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Reports clear Hayes in energy contract probe By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — The state released a large number of documents Tuesday related to an investigation of Oregon Department of Energy employees accused of steering a contract to a company tied to Cylvia Hayes, a Bend resident and girlfriend of Gov. John Kitzhaber.

Among the documents are a pair of reports declaring that Hayes did nothing wrong. One stated that Hayes was simply “pursuing her passion — making Oregon green,” and the other referred to her reputation as a “rock star” in the state’s green energy field. “I think the results say it all,” Hayes said. “Throughout the process, it’s always been

clear I wasn’t involved with or aware of any wrongdoing.” But the reports are not nearly as complimentary to the Department of Energy or the four employees accused of steering a contract to Hayes’ company, all of whom were cleared last week of criminal wrongdoing. See Hayes / A6

Reports say Cylvia Hayes, of Bend, Gov. Kitzhaber’s girlfriend, did nothing wrong.

By Lauren Dake

A QUESTION OF NECESSITY

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Goose Watch Alliance member Foster Fell, 63, of Bend, helps Emily Strome, 19, of Bend, her cousin Savanna Jones, 18, visiting from Savannah, Ga., and Amanda Bishop, 17, of Bend, sign a petition in front of the Bend Public Library downtown on Tuesday. Fell said he had collected more than 150 signatures on the petition to convince the Bend Park & Recreation District to hold a public hearing before any geese are killed.

Given green light to kill geese, park district faces opposition By Nick Grube • The Bulletin

K

illing Canada geese is a numbers game. At least it is for the Bend Park & Recreation District.

The district has approval from the state to use lethal force against the so-called pest this summer, but only if park officials can determine the killing is warranted. What that ultimately comes down to is the number of adult geese in the district’s riverfront parks. If the population exceeds 150,

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then officials will be allowed to catch and euthanize up to 100 adult geese to bring the population down to that numeric threshold. This means if there are 200 adult geese in Bend’s parks, then the district can kill 50. If there are 600, then the district can kill 100. But those who oppose lethal management

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of geese say there are several flaws in this system, which was developed recently by the district, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife. “I think it’s totally unnecessary,” Bend resident Foster Fell said. “We don’t need to resort to these periodic exterminations.” Fell and others organized a goose memorial last year for the 109 birds the district gassed as part of its population-reduction effort. That memorial garnered national attention for what has become a controversial issue here in Bend. See Geese / A4

Cyber police stymied by hackers’ anonymity By Michael Riley, Greg Farrell and Ann Woolner WASHINGTON — Hardly a month has gone by this year without a multinational company such as Google, EMC Corp. or Sony disclosing it’s been hacked by cyber intruders who infiltrated networks or stole customer information. Yet no hacker has been publicly identified, charged or arrested. If past enforcement efforts are an indication, most of the perpetrators will never be prosecuted or punished.

District remapping plan hailed as historic

“I don’t have a high level of confidence that they will be brought to justice,” said Peter George, chief executive of Fidelis Security Systems Inc., a data protection consulting firm whose clients include IBM, the U.S. Army and the Department of Commerce. “The government is doing what they can, but they need to do a lot more.” In the United States, the FBI, the Secret Service and other law enforcement agencies are confronting a massive crime wave that’s highly organized and hard to combat with tradi-

The Associated Press ile photo

Sony Corp., targeted since April by hacker attacks that have compromised more than 100 million customer accounts, is investigating two new possible intrusions. tional methods. The hacker organizations are well-funded and global, eluding arrest except in the rarest of cases. See Hackers / A4

