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Education bills snagged in Salem; more talks today By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — A political showdown over a slew of education reform bills materialized at the state Capitol on Monday as expected. But instead of making progress, the two parties could only agree to give it another shot today. Representatives were expected to vote on a package of bills that some lawmakers

2 fired CEC workers win lawsuit, are awarded nearly $4M

said would transform the state’s education system. The bills are wide ranging, from dipping into the education reserves to bolster the K-12 budget to expanding online charter schools. Some are clearly Democrat priorities, like requiring school districts to offer full-day kindergarten. Others, which Republicans are being more vocal about, allow community

colleges to sponsor charter schools. The package of bills also includes one of Gov. John Kitzhaber’s top priorities for the session, Senate Bill 909, which would create one entity, the Oregon Education Investment Board, to oversee all education starting from the early childhood level through graduate school. See Education / A4

IN THE LEGISLATURE

Say hey to summer

Two top deputies leaving DA’s office By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

The two top deputies of Deschutes County District Attorney Patrick Flaherty have resigned, and will leave by July 5. Flaherty announced the resignations of Chief Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson and Deputy District Attorney Pat Horton in a news release Monday. In January, soon after taking office, Flaherty hired Anderson and Horton. Both were key hires after Flaherty fired five attorneys who had served under Mike Dugan, the previous district attorney. In their letters of resignation, Anderson cited personal reasons and Horton said his work was nearly completed. In a news release Monday, Flaherty praised both employees. He described Anderson as “a stellar prosecutor who enthusiastically took on the many challenges our office has encountered during the transition period.” Flaherty wrote in the news release that both attorneys “efficiently went about implementing or setting in motion many of the procedural and structural changes (Horton) recommended.” Flaherty also wrote he would not make any further comment. Another January hire of Flaherty’s, former Deschutes County Sheriff Les Stiles, resigned in April after more than three months in the office. When he resigned, Stiles, who was a part-time investigator in the office, said at the time he had finished his duties for Flaherty. See Deputies / A5

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

A jury is awarding nearly $4 million in damages to two former Central Electric Cooperative employees who say they were fired in 2007 because of their age. A verdict was reached in the nearly 3-year-old case on Wednesday. The Deschutes County Circuit Court jury found Robert Hoar, who was 53 when he was fired, and Paul Yancey, who was 57, were the victims of age discrimination. Hoar, a former line superintendent for the co-op, receives $1,705,797 in economic damages. Yancey, formerly a senior lineman, receives $986,693 in economic damages. Both men are also being awarded $250,000 in noneconomic damages and $400,000 in punitive damages, according to court documents. Jeff Beaman, a spokesman for the co-op, released a statement Monday saying the company will contest the verdict. “CEC was disappointed with the jury verdict in the recent case brought by two former employees concerning their termination,” Beaman said in the statement. “CEC believes there is a strong basis under Oregon law for a new trial in this matter, and that motion will be filed with the court promptly. Because this matter is continuing litigation, we will have no further comment.” See Lawsuit / A5

Fred R. Conrad / New York Times News Service

Two neurons glow in response to a roundworm being exposed to certain chemicals at Rockefeller University in New York.

In a tiny worm, unlocking secrets of the human brain

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The Stephenson brothers — Tristyn, 10, left, and Kyler, 9, both from Bend — build a miniature waterworks Monday in the sand at McKay Park. Today is the summer solstice and the longest day of the year, with sunrise set for 5:22 a.m., sunset at 8:52 p.m. and a temperature forecast to be in the high 80s. To see more of what the official start of summer has in store for us weather-wise, check out the full forecast on Page C6.

Inside Melt: What do we get with hot days plus a hefty snowpack? • C1 Grill: Tips, recipes to make you the king of backyard cooking • F1

In an eighth-floor lab overlooking New York’s East River, Cornelia Bargmann watches two colleagues manipulate a microscopic roundworm. They have trapped it in a tiny groove on a clear plastic chip, with just its nose sticking into a channel. Pheromones are being pumped through the channel, and the researchers have genetically engineered two neurons in the worm’s head to glow bright green if a neuron responds. These ingenious techniques for exploring a tiny animal’s behavior are the fruit of many years’ work by Bargmann’s and other labs. Despite the roundworm’s lowliness on the scale of intellectual achievement, the study of its nervous system offers one of the most promising approaches for understanding the human brain, since it uses much the same working parts but is around a million times less complex. See Worms / A5

In the rising income gap, CEO pay holds much of the sway

An Independent Newspaper

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Vol. 108, No. 172, 42 pages, 7 sections

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By Peter Whoriskey The Washington Post

It was the 1970s, and the chief executive of a leading U.S. dairy company, Kenneth Douglas, lived the good life. He earned the equivalent of about $1 million today. He and his family moved from a

three-bedroom home to a four-bedroom home, about a half-mile away, in River Forest, Ill., an upscale Chicago suburb. He joined a country club. The company gave him a Cadillac. The money was good enough, in fact, that he sometimes turned down raises. He said making too

much was bad for morale. Forty years later, the trappings at the top of Dean Foods, as at most big U.S. companies, are more lavish. The current chief executive, Gregg Engles, averages 10 times as much in compensation as Douglas did, or about $10 million in a

typical year. He owns a $6 million home in an elite suburb of Dallas and 64 acres near Vail, Colo., an area he frequently visits. He belongs to as many as four golf clubs at a time — two in Texas and two in Colorado. See Wealth / A4


A2 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

6

9 31 33 39 41

Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $16.8 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

Ozier Muhammad / New York Times News Service

Mario Barbuto, a general contractor, measures a deck during a job this month in Larchmont, N.Y. When it comes to hiring contractors, experts say there are some things to keep in mind to keep the project from going wrong. “People shop for cars more carefully than contractors,” Barbuto says.

Choose the right contractor to avoid remodeling misery By Alina Tugend New York Times News Service

When we lived in London, we bought a Victorian home that hadn’t been touched since the 1970s. In fact, the electrical wiring was so tangled and potentially dangerous that several qualified electricians declined to work on it. Then, we did everything you’re not supposed to when planning construction. We hired a contractor who had previously worked on our apartment building without checking references. We had no idea if he was licensed. We started the project when I was six months pregnant. Still, despite some setbacks, the project was finished on time. In fact, the living room floors were being varnished when I was in the hospital giving birth. The place looked good, and we even received a baby present from Dave, our contractor. Dumb luck. And dumb might be the operative word here. As more people are turning to remodeling instead of moving, it makes sense to know how to choose a general contractor. “People shop for cars more carefully than contractors,” said Mario Barbuto, who has been a general contractor for the last 25 years in the New York area. A remodeling experience gone wrong can make your life hell. Patricia Maier, a retired teacher, signed a contract in July 2008 for an addition to her house in Lexington, Mass., which was built in 1884. Almost three years later, she is still coping with a job that was supposed to take four months. She hired an architect who was the husband of a colleague and used a general contractor he suggested. The builder quickly did much of the exterior work, then took a 10day trip to the Caribbean. Things never got back on track. Newly installed floors warped, were reinstalled and warped again. French doors that had been put in weren’t sealed correctly. Gutters didn’t drain properly. The architect dropped out of the process. “Things looked good superficially but there were so many problems,” she said. Now Maier is seeking redress through various state offices. “Never hire a friend,” she said, referring to the architect. “It will always backfire.” Do you even need to hire a general contractor? No, said David Dillon, a general contractor based in Dallas. Any competent person can oversee construction, he said. But if several subcontractors are involved, a lot of time will be spent by a homeowner managing details and personalities. Should you decide you want a general contractor to run your project, how do you find one? Word of mouth is always a good option, as is contacting your local government’s public works and building departments. “They’re full of opinions about who is good and who is not.

They’re looking at their work every day,” said Dillon, who has selfpublished a book this year called “Homeowners, It’s Time to Think Like a General Contractor.” (CreateSpace, $7.99) Online referral sites are another option to find contractors. Some are free, but Angie’s List, which is one of the better known, charges membership fees. The cost starts at less than $10 a month, and opinion online is divided on how good these sites are. After narrowing down a list, what do you do? Most people would say ask for references and photos of previous work, but that’s just the beginning. References are important, but how do you know they’re genuine customers? Website photos are nice, but a lot can be hidden. So it is much more important to ask to physically see work that has withstood the test of time. “I show jobs that are 6 or 7 years old, because new jobs always look good,” Barbuto said. And he’s happy to ask former customers if he can do a walk-through for potential clients. When hiring someone, homeowners should make sure they understand whether the prices a contractor gives you are hard and fast or guesstimates, Dillon said. If the contractor says it will cost $5,000 for the plumber, ask to see the contract between the contractor and plumber, Dillon said. Otherwise it could turn out to really be $17,000 — and guess who is going to pay that difference? “Anyone who is aboveboard should be willing to show you the contracts,” he said. And be sure to get multiple bids, and when you do, compare what is priced. “If one has an electrician bid and one doesn’t — what’s up with that?” he said. “Go through it line by line.” I asked some friends who had construction experience what advice they would pass on. Here are some hard-won words of wisdom: • Check the number of projects the contractor has going at the same time. Too many at once can add a considerable amount of time to your own. • What margin does your contractor take to provide materials? Perhaps you can save by buying materials yourself. Contractors aren’t always keen on it, though. Barbuto warns that if you get your own windows, for example, and they’re the wrong size or cracked, the problem is yours to deal with, not his. • Listen to the ways the contractor and the subcontractors, like the plumbers and electricians, interact. My friend Amy had four different contractors come with their subcontractors to bid on a major renovation. “Listening to them talk together, I got a sense of how they respected each other and worked together,” she said. “In the end, we didn’t hire the cheapest guy, but the one I thought was the smartest and most creative and got along best with his subcontractors.”

Retailer rewards cards are getting a whole lot more rewarding lately, with some offering 5 percent cash back on your purchases along with other goodies. While getting something for nothing is a smart spender’s Holy Grail, credit cards can be a dicey proposition because of their punitive interest charges on unpaid balances. Get-out-of-debt guru Dave Ramsey never recommends getting a credit card no matter how good the rewards, often saying, “If you play with snakes, you’re going to get bit.” Still, even Clark Howard, longtime critic of store cards, recently changed his mind. Howard, who doles out money advice on TV, radio and in books, said that despite his reservations, he’s intrigued by Target-branded cards that offer 5 percent cash back. “That 5 percent is a significant enough number to make me rethink my typical advice,” he told his radio listeners. The main consideration when thinking about applying for a retailer-branded credit card is whether you will pay off the entire balance every month, said Farnoosh Torabi, author of the book “Psych Yourself Rich: Get the Mindset and Discipline You Need to Build Your Financial Life” and a money expert with Credit.com. That’s especially true with retailer credit cards, because they tend to have very high finance charges, many exceeding 20 percent. Another consideration is the impact on your credit scores. Opening new lines of credit temporarily lowers your scores. And many cards have low limits, meaning you will easily use a greater percentage of your available credit, another factor that harms credit scores.

Perhaps a bigger concern is that several studies show that consumers spend more money with credit cards than they do with cash. Despite potential drawbacks, many consumers might benefit by using retailer cards from a store where they shop most. Here’s a sampling of lucrative retailer-branded credit cards to fit a variety of shopping tastes. Helping to compile the list were Amber Stubbs, managing editor of CardRatings.com; Bill Hardekopf, founder of LowCards. com; and Tim Chen, founder of NerdWallet.com. Read the terms and conditions before applying for any card, paying special attention to interest rates and annual fees. More information on each card can be found online at the retailer websites.

Target Target isn’t accepting applications for its Visa credit card, but if you shop at Target often, especially if you buy food and clothing there, it could be worth getting its store-only “REDcard.” You’ll get a straight 5 percent off on all purchases, including at the pharmacy. Target’s debit card reaps the same benefits, but it can’t be used at the retailer’s website.

Lowe’s The home-improvement store’s Lowe’s Consumer Credit Card also gives back a generous 5 percent. It has no fee, but its interest rate is very high, at 24.99 percent for new accounts. It is also a Lowe’s-only card.

Gap Hardekopf said store cards of-

ten aren’t a good deal compared with the best traditional credit cards, but the Gap Visa card has some appealing features. It gives you a 10 percent discount on Tuesdays; five points for every $1 spent on company brands at Gap, Banana Republic, Old Navy, Piperlime and Athleta; one point for every dollar spent elsewhere; a $10 reward card for every 1,000 points accumulated; and it sends exclusive offers to cardholders.

Best Buy The Reward Zone MasterCard gives back 4 percent on Best Buy purchases, 2 percent on dining and groceries and 1 percent on everything else. Cardholders who take advantage of Best Buy’s deferred interest deals should watch out for retroactive interest, Chen said. The annual fee depends on creditworthiness, and it ranges from nothing to $59.

Costco The warehouse club’s True Earnings American Express card gives 3 percent cash back on gasoline purchases up to $3,000 a year, then 1 percent after that. You also get 3 percent cash back at restaurants, 2 percent on travel and 1 percent everywhere else, including Costco.

REI This Visa card earns you 5 percent back from purchases from this sporting goods store. That’s on top of a 10 percent refund on most purchases for being an REI member, a prerequisite for applying for the card. Membership costs a one-time $20 fee. You earn 1 percent on other purchases. You also get a $20 REI gift card after you make your first purchase with the card.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 A3

TS  Web overseer Supreme Court blocks bias suit against Wal-Mart opens door to new domains By Adam Liptak

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday threw out an enormous employmentdiscrimination class action suit against Wal-Mart that had sought billions of dollars on behalf of as many as 1.5 million women workers. The suit claimed that WalMart’s policies and practices had led to countless discriminatory decisions over pay and promotions. The court divided 5-4 along ideological lines on the basic question in the case — whether the suit satisfied a requirement of the class-action rules that “there are questions of law or fact common to the class” of women employees. The court’s five more conservative justices said no, shutting down the suit and limiting the ability of other plaintiffs to band together in large class actions. The court was unanimous, however, in saying that the plaintiffs’ lawyers had improperly sued under a part of the class-action rules that was not primarily concerned with monetary claims. Business groups welcomed the decision, and labor and consumer groups strongly criticized it. But all agreed it was momentous. “This is without a doubt the most important class action case in more than a decade,” said Robin S. Conrad, a lawyer with the litigation unit of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, the business advocacy group. The court did not decide whether Wal-Mart had, in fact, discriminated against the women, only that they could not proceed as a class. The court’s decision on that issue will almost certainly affect all sorts of other class-action suits, including ones brought by investors and consumers, because it tightened the definition what constituted a common issue for a class action, and also said that judges must often consider the merits of plaintiffs’ claims in deciding whether they may proceed as a class. “You will have people invoking the decision in lots of different cases,” said Brian Fitzpatrick, a law professor at Vanderbilt University specializing in class action law. “The Supreme Court has said that it’s OK to look at the merits of the lawsuit to decide whether to allow it to go forward at the earliest possible moment.”

By David Sarno Los Angeles Times

The Associated Press ile photo

A Wal-Mart associate arranges a display of children’s shirts at a store in Fayetteville, Ark. The Supreme Court ruled for Wal-Mart on Monday in its fight to block a massive sex discrimination lawsuit on behalf of women who work there.

Heavy blow for big cases and lawyers who bring them By Steven Greenhouse New York Times News Service

With the dismissal of a sexdiscrimination lawsuit brought on behalf of 1.5 million women who have worked at Wal-Mart, the Supreme Court on Monday significantly tightened the rules for how a large group of individuals can join together to sue a company for alleged harm done to them. The court’s decision will not just make it harder to bring big, ambitious employment class-action cases asserting discrimination based on sex, race or other factors, legal experts said. In the majority opinion, the court set higher barriers for bringing many types of nationwide class actions against a large company with many branches. In its majority opinion, the

court essentially said that if lawyers brought a nationwide class action against an employer, they would have to offer strong evidence of a nationwide practice or policy that hurt the class. In the Wal-Mart case, the court found that the plaintiffs had not demonstrated that Wal-Mart had any nationwide policies or practices that discriminated against women. The opinion, written by Justice Antonin Scalia, noted that WalMart’s official corporate policy opposed discrimination, while the company gave the managers at its more than 3,400 stores considerable discretion over pay and promotions. “In a company of Wal-Mart’s size and geographical scope, it is quite unbelievable that all managers would exercise their

discretion in a common way without some common direction,” Scalia wrote. The ruling was widely hailed by business groups, some of which filed amicus briefs urging the court to limit class actions. The court’s ruling will push plaintiffs’ lawyers into filing fewer huge class actions and more cases on behalf of individuals or smaller groups, lawyers said. The Supreme Court decision “strikes a blow to those who face discrimination in the workplace to be able to join together and hold companies, especially large companies, accountable for the full range of discrimination they may be responsible for,” said Marcia Greenberger, co-president of the National Women’s Law Center.

LOS ANGELES — Move over, dot-com — get ready for dot-anything. The group that governs Internet domain names is opening up the system so that companies and organizations can apply to create their own versions of .com, .org or .gov. Under the new rules, instead of a coke.com, Coca-Cola might control the domain .coke and assign Web addresses such as drink.coke or bottle.coke. The California-based group known as ICANN called it “one of the biggest changes ever” to the way the Internet’s naming system works. With the domain expansion, the group of 22 existing suffixes — many of which were established in the early 1980s — could quickly balloon to hundreds or thousands. ICANN said more recognizable addresses would allow Web users to find what they’re looking for more quickly. Nonprofit groups could reserve the .school domain and hand out addresses to every elementary school. Cities could consolidate their websites to .nyc or .losangeles. And interest groups could stake out their own corner of the Web: .car for auto enthusiasts, .law for attorneys, and .food for restaurants. “Today’s decision will usher in a new Internet age,” said Peter Dengate Thrush, chairman of ICANN’s board of directors, in a statement following the

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group’s approval of the expansion in Singapore on Monday. “We have provided a platform for the next generation of creativity and inspiration.” But with a price tag of $185,000, creating a new domain won’t be cheap or easy. ICANN, which will make the final decisions on new domains, requires that applying be “established public or private organizations,” and all applicants must prove they have the technical capability to keep a domain running. ICANN’s announcement drew criticism from those who disputed the value of expanding the already complicated Internet naming system, including those that said the move would mostly benefit the nonprofit ICANN and the for-profit companies, like GoDaddy.com and VeriSign Inc., that sell Web addresses. Some also questioned whether the new domain system would make navigating the Web any easier. “The naming system is not a search engine,” said Joe Touch, the director of the University of Southern California’s Postel Center, an Internet research group. “If you want to find Ford, you should type ‘ford’ into Google or Bing — trust me, it’ll work.”

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Justices say regulators should set emissions rules WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday unanimously rejected a lawsuit that had sought to force major electric utilities to reduce their greenhouse-gas emissions without waiting for federal regulators to act. The suit was brought by six states, New York City and several land trusts. Its central contention was that carbon-dioxide emissions from power plants belonging to four private companies and the Tennessee Valley Authority amounted to a public

nuisance. The suit asked a federal court in New York to order the defendants to reduce their emissions. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, writing for the court, said the plaintiffs were making their case in the wrong forum. Under the Clean Air Act, she wrote, the matter must be addressed by the Environmental Protection Agency rather than by the courts. The court’s ruling on the one hand reaffirmed that the federal environmental agency has the tools to address emissions of carbon dioxide. On the other hand, it limited the options of environmental advocates who have been pressing the agency

to move faster in the face of considerable resistance in Congress. The lawsuit was filed in 2004 against a different regulatory backdrop. In those days, the Bush administration argued that the Clean Air Act did not permit the agency to issue regulations addressing climate change, and that it would be unwise to do so in any event. But in 2007, the Supreme Court ruled that the law did authorize federal regulation of greenhouse-gas emissions, and that the agency was required to issue them unless it had a scientific basis for its refusal. — New York Times News Service

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White House, lawmakers speed up debt talks By Lori Montgomery The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The White House and congressional leaders are accelerating negotiations over the biggest debt-reduction package in at least two decades amid mounting concern that the effort is running out of time. Over the next six weeks, negotiators must strike a bipartisan compromise to slice more than $2 trillion from the federal budget by 2021, reduce the complex

plan to writing and persuade a bitterly divided Congress to support it. But one or both chambers is due to be on break for three of those weeks. And when Congress last reached a big debt-reduction deal, it took more than a month just to draft the legislation. That leaves little room for chance — or last-minute negotiating to marshal votes for what is likely to be a politically difficult package of unprecedented

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cuts to long-sacrosanct federal programs. “I keep talking to other colleagues who have confidence that someone else is working things out,” said Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., a freshman member of the Budget Committee. “But I keep looking around thinking, ‘If we’re not doing it, then who is?’” With an Aug. 2 deadline nearing, along with the threat of turmoil in global financial markets

if Congress doesn’t act, Vice President Joe Biden is stepping up talks this week with six lawmakers from both parties in hopes of presenting a plan to President Barack Obama and congressional leaders by July 4. So far, negotiators have identified many areas of consensus: Farmers are certain to lose some federal subsidies, for example. And federal workers will have to contribute more to finance their retirement.

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A4 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Wealth Continued from A1 While Douglas’ office sat on the second floor of a milk distribution center, Engles’ stylish new headquarters occupy the top nine floors of a 41-story Dallas office tower. When Engles leaves town, he takes the company’s $10 million Challenger 604 jet, which is largely dedicated to his needs, both business and personal. The evolution of executive grandeur — from very comfortable to jet-setting — reflects one of the primary reasons that the gap between those with the highest incomes and everyone else is widening. For years, statistics have depicted growing income disparity in the United States, and it has reached levels not seen since the Great Depression. In 2008, the last year for which data are available, for example, the top 0.1 percent of earners took in more than 10 percent of the personal income in the United States, including capital gains, and the top 1 percent took in more than 20 percent. But economists had little idea who these people were. How many were Wall street financiers? Sports stars? Entrepreneurs? Economists could only speculate, and debates over what is fair stalled. Now a mounting body of economic research indicates that the

rise in pay for company executives is a critical feature in the widening income gap.

“Do people bitch because (Chief Executive Gregg) Engles makes so much? Yeah. But there’s nothing you can do about it.”

Many big earners

— Bob Goad, a 61-year-old pasteurizer at a Dean Foods

The largest single chunk of the highest-income earners, it turns out, are executives and other managers in firms, according to a landmark analysis of tax returns by economists Jon Bakija, Adam Cole and Bradley Heim. These are not just executives from Wall Street, either, but from companies in even relatively mundane fields such as the milk business. The top 0.1 percent of earners make about $1.7 million or more, including capital gains. Of those, 41 percent were executives, managers and supervisors at non-financial companies, according to the analysis, with nearly half of them deriving most of their income from their ownership in privately held firms. An additional 18 percent were managers at financial firms or financial professionals. In all, nearly 60 percent fell into one of those two categories. Other recent research, moreover, indicates that executive compensation at the nation’s largest firms has roughly quadrupled in real terms since the 1970s, even as pay for 90 percent of America has stalled. This trend held at Dean Foods. Over the period from the ’70s until

(Not) spreading the wealth The income gap between the wealthy and the rest of the country has grown along with dramatic increases in CEO pay.

Growing share of income for the rich Inequality in the United States has grown steadily since the 1970s, following a flat period after World War II. In 2008, the wealthiest 10 percent of earners took in almost the same amount of income as the rest of the country combined. SHARE OF NATION’S INCOME Including capital gains 80%

The top 0.1 percent of the population (those making about $1.7 million or more) saw the sharpest increase in income share, taking home 2.6% of the nation’s earnings in 1975 and 10.4% in 2008.

Bottom 90% of earners 60

Top 10% of earners

40

10.4%

Top 0.1% Top 0.1 to 0.5% Top 0.5 to 1% 20

Top 1 to 5%

Top 5 to 10% 0 ’20

Top 10%

’40

’60

’80

’00 ’08

INCOME LEVEL

NUMBER OF PEOPLE

AVERAGE INCOME

Top 0.1%

152,000

$5.6 million

+385%

Top 0.1 to 0.5%

610,000

$878,139

+141%

Top 0.5 to 1%

762,000

$443,102

+90%

Top 1 to 5%

6.0 million

$211,476

+59%

Top 5 to 10%

7.6 million

$127,184

+38%

Bottom 90%

137.2 million

$31,244

-1%

Compared with other countries

8%

Although the gap between the top earners and everyone else has risen in several other nations, the growth has been more pronounced in the United States.

6

OVERALL CHANGE 1970 - 2008

U.S.

SHARE OF NATION’S INCOME EARNED BY THE TOP 0.1%

Britain 4

France 2

Japan Excluding capital gains

0 ’70

’80

’90

’00

’07

Who makes up the top 0.1%? 0%

10

20

30

40

Executives, managers (non-finance) Finance, including management Lawyers Real estate Medical Other entrepreneur Arts, media, sports Math, engineering, technical Other Business operations (non-finance) Other skilled sales Professors and scientists Farmers and ranchers

Rising executive pay

In 2005, the top 0.1 percent of earners in the U.S. made upwards of about $1.7 million, including capital gains. Forty-one percent of these roughly 140,000 families had a breadwinner who was an executive, a supervisor or a manager.

TOTAL CHANGE SINCE 1970 +430%

Executive pay began to grow around the same time as income equality in the U.S. and has increased about fourfold since 1970, while average wages for all workers have remained relatively flat.

+400%

Median executive income* +300 +250%

Defenders of executive pay levels say the higher salaries are justified as the +200 size and profits of companies grow.

Corporate profits

+100

Average wage income** +26% +0 ’70

’80

’90

’00

’05

*Based on the salary, bonuses and stock options of the three highest-paid officers in the largest 50 firms. ** Calculated from Bureau of Economic Analysis data. Note: All figures have been adjusted for inflation. Sources: The World Top Incomes Database and reports by Jon Bakija, Williams College; Adam Cole, U.S. Department of Treasury; Bradley T. Heim, Indiana University; Carola Frydman, MIT Sloan School of Management and NBER; Raven E. Molloy, Federal Reserve Board of Governors; Thomas Piketty, Ehess, Paris; Emmanuel Saez, UC Berkeley and NBER. Alicia Parlapiano / The Washington Post

Ousted Tunisian leader sentenced in absentia New York Times News Service

today, while pay for Dean Foods chief executives was rising 10 times over, wages for the unionized workers actually declined slightly. The hourly wage rate for the people who process, pasteurize and package the milk at the company’s dairies declined by 9 percent in real terms, according to union contract records. It is now about $23 an hour. “Do people bitch because Engles makes so much? Yeah. But there’s nothing you can do about it,” said Bob Goad, 61, a burly former high school wrestler who is a pasteurizer at a Dean Foods plant in Harvard, Ill., and runs an auction business on the side to supplement his income. “These companies have the idea that the only people that matter to the company are those at the top.” Through a spokesman, Engles declined to be interviewed. Company officials threatened to call the police as a reporter was interviewing workers outside one of its dairies. Defenders of executive pay have argued that today’s chief executives are worth more because, among other things, companies are larger and more complex. But critics question why so much of the growth in income should go to the wealthiest. Douglas, the Dean Foods chief from the ’70s, died in 2007. But his son, Andrew Douglas, said his father viewed wages in part as a moral issue. If his father had seen what executives were making today, Andrew Douglas said, he’d be “spinning in his grave. My dad just believed that after a while, what else would you need the money for?” Inequality, economists have noted, is an essential part of capitalism. At least in theory, “the invisible hand,” or market system, sets compensation levels to lead workers into pursuits that are the most productive to society. This produces inequality but leads to a more efficient economy. As a result, economists have noted, there is an inherent tension in market-oriented democracies because while society aims to endow each person with equal political rights, it allows very unequal economic outcomes. “American society proclaims the worth of every human being,” economist Arthur Okun, former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, wrote in his 1975 book on the subject, “Equality and Efficiency.” But the economy awards “prizes that allow the big winners to feed their pets better than the losers can feed their children.” Americans have been uneasy about the income gap at least since the ’80s, according to polls. Repeated surveys by the National Opinion Research Center since 1987 have found that 60 percent or more of Americans agree or strongly agree with the statement that “differences in income in America are too large.” Income inequality has been on the rise for decades in several nations, including Britain, China and India, but it has been most pronounced in the United States, economists say. In 1975, for example, the top 0.1 percent of earners garnered about 2.5 percent of the nation’s income, including capital gains, according to data collected by University of California economist Emmanuel Saez. By 2008, that share had quadrupled and stood at 10.4 percent. The phenomenon is even more pronounced at even higher levels of income. The share of the income commanded by the top 0.01 percent rose from 0.85 percent to 5.03 percent over that period. For the 15,000 families in that group, average income now stands at $27 million. Democratic leaders, whose constituents have expressed more alarm over the divide, have used the phenomenon to justify their policies, such as universal health care. “A nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous,” President Barack Obama said in his inaugural address. But exactly what the government ought to do about the income gap hasn’t been clear, because economists have been divided over what is causing it to grow. They weren’t even sure, for example, who was making all that money. Sure, people like Bill Gates and LeBron James made lots. But it wasn’t at all clear who the other roughly 140,000 earners were in the top 0.1 percent — that is, people earning about $1.7 million a year, including capital gains. Then, late last year, economists Bakija, Cole and Heim completed their massive analysis of income tax returns. Little noticed outside academic circles, their research focused on the top 0.1 percent of earners. From

those tax returns, they could glean a taxpayer’s occupation, which is self-reported. Using the employer’s tax identification number, the researchers found the industry they were employed in. “Basically, executives represent a much bigger share of the top incomes than a lot of people had thought,” said Bakija, a professor at Williams College, who with his co-authors is continuing the research. “Before, we just didn’t know who these people were.”

What’s changed? So what has happened since the ’70s that has sent executive pay upward? While no company over this period of time — from the 1970s to today — can be considered completely typical, Dean Foods offers a better comparison than most because fundamentally it hasn’t changed. The dairy business is still the root of the company; it was on the Fortune 500 by the late ’70s and remains there today. It grew then and more recently through acquisition. The case of Dean Foods appears to bolster the argument that executive compensation moves with company size: Dean Foods’ profit in 2009 was roughly 10 times what it was in 1979, adjusted for constant dollars. Engles’ compensation has averaged 10 times that of Douglas. “It’s a different company today,” company spokesman Jamaison Schuler said. He declined to comment further. But some economists have offered an alternative, difficult-toquantify explanation: that the social norms that once reined in executive pay have disappeared. This new attitude, according to this view, was reflected in epigrammatic form by the 1987 movie “Wall Street,” which made famous the phrase “greed, for lack of a better word, is good.” Americans were growing more comfortable with some extremes in pay. Payoffs for the stars on Wall Street, in the movies and in pro sports were rising.

TRIPOLI, Libya — A Tunisian court sentenced the country’s ousted president, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, and his wife, Leila Trabelsi, to 35 years in prison and a fine of roughly $66 million after a trial in absentia for embezzlement and misuse of public funds, state news media said Monday night.

Education Continued from A1 On Monday morning, the Senate passed the bill creating the powerful board. Those in favor of the bill said it was the framework for a sea change that would overhaul the state’s education system. Opponents said it would centralize power too much. Others said it was premature and needed more vetting. But Sen. Rod Monroe, DPortland, who advocated for the bill, said there was a provision that would allow the measure to expire in 2016 if the idea didn’t work. He said it was worth giving it a shot, since with Oregon’s high dropout rates, something clearly wasn’t working. “The status quo is the worst possible action,” Monroe said. The bill passed, 21-8, and went to the House, where many expected it would be voted on later in the day. But on the House side, representatives never reached the bill; instead the 30-30 House slipped into partisan gridlock and only voted on one education-related bill Monday afternoon. The bill, House Bill 2301, would give more students the chance to enroll in online virtual schools. Currently there is a limit to the number of students that can enroll. The bill was being pushed mainly by Republicans and was the first one on the list of bills. It was also expected to be the most controversial. After a debate,

He still faces charges for the possession of illegal drugs, firearms and archaeological relics found in his palaces, as well as for ordering the killing of civilians in his bid to cling to power. The verdict Monday, after the one-day trial, focused on $27 million in jewels and public money reportedly found at one of his mansions.

lasting more than an hour, the vote came in at a dead tie with 30 lawmakers voting for it and 30 against. It needed at least 31 votes to pass. Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, said a “no” vote on the bill would be like telling parents and students that lawmakers know better than they do where they should send their student to school. But several Democrats, including Rep. Michael Dembrow, D-Portland, said there needs to be more structure in place to govern online schools before the Legislature can approve their growth. After the vote, the two parties met in private several times before calling it quits for the day. Republicans made it clear they would try for another vote on the online charter school bill today. Democrats voiced concerns afterward, saying Republicans had agreed not to stop all the bills if one of the bills they pushed failed. The idea lawmakers agreed to, they said, was to vote on each bill based on its merits. In other words, no back-door dealing was meant to happen. Rep. Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, said he hopes Republicans will let their caucus members “vote their conscience.” The House is expected to convene this morning to tackle the education reform bills once again. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 A5

Worms

Deputies

Continued from A1 Caenorhabditis elegans, as the roundworm is properly known, is a tiny, transparent animal just a millimeter long. In nature, it feeds on the bacteria that thrive in rotting plants and animals. It is a favorite laboratory organism for several reasons, including the comparative simplicity of its brain, which has just 302 neurons and 8,000 synapses, or neuron-to-neuron connections. These connections are pretty much the same from one individual to another, meaning that in all worms the brain is wired upin essentially the same way. Such a system should be considerably easier to understand than the human brain, a structure with close to 100 million neurons, 100,000 miles of biological wiring and 100 trillion synapses. The biologist Sydney Brenner chose the roundworm as an experimental animal in 1974 with this goal in mind. He figured that once someone provided him with the wiring diagram of how 302 neurons were connected, he could then compute the worm’s behavior. The task of reconstructing the worm’s wiring system fell on John White, now at the University of Wisconsin. After more than a decade’s labor, which required examining 20,000 electron microscope cross sections of the worm’s anatomy, White worked out exactly how the 302 neurons were interconnected. But the wiring diagram of even the worm’s brain proved too complex for Brenner’s computational approach to work. Bargmann was one of the first biologists to take White’s wiring diagram and see if it could be understood in other ways.

Continued from A1 Anderson submitted her letter on Wednesday, and in it expressed regret over leaving Flaherty’s office. She thanked her boss for the opportunity. Citing personal reasons, though, Anderson said she had to return to the Portland area. “I will remain deeply indebted to you for this opportunity,” she wrote. A former Multnomah County prosecutor, Anderson’s plans are not clear. Sometime last week, Anderson contacted some district attorneys offices in the Portland area, according to Rod Underhill, the chief deputy district attorney in Multnomah County. “We’ve had contact with her, but nothing is finalized,” he said. Flaherty hired Horton in January to analyze how the office functioned and to do things like guide the budget process and the renovation of the office’s interior. In his resignation letter, submitted Monday, Horton thanked Flaherty for the chance to work in the DA’s office and wrote much of his work was done. It was time to move on, Horton wrote in his letter. “Implicit in the definition of my current duties is that it has a completion date,” Horton wrote. Deschutes County Commissioner Alan Unger said Flaherty had a lot of work ahead as he sought to replace the two key deputies. “When you lose your two top people, you’re going to be working really hard to keep the office going while you search for two new top people,” Unger said. Like Unger, Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney said Flaherty had suffered a loss with the two

Love of labs Cori Bargmann grew up in Athens, Ga., a college town where her father taught statistics at the University of Georgia. Both her parents had been translators and met while Rolf Bargmann was working at the Nuremberg trials. Her mother, Ilse, would read to her in German the works of the Austrian animal behaviorists Konrad Lorenz and Karl von Frisch, planting the seeds of an interest in neuroscience. “I went into science because I loved the labs,” Bargmann says. She liked the machines and instruments, the fun of building things with one’s own hands, of learning what no one else knew. An outstanding student, she chose for her Ph.D. degree to work in the MIT lab of Robert Weinberg, a leading cancer biologist. The first mutated genes capable of causing cancer were being isolated. “It was an incredibly exciting time,” she says. Her task was to clone a rat gene called neu. When mutated, the gene causes a tumor, but one that the rat’s immune system can attack and destroy. Several years later, the human version of neu, called HER-2, was found to be amplified in breast cancer, and its receptor protein product is the target of the artificial antibody known as Herceptin, a leading breast cancer drug. For her postdoctoral work, Bargmann decided to work on animal behavior. The mouse is a

Lawsuit Continued from A1 Katherine Tank, attorney for Hoar and Yancey, said her office had no comment as she had heard the co-op intends to appeal. The case was filed in June 2008 after two reports from the state Bureau of Labor and Industries found an apparent pattern of targeting older employees at the Redmond utility.

Fred R. Conrad / New York Times News Service

Cornelia Bargmann, right, and Andrew Gordus examine a worm experiment in Bargmann’s lab at Rockefeller University in New York. Bargmann settled on studying roundworms because she did not like hurting furry animals. “I would start to cry every time I had to do anything with a mouse,” she says. standard organism for such studies, but she did not like hurting furry animals. “In Weinberg’s lab I would start to cry every time I had to do anything with a mouse,” she says. A nonfurry alternative was the fruit fly. She interviewed with a leading laboratory in California, but her husband at the time did not wish to move there. That left the roundworm. There are now several hundred worm labs around the world, of which perhaps 30 or so, like Bargmann’s, focus on the worm’s nervous system. In 1987, “worms weren’t entirely respectable,” Bargmann says. But right there at MIT, H. Robert Horvitz had established one of the first serious worm labs in the United States. She joined his lab and read everything written on the worm, including all the back copies of the little field’s informal journal, The Worm Breeder’s Gazette. She noticed that a particular behavior of C. elegans had been described but not well explored: It can taste waterborne chemicals and move toward those it finds attractive. White’s wiring diagram had been published the year before, in 1986. With this in hand, she told Horvitz she planned to identify which of the worm’s 302 neurons controlled its chemicaltracking behavior. He thought the project was too ambitious, but said she could spend six months on the attempt. Each neuron in the worm’s brain is known, and is assigned a three letter name. Specific neurons can be identified under a microscope and zapped with a laser beam, allowing the neuron’s role to be deduced from whatever function the worm may seem to have lost. Bargmann discovered, by accident, the neurons that control the worm’s switch into hibernation, a survival strategy for when food is scarce or neighbors too many. Finally, she found the neurons that control taste, showing that without them the worm could not track chemicals, and that it retained this ability even if she killed all the other neurons in the worm’s body. She also discovered that the worms have a sense of smell — the ability to detect airborne chemicals — as well as a sense of taste. Since worms eat bacteria that feed on decaying plants and carcasses,

she figured they should be able to detect and home in on the aromas of putrefaction. The redolent draft from these experiments caused a certain degree of complaint in Horvitz’s lab. After she succeeded, she says, “Horvitz told me that my great strength as a scientist was that I could think like a worm.” “Cori is talented beyond thinking like a worm,” Horvitz now says. “She can think like very few other people in a rigorous and creative way, and so has repeatedly developed new kinds of approaches.” Bargmann moved in 1991 to the University of California, San Francisco, to start her own lab. She began by following up her finding that worms have a sense of smell. In 1991, Richard Axel and Linda Buck discovered the molecular basis for the sense of smell: There are about a thousand genes, at least in rats, that make odorant receptors, proteins that stud the olfactory nerves’ endings in the nose and respond to specific odors. The C. elegans genome had just been decoded, and Bargmann was able to identify the worm’s odorant receptor genes. In fact, they have 2,000 of them, twice as many as the rat.

Reports said the co-op hired an outside firm to conduct surveillance targeting older employees. In Hoar’s case, the bureau found “substantial evidence that his termination was the result of unlawful discrimination based on age.” The report on Yancey said he “produced a prima facie case of disparate treatment” based on his age. Termination notices for both Hoar and Yancey said their job

performance had “fallen far below that which was extended,” the bureau report said. In 2008 a BOLI spokeswoman told The Bulletin a mediation process was attempted but proved unsuccessful. The two men eventually withdrew their complaints from the state office in order to sue the co-op for damages.

Only smells “This is what they do,” Bargmann says. The worm cannot see. Its world is one of smells, not sights. It needs to scent the soil bacteria that are its prey, while avoiding those that are poisonous to it. Ten percent of its genes are dedicated to making it a champion connoisseur of odors, mostly unpleasant. With the odorant genes in hand, Bargmann could apply genetics to figuring out how the worm’s sense of smell worked. By working with mutant worms, she showed that a specific odor receptor recognizes a specific odor, a finding that was implied by the Axel-Buck discovery but that no one had managed to nail down. She found that worms with a mutation in a gene called odr-10 could not smell diacetyl, a chemical that gives butter its odor and is also produced by a bacterium that is a favorite worm food. The odr10 gene, which makes the odor receptor protein that detects diace-

tyl, is active in neurons that guide the worm toward a scent. Bargmann switched things around so that odr-10 was expressed only in a neuron that detected scents repulsive to the worm. These worms backed away from the buttery odor, showing that it is not the odor receptors but the wiring of the nervous system itself that determines whether the worm deems an odor delicious or detestable. This was a surprising result because most people thought that sensory information was perceived as neutral, with the brain deciding later from the context whether it was good or bad. Some scientists said that only worms behave this way, but the same result was later obtained in mice. Bargmann sees the arrangement in evolutionary terms. “The more reliable a piece of information is, the more it will be shifted into the genome,” she says. That way, an organism does not have to risk learning what is good or bad; the genes will dictate the right behavior by wiring it into the nervous system. Worms are wired up to know that diacetyl means good eating. After studying the little animal for 24 years, she believes she is closer to understanding how its nervous system works. Though the worm’s nervous system is routinely described as simple, that is true only in comparison with the human brain. The worm has 22,000 genes, almost as many as a person, and its brain is a highly complex piece of biological machinery. The work of Bargmann’s and other labs has deconstructed many of its operational mechanisms. What would be required to say that the worm’s nervous system was fully understood? “You would want to understand a behavior all the way through, and then how the behavior can change,” Bargmann says. “That goal is not unattainable,” she adds.

resignations. That Horton and Anderson will leave office at the same time only compounded the impact, she said. Baney has been pleased with Flaherty’s office’s performance, adding that she hoped that would continue. “What I’ve seen coming out of the office, the (case) numbers appear good. I hope it doesn’t take too long to fill those positions,” Baney said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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A6 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N A T ION / WOR L D

Radioactive tritium found at many U.S. nuclear sites By Jeff Donn The Associated Press

BRACEVILLE, Ill. — Radioactive tritium has leaked from three-quarters of U.S. commercial nuclear power sites, often into groundwater from corroded, buried piping, an Associated Press investigation shows. The number and severity of the leaks has been escalating, even as federal regulators extend the licenses of more and more reactors across the nation. Tritium, which is a radioactive form of hydrogen, has leaked from at least 48 of 65 sites, according to U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission records reviewed as part of the AP’s yearlong examination of safety issues at aging nuclear power plants. Leaks from at least 37 of those facilities contained concentrations exceeding the federal drinking water standard — sometimes at hundreds of times the limit. While most leaks have been found within plant boundaries, some have migrated offsite. But none is known to have reached public water supplies. At three sites — two in Illinois and one in Minnesota — leaks have contaminated drinking wells of nearby homes, the records show, but not at levels violating the drinking water standard. At a fourth site, in New Jersey, tritium has leaked into an aquifer and a discharge canal feeding picturesque Barnegat Bay off the Atlantic Ocean. Any exposure to radioactivity, no matter how slight, boosts cancer risk, according to the National Academy of Sciences. Federal regulators set a limit for how much tritium is allowed in drinking water, where this contaminant poses its main health risk. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says tritium should measure no more than 20,000 picocuries per liter in drinking water. The agency estimates seven of 200,000 people who drink such water for decades would develop cancer. The tritium leaks also have spurred doubts among independent engineers about the reliability of emergency safety systems at the 104 nuclear reactors situated on the 65 sites. That’s partly because some of the leaky underground pipes carry water meant to cool a reactor in an emergency shutdown and to prevent a meltdown. Fast moving, tritium can indicate the presence of more powerful radioactive isotopes, like cesium-137 and strontium-90. So far, federal and industry officials say, the tritium leaks pose

Obama’s ATF choice in line for scrutiny

no health or safety threat. Tony Pietrangelo, chief nuclear officer of the industry’s Nuclear Energy Institute, said impacts are “next to zero.”

Prolific leaks Like rust under a car, corrosion has propagated for decades along the hard-to-reach, wet underbellies of the reactors — generally built in a burst of construction during the 1960s and 1970s. There were 38 leaks from underground piping between 2000 and 2009, according to an industry document presented at a tritium conference. Nearly two-thirds of the leaks were reported over the latest five years. For example, at the three-unit Browns Ferry complex in Alabama, a valve was mistakenly left open in a storage tank during modifications over the years. When the tank was filled in April 2010, about 1,000 gallons of tritium-laden water poured onto the ground at a concentration of 2 million picocuries per liter. In drinking water, that would be 100 times higher than the EPA health standard. And in 2008, 7.5 million picocuries per liter leaked from underground piping at Quad Cities in western Illinois — 375 times the EPA limit. Subsurface water not only rusts underground pipes, it attacks other buried components, including electrical cables that carry signals to control operations. A 2008 NRC staff memo reported industry data showing 83 failed cables between 21 and 30 years of service — but only 40 within their first 10 years of service. Underground cabling set in concrete can be extraordinarily difficult to replace. Under NRC rules, tiny concentrations of tritium and other contaminants are routinely released in monitored increments from nuclear plants; leaks from corroded pipes are not permitted. The leaks sometimes go undiscovered for years, the AP found. Many of the pipes or tanks have been patched, and contaminated soil and water have been removed in some places. But leaks are often discovered later from other nearby piping, tanks or vaults. Mistakes and defective material have contributed to some leaks. However, corrosion — from decades of use and deterioration — is the main cause. And, safety engineers say, the rash of leaks suggest nuclear operators are hard put to maintain the decadesold systems.

Study: Docs overtesting for cervical cancer virus

The Washington Post WASHINGTON ��� President Barack Obama’s nominee to head the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is scheduled to meet with senior Justice Department officials today amid growing pressure on the agency’s leadership over a controversial gun-trafficking operation. Andrew Traver, who runs the ATF’s Chicago office, is arriving in Washington as political fallout is continuing from the agency’s “Fast and Furious” operation, which targeted Mexican gun traffickers but has been linked to the killing of a U.S. law enforcement officer. Republicans in Congress have criticized the ATF’s handling of the investigation. The ATF has been without a permanent director since 2006, when Congress required the position to be confirmed by the Senate. With the powerful gun lobby able to block a director because one senator can hold up a nomination, Obama in November nominated Traver. But the National Rifle Association strongly opposes Traver because the organization believes he is linked to gun-control advocates and anti-gun activities, the organization has said.

The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Too many doctors are testing the wrong women, or using the wrong test, for a virus that causes cervical cancer. The days of one-size-fits-all screening for cervical cancer are long gone. How often to get a Pap smear — and whether to be tested for the cancercausing HPV virus at the same time — now depend on your age and other circumstances. But a government study reports Monday that a surprising number of doctors and clinics aren’t following guidelines from major medical groups on how to perform HPV checks, suggesting a lot of women are getting unnecessary tests. That wastes money and could harm women who wind up getting extra medical care they didn’t need, says Dr. Mona Saraiya of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, who led the research. “It’s extremely discouraging,” says Debbie Saslow, gynecologic cancer director at the American Cancer Society, who’s had to argue with her doctor against testing too often. “We have not been able to get that message across.”

The Associated Press

Syrian President Bashar Assad’s Monday speech has been awaited in the hope it would offer a path to a compromise in the face of mounting pressure, but many activists voiced skepticism about what he said.

Syria’s Assad offers path to change, but few specifics By Anthony Shadid New York Times News Service

BEIRUT — In his first address in two months, President Bashar Assad of Syria on Monday offered a national dialogue that he said could usher in change to a country where his party and family have monopolized authority for four decades. Deep skepticism greeted the proposal, and even some who were sympathetic to the leadership said they doubted that

Assad was ready to surrender absolute power, at least for now. But as the country wrestles with its gravest crisis in a generation, the question remains: If the government is in fact sincere, whom would it talk to? The government, which long equated almost any dissent with sedition, has suggested it may choose whom it will speak to — Assad mentioned the possibility of more than 100 people, although the government has

W  B Sudan steps up furious drive to stop rebels NAIROBI, Kenya — The Sudanese Army and its allied militias have gone on an unsparing rampage to crush rebel fighters in the Nuba Mountains of central Sudan, according to U.N. officials

and villagers who have escaped. “The market was burning,” said Salah Kaka, a mother of four who trekked for days with thousands of others to a mushrooming refugee camp after her husband disappeared during an air raid. “I dug ditches in the ground and hid the children.”

yet to say who they may be. The divide seemed to underline the criticism voiced by many opposition activists Monday: The proposal is a bid for time in a country that may be running out of it. “The street hasn’t managed to break the bones of the authority, and the authorities haven’t managed to break the bones of the street,” said Louay Hussein, an opposition figure in Damascus, the capital. “We’re passing

through an intractable period before the crisis.” For days, Assad’s speech was awaited in the hope that it would offer a crucial insight into the leadership’s willingness to compromise in the face of the uprising and mounting pressure from Turkey, the United States and the European Union. Assad offered at least a theoretical path for change, even if the speech lacked specifics and delivered somewhat vague deadlines.

Tens of thousands of rebel fighters have refused the government’s threat to disarm, digging into the craggy hillsides.

cial corruption and allowing security forces to kill hundreds of protesters who rallied against his regime in February. Mubarak’s lawyer, Farid Deeb, told Reuters of the former president condition on Monday, referring to a medical report filed with the court. Deeb was quoted as telling Agence France-Presse that Mubarak has “stomach cancer and the tumors are growing.” — From wire reports

Lawyer: Mubarak has cancer in stomach CAIRO — Toppled Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak has cancer, according to his lawyer, who disclosed the news less than two months before Mubarak is to stand trial, accused of finan-


B

Tech Focus Concern grows over a startup bubble, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,629.66 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +13.18 +.50%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

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12,080.38 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +76.02 +.63%

Citigroup puts EMI up for sale EMI, the music company that was seized by Citigroup in February after a disastrous four-year ownership by the private equity firm Terra Firma, is being put up for sale again. The smallest of the four major record companies, EMI announced Monday that it had begun a process “to explore and evaluate potential strategic alternatives, including a possible sale, recapitalization or initial public offering.” A sale is widely considered the likeliest outcome, with an auction to begin in coming weeks. In a memo to employees, Roger Faxon, EMI’s chief executive, wrote that by the fourth quarter of this year, “we will have a good idea of who our new owners are likely to be.” Some music executives say they believe the sale could wrap up even sooner.

China’s economy slowing, analysts say

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1,278.36 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +6.86 +.54%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 2.96 treasury CHANGE +.68%

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Jobless rates hold steady in May By Jordan Novet Seasonally adjusted unemployment rates for two of Central Oregon’s three counties fell slightly again last month. Statistics the Oregon Employment Department released Monday show jobless numbers fell further in May in Deschutes and Crook counties. The former, with 12 percent, fell 0.1 percentage points, and the latter, with 15.1 percent, dropped 0.2 percentage points. In Jefferson County, the rate for May, 12.4 percent, was flat compared with the previous month. The overall unemployment declines from the seasonally adjusted unemployment peaks in spring 2009 — Crook County, for example, saw an 18.7 percent unemployment rate in May and

June 2009, compared with 15.1 percent in May 2011 — demonstrate progress in the counties. “Good news,” said Carolyn Eagan, regional economist for the Oregon Employment Department. “We’re kind of holding steady, inching down a little bit, millimetering down a little bit.” In context, though, the region continues to suffer in terms of unemployment more than other places. Crook County’s rate is still the highest in Oregon. And the unemployment rates in Central Oregon counties still trail the national average, which is now at 9.1 percent. Eagan said she believes summer hiring was not happening at the usual rate because April and May were cooler than usual. See Jobless / B2

Unemployment rates for May Seasonally adjusted jobless rates in Central Oregon fell last month from April and from May 2010.

Crook County 17.2%

United States 9.6%

Oregon 10.9%

9%

April 2011

May 2011

Homebuilders’ confidence in the housing market fell to its lowest level in nine months.

April 2011

May 2011

May 2010

14.5%

May 2010

April 2011

April 2011

18

13 16

14

12

10 J J A SOND J FMAM J

2010

2011

* Readings below 50 indicate negative sentiment about the market. Source: National Association of Home Builders AP

May 2011

Jefferson County 14%

May 2011

12.4% 12.4%

May 2010

April 2011

May 2011

Source: Oregon Employment Department Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

If the Greek government can win a crucial vote of confidence tonight, paving the way to passing austerity measures into law this month, it will also win an immediate infusion of cash that will tide it — and the rest of Europe — over for now. But in many ways, that will be the easy part. The payment of 12 billion euros will help Greece pay its debts coming due only until September. After that, Greece still faces obstacles to winning tens of billions more in a much bigger bailout package that is essential to its survival through next year. See Greece / B2

EXECUTIVE FILE

Bend businessman uses motivational skills to succeed in work, life By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

K

Ed Merriman / The Bulletin

Vito DiMaio, manager of the North Coast Electric Co.’s service center in Bend, says the growing demand for green energy products, combined with his background as a Dale Carnegie instructor, helped him maneuver the distribution center through tough times.

The basics Who: Vito DiMaio Position: Manager, Central Oregon service center

Company: North Coast Electric Company Address: 1260 N.E. First St., Bend Phone: 541-382-6211 Website: www.northcoastelectric.com

nowing “How to Win Friends and Influence People” is more than a slogan for Vito DiMaio, who manages the North Coast Electric Company’s Central Oregon service center, teaches Dale Carnegie inspirational seminars and sits on the board of directors for Grandma’s House women’s shelter. “It’s a positive approach that helps you in every aspect of life, from your family and personal relationships to running a business,” DiMaio said. North Coast Electric, based in Seattle, was founded in 1913 and operates 33 service centers across the Northwest, including the one managed by DiMaio in Bend. “We distribute electrical parts and equipment to commercial contractors throughout Central Oregon,” DiMaio said. “We warehouse parts and equipment here in Bend and sell it to the contractors and others who install it,” DiMaio said. DiMaio, 45, grew up Philadelphia. He graduated with a degree in electrical engineering from the University of Dayton in Ohio in 1987. He took his first Dale Carnegie course in 1988 in Milwaukee and started his electrical distribution career in 1989 in Hawaii for a company called Alpha Electric Supply. See DiMaio / B5

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NAHB/Wells Fargo Housing Market Index*, seasonally adjusted

Vote of confidence only 1st step for Greece

Putting Dale Carnegie to work

Borders seeks loan, plans to hold auction

Confidence drops

$36.065 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.326

New York Times News Service May 2010

12.1% 12%

May 2010

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By Graham Bowley

Deschutes County

15.3% 15.1%

9.5% 9.3%

9.1%

SHANGHAI — New economic analyses of China provide further indication that the nation’s supercharged economy is beginning to slow, and warn that soaring inflation, rising labor costs and mounting local government debt threaten to weaken growth even more. Several economists in China have recently lowered their growth forecasts for this year and next year to about 8.5 percent, down from earlier forecasts of 9 percent to 10 percent, while also warning about the possibility of a sharp rise in nonperforming loans at the nation’s big state-owned banks. Since the financial crisis, China has been the world’s leading growth engine. But for much of the past year, China has been trying to rein in overly aggressive bank lending as a way to tame soaring inflation and property prices. Those tightening measures have not only weakened growth in China, analysts say, but have also begun to expose a host of other problems in the nation’s financial system.

WILMINGTON, Del. — Borders Group Inc., the bankrupt U.S. bookstore chain, has asked a judge to approve a $30 million loan and plans to hold an auction on July 19. Borders wants to complete a sale by July 29, according to a filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Manhattan. The company is “encouraged that one of the parties presently negotiating with the debtors will emerge as the successful buyer,” Andrew Glenn, a Borders lawyer, wrote in the June 17 filing. — From wire reports

$1541.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$2.90

CENTRAL OREGON UNEMPLOYMENT

The Bulletin

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

B

By Ben Protess

New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

ESPOO, Finland — Late last year, the Apple iPhone became the best-selling device at Finland’s leading mobile operator, a highly embarrassing situation for Nokia, the struggling mobile phone maker that has long been Finland’s corporate standard-bearer. So Stephen Elop, who left a top post at Microsoft in September to lead the turnaround effort at Nokia, knows that his first priority is to steal a beat on the competition and quickly get Nokia back in the game. Nine months into the job, after a reorganization that will eliminate 7,000 jobs and the introduction of a new operating system from Microsoft, Elop has taken

Even as Congress squabbles over who will lead the new consumer watchdog, the fledging agency is gearing up to police Wall Street. Over the last several months, Republicans have scrutinized the early moves of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, introducing measures to slash its budget and ordering investigations into the scope of its authority. The attacks, which center on Elizabeth Warren, the Obama administration official setting up the bureau, have stymied the White House from naming a director. See Consumer / B5

6 POINT INSPECTION BRAKES New York Times News Service

TIRE PRESSURE

Nokia’s new N9 smartphone features a touch-screen that is designed for one-hand use. the first visible step in that direction. In Singapore today, Nokia will introduce a sleek touchscreen smartphone, the N9, with a useful innovation not found on any competing device. See Nokia / B2

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Jobless Continued from B1 Labor force numbers have been unusually low in Deschutes and Crook counties in recent months. In Deschutes County, the labor force count for May was 78,559, and the previous month it was 78,812. The number hasn’t fallen lower than 79,000 since May 2006. And in Crook County, where the count was under 8,900 from January to May of this year, the labor force has not been that low since February 2004. As for what the future holds

Greece Continued from B1 It has to persuade private banks and other companies that hold its government debt to take part in the bailout by agreeing to lend the country the same amount of money again after their bonds are redeemed. Only then will other European countries and the International Monetary Fund agree to put up their share of the new bailout. The IMF’s acting managing director, John Lipsky, warned that the European Union must be prepared to underwrite the finances of the Greek state for the next year — a much tougher position than European officials expected — in order for the IMF to release its portion of the aid. “That needs to be done before we can move forward and we are hopeful that those conditions will be met with alacrity,” Lipsky said. If Greece’s economic emergency is not dealt with quickly, the IMF said in a report, there is a risk of contagion to other countries, starting with Ireland and Portugal, but possibly spreading to Spain, Italy and even Belgium. Greece needed a 110 billioneuro bailout last year from European governments and the IMF. The hope was that the country’s economy would be growing by now and that it could start selling bonds in the markets to raise money. But still in the grip of its economic crisis, it is short on cash to pay interest to private investors that have lent it money through the years in the form of government bonds. As a result, Greece is seeking a second bailout from the rest of Europe and the IMF, possibly as much as 100 billion euros.

Taking a hit At stake in the negotiations is the degree to which Greece’s bond holders would agree to take a hit on their investments. One aggressive option, proposed by Germany, was for banks to be forced to exchange all of their Greek debt for bonds of a longer maturity. But such forced restructuring would have constituted a default and appears to have been ruled out, at least for now, after Germany backed down last week.

Nokia Continued from B1 “It’s optimized for one-hand use,” said Marko Ahtisaari, Nokia’s head of design, whose team devised the N9, which allows users to switch between applications with a thumb, avoiding the need to return to a main menu screen or press a button, something required on both the iPhone and Android phones. The N9, which will sell unsubsidized for the equivalent of about $670 to $760 for 16 and 64 gigabyte models, is no panacea for Nokia, which is well behind in the fast-growing market for smartphones and was leapfrogged in revenue by Apple in the first quarter. Late last month, Nokia issued a second-quarter profit warning and abandoned its 2011 outlook, a move that sent its stock tumbling more than 17 percent. “The market is changing,” said Pal Zarandy, a partner at Rewheel, a Helsinki firm that advises operators on their mobile data strategies. “The whole smartphone data transformation is a window that will last one or two more years. Then that market will be saturated. The question is: Can Nokia and Microsoft come up with relevant phones fast enough?” Elop, a 47-year-old Canadian who ran Microsoft’s Office products division before joining Nokia, said the alliance between the companies would deliver. The release of the N9 — which Elop said he pushed for relentlessly after he arrived — was

for local unemployment, Eagan hopes June employment will be stronger, to make up for the lack of employment gains in April and May. “And then,” she said, “I hope the weather stays good, and I hope that (the tourism-promotion organization) Visit Bend continues their stellar job that they’ve been doing to continue to recruit big events to Central Oregon, because that seems to really be positively impacting employment in leisure and hospitality.”

With Xbox’s new in-game advertising, engagement is the goal

PARIS AIR SHOW

By Tanzina Vega

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

The other option is a voluntary rollover of maturing debt. Investors willingly agree simply to buy their bonds again when they come due. This is being called the Vienna scenario, referring to the voluntary rollover by Austrian banks during the global financial crisis of their commitments to Eastern European countries. The trick is to persuade commercial investors to willingly put off receiving their bond payments. “The real question is what their incentive will be for all of the banks to roll over their short term bonds,” said William Rhodes, a former senior vice chairman of Citigroup who has been involved with several emerging market debt crises. “How do you do a voluntary deal and get everyone on board that does not trigger a default?” If there is a delay in payment, even if voluntary, that could be considered a technical default. Analysts say that would spook markets, potentially leading to downgrades of the banks that own much of the debt, initiating payment clauses in insurance contracts written on Greek debt, and leading to questions being raised about the creditworthiness of other highly indebted European nations. According to Moody’s, one of the big credit rating agencies, a delay in bond payments would not necessarily be considered a default if investors did not feel pressured into taking part in a plan to delay bond payments due to them. The hope is that by making the rollover voluntary it would not be interpreted as a default, setting off untold consequences throughout the global financial system. But according to Nicolas Veron, a senior fellow at Bruegel, an economics research institute in Brussels, the definition of what is a default is deeply uncertain and even a voluntary debt exchange could be challenged by holders of credit-default swaps, in a court of law. “Part of the problem is there are different judges,” he said. “There are the rating agencies. There is the ECB, and what debt it will accept, and the International Swaps and Derivatives Association and its views on credit-default swaps. You may have three different opinions.”

a harbinger, he said, of a more competitive Nokia. The N9 runs a variant of Nokia’s MeeGo operating system, a product of Nokia’s shortlived venture with Intel, the chip maker. The device was already in the pipeline when he arrived last fall, but Elop said he saw its potential and accelerated its release, working closely with his design chief, Ahtisaari, who now reports directly to him. Ahtisaari said design had a new priority at Nokia, a company traditionally run by radio engineers. “Stephen gets design,” Ahtisaari said. Nokia has gone through a bracing transition since Elop arrived. The company is cutting 4,000 jobs, including 1,500 in Finland, and transferring 3,000 others to a consultant, Accenture. The moves were a consequence of Elop’s decision to phase out Nokia’s in-house operating system, Symbian, in favor of Microsoft’s Windows software for phones. Elop acknowledged that the job cuts and transition to Microsoft, considered necessary to restore competitiveness, have been challenging. But he rejected criticism from some analysts who had questioned whether he could have better finessed the timing of the move to Microsoft’s software to limit any damage to Symbian. “We are shifting a whole company,” Elop said. “There are tens of thousands of people here. What they do every day is being changed right now. And that’s not something you can do under the cloak of darkness or privacy.”

