / D4

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D2 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD SOCCER Local

TELEVISION TODAY BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Minnesota Twins, ESPN. 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports.

TUESDAY BASEBALL Noon — Little League, Southwest Regional Tournament, first semifinal, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — Little League, Southwest Regional Tournament, second semifinal, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — Detroit Tigers at Cleveland Indians or Los Angeles Angels at New York Yankees, MLB network.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — WNBA, Seattle Storm at New York Liberty, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 7:30 p.m. — Little League, Northwest Regional Tournament, pool play, Bend South vs. Washington, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available, The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S 

 B Golf • Bend golfer finishes second at stroke play event: Bend’s Tiffany Schoning fired a 1-overpar-73 Sunday to finish in second place in the 21st Oregon Women’s Stroke Play Championship at Emerald Valley Golf Club in Creswell. Schoning, a senior-to-be at Portland State University and a Summit High School graduate, finished the 36-hole tournament at 5 over. In a field of 45 golfers, Schoning finished two strokes better than a three-way tie for third place, but six strokes behind champion Monica Vaughan, a 16-year-old from Reedsport.

Tennis • Stepanek upsets Monfils to win Washington title: Unseeded Radek Stepanek’s netcharging style carried him to the Legg Mason Tennis Classic title in Washington at age 32, making him the tournament’s oldest champion since Jimmy Connors was 35 in 1988. The unseeded Stepanek, of the Czech Republic, won an ATP final for the first time in 2½ years by upsetting top-seeded Gael Monfils, of France, 6-4, 6-4 Sunday. • Radwanska beats Zvonareva to win Carlsbad title: Agnieszka Radwanska, of Poland, won her first tournament title in more than three years with a 6-3, 6-4 victory over third-ranked Vera Zvonareva in the Mercury Insurance Open final in California on Sunday. — Associated Press

2011 Bend Premier Cup ——— Men’s U19 HS Boys Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A Mustang Rough Riders (CAN) 2, Eugene Metro FC United 1 Oregon Rush 92 B 9, Crossfire Premier B93 Storkson (WA) 1 Oregon Rush 92 B 5, Mustang Rough Riders (CAN) 1 Eugene Metro FC United 1, Crossfire Premier B93 Storkson (WA) 1 Bracket B Kaos Surge (CAN) 4, River City SC Rapids (WA) 0 Oregon Rush 94 Nike Boys 5, Washington Rush 93 Nike 2 River City SC 94 Rapids (WA) 2, Oregon Rush 94 Nike Boys 1 Kaos Surge (CAN) 3, Washington Rush Nike (WA) 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Oregon Rush 92 B 4, River City SC 94 Rapids (WA) 1 Mustang Rough Riders (CAN) 3, Kaos Surge (CAN) 1 Final Mustang Rough Riders (CAN) 3, Oregon Rush 92 B 0 Women’s U18 U17/U18 Girls Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A Washington Rush G94 Nike (WA) 2, FC Willamette Possession 1 Oregon Rush 93G Nike 3, Blackhills FC GU17 (CROSS) (WA) 0 Oregon Rush 93G Nike 3, Washington Rush G94 Nike (WA) 0 Blackhills FC GU17 (CROSS) (WA) 4, FC Willamette Possession 0 Bracket B Alliance FC Devils 93 (CAN) 7, Mt. Rainier FC 94 Blue (WA) 1 Mt. Rainier FC 94 Blue (WA) 0, Independent Joga Bonita 0 Alliance FC Devils 93 (CAN) 6, EMFC Havoc 0 Bracket C North Valley United (CAN) 0, EMFC Havoc 0 Independent Joga Bonita 3, Elko Indar Futbol U18 (NV) 0 Elko Indar Futbol U18 (NV) 1, North Valley United (CAN) 1 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Alliance FC Devils 93 (CAN) 3, Oregon Rush 93G Nike 1 Independent Joga Bonita 2, Elko Indar Futbol U18 (NV) 1 Final Alliance FC Devils 93 (CAN) 4, Independent Joga Bonita 1 Boys U10 Saturday’s Results Bracket A Vancouver United Timbers 01 (WA) 3, Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys Blue 1 AYSO 870 Albany Heat 8, Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys White 0 Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys White 2, Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys Blue 1 AYSO 870 Albany Heat 1, Vancouver United Timbers 01 (WA) 1 Bracket B RPSC River 6, EMFC Valencia 0 Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys Red 12, RPSC River 0 Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys Red 1, EMFC Valencia 0 Sunday’s Results Consolation Vancouver United VUSA Timbers O1 (WA) 7, Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys Red 0 Oregon Rush SC U10 Boys White 2, EMFC Valencia 2 Final RPSC River 11, AYSO 870 Albany Heat 1 Boys U11 Saturday’s Results Eugene Metro FC 00 Rovers Blue 2, Washington Rush 00 Swoosh (WA) 2 Washington Rush 00 Nike (WA) 5, Eugene Metro FC Rovers White 0 Oregon Rush 00 Boys Nike 1, Washington Rangers 0 Washington Rush 00 Nike (WA) 4, Eugene Metro FC 00 Rovers Blue 0 Washington Rush 00 Swoosh (WA) 2, Washington Rangers (WA) 0 Oregon Rush 00 Boys Nike 4, Eugene Metro FC 00 Rovers White 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Washington Rush 00 Nike (WA) 5, Eugene Metro FC Rovers Blue 0 Oregon Rush 00 Boys Nike 2, Washington Rush 00 Swoosh (WA) 0 Final Washington Rush 00 Nike (WA) 2, Oregon Rush 00 Boys Nike 0 Boys U12 Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A WA Rush B99 Nike (WA) 8, Spartans 0 Eugene Metro FC 99 Celtic 10, Pacific FC 99 White (WA) 1 Oregon Rush 99Boys Nike 8, Spartans 1 WA Rush B99 Nike (WA) 7, Eugene Metro FC 99 Celtic 0 Oregon Rush 99Boys Nike 5, Pacific FC 99 White (WA) 0 Sunday’s Results Final WA Rush B99 Nike (WA) 2, Oregon Rush 99Boys Nike 1 Boys U13 Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A Shadow B98 U13 Navy (WA) 3, Eugene Metro FC 98 Juventus 1 Vancouver United CPSC Timbers Reds (WA) 2, Oregon Rush 98B Nike Rush 2 Washington Rush M98 Nike (WA) 5, Shadow B98 U13 Navy (WA) 0 Oregon Rush 98B Nike Rush 2, Eugene Metro FC 98 Juventus 1 Washington Rush M98 Nike (WA) 2, Vancouver United CPSC Timbers Reds (WA) 1 Sunday’s Results Final Washington Rush M98 Nike (WA) 6, Vancouver United CPSC Timbers Reds (WA) 1 Boys U13 Silver Saturday’s Results Bracket A WSA Wolves (WA) 6, Washington Rush B98 Swoosh (WA) 0 Redding Kaos Raiders (CAN) 4, Oregon Rush 98 Swoosh Boys 0 Redding Kaos Raiders (CAN) 7, Washington Rush B98 Swoosh (WA) 0 WSA Wolves (WA) 6, Oregon Rush 98 Swoosh Boys 0 Sunday’s Results Final Redding Kaos Raiders (CAN) 3, WSA Wolves (WA) 1 Boys U14 Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A Cascade Futbol Rangers 3, EMFC Boca Juniors 2 Spokane Shadow YSC Shadow 97 Navy (WA) 4, Washington Rush B97 Nike (WA) 2 Cascade Futbol Rangers 1, Spokane Shadow YSC Shadow 97 Navy (WA) 0 EMFC Boca Juniors 2, Washington Rush B97 Nike (WA) 1 Bracket B Crossfire Premier B97 Storkson (WA) 3, Eugene Metro Futbol Boca Jr White 3 WSA Pilots (WA) 4, Oregon Rush 97 Nike Boys 1 Crossfire Premier B97 Storkson (WA) 2, Oregon Rush 97 Nike Boys 2 Eugene Metro Futbol Boca Jr White 1, WSA Pilots (WA) 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Cascade Futbol Rangers 0, Oregon Rush 97 Nike Boys 0 WSA Pilots (WA) 2, Spokane Shadow YSC Shadow 97 Navy (WA) 1 Final

WSA Pilots (WA) 2, Cascade Futbol Rangers 1 Boys U14 Silver Saturday’s Results Southside SC SSC 97 Santos 4, VUSA Timbers Timbers 97 Red (WA) 0 Hillsboro HSC Force 1, Salmon Creek Juventus 97 (WA) 1 Oregon City SC OC Arsenal 1, Mariposa’s Mariposa 0 Basin United Veloce 2, VUSA Timbers Timbers 97 Red (WA) 0 Hillsboro HSC Force 2, Oregon City SC OC Arsenal 1 Southside SC SSC 97 Santos 2, Salmon Creek Juventus 97 (WA) 0 Mariposa’s Mariposa 5, Basin United Veloce 0 Sunday’s Results Final Southside SC SSC 97 Santos 4, Hillsboro HSC Force 3 Boys U16 U15/16 Boys Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A WA Rush B96-Nike (WA) 2, Spokane Shadow B95 Sky (WA) 0 Eugene Metro Futbol EMFC 95 Gunners 9, Idaho Rush Nike 96-97 (ID) 0 Oregon Rush 96 Boys Nike 1, Washington Rush B95 Nike (WA) 0 WA Rush B96-Nike (WA) 6, Idaho Rush Nike 96-97 (ID) 0 Oregon Rush 96 Boys Nike 3, NW Nationals B96 Red (WA) 2 Spokane Shadow B95 Sky (WA) 3, Washington Rush B95 Nike (WA) 1 Eugene Metro Futbol EMFC 95 Gunners 1, NW Nationals B96 Red (WA) 0 Sunday’s Results Final WA Rush B96-Nike (WA) 1, Eugene Metro Futbol EMFC 95 Gunners 0 Boys U16 U15/16 Boys Silver Saturday’s Results Bracket A South Hill Revolution B95-Black (WA) 3, Spokane Shadow Shadow B96 U15 Navy (WA) 2 Madras United 5, WA Rush B95 Swoosh (WA) 0 South Hill Revolution B95-Black (WA) 4, WA Rush B95 Swoosh (WA) 0 Madras United 1, Spokane Shadow Shadow B96 U15 Navy (WA) 0 Sunday’s Results Final South Hill Revolution B95-Black (WA) 5, Madras United 1 Girls U10 Saturday’s Results Bracket A Washington Rush G01 Black (WA) 4, EMFC 01 Cypress White 0 Oregon Rush Girls White 5, EMFC 01 Cypress White 0 Washington Rush G01 Black (WA) 2, Oregon Rush Girls White 0 Bracket B Irish 6, Oregon Rush Girls Blue 1 EMFC 01 Cypress Blue 1, Oregon Rush Girls Blue 0 Irish 5, EMFC 01 Cypress Blue 2 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Washington Rush G01 Black (WA) 2, EMFC 01 Cypress Blue 0 Irish 2, Oregon Rush Girls White 0 Consolation Oregon Rush Girls Blue 4, EMFC 01 Cypress White 2 Final Washington Rush G01 Black (WA) 1, Irish 0 Girls U11 8v8 Saturday’s Results Bracket A Rogue Valley 00 Slammers 6, Oregon Rush Swoosh 0 Idaho Rush Soccer Idaho Rush Blue (ID) 4, Oregon Rush Swoosh 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinal Rogue Valley 00 Slammers 4, Oregon Rush Swoosh 0 Final Idaho Rush Soccer Idaho Rush Blue (ID) 2, Rogue Valley 00 Slammers 0 Girls U11 11v11 Saturday’s Results Bracket A Clackamas United Force 5, Oregon Rush OO Nike 0 Eugene Metro FC EMFC 00 SOL Blue 5, Eugene Metro FC EMFC 00 SOL White 1 WUSC Celtic 2, Oregon Rush 00 Nike 0 Clackamas United Force 6, Eugene Metro FC EMFC 00 SOL White 0 WUSC Celtic 1, Eugene Metro FC EMFC 00 SOL Blue 1 Sunday’s Results Final Clackamas United Force 2, WUSC Celtic 1 Girls U12 Gold Saturday’s Results Oregon Rush 99G Nike 4, Mid Valley MVSC-Forza 2 Willamette United WUSC GU12 White 2, RVSC Inferno 1 Southside SSC 99 Fury 1, RVSC Inferno 0 Eugene Metro FC EMFC 99 Athleticablue 3, Willamette United WUSC GU12 White 0 Southside SSC 99 Fury 2, Mid Valley MVSC-Forza 2 Eugene Metro FC EMFC 99 Athleticablue 5, Oregon Rush 99G Nike 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinals RVSC Inferno 1, Eugene Metro FC EMFC 99 Athletica Blue 0 Willamette United WUSC GU12 White 2, Southside SSC 99 Fury 0 Final Willamette United WUSC GU12 White 3, RVSC Inferno 2 Girls U12 Silver Saturday’s Results Bracket A OR Rush 99 Swoosh 3, North United 0 Washington Rush G99 Swoosh (WA) 2, LOSC Freedom 0 Willamette United WUSC GU12 Navy 0, Grants Pass Youth Strikerz 0 Northeast United (NEU) Juventus 4, North United 0 Washington Rush G99 Swoosh 4, Willamette United WUSC GU12 Navy 1 LOSC Freedom 5, OR Rush 99 Swoosh 1 Northeast United (NEU) Juventus 3, Grants Pass Youth Strikerz 0 Sunday’s Results Final Washington Rush G99 Swoosh (WA) 4, Northeast United (NEU) Juventus 2 Girls U13 Silver Saturday’s Results Washington Reliance (WA) 3, Clackamas United Fusion 0 Lake Oswego LOSC SOL 2, ORSC 98 Girls Swoosh 1 VUSA Timbers G98 Blues (WA) 0, Washington Reliance (WA) 0 Clackamas United Fusion 3, WUSC Inter Milan 2 VUSA Timbers G98 Blues (WA) 3, ORSC 98 Girls Swoosh 0 WUSC Inter Milan 5, Lake Oswego LOSC SOL 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinals VUSA Timbers G98 Blues (WA) 1, Clackamas United Fusion 0 WUSC Inter Milan 4, Washington Reliance (WA) 0 Final WUSC Inter Milan 2, VUSA Timbers G98 Blues (WA) 0 Girls U13 Gold Saturday’s Results Oregon Rush 98 Girls Nike 5, Elko Indar Fubtol Elko Indar U13 (NV) 1 Rogue Valley Impact 2, EMFC Storm 1 EMFC Storm 3, Elko Indar Futbol Elko Indar U13 (NV) 2 Oregon Rush 98 Girls Nike 1, Rogue Valley Impact 0 Sunday’s Results Final Oregon Rush 98 Girls Nike 5, Rogue Valley Impact 1 Girls U14 Silver Saturday’s Results Bracket A Westside Metros SC Red Magic 2, Hillsboro Freedom United 0

Idaho Torrent (ID) 4, Clackamas United Cosmos 3 VUSA Timbers Navy (WA) 1, Lake Oswego Mystics 0 Westside Metros SC Red Magic 7, Idaho Torrent (ID) 1 Ashland Supernova 2, Lake Oswego Mystics 0 VUSA Timbers Navy (WA) 2, Clackamas United Cosmos 0 Ashland Supernova 3, Hillsboro Freedom United 2 Sunday’s Results Final Westside Metros SC Red Magic 1, Ashland Supernova 0 Girls U14 Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A Oregon Rush Nike 3, WSA Valor (WA) 1 Lake Oswego SC Ice 4, Rainier Valley Slammers RVS 97 Orange (WA) 1 Oregon Rush Nike 1, Lake Oswego SC Ice 0 WSA Valor (WA) 2, Rainier Valley Slammers RVS 97 Orange (WA) 1 Bracket B Washington Rush G97 Nike 3, WUSC Manchester United 1 CFC Fusion 1, MRFC 97 Blue (WA) 0 CFC Fusion 2, Washington Rush G97 Nike (WA) 1 WUSC Manchester United 0, MRFC 97 Blue (WA) 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Oregon Rush Nike 3, Washington Rush G97 Nike (WA) 3 WSA Valor (WA) 1, CFC Fusion 1 Final WSA Valor (WA) 4, Washington Rush G97 Nike (WA) 1 Girls U15 Gold Saturday’s Results Bracket A EMFC Impact 2, Oregon Rush 96 Girls Nike 2 River City G-96 Black (WA) 2, Washington Rush Nike (WA) 0 Washington Rush Nike (WA) 3, EMFC Impact 0 River City G-96 Black (WA) 2, Oregon Rush 96 Girls Nike 0 Sunday’s Results Final Washington Rush Nike (WA) 2, River City G-96 Black (WA) 1 Girls U16 Gold Saturday’s Results Eastside FC 95 White (WA) 3, Oregon Rush 95G Nike 2 Eugene Metro FC Magic 1, WA Rush 95 Nike (WA) 0 Mt. Rainier Futbol MRFC 95 Cosmos (WA) 1, Eastside FC 95 White (WA) 1 Oregon Rush 95G Nike 5, Blackhills FC BFC GU16 (CROSS) (WA) 0 Mt. Rainier Fubtol MRFC 95 Cosmos (WA) 1, WA Rush 95 Nike (WA) 0 Eugene Metro FC Magic 3, Blackhills FC BFC GU16 (CROSS) (WA) 1 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Oregon Rush 95G Nike 2, Eastside FC 95 White (WA) 0 Eugene Metro FC Magic 3, Mt. Rainier Futbol MRFC 95 Cosmos (WA) 2 Final Oregon Rush 95G Nike 2, Eugene Metro FC Magic 0 Girls U16 U15/U16 Silver Saturday’s Results South Hill Revolution G95 Black (WA) 4, WSA Victory (WA) 1 Harbor FC 95S (WA) 2, Oregon Rush 96 Girls Swoosh 1 Washington Rush 96 Girls Swoosh (WA) 1, WSA Victory (WA) 0 South Hill Revolution G95 Black (WA) 5, EMFC Chelsea 0 Harbor FC 95S (WA) 2, Washington Rush 96 Girls Swoosh (WA) 0 EMFC Chelsea 2, Oregon Rush 96 Girls Swoosh 0 Sunday’s Results Semifinals Harbor FC 95S (WA) 3, Washington Rush 96 Girls Swoosh (WA) 0 South Hill Revolution G95 Black (WA) 3, EMFC Chelsea 0 Final South Hill Revolution G95 Black (WA) 1, Harbor FC 95S (WA) 0 Girls U17 U16/U17 Girls Silver Saturday’s Results Bracket A Bridlemile BSC 95G Black 6, Oregon Rush 94/95 Swoosh 2 Bridlemile BSC 95G Black 5, Vancouver United (VUSA) Blitz 95 (WA) 1 Washington Rush 94 Girls Swoosh (WA) 0, Pacific FC Avalanche 95 (WA) 0 Pacific FC Avalanche 95 (WA) 5, Oregon Rush 94/95 Swoosh 2 Washington Rush 94 Girls Swoosh (WA) 1, Vancouver United (VSUA) Blitz 95 (WA) 0 Sunday’s Results Final Bridlemile BSC 95G Black 1, Pacific FC Avalanche 95 (WA) 0

Reno-Tahoe Open Sunday At Montreaux Golf and Country Club Reno, Nev. Purse: $3 million Yardage: 7,472; Par 72 Final (a-amateur) Scott Piercy (250), $540,000 72-70-61-70—273 Pat Perez (150), $324,000 73-68-65-68—274 Steve Flesch (83), $174,000 68-69-70-68—275 Blake Adams (83), $174,000 67-72-67-69—275 Jim Renner (55), $120,000 74-69-65-68—276 Matt McQuillan (45), $97,125 71-69-71-66—277 Ben Martin (45), $97,125 68-72-68-69—277 Steve Elkington (45), $97,125 73-65-68-71—277 Nick O’Hern (45), $97,125 65-72-69-71—277 Billy Horschel (33), $69,000 71-70-70-67—278 Bryce Molder (33), $69,000 72-71-68-67—278 Hunter Haas (33), $69,000 70-67-72-69—278 Michael Letzig (33), $69,000 70-69-70-69—278 Josh Teater (33), $69,000 72-67-66-73—278 Billy Mayfair (28), $51,000 73-70-69-67—279 Sunghoon Kang (28), $51,000 69-72-70-68—279 Chris Riley (28), $51,000 66-72-68-73—279 Rod Pampling (26), $42,000 68-70-72-70—280 Shane Bertsch (26), $42,000 71-69-69-71—280 Mathias Gronberg (0), $42,000 73-69-66-72—280 Tom Pernice, Jr. (24), $32,400 73-69-70-69—281 Garrett Willis (24), $32,400 73-66-72-70—281 Chris DiMarco (24), $32,400 72-72-67-70—281 Brian Davis (24), $32,400 73-67-67-74—281

MLS

Champions Tour

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Columbus 9 7 7 34 24 Philadelphia 8 5 9 33 27 New York 6 6 12 30 37 Sporting Kansas City 7 7 9 30 32 Houston 6 7 10 28 28 D.C. 6 6 9 27 29 New England 4 10 9 21 22 Toronto FC 3 11 11 20 24 Chicago 2 7 13 19 23 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 13 3 9 48 35 FC Dallas 12 6 6 42 31 Seattle 11 5 8 41 35 Colorado 9 6 10 37 35 Real Salt Lake 10 5 6 36 30 Chivas USA 7 8 8 29 30 Portland 7 10 5 26 28 San Jose 5 8 10 25 25 Vancouver 3 11 9 18 25 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Sunday’s Game Vancouver 4, Chicago 2 Saturday’s Games Chivas USA at Seattle FC, 1 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. New England at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at New York, 4:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Colorado at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14 Portland at Houston, 6 p.m.