SALEM — Oregon lawmakers announced new legislative boundaries on Tuesday that could lead to a change in who represents Central Oregonians in Salem. The agreement Central Oregon districts was hailed by some Once ever y decade, the Legi as a historic biparslature is tasked with redrawing legis lative tisan agreement. districts. On Tuesday, It marks the first a bipartisan set of state house and time since 1981 INSET senate district map the two parties AREA proposals was have been able to released. agree on redrawExistin52 g state House districts ing the state’s legislative boundD57 D18 W A S D59 CO aries. But some D17 GR ANT J E F F. WHE. Central Oregon LINN D54 lawmakers said D55 LANE the redrawing of CROOK D7 D53 the maps show DESCH. D60 signs of political KLA. LAKE Inside maneuvering. Propo d H Though re- • See existing and proposed districting rules district maps, Page A4 mandate that political parties not draw the lines to their advantage, Tuesday’s reaction to the maps shows what an inherently political process redistricting can be. Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, said he was “offended” by the results, saying the maps were drawn “in an effort to create a partisan outcome” by shrinking his district to include more Democrats and fewer Republicans. He said the maps point to an intent to secure a Democratic seat east of the Cascades. The state’s population needs to be evenly divided into districts. Each House district must have 63,851 people, and each Senate district must comprise 127,702 people. Because it’s grown faster than the rest of the state, Bend has become too large for one state House district. And Deschutes County can no longer be represented mostly by one district, either. See Districts / A4

Star TV anchors are moving on, often to invest in themselves By Brian Stelter New York Times News Service

It’s enough breaking news to make even a news anchor’s head spin. Television is undergoing a sea change this season as a dozen famous television anchors and celebrities — whose shows are Jim Lehrer watched by more than 40 million left “PBS viewers every day — are leaving NewsHour.” their longtime perches. To name a few, on Friday, Jim Lehrer ended his daily duties on the “PBS NewsHour”; on Monday, Scott Pelley replaced Katie Couric on the “CBS Evening News”; today, Meredith Vieira will leave the “Today” show on NBC; and later this month, her former colleague Keith Olber- Katie Couric mann will start a new show on stepped down Current TV. as anchor of By now, viewers may barely “CBS Evening recognize their favorite shows News.” and channels. It seems like the most tumultuous time on the small screen in a generation, but much of the tumult is off the screen, in business meetings about how the media industry is transforming. Although some of those departing, like Lehrer and Regis Philbin, are leaving their shows because of a generational shift, others are moving on because they want a bigger financial stake in their own brands. Couric, Oprah Winfrey and Glenn Beck, among others, are taking equity stakes in themselves, separating from the media conglomerates that have profited mightily from their star power. See Anchors / A4


A2 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

29 32 35 47 52 13 x4 Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $33 million for Friday’s drawing.

Food supply under strain on a warming planet

Victor Valenzuela selects wheat plants for breeding at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in Ciudad Obregon, Mexico. gesting that extra carbon dioxide does act as plant fertilizer, but that the benefits are less than previously believed — and probably less than needed to avert food shortages.

By Justin Gillis New York Times News Service

CIUDAD OBREGON, Mexico — The dun wheat field spreading out at Ravi Singh’s feet offered a possible clue to human destiny. Baked by a desert sun and deliberately starved of water, the plants were parched and nearly dead. Singh, a wheat breeder, grabbed seed heads that should have been plump with the staff of life. His practiced fingers found empty husks. “You’re not going to feed the people with that,” he said. But then, over in Plot 88, his eyes settled on a healthier plant, one that had managed to thrive in spite of the drought, producing plump kernels of wheat. “This is beautiful!” he shouted as wheat beards rustled in the wind. Hope in a stalk of grain: It is a hope the world needs these days, for the great agricultural system that feeds the human race is in trouble. The rapid growth in farm output that defined the late 20th century has slowed to the point that it is failing to keep up with the demand for food, driven by population increases and rising affluence in once-poor countries. Consumption of the four staples that supply most human calories — wheat, rice, corn and soybeans — has outstripped production for much of the past decade, drawing once-large stockpiles down to worrisome levels. The imbalance between supply and demand has resulted in two huge spikes in international grain prices since 2007, with some grains more than doubling in cost. Those price jumps, though felt only moderately in the West, have worsened hunger for tens of millions of poor people, destabilizing politics in scores of countries. Now, the latest scientific research suggests that a previously discounted factor is helping to destabilize the food system: climate change. Many of the failed harvests of the past decade were a consequence of weather disasters. Scientists believe some, though not all, of those events were caused or worsened by human-induced global warming. Temperatures are rising rapidly during the growing season in some of the most important agricultural countries, and a paper published several weeks ago found that this had shaved several percentage points off potential yields, adding to the price gyrations. A rising unease about the future of the world’s food supply came through during interviews this year with more than 50 agricultural experts working in nine countries. These experts say that in coming decades, farmers need to withstand whatever climate shocks come their way while roughly doubling the amount of food they produce to meet rising demand. And they need to do it while reducing the considerable environmental damage caused by the business of agriculture.