New York Times News Service

Francois Mori / The Associated Press

Visitors walk in the rain on the first day of the Paris Air Show, at the Bourget airport on Monday. Visible in background is the Boeing 747-8.

Strong plane orders set tone of confidence By Nicola Clark New York Times News Service

LE BOURGET, France — The world’s biggest aircraft manufacturers affirmed the industry’s strengthening recovery Monday, announcing more than $26 billion in orders and commitments for more than 200 new commercial planes. A large portion of those deals, which were secured on the first day of the Paris Air Show, was for Airbus’ latest version of the popular A320 single-aisle jet, which is being revamped with more fuel-efficient engines. The company said it had secured commitments for 126 A320neos, which, when finalized, would be worth as much as $11.5 billion at list prices. Neo stands for New Engine Option. Meanwhile, Boeing said it had received orders for up to 17 of the new stretched passenger version of its 747 jet, the 747-8i, placed by two unidentified customers and valued at as much as $5.4 billion.

“This has actually exceeded my expectations for the first day,” said Saj Ahmad, an analyst at FBE Aerospace in London. “One does wonder what they are going to have left to announce for the rest of the week.” Airbus had been widely expected to announce a flurry of orders for the A320neo, which the plane maker says will be 15 percent more fuel-efficient than its current offering of single-aisle planes. Two of the biggest A320neo buyers were leasing companies. GE Capital Aviation Services, the aircraft-leasing arm of General Electric, made a firm order for 60 A320neos, while the Air Lease Corp., the Los Angelesbased company run by Steven Udvar-Hazy, formerly of AIG’s International Lease Finance Corp., committed to buy 50 of the planes. “This shows the confidence that the lessors have that they can actually place these airplanes,” Ahmad said.

Boeing considers bigger Dreamliner PARIS — Boeing is leaning toward a bigger version of the 787 Dreamliner as the U.S. company seeks to out-maneuver Airbus in a widebody jetliner market it reckons will be worth almost $2 trillion over the next 20 years. The 787-10 could enter service by 2016, Jim Albaugh, Boeing’s commercial airplanes chief, said Sunday ahead of the Paris Air Show. That would provide competition for Airbus’s A350-900 and steal a march on the larger A350-1000, which won’t be ready until 2017, according to a schedule announced Saturday. — B lo o mberg News

Users of Microsoft’s popular Xbox Kinect gaming console will soon be able to use voice and motion commands to interact with advertisements while they are playing their favorite game or watching a video. On Tuesday, Microsoft is set to announce a new suite of advertising tools, called NUads, short for natural user-interface ads, that will let users interact with advertising on the console dashboard or embedded in games and other video content. The ads use the same voice and motion control developed for the company’s Kinect game console, which it introduced in time for the 2010 holiday season. The new ads are intended to help advertisers keep the attention of Xbox users in a way that traditional television advertising does not. “When you have highly interactive people and a passive medium, they are interacting with their phone or their laptop while watching TV,” said Mark Kroese, the general manager of the advertising business group at Microsoft. The new ads, Kroese said, “create a natural way for the user to engage with the TV.” Using voice commands, gamers will be able to send messages about an ad to a social networking site like Twitter by saying “Xbox Tweet.” Advertisers who want to send more information about a product or promotion associated with a campaign can prompt Xbox users to say “Xbox More,” which will send users an email with the information they wanted.

2011

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 B3

T F Experts ponder Investor concern growing the era of massive as startups rake in millions amounts of data IPhone app serves THE TECH-BUBBLE QUESTION

as cautionary tale after raising $41M — and flopping

San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News

By Claire Cain Miller New York Times News Service

PALO ALTO, Calif. — What if you threw a $41 million party and nobody came? A startup company called Color knows how that feels. In March, Color unveiled its photo-sharing cellphone application — and revealed that it had raised $41 million from investors before the app had a single user. Despite the company’s riches, the app landed with a thud, attracting few users and many complaints from those who did try it. “It would be pointless even if I managed to understand how it works,” one reviewer wrote in the Apple App Store. Since then, Color has become a warning sign for investors, entrepreneurs and analysts who fear there is a bubble in startup investing. They say it shows that venture capitalists, desperate to invest in the next Facebook or LinkedIn, are blindly throwing money at startups that have not shown they can build something useful, much less a business that can provide decent returns on investment. Color, which says it is overhauling its app, is just one of the startups that have set tongues wagging about bubbly excess in Silicon Valley. The Melt plans to sell grilled-cheese sandwiches and soup that people can order from their mobile phones. It raised about $15 million from Sequoia Capital, which also invested in Color. Airbnb, which helps people rent rooms in their homes, is raising venture capital that would value it at a billion dollars. Scoopon, a kind of Groupon for Australians, raised $80 million; Juice in the City, a Groupon for mothers, raised $6 million; and Scvngr, which started a Groupon for gamers, raised $15 million. These could, of course, turn out to be successful businesses. The worry, investors say, is the prices. They say they have paid two to three times more for their stakes in such startups over the past year. According to the National Venture Capital Association, venture capitalists invested $5.9 billion in the first three months of the year, up 14 percent from a year before, but they invested in 51 fewer companies, indicating that they were funneling more money into fewer startups. “The big success stories — Facebook, Zynga and Twitter — are leading to investing

New York Times News Service

Bill Nguyen founded of Color, an iPhone-app startup that raised $41 million before it had a single user.

“We live in a very favorable environment for startups right now, so if the number we raised was significantly larger than it would be at any other time, I’m not going to apologize for that.” — Bill Nguyen, founder, Color

Noah Berger / New York Times News Service

Jonathan Kaplan founded The Melt, a service that will sell grilledcheese sandwiches and soup that people can order through their phones. The startup raised about $15 million from investors. in ideas on a napkin, because no one wants to miss out on the next big thing,” said Eric Lefkofsky, a founder of Groupon who also runs Lightbank, a Chicagobased venture fund with a $100 million coffer. A decade ago, in the first surge of Internet investing, it was not unusual for tech startups to raise tens of millions of dollars before they had revenue, a product or users. But venture capitalists became more cautious after the bubble burst and the 2008 recession paralyzed Silicon Valley. Meanwhile, it now costs less than ever to build a website or mobile app. So this time around the general philosophy has been to start small. “By starting out lean, you have the chance to know if you’re on to something,” said Mark Suster, a managing director at GRP Partners. “If you start fat and the product concept doesn’t work,

inherently the company will lose a lot of money.”

Color lessons Two of Color’s photo-sharing competitors, Instagram and PicPlz, exemplify the lean startup ethos. They started with $500,000 and $350,000, respectively, and teams of just a few people. As they have introduced successful products and attracted users, they have slowly raised more money and hired engineers. Color, meanwhile, spent $350,000 to buy the Web address color.com, and an additional $75,000 to buy colour. com. It rents a cavernous office in downtown Palo Alto, where 38 employees work in a space with room for 160, amid beanbag chairs, tents for napping and a hand-built half-pipe skateboard ramp. Bill Nguyen, Color’s always-

smiling founder, has hired a team of expensive engineers, like D.J. Patil, a former chief scientist at LinkedIn. “If I knew a better way of doing it, I would, but that’s what my cost structure is,” Nguyen said in an interview last week. Nguyen bounds around the Color office in bare feet and talks with implicit exclamation points at the end of each phrase, fueled by what he calls an addiction to Coke Zero. Despite his sprightliness, he says he has been chastened in the last three months. “Your ego gets bruised a little bit,” he said. “There’s no doubt I wish we would have launched and millions of people would have used it, but that didn’t happen. The reality is we’re going to plug away at it and take a much more traditional route to go from A to B.” But he makes no apologies for the amount of money he raised. “We live in a very favorable environment for startups right now, so if the number we raised was significantly larger than it would be at any other time, I’m not going to apologize for that,” he said.

Employees sell their shares, fearing a bubble will burst By Miguel Helft New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — While Silicon Valley and Wall Street debate whether a new technology bubble is in the making, some early Facebook employees are not taking any chances. They’re leaving the company to cash out on millions of dollars in stock options while Facebook’s valuation continues to soar. “If you’ve seen the world blow up once, you just don’t know what’s going to happen a year from now,” said one former Facebook employee, referring to the dot-com crash a decade ago. He joined the company in its early days, and left a few months ago so he could sell some of his shares. A company policy bars current employees from selling stock. “It seemed very risky

to stay in a situation where all of your liquidity was tied up in what I consider a high-risk company,” he said, declining to make his name public when discussing a financial decision, and also because he did not want to upset Facebook. He is hardly the only tech industry insider cashing in to minimize his financial risk in case the value of private companies starts heading south. Employees and investors at dozens of hot startups have sold hundreds of millions of dollars’ worth of shares, fueling a booming market in private transactions. Facebook has been driving the trend; last year, it accounted for nearly 45 percent of all the trades on SecondMarket, a leading marketplace for private company shares.

Founders and early investors have sold shares in their startups for years, usually through brokers and a small network of funds specializing in private-company transactions. But such sales have expanded greatly in recent years, with early rank-and-file employees participating in deals in evergrowing numbers. Employees have become more interested in selling, in part because companies are taking longer to go public. And workers’ eagerness to see tangible reward has promoted the creation of a

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are profound changes fueled by data. Companies and organizaSAN JOSE, Calif. — The tions are being scrutinized like era of big data has arrived. never before,” said Don Tapscott, Last year, consumers and author of “Macrowikinomics: businesses around the world Rebooting Businesses and the are estimated to have stored World.” more than 13 exabytes of inThe digital information era formation on PCs, laptops and is making government and corother devices — the equiva- porations more transparent, he lent of more than 52,000 times said. the information housed in the Yet individuals, wittingly or Library of Congress. An exa- not, are giving up their privacy, byte is 1 followed by 18 zeros, Tapscott said. While advocator a billion gigabytes. ing for more open government And the amount of data and corporations, Tapscott said stored in such “technologi- he does not accept the Facebook cal memories” is growing ethos that, “If we are all more 25 percent a year, said Mar- open, we will be better people. I tin Hilbert, a researcher at don’t buy this (notion that) prithe University of Southern vacy is dead and we should all California. get used to it. We have governHe joined an eclectic group ments collecting dossiers on of experts in us. Government Santa Clara, is not always Calif., recently “This is an age benevolent.” for a two-day of network Internet techconference nology, in a sponsored by intelligence, an age sense, is returnThe Economist of collaboration ing America to magazine to dean earlier time, bate what this and an age when many peoi n f o r m a t i o n where there are ple lived in small overload means communities for individu- profound changes where neighbors als, businesses fueled by data. knew much more and society. about one anothCompanies and The collective er, said Naveen conclusion: It organizations are Jain, founder and means greater being scrutinized CEO of Intelius, a government service that digs and corporate like never before.” up information transparency on individuals. — and threats — Don Tapscott, author, Throughout the to personal “Macrowikinomics: day, people leave Rebooting Businesses privacy. tech nolog ica l Information and the World” fingerprints — technolog y from video camis a boon for eras monitoring businesses that know how to banks, streets and malls to softcrunch data for their competi- ware that tracks online behavior, tive advantage. But the con- such as search results, he said. stant bombardment of tweets, “If you want privacy,” he addtext messages and beeping de- ed, “you can’t expect Google to vices may also be an impedi- give you information for free.” ment to the ability of people to Said Barlow: “Everything you focus their attention and form do in life leads to a digital slime deep thoughts, some partici- trail.” pants said. Nicholas Carr, author of “The “It’s like fire,” said John Shallows,” a book that argues Perry Barlow, co-founder of the Internet hurts the way people the Electronic Frontier Foun- think, said multitasking and the dation. “It will have all man- constant craving for more inforner of consequences.” mation make workers less proBusinesses that analyze ductive. “If you never pay attendata about customers in- tion to information closely, you creasingly have an edge over never create that wealth of intertheir competitors, said James nal connections that give way to Manyika, director of the McK- thoughts,” he said. insey Global Institute. “People who multitask a lot He estimates that in 2009, think they are being productive nearly all companies in the because they are taking in a lot United States with at least of information,” Carr said. “But 1,000 employees on average when you test their productivity, stored at least 200 terabyes it’s actually lower than people of data — twice the size of who aren’t multitasking. There is Wal-Mart’s data warehouse no such thing as doing two things in 1999. simultaneously.” In the past decade, “Our The information age is upendability to digitize data has ing life as we know it — much like gone up dramatically,” said previous technological changes Manyika. “Storage capa- did, researcher Hilbert said. bilities to capture data have “When you are in the middle of changed dramatically. And it, it’s as disruptive as you’ve ever the Internet has made it very seen,” he said. When automoeasy to share data.” biles first appeared, “People were Retail companies that are killing each other. There was no savvy about sifting through DMV. There were no driver’s litheir data can improve oper- censes. Now we have to create ating margins by 60 percent, these institutions for the inforhe said. But in coming years, mation age.” Manyika added, the United States will face a severe shortage of workers with deep analytical skills, as well as manget a room agers and analysts with the capabilities to make business sense of this information. “In the next two years, the sexy job will be statistician,” he said. The data deluge is changing all areas of society. “This is an age of network intelligence, an age of collaboOPEN HOUSE JUNE 25, 1-5PM ration and an age where there

By John Boudreau

541-706-6900

541-388-4418

number of businesses to serve their needs. Still, fear of a bursting bubble is not the only factor behind sales of shares by employees. Early employees who leave Facebook or any other private startup typically have 90 days to exercise their stock options. When they do, they face a high tax bill. An employee who exercises $10 million in shares may face some $3 million in taxes, and in many cases the only way the employee can pay those taxes is by selling some shares.

3RD ST. & EMPIRE BLVD.


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMC Net wi AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accelr8 Accenture AccretivH Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity AcuraPh Acxiom AdobeSy AdolorCp Adtran AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agilysys Agnico g Agrium g AirLease n AirProd AirTrnsp Aircastle Airgas AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexcoR g Alexion s Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBGlbHi AlliBInco AlliantEgy AldIrish rs AlldNevG AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlmadnM g AlmostFam AlnylamP AlonUSA AlphaNRs AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN rs AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alvarion AmBev s AmTrstFin Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AFTxE AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AmIntlGrp AmOriBio AmRepro AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Ann Inc Annaly AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCoal ArchDan ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhRsh h ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth AtlPwr g AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AuRico g Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp

1.74 -.11 1.12 24.63 -.33 0.56 23.04 +.42 1.34 64.49 +.18 12.27 1.20 45.34 +.32 45.98 +.62 1.08 10.01 +.20 1.02 9.32 +.12 1.80 39.84 +.40 0.20 14.18 +.02 34.95 -.10 5.71 +.02 20.23 -.34 0.58 35.07 -.31 1.72 30.96 +.19 15.35 -.34 6.75 -.31 1.38 -.01 0.22 14.52 -.02 7.98 -.09 0.05 26.33 +.33 2.52 +.01 1.92 52.02 +.34 0.70 66.39 +.91 0.42 7.20 21.80 +.40 3.16 31.55 -.66 1.61 +.09 0.72 20.43 +.33 3.95 -1.00 0.90 53.96 +.01 23.42 +.40 7.77 -.22 12.19 -.11 6.09 -.10 60.52 -2.07 31.37 +.85 2.39 +.02 0.17 10.98 +.11 0.04 24.99 +.64 5.24 -.02 0.52 56.83 +.61 4.50 +.63 12.21 +.11 30.95 +.48 1.99 +.10 0.36 37.41 +.10 0.24 59.04 +.92 6.04 1.16 +.05 13.70 -.02 6.89 -.11 0.06 5.63 +.03 2.66 +.29 26.88 -.60 0.04 7.05 -.03 6.34 -.07 12.41 +.04 17.85 +.49 28.62 +1.57 2.16 +.03 0.60 44.77 +1.56 96.44 +.38 6.69 +.02 7.11 +.01 1.22 +.06 48.38 +.95 7.99 +.30 0.64 60.98 -1.12 0.11 82.98 +3.23 25.81 -.09 2.32 91.18 +1.14 6.27 -.06 0.40 11.99 +.08 1.16 66.84 +.52 29.24 -.25 6.54 +.35 66.92 +1.55 0.86 8.96 +.14 0.66 65.68 +.98 5.21 +.07 0.12 14.78 +.06 35.72 +.04 7.10 +.33 45.01 +.40 1.54 22.69 -.23 17.04 +.43 0.72 60.00 +1.38 0.20 81.80 +.96 89.77 +1.64 3.00 -.01 1.20 15.06 +.23 0.48 7.92 +.01 1.70 40.27 +.54 2.30 +.04 30.13 +.55 2.06 +.05 18.59 +.11 0.84 29.88 +.23 2.13 24.35 -.04 3.06 +.06 23.95 -3.82 8.98 -.05 0.16 10.05 -.04 40.98 -1.14 0.66 5.89 -.02 0.74 15.60 +.06 .90 -.07 0.24 42.93 +.15 0.48 21.92 +.24 1.52 27.32 +.24 1.15 -.07 1.18 31.80 +.69 0.32 21.98 +.01 13.64 -.05 187.72 +1.35 28.70 +.03 26.22 -1.44 1.54 28.79 +.40 63.90 +.98 0.50 5.42 -.16 0.52 50.06 +.26 1.00 +.03 10.25 +.12 1.35 34.70 +.54 5.60 29.80 -.35 8.93 -.01 0.44 12.73 +.18 1.84 37.91 +.27 0.10 12.18 +.11 0.72 48.88 +.38 0.65 34.54 -.22 28.02 +.04 1.06 7.21 +.04 7.61 +.06 50.68 +.48 0.92 29.28 +.14 0.92 56.55 -.11 0.42 41.39 +.39 0.42 22.00 +.02 0.24 41.27 +.37 58.45 +.44 5.72 +.03 0.06 50.13 -.03 18.22 +.66 11.42 -.24 0.36 69.65 -.80 2.92 -.02 1.00 36.74 +.16 35.59 -.41 0.20 42.12 +.02 1.16 57.23 +.22 26.39 -.03 2.59 18.50 +.10 1.94 -.01 1.00 7.35 +.07 0.60 49.58 +.19 4.78 -.07 0.60 116.80 -.36 0.48 25.99 +.61 42.07 +.40 1.12 10.05 +.07 315.32 -4.94 0.32 12.42 +.01 8.39 -.01 20.30 +.68 0.62 21.53 +.01 .10 +.01 0.75 31.59 +.06 32.75 +.20 0.44 24.81 -.26 0.64 30.44 +.27 0.06 20.45 +.30 1.36 -.04 1.40 15.97 +.06 9.97 +.65 31.80 +.63 0.12 21.97 -.01 0.13 27.05 +.06 1.44 7.47 2.17 +.04 10.70 +.05 36.81 +.01 .43 -.03 24.51 +.50 17.05 +.80 32.83 +.76 0.40 12.91 +.16 0.70 62.53 +2.80 13.93 -.04 0.60 25.39 -.06 15.17 +.03 0.04 13.36 +.01 0.72 35.02 -.01 0.18 15.59 +.39 0.52 13.05 +.01 2.55 49.27 40.05 +.13 1.09 15.25 -.16 1.60 31.16 +.27 12.64 +.08 1.36 32.17 +.26 39.13 -.12 9.99 +.47 5.19 -.07 33.71 +.60 35.70 +.01 1.80 72.15 +.44 1.44 52.40 +.73 292.24 +.53 19.45 -.19 0.36 32.75 +.25 6.25 +.16 3.57 131.74 +2.66 3.26 -.39 17.50 +.55 1.00 36.80 +.15 15.90 +.20 1.10 25.02 +.35 29.97 -.02 0.92 27.61 +.25 1.59 +.08 0.92 30.66 +.12 0.84 19.38 -.06 0.64 26.27 +.08

Nm BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BSD Med BabckW n Baidu BakrHu BallCp s BallyTech BalticTrdg BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoMacro BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h Bankrate n BarcGSOil BiPLive BiPLSpxVM Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconP rs BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biodel BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip Bitauto n BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnhC&I BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I BlkRlAsst Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BlueNile BdwlkPpl BobEvans BodyCen n Boeing Boingo n Boise Inc BoozAllen n BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSoft Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldOfPr BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckeye BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE CBS B CDC Cp rs CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CSX s CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CalifWtr s Calix CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CardnlHlth CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd CaribouC CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CasellaW Caseys CashAm CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CatoCp Cavium Cbeyond CelSci Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterFncl CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh CharterCm

D 2.07 38.92 +1.06 38.42 +.49 0.68 7.93 +.12 1.82 88.90 +.35 1.82 73.35 +.29 45.55 -1.95 52.09 +.44 0.42 41.84 -.32 3.22 -.31 1.50 49.60 +.48 0.18 16.08 +.15 3.71 -.23 27.99 -.04 118.28 +.60 0.60 69.29 -.06 0.28 37.76 -.06 39.55 +.67 0.55 6.07 +.10 0.56 11.25 -.07 0.80 19.32 +.15 2.08 35.85 -.41 0.79 11.26 0.70 11.25 +.06 0.04 12.40 +.23 0.04 10.60 -.08 1.52 -.05 1.80 45.86 +.17 1.14 -.04 2.80 62.10 +.34 0.52 26.06 -.14 2.08 58.48 +.40 .74 15.35 +.01 24.12 +.07 30.16 +.40 13.82 -.87 0.36 16.49 -.08 24.12 -1.12 52.80 -1.12 0.76 109.14 +.47 20.14 -.27 0.32 23.44 +.28 0.48 43.17 -.01 25.55 -.71 1.24 59.93 +1.59 2.40 50.66 +.86 1.33 +.01 21.68 +.21 3.26 +.01 0.10 6.14 +.04 1.64 85.96 +.83 52.59 +.60 0.20 32.65 +.17 0.24 7.24 +.17 0.96 31.99 +.25 0.32 32.15 +.08 76.10 +.59 0.30 46.14 -.05 0.60 31.54 +.53 32.69 +.29 43.50 +.42 1.69 -.03 98.60 +3.84 0.10 5.87 25.50 -.16 0.80 19.13 +.11 2.50 -.02 6.84 +.20 6.74 -.06 1.46 30.34 +.23 1.04 9.29 +.11 40.15 -.61 5.50 189.40 +2.06 0.32 4.18 1.44 13.28 -.21 2.28 17.18 +.11 1.36 9.53 +.03 1.09 13.66 +.06 0.40 16.45 -.18 0.60 15.55 +.15 21.36 -.12 43.11 +.11 2.09 27.99 +.39 0.80 33.82 +.37 20.02 -.57 1.68 74.52 +.36 8.37 -.54 0.80 6.93 +.18 18.35 +.19 73.18 +1.66 0.04 6.44 +.08 2.00 105.68 +1.75 6.74 -.05 7.92 +.10 0.72 30.97 -1.02 0.60 11.46 +.18 1.05 27.12 -.66 1.67 19.20 -.02 23.05 +.41 0.44 19.55 +.38 25.73 +.50 7.84 +.13 1.60 +.02 0.56 23.91 +.35 1.32 27.81 +.29 0.36 31.25 -.36 0.60 22.88 +.10 33.82 +2.62 1.38 -.03 6.43 -.02 23.72 +.38 0.52 32.27 +.05 0.56 18.59 +.18 0.34 9.20 +.23 10.13 +.04 0.32 25.09 +.07 0.28 10.34 +.21 1.28 73.50 +.54 17.97 +.12 0.05 18.30 +.32 4.00 62.71 -.80 0.20 23.46 +.30 0.80 41.37 +1.21 0.10 91.63 +.11 0.49 36.33 -.51 60.23 +1.37 1.00 65.42 -.38 0.20 21.71 +.12 23.86 -.12 0.84 18.00 +.18 0.40 23.77 -.02 0.40 26.37 +.49 2.01 -.02 27.10 -.33 0.40 138.57 +2.51 1.16 77.30 +.42 0.04 50.05 +1.16 42.95 +.26 5.50 +.02 1.12 34.62 +.34 5.60 278.92 +1.04 0.84 19.64 -.04 36.66 +.06 7.38 +.18 5.91 230.34 +.30 13.97 +.35 0.12 25.11 +.30 0.34 8.95 +.08 22.57 +.20 21.28 +.51 0.50 37.49 +.16 25.06 +.22 0.60 35.30 -.74 0.72 38.46 +.95 0.12 60.47 +.13 63.05 +1.28 9.12 +.26 10.00 -.03 5.69 -.06 0.63 9.27 +.07 16.39 +.21 0.62 18.31 +.17 19.40 +.41 0.04 6.39 +.11 5.00 -.21 6.28 +.07 15.53 -.02 1.23 1.96 64.78 +.70 0.40 23.20 -.61 14.75 -.25 45.80 -.31 1.16 34.23 +.06 1.30 75.66 +.22 0.36 38.59 -.23 1.20 60.82 +.37 9.80 -.30 .34 +.03 0.20 49.59 +.75 3.68 +.56 0.04 6.10 +.09 0.30 11.98 +.09 1.64 13.88 +.17 1.36 +.03 0.86 44.46 +.58 .28 -.01 26.81 +.15 20.14 -.23 12.87 +.77 29.28 +.03 1.00 35.73 +.46 0.72 51.92 +4.04 34.73 -.43 30.20 +.15 5.43 -.02 0.60 45.51 +.51 0.14 52.91 +2.05 54.64 +.32 1.84 98.18 +2.23 0.04 15.76 +.08 0.92 28.95 +.51 37.58 -.37 12.58 -.66 .48 -.04 0.24 49.16 +1.60 8.17 +.03 59.59 +1.72 1.97 -.05 3.64 28.06 +.11 3.25 +.09 7.83 +.10 1.89 19.74 +.50 0.80 33.52 +.12 33.48 +.84 5.79 -.10 0.79 18.83 +.09 0.03 16.74 -.05 1.56 13.07 -.08 11.88 +.16 0.01 21.07 +.02 10.15 +.08 13.95 -.07 2.90 39.60 +.15 6.19 -.02 79.74 +.03 32.54 +.43 117.40 +.32 2.82 +.06 39.10 -.03 4.02 +.22 56.03 -.78

Nm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaCEd ChinaDigtl ChiFnOnl ChinGerui ChinaGreen ChinaLife ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaTcF ChinaTInfo ChinaUni ChXDPlas ChiXFash n ChinaYuch ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchD s CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp rs CitzRepB h CitrixSys Clarcor CleanEngy Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Codexis Coeur CoffeeH CogentC Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Comtech Comverge Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpExc CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane Credicp CSVS2xVxS CSVSIvVxSt CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus Crocs Crossh g rs CrosstexE CrosstxLP CrwnCstle CrownHold Ctrip.com CubicEngy CubistPh Cummins Curis CurEuro CurSwiss CushTRet Cyberonics Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCA TotRet DCT Indl DG FastCh DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DUSA Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere Delcath Delek Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemandTc DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaCon n DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigitalGlb Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBull DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear DrxREBull

D 52.80 +.77 30.04 +.29 5.26 +.27 17.03 -.01 8.17 +.17 1.70 17.48 +1.02 0.35 28.10 +.08 3.12 99.91 +.74 0.20 33.30 +.04 0.20 14.45 +.19 45.70 +.98 0.62 3.50 +.05 4.50 +.13 1.56 5.33 -.24 3.19 +.17 2.96 -.03 3.58 -.30 0.91 47.98 -.09 8.19 +.02 5.28 -.08 1.93 44.67 +.12 0.30 2.60 -.05 4.65 +.19 2.43 +.04 1.66 +.06 3.53 -.21 2.45 -.35 0.12 19.53 3.97 +.17 2.72 -.14 1.50 18.79 -.14 6.50 -.22 276.05 +7.08 12.65 +.24 1.56 62.30 -.36 33.89 -.34 0.68 40.44 +.56 4.94 +.01 16.96 +.23 0.40 82.34 -.82 3.05 +.06 1.60 28.54 -.35 0.84 19.57 -.45 0.49 32.29 +.26 13.49 -.02 0.24 15.14 +.17 2.13 25.99 -.06 1.97 27.30 0.04 38.16 -.14 .67 -.00 74.80 +.61 0.42 44.72 +.72 12.52 +.05 3.63 +.03 3.43 -.16 0.56 82.20 +.69 2.40 67.86 +.32 19.07 -.12 0.90 60.38 +1.07 12.58 +.19 1.88 65.83 +.21 0.52 28.77 +.16 9.44 -1.04 23.60 +.61 0.12 13.10 -2.49 15.47 +.12 0.36 32.99 +.04 67.91 +.26 1.44 17.20 -.10 0.72 9.46 +.15 48.58 +.80 1.27 -.07 2.32 89.11 +1.23 14.88 +.53 0.60 20.45 +.35 3.36 +.16 0.45 23.69 +.04 0.45 22.54 +.12 0.40 34.28 -.13 0.92 41.49 +.10 0.48 13.64 +.15 25.05 +.05 39.96 +2.68 0.38 42.11 -.14 30.08 -.40 0.80 38.55 +.05 9.55 +.12 24.05 -.95 27.27 -.45 1.00 25.86 +.70 2.67 +.05 0.40 36.99 +.28 0.92 24.86 +.21 11.64 +.05 84.65 -.14 47.97 +.46 2.64 72.27 +.34 0.40 46.11 +.25 2.40 53.01 +.23 23.31 -.09 21.20 +.07 0.96 37.11 +.42 59.95 -.31 13.19 +.35 .10 -.01 0.06 75.03 +2.16 1.16 59.89 +.49 0.42 18.76 +.02 1.64 65.31 +.40 2.30 32.10 +.13 44.43 -.24 0.66 26.57 +.14 1.00 105.39 +2.08 16.68 -.02 4.13 -.01 0.64 53.38 -.11 0.20 17.92 +.12 0.60 40.65 +.16 1.65 31.40 +.01 21.39 +.02 12.28 -.30 0.96 81.25 +1.62 7.91 +.09 0.18 8.36 +.03 57.25 +1.21 0.30 16.31 +.14 35.12 +.94 0.80 52.91 +.41 3.75 +.10 0.88 48.00 +.40 0.92 47.60 +.55 1.95 86.27 +.74 23.44 -2.21 161.74 +6.78 1.40 39.39 -.10 0.32 3.14 -.02 33.15 -1.12 0.87 10.74 +.32 24.64 +1.43 .65 -.02 0.36 10.91 +.16 1.16 17.16 +.27 40.63 +.22 37.03 -.21 40.08 +.13 .74 +.01 35.68 +.72 1.05 93.48 -.14 3.32 +.11 0.10 142.47 -.07 116.92 +.23 0.90 9.48 -.28 24.94 -.06 1.26 -.02 45.66 -.62 0.36 19.74 +.14 2.40 12.53 +.03 .78 0.50 53.57 +.90 1.15 4.81 +.05 0.20 3.61 -.10 0.28 5.13 +.04 28.82 +.31 0.78 9.88 1.33 30.14 +.08 0.15 11.23 +.14 0.70 50.80 -.30 48.30 +1.35 2.35 49.25 +.01 5.72 +.01 0.11 9.93 +.08 16.20 +.10 0.08 51.99 +.15 7.69 -.55 1.28 47.16 +.04 16.95 -.36 84.94 +.87 0.24 56.01 +.15 12.54 -.12 80.60 +1.17 0.20 5.66 +.59 1.64 80.06 +1.53 5.09 +.03 0.15 13.50 +.14 16.19 +.18 0.48 27.97 +.43 9.69 +.11 .52 -.01 1.00 23.13 +.42 8.59 +.66 18.82 +.05 38.55 +.42 1.70 -.11 3.85 -.06 0.20 36.52 +.23 7.78 -.08 1.07 57.40 -.21 13.80 +.11 49.09 6.55 0.16 13.93 +.10 0.68 76.73 -.22 2.90 +.80 13.72 +.32 2.46 81.25 +.26 0.50 66.73 -.61 0.32 10.06 +.05 7.00 +.24 10.85 +.07 11.90 -.90 36.78 +.57 1.12 29.88 +.40 2.72 61.83 +1.34 23.85 +.26 0.20 51.31 +1.29 23.50 -.20 46.93 +.28 1.35 38.15 +.39 40.33 -1.14 49.20 -.07 38.44 -.64 0.84 33.29 -.20 24.87 -.24 12.65 -.46 16.87 -.18 0.01 39.18 +.12 20.39 +.09 23.53 +.03 35.20 -.12 0.39 70.39 +2.49

Nm

D

DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DolbyLab DoleFood DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DukeR pfN DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy DynexCap

0.16 0.05 0.24

0.40

1.97 1.40 0.60 1.04 0.52 1.10 1.00 1.28

0.52 1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.81

1.08

Nm 71.06 +1.92 74.70 +1.19 64.78 +.53 23.62 +.53 40.92 +.51 36.91 +.33 27.89 +.14 38.23 +.19 42.70 13.11 +.24 21.68 +.01 34.27 +.38 72.24 +.08 64.17 +1.52 48.16 +.50 24.07 +.27 92.53 +.58 56.22 +.90 19.37 +.29 1.68 +.02 2.75 +.19 19.82 +.29 63.12 +.82 34.96 +.37 40.90 +.36 5.10 +.25 21.46 -.06 49.50 +.19 4.67 +.03 63.12 +.96 3.97 +.03 50.39 +.82 24.39 +.17 18.83 +.09 13.76 +.31 25.02 -.08 2.95 +.17 2.04 -.02 15.12 +.09 2.53 -.05 5.97 +.04 9.71 +.06

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe

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E-F-G-H ECDang n E-Trade eBay EMC Cp EMCOR EMS Tch ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EV Engy EagleBulk EagleMat ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak EasyLkSInt Eaton s EatnVan EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW EVTxBWOp Ebix Inc Ecolab EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts Embraer Emcore lf EmersonEl EmpDist EmpirRst h EmployH EmpIca Emulex EnbrEPt s Enbridge s EnCana g EndvrInt rs EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix EndurSpec Ener1 Energen EngyConv EngyPtrs EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqLfPrp EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver Evercore EverestRe EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h Exar ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express ExpScripts Express-1 ExterranH ExterranP ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal s FedExCp FedMogul FedRlty FedInvst Feihe Intl FelCor Ferro FiberTwr FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBusey FstCwlth FFnclOH FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstRepB n FstSolar FTNDXTc FTArcaBio FT ConDis FT Fincl FT Tech FT Copper FT RNG FTrVLDv FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstBcp Fleetcor n Flextrn Flotek FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet s Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FredsInc FMCG s Freescale n FDelMnt FreshMkt n FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelTech FuelCell FullHseR FullerHB

12.25 +.75 13.78 +.06 28.82 -.01 26.03 +.20 28.61 +.17 32.88 +.04 2.67 44.98 -.40 0.64 100.90 -1.35 0.88 50.09 -.22 3.04 48.79 -1.18 2.32 +.01 0.40 27.48 +.20 0.20 7.43 +.02 0.20 19.27 +.08 1.88 96.47 +1.45 3.37 4.65 +.26 1.36 47.41 +.41 0.72 29.34 +.01 1.28 11.99 -.01 1.16 10.47 +.05 1.14 10.07 +.07 1.21 12.01 1.33 12.72 +.07 20.29 +.14 0.70 54.22 +.27 1.28 39.24 0.20 8.39 83.92 -.09 3.86 +.18 0.04 19.69 -.06 1.76 33.61 -.01 10.22 -.06 0.10 13.45 -.20 22.36 +.12 0.72 31.33 -.37 2.18 +.02 1.38 52.83 +.77 18.93 +.01 1.17 +.37 0.24 15.92 +.31 8.98 +.18 8.10 +.02 2.06 29.36 +.65 0.98 31.10 +.13 0.80 30.10 -.37 13.40 -.28 7.86 +.16 38.37 +.05 8.34 -.07 1.20 40.68 +.17 1.41 0.54 55.40 -.49 1.14 +.02 13.90 -.16 2.24 44.75 +.51 3.58 47.82 +.42 29.34 -.68 4.78 +.04 2.16 29.73 -.13 0.79 22.14 -.21 31.47 +.22 45.75 -.03 1.40 50.93 -.21 9.02 -.13 3.32 69.40 +.05 2.39 40.48 +.40 7.64 +.07 10.16 +.19 0.64 34.14 -.20 96.49 +.66 1.50 64.37 +.47 0.88 18.16 +.22 1.47 59.64 +.56 0.37 13.54 -.08 4.16 136.29 +1.69 0.75 99.24 +1.92 35.79 +.17 0.72 32.81 -.71 1.92 82.13 +.30 .59 7.69 -.08 5.92 +.02 3.06 -.02 0.16 18.61 9.15 -.20 2.10 41.98 +.24 4.38 7.03 +.22 0.28 27.37 +.34 0.50 47.55 +.01 20.96 +.16 54.79 -.89 2.86 +.03 19.72 -.10 1.91 25.67 -.18 0.56 20.21 +.25 3.10 -.04 1.88 79.71 +.69 32.69 +.71 30.65 +.33 98.18 +.98 37.02 +.42 0.24 32.96 -.19 0.60 80.46 +1.22 40.12 +.09 0.48 10.11 +.08 3.48 -.23 36.41 +.01 7.44 15.92 +.11 0.72 53.52 +.92 0.52 33.09 +.28 0.52 87.50 +.51 20.10 +.12 2.68 86.14 +1.09 0.96 24.60 +.19 6.77 -.57 5.29 +.02 12.63 +.50 1.08 -.09 13.56 +.13 0.48 15.25 +.18 0.20 31.22 +.23 1.28 11.90 +.07 0.24 12.55 -.01 23.01 -.08 14.65 -.22 0.20 22.98 +.37 0.24 14.83 +.31 0.16 5.25 +.05 0.12 5.68 +.06 0.48 16.03 +.21 0.04 10.08 -.14 11.10 +.09 16.66 -.09 0.04 12.20 +.12 0.64 13.64 +.11 34.05 -.20 125.02 +3.47 0.10 24.50 +.10 42.20 +.35 0.09 20.80 +.25 0.19 14.51 +.04 0.01 22.28 +.09 0.35 38.59 +.09 0.05 20.51 -.07 0.40 15.91 +.11 2.20 44.16 +.42 0.64 15.98 -.02 61.35 +.16 5.34 +.20 1.31 +.03 30.00 -.23 6.27 -.04 7.44 -.11 0.90 32.22 +.10 1.28 104.90 -.79 0.50 61.51 +1.03 26.02 -.41 0.66 23.41 +.59 4.74 +.06 12.94 +.17 4.49 +.15 18.00 +.04 39.49 +.81 25.50 -.30 8.56 -.08 22.72 +.06 4.73 0.76 63.95 +.48 110.71 +4.03 29.11 +.61 1.96 20.55 -.08 1.00 124.32 -.06 0.20 14.25 +.13 1.00 47.41 -.52 14.89 -.10 0.20 25.97 -.10 36.73 +1.38 0.75 7.93 +.06 0.24 31.07 +.96 1.20 16.05 +.23 6.18 -.80 1.43 -.03 3.26 -.23 0.30 21.65 +.13

Nm FultonFncl FurnBrds FushiCopp Fusion-io n GATX GMAC CpT GMX Rs GNC n GT Solar GTx Inc GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp Generac GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB Gensco GeneticT h GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec rs Genworth GeoGrp GaGulf GerberSci Gerdau GeronCp GettyRlty GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPtrs GlobPay GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldRsv g GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenDot n GreenMtC GreenbCos Greenhill Griffon GrifolsSA n Group1 GrubbEllis GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE H&E Eq HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HDFC Bk HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCr pfI HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HigherOne HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HilltopH HimaxTch HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HooperH HorMan HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira

D 0.16 10.60 -.07 4.29 +.03 4.80 +.27 22.79 +1.29 1.16 36.96 +.56 24.70 -.12 4.23 -.31 21.05 +.28 13.31 -.12 5.83 +.58 0.56 5.85 +.04 1.68 17.09 +.01 0.29 9.51 +.06 1.32 28.15 +.05 26.80 +.36 0.16 13.76 +.05 0.45 18.13 +.30 0.20 79.13 +1.23 2.00 33.67 +.01 38.00 +.78 .24 +.01 28.59 +.09 68.03 -.10 7.50 +.48 6.18 -.01 18.04 +.18 37.57 -.01 1.88 72.77 +1.10 0.60 18.48 -.01 0.40 16.46 +.10 1.46 +.01 1.12 38.33 +.38 4.30 +.16 29.52 +.52 2.38 47.38 +.46 45.54 +1.00 5.83 +.16 3.76 -.03 0.18 15.70 +.20 0.48 28.27 +.34 19.41 -2.50 1.80 51.79 +.55 2.95 +.08 10.20 22.81 +.09 23.20 +.05 11.00 -.02 0.27 9.93 -.03 3.92 +.06 1.92 26.03 +.08 0.18 7.28 -.10 0.30 33.47 +.54 40.10 +.57 0.52 13.40 -.03 2.11 41.49 +.13 2.25 +.02 0.40 9.56 +.07 2.88 +.09 33.79 +.29 5.17 +.08 2.00 22.22 -.58 0.08 49.69 +.54 0.40 11.25 -.24 0.25 22.56 +.21 1.21 +.01 0.15 20.25 -.20 4.33 -.20 0.12 11.61 +.19 1.00 31.02 +.08 0.19 14.33 +.10 2.60 -.39 0.48 24.30 +2.20 0.41 47.35 +.90 2.31 +.04 1.40 135.14 -2.09 1.16 92.51 +1.39 17.79 -.27 14.92 +.12 484.58 -.44 1.68 25.62 +.29 41.78 +.35 0.84 48.98 +.83 18.61 +.08 25.25 +.05 2.64 146.04 +1.50 2.73 -.06 6.35 +.10 12.96 +.11 0.52 24.89 -.38 4.99 -.04 1.76 -.02 0.08 5.33 -.15 3.33 +.30 0.83 20.92 +.08 31.61 -1.24 79.98 -.12 19.62 +.29 1.80 53.54 +.13 9.77 +.04 7.09 -.04 0.44 36.55 +.55 .34 -.01 0.15 23.15 +.27 0.80 41.58 +.61 0.03 6.78 +.01 2.89 +.19 24.12 -.53 13.03 +.47 34.23 -.36 0.58 31.33 +.07 1.92 37.71 +.62 1.11 157.57 -1.12 1.80 48.87 -.14 2.00 26.95 -.13 30.73 -.11 31.90 +.55 0.36 46.43 +.41 6.59 +.10 0.96 31.72 -.07 28.11 +.67 .88 -.17 1.10 36.18 -.87 3.03 +.20 73.83 +1.52 5.23 -.10 13.35 +4.96 0.50 36.98 +.24 0.10 43.22 +.16 6.90 -.04 0.07 12.63 +.19 1.00 44.69 +.35 0.82 30.51 +.22 0.40 24.27 -.17 11.03 -.41 1.20 44.07 +.71 4.10 28.74 +.22 1.24 23.94 +.19 5.66 +.20 3.06 -.05 2.86 52.98 +.78 3.25 53.20 +.35 10.51 +.13 1.20 21.02 +.47 30.05 +.57 25.73 +.21 44.04 +1.00 0.08 15.88 -.14 0.04 19.51 +.02 5.69 -.01 7.06 +.07 1.92 54.08 +.32 15.38 +.55 0.28 59.29 +.94 .40 -.01 71.06 +.78 0.50 53.39 +.59 5.11 -.15 0.24 5.27 +.02 1.38 56.22 +.56 15.31 +.01 0.40 68.73 -.55 0.48 34.99 -.01 20.25 +.29 14.64 +.35 39.00 +1.16 17.91 +.01 1.70 32.79 +.53 0.45 44.87 +.27 0.76 23.00 +.46 8.85 -.02 0.12 2.01 +.26 0.60 64.45 +1.87 9.65 -.17 19.99 +.36 1.00 34.77 +.24 35.11 +1.49 2.48 61.55 +1.19 36.42 -.20 1.33 56.43 +.58 .95 +.04 0.44 14.81 1.07 -.01 0.51 29.13 +.17 25.37 +.26 11.33 +.62 54.84 +.72

Nm HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn HutchT Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 1.80 23.33 +.42 0.12 16.30 +.21 0.28 7.31 +.09 2.02 +.02 0.32 8.18 +.01 25.09 -.06 1.00 80.26 +2.75 0.52 45.04 +.07 0.04 6.32 -.09 35.99 +.04 0.40 16.95 +.15 2.46 -.13 8.91 +.10 4.14 -.02

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 36.30 +.15 IAMGld g 0.08 18.99 +.44 ICICI Bk 0.63 45.32 -.51 iGateCorp 0.15 15.39 -.03 ING GRE 0.54 8.16 +.02 ING GlbDv 1.20 10.88 +.09 ING 11.59 -.13 ING 8.5cap 2.13 25.16 -.24 INGPrRTr 0.31 6.09 -.06 ION Geoph 8.33 -.17 IPG Photon 62.00 -.18 iShGold s 15.04 +.01 iShGSCI 34.00 -.09 iSAstla 0.82 25.23 -.18 iShBraz 2.53 71.25 +.36 iSCan 0.50 30.33 +.09 iShEMU 0.95 37.79 -.12 iSFrnce 0.66 26.47 -.06 iShGer 0.29 26.37 +.08 iSh HK 0.45 17.97 -.23 iShItaly 0.33 17.34 -.14 iShJapn 0.14 10.01 +.01 iSh Kor 0.44 61.55 -.36 iSMalas 0.34 15.04 -.05 iShMex 0.54 59.54 +.29 iShSing 0.43 13.37 +.06 iSPacxJpn 1.56 46.08 -.29 iSSpain 2.15 41.01 -.32 iSSwitz 0.32 26.56 +.08 iSTaiwn 0.29 14.82 -.10 iSh UK 0.43 17.52 +.03 iShSilver 35.09 +.14 iShDJDv 1.75 52.43 +.39 iShBTips 3.86 110.22 -.30 iShChina25 0.63 41.95 -.13 iShDJTr 1.05 94.52 +.73 iSSP500 2.46 128.79 +.70 iShBAgB 3.87 107.35 -.14 iShEMkts 0.64 45.72 -.07 iShiBxB 5.13 110.88 +.02 iSh ACWI 0.81 46.94 +.18 iShIndones 0.15 30.69 +.07 iSSPGth 1.20 67.04 +.38 iShNatRes 0.64 41.42 +.01 iShSPLatA 1.18 49.78 +.30 iShB20 T 4.01 97.02 +.12 iShB7-10T 3.20 97.30 -.15 iShB1-3T 0.79 84.45 iS Eafe 1.42 58.59 -.07 iSRusMCV 0.91 46.36 +.29 iSRusMCG 0.59 58.88 +.43 iShRsMd 1.59 105.16 +.72 iSSPMid 1.00 94.10 +.79 iShiBxHYB 7.43 89.47 +.62 iShs SOX 0.31 52.72 +.07 iShNsdqBio 0.51 102.53 +.91 iShC&SRl 1.90 72.46 +.83 iSR1KV 1.25 66.40 +.25 iSR1KG 0.76 58.43 +.35 iSRus1K 1.18 71.42 +.37 iSR2KV 1.24 70.84 +.68 iShBarc1-3 2.71 105.04 -.09 iSR2KG 0.53 89.28 +.84 iShR2K 0.89 78.95 +.72 iShBar3-7 2.31 118.11 -.06 iShUSPfd 2.87 39.14 +.04 iShREst 1.98 60.07 +.63 iShDJHm 0.07 12.43 +.11 iShDJRBk 0.28 22.81 -.07 iShFnSc 0.61 54.81 +.03 iShUSEngy 0.50 41.25 +.11 iShSPSm 0.74 70.24 +.70 iShBasM 0.93 74.42 +.65 iShPeru 1.06 37.97 -.39 iShDJOE 0.24 58.96 +.15 iShDJOG 0.29 65.38 -.26 iShEur350 0.98 41.21 -.15 iStar 7.41 +.06 ITT Corp 1.00 57.08 +.75 ITT Ed 75.75 +.12 IconixBr 22.83 +.62 IdenixPh 5.10 -.05 Identive 2.30 -.03 IDEX 0.68 43.24 +.25 ITW 1.36 54.62 -.31 Illumina 72.40 +.98 Imax Corp 29.04 -.55 Immucor 19.61 +.03 ImunoGn 11.76 +.04 Imunmd 3.75 -.03 ImpaxLabs 20.45 +.08 ImpOil gs 0.44 44.74 -.51 inContact 4.42 +.14 Incyte 18.25 +.32 IndiaFd 3.87 28.27 -.42 IndoTel 1.50 32.38 +.03 Inergy 2.82 35.01 +.19 Infinera 6.05 +.03 InfoSpace 8.76 -.01 Informat 55.45 +1.32 InfosysT 1.35 60.70 -.93 IngerRd 0.48 43.73 +.08 IngrmM 17.17 +.11 Inhibitex 3.75 +.03 InlandRE 0.57 8.80 +.12 Innospec 31.32 +.31 InovioPhm .61 -.02 InsightEnt 16.29 +.21 InsitTc 18.57 -.70 Insulet 19.60 +.28 IntgDv 7.31 -.01 IntegrysE 2.72 51.02 +.68 Intel 0.84 21.33 +.14 InterXion n 14.08 +.22 InteractBrk 0.40 16.32 +.25 IntcntlEx 120.63 +2.52 InterDig 0.40 35.83 +.64 Intermec 10.73 +.13 InterMune 33.20 -.15 InterNAP 7.28 +.26 IntlBcsh 0.38 16.36 +.16 IBM 3.00 165.02 +.58 IntFlav 1.08 61.82 +.31 IntlGame 0.24 16.56 +.22 IntPap 1.05 27.44 +.87 IntlRectif 24.99 +.33 IntTower g 6.57 InterOil g 49.98 -.07 Interpublic 0.24 11.45 +.09 Intersil 0.48 12.39 +.10 IntraLks n 16.83 -.23 IntPotash 29.07 +.06 Intuit 49.40 +.24 IntSurg 351.71 +7.25 Invesco 0.49 23.11 +.07 InvMtgCap 3.94 20.99 +.10 InVKSrInc 0.29 4.95 -.03 InvRlEst 0.69 8.64 +.01 IridiumCm 8.42 +.03 IronMtn 1.00 32.85 +.30 Isis 8.62 -.10 IstaPh 7.73 +.20 ItauUnibH 0.67 22.22 +.19 Itron 47.37 -.43 IvanhoeEn 1.85 +.16 IvanhM g 1.48 22.53 -.10 Ixia 12.51 +.05 JA Solar 5.08 -.01 JDS Uniph 15.78 +.27 JPMorgCh 1.00 40.48 -.32 JPMAlerian 1.95 35.56 +.21 Jabil 0.28 18.26 -.03 JackHenry 0.42 29.10 +.27 JackInBox 22.05 +.44 JacobsEng 41.27 +.32 Jaguar g 4.53 +.15 Jamba 2.05 -.04 JamesRiv 18.78 +.01 JanusCap 0.20 9.39 +.17 Jarden 0.35 33.71 +.81 JazzPhrm 29.32 +.09 Jefferies 0.30 21.25 -.12 JetBlue 6.00 +.06 Jiayuan n 9.19 -.81 JinkoSolar 23.00 -.59 Jinpan 0.14 9.95 -.53 JoeJeans h .91 +.07 JohnJn 2.28 66.51 +.22 JohnsnCtl 0.64 37.39 +.28 JonesGrp 0.20 10.54 +.22

Nm JonesLL JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KAR Auct KB FnclGp KB Home KBR Inc KBW Inc KEYW n KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KC Southn KapStone Kellogg Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindMM KindredHlt KineticC Kinross g KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr Knoll Inc KodiakO g Kohls KoreaElc KornFer KosmosE n Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger KronosW s Kulicke L&L Engy L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LKQ Corp LML Pay LPL Inv n LSB Inds LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp s LeeEnt LegacyRes LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibStarzA LibtProp LifePrt slf LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare LincElec s LincNat LinearTch LinkedIn n LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g Liquidity LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LoopNet Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol Lufkin lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

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D 2.36 -.13 1.12 50.31 +.56 17.98 -.21 2.44 82.69 +.17 1.00 40.17 +.56 0.80 83.02 +.61 15.56 +.04 1.04 65.27 +.31 1.00 31.32 +.27 25.56 -.07 13.41 -.11 55.28 +.10 21.93 -.01 0.80 11.50 +.13 16.93 +.25 0.32 36.96 +.23 22.40 +.30 20.15 +.04 71.33 +.55 0.90 38.68 +.49 10.56 -.15 0.48 32.39 +.51 12.31 +.08 0.32 74.33 -1.69 11.17 +.68 1.52 35.79 +.40 1.02 31.28 +.71 5.02 +.12 17.97 -.03 14.33 +.07 6.69 -.21 5.58 +.02 0.74 40.52 +.15 16.10 +.08 0.16 9.95 +.06 1.38 35.97 +.28 5.44 +.16 7.91 +.08 47.28 +.85 20.02 -.21 0.64 24.47 +.21 1.21 -.02 1.80 -.04 5.87 +.15 0.09 23.10 +.11 1.47 -.05 0.30 26.26 +.02 7.37 -.06 11.91 +.29 14.58 +.33 4.48 +.02 3.00 -.03 1.06 19.12 -.11 59.09 +1.06 0.80 24.90 -.05 26.32 +.78 1.28 44.70 +.06 52.44 +3.51 5.50 102.09 +6.15 18.59 +.84 3.17 -.05 14.33 +.05 0.32 32.79 +.86 1.12 66.46 +.61 13.43 -.05 0.40 17.70 -.11 0.56 37.29 +.94 0.20 22.39 -.44 0.20 60.73 +1.41 45.57 +.09 24.49 -.29 7.65 -.15 1.96 -.03 0.07 3.70 -.01 3.33 +.05 1.10 63.36 +.23 0.28 10.20 22.57 +.31 22.76 +.06 17.78 +.01 39.84 +.59 1.80 18.15 +.10 0.25 12.16 +.15 40.10 +.37 9.59 +.36 23.49 +.18 0.48 15.40 -.05 22.85 +.20 1.20 33.37 +.03 23.59 -.44 0.14 26.82 +.33 0.20 5.26 -.17 7.53 -.09 23.83 +.06 0.29 1.33 -.01 0.80 16.26 -.10 11.75 +.28 1.42 69.02 -.85 2.92 47.80 -.12 0.44 69.90 +.85 0.04 7.48 +.03 1.52 24.40 +.31 0.40 24.63 +.04 1.92 41.72 +.41 0.24 4.93 -.02 52.41 -.74 7.89 +.24 1.41 -.03 3.39 -.08 7.56 -.04 36.16 -.04 49.71 +.36 41.89 -.32 245.63 -.04 1.42 8.63 +.07 35.21 +.97 1.01 -.03 25.59 +.08 16.49 +.12 0.06 5.61 +.12 2.48 -.30 9.26 +.07 100.09 +.41 1.00 15.83 -.07 8.14 -.04 0.40 5.42 -.17 0.32 15.07 +.35 62.93 -.77 0.80 51.82 +.23 8.42 +.44 0.15 16.19 +.14 0.15 16.89 +.13 0.20 20.66 -.08 2.20 57.05 +.42 0.92 19.51 +.01 1.86 54.31 +.39 29.54 -.74 1.24 83.23 +2.12 20.26 -.15 1.40 17.38 -.84 9.93 -.10 1.06 37.51 -.09 0.72 83.56 +.14 0.55 5.85 -.17 1.40 22.77 +.15 0.42 50.50 -.02 0.92 44.93 +1.17 1.60 71.61 +.64 7.51 +.01 3.72 +.08 1.10 35.06 +.33 9.24 +.65 17.62 -.45 1.12 46.56 -.23 2.56 -.04 2.00 65.73 +1.04 0.40 3.96 -.04 0.44 12.29 +.04 8.69 -.11 2.53 60.42 +.18 5.53 -.22 1.98 -.02 32.89 +.16 1.70 45.82 +.56 0.54 37.25 +.76 33.66 +.17 20.12 +.01 1.45 39.73 +.28 0.70 12.40 -.36 0.47 9.16 -.01 0.76 8.66 0.80 8.94 +.02 0.60 7.65 -.03 0.66 8.15 -.08 15.62 -.19 19.74 +.32 7.89 +.40 1.50 49.05 +.54 38.82 +.71 63.00 +.98 26.81 +.56 1.84 101.50 -.69 0.60 36.49 +.43 .31 -.01 1.05 13.49 -.01

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D 31.29 +.71 15.41 +.02 0.86 53.48 +.79 0.16 15.79 +.10 18.91 +.10 3.25 +.07 3.31 -.25 6.11 -.48 0.40 60.58 +.02 5.20 +.02 21.32 +.34 0.61 17.77 +.09 23.48 +.18 3.12 +.42 14.98 +.01 4.64 +.06 11.27 -.33 0.09 2.02 1.47 14.50 -.01 1.52 14.49 -.11 5.38 +.18 8.18 -2.00 0.60 17.85 +.32 0.28 21.40 -.16 0.84 22.04 +.36 24.36 -.12 11.33 +.13 34.34 +.59 .95 -.03 38.24 -.03 0.01 3.93 +.03 19.18 -.09 .22 -.01 1.90 +.01 0.25 12.79 +.16 87.37 +1.17 1.33 -.06 14.46 +.51 0.65 12.55 +.13 0.20 75.05 -.08 0.16 52.18 +.17 6.41 -.06 10.16 +.72 0.52 32.40 +.15 2.16 63.06 +.65 1.72 49.02 +.25 24.59 -.17 3.36 -.04 24.40 -.10 1.73 33.63 +.15 41.95 +.75 7.62 +.09 1.00 15.17 +.09 0.72 64.27 -.08 0.84 11.94 -.44 1.85 42.93 +.44 1.78 25.07 +.30 53.21 -.81 0.95 77.22 -.45 0.04 6.19 -.08 0.24 14.08 +.18 0.48 60.56 +.67 0.48 47.61 +.52 1.04 70.38 +.38 4.61 -.32 7.60 +.57 0.64 29.19 +.39 .85 -.02 4.45 -.16 0.80 30.84 +.38 25.89 -1.86 31.28 +.26 15.73 -.47 1.00 6.43 +.08 0.16 11.71 +.32 2.13 106.64 +1.02 10.00 +.07 1.24 -.01 2.12 38.25 +.24 8.32 +.19 30.45 -.02 1.08 66.37 +.38 0.42 25.62 +.48 1.10 +.03 31.62 -.31 0.18 43.76 +.98 0.56 26.36 +.48 0.80 62.66 -.67 1.70 79.79 +.67 0.96 60.76 +.51 14.59 -.05 48.66 +.76 1.42 36.68 +.59 0.28 19.55 +.31 0.44 80.42 +.40 .28 -.02 43.62 +.64 0.88 76.11 +.93 54.14 +.13 35.96 -.32 2.16 55.65 +.11 12.56 -.46 16.95 -.21 18.05 -.19 35.59 +.99 3.36 69.29 +.35 3.36 68.70 +.25 0.44 56.39 +.24 3.98 16.15 -.21 9.91 +.12 0.52 43.16 +2.04 30.50 +.54 17.71 +.06 5.49 -.10 1.08 52.61 +1.11 0.69 48.82 +.33 0.12 16.88 +.08 7.22 -.04 16.52 +.01 0.82 60.84 +.60 36.98 +.30 1.94 38.95 +.19 0.24 21.61 +.03 8.77 -.06 17.42 -.08 0.40 84.28 +2.28 0.40 16.31 +.35 0.10 62.97 +.04 3.06 120.54 +.80 150.03 +.09 1.65 170.52 +1.37 2.44 127.70 +.65 69.91 +.47 1.74 53.09 +.40 0.31 17.68 +.25 0.20 23.43 -.13 0.72 40.33 +.10 4.41 39.49 +.11 0.37 25.08 +.07 0.46 51.71 +1.12 0.47 54.71 -.20 0.42 63.46 +.69 1.00 77.90 +1.57 31.11 +.12 16.81 +.28 0.40 9.71 +.03 57.00 +.02 2.39 57.47 +.25 0.58 22.80 +.06 19.04 -.14 0.84 49.30 +1.11 10.84 +.45 139.45 -.08 36.69 +.85 16.80 +.23 2.46 -.11 0.68 44.72 -.17 41.79 +.85 10.32 -.01 5.59 -.03 9.36 +.06 1.82 37.32 -.01 2.38 -.03 13.99 -.09 0.46 19.19 +.16 1.53 51.15 +.39 2.00 +.05 6.80 -.11 39.48 +.08 1.00 82.13 +.34 0.51 30.91 +.20 0.24 16.10 +.19 5.64 +.57 9.58 +.30 1.00 50.89 +1.90 0.40 46.57 -.57 8.74 +.31 25.87 -.45 1.65 +.03 2.89 32.76 +.09 0.72 14.37 +.12 0.52 22.90 -.08 75.13 +1.11 0.75 15.27 +.41 20.02 +.52 16.48 +.78 26.55 -.48 0.70 32.43 +.11 3.75 -.03 1.92 53.27 +.06 24.33 -.41 1.48 23.88 +.57 34.29 +.71 0.84 36.26 +.71 12.28 -.35 7.37 +.05 0.20 10.99 +.09 6.02 +.09 32.47 +.59 1.46 82.90 +.40 1.56 17.47 +.19 0.39 89.65 +.79 8.98 +.07 9.22 +.15 50.00 +.07 0.81 12.11 -.04 3.72 131.08 -.15 4.00 -.14 10.71 -.03 7.96 +.18 0.72 67.65 +1.08 42.74 +1.49 0.44 39.38 -.62 14.73 +.01 5.86 -.23 38.56 +.74 9.66 +.13 0.41 6.02 -.06 24.45 +.21 0.12 31.16 +.97 0.08 8.57 +.47 3.20 115.06 +1.06 0.50 29.95 +.04 77.62 -2.95 0.48 10.01 +.17 1.24 -.07 2.87 -.14 1.92 50.78 -.09 0.24 73.85 +.92

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Consumer

lenders, mortgage firms and debt collectors. It is unclear how long the vacancy will last. When President Barack Obama appointed Warren to steer the bureau through its early days, he stopped short of nominating her as its first director. Some administration officials contend that Warren, a Harvard law professor and noted consumer advocate, is too controversial to win Senate confirmation. In May, 44 of 47 Republican senators told Obama that they would oppose any nominee unless the bureau was subjected to additional congressional oversight. Democrats, who would need 60 lawmakers to bring a vote on a nominee, have floated the prospect of a recess appointment. The bureau, meanwhile, will have plenty to keep it busy. Even without a director, the bureau can write rules and issue orders on Day 1 about the consumer protection laws it is inheriting from the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Reserve,

Continued from B1 But the vacancy will not delay the bureau’s debut as the newest cop on Wall Street. On July 21, the bureau will formally open its doors and will be able to send its examiners into Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and other financial titans — whether or not it has a director. It can also issue new rules for big banks, examine their books and file enforcement actions, all crucial steps for an agency that was born only a year ago. “They have almost unlimited ability to go after the banks on consumer issues,” said Jaret Seiberg, a policy analyst at MF Global. “They’re saying, ‘We’re the new sheriff in town.’” Still, the bureau’s full impact “will be muted” for now, Seiberg said. The bureau, for instance, needs a chief before it can oversee some less regulated corners of the finance industry, including tens of thousands of payday

DiMaio

Coming up What: Power Networking for Business Success When: Tuesday, June 28, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Where: Bend Golf & Country Club Speaker: Vito DiMaio

Continued from B1 In 2001 DiMaio and his wife, Jennifer, moved to Bend so he could take the job managing the North Coast Electrical Company’s Central Oregon distribution center, which he said the company calls a service center because it services the region’s electrical contractors. The couple have three daughters, Alyssa, 15; Samantha, 11; Cassie, 9; and Tia, 7. DiMaio took a second Dale Carnegie training class in 1998 and has been teaching ever since, including more than a decade as the organization’s Central Oregon trainer. At the high point of the region’s construction boom in 2006, DiMaio said North Coast Electric employed 11 people at the warehouse and service center. At the low point of the 2008-09 recession, during the winter of 2009, DiMaio said sales of electrical parts and equipment had fallen by 25 to 30 percent, and the staff at the Central Oregon service center was cut almost in half to six full-time employees. But instead of giving up and

closing the doors, DiMaio said he and his staff kept a positive attitude and looked for ways to increase sales despite the collapse of the construction industry. “My Carnegie background gave me the confidence to become involved in the National Association of Electrical Distributors,” where he said he learned how electrical distributors and contractors in Chicago, New York and other large metropolitan areas were moving into distribution of green energy products to boost sales during the difficult economic times. “I brought ideas from a national level back to our company,” DiMaio said. One of the most important messages the Dale Carnegie program teaches is to become genu-

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 B5

among other regulators. For example, the trade commission will hand over authority to enforce certain restrictions on telemarketing, while the Fed is transferring its power to oversee mortgage disclosure rules. The bureau had already announced plans to revamp mortgage disclosure forms that had long confused would-be home buyers. In May, the bureau brought out two prototypes for a simplified, one-page form that would combine and replace existing documents. Under the authority of the Treasury secretary, Timothy Geithner, the bureau on July 21 can examine the books of some 110 banks that have more than $10 billion in assets, according to a report issued in January by the inspectors general for the Treasury Department and Federal Reserve. The bureau plans to watch for major violations of mortgage disclosure laws and other infractions at the firms that could cause consumers to unwittingly sign up for risky loans. The bureau also will scruti-

nize whether credit card forms issued by big banks are misleading.

inely interested in other people, and from a business standpoint, DiMaio said, that means taking a genuine interest in your employees, and in your customers. “Become genuinely interested in what your customer needs, and what’s in it for them,” he said. While networking is an important aspect of building business clients and customers, DiMaio said net-weaving, where you help connect other people who you believe can help each other or exchange business services, is the most rewarding experience. “To me it is rewarding to put people together,” he said. “I find enjoyment in helping other people succeed.” “We found people are really interested in saving energy. Solar systems and LED lighting are two of the best ways to do that. We decided to branch out into parts for solar systems, parts for electric vehicle charging stations and the more efficient LED lighting technology,” DiMaio said. In talking with employees about what was most important to them, it was clear that having a sense of control and input, and seeing opportunities

for a brighter future ahead were very important. So DiMaio said the company continued to pay professional wages to those employees who remained on the job, but they were asked for suggestions on how the company could get more done with fewer employees. After adding the lineup of energy-saving parts and getting the staff to find ways to get the job done with less, DiMaio said sales began rebounding last year. “In the second half of 2010 sales have come back very strong, and for the first four months of 2011 we are double last year as far as sales,” he said.