GA 22 20 33 30 28 33 33 46 30 GA 20 24 27 31 16 26 35 30 36

GOLF WGC WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS Bridgestone Invitational Sunday At Firestone Country Club (South Course) Akron, Ohio Purse: $8.5 million Yardage: 7,400; Par: 70 Final Adam Scott (550), $1,400,000 62-70-66-65—263 Rickie Fowler (258), $665,000 68-64-69-66—267 Luke Donald (258), $665,000 68-69-64-66—267 Jason Day (128), $332,500 63-70-66-69—268 Ryo Ishikawa (0), $332,500 67-68-64-69—268 Kyung-tae Kim (0), $215,000 66-72-66-66—270 Zach Johnson (96), $215,000 70-68-64-68—270 Rory McIlroy (0), $215,000 68-68-67-67—270 Lee Westwood (0), $152,500 67-71-68-65—271 David Toms (81), $152,500 68-68-68-67—271 Aaron Baddeley (69), $117,333 68-70-69-65—272 Fredrik Jacobson (69), $117,333 68-66-67-71—272 Martin Laird (69), $117,333 66-67-67-72—272 Steve Stricker (62), $100,000 71-65-67-70—273 Francesco Molinari (0), $95,500 73-64-68-69—274

Keegan Bradley (58), $95,500 Mark Wilson (54), $89,500 Robert Karlsson (54), $89,500 D.A. Points (52), $85,000 Matt Kuchar (52), $85,000 Peter Hanson (0), $81,250 Bubba Watson (50), $81,250 Jim Furyk (46), $75,250 Bo Van Pelt (46), $75,250 Lucas Glover (46), $75,250 Retief Goosen (46), $75,250 Ryan Moore (46), $75,250 Nick Watney (46), $75,250 Martin Kaymer (0), $68,500 Hennie Otto (0), $68,500 Scott Stallings (41), $68,500 Anders Hansen (0), $68,500 Justin Rose (37), $64,500 Simon Dyson (0), $64,500 Brandt Snedeker (37), $64,500 Edoardo Molinari (0), $64,500 Geoff Ogilvy (31), $58,500 Ernie Els (31), $58,500 Louis Oosthuizen (31), $58,500 Hunter Mahan (31), $58,500 Richard Green (0), $58,500 Tiger Woods (31), $58,500 Matteo Manassero (0), $58,500 Charley Hoffman (31), $58,500 Paul Casey (25), $53,000 Gary Woodland (25), $53,000 Stewart Cink (25), $53,000 Brendan Steele (21), $49,300 Rory Sabbatini (21), $49,300 Robert Allenby (21), $49,300 Dustin Johnson (21), $49,300 Phil Mickelson (21), $49,300 Alvaro Quiros (0), $46,500 Charl Schwartzel (16), $46,500 Y.E. Yang (16), $46,500 Alexander Noren (0), $46,500 Sergio Garcia (16), $46,500 Heath Slocum (13), $45,000 K.J. Choi (11), $43,750 Jonathan Byrd (11), $43,750 Padraig Harrington (11), $43,750 Sean O’Hair (11), $43,750 Bill Haas (8), $42,250 Arjun Atwal (8), $42,250 Graeme McDowell (6), $41,500 Harrison Frazar (5), $40,750 Jhonattan Vegas (5), $40,750 Darren Clarke (0), $39,250 Jeff Overton (2), $39,250 Ian Poulter (2), $39,250 Thomas Bjorn (0), $39,250 Miguel A. Jimenez (0), $38,000 Jae-bum Park (0), $37,500 Pablo Larrazabal (0), $37,000 Yuta Ikeda (0), $36,500 Stuart Appleby (1), $36,000

67-65-68-74—274 69-69-71-66—275 68-65-72-70—275 66-70-72-68—276 71-69-65-71—276 70-67-70-70—277 69-70-68-70—277 73-69-67-69—278 68-70-71-69—278 68-68-72-70—278 72-68-68-70—278 66-66-74-72—278 65-70-70-73—278 69-70-73-67—279 69-66-75-69—279 69-68-72-70—279 72-70-67-70—279 71-70-72-67—280 77-66-69-68—280 66-68-74-72—280 72-66-70-72—280 68-70-76-67—281 71-71-71-68—281 71-71-70-69—281 71-69-72-69—281 69-68-74-70—281 68-71-72-70—281 70-72-67-72—281 68-69-70-74—281 73-71-71-67—282 70-66-73-73—282 66-70-71-75—282 69-74-74-66—283 66-77-71-69—283 70-73-70-70—283 73-69-70-71—283 67-73-71-72—283 73-74-67-70—284 74-71-68-71—284 72-71-69-72—284 69-73-70-72—284 68-72-72-72—284 71-65-75-74—285 74-71-70-71—286 67-74-75-70—286 71-70-73-72—286 72-72-69-73—286 72-72-70-74—288 68-73-71-76—288 71-72-75-71—289 72-72-77-70—291 73-70-74-74—291 77-74-69-72—292 72-73-73-74—292 71-69-80-72—292 66-72-75-79—292 73-73-74-73—293 73-72-77-72—294 66-76-74-79—295 74-72-77-74—297 73-76-78-72—299

PGA Tour

3M Championship Sunday At TPC Twin Cities Blaine, Minn. Purse: $1,750,000 Yardage: 7,114; Par 72 Final Jay Haas (263), $262,500 64-69-68—201 Kenny Perry (128), $128,333 66-70-66—202 Tom Lehman (128), $128,333 65-69-68—202 Peter Senior (128), $128,333 65-67-70—202 Hal Sutton (84), $84,000 67-69-67—203 Tom Watson (67), $66,500 69-70-65—204 Mark O’Meara (67), $66,500 68-68-68—204 Olin Browne (40), $40,056 71-71-63—205 Joey Sindelar (40), $40,056 66-74-65—205 Hale Irwin (40), $40,056 67-72-66—205 Larry Mize (40), $40,056 71-67-67—205 Jay Don Blake (40), $40,056 68-69-68—205 David Eger (40), $40,056 66-71-68—205 Mark Calcavecchia (40), $40,056 66-68-71—205 Tommy Armour III (40), $40,056 69-67-69—205 John Huston (40), $40,056 64-68-73—205 Craig Stadler, $24,745 74-66-66—206 Chip Beck, $24,745 67-72-67—206 John Cook, $24,745 67-71-68—206 Corey Pavin, $24,745 68-69-69—206 Bobby Clampett, $24,745 68-69-69—206 Mike Goodes, $18,856 69-72-66—207 Lonnie Nielsen, $18,856 68-71-68—207 Bernhard Langer, $18,856 68-70-69—207 Dan Forsman, $18,856 68-69-70—207 Tom Kite, $15,575 70-70-68—208 Fred Couples, $15,575 69-69-70—208 David Frost, $15,575 71-67-70—208 Nick Price, $15,575 68-68-72—208 D.A. Weibring, $11,834 70-73-66—209 Chien Soon Lu, $11,834 69-73-67—209 Jeff Sluman, $11,834 71-71-67—209 Jim Rutledge, $11,834 72-70-67—209 Ted Schulz, $11,834 68-72-69—209 Michael Allen, $11,834 71-69-69—209 Steve Lowery, $11,834 73-66-70—209 Rod Spittle, $11,834 65-72-72—209 Bob Tway, $9,100 71-74-65—210 Steve Jones, $9,100 69-72-69—210 David Peoples, $9,100 74-66-70—210 Steve Pate, $9,100 67-72-71—210 Tom Purtzer, $7,875 70-71-70—211 Bob Gilder, $7,875 67-72-72—211 Tom Jenkins, $7,875 70-69-72—211 J.L. Lewis, $6,650 72-72-68—212 Mark McNulty, $6,650 73-70-69—212 Scott Simpson, $6,650 70-71-71—212 Bobby Wadkins, $6,650 69-69-74—212 Wayne Levi, $5,250 72-73-68—213 Gary Hallberg, $5,250 65-76-72—213 Robert Thompson, $5,250 73-69-71—213 Brad Bryant, $5,250 69-71-73—213 Gil Morgan, $3,763 73-73-68—214 Robin Byrd, $3,763 75-69-70—214 Bill Glasson, $3,763 67-75-72—214 Mark Brooks, $3,763 73-69-72—214 Tim Simpson, $3,763 73-69-72—214 Brad Faxon, $3,763 68-72-74—214 Bruce Fleisher, $3,763 71-69-74—214

Jim Thorpe, $3,763 Morris Hatalsky, $2,975 Jay Sigel, $2,275 John Jacobs, $2,275 Russ Cochran, $2,275 John Harris, $2,275 Keith Fergus, $2,275 Fuzzy Zoeller, $2,275 Loren Roberts, $2,275 Ronnie Black, $1,593 Ben Bates, $1,593 Lee Rinker, $1,383 Mike Reid, $1,383 Keith Clearwater, $1,155 Jerry Pate, $1,155 Jim Gallagher, Jr., $1,155 Joe Ozaki, $1,015 Peter Jacobsen, $945 Ben Crenshaw, $875 Graham Marsh, $805 Dana Quigley, $735

72-68-74—214 69-72-74—215 71-75-70—216 75-70-71—216 73-72-71—216 73-71-72—216 69-74-73—216 70-72-74—216 75-66-75—216 76-72-69—217 72-75-70—217 70-83-65—218 73-73-72—218 76-74-69—219 75-74-70—219 69-74-76—219 73-73-74—220 74-75-73—222 73-78-72—223 78-74-73—225 74-76-76—226

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE League standings East Division x-Wenatchee AppleSox Walla Walla Sweets Bellingham Bells Kelowna Falcons West Division x-Corvallis Knights Bend Elks Cowlitz Black Bears Kitsap BlueJackets Klamath Falls Gems x-clinched division

W 38 24 21 17

L 13 27 30 34

W 35 29 27 22 18

L 16 25 24 29 33

Sunday’s Games Walla Walla 5, Cowlitz 4 Kitsap 8, Kelowna 5 Bellingham 11, Wenatchee 9 Klamath Falls 5, Bend 4 Today’s Games Bellingham at Kelowna, 6:35 p.m. Klamath Falls at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Cowlitz at Corvallis, 6:40 p.m. Wenatchee at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Games Bellingham at Kelowna, 6:35 p.m. Klamath Falls at Kitsap, 6:35 p.m. Wenatchee at Walla Walla, 7:05 p.m. Cowlitz at Corvallis, 7:15 p.m. Sunday’s Summary

Gems 5, Elks 4 Bend 000 003 001 — 4 9 4 Klamath Falls 110 010 011 — 5 10 2 Ostapeck, Chris (7), Grazzini (8), Cuneo (8) and Buchanan, Demello. Merten, Miller (7), Schoonover (9) and Sandler. W — Schoonover. L — Cuneo. 2B — Bend: Collis, Benjamin, Demello; Klamath Falls: Sandler, Miller. 3B — Klamath Falls: Sanguinetti.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT Eastern Conference W L Pct Indiana 15 7 .682 Connecticut 13 7 .650 New York 12 9 .571 Chicago 10 12 .455 Atlanta 9 11 .450 Washington 4 14 .222 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 16 4 .800 San Antonio 12 8 .600 Seattle 12 9 .571 Phoenix 11 9 .550 Los Angeles 7 13 .350 Tulsa 1 19 .050 ——— Sunday’s Games Atlanta 70, Seattle 53 Connecticut 96, Phoenix 95, OT Chicago 88, Indiana 69 Minnesota 84, Los Angeles 78 Today’s Games No games scheduled

GB — 1 2½ 5 5 9 GB — 4 4½ 5 9 15

SPRINT CUP Pennsylvania 500 Sunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (13) Brad Keselowski, Dodge, 200 laps, 115.5 rating, 47 points. 2. (11) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 200, 127.1, 43. 3. (5) Kurt Busch, Dodge, 200, 127.7, 42. 4. (18) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 200, 114.6, 40. 5. (12) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 200, 102.2, 40. 6. (31) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 200, 94.4, 38. 7. (4) Carl Edwards, Ford, 200, 106.8, 38. 8. (9) Greg Biffle, Ford, 200, 86.2, 37. 9. (19) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 200, 98.8, 35. 10. (7) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 200, 93.7, 34. 11. (28) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 200, 83.1, 33. 12. (3) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 200, 81.2, 32. 13. (25) Mark Martin, Chevrolet, 200, 85.1, 31. 14. (10) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 200, 84.4, 30. 15. (6) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 200, 118.6, 31. 16. (20) Matt Kenseth, Ford, 200, 71, 28. 17. (8) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 200, 85, 27. 18. (14) Clint Bowyer, Chevrolet, 200, 83.9, 26. 19. (29) A J Allmendinger, Ford, 200, 67, 25. 20. (27) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 200, 70.4, 24. 21. (17) Regan Smith, Chevrolet, 200, 67.2, 23. 22. (16) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 200, 68.1, 22. 23. (24) David Gilliland, Ford, 200, 55.5, 21. 24. (33) David Reutimann, Toyota, 200, 61.8, 20. 25. (22) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 200, 56.4, 19. 26. (1) Joey Logano, Toyota, 200, 104.2, 19. 27. (36) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 199, 50.1, 0. 28. (2) Kasey Kahne, Toyota, 199, 67.8, 16. 29. (42) Andy Lally, Ford, 199, 42.2, 15. 30. (21) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 198, 50.6, 14. 31. (39) Travis Kvapil, Ford, 198, 44.3, 0. 32. (23) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 198, 54.1, 12. 33. (41) Jason White, Ford, 197, 37.4, 0. 34. (15) David Ragan, Ford, 149, 44, 10. 35. (38) Robby Gordon, Dodge, electrical, 79, 39.2, 9. 36. (32) Casey Mears, Toyota, ignition, 30, 39.8, 9. 37. (30) Todd Bodine, Toyota, brakes, 25, 35.3, 0. 38. (37) David Stremme, Chevrolet, brakes, 18, 32.6, 6. 39. (26) Brian Vickers, Toyota, engine, 18, 37.9, 5. 40. (40) Scott Speed, Ford, electrical, 16, 31.4, 0. 41. (43) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, transmission, 14, 29.5, 0. 42. (35) Erik Darnell, Ford, brakes, 8, 29.5, 0. 43. (34) J.J. Yeley, Ford, overheating, 7, 30.1, 1.

Honda Indy 200 Sunday At Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course

NHRA NATIONAL HOT ROD ASSOCIATION ——— Northwest Nationals Sunday At Pacific Raceways Kent, Wash. Final Finish Order TOP FUEL 1, Del Worsham. 2, Tony Schumacher. 3, Antron Brown. 4, Spencer Massey. 5, Larry Dixon. 6. Brandon Bernstein. 7, Shawn Langdon. 8, Doug Kalitta. 9, Bob Vandergriff. 10, Steven Chrisman. 11, Troy Buff. 12, Morgan Lucas. 13, Ron Smith. 14, David Grubnic. 15, Scott Palmer. 16. Terry McMillen. FUNNY CAR 1, Tim Wilkerson. 2, Jack Beckman. 3, Robert Hight. 4, Matt Hagan. 5, Ron Capps. 6, Bob Tasca III. 7, Tony Pedregon. 8, John Force. 9, Melanie Troxel. 10, Brian Thiel. 11, Jeff Diehl. 12. Jeff Arend. 13, Johnny Gray. 14, Mike Neff. 15, Gary Densham. 16, Cruz Pedregon. PRO STOCK 1, Jason Line. 2, Greg Anderson. 3, Erica Enders. 4, Rodger Brogdon. 5, V. Gaines. 6, Vincent Nobile. 7, Allen Johnson. 8, Mike Edwards. 9, Larry Morgan. 10, Shane Gray. 11, Ronnie Humphrey. 12, Greg Stanfield. 13, Kurt Johnson. 14, Warren Johnson. 15, Ron Krisher.

TENNIS ATP ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Legg Mason Classic Sunday At William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center Washington Purse: $1.403 million (WT500) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Gael Monfils (1), France, 6-4. 6-4.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Mercury Insurance Open Sunday At La Costa Resort and Spa Carlsbad, Calif. Purse: $721,000 (Premier) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Championship Agnieszka Radwanska (3), Poland, def. Vera Zvonareva (1), Russia, 6-3, 6-4.

DEALS Transactions

AUTO RACING NASCAR

IndyCar

Lexington, Ohio Lap length: 2.258 miles (Starting position in parentheses) 1. (1) Scott Dixon, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 2. (3) Dario Franchitti, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 3. (5) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 4. (9) Takuma Sato, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 5. (16) Tony Kanaan, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 6. (8) Alex Tagliani, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 7. (19) Marco Andretti, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 8. (20) Oriol Servia, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 9. (11) Sebastien Bourdais, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 10. (21) Vitor Meira, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 11. (10) Charlie Kimball, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 12. (14) Simona de Silvestro, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 13. (18) Simon Pagenaud, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 14. (4) Will Power, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 15. (12) E.J. Viso, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 16. (2) Ryan Briscoe, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 17. (25) Ana Beatriz, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 18. (26) Martin Plowman, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 19. (15) Helio Castroneves, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 20. (7) James Hinchcliffe, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 21. (23) Danica Patrick, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 22. (27) Ed Carpenter, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 23. (24) James Jakes, Dallara-Honda, 85, Running. 24. (6) Graham Rahal, Dallara-Honda, 83, Running. 25. (13) J.R. Hildebrand, Dallara-Honda, 81, Running. 26. (17) Mike Conway, Dallara-Honda, 63, Mechanical. 27. (22) Sebastian Saavedra, Dallara-Honda, 20, Contact.

BASEBALL American League TAMPA BAY RAYS—Placed RHP Alex Cobb on the 15-day DL. Recalled LHP Cesar Ramos from Durham (IL). National League CINCINNATI REDS—Placed LF Chris Heisey on the 15-day DL, retroactive to Aug. 6. Called up CF Dave Sappelt from Louisville (IL). COLORADO ROCKIES—Recalled RHP Josh Roenicke from Colorado Springs (PCL). Optioned RHP Greg Reynolds to Colorado Springs. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Waived PK Jacob Harfman and OT Rob McGill. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Waived WR Brandon Smith. DALLAS COWBOYS—Signed QB Tom Brandstater and WR Dominique Edison. HOUSTON TEXANS—Signed LB Tim Dobbins. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Waived T Micah Kia. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed DE Mark Anderson. Released DL Marlon Favorite and CB Thad Turner. Placed OL Kyle Hix on injured reserve. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS—Waived DE Curtis Johnson. NEW YORK JETS—Signed WR Derrick Mason to a two-year contract and LS Wilson Raynor and TE Keith Zinger. Waived LB Cody Brown and TE Collin Franklin. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Signed WR Derek Hagan, WR Chad Jackson, WR Shawn Bayes and FB Bryson Kelly. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS—Waived FB Kenny Younger. Waived-injured FB Patrick DiMarco. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed S Donte Whitner to a three-year contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League MINNESOTA WILD—Traded C James Sheppard to San Jose for a 2013 third-round draft pick. COLLEGE MICHIGAN—Suspended P Will Hagerup and WR Terrence Robinson for the first four games of the season for violating unspecified team rules. Redshirted WR Darryl Stonum.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 467 170 5,975 2,152 The Dalles 456 196 6,082 2,257 John Day 317 151 5,460 2,184 McNary 544 171 3,514 1,622 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Saturday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 278,327 103,452 150,454 68,051 The Dalles 206,721 80,447 99,461 47,185 John Day 178,829 75,271 64,085 31,820 McNary 174,942 59,710 37,944 17,101

Broken ankle not enough to stop Keselowski at Pocono The Associated Press LONG POND, Pa. — Brad Keselowski was inspired Sunday by a relative in the Navy Seals, and that was all he needed to push through his painful ankle injury. Keselowski’s cousin lost a friend who was one of 30 American service members who died when their helicopter was shot down during fighting in eastern Afghanistan. The NASCAR driver took the sacrifice to heart, and vowed he would not leave his car no matter how bad he hurt.

So Keselowski went out and raced all 500 miles of the Sprint Cup stop at Pocono Raceway with a broken left ankle. As if that wasn’t enough, he somehow managed to win, too. Competing with a brace on his ankle, Keselowski sped off on the final restart late in the race to pick up his second victory of the season. He gingerly climbed out of his car to celebrate with his crew in Victory Lane. He dedicated the victory — one that thrust him into Chase

AUTO RACING ROUNDUP contention — to the troops in Afghanistan. “I might not be feeling great, but those are the guys that are really making sacrifices,” Keselowski said. “Whenever I got in the car and felt like, man, this really hurts, it was good inspiration as to what it takes to ‘man up’ and make it happen.” Keselowski was an unlikely winner after he crashed head-on

into a wall on Wednesday during a test session at Road Atlanta. He slammed a section of wall at 100 mph and was forced out of the Nationwide Series race. He insisted during practice this weekend he wouldn’t leave the No. 2 Dodge, no matter the aches and pain. Also on Sunday: Dixon pulls away to win Mid-Ohio LEXINGTON, Ohio — Pole-sit-

ter Scott Dixon waited patiently before taking control 24 laps from the finish and then coasted to an easy victory over Dario Franchitti in the IndyCar race at MidOhio. The victory gave the New Zealander wins on the road track in the last three odd-numbered years. Dixon, who dominated qualifying to capture his first pole of the season, stayed on rookie James Hinchcliffe’s tail until the Canadian finally pitted for the first time on lap 53. Dixon skirted a challenge from Franchitti and

took command on lap 61 of the 85-lap race to pull away. Wilkerson ends winless drought KENT, Wash. — Tim Wilkerson ended a yearlong winless drought by racing to his third consecutive Funny Car title at the O’Reilly Auto Parts NHRA Northwest Nationals at Pacific Raceways. Wilkerson drove his Ford Mustang to a 4.146second run at 300.53 mph to defeat Jack Beckman, who finished in 4.598 at 238.64. Del Worsham (Top Fuel) and Jason Line (Pro Stock) also won their divisions.


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL NL BOXSCORES Padres 7, Pirates 3 San Diego Venable rf Bartlett ss Maybin cf Guzman 1b O.Hudson 2b Blanks lf Forsythe 3b L.Martinez c Latos p Qualls p Spence p Totals

AB 5 4 4 5 4 3 3 3 3 0 0 34

R 1 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 7

H BI BB 3 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 6 5

SO 0 0 0 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .260 .251 .273 .336 .242 .200 .197 .222 .083 -----

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Paul cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .267 Diaz rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Lincoln p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-A.McCutchen ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Walker 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .278 Ludwick lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .238 G.Jones 1b-rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .240 Doumit c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .283 Alvarez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .206 Br.Wood ss 3 1 2 3 0 0 .236 Correia p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .093 D.McCutchen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Pearce ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .221 Totals 32 3 6 3 1 8 San Diego 010 003 120 — 7 9 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 030 — 3 6 1 a-grounded out for D.McCutchen in the 6th. bgrounded into a fielder’s choice for Lincoln in the 8th. E—Doumit (3). LOB—San Diego 7, Pittsburgh 4. 2B—Venable (8), Blanks 2 (2). HR—Br.Wood (7), off Qualls. RBIs—Venable 2 (22), Bartlett (27), Forsythe 3 (6), Br.Wood 3 (24). SB—Venable 2 (21). CS—Paul (6). S—Latos. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 6 (Latos 3, Guzman, O.Hudson, Bartlett); Pittsburgh 1 (Diaz). Runners moved up—Maybin, Forsythe, L.Martinez, Pearce. GIDP—Guzman. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Br.Wood, Walker, G.Jones). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos W, 6-11 7 4 2 2 1 7 106 3.87 Qualls 1 2 1 1 0 0 13 3.27 Spence 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 0.45 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Corra L, 12-10 5 2-3 5 4 4 4 3 93 4.78 D.McCutchen 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 2.93 Lincoln 2 4 3 3 0 3 40 5.63 Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.08 Latos pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Qualls 2-2, D.McCutchen 2-1. IBB—off D.McCutchen (L.Martinez). HBP—by Spence (Doumit), by Lincoln (Forsythe). WP— D.McCutchen. T—2:59. A—35,601 (38,362).

Cardinals 8, Marlins 4 St. Louis AB Furcal ss 5 Theriot 2b 5 Pujols 1b 4 Holliday lf 4 Berkman rf 3 Jay cf 2 M.Boggs p 0 c-Schumaker ph 0 McClellan p 1 Salas p 0 T.Cruz c 4 Descalso 3b 4 J.Garcia p 1 a-C.Patterson ph-cf 3 Totals 36

R 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 8

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 2 3 1 2 1 1 2 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 9 8 6 10

Avg. .205 .273 .283 .317 .292 .298 .000 .286 .143 .000 .246 .262 .087 .240

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bonifacio ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .286 Amezaga 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .262 Stanton rf 2 0 0 0 3 1 .260 G.Sanchez 1b 4 0 0 1 0 2 .281 Morrison lf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .248 Cameron cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .206 Dobbs 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .300 Hayes c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .272 Vazquez p 2 1 2 0 0 0 .216 b-Petersen ph 1 1 1 2 0 0 .254 M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Badenhop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .500 Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Wise ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .204 Totals 34 4 9 4 4 10 St. Louis 000 103 301 — 8 9 0 Florida 001 012 000 — 4 9 2 a-doubled for J.Garcia in the 6th. b-homered for Vazquez in the 6th. c-walked for M.Boggs in the 7th. dstruck out for Cishek in the 9th. E—Bonifacio (9), Stanton (4). LOB—St. Louis 7, Florida 8. 2B—C.Patterson (3), Morrison (21), Hayes (7), Vazquez (1). HR—Pujols (27), off Vazquez; Petersen (1), off M.Boggs. RBIs—Theriot (39), Pujols (69), Holliday 3 (62), Berkman (75), Jay 2 (29), Amezaga (3), G.Sanchez (61), Petersen 2 (5). S—Bonifacio. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 4 (T.Cruz 3, McClellan); Florida 5 (Hayes, G.Sanchez, Morrison 3). Runners moved up—G.Sanchez, Cameron. GIDP— McClellan, G.Sanchez. DP—St. Louis 1 (Descalso, Theriot, Pujols); Florida 1 (Bonifacio, Amezaga, G.Sanchez).

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arroyo 6 5 4 4 3 4 109 5.48 Ondrusek H, 13 1-3 2 3 3 0 0 11 2.63 Bray H, 14 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.00 Masset W, 2-5 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 14 3.62 Chapman H, 8 1 0 0 0 0 3 20 3.51 Crdro S, 20-25 1 0 0 0 0 0 15 2.45 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA R.Wells 7 8 6 6 1 1 91 6.05 Marshall L, 5-5 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 24 3.04 Samardzija 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 3 22 3.53 Inherited runners-scored—Bray 2-0, Masset 2-2, Samardzija 2-0. IBB—off Masset (DeWitt). HBP—by Ondrusek (Re.Johnson). WP—Masset, R.Wells. T—3:16. A—39,619 (41,159).

Diamondbacks 4, Dodgers 3 Los Angeles J.Carroll ss Miles 3b Ethier rf Kemp cf J.Rivera lf-1b Loney 1b Lindblom p D.Navarro c Velez 2b Kershaw p Gwynn Jr. lf Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 3 0 3 3 2 1 31

R 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 1

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 6

Avg. .294 .295 .306 .316 .308 .251 --.197 .000 .250 .256

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Roberts 3b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .259 K.Johnson 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .215 J.Upton rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .295 Nady 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .249 C.Young cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .244 Montero c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .268 Cowgill lf 2 1 1 0 1 1 .227 Ransom ss 3 1 1 2 0 1 .211 I.Kennedy p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .068 a-Burroughs ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 4 5 4 3 8 Los Angeles 000 012 000 — 3 6 0 Arizona 200 000 20x — 4 5 0 a-doubled for I.Kennedy in the 7th. LOB—Los Angeles 2, Arizona 4. 2B—Ethier (28), Burroughs (2). HR—Loney (5), off I.Kennedy; K.Johnson (18), off Kershaw; Ransom (1), off Kershaw. RBIs—Ethier (51), J.Rivera (8), Loney (35), K.Johnson 2 (48), Ransom 2 (2). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 1 (J.Rivera); Arizona 2 (Ransom, K.Johnson). Runners moved up—R.Roberts. GIDP—Miles. DP—Arizona 1 (Ransom, K.Johnson, Nady). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Kershw L, 13-5 6 1-3 5 4 4 3 7 Lindblom 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO Kendy W, 14-3 7 6 3 3 1 3 Hernandez 1 0 0 0 0 2 Putz S, 26-30 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Lindblom 1-0. T—2:26. A—25,575 (48,633).

NP 113 18 NP 100 8 9

ERA 2.79 1.80 ERA 3.20 2.88 2.75

Nationals 3, Rockies 2 Washington Ankiel cf Espinosa 2b Zimmerman 3b Morse 1b Werth rf J.Gomes lf Storen p Desmond ss Flores c Lannan p Mattheus p Clippard p Coffey p c-L.Nix ph 1-Bixler pr-lf Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 3 4 0 4 3 3 0 0 0 1 0 34

R 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 4

SO 1 1 1 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .247 .228 .299 .324 .223 .218 --.230 .206 .089 --.000 --.259 .185

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. E.Young lf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .245 Fowler cf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .263 C.Gonzalez rf 5 0 0 1 0 0 .287 Tulowitzki ss 5 0 2 0 0 3 .299 Wigginton 1b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .261 Nelson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .241 b-S.Smith ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .282 Belisle p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Roenicke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Alfonzo c 4 0 3 0 0 0 .364 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .259 A.Cook p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-J.Herrera ph-3b 1 1 0 0 1 0 .246 Totals 35 2 9 2 4 5 Washington 020 000 010 — 3 7 1 Colorado 000 000 200 — 2 9 1 a-walked for Mat.Reynolds in the 7th. b-popped out for Nelson in the 7th. c-singled for Coffey in the 9th. 1-ran for L.Nix in the 9th. E—Morse (5), A.Cook (2). LOB—Washington 8, Colorado 11. 2B—Espinosa (20), Flores (2). HR— J.Gomes (12), off A.Cook. RBIs—Werth (43), J.Gomes 2 (33), C.Gonzalez (58), Wigginton (44). SB—M.Ellis (3). S—Fowler. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 5 (Morse, Lannan, Ankiel, Desmond, Espinosa); Colorado 5 (Wigginton, A.Cook 2, S.Smith, E.Young). Runners moved up—Ankiel, Espinosa, Zimmerman, Lannan. GIDP—Fowler. DP—Washington 1 (Desmond, Espinosa, Morse).

St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Garcia 5 6 2 2 3 5 97 3.23 Boggs W, 2-3 1 2 2 2 0 0 27 3.43 McClellan H, 1 2 0 0 0 1 2 36 4.07 Salas 1 1 0 0 0 3 19 2.28 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vazquez 6 4 4 4 3 6 91 4.93 M.Dunn L, 5-6 1-3 1 2 0 0 0 5 3.66 Badenhop 2-3 2 1 1 2 1 19 3.98 Choate 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 1.59 Cishek 1 2 1 1 1 1 21 3.34 Inherited runners-scored—Badenhop 2-2. IBB—off Vazquez (Pujols, Berkman). WP—J.Garcia, McClellan, Badenhop, Cishek. Balk—J.Garcia. T—3:23. A—20,011 (38,560).

Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lannan 6 6 1 1 4 3 98 3.56 Mattheus H, 4 1-3 1 1 0 0 0 3 2.55 Clippard W, 2-0 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 16 1.56 Coffey H, 7 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 4.40 Storen S, 29-33 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.75 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Cook 6 2-3 4 2 2 3 4 79 5.05 Mat.Reynolds 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 3.72 Belisle L, 5-4 1 2 1 1 1 2 29 3.81 Roenicke 1 1 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Lannan pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Mattheus 1-0, Clippard 2-2, Mat.Reynolds 1-0. IBB—off A.Cook (Flores), off Belisle (Morse). T—2:57. A—34,812 (50,490).

Reds 8, Cubs 7

Braves 6, Mets 5

Cincinnati Sappelt lf Renteria ss Votto 1b Bruce rf Frazier 3b Stubbs cf Hanigan c Janish 2b Arroyo p a-F.Lewis ph Ondrusek p Bray p Masset p c-Alonso ph Chapman p Cordero p Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 3 4 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 36

R H 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 11

BI 0 2 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .200 .241 .322 .264 .265 .253 .250 .229 .146 .253 ------.500 -----

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. S.Castro ss 5 2 2 1 0 1 .314 Campana lf 5 0 1 1 0 1 .273 Ar.Ramirez 3b 5 1 0 0 0 0 .285 C.Pena 1b 4 1 0 0 1 2 .222 Byrd cf 3 1 3 2 1 0 .310 DeWitt 2b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .272 Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Samardzija p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Soto c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 Colvin rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .126 d-Je.Baker ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .287 R.Wells p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .167 b-Re.Johnson ph 0 1 0 0 0 0 .325 Barney 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .288 Totals 35 7 8 6 4 9 Cincinnati 010 320 020 — 8 11 0 Chicago 002 002 300 — 7 8 0 a-grounded out for Arroyo in the 7th. b-was hit by a pitch for R.Wells in the 7th. c-grounded into a double play for Masset in the 8th. d-struck out for Colvin in the 8th. LOB—Cincinnati 4, Chicago 6. 2B—Votto (27), Frazier (3), Byrd 2 (18). HR—Stubbs (14), off R.Wells; Frazier (3), off R.Wells; Renteria (3), off R.Wells; S.Castro (5), off Arroyo; DeWitt (4), off Arroyo. RBIs—Renteria 2 (26), Frazier 3 (8), Stubbs (37), Hanigan (21), S.Castro (52), Campana (5), Byrd 2 (22), DeWitt 2 (19). SB—Stubbs (28). Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 2 (Arroyo, Alonso); Chicago 5 (R.Wells 2, DeWitt, Soto 2). Runners moved up—Hanigan. GIDP—Frazier, Alonso. DP—Chicago 2 (S.Castro, DeWitt, C.Pena), (Ar. Ramirez, Soto, C.Pena).

Atlanta AB R H Bourn cf 5 0 1 Prado 3b-lf 4 0 0 Freeman 1b 4 0 0 Uggla 2b 5 0 1 Heyward rf 2 2 1 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 c-Conrad ph 1 0 0 Venters p 0 0 0 D.Ross c 0 0 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 5 2 2 Constanza lf-rf 3 2 2 Boscan c 4 0 2 d-Hinske ph 0 0 0 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 Minor p 2 0 0 C.Jones 3b 2 0 1 Totals 37 6 10

BI 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 6

BB 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 7

SO 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 8

Avg. .304 .271 .296 .220 .222 --.235 --.250 .236 .412 .375 .250 --.231 .260

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .336 a-Harris ph-2b 3 0 2 2 0 1 .245 Acosta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Thole c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 Ju.Turner 2b-ss-2b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .270 D.Wright 3b-ss 4 0 0 0 1 3 .268 Hairston rf-2b-rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .264 Bay lf 3 3 3 0 2 0 .249 Pagan cf 5 0 1 1 0 0 .246 R.Paulino c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .298 Parnell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Pridie ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .234 Evans 1b-3b 5 2 2 0 0 1 .188 Gee p 2 0 2 1 0 0 .143 D.Carrasco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Dan.Murphy ph-2b 1 0 1 1 0 0 .320 Duda rf-1b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .262 Totals 38 5 12 5 6 8 Atlanta 010 130 001 — 6 10 1 New York 020 002 100 — 5 12 3 a-singled for Jos.Reyes in the 2nd. b-singled for D.Carrasco in the 6th. c-struck out for O’Flaherty in the 8th. d-walked for Boscan in the 9th. e-walked for Parnell in the 9th. E—Constanza (1), D.Carrasco (1), Evans (1), Ju.Turner (11). LOB—Atlanta 14, New York 12. 2B— Pagan (15). HR—Heyward (12), off Gee; Ale.Gonzalez (9), off Gee; Constanza (1), off Gee. RBIs—Bourn (35), Heyward (30), Ale.Gonzalez 2 (37), Constanza (5), C.Jones (49), Harris 2 (12), Pagan (39), Gee (3), Dan. Murphy (49). SB—Constanza (1), Bay (10). S—Constanza. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 7 (Uggla, Ale.Gonzalez 2, Heyward, C.Jones, Conrad, Prado); New

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Boston New York Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Detroit Cleveland Chicago Minnesota Kansas City West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 70 69 59 58 44 W 61 56 55 51 49 W 64 63 51 49

L 43 44 54 56 67 L 53 56 58 63 65 L 51 52 63 64

Pct .619 .611 .522 .509 .396 Pct .535 .500 .487 .447 .430 Pct .557 .548 .447 .434

AL BOXSCORES

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 1 11 12½ 25 GB — 4 5½ 10 12 GB — 1 12½ 14

Sunday’s Games Toronto 7, Baltimore 2 Oakland 5, Tampa Bay 4, 10 innings Chicago White Sox 7, Minnesota 0 Kansas City 4, Detroit 3 L.A. Angels 2, Seattle 1 Texas 5, Cleveland 3 Boston 3, N.Y. Yankees 2, 10 innings

WCGB — — 10 11½ 24 WCGB — 12½ 14 18½ 20½ WCGB — 7 18½ 20

L10 6-4 8-2 6-4 6-4 3-7 L10 6-4 4-6 4-6 2-8 6-4 L10 5-5 6-4 4-6 6-4

Str W-2 L-2 L-2 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 L-1 W-3 L-4 W-1 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 L-1

Home 37-22 37-22 27-28 28-26 27-30 Home 33-25 29-24 24-32 26-28 31-32 Home 37-22 32-25 31-24 29-29

Away 33-21 32-22 32-26 30-30 17-37 Away 28-28 27-32 31-26 25-35 18-33 Away 27-29 31-27 20-39 20-35

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta New York Florida Washington Central Division Milwaukee St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division San Francisco Arizona Colorado Los Angeles San Diego

Today’s Games Chicago White Sox (Danks 4-9) at Baltimore (Guthrie 5-15), 4:05 p.m. Boston (Wakefield 6-4) at Minnesota (S.Baker 8-6), 4:10 p.m. Kansas City (Hochevar 8-8) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 10-7), 4:10 p.m. Seattle (Furbush 2-3) at Texas (M.Harrison 9-8), 5:05 p.m.

W 74 66 56 55 55 W 65 62 55 54 49 37 W 63 62 53 52 51

L 40 49 57 59 59 L 50 53 59 59 66 77 L 52 52 62 61 64

Pct .649 .574 .496 .482 .482 Pct .565 .539 .482 .478 .426 .325 Pct .548 .544 .461 .460 .443

Sunday’s Games Atlanta 6, N.Y. Mets 5 St. Louis 8, Florida 4 San Diego 7, Pittsburgh 3 Milwaukee 7, Houston 3 Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 7 Washington 3, Colorado 2 San Francisco 3, Philadelphia 1 Arizona 4, L.A. Dodgers 3

GB — 8½ 17½ 19 19 GB — 3 9½ 10 16 27½ GB — ½ 10 10 12

WCGB — — 9 10½ 10½ WCGB — 4 10½ 11 17 28½ WCGB — 3½ 13 13 15

L10 9-1 5-5 4-6 4-6 6-4 L10 9-1 7-3 5-5 0-10 7-3 3-7 L10 2-8 5-5 4-6 5-5 6-4

Str L-1 W-1 L-1 L-4 W-1 Str W-4 W-4 W-1 L-10 L-1 L-3 Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 W-4

Home 41-18 34-22 23-30 23-34 32-23 Home 41-15 29-24 30-27 26-32 27-32 19-40 Home 34-23 30-25 28-31 28-31 23-36

Away 33-22 32-27 33-27 32-25 23-36 Away 24-35 33-29 25-32 28-27 22-34 18-37 Away 29-29 32-27 25-31 24-30 28-28

Today’s Games Atlanta (D.Lowe 6-10) at Florida (Hand 1-3), 4:10 p.m. Colorado (Hammel 6-11) at Cincinnati (H.Bailey 6-5), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Stauffer 7-8) at N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 6-9), 4:10 p.m. Washington (Wang 0-2) at Chicago Cubs (Garza 5-8), 5:05 p.m. Houston (W.Rodriguez 7-8) at Arizona (D.Hudson 11-7), 6:40 p.m. Philadelphia (Halladay 14-4) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 7-13), 7:10 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 8-6) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 9-1), 7:15 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Red Sox 3, Yankees 2: BOSTON — Josh Reddick hit a game-ending RBI single in the 10th inning and Boston beat the New York Yankees. With the win, the Red Sox took over sole possession of first place in the AL East and clinched a win in the season series against New York for the first time since 2004. • White Sox 7, Twins 0: MINNEAPOLIS — Jake Peavy won for the first time in more than six weeks with eight shutout innings for Chicago, and the White Sox beat the Twins to sweep a three-game series in Minnesota for the first time in more than seven years. Brent Lillibridge, Paul Konerko, Alexei Ramirez and Alex Rios each hit home runs for the White Sox, who had lost 29 of 36 games to their nemeses until winning three straight at Target Field this weekend. • Royals 4, Tigers 3: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Johnny Giavotella hit his first major league home run and doubled. Giavotella, promoted Friday after hitting .338 in 110 games with Triple-A Omaha, is five for 11 in his first three games. • Blue Jays 7, Orioles 2: BALTIMORE — Ricky Romero pitched eight innings of four-hit ball and Brett Lawrie hit his first major league homer. John McDonald had three hits and two RBIs for the Blue Jays, who took two of three from the Orioles and have won seven of 11 overall. • Athletics 5, Rays 4: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Josh Willingham led off the 10th inning with a home run for Oakland. Willingham lined a pitch from Jake McGee (0-1) into the left field stands for his 17th homer this season. Fautino De Los Santos (1-0) threw a scoreless ninth to pick up his first major league win and Andrew Bailey allowed two singles in the 10th before getting his 13th save. • Angels 2, Mariners 1: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Ervin Santana pitched into the ninth inning of his fourth straight phenomenal start, and Mark Trumbo homered off Felix Hernandez. Santana (8-8) held the Mariners to seven hits and won his duel with Hernandez (10-10), whose 12 strikeouts were one shy of his career high. Santana lost his shutout bid on Mike Carp’s one-out homer in the ninth, and manager Mike Scioscia pulled him two outs short of his third consecutive complete game. • Rangers 5, Indians 3: ARLINGTON, Texas — Elvis Andrus hit a go-ahead two-run single in Texas’ five-run eighth. Josh Tomlin shut out the Rangers over seven innings, but the 25-year-old right-hander walked Mike Napoli leading off the eighth and gave up a single to Mitch Moreland, his final batter.

• Padres 7, Pirates 3: PITTSBURGH — Fading Pittsburgh finished up the worst homestand in its 125-year history and lost its 10th straight game overall, beaten by Mat Latos (6-11) and San Diego. Latos’ mastery continued the misery for the Pirates, who completed an 0-7 stay at PNC Park against the last-place Padres and Chicago Cubs, two teams that were a combined 39 games under .500 when the week began. • Giants 3, Phillies 1: SAN FRANCISCO — Tim Lincecum stayed sharp until getting hit in the right knee by Chase Utley’s bounding bat and San Francisco ended Philadelphia’s season-high nine-game winning streak, tagging Roy Oswalt and beating the Phillies. Jeff Keppinger had four hits as the Giants spoiled Oswalt’s return from the disabled list. San Francisco avoided a four-game sweep in a matchup of NL division leaders. • Braves 6, Mets 5: NEW YORK — Chipper Jones hit a tiebreaking single in the ninth inning of a wild game that included injuries to New York’s top two hitters, Jose Reyes and Daniel Murphy. Jason Heyward, Alex Gonzalez and Jose Constanza homered early for the Braves, who finally solved rookie Dillon Gee and handed the Mets their sixth loss in seven games. Dan Uggla extended his hitting streak to a career-best 28 games. • Brewers 7, Astros 3: HOUSTON — Zack Greinke tied a season high by going seven innings and Prince Fielder homered to help Milwaukee beat Houston for its sixth straight win. Fielder had three hits and scored four runs for the Brewers, who have won 11 of their last 12 games. Yuniesky Betancourt drove in three runs. • Cardinals 8, Marlins 4: MIAMI — Matt Holliday drove in three runs with a pair of two-out singles, Albert Pujols homered and St. Louis rallied to complete its first four-game series sweep on the road since 2004 by beating Florida. In a single series, the Cardinals matched their longest winning streak of the season. • Diamondbacks 4, Dodgers 3: PHOENIX — Cody Ransom made his first career homer a memorable one, lifting a two-run shot off All-Star Clayton Kershaw in the seventh inning to help Arizona rally past the Los Angeles Dodgers and avoid a threegame sweep. Kelly Johnson hit a two-run homer to the pool deck in right-center off Kershaw (13-5) in the first inning and Ransom’s shot to left put the Diamondbacks back ahead. • Reds 8, Cubs 7: CHICAGO — Ryan Hanigan hit a tiebreaking single off Sean Marshall in Cincinnati’s two-run eighth inning and the Reds ended the Chicago Cubs’ seven-game winning streak. Center fielder Marlon Byrd slipped while chasing Joey Votto’s shallow pop fly to start the eighth against Marshall (5-5). Votto scored on Todd Frazier’s double to tie the game. • Nationals 3, Rockies 2: DENVER — Jonny Gomes hit his first home run for Washington, Jayson Werth delivered a tiebreaking single in the eighth inning and the Nationals beat Colorado. The Rockies split the four-game series and went 2-5 on their homestand. Eliezer Alfonzo got three hits for Colorado and Troy Tulowitzki had two.

York 4 (Ju.Turner 2, Evans, Hairston). Runners moved up—Prado, Boscan. GIDP—Pagan. DP—Atlanta 1 (Uggla, Freeman). Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor 5 2-3 7 4 4 2 5 94 4.85 O’Flaherty 1 1-3 4 1 1 1 2 37 1.04 Venters W, 6-1 1 0 0 0 2 1 20 1.22 Kimbrl S, 34-39 1 1 0 0 1 0 18 1.93 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gee 5 6 5 5 3 4 101 3.93 D.Carrasco 1 1 0 0 1 0 23 4.81 Acosta 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 4.63 Byrdak 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 16 3.54 Parnell L, 3-4 1 1-3 3 1 1 1 2 21 3.75 Inherited runners-scored—O’Flaherty 2-2, Parnell 10. IBB—off O’Flaherty (R.Paulino). HBP—by Gee (Prado, Heyward). WP—Gee. T—3:25. A—29,853 (41,800).

Giants 3, Phillies 1 Philadelphia Rollins ss Victorino cf Utley 2b Howard 1b Pence rf Ibanez lf Ruiz c M.Martinez 3b c-B.Francisco ph Oswalt p a-Mayberry ph Lidge p Stutes p d-Gload ph Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 1 2 1 0 0 1 36

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 1 1

SO 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .263 .306 .288 .250 .311 .243 .265 .221 .224 .150 .259 ----.260

San Francisco An.Torres cf Keppinger 2b Br.Wilson p Beltran rf Rowand lf P.Sandoval 3b A.Huff 1b O.Cabrera ss

AB 5 4 0 4 1 4 2 3

R 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0

SO 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 1

Avg. .232 .307 --.284 .248 .315 .244 .233

Schierholtz lf-rf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .274 C.Stewart c 4 1 2 1 0 0 .222 Lincecum p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .095 Ja.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Fontenot ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Totals 32 3 13 3 4 6 Philadelphia 001 000 000 — 1 8 0 San Francisco 000 111 00x — 3 13 1 a-grounded out for Oswalt in the 7th. b-flied out for Ja.Lopez in the 8th. c-doubled for M.Martinez in the 9th. d-flied out for Stutes in the 9th. E—A.Huff (4). LOB—Philadelphia 9, San Francisco 12. 2B—B.Francisco (9), P.Sandoval (18), O.Cabrera (2). RBIs—Utley (34), Keppinger (22), O.Cabrera (4), C.Stewart (5). SB—An.Torres (13), A.Huff (5). S—Lincecum. SF—Keppinger, O.Cabrera. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 3 (Oswalt, Ibanez, Rollins); San Francisco 6 (C.Stewart 2, An.Torres 2, Schierholtz, Beltran). Runners moved up—Rollins. GIDP—Beltran, A.Huff. DP—Philadelphia 2 (Oswalt, Rollins, Howard), (Rollins, Howard). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB Oswalt L, 4-7 6 12 3 3 2 Lidge 1 0 0 0 2 Stutes 1 1 0 0 0 S. Francisco IP H R ER BB Lincm W, 10-9 7 2-3 7 1 1 1 Ja.Lopez H, 17 1-3 0 0 0 0 Wilsn S, 34-38 1 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Ja.Lopez Lidge (Schierholtz). T—2:34. A—42,366 (41,915).

SO NP ERA 4 93 3.84 1 16 1.93 1 17 3.02 SO NP ERA 5 114 2.69 0 7 2.49 0 7 2.77 2-0. IBB—off

Brewers 7, Astros 3 Milwaukee Morgan cf F.Lopez 2b Estrada p Loe p Braun lf Fielder 1b Kotsay rf Y.Betancourt ss Counsell 3b Lucroy c Greinke p

AB 3 4 0 0 5 4 5 5 3 4 2

R 2 0 0 0 0 4 1 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 1 3 1 0 3 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 0

Avg. .324 .233 .222 --.326 .304 .251 .268 .148 .283 .214

b-Jo.Wilson ph-2b 1 0 0 0 Totals 36 7 11 7

0 3

0 .262 4

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Shuck rf-cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .333 Altuve 2b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .328 Bourgeois cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .324 Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ca.Lee 1b 2 0 1 2 2 0 .266 J.Martinez lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Paredes 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Barmes ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .251 Corporan c 4 0 1 0 0 3 .189 Norris p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .105 W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-M.Downs ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .230 S.Escalona p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Bogusevic ph-rf 2 1 1 0 0 1 .217 Totals 33 3 8 3 3 11 Milwaukee 202 020 100 — 7 11 0 Houston 000 001 020 — 3 8 0 a-doubled for W.Lopez in the 6th. b-popped out for Greinke in the 8th. c-singled for Fe.Rodriguez in the 8th. LOB—Milwaukee 8, Houston 6. 2B—Morgan (13), Kotsay (7), Y.Betancourt (19), M.Downs (10). HR—Fielder (26), off Norris. RBIs—F.Lopez (3), Fielder 2 (85), Kotsay (21), Y.Betancourt 3 (48), Altuve (4), Ca.Lee 2 (63). CS—Barmes (1). S—F.Lopez, Greinke. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 3 (Greinke, Morgan, Counsell); Houston 3 (J.Martinez 2, Bogusevic). Runners moved up—Shuck. GIDP—J.Martinez. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Greinke, Y.Betancourt, Fielder). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke W, 10-4 7 4 1 1 3 6 101 4.21 Estrada 2-3 3 2 2 0 2 20 4.80 Loe 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 3 21 4.05 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris L, 5-8 5 8 6 6 1 2 94 3.73 W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.63 S.Escalona 1 2 1 1 1 0 25 2.78 Fe.Rodriguez 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 2.43 Melancon 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 3.04 Inherited runners-scored—Loe 1-0. HBP—by Norris (Morgan). WP—Greinke 2, Estrada, Loe, Norris. T—2:59. A—22,885 (40,963).

Red Sox 3, Yankees 2 (10 innings) New York Gardner lf Jeter ss Granderson cf Teixeira 1b Cano 2b Swisher rf Er.Chavez dh Martin c E.Nunez 3b Totals

AB 5 4 2 4 5 5 4 4 4 37

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

H BI BB SO 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 8 2 4 11

Avg. .282 .273 .273 .251 .295 .267 .304 .228 .273

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .318 Pedroia 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .310 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .348 Youkilis 3b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .270 D.Ortiz dh 4 0 2 0 1 1 .288 1-D.McDonald pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .165 C.Crawford lf 4 0 3 0 1 0 .260 Reddick rf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .338 Varitek c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .228 Scutaro ss 4 1 4 1 0 0 .272 Totals 36 3 11 3 5 4 New York 000 010 100 0 — 2 8 0 Boston 010 000 001 1 — 3 11 0 One out when winning run scored. 1-ran for D.Ortiz in the 10th. LOB—New York 10, Boston 12. 2B—D.Ortiz (29), Scutaro (9). HR—E.Nunez (4), off Beckett; Gardner (5), off Albers. RBIs—Gardner (28), E.Nunez (25), Pedroia (60), Reddick (23), Scutaro (24). SB—Gardner 2 (35), Granderson (22). CS—Pedroia (5). S—Ellsbury. SF—Pedroia. Runners left in scoring position—New York 7 (Jeter 2, Swisher, Er.Chavez, Cano 2, Granderson); Boston 6 (Ellsbury 5, Varitek). Runners moved up—Cano, E.Nunez. New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Garcia 5 5 1 1 3 1 96 3.16 Logan 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 11 3.03 Wade 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 18 1.80 R.Soriano H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 4.26 Robertson H, 24 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 1.41 Ma.Rivera BS, 5-34 1 1 1 1 0 0 9 1.87 P.Hughes L, 2-4 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 13 7.11 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beckett 6 6 1 1 2 5 101 2.17 Albers 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 14 2.31 F.Morales 1-3 0 0 0 2 0 12 4.86 Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 3 16 4.26 Papelbon 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 3.28 D.Bard W, 2-5 1 0 0 0 0 2 17 2.36 Inherited runners-scored—Wade 2-0, F.Morales 1-0. IBB—off P.Hughes (C.Crawford). HBP—by Albers (Jeter). WP—Robertson 2. T—4:15. A—38,189 (37,493).

Angels 2, Mariners 1 Seattle I.Suzuki dh Ja.Wilson ss Ackley 2b Carp 1b C.Wells rf J.Bard c F.Gutierrez cf Robinson lf Seager 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 7 1 1

SO 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 2 1 8

Avg. .269 .221 .301 .311 .265 .224 .195 .222 .167

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aybar ss 4 0 0 0 0 2 .271 H.Kendrick 2b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .302 Tor.Hunter rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .248 Abreu dh 3 0 0 0 0 2 .253 V.Wells lf 3 0 1 1 0 1 .212 Callaspo 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .287 Trumbo 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .261 Bourjos cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .266 Bo.Wilson c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .182 Totals 28 2 4 2 0 12 Seattle 000 000 001 — 1 7 0 Los Angeles 001 000 10x — 2 4 0 LOB—Seattle 5, Los Angeles 2. HR—Carp (3), off E.Santana; Trumbo (22), off F.Hernandez. RBIs—Carp (15), V.Wells (43), Trumbo (63). CS—C.Wells (1). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (Ackley 2, Robinson); Los Angeles 1 (Trumbo). GIDP—I.Suzuki. DP—Los Angeles 1 (H.Kendrick, Trumbo). Seattle IP H R ER Hrndz L, 10-10 8 4 2 2 Los Angeles IP H R ER Santana W, 8-8 8 1-3 7 1 1 Waldn S, 25-32 2-3 0 0 0 WP—E.Santana. T—2:07. A—38,823 (45,389).

BB 0 BB 1 0

SO 12 SO 7 1

NP 98 NP 115 9

ERA 3.31 ERA 3.21 2.80

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 4

Avg. .280 .296 .268 .306 .254 .261 .215 .265 .245 .182 .259

White Sox 7, Twins 0 Chicago AB R H Pierre lf 3 0 1 De Aza lf 1 0 0 Al.Ramirez ss 5 1 1 Konerko dh 4 1 1 a-Vizquel ph-dh 1 0 0 Quentin rf 4 1 2 Rios cf 4 2 2 Lillibridge 1b 4 1 2 Beckham 2b 4 0 1 Flowers c 3 0 1 Morel 3b 4 1 1 Totals 37 7 12

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .275 Revere lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .253 Mauer c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Cuddyer 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .298 Valencia 3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Kubel rf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .305 Thome dh 3 0 0 0 0 1 .248 Plouffe 2b-1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .189 Tolbert 3b-2b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Nishioka ss 3 0 1 0 0 1 .215 Totals 30 0 4 0 0 7 Chicago 010 300 210 — 7 12 0 Minnesota 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 E—Duensing (2). LOB—Chicago 5, Minnesota 4. 2B—Quentin 2 (28), Rios (17), Morel (10), Revere (5), Mauer (8). HR—Lillibridge (9), off Duensing; Konerko (26), off Duensing; Al.Ramirez (11), off Al.Burnett; Rios (7), off Mijares. RBIs—Al.Ramirez 2 (47), Konerko (79), Rios 2 (26), Lillibridge (18), Morel (19). CS—Lillibridge (5), Tolbert (1). S—Pierre. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 2 (Pierre, Rios); Minnesota 2 (Cuddyer, Valencia). Runners moved up—Mauer. GIDP—Al.Ramirez. DP—Minnesota 2 (Nishioka, Plouffe, Cuddyer), (Mauer, Mauer, Plouffe). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Peavy W, 5-5 8 3 0 0 0 6 108 4.63 Thornton 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.49 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dnsing L, 8-10 6 1-3 9 5 4 1 4 104 4.56 Al.Burnett 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 16 5.84 Mijares 2 2 1 1 0 0 25 5.74 Inherited runners-scored—Al.Burnett 1-1. HBP—by Peavy (Tolbert). T—2:30. A—39,353 (39,500).

Athletics 5, Rays 4 (10 innings) Oakland J.Weeks 2b Sogard ss Matsui dh Willingham lf DeJesus rf S.Sizemore 3b Sweeney cf Powell c Rosales 1b Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 5 2 2 4 4 36

R H 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 2 2 3 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 5 10

BI 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

BB 1 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 6

SO 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 3 1 9

Avg. .293 .217 .267 .248 .234 .236 .294 .191 .093

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jennings lf 5 0 3 1 0 0 .344 Damon dh 4 0 0 1 1 0 .261 Longoria 3b 5 1 1 1 0 0 .225 Zobrist 2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Kotchman 1b 5 1 3 1 0 0 .336 1-E.Johnson pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .187 B.Upton cf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Joyce rf 4 1 1 0 1 1 .280 Shoppach c 2 0 0 0 0 2 .182 a-Chirinos ph-c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .286 S.Rodriguez ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .217 Totals 40 4 10 4 2 7 Oakland 000 130 000 1 — 5 10 0 Tampa Bay 001 200 100 0 — 4 10 0 a-grounded out for Shoppach in the 6th. 1-ran for Kotchman in the 10th. LOB—Oakland 8, Tampa Bay 9. 2B—DeJesus (15).

3B—J.Weeks (6). HR—Matsui (11), off Price; Willingham (17), off McGee; Kotchman (6), off Cahill; Longoria (16), off Balfour. RBIs—Matsui 2 (56), Willingham (63), Sweeney (17), Jennings (11), Damon (50), Longoria (58), Kotchman (34). SB—Damon (10), S.Rodriguez (9). S—Sweeney. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 6 (Rosales 3, Willingham, Powell 2); Tampa Bay 5 (Shoppach, Zobrist, Longoria 2, Joyce). Runners moved up—Matsui. GIDP—DeJesus, Sweeney, Rosales. DP—Tampa Bay 3 (Zobrist, S.Rodriguez, Kotchman), (Longoria, Zobrist, Kotchman), (Zobrist, Kotchman). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO Cahill 6 6 3 3 2 5 Fuentes H, 4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 Balfour BS, 3-5 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 Santos W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 1 Bailey S, 13-15 1 2 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO Price 4 2-3 7 4 4 3 7 Howell 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 Jo.Peralta 2 2 0 0 1 1 Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 0 McGee L, 0-1 1 1 1 1 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Howell 2-1. Cahill (S.Rodriguez). WP—Howell. T—3:39. A—21,425 (34,078).

NP ERA 112 3.93 6 4.08 29 2.20 22 2.04 16 1.93 NP ERA 110 3.89 24 7.71 23 3.73 10 2.05 23 3.86 HBP—by

Blue Jays 7, Orioles 2 Toronto R.Davis lf Y.Escobar ss Bautista rf Lind dh Encarnacion 1b Rasmus cf Arencibia c Jo.McDonald 2b Lawrie 3b Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 40

R H 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 3 1 2 1 1 0 3 2 2 7 13

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 2 1 7

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .238 .302 .315 .272 .277 .244 .216 .235 .455

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Andino ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Markakis rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .284 Ad.Jones cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .292 Guerrero dh 4 0 0 0 0 0 .277 Mar.Reynolds 1b 3 2 2 2 0 0 .222 Reimold lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .214 Tatum c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .255 J.Bell 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .100 C.Izturis 2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 B.Davis 2b 2 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Totals 30 2 5 2 0 6 Toronto 002 301 010 — 7 13 0 Baltimore 000 010 100 — 2 5 1 E—J.Bell (1). LOB—Toronto 6, Baltimore 2. 2B— Bautista (19), Encarnacion (28), Rasmus (4), Arencibia (13), Jo.McDonald (6), Andino (12), B.Davis (3). HR— Lawrie (1), off Simon; Mar.Reynolds 2 (26), off R.Romero 2. RBIs—Bautista 2 (76), Arencibia 2 (52), Jo.McDonald 2 (19), Lawrie (2), Mar.Reynolds 2 (62). SB—R.Davis (34). CS—Jo.McDonald (4). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 4 (Lind, Y.Escobar, Rasmus, R.Davis); Baltimore 2 (Guerrero, Andino). Runners moved up—Y.Escobar, Lawrie. GIDP— Ad.Jones, Guerrero. DP—Toronto 2 (Y.Escobar, Jo.McDonald, Encarnacion), (Janssen, Jo.McDonald, Encarnacion). Toronto IP H R ER Romro W, 10-9 8 4 2 2 Janssen 1 1 0 0 Baltimore IP H R ER Simon L, 3-5 5 2-3 10 6 4 Bergesen 3 3 1 1 M.Gonzalez 1-3 0 0 0 HBP—by R.Romero (Markakis). T—2:25. A—13,824 (45,438).

BB 0 0 BB 0 0 0

SO 5 1 SO 3 4 0

NP 94 14 NP 97 42 2

ERA 2.94 2.60 ERA 4.08 5.66 5.30

SO 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 7

Avg. .247 .289 .229 .318 .230 .217 .314 .288 .259

Royals 4, Tigers 3 Detroit A.Jackson cf Boesch lf Raburn 3b Mi.Cabrera 1b Ordonez dh Guillen 2b Jh.Peralta ss Avila c Dirks rf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 35

R H 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 1 3 10

BI 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .305 Me.Cabrera lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .303 Giavotella 2b 4 2 2 1 0 1 .455 Butler dh 4 0 0 1 0 1 .291 Hosmer 1b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .282 Francoeur rf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .273 Maier cf 3 1 1 1 0 2 .250 B.Pena c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .259 Moustakas 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .189 A.Escobar ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .247 Totals 29 4 6 4 1 10 Detroit 000 003 000 — 3 10 0 Kansas City 000 310 00x — 4 6 0 LOB—Detroit 5, Kansas City 2. 2B—A.Jackson (16), Mi.Cabrera (30), Dirks (7), Giavotella (2), Francoeur (31). 3B—Maier (2). HR—Giavotella (1), off Scherzer. RBIs— A.Jackson (25), Mi.Cabrera (71), Dirks (20), Giavotella (2), Butler (61), Maier (4), B.Pena (24). SB—Guillen (1). CS—A.Gordon (7). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 2 (Jh.Peralta, Ordonez); Kansas City 1 (B.Pena). Runners moved up—Raburn, Butler. Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzr L, 11-7 5 6 4 4 1 5 90 4.33 Below 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 4 35 3.46 Alburquerque 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.29 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chen W, 6-5 5 5 3 3 0 5 84 4.43 L.Coleman H, 7 2 3 0 0 0 0 26 1.77 G.Holland H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 1.37 Soria S, 21-27 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 3.88 Chen pitched to 3 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—L.Coleman 1-1. WP— Scherzer. T—2:32 (Rain delay: 0:46). A—20,132 (37,903).

Rangers 5, Indians 3 Cleveland Brantley lf Kipnis 2b A.Cabrera ss Hafner dh C.Santana c Fukudome rf Chisenhall 3b Duncan 1b LaPorta 1b Carrera cf Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 2 0 3 31

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

H BI BB 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 5 3 2

SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 5

Avg. .274 .240 .289 .293 .235 .250 .227 .250 .241 .246

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 2 1 0 1 2 0 .237 Andrus ss 4 0 1 2 0 0 .280 J.Hamilton lf-cf 4 0 0 1 0 2 .304 Mi.Young 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .336 N.Cruz rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .260 Napoli dh 1 1 1 0 2 0 .294 Moreland 1b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .267 Torrealba c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .274 1-A.Blanco pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .206 Teagarden c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .267 En.Chavez cf 2 0 0 0 0 1 .300 a-Dav.Murphy ph-lf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .256 Totals 28 5 7 5 4 5 Cleveland 010 010 010 — 3 5 0 Texas 000 000 05x — 5 7 0 a-singled for En.Chavez in the 8th. 1-ran for Torrealba in the 8th. LOB—Cleveland 4, Texas 3. 3B—Brantley (4). HR—Brantley (7), off C.Lewis. RBIs—Brantley 2 (44), Chisenhall (7), Kinsler (45), Andrus 2 (42), J.Hamilton (62), Dav.Murphy (21). SB—Kipnis (2). SF—Chisenhall. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 3 (Carrera, Kipnis, Hafner). GIDP—Andrus, N.Cruz. DP—Cleveland 2 (A.Cabrera, Kipnis, Duncan), (A.Cabrera, Kipnis, Duncan). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tomlin 7 4 2 2 3 4 95 4.08 Smith L, 2-3 0 3 3 3 1 0 14 1.84 R.Perez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 2.35 Durbin 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 6.28 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Lewis 7 1-3 5 3 3 1 3 108 4.12 D.Oliver W, 4-5 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 17 2.09 Adams S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 2.08 Tomlin pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. J.Smith pitched to 4 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—J.Smith 2-2, R.Perez 2-1, Durbin 1-0. T—2:38. A—37,431 (49,170).


D4 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Bend South

RUNNING SCOREBOARD 371, Tim Apple, Bend, 4:10:50. 372, Sarah Shoop, Bend, 4:12:17. 373, Heidi Hill, Albany, 4:13:23. 374, Naomi Laviolette, Wilsonville, 4:16:57. 375, Tami Fuller, Kennewick, Wash., 4:17:38. 376, Matthew Lachance, Bend, 4:21:28. 377, Amanda Broady, Bend, 4:22:50. 378, Teresa Clemens-Brower, Aloha, 4:22:51. 379, Adam Keough, Dundee, 4:27:02. 380, Siri Gese, Puyallup, Wash., 4:32:21. 381, Bree Warjone, Olympia, Wash., 4:52:11