‘All the world is talking’ Sitting with a group of his fellow wheat farmers, Francisco Javier Ramos Bours voiced a suspicion. Water shortages had already arrived in recent years for growers in his region, the Yaqui Valley, which sits in the Sonoran Desert of northwestern Mexico. In his view, global climate change could well be responsible. “All the world is talking about it,” Ramos said as the other farmers nodded. Farmers everywhere face rising difficulties: water shortages as well as flash floods. Their crops

Promises unkept

Photos by Josh Haner / New York Times News Service

Farmers tour wheat fields at the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center in Ciudad Obregon, Mexico. As global warming puts stresses on farmers feeding a growing world population, financing to develop new crop varieties and new techniques has been slow to materialize.

A family gathers agricultural waste in the village of Samhauta, in a rice-growing region of northeastern India. are afflicted by emerging pests and diseases and by blasts of heat beyond anything they remember. Decades ago, the wheat farmers in the Yaqui Valley of Mexico were the vanguard of a broad development in agriculture called the Green Revolution, which used improved crop varieties and more intensive farming methods to raise food production across much of the developing world. When Norman Borlaug, a young U.S. agronomist, began working here in the 1940s under the sponsorship of the Rockefeller Foundation, the Yaqui Valley farmers embraced him. His successes as a breeder helped farmers raise Mexico’s wheat output sixfold. In the 1960s, Borlaug spread his approach to India and Pakistan, where mass starvation was feared. Output soared there, too. Other countries joined the Green Revolution. Borlaug became the only agronomist ever to win the Nobel Peace Prize, in 1970, for helping to “provide bread for a hungry world.” As he accepted the prize in Oslo, he issued a stern warning. “We may be at high tide now,” he said, “but ebb tide could soon set in if we become complacent and relax our efforts.” As output rose, staple grains — which feed people directly or are used to produce meat, eggs, dairy products and farmed fish — became cheaper and cheaper. Overall, the percentage of hungry people in the world shrank. By the late 1980s, food production seemed under control. Governments and foundations began to cut back on agricultural research, or to redirect money into the problems created by intensive farming, like environmental damage. Over a 20-year period,

Western aid for agricultural development in poor countries fell by almost half, with some of the world’s most important research centers suffering mass layoffs. Just as Borlaug had predicted, the consequences of this loss of focus began to show up in the world’s food system toward the end of the century. Output continued to rise, but because fewer innovations were reaching farmers, the growth rate slowed. That lull occurred just as food and feed demand was starting to take off, thanks in part to rising affluence across much of Asia. And erratic weather began eating into yields. In 2007 and 2008, with grain stockpiles low, prices doubled and in some cases tripled. Whole countries began hoarding food, and panic buying ensued in some markets, notably for rice. Food riots broke out in more than 30 countries. Farmers responded to the high prices by planting as much as possible, and healthy harvests in 2008 and 2009 helped rebuild stocks, to a degree. That factor, plus the global recession, drove prices down in 2009. But by last year, more weather-related harvest failures sent them soaring again. This year, rice supplies are adequate, but with bad weather threatening the wheat and corn crops in some areas, markets remain jittery. Experts are starting to fear that the era of cheap food may be over. “Our mind-set was surpluses,” said Dan Glickman, a former U.S. secretary of agriculture. “That has just changed overnight.”