Assembling the team The bureau says it will hire several hundred staff members, roughly half of whom will work in the supervision and enforcement departments. Over time, the bureau hopes to hire nearly 200 bank examiners and enforcement officials from other federal banking agencies like the Federal Reserve and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., according to a person with knowledge of the situation. Government employees at other regulatory agencies whose positions are being shifted to the new bureau will have to apply for the roles like any other candidate. The bureau has until October to pick which federal employees it wants to hire. If examiners spot wrongdoing at banks, the bureau can file lawsuits right away — no director needed. The bureau’s enforcement division, run by a former Ohio at-

Q: A:

What is the biggest challenge the company faces today? The biggest challenge we face in the new business reality is how to do more, better, faster with fewer resources.

Q:

Are green energy products entirely responsible for the doubling of sales during the first four months of this year? No, energy-efficient products helped, but a lot of the sales growth was in government-type jobs, such as the ex-

A:

torney general, Richard Cordray, is deciding which cases to prioritize, according to the person close to the bureau. While Cordray can bring only civil actions against banks and their executives, the bureau does have authority to refer matters to the Justice Department if it appears that criminal laws were broken. Tips from whistle-blowers and consumers could prompt the bureau to take action, too. Several hundred consumers have lodged complaints with the agency over the last year, some stemming from the financial crisis. Roughly half center on mortgages. While the bureau’s new authorities have Wall Street bracing for a crackdown, the banks’ lightly regulated competitors may receive a small reprieve. Absent a director, the bureau doesn’t have the authority to oversee payday lenders, mortgage brokers and other nonbank lenders, according to an interpretation of the statute by Treasury and Fed inspectors general. Warren is not even allowed to identify the nonbank

financial firms she plans to regulate, the report said. But some questions remain about whether these firms, which spent millions of dollars lobbying Congress last year to avoid the bureau’s authority, are entirely off limits. Raj Date, one of Warren’s deputies and a leading contender to be the bureau’s director, said at a Consumer Bankers Association conference in Orlando, Fla., on Tuesday that the agency’s ability to oversee nonbank firms was a “more nuanced question,” acknowledging that the statute was open to interpretation. Those firms, meanwhile, are steering clear of the controversy surrounding the bureau. “We are not participating in the politics of this,” said Steven Schlein, a spokesman for the Community Financial Services Association of America, the leading trade group for payday lenders. “We want to see the bureau staffed with qualified people who will take the short-term lending industry and needs of consumers seriously.”

pansion going on at Central Oregon Community College, and at the electric vehicle charging station project at the Bend-La Pine (school district’s) administration building.

• Give honest, sincere appreciation. • Be a good listener. Encourage others to talk about themselves. • Remember that a person’s name is to that person the sweetest and most important sound in any language. • Praise the slightest improvement and praise every improvement. • The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it. • Try to honestly to see things from the other person’s point of view. • Get all the facts and weigh them, then act when you come to a decision • Clear your desk of all papers except those relating to the immediate problem at hand. • Do things in the order of their importance.

Q: A:

Why did you volunteer to serve on the Grandma’s House board of directors? Grandma’s House is a shelter home and outreach organization for teen moms. I was lucky in life and had parents who made a difference in my life. I wanted to give something back to the community.

Q: A: Q:

What’s most important to you? My role as a father and a husband.

What are 10 tips you teach business people and others taking Dale Carnegie courses that you teach? • Don’t criticize, condemn or complain.

A:

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Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

www.denfeldpaints.com

Largest Selection

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .88f .96f ... .24 .48f .22 .84f .12f .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 13 19 10 16 16 16 26 25 ... 22 9 ... 10 11 13 13 ... 16 29 6

66.92 +1.55 +18.0 25.02 +.35 +11.1 10.60 -.08 -20.5 14.34 +.39 -7.8 74.52 +.36 +14.2 9.05 +.25 +7.1 44.09 +.49 -6.7 61.45 +1.14 +1.9 81.25 +1.62 +12.5 9.03 -.34 +22.2 32.96 -.19 +10.8 34.99 -.01 -16.9 11.21 +.15 -8.6 21.33 +.14 +1.4 8.20 -.10 -7.3 24.04 +.04 +7.5 6.09 +.06 +.5 7.70 +.17 -18.6 21.90 ... +8.0 12.31 +.08 +2.6 24.47 +.21 -12.3

Name

Div

PE

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58f .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .48f ... .60

20 16 17 12 30 ... 39 22 14 14 18 10 25 9 40 13 13 11 34 ...

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1541.00 $1541.50 $36.065

Pvs Day $1538.00 $1538.60 $35.739

Market recap 83.23 44.93 44.43 7.64 47.87 2.74 39.33 155.03 22.80 53.21 82.90 41.32 35.83 10.49 11.54 24.50 16.01 26.95 17.23 20.34

+2.12 +1.17 +.31 +.53 +.20 -.03 +.15 +2.08 +.06 +.70 +.40 +.46 +.39 -.24 +.05 +.01 +.05 -.38 +1.33 +.01

-2.6 +6.0 -4.4 -56.8 -16.5 +32.4 +5.0 +11.4 +1.4 -19.9 -1.0 -8.5 +11.5 -10.3 -5.3 -9.2 -5.4 -13.0 +22.2 +7.4

Prime rate Time period

NYSE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

Vol (00)

S&P500ETF BkofAm SPDR Fncl iShR2K FordM

1373273 869155 510637 466480 450841

Last Chg 127.70 10.60 14.88 78.95 12.94

+.65 -.08 -.01 +.72 +.17

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Dex One Talbots CaptlTr Pharmerica ZaleCp

Last

Chg %Chg

2.90 +.80 +38.1 3.73 +.65 +21.1 3.68 +.56 +17.9 11.91 +1.30 +12.3 5.41 +.58 +12.0

Losers ($2 or more)

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

CheniereEn VantageDrl OpkoHlth Adventrx KodiakO g

46746 37422 34876 32930 29931

Name

8.17 1.66 3.28 2.66 5.28

RschMotn Cisco Microsoft Level3 Intel

+.17 -.01 -.01 +.29 -.27

Gainers ($2 or more)

Vol (00) 540430 536006 532769 426563 369788

Chg %Chg

Name

OrsusXel rs Bacterin n HKN Cover-All Adventrx

4.05 3.17 2.33 2.55 2.66

+.86 +.41 +.28 +.29 +.29

HarbinElec QuickLog HimaxTch Icagen rs UnvStainls

+27.0 +14.9 +13.7 +12.8 +12.2

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

2.00 2.22 9.04 3.22 3.93

-.70 -25.9 -.30 -11.9 -.90 -9.1 -.31 -8.8 -.37 -8.7

Accelr8 GoldRsv g NewEnSys PhrmAth EllieMae n

3.95 -1.00 -20.2 2.60 -.39 -13.0 2.48 -.30 -10.8 2.41 -.22 -8.4 5.40 -.49 -8.3

Last

Chg %Chg

Chg %Chg

13.35 +4.96 +59.2 3.12 +.42 +15.6 2.01 +.26 +14.9 2.44 +.30 +14.0 40.65 +4.74 +13.2

Name

Last

Vitacost h AlmostFam Spire h ChinaTInfo FuelTech

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

-1.86 +.17 +.21 +.03 +.14

Losers ($2 or more)

QiaoXMob ChinaDEd PhxNMda n BPZ Res ChiNBorun

2,061 975 100 3,136 31 51

Last Chg 25.89 15.14 24.47 2.15 21.33

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Name

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more)

Last Chg

Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Indexes

Chg %Chg

3.41 -2.29 -40.2 23.95 -3.82 -13.8 2.09 -.32 -13.3 2.45 -.35 -12.5 6.18 -.80 -11.5

Diary 231 240 34 505 4 9

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,486 1,120 98 2,704 30 104

12,876.00 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,565.78 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 441.86 353.53 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,770.05 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,010.91 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 868.57 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,080.38 5,201.22 429.17 8,032.22 2,268.63 2,629.66 1,278.36 13,526.94 788.48

+76.02 +42.67 +2.38 +32.11 +1.52 +13.18 +6.86 +78.56 +6.73

YTD %Chg %Chg +.63 +.83 +.56 +.40 +.07 +.50 +.54 +.58 +.86

52-wk %Chg

+4.34 +1.85 +5.97 +.86 +2.73 -.87 +1.65 +1.25 +.62

+15.69 +17.31 +12.86 +15.09 +20.99 +14.88 +14.84 +15.79 +19.46

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

331.64 2,544.94 3,799.66 5,693.39 7,150.21 21,599.51 35,109.97 19,692.52 3,467.49 9,354.32 2,019.65 3,013.60 4,512.50 5,608.39

-.44 t -.81 t -.63 t -.38 t -.19 t -.44 t +.24 s -2.01 t -.06 t +.03 s -.60 t +.28 s -.85 t -.63 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0573 1.6183 1.0208 .002115 .1545 1.4305 .1283 .012450 .084247 .0356 .000922 .1560 1.1813 .0345

1.0615 1.6178 1.0199 .002122 .1544 1.4315 .1283 .012490 .084024 .0357 .000920 .1563 1.1790 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.74 +0.07 +1.2 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.73 +0.07 +1.1 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.32 +0.03 +2.6 GrowthI 26.11 +0.18 +1.0 Ultra 23.16 +0.15 +2.3 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.21 +0.13 +2.4 AMutlA p 25.98 +0.15 +3.8 BalA p 18.28 +0.07 +3.1 BondA p 12.39 -0.01 +3.2 CapIBA p 50.94 +0.06 +4.0 CapWGA p 35.92 -0.01 +2.1 CapWA p 21.12 -0.02 +4.3 EupacA p 41.54 -0.11 +0.4 FdInvA p 37.22 +0.14 +2.1 GwthA p 30.50 +0.12 +0.2 HI TrA p 11.35 -0.02 +4.0 IncoA p 16.96 +0.05 +4.5 IntBdA p 13.57 -0.01 +2.1 ICAA p 28.16 +0.13 +0.9 NEcoA p 25.84 +0.10 +2.0 N PerA p 28.71 +0.02 +0.3 NwWrldA 53.81 -0.11 -1.4 SmCpA p 38.32 -0.05 -1.4 TxExA p 12.09 +4.2 WshA p 28.30 +0.19 +5.2 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.23 -0.08 -3.0 IntEqII I r 12.10 -0.03 -2.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.17 NA IntlVal r 27.63 NA MidCap 34.79 NA MidCapVal 21.38 NA Baron Funds: Growth 53.73 +0.36 +4.9 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.99 NA DivMu 14.50 +3.2 TxMgdIntl 15.20 -0.08 -3.4

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.14 +0.10 GlAlA r 19.65 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.29 -0.01 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.18 +0.10 GlbAlloc r 19.75 -0.01 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 52.43 +0.19 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.35 +0.23 DivEqInc 10.20 +0.04 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.29 +0.24 AcornIntZ 39.62 -0.21 ValRestr 49.47 +0.14 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.26 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.08 -0.03 USCorEq2 11.16 +0.07 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.11 +0.05 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 34.50 +0.05 NYVen C 32.87 +0.04 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.35 -0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.20 -0.09 EmMktV 33.88 -0.20 IntSmVa 16.95 -0.10 LargeCo 10.08 +0.06 USLgVa 20.86 +0.13 US Small 21.72 +0.18 US SmVa 25.48 +0.24 IntlSmCo 16.95 -0.10 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 18.05 -0.03 Glb5FxInc 11.24 2YGlFxd 10.21 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.92 +0.13 Income 13.54

+3.9 +1.2 +0.8 +4.1 +1.3 -1.8 +1.5 +1.3 +1.6 -0.8 -1.9 -0.9 +2.2 -0.7 -0.5 -1.0 +3.7 -3.8 -5.9 -0.3 +2.6 +4.3 +1.9 -0.3 -0.2 +0.6 +0.1 +3.3 +0.6 +2.9 +3.4

IntlStk 35.35 -0.02 Stock 110.11 +0.27 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.13 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.04 +0.05 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.03 -0.01 GblMacAbR 10.14 LgCapVal 18.08 +0.05 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.18 +0.09 FPA Funds: FPACres 27.68 +0.03 Fairholme 31.30 -0.09 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.76 +0.06 StrInA 12.58 -0.02 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 19.97 +0.06 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.82 +0.01 FF2015 11.54 +0.01 FF2020 14.01 +0.02 FF2020K 13.25 +0.02 FF2025 11.67 +0.01 FF2030 13.94 +0.03 FF2030K 13.58 +0.02 FF2035 11.58 +0.03 FF2040 8.09 +0.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.49 +0.05 AMgr50 15.65 +0.01 Balanc 18.58 +0.04 BalancedK 18.59 +0.04 BlueChGr 45.63 +0.23 Canada 56.75 +0.51 CapAp 25.78 +0.15 CpInc r 9.46 -0.02 Contra 67.23 +0.21 ContraK 67.24 +0.21 DisEq 23.11 +0.16 DivIntl 29.82 -0.09 DivrsIntK r 29.82 -0.08 DivGth 28.38 +0.10

-1.0 +2.5 NA -0.5 +2.6 NA -0.4 +3.7 +3.3 -12.0 -0.8 +4.0 -0.7 +2.1 +2.1 +2.0 +2.1 +1.7 +1.6 +1.6 +1.3 +1.4 +1.0 +1.8 +2.2 +2.3 +0.6 -2.4 +1.7 +3.1 -0.6 -0.6 +2.6 -1.1 -1.0 -0.2

EmrMk 25.29 Eq Inc 44.89 EQII 18.55 Fidel 32.90 FltRateHi r 9.80 GNMA 11.70 GovtInc 10.62 GroCo 86.38 GroInc 18.55 GrowthCoK 86.38 HighInc r 9.00 Indepn 24.21 IntBd 10.77 IntlDisc 32.36 InvGrBd 11.63 InvGB 7.56 LgCapVal 11.72 LevCoStk 28.79 LowP r 40.26 LowPriK r 40.26 Magelln 69.96 MidCap 28.05 MuniInc 12.58 NwMkt r 15.83 OTC 55.64 100Index 8.88 Ovrsea 32.26 Puritn 18.24 SCmdtyStrt 12.34 SrsIntGrw 11.23 SrsIntVal 10.00 SrInvGrdF 11.64 STBF 8.53 SmllCpS r 19.57 StratInc 11.26 StrReRt r 9.82 TotalBd 10.93 USBI 11.53 Value 69.74 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 44.75 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 38.57 500IdxInv 45.43

-0.10 +0.11 +0.05 +0.13 -0.01 -0.01 +0.57 +0.03 +0.57 -0.02 +0.17 -0.01 -0.12 -0.01 +0.04 +0.11 +0.21 +0.21 +0.17 +0.14

+0.07 +0.04 -0.10 +0.04 -0.03 -0.03

+0.15 -0.01 +0.01 -0.01 -0.01 +0.31

-4.0 +1.7 +1.9 +2.4 +1.3 +3.6 +2.9 +3.9 +1.6 +3.9 +3.5 -0.6 +3.6 -2.1 +3.4 +3.8 +2.2 +1.3 +4.9 +5.0 -2.2 +2.2 +4.6 +3.8 +1.3 +1.6 -0.7 +2.2 -2.4 -0.5 +0.6 +3.5 +1.5 -0.1 +4.1 +2.9 +3.7 +3.2 +1.5

+0.05 -12.4 +0.27 +2.3 +0.24 +2.5

IntlInxInv 35.40 -0.13 TotMktInv 37.25 +0.21 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 45.44 +0.25 TotMktAd r 37.26 +0.22 First Eagle: GlblA 47.42 +0.09 OverseasA 22.93 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.72 +0.01 FoundAl p 10.88 +0.01 HYTFA p 9.93 IncomA p 2.20 -0.01 USGovA p 6.82 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.73 IncmeAd 2.19 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.22 -0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.31 +0.05 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.26 -0.03 GlBd A p 13.77 GrwthA p 18.61 -0.01 WorldA p 15.23 -0.01 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.80 +0.01 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 40.53 +0.18 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.99 +0.12 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 13.45 -0.04 Quality 21.00 +0.12 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 36.64 +0.20 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.28 MidCapV 36.97 +0.20 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.36 CapApInst 37.52 +0.30 IntlInv t 61.21 -0.12 Intl r 61.88 -0.11

+1.0 +2.5 +2.6 +2.6 +2.3 +1.2 +5.5 +4.0 +5.6 +4.1 +2.9 +3.6 +4.2 +3.8 +3.2 +4.0 +3.6 +4.6 +2.6 +3.4 +0.7 +4.9 -0.6 +5.0 +2.1 NA +2.3 NA +2.2 +2.0 +2.2

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 32.99 +0.03 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.04 +0.04 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.62 +0.08 Div&Gr 19.96 +0.07 TotRetBd 11.24 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.39 +0.03 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.09 +0.03 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.82 +0.09 CmstkA 15.91 +0.07 EqIncA 8.68 +0.02 GrIncA p 19.40 +0.04 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.76 +0.03 AssetStA p 24.54 +0.04 AssetStrI r 24.76 +0.03 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.67 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.66 HighYld 8.19 -0.01 ShtDurBd 11.03 USLCCrPls 20.61 +0.11 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 44.85 -0.17 PrkMCVal T 23.12 +0.11 Twenty T 62.91 +0.37 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.07 LSGrwth 12.96 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 20.88 -0.02 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.24 -0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 29.83 +0.13 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.74 StrInc C 15.36 -0.01 LSBondR 14.68 -0.01

-4.7 -4.6 -1.7 +2.4 +3.2 +0.8 +2.2 +4.0 +1.8 +1.9 +1.5 +0.1 +0.5 +0.6 +3.3 +3.4 +3.6 +1.2 -0.3 -11.4 +2.4 -4.3 NA NA -4.1 -4.3 +5.6 +5.6 +5.3 +5.4

StrIncA 15.28 -0.01 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.45 -0.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.49 +0.04 BdDebA p 7.91 -0.02 ShDurIncA p 4.60 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.38 +0.04 ValueA 23.46 +0.09 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.57 +0.09 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.83 -0.02 MergerFd 16.15 +0.02 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.51 TotRtBdI 10.51 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 39.45 +0.29 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.93 GlbDiscZ 30.32 QuestZ 18.16 +0.02 SharesZ 21.50 +0.05 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 48.02 +0.39 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 49.71 +0.40 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.36 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.63 +0.12 Intl I r 19.60 -0.05 Oakmark r 42.63 +0.24 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.00 -0.01 GlbSMdCap 15.82 +0.01 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 34.59 -0.09 GlobA p 62.32 -0.02 GblStrIncA 4.35 -0.01 IntBdA p 6.68 -0.01

+5.6 +4.8 -0.6 +4.1 +2.0 +1.7 +2.9 +3.1 +3.2 +2.6 +2.3 +3.3 +3.5 +5.6 +2.5 +2.7 +2.7 +3.4 +4.5 +4.3 NA +3.2 +1.0 +3.2 +3.8 +2.3 -5.2 +3.2 +4.3 +3.7

MnStFdA 32.05 +0.15 RisingDivA 16.00 +0.10 S&MdCpVl 33.07 +0.20 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.48 +0.09 S&MdCpVl 28.26 +0.17 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.43 +0.09 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.78 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.26 -0.09 IntlBdY 6.67 -0.02 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.00 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.85 AllAsset 12.36 ComodRR 8.80 -0.01 DevLcMk r 10.98 -0.02 DivInc 11.55 -0.01 HiYld 9.31 -0.02 InvGrCp 10.70 -0.02 LowDu 10.49 RealRtnI 11.64 -0.02 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 11.00 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.64 -0.02 TotRtA 11.00 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.00 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.00 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.00 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.00 +0.17 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.32 +0.24 Price Funds: BlChip 38.31 +0.19 CapApp 21.02 +0.06 EmMktS 33.56 -0.14 EqInc 24.05 +0.10

-1.0 +3.4 +3.2 +3.0 +2.8 +3.0 +6.0 -5.0 +3.6 +2.9 NA NA +2.5 +4.4 +3.7 +3.5 +4.6 +2.1 +4.8 +1.0 +3.0 +4.6 +2.8 +2.4 +2.9 +3.0 +4.8 +1.0 +0.5 +3.5 -4.9 +1.9

EqIndex 34.57 Growth 31.93 HlthSci 34.70 HiYield 6.80 IntlBond 10.32 Intl G&I 13.71 IntlStk 14.20 MidCap 60.35 MCapVal 24.46 N Asia 18.85 New Era 50.39 N Horiz 35.48 N Inc 9.60 R2010 15.72 R2015 12.16 R2020 16.77 R2025 12.26 R2030 17.56 R2035 12.41 R2040 17.66 ShtBd 4.87 SmCpStk 35.70 SmCapVal 36.35 SpecIn 12.53 Value 23.90 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.53 VoyA p 22.30 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.92 PremierI r 21.22 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.10 S&P Sel 20.07 Scout Funds: Intl 32.47 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.23 Sequoia 140.41 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.43 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 49.48 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.41

+0.19 +2.5 +0.12 -0.7 +0.26 +14.6 -0.01 +3.7 -0.02 +5.0 -0.06 +3.0 -0.05 -0.2 +0.31 +3.1 +0.12 +3.2 -0.01 -1.7 -0.02 -3.4 +0.26 +5.9 +2.8 +0.02 +2.5 +0.02 +2.3 +0.04 +2.0 +0.03 +1.8 +0.04 +1.6 +0.03 +1.5 +0.04 +1.4 +1.5 +0.25 +3.7 +0.26 +0.6 +3.3 +0.10 +2.4 NA +0.08 -5.9 +0.08 +2.3 +0.11 +4.3 +0.21 +2.5 +0.11 +2.6 -0.08 +0.3 +0.06 -0.4 +0.93 +8.6 -0.10 +1.9 -0.43 -4.4 -0.06 +1.4

IntValue I 29.05 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.16 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.90 CAITAdm 10.99 CpOpAdl 76.04 EMAdmr r 38.52 Energy 126.76 ExplAdml 70.57 ExtdAdm 42.39 500Adml 118.27 GNMA Ad 10.95 GrwAdm 31.95 HlthCr 58.46 HiYldCp 5.75 InfProAd 26.64 ITBdAdml 11.49 ITsryAdml 11.65 IntGrAdm 61.20 ITAdml 13.58 ITGrAdm 10.03 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.59 LT Adml 10.93 MCpAdml 95.55 MuHYAdm 10.32 PrmCap r 69.00 ReitAdm r 85.09 STsyAdml 10.78 STBdAdml 10.65 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.79 SmCAdm 35.72 TtlBAdml 10.77 TStkAdm 32.25 WellslAdm 54.65 WelltnAdm 55.06 Windsor 45.88 WdsrIIAd 47.37 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.96 CapOpp 32.91 DivdGro 15.18

-0.07 +1.6 +1.4 +0.08 +3.0 +4.5 +0.38 -1.0 -0.09 -3.4 -0.14 +4.8 +0.55 +4.0 +0.32 +2.7 +0.64 +2.6 +3.5 +0.20 +1.4 +0.56 +14.0 -0.01 +4.3 -0.02 +5.0 -0.01 +4.8 -0.01 +4.0 -0.19 -0.5 +4.2 -0.02 +4.3 +1.9 +5.4 +4.5 +0.63 +3.7 +4.5 +0.50 +1.1 +1.06 +9.3 +1.3 +2.0 +1.0 +2.0 +0.31 +2.7 +3.2 +0.18 +2.6 +0.11 +4.9 +0.12 +3.2 +0.14 +0.6 +0.21 +4.0 +0.14 +2.1 +0.16 -1.0 +0.11 +5.6

Energy 67.50 EqInc 21.53 Explr 75.78 GNMA 10.95 GlobEq 18.20 HYCorp 5.75 HlthCre 138.52 InflaPro 13.56 IntlGr 19.23 IntlVal 31.57 ITIGrade 10.03 LifeCon 16.66 LifeGro 22.45 LifeMod 19.99 LTIGrade 9.59 Morg 18.26 MuInt 13.58 PrecMtls r 24.31 PrmcpCor 14.02 Prmcp r 66.47 SelValu r 19.52 STAR 19.50 STIGrade 10.79 StratEq 19.48 TgtRetInc 11.55 TgRe2010 22.92 TgtRe2015 12.72 TgRe2020 22.60 TgtRe2025 12.89 TgRe2030 22.12 TgtRe2035 13.33 TgtRe2040 21.89 TgtRe2045 13.75 USGro 18.46 Wellsly 22.55 Welltn 31.87 Wndsr 13.59 WndsII 26.68 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 26.19 TotIntlInst r 104.77 500 118.23 MidCap 21.04 SmCap 35.67

-0.07 +4.8 +0.12 +6.3 +0.59 +3.9 +3.5 +0.02 +1.9 -0.01 +4.3 +1.34 +14.0 -0.01 +4.9 -0.05 -0.6 -0.12 -1.8 -0.02 +4.2 +0.03 +2.3 +0.06 +1.8 +0.04 +2.1 +5.4 +0.12 +1.3 +4.1 -0.20 -8.9 +0.08 +1.8 +0.47 +1.0 +0.15 +4.1 +0.03 +2.2 +1.9 +0.21 +6.3 +0.01 +2.9 +0.03 +2.7 +0.02 +2.4 +0.05 +2.3 +0.03 +2.1 +0.06 +2.0 +0.03 +1.8 +0.06 +1.8 +0.04 +1.9 +0.08 +1.2 +0.04 +4.8 +0.06 +3.1 +0.04 +0.6 +0.12 +3.9 -0.09 -0.36 +0.63 +0.14 +0.31

-0.6 -0.6 +2.5 +3.6 +2.7

SmlCpGth

22.76 +0.19 +3.8

SmlCpVl

16.22 +0.14 +1.3

STBnd

10.65

+1.9

TotBnd

10.77

+3.2

TotlIntl

15.65 -0.06 -0.7

TotStk

32.24 +0.19 +2.6

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

21.90 +0.08 +3.0

DevMkInst

10.07 -0.03 +0.9

ExtIn

42.39 +0.32 +2.7

FTAllWldI r

93.53 -0.27 -0.3

GrwthIst

31.95 +0.20 +1.4

InfProInst

10.85 -0.01 +5.0

InstIdx

117.44 +0.63 +2.6

InsPl

117.45 +0.63 +2.6

InsTStPlus

29.17 +0.17 +2.6

MidCpIst

21.11 +0.14 +3.7

SCInst

35.72 +0.31 +2.7

TBIst

10.77

TSInst

32.26 +0.19 +2.6

+3.2

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

97.69 +0.52 +2.6

MidCpIdx

30.15 +0.19 +3.7

STBdIdx

10.65

+2.0

TotBdSgl

10.77

+3.2

TotStkSgl

31.13 +0.18 +2.6

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.99 -0.01 +3.7

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.45 +0.08 +5.5


B USI N ESS

B6 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY

THURSDAY

CRISIS COMMUNICATION PLANNING: Agility Recovery and Small Business Association present a discussion about learning the steps and best practices for developing an emergency communication process; free; 11 a.m.; www1.gotomeeting.com/ register/748002384. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Midstate Electric Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Road, La Pine; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit. cocc.edu.

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541550-6603. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CENTRAL OREGON VISITORS ASSOCIATION 40TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON: Keynote provided by Peter Yesawich, chairman and chief executive officer of Ypartnership; $30 for Central Oregon Visitor Association members; $40 for others; corporate tables also available; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 800-800-8334, laura@ visitcentraloregon.com or http:// visitcentraloregon.com/. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Celebrate Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home 100 years of service; free; 5 p.m.; Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 105 N.W. Irving Ave.; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber. org. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-3187506, ext. 109.

FRIDAY WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamentals of traffic safety and meets the requirements of ODOT’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. to Scott and Brandi S. Davis, La Pine Acres, Lot 30, Block 5, $180,700 Pahlisch Homes Inc. to Mark and Lorri Petterson, Bridges at Shawdow Glen, Phase 1, Lot 12, $330,000 Kip J. Harris and Christine M. Castle to William and Julie Wheir, Township 16, Range 12, Section 18, $1,250,000 Todd M. and Penny L. Sheldon to Bank of America N.A., Arrowdale Lots 5 and 6, Block 1, Sections 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, Township 14, Range 13, Partition Plats 200566, 2006-30, 2006-43, 2007-1, 2008-42 and 2008-52, $616,250 CitiMortgage Inc. to Fannie Mae, Eastwood Addition, Lot 4, Block 1, $287,328.12 Rembold Holdings LLC to Dixie Gillin, Parks at Broken Top, Phase 3, Lot 96, $582,500 LSI Title Co. of Oregon LLC to Deutsche Bank Trust Co., Pines at Pilot Butte, Phases 1 and 2, Lot 32, $191,995 LSI Title Co. of Oregon LLC to GMAC Mortgage LLC fka GMAC Mortgage Corp., Oregon Water Wonderland Unit 2, Lot 19, Block 28, $153,469 Lou-Wayne Steiger to Patrick R. and Joy L. O’Keefe, Quail Pine Estates, Phase 10, Lot 18, $275,000 Jason D. Baker and Mary J. Donohue to Kenneth L. and Mary Ann Cook, Township 17, Range 12, Section 11, $250,000 William E. and Connie L. Rybicki to Ross Silver, Parks at Broken Top, Phase 3, Lot 105, $430,000 Gregory D. and Marcie D. Newton to Robert G. Ross and Janey M. Purvis, Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase 23, Lot 56, Block 18, $630,000 Elizabeth A. Veatch trustee of Elizabeth Ann Veatch Trust to LouWayne Steiger, Rivers Edge Village, Phase 2, Lot 16, Block 1, $250,000 Old Town Properties Inc. to David D. and Barbara L. Milne, Ponderosa Estates Second Addition, Lot 4, Block 3, $270,000 Kevin Wright to Paula and R. Lynn Rampy, Sun Meadow No. 3, Lot 57, $170,000 Marlene L. and Christian P. Hasler to

John T. and Jeri G. Scharpf, Golden Butte, Phase 2, Lot 44, $475,000 SB & KH Properties LLC to Patrick G. and Shirley A. Huycke, West Bend Village, Phases 3, 4 and 5, Lot 79, $175,500 Michael C. Ronnie and Constance Ronnie to Lindsay A. Bennett, Stonehaven Phase 1, Lot 19, $220,000 Raymond J. and Ann M. Petrillo to Janey Evans and Franz Walentin, Deschutes River Ranch, Lot 9, $150,000 Terry L. and Nancy L. Funk to Ada S. McKay and Roxanne McKay, Descutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 8, Part 2, Lot 15, Block 99, $170,000 Bend Equity Group to Brett A. and Lindsay N. Prentice, Brookland Park, Lot 15, $184,000 Peter F. and Lisa W. Johnston to Timothy A. and Ann M. Willis, West Ridge, Lot 1, Block 4, $361,000 Jeffrey D. and Kristen L. Maze to John L. and Sybilla M. Steenport, Shevlin Ridge, Phase 2, Lot 43, $440,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Ridgewater, Phases 1 and 2, Lot 7, $235,000 Thomas G. and Karyn Miller to Phillip A. Minor and Karen A. Smith, Pines at Sisters P.U.D., Lot 44, $150,000 Raymond R. and Maurine A. Schroeder to Lyssa and Wayne Sauer, a portion of Cimarron City, Lot 6, Block 2, $184,900 Joseph K. and Heidi J. Lyons to Thomas S. Schuchardt and ZungJung Shanti In, Deschutes River Woods, Lot 85, Block ZZ, $390,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Bret H. Grier, Molly H. Callahan-Grier and Dennis K. Grier, Tanglewood, Lot 6, Block 10, $170,000 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Ryan Cartmill, Raven Wood Addition, Lot 8, Block 1, $173,500 Gary B. and Lynette H. Blake to Kip J. Harris and Christine M. Castle, Partition Plat 200430, Parcel 1, $899,000 Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to Donald and Margaret McCowan, Willow Creek at Mountain High, Lot 20, $300,000 Hendricksom Homes of Oregon LLC to Jeffrey A. Trant trustee of Jeffrey A. Trant Family Trust, RiverRim P.U.D. Phase 9, Lot 287, $343,000

MLMT 2005-LC1 Bend Industrial LLC to East Empire - Bend LP, East Empire Business Park, Phases 4 and 5, Lots 13, 14 and 15, $5,500,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Donna H. Gallardo, View Ridge, Lot 14, $175,000 Blake F. and Li-Li C. McMahon to Annice B. Chadwick, Eagle Crest, Lot 22, Block 9, $425,000 Lisa Havniear to Thomas H. and Cassandra M. Walling, replat of portion of Cimarron City, Lot 25, Block 2, $163,000 Jay C. and Sharon R. Compton to Mark W. and Barbara Davies, RiverRim P.U.D., Phase 1, Lot 130, $782,422 Michael J. and Jill M. Grow to Stephen A. and Cheryl L.S. Baer, Camelot, Lot 4, $150,000 James Mullaney personal representative of Margaret R. Raker aka Margaret Ruth Laskey to Andreas W. and Joyce E. Falkenberg, Mountain Village West 1, Lot 2, Block 14, $275,000 Henry and Diana Oberbarnscheidt to John M. and Tracy Y. McKenzie, Township 17, Range 12, Section 4, $239,000 Jennifer D. Moon to David C. Tracy and Julia A. Williamson-Tracy, Shadow Ridge, Lot 23, $425,000 James A. and Jacque L. King to Marcia R. Boykin, Stonehaven, Phase 1, Lot 13, $200,000 Gwendy L. McCarthy and Kevin S. Sampson to Jordan T. Ries and Shannon E. Christian, Tamarack Park East, Phase 5, Lot 13, Block 7, $158,000 Tennbrook Financing LLC to Stone Bridge Homes NW LLC, Renaissance at Shevlin Park, Lots 35 and 45, $183,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Pinebrook, Phase 2, Lot 1, Block 7, $169,114 Dennis S. and Marcia A. Martin to Steven W. and Melissa R. Black, Fremont Crossing, Lot 24, $419,000 John A. and Marise D. Morrow to Timothy M. Rippey and Janice L. Rippey trustees of Timothy M. Rippey Revocable Trust, Alberello at Sunriver, Lots 21 and 22, $372,000 First American Title Insurance Co. to Citimortgage Inc., Pines P.U.D.,

Phase 6, Lot 47, $691,897.16 First American Title Insurance Co. to Bank of New York fka Bank of New York Mellon, Awbrey Butte Homesites, Phase 32, Lot 18, $513,770 Tennbrook Financing LLC to Greg Welch Construction Inc., Renaissance at Shevlin Park, Lots 48 and 49, $216,000 Tennbrook Financing LLC to Choice One Builders LLC, Renaissance at Shevlin Park, Lots 32 and 34, $180,000 Tennbrook Financing LLC to Choice One Builders LLC, Renaissance at Shevlin Park, Lots 33 and 50, $180,000 55 Properties LLC to Alicia I. Navia, Indian Ford Ranch Homes Plat No. 1, Lot 17, Block 1, $235,000 Regional Trustee Services Corp. to US Bank N.A., Township 21, Range 10, Section 33, $172,500 Mark and Laurie Musblitz to Old Town Properties Inc., Yardley Estates, Phase 1, Lot 23, $218,000 Home Federal Bank to The Willamette Valley Co., Township 17, Range 12, Section 32, Deschutes, Lots 1, 2, 7, 8, Block 5, $945,000 Charles L. and Deborah L. Rauscher to Thomas W. Benn, Harris Estates, Phase 2, Lot 2, Block 3, $325,000 Robert E. Jr. and Barbara G. Ashley to Richard Lewis and Barbara Garland-Lewis, Ridge at Eagle Crest 58, Lot 16, $425,000 Vanderbilt Mortgage & Finance Inc. to Michelle Lezie-Tormey, Panoramic View Estates, Lots 14 and 15, Block 6, $180,000 Richard D. Schmunk trustee of Richard C. Schmunk Revocable Trust and successor trustee of Carol S. Schmunk Revocable Trust to Daniel E. Jordan and Marcy A. Kuhlman, Squaw Creek Canyon Recreational Estates First Addition, Lot 31, Block 17, $450,000 Crook County

Bank of the Cascades to Cheryl A. Proffitt-Schmidt, Longhorn Ridge, Phase 1, Lot 6, $195,000 Freedom Tax Centers LLC to The Bank of Commerce trustee fbo Matt Morgan IRA, Longhorn Ridge, Phase 2, Lot 76, $158,700 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Hugh E. Barker and Joan M. Barker, Ochoco Pointe South P.U.D., Lot 6, $151,000

ATTENTION TOUR OF HOMES™ ADVERTISERS THE CENTRAL OREGON

BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

11

A SHOWCASE OF THE FINEST HOMES IN CENTRAL OREGON JULY 15, 16, 17 AND 22, 23, 24 Fridays: Noon – 6 pm, Saturdays and Sundays: 10 am – 6 pm Official Sponsors:

The Bulletin presents the Official Tour Guide, to be published Wednesday, July 13. Extra copies of the guide will also be distributed at the homes during the Tour.

Reach more than 70,000 adult readers in the official Tour of HomesTM Guide

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: FRIDAY, JUNE 24 Call your Bulletin sales representative today! Space is limited.

541-382-1811


L

Inside

OREGON Portland takes heat for emptying soiled reservoir, see Page C3. $100 million a year spent on inmate health care, see Page C3.

UTAH Supplement industry finds “natural ally” in Sen. Orrin Hatch, see Page C6. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011

WARM WEATHER

IN BRIEF Car crash results in power outage A Bend man was arrested in Redmond early Monday morning after police said he drove his car into a power pole while under the influence, causing 14 homes in the area to lose power. Devon Olden, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants, reckless endangering and failure to perform the duties of a driver after driving his 1992 Ford Crown Victoria into a power pole at Northwest Coyner and Northwest Helmholtz in Redmond. Police say Olden was traveling east on Northwest Coyner with passenger James Carranza, 21, when the car drifted to the right shoulder of the road. Olden lost control and crashed into a Central Electric Cooperative power pole, causing extensive damage. Neither was injured.

Well, sh ot! WORKSHOP Join Bulletin photographers here every other Tuesday for a lesson in photographic fundamentals. Follow the series at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot Coming up: July 5: Virtual field trip to the Upper Deschutes • July 19: Contests • Aug. 2: Virtual field trip to Smith Rock • Aug. 16: Portraits Part II • And more ...

For The Bulletin

More local briefing, plus News of Record, on Page C2.

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state. or.us Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

HOUSE Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state. or.us Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

Your D.C. delegation U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. Phone: 202-225-6730 Bend office: 541-389-4408 Web: walden.house.gov U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-3753 Bend office: 541-318-1298 Web: merkley.senate.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-5244 Bend office: 541-330-9142 Web: wyden.senate.gov

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators SENATE Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state. or.us Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

HOUSE Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state. or.us Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

Officials say heat shouldn’t affect snowmelt By Leon Pantenburg

— Bulletin staff reports

SENATE

C

Photos by Pete Erickson

As you might guess, I made quite a few photos using different lenses with both horizontal and vertical compositions and with different types of waves to capture sunset at Second Beach in Olympic National Park. This picture was chosen because of the sun coming through the sea cave, the water covering the sand entirely and the small wave at the bottom pointing at the sea stack and mirroring the shape of the red cloud on the top.

Focus in on the best stuff Exercise restraint to turn a large shoot into an interesting presentation

So what happens later this week when projected high temperatures in the 90s and an above-average snowpack in the mountains combine? There’s no question there is still a lot of snow in the higher elevations: Mt. Bachelor recorded 665 inches of snow this season, according to www.mtbachelor .com, besting the previous record of 606 inches set during the winter of 1998-1999. Last March was the snowiest one on record. Cool temperatures this spring and cloudy, rainy weather also combined to slow the snowmelt rate. But this unusually heavy snowpack in the mountains doesn’t concern area recreation agencies, which don’t foresee flooding in the lower elevations as runoff charges river and lakes. “We’re not planning on a lot of flooding, even if it does get hot this week,” said Karen Curtiss, deputy fire staff officer for the Deschutes National Forest. “It may be 90 degrees in Bend, but it will be cooler at the higher elevations in the mountains. One day of hot weather wouldn’t have that much impact on snowpack melt.” The National Weather Service is not forecasting increased flows in the Deschutes River, according to Tom Herrett, a hydrologist with the United States Geological Survey. See Snowmelt / C2

By Pete Erickson The Bulletin

We’ve all sat through slide shows of people’s vacation pictures and needed about a gallon of coffee to keep from drifting off to our own dreamy vacation. But a well-edited slide show, blog, book or other grouping of pictures can capture the interest of the audience and make them think you’re a great photographer and want to see more pictures. New photographers often have difficulty editing their pictures. They become too attached to a certain photo for whatever reason and forget about the attention span of the viewing audience. Editing consists of two basic steps. The first happens when you shoot the pictures, and the second happens later when you look at the pictures. You can’t do a million images of everything, and you can’t just do one picture to tell the entire story. The photographer must constantly be thinking of what’s going on and adjust to capture the moments. Look for three basic kinds of pictures: the overall, the medium and the detail. Shoot all three in vertical and horizontal formats. The audience will be bored with every picture being the same, so mix it up during the shoot. The second step, sitting down to look at your pictures, usually takes more time than taking them. A couple of computer programs, Lightroom and Aperture, are designed to streamline your editing. Regardless of how you edit, you must be ruthless. A typical newspaper story uses one or maybe two pictures. I typically shoot about 50 to 300 pictures of one event, depending on the subject. While shooting, I look at the LCD viewer and pick some of the best ones. Then in the office, I already know which ones to look for and focus on them. Editing this way takes only a couple of minutes. I recently went to Olympic National Park for a week of backpacking, combining beaches and rainforest. The editing for a trip like that will take much longer because the pictures all need to work together well. I took around 700 pictures during the week and have cut them down to four and described in each caption why I picked the particular photo for this installment.

ASSIGNMENT Go back through one of your favorite

A branch of the Hoh River flows through the Hoh Rainforest. Rain on the first leaves of summer is brilliant green and a big reason behind my timing for the trip. I picked this scene because the trees frame the rapids. When shooting in the rainforest, go when it’s raining to get the best pictures. I ended up carrying my small fixed focal length lenses and an umbrella to cover the camera when working.

These trees are right on the Hoh Rainforest trail about four miles up from the visitors center. I made the same picture in the morning with more light on the trees, but the contrast of this picture made it work. The red cedar and the new bright green leaves make for really good contrast. I wanted to include a detail shot. This is about one inch of an old-growth cedar and it makes a groovy shape. It also balances out the huge look of the other pictures of the amazing forest. shoots and select the single photo that you feel best represents that subject. Then in the caption, tell us why you chose it.

We’ll sort through the submissions and publish the best photos, and the best captions.

Attention, photographers! Submit your own photos at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshot and we’ll pick the best photos for publication next week in this space. No doctored photos, please!

Health secretary touts U.S. prevention programs By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sibelius launched a new effort Monday to make sure that Americans who qualify for Medicare know that under the Affordable Care Act, they are eligible for numerous preventive treatments, often at no cost. As of June 10, almost 5.5 million Americans have already taken advantage of one or more preventive programs in 2011, she said. That’s roughly one out of every six of the 33 million Americans who qualify for Medicare, but that number could be higher. “We know that having a person in Medicare go without a potentially life-saving test because they don’t know it’s there for no cost is just as tragic as having them skip the test because they can’t afford it,” she said. As of Jan. 1, many treatments have no more out-of-pocket costs for seniors, such as bone mass measurement, colorectal cancer screening and diabetes screening, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Preventable illnesses such as diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure take a toll on families and drive up health care costs, said Dr. Donald Berwick, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. See Health care / C5


C OV ER S T ORY

C2 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 4:57 p.m. June 17, in the area of Northeast Steins Pillar Drive. Burglary — A burglary and theft were reported at 8 a.m. June 19, in the area of South Main Street.

Redmond Police Department

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 9:44 p.m. June 17, in the 2400 block of Southwest Timber View Court. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 6:24 p.m. June 17, in the 2900 block of Southwest Salmon Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:46 p.m. June 17, in the 2300 block of Northeast Fifth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:51 p.m. June 17, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street and Northwest Maple Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:38 p.m. June 17, in the 400 block of Southwest Ninth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:57 p.m. June 17, in the 1500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:14 a.m. June 17, in the 3000 block of Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported and a firearm reported stolen at 9:36 p.m. June 18, in the 3100 block of Southwest Pumice Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:57 p.m. June 18, in the 700 block of Northwest Canyon Drive. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 11:46 a.m. June 18, in the 800 block of Northwest 21st Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:53 a.m. June 18, in the area of Southwest 31st Street and Southwest Obsidian Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:32 p.m. June 18, in the 2100 block of Southwest 31st Street. DUII — Susan Laverda Finch, 52, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:53 p.m. June 19, in the area of Northwest 28th Street and Northwest Hemlock Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:24 p.m. June 19, in the 700 block of Northeast Negus Place. Theft — A dog was reported stolen at 3:13 p.m. June 19, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. DUII — Luther Graham, 60, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:19 a.m. June 19, in the 700 block of Southwest Sixth Street.

Theft — A theft was reported at 6:03 p.m. June 17, in the 52400 block of Cascade Court in La Pine. DUII — Patrick Gerard Graeve, 52, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:31 p.m. June 17, in the 64600 block of Cook Avenue in Tumalo. DUII — Brian Monte Berg, 49, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:07 p.m. June 17, in the 67700 block of Cloverdale Road in Cloverdale. DUII — Michelle Vetter, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:03 p.m. June 17, in the 67700 block of Cloverdale Road in Cloverdale. Theft — An MP3 player was reported stolen and an arrest made at 3:08 p.m. June 17, in the 15500 block of Liberty Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:50 p.m. June 17, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 3 in Cloverdale. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:44 p.m. June 17, in the area of Southwest Helmholtz Way and West State Highway 126 in Redmond. Theft — Lumber and metal were reported stolen at 12:54 p.m. June 17, in the 63300 block of U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. DUII — Anton Merle Suty III, 56, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:59 a.m. June 17, in the 400 block of Northeast O’Neil Way in Redmond. Theft — A bicycle was reported stolen at 10:51 a.m. June 17, in the 54400 block of Foster Road in Bend. Theft — Fly fishing rods were reported stolen at 10:09 a.m. June 17, in the 100 block of North Pine Street in Sisters. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:16 a.m. June 17, in the 1700 block of A Avenue in Terrebonne. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:58 a.m. June 17, in the area of Bear Creek and Ward roads in Bend. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 3:35 a.m. June 17, in the 500 block of Northwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:41 p.m. June 18, in the 15900 block of Deedon Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:19 p.m. June 18, in the area of Lava Lands. Theft — A theft was reported at

L B  

2:13 p.m. June 18, in the 60300 block of Hiawatha Lane in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:45 p.m. June 18, in the 52600 block of Ranch Drive in La Pine. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 1:41 p.m. June 18, in the 63300 block of Britta Street in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 12:55 p.m. June 18, in the 67500 block of Cline Falls Road in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:47 a.m. June 18, in the area of Old Bend Redmond Highway and Young Avenue in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:27 p.m. June 19, in the 21800 block of Hidaway Hills Court in Bend. Criminal mischief — Damage to a tire swing was reported at 9:05 p.m. June 19, in the area of Bluegrass and Crossroads loops in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:19 p.m. June 19, in the 51600 block of Huntington Road in La Pine. Criminal mischief — Damage to a fence was reported at 1:20 p.m. June 19, in the 7700 block of Northwest Spruce Avenue in Redmond. DUII — Robert Daniel Kelly, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:41 a.m. June 19, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Young Avenue in Redmond. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary and theft were reported June 12, in the 1100 block of Southeast McTaggart Road in Madras. Theft — A Chihuahua was reported stolen June 13, in the 500 block of Eighth Street in Metolius. Criminal mischief — Damage to a gate was reported and arrests made June 13, in the 1400 block of Southwest Jericho Lane in Culver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported June 13, in the area of Southwest Feather Drive and Southwest Imo Lane in Culver. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:40 p.m. June 16, in the area of Northeast Loucks Road and Northeast Bean Drive in Madras. Burglary — A burglary was reported June 16, in the 7800 block of Southwest Box Canyon Place in Crooked River Ranch. Oregon State Police

DUII — Terrence Brown, 47, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:43 p.m. June 17, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Reed Market Road in Bend. DUII — Kayla Leeann Newton, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:16 a.m. June 19, in the 5600 block of Southwest Young Avenue in Redmond.

Supreme Court defines flag burning as protected political protest in 1989 T O D AY IN HISTORY

The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, June 21, the 172nd day of 2011. There are 193 days left in the year. Day. Summer arrives at 1:16 p.m. EDT. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 21, 1788, the United States Constitution went into effect as New Hampshire became the ninth state to ratify it. ON THIS DATE In 1963, Cardinal Giovanni Battista Montini was chosen to succeed the late Pope John XXIII; the new pope took the name Paul VI.

In 1989, a sharply divided Supreme Court ruled that burning the American flag as a form of political protest was protected by the First Amendment. In 2005, 41 years to the day after three civil rights workers were beaten and shot to death, Edgar Ray Killen, an 80-yearold former Ku Klux Klansman, was found guilty of manslaughter in a Mississippi court. (Killen was sentenced to 60 years in prison.)

Bulletin staff reports

Website addresses unclaimed money The Oregon Department of State Lands recently launched an online claim service site that will allow residents to search

Snowmelt

The department reports that there is nearly $400 million of unclaimed money. For those interested in seeing if they have unclaimed money in their name, visit the website https://oregonup.us.

Wet spring sets records in Oregon

Continued from C1 “Typically, the NWS takes hot weather into account when they do their forecasting,� he said. “You need to have heat in the higher elevations before there might be increased water flows down below. If the snowpack is gone at the lower elevations, which it already is, there shouldn’t be a flooding danger.� Several issues affect how fast the snow melts, Herrett added, and daytime heat is just one factor. “Warm temperatures, combined with rain on the snow, could cause a problem, because it would make the snowpack melt abnormally fast,� Herrett said. “But the long, cool spring slowed down the snowmelt, and allowed the lower elevations to get cleared out.� A few days of hot weather may kick up the river flows, he added, but that won’t cause flooding. The bad news in a big snowpack is for hikers, who should wait to head for the high country, officials said. “Much above 5,000 feet, the trails are still under snow,� said Jean Nelson-Dean, public affairs specialist with the Des-

PORTLAND — The wet spring in Oregon has made it to No. 2 in the record books. The Oregonian reports it was second-wettest spring in 117 years of record keeping. The National Climatic Data Center figures also show it was the fifth-coolest spring in Oregon. The springtime weather included mountain snowpacks that kept growing well into May when they usually peak April 1, bringing plenty of snowmelt that combined with rain to send the Columbia River to flood stage and over for weeks, as measured at Vancouver, Wash. But Oregon was not alone for wet weather. Montana also had its second-wettest spring in 117 years, while it was the wettest March through May for that period in Washington state, Wyoming, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Tennessee and Vermont. — The Associated Press chutes National Forest. “There is still a lot of snow along the Cascade Lakes Highway and in the Three Creeks area near Sisters.� The abnormal snowpack will contribute to hazardous conditions for hikers, she said. “We’re five to six weeks behind the normal snowpack melt, so the trails, right now, are as they would typically be in late April or May,� Nelson-Dean said. “In some areas, hikers will end up postholing on the trails because of the snow, and that will be miserable.� The snowpack has slowed down the usual trail maintenance, she added, which means

Bull trout going back in Clackamas The Associated Press PORTLAND — Bull trout are going to be put back in the upper reaches of the Clackamas River on the flanks of Mount Hood in Oregon after being gone for nearly 50 years. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said Monday that bull trout from the Metolius River near Sisters will be transplanted into the Clackamas on the Mount Hood National Forest starting June 30. Bull trout are a threatened

there are more blow-downs across trails. “There was a lot of bug kill on the trees, and that, combined with the extra snow, makes some areas dangerous,� Nelson-Dean said. “We’d advise hikers to keep looking up so they don’t walk under some potentially dangerous trees that might fall on them.� Most campgrounds are open, even though some might not be completely open due to snowdrifts. All the boat landings and docks are open. Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at lpantenburg@bendbulletin.com.

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Opening: Friday, July 15 @ 7:30pm Sat., July 16 & 23 @ 7:30pm Sun., July 17 & 24 @ 2:00pm For tickets go to www.2ndstreettheater.com 541.312.9626

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Juliette Lewis is 38. Musician Justin Cary is 36. Rock musician Mike Einziger (Incubus) is 35. Actor Chris Pratt is 32. Rock singer Brandon Flowers is 30. Britain’s Prince William is 29. Pop singer Kris Allen (“American Idol�) is 26. Actor Jascha Washington is 22. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “In America, to look a couple of years younger than you actually are is not only an achievement for which you are to be congratulated, it is patriotic.� — Cynthia Propper Seton, American writer (1926-1982)

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 C3

O Portland’s controversial, $36,000 flush

Shakespeare Festival finds cracked beam

By Tim Fought The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Call it the big flush. Because a 21-year-old man was caught on a security camera urinating into a city reservoir, Oregon’s biggest city is sending 8 million gallons of treated drinking water down the drain. Portland officials defended the decision Monday, saying they didn’t want to send city residents water laced, however infinitesimally, with urine. Public health officials say, however, that urine is sterile in healthy people and that the urine in the reservoir was so diluted — perhaps a half pint in millions of gallons — that it posed little risk. Some people in the city, in the suburbs and around the world called the flush an overreaction, especially since animals such as ducks contribute waste routinely and, sometimes, die in the water. “More than 1 billion people worldwide do not have reliable access to clean drinking water, and here we are tossing away nearly 8 million gallons of water just to appease the ignorant residents who believe their tap water will otherwise turn yellow,” read one comment posted on The Oregonian’s website. Water from the city’s five open air reservoirs, all in parks, goes directly to customers. The reservoirs are due to be replaced by underground storage within a decade, a result of federal requirements. The reservoirs distribute water that flows from glaciers on Mount Hood. It is treated before it goes to the reservoirs for distribution, and then goes directly to consumers. The reservoirs are drained twice a year for cleaning, and workers have found animal carcasses, paint cans, construction material, fireworks debris and even the plastic bags people use

ASHLAND — The Oregon Shakespeare Festival has canceled all shows in the Angus Bowmer Theatre this week after discovering a main support beam is cracked and threatening to collapse. The Mail Tribune reported that festival officials announced the weeklong closure Sunday afternoon as crews set up scaffolding to stabilize the sagging beam. A festival spokeswoman said officials were grateful the 70-foot beam that spans the theater did not come down and that no one was injured. The festival expects to decide later this week whether further closures of the 600-seat theater will be needed.

Benjamin Brink / The Oregonian

This spot at Mount Tabor is where a 21-year-old man was seen on surveillance video urinating into one of Portland’s drinking water reservoirs. City officials have decided to empty the reservoir at the cost of about $36,000 because of the incident.

“Nobody wants to drink pee, and I don’t want to deal with the 100 people who would be unhappy that I’m serving them pee in their water.” — David Shaff, administrator, Portland Water Bureau to scoop up after their dogs, said David Shaff, administrator of the city water bureau. Even so, Shaff said, the yuck factor was the primary reason for the decision to drain the 8 million gallons, at a cost of less than $8,000 to treat it as sewage. “Nobody wants to drink pee, and I don’t want to deal with the 100 people who would be unhappy that I’m serving them pee in their water,” he said. Shaff said the security cameras also showed something that’s

still unidentified was thrown in the water, heightening concern about potential risks. City Commissioner Randy Leonard, who is in charge of the water bureau, defended the decision, citing a potential public health risk. He said he worried about the possibility of chlamydia or AIDS from blood in urine. “I’m for taking the most conservative approach,” he said. Dr. Gary Oxman, the county health officer, said the risk was so close to nil that it falls in the

$100M a year spent on inmate health The Associated Press PORTLAND — Health care costs for Oregon prison inmates have reached about $100 million a year and keep increasing as the state deals with inmates who are getting older and sicker, including one woman with kidney disease who cost the state about $1.1 million last year. The cost is taking an ever-bigger share of the state prison budget, jumping from 6 percent in the 2003-05 biennium to 15 percent in 2009-11, The Oregonian reported. With no insurer to help, the state pays for every inmate. Lawmakers faced with tough choices this legislative session had to cut other state services, including elderly care and treatment for youth addiction. Inmates are guaranteed decent medical care, thanks to Texas inmate J.W. Gamble, a convicted killer who was hurt in 1973 while unloading cotton bales on a prison detail. He sued prison officials for neglect and pursued his claim to the U.S. Supreme Court. Justices ruled in 1976 that poor medical care was cruel and unusual punishment forbidden by the Constitution, and that remains the rule. “There is an obligation to provide medical care for serious medical needs,” said Dr. Don Kern, president of the national Society of Correctional Physicians. “We’re not talking about cosmetic surgery.” Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that inadequate medical and mental care in California

“If we’re out of money, we still have to provide the treatment.” — Bill Hoefel, health services administrator, Oregon Corrections Department prisons is intolerable. The court said California, given one chance after another to make fixes, must bring down its prison population until all inmates receive adequate care. “If we’re out of money, we still have to provide the treatment,” Bill Hoefel, health services administrator of the Oregon Corrections Department, told The Oregonian. Besides sheer numbers and growing complexity, prison officials face the same pressures as any medical system — escalating prices for tests, drugs and specialized treatments. “We have no control over who’s coming in or with what,” Hoefel said.

Elderly inmates Elderly inmates, in particular, are an increasingly costly challenge. Ten years ago, Oregon prisons held 258 inmates 61 and older. Now there are 674. Corrections officials say they spend $776 a year on a 40-yearold inmate’s health needs. The tab soars to $6,527 for inmates over 70. Inmates also enter prison old-

er in body than age after years of drug and alcohol abuse, and infrequent health care, Kern and others said. A 50-year-old inmate often has problems typical of a 60-year-old, Kern said. “I’m just seeing sicker and sicker patients,” said Dr. Michael Puerini, medical director at Oregon State Correctional Institution and the next president of the Society of Correctional Physicians. Mental health care costs are also a major factor. About seven in 10 of the state’s 14,000 inmates need some type of mental health care in a system never designed to provide it, officials say. The Corrections Department has added 525 beds for mental health care since 2005 for a total of 900 — more than the Oregon State Hospital, the state’s main psychiatric care facility. Separate mental health infirmaries have been created within prisons and one “supermax” facility has been turned into a ward for the most severely ill. But officials still must choose who gets a bed and more focused treatment. Sending troubled inmates back into the general prison population leaves them vulnerable to taunts and attacks. And some mentally ill inmates lose control, harming themselves, other inmates or employees. “The corrections environment is not good for a person with serious mental health illness,” said Jana Russell, administrator of the Corrections Department’s Behavioral Health Services Division.

Springfield man gets 8 months in for poaching The Associated Press EUGENE — An Oregon man has been sentenced to eight months in prison for his role in what Oregon State Police have called the largest deer poaching case in state history. The (Eugene) Register-Guard reports that 26-year-old Miguel Kennedy of Springfield was sentenced last week in Eugene after

O  B

pleading guilty to identity theft, forgery, unlawfully transferring hunting tags and racketeering. Racketeering is defined as collaborating with others in a pattern of criminal behavior using the same method to commit multiple crimes. Several other Springfield residents have also been charged in the alleged illegal killing of nearly

300 deer between 2005 and 2010. Kennedy will actually serve 14 months in prison as a result of also violating his probation in a previous case.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

“never say never” range. Even with the uncertainty over an object thrown in the water, “that’s still a very small risk,” he said. The young man, Josh Seater, told KATU-TV he’d been drinking, was with friends and thought that the reservoir was a sewage treatment plant. He said he felt guilty instantly, and then security guards arrived. “I knew I did wrong when I did it,” he told the station. In addition to the sewage charge, Shaff said, the flushed water is worth $28,000. The Mount Hood watershed that supplies the city is brimming this spring, with 8 million gallons flowing through it about every half hour. “If I lived in Texas, I might have had a different response,” he said.

NOAA operations center opens July 1

over the objections of officials in Washington state. A new pier for six ships and a warehouse and administration building were built at a cost of $30 million on Yaquina Bay.

Man shoots himself in groin in Newberg NEWBERG — Newberg police say a man who accidentally shot himself in the groin with a .40-caliber pistol is expected to recover. Capt. Jeff Kosmicki says the shooting happened Monday in the parking lot of an auto supply store. Newport-Dundee Fire Department medics happened to be inside the store and treated the man once they got the emergency call. Kosmicki says the unidentified man was taken to a Portland-area hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Police say the man gave officers permission to remove the gun from his vehicle. — From wire reports

NEWPORT — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Pacific marine operations center opens July 1 at Newport. The center and its 175 jobs were moved from Seattle

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C4 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Agri-tourism rules a good compromise

T

he truth about farming in Deschutes County is this: Most of those who farm must also do something else to make a living. In fact, the last time the U.S. Department of Agri-

culture tallied the numbers, about two-thirds of farms in the county produced incomes of $5,000 or less. Knowing that, it’s easy to understand why some farmers want to rent out chunks of their land for special events, among them weddings and reunions. The income they receive from such activities can mean someone in the family may have to work a bit less somewhere else. Some neighbors object, however, to the noise, cars and general disruption that can accompany such activities. All of which explains why the county has struggled for several years to strike a balance between farmers who see weddings as a much-needed source of income and their neighbors, who view them as the ruination of their quiet bit of rural life. Now the county’s Community Development Department is prepared to give the planning commission, and, likely next month, the full county commission its proposed changes to the current county code covering such activities. While the department’s proposals will not make everyone happy, they strike a reasonable balance between neighbors, and they do so in a manner suited to the region. Among the changes the department suggests: • Farmers could not replace agriculture with social events.

• Those renting space for events would have to submit traffic management plans, set back event spaces at least 100 feet from the property line, and, if the county asks them to do so, install berms, landscaping or other means to hold down noise and visual impact. • Events could be held between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m., but amplified sound could be used only between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. Commercial events could be held only 20 days per year. The list is both more and less restrictive than a bill now on the way to Gov. John Kitzhaber which makes some agri-tourism a conditional use on land zoned for exclusive farm use. The latter may allow fewer events each year, but they can run longer. Too, they must be more closely tied to agriculture than the county would require. The Community Development Department’s proposed changes are designed to give everyone at least some of what they want. Those who had hoped to become Wedding Central will no doubt be disappointed, as will those who object when the neighbors have a party that draws more than five cars. Most, however, should be able to live with what the county has in mind.

Spend fees on roads B

end residents will find getting around town easier in the years ahead because they agreed earlier this year to tax themselves to finance major traffic improvements. That doesn’t mean the city’s road problems are solved, however. Nor does it mean, as City Councilor Mark Capell has suggested on a couple of occasions, that fees currently being funneled into transportation might be moved elsewhere. Though the idea has been discussed and rejected in the past, he’s not quite ready to give up on it. He should be. City residents voted in May to pony up $30 million for a bond measure that will finance a variety of major traffic improvements around town, including new roundabouts and a revamp of Reed Market Road, where usage far exceeds what the road was designed for. That money cannot be spent on anything else, and Capell understands that; rather, he would like councilors to consider whether franchise fees that now support transportation could better be spent elsewhere. Capell is correct in noting that there are real needs in other city agencies. The fire department, as one example, will have to tap its reserve fund to balance its budget over the next two years. It expects to spend $1.3 million of a $2 million total in the fund in that effort. Other city departments face similar

problems, as well. But transportation, housed within the public works department, has financial problems of its own, even with the $30 million bond. A couple of years ago its street repair backlog stood at some $12 million worth of work, and while the economy has brightened a bit since then, it’s still far from robust. The result is that the city must do what any financially strapped family would do, tend to the most critical things now and hope that smaller problems can be resolved later. Beyond transportation’s clear need for the money, there’s another problem with any plan to shift funds elsewhere. It just looks bad. City officials went to voters saying extra money was necessary to keep the city running smoothly, and voters agreed. To move money now would be to break trust with those voters, implying as it might that the city could have done its major construction from existing funds had it wished to do so. We know that the implication is not true but it looks bad, so much so that moving money from transportation to other needs would surely come back to haunt the city sometime in the future. Voters have long memories, and if they believe the city played a shell game with transportation dollars, even if that belief is not justified, the city will pay the price sometime down the road.

School district did not pay for field trip IN MY VIEW

By Hazel Inman Bulletin guest columnist

S

tan Cherzan of Bend noticed a Redmond school bus near Yaquina Bay in Newport in early June. In a letter to the editor, he asked why we were there and how could we justify the expense. Cherzan and anyone agitated by his letter ought to know that those students, volunteers, and teachers paid 100 percent of the costs from their own resources. Redmond School District paid zip, zero, nothing. Fundraising, scholarships, and personal donations covered it. I’m a parent chaperone. I was there. I know. We even paid for the bus fuel. These teachers know how to get the most bang for a buck. Look what they did for our fifth-graders. When Cherzan glimpsed the Redmond school bus, our students were aboard Marine Discovery Tours for two hours on a scholarship from the Oregon Trawl Fishermen. Free education! This alone would be awesome. But teachers gave more. They taught lots of marine science in class. They layered multiple learning experiences on the field trip, packing it in. Imagine landing on Beverly Beach with a deluge of saturating rain, the surf rolling toward you, and the sand sucking out beneath your feet. Glorious nature — the feel, smell and sound of the Pacific’s welcome. Then imagine exploring the Newport Aquarium, seeing and touching the life forms you first heard about in the classroom. Imagine spending two hours with a

marine biologist and captain aboard Marine Discovery Tours on the Yaquina Bay, observing magnified plankton, casting and retrieving nets that bring sideways-scurrying crabs, fish, shrimp, and ribbons of verdant seaweed to the water tables on board, and understanding the life hidden below the surface because you’d studied it moments ago at the aquarium. Imagine learning the name and function of navigational technology and having a turn at driving the boat across the gentle bay and then the thrill of crossing the bar, climbing swells and dropping, holding onto the railing and screaming your excitement, then knowing — knowing — you were atop the mighty Pacific Ocean, looking back to see Yaquina Head’s light, the jetties, the bay, straining to spot whales. Imagine combing the beach and peering into lush tide pools in the calm, blue-sky morning at Devil’s Punch Bowl State Park. Imagine you can see in real life what you’ve learned about in class — these species alien to children raised in the high desert, the pod of orcas spouting columns of white spray and breaching dark and light flesh above the dense blue waters. And now imagine you’ve experienced these layers of education so far and find yourself at the U.S. Coast Guard, exploring their three boats and seeing a video of their training exercises on the very bar you’ve crossed

just the day before. See how rich and meaningful each individual experience becomes when combined with the others. See how much is gained by first-hand experience. Cherzan, you and your wife loved the beach enough to take a detour from Portland on your way home. Some of our students had never been to the beach and might have passed their whole childhoods with never doing so. You’re a veteran, and I thank you for your service to our country. These children will become the stewards of our earth and ocean. Some may be moved by this trip and want to serve our country, too, in the Navy or Coast Guard or as marine biology scientists. Please don’t confuse and mingle the achievements of smart, thrifty teachers (God knows they have to be in this day and age of economic woes) with the news you read of budget cuts and cries for more money. It’s not what happened here. Nearly 100 children gained knowledge, interest and enthusiasm for an ocean that covers 30 percent of our planet on their own dime with scholarship help from others who know the importance of marine education. Cherzan, you and I and everyone are counting on this next generation to handle things. We need them to care. We need them to be smart. These fifthgrade teachers at Vern Patrick Elementary understand this. And boy, are they doing a great job with as little as they get. Hazel Inman lives in Redmond.

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Ten-hut! Young recruits are determined and optimistic By Gregory Clay McClatchy-Tribune News Service

OKLAHOMA CITY — od, they look so young. And their idealism is utterly amazing, especially during a time when national cynicism and skepticism are racing at an all-time high among an often jaded and sometimes unforgiving American public. One soldier who graduated from nine weeks of basic training at Fort Sill in Oklahoma said he was 24 years old, married with three children. Except he didn’t look a day over 18. Another soldier was 19, another had just turned 20 and set to ship off to Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio for Advanced Individual Training to learn his job as a medic for the next five months. A female soldier with Shirley Temple’s curly top was only 5-foot-3, 20 years old, with eyeglasses, replete with an unabashed eagerness to also learn medic duties. This gaggle of U.S. Army uniforms,

G

combat boots and bright eyes to match is armed with an unwavering hope coursing through their veins. They are young at heart but fiercely determined in mind. You want determination? One bespectacled soldier, who just graduated the day before, was headed to San Antonio to learn his new craft: carpentry. He couldn’t wait to learn how to build military housing for soldiers abroad, or other structures such as schools, most likely in some war zone in some faraway place. During the actual graduation ceremony at McMahon Auditorium in Lawton, Okla., newly minted soldiers sit at attention in the middle rows of the audience, hands palms down on kneecaps, staring straight ahead. They head to the graduation dais row-by-row at strict attention, announce their names via microphone and ultimately meet their commanding officers. One soldier set to ship out for the next phase told me he had lost 40 pounds

during the rigorous basic training. As he said, “When we are not working out, we are working out.” There are many miles to run before you recite the “The Soldier’s Creed” on graduation day (usually held on Thursdays and Fridays at Fort Sill). Another soldier told me the military, partly due to the weak economy with the uncertain jobs front, is a hot spot for young people these days. He said there is a waiting list of up to a year and a half for basic boot camp to join the Marine Corps; another soldier said the Air Force waiting list can be up to two years. One newbie soldier who resembled former New York Yankees pitcher Andy Pettitte said he eventually would be deployed to Afghanistan as a medic. He already knows this, he said. However, the clincher for me was when he said he would have volunteered for Afghanistan duty even if he weren’t ordered to go. Why would anyone want to look forward to Afghanistan, I ask. “Because that’s my job,” he says. “If I

go to Afghanistan, that means at least one American will be safe at home, sir.” Another soldier chimed in, “Better me than you, sir.” OK, if you say so. But why care about me, I ask. You don’t know me, never met me before this particular day, I suggest. One of the soldiers asks me, “Where are you from, sir?” I respond, “Washington D.C., the nation’s capital.” He then asks another soldier standing nearby, “Where are you from?” The soldier says Pennsylvania. He asks another soldier for his home state; she answers Iowa. He asks the same of another soldier; he says Virginia. Then, the fresh-faced soldier probably no more than about 5-foot-5 in height and just turned 20, responds, “See, sir, we are all Americans.” His message: We, as soldiers, are here to serve the United States of America. That means the American people. To

preserve and protect. Listening to these U.S. soldiers evoke such unfettered enthusiasm was both informative and enlightening. I haven’t heard such love for fellow (U.S.) man — and woman — since the terrorist attacks on Sept 11, 2001, when, in its aftermath, much of the country bonded, whether through fear, or a sense of loss or just plain goodwill. Both strangers and friends alike partook. But what about the ultimate sacrifice. Suppose you become a casualty of war. “We know what can happen,” one young soldier explains. You know the deal, I ask. “We know the deal, sir,” another soldier says convincingly. Are you sure? “Yes sir,” he says without equivocation. Enough said. Ten-hut! Gregory Clay is assistant sports editor for McClatchy-Tribune News Service.


C OV ER S T ORY

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 C5

O Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Dale Asher Mitchell October 6, 1934 - June 18, 2011 Dale Asher Mitchell, passed away very peacefully at his home of 49 years, on Saturday, June 18, 2011. He was married to Barbara for 52 years, whom he lost just over a year ago. He has three children, Rob (married to Cherie), Sissy (married to Dave Easley), and DeAnna (married to Scott Christiansen. Dale Mitchell He was the proud Papa of 12 grandchildren, and five great-grandchildren. He was known to many as ‘Mitch’ or ‘Stubby’. He worked as a logger/truck driver/low boy operator for Brooks Scanlon, Diamond Int’l, and Bend Aggregate & Paving. He retired in 1996. Dale enjoyed touring the country with his wife on their motorcycle. He also liked to be in his shop working on old cars and tinkering on different projects. He was a very prideful man who loved and cared for everyone. We would love for all who had the privilege of knowing Dale, to join us on Friday, June 24th at 3 p.m. for a celebration of his life at his home at 64404 O.B. Riley Road, Bend, Oregon.

Robert ’Bob’ Leroy Redmond May 24, 1942 - May 31, 2011 Robert Leroy Redmond, passed away in Redmond, on May 31, 2011. Bob was born May 24, 1942, in Bend, to Edward and Blanche Redmond, the youngest of seven children. He grew up in Bend, and married Marilyn Brown on September 2, 1962. They moved to Washington, where he worked for Boeing Aircraft. While there, Doug was born in 1964, and Debbie in 1966. At age seven, Debbie drowned in an accident in a neighborhood lake. In 1975, they returned to Central Oregon. He worked for Sea Swirl Boat Company in Culver for 26 years. Bob loved the outdoors: fishing, hunting, and hiking. He looked forward to attending church at Redmond Assembly of God. After he developed health problems, his friends and neighbors, Gordon and Mildred Severyn gave him a ride to church. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn of Redmond; son, Doug of Bend; brother, William of Myrtle Creek; as well as many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by daughter, Deborah; parents; three sisters; and two brothers. Please sign the online guestbook at www.redmondmemorial.com

John Edward Lockshaw January 1, 1943 - June 16, 2011 John E. Lockshaw Jr. died June 16, 2011, at the age of 68. He was born January 1, 1943, in Los, Angeles CA, to John and Dorothy (Albers) Lockshaw. John served in the United States Navy from 1960 1963. He married Carolyn Johnson on May 9, 1964, John E. in Covina, Lockshaw, Jr. CA. They later moved to Troutdale, OR, where John worked as an electrician all over the Portland Metro area. John worked for EC Company as a Vice President and Project Manager, retiring in 2004. He and Carolyn moved from Troutdale to Redmond, OR, nine years ago. John enjoyed fishing, wood working and restoring his 1980 Chevy Stepside, which received a couple of awards for his restoration work. He is survived by his wife, Carolyn Lockshaw, a son, John Lockshaw III of Turner, OR, a daughter, Stacey Lockshaw of Hillsboro, OR, daughter, Tina Terry of Troutdale, OR, three brothers, Mike, Steve, and Larry, a sister, Theresa Blanke, and two grandchildren, Kyle and Amanda Terry. He was preceded in death by his parents. Services will be held Wednesday, June 22, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at St. Thomas Catholic Church in Redmond, OR. Donations may be made to Redmond Sisters Hospice or Redmond Health Care Center. Please sign our guestbook at www.redmondmemorial.com

Wyden’s Daredevil comedian of ‘Jackass’ series dies at 34 mother, Edith, dies at 91 By Daniel E. Slotnik

New York Times News Service

Ryan Dunn, a star of the “Jackass” television show and movies, which feature perilous stunts and gags that often run afoul of good taste, died early Monday when his car went off a road and crashed in woods in West Goshen Township, Pa. He was 34. A passenger, who has not been identified, also died in the crash, which occurred near Dunn’s home in West Chester, Pa., the West Goshen Township police said. The car, Dunn’s Porsche 911, burst into flames. An original member of the “Jackass” franchise, Dunn also appeared in spinoffs like “Viva la Bam,” starring his friend and collaborator Bam Margera, and his own MTV show, “Homewrecker,” a malicious take on a home renovation show. Dunn performed innumerable painful and humiliating stunts on “Jackass.” In “Jackass 3D” he was pelted with paintballs while soaring through the air in a duck costume; in an early episode he jumped into raw sewage. Ryan Matthew Dunn was born on June 11, 1977, in Medina, Ohio. He moved to Philadelphia when he was 15 and met Margera on his first day of high school there. His career in reckless behavior started in the 1990s, when he and Margera started filming underground skateboard and stunt videos. The videos, titled “CKY” for “Camp Kill Yourself,” caught the eye of Johnny Knoxville,

By Terrence Petty The Associated Press

The Associated Press ile photo

Reality television personality and daredevil Ryan Dunn attends the “Jackass 3D” premiere in London cinema in November 2010. Dunn died early Monday of injuries sustained in a car crash in suburban Philadelphia. He was 34. a like-minded prankster who became the “Jackass” frontman. Knoxville asked to include “CKY” clips and new footage featuring them on “Jackass,” which had its premiere on MTV

in 2000. Dunn also played more conventional roles, appearing in the romantic comedy “Blonde Ambition” (2007) and NBC’s “Law & Order: SVU.”

Infamous Zambian leader dies at 68 By Barry Bearak New York Times News Service

Frederick Chiluba, the first democratically elected president of Zambia, a man whose image as a defender of civil liberties was later tarnished by his efforts to suppress political opposition and accusations that he used millions of dollars of public money on his wardrobe and other extravagances, died Saturday in Lusaka. He was 68. He suffered from chronic heart problems. His death was confirmed by his spokesman, Emmanuel Mwamba. The son of a copper miner, Frederick Jacob Titus Chiluba — a diminutive man barely 5 feet tall — was Zambia’s president from 1991 to 2002. His ascent to high office was for a time considered a heartening success story in a poor, landlocked nation of 13 million people in southern Africa. He left secondary school before graduation and was working as a low-paid bookkeeper when he joined a union, rising through the ranks in the labor movement until he became chairman of the Zambia Congress of Trade Unions in 1974. The nation had won indepen-

Health care Continued from C1 “In America today, we spend $147 billion annually on obesityrelated illnesses,” he said. “Medicare and Medicaid paid out 42 percent of those costs.” Three-quarters of health care costs go to treat chronic illnesses, many that can be prevented, he said. “We need a fundamental shift in how we think about health care as we move toward investing in healthy behaviors, and that’s what the Affordable Care Act does,” he said. In Oregon, where the population grew by 12 percent between 2000 and 2010, the population is also getting older, according to Census Bureau figures. In 2000, 12.8 percent of all Oregonians were 65 and older; by 2009, that number had grown to 13.5 percent.

dence 10 years earlier. Kenneth the vote. Kaunda, a hero of the liberation In his first address, the new struggle, was Zambia’s first president said, “The Zambia we president but his single-party, inherit is destitute — ravaged socialist rule was an economic by the excesses, ineptitude and failure. In 1981, he jailed Chi- straight corruption of a party luba and other labor leaders and a people who have been in without charges after they in- power for too long.” He lamentstigated wildcat ed that after 27 strikes. years of Kaunda’s A judge ruled “The devil has leadership, “Now the detentions tried to put the the coffers are unconstitutional, empty. The peoand after three stigma of a thief ple are poor. The months behind on me, but God misery endless.” bars, Chiluba The remarkemerged em- has dealt with the able transformaboldened. He devil.” tion seemed to would eventucome in Chiluba ally forge a co- — Frederick Chiluba, rather than in his alition of unions, former president, nation. civic groups and Zambia The Chiluba churches to form government was the Movement notably corrupt, for Multi-Party Democracy to and the president appeared to challenge Kaunda at the polls. regard himself as irreplaceable. A personable man with ora- In 1996, he barred Kaunda from torical gifts, Chiluba was a running against him, changborn-again Christian and often ing the constitution to preclude used biblical references in his candidates born outside Zamspeeches. He was also a pas- bia. He even attempted to desionate advocate of democracy, port Kaunda to Malawi. and in 1991, when Kaunda fiIn 2001, Chiluba again toyed nally agreed to multiparty elec- with rewriting the law, this time tions, Chiluba won the presi- to allow himself a third term in dency with nearly 76 percent of office. But by then, the presi-

At 17.5 percent, 14.3 percent and 13.5 percent, respectively, Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties are all at or above the state average for seniors. With its wealth of outdoor activities, Central Oregon attracts retirees who want to lead an active lifestyle, said Pam Norr, executive director of the Central Oregon Council on Aging. “What we are seeing is a more active and interested senior population,” she said. “Seniors are becoming more interested in how they can keep themselves healthy.” Dr. Sean Rogers, medical director for the Bend Memorial Clinic, which accepts Medicare patients, said that people are also living longer. This has enlarged the 65-and-over category considerably. Typically, Rogers has already been treating his patients by the time they qualify for Medicare by turning 65, so they are

already familiar with the benefits and practice of preventive medicine. “Many of the screening tests that we do already, like mammograms and colonoscopies, begin at earlier ages. These people have been exposed to screening tests earlier in life,” he said. What has changed is that he now gives tests to much older patients. “Ages for screening tests have been extended because people are living longer, and they’re living healthier lives into their 80s and 90s,” he said. “There is no actual upper limit on age for a mammogram. There’s no recommended cutoff, because it varies on that woman’s individual health. Although it’s unusual, I’ve had patients in their 90s get mammograms.” It’s still worth administering the test if the patient thinks that she would want to pursue a course of treatment, such as a

dent’s reputation as a reformer had been replaced by one far less flattering. Instead, Chiluba anointed his former vice president, Levy Mwanawasa. The new president decided to shine a light on public corruption. Chiluba would soon be charged with stealing $500,000 of public funds. He additionally was sued in a civil action by Zambia’s attorney general, who decided to try the case in Great Britain. Testimony in the civil matter was astonishing. Zambia’s anti-corruption task force had seized much of Chiluba’s wardrobe, including 349 shirts, 206 jackets and suits, and 72 pairs of size-6 shoes. The court ruled Chiluba owed Zambia $57 million. Chiluba, who never appeared in court, refused to recognize the verdict, calling it “racist” and “obscene.” In 2009, a magistrate acquitted Chiluba, ruling that however large his fortune, the money could not be traced to missing government funds. Celebrating the news, the former president said, “The devil has tried to put the stigma of a thief on me, but God has dealt with the devil.”

mastectomy or lumpectomy, if she has breast cancer, he said. Ten or 15 years ago, he didn’t have those types of discussions with his older patients. In the early 20th century, when the age of retirement was set at 65, the percentage of people who reached that age was in the single

PORTLAND — Edith R. Wyden, the mother of U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden of Oregon, has died at age 91. The senator said his mother, who fled Nazi Germany in 1936, died Sunday at a retirement community in Palo Alto, Calif. Edith Wyden was born in Koenigsberg, Germany, to George and Else Rosenow. The Jewish family first went to Iraq after leaving Nazi Germany then emigrated to the United States in 1939. In 1947, she married Peter Wyden, whose family also fled Nazi Germany. They divorced in 1959. Peter Wyden, an author and journalist, died in 1998. Edith Wyden had a long career as an industrial economist, researcher and reference librarian. She published papers on economic and industrial development while working at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, Calif. “My mother was my role model,” Sen. Wyden said. Peter Wyden, who wrote books on the “Bay of Pigs” invasion of Cuba and the Berlin Wall, was known for the energy he put into researching his books. Sen. Wyden said while his mother was a quieter person than his father, she was just as good at research. Edith Rosenow met Peter Wyden at a function for fellow Jews in New York City in 1944. Both joined the U.S. military. Peter served with the U.S. Army’s Psychological Warfare Division, writing letters to Edith from France. Edith was a member of the Women’s Army Corps from April 1944 to May 1946, serving in England, France and Germany. While in Germany, she worked with a U.S. unit that was involved in planning the Allied occupation of the conquered country. Sen. Wyden said his mother’s memories of Nazi Germany had a lasting effect on her. “She felt lucky, and her family were lucky, to get out,” he said. Wyden said his mother remembered hearing Germans dismiss Adolf Hitler as insignificant before he rose to power. “She felt strongly about people not giving short shrift to obvious realities and problems,” he said. Edith Wyden earned a bachelor’s degree in archaeology from the University of Rochester in 1941 and a Master’s in Oriental Studies from Yale in 1943. Wyden said his mother had a “quiet dignity” but was a “consummate achiever.” She is survived by Sen. Wyden, by daughter-in-law Nancy Bass Wyden, and four grandchildren.

digits, he said. Someone born today has a life expectancy of 78. “Sixty-five is not old. It used to be really old, but not anymore,” he said. Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

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C6 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, JUNE 21

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

90s Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

85/53

82/52

91/53

63/50

87/48

74/36

Sunriver 84/45

74/55

Chemult 83/42

80s

Bend

Boise

87/48

82/55

96/60

Eastern

82/45

90s Redding

84/47

100s

86/47

Sunny skies and dry conditions.

Crater Lake 79/45

Elko

103/69

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

81/50

Helena

85/54

85/46

77/38

Missoula

Eugene Grants Pass

83/46

Fort Rock

City

Portland

Burns

Hampton

83/43

Seattle

Mostly sunny and warm.

87/44

73/54

81/59

78/50

70s 60s Idaho Falls 78/48

84/44

Reno

90/62

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:52 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:52 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . .none Moonset today . . . 11:39 a.m.

Salt Lake City

79/59

79/57

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

New

First

Full

June 23 July 1

July 7

July 14

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mainly sunny, pleasant, breezy. HIGH

LOW

Astoria . . . . . . . .68/55/trace . . . . . 69/52/pc. . . . . . 66/52/pc Baker City . . . . . . 76/40/0.00 . . . . . . 82/46/s. . . . . . . 86/53/s Brookings . . . . . . 75/49/0.00 . . . . . . 65/55/s. . . . . . . 61/53/s Burns. . . . . . . . . . 78/41/0.00 . . . . . . 84/53/s. . . . . . . 89/54/s Eugene . . . . . . . . 73/46/0.00 . . . . . 85/54/pc. . . . . . . 81/51/s Klamath Falls . . . 83/41/0.00 . . . . . . 89/51/s. . . . . . 83/47/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 77/37/0.00 . . . . . . 87/53/s. . . . . . . 91/49/s La Pine . . . . . . . . 82/40/0.00 . . . . . . 87/44/s. . . . . . . 88/43/s Medford . . . . . . . 89/52/0.00 . . . . . . 97/54/s. . . . . . . 95/57/s Newport . . . . . . . 61/54/0.03 . . . . . 63/50/pc. . . . . . 60/51/pc North Bend . . . . . 63/54/0.00 . . . . . 65/52/pc. . . . . . 65/52/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 82/49/0.00 . . . . . . 85/58/s. . . . . . . 91/60/s Pendleton . . . . . . 78/49/0.00 . . . . . . 87/56/s. . . . . . 90/55/pc Portland . . . . . . .71/57/trace . . . . . 81/59/pc. . . . . . 78/54/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 76/45/0.00 . . . . . . 84/49/s. . . . . . . 90/48/s Redmond. . . . . . . 82/42/0.00 . . . . . . 90/48/s. . . . . . . 91/48/s Roseburg. . . . . . . 81/52/0.00 . . . . . 91/59/pc. . . . . . 84/54/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 74/58/0.00 . . . . . 83/55/pc. . . . . . . 80/52/s Sisters . . . . . . . . . 78/40/0.00 . . . . . . 85/47/s. . . . . . . 88/43/s The Dalles . . . . . . 77/60/0.00 . . . . . . 91/59/s. . . . . . . 91/57/s

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

9

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81/43 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .92 in 1970 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.14” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 in 1960 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.55” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.30” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.96” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.95 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.32 in 1948 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97....Mod. Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine..............................Mod. Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

LOW

77 45

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and pleasant. HIGH

74 40

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Last

SATURDAY

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:07 a.m. . . . . . .9:49 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:26 a.m. . . . . . .7:40 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .3:33 a.m. . . . . . .6:26 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .2:22 a.m. . . . . . .3:58 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:49 p.m. . . . . . .1:43 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .1:15 a.m. . . . . . .1:27 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

72/52

80/45

84/44

Crescent

Crescent Lake

BEND ALMANAC

Paulina

Brothers

73 38

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 89° Medford • 35° Meacham

FRIDAY

Mostly to partly sunny, significantly cooler, LOW windy afternoon.

HIGH

88 46

Vancouver

84/46

Mostly to partly sunny, warm, afternoon LOW breezes.

NORTHWEST

Central

La Pine

HIGH

THURSDAY

Mostly sunny today, with partly cloudy skies holding west of the Cascades.

86/50

Camp Sherman 82/45 Redmond Prineville 87/48 Cascadia 84/49 86/49 Sisters 85/47 Bend Post 84/47

LOW

48

Mitchell

Madras 87/51

Oakridge Elk Lake

Tonight: Mostly clear and not as cold.

Partly to mostly sunny.

89/52

88/53

83/45

80s

Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

Today: Mostly sunny and significantly warmer.

87

Bob Shaw

70s

WEDNESDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45,163 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173,940 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 82,833 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,653 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148,875 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 507 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,090 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,801 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 458 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 44.6 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 599 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Vancouver 72/52

S

S

Calgary 73/54

S

Saskatoon 72/54

S Winnipeg 66/55

S

S

Thunder Bay 66/52

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 70/54

Halifax 63/50 P ortland Bismarck Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 76/56 62/53 78/49 79/66 81/59 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston Buffalo 75/62 68/61 Boise Detroit 79/64 73/64 Rapid City 82/55 83/69 New York 72/53 • 109° Des Moines 84/69 Laredo, Texas 78/61 Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus Chicago 73/47 91/71 85/71 Omaha • 25° 87/69 San Francisco Washington, D. C. 75/61 Salt Lake 79/59 Grand Canyon City 90/72 Las St. Louis Denver Louisville Airport, Ariz. 79/57 Kansas City Vegas 88/70 78/52 95/73 81/62 102/81 • 3.50” Charlotte 95/72 Albuquerque Shelbyville, Ind. Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 87/62 73/63 90/67 94/73 89/71 Phoenix Atlanta 109/82 Honolulu 95/72 Birmingham 87/74 Dallas Tijuana 93/75 97/76 74/63 New Orleans 90/79 Orlando Houston 95/76 Chihuahua 93/78 101/68 Miami 91/78 Monterrey La Paz 100/77 98/64 Mazatlan Anchorage 88/72 63/51 Juneau 64/48 Seattle 74/55

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .102/77/0.00 . . .95/73/t . . 96/73/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .76/64/0.00 . . .87/68/t . . . .84/66/t Albany. . . . . . . . .81/53/0.00 . .84/65/sh . . . .81/64/t Albuquerque. . . .83/57/0.00 . . .87/62/s . . . 93/62/s Anchorage . . . . .59/50/0.01 . 63/51/pc . . 62/52/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .93/76/0.00 . . .95/72/t . . . .90/72/t Atlantic City . . . .79/61/0.02 . 82/68/pc . . . .78/70/t Austin . . . . . . . . .99/78/0.00 . . .97/77/t . . . .96/74/t Baltimore . . . . . .79/68/0.08 . . .90/74/t . . . .93/74/t Billings. . . . . . . . .74/51/0.00 . 78/49/pc . . 84/55/pc Birmingham . . . .96/78/0.00 . . .93/75/t . . . .87/71/t Bismarck . . . . . . .69/56/0.76 . . .62/53/r . . . 69/52/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . . .82/55/s . . . 89/61/s Boston. . . . . . . . .83/62/0.00 . . .79/64/s . . 76/63/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .78/60/0.00 . .80/66/sh . . . .79/68/t Buffalo . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . .73/64/t . . . .74/65/t Burlington, VT. . .77/50/0.00 . .82/56/sh . . 80/61/pc Caribou, ME . . . .68/52/0.00 . .72/48/sh . . 72/49/pc Charleston, SC .102/80/0.00 . . .95/77/t . . . 94/77/s Charlotte. . . . . . .94/70/0.00 . . .95/72/s . . . 96/73/s Chattanooga. . . .95/70/0.00 . . .95/71/t . . . .89/70/t Cheyenne . . . . . .60/48/0.00 . 73/47/pc . . . 77/49/s Chicago. . . . . . . .79/65/0.18 . . .87/69/t . . . .77/63/t Cincinnati . . . . . .76/64/0.77 . . .91/71/t . . . .83/67/t Cleveland . . . . . .80/63/0.01 . . .85/69/t . . . .81/67/t Colorado Springs 68/49/0.25 . 74/50/pc . . . 78/54/s Columbia, MO . .88/76/0.00 . . .86/65/t . . 78/61/pc Columbia, SC . .101/76/0.00 . .100/75/s . . 100/75/s Columbus, GA. . .95/76/0.00 . . .95/73/t . . . .92/72/t Columbus, OH. . .74/63/0.02 . . .91/71/t . . . .83/67/t Concord, NH . . . .81/45/0.00 . 82/57/pc . . 81/56/pc Corpus Christi. . .96/78/0.00 . 88/80/pc . . . .87/77/t Dallas Ft Worth. .99/78/0.00 . . .97/76/t . . 94/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .73/62/0.27 . . .91/71/t . . . .82/66/t Denver. . . . . . . . .66/49/1.55 . 78/52/pc . . . 82/56/s Des Moines. . . . .83/64/2.11 . . .78/61/t . . 67/58/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .77/61/0.04 . . .83/69/t . . . .82/65/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .65/48/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . 50/46/sh El Paso. . . . . . . . .96/78/0.00 . . .97/72/s . 101/75/pc Fairbanks. . . . . . .65/56/0.06 . . .75/56/r . . . .68/56/r Fargo. . . . . . . . . .75/62/0.00 . . .65/57/r . . . .62/52/r Flagstaff . . . . . . .79/30/0.00 . . .81/40/s . . . 86/46/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .80/64/0.00 . . .88/69/t . . . .80/61/t Green Bay. . . . . .65/57/0.00 . . .68/61/t . . . .72/57/t Greensboro. . . . .91/67/0.00 . . .95/73/t . . 95/72/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .78/63/0.03 . . .86/69/t . . . .89/71/t Hartford, CT . . . .82/55/0.00 . .84/64/sh . . . .82/65/t Helena. . . . . . . . .73/53/0.00 . . .78/50/s . . 82/53/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .86/73/0.02 . . .87/74/s . . . 87/74/s Houston . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . .93/78/t . . . .88/77/t Huntsville . . . . . .94/74/0.00 . . .94/70/t . . . .85/71/t Indianapolis . . . .78/66/2.03 . . .91/73/t . . . .84/66/t Jackson, MS . . . .98/75/0.03 . . .92/74/t . . . .87/73/t Madison, WI . . . .80/63/0.00 . . .80/66/t . . . .74/59/t Jacksonville. . . . .98/71/0.00 . 97/77/pc . . 96/76/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .59/48/0.31 . 64/48/pc . . 64/49/sh Kansas City. . . . .89/78/0.00 . . .81/62/t . . 80/59/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .87/68/t . . . .81/61/t Las Vegas . . . . . .95/71/0.00 . .102/81/s . . 106/83/s Lexington . . . . . .79/65/0.05 . . .93/70/t . . . .85/67/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .89/68/0.00 . .77/60/sh . . 76/59/pc Little Rock. . . . . .97/78/0.00 . . .89/71/t . . . .88/71/t Los Angeles. . . . .69/60/0.00 . . .73/63/s . . . 76/63/s Louisville . . . . . . .91/70/0.57 . . .95/73/t . . . .87/69/t Memphis. . . . . . .94/78/0.00 . . .91/73/t . . . .89/71/t Miami . . . . . . . . .91/76/0.26 . 91/78/pc . . . .91/79/t Milwaukee . . . . .71/55/0.45 . . .75/65/t . . . .72/59/t Minneapolis . . . .77/62/0.00 . . .75/62/t . . 66/55/sh Nashville . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . . .94/73/t . . . .85/69/t New Orleans. . . .95/80/0.00 . . .90/79/t . . . .90/76/t New York . . . . . .81/67/0.00 . . .84/69/t . . . .83/72/t Newark, NJ . . . . .82/67/0.00 . . .85/68/t . . . .85/72/t Norfolk, VA . . . . .80/66/0.06 . 87/72/pc . . . .93/76/t Oklahoma City . .96/78/0.00 . . .90/67/t . . 93/71/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .87/68/0.24 . . .75/61/t . . 72/58/sh Orlando. . . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . . .95/76/t . . . .95/77/t Palm Springs. . .108/71/0.00 . .106/75/s . . 109/77/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .86/66/0.56 . . .87/68/t . . . 78/61/c Philadelphia . . . .79/69/0.00 . . .85/71/t . . . .89/72/t Phoenix. . . . . . .103/78/0.00 . .109/82/s . . 112/84/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .78/66/0.35 . . .88/69/t . . . .84/67/t Portland, ME. . . .78/51/0.00 . 76/56/pc . . 74/52/pc Providence . . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .83/63/s . . . 79/63/c Raleigh . . . . . . . .93/69/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . 97/73/pc

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .63/57/0.66 . .72/53/sh . . 75/51/pc Savannah . . . . .101/77/0.00 . . .98/77/t . . . 96/76/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .89/52/0.00 . . .90/62/s . . . 93/63/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .69/54/0.00 . 74/55/pc . . 66/54/pc Richmond . . . . . .78/67/0.22 . . .91/73/t . . 96/73/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .78/66/0.12 . . .71/58/t . . 66/53/sh Rochester, NY . . .79/52/0.00 . . .82/62/t . . . .80/66/t Spokane . . . . . . .70/48/0.00 . . .82/54/s . . 88/56/pc Sacramento. . . . .97/61/0.00 . .102/65/s . . 100/59/s Springfield, MO. .92/77/0.00 . . .83/65/t . . 80/63/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .88/70/t . . . .83/65/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .94/79/0.00 . . .95/76/t . . . .95/76/t Salt Lake City . . .72/49/0.00 . . .79/57/s . . . 89/60/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .98/69/0.00 . .103/73/s . . 109/74/s San Antonio . . . .99/78/0.00 . 96/76/pc . . . .94/75/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .95/82/0.00 . . .90/67/t . . 91/68/pc San Diego . . . . . .69/61/0.00 . . .72/62/s . . . 74/65/s Washington, DC .80/67/0.34 . . .90/72/t . . . .95/75/t San Francisco . . .90/57/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . . 75/53/s Wichita . . . . . . . .94/72/0.37 . 87/64/pc . . 89/64/pc San Jose . . . . . . .96/61/0.00 . . .94/63/s . . . 92/60/s Yakima . . . . . . . .83/43/0.00 . . .87/53/s . . . 90/55/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .79/47/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . 85/54/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . .107/75/0.00 . .110/77/s . . 113/79/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .66/52/0.00 . .68/57/sh . . 64/55/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .91/64/0.00 . . .84/73/s . . . 85/72/s Auckland. . . . . . .59/50/0.00 . 62/54/pc . . 60/53/pc Baghdad . . . . . .106/82/0.00 . .110/87/s . . 112/85/s Bangkok . . . . . . .82/81/0.00 . . .86/79/t . . 89/78/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .81/75/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . 94/71/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . . .87/77/s . . . 86/75/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .68/54/0.08 . . .73/57/c . . . .77/55/t Bogota . . . . . . . .66/50/0.06 . 65/53/pc . . 66/52/pc Budapest. . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . 82/61/pc . . . 90/68/s Buenos Aires. . . .59/50/0.00 . 62/45/pc . . 60/46/pc Cabo San Lucas .88/73/0.00 . 93/72/pc . . 90/71/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .91/72/0.00 . . .91/69/s . . . 92/68/s Calgary . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . .73/54/sh . . . 77/54/s Cancun . . . . . . . .82/75/8.45 . 87/78/pc . . 86/77/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .61/43/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 62/46/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .64/48/sh . . 61/47/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .79/54/0.00 . 81/61/pc . . . .77/59/t Harare . . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .70/55/s . . . 71/48/s Hong Kong . . . . .86/84/0.00 . . .88/83/t . . . .86/81/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .79/68/s . . 80/66/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .84/63/s . . . 85/64/s Johannesburg . . .64/45/0.00 . . .64/47/s . . . 62/39/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . 71/65/pc . . 72/64/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .82/64/s . . 77/61/pc London . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .68/54/sh . . 64/53/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .97/61/0.00 . . .95/64/s . . . 93/63/s Manila. . . . . . . . .82/79/0.00 . . .86/82/t . . . .87/78/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .91/90/0.00 . .113/87/s . . 115/86/s Mexico City. . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .75/59/t . . . .74/61/t Montreal. . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . 79/59/pc . . . 79/64/s Moscow . . . . . . .54/48/0.00 . . .70/55/c . . . .68/54/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .63/61/0.00 . 78/62/pc . . 75/59/sh Nassau . . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . 89/78/pc . . 90/79/pc New Delhi. . . . . .88/86/0.00 . . .93/84/s . . . .96/83/t Osaka . . . . . . . . .77/72/0.14 . . .84/71/t . . . .83/72/t Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .66/48/t . . . .64/50/t Ottawa . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . . 77/63/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . .73/59/sh . . 68/55/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .81/61/0.00 . . .79/67/s . . 39/66/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .88/70/s . . . 90/68/s Santiago . . . . . . .50/43/0.00 . 51/32/pc . . . 58/34/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .79/59/0.00 . . .78/57/s . . 75/56/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . . .76/64/c . . 72/59/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . . .81/65/t Shanghai. . . . . . .73/72/0.00 . . .84/74/t . . . .83/75/t Singapore . . . . . .84/82/0.00 . . .90/77/t . . . .87/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .64/52/0.00 . . .75/54/t . . . 77/57/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . . .60/45/s . . . 58/44/s Taipei. . . . . . . . . .88/82/0.14 . . .92/81/t . . . .91/80/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .86/72/s . . . 85/71/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .77/73/0.09 . . .82/70/t . . 81/69/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . 79/66/pc . . 68/63/sh Vancouver. . . . . .68/55/0.00 . 72/52/pc . . 72/52/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . .82/59/sh . . . 88/64/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .66/52/0.14 . . .72/55/t . . 81/64/pc

Supplements industry finds ‘natural ally’ in Utah senator By Eric Lipton New York Times News Service

SALT LAKE CITY — A drive along mountain-lined Interstate 15 here shows why Sen. Orrin Hatch is considered a hero in this region nicknamed the Silicon Valley of the nutritional supplement industry. In Lehi is the sprawling headquarters of Xango, where company officials praised Hatch late last year for helping their exotic fruit juice business “operate without excessive intrusion” from Washington. Up in Sandy, Utah, is 4 Life Research, whose top executives donated to Hatch’s last re-election campaign after federal regulators charged the company with making exaggerated claims about pills that it says helps the immune system. And nearby in West Salem, assembly-line workers at Neways fill thousands of bottles a day for a product line that includes Youthinol, a steroid-based hormone that professional sports leagues pushed to ban until Hatch blocked them. “Sen. Hatch — he’s our natural ally,” said Marc Ullman, a lawyer for several supplement companies.

Credits supplements Hatch, a Republican who credits a daily regimen of nutritional supplements for his vigor at 77, has spent his career in Washington helping the $25-billion-a-year nutritional supplement industry thrive. He was the chief author of a federal law enacted 17 years ago

Sen. Orrin Hatch, RUtah, speaks at Xango, a nutritional supplement company, in Lehi, Utah, in April. Under legislation Hatch wrote, nutritional supplement companies could introduce products without FDA approval. New York Times News Service ile photo

that allows companies to make general health claims about their products but exempts them from federal premarket reviews of their safety or effectiveness. During the Obama administration, Hatch has repeatedly intervened with his colleagues in Congress and federal regulators in Washington to fight proposed rules that industry officials consider objectionable. While Congress is often stalled or bitterly divided in addressing some of the nation’s most pressing problems, like the economy and immigration, legislative champions like Hatch are often remarkably successful in delivering for niche industries or parochial programs. It is not unusual, of course, for lawmakers to fight for local interests, but Hatch’s alliances are particularly strong and mutually beneficial. While his role has long been known, the extent of his industry ties and advocacy have not previously been reported. Hatch has been rewarded with hundreds of thousands of dollars in campaign contributions, political loyalty and corporate sponsorship of his favorite causes back home. His family and friends have benefited, too, from links to the supplement industry. His son Scott Hatch is a longtime industry lobbyist in Washington, as are at least five of the senator’s former aides. Hatch’s grandson and sonin-law increase revenue at their chiropractic clinic near here by selling herbal and nutritional treatments, including $35 “thyroid dysfunction” injections and a weight-loss product called “Slim and Sassy Metabolic Blend.” And

Hatch’s former law partner in Utah owns Pharmics, a small nutritional supplement company in Salt Lake City. But many public health experts argue that in his advocacy, Hatch has hindered regulators from preventing dangerous products from being put on the market, including supplements that are illegally spiked with steroids or other unapproved drugs. They also say he is the person in Washington most responsible for the proliferation of products that make exaggerated claims about health benefits.

‘A Wild West’ Just in the past two years, 2,292 serious illnesses, including 33 deaths, were reported by consumers who used supposedly harmless nutritional supplements, federal records show. And some of Hatch’s most important supporters in Utah have faced repeated accusations of falsely claiming their products can treat almost everything, including cancer and heart disease. “Orrin Hatch certainly has a right to fight for his constituents,” said Steven Novella, a clinical neurologist at the Yale School of Medicine who was a co-founder of a website that tracks claims by the supplement industry. “But the consequences are we have an effectively unregulated market for these products, a Wild West, and people are being abused by slick marketing, and as a result taking things that are worthless or in some cases not even safe.” Hatch rejects such accusations, noting that he has repeatedly de-

manded that federal regulators step up enforcement of existing laws, and even worked to expand their powers. “No relationships have or will ever have any impact on my policy positions,” Hatch said in a written statement. “Supplements are healthy and safe, and they are a major industry in my home state of Utah.” Congressional auditors issued

a report last year concluding that nutritional supplement companies were too often making unjustified health claims and selling contaminated herbal products. The auditors said trace amounts of lead appeared in 37 of the 40 test cases. Hatch also succeeded in making sure that new restrictions on supplements the industry objected to were not included in a landmark food safety bill.

Industry executives thanked Hatch at a fundraiser during the industry convention in June 2010. “It is important that you support your champions — support people who support you,” Hatch told the gathering. “ Even if you are a Democrat, you ought to be supporting me. Because I will help get other Democrats to straighten out their act to do what is right. And that will be a blessing to you.”


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Tennis Inside Rafael Nadal advances after first day of Wimbledon, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011

GOLF

COMMUNITY SPORTS

Local golfers start well at Oregon Am PORTLAND — Redmond’s Alex Fitch and Bend’s Tiffany Schoning are off to strong starts at the 102nd Oregon Amateur Championship. Fitch, a senior-to-be at Linfield College in McMinnville, shot a 3-under-par 67 Monday at Waverley Country Club in Portland to finish the first round of stroke play in a tie for second place, just one shot behind leader Landon Banks, of Tualatin. Fitch, a former Redmond High School standout, is one of nine Central Oregon golfers — two men and seven women — competing in the men’s and women’s Oregon Amateur tournaments this week at Waverley. Schoning, a senior-to-be at Portland State, is in nearly as good a position as Fitch. Schoning shot a 3-over-par 74 to tie for third place on the women’s side. She is five strokes behind leader Lindsay Aho, of Brush Prairie, Wash. The Oregon Amateur begins with 36 holes of stroke play. Sixty-four of the 108 golfers in the men’s field will advance to match play, which begins Wednesday, and will be seeded based on their finish in the stroke-play rounds. Thirty-two of the 48 golfers in the women’s field advance. Jesse Heinly, of Bend, appears to be in good position after a first-round 74 that put him in a tie for 42nd place. On the women’s side, Kailin Downs, of Bend, is in a tie for 16th place at 7 over. Bend’s Madison Odiorne, who at 14 is among the youngest golfers in the field, shot a 79 and is in a tie for 23rd place. Also, Bend golfers Amy Anderson (+9), Lisa Schmidt (+9), Rosie Cook (+11) and Chelsey Lind (+11) are all in the top 32 after the first round. Both sides of the Oregon Amateur, the oldest and most prestigious amateur tournament in the state, will end Saturday with 36-hole championship matches. For complete results, visit www. oregonamateur.org. — Bulletin staff report

INSIDE

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Bulletin reporter Amanda Miles works on her backhand during a tennis lesson earlier this month with Justin Milnes, a tennis coach at the Athletic Club of Bend.

SUMMER SPORTS SERIES

If you go

Tennis A few pieces of equipment are all you need when hitting the court Reporter’s prelude: This past winter, I had so much fun trying out and writing about Central Oregon’s popular snow sports that The Bulletin decided to bring back the series for this summer. Join me as I explore a number of the region’s cherished summer sports and recreational activities. This week, I try tennis.

W

hen it comes to tennis, Central Oregon offers no shortage of options. Whether you are a youth or an adult, a beginner or an experienced player, you should be able to find a facility or program in the area to suit your needs. To get started, you do not need a lot in terms of equipment: a racket,

AMANDA MILES some court shoes and a tennis ball will do. If you have never played before — or it has been awhile — some lessons to get down the fundamentals are a good place to start. The park and recreation district programs in Bend, Redmond, Sisters and Prineville all offer tennis lessons for youths, and the Bend Park & Recreation District offers adult sessions as well. You might also consider taking a tennis

course at Central Oregon Community College in Bend. In addition to the public programs, Central Oregon is home to a number of clubs that provide tennis lessons and playing opportunities. If you are not a club member, don’t worry: You can still take lessons at these facilities, usually for a slightly increased fee. Even at that increased rate, taking some lessons to get started is rather affordable. “Tennis has risen in popularity since the economy’s fallen,” said Justin Milnes, a tennis professional at the Athletic Club of Bend with whom I recently took a lesson. “A big reason is it’s a little bit cheaper than other activities.” See Tennis / D6

Some examples of facilities that offer tennis lessons/classes in Central Oregon:

BEND Athletic Club of Bend 541-385-3062 www. athleticclubofbend. com Bend Golf and Country Club 541-382-3261 www.bendgolfclub. com Bend Park & Recreation District 541-389-7275 www. bendparksandrec.org Broken Top Club 541-383-8200 www.brokentop.com Central Oregon Community College 541-383-7700 www.cocc.edu

PRINEVILLE Crook County Parks &

Recreation District 541-447-1209 www.ccprd.org

REDMOND Eagle Crest Resort 855-682-4786 www.eagle-crest.com Redmond Area Park and Recreation District 541-548-7275 www.raprd.org

SISTERS Sisters Park and Recreation District 541-549-2091 sistersrecreation.com

SUNRIVER Sage Springs Club & Spa at Sunriver Resort 541-593-7890 www.sunriver-resort. com

MLB Yankees .........5 Reds...............3

Rangers .........8 Astros ............3

Rockies ..........8 Indians ...........7

Cubs ..............6 White Sox ......3

Orioles ...........8 Pirates ...........3

Rays ...............8 Brewers..........4

Red Sox ....... 14 Padres ...........5

Angels ...........2 Marlins ..........1

Braves............2 Blue Jays .......0

Dodgers .........4 Tigers ............0

Rockies beat Indians For related MLB stories, see Page D3

Inside: More on Tennis • Getting geared up, Page D6

CYCLING

WCL BASEBALL

Gearing up by gearing down

Late RBI leads Elks to road win over Falcons

Bend’s Chris Horner prepares for Tour de France by passing on European tuneup races By James Raia

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 College baseball ........................D3 NFL ........................................... D4 Golf ........................................... D4 NBA .......................................... D4 Community Sports .............. D5, 6

Bulletin staff report KELOWNA, British Columbia — Shawn O’Brien hit what turned out to be the game-winning RBI single in the top of the eighth inning Monday to push the Bend Elks past the host Kelowna Falcons 2-1 in West Coast League baseball action. O’Brien, who went two for three on the night, knocked in Royce Bolinger with two outs to break a 1-1 tie. Kelowna put just one runner on base in the eighth and ninth innings and Bend improved to 7-6 in WCL play. Relief pitcher Taylor Chris earned the victory for the Elks, shutting out the Falcons (3-10 WCL) in the seventh and eighth innings. Bend starter Kurt Jahnke received the no decision but pitched well, allowing four hits and one run in six innings. Closer Stephen Ostapeck picked up the save with a scoreless ninth. Bend and Kelowna play again today at 6:35 p.m.

Next up

overall contenders in this year’s event, beginning • Tour de July 2 in Vendee. Less than two weeks France This season, his 17th as from his fifth Tour de France, Chris Horner • When: July 2 a pro, Horner was scheduled to train to peak for hasn’t been doing much in -July 24 defense of his 2010 title the past month to prepare • TV: NBC, in the six-day Tour of the except ride his bike and Versus Basque Country in Spain watch his diet. Which is in April. He finished secexactly what he was supond to teammate Andreas Kloden posed to do. Rather than compete in key of Germany. But with teammate Levi LeipheEuropean tuneup races like Dauphine-Libere in France and the imer recovering from a stomach Tour of Switzerland, he has been ailment, Horner was also asked to training in San Diego, where he ride the eight-day Tour of Califorlives in the United States when not nia in May to further expose the in Bend. Horner has also contin- team’s sponsor. Horner dominated ued to monitor his diet with home- the mountain stages en route to his cooked meals while avoiding his overall title. As a result, Horner will begin wont for junk food. He hasn’t raced since his victory May 22 in the Tour the Tour de France with a goal of “peaking” three times in one seaof California. Three months shy of his 40th son. He asked and received permisbirthday, Horner hopes that his sion from his team not to race in unique approach to cycling’s big- Europe prior to the Tour de France. Horner, who will leave soon for gest race will prove wise. After finishing 10th overall as the Europe, spoke Monday from his top American in the 2010 Tour de townhouse in San Diego on the upFrance, Horner is among four riders coming race. on the RadioShack squad pegged as See Gearing / D4

For The Bulletin

Colorado Rockies’ Jason Giambi celebrates in the dugout after his three-run home run in the fifth inning Monday, in Cleveland.

• Quick tips on the essentials of tennis, Page D6

Elks add split squad games tonight, Wednesday Marcio Jose Sanchez / The Associated Press

Chris Horner celebrates after winning a stage of the Tour of California in San Jose, Calif., in May. Horner is preparing for the Tour de France starting in July.

The Bend Elks’ split-squad team has added two home games to the schedule for this week, both against the Thurston County (Wash.) Senators. The games are set for today and Wednesday, both at 6:35 p.m. at Vince Genna Stadium. Elks officials note that regular $2 Tuesday and Free Kids Wednesday promotions are in effect for the added games.


D2 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY TENNIS 4 a.m. — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2. Noon — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 11 a.m. — College World Series, Game 7, California vs. Texas A&M, ESPN. 4 p.m. — College World Series, Game 8, Virginia vs. South Carolina, ESPN. 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, New York Yankees at Cincinnati Reds or Toronto Blue Jays at Atlanta Braves, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at San Francisco Giants or Detroit Tigers at Los Angeles Dodgers, MLB Network.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — WNBA, Phoenix Mercury at San Antonio Silver Stars, ESPN2. 7 p.m. — WNBA, New York Liberty at Los Angeles Sparks, ESPN2.

WEDNESDAY TENNIS 4 a.m. — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2. Noon — Wimbledon, early round, ESPN2.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — College World Series, Game 9, North Carolina vs. Vanderbilt/ Florida loser, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals, Root Sports. 5 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at St. Louis Cardinals, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA Draft preview, ESPN. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball • McKeon is Marlins’ interim manager: Jack McKeon assumed the rarest of roles Monday: 80-year-old caretaker. Nearly six years after McKeon retired as the Florida Marlins’ manager, he returned to his old job on an interim basis and will lead the team for the rest of the season. The Marlins are expected to hire another manager after this season before they move into their new ballpark next April. McKeon, who guided Florida to the 2003 World Series championship, becomes the second-oldest manager in major league history. Connie Mack managed the Philadelphia Athletics in a suit, tie and straw hat until 1950, when he was 87. • MLB rejects proposed Dodgers TV deal: Baseball Commissioner Bud Selig on Monday rejected a proposed television deal between the Los Angeles Dodgers and Fox Sports that voids a recent divorce settlement between team owner Frank McCourt and his ex-wife, Jamie McCourt. Selig said in a statement the TV contract would not be in the best interests of baseball and would further divert team assets to McCourt’s “personal needs.” • Pujols out six weeks with wrist fracture: Concluding a news briefing about Albert Pujols’ injury that killed the mood at Tony La Russa’s charity golf event, the St. Louis Cardinals manager let down his guard. “I’m going to go find a place to cry,” La Russa said. Pujols will be out an estimated six weeks with a fractured left wrist from a firstbase collision over the weekend.

Basketball • Hoops on a flat top a daunting task to organizers: Staging the first NCAA college basketball game on the flight deck of an aircraft carrier in Coronado, Calif., is going to be a task as big as the USS Carl Vinson itself. Just less than five months before North Carolina and Michigan State are scheduled to play on Veterans Day, officials from the Navy, ESPN and the Morale Entertainment Foundation spent a few hours Monday inspecting the flat top, which last month buried Osama bin Laden at sea. The inspection, which continues today, is a big step in the process of securing final approval from the Navy. Among the numerous issues organizers have to deal with are security, weather, lighting and getting the participants and an estimated 7,000 fans from shore to the ship, which is 1,092 feet long.

Cycling • Swiss doctors waking Soler from induced coma: Doctors treating Juan Mauricio Soler said Monday they are slowly waking the Colombian cyclist up from his induced coma, a process that may take days if all goes well. The 28-year-old rider is in stable condition and his recovery is proceeding as expected, but there are concerns about the extent of his brain injuries and whether he will suffer any lasting damage from his crash during the Tour of Switzerland last week.

Football • Butte’s Carriger commits to Oregon football: Butte High defensive end Cody Carriger says he’s committed to playing football for the Oregon Ducks. The 6-foot-7, 230-pounder will be a senior this fall and can sign with the Ducks in February. He made the commitment late last week, but didn’t announce it until Monday so he could notify the other teams that were recruiting him, including Washington, Army, Wyoming, Montana and Montana State. Carriger told the Montana Standard he chose to accept the full-ride scholarship from Oregon because that’s where he felt comfortable. He says making the commitment early is going to make him work harder and play harder as he prepares to join the Pac-12 team in the fall of 2012. • Four conference commissioners each get $1 million: Four of college football’s six powerhouse conferences paid their top executives $1 million or more, an Associated Press analysis of tax records shows, far eclipsing the compensation of most university presidents. A review of 2009 IRS returns, the most recent available, shows that Big Ten commissioner Jim Delany was the highest paid, receiving total compensation valued at $1.6 million, followed by Atlantic Coast Conference commissioner John Swofford ($1.1 million), Southeastern Conference commissioner Mike Slive ($1 million) and Big 12 commissioner Dan Beebe ($997,000). The other two commissioners each started in July 2009, so their compensation figures are only for the last six months of the year: PAC-10’s Larry Scott ($735,000) and Big East’s John Marinatto ($366,000). — The Associated Press

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASEBALL WCL WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division Wenatchee AppleSox Walla Walla Sweets Bellingham Bells Kelowna Falcons West Division Kitsap BlueJackets Corvallis Knights Bend Elks Klamath Falls Gems Cowlitz Black Bears Monday’s Games Bend 2, Kelowna 1 Corvallis 6, Wenatchee 4 Bellingham 1, Cowlitz 0 Today’s Games Bend at Kelowna, 6:35 p.m. Kitsap at Klamath Falls, 7:05 p.m. Cowlitz at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m. Corvallis at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Bend at Kelowna, 6:35 p.m. Cowlitz at Bellingham, 7:05 p.m. Corvallis at Wenatchee, 7:05 p.m. Kitsap at Klamath Falls, 7:05 p.m. Thursday’s Games Kelowna at Cowlitz, 6:35 p.m. Walla Walla at Corvallis, 6:40 p.m. Kitsap at Klamath Falls, 7:05 p.m.

W 14 5 5 3

L 2 7 9 10

W 11 7 7 4 4

L 5 5 6 7 9

Monday’s Summary

Elks 2, Falcons 1 Bend 000 000 110 — 2 6 1 Kelowna 000 100 000 — 1 5 1 Jahnke, Chris, Ostapeck and Demello. Otterman, Mortenson, Paterson, Stafford and Stoup. W — Chris. L — Mortenson. 2B — Bend: OBrien.

College NCAA College World Series Omaha, Neb. All Times PDT ——— Double Elimination x-if necessary Saturday, June 18 Vanderbilt 7, North Carolina 3 Florida 8, Texas 4 Sunday, June 19 Virginia 4, California 1 South Carolina 5, Texas A&M 4 Monday, June 20 Game 5 — North Carolina 3, Texas 0, Texas eliminated Game 6 — Florida 3, Vanderbilt 1, susp. (will be completed today at 8 a.m.) Today, June 21 Game 7 — California (37-22) vs. Texas A&M (47-21), 11 a.m. Game 8 — Virginia (55-10) vs. South Carolina (51-14), 4 p.m. Wednesday, June 22 Game 9 — Game 5 winner vs. Game 6 loser, 4 p.m. Thursday, June 23 Game 10 — Game 7 winner vs. Game 8 loser, 4 p.m. Friday, June 24 Game 11 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 11 a.m. Game 12 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 4 p.m. Saturday, June 25 x-Game 13 — Game 6 winner vs. Game 9 winner, 11 a.m. x-Game 14 — Game 8 winner vs. Game 10 winner, 4

p.m.

New York at Los Angeles, 7 p.m.

Championship Series Best-of-3 Monday, June 27 — Game 1, 5 p.m. Tuesday, June 28 — Game 2, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 29 — Game 3, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS

BASKETBALL WNBA WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT Eastern Conference W L Pct Connecticut 4 1 .800 Chicago 3 2 .600 Indiana 3 3 .500 New York 2 3 .400 Washington 1 4 .200 Atlanta 1 5 .167 Western Conference W L Pct San Antonio 4 0 1.000 Minnesota 5 1 .833 Los Angeles 3 1 .750 Seattle 2 2 .500 Phoenix 1 3 .250 Tulsa 1 5 .167 ——— Monday’s Games No games scheduled Today’s Games Chicago at Atlanta, 9 a.m. Indiana at Washington, 4 p.m. Phoenix at San Antonio, 5 p.m. Seattle at Tulsa, 5 p.m.

GB — 1 1½ 2 3 3½ GB — — 1 2 3 4

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Wednesday’s Games Sporting Kansas City at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Thursday’s Game New York at Seattle FC, 7 p.m. Saturday’s Games Houston at D.C. United, 3 p.m. Los Angeles at San Jose, 3:30 p.m. Chivas USA at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Vancouver at Sporting Kansas City, 5:30 p.m. Portland at FC Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m.

TENNIS Wimbledon Monday At The All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club Wimbledon, England Purse: $23.6 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Grass-Outdoor Singles Men First Round Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-4, 7-5, 6-3. Grega Zemlja, Slovenia, def. Lukas Lacko, Slovakia,

6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (8), 6-4. Mardy Fish (10), United States, def. Marcel Granollers, Spain, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (5), 6-4. Milos Raonic (31), Canada, def. Marc Gicquel, France, 6-3, 7-6 (3), 6-3. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3, 6-3. Rainer Schuettler, Germany, def. Thomaz Bellucci (30), Brazil, 7-6 (3), 6-4, 6-2. Alex Bogomolov Jr., United States, def. Donald Young, United States, 7-5, 4-6, 6-3, 6-1. Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, def. Tommy Haas, Germany, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (3), 3-6, 6-3. Stanislas Wawrinka (14), Switzerland, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 6-3, 6-4, 6-4. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-4, 6-2, 6-2. Gael Monfils (9), France, def. Matthias Bachinger, Germany, 6-4, 7-6 (3), 6-3. Ryan Sweeting, United States, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 3-6, 4-6, 6-1, 7-6 (1), 6-1. Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, def. Igor Sijsling, Netherlands, 6-3, 6-4, 6-2. Simone Bolelli, Italy, def. Martin Fischer, Austria, 7-5, 6-4, 6-4. Richard Gasquet (17), France, def. Santiago Giraldo, Colombia, 7-5, 6-3, 7-6 (3). Julien Benneteau, France, def. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, 6-4, 6-2, 3-6, 4-6, 6-1. Dudi Sela, Israel, def. Frederico Gil, Portugal, 6-4, 6-1, 6-4. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Filippo Volandri, Italy, 6-2, 6-2, 6-1. Andy Murray (4), Britain, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 4-6, 6-3, 6-0, 6-0. Gilles Simon (15), France, leads Edouard Roger-Vasselin, France, 4-6, 6-4, 6-3, 4-5 (40-30), susp., rain. Tobias Kamke, Germany, leads Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, 6-3, 7-6 (4), 1-5, susp., rain. Juan Ignacio Chela (25), Argentina, leads Marinko Matosevic, Australia, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (6), 3-1, susp., rain. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, leads Marin Cilic (27), Croatia, 7-6 (2), 3-6, 2-1, susp., rain. Victor Hanescu, Romania, leads Jaroslav Pospisil, Czech Republic, 6-4, 2-1, susp., rain. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, leads Janko Tipsarevic (23), Serbia, 1-0 (0-15), susp., rain. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, leads Daniel Cox, Britain, 6-2, 0-1, susp., rain. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, leads Arnaud Clement, France, 5-4 (15-15), susp., rain. Juan Martin del Potro (24), Argentina, leads Flavio Cipolla, Italy, 6-1, 1-3, susp., rain. Robin Haase, Netherlands, leads Pere Riba, Spain, 5-4 (30-15), susp., rain. Women First Round Venus Williams (23), United States, def. Akgul Amanmuradova, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 6-1. Kimiko Date-Krumm, Japan, def. Katie O’Brien, Britain, 6-0, 7-5. Elena Vesnina, Russia, def. Laura Pous-Tio, Spain, 6-4, 6-3. Ksenia Pervak, Russia, def. Shahar Peer (22), Israel, 5-7, 6-4, 6-4. Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Anastasia Pivovarova, Russia, 3-6, 6-2, 6-3. Pauline Parmentier, France, def. Sorana Cirstea, Romania, 6-1, 6-3. Yanina Wickmayer (19), Belgium, def. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 7-5, 6-3. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Alison Riske, United States, 6-0, 3-6, 6-3. Christina McHale, United States, def. Ekaterina Makarova (28), Russia, 2-6, 6-1, 8-6. Sara Errani, Italy, def. Kaia Kanepi (17), Estonia, 61, 6-4. Alexandra Dulgheru, Romania, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-2, 6-4. Svetlana Kuznetsova (12), Russia, def. Zhang Shuai, China, 3-6, 6-3, 6-4. Francesca Schiavone (6), Italy, def. Jelena Dokic, Australia, 6-4, 1-6, 6-3. Monica Niculescu, Romania, def. Sybille Bammer,

Austria, 6-1, 6-1. Kateryna Bondarenko, Ukraine, leads Alize Cornet, France, 7-5, susp., rain. Tamira Paszek, Austria, leads Ayumi Morita, Japan, 5-7, 6-3, 2-0, susp., rain. Victoria Azarenka (4), Belarus, leads Magdalena Rybarikova, Slovakia, 6-4, 3-2 (30-40), susp., rain. Sandra Zahlavova, Czech Republic, leads Iveta Benesova, Czech Republic, 2-1 (40-30), susp., rain.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Optioned INF Andrew Romine to Salt Lake (PCL). Recalled RHP Michael Kohn from Salt Lake. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Agreed to terms with SS Jonathon Berti, LHP David Rollins, DH Eric Arce, SS Jorge Vega-Rosado, RHP Taylor Cole, 1B Kevin Patterson, OF Kevin Pillar, C Luis Munoz, RHP Andrew Sikula, RHP Leslie Williams, OF Nico Taylor, OF Nicholas Baligod, SS Cody Bartlett, LHP, Shane Davis and RHP Colby Broussard. National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Activated OF Dexter Fowler from the 15-day DL and optioned him to Colorado Springs (PCL). FLORIDA MARLINS—Named Jack McKeon interim manager. Placed OF Chris Coghlan on the 15-day DL, retroactive to June 17. Optioned LHP Brad Hand to Jupiter (FSL). Recalled RHP Jose Ceda from New Orleans (PCL). Sent C Brad Davis outright to New Orleans. NEW YORK METS—Agreed to terms with OF Travis Taijeron, SS Carlos Leyva, RHP Tyson Seng, RHP Dustin Emmons, OF Charles Thurber, LHP Mark Picca and C Edward Rohan. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association DENVER NUGGETS—Exercised their fourth-year option on G Ty Lawson’s contract. HOCKEY National Hockey League CALGARY FLAMES—Re-signed G Henrik Karlsson to a two-year contract. DETROIT RED WINGS—Agreed to terms with D Nicklas Lidstrom on a one-year contract. MINNESOTA WILD—Re-signed D Nate Prosser to a one-year contract. COLLEGE BIG 12 CONFERENCE—Named Sean Doerre and Cassandra Novy communications assistants and William Draper internet services assistant. ARKANSAS—Announced junior G Rotnei Clarke has been granted a release from his basketball scholarship. DRAKE—Named Stan Johnson men’s assistant basketball coach. OHIO WESLEYAN—Promoted women’s assistant lacrosse coach Meg Grossman to women’s lacrosse coach. SAN JOSE STATE—Named Anh-Dao Nguyen-Church director of operations for Olympic sports. WENTWORTH TECH—Announced the resignation of men’s volleyball coach Rob Mullowney.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,923 1,059 172 52 The Dalles 2,044 1,069 46 6 John Day 1,464 722 25 9 McNary 985 459 22 4 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Sunday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 214,899 71,236 7,939 2,656 The Dalles 150,293 52,569 1,819 832 John Day 125,269 50,394 3,140 1,815 McNary 116,384 38,810 2,830 1,601

TENNIS: WIMBLEDON

Venus Williams, Nadal win openers By Howard Fendrich The Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England — Back on one of tennis’ top stages, Venus Williams cut a familiar figure Monday at Wimbledon, from her latest original, somewhat-seethrough outfit to her trademark booming serves and aggressive groundstrokes. Williams smacked seven aces at up to 118 mph, totaled 23 winners to only five unforced errors, and overwhelmed 97th-ranked Akgul Amanmuradova of Uzbekistan 6-3, 6-1 in the first round at the All England Club. The seven-time major champion recently was off the tour for about five months with a bum hip, including missing the French Open, and this is only her fourth tournament in nearly a year. “It’s a good place to start. And this is kind of like a home for her. She loves it,” said Williams’ hitting partner, David Witt. “She feels confident out here, and in women’s tennis, ‘confident’ goes a long way.” There sure was nothing shy about a playsuit Williams called “trendy”: white and sleeveless, with a deep “V” neckline, a triangle cut out in the back, a gold belt and gold zipper. “Jumpers are very ‘now,’ ” she explained, “as is lace.” Not as sensational as the corsetlike black lace number with skintoned undergarments that drew so

much attention at the 2010 French Open, but Monday’s romper looked something akin to a toga and surely would have won the approval of her Roman goddess namesake. “She always has something interesting,” said the 6-foot-3 Amanmuradova, a rare opponent taller than the 6-foot-1 Williams. “It’s good to have something different on the tour. I wear shorts, and everybody is criticizing that I look like a guy. ... If she feels comfortable, perfect. Personally, I wouldn’t wear this, because it’s not going to look good on me. But if it’s white, you can play. That’s the rule. If everybody wears the same, it’s boring.” Williams’ outfit — and, of course, superb play, which betrayed no lingering effects from her injury — generated the most buzz on Day 1 in the 125th edition of the grasscourt Grand Slam tournament. “I do realize I don’t have as many matches,” said Williams, only 5-2 this season and only 9-3 since last July. “So, yeah, for sure, I know I need to kind of come out firing. Been pretty good at that in the past — and today.” Others reaching the second round included 10-time major champion Rafael Nadal, whose parents sat in the Royal Box during his 6-4, 6-2, 62 victory over 90th-ranked Michael Russell of Houston; No. 4 Andy Murray, and No. 10 Mardy Fish. It was Nadal’s first chance to play the tournament’s opening match

Kirsty Wigglesworth / The Associated Press

Venus Williams returns a shot to Akgul Amanmuradova at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, Monday. on Centre Court, an honor given to the defending men’s champion, and something he called a “big emotion.” Bad knees forced Nadal to withdraw in 2009, a year after he won Wimbledon for the first time. He was more blase about his parents’ special seats, saying: “It doesn’t make any difference to me whether I see them in my (guest) box or in the Royal Box. But I think it was a beautiful experience for them.” Nadal now faces another American, 69th-ranked Ryan Sweeting of

Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., who dropped the first two sets against Pablo Andujar of Spain before coming all the way back to win 3-6, 4-6, 6-1, 7-6 (1), 6-1. It’ll be Sweeting’s third match against Nadal this year. Nadal won the others in straight sets, including at the Australian Open. “They keep putting me up in the top half of the draw. I don’t know what the deal is,” Sweeting said. “What can I say? He’s obviously one of the toughest opponents to play on any surface.”

Murray inspired by messages; McHale upsets seeded player By Caroline Cheese The Associated Press

WIMBLEDON, England — One message read: “Believe in yourself and never give up.” Another simply said: “Make history.” The words of support from Facebook fans printed on Andy Murray’s racket bag looked as if they might be having the opposite effect Monday when he dropped his first set at Wimbledon. Then, as if flicking on a switch, Murray reeled off 15 consecutive games for a 4-6, 6-3, 6-0, 6-0 victory over Daniel Gimeno-Traver to reach the second round. Gimeno-Traver began the match confidently under the roof at Centre Court and hit some particularly good forehands, but by the end, the 56th-ranked Spaniard looked every bit the player who has lost in the first round at eight of his 12 Grand Slam tournaments.

TENNIS NOTEBOOK And Murray’s unusual bag — the brainchild of his racket sponsor — didn’t end up being consigned to history. Murray said it might even turn out to be a source of inspiration in the future. Turnaround After blowing a big lead and losing at the French Open, 19-year-old Christina McHale of Englewood Cliffs, N.J., made sure she didn’t make the same mistake at Wimbledon. McHale reached the second round at the All England Club for the first time — and at any Grand Slam tournament for only the second time — by eliminating 28th-seeded Ekaterina Makarova of Russia 2-6, 6-1, 8-6 Monday. Last month in Paris, McHale led Sara Errani of Italy 5-0 in the third set before losing 6-7 (4),

6-2, 9-7. Against Makarova, McHale served for the match at 7-6 and fell behind love-40. But she came back to pull out the victory and improve to 2-6 at major tournaments. Texting Rory Rafael Nadal tried texting Rory McIlroy after the Northern Irishman won golf’s U.S. Open. Nadal’s didn’t hear back right away. Now the tennis star could get a chance to congratulate his pal in person. McIlroy is expected to visit Wimbledon next week. Nadal watched McIlroy’s eight-stroke victory in Bethesda, Md., over the past few days. “When you have to defend the advantage, you start to play a little bit more defensive. Sometimes can be dangerous. And he did perfect. He managed the moments perfect, in my opinion,” Nadal said.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 D3

M A JOR LEAGUE BASEBALL BOXSCORES Red Sox 14, Padres 5 San Diego AB R H Denorfia rf 5 0 1 Bartlett ss 3 0 0 c-Venable ph-lf 1 0 0 Headley 3b 5 2 4 Ludwick lf 3 1 1 Alb.Gonzalez ss 1 0 0 Guzman dh 5 0 2 O.Hudson 2b 5 2 3 Maybin cf 4 0 0 Rizzo 1b 4 0 1 Hundley c 3 0 1 Totals 39 5 13

BI 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 5

BB 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 4

SO 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 1 8

Avg. .301 .255 .235 .297 .260 .200 .357 .244 .244 .161 .220

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 4 1 1 1 2 0 .311 Pedroia 2b 4 3 1 1 2 0 .268 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 5 2 3 3 0 1 .353 Youkilis 3b 4 1 2 2 1 1 .265 1-Sutton pr-3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .314 Ortiz dh 4 1 2 2 1 2 .323 D.McDonald lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .114 a-J.Drew ph-rf 1 2 1 0 1 0 .235 Scutaro ss 4 2 2 1 0 1 .286 Varitek c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .231 Cameron rf 2 0 0 0 1 1 .153 b-Reddick ph-lf 1 1 1 2 1 0 .412 Totals 36 14 14 13 9 9 San Diego 000 003 011 — 5 13 0 Boston 101 100 (10)1x —14 14 0 a-walked for D.McDonald in the 7th. b-singled for Cameron in the 7th. c-popped out for Bartlett in the 8th. 1-ran for Youkilis in the 7th. LOB—San Diego 11, Boston 9. 2B—Headley (21), Rizzo (2), Pedroia (14), Ad.Gonzalez (25), Youkilis (20), Ortiz (20). 3B—Guzman (1). HR—O.Hudson (1), off A.Miller. RBIs—Denorfia (15), Guzman (1), O.Hudson 3 (10), Ellsbury (37), Pedroia (33), Ad.Gonzalez 3 (67), Youkilis 2 (52), Ortiz 2 (48), Scutaro (13), Varitek (15), Reddick 2 (6). Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 5 (Hundley, Ludwick, Rizzo, Denorfia, Venable); Boston 7 (Scutaro 2, D.McDonald, Ad.Gonzalez, Ortiz, Pedroia 2). GIDP—Ludwick, Ellsbury, Pedroia. DP—San Diego 2 (O.Hudson, Bartlett, Rizzo), (Headley, O.Hudson, Rizzo); Boston 1 (Scutaro, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeBlanc 3 7 3 3 2 1 83 5.17 Luebke L, 1-2 3 1-3 1 2 2 2 6 50 3.23 Frieri 1-3 0 4 4 2 0 26 3.28 Scribner 0 4 4 4 1 0 25 4.85 Neshek 1 1-3 2 1 1 2 2 33 3.60 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA A.Miller 5 2-3 7 3 3 3 6 89 4.76 Albers W, 2-3 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 26 3.08 Bowden 1 3 1 1 0 0 25 1.69 Hottovy 1 2 1 1 0 1 13 7.36 LeBlanc pitched to 3 batters in the 4th. Scribner pitched to 5 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Luebke 3-1, Frieri 1-1, Scribner 3-3, Neshek 1-0, Albers 1-0. IBB—off Frieri (Ortiz). HBP—by Frieri (Scutaro, Varitek). WP—Bowden. T—3:40. A—38,020 (37,493).

Rangers 8, Astros 3 Houston AB Bourgeois rf 4 Bourn cf 3 Keppinger 2b 4 Ca.Lee dh 3 Michaels lf 4 C.Johnson 3b 4 Wallace 1b 4 Barmes ss 3 Corporan c 2 a-Ang.Sanchez ph 1 Totals 32

R 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 7 3 3

SO 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 5

Avg. .345 .280 .311 .266 .210 .242 .303 .220 .154 .250

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 5 1 0 0 0 0 .235 Andrus ss 4 1 1 0 1 2 .279 J.Hamilton lf 4 2 2 2 0 1 .291 A.Beltre 3b 4 1 3 2 0 0 .267 Mi.Young dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .307 N.Cruz rf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .236 Moreland 1b 4 2 1 1 0 1 .296 Teagarden c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .071 Gentry cf 4 1 3 1 0 0 .271 Totals 36 8 12 8 1 6 Houston 000 200 010 — 3 7 1 Texas 331 000 01x — 8 12 0 a-grounded out for Corporan in the 9th. E—C.Johnson (8). LOB—Houston 6, Texas 6. 2B— Keppinger (4), Mi.Young (20), Gentry (5). 3B—J.Hamilton (2). HR—Moreland (9), off Melancon. RBIs—Ca.Lee (37), Michaels 2 (5), J.Hamilton 2 (31), A.Beltre 2 (53), Mi.Young (45), N.Cruz (38), Moreland (21), Gentry (5). SB—Bourn (30), Gentry 3 (9). SF—Ca.Lee, N.Cruz. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 2 (Ca. Lee, C.Johnson); Texas 5 (Moreland, Mi.Young, Kinsler, N.Cruz, Andrus). Runners moved up—Kinsler. DP—Texas 1 (Kinsler, Moreland). Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ L, 3-9 2 2-3 8 7 5 1 3 84 5.33 An.Rodriguez 4 1-3 2 0 0 0 2 51 5.33 Melancon 1 2 1 1 0 1 21 1.83 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Holland W, 6-2 7 1-3 6 3 3 3 4 113 4.69 M.Lowe 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 4.58 D.Oliver 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 2.57 Inherited runners-scored—An.Rodriguez 1-0, M.Lowe 2-1. WP—Happ. PB—Corporan. Balk—Happ. T—2:46. A—41,205 (49,170).

Cubs 6, White Sox 3 Chicago (N) Fukudome rf S.Castro ss DeWitt lf Montanez lf Ar.Ramirez 3b C.Pena 1b A.Soriano dh Soto c LeMahieu 2b Campana cf Totals Chicago (A) Pierre lf Vizquel 2b Quentin rf Konerko 1b A.Dunn dh Al.Ramirez ss

AB 4 4 4 0 3 3 4 4 4 3 33 AB 5 4 4 3 4 4

R 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 6 R 1 0 1 1 0 0

H 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 7 H 1 1 1 1 0 0

BI 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 6 BI 0 0 1 2 0 0

BB 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 BB 0 0 0 1 0 0

SO 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 2 0 7 SO 0 0 0 2 3 0

Avg. .284 .318 .262 .257 .281 .220 .274 .220 .250 .241 Avg. .256 .284 .260 .327 .178 .289

Pierzynski c 4 0 3 0 0 0 .290 Rios cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .210 Teahen 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .197 Totals 35 3 9 3 2 5 Chicago (N) 002 004 000 — 6 7 0 Chicago (A) 300 000 000 — 3 9 0 LOB—Chicago (N) 4, Chicago (A) 7. HR—S.Castro (2), off Floyd; C.Pena (12), off Floyd; Konerko (20), off Zambrano. RBIs—S.Castro 3 (35), C.Pena 3 (36), Quentin (48), Konerko 2 (58). SB—S.Castro (9). S—Campana. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago (N) 2 (DeWitt, Fukudome); Chicago (A) 3 (Konerko, Vizquel, Pierre). Runners moved up—Pierre 2, Vizquel, Teahen. GIDP—Rios. DP—Chicago (N) 1 (Ar.Ramirez, LeMahieu, C.Pena). Chicago (N) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zmbrano W, 6-4 8 7 3 3 2 5 115 4.50 Mrmol S, 15-19 1 2 0 0 0 0 22 2.70 Chicago (A) IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Floyd L, 6-7 5 5 6 6 3 3 101 4.31 Bruney 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.00 Ohman 2 0 0 0 0 1 24 5.03 Harrell 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 20 7.20 Sale 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 4.50 Floyd pitched to 4 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Sale 2-0. WP—Floyd. T—2:45. A—36,005 (40,615).

Rockies 8, Indians 7 Colorado C.Gonzalez cf Nelson 2b Helton 1b Tulowitzki ss Giambi dh S.Smith rf Wigginton 3b Blackmon lf Iannetta c Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 4 5 4 3 3 38

R H 2 3 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 8 12

BI 0 0 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 7

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 4

SO 1 2 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 6

Avg. .281 .274 .311 .278 .245 .307 .261 .354 .234

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. G.Sizemore cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .235 Brantley lf 5 2 2 0 0 1 .278 A.Cabrera ss 4 1 1 0 0 2 .295 Hafner dh 3 1 1 3 1 1 .341 Choo rf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .244 C.Santana 1b 4 2 3 1 0 1 .237 O.Cabrera 3b 3 0 1 0 1 1 .249 Phelps 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .160 Marson c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .231 a-T.Buck ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .223 Totals 36 7 12 7 2 9 Colorado 100 060 010 — 8 12 0 Cleveland 300 120 010 — 7 12 1 a-flied out for Marson in the 9th. E—Marson (1). LOB—Colorado 7, Cleveland 4. 2B—Tulowitzki (18), S.Smith (18). HR—Giambi (7), off Carmona; Hafner (6), off Nicasio; C.Santana (10), off Nicasio. RBIs—Helton (31), Tulowitzki 3 (49), Giambi 3 (18), Hafner 3 (26), Choo 2 (27), C.Santana (31), Phelps (5). SB—C.Gonzalez (11), C.Santana (3). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 5 (S.Smith, Wigginton 3, Helton); Cleveland 2 (O.Cabrera 2). GIDP—Nelson, G.Sizemore, Marson. DP—Colorado 2 (Nelson, Tulowitzki, Helton), (Nelson, Tulowitzki, Helton); Cleveland 1 (Carmona, A.Cabrera, C.Santana). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nicasio 4 2-3 7 6 6 2 6 80 4.71 Brothers 1-3 2 0 0 0 0 10 6.75 Lndstrm W, 2-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 9 2.73 Reynolds H, 11 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 2 26 3.63 Btancourt H, 17 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 7 3.38 Street S, 21-23 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 3.74 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Carmona L, 4-9 4 2-3 9 7 7 2 0 81 6.17 Durbin 2 1 0 0 0 3 25 6.68 R.Perez 2-3 2 1 0 2 1 21 1.24 Herrmann 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 24 5.06 Inherited runners-scored—Brothers 3-2, R.Betancourt 1-1, Durbin 1-0, R.Perez 1-0, Herrmann 2-1. T—3:19. A—15,224 (43,441).

Orioles 8, Pirates 3 Baltimore Hardy ss Markakis rf Ad.Jones cf D.Lee 1b Wieters c Mar.Reynolds 3b Pie lf Andino 2b Arrieta p M.Gonzalez p b-Guerrero ph Berken p Gregg p Totals

AB 4 5 5 5 5 1 5 5 2 0 1 0 0 38

R H 1 2 2 3 1 2 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 14

BI 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

BB 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .298 .265 .297 .249 .261 .220 .248 .253 .500 --.288 -----

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .257 J.Harrison 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .269 Moskos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ti.Wood p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Diaz ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --A.McCutchen cf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .283 G.Jones 1b 2 1 0 0 2 0 .251 Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Paul rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .269 Cedeno ss 3 0 1 2 0 0 .226 McKenry c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .150 Morton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .038 D.McCutchen p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Ciriaco ph-3b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 30 3 5 3 2 6 Baltimore 521 000 000 — 8 14 0 Pittsburgh 010 200 000 — 3 5 3 a-popped out for D.McCutchen in the 5th. b-lined out for M.Gonzalez in the 7th. c-struck out for Ti.Wood in the 8th. E—Tabata (2), Moskos (1), J.Harrison (1). LOB— Baltimore 9, Pittsburgh 2. 2B—Markakis (7), Wieters (11), A.McCutchen (15), Cedeno (13). RBIs—Ad.Jones 2 (40), D.Lee (18), Wieters (32), Mar.Reynolds (37), Andino (6), Arrieta (1), Paul (10), Cedeno 2 (20). SB—Paul (9). S—Arrieta. SF—Mar.Reynolds. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 4 (Hardy, Pie, Guerrero, D.Lee); Pittsburgh 2 (McKenry 2). Runners moved up—Cedeno. GIDP—Ad.Jones, D.Lee, Walker. DP—Baltimore 2 (Hardy, D.Lee), (D.Lee, Hardy, D.Lee); Pittsburgh 2 (Cedeno, Walker, G.Jones), (Ciriaco, Walker, G.Jones). Baltimore IP Arrieta W, 9-4 5

H R ER BB SO NP ERA 3 3 3 2 2 87 4.50

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Boston New York Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Cleveland Detroit Chicago Minnesota Kansas City West Division Texas Seattle Los Angeles Oakland

W 44 42 40 36 33 W 39 39 35 31 31 W 39 37 36 33

L 28 29 33 37 37 L 32 34 39 39 41 L 35 35 38 40

Pct .611 .592 .548 .493 .471 Pct .549 .534 .473 .443 .431 Pct .527 .514 .486 .452

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 1½ 4½ 8½ 10 GB — 1 5½ 7½ 8½ GB — 1 3 5½

WCGB — — 3 7 8½ WCGB — 4 8½ 10½ 11½ WCGB — 5½ 7½ 10

Monday’s Games Baltimore 8, Pittsburgh 3 Colorado 8, Cleveland 7 L.A. Angels 2, Florida 1 N.Y. Yankees 5, Cincinnati 3 Boston 14, San Diego 5 Atlanta 2, Toronto 0 Texas 8, Houston 3 Chicago Cubs 6, Chicago White Sox 3 Tampa Bay 8, Milwaukee 4 L.A. Dodgers 4, Detroit 0

L10 8-2 8-2 7-3 4-6 4-6 L10 5-5 5-5 5-5 9-1 5-5 L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 6-4

Str W-2 W-3 W-4 L-2 W-2 Str L-1 L-1 L-1 W-7 L-2 Str W-1 W-1 W-2 W-5

Home 22-14 23-17 18-18 17-18 20-18 Home 23-13 22-14 16-18 14-16 21-20 Home 21-13 21-18 15-20 19-16

Away 22-14 19-12 22-15 19-19 13-19 Away 16-19 17-20 19-21 17-23 10-21 Away 18-22 16-17 21-18 14-24

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta New York Washington Florida Central Division St. Louis Milwaukee Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division San Francisco Arizona Colorado Los Angeles San Diego

Today’s Games Baltimore (Guthrie 2-8) at Pittsburgh (Ja. McDonald 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Chacin 8-4) at Cleveland (Talbot 2-4), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Fister 3-8) at Washington (L.Hernandez 4-8), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Angels (E.Santana 3-7) at Florida (Vazquez 3-7), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (B.Gordon 0-0) at Cincinnati (Cueto 4-2), 4:10 p.m. Oakland (Outman 2-1) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-0), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Latos 4-8) at Boston (Aceves 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Z.Stewart 0-0) at Atlanta (Minor 0-2), 4:10 p.m. Houston (Lyles 0-2) at Texas (C.Wilson 7-3), 5:05 p.m. Arizona (J.Saunders 3-7) at Kansas City (Hochevar 4-7), 5:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 3-6) at Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 6-5), 5:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Hellickson 7-5) at Milwaukee (Greinke 6-2), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Scherzer 9-2) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 5-6), 7:10 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 4-5) at San Francisco (Bumgarner 3-8), 7:15 p.m.

W 45 41 35 35 32 W 40 40 38 35 30 27 W 39 39 36 33 30

L 28 33 37 37 41 L 33 34 36 37 42 47 L 33 34 36 41 44

Monday’s Games No games scheduled

Pct .616 .554 .486 .486 .438 Pct .548 .541 .514 .486 .417 .365 Pct .542 .534 .500 .446 .405

GB — 4½ 9½ 9½ 13 GB — ½ 2½ 4½ 9½ 13½ GB — ½ 3 7 10

WCGB — — 5 5 8½ WCGB — 1 3 5 10 14 WCGB — 1½ 4 8 11

L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 8-2 0-10 L10 3-7 4-6 5-5 5-5 5-5 3-7 L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 4-6 1-9

Str L-1 W-2 L-1 L-1 L-11 Str W-2 L-2 L-1 L-4 W-1 L-2 Str L-4 L-2 W-1 W-2 L-6

Home 28-12 20-17 16-19 19-13 15-23 Home 20-13 25-10 21-18 15-19 16-22 13-25 Home 19-12 22-17 19-19 17-21 14-26

Away 17-16 21-16 19-18 16-24 17-18 Away 20-20 15-24 17-18 20-18 14-20 14-22 Away 20-21 17-17 17-17 16-20 16-18

Today’s Games Philadelphia (Halladay 9-3) at St. Louis (McClellan 6-3), 5:15 p.m.

Los Angeles M.Izturis 3b Aybar ss Tor.Hunter rf Abreu lf S.Downs p Walden p V.Wells cf-lf H.Kendrick 2b Trumbo 1b Mathis c Weaver p b-Callaspo ph Bourjos cf Totals

Roundup

0 0 0 BB 1 1 0 1 1

1 3 0 SO 4 1 0 0 1

12 27 10 NP 55 41 24 13 23

6.38 6.14 3.18 ERA 3.77 2.39 2.70 4.76 1.35

Yankees 5, Reds 3 New York AB R Swisher rf 3 1 Dickerson rf 0 0 Granderson cf 3 1 Teixeira 1b 4 1 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 1 1-R.Pena pr-3b 0 0 Cano 2b 4 1 Martin c 4 0 An.Jones lf 3 0 Gardner lf 1 0 E.Nunez ss 4 0 Nova p 3 0 Ayala p 0 0 Logan p 0 0 Ma.Rivera p 0 0 Totals 33 5

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 4 2

Cincinnati Stubbs cf

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 0 3 .261

AB R 4 1

SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 9

Avg. .238 .313 .280 .251 .292 .286 .295 .238 .213 .293 .247 .000 -------

the wall and Texas opened the Lone Star Series with a victory over Houston. The AL West leaders scored in each of the first three innings, quickly settling back in at home after a 3-7 road trip wrapped a stretch of playing 17 of 20 games on the road. • Cubs 6, White Sox 3: CHICAGO — Carlos Zambrano kept his cool this time after a tough first inning, Carlos Pena hit a three-run homer and Starlin Castro drove in three runs as the Chicago Cubs rallied to beat the White Sox. The first matchup of six this season between the crosstown rivals with losing records drew a crowd of 36,005. • Angels 2, Marlins 1: MIAMI — With their new old manager, free-falling Florida had the same old result. Jered Weaver pitched seven innings and the Los Angeles Angels spoiled 80-year-old Jack McKeon’s return to the dugout with a win over the Marlins, who tied a franchise record with their 11th consecutive loss. • Rays 8, Brewers 4: MILWAUKEE — Jeff Niemann tossed six scoreless innings in his return from a back injury, Evan Longoria homered and Tampa Bay beat Milwaukee in its first-ever appearance at Miller Park. Niemann (2-4) had spent the past 45 days on the disabled list with a lower back strain, but looked comfortable while using his big curveball to neutralize the Brewers. • Dodgers 4, Tigers 0: LOS ANGELES — Clayton Kershaw threw a two-hitter for his third career shutout and complete game, Juan Uribe homered, and the Los Angeles Dodgers resumed their interleague schedule with a victory over Detroit. It was the second straight shutout for the Dodgers, who beat Houston 1-0 on Sunday.

B.Phillips 2b 4 1 2 0 0 0 .279 Votto 1b 3 1 0 0 0 0 .323 Bruce rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .280 Rolen 3b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .257 Heisey lf 4 0 0 1 0 2 .262 Hanigan c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .262 b-Renteria ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .219 Janish ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .229 Tr.Wood p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .071 Arredondo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-F.Lewis ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .288 Fisher p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 33 3 6 2 0 8 New York 400 000 010 — 5 9 0 Cincinnati 100 000 002 — 3 6 1 a-singled for Arredondo in the 8th. b-struck out for Hanigan in the 9th. 1-ran for Al.Rodriguez in the 8th. E—Janish (7). LOB—New York 3, Cincinnati 4. 2B—Cano (16). RBIs—Al.Rodriguez (44), Cano (47), Martin (30), An.Jones (12), Rolen (28), Heisey (23). SB—Granderson (11), Stubbs (21). CS—E.Nunez (2). Runners left in scoring position—New York 1 (An. Jones); Cincinnati 1 (Renteria). Runners moved up—Martin, Bruce. GIDP—Cano, An.Jones, Votto. DP—New York 1 (Cano, E.Nunez, Teixeira); Cincinnati 2 (Rolen, B.Phillips, Votto), (Janish, Votto).

Toronto Y.Escobar ss C.Patterson lf Bautista rf Lind 1b A.Hill 2b Arencibia c R.Davis cf J.Nix 3b a-Encarnacion ph L.Perez p Camp p R.Romero p McCoy 3b Totals

New York IP Nova W, 7-4 8 Ayala 0 Logan 0 Rivera S, 18-21 1

Atlanta AB R Schafer cf 4 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 Heyward rf 4 0 Freeman 1b 3 0

H 4 1 0 1

Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Romero L, 6-7 7 6 2 2 2 4 100 2.98 L.Perez 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 3.80 Camp 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.13 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson W, 6-6 8 2 0 0 1 8 96 3.73 Kmbrl S, 20-25 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.92 T.Hudson pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Camp 1-0, Kimbrel 2-0. HBP—by R.Romero (Freeman). T—2:20. A—22,937 (49,586).

Angels 2, Marlins 1

• Rockies 8, Indians 7: CLEVELAND — Jason Giambi’s gigantic three-run homer in Colorado’s six-run fifth inning off Fausto Carmona sent the Rockies over Cleveland, the Indians’ first loss in seven interleague games this season. Giambi’s 440-foot shot — his 422nd career homer — against Carmona (4-9) helped the Rockies win for the fifth time in six games. • Braves 2, Blue Jays 0: ATLANTA — Tim Hudson took a one-hitter into the ninth inning and hit his second career home run in Atlanta’s victory over Toronto. Hudson (6-6) allowed two hits, one walk and struck out a season-high eight, including the 1,600th of his career. He connected off Ricky Romero (6-7) for a two-run homer with two outs in the seventh. • Yankees 5, Reds 3: CINCINNATI — Alex Rodriguez keyed a four-run first with an RBI single and rookie Ivan Nova handled the NL’s most prolific offense for eight innings, leading the New York Yankees over Cincinnati. The Yankees have won nine of 11, moving a season-best 13 games over .500 at 42-29. • Orioles 8, Pirates 3: PITTSBURGH — Nick Markakis had three hits and Jake Arrieta moved into a tie for the American League lead in wins as Baltimore pounded Pittsburgh. Arrieta (9-4) gave up three runs over five innings and even added his first major league hit to became the first Orioles pitcher to reach nine wins by June 20 since Sidney Ponson in 2003. • Rangers 8, Astros 3: ARLINGTON, Texas — Adrian Beltre had a pair of RBI singles among his three hits, Josh Hamilton hit a two-run triple off M.Gonzalez 1 1 0 0 Berken 2 0 0 0 Gregg 1 1 0 0 Pittsburgh IP H R ER Morton L, 7-4 2 8 7 6 D.McCutchen 3 2 1 1 Moskos 2 3 0 0 Ti.Wood 1 1 0 0 Hanrahan 1 0 0 0 T—2:54. A—22,447 (38,362).

Uggla 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .178 D.Ross c 2 0 1 0 1 0 .327 McLouth lf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .237 Di.Hernandez 3b 3 1 0 0 0 0 .212 T.Hudson p 3 1 1 2 0 1 .071 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 2 6 2 3 5 Toronto 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Atlanta 000 000 20x — 2 6 1 a-grounded out for J.Nix in the 8th. E—Y.Escobar (7), Freeman (5). LOB—Toronto 4, Atlanta 6. 2B—Ale.Gonzalez (13), Heyward (6). HR—T.Hudson (1), off R.Romero. RBIs—T.Hudson 2 (2). SB—Heyward (4), McLouth (2). CS—Schafer (4). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 2 (J.Nix, Lind); Atlanta 5 (Freeman, Di.Hernandez, McLouth, Uggla 2). Runners moved up—McLouth. GIDP—Uggla. DP—Toronto 1 (J.Nix, Lind).

R 1 1 1 0

ER 1 1 1 0

BB 0 0 0 0

SO 7 0 0 1

NP 105 5 1 19

ERA 4.13 1.59 3.94 1.91

Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Tr.Wood L, 5-5 7 8 4 4 1 6 107 5.11 Arredondo 1 1 1 1 1 1 21 3.78 Fisher 1 0 0 0 0 2 8 3.71 Ayala pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Logan pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Logan 1-0, Ma.Rivera 22. HBP—by Logan (Votto). WP—Nova, Arredondo. T—2:46. A—41,173 (42,319).

Braves 2, Blue Jays 0 AB 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 2 1 0 0 2 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 11

Avg. .280 .266 .330 .324 .242 .230 .240 .176 .254 ----.000 .224

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .227 .251 .216 .268

SO 1 0 0 2

AB 4 4 4 4 0 0 4 4 4 4 2 1 0 35

R H 1 3 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 11

BI 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 1 1 0 10

Avg. .295 .280 .232 .289 ----.203 .305 .254 .191 .000 .281 .254

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bonifacio ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Morrison lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .278 G.Sanchez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .304 Dobbs rf 4 0 2 0 0 2 .306 Jo.Lopez 3b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .197 c-H.Ramirez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .254 J.Buck c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .224 Wise cf 2 0 1 1 0 1 .286 Ani.Sanchez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .138 a-Helms ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .205 Cishek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Choate p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --L.Nunez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 1 5 1 1 9 Los Angeles 000 001 010 — 2 11 1 Florida 010 000 000 — 1 5 0 a-flied out for Ani.Sanchez in the 7th. b-struck out for Weaver in the 8th. c-struck out for Jo.Lopez in the 9th. E—M.Izturis (3). LOB—Los Angeles 6, Florida 5. 2B—M.Izturis (18), H.Kendrick (18). RBIs—Tor.Hunter 2 (37), Wise (1). SB—Aybar (15). S—Ani.Sanchez. SF—Wise. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (Abreu 2, Mathis 2); Florida 1 (G.Sanchez). Runners moved up—Aybar, Tor.Hunter, Trumbo, Bonifacio. GIDP—Aybar, V.Wells, Trumbo. DP—Florida 3 (G.Sanchez, Bonifacio, Ani.Sanchez), (Jo.Lopez, Infante, G.Sanchez), (Infante, Bonifacio, G.Sanchez). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver W, 9-4 7 5 1 1 1 6 121 2.01 S.Downs H, 11 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.57 Wlden S, 17-20 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 2.59 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ani.Sanchez 7 8 1 0 0 8 102 2.81 Cishek L, 0-1 2-3 2 1 1 0 1 11 2.03 Choate 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 0.66 L.Nunez 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 3.66 Inherited runners-scored—Choate 1-0. WP—Ani. Sanchez. PB—J.Buck. Balk—Ani.Sanchez. T—2:47. A—16,984 (38,560).

Rays 8, Brewers 4 Tampa Bay Damon lf Howell p c-Fuld ph-p C.Ramos p Jo.Peralta p Farnsworth p Zobrist rf Longoria 3b B.Upton cf S.Rodriguez 2b Kotchman 1b Shoppach c E.Johnson ss Niemann p a-Ruggiano ph-lf Totals

AB 3 0 0 0 0 0 4 5 5 4 5 4 3 2 2 37

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 8

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 2 4 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 9 8 5

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 1 1 2 0 8

Avg. .271 --.236 ------.268 .237 .218 .217 .341 .190 .210 .000 .333

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. R.Weeks 2b 4 0 2 0 1 0 .291 Morgan cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .343 C.Hart rf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .270 Fielder 1b 3 1 1 1 2 1 .301 McGehee 3b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .232 Kotsay lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .236 Y.Betancourt ss 4 0 2 2 0 0 .228 Lucroy c 3 1 1 1 1 1 .265 Narveson p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Dillard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Jo.Wilson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .241 DiFelice p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Counsell ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .210 Hawkins p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 4 9 4 6 8 Tampa Bay 100 000 430 — 8 9 0 Milwaukee 000 000 121 — 4 9 2 a-doubled for Niemann in the 7th. b-flied out for Dillard in the 7th. c-walked for Howell in the 8th. d-struck out for DiFelice in the 8th. E—Fielder (4), McGehee (13). LOB—Tampa Bay 9, Milwaukee 10. 2B—Zobrist (24), Shoppach (2), Ruggiano (3), Morgan (7). HR—Longoria (6), off DiFelice; Lucroy (7), off Howell. RBIs—Zobrist (38), Longoria 4 (23), B.Upton 2 (33), Ruggiano (10), Fielder (62), Y.Betancourt 2 (24), Lucroy (32). SB—Fuld (15), B.Upton (19). S—E.Johnson. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 6

(S.Rodriguez, Zobrist 2, Shoppach 2, E.Johnson); Milwaukee 5 (Fielder, Narveson, Y.Betancourt 2, Counsell). Runners moved up—Longoria. GIDP—Morgan. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (S.Rodriguez, E.Johnson, Kotchman). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niemann W, 2-4 6 4 0 0 3 5 85 4.82 Howell 1 1 1 1 1 0 16 8.31 Fuld 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 C.Ramos 0 1 2 2 2 0 20 4.03 Jo.Peralta 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 23 3.28 Farnsworth 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 2 25 1.93 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Narveson L, 4-5 6 2-3 5 4 4 3 6 101 4.55 Dillard 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 15 3.46 DiFelice 1 1 3 3 2 1 25 18.00 Hawkins 1 1 0 0 0 1 14 0.47 C.Ramos pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Jo.Peralta 3-2, Farnsworth 2-0, Dillard 1-1. HBP—by Dillard (S.Rodriguez). WP—Niemann, Dillard. T—3:37. A—35,495 (41,900).

Dodgers 4, Tigers 0 Detroit A.Jackson cf C.Wells lf Ordonez rf Mi.Cabrera 1b V.Martinez c Jh.Peralta ss Raburn 2b Worth 3b Benoit p Penny p Schlereth p Santiago 3b Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 0 2 0 1 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 11

Avg. .248 .244 .172 .324 .324 .299 .210 .375 --.000 --.225

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. D.Gordon ss 3 0 0 0 1 3 .280 Uribe 3b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .213 Ethier rf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .313 Kemp cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .325 Loney 1b 4 2 3 0 0 0 .266 M.Thames lf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .182 Gwynn Jr. lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .214 Navarro c 3 1 1 1 1 1 .181 Carroll 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .305 Kershaw p 3 0 1 2 1 1 .294 Totals 30 4 9 4 6 7 Detroit 000 000 000 — 0 2 1 Los Angeles 100 001 02x — 4 9 0 E—V.Martinez (1). LOB—Detroit 2, Los Angeles 9. 2B—Raburn (10), Loney (8), Navarro (3). HR—Uribe (4), off Penny. RBIs—Uribe (23), Navarro (6), Kershaw 2 (3). SB—Kemp (18). CS—D.Gordon (2). S—D.Gordon. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 1 (Mi. Cabrera); Los Angeles 6 (Ethier, Kershaw 3, Kemp, D.Gordon). Runners moved up—Ordonez, Worth, Uribe, Navarro, Carroll. GIDP—Kemp. DP—Detroit 1 (Worth, Raburn, Mi.Cabrera). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO Penny L, 5-6 6 7 2 2 3 4 Schlereth 1 1-3 1 2 2 3 2 Benoit 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Kershaw W, 7-3 9 2 0 0 1 11 Inherited runners-scored—Benoit 3-2. Penny (Carroll), off Schlereth (Navarro). T—2:44. A—29,355 (56,000).

NP ERA 96 4.80 30 3.13 11 5.06 NP ERA 112 3.01 IBB—off

LEADERS Through Monday’s Games ——_ AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—AdGonzalez, Boston, .353; Bautista, Toronto, .330; Konerko, Chicago, .327; MiCabrera, Detroit, .324; VMartinez, Detroit, .324; Ortiz, Boston, .323; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .312. RUNS—Granderson, New York, 62; Bautista, Toronto, 55; AdGonzalez, Boston, 54; MiCabrera, Detroit, 53; Ellsbury, Boston, 52; Boesch, Detroit, 49; Kinsler, Texas, 48. RBI—AdGonzalez, Boston, 67; Konerko, Chicago, 58; Teixeira, New York, 55; Granderson, New York, 54; Beltre, Texas, 53; Youkilis, Boston, 52; MiCabrera, Detroit, 48; Ortiz, Boston, 48; Quentin, Chicago, 48. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 104; Ellsbury, Boston, 90; MiYoung, Texas, 88; ACabrera, Cleveland, 87; Konerko, Chicago, 87; Ortiz, Boston, 84; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 83. DOUBLES—AdGonzalez, Boston, 25; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 24; Ellsbury, Boston, 22; MiCabrera, Detroit, 20; AGordon, Kansas City, 20; Ortiz, Boston, 20; Quentin, Chicago, 20; Youkilis, Boston, 20; MiYoung, Texas, 20. TRIPLES—Bourjos, Los Angeles, 6; Granderson, New York, 6; Crisp, Oakland, 5; RDavis, Toronto, 5; AJackson, Detroit, 5; Aybar, Los Angeles, 4; CCrawford, Boston, 4; Gardner, New York, 4; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 4. HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 21; Granderson, New York, 21; Teixeira, New York, 21; Konerko, Chicago, 20; Ortiz, Boston, 17; Quentin, Chicago, 17; NCruz, Texas, 15; AdGonzalez, Boston, 15; Lind, Toronto, 15. STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 24; Andrus, Texas, 21; Crisp, Oakland, 21; BUpton, Tampa Bay, 19; RDavis, Toronto, 18; ISuzuki, Seattle, 18; Aybar, Los Angeles, 15; Fuld, Tampa Bay, 15. PITCHING—Scherzer, Detroit, 9-2; Verlander, Detroit, 9-3; Lester, Boston, 9-3; Sabathia, New York, 9-4; Arrieta, Baltimore, 9-4; Weaver, Los Angeles, 9-4; Tomlin, Cleveland, 8-4. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .341; Kemp, Los Angeles, .325; Votto, Cincinnati, .323; Pence, Houston, .321; SCastro, Chicago, .318; Ethier, Los Angeles, .313; Helton, Colorado, .311. RUNS—Braun, Milwaukee, 54; JosReyes, New York, 54; Pujols, St. Louis, 52; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 51; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 51; Votto, Cincinnati, 50; Bourn, Houston, 47; Kemp, Los Angeles, 47; CYoung, Arizona, 47. RBI—Fielder, Milwaukee, 62; Howard, Philadelphia, 58; Kemp, Los Angeles, 57; Berkman, St. Louis, 51; Braun, Milwaukee, 51; Pence, Houston, 51; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 49. HITS—JosReyes, New York, 103; SCastro, Chicago, 95; Pence, Houston, 93; RWeeks, Milwaukee, 87; Kemp, Los Angeles, 86; Votto, Cincinnati, 86; Braun, Milwaukee, 84; GSanchez, Florida, 84. DOUBLES—Beltran, New York, 21; SCastro, Chicago, 21; Headley, San Diego, 21; Coghlan, Florida, 20; Montero, Arizona, 20; Pence, Houston, 20; JosReyes, New York, 20; CYoung, Arizona, 20. TRIPLES—JosReyes, New York, 12; Victorino, Philadelphia, 7; Rasmus, St. Louis, 6; Bourn, Houston, 5; SCastro, Chicago, 5; Fowler, Colorado, 5; Bonifacio, Florida, 4; SDrew, Arizona, 4; Espinosa, Washington, 4; SSmith, Colorado, 4. HOME RUNS—Fielder, Milwaukee, 20; Kemp, Los Angeles, 20; Berkman, St. Louis, 17; Bruce, Cincinnati, 17; Pujols, St. Louis, 17; Stanton, Florida, 16; Braun, Milwaukee, 15; Howard, Philadelphia, 15. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 30; JosReyes, New York, 26; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 21; Desmond, Washington, 20;

COLLEGE WORLD SERIES

North Carolina ousts Texas The Associated Press OMAHA, Neb. — The games keep getting bigger for North Carolina, and Kent Emanuel keeps getting better. The freshman left-hander pitched the first complete-game shutout at the College World Series in five years in a 3-0 victory that eliminated Texas on Monday. Emanuel limited the Longhorns to four singles in his third win of the NCAA tournament and first career shutout. The 19-year-old Emanuel showed plenty of maturity in methodically and coolly keeping the Longhorns off balance with changeups and curves when they were sitting on fastballs. “Other than his left arm, that’s his best trait, his demeanor,” Carolina coach Mike Fox said. “You don’t see a lot of emotion out of him. That’s what you want when

you’re on the mound, especially on this stage.” North Carolina’s offense, which couldn’t get timely hits in an opening loss to Vanderbilt, produced enough to support Emanuel. Jacob Stallings hit a two-run single in the third inning and Ben Bunting finished a four-hit day with an RBI double in the ninth for the Tar Heels (51-15), who play Vanderbilt or Florida on Wednesday. Texas (49-19) went two games and out for the second time in 25 CWS appearances since 1966 and for the fourth time in its record 34 trips to Omaha. The last time was in 2000. “We didn’t come here to be the first team to leave,” Texas shortstop Brandon Loy said. “You’re never going to be satisfied, I don’t think, unless you come out of here with a national champi-

onship. We did some amazing things with this team. It’s tough to leave now.” Emanuel (9-1) walked one and struck out five. North Carolina’s Robert Woodard pitched the last shutout here, blanking Clemson in 2006. The last freshman to do it was LSU’s Brett Laxton in 1993 against Wichita State. “It was a brilliantly pitched game by their pitcher,” Texas coach Augie Garrido said. “He was terrific. He got three pitches over. He used them in different count spots where he would lead guys off of changeups. He’d lead guys off with breaking balls. He’d lead guys off with fastballs and he had command throughout the game from beginning to end.” The Longhorns’ offense struggled in their two CWS games, going three-up, three-down in 11 of 18 innings against Florida and

North Carolina. They twice ran themselves out of innings Monday, with Jonathan Walsh getting doubled off in the second and Mark Payton in the fourth. Also on Monday: Vanderbilt vs. Florida suspended OMAHA, Neb. — Heavy rain following high winds forced the suspension of the Florida-Vanderbilt game at the College World Series until today at 8:06 a.m. Florida leads 3-1 with two outs in the bottom of the sixth inning. Civil defense sirens sounded in the area, but no tornado warning was issued. Fans at TD Ameritrade Park began filing out, but play continued for a couple more pitches before umpires waved players off the field. Fans took refuge in the stadium concourse until the NCAA announced the suspension 2½ hours after play was stopped.

Eric Francis / The Associated Press

North Carolina catcher Jacob Stallings, right, and pitcher Kent Emanuel celebrate their 3-0 win against Texas in an NCAA College World Series baseball game in Omaha, Neb., Monday.


D4 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NFL

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Key owners’ meeting begins today in Chicago By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

CHICAGO — One day of owners’ meetings could turn into two. Whether that’s a sign of progress toward the end of the lockout and labor peace is debatable. NFL owners will gather today, and perhaps into Wednesday, to discuss the status of negotiations with the players for a new collective bargaining agreement. This is the first meeting called by the league strictly for labor matters, and the 32 team owners and representatives who will be on hand were advised last week to prepare to stay an extra day. That’s how complex — and perhaps contentious — some of the issues are. In the past three weeks, groups led by NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith have made enough progress toward a CBA that it sparked optimism training camps could open on time late next month. But no one is saying a deal is imminent, and several owners are known to have strong questions about proposals being discussed with the players. Each side is eager to get something done before the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis rules on the league’s request to permanently block an injunction that originally lifted the lockout. That injunction had been on hold while the three-man appeals panel considers the case, but one of the judges warned the owners and players they both wouldn’t like the decision. Fearful of a ruling in which both sides lose — for example,

the lockout could be allowed to continue, but only until it reaches six months, which would be four days after the regular season opens — Goodell, lead negotiator Jeff Pash and a handful of owners have met with Smith and a group of players over the past three weeks. Out of those talks has come word of movement and an atmosphere of cooperation, a far cry from the rhetoric and court actions of the previous months. Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay has said a deal needs to be in place by July 4 in order to have a normal training camp and preseason. The Minnesota Vikings announced they could wait until July 18 to determine if they will hold any of their training camp in Mankato, as they usually do, but that certainly is cutting things close. No talks with the players are scheduled until after the Chicago owners’ meeting. Instead, the owners will be briefed on recent negotiations, including such topics as prospective salary caps; a rookie wage scale; free agency requirements; health benefits; and, most significantly, how much revenue from the $9.3 billion business they are willing to share with the players. Of chief concern on the owners’ side could be keeping a united front if some teams, particularly the lower-revenue or small-market franchises, are not satisfied with the numbers presented in Chicago. The first preseason game, at the Pro Football Hall of Fame, is scheduled for Aug. 7. That makes these meetings, over 24 hours or more, critical in the NFL’s first work stoppage since 1987.

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Tiger Woods, left, watches his tee shot along with Rory McIlroy at the Chevron World Challenge golf tournament in December 2010, in Thousand Oaks, Calif. The manner in which McIlroy won the U.S. Open made comparisons with Woods inevitable.

Rivalry with McIlroy begins with Woods on the couch By Bill Pennington

NFL Hall of Famers speak out against poor benefits Y

New York Times News Service

The Associated Press WASHINGTON — His body battered and bruised by a Hall of Fame career in the NFL, Joe DeLamielleure limped to the podium to state his case. “We’ve earned the right to have a livable pension,” the former guard with the Bills and Browns said after detailing his lengthy resume of surgeries. “The NFL is the most lucrative sport on the planet and they can’t take care of 2,000 guys? That’s wrong.” DeLamielleure was one of a collection of NFL Hall of Famers and current players who held a press conference Monday backing a class-action lawsuit against the NFL, demanding better benefits for former players. Carl Eller, one of the plaintiffs, says the league has not done what is “fair and right” in supporting the financial and medical concerns of former players. He was joined at the National Press Club by Hall of Famers Lem Barney, Elvin Bethea and Paul Krause, among others, each of whom detailed the struggles they have had in their post-NFL lives trying to receive benefits from the league. “These are real people, real players and real pain,” Eller said. “Football is a game; life is not. We are suffering from the game.” The former players said they wanted their concerns to be heard and considered in lockout negotiations between the players and NFL owners. And while many of the former play-

ers expressed disdain with the players union, the lawyer representing Eller’s suit expressed confidence that the issue of retired player benefits would be addressed in any deal. “We are absolutely confident that a resolution can be reached that would do, as the league has said, what is fair and right on behalf of the retirees,” attorney Michael Hausfeld said. “Today is the time, before the owners meet and before this hopefully moves to conclusion, that these interests can be heard and these needs can be resolved.” While the event was an opportunity for former players to detail their concerns, about a dozen current or recently retired players attended to show their support for the cause, earning warm greetings from their counterparts. “These are courageous men and I came here for them,” Ravens linebacker Brendon Ayanbadejo said. “I came here for the current players because this is far from the glitz and glamour of the NFL. If you’re talking to a 24-year-old young man, he’s not thinking about these types of issues, so we have to bring these issues to the public, so everybody is aware of exactly what’s going on. We need to support these men and do what’s right. These men earned it.” Several players referenced Bears safety Dave Duerson, who committed suicide amid mounting financial and personal issues, and potential effects from concussions.

Continued from D1 You opted this year not to not race in Europe leading into the Tour de France. What was it like? I’m using the same philosophy that’s always worked for me. When I come from the States where I have my home, where I have my family and my food and I have the kind of weather I’m used to, I always ride good. But when I come to Europe and they throw me over there to the Tour de Suisse and I’m sitting in Lugano (Italy) a week before the race, it could be cold out. I’m in the hotel for a week by myself and I’m eating hotel food and I’m not eating the food that’s at my house. Maybe it’s bad weather still when the race starts; you can’t control that. So you can really can’t control your training. You can’t control how the race is going to affect your training. You can’t control your eating. You can’t control your mindset because maybe you’re depressed because you’ve been away from your family for six weeks. Then with the Tour de France, you’ll be way from your family for 10 weeks.” So are you feeling prepared despite not having raced? It’s nice to have a day or two of racing to get under your legs, but I can get that at the Tour de France in the first couple of stages, too, and before you get to the mountains. So I don’t have any worries. But the other advantage to skipping the Tour de Suisse for me is that there’s no chance of crashing before you go to the Tour de France. It’s huge. And lastly, you’re fresher for the end of the season stuff, too. Early in your career after you came back from Europe you dominated the domestic season and didn’t have the grind of European racing like in two grand tours in a season or a lot of the Classic one-day events. Is that part of the reason you’re still racing at nearly age 40? Certainly, it’s a good theory. I don’t know if you’re correct or if you’re wrong, either. But no one has the answers to that. Everyone’s body is different and everyone trains in a different way. There is not one good answer why I am still riding good at age 40. There are multiple answers. But why am I still riding at 40? The No. 1 reason is I want to be. You said at the Tour of California that your team is so strong for the Tour de France, you won’t know who the team leader is until you get the mountains. Do you still think that? We might never find out. We might go all the way to the last time trial (July 23 in Grenoble) and it is what it is. But the biggest problem we are going to have is that when we get on one of the major climbs, and let’s just say there are all four of us in a group of 10. If there are four in a group of 10, you have to cover every attack that’s made. If you miss an attack, then guess who they’re going to call on to pull it back. That’s going to be me, and then your chances are less to win. Looking at the Tour de France and hearing recently that (three-time winner) Alberto Contador will be back, can anyone beat him? At this point, absolutely not. It takes him making a mistake. At the Tour of California, I said Alberto is the only guy I can’t climb with. And he’s the only one that from January first to December 31st … nobody can.

BETHESDA, Md. — ou had to wonder what he was thinking, watching on television with his balky left leg propped on a hassock. There on the screen, in highlights viewed nonstop around the world, his kingdom was being overrun. His once mighty empire, already wounded and weakened, was beginning to seem antiquated and outmoded — so last decade, so last century. As Rory McIlroy made it look easy at the 111th U.S. Open, even easier than Tiger Woods once did, what was Woods thinking? For nearly 18 months, golf has been transfixed by Tiger’s comeback, Tiger’s health, Tiger’s lifestyle and Tiger’s swing changes. Today, as McIlroy storms the gates of golf’s hierarchy — part wunderkind, part new age pioneer — Woods finds himself mentioned only in postscript. If his name comes up, it is generally in relation to one of his revered records being obliterated. Last weekend he was talked about in entirely different contexts: to note that McIlroy was almost the same age as Woods was when he won his first major, or to document that McIlroy hits it farther than Woods ever did, or more accurately than Woods did, or that he plays with more joie de vivre. Happy Father’s Day, Tiger. As Woods watched this weekend, did he realize that McIlroy was not yet 8 in April 1997 when Woods won that seminal Masters championship? He must know that not long ago McIlroy, speaking with respect but his usual candor, said of Woods: “When Tiger had that aura, I wasn’t playing against him — I was watching on TV. I’m not sure we are going to see him domi-

nate again the way he did.” McIlroy later added, “He’s playing like an ordinary golfer.” Watching McIlroy and Woods interact at times in the past year, it is obvious the now 22-year-old McIlroy feels little of the awe so common to Woods’ contemporaries of the last 10 to 12 years. The day before last year’s U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, there was a scene on the practice putting green when Woods was putting alone in a distant section. His fellow competitors, about 15 of them, gave him a wide berth, leaving him isolated in one corner of the large putting surface. It was as if the imperious Woods was separated by an invisible force field. Until, that is, a grinning McIlroy, looking small and wide-eyed but far from intimidated, dared to approach Woods’ cloister. He called his name, then slapped Woods on the back as the two made small talk. Woods broke his practice trance and was soon even giggling, charmed, it seemed, by McIlroy, who soon retreated. As McIlroy rejoined the bigger group, Woods looked around, as if mystified by what had just happened, then turned his back on the other golfers to resume his solitary putting rehearsal. But did he, somewhere in the back of his mind, register McIlroy’s cheekiness? McIlroy at the time seemed like a young pup heedlessly willing to go wrestle with the big dog of the yard for a minute or two. But did Woods notice? If he did not then, he does now. If golf is lucky, as Woods watched on television this weekend, he was seeing and thinking about his first true rival as a professional. Woods has never had a rival of the traditional sort. For him, there has been nothing like

the extended Nicklaus-Palmer duels or the Watson charge at the established Nicklaus. And in this case, it is a rival not just on the golf course but off it. It is interesting to note how McIlroy has handled his introduction to worldwide fame. He has conducted interviews before his rounds — times that you would think he would be tense — that are more relaxed, gracious and forthcoming than interviews Woods has done after his rounds, which should be times of reduced stress. McIlroy chats with fans across the restraining ropes during his rounds. He is not yet in Lee Trevino’s class, but he is smiling and approachable. If Woods can get healthy — a big if — the Rory-Tiger rivalry that will most likely ensue will see McIlroy as the more popular figure. He will be a favorite of younger golf fans and non-American golf fans, and he will most likely win over the considerable number of golf fans who found Woods’ personal transgressions repugnant. Then again, McIlroy will be the new thing: younger, more powerful, more hale and hearty. In time, Woods, as hard as it might have seemed even a year ago, could be the sympathetic figure. He will be aging in professional golf years, he will be the elder trying to tie a victorious, somewhat honorable ribbon on his golf legacy, and he will perhaps be hobbled as he struggles to do it. He might literally be always playing behind McIlroy, trying to catch him. There he is, Woods the underdog. At home this weekend, as he fidgeted on his couch, perhaps readjusting the ice pack on his left knee and Achilles tendon, were those the thoughts crossing the mind of Tiger Woods? The real question: How could they not be?

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Effort seems there in NBA negotiations, but is time? By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

NEW YORK — The effort seems there in the NBA labor talks. Time might not be. Owners and players are scheduled to meet again Tuesday, a session that Commissioner David Stern indicated would be critical in gauging whether a new collective bargaining agreement can be reached before the current deal expires on June 30. This will be at least the sixth meeting this month. After Friday’s 4½-hour session, both parties left believing the

commitment to getting a deal done was there, yet unsure if there would be enough time to avoid a lockout. “There’s a very clear sense of urgency, but we’re not sure between now and July 1 if we can make up the gulf that exists between the two sides,” players association president Derek Fisher of the Los Angeles Lakers said Friday. Although the league agreed last week to leave contract guarantees as is, major disagreements remain. Players argue that the current system doesn’t need an overhaul. Owners disagree and seek a hard salary cap system

BASKETBALL and a reduction of contract lengths, all part of their desire to slash player costs by about one-third, about $750 million of the approximately $2.1 billion spent on player salaries and benefits last season. Owners also seek to change the split of revenues, of which players currently are guaranteed 57 percent. Players have offered to discuss a reduction in that percentage, but their figure was not acceptable to the league. “We’re very far apart still on some big

items as well as some small items, but not afraid of the July 1 deadline in terms of giving up on this process,” Fisher said. “We’re still committed to trying to get something done between now and July 1.” Union executive Maurice Evans of Washington, however, was frustrated by the owners’ stance, saying they’re still pushing for items that were in an original proposal that players already believed was off the table. “There’s still major changes to the system as we know it, and according to them, there is no system,” Evans said.

“So we’re starting from scratch, and that’s kind of hard to do in two weeks.” Today, Stern expects a counterproposal relating to the economic issues of the league. Though both he and Fisher have said things can happen quickly once there’s a breakthrough, it’s unlikely a deal will be reached this week, let alone today. Yet both sides might be reluctant to call off the talks entirely, especially since that would overshadow Thursday night’s draft. The best news then might be if they end the meeting by deciding to have another.


C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 D5

C  S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

AUTOS AUTOCROSS CLUB OF CENTRAL OREGON MONTHLY MEETING: Wednesday; 6 p.m. social, 6:30 p.m. meeting; Pappy’s Pizzeria, Bend; all welcome; www.autoxclub.org. OPEN TRACK DAY: Thursday; Oregon Raceway Park, Grass Valley; pre-event safety inspection and classroom training session at 4 p.m. on Tuesday at Pappy’s Pizzeria in Bend; www.autoxclub.org. AUTOCROSS COMPETITION EVENTS NO. 3 AND NO. 4: Saturday and Sunday; Hoodoo Mountain Resort; registration begins at 7:45 a.m.; $15 students, $25 ACCO members, $30 nonmembers per event; www.autoxclub.org.

BASEBALL

$94 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $127 otherwise.

BIKING MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; 541923-5650; www.trinitybikes.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Includes options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, after-school programs, camps, races and shuttles; age 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling, freeride mountain biking and cyclocross; info@bendenduranceacdemy.org; www.bendenduranceacdemy.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION CYCLING PROGRAM: Now available; mountain bike sessions and junior race team road sessions with racing opportunities; through August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. WEEKLY RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675.

BEND ELKS ADVANCED CAMP: For advanced players ages 10-13; June 24-26, June 30-July 2, July 5-6 and July 10-11; 9 a.m.-noon each session; work in fielding, hitting and simulated games; $25 per session or $195 for all 10; includes Bend Fieldhouse summer pass, practice shirt, cap and Elks tickets; 541312-9259; jr@bendelks.com. BEND ELKS CAMPS: For boys and girls ages 7-14; with coaching from Elks players and coaches; Monday, July 11-Thursday, July 14; 8:30a.m.-12:30 p.m. all days; at Vince Genna Stadium in southeast Bend; bring baseball glove each day; $80 for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $108 otherwise; www. bendparksandrec.org; 541-389-7275. SUMMER YOUTH BASEBALL/ SOFTBALL: Through Bend Park & Recreation District; through August 4; for boys and girls ages 6-12; $52 in district, $70 otherwise; 541-3897275; www.bendparksandrec.org. COUGAR SUMMER BASEBALL CAMP: today-Thursday; 9 a.m.noon, Mountain View High School; for boys entering grades four through eight; includes instruction in hitting, base running, pitching and fielding; $60; 541-420-6266; kory.bright@gmail.com.

HIKING

BASKETBALL

MISCELLANEOUS

COBO LITTLE DRIBBLERS FUNDAMENTAL BASKETBALL CAMPS: For children in grades two through five; two session options: Monday, June 27-Thursday, June 30, at Mountain View High School and Tuesday, July 12-Friday, July 15, at Cascade Middle School; 9 a.m.noon both sessions; $75 per camp for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $101 otherwise; 541-3897275; www.bendparksandrec.org. MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL CAMPS: For children in grades five through nine; two session options: Monday, June 27-Thursday, June 30, at Mountain View High School from 10 a.m.-1 p.m., and Tuesday, July 12-Friday, July 15, at Cascade Middle School from 1-4 p.m.; $75 per camp for Bend Park & Recreation District residents, $101 otherwise; 541-3897275; www.bendparksandrec.org. HOT SHOT BASKETBALL CAMPS: Monday, July 11-Thursday, July 14; clinics, day camps and evening elite sessions for players in kindergarten through 12th grade (2011-12 school year); Summit High School, Bend; $115-$235; scholarships available; 208-720-7904; www.hsbcamps.com. COBO ADVANCED MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALL CAMP: For children in grades four through nine; Monday, Aug. 15-Thursday, Aug. 18; at Mountain View High School; 9 a.m.-noon for grades 4-6 and 1-4 p.m. for grades seven through nine;

BOCCE BALL LEAGUE: Wednesdays at Maverick’s Country Bar and Grill, 20565 Brinson Blvd., Bend; 6:30 p.m.; two-player teams; can join any week; no registration necessary; free; 541-382-4270. ARCHERY: Age 8-19; includes proper safety, bow handling and archery etiquette; Thursdays, July 7-28; 5:30-7 p.m.; equipment provided if necessary; at CentWise, 533 S.W. 5th St., Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. TUMBLING/BEGINNING GYMNASTICS: Ages 6-10; Mondays and Wednesdays, June 13-July 11; 6:45-7:30 p.m.; basic exercises such as rolls, cartwheels, handstands and low balance beam; $35; RAPRD Activity Center; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. PARENT AND ME TUMBLING: Ages 2-4; Thursdays, June 16-July 7; introduction to fundamental tumbling skills with parental assistance; 11-11:30 a.m.; $22; at the RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. FUN & FIT FRIENDS: For girls ages 11-14; Tuesdays through Fridays, noon-4 p.m.; three sessions: todayJuly 1, July 12-22, August 2-12; each day starts with brown bag lunch and discussion of how to make good nutritional choices; afternoon activities including swimming, Zumba, Nia, yoga and more; $50 for district residents, $68 otherwise; www. bendparksandrec.org; 541-389-7665.

DAY HIKE FOR FAMILIES: Wednesday; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; at Sparks Lake; take a backpack, water, lunch and sunscreen; parent/chaperone required for children; $20 per family; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. SILVER STRIDERS GUIDED HIKES: With a trained naturalist; two to three hikes per week through October; hikes take place in state parks and national forests in Central and Eastern Oregon; $20; geared toward hikers age 50 and older of varying abilities; 541383-8077; strikeon@silverstriders. com; www.silverstriders.com.

BEND ROCK GYM: Ages 9-16; equipment provided at the gym; Tuesday, June 28; 1:15-4:15 p.m.; waiver signed by guardian required; transportation from RAPRD Activity Center provided; $22; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. FRISBEE DISC GOLF: Ages 9-14; Friday, July 8; 10-a.m.-noon; game at challenge course at High Desert Sports Complex in Redmond; $7; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. GUYS GET FIT: For middle school boys, ages 11-14; Tuesdays through Fridays, noon-4 p.m.; two sessions: July 12-15, July 26-29; each day starts with a brown bag lunch and discussion of how to make good nutritional choices; afternoon activities include weight training, sports conditioning, core training and outdoor boot camp; $25 for district residents; $34 otherwise; www. bendparksandrec.org; 541-389-7665. JAVELIN CLINIC: With Scott Halley, former NAIA national champion at Concordia; Saturday, July 23; 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Redmond High School; includes drills, video analysis and discussion of coaching theory; $25 for coaches, $50 for throwers; www.coachhalley.com. LULULEMON BOOT CAMP: Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; focuses on sport-specific drills, cardiovascular training and core strength exercises; for all ability levels; free; bring water bottle and sweat towel; Megan Hill; 541-4805039 or Salt Fit on Facebook. SUMMER FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes newcomers and former fencers; new hours for fitness and competitive training; Mondays, 4-7 p.m. and Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays, 5:30-7 p.m.; Randall, 541-389-4547; Jeff at 541-419-7087. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com. PROJECT HEALING WATERS: Flyfishing and fly-tying program for disabled active military service personnel and veterans; meetings held the second Wednesday of each month; 6 p.m.; Orvis Company Store; 320 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; outings begin in the spring; Brad at 541-536-5799; bdemery1@aol.com. ADULT OPEN PLAY ROLLER HOCKEY: Sundays, 6:30-8 p.m.; $5; Cascade Indoor Sports, Bend; www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183. ACROVISION TAEKWONDO: For those age 6 and up; Tuesdays and Thursdays, July 5-28; 7-8 p.m. at the RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m.; Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Sundays, 1-4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play every Monday; 6-9 p.m. (setup a half hour before); beginner classes available, cost is $60; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; dropin fee, $5 for adults, $3 for youths and seniors; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267614-6477; bendtabletennis@yahoo. com; www.bendtabletennis.com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nine-ball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eightball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@gmail.com or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-6471363; www.foxsbilliards.com.

PRACTICE WITH LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY TEAM: 3-5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center, corner of Empire Avenue and High Desert Lane, Bend; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com, 541-306-7364. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY PRACTICES: For men and women of all skill levels; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 7 p.m., Sundays; first practice is free, $7 thereafter; skates available for beginners; nicholecp@hotmail.com or 415-3360142.; www.renegadesor.com. URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River in Bend through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-9622862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

MULTISPORT PACIFIC CREST: Friday-Sunday; Sunriver; races include long-course triathlon, endurance duathlon, Olympic triathlon and duathlon; sprint triathlon and duathlon; marathon, half-marathon, 5K and 10K runs/ walks, Kids Splash Pedal-n-Dash triathlon and kids dash; $12-$195; www.racecenter.com/pacificcrest. MERRELL OYSTER OFF ROAD ADVENTURE RACE: Saturday; Bend; teams of two to four individuals; full race, 8 a.m.; half race 10 a.m.; includes running and mountain biking; age 12 and older; $60-$70 per person; oysterracingseries.com/Bend.php. REBOUND MINI DUATHLON SERIES: Saturday, July 2, Deschutes Dash simulated bike course and 5K run outside; Rebound Sports Performance & Pilates, 143 S.W. Century Drive; $15 adults, $10 juniors; heats of eight riders at 7 a.m., 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. time slots; www.ReboundSPL.com. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY MULTISPORT PROGRAM: For ages 12-16; through Aug. 13: swim (Tuesdays), bike (Wednesdays) and run (Thursdays) practice sessions, 34:30 p.m.; two-day ($200) and threeday ($300) enrollments available; Joanne Stevens; 541-848-3691; www.bendenduranceacademy.org.

PADDLING KAYAKING: For all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Sundays, 4-6 p.m., Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org.

RUNNING TODD EVANS BEAMER INDEPENDENCE DAY RUN: Monday, July 4; Sahalee Park, Madras: $5 or $20 with stainless steel drink container or hat; registration begins at 6:15 a.m.; 6-mile walk, 7 a.m.; 10K run, 8 a.m.; 2-mile fun run; 9 a.m.; breakfast afterward; proceeds go toward memorial scholarship fund; Amber Searcy; 541-279-7100. FOURTH OF JULY FUN RUN: Monday, July 4; Sunriver; 5-mile run and 3-mile run/walk; 9 a.m.; $15 walkers, $20 runners ($30 day of race); 541-593-4603; www. sunriver-resort.com/recreation. SPARK YOUR HEART: Monday, July 4; 5K run/walk and Kids’ Firecracker Dash; 8 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; www.stcharleshealthcare. org/spark-your-heart.html. REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB (RORK): Weekly run/walk; Saturdays at 8 a.m.; all levels welcome; free; for more information and to be added to a weekly e-mail list, e-mail Dan Edwards at rundanorun@gmail. com; follow Redmond Oregon Running Klub on Facebook.

FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Mondays at 5:30 p.m.; 3-7 miles; all paces welcome; free; no registration necessary; Jenny; 541-317-3568; melanie@ footzonebend.com. GOOD FORM RUNNING CLINIC: Tuesdays at 7 p.m. and Saturdays at 8 a.m. (check website for available dates); learn the basics of good running form and what it can do to improve efficiency, reduce injury and make you faster; at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; RSVP; free; 541-317-3568; sign up at www. footzonebend.com./events/clinics. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays; locations vary; pace and hill workouts designed to benefit runners of all levels; local running standout Max King leads workout; max@footzonebend.com. ASK THE EXPERTS: Tuesdays; 6 p.m.; at FootZone; physical and massage therapists offer free informal Q&A sessions to assist with injury prevention and recovery; shawn@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. NOON TACO RUN: Wednesdays at noon; meet at FootZone; place an order for a taco or burrito from Taco Stand (optional), go for a 6-10mile run and have lunch when you return; cost of lunch only; teague@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. LEARN TO RUN ALUMNI RUNNING GROUP: Wednesdays, 5:30 p.m.; meet at FootZone; easy, supportive and informal midweek running group; caters to slower paces and walk/runners; free; shawn@ footzonebend.com; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; 3 to 5 miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601. YOGA FOR RUNNERS: Wednesdays at 7 p.m.; at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; $5 per session or $50 for 12 sessions; focuses on strengthening and lengthening muscles and preventing running injuries; 541-389-1601. FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; personal trainer Kyle Will will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injuries; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park in Bend; runs of various lengths; free; runsmts@gmail.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing. Scuba certification available for adults and kids age 12 and older; refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners, 541-312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SNOW SPORTS BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY SUMMER NORDIC TRAINING PROGRAM: For skiers ages 14-23; through Aug. 15; program runs Tuesdays through Saturdays; strength and agility, skate and classic roller skiing, late-season snow skiing, hiking and running; Ben Husaby; 541-678-3864; ben@ bendenduranceacademy.org; www. bendenduranceacademy.org. MBSEF ALPINE SKIING SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Through August for skiers ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF FREERIDE SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Through August for skiers ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF NORDIC SKIING SUMMER DRYLAND TRAINING: Through August

for skiers ages 11-18; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF SUMMER ALPINE CAMPS AT MOUNT HOOD: Camps for juniors ages 9-13 and juniors ages 13-19 Monday, June 27-Friday, July 1; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

SOCCER OREGON RUSH: Friday, July 1 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, July 2 at 1 p.m.; both games vs. Portland Rain U23; Summit High School; WPSL (women’s pro-am league); $5 adults, $3 youths; $20 individual season ticket; $30 family season pass; free for Oregon Rush players wearing jersey; www.oregonrush.com. MEN’S SOCCER LEAGUE: Competitive outdoor league; season lasts until early October; Joe Oberto; 541-3229686; joberto@bendcable.com. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Age 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $7; Friday nights; coed 78:30 p.m., men 8:30-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com.

SWIMMING PRE-COMP KIDS: Grades 1-8; advanced swim-lesson program that serves as a feeder for Cascade Aquatic Club; children must be able to swim one length of crawl stroke with side breathing and one length of backstroke in a level position; meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, June 28-July 21, 5:30-6:15 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. YOUTH SWIM LESSONS: For ages 12-17; learning to swim and improving fitness; Tuesdays and Thursdays, July 5-28; 5:30-6 p.m. at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $30.00; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. SUMMER SWIM LESSONS: Classes available for children six months of age and older, as well as adults; at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend; multiple times and levels available; register at www.juniperswimandfitness. com or in person at 800 N.E. 6th St.; 541-389-7665. CHILDREN’S SWIM LESSONS: Ages 3-11; July 4-15; multiple times available; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. WATERBABIES: Basic water skills for infants and toddlers; ages 6 months through 3 years; games and challenges; parent participation; July 415; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $32; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only (student ID required); Saturday; 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $2.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:25 to 8:25 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone under age 18; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; RAPRD, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

TENNIS YOUTH TENNIS CLINICS: Ages 4-17; for beginners through experienced players; Mondays through Thursdays, June 27-July 7; Sam Johnson Park; 541-548-7275; see www.raprd.org for age group times and costs. BROKEN TOP CLUB SUMMER TENNIS FESTIVAL: Saturday, July 2; noon-4 p.m.; clinics at noon, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.; cardio tennis classes at 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m.; QuickStart tennis for juniors 10 and younger; fast serve contest, ball machine and prizes; free; public welcome; 62000 Broken Top Drive, Bend; 541-312-4758; bob.harrington@hotmail.com.

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD

I B

HORSESHOES

Baseball • Shock win Idaho tournament: Competing as the No. 4 seed in the 13 and under division, the Bend-based Central Oregon Shock won the 10th annual Dairy Days tournament on Saturday. The tournament was staged Thursday through Saturday in Meridian, Idaho. The Shock played in two qualifying games Friday to determine their seed. On Saturday, they defeated the Idaho Crush 7-4 before knocking off the top-seeded Boise Rampage 9-4 in the semifinals. In the finals, the Shock beat the thirdseeded Boise Titans 5-2 to win the championship. The members of the Shock are Brian Blasquez, T.J. Cecil, Nolan Juhl, Cameron Himes, Chris Mason, Nick Mason, Chase Ricker, Matt Solley, Elliot Willy and Dominick Zombik.

Football • Spots still available in youth league: Late registration is still available in the Bend Park & Recreation District’s upcoming fall youth football league. Registration is available online at bendparksandrec.org or in person

at the park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St. Some grades, teams or schools may be full. Registration will be accepted for remaining spots until they are also filled. The league is open to youths who will attend grades four through six during the 2011-12 school year. The league starts Aug. 15 and concludes Oct. 23. Teams will be formed in Bend, Prineville, Sisters and Jefferson County. Cost is $90 for park district residents, $110 otherwise. All protective equipment except for shoes will be provided (helmet, shoulder pads, pants and mouth guard). Weight limits for ball carriers will be applied. For more information, contact the park district office at 541-3897275.

Miscellaneous • Bend facility gets upgrade: Nearly 15,000 square feet of artificial turf has recently been installed at Cascade Indoor Sports in northeast Bend. The Agility 69 turf is a synthetic grass designed for indoor recreation, according to a Cascade Indoor Sports press release. The turf’s foam backing should create a softer playing surface for

the facility’s participants in indoor soccer, lacrosse, flag football and other activities. Along with the new field, Cascade Indoor Sports has installed a warm-up area that players can use to prepare for games.

Running • Memorial run slated: A scholarship fundraiser for Madras students, the annual Todd Evans Beamer Independence Day Run, is scheduled to be held July 4. The annual event includes a 10kilometer run a 6-mile walk and a 2-mile fun run. Registration begins at 6 a.m. at Sahalee Park, located on C Street in Madras. The walk starts at 7 a.m. A bus will transport 10K runners to the start of their event at 7:30 a.m., and their race will begin 30 minutes later. The fun run begins at 9 a.m. Registration is $5. A stainless steel drink container or a hat can be purchased for an additional fee. Proceeds from the event will go to a memorial scholarship in honor of Beamer, a former Madras student-athlete who died in 1997. This year’s scholarship recipients are recent Madras High School graduates JoElla Smith and Rachel Simmons.

For more information, contact Amber Searcy at 541-279-7100.

Tennis • Festival on tap: A tennis event open to the public is scheduled to be held in Bend next week. The Broken Top Summer Tennis Festival will be staged at the Broken Top Club tennis facility from noon to 4 p.m. on July 2. The festival will include clinics at noon, 1 and 3 p.m., “cardioâ€? tennis classes at 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 p.m., and QuickStart tennis, a program designed specifically for youngsters, for juniors age 10 and younger. A fast-serve contest using a speed radar gun will also be conducted. The festival is free and open to the public. For more information, contact Broken Top tennis director Bob Harrington at bob.harrington@ hotmail.com. — Bulletin staff reports

Juniper Open 1 June 18, Bend, 32 pitchers Class A: 1, Barry Chapelle. 2, Gary Kollmann. Class B: 1, Al Holland. 2, Jim Postell. 3, Jim Peterson. Class C: 1, Robert Peebles. 2, John Bucey. Class D : 1, John Trahan. 2, Jim Wear. Class E: 1, Jim Howard. 2, Loretta Trahan. June 19, Bend, 26 pitchers Class A: 1, Barry Chapelle. 2, Gary Kollmann. Class B: 1, Bob Bender. 2, Jim Campbell. Class C: 1, John Bucey. 2, Robert Peebles. 3, Jim Wear. Class D: 1, Alan Reeder. 2, Larry Flanary. 3, Jim Howard.

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C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D6 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Tennis gear guide: Rackets and shoes

Tyler Roemer / The Bulletin

Justin Milnes, a tennis coach at the Athletic Club of Bend, teaches Bulletin reporter Amanda Miles basic stroke technique earlier this month.

Tennis Continued from D1 For example, Milnes said he is charging $40 for adult beginners clinics, which comprise four 90-minute lessons, while junior classes at Broken Top Club in Bend cost $10 for members and $12 for nonmembers. And youth tennis clinics through the Redmond Area Park and Recreation District cost $45 to $71.50, depending on residency status, and include up to eight 60- or 90minute sessions spread over two weeks. Youth programs are offered for kids as young as 4 years old. Aside from its relatively low cost, another appealing aspect of tennis is that it can be played year-round — even in these parts — thanks to indoor courts. All of the Athletic Club of Bend’s courts, for example, are indoors, as are some at Sunriver Resort, so you can keep playing through the colder months to your heart’s content. “During the winter, we’re slammed in here,” Milnes said. “That’s our busiest time of year.” That accessibility is a good thing if you get hooked on tennis, as once you gain some proficiency, you can continue attending clinics for more advanced players and even take part in competitions. Of course, if you’re just looking for a place to play, public courts — which are scattered throughout the region — are accessible at no cost. A number of public high schools in Central Oregon have courts, as do some parks such as Juniper Park in Bend and Sam Johnson Park in Redmond. Whichever options you choose

to pursue, you are taking up a sport you can enjoy for years to come. “It’s a lifelong sport,” Milnes said. “You can do it forever, and you can do it at all sorts of levels. You can work as hard as you want and get a killer cardio (vascular) workout in, or you can be 85 years old and come out and go at your own pace, and do it a little bit slower.”

My turn I have a couple of tennis memories from my childhood. One of them was a basic introduction to the sport in either intramurals or gym class in middle school. Another was my mom taking my siblings and me during the summer to the local high school, where we would whack tennis balls against a wall with a line painted at net level. Perhaps the most powerful memory that lingers still was my first and only session of tennis lessons at the local parks and recreation department. I was perhaps 10 years old. Though my recollections are somewhat hazy

now, I remember enjoying what I was learning. But when it came time for some testing by my instructor, I totally choked. I knew I could perform the skills he wanted — at least better than I did — but my nerves got in the way. I have not attempted to play tennis since my youth, though I do have an appreciation for the sport. I often watch the Grand Slam tournaments on television, admiring the skill, stamina and athleticism of the players. So despite my previous failure, I looked forward to my lesson at the Athletic Club of Bend, which boasts seven indoor tennis courts within its expansive facility. Of course, a prospective player can learn only so much in 30 minutes, but I gave it my best shot (ha!) under the tutelage of Justin Milnes, one of the club’s professionals. Milnes worked with me on developing proper forehand and backhand swings from start to follow-through. He started me out close to the net while I worked on getting down the proper movements. Then we moved back first

Obviously, it’s hard to play tennis without a racket, so if you decide to make tennis a hobby, you will need to purchase a racket at some point. Numerous options are on the market: Rackets can vary in terms of weight, the size of the racket head (in square inches) and the size of the “sweet spot” in the strings area, not to mention colors and prices. With so many options, Sabrina Fefferman, who co-owns The Racquet Shoppe in Bend, suggested trying out rackets to determine which one you like best. At The Racquet Shoppe, for example, for $25 per year, you can “demo” a few rackets for a few days at a time to put them to your personal test. Fefferman said players can feel variances between rackets when they try them, which can help them determine what they like. “You can tell,” Fefferman said. “Trust me, you take out four rackets and you go hit with them, you can tell what you like and what you don’t like, even if you are new.” As far as footwear goes, if you think you can hop onto the tennis court with your running shoes or cross trainers, think again. Investing in a pair of court shoes is a sound idea for both your body (especially the lower legs) and the court. “The biggest difference is the lateral support,” Fefferman said of the distinction between court shoes and running shoes. “That’s the key. And the bottom of the shoe is meant for a hard-court surface.” Court shoes, Fefferman said, have treads on the bottom designed for movement in various directions and heel cups designed to keep players on top of their shoes, whereas the tread on running shoes is designed for forward motion, so those shoes can “catch” on the court. — Amanda Miles

to the service line and finally to the baseline. And throughout the lesson, Milnes paused to offer suggestions on subjects such as my grip and how to put topspin on the ball. And I focused as much as I could on performing the strokes correctly, instead of concentrating on where I was hitting the ball. I’ll worry about that later. In all, it was a fast and fun 30 minutes that offered just a taste of tennis. I understand now why tennis players are so fit. Even with my relatively limited movement around the court, I was breathing a little bit heavily, and I happen to be in good shape right now. And I could understand how fun tennis could be with some instruction and practice. Who doesn’t get a charge out of striking a ball, whether it’s kicking a soccer ball, hitting a baseball with a bat or whaling on a tennis ball with a racket? It’s just fun. Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Clockwise from bottom left, men’s adidas Barricade court shoes, $120; Wilson Khamsin Five FX racket, $239; Babolat XS 109 racket, $139; Prince EXO3 Tour Lite 100 racket, $159; women’s K-Swiss Bigshot court shoes, $115.

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Tennis quick tips: The essentials 1. Mind your strings. Keeping your racket’s strings in good condition is a key element to your experience. If you have a racket you would like to use that is in good shape but has not been used for a while, it’s time to get it restrung. “Even a racket sitting in your house — it loses tension,” said Sabrina Fefferman, co-owner of The Racquet Shoppe in Bend. “It won’t hold the tension.” Restringing your racket at Fefferman’s shop costs $18 plus the cost of the strings, which range from $10 to $40. But it can play a prominent role in your enjoyment out on the court. “It’s not a very expensive thing,” Fefferman explained. “And really, if you don’t do it, you’re not really going to have a great experience because if the strings are dead, the ball’s not going to go anywhere and it’s not going to go where you want it to go. You’re not going to have control or power or feel.” You should get your racket restrung on a regular basis. The rule of thumb, Fefferman said, is that the number of times you play per week is also the number of times you should restring your racket in a year. So if you play four times per week, restring your racket four times over the course of the year (or if you break a string). 2. Get some advice from the pros. Fefferman’s business partner, Lisa Palcic, suggested that even if you do not spring for lessons, getting some tips from an instructor is always a good idea. “When you’re first learning, sometimes people — they just want to do it themselves,” Palcic said. “But if you do it yourself for too long, you start to pick up some bad habits, and then it’s really hard to break them.” Palcic said tennis is an easy sport to get into because of its accessibility — but, she added, it is very technical. An instructor, she noted, can offer suggestions on “certain little things that are really important that can completely change how quickly you improve and how you can feel good about the game a lot more quickly than just going out there and being frustrated.” — Amanda Miles

ONLY IN THE BULLETIN’S GO! MAGAZINE This summer your ticket to the season’s best concerts may be inside GO! Magazine. Look for it every Friday in The Bulletin.

WIN TICKETS FOR: WEEN ALISON KRAUSS & UNION STATION featuring JERRY DOUGLAS

PINK MARTINI Make sure you buy a copy of The Bulletin on June 10, 17 and 24 for your chance to win! Plus, look for GOLDEN TICKETS all summer long as we’re putting tickets to SIX other premium concert events inside GO! MAGAZINES. Don’t Miss It!! Golden Ticket for two concert tickets must be redeemed at the Ticket Mill in the Old Mill District. Original Golden Ticket must be presented. Golden Ticket is only good for the concert listed on the ticket. Golden Tickets can be found in home delivery and single copy newspapers (store copies only, no racks). Golden Tickets have no cash value.

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FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT Inside

Pet calendar Behavior classes, horse event, Page E3

COMMUNITY LIFE

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• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011

HORSE COUNTRY

Keep your horse calm when

thunder rolls Have a plan for your steed during severe weather in the High Desert By Linda Weiford For The Bulletin

W

henever thunderstorms roar across Central Oregon, Chicks Charming Billy, a championship cow-reining horse, goes into a tizzy by jumping and spinning in a series of frantic pirouettes. “Over and over, he’ll jump a good four feet off the ground and twirl,” said his owner, Sarah Resor of Silver Horse Ranch in Bend. “I’ve never seen anything like it.” The warm weather that finally arrived to the area means summer thunderstorms will eventually roll in. While many horses do just fine in Mother Nature’s chaos, others get distressed, according to the Equestrian Medical Safety Association in Santa Fe, N.M., and some — like Chicks Charming Billy — get plain excited. “He doesn’t appear panicked. It’s more like, ‘Gee, this is thrilling!’” said Resor, who boards 40 horses and owns 20 of her own. Even so, when severe thunderstorm

warnings are issued in Central Oregon, she makes sure the horses and riders at her ranch are as safe as possible. “I’ve seen storms here really pack a punch.” Loud noise aside, horses have good reason to get spooked by angry summer weather. Each year in the U.S., flying debris and lightning strikes kill numerous horses and other livestock during tornadoes and severe thunderstorms, according to news reports. Last summer in Jasper, Ga., four championship race horses were killed when lightning struck a drainage pipe near where they had gathered during a storm. Just last month, twisters killed three horses and injured at least a dozen on ranches in Oklahoma. In fact, in the horse world, weather-related threats are a big enough concern that the American Association of Equine Practitioners established an emergency fund to provide aid to horses “affected by recent storms and natural disasters,” according to its website. See Storms / E6

Photo courtesy David Johnson

Sarah Resor, of Silver Horse Ranch, rides her Quarter horse, Chicks Charming Billy, shortly after a small thunderstorm recently rolled over Bend. “... he’ll jump a good four feet off the ground and twirl” during storms, she said.

YOUR PETS

ADOPT ME

Babu is always on duty

Radar could be your new buddy

Say hello to Babu, a 6-year-old Hungarian puli who lives in Bend with Diane and Kermit Yenson. Babu is always on duty to alert when strangers approach, but loyal and loving once he gets to know people. He loves to collect brush and bramble on his “dreads” and bring it all inside with him. When he’s napping, it’s sometimes hard to tell which end is his head and which is his tail. Contact: 541-383-0358.

This is Radar, a young pit bull mix. He is easy-going and gets along well with everybody — dogs, cats, horses, kids. He has been at the shelter for several months now and would love a family to call his own. Radar needs an active and fun home where he can get lots of exercise every day. He would be a great hiking buddy, dog park buddy, or just a play-around-town-and-havea-good-time buddy. He just loves to run and play. If you’d like to meet Radar or any other animal available for adoption at the Humane Society of Redmond, visit 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave. Contact: 541-923-0882.

To submit a photo for publication, e-mail a high-resolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@bendbulletin.com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Submitted photo

Submitted photo

“It’s the speed, the smartness, the quickness — and you would not believe the roughness that she has inside. She’s like a little pit bull when she bites. She has that model face, and then opens the gums up and lets you have it.”

SPOTLIGHT

— John Johnson, of Minneapolis, says of his protection dog Julia

‘Protection dogs’ with a $230,000 price tag By John Tierney New York Times News Service

MINNEAPOLIS — Don’t call her a guard dog. When she costs $230,000, as Julia did, the preferred title is “executive protection dog.” This 3-year-old German shepherd, who commutes by private jet between a Minnesota estate and a home in Arizona, belongs to a canine caste that combines exalted pedigree, child-friendly cuddliness and arm-lacerating ferocity. Julia and her ilk have some of the same tracking and fighting skills as the dogs used in elite military units like Navy SEAL Team 6, which took a dog on its successful raid of Osama bin Laden’s compound in Pakistan in May. In fact, Julia was sold by a trainer, Harrison Prather, who used to supply dogs to SEAL Team 6 and the British special forces. But then Prather switched to a more lucrative market. “Either rich people discovered me, or I discovered them — I can’t remember which happened first,” said Prather, the president of Harrison K-9 Security Services in Aiken, S.C. See Protection / E6

Julia, a protection dog, works with a trainer as her owner’s assistant, Lori Aspelin, watches in Lakeville, Minn., June 11. A growing number of wealthy people around the world are coveting the security and status provided by a dog with the right credentials, the preferred title is “executive protection dog.” Allen Brisson-Smith New York Times News Service

Sisters to host barbecue contest Brews, View and Bar-B-Ques, Oregon’s first Kansas City BBQ Society-sanctioned barbecue contest, is predicted to bring competitors from across the nation to downtown Sisters on Saturday and Sunday. Darel Martin from Piggy D’s BBQ in Winthrop, Wash., and Scott Harper from Pit-n-Pits BBQ in Bonney Lake, Wash., will be among the nationally known chefs in attendance. Contests will be in the categories of brisket, chicken, pork and ribs. Hours are from noon to 8 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free, and the action takes place in a field at the corner of West Hood Avenue and Cottonwood Street. Contact: jeri@sisterscountry.com or 541-549-0251.

Astronomy Week at nature center Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory will celebrate Astronomy Week with a variety of programs and film June 22-25. The center will host a program on constellations at 8 p.m June 25. Contact: www.sunrivernaturecenter.org or 541-598-4406. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Wife should have some say Olbermann, new network in who sleeps with whom set sights on MSNBC Dear Abby: I couldn’t believe your response to “Stumped and Trumped in Ohio” (May 12). You made a point of saying to the father that his daughter and her boyfriend are in HIS house and they should abide by HIS rules and sleep in separate bedrooms. It’s his wife’s house, too, and she thought it was fine for them to share a room. Since when should the man’s opinion automatically trump the woman’s? Furthermore, what about hypocrisy? He admitted that he and his wife were indulging in “premarital mambo,” as he so quaintly puts it. In this day and age, you can assume his daughter and the boyfriend are as well, especially since they wanted to stay in the same room. So it was OK for him, but it’s offensive when they do it? Nonetheless, it is the parents’ house. If they had mutually agreed that the youngsters should sleep in separate rooms, so be it. This is something the husband and wife should have worked out together before “Julie” brought her boyfriend home for a visit. But in saying it’s the man’s house and everyone should abide by the man’s rules, you insulted women everywhere. — Burned Up in Springfield, N.J. Dear Burned Up: You’re right. I was clumsy. While I agree with you that the writer and his wife should have reached a mutual agreement before the daughter

DEAR ABBY

and her boyfriend arrived, they didn’t. Call me a stick-in-themud, but I don’t think an unmarried houseguest has a “right” to share a bedroom if EITHER parent is uncomfortable with it. And while the father may know his daughter is having sex, theoretically, I’m sure he isn’t the only parent who would prefer it was “out of sight, out of mind.” Readers were divided about this: Dear Abby: When my husband and I were dating, and even after he moved in with me before we married, whenever we visited his parents’ home, I always slept in the guest room. Why? Out of respect for his parents’ wishes. It was never something that was asked of me. I did it out of respect for someone else’s home. This man’s wife caved under false pressure. The daughter will visit just as often. Sleeping arrangements rarely stop someone from visiting. If the new boyfriend stops accompanying her, then everyone should realize he’s not worth his salt. Respectful adults don’t just “happen”; they are raised that way. — Rebecca in St. Paul Dear Abby: Today’s letter had my blood boiling. I wholeheartedly agree that rules of a household should be respected. However, the father’s objection to his

daughter and her boyfriend sleeping in the same room isn’t about respecting his “wishes.” He’s upset because he’s trying to control his daughter, and he isn’t willing to accept that she’s grown up and deserves the same freedom he and his wife had. I’m surprised you encouraged him, given that he made it clear he had no problem with premarital sex. He’s a blatant hypocrite. — Caitlin in L.a. Dear Abby: I think guests, including children and grandchildren, who live together in today’s world should be allowed to share a room. Times have changed. Prudishness is out of date. — Realistic Contemporary Grandma Dear Abby: Before my husband and I married, we visited my straitlaced aunt. Neither of us expected to sleep together there. If you don’t want someone’s morals imposed on you, what gives you the right to impose your looser morals on them? — Diane in South Carolina Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Find It All Online

By Brian Stelter New York Times News Service

As of Monday, there will be new competition for progressive attention spans on television. Challenging MSNBC, which has a stable lineup of left-leaning hosts, will be Current TV, where Keith Olbermann will start anchoring the 8 p.m. hour, his former time slot on MSNBC. Rather audaciously, Olbermann will try to draw viewers away from MSNBC and to his new home, where he wants to add more hours of like-minded hosts. Already, Olbermann seems to have succeeded in one respect: in creating a robust marketplace for liberal television talent. Since he left in January, MSNBC has signed prominent contributors like Eugene Robinson, the Washington Post columnist, to new long-term contracts, in some cases staving off Current’s attempts to poach them. MSNBC has also tried out new hosts, like Cenk Uygur, an Internet talk show host who has become the channel’s 6 p.m. anchor. The channel’s total ratings are holding steady so far this year. Olbermann, meanwhile, has persuaded some boldface names to appear on Current, where he is re-creating his MSNBC show, “Countdown.” His huge challenge will be persuading viewers to come too, given that the channel

‘Countdown’ Wh e n : 8 p.m. Where: Current TV

is generally only watched only by tens of thousands of viewers at any given time and is high on the channel lineup in most markets. He anticipates that the early viewership totals will be low; he said on a conference call with reporters Friday, “We’re in this for the long haul.” Few of Olbermann’s producers or regular guests from MSNBC are joining him on the new show. His entreaties to MSNBC employees sparked something of a bidding war, according to people involved in contract negotiations who insisted on anonymity to avoid distressing executives at

MSNBC or Current. “The threat of Keith’s new show meant that MSNBC had to spend a little bit of extra money — and Phil was willing to do that,” one of the people said, referring to Phil Griffin, the president of MSNBC. Olbermann, always pleased to pick a fight, clearly wants to foster competition. To Rolling Stone this month, he said “we’re going to take MSNBC’s business away from them,” a comment Griffin chalked up to strategic posturing. “Look,” he said in an interview on Friday, “everybody has a strategy, and that is purely a strategy. I’m talking about reality, and the reality is that we’ve never been stronger.”

Icy

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Real Estate Every Saturday

25 NW Minnesota Ave. #5 Downtown Bend | 541-388-0155

64th Annual Blow-out Celebration

ROCKHOUND SHOW & POW WOW

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JEWELRY, GEM & MINERAL SHOW June 23-26 • Crook County Fairgrounds • Prineville, OR 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday-Saturday • 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday ✦ FREE admission ✦ Public welcome ✦ Dealer booths - Inside & out - Vendors from all over the world ✦ Field trips ✦ Showcase displays & auction - Open to the public ✦ Potluck dinner at 6:30 p.m. on set-up day ✦ Excellent selection of materials ✦ Obsidian * Jade * Petrified Wood * Jasper * Plume Agate Limb Casts * Moss Agate * Thunder Eggs * Crystals Precious Gems * A wide variety of Faceting Rough & Lots More

For More Information Prineville Rockhound Pow Wow Rock & Gem Show Contact 541-447-5298 or Richknightr@gmail.com www.prinevillerockhoundpowwow.com

BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 6/21/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show (N) ‘PG’ America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Cooking Odyss Hubert Keller Travels-Edge Steves Europe

6:00

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News KEZI 9 News ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Globe Trekker Tunisia & Libya ‘G’ This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Wipeout Summer Sneak Peek ‘PG’ America’s Got Talent ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Baltimore ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) Wipeout Summer Sneak Peek ‘PG’ MasterChef Top 16 Compete (N) ‘14’ News on PDX-TV History Detectives (N) ’ ‘G’ Å America’s Got Talent ’ ‘PG’ Å One Tree Hill ’ ‘PG’ Å Amer. Woodshop Moment-Luxury History Detectives (N) ’ ‘G’ Å

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Combat Hospital (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Voice The Semi-Finals The eight remaining vocalists face off. (N) ‘PG’ NCIS: Los Angeles Overwatch ‘14’ The Good Wife Great Firewall ‘14’ 101 Ways to Leave a Game Show Combat Hospital (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Raising Hope ‘14’ Raising Hope ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Oregon Exper Price-Antiques Frontline The Madoff Affair ’ ‘PG’ The Voice The Semi-Finals The eight remaining vocalists face off. (N) ‘PG’ Hellcats The Prisoner’s Song ‘PG’ House of Payne Meet the Browns Love of Quilting Joy/Painting Mexican Table Julia-Jacques Oregon Exper Price-Antiques Frontline The Madoff Affair ’ ‘PG’

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News KEZI 9 News Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens In the Life ‘PG’ News Roseanne ‘PG’ Cooking Odyss In the Life ‘PG’

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens In the Life ‘PG’ Jay Leno Roseanne ‘PG’ Hubert Keller In the Life ‘PG’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Family Jewels Family Jewels Family Jewels Family Jewels 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. (2:30) “Conan the ›› “Conan the Destroyer” (1984, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Grace Jones, Wilt Chamberlain. Conan ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. 102 40 39 Barbarian” (1982) attempts to retrieve a sacred religious artifact. Å Ex-Green Beret goes on Vietnam mission. Å Ex-Green Beret goes on Vietnam mission. Å Wild Kingdom Swimming Lions ‘G’ Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘14’ Å Planet Earth Caves ’ ‘G’ Å Croc Keeper (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Rocky Mountain Gators Pilot ‘PG’ Planet Earth Caves ’ ‘G’ Å 68 50 26 38 The Most Extreme ’ ‘G’ Å The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Housewives/OC Housewives/NJ Housewives/NJ Million Dollar Decorators (N) ‘14’ Million Dollar Decorators ‘14’ 137 44 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition Extreme Makeover: Home Edition ›› “Fletch” (1985, Comedy) Chevy Chase. Premiere. ’ Å Country Fried Country Fried The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å 190 32 42 53 The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ Å 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC 60 Minutes on CNBC Wealth-Risk Zumba Dance ‘G’ 51 36 40 52 Crackberry’d: The Truth About Infor. Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Daily Show Colbert Report (7:58) Futurama (8:29) South Park Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 (N) ‘14’ Workaholics ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (4:56) South Park (5:26) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:56) Wyatt Cenac: Comedy Person Desert The Yoga Show PM Edition Get Outdoors Redmond City Council Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Phineas and Ferb Good-Charlie ››› “Cars” (2006, Comedy) Voices of Owen Wilson, Paul Newman. Å Shake It Up! ‘G’ Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab (N) ‘G’ Deadliest Catch Sea Change ’ ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch (N) ’ ‘14’ Å After the Catch Relentless (N) ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) College Baseball NCAA World Series, Game 8: Teams TBA (N) Å WNBA Basketball New York Liberty at Los Angeles Sparks (N) (Live) Å Football Live NFL Yearbook (N) NFL Yearbook (N) Football Live NASCAR Now 22 24 21 24 WNBA Basketball Phoenix Mercury at San Antonio Silver Stars (N) Å College Basketball From March 5, 2011. (N) Can’t Blame Can’t Blame AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball From Dec. 1, 2010. (N) 23 25 123 25 (4:00) College Basketball (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 The Nine Lives of Chloe King ‘PG’ Pretty Little Liars It’s Alive ‘14’ Pretty Little Liars (N) ‘14’ Å The Nine Lives of Chloe King ‘PG’ Pretty Little Liars ‘14’ Å The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Marc Murphy. Cupcake Wars Bollywood Bake-Off Chopped Chopped Go for It! (N) 24 Hour Restaurant Battle 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (3:30) “The Devil Wears Prada” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Marley & Me” (2008, Comedy-Drama) Owen Wilson, Jennifer Aniston. Premiere. ››› “Marley & Me” (2008) Owen Wilson, Eric Dane. 131 Yard Crashers Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l My First Place My First Place 176 49 33 43 Yard Crashers How the States Got Their Shapes Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy How the States Got Their Shapes Brad Meltzer’s Decoded 2012 ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 (4:00) Lee & Grant ‘PG’ Å Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers Back Breaker ‘PG’ How I Met How I Met Drop Dead Diva Hit and Run ‘PG’ 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word 16 and Pregnant Kianna ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant Taylor ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant Checking in following the season. ‘14’ 16 and Pregnant Allie (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant 192 22 38 57 16 and Pregnant An anorexic puts on baby weight. ‘14’ SpongeBob Big Time Rush Big Time Rush iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Mariners Post. MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals From Nationals Park in Washington, D.C. The Dan Patrick Show (N) Golden Age 20 45 28* 26 (4:00) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Washington Nationals (N) (Live) Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die (7:14) 1,000 Ways to Die ’ ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die iMPACT Wrestling ’ ‘14’ Å (11:13) Repo Games ’ ‘PG’ 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die Star Trek: Enterprise Damage ‘PG’ ›› “Anacondas: The Hunt for the Blood Orchid” (2004, Suspense) Å ›› “Anaconda 3: Offspring” (2008, Horror) David Hasselhoff. ‘PG’ Å “Anacondas: Trail of Blood” ‘14’ 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 ’ ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord Å ACLJ This Week Facing Life Full Flame Å Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Guys and Dolls” (1955) Marlon Brando. A gambler bets he (6:45) ›› “Angel Face” (1952, Crime Drama) Robert Mitchum, Jean Simmons. A devi- ››› “Young Bess” (1953, Historical Drama) Jean Simmons, Stewart Granger. The ››› “The Actress” (1953, Drama) Spencer Tracy, Jean Sim101 44 101 29 mons, Anthony Perkins. Å ous woman plots the death of her wealthy stepmother. Å early years in the life of England’s Queen Elizabeth I. Å can woo a Salvation Army missionary. Å Fabulous Cakes Las Vegas. ’ ‘G’ 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids and Counting ’ ‘PG’ Å 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count The Little Couple The Little Couple 19 Kids and Counting ’ ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Fabulous Cakes ’ ‘G’ Å Law & Order Chattel ’ ‘14’ Law & Order Oxymoron ’ ‘14’ Memphis Beat At the River ‘14’ Memphis Beat Inside Man (N) ‘PG’ HawthoRNe Fight or Flight (N) ‘PG’ Memphis Beat Inside Man ‘PG’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Internet. ’ ‘14’ Regular Show World of Gumball World of Gumball Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Scooby-Doo Looney Tunes World of Gumball King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:43) Sanford & Son The Kid ‘PG’ Sanford & Son Sanford and Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Happily Divorced 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar Deadline (N) ‘PG’ Å Covert Affairs Bang and Blame ‘PG’ Law & Order: Criminal Intent ’ ‘14’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Behind the Music Jennifer Lopez Jennifer Lopez. ‘PG’ Basketball Wives Jen is curious. ‘14’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Å Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Å Basketball Wives Jen is curious. ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 Greatest Prnks PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:45) ›› “The Chase” 1994 Charlie Sheen. ‘PG-13’ (6:20) ››› “Lucas” 1986 Corey Haim. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Young Guns” 1988, Western Emilio Estevez. ’ ‘R’ Å (9:50) ››› “Casino” 1995, Crime Drama Robert De Niro. ’ ‘R’ Å ››› “The Fabulous Baker Boys” 1989 Jeff Bridges. ‘R’ Å ››› “Working Girl” 1988, Romance-Comedy Melanie Griffith. ‘R’ Å After Film School Fabulous Baker ››› “Working Girl” 1988, Romance-Comedy Melanie Griffith. ‘R’ Å AMA Motocross High Point Raceway Hooters Bikini Ellismania ‘14’ The Daily Habit Dirt Demons Built to Shred Built to Shred Hooters Bikini Ellismania ‘14’ The Daily Habit Dirt Demons Big Break Indian Wells Feherty Lee Trevino. School of Golf Playing Lessons Golf Central Inside PGA Tour Feherty Lee Trevino. School of Golf Playing Lessons Golf Central Inside PGA Tour The Waltons The Last Straw ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ (3:45) ›› “Dance With Me” 1998 Vanessa ›› “Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief” 2010 Logan Lerman. A › “Repo Men” 2010, Science Fiction Jude Law, Forest Whitaker. Agents repossess REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel (N) Game of Thrones Fire and Blood A new HBO 425 501 425 10 L. Williams. ’ ‘PG’ Å ’ ‘PG’ Å youth learns that his father is the Greek god Poseidon. ‘PG’ transplanted organs for nonpayment. ’ ‘R’ Å king rises in the north. ’ ‘MA’ ›››› “Pulp Fiction” 1994 John Travolta. Criminals cross paths in three interlocked tales of mayhem. ‘R’ Å (8:15) ›››› “Pulp Fiction” 1994 John Travolta. Criminals cross paths in three interlocked tales of mayhem. ‘R’ Å ››› Carrie ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (6:20) › “Couples Retreat” 2009 Vince Vaughn. Four Midwest- (8:15) ›› “National Lampoon’s Vacation” 1983, Comedy Chevy Chase. A vacationing › “Vampires Suck” 2010 Matt Lanter. A spoof of “Twilight” fea- Femme Fatales ’ (4:30) ›› “Wild Things” 1998 Kevin Bacon. Two high-school MAX 400 508 7 vixens conspire against a faculty member. ’ ‘R’ ern couples descend on an island resort. Å family detours into screwball side trips. ‘R’ Å tures a love-struck vampire and werewolf. ‘MA’ Å Amish at the Altar ‘PG’ Amish on Break (N) ‘PG’ Amish at the Altar ‘PG’ Amish on Break ‘PG’ Border Wars The Front Lines ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Speed Racer Speed Racer Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Speed Racer Speed Racer OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Speed Racer Speed Racer NTOON 89 115 189 Driven TV Ted Nugent Hunting, Country Truth Hunting Western Extreme Dream Season Hunting TV Wild Outdoors Truth Hunting Hunting, Country Bone Collector Steve’s Outdoor Whitetail Nation Management OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) ›› “Twilight” 2008 Kristen Stewart, “Beyond Gay: The Politics of Pride” 2009 Ken Coolen. An ex- ›› “Youth in Revolt” 2009 Michael Cera. iTV. A teen goes on a Nurse Jackie ’ United States of Nurse Jackie ’ United States of Episodes Episode 4 The Real L Word SHO 500 500 amination of pride celebrations internationally. ‘NR’ ’ ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Billy Burke. iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ carnal quest to lose his virginity. ’ ‘R’ Å ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å American Trucker Pass Time ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition (N) Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ American Trucker Pass Time ‘PG’ Barrett-Jackson Special Edition Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:15) ›› “Eat Pray Love” 2010 Julia Roberts. Å (6:40) ›› “Brooklyn’s Finest” 2009, Crime Drama Richard Gere, Don Cheadle. ’ ‘R’ Å › “Resident Evil: Afterlife” 2010 Milla Jovovich. ’ ‘R’ (10:40) ›› “White Chicks” 2004 Shawn Wayans. Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:55) “Harlem Hostel” 2010 Rafael Sardina. Several friends (6:20) ›› “No Good Deed” 2002 Samuel L. Jackson. Three ››› “In the Loop” 2009, Comedy Peter Capaldi, Tom Hollander. Politicos look for op- ››› “The Wild and Wonderful Whites of West Virginia” 2009 A “A Good Day” TMC 525 525 open an illegal youth hostel in Queens. ‘NR’ Å bank robbers hold a policeman hostage. ‘R’ Å portunity as the U.S. prepares for war. ’ ‘NR’ Å year in the life of a West Virginia family. Heads-Up Poker UFC: Sanchez vs. Kampmann ‘MA’ WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å UFC: Sanchez vs. Kampmann ‘MA’ WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Where Are Staten Island Cakes (N) ‘PG’ Å Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Staten Island Cakes ‘PG’ Å Cupcake Girls Cupcake Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY REDMOND FARMERS MARKET: 11:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue; 541-550-0066 or www .localharvest.org/redmond-farmersmarket-M31522. TUESDAY MARKET AT EAGLE CREST: Free admission; 2-6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; 541633-9637 or info@ sustainableflame .com. “THE LORD OF THE RINGS, THE TWO TOWERS”: A screening of the 2002 PG-13 rated film, in its extended cut, with a filmed introduction from director Peter Jackson; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347.

WEDNESDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or www.bend farmersmarket.com. VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegan dish with a list of its ingredients and hear from Shayla Scott about Chimps Inc., with a video; donations accepted; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON PASQUALE”: Starring Anna Netrebko, Matthew Polenzani, Mariusz Kwiecien and John Del Carlo in an encore presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $15; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and Discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1074 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. VANDAVEER AND CHEYENNE MARIE MIZE: The indie-folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. “WITH MY OWN TWO WHEELS”: A screening of the documentary about the bicycle as a vehicle for change; followed by a discussion with the director; proceeds benefit World Bicycle Relief; $10; 8 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-549-8800 or swimnfish@ bendcable.com. BOBBY JOE EBOLA & THE CHILDREN MACNUGGITS: Rootsy punk rock from California, with Emily’s Army; free; 9 p.m.; Madhappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@ gmail.com.

THURSDAY AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave reads from her children’s book “A Home for Harry and Lola”; free; 12:30 p.m.; Sisters Elementary

School, 611 E. Cascade Ave.; 541-549-8755 or navebbr@aol.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Marcus Borg talks about his novel “Putting Away Childish Things: A Tale of Modern Faith”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. DUDAMEL, LET THE CHILDREN PLAY: A screening of the Los Angeles Philharmonic conductor leading children through the joys of experiencing music; $12.50; 7 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347 or www.fathomevents.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovationtw.org. TECH N9NE: The hip-hop act performs, with Krizz Kaliko, Kutt Calhoun, Big Scoob, Jay Rock, Mayday, Steve Stone and Maintain; $26 plus fees in advance, $30 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www.bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. SISTERS FARMERS MARKET: 3-7 p.m.; North Ash Street and West Main Avenue; www.sisters farmersmarket.com. HULLABALOO: Event features a street festival with food, a kids area, bicycle racing, street performances, live music, a performance by Marc Cohn, and more; free; 4-9 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxhullabaloo.com. SPLASH, PEDAL AND DASH: A race for kids ages 4-12; registration required; proceeds benefit Care For Kids; $25; 4 p.m., 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. registration; Village at Sunriver, 57100 Beaver Drive; 541-420-2282. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Kitsap; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “LETTERS HOME FROM ICELAND”: A screening of the travelogue about the wilds of Iceland; followed by a discussion with the author of “The Tricking of Freya”; part of Jefferson County Community Read; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE”: The Children’s Theater Co. presents C.S. Lewis’ tale of four children transported to Narnia; $5; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024,

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

childrenstheater@me.com or www.childrenstheatercompany.net. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. BARBERGRASS: The High Desert Harmoneers and the Central Oregon Bluegrass pickers perform; proceeds benefit the High & Dry Bluegrass Festival and the High Desert Harmoneers; $15; 7:30 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-548-4746 or www.hadbf.com. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-5046721 or www.innovationtw.org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// url.bb/LBS11. THE HENHOUSE PROWLERS: The Chicago-based bluegrass band performs; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 day of show; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Genealogical Society; free admission; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553. PRINEVILLE FARMERS MARKET: Free; 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m.; Prineville City Plaza, 387 N.E. Third St.; 503-739-0643. COUNTRY QUILT SHOW: Themed “Roundup of Stars,” with prizes, demonstrations, awards and more; $2, free ages 11 and younger; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Crooked River Elementary School, 640-641 N.E. Third St., Prineville; 541-447-6300. GUNFIGHT IN THE BADLANDS: A two-day cowboy action shooting event, themed spaghetti Western, with movie parodies and shooting; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association Range, U.S. Highway 20, milepost 24, Millican; 541-647-0799. HEALTHY HOUNDS WEIGHT LOSS WALK: A 3K walk with your dog, in support of dog weight loss; registration requested; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Central Oregon; $25; 9 a.m., 8:30 a.m. registration; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-382-3537 or www.hsco.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. FIRECRACKER FUN FLY: A day of radio-controlled model flying demonstration; bring a lawn chair; free; 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Popp’s Field, milemarker 17 on E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-330-5508, waldemar.frank@gmx.net or www. bamrc.com.

NORTHWEST CROSSING FARMERS MARKET: Free; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. RELAY FOR LIFE: A 24-hour walking event, with a silent auction, food, ceremonies and more; proceeds benefit cancer treatment patients; free; 10 a.m.; La Pine High School, 51633 Coach Road; 541-771-9644. SHRED DAY: Safely destroy personal documents; donations benefit MountainStar Family Relief Nursery; donations of diapers and wipes accepted; 10 a.m.-noon; South Valley Bank & Trust, 735 N.E. Purcell Blvd., Bend; 541-385-0485. BITE OF BEND: Food festival includes local food booths offering bites of their creations, a beer garden, wine, a Top Chef competition, a children’s area and live music; proceeds benefit The Hunger Prevention Coalition of Central Oregon; donations accepted; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; downtown Bend; 541-323-0964, info@layitoutevents .com or www.thebiteofbend.com. PROSPECTING AND PANNING: Pan for gold at a re-created placer mine; $2; 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. BREWS, VIEWS AND BAR-B-QUES: A barbecue contest with local and regional chefs, with live music; free admission; noon-8 p.m.; downtown Sisters; 541-549-0251 or jeri@ sisterscountry.com. STATE OF JEFFERSON: The Oregonbased reggae band performs as part of the brewery’s anniversary party; with a barbecue and additional performances by Exit Strategy and the Scott Foxx Band; event takes place between the brewery and Bank of the Cascades; free admission; 2-9 p.m., band plays at 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery & Public House, 1044 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3829242 or www. randompresents. com. POWER EXPLOSION 2011: The Freedom Team rips phone books in half, bends steel bars and horseshoes and more; free; 3-5 p.m.; Troy Field, Bond Street and Louisiana Avenue, Bend; 541-390-7770, office@ thefreedomteam.org or www.tfea .us/poster.htm. VFW DINNER: A dinner of crab and shrimp Louie; proceeds benefit local veterans; $8; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Pine Lane and Past Fraction Zero; with a barbecue and silent auction; proceeds benefit Megan Cecil, who has breast cancer; $15, $25 per couple; 6 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-390-0441. BEND ELKS GAME: The Elks play Kitsap; $5-$9; 6:35 p.m.; Vince Genna Stadium, Southeast Fifth Street and Roosevelt Avenue; 541-312-9259 or www.bendelks.com. “THE LION, THE WITCH AND THE WARDROBE”: The Children’s Theater Co. presents C.S. Lewis’ tale of four children transported to Narnia; $5; 7 p.m.; The Bridge Church of the Nazarene, 2398 W. Antler Ave., Redmond; 541-460-3024, childrenstheater@me.com or www. childrenstheatercompany.net. JEFFERSON COUNTY COMMUNITY READ: Christina Sunley, author of “The Tricking of Freya,” talks about Iceland and her novel-writing quest; free; 7 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

M T For Tuesday, June 21

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BILL CUNNINGHAM NEW YORK (no MPAA rating) 2:15, 4:10, 6:30 BRIDESMAIDS (R) 2:25, 6:25 CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS (G) 2:10, 4:15, 6:35 INCENDIES (R) 2:20, 6:20 MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) 2, 4:20, 6:40 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG13) 2:05, 4:25, 6:45

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 1:45, 4:40, 7:35, 10:40 THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 10 a.m. FAST FIVE (PG-13) 1:30, 4:25, 7:25, 10:15 GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 4:45, 6:45, 8, 9:45, 10:30 GREEN LANTERN 3-D (PG-13) 12:15, 3:15, 6:15, 9:30 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 2, 5, 8:10, 10:45

JUDY MOODY AND THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER (PG) 1:55, 4:30, 7, 9:20 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (DP — PG) 12:30, 3, 6:30, 9:40 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 1:15 LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS — DIRECTOR’S CUT (PG-13) 7 MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) 12:05, 1:05, 3:05, 4:05, 6:10, 7:05, 9:15, 10:05 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) Noon, 3:30, 6:55, 9:50 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 12:35, 1:40, 3:20, 4:15, 6:40, 7:45, 9:25, 10:20 THE TALE OF DESPEREAUX (G) 10 a.m. THOR (PG-13) 12:20 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG13) 12:50, 3:35, 6:25, 9:55 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG13) 1, 3:55, 7:15, 10:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) LIMITLESS (PG-13) 6 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 9

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 8:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 6:45, 9:15 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 12:15, 2:30, 4:45 MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 SUPER 8 (PG-13) 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 5 WIN WIN (R) 7:45

MADRAS CINEMA 5 1101 S.W. U.S. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 12:50, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:15 MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS (PG) 12:35, 3, 5:20, 7:30, 9:45 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 12:40, 6:40 SUPER 8 (PG-13) Noon, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 3:50, 9:40

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 4, 7 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

GREEN LANTERN (PG-13) 5:15, 7:45 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 8 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 5:45 MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13) 5:45, 8

THE HANGOVER PART II (UPSTAIRS — R) 4:15, 7:15 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

P C  GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Private lessons to help with your dog’s manners and with problems; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Private lessons to get your dog ready to show in AKC obedience trials; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or www.linsschoolfordogs.com. CLICKER TRAINING: Solve behavior problems; 6 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays; Bend Pet Resort, 60909 S.E. 27th St.; Chris at 541-633-0446 or www.DeschutesRiverDogs.com. PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; teaches socialization, confidencebuilding skills, playtime, handling exercises and more; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-3123766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. PUPPY KINDERGARTEN CLASSES: Ongoing training, behavior and socialization classes for puppies 10 to 16 weeks; $80 for four weeks; 6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursdays; Pawsitive Experience, 65111 High Ridge Drive, Tumalo; Meredith Gage, 541-318-8459, trainingdogs123@ bendbroadband.com or www .pawsitiveexperience.com. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Six-week drop-in classes; $99.95; 9 and 10 a.m., and 7 and 8 p.m. Mondays, 9 and 10 a.m. Wednesdays, 9 and 10 a.m., and 7 and 8 p.m. Fridays, 1 and 2 p.m. Saturdays; Petco, 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen at 541-382-0510. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Agility is a great way to connect with your dog; $95; 4 p.m. Saturdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-633-6774 or www.desertsageagility.com. PUPPY MANNERS CLASS: Social skills for puppies up to five months; $110 for six-week class, cost includes materials; 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays; preregister; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www. friendsforlifedogtraining.com. GRAB BAG CLASS: Basic manners, agility, Tellington T Touch, exerball and more; $15 per session; 6-7 p.m. Fridays; ; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE TRAINING: A positive approach to behavior problems large and small; cost by quotation;

times by appointment; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. SATURDAY CONFIDENCE CLASS: Combination of agility, Tellington T Touch, games, exerball, basic manners; $15 per session; 1011 a.m. Saturdays; Friends for Life Dog Training, 2121 S.W. Deerhound Ave., Redmond; Dennis Fehling, 541-350-2869 or www .friendsforlifedogtraining.com. PRIVATE BEHAVIORAL COUNSELING: Individual attention for you and your dog’s needs; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey, www .dancinwoofs.com or 541-312-3766. HEALTHY HOUNDS CHALLENGE 3K WALK: Walk with your dog, benefit for Humane Society of Central Oregon; 9 a.m. June 25; registration 8:30 a.m.; $25 entry fee; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive, Bend; www.hsco.org. OFF-LEASH PLAY CLASS: Supervised play groups for the nonagressive social dog, learn to recognize good behavior and the not-so-good, current vaccinations required; $10; 10:30-11:30 a.m. June 25; register by June 24; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht at 541-536-2458, diannshappytails@msn.com or www.OregonDogLady.com. PUPPY MANNERS: Learn good social skills with people and other puppies, basic rules, and commands, two sets of vaccinations required; $85 for 6 weeks; 6:30-7:45 p.m. June 28; register by June 27; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht, 541-5362458 or diannshappytails@msn. com or www.oregondoglady.com. BASIC LEVEL DOG CLASS: Teaches good manners, basic commands, leash walking and more, current vaccinations required; $75 for six weeks; 6:30-7:30 p.m. starting June 29; register by June 28; La Pine Training Center; Diann Hecht at 541536-2458, diannshappytails@msn. com or www.OregonDogLady.com.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows with instructors available; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS: Organizers of the 2011 Wild Trails Horse Expo are looking for volunteers to demonstrate various trail riding tips, techniques, and other topics of interest to the recreational trail rider during the 2011 Wild Trails Horse Expo at the Rimrock Event Center, Brasada Ranch, July 22-24, a free event; for information contact Sandy Mayernik, sandy@ CentralOregonTrailCourse.com, http://WildTrailsHorseExpo.com. FAR WEST REGIONAL MORGAN HORSE SHOW: Performances daily at 9 a.m. and 7 p.m. June 22-25; free for spectators; participant registration information on the website; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; for information contact Marli Perry at 541-548-3541 or www.farwestmorgan.com.

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day


E4 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, June 21, 2011: This year, you open up to changes and new possibilities. Sometimes your approach is very rational and logical. Other times it is emotional. What you can count on is that your moods and the way you process things will change. Curb a tendency to be negative or uptight, which manifests frequently in your personal life. Learn ways to relieve stress that suit you. If you are single, others find you extremely desirable. The question remains who you will choose to relate to. If you are attached, the two of you have an intriguing tango taking place. It adds to the mystery that exists between you. CANCER appeals to you emotionally. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Assume a low profile. You are about to change directions. A boss is difficult and is transforming right in front of you. Know your limits and understand what is happening within a special bond. Focus on where you want to make a difference. Tonight: Play it low-key. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Honor your priorities, which involves a more detached approach. Answers come forward when you are not triggered. Understand when enough is enough. Visualize more of what you want from a situation. That, with unusual perception, will help you hit a home run. Tonight: Just don’t be alone. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Take a stand if need be. You

could be overwhelmed by a situation. A partner could be most controlling about the outcome. Your ability to change directions comes forth. Remain flexible, and you will gain. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Reach out for someone who has unusual thinking. That person could be instrumental in choosing a new direction. A partner or associate might be changing and is very demanding at present. Your response might be more normal than you think. Tonight: Opt for a different type of night. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH A partner could be challenging on a daily basis. Coming to terms with this person’s needs, as well as his or her requests, could be exhausting. A discussion could help you isolate what’s important from what’s irrelevant, giving you a little more space. Tonight: An important chat. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Defer to others. Know what is happening with a partner. You could be overwhelmed by others. You might need to screen your calls or do something else that you would prefer not to do. Zero in on key priorities in the next few weeks. Tonight: Shop options. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You need to focus in order to complete what you must. A discussion could be a high priority, but you also might be a little stunned by what emerges. If you want to pursue the perceptive path, do. In your heart, you might be reluctant. Honor your inner voice. Tonight: Working late. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You cannot deflect or hide your enthusiasm, which probably

stems from a personal matter. Still, know when it is appropriate to let the cat out of the bag, which is not today. Be careful with a partner who can act up. Tonight: Ever frisky. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Dealing with family and a domestic matter could slow you down. Knowing what is enough and the appropriate choices could be key to dealing with some negativity. Sooner or later, someone has to open up and talk! Tonight: Homeward bound. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Communication overwhelms you. You might feel the need to pull back and demand less. Your sense of humor emerges when dealing with others. Laughter comes forth once you let go of an issue. Tonight: Be smart -don’t personalize everything you hear. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHH You can go way overboard with spending. You might feel repressed in some manner. You wonder what you need to do in order to open up. Discussions are animated and lively. Someone might be touting one idea, wanting controversy and opinions. Tonight: Buy a treat on the way home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Empower yourself to make a change. Open doors and understand that although you might be fearful, you might want to go through the experience anyway. Understand that a partner might be expressing a great deal of satisfaction. Tonight: In the limelight.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Storms

Protection

Continued from E1 Tornadoes in the High Desert are unusual, but severe thunderstorms are not. Folks who were here in June 2009 probably recall an explosive storm that slammed the area with gusty winds, lightning, golf ball-sized hail, and an inch of rain in 20 minutes, according to the National Weather Service. Additionally, our semi-arid weather commonly produces dust devils — small but vigorous whirlwind tunnels of dust that zip across the ground. Last spring at Resor’s ranch, a dust devil ripped the roof off a hay shelter. Afterward, she strengthened the attachments to all the sheds’ roofs and sidings, she said. When a severe thunderstorm is approaching, should horses remain in the pasture or be led inside? There’s no hard and fast rule on this, said veterinarian Jessie Evans of Bend Equine Medical Center. “It depends on the horses’ personalities and what they’re used to. A horse that is typically left outside might injure itself if confined to a stable during a storm,” Evans explained. Conversely, a horse known to panic during storms that is comfortable in a stable should probably be brought indoors, she said. Two local cases of horses injured during storms stand out in Evans’ mind. One involved a horse treated for multiple lacerations after he ran through a fence made of wood and barbwire. The other was a young horse that broke its nose after getting hit by a hefty tree branch, she said. And sometimes riders can get in trouble atop horses spooked during storms. Evans recalls when an unexpected storm marched in one day five years ago when she was working as a trail-riding guide at Yellowstone National Park. “We were on a high field with a lot of lightning and thunder around us,” she said. Suddenly, an otherwise mellow horse reared up and galloped away, leaving a dazed tourist on the wet ground. Evans collected the frightened horse and rode him back to the stable, she said. “I had everyone get off and walk their horses back. The fellow who got thrown was all too happy to walk.” Likewise, Resor, who offers summer horse camp to kids between the ages of 6 and 16, has a hard and fast rule when it comes to thunderstorms and her young student riders. “Dismount and walk. That’s what we’d do. Dismount and walk back.” Below are tips on how to protect your horse and yourself during thunderstorms, as advised by the Equestrian Medical Safety Association and the National Lightning Safety Institute: • Remember that a lightning bolt is hotter than the sun, enough to fuse sand into glass, meaning that you and your horse don’t have to get hit directly to get injured or killed. • Avoid higher elevations, or standing under a large tree or near metal fences or pipes, because lightning seeks the highest and easiest pathways toward the ground. • Look for large boulders or bushes for shelter on the trail. • Avoid sheds with metal roofs, which attract lightning and make more noise when pelted by rain or hail. • Make sure fence posts, building sidings and roofs are securely fastened.

Continued from E1 He and others in the high-end dog training business say prices have shot up recently thanks to the growing number of wealthy people around the world who like the security — and status — provided by a dog with the right credentials. Moguls and celebrities now routinely pay $40,000 to $60,000 for a well-bred German shepherd that is certified as an expert in the sport of Schutzhund, which means “protection dog.” The price can go much higher if a dog does well at an international championship, as Julia did. “She’s a top deal,” Julia’s owner, John Johnson, said as she escorted him around the grounds of his 15acre estate outside Minneapolis. “She’s won awards. She looks at you, she’s got the most beautiful face.” But $230,000? “It’s a lot of money,” he said matter-of-factly. “It’s the speed, the smartness, the quickness — and you would not believe the roughness that she has inside. She’s like a little pit bull when she bites. She has that model face, and then opens the gums up and lets you have it.” Johnson said he got his first protection dog after receiving personal threats while he was running the Northland Group, a debt-collection company in Minnesota that he founded and eventually sold three years ago. Now he has six protection dogs, all German shepherds, and normally takes a couple in his car whenever he goes out. “It’s for both security and companionship,” he said as Julia nuzzled his leg, looking like a gentle enough companion. But when an intruder emerged near the tennis court of his estate, all it took was one command, “Packen!” (the bite command from the German word for “seize”), to send Julia racing across the lawn. She sunk her teeth into the intruder’s arm, which was encased in padding for a demonstration, and hung on even as he lifted her off the ground in a vain attempt to shake free of her. She let go only upon being commanded and then stood guard over her new prisoner, barking and threatening to bite again whenever he made a move to escape, which he wisely did not try. Julia’s was a controlled ferocity, which trainers distinguish from the anger manifested by ordinary dogs. When two dogs try to intimidate each other, they stiffen, growl, bare their teeth and stare intently. Protection dogs are trained to continue looking

Linda Weiford can be reached at ldweiford@ gmail.com.

Photos by Rainier Ehrhardt / New York Times News Service

Buffy, a black German shepherd, and Deanna Louvier, a trainer, work out at Harrison K-9 Security Services in Aiken, S.C., on May 18.

Izzo, a 2-year-old German shepherd, sits by his trainer Patrick Ashley at Harrison K-9 Security Services. around and protecting their owners, not establish their own dominance. And, when commanded, they are supposed to switch instantly from attack mode to pet mode. “The dog has to get along with children,” Prather said. “The client is often a guy on his second family. He travels a lot, leaves his wife

alone with the kids in a large house — maybe 30,000 square feet, so big you don’t even know what’s going on at the other side of the house. He wants peace of mind and a dog that his wife can handle. We don’t sell tank-stoppers.” The price tag for a protection dog has risen because of increasing demand in the United States, Latin America (especially Mexico), the Middle East, Asia and other places, said Prather and Wayne Curry, the owner of Kraftwerk K9 in Rochester, Wash. “I’ve turned down offers of more than $200,000 for one of my champion dogs,” said Curry, who added that he knew of a dog that had sold for more than $400,000 because of its bloodline and breeding potential. (Although Julia’s offspring most likely would have commanded top prices, Johnson said he had no time to breed her and instead had her spayed shortly after buying her in January.) To clients who can afford the $50,000 price for a typical well-credentialed dog, there are lots of ways to rationalize the price. “When you compare the costs of a full-time bodyguard versus a dog, the dog makes a lot of sense,” Curry said. “And the dog, unlike the bodyguard, can’t be bought off.”

Prather’s dogs are trained for three years in Germany before they go to South Carolina, where they receive further training and are put to the test of family living. Before her sale, Julia lived for four months in the home of November Holley, the company’s vice president and head trainer. “I’ve probably trained a thousand dogs, and she’s the best I’ve ever seen,” Holley said. “The total package. Did absolutely everything you wanted, no questions asked. Good with kids, good with horses, good with cats. A perfect lady in the home.” Julia also proved her mettle as a baby-sitter, Holley added. “If my daughter Kailee was outside in the woods, I’d say, ‘Julia, where’s Kailee?’, and she’d go out and find her. She was like a person.” At her new home in Minnesota, Julia has a part-time trainer, Jeremy Norton, who also works as a firefighter in Minneapolis. Norton agreed that Julia was a special dog, but he smiled a bit uncomfortably when asked to explain the $230,000 price. “It’s in the eye of the beholder,” he said. “That’s as politic an answer as I can muster. I mean, Julia’s nice, but that’s half my house. There’s no way to wrap your head around that.”


AH

HOM ES , GARDENS AND FOOD IN CENTRAL OREGON

F

Pet pests Martha Stewart shares tips on keeping your pets safe from insect scourges, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, JUNE 21, 2011

Spring means leeks at their most tender At the Market is a weekly look at produce available at local farmers markets.

By Julie Johnson The Bulletin

Leeks are a favorite member of the allium family — a family that also includes onions and garlic — and spring is an excellent time to buy them at farmers markets. Spring leeks are generally more slender and tender than they are come fall. Look for specimens with bright green leaves and moist, flexible root ends (if the white root end is rigid, the leek will be very tough). While the entire leek is edible, only the white root end portion imparts the pungent oniony flavor leeks are beloved for, according to “The Science of Good Food” by David Joachim and Andrew Schloss. Growers try to maximize the length of the white portion by mounding soil around the leek as it grows, shielding it from sunlight. Leeks contain fewer sugars and more long-chain carbohydrates than regular onions, say Joachim and Schloss. That means they obtain a slippery texture when cooked that helps to thicken soups and stews. If there is one drawback to leeks, it is the grit that tends to build up between their layers. The concentric layers of the leek (each layer is a swollen leaf base) trap dirt between them as they grow. The only sure way to remove the grit is to expose all the layers before introducing them to water. Slice leeks into discs, then separate each disc into rings and deposit into a sinkful of cool water. Agitate the water, then walk away for five minutes to let the grit settle to the bottom of the sink. Scoop out the leeks and rinse. If your recipe calls for larger pieces of leek, not rings, slice the leek in half lengthwise, separate into water and then clean as above. Try adding leeks to a simple vegetable saute to throw over pasta or rice. Roasting until softened and slightly brown or braising in a liquid such as wine also increases the sweetness of the leek.

AT THE MARKET

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

FOOD

And now we

GRILL By Jan Roberts-Dominguez For The Bulletin

I

Julie Johnson can be reached at 541-383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com. The Bulletin ile photo

Sauteing, roasting and braising all yield good results when cooking leeks.

GARDEN

Removing dirt from the equation

Julie Johnson / The Bulletin

Kebabs are an easy way to take advantage of grilling season.

t’s a funny thing about cooking. When someone else is doing it, the average young person is rarely motivated to learn the difference between a french fry and a stir-fry. But put that same individual in the kitchen of his very first apartment, facing his third consecutive meal of ramen noodles, and suddenly he’s fantasizing about midnight trysts with The Barefoot Contessa. A while back I worked with a young man who was in such a predicament: Away from home (the Midwest, for gosh sakes!) and setting up housekeeping in a studio apartment in downtown Corvallis, Paul found himself adrift but in survival mode. He was a prime candidate for a bit of cooking school wisdom. So I gave him a few lessons every now and then, and have enjoyed sharing what we both learned from the experience. Quite early in the process, the concept of barbecue came up. At first I thought that we were jumping the gun a bit. After all, for beginning cooks like Paul, who are still grappling with such need-toknow stuff as “does mayonnaise get stored in the fridge or pantry?” (the fridge), and “what would happen if I don’t get the chicken fully cooked?” (you’ll get to use up one of your sick days), just how essential is it to understand barbecue? Well, on the list of things to know that will save your life, I guess the art of cooking over glowing coals falls pretty far down the page. But in some parts of the country — particularly California and most of the West Coast — one’s social life could be in total jeopardy if you don’t know your way around a Weber, or at least a hibachi. See Grilling / F2

By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

Growing anything in Central Oregon can require huge amounts of time, expense and effort. But a different approach to growing large quantities of produce is being tried this summer by a group of gardening volunteers. The volunteers plan to donate all the produce they grow to area food banks through NeighborImpact’s “Grow a Row” program. The garden uses an innovative technique that maximizes output while using less water, space and time than conventional gardening. The technique was developed by Dr. Jacob Mittleider in the 1960s, says garden volunteer Jim Davis. The idea is to make the best use of water, nutrients and space to grow as much as possible. The garden, about 100 feet by 150 feet, is located on space donated by Victoria’s Vegetables in east Bend. All the materials to build the structures, the irrigation infrastructure, the labor to install it and the water for irrigation have been donated. See Mittleider / F5

Inside • General grilling, marinating and food-safety tips • Coal temperature and meat doneness, Page F2

Igniting charcoal One of the handiest devices for starting charcoal is the electric charcoal lighter. You place it under a pile of charcoal and plug it in. In no time at all, the heating unit is glowing hot and the chunks of charcoal sitting on or near it light very quickly. It isn’t expensive (less than $10), but it does require an electric outlet. A trick that doesn’t require electricity calls for either a very large tin can (those commercial kitchen-sized cans, No. 10s) with both ends removed, or 15 inches of stovepipe (8 inches in diameter). To use it, place the pipe (or can) on the base where you would pile the charcoal. Stuff a sheet of crumpled newspaper in the bottom of the pipe. Now pour the desired amount of charcoal on top of the newspaper. When you’re ready to start the coals, ignite the newspaper from below. The flame will shoot upward through the charcoal, lighting it in short order. Within about 10 minutes, the coals are taking on a life of their own and it’s OK to remove the pipe; lift carefully, using thick kitchen mitts, pot holders or tongs. The coals will tumble out the bottom. In about 20 more minutes or so, the coals should be ready. — Jan RobertsDominguez

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

HOME

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S

A dream space in Paris, just 61⁄2 feet deep By Joyce Wadler New York Times News Service

As a designer, Kein Cross is pretty good at estimating space, and when he saw the 18th-century courtyard house in Paris in an ad, he knew it was small — maybe 9 or 10 feet deep.

But walking into it on a rainy day in January, Cross realized his estimate was far too optimistic. The house, which he would later describe to friends in New York as a carriage house, was a respectable 19 feet wide, but from front to back it was only 61⁄2 feet. The liv-

ing room, minus the area taken up by a stairway, was less than 4 feet deep — were Cross to stand in it, arms outstretched, he could easily touch both walls. The kitchen was so tiny there wasn’t room to open the oven. Cross’ reaction?

“Wow! It was like God sent this to me,” he said. “Regardless of how small it is, you have two floors and a stairway, so you can create light and space. I was so excited, I told them I would pay three years in advance.” See Paris / F4

• THE DOMINGUEZ FAMILY TERIYAKI CHICKEN, F2 • MY MOM’S BEEF KEBABS, F2 • THE FLYING DUTCHMAN’S ASPARAGUS AND AGED GOUDA OMELETTE, F3 • DUTCH OVEN BLUEBERRY COBBLER, F3 • GRAHAM CRACKER CAKE, F6


F2 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F Grilling Continued from F1 I wanted Paul to experience that, to appreciate how cooking as simple and basic as grilling plain pieces of meat and fieldfresh vegetables over charcoal (or gas if you are so inclined) produces a fine eating experience of exquisitely grand proportions. Because of Paul’s living situation back then (no deck), he was going to need to use some sort of portable grill that could be set up outside his front door or even the parking lot of his apartment complex. He opted for a small charcoal-using model, even though there were some equally portable gas grills to choose from. I highly approved because even though cooking over gas is more convenient and less messy, when I’m really after great grill-

Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Readers can contact her by e-mail at janrd@ proaxis.com.

Makes 6 servings. This has been a successful date-night offering for our oldest son. I’m sure that by now, however, he’s even spun off in all sorts of directions with the basic recipe. mustard (“prepared” means that it comes in a jar already made into a paste rather than in a powder) 2 to 3 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely minced 1 tsp shredded fresh ginger root (optional) 6 half breasts of chicken, boned and skinned

In a resealable bag or a glass or plastic container with lid, combine the tempura sauce, water, vegetable oil, mustard, garlic, and ginger root if you’re using it. Add the chicken and close or cover and refrigerate for about 3 hours (if you marinate the meat much longer than that, it will be too salty; on the other hand, you can get away with only 2 hours if you are running out of time). About 40 minutes before you’re ready to eat, get the coals started. Once they are medium-hot (a slight glow showing through a layer of ash), they’re ready. Lift the chicken breasts from the marinade and place them on the grill. Cook the chicken breasts, turning once so that both sides can brown, until the meat is just barely firm to the touch. If the meat gets overly firm, it will be dry, but folks won’t be too critical, because that’s how most people cook it. On the other hand, if you can present a moist-but-perfectly-golden piece of chicken, your guests will praise 8 5 6 NW Bon d • Down town Be n d • 5 4 1 -3 3 0 -5 9 9 9 www.h ave n h ome style .com your grilling skills for all eternity.

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Tips for grilling and marinades

Charcoal imparts the best flavor to grilled food, but gas is more convenient. Julie Johnson The Bulletin

Determining coal temperature First of all, it usually takes 30 to 45 minutes before the coals are ready for grilling. Never begin grilling until the coals are covered with a light ash and are no longer flaming. Visually, hot coals are barely covered with gray ash. Medium coals glow through a layer of gray ash, and low coals are covered with a thick layer of gray ash. To physically check the temperature of the coals, cautiously hold the palm of your hand about 4 inches

above the coals. Count the number of seconds you can hold your hand in that position before the heat forces you to pull it away. Time Temperature 1 second Hot (high) 3 seconds Medium-hot 4 seconds Medium 5 seconds Low

Determining meat doneness Knowing when to take the food off

Call 541.330.6160 Dr. Daniel Teng, M.D.

the grill requires that the cook have a “feel” for the food. To illustrate, hold your hand out, palm up. Press the fleshy part of your palm. Raw meat feels like your palm in an open-handed position. Now curl your fingers up toward the palm, forming a very loose fist. Poke your palm again. That’s how medium-rare meat will feel To know when the meat has reached medium, just clench a little tighter, and for well-done make a real fist and feel how firm the palm is. — Jan Roberts-Dominguez

MY MOM’S BEEF KEBABS Makes enough for a party of 8 to 10 people. My mother would put the meat in the marinade the day before we went camping, then the first evening’s meal at our campsite was already “in the bag.” 2 C bottled Italian dressing 1 C dry red wine 1 ⁄2 C soy sauce 3 lbs of top sirloin, cut into 1to 1½-inch chunks ¼ lb fresh mushrooms, halved

1 red bell pepper (seeded and cut into 1-inch chunks) 1 green bell pepper (seeded and cut into 1-inch chunks)

Soak the skewers in water before using to prevent them from burning on the grill. Combine the dressing, wine and soy sauce in a container. Place the meat in a resealable plastic bag (or a glass or plastic container with lid). Place the mushrooms in similar container. Give the marinade a good stir right before pouring it over the meat and mushrooms; otherwise you’ll only get the top layer of oil. Pour enough of the marinade over the meat so that all of the chunks will be covered when the chunks are just sitting there. Pour the remainder of the marinade over the mushrooms. Place these packets of meat and mushrooms in your refrigerator. They can stay there for as little as 6 hours, or for as long as 24. About 40 minutes before you’re ready to eat,

1 yellow bell pepper (seeded and cut into 1-inch chunks) 1 onion (we used Walla Walla sweets because they’re available right now) Bamboo skewers

gather all of your friends around a table — hey, this is a messy job, you might as well share the misery — and begin skewering meat and veggies onto the bamboo sticks. Snuggle the chunks right up against each other so that the meat gets nicely flavored during cooking from the neighboring vegetables, and vice versa. But don’t smash them so close that the sides can’t get browned a bit from the coals. Now march everyone over to the sink and make them wash their hands with soap and hot water so they don’t contaminate other foods with the raw meat and uncooked marinade that they’ve been touching. While you are skewering the meat, the coals can be heating up. Once all of the meat has been skewered, everyone’s hands are washed, and the coals are relatively hot (meaning they have a light coating of ash on them, and are no longer flaming), place the skewers on the grill. Cook, turning the skewers several times so all sides can brown, until the meat is cooked to the desired degree of doneness. ✓ Carpet Cleaning ✓ We move furniture! To serve, remove the skew✓ Upholstery Cleaning ✓ Pet Odor Control ers to a large, clean platter and ✓ Safe, Non-Toxic ✓ IICRC Master Cleaning pass it around. No need to reChemicals Technician on staff move the food from the skewOVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN CLEANING AND RESTORATION CCB#72129 ers. That’s something that diners can do for themselves. www.cleaningclinicinc.com • 541-382-9498

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ing flavor, nothing can beat oldfashioned charcoal. For Paul, the two basic areas of concern were: How do you know when to put the food on the grill (when are the coals ready), and how do you know when to take the food off. Timing the food to the readiness of the coals is not as tricky as it may seem. It’s just a matter of temperature. Some foods need to be cooked quickly over hot coals, some need a slow treatment over low coals, while most foods fall somewhere in between. The following chart and other information will help. In fact, they could set almost anyone onto the path of a lifelong barbecuer.

THE DOMINGUEZ FAMILY TERIYAKI CHICKEN

1 C tempura sauce (this soy sauce-type seasoning is made by Kikkoman; it’s slightly sweeter than soy sauce, and is a little more concentrated in flavor; optionally, use soy sauce) ½ C water (or beer, or dry white wine) ¼ C vegetable oil 2 tsp prepared Chinese

Next week: Cocktails

• Don’t be cheap when it comes to setting up the grill with the proper amount of charcoal. If you don’t use enough, you’ll run out of heat at the inopportune moment when guests are hungry but the food isn’t quite cooked. To get it started, pile the coals into a tall peak (or use an ignitor mechanism, see “Igniting charcoal,” Page F1). Once they’re lit, spread them out so that the bed of coals will extend a generous 2 inches beyond the food. • Clean the grill grate well with a wire brush between uses. The cooked-on food comes off easiest when the grate is hot, so either do this task immediately after taking the food off the grill, or immediately before putting uncooked food on it. It’s also helpful to brush some vegetable oil over the grates (or spray with one of the non-stick sprays), to prevent food from sticking. • Trim away extra fat from meats before grilling in order to avoid grease flare-ups that will contribute an unpleasant flavor. • Keep a water bottle with a spray nozzle nearby to douse any grease fires as they flare up. • Because of the high sugar content of sweet barbecue sauces (like the bottled ones that look like dark ketchup), don’t brush them on the cooking meat until the last 10 minutes of cooking or the surface will burn. • From a food-safety perspective, solid pieces of (non-poultry) meat can be cooked to whatever doneness you prefer, from rare to well-done, without worrying about foodborne illness (because the bacteria are lurking on the surface of the meat, and will be destroyed with the proper amount of heat from grilling). However, ground meats — like hamburgers — need to be cooked thoroughly (sorry, no pink meat allowed), since the activity of grinding meat mixes all those surface bacteria throughout the product. • For safety reasons, always marinate meat in the refrigerator, never at room temperature. • Also for safety reasons, the platter used to carry the raw meat to the grill should not be used to hold the cooked meat (unless it has received a thorough washing in hot, soapy water). Any bacteria that might be on the raw meat would still be on the platter and would recontaminate the cooked meat. The same goes for any utensils that touch the raw meat. • Allow ¼ to ½ cup of marinade for each 1 to 2 pounds of meat. • Marinades may be cooked or uncooked, but cooked marinades should be completely cooled before adding to the raw meat you want to marinate. • A heavy-duty plastic bag is a convenient container for marinating (it’s disposable). To make sure all the sides of meat are exposed during marinating, smoosh the bag around every now and then, or stir the meat if it’s in a deep dish so the pieces on the surface get buried. • Because most marinades need time to do their magic, it’s an ideal “before you go to work” sort of activity. The upside to all that fussing in the morning is that you end up with a fast meal at the end of your day. For tenderizing and flavoring to take place, beef must be marinated at least 6 hours, or as long as overnight. Marinating longer than 24 hours causes the meat fibers on the surface to break down, resulting in a “mushy” texture. With the lighter meats, such as pork or chicken, 3 to 4 hours will do the trick for highflavored or extremely salty (soy sauce based) marinades. Much longer than that and the meat doesn’t retain its own identity. • Don’t think the marinade has fulfilled its job once the meat goes on the grill. Brush it on the meat during grilling for an extra boost of flavor and moisture. Marinades that have a high sugar content, or contain other ingredients that might burn easily, should be brushed on only during the last 20 minutes of grilling. • As long as you boil whatever marinade is left over for at least 1 minute, then it can be served as a sauce with the grilled meat. But remember: For food safety reasons, marinade that has been in contact with the raw meat should be heated to the boiling point and simmered for at least 60 seconds before serving. — Jan Roberts-Dominguez


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 F3

F Campfire cooking: Danger never tasted so good roughing it with some panache By Jim Harrington

Cook your own danger dog

Contra Costa Times

By Jackie Burrell Contra Costa Times

Summer — the season for campfires and toasty marshmallows — is nearly here. But man cannot live by s’mores alone. So it’s hardly surprising that camp food has inspired its very own publishing niche, complete with practical, macho and whimsical approaches to the fine art of the weenie roast. The newest batch of camp cookbooks includes a British charmer, a macho Tim Allen-esque tome and what can only be described as “camping with Jeeves.”

‘The Camping Cookbook’ The best of the bunch is Annie Bell’s new “Camping Cookbook: 95 Inspirational Recipes, From Hearty Brunches to Campfire Suppers” (Kyle Books, 176 pgs., $16.95). Bell is the British food writer behind two particularly tasty volumes — “Gorgeous Vegetables” and “Gorgeous Christmas.” This camping foray was inspired by Bell’s husband’s wish to spend his birthday on a sailboat-camping vacation. So when Bell says these recipes are tried and true, she means they were tested under conditions that will make your camp setup look like something out of “Top Chef.” Bell’s prep tips alone are worth the price of the book. And the paramount consideration for everything is to minimize the water required, both in preparation and cleanup. The book is obviously written by someone with ample experience in scrubbing camp pots. With cold water. In the dark. It’s a very British book, so American audiences will be alternately charmed (Enid Blyton references!) and put off (egad, kippers?). But there’s plenty of humor and practical wisdom.

‘Ultimate Camp Cooking’ Stand-up comics Mike Faverman and Pat Mac sprinkle plenty of humor into their “Ultimate Camp Cooking” (Andrews McMeel, 216 pgs., $14.99) book, which riffs on the DVD cooking series of the same name. It’s a book for guys who like to camp, carouse and cook hearty food that’s rich enough to horrify cardiologists and aromatic enough to make the entire campground jealous. Campground jealousy is a theme of the book. Unfortunately, all that flavorful aroma relies heavily on canned and processed ingredients. A recipe for Mexican Lasagna, for example, calls for cans of condensed cream of mushroom soup, enchilada sauce, nacho cheese sauce and refried beans, layered between readymade corn tortilla shells. It’s not an entirely can openercentric volume, of course. The book also includes recipes for Asian-inspired, grilled asparagus, salmon with fresh herbs, and a Dutch oven blueberry cobbler.

THE FLYING DUTCHMAN’S ASPARAGUS AND AGED GOUDA OMELETTE Makes 4 servings. 6 oz pencil-thin asparagus, ends trimmed 1½ tsp extra-virgin olive oil ½ tsp kosher salt Freshly milled black pepper 8 large farm-fresh eggs, divided 2 TBS unsalted butter, divided 2½ oz aged Gouda, grated (about 2⁄3 C), divided

Prepare a medium-high heat fire, with the flames occasionally licking the grill grate. Let it burn steadily for 30 minutes. Toss the asparagus with the oil, salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Carefully lay the asparagus across the grill grate. Grill, turning occasionally, until tender and lightly charred, 4-5 minutes. Transfer to a plate. In a bowl, whisk together the eggs and pepper to taste. Place a skillet over the grill. Drop in 1 tablespoon butter and let melt. Pour in half the eggs and sprinkle with half the cheese. Cook until sides and bottom are lightly set, about 2 minutes. Arrange half the asparagus on top of the omelet. Fold the omelet over the asparagus and cook 1 minute more. Divide the omelet in half, and serve. Repeat for remaining servings. — “Campfire Cookery”

DUTCH OVEN BLUEBERRY COBBLER Makes 4-6 servings. ½ C all-purpose flour ½ C granulated sugar ½ TBS baking powder 1 C heavy whipping cream 3 TBS unsalted butter, room temperature 1 C fresh blueberries Powdered sugar, garnish

In a large bowl, combine the flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, cream and butter, and mix until it makes a sticky dough. Grease 6 individual ramekins. Drop about ¼ cup dough into each ramekin and use your fingers to spread it evenly across the bottoms and up the sides to form a cup for the filling. Put a few spoonfuls of blueberries in each cup. Put the ramekins in your Dutch oven and pour a little hot water in the bottom, so ramekins are half-submerged. Cover the Dutch oven and put 8 hot coals on top and 4 around the outside of the bottom, but not underneath. Cook for 35-40 minutes, or until the dough has cooked through. Sprinkle with powdered sugar before serving. — “Ultimate Camp Cooking”

WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Some call them “danger dogs.” Others refer to them as “street dogs.” No matter the official title, what began as Tijuana street food quickly has spread north. Now these dangerously addictive, bacon-wrapped hot dogs are the darlings of the late-night crowd, especially among concertgoers who scoop them up from street vendors outside the HP Pavilion in San Jose, Calif., and the Fox Theater in Oakland, Calif., long after the last encore. Danger dogs are even popping up on some local cafe menus. One national fast-food chain — Wienerschnitzel, of course — has gotten in on the action, too. Tom Amberger, vice president of marketing for the chain, calls the flavor combination irresistible. “Everybody loves bacon,” he says. “It just seems to make everything better.” They’re a potent draw at CJ’s All American Grill in Walnut Creek, Calif. “They love them,” says owner Drew Albert. “Most people that have tried them definitely come back and get another.” The bacon-wrapped hot dog is self-explanatory. A piece of bacon is wrapped, corkscrew style, around a hot dog. Then the whole thing is grilled or

1. Wrap bacon around a hot dog, corkscrew-style. Secure the bacon to the hot dog using (nonplastic) tooth picks. 2. Grill the hot dog, as you would normally. It’s done when the bacon gets crispy. (If you don’t want the bacon too crispy, you can partially cook the hot dogs before putting on the bacon, then place on the grill.) Remove the toothpicks and place the hot dog in a bun. 3. Top it with your favorite condiments or go “street” style and add mayonnaise, ketchup, mustard and grilled onions.

Photos by Dan Rosenstrauch / Contra Costa Times

A “danger dog” is covered with cheese and served with sweet potato fries at CJ’s All American Grill in Walnut Creek, Calif. The danger dog, or “street dog,” became popular with street vendors who would sell them late at night in San Francisco’s Mission District. cooked in a frying pan. But there’s no consensus on how best to top it. Some like it naked — the best way to taste the flavor of the meat — while others dress it up “street”-style with mayonnaise, grilled onions, ketchup and mustard. Other fans have their own variations. “We have people who have done it with jalapeno and cheese,” Albert says. “We have had people do it with mustard and sauerkraut. You can dress it up however you’d like.” Most trace the danger dog’s origins back to Tijuana, Mexico, where it is considered street food. Then vendors began selling the item on street corners in Los

Angeles, and late at night in San Francisco’s Mission District. When danger dog street carts began popping up outside concert halls in San Jose and Oakland, danger dogs ascended to Bay Area cult food status. There were nights when you could find them, and other nights when finding a good bacon-wrapped hot dog was an adventure unto itself — and thus part of its allure. Soon people in New York, Chicago and other cities were singing the gospel of the danger dog. The natural next step, Albert says, was to take the danger dog off the street and put it on a real menu. “My wife had the idea,” Al-

A “danger dog” cooks on the grill at CJ’s All American Grill. bert says. “She knew about them from living in New York. And we heard they were pretty popular in San Francisco. Then one night we were watching — ‘Man v. Food,’ I think — and there they were.” Now, Albert is spreading the word. “It’s not something that people know about,” he says. “It’s different — and good.”

Getting a lunch lift from your leftovers By Judy Hevrdejs Chicago Tribune

The outdoor grilling/picnic season is in full swing. If you covet your free time (and I do), you cook enough for 10 when only eight are coming to dinner. You’re counting on leftovers. You say “leftovers” is an ugly word? Get over it. Leftovers can make a great lunch, especially if you want to squeeze sunshine time into the workday. So grill an extra chicken half or beef steak, pork chop or vegetables, perhaps zucchini or red pepper wedges. Make a little extra German potato salad, bacon-studded baked beans or chilled marinated vegetables. All are worth repurposing for lunch if — and this is crucial — you treat the foods properly during the warm weather. “When it comes to leftovers in the summertime, chilling out is critical,” says Shelley Feist, of the Partnership for Food Safety Education, a nonprofit based in Arlington, Va. “Leftover food that has been out in temperatures above 90 (degrees) Fahrenheit for more than one hour should be tossed.” Here’s why: “Incidences of foodborne illness do tend to spike in the summer,” says Feist, in part because the season’s warm, humid conditions are right for harmful

bacteria to thrive. “Bacteria love to thrive in the zone between 40 (degrees) Fahrenheit and 140 (degrees) Fahrenheit.” So once food is cooked, refrigerate it as soon as possible or, for the interim, place it in a cooler with adequate freezer packs. If freezer packs in the cooler are liquid by the time you get them home, says Feist, then you weren’t keeping something cool and you should toss perishable leftovers. Leftover shredded or sliced chicken, pork or beef can serve as a salad topper or sandwich filling. Consider mixing shredded chicken or pork with a favorite barbecue sauce, packing a bun separately, then heating the barbecue mix thoroughly (to 165 degrees F) in the microwave before spooning onto a bun. Pack a serving of potato salad, baked beans or marinated vegetables as a side. Don’t forget to pack such a lunch with a freezer pack and keep well chilled. Those grilled vegetables? Pack slices separate from bread or a bun, then assemble a sandwich at work. Or dice and mix vegetables with a cooked grain (barley, rice, quinoa), moisten with a vinaigrette and then chill until lunch.

More tips Pack one cooler with beverages, another with perishable foods. Guests can get to beverages without disturbing perishable foods that need to maintain a consistent, cold temperature. Reheat properly stored leftovers thoroughly in the microwave. Stir at least once during heating; after heating, let stand a few minutes.

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‘Campfire Cookery’ By contrast, “Campfire Cookery: Adventuresome Recipes and Other Curiosities for the Great Outdoors” (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 304 pgs., $29.95) is a curiosity in itself. Co-authors Sarah Huck and Jaimee Young, recipe developers and testers for New York Times food columnist Melissa Clark, have lavished considerable attention on their prose. In her foreword, Clark confesses she’s not entirely sure when her assistants are joking, but she knows a good recipe when she sees one. We do too, and there are many here. But unless Jeeves is into backpacking, it’s highly unlikely that we’ll be dining on this duo’s squab, stuffed with pate, and served on china. That said, a campfire breakfast that includes a Flying Dutchman’s Asparagus and Aged Gouda Omelette sounds pretty fabulous. As long as there’s coffee. And bacon.

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F4 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: Cooling Ways to deal with the hot days ahead.

Kein Cross’ Parisian home, level 1 Mirror

Kitchen island

Stairs to second floor

2-burner stovetop

Mini fridge 6½ feet Chair Couch Table

Sink

Desk Window

Window

Valerio Mezzanotti / New York Times News Service

The exterior of Kein Cross’ rental home in Paris aft`er its renovation. “It needed me. It was a diamond in the rough,” says Cross, a designer. The middle “window” on the upper floor is in fact mirrored glass dressed up to look like a window.

Paris Continued from F1 Cross, who has an apartment in Greenwich Village as well, continued: “It needed me. It was a diamond in the rough. Honestly, what I think it is, I walked up to it and I saw exactly the way I would make it, and exactly the way it would become, and without me it would never become. And what could be more fun than spending a month in the mother ship of decor doing your own house?” (It should be noted that Cross is someone who seeks out unusual spaces; his New York City duplex has a 3-foot-square dumbwaiter that he turned into a bathroom.) Cross, 49, travels to Paris frequently for business, and for sev-

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eral years ran La Maison Moderne, a housewares shop in Chelsea. Living in Paris has been his dream since he was 21. “I was going to live in New York for a year, then move to Paris,” he says. “It got delayed 26 or 27 years.” What finally pushed him to make the move was the death of a friend. “My assistant, Brian, had bought a house in Marrakesh with his boyfriend, and he was talking about moving there,” Cross says. “Last September, I was in Paris, and when I came back, I couldn’t get in touch with him. Then his brother called me and said he had had a heart attack and died. That kind of threw things into perspective, that you better do things when you’re thinking about it, because who knows if you’re going to be around next year.” He began his search this year and quickly found his house a few blocks away from Notre Dame in the Fourth Arrondissement. The exterior was battered and marred by a bricked-up window; the kitchen had an old water heater that “stuck out like a sore thumb”; and the bathroom was grubby. But the owner was happy to let Cross do anything he wanted, and the rent, which Cross would prefer not to disclose, was half market rate. His budget was $25,000 and he kept to it, with an eye for sales and a fearless ability to repurpose furnishings. He brought in a contractor he had worked with before, and the two shared the house for two weeks, tearing out most of the kitchen. “Who uses an oven?” Cross says. “Instead, I put in a two-burner cooktop, black ceramic, by Hotpoint, and I got an incredible coffeemaker, a Nespresso as big as my stove.

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Kein Cross’ Parisian home, level 2 Sink

Built-in closet TV table

Tub/ shower

Bunk beds

Chair

Stairs

Toilet

Closet Window

Window New York Times News Service

Cross’ trademark as a designer is black-and-white stripes. You only need an oven to bake, and the last thing I baked was a turkey in 1986.” New cabinets, under the cooktop and the island, were made out of bathroom vanities. Cross replaced the doors of a cabinet on an adjacent wall with white lacquered doors from a bathroom cabinet he bought, and put a console underneath as a desk. The leftover wood from the bathroom cabinet became a canopy over the kitchen sink. The total cost of all this, plus the two rolling storage boxes he uses for seating, came to about $3,400. (There were also a few splurges, including a cement bust of Bacchus that was about $2,800.) Cross used just three colors — white, gray and black — with his trademark black-and-white stripes. He camouflaged the water heater by painting it and the wall behind it dark gray, then striping the wooden canopy above it. The living area was so small there wasn’t room for a couch or

The first floor after Cross’ renovation. He stuck to a budget of $25,000 for the project, including roughly $2,800 for a cement bust of Bacchus.

“I was going to live in New York for a year, then move to Paris,” Cross says. “It got delayed 26 or 27 years.” even a pair of chairs. So Cross created what he calls a pasha’s bed: “anything you can put in a

little, narrow space and put pillows on it and make a place to relax.” In this case, that was the end of a modular sofa that cost about $1,000. The bedroom was another challenge. Hoping to evoke the romance of sleeping on a train, Cross bought a bunk bed with a futon that opened to a double bed on the bottom. But the futon was so uncomfortable he threw it out and bought a full-size mattress that doesn’t fold up. Even so, it is a cozy space, with the bottom of the upper berth covered in striped wallpaper and a cushion against the back wall. In the bathroom, he replaced the sink and mirror, regrouted the white tiles, installed $69 glass shower doors, added two rows of black tiles and striped the bath-

tub with black enamel paint. Much of the renovation magic was done with mirrors. Cross covered the outside of the bricked-up window on the second floor with mirrored glass (then he glued on pieces of wood to mimic mullions and dressed the windows in inexpensive gray shades and flowerboxes). Opposite the front door is another mirror that visually doubles the size of the entrance. There are also mirrors in the kitchen and bedroom walls. In reality, the space between Cross’ bed and the wall is so narrow that to get into the bathroom, he has to turn sideways, and the door, which could not be opened, had to be replaced with fabric. But to him, it is worth it. He is in his dream house, in Paris.

Swapping out stuck-on cabinet handles By Al Heavens The Philadelphia Inquirer

Q:

I wanted to make some changes to the look of my 25-year-old kitchen. Although the cabinets are in excellent con-

dition and I still like their style and color, I thought a new set of cabinet pulls would go a long way toward updating their look. Unfortunately, when I unscrewed the existing pulls, I found most of them were stuck to the cabinets. I thought about running a razor blade around the edges but I’m worried that doing so would damage the finish. The new pulls match the existing holes but the new design is just slightly narrower on the ends, so preserving the finish is important. Do you have any suggestions?

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A:

Might be built-up wax, or someone along the way might have glued the pulls to the surface as the hardware loosened and there was no longer an easy way to tighten them. I always try denatured alcohol to soften paint or glue so that I can wipe it away. There are household cleaners that would do the same thing, but some mar or dull the shine. Give it a try but be very careful.

Q:

I have metal windows installed in my condo in Sea Isle City, N.J. I am not sure I have the correct terminology, but there is a thin substance that separates the interior sill from the exterior sill. When I got the windows 10 years ago, the installer secured the windows to the building by

screwing the window through this substance. Someone pointed out that the substance that separates the two sills prevents the transfer of cold or heat from the outside sill to the inside sill. The substance is now shrinking away from the screws. Someone told me to take the screws out and fill the holes with silicone sealant and immediately put the screws back. I assume the windows are aluminum, and from what I’ve read, silicone sealant provides an airtight seal, as well as a water-resistant one. I’d say proceed.

A:

Questions? E-mail Al Heavens at aheavens@phillynews.com or write to him at The Philadelphia Inquirer, Box 8263, Philadelphia, PA 19101.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 F5

G

Next week: Sedums How best to appreciate these succulents.

Fine books take readers to gardens near and far By Joel M. Lerner Special to The Washington Post

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

The Mittleider system uses a minimal amount of water in this Victoria’s Vegetables greenhouse. A new volunteer garden located nearby uses the same system to grow food for the poor.

Mittleider Continued from F1 Victoria Roth has been using the Mittleider method in her Victoria’s Vegetables commercial business for the past two years, and she says it outproduces conventional soil-based gardens by at least 5-to-1. “Mittleider believed he could grow food for everyone,” Roth said. “He came up with this concept and went to 27 countries, setting up demonstration gardens in very different climates and areas.” The Mittleider method relies on raised beds, with a sandand-sawdust growing medium instead of dirt. Soil structure, composition and fertility is not an issue, Roth said, since dirt isn’t part of the system. Specially-designed irrigation pipes go through the beds. When properly set up and designed, Roth said, the garden only needs to be watered for 30 seconds every day. The plants are fed a mixture of water-soluble micronutrients, which are sprinkled on the growing medium surface, Roth said. The nutrients include iron, manganese, copper, zinc, nitrogen and phosphorus. “All these minerals are things your body needs,” Roth said. “If a plant isn’t fed these micro-nutrients, you won’t get them from eating that plant.” The Mittleider method can be used in any climate and place,

Beautifully illustrated books continue to be among the best ways to keep up with the latest trends in landscape design. Several new favorites of mine cover a wide range of landscape-related topics — and offer the opportunity to view the world from the comfort of your armchair. • “Hamptons Gardens,” by Jack deLashmet (Assouline, 2011, $150), is about the communities of farmers and fishermen that were founded more than 350 years ago on the easternmost reaches of Long Island, N.Y. The Hamptons include about 12 individual hamlets and villages with some of the most expensive real estate in the country. The author, a landscape designer, discusses residents’ desire to maintain gardens on their estates. The 155 color illustrations are magnificent with the text outlining the impetus influencing the landscape professionals. • “American Eden: From Monticello to Central Park to Our Backyards: What Our Gardens Tell Us About Who We Are,” by Wade Graham (Harper Collins, 2011, $35). Although the title implies that it’s a history going back to Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello home, built in the late 1700s, the book actually goes back over a century earlier to the styles that influenced Jefferson and his contemporaries.

The author describes subsequent periods in American garden design. This 459-page collection of landscape design history in this country is enjoyable reading. It is well researched, posing an interesting historic tie from the past to the present. • “The Living Garden: A Place That Works With Nature,” by Jane Powers (Frances Lincoln Limited, 2011, $35), begins by explaining ways the natural world takes care of itself. The balance of nature is a well-ordered system, cyclical and reliable. It is only in about the past 20 years that most humans have understood that this cycle is driven by billions of living and dying organisms all playing a part in the health of our planet. The author illustrates the importance of this balance among plants, wildlife and people. She describes the simple example of a plant’s growth, its demise, composting and return to the soil to add nourishment for the next generation of life.

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The Mittleider system uses a growing medium of sand and straw, above, to grow vegetables in raised beds, at right. The system pictured is used at Victoria’s Vegetables as well as a volunteer garden nearby. Roth said, including on rooftops or over asphalt. “The cost of the setup is upfront,” Roth said. “Once that is completed, the only cost is the water and the water-soluble micronutrients.” In many areas with poor soil, short growing seasons and limited resources, Roth said, the Mittleider method might be the most practical way to grow large amounts of produce. In Central Oregon, fresh produce is expensive, particularly

for people who must rely on food banks to stay fed. Getting fresh produce for distribution at the food bank is always a problem, says Gary Kelso, co-manager of the Giving Plate food relief organization in Bend, because there is not a lot available, and since it is perishable, the produce must be distributed quickly. “People don’t have a lot of gardens in this area, so there is not much surplus,” Kelso said. “The fresh vegetables in the stores have to come from somewhere else, and that means the transportation costs have to be added to the prices we pay.” The “Grow a Row” program was started by NeighborImpact three years ago to help address that problem. The program encourages local gardeners to grow extra vegetables, with the idea of donating the fresh pro-

duce to food banks to be distributed to needy people. “You will often see or hear of the Mittleider method as being organic gardening or the poor man’s hydroponic method,” Davis said. “We hope to show that it is practical to grow large amounts of vegetables here in the High Desert.” Interest in the food bank garden project has been good, Davis said, and part of the appeal for volunteers is learning the Mittleider techniques. “So far we have about 40 volunteers signed up to help,” Davis said. “The idea is that people will volunteer to help and learn, so they can teach others. We want this garden to be a selfsustaining learning place.”

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How to keep gardening to a ripe old age pick up on either color. I don’t know why the dwarf deutzia Nikko is not used more widely, especially massed. It is a low-maintenance, high-performing shrub that forms a lovely mound of fine, textured green leaves and is smothered in white blossoms in May.

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life’s third act, “Embroidered Ground.” Through this design and horticultural reduction, “we achieve a welcome serenity,” she says. Shrubs can grow large in just a few years, so it’s important to know how big your selections will get. There are now many, really good smaller and dwarf shrub varieties available that function as perennials in their flowering, texture and scale. If they are given optimum sun or shade conditions and good soil, they don’t need lifting, dividing or staking, and are less needy in a drought, and you don’t need to cut back and tidy them year to year. What you might give up in flower ornament, you gain in the decorative effects of foliage, along with winter form and color. Shrubs also feed and shelter birds in a way perennials cannot. Like many of us, Dickey loves the chartreuse-leafed spirea Ogon, sometimes sold as Mellow Yellow. It forms handsome, feathery mounds, about three feet high and wide. She also commends White Gold, a Japanese spirea with golden foliage and white flowers in spring. I love the bumald spirea named Magic Carpet. Its golden leaves are tinged a deep pink in the spring, and it pairs well with tulips that

7th St

After three or four hours of digging and weeding, a hot bath, a soft chair and a couple of aspirin have their appeal, but I like to think I’ve got a fair few years of full-bore gardening in front of me. And yet I do wonder what happens when you reach that point in life when the limbs are too feeble or arthritic for the work. For many folks, not much will change. They will continue to view the space around the house as a necessary evil and get the mow-and-blow brigade to cut the grass, mulch the beds and shape the bushes. (Favorite cringe scene of the past year: mowand-blower sculpting a gumdrop azalea with gas-powered hedge clippers.) But for active gardeners, who love to nurture plants and work the soil, the decision to scale back gardening also means scaling back the garden. This can be hard, to let go of beds that are full of memories as well as flowers. Page Dickey, a garden designer and writer in North Salem, N.Y., has consciously dismantled some of the beloved elements of her 30-year-old, three-acre garden at her property, Duck Hill, now that she and her husband, Bosco Schell, are in their 70s.

One candidate for change was a classic double border dominated by perennials, some 40 feet long, and now mass planted with a dwarf red-twigged dogwood underplanted with cranesbill and the cyclamineus daffodil Jenny. In time the dogwood will need the older canes removed in late winter to keep the young, stunningly colorful ones coming. I imagine that what she has lost in June glory she has made up with dramatic bands of stems in winter, blood red against the snow. I think of the redtwig dogwood as more vivid in colder climes. Highbush blueberries would work as well in such a setting. Apart from the fruit, you’d have the red foliage in fall and the orange glow on the winter twigs. Or you could use dwarf varieties of crape myrtle. The point is that by shifting to beds dominated by shrubs, you can have fabulous landscape effects with much less effort beyond the initial toil and expense. And like Dickey, you can throw in reliable bulbs and the lowestcare perennials, too, of course, plants such as cranesbills, Lenten roses and epimediums. “As we grow older, it becomes easier to admire simplicity, even to long for it,” Dickey writes in her book about gardening in

5th St

The Washington Post

Hwy 97

By Adrian Higgins


F6 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Let Fido spend the summer pest-free H

ere’s how to keep fleas, ticks and other pests from bugging your dogs and cats this summer. Feeding your cats and dogs well is one of the top things you can do to keep bugs at bay. Pets that eat balanced, high-quality diets seldom have pest problems. Ultra-premium canned food or a balanced homecooked diet are among the best choices. Beyond that, follow these tips, and make sure to consult your vet for more specific advice on prevention and for treatment.

Fleas and ticks Fleas can hitch a ride indoors on your pet and make a home in your carpets, baseboards and bedding. As for ticks, they climb tall grass and foliage. So when animals or

MARTHA STEWART humans walk by, ticks can crawl onto their skin and embed themselves. For many pets, flea bites cause only slight skin irritation. Other animals have a more severe reaction, which can include hair loss, lesions and ulcers. A serious infestation can trigger anemia, especially in puppies and kittens. Fleas may also carry infectious diseases and parasites such as tapeworm. Ticks can transmit Lyme disease; Rocky Mountain spotted fever (rare in cats); and ehrlichiosis, a disease that can attack white blood cells, the spleen, the liver, lymph nodes

and bone marrow. Prevention: For flea control, vacuum daily (dispose of the vacuum bag or debris outside), wash pet bedding in hot water and keep grass short. Consider adding beneficial nematodes (microscopic worms that feed on young fleas) to your yard. You can also sprinkle diatomaceous earth — a natural substance that causes fleas and ticks to dehydrate and die — indoors and out. Look for it at pet stores. For fleas, a repellent spray that’s made from herbal or food-based ingredients is one of the safest methods of direct intervention. The most effective treatments are chemical insecticides, which you apply periodically to an animal’s skin. “These work against all life stages of fleas and ticks, but they’re also the most toxic,” says veterinarian Kenneth Fisch-

er of Hillsdale Animal Hospital in Hillsdale, N.J. “Only use the minimum to get the job done.” If you find a tick, use tweezers to grab the head where it entered the skin (don’t squeeze the body), and pull it out gently but firmly. Then drown it in rubbing alcohol.

Mosquitoes Itchy bites aren’t the issue for pets. Dogs and outdoor cats can get heartworms from an infected mosquito, resulting in heartworm disease. The serious condition affects a pet’s heart, lungs and circulatory system. Prevention: Have your pets tested annually for heartworms, reduce their exposure to mosquitoes and use a monthly preventive as advised by your vet. “There is no proven natural preventative, and monthly oral preventatives

are quite safe,” Fischer says.

Ear mites If your pet is scratching near its ears or shaking its head, these external parasites may be the culprit. Another indicator: An animal’s ear canal may look like it’s full of coffee grounds (it’s debris from the mites). If left untreated, mites can damage the canal and the eardrum and cause permanent hearing loss. Prevention: Don’t introduce a new pet to your household without having her checked for ear mites by a vet. Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 W. 26th St., 9th floor, New York, NY 10001, or e-mailed to mslletters@marthastewart.com.

Robert Clark / New York Times News Service

Learn how to avoid pest problems, and you and your pets can enjoy a happy, healthy summer.

Flourless graham cracker cake well worth the effort By Julie Rothman

GRAHAM CRACKER CAKE

The Baltimore Sun

Fannie Felice of St. Augustine, Fla., was looking for a recipe for one of her favorite cakes that her motherin-law used to make some years ago. The cake was made with graham cracker crumbs and no flour. It also had coconut in the batter and was frosted with a chocolate whipped cream. Nancy Snyder from Easton, Md., sent in a recipe she found in one of her cookbooks, which she thought sounded very close to what Felice was searching for. This is not your simple one-bowl cake, but the effort involved in making this beauty is well worth the reward.

RECIPE FINDER

RECIPE REQUEST: Emilia Schwartz from Pasadena, Md., is looking for Weight Watchers recipe from a few years back for a salad using cannellini beans.

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278 or e-mail recipefinder@baltsun.com. If you send in more than one recipe, please put each on a separate piece of paper and include your name, address and daytime phone number.

Makes: 10-12 servings FOR THE CAKE: 25 graham crackers, crumbled (about 31⁄3 C) ½ C unsweetened shredded coconut 2½ tsp baking powder

1 stick (½ C) unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 C sugar 4 eggs, separated 1 tsp vanilla extract 1 C milk

To make the cake: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease and flour (or line with parchment paper) two 8- or 9-inch round cake pans. In a food processor, pulse the graham cracker crumbs and coconut until very fine. Add the baking powder and pulse six to eight times. Transfer to a bowl and set aside. With mixer on medium speed, cream the butter until smooth. Add the sugar gradually, beating until blended. Add the egg yolks, two at a time, beating for 1 minute after each addition. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Beat for 1 extra minute. Blend in vanilla extract. Reduce the mixer to low. Add 1 cup of the crumb mixture along with 1⁄3 cup of milk and mix to blend in. Repeat until all crumb mixture and milk are blended in. Scrape down sides of bowl and mix 10 seconds more. Set batter aside. Set up mixer with clean, dry mixing bowl and whisk attachment. Beat egg whites on medium speed until frothy. Add the cream of tartar and kick

⁄8 tsp cream of tartar FOR THE FILLING AND FROSTING: 1¼ C heavy whipping cream, well chilled 1 ⁄6 C confectioners’ sugar

1

the mixer up to medium-high. Beat until the egg whites reach the firm peak stage. Do not overbeat. Fold ¼ of the egg whites into the batter, taking about five full rotations of the bowl. Fold in the remaining whites, about 10 full turns. Spoon batter into prepared pans and smooth the surface. Bake in the center of the preheated oven for 25 to 30 minutes, or until cake layers begin to come away from the sides of the pan and are springy to the touch. Let cakes cool in pans for 10 minutes, then unmold onto cake racks to cool completely. To make filling and frosting: Chill clean mixing bowl and whisk in freezer for 5 minutes before beginning. Pour cream into chilled bowl and whip on medium high speed for 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the confectioners’ sugar and the cocoa, lower the speed to medium, and beat until the cream begins to thicken. Add the coffee and the Kahlua. Continue whipping until the cream reaches soft peak stage, then

1½ TBS unsweetened cocoa ½ tsp brewed coffee 1 TBS Kahlua FOR THE GARNISH: ¼ tsp unsweetened cocoa About ¼ C raspberries (optional)

remove from the mixer and finish whisking by hand until cream is thick. Refrigerate until ready to use. To construct the cake: Set first layer of cake on plate, topside down. Fit pastry bag with No. 5 plain tube and fill bag 1⁄3 full with mocha whipped cream. Starting ½ inch from edge of cake, pipe a circle of cream around the layer. Fill center with additional cream, smoothing surface with large metal spatula. Carefully place second layer on top of frosted bottom layer. Empty the remaining cream into the pastry bag. Pipe ½-inch dots on the top layer, beginning at the outer edge. Each dot should touch the preceding one, forming a ring. Continue working toward the center of the cake until the entire surface is covered. Put the ½ teaspoon unsweetened cocoa in a fine strainer, and gently tap it to sprinkle the cocoa across the top of the cake. Add raspberries, if desired. Refrigerate, but remove from the refrigerator at least 1 hour before serving.

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 G1

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ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

1 7 7 7

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food

S . W .

246

265

267

270

Building Materials

Fuel and Wood

Lost and Found

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry , split lodgepole, 1 for $155 or 2 for $300. No limit. Cash, check, or credit. Bend 541-420-3484

FOUND black and white young female cat, might be from downtown, jumped into car. 541-389-9670.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

212

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

242

Exercise Equipment Elliptical, Nordic Track 990, good condition, $500 firm. Call 541-419-6436

200

Golf Equipment

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

A Red Leather Sofa, Loveseat and Chair. Great condition. $500 or best offer. Please call 541-318-0286 Beautiful 7-ft 4-inch blue Leather Couch; 68-inch marble topped bar. Both in perfect condition. Moving. $500 each. 541-504-9761

245 EXCELLENT CLEAN GOLF BALLS ... $20/100 541-383-2155.

EZ-GO golf cart, Freedom, 36 volt, new batteries, charger, canopy, enclosure. Green/ tan, $1800. 541-317-8546

246

In the Forum Center

541-330-0420

Call 866-700-2424

255 THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

259

Memberships

Guns, Hunting and Fishing 30-06 Remington 770 bolt hunting rifle w/3x9 scope, like new, $350. 541-526-0617

260

30-378 Weatherby Mag Mark V Leopold VariX lll 6.5-20 x 50mm. $2100. 541-771-6768

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

LOST DOG $500 REWARD

REDMOND Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 1242 S. Hwy 97 541-548-1406 Open to the public .

"CHIRPA" - 8 year old female, off-white Pekingese Shih Tzu. Lost in SW Redmond near Yew & Canal Streets over Memorial Day weekend. CALL 541-414-4424

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

LOG TRUCK LOADS of dry Lodgepole firewood $1200 for Bend delivery. 541-419-3725 or 541-536-3561 for more info.

Solitaire & Wedding Band with 12 diamonds, $4000, Bend, 253-906-7777.

Computers

Misc. Items Business Owners: Gifts for clients or employees? (40) 1-lb. boxes of Gourmet Bridgeton Fudge at cost, $6.25/box. All or part. Call 541-923-0574 BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Kenmore 6000 BTU air conditioner, w/ remote, like new. $125. 541-389-9268

Found Camera, corner of Westview & 15th in Bend, 6/13, FIND IT! call to ID, 541-318-8789. BUY IT! SELL IT! Lost Cat, Grey tabby, female, short hair, missing 6/6, SE The Bulletin Classiieds Bend, 541-318-6030 Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800

541-647-8261

Art, Jewelry and Furs

Brasada Ranch Yearly Golf Membership, discount at $400/mo, call 541-815-9002.

Free Boxer Mix, neutered, to 308 Ruger M77 Rifle w/ approved without small kids, Weaver 4X scope, exc. cond., good dog, 541-280-5264. $500, 541-389-5421. Furniture German Shepherd AKC pups, Carry concealed in 33 states. $700. 509-406-3717 Sat. June 25th 8 a.m, Red Adult companion cats, free to www.sbhighdesertkennels.com mond Comfort Suites. Qualify seniors! Tame, altered, shots, German Shepherd Purebred Pups For Your Concealed Hand ID chip, more. To visit or for all colors avail, shots, microgun Permit. Oregon & Utah info, see www.craftcats.org Visit our HUGE home decor chipped, $400+, 208-404-9434 permit classes, $50 for Or or call 389-8420, 647-2181. consignment store. New www.smsgsd.com egon, $60 for Utah, $100 for items arrive daily! 930 SE Adult foster cats: 1-5 yrs, or- Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue both. www.PistolCraft.com. Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., ange, tabbys, all shots, ready Call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS group. At least a dozen small Bend • 541-318-1501 to adopt $10 ea 541-548-5516 (4867) to Pre-Register. kittens just out of foster care. www.redeuxbend.com 389-8420, 647-2181. Altered, AT STUD unregistered black CASH!! shots, ID chip, more. Small & white parti-poodle, teaFor Guns, Ammo & Reloading adoption fee. Open Sat/Sun GENERATE SOME excitement in cup size @ only 4 lbs! Supplies. 541-408-6900. your neighborhood! Plan a 1-5, call for other days/ $150. 541-546-7305. garage sale and don't forget hours. For directions, photos, DO YOU HAVE to advertise in classified! Aussie's Mini/Toy, AKC, all coletc. see www.craftcats.org. SOMETHING TO SELL 541-385-5809. ors, family raised, 1st shot, LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, FOR $500 OR LESS? wormed, parents on site. titled parents, performance Late 40’s Vanity, excellent con541-788-7799; 541-598-6264 Non-commercial dition, curved glass mirror, pedigree, OFA cert hips & eladvertisers may $180. 541-279-4634 Bearded Dragon - 1.5 yrs. old bows, $500. 541-771-2330 place an ad with our nocturnal, great lizard. Full www.royalflushretrievers.com Patio table, brown metal frame, "QUICK CASH set up included. $115 Labradoodles, Australian smoked glass top, 66X40, exc. SPECIAL" 541-771-8377 Imports - 541-504-2662 cond. $50. 541-388-5152 1 week 3 lines www.alpen-ridge.com Boxer Pups, AKC, 1st shots, $12 or Second Hand house & crate-trained. 4 left, Maine Coon cross kittens, 4 2 weeks $18! call for pix. 541-280-6677 Mattresses, sets & males, 2 females, 2 polydacAd must singles, call tyls, $75 ea. 541-389-0322 Boxer pups, AKC & CKC Regisinclude price of single item 541-598-4643. tered, 2 females left, all shots. POODLE Pups, AKC Toy of $500 or less, or mul$500-$650. 541-325-3376 tiple items whose total Pomapoos too! Lovable, happy Check out the does not exceed $500. tail-waggers! 541-475-3889 Chihuahua-Pug mix puppies, 3 classiieds online males, raised for personal POODLE PUPS, males, black & Call Classifieds at companions, $125 each. white, shots, wormed, house www.bendbulletin.com 541-385-5809 541-389-0322 Updated daily raised. $275-$375. www.bendbulletin.com 503-779-3844. Chi-Poms, cute, lovable, playful, 6 wks. Male $250, female, Pug Puppy Male Black $400, GUNS $300 OBO. 541-598-5076 Parents on site, Call Buy, Sell, Trade 503-863-6755,503-928-9511 541-728-1036. Dachshund AKC mini, $310. We Service All Vacs! Bend 503-470-0729. Video at: Quaker Parrot, 1 yr. old, with US ARMY COLT 1911, made in www.bendweenies.com Free Estimates! all accessories, $150, call 1918, issued leather holster, 541-548-0747. $1750 OBO, 541-728-1036 Dachshund Mini Puppy, The Oreck only 1 male left! $250. Call UTAH + OR CCW: Oregon and XL Silver 360-607-0604 (Prineville). Utah Concealed License Only $249 Class. Saturday June 18 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $65 Utah, $100 OR+UT. InBend’s Only cludes Utah required photo, Authorized Call Paul Sumner Schnauzer Mix, male, 10 weeks, Oreck Store. (541)475-7277 for prereg, 2nd shot, pup kit, loves kids, email and info $350. 541-410-7701 Sheltie/Chihuahua, 1 year old female, not spayed, very friendly, $100. 541-876-5220

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

249

Sweet Lop Rabbit male, $15. NOT for snake food. For more info, call 541-548-0747

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

There is Hope! Call for FREE DVD Farewell To Fibromyalgia

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Health and Beauty Items

Majestic Wood Cookstove, 6 caps, very nice/clean, black/ chrome. $700. 541-923-6987

Pets and Supplies

A-1 Washers & Dryers

248

Chronic Pain & Fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, anxiety, migraines?

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Winch. Mdl 97 Black Diamond Trap, 12 ga, very good cond, $1200 OBO. 541-385-6021

Antiques & Collectibles

General Merchandise

208

O r e g o n

Guns, Hunting and Fishing

Treadmill, good cond., $80, OBO; Olympic Weight set & Bench, curling bar, etc., $75 OBO, 541-390-1161.

Furniture & Appliances

B e n d

210

208

!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A v e . ,

Furniture & Appliances

208

210

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

268

Trees, Plants & Flowers Large tomato plants for $5. Broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and several varieties of pepper plants for $2. (541) 390-7263.

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS 541-389-9663

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663 For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Hummingbirds Are Back!

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Farm Market

300 325

Hay, Grain and Feed Hay for Sale - Grass & Grass/Alfalfa mix, 3 tie and 3x4 bales. Call 541-548-3086 Quality Hay For Sale Delivery Available 541-350-0018 541-777-0128 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

333

Poultry, Rabbits, and Supplies FREE Red Frizzle Bantam, three 541-617-9501

roosters, months.

350

Horseshoeing/ Farriers NILSSON HOOF CARE - Certified natural hoof care practitioner with www.aanhcp.net 541-504-7764.

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1496 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Where buyers meet sellers.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

9 7 7 0 2

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend John Deere mower deck for X500 select series tractor. New $600. 541-536-5466. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

541-322-7253

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Haying Contractor will mow rake & bale for percentage, or will buy standing hay. Call 541-948-2125


G2 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

HEALTHCARE

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

CAUTION

421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state.

Director of Nursing East Cascades Retirement Community in Madras Oregon is looking for a new Director of Nursing (DON) for our 20 bed Skilled Nursing Home. Must have: • Valid Oregon RN license • Exp. in Long-Term Care • Passion for working with seniors DON experience is preferred but not a requirement. This is a great opportunity for an experienced nurse ready to make the leap to DON. vernon@srhousingmgmt.com

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

In-Home Pet Sitter. Dates vary, 2-5 nights. Requires o'night stay. 2 cats & dog. Refs req’d. 541-647-8193

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809

Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809

Drivers: Local moving company seeks Class A Drivers. Top pay, benefits; experience preferred. Please call weekdays: 541-383-3362.

Executive Director 541-383-0398

Molalla Manor Care Center, part of the Prestige Care family, is looking for a dedicated and compassionate Administrator to join our Legacy of Care in Molalla, Oregon. Ideal candidate will have a Bachelor’s degree and must be licensed as a Nursing Home Administrator with 2 yrs. exp. in LTC. We offer competitive salary, benefits, including medical, dental and 401K. Please apply online: www.prestigecare.com EEO/AA Inventory and Accounting Specialist needed to join our team. AA or BA in Accounting or Business required. Fax resume and cover letter with salary history to 866-611-3607. LIFT MECHANIC, experienced, for Solitude Mountain Resort Utah. Year-round + benefits. Apply online at: www.skisolitude.com

Mental Health Program Manager

We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

454

NURSE

Administrator

Prineville Hospital Foundation seeks a professional Executive Director for a regular full-time, exempt position to lead philanthropic activities that benefit the Prineville Hospital Foundation. Compensation range for this position is $55,000 $75,000 annually/DOE. To review the full job description visit our website at www.prinevillehospital foundation.org To apply for this position send cover letter and resume to phfresumes@gmail.com or to PO Box 596, Prineville, OR 97754. The posting for this position closes June 30, 2011.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Full-time manager for an 11 bed Adult Residential Psychiatric Treatment Program in Grants Pass, Oregon. The manager oversees program, regulation compliance, staff, and services for clients with mental health disorders. Master’s degree in psychology or related field preferred with licensure a plus; Registered Nurse with healthcare management experience will be considered. Salary depending on qualifications. Excellent benefits. For further information visit www.optionsonline.org and click on “Jobs”; application available from website. Please submit a letter of inquiry and résumé by email to jgillyatt@optionsonline.org or fax to 541-479-3514.

Regional Nurse Consultant (RN)

Ranch Hand - Seeking full time ranch hand for smoke free workplace. Duties include operating tractors, hay equipment, sprinkler irrigation, fence repair, feeding cattle. Experience with horses & mechanical repair helpful. Houseing & utilities provided. Send resume & references to 89037 Hwy 293, Madras, OR 97741 or e-mail jams@wildblue.net

Prestige Care is looking for a Regional Nurse Consultant (RN) for our Corporate Office in Vancouver, WA. RN will be responsible for providing support to skilled nursing facilities as necessary to ensure the safety and well being of residents and to achieve compliance with company policies and procedures, State and Federal regulations and clinical standards of practice. Ideal candidate will have a min. of 5 yrs exp. as a DNS in a skilled nursing facility. Must have working knowledge of State and Federal regulations, the Remember.... Add your web address to survey process, the miniyour ad and readers on mum data set (MDS) and The Bulletin's web site will Resident Assessment Inbe able to click through austrument (RAI) process. tomatically to your site. Prestige offers competitive salary, benefits, including medical, dental and 401K. To apply visit: What are you www.prestigecare.com looking for? You’ll EEO/AA

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Railroad Vegetation Vegetation control on railroad tracks in western US. Seeking Class B Hazmat/ Tank. Ability to pass pesticide license requirements. Various states, extended travel, full time, benefits, lodging/per diem. 503-362-8322

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Foreman

Crook County Road Department Working Foreman (Non-union) $24.79 per hour Full time w/benefits Closes: July 7, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. Must have experience in road maintenance, construction and supervision of working staff. Current Oregon CDL and Medical ICC Card. Able to lift 40 pounds, stoop, kneel bend and stand for long periods. General knowledge of the use and operation of trucks and heavy equipment. General knowledge of mechanical maintenance of trucks and heavy equipment. Willing to work weekends and evenings for emergency response. Must have current ODOT flagging certification card, or willing to be certified.

REQUIREMENTS:

Applicants selected for interview will be required to take a pre- employment drug test. This is a non-union represented position. Applications and full job description can be found at www.co.crook.or.us. Along with the Crook County application, please submit the “Crook County Road Department Application Supplement”. Please apply at the Crook County Treasurer’s/Tax Office at 200 NE 2nd St., Prineville, OR 97754; 541-447-6554.

find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

SOCIAL SERVICES

Children's Care Coordinator In Grants Pass, OR. Full-time Children's Care Coordinator(s) position open for wrap-around and intensive community-based treatment services. Master's degree in psychology or related field preferred, but bachelor's degree with experience with child-serving agencies will be considered. Competitive salary commensurate with degree and experience. Excellent benefits. For more information and an application, visit www.optionsonline.org and click on Jobs, or call 541-476-2373. EOE. Fax application to 541-479-3514. The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

528

Finance & Business

Loans and Mortgages

500

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

528

www.oregonfreshstart.com

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

486

THE BULLETIN The Bulletin has an immediate opening for a full-time pressroom Roll Tender. This entry-level position is responsible for the loading of newsprint rolls and the operation of the reel stands on the press. This position works 32 to 40 hours per week, with benefits. Pay rate $10.00 per hour.

Sell an Item

Independent Positions

FAST!

Supplemental income! Place/ supervise international high school students in your community. Training, compensation and international trip available. Call Sid @ 1-855-299-6167

If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days

The Bulletin

(Private Party ads only)

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

SECURITY OFFICERS $10.00/hr GUARDSMARK, LLC A nationwide leader in security services is hiring a FT officer to work a night shift for the Redmond area. Applicants must have or be able to obtain a DPSST certification. They must also have a clean criminal background, good computer skills, a professional demeanor and excellent customer service skills. This position requires several miles of walking per day. Individuals with any security, law enforcement or military backgrounds are encouraged to apply! Please fax resume to 503-224-2057. For further company information please visit www.guardsmark.com

The right person for the job must be able to move and lift 50 lbs. or more on a continuing basis. The position also requires becoming certified as a forklift driver; reaching, standing, sitting, pushing, pulling, stooping, kneeling, walking and climbing stairs. Learning and using proper safety practices will be a primary responsibility. If interested, or for more information, please contact Al Nelson, Pressroom Manager via e-mail, anelson@bendbulletin.com Applications are also available at the front desk at The Bulletin, 1777 Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. Pre-employment drug testing required.

Where buyers meet sellers. You know what they say about “one man’s trash”. There’s a whole pile of “treasure” here!

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

573 BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

PRINTING PRESS

Are you interested in learning the entry-level basics of being a Pressman?

541-382-3402

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

RV House Technician

RV dealership is in need of an experienced house technician. This position requires a minimum of three years experience with knowledge of electrical, plumbing and basic carpentry. Employee must supply own tools, pass background check and drug testing. 40 hr. work week Mon. - Fri. Benefit pkg includes Medical, Dental, RX & Vision. Wage D.O.E. EOE. Please send resume to Box 16403210, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

visit our website at

Call 541-385-5809

Business Opportunities Elk Lake Lodge One-quarter ownership for sale. Includes year-round cabin usage. $525,000. Courtesy to Brokers. Call 541-390-6776

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

642

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $610$650/mo. 541-385-6928.

DELUXE 2 BEDROOM $495 per mo.

Call for Specials! 630

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 1100 sq ft, 2 Bdrm, 1½ bath downtown townhome with patio. Home biz OK. 111 NW Hawthorne #6. $795/mo incl water/garbage. 541-388-4053 Avail. 6/25, Furnished 1 bdrm. condo at 7th Mtn., all utils+ cable & wifi paid, deck, pools, hot tubs, $700+dep., no smoking/pets, 541-979-8940 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Renovated 2 bdrm., 1 bath, blocks from St. Charles & Pilot Butte. W/S/G paid. Laundry onsite. Parking. No pets/ smoking.$625. 541-410-6486

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $615/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $650/mo. 541-480-3666

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. Starting at $625.

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

personals Seeking info of suspicious activity involving lt blue GMC mini pickup w/black lumber rack, areas of: NE Watt Way; Juniper Rd; NE 4th/Greenwood; and/or Hwy 20/27th St. Call 541-848-0288 Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Cottage like large 1 bdrm in quiet 6-plex in old Redmond, SW Canyon/Antler. Hardwoods, W/D. Refs, $550+ utils, avail July, 541-420-7613

incl. storage room and carport, smoke free bldg., fenced dog run, on-site laundry, close to schools, park and shopping. O BSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com 541-923-1907

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 G3 650

658

693

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent Redmond

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big wood stove, util. room, 1/2 acre lot, RV parking, dbl garage w/openers, $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

3 Bedroom, 2 bath, 1994 manufactured home. Nice & clean, 8291 N Hwy 97, Terrebonne. No pets/smoking, $725/mo. 541-419-9576

Great 3200sf building, open floor plan, lots of parking, great opportunity! Rent neg. 1279 NE 2nd Bend. Call 541-420-4418; 541-383-1429

4 BDRM., 3 BATH, 2150 sq.ft. home, incl. 500 sq.ft. office on site, no garage, avail. 7/1, $1200, No smoking. 509-947-9662.

A Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1168 sq.ft., newer paint & carpet, patio, large lot, RV parking, dbl. garage, w/opener, $850, 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

A newer 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1590 sq. ft, gas fireplace, great room, huge oversize dbl. garage w/openers, big lot, $1195, 541-480-3393 or 610-7803

Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660

PROVIDENCE. 3/2 single story; Large Fenced Yard; RV parking; Pets; $1150. 541-480-9200.

Crooked River Ranch, 5 acres horse property fenced, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D hookup, $800 plus deps. 541-420-5197,209-402-3499

Real Estate For Sale

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Eagle Crest gated 3 Bdrm 2½ bath home w/3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, pvt hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $1400/mo + security dep and utils/maintenance. Lease w/option; owner may carry. Call 541-923-0908.

745

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend Beautiful, newer 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1700 sq.ft., on 2.5 acre, nice neighborhood, dbl. garage, gorgeous views of Cascades, RV/Boat storage, $975 mo., 1st, last, dep., 541-382-6268.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

2 Bdrm. Starting at $525 Ask Us About Our Sumertime Specials! Chaparral & Rimrock Apts Clean, energy efficient, w/patios,on-site laundry, storage avail. Near schools, pools, skateboard park & shopping. Large dog run, some large breeds OK w/mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1095. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Houses for Rent SW Bend

648

Houses for Rent General

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

656

3/2 mfd. 1440 sq.ft., family room, wood stove, newer carpet and paint, big lot, dbl garage, w/opener. $895. 541-480-3393 /610-7803

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 4 Bdrm., 2 bath, 2032 sq.ft. mobile in Prineville, 40x36’ shop, 2.28 fenced acres, setup for horses, pets allowed, hot tub, private well, $950/mo., deposits neg., call 541-416-2557.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678. The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $500/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

700 800

Boats & RV’s

Homes for Sale

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

750

Redmond Homes Eagle Crest ~ Owner will carry with down. Gated 3 bedroom, 2½ bath home with 3-car garage & workshop. Reverse living, private hot tub, beautiful mountain views, 2200 sq ft. Enjoy Eagle Crest’s pool, tennis & exercise facilities. $399,000. Call 541-923-0908.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

850

Snowmobiles

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $850! Sled plus trailer package $1550. Many Extras, call for info, 541-548-3443. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

860

Quality Builders Electric

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Building/Contracting

Levi’s Dirt Works:RGC & CGC

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways... Call Grant, 541-279-3183 • CCB190612

Computer/Cabling Install

Excavating Residential & Commercial subcontracting for all your dirt & excavation needs. • Small & large jobs for contractors & home owners by the job - or hour. • Driveway grading (low cost get rid of pot holes & smooth out your driveway) • Custom pads large & small • Operated rentals & augering • Wet & dry utilities • Concrete CCB#194077 541-639-5282.

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, con struction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Since 1978

YUCK I do not want to clean gutters again! Then Call B&R 541-389-8008 1-800-580-8008 and we will! ccb#103411 Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years! FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883

Honda VT700 Shadow 1984, 23K, many new parts, battery charger, good condition, $3000 OBO. 541-382-1891 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Motorcycles And Accessories HARLEY DAVIDSON CUSTOM 883 2004 • Forward controls • Quick release windshield • Back rest • Large tank • Low miles! • $4000 Call 541-504-9284 or 541-905-5723

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Like Brand New

Dinli 50cc. 2003, Electric start, great shape. Perfect for your kids’ first quad. $800. 541/954-5452, John.

865

ATVs Harley Davidson Heritage Softail, 2009. 682 mi., 7 yr ext. warranty, upgraded pipes, engine guard bar. Bike has been lowered; mint cond. Consider trade. $15,500. 541-420-5855

17.5’ Bayliner 175, 135HP merc, perfect cond., Bimini Top, Lawrence fish finder, all safety equip., Kay trailer w/breakaway tongue, $8000 OBO, 541-350-2336.

18’3” Bluewater 1984, 1 owner, 289 fishing motor & water skis, Calkins trailer, fish finder, sun cover, boat cover, well taken care of, $3500. Call 541-815-7367

18’ Sailboat, Main & Jib, swing keel & rudder,sleeps 2,trailer, $2000 OBO; 9’ Fiberglass Trihull, $400; 10’ Ram-X Dinghy, $475, 541-280-0514.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

HONDA 2004 400EX, like new condition with extras. $3000 OBO. 541-420-7100.

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919. Polaris Sportsman X2, 2006, 500cc, HO EFI, 180 miles, black/silver, dump bed, $3950. 541-317-8546

Fabulous country ranch, with barn and much more. Call for details. 541-475-7599

2 Adjacent 1-Acre Lots in Oregon Water Wonderland off Century Dr., 55405 Gross Dr. S., 1 lot w/septic, $49,000, 1 without, $39,000, will carry and/or build to suit, 541-698-7720.

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail Classic 2006, Vance-Hines pipes, crash bar w/foot pegs, Power Command, Stage 1 backrest w/luggage rack, Dyno-tune, all work performed by Jerry’s Custom Cycle, exc. cond, $13,900 OBO. 541-549-4834, 588-0068

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike! $8800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Rooing AMERICAN ROOFING Quick, efficient, quality work New • Re-roofs • Repairs Free Estimates CCB #193018 Call Jorge - 541-497-3556

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Tile, Ceramic

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

GAS

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 Ferris Building & Landscape Maintenance Remodeling, Pole Barns, Landscape Maint., Tree Service & Haul Away. CCB #68496 Harry Ferris 541-408-2262 Summer Maintenance! Monthly Maint., Weeding, Raking, One Time Clean Up, Debris Hauling 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Free aeration with full season agreement, Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

CHECK YOUR AD

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Window Cleaning

Snowberry Village #50 $78,500. 3 bdrm, 2 baths 1404 sq. ft. 1993 Silvercrest. NEW ~ NEW ~ NEW! EXTENSIVELY REMODELED. All rooms are spacious. Features new paint, new carpet, new tile floors in kitchen, laundry room & both baths, some new appliances. New exterior paint. A must see! Call Marilyn Rohaly, Broker, 541-322-9954 John L. Scott Real Estate Bend www.JohnL.Scott.com

Window Cleaning Deliciously Low Prices • All Work Guaranteed • NO Streak Policy • Family Owned & Operated • Same Day Service Free Estimates • Residential/ Commercial 760-601-0013

541-385-5809

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport ATV 2008 Blue, Low hours very clean, freshly serviced. $3950. Will consider offers. See at JD Powersports, Redmond. 541-526-0757 • Richard 541-419-0712

20’ Blue Water Vision, 2000. 220 hp, dual batteries w/ switch, great for family skiing/ wake boarding/fishing. Sun shade, tubes, skis & depth finder incl. Runs great! Always stored inside. $8500. 541-420-5073 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

870

Boats & Accessories 14' aluminum flat bottomed boat $300. Call 541-647-9637 after 12:00 P.M. email, edsina2@hotmail.com

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Please check your ad on the Harley Dyna FXDWG 1998, custom paint, lots of chrome, first day it runs to make sure head turner, be loud & proud, it is correct. Sometimes in$7500, 541-280-9563 structions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please Honda Gold Wing GL contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be 1100, 1980. 23,000 happy to fix it as soon as we miles, full dress plus can. R..E Deadlines are: helmets, $3500 or Weekdays 11:00 noon for best offer. next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. Call 541-389-8410 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Yamaha Grizzly Sportsman Special 2000, 600cc 4-stroke, push button 4x4 Ultramatic, 945 mi, $4100. 541-678-4030

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975

***

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Honda Trail 90 1969, Yellow, very nice, dual spd. trans, rack, street legal, $1995, 541-318-5010

Summer Price

For Sale by Owner $285,000.

• 1 Bdrm/1 Bath, Cozy, clean end unit Central location. Fenced back yard. Off street parking. No Pets. $ 4 2 5 WST 762 • Near Pioneer Park - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs units. Coin-op Homes with Acreage laundry on site. Private balconies. $ 4 9 5 WST •Near Downtown on Bond - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath. Laundry facilities Fleetwood 1512 sq ft double on site. Off street parking. $ 5 7 5 WST wide on 1.34 acres, Crooked • Furnished Studio Unit - Down by the riverside. $ 5 9 5 All River Ranch. Heat pump, 2 Utilities. bdfrms, den, 2 full baths, • 3 Bdrm/1 Bath Close to Downtown - small fenced courtsepa guest room & garage yard + large community area. Pets considered. W/D hook-ups. w/ 1/2 bath. Great view. $ 5 9 5 WST. $126,500. Call for appoint• 1 Bdrm/1 Bath NE Guest House with Gas Fireplace and ment, 541-923-0574 W/D included. Fenced yard. Pet okay. all hardwood floors. Very People Look for Information private. $ 6 0 0 WS • 2 Bdrm/ 1.5 Bath Townhouse - Near Hospital - single ga- About Products and Services rage. Laundry room. Private patio. Extra parking. $ 6 6 5 WS. Every Day through • SW Side Close to all The Action! 2 Bdrm/1 Bath duplex The Bulletin Classifieds with sgl. garage and real fireplace. Nice deck. Fenced ‘ala naturale’ back yard. Pets Okay. $ 6 7 0 WS 763 • Spacious Townhome Close to Hospital. 2 Bdrm/2.5 Bath with sgl. garage, and laundry room. Gas fireplace. Extra stor- Recreational Homes age. $720 WS. and Property • Close to River and Downtown - 3 Bdrm/1.5 Bath. W/D The Bulletin is now offering a Hook-ups. Rear Deck with large storage room. Ample off street Elk Lake Lodge One-quarter LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE parking. $ 7 2 5 WST ownership for sale. Includes Rental rate! If you have a • Very Nice Newer 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath NE home. Approx. year-round cabin usage. home to rent, call a Bulletin 1800 sq. ft. mtn. views. Double garage. Fenced natural back$525,000. Courtesy to BroClassified Rep. to get the yard. $ 9 5 0 mo. kers. Call 541-390-6776 new rates and get your ad ***** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES ***** started ASAP! 541-385-5809 CALL 541-382-0053 773

Home Improvement

870

Boats & Accessories

756

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Electrical Services

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Jefferson County Homes

Acreages

Barns

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

SAVER!

16’ Esquire Runabout, new paint, upholstery, rebuilt trailer, new Bimini top, 115 HP Merc engine, $5200 invested in rebuild, selling for $3950, Please call 541-536-9281 or 541-948-2617. 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Houseboat 38 x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20’ cabin, 12’ rear swim deck plus 6’ covered front deck. Great price! $14,500. 541-788-4844

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435


G4 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN 875

881

Watercraft

Travel Trailers

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Fun Finder Model 189FBS, 2008, 7’ wide w/slide; 19’ long, sleeps 5, excellent condition, 3400# dry, $10,500. Call Fred, 541-516-1134 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Autos & Transportation

932

933

935

975

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

4WD 33,000 miles, traction control. Vin #524154

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Honda Pilot LX 2007 $18,888 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Chevy 3/4 Ton 1989, 4x4, 100K miles, 350 engine, Great cond. $3900. Call 541-815-9939

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Surveyor Model #264, 2011, used 1x, exlnt cond, always under cover, Cherry cabinets, slide-out, automatic awning. $22,500. 541-977-5358

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

880

Motorhomes 30’ Diesel Pusher Safari Sahara 1998. 20k orig. miles, exc. cond., maint. records, 300 h.p. Cat engine, 60 Allison trans., Magnum S26V300 chassis, LR slide, front entry, rear queen bed, full shower, Nomad & Sultan pkgs., low hours on generator. $53,000 • 541-410-3658.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882 Alfa See Ya 40 2005. 2 slides, 350 CAT. Tile. 2 door fridge w/ice maker. $105K. 541-610-9985

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $89,900. 541-215-5355

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 JRL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $52,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi., Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, $61,000, 541-548-5216.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $64,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Chevrolet 3500 Service Truck, 1992, 4x4, automatic, 11-ft storage bed. Liftgate, compressor & generator shelf inside box, locked storage boxes both sides of bed, new tires, regular maintenance & service every 3K miles, set up for towing heavy equip. $4495 obo. 541-420-1846

GMC 6000 dump truck 1990. 7 yard bed, low miles, good condition, new tires! ONLY $4500 OBO. 541-593-3072

Chevy Flatbed 1975, 454 engine, 2-spd trans, tires 60%, Runs/drives well, motor runs great, $1650. 541-771-5535

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. Peterbilt 379 Dump Truck 1988, 15’ box, drop axle, 425 Cat, 13-spd, $20,000 OBO. Call 541-233-8068 Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355. Towmaster Equipment Trailer, 14,000 lb capacity. Tandemn axle, 4-wheel brakes, 18’ bed, heavy duty ramps, spare tire mounted, side mounted fork pockets, all tires in good condition. $4295 or best offer. 541-420-1846.

Truck with Snow Plow!

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Utility Trailers

12 ft. Hydraulic dump trailer w/extra sides, dual axle, steel ramps, spare tire, tarp, excellent condition. $6500 firm. 541-419-6552

931

Brand new studded snow tires, 275-65xR16, fit all mid-sized SUV's & cars. Cost over $500 will sell $400. 541-706-1820 Leer Canopy, on 2000 Chevy X-cab short box, $500, 541-408-4709. We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $97,400. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

MUST SELL

70 Monte Carlo All original, beautiful, car, completely new suspension and brake system, plus extras. $5000 obo. 541-593-3072 Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

(Private Party ads only) Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11 1/2 ft. overall height, perfect cond,$37,999. 541-312-8974 MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250 Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179. Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395 Ford F150 2010 Super Cab Lariat loaded, 12,000 miles. $25,977 #B74273 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Ford 2-Dr. Sedan 1951, exc., original, ready to cruise, $8500, 541-388-0137.

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Ford F-250 1992, 4X4,460 eng, steel flatbed, headache rack, ~10K on new trans, pro grade tires, $2600, 541-815-7072.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

International Travel All 1967,

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yes., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

Ford Sport Trac Limited Edition 2007, too many extras to list incl. new tires, 106k, $18,995, 541-441-4475

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevrolet Avalanche 2002, 4WD, 130K miles, green, sunroof, tow pkg, leather. $7500. 541-707-0157 Porsche 1983 911SC Cabriolet. Info:

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa exhaust, too many options to list, pristine car, $37,500. Serious only, call 541-504-9945

885

Canopies and Campers

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 Model Camper, loaded, pheengine, auto. trans, ps, air, nomenal condition. $17,500. frame on rebuild, repainted 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins original blue, original blue Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, interior, original hub caps, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as exc. chrome, asking $9000 or unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 make offer. 541-385-9350.

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $13,500. 541-408-2111

Mercury Mountaineer 1997 V8 5.0L Engine AWD Automatic 169K miles $3895, Peter 541.408.0877 Mercury Mountaineer 1999 56,000 mi., leather, loaded. Vin# J36326 $7,997 541-598-3750

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings. Ford Broncos 1984 (2), 1 runs good,body is shot, other does not run, but body is good, $850 OBO, 541-536-5290

933 Ford Explorer 1999 XLT V6 4.0L 106K, 4WD,CD, tape deck, tow bar, auto, fully loaded $4995, Peter 541-408-0877

Grand Laredo

Cherokee 1998, 6 cyl.,

4L, 180K mi., new tires & battery, leather & alloy, ask $3450, Bill, 541-480-7930.

Nissan Murano SL 2009 Leather, camera, loaded $28,777 #W105908 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

V6, runs great, looks good inside & out, $2500.

541-389-0435

NAV-leather-loaded 15k miles. VIN #031977. Priced at wholesale book...

$42,888 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Ford Focus SE, 2001, 4-dr, 5-spd, 37 mpg, 94K miles, silver in color, power windows & doorlocks, keyless entry, AC, dual airbags, cruise control, CD. Maintained extremely well, runs & drives great, non-smoker, always garaged, $4500 OBO. 541-350-9938

Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007 All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218. Nissan Maxima 2005, 3.5SL, 58K Mi., exc. condition, $15,200, 541-318-0292.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188. Honda Civic LX 2003, clean, w/mounted snow tires, 120K miles, $4850, 541-595-2269.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950. Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3800, 541-416-9566

SUBARUS!!!

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Porsche Boxster 2000, exc. cond.; 67K, dark blue w/tan leather. $11,900 280-0397 or satoriwyou@yahoo.com

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k, immac.,loaded, dealer maint, $19,500. 503-459-1580.

Porsche Cayenne S 2008 Nearly every option: 20" wheels, navigation, Bi-Xenon lights, thermally insulated glass, tow pkg, stainless steel nose trim, moonroof, Bose sys, heated seats. 66K mi. MSRP was over $75K; $34,900. 541-954-0230

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

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Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van, 1999, with tow pkg., good condition, $4200. 541-419-5693 CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $2500. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639

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Automobiles Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Chevrolet ½-ton 1979 4x4, 350 eng, 86K miles, recent overhaul eng & trans, great cond, $1800. 541-409-1849

CHEVY 1978 K-20, 4x4, Camper Special, 350 4 speed, orig. 1 owner, $2500. Before 9 p.m. call 541-408-0861.

Chrysler LeBaron Convertible, 1995

DLR# 0225

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition & much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $4900, John Day, 541-575-3649

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition, 2004, 4x4, V8, 91K, Auto, AC, 541-598-5111 $8495

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

541-389-5355

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

UNBELIEVABLE

www.83porsche911sccabriolet. com

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

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The Bulletin Classiieds

Cougar 30’ 2004, 2 slides, clean, exc. condition, new tires, $13,500, 360-901-5922.

Ford 2 Door 1949,

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

MERCEDES C300 2008

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Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQS, Loaded, 4 slides, 38’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $34,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, runs good, $1250 firm. Bend, 831-295-4903

351 V-8, manual, 4WD, Lariat, 137K, exc. cond., $2750 OBO, 541-447-3327.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $65,000. 760-644-4160

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $138,500. Call 541-647-3718

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Lexus RX350 2010

Ford 3/4 Ton 1990, Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Buicks -Nice luxury cars, 30 mpg highway. 1995 Limited LeSabre, 111k, $3900, gold; 1998 Custom LeSabre, 91k at $4500, silver; 2005 LeSabre Custom 84k, $6900; 2006 Lucerne, 76k, $7900. Call 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639.

Buick Park Avenue 1996, loaded, 27 mpg, $2700, 541-419-5060.

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F524916 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999623796/DICKEY Investor No: 172571371 AP #1: 127789 Title #: 110135554 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by TIMMY LEE DICKEY as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated July 6, 2007, Recorded July 30, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-41586 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWO (2), BLOCK ELEVEN (11), TETHEROW CROSSING, PHASE III, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 7 PYMTS FROM 09/01/10 TO 03/01/11 @ 516.85 $3,617.95 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$3,617.95 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 5451 NW IRWIN LANE, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $154,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 08/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on July 25, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales TAC# 937823 PUB: 06/06/11, 06/13/11, 06/20/11, 06/27/11 DATED: 03/17/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L519427 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017594/WOLFE AP #1: 100912 Title #: 100698721 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ROBIN M. WOLFE as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE CO. as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated January 28, 2003, Recorded February 3, 2003 as Instr. No. 2003-07699 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 17 IN BLOCK 7 OF MEADOWVIEW ESTATES, FIFTH ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 9 PYMTS FROM 07/01/10 TO 03/01/11 @ 669.59 $6,026.31 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $48.72 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $25.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$6,100.53 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1308 NE VIKING AVE., BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $72,133.95, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on July 25, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 03/16/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 937814 PUB: 06/07/11, 06/14/11, 06/21/11, 06/28/11


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, June 21, 2011 G5

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Alice F. Hall has been appointed as Personal Representative of the estate of Daisy M. Davis, deceased, Deschutes County Circuit Court Case No. 11PB0069ST. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same within four months from the first date of publication of this notice at 1011 Harlow Road, Suite 300, Springfield, Lane County, Oregon 97477, or they may be barred. Any person whose rights may be affected by these proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the above-entitled Court or from the Personal Representative or from the Personal Representative's attorneys, Thorp, Purdy, Jewett, Urness & Wilkinson, P.C. DATED and first published: June 14, 2011. /s/ Alice F. Hall, Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE Sealed bids for ITB 1380-11 China and Small Wares at Central Oregon Community College will be accepted by Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator, in Metolius Hall Room 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 until 4:00PM, local time, July 7, at which time all Bids will be opened. Bids received after the time fixed for receiving Bids cannot and will not be considered. The College is soliciting Bids from vendors to supply and deliver china and small wares for the 15,000sf Culinary Instructional Building located on the Bend campus. ITB documents may be obtained from the Purchasing Coordinator Office, located at Metolius Hall, Room 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701 by emailing: jmosier@cocc.edu. All Bids submitted shall contain a statement as to whether the bidder is a resident or non-resident bidder, as defined in ORS279.A.120. No bidder may withdraw their bid after the hour set for the opening thereof and before award of the Contract, unless award is delayed beyond thirty (30) days from the bid opening date. The College may waive any or all informalities and irregularities, and pursuant to ORS 279C.395 may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public procurement procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all Bids upon a finding of the College that it is in the public interest to do so. The College is not responsible for any costs of any Bidders incurred while submitting bid; all Bidders who respond to solicitations do so solely at their own expense. Central Oregon Community College, a Community College District created within the context of Oregon Revised Statutes, is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Minority and Women-Owned Businesses are encouraged to participate in this solicitation. The Purchasing Coordinator is the sole point of contact for this procurement. All communication between the Offeror and the College regarding this solicitation shall be in writing, submitted by email, to the Purchasing Coordinator at the email listed above. Email inquiries shall be indentified in the subject lines as "ITB 1380-11 inquiry". Bidders are to rely on written statements issued exclusively by the Purchasing Coordinator. Any other communication will be considered unofficial and non-binding. Communications directed to other then the Purchasing Coordinator will have no legal bearing on this ITB or the resulting contract(s). Dated this June 21, 2011 PUBLISHED:Bend Bulletin Daily Journal of Commerce LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-1110114 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JEFFREY PAWLOWSKI, (MARRIED), as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 12/21/2007, recorded 12/31/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-66403, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said

Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 30 OF RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 38, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 597 HIGHLAND MEADOWS LOOP REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of May 16, 2011 Unpaid Principal $ 163,994.25 Interest $ 9,704.43 Accrued Late Charges $ 312.18 Foreclosure Fees and Costs $ 1,801.00 Beneficiary Fees and advances $ 1,007.00 TOTAL: $ 176,818.86 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $163,994.25, PLUS interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on September 20, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 5/16/2011 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC, AS TRUSTEE BY Asset Foreclosure services, inc. as agent for the Trustee 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: 877-237-7878 By: Angela Barsamyan Foreclosure Assistant 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: (877)237-7878 ASAP# 3999850 05/31/2011, 06/07/2011, 06/14/2011, 06/21/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0149643686 T.S. No.: 11-01581-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of January 17, 2006 made by, ANTHONY P. ZACHARY AND AMBER L. ZACHARY, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as the original grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the original trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, as the original beneficiary, recorded on January 27, 2006, as Instrument No, 2006-06231 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Wells Fargo Asset Securities Corporation, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-AR5, {the "Beneficiary"). APN: 244310 LOT THIRTY-FOUR (34), HAYDEN RANCH ESTATES PHASES 2 AND 3. CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 1233 NE 3RD STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $9,143,81 as of May 19, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $160,100.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.87500% per annum from July 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 22, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187-110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 23, 2011 ASAP# 4005122 05/31/2011, 06/07/2011, 06/14/2011, 06/21/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1218107726 T.S. No.: 10-11674-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of December 27, 2005 made by, RONALD CAPASSO AND SHARON COOK, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as the original grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as the original

trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR EXPRESS CAPITAL LENDING, as the original beneficiary, recorded on January 6, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-00927 of Official Records in the Office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust"). The current beneficiary is: US Bank National Association, as Trustee for the holders of Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I Trust 2006-IM1, (the "Beneficiary"). APN: 201719 LOT TWENTY-FIVE (25), LAVACREST PHASE 2. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 63315 LAVACREST ST., BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the Trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; failed to pay advances made by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $24,312.40 as of May 19, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $246,750.00 together with

interest thereon at the rate of 6.99000% per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus ail accrued late charges thereon; and all Trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed Trustee under the Deed of Trust will on September 23, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due

(other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, Trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 FOR SALE INFORMATION CALL: 714.730.2727 Website for Trustee's Sale Information: www.lpsasap.com TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "Trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: May 23, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Michael Busby, Authorized Signature ASAP# 4005412 05/31/2011, 06/07/2011, 06/14/2011, 06/21/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: ROUSE INVESTMENTS, LLC. Trustee: AMERITITLE. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: LIBERTY BANK. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Seventy-eight (78), NORTH BRINSON BUSINESS PARK, PHASE III, recorded June 9, 2000, in Cabinet E, Page 451, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: April 30, 2008. Recording No. 2008-18971 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4.DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $2,294.08 each, due the first of each month, for the months of July 2010 through March 2011; plus late

charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $342,153.98; plus accrued interest of $18,797.10; plus interest at the rate of 6.7500% from June 1, 2010 to July 1, 2010; plus interest at the default rate of 10.00% per annum from July 1, 2010; plus late charges of $1,605.80; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7.TIME OF SALE. Date: August 18, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the

Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #33002.00006). DATED: March 31, 2011. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-110332

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GARTH E ELLEFSON AND LISA V ELLEFSON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to WESTERN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of NEW CENTURY MORTGAGE CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 6/26/2006, recorded 6/30/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-45223, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL I INC. TRUST 2006-HE8 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE8. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: A tract of land lying in the West Half of the Southeast Quarter (W 1/2 SE 1/4) of Section 8, Township 17 South, Range 12 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the Quarter Section comer between Sections 8 and 17; thence along the South line of said Section 8, South 89º43' East, 1028.8 feet to a point; thence North 25º08' West, 33.17 feet to the North line of Cooley Road; thence North 25º08' West along the East line of the Tumalo Bend State Highway, 462.01 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; thence continuing North 25º08' West along said Highway line, 370.00 feet to an iron rod; thence North 68º51' East, 643.70 feet to an iron rod; thence North 68º22' East, 64.48 feet to an iron rod; thence South 00º10 1/2' East along the East line of the West Half of the Southeast Quarter (W 1/2 SE 1/4) of said Section 8, a distance of 378.05 feet to an iron rod; thence South 67º07' West, 546.98 feet to the TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPT the East 60 feet for roadway purposes. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 63661 SCENIC DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 10, 2011 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2010 8 payments at $1,754.34 each $14,034.72 (11-01-10 through 06-10-11) Late Charges: $221.67 Beneficiary Advances: $1,145.98 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $15,402.37 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $317,873.73, PLUS interest thereon at 3.000% per annum from 10/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 13, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for October 13, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/13/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 6/10/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, GWEN E. HOGUE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as beneficiary, dated 10/9/2003, recorded 10/14/2003, under Instrument No. 2003-70986, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 32 OF HOLLOW PINE ESTATES, PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 138 SOUTHEAST AIRPARK DRIVE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 15, 2011 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 3 payments at $ 1,129.42 each $ 3,388.26 2 payments at $ 1,842.18 each $ 3,684.36 7 payments at $ 1,785.20 each $ 12,496.40 (07-01-10 through 06-15-11) Late Charges: $ 650.70 Beneficiary Advances: $ 2,794.50 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 23,014.22 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $216,136.49, PLUS interest thereon at 3.5% per annum from 06/01/10 to 10/1/2010, 3.5% per annum from 10/01/10 to 12/01/10, 3% per annum from 12/01/10 to 10/01/11, 3% per annum from 10/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 21, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for October 21, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/21/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 6/15/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 4020810 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011

ASAP# FNMA4023477 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-ALT-000092


G6 Tuesday, June 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L524584 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018679/EDWARDS Investor No: 4004463005 AP #1: 134740 Title #: 110120038 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MOLLIE ANN EDWARDS as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE CO. as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated June 28, 2005, Recorded July 1, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-42030 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 6 AND THE WEST HALF (W1/2) OF LOT 5, IN BLOCK 32, DAVIDSON ADDITION TO SISTERS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,821.78 $7,287.12 4 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 80.66 $322.64 2 PYMTS FROM 02/01/11 TO 03/01/11 @ 1,822.00 $3,644.00 1 L/C DUE 02/16/11 @ 80.66 $80.66 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $80.66 CREDIT DUE <$1,179.05> RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $40.50 $40.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$10,276.53 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 507 E. JEFFERSON AVENUE, SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $255,963.26, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 09/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on July 25, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 03/15/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 937815 PUB: 06/07/11, 06/14/11, 06/21/11, 06/28/11

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L524424 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018802/PETERSON Investor No: 4005299595 AP #1: 254025 Title #: 110109760 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by CHRIS P. PETERSON as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated March 26, 2007, Recorded March 28, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-18015 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT THIRTY-TWO (32), MONTICELLO ESTATES, PHASE 1, RECORDED MAY 17, 2007, IN CABINET H, PAGE 329. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 3 PYMTS FROM 11/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,287.68 $3,863.04 3 L/C FROM 11/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 53.54 $160.62 2 PYMTS FROM 02/01/11 TO 03/01/11 @ 1,305.55 $2,611.10 1 L/C DUE 02/16/11 @ 53.54 $53.54 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $27.00 $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$6,715.30 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 21286 MONTICELLO DRIVE, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $248,721.74, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 10/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on July 22, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 03/14/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 937816 PUB: 06/07/11, 06/14/11, 06/21/11, 06/28/11

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F512183 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0064170731/OLD MILL P Investor No: 0064170731 AP #1: 246777 Title #: 100267895 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by OLD MILL PARTNERS, LLC as Grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated March 20, 2006, Recorded March 21, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-19573 in Book --Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 2 OF HILL STREET HOMESITES, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 2 PYMTS FROM 01/01/10 TO 02/01/10 @ 1,548.52 $3,097.04 13 PYMTS FROM 03/01/10 TO 03/01/11 @ 1,360.12 $17,681.56 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $847.84 IMPOUND/ESCROW DEFICIT $3,618.84 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $410.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$25,655.28 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 74 SW CLEVELAND AVE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $228,000.00, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 12/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on July 15, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Beneficiary may be attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained may be used for that purpose. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 03/07/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 937195 PUB: 05/31/11, 06/07/11, 06/14/11, 06/21/11 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-109756

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MARK SCHANG, as grantor, to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 2/27/2007, recorded 3/2/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-12803, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWELVE, BLOCK FIVE, TALL PINES FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 16132 AQUA ROAD LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 2, 2011 Delinquent Payments from December 01, 2010 1 payments at $ 1,394.77 each $ 1,394.77 6 payments at $ 1,429.52 each $ 8,577.12 (12-01-10 through 06-02-11) Late Charges: $ 433.72 Beneficiary Advances: $ 44.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 10,449.61 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $212,438.02, PLUS interest thereon at 7% per annum from 11/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 7% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 5, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for October 5, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/2/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 6/2/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-109695 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JAMES W. DUNN, LOU ANN DUNN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, as beneficiary, dated 4/2/2007, recorded 4/19/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-22451, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac IMSC Mortgage Loan Trust 2007-AR2, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-AR2 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated July 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 7 OF FAIRHAVEN VISTA, P.U.D., PHASE V, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 419 NORTHWEST 25TH STREET REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 9, 2011 Delinquent Payments from January 01, 2011 6 payments at $ 1,492.67 each $ 8,956.02 (01-01-11 through 06-09-11) Late Charges: $ 373.15 Beneficiary Advances: $ 55.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 9,384.17 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $223,900.00, PLUS interest thereon at 8% per annum from 12/01/10 to 7/1/2011, 8% per annum from 7/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 12, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for October 12, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/12/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 6/9/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, PHILLIP S . SKEEN, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR USA DIRECT FUNDING, as beneficiary, dated 2/28/2008, recorded 3/7/2008, under Instrument No. 200810335, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by ONEWEST BANK, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: A portion of Lots Four (4) and Five (5), Block Two (2), LAKE PARK ESTATES, recorded June 18, 1971, in Cabinet A, Page 483, in Section 35, Township 14 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described, as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of Lot 5, Block 2, LAKE PARK ESTATES, the true point of beginning of this description; thence North 18º55'00" East, 282.20 feet; thence North 58º01'40" East, 135.00 feet; thence North 1º49'53" West, 439.30 feet to the Southerly right of way of a 60.00 foot public road; thence South 79º14'20" West, 150.00 feet along said road; thence South 10º44'39" West, 622.92 feet to the Westerly line of Lot 5; thence South 27º28'45" East, 155.00 feet to the true point of beginning. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 4648 NORTHEAST 29TH COURT REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of June 13, 2011 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2011 4 payments at $ 1,502.08 each $ 6,008.32 (03-01-11 through 06-13-11) Late Charges: $ 193.65 Beneficiary Advances: $ 0.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 6,201.97 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $309,829.85, PLUS interest thereon at 5% per annum from 02/01/11 to 1/1/2012, 5% per annum from 1/1/2012, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on October 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for October 14, 2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or oneyear lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 9/14/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from you rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe you current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar at 800-452-7636 and ask for lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance may be obtained through Safenet at 800-SAFENET. DATED: 6/13/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 4012320 06/14/2011, 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011

ASAP# 4018998 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011

ASAP# FNMA4021881 06/21/2011, 06/28/2011, 07/05/2011, 07/12/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-109694

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE


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360

Gentle Dentistry

541-389-2963 • Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply

( 541) 548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

20% OFF

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: June 30, 2011.

$

Special Oil Change Price!

21

16 OIL CHANGES!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra. Coupon expires 7/4/11.

Includes 5 QTS of oil, oil filter, inspection of belts, hoses, fluids, lights, tires, brakes The key tag includes three lube, oil & filters.

The cost is only $4865 per tag.

Special Oil Change Price!

541-389-HOME

$16.21 each

Special Oil Change Price!

FREE MIMOSAS

www.HomeHeatingBend.com

WITH COUPON

®

EXPIRES 6/27/11

D S CAR VICE L SER FINANCIA

“Wizard of Comfort”

Rooms too hot or too cold?

FREE

Duct Video & Performance Test

A $250 Value Expires 6/30/11

CCB 191568

SAVE $500

Premium Level 2-Speed Heat Pump *Lower your utility over payment sale* Expires 6/30/11

“Pre-Season” Heat Pump/ AC Tune Up!

SAVE $25 Expires 6/30/11 Call Today!

Allergy Relief Air Purification Systems

DELI & PUB 913 NE 3RD STREET • BEND, OR CORNER OF GREENWOOD & 3RD STREET (ACROSS FROM WELLS FARGO)

541.383.1694

OPEN BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER

SUNDAY BRUNCH $ 9.99 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM EVERY SUNDAY

Special Oil Change Price!

Chem-Dry of Bend

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

Special Oil Change Price!

Special Oil Change Price!

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through July 6, 2011.

M O T O R S

144

Free Bleach*

Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per party. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 7/15/2011 at participating location.

It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

BW0611

Expires 7/31/11

Get One FREE Drinks Not Included.

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

BW0611

2 Rooms Cleaned

541-593-1799

Family Fun - Face Painting & Balloon Figures

DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

20OFF

Expires 7/31/11

of Central Oregon

Buy One Regular Price

SEE BACK SIDE FOR MORE DELICIOUS COUPONS!

$

Whole House Cleaning

BEND (At Highway 97)

1 OFF Dinner

($950 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

1552 NE Third Street

$ 50

( 7 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party

$ 95

MORE SPECIALS ON THE BACK

®

Upholstery Cleaning

($130 Minimum Upholstery cleaning purchase required). One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 6/30/11.

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER ES CARD IAL SERVIC FINANC

Tuesday, June 21, 2011


Tuesday, June 21, 2011

THE BULLETIN

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through July 6, 2011.

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

M O T O R S

Special Oil Change Price!

$

15 OFF UPHOLSTERY CLEANING

ANY 2 AREAS & 1 HALL CLEANED Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 6/30/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. Sectional sofas may not be separated. Sofas over 7 feet and certain fabrics may incur additional charges. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 6/30/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

MORE SPECIALS ON THE BACK Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER

16 OIL CHANGES!

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

3 Oil Changes (Gas)

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

21

Coupon expires 7/4/11.

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Includes 5 QTS of oil, oil filter, inspection of belts, hoses, fluids, lights, tires, brakes The key tag includes three lube, oil & filters.

Covers most vehicles. Diesels extra.

®

ES CARD IAL SERVIC FINANC

$

Special Oil Change Price!

The cost is only $4865 per tag.

Special Oil Change Price!

$16.21 each

Special Oil Change Price!

99

Special Oil Change Price!

$

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

Special Oil Change Price!

Free Bleach* with new patient exam, cleaning and x-rays if necessary

$ 00

1 OFF Lunch $ 95

$ 50

1 OFF Dinner

Chem-Dry of Bend

( 9 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party

Offer expires 6/30/11

Offer expires 6/30/11

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

20% OFF Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond

Dine In, Take Out | 541-389-9888

th Anniversary

11

61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: June 30, 2011.

FREE MIMOSAS WITH COUPON EXPIRES 6/27/11

SUMMER SPECIAL Get ready for the summer driving season with our SIGNATURE DELUXE MAINTENANCE SERVICE. Includes lube, oil & filter service (up to 5 qts of oil). Bumper to bumper factory inspections and adjustments. Tune check and computer check. *Diagnosis not included* www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

Only

$

*

44.95

913 NE 3RD STREET • BEND, OR CORNER OF GREENWOOD & 3RD STREET (ACROSS FROM WELLS FARGO)

541.383.1694

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

$10 OFF

Dinner for Two. Any two dinner entrees* and two beverages COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6, A $30 VALUE.

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 7/31/11

$18.95 With choice of soup or salad and bread and choice of baked potato, French fries, Rice or Vegetables

Fish House

*Not valid with light side entrees or salads.

DELI & PUB

SUNDAY BRUNCH $ 9.99

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 6/30/2011

541-382-3173

OPEN BREAKFAST, LUNCH & DINNER

SAVE UP TO

$

160

1. Subject to credit approval. Additional terms and conditions apply. See Store Associate for complete details and Rebate Form.

9:00 AM - 2:00 PM EVERY SUNDAY

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 7/31/11.

Upholstery Cleaning

$

20OFF

($130 Minimum Upholstery cleaning purchase required). One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 7/31/11

of Central Oregon

BW0611

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 7/31/11

BW0611

Whole House Cleaning

$ ® ®

The World’s Greenest Carpet Cleaner

144

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. Fuel surcharge may apply. Expires 7/31/11

BW0611

( 541) 548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

NEW PLAN–DESIGNED FOR CENTRAL OREGON VIEWS $ ONLY

89,900 WITHOUT GARAGE!

ONLY $95,900 with attached garage! Included features: • Split Bedrooms • 9’ Walls with Vault in Great Room • Large Front Porch with Timber Truss • See reverse side for loor plan

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153 BEND 1552 NE Third Street (At Highway 97)

541-389-2963

Hurry in! Offer valid April 30, 2011 through July 30, 2011.

FIRST-TIME OFFER!

FAMILY NIGHT BUFFET 5:00 - 8:00 pm Tuesday

Buy One Regular Price

Get One FREE Drinks Not Included.

Family Fun - Face Painting & Balloon Figures

541-389-2963 • Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply

ALPINE DENTAL

2 Rooms Cleaned

541-593-1799

Gentle Dentistry

By Mail-In Rebate1 on Goodyear® Assurance® ComforTred® Touring tires.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

SPRING ! l Specia

360

CCB#181069

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 7/31/11

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

MINIMUM $ SAVINGS OF

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

$ 50

( 7 minimum purchase required) Discount applies to entire party

*call for details

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry Modern, State of the Art Facility

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S.

Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per party. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 7/15/2011 at participating location.

SEE BACK SIDE FOR MORE DELICIOUS COUPONS!

DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

541-389-HOME www.HomeHeatingBend.com ®

D S CAR VICE L SER FINANCIA

“Wizard of Comfort”

Rooms too hot or too cold?

FREE

Duct Video & Performance Test

A $250 Value Expires 6/30/11

CCB 191568

SAVE $500

Premium Level 2-Speed Heat Pump *Lower your utility over payment sale* Expires 6/30/11

“Pre-Season” Heat Pump/ AC Tune Up!

SAVE $25 Expires 6/30/11 Call Today!

Allergy Relief Air Purification Systems


C

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Full Service Auto Care Specialists Foreign & Domestic Mechanical Repair

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE • Includes up to 5 quarts of Napa Oil and oil filter

Starting at

$

• Vehicle safety inspection

SPECIAL $

*

so nR d.

Offer expires 6/30/11

fession

541-382-3173

OFF

Plan #1780

NE Pro

Dinner for Two. Any two dinner entrees* and two beverages

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6, A $30 VALUE.

Fish House

*Not valid with light side entrees or salads.

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 7/31/11

al Ct.

27th St.

am

New customers only

$10

Ct.

illi

NW

Rim

Alpine Dental

W

54 14

ple Ma

(541) 382-2281 NE Neff Rd.

with this coupon $170 value!

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires 6/30/2011

New Plan Designed for Central Oregon Views!

(800) 970-0153

49

2078 NE Professional Ct.

SAVE $120

www.stevesautomot iveofbend.com Call for FREE Information Package

95

NE Williamson Blvd.

22.95

ALPINE DENTAL

NE

• Includes tire rotation and brake check ALL FOR ... 902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541-382-7911

NEW PATIENTS

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

$18.95 With choice of soup or salad and bread and choice of baked potato, French fries, Rice or Vegetables COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE. Not valid with other offers or take-out. Please present coupon. Expires 7/31/11

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 7/31/11.

The Phoenix Lounge Full Service Bar Big Screen TVs • Bar Menu Drink Specials

of Central Oregon

Lunch Specials Include:

541-593-1799

IICRC Certiied Technician

Choice of select entrees Salad or Soup and Pork Fried Rice & Vegetable Low Mein Dine In, Take Out | 541-389-9888 61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

EVERY THURSDAY 6PM–CLOSE!

$

$

164

195

ANY 4 AREAS CLEANED

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 6/30/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 6/30/11.

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

We Cater to Cowards • Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

Friday Appointments Available

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

541-548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! DIESEL OIL CHANGE $47.42 Coupon expires 7/4/11

murrayandholt.com

541-382-2222

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Loyalty Key Tag $142.26 Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection That’s just $47.42 per Oil Change Retail Value $239.85! Savings $97.59

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

$

99

29

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front Window • New Oil Filter • Vacuum Front • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Top off most Fluids • Tire Rotation under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 6/30/11

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

DELI & PUB 913 NE 3RD ST., BEND 541-383-1694

CORNER OF GREENWOOD & 3RD ST. ACROSS THE STREET FROM WELLS FARGO BANK

Meats Over 80 Sausage varieties

Deli

Pub

Sausages • Ham Turkey • Jerky Bacon Snacks Sticks • Franks Wieners

Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Fresh Kobe Beef Burgers BBQ Pork Ribs

FREE Small Garlic Parmesan Twists With purchase of any Large or X-Large Pizza at regular menu price

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE

FAVORITE TOPPING

Side of Wings 3off $2off $1off FREE with Purchase of

$

Any X-Large Pizza

Any Large Pizza

Any Medium Pizza

any Reg. Price Large Pizza

Original Crust Only

Original Crust Only

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

541-389-2963 • 1552 NE 3RD • BEND

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 7/15/2011 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 7/15/2011 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

Extra Charge for Pan Crust Will Apply Limited delivery area & hours. Delivery fee may apply. One coupon per order. Not valid with any other offer, promotion or discount. Valid through 7/15/2011 at participating location. DINE-IN, CARRY-OUT OR DELIVERY

11999 Bearing Repack Extra

Most cars & light trucks. Expires 6/30/11

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189 Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

FREE INSPECTION We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

Chem-Dry of Bend

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through July 6, 2011.

M O T O R S

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

NOW OFFERING BBQ MEATS SMOKED ON-SITE!

FREE TWISTS

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Cleaner, Fresher, Healthier Indoor Air ... GUARANTEED! At Home Heating & Cooling, we may not be medical doctors, but we are air doctors. We know air. We know filtration. We know ventilation. And we know service. We can assemble an indoor air package that fits your family and budget. The food your family eats is regulated and inspected. The water your family drinks is tested and treated. When it comes to the air your family breathes, it’s all up to you. And when you can’t breathe, nothing else matters! Don’t wait. Call us today!

541-389-HOME www.HomeHeatingBend.com CCB 191568

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES 1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com


C

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! FREE INSPECTION We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts *Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through July 6, 2011.

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

M O T O R S

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

$

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! DIESEL OIL CHANGE $47.42 Coupon expires 7/4/11

Loyalty Key Tag $142.26

541-382-2222

murrayandholt.com

Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection

Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

ANY 5 AREAS CLEANED

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 6/30/11.

Must present coupon at time of cleaning. An area is defined as any room up to 300 square feet. Baths, halls, large walk-in closets and area rugs are priced separately. Offer does not include protector. Residential only. Valid at participating locations only. Not valid with any other coupon. Some restrictions may apply. $99 minimum service order. Expires 6/30/11.

Call for Free Estimate 541-706-9390 • 1-800-STEEMER WE ALSO OFFER YOU PEACE OF MIND AT NO ADDITIONAL CHARGE THROUGH: • ARRIVAL TIMES SCHEDULED AT YOUR CONVENIENCE • SAME DAY SERVICE • CAREFUL MOVING OF FURNITURE

We Cater to Cowards • Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

Friday Appointments Available

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

195

ANY 4 AREAS CLEANED

Schedule Online at www.stanleysteemer.com

That’s just $47.42 per Oil Change Retail Value $239.85! Savings $97.59

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

$

164

• SPOT TREATMENT & TOUGH STAIN REMOVAL • NO HIDDEN CHARGES • LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

The Phoenix Lounge

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Full Service Bar Big Screen TVs • Bar Menu Drink Specials

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets! Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

Lunch Specials Include: Choice of select entrees Salad or Soup and Pork Fried Rice & Vegetable Low Mein

EVERY THURSDAY 6PM–CLOSE!

Dine In, Take Out | 541-389-9888

541-548-5105

Chem-Dry of Bend

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

Call for FREE Information Package

(800) 970-0153

New Plan Designed for Central Oregon Views!

54 14

NW

Rim ple Ma

NOW OFFERING BBQ MEATS SMOKED ON-SITE!

Plan #1780

Over 80 Sausage varieties

913 NE 3RD ST., BEND 541-383-1694

Ct.

CORNER OF GREENWOOD & 3RD ST. ACROSS THE STREET FROM WELLS FARGO BANK

FREE TWISTS

FREE Small Garlic Parmesan Twists With purchase of any Large or X-Large Pizza at regular menu price Original Crust Only

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE

FAVORITE TOPPING

$

FREE Side of Wings

off $

3

Any X-Large Pizza

2