LOCAL Haulin’ Aspen Sunday In Bend 7-mile Race 1, Jeff Oswalt, Spokane, Wash., 0:44:39. 2, Jason Townsend, Bend, 0:44:54. 3, Zoe Roy, Bend, 0:46:11. 4, Stuart Curtis, Durham, N.H., 0:47:35. 5, Todd A. Goselin, Hillsboro, 0:50:25. 6, Lance Newman, Bend, 0:51:06. 7, Roger Randall, Bend, 0:51:31. 8, Shawn Zumwalt, Bend, 0:53:07. 9, Misako Yamamoto, Beaverton, 0:53:24. 10, Bob Nichols, Vancouver, B.C., 0:53:26. 11, Daniel Hodgson, Bend, 0:53:30. 12, Christopher Nichols, Chico, Calif., 0:55:04. 13, Dave Thomason, Bend, 0:55:05. 14, Cindy Alt, Bend, 0:55:09. 15, Jordan Friese, Eugene, 0:55:37. 16, Rick Ader, Portland, 0:55:49. 17, Russell Mahaney, Bend, 0:55:59. 18, Nicholas Hill, Penticton, B.C., 0:56:10. 19, Stuart Alt, Bend, 0:56:36. 20, Dan Smith, Corvallis, 0:57:18. 21, Mike Roberts, Bend, 0:57:33. 22, Alexis Eudy, Bend, 0:57:42. 23, Alexis Snyder, Tigard, 0:58:12. 24, Michelle Snyder, Tigard, 0:58:15. 25, Dan Smith, Springfield, 0:58:16. 26, Nate Pedersen, North Mankato, Minn., 0:58:27. 27, Kelly O’Keefe, Portland, 0:59:07. 28, Aaron Currier, Salem, 0:59:42. 29, Julie Downing, Bend, 1:00:43. 30, Darlene Nastansky, Porltand, 1:00:56. 31, Andy Stearns, Bend, 1:01:07. 32, Marc Chlopek, Omaha, Neb., 1:01:07. 33, Jennifer Redding, Bend, 1:02:07. 34, Yvette Cattana, Coogee. Australia, 1:02:10. 35, Charcie Clausen, Portland, 1:02:14. 36, Rebecca Miles, Lake Oswego, 1:02:36. 37, Neil Neisner, Klamath Falls, 1:02:36. 37, Amy Weinsheim, Redmond, 1:02:36. 39, Kevin Iverson, Bend, 1:02:37. 40, David Dean, Moscow, Idaho, 1:02:53. 41, Shayla Moline, Hood River, 1:02:55. 42, Amber Bukovnik, Bend, 1:03:31. 43, Kelly Oswalt, Gresham, 1:03:34. 44, Kelsey Sweeney, Bend, 1:03:34. 45, Leticia Iverson, Bend, 1:03:37. 46, Lisa Nichols, Chico, Calif., 1:04:14. 47, Lisa Heinrichs, Redmond, 1:04:24. 48, Heather Bell, Gresham, 1:04:26. 49, Janet Chappell, Ashland, 1:04:29. 50, Kari Anderson, Juneau, Alaska, 1:05:32. 51, Guadalupe Brandon, Vallejo, Calif., 1:05:56. 52, Jennifer Lee, Bend, 1:06:23. 53, Russ Ward, Bend, 1:07:12. 54, Kym Townsend, Bend, 1:08:39. 55, Morgan Ohman, Klamath Falls, 1:08:51. 56, Chelsea Town, Bend, 1:09:09. 57, Jenny Brown, Bend, 1:10:12. 58, Alisha Stone, Bend, 1:10:23. 59, April Mack, Sublimity, 1:10:24. 60, Cheryl Berrin, Bend, 1:10:45. 61, Eric Ventimeglia, Klamath Falls, 1:11:22. 62, Dean Hernandez, Roseville, Calif., 1:11:22. 63, Andrew Wyman, Forest Grove, 1:11:36. 64, Stephanie Ring, Wilsonville, 1:11:43. 65, Joey Thomas, Lincolnshire, Ill., 1:12:08. 66, Leslie Fagan, Omaha, Neb., 1:12:11. 67, Gretchen Lutes, Portland, 1:12:14. 68, Davina Dungy, Salem, 1:13:01. 69, Bradley Pickens, Eugene, 1:13:10. 70, Sandra Parker, Centralia, Wash., 1:13:12. 71, Wendy Mahaney, Sunriver, 1:13:26. 72, Adele Tennant, Bend, 1:13:29. 73, Ron Rods, Brunswick, Ga., 1:13:56. 74, Karen Oliver, Ashburn, Va., 1:14:01. 75, Lew Hollander, Bend, 1:14:17. 76, Leah Olsen, Portland, 1:14:24. 77, Gabrielle Johnston, Portland, 1:14:26. 78, Riley Repp, Portland, 1:14:46. 79, Chris Parkinson, Hubbard, 1:14:51. 80, Nicole Wyman, Forest Grove, 1:14:51. 81, Jessica McCurdy, Beaverton, 1:15:06. 82, Jennifer Dean, Moscow, Idaho, 1:15:06. 83, Elena Pressprich, Bend, 1:15:07. 84, Jeenie Balkins, Corvallis, 1:15:17. 85, Brenda Vasquez, Woodburn, 1:15:31. 86, Drake Repp, Portland, 1:15:41. 87, Anne Marie Daggett, Bend, 1:15:56. 88, Vanessa Cobarrubia, Bend, 1:15:56. 89, Robin Antonson, Bend, 1:15:57. 90, Brian Barber, Boise, Idaho, 1:16:03. 91, Lance Repp, Portland, 1:16:08. 92, Cathy Knight, Roseburg, 1:16:30. 93, Sharyn Fetrow, Black Butte Ranch, 1:16:43. 94, Susanne Pickens, Eugene, 1:16:54. 95, Chad Ash, Eugene, 1:16:56. 96, Nichole Ryan, Bend, 1:17:37. 97, Cheryl Stice, Cathedral City, Calif., 1:18:16. 98, Kathy Spivey, Palm Desert, Calif., 1:18:32. 99, Jessica Scott, Beaverton, 1:18:33. 100, Kelly Orehovec, Portland, 1:18:34. 101, Ona Larsell, La Pine, 1:18:34. 102, Justn Scott, Beaverton, 1:18:35. 103, Pam Weekley, Cathedral City, Calif., 1:18:35. 104, Shannon Warner, Bend, 1:18:56. 105, Andraya Offutt, Bend, 1:18:56. 106, Ainsley Abraham, Eugene, 1:19:22. 107, Corey Abraham, Eugene, 1:19:24. 108, Tina Dodge Vera, Albany, 1:19:39. 109, Edward Johnston, Portland, 1:19:46. 110, Susan Laramee, Sunriver, 1:20:13. 111, Ellen Gallagher, Redmond, 1:20:37. 112, Angie Kusman, Port Orchard, Wash., 1:21:18. 113, Stacy Lambert, Portland, 1:21:25. 114, Tracy Goheen, Bellingham, Wash., 1:21:52. 115, Kimberle Williamson, Redmond, 1:24:31. 116, Lisa Parkinson, Hubbard, 1:24:32. 117, Kayla Parkinson, Hubbard, 1:24:33. 118, Janet Farrens, Bend, 1:24:41. 119, Julie Watts, Bend, 1:24:42. 120, Natalie Pacholl, Vancouver, Wash., 1:24:44. 121, Erin Eggert, Walla Walla, Wash., 1:24:46. 122, Susan Manganaro, Sunriver, 1:25:11. 123, Jo Ann Hand, Bend, 1:25:32. 124, Russ Fetrow, Black Butte Ranch, 1:25:43. 125, Vicki Ash, Eugene, 1:25:49. 126, Allison Wyman, Beaverton, 1:26:25. 127, Charity Creech, Bend, 1:27:37. 128, Laurel Calderwood, Brookline, Mass., 1:29:18. 129, Randy Miller, Bend, 1:29:26. 130, Paige Miller, Bend, 1:29:29. 131, Katrina West, Roseburg, 1:32:17. 132, Holly Winter, Dundee, 1:32:34. 133, Michele Macauley, Pleasant Hill, Calif., 1:34:18. 134, Rita Thompson, Philomath, 1:34:50. 135, Glenn Balkins, Corvallis, 1:37:57. 136, Breanna Santos, Palm Desert, Calif., 1:40:07. 137, Carole Insell, Palm Desert, Calif., 1:40:57. 138, Cameron Miller, Bend, 1:43:02. 139, Kari Miller, Bend, 1:43:02. 140, Kim Preciado, Roseburg, 1:47:01. 141, Heidi Cromwell, Bend, 1:47:10. 142, Jenniffer Smith, Bend, 1:50:26. 143, Linda Fisher-Berlanga, Bend, 1:50:27. 144, Carly Thomas, Lincolnshire, Ill., 1:51:12. 145, Georgeanne Windisch, Bend, 1:57:07. 146, Kathleen Nazareth, Fremont, Calif., 2:21:10. 147, Mitchell Daletas, Eugene, 2:26:00. 148, Jeannette Daletas, Eugene, 2:26:01. Half Marathon 1, Jesse Stevick, Olympia, Wash., 1:21:15. 2, Daniel Friesen, Lake Oswego, 1:27:51. 3, Casey Glick, Bend, 1:30:15. 4, Kevin Blount, Ellensburg, Wash., 1:30:53. 5, David Cleveland, Prineville, 1:30:59. 6, Tom Moline, Hood River, 1:31:25. 7, James Clark, Arlington, Wash., 1:35:07. 8, Dan Moline, Mendota Heights, Minn., 1:35:49. 9, Paul Tate, Portland, 1:35:53. 10, Seth Kaufman, Jupiter, Fla., 1:37:06. 11, Joseph Ewers, 1:37:17. 12, Kevin Brown, Portland, 1:38:12. 13, Gary Hefner, Long Beach, Calif., 1:38:56. 14, John Toepke, Springfield, 1:39:17.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Haulin’ Aspen runners take off at the start of the Haulin’ Aspen marathon, half marathon and seven-mile trail races at Miller Elementary School in Bend Sunday morning. 15, Chris Tompkins, Redmond, 1:39:59. 16, Lukas Chase, Arlington, Wash., 1:40:15. 17, Scott Huntoon, Dorchester, Mass., 1:40:56. 18, Aaron Newsom, Arlington, Wash., 1:41:27. 19, Matt Franke, Redmond, 1:42:19. 20, Mike Lindaas, Bend, 1:42:39. 21, Ulrike Krotscheck, Olympia, Wash., 1:43:03. 22, Alinna Ghavami, Keizer, 1:43:49. 23, Joshua Decelles, Bend, 1:44:02. 24, Christopher Cheng, Bend, 1:44:26. 25, Samuel Corliss, Bend, 1:44:59. 26, Spencer Witter, Philomath, 1:45:41. 27, Steven Miles, Lake Oswego, 1:46:06. 28, Liz Anjos, Portland, 1:46:06. 29, Bretagne Dow-Hygelund, Sunriver, 1:46:22. 30, Fritz Siegert, Boise, Idaho, 1:46:25. 31, Ethan Lorimor, Bothell, Wash., 1:47:10. 32, Bryce Ferguson, Seattle, Wash., 1:47:11. 33, Brian Levering, Bend, 1:47:20. 34, Ben Heuberger, Mcminnville, 1:47:54. 35, Matthew Grymek, Somerville, Mass., 1:48:23. 36, Chris Samaras, Redding, Calif., 1:48:32. 37, Michael Allen, Hillsboro, 1:48:50. 38, Mindy Gaddis, Boise, Idaho, 1:48:56. 39, Jenny Stevick, Olympia, Wash., 1:49:58. 40, Darragh Hildreth, Bend, 1:50:00. 41, Calena Morehead, Omaha, Neb., 1:50:03. 42, Jennifer Edelmann, Boston, Mass., 1:50:26. 43, Steve Walters, Beaverton, 1:51:15. 44, Nancy Abraham, Steilacoom, Wash., 1:51:16. 45, Susan Clark, Eugene, 1:51:25. 46, Robert Harris, Lake Forest, Calif., 1:51:44. 47, M. Ester Ceja, Boise, Idaho, 1:52:11. 48, Damon Brewer, Granite Bay, Calif., 1:52:22. 49, Jeff Whinery, La Grande, 1:52:27. 50, Judy Mathison, Portland, 1:52:59. 51, Martin Hahn, Portland, 1:53:27. 52, Scott Dougall, Keizer, 1:54:27. 53, Blain Cunningham, Newport, 1:54:35. 54, Aaron Thompson, Folsom, Calif., 1:54:42. 55, Fred Kondziela, Central Point, 1:54:50. 56, Casey Gifford, Eugene, 1:55:00. 57, Trisha Kluge, Eugene, 1:55:47. 58, Chris Egertson, Bend, 1:55:54. 59, Curtis Safley, Boring, 1:56:13. 60, Robin Bryson, Prosser, Wash., 1:56:48. 61, Marika Collins, Bend, 1:57:12. 62, Vicky Shea, Reno Nv, 1:57:14. 63, Holley Dryden, Boise, Idaho, 1:57:17. 64, Amy Hiebert, Corvallis, 1:57:37. 65, Julia Eidukas, Bend, 1:57:46. 66, Paula Vanderford, Portland, 1:57:58. 67, Michelle Alanis Edwards, Bend, 1:58:29. 68, Anna Barram, Portland, 1:58:31. 69, Steve West, Roseburg, 1:58:36. 70, Joe Schnabel, Salem, 1:58:40. 71, Allison Strnad, Nashville, Tenn., 1:58:43. 72, Chris Kromm, Madison, Wis., 1:58:43. 73, Lindsey Kromm, Madison, Wis., 1:58:43. 74, Kieran Mckinnell, Bend, 1:58:47. 75, Brian Wood, Corvallis, 1:58:55. 76, J.t. Bushnell, Corvallis, 1:59:10. 77, Donnie Flahavan, Shingle Springs, Calif., 1:59:18. 78, Bree Weinstein, Vancouver, Wash., 1:59:54. 79, Mark Mcgahan, Kuna, Idaho, 1:59:57. 79, Jennifer Rodriguez, Houston, Texas, 1:59:57. 81, Carrie Heuberger, Ashland, 2:00:11. 82, Tom Kay, Eugene, 2:00:22. 83, Derrick Chappell, Ashland, 2:00:30. 84, Chelsea Wiens, Monmouth, 2:00:44. 85, Chris Svetich, Eugene, 2:00:57. 86, Sadie Thorin, Eugene, 2:00:58. 87, Erik Rook, Long Creek, 2:01:07. 88, Joe Mosley, Eugene, 2:01:08. 89, Kori Welch, Portland, 2:01:25. 90, Deana Wyland, Albany, 2:01:27. 91, Tiffany MacDonald, Sherwood, 2:01:28. 92, Mark Adams, Portland, 2:01:39. 93, Lily Hernandez, Roseville, Calif., 2:02:15. 94, Tenessa Roizman, Mccall, Idaho, 2:02:22. 95, David Hardtke, Oakland, Calif., 2:02:31. 96, Hailee Smith, Gilchrist, 2:02:40. 97, Natasha West, Roseburg, 2:03:01. 98, John Hahn, Tigard, 2:03:37. 99, Heidi Rowles, Bend, 2:04:40. 100, Megan Heuberger, Eugene, 2:04:45. 101, Matthew Wood, Portland, 2:04:47. 102, Mark Friesen, Beavercreek, Ohio, 2:04:51. 103, Sharon Mosley, Eugene, 2:04:55. 104, Hillary Cooper, Tigard, 2:05:03. 105, Terri Silliman, Eugene, 2:05:07. 106, Rosie Crisostomo, Corvallis, 2:05:54. 107, Michael Gauvin, Coos Bay, 2:05:54. 108, Susy Friesen, Beavercreek, Ohio, 2:05:59. 109, Kent Ness, Boise, Idaho, 2:06:14. 110, Lisa Cowan, Wilsonville, 2:06:18. 111, Margie Wilkerson, Bellingham, Wash., 2:06:27. 112, Melissa Nisly, Salem, 2:06:54. 113, Steve Kaufmann, Bend, 2:06:55. 114, Brooke Landon, Portland, 2:07:01. 115, Ronald Virden, Salem, 2:07:06. 116, Jeff Peterman, Veneta, 2:07:19. 117, Cameron Fischer, Bend, 2:07:38. 118, Randy Eckhart, Bend, 2:07:41. 119, John Kluge, Eugene, 2:07:46. 120, Cael Savage, Dulles, Va., 2:07:46. 121, Heidi McBride, Portland, 2:08:12. 122, Corey Crain, Bend, 2:08:23. 123, Amy Garber, Eugene, 2:08:33. 124, Dominic Parker, Centralia, Wash., 2:08:36. 125, Kelly Candanoza, Philomath, 2:08:38. 126, Eran Hozias, Portland, 2:08:40. 127, Becky Eriksson, Bend, 2:08:50. 128, Catalina Conger, Bend, 2:08:58. 129, Sara Curtis, Durham, N.H., 2:09:03. 130, Ronald Dalesky, Hillsboro, 2:09:20. 131, Ellis Clair, Bend, 2:09:36. 132, Tricia Fields, Glennallen, Alaska, 2:09:47. 133, Jim Oakes, San Diego, Calif., 2:09:58. 134, Michael Knouse, Portland, 2:09:59. 135, Andrew Naegeli, Albany, 2:10:18. 136,

Paul Hicks, Eugene, 2:10:33. 137, Melinda Fahey, Bend, 2:10:53. 138, Erica Mckoy, Redmond, 2:10:54. 139, Lizzie Eastman, Hillsboro, 2:10:59. 140, Michael Langeliers, Corvallis, 2:11:08. 141, Moises Lucero, Eugene, 2:11:11. 142, Timothy Ryf, Portland, 2:11:12. 143, Polly Nelson, Eugene, 2:11:18. 144, Charlie Moore, Portland, 2:11:19. 145, John Russell, Portland, 2:11:20. 146, Anca Stamm, Boise, Idaho, 2:11:25. 147, Angelina Anello-Dennee, Bend, 2:11:26. 148, Jaime Chase, Portland, 2:11:26. 149, Pete Seashols, Bend, 2:11:31. 150, Leilani Bentley, Portland, 2:11:33. 151, Kerry Arndt, Portland, 2:11:33. 152, Gina Zandy Ohnstad, Portland, 2:11:38. 153, Robert Hotchkiss, Portland, 2:11:43. 154, Catherine Hotchkiss, Portland, 2:11:43. 155, Gina Lucero, Eugene, 2:11:51. 156, Teresa Murray, Newport, 2:11:59. 157, Scott Lieberman, Eagle, Idaho, 2:12:05. 158, Haley Beal, Bend, 2:12:35. 159, Jessica Hoffman, Albany, 2:12:39. 160, Amanda Reinholtz, Eugene, 2:12:52. 161, Marla Hacker, Bend, 2:12:56. 162, Tim Graves, Woodinville, Wash., 2:12:57. 163, Brandi Stewart-Wood, Vancouver, Wash., 2:13:05. 164, Joanna Haugen, Albany, 2:13:09. 165, Mitchell Scofield, Prineville, 2:13:37. 166, Erica Kinsel, Olympia, Wash., 2:14:05. 167, Clayton Kinsel, Olympia, Wash., 2:14:07. 168, Amy Rowles, Bend, 2:14:07. 169, David Sieperda, Durham, Calif., 2:14:15. 170, Rebecca McGee, Eugene, 2:14:17. 171, Nicole Gregory, Portland, 2:14:19. 172, Matthew Beaver, Terrebonne, 2:14:20. 172, Kelsi Cross, Terrebonne, 2:14:20. 174, Jason Mckenzie, Jonesborough, Tenn., 2:14:25. 175, Amanda Weinman, Eugene, 2:14:40. 176, Katy Stienmetz, Bend, 2:14:42. 177, Linda Williams, Beaverton, 2:14:45. 178, Sara Wiener, Bend, 2:15:22. 179, Carolyn Mccann, Eugene, 2:15:28. 180, Erin Kerr, Bend, 2:15:44. 181, Laura Mavity, Bend, 2:15:49. 182, Jodi Vizzini, Medford, 2:15:57. 183, Lea Smith, Salem, 2:16:01. 184, Jill Allen, Portland, 2:16:03. 185, Lisa Quillin, Eugene, 2:16:24. 186, Zila Phillips, Bend, 2:16:31. 187, Philip Hawkes, Penticton, B.C., 2:16:52. 188, Karen Bea, Phoenix, Ariz., 2:16:58. 189, Amy Jaggard, Bend, 2:17:06. 190, Ben Sherman, Portland, 2:17:24. 191, Michael Collings, Walnut Creek, Calif., 2:17:29. 192, Jerry Korson, Gates, 2:18:03. 193, Bill Kassing, Gresham, 2:18:07. 194, Lisa Hudson, Corvallis, 2:19:13. 195, Kristin Gnojewski, Boise, Idaho, 2:19:34. 196, Nancy Thomas, Lincolnshire, Ill., 2:19:43. 197, Jim Thomas, Lincolnshire, Ill., 2:19:43. 198, Rian Rasubala, Salem, 2:20:31. 199, Lucas Ferrando, Salem, 2:20:31. 200, Jessica Secan, Seattle, Wash., 2:21:00. 201, Aline Bahamondez, Hillsboro, 2:21:09. 202, Gregory Hudson, Corvallis, 2:21:10. 203, Cheryl Salazar, Kirkland, Wash., 2:21:13. 204, Gary Repp, Portland, 2:21:14. 205, Robert Megel Sr., Troutdale, 2:21:14. 206, Marybel Rodriguez, Bend, 2:21:17. 207, Stan Manley, Coburg, 2:21:19. 208, Anne Aylward, Tigard, 2:21:24. 209, Viviana Cumplido, Phoenix, Ariz., 2:21:35. 210, Adam Saffel, Hillsboro, 2:21:50. 211, Naomi Zwonitzer, Bend, 2:21:54. 212, Brian Crosby, Bend, 2:21:59. 213, Jenny Lonergan, Woodburn, 2:22:01. 214, Morgan Davis, Bend, 2:22:11. 214, Ashlee Johnson, Bend, 2:22:11. 216, Shannon Wipf, Beaverton, 2:22:13. 217, Cheryl Younger, Bend, 2:23:03. 218, Maryalicia Verdecchia, Vancouver, Wash., 2:23:04. 219, Tim Krigbaum, Bend, 2:23:34. 220, Mary Carroll, Bend, 2:23:47. 221, Cassandra Hernandez, Roseville, Calif., 2:23:54. 222, Jim Yourdon, Bend, 2:23:55. 223, Ryan Mungall, Bend, 2:24:00. 224, Tracie Hannick, Chico Ca Usa, 2:24:22. 225, Mark Koopman, Bend, 2:24:23. 226, Nathan Isaacs, Beaverton, 2:24:27. 227, Molly Bair, Portland, 2:24:43. 228, Mallory Tompkins, Redmond, 2:24:47. 229, Jeanette Johnson, Lostine, 2:25:20. 230, Michael Valbuena, Vancouver, Wash., 2:25:36. 231, Nicole Weathers, Bend, 2:25:39. 232, Trisha Savage, Dulles, Va., 2:25:51. 233, Dawn Hietala, Albany, 2:26:23. 234, Toby Bayard, Bend, 2:26:33. 235, Katie Surbrook, Portland, 2:26:35. 236, Laurel Weiland, Bend, 2:26:44. 237, Janell Schade, Tumwater, Wash., 2:26:56. 238, Ian Reid, Talent, 2:27:06. 239, Annie Reid, Talent, 2:27:06. 240, Gail Saxton, Milwaukie, 2:27:08. 241, Liza Behles, Boulder, Colo., 2:27:11. 242, Matt Sweeney, Bend, 2:27:15. 243, Shelie Best, Penticton, B.C., 2:28:26. 244, Kelly Weisheipl, Ashland, 2:28:30. 245, Kelly Jensen, Bellingham, Wash., 2:28:50. 246, Marcy Anderson, Bend, 2:28:50. 247, Adrianne Osborne, Bend, 2:29:26. 248, Susan Hale, Portland, 2:29:27. 249, Sydney Waite, Prineville, 2:29:38. 250, Jeff Timm, Bend, 2:29:40. 251, Jennifer Berry-O’Shea, Bend, 2:29:43. 252, Shawn Waite, Prineville, 2:29:46. 253, Max Tejeda, Houston, Texas, 2:29:49. 254, Alyssa Henry, Baker City, 2:30:00. 255, Stephanie Krause, Bend, 2:30:09.

256, Tommy Hake, Mount Shasta, Calif., 2:30:14. 257, Carone Weigel, Portland, 2:30:19. 258, Kristen Calderwood, Bend, 2:30:23. 259, Jodi Rods, Brunswick, Ga., 2:31:33. 260, Jennifer Sypher, Flagstaff, Ariz., 2:31:33. 261, Ashley Rebholtz, Roseville, Calif., 2:31:55. 262, Brittney Gese, Campbell, Calif., 2:31:56. 263, Robin Berg, San Jose, Calif., 2:31:57. 264, Kori Rayborn, Baker City, 2:32:01. 265, Jennifer Mason, Canton Ct, 2:32:13. 266, Chuck Sypher, Flagstaff, Ariz., 2:32:41. 267, Lisa Gallagher, Boise, Idaho, 2:33:01. 268, Brooklyn Walker, Powell Butte, 2:33:26. 269, Amy Fauver, Portland, 2:33:30. 270, Todd Borkowitz, Portland, 2:33:30. 271, Molly Rogers, Portland, 2:33:32. 272, Kenzie Hruby, West Linn, 2:34:42. 273, Janelle Harris, Pollock Pines, Calif., 2:34:51. 274, Tonya Koopman, Bend, 2:34:53. 275, Cat Addison, Bend, 2:35:00. 276, Kathy Lein, Bend, 2:35:03. 277, Jeffrey Trujillo, Ogden, Utah, 2:35:15. 278, Cristi Franklin, Wilsonville, 2:35:23. 278, Greg Wolf, Folsom, Calif., 2:35:23. 280, Jason Schermerhorn, Seaside, 2:36:47. 281, Brian Horn, Portland, 2:36:55. 282, John Horn, West Linn, 2:37:00. 283, Nancy Morris, Redmond, 2:37:05. 284, Jon Winders, Roseburg, 2:37:08. 285, Carie Bussey, Olympia, Wash., 2:37:58. 286, Jamie Wilcox, Riverton, Wyo., 2:37:58. 287, Michal Yourdon, Bend, 2:38:02. 288, Carol Clair, Bend, 2:39:30. 289, Taylor Scofield, Prineville, 2:39:40. 290, Lucia Gonzales, Hood River, 2:39:44. 291, Melissa Foo, San Diego, Calif., 2:39:58. 292, Judy Rosen, Bend, 2:40:43. 293, Heather Lynch, Bend, 2:40:49. 294, Lor Horton, Milwaukie, 2:41:09. 295, Eileen Virden, Salem, 2:41:30. 296, Melissa Durham, Bend, 2:41:33. 297, Chelsey Recker, Bend, 2:41:40. 298, Samantha Webb, Washington, D.C., 2:41:42. 299, Colleen Keely, Louisville, Ky., 2:41:43. 300, Laura Franz, Portland, 2:43:00. 301, Eric Plummer, Bend, 2:43:11. 302, Elizabeth Irwin, Seattle, Wash., 2:43:32. 303, Ann Goldmann, Portland, 2:43:39. 304, Elizabeth Bettencourt, Vancouver, Wash., 2:43:56. 305, Daniel Smith, Rainier, 2:43:56. 306, Kris Hake, Mount Shasta, Calif., 2:44:31. 307, Morris Roberts, Winchester, 2:44:47. 308, Angela Roberts, Winchester, 2:44:47. 309, Courtney Repp, Medford, 2:45:02. 310, Allison Trujillo, Ogden, Utah, 2:45:05. 311, Robert Huskey, Bend, 2:46:42. 312, Lori Morehead, Omaha, Neb., 2:46:50. 313, Jessica Ballestrazze, Eugene, 2:47:30. 314, Moik Mccullough, Klamath Falls, 2:47:52. 315, Stacey Currier, Salem, 2:48:13. 316, Kurt Reeser, Vancouver, Wash., 2:48:47. 317, Alicia Delashmutt, Portland, 2:48:48. 318, Dana Woods, Olympia, Wash., 2:49:34. 319, Beth Rimmer, Kirkland, Wash., 2:49:51. 320, Larissa Morehead, Omaha, Neb., 2:49:57. 321, Pamela Culbertson, Eagle, Idaho, 2:50:10. 322, Monica Baughman, Bend, 2:50:21. 323, Amber Petersen, Redmond, 2:50:30. 324, Don Hildebrand, Sisters, 2:50:42. 325, Elisa Carroll, Bend, 2:50:58. 326, Victoria Mckenzie, Jonesborough, Tenn., 2:51:08. 327, Jeffrey Eastman, Hillsboro, 2:51:44. 328, Sheena Miltenberger, Bend, 2:52:07. 329, Letha Crawford, Bend, 2:52:07. 330, Eliza Cazares, Solvang, Calif., 2:52:15. 331, Elizabeth Gould, Toronto, 2:52:28. 332, Richard Arnold, Bend, 2:52:30. 333, Jennifer Seward, Olympia, Wash., 2:52:32. 334, Kari Tyne, Bend, 2:52:34. 335, Rebecca Seago-Coyle, Rochester, Wash., 2:52:35. 336, Katherine Stroer, Savannah, Ga., 2:52:47. 337, David Benkeser, Seattle, Wash., 2:52:48. 338, Linda Murphy, Talent, 2:53:31. 339, Mark Franklin, Wilsonville, 2:53:38. 340, Mike Seashols, Belmont, Calif., 2:53:39. 341, Molly Mcguire, Beaverton, 2:53:44. 342, Jill Kaufmann, Bend, 2:54:33. 343, Mike Callinan, Capitola, Calif., 2:55:06. 344, Michael Boyce, Salem, 2:56:08. 345, Brooke Alley, Milwaukie, 2:56:31. 346, Marcus Britton, Milwaukie, 2:56:32. 347, Lindsay Woods, Bend, 2:58:24. 348, Susan Newton, Redmond, 2:58:45. 349, Jeanette King, Bend, 3:01:26. 350, Jane Sabin-Davis, Bend, 3:01:37. 351, Lenora James, Bend, 3:02:29. 352, Rob Messing, Penticton, B.C., 3:03:53. 353, Steffanie Moyers, Oregon City, 3:04:07. 354, John Fackenthall, Walla Walla, Wash., 3:04:31. 355, Patricia Fackenthall, Walla Walla, Wash., 3:04:32. 356, Kristin Smith, Oregon City, 3:06:21. 357, Laura Jacobs, Bend, 3:06:37. 358, Carol Mattson, Hillsboro, 3:11:51. 359, Travis Raymond, Albany, 3:16:35. 360, Tina Moser, Coeur D’Alene, Idaho, 3:24:26. 361, Jeremy Moser, Coeur D’Alene, Idaho, 3:24:26. 362, Tim Spicer, Richland, Wash., 3:26:40. 363, Michelle Bunker, Kennewick, Wash., 3:26:41. 364, Linda Togiai, Richland, Wash., 3:26:41. 365, Jennifer Richman, Portland, 3:30:54. 366, Stephen Hamilton, Sunriver, 3:31:03. 367, Terri Wiens, Monmouth, 3:38:05. 368, Aaron Davis, Albany, 3:51:32. 369, Neal Rusk, Bend, 3:52:57. 370, Susan Padgett, Eugene, 4:06:44.

Scott wins Bridgestone Invitational The Associated Press AKRON, Ohio — The chants and cheers began as Adam Scott walked toward the 18th green to complete a command performance Sunday in the Bridgestone Invitational and win his first World Golf Championship. But in a surreal scene at Firestone, they weren’t for him. They were for his caddie. “Stev-ie Will-iams,” they shouted as the guy carrying the bag for Scott broke into a big smile. The celebration made it clear that Steve Williams felt vindicated after being fired last month by Tiger Woods. The interview after it was over — yes, he gave interviews — made it sound as if it was Williams who shot the 5-under 65. At one point, Williams described himself as a “good front-runner when I’m caddying.” “I’ve caddied for 33 years — 145 wins now — and that’s the best win I’ve ever had,” Williams told CBS Sports on the 18th green. This from a guy whose 12 years working for Woods featured 13 majors and 16 world titles among 72 wins worldwide. That includes the 2001 Masters, when Woods won an unprecedented fourth straight major. Clearly, Williams is still angry over how — and when — Woods cut him loose. He even disputed

GOLF ROUNDUP Woods’ version of how it happened, saying Woods told him over the phone, not in person. Scott didn’t seem to mind that his caddie was getting most of the attention. “I can talk about Steve now and not Tiger,” Scott said to laughter, alluding to the countless times he and other players have been asked about Woods. “I’m sure there are a lot of other golfers who wouldn’t mind that, either.” The latest chapter in the endless saga involving Woods took away from a premier performance by Scott, who didn’t make a bogey over his last 26 holes and couldn’t afford to with 19-year-old Ryo Ishikawa giving him all he could handle. They were never separated by more than one shot until Scott chipped in from the side of the 12th green, then rolled in a birdie putt from just inside 30 feet on the 14th to build a three-shot lead. Ishikawa three-putted the 15th, and Scott had no trouble closing this one out. He wound up winning by four shots over world No. 1 Luke Donald, who shot 66; and Rickie Fowler, who played a final round worthy of a winner with a bogey-

free 66, only to run into an affable Australian who couldn’t be beat. Ishikawa made a bogey on the last hole to tie for fourth with Jason Day. They both shot 69. Scott finished at 17-under 263, the lowest score to win at Firestone since Woods had 259 in 2000 in an 11-shot win. With a three-shot lead, Scott thought about playing it safe on the 18th. Williams told him to take 6-iron at the flag, and Scott obliged with a shot that rolled past the cup and settled 5 feet away. When they got to the green, one fan shouted out, “How do you like him now, Tiger?” Also on Sunday: Piercy takes Reno-Tahoe RENO, Nev. — Scott Piercy squandered a three-stroke lead, then dodged more trouble down the stretch before making a 7-foot par putt on the final hole to win by one stroke. Piercy shot a 2-under 70 to finish at 15-under 273, beating Pat Perez for his first victory on the PGA Tour. Haas wins on Champions Tour BLAINE, Minn. — Jay Haas birdied the final hole to win the 3M Championship by one shot over Tom Lehman, Kenny Perry and Peter Senior. Haas started the day one shot behind Senior and John Huston and had a 68 to finish at 15-under 201.

Marathon T1, Rod Bien, Bend, 2:58:03. T1, Stuart Gillespie, Denver, Colo., 2:58:03. 3, Jeff Hoppert, Portland, 3:08:47. 4, Tom Flahavan, Shingle Springs, Calif., 3:14:29. 5, Jc Callans, Eagle Point, 3:14:34. 6, Garrette McIntire, Bend, 3:16:23. 7, Phil Orlowski, Portland, 3:22:44. 8, David Uri, Bend, 3:24:36. 9, Myk Rose, Monmouth, 3:28:09. 10, Glenn Jobe, Sierraville, Calif., 3:32:59. 11, Steven Reda, Lakewood, Wash., 3:34:27. 12, Larry Abraham, Steilacoom, Wash., 3:36:39. 13, Andy Pearson, Boulder, Colo., 3:39:14. 14, Santi Preciado, Roseburg, 3:39:33. 15, MJ Engle, Coos Bay, 3:40:13. 16, Nick Lelack, Bend, 3:42:01. 17, Todd Bosworth, Eugene, 3:46:30. 18, Ashley Turner, Chicago, Ill., 3:46:49. 19, Lance Dayton, Portland, 3:48:11. 20, Anne Larsen, Olympia, Wash., 3:51:07. 21, Laura Madison, Echo, 3:52:43. 22, Brian Frankle, Bend, 3:53:46. 23, Michael Clausen, Portland, 3:57:40. 24, Manuel Crisostomo, Corvallis, 4:00:19. 25, Sean Grunwald, Medford, 4:00:26. 26, Seth McDowell, Boise, Idaho, 4:02:24. 27, Rebecca Neilson, Portland, 4:02:57. 28, Zachary Webb, Bend, 4:05:57. 29, Kevin Burman, Centralia, Wash., 4:06:37. 30, Sarah Barber, Boise, Idaho, 4:09:59. 31, Susan Armstrong, Ogden, Utah, 4:10:20. 32, Charles Clark, Ann Arbor, Mich., 4:11:38. 33, Deidre Tarkany, Bend, 4:13:08. 34, Ray Allen, Albany, 4:13:56. 35, Lyndsay Price, Portland, 4:16:46. 36, Sharlie Mcadams, Portland, 4:17:30. 37, Beth Egelhoff, Denver, Colo., 4:18:18. 38, Brian Hall, Salt Lake City, Utah, 4:19:50. 39, Matthew Shore, Phoenix, 4:21:32. 40, Juerg Fehr, 4:21:53. 41, Barbara Trechslin,4:21:53. 42, Bradley Reynoso, Salem, 4:24:36. 43, Michael Meissner, Pittsburgh, Pa., 4:27:48. 44, Sarah Kurtz, Portland, 4:28:43. 45, Ellen Dowling, Hoboken, N.J., 4:29:40. 46, Rebecca Seyferth, John Day, 4:30:51. 47, Alexander Schwarzkopf, Eugene, 4:30:54. 48, Lural Ramirez, Albany, 4:31:15. 49, Lauren Newey, Portland, 4:31:52. 50, Jim Hammond, Bend, 4:32:59. 51, Betsy Scott, Trout Lake, Wash., 4:33:21. 52, Greg Burnett, West Linn, 4:34:03. 53, Patrick Grengs, West Richland, Wash., 4:34:31. 54, Bret Henry, Lake Oswego, 4:34:37. 55, Susan Henry, Baker City, 4:35:30. 56, Lisa Dean, Fort Jones, Calif., 4:37:43. 57, Joseph Andrulewicz, Portland, 4:37:48. 58, Sam Yang, Vancouver, Wash., 4:39:09. 59, Jeanne Giraudier, Eugene, 4:39:26. 60, Suzanne Rebne, Glendale, Ariz., 4:39:41. 61, David Sorenson, Seattle, Wash., 4:40:01. 62, Tamara Apple, Bend, 4:40:57. 63, Shawn Mallory, Portland, 4:40:57. 64, Kelly Goldman, Sacramento, Calif., 4:41:16. 65, Mike Davis, Portland, 4:42:22. 66, Kevin Degroot, Ontario, Calif., 4:43:10. 67, Cody See, Chino, Calif., 4:43:10. 68, Doug Beagle, Houston, Texas, 4:44:28. 69, Ryan Munn, Central Point, 4:44:58. 70, Katie Reynoso, Salem, 4:46:49. 71, Jon Miller, Irwin, Pa., 4:47:13. 72, Richard Knowles, Haines, 4:48:07. 73, Ken Vanlieu, Tigard, 4:48:33. 74, Lisa Nasr, Bend, 4:49:07. 75, Barbara Pratt, Independence, 4:49:10. 76, Fred Falcon, West Jordan, Utah, 4:51:00. 77, Doug Dannen, Vancouver, Wash., 4:51:38. 78, Jeff Jaynes, Salem, 4:52:42. 79, Jamie Bennett, Salt Lake City, Utah, 4:52:46. 80, Rocco April, Redmond, 4:53:56. 81, Nigel Rini, Sierra Madre, Calif., 4:54:33. 82, Brian Francis, Lacey, Wash., 4:54:33. 83, Paul Shaber, Fruitland, Idaho, 4:55:17. 84, Stephanie Irving, Trout Lake, Wash., 4:56:04. 85, Kimberly Bernosky, Portland, 4:57:23. 86, George Jackson, Tacoma, Wash., 4:57:47. 87, Wendy Farjami, Portland, 4:58:10. 88, Tom Craven, Honolulu, Hawaii, 4:58:13. 89, Susie Ro, Spokane, Wash., 4:58:18. 90, Carrie Christiansen, Portland, 4:58:21. 91, Haig Newton, Edina, Minn., 4:59:33. 92, Peter Ripmaster, Asheville, N.C., 4:59:34. 93, Ross Erickson, Lake Stevens, Wash., 5:00:14. 94, Cecilia Brothers, Lincoln City, 5:00:20. 95, Janine Fetke, Walla Walla, Wash., 5:00:21. 96, Melanie Springer Mock, Dundee, 5:03:14. 97, Anne Johnson, Juneau, Alaska, 5:04:41. 98, Ashley Reynoso, Salem, 5:10:47. 99, Jaime Rae Johnson, Eugene, 5:13:16. 100, Gail Mccaslin, Hendersonville, N.C., 5:14:48. 101, Lindsay Burman, Centralia, Wash., 5:14:53. 102, Edie Belso, Centreville, Va., 5:16:51. 103, Ann Happel, Brush Prairie, Wash., 5:17:15. 104, Jen Hammond, Bend, 5:21:26. 105, Martin Morgan, Bodmin Cornwall, 5:21:54. 106, Gail Henry, Lake Oswego, 5:24:04. 107, Michael Johnson, Portland, 5:24:37. 108, Carl Belso, Centreville, Va., 5:27:50. 109, Chantelle Kay, Pagosa Springs, Colo., 5:30:27. 110, Jerry Desmul, Enumclaw, Wash., 5:31:22. 111, Marv Bradley, Canon City, Colo., 5:32:49. 112, Rick Haase, Shoreline, Wash., 5:33:16. 113, David Sachitano, Oakland, Calif., 5:34:18. 114, Loren Thomas, Philadelphia, Pa., 5:34:44. 115, Kristin Harkins, Philadelphia, Pa., 5:34:44. 116, Jackie Frederick, Yelm, Wash., 5:35:13. 117, Michael Hirschler, Seattle, Wash., 5:35:16. 118, Starrla Johnson, Seattle, Wash., 5:35:17. 119, Jennifer Riggs, Louisville, Ky., 5:40:35. 120, Kathleen Grant, Louisville, Ky., 5:40:35. 121, Jamie Akers, La Grande, 5:42:42. 122, Roger Adams, Portland, 5:43:48. 123, Jehanne Fauquier, Penticton, B.C., 5:46:31. 124, Meggan Oliver, Penticton, B.C., 5:46:45. 125, Kelly Hutchins, Olympia, Wash., 5:47:45. 126, David Thierjung, Kalamazoo, Mich., 5:47:48. 127, Elysa Barron, Ouray, Colo., 5:48:08. 128, Amy Jackson, Portland, 5:50:30. 129, Aaron Jackson, Portland, 5:50:30. 130, Brent Schmitter, Greenville, Wis., 5:51:18. 131, Kelley Garcia, Albuquerque, N.M., 5:54:18. 132, Jo May, Houston, Texas, 5:54:33. 133, Johannes Fackenthall, Walla Walla, Wash., 5:56:08. 133, Peter Fackenthall, Angwin, Calif., 5:56:08. 135, Daniel Tyukody, Manhattan Beach, Calif., 5:56:54. 136, Jeffrey Linwood, Austin, Texas, 6:01:22. 137, Scott Budlong, Helena Mt, 6:03:05. 138, Megan Clothiers, Lebanon, 6:05:50. 139, Warren Nelson, Vancouver, Wash., 6:10:40. 140, Peter Bennink, Vancouver, Wash., 6:12:09. 141, David Page, Greenwich Ct, 6:16:45. 142, James Galyen, Redlands, Calif., 6:22:49. 143, Lindsey Meyer, Auburn, Calif., 6:32:09. 144, Fenny Roberts, Salem, 6:42:00. 145, Donna Mandt, Belleville, Wis., 6:42:10. 146, Jessica Morgan, Portland, 6:50:15. 147, Raymond McCaslin, Hendersonville, N.C., 7:26:40.

Continued from D1 “There’s no messing around,” Waterman says. “Get the subs in in the third inning and then after the fourth you can be a little more strategic.” In Little League, players can re-enter the game in their original spot in the batting order once their substitute has played a minimum of six consecutive outs in the field and has been to the plate at least once. Little League also has strict limits on pitch counts, which were adopted at the start of the 2007 season after decades of limiting only the number of innings a player could pitch. (Several leagues around the country were used as pilot programs for the new pitchcount system in 2005 and 2006.) Under the current rules, if a player throws 20 or fewer pitches, he can pitch the next day. Twenty-one to 35 pitches, and he must take a day off from pitching before returning to the mound. Thirty-six to 50 pitches requires two days of rest. Fifty-one to 65 pitches is a three-day break, and 66 or more pitches means no pitching for four days. “You’ve got to balance a good mix of pitchers in a game,” says Waterman, because allowing a pitcher to throw a complete game means a team would most likely not have him to pitch again for four days. “You try to bring in a fireballer and (then a) crafty guy. Of course, you can have a great plan, but then if a kid’s not having a great day it blows

it up. “We’re kind of flying by the seat of our pants sometimes,” Waterman adds. “You just have to roll with it.” Through Bend South’s first two games of the Northwest Regional, the team has used seven different pitchers. With Sunday’s off day, all but one of those players will be eligible to pitch in tonight’s game against North Bothell, Wash. Other Little League rules that differ from traditional baseball include the rule that runners may not leave a base until the pitched ball crosses home plate, which in turn allows pitchers to throw from the windup with runners on base. The pitch count, though, may be the most challenging rule for a coach to plan around. “If I didn’t have the depth of pitching we have, there’d be a lot more stress in my life,” Waterman says. “You just have got to do your best to keep as many options open as possible.” Quick hits: An announced crowd of 9,800 watched Southern California defeat Northern California 10-2 on Saturday night in the West Regional Tournament at Al Houghton Stadium. The stadium’s official seating capacity is 9,000. … Wyoming improved to 1-1 in the Northwest Regional on Sunday with a 12-6 victory over Alaska. The loss dropped Alaska to 0-2. Wyoming trailed 6-5 after 41⁄2 innings but scored seven runs in the bottom of the fifth to go ahead. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@ bendbulletin.com.

Schedule A look at Bend South’s schedule at the 2011 Little League Northwest Regional Tournament. All games will be broadcast live on the radio on KICE-AM 940. Friday: Lewiston, Idaho, 9, Bend South 6 Saturday: Bend South 10, Big Sky, Mont., 6 Today: Bend South vs. North Bothell, Wash., 7:30 p.m. Wednesday: Bend South vs. Laramie, Wyo., 9:30 a.m. • After pool-play competition ends Wednesday, the top four teams from the six-team tournament will advance to Thursday’s semifinal round Thursday: No. 2 seed vs. No. 3 seed semifinal game, 1 p.m.; No. 1 seed vs. No. 4 seed semifinal game, 7 p.m. Saturday: Championship game, 2 p.m.

Pool play standings The top four teams after pool play advance to the semifinals. W L Washington 2 0 Idaho 1 1 Montana 1 1 Oregon (Bend) 1 1 Wyoming 1 1 Alaska 0 2 Sunday’s Games Laramie, Wyo., 12, Abbott O Rabbit 6 North Bothell, Wash. 11, Lewiston, Idaho, 5 Today’s Games Abbott O Rabbit vs. Big Sky, Mont., 9:30 a.m. Bend South vs. North Bothell, Wash., 7:30 p.m.

On the web For more information and live updates from the Northwest regionals: www.littleleague.org/series/2011divisions/llbb/qualify/northwest.htm

Susan Gorman, M.D. Gynecologist

(541) 504-7635 www.womenthatcare.com


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 D5

Gran Fondo Continued from D1 (See “If you go” for more details on all three Gran Fondo events.) The following evening, Horner will host a VIP dinner at the Century Center in Bend for event sponsors and the top 20 fundraising riders for the Gran Fondo’s three designated charities: the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, World Bicycle Relief and Livestrong. “The theater is where most people can really hear some cool stories, and the dinner’s where people can become more intimate,” Horner explains. And, of course, there is the ride. “The ride is the main part,” Horner notes. “There’s no doubt about it. Everyone wants to ride their bike, so there’s no kidding yourself there. … And then hopefully myself being affiliated with it makes the weekend that much more enjoyable.” Cyclists will tackle an 85-mile route that starts and finishes at Deschutes Brewery on Southwest Simpson Avenue in Bend. In between, riders will climb up Century Drive, descend toward Sunriver via the Sunriver cutoff, then navigate Forest Service Road 40 before hitting the Cascade Lakes Highway just north of Crane Prairie Reservoir. Awards will be presented to the top three male and female finishers, but Horner says the event is more of a fun ride than a race. “You can do the ride in four hours or you can do the ride in eight hours,” Horner explains. “It’s not a problem.” Out on the course, riders will be able to mill around and fuel up at the route’s four aid stations, and may even be able chat with Horner himself, who plans to drive the course in a vehicle and make stops at some of the stations so that he can mingle with riders. Originally, Horner had planned to take to his bike along with all of the other Gran Fondo participants. But given recent events, it is somewhat remarkable that he will be out on the course at all. On July 8, Horner crashed during Stage 7 of the Tour de France. Suffering a concussion, a broken nose, a fractured rib and injuries to his right leg, he spent a couple of days in a hospital in France and had to withdraw from the race. Then, back home in Bend, the leg injury lingered, forcing Horner into a protective boot for a few days. Finally, the 39-yearold was back training on the bike

If you go: Cascade Gran Fondo When: Aug. 18-20 On the web: www.cascadegranfondo.com

AUG. 18 An Evening with Chris Horner — Stories from the Road When: 7-9 p.m. Where: Tower Theatre, downtown Bend Cost: $20 adults, $5 kids (18 and younger)

AUG. 19 VIP Dinner When: 7-9 p.m. Where: Century Center, Bend Cost: $150, limited seating available

AUG. 20 Cascade Gran Fondo ride When: 9 a.m. Where: 85-mile course from Bend to Sunriver and then back to Bend via the Cascade Lakes Highway Cost: $120 adults, $30 kids (18 and younger)

at the end of the month, with designs on competing in the USA Pro Cycling Challenge, a multiday stage race scheduled to begin Aug. 22 in Colorado. But on July 31, not long after completing a 60-mile training ride, Horner developed a pain in his right side. When the pain worsened, Horner went to the St. Charles Bend emergency room. He was diagnosed with a blood clot in his right lung, which he says could have stemmed from the leg injury he incurred in the Tour crash. “(July) was unbelievable because that one crash from the Tour just never stops coming back,” Horner explains. “I thought it was done when I left Paris. Came back again. I thought it was done when my leg healed. It came back again. And now we’ve started August, so hopefully it’s truly done.” Horner spent two days in intensive care at the hospital, where he was put on painkillers and medication that prevents his blood from coagulating. He was released last Tuesday. By Thursday, he was washing his car. “It was so strange because here you are in the hospital almost dying, but then we’re out having a salad at Red Robin (Tuesday)

night,” Horner observes. “It’s crazy. It’s one of these injuries that’s so bizarre, and it’s really hard for me not to just go out and jump on my bike.” But Horner’s season is over. And he does have to stay off the bike for a few more weeks, after which, he says, he can basically resume his normal activities. The layoff will, however, prevent him from riding in the inaugural edition of his own event. So instead, Horner plans to be especially visible and sociable throughout the Gran Fondo. And perhaps next year cycling aficionados will get their chance to bump handlebars with Horner, as he says that he hopes to make the event an annual one. In the meantime, registration is still available for this year’s Gran Fondo, which means “big ride” in Italian. Cost is $120 for adults, $30 for kids ages 18 and younger. Prospective riders can sign up in advance at www.cascadegranfondo.com or at the start/finish on the day of the ride before the 9 a.m. start time. After the brief hiatus, Horner says, he will be back to training, though he will not race for the next six months while he is still on the medication. Horner says the no-race policy is because of the risk of crashing. Internal bleeding that could result from a crash would be difficult to manage. So while July was a nightmare month for Horner, August is already looking like a turnaround. He is to marry Elliott in a small private ceremony this Saturday, he will stage his first Gran Fondo next week, and soon he will be back to riding. He is already plotting next season’s comeback as a 40-year-old from his recent string of frightening health issues. “As an athlete, (being told) ‘You might die’ wasn’t what was scaring me,” Horner explains of the blood clot. “What was scaring me was ‘You might not race your bike again or you might not be able to ride your bike again.’ “It’s what I love to do. It’s also what pays the bills and supports the family. (Horner is the father of three children.) But I just couldn’t imagine not being a bike rider at any point in time. Even when the time comes to retire, move on to something else, I still will ride my bike and probably still race my bike, just not be doing it as a profession.” Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

C C   Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

JUNIOR DEVELOPMENT MINI BIKES: Six-week program introduces off-road cycling to youth ages 6 to 8; 9 to 11 a.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays, July 26-Sept. 1; enrollment options include one, two or three days per week; $95$260, depending on number of days; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-335-1346. MIGHTY BIKES: Six-week off-road cycling program for youth ages 8 to 12; 9 to 11 a.m. or 4 to 6 p.m., Tuesdays through Thursdays, July 26-Sept. 1; enrollment options include one, two or three days per week; $95-$260, depending on number of days; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-335-1346.

RACES CENTRAL OREGON CRIT SERIES: Weeknight criterium series held on the roads surrounding Summit High School in Bend; Wednesday ; races start at 5:40 p.m.; registration starts at 5 p.m. and closes 10 minutes before each race; $10 for adults, $5 for students; 541-385-7413; www.centraloregonracing.net. OBRA CRITERIUM CHAMPIONSHIPS:

Races to crown Oregon Bicycle Racing Association’s 2011 criterium champions in multiple age and category divisions, held in NorthWest Crossing neighborhood in west Bend; Saturday ; www. centraloregonracing.net. WARP DOWNHILL: For all ages, novices to pros; 1,500 feet of vertical drop; Saturday and Sunday ; Willamette Pass ski area; $30, or $40 day of event; training on Saturday, races on Sunday; www.warpracing.org. CENTRAL OREGON TIME TRIAL SERIES: Weeknight individual time trial held on 7.1-mile course in southeast Bend; 6 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 17; registration available from 5:15 to 6 p.m. only at race site, start at Rickard Road; $10 for adults; $5 for students; 541-385-7413; www.centraloregonracing.net. MASTERS ROAD NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: USA Cycling national championship racing in time trial, criterium and road racing for amateur riders ages 30 and older on courses in Bend; Aug. 31-Sept. 4; www.visitbend. com, www.usacycling.org. HIGH CASCADES 24: Twentyfour-hour mountain bike race for individuals, pairs and teams on a 16.5-mile course staged at Wanoga complex southwest of Bend; Sept. 10-11; $250 for individuals; $375 for pairs; $480 for teams

of four; $600 for teams of six; www.mudslingerevents.com.

RIDES DIRT DIVAS GROUP RIDE: Womenonly guided group mountain bike ride leaves from Pine Mountain Sports in Bend at 5:30 p.m., Mondays, today and Aug. 22; free; rental and demo bikes available at no charge (be at the shop by 5 p.m.); 255 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-385-8080; www. pinemountainsports.com.

OUT OF TOWN YAQUINA LIGHTHOUSE CENTURY: Supported bicycle tour of 25, 70 or 100 miles held near Newport on the Oregon Coast; course opens at 7 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 20; $15 or $30, depending on distance; register day of event or in advance at www.orbike.com; information at www.yaquinawheels.org. CRATER LAKE CENTURY RIDE: Saturday, Aug. 20; 6 a.m.; Chiloquin; $55, individual riders; $90, tandems; 100-mile and 62-mile options; supported ride with rest stops; 541-882-1501; erin@discoverklamath.com; www.craterlakecentury.com.

CYCLING SCOREBOARD ROAD RACING Central Oregon Criterium Series Aug. 3, Bend Women’s/Junior 1, Lance Haidet. 2, Thomas Wimberly. 3, Javier Colton. 4, Alex Martin. 5, Abby Calvo. 6, Donovan Birky. 7, Jake Perrin. 8, Colin Dunlap. 9, Cameron Carrick. Category 3/4/5 1, Austin Line. 2, Todd Berger. 3, Chris Roots. 4, Jurgen Fennerl. 5, Wade Miller. 6, Max Christman. 7, Brant Rushton. 8, Steve Wursta. 9, Eric Birky. 10, Ryan Altman. 11, Anthony Broadman. 12, Gearge Wescott. 13, Whit Bazemore. 14, Justin Calvo. 15, Chuck Meyer. 16, Cliff Cayer. 17, Michelle Bazemore. 18, Cameron Carrick. 19, Mary Ramos. 20, Adam Short. 21, Thomas Pastor. 22, Jake Perrin. 23, Helen Grogan. 24, Matt Brownfield. Category 1/2/3 1, Eric Martin. 2, Kyle Wuepper. 3, Connor McCutcheon. 4, Ben Thompson. 5, Sal Collura. 6, Karsten Hagen. 7, Mike Brown. 8, Scott Gray. 9, Doug Perrin. 10, Chris Winans. 11, Derek Stallings. 12, Brian Seguin. 13, Tim Jones. 14, Rob Angelo. 15, Mike Olson.

541-388-4418

bendbulletin.com/b boocoo


D6 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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(541) 548-5335


THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 E1

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Pit Bull purebred brindle male, 10 mos, current shots, sweet, lovable. Free. 541-948-4084

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: Old Oriental Rugs, any size or condition, call toll free, 1-800-660-8938.

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

2 Male Guinea Pigs, about 1 yr old, with cage, supplies & food, $40 all. 541-617-0706 Adult companion cats FREE to seniors, disabled & veterans! Enhance your life with a new furry friend. Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, more. Visit www.craftcats.org for photos. 389-8420, 647-2181, open Sat/Sun 1-5 at 65480 78th St., call re: other days. Alaskan Malamute purebred females, 7 weeks, 1st shots & wormed, parents on site. $500 ea. 541-475-7181

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Lhasa Apso/Shih Tzu pups, gorgeous, $300/ea. Linda 503-888-0800 Madras.

Maltese, 1 male, 1 female, 1 yr old. Shots current. $300 ea. 541-536-2181 or 541-780-8067 Malti-Poo Female, 5 months, Gold/white, 1st/2nd shots, Always Happy, Great around kids. $200. 541-223-8545 Maremma Livestock Guardian Dog. 1 year old male $300. Please call 541-419-1270.

Bulldog, ½ American ½ English female. Free to approved forever home. 541-408-1115 cabin creek gun dogs.com talltimberpudelpointers.com Professional training all breeds Pudel Pointer and Yellow Lab pups available. now ! 541-459-9798 541-680-0009 Chihuahua puppies, 8 wks. 4 males $225 each, 1 Female $300. Call 541-306-9614

AKC registered, champion lines. Accepting deposits now, ready to go home with you in late August. $2000. 541-416-0375 English Bulldog, Registered, 5 yr female. $500 to approved pet home only. 541-408-1115

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Buffet & Hutch, Red, glass doors, brand new, $250, 541-548-2849. Commercial Gas Range, has grill, 2 burners, oven, works good! $300. 541-977-9772 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Love Seat, beige & brown, perfect cond., $200 cash, 541-330-8349.

Pit Bull - 3-yr old Blue Nose Pit looking for a good home. I don’t have time to give him the attention he needs. Please call/text with any questions: 949-338-9775. I won’t let him go to just anyone, needs to be a good Pit-friendly home. $100

Mattress-Box Springs in plastic, frame, mattress pad, comforters sheets pillows. All new, $300. 541-350-4656.

IDITAROD BLOODLINE Siberian Husky/Wolf mix puppies for sale. great protection, beautiful, smart, 3 F, 3 M. $400. 541-408-8342 KITTENS, altered, shots. Avail. @ Larry's RV, N. Hwy. 97 next to Space Age. Mom cats gave birth in a display RV & owners cared for them in an office. Mom’s stay, but babies need homes. Small rehome fee. Visit 9-6 Sat, 10-5 Sun. Info: 541-647-2181.

LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, titled parents, performance pedigree, OFA cert hips & elbows, $500. 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com LAB PUPS AKC Black & Yellow 1st shots, dewclaws and dewormed. Mom has OFA hip and EIC clear. $500 each call 541-633-6591

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Golf Equipment New Wilson Golf Bag & Clubs, never used, $450/make offer. Call eves: 541-385-9350

Siberian Husky pups for sale. AKC. $400+ 541-330-8627 stones-siberians@live.com

Sponsor needed for Cayenne, a spunky little guy who had to have an eye removed due to severe injury/glaucoma. He's recovering well & will be available for adoption into a good inside-only home soon. Local rescue group appreciates help with his vet costs. Tax-deductible. Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, www.craftcats.org, PO Box 6441, Bend 97708, 389-8420.

Standard DACHSHUND pups dewormed/1st shots. BLK/TAN. Pre-spoiled. Call for info 541-815-1973

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Furniture & Appliances 7½’ white leather couch, excellent condition, $275. 541-504-4225 Antique Vanity (waterfall design), excellent cond, $50. 541-350-4656

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20 gauge Ithaca Model 37, $275. 22LR Remington Nylon 66, $225. 541-771-5648 22LR Sentinel aluminum 9-shot revolver, 4” bbl, w/holster & ammo, $200. 541-647-8931 22mag Taurus SS revolver $425. H&R Trapper, 22 RF, octagon bbl, $375. 541-647-8931

Wheelchair Invacare SX5 Lightweight Like New - $150.00 541-693-4644

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380 Bersa, $275. Ruger 10/22 custom rifle, $350. Interarms 9mm, $285. 541-647-8931

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CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

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.270 Weatherby Vanguard Like new, $375. 541-771-5648

Downriggers walker electric with swivel lockable bases, 4 ft. booms, fresh or salt water, with extras and manuals. $475 OBO. 541-408-4528

Printer, Epson Pro 4000, exc. cond. $495 FIRM, call 541-504-8316.

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Travel/Tickets DUCK TICKETS (2), for most games, variety of prices depending on which game. $150/up. 541-573-1100.

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BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store. In the Forum Center

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public . Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541 447-6934 Open to the public.

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

256

Misc. Items

Oreck Steam-Glide $79.95

SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

FREE DVD Reveals weight loss myths. Get ANSWERS to lasting weight loss.

541-598-4643.

The only steam mops good enough to be an ORECK

472sq ft engineered Australian Cypress flooring, unopened boxes. $1900 OBO. 541-475-2638 7am to 7pm.

269

singles, call

German Shepherd puppy, black female, 12 weeks, parents on site. $225. 541-536-5538

Golden Retriever Pups AKC, 2 mos, ready to go! $600. Shots, wormed, vet-checked. More pictures avail. 509-281-0502

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Bend local, buys GUNS of all kinds. 541-526-0617

Maytag Neptune washer/ dryer sold as set, front load, large capacity, white, $650. FREE barn/shop adult cats, ex541- 389-9345, lve message. pert rodent control in ex- Poodle Pups,Black Standard, change for safe shelter, food gorgeous females, all champ New Round Bamboo chair with & water. Altered, shots, some large round embroidered bloodlines, athletic, fun loving, tame, some not so much. pillow, $100. 541-350-4656 very smart & well mannered, We'll deliver! 541-389-8420. don’t shed, non-alergenic, ‘One of a Kind’ great in the home, trainable for Juniper lamps. hunting $1500, 541-601-3049 $150-$200 each. 377 SW Century Dr., Suite #204 above Prudential Realty. Frenchie/ Pug puppies. BeauBy appt. only or tiful colors. Puppy package go see at showroom. incl. $100 deposit . $700 to 541-408-4613. $750 each. 541-548-0747 or Poodle Pups, toy or teacup. Also older pups & retired adults, Range, Jenn-Air Dual fuel, 541-279-3588. loving, friendly, 541-475-3889 modular slide-in down draft, German Shepherd puppies, black, like new, paid $2000, Queensland Heelers absolutely gorgeous sable sell $800 OBO, 541-306-9561 Standards & mini,$150 & up. colored, males & females, 8 Second Hand 541-280-1537 weeks, 1st shots, $250/ea. http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Mattresses, sets & 541-280-1439.

Kittens & cats to adopt! Open house Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt. Low adoption fee. Altered, shots, ID chip, carrier & more. Discount for Chihuahua Pups, assorted 2! 65480 78th St., Bend, colors, teacup/toy, 1st shots, 389-8420, 647-2181. Map/ wormed, $250,541-977-4686 photos: www.craftcats.org. Cockatiels (7) & Lovebirds (10), Lab puppies, black, AKC, M/F, $10 ea., please call shots/wormed, seeking good 541-410-9473 homes! $250. 541-447-8958

DACHSHUND PUPPIES 2 females 1 blonde 1 brindle 541-536-2494 full blooded no papers $300 OBO

A-1 Washers & Dryers

ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPIES

German Shorthair AKC pups, Aussie Shepherd/Border Collie champ lines, males & fePups 5 weeks, 5 male, 2 females, B&W ticked, liver & Ragdoll cat purebred male 4yr, males, $200, 541-548-0183 ticked, parents on site. $350 neutered all shots, owner Ready 8/12. 541-573-1237 cannot keep due to business FIND IT! travel. Extremely calm & BUY IT! gentle temperament. Food, SELL IT! toys, scratching post, liter The Bulletin Classiieds box, carrier, food bowls included. $275, 541-536-6196. Aussies, Mini, $300. Has had Shih-Poo Toy puppies! 3 feShots, 8 weeks old. Black Tri Goldendoodle puppies, kid males, 4 males left. Hypo al541-639-1038 conditioned, 8 weeks, sweet, lergenic cuties. 1st shots. health guarantee. $500/each home raised. parents on site. Aussies, Mini/Toys, $250 and 541-548-4574 541-408-5909 Kelly, 541-604-0716 or up. Parents on site; shots and 541-489-3237 wormed, family-raised. Golden Retriever, AKC, 5 mo 541-598-5314 or 541-788-7799 male, all shots, vet checked, $300. 509-281-0502

Beagle Pups, 2 left, $400 each. PH 541-420-8907 Ready to go w/ 1st shots. kodachromes@gmail.com

!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Fountain, Small Sculptured, indoor or outdoor, $100, 541-388-3036.

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496

Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

286

541-389-9663

Sales Northeast Bend

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

John Deere Riding Lawn Mower, like brand new! 42 hrs on motor, break-in? LA120 automatic, 21hp/OHV twin with: rear bagger system; leaf sweeper w/lg catch bag; ferrtilizer spreader & seeder, etc.; seat cover; sun canopy; set of spare blades, all brand new. $2100 for system, OBO. 541-408-4528 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Farm Market

300 325

Hay, Grain and Feed

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Lost female Corgi, black, lost south of Redmond, near 43rd. 541-419-3084. Lost Wallet w/cash & checkbook, Aug 4, Bi-Mart/Colorado area? 541-815-7794 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

Partners LLC Landscape Maintenance. Hay pick-up & delivery, firewood sales & delivery, hay pick $.75 a bale. #901360. 541-777-0128

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend 270

Lost and Found

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Found Bike in road on Hwy 20 Barley Straw; Compost; near Sisters Aug. 3. Call to Fuel and Wood 541-330-0420 541-546-6171. identify, 541-350-4656 Found Bike: SW Redmond, 347 Washer & Dryer, Maytag NepWHEN BUYING 7/28, call to identify, tune/Atlantis, gas. Great HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for Llamas/Exotic Animals 541-410-7188. FIREWOOD... concealed license. NRA, shape, $600/obo. Amana Found Black Cat, somebody’s Alpaca dispersal sale, all reg., To avoid fraud, The Police Firearms Instructor, Refrigerator, bottom freezer, pet! August 2nd, in RedBulletin recommends Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed., Aug quality breeding stock to ribworks great, $500/obo. Kirby mond. 541-548-1994 payment for Firewood 17th, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call bon winners. All Reasonable G5 vacuum with shampoo only upon delivery Kevin, Centwise, for reservaoffers considered. For info system & all attachments. Found Camera in Black Case: and inspection. tions $40. 541-548-4422 call 541-385-4989. $300/obo. ALL MUST GO! Sun., Mill District, call to id, Call 541-317-9702 541-610-8460,541-322-0240 • A cord is 128 cu. ft. Military Guns from 1865, priced 358 4’ x 4’ x 8’ Washer & Gas Dryer, Maytag, FOUND Diamond Ring in Sunrifrom $100 & up. (ApproxiFarmers Column Neptune front-load, exc. cond • Receipts should include, ver, call 971-322-9293, or mately 12.) 541-617-5997 $500 OBO, 541-306-9561. name, phone, price and kind Sunriver Police Dept. to 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS Remington SP10 Ga. and 4 of wood purchased. identify. for protecting hay, firewood, cases (1000 rounds) ammo, • Firewood ads MUST inThe Bulletin Found Keys, on Shoshone Rd, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. lifetime of goose hunting for clude species and cost per Over 40 Years Experience in recommends extra caution 7/31, call to identify, 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. $1800, 541-573-3284. cord to better serve our Carpet Upholstery when purchasing products 541-390-3714. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net customers. & Rug Cleaning or services from out of the Wanted: Collector seeks high Call Now! Found Stroller in Erickson’s A farmer that does it right & is area. Sending cash, checks, quality fishing items. Call 541-382-9498 parking lot, Bend. Call Mgr to on time. Power no till seedor credit information may 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 CCB #72129 identify: 541-382-4421 ing, disc, till, plow & plant be subjected to F R A U D . www.cleaningclinicinc.com new/older fields, haying serFor more information about Winchester Model 120 12 ga Found:USB drive, Patriot, Drake All Year Dependable vices, cut, rake, bale, Gopher an advertiser, you may call pump shotgun, $250. Park, 7/27 at Munch & MuFirewood : Dry , split lodgecontrol. 541-419-4516 the Oregon State Attorney 541-504-1296 Running Shoes, Terra Planeo sic, call to ID, 541-389-7889 pole, 1 for $155 or 2 for General’s Office Consumer Evo, Size 38 (7), wore twice, Found: Vehicle Key, for Ford, $300. No limit. Cash, check, Protection hotline at 247 will sell for $80. Looking for your next Stevens Rd., 8/2, call or credit. Bend 541-420-3484 1-877-877-9392. 541-617-8598 employee? Sporting Goods 541-788-1309. Place a Bulletin help Central Oregon Mix, Sunsetter retractable motor- Misc. wanted ad today and semi-dry, split, delivered, Bend. Found Wedding Ring, Ray’s Suized awning, $500 OBO. reach over 60,000 permarket parking lot, Red$135 for one cord or $260 for 541-604-4694, 541-350-7378 readers each week. mond 7/31. Call to identify: two. Cash, Check or Credit. Your classified ad will 541-350-1020 212 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi 541-420-3484 also appear on audio & studio equip. McInLost Bobtail Orange Cat, 7/27 Antiques & Camping: Dome tent, mattress, bendbulletin.com which Dry Lodgepole For Sale tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, in Terrebonne, please call if stove, lantern, ice chest, currently receives over Collectibles $150/cord rounds; $175/cord Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, you see him, 541-548-1923. BBQ, $100 all. 541-350-4656 1.5 million page views split. 1.5 Cord Minimum NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 every month at Antiques Wanted: Tools, wood LOST Camera Sat., July 30, 36 years’ service to Central no extra cost. furniture, fishing, marbles, Drake Park or downtown Oregon. Call 541-350-2859 261 Bulletin Classifieds old signs, beer cans, old Bend area. 541-390-0381 Medical Equipment Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 Get Results! photography. 541-389-1578 Raft heavy rubber, new AC/DC cord $135; 2@$129ea; 3@ Lost Cat - Grey w/black stripes Call 385-5809 or place Fishing Creel, $25. Flower cart, tabby cat, NE Lynda Ln area. pump, cushions, new elect Power chair, Jazzy 610, great $125ea. Split: 1 cord $165; 2 your ad on-line at cond., $1000 OBO, $95, Victorian ladder, $75. last seen 7/31. $REWARD$ motor with battery $200. @ $159 ea; 3@$155 ea. Cash bendbulletin.com 541-317-0638. 541-389-5408 541-390-1236 541-350-4656. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800 Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Onan RV GenSet microlite generator with propane hose, exhaust pipe & air filter. Very low hrs. $1200. 541-593-6901; 503-741-6374

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E2 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Oregon Medical Training PCS

Phlebotomy classes begin Aug 29th. Registration now open: www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

476

Employment Opportunities Automotive Technician Rare opportunity to work in a very busy, growing, fast paced environment. Subaru/ Japanese vehicle experienced preferred. Automotive experience mandatory. Valid ODL and own tools a must. Pay DOE. Call Subaguru at 541-382-6067.

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476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Bookkeeper Established Nutraceutical company in Sisters, Oregon, is looking for a bookkeeper. 36-40 hrs per week, duties include accounts receivable and account payable. Experience with MAS90 accounting system, is preferred but not required. Benefits include medical/dental insurance and vacation/holiday pay. The right candidate could also perform some customer service. Call 541-549-7800 ext. 105 or email resume to jennifer@metabolicmaintenance.com Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, part-time. Transportation & references required. 541-610-2799.

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Drivers Short logger truck drivers and chip drivers. Requires 2 yrs experience, with a clean DMV record. Pick up application at 433 Patterson Bridge Road or call 541-575-2102

Advertising Account Executive

The Bulletin is looking for a goal-driven and energetic sales professional that understands the importance of closing as well as consulting. If you believe in hard work, aggressive prospecting, the freedom of commissioned sales and your own ability to make things happen, we'd like to hear from you. This is a full time sales position that offers medical & dental benefits and well as a 401K. It also offers income potential commensurate with your hard work and closing abilities. The position responsibilities include sales and service of existing customers, aggressive representation of our multitude of advertising products, and aggressive prospecting and closing. The ability to juggle multiple customers, projects and deadlines every day will be key to your success, and a pre-employment drug screen is required. The Bulletin is Central Oregon's daily newspaper, with a strong circulation base and stable readership. We create and deliver an ever-expanding list of award-winning advertising solutions and reader content that gets results for our customers. From our targeted niche products to comprehensive daily local news coverage, no one provides better advertising access to Central Oregon consumers. If you think you have what it takes to help others grow their business and be successful in our environment, please send your resume, cover letter and salary history via e-mail to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You can also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: The Bulletin Attention Sean Tate 1777 SW Chandler Bend OR 97701 No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace

Finance & Business

Drug & Alcohol Counselor, full-time. CADC /experience required. Madras & Bend area. Salary DOE. Please fax resume to 541-383-4935 or email pfeifera@opusnet.com EDUCATION

Elementary Art/ Music/Performance Teacher needed, part-time at Eastmont Community School. Must have experience teaching music & art or extensive background in music. Prefer BA in music, or minor in music. Apply online at: http://job. eastmontschool.com

Job closes Aug. 14, 2011. Limited Energy Tech. LEA Oregon license required. Design and installation in fire alarm systems preferred. Possible travel. Submit resume via email. info@dry-canyon.com 541-504-5491 LOGGING We are seeking experienced: • Feller Buncher Operator • Heavy Duty Diesel Mechanic Pickup application at Iron Triangle LLC, 433 Patterson Ridge Rd., John Day, Oregon, or call for one: 541-575-2102

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Rentals

500 600 528

630

Loans and Mortgages

Rooms for Rent

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Bend, 8th/Greenwood, laundry & cable incl., parking, no smoking $400. 541-317-1879

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

ROOM FOR RENT in mfd home in Bend, $150 mo., wood stove avail., 253-241-4152. STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

#1 Good Deal! 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath townhouse, W/D hookup, W/S paid, $625+ dep., 2940 NE Nikki Ct., 541-390-5615.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $610$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Renovated 2 bdrm., 1 bath, blocks from St. Charles & Pilot Butte. W/S/G paid. Laundry onsite. Parking. No pets/ smoking.$600. 541-410-6486

visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

Spacious, quiet Town Home - 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, W/D. Private balcony & lower patio, storage, W/S/G paid. $650 2022 NE Neil. 541-815-6260

1 Bedroom Apartments

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632

Pay rent based upon your income! For Seniors 62 & older or disabled, regardless of age. Spacious, affordable living * Income limits apply. * Lease, security deposits & references are required. Madras Estates 242 SW 3rd St. • Madras 541-475-1969 Fax 541-475-2460 TDD #771 Managed by Legacy Management GroupL L C

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider. The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

PRIVATE PARTY LOANS: On Real Estate Equity. No credit or income requirements. No Points. Call today. 858-292-1991.

1 Bdrm., $525. In quiet complex. close to shopping. On-site laundry, no smoking, no pets. 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. 541-633-7533

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

Madras, Prineville and Bend

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

H

3 Bedroom, 2 bath, dbl garage, fenced yard, gas heat, W/D hookup (gas). Close to hospital. No smoking, no pets. 541-388-2250 541-815-7099 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend 4 Bdrm., 1.5 bath, large fenced yard, 2 car garage, wood stove & elec. heat, new carpet, $1200/mo+ dep. call 541-549-6102.

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend A

LARGE COZY 1 BDRM CONDO, 754 sq.ft., wood stove, W/S/G pd, utility hook ups, front deck storage, $595 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

Redmond - $625 Spacious 2 bdrm., 1 bath apt, in quiet well maint. 4-plex in desirable NW neighborhood. Newly remodeled kitchen w/granite counters, dishwasher, hardwood floors, tile floor in kitchen & bath, laundry equip. hookups, secure 2-car garage parking, pets OK w/dep. lawn/landscape maint. incl. 1st mo.+security dep required for move in. Avail 9/1. Contact Bruce, 541-480-3666. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 bdrm 1 bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $650/mo. 541-480-3666

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634

3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, newer carpets & paint,fenced yard,W/D hook ups, pellet, dbl garage. Dog ok, NO cats/smoking $1050mo $1200 dep. 541 410-6543

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Refurbished Interior - 2 Bdrm 2 Bath duplex, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan, close to shopping. No animals please. $795/mo. 541-382-6485

631

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

H Redmond,

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex General

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

TREE CLIMBER/FALLER Full time seasonal for experienced climber. $15-$20/hour DOE. 541-480-3494

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Houses for Rent General PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

740

Condo / Townhomes For Sale MT. BACHELOR VILLAGE CONDO remodeled, furnished, vaulted ceiling, end unit, sleeps 6. Price reduced $159,900. 541-749-0994.

745 BANK OWNED HOMES! FREE List w/Pics! www.BendRepos.com steve scott realtors 685se 3rd, bend, or

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

658

2 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, dbl. garage, $850/mo. + dep. 9199 SW Panarama, CRR. 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, $900/mo. + dep. 14920 SW Maverick, CRR. No smoking. 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 537 NW 28th St., in Fieldstone, great room, 3 bdrm.+ office+bonus, A/C, landscaping incl., $1300/mo., 541-389-2192, 541-350-3219

sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Homes for Sale

Houses for Rent Redmond

Clean 3 Bedroom 2 bath, dbl garage & shop. No smoking. 12736 SW Wheatgrass, CRR. Cottage-like large 1 bdrm in $1000/mo + deposits. quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hard- 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 woods, W/D. Refs, $550+ 687 utils, avail now! 541-420-7613

648

700

Beautiful Newer 3 Bedroom/2 Bath home, Large corner lot, pets negotiable, Rent is $1300, yearly lease. Call 503-559-8979

Apt./Multiplex Redmond A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath 2-story townhouse. Large fenced back yard, w/garage. 2825 Umatilla. $725/mo, 1st, last, + cleaning dep. 541-815-0747

Real Estate For Sale

746

Northwest Bend Homes

762

Homes with Acreage 2 Bdrm 2 Bath with A/C on 5 acres near BLM, Redmond. Shop, barn, greenhouse, garden space, pvt well. By owner, $169,900, firm. 541-548-8452

Tuscan Estate 3000 sq. ft. new home, sep. guest house, Bend area, 20 acres, $929k. Owner contract, no interest $250k down. James 503-632-4422.

773

Acreages ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Beautiful custom home on Awbrey Butte. Award winning builder. 3 bdrm, 2.5 baths, 2497 sq.ft., 3-car garage, RV garage. .83 acre. Many unique features. $725,000. 541-408-2594. Visit http://261973.byoregonowner.com

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes New & Used manufactured homes, move-in ready, Financing avail. Call J & M Homes, 541-548-5511 www.jandmhomes.com

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678. Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717 Approximately 1800 sq.ft., perfect for office or church south end of Bend $750, ample parking 541-408-2318.

1 per day

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To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

870

880

881

885

925

932

935

975

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Canopies and Campers

Utility Trailers

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Skyline Layton 25’

Lance-Legend 990 11’3" 1998, w/ext-cab, exc. cond., generator, solar-cell, large refrig, AC, micro., magic fan, bathroom shower, removable carpet, custom windows, outdoor shower/awning set-up for winterizing, elec. jacks, CD/stereo/4’ stinger. $10,500 Bend, 541.279.0458

Antique and Classic Autos

Snowmobiles

18’3” Bluewater 1984, 1 owner, 289 fishing motor & water skis, Calkins trailer, fish finder, sun cover, boat cover, well taken care of, $3500. Call 541-815-7367

Summer Price

18.5’ Reinell 185 2005, V-6 Volvo Penta, low hrs., must see, $17,000, 541-330-3939.

800 850

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories Harley Davidson Fat Boy 2001, 18K, 1 owner,dark red & black, beautiful bike in exc. cond., $9950, 541-923-2248.

THE BULLETIN • Monday, August 8, 2011 E3

Fleetwood Southwind 1999, 33 Ft. Ford V-10 1 slide out, Dual A/C- F/A, micro, TV's in Living Room & Bedroom. Sleeps 6, 9075 miles. $35,000 OBO. 541-504-7560 or 541-923-3510

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

541-322-7253

2008, Model 208 LTD. Like brand new. Used 4x Bend to Camp Sherman. Winterized, in storage. 3855 lbs Sleeps 5. Queen walk around bed w/storage, full bathroom, full kitchen & lrg fridge. Dual batteries & propane tanks, awning,corner-leveling jacks, Easylift Elite load hitch w/ bars, furnace, AC, AM/FM stereo. Couch & dining table fold out for extra sleeping. $11,795 OBO. 760-699-5125.

Springdale 18’ 2007, like new cond., new tires, A/C, 3 burner stove,oven,micro, tub/shower, dinette w/ rear window to view outdoors, outside shower, 2 propane tanks, weather cover, $9200, 503-639-3355

6x10 hydraulic dump trailer, $3,950. 541-389-9345.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

25’ Catalina Sailboat 1983, w/trailer, Honda Trail 90 1969, Yellow, very nice, dual spd. trans, rack, street legal, $1995, 541-318-5010

swing keel, pop top, fully loaded, $11,000, call for details, 541-480-8060 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891 KAWASAKI 750 2005 like new, 2400 miles, stored 5 years. New battery, sports shield, shaft drive, $3400 firm. 541-447-6552.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

RAFT RUBBER cushions lifevest and oars, pump, $125. 541-350-4656

VESPA 2005 Gran Turismo 200 Perfect Cond., rare vintage green color, top box for extra storage, 2 helmets, incl. $3250. 541-419-9928.

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

865

875

ATVs

Watercraft 16’ Canoe with paddles & jackets, good condition, $200. 541-389-7952

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

870

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Motorhomes

15hp SS Model 15MSH Yamaha 2-stroke outboard, purchased new ‘91; seldom used, exclnt! $695. 541-504-4225

Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 16’ MirroCraft, 1976, new paint 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge & top; 1976 35hp Johnson with ice-maker. $98,000. motor, good shape; and 541-610-9985 trailer, $1800 all. Call 541-383-2314 541-408-2488 16’ x 4’ Willies drift boat, excellent cond, $3500. Nissan 6hp 4-stroke motor, low hours, $950. 541-504-1998

Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $3995. Call 541-420-1846.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories New Bridgestone Tires (4) Ecopia EP20 M&S 195/65R15, $225. 541-504-1296 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Fifth Wheels JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $97,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Phoenix Cruiser 2001, 23 ft. V10, 51K. Large bath, bed & kitchen. Seats 6-8. Awning. $35,500 OBO. 541-923-4211

VolkswagenEuroVan 2000 - Winnebago conversion, 88,334 miles, well cared for, sleeps four, can seat seven; small kitchen, propane; 2 new tires, new shocks, alternator, water pump, deep cycle battery, sound system; $25,000541-389-6474

Antique and Classic Autos 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

29’ Alpenlite Riviera 1997 5th whl. 1 large slide-out. New carpeting, solar panel, AC & furnace. 4 newer batteries & inverter. Great shape. Must see to appreciate. $13,900 541-389-8315 541-728-8088

Aircraft Hangar for rent, Redmond Airport (RDM) , north side. 41' wide x 33'-6"deep with 41' wide x 13'-5" high power bi-fold door. 120v lighting & receptacles. $400/ month. 541-548-0810, days. Cirrus SR22 GTS 2005, 80 Hr. SMOH, (2) 1/3 ownership shares avail., $40,000 ea., 541-408-0851.

Executive Hangar at Bend Airport (KBDN). Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 RL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $50,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 760-644-4160

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11½’ overall height, perfect cond, NOW $36,000. 541-312-8974 Fleetwood Wilderness 36’ 2005 4 slides, rear bdrm, fireplace, AC, W/D hkup beautiful unit! $30,500. 541-815-2380

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

60’ wide x 50’ deep, with 55’ wide x 17’ high bi-fold door. Natural gas heat, office & bathroom. Parking for 6 cars. Adjacent to Frontage Rd; great visibility for aviation bus. $235K 541-948-2126

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

1982 INT. Dump with Arborhood, 6k on rebuilt 392, truck refurbished, has 330 gal. water tank with pump and hose. Everything works, $8,500 OBO. 541-977-8988 Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $3995. 541-420-1846

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Travel Trailers

For Memorial 70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $4000 OBO. 541-593-3072

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

Chevy

Wagon

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $37,500. 541-420-3250

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Thanksgiving Novena to St. Jude: Oh Holy St. Jude, Best Buy Hurricane Apostle & Martyr, great in 32’ 2007, 12K mi., virtue and rich in miracles, Cherry Wood, leather, BEST BUY - $3500 near kinsman of Jesus Christ, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, Northwood 2001, 27’ Yellowstone - sleeps 6, su- Nash faithful intercessor of all, jacks, camera, like new, 24’ model 235A, w/ 6 ft. per clean, 4 new tires, selwho invoke your special panon smoker, low book slide, sleep 5, weights 4,537 dom used. 541-388-2290 tronage in time of need, to $59,900, 541-548-5216. lbs. $7,800. 541-633-3629 you I have recourse, from the depth of my heart and humbly beg to whom God has given such great power, to come to my assistance. Help me in my present and Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, urgent petition. In return I Coleman Chesapeake 1993, $1995, promise to make your name mint cond., garaged, 22 ’8” Pilgrim 27’, 2007 5th wheel, 1 Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self known and cause you to be slide, AC, TV, full awning, exopen, awning/screen encl. contained, Cab-over, needs invoked. St. Jude Pray for Us cellent shape, $23,900. best buy on mkt. $3,900. TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or and all who invoke your aid. 541-350-8629 619-971-4225, NW Bend. 503-585-3240. Amen.

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Concrete Construction

NOTICE: Oregon state law JJ&B Construction - Quality requires anyone who Concrete work, over 30 yrs contracts for construction experience. Sidewalks, RV work to be licensed with the Pads, Driveways... Call Grant, Construction Contractors 541-279-3183 • CCB190612 Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Computer/Cabling Install Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the QB Digital Living CCB Consumer Website •Computer Networking www.hirealicensedcontractor.com •Phone/Data/TV Jacks or call 503-378-4621. The •Whole House Audio Bulletin recommends •Flat Screen TV & Installation checking with the CCB prior 541-280-6771 to contracting with anyone. www.qbdigitalliving.com Some other trades also CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C require additional licenses and certifications.

Russ Peterson

Decks DECK

REFINISHING

Don’t let old stains build up year after year, strip off for the best look. Call Randy 541-410-3986. CCB#147087

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Excavating

Handyman

Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Debris Removal

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

JUNK BE GONE

Handyman

Builder / Contractor 40 years experience Home Repairs & Remodels 541-318-8789 • CCB 50758

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Child Care, Reg.

Domestic Services

Certified in-home child care Space is limited! Accepting children for Fall: part-time, all day, before/after school. 20yrs exp • Tami 541-610-9249

Home is where the dirt is! 9 years exp. in housekeeping. Refs, & rates to fit your needs Call Julie & Jobana today! 541-728-1800; 541-410-0648

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Bend’s Reliable Handyman Lowest Rates / Sr. Discounts Repairs, yard care, clean-ups, disposal, paint, fences, odd jobs CCB#180267 541-419-6077

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home Improvement

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Porsche 1983 911SC Cabriolet. Info: www.83porsche911sccabriolet. com

VW BAJA BUG 1974 1776cc engine. New: shocks, tires, disc brakes, interior paint, flat black. $7000 OBO. 541-322-9529

Lincoln Navigator 1998, 5.4L V8, 4WD, AT, 146K miles, non-smoker, always garaged. Loaded: tow package, CD/ DVD, seats 8 (removable 3rd row), power leather seats, front/back climate control, always well-maintained, good condition. Asking $5300 obo. Call 541-350-9938 Nissan Pathfinder 1989, 3 L V-6, exc. cond., runs great. $1800. 541-480-5950.

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Camaro 2010 LT2, Rally Yellow, fully loaded, 19-in Pirelli all-season tires, 36K miles, $27,500. 541-425-0039

933

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, parts and maintenance $19,500. 503-459-1580. records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition & much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $4900, John Day, 541-575-3649

Chevy 4X4 1976, camper special, 173K, 4” lift, winch, detailed, nice cond, records, 2nd owner, $2400. 541-923-2123

F-250

1986,

Lariat, x-cab, 2WD, auto, gas or propane, 20K orig. mi., new tires, $5000, 541-480-8009. FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly every option: 20" wheels, navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, thermally insulated glass, tow pkg, stainless steel nose trim, moonroof, Bose sys, heated seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Toyota Landcruiser 2008, silver, gray lthr, loaded, 23K, immac, $58,500. 360-771-7774

940

Vans

GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4000 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van, 1999, with tow pkg., good condition, $3500. 541-419-5693 CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $3950 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Ford Edge SE 2007 62,000 miles pw, pdl, red with tan interior, one owner great condition, $16,000 OBO, call 541-280-1817

Dodge Grand Caravan SXT 2005: StoNGo, 141k miles, power doors/trunk $7850. Call 541-639-9960 Ford E150 1988, 4.9L/6 cyl., exc. cond., auto tech. owned. $1100. 541.480.5950

International Travel All 1967,

Ford Excursion 2005, 4WD, diesel, exc. cond., $24,000, 541-923-0231.

CADILLAC CONCOURSE 1994, black, 130k mi., sun/moonroof, cruise, tilt, bucket seats, leather, keyless entry alarm. $1900. 541-389-3151

2006, AT 76K, good all weather tires, $13,500 obo. 858-345-0084

541-389-5355

Ford

BMW 323i convertible, 1999. 91K miles. Great condition, beautiful car, incredibly fun ride! $9300. 541-419-1763 BUICKS - I have a nice 1995 LeSabre, limited model, and a nice 1998 LeSabre, custom model -- either of these cars will provide someone fine wheels for a long time, plus 30mpg hwy. Bring 39-$100 bills! Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

Nissan Xterra S - 4x4

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

541-389-5016 evenings.

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

DLR# 0225

$19,450!

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $30,000. 541-548-1422

Audi A8L 2007 great condition, ext. warranty, premium & sport pkg, alcantara pkg, newer tires, 20" wheels, Gray Metallic, 43k miles, $39,995. Call 541-410-6333.

Lexus RX350 All Wheel Drive 2010, only 800 miles nav. system-loaded #009206 $44,995 541-598-3750

Ford Sport Trac Limited Edition 2007, 4x4, many extras incl. new tires, 106k, $16,495, 541-441-4475

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Building/Contracting

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition 2004 4x4, V8, 91K, auto, AC, $8495. 541-598-5111

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Chrysler SD 4-Door 1930, CDS Royal Standard, 8-cylinder, body is good, needs some restoration, runs, taking bids, 541-383-3888, 541-815-3318

Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed 1975, 454 eng., 2-spd trans, tires 60%, Runs/drives well, motor runs great, $1650. 541-771-5535

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

Honda Pilot, 2005, orig owner, like new! 36K mostly hwy miles. Has 4 new studded tires. $20,000. 541-330-6291

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

MUST SELL GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $3500 OBO. 541-593-3072

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

MUST SELL

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $58,500, 541-280-1227.

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

881 Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

882

880

Boats & Accessories

personals

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-279-5303

Four Winds Chateau M-31F 2006, 2 power slides, back-up camera, many upgrades, great cond. $43,900. 541-419-7099

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

GMC Envoy 2002 4WD, 75K, maroon, many extras, 1 owner, beautiful cond, must see, $10,000. 541-923-5089

call

Chevy Corvette 1988 4-spd manual with 3-spd O/D. Sharp, loaded, 2 tops, (tinted & metal. New AC, water pump, brake & clutch, master cylinder & clutch slave cyl. $9500 obo. 541-419-0251.

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3200, 541-416-9566

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Mercury Cougar 1994, XR7 V8, 77K mi, excellent cond. $4995. 541-526-1443 Mini S 2009, 6,800 miles, exc. cond. mellow yellow, black top, black interior, convenience, cold weather, premium & sport packages, 17" alloy wheels, extra wheels and winter tires, center armrest, Mini HiFi system, ALTA turbo down pipes, catalysts, intake system and boost tube, boost & water gauges. $25,500. 503-784-1166 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Porsche

Boxter

1999,

exc. cond., 88K, $11,999, call 541-350-1379

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Toyota Privia 1992, 154,000 miles, runs good, is clean, $2000. 541-815-4121

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler installation & repair • Aerate • Trimming • Summer Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Remodeling, Carpentry

Arcata Development Company CB License 180888

Painting, Wall Covering

Window & Door Replacement

Don’t Wait! Paint!

Rental Preservation

Ignoring your home’s paint leads to costly repairs. Protect your investment! Call us for interior/exterior painting options to fit your budget! A L S O Deck refinish/sanding. Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Painting & Pressure Washing Remodels/Carpentry Repair Roofing/Kitchen & Bath Free Estimates Small Jobs OK

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. 541-388-6910. ccb#5184

Call Mike Holm, 541-977-6448

Picasso Painting All Phases Exterior interior 25 yrs exp. CCB# 194351 Affordable • Reliable. Bruce Teague 541-280-9081,

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Tile, Ceramic


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

E4 Monday, August 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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LEGAL NOTICE Arnold Irrigation District Monthly Board Meeting The Board of Directors of Arnold Irrigation District will hold their monthly board meeting on Wednesday, August 10, 2011 at 3:00 pm at 19604 Buck Canyon Rd. LEGAL NOTICE Public Auction Public Auction to be held on Saturday August 13, 2011 at 11:30 a.m. at Old Mill Self Storage, 150 SW Industrial Way, Bend, Oregon 97702. (Unit # 218). LEGAL NOTICE The undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the estate of DOROTHA MARIE SAKRISON, Deceased, by the Deschutes County Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, probate number 11PB0089. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same with proper vouchers within four (4) months after the date of first publication to the undersigned or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned or the attorney. Date first published: August 8, 2011 DAVID L. SAKRISON Personal Representative c/o Ronald L. Bryant Attorney at Law Bryant Emerson & Fitch, LLP PO Box 457 Redmond OR 97756 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: SHAUN L. JOHNSTONE AND VIVINNE A. JOHNSTONE. Trustee:AMERITITLE. Successor Trustee:NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary:OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot 3, Block 10, HAYDEN VILLAGE PHASE IV, recorded September 10, 1992, in Cabinet C, Page 690, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 15, 2005. Recording No.: 2005-37442. Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $944.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of February 2011 through April 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $125,420.46; plus interest at the rate of 5.4500% per annum from January 1, 2011; plus late charges of $116.61; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date:October 13, 2011. Time:11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and

meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30391). DATED: May 18, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7721 T.S. No.: 1246252-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Brian Lantzy and Sibila Lantzy, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 26, 2007, recorded May 02, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-25403 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 33 of Monticello Estates, Phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 21282 Monticello Dr. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,966.07 Monthly Late Charge $71.06. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $239,355.00 together with interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from March 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 30, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-385866 08/01, 08/08, 08/15, 08/22 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx5788 T.S. No.: 1206803-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Gordon R. Broussard Jr. and Barbara E. Broussard, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title Co., as Trustee, in favor of Abn Amro Mortgage Group, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 19, 2005, recorded July 29, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-49512 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot Ten, Block One, Valhalla Heights Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2735 NW Marken Street Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's:

Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,781.20 Monthly Late Charge $77.27. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $260,011.06 together with interest thereon at 5.375% per annum from November 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 27, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 21, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-385172 07/25, 08/01, 08/08, 08/15 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxxxxxx5302 T.S. No.: 1325237-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jill Littlejohn, Who Acquired Title As Jill Stinson, as Grantor to Chicago Title Company/fidelity National Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated November 25, 2005, recorded December 14, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-85664 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A parcel of land located in the county of Deschutes, state of Oregon. section 17, town 17, range 12 and known as: being lot number 1 and lot number 2 block 13 in Bend View Addition of Deschutes County records. Commonly known as: 607 NW Trenton Ave. Bend OR 97701-1127. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 15, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; failure to pay when due liens and charges Superior hereto; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,245.76 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $293,655.34 together with interest thereon at 6.900% per annum from October 15, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 24, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time

of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 16, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-384413 07/18, 07/25, 08/01, 08/08 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1.PARTIES: Grantor: DENISE WYNNE. Trustee: WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER. 2.DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Sixteen (16), Block Two (2), HAYDEN VILLAGE PHASE I, recorded September 13, 1990, in Cabinet C, Page 464, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3.RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: June 2, 2003. Recording No.: 2003-36705 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $800.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of February 2011 through April 2011; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $90,969.27; plus interest at the rate of 4.9500% per annum from January 1, 2011; plus late charges of $84.06; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6.SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF

SALE. Date:October 13, 2011 Time:11:00 a.m. Place:Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8.RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30392). DATED: May 18, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx1242 T.S. No.: 1327109-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tyler F. Gist, An Unmarried Man, as Grantor to David A. Kubat, Bar #osba84265, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Home Loan Center, Inc., Dba Lending Tree Loans Its Successors and Assigns, as Beneficiary, dated January 24, 2009, recorded January 29, 2009, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2009-04090 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 72, Shevlin Ridge Phase 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2414 Northwest Brickyard Street Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2011 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,877.70 Monthly Late Charge $73.21. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $279,795.27 together with interest thereon at 4.500% per annum from January 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 24, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of

Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 16, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-384417 07/18, 07/25, 08/01, 08/08 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7176 T.S. No.: 1326767-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Tracey L. Whitaker, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For American Brokers Conduit, Its Successors and Assigns, as Beneficiary, dated August 26, 2005, recorded September 02, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-59241 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3, block A, Skyline Subdivision, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16384 Skyliners Road Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2011 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,453.90 Monthly Late Charge $47.32. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $147,715.61 together with interest thereon at 5.875%

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4154 T.S. No.: 1328462-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Katherine L. Hammond and Robert L. Wright, Wife And Husband, as Grantor to Wells Fargo Financial National Bank, as Trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated December 19, 2006, recorded January 22, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-03775 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 48, ridge at eagle crest 18, Deschutes county, oregon Commonly known as: 623 Goshawk Dr Redmond Or 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due may 20, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,035.74 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $140,897.17 together with interest thereon at 7.625% per annum from April 20, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on November 07, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the bond street entrance to deschutes county courthouse 1164 Nw Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 30, 2011. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you notice of the requirement. If you do not have a fixed-term lease, the purchaser may require you to move out after giving you a 30- day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is XXX, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about you rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice: If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guide-lines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included with this notice. OREGON STATE BAR 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road Tigard, Oregon 97224 (503) 620-0222 (800) 452-8260 Directory of Legal Aid Programs:http://www.oregonlawhelp.org Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon Ca 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-385861 08/01, 08/08, 08/15, 08/22

per annum from January 01, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on October 24, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs,

trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 16, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-384416 07/18, 07/25, 08/01, 08/08 PUBLIC NOTICE The Bend Park & recreation District Board of Directors will meet in a work session beginning at 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, August 9, 2011, at the district office, 799 SW Columbia, Bend, Oregon. Agenda items include a report on the district's adopt a park and trail program and a review of the recreation needs assessment community survey. The board will meet in a regular meeting at 7:00 p.m. to consider adoption of a public information policy and awarding of a contract for the construction

of a segment of the Coyner Trail. the board will also meet in a executive session pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(e) for the purpose of discussing real property transactions. The agenda and supplementary reports may be viewed on the district’s web site, www.bendparksandrec.org. For more information call 541-389-7275.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-11-443115-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MICHAEL C BENNETT AND KAREN M BENNETT, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR GREYSTONE RESIDENTIAL FUNDING, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 11/20/2006, recorded 11/28/2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2006-77942,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 116441 LOT 14, BLOCK 43, DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 9, PART II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 17118 MERCED ROAD BEND, OR 97707 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 11/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $810.44 Monthly Late Charge $40.52 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $80,841.96 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.0000 per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 11/21/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 11/21/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under State law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 10/22/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 7/15/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 4046486 08/01/2011, 08/08/2011, 08/15/2011, 08/22/2011

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