Shaken assumptions For decades, scientists believed that the human dependence on fossil fuels, for all the problems it

was expected to cause, would offer one enormous benefit. Carbon dioxide, the main gas released by combustion, is also the primary fuel for the growth of plants. Humans have already raised the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by 40 percent since the Industrial Revolution, and are on course to double or triple it over the coming century. Studies have long suggested that the extra gas would supercharge the world’s food crops, and might be especially helpful in years when the weather is difficult. But for the past decade, scientists at the University of Illinois have been putting the “CO2 fertilization effect” to a real-world test in the two most important crops grown in the United States. They started by planting soybeans in a field, then sprayed extra carbon dioxide from a giant tank. Based on the earlier research, they hoped the gas might bump yields as much as 30 percent under optimal growing conditions. But when they harvested their soybeans, they got a rude surprise: The bump was only half as large. When they grew the soybeans in the sort of conditions expected to prevail in a future climate, with high temperatures or low water, the extra carbon dioxide could not fully offset the yield decline caused by those factors. They also ran tests using corn, America’s single most valuable crop and the basis for its meat production and its biofuel industry. While that crop was already known to be less responsive to carbon dioxide, a yield bump was still expected — especially during droughts. The Illinois researchers got no bump. Their work has contributed to a broader body of research sug-

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At the end of a dirt road in northeastern India, nestled between two streams, lies the remote village of Samhauta. Anand Kumar Singh, a farmer there, recently related a story that he could scarcely believe himself. Last June, he planted 10 acres of a new variety of rice. On Aug. 23, the area was struck by a severe flood that submerged his field for 10 days. In years past, such a flood would have destroyed his crop. But the new variety sprang back to life, yielding a robust harvest. “That was a miracle,” Singh said. The miracle was the product not of divine intervention but of technology — an illustration of how far scientists may be able to go in helping farmers adapt to the problems that bedevil them. “It’s the best example in agriculture,” said Julia Bailey-Serres, a researcher at the University of California, Riverside, who has done genetic work on the rice variety that Anand Kumar Singh used. “The submergence-tolerant rice essentially sits and waits out the flood.” The new rice variety that is exciting farmers in India is the product of the International Rice Research Institute in the Philippines. Leading researchers say it is possible to create crop varieties that are more resistant to drought and flooding and that respond especially well to rising carbon dioxide. The flood-tolerant rice was created from an old strain grown in a small area of India, but decades of work were required to improve it. Money was so tight that even after the rice had been proven to survive floods for twice as long as previous varieties, distribution to farmers was not assured. Then a U.S. charity, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, stepped in with a $20 million grant to finance final development and distribution of the rice in India and other countries. It may get into a million farmers’ hands this year. Governments have recognized that far more effort is needed on their part, but they have been slow to deliver. In 2008 and 2009, in the midst of the political crises set off by food prices, the world’s governments outbid one another to offer support. At a conference in L’Aquila, Italy, they pledged about $22 billion for agricultural development. It later turned out, however, that no more than half that was new money not previously committed to agriculture, and two years later, the extra financing has not fully materialized. “It’s a disappointment,” Gates said.

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Interior is lobbied over ban on mining near Grand Canyon By Renee Schoof McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — A moratorium on new uranium mining around the Grand Canyon expires in six weeks, and the Interior Department is under pressure from conservation groups and mining companies over what to do about it.

Conservation groups want to stop more uranium mining near the majestic Grand Canyon, a part of the American landscape that’s been protected since the late 19th century and is known worldwide for its stunning vistas. Uranium mining companies already have rights on public lands in the area that the deci-

sion wouldn’t affect. They’re eager to expand to feed a growing demand for fuel for nuclear power in many parts of the world. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar has a July 21 deadline, when the two-year moratorium he imposed on new uranium mining on 1 million acres around Grand Canyon National Park expires.

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Yemen leader’s burns now called severe RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — The uncertainty surrounding the political future of Yemen’s president, Ali Abdullah Saleh, deepened Tuesday as he was treated for far more severe burns than had first been disclosed, while maneuvering intensified in the capitals of Yemen, the United States and Saudi Arabia to head off an emerging and dangerous power vacuum. Saleh’s sudden departure from Yemen initially prompted warring factions to call a ceasefire, but that failed to stabilize the fractured nation as fighting Tuesday intensified in the south between militants and the government, leaving dