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Your full guide to the Pacific Crest sports festival • INSIDE

Ten events are on the schedule for the 2011 Pacific Crest end Sports Festival, which Weekwill be staged in Sunriver through Sunday. The weekend’s this Friday running and multisport includes events ranging lineup from hourslong endurance activities designed for youngsters races to . Descriptions of each race listed below. are • Long course triathlon: In a race with distances those in a Half-Ironman similar to triathlon, participants in Pacific Crest’s long course triathlon begin Wickiup Reservoir, followedwith a 1.2-mile open-water swim at on Cascade Lakes Highway by a 53-mile point-to-point bike ride 40. The triathlon is completedand Forest Service roads 45 and after a 13.1-mile run on paths in Sunriver. This paved event serves as the TRI NorthWest Long Course Championships. • Endurance duathlon: Offers the same distances the long course triathlon, and routes as less the swim. • Marathon: This 26.2-mile footrace on wide, paved pathways in Sunriver is a certified Boston Marathon qualifier. • Half marathon: This 13.1-mile footrace on wide, paved ways in Sunriver is the pathmost Monday, more than 1,200 popular Pacific Crest event. As of runners were registered for the race. • Olympic-distance triathlon: Participants in this three-leg event perform a 1,500-meter open-wate r swim at Wickiup Reservoir, a 28-mile point-topoint bike ride on Forest Service Road 40, and a 19-kilometer run on paved paths in Sunriver. Of the four multisport events offered at Pacific Cre t th

Pacific Crest Preview • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • The Bulletin

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‘Phenomenal’ return: Three salmon back to dam so far By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Surviving predators and volatile ocean conditions, two more spring chinook salmon have survived the 3-year journey that brought them back to the Pelton Round Butte dam complex. “It’s exciting,” said Mike Gauvin, the dam’s mitigation coordinator. “It shows that the program is making progress.” So far, three fish out of between 700 and 1,000 have made it back to the dam spawning grounds. The fish were released in 2008, and the first one returned May 25.

The second one appeared May 31, and the most recent one appeared Monday. “Getting these adult fish back is a huge deal,” said PGE Fish Biologist James Bartlett. “To get three back is phenomenal.” Biologists say 1/2 to 1 percent of chinook survive. Gauvin says he is hopeful that about seven more fish will come back. Already, two additional chinook from the 2008 batch were identified traveling up the Bonneville Dam by their tags, and could possibly be en route, said Bartlett. See Fish / A5

CASCADES CAMPUS

Submitted photo

The second fish to complete its journey back to the Pelton Round Butte dam complex was this one, weighing in at roughly 12 pounds. It arrived May 31, and a third appeared Monday.

Cocktail hour? Not quite

Bond for OSU to buy building has a shot Lawmakers also pass 14 education-reform bills By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — Not too long ago, Central Oregon lawmakers spent the legislative session defending the existence of the Oregon State University-Cascades Campus. Now, they are advocating to allow the university to grow — and it’s looking like they will succeed. A $2.29 million bond, which would help the university purchase a building to house its graduate programs, has been given the thumbs-up by a powerful subcommittee. Sen. David Nelson, R-Pendleton, who is on the Capital Construction subcommittee, pulled out a large spreadsheet Tuesday afternoon and ran his finger down a list of projects. Although the subcommittee has not yet voted on the list of projects and sent them to the full Ways and Means Committee, the OSU-Cascades project, Nelson said, is on the list of tentatively approved projects. Nelson said the committee worked off a set of criteria, including what projects made economic sense and what the return of the investment would be. He said one of the most important factors was community support. See Cascades / A5

IN THE LEGISLATURE House Bill 3627

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Crook County Deputy District Attorney Katherine Krauel-Hernberg performs a field sobriety test under the eye of Oregon State Police Sgt. Mike Iwai as other volunteers and officers do the same Tuesday. About a dozen prominent Crook County citizens attempted the tests after drinking alcohol. In the background is the Oregon State Police’s mobile DUII processing center, which contains three blood-alcohol breath-test stations and two small holding cells. It will be staying in Prineville through the weekend.

Volunteer drinkers take on sobriety tests to raise awareness of drunken driving before big weekend By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — In a back room at the Crook County Fire & Rescue fire station, several of Prineville’s more prominent residents spent the better part of Tuesday afternoon drinking cocktails out of plastic cups and chuckling at the notion they could be considered celebrities.

The “Celebrity Wetlab,” as it was billed, brought a dozen Crook County “celebrities” to spend the day drinking and undergoing various sobriety tests in the interest of raising awareness about drunken driving. The Oregon State Police brought their mobile DUII processing center, a 40-foot motorhome that’s been remodeled to contain three blood-

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Bartenders can be combat veterans’ first line of defense By Faye Fiore

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alcohol breath-test stations and two small holding cells. Tuesday’s volunteers took their breath tests in the processing center, and the processing center will be staying in Prineville through the weekend to help local law enforcement personnel deal with an anticipated uptick in drunken driving incidents. Crook County Sheriff Jim Hensley said the next few weeks have historically been some of the most dangerous on the roads of Crook County, with the rodeo half of the Crooked River Roundup scheduled for this weekend and the horse racing half in mid-July. See Wetlab / A5

DALE CITY, Va. — The minute one of her regulars comes through the canteen door at VFW Post 1503, Dori Keys starts to pour. Captain Morgan and Diet Coke for Rich. Old Crow on the rocks for Sam. Bruce likes Miller Lite. The men she serves have one thing in common: They are American combat veterans. After seven years

of listening from behind the bar, she knows a lot more about some of them than what they drink. Men like Bruce Yeager, 62, who came in one day complaining about a sore on his foot that wouldn’t heal. A former Army medic in Vietnam, he knew what was wrong. But it took Keys to persuade him to see a doctor. She even drove him. See Veterans / A4

The bill would help OSU-Cascades buy a building to house its graduate programs. • Sponsors: Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend; Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver; Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend; Rep. John Huffman, R-The Dalles; Rep. Mike McLane, R-Powell Butte • History: The university has committed about $1.5 million to the project. And a donor, who wishes to remain anonymous until the deal is complete, would contribute $800,000. • What’s next: The bill needs to be passed out of the Capital Construction subcommittee to the full Ways and Means Committee. After that would come votes in the House and Senate. • Read the bill: www.leg.state.or.us/11reg/measures/hb3600. dir/hb3627.intro.html ON THE WEB:

Politics & Policy The Bulletin’s blog on state government. Read updates from Salem at www.bendbulletin.com/politicsblog.

Health-plan forms are put through the acid test: focus groups By Susan Jaffe McClatchy-Tribune News Service

BUFFALO, N.Y. — At an office tucked next to a department store in a shopping mall, Susan Kleimann pushed two sets of papers across a table to a woman in her 40s wearing a gray sweatshirt. Inside “We aren’t testing you,” assured • Loophole in Kleimann, who runs a marhealth law, ket research firm in Bethesda, Page A5 Md. “We are testing health plan information.” Kleimann explained that they’d be comparing two documents that described two hypothetical insurance plans. See Health / A5


A2 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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The U.S Air Force Thunderbirds squadron uses alternative fuel at Andrew Air Force Base in Maryland. The Thunderbirds’ jets are powered by a blend of conventional jet fuel and camelina-based hydrotreated renewable jet fuel.

U.S. military creating market for affordable, homegrown biofuel By Renee Schoof McClatchy -Tribune News Service

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ANDREWS AIR FORCE BASE, Md. — Maj. Aaron Jelinek of the Air Force Thunderbirds flies his F-16 upside down, rolls it, thunders past his teammates in breathtaking close charges and joins five other fighter jets in precision formation. And for the first time in the 58 years of Thunderbird air shows, Jelinek’s flight last month was fueled by a 5050 blend of conventional jet fuel and biofuels. “Flying is a blast,” he said after the show at Andrews Air Force Base, outside Washington. As for the biofuels blend, he said: “There is no difference that I can tell.” Biofuels have buzz in the military because the Air Force and the Navy are taking a lead role in creating a U.S. market for them. They’ve spent the past few years testing and certifying aircraft to run on them. Now they need hundreds of millions of gallons of biofuels to meet the goals they’ve set for using alternative energy by the end of this decade. The challenge for the new industry is to find money to ramp up from nearly zero today. The Department of Defense has called for biofuels that don’t displace food, don’t use up fresh water, yield less greenhouse-gas pollution than conventional fuels and cost the same. About a dozen compa-

“Just about every major country is looking at alternative fuels in some shape or form.” — Tom Hicks, deputy assistant energy secretary, U.S. Navy nies that want to make this jet fuel for the global market have exhibits for the first time this year at the Paris Air Show, which began Monday. The potential market is huge, for military and commercial aviation. President Barack Obama in March gave the job of helping the private sector do this to the Departments of Energy, Agriculture and the Navy. National security is the main reason to move off oil dependence, according to Navy Secretary Ray Mabus. “Our military depends too much on fossil fuels,” Mabus, a former Mississippi governor and ambassador to Saudi Arabia, said at a recent business conference. Oil comes from volatile places, and its price spikes eat into the military budget, Mabus said. As world demand for oil rises, it’s likely to become more expensive, so the military is seeking alternative fuels. The main thing the Navy brings is a market, Mabus said. But the price, he

added, “is going to have to be pretty competitive with fossil fuels.” The cost of biofuels now is about $35 a gallon, 10 times the cost of conventional jet fuel. Mabus ordered the Navy to get ready to use alternative energy for half of its power at sea and on shore by 2020. That would require more than 300 million gallons of biofuels a year, for blending with conventional fuel. The Air Force aims to fly on a 5050 blend of biofuels and conventional fuel by 2016, an annual requirement of 400 million gallons. The military provides 10 percent of the U.S. demand for aviation fuel; if the Department of Defense were an airline, it would be the biggest one. That’s big enough to have an influence on the nascent biofuels market, said Tom Hicks, the deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for energy. “Just about every major country is looking at alternative fuels in some shape or form,” Hicks said. The Navy predicts that it will have enough biofuels for an aircraft carrier strike group that will be deployed over the horizon on a 50-50 biofuel blend in 2016. The Air Force will have its entire fleet certified to run on biofuels by the end of 2012 and will buy them when they’re available at a good price, Undersecretary Erin Conaton said.

The federal government on Monday extended for six months a moratorium on new uranium mining claims in a million-acre buffer zone around the Grand Canyon as it awaits the conclusions of a study of potential environmental harm to the region. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said that expanded uranium mining around the canyon could threaten water supplies, air quality, wildlife, desert vegetation and priceless scenery. Once lost, he said, those assets can never be reclaimed. But he said he was “(A 20-year not yet ready to declare moratorium), the area off limits to new mining claims for if ultimately the next 20 years, as selected, would many local and state officials and environ- ensure that all mental advocates have public lands demanded. He said in a briefing at the Grand adjacent to Canyon that a 20-year Grand Canyon moratorium was his National Park are preferred solution but that more scientific protected from study was needed. new hard rock The decision represents at least a partial mining claims, victory for environmen- all of which are talists, who have grown increasingly uneasy in in the watershed recent months as the of the Grand Obama administration has, in their view, Canyon.” seemed to retreat on — Ken Salazar, U.S. several environmental interior secretary and regulatory fronts. They were particularly unhappy with Salazar’s decision last month, under pressure from Republicans in Congress and energy interests, to reverse his own policy that would have set aside millions of federally owned acres as wilderness protected forever from energy exploration. Salazar said that the relatively small number of existing mining claims around the canyon would be honored but that he was leaning strongly against allowing any new activity. “This alternative, if ultimately selected,” he said, “would ensure that all public lands adjacent to Grand Canyon National Park are protected from new hard rock mining claims, all of which are in the watershed of the Grand Canyon.” According to the U.S. Geological Survey, northern Arizona contains enough uranium to meet the U.S. nuclear industry’s needs for only about six years, and the Grand Canyon region holds just a fraction of that.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

11 24 25 31 46 17 x3 Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $76 million for Friday’s drawing.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service TOKYO — Power generation using heat produced from garbage incineration is increasing this summer as an alternative energy source to offset the expected electricity shortages due to the ongoing crisis at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. The local governments of Tokyo, Yokohama and Nagoya plan to increase electricity output using heat from waste incinerators during this summer’s peak periods of electricity consumption. The total electricity output at the 20 garbage disposal plants operated by Clean Association of Tokyo 23 is about 250,000 kilowatts. This figure is equivalent to the output of a midsize thermal power plant. Actual power output from the plants has been about half of the figure and the plants themselves consume electricity. The association planned to sell an average of 52,000 kilowatts between July and September this year via Tepco’s transmission grid. But as the power shortage may be serious in summer when demand surges for air-conditioning, the association decided to raise the sales volume to up to 96,000 kilowatts, nearly double the current level.

As the plants aim to increase the volume of electricity to be sold to Tepco, power from the garbage incineration is expected to cover demand for about 30,000 households. An official of the city government’s Waste Disposal Facilities Division of the Resource and Waste Recycling Bureau said, “As part of the city government’s measures in relation to the Great East Japan Earthquake, we’ll contribute to the power supply as much as we can.” The Nagoya city government also plans to raise the sales volume of electricity produced from garbage incinerators by about 20 percent to 11,700 kilowatts. According to the Environment Ministry, the total electricity output capacity of garbage incinerators at local governments nationwide was 1,673,000 kilowatts as of the end of fiscal 2009. Though the figure is equivalent to the output of two nuclear power reactors, the actual output from the waste disposal plants has been about half of their capacity. As power generation is less efficient if noncombustible garbage is included, the Clean Association of Tokyo 23 has asked citizens to sort garbage with greater care.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 A3

T S Obama’s tough task on Afghanistan Cigarette packs By Scott Wilson and Karen DeYoung The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama will face a stiff political challenge today in presenting his plan for a gradual end to the U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan. His prime-time address must remind a skeptical electorate and a concerned Congress that the country’s longest war remains worth fighting — and funding — for several more years. Obama’s generals have requested more time to consolidate the gains they say have been made since the president dispatched 33,000 additional U.S. troops to the country last year. The escalation, which angered his party’s anti-war base, followed a monthslong strategy review to determine how to salvage a flagging war effort. Since then, public opinion has turned increasingly against the war, except for a now-diminishing

Huntsman diplomatic in declaration

boost in approval after the killing of Osama bin Laden in May. As he begins the promised withdrawal, Obama’s challenge will be to provide his generals with the resources to wage the war’s final phase while persuading Congress that, at a time of fiscal strain, maintaining most of a $10 billion-a-month war effort is worthwhile. “The process (leading to the decisions to be announced today) was all about the mission that was laid out in December of 2009, the surge in forces that followed from that decision and that mission, and the evaluation of the success that we’ve had since that mission began,” Jay Carney, Obama’s press secretary, told reporters Tuesday. “Having said that, we are always mindful of the fact that, as powerful and wealthy as this country is, we do not have infinite and unlimited resources, and we have to make decisions about how to spend our precious dollars and, more importantly, how and when

Senate confirms Panetta as defense chief WASHINGTON — Leon Panetta was confirmed unanimously by the Senate on Tuesday as the new secretary of defense, placing him in charge of the final stage of the withdrawal in Iraq and the administration’s military policy in Afghanistan. The 100-0 vote in favor of Panetta, a former House member and White House official who most recently served as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, showed strong congressional confidence in his ability to hold what lawmakers described as one of the most demanding jobs in the capital. “Leon Panetta heading up the Department of Defense is just a home-run choice,” said Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., noting that the strong backing for Panetta was a rare bipartisan moment. — New York Times News Service

to use military force.” Obama made his decision early Tuesday and informed only a small number of senior advisers of his plan. Even drafts of his speech, which he will deliver at 5 p.m. Pacific time from the White House, circulated late Tuesday without final withdrawal numbers. But the broad outline of the plan

is likely to include the removal of 5,000 troops this summer with an additional 5,000 by the end of the year, according to administration officials familiar with the White House deliberations. That would leave 23,000 troops in Afghanistan from the surge forces that Obama endorsed after the strategy review in 2009.

ONE VOTE DOWN, MORE TO COME IN GREECE

The Washington Post JERSEY CITY, N.J. — Since the beginning — which was all of seven weeks ago — Jon Huntsman’s campaign has promised something completely different. The campaign has offered video tidbits of a mystery man, a father of seven, a lover of rock music and a diplomat on a dirt bike who is no ordinary politician. The operation launched a sleek, clean website that looks nothing like those of other candidates. Jon Huntsman Then the big reveal: Huntsman took the stage at Liberty State Park on Tuesday and sought to deliver a careful message, one that included a different take from his Republican rivals on President Barack Obama. “I respect the president of the United States,” said Huntsman, who served as Obama’s ambassador to China until late April. “He and I have a difference of opinion on how to help a country we both love. But the question each of us wants the voters to answer is who will be the better president, not who’s the better American.” A self-described “margin of error” candidate with little support in opinion polls, Huntsman entered the race for the White House on Tuesday as the biggest wild card in the 2012 field. His long list of credentials and his fundraising ability could quickly catapult him to top-tier status. Or, his unconventional approach and conciliatory message could relegate him to a footnote in the race.

Split on Libya shapes up in Senate, House McClatchy-Tribune News Service WASHINGTON — Key senators on Tuesday urged giving the White House authority for a oneyear, limited Libya mission, but sentiment was growing in the House of Representatives to cut off the effort’s funding. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John Kerry, D-Mass., who proposed the one-year measure, argued that not supporting efforts such as those of the Libyan rebels would “be ignorant, irresponsible and shortsighted and dangerous for our country.” But in the House, Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., had a different view. “Our members are frustrated over the president’s action, his lack of positing a clear vision and mission,” he said.

will carry grisly warning labels The Associated Press

RICHMOND, Va. — Rotting teeth and gums. Diseased lungs. A sewn-up corpse of a smoker. Cigarette smoke coming out of the tracheotomy hole in a man’s neck. Cigarette packs in the U.S. will have to carry these macabre images in nine new warning labels that are part of a campaign by the Food and Drug Administration to use fear and disgust to discourage Americans from lighting up. The labels, announced Tuesday, represent the biggest change in cigarette packs in the U.S. in 25 years. At a time when the drop in the nation’s smoking rate has come to a standstill, the government is hoping the in-your-face labels will go further than the current surgeon general warnings toward curbing tobacco use, which is responsible for about 443,000 deaths a year in the U.S. “These labels are frank, honest and powerful depictions of the health risks of smoking,” Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said in a statement. Other countries such as Canada and Uruguay have used graphic, even grisly, warnings for years, and various studies

Courtesy U.S. Food and Drug Administration

This image provided by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration shows one of nine new warning labels cigarette makers will have to use by the fall of 2012. suggest they spur people to quit. But exactly how effective they are is a matter of debate, since the warnings are usually accompanied by other government efforts to stamp out smoking.

Iraq blast kills at least 27 Los Angeles Times

Lefteris Pitarakis / The Associated Press

Greek protesters gesture Tuesday at Syntagma Square in front of the Greek Parliament in central Athens during a peaceful ongoing rally against plans for new austerity measures. On Tuesday, Prime Minister George Papandreou won a crucial confidence vote in parliament. The vote averts early elections and a stalled government, which many had feared could throw Greece into default on its loans and the rest of the euro zone into a financial panic rivaling the one that followed the Lehman Brothers

bankruptcy in 2008. Now, Papandreou must face an even bigger challenge when Parliament votes next week on a slate of measures that includes tax hikes, wage cuts and state privatization. The steps were required by the European Union, the European Central Bank and the International Monetary Fund before releasing the next segment of aid, which Greece needs to meet expenses through the summer. — New York Times News Service

Syria’s Assad orchestrates shows of support, offers broad amnesty New York Times News Service BEIRUT — The government of President Bashar Assad of Syria offered a broad amnesty and rallied tens of thousands of supporters in Damascus and other cities on Tuesday in the latest move to blunt an uprising that poses the gravest challenge to his rule.

The scenes across the country illustrated the complexity of the three-month crisis in Syria, which has deeply isolated Assad’s leadership. Though orchestrated, the rallies underlined the reservoirs of support Assad himself still draws on. But even as his government seeks to suggest at least the intention of

reform, violence erupted again, as security forces fired on counter-protests, killing nine people, activists said. The rallies came a day after Assad offered a national dialogue and somewhat vague promises to bring about change in one of the Middle East’s most authoritarian governments.

NAJAF, Iraq — At least 27 people, many of them police, were killed and more than 30 wounded when a bomb exploded Tuesday near by the home of the provincial governor in the southern Iraq city of Diwaniyah, according to police and medical sources. Gov. Salam Hussein Alwan and his family were uninjured, according to police. The blast ripped through the area around his compound in the capital of the normally quiet Qadisiyah province.

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The bombing was followed by a secondary blast when the fuel tank of a police car blew up. Officials complained that the province had been warned in advance but failed to thwart the attack.

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A4 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

California Veterans controller keeps pay from lawmakers

Pakistan detains senior officer on alleged militant ties

By Shane Goldmacher

New York Times News Service

Los Angeles Times

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — State Controller John Chiang has decided to deny California lawmakers their pay for failing to produce a truly balanced spending plan, infuriating legislative leaders but pumping new life into budget negotiations just 10 days before the start of the new fiscal year. Indignant Democratic lawmakers, having passed a budget on the June 15 deadline without input from Republicans or Gov. Jerry Brown, said the controller, who issues state paychecks, was engaged in an illegal power grab. Chiang said in his announcement Tuesday that aspects of the Democrats’ budget — which Brown had swiftly vetoed — were incomplete and the plan therefore violated a new law that punishes the Legislature for late spending plans. The impact on legislators’ wallets could be severe. Until they approve a budget that Chiang deems balanced, rank-and-file lawmakers, who are paid at the end of each month, will be docked about $400 a day. That sum is the daily portion of their $95,291 salary plus $142 in per diem allowance. Chiang said the forfeiture is required because the budget that Democrats approved spent more — $1.85 billion more, in his analysis — than it collected in taxes and fees. “The numbers simply did not add up,” said Chiang, who is also a Democrat. Voters passed a law last fall requiring that legislators’ pay be seized for every day that a budget is late. That law, which also enabled lawmakers to pass spending plans with a simple majority vote, does not specify that it be balanced, but Chiang noted that other laws do.

Continued from A1 When they amputated his gangrenous leg a few weeks later — the result of diabetes linked to his exposure to Agent Orange — he couldn’t very well stay alone in his own home, so she brought him to hers. “I listened to Dori because she is a real good person,” Yeager says, nursing the beer she just poured him. That’s about all he can put into words before his eyes mist up. When it comes to dispensing health care, war veterans are a hard group to reach. They came up in a military system that rewards toughness and discourages complaints, particularly concerning psychological problems. Combat veterans are at well-established risk for post-traumatic stress disorder and depression; the suicide rate among them runs higher than in the civilian world. Great advances in treatment have been made since the troops came home from Vietnam. Then, PTSD wasn’t even a formal diagnosis. Finding the ones who need help is the hard part. That’s where women like Keys come in: a 53-year-old mother of three who rides a Harley, likes to sit and embroider on her days off, and spends more time with the men who fought in places like Berlin and Baghdad than even some of their families do. Those who still have families anyway. “In social work, you try to meet the client where they are. If that happens to be a bar, then that’s where the first line of help needs to be,” says Keith Anderson, an assistant professor of social work at Ohio State University. Anderson is the lead author of “The Healing Tonic,” a pilot study that explored the family-like relationships between bartenders and veterans at VFW canteens across the state. The study’s results suggest that with some simple training, the women behind the bar — and most of them happen to be women — could be an untapped resource in identifying veterans in crisis and steering them toward professional help. At lunchtime on a recent warm day, the parking lot of Post 1503 is full of pickup trucks. The air inside is cool and smoky, four flat screens flicker in the dark and the special is spaghetti with meat sauce. Keys is tending bar and

Mary F. Calvert / Los Angeles Times

Dori Keys, 53, right, is a bartender at VFW Post 1503 in Dale City, Virginia. She pours drinks and spots troubles. New research proposes that bartenders can be trained to flag signs of post-traumatic stress disorder and depression among veterans. At left is Vietnam veteran Bruce Yeager, whom she helped through a leg amputation. every stool is taken up by creatures of habits so set, she can recite with eyes closed who is there and the order in which they are seated. (“Bob, Sam, Donnie, Mac, Benny, Dave, Jerry, Jim ...”) This flag-studded brick building in the northern Virginia suburbs is tucked between the Army’s Fort Belvoir and the Marine Corps base at Quantico. It looks more like a post office than what it is: the biggest VFW post in the country and a study in the damage of war over time. The requirement for membership is simple but steep: honorable service in a combat zone. “Not sitting in Buford, South Carolina,” barks bar manager John Meehan, who was in Korea with the Army.

Many wars represented Veterans of every major battle since World War II are members here, separated by decades and bound by war. They lost 85-yearold Vinnie Salzillo last month; he was at Iwo Jima. About two dozen of the younger ones aren’t old enough to buy a beer, but they have two tours each in Afghanistan and Iraq behind them. Some guys like Rich Silva, 47, here this afternoon in his battle

fatigues, are still on active duty. He fought in Panama, the 1991 Persian Gulf War, Bosnia, and twice each in Afghanistan and Iraq. A few weeks ago, a thunderstorm sent him diving under his bed for cover. Later at the bar, he told Keys. “When my wife divorced me, I had nobody to go to. Dori spent 10 or 12 hours talking to me. She was working a double shift that day,” he says over a Captain Morgan as Keys, at the well and out of earshot, wipes down the copper railings. “Then she made sure I got a ride home.” They talk; she listens — sister, confessor, wisecracker, friend, stationed behind the long, varnished bar sometimes 13 hours at a time, with the bad knees to prove it. She was busing tables at 15 and pouring drinks at 22. But no civilian saloon was ever like this. The men who come here aren’t looking to get drunk, or see who they can take home. They come for the fellowship of service, where they can talk or not talk, and no war story is too stale or horrific to tell. Still, it is by no means a glum place. The conversation is lively. If someone gets out of line, one “Watch it,” from Keys generally suffices. When it doesn’t, as in

the case of the guy who threatened her with a .357 magnum, she has him kicked out. “This place has made me tough and it’s made me a better person. I have more patience with everything now, I realize what life is,” she says, managing to carry on a conversation with one eye on her patrons, an occupational talent. Service members returning from the battlefield today are routinely assessed for PTSD. But some older veterans still struggle with what they did or saw; in fact, not long before he died, Vinnie Salzillo told Rich Silva that some things still haunted him 70 years later. Nearly a third of Vietnam veterans came home with PTSD, according to Dr. Sonja Batten, who works on national mental health policy for the Veterans Administration. A study conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health and others showed that more than three decades after the war ended, about 12 percent of Vietnam veterans still had the disorder. Modern treatment can be effective no matter how long ago the war, Batten said, noting that more than half of the veterans currently in VA care for PTSD fought in Vietnam.

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — A serving brigadier general in the Pakistani Army has been detained on suspicion of links with an extremist group, according to an army spokesman. The detention of the officer, Brig. Gen. Ali Khan, raises serious concerns about the infiltration of elements sympathetic to Islamic extremists in the higher ranks of the army. While the lower ranks of the army, air force and navy have long been known to have elements sympathetic to the Taliban and extremist organizations, the arrest of Khan is the first known arrest of a senior army official. News of his detention comes at a sensitive time for the army, when morale in its ranks is at a historical ebb after the May 2 night raid by U.S. commandos that killed Osama bin Laden, and after an attack on Pakistan’s largest naval base by militants who appear to have had inside assistance. Khan was serving at the General Headquarters of the Pakistan Army in the garrison city of Rawalpindi, outside the capital, Islamabad. He was picked up for questioning by the Special Investigative Branch of the Pakistan Army on May 6, but the announcement of the arrest was made Tuesday, after an army spokesman confirmed that he had been detained, to the BBC Urdu website. Maj. Gen Athar Abbas, the spokesman, confirmed the detention to The New York Times, saying Khan had links with Hizb-ut-Tahrir, a group that is banned in Pakistan.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Cascades Continued from A1 “Commitment from the community … that was crucial,” he said. “The state always looks at that if someone asks for money, they want to see community involvement. And this community evidently wanted it, and we’re trying to respond to those needs.” The bond would come from lottery revenue funds. In addition, the university has committed about $1.5 million to the project. And a donor, who wishes to remain anonymous until the deal is complete, would contribute $800,000. The combined funds would help the university to buy the Edge Wireless building at 650

Health Continued from A1 “What you tell us today will help us improve the information and be sure that consumers can easily understand what they read about different health plans,” she said. While a video camera captured every moment, the woman accepted the task with gusto. She said that getting rid of some columns would make the form clearer and changing the blue ink to black would be easier on the eyes. But the last page was trouble. “This is really wordy,” she said. “I would have to put it down and go get a bowl of ice cream and go back to it later.” Starting next March, insurers and employers will have to make it easier for consumers faced with the ordeal of picking health plans. Under the 2010 health care law, they’ll have to provide health policy information that the average enrollee can understand and use to compare with other plans. A group assembled by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners developed the forms, and policymakers are getting feedback the same way advertisers learn the best way to sell orange juice: consumer focus-group testing. The woman in the gray sweatshirt was among eight people who received $75 stipends to sit in a windowless room and spend 90 minutes reviewing the forms and answering questions. Consumers Union sponsored the one-on-one sessions, spread over two days last month along with an identical round in St. Louis. According to the law, the information forms must use standardized language to define some common terms, such as premiums and coinsurance, and to explain which benefits are covered and which aren’t, what deductibles the consumer

Wetlab Continued from A1 “This is rodeo week; this has been around here for 66 years,” Hensley said. “It’s a great tradition here, but over the years there have been too many serious motor vehicle accidents after this event.” Justin Iverson, one of the volunteer drinkers Wednesday and the coordinator of alcohol service and alcohol monitoring at the rodeo and the horse races, said they’ve been fortunate not to have any serious alcohol-related incidents at the events in the last few years. Nursing a 7 and 7 cocktail and a handful of Doritos, Iverson said the fire station conference room wasn’t the most pleasant venue for a few cocktails, and the uniformed officers serving up carefully measured drinks weren’t the most en-

S.W. Columbia St. in Bend. Nelson said there was a slew of projects that the subcommittee had to consider, and many of the projects did not receive funding or received delayed funding. Most lottery funds are already allocated to education or parks, but there is a sliver reserved for economic development. There is about $282 million in this fund for bonding capacity. Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, said the news is consistent with what he had been hearing. But, he said, there are no guarantees until the bill has the governor’s signature. “Until the gavel falls, I’m going to remain cautiously optimistic,” he said. Conger said that in any given legislative session things can

change quickly. There is also the time crunch. Lawmakers are expected to adjourn within the next couple of days or early next week. Despite recognizing potential obstacles, Conger agreed that Nelson’s news was positive. Rep. Gene Whisnant, RSunriver, said it would be one of the major accomplishments this session for Central Oregon if the bond were given final approval. “It’s great for Central Oregon. It’s great for OSU-Cascades,” he said. The Capital Construction subcommittee has been called the endgame subcommittee. It’s where final decisions are made and large budgets such as an education reform package and the public safety budget go through. Nelson said he does not foresee anything that

Health reform loophole could add 3M to Medicaid WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama’s health care law would let several million middle-class people get nearly free insurance meant for the poor, a twist government number crunchers say they discovered only after the complex bill was signed. The change would affect early retirees: A married couple could have an annual income of about $64,000 and still get Medicaid, said officials who make long-range cost estimates for the Health and Human Services department. Up to 3 million more people could qualify for Medicaid in 2014 as a result of the anomaly. That’s because, in a major change from today, most of their Social Security benefits would no longer be counted as income for determining eligibility. It might be compared to allowing middle-class people to qualify for food stamps. Medicare chief actuary Richard Foster says the situation keeps him up at night. “I don’t generally comment on the pros or cons of policy, but that just doesn’t make sense,” Foster said during a question-and-answer session

will be responsible for, how the plans’ networks work and enrollees’ rights to appeal denials of claims. The law even bans the dreaded fine print by mandating at least a 12-point type size, larger than in a typical newspaper. To make it easier for consumers to compare how much coverage plans offer, the forms include two pages of “coverage facts labels” — modeled after nutrition facts labels on food

gaging bartenders. “I haven’t tipped them at all,” he said. “Their outfits really aren’t all that appealing.” Crook County Chief Deputy District Attorney Aaron Brennaman — drinking Jameson on ice as part of the experiment — said having the OSP’s processing center in Prineville for the rodeo will be a big help. Crook County has only one breath-test machine and 32 jail cells it shares with Jefferson County, Brennaman said, making it extremely complicated for local law officers to deal with multiple DUII suspects at the same time. After a few hours of supervised drinking and periodic breath tests, the volunteers were led outside for field sobriety tests. The volunteers underwent the same three tests administered to most people pulled over on suspicion of drunken driving — 30 seconds of standing on

at a recent professional society meeting. “This is a situation that got no attention at all,” added Foster. “And even now, as I raise the issue with various policymakers, people are not rushing to say ... we need to do something about this.” Indeed, administration officials and senior Democratic lawmakers say it’s not a loophole but the result of a well-meaning effort to simplify rules for deciding who will get help with insurance costs under the new health care law. Instead of a hodgepodge of rules, there will be one national policy. “This simplification will stop people from falling into coverage gaps and may cause some to be newly eligible for Medicaid and others to no longer qualify,” said Brian Cook, spokesman for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. But states have been clamoring for relief from Medicaid costs, complaining that just these sorts of federal rules drive up spending and limit state options. — The Associated Press

products — that illustrate what a policy might pay and what a consumer would pay for three common medical conditions: maternity care, breast cancer and diabetes. Kleimann asked the testers to read the papers that described the imaginary plans and pick the one they liked best. One young man dived into the task, but was stopped by the word “coinsurance.” The form offered a definition he said he

one leg, walking toe-to-heel along a straight line, turning, and walking back along the line, and a test of involuntary eye movements. The eye test, officially known as Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus, or HGN test, requires a suspect to track a moving object — typically a pen held by an officer — side-toside across their fields of vision. Sgt. Mike Iwai from the Oregon State Police said that when an individual has consumed alcohol or a handful of other drug types, the eyes will involuntarily twitch when the pupil moves to the outside corner of the eye. “You can practice the walk and turn test, you can practice the oneleg stand test, but you can’t practice the HGM test to beat law enforcement as a suspect,” he said. Nearly all of the volunteers Tuesday failed their field sobriety tests before catching rides home

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 A5

would stymie the bill. Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, said it’s a turning point for OSU-Cascades. “It shows they are here to stay,” Telfer said. “They are no longer on the chopping block. Now, we can move on and get everyone behind OSU-Cascades.” Lawmakers did signal the end was near Tuesday, when they passed a package of 14 educationreform bills. The passage of the education bills, which some lawmakers said will overhaul the state’s education system, was one of the last major hurdles lawmakers had to pass before they could end the session. The bills include priorities for both parties as well as the governor. They tackle a wide range of topics, from expanding online

charter schools to dipping into the education reserves and sending more money to local school districts. One bill sends $25 million more to the K-12 budget, another helps school districts access funding for all-day kindergarten. One would make the superintendent of public instruction a position appointed by the governor instead of through elections. The governor also received approval from both chambers on one of his priorities for the session, Senate Bill 909, which would create an Education Investment Board charged with overseeing all levels of education. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

didn’t understand. During a break halfway through the session, he tried unsuccessfully to call a friend who’s an insurance agent. In addition to the Consumers Union testing, America’s Health Insurance Plans, a trade association of more than 1,300 insurance companies, and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association held separate consumer focus-group testing sessions in St. Louis and Seattle with 40 people. Consumers Union’s preliminary results and America’s Health Insurance Plans’ report found that the labels achieve most of their mission. “There is universal support for a simplified, standardized format,” said Susan Pisano, a spokeswoman for America’s Health Insurance. The National Association of Insurance Commissioners turned over the task of developing the forms to a group of state insurance regulators, consumer and patient advocates, insurance companies and health care providers. Over the course of several lengthy conference calls, the group revised the forms based on suggestions from consumers and others. The revised forms were endorsed and sent to the insurance commissioners for approval last Friday. The labels then will go to federal officials — perhaps by the end of June — who’ll issue the regulations on the use and distribution of the forms. Consumers Union used an intensive consumer focus-group test called “cognitive interviewing,” in which researchers encourage participants to express every reaction they have to the product, with prompting from an interviewer. The testers were 26 to 64 years old, and either had no insurance or bought their own policies in the individual market. (Anonymity was guaranteed, which is why participants’ names can’t be published.)

The testing targeted the “coverage facts labels.” The labels say the information can help consumers compare plans by showing how much they’d pay for procedures based on the national average costs. A beneficiary’s actual costs might be different, based on the doctor’s advice, what providers charge and how much the policy pays, among other factors. That didn’t go over well with some testers. “The word ‘might’ ruins everything,” one young man said. “It’s kind of sketchy.” The woman who needed an ice cream break told Kleimann that she understood the purpose of the coverage facts labels: “Even though they may not be real numbers, if the treatment is the same, this tells me which plan will save me money,” she said. “I am in the population at risk for breast cancer, so this would help me.” But like some other participants, she suggested adding other medical treatment examples for the coverage facts labels, something an average family would experience: “I’m much more likely to fall in my driveway than be diagnosed with diabetes.” Premiums, deductibles and other numbers intimidated another participant, a man in his 20s wearing shorts and flipflops. He had to turn his baseball cap around so it wouldn’t hide his face from the video camera that was recording the sessions. “I’d have to have a calculator or ask someone from NASA to do the math,” he said. At the end of each session, Kleimann asked the crucial question: Which plan would you buy? All but two participants were able to make decisions. For those two, the new forms were no substitute for the all-purpose experts in their lives. “I’d probably call my mom and ask her,” said the young man who needed a calculator.

with sober drivers. While the tests are routine, officers often have a pretty good idea if a driver has been drinking as soon as they approach the car, said Ray Cuellar from the Oregon State Police. “The car, unless you’ve got the windows down or you’re smoking a cigarette, it already smells like a brewery in there,” Cuellar said. “Sometimes they’ll fumble through their wallet, give you a picture of their kid instead of their registration … you kind of know.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

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Fish Continued from A1 “It’s really an amazing journey they make,” Bartlett said. “They started out as 4-inch fish when they left, and they’re returning at 12 pounds and 21⁄2 feet.” The fish made an epic journey that took them down the Deschutes, through The Dalles Dam, the Bonneville Dam, and out into the thrashing waters of the Pacific. The fish then spent two years bulking up by chowing down on ocean grub. The chinook that survived started a return journey to the dam to spawn, traveling up the Columbia River and the Deschutes River. The two most recent returnees were identified by their tags as part of the group that biologists and volunteers released into Metolius and Deschutes River tributaries in 2008. The fish began their migration in 2009. The restoration of the salmon to the Upper Deschutes Basin is part of the $100 million Pelton Round Butte dam project that has been in the works for nearly 15 years, with the participation of such agencies as Portland General Electric, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. The return of these fish is just the beginning of the project. In the years following 2008, thousands more were released in tributaries, and are currently somewhere in the middle of their journey. Bartlett said “2012 will really be a fabulous year to watch. We’re just breaking the ice right now.” The three fish that arrived back are being held in a holding tank at the Round Butte Hatchery. Gauvin said biologists are just now beginning to determine what gender the fish are as they prepare to spawn. Once the chinook reproduce, the ones that successfully made the journey will die, having completed their biological cycle. Gauvin said one of the benefits of having the fish tagged is determining how long it takes to cover the distance. For example, the second chinook discovered in late May took 21 days to go from the Bonneville Dam fish ladder to the Pelton trap. Bartlett said that at this point, the biologists are mostly concerned with getting back as many salmon as possible from this first group of fish. “All I want is that enough fish come back to sustain the population,” Bartlett said. “And so far, things are working great.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com

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A6 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A GIFT TO THE COMMUNITY PRESENTED EXCLUSIVELY BY

&

Listen to the synchronized soundtrack accompanying The Bulletin and Bank of the Cascades fireworks on these radio stations.

A VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING FOR THEIR SUPPORT OF THIS COMMUNITY EVENT: PILOT BUTTE SCENIC VIEWPOINT • OREGON STATE PARKS • OREGON DEPT. OF FORESTRY • CITY OF BEND POLICE DEPT • CITY OF BEND FIRE DEPT BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA • DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST • TaylorNW


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At Work Do-it-all dads struggle to find balance, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,687.26 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +57.60 +2.19%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Hulu ponders sale after takeover offer Hulu, the online video service, is weighing a possible sale of the company after it received a takeover offer from an unidentified suitor, people briefed on the matter said Tuesday. The unsolicited offer has prompted Hulu’s board to consider its options, and the company is speaking to potential advisers, these people said. It may contact potential buyers, including other media companies and private equity firms that have wanted the chance to buy the service. Yet one of the people cautioned that Hulu’s board had not decided to sell.

Airbus gets more orders for its A320 LE BOURGET, France — Airbus announced more orders for its revamped A320 single-aisle plane on Tuesday, tapping into growing demand for more fuel-efficient planes from leasing companies and fast-growing low-cost airlines, particularly in Asia. Airbus, the European plane maker, said it had commitments for more than 100 more A320neo jets at the Paris Air Show here, bringing the total backlog for the plane, which has been on offer since December, to nearly 600. That is well above the 500-order benchmark that Airbus had initially predicted it would achieve by the end of the show. The momentum is building for the 150- to 180-seat plane, which is being equipped with new engines that are 15 percent more fuel-efficient than current models. That puts pressure on Boeing to decide whether to follow suit with an enhanced version of its competing 737 jet, or to develop a new narrow-bodied jet for delivery at the beginning of the next decade.

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12,190.01 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +109.63 +.91%

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1,295.52 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +17.16 +1.34%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.98 treasury CHANGE +.68%

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$1546.00 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$4.50

Consumer prices Changes from the preceding month in the Consumer Price Index for all urban consumers: 0.6 percent

By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

About 40 percent of Oregon companies responding to an Oregon Employment Department survey this spring reported plans to hire in the next six months. The figure compares favorably with results of the first survey, in the fall of 2010, which showed around 33 percent of companies in the state intended to hire. Seasonal and turnover hiring rank as the top explanations for the rosier picture. But some businesses across the state are also reporting expansions because of growth and restorations of positions eliminated during the recession. Based on the spring survey, between now and October, for example, 15 percent of Oregon com-

Inside

By Nathaniel Popper

• See survey results by industry, Page B2 • New report shows Oregon cities are slow to recover jobs, Page B2 panies in the manufacturing sector said they would expand, and 13 percent of construction companies said they have plans to bring back pre-recession jobs. “We are getting some businesses that are, you know, looking to expand, more optimistic about the future,” said Nick Beleiciks, state employment economist at the Oregon Employment Department. See Hiring / B2

Los Angeles Times

NEW YORK — In a one-two punch to its reputation, JPMorgan Chase & Co. was accused by regulators in separate cases of misleading big investors about the riskiness of mortgage-related securities it was selling just as the home-loan market was melting down. The Securities and Exchange Commission sued the giant bank’s securities unit over its sale in 2007 of a complex investment product whose value was

Paying admission at the bookstore

0.2 -0.0 -0.2 -0.4 -0.6 MJ J ASOND J FMAM 2010 2011 Note: All figures seasonally adjusted Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics AP

indirectly tied to a collection of residential mortgages. JPMorgan did not tell the product’s institutional buyers that it had been partly designed by a hedge fund that would profit if the security lost value, the SEC said in a complaint filed Tuesday in Manhattan federal court. As it filed the complaint, the agency announced that JPMorgan, the second-largest U.S. bank by most measures, had agreed to pay $153.6 million to settle the case. See JPMorgan / B5

IRS revokes tax status of some nonprofits in region The Bulletin

New York Times News Service ile photo

Katie Butterick, right, waits to take money from patrons buying copies of books by author Julie Orringer, before she reads her book “Invisible Bridge,” at Kepler’s Books, in Menlo Park, Calif., last month.

Retailers capitalizing on author events, something that Amazon can’t copy By Julie Bosman and Matt Richtel New York Times News Service

Independent bookstores, squeezed by competition from Internet retailers like Amazon, have long done something their online brethren cannot emulate: author events. And now many bookstores say they have no choice but to capitalize on this grand tradition. They are charging admission. Bookstores, including some of the most prominent around the country, have begun selling tickets or requiring a book purchase of customers who attend author

readings and signings, a practice once considered unthinkable. “There’s no one right now who’s not considering it,” said Sarah McNally, the owner of McNally Jackson Books in Manhattan. “The entire independent bookstore model is based on selling books, but that model is changing because so many book sales are going online.” The Boulder Book Store in Colorado caused a stir in April when it announced it would charge $5 a person to attend store events. In April, Kepler’s Books, an independent in Menlo Park, Calif., began

charging customers a $10 gift card, which admits two people to each author appearance. (They also have the option of buying the book in exchange for admission.) McNally is overseeing the construction of an event space in the lower level of her store. As soon as the space is ready, she said, the store will start charging admission to its events. Bookstore owners say they are doing so because too many people regularly come to events having already bought a book online or planning to do so later. See Bookstores / B2

A camera that lets you take shots first and focus later New York Times News Service

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$36.373 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.308

By Tim Doran

By Steve Lohr

0.2%

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More companies plan 2 regulators accuse to hire in next 6 months JPMorgan Chase of Oregon Employment Department survey shows growing confidence misleading investors

Gannett lays off 700 at newspapers Gannett confirmed Tuesday what many newspaper publishers across the country have feared since the recession officially ended two years ago: that the lagging economic recovery is forcing more job cuts. Gannett let go of 700 people in its community publishing division, or 3 percent of its employees across newspapers like The Courier-Journal of Louisville, Ky., The Cincinnati Enquirer in Ohio and The Indianapolis Star. The company’s flagship paper, USA Today, cut 9 percent of its workforce last summer and was not affected by the layoffs. Employees who lost their jobs were notified Tuesday. Robert Dickey, president of the community publishing division, said that as the company looked at its disappointing midyear advertising figures, it was left with little choice. — From wire reports

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With an innovative camera due out later this year from a company called Lytro, photographers will have one fewer excuse for having missed that perfect shot. The company’s technology allows a picture’s focus to be adjusted after it is taken. While viewing a picture taken with a Lytro camera on a computer screen, you can, for example, click to bring people in the foreground into sharp relief or switch the focus to the mountains behind them. But is Lytro’s technology just

a neat feature, or is it the next big thing in cameras? The founding team of the Silicon Valley startup and investors who have put in $50 million are betting on the latter. The technology has won praise from computer scientists and raves from early users of its prototype camera. “We see technology companies all the time, but it’s rare that someone comes along with something that is this much of a breakthrough,” said Ben Horowitz, co-founder of Andreessen Horowitz, a major investor in Lytro. “It’s super exciting.” See Camera / B5

If you scan the Internal Revenue Service’s recently issued list of more than 3,700 Oregon nonprofits stripped of their tax-exempt status, you’ll find the Central Oregon Airshow Inc. on Page 15. But Central Oregon Airshow also appears on a separate IRS list of charities in good standing, those eligible to receive tax-deductible donations. The reason: They’re two separate organizations. Figuring that out, however, might be a challenge for some potential donors. “I’m sure there is confusion,” said Rick Allen, secretary-treasurer of Central Oregon Airshow, the organization that raises money for The Airshow of the Cascades, scheduled for Aug. 26-27 at Madras Airport. “We’re right in the middle of our fundraising for this year’s show,” Allen said. “We don’t want to get confused (with the other nonprofit.) “We’re alive and well.” Allen’s organization has its taxexempt status and can be found on the IRS list of eligible charities. The other nonprofit with the same name is now defunct. It was the group that organized an air show at Redmond Airport through 1996, according to The Bulletin’s archives. On June 8, the IRS revoked the tax exemption for about 275,000 organizations nationwide and published the list on its website. The purge included 164 Central Oregon nonprofits. Officials with the IRS and The Nonprofit Association of Oregon, which provides assistance to nonprofits, suggest consumers question charities to be sure donations will be tax-deductible. They can ask for a copy of the charity’s letter of determination from the IRS and look up the charity on websites like guidestar. org, which provides free information on nonprofits. See Nonprofits / B5

On the Web

New York Times News Service

A single exposure demonstrates the effects of the Lytro technology, which allows a picture’s focus to be adjusted after the photo is taken. The company has raised $50 million from investors who see the technology as a major breakthrough for the consumer camera market.

To search for nonprofits that have had their tax-exempt status revoked by the Internal Revenue Service, visit www.irs.ustreas .gov/charities/article/0,,id =239696,00.html To search for nonprofit organizations the Internal Revenue Service says are eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions, visit www.irs.ustreas.gov/charities/ article/0,,id=96136,00.html


C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Oregon cities slow to bring back jobs, according to report The Associated Press PORTLAND — It may take years for Oregon cities to recover enough jobs to get back to the employment levels seen before the recession, according to a new report. The economic forecasting firm IHS Global Insight predicts it may take until the middle of 2014 before the Portland metro area recovers all the jobs it lost. Other Oregon cities may take even longer. The forecasting firm said a full recovery may take until 2018 for Medford and 2019 for the Eugene-Springfield area. It could take until 2021 in the Bend area, which had been one of the fastest-growing areas in the nation, The Oregonian reported Tuesday. The quickest return to pre-recession peak employment was expected in Corvallis, home to Oregon State University, possi-

bly by 2013. The picture emerging from state and national economic reports released Monday shows a longer recovery than usual after a recession. Rising gas prices, disruption from Japan’s disasters and fallout from extreme U.S. weather have slowed momentum, although not enough, economists believe, to drag the United States back into recession. “There’s no sign of a fast recovery,” said Jim Diffley, IHS Global Insight’s chief regional economist. “The depth of the recession was so great.” Metro regions account for 86 percent of Oregon’s gross state product, led by the PortlandVancouver, Wash., area at 62 percent, the report said. In Washington state, the urban effect is even greater, accounting for 94 percent of the state’s economic activity, led by Seattle-TacomaBellevue at 68 percent.

Expanding, restoring positions In recent months, the Oregon Employment Department conducted two surveys of companies in the state to find out hiring plans. Some companies reported plans to add employees because of growth; others said they’d reinstate positions cut in the recession. Results from surveys conducted September-November 2010 and March-May 2011:

Percentage of industry sectors reporting hiring due to expansion or restoration Expansion Sector

Restoration

Fall

Spring

Fall

Spring

’10

’11

’10

’11

Administrative and Waste Services

9%

12%

3%

6%

Construction

7%

7%

9%

13%

10%

13%

2%

3%

9%

7%

2%

2%

Health Care and Social Assistance

11%

11%

2%

3%

Information

16%

14%

3%

2%

5%

4%

2%

2%

11%

15%

10%

10%

Educational Services Financial Activities

Leisure and Hospitality Manufacturing Natural Resources and Mining Professional and Technical Services* Retail Trade Transportation, Warehousing and Utilities

3%

3%

3%

2%

13%

12%

4%

3%

5%

8%

1%

3%

11%

11%

4%

5%

Wholesale Trade

8%

12%

3%

5%

Other Services

8%

7%

4%

2%

* Includes management of companies and enterprises Source: Oregon Employment Department

Hiring Continued from B1 Even in the worst of times, he said, there are always companies with growth plans, just as companies with intentions of decreasing employment always exist. So for Beleiciks, the clearest good news lies in the drop in the percentages of employers surveyed that said economic reasons were preventing them from hiring in the next six months. The fall survey results showed 67 percent of respondents citing the recession or other economic challenges. The spring survey results show the number fell to 49 percent, even as high fuel costs started registering among the challenges. In addition to releasing the spring survey results Monday, the Oregon Employment Department rolled out unemployment rates for counties in May. The state rate fell slightly again, to 9.3 percent, and Crook and Deschutes counties also saw their rates drop slightly, to 15.1 percent and 12 percent, respectively. Jefferson County’s rate stayed the same in April and May, at 12.4 percent. The fall and spring surveys are the first of their kind for the Oregon Employment Department. The spring survey checked with 5,150 private sector employers, up from the first survey, which went to 4,650 such employers. A third survey the department will conduct with private sector employers later this year will clarify whether the slight improvement in the second survey was just based on a rise in seasonal hires or whether the economy is actually improving, Beleiciks said. Beleiciks said the department did not send the spring surveys to the same companies that received the fall surveys, because the department wanted a random sample. The department in-

On the Web The survey results are posted online, at www.qualityinfo.org/ pubs/future/future_hiring2.pdf.

creased the number of employers to get more detailed information, such as how regions differed, he said. For example, the bump in surveys sent out has allowed the department to observe that the expansion rate for the next few months in Central Oregon and the Columbia River Gorge falls below the state average of 10 percent. Specifically in Central Oregon, Carolyn Eagan, regional economist for the Oregon Employment Department, said she believes if industries are hiring in Central Oregon and it’s not seasonal or because of turnover, it’s to restore jobs lost during the recession, rather than expanding because of growth. She said she knows individual companies in the region are expanding, but she does not see whole industries showing the development. In Deschutes County, one industry that could show some expansion in payroll is health care. One private employer in the field is the St. Charles Health System. The nonprofit is planning to open a St. Charles Family Care clinic in the Clear One Health Plans building on Northeast Conners Avenue in Bend in September. The new office should expand the parent company’s employment by about 10, said Chief Financial Officer Karen Shepard. “That’s providing (primary care) access to people that don’t have access today,” Shepard said. And it’s a new venue for the nonprofit to operate, which expands employment, she said. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

Federal oversight agency failed to refer housing complaints to investigators By Gretchen Morgenson New York Times News Service

The federal agency overseeing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the taxpayer-owned mortgage finance giants, failed to refer to criminal investigators and other authorities almost 100 complaints about possible foreclosure abuse and mortgage fraud at the companies over a recent two-year period, according to a report issued late Tuesday by the inspector general of

Bookstores Continued from B1 Consumers now see the bookstore merely as another library — a place to browse, do informal research and pick up staff recommendations. “They type titles into their iPhones and go home,” said Nancy Salmon, the floor manager at Kepler’s. “We know what they’re doing, and it has tested my patience.” Novelist Ann Patchett, who is on a three-week tour for her new book, “State of Wonder,” appeared at a ticketed event at Kepler’s last week. While she said she is “sympathetic” to bookstores, she is concerned that people who do not have enough money to buy a hardcover book — especially students or the elderly — might be left out. “I wouldn’t want the people who have no idea who I am and have nothing else to do on a Wednesday night shut out,” she said. “Those are your readers.” While e-book sales have exploded in the past year, sales of print books have suffered, hitting brick-and-mortar stores especially hard. But the independent bookstores that have survived the growth of Amazon and the big bookstore chains

the Federal Housing Finance Agency. While the report did not determine whether these and other complaints had merit, it said that the agency’s unresponsiveness to them was problematic. “Failure to recognize and quickly provide law enforcement authorities with information about allegations of fraud and other potential criminal conduct presents a significant risk for the agency,” the report said.

The inspector general’s report is the third to assess the agency that acts as conservator for Fannie and Freddie, which have cost the taxpayer roughly $154 billion since they nearly collapsed in September 2008. The assessment covers the agency’s responses to complaints raised by consumers as well as current and former employees of Fannie and Freddie. It covers a period from July 30, 2008, when the finance agency was created,

through Oct. 31, 2010, when the inspector general began its operations. “Millions of Americans have been touched by the housing crisis,” Steve Linick, the inspector general, said in a statement. “Increasingly, they have filed complaints about fraud, waste or abuse, including allegations of improper foreclosures and possible criminal activity. Those complaints deserve timely and responsible action by FHFA.”

have tried to retool over the years to become tougher, more agile and more creative in finding new sources of revenue beyond print books. Anne Holman, the general manager of The King’s English Bookshop, an independent in Salt Lake City, said an industrywide discussion began a few years ago about whether to charge for events. “We don’t like to have events where people can’t come for free,” Holman said. “But we also can’t host big free events that cost us a lot money and everyone is buying books everywhere else.” The bookshop now requires book purchases or sells tickets for about half its 150 annual events, up from 10 percent five years ago. Publishers can benefit from bookstore events, which are frequently covered in local media as news events, giving book sales a boost. But privately, some publishers said they were skeptical. “We pay for the author to travel and come to the bookstore, and then the store makes money from it?” one said. Readers seem split on the practice. Helen Glikman, 54, a professor of social work from Cambridge, Mass., who regu-

larly attends readings at local bookstores, said she would happily pay a nominal fee, say $10, to hear Paul Auster, whom she has seen twice, or Jonathan Lethem. “You get a real sense of community at an independent bookstore,” she said. “You get an intellectual community that gathers around books, and that can only happen at a bookstore.” Joshua Roberts, who works for Drexel University, attended a reading of Eleanor Henderson’s debut novel “10,000 Saints” at the Strand bookstore in Manhattan on Thursday night. He has known Henderson for years and was thrilled that her book was out, but he was disinclined to pay to attend a reading at a bookstore. “Who would the money go to? Not to the author?” he asked. “That’s terrible.” After the reading, Henderson said her initial reaction was that charging would be unwise. “I’m not sure that charging readers would be a) useful or b) friendly,” she said. “While I understand the need for bookstores to make money, I don’t think they should discourage readers.” Some bookstore owners say that while they understand the impulse to charge, they are not

comfortable doing it themselves. Barnes & Noble, the largest bookstore chain in the country, has never charged admission to its events, a spokeswoman said. “We are retailers, we are selling a product, for sure, but, at the same time, we’re a cultural center,” said Neal Sofman, co-owner of Bookshop West Portal in San Francisco, adding that he would not rule out charging in the future. “You can never say never anymore.” Others make an occasional exception to their no-charging policy. BookCourt, a bookstore in Brooklyn that holds about 300 author events each year, charged $10 a person for an event celebrating the magazine N+1 in December, at the urging of Keith Gessen, an author and an editor of N+1. More than 200 people showed up. “I think it makes it more fun,” said Gessen, adding that he believed all events should charge admission. “I don’t think you should be able to walk into a Barnes & Noble and get to look at Joan Didion.”

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 B3

A W Expatriate spouses have hard time finding work abroad By Tanya Mohn New York Times News Service

Overseas assignments are more brisk after the recession, but accompanying spouses and partners still struggle to find work abroad, too. An annual survey of global relocation trends found that 61 percent of companies surveyed are expecting to transfer more employees in 2011 than in recent years, higher than the historical average of 57 percent. But only 15 percent of spouses employed before going abroad were able to find overseas assignments, about 10 percent less than in 2006. Scott Sullivan, an executive vice president of Brookfield Global Relocation Services, publishers of the annual survey, said that “trailing” spouses in the current uncertain market are especially reluctant to give up jobs — and a second income — at home because of risks to future earning potential and career development. The lack of employment opportunities abroad for partners “wasn’t as much of a challenge to companies 20 to 30 years ago,” Sullivan said, but with the rise in dual-career couples, “it’s become a huge issue across the board.” He added, “Companies can’t find the best people to go on assignments, so the talent pool for highly skilled international employees is deteriorating.” Yvonne McNulty, an assistant professor of international business at James Cook University’s Singapore campus who studies mobility issues, said, “The dual-career issue remains the No. 1 reason for refusing assignments.” Some 20 years ago, financial compensation packages for expatriate families were more robust, with higher salaries and other perks like drivers, club memberships and first-class airfare for home leave so a spouse could afford not to work. Today, while packages are lower overall, “companies are being more proactive” in helping spouses find work, McNulty said.

Do-it-all dads struggle to find balance By Cindy Krischer Goodman

German Navarro, a father of seven, balances a full-time job at a Florida factory with caregiving responsibilities that he splits with his wife, Zuliana, who also works at the factory. Here, the Navarros feed their children Sabastian, 7, left, and Jacob, 5.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Terry Frank considers himself a realistic, ambitious, whitecollar father who wants to climb the ranks at his company and be a super-involved parent. He cringes when he recalls the time he had to travel for work and missed his son’s baseball game — the one when his 9-year-old son William pitched a complete game. “I heard all about it from another dad, and I felt bad that I wasn’t there to see it,” said Frank, father of two boys and senior vice president at BankAtlantic. Today’s dads want to do it all, rise up in their organizations, cheer on their kids, supervise homework and do the morning drop-off. New research shows that balancing it all is not proving as easy for many of them. A significant majority of the engaged fathers see their responsibilities to their children as both caring for them and earning money to support them, according to the study by Boston College’s Center for Work & Family of 1,000 white-collar managers in large corporations with children under 18 at home. Brad Harrington, executive director of the Boston College Center for Work & Family, said that just a decade ago, more fathers would have described their role as traditional breadwinner. This makes Harrington raise a question normally pegged to working mothers: Can men obtain professional growth in the workplace and equality in their home life?

Charles Trainor Jr. Miami Herald

Being a good dad Fathers may still be grappling with the definition of being a good father. Researchers discovered a huge gap between what dads think they should do at home and what they really do. In the survey, 70 percent of the dads said they and their spouses should equally share caregiving for their children, but only 30 percent said they actually do. Most white-collar fathers earning more than $75,000 a year worked more than 45 hours a week, described job pressure as high and said they spend about 2.5 hours a day with their kids. When asked if they would

sponsibility at home, too. She has less flexibility than he has in his workday. He must prioritize what events he attends or tasks he takes on at home and at the office. “I can’t do it all, but I look at what’s important.”

Provider vs. caregiver Eddy Arriola, a father of two, approaches work and family balance from a different perspective — that of entrepreneur. Having launched two businesses before turning 40, Arriola is a Type A workaholic who runs Apollo Bank in Miami and still is devoted to his family. Arriola said being a good fa-

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Spousal support A second survey, the 2010 Worldwide Survey of Expatriate Policies & Practices, released this month by Mercer, an international human resources management consulting firm, found that an increasing number of the more than 1,000 multinational companies polled offer some spousal support that includes job search assistance. “It has gone from nice to have to a must-have strategic support service,” said Susan Ginsberg, vice president, global services for Ricklin-Echikson Associates, a human resources consulting firm with professional coaches in 50 countries that specializes in career and transition assistance for spouses and partners overseas. During negotiations, the offer of support can be “key to ensure that it doesn’t become a deal breaker.” Navdeep Boparai, originally from India, recently relocated to Houston with her husband from England. She worked as an auditor for Deloitte, and hopes to find similar work in this country. Her husband’s employer, an oil and gas company, is outsourcing counseling through RicklinEchikson. Even before the move, a consultant helped her write an American-style résumé, learn about the local job market and salary issues and prepare for interviews. The adjustment has not been easy, Boparai said. “The working culture is totally different. Americans are always checking their e-mail. Here, work is life, it defines them.” She said that she wanted to know what to expect. “Otherwise,” she said, “it could be a bit of a disaster.” Cultural issues as well as foreign languages, licensing and certification, and obtaining work permits are often obstacles to spouses getting jobs in new countries.

like to spend more time interacting with their children on a typical work day, 77 percent of the fathers responded that they would. At the same time, nearly 60 percent want to climb higher in their workplaces. “Women faced up to 10 years ago that they have to make tradeoffs. Fathers haven’t confronted that dilemma,” Harrington said. Frank’s situation mirrors that of working women who not too long ago began to face for the first time work/life balance concerns. Frank admits it is challenging to be a successful professional and an involved dad. His wife works as a teacher, and that means he has to take on re-

ther is not just about doing laundry and packing lunches — splitting day-to-day chores. “It’s also being a good role model and provider.” He said an understanding workplace is critical for fathers who want to be successful at work and engaged at home. “I work 80 hours a week, but I define when. When you have control over your schedule, it makes a world of difference.” In contrast, German Navarro exemplifies the blue-collar dads who, research shows, have more family time than corporate ladder-climbers. “The reality is they’re doing the caregiving because their wives are working, contributing significantly to the household income and don’t have flexibility,” Harrington said. Navarro, a father of seven, oversees the production line at the Earth Friendly Products factory in Opa-locka, Fla. When his shift ends at 4 p.m., he dashes home to do laundry, make dinner, iron clothes and help the three kids who still live at home with homework. His wife, Zuliana, who also works at the plant, gets home about an hour later. “Sometimes she cooks, sometimes I cook. I’d rather do the laundry. I like to iron clothes.” For Navarro, work is all about earning enough money to support his family. “When I’m at work, I think of my kids. I have a purpose.” Going forward, Harrington said, a supportive environment will be critical for all fathers who want to align work and family ambitions. “This has tangible benefits for their organizations.”

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B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMC Net wi AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc Accenture AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity AcuraPh Acxiom Adecaog n AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agilysys Agnico g Agrium g AirLease n AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish rs AlldNevG AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlmadnM g AlmostFam AlonUSA AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alvarion AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Ameresco n Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AmOriBio AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AVangrd AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Anaren Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Ann Inc Annaly Anooraq g AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache Apache pfD AptInv ApolloGM n ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG Astec AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis

1.95 +.21 1.12 25.68 +1.05 0.56 22.93 -.11 1.34 64.85 +.36 12.49 +.22 1.20 46.16 +.82 47.20 +1.22 1.80 40.16 +.32 0.20 14.45 +.27 35.00 +.05 8.49 +.15 5.85 +.14 20.27 +.04 0.58 35.59 +.52 1.72 31.11 +.15 15.71 +.36 6.87 +.12 1.41 +.03 8.15 +.17 0.05 26.82 +.49 2.55 +.03 1.92 52.26 +.24 0.70 67.93 +1.54 0.42 7.20 22.00 +.20 3.37 +.21 33.97 +2.42 0.90 54.79 +.83 24.16 +.74 7.77 12.75 +.56 6.01 -.08 64.66 +4.14 32.03 +.66 2.51 +.12 0.17 11.19 +.21 0.04 25.89 +.90 5.46 +.22 0.52 57.85 +1.02 4.08 -.42 12.54 +.33 12.21 +.05 32.01 +1.06 1.94 -.05 0.36 37.98 +.57 0.25 6.22 +.33 0.24 58.89 -.15 6.04 1.20 +.04 13.72 +.02 7.22 +.33 0.06 5.81 +.18 2.79 +.13 27.06 +.18 0.04 7.20 +.15 6.53 +.19 12.64 +.23 18.07 +.22 28.61 -.01 2.23 +.07 0.60 44.63 -.14 100.01 +3.57 6.67 -.02 7.67 +.56 1.24 +.02 49.82 +1.44 8.36 +.37 0.64 65.43 +4.45 0.11 85.32 +2.34 25.81 2.32 92.50 +1.32 6.42 +.15 0.40 12.50 +.51 1.16 68.05 +1.21 30.06 +.82 6.54 67.88 +.96 0.86 9.00 +.04 0.66 67.68 +2.00 5.40 +.19 0.12 15.37 +.59 36.22 +.50 1.80 79.34 +1.16 7.49 +.39 45.31 +.30 1.55 +.01 23.58 +.89 17.49 +.45 0.72 61.47 +1.47 0.20 82.77 +.97 92.92 +3.15 3.09 +.09 0.48 7.94 +.02 1.27 19.41 +.37 1.70 40.38 +.11 0.80 70.40 +1.03 2.35 +.05 32.79 +2.66 2.06 19.36 +.77 0.84 30.12 +.24 2.13 24.70 +.35 3.27 +.21 25.89 +1.94 0.16 10.23 +.18 42.82 +1.84 0.40 7.11 +.07 0.66 6.01 +.12 0.74 15.77 +.17 0.24 43.99 +1.06 0.48 22.19 +.27 1.52 27.31 -.01 1.24 +.09 1.18 32.38 +.58 14.45 +.81 194.23 +6.51 29.10 +.40 26.31 +.09 1.54 28.87 +.08 13.11 -.04 66.12 +2.22 0.52 50.60 +.54 10.82 +.57 1.35 35.19 +.49 5.60 28.50 +.10 9.22 +.29 0.44 12.95 +.22 1.84 37.88 -.03 0.10 12.39 +.21 0.72 49.55 +.67 0.65 35.10 +.56 0.60 24.09 +.34 28.78 +.76 1.09 +.03 7.25 +.04 8.00 +.39 51.78 +1.10 0.04 11.82 +.70 0.92 29.36 +.08 0.92 57.34 +.79 0.42 41.58 +.19 0.42 22.66 +.66 0.24 42.49 +1.22 58.17 -.28 5.90 +.18 0.06 50.87 +.74 11.82 +.40 0.36 72.15 +2.50 3.05 +.13 .99 -.05 1.00 37.55 +.81 17.99 +.86 38.06 +2.47 0.20 42.85 +.73 1.16 57.75 +.52 27.56 +1.17 2.59 18.50 .79 +.02 2.00 +.06 1.00 7.38 +.03 0.60 50.21 +.63 4.95 +.17 0.60 119.10 +2.30 3.00 64.29 +.56 0.48 26.09 +.10 16.00 +.30 42.45 +.38 1.12 10.15 +.10 325.30 +9.98 0.76 34.68 +.35 0.32 12.68 +.26 8.53 +.14 21.29 +.99 0.62 21.61 +.08 .09 -.01 0.75 32.52 +.93 32.72 -.03 0.44 26.02 +1.21 0.64 30.57 +.13 0.06 21.16 +.71 1.33 -.03 1.40 16.12 +.15 10.26 +.29 33.11 +1.31 0.12 22.44 +.47 0.13 27.58 +.53 1.44 7.40 -.07 2.15 -.02 10.91 +.21 37.60 +.79 0.24 11.80 -.17 26.74 +2.23 17.65 +.60 33.28 +.45 0.40 13.11 +.20 0.70 63.21 +.68 14.75 +.82 0.60 25.38 -.01 15.47 +.30 0.04 13.54 +.18 0.72 35.48 +.46 0.18 15.89 +.30 36.21 +.85 0.52 13.22 +.17 2.55 49.17 -.10 41.11 +1.06 1.09 15.58 +.33 13.04 +.40 1.36 32.31 +.14 40.61 +1.48 4.29 +.25 10.34 +.35 5.50 +.31 34.62 +.91 37.04 +1.34 1.80 74.62 +2.47 1.44 52.70 +.30 292.43 +.19 19.67 +.22 0.36 34.07 +1.32 6.60 +.35 3.57 131.77 +.03 3.40 +.14 1.00 37.38 +.58 16.27 +.37 1.10 25.01 -.01 30.58 +.61 0.92 28.27 +.66 1.68 +.09

Nm AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T pfC BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BabckW n Baidu BakrHu BallCp s Ballanty BallyTech BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g Bankrate n BankUtd n BarcGSOil Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconP rs BeacnRfg BeazerHm BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRefLab Biodel BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BiostarPh BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blckbaud Blkboard BlackRock BlkCorpHY BlkEnhC&I BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BlueNile BodyCen n Boeing Boingo n Boise Inc BoozAllen n BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq BritATob Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSoft Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldOfPr BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CSG Sys CSX s CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CalifWtr s Calix CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CapOne CapitlSrce CapFdF rs Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen Cavium Cbeyond CedarSh CelSci Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CentCas CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner Changyou ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng

D 0.92 0.84 2.03 0.64 2.07

30.97 +.31 20.39 +1.01 26.18 -.03 26.22 -.05 39.08 +.16 38.89 +.47 0.68 7.92 -.01 1.82 90.53 +1.63 1.82 75.00 +1.65 48.03 +1.04 47.10 +1.55 53.09 +1.01 0.42 43.40 +1.56 3.42 +.20 1.50 49.87 +.27 0.18 16.59 +.51 28.30 +.31 127.71 +9.43 0.60 70.64 +1.35 0.28 38.12 +.36 4.89 -.13 41.01 +1.46 0.56 11.65 +.40 0.80 19.35 +.03 0.79 11.55 +.29 0.70 11.15 -.10 0.04 12.41 +.01 0.04 10.83 +.23 5.55 +.10 1.55 +.03 1.80 46.29 +.43 1.17 +.03 2.80 62.87 +.77 0.52 26.32 +.26 2.08 59.67 +1.19 15.35 0.56 27.85 -.15 24.16 +.04 0.36 16.92 +.43 23.32 -.80 52.01 -.79 0.76 109.74 +.60 18.94 -1.20 0.48 44.19 +1.02 27.32 +1.77 1.24 59.80 -.13 2.40 52.53 +1.87 1.31 -.02 22.61 +.93 3.34 +.08 0.76 83.45 -.02 1.64 86.53 +.57 54.06 +1.47 0.20 33.38 +.73 0.24 7.57 +.33 0.96 32.11 +.12 15.76 +.16 0.32 32.15 76.49 +.39 0.30 50.17 +4.03 0.60 32.38 +.84 33.07 +.38 44.97 +1.47 20.80 -.48 1.72 +.03 98.65 +.06 0.10 5.78 -.09 25.85 +.35 0.80 19.25 +.12 2.56 +.06 1.19 +.10 1.46 30.31 -.03 1.04 9.14 -.15 0.48 27.10 +.83 40.49 +.34 5.50 190.73 +1.33 0.61 7.31 +.13 1.44 13.65 +.37 1.36 9.71 +.18 0.40 16.56 +.11 0.60 16.00 +.45 21.88 +.52 44.25 +1.14 21.90 +1.88 1.68 73.98 -.54 8.20 -.17 0.80 7.18 +.25 18.69 +.34 75.56 +2.38 0.04 6.58 +.14 2.00 106.73 +1.05 6.92 +.18 8.19 +.27 0.72 31.83 +.86 0.60 11.48 +.02 1.05 27.78 +.66 1.67 19.46 +.26 23.75 +.70 0.44 19.47 -.08 26.82 +1.09 8.09 +.25 1.66 +.06 0.56 24.31 +.40 1.32 27.98 +.17 3.66 87.29 +.88 0.36 32.21 +.96 0.60 23.22 +.34 35.85 +2.03 1.35 -.03 6.66 +.23 24.04 +.32 0.52 32.52 +.25 0.56 18.59 0.34 9.25 +.05 10.36 +.23 0.32 25.79 +.70 0.28 10.52 +.18 18.69 +.72 0.05 19.05 +.75 0.20 25.14 +1.68 0.80 42.74 +1.37 0.10 91.67 +.04 0.49 37.11 +.78 1.00 66.99 +1.57 0.20 22.10 +.39 24.78 +.92 0.84 18.36 +.36 0.40 24.29 +.52 0.40 26.91 +.54 27.93 +.83 0.40 146.78 +8.21 1.16 77.96 +.66 0.04 50.51 +.46 43.27 +.32 5.51 +.01 1.12 34.77 +.15 5.60 282.81 +3.89 0.84 19.74 +.10 38.03 +1.37 7.50 +.12 13.95 -.02 18.36 +.48 0.12 25.79 +.68 0.76 20.73 +.40 0.34 9.08 +.13 23.30 +.73 21.71 +.43 0.50 37.83 +.34 25.96 +.90 0.60 35.97 +.67 0.12 61.86 +1.39 63.90 +.85 9.46 +.34 10.22 +.22 5.74 +.05 0.63 9.37 +.10 16.98 +.59 0.62 18.37 +.06 20.71 +1.31 0.04 6.38 -.01 5.27 +.27 6.49 +.21 15.84 +.31 1.96 65.26 +.48 0.40 24.65 +1.45 15.96 +1.21 46.99 +1.19 1.16 34.22 -.01 1.30 77.11 +1.45 0.36 40.23 +1.64 1.20 61.16 +.34 10.11 +.31 0.20 50.66 +1.07 0.04 6.19 +.09 0.30 12.05 +.07 0.26 5.11 +.16 1.64 13.88 1.40 +.04 0.80 148.10 +4.18 0.86 45.07 +.61 27.31 +.50 20.65 +.51 12.71 -.16 0.68 48.83 +1.56 30.52 +1.24 1.00 37.24 +1.51 0.72 52.35 +.43 36.81 +2.08 30.90 +.70 0.60 44.91 -.60 54.40 -.24 1.84 101.39 +3.21 0.04 15.96 +.20 39.26 +1.68 12.69 +.11 0.36 5.20 -.02 .51 +.03 0.24 50.90 +1.74 8.32 +.15 60.04 +.45 1.94 -.03 3.64 28.79 +.73 3.31 +.06 8.07 +.24 1.89 20.06 +.32 0.80 34.07 +.55 34.32 +.84 6.05 +.26 0.79 19.00 +.17 1.56 13.25 +.18 12.07 +.19 0.01 21.42 +.35 10.00 -.15 14.50 +.56 2.84 +.04 2.90 40.06 +.46 6.34 +.15 79.89 +.15 33.60 +1.06 118.73 +1.33 38.21 +1.73 39.71 +.61 4.10 +.08 47.62 +3.02 56.20 +.17 53.67 +.87 30.32 +.28 5.34 +.08 17.65 +.62 8.10 -.07 0.35 28.79 +.69

Nm Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaBAK ChinaCEd ChinGerui ChinaGreen CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaMed ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChiNBorun ChinaPet ChinaRE ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaTInfo ChinaUni ChinaYuch ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp rs CitzRepB h CitrixSys Clarcor CleanDsl rs CleanEngy Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CoffeeH CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompssMn CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech Comverge Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conns ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts CorOnDm n Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CtrySCkg n CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubistPh Cummins Curis CurEuro CurAstla CurtisWrt Cyberonics Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DUSA Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaCon n DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBull DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood DollarFn s

D 3.12 101.59 +1.68 0.20 34.36 +1.06 0.20 14.90 +.45 46.11 +.41 0.62 3.52 +.02 .97 +.03 4.73 +.23 3.18 +.22 4.24 +.66 24.96 +1.00 0.91 48.82 +.84 8.14 -.05 1.93 45.07 +.40 2.87 -.05 4.74 +.81 3.16 93.74 +.96 5.16 +.14 4.87 +.22 2.47 +.04 1.81 +.15 3.62 +.09 2.96 +.51 0.12 19.97 +.44 1.50 19.62 +.83 7.06 +.56 285.25 +9.20 12.69 +.04 1.56 62.85 +.55 34.19 +.30 0.68 41.52 +1.08 5.03 +.09 17.59 +.63 0.40 85.64 +3.30 3.04 -.01 1.60 28.54 +.01 0.84 19.91 +.34 0.49 32.58 +.29 14.40 +.91 0.24 15.51 +.37 2.13 26.00 +.01 1.97 27.42 +.12 0.04 39.31 +1.15 .70 +.03 77.21 +2.42 0.42 45.54 +.82 5.65 -.06 12.83 +.31 3.77 +.14 3.26 -.17 0.56 84.68 +2.48 2.40 67.78 -.08 19.66 +.59 0.90 61.45 +1.07 13.08 +.50 1.88 66.26 +.43 0.52 29.15 +.38 24.61 +1.01 0.12 14.00 +.90 0.40 6.09 +.16 15.60 +.13 0.36 34.42 +1.43 72.06 +4.15 1.44 17.22 +.38 50.07 +1.49 1.31 +.04 2.32 88.92 -.19 14.94 +.06 0.60 20.74 +.29 3.40 +.04 0.45 24.05 +.36 0.45 22.86 +.32 0.40 34.60 +.32 0.48 14.29 +.65 2.00 25.47 +.57 26.31 +1.26 41.52 +1.56 0.38 42.02 -.09 1.80 85.47 +.34 31.21 +1.13 0.80 39.10 +.55 9.68 +.14 25.72 +1.67 28.02 +.75 1.00 26.28 +.42 2.76 +.09 0.40 37.66 +.67 0.92 24.93 +.07 11.47 -.17 86.91 +2.26 49.21 +1.24 7.72 +.36 2.64 73.73 +1.46 0.40 48.17 +2.06 2.40 52.95 -.06 23.91 +.60 21.62 +.42 0.96 37.03 -.08 61.42 +1.47 13.64 +.45 .10 -.00 0.06 76.95 +1.92 1.16 61.50 +1.61 0.42 19.61 +.85 2.30 33.07 +.97 45.05 +.62 4.47 +.05 1.00 109.52 +4.13 16.86 +.18 4.20 +.07 0.64 54.62 +1.24 18.08 +.29 0.20 17.66 -.26 0.60 41.88 +1.23 1.65 31.86 +.46 21.38 -.01 12.45 +.17 10.19 +.60 0.96 81.39 +.14 8.30 +.39 10.87 +.27 0.18 8.40 +.04 58.44 +1.19 0.30 16.52 +.21 36.17 +1.05 0.80 53.51 +.60 3.79 +.04 0.88 47.95 -.05 1.95 86.72 +.45 21.85 -1.59 1.40 40.36 +.97 34.00 +.85 0.87 10.77 +.03 24.67 +.03 0.36 11.09 +.18 41.44 +.81 37.80 +.77 40.96 +.88 36.15 +.47 1.05 97.52 +4.04 3.40 +.08 0.10 143.51 +1.04 3.55 106.30 +.37 0.32 31.85 +.12 25.03 +.09 1.26 46.16 +.50 0.36 20.19 +.45 2.40 12.53 .78 +.00 0.50 55.55 +1.98 1.17 +.02 4.99 +.18 0.28 5.20 +.07 29.99 +1.17 0.40 3.82 +.06 0.78 9.91 +.03 1.33 30.18 +.04 0.15 11.38 +.15 0.70 52.25 +1.45 49.94 +1.64 2.35 49.69 +.44 6.01 +.29 0.11 10.38 +.45 16.84 +.64 0.08 53.07 +1.08 1.28 48.49 +1.33 17.77 +.82 84.74 -.20 0.24 58.16 +2.15 12.76 +.22 83.93 +3.33 0.20 6.43 +.77 1.64 82.13 +2.07 .35 +.01 5.25 +.16 16.33 +.14 0.48 28.35 +.38 9.81 +.12 .55 +.03 1.00 23.95 +.82 9.01 +.42 19.59 +.77 39.21 +.66 1.77 +.07 3.95 +.10 0.20 37.61 +1.09 7.87 +.09 1.07 59.40 +2.00 49.57 +.48 6.48 -.07 0.16 13.92 -.01 0.68 78.22 +1.49 2.51 -.39 14.54 +.82 2.46 82.37 +1.12 0.18 72.98 +1.10 0.50 68.02 +1.29 0.32 10.22 +.16 7.08 +.08 11.00 +.15 12.70 +.80 37.39 +.61 2.72 62.56 +.73 31.27 +.98 0.20 52.71 +1.40 47.81 +.89 0.84 40.44 +2.29 37.71 -2.62 47.37 -1.83 36.79 -1.65 1.20 34.57 +1.74 23.38 -1.49 12.36 -.29 15.91 -.96 0.01 42.13 +2.95 19.29 -1.10 24.42 +.89 35.61 +.41 0.05 72.12 +1.73 75.75 +4.69 0.10 77.84 +3.14 68.46 +3.68 0.24 24.04 +.42 42.04 +1.13 37.65 +.74 28.64 +.75 0.40 38.78 +.55 8.90 +.28 42.60 -.10 13.09 -.02 21.99 +.31

Nm

D

DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DurectCp DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy DynexCap

1.97 1.40 0.60 1.04 0.52 1.10 1.00 1.28

0.52 1.64 0.48 1.00 0.68 1.44

1.08

Nm 34.40 +.13 73.33 +1.09 65.49 +1.32 48.23 +.07 24.62 +.55 96.28 +3.75 57.89 +1.67 19.52 +.15 1.75 +.07 2.76 +.01 19.99 +.17 64.46 +1.34 36.08 +1.12 40.81 -.09 5.76 +.66 21.48 +.02 51.12 +1.62 4.72 +.05 64.63 +1.51 4.04 +.07 51.72 +1.33 24.97 +.58 18.80 -.03 13.93 +.17 75.39 +.63 2.95 2.05 +.01 2.55 +.02 6.05 +.08 9.83 +.12

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House E-Trade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EagleBulk ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton s EatnVan EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc EchoGLog EchoStar Ecolab ECOtality EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoEl ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts eMagin Embraer Emcore lf EmersonEl EmmisCm EmpDist EmpirRst h EmployH Emulex EnbrEPt s Enbridge s EnCana g EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix EndurSpec Ener1 Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entercom Entergy EnteroM rs EntPrPt EntropCom EnzoBio EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EthanAl Evercore EverestRe EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExamWk n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts Express-1 ExterranH ExterranP ExtorreG g ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FactsetR FairIsaac FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal s FedExCp FedMogul FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FiberTwr FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FidusInvt n FifthStFin FifthThird FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstRepB n FstSolar FTArcaBio FT ConStap FT Copper FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstBcp Flextrn Flotek FlowInt FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet s Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredsInc FMCG s Freescale n FDelMnt FreshMkt n FriendFd n FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelTech FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl FurnBrds FushiCopp Fusion-io n GMAC CpT GMX Rs GT Solar GTx Inc GabelliET

12.04 -.21 0.25 8.13 +.52 14.00 +.22 29.78 +.96 26.65 +.62 28.95 +.34 2.67 46.26 +1.28 0.64 102.19 +1.29 0.88 50.87 +.78 2.36 +.04 0.20 7.64 +.21 0.20 19.51 +.24 1.88 100.10 +3.63 3.44 +.07 1.36 48.69 +1.28 0.72 29.70 +.36 1.28 12.12 +.13 1.16 10.63 +.16 1.14 10.23 +.16 1.21 11.95 +.25 1.33 12.59 +.21 20.57 +.28 16.87 +.73 35.07 +1.44 0.70 54.87 +.65 2.80 -.26 1.28 39.17 -.07 0.20 8.41 +.02 84.25 +.33 4.13 +.27 0.04 20.22 +.53 0.88 30.63 +.41 1.76 34.17 +.56 10.69 +.47 0.10 14.08 +.63 22.68 +.32 4.63 -.03 0.72 30.54 -.53 2.29 +.11 1.38 53.92 +1.09 1.14 +.08 19.10 +.17 .95 -.22 0.24 16.05 +.13 8.30 +.20 2.06 29.81 +.45 0.98 31.59 +.49 0.80 29.86 -.24 8.55 +.69 39.51 +1.14 8.36 +.02 1.20 40.63 -.05 1.36 -.05 0.54 56.27 +.87 71.45 +1.11 1.17 +.03 2.24 46.08 +1.33 3.58 48.17 +.35 30.86 +1.52 4.91 +.13 2.16 30.85 +1.12 0.79 22.77 +.63 32.31 +.84 45.79 +.04 1.40 52.00 +1.07 9.51 +.49 8.10 -.03 3.32 69.39 -.01 2.56 +.08 2.39 41.49 +1.01 8.09 +.45 4.06 +.24 10.16 0.64 34.38 +.24 99.64 +3.15 1.50 64.82 +.45 0.88 18.48 +.32 1.47 59.91 +.27 0.37 13.91 +.37 4.16 137.71 +1.42 0.75 102.41 +3.17 36.20 +.41 0.28 20.98 +.48 0.72 33.23 +.42 1.92 81.53 -.60 .59 -.01 7.89 +.20 24.91 +.76 3.01 -.05 0.16 18.76 +.15 9.23 +.08 2.10 41.85 -.13 4.43 +.05 7.37 +.34 0.28 28.28 +.91 0.50 48.28 +.73 21.20 +.24 54.99 +.20 3.32 +.46 20.62 +.90 1.91 25.81 +.14 12.25 +.82 0.56 20.43 +.22 3.12 +.02 1.88 80.57 +.86 31.40 +.75 103.00 +4.82 38.06 +1.04 0.24 32.88 -.08 0.60 82.04 +1.58 41.04 +.92 0.48 10.26 +.15 3.68 +.20 37.09 +.68 1.08 100.90 +2.52 0.08 29.70 +.74 16.55 +.63 0.72 53.62 +.10 0.52 33.82 +.73 0.52 89.13 +1.63 20.34 +.24 2.68 86.40 +.93 0.24 6.32 +.27 0.96 24.85 +.25 5.55 +.26 13.19 +.56 1.07 -.01 13.68 +.12 0.48 15.48 +.23 0.20 31.28 +.06 15.00 1.28 11.65 -.25 0.24 12.67 +.13 23.60 +.59 15.66 +1.01 0.20 23.12 +.14 0.24 15.10 +.27 0.12 5.74 +.06 0.04 10.08 11.17 +.07 18.46 +1.80 0.04 12.30 +.10 0.64 13.60 -.04 34.05 124.65 -.37 42.84 +.64 0.18 24.73 +.35 0.58 39.73 +1.43 0.05 20.98 +.52 2.20 44.21 +.05 0.64 16.13 +.14 61.74 +.39 5.46 +.12 1.35 +.04 6.41 +.14 7.85 +.41 4.06 +.24 0.90 32.48 +.26 1.28 108.87 +3.97 0.50 62.65 +1.14 27.35 +1.33 1.16 62.64 +.49 0.66 24.12 +.71 4.80 +.06 13.32 +.38 4.83 +.34 18.08 +.08 40.15 +.66 26.30 +.80 8.74 +.18 24.64 +1.92 4.72 -.01 0.76 64.21 +.26 113.80 +3.09 29.89 +.78 1.96 20.89 +.34 1.00 126.33 +2.01 0.20 14.38 +.13 1.00 49.24 +1.83 16.05 +1.16 0.20 26.33 +.36 38.71 +1.98 3.64 -.08 0.75 8.06 +.13 0.24 32.08 +1.01 1.20 16.42 +.37 23.75 +.38 6.28 +.10 1.45 +.02 0.30 22.25 +.60 0.20 10.71 +.11 4.22 -.07 5.43 +.63 25.00 +2.21 25.05 +.35 4.45 +.22 13.91 +.60 5.37 -.46 0.56 5.92 +.07

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp Generac GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenMot n GMot wtA GMot wtB Gensco GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec rs Genworth GeoGrp GeoGloblR Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp Gevo n GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldRsv g GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenDot n GreenMtC GreenbCos Greenhill GrifolsSA n Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HSBUS pfH HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HlthStrm HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HigherOne HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HilltopH HimaxTch HiSoft n HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HooperH HorMan HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT

D 1.68 17.10 +.01 0.29 9.47 -.04 1.32 28.42 +.27 27.51 +.71 0.16 14.16 +.40 0.45 18.15 +.02 0.20 80.35 +1.22 2.00 33.98 +.31 38.98 +.98 .24 +.01 3.47 +.09 30.14 +1.55 68.62 +.59 7.53 +.03 6.38 +.20 18.54 +.50 39.26 +1.69 1.88 73.40 +.63 0.60 18.81 +.33 0.40 16.46 1.46 1.12 38.33 4.53 +.23 29.59 +.07 20.65 +.07 15.18 +.07 46.35 +.81 3.75 -.01 0.18 16.05 +.35 0.48 29.36 +1.09 19.89 +.48 1.80 52.48 +.69 3.06 +.11 10.42 +.22 22.90 +.09 .50 +.03 21.29 +.53 23.94 +.74 0.27 9.98 +.05 3.93 +.01 13.47 -1.34 0.18 7.43 +.15 0.30 34.20 +.73 39.90 -.20 0.52 13.54 +.14 0.36 15.08 +.38 2.11 41.50 +.01 2.40 +.15 0.40 9.63 +.07 35.88 +2.09 5.34 +.17 0.08 50.57 +.88 0.40 11.66 +.41 0.25 23.75 +1.18 1.24 +.03 0.15 20.91 +.66 4.49 +.16 0.12 11.51 -.10 1.00 32.05 +1.03 0.19 14.57 +.24 2.57 -.03 0.48 27.69 +3.39 0.41 48.50 +1.15 2.38 +.07 1.53 24.72 +.04 1.40 135.96 +.82 1.16 92.11 -.40 18.86 +1.07 15.59 +.67 493.00 +8.42 1.68 26.31 +.69 44.32 +2.54 0.84 50.06 +1.08 19.22 +.61 25.23 -.02 2.64 148.50 +2.46 6.55 +.20 13.26 +.30 0.52 25.21 +.32 5.27 +.28 1.86 +.10 0.08 5.49 +.16 3.35 +.02 0.83 20.84 -.08 32.54 +.93 82.90 +2.92 20.22 +.60 1.80 53.41 -.13 7.19 +.10 0.44 38.21 +1.66 .38 +.04 0.05 13.00 +.20 0.15 23.73 +.58 0.80 43.24 +1.66 0.03 6.87 +.09 3.55 +.66 25.73 +1.61 33.90 -.33 0.58 31.53 +.20 1.92 37.85 +.14 1.80 49.37 +.50 1.63 24.81 +.19 31.60 +.87 32.73 +.83 0.36 47.13 +.70 6.66 +.07 0.96 31.67 -.05 29.08 +.97 .90 +.02 1.10 36.89 +.71 2.98 -.05 74.97 +1.14 5.25 +.01 14.64 +1.29 0.50 37.92 +.94 0.10 44.29 +1.07 7.15 +.25 0.07 12.90 +.27 1.00 45.38 +.69 0.82 31.39 +.88 0.40 24.91 +.64 11.16 +.13 1.20 43.98 -.09 4.10 29.00 +.26 1.24 23.87 -.07 5.73 +.07 3.00 -.06 2.86 53.42 +.44 0.63 16.13 +.06 10.54 +.03 1.20 21.35 +.33 30.86 +.81 25.61 -.12 45.81 +1.77 11.21 -.96 0.08 16.11 +.23 0.04 19.72 +.21 5.78 +.09 .39 +.04 7.42 +.36 1.92 54.09 +.01 16.39 +1.01 0.28 61.03 +1.74 71.55 +.49 0.50 54.99 +1.60 5.27 +.16 0.24 5.43 +.16 1.38 56.23 +.01 15.58 +.27 0.40 71.53 +2.80 0.48 35.30 +.31 20.94 +.69 15.04 +.40 39.78 +.78 18.15 +.24 1.70 33.05 +.26 0.45 45.95 +1.08 0.76 23.13 +.13 8.82 -.03 0.24 2.13 +.12 13.44 +.13 0.60 66.62 +2.17 9.52 -.13 20.42 +.43 1.00 35.43 +.66 36.16 +1.05 2.48 61.83 +.28 36.75 +.33 1.33 57.81 +1.38 .91 -.04 0.44 15.20 +.39 1.12 +.05 0.51 29.50 +.37 26.49 +1.12 55.50 +.66 1.80 24.12 +.79 0.12 16.47 +.17 0.28 7.54 +.23 2.05 +.03 0.32 8.21 +.04 25.51 +.42 1.00 81.64 +1.38 0.52 45.88 +.84 0.04 6.40 +.08 0.40 17.74 +.79 2.38 -.08

Nm Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 39.90 +.44 9.24 +.33 4.33 +.19

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 37.07 +.77 IAMGld g 0.08 19.89 +.90 ICICI Bk 0.63 45.76 +.44 ICO Glb A 2.95 +.06 IdexxLabs 75.60 +1.36 IDT Corp 0.92 26.26 +1.43 iGateCorp 0.15 15.74 +.35 IHS Inc 88.19 +2.47 ING GRE 0.54 8.20 +.04 ING GlbDv 1.20 11.05 +.17 ING 11.93 +.34 INGPrRTr 0.31 6.10 +.01 ION Geoph 8.70 +.37 IPG Photon 63.69 +1.69 iShGold s 15.10 +.06 iSAstla 0.82 25.68 +.45 iShBelg 0.24 14.25 +.20 iShBraz 2.53 71.73 +.48 iSCan 0.50 31.05 +.72 iSFrnce 0.66 27.16 +.69 iShGer 0.29 27.07 +.70 iSh HK 0.45 18.18 +.21 iShItaly 0.33 17.86 +.52 iShJapn 0.14 10.18 +.17 iSh Kor 0.44 63.07 +1.52 iSMalas 0.34 15.17 +.13 iShMex 0.54 60.17 +.63 iShSing 0.43 13.62 +.25 iSPacxJpn 1.56 46.88 +.80 iShSoAfr 1.82 70.98 +1.77 iSSpain 2.15 42.16 +1.15 iSSwedn 0.55 31.92 +.98 iSSwitz 0.32 26.96 +.40 iSTaiwn 0.29 15.04 +.22 iSh UK 0.43 17.84 +.32 iShChile 0.54 73.40 +1.53 iShSilver 35.51 +.42 iShDJDv 1.75 52.89 +.46 iShBTips 3.86 110.49 +.27 iShAsiaexJ 0.97 60.76 +.99 iShChina25 0.85 41.90 +.64 iShDJTr 1.05 96.34 +1.82 iSSP500 2.46 130.50 +1.71 iShBAgB 3.87 107.45 +.10 iShEMkts 0.64 46.56 +.84 iShiBxB 5.13 110.85 -.03 iShEMBd 5.60 108.82 +.73 iSSPGth 1.20 68.04 +1.00 iSSPGlH 1.20 57.57 +.31 iShNatRes 0.64 42.45 +1.03 iShSPLatA 1.10 49.55 +.52 iShB20 T 4.01 96.59 -.43 iShB7-10T 3.20 97.17 -.13 iShB1-3T 0.79 84.46 +.01 iS Eafe 1.42 59.86 +1.27 iSRusMCV 0.91 47.08 +.72 iSRusMCG 0.59 60.12 +1.24 iShRsMd 1.59 107.04 +1.88 iSSPMid 1.00 95.89 +1.79 iShiBxHYB 7.43 90.07 +.60 iShs SOX 0.31 53.96 +1.24 iShNsdqBio 0.51 103.87 +1.34 iShC&SRl 1.90 72.97 +.51 iShBFxBd 6.15 106.76 -.07 iSR1KV 1.25 67.22 +.82 iSMCGth 0.60 108.31 +2.30 iSR1KG 0.76 59.41 +.98 iSRus1K 1.18 72.44 +1.02 iSR2KV 1.24 72.12 +1.28 iShBarc1-3 2.71 105.10 +.06 iSR2KG 0.53 91.54 +2.26 iShR2K 0.89 80.66 +1.71 iShBar3-7 2.31 118.03 -.08 iShUSPfd 2.87 39.25 +.11 iSRus3K 1.25 77.65 +1.13 iShDJTel 0.72 24.62 +.36 iShREst 1.98 60.60 +.53 iShDJHm 0.07 12.64 +.21 iShFnSc 0.61 55.50 +.69 iShSPSm 0.74 71.47 +1.23 iShBasM 0.93 76.72 +2.30 iShPeru 1.06 38.37 +.40 iShSCGrth 0.61 78.24 +1.58 iStar 7.62 +.21 ITT Corp 1.00 57.68 +.60 ITT Ed 76.78 +1.03 IconixBr 23.71 +.88 Identive 2.35 +.05 IDEX 0.68 44.10 +.86 Ikanos 1.23 +.03 ITW 1.36 55.54 +.92 Illumina 73.80 +1.40 Imax Corp 29.91 +.87 Immucor 19.83 +.22 ImunoGn 11.95 +.19 Imunmd 3.79 +.04 ImpaxLabs 20.62 +.17 ImpOil gs 0.44 45.47 +.73 inContact 4.62 +.20 Incyte 18.71 +.46 IndiaFd 3.87 28.61 +.34 IndoTel 1.50 33.01 +.63 Inergy 2.82 35.42 +.41 Infinera 6.46 +.41 Informat 56.60 +1.15 InfosysT 1.35 61.75 +1.05 IngerRd 0.48 44.68 +.95 IngrmM 17.60 +.43 Inhibitex 3.93 +.18 InlandRE 0.57 8.78 -.02 InnerWkgs 8.50 +.30 Innospec 32.56 +1.24 InovioPhm .61 +.00 Inphi n 16.74 +.39 InsightEnt 16.39 +.10 InsitTc 19.49 +.92 Insulet 20.47 +.87 IntgDv 7.51 +.20 IntegrysE 2.72 51.29 +.27 Intel 0.84 21.65 +.33 IntParfum 0.32 22.10 -.06 InteractBrk 0.40 16.27 -.05 IntcntlEx 122.27 +1.64 InterDig 0.40 37.31 +1.48 Intrface 0.08 18.80 +.58 InterMune 34.97 +1.77 IBM 3.00 166.22 +1.20 IntFlav 1.08 63.04 +1.22 IntlGame 0.24 16.98 +.42 IntPap 1.05 28.78 +1.34 IntlRectif 25.97 +.98 IntTower g 6.99 +.42 InterOil g 50.77 +.79 Interpublic 0.24 11.81 +.36 Intersectns 0.60 16.13 +.29 Intersil 0.48 12.56 +.17 IntraLks n 17.34 +.51 IntPotash 31.03 +1.96 Intuit 50.39 +.00 IntSurg 351.90 +.19 Invesco 0.49 23.37 +.26 InvMtgCap 3.94 20.89 -.10 InVKSrInc 0.29 4.98 +.03 InvTech 13.93 +.35 InvRlEst 0.69 8.65 +.01 IridiumCm 8.47 +.05 IronMtn 1.00 33.34 +.49 IronwdPh 15.90 -.05 Isis 8.80 +.18 iSoftStn n 12.12 +.41 IstaPh 7.98 +.25 ItauUnibH 0.67 22.13 -.09 IvanhoeEn 1.92 +.07 IvanhM g 1.48 23.30 +.77 Ixia 12.57 +.06 JA Solar 5.14 +.06 JDASoft 30.44 +1.03 JDS Uniph 16.44 +.66 JPMorgCh 1.00 40.91 +.43 JPMCh wt 13.26 +.26 JPMAlerian 1.95 36.18 +.62 Jabil 0.28 18.85 +.59 JackHenry 0.42 29.75 +.65 JackInBox 22.11 +.06 JacobsEng 41.93 +.66 Jaguar g 4.80 +.27 Jamba 2.10 +.05 JamesRiv 19.28 +.50 JanusCap 0.20 9.44 +.05 JpnSmCap 0.08 7.92 -.39 Jarden 0.35 34.41 +.70 JazzPhrm 30.89 +1.57 Jefferies 0.30 21.35 +.10 JetBlue 6.13 +.13 Jiayuan n 10.19 +1.00 JinkoSolar 23.49 +.49 JoeJeans h .95 +.04 JohnJn 2.28 66.49 -.02 JohnsnCtl 0.64 38.54 +1.15 JonesGrp 0.20 10.80 +.26 JonesLL 0.30 93.57 +1.99

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D 1.40 82.10 +2.15 0.16 15.96 +.17 19.23 +.32 3.32 +.07 6.24 +.13 0.40 60.78 +.20 5.34 +.14 21.87 +.55 0.61 17.73 -.04 23.49 +.01 3.11 -.01 15.04 +.06 4.67 +.03 12.03 +.76 1.84 25.14 +.04 0.09 2.08 +.06 5.65 +.27 7.39 -.79 0.60 17.75 -.10 0.28 22.61 +1.21 0.84 22.52 +.48 25.89 +1.53 11.78 +.45 2.84 +.15 35.88 +1.54 .98 +.03 40.05 +1.81 0.01 4.22 +.29 20.17 +.99 .21 -.01 1.99 +.09 0.25 13.07 +.28 87.43 +.06 1.35 +.02 14.40 -.06 0.65 12.50 -.05 0.20 78.15 +3.10 0.16 53.47 +1.29 6.40 -.01 10.25 +.09 0.52 33.01 +.61 2.16 63.70 +.64 1.72 49.58 +.56 24.20 -.39 25.64 +1.24 1.73 33.77 +.14 2.50 43.75 +1.80 34.70 +.99 8.66 +1.04 1.00 15.35 +.18 0.72 64.79 +.52 0.84 12.16 +.22 1.85 43.26 +.33 1.78 25.22 +.14 53.00 -.21 0.04 6.30 +.11 0.24 14.28 +.20 0.48 60.62 +.06 0.48 48.77 +1.16 1.04 70.40 +.02 4.36 -.25 7.21 -.39 0.64 29.66 +.47 .92 +.07 4.58 +.13 0.80 31.03 +.19 28.55 +2.66 31.88 +.60 15.61 -.12 1.00 6.54 +.11 0.16 12.05 +.34 2.13 107.82 +1.20 0.17 31.06 +.60 10.72 +.72 1.26 +.02 2.12 38.17 -.08 7.05 +.56 8.37 +.05 31.66 +1.21 1.08 68.55 +2.18 0.42 26.34 +.72 1.11 +.01 33.72 +2.10 0.18 44.70 +.94 0.56 26.83 +.47 0.80 63.85 +1.19 1.70 81.81 +2.02 0.96 61.17 +.41 51.10 +2.44 32.99 +1.07 1.42 37.70 +1.02 0.28 20.01 +.46 0.44 82.20 +1.78 46.56 +2.94 0.88 78.24 +2.13 55.86 +1.72 37.04 +1.08 2.16 56.35 +.70 12.71 +.15 37.65 +2.06 3.36 70.94 +1.65 3.36 70.31 +1.61 0.44 57.90 +1.51 2.74 +.18 4.37 +.39 16.52 +.37 10.30 +.39 0.52 43.55 +.39 31.31 +.81 5.51 +.02 1.08 53.95 +1.34 0.69 49.60 +.78 0.08 85.92 +2.08 0.12 17.07 +.19 7.52 +.30 16.66 +.14 0.82 61.85 +1.01 37.60 +.62 1.94 39.03 +.08 0.24 22.01 +.40 9.07 +.30 17.86 +.44 0.40 85.11 +.83 0.40 16.52 +.21 0.10 67.00 +4.03 3.06 121.59 +1.05 150.76 +.73 3.54 39.70 +.51 1.65 173.81 +3.29 2.44 129.45 +1.75 1.74 53.46 +.37 0.31 18.01 +.33 0.20 23.69 +.26 0.72 40.97 +.64 4.41 39.75 +.26 1.50 61.49 +.24 45.85 -.01 0.37 25.27 +.19 0.46 52.74 +1.03 0.47 56.66 +1.95 0.29 39.15 +1.10 0.42 65.77 +2.31 1.00 78.85 +.95 31.15 +.04 17.26 +.45 0.40 10.00 +.29 16.38 +.53 57.96 +.96 55.58 +.06 0.58 22.99 +.34 19.22 +.18 0.84 49.62 +.32 11.12 +.28 143.92 +4.47 37.52 +.83 17.43 +.63 2.56 +.10 0.68 44.97 +.25 42.86 +1.07 10.60 +.28 5.86 +.27 9.80 +.44 1.82 37.78 +.46 14.42 +.43 0.46 19.11 -.08 1.95 -.05 6.87 +.07 39.54 +.06 1.00 83.50 +1.37 0.51 31.36 +.45 0.39 35.79 +.75 0.47 28.53 +.57 0.24 16.42 +.32 5.75 +.11 9.90 +.32 1.00 51.27 +.38 0.40 47.69 +1.12 27.32 +1.45 1.62 -.03 2.89 33.85 +1.09 0.72 14.78 +.41 0.52 22.96 +.06 73.51 -1.62 0.75 15.47 +.20 20.00 -.02 17.09 +.61 26.57 +.02 0.70 33.14 +.71 7.08 -.11 1.92 53.12 -.15 25.04 +.71 .30 +.02 1.48 24.29 +.41 35.14 +.85 12.99 +.71 7.46 +.10 0.20 11.40 +.41 18.18 -.45 6.25 +.23 32.96 +.49 1.46 83.37 +.47 1.56 17.55 +.08 9.70 +.72 9.19 -.03 53.13 +3.13 0.81 12.11 3.72 134.51 +3.43 11.96 +.22 4.26 +.26 11.21 +.50 8.05 +.09 0.72 69.20 +1.55 43.81 +1.07 0.44 40.31 +.93 16.31 +1.58 6.22 +.36 39.26 +.70 0.41 6.16 +.14 26.01 +1.56 0.12 33.01 +1.85 0.08 9.27 +.70 3.20 114.96 -.10 0.50 30.03 +.08 92.02+14.40 0.48 10.55 +.54 1.46 +.22 2.00 +.08 52.01 +1.23 14.52 +.02 9.95 +.08

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0.06

0.12

0.72

1.44 0.44 0.60

0.04 0.35 0.08

0.24

1.57 0.04 1.04 2.00 0.72 0.20 0.20 0.72 0.85 0.71 1.00 1.26 0.76

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0.27 0.80 1.20 0.45 1.75 0.60 1.27 1.12 0.52 0.67 0.81 3.03 1.36 1.98 0.83 0.08 0.52 0.68

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0.83 0.30 0.52 0.32 0.08

1.24 0.40 2.20 1.00 1.16 0.68 1.92 0.94 0.20 0.02 0.30 0.66 2.64 1.63 3.16 0.28 1.12 0.30 0.58 0.48 1.68 0.88 0.79 1.64

0.36 0.16 0.26 0.92 1.20 1.00

Nm 5.91 +.51 14.86 +.05 22.53 +.83 5.43 +.11 9.20 +.04 5.89 +.05 1.36 +.25 2.86 +.18 41.05 +.55 4.19 +.14 22.57 +.63 78.43 +.55 59.76 +1.67 22.33 +.66 62.01 +1.52 52.93 -.06 71.26 +4.16 24.53 -.06 25.74 +.34 56.44 +.80 22.49 +1.21 2.12 +.01 13.60 +.78 10.85 +.19 33.78 +.35 3.02 +.08 24.47 +.19 40.34 +1.78 17.15 +.42 27.83 +1.16 39.86 -.14 31.10 +.38 33.70 11.16 +.12 42.20 +.94 18.57 +.01 5.93 +.08 27.26 +.42 8.58 +.10 21.61 -.17 12.05 +.05 12.90 +.55 5.24 +.03 16.28 +.37 13.62 +.11 16.04 +.28 41.93 +.61 37.90 +.95 35.34 +.22 31.34 -.03 39.04 +.78 73.31 +1.43 15.09 +.21 36.32 +.56 24.98 +.44 33.20 +.02 23.46 +.47 3.41 +.06 69.94 +1.11 15.46 +.06 4.68 +.25 36.73 +.90 54.06 +1.90 20.65 +.24 44.23 +.82 24.69 +.87 15.73 +.48 10.58 +.42 .58 +.03 3.24 +.18 87.31 +.46 8.15 +.06 17.50 -.28 13.95 +.16 36.33 +.92 6.96 +.16 36.67 +1.17 20.59 +1.39 30.43 +1.76 6.82 +.30 58.28 +.28 31.81 +.78 5.83 +.09 8.08 -.25 29.44 +.63 38.52 +.80 40.54 +1.12 6.87 +.13 17.27 +.88 16.50 +.65 8.73 +.27 9.06 +.02 7.96 +.23 25.90 -.03 2.93 +.07 35.60 +.78 9.11 +.38 7.70 -.64 10.41 +.11 9.34 +.02 34.23 +1.16 13.39 5.85 +.15 20.60 +.85 19.09 +.29 13.54 +.08 8.88 +.37 26.06 +.35 30.15 +1.50 11.66 +.33 66.57 +2.67 25.49 +.40 2.32 -.01 2.04 +.22 31.29 +.17 32.91 +1.22 20.54 +.41 13.87 +.12 19.01 +.16 34.97 +.67 18.77 +.05 12.91 -.03 3.45 +.08 9.68 +.15 47.59 +.44 51.07 +.69 55.20 +1.91 15.20 +.55 20.59 +.52 13.27 +.37 14.94 +.31 3.69 -.04 .15 +.01 35.74 +1.47 19.53 +.64 27.23 +.21 6.37 +.24 47.68 +.44 4.46 +.13 4.24 +.01 21.32 +.19 59.06 +.32 46.13 +.91 46.73 +2.73 31.90 +.12 9.47 +.25 8.43 +.57 4.62 +.23 15.68 +.10 9.77 +.05 13.34 +.31 28.80 +.31 60.85 +.50 23.93 +.46 16.31 +.32 4.31 +.26 29.51 +1.31 64.93 +1.45 45.20 +1.28 6.41 -.03 40.41 +2.42 57.91 +.92 14.15 +.54 27.31 +1.15 29.03 +.40 27.53 +1.52 21.89 +.88 16.44 +.47 12.43 +.38 47.53 +.66 39.69 +1.35 32.03 +.75 16.76 +.22 22.88 +.71 22.12 +.92 63.98 +1.18 51.71 +.98 9.84 +.45 37.07 +.10 28.57 +.33 31.26 +.30 18.84 +.90 93.43 +.87 25.72 +.77 51.71 +.54 76.85 +1.86 46.10 +.72 43.05 75.93 +1.53 35.74 +.40 48.83 +1.77 22.76 +1.26 29.47 +.40 17.32 +.55 10.15 +.27 20.54 +.28 63.26 +.40 3.69 +.05 82.46 +1.88 25.05 -.03 55.88 +1.46 18.09 +.28 26.80 +6.43 1.16 +.02 63.53 +1.42 80.76 +.63 64.89 +1.43 43.31 +.36 48.07 -.41 1.89 +.02 86.94 +1.62 61.89 +2.02 58.08 +.51 59.37 +3.73 .59 +.04 .74 +.04 22.29 +.69 38.45 +.88 19.66 +.52 32.91 +1.18 10.75 +.26 97.06 +1.15 14.67 +.10 27.96 +.64 5.26 +.05 23.40 +.13 4.29 +.11 66.66 +1.87 14.01 +.39 19.09 -.01 12.36 +1.16

D

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Camera

a conventional camera. It accomplishes that with a special sensor called a microlens array, which puts the equivalent of many lenses into a small space. “That is the heart of the breakthrough,” said Pat Hanrahan, a Stanford professor, who was Ng’s thesis adviser but is not involved in Lytro. But the wealth of raw light data comes to life only with sophisticated software that lets a viewer switch points of focus. This allows still photographs to be explored as never before. “They become interactive, living pictures,” Ng said. He thinks a popular use may be families and friends roaming through different perspectives on pictures of, say, vacations and parties posted on Facebook (Lytro will have a Facebook app). For a photographer, whether amateur or professional, the Lytro technology means that the headaches of focusing a shot go away.

Continued from B1 Lytro’s founder and chief executive is Ren Ng, 31. His achievement, experts say, has been to take research projects of recent years — requiring perhaps 100 digital cameras lashed to a supercomputer — and squeeze that technology into a camera headed for the consumer market later this year. Ng explained the concept in 2006 at Stanford University in his Ph.D. thesis, which won the worldwide competition for the best doctoral dissertation in computer science that year from the Association for Computing Machinery. Since then Ng has been trying to translate the idea into a product that can be brought to market — and building a team of people to do it. The Lytro camera captures far more light data, from many angles, than is possible with

JPMorgan

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 B5

serious damage to Goldman’s reputation and share price. In both SEC cases, hedge funds wanting to bet against the subprime mortgage market worked with banks to design securities whose value would depend on the value of home loans chosen for their low quality, according to the government, and the banks sold the securities without disclosing the roles played by the hedge funds. In the JPMorgan case, Magnetar, an investment firm based in Evanston, Ill., helped design the security, dubbed Squared CDO 2007-1. Magnetar, which the SEC did not accuse of wrongdoing, issued a statement Tuesday saying it “did not control the asset-selection process” in the Squared CDO deal. Fifteen institutional investors, including a Paris bank and a Minnesota nonprofit, bought the security in early 2007 and saw their investments plunge in value within months. They will

Continued from B1 A day earlier, the National Credit Union Administration, a federal regulator of credit unions, sued JPMorgan and Royal Bank of Scotland, accusing them of selling mortgage-backed bonds that were “destined to perform poorly,” leading to losses that brought down five large credit unions. The suit, filed in federal court in Kansas, seeks $800 million from the banks. JPMorgan and RBS declined to comment on that case. This week’s allegations are notable because unlike some Wall Street rivals, JPMorgan until now hadn’t been explicitly accused of misconduct that helped lead to the global financial crisis. But Tuesday’s SEC case is very similar to one the agency brought last year against Goldman Sachs Group Inc. that did

be reimbursed for their losses with the money JPMorgan is paying to settle the case. In an e-mail quoted in the suit, a JPMorgan employee pushes salespeople to unload the security in March 2007, writing: “We are sooo pregnant with this deal, we need a wheelbarrel to move around ... Let’s schedule the cesarian please.” In a statement Tuesday, JPMorgan said it was “pleased to have reached agreement with the SEC to put this matter concerning certain 2007 disclosures behind us.” A company spokesman said the settlement, which requires court approval, would not have a material effect on the bank’s earnings. JPMorgan shares rose 43 cents, or 1.1 percent, on Tuesday to $40.91, suggesting that some investors had feared more worrisome allegations from the SEC. “The lack of something more onerous may be the positive

here,” said Jeff Harte, a banking analyst at Sandler O’Neill. The suit filed by the credit union regulator accuses JPMorgan of offering bonds to credit unions in late 2006 and early 2007 that “were significantly riskier than represented,” using marketing material that “contained untrue statements of material fact.” U.S. credit unions lost $278 million on mortgage-backed bonds purchased from JPMorgan when their market value plummeted, the agency said. Five of the credit unions that bought the bonds had to be liquidated by NCUA, including Western Corporate, a so-called corporate credit union that served and was owned by retail credit unions. The lawsuit joins a number of other actions seeking to recover losses on mortgage bonds sold by Wall Street banks before the crisis.

Find Your Dream Home

Nonprofits

The IRS has been notifying nonprofits about the new law for several years. The agency, which plans monthly updates to the revocation list, believes the vast majority of tax-exempt groups have complied and filed their required returns. Most of the organizations to lose their tax-exempt status are no longer in business, the IRS and The Nonprofit Association of Oregon say. But it can be hard to tell. A cursory review of the revoked nonprofits shows at least a half dozen in Central Oregon that have the same names as organizations on the eligible list, known as Publication 78. Some appear to be local chapters of national organizations. For example, one called Little League Baseball Inc. with a Sisters post office box appears on the revoked list, while six others with the same name and addresses in Bend, La Pine, Madras, Prineville and Redmond show up on the eligible list.

Continued from B1 “The best consumer protection for a donor is to ask questions,” said Deborah Steinkopf, development and communications director for The Nonprofit Association of Oregon. “If the agency is unable to (provide adequate answers), that would be a red flag.” The IRS dueling lists stem from the agency’s efforts to enforce provisions of a 1996 law. It called for the IRS to revoke the tax-exempt status of any nonprofits that failed to file an annual return, known as a Form 990, for three consecutive years. A charity that loses its tax-exempt status may be required to pay income tax on donations received during the revocation period. Donors also may not receive tax deductions for their gifts. Along with typical charities that raise money for various causes, the law applies to nonprofit labor and business groups, fraternal organizations, some cooperatives and others. It also required many small tax-exempt organizations to file a Form 990 for the first time, beginning in 2007.

While the IRS assigns tax-exempt organizations a unique employer identification number, the agency does not make it available on both lists. The number shows up on the list of revoked organizations, but not on the list of the eligible nonprofits generated by the agency’s search feature, according to a review. It is available, however, from the agency’s downloadable data. When asked about the potential overlap, an IRS spokesman referred to the agency’s published policies and statements on its website. The law provides no appeal process and does not allow the IRS to correct, or undo, the revocation, according to the statements. To regain tax-exempt status, an organization must apply and pay a user fee of $400 or $850, depending on its average annual gross receipts. The nonprofit may ask for retroactive reinstatement, according to the agency’s website. “What you’re running into is

not uncommon,” said Steinkopf, of the Nonprofit Association. “The IRS had some old data in its system.” Based on its own examination of the IRS data, the association believes most nonprofits on the revoked list are defunct or the federal agency had incorrect information. Many nonprofits are run by volunteers, said Allen, the organizer for The Airshow of the Cascades, and when the fundraising stops, members stop meeting and the organizations fade away. Over the years, he said, the IRS’ list of nonprofits must be inflated with the names of many organizations no longer in operation. Over time, he said, the purging should make the agency’s lists more accurate. “Maybe the list will become up-to-date,” he said, “Certainly, they’re weeding them out.” Tim Doran can be reached at 5 4 1 -3 8 3 -0 3 6 0 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

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P l e a s e v i s i t w w w. e n v i r o c e n t e r. o r g f o r m o r e d e t a i l s .

Market update Northwest stocks Name

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YTD Last Chg %Chg 67.88 25.01 10.83 14.82 73.98 8.82 44.60 62.40 81.39 8.85 32.88 35.30 11.32 21.65 8.26 24.62 6.26 8.01 22.18 12.61 24.76

+.96 -.01 +.23 +.48 -.54 -.23 +.51 +.95 +.14 -.18 -.08 +.31 +.11 +.33 +.06 +.58 +.17 +.31 +.28 +.30 +.29

+19.7 +11.1 -18.8 -4.7 +13.4 +4.4 -5.7 +3.5 +12.7 +19.8 +10.5 -16.2 -7.7 +2.9 -6.7 +10.1 +3.3 -15.3 +9.4 +5.1 -11.3

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58f .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50 .24 .48f ... .60

20 17 17 12 31 ... 39 22 14 14 18 10 26 9 40 13 13 11 34 ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1546.00 $1546.00 $36.373

Pvs Day $1541.00 $1541.50 $36.065

Market recap 84.51 46.10 44.68 7.72 48.95 2.76 39.79 156.84 22.99 53.58 83.37 41.93 36.73 10.75 11.52 24.72 15.99 27.46 16.79 21.14

+1.28 +1.17 +.25 +.08 +1.08 +.02 +.46 +1.81 +.34 +.37 +.47 +.61 +.90 +.26 -.02 +.22 -.02 +.51 -.44 +.80

-1.1 +8.8 -3.9 -56.4 -14.6 +33.2 +6.2 +12.7 +2.2 -19.3 -.5 -7.1 +14.3 -8.0 -5.4 -8.3 -5.5 -11.4 +19.1 +11.7

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Last Chg

S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl FordM iShR2K

1688075 992045 704157 696904 658614

129.45 +1.75 10.83 +.23 15.09 +.21 13.32 +.38 80.66 +1.71

Gainers ($2 or more) ChiNBorun ChinaGreen Pharmerica LonePne gn FMajSilv g

Last

Chg %Chg

4.74 +.81 +20.7 4.24 +.66 +18.4 13.36 +1.45 +12.2 12.56 +1.35 +12.0 18.46 +1.80 +10.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name Dex One Navios un iP SER2K AmrRlty Pandora n

Last

Chg %Chg

2.51 -.39 -13.4 4.15 -.55 -11.7 32.08 -3.92 -10.9 3.90 -.36 -8.5 13.50 -1.11 -7.6

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

KodiakO g WT DrfChn NovaGld g NwGold g Hyperdyn

Last Chg

45746 5.45 +.17 44477 25.55 +.16 32792 9.16 +.47 28903 9.91 +.65 27779 4.33 +.19

PhrmAth Express-1 GoldResrc OrsusXel rs Rubicon g

Last

2,611 463 87 3,161 66 25

Last Chg

843894 619412 614739 512165 439528

15.51 +.37 28.55 +2.66 2.00 +.08 55.23 +1.16 24.76 +.29

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

3.04 +.63 +26.1 3.32 +.46 +16.1 27.69 +3.39 +14.0 4.59 +.54 +13.3 4.37 +.39 +9.8

Name

Last

TowerBcp GulfRes Zion wt12-12 ChinaTInfo Sina

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

26.80 +6.43 3.55 +.66 2.27 +.42 2.96 +.51 92.02 +14.40

+31.6 +22.8 +22.7 +20.8 +18.6

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

HKN ChiMarFd T3 Motn un SwGA Fn UnvSecInst

2.16 2.42 3.15 7.40 6.59

-.17 -.17 -.18 -.38 -.28

-7.3 -6.6 -5.4 -4.9 -4.1

Gevo n GlobusM n GTx Inc HlthStrm SusqBnc

344 125 28 497 3 8

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Cisco RschMotn SiriusXM PwShs QQQ Microsoft

Last

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Name

Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

13.47 -1.34 9.10 -.90 5.37 -.46 11.21 -.96 7.70 -.64

-9.0 -9.0 -7.9 -7.9 -7.7

Diary 2,095 536 89 2,720 59 39

12,876.00 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,565.78 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 441.86 353.53 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,770.05 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,010.91 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 868.57 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,190.01 5,300.57 429.80 8,156.27 2,307.90 2,687.26 1,295.52 13,731.91 806.37

+109.63 +99.35 +.63 +124.05 +39.29 +57.60 +17.16 +204.97 +17.89

YTD %Chg %Chg +.91 +1.91 +.15 +1.54 +1.73 +2.19 +1.34 +1.52 +2.27

52-wk %Chg

+5.29 +3.80 +6.13 +2.41 +4.51 +1.30 +3.01 +2.78 +2.90

+18.42 +24.35 +15.71 +18.91 +24.17 +18.81 +18.28 +19.55 +24.84

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

336.14 2,580.87 3,877.07 5,775.31 7,285.51 21,850.59 35,276.60 20,102.34 3,459.56 9,459.66 2,048.17 3,053.51 4,565.20 5,664.03

+1.36 s +1.41 s +2.04 s +1.44 s +1.89 s +1.16 s +.47 s +2.08 s -.23 t +1.13 s +1.41 s +1.32 s +1.17 s +.99 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0609 1.6246 1.0293 .002118 .1546 1.4416 .1284 .012480 .084839 .0358 .000928 .1573 1.1896 .0346

1.0573 1.6183 1.0208 .002115 .1545 1.4305 .1283 .012450 .084247 .0356 .000922 .1560 1.1813 .0345

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.99 +0.25 +2.5 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.97 +0.24 +2.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.37 +0.05 +3.3 GrowthI 26.55 +0.44 +2.7 Ultra 23.61 +0.45 +4.2 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.46 +0.25 +3.7 AMutlA p 26.24 +0.26 +4.8 BalA p 18.45 +0.17 +4.0 BondA p 12.39 +3.2 CapIBA p 51.38 +0.44 +4.8 CapWGA p 36.49 +0.57 +3.7 CapWA p 21.18 +0.06 +4.6 EupacA p 42.29 +0.75 +2.2 FdInvA p 37.85 +0.63 +3.8 GwthA p 31.03 +0.53 +1.9 HI TrA p 11.36 +0.01 +4.1 IncoA p 17.09 +0.13 +5.3 IntBdA p 13.57 +2.2 ICAA p 28.51 +0.35 +2.2 NEcoA p 26.27 +0.43 +3.7 N PerA p 29.19 +0.48 +2.0 NwWrldA 54.44 +0.63 -0.3 SmCpA p 38.92 +0.60 +0.2 TxExA p 12.09 +4.3 WshA p 28.61 +0.31 +6.3 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.76 +0.53 -1.3 IntEqII I r 12.33 +0.23 -1.0 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.43 +0.38 +3.4 IntlVal r 28.05 +0.42 +3.5 MidCap 35.86 +0.77 +6.6 MidCapVal 21.76 +0.27 +8.4 Baron Funds: Growth 54.81 +1.08 +7.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.97 +3.6 DivMu 14.50 +3.2 TxMgdIntl 15.52 +0.32 -1.3

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.35 +0.21 GlAlA r 19.85 +0.20 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.48 +0.19 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.39 +0.21 GlbAlloc r 19.96 +0.21 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 53.89 +1.46 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 30.02 +0.67 DivEqInc 10.35 +0.15 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.98 +0.69 AcornIntZ 40.29 +0.67 ValRestr 50.36 +0.89 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.33 +0.07 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.31 +0.23 USCorEq2 11.36 +0.20 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.52 +0.41 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 34.92 +0.42 NYVen C 33.27 +0.40 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.35 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.46 +0.26 EmMktV 34.34 +0.46 IntSmVa 17.28 +0.33 LargeCo 10.21 +0.13 USLgVa 21.22 +0.36 US Small 22.21 +0.49 US SmVa 26.06 +0.58 IntlSmCo 17.27 +0.32 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 18.44 +0.39 Glb5FxInc 11.23 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.21 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.64 +0.72 Income 13.55 +0.01

+5.1 +2.2 +1.9 +5.3 +2.4 +1.0 +3.8 +2.8 +3.9 +0.9 -0.1 -0.1 +2.1 +4.1 +0.5 +0.7 +0.2 +3.7 -2.6 -4.6 +1.6 +3.9 +6.1 +4.2 +2.0 +1.7 +0.6 +2.3 +3.2 +0.6 +4.0 +3.5

IntlStk 35.96 +0.61 Stock 111.61 +1.50 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.13 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.27 +0.23 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.03 GblMacAbR 10.13 LgCapVal 18.32 +0.24 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.35 +0.17 FPA Funds: FPACres 27.88 +0.20 Fairholme 31.78 +0.48 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.14 +0.38 StrInA 12.60 +0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.36 +0.39 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.93 +0.11 FF2015 11.64 +0.10 FF2020 14.15 +0.14 FF2020K 13.38 +0.13 FF2025 11.81 +0.14 FF2030 14.10 +0.16 FF2030K 13.75 +0.17 FF2035 11.73 +0.15 FF2040 8.20 +0.11 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.69 +0.20 AMgr50 15.79 +0.14 Balanc 18.76 +0.18 BalancedK 18.76 +0.17 BlueChGr 46.58 +0.95 Canada 58.08 +1.33 CapAp 26.27 +0.49 CpInc r 9.51 +0.05 Contra 68.56 +1.33 ContraK 68.56 +1.32 DisEq 23.48 +0.37 DivIntl 30.42 +0.60 DivrsIntK r 30.41 +0.59 DivGth 28.90 +0.52

+0.7 +3.9 NA +0.8 +2.6 +0.7 +0.9 +4.7 +4.1 -10.7 +1.1 +4.2 +1.3 +2.9 +3.0 +3.0 +3.1 +2.9 +2.8 +2.9 +2.7 +2.8 +2.7 +2.7 +3.2 +3.3 +2.7 -0.1 +3.7 +3.7 +1.3 +1.4 +4.2 +0.9 +1.0 +1.7

EmrMk 25.71 Eq Inc 45.49 EQII 18.78 Fidel 33.48 FltRateHi r 9.81 GNMA 11.70 GovtInc 10.62 GroCo 88.35 GroInc 18.77 GrowthCoK 88.36 HighInc r 9.00 Indepn 24.85 IntBd 10.76 IntlDisc 33.04 InvGrBd 11.63 InvGB 7.56 LgCapVal 11.88 LevCoStk 29.48 LowP r 40.93 LowPriK r 40.93 Magelln 71.23 MidCap 28.63 MuniInc 12.58 NwMkt r 15.86 OTC 57.24 100Index 8.98 Ovrsea 33.06 Puritn 18.45 SCmdtyStrt 12.43 SrsIntGrw 11.43 SrsIntVal 10.21 SrInvGrdF 11.63 STBF 8.53 SmllCpS r 20.02 StratInc 11.28 StrReRt r 9.85 TotalBd 10.93 USBI 11.53 Value 70.90 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 46.19 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 39.38 500IdxInv 46.05

+0.42 +0.60 +0.23 +0.58 +0.01

+1.97 +0.22 +1.98 +0.64 -0.01 +0.68

+0.16 +0.69 +0.67 +0.67 +1.27 +0.58 +0.03 +1.60 +0.10 +0.80 +0.21 +0.09 +0.20 +0.21 -0.01 +0.45 +0.02 +0.03

+1.16

-2.4 +3.1 +3.2 +4.2 +1.4 +3.6 +2.9 +6.3 +2.8 +6.3 +3.5 +2.1 +3.5 +3.4 +3.8 +3.6 +3.7 +6.6 +6.7 -0.5 +4.3 +4.6 +4.0 +4.2 +2.7 +1.8 +3.4 -1.7 +1.2 +2.7 +3.4 +1.5 +2.2 +4.3 +3.3 +3.7 +3.2 +3.2

+1.44 -9.6 +0.81 +4.5 +0.62 +3.9

IntlInxInv 36.11 +0.71 TotMktInv 37.81 +0.56 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.05 +0.61 TotMktAd r 37.81 +0.55 First Eagle: GlblA 47.92 +0.50 OverseasA 23.18 +0.25 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.72 FoundAl p 11.00 +0.12 HYTFA px 9.93 IncomA p 2.22 +0.02 USGovA p 6.82 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.78 +0.05 IncmeAd 2.20 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.24 +0.02 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.56 +0.25 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.40 +0.14 GlBd A p 13.82 +0.05 GrwthA p 18.94 +0.33 WorldA p 15.49 +0.26 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.85 +0.05 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 41.15 +0.62 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.16 +0.17 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.63 +0.18 Quality 21.17 +0.17 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.29 +0.65 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.28 +0.01 MidCapV 37.62 +0.65 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.38 +0.02 CapApInst 38.34 +0.82 IntlInv t 62.51 +1.30 Intl r 63.19 +1.31

+3.0 +4.1 +4.0 +4.1 +3.4 +2.3 +5.5 +5.2 +6.1 +5.0 +2.9 +4.0 +4.7 +4.7 +4.5 +6.0 +3.9 +6.5 +4.4 +3.7 +2.3 +5.8 +0.7 +5.8 +3.9 +3.4 +4.1 +3.1 +4.4 +4.2 +4.4

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.61 +0.62 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.66 +0.62 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.40 +0.78 Div&Gr 20.21 +0.25 TotRetBd 11.23 -0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.37 -0.02 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.27 +0.18 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.04 +0.22 CmstkA 16.16 +0.25 EqIncA 8.76 +0.08 GrIncA p 19.65 +0.25 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.29 +0.53 AssetStA p 25.08 +0.54 AssetStrI r 25.31 +0.55 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.66 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.65 -0.01 HighYld 8.19 ShtDurBd 11.03 USLCCrPls 20.91 +0.30 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 45.62 +0.77 PrkMCVal T 23.40 +0.28 Twenty T 64.21 +1.30 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.23 +0.14 LSGrwth 13.17 +0.18 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.22 +0.34 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.58 +0.34 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.32 +0.49 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI x 14.73 -0.01 StrInc C x 15.36 LSBondR x 14.68

-2.9 -2.8 +0.1 +3.6 +3.1 +0.7 +3.3 +5.4 +3.4 +2.9 +2.8 +2.4 +2.7 +2.8 +3.2 +3.3 +3.6 +1.2 +1.2 -9.9 +3.7 -2.3 +3.0 +2.6 -2.6 -2.7 +7.3 +6.0 +5.7 +5.8

StrIncA x 15.28 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.47 +0.02 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.67 +0.18 BdDebA p 7.93 +0.02 ShDurIncA p 4.60 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.47 +0.09 ValueA 23.70 +0.24 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.81 +0.24 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.00 +0.17 MergerFd 16.21 +0.06 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.50 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.50 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 40.26 +0.81 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.26 +0.33 GlbDiscZ 30.66 +0.34 QuestZ 18.33 +0.17 SharesZ 21.75 +0.25 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 48.91 +0.89 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 50.63 +0.92 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.34 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.91 +0.28 Intl I r 19.94 +0.34 Oakmark r 43.15 +0.52 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.07 +0.07 GlbSMdCap e 15.81 -0.01 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 35.08 +0.49 GlobA p 63.52 +1.20 GblStrIncA 4.36 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.71 +0.03

+6.1 +5.0 +1.0 +4.4 +2.0 +1.7 +3.5 +4.2 +4.3 +4.5 +2.7 +3.2 +3.4 +7.8 +3.7 +3.8 +3.6 +4.6 +6.4 +6.3 NA +4.2 +2.7 +4.5 +4.7 +4.1 -3.8 +5.2 +4.6 +4.1

MnStFdA 32.49 +0.44 RisingDivA 16.20 +0.20 S&MdCpVl 33.60 +0.53 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.67 +0.19 S&MdCpVl 28.71 +0.45 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.62 +0.19 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA x 6.78 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.75 +0.49 IntlBdY 6.71 +0.04 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.01 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.86 +0.03 AllAsset 12.36 ComodRR 8.87 +0.07 DevLcMk r 11.03 +0.05 DivInc 11.57 +0.02 HiYld 9.32 +0.01 InvGrCp 10.70 LowDu 10.50 +0.01 RealRtnI 11.66 +0.02 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 11.01 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.66 +0.02 TotRtA 11.01 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.01 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.01 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.01 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.32 +0.32 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.90 +0.58 Price Funds: BlChip 39.13 +0.82 CapApp 21.21 +0.19 EmMktS 34.13 +0.57 EqInc 24.34 +0.29

+0.3 +4.7 +4.9 +4.3 +4.4 +4.4 +6.7 -3.7 +4.2 +3.0 +4.5 NA +3.3 +4.9 +3.9 +3.7 +4.7 +2.2 +5.0 +1.0 +3.1 +4.8 +2.9 +2.5 +3.0 +3.1 +5.5 +2.5 +2.6 +4.4 -3.3 +3.1

EqIndex 35.03 Growth 32.65 HlthSci 35.20 HiYield 6.80 IntlBond 10.37 Intl G&I 13.98 IntlStk 14.46 MidCap 61.53 MCapVal 24.80 N Asia 19.11 New Era 51.69 N Horiz 36.21 N Inc 9.59 R2010 15.86 R2015 12.29 R2020 16.97 R2025 12.43 R2030 17.83 R2035 12.61 R2040 17.95 ShtBd 4.87 SmCpStk 36.41 SmCapVal 37.09 SpecIn 12.56 Value 24.24 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.59 VoyA p 22.79 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.16 PremierI r 21.65 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.66 S&P Sel 20.34 Scout Funds: Intl 33.12 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.72 Sequoia 141.72 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.81 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 50.06 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.89

+0.46 +3.8 +0.72 +1.6 +0.50 +16.2 +3.7 +0.05 +5.5 +0.27 +5.0 +0.26 +1.6 +1.18 +5.1 +0.34 +4.6 +0.26 -0.4 +1.30 -0.9 +0.73 +8.1 -0.01 +2.7 +0.14 +3.4 +0.13 +3.4 +0.20 +3.2 +0.17 +3.2 +0.27 +3.2 +0.20 +3.1 +0.29 +3.0 +1.5 +0.71 +5.8 +0.74 +2.7 +0.03 +3.5 +0.34 +3.9 NA +0.49 -3.9 +0.24 +4.4 +0.43 +6.4 +0.56 +4.0 +0.27 +3.9 +0.65 +2.3 +0.49 +0.7 +1.31 +9.6 +0.38 +3.8 +0.58 -3.3 +0.48 +3.2

IntValue I 29.55 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.39 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.08 CAITAdm 10.99 CpOpAdl 77.30 EMAdmr r 39.04 Energy 129.50 ExplAdml 72.35 ExtdAdm 43.29 500Adml 119.87 GNMA Ad 10.94 GrwAdm 32.50 HlthCr 58.85 HiYldCp 5.75 InfProAd 26.67 ITBdAdml 11.47 ITsryAdml 11.64 IntGrAdm 62.57 ITAdml 13.58 ITGrAdm 10.03 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.57 LT Adml 10.93 MCpAdml 97.42 MuHYAdm 10.33 PrmCap r 70.11 ReitAdm r 85.75 STsyAdml 10.78 STBdAdml 10.65 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.78 SmCAdm 36.49 TtlBAdml 10.76 TStkAdm 32.74 WellslAdm 54.82 WelltnAdm 55.51 Windsor 46.60 WdsrIIAd 47.95 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.28 CapOpp 33.46 DivdGro 15.32

+0.50 +3.4 +0.23 +2.4 +0.18 +3.8 +4.5 +1.26 +0.7 +0.52 -2.1 +2.74 +7.1 +1.78 +6.6 +0.90 +4.9 +1.60 +4.0 -0.01 +3.5 +0.55 +3.1 +0.39 +14.8 +4.3 +0.03 +5.1 -0.02 +4.6 -0.01 +3.9 +1.37 +1.7 +4.2 +4.3 +1.9 -0.02 +5.2 +4.5 +1.87 +5.7 +0.01 +4.6 +1.11 +2.7 +0.66 +10.1 +1.3 +2.0 +1.0 -0.01 +1.9 +0.77 +4.9 -0.01 +3.1 +0.49 +4.1 +0.17 +5.2 +0.45 +4.0 +0.72 +2.2 +0.58 +5.2 +0.32 +3.4 +0.55 +0.7 +0.14 +6.5

Energy 68.96 EqInc 21.74 Explr 77.70 GNMA 10.94 GlobEq 18.53 HYCorp 5.75 HlthCre 139.44 InflaPro 13.57 IntlGr 19.65 IntlVal 32.12 ITIGrade 10.03 LifeCon 16.77 LifeGro 22.76 LifeMod 20.20 LTIGrade 9.57 Morg 18.64 MuInt 13.58 PrecMtls r 25.09 PrmcpCor 14.24 Prmcp r 67.55 SelValu r 19.78 STAR 19.71 STIGrade 10.78 StratEq 19.92 TgtRetInc 11.61 TgRe2010 23.09 TgtRe2015 12.84 TgRe2020 22.84 TgtRe2025 13.04 TgRe2030 22.40 TgtRe2035 13.52 TgtRe2040 22.20 TgtRe2045 13.95 USGro 18.86 Wellsly 22.62 Welltn 32.14 Wndsr 13.81 WndsII 27.01 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 26.67 TotIntlInst r 106.72 500 119.83 MidCap 21.45 SmCap 36.43

+1.46 +0.21 +1.92 -0.01 +0.33

+7.0 +7.4 +6.6 +3.4 +3.8 +4.3 +0.92 +14.8 +0.01 +5.0 +0.42 +1.6 +0.55 -0.1 +4.2 +0.11 +2.9 +0.31 +3.2 +0.21 +3.2 -0.02 +5.2 +0.38 +3.4 +4.2 +0.78 -6.0 +0.22 +3.4 +1.08 +2.7 +0.26 +5.4 +0.21 +3.3 -0.01 +1.8 +0.44 +8.7 +0.06 +3.5 +0.17 +3.5 +0.12 +3.4 +0.24 +3.3 +0.15 +3.3 +0.28 +3.3 +0.19 +3.3 +0.31 +3.3 +0.20 +3.3 +0.40 +3.3 +0.07 +5.1 +0.27 +4.0 +0.22 +2.2 +0.33 +5.2

+0.48 +1.95 +1.60 +0.41 +0.76

+1.2 +1.2 +3.9 +5.6 +4.8

SmlCpGth

23.35 +0.59 +6.5

SmlCpVl

16.50 +0.28 +3.1

STBnd

10.65

TotBnd

10.76 -0.01 +3.1

+1.9

TotlIntl

15.95 +0.30 +1.2

TotStk

32.73 +0.49 +4.1

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

22.09 +0.19 +3.9

DevMkInst

10.27 +0.20 +2.9

ExtIn

43.29 +0.90 +4.9

FTAllWldI r

95.27 +1.74 +1.5

GrwthIst

32.50 +0.55 +3.1

InfProInst

10.86 +0.01 +5.1

InstIdx

119.03 +1.59 +4.0

InsPl

119.04 +1.59 +4.0

InsTStPlus

29.61 +0.44 +4.2

MidCpIst

21.52 +0.41 +5.7

SCInst

36.48 +0.76 +4.9

TBIst

10.76 -0.01 +3.1

TSInst

32.75 +0.49 +4.2

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

99.01 +1.32 +3.9

MidCpIdx

30.74 +0.59 +5.7

STBdIdx

10.65

TotBdSgl

10.76 -0.01 +3.1

TotStkSgl

31.60 +0.47 +4.1

+2.0

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.99

+3.7

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.62 +0.17 +6.5


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON VISITORS ASSOCIATION 40TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON: Keynote provided by Peter Yesawich, chairman and chief executive officer of Ypartnership; $30 for Central Oregon Visitors Association members; $40 for others; corporate tables also available; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 800-8008334, laura@visitcentraloregon.com or http://visitcentraloregon.com/. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Celebrate NiswongerReynolds Funeral Home 100 years of service; free; 5 p.m.; NiswongerReynolds Funeral Home, 105 N.W. Irving Ave.; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-3187506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. OREGON CHAPTER COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS INSTITUTE RULES AND REGULATIONS LUNCHEON: Learn how to make rules enforceable, how to include the community in the rule-making process, the rule-adoption process and how local law enforcement can help; $20 for members and $30 for others when preregistered; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www.caioregon.org. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab

& Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of ODOT’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 109.

NEWS OF RECORD

382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org.

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

July 5

June 29 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT: NorthWest Crossing businesses and restaurants will offer specials, entertainment and giveaways. Held the last Wednesday of each month; free; 5-8 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend.

THURSDAY June 30 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. PUT YOUR INVESTMENT PLAN INTO ACTION: Learn basic strategies to optimize your investment portfolio. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-3181794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com. GREEN DRINKS: Monthly networking event for environmental professionals and anyone interested in “green” things. Learn about Heart Springs Design landscaping. Free shuttle available; call 541-610-6103; free; 5-7 p.m.; Heart Springs Design, 18430 Walton Road, Bend; 541-385-6908 ext. 11 or www.envirocenter.org.

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7

FIVE REASONS YOU SHOULD CONSIDER SELLING YOUR HOME NOW: Visit www.exitrealtybend .com and select the real estate show icon or go to http://goo.gl/ RtnJe to view real estate agent Jim Mazziotti’s live internet TV real estate program; free; 7 p.m.; 541480-8835, mazz@propertiesinbend .com or www.exitrealtybend.com.

WEDNESDAY July 6 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY July 7 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-6109125.

Filed June 14

Kristan N. Yoakam, 21285 E. Highway 20, #126, Bend Paul A. Ratti, 1833 S.W. Canal Blvd., #18, Redmond Matthew T. Roberts, 20833 Morningstar Drive, Bend Jeanette S. Madson, 2540 N.E. Sixth St., Bend Heather L. Budd, 141 S.W. 15th St., #37, Bend Gary S. and Lisa J. Flaherty, 61515 Tanya Drive, Bend Filed June 15

Anjanette M. Cottew, 20886 King David Ave., Bend Stephen E. and Tammy R. McGuire, 61697 Fargo Lane, Bend Cathy L. Solomon, 2600 N.E. Forum Drive, #5, Bend Tammy S. Moore, 139 S. Main St., Prineville Filed June 16

Michael J. Huffstuttler, 1859 N.E. Eighth St., Redmond Ryan A. and Cindy M. Middaugh, 6622 S.E. Davis Loop, Prineville Robert T. Bancroft, 1900 N.E. Third St., Suite 106 #32, Bend Andrew D. Arntson, 735 N.W. 15th St., Bend Jeremy M. and Amber D. Southward, 912 N.W. Poplar Place, Redmond Filed June 17

Terry E. Bergland, P.O. Box

1260, Prineville Robert L. Corbin Jr., 103 N.E. Buena Villa Drive, Prineville Dixie M. Hanna, 1900 N.E. Third St., Suites 106-236, Bend David W. and Jeannie M. Fuller, P.O. Box 5503, Bend Lori A. Carder, 932 N.E. Eighth St., Bend David R. Byrd, 20380 Rocca Way, Bend David R. Sr. and Maryann L. Burritt, 15769 Davis Ave., La Pine Elizabeth J. Chesney, 150 S.W. Cascade Mountain Court, Redmond JoAnna L. Howard, 665 Peak View Place, Bend Chris A. Miller, 665 S.W. Peak View Place, Bend Dana R. Carty, 20889 S.E. Westview Drive, Bend Ian J. and Jessica M. Woodford, 61282 Splendor Lane, Bend David J. Allensworth, P.O. Box 8524, Bend Melissa A. Waldman, P.O. Box 1857, Bend Peggy J. White, P.O. Box 977, Jefferson Filed June 21

Angela K. Hudspeth, 1019 N.W. Rockcrest Court, Redmond Joan M. Chambers, 21180 Claremont Court, Bend Chapter 13 Filed June 14

Keith R. and Annette Rockow, 927 N.W. Redwood Place, Redmond Filed June 15

Todd D. and Angela M. Surplus, 4540 N.W. Grimes Road, Prineville

TUESDAY POWER NETWORKING FOR BUSINESS SUCCESS: Learn effective ways to create positive first impressions and establish immediate rapport; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-

FRIDAY July 1 FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

ATTENTION TOUR OF HOMES™ ADVERTISERS THE CENTRAL OREGON

BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

11

A SHOWCASE OF THE FINEST HOMES IN CENTRAL OREGON JULY 15, 16, 17 AND 22, 23, 24 Fridays: Noon – 6 pm, Saturdays and Sundays: 10 am – 6 pm Official Sponsors:

The Bulletin presents the Official Tour Guide, to be published Wednesday, July 13. Extra copies of the guide will also be distributed at the homes during the Tour.

Reach more than 70,000 adult readers in the official Tour of HomesTM Guide

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: FRIDAY, JUNE 24 Call your Bulletin sales representative today! Space is limited.

541-382-1811


L

C

Inside

SCHOOL’S OUT Students learn about electronics at camp, see Page C3. OREGON Group sues state over transgender insurance claim, see Page C6. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011

IN BRIEF Crosswalk sting in Bend today Bend Police will be on the lookout for drivers violating pedestrian safety laws today at a crosswalk on Northeast Purcell Boulevard between Savannah Drive and Lena Place. The pedestrian safety operation will occur from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It is the first of four scheduled to take place in Bend this summer. The operation consists of plainclothes police officers acting as pedestrians, and using the crosswalks multiple times throughout the day. Motorists who don’t obey pedestrian traffic laws will be stopped by police and given warnings or citations with fines of up to $297. Signs will be posted at the location today, alerting motorists to the operation. The goal of the operation is to educate the public on pedestrian safety, and reduce the number of pedestrian-vehicle accidents.

Utility worker’s $25K severance queried Commission approves deal for retired employee after lack of public vote raised officials’ eyebrows By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

LA PINE — The La Pine Special Sewer District voted to approve a $25,000 severance agreement with a former utility worker Tuesday. The vote was merely a formality. Former employee Marion John Bales left the district in September. Commission-

ers signed the agreement Tuesday after La Pine city officials questioned why the severance agreement never received a public vote. Two sewer district commissioners said Tuesday they did not remember discussing or voting on a severance agreement for Bales last year. However, meeting minutes show that one of the commis-

sioners, James Newton, was present for a discussion on the severance agreement in July, and both Newton and Commissioner Dennis Carter voted in September to use district funds to purchase a $300 Sportsman’s Warehouse gift for Bales to thank him for his work. The minutes do not show the commissioners voted on the $25,000 severance agreement. At the same meeting Tuesday, commissioners for the La Pine water and sewer districts agreed to move ahead with a process to allow the city to absorb the sewer and water districts. City officials

have sought to absorb the districts for months and the districts have resisted, with a water district commissioner in one case threatening to sue the city if it pursued a takeover. Also on Tuesday, water and sewer commissioners discussed issues related to two newly formed employee unions. District Operations Manager Donna Zigler said Tuesday that the severance agreement was done to recognize Bales for his service, and the district was not trying to get him to leave. See Severance / C5

FROM SPRING TOWARD SUMMER

Child safety seat clinic rescheduled The child safety seat clinic that was scheduled to take place today at the Bend Fire Department West Station has been rescheduled because of staffing issues. The clinic will be postponed to June 29. This is a one-time change, and the clinics will continue to be held every fourth Wednesday at the Fire Department on 1212 S.W. Simpson Avenue in Bend. Those interested in scheduling a child safety seat inspection with the Fire Department can do so by calling 541-322-6309.

Fired prosecutors file notice with county Attorneys for three former Deschutes County deputy district attorneys have filed a notice with the county indicating that if a judge dismisses their current claims against the county, they could amend the lawsuit to seek redress for different alleged wrongdoings. The prosecutors suing Deschutes County were among five fired by Deschutes County District Attorney Patrick Flaherty after he took office in January. In April, Brentley Foster, Jody Vaughan and Phil Duong filed a lawsuit against Flaherty and county officials, seeking reinstatement as well as roughly $22.5 million in punitive, economic and other damages. The former prosecutors allege wrongful discharge, unfair labor practices, sex discrimination and violations of their First Amendment rights to free speech and association. Earlier this month, attorneys for Deschutes County filed court documents asking a federal judge to dismiss the portions of the lawsuit that involve the county and its officials. The attorneys wrote that the county government does not control the day-today activities of deputy district attorneys, so it is not legally their employer and therefore not liable for the firing of three prosecutors. In a supplemental tort claim notice sent to the county on June 10, attorneys for Foster, Vaughan and Duong wrote that if a judge dismisses their current claims against the county, they reserve the right to sue the county for interfering with the former prosecutors’ economic relations and aiding and abetting the district attorney in allegedly discriminating against the prosecutors. The attorneys for the former prosecutors believe they can pursue those claims even if a judge determines Deschutes County was not legally the prosecutors’ employer, according to the notice. — Bulletin staff reports

News of Record on Page C2.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

C

hris Marion, left, and Susan Franke, both of Bend, with their dog Rainey, move their canoe down a snowy bank to Devil’s Lake along Century Drive west of Bend on Tuesday afternoon. The first day of summer was Tuesday, marking the longest day of the year — the day when the North Pole was tipped farther toward the sun than any other day of 2011. To see

how summery the rest of the week will be, turn to Page C6.

Orozco’s lawyer may seek new BEND-LA PINE SCHOOLS venue if heavier charges arise Start times to remain unchanged; early hour, transportation costs cited By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Andrea Orozco’s lawyer says with protesters outside the Jefferson County Courthouse and her client still receiving threats she is considering asking for a change of venue for a trial. But attorney Angela Lee said the request is currently on hold. She is awaiting final word from a grand jury deliberating on potential charges in a fatal crash allegedly caused by Orozco, 28, of Madras, last November. The grand jury indicted Orozco on five felonies and five misdemeanors in March. The charges are for assault and reck-

less endangerment against five minors who were riding in Orozco’s vehicle at the time of the crash. None Andrea of the charges Orozco listed Leonard Ross, 73, of Metolius, who died as a result of the collision. Last Thursday a group of protesters with signs lined up outside of the courthouse expecting Orozco to be in attendance. She didn’t show. Lee requested the case be held

over last week as she wanted to await any additional charges from the grand jury. “I can’t say what is going to happen,” Lee said. “I don’t know what the grand jury is doing, but I think it would be fair to say if the grand jury were to come back with more serious charges, I would ask for a change of venue. Especially now with the protesters. That makes it difficult.” Lee said right now she is focusing on keeping Orozco safe. “If (Andrea Orozco) doesn’t have to go out in public, then we will try to keep her out of that situation,” Lee said. See Orozco / C5

Portland lawyer confirmed as federal judge By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Senate on Tuesday confirmed Portland lawyer Michael Simon to be a U.S. District judge in Oregon. The vote was 64-35. President Obama nominated Simon, a partner at Perkins Coie LLP, on July 14, 2010. When the Senate failed to take up Simon’s nomination before the end of the term, the presi-

dent resubmitted his name this year, and the nomination passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Feb. 17. “Michael Simon is a man of enormous integrity, intellectual breadth and depth,” Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., said on the Senate floor Tuesday about the man he and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore, recommended for the judgeship. “(He) has earned a reputation as a top lawyer in

commercial litigation, appellate law and constitutional law. He is respected nationally. He is eminently qualified for this seat.” Merkley also praised Simon’s community service, particularly in the Classroom Law Project, a nonprofit organization that the senator said helps prepare students to become “active, engaged and informed participants in our democratic society.” See Judge / C5

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

After considering a change to school start times, Bend-La Pine Schools officials have decided to leave the current times unchanged. The district agreed to look into switching start times — middle and high school students would have started later, elementary earlier — during last year’s union contract negotiations. Elementary schools in Bend start at 9 a.m., and middle and high schools begin at 7:45 a.m. A committee of Bend Education Association members, building administrators and district office staff members reviewed studies on the impacts on students and estimated the financial cost of a change. Stephanie Bennett, principal of Cascade Middle School and a committee member, said the effect of moving elementary start times earlier was the trump card. Some elementary students, Bennet said, would have been waiting for the bus too early in the morning. “We didn’t want to see little kids waiting for the bus at six

“The committee also felt, yes, there is a benefit to later start times — if we had the transportation system that would support a single start time.” — Vicki Van Buren, Bend-La Pine Schools chief academic officer in the morning. That’s kind of a no-brainer,” Bennett said. Reviewing studies on start times did not provide enough information to support a time change, according to Chief Academic Officer Vicki Van Buren, who was on the study committee. The committee was directed to find a “compelling student performance reason” for making a change but did not find enough to support a time switch. See Start / C5


C2 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O 

B  Jury convicts illicit dentist of murder PORTLAND — An Oregon jury has found an unlicensed dentist guilty of murder in the shooting death of a fellow Russian immigrant who prosecutors said had been a patient. The Oregonian reported a Multnomah County jury on Tuesday convicted 81-year-old Viktor Gebauer in the February 2010 death of 47-year-old Viktor Merezhnikov at Gebauer’s home in Gresham. Prosecutors argued the victim was a patient who had a crown removed several days before the shooting and returned to see Gebauer because the tooth was still bothering him. Merezhnikov twice called his brother on his cellphone, telling him Gebauer had a gun on him. Defense lawyers claimed Gebauer never saw Merezhnikov before the shooting, and that he threatened Gebauer and was intent on robbing him. Sentencing was set for July 22.

Zoo caracal gives birth to 3 kittens PORTLAND — The Oregon Zoo is singing the praises of a caracal named Peggy, who recently gave birth to three healthy kittens. Senior Africa zookeeper Asaba Mukobi says Peggy is protective, makes sure all three get fed and “sets boundaries for the kittens now that they’re moving around.” Peggy is a first-time mom and zookeepers monitored the new family closely via remote camera for several days after the June 8 birth. While mom and the kittens are still spending their time in a behind-the-scenes area, the zoo says the kittens’ father, Cricket, remains on exhibit. Caracals live in the woodlands and savannas of North Africa, Southwest Asia and the Arabian Peninsula. While the animals are not considered in major peril, hunting and habitat loss pose risks to wild populations.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to a solar light was reported at 7:48 a.m. June 17, in the 20500 block of Prospector Loop. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 8:43 a.m. June 17, in the 1500 block of Northwest Juniper Street. Theft — Copper wire was reported stolen at 10:15 a.m. June 17, in the 700 block of Northeast First Street. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:41 a.m. June 17, in the 100 block of Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:46 p.m. June 17, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. Theft — An RV battery was reported stolen at 1:16 p.m. June 17, in the 1000 block of Northwest Delaware Avenue. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 1:30 p.m. June 17, in the 900 block of Northwest Carlon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:42 p.m. June 17, in the 3400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief and a theft were reported at 2:23 p.m. June 17, in the 61200 block of Paulina Lane. DUII — Patrick Kevin Ployer, 49, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:24 p.m. June 17, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:14 p.m. June 17, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:56 p.m. June 17, in the 1300 block of Northeast First Street. DUII — Frank Cody Serbus, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:29 p.m. June 17,

in the area of Southwest Hill Street and Southwest Wilson Avenue. DUII — Nathan Samuel Goreham, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:58 a.m. June 18, in the area of Northwest Wall Street and Northwest Franklin Avenue. DUII — Maverick Dean Whitson, 18, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:50 a.m. June 18, in the area of Northwest Bond Street and Northwest Idaho Avenue. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 9:18 a.m. June 18, in the 3400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:26 a.m. June 18, in the 2500 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:36 a.m. June 18, in the 61400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and an arrest made at 9:58 a.m. June 18, in the 200 block of Northwest Revere Avenue. DUII — Kelly Marie Reid, 42, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:01 p.m. June 18, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Greeley Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 5:11 p.m. June 18, in the 1100 block of Southeast Third Street. DUII — Amber Kirsten Schmucker, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:12 p.m. June 18, in the 600 block of Northwest Florida Avenue. DUII — Charles Michael Galles, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:13 a.m. June 19, in the area of Northeast Ocker Drive and Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:18 a.m. June 19, in the 1000 block of Northeast Kayak Loop. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:31 a.m. June 19, in the 20800 block of Redside Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:55 a.m. June 19, in the 100 block of Southwest Century Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:52

p.m. June 19, in the 300 block of Southeast Third Street. DUII — Thomas Dale Stinnett, 52, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:42 p.m. June 19, in the 200 block of Northeast Revere Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:23 p.m. June 19, in the area of Northeast Eighth Street and Northeast Ravenwood Drive. Redmond Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:39 p.m. June 20, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:01 p.m. June 20, in the 2400 block of Northwest Cedar Avenue. Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 4:28 p.m. June 20, in the 2200 block of Southwest 19th Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:49 p.m. June 20, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:48 p.m. June 20, in the 1400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 2:43 p.m. June 20, in the 400 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Theft — A transmission was reported stolen at 1:44 p.m. June 20, in the 300 block of Southeast Franklin Street. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 9:28 a.m. June 20, in the area of Southeast Loma Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and an act of criminal mischief reported at 3:43 p.m. June 20, in the area of Northwest Second Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 2:09 p.m. June 20, in the 20400 block of Heritage Avenue in Bend. DUII — Devon George Olden, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:52 a.m. June 20, in the area of Northwest Coyner Avenue and Northwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond.

Algae advisory issued for Lost Creek Lake MEDFORD — A voluntary advisory has been issued warning people and pets against contact with water in Lost Creek Lake in southern Oregon after tests showed an outbreak of bluegreen algae above levels considered unhealthy. The Mail Tribune reported that water samples taken last week showed that water at the Catfish Cove day-use area has algae levels of more than seven times World Health Organization thresholds for safety. But water sampled at the Takelma boat ramp area at the reservoir’s southwest side showed levels well below unhealthy standards. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers posted warning signs Monday at lake boat ramps and swimming areas saying the advisory is voluntary — the first of the year in Jackson County and only the second so far this year in Oregon.

2 malnourished horses seized near Silverton SILVERTON — Marion County sheriff’s deputies have seized two malnourished horses that had been kept in a 15-by-40foot pen near Silverton, east of Salem. Mud in the pen was a foot deep and the horses had no shelter. Deputies and animal rescue workers say the animals are also suffering from skin ailments, muscle loss and hoof rot. A 6-year-old mare named Robi is reportedly 300 pounds underweight while a 3-year-old named Cali is an estimated 150 pounds too thin. The property owner called the sheriff’s office, saying he rented the space to the horses’ owner but she failed to care for them. He told deputies he tried to feed the horses and tried to reach the owner, but she blocked his calls. A certified letter to her was returned unclaimed. The horses have been taken to Lighthouse Farm Animal Sanctuary near Scio. — From wire reports

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WWII Allies victorious in 1945 battle for Okinawa The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, June 22, the 173rd day of 2011. There are 192 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 22, 1911, Britain’s King George V was crowned at Westminster Abbey. ON THIS DATE In 1611, English explorer Henry Hudson, his son and several other people were set adrift in present-day Hudson Bay by mutineers aboard the Discovery; their fate remains unknown. In 1870, the U.S. Department of Justice was created. In 1940, during World War II, Adolf Hitler gained a stunning victory as France was forced to sign an armistice eight days after German forces overran Paris. In 1941, Germany launched Operation Barbarossa as it invades the Soviet Union. In 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, more popularly known as the GI Bill of Rights. In 1945, the World War II battle for Okinawa ended with an Allied victory. In 1969, singer-actress Judy Garland died in London at age 47.

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T O D AY IN HISTORY In 1977, John Mitchell became the first former U.S. attorney general to go to prison as he began serving a sentence for his role in the Watergate cover-up. (He was released 19 months later.) In 1981, Mark David Chapman pleaded guilty to killing rock star John Lennon. Abolhassan Bani-Sadr was deposed as president of Iran. In 1993, former first lady Pat Nixon died in Park Ridge, N.J., at age 81. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Singer-actor Kris Kristofferson is 75. Actress Meryl Streep is 62. Pop singer Cyndi Lauper is 58. Actor-producer-writer Bruce Campbell is 53. Author Dan Brown (“The Da Vinci Code”) is 47. Actress Mary Lynn Rajskub is 40. TV personality Carson Daly is 38. Rock musician Chris Traynor is 38. Country musician Jimmy Wallace is 38. Actor Donald Faison is 37. Actress Alicia Goranson is 37. TV personality/ actor Jai Rodriguez is 32. Actress Lindsay Ridgeway is 26. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “If you look at life one way, there is always cause for alarm.” — Elizabeth Bowen, Irish author (1899-1973)


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 C3

S’ O

A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

Electronics lessons spark curiosity Projects help kids connect scientific theory, everyday uses of power The Bulletin

Increasing difficulty With each new project in the workbook, the difficulty level increases. After creating light on a circuit board, students worked on making speakers function, hooking up the correct wires to make noises that varied between Morse code-like clicks and a crackling, screeching noise. Students seemed to revel in the latter sound, laughing at the squeaky, high-pitched noise. “It’s annoying, to say the least,” said Luke Mocke, 10, holding the wires together and smiling fiendishly. Others joined in, creating varying pitches of the same noise. Those who had completed the

2 win scholarships from local auto shops A Bend High School senior and a Redmond High School senior each won a $1,000 scholarship from Oil Can Henry’s. Amanda Dougherty, of Bend High, won the scholarship from the automotive maintenance shops’ Bend location. Redmond High’s Cassidy Fisher won the scholarship from the Redmond location, according to a news release from the company. The company awarded 88 $1,000 scholarships to students in Oregon and five other states.

B y Megan Kehoe It sounded like rusty nails scraping across a chalkboard. But the students didn’t scream or wail or cry at the ear-splitting noise that erupted in their electronics camp classroom Tuesday afternoon. Instead, they giggled and laughed at the horrid sound, proud of the noise they created out of some simple copper wires and a speaker cone. “This will definitely annoy my parents,” said Gordon Kling, 9, smiling. On Tuesday, about 15 children between the ages of 7 and 11 spent the afternoon engrossed in a world of circuits, switchboards, wiring and speaker parts. The Bend Park & Recreation District’s weeklong Electronics Camp, being held at High Lakes Elementary School in Bend this week, allows students to stretch their minds during the second week of their summer vacation. Students sat around tables on which electronic parts were piled, flipping through workbooks loaded with a variety of projects. Throughout the week, students get to complete each project at their own pace. “I like the camp because I want to be an engineer someday,” said Colt Musgrave, 8. “So I think it’s pretty awesome.” Through the projects, students learned the ins and outs of how speakers create noise, how energy can be transmitted from a battery, and the way circuit boards work. “I like how on the first day I was able to do the first project, and it worked,” said Kailei Oullette, 8, the only girl at the camp. “I was really happy when I plugged it in and it lit up.”

IN BRIEF

COCC, OSU-Cascades instructor honored A local commander of the Oregon Army National Guard was awarded a MacArthur Leadership Award on May 19, one of seven such awards given out this year, according to a Central Oregon Community College news release. Capt. Sean Nixon, who teaches military science at COCC and Oregon State UniversityCascades Campus, was given the award at the Pentagon. The award is given to members of the Army National Guard and recognizes contributions to both a local community and the Army.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

As his red light illuminates, Jesse Fishkin, 11, of Bend, reads final instructions on an SCR Works light project during summer Electronics Camp at High Lakes Elementary School in Bend on Tuesday afternoon.

“They struggle with some of these ideas, but it teaches them to focus. It’s not like they save the princess and get to move on to the next level. They have to spend time working through it.”

COCC will be closed on the Fourth of July. The closure includes the library, computer labs and bookstore, according to a news release from the college. — Bulletin staff reports

C O N TAC T U S

— Jenny La Duca, electronics camp instructor

speakers project went on to face more challenging ones. Jacob Broady, 11, hunched over his circuit board. The end result of his project was to be the illumination of a light bulb. It didn’t work. After putting the board together eight times with no luck, Jacob was visibly frustrated. He had even tried to get help from others in the class. “You need new capacitors,” said Jesse Fishkin, 11. “Or you have to push them in harder.” Jacob followed Jesse’s advice but was still unsuccessful. The light bulb remained dark. Successes and failures are a big part of the camp, said camp instructor Jenny La Duca. Teamwork is also a major factor, with

COCC will close for July 4 holiday

Electronics teacher Jenny La Duca, left, helps Luke Mocke, 10, of Bend, work in his light project Tuesday.

students told to help one another through some of the difficult projects. “It’s hard to get a lot of these right the first time,” La Duca said of the projects. “But I think it’s important that they don’t get that instant gratification. It makes them feel even more successful when they get it right.” Colt, who was in the class with his older brother, Luke Musgrave, 10, said it was good having his sibling nearby. “It’s nice because if I need help, he can help me,” Colt said.

SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: pcliff@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

ALL NEW 2011 DODGE AVENGER MAINSTREET

Making radios Later this week, students will make radios, stretching their technical abilities to the max. La Duca said that even though students may have trouble wading through the difficult projects, the lessons they learn in the process are worth it. “They struggle with some of these ideas, but it teaches them to focus,” La Duca said. “It’s not like they save the princess and get to move on to the next level. They have to spend time working through it.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

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With the required items nearby, Kailei Oullette, 8, of Bend, twists wires together while working on an electronics project with other students attending the summer Electronics Camp.

The Bulletin

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C4 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Oregon caves in on union demands

M

ediation does not mean “cave in.” But cave in is what the state of Oregon has done as negotiations with the two biggest unions of state employees have moved to

mediation. Gone are the state’s two major opportunities to make significant permanent changes in compensation. Most of what happens now will be temporary. That’s not what Oregon needs. When the negotiations began this winter, Gov. John Kitzhaber made strong proposals. He came into office just as Gov. Ted Kulongoski’s reset cabinet finished a report on state government. The report’s message was daunting. “The state will face a decade of deficits if it tries to sustain the type and scope of services it now provides,” the report said. About three out of every four dollars that comes from the general fund goes to a paycheck or benefits for a paycheck. Teachers and other education workers make up the bulk of those costs. Some 35 percent goes to the employees of state agencies. Kitzhaber asked for two permanent changes in state employee compensation — in retirement benefits and health care. He has caved in on one and cut the state’s savings in half on the other. The state asked for an end to the 6 percent employee pickup. That’s a contribution the state now makes toward employee retirement accounts. The cost to the state is estimated at about $58 million for the 2011-2013 biennium for the members of Oregon’s

American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. For both unions, it’s roughly double that. The state’s latest offer to one of the large unions — AFSCME — drops that request. The state is likely making the same offer to the other large union. Savings to the state is now zero. The state had also asked for employees to start paying a share of their health insurance premiums. State employees currently pay nothing toward the premium. Family health plans cost Oregon nearly $15,000 a year on average per worker. Individual plans cost $6,000 on average. The state had asked for a 10 percent contribution. The state has now dropped that to 5 percent, according to the offer to AFSCME. We tried to reach the state’s lead negotiator, Gail Parnell, for cost information on the health care proposal on Tuesday. She did not get in touch. It would be nice for taxpayers to know what this contract proposal will cost the state and, more importantly, why the state didn’t hold firm. The state of Oregon’s proposals have gone from showing backbone to spineless.

Thank you, Wayne Smith

I

f you have a disability, or are the parent or sibling of someone with a disability, you know that Bend can be a pretty good place to be. Our school district’s special education programs and those who run them are good, and our park district is a leader in offering programs for those with physical and intellectual disabilities. In many ways, we have Wayne Smith to thank for the latter. His background in therapeutic recreation and his age — he’s a child of the ’60s and its focus on civil rights — pushed him to create not just a program or two for those with special needs, but a whole host of programs for people of all ages. This summer adults with disabilities will take part in camp-outs and rafting trips, attend Munch & Music in Drake Park, participate in community service projects, get fit with Zumba dance classes and tend to a garden plot in the city’s community garden. Folks with limited mobility can find a wheelchair tennis program. Children from 3 up will take part in their own programs over the summer, and the district continues to work actively with families whose disabled members want to participate in “normal” recreation programs. In addition, the district has specialized equipment available to give those with physical challenges a way to participate in ev-

Smith has done more than simply create programs, however. Over the years he worked actively in the programs he created, and he brought an understanding and gentleness to his work that will be missed. erything from golf to bicycling. Even better, many of the district’s therapeutic recreation programs operate year round. Prices are reasonable, and the district offers a variety of payment options to ensure that all who want to participate will be able to do so. Smith has done more than simply create programs, however. Over the years he worked actively in the programs he created, and he brought an understanding and gentleness to his work that will be missed. Wayne Smith has just a few more days on the job, and then he retires. No doubt the solid foundation he has built for therapeutic recreation will live on once he leaves Bend Park & Recreation District, but without him it may never have reached the high quality and broad range it has today.

My Nickel’s Worth Remember teachers’ cuts

Keep cats safe indoors

Indeed, Bend-La Pine teachers deserve thanks for their concessions. Fast-forward to sometime in the nottoo-far-distant future (we hope) when times are “good” (or at least better). The private sector will be doing well, so can we expect The Bulletin to exhort the community to pay the teachers more? In our combined more than 55 years of public school teaching, we suffered accusatory comments of the press (e.g., teachers care more about their paychecks than they do about their students, etc.), but never, when the economy improved, did the public and press recall our sacrifices which were similar to those of Bend-La Pine. And never did the press advocate for higher salaries when the economy had improved. We’ll be waiting! Janet and Gary Gehlert Sunriver

In light of the Prineville cat who contracted bubonic plague after being kept in a barn, I urge readers to keep their cats (and dogs, too) indoors and allow them outdoors only on a leash or in a fenced-in yard, under constant supervision. Diseases like the plague aren’t the only dangers lurking outdoors. Every day, animals are stolen for experimentation, used for target practice or bait for dogfighting, poisoned, and worse after being left outside alone for “just a few minutes.” Extreme weather and traffic claim the lives of untold cats and dogs each week. Random acts of cruelty are also common: Most of the 400plus new cruelty cases PETA receives weekly involve animals that were victimized while outside unattended. What’s more, free-roaming cats terrorize, maim and kill birds and small animals, taking a massive toll on vulnerable wildlife species that are already struggling to survive habitat loss and other challenges. Please, keep animals safe: Keep them indoors. For tips on keeping cats content in the “great indoors,” visit www.PETA.org. Martin Mersereau is a director with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals

Money better spent Don’t get me wrong, folks. I like to see and hear the boom of fireworks on Fourth of July as much as anyone else. I do not understand why the Redmond chamber waited to the last minute to raise money for its fireworks show. It had a full year to do so. Besides, with a lot of people out of work that need help to live, I think the money could be better spent, rather than blow up $7,000 into the sky. This thought goes for all cities and towns. Next year put on a bigger show by getting your fireworks money early. Mel Coffin La Pine

Remove principals This is in response to Paul Moore’s My Nickel’s Worth letter on June 6 — “Misleading editorial on Redmond schools.” Mr. Moore, if you are “physically

and verbally assaulted” as part of your teaching job, you should insist that your highly paid principal(s) become involved. Such classrooms breed poor academic results. If oversight of discipline (bullying), oversight of academic content and evaluation of teachers is not the principals’ job, then, what is? Districts can save millions of dollars by removing principals from our schools. Their removal has been done in many places across America — with great results. Teachers then can exercise the adequate authority to appropriately control their classrooms. Such a reform would create the funds needed to keep some of those potentially great new teachers who are presently being deleted. Mr. Moore, after a prior career, I taught public high school. I’ve never had so much off time — without accountability. How lucky, $23 per hour — without oversight! Every report indicates that other than our advanced placement students, kids are being poorly educated in our public high schools — regardless of funding. Examples: Bend-La Pine “high school graduates” cannot pass the dumbeddown tests for No Child Left Behind. In the Bend-La Pine school district, grant money is now given to teachers to try to prove that more money pays off in better academic performance. Sadly, such initiatives have proven to breed even poorer academic results. Improvements (reform) start here with your local school boards, not from Washington, D.C., or Salem. Ronald Deady Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Aid may be impediment to smart power in Afghanistan By David Brooks New York Times News Service

S

o far, few politicians have embraced my plan for a Marshall Plan Tax. The idea is that every time a think-tanker, op-ed writer or retired senator calls for a new Marshall Plan or a moonshot-type initiative to solve a social problem, they would have to pay a tax of $50. Within a few months, we’d have enough money to pay for an actual new Marshall Plan. The problem with my proposal is this: Do Marshall Plans work? If this country really did galvanize its best minds and billions of dollars to alleviate poverty somewhere or to solve some complicated problem, could we actually do it? Well, the U.S. has been engaged in a new Marshall Plan for most of the past decade. Between 2002 and 2010, the U.S. spent roughly $19 billion to promote development in Afghanistan. Many other nations have also sent thousands of aid workers and billions of dollars. In some spheres the results have been

impressive. Nearly two-thirds of Afghans now have access to basic health services, up from 9 percent a decade ago. Under the Taliban, 900,000 boys and no girls attended schools. Now more than 7 million Afghans attend school, and 35 percent of them are girls, according to the U.S. Agency for International Development. But when it comes to laying the foundation for economic growth and stability, the results have been discouraging. Stuart Gordon of Chatham House, a British think tank, studied aid efforts in Helmand province and concluded that in places where state capacity is weak and security is uncertain, foreign aid “may have as many negative, unintended effects as positive ones.” After a thorough two-year review of U.S. aid efforts in Afghanistan, the staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee emphasized, “The unintended consequences of pumping large amounts of money into a war zone cannot be underestimated.” Much of the aid effort was premised on the assumption that development

DAVID BROOKS would foster stability. Young men with jobs wouldn’t plant roadside bombs. Communities with growing economies would reject the Taliban. Give people money and jobs and you will improve their character and behavior. In Afghanistan, as elsewhere, this assumption seems not to be true. A conference of experts brought together last year in Wilton Park in Britain concluded that there is a “surprisingly weak evidence base for the effectiveness of aid in promoting stabilization and security objectives” in Afghanistan. Violence doesn’t stem from poverty. It stems from grudges, tribal dynamics and religious fanaticism — none of which can be ameliorated by building new roads.

Meanwhile, the influx of aid has, in many cases, created dependency, fed corruption, contributed to insecurity and undermined the host government’s capacity to oversee sustainable programs. In the district of Nawa, for example, USAID spent $400 per person last year. The per-capita income before aid was $300. According to the World Bank, 97 percent of Afghanistan’s GDP derives from spending related to the military and donor community presence. This incredible infusion distorts labor markets. An Afghan can make $75 a month as a teacher but more than $1,000 a month as a translator or driver for aid workers. The most talented people get sucked out of the real economy and into the aid economy. As aid workers grow frustrated by nonfunctioning Afghan bureaucracies, they build their own parallel ones that, in turn, take responsibility from and infantilize the Afghan agencies that are going to have to administer the country in the long run. The sad thing is, we are not foreign

aid rookies. People have spent years trying to learn from past foreign aid disappointments and still, with all these resources, the results are discouraging. This experience should have a chastening influence on the advocates of smart power. When she became secretary of state, Hillary Clinton sketched out a very attractive foreign policy vision that would use “the full range of tools at our disposal: diplomatic, economic, military, political, legal and cultural.” But it could be that cultural and economic development works on a different timetable than traditional foreign policy. Perhaps we don’t know enough, can’t plan enough, can’t implement effectively enough to coordinate nation building with national security objectives. The peace and security timetable is measured in years or decades. Development progress, if it comes at all, is measured in generations. David Brooks is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 C5

O    Yelena Bonner, 88, Sakharov’s widow and lifelong critic of Russia

D N Clyde Raymond Benke, of Bend

By Kevin Klose and Emma Brown

Feb. 20, 1950 - June 12, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, 541-382-5592

The Washington Post

www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 2:00 PM, June 26, 2011, please come and raise a Glass in Clyde's Honor at Rika and Stan Turel's, 2125 NE 11th Place, Bend, (541) 815 9463 for more info.

Dale Asher Mitchell, of Bend Oct. 6, 1934 - June 18, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend. 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Celebration of life will be held at 3:00 pm, on Friday, June 24, 2011, at the family home, 64404 O.B. Riley Rd., Bend.

Darwin Littrell, of Bend August 4, 1927 - June 16, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend. 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: No services will be held at this time.

Harrison Gerard Rowe, of Ephrata, WA July 27, 1915 - June 19, 2011 Arrangements: Nicoles Funeral Home, Ephrata, WA. (509) 754-3420 www.nicolesfuneralhome.com

Services: Funeral mass to be held at Saint Rose of Lima Catholic Church, 323 D St. SW, Ephrata, WA, on June 28, 2011, at 10:00 am. Contribution: Plant a tree or make a donation to your favorite charity in Harrison’s name in lieu of sending flowers.

The Associated Press ile photo

Longtime anti-war demonstrator Brian Haw chants slogans during a protest opposite the Houses of Parliament in central London in 2007. Haw died Sunday at age 62.

Brian Haw, camped outside Parliament to protest wars By Dennis Hevesi New York Times News Service

Brian Haw, who day after day and night after night for nearly a decade maintained a vigil outside Parliament in London to protest the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, becoming an annoyance to some politicians and a stopping point for tour guides, died Saturday. He was 62. Haw died in Germany, where he had been receiving treatment for lung cancer since March, his family told The Associated Press. On June 2, 2001, Haw — an evangelical Christian who had previously taken his one-man world peace mission to Northern Ireland during the so-called Troubles and to the killing fields of Cambodia as that country tried to heal — set up a makeshift camp on the grassy area in Parliament Square. At first, his protest was directed at the impact of U.N. economic sanctions, imposed after Iraq invaded Kuwait in 1990, on the children of Iraq. After the American-led invasion of Iraq in

2003, which Prime Minister Tony Blair’s government supported, it became, to use Haw’s preferred term, a protest for peace. Not long after, he moved to the pavement opposite the Houses of Parliament and began building what grew into a wall 20 yards long of peace flags, handmade placards (“Stop Killing My Kids”) and photographs (Blair with a Hitlerish mustache). The police would tear down that wall in 2007, but Haw, with one sign, stayed. Parliament Square became his home. His mail was delivered there. It was his registered address when he ran for Parliament in 2004, receiving 298 votes. People gave him food, coffee, tobacco. He slept under a green tarp and spent his days hectoring the powerful across the road through his bullhorn. Drivers would honk in support. Three times, he said, his nose was broken by irate passers-by. City officials and members of Parliament passed several measures to oust him. Most were

overturned. One, which required protesters to have authorization from the police “when the demonstration starts,” could not be applied to him retroactively. He continued to demonstrate “because our country is committing infanticide, genocide, the looting of nations,” he told reporters in 2010. “I’m determined to be there until they kill me.” Brian William Haw was born in Barking, near London, on Jan. 7, 1949. He served in the merchant navy before attending a religious school in Nottingham for one semester, after which he embarked on his world peace mission. Haw is survived by seven children. He and his wife, Kay, divorced in 2003, a year and a half into his round-the-clock demonstration in Parliament Square. “I can’t kiss my own child each night, but I’m doing this for all the children,” he told The New York Times in 2005. On Monday, his camping chair and footstool remained in place across the street from Parliament.

GOP opposition

of 36 judicial emergencies declared by U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts because of an excessive backlog of cases. Senate Judiciary Chairman Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., criticized Senate Republicans for causing unnecessary delays in Simon’s and other confirmations. “Traditionally, someone like this would have gone through the day after he had been reported,” Leahy said. He also took exception to Grassley’s objection to Simon based on his affiliation and work on behalf of the ACLU. “Certainly defending civil liberties is no vice. We ought to be proud of people who defend our civil liberties,” he said.

Yelena Bonner, a Russian human rights activist who, with her late husband, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Andrei Sakharov, was one of the Soviet Union’s most outspoken political dissidents, died June 18 in Boston. She was 88. She had been hospitalized since February, had heart surgery in March and since then had had several bouts with infection, said her daughter, Tatiana Yankelevich. Bonner was a prominent activist even before she met Sakharov, the father of the Soviet hydrogen bomb, at the trial of a fellow dissident in 1970. The two married in 1972 and together became symbols of resistance against Soviet political repression. Headstrong and sharptongued with a no-nonsense voice deepened by years of chain-smoking acrid Russian cigarettes, Bonner helped lead a group that monitored violations of the 1975 Helsinki Accords, in which the Soviet government had promised to respect human rights and uphold fundamental freedoms. Bonner and her group were inundated by “the constant flood of people coming to our door, all sorts of people with all sorts of problems,” she once told The Washington Post. “There are so many phone calls - they would keep not just one wife busy, but a whole institute of wives.” The work drew threats and harassment and landed many activists in jail - or, if they were lucky, in exile. In 1980, Sakharov was banished to Gorky, 250 miles from Moscow, after he publicly criticized the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. Bonner became her husband’s sole link to the West, ferrying his writings to Moscow and bringing him news of the outside world. State media called Bonner a CIA agent, a Zionist and a greedy schemer

whose seductions had turned Sakharov against his own country. In 1984, she too was exiled to Gorky after being convicted of slandering the Soviet state. Isolated from family and forbidden from communicating via telephone, the couple lived under constant KGB surveillance. “Whenever the authorities did not like something, it was our car that suffered,” Bonner wrote in “Alone Together,” her 1986 memoir of their shared exile. “Either two tires would be punctured, or a window smashed or smeared with glue. This was how we knew that we had done something bad by their standards.” Bonner’s memoir is, in part, a love story of mutual sacrifice. Sakharov, in an effort to persuade authorities to allow an ailing Bonner to travel overseas for medical care, mounted a series of hunger strikes totaling about 200 days and endured Orwellian forcefeedings that left him depleted and ill. Bonner was eventually granted a temporary visa to the United States, where she had coronary bypass surgery in the mid-1980s. She might have stayed in the United States - where her mother and two children had settled a decade before - but she gave up the freedoms of the West to go back to her husband and their tightly controlled life together. While in the United States, she visited Washington, an experience she described as “phantasmagoric.” She was feted at the National Academy of Sciences, which she visited as a representative of her husband. She met actor Jason Robards, who played her husband in the 1984 TV movie “Sakharov.” “And at the same time, in the back of my mind,” she told Robards, “I am packing my bags to return to the Soviet Union in less than a month. I wonder why I am not crazy.”

Velma G. Stone, of Bend Sept. 1, 1914 - June 19, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend, 541-382-0903, www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Graveside services will be held on Friday, June 24, 2011, at 2:00 pm, at Orting Cemetery, 19600 Orting-Kapowsin Hwy, in Orting, WA. Contributions may be made to:

Orting Christian Church, 112 Varner Ave., SE, Orting, WA 98360 (360) 893-2063.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLIN ES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Judge Continued from C1 Wyden also praised Simon’s qualifications, particularly his participation in the Department of Justice’s case against American Airlines as a member of the department’s antitrust division during the Reagan administration. The case extended the application of the Sherman Act to monopolies and attempted monopolies, Wyden said. Simon, who is married to state Sen. Suzanne Bonamici, D-Portland/Beaverton, graduated summa cum laude from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1978, and three years later earned his law degree cum laude from Harvard University.

Orozco Continued from C1 “My client is still receiving a lot of threats.” According to Oregon State Police, the crash occurred on Nov. 20, 2010, when Orozco ran a stop sign while driving a Ford Expedition with eight passengers. Six of them were children ranging in age from 2 to 14. Orozco’s vehicle collided with

Start Continued from C1 “There really is not much out there,” Van Buren said. “There were very few studies that addressed the impact on academic achievement.” That said, the committee agreed every student starting later in the morning could be the

His long association with the Oregon branch of the American Civil Liberties Union drew the ire of Senate Republicans. Before Tuesday’s vote, Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, the ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, spoke against Simon’s nomination. Simon had previously argued that Americans’ civil liberties had been eroded by measures enacted following 9/11, he said. “I recognize that judicial nominees should not be evaluated solely on client lists,” Grassley said, referring to the ACLU, “(but) I would rank this organization as very liberal.” The judgeship had been open for 664 days, ever since Ancer Haggerty took senior status Aug. 26, 2009. The vacancy was one

a Toyota four-door driven by Linda Ross, 61, at the intersection of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Highland Lane. Leonard Ross was in the passenger seat and died of his injuries. Police said three passengers were thrown from Orozco’s vehicle, and everyone in the crash was hospitalized. Jefferson County District Attorney Steven Leriche said his office has no comment on an active case.

best option. That would mean, however, that the district would have to double its bus fleet. As it is now, a bus will make an early run, picking up secondary students, then take another route for elementary students. Doubling the bus fleet would cost about $10 million, according to committee estimates. With the budget pressures on the district,

Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

In March his office released a statement saying “… the grand jury term has been extended and continues to investigate and seek new and more information regarding the motor vehicle crash of Nov. 20, 2010, at the intersection of Southwest Culver Highway and Southwest Highland Lane.” Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

such a large expenditure was not going to happen, Van Buren said. “The committee also felt, yes, there is a benefit to later start times — if we had the transportation system that would support a single start time,” Van Buren said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Severance Continued from C1 “He wanted to leave,” Zigler said. “That’s why the severance agreement was never really discussed, because he wanted to retire.” The severance agreement approved Tuesday is backdated to Aug. 31, 2010. Bales’ severance payout included more than $21,000 for unused sick days and vacation time, and a bonus of approximately $3,000. “The additional pay of $3,248.52 was added as an early retirement incentive, making it an even $25,000.00,” Zigler wrote in an April 27 e-mail to City Manager Rick Allen. The city of La Pine released e-mails regarding the severance agreement in response to a request by The Bulletin. When Allen asked Zigler who approved the additional $3,000 paid to Bales, Zigler responded that it was the La Pine Special Sewer District Board of Directors. “The board felt it was appropriate after his years of service,” Zigler wrote. The severance agreement approved Tuesday also states that if Bales files a claim for unemployment, the district will not oppose it. So far, Bales has not filed for unemployment, Zigler said Tuesday. It is legal and not uncommon for government agencies to enter into severance agreements with employees, but the problem with the Bales agreement is that none of the district’s officials ever formally approved the agreement, Allen wrote in an e-mail to Zigler. “No executive session was ever held, no motion made, no vote taken or any other kind of approval from the district to enter into a separation agreement is given nor is that authority ever delegated to you or (attorney Christy Monson),” Allen wrote.

Allen also questioned why the district paid Bales for his unused sick time. In an April 27 e-mail, Allen wrote that the city had not been able to produce a copy of the sewer district personnel policy that allowed for employees to cash out sick time. “The policy in place at the same time for the water district did not allow for payment of sick leave, so it does raise interesting questions,” Allen wrote. “With only 600 accounts, $25,000 cost each customer $41. …” Zigler said Tuesday that Allen told district staff members he did not care whether they produced the sewer district personnel policy.

Unions certified As the sewer and water districts move ahead with plans to allow for a city takeover, the two newly formed employee unions — the sewer district union has two employees and the water district has three — were certified Monday by the Employee Relations Board. One of the unions could soon lose a member, however, because the districts are petitioning to have Zigler removed so she can bargain on the districts’ behalf with the unions. Otherwise, there would be no managers to negotiate with the unions’ representatives. The water and sewer boards voted unanimously Tuesday to petition to remove Zigler from the union of which she’s a member. Water District Commissioner Brian Earls said doing this would mean the districts’ commissioners will not have to handle all of the negotiations. “I think that will make our job much easier in the long run,” Earls said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, JUNE 22

HIGH Ben Burkel

87

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE 90s

Western

60s

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

86/54

82/51

92/53

61/44

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

89/49

88/50

83/42

Mitchell

Madras

86/47

87/48

Camp Sherman 82/42 Redmond Prineville 87/45 Cascadia 84/46 Paulina 86/46 Sisters 80s 80/42 85/44 Bend Post 87/45

Oakridge Elk Lake 84/44

74/33

84/43

Brothers

Sunriver 84/42

84/41

Burns

La Pine

88/43

87/41

Crescent Lake 77/35

Hampton

Crescent 83/40

Fort Rock

82/42

Morning clouds, then partly cloudy today. Mostly cloudy tonight. Central

Today: Partly cloudy, isolated storms far eastern oregon, breezy, warm.

Chemult 83/39

Tonight: Partly cloudy. LOW

Vancouver 70/52

50s Seattle 60s 66/52

City

80s

Missoula 88/56

74/55

Eugene Sunny to partly cloudy 75/50 skies today. Clear to partly Grants Pass cloudy tonight. 88/55 Eastern

Helena Bend

84/53

Boise

87/45

70s

93/61

Idaho Falls

90s Elko 91/54

102/67

83/49

Reno

96/63

San Francisco Sunny to partly cloudy 75/55 skies today. Clear to partly cloudy tonight.

70/41

100s

LOW

Salt Lake City 87/62

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

New

First

Full

June 23 July 1

July 7

July 14

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . . 71/56/0.00 . . . . . . 60/52/c. . . . . . 60/51/sh Baker City . . . . . . 82/39/0.00 . . . . . 87/50/pc. . . . . . 72/40/sh Brookings . . . . . . 69/50/0.00 . . . . . 65/51/pc. . . . . . 66/51/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 81/47/0.00 . . . . . 89/52/pc. . . . . . 75/41/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 80/46/0.00 . . . . . 75/50/pc. . . . . . . 69/47/c Klamath Falls . . . 86/43/0.00 . . . . . . 84/48/s. . . . . . . 73/41/s Lakeview. . . . . . . 82/48/0.00 . . . . . . 85/51/s. . . . . . . 74/44/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 85/37/0.00 . . . . . . 87/41/s. . . . . . . 71/35/s Medford . . . . . . . 96/54/0.00 . . . . . . 90/57/s. . . . . . 77/51/pc Newport . . . . . . .63/52/trace . . . . . . 59/49/c. . . . . . 60/49/sh North Bend . . . . . 66/48/0.00 . . . . . 61/53/pc. . . . . . . 61/49/c Ontario . . . . . . . . 87/50/0.00 . . . . . 94/63/pc. . . . . . 83/52/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 82/48/0.00 . . . . . 90/58/pc. . . . . . . 78/49/s Portland . . . . . . . 83/54/0.00 . . . . . 74/55/pc. . . . . . 67/52/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 82/46/0.00 . . . . . 84/46/pc. . . . . . . 69/42/s Redmond. . . . . . . 87/44/0.00 . . . . . 91/46/pc. . . . . . . 72/40/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 88/55/0.00 . . . . . 78/54/pc. . . . . . 71/50/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 84/51/0.00 . . . . . 75/52/pc. . . . . . 69/50/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 86/38/0.00 . . . . . . 85/44/s. . . . . . . 72/37/s The Dalles . . . . . . 90/56/0.00 . . . . . 82/55/pc. . . . . . . 72/53/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

9

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84/46 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .95 in 1970 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.14” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 in 1947 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.57” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.30” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.98” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.95 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.75 in 1967 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97.....High Sisters...............................Mod. Bend, east of Hwy. 97.....Mod. La Pine...............................High Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

Partly to mostly cloudy, slight chance LOW of a few showers.

77 45

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

75 45

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Last

HIGH

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:13 a.m. . . . . . .9:53 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:26 a.m. . . . . . .7:42 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .3:31 a.m. . . . . . .6:26 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:18 a.m. . . . . . .3:55 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:45 p.m. . . . . . .1:39 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:11 a.m. . . . . . .1:24 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 79/55

Portland

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:52 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:23 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:52 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:11 a.m. Moonset today . . . 12:40 p.m.

SUNDAY Partly cloudy and mild.

73 38

BEND ALMANAC

88/44

84/44

HIGH

72 35

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 96° Medford • 37° Meacham

SATURDAY Mostly sunny, breezy, mild.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Redding

Crater Lake

Partly cloudy to mostly sunny, significantly LOW cooler, windy.

NORTHWEST

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

45

FRIDAY

There will be morning clouds in the west, with sunny to partly cloudy skies east of the Cascades.

85/43

70s

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44,888 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173,640 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 82,995 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,632 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149,178 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 507 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,240 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,796 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 474 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 34.1 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 403 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 70/52

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 79/55

S

Saskatoon 75/55

Seattle 66/52

S

S

S

Thunder Bay 55/52 Winnipeg 66/52

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 77/59

Halifax 64/48 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland Green Bay 71/56 (in the 48 84/56 70/64 74/55 St. Paul contiguous states): 71/58 Boston 69/55 Boise 71/62 Rapid City Buffalo 93/61 New York Detroit 77/53 74/65 • 114° 80/69 80/66 Des Moines Palm Springs, Calif. Cheyenne Philadelphia 68/57 Chicago Columbus 79/50 85/73 75/61 82/66 • 29° Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 72/58 75/55 Stanley, Idaho City 90/74 Las Denver Louisville 87/62 Kansas City Vegas • 4.98” 82/55 83/68 76/60 St. Louis 108/85 Charlotte Montevideo, Minn. 79/64 94/69 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville 93/65 72/65 95/69 88/68 Atlanta Phoenix 88/72 Little Rock 113/85 Honolulu Birmingham 90/68 88/74 Tijuana 88/72 Dallas 77/64 New Orleans 94/74 90/75 Orlando Houston 94/75 Chihuahua 92/77 99/69 Miami 91/79 Monterrey La Paz 97/75 98/65 Mazatlan Anchorage 86/72 64/49 Juneau 64/48 Bismarck 70/50

FRONTS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .93/65/0.11 . . .94/73/t . . 98/75/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .87/67/0.07 . . .85/66/t . . . .79/60/t Albany. . . . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .73/64/t . . . .71/63/t Albuquerque. . . .89/59/0.00 . . .93/65/s . . . 97/66/s Anchorage . . . . .58/50/0.00 . 64/49/pc . . 65/53/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .95/76/0.00 . . .88/72/t . . . .87/71/t Atlantic City . . . .83/63/0.00 . . .81/73/t . . . .85/72/t Austin . . . . . . . .101/79/0.00 . . .95/74/t . . 98/74/pc Baltimore . . . . . .87/67/0.00 . . .89/72/t . . . .89/71/t Billings. . . . . . . . .78/52/0.00 . 84/56/pc . . . .87/57/t Birmingham . . . .95/72/0.49 . . .88/72/t . . . .91/70/t Bismarck . . . . . . .64/58/0.05 . . .70/50/c . . 75/51/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .88/56/0.00 . 93/61/pc . . 82/49/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .76/65/0.00 . . .71/62/c . . . .68/60/t Bridgeport, CT. . .79/63/0.00 . . .75/64/t . . . .72/64/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . . .74/65/t . . . .78/61/t Burlington, VT. . .82/54/0.00 . . .79/61/t . . . .70/58/t Caribou, ME . . . .72/49/0.00 . 75/48/pc . . 74/52/pc Charleston, SC .102/79/0.00 . 94/77/pc . . . .92/75/t Charlotte. . . . . . .96/67/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . . .89/68/t Chattanooga. . . .93/72/0.16 . . .87/69/t . . . .89/68/t Cheyenne . . . . . .70/47/0.00 . 79/50/pc . . . 83/54/s Chicago. . . . . . . .89/72/0.00 . . .75/61/t . . 67/57/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .90/64/1.63 . . .83/67/t . . . .80/62/t Cleveland . . . . . .89/68/0.33 . . .86/68/t . . . .78/64/t Colorado Springs 78/51/0.00 . 79/53/pc . . . 85/57/s Columbia, MO . .84/65/0.11 . 73/58/pc . . . 76/60/s Columbia, SC . .101/72/0.00 . 99/75/pc . . . .93/73/t Columbus, GA. .100/77/0.00 . . .91/74/t . . . .88/71/t Columbus, OH. . .90/66/0.39 . . .82/66/t . . . .79/62/t Concord, NH . . . .83/50/0.00 . . .74/58/c . . . .71/57/t Corpus Christi. . .96/80/0.00 . . .87/81/t . . . .86/80/t Dallas Ft Worth. .96/66/2.72 . . .94/74/t . . 98/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .89/67/0.00 . . .83/66/t . . . .78/61/t Denver. . . . . . . . .76/53/0.02 . 82/55/pc . . . 90/57/s Des Moines. . . . .79/64/0.05 . .68/57/sh . . 70/58/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .87/69/0.02 . . .80/66/t . . . .76/63/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .58/52/0.37 . .55/47/sh . . 53/49/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . .98/68/0.00 . 99/76/pc . 102/77/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .73/55/0.05 . .74/55/sh . . 73/53/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .63/57/1.72 . .60/53/sh . . 71/52/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .85/36/0.00 . . .87/42/s . . . 86/46/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .91/70/1.38 . . .78/62/t . . 67/59/sh Rapid City . . . . . .69/55/0.25 . 77/53/pc . . 79/56/pc Green Bay. . . . . .64/60/0.10 . . .71/58/t . . 65/55/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . .95/60/0.00 . . .96/63/s . . . 91/58/s Greensboro. . . . .96/68/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . 91/68/pc Richmond . . . . . .92/66/0.00 . 96/74/pc . . . .92/71/t Harrisburg. . . . . .86/66/0.27 . . .85/70/t . . . .87/67/t Rochester, NY . . .82/59/0.00 . . .79/66/t . . . .81/63/t Hartford, CT . . . .86/59/0.00 . . .77/64/t . . . .73/60/t Sacramento. . . .102/63/0.00 . .101/61/s . . . 92/59/s Helena. . . . . . . . .80/44/0.00 . 84/53/pc . . . .80/51/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .87/70/0.05 . 79/64/pc . . 77/63/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .85/72/0.03 . 88/74/pc . . . 88/75/s Salt Lake City . . .80/52/0.00 . . .87/62/s . . 94/63/pc Houston . . . . . . .98/82/0.00 . . .92/77/t . . . .94/78/t San Antonio . . . .99/78/0.00 . . .96/75/t . . 95/74/pc Huntsville . . . . . .91/73/0.22 . . .86/69/t . . . .89/69/t San Diego . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . .70/62/s . . . 72/62/s Indianapolis . . . .87/71/0.00 . . .82/65/t . . . .76/62/t San Francisco . . .86/58/0.00 . . .76/55/s . . . 70/52/s Jackson, MS . . . .86/70/0.50 . . .91/73/t . . 90/70/pc San Jose . . . . . . .96/65/0.00 . . .91/56/s . . . 80/54/s Madison, WI . . . .87/64/0.00 . . .72/59/t . . 68/56/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .82/49/0.00 . . .86/56/s . . . 91/57/s Jacksonville. . . . .97/74/0.00 . 97/73/pc . . . .92/72/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . .64/48/sh . . 59/48/sh Kansas City. . . . .78/64/0.02 . 76/60/pc . . 79/59/pc Amsterdam. . . . .70/59/0.00 . 64/57/pc . . 63/54/sh Lansing . . . . . . . .88/70/0.01 . . .80/62/t . . 71/60/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . . .81/70/s . . . 82/69/s Las Vegas . . . . .102/75/0.00 . .108/85/s . . 109/84/s Auckland. . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . 60/55/pc . . 62/57/sh Lexington . . . . . .87/72/0.00 . . .82/66/t . . . .83/63/t Baghdad . . . . . .107/78/0.00 . .113/89/s . . 112/84/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .72/63/0.06 . 74/58/pc . . 77/59/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . 87/79/pc . . . .90/80/t Little Rock. . . . . .87/80/0.00 . . .90/68/t . . . .90/69/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . 94/74/pc . . . .95/69/t Los Angeles. . . . .70/60/0.00 . . .72/65/s . . . 70/63/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .82/73/0.00 . . .88/76/s . . . 87/75/s Louisville . . . . . . .89/73/0.34 . . .83/68/t . . . .82/64/t Berlin. . . . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . .82/55/t . . . 73/56/c Memphis. . . . . . .85/75/0.01 . . .89/71/t . . . .89/72/t Bogota . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . 66/52/pc . . 64/51/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .92/78/0.00 . 91/79/pc . . . .89/78/t Budapest. . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .90/66/s . . . 93/67/s Milwaukee . . . . .77/55/0.07 . . .70/60/t . . 67/57/sh Buenos Aires. . . .57/43/0.00 . . .60/49/s . . 58/41/sh Minneapolis . . . .79/64/1.18 . .69/55/sh . . 64/54/sh Cabo San Lucas .90/77/0.00 . 92/70/pc . . 90/71/pc Nashville . . . . . . .87/72/0.03 . . .88/68/t . . . .89/66/t Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/72/0.00 . . .91/70/s . . . 92/69/s New Orleans. . . .93/78/0.00 . . .90/75/t . . . .88/74/t Calgary . . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . .79/55/sh . . 77/48/sh New York . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .80/69/t . . . .81/70/t Cancun . . . . . . . .86/79/0.00 . 88/77/pc . . 87/76/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .86/71/0.00 . . .82/71/t . . . .84/70/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.00 . 61/45/pc . . 59/43/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .88/67/0.00 . 97/75/pc . . . .92/76/t Edinburgh . . . . . .55/52/0.00 . .59/46/sh . . 60/43/sh Oklahoma City . .95/62/0.00 . 95/69/pc . . 94/73/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .84/55/0.00 . . .73/61/t . . . .68/54/t Omaha . . . . . . . .76/64/0.32 . 72/58/pc . . 74/58/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . . .71/48/s . . . 73/49/s Orlando. . . . . . . .97/75/0.00 . . .94/75/t . . . .93/75/t Hong Kong . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . .87/83/t . . . .88/82/t Palm Springs. . .113/80/0.00 . .113/78/s . . 109/75/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .81/70/0.00 . 81/68/pc . . 82/67/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .87/68/0.45 . . .75/60/t . . 69/59/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .91/63/0.00 . . .85/64/s . . . 84/63/s Philadelphia . . . .85/68/0.02 . . .85/73/t . . . .89/72/t Johannesburg . . .64/37/0.00 . . .64/39/s . . . 65/40/s Phoenix. . . . . . .109/78/0.00 . .113/85/s . . 112/84/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . 72/65/pc . . 71/64/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .86/68/0.24 . . .81/65/t . . . .80/63/t Lisbon . . . . . . . . .86/63/0.00 . 79/61/pc . . 75/64/pc Portland, ME. . . .82/57/0.00 . 71/56/pc . . . .68/56/t London . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .64/50/sh . . 65/48/sh Providence . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .77/63/c . . . .70/60/t Madrid . . . . . . . .99/64/0.00 . . .93/63/s . . . 90/57/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .95/71/0.00 . 99/73/pc . . . .94/71/t Manila. . . . . . . . .88/77/0.00 . . .87/82/t . . . .85/78/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . 96/77/pc . . . .93/75/t Seattle. . . . . . . . .78/54/0.00 . 66/52/pc . . 63/50/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .70/61/0.11 . .63/53/sh . . 71/52/pc Spokane . . . . . . .77/51/0.00 . 85/57/pc . . 72/46/pc Springfield, MO. .85/64/0.19 . 83/62/pc . . . .86/63/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .95/78/0.00 . . .93/78/t . . . .90/77/t Tucson. . . . . . . .105/67/0.00 . .109/73/s . . 108/74/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .90/70/0.00 . 93/67/pc . . . .94/70/t Washington, DC .87/70/0.01 . . .90/74/t . . . .89/71/t Wichita . . . . . . . .87/63/0.00 . 88/63/pc . . 89/67/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .84/50/0.00 . 89/56/pc . . . 76/47/s Yuma. . . . . . . . .110/77/0.00 . .114/79/s . . 113/79/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .111/90/0.00 . .114/88/s . 113/86/pc Mexico City. . . . .75/59/0.15 . . .76/59/t . . . .77/60/t Montreal. . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . 81/66/pc . . 68/57/sh Moscow . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .68/54/t . . . 75/55/s Nairobi . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .77/62/sh . . 75/59/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .93/81/0.00 . 91/78/pc . . 90/77/pc New Delhi. . . . .100/86/0.00 . . .95/84/t . . 97/83/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .82/72/t . . 83/71/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .64/50/t . . . .63/46/t Ottawa . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . .77/63/sh . . 64/59/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . .72/57/c . . 66/50/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .86/68/0.00 . 75/66/pc . . 76/65/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . . .88/68/s . . . 90/70/s Santiago . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . . .56/41/s . . . 61/42/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . 73/56/pc . . . 78/57/c Sapporo. . . . . . . .73/73/0.00 . .73/62/sh . . 67/58/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .80/71/t . . . .76/68/t Shanghai. . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . . .84/75/t . . . 85/76/c Singapore . . . . . .90/82/0.00 . . .89/78/t . . . .88/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .66/52/0.00 . 77/55/pc . . 76/57/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .58/48/s . . . 65/49/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .91/81/0.00 . 89/80/pc . . 91/81/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . .82/72/s . . . 83/71/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . 84/72/pc . . 83/73/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . . .70/64/t . . 70/62/sh Vancouver. . . . . .72/55/0.00 . 70/52/pc . . . 66/52/c Vienna. . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . . .86/68/s . . . .84/55/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . 82/64/pc . . . 79/57/c

State sued over transgender insurance claim Proposal to compensate The Associated Press SALEM — A national civil rights group has filed a lawsuit against the state of Oregon, claiming it denied insurance coverage for a transgender state worker. Lambda Legal said it filed the suit Tuesday on behalf of Alec Esquivel, a law school graduate who is an Oregon Court of Appeals clerk. The legal group says Esquivel was a woman who is making the transition to a male gender identity. As part of his transition-related

health plan, Esquivel’s doctor recommended he undergo a hysterectomy because of a heightened risk for uterine and ovarian cancer. Esquivel’s doctor submitted a request for insurance coverage that was denied last year. The lawsuit argues that Oregon’s antidiscrimination law prohibits an employer from denying insurance coverage on the basis of gender identity. State officials were not immediately available.

Alec Esquivel, left, and his attorney, Dru Levasseur, talk with news people outside the Marion County Courthouse, in Salem, after filing a lawsuit against the Oregon Public Employees Benefit Board on Tuesday. Timothy Gonzalez Statesman Journal

for wolf kills is revived The Associated Press SALEM — Oregon lawmakers have revived a bill to compensate ranchers for livestock killed by wolves. The Oregonian reports the measure was revived Monday following negotiations involving conservationists, cattlemen, the Oregon Farm Bureau, tribal officials and the governor’s office. House Bill 3560 would direct the Oregon Department of Ag-

riculture to establish and implement a wolf depredation fund providing $100,000 to be used for grants to counties dealing with wolf issues. The proposal was a top priority for agricultural groups but had been sidelined in committee since April. To date, state officials have confirmed 41 livestock losses due to wolves, with the last confirmed kill on June 5.


S

Tennis Inside Serena Williams advances at Wimbledon, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011

TEE TO GREEN

GOLF

WCL BASEBALL

Elks hold off rally for win over Falcons

Local golfers advance to match play at Oregon Am PORTLAND — Eight of nine Central Oregon golfers advanced into match play Tuesday at the 102nd Oregon Amateur Championship. Amy Anderson, a former Weber State University golfer who won the Bend Ladies Invitational just two weeks ago, shot 1-over-par 72 Tuesday at Waverley Country Club to finish 36 holes of stroke play at 10 over, earning the No. 8 seed. Anderson will play Bend’s Madison Odiorne, a 14-year-old who earned the No. 25 seed, today in the first round. The Oregon Amateur began with two rounds of stroke play. Thirty-two of the 47 golfers in the women’s field advanced to match play, which begins today, and are seeded based on their finish in the stroke-play rounds. Sixtyfour of the 108 golfers in the women’s field advanced. Bend golfers Tiffany Schoning, a senior-to-be at Portland State, and Chelsey Lind, of Oregon State, tied at 15 over to earn the No. 16 and 17 seeds, respectively. The two will face each other in today’s first round of match play. Bend’s Kailin Downs, who won the 2002 Oregon Amateur, earned the No. 29 seed, and Bend’s Rosie Cook finished with the No. 30 seed. On the men’s side, Redmond’s Alex Fitch, a seniorto-be at Linfield College in McMinnville, struggled to a 4over 74 to finish at 1 over and in a tie for 12th place. Bend’s Jesse Heinly, a sophomoreto-be at Concordia University, finished stroke play at 6 over and with the No. 30 seed. Both sides of the Oregon Amateur, the oldest and most prestigious amateur tournament in the state, will end Saturday with 36-hole championship matches. For complete results, visit www. oregonamateur.org. — Bulletin staff report

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Papers suggest Oregon paid for old recruit information PORTLAND — The University of Oregon has released documents related to its use of recruiting services that suggest the school paid for information that was outdated. The documents include a “2010 National High School Evaluation Booklet” that actually includes prep athletes who graduated in 2009 and were a part of that year’s recruiting class. It was part of a package that purportedly was for athletes entering school in 2011. The package was prepared by Texas-based Complete Scouting Services, an agency run by Will Lyles. Oregon paid Lyles $25,000 in February 2010. The NCAA is looking into the payment but will not comment on pending investigations. Oregon maintains it did nothing wrong by paying Lyles for the information. Many college programs pay for such services. Oregon’s payment to Lyles has been questioned because of his relationship with Ducks running backs Lache Seastrunk and LaMichael James. Oregon paid Lyles soon after Seastrunk signed a letter of intent with Oregon. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 College baseball ........................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 NFL ........................................... D4 Track & Field ............................ D4 NBA .......................................... D4 Tee to Green......................... D5, 6

D

Bulletin staff report

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Dennis Haniford, of La Pine, chips onto the 18th green while playing with friends at Quail Run Golf course in La Pine Sunday afternoon.

CENTRAL OREGON GOLF COURSE TOUR

Quail Run La Pine facility is among the better public courses in the region, even if some people don’t know it Editor’s note: This is another in a seasonlong series visiting each public and semiprivate golf course in Central Oregon. LA PINE — verything seemed to be going so well on the back nine of Quail Run Golf Course. After alternating par and bogey passing the turn, I stepped up to the straightforward par-4 15th hole. An awful shank left me under a bush in a small meadow left of the fairway. Then I got greedy trying to salvage the hole and went for too much, losing the ball right into a dense forest of ponderosa pines that can wreak havoc on a round of golf at the La Pine course. There was no saving par from there, nor bogey. The hole was much more of a score killer than that. The 388-yard 15th hole is a lot like many of the holes at Quail Run, a

E

Breaking down the course

ZACK HALL course much better and more challenging than the uninitiated might think. From the tee, the hole is straight with a handful of bunkers. But in reality, one misstep that sends a ball bounding away from the fairway could mean doom for a scorecard. The forest always seems to loom, ready to snatch a poor shot and turn it into a triple bogey, even without the burden of a penalty stroke. Pine trees sure meant trouble for me on a recent cloudless and warm day. About 25 miles south of Bend, and a few miles west off U.S. Highway 97, Quail Run is off the beaten path for most Central Oregon golfers. Even if

The basics General information about Quail Run Golf Course Number of holes: 18 Status: Open seasonally Location: 16725 Northridge Drive, La Pine Tee times: 541-536-1303 or 800-895GOLF Course stats: Par 72, 6,897 yards Green fees: Through Sept. 30, $55 daily; after 2 p.m., $35 daily. Oct. 1 through end of season, $42 daily. Power cart: $13 Director of golf: Todd Sickles Course designer: Jim Ramey (original nine, 1991; second nine, 2006) Extras: Driving range, putting and chipping area, practice bunkers, snack bar, pro shop Website: www.golfquailrun.com

FOOTBALL you make the proper right turn off 97 onto Prairie Drive, you still have to find the course through a maze of roads and lackluster signage. And the course gets more snow than most courses in the region because of its elevation, usually forcing Quail Run to open for the season later and close earlier. See Quail Run / D6

A closer look at Quail Run. For more information on the items below, see Page D6.

Deadliest sport among young athletes found to be football, study reveals By Oliver Renick

DIFFICULTY

STRATEGY

EXTRAS

Quail Run, while fair, can be a tough test of golf for even highly skilled golfers. At 6,897 yards from the back tees, the course is not overly long, which makes it navigable for novices. But golfers with accuracy problems, particularly from the tee, can pay a steep price.

Golfers who struggle with a driver will be wellserved by leaving it in the bag. A relatively dense forest can turn even straightforward holes into an adventure. Approach shots should be played below the hole to account for Quail Run’s hard, fast greens.

Quail Run’s clubhouse is not fancy, but it houses an inexpensive snack bar and wellstocked pro shop. Full-size driving range uses grass tee boxes, and a short-game practice area rests nearby. The practice putting green is right where it should be: just off the first tee.

Bloomberg News

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Jeter’s 3,000th comes with marketing possibilities By Richard Sandomir New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — Derek Jeter’s 3,000th hit will be a cause for celebration, marketing and — not least of all — digging up dirt. After the game, a groundskeeper will tote a shovel and bucket onto the field to scoop five gallons of dirt from the batter’s box and shortstop’s patch. In baseball’s version of preserving the chain of evidence, the bucket will be sealed with tape and verified as the dirt beneath Jeter’s feet with tamper-proof holograms “It will be scooped in our presence,” said Cosmo Lubrano, an authenticator for Major League Baseball who would prove the dirt’s veracity if the 3,000th hit occurs at Yankee Stadium as he follows a bucket-carrying groundskeeper, probably Dan Cunningham. “We’re there as a witness.” The dirt — from Yankee Stadium if all goes perfectly, but from some ballpark — will find its way into a vast and lucrative universe of celebrity memorabilia and collectibles, much of it orchestrated by a company named Steiner Sports. Tablespoonfuls of the dirt will be poured into capsules to dangle on key chains; ladled into disks to be framed with photographs of the hit (in what is called a dirt collage); and glued into the interlocking ‘NY’ carved into commemorative bats. “That bucket of dirt will go a long way,” said Brandon Steiner, the chairman of Steiner Sports, who has a memorabilia partnership with the Yankees and a marketing deal with Jeter. See Jeter / D4

KELOWNA, British Columbia — Cullen Hendrickson went two for four with a grand slam home run in the top of the fourth inning to propel the Bend Elks past the Kelowna Falcons 9-8 on Tuesday. The Elks (8-6 West Coast League) pounded out 12 hits and were issued 10 bases on ball against the host Falcons. Hendrickson, Derek Blankenship, Kyle Buchanan and Tony DeMello all recorded two hits against Kelowna. Additionally, Jordan Brower went three for five with two runs scored and an RBI for Bend. Starting pitcher Jeff Brigham picked up the win for the Elks, allowing two hits and no runs in five innings of work. With Bend leading 9-1, the Falcons (3-11 WCL) scored seven runs in the bottom of the eighth to make things interesting, but never took the lead. Stephen Ostapeck pitched 1 1⁄3 innings of shutout ball to earn the save for the Elks. Bend, which is two games back of WCL West Division-leading Kitsap (11-5), grabbed a 2-0 lead in the top of the second off RBI singles by Brower and Blankenship. The Elks made it 8-0 in the fourth, in large part because of Hendrickson’s bases-loaded homer. Bend almost gave up its early lead in the bottom of the eighth inning when Kelowna strung together seven runs to make the score 9-8. Ostapeck closed the door on a potential Falcon rally, though, and the Elks held on for their third consecutive victory. The two teams play again today at 6:35 p.m. in Kelowna. Also on Tuesday, the Elks’ split squad beat Thurston County 6-5 in Bend.

Ruth Fremson / The New York Times

Sports memorabilia related to Derek Jeter being sold to commemorate when he gets his 3,000th hit, at Steiner Sports in New Rochelle, N.Y.

NEW YORK — Researchers who analyzed 30 years of trauma-related sports deaths among youths found that football accounted for 57 percent of the fatalities — and that many would have been prevented if athletes with head injuries had been kept off the field. The report, which reviewed information from a U.S. registry of 1,827 sudden deaths of young athletes from 1980 to 2009, found that 261, or 14 percent, were caused by blunt trauma. The study, published Monday in the Journal of Pediatrics, analyzed data on fatal injuries that occurred during 22 different sports. Twelve percent of the 138 football deaths caused by head or neck injuries involved students who returned to the game after a concussion, researchers said. In some of these “second-impact syndrome” deaths, athletes were cleared for play despite symptoms from a previous head injury. More education is needed for coaches, trainers, parents and students on the consequences of repeat head blows, the researchers said in the report. “Second-impact syndrome is avoidable,” said study author Dr. Barry Maron of the Minneapolis Heart Institute Foundation, a cardiovascular education and research center. “It’s obviously a coaching and medical issue to avoid this, independent of the equipment used, so football players do not return prematurely to play.” See Football / D4


D2 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY TENNIS 4 a.m. — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2. Noon — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — College World Series, Game 9, North Carolina vs. Vanderbilt, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals, Root Sports.

WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division Wenatchee AppleSox Walla Walla Sweets Bellingham Bells Kelowna Falcons West Division

5 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA Draft preview, ESPN.

THURSDAY TENNIS 4 a.m. — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2. Noon — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals, Root Sports. 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals or Oakland Athletics at New York Mets, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — College World Series, Game 10, California vs. Virginia, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals or Arizona Diamondbacks at Kansas City Royals, MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA Draft preview, ESPN. 4:30 p.m. — NBA Draft, ESPN.

SOCCER 7 p.m. — MLS, New York Red Bulls at Seattle Sounders, ESPN2. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Auto racing • NASCAR fines JGR crew chiefs $50,000 each: NASCAR fined Joe Gibbs Racing’s three crew chiefs $50,000 each Tuesday for bringing unapproved oil pans to Michigan last week. Mike Ford, Dave Rogers and Greg Zipadelli also were placed on probation through the end of the year, as was JGR competition director Jimmy Makar and car chiefs Chris Gillin (No. 11), Wesley Sherrill (No. 18) and Jason Shapiro (No. 20). NASCAR discovered the unapproved oil pans in the cars of Kyle Busch, Denny Hamlin and Joey Logano during a pre-practice inspection Friday at Michigan International Speedway. NASCAR never said if the oil pans were illegal, but confiscated them because they had not been submitted for approval before arriving at the track.

Basketball • Raptors hire Mavs assistant Dwane Casey as coach: The Toronto Raptors hired Dwayne Casey as their coach on Tuesday, nine days after the Dallas assistant helped the Mavericks win the championship. Casey succeeds Jay Triano, a Canadian who became a consultant after the Raptors finished 22-60. Casey was the head coach of the Minnesota Timberwolves from June 2005 to January 2007, compiling a 43-59 record. Casey said his No. 1 goal is to give the Raptors a “defensive identity.” He partially credited the Mavericks’ performance against LeBron James and the Miami Heat in the NBA finals to the breaking down of hockey video.

Kitsap BlueJackets Corvallis Knights Bend Elks Klamath Falls Gems Cowlitz Black Bears

Football • Ohio State drops review of players’ car purchases: Ohio State University on Tuesday dropped its review of car purchases by football players and family members after two separate investigations found dealerships made money on almost all of the sales. The university made its decision in light of a report by the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles and a separate review by the Ohio Independent Automobile Dealers Association. “We have seen no evidence that would lead us to believe that Ohio State student athletes violated any policies when purchasing used cars,” said university spokesman Jim Lynch. The reviews were launched after questions about players’ car purchases arose in the wake of a scandal in which some players received cash and tattoos for autographs, championship rings and equipment. —The Associated Press

W 15 5 5 3

L 2 7 10 11

W 11 7 8 5 5

L 6 6 6 7 9

Tuesday’s Games Bend 9, Kelowna 8 Klamath Falls 7, Kitsap 3 Cowlitz 4, Bellingham 3 Wenatchee 4, Corvallis 3 Today’s Games Bend at Kelowna, 6:35 p.m. Cowlitz at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m. Corvallis at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Kitsap at Klamath Falls, 7:05 p.m. Thursday’s Games Kelowna at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Walla Walla at Corvallis, 6:40 p.m. Kitsap at Klamath Falls, 7:05 p.m. Tuesday’s Summary

Elks 9, Falcons 8 Bend 020 600 100 — 9 12 0 Kelowna 000 001 070 — 8 8 1 Bringham, Brennen (6), Grazzini (8), Ostapeck (8) and Demello. Dickson, Marris (3), Hermes (5), Paterson (8), Stafford (8), Bowen (9) and Norris-Jones. W — Bringham. L — Dickson. 2B — Bend: Christian, Demello. HR — Bend: Hendrickson. Kelowna: Freisen.

College NCAA College World Series Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT ——— Double Elimination x-if necessary Saturday, June 18 Vanderbilt 7, North Carolina 3 Florida 8, Texas 4 Sunday, June 19 Virginia 4, California 1 South Carolina 5, Texas A&M 4 Monday, June 20 Game 5 — North Carolina 3, Texas 0, Texas eliminated Game 6 — Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1 Tuesday, June 21 Game 7 — California 7, Texas A&M 3, Texas A&M eliminated Game 8 — South Carolina 7, Virginia 1 Today, June 22 Game 9 — North Carolina vs. Vanderbilt, 4 p.m. Thursday, June 23 Game 10 — California vs. Virginia, 4 p.m. Friday, June 24 Game 11 — Florida vs. Game 9 winner, 11 a.m. Game 12 — South Carolina vs. Game 10 winner, 4 p.m. Saturday, June 25 x-Game 13 — Florida vs. Game 9 winner, 11 a.m. x-Game 14 — South Carolina vs. Game 10 winner, 4 p.m. Championship Series Best-of-3 Monday, June 27 — Game 1, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 28 — Game 2, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 29 — Game 3, 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT Eastern Conference W L Pct Connecticut 4 1 .800 Indiana 4 3 .571 Chicago 3 3 .500 New York 2 4 .333 Atlanta 2 5 .286 Washington 1 5 .167 Western Conference W L Pct Minnesota 5 1 .833

GB — 1 1½ 2½ 3 3½ GB —

Los Angeles San Antonio Seattle Phoenix Tulsa

4 1 4 1 3 2 2 3 1 6 ——— Tuesday’s Games Atlanta 71, Chicago 68 Indiana 89, Washington 80 Phoenix 105, San Antonio 98 Seattle 82, Tulsa 77 Los Angeles 96, New York 91 Today’s Games No games scheduled Thursday’s Games New York at Tulsa, 9:30 a.m. Connecticut at Chicago, 5 p.m.

.800 ½ .800 ½ .600 1½ .400 2½ .143 4½

TENNIS Wimbledon

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts New York 5 2 8 23 Philadelphia 6 4 4 22 Columbus 5 4 6 21 Houston 4 6 6 18 D.C. 4 5 5 17 Chicago 2 4 9 15 New England 3 7 6 15 Toronto FC 2 6 9 15 Sporting Kansas City 3 6 4 13 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts Los Angeles 9 2 7 34 FC Dallas 8 4 4 28 Seattle 6 4 7 25 Real Salt Lake 6 3 4 22 Colorado 5 4 7 22 San Jose 5 5 4 19 Portland 5 6 3 18 Chivas USA 4 6 5 17 Vancouver 2 6 8 14 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games Sporting Kansas City at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Thursday’s Game New York at Seattle FC, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston at D.C. United, 3 p.m.

Los Angeles at San Jose, 3:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Portland at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.

GF 24 16 16 19 19 17 12 15 17

GA 16 12 16 20 25 20 19 26 20

GF 25 20 19 15 18 20 18 18 17

GA 15 17 15 8 17 17 22 18 22

Tuesday At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club Wimbledon, England Purse: $23.6 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Gilles Simon (15), France, def. Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 7-6 (3). Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Janko Tipsarevic (23), Serbia, 7-5, 3-1, retired. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, def. Daniel Cox, Britain, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4. Juan Ignacio Chela (25), Argentina, def. Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 6-2. Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez (26), Spain, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 6-3, retired. Tobias Kamke, Germany, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 5-7, 6-1. Juan Martin del Potro (24), Argentina, def. Flavio Cipolla, Italy, 6-1, 6-4, 6-3. Andy Roddick (8), United States, def. Andreas Beck, Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (6), 6-3. Victor Hanescu, Czech Republic, def. Jaroslav Pospisil, Romania, 6-4, 6-3, 6-2. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Marin Cilic (27), Croatia, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Fernando Verdasco (21), Spain, def. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 2-6, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (6), 9-7. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2. Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 7-6 (2), 6-4, 6-2. Bernard Tomic, Australia, def. Nikolay Davydenko (29), Russia, 7-5, 6-3, 7-5. Lukasz Kubot, France, def. Arnaud Clement, Poland, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6, 5-7, 6-4. Karol Beck, Slovakia, def. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 4-6, 7-6 (6), 4-6, 6-2, 6-4. David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Benoit Paire, France, 6-4, 6-4, 6-4. Mikhail Youzhny (18), Russia, def. Juan Monaco, Argen-

tina, 4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 4-6, 6-4. Florian Mayer (20), Germany, def. Daniel Evans, Britain, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (1), 3-6, 6-4. Rik de Voest, South Africa, def. Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2. Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 7-5. Viktor Troicki (13), Serbia, def. Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 3-6, 6-0, 7-6 (3), 6-3. Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Conor Niland, Ireland, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (7), 4-6, 6-4. Marcos Baghdatis (32), Cyprus, def. James Blake, United States, 6-4, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 4-6, 6-4. David Nalbandian (28), Argentina, def. Julian Reister, Germany, 7-5, 6-2, 6-3. Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Jeremy Chardy, France, 6-4, 6-1, 6-1. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, def. Kenny de Schepper, France, 6-7 (6), 3-6, 6-3, 6-1, 6-4. Ricardo Mello, Brazil, def. Frank Dancevic, Canada, 3-6, 3-6, 6-4, 7-6 (6), 6-2. Michael Llodra (19), France, def. James Ward, Britain, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-3. Fernando Gonzalez, Chile, def. Alexandr Dolgopolov (22), Ukraine, 6-3, 6-7 (6), 7-6 (3), 6-4. Nicolas Almagro (16), Spain, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Lleyton Hewitt, Australia, def. Kei Nishikori, Japan, 6-1, 7-6 (4), 6-7 (7), 6-3. Robin Soderling (5), Sweden, def. Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 6-4, 6-4, 2-6, 7-6 (5). Somdev Devvarman, India, def. Denis Gremelmayr, Germany, 6-4, 4-2, retired. John Isner, United States, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 7-6 (6). Ryan Harrison, United States, def. Ivan Dodig, Croatia, 7-6 (5), 6-0, 7-5. Igor Andreev, Russia, def. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, 6-4, 7-6 (5), 6-7 (4), 4-6, 6-3. Yen-hsun Lu, Taiwan, def. Tommy Robredo, Spain, 6-4, 6-4, 6-1. Jurgen Melzer (11), Austria, def. Alejandro Falla, Colombia, 3-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2, 6-2. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, def. Go Soeda, Japan, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 6-2. Andreas Haider-Maurer, Austria, def. Florent Serra, France, 7-6 (5), 6-3, 6-3. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, vs. Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, 3-6, 6-3, 5-5, susp., darkness. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, leads Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (7), 6-4, 3-5, susp., darkness. Grigor Dimitrov, Bulgaria, leads Cedrik-Marcel Stebe, Germany, 7-5, 7-5, 3-3, susp., darkness. Women First Round Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez, Spain, def. Jelena Jankovic (15), Serbia, 5-7, 6-4, 6-3. Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (14), Russia, def. Lesia Tsurenko, Ukraine, 6-4, 7-6 (3). Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, def. Aleksandra Wozniak, Canada, 7-6 (7), 6-4. Marina Erakovic, New Zealand, def. Chang Kai-chen, Taiwan, 6-4, 6-2. Virginie Razzano, France, def. Sania Mirza, India, 7-6 (4), 2-6, 6-3. Stephanie Dubois, Canada, def. Irina Falconi, United States, 6-2, 6-2. Simona Halep, Romania, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-1, 6-2. Anne Keothavong, Britain, def. Naomi Broady, Britain, 6-2, 6-4. Petra Kvitova (8), Czech Republic, def. Alexa Glatch, United States, 6-2, 6-2. Roberta Vinci (29), Italy, def. Vera Dushevina, Russia, 7-5, 6-2. Petra Martic, Croatia, def. Vania King, United States, 5-7, 6-2, 6-2. Nadia Petrova, Russia, def. Vesna Dolonts, Russia, 6-3, 6-4. Andrea Petkovic (11), Germany, def. Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, 6-3, 6-4. Tsvetana Pironkova (32), Bulgaria, def. Camila Giorgi, Italy, 6-2, 6-1. Serena Williams (7), United States, def. Aravane Rezai, France, 6-3, 3-6, 6-1. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, def. Alize Cornet, France, 7-5, 6-2. Tamira Paszek, Japan, def. Ayumi Morita, Austria, 5-7, 6-3, 6-0. Rebecca Marino, Canada, def. Patricia Mayr-Achleitner, Austria, 6-3, 7-6 (5). Daniela Hantuchova (25), Slovakia, def. Vitalia Diatchenko, Russia, 4-6, 7-6 (5), 6-3. Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, def. Sandra Zahlavova, Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-3, 8-6. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Arantxa Parra Santonja, Spain, 6-2, 6-1. Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, def. Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-4, 3-2, retired. Elena Baltacha, Britain, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 6-2, 6-4. Melinda Czink, Hungary, def. Sam Stosur (10), Australia, 6-3, 6-4.

Peng Shuai (20), China, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-0, 6-4. Anastasiya Yakimova, Belarus, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 4-6, 6-2, 6-1. Marion Bartoli (9), France, def. Kristyna Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-0, 6-2. Maria Kirilenko (26), Russia, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-2, 6-1. Maria Sharapova (5), Russia, def. Anna Chakvetadze, Russia, 6-2, 6-1. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, def. Emily WebleySmith, Britain, 6-3, 5-7, 8-6. Eleni Daniilidou, Greece, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 6-4, 6-4. Lucie Safarova (31), Czech Republic, def. Lucie Hradecka, Czech Republic, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3. Li Na (3), China, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-3, 6-3. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def. Romina Oprandi, Italy, 6-0, 6-1. Tamarine Tanasugarn, Thailand, def. Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 6-2, 6-3. Ana Ivanovic (18), Serbia, def. Melanie Oudin, United States, 6-0, 6-1.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Recalled OF Jarrod Dyson from Omaha (PCL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Called up Wily Mo Pena from Reno (PCL). Sent INF Sean Burroughs outright to Reno. ATLANTA BRAVES—Purchased the contract of INF Julio Lugo from Gwinnett (IL). Optioned Diory Hernandez to Gwinnett. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Acquired INF Josh Rodriguez from Cleveland for cash considerations and assigned him to Indianapolis (IL). SAN DIEGO PADRES—Placed 1B Brad Hawpe on the 15day DL. Optioned LHP Wade LeBlanc to Tucson (PCL). Called up LHP Josh Spence from San Antonio (Texas). Recalled C Kyle Phillips from Tucson. Designated OF Luis Durango for assignment. Requested unconditional release waivers on INF Jorge Cantu. ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Recalled 1B-OF Mark Hamilton from Memphis. Placed 1B Albert Pujols on the 15-day DL. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Agreed to terms with 3B Matt Skole, RHP Brian Dupra, RHP Manny Rodriguez, OF Caleb Ramsey, LHP Blake Monar, SS Deion Williams, LHP Todd Simko, RHP Travis Henke, 2B Khayyan Norfork, C Erick Fernandez, OF Shawn Pleffner, LHP Bobby Lucas, RHP Kenneth Ferrer, 2B Trey Karlen, RHP Alex Kreis, LHP Ben Hawkins, 3B Bryce Ortega and RHP Ritchie Mirowski. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE BOBCATS—Announced F Boris Diaw exercised his player option for next season. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Announced the resignation of president Robert Rowell to pursue other business endeavors. TORONTO RAPTORS—Named Dwane Casey coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Announced the League’s Board of Governors approved the sale of the Atlanta Thrashers to True North Sports & Entertainment, Ltd. and approved the immediate relocation of the franchise to Winnipeg, Manitoba. SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS—Suspended Real Salt Lake MF Jean Alexandre for one game and fined him $500 for a reckless tackle in a game against D.C. United on June 18. COLLEGE GEORGE WASHINGTON—Named Tamika Louis and Kristin Cole women’s assistant basketball coaches. MASSACHUSETTS—Named Malik Hall defensive line coach. MEMPHIS—Signed women’s basketball coach Melissa McFerrin to a one-year contract extension through the 201516 season.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,965 1,023 192 49 The Dalles 2,176 1,016 62 14 John Day 1,835 1,051 31 14 McNary 1,191 541 28 4 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 216,864 72,259 8,131 2,705 The Dalles 154,250 54,236 1,915 851 John Day 127,104 51,445 3,171 1,829 McNary 119,188 40,066 2,877 1,607

TENNIS: WIMBLEDON

COLLEGE BASEBALL

Healthy Serena wins her first-round match

Cal eliminates Texas A&M

Baseball • Clemens seeks to limit ex-teammates’ testimony: Roger Clemens and the prosecutors who have accused him of lying about using performance-enhancing drugs submitted a flurry of motions Tuesday ahead of next month’s criminal trial, with the baseball star trying to limit his former teammates’ testimony about drug use and the government trying to block revelations about his chief accuser’s investigation for sexual assault. The filings revolved around the prosecution’s leading witness — former Clemens trainer Brian McNamee, who says he injected the seven-time Cy Young Award winner with steroids and human growth hormone. Clemens has steadfastly disavowed using drugs and is scheduled to go on trial July 6 on charges that he lied when he made those denials during congressional testimony. Trial is expected to last four to six weeks in federal court in Washington, just a couple of blocks from where Clemens testified before Congress in 2008. • Reyes tells Mets he won’t negotiate during season: Jose Reyes has told the New York Mets he’s not interested in negotiating a new contract during the season. The star shortstop can become a free agent after the World Series and could be one of the biggest prizes on the open market next winter. Reyes says he wants to stay with the Mets, but doesn’t want any off-the-field distractions right now. Mets general manager Sandy Alderson says he reached out recently to Reyes’ agent, Peter Greenberg, and asked about the possibility of negotiating a new deal during the season. • McCourt lawyer: Selig hasn’t acted in good faith: Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig hasn’t acted in good faith by rejecting a proposed television deal involving the Los Angeles Dodgers and appeared determined to run Frank McCourt out of the sport, an attorney representing the embattled owner said Tuesday. A day after Selig announced he wouldn’t approve a Dodgers TV deal with Fox Sports — reportedly worth up to $3 billion — lawyer Robert Sacks questioned the commissioner’s intentions and warned that any potential takeover of the team by Major League Baseball would be met with resistance. McCourt hoped Selig would sign off on the transaction that would have provided him with $385 million up front and was vital to a binding settlement reached between him and his exwife and former Dodger CEO Jamie McCourt last week.

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASEBALL WCL

By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England — The 352 days Serena Williams lived through between Grand Slam appearances were filled with health problems and hospitalizations, doubts and depression. Cuts from glass on both feet. One subsequent operation on her right foot, then a second. Clots in her lungs. Surgery to remove a pool of blood under her skin. On and on it went. Finally healthy, and finally back at a major tournament, Williams was simply overwhelmed by it all at the conclusion of her match at Wimbledon on Tuesday. As soon as she snapped off her 13th ace of the afternoon to close an uneven performance in a 6-3, 3-6, 6-1 victory over Aravane Rezai of France in the first round, Williams placed her right palm on her chest. Her eyes welled with tears. By the time she walked to the net to shake hands with Rezai, Williams was crying. She sat in her sideline chair, covered her face with a tournament towel and sobbed. And she kept right on bawling through a postmatch TV interview with the BBC. “It definitely was so emotional for me because, you know, throughout the last 12 months, I’ve been through a lot of things that’s not normal; things you guys don’t even know about,” the 29-year-old American said at her news conference. “So it’s just been a long, arduous road. To stand up, still, is pretty awesome.” A first-round win at a Grand Slam tournament is not exactly the sort of achievement Williams normally would celebrate: Her career mark in such matches is now

Sang Tan / The Associated Press

Serena Williams returns a shot to France’s Aravane Rezai at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, Tuesday. 44-0, after all. But she’d never before been away from her sport for such an extended time — and, more to the point, she’d never before been through such a series of scares. Williams got the “all clear” from her doctor about 2½ months ago, only began practicing at full speed about one month ago, and played her first match anywhere since July at a grasscourt tournament in Eastbourne last week. Rezai, once ranked as high as 15th but now 61st, was struck by the high level of Williams’ play, particularly down the stretch — and by her reaction at match’s end. “It shows she’s not a machine; she’s a human being,” Rezai said. “We all have a heart. We all have emotions. ... If she wins the next two or three matches, I think she

can win the tournament.” Other winners included 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro, two-time French Open finalist Robin Soderling, top-seeded Caroline Wozniacki and French Open champion Li Na. But former No. 1 Jelena Jankovic lost in the first round. Day 2 of Wimbledon also featured a rematch of the longest match in tennis history. In a sequel that couldn’t possibly live up to the original, John Isner beat Nicolas Mahut 7-6 (4), 6-2, 7-6 (6) in 2 hours, 3 minutes — 9 hours, 2 minutes shorter, and 149 fewer games, than their first-round match at the All England Club a year ago, when Isner won 70-68 in the fifth set. “It wasn’t easy,” Isner said, “but obviously it was considerably quicker than the last time we played.”

The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — California coach David Esquer called on all hands to save his baseball program, and he’s doing the same to keep his team playing in the College World Series. Freshman utilityman Derek Campbell drove in two runs out of the No. 9 spot, closer Matt Flemer pitched three scoreless innings in his longest outing of the year and the Golden Bears kept up their improbable postseason run with a 7-3 victory over Texas A&M. “I’m happy our guys kind of grinded it out, because that’s kind of how we do it. We don’t do it easy,” Esquer said. The Bears (38-22) won their first CWS game in three appearances since 1980 and will play Virginia on Thursday in another elimination game. Also on Tuesday: Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vanderbilt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 OMAHA, Neb. — Florida’s Steven Rodriguez pitched nohit relief for 4 1⁄3 innings and the Gators finished a victory over Vanderbilt in the completion of a College World Series game suspended because of inclement weather. Florida (52-17) needs a win over Vanderbilt or North Carolina on Friday to reach the best-of-three finals. South Carolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Virginia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 OMAHA, Neb. — Colby Holmes, John Taylor and Matt Price combined on a five-hitter and defending national champion South Carolina tied the record for consecutive NCAA tournament wins with a victory over Virginia. The Gamecocks (52-14) are off until Friday and would have to be beaten twice to not return to the best-of-three finals.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL BOXSCORES Rangers 5, Astros 4 (11 innings) Houston Bourgeois rf Bourn cf Keppinger 2b Ca.Lee dh Michaels lf C.Johnson 3b Wallace 1b Barmes ss Corporan c Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 4 43

R H 1 3 2 3 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 4 12

BI 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 3 6

Avg. .359 .285 .326 .265 .194 .242 .296 .219 .133

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 3 0 1 0 2 1 .236 Andrus ss 5 0 0 0 0 3 .274 J.Hamilton lf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .295 A.Beltre 3b 5 0 0 0 0 0 .262 Mi.Young dh 5 1 3 1 0 1 .312 N.Cruz rf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .236 Moreland 1b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .294 Teagarden c 3 1 2 0 0 1 .176 a-Torrealba ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .257 En.Chavez cf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .333 Totals 40 5 11 5 2 9 Houston 102 000 100 00 — 4 12 0 Texas 010 100 110 01 — 5 11 2 No outs when winning run scored. a-lined out for Teagarden in the 8th. E—Kinsler (7), Andrus (14). LOB—Houston 7, Texas 8. 2B—Bourgeois (5), Bourn 2 (19). 3B—En.Chavez (2). HR—Mi.Young (4), off Lyles; N.Cruz (16), off Lyles; J.Hamilton (6), off Escalona; Moreland (10), off Del Rosario. RBIs—Bourn 2 (25), Keppinger 2 (11), J.Hamilton (32), Mi.Young (46), N.Cruz (39), Moreland (22), En.Chavez (7). SB—Bourn 2 (32). CS—Bourgeois (3), Keppinger (1). Runners left in scoring position—Houston 3 (Keppinger 3); Texas 2 (Andrus, Torrealba). GIDP—Keppinger, Barmes. DP—Houston 1 (Keppinger, Wallace); Texas 2 (A.Beltre, Kinsler, Moreland), (A.Beltre, Kinsler, Moreland). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lyles 7 7 3 3 2 6 100 4.20 Escalona 0 1 1 1 0 0 4 2.31 Fe.Rodriguez 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 6 3.29 Abad 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 6.32 DlRsario L, 0-2 2 1-3 2 1 1 0 3 28 4.59 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Wilson 6 2-3 11 4 4 0 4 107 3.17 M.Lowe 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 12 4.29 Feliz 2 1 0 0 0 2 35 1.98 Tteyama W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 1 0 19 3.52 Escalona pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Del Rosario pitched to 1 batter in the 11th. Inherited runners-scored—Abad 2-0, Del Rosario 20, M.Lowe 2-0. HBP—by Fe.Rodriguez (N.Cruz). T—3:15. A—33,533 (49,170).

Brewers 5, Rays 1 Tampa Bay Damon lf Zobrist 2b Joyce rf Longoria 3b Kotchman 1b B.Upton cf Jaso c Brignac ss Hellickson p a-Fuld ph A.Russell p Howell p C.Ramos p Sonnanstine p Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 1 11

Avg. .267 .264 .309 .231 .339 .218 .224 .177 .000 .235 ------.000

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Weeks 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .287 Morgan cf 2 0 0 0 0 0 .336 c-Jo.Wilson ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .241 C.Gomez cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .213 Braun lf 3 0 1 2 1 0 .310 Fielder 1b 2 0 1 1 2 0 .303 McGehee 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .229 C.Hart rf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .265 Y.Betancourt ss 4 1 1 1 0 0 .229 Loe p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Axford p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Lucroy c 4 1 3 0 0 0 .275 Greinke p 2 0 1 0 0 0 .222 b-Counsell ph-ss 1 1 0 0 1 0 .207 Totals 28 5 7 5 7 3 Tampa Bay 000 000 100 — 1 4 0 Milwaukee 110 000 30x — 5 7 1 a-grounded out for Hellickson in the 7th. b-walked for Greinke in the 7th. c-walked for Morgan in the 7th. E—Fielder (5). LOB—Tampa Bay 6, Milwaukee 8. 2B—B.Upton (12), Jaso (8). HR—Y.Betancourt (4), off Hellickson. RBIs—Jaso (16), Braun 2 (53), Fielder (63), McGehee (32), Y.Betancourt (25). S—Morgan. SF—McGehee. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 2 (B.Upton, Damon); Milwaukee 4 (C.Hart, R.Weeks, Y.Betancourt 2). Runners moved up—Longoria, Kotchman. GIDP— R.Weeks. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Zobrist, Kotchman). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hllickson L, 7-6 6 3 2 2 4 3 105 3.09 A.Russell 1-3 1 2 2 1 0 14 2.73 Howell 0 2 1 1 1 0 8 9.35 C.Ramos 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 3.91 Sonnanstine 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 5.88 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Greinke W, 7-2 7 4 1 1 0 10 116 4.77 Loe 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 5.05 Axford 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 2.70 Howell pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Howell 2-2, C.Ramos 2-0. HBP—by Greinke (Joyce). T—3:01. A—40,079 (41,900).

Padres 5, Red Sox 4 San Diego Denorfia rf-lf Bartlett ss Headley 3b Ludwick lf Venable rf Guzman dh O.Hudson 2b Rizzo 1b Maybin cf Hundley c Totals

AB 3 2 3 5 0 5 4 5 3 3 33

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 5

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 1 1 7 5 8

SO 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 5

Avg. .295 .257 .297 .255 .235 .316 .236 .167 .245 .231

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 5 0 2 1 0 3 .313 Pedroia 2b 2 0 1 0 3 0 .270 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .350 Youkilis 3b 5 0 4 1 0 0 .276 1-Sutton pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .314 Ortiz dh 5 0 0 0 0 1 .317 J.Drew rf 4 0 0 0 1 3 .230 Saltalamacchia c 3 1 1 0 1 2 .250 Scutaro ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .293 Reddick lf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .429 Totals 37 4 13 4 5 11 San Diego 022 000 100 — 5 7 1 Boston 101 101 000 — 4 13 0 1-ran for Youkilis in the 9th. E—Headley (9). LOB—San Diego 11, Boston 11. 2B—Guzman (1), Rizzo (3), Hundley (5), Youkilis (21), Reddick (3). 3B—Reddick (1). RBIs—Bartlett (19), Headley (27), Rizzo (2), Maybin (16), Hundley (13), Ellsbury (38), Ad.Gonzalez (68), Youkilis (53), Reddick (7). SB— Maybin (8), Ortiz (1). CS—Ellsbury (10). S—Denorfia. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 8 (Guzman, Ludwick 4, Denorfia, Maybin 2); Boston 7 (Ortiz 2, Ad.Gonzalez 2, Saltalamacchia, Youkilis, Reddick). Runners moved up—Headley, Rizzo, J.Drew. GIDP— Ad.Gonzalez, Ortiz. DP—San Diego 2 (Latos, Headley, Bartlett), (Headley, Bartlett, Rizzo). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Latos 5 2-3 10 4 4 4 8 120 4.22 Qualls W, 4-3 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 0 30 2.43 M.Adams H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 2 14 1.35 H.Bell S, 19-20 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 2.70 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Aceves 5 4 4 4 6 4 98 3.70 Wheeler L, 0-1 1 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 22 6.53 Bard 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 0 23 2.55 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.03 Inherited runners-scored—Qualls 2-1, Bard 3-1. IBB—off Wheeler (O.Hudson). HBP—by Aceves (Headley). T—3:42. A—38,422 (37,493).

Diamondbacks 7, Royals 2 Arizona R.Roberts 3b K.Johnson 2b

AB R 4 0 4 1

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 1 1 0 .257 1 0 0 1 .215

J.Upton rf S.Drew ss C.Young cf Montero c W.Pena dh Miranda 1b G.Parra lf Totals

4 3 4 4 4 4 4 35

0 1 1 1 1 1 1 7

2 0 1 1 1 2 1 9

1 0 2 0 1 0 2 7

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 1 0 1 2 2 0 8

.305 .275 .253 .278 .250 .231 .275

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 4 1 3 2 0 0 .287 Me.Cabrera cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Hosmer 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .276 Francoeur rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .260 Butler dh 2 0 1 0 2 0 .304 Moustakas 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Treanor c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .210 Getz 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 A.Escobar ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .252 Totals 32 2 6 2 4 4 Arizona 000 011 320 — 7 9 0 Kansas City 100 000 100 — 2 6 0 LOB—Arizona 3, Kansas City 7. 2B—J.Upton 2 (21), Miranda (6), A.Gordon (21), Me.Cabrera (16). 3B—G.Parra (3), A.Gordon (4). HR—W.Pena (1), off Hochevar; C.Young (15), off Teaford; A.Gordon (9), off J.Saunders. RBIs—R.Roberts (31), J.Upton (39), C.Young 2 (40), W.Pena (1), G.Parra 2 (20), A.Gordon 2 (43). CS—Getz (3). Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 2 (S.Drew, C.Young); Kansas City 4 (Moustakas, Francoeur, Hosmer, Me.Cabrera). Runners moved up—R.Roberts, Me.Cabrera. Arizona IP H R ER Snders W, 4-7 7 6 2 2 Da.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 Heilman 1 0 0 0 Kansas City IP H R ER Hochevar L, 4-8 7 8 5 5 Teaford 1 1 2 2 Soria 1 0 0 0 WP—Hochevar. T—2:27. A—19,305 (37,903).

BB 3 1 0 BB 1 1 0

SO 3 1 0 SO 6 1 1

NP 109 19 7 NP 97 28 16

ERA 4.35 2.65 6.75 ERA 4.97 3.00 4.50

SO 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .280 .303 .242 .288 .281 .154 .228 .254 .500 .293 ------.202

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Boston New York Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Cleveland Detroit Chicago Minnesota Kansas City West Division Texas Seattle Los Angeles Oakland

W 44 42 40 36 33 W 39 39 36 32 31 W 40 37 36 34

L 29 29 34 38 38 L 33 35 39 39 42 L 35 36 39 40

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pct .603 .592 .541 .486 .465 Pct .542 .527 .480 .451 .425 Pct .533 .507 .480 .459

GB — 1 4½ 8½ 10 GB — 1 4½ 6½ 8½ GB — 2 4 5½

WCGB — — 3½ 7½ 9 WCGB — 4½ 8 10 12 WCGB — 6 8 9½

Tuesday’s Games Pittsburgh 9, Baltimore 3 Colorado 4, Cleveland 3 Washington 6, Seattle 5 Florida 5, L.A. Angels 2 Oakland 7, N.Y. Mets 3 San Diego 5, Boston 4 Atlanta 5, Toronto 1 N.Y. Yankees at Cincinnati, ppd., rain Texas 5, Houston 4, 11 innings Arizona 7, Kansas City 2 Chicago White Sox 3, Chicago Cubs 2 Milwaukee 5, Tampa Bay 1 L.A. Dodgers 6, Detroit 1 Minnesota 9, San Francisco 2

AB 4 5 5 4 4 5 4 4 2 1 0 0 0 1 39

R H 1 1 0 1 1 4 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 13

BI 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bonifacio cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .263 Morrison lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .277 G.Sanchez 1b 4 1 1 1 0 2 .304 H.Ramirez ss 4 2 2 0 0 1 .206 Dobbs 3b 3 2 3 0 1 0 .317 Stanton rf 4 0 3 2 0 1 .255 J.Buck c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .221 Infante 2b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .254 Vazquez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .174 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Wise ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Badenhop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 c-Helms ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .203 Ceda p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --L.Nunez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 5 12 5 2 8 Los Angeles 000 000 002 — 2 13 0 Florida 110 001 02x — 5 12 1 a-popped out for E.Santana in the 6th. b-flied out for Mujica in the 7th. c-struck out for Badenhop in the 8th. d-struck out for Cassevah in the 9th. E—Dobbs (6). LOB—Los Angeles 13, Florida 7. 2B—Tor.Hunter (12), Conger (7), Stanton (16). HR—G.Sanchez (13), off E.Santana. RBIs—Tor.Hunter (38), G.Sanchez (45), Stanton 2 (43), Infante 2 (22). SB—H.Kendrick (6), Bonifacio (5), H.Ramirez (13). S—Vazquez. SF—Infante. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 8 (Callaspo 2, Aybar, E.Santana, M.Izturis 2, Bourjos, Branyan); Florida 5 (Bonifacio 2, Infante 2, G.Sanchez). Runners moved up—Abreu. GIDP—H.Kendrick, J.Buck. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Aybar, H.Kendrick, Branyan); Florida 2 (H.Ramirez, G.Sanchez), (Mujica, Infante). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Santana L, 3-8 5 5 2 2 1 6 76 4.22 R.Thompson 1 2 1 1 1 1 25 3.26 Kohn 1 3 2 2 0 0 21 7.71 Cassevah 1 2 0 0 0 1 15 6.23 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vazquez W, 4-7 5 1-3 10 0 0 0 4 100 6.37 Mujica H, 4 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 25 3.03 Choate 0 0 0 0 1 0 9 0.66 Badenhop H, 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 2.82 Ceda 2-3 1 2 1 1 2 18 13.50 Nunez S, 20-23 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 3.62 Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Kohn pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Cassevah 2-2, Mujica 20, Badenhop 1-0, L.Nunez 1-0. WP—Mujica. T—3:16. A—17,344 (38,560).

Athletics 7, Mets 3 Oakland J.Weeks 2b Pennington ss Crisp cf Matsui lf C.Jackson 1b Sweeney rf K.Suzuki c S.Sizemore 3b Outman p Breslow p b-Barton ph Fuentes p Balfour p Totals

AB 3 3 5 2 3 5 4 4 3 0 1 0 0 33

R H 3 1 2 2 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 10

BI 0 1 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 2 2 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .362 .262 .261 .225 .263 .291 .226 .265 .000 --.212 -----

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .336 Turner 3b-2b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .275 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .283 Dan.Murphy 1b-3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Pagan cf 3 2 1 0 1 0 .255 Bay lf 3 1 3 2 1 0 .236 R.Paulino c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .306 Acosta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Harris ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Parnell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --R.Tejada 2b 1 0 0 1 1 1 .280 d-Duda ph-1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .143 Gee p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .048 a-Hairston ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .258 D.Carrasco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Thole c 2 0 0 0 0 0 .239 Totals 32 3 5 3 5 6 Oakland 202 021 000 — 7 10 1 New York 000 101 010 — 3 5 0 a-popped out for Gee in the 4th. b-flied out for Breslow in the 8th. c-was hit by a pitch for Byrdak in the 8th. d-walked for R.Tejada in the 8th. E—J.Weeks (2). LOB—Oakland 9, New York 9. 2B—Pennington (9), Turner (12), Pagan (5). 3B—Bay (1). HR—Bay (3), off Outman. RBIs—Pennington (21), Matsui (30), C.Jackson 2 (19), Sweeney (8), K.Suzuki (16), Bay 2 (15), R.Tejada (11). SB—J.Weeks 2 (4). SF—Matsui, R.Tejada. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 7 (Sweeney, S.Sizemore 2, Crisp, Outman, K.Suzuki 2); New York 4 (Beltran, Hairston, Thole 2). Runners moved up—C.Jackson. GIDP—Crisp, K.Suzuki, S.Sizemore. DP—New York 3 (Jos.Reyes, R.Tejada, Dan.Murphy), (Dan.Murphy, Jos.Reyes, Dan.Murphy), (Jos.Reyes, Duda). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO Outman W, 3-1 6 4 2 1 2 4 Breslow 1 0 0 0 1 0 Fuentes 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 Balfour S, 2-4 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 New York IP H R ER BB SO Gee L, 7-1 4 3 4 4 6 1 D.Carrasco 2 4 3 3 2 0 Acosta 1 1 0 0 0 0 Byrdak 1 0 0 0 0 2 Parnell 1 2 0 0 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Balfour 2-0. Fuentes (Harris). T—3:17. A—37,019 (41,800).

NP ERA 98 2.86 16 3.62 19 4.73 24 2.48 NP ERA 87 3.21 45 5.94 17 7.94 11 3.86 26 3.38 HBP—by

Rockies 4, Indians 3 Colorado C.Gonzalez cf J.Herrera 2b Helton 1b

AB 4 3 4

R 1 0 0

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0

SO 1 0 1

Avg. .285 .246 .310

Str L-1 W-3 L-1 L-3 L-1 Str L-2 L-2 W-1 W-8 L-3 Str W-2 L-1 L-1 W-6

Home 22-15 23-17 18-18 17-18 20-18 Home 23-14 22-14 17-18 14-16 21-21 Home 22-13 21-18 15-20 19-16

Away 22-14 19-12 22-16 19-20 13-20 Away 16-19 17-21 19-21 18-23 10-21 Away 18-22 16-18 21-19 15-24

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta Washington New York Florida Central Division Milwaukee St. Louis Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division Arizona San Francisco Colorado Los Angeles San Diego

Today’s Games Baltimore (Britton 6-4) at Pittsburgh (Correia 8-6), 9:35 a.m. N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 5-6) at Cincinnati (Leake 6-3), 9:35 a.m., 1st game Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 3-5) at Atlanta (Beachy 1-1), 10:05 a.m. San Diego (Richard 2-9) at Boston (Lackey 5-5), 10:35 a.m. Tampa Bay (Price 7-6) at Milwaukee (Marcum 7-2), 11:10 a.m. Detroit (Porcello 6-5) at L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 5-6), 12:10 p.m. Colorado (Hammel 4-6) at Cleveland (Tomlin 8-4), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Bedard 4-4) at Washington (Lannan 4-5), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (Pineiro 3-3) at Florida (Sanches 3-1), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (B.Gordon 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 4-2), 4:10 p.m., 2nd game Oakland (G.Gonzalez 6-5) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 3-7), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Myers 3-6) at Texas (C.Lewis 6-7), 5:05 p.m. Arizona (I.Kennedy 7-2) at Kansas City (Francis 3-7), 5:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (D.Davis 1-5) at Chicago White Sox (Peavy 2-1), 5:10 p.m. Minnesota (Blackburn 6-4) at San Francisco (Vogelsong 4-1), 7:15 p.m.

Marlins 5, Angels 2 Los Angeles Aybar ss H.Kendrick 2b Tor.Hunter rf Abreu lf Callaspo 3b Branyan 1b Conger c Bourjos cf E.Santana p a-M.Izturis ph R.Thompson p Kohn p Cassevah p d-V.Wells ph Totals

L10 7-3 8-2 6-4 4-6 3-7 L10 5-5 4-6 5-5 9-1 4-6 L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 7-3

W 46 42 36 35 33 W 41 40 38 36 30 27 W 40 39 37 34 31

L 28 33 37 38 41 L 34 34 36 37 43 48 L 34 34 36 41 44

Pct .622 .560 .493 .479 .446 Pct .547 .541 .514 .493 .411 .360 Pct .541 .534 .507 .453 .413

GB — 4½ 9½ 10½ 13 GB — ½ 2½ 4 10 14 GB — ½ 2½ 6½ 9½

Tuesday’s Games Philadelphia 10, St. Louis 2

WCGB — — 5 6 8½ WCGB — 1½ 3½ 5 11 15 WCGB — 2 4 8 11

L10 8-2 5-5 9-1 4-6 1-9 L10 4-6 2-8 5-5 5-5 5-5 3-7 L10 6-4 4-6 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str W-1 W-3 W-1 L-2 W-1 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-3 Str W-1 L-5 W-2 W-3 W-1

Home 28-12 21-17 20-13 16-20 16-23 Home 26-10 20-14 21-18 16-19 16-22 13-25 Home 22-17 19-13 19-19 18-21 14-26

Away 18-16 21-16 16-24 19-18 17-18 Away 15-24 20-20 17-18 20-18 14-21 14-23 Away 18-17 20-21 18-17 16-20 17-18

Today’s Games Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 7-5) at St. Louis (Lohse 7-3), 5:15 p.m.

Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Fister 8 3 1 1 1 3 99 3.34 League 2-3 2 3 0 1 0 25 3.82 Pauley L, 4-1 0 2 2 2 0 0 4 1.56 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA L.Hernandez 4 10 5 4 1 2 70 3.97 Mattheus 2 0 0 0 0 1 25 0.00 Balester 2 2 0 0 1 1 33 3.68 Coffey W, 3-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 2.25 L.Hernandez pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. Pauley pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Pauley 2-2, Mattheus 1-0. HBP—by Fister (Desmond). T—2:57. A—21,502 (41,506).

Braves 5, Blue Jays 1

Roundup • Marlins 5, Angels 2: MIAMI — Florida’s new 80-year-old manager still has the winning touch. Jack McKeon earned his first victory since coming out of retirement when the Marlins broke an 11game losing streak by beating the Los Angeles Angels. Javier Vazquez and five relievers gave up 13 hits and the Angels had at least one hit in every inning, but they went one for 15 with runners in scoring position. • Phillies 10, Cardinals 2: ST. LOUIS — Jimmy Rollins and Chase Utley each had a two-run single to help spark Philadelphia’s season-best nine-run eighth inning. Carlos Ruiz had four hits and one of two bases-loaded walks in the eighth for the NL East-leading Phillies, who have won Roy Halladay’s past seven starts but put it together too late for the right-hander to become the majors’ first 10-game winner. • Nationals 6, Mariners 5: WASHINGTON — Wilson Ramos capped a five-run ninth inning with a game-ending three-run homer for Washington. Jerry Hairston and Danny Espinosa each had two-out RBI singles before Ramos connected on a 1-1 pitch from David Pauley, hitting a drive deep to center for his sixth homer. • Padres 5 Red Sox 4: BOSTON — Former Boston prospect Anthony Rizzo drove in the go-ahead run in the seventh inning to help San Diego snap a season-worst six-game losing streak. Rizzo grounded out with the bases loaded to first baseman Adrian Gonzalez, traded to Boston in the offseason for Rizzo and two other minor leaguers. • Brewers 5, Rays 1: MILWAUKEE — Zack Greinke struck out 10 over seven effective innings to help Milwaukee avoid losing consecutive home games for the first time this season. Greinke (7-2) struck out at least a batter in every inning, including the side in the third. He gave up one earned run on four hits. • Rockies 4, Indians 3: CLEVELAND — Seth Smith’s second homer of the game snapped a ninth-inning tie and Colorado held Cleveland hitless into the sixth. Smith connected off Cleveland closer Chris Perez (2-3), hitting a 2-2 pitch into the right-field seats for his eighth homer of the season and fourth career multihomer game. Matt Belisle (5-2) worked one inning for the win. • Rangers 5, Astros 4: ARLINGTON, Texas — Mitch Moreland blasted the first pitch of the bottom of the 11th inning into the upper deck in right field to lift Texas to the win. Moreland’s second homer in as many games gave reliever Yoshinori Tateyama (1-0) his first career win and handed Houston rookie reliever Enerio del Rosario (0-2) the loss. • Athletics 7, Mets 3: NEW YORK — Josh Outman threw another impressive game, Jemile Weeks scored three times and streaking Oakland

Tulowitzki ss Giambi dh S.Smith rf Wigginton 3b 2-E.Young pr Nelson 3b Blackmon lf Iannetta c Totals

4 4 4 4 0 0 4 3 34

0 0 1 3 2 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 11

0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 4

.274 .281 .316 .261 .214 .274 .327 .229

Colorado Chacin Reynolds H, 12 R.Betancourt Belisle W, 5-2 Street S, 22-24 Cleveland

IP 6 2-3 1-3 0 1 1 IP

H 2 0 3 1 1 H

R 1 0 2 0 0 R

ER 1 0 2 0 0 ER

BB 6 0 0 0 1 BB

SO 7 0 0 0 1 SO

NP 115 7 12 16 21 NP

handed rookie Dillon Gee his first loss of the season. Ryan Sweeney had four hits, including an RBI single, and the A’s won their sixth straight after dropping 13 of 14 — their longest win streak since a seven-game run in September 2009. • Braves 5, Blue Jays 1: ATLANTA — Brian McCann hit a two-run homer, Jason Heyward had an RBI single and Mike Minor ended a nine-start winless streak as Atlanta won its third straight. Minor (1-2) allowed five hits, one run, one intentional walk and struck out a season-high eight in seven innings. • Pirates 9, Orioles 3: PITTSBURGH — Neil Walker had two hits and drove in three runs to help Pittsburgh snap a four-game losing streak. Chris Resop (3-2) picked up the victory in relief after starter James McDonald couldn’t get through the requisite five innings — even though he was staked to an early five-run lead. • Diamondbacks 7, Royals 2: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Wily Mo Pena and Chris Young homered, and Joe Saunders pitched seven strong innings for Arizona. Saunders (4-7), who started the season 0-5, picked up his fourth victory in six starts. He held the Royals to six hits and two runs over seven innings, his 10th consecutive start pitching at least six innings. • White Sox 3, Cubs 2: CHICAGO — Brent Morel hit a go-ahead sacrifice fly in the seventh inning and the White Sox beat the Cubs to even their crosstown series at one game apiece. Paul Konerko homered for a fifth straight game for the White Sox and Carlos Pena hit his second in as many nights for the Cubs. • Twins 9, Giants 2: SAN FRANCISCO — Ben Revere had two hits and two RBIs to highlight an eight-run first inning, and surging Minnesota tied a major league record by opening with eight consecutive hits against Madison Bumgarner in a victory over San Francisco. Luke Hughes had a two-run single and four others had an RBI in the first to chase Bumgarner (3-9) before some fans even found their seats at cozy AT&T Park. • Dodgers 6, Tigers 1: LOS ANGELES — Chad Billingsley bounced back from two horrendous outings, Andre Ethier hit a two-run homer and the Los Angeles Dodgers beat Detroit, preventing Max Scherzer from becoming the first 10-game winner in the majors. Billingsley (6-6) allowed a run and six hits over 5 1⁄3 innings — the first time in four starts that he made it past the fifth. Note: Tuesday’s New York Yankees/Cincinnati Reds game was postponed because of rain. It will be made up today as part of a day-night doubleheader.

Talbot 6 1-3 8 3 3 2 2 107 4.91 R.Perez 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 19 1.17 C.Perez L, 2-3 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 2.63 R.Betancourt pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Mat.Reynolds 1-0, Belisle 2-1, R.Perez 1-0. T—3:16. A—15,877 (43,441).

Pirates 9, Orioles 3

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Brantley cf 4 0 0 0 1 1 .274 Phelps 2b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .207 A.Cabrera ss 2 2 1 0 3 1 .296 Hafner dh 3 0 1 1 1 1 .341 1-Everett pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .228 b-Kearns ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Choo rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .244 C.Santana 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .234 T.Buck lf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .224 Hannahan 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .220 Marson c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .235 a-G.Sizemore ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Totals 33 3 7 3 7 8 Colorado 000 012 001 — 4 11 0 Cleveland 000 001 020 — 3 7 0 a-grounded out for Marson in the 9th. 1-ran for Hafner in the 8th. 2-ran for Wigginton in the 9th. LOB—Colorado 5, Cleveland 10. 2B—C.Gonzalez (15), Giambi 2 (2). 3B—Phelps (1), Marson (2). HR— S.Smith (7), off Talbot; S.Smith (8), off C.Perez. RBIs— J.Herrera (10), S.Smith 3 (32), Hafner (27), Choo (28), T.Buck (9). SB—A.Cabrera (12). CS—J.Herrera (3). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 2 (Tulowitzki, Blackmon); Cleveland 7 (Hafner 2, C.Santana, Brantley, Hannahan, Kearns 2). Runners moved up—J.Herrera. GIDP—Tulowitzki, Blackmon, Iannetta. DP—Cleveland 3 (C.Santana, A.Cabrera, C.Santana), (Hannahan, Phelps, C.Santana), (Phelps, A.Cabrera, C.Santana). ERA 2.71 3.57 3.99 2.41 3.63 ERA

Baltimore Hardy ss Markakis rf Ad.Jones cf D.Lee 1b Wieters c Scott lf Bergesen p Rapada p Mar.Reynolds 3b Andino 2b Guthrie p Pie lf Totals

AB 5 5 3 5 3 3 0 0 3 4 3 1 35

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Hairston Jr. lf 1 1 1 1 0 0 .251 Morse 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .308 Espinosa 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .237 W.Ramos c 4 1 1 3 0 0 .251 L.Hernandez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .160 Mattheus p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Bixler ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Balester p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Stairs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .116 Coffey p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Desmond ss 2 1 0 0 0 0 .234 Totals 31 6 7 6 2 3 Seattle 201 110 000 — 5 13 1 Washington 000 001 005 — 6 7 1 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Mattheus in the 6th. b-flied out for Balester in the 8th. E—Smoak (4), Werth (5). LOB—Seattle 8, Washington 2. 2B—Ryan (9), A.Kennedy (13). HR—W.Ramos (6), off Pauley. RBIs—A.Kennedy 2 (23), Ackley 2 (3), Fister (1), Bernadina (15), Hairston Jr. (16), Espinosa (44), W.Ramos 3 (22). SB—I.Suzuki (19), F.Gutierrez (2). S—Fister. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 5 (I.Suzuki, Peguero, Smoak 2, Fister); Washington 1 (Zimmerman). Runners moved up—Ryan, A.Kennedy, Ackley. GIDP—I.Suzuki, Zimmerman 3. DP—Seattle 3 (Ackley, Ryan, Smoak), (Ackley, Ryan, Smoak), (Ryan, Ackley, Smoak); Washington 2 (Zimmerman, L.Hernandez), (Espinosa, Desmond, Morse).

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3 5

SO 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 7

Avg. .301 .264 .297 .243 .262 .239 ----.226 .247 .333 .245

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf 5 2 2 2 0 0 .260 J.Harrison 3b 4 2 2 0 0 0 .286 Br.Wood 3b 1 1 1 0 0 0 .229 G.Jones 1b 5 1 1 2 0 0 .250 A.McCutchen cf 1 1 1 0 3 0 .286 Walker 2b 4 0 2 3 0 0 .260 Paul rf 4 0 1 2 0 2 .268 Cedeno ss 3 1 2 0 1 0 .232 McKenry c 4 1 2 0 0 0 .208 Ja.McDonald p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .111 Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Overbay ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Watson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Diaz ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .256 Ti.Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 9 15 9 4 3 Baltimore 000 030 000 — 3 8 1 Pittsburgh 311 000 13x — 9 15 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Resop in the 6th. b-singled for Veras in the 8th. E—Mar.Reynolds (16). LOB—Baltimore 10, Pittsburgh 9. 2B—Guthrie (1), Tabata (14), G.Jones

(10), Walker (13), McKenry (1). HR—Hardy (9), off Ja.McDonald; Ad.Jones (11), off Ja.McDonald. RBIs— Hardy (25), Ad.Jones 2 (42), Tabata 2 (14), G.Jones 2 (26), Walker 3 (49), Paul 2 (12). S—A.McCutchen, Ja.McDonald. SF—Walker, Paul. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 4 (Andino 2, D.Lee, Guthrie); Pittsburgh 7 (J.Harrison, McKenry, Tabata, Cedeno 2, Paul 2). Runners moved up—Scott, G.Jones. GIDP—Walker, Cedeno. DP—Baltimore 2 (Andino, Hardy, D.Lee), (Andino, Hardy, D.Lee). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Guthrie L, 2-9 6 1-3 11 6 5 3 2 97 3.79 Bergesen 1 1-3 4 3 3 1 0 34 5.53 Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 7.15 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ja.McDonald 4 2-3 7 3 3 4 3 104 4.86 Resop W, 3-2 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 2 14 3.82 Watson H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 1.13 Veras H, 13 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.16 Ti.Wood 1 0 0 0 1 1 16 4.05 Inherited runners-scored—Bergesen 3-0, Rapada 2-0, Resop 2-0. T—3:02. A—33,806 (38,362).

Nationals 6, Mariners 5 Seattle I.Suzuki rf Ryan ss A.Kennedy 3b Smoak 1b Ackley 2b Peguero lf Halman lf F.Gutierrez cf C.Gimenez c Fister p League p Pauley p Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 4 0 4 3 3 0 0 37

R H 1 2 2 2 1 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5 13

Washington Werth rf Bernadina cf Zimmerman 3b L.Nix lf

AB 3 3 4 3

R 1 0 0 0

BI 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 4

Avg. .279 .255 .283 .260 .267 .200 .393 .211 .179 .333 -----

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 1

Avg. .233 .282 .300 .280

Toronto Y.Escobar ss C.Patterson lf b-J.Rivera ph-lf Bautista rf Lind 1b A.Hill 2b J.Molina c R.Davis cf McCoy 3b Z.Stewart p Rzepczynski p a-Encarnacion ph Frasor p Dotel p Totals

AB 4 3 1 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 0 1 0 0 32

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 1 1

SO 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .279 .267 .249 .325 .328 .237 .301 .237 .217 .000 --.253 -----

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Schafer cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .230 Heyward rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .223 C.Jones 3b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .267 McCann c 3 1 2 2 1 0 .301 Freeman 1b 3 0 1 0 1 2 .269 Uggla 2b 4 1 0 0 0 0 .176 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 0 2 1 0 0 .254 McLouth lf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .237 Minor p 3 1 1 0 0 2 .273 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Hinske ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 5 11 5 3 7 Toronto 100 000 000 — 1 5 0 Atlanta 103 100 00x — 5 11 0 a-flied out for Rzepczynski in the 7th. b-grounded out for C.Patterson in the 8th. c-struck out for O’Flaherty in the 8th. LOB—Toronto 5, Atlanta 7. 2B—Y.Escobar (9), C.Patterson (15), J.Molina (7), Ale.Gonzalez (14), Minor (2). HR—McCann (12), off Z.Stewart. RBIs—Lind (45), Heyward (18), C.Jones (41), McCann 2 (41), Ale.Gonzalez (23). CS—Heyward (2). SF—C.Jones. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 3 (Bautista, Z.Stewart 2); Atlanta 3 (Uggla, Freeman 2). Runners moved up—C.Patterson, C.Jones. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Z.Stewart L, 0-1 3 2-3 10 5 5 3 2 77 5.91 Rzepczynski 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 24 3.23 Frasor 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.73 Dotel 1 1 0 0 0 1 19 4.43 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Minor W, 1-2 7 5 1 1 1 8 95 4.59 O’Flaherty 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 1.34 Venters 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.58 Inherited runners-scored—Rzepczynski 3-0. IBB—off Z.Stewart (McCann), off Minor (McCoy). WP—Z.Stewart. T—2:22. A—26,849 (49,586).

White Sox 3, Cubs 2 Chicago (N) AB Re.Johnson cf 4 S.Castro ss 4 Je.Baker dh 4 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 Soto c 4 A.Soriano lf 4 C.Pena 1b 4 Montanez rf 3 DeWitt 2b 0 LeMahieu 2b 2 a-Fukudome ph-rf 1 Totals 33

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 7

BI 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 1 3 0 1 1 0 0 0 8

Avg. .354 .320 .324 .282 .215 .269 .221 .237 .262 .231 .288

Chicago (A) AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .253 Vizquel 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 Quentin rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .260 1-Lillibridge pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .266 Konerko 1b 3 1 2 1 1 0 .331 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .175 Al.Ramirez ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .288 Pierzynski c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .291 Rios cf 2 1 1 0 1 0 .212 Morel 3b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .251 Totals 29 3 7 3 2 4 Chicago (N) 000 011 000 — 2 7 0 Chicago (A) 011 000 10x — 3 7 0 a-singled for LeMahieu in the 8th. 1-ran for Quentin in the 8th. LOB—Chicago (N) 5, Chicago (A) 6. 2B—Ar.Ramirez (18), Quentin (21), Konerko (12), Al.Ramirez (19), Rios (12). HR—C.Pena (13), off Buehrle; Konerko (21), off Garza. RBIs—Ar.Ramirez (33), C.Pena (37), Pierre (16), Konerko (59), Morel (15). S—Pierre. SF—Ar.Ramirez, Morel. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago (N) 2 (Soto, Ar.Ramirez); Chicago (A) 4 (Quentin, Pierzynski, Vizquel, Al.Ramirez). Runners moved up—Pierre, Morel. Chicago (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garza 5 4 2 2 1 4 72 4.11 Smrdzija L, 5-3 2 2 1 1 0 0 24 4.17 R.Lopez 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 11 6.59 Grabow 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.94 Chicago (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Buehrle 5 1-3 5 2 2 0 3 70 3.73 Crain W, 3-2 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 18 2.81 Thornton H, 9 2-3 2 0 0 0 0 18 4.21 Santos S, 13-15 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 3 15 3.18 Inherited runners-scored—Grabow 2-0, Crain 2-1, S.Santos 2-0. IBB—off R.Lopez (Konerko). T—2:31 (Rain delay: 1:44). A—35,155 (40,615).

Twins 9, Giants 2 Minnesota Revere cf A.Casilla 2b Mauer c 1-Butera pr-c Cuddyer rf D.Young lf Valencia 3b L.Hughes 1b Nishioka ss Pavano p Mijares p Totals

AB 5 5 5 0 4 5 5 5 4 4 0 42

R H 1 2 2 2 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 14

San Francisco Torres cf S.Casilla p C.Stewart c M.Tejada ss P.Sandoval 3b Huff 1b Burriss 1b C.Ross lf-cf Schierholtz rf Hall 2b Whiteside c Affeldt p Romo p b-Rowand ph Bumgarner p Mota p a-Burrell ph-lf

AB 3 0 1 4 4 2 2 4 4 4 3 0 0 1 0 1 2

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 9

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 3 0 8

Avg. .269 .268 .220 .176 .280 .254 .221 .264 .200 .000 ---

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .231 --.167 .221 .286 .246 .260 .264 .250 .227 .207 .000 --.243 .167 .200 .221

Totals 35 2 9 2 0 2 Minnesota 800 000 001 — 9 14 0 San Francisco 000 000 110 — 2 9 2 a-grounded out for Mota in the 5th. b-grounded out for Romo in the 9th. 1-ran for Mauer in the 9th. E—M.Tejada (8), P.Sandoval (2). LOB—Minnesota 7, San Francisco 6. 2B—Revere (3), A.Casilla (10), Mauer (2), Cuddyer (13), Valencia (13), Nishioka (3), Huff (14), Mota (1). HR—A.Casilla (2), off Romo; Whiteside (2), off Pavano. RBIs—Revere 2 (7), A.Casilla (15), Mauer (6), Cuddyer (29), D.Young (20), Valencia (33), L.Hughes 2 (9), Burriss (3), Whiteside (5). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 4 (Mauer, Pavano 2, L.Hughes); San Francisco 4 (M.Tejada 2, Schierholtz, Torres). Runners moved up—Valencia, Nishioka, P.Sandoval, C.Ross, Burrell. GIDP—C.Ross. DP—Minnesota 1 (Nishioka, A.Casilla, L.Hughes); San Francisco 1 (Hall, Huff). Minnesota IP H R ER BB Pavano W, 5-5 8 9 2 2 0 Mijares 1 0 0 0 0 SF IP H R ER BB Bmgrner L, 3-9 1-3 9 8 8 0 Mota 4 2-3 3 0 0 0 S.Casilla 2 0 0 0 1 Affeldt 1 0 0 0 0 Romo 1 2 1 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Mota 1-0. T—2:39. A—41,958 (41,915).

SO 2 0 SO 1 3 2 1 1

NP 107 11 NP 25 61 30 7 25

ERA 4.05 4.24 ERA 4.06 3.89 1.50 3.86 2.38

Dodgers 6, Tigers 1 Detroit A.Jackson cf Kelly 3b Boesch rf V.Martinez 1b Dirks lf Avila c Raburn 2b a-Mi.Cabrera ph Worth 2b Santiago ss Scherzer p c-C.Wells ph Purcey p Schlereth p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 3 2 1 1 3 2 1 0 0 32

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 1 3 11

Avg. .248 .258 .298 .327 .250 .300 .208 .323 .360 .219 .000 .253 -----

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 5 0 1 1 0 1 .273 Uribe 3b 4 1 1 0 1 1 .214 Ethier rf 5 1 1 2 0 1 .311 Kemp cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .321 Loney 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .266 Miles 2b 3 2 2 0 1 0 .310 A.Ellis c 3 0 1 1 1 0 .278 Gwynn Jr. lf 3 0 1 1 1 1 .217 Billingsley p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .286 MacDougal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Oeltjen ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .231 Guerrier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Kuo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Blake ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .248 Hawksworth p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 6 9 6 6 6 Detroit 000 100 000 — 1 7 0 Los Angeles 010 122 00x — 6 9 0 a-grounded into a double play for Raburn in the 6th. b-doubled for MacDougal in the 6th. c-singled for Scherzer in the 7th. d-fouled out for Kuo in the 8th. LOB—Detroit 7, Los Angeles 9. 2B—D.Gordon (1), Loney (9), Oeltjen (1). HR—Ethier (7), off Scherzer. RBIs—V.Martinez (40), D.Gordon (2), Ethier 2 (36), A.Ellis (3), Gwynn Jr. (7), Oeltjen (1). SB—Kemp 2 (20). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 4 (Raburn, Mi.Cabrera 2, Kelly); Los Angeles 5 (D.Gordon 2, Uribe, Gwynn Jr. 2). Runners moved up—A.Ellis. GIDP—Kelly, Mi.Cabrera. DP—Los Angeles 2 (D.Gordon, Miles, Loney), (D.Gordon, Miles, Loney). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer L, 9-3 6 9 6 6 2 3 102 4.61 Purcey 2-3 0 0 0 2 1 26 2.22 Schlereth 1 1-3 0 0 0 2 2 21 2.96 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bllngsly W, 6-6 5 1-3 6 1 1 2 6 110 4.48 MacDougal H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 2.19 Guerrier 1 1 0 0 1 1 11 3.89 Kuo 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 9.53 Hawksworth 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 3.00 Inherited runners-scored—Schlereth 2-0, MacDougal 3-0. T—3:06. A—37,769 (56,000).

Phillies 10, Cardinals 2 Philadelphia AB Rollins ss 4 Victorino cf 5 Utley 2b 4 Bastardo p 0 Herndon p 0 Howard 1b 2 Polanco 3b 3 1-W.Valdez pr-3b 1 Ibanez lf 4 Do.Brown rf 3 c-B.Francisco ph-rf 2 Ruiz c 4 Halladay p 2 a-Gload ph 1 Stutes p 0 d-M.Martinez ph-2b1 Totals 36

R 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 10

H 1 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 4 0 1 0 0 11

BI 2 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 10

BB 2 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 9

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4

Avg. .258 .297 .263 --.000 .257 .291 .248 .240 .213 .222 .256 .054 .298 --.190

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Theriot ss 3 0 0 1 1 0 .299 Jay rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .307 e-Kozma ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Holliday lf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .343 T.Cruz c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Berkman 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .303 f-A.Brown ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Rasmus cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .254 Y.Molina c-1b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .296 Descalso 3b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .249 McClellan p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .160 b-M.Hamilton ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .148 T.Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Motte p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Tallet p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Batista p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cleto p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Schumaker 2b-lf 2 0 1 1 0 0 .244 Totals 30 2 5 2 4 8 Philadelphia 000 000 190 — 10 11 0 St. Louis 000 010 100 — 2 5 1 a-singled for Halladay in the 7th. b-singled for McClellan in the 7th. c-singled for Do.Brown in the 8th. dwalked for Stutes in the 8th. e-grounded out for Jay in the 8th. f-struck out for Berkman in the 8th. 1-ran for Polanco in the 8th. E—Y.Molina (4). LOB—Philadelphia 10, St. Louis 6. 2B—Descalso (14). RBIs—Rollins 2 (30), Utley 2 (15), Howard (59), Polanco (39), B.Francisco (26), Ruiz (14), Gload (5), M.Martinez (4), Theriot (24), Schumaker (16). CS—Theriot (4). SF—Schumaker. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 4 (Victorino 3, W.Valdez); St. Louis 2 (McClellan, Jay). GIDP—Howard, Ibanez. DP—St. Louis 2 (Schumaker, Theriot, Berkman), (Schumaker, Theriot, Berkman). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Halladay 6 4 1 1 2 5 97 2.51 Stutes W, 2-0 1 1 1 1 1 0 20 2.38 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 1 1 25 0.96 Herndon 1 0 0 0 0 2 10 4.18 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McClellan 7 5 1 1 4 2 90 3.73 Mllr L, 0-1 H, 4 1-3 1 2 2 1 0 16 3.86 Motte BS, 2-2 0 0 2 2 0 0 9 2.70 Tallet 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 10 7.71 Batista 0 1 3 3 2 0 14 4.60 Cleto 1 1-3 3 1 1 2 1 41 16.20 Motte pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Batista pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Motte 2-1, Tallet 3-1, Batista 3-3, Cleto 2-2. HBP—by Motte (Howard, Polanco). T—3:12. A—40,095 (43,975).

LEADERS Through Tuesday’s Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .350; Konerko, Chicago, .331; VMartinez, Detroit, .327; Bautista, Toronto, .325; MiCabrera, Detroit, .323; Ortiz, Boston, .317; Ellsbury, Boston, .313. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 62; Bautista, Toronto, 55; AdGonzalez, Boston, 55; MiCabrera, Detroit, 53; Ellsbury, Boston, 52; Boesch, Detroit, 49; ACabrera, Cleveland, 48; Kinsler, Texas, 48. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .336; Votto, Cincinnati, .323; Kemp, Los Angeles, .321; Pence, Houston, .321; SCastro, Chicago, .320; SSmith, Colorado, .316; Ethier, Los Angeles, .311. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 54; JosReyes, New York, 54; Pujols, St. Louis, 52; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 52; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 51; Votto, Cincinnati, 50; Bourn, Houston, 49.


D4 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NBA

NFL

Avoiding lockout depends on salary cap

NFL owners, players to meet again By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Saying it reflects a “desire to go as far as we can to avoid a lockout,” NBA Commissioner David Stern revealed Tuesday that owners have moved off their insistence on a hard salary cap. Players don’t see it that way. So it appears the cap system remains the biggest obstacle to a new collective bargaining agreement before the rapidly approaching June 30 deadline. Stern said the league has proposed a “flex cap,” in which teams would target a uniform dollar amount to spend, but would still be permitted to exceed it up to an unspecified level. Players argue it’s still a hard cap, because the ceiling would eventually kick in. So even though both sides felt there was progress in what Stern had said was an important day in these negotiations, a sizable gap remains. “At this point we’re still just really far apart on the largest issue of hard salary cap, and still some economic issues as well,” players association president Derek Fisher of the Lakers said. Calling it “virtually the best shot we think we have” to avoid a work stoppage, Stern said the owners’ proposal would ensure that players’ total compensation would never fall below $2 billion a year in a 10-year contract, slightly less than the league paid this season. He said the average player salary would be about $5 million and Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver said the goal would be an eventual 50-50 split of basketball revenues. The players are currently guaranteed 57 percent. Though Stern refused to call this his last offer, he said the “cupboard is getting barer and barer.” “It’s all out there,” he said. “The owners to a person feel that this is what we have to give.” The flex cap offer had previously been proposed to the players, but had not been disclosed publicly until Tuesday. According to Stern, teams would be targeted to spend approximately $62 million, with the option to spend above through certain exceptions before reaching a limit they could not exceed. Under the current soft salary cap, teams can use various exceptions to exceed the cap, with the penalty of a dollar for dollar luxury tax once they reach the threshold. The cap this year was $58 million, and the NBA champion Dallas Mavericks, under big-spending owner Mark Cuban, blew well past the tax level of $70 million. The union made a proposal that offered more than $500 million in player salary reductions over the life of a five-year contract, a person with knowledge of the proposal told The Associated Press.

AP ile

Walter Dix is shown after winning the 200-meter race at Lausanne, Switzerland, in July 2010. In a sport known for flash, Dix prefers not to stand out.

Reserved sprinter Dix breaking out of shell By Pat Graham The Associated Press

EUGENE — For years, sprinter Walter Dix has cultivated an air of mystery with his quiet and reserved demeanor. In a sport known for its flash, Dix simply preferred not to stand out, which was difficult to do after a highly decorated career at Florida State and even more difficult after capturing two Olympic bronze medals at the 2008 Beijing Games. More and more, though, he’s stepping out of his shell as he hopes to climb out of the shadows of Jamaica’s Usain Bolt and fellow American Tyson Gay, possibly even steal some of their spotlight. Only then, Dix insisted, will fans see a glimpse of his true personality, one that he asserts leans more toward showy than shy. Until that time, he’s content with just being an enigma. “The less people know, the more they want to conjure up for themselves,” said Dix, who will run the 100 and 200 at the U.S. championships in Eugene this weekend. “There’s power in (anonymity), because the people don’t know what to expect, don’t expect anything. “Hopefully, they’ll find out that I want to be one of the greatest athletes to walk on this planet.” That’s a tall order in this era of Bolt, who’s chewing up records each time he tears down the track at a major meet. The Jamaican sensation has set the bar so high in sprinting, that others are forced to raise their game or be left in his dust. And that’s what Dix has been quietly doing on a sunsplashed track in Tampa, Fla., this spring, running in only a handful of meets. That’s all part of his plan: Diligently work on his starts in relative seclusion and “let it hang out at nationals.” The field is quite deep in the 100 at the U.S. championships, with Gay the clear favorite. But there’s also Michael Rodgers, Darvis Patton and Justin Gatlin, who returned last year after a four-year suspension for doping. They’re all vying for a spot at worlds in Daegu, South Korea, later this summer and a chance to possibly face Bolt. In the 200, Dix may very well be the favorite, depending on the status of Gay, who won’t make any decisions on whether he will run the event until after his performance in the 100. Wallace Spearmon, another top contender in the 200, is dealing with a left Achilles tendon ailment that has hindered his training. Gatlin could be a factor in that race, too, along with a host of up-and-coming runners such as Mookie Salaam of Oklahoma and NCAA champion Maurice Mitchell of Florida State. “In the 200, a lot of people are expecting me to do some things,” Dix said. “In the 100, I want to shock people.”

Jeter Continued from D1 The selling of Jeter’s historic hit — he is six short of 3,000 as he waits to heal from a calf strain — actually has its own campaign name: “DJ 3K,” and a logo that will appear on much of the merchandise capitalizing on his achievement. It is quite a list: T-shirts, caps, jerseys, bobbleheads, decals, cellphone skins, wall murals, patches, bats, balls, license plates and necklaces made by two dozen MLB licensees. Modell’s, the venerable New York sports goods chain, is not going to miss out. The chain’s Times Square location will stay open past its midnight or 1 a.m. closing time as long as fans keep shopping on the day or night of the accomplishment. “We’re locked and loaded,” said Mitchell Modell, chief executive of Modell’s. The ingenious and sometimes crass rush to cash in on sports achievements is hardly new, whether it focuses on championship teams or great players. Each new chapter, however, adds some new flourish in the grab for nostalgia dollars, whether in the form of a new product or a different commercial approach. The so-called “hot market” for Jeter’s 3,000th hit — the player’s equivalent of a World Series championship — will test his sky-high popularity during a season when he is batting .260. “I’ve been here for 13 years,” said Howard Smith, the senior vice president for licensing of Major League Baseball. “And other than the home run race in 1998, this is the most significant business we’ve done for a hot market for a player.” Warehouses of some of the biggest licensees, like Majestic and New Era, which are accus-

tomed to supplying stores with World Series merchandise, are ready to deliver their Jeter material to retailers. “Between the New York market and how revered Jeter is, it’s going to be a huge event,” said Michael Johnson, a spokesman for Majestic, which is producing an array of jerseys and T-shirts. And already, John Killen, the president of Wincraft, one of the 24 licensees, said he has booked substantial business for his Jeter flags, lanyards, pennants, travel mugs, pins and magnets. “Short of someone of Jeter’s caliber retiring, you won’t get an event bigger than this,” he said. And, Jeter will get a cut of some of it. For all the licensed products sold by the likes of Rawlings, Nike, Majestic, Louisville Slugger, Fathead and New Era, he will share royalties with MLB and the players union; he will also share in the sale of products sold under his deal with Steiner Sports. Already, he has designated proceeds from the sale of a silicone bracelet to benefit his Turn 2 Foundation. Everything Jeter touches or wears as he pursues his 3,000th hit carries value. So will the bases he steps on. In deciding what to provide for sale, Jeter controls his cleats, wristbands, bats and batting gloves. The New York Yankees control what they provide to him, like his uniform, warm-up jackets, and caps, as well as the dirt, the bases and the pitching rubber. And Steiner, through his deals with the Yankees and Jeter, can sell whatever he gets. Jeter will probably ask to keep things — perhaps the most valuable items like the 3,000th hit ball — for himself. “When the time comes,” said the Yankees’ president, Randy Levine, “we’ll sit down with Derek and his representatives and reach a mutu-

TRACK & FIELD Beating Gay would definitely send a message. After all, Gay is the fastest runner in the world not named Bolt. To get his named mentioned in the same sentence as Bolt and Gay, Dix realizes he has to upstage them at a big competition. Should that happen, Dix said his personality will shine through. And remember, Bolt didn’t really start dancing and entertaining the crowd with his antics until after he started shattering records. “Before 2008, nobody had the perception that he was a clown,” Dix said. “But when you’re in the spotlight, people get to know you.” Dix paused and chuckled. “I’m not saying I’m going to start dancing, though,” he said. Now, more than ever, he craves a piece of the spotlight to show people he’s not a reluctant star who shies away from the exposure. Maybe once true, it’s become a label he’s eager to shed. At Florida State, Dix was trumpeted as the future of American sprinting. That was pressure. In Beijing, he captured two bronze medals and was on his way to becoming one of the faces of American sprinting. Even more pressure. At first, he was rather uncomfortable with all the pressure and attention. It showed on the track. The 25-year-old had a rough performance at the ’09 U.S. championships after hurting his hamstring in the 100, an ailment that kept him out of the 200, as well. About then, Dix also was going through a coaching switch and found himself embroiled in a legal scuffle with his agent — whom he’s since left — over, in part, a contract deal with Nike, who’s still his sponsor. This wasn’t exactly the direction you’d expect a sprinter who won two bronze medals in Beijing to travel. He should’ve been cashing in on his fame, not backsliding. Since then, he’s been steadily getting his career back on track. He’s returned to the basics, tinkering with his start under the direction of veteran coach Rey Robinson. In Dix’s mind, his burst out of the blocks will be key in closing the gap on Bolt, the world record holder in both the 100 (9.58) and 200 (19.19). “The pressure of running fast that Bolt has put on everyone, it’s made athletes and coaches respond in practice,” Dix said. “He put pressure on all of us.” Especially in the 100. “Ten-flat is not good enough now,” said Dix, who turned in his top 100 time of 9.88 seconds last August. “Bolt showed that those 10-flat times that we’re running are ancient. It tells you what’s to come.”

al accommodation that’s good for everybody.” Steiner said he has already collected the jersey, batting gloves and cleats Jeter wore when he got his 2,994th hit June 13; Steiner expects to get those items, and his cap, for every hit through 3,000. The dirt and bases (which could be switched every inning) will be added to the bounty only for hit No. 3,000. Jeter is not likely to provide an extra bonanza by changing into a new game-perspired jersey every inning. “That wouldn’t be Jeter-like,” Steiner said. “He’d never wear 10 jerseys in a game. Maybe two.” Steiner also plans to sell the official lineup card, and replicas of it, and package fans’ ticket stubs into collectibles. He also hopes to develop photographs of the hit at Yankee Stadium to sell before fans leave. “This won’t be the circus coming to town,” Steiner said. Smith, the MLB executive, said Jeter approached the marketing with some trepidation, fearing that it might seem all too much. Smith said that during a recent meeting with Jeter and his agent, Casey Close, “I explained how appropriate it was for us to market these products. And Derek is like, ‘I don’t want to take the limelight’; he felt weird about it. I said, ‘It’s appropriate to be recognized; you’re a generational athlete.’ ” Jeter’s return is scheduled for June 29, when the Yankees play the second game of a threegame series against the Milwaukee Brewers at home, followed by trips to Citi Field (against the New York Mets) and Cleveland, before returning home to play Tampa Bay ahead of the AllStar Game. “We have to be ready,” said Lubrano, the Yankee Stadium authenticator. “He could go five for five.”

ROSEMONT, Ill. — The next time NFL owners meet over labor, there is hope it will be to ratify a new collective bargaining agreement with the players. Don’t get carried away thinking a deal is imminent. Optimism is in the air, for sure. That doesn’t mean the end of the lockout is at hand. Owners were briefed Tuesday on discussions for a new CBA that would net the players just under 50 percent of total revenues. Next up: more talks with the players in the Boston area. Several people with knowledge of the negotiations told The Associated Press that Commissioner Roger Goodell and his labor committee will meet with players association chief DeMaurice Smith today and Thursday. The owners spent five hours Tuesday getting updated on various CBA issues. The people spoke on condition of anonymity because the negotiations are supposed to be confidential. “We’re going to meet with them soon and we’re eager to accelerate the pace of the negotiations,” said Jeff Pash, the league’s chief negotiator. “We have a lot of work to do and we’ve got to do it right,” Goodell added. “The agreement has to focus on several issues and the issues are complex. It must be done in a way that is fair to the players and a way that is fair to the clubs.” One person told the AP that the players’ share would approach the 50 percent the NFLPA has said it has received throughout the past decade. But the expense credits — about $1 billion last year — that the league takes off the top would disappear. Also, there would no longer be “designated revenues” from which the players would share, the person said. Instead, the players would share from the entire pie, which they project will grow significantly over the course of the new CBA, which is expected to run anywhere from six to 10 years. So if they are taking 48 percent or more of a much higher revenue stream — without the initial NFL deduction for operating expenses — the players still would receive far more money than they got under the previous agreement. A salary floor keeping teams within 90 percent of the cap also would be included. The players have been concerned that some teams whose revenue streams don’t match up with the richer clubs would try to hold down salary spending. “It was a good day in the sense of we had a full discussion on the issues,” Goodell said. “Ownership is united and determined to reach an agreement and have a full 2011 season. The ownership has a better understanding of the framework (of a new CBA).” Several owners were expected to have objections to some of the proposals. Goodell was asked if there was a consensus among owners, to which he replied that “is a little deceiving because we don’t have an agreement” with the players. “The membership has a strong view of the priorities and what we need to do, and a determination to get there,” Goodell said. Both sides appear eager to find common ground for a new collective bargaining agreement rather than going back into court. A U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals is considering the league’s appeal of a lower-court injunction that originally blocked the lockout. That injunction is on hold, and a ruling could come anytime. “This is the season to get a deal,” Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay said. “I think the logic that you’re pushing on both sides is saying why get a deal Oct. 1, or whenever, when you could have had July 7, or whatever.” The lockout began March 12. Training camps are scheduled to open in late July. The person with knowledge of the negotiations said the players made economic concessions over the past three weeks of “secret” talks on both revenue percentage and on future stadium credits; many NFL teams have heavy debt for stadium construction. “The next financial model is going to look more like a division of percentage of total revenues,” the person said. “That is the context being discussed. It is a simpler mechanism to understand. You take away the 60 percent of defined gross revenues, take away the upfront expense credits that keep growing and now will be gone, it becomes easier to deal with the economics on a macro level.”

Football Continued from D1 Symptoms of concussion include headache, dizziness, disorientation, memory loss and seizures, according to the study. The deaths analyzed in the report occurred among those younger than 21 and involved scholastic sports teams as well as those in youth sports leagues not affiliated with schools. All the second-impact football deaths occurred among high school athletes, according to the report. Increased awareness of second-impact syndrome among football players has led 21 states to enact laws that pull student athletes from a game after a head injury and set procedures for allowing them to safely return, according to Gail Hayes, a spokeswoman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. North Carolina Gov. Beverly Perdue signed into law one such bill on June 16. The New York state legislature approved a similar bill on June 14. More than 90 percent of the football deaths analyzed came from head and neck blows that led to subdural hematoma, the

accumulation of blood within the cranium shutting off vital functions, Maron said. Ten of the deaths were the result of helmet-to-helmet blows, the study found. Offensive running back was the single most deadly position in football, with 33 deaths in 30 years. Sixty-nine deaths occurred among defensive players, according to the report. “Some of the things we talk to the students about are making them aware of signs and symptoms that are typical of concussions,” said Todd Nelson, Director of Safety and Risk Management at New York State Public High School Athletic Association. The group worked with Kemp Hannon, a New York state senator, on the bill. “It’s not the old days where you had to shake it off and get back into the game,” Nelson said. Among the 22 sports analyzed, track and field was the second-most deadly sport with 27 fatalities, primarily from pole vaulters falling outside the padded landing area, according to the report. Batted balls were the primary reasons for 16 trauma-related deaths in baseball. Boxing claimed 12 lives.


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GOLF NOTEBOOK

McIlroy’s star rising, but not on PGA Tour By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

BETHESDA, Md. — When Rory McIlroy walked onto the first tee Sunday at the U.S. Open, he briefly acknowledged one golf official and quickly extended his hand to warmly greet two others, USGA executive director Mike Davis and USGA president Jim Hyler. The first official who got little more than a nod was PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem. That scene was a reminder that while a star was born outside the nation’s capital, McIlroy is only a part-time golfer in America. McIlroy decided last year not to renew his PGA Tour membership, which required him to play 15 times (including the four majors and three World Golf Championships). He now can play only 10 events a year. The tour amended its policy so The Players Championship would not count against the 10, but McIlroy chose not to play that, either. There are no hard feelings with the PGA Tour, or with Finchem. The 22-year-old from Northern Ireland simply found himself playing too much golf right about the time the FedEx Cup playoffs got under way in late August, which would be the reason to take up membership in America in the first place. Still, it leaves the PGA Tour with limited exposure of golf’s new Boy Wonder. And that wouldn’t seem to help as the tour negotiates a new television contract that expires after 2012. “Rory’s performance in the U.S. Open has generated a lot of interest and a lot of excitement,” PGA Tour spokesman Ty Votaw said Tuesday. “Who knows what the future holds with respect to his membership status.” There is talk that McIlroy might consider joining the PGA Tour again, although likely not until the 2013 season. Chubby Chandler, his agent at International Sports Management, suggested Sunday evening that McIlroy has “a duty to be over here a little bit more being the Open champion.” “So I think obviously there’s a good chance that he’ll play a little bit more over here,” Chandler said. “But he won’t play a lot because he can’t do both tours.” Tour officials likely will bring up its membership policies, as they do just about every year, and decide if anything needs to be changed. One policy that seems to unfairly punish McIlroy is that he is restricted to 10 events (not including The Players) because he gave up his membership, while Martin Kaymer and Alvaro Quiros can play 12 U.S. tour events because they never joined the PGA Tour. Finchem was an observer in the final group, and after seeing that record-setting performance said it would only help golf. “Rory’s victory this week creates a lot of interest globally,” Finchem said. “It’s a global game. That’s the way you have to look at it. We’d love to have him play a little bit more, but there’s an integration of tournament and competition — that’s what the fans are into. Candidly, it’s in our interest for the European tour to be very, very strong. So if he’s playing more on the European tour and we have Paul Casey and Luke Donald playing more over here, that’s a good thing. “So it’s all good,” he said. “There’s no downside to it.” Lefty’s lament For only the third time since he has been playing all four majors, Phil Mickelson heads to the British Open without having finished in the top 10 in the first two majors of the year. “I just didn’t play how I had hoped,” Mickelson said after finishing 23 shots out of the lead, his largest gap ever at the U.S. Open. “It just gets me more geared up to look forward to the British. We had some big tournaments — the British and the PGA — coming up, as well as the FedEx Cup. So I’ll have the next two weeks to try and get my game ready and head over to Europe.” Mickelson’s next start is the Scottish Open, played this year at Castle Stuart. His win at the Houston Open is looking more like an anomaly, and his performance in the majors has tailed off since he realized he was dealing with a rare form of arthritis last summer. Mickelson has finished out of the top 10 in four straight majors.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 D5

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@ bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Saturday Men’s Game, June 18 Net Better Ball 1, Ed Hagstrom/Ken Waskom, 64. 2, Dave Morton/John Reed, 64. 3, Danny Duggan/Jeff Weichman, 65. 4, John Maniscalco/Larry Hinkle, 65. Skins — Danny Duggan, No. 1; Doug Rychard, No. 8; Burt Larson, No. 10; Dave Morton, No. 17. Father’s Day Tournament, June 19 Best Ball 18-Hole Division — 1 (tie), Bob Bernard & Blair Bennett 62; C.J. & Nick Edmonds, 62; Brian & Ben Wasserman, 62. Nine-Hole Division — 1, Todd & Brad Smith, 36. 2 (tie), Brad & Ryan Parsons, 37; Ron & Matthew Seals, 37; John & Charlie Murphy, 37. Loop Course Division — 1, Bob & Ocean Eisenberg, 14. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Ladies’ Golf Association, June 15 O.N.E.S. Scoring Championship Flight — Gross: 1, Kandy Lamson, 38. Net: 1, Karen Pagen, 33.5. A Flight — Gross: 1, Vicki Taylor, 41. 2, Cindi Eielson, 44. Net: 1, Dana Hagenbaugh, 33.5. 2, Marty Wade, 34. B Flight — Gross: 1, Mari Tank, 42. Net: 1, Elaine Dehart, 34. C Flight — Gross: 1, Sue Wesson, 50. Net: 1 (tie), Nan Cooley, 35.5; Nancy Weaver, 35.5. D Flight — Gross: 1, Dorothy Stenkamp, 50. Nine-Hole Division (Stroke Play) — Gross: 1, Berta Cleveland, 54. Net: 1, Cherie Newlin, 43. Men’s Daily Game, June 16 King Of The Hill First Flight (9 handicap or less) — Gross: 1, Mike Smolich, 77. 2 (tie), Franz Miller, 78; Brian Mikkelborg, 78. Net: 1 (tie), Mark Swearingen, 71; Andy West, 71. 3 (tie), Carl Ryan, 72; Craig Smith, 72. Second Flight (10-15) — Gross: 1, Tom Archey, 80. 2, Ron Estes, 84. Net: 1, Mike Rippett, 72. 2 (tie), Maury Hardman, 75; Ed Chernoff, 75. Third Flight (16 and higher) — Gross: 1, Ron Tokuyama, 89. 2, Steve Pistole, 91. Net: 1, Ted Hetzel, 70. 2 (tie), Ron Nasharr, 71; Sid Smith, 71. Friday Night Fights, June 17 Couples Team Scramble Gross: 1, Don & Joanne Christensen/Ray & Ruby Kays/ Bob & Carol Reinhard/Bill & Sandy Mills. Net: 1, Tim Laroche & Cindy Latimer/Steve Stewart & Cyndee Hodge/Joe & Charlotte Rodgers. LDs — Men: Marty Windman. Women: Donna Keller. KP — Men: Tom Thornton. Women: Cyndee Hodge. Closest Second Shot To Pin — Men: Bob Reinhard. Women: Carol Reinhard. Long Putt — Men: Frank Putnam. Men Or Women: Joanne Christensen. CROOKED RIVER RANCH Men’s Golf Club, June 21 Stroke Play A Flight (0-13 Handicap) — Gross: 1, Monty Modrell, 70. 2, Jim Martin, 73. 3, Fred Johnson, 74. Net: 1, Frank Earls, 61. 2, Ron Garzini, 62. 3, Herb Parker, 63. B Flight (14-18) — Gross: 1, Calvin Mobley, 76. 2, Bob Holloway, 76. 3, Wylie Harrell, 77. Net: 1, Ron Aker, 60. 2, Gary Johnson, 63. 3, Dale Monroe, 63. C Flight (19-25) — Gross: 1, Gerry Skaurud, 77. 2, Cary Poole, 78. 3, Art Crossley, 83. Net: 1, Ron Mahood, 56. 2, Jack Martin, 58. 3, Bob Bengtson, 63. D Flight (26 and up) — Gross: 1, Eddie Maroney, 79. 2, Doug Wyant, 85. 3, Bill Heisler, 86. Net: 1, Gene Ressler, 56. 2, Ron Meisner, 57. 3, Ken Nored, 59. DESERT PEAKS Wednesday Ladies Club, June 15 Captain’s Choice 1, Margaret Sturza, 9. 2, Tina Gruner, 6. 3, Teresa Lindgren. KP — Teresa Lindgren. Wednesday Twilight League, June 15 Team Match Play Standings The Good, Bad & Ugly, 37-19. Brunoe Logging, 36-20. Try To Farms, 28-28. Central Oregon Insurance, 32-24. Earnest Electric, 25-31. Gruner Chevrolet, 35-21. Oregon Embroidery, 21-35. Billy Baroo’s, 19-37. Schmidt House, 22-34. Willow Creek Driving Range, 31-25. Bel Air Funeral Home, 32-24. Good Old Boys, 28-28. Shielding International, 25-31. Keith Manufacturing, 21-35. KPs — Flight 1: Gary Gruner, Denny Story. Flight 2: Steve Davis, Dean Hunt. Flight 3: Jerin Say, Jens Lovtang. LDs — Flight 1: Denny Story, Ed McDaniel. Flight 2: Brent Moschetti. Flight 3: Shane Henning, Jim Manion. Thursday Men’s Club, June 16 Net Blind Draw 1, Ken Southwick/Bob Victorin, 140. 2, Sam Brown/Skip Ditmore, 143. KP — Joe Kirkwood. LD — Ed McDaniel. Friday Night Couples, June 17 Net Chapman 1, Bruce & Jeanette Houck, 30.7. 2, Scott Ditmore & Vicki Moore, 34.3. 3, Gary & Tina Gruner, 34.9. Sunday Group Play, June 19 Blind Draw Gross: 1, Spud Gephart/Gary Burtis, 163. 2, Fred Blackman/Kurt Ocker, 164. Net: 1, Francisco Morales/Dean Ditmore, 138. Val Paterson/Sid Benjamin, 139. KP — Ed McDaniel. LD — Francisco Morales. EAGLE CREST Resort Cup, June 7 Team Match Play 1, Black Butte Ranch, 306. 2, Widgi Creek, 296. 3, Eagle Crest, 292. 4, Sunriver Resort, 282. Season Standings (Two Matches) — Black Butte Ranch, 625. 2, Widgi Creek, 607; 3, Sunriver Resort, 584; 4, Eagle Crest, 548. Individual Winners A Players — 1, Curt Maddux (WC), 38. 2, Ray Schadt (EC), 36. 3, Roger Palmer (EC), 35. 4 (tie), Mel Jolly (BB), 33; Brian Holmes (SR), 33. B Players — Jerry Lawhun (BB), 40. Frank Nickel (EC), 39; Mike Thurlow (EC), 39. Edward Seabloom (BB), 38. THE GREENS AT REDMOND Men’s Club, June 16 Net Stroke Play A Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Jeff Strauser, 27.5. 2 (tie), Tony Rosengarth, 28; Steve Rupp, 28. 4, Marv Bibler, 28.5. 18 Holes: 1, Jeff Strauser, 52. 2, Bob Grabar, 55. 3, Don O’Malley, 56. 4, Steve Rupp, 57. B Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Scott McMillin, 27. 2, Tom Zowney, 28. 3, Dennis Gillett, 29.5. 4 (tie), Mike Frier, 30.5; Miles Hutchins, 30.5. 18 Holes: 1, Dennis Gillett, 53. 2, Scott McMillin, 54. 3, Miles Hutchins, 58. 4, Arlie Holm, 60. KPs — Jeff Strauser, No. 5; Don O’Malley, No. 7; Mike Frier, No. 13; Hoyt Norris, No. 16. Golfer of the Week — Scott McMillin. JUNIPER Ladies Golf Club, June 15 Net Odd Holes Flight A (0-30 handicap) — 1, Jan Carver, 36.5. 2, Shan Wattenburger, 37. 3 (tie), Sandy Cameron, 38; Nancy Hakala, 38; Pam Garney, 38. Flight B — 1, Sharon Weldon, 31. 2, JoAnne Hare, 32. 3, Doris Thompson, 34. KPs — Cheryl Steppe, No. 3; Cherry Spurlock, No. 8; Doris Thompson, No. 13; Donna Condrashoff, No. 16. MEADOW LAKES Men’s Association U.S. Open Night, June 16 Two-Man Best Ball Gross: 1, Clay Smith/Jake Shinkle, 35. 2, Jim Montgomery/Zach Lampert, 36. 3 (tie), Les Bryan/Caleb Henry, 37; Pat O’Gorman/Dustin Conklin, 37. Net: 1, Shawn Lampert/Joe Castillo, 31. 2, Grant Kemp/Britton Coffer, 32. 3 (tie), Mike Close/Curtis Scofield, 33; Johnnie Jones/Joel White, 33; Jared George/Matt York, 33; Dave Barnhouse/Dave Ego, 33; Steve Reynolds/Ron Edgerly, 33. KPs — A Flight: Curtis Scofield, No. 13; Jon Wilber, No. 17. B Flight: Dewey Springer, No. 13; Joel White, No. 17. Sunday Skins Game, June 19 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Jeff Storm, 71. 2, Les Bryan, 74. 3, Jim Montgomery, 76. Net: 1, Les Bryan, 67. 2, Jeff Storm, 68. 3 (tie), Clay Smith, 73; Jeff Brown, 73. Skins — Gross: Jeff Storm, Nos. 2, 6, 14, 16; Les Bryan, Nos. 5, 17; Jim Montgomery, No. 7; Jeff Brown, No. 13; Rob Dudley, No. 18. Net: Jeff Storm, Nos. 2, 14, 16; Mike Close,

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No. 12; Jeff Brown, No. 13; Les Bryan, No. 17. SUNRIVER RESORT Central Oregon Women’s Golf Association, June 15 Stroke Play at Meadows course Class A — Gross: 1, Jan Sandburg. 2, Melinda Bailey. 3, Sue Rogers. 4, Debbie Hehn. Net: 1, Sue Adams. 2, Fran Atchison. 3 (tie), Carol Woodruff; Karen Wintermyre. Class B — Gross: 1, Andi Northcote. 2, Denise Waddell. 3, Marie Olds. 4, Adele Johansen. Net: 1, Mary Clark. 2 (tie), Phyllis Lees; Bonnie Bell. 3, Linda Romani. 4, Veron Rygh. Class C — Gross: 1, Sandy Austen. 2 (tie), Cookie Dillavou; Barbara Wellnitz. 4, Donna Loringer. Net: 1, Beattie Stabeck. 2, Ann Bard. 3, Ruth Thoren. 4 (tie), Pat Neufeldt; Sallie Hennessey. Class D — Gross: 1, Karyn Goman. 2, Joan Johnson. 3, Sandy Mills. 4, Nancy Dolby. Net: 1, Nancy Peccia. 2, Charleen Hurst. 3, Darlene Ross. 4, Anita Lohman. KP — Class A: Sue Rogers. Class B: Phyllis Lees. Class C: Sallie Hennessey. Class D: Shenny Braemer. Accurate Drive — Class A: Judy Bluhm. Class B: Veron Rygh. Class C: Deanna Cooper. Class D: Carol Leonard. WIDGI CREEK Central Oregon Junior Golf Association, June 20 Stroke Play Boys 16 and Up Division — 1, Cole Ortega, 69. 2, Zach Mode, 73. 3, Jared Lambert, 77. 4, Stephen Drgastin, 79. 5 (tie), Jaired Rodmaker, 86; Doug Lyons, 86. 7, Nathan Pajutee, 87. 8, Zach Cummings, 88. 9, Tim Messner, 89. 10, Keegan Spring, 90. Girls Varsity Division — 1, Rebecca Kerry, 79. 2, Madi Mansberger, 83. 3, Kayla Good, 90. 4, Sarah Heinly, 93. 5, Megan Mitchell, 94. 6, Sydney King, 95. 7, Anna Schwab, 96. 8, Alyssa Kerry, 98. 9, Victoria Sample, 99. 10, Cayla Lussier, 110. Boys Division 14-15 — 1, T.K. Wasserman, 75. 2, Ryan Blackwell, 77. 3, Declan Watts, 78. 4 (tie), Will Mayer, 80; Chapin Pedersen, 80. 6, Mason Rodby, 82. 7, Riley Goldstein, 86. 8 (tie), Sam Heinly, 90; Christorpher Wallace, 90; James Seeley, 90. Girls Nine-Hole Division — 1, Kira Davis, 50. 2, Molly Wasserman, 55. 3, Kaitlan Dalton, 63. 4, Asche Kelleher, 65. 5, Katie Reed, 66. 6, McKenzie McQuire, 67. 7, Lauren Goldsteim, 68. 8, Shannon Moyer, 70. Boys Division 12-13 — 1, Ben Wasserman (Card), 79. 2, Rhett Pedersen, 79. 3, Matt Schwab, 82. 4, Richie Mikesell, 88. 5, Max Michalski, 91. 6, Mario Mora, 92. 7, Eric Wasserman, 95. 8 (tie), Cole Chrisman, 100; Mark Olsen, 100. 10, Joe Navarra, 105. Boys Novice Division — 1, Josh Maitre, 47. 2 (tie), Cole Sprando, 55; Brad Smith, 55. 4 (tie), Zach Parsons, 56; Alec Doan, 56. 6 (tie), Cole Younger, 58; T.J. Newell, 58; Spencer Snider, 58. 9, Nichalos Guyer, 60. 10, Wyatt Hougham, 62; Payton Cole, 62; Cody Feis, 62. Boys Division 9-11 — 1, Andrew Watts, 39. 2, Isaac Buerger, 45. 3, Nick Watts, 48. 4, Drew Watts, 50. 5, Connor Duggan, 52. 6, Leeson Handley, 53. 7, Seth Chilcutt, 54. 8, Ryder Hoover, 55. 9, Hunter Holmes, 58. 10, Isaac Hathaway, 60. Boys Division 9-11 (Short Course) — 1, Jackson Murphy, 42. 2 (tie), Luke Buerger, 45; Lucas Hughes, 45; Ryan Parsons, 45. 5, Cade Doan, 49. 6, Kyle Reed, 52. 7, Reid Cramer, 55. 8 (tie), Milo Mora, 56; Jake Nitsos, 56. 10, Jack McCleary, 57. Girls Division 9-11 (Short Course) — 1, Megan McCleary, 55. 2, Maggie Edmonds, 57. 3, Lily Chrisman, 59. 4, Carolyn Scherbinske, 68. BEST OF BEND BESTBALL at Pronghorn, June 17 at Brasada, June 18 at Tetherow, June 19 Two-Man Best Ball Open Division — Gross: 1, Jim Tebbs/Jay Fredrickson, 73-61-73—207. 2, Tom Carlsen/Conor Carlsen, 71-66-71—208. 3, Morgan Morita/Moose Adams, 75-66-70—211. Net: 1, Kevin Lachenmeier/Raoul Calderon, 68-60-67—195. 2, Steve Turcotte/ Tony Willis, 68-63-65—196. 3, Justin Stewart/Matt Stewart, 61-6076—197. Senior Division — Gross: 1, Stein Swenson/Mike Reuther, 71-69-74—214. 2, Verl Steppe/Pat Woerner, 74-72-73—219. 3, Larry Stewart/Mike Duckham, 76-71-78—225. Net: 1, Kim Milligan/Dave O’Brien, 68-60-73—201. 2, John Thompson/Michael Combs, 69-63-74—206. 3, Steve Gurnee/Brian McDowell, 7366-69—208. Pronghorn Daily Winners Open — Gross: 1, Perry Ponti/Chris Bae, 71. Net: 1, Justin Stewart/Matt Stewart, 61. Senior — Gross: 1, Stein Swenson/Mike Reuther, 71. Net: 1, Larry Oliver/Butch Lenberg, 68. KPs — Open: Ed Amarillas, No. 7. Senior: Stein Swenson, No. 14. LDs — Open: Todd Hutchinson, No. 11. Senior: William Herzog, No. 2. Brasada Daily Winners Open — Gross: 1, Jim Tebbs/Jay Fredrickson, 61. Net: 1, Justin Stewart/Matt Stewart, 60. Senior — Gross: 1, Stein Swenson/Mike Reuther, 69. Net: 1, Kim Milligan/Dave O’Brien, 59. KPs — Open: Jay Fredrickson, No. 4. Senior: Diane Clavin, No. 6. LDs — Open: Andrew Schier, No. 18. Seniors: Pat Woerher, No. 16. Tetherow Daily Winners Open — Gross: 1, Morgan Morita/Moose Adams, 70. Net: 1, Ron Steinthal/Mike Steinthal, 65. Senior — Gross: 1, Verl Steppe/Pat Woerner, 73. Net: 1, Steve Gurnee/Brian McDowell, 69. KPs — Open: Dan Boone, No. 3. Senior: Bill Herzog, No. 3. LDs — Open: Todd Hutchinson, No. 18. Senior: Dave O’Brien, No. 18.

Hole-In-One Report June 17 BLACK BUTTE RANCH BIG MEADOW Tom Hedford, Black Butte Ranch No. 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-hybrid June 17 JUNIPER James Templeton, Corvallis No. 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-iron June 17 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Kenneth Johnson, Redmond No. 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron June 19 MEADOW LAKES Phil Prodehl, Bend No. 17. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-iron June 19 BRASADA Adam Audette, Bend No. 17. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-hybrid June 20 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Jack Hogan, Redmond No. 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-iron June 21 CROOKED RIVER RANCH Ron Meisner, Crooked River Ranch No. 16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 yards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com.

——— LEAGUES Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend plays weekly tournaments. Members of the men’s club and others interested River’s Edge Golf Club men with an established USGA handicap are invited to participate. For more information or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Tuesdays — The Ladies League at Lost Tracks Golf Club plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women golfers are welcome. For more information, call the pro shop at 541-385-1818. Tuesdays — Black Butte Ranch Women’s Golf Club accepts women golfers of all levels. Cost to join is $40 plus green fees for the 2011 season. For more information or to register, call the Big Meadow golf shop at 541-595-1500. Tuesdays — Ladies of the Greens women’s golf club at The Greens at Redmond golf course play weekly from May through October. New members are welcome. For more information or to register, call Lynn Holm at 541-388-2656. Wednesdays — The Women’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course plays weekly in tournaments that tee off at 9:30 a.m. Members are welcome and should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information, or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. Cost is $35 plus $30 handicapping fee. Nightly green fee is $7. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Juniper Ladies Golf Club plays weekly between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information visit www.juniperladies.com. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Ladies Club at Desert Peaks in Madras. Times vary each week. Cost is $20 to join and weekly games are held. For more information, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368. Wednesdays — Men’s club at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters plays every Wednesday morning. Cost is $60 to sign up for the year, and weekly 18-hole games are held. For more information, call Aspen Lakes at 541-549-4653. Wednesdays — Men’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts around 9 a.m. Cost is $55 for annual membership. For more information, e-mail Don Olson at d.s.olson@msn.com or go to www.srmengolf.com. Wednesdays — Women’s club at Sunriver Resort plays weekly tournaments at the Meadows or Woodlands courses with shotgun starts around 9 a.m. There are both 9-hole and 18-hole groups. For more information, e-mail (for 9-hole) Linda Salzer at lsalzer@chamberscable.com for nine-hole group, or Joni Cloud, at joni.cloud9898@gmail.com for 18-hole group. Thursdays — Ladies League at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information, call Linda Richards at 503-577-5983. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Mondays through Fridays — Pee Wee Golf Clinics at Juniper Golf Course are open to beginning golfers ages 5-7. Classes begin at noon each day and are expected to last between 30 to 40 minutes each. Camp dates: June 20-24, June 27-30, July 11-14, July 18-21, July 25-28, Aug. 1-4. Cost is $25 per student. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541548-3121 or email him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Mondays or Wednesdays — Junior Golfer Classes at Juniper Golf Course are open to golfers ages 8-17 from June 20 through Aug. 3. Classes for beginners are scheduled from 1:30-2:45 p.m.; intermediate golfers from 3:30-4:45 p.m. Cost is $75 and classes are limited to 20 students. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541-548-3121 or email him at pro@ stuartallisongolf.com. Mondays and Wednesdays — Tournament Player Classes at Juniper Golf Course are open to advanced golfers ages 8-17 from June 20 through Aug. 3. Classes begin at 5 p.m. Cost is $35 and classes are limited to four students. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541-548-3121 or email him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Wednesdays — Sunriver Resort will host junior golf camps every Wednesday from June 22 through Aug. 17. Conducted by Sunriver’s instructional staff, camps run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and include instruction on all phases of the game, as well as lunch and a nine-hole playing lesson. Cost is $125. For more information or to register, visit www.sunriver-resort.com or call Mike Palen, Sunriver’s director of instruction, at 541-788-4249. Fridays and Saturdays — Junior golf camp for advanced golfers at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. Camps are designed to prepare experienced golfers for competitive golf. Camps are scheduled to run 3-4:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Camp dates: June 24-25, July 8-9, July 22-23, Aug. 5-6, Aug. 19-20. Cost is $50 per student. To register or for more information, contact Eagle Crest director of instruction Tam Bronkey at 541-504-3879 or email him at tamb@eagle-crest.com. June 27-July 1 — Junior Golf Camp at Crooked River Ranch is open to all children ages 8 to 17. Instructors will teach the fundamentals of etiquette, putting, chipping, approach shots, and tee shots. Classes run Monday through Thursday, from 3-5 p.m. and 7 a.m.-noon on Friday. Tournament to follow on Friday afternoon. Cost is $80 per child and includes lunch each day. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-923-6343. Mondays through Fridays — Junior full-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend are open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 9-16. Camps runs 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily, and campers will work on putting, chipping, bunker play and the full swing. Nine holes of golf accompanied by instructors each day also included. Cost is $595 and includes all golf activities, lunch daily and amenity package. Camp dates: June 27-July 1 and July 18-22. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. Tuesdays through Thursdays — Ladies-only golf school at Black Butte Ranch creates a comfortable learning environment for women golfers of all skill levels. Three-day school runs from 9-11:30 a.m. each day. Dates for school include July 12-14, July 19-21, July 26-28, and Aug. 2-4. Cost is $425 and includes lunch, nine holes of golf each day, and on-course instruction. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch.com or call 541-595-1500. July 31-Aug. 4 — Oregon State University’s Junior Golf Camp in Corvallis is for boys and girls ages 12 through 18. Camp attendees will receive instruction by Oregon State women’s golf coach Risë Alexander, and assistant Kailin Downs, a former professional golfer and Mountain View High School standout. Cost is $995, and includes instruction, room, board, t-shirt, green fees and practice ball expenses). Cost is $845 for golfers who do not need room and board. For more information or to register, visit www.oregonstategolfcamp.com/junior-golf-camp.cfm. Wednesdays through Fridays — Adult-child three-day golf camp at Black Butte Ranch. Camp includes two hours of instruction each day and one round of golf. Classes from 9 to 11 a.m. each day. Cost is $350 and includes instruction for one adult and one child. Additional children $150 each. Camp dates: Aug. 10-12, Aug. 1719. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch. com or call 541-595-1500. Aug. 8-12 — Junior Golf Camp at Crooked River Ranch is open to intermediate golfers ages 11 to 17. Instructors will teach the fundamentals of putting, chipping, approach shots, and tee shots. Classes run Monday through Thursday, from 7:30-10 a.m. and 7 a.m.-noon on Friday. Tournament to follow on Friday afternoon. Cost is $95 per child and includes lunch each day. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-923-6343. ——— TOURNAMENTS June 23 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. June 24-26 — 2011 Mirror Pond Men’s Amateur Invitational, Central Oregon’s oldest golf tournament, at Bend Golf and Country Club attracts top amateur male golfers from Oregon and beyond for 36 holes of individual stroke-play competition over two days.

A practice round is scheduled for June 24, followed by tournament play on both Saturday and Sunday. Invited guest entry fee is $220 and includes practice round, tee prize, hosted tournament dinner, stroke-play event, and additional contests. The field is limited to the first 140 paid entries. Players can register in three divisions: regular (age 18 and older), senior (age 50 and older) and super senior (age 65 and older). To register, call the Bend G&CC golf shop at 541382-2878, e-mail at bendgolfshop@bendgolfclub.com or visit www. bendgolfclub.com. June 25 — The Central Oregon Builders Association is hosting two golf tournaments in one day at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend. Four-person shamble tees off with a 7:30 a.m. shotgun start. Four-person scramble tees off at 1:30 p.m. Cost is $125 per person or $450 per team to play in one tournament, or $200 per person or $800 per team to play in both tournaments. Fee includes lunch, tee and raffle prizes. Proceeds to benefit the COBA Government Affairs Program. For more information or to register, call Andy High at 541389-1058, or e-mail him at andyh@coba.org. June 25 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel.com/amateurtour. June 25 — St. Thomas Academy Golf Tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Challenge Course in Redmond. Scramble begins with 8:30 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $75 per player or $300 per team and includes green fees, cart and barbecue lunch. Individual contests and prizes also included. All proceeds go to educational materials for the children at St. Thomas Academy in Redmond. For more information or to register, call St. Thomas at 541-548-3785. June 25 — The 17th Annual Three Sisters Open Women’s Golf Tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course in Redmond. The team scramble begins with an 8 a.m. shotgun start and is for women golfers of all abilities. Proceeds will benefit Quota International of Central Oregon and Bend Women’s Scholarship Fund. Cost is $100 per player and includes golf, use of a cart, continental breakfast, lunch, tee gift and prizes. Space is limited and entries will be accepted on a first-come basis. For more information or to register, call Kathy Wuest at 541-382-2421 or e-mail her at kwuest@lumbins.com. June 27 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Crooked River Ranch. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail. com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 27-July 1 — Rolex Tournament of Champions at Crosswater Club in Sunriver. American Junior Golf Association tournament features top boys and girls from around the country and beyond to play in 72 holes of stroke play with a 54-hole cut. For more information, call the AJGA at 770-868-4200 or visit www.ajga.org. June 28 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s Summer Golf Experience at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Event is for 6- to 8-year-olds. Players must be at Awbrey Glen by 3 p.m., and golf begins at 3:30 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 28 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. June 30 — Dollars for Scholars golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course in Redmond is hosted by the Redmond Realtors Association. Four-person scramble begins with 9 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $65 per person and includes cart, range balls and lunch. Proceeds to benefit the Redmond Realtors Scholarship Fund. To register or for more information, call Tina DeCamp at 541-504-7453. July 7 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. July 8 — Golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge course in Redmond to benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon and Kiwanis Club of Redmond. Four-person scramble begins at 8 a.m. Entry fee is $125 per person or $500 per team and includes continental breakfast, barbecue lunch, prizes for the first- and second-place teams, men’s and women’s long-drive contest, and closest-to-the-pin contest on every hole. Awards ceremony and silent auction to follow tournament. Sponsorships are available. For more information, contact Brandy Fultz at 541-504-9060, or e-mail to bfultz@bgcco.org. July 9-10 — Prineville Pro-Am Invitational at Prineville Golf Club. Friday practice round and evening horse race for professionals also available. For more information, contact Prineville GC at 541-480-3566. July 9 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Sunriver Resort’s Meadows course. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel. com/amateurtour. July 9 — Inaugural High Desert Ducks Classic golf tournament at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert & Casino near Warm Springs. Scramble tournament, hosted by the Oregon Club of Jefferson County, tees off with 1 p.m. shotgun start. Former Duck athletes scheduled to appear include: Dino Philyaw, Aaron Gipson, Josh Wilcox, Steve Baack, Andiel Brown, Tony Koker, Jared Siegel, Josh Tschirigi and Demetrius Spates. Cost to play is $150 and includes golf, cart, dinner and reception. Proceeds to benefit the Duck Athletic Fund. For more information, visit www.jeffcoducks.org or e-mail highdesertducks@gmail.com. July 10 — The Audrey Ditmore Memorial Golf Tournament is an 18-hole four-person scramble at Desert Peaks Golf Club in Madras. Cost is $100 per team. For more information or to register, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368, visit www.desertpeaksgolf.com, or e-mail desertpeaks@clearwire.net. July 11 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Club in Prineville. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 11 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at John Day Golf Course in John Day. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at

host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. July 11-12 — Central Oregon Junior at Broken Top Golf Club in Bend and Juniper Golf Course in Redmond is an Oregon Golf Association junior tournament. For more information or to register, call the OGA at 866-981-4653 or visit www.oga.org. July 11-12 — Peter Jacobsen’s Legends of Oregon golf tournament at Pronghorn Club near Bend. Tournament is a two-net shamble, and each team will include an Oregon “Legend” in group to round out fivesome. University of Oregon alumni and coaches scheduled to be on hand include Mike Bellotti, Joey Harrington, and Jacobsen. Cost is $5,000 per foursome. The field is limited to the first 18 groups to sign up. Proceeds benefit the Duck Athletic Fund. For more information, call 541-346-5433, or visit www.legendsoforegon.com. July 11-16 — PNGA Men’s Amateur at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tournament begins with 36 holes of stroke play followed by single-elimination match play. All golfers must carry a 4.4 handicap index or better. Cost is $215 and field is limited to 168 golfers. For more information or to register, visit www.thepnga.org or call the PNGA at 800-643-6410. July 12 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s Summer Golf Experience at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Event is for 6to 8-year-olds. Players must be at Awbrey Glen by 3 p.m., and golf begins at 3:30 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga. com. July 14 — Central Oregon Golf Tour Iron Man event at Eagle Crest Resort’s Ridge and Challenge courses in Redmond is a 36hole tournament. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. July 14-15 — Diamond in the Rough Ladies Invitational at Crooked River Ranch is a 36-hole tournament for two-person teams. Thursday’s round is a best ball followed by a Friday Chapman. Open to any golfer with an official USGA handicap. For more information or to register, call Crooked River Ranch at 541-9236343, or visit www.crookedriveranch.com. July 15 — The Deschutes Brewery Sagebrush Classic at Broken Top Club in Bend. The four-person best ball begins with shotgun starts at 7:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Golf includes cart, range balls, tee gifts, select golf clothing, breakfast and/or lunch, beverages, team photo, and tickets to Saturday’s feast. Field is limited to 52 teams. Sponsorships are also available. Proceeds to benefit family and children’s charities in Central Oregon. Information on pricing can be found at www.sagebrush.org. To register for golf, contact Linda Bones at 541-312-6947 or e-mail Linda@sagebrush.org. All other inquiries, call 800-601-8123. July 15 — The 30th annual St. Charles Medical Center golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course. This tournament is a four-person Texas scramble with awards for men, ladies and mixed doubles. Prizes for men’s and women’s long-drive competition. Shotgun start at 8:30 a.m. Entry fee is $95 per player and includes continental breakfast, golf, cart, range balls, prizes and catered lunch. For more information, call Jean at 541-548-4547. July 16 — Men’s League Invite at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville is a two-person scramble tournament. Tournament open to the public. Event tees off with an 8 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $35 plus green fee. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. July 16 — Ninth annual Prineville Soroptimist Coed Golf Tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course. Four-person coed scramble tournament begins at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start followed by lunch and awards. Cost is $55 per player or $220 per team and includes green fees, continental breakfast, lunch, and prizes. Proceeds benefit International Soroptimists of Prineville, which will fund local youth scholarships and women’s awards. For more information or to register, call Dale Comini at 541-447-5305 or Meadow Lakes at 541-447-7113. July 18 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at golf course to be determined. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 21 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. July 25 — U.S. Amateur sectional qualifying tournament at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Event is open to any amateur male player with a handicap index of 2.4 or lower. Top finishers qualify for the 110th U.S. Amateur Championship to be held Aug. 22-28 at Erin Hills Golf Course in Erin, Wis. Download a registration form at www.usga.org and click on the “championships” link. July 25 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. July 25 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Tokatee Golf Club in Blue River. Tee times begin at 11 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. July 26 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s Summer Golf Experience at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Event is for 6to 8-year-olds. Players must be at Awbrey Glen by 3 p.m., and golf begins at 3:30 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga. com.

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541-322-6024

British Open Champ CBS Golf Analyst

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Devin’s Destiny is a non-proit 501(c)(3) organization solely funded by private donations.

All Day, Any Day! Call for tee time or book online @ Golfquailrun.com

(541) 536-1303 or (800) 895-GOLF


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D6 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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G W LPGA TOUR LPGA CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Pittsford, N.Y. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Locust Hill Country Club (6,534 yards, par 72). Purse: $2.5 million. Winner’s share: $375,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 9:30-11:30 a.m., 9-11 p.m.; Friday, 9:30-11:30 a.m., 9-11 p.m.; Saturday, 1-4 p.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Sunday, 1-4 p.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.).

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Last year: Cristie Kerr cruised to a 12stroke victory to become the first American to top the world ranking.

With Mount Bachelor in the background, a golfer tees off on the eighth hole while his partner watches his shot at Quail Run Golf course in La Pine Sunday.

Last event: Top-ranked Yani Tseng won the LPGA State Farm Classic on June 12 for her second victory of the year and seventh tour title in four years.

Quail Run

Online: www.lpga.com

PGA TOUR TRAVELERS CHAMPIONSHIP Site: Cromwell, Conn. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: TPC River Highlands (6,841 yards, par 70). Purse: $6 million. Winner’s share: $1.08 million. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, noon-3 p.m., 5:30-8:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday-Sunday, noon-3 p.m.). Last year: Bubba Watson won his first PGA Tour title. Last week: Rory McIlroy won the U.S. Open at Congressional for his first major title, smashing the tournament scoring records at 16-under 268. Online: www.pgatour.com

CHAMPIONS DICK’S SPORTING GOODS OPEN Site: Endicott, N.Y. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: En-Joie Golf Course (6,974 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.75 million. Winner’s share: $262,500. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 3:305:30 p.m., 11 p.m.-1 a.m.; Saturday, 4:30-6:30 p.m., 9-11 p.m.; Sunday, 4:30-6:30 p.m., 9-11 p.m.) Last year: Loren Roberts birdied the final hole for a 7-under 65 and a one-stroke victory over Fred Funk. Last event: Mark Wiebe won the Greater Hickory Classic on June 12, beating James Mason with a par on the third hole of a playoff. Online: www.pgatour.com

EUROPEAN TOUR BMW INTERNATIONAL OPEN Site: Nord-Eichenried, Germany. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Munich Nord-Eichenried Golf Club (7,025 yards, par 72). Purse: $2.87 million. Winner’s share: $478,480. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.). Last year: England’s David Horsey won his first European Tour title, making a 5-foot birdie putt on the final hole for a one-stroke victory over Ross Fisher. Online: www.europeantour.com

NATIONWIDE TOUR MEXICO OPEN Site: Leon, Mexico. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: El Bosque Country Club (7,708 yards, par 72). Purse: $700,000. Winner’s share: $126,000. Television: None. Last year: Jamie Lovemark won his first Nationwide Tour victory. Last week: Australia’s Mathew Goggin won the Wichita Open on Sunday for his second Nationwide Tour title of the year and fourth overall. Online: www.pgatour.com

Continued from D1 So for those who have never ventured south beyond Sunriver for a round of golf, Quail Run might be nothing more than a vague concept. If so, that’s too bad. Quail Run lacks the fanfare of many of this region’s elite courses. But in reality, Quail Run — among the best conditioned golf courses in Central Oregon — can count itself among some of the best public courses in the region. The course is challenging and well designed — not an easy task considering that Jim Ramey, Sunriver Resort’s longtime director of agronomy, designed Quail Run’s two nines 15 years apart. And it can be a blast to play, as long as the torturous pines are avoided. Although its 18 holes can compete with any public course in the region, Quail Run is a bit different from its peers. For one, it still holds a folksy charm. My playing partner and I played in a foursome with two Quail Run members, and we caught up with another foursome on the twisting par-4 third hole. On the tee, my partner and I noticed that four golfers were using four separate motorized golf carts, a rare sight to be sure. My partner commented that he had never seen such a thing before. “We’ve played with three guys in three carts before,” one of our members replied. “We (Quail Run members) all own our own carts, so why not? We all hit it all over the place anyway.” Apparently, playing one cart per person is not so uncommon at Quail Run. And it really was no bother to us. My only wish was that I could have seen the army of golf carts later in my round. Maybe that would have taken my mind off the fact that, in a battle between Quail Run and me, the La Pine golf course was very much winning.

Difficulty of course Though Quail Run is not a particularly long golf course at 6,897 yards, it is a deceptively difficult track. What makes it so? Though Quail Run’s fairways are generous, the course rests in a relatively dense forest, and its interme-

Quail Run SCORECARD Hole No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 No. 4 No. 5 No. 6 No. 7 No. 8 No. 9 Out

Par Yardage Par 4 422 yards Par 3 186 yards Par 4 382 yards Par 5 504 yards Par 4 416 yards Par 5 525 yards Par 4 429 yards Par 3 160 yards Par 4 464 yards Par 36 3,488 yards

No. 10 Par 3 180 yards No. 11 Par 4 393 yards No. 12 Par 5 510 yards No. 13 Par 4 350 yards No. 14 Par 3 200 yards No. 15 Par 4 388 yards No. 16 Par 4 395 yards No. 17 Par 5 542 yards No. 18 Par 4 451 yards Out Par 36 3,409 yards *All distances from back tees

diary rough takes the form of some rather testy ponderosa pines. Any golfer whose tee shot is hit off target and past the first cut of rough will likely turn bogey into a best-case scenario. For most average golfers, most of whom struggle with accuracy off the tee, that makes for a stern challenge. However, novices will find at Quail Run a course that shrinks down to 5,391 yards (from the red tees) with a design that is not overly punitive, as long as the ball can be kept in play.

Favorite hole Quail Run does not have a true signature hole, but it does offer a consistent design with good hole after good hole. My favorite, though, is the 504-yard, par-5 fourth hole. The slight dogleg right looks rather pedestrian from the tee box, but a good drive will put a golfer at the bend in the fairway. And that sets up a gorgeous second shot with lush green grass and white-sand bunkers leading into a well-designed shallow green — all framed by a forest of tall pines. A golfer who didn’t know better might think No. 4 at Quail Run was designed by famed course architect Donald Ross.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet

Strategy Conservative play has its rewards at Quail Run considering that avoiding the pine trees is a must for a golfer hoping to card a good score. Teeing off with a fairway wood, assuming a golfer can control it, can help to avoid the punitive forest. And because Quail Run is not overly long, strong players will still be able to make their approach shots with a short iron. Play most approach shots short of the hole, accounting for the hard and fast greens that make stopping a ball at Quail Run a challenge. Once on the green, go after your line aggressively, as most putts will run true on Quail Run’s well-kept putting surfaces.

Extras Quail Run’s clubhouse will not grab anybody’s attention, but it does offer an inexpensive snack bar with a television and plenty of seating. And the course’s pro shop is roomy with gear of all kinds on display. The facility also has an ample outdoor seating area that is well shaded. The course’s full-size driving range offers abundant room to practice, and a shortgame practice area gives golfers a chance to hone their chipping skills. The practice putting green is not huge, but it rests just off the first tee, giving golfers a chance to work on their putting while waiting to tee off.

Value At $55 during prime time, Quail Run is not inexpensive. But the La Pine course does compare well to its peers, including the Woodlands and Meadows courses at Sunriver Resort and Bend’s Widgi Creek Golf Club and Lost Tracks Golf Club. The green fees at Quail Run drop to $35 after 2 p.m. each day during the summer, making Quail Run one of the best bargains in the region. Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

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• Meadow Lakes hires new head pro: Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville has recently hired Alan Hoover as its new head golf professional. Before coming to Meadow Lakes, Hoover was the head professional at Harvard Gulch Golf Course, a municipal golf course in Denver. Hoover replaces Lee Roberts, who is retiring this month as head pro at Meadow Lakes. Roberts had been the head pro at Meadow Lakes since 2002. • Aspen Lakes names assistant as interim head pro: Josh McKinley has recently been named the interim head professional at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters. McKinley replaces Matt Phil-

lips, who had been the head pro at Aspen Lakes since February 2009 until recently moving to the Oregon Coast for personal reasons, according to the club. McKinley, a 35-year-old veteran of the Iraq War, has been an Aspen Lakes assistant professional for two seasons. The search for a permanent head pro is ongoing, says Matt Cyrus, co-owner of Aspen Lakes. • Pronghorn’s PGA Tour Academy hires Sunriver pro: Mike Palen has been hired as the head instructor at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend. Palen, 40, has been the director of instruction at Sunriver Resort since 2007. He replaces Joey Pickavance, who came to Pronghorn’s PGA Tour Academy in 2010. — Bulletin staff reports


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HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS Inside

SAVVY SHOPPER

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22, 2011

Splish-splash

INSIDE

The young and the youngat-heart can’t help but enjoy a water toy like this Ultimate Beach Ball Sprinkler, available last week on sale at Target in Bend for $9.99. This 88-inch beach ball is inflated with air, but also has a layer for the water. Just screw in the garden hose and you’re ready for a wet soccer game in the yard.

Dear Abby Husband abused by his wife finds few resources for men, Page E2

Movie Times Central Oregon theater listings, Page E3

SHOPPING IN BRIEF

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Fun in the sun Rockhounds shouldn’t miss the powwow Jewelry, gems and more will be on display Thursday through Sunday at the Crook County Fairgrounds for the Rockhound Show & Pow Wow. More than 60 vendors will display their goods, including jade, obsidian and crystals. The event is free and will center on Carey Foster Hall at the fairgrounds. It will take place 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. The fairgrounds are located off Main Street in Prineville. Contact: www.prineville rockhoundpowwow.com or 541-447-5298.

Get a pair of sandals with your pedicure Pretty toes and new sandals go together. Now there’s an opportunity to have both and save a few bucks. Bend businesses Spa W and North Soles Footwear are teaming up. Get a pedicure at Spa W, which ranges from $38 to $62, and receive a $10 off certificate for a pair of sandals at North Soles in downtown Bend. Conversely, buy a pair of sandals at North Soles and get a certificate for $5 off a pedicure at Spa W. The offer is good through July 4. Spa W is located at 125 N.W. Wall St. North Soles is at 800 N.W. Wall St. Contact: North Soles Footwear at www.northsoles ofbend.com or 541-312-8566; Spa W at http://spa-w.com or 541-388-1485.

Worried about whether that sunscreen is truly effective? You can let your child splash away, as 1-year-old Delaney Hell did last week at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center’s children’s pool, with the assurance of SPF 50+ protection in a rash guard shirt and bottom. This ensemble, made by New Zealand brand Snapper Rock, is lightweight and dries quickly. It is selling this week from Bendbased online retailer Play Outdoors for $29.93. The hat, an SPF 50+ quick drying hat from i play, costs $11.50.

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Pete Erickson The Bulletin

Budding bikers

Pete Erickson The Bulletin

Forget training wheels. Introduce your toddler to two-wheeled fun with a balance bike, like this Haro Z10, available at Hutch’s for $99.99. These bikes help kids figure out how to steer and shift their weight, meaning they can balance and coast long before they ride with Digging in the dirt pedals and gears. There Curious minds can collect speciare two more pluses: mens, conduct experiments and One is they have a examine animal footprints with this handle on the back Animal Science Kit by Little Labs, for quick parental available at Kids World in Bend. intervention; the The kit, priced at $16.99, will other is when you provide children around age yearn to move a 6 with the fun of digging touch faster than together with parents in usual, your todthe backyard. Those dler is happy to a few years older will oblige. enjoy reading about and figuring out experiments on their own.

chool is out, the weather is finally fine and a

Gaze at the stars

whole summer of fun awaits. What to do with your children during all that daylight? Here are a

few great items to help engage your young ones. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Many people don’t realize that a decent pair of binoculars can be as good or better than a telescope for looking into the night sky, said Robert Grossfeld, manager of the Sunriver Observatory. Budding astronomers can see craters on the Moon, moons orbiting Jupiter, Milky Way starfields and even other galaxies. The bonus: Binoculars like this Orion 10x50 WorldView Waterproof pair, at $75, don’t cost as much as a decent telescope and can be used during the day, too. Find this pair of binoculars and others at the Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory gift shop. The staff there even have the star-gazing expertise to show you how to use them.

HOT TOYS “Cutting boards are just terrible. There’s 200 times more bacteria on a cutting board than a toilet seat.” — Charles Gerba, environmental microbiologist at the University of Arizona

Courtesy North Soles Footwear

Retailer of kids’ outdoor gear to host sale Just in time for hot weather, Play Outdoors, the Bend-based online retailer for children’s outdoor gear, will hold a summer warehouse sale for three days in early July. Discounts of up to 50 percent will be available on summer and winter outdoor clothing, footwear, gear, toys and more. The sale will take place July 7 and 8 from noon to 6 p.m. and July 9 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Play Outdoors formerly had a retail location in the Old Mill area, but now is based out of its Bend warehouse at 840 S.E. Woodland Blvd. The business intends to begin doing more regular retail sales at the warehouse in the fall. Contact: www.playoutdoors .com. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Courtesy Robert Grossfeld

Using gadgets to zap germs By Farhad Manjoo New York Times News Service

Toilet seats get a bad rap, says Charles Gerba, an environmental microbiologist at the University of Arizona. Indeed, because of what goes on there, we tend to consider bathrooms — even the most respectable bathrooms — as generally less than sterile. That view, it turns out, is unfair. In numerous studies, Gerba and his colleagues have found that toilet seats are often one of the least germ-infested areas in your house. Much of the rest of the bathroom, too, isn’t especially toxic. If you’re really worried about germs, look to the kitchen. “Cutting boards are just terrible,” Gerba said, by way of example. “There’s 200 times more bacteria on a cutting board than a toilet seat.” I got to talking to Gerba — who has been studying the spread of bacteria, viruses and other pathogens in households for so long that many of his colleagues call him Dr.

Germ busters TOP: The Verilux CleanWave Sanitizing Furniture and Bed Vac uses UV light to sanitize soft items and can remove bedbugs and dust-mite eggs. LEFT: The VIOlight UV Cell Phone Sanitizer uses ultraviolet light to destroy microorganisms on cellphones.

Lipstick shows its true colors By Elizabeth Wellington The Philadelphia Inquirer

Big news, makeup mavens: Our vintage friend the lipstick is strutting her way back to our kissers in a bevy of cool, creamy nudes and corals. But that doesn’t mean she’s not bringing some heat along. The super-chic are loving this season’s a-littlebit-lustrous, a-little-bit-opaque oranges, and by the time fall rolls around, our pouty puckers will be popping with shades of persimmon. This is especially true if we take our cues from the fall 2011 runway favorites: Diane Von Furstenberg, Oscar de la Renta, and Betsey Johnson. Lip gloss — our preferred, barely-there default color for the last 10 or so years — is so yesterday. (And let’s not forget, greasy.) See Lipstick / E6

Photos via New York Times News Service

Germ — because lately I’ve had cleanliness on the brain. I’ve been testing several gadgets that promise to reduce or eliminate many household pathogens: devices to sanitize your cellphone, your toothbrush, your bedding, your

floors, your countertops, and even the very air circulating through your home. One by one, I put these gadgets through their paces. But then what? See Germs / E6

Akira Suwa / Philadelphia Inquirer

After years of muted lip gloss, creamy lipsticks in vivid hues have come to the fore on the runways and in the stores, a trend inspired by celebrities, retro TV and better times.


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Husband abused by his wife finds few resources for men

Viewers still drool for frosting fantasies By Alessandra Stanley New York Times News Service

Dear Abby: I was a victim of domestic abuse by my wife, and I don’t feel I have been treated fairly. There are many programs for abused women, but I haven’t found any for men. This problem is more common than people realize, but men are embarrassed to say anything. I’d like my voice to be heard to encourage men to speak up. I did not hit my wife back after she beat on me. I still love her, but I refuse to be abused any longer. Abby, please help me help myself and others. — Bill in Arkansas Dear Bill: Gladly. Among the problems with spousal abuse is that it escalates. Over the last decade domestic violence groups have become more aware of female-to-male domestic violence and violent behavior in samesex relationships, and are better prepared to offer help than they used to be. That’s why it’s important you contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline. The toll-free number is 800-799-7233. Counselors there offer guidance to women and men who are being abused by their spouse or partner. Another organization, SAFE (Stop Abuse for Everyone), also assists victims of abuse regardless of age, gender or sexual orientation. Its website is www. safe4all.org. Dear Abby: Our daughter is divorced with two children. She has been dating a man who has three children. Recently, they decided to move in together. All the children are first grade or younger. What would be the proper way to handle birthdays? If my daughter and her boyfriend were married, or even engaged, I wouldn’t have a problem sending gifts to his children. But since my husband and I hardly know this man (we live in another state and have met him only once or twice), we’re not sure how to handle this. Should

DEAR ABBY we just continue to send birthday gifts to our daughter’s kids and nothing but cards to his? Or would that look bad? What’s the proper thing? — Fair-minded in West Virginia Dear Fair-minded: Your daughter and grandchildren have formed a household with her boyfriend and his kids. If you’re compassionate people, you will treat all of the children equally for as long as the relationship lasts. If they decide to marry, which is a possibility, you will wind up being grandparents to all of them. If they eventually separate, you will have done the right thing and lent some stability and happiness to those children’s lives. Dear Abby: For a lot of reasons — many betrayals among them — I have almost completely lost my faith in the basic goodness of people. I have started isolating myself because I believe that more contact with people will destroy what little belief I have left. I don’t want to be so bitter and cynical, and I need help overcoming this. Any advice would be appreciated. — Wounded Soul in Minnesota Dear Wounded: I’m sorry you have suffered disappointment. But isolating yourself from others isn’t the solution. I don’t know anyone who hasn’t been disappointed in someone at some point, but it’s not a reason to hide. Trust is something that has to be developed, and building it takes time. While I agree that relationships can be risky, unless you are willing to take some risk, there will be no reward. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

By any logical standard, say the collapse of Holland’s tulip bubble in 1637 or Mrs. Fields filing for bankruptcy in 2008, cupcake mania should surely by now be waning. Instead, there are as many cream-filled series on cable as there are cupcake flavors at Crumbs. TLC features “DC Cupcakes” as well as Buddy Valastro’s “Cake Boss,” and his two spinoffs, “Kitchen Boss” and “Next Great Baker.” The Food Network offers “Cupcake Wars,” “Have Cake, Will Travel” and “Last Cake Standing,” while the Cooking Channel has, among others, “Sweet Dreams” and “Unique Sweets.” These kinds of programs offer a rush of butter cream, nougatine and fudge every bit as addictive and heart-stopping as the Bering Sea adventures of crab fishermen on the Discovery Channel — The Deadliest Batch. Television keeps piling on more swirls, sprinkles and filigree. On Tuesday, WE TV introduced “Staten Island Cakes,” starring Vincent Buzzetta, a 21-year-old pastry chef who owns the Cake Artist in West Brighton and is known as Vinny to his overbearing Italian-American relatives who hover and holler as he constructs elaborate cakes the size of shopping carts. Sunday, “POV” is showing “Kings of Pastry.” And it’s telling that “POV,” a PBS series best known for searing looks at issues like war, poverty and human rights, is devoting an entire documentary to French bakers. The film follows three bakers who compete for the highest artisanal accolade in France, to be one of the Meilleurs Ouvriers de France, which in cookery circles at least, is as prestigious as the Legion d’Honneur. (Winners wear a tricolor collar on their

‘Kings of Pastry’ When: 10:30 p.m. Sunday Where: OPB

white chef’s smocks.) These aspiring MOFs train for months; they practice the dreaded spunsugar sculpture with the kind of anxious determination that grips Tour de France cyclists before L’Alpe d’Huez. And as long as hard times linger, these exaltations of dessert have staying power, because bakeries are the ultimate takethis-joblessness-and-shove-it fantasy. The small-business impulse is at the core of the American dream, and this one dovetails with the foodie-ism of the moment. Owning a restaurant is an ambition whose perils are writ large, whereas a bakery seems so much more accessible and do-it-yourself. As Katherine Kallinis and Sophie LaMontagne, two sisters who traded whitecollar careers for pink aprons to open Georgetown Cupcake in 2008 prove, almost anyone can bake cupcakes in her kitchen. Their gamble turned into “DC Cupcakes.” Gourmet cake shops are so common that the fad is easily parodied. Kristen Wiig’s character in the hit movie “Bridesmaids” is a failed baker. Dessert shows are particularly suited to television. Few would contemplate scaling Chef Ferran

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Icy

541-322-CARE Paid Advertisement

BEAD SALE Vickie Hrehocik, owner of Little Indulgences Beads in Portland, will bring 1000s of strands of semi-precious beads, pearls, and cubic zirconia to Bend for a sale this weekend. She is a direct importer of beads from various factories in China and India and brings low prices and great quality directly to you. The public is welcome and there are no requirements to buying at wholesale prices. Many varieties of goods will be available including black onyx, smoky quartz, freshwater pearls, garnets, amethyst, peridot, tiger eye, hematite, howlite, cubic zirconia, and carnelian and more.

25 NW Minnesota Ave. #5 Downtown Bend | 541-388-0155

Food, Home & Garden In

The sale dates are Friday, June 24th and Saturday, June 25th from 10 am to 5 pm. The sale location is the Shilo Inn Hotel, 3105 OB Riley Road, Bend. Contact: 503-309-4088.

64th Annual Blow-out Celebration

ROCKHOUND SHOW & POW WOW

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JEWELRY, GEM & MINERAL SHOW

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Adria’s recipe for Cloud of Carrot With Tangerine Concentrate, but almost anyone can pull off a cupcake or even a three-layer, red-velvet cake. It’s simple and the only complications are visual. The act and possibilities of decorating a cake are so much more camera-friendly than even the most erotically shot shrimp risotto or blanquette de veau. In a single cupcake there is color, heft, vertical reach, and turrets and glazes galore. WE TV and “POV” examine the opposite ends of the baking world — a Staten Island baker who uses a glue gun and plastic foam, and French chefs who have worked at Lenotre and made desserts for the president of France and the sultan of Brunei. But both shows offer the same basic payoff: food that feeds the eyes. On television it’s hard to have your cake and watch it too.

For More Information Prineville Rockhound Pow Wow Rock & Gem Show Contact 541-447-5298 or Richknightr@gmail.com www.prinevillerockhoundpowwow.com

SOLAR & RADIANT HEATING SYSTEMS 541-389-7365 CCB# 18669

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

WEDNESDAY PRIME TIME 6/22/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Cooking Class Scandinavian Official-Fest Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News KEZI 9 News ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Travelscope ‘G’ Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Steves Europe Travels-Edge Travelscope ‘G’ Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 Å Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Happy Endings The Voice Results Show (N) ’ ‘PG’ America’s Got Talent (N) ‘PG’ Å Undercover Boss MGM Grand ‘PG’ Criminal Minds Lauren ’ ‘14’ The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Happy Endings So You Think You Can Dance Dancers try to impress the judges. (N) ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Burn Notice Friends and Family ‘PG’ The Space Age: NASA’s Story Å NOVA Space Shuttle Disaster ‘PG’ The Voice Results Show (N) ’ ‘PG’ America’s Got Talent (N) ‘PG’ Å America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘14’ America’s Next Top Model ’ ‘PG’ For Your Home Katie Brown Lap Quilting ‘G’ Painting Wild The Space Age: NASA’s Story Å NOVA Space Shuttle Disaster ‘PG’

10:00

10:30

Primetime Nightline: Beyond Belief America’s Got Talent (N) ‘PG’ Å Blue Bloods Officer Down ‘14’ Å Primetime Nightline: Beyond Belief News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Burn Notice Question & Answer ‘PG’ Journey to Palomar ’ ‘PG’ Å America’s Got Talent (N) ‘PG’ Å House of Payne Meet the Browns Test Kitchen Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Journey to Palomar ’ ‘PG’ Å

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News KEZI 9 News Family Guy ‘PG’ King of Queens News Roseanne ‘PG’ Cooking Class

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens Saving the Ocean Jay Leno Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Scandinavian Saving the Ocean

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 Caught Up ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘PG’ Å Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Family Jewels Family Jewels 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter (3:30) “From Dusk ›› “The Chronicles of Riddick” (2004, Science Fiction) Vin Diesel, Colm Feore, Thandie Newton. A fugitive ››› “Batman Begins” (2005, Action) Christian Bale, Michael Caine, Liam Neeson. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City’s Dark ››› “Batman Begins” (2005) Christian 102 40 39 Till Dawn” fights an invading ruler and his army. Å Knight. Å Bale, Michael Caine. Å Shark Rebellion ’ ‘PG’ Å Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘G’ Å Finding Bigfoot Caught on Tape ‘PG’ Swamp Wars Gator vs. Python ‘PG’ Rattlesnake Republic (N) ’ ‘PG’ Swamp Wars Gator vs. Python ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 The Most Extreme Dirty Jobs ’ ‘G’ Rocco’s Dinner Party ‘14’ Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Kathy Griffin: 50 & Not Pregnant ‘14’ Kathy Griffin: Gurrl Down! (N) ‘14’ Rocco’s Dinner Party (N) ‘14’ Kathy Griffin: Gurrl Down! ‘14’ 137 44 Trick My Truck Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ›› “8 Seconds” (1994) Luke Perry. An Oklahoma youth becomes rodeo champ in 1987. ’ CMT Music ‘PG’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å 190 32 42 53 Trick My Truck Crime Inc. Illegal Gambling Crime Inc. Illegal Gambling Mad Money Crime Inc. Illegal Gambling Crime Inc. Illegal Gambling Trade FX Making Money 51 36 40 52 American Greed Art Williams Jr. Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Colbert Report Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Jon Benjamin Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (4:56) South Park (5:26) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:56) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:26) Scrubs ‘14’ Daily Show Bend La Pine U of O Today Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place A.N.T. Farm ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Fish Hooks ‘G’ Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash-Chicago Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab (N) ‘G’ MythBusters Sand Neck Tie. ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters Dirty Dozen ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Let There Be Light ‘PG’ Life on a Wire (N) ’ Å MythBusters Dirty Dozen ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals From Busch Stadium in St. Louis. (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Football Live NFL Live (N) NBA Draft Preview (N) College Baseball NCAA World Series, Game 9: Teams TBA Å 22 24 21 24 (4:00) College Baseball NCAA World Series, Game 9: Teams TBA (N) Å College Basketball Quarterfinal, from March 10, 2011. Boxing Boxing: 1988 Ramirez vs. Whitaker Boxing: 1998 Jackson vs. Phillips College Basketball From Jan 27, 2011. (N) 23 25 123 25 Basketball SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ››› “Dirty Dancing” (1987, Romance) Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze, Jerry Orbach. ››› “Grease” (1978, Musical) John Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Stockard Channing. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Batali vs. Liu Chopped All Stars Showdown ‘G’ Food Network Star Dueling Desserts Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (4:00) “Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher. › “What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher. 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ My First Place My First Place Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Income Property Property Brothers Raun & Jasprit ‘G’ Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Modern Marvels Engines ‘G’ Å Secret Access: Air Force One ‘PG’ How the States Got Their Shapes Marijuana: A Chronic History ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels Distilleries ‘G’ Å 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels Gas Tech ‘G’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Vanished With Beth Holloway ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries Bruce Kelly. ‘14’ The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Teen Wolf Pack Mentality ’ ‘PG’ Teen Wolf Magic Bullet ’ ‘PG’ 16 and Pregnant Allie ’ ‘14’ Å The Challenge: Rivals (N) ’ ‘14’ The Challenge: Rivals ’ ‘14’ 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show SpongeBob Big Time Rush ’ ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals From Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. The Dan Patrick Show (N) Gaming 101 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals (N) (Live) (5:22) Gangland Hate Nation ’ ‘14’ (6:34) Gangland ’ ‘14’ Å (7:44) Jail ’ ‘14’ Å (8:22) Jail ’ ‘14’ (9:01) Jail ’ ‘14’ (9:39) Jail ’ ‘14’ Å (10:18) Jail ‘14’ (10:56) Jail ‘14’ UFC Unleashed 132 31 34 46 (4:11) Gangland Hollywd-Trsr Haunted Collector Ghost Hunters Uninvited Guests ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Haunted Collector (N) Hollywd-Trsr Hollywd-Trsr Haunted Collector 133 35 133 45 Hollywd-Trsr Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Just Paula Best of Praise Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Meet the Browns Meet the Browns House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne House of Payne Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond “All the Brothers ›› “Bomba, the Jungle Boy” (1949, Adventure) Johnny Shef- ›››› “The Prisoner of Zenda” (1937, Adventure) Ronald Colman, Madeleine Carroll. ››› “The Prisoner of Zenda” (1952, Adventure) Stewart ›› “Tarzan’s Secret Treasure” (1941, Adventure) Johnny 101 44 101 29 Weissmuller, Maureen O’Sullivan, John Sheffield. field, Peggy Ann Garner. A British look-alike subs for the king of Ruritania. Å Granger, Deborah Kerr. Å (DVS) Were Valiant” Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant Toddlers & Tiaras (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Know-Pregnant Know-Pregnant 178 34 32 34 Know-Pregnant Bones Yanks in the U.K. ‘14’ Å The Mentalist Seeing Red ‘14’ Å The Mentalist The Thin Red Line ‘14’ Franklin & Bash Bro-Bono (N) ‘14’ Men of a Certain Age (N) ‘MA’ Å Franklin & Bash Bro-Bono ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Bones Yanks in the U.K. ‘14’ Å MAD ‘PG’ Looney Tunes Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Border Patrol Border Patrol (N) Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v Food Man v Food Bert-Conqueror Bert-Conqueror Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Happily Divorced Happily Divorced Hot in Cleveland 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Call of Silence ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Navy commander’s death. ‘PG’ NCIS Kill Screen ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Out of the Frying Pan ... ‘PG’ NCIS Tell-All ’ ‘PG’ Å (DVS) NCIS Reveille ’ ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS A Mafia dumping ground. ‘PG’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives Jen is curious. ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ ›› “The Fighting Temptations” 191 48 37 54 Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:00) ››› “Bugsy” 1991 Warren Beatty. ’ ‘R’ Å (6:20) ›› “Class” 1983 Jacqueline Bisset. ‘R’ Å ›› “Absolute Power” 1997, Suspense Clint Eastwood. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:05) ››› “The Thing” 1982, Horror Kurt Russell. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “Grand Canyon” 1991 Danny Glover. A white lawyer befriends a black tow-truck driver. ››› “The Verdict” 1982, Drama Paul Newman, James Mason. ‘R’ Å ››› “The Verdict” 1982 Paul Newman. A lawyer’s career hinges on a controversial lawsuit. Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania ‘14’ Ellismania ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Shark Fights 2011 Ellismania ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Travelers Championship Highlights Top 10 Feherty Lee Trevino. 19th Hole Golf Central Quest-Card Top 10 Feherty Lee Trevino. 19th Hole Quest-Card 19th Hole The Waltons The Medal ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å › “I Love You, Beth (5:45) › “Mr. Deeds” 2002, Comedy Adam Sandler, Winona Ryder. A pizza maker I Can Be President: ›› “Shrek Forever After” 2010, Comedy Voices of Mike Myers, The Art of GetGame of Thrones Fire and Blood A new Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist HBO 425 501 425 10 Cooper” ’ Ross Douthat. ’ ‘MA’ Å inherits a fortune from a distant relative. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Kid’s-Eye Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz. ’ ‘PG’ Å ting By king rises in the north. ’ ‘MA’ ›› “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” 2003, Horror Jessica Biel. ‘R’ › “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning” 2006, Horror ‘R’ ›› “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” 2003, Horror Jessica Biel. ‘R’ “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” IFC 105 105 ›› “Fright Night Part 2” 1988 Roddy McDowall. A vampire quar- (6:45) ›› “Ninja Assassin” 2009, Action Rain, Naomie Harris, Ben Miles. A rogue as- ››› “Catfish” 2010 A man documents his brother’s meeting with ›› “Date Night” 2010 Steve Carell. A case of mistaken identity ›› “Daredevil” 2003 MAX 400 508 7 tet pursues the duo who killed their chief. sassin saves the life of a Europol agent. ’ ‘R’ Å an online friend. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å leads to a wild adventure. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Ben Affleck. Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad (N) ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Border Wars Hidden Narcotics ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai NTOON 89 115 189 Shooting USA Å Cowboys Amer. Guardian Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Best Defense Shooting Gallery Shooting USA Å Amer. Rifleman Amer. Guardian Impossible Shots Cowboys OUTD 37 307 43 (4:25) ›› “Extraordinary Measures” 2010 (6:15) › “The Back-up Plan” 2010 Jennifer Lopez. iTV. A single woman becomes United States of Nurse Jackie ’ Inside NASCAR “Frat Party” 2009, Comedy Randy Wayne. A young man throws Inside NASCAR › “Crossing Over” SHO 500 500 Brendan Fraser. ‘PG’ pregnant, then meets her ideal man. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ a wild bash on the eve of his wedding. ‘R’ Å (iTV) ‘PG’ 2009 ‘R’ Tara ‘MA’ Å Car Warriors ’79 Cadillac ‘14’ Car Warriors ’00 F-150 Trucks ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Warriors ’79 Cadillac ‘14’ Car Warriors ’00 F-150 Trucks ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 Please Give 2010 (5:20) ›› “Alice in Wonderland” 2010 Johnny Depp. (7:10) ›› “Maid in Manhattan” 2002 Jennifer Lopez. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “The Karate Kid” 2010, Drama Jaden Smith, Jackie Chan. ’ ‘PG’ Å (11:20) Takers ’ STARZ 300 408 300 ›› “Femme Fatale” 1991 Colin Firth. A man tracks his missing (6:35) ›› “Finishing the Game” 2007 Roger Fan. Studio chiefs › “Frank McKlusky, C.I.” 2002 Dave Sheridan. An investigator “Saint John of Las Vegas” 2009 Steve Buscemi. A compulsive ›› “Grand Theft Parsons” 2003 Johnny TMC 525 525 bride in the L.A. underground. ’ ‘R’ Å seek a replacement for the late Bruce Lee. ’ for insurance fraud works on a case. ‘PG-13’ gambler faces temptation in Las Vegas. ‘R’ Knoxville. ’ ‘PG-13’ (4:00) 2011 NHL Awards (N) (Live) 2011 NHL Awards › “Bloodsport” (1988, Adventure) Jean-Claude Van Damme, Donald Gibb. › “Bloodsport” (1988, Adventure) Jean-Claude Van Damme, Donald Gibb. VS. 27 58 30 Braxton Family Values ‘14’ Å Braxton Family Reunion ‘14’ Å Staten Island Cakes ‘PG’ Å Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Staten Island Cakes ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer Body of Water ‘PG’ Braxton Family Values ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmers market.com. VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegan dish with a list of its ingredients and hear from Shayla Scott about Chimps Inc., with a video; donations accepted; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON PASQUALE”: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in an encore presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and Discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541312-1074 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. VANDAVEER AND CHEYENNE MARIE MIZE: The indie-folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www .innovationtw.org. “WITH MY OWN TWO WHEELS”: A screening of the documentary about the bicycle as a vehicle for change; followed by a discussion with the director; proceeds benefit World Bicycle Relief; $10; 8 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-549-8800 or swimnfish@ bendcable.com. BOBBY JOE EBOLA & THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS: Rootsy punk rock from California, with Emily’s Army; free; 9 p.m.; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@ gmail.com.

THURSDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave reads from her children’s book “A Home for Harry and Lola”; free; 12:30 p.m.; Sisters Elementary School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541549-8755 or navebbr@aol.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Marcus Borg talks about his novel “Putting Away Childish Things: A Tale of Modern Faith”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. DUDAMEL, LET THE CHILDREN PLAY: A screening of the Los Angeles Philharmonic conductor leading children through the joys of experiencing music; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-3826347 or www.fathomevents.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood

Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. TECH N9NE: The hip-hop act performs, with Krizz Kaliko, Kutt Calhoun, Big Scoob, Jay Rock, Mayday, Steve Stone and Maintain; $26 plus fees in advance, $30 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// url.bb/LBS11. THE HENHOUSE PROWLERS: The Chicago-based bluegrass band performs; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 day of show; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www .silvermoonbrewing .com.

SATURDAY FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www. sistersfarmersmarket.com. HULLABALOO: Event features a street festival with food, a kids area, bicycle racing, street performances, live music, a performance by Marc Cohn, and more; free; 4-9 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources .com or www.nwxhullabaloo .com. SPLASH, PEDAL AND DASH: A race for kids ages 4-12; registration required; proceeds benefit Care For Kids; $25; 4 p.m., 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. registration; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-420-2282. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Kitsap; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “LETTERS HOME FROM ICELAND”: A screening of the travelogue about the wilds of Iceland; followed by a discussion with the author of “The Tricking of Freya”; part of Jefferson County Community Read; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE”: The Children’s Theater Co. presents C.S. Lewis’ tale of four children transported to Narnia; $5; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, childrenstheater@me.com or www.childrenstheatercompany.net. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. BARBERGRASS: The High Desert Harmoneers and the Central Oregon Bluegrass pickers perform; proceeds benefit the High & Dry Bluegrass Festival and the High Desert Harmoneers; $15; 7:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-548-4746 or www.hadbf.com. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org.

YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Genealogical Society; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. COUNTRY QUILT SHOW: Themed “Roundup of Stars,” with prizes, demonstrations, awards and more; $2, free ages 11 and younger; 9 a.m.4 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6300. GUNFIGHT IN THE BADLANDS: A two-day cowboy action shooting event, themed spaghetti Western, with movie parodies and shooting; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range, U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24, Millican; 541-647-0799. HEALTHY HOUNDS WEIGHT LOSS WALK: A 3K walk with your dog, in support of dog weight loss; registration requested; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon; $25; 9 a.m., 8:30 a.m. registration; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541382-3537 or www.hsco.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www.central oregonsaturdaymarket.com. FIRECRACKER FUN FLY: A day of radio-controlled model flying demonstration; bring a lawn chair; free; 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Popp’s Field, milemarker 17 on E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-330-5508, waldemar. frank@gmx.net or www.bamrc.com. NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. RELAY FOR LIFE: A 24hour walking event, with a silent auction, food, ceremonies and more; proceeds benefit cancer treatment patients; free; 10 a.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-771-9644. SHRED DAY: Safely destroy personal documents; donations benefit MountainStar Family Relief Nursery; donations of diapers and wipes accepted; 10 a.m.-noon; South Valley Bank & Trust, 735 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-0485. BITE OF BEND: Food festival includes local food booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a Top Chef competition, a children’s area and live music; proceeds benefit The Hunger Prevention Coalition of Central Oregon; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-323-0964, info@layitoutevents. com or www.thebiteofbend.com.

PROSPECTING AND PANNING: Pan for gold at a re-created placer mine; $2; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. BREWS, VIEWS AND BAR-B-QUES: A barbecue contest with local and regional chefs, with live music; free admission; noon-8 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251 or jeri@ sisterscountry.com. STATE OF JEFFERSON: The Oregon-based reggae band performs as part of the brewery’s anniversary party; with a barbecue and additional performances by Exit Strategy and the Scott Foxx Band; event takes place between the brewery and Bank of the Cascades; free admission; 2-9 p.m., band plays at 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery & Public House, 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-9242 or www.randompresents.com. POWER EXPLOSION 2011: The Freedom Team rips phone books in half, bends steel bars and horseshoes and more; free; 3-5 p.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-3907770, office@thefreedomteam.org or www.tfea.us/poster.htm. VFW DINNER: A dinner of crab and shrimp Louie; proceeds benefit local veterans; $8; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Pine Lane and Past Fraction Zero; with a barbecue and silent auction; proceeds benefit Megan Cecil, who has breast cancer; $15, $25 per couple; 6 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-390-0441. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Kitsap; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE”: The Children’s Theater Co. presents C.S. Lewis’ tale of four children transported to Narnia; $5; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, childrenstheater@me.com or www .childrenstheatercompany.net. BEATLES SINGALONG: Local acts perform Beatles material with community members joining in; proceeds benefit KPOV; $10-$12 in advance, $15 adults at the door, $5 ages 17 and younger; 7-10 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541322-0863 or www.kpov.org. JEFFERSON COUNTY COMMUNITY READ: Christina Sunley, author of “The Tricking of Freya,” talks about Iceland and her novelwriting quest; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovation tw.org.

M T For Wednesday, June 22

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BILL CUNNINGHAM NEW YORK (no MPAA rating) 2:15, 4:10, 6:30 BRIDESMAIDS (R) 2:25, 6:25 CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS (G) 2:10, 4:15, 6:35 INCENDIES (R) 2:20, 6:20 MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) 2, 4:20, 6:40 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG13) 2:05, 4:25, 6:45

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 1:45, 4:40, 7:35, 10:40 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 10 a.m. FAST FIVE (PG-13) 1:30, 4:25, 7:25, 10:15 GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 4:45, 6:45, 8, 9:45, 10:30 GREEN LANTERN 3-D (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:30 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 2, 5, 8:10, 10:45

JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) 1:55, 4:30, 7, 9:20 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (DP — PG) 12:30, 3, 6:30, 9:40 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 1:15 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DON PASQUALE (no MPAA rating) 6:30 MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) 12:05, 1:05, 3:05, 4:05, 6:10, 7:05, 9:15, 10:05 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) Noon, 3:30, 6:55, 9:50 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 12:35, 1:40, 3:20, 4:15, 6:40, 7:45, 9:25, 10:20 THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX (G) 10 a.m. THOR (PG-13) 12:20 THOR 3-D (PG-13) 10:35 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG13) 12:50, 3:35, 6:25, 9:55 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG13) 1, 3:55, 7:15, 10:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) LIMITLESS (PG-13) 6 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 9 RIO (G) 3

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 8:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 6:45, 9:15 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 12:15, 2:30, 4:45 MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) 5:45, 8 WIN WIN (R) 7:45 WITH MY TWO WHEELS (no MPAA rating) 8

MADRAS CINEMA 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 12:50, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:15 MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) 12:35, 3, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 12:40, 6:40 SUPER 8 (PG-13) Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 3:50, 9:40

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 4, 7 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 5:30 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 5:45

THE HANGOVER PART II (UPSTAIRS — R) 4:15, 7:15 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

‘Killing’ finale provokes a murderous response By Mary McNamara Los Angeles Times

Never mind who killed Rosie Larsen. The mystery I want solved is how AMC shows continue to have cultural footprints so much larger than their audience. It began with “Mad Men” and continues now with “The Killing,” the season finale of which left many cross-eyed and panting with rage. Their words all but quivering in cancel-my-subscription frustration, critics, fan bloggers and tweeters could not believe that after all the show had demanded of them (13 whole episodes), after all the “red herrings” and shots of Seattle looking like a rain-soaked ghetto instead of the hipster birthplace of Starbucks and Nirvana, we didn’t even get to find out who the real bad guy was. Or at least not for certain. Although it appeared that detectives Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) and Stephen Holder (Joel Kinnaman) had nailed mayoral candidate Darren Richmond (Billy Campbell) for the crime, the last-minute revelation that Holder falsified evidence seemed to indicate otherwise. What?!? Thus was Father’s Day filled with howls of protest from those who desperately Needed to Know. Some desired it to justify a show they had, apparently, found increasingly fragmented and slow-moving. Others, if the levels of fury were any indication, sought something deeper — a reassurance, perhaps, that our fascination with all things Scandinavian (“The Killing” is based on a successful Danish series) is still a legitimate trend. Score another point for AMC, which managed once again to turn TV watching into obsession. For better or worse, “The Killing” season finale generated the kind of reaction usually reserved for the final episode of long-running shows. Reminiscent of the climactic scene in “Murder by Death,” in which Truman Capote’s Lionel Twain blasts famous literary detectives for withholding clues and introducing key characters at the last minute, the hyberbolic outrage over “The Killing” seemed aimed at a cultural phenomenon like “Lost” or “The Sopranos” that had disappointed or confused its viewers with a strange or inconclusive ending. Some of this is a matter of medium rather than message — as criticism, especially TV criticism, grows more conversational and immediate, the language has become increasingly overwrought. “The Killing” was neither cultural phenomenon, nor was it, despite what you might read on the blogosphere, a crime against the art form and humanity. Creator Veena Sud promised an anti-police procedural, and that is what she delivered, dismissing, sometimes brilliantly, sometimes regrettably, the most basic conventions of murder on TV. As any lover of murder-mystery novels knows, the solving of the crime is usually secondary to the various secrets and subplots the investigation reveals. Writers love a good murder because great violence is a clarifying agent, permission to peep

AMC via The Associated Pres

Mireille Enos portrays Detective Sarah Linden, and Joel Kinnaman portrays Detective Stephen Holder, right, on AMC’s “The Killing.” into our neighbors’ windows. Each “red herring” of “The Killing” revealed something dark and disturbing — the need of a young girl to find acceptance through humiliating sex, the fine line between fondness and overfamiliarity many young teachers walk, the separate enigmas and glossed-over miscommunications that make up even the most loving families, the bestial violence that hunkers down deep in every father’s soul. The uber narrative of “The Killing” is not the death of Rosie Larsen but the revelation of Sarah Linden, a woman so obsessed with and damaged by her career as a detective that she is marrying a man she does not love and moving to Sonoma to escape it. “The Killing” was far from perfect. Sud did herself no favors by adopting many of the hallmarks of a procedural, especially confining the action of each episode to the corresponding day of the investigation; the Sonoma subplot was absurd, the escort service trope maddeningly trite. But the pacing and narrative detours were no more bothersome than those of “Mad Men” and for the same reason: If the moments did not string together in a perfect Add-a-Bead TV narrative, they were compelling to watch. That Rosie’s mother, Mitch (Michelle Forbes), neither rallied nor collapsed; that Sarah’s mother figure is her social worker; that the investigation made its way through the insular worlds of a mosque, a reservation, teenage cliques and mayoral politics and sent all manner of messy truths to the surface as it did so; that Holder speaks a patois of street and recovery slang, all made up for the feeling that after stubbornly rejecting the rules and regs of TV crime drama, Sud occasionally had to simply keep walking until she got herself going in more or less the right direction. No show is going to live or die by its season finale. When you try something new, you’re going to make mistakes; if you don’t, you’re not trying hard enough. For those who need closure, there are all manner of admirable crime procedurals on the networks.


E4 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, June 22, 2011: This year, your ability to visualize and create pinnacles. You can see and imagine things, objects and situations that to many people are not even conceivable. As a result of this trait, if you are a writer, painter or artist of any type, you could create a major piece of work. If you are single, you might be drawn to someone who is emotionally unavailable. In the long run, this situation could cause a problem. If you are attached, the two of you benefit from frequent downtime together. If you indulge in more private time, you could act like new lovers. PISCES draws you in close. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH You might want to understand more of what motivates you. What you see as a possibility, though not verbalized, probably needs to be jumped on. Recognize that somehow you might need to acknowledge an idea in order to make it work. Tonight: Get some extra R and R. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH A meeting could prove to be instrumental and moves your mind in a new direction. You might wonder what is best to do under the circumstances. If you open up, you’ll see the power of brainstorming. Why not? Tonight: Brainstorm away till the wee hours. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH A statement goes far, but

there is an intrinsic rebellion within you. The issue is determining the best way to handle this situation. You could be overwhelmed by everything that you are hearing. Let go of rebellion; let in self-discipline. Tonight: Work as late as need be. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH A situation invites you to stretch beyond your comfort level. Knowing how to break past self-imposed rigidity might be more important than you realize. You come from a more grounded position than you are aware of. Tonight: Relax ... choose a fun mental diversion. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Work directly with a partner or associate whom you find unusually inspiring. Be aware of the demands around you to take a more active role. Tonight: Allow someone else to make the first move. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Recognize that the smart move is often to let someone have his or her way. Finding agreement could be difficult, and you tumble back and forth as far as finding a resolution. Simply back off. Tonight: Go with a dinner invitation. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH The only answer is “yes.” Be willing to take on a situation that could be difficult. Use your intuitive skills and innate leadership, and move forward. A boss will tune in to your ideas as much as you tune in to his or hers. Tonight: Manifesting an idea will take time. Expect to work late. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Your playfulness might

be intriguing, but what really sets others back is your ability to move on a very strong, intuitive, gut level. As logical as you might seem, you don’t always make your decisions from that point. Tonight: Go with the moment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Deal with a partner directly. You might be prone to calling it a day early, as other matters seem to float into your mind from out of nowhere. Deal with an issue that might be running your mind, if not your life. Tonight: Out and about — invite a key person. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might assume that there is another way or approach that might be better. Listen to what a partner or several people share. Your questions help you explore your options more openly. You might wonder which way to go. Tonight: Hanging out. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH Your nurturing approach draws many people in. How you deal with a situation could change radically if you remain open and coherent. Communicate your bottom line in a manner in which it can be handled. Tonight: Relax with the moment. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Your playfulness takes you to a new level and helps a child or new friend relax. Don’t hesitate to explore a newfound creativity. You have always been imaginative, but of late, that gift has skyrocketed. Tonight: Just make it fun. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Germs Continued from E1 Germs’ power derives from their invisibility. And that’s the trouble with fully evaluating these high-tech germ destroyers — how would I know that they were working well? To find out, I asked Dr. Gerba, who is not paid to endorse any of the products I tested, and he said I’d more or less have to take it on faith. The good news is that we know a lot about sanitizing, but as to claims of a specific product’s effectiveness, firm answers are hard to get without your own lab. Consider the VIOlight UV Cell Phone Sanitizer, a $40 device that promises to eliminate 99.9 percent of the bacteria and other nasties sitting on your phone. It purports to do so by using a beam of ultraviolet light, which is a specific wavelength of light that, when focused precisely, penetrates and damages the DNA of microorganisms. Gerba said that ultraviolet-based systems have been used in commercial and industrial sanitizing applications for many years. The technology is now getting small and inexpensive enough to be found in many consumer devices, too. In fact, most of the devices I tested used UV light as their primary cleaning agent. The cellphone cleaner, a hunk of silver plastic as big as a soap dispenser, is simple to use: Just drop your phone inside and shut the lid. A light on the front blinks on and off to tell you it’s working. After about five minutes, the sanitizing is done. When you pull your phone out, it won’t look or smell any cleaner — the sanitizer isn’t meant to remove smudges or stains — but presumably the UV light has killed off everything microscopic.

But does it work? Presumably. On the one hand, UV light is a proven sanitizer. But on the other I honestly have no idea if this particular cleaner did its job well. Gerba added that, with cellphones, it may not matter much. Even if you assume that the sanitizer is decimating the phone’s microscopic inhabitants, it’s unlikely that your phone was covered in anything really dangerous. “Cellphones can get fairly germy, but it’s only your germs,” Gerba said. “Unless you’re sharing your phone with other people, there’s nothing to worry about.” (Gerba is asked about the necessity of cellphone sanitizing so often that he has a quip at the ready: “It keeps you from talking dirty.”) You’re on slightly firmer ground with another VIOlight device — the $30 toothbrush sanitizer. This looks like a standard toothbrush holder, but when you press a button on the front, a UV light shines on the germs on your brushes (the unit holds up to four). According to a 2008 study published in the American Journal of Dentistry, toothbrushes treated with the VIOlight had 86 percent fewer “colony-forming units” — a measure of germs — than toothbrushes that were just rinsed in cold water. The study does note, however, that there’s no proof that a cleaner toothbrush results in better oral health. UV light can also help with your cutting board, that epicenter of household filth. For this, I tried the CleanWave Sanitizing Wand, a $70 device made by Verilux. The wand looks like a shrunken light saber, and to at-

More germ busters

The Iotus Home Cleaning System adds an extra oxygen molecule to water and uses it as a cleaning agent. Honeywell’s air purifier tower uses several layers of filters and UV lights to kill germs passing through

The Shark Lift-Away Professional Steam Pocket Mop is a small steam cleaner that can be used to clean floors and countertops. Photos via New York Times News Service

tack your germs, you can play Luke Skywalker. Turn on the wand, hold one edge against a flat surface — your cutting board, your countertop, your desk — and slowly move it back and forth over the area you’d like to sanitize. Ryan Douglas, the chief executive of Verilux, said that when he cleans with the wand, he can tell that it’s working. “As you wand over an area, there’s a ‘freshness’ you can smell when the biological material is killed,” Douglas said. I confess I smelled nothing of the sort. Still, of all the applications for UV, Gerba said studies show that it is most effective on hard, nonporous surfaces like cutting boards. Even though I couldn’t tell it was working, there’s a high likelihood that the wand cleaned my cutting board far better than would most other home cleaning products, and it also contained no harmful chemicals. What’s more, as Douglas pointed out, there’s no way to know that traditional spray cleaners are actually sanitizing, either. I did have one problem with the wand: For safety reasons (UV light can be harmful if you look at it directly), it will work only

when you wave it horizontally, with the UV beam pointed downward. That means you can’t use it to sanitize your kitchen walls or your faucet, and must rely on traditional cleaners. There are two other UV gadgets I tested. The Verilux CleanWave Sanitizing Furniture and Bed Vac ($130) will sanitize soft, plush items that you can’t attack with traditional sanitizing chemicals. Douglas said it is especially effective against bedbug and dust-mite eggs. I also ran Honeywell’s HEPAClean UV Antibacterial Air Purifier (about $200) in my bedroom for a few nights. In addition to several layers of filters — which are used in many air purifiers — this unit uses UV lights to kill germs passing through the air. It promises to eliminate 99 percent of such pathogens — but, of course, I had no way to test that.

Using water Besides UV, another hightech sanitizing method is “super-oxygenated water,” which is used in commercial agriculture. The Iotus Home Cleaning System ($219) comes with an electronic base and two vessels for water — one big bowl and one spray bottle. You fill one of the vessels with water, insert it into the base, and turn it on. The water cycles through the base, where it’s hit with an electrical current and forced to take on an extra oxygen molecule. After a few minutes, all the water is converted — and now it’s ready to sanitize. You can fill the bowl with items to sanitize — fruit, vegetables, meat, dishcloths, sponges, baby bottles, pacifiers — or use the spray bottle for general cleaning. It’s harmless, and effective even against stains. But how do you know this product harnesses the proven oxygenating process to actually work well? Once again: You don’t. That brings me to my favorite sanitizing gadget, the Shark Lift-Away Professional Steam Pocket Mop (about $200). This device works on floors and countertops, and it requires no soaps or other cleaning products. Instead, it uses just water: Water in the mop’s chamber is heated and converted into steam, which then shoots into the mop head to clean your floors. I found the mop to be quick and convenient, and it removed stains and left my kitchen floors gleaming. And how did I know it was sanitizing? I saw the steam rising from the tile. That’s good enough for me.

Akira Suwa / Philadelphia Inquirer

Maryam Sherif, 23, receives lipstick from Andie Kaguer at the MAC store in Philadelphia on June 13.

Lipstick Continued from E1 “The consumer just wants to exhale a bit,” said Karen Grant, vice president and senior global industry analyst at the NPD Group. “Coming out of the recession, it seems consumers’ thirst for color and play was being reawakened.” Last week NPD reported that sales of “prestige lip products” — any lip product sold in department stores — were up 7.2 percent, from $172.6 million in January through April last year, to $185 million for the same period this year. Even more surprising, NPD also reported that sales of lip color — that’s lipstick only, not gloss — were up 11.2 percent, from $82.7 million in the first four months of 2010 to $92 million this year. “For years, everyone was going with the bare lip, the nude lip, just a bit of shimmer,” Grant added. “Now the new colors and textures are making lipstick cool again.” Clothes for this season are pushing the trend, with bold color combinations such as pinks and oranges and turquoises and yellows the most popular. And fashion’s recent love affair with all things 1940s pinup — pencil midis, vintage pin curls, dotted shirt dresses — is a driver as well. All these looks require a full, retro lip. It was the February launch of MAC Cosmetics’ Viva Glam Gaga 2 — inspired by Lady Gaga — that really got our attention. According to NPD, MAC has been the No. 1-selling lipstick this year, followed by Lancome’s L’Absolu Rouge, Clinique’s Long-Lasting Soft Shine

Lipstick, Lauder’s Pure Color Lipstick, and Chanel Rouge Coco Shine. It also helps that the lip color of today feels different than that of yesteryear. Part of the reason many women moved away from lipstick in the early millennium was, yes, they wanted the Jennifer Lopez sun-kissed, dewy look, but classic lipsticks were drying and left a weird aftertaste. Women opted instead for rosy cheeks and colorful eyes. Now, many lipstick brands, including MAC and drugstore brands such as Maybelline, are infusing lipsticks with Vitamins D and B, and even shea butter, for moisture. So when it comes to makeup this season, there are two different looks, Grant said. One is sheer foundation and nude or coral lips. This goes best with a khaki summer suit. Beyonce wears this well in the beginning of her new “Run the World (Girls)” video. Or, Grant said, women are going for the more dramatic look —

a 2011 version of the porcelainskinned girls in Robert Palmer’s 1986 “Addicted to Love” video. You can still wear a sleeveless black sheath and a smoky eye, but to make this more modern, think Catherine Zeta-Jones in her glittering, red-sleeved Elie Saab gown at this year’s Tony Awards. But if you’re still traumatized by the too-red lips you wore in the 1990s and want to know how to achieve the sultry vibe without looking like you lost a fistfight with a clown, here’s a tip from MAC senior artist Jennifer Karsten: Use a darker lip liner to define the outer edges of the lip and lightly fill in. Then apply a brighter, more tomatoey red in the center of the lip, blend, and touch it up with a bit of gloss. Remember, a bit of shine, not a can of Crisco. “That’s how you get this beautiful, faded dimensional lip,” Karsten said. “And it’s a way that women of all complexions can have a true red.”

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 F1

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Adult companion cats, free to seniors! Tame, altered, shots, ID chip, more. To visit or for info, see www.craftcats.org or call 389-8420, 647-2181. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Adult foster cats: 1-5 yrs, orange, tabbys, all shots, ready to adopt $10 ea 541-548-5516

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

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Memberships Brasada Ranch Yearly Golf Membership, discount at $400/mo, call 541-815-9002.

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

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Fuel and Wood

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484

Priced Right to sell, 10” Radial Arm Saw; Double pane aluminum windows w/screens, Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine: $125 Rounds, $150 split, free exc. cond. - (2) 6x4’s, (1) delivery to Bend/Redmond, 5x4, (7) 4x3, (1) 3x3; 25’x8’ 541-815-5546. trailer frame, axles & tires. Call eves, 541-548-2803. Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ Speakers, Tower, 140W, $40; $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; set of smaller speakers, 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin $20,541-923-8627 price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McInLOG TRUCK LOADS of dry tosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Lodgepole firewood Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, $1200 for Bend delivery. NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more info.

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Building Materials

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Trees, Plants & Flowers Large tomato plants for $5. Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and several varieties of pepper plants for $2. (541) 390-7263.

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261

541-322-7253

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K. St. 541 475-9722 Open to the public.

13 4x8 sheets white vinyl lattice, great shape, retail $30 ea; sell $15 ea 541-382-8814

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

BarkTurfSoil.com Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

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Misc. Items Business Owners: Gifts for clients or employees? (40) 1-lb. boxes of Gourmet Bridgeton Fudge at cost, $6.25/box. All or part. Call 541-923-0574

Hummingbirds Are Back!

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663 For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

9 7 7 0 2 Farm Market

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Farm Equipment and Machinery FORD TRACTOR Mdl 3000, loader, hay forks, nice tires. 47 hp. $7250. 541-536-3889

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend John Deere mower deck for X500 select series tractor. New $600. 541-536-5466. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Lost and Found

The

308 Ruger M77 Rifle w/ Weaver 4X scope, exc. cond., $500, 541-389-5421.

Carry concealed in 33 states. Sat. June 25th 8 a.m, Red mond Comfort Suites. Qualify For Your Concealed Hand gun Permit. Oregon & Utah permit classes, $50 for Or egon, $60 for Utah, $100 for both. www.PistolCraft.com. Call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS (4867) to Pre-Register.

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

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EZ-GO golf cart, Freedom, 36 volt, new batteries, charger, canopy, enclosure. Green/ tan, $1800. 541-317-8546

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

UTAH + OR CCW: Oregon and Utah Concealed License Class. Saturday June 18 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $65 Utah, $100 OR+UT. Includes Utah required photo, Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for prereg, email and info

Art, Jewelry and Furs

EXCELLENT CLEAN GOLF BALLS ... $20/100 541-383-2155.

541-389-6655

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Elliptical, Nordic Track 990, good condition, $500 firm. Call 541-419-6436

Golf Equipment

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

The Bulletin Classifieds

Chronic Pain & Fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, anxiety, migraines?

Exercise Equipment

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

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Trikke T12 Roadster, caliper disc brakes, custom wheels, like new $500. 541-923-3839

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

Bicycles and Accessories

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Quaker Parrot, 1 yr. old, with all accessories, $150, call 541-548-0747.

B e n d

Guns, Hunting and Fishing

!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Pug Puppy Male Black $400, Parents on site, Call 503-863-6755,503-928-9511

A v e . ,

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Sweet Lop Rabbit male, $15. NOT for snake food. For more info, call 541-548-0747

Free Boxer Mix, neutered, to approved without small kids, good dog, 541-280-5264. German Shepherd AKC pups, A Red Leather Sofa, $700. 509-406-3717 Loveseat and Chair. Great www.sbhighdesertkennels.com condition. $500 or best offer. Please call German Shepherd Purebred Pups 541-318-0286 all colors avail, shots, microchipped, $400+, 208-404-9434 www.smsgsd.com Couch & Love Seat, Ashley, HELP: Need to find silver or seats recline 3 positions, white miniature male hunter green, perfect cond., Schnauzer willing to become $300, Coffee table, solid oak, a dad in Nov. 541-447-3772. raise up top, good cond., $75, 541-389-7669. Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue group. At least a dozen small Dinette Set, Full & Queen size kittens just out of foster care. beds, large work desk, EV389-8420, 647-2181. Altered, ERYTHING IN HOUSEHOLD! shots, ID chip, more. Small Moving, call 541-312-4422 adoption fee. Open Sat/Sun for appt. 1-5, call for other days/ hours. For directions, photos, GENERATE SOME excitement in etc. see www.craftcats.org. your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, to advertise in classified! titled parents, performance 541-385-5809. pedigree, OFA cert hips & elbows, $500. 541-771-2330 Late 40’s Vanity, excellent conwww.royalflushretrievers.com dition, curved glass mirror, Labradoodles, Australian $180. 541-279-4634 Imports - 541-504-2662 Patio table, brown metal frame, www.alpen-ridge.com smoked glass top, 66X40, exc. Maine Coon cross kittens, 4 cond. $50. 541-388-5152 males, 2 females, 2 polydactyls, $75 ea. 541-389-0322 Range, Elec, GE, 30”, 4 burners, oven & drawer, white, $100, Mini Aussies, Adult & pup541-548-9619,503-510-5626 pies, starting at $150, call 541-447-6191. POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Pomapoos too! Lovable, happy tail-waggers! 541-475-3889

Schnauzer Mix, male, 10 weeks, 2nd shot, pup kit, loves kids, $350. 541-410-7701

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Dachshund AKC mini, $310. Bend 503-470-0729. Video at: www.bendweenies.com Dachshund Mini Puppy, only 1 male left! $250. Call 360-607-0604 (Prineville).

Scottie Female, 12 weeks, papers, 1st/2nd shots, parents on site, $500. 541-317-5624

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

FOUND black and white young female cat, might be from downtown, jumped into car. 541-389-9670. Lost Cat, Grey tabby, female, short hair, missing 6/6, SE Bend, 541-318-6030

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Hay, Grain and Feed Hay for Sale - Grass & Grass/Alfalfa mix, 3 tie and 3x4 bales. Call 541-548-3086 FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Quality Hay For Sale Delivery Available 541-350-0018 541-777-0128 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Haying Contractor will mow rake & bale for percentage, or will buy standing hay. Call 541-948-2125

LOST DOG $500 REWARD "CHIRPA" - 8 year old female, off-white Pekingese Shih Tzu. Lost in SW Redmond near Yew & Canal Streets over Memorial Day weekend. CALL 541-414-4424 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


F2 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

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Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

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Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

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Domestic & In-Home Positions In-Home Pet Sitter. Dates vary, 2-5 nights. Requires o'night stay. 2 cats & dog. Refs req’d. 541-647-8193

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Employment Opportunities Director of Nursing East Cascades Retirement Community in Madras Oregon is looking for a new Director of Nursing (DON) for our 20 bed Skilled Nursing Home. Must have: • Valid Oregon RN license • Exp. in Long-Term Care • Passion for working with seniors DON experience is preferred but not a requirement. This is a great opportunity for an experienced nurse ready to make the leap to DON. vernon@srhousingmgmt.com

280 ESTATE SALE*1627 NW CITY VIEW* Sofa, Chairs, Dining, Bedrooms, Patio, Rugs, Art, Office, Futons. SATURDAY 10-12 ONLY (541)639-5006 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

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The Children’s Vision Foundation

Executive Director Prineville Hospital Foundation seeks a professional Executive Director for a regular full-time, exempt position to lead philanthropic activities that benefit the Prineville Hospital Foundation. Compensation range for this position is $55,000 $75,000 annually/DOE. To review the full job description visit our website at www.prinevillehospital foundation.org To apply for this position send cover letter and resume to phfresumes@gmail.com or to PO Box 596, Prineville, OR 97754. The posting for this position closes June 30, 2011.

HEALTHCARE

Administrator Molalla Manor Care Center, part of the Prestige Care family, is looking for a dedicated and compassionate Administrator to join our Legacy of Care in Molalla, Oregon. Ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s degree and must be licensed as a Nursing Home Administrator with 2 yrs. exp. in LTC. We offer competitive salary, benefits, including medical, dental and 401K. Please apply online: www.prestigecare.com EEO/AA

541-383-0398 DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Drivers: Local moving company seeks Class A Drivers. Top pay, benefits; experience preferred. Please call weekdays: 541-383-3362.

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FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Inventory and Accounting Specialist needed to join our team. AA or BA in Accounting or Business required. Fax resume and cover letter with salary history to 866-611-3607. LIFT MECHANIC, experienced, for Solitude Mountain Resort Utah. Year-round + benefits. Apply online at: www.skisolitude.com

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

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Employment Opportunities

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Railroad Vegetation

SECURITY OFFICERS $10.00/hr GUARDSMARK, LLC

Mental Health Program Manager Full-time manager for an 11 bed Adult Residential Psychiatric Treatment Program in Grants Pass, Oregon. The manager oversees program, regulation compliance, staff, and services for clients with mental health disorders. Master’s degree in psychology or related field preferred with licensure a plus; Registered Nurse with healthcare management experience will be considered. Salary depending on qualifications. Excellent benefits. For further information visit www.optionsonline.org and click on “Jobs”; application available from website. Please submit a letter of inquiry and résumé by email to jgillyatt@optionsonline.org or fax to 541-479-3514.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 Foreman

NURSE

Regional Nurse Consultant (RN)

Vegetation control on railroad tracks in western US. Seeking Class B Hazmat/ Tank. Ability to pass pesticide license requirements. Various states, extended travel, full time, benefits, lodging/per diem. 503-362-8322

Prestige Care is looking for a Regional Nurse Consultant (RN) for our Corporate Office in Vancouver, WA. RN will be responsible for providing support to skilled nursing facilities as necessary to ensure the safety and well being of residents and to achieve compliance with Remember.... company policies and proceAdd your web address to dures, State and Federal your ad and readers on regulations and clinical stanThe Bulletin's web site will dards of practice. Ideal canbe able to click through audidate will have a min. of 5 tomatically to your site. yrs exp. as a DNS in a skilled nursing facility. Must have working knowledge of State The Bulletin Classifieds is your and Federal regulations, the Employment Marketplace survey process, the miniCall 541-385-5809 today! mum data set (MDS) and Resident Assessment Instrument (RAI) process. RV House Technician Prestige offers competitive salary, benefits, including RV dealership is in need of medical, dental and 401K. To an experienced house apply visit: technician. This position www.prestigecare.com requires a minimum of EEO/AA three years experience with knowledge of electrical, plumbing and basic carNeed Seasonal help? pentry. Employee must supply own tools, pass Need Part-time help? background check and drug Need Full-time help? testing. 40 hr. work week Advertise your open positions. Mon. - Fri. Benefit pkg includes Medical, Dental, RX The Bulletin Classifieds & Vision. Wage D.O.E. EOE. Please send resume to Box 16403210, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Crook County Road Department Working Foreman (Non-union) $24.79 per hour Full time w/benefits Closes: July 7, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. Must have experience in road maintenance, construction and supervision of working staff. Current Oregon CDL and Medical ICC Card. Able to lift 40 pounds, stoop, kneel bend and stand for long periods. General knowledge of the use and operation of trucks and heavy equipment. General knowledge of mechanical maintenance of trucks and heavy equipment. Willing to work weekends and evenings for emergency response. Must have current ODOT flagging certification card, or willing to be certified.

A nationwide leader in security services is hiring a FT officer to work a night shift for the Redmond area. Applicants must have or be able to obtain a DPSST certification. They must also have a clean criminal background, good computer skills, a professional demeanor and excellent customer service skills. This position requires several miles of walking per day. Individuals with any security, law enforcement or military backgrounds are encouraged to apply! Please fax resume to 503-224-2057. For further company information please visit www.guardsmark.com

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

PRINTING PRESS

THE BULLETIN

Are you interested in learning the entry-level basics of being a Pressman?

REQUIREMENTS:

The Bulletin has an immediate opening for a full-time pressroom Roll Tender. This entry-level position is responsible for the loading of newsprint rolls and the operation of the reel stands on the press. This position works 32 to 40 hours per week, with benefits. Pay rate $10.00 per hour.

Applicants selected for interview will be required to take a pre- employment drug test. This is a non-union represented position.

The right person for the job must be able to move and lift 50 lbs. or more on a continuing basis. The position also requires becoming certified as a forklift driver; reaching, standing, sitting, pushing, pulling, stooping, kneeling, walking and climbing stairs. Learning and using proper safety practices will be a primary responsibility.

Applications and full job description can be found at www.co.crook.or.us. Along with the Crook County application, please submit the “Crook County Road Department Application Supplement”. Please apply at the Crook County Treasurer’s/Tax Office at 200 NE 2nd St., Prineville, OR 97754; 541-447-6554.

If interested, or for more information, please contact Al Nelson, Pressroom Manager via e-mail, anelson@bendbulletin.com Applications are also available at the front desk at The Bulletin, 1777 Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. Pre-employment drug testing required.

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Redmond Area

AWBREY BUTTE Sat., June 25, 9-2. 2957 NW Three Sisters Dr. HUGE Sale - 4 families! Don’t miss it! No early birds.

Family Yard Sale: Sat. 9:304, 3157 SW 25th St., tools, china, pool, furniture, camping,crystal, toys & much more!

YOU DON'T WANT TO MISS THIS ONE! One day only. 7 to 2. Sat, 6/25. Huge inventory of RUBBER STAMPS. Unique Christmas items from OH. Much more. Early birds ok. 2035 NW Nickernut Ct. Redmond.

SATURDAY ONLY ! ! Great stuff!!! clothes, toys, sporting goods, furniture, TVs, DVD players, bed, books, jewelry, dvd's. 2541 NW FoDRAKE PARK NEIGHBORHOOD ley Court. 8AM-2PM. MULTI-FAMILY SALE Sat. June 25th 9 - 3 Quality & Quantity in one stop! Find It in

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin Classiieds

Yard Sale: Fri. & Sat., 9-5, North end of Cook Ave., Tumalo, elec., books, clothes, knick-knacks,firearms,ammo, reloading, bikes, misc.

Garage Sale: Sat. 9-1, 3040 NW Winslow Dr, golf equip., electronics, clothes, & stuff.

(CVF) is currently collecting household and office dona- Huge Community Garage tions for their Step Above Sale: Sat. 8-6, near Awbrey Your Average Garage Glen Golf Course at Awbrey Sale on July 22, 23 & Meadows, off Mt. Washing24th and July 29 & 30th, ton at NW Putnam Rd. Wood at the Bend Factory Stores. working machinery, power Proceeds will go directly tools, furniture, snow blower, towards supporting Central electronics, camping equip. Oregon’s children vision screenings and will also be **** MOVING SALE **** providing free seven step SUNDAY 9am-2pm. vision screenings for chil3049 NW Jewell Way. In dren ages 5 and older during Aubrey Butte. Furniture, event.. Your donations are Honda Lawmover, Big tax deductible. For more inscreen TV.... and Much formation and donations More. pickup, please call (541) 330-3907

Yard Sale: Sat-Sun 10-4, 64525 Bailey Rd, Tumalo, desks, table, chairs, camping, misc. pictures. ‘86 HD Sportster, low mi, new fork seals, $2000/trade for car.

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H H FREE H H Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Fri & Sat. 8:00 a.m. 2863 NE Jill Ave. (Hwy 27 & Jill Ave.) Sales Southwest Bend Kitchen items & very nice "lodge style" home decor. 12 GARAGE SALE - Antiques, piece set china dishes and round Oak table & chairs with crystal stemware. Tons of 2 extensions, toll-painted pie misc. 541-280-6411 safe, fishing poles, tools, yard art & more! Fri-Sat, PRE-ESTATE SALE! Fri & Sat 6/24-25, 9-4. Antiques, colJune 24 & 25 9-3, 55601 Big lectibles, misc. 20618 NE SiRiver Dr. (5 miles south of las Dr., off Boyd Acres Rd. Sunriver off Huntington).

286 Snowberry Village Annual Summer Garage Sale! 132-unit retirement park. 1188 NE 27th St. Sat., June 25th, 9am-4pm. Yard Sale/Benefit, Sat. 8-3, 2200 NE Hwy. 20 (turn at Chevron) in parking lot behind Jake’s Diner, benefits Bend Genealogical Society. Thomas electric organ & more! Info call 541-317-9553

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 288

Sales Southeast Bend Garage Sale 9-4 Fri-Sat. Old tools, cameras, paint equip, misc. 61164 Hilmer Creek Dr, off Ferguson & Sage Creek Dr Garage Sale Fri-Sat, 9-3, 20625 Redwing Lane, off Brosterhous. Canning jars, household items, crafts supplies!

MOVING SALE! New dining tables, couches, drapes,rugs,chairs,great misc. Sat.June 25, 8:30 2:30. 23427 Butterfield Trail. Don't Miss!

GARAGE SALE

Sat 6/25 8am-2pm @ 1925 NW Canyon Drive (NW Canyon & 10th): Tons of kids clothes & toys (girls sizes 6x-16); Barbies, Disney Princess', games, books & more. Some household items too.

Huge Everything Must Go Sale! Furniture, tools, kitchen, knitting yarns & machine, antiques, books, house full! FriSat., 8-3, 3401 SW 34th St. Huge Multi-Family Sale: 3 Days! Thur.-Fri.-Sat. 9-4, Tons of quality stuff, bargain prices, ALL must go! 937 NW 22nd Ct. Redmond.

Moving-In Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-3, 8550 5th St, Terrebonne, 2x Large men’s clothes, See Craigslist for more info. SALE! Home decor, clothes, toys & much more. Fri & Sat., 8-? 2391 NW Hazelwood Ave (corner of Hemlock & 23rd) Yard Sale: Fri. & Sat. 9-4, 216 SW 3rd St., between Cascade & Black Butte, lots of misc. items.

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Sales Other Areas Antique Sale & More! Friday, June 24 only, 8-? 570 South Elm St., Sisters, just down from Village Green Park. Children’s Clothes 50% LOWER than thrift stores! Boys age 10 & under; girls age 4 & under. Toys too! Fri-Sun, 9-5, 14774 Bluegrass Loop, Sisters. See my ad on craigslist. MULTI-FAMILY MOVING SALE June 24/25 8:00AM - 3:00 PM Furniture, Antiques, Tools, Tack & much more. Additional items added daily. 67312 Bass Lane, Bend, 97701 Small Farm Sale: Misc. Tools & ranch items, Cycle Mower, Harrow, etc., Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-1, 4799 SW Williams Rd, Powell Butte. No Earlies or Checks.

SOCIAL SERVICES

Children's Care Coordinator In Grants Pass, OR. Full-time Children's Care Coordinator(s) position open for wrap-around and intensive community-based treatment services. Master's degree in psychology or related field preferred, but bachelor's degree with experience with child-serving agencies will be considered. Competitive salary commensurate with degree and experience. Excellent benefits. For more information and an application, visit www.optionsonline.org and click on Jobs, or call 541-476-2373. EOE. Fax application to 541-479-3514.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

500 528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

L o o kin g for y o ur n e x t e m plo y e e ? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

573

Business Opportunities 486

Independent Positions Supplemental income! Place/ supervise international high school students in your community. Training, compensation and international trip available. Call Sid @ 1-855-299-6167

Elk Lake Lodge One-quarter ownership for sale. Includes year-round cabin usage. $525,000. Courtesy to Brokers. Call 541-390-6776

Turn-key Computer service & repair shop. Incl. inventory. Busy location on 3rd. St. Call for details & info. 541-306-6700.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 F3 650

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600 630

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

642

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Call for Specials!

2 Bdrm. Starting at $525 Ask Us About Our Sumertime Specials! Chaparral & Rimrock Apts Clean, energy efficient, w/patios,on-site laundry, storage avail. Near schools, pools, skateboard park & shopping. Large dog run, some large breeds OK w/mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Renovated 2 bdrm., 1 bath, blocks from St. Charles & Pilot Butte. W/S/G paid. Laundry onsite. Parking. No pets/ smoking.$600. 541-410-6486

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 1100 sq ft, 2 Bdrm, 1½ bath downtown townhome with patio. Home biz OK. 111 NW Hawthorne #6. $795/mo incl water/garbage. 541-388-4053 Avail. 6/25, Furnished 1 bdrm. condo at 7th Mtn., all utils+ cable & wifi paid, deck, pools, hot tubs, $700+dep., no smoking/pets, 541-979-8940 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $615/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $650/mo. 541-480-3666

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

SPRING BLAST!

Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $610$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

personals Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Cottage like large 1 bdrm in quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs, $550+ utils, avail July, 541-420-7613 DELUXE 2 BEDROOM $495 per mo.

incl. storage room and carport, smoke free bldg., fenced dog run, on-site laundry, close to schools, park and shopping. O BSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com 541-923-1907

648

Houses for Rent General

775

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Real Estate For Sale

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

PROVIDENCE. 3/2 single story; Large Fenced Yard; RV parking; Pets; $1150. 541-480-9200.

700

Snowberry Village #50 $78,500. 3 bdrm, 2 baths 1404 sq. ft. 1993 Silvercrest. NEW ~ NEW ~ NEW! EXTENSIVELY REMODELED. All rooms are spacious. Features new paint, new carpet, new tile floors in kitchen, laundry room & both baths, some new appliances. New exterior paint. A must see! Call Marilyn Rohaly, Broker, 541-322-9954 John L. Scott Real Estate Bend www.JohnL.Scott.com

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Beautiful, newer 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1700 sq.ft., on 2.5 acre, nice neighborhood, dbl. garage, gorgeous views of Cascades, RV/Boat storage, $975 mo., 1st, last, dep., 541-382-6268.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1095. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

745

Homes for Sale

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 3/2 mfd. 1440 sq.ft., family room, wood stove, newer carpet and paint, big lot, dbl garage, w/opener. $895. 541-480-3393 /610-7803

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1994 manufactured home. Nice & clean, 8291 N Hwy 97, Terrebonne. No pets/smoking, $725/mo. 541-419-9576 A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 Crooked River Ranch, 5 acres horse property fenced, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, $800 plus deps. 541-420-5197,209-402-3499

750

Redmond Homes Eagle Crest ~ Owner will carry with down. Gated 3 bedroom, 2½ bath home with 3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, private hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Enjoy Eagle Crest’s pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $399,000. Call 541-923-0908.

762

Homes with Acreage Fleetwood 1512 sq ft double wide on 1.34 acres, Crooked River Ranch. Heat pump, 2 bdfrms, den, 2 full baths, sepa guest room & garage w/ 1/2 bath. Great view. $126,500. Call for appointment, 541-923-0574

For Sale by Owner $285,000.

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Summer Price

860

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004 • Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles! • $4000 Call 541-504-9284 or 541-905-5723

Like Brand New Harley Davidson Heritage Softail, 2009. 682 mi., 7 yr ext. warranty, upgraded pipes, engine guard bar. Bike has been lowered; mint cond. Consider trade. $15,500. 541-420-5855

Fabulous country ranch, with barn and much more. Call for details. 541-475-7599

Eagle Crest gated 3 Bdrm 2½ PUBLISHER'S bath home w/3-car garage & NOTICE workshop. Reverse living, pvt All real estate advertising in 763 Harley Davidson Police Bike hot tub, beautiful mountain this newspaper is subject to 2001, low mi., custom bike Recreational Homes views, 2200 sq ft. Pool, tenthe Fair Housing Act which very nice.Stage 1, new tires and Property nis & exercise facilities. makes it illegal to advertise & brakes, too much to list! $1400/mo + security dep "any preference, limitation or A Must See Bike! $8800 and utils/maintenance. Lease Elk Lake Lodge One-quarter discrimination based on race, OBO. 541-383-1782 ownership for sale. Includes w/option; owner may carry. color, religion, sex, handicap, year-round cabin usage. Call 541-923-0908. familial status, marital status $525,000. Courtesy to Broor national origin, or an inkers. Call 541-390-6776 661 tention to make any such preference, limitation or disHouses for Rent Harley Davidson Ultra crimination." Familial status Classic 2008, clean, 15K Prineville includes children under the What are you mi, lots of upgrades, cstm age of 18 living with parents exhaust, dual control looking for? You’ll or legal custodians, pregnant 4 Bdrm., 2 bath, 2032 sq.ft. heated gloves & vest, lugmobile in Prineville, 40x36’ women, and people securing fi nd it in The gage accessories, $15,500 shop, 2.28 fenced acres, custody of children under 18. OBO. 541-693-3975 setup for horses, pets alBulletin Classifi eds This newspaper will not lowed, hot tub, private well, knowingly accept any adver$950/mo., deposits neg., call tising for real estate which is 541-416-2557. in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed 687 that all dwellings advertised 773 in this newspaper are availCommercial for Acreages able on an equal opportunity Rent/Lease basis. To complain of disHarley Dyna FXDWG 1998, 2 Adjacent 1-Acre Lots in crimination call HUD toll-free custom paint, lots of chrome, Oregon Water WonderOffice / Warehouse at 1-800-877-0246. The toll head turner, be loud & proud, land off Century Dr., 55405 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. free telephone number for $7500, 541-280-9563 Gross Dr. S., 1 lot w/septic, spaces, 827 Business Way, the hearing impaired is $49,000, 1 without, $39,000, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + 1-800-927-9275. will carry and/or build to $300 dep. 541-678-1404 The Bulletin is now offering a suit, 541-698-7720. LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Office/Warehouse located in Rental rate! If you have a SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., *** home to rent, call a Bulletin competitive rate, CHECK YOUR AD Classified Rep. to get the 541-382-3678. Please check your ad on the new rates and get your ad first day it runs to make sure started ASAP! 541-385-5809 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, it is correct. Sometimes inMORE AFFORDABLE Rental structions over the phone are 650 rate! If you have a home to misunderstood and an error rent, call a Bulletin Classified can occur in your ad. If this Houses for Rent Rep. to get the new rates and happens to your ad, please NE Bend get your ad started ASAP! Honda Gold Wing GL contact us the first day your 541-385-5809 ad appears and we will be 1100, 1980. 23,000 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big happy to fix it as soon as we wood stove, util. room, 1/2 Warehouse/Office space, 1235 miles, full dress plus can. R..E Deadlines are: sq ft, large roll-up door. acre lot, RV parking, dbl gahelmets, $3500 or Weekdays 11:00 noon for 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple rage w/openers, $895. best offer. next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for net; $500/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 Sunday and Monday. Call 541-389-8410 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541 4 BDRM., 3 BATH, 2150 sq.ft. 541-385-5809 home, incl. 500 sq.ft. office Thank you! 693 on site, no garage, avail. 7/1, The Bulletin Classified Ofice/Retail Space $1200, No smoking. *** 509-947-9662. for Rent Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq. views in farm fields, sepft, gas fireplace, great room, An Office with bath, various tic approved, power, OWC, Honda Trail 90 1969, Yelsizes and locations from huge oversize dbl. garage 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $200 per month, including low, very nice, dual spd. w/openers, big lot, $1195, $114,900, 541-350-4684. utilities. 541-317-8717 trans, rack, street legal, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 $1995, 541-318-5010

GAS

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Building/Contracting

Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways... Call Grant, 541-279-3183 • CCB190612

Computer/Cabling Install

Excavating Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, con struction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Home Improvement

Since 1978

YUCK I do not want to clean gutters again! Then Call B&R 541-389-8008 1-800-580-8008 and we will! ccb#103411 Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

CCB#180420

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

880

Motorhomes

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

14' aluminum flat bottomed boat $300. Call 541-647-9637 after 12:00 P.M. email, edsina2@hotmail.com 16’ Esquire Runabout, new paint, upholstery, rebuilt trailer, new Bimini top, 115 HP Merc engine, $5200 invested in rebuild, selling for $3950, Please call 541-536-9281 or 541-948-2617. 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

17.5’ Bayliner 175, 135HP merc, perfect cond., Bimini Top, Lawrence fish finder, all safety equip., Kay trailer w/breakaway tongue, $8000 OBO, 541-350-2336.

18’3” Bluewater 1984, 1 owner, 289 fishing motor & water skis, Calkins trailer, fish finder, sun cover, boat cover, well taken care of, $3500. Call 541-815-7367

18’ Sailboat, Main & Jib, swing keel & rudder,sleeps 2,trailer, $2000 OBO; 9’ Fiberglass Trihull, $400; 10’ Ram-X Dinghy, $475, 541-280-0514.

Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Free aeration with full season agreement, Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

30’ Diesel Pusher Safari Sahara 1998. 20k orig. miles, exc. cond., maint. records, 300 h.p. Cat engine, 60 Allison trans., Magnum S26V300 chassis, LR slide, front entry, rear queen bed, full shower, Nomad & Sultan pkgs., low hours on generator. $53,000 • 541-410-3658.

Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge w/ice maker. $105K. 541-610-9985

Dinli 50cc. 2003, Electric start, great shape. Perfect for your kids’ first quad. $800. 541/954-5452, John. HONDA 2004 400EX, like new condition with extras. $3000 OBO. 541-420-7100.

Painting, Wall Covering

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Ferris Building & Landscape Maintenance Remodeling, Pole Barns, Landscape Maint., Tree Service & Haul Away. CCB #68496 Harry Ferris 541-408-2262

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semiretired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. 541-388-6910. ccb#5184

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $3850. 541-678-4030

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Window Cleaning

Window Cleaning Deliciously Low Prices • All Work Guaranteed • NO Streak Policy • Family Owned & Operated • Same Day Service Free Estimates • Residential/ Commercial 760-601-0013

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport ATV 2008 Blue, Low hours very clean, freshly serviced. $3950. Will consider offers. See at JD Powersports, Redmond. 541-526-0757 • Richard 541-419-0712

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $64,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $97,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11 1/2 ft. overall height, perfect cond,$37,999. 541-312-8974

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of 48K, immaculate, 330 Cumthe line! cell 805-368-1575 mins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi., Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, $61,000, 541-548-5216.

865

ATVs

The Bulletin

880

Motorhomes

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Polaris Sportsman X2, 2006, 500cc, HO EFI, 180 miles, black/silver, dump bed, $3950. 541-317-8546

J. L. SCOTT

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years!

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

20’ Blue Water Vision, 2000. 220 Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, hp, dual batteries w/ switch, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, great for family skiing/ wake w/d, $89,900. 541-215-5355 boarding/fishing. Sun shade, tubes, skis & depth finder incl. Runs great! Always stored inside. $8500. 541-420-5073 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Landscaping, Yard Care

Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

875

Watercraft

SAVER!

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help!

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Handyman Service

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492

870

Boats & Accessories

541-385-5809

Honda VT700 Shadow

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

870

Boats & Accessories

Snowmobiles

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443.

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Call 541-385-5809

541-385-5809


F4 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN 881

Travel Trailers

Fun Finder Model 189FBS, 2008, 7’ wide w/slide; 19’ long, sleeps 5, excellent condition, 3400# dry, $10,500. Call Fred, 541-516-1134 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

Autos & Transportation

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

$19,450! Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Surveyor Model #264, 2011, used 1x, exlnt cond, always under cover, Cherry cabinets, slide-out, automatic awning. $22,500. 541-977-5358

Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $4495 obo. 541-420-1846

GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $4500 OBO. 541-593-3072

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395 Ford F150 2010 Super Cab Lariat loaded, 12,000 miles. $25,977 #B74273 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

541-389-5016 evenings. Ford Broncos 1984 (2), 1 runs good,body is shot, other does not run, but body is good, $850 OBO, 541-536-5290

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $13,500. 541-408-2111

Vans

Ford Explorer 1999 XLT V6 4.0L 106K, 4WD,CD, tape deck, tow bar, auto, fully loaded $4995, Peter 541-408-0877

Mercury Mountaineer 1997 V8 5.0L Engine AWD Automatic 169K miles $3895, Peter 541.408.0877

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Ford F-250 1992, 4X4,460 eng, steel flatbed, headache rack, ~10K on new trans, pro grade tires, $2600, 541-815-7072.

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

Mercury Mountaineer 1999 56,000 mi., leather, loaded. Vin# J36326 $7,997 541-598-3750

Grand Laredo

Cherokee 1998, 6 cyl.,

4L, 180K mi., new tires & battery, leather & alloy, ask $3450, Bill, 541-480-7930.

DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend Nissan Murano SL 2009 Leather, camera, loaded $28,777 #W105908 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

UNBELIEVABLE Ford 2-Dr. Sedan 1951, exc., original, ready to cruise, $8500, 541-388-0137. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford Sport Trac Limited Edition 2007, too many extras to list incl. new tires, 106k, $18,995, 541-441-4475

4WD 33,000 miles, traction control. Vin #524154

Fifth Wheels

$18,888

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3800, 541-416-9566

Ford Focus SE, 2001, 4-dr, Porsche Boxster 2000, exc. cond.; 67K, dark blue w/tan 5-spd, 37 mpg, 94K miles, leather. $11,900 280-0397 silver in color, power winor satoriwyou@yahoo.com dows & doorlocks, keyless entry, AC, dual airbags, cruise control, CD. MainSaab 9-3 SE 1999 tained extremely well, runs & convertible, 2 door, Navy drives great, non-smoker, with black soft top, tan inalways garaged, $4500 OBO. terior, very good condition. 541-350-9938 $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

The Bulletin

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van, 1999, with tow pkg., good condition, $4200. 541-419-5693

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

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Automobiles Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Honda Civic LX 2003, clean, w/mounted snow tires, 120K miles, $4850, 541-595-2269.

Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

Lexus RX350 2010

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

541-322-7253

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Sport Utility Vehicles GMC ½-ton Pickup, 1972, LWB, 350hi motor, mechanically A-1, interior great; body needs some TLC. $4500 OBO. Call 541-382-9441

Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

Honda Pilot LX 2007

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Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

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West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Chevy 18 ft. Flatbed 1975, 454 eng., 2-spd trans, tires 60%, Runs/drives well, motor runs great, $1650. 541-771-5535

Nissan Maxima 2005, 3.5SL, 58K Mi., exc. condition, $15,200, 541-318-0292.

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition, 2004, 4x4, V8, 91K, Auto, AC,541-598-5111 $8495

Buick Park Avenues 2 avail. w/auto., AC, clean interior, loaded, run great, 21 in-town mpg & 27-29 hwy mpg! Priced at $2000 & up. Call for details at 541-419-5060. Buicks -Nice luxury cars, 30 mpg highway. 1995 Limited LeSabre, 111k, $3900, gold; 1998 Custom LeSabre, 91k at $4500, silver; 2005 LeSabre Custom 84k, $6900; 2006 Lucerne, 76k, $7900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

NAV-leather-loaded 15k miles. VIN #031977. Priced at wholesale book...

$42,888 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007 Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly every option: 20" wheels, navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, thermally insulated glass, tow pkg, stainless steel nose trim, moonroof, Bose sys, heated seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230

Chevrolet Avalanche 2002, 4WD, 130K miles, green, sunroof, tow pkg, leather. $7500. 541-707-0157

Chrysler LeBaron Convertible, 1995 V6, runs great, looks good inside & out, $2500.

541-389-0435

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

International Travel All 1967,

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 JRL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $52,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 760-644-4160 Cedar Creek 2006, RDQS, Loaded, 4 slides, 38’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $34,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Cougar 30’ 2004, 2 slides, clean, exc. condition, new tires, $13,500, 360-901-5922.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. Peterbilt 379 Dump Truck 1988, 15’ box, drop axle, 425 Cat, 13-spd, $20,000 OBO. Call 541-233-8068 Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355. Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $4295 or best offer. 541-420-1846.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yes., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

Porsche 1983 911SC Cabriolet. Info: www.83porsche911sccabriolet. com

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Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

WILLYS JEEP 1956 12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer. 541-389-5355

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Pickups Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

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Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition & much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $4900, John Day, 541-575-3649

Brand new studded snow tires, 275-65xR16, fit all mid-sized SUV's & cars. Cost over $500 will sell $400. 541-706-1820 Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Leer Canopy, on 2000 Chevy X-cab short box, $500, 541-408-4709.

Chevrolet ½-ton 1979 4x4, 350 eng, 86K miles, recent overhaul eng & trans, great cond, $1800. 541-409-1849

We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

CHEVY 1978 K-20, 4x4, Camper Special, 350 4 speed, orig. 1 owner, $2500. Before 9 p.m. call 541-408-0861.

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Antique and Classic Autos MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

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Canopies and Campers

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Lance Camper 2000 11 1/2 ft. long, remote contr. electric jacks, forced air furnace, 12 volt DC system, fully loaded, great condition! $12,000 call 541 317-5824.

MUST SELL

70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $5000 obo. 541-593-3072

Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, Model Camper, loaded, phe8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, alnomenal condition. $17,500. ways garaged, red, 2 tops, 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, exhaust, too many options to 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as list, pristine car, $37,500. Seunit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 rious only, call 541-504-9945

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Utility Trailers

SUBARUS!!!

Ford 3/4 Ton 1990, 351 V-8, manual, 4WD, Lariat, 137K, exc. cond., $2750 OBO, 541-447-3327.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Delores A. Carroll, an unmarried woman, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 26, 2007, recorded January 31, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 06434, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to Lasalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA4 Trust, as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". EXHIBIT "A" LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Block "A" of the Replat of a portion of the REDMOND TOWNSITE COMPANY'S FIRST ADDITION, Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Northeast corner of Block "A"; thence South 0° 20' 45" East, a distance of 119.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence continuing South 0° 20' 45" East, a distance of 81.00 feet; thence South 89° 07' 14" West, along the South edge of a rock wall, a distance of 100.00 feet; thence North 0° 20' 45" West, a distance of 81.66 feet; thence North 89° 30' 00" East, a distance of 100.00 feet to the true point of beginning. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 125 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,123.08, from December 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $1,182.62, from March 1, 2010, monthly payments in the sum of $1,218.22, from October 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,282.23, from March 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $217,873.81, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.207% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 2, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-29-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105551

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $150,976.09. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO-ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER. UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL BE MAILED TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by James P. Diner and Robin L. Diner, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor, to U.S. Bank Trust Company, National Association, as trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank National Association ND, as beneficiary, dated June 29, 2005, recorded July 5, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2005-42434, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 63, Block 19, Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. Note: Although not insured, any conveyance or encumbrance of the record title should include the following: Together with a 1/1045th undivided interest as tenants in common in the following described parcels: Parcels E, F, G, H and I. Together with that certain 27 x 56, Skyline manufactured home bearing VIN No. 67910697KAB, and more fully described in that certain Application to Exempt document filed with the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon on December 28, 2000 under Volume 2000, Page 52196. 1.Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 9/5/2010 through 4/5/2011: 8 payment(s) at $880.13. Total Payments: $7,041.04; Late Charges: 6 late charge(s) at $4.01 for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date. Total Late Charges: $264.06; Property inspection: $95.00; Advances/Escrow: $3483.00. THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED: $10,883.10. 2.Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $148,476.09 as of April 13, 2011. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on August 24, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: April 19, 2011. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527.

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Michael J. Vandehey and Teresa A. Vandehey, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 22, 2005, recorded July 25, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 47786, beneficial interest now held by Springleaf Financial Services, INC formerly known as American General Financial Services, INC., D/B/A American General Financial Services (DE), INC as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". EXHIBIT "A" LEGAL DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land located in the Southwest Quarter Southeast Quarter (SW1/4 SE 1/4) of Section Sixteen (16), Township Eighteen (18) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the East 1/16 corner between Sections. 16 and 21, Township 18 S., R. 12, E.W.M, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence North 00°15'27" East, 1223.23 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence South 89°43'00" West, 185.19 feet to the Easterly right of way of Sipchen Road; thence along a curve to the left having a radius of 353.49 feet, a central angle of 7°57'28", the long chord of Which bears North 42°36'50" West, 49.06 feet: to the Easterly right of way of the Burlington Northern Railroad; thence along a curve to the left having a radius of 2009.86 feet, a central angle of 2°06'18", the long chord of which bears North 30°08'31" East, 73.90 feet: thence North 89°43"00" East, 181.75 feet; thence South 00°15'27" West, 100.00 feet to the true point of beginning. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60872 Brosterhous Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $830.00, from August 15, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $173,039.95, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from July 15, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-21-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106302


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

NOTICE Central Electric Cooperative, Inc., gives notice that unclaimed capital credit payments have been available since December 11, 2006 at the office of the Cooperative, at 2098 N. Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon to the member’s names hereunder of membership and payments which have been authorized for more than 4 years. Unless said members or heirs claim said payments not later than Jan 1, 2012, they will be forfeited to the Cooperative. These payments are retired capital credits for patronage for the years: 1982 and 2004. To claim the capital credit payment please phone or write our office. 3H FARMS 7 R LAND & CATTLE CO 78TH ST SHARED WELL A BAR D PINTO RANCH ABBATOYE TIM B ABBOTT GABE ABBOTT OLETHA M ABBY JOHN D ABDICH ROBERT ACKERMAN RONALD M ADAIR RICHARD ADAMS KENARD ADAMS NORMAN ADAMS SUSAN P ADVANCED SURGICAL CARE AGER SEAN AGNER E M AHRENS JOHN H AIMONE PATRICIA A AINGE RAY AIROLDI HAROLD ALBERT KEN ALBERT LUCIEN J ALBERTINI ALAN F ALDOR KATHRYN ALDOUS MARVIN L ALEXANDER ELIZABETH ALFORD ALMOUTH A ALGER RICHARD B ALLEN DAN L ALLEN DOUGLAS P ALLEN MARJORIE S ALLEN RICHARD ALLEN STEVE R ALMASIE LARRY P ALPINE MTN HOMES INC AMADOR SHAYLA C AMARAL JOEL J AMBROSON RODD M AMENS ROBERT D AMERICAN FEDERAL SAVINGS AMES A GARY AMES DALE AMSBERRY H MEL ANCELL CELESTE C ANDERS RICHARD L ANDERSEN ANTHONY C ANDERSEN RALPH V ANDERSON ANDY ANDERSON BRUCE P ANDERSON DARRELL D ANDERSON DAVID C ANDERSON DEL R ANDERSON DONALD R ANDERSON JEFF L ANDERSON LLOYD W ANDERSON MARY E ANDERSON MIKE C ANDERSON RAINSE E ANDERSON RICHARD F ANDERSON RON ANDERSON RUTH F ANDERSON SCOTT D ANDERSON STEVE L ANDERSON WM R ANDERSON CHRISTOPHER ANDRESEN DARVON M ANDRULIS RENEE ANGELL MILLARD ANGLER KATHRYN M ANSELL RICHARD M ANSORGE MICHELE A ANSTETT GARY F ANTHONY KATHRYN APPLEGATE LOUIS A APPLEGATE WILLIAM R ARENZ JOHN ARIAIL JAMES M ARMITAGE JANET E ARONSON DAVID J ASH LAWRENCE M ASHCRAFT LAMONICA F ASSOCIATE DEVELOPMENT CO ASSOCIATED MGMT ASTON EDWIN L ATKINSON JOSEPH G ATTELL GUSSIE AUGUSTINE FRANK E AUGUSTYNOVICH RON AUSBROKS TERRI E AUZENNE ALLEN J AUZENNE RONALD J AVEY FRANK D AYALA ALFREDO AYLWARD ERNEST M BABBITT JAMES M BABCOCK CRAIG BACH CHARLES J BACHAND MICHAEL BACHMAN SONNY J BACON DONALD C BACON WARREN C BAGGETT BAGLEY ROBERT R BAILEY AL L BAILEY AMBER D BAILEY WM M BAKER HARVEY W BAKER JAMES A BAKER LOGAN L BAKER MICHAEL D BAKER RICHARD W BALDRIDGE ROGER H BALL CHANCY E BALL DON BALL JAMES C BALLEW WILLIAM W BALLIN RUTH E BALTZOR ARTHUR L BANGS GARY W BANKOFIER ANN W BANTA OREN C BARBER MURL S BARCLAY JOSEPH J BARCROFT D J BARKER GLEN BARKER REED A BARKES RICHARD D BARLUP GERALD L BARNDOLLAR VICKY M BARNES GAYLA A BARNES JUDY L BARNES STEVEN M BARNETT JAMES E BARNETT LOU E BARNGROVER ROBERT E BARNHART JANET L BARR PAUL R BARRETT KEN BARRETT MICHAEL W BARRETT RODERICK D BARRY OLIVE M BARTA VERNA I BARTH HERBERT E BARTHOLOMEW JOHN C BARTLETT NICK H BARTLINE BETTY H BARTON GARY A BASHOR JAY F BASS CHARLES L BASSFORD PAUL S BATES CARYL B BATES DAVE A BAUER KEITH J BAUER KIM S BAUGHMAN SHANNA L BAUMAN JOHN S BAUMAN RANDALL M E BAUNACH FRANCES V BAXTER SANDRA K BAYES CASEY J BEALL PAULINE BEALS DAVID E BEALS JEANNE A BEAN STEVEN BEARD JOHN R BEATY PAT M BEAUPRE CHRISTINE C BEBB EDWARD E BECK JOHN E BECK MARGARET BECKER KAREN L BECKMAN I KENT BECKWITH JEFFERY D BECRAFT HARRY R BEGIN MICHAEL BEGLEY AMANDA J BEGLEY DANIEL E BELDING MICHAEL T BELL JAY E BELL JOHN C BELL RANDALL N BELL ROGER G BELLEMORE PAUL H BELVEAL STACEY M BELZEL JOHN BEND PHYSICAL THERAPY BENDELE PAUL A BENEDICT SCOTT BENIASCH KEITH R BENJAMIN ROBERT M BENNETT LEONA M BENNETT ROBERT L BENNETT STEPHEN BENNETT STEVEN L BENSON CECIL G BENSON GARY G BENSON HELEN TRU M BENSON KAREN J BERG STEVEN BERGER CHARLES D BERGER DAVID BERGER WALTER O

BERGHOFER RONALD B BERGMEN CLARK A BERGSMA GEORGE BERGSMA JOHN E BERGSMA RODDY G BERKSON JOHN S BERLAND KENNETH BERNDT MERLE H BERNHARDS TAILOR SHOP BERNHARDT-GEHRMANN BERNLOEHR TERI BERRY GEORGE S BERRY HERSCHAL A BERRY MARK E BERRY MICHAEL R BERTINOIA EDWARD A BESEL KRISTA D BESSEY FLOYD J BEST BARRETT J BETTUCCI FRANK A BEVINS MAURICE G ESTATE BIDIMAN ORRIN W BIEVER KRISTY BIGHAUS TOM A BILKOSKY ROBERT R BILLHYMER HELEN J BILLINGS DAN M BILLINGS JACK R BILLINGS JAMES R BILYEU JEFF BILYEU RICHARD BINFORD LINDLEY BLACK JAMES E BLACKWELL DON W BLACKWELL HENRY B BLACKWOOD JEFF D BLAIR GARY L BLANCHARD EUNICE F BLANK MARY C BLAYLOCK DONALD BLOCH BONNIE J BLOCH KEITH W BLODGETT NICK C BLOMQUIST DAWN D BLONSKI ARTHUR S BLOOM WILLIAM H BLUNT JOHN BOARDMAN E RUSSELL BOARDMAN PHYLLIS M BOATWRIGHT JERRY D BOB GODFREY PONTIAC INC BOCCI ROBERT L BOCHSLER GERALD J BODENLOS CAMILLE S BODIN DAVID W BODTKER F N BOEHI RONALD C BOEHM CARTER R BOETTCHER TAMMY S BOHAM DAN S BOHN MARY A BOLCE ELLA M BOLCE NANCY M BOLES JAMES E BOLLARD TERESA A BOLT RUSS BOLTEN PHILLIP B BOLTINGHOUSE WILLIAM A BOLTON DON BOLTON ROBERT S BONANNO ROBERT K BOND NANCY K BOND STEVE K BOND THOMAS BONHAM HARRY S BONIFACE RICHARD M BONNIEVIEW RANCH INC BONS REBECCA N BORDEN CLARA BORDEN JESSIE B BORK DIANE J BOSTIC JOHN E BOUCHE PARRIS BOURGEOIS RUSSELL BOWEN PAUL BOWERS MARION E BOYANOVSKY-KUTSCH RON BOYD ROBERT G BOYLE CHRIS D BOYLE CONNIE S BOYLE DANIEL J BRADBURY HAROLD W BRADBURY JOSEPH H BRADFORD CAROL A BRADLEY CLARK J BRAND MALCOLM L BRANDENBURG DON F BRANDER ALEX G BRANDT WM D BRANSON LORRI J BRATLEY C M BREADON ROBERT W BRENIMAN S KEYES L BRENNAN MICHAEL A BREUSER PHILLIP D BREW ROBERT S BREWER DONALD L BREWER ROY B BRICKER PENNI-ANN BRIER FRANK D BRILES JUDITH M BRINKLEY TOM G BRITTAIN CHARLES L BRITTAIN DONALD BRITTSAN RUSSELL BRONSON ROBERT P BROOKS CONLEY BROSWICK BRUCE I BROTHERS J THOMAS BROTHERS PAUL BROUGHTON DEBBIE L BROUGHTON HAL F BROUHARD JIM D BROWN ALFRED J BROWN ALICE A BROWN CRAIG E BROWN DARCI BROWN DEBORAH K BROWN DONALD G BROWN HAZEL F BROWN J W BROWN J SCOTT BROWN JAMES W BROWN JEFFREY A BROWN JIM J BROWN JOHN M BROWN KATHY M BROWN MIKE A BROWN NEIL D BROWN RICHARD C BROWN ROBERT L BROWN RON E BROWN RUSSELL O BROWNING J ROBERT BRUCKER M BRUCKERT O C BRUNE LEROY A BRUNMEIER R J BRYAN KENNETH M BRYANT WAYNE E BRYANT WILLIAM M BUCHANAN L A BUCHMAN ED H BUCK VIRGINIA R BUCKNER AUGUSTA BUCKNER GRACE BUCKNER W A BUDKE AFTIN M BUENA VISTA CATTLE CO BUERMANN WILLIAM L BUESHER RBT G BUIGI THOMAS J BULGER JOSEPH E BUNCH CURT BUNCH DAN BUNDOCK HUGH M BUNDOCK W E BUNNELL LOREN K BURCH DENINE BUREN JULIE M BURGESS DALE E BURHART CHARITY A BURING RICHARD M BURKE DANIEL D BURKE WILLIAM P BURKS FLOYD E BURNETTE WILLIAM J BURNISTON JACK K BURNS C DICK R BURNS GENE A BURNS JANET M BURRELL JAMES H BURT CHERYL A BURTON JEFFREY S BURTON MICHAEL A BURTON ROBERT D BURWELL KIRBY J BURWELL TODD V BUSBY DAVID H BUSHNELL MERLE BUTTKE CARL H BUTTRAM WILBUR G BUTZ RONALD D BUXTON DAVID L BUZARD JULIA BUZZARD WILLIAM G BYERS GEORGE J BYERS MICHAEL L BYERS MICHAEL D BYRD JOHNNIE BYRD RICHARD L BYRD WALTON E BYRNE GREGORY W

C & L RANCH CAILLIET SUE CALDWELL LOUIS CALKINS RONALD D CALLISON PATRICK L CAMARILLO THOMAS L CAMERON SHARON CAMERON WILEY CAMOMILE BETTY CAMPBELL BOB C CAMPBELL ELLA E CAMPBELL KEN R CAMPBELL KIRK R CAMPOS HEIDI L CANFIELD FRED C CANJA SAFRON S CANNARD WALTER C CANNON A W CANNON MATT CANNON RICHARD R CANOY RICHARD L CANTWELL ROGER W CANYON COURT CARBAUGH PAUL B CARD ROBERT V CARELLI MAC W CARGILE CATHLEEN A CARLEY MARGARET V CARLILE FRIEDA K CARLSON A B CARLTON R A CARPENTER ANDREW CARPENTER KENNETH CARPENTER LARRY K CARR ARRAH M CARR LESLIE D CARR MICHELLE CARRIGAN CARROLL E CARTER BRAD S CARTER GEORGE W CARTWRIGHT GARY E CARTWRIGHT WILLIAM S CARY MARIE N CASCADE DEV INC CASHEN TRACY D CASTANEDA DAVID CASTLE WILLIAM E CASTRO JAMES J CASWELL JOSEPH H CAUDLE CAROL L CAUFIELD JOSEPH CAVENDER DIANE M CAVIS CLAUDE O CD HOME ENTERTAINMENT INC CECIL ED J CEDERGREEN COLLIN L CENARRUSA JOE E CENTRAL TRUSS C CENTRAL OR CUSTOM HOMES CESSNA DOLORES L CHADBOURNE PHILLIP F CHAFFIN GORDON R CHALKER LORI CHAMBERLAIN CRAIG D CHAMBERLAIN LYNDALL C CHANEY NATHAN CHANGING HORIZONS INC CHAPIN AL P CHAPMAN HOWARD C CHARLES H G CHASE NINA M CHASE PHIL W CHAVEZ MARGARETT R CHAVRE NEAL R CHESHIRE MICHAEL N CHESTER RODNEY L CHIAPUZIO ROBERT CHILDERS RONALD E CHOPPING ROBERT CHRISTENSEN DANA M CHRISTENSEN JEFF R CHRISTIAN MARK A CHRISTIANSEN OTTO H CHRISTIANSON T A CHRISTOPHERSON CARRIE L CHURCHILL JULIET N CHURCHILL TOMMIE N CIRCLE F RANCHES INC CITY TOURNAMENT CLAES THOMAS E CLAFLIN PETER E CLAPP MARTIN A CLAREY DUVEEN O CLARK ALFRED L CLARK AMY M CLARK DANIEL K CLARK DAVID L CLARK KENDRA CLARK KENNETH W CLARK RICHARD I CLARK ROBERT D CLARK RUSSELL B CLARK STEVE CLARK TERRY L CLARK THOMAS L CLARK VIOLET E CLARKE JAMES H CLECKER MARIA P CLEMENS CECILE CLEMENT BRAD D CLEVENGER RAY CLINE FALLS OASIS IMP DIS CLINKENBEARD DEREK S CLINTON L POWELL CLONTZ ALVIE T CLOUSE RONALD E CMC CONSTRUCTION CNTRL LMB & TRUSS/G HOBIN COATNEY ED L COATS KATHLEEN K COBLANTZ RAY J COCHRAN LESLIE A COCKRUM JACK W COE MERILYN COFFEY KATHRYN N COFFEY LEONA D COFFMAN ROBERT E COLE GLORIA J COLE KAREN A COLE STEVEN W COLEMAN ALLEN B COLEMAN LULA I COLLIER LORRI COLLINS ALLEN M COLLINS BLANCHE E COLLINS DARRELL D COLLINS PATRICIA A COMBS DAVID W COMBS PAUL W COMBS THOMAS COMPTON JUDY R COMPTON LAURENCE R COMSTOCK ROBERT CONANT EATON H CONING GARY A CONKLIN EVELYN M CONKLIN FRANK S CONN JOSHUA W CONNER RON A CONNOLLY MICHAEL CONRADS O B CONTRERAS RICHARD M COOK ALMA A COOK DIANA K COOK JUSTIN E COOKE EDWARD J COOKE ROBERT A COOL WAYNE A COOMBS MAC M COONCE LEE F COOPER DAVE W COOPER EDWARD L COOPER EDWIN T COOPER JAMES H COOPER JAMES L COOPER JOHN D COOPER LAFE M COPELAND RICHARD D COPP ROBERT S CORAZZINI PAUL CORBARI ROBERT S CORDES ROGER A CORNOG CHESTER CORPS CORRIGAN GEORGE J CORRIGAN ROBERT CORUM ALLEN COSNER ANDREW R COSNER FRED R COSSETTE JACK T COTTRELL GENE COUEY KAREN M COUNTRY EST MOBILE HOMES COURSEY LINDA M COURTRIGHT LESTER L COWAN BARBARA COWAN RICK W COX BOYD E COX DENESE COX DON COX OLEN J COX ROBIN COZBY BETSY E CRAIG DALE D CRAM AND RHOADS CRAMBLETT BRENT R CRANE IVA A CRAVENS BUD CRAWFORD ILA L CRAWFORD ROBERT J CREASEY OPAL O CREEL J LEROY CRETSINGER DAVID M CRISAFULLI LINDY W CRISMAN WILLIAM G CROCKER RICHARD L CROFTS FRANKLIN P CROMWELL WILLIAM T CRONIN GEORGE R CROOK CO IMP CROOKS RICHARD C CROSSETT ADA J CROUCH BOB R CROWE DAVID V CROWLEY JAMES B CRUM R C ASSOC CRUSE VERNON A CUELLAR JUDY K CUEVAS JAMES W CULLEY KEVIN R CUMINS JAMES E CUNETTO DEBBIE A CUNNINGHAM MINNIE CUNNINGHAM PATRICK J CUNNION JOHN J CURRIE JAMES A CURTIS LINDA M CURTIS MARCELLA R CURTIS MICHAEL J CUSTENBORDER J C CUTANEO EUGENE C CUTSFORTH DAVID H CUTTING PAT J D & R RENTALS D & S CATTLE CO

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 F5 D H M DEVELOPMENT CO DACHENHAUSEN ROBERT D DAEGES MICHAEL J DAEUBLE THEODORE C DAGGETT HAZEL M DAHL CLYDE DAHLEN JIM H DAHLSTROM VIRGINIA M DALE ROMIG GIFTS DALEY MATHEW H DANIELS NORMAN P DANIELS TARYN DANNEN W E DANNUNZIO SUE DARLING DAVID M DAUGHERTY J RICHARD DAVIDSON GERALD O DAVIDSON N GORDON DAVIDSON THOMAS A DAVIES JAKE DAVIS ALBERT W DAVIS CHARLES DAVIS COLEMAN E DAVIS DAVID B DAVIS DENNIS L DAVIS EMERY D DAVIS FREDERICK A DAVIS HAROLD DAVIS HOWARD H DAVIS JOE W DAVIS KENNETH DAVIS LON J DAVIS MARTY L DAVIS RANDY C DAVIS RICHARD E DAVIS STAFFORD W DAY GERALDINE B DAY LESTER A DAY MICHAEL H DE KONING EDWIN DEAN FRANK L DEAN HOWARD R DEARDORFF DELBERT R DEBERNARDI GARY L DEBRON JOHN J DECKER EVERETT F DEFREMERY MARY S DEGERMAN KENNETH DEIBELE DEAN C DEJANIKUS MIMI S DEKAY CHARLES W DELGADO JON DELL GERALD C DELL JOHN D DELLER DAVID J DELONG DENNIS G DEMAR KO ENTERPRISES DEMASTERS JAMES G DENLOR INC DENNIS GARY DENNIS WAYNE R DENTON JILLIAN L DENTON KEN R DENTON ROBIN M DENTON WAYNE E DEPOT BUILDING DERIEUX LARRY E DERR JANICE M DESERT SEED DEVINE PATRICK DEVORE LILLIAN DEWEESE HOWARD DEZOTELL ROBERT W DIAZ BONNIE L DIAZ RICHARD E DIBBLE JANET E DIGIANFLIPPO CHRISTINA M DILLEY PATRICK W DILLING PEARL D DIMMITT ROBERT DINGER LLOYD E DINGLE STEPHEN DITMORE DEAN DIXON FLOYD L DIXON LILLIAN O DIXON MIKE L DOBKINS JOHN V DODGE STEVE M DOHERTY ALIDENE M DOHERTY RAY E DOMINGUES PAUL H DON FISHER CONSTRUCTION DONAFRIO DON DONOHO WOODROW W DOOLIN FRED DORIGAN FRANCIS DORSHIMER JR G R DOUBLE B RANCH DOUGLAS BERT R DOUGLAS JEFFREY W DOUGLAS CASCADE CORP DOUGLASS DAVID L DOVER MARILYN DOWD ROY B DOWELL LARRY G DOWERS H DAVID DR TURNER-SPRANG ETAL DRAKE RICK H DRAKE STEVEN A DREES ROY J DREW DAVID L DREW LINDA E DRILL ANTHONY J DRIVER ELBERT D DRY CANYON FARMS DUCHETT ERIC DUCKWORTH CAROL A DUENO KELLI A DUFF GARY C DUFFY TOM DUGGAN DENNIS W DULIN GLENN DUNAWAY DWAYNE T DUNAWAY O E DUNBAR ARLO W DUNBAR SALLY DUNCAN EDWARD N DUNCAN LARRY HEL DUNHAM R HOWARD DUNN EUGENE R DUNN JULIUS H DUNN MARK DUNN PHILIP G DUNN ROBERT M DUNN SHIRLEY A DUNNE ERIC N DUNNE RICHARD D DURAN MONSE DURANT GAIL L DURHAM WILLIAM C DURNING-STALICK ANNE W DURST DON M DYER MIKE EAST PORTLAND INVESTMENT EASTMAN DARWIN C EATON C SUSAN ECKMAN PAUL EDENFIELD BONNIE J EDGINGTON JESSE C EDMONDSON MUSETTA EDWARDS C B EDWARDS C CHICK H EDWARDS EUGENE L EDWARDS LEE E EDWARDS RONALD E EDWARDS WILLIAM J EGAN VIRGINIA G EGELINE STEVEN C EIDE MELVIN D EIDEMILLER DOROTHY D EL TORO EXPRESS INC ELBERS JULIANNE M ELLER WENDELL L ELLIOTT CHARLES R ELLIOTT DARL ELLIOTT DONALD P ELLIOTT MORGAN H ELLIS CLIFF R ELLIS EDMUND ELLIS NANCY I ELLIS ROBERT D ELLISON DAVID G ELLISON JOHN C ELLISON WILLIAM H ELLSWORTH RUSSELL J ELMORE DEBBIE E ELPI TRAVIS J ELSTON JUDY K ELWEFATI MOHAMED N EMERY JOSIE L EMRICK AL ENDICOTT CHARLES ENGIN ASSOC ENGSTLER CAROLE L ENGSTROM MATTHEW J ENOS LEWIS W EORIATTI JULIE N EPSTEIN MICHAEL P ERCANBRACK SHENA ERCOLIN DIANE E ERDMAN HENRY M ERETH MARK W ERICKSON CYNTHIA L ERICKSON K GLENN ERIKSON JOHNNIE C ERIKSON KELLY ERNST STEVE R ERNST-HOUCK JAN K ESHLEMAN EARL ESTERGREEN ALICE ETHREDGE LOIS M EVANS REUBEN W EVERED MARGARET J EVERETT ROGER W EVERHART CHARLES S EWEN KATE M EWING LEON EXTRA R G ESTATE FAGG FRED D FAHNESTOCK KEVIN FAIRCHILD HELEN J FAIRCHILD SCOTT M FALLEY SAM F FALTYS RANDY FANNING CURTIS H FAR WEST FEDERAL BANK FARIS JAMES C FARLEY ROBERT F FARNEY JAMES M FARNSWORTH DAVID A FARNSWORTH THOMAS D FARR W M FARRELL ALYS BELLE FARRELL J DOUGLAS FARRELL JOE W FEHLMAN AVALYN L FELDSCHAU LAWRENCE FELICIANO MATTHEW A FERGUSON SAMUEL E FERRERA BART R FERTSCH ARON W FICK DEXTER A FIELDS RAYMOND FIJALKA DAVID F FINCHER HAROLD M

FINDLAY HUGH G FINDLEY COLLEN FINK ANNE H FINNELL JORDAN FINNELL MICHAEL R FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD FIRST INTERSTATE BANK FISHER FRANK A FISHER GEORGE A FISHER MARC R FISHER OLIVE E FISHER RODGER A FISHER THOMAS C FISHER WALDO R FITCH HARRY L FITZPATRICK E B FITZSIMMONS DWAYNE L FLANDEY MEYER F FLEGEL WINSTON M FLESHER RICK A FLETCHER H K FLINT LARRY B FLOREA DAN FLORY DAWN A FLOWER ROBERT C FLOWERS ELSIE L FLOYD JEFF H FOLEY ROBERT H FOLEY THOMAS P FOLLETT LYNN P FORD EVELYN E FORE STEVEN E FOREMAN LYLE G FORSBERG VAUGHN D FOSS ART FOSTER A L FOSTER FRANK FOSTER GRANT FOSTER MILO FOUCAULT JAMES FOUNTAIN TIM N FOWLER BETTY J FOWLER MARION E FOWLS CAROLINE A FOX AARON W FOX RODNEY G FOXLEY EDWARD FOY DWIGHT D FRANCE DAVID W FRANEY JAMES M FRANK RICHARD L FRANKE HERBERT P FRANKLIN EDITH M FRANKLIN WILLIAM L FRANKS R MINOR FRANTZ VIRGINIA F FRASER PATRICIA M FRASER QUENTON J FRAZEE D BRUCE FRAZEE NONA ESTATE OF FREEMAN JACK N FREEMAN PAT S FREEMAN ROBERT J FREIGHTLINER INC FRIBERG RUTH E FRICKEY ALLAN K FRIEND PAMELA S FRISTROM GUY FRITZ GEORGIA FULLER ROBIN L FULTON LAMOINE FULTON & KAUFFMAN FUNKHOUSER JOHN A FUQUA DONALD K FUQUA JEANETTE FURLOTT CLIFF D GAGE THOMAS M GAINES CLAY GAINES THOMAS M GAISER DONALD F GALE WESTON W GALES COLLENA M GALL ALVIN G GALLOWAY JOHN C GAMBLE TED R GANDER DAVE C GANGER LAWRENCE GARD EDWARD E GARDEN HOME PROPERTIES GARDNER BUSTER L GARDNER GARY P GARDNER ROBERT C GARNER RALPH J GAROUTTE MIKE S GARRISON CALEEN A GARRISON JAMES ESTATE OF GASCON JOSEPH F GASSNER JENNIFER F GATES MICHAEL A GAYLORD EDSON C GECK HAL E GEHRKE CLARENCE A GEORGE ERNEST GEORGE MARY A GERALD A COFFMAN GERBER JOHN C GERBER ROBERT D GERDES EARL GERGEN YVONNE C GERKE EUNICE GESIK KELLEY A GHIRARDO LOUIS J GIBBONS JAMES H GIBSON CHRISTINE A GIBSON STANLEY M GIBSON WARREN N GIBSON WILLIAM H GIEFFELS MONTE J GILBERT DORATHY GILBERT TED D GILCHRIST EDITH GILCHRIST F RUST GILLERAN TIM F GILLESPIE DEREK P GILLILAND NORMAN GILLUM HARLEN G GILMER JERRY L GILMORE BERNADETT L GILMORE VIRGLE F GILPIN CLARENCE H GILPIN EILEEN GILPIN MICHAEL E GIORDANO MIKE S GITTINGS EMMA H GLANTZ KENNETH E GLASGOW THELMA L GLASPEY SUSAN L GLASS BYRON B GLAZIER HOWARD L GOBLE WILBUR M GOCKE WILLIAM F GODAT CARYL E GODDARD GALE L GODDARD LAVONNE G GODDEN JACOB J GOERTLER ROBERT ESTATE OF GOETZ R L GOLDBERG SARA G GOLDSMITH RICHARD E GOLDSTRAND LUCY GOMPERTZ KATHLEEN A GONZALEZ FRED C GONZALEZ LINDSEY C GOODFELLOW PAUL GOODMAN JEFFREY L GOODMAN JOHN J GOODWIN MARY J GORDON EVELYN GORDON JOHN R GORDON NORMAN W GOSS JAMES L GOTCHY CLARENCE E GOULD ALTA M GOYTIA RUBEN GRABENHORST RICHARD GRADY ROBERT M GRAGE DENNIS H GRAHAM DUANE K GRAHAM JEFFERY GRANITE BUTTE GRANT CLOYCE J GRANT JOHN H GRANT MARYDITH D GRANUM MICHAEL J GRAVANCE DAVE L GRAVES FRED C GRAVES REBECCA K GRAVES ROBERT D GRAVLEY JAMES GRAY CLAIRE M GREEN DOROTHY E GREEN LESTER D GREEN RICHARD W GREEN W B GREEN WILLIAM D GREEN BROTHERS FARMS GREENBLAT ALAN P GREENOUGH ED GREESON DAVID L GREGG MARGARET E GREGOIRE JOHN J GREGORY ALEX L GREGORY RENEA E GREKEL EDWARD GRESSER TIM W GRIBSKOV POLLY J GRIFFIN E M GRIFFITH JIM D GRIFFITH TRADING CO INC GRIFFITHS ARTHUR L GRIGGS DAN D GRINDSTONE LIVESTOCK GROSHONG THOMAS M GROSS WILLIAM N GROVE GERALD E GROVER MICHAEL GRUBB DONALD T GULLICKSON CARLA GUNDERSON CECIL V GUNJUR YATIAH S GUNN LINDA GUNTER ROBERT G GUS ASSOC GUYTON CHARLES HAAS PAUL G HAAS PAUL H HAASE PHILLIP R HADDOCK JOHN D HAFTER ELITA V ESTATE OF HAGEMAN PAUL L HAGER ORVAL O HAINES KEVIN HAINES RALPH A HALDORS C S HALE SAMUEL L HALEY THOMAS W HALEY WILLIAM W HALICKI RAY HALL BILLY J HALL FRED A HALL HAZEL M HALL JIM F HALL LEROY E HALL MARGUERIT A HALL MICHAEL

HALL RICHARD L HALLOWELL SCOTT A HALSTEAD KATHY R HALTER JERRY HAMAR BRUCE A HAMILTON FLETCHER HAMILTON JAMES G HAMILTON RAY N HAMMACK DRUSILLA HAMMACK JOHN HAMMACK SANDRA K HAMMACK ALAN G & SANDRA HAMMON DURLIN R HAMPTON DANA S HAMPTON BUTTE GRAZING ASN HANBY MARIE HANCOCK PAUL HANKINS CLAUDE L HANKINS TRACY A HANLON COLLEEN L HANSEN HAZEL L HANSEN MARLENE B HANSEN RON R HANSEN STEPHEN G HANSON ARNOLD E HANSON DONALD A HANSON JILL M HANSON OSWALD HANSON PHILIP L HARBAUGH EVA HARBEINTNER ROBERT G HARBICK WAYNE R HARDCASTLE CONSTRUCTION HARDIE ARTHUR D HARDIN BOB W HARDING EDNA HARDING HAROLD S HARDING MICHAEL L HARGIS ROBERT E HARING ARLINE HARKLEROAD DONALD G HARLESS DEWEY R HARMAN EUGENE C HARMON KAY HARMON ROD E HARMON WILLIAM D HARMON WILLIAM W HARNESS DON HAROLD W J HARPER TRACY K HARRELL ALLEN L HARRINGTON EVERETT J HARRINGTON STEVE HARRIS E MAY HARRIS GLENN H HARRIS GRACE HARRIS JOHNNIE HARRIS LAURA HARRIS WAYNE L HARRISON WILLARD R HART E MARLENE HART GLENN A HARTRICH CATHY S HARTSOCK ROBERT E HASKIN ROBERT HASKIN VERN G HASLEY LESLEY L HASWELL RICHARD W HATTAN MAXINE H HAVERFIELD BURTON O HAVERLY JOHN HAWKINS GEO L HAWLEY NANCY G HAYCOCK RICHARD D HAYHURST WILLIAM L HAYNES JACK L HAYNES JONNIE S HAYNES ROBERT N HAYS DICK E HAYS KEN E HBK SERVICES INC HEAGLE JAMES H HEALEY JOHN M HEATER ROLLIN K HEATON THOMAS W HEBB PAUL H HECHT WILLIAM J HEDGE J DALE HEIBEL HEATHER M HEIMAN HERBERT HEIN ESTER J HEINRICH DAN J HEINRICH TINA HEISER GEORGE W HEITKEMPER PETER HELBERG ERIC G HELFRICH PHILLIP E HELMS SUSAN HELTON CLINTON L HELZER C L HEMPENIUS STEVE H HEMPHILL CHARLES T HENDERSON DORIS J HENDRICKSON RUSSELL HENKEL JACK R HENNEN JACK D HENRY JACQUELIN B HENRY MARLEE L HENRY RICHARD R HENRY THOMAS A HENSLEY MICHAEL A HENSON CHESTER N HERAUF GARY A HERB STANLEY C HERING JOHN B HERMAN MICHAEL R HERNANDEZ MIKE J HERNANDEZ SHELLI R HERRING HUBERT B HERRING JACK D HERRMANN FRANZ E HERSHBERGER DOYLE A HERVIN JASON O HETZLER HOWARD G HEUSTON LEONARD Z HEWITT BRIANNA HEWITT VICKI I HEWITT WILLIAM J HEYDEN JOHN R HIBBARD GEORGE HIBBARD JIM O HIBBS CHARLES H HICKEY ILA M HIGDON TERRY L HIGH DESERT MORTGAGE HILDEBRANDT RUSSELL R HILDERBRAND FRANCESS O HILL DOUGLAS A HILL JOHN J HILL RONALD J HILL ROY J HILLE ARVIN HILLS JAMES R HILT MURRAY E HINDERLIDER JOHN M HINRICHS JOHN HINTON DALLAS L HINTON JIM E HINTZ NANCY L HITES JAMES L HOADLEY SHANE K HOBGOOD ROBYN C HOBIN LESLIE R HOBIN BUILDING MTRLS HODGES DONNA J HODGSON CECIL HODGSON ROBERT L HOFFMAN GARY HOFSTETTER ADAM J HOGAN RITA E HOLBROOK STEPHEN M HOLCOMB RICHARD E HOLLAMON DARLENE L HOLLAND JAMES F HOLLAND TATSYANA HOLLIDAY AL R HOLLIPETER ROBERT C HOLLOWAY DAVID B HOLMES BRANDIE L HOLTER DALVIN D HOLUM JAMES M HOMAN ASHLEY HOOD NUEL HOPKINS WILLIAM E HOPPER JOHN A HORN SHERRY L HORNBACK DANIEL W HORSE BUTTE RANCH HORSELL WILLIAM B HORTON CHERRY R HOSFORD JAMES D HOSKINS KATHLEEN L HOTCHKISS ROBERT M HOUGH MERLE M HOUSDEN OSCAR ESTATE HOUSTON WILLIAM C HOWARD DALE W HOWARD HANK L HOWE WIL & ASSOC HOWEY JERALD E HUBER HAROLD A HUBSTENBERGER KELLY F HUDDLESTON L P HUDSON GORDON W HUDSON NEIL K HUDSON THOMAS R HUFSTADER RICK A HUGHES GEORGE W HUGHES JOHN G HUGIE SCOTT HULBERT RONALD A HULL WARREN T HULL ENTERPRISES LLC HULSE DAVEY W HUNKING MARTHA E HUNT KATHRYN M HUNTER HARRY HUNTER VANCE HURLBURT F T HURST L M HURST RONALD L HVAL GARY L IACOVETTA BEA S IHLE CARL IMCE LEROY IMWALLE ROBERT J INGLIS MARIE A IRELAND KENNETH G IREY H VERN ESTATE IRWIN ANDREA IRWIN RICHARD H ISAAC BURDETT E ISHAM RICHARD L IVERSON LARRY R IVIE GEORGE E J D ROELKE CABINETS J G BOSWELL CO JACKSON BIRT W JACKSON DAVID L JACKSON LEE R JACKSON RICHARD E JACKSON V L JACKSON WAYNE J JACOB JOHN R JACOBSON ALAN G

JACOBSON TIM D JACQUES PHIL D JAHN DONALD D JAMES ALVIN C JAMES MICHAEL D JAMES SHERI K JAMES WILLIAM R JANES CINDY JANIGIAN MELISSA JANSEN ELLEN M JAQUA MARY JARVIS JAN G JASA REUBEN D JEARDOE CHERYLL A JEFFERS DEAN W JENKIN CRAIG F JENKINS JACK K JENNINGS WILLIAM L JENSEN JAMES W JENSEN RICK C JENSEN WILLIAM K JEPSEN JERALD R JEPSON NICHOLAS H JERNAGAN M L ROY JEYS LUKE JOHN COELHO & SONS JOHNS JERRY L JOHNSON BILL H JOHNSON CARL B JOHNSON CHARLES P JOHNSON CLARENCE R JOHNSON DAVID L JOHNSON DAVID K JOHNSON DONALD E JOHNSON DOUGLAS S JOHNSON E J JOHNSON GARY W JOHNSON HARVEY W JOHNSON HERBERT L JOHNSON INA M JOHNSON JULIE A JOHNSON KENNETH P JOHNSON MARIAN JOHNSON MARK A JOHNSON MARK J JOHNSON MARTIN W JOHNSON MELLADEAN JOHNSON MICHAEL G JOHNSON RAYMOND A JOHNSON RICHARD JOHNSON ROBERT E JOHNSON ROBERT L JOHNSON SHARON R JOHNSON TOM W JOHNSON W B JOHNSON WENDY E JOHNSON WILLIAM JOHNSTON EVERETT L JOHNSTON GERALD B JOHNSTON HELEN M JOHNSTON MARGARET M JOHNSTON ROBERT W JONAS BOB W JONAS DANIEL T JONES CHARLES P JONES DAVID S JONES DAVID L JONES ILSE JONES JAMES H JONES JEFFREY L JONES JERRY JONES LINDA L JONES LUELLA K JONES OLIVER R JORDAN GEROLD W JORGENSEN ARLINE M JOSEPH-ARNTSON JUDY LOWELL D JUSTICE DONALD B K F & H REPAIR INC KADHIM BASIM M KAGEE INC KALBERER HOTEL SUPPLY KALISZEWSKI JOSEPH V KALK NICOLE J KANADA KIRBY KANE KEVIN M KAPELA EILEEN KARDAS WILLIAM F KASHNER DICK KASZA IMRE KAUFFMAN KRISTI J KAUTZ JUNIOR W KAVANAGH DEVEREUX L KEALIHER KEELE W SCOTT KEENER JAMES P KELLER JOHN T KELLER KORI T KELLER SUSANNE R KELLY DOROTHY E KELLY JEAN E KELSEN STEVEN KEMP JOHN KENDALL DOUGLAS D KENDALL JAMES N KENDRICK CHARLES P KENDRICK MICHAEL M KENNEDY FRANK W KENNEDY H LEON KENNEDY THOMAS A KENT ALAN R KENTNER PAMELA KENTNER VIOLA M KENYON STANLEY J KEPHART HORACE KESSEL JOYCE KESSLER DOUGLAS C KEY TV INC KIGHTLINGER HUGH KILIAN NADINE R KILLIAN GEORGE KILLINGER DONALD KIMBALL EDWARD L KINCH PHYLLIS KINDSVATER ROBERT A KING GENE KING LEWIS M KINGERY JACK W KINGSBURY DOROTHY W KINNEY STEVE B KIPPER DEBRA J KIRBY CLARENCE L KIRCHNER BOB E KIRK RAYMOND L KIRKLAND DAVID W KIRKPATRICK MARK D KIRKPATRICK RICHARD T KIRKWOOD MARIETTA L KISER BOB L KISSLER CLARENCE KITCHELL LONNY S KITTERMAN YVONNE A KITTLESON CHARLES R KJOS OLGA KLECKER NICK KLECKER SHELLEY T KLEIN RODNEY L KLEINHEINZ WILLIAM C KLINE OROVILLE KLINK CLEM K KLONOSKI PAT KNAPP GERRY L KNAPP W H KNICKERBOCKER M E KNIGHT GLADYS KNOKE LINDSEY A KNOX BUCKLEY G KNUCKLES VICKIE J KOBASIC JOHN I KOEHLER PETER H KOHLER TERESA A KOHLS DAVID A KOLLEN CODY T KONNER MICHAEL S KOOP DAVID A KOOPS ROLLIE B KOOPS TUNIS B KOOYMAN DOUGLAS J KOPLAU ROBERT O KOROSKI DAVE M KOROUSH LONNIE D KOSCT CHAD KOSMALA GARY W KOUTSOURIS PETER T KOVACHEVICH LARRY KOZAK MICHAEL KRAFT ROBERT KRAH EST OF DOROTHY W KRAJCIK MAX J KRAMER DONNA M KRATZ RUSSELL W KREEFER ROBERT E KREHBIEL NORM G KRESHON TOM L KROEKER MELANIE F KROPF LAWRENCE KUEHN ROBERT O KUEHNE EDWIN A KURTZ JERRY R LA BERRY LEGELE LADUE STEPHEN B LADUKE J H LAFFERTY L F LAKESHORE LODGE LAMKIN GLORIA LANCE JIM LANDERHOLM LEWIS LANDERS MIKE T LANDIS CLINT L LANDIS ROY S LANDRUM DARRELL LANE RYAN J LANEY JODY L LANGE STEPHANIE M LANGMAS DAVID A LANTER ROBERT T LARIONOV LEON M LARISCH RUDY LARREW BROOKE LARSEN JAMES P LARSEN MARK S LARSON MARK S LARSON REX A LARSON RICHARD A LARSON ROY L LASS DENNIS E LATHAM PAUL E LATOURETTE FRANCES S LATTIMER KRYSTAL G LAVAGNINO LORENZO F LAVENDER JANICE M LAWRENCE LORI L LAWSON ROBERT W LAWTON WILLIAM C LAYTON FRANK P LAYTON STEPHANIE B LE DOUX ROY LEACH M WILTON LEADER ESTHER W LEAF LYNETTE M LECKBAND EVA LECKBEE MERVIN LEDBETTER CHAD R LEDERMAN JOHN P

LEDGERWOOD LADONNA J LEE K L LEE MONROE A LEE TERRIE Y LEE WILLIAM F LEEVER MICHAEL E LEFEBRE BEN LEFLEY WAYNE W LEFORS LAURIE J LEGG GALEN L LEGORE JOE W LEHMAN KATHY LEHUQUET BRAD D LEITH ADELAIDE F LEITH ANNA E LEIX FRED W LEMKE MARK C LENGELE LYNDON C LENZ ROSEMARY H LEON JOHN E LEONARD CAROLYN A LEONE MICHAEL D LEONTI MARK S LETZ ROY LEVI COLIN T LEWALLEN DENNIS L LEWIS MARK LEWIS MIKE G LEWIS R L LEWIS RICHARD D LEWISON JUSTIN J LIAO FRANK LIBOLT RICHARD E LIGHT ROBERT C LILLEBO CHRIS H LILLYWHITE HEROLD S LIND HILL A LINDE DAVID J LINDLEY BRYAN D LINDSAY C R LINK DAVID LIPPINCOTT MICHAEL R LIPPOLD FLORENCE LISENSKY MARY ESTATE OF LITTLE RICHARD D LITTLEDEER ROY LIVESEY RICHARD W LOBUE MILDRED V LOCKER JAMES R LOCKYEAR MAX L LOEB ALFRED A LOEKS RICK E LOGAN NORMA D LOGAN NORMAN D LOMBARDO JOSEPH T LONG JOHN C LONG MARK L LONG QUINN A LOOMIS BARBARA L LOPEZ JOSE M LORD ANTONY N LOTT DEBRA J LOUTH SHARON LOVEGREN GRANT A LOVEJOY PAUL D LOWE LEON A LOWE RICHARD G LOWE ROBERT I LOWERY BERNADINE LOWNDES RANDY M LOWRY H TYRRELL LOZIER ROBIN D LUCAS WILLIAM A LUCKMAN ANGIE J LUCKMAN MARJORIE S LUDEMAN SHIRLEY LUND KENNETH M LUNDGREN FERN L LUNDGREN GARLAN R LUNDGREN JOHN A LUNDGREN LARRY LUSK CAROLYN L LUSTER DAVID R LUTON ROBERT C LUTSCHG ROBERT C LUTTON PAUL E LUTZ C W LUZIUS PAUL L LYDY THYRA I LYNCH CHARLES B LYNCH GARY S LYNCH LESLIE J LYON LEON LYSAGHT MONICA E LYTLE WALLACE MACDONALD JOHN MACKEY RANDY L MACTHERSON GARY K MACY GREG MACY TERRY L MADDOX JERRY MADRAS VET CLINIC MAHODY PATRICK J MAIN ROBERT E MAINE D C MAINELINE RANCH MAJOR BILL MALLOY LUDWIG & WHEELER MANES JOSEPHINE A MANESS DEBBIE MANGERS ROBERT G MANN CLARK D MANN FLETCHER J MANN HARLAN A MANNIX LAWRENCE A MANSFIELD ROBERT W MANZANARES DIANA R MARCUM JOYCE K MARIPOSA FARMS LTD MARJAMA MARVIN L MARKGRAF CHERYL R MARKS CREEK LODGE INC MARNEY TIMOTHY W MARSH TAMMY MARTENS THOMAS J MARTIN CRAIG L MARTIN EDWARD G MARTIN FRANK T MARTIN JOSEPH H MARTIN KENNETH R MARTIN LOTTIE D MARTIN RALPH W MARTINSON AMBER MARYBROOK CORP MASNICA DEBRA J MASON ARMEL S MASON BETTY S MASON JEFFERY A MASON LORRAINE MASSEY BURL V MAST JOHN R MASTERS TINA MASTON ANN MATHENY JERROLD G MATHENY RONALD G MATHESON WELL MATHEWS VALERIE G MATSON ERNEST T MATSON J W MATSON NEAL M MATTHEWS EMORY A MATTSON FLOYD G MATTSON LYNNE MAULT BILLIE J MAUPIN GARRETT H MAURICIO HECTOR MAXWELL MARION M MAY A DANIEL MAY REBECCA S MAY-VARAS CARRIE M MAYER ELIZABETH MAYFIELD RON MAYHUGH TIMOTHY L MCADAMS LLOYD C MCALISTER WILLIAM R MCAULAY ROBERT C MCBETH LEWIS A MCBRIDE KIMBERLY L MCCABE TERRANCE MCCAFFERTY JOHN MCCAHAN ESTHER MCCAIGE JOHN E MCCAIN ELVA G MCCAIN JANICE E MCCAIN JANIE M MCCALEB J FRED MCCALL RICHARD L MCCALLISTER JEANETTE L MCCALLISTER ROYAL H MCCANN MALACHY MCCARTHY T M MCCARY HULEN C MCCARY JAMES C MCCAWLEY EDGAR MCCAY DENNIS M MCCLAIN RUSTY L MCCLAMMY THOMAS V MCCLAUGHRY SHARON MCCLEARY DAVE L MCCLOW AND HOPE MCCONNELL COLVIN S MCCONNELL NANCY R MCCORD BRUCE M MCCORMACK G M MCCOY DAWN MCCOY LEE R MCCREA JOHN D MCCREIGHT DONALD L MCCULLOUGH RON MCCULLY RUTH E MCCUTCHEN MARK MCDANIEL ELMER L MCDANIEL JOHN H MCDANIEL LAVINA M MCDARMENT RICHARD W MCDONALD B K MCDOWELL MAXINE E MCDUFFIE & YORK MCEWEN BARBARA M MCFADDEN JAMES H MCFARLAN STEVEN D MCFARLANE WILLIAM MCGAVRAN MARK S MCGEE JAMES A MCGHEE LLOYD M MCGILL ROBERT D MCGINNIS THOMAS E MCGLOTHLIN ROSELINE A MCGUIRE EDWARD E MCHUGH ALICE MCINTOSH DONAL W MCINTOSH GENE MCINTOSH JACK L MCKAY CHARLES B MCKAY DAVID J MCKAY HARLEY MCKAY JEFF A MCKECHNIE ROBERT P MCKELVY THELMA N MCKEMIE BERT D MCKENZIE EARLINE L MCKIBBIN JOHN S MCKINNEY GARY F MCLAGAN ROBERT R MCLAREN JOHN J

MCLAUCHLIN RUTH S MCLEOD DOUGLAS MCMICKEN MARGARET L MCMILLAN O E MCMINN STEPHANIE L MCMULLENS SHARON I MCMURRAY LYNN L MCNABB JUDITH M MCNALL DAVID D MCNEE ANN MCPHERSON DONALD MCQUAID JOE E MCREYNOLDS MATTHEW W MCSWAIN MARY E MCVAY SHAWN T MCWILLIAM BJ MEADOWS BYRON D MEDEIROS LOUIS J MEEKER MARSHA A MEEKS LUCILLE M MEIER JOHN T MEJDELL HARRY H MELGAARD BRENT R MENDENHALL NANCY G MENDENHALL STEVE MERCER D E MERCER THOMAS H MERLICH STUART K MERRICK STEVEN MERRILL MAX MERRITT GENE W MERWIN JOHN W METKE J PAT MEYERS DON E TRUST “B” MEZORI MARGARET M MICHALSEN ROGER C MIDDLETON BETTY J MIDWAY PLUMBING MIKESELL KRISTI MILES RAY M MILES VADA L MILKS DUANE MILLER CRAIG R MILLER DON E MILLER DON M MILLER EDNA R MILLER EMILY J MILLER GLENN MILLER HARLAN R MILLER HARVEY I MILLER HELEN A MILLER JERRY I MILLER KAREN A MILLER KENNETH W MILLER L VIVIAN MILLER MORRIS M MILLER RAYMOND L MILLER ROBERT W MILLER ROBERT L MILLER STANLEY F MILLS REBECCA S MILLS ROCKY MILLS WILLIAM F MINNETTE MITCH J MINNICK PAULINE MISCHEL ROD D MITTS LINDA & JOHN MIZE ANNIE M MLASKO RUDOLPH R MODE GARY R MOELLER CALVIN E MONAHAN BEVERLY K MONROE BARBARA MONSON LEFTY MONTGOMERY EVANS MONTGOMERY LORREN K MOODY LARRY R MOORE DANIEL R MOORE DELLA M MOORE FRANCES N MOORE GARY T MOORE JAMES W MOORE LIN G MOORE MARGIE M MOORE PANSY L MOORE PETER C MOORE CLEAR CO MOOREHEAD DAVID M MOORMAN JEANNETTE M MORALES GEORGE MORALES L M MORAN DENNIS B MORAN PAUL D MORE JOHN H MOREHOUSE MARION R MORELLI SUE A MORELLI-WIDMARK MORFIN RICHARD F MORGAN BEVERLY MORGAN CARL E MORGAN HAROLD R MORGAN MICHAEL G MORGAN RAPP MORGAN RUSSELL G MORGAN TERESA A MORISETTE SETH MORRIS ARCHIE J MORRIS EVERETT R MORRIS GARY W MORRIS KYLE MORRIS LYDIA C MORRIS RICHARD K MORRIS ROBERT L MORRIS B MORRISON GERALD L MORRISON HARRY A MORRISON ROBERT N MORRISON WAYLAND E MORTGAGE BANCORPORATION MORTON PETER F MOSAR ROBERT A MOSCHETTI RON MOSES ROBERT L MOSS SUSAN MOUSER OLEN J MOWLDS JD OLDS KEN C MRS ESTATE MUD SPRINGS RANCHES MUHLEMAN JENNIFER L MUHLHAUSER CONRAD C MUIR DIANE L MULE SHOE CATTLE CO MULLARD PHILLIP G MULLENS MICHAEL L MULLINS RICHARD D MUMFORD DWIGHT C MUMMERT A EUGENE MUNK DANA A MUNKERS HAZEL J MUNSON W E MURDERS D W MURDERS RONALD L MURDOCH THOMAS L MURPHY AL MURPHY FATHER J MURPHY LOIS L MURRAY ARTHUR E MURRAY JOHN R MUTCH AMANDA MUZGAY PERRY MUZZEY FRANK D MYERS MONTE K NAGEL JOHN E NAGEL JOHN K NASON D SCOTT NASON DENNIS R NATION R CLARK NAUMANN DAVID R NAYLOR JASON NAYLOR ROBERT M NEAL ELIZABETH C NEET DARRELL D NEFF KENT E NELSON A TED NELSON ELWIN W NELSON HARRY NELSON ROBERT D NELSON WALTER J ESTATE NESBIT FRANK M ESTATE OF NESS STEVEN A NEUGARD JON W NEUMEISTER VERA NEWCOMB WILLIAM D NEWMAN JIMMIE F NEWTON MARVIN M NEWTON THEODORE E NICHLOS ERNEST H NICHOLAS NORMAN H NICHOLS BETTY J NICHOLSON SCOTT L NICKERSON GARY NICOLAI THEODORE NIENDORF JOHN E NIERMANN ALVIN H NIESS DAVID R NOAH G KENNETH NOBLE ANGEL NOBLE MARGARET NOBLE MARVIN B NOBLET CAROLINE NOLAN DANIEL D NOLEN EDWARD C NORDBY ROBERT H NORDSTROM RAY A NORMAN JIM B NORMAN RON P NORTHAM MICHAEL B NORTHWEST DREAM HOMES NOW & THEN SHOP NUGENT ROY C O’BRIEN JOHN OAK K R OAR KATE A OBRIEN PATRICK F OBRIEN ROBERT M OCHOCO TELECASTERS INC OCONNELL MICHAEL ODLE RICHARD V OFFICER JIM OFFIELD DONALD F OHOLLAREN JOHN ESTATE OF OHIO KNIFE CO OLDHAM ALLEN P OLEARY CLARENCE OLEMAN DELMER L OLIVER MARY L OLIVER PATRICK J OLIVIER STEVE R OLMSTED VERNON OLSEN DAVID S OLSON CHEVRON OLSON CRAIG R OLSON DARIS G OLSON GLENN L OLSON HARVEY J OLSON JAMES A OLSON PATRICK K OMNI RESOURCES OMOHUNDRO PAUL H ONEAL JULIE R ONEEL WESLEY G ONEIL LESTER H ONEIL RICHARD D OPIE HAZEL OPOKA KAROL

OREGON RECOVERY-OXFORD HOUSES OREGON SUN RANCH INC ORRELL SARAH S ORTLOFF ROD ORZECHOWSKI MELINDA OSBORNE BILL R OSKO GEORGE E OSTROM SCOTT W OSUNA KAREN M OTTERSON MELVIN P OUELLETTE NORRIS H OVERBAY RON I OVERBY H E OVERHOLSER DENYS D OWEN GENE OWEN RACING SHELLS OWENS JOHN OWENS NEIL D OWINGS LEONARD V OWINGS PATRICK OWNBEY BILL PACHECO MARK PACIFIC 1ST FEDERAL PADGET RAYMOND E PADGETT ALLEN J PAGE ALICE L PALFY STEVE P PALMER DAVID PALMER JUDY D PALMER MICHAEL R PALMER VERNON W PANG DAVID T PANNER OWEN PARK JESSE L PARK RONALD A PARK MOTEL PARKER ED J PARKER GARY W PARKER GEORGE A PARKER RON PARKEY WANDA M PARKS GARY A PARRY JAMES W PARSONS MARK D PARTCH JEROME E PARTNEY G L PASCHALL GARY W PASCHALL SAMUEL PASCHALL W ELOISE PATERA LYNNE M PATT OLNEY PATT RALPH O PATTENAUDE MARVIN M PATTERSON CURTIS M PATTERSON EMMITT C PATTERSON HEATHER C PATTERSON SUE PATTON JAMES A PATTON LOWELL E PAULSON DONALD M PAULSON SALLY L PAULSON ENTERPRISES INC PAULY RANCH PAYNE MARTHA K PAYNE WILMA L PEALATERE RALPH PEARSON CATHY L PEASE GILBERT C PEASE MARK W PEASLEY ROBERT N PEDERSEN RAY PEIFFER JANET A PELKEY FRED A PELTON RIDGE ROCK & LAND PENA LEN A PENCE LORETTA J PENDERGRAFT GENUIA M PENNEY ARTHUR W PENNINGTON DANIEL C PEREZ PAULO PERIN LARRY A PERKINS BONNIE PERKINS VONDA PERRY CHARLES L PETE WILSON REALTY PETERS EDWARD A PETERS RANDY W PETERS RICHARD K PETERSEN LAWRENCE W PETERSEN MICHAEL S PETERSEN RICHARD L PETERSEN WALTER F PETERSON DEE ANN PETERSON JACK B PETERSON PAUL D PETERSON RICK A PETERSON ROLF R PETERSON THELMA PETFORD CHRIS PETRIE TOM PETROZZI DANIEL P PETTET J D PETTET JOSEPH D PFAFF HENRY V PFAFMAN JIM PFEFFER EDITH PHEIFER KATHLEEN R PHILLIBER WILLIAM R PHILLIPS BEVERLY PHILLIPS CHARLES E PHILLIPS DIAN L PHILLIPS GEORGE J PHILLIPS LLOYD PHILLIPS ROGER C PHILLIPS RON PHILLIPS THOMAS J PICKARD BOB N PICKETT BARBARA H PICKETT JAMES F PIEPER DEAN M PIEPER ROBERT L PIERATT BROS PIERCE GARY PIERCE JOHN S PIERCE PAUL PILLION PAT PINA DAVID A PIONEER INDUSTRIES PIPER WILLIAM D PITTS CARROLL E PITTS LAWRENCE D PLATT PATTY A POBANZ DONALD E POINDEXTER JEFF T POLLY LOIS C POMEROY TOM POND ALEX PONGRACZ MATYAS PONTIUS JUANITA L PONTON KENNETH F POOLE ALBERT R POOLE CAROL POOLE FLORENCE E POOLE STANLEY D POPE C EVERETT POPPLEWELL GARY L PORTER DOUGLAS D PORTER JESSICA PORTER LARRY R PORTER WILLIAM W PORTILLO JUANA D PORTUS DIANA L POTTER FRANK POTTS RICHARD POVEY HAROLD B POWELL JAMES W POWELL LEONARD POWELL MARVIN R POWELL MELISSA T POWELL RICHARD D POWERS MICHAEL W POWERS MICHAEL J POWERS ROY PRATZ WARREN W PRENTICE BRUCE G PRICE HAROLD R PRICE JOHN E PRICE PEGGY PRICE RHODA S PRICE WESLEY B PRIGMORE WANDA PRINEVILLE HIGHLANDS LTD PRINZING TRAVIS PROCTOR MARYSE L PROSSER DAVID E PROUGH WILLIAM W PROUTY JOHN E PROVINCE E C PRUNER JAMES C PUCKETT DONALD PULIDO MIGUEL PURA VERNON A PURCELL GREGORY PURCELL PETER J PURVINE BEATRICE M PURVIS DAN PUSHEE VIRL E PYLE JAMES A QUEARY LOUIS B QUILLIN CHARLES QUINCY JAMES E QUINN JOE J R AND T TRUCKING R D B ENTERPRISES INC RABY MARGARET L RACELY ANDREW V RADER O CARL RADIO STATION KPRB RAEBURN TOM J RAHMN GERALD RAINBOW COIN-OP LAUNDRY RAINES GENE M RAINEY JOHN RAMBERG CAROL A RAMEY JOAN L RAMIREZ ALEXIS A RAMOSS SHASTA RAMSEY ALBERT L RAMSEY LLOYD F RANCH HOUSE DELI RANKIN ERNEST L RANKIN JOHN A RANTSCHLER JOHN F RANYARD BONNIE R RAPUE KARON Y RAU GEORGE A RAUBERTUS STANLEY RAWLINS GARY RAWLINS GERALD S RAWLINSON RONALD F RAYBURN WILLIAM S RAYGOR FRANCIS W RAYMOND FREDRICK H RAYNIS EDGAR A READ KATHLEEN M RECTOR AUDREY REDDING DALE R REED DEE L REED JOSEPHINE K REED RONALD REED WILLIAM M REESE RUTH ANN REETZ WAYNE P REEVE FARIL


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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE PREMIER WEST BANK, an Oregon banking institution, Plaintiff, v. STEPHEN TRONO, STEPHEN J. ROMANIA, and THE TRONO GROUP, LLC, an Oregon Limited Liability Company, TRONO DEVELOPMENT, INC., an Oregon corporation, RIVER BEND MASTER OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., an Oregon domestic non-profit corporation, FREEHOLD CAPITAL PARTNERS, LLC, a foreign limited liability company, FREEHOLD LICENSING, LTD, a Texas limited partnership, FCP REALTY INTERESTS II, LLC, a Nevada limited liability company, PETER M. THOMAS, MCINTOSH ENTERPRISES, INC., a Florida corporation, HARRY G. "SKIP" SMITH, an individual, and LAYNE ALLEN I, LLC, a California limited liability company, Defendants.

LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Greg A. Hickman and Janice M Hickman, Grantor(s), to Nancy L. Peterson trustee, in favor Green Tree Servicing LLC, f/k/a Green Tree Financial Servicing Corporation, as beneficiary, recorded 07/16/1998, as beneficiary, recorded 07/16/1998, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. Book 503, Page 0516, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 140682; Lot 2, Block 9, Forest View, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 52887 Shady Lane, La Pine, OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $915.39 beginning on Jan, 2011; plus late charges of $15.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/ premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $131670.90 together with interest thereon at the rate of .61% per annum from Jan, 2011 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 09/09/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s and attorney’s fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under

LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BEND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON FEES A public hearing on proposed fee changes for the City of Bend, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, will be held in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend. The proposed fee changes will be effective July 1, 2011. The hearing will take place on the 27th day of June, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. The purpose of the hearing is to discuss the proposed fee changes with interested persons. Copies of the proposed fee changes are available for review at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, during normal business hours. LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BEND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM A public meeting of the City Council of the City of Bend, Deschutes County, State of Oregon will be held on June 27, 2011, at 5:00 pm, at City Council Chambers, City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend. The purpose of this meeting will be to hold a public hearing to hear and receive comments on the City’s Capital Improvement Program (CIP). Copies of the CIP are available for review at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, during normal business hours. LEGAL NOTICE CITY OF BEND NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON STATE SHARED REVENUES A public meeting of the City Council of the City of Bend, Deschutes County, State of Oregon will be held on June 27, 2011, at 5:00 pm, at City Council Chambers, City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend. The purpose of this meeting will be to hold a public hearing to hear and receive proposed uses of state shared revenue funds for the 2011-12 fiscal year. This is the second of two public hearings required for the City to be eligible to receive state shared revenues in the upcoming year. The first hearing for “possible uses” of state shared revenues was held before the Budget Committee on May 4, 2011. LEGAL NOTICE DESCHUTES COUNTY ROAD DEPARTMENT BEND, OREGON INVITATION TO BID 2011 FOR THE MANUFACTURE AND DELIVERY OF ONE (1) NEW AND UNUSED CURRENT MODEL LOADER MOUNTED SNOW BLOWER Sealed bids will be received at the Deschutes County Road Department, 61150 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, until but not after, 2:00 p.m. on June 28, 2011 at which time all bids for the above-entitled public works project will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed work consists of the following: The Manufacture and Delivery Of One (1) New and Unused Current Model, Loader Mounted Snow Blower. Specifications and other bid documents may be inspected and obtained at the Deschutes County Road Department, 61150 S.E. 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702 or the Deschutes County website, www.deschutes.org. Inquiries pertaining to these specifications shall be directed to Randy McCulley, Equipment Manager, tele-

phone (541) 604-6917. IMPORTANT: Prospective bidders downloading/accessing website-posted project specifications and other bid documents MUST complete and submit the Contact Information Form provided on the website, or contact the Road Department by telephone at (541) 388-6581, to provide contact information, to receive follow-up documents (addenda, clarifications, etc). Failure to provide contact information to the Road Department will result in proposer disqualification. Only those requesting project specifications directly from the Road Department and those notifying the Road Department website access to the project specifications will receive follow-up documents (addenda, clarifications, etc). Bids shall be made on the forms furnished by the County, incorporating all contract documents, addressed and mailed or delivered to Tom Blust, Department Director, 61150 SE 27th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702 in a sealed envelope plainly marked "BID FOR ONE (1) NEW AND UNUSED LOADER MOUNTED SNOW BLOWER" and the name and address of the bidder. No bid will be received or considered by Deschutes County unless the bid contains a statement by the bidder that the provisions of ORS 279C.840 are to be complied with. Each bid must contain a statement as to whether the bidder is a resident bidder, as defined in ORS 279A.120 (1) (b). Oregon law requires the contract be awarded to the lowest responsive bidder who provides recycled materials instead of non-recycled materials pursuant to ORS 279A.125. The award of the contract and purchase of this equipment unit is subject to approval of the 2011/2012 Fiscal Year Budget by the Deschutes County Board of Commissioners. Subject to budget approval, the contract will be awarded no earlier than July 1, 2011 and at a regularly scheduled meeting of the Board of County Commissioners. Deschutes County may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding of Deschutes County it is in the public interest to do so. The protest period for this procurement is seven (7) calendar days. TOM BLUST Department Director PUBLISHED: DAILY JOURNAL OF COMMERCE: June 15, 2011 & June 22, 2011 THE BEND BULLETIN: June 15, 2011 & June 22, 2011

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Case No.: 10CV0235SF Notice is hereby given that I will on July 14, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 721 SW Industrial Way, Bend, Oregon 97702, to wit, Lot Two (2) in Block Two (2) of Mill "A" Area of Shevlin Center Second Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County Oregon. Said sale is made under an Amended Writ of Execution in Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated May 25, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Premier West Bank as plaintiff, recovered Limited General Judgment on February 24, 2011, against The Trono Group, LLC as defendant. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Jinnie L. Willard, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: June 8, 2011; June 15, 2011; June 22, 2011 Date of Last Publication June 29, 2011 Attorney: Joseph E. Kellerman, OSB #92199 Hornecker, Cowling, Hassen & Heysell, LLP 717 Murphy Road Medford, OR 97504 (541) 779-8900 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale.

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the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. DATED: april 29, 2011 By Katrina E. Glogowski, Glogowski Law Firm, PLLC, 2505 Third Ave Ste 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Emily P. Meeks and Jimmy Meeks, Grantor(s), to First American Title Insurance Company of Oregon trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 10/02/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-53284, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11821, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 190576; Lot 19 in Block 74 of Bend Park, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon; Commonly known as 396 SE Dell Lane, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1000.38 beginning on Dec., 2010; plus late charges of $0.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $218019.17 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.88% per annum from Dec., 2010 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is

hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 7/22/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s and attorney’s fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: March 14, 2011 by: /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Paul D. Strausbaugh and Elizabeth Strausbaugh, Grantor(s), to National City Bank trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, a division of National City Bank, as beneficiary, recorded 1/22/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-03840, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 22, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11440, and Glogowski Law Firm, PLLC being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 185706; Lot 24 of WINDANCE ESTATES PHASE II, Deschutes County, Oregon, excepting therefrom - See Exhibit A; Commonly known as 155 SE Windance Court, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and

notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1408.62 beginning on Feb, 2011; plus late charges of $224.79; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum f $242092.72 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75% per annum from Feb, 2011 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 09/26/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s and attorney’s fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for

any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. DATED: May 24, 2011 By /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski Glogowski Law Firm, PLLC 2505 Third Ave Ste 100 Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Guy H. Walter and Belinda A. Walter, Grantor(s), to Amerititle trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage, as beneficiary, recorded 3/23/2007, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. 2007-17207, which was subsequently assigned to Green Tree Servicing, LLC on March 23, 2010 under Instrument No. 2010-11764, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 111460; Lot Fourteen (14), Block V, excepting a portion thereof, and a portion of Lot - See Exhibit A; Commonly known as 19205 Choctaw Rd., Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $1196.06 beginning on Jan, 2011; plus late charges of $239.20; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $145089.09 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from Jan, 2011 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorneys' fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if applicable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 08/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the

beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: April 4, 2011 by: Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Geoffrey W. Hays and Kellene S. Hays, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 1, 2006, recorded April 10, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 24425, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Six in Block Four of Crestridge Estates, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 7145 N.W. Poplar Drive, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,417.35, from September 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $2,536.23, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $2,418.92, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $417,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.025% per annum from August 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid

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REID JERRY REID OPAL K REIGLES JOHN L REILL NORA M REISWIG CAROL D REISWIG DONN A RENCHER FRANK L RENFROW DEAN L RENKEN GLEN P RESCH ALISSA L RESPINI D RACHAEL REX JOHN M REYES FRED R REYNOLDS ANN L REYNOLDS GEORGE REYNOLDS GERALD REYNOLDS JERRY REYNOLDS LOIS REYNOLDS MIKE D REYNOLDS ONITA M REYNOLDS RICHARD S RHEINHOLDT MARVIN RHODEN JACK E RHODES LISA L RIBERA FRANK J RICE J E RICE RICHARD A RICE TOM A RICHARDS BERTHA J RICHARDS HAROLD C RICHARDSON CLYDE R RICHARDSON PATRICIA M RICHARDSON RICHARD L RICHARDSON WILMA RICKETTS HARRIET RICKMAN STEVE RICO ALBERT RIDDLEMOSER M C RIGGINS FLOYD F RIGNEY R LEE RILEY ERROLL F RILEY MAX E RING DON L RIPS RESTR & LOUNGE RIQUELME ENRIQUE RISTAU WARD W RITCHEY MARTIN S RITCHIE GARRY D RIVERS BEN L ROACH B ANNE ROBB BETTY J ROBBINS LAURA D ROBERT RHEN CONST ROBERTS BURTON W ROBERTS DAWN D ROBERTS KEITH R ROBERTS MICHAEL E ROBERTS PHILLIP F ROBERTS RON B ROBERTS RUSSELL C ROBERTS STEVEN SU M ROBERTS THOMAS E ROBERTS TIM P ROBERTSON CAROLYN T ROBERTSON ROSIE L ROBINS DON ROBINSON PAMELA R ROBINSON RITA ROBINSON WARREN A ROBSON JAMES H ROBY DONALD E RODGER RONALD J RODGERS NEIL H RODGERS RALPH R RODRIGUEZ BERNIDET RODRIGUEZ JOSE F ROELKE JOHN D ROGERS DOUGLAS L ROGERS KIM M

ROGERS LELAND T ROGERS R L ROGERS TIMOTHY J ROGERSON RONALD G ROJAS MARIO ROMBOUGH RUSS C ROMERO VIRGIL D ROMMEL DONNA F RONCERAY MAURICE ROOD LEO C ROOT DANIEL A ROSE DOROTHY A ROSE JAMES R ROSE MICHAEL L ROSE ROBERT A ROSENSTIEL DENNIS R ROSENSTIEL ELTON A ROSENTHAL JOHN C ROSES DELMAR R ROSS GEORGE W ROSS MIKE R ROST CARY M ROWAT GORDON A ROWLAND ROBERT W ROY F C ROYDON O M ROYSE TIMOTHY A RRSS CORP RUDD JOSEPH H RUDDELL BILL E RUFKAHR ROSEMAE B RUIS SHARON L RUMLEY S DAVE RUNDELL RON A RUPE BETTY L RUSH ROBB C RUSHING CHARLES R RUTHERFORD ROBERT C RUTLEDGE JIMMY RYCHARD DEBORAH K RYSDAM FRANCIS E S & B FARMS WEST S T B RETREAT CO SACKINGER GEORGE P SADDLER GEORGE D SAILORS TAMMY S SAMPAULESI PAUL J SAMPLE DOUGLAS SAMPLE JOHN A SAMPLES DENNY L SAMUEL STEVE SANCHEZ DAVID N SANDEEN KRISTOPHER SANDER C V SANDERCOCK GARY SANDILANDS JOHN R SANVILLE DAVID K SAUL IVAR SAUNDERS CAROLYN E SCANNELL LEONARD W SCARBOROUGH ROGER D SCHABLE DANA S SCHAFFNER PATRICK J SCHALKA KARL A SCHARN TIM E SCHECHTEL DAVID H SCHIRM RONALD L SCHLANGEN NANCY P SCHMELZ STANLEY C SCHMID SCOTT SCHMIDT VINCENT SCHMITH D H SCHMITT PETE J SCHNEIBEL RICHARD R SCHNEIDER HARVEY P SCHNITZLER RICHARD P SCHRADER LAURENCE G SCHRADER WILLIAM F SCHROEDER MERLE W

SCHULTZ JAMES L SCHULTZE GERALD W SCHUTZ VICTORIA D SCHWIEGER GEORGE B SCOFIELD ART E SCOTT AUBREY W SCOTT CHERYL A SCOTT DONALD V SCOTT DUANE SCOTT JACK R SCOTT JIM J SCOTT SUSAN E SCRUGGS JAMES V SEBER PATRICK R SEDBERRY JOHN W SEE KEITH M SEGALL ELLIOT SEKAVEC LELLIE C SELINSKI LARRY SELLERS JANA L SEPENUK NORMAN SERAFIN NADINE SETHER VALERIE SEVEN STAR RANCH SEVERSON DINA M SEVERY LAWRENCE D SEXTON JIM E SEXTON LEONARD E SHAFFER GENE E SHAFFER ROBERT D SHANK CATHY A SHANK JILLIAN SHAPIRO STEVEN D SHARER ROY H SHAW MAXINE SHAW SAMUEL B SHAW TED T SHEA THOMAS A SHEARER DAVE H SHEARER LINDA S SHEETS WANDA E SHELDEN THOMAS M SHELDON DAWN M SHELDON EVERETT R SHELDON ROSALIE A SHELTON TROY S SHENK CATHERINE A SHEPEARD ZOLA L SHEPHARD STAN SHEPHERD ANNE C SHEPPARD JOHN R SHERMAN OTTO E SHERRY M HARGER SHETLER MELVIN C SHIELDS CATHERINE SHIELDS JERALD C SHIELDS JOHN A SHIRKEY WANDA SHIRLEY STEVEN C SHOLES ELDORA E SHORT ALBERN L SHORT JAMES F SHROY MAUDE SHUM SARA J SHURTLEFF JOY G SIEG JENNIFER SIFERS GLINDA F SILER ORVILLE P SILER S CRAIG SIMMONS DON C SIMMONS GLENN C SIMMONS RANDY SIMMONS ROBERT J SIMON BEN N SIMONIS CAROLINE A SIMONSEN KATHLEEN M SIMONSON GEORGE SIMPSON EARL T SIMS JOHN M

SINCLAIR RANDAL E SISK IVAN P SISTERS CABLE TV SISTERS CABNT & WDWK INC SISTERS ESCROW BEND TITLE SISTERS FEED & GARDEN SPL SISTERS GEN STORE SISTERS LAND ASSOC SISTERS OFFICE SUPPLY SISTERS TEXACO SIVERS EMMA J SKAAR DENNIS SKAAR DENNY SKEEL LAUREN D SKEEN VEVA E SKEES ERNEST C SKEIE OWEN B SKELTON KEITH D SKERRETT DANIEL H SLACK MARLENE K SLOAN DONALD N SLOAN HAROLD L SMITH AGNES C SMITH ALAN R SMITH BARBARA A SMITH BENJAMIN R SMITH CECIL D SMITH CHARLES R SMITH DEL SMITH DENNIS A SMITH DON W SMITH DONALD R SMITH DOROTHY C SMITH DOUGLAS C SMITH DOUGLAS N SMITH E R SMITH ERICA SMITH GARY SMITH GREGORY L SMITH JAMES B SMITH JANICE K SMITH JERRY M SMITH JOEL G SMITH JOHN B SMITH JOHN E SMITH JOHN D SMITH LARRY E SMITH LAWRENCE D SMITH LINDA M SMITH MARGARET D SMITH MARIAN R SMITH MARLIN M SMITH MICHAEL D SMITH PIPER K SMITH RANDALL L SMITH RICHARD F SMITH RICHARD D SMITH ROGER M SMITH SHAWNA SMITH TIFFANY SMITH VICTOR W SMITH W D SMITH WILBUR J SMITH WILLIAM C SMITH CHRISTOPHER M SMITHWICK LOIS SNYDER DENISE M SOARD LES L SODERBERG JOE SOLBERG DAVID A SOLOMON JOSEPH C SOMMER DAVID E SORENSEN DONALD J SORENSON TED SOSA SAM S SOTO GENE SPARKMAN RAY J SPARKS WILLIAM F

SPATZ WILLIAM R SPEAKMAN DARREL E SPEAKMAN JANIENE SPECK GEORGIA R SPEEDLING JAMES M SPEER & SONS NURSERY INC SPELBRINK MARCIA L SPENCER CHESTER F SPENCER DEAN H SPENCER PATRICIA L SPIES EDWARD R SPIES HILDE L SPIRES EARL SPITTLER LAURA L SPITTLES TERESA S SPOHN WILLIAM J SPRAGUE GEORGE C SPRENGER TOM SPRINGATE KATHLEEN M SPRINGER DAN SPRINGER JEFFREY M STANARD JAMES R STANDLEY BRYAN L STANDLEY ETAL C STANTON MARJORIE P STARK JACK B STARR CLAUDIA S STARR JERRY L STATON ROBERT W STAUDINGER EARL G STEEGE ELMER H STEELE EVELYN STEEVENS B L STEFFEY ROLAND STENKAMP DIANE M STEPETIN MIKE L STEPHENS LARRY W STEPHENS LESTER P STEPHENS MIKE STEPHENSON BOB L STERKOWICZ MIKE STEVENS WANDA A STEWARD LEE H STEWARD STEVEN L STEWART DAVID D STEWART ROBERT D STEWART ROBERT R STEWART ROGER STEWART URBA H STILLSON JAMES E STOLIAR RON STOLL MANUEL STONE MITCHELL D STONER CLAIRE W STORMER ROBERT W STORRAR DARRYL E STORRS A H STOUTENBURG PAUL C STRAHM JOSEPH F STRATTON WILLIAM D STRAW JENIFER M STREADWICK ROBERT L STREBINGER JOHN STREDWICK BARBARA J STRIDE JON P STRINGFELLOW MICHAEL J STROBEHN CLIFFORD M STROMME ERNEST H STRONEGGER MABEL L STRONEGGER RICHARD J STRONG CARL W STROUD WARD J STROUP CAROL N STROUSE MICHAEL S SUA TRAN V SUGLIAN MICHAEL J SUITER JERRY W SULKOSKY ORTHOPEDIC CLINIC

SULLIVAN J KEVIN SULLIVAN JAMES P SULLIVAN JEFF M SULLIVAN JOHN T SULLIVAN PHILLIP M SULLIVAN SIMMONS SUSAN E SUMMERFIELD LYLE SUMMERS JOHNNIE M SUMNER JERRY O SUNBURST HOMES SUNCRAFT MOLDINGS INC SUNDANCE LND & LVSTCK SUNDAY DARWIN SUNDSETH BRUCE R SUNDSETH MARTHA SURGEON MARY KAY SUTTON CLAYTON C SUTTON VAN L SVOBODA CLEO SWANK HERBERT F SWANSON CINDY R SWANSON D SWANSON DALLEEN J SWANSON DAN A SWANSON JOHN S SWANSON LUELLEN I SWARTZ ELMER C SWEARINGEN DAN D SWEENY GORDON F SWENSON OSCAR L SYTSMA GARY J TABER RON F TACKMAN WM H ESTATE TANNER GERALD E TARANOFF ANNABELLE E TATUM HOWARD L TAYLOR ALFRED B TAYLOR DAVID TAYLOR FOREST G TAYLOR L A TAYLOR NAOMI J TAYLOR PAULINE G TAYLOR ROSS H TAYLOR WAYNE L TEEL TANA TEENY DEBRA J TELFER CHRISTINE TEMPLE TAMARA L TENNANT MARGARET C TERREL KATIE TERRILL GEORGE A TERRITO C J TERRY FRANK A TERZIAN STEPHEN TESDALE THOR TEWALT GENE R THE HUB RESTAURANT THE PINE CONE THIEDE DICK D THIEMAN NELLIE B THOMAS BRIAN THOMAS DEBI L THOMAS GIL THOMAS GUY O THOMMEN RONALD L THOMMEN TRAVIS A THOMPSON DONALD THOMPSON F DAVID THOMPSON JIM THOMPSON JOSEPH THOMPSON LARRY L THOMPSON MIKE C THOMPSON RON L THOMPSON STANLEY A THOMPSON TOMMY THORN STAN A THORNE RICHARD M THORNTON G E THORPE JAMES R

THREE CRICKS INV THRIFTY FOOD CENTER TIEKAMP PATRICK J TIERNEY ANNETTE TIERNEY ROBERT B TIFFANY MARSHA J TILSON ROBERT J TIMOTHY CALVIN R TINGLEY WILLIAM A TIPTON DONALD E TIPTON LARRY M TODD JASON A TOMLINSON W H TOMORUG EUGENE P TOMPKINS JON D TOMPSETT HOGAN MANUF CO TONEY MEGAN M TORKELSON EDITH TOWNES ROBERT W TOWNSEND TREVOR D TOWRY TRACY A TRANS AMERICA RELOCATION TRATTNER ROSE A TRAUTLOFF ALICE TRIATOMIC INDUSTRIES TRIMBLE DORIS TRIPLE L RANCH TRIPP DENNIS F TRUEDSON VERNAL A TRUJILLO MARK W TUCKFIELD GLADYS TURLEY G J TURNER AMANDA M TURNER DELBERT R TURNER GRANT E TURNER JOEL R TURNER LISA S TURNER RANDY L TUTTLE GEORGE R TWEEDY ROBERT G TWELKER PAUL A TWIGGER MICHELLE R TYLER EFFIE M U S FORT KID U S NATL BANK KNIGHT U-LOCK-IT STORAGE UELAND ROBERT L UFFELMAN STEPHEN P UHL BILL R UMBACK SARA UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHRCH UNITED SAVINGS BANK UNITED TELE CO OF THE NW UNIVERSAL FOREST PROD INC UTERHARDT LUBY VAN ESS GRANGER VAN GINKLE GARRITT VAN HOUTEN JAMES VAN RELCO CO INC VAN VLEET GEORGE VANDERVORSTE MARY M VANDERVORSTE ARTHUR ESTATE VANDERVORT STEWART W VANDEVER TERRY V VANVEEN JANEY E VANWINKLE ROBERT W VANZYL ROGER A VARNON JACK VARNUM KATHERINE L VASQUEZ JOB TORRES VAUGHN HAZEL M VAUGHT ANDREW J VENN STEVEN A VENO CATHERINE C VICKERS WILLIAM V

VICTOR KEITH L VILES JOHN W VINEYARD TODD O VINSON JAMES A VINTAGE HOMES VIRGEN RAUL VIRTUE MAGAZINE VOGT JACK N VOLLUM PATRICIA L VOLPERT JOAN VON OSTEN JAMES VON WOGLOM WESLEY VOOS SUSAN I VORPAHL VERA VRANIZAN JAMES M WADDELL STEPHEN A WAGENER SID J WAGER BRIAN K WAGGONER PAUL R WAGNER JOHN F WAGNER WILL W WAHAUS D E WAINIO DENNIS A WAITZ BUD WALDEN JAMES L WALDOW LEONA WALDRAM DAVID W WALDRON DAVID E WALKER BILL R WALKER CHARLES R WALKER HOMER R WALKER STEVEN L WALKER THOMAS A WALL GARY A WALLACE DONITA F WALSTER DON B WALTER N GORSON WALTERS ODIE WALTMAN STACY WALTONEN EVERETT D WANZO CHARLES M WARD ELMER S WARE EVERTON E WARNER CHRISTOPHER WARNER DENNIS W WARNES CELIA B WARREN EDWARD H WARRINGTON ERNEST WARTON GERALD B WASCHGAU J A WASHINGTON MUTUAL BANK WATERS TERI L WATSON CHARLES W WATSON RICHARD G WAY SIGRID J WEASER A R WEAVER THOMAS E WEBB FRED E WEBB STANLEY L WEBBER KENNETH L WEBBER ROBERT D WEBER CHRISTIAN J WEDGE CINDY S WEIGEL DON WEINMANN CAROL WEISBERG JAMES B WEISNER JODI WEISS LARRY R WEISSERT WESLEY R WELCH RONALD E WELLER PATRICK WELLINGTON RICHARD J WELLS GREGORY L WELLS RONALD W WELLS FARGO LAND CO WENDE COLLEEN WEST JOAN A WEST PALOMA D WEST RICHARD C

WESTERN BANK WESTERN STATES DEV CORP WESTFALL JOHN M WESTGATE FREDRICK E WESTMORELAND CALVIN C WESTWOOD PROP WETER O B WHALEN THOMAS F WHALEY SONDRA D WHEELER ROBERT A WHEELER SARAH WHITAKER BARRY G WHITE BYRON D WHITE CLARENCE H WHITE DALTON D WHITE JOSEPH T WHITE MELINDA WHITMIRE DWAYNE WHITMORE SYLVIA L WHITTINGTON JANET E WIBERG TED R WICK LESTER WICKLAND DEVELOPMENT CORP WIEGAND ADELINE C WIESE RICHARD L WIKLUND WALLY WILBER ARNOLD J WILDMAN TAMMY M WILES DONALD R WILES PATTY S WILKERSON VICTOR T WILLIAMS BARBARA J WILLIAMS BESSIE L WILLIAMS CHARLEY L WILLIAMS DONALD L WILLIAMS ELIZABETH F WILLIAMS ELMER F WILLIAMS GARRY A WILLIAMS HELEN WILLIAMS JOHN F WILLIAMS JUANITA G WILLIAMS KEITH WILLIAMS KENAN WILLIAMS LONNIE D WILLIAMS MATT WILLIAMS ROBERT R WILLIAMS TERRY A WILLIAMSON RALPH WILLINGHAM LETHA P WILSON ALVIN P WILSON BARBARA J WILSON BOBBIE WILSON CALLIE M WILSON CHARLES K WILSON CHARLES E WILSON DENNIS D WILSON DOUGLAS H WILSON E E WILSON FRANCES M WILSON FRANK D WILSON HAROLD W WILSON JACQUELIN L WILSON JAMES O WILSON JON T WILSON KAY F WILSON LEONARD H WILSON MARVIN J WILSON MAX B WILSON RICHARD K WILSON STEVE A WILSON VICTOR L WILSON VERA ESTATE OF WING WALTER E WING RANCHES INC WININGER ROBERT A WINKLER MARK F WINNOP ROBERT P WINSLOW JOHN B

WINTERS CHRIS WINTERS RUTH E WINTERSWONSER DONNA R WIRT RUSSELL L WISBECK STEVEN W WISE MURLIN D WISER FRANK & ASSOCIATES WISNER JOHN C WITT GORDON E WITTE ROXANNE K WITTY DALLAS WOERNER JAKE E WOLFE HELEN I WOLFF CLARENCE R WOLFF ROBERT WOMACK TIM J WOOD JAYSON WOOD MARSHA G WOOD ROBERT W WOOLLEY MICHAEL J WORKMAN HAROLD WRIGHT BARBARA WRIGHT CAROL WRIGHT LENA D WRIGHT RICHARD S WRIGHT SUSAN P WRISTON HALTON L WRONA REBECCA WUERFEL TIMOTHY D WYE LOIS B XCALIBER AUTO DESIGNS YAHR VIC R YARBER BEVERLY YATES GINA YEAGER JOHN P YONGE W E YORK BENNIE N YORK DALE G YORK ELVIN E YORK KENNETH A YORK THAD YOST SAM W YOUDE SUE A YOUNG DONALD E YOUNG EDDY K YOUNG KATHLEEN A YOUNG ROBERT F YOUNG ROBERT E YOUNGBERG WAYNE E YUEN YEUNG YUTZIE WALLACE A ZAHL NANCY L ZAKOVIES CJ ZAPF ERNEST ZAVACKI MYRA J ZEIGLER KELLIE A ZIEGLER A JACK ZIKA JAMES W ZIMMERMAN JOE ZIMMERMAN THOMAS W ZINIKER ED ZIRKLE DENNY R ZIRKLE NANCY ESTATE OF ZITEK LA RENA L ZIVNEY DONALD D ZNEROLD R MICHAEL ZODROW HAROLD E ZUBER EDITH M ZUERCHER ELMER L ZURCHER SAMUEL ZURFLU LYLE D ZYBACH JOHN


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 F7

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by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-13-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-103954

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Mark K. Cahalane and Sharon A. Cahalane, as grantor to Western Title, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 23, 2006, recorded August 25, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 58638, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 533, Northwest Crossing, Phase 9 & 10, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2401 N.W. High Lakes Loop, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,917.97, from January 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $3,722.33, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $416,648.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from December 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given hat the undersigned trustee will on August 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes

the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 03/29/2011 By: _/s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105667 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0215859422 T.S. No.: 11-00480-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of July 20, 2009 made by, RICHARD G. COPE AND KIMBERLY A. COPE, as the original grantor, to ROBERT W. KRAFT, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR ACCESS NATIONAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as the original beneficiary, recorded on July 28, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-32057 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 140394 LOT TWENTY-ONE (21), BLOCK TWENTY-SIX (26), TALL PINES FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 15884 BUSHBERRY CT, LA PINE, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $19,880.53 as of June 6, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $322,616.59 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 7, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in

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Legal Notices

the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 8, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4018338 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011, 07/06/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Anthony J. Aceti, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 1, 2005, recorded December 5, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 83384, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Fifty-Six (56), Phase 4, Huntington Meadows Phases 3 and 4, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 16436 Cassidy Court, La Pine, OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $465.45, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $455.65, from January 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee,

their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $96,716.33, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.775% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

later than five days before ceedings: This shall not be $1,856.08, from December 1, By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland the date last set for the sale, construed to be an attempt 2010, together with all costs, KELLY D. SUTHERLAND to have this foreclosure proto collect the outstanding indisbursements, and/or fees Successor Trustee ceeding dismissed and the debtedness or hold you perincurred or paid by the benSHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC trust deed reinstated by sonally liable for the debt. eficiary and/or trustee, their 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N paying to the beneficiary of employees, agents or asVancouver, WA 98662 the entire amount due (other Dated: 05-04-2011 signs. By reason of said dewww.shapiroattorneys.com/wa than such portion of the fault the beneficiary has deTelephone: (360) 260-2253 principal as would not then By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland clared all sums owing on the Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 be due had no default ocKELLY D. SUTHERLAND obligation that the trust deed S&S 10-104639 curred) and by curing any Successor Trustee secures immediately due and other default complained of SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC payable, said sum being the LEGAL NOTICE herein that is capable of be5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N following, to-wit: TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE ing cured by tendering the Vancouver, WA 98662 $134,688.40, together with A default has occurred under performance required under www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa interest thereon at the rate the terms of a trust deed the obligations or trust deed, Telephone: (360) 260-2253 of 5.625% per annum from made by Soni J. Kennedy and in addition to paying said Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 October 1, 2010, together and, Jeff S. Kennedy, as sums or tendering the perS&S 10-105596 with all costs, disbursements, grantor to Western Title formance necessary to cure and/or fees incurred or paid Company, as Trustee, in faLEGAL NOTICE the default, by paying all by the beneficiary and/or vor of Washington Mutual TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE costs and expenses actually trustee, their employees, Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, A default has occurred under incurred in enforcing the obagents or assigns. WHEREdated February 16, 2007, rethe terms of a trust deed ligation and trust deed, toFORE, notice hereby is given corded February 27, 2007, in made by Kenneth D. Purvis gether with trustee's fees and that the undersigned trustee the mortgage records of Desand Mary K. Purvis, as tenattorney's fees not exceedwill on September 8, 2011, at chutes County, Oregon, in ants by the entirety, as ing the amounts provided by the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in Book 2007, at Page 11756, grantor to AmeriTitle, as said ORS 86.753. In conaccord with the standard beneficial interest having Trustee, in favor of Silver struing this notice, the mastime established by ORS been assigned to U.S. Bank Falls Bank, as Beneficiary, culine gender includes the 187.110, at the main enNational Association, as dated October 28, 2004, refeminine and the neuter, the trance of the Deschutes Trustee, successor in intercorded November 5, 2004, in singular includes the plural, County Courthouse, located est to Bank of America, Nathe mortgage records of Desthe word "grantor" includes at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in tional Association as Trustee chutes County, Oregon, in any successor in interest to the City of Bend, County of as successor by merger to Book 2004, at Page 66444, the grantor as well as any Deschutes, State of Oregon, Lasalle Bank, National Assobeneficial interest having other person owing an oblisell at public auction to the ciation as Trustee for WaMu been assigned to EverBank, gation, the performance of highest bidder for cash the Mortgage Pass-Through Ceras covering the following dewhich is secured by said trust interest in the said described tificates Series 2007-OA3 scribed real property: Lot deed, and the words "trustee" real property which the Trust, as covering the folTwo Hundred (200), in Crossand "beneficiary" include grantor has or had power to lowing described real proproads Third Addition, Destheir respective successors in convey at the time of the exerty: Lot 2, OAKVIEW, chutes County, Oregon. interest, if any. Also, please ecution of said trust deed, PHASE VII, Deschutes COMMONLY KNOWN AS: be advised that pursuant to together with any interest County, Oregon. COM14597 Bluegrass Loop, Sisthe terms stated on the Deed which the grantor or his sucMONLY KNOWN AS: 2827 ters, OR 97759. Both the of Trust and Note, the bencessors in interest acquired N.E. Hope Drive, Bend, OR beneficiary and the trustee eficiary is allowed to conafter the execution of said 97701. Both the beneficiary have elected to sell the said duct property inspections trust deed, to satisfy the and the trustee have elected real property to satisfy the while property is in default. foregoing obligations thereby to sell the said real property obligations secured by said This shall serve as notice that secured and the costs and to satisfy the obligations setrust deed and a notice of the beneficiary shall be conexpenses of sale, including a cured by said trust deed and default has been recorded ducting property inspections reasonable charge by the a notice of default has been pursuant to Oregon Revised on the said referenced proptrustee. Notice is further recorded pursuant to Oregon Statutes 86.735(3); the deerty. The Fair Debt Collecgiven to any person named in Revised Statutes 86.735(3); fault for which the foreclotion Practice Act requires ORS 86.753 that the right the default for which the sure is made is grantor's failthat we state the following: exists, at any time that is not foreclosure is made is ure to pay when due the This is an attempt to collect a later than five days before grantor's failure to pay when following sums: Monthly debt, and any information the date last set for the sale, due the following sums: payments in the sum of obtained will be used for that to have this foreclosure proMonthly payments in the sum $863.35, from November 1, purpose. If a discharge has ceeding dismissed and the of $1,489.48, from April 1, 2010, and monthly paybeen obtained by any party trust deed reinstated by 2010, monthly payments in ments in the sum of through bankruptcy propaying to the beneficiary of the sum of $1,475.95, from February 1, 2011, and 1000 1000 1000 monthly payments in the Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices sum of $1,566.61, from April 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or LEGAL NOTICE fees incurred or paid by the TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #. OR-11-418954-NH Reference is made to that certain deed beneficiary and/or trustee, made by, JESSICA M. KNOX , A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of their employees, agents or FIRST FRANKLIN A DIVISION OF NAT. CITY BANK OF IN A NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, as Benefiassigns. By reason of said ciary, dated 8/4/2005, recorded 8/11/2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in default the beneficiary has book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception declared all sums owing on number 2005-52832,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and the obligation that the trust State, to-wit: APN: 189344 LOT SEVENTY-NINE (79), OBSIDIAN ESTATES, NO. 2, CITY OF REDdeed secures immediately MOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3017S W PUMICE AVE REDMOND, due and payable, said sum OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satbeing the following, to-wit: isfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section $305,408.21, together with 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantinterest thereon at the rate ors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 2/1/2010, and all subseof 3.413% per annum from quent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are March 1, 2010, together with due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior all costs, disbursements, liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or and/or fees incurred or paid associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be by the beneficiary and/or paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or trustee, their employees, pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary agents or assigns. WHEREunder the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $746.33 FORE, notice hereby is given Monthly Late Charge $37.32 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligathat the undersigned trustee tions secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, will on September 7, 2011, at to-wit: The sum of $132,680.08 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.7500 per annum the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure accord with the standard costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. time established by ORS Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned 187.110, at the main entrustee will on 9/12/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by sectrance of the Deschutes tion 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. County Courthouse, located BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or the City of Bend, County of had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any Deschutes, State of Oregon, interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust sell at public auction to the deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, inhighest bidder for cash the cluding a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Secinterest in the said described tion 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding disreal property which the missed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due grantor has or had power to (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), toconvey at the time of the exgether with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in ecution of said trust deed, the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at together with any interest any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: which the grantor or his suc714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender cessors in interest acquired includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any after the execution of said successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an trust deed, to satisfy the bligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and foregoing obligations thereby 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this secured and the costs and sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF expenses of sale, including a OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, reasonable charge by the that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as trustee. Notice is further necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and given to any person named in exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall ORS 86.753 that the right have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be Dated: 04-27-2011 exists, at any time that is not entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS 1000 1000 1000 The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices 9/12/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if LEGAL NOTICE you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. ADVERTISEMENT FOR SUBCONTRACTOR/SUPPLIER BIDS The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential 1.01 NOTICE TO BIDDERS tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the The La Pine Park and Recreation District has entered into a Construction Manager/General Conforeclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an tractor contract for the Renovation of the La Pine Event Center located at 16405 First Street, La eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not Pine, Oregon 97739. CS Construction, located at 1506 NE 1st Street, Unit 1, Bend, Oregon give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the 97701 will be receiving subcontractor bids for the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. following scopes of work: You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF 02200 Sitework (including excavation and concrete) YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A 03300 Cast-in-place Concrete LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE 05500 Metal Fabrications IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE 06100 Rough Carpentry OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE 06402 Interior Architectural Woodwork UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in 07210 Building Insulation writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease 07920 Joint Sealants (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the 08110 Steel Doors and Frames buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give 08360 Sectional Overhead Door (Installation only) you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease 08710 Door Hardware with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW 09250 Gypsum Board DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING 09653 Resilient Wall Base BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY 09910 Painting AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER 10520 Fire Protection Specialties EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES 10801 Toilet and Bath Accessories TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or 15000 Mechanical Division:Plumbing one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to 15000 Mechanical Division:HVAC move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, 15000 Mechanical Division:Fire Sprinkler the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have 16000 Electrical (Complete) a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or Closing deadline for submitting bids: Thursday, July 14, 2011, 2:00 PM, current local time Only week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before written bids will be received prior to the date and time specified. Bids will NOT be opened and requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under read publicly. Bids may be delivered in person or mailed to the CS Construction at the adstate law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that dress listed. Bids will be received via FAX at 541-617-9590. E-mail bids will not be received. you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental Bids received after the time fixed for receiving bids cannot and will not be considered. A preagreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure bid conference and project walk-through will be held on Tuesday, June 28, 2011, 2:00 PM, cursale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not rent local time, at the La Pine Event Center located at 16405 First Street, La Pine, Oregon later than 8/13/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must 97739. The purpose will be to answer any questions bidders may have, review the scope of be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written work, tour the existing facilities, and to consider any suggestions Bidders wish to make. Any rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT statements made by the District's representatives at the conference are not binding upon the YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you District unless confirmed by written addendum. The conference is held for the benefit of bidpaid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your ders. landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent 1.02 BIDDING DOCUMENTS from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you Bidding documents for the work are those prepared by BBT Architects, 1160 SW Simpson Avenue, do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this Suite 100, Bend, Oregon 97702. All plan distribution will be coordinated by Central Oregon property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. Plans, specifications, and to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or addenda for this project may be viewed, printed or ordered on line from Central Oregon Builders individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a Exchange at http://www.plansonfile.com, then click on Public Works Projects then Lapine Park tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that and Recreation District. Bidders are responsible for checking this web site for the issuance of possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a any addenda prior to submitting a bid. Bidders should register with Central Oregon Builders new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after Exchange as a planholder to bid this project. Register at www.plansonfile.com. If you have the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord questions contact Central Oregon Builders Exchange at 541-389-0123, Fax 541-389-1549 or and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible email at admin@plansonfile.com. If the bidder/contractor does not register with the plan for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer center, the bidder/contractor will still be held responsible for all addenda's/changes to the specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL documents and will be considered nonresponsive if their bid does not reflect those THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A addenda/changes. LA PINE EVENT CENTER REMODEL Page 2 of 2 Bidding Documents will LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS be available for examination during the bidding period at the following locations: Central EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST Oregon Builders Exchange, 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon, 97701. CS Construction, 1506 YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE NE 1st Street, Unit 1, Bend, Oregon 97701 BBT Architects, 1160 SW Simpson Avenue, Suite AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR 100, Bend, Oregon 97702 La Pine Park and Recreation District, 16405 First Street, La Pine, DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO Oregon 97730 LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE 1.03 STATE PROVISIONS FOR PREVAILING WAGES INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe No bid will be received or considered unless the Bid contains a statement by the bidder, as part of you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. the bid, that the provisions required by ORS 279C.805 (Workers on Public Works to be paid not Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have less than prevailing rate of wage) are to be complied with. enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal 1.04 REJECTION OF BIDS assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with Pursuant to ORS 279C.395, the La Pine Park & Recreation District may reject any bid not in this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: compliance with all prescribed bidding procedures and requirements and may reject all bids if, www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 5/6/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as in the judgment of the District, it is in the public interest to do so. No bidder may withdraw his trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary bid after the hour set for the opening thereof and before award of the Contract, unless award is Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC delayed beyond thirty (30) days from the bid opening date. 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information:_ Quality Loan 1.05 QUESTIONS AND SUBSTITUTION REQUESTS Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: Bidders questions and interpretation of the drawings and specifications must be received by the 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been CM/GC (CS Construction) at least seven calendar days prior to the date and time set for the released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note receipt of bids in accordance with the instructions to bidders. (July 5, 2011). Substitution holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT requests for products specified must be received by the Architect (BBT Architects) at least seven AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you calendar days prior to the date and time set for the receipt of bids in accordance with are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted specification section 01640. (July 5, 2011). to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3991921 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011, 07/06/2011, 07/13/2011


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the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-06-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106258 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by David I. Epstein, as grantor to First American Title Ins. Co., as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated June 6, 2006, recorded June 15, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 41453, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 13 of Forest Meadow, Phase 1, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 61198 Forest Meadow Place, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,199.50, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $398,400.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.625% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 26, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes

any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-22-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104649

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0155544174 T.S. No.: 11-01221-8 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 18, 2006 made by, DEBRA J. LACHANCE SPICER AND DAVID H. SPICER, as the original grantor, to AMERITITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR GROUP ONE LENDING, A DIVISION OF NORTHWEST MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as the original beneficiary, recorded on August 23, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-57637 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Wells Fargo Asset Securities Corporation, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-18, {the "Beneficiary"). APN: 194639 LOT SIXTEEN (16) OF RIVER'S EDGE VILLAGE, PHASE V, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2841 NW FAIRWAY HEIGHTS DRIVE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $31,343.28 as of May 27, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $432,868.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000% per annum from August 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 3, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of

Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 06/01/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4011927 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Mark Dickens, as grantor to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated April 14, 2006, recorded May 1, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 29739, beneficial interest having been assigned to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association as Trustee as successor by merger to Lasalle Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-AR7 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot Thirty-Six, Block Eight, Highland Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 28 N.W. Allen Road, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $4,096.59, from April 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $4,144.36, from May 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $4,404.31, from June 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $3,985.75, from May 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $4,265.19, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $965,399.71, together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.258% per annum from March 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 1, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-28-2011

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 09-102822 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0191741032 T.S. No.: 10-10689-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of November 24, 2003 made by, AURELIO GARCIA GARCIA, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SEPARATE PROPERTY, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR ACTION MORTGAGE COMPANY, as the original beneficiary, recorded on November 26, 2003, as Instrument No. 2003-81907 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: WELLS FARGO BANK NA, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 111406 LOT ONE HUNDRED FIFTY-NINE (159), BLOCK PP, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1962, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 19074 CHOCTAW RD., BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $12,138.33 as of May 31, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed

of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $116,404.88 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.87500% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust-Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 3, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred}, together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA

92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: June 1, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4011847 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kenneth P. Delunas and Jan E. Delunas, as grantor to U.S. Bank of Washington, N.A., as Trustee, in favor of U.S. Bancorp Mortgage Company, as Beneficiary, dated September 25, 1992, recorded October 13, 1992, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 279, at Page 0243, as Instrument No. 92-33938, beneficial interest having been assigned to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, as covering the following described real property: Homesite No. 154 of Glaze Meadow Homesite Section, Sixth Addition, Black Butte Ranch, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 13967 Hedge Nettle, Black Butte Ranch, OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No. 310454 Trustee No. 40015.638/ATV Successor Trustee: Julie B. Hamilton Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made, executed, and delivered by Julie M. Thibodeau, an unmarried individual, as Grantor, to Fidelity Service Corporation, as Trustee, to secure certain obligations in favor of Action Mortgage Company, a corporation, as Lender, dated January 27, 2005, and recorded on January 31, 2005, under Deschutes County Recording No. 2005-06106. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Oregon Housing and Community Services Department, State of Oregon by assignment of deed of trust recorded on February 16, 2005, under Deschutes County Recording No. 2005-09273. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 9 OF RAILEY'S PLACE, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 240 Southwest 25th Street, Redmond, Oregon 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due, the following sums: 2 Monthly payments of $921.48 due from 11/1/2010 through 12/1/2010: $1,842.96 2 Late charges of $36.00 due on payments past due from 11/1/2010, through 12/1/2010: $72.00 3 Monthly payments of $897.43 due from 1/1/2011, through 3/1/2011: $2,692.29 3 Late charges of $36.00 due on payments past due from 1/1/2011, through 3/1/2011: $108.00 Advances by Lender: Additional Late Charge Balance: $317.53 Property Inspection Fees: $24.00 Sub-Total of Monthly Payments, Late Charges, and Advances in arrears: $24.00 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $121,883.19, AS OF OCTOBER 1, 2010, PLUS, FROM THAT DATE UNTIL PAID, ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST AT THE RATE OF 4.9500% PER ANNUM, PLUS ANY LATE CHARGES, ESCROW ADVANCES, FORECLOSURE COSTS, TRUSTEE’S FEES, ATTORNEYS’ FEES, SUMS REQUIRED FOR PROTECTION OF THE PROPERTY AND ADDITIONAL SUMS SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on August 5, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee’s and attorney’s fees. Notice is also given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to bring a court action to assert the non-existence of a default or any other defense to acceleration and sale. NOTICE TO TENANTS: VIF YOU ARE A TENANT OF THIS PROPERTY, FORECLOSURE COULD AFFECT YOUR RENTAL AGREEMENT. A PURCHASER WHO BUYS THIS PROPERTY AT A FORECLOSURE SALE HAS THE RIGHT TO REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT AFTER GIVING YOU NOTICE OF THE REQUIREMENT. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE, THE PURCHASER MAY REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT AFTER GIVING YOU A 30-DAY NOTICE ON OR AFTER THE DATE OF THE SALE. IF YOU HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE, YOU MAY BE ENTITLED TO RECEIVE AFTER THE DATE OF THE SALE A 60-DAY NOTICE OF THE PURCHASER’S REQUIREMENT THAT YOU MOVE OUT. TO BE ENTITLED TO EITHER A 30-DAY OR 60-DAY NOTICE, YOU MUST GIVE THE TRUSTEE OF THE PROPERTY WRITTEN EVIDENCE OF YOUR RENTAL AGREEMENT AT LEAST 30 DAYS BEFORE THE DATE FIRST SET FOR THE SALE. IF YOU HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE, YOU MUST GIVE THE TRUSTEE A COPY OF THE RENTAL AGREEMENT. IF YOU DO NOT HAVE A FIXED-TERM LEASE AND CANNOT PROVIDE A COPY OF THE RENTAL AGREEMENT, YOU MAY GIVE THE TRUSTEE OTHER WRITTEN EVIDENCE OF THE EXISTENCE OF THE RENTAL AGREEMENT. THE DATE THAT IS 30 DAYS BEFORE THE DATE OF THE SALE IS JULY 6, 2011. THE NAME OF THE TRUSTEE AND THE TRUSTEE’S MAILING ADDRESS ARE LISTED ON THIS NOTICE. FEDERAL LAW MAY GRANT YOU ADDITIONAL RIGHTS, INCLUDING A RIGHT TO A LONGER NOTICE PERIOD. CONSULT A LAWYER FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS UNDER FEDERAL LAW. YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO APPLY YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT AND ANY RENT YOU PREPAID TOWARD YOUR CURRENT OBLIGATION UNDER YOUR RENTAL AGREEMENT. IF YOU WANT TO DO SO, YOU MUST NOTIFY YOUR LANDLORD IN WRITING AND IN ADVANCE THAT YOU INTEND TO DO SO. IF YOU BELIEVE YOU NEED LEGAL ASSISTANCE WITH THIS MATTER, YOU MAY CONTACT THE OREGON STATE BAR AND ASK FOR THE LAWYER REFERRAL SERVICE. CONTACT INFORMATION FOR THE OREGON STATE BAR IS INCLUDED WITH THIS NOTICE. IF YOU HAVE A LOW INCOME AND MEET FEDERAL POVERTY GUIDELINES, YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR FREE LEGAL ASSISTANCE. CONTACT INFORMATION FOR WHERE YOU CAN OBTAIN FREE LEGAL ASSISTANCE IS INCLUDED WITH THIS NOTICE. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. UNLESS YOU NOTIFY US WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING THIS LETTER THAT YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT, OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT IS VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY US, IN WRITING WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS LETTER THAT YOU DO DISPUTE THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION OF IT, WE WILL PROVIDE VERIFICATION BY MAILING YOU A COPY OF THE RECORDS. IF YOU SO REQUEST, IN WRITING, WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIPT OF THIS NOTICE, WE WILL PROVIDE YOU WITH THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. DATED this 24th day of March, 2011. SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE: JULIE B. HAMILTON, Oregon Bar #092650 c/o Hillis Clark Martin & Peterson P.S. 1221 Second Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, Washington 98101-2925 Telephone: (206) 623-1745

following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,796.07, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $108,409.33, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.875% per annum from January 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on September 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and

expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the ben-

eficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 05-13-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 08-101271 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031069206 T.S. No.: 11-02157-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of April 7, 2006 made by, C. DONALD SCHULMERICH, SHEILA R. SCHULMERICH, as the original grantor, to AMERITITLE, as the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as the original beneficiary, recorded on April

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S.#: OR-11-435984-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JENNIFER M. BAILEY, A/K/A JENNIFER BAILEY, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ("MERS"), AS NOMINEE FOR BANK OF THE WEST, as Beneficiary, dated 3/26/2008, recorded 4/23/2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 2008-17783,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 140756 LOT ELEVEN (11), BLOCK FIVE (5), FOREST VIEW, RECORDED JUNE 10, 1971, IN CABINET A, PAGE 364, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 52711 SUNRISE BLVD. LA PINE, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 11/1/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,378.27 Monthly Late Charge $68.91 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $178,378.26 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5000 per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 9/19/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 9/19/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31,2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 8/20/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 5/13/2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee 818 Stewart Street, Suite 800 Seattle, WA 98101 Signature By: u Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information:_ Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3998700 06/01/2011, 06/08/2011, 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 F9

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17, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-26210 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for HarborView Mortgage Loan Trust, Mortgage Loan Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-7, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 20 11 19C0 05500 LOT SIX (6) IN BLOCK SIXTEEN (16) OF OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 17241 GADWALL DR, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $4,611.77 as of June 15, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $170,577.92 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.32500% per annum from January 1, 2011 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on October 18, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187-110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 06/11/2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4024865 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011, 07/06/2011, 07/13/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Barbara A. Hartnett, as grantor to First American Title Insurance Co., as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 17, 2004, recorded September 23, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 57189, beneficial interest having been assigned to Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as Trustee for Wamu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2005-PR1 Trust, as covering the following described real property: LOT 14 OF HOLLIDAY PARK THIRD ADDITION, PHASE 1, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 2586 N.E. Robinson Street, Bend, OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $856.06, from December 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $793.99, from November 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $167,879.01, together with interest thereon

at the rate of 3.232% per annum from November 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

interest thereon at the rate of 5.65% per annum from January 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

Dated: 04-14-2011 Dated: 04-27-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104094 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Kirk D. Kowalke, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 13, 2006, recorded March 15, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 17918, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: See complete Legal Description attached hereto as Exhibit "A". EXHIBIT "A" Lot 61, CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, PHASE 7. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the following described parcel: BEGINNING at the comer common to Lots 61 and 60, CASCADE VIEW ESTATES, Phase 7, and Lot 5, Block 7, SOUTH HEIGHTS ADDITION; thence along the South line of said Lot 61, North 89°39'54" West, 119.00 feet to the Northeast right-of-way of SW Cascade Vista Drive; thence along said right-of-way, North 27°15'23" West, 31.36 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way, North 72°00'11" East 97.01 feet to the line common to said Lots 61 and 60; thence along said common line, South 35°03'42" East, 71.52 feet to the point of beginning. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3848 S.W. 35th Place, Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,600.83, from February 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $340,000.00, together with

By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104638 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Raymond E. Tisdale, an unmarried man and Judith A. Beaumonte, an unmarried woman, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Mid Oregon Federal Credit Union, its successors and/or assigns, as Beneficiary, dated August 15, 1997, recorded August 20, 1997, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 458, at Page 2915, as Instrument No. 97-29719, beneficial interest having been assigned to PHH Mortgage Corporation, as covering the following described real property: Lot Seven (7), Block EEE, Deschutes River Woods, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 60223 Turquoise Road, Bend, OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $286.56, from January 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $32,206.72, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.75% per annum from December 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on August 25, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described

real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually

incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party

through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-22-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106471

NOTICE

OF

PUBLIC NOTICE SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET

ADOPTION

A supplemental budget will be discussed and adopted for the fiscal year July 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 for the City of Redmond, State of Oregon. The meeting will take place on the 28th day of June, 2011, at 7:00 pm at Redmond Council Chambers. The purpose of the meeting is to discuss and adopt the resolution for the supplemental budget. A copy of the supplemental budget may be inspected or obtained on or after June 27th. SUMMARY OF CITY OF REDMOND SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET (all figures reflect total appropriations for each category) Fire Fund: Revenue Amount Federal Grants & Awards $19,866 Ambulance Billings $1,000,000 Fire Med Subscriptions $56,000 Beginning Fund Balance $1,482,051 Revised Total Revenue

Expenditure Personal Services Materials & Services Capital Outlay Contingency Reserve Special Payments Revised Total Expenditure

$7,605,446

Amount $5,008,266 $1,000,450 $31,000 $0 $0 $1,348,297 $7,605,446

As a result of the annexation of Redmond Fire and Rescue to Deschutes County Fire Protection District #1 and in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the City and the District, the ending fund balance of the Fire Fund for FY 2010/11 needs to be paid to the District. It is assumed the final amount will be no greater than $1,348,297. In order to appropriate these funds to the Special Payments category, the Fire Fund’s resources and expenditures have been updated to the latest full year projections for FY 2010/11. Publish: Bend Bulletin on June 22, 2011.

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-109625 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RAYMOND JAY HAYES, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK, INC., DBA AMERICAN MORTGAGE NETWORK OF OREGON, as beneficiary, dated 11/22/2006, recorded 12/4/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-79425, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: THAT PORTION OF THE SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4) OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 14 SOUTH, RANGE 13, EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 S W1/4); THENCE EASTERLY ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4) A DISTANCE OF 800 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS MARKED BY AN IRON ROD; THENCE SOUTHERLY ON A LINE PARALLEL TO AND 800 FEET EAST OF THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION TO THE CENTER LINE OF CENTRAL OREGON IRRIGATION DISTRICT LATERAL C-23 AS NOW LOCATED, WHICH POINT IS THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG SAID LINE PARALLEL TO AND 800 FEET EAST OF THE WEST LINE OF SAID SECTION A DISTANCE OF 360 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT WHICH IS 310 FEET SOUTH OF THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED IRON PIN ON THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4); THENCE EASTERLY 552 FEET, MORE OR LESS, ON A LINE TO A POINT ON THE EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW1/4 SW1/4) OF SAID SECTION WHICH IS 268 FEET SOUTH OF THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (S1/2 SW1/4); THENCE EASTERLY ON THE SAME BEARING AS THE LAST ABOVE DESCRIBED LINE 260 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF NORTHWEST MARKET ROAD AS NOW LOCATED OVER SAID PREMISES; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE 73 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE CENTER LINE OF CENTRAL OREGON IRRIGATION DISTRICT LATERAL C-23; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE CENTER LINE OF SAID C. O. I. D. LATERAL C-23 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Tax Parcel Number: 128563 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3535 NORTHWEST WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 6, 2011 Delinquent Payments from February 01, 2011 5 payments at $1,773.66 each $8,868.30 (02-01-11 through 06-06-11) Late Charges: $443.40 Beneficiary Advances: $22.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $9,333.70 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $248,473.98, PLUS interest thereon at 7.250% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for October 7, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/7/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 6/6/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# FNMA4016351 06/15/2011, 06/22/2011, 06/29/2011, 07/06/2011


F10 Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809


The events

Pacific Crest Preview • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • The Bulletin

Ten events are on the schedule for the 2011 Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival, which will be staged in Sunriver this Friday through Sunday. The weekend’s running and multisport lineup includes events ranging from hourslong endurance races to activities designed for youngsters. Descriptions of each race are listed below.

Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival In Sunriver Friday through Sunday

• Long course triathlon: In a race with distances similar to those in a Half-Ironman triathlon, participants in Pacific Crest’s long course triathlon begin with a 1.2-mile open-water swim at Wickiup Reservoir, followed by a 53-mile point-to-point bike ride on Cascade Lakes Highway and Forest Service roads 45 and 40. The triathlon is completed after a 13.1-mile run on paved paths in Sunriver. This event serves as the TRI NorthWest Long Course Championships.

Swim, bike, run

• Endurance duathlon: Offers the same distances and routes as the long course triathlon, less the swim. • Marathon: This 26.2-mile footrace on wide, paved pathways in Sunriver is a certified Boston Marathon qualifier. • Half marathon: This 13.1-mile footrace on wide, paved pathways in Sunriver is the most popular Pacific Crest event. As of Monday, more than 1,200 runners were registered for the race. • Olympic-distance triathlon: Participants in this three-leg event perform a 1,500-meter open-water swim at Wickiup Reservoir, a 28-mile point-topoint bike ride on Forest Service Road 40, and a 19-kilometer run on paved paths in Sunriver. Of the four multisport events offered at Pacific Crest, the Olympic-distance triathlon draws the biggest field. As of Monday, some 600 triathletes were registered.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile

Competitors run during the Olympic-distance triathlon of the Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival during last year’s event.

More than 5,000 comp etitors are expected to take part in running or multisport races in the 15th annual Pacific Crest

• Olympic-distance duathlon: Offers the same distances and routes as the Olympic-distance triathlon, less the swim. 5K run and walk: A mostly flat 3.1-mile footrace on paved paths in Sunriver.

T

• 10K and 5K:: Mostly flat footraces on paved paths in Sunriver.

• Kids’ Splash Pedal-n-Dash: A timed event for kids ages 12 and younger begins at the Sunriver Community Church and includes a “splash” through three wading pools, followed by a quartermile bike and a quarter-mile run. All participants will receive a finisher’s medal and a T-shirt after crossing the finish line. Entry fee is $25. • Kids’ 1-mile and half-mile dash: Youngsters have two running options from which to choose for this nontimed event, which is staged in the Sunriver Village Mall. Finishers will receive a T-shirt and finisher’s medal. Entry fee is $12. All proceeds from both kids events go to the Three Rivers Cares for Kids Foundation. Bulletin photo illustration / Bulletin ile photos and Thinkstock

The schedule The finish line for all events is located in the Athlete Village in the Sunriver Village Mall off Abbot Drive in Sunriver. All running races begin on Ponderosa Road in Sunriver.

Friday, June 24 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. — Packet pickup and late registration; Sport & Fitness Expo 4 p.m. — Kids’ Splash Pedal-n-Dash, Sunriver Community Church

Saturday, June 25

Sunday, June 26

6 a.m. — Packet pickup and late registration for marathon and half marathon 7:30 a.m. — Marathon begins 8 a.m. — Half marathon begins 9 a.m. — Long course triathlon and endurance duathlon begin at Wickiup Reservoir 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. — Sports & Fitness Expo 9:10 a.m. (approx.) — First halfmarathoner expected to finish 10 a.m. (approx.) — First marathoner expected to finish Noon — Awards ceremony for marathon and half marathon 12:30 p.m. (approx.) — First endurance duathlete expected to finish 12:50 p.m. (approx.) — First long course triathlete expected to finish 1 to 5 p.m. — Packet pickup and late registration for Olympic triathlon and duathlon, 10K, 5K and kids’ runs 4 p.m. — Awards ceremony for long course triathlon and endurance duathlon

7:30 a.m. — Packet pickup and late registration for 5K and 10K runs 8 a.m. — Kids’ 1-mile and 1⁄2 -mile Dash 9 a.m. — 5K run/walk begins 9 a.m. — Olympic-distance triathlon and duathlon begin at Wickiup Reservoir 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. — Sport & Fitness Expo 9:15 a.m. — 10K run/walk begins 10:15 a.m. — Awards ceremony for 5K run 11 a.m. — Awards ceremony for 10K run 11:05 p.m. (approx.) — First Olympic-distance triathletes and duathletes expected to finish 1 p.m. — Awards ceremony for Olympic-distance triathlon and duathlon

Registration information: http://www.racecenter.com/ pacificcrest/register.htm

On the flip side • Turn the page over for a spectators’ guide, maps of the courses, 2010 winners and a look at the weekend weather

he arrival of thousands upon thousands of endurance athletes (and at least a few weekend-warrior types) in Sunriver each June signals that summer has finally arrived in Central Oregon. The 2011 Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival gets under way this Friday and continues through Sunday, and the schedule is packed: four running races, four multisport events, and two races for kids. Despite a dreary winter and spring across the Northwest, turnout for the 15th annual Pacific Crest event does not appear to be taking a hit. Organizers say registration is on par with previous years, and turnout is expected to eclipse 5,000 competitors. As of Monday, more than 1,200 runners had signed up for the half marathon. Of the 10 events offered at Pacific Crest, the half marathon draws the biggest field. While the half marathon attracts the highest numbers, the long course triathlon remains Pacific Crest’s longeststanding and marquee event, whose winners each year are highly regarded for conquering the challenging course. Eugene resident Mackenzie Madison, the reigning Pacific Crest women’s long course champion and course record holder, is considered the favorite to claim the women’s title for a third consecutive year. According to race organizers, Kristi Johnson, an elite triathlete from Arizona, could challenge Madison’s bid for a hat trick. Who will win the 2011 men’s race in the long course triathlon is anyone’s guess. As of Monday, none of the top five finishers from 2010 had entered. That leaves the door wide open for five new faces on the podium. Last year’s men’s champion, Chris Bagg, of Portland, did share with us his pick to win: Phillipe Kozub, a Portland resident and the recent winner of the Auburn (Calif.) Triathlon, a race billed as the “World’s Toughest Half.” According to Bagg, other favorites in the men’s race include Joshua Monda and Justin Samples, both of Vancouver, Wash., and Brady Childs, of Portland. Triathletes in the long course event are competing for a slice of a $5,000 prize purse. The men’s and women’s winners each receive $1,000, and the next four men’s and women’s finishers also earn payouts. Pacific Crest isn’t just for super-endurance athletes like marathon runners and long-distance triathletes. A shorterdistance triathlon and duathlon as well as 5- and 10-kilometer running races are also among the lineup of events. Even youngsters 12 and younger can be part of the racefilled weekend. A multisport event for kids is on tap Friday afternoon, and short-distance running races for kids are slated for Sunday. Pacific Crest race manager Jon Atherton said that time and time again he hears that the region’s scenic beauty — featuring high mountain lakes, snowy peaks, meandering rivers and pine forests — is what draws endurance athletes to the weekend sports festival each year. Said Atherton: “Athletes who have raced everywhere in the country, as well as locally, say, ‘It’s the most beautiful course I’ve ever done.’”

S ec t ion written and compiled by Heather Clark • For The Bulletin


Reigning Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival champs

Pacific Crest Preview • Wednesday, June 22, 2011 • The Bulletin Competitors swim during a triathlon at a past Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival.

Weather and water: How warm or cold will it be?

The Bulletin ile

Event winners from the 2010 Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival:

Triathlon LONG COURSE TRIATHLON Male: Chris Bagg, Portland, 4 hours, 7 minutes, 46 seconds

MARATHON Male: Holden Rennaker, Portland, 2:58:31 Female: Sabine Pullins, Bend, 3:09:55 Masters Male: Tom Moline, Hood River, 3:01:42 Masters Female: Lisa Dean, Fort Jones, Calif., 3:50:02 HALF MARATHON Male: Kalpanatit Broderick, Bend, 1:12:10

Twin Lakes

r

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START Wickiup Reservoir

46

Rive

ver

Deschu

tes

i utes R

Li

La Pine

Note: Triathlon swims are in Wickiup Reservoir. Triathlon runs are in and around Sunriver.

East Cascade Rd.

Triathon, duathlon run courses First leg of run course (all triathlons and duathlons) Half Ironman/ Endurance Duathlon run course Olympic Distance Triathlon & Duathlon run course

SUNRIVER

East Cascade Rd.

r.

Running

D

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Marina

rD

Masters Female: Angela Allen, Sherwood, 2:10:28

42

Crane Prairie Reservoirr

River Rd.

Overlook Rd.

ave

Masters Male: Dave Florence, Canby, 1:49:07

Half-ironman triathlon and endurance duathlon course Olympic distance triathlon and duathlon course

40

Be

Female: Angela Allen, Sherwood, 2:10:28

NATIONAL FOREST

Cultus Lake

Lodge Cente r Dr.

Airport

r.

OLYMPIC DUATHLON Male: Chris Harig, Issaquah, Wash., 1:46:53

Sunriver

FINISH

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Masters Female: Kelli Reed, Eugene, 5:12:32

45

Abb

Masters Male: B Bottenberg, Reno, Nev., 4:32:38

Little Lava Lake

eR d.

Female: Holly Graham, Tucson, Ariz., 4:45:16

Lava Lake 46

cad

ENDURANCE DUATHLON Male: Scott Kocher, Portland, 4:12:56

46

r.

Duathlon

Mt. Bachelor

Elk Lake

Cas

Masters Female: Ann Davidson, Portland, 2:24:39

97

ot D

Masters Male: Dave Campbell, Newport, 2:18:44

Bend

Cascade Lakes Highway

Abb

Female: Ann Davidson, Portland, 2:24:39

Triathlon, duathlon bike courses

We st

OLYMPIC TRIATHLON Male: Adam Zucco, Elburn, Ill., 2:06:56

Watching the action unfold during the 15th annual Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival can be rather tricky for spectators. After all, participants in the long course triathlon — Pacific Crest’s hallmark event — cover a total of more than 71 miles. We asked Bend resident Brook Gardner, a 12-time finisher in the Pacific Crest long course triathlon who is entered in the race again this year, to share with us his suggestions for best spots to catch the weekend’s racing action. The swim: The first leg of both the Olympic-distance and long course triathlon is held at Gull Point at Wickiup Reservoir. The controlled chaos known as the swim-to-bike transition area is located here, and participants in the Olympic and long course duathlon (bike-to-run only) also start from this point. So a lot will be happening at Wickiup, making it a great place to see which competitors emerge from the water with an early lead. Gardner noted that the spacious boat ramp at Gull Point makes viewing comfortable for spectators. “It’s always just gorgeous out there,” he said. “Most years there’s not a cloud in the sky and the water is like glass.” There is, however, a catch. No vehicle parking is allowed at the boat ramp, and spectators who want to drive their own car will have to find a nearby forest service road along which to park. Want less hassle? Catch a free ride on the athlete shuttle bus from Sunriver to the lake and back. A shuttle time schedule is posted at www.racecenter.com/pacificcrest. The bike: In the interest of safety for cyclists competing on the bike course, organizers are reticent to encourage spectators to drive on the course. That said, riding either the Olympic or long course bike route in the opposite direction of the racers is a no-impact way to view the race and/or cheer on the cyclists. But the best spot from which to offer encouragement, according to Gardner, is at the crest of the grueling Sparks Lake climb on Cascade Lakes Highway just as it passes Dutchman Flat and the entrance to Mt. Bachelor ski area. Participants are likely to need a lift after cresting the 3.5-mile, 800-foot ascent. Keep in mind, with 20 miles of cycling and a half marathon yet to complete, the riders will need to leave something in the tank. But if they do not gauge their effort wisely, “the Sparks grade,” Gardner said, “will take it out of you.” The run: An easy place to catch the running portions of the multisport races as well as the running-only races is from the Sunriver Village Mall. From there looking across Beaver Drive, spectators can view triathletes fresh off the bike-to-run transition. Still recovering from their effort on the bike, the competitors’ legs should be screaming at this point, and words of encouragement from the crowd provide a much-needed boost. But Gardner insisted that the most critical juncture for spectators on the run course is near the Sunriver Stables, which are located about two-thirds of the way through the half marathon and marathon course. “It’s super exposed (to the sun) and people could use a good cheering,” Gardner said. “It’s right at about nine miles and everyone is suffering.”

.

Masters female (40 and older): Stephanie Snyder, Salem, 5:18:11

Spectators’ guide

r Rd

Masters male (40 and older): Raymond Whitlow, Yamhill, 4:37:01

Rive

Female: Mackenzie Madison, Eugene, 4:42:53 (course record)

South Century Dr. to 97

Finish Meado w Rd.

Start

Spring River Rd. South Century Dr.

Female: Jessica Dobek, Tualatin, 1:23:20

Marathon course is two circuits of the course, half marathon is one circuit

10 KILOMETERS Male: Timothy Badly, Bend, 34:31

Cas cad eR d.

Masters Female: Susie Jones, Bend, 1:36:52

East Cascade Rd.

Marathon and half marathon courses

5K and 10K run courses

Masters Male: Tim Monaco, Bend, 1:22:39

SUNRIVER

We st

SUNRIVER

Female: Jordyn Smith, Eugene, 39:10

Masters Male: Mike Gauthier, Manhattan Beach, Calif., 21:48 Masters Female: Susan Baker, Colorado Springs, Colo., 21:50

Dr.

ot D Abb

River Rd.

Overlook Rd.

South Century Dr. to 97

Finish

Meado

w Rd.

Start

ot D

ot D r.

Lodge Cente r Dr.

Airport

South Century Dr. to 97

Finish Meado w Rd.

10K course

r.

5K course Lodge Cente r Dr.

Abb

.

Rive r Rd .

Marina

er

r.

Dr. er Be av

Abb

Overlook Rd.

Abb

Female: Macayla Claver, Merlin, 19:16

ot D r.

Masters Female: Billie Cartwright, Yakima, Wash., 48:31 5 KILOMETERS Male: Brian Marshall, Bend, 18:12

East Cascade Rd.

East Cascade Rd.

Be av

Masters Male: Gustavo Gomez, Fresno, Calif., 38:26

Start

Spring River Rd.

Spring River Rd. South Century Dr.

South Century Dr.

An unseasonably cool spring in Central Oregon that brought generous amounts of late-season snow and below-average temperatures is not expected to affect participants competing in the Pacific Crest Weekend Sports Festival to the extent that some, even a few weeks ago, may have thought. While the Cascade Lakes Highway was until early last week inaccessible to bikes and cars and opened this year later than usual (it closes each winter when the snow flies), the scenic byway is now open. Which is all to say that competitors in the long course triathlon and endurance duathlon will experience no change while racing on the 53-mile bike course from Wickiup Reservoir to Sunriver via Mount Bachelor. But according to Pacific Crest race manager Jon Atherton, the question on the minds of many of the triathletes is: How cold will the water be on race day at Wickiup Reservoir? Unfortunately, the answer isn’t clear. As of Monday, the water temperature at Wickiup — the largest of Central Oregon’s Cascade lakes at 11,200 acres — likely had not reached 60 degrees. According to Atherton, until last year, the water temperature over the Pacific Crest race weekend at Wickiup had never dipped below 63 degrees. On race day in 2010, he pointed out, the water was a chilly 61 degrees. Nearly all participants in the long course and Olympic triathlons wear a wet suit, which provides buoyancy as well as a barrier from the cold water. A handful of swimmers each year opt to compete without a wet suit, Atherton noted. “Anything over 60 degrees is fine, and 65 is optimum,” Atherton observed. “Much warmer than 65, and it becomes a problem because you overheat in your wet suit. Under 60, and when you first jump in the water, it’s like someone squeezing your throat.” In its early years, the Pacific Crest triathlon was held at Crescent Lake and later at Cultus Lake, where bone-chilling water temperatures ranged from 55 to 58 degrees, Atherton said. Though the water temperature at Wickiup may be cool now, Atherton said it’s likely to warm up in time for this weekend’s races if the forecast holds for some 80-degree days this week in Central Oregon. “The thing to keep in mind is that the water level at Wickiup is not very deep and (the reservoir) has a gigantic surface area,” Atherton explained. “When the sun shines, it heats the lake up very quickly. My guess is that the water will be at least 63 degrees if the weather remains as it’s projected to be.” Atherton, whose Portland-based AA Sports company organizes numerous triathlons and other endurance events throughout the Northwest, cited a triathlon held in the Portland area earlier this month for which the water temperature at the swimming venue increased from 58 to 63 degrees in the span of a week. Pacific Crest organizers were initially concerned that uncertainty about the weather might have kept entries down for the annual multipsort festival in Sunriver. But Atherton said that all early registration numbers indicate that attendance will be on par with previous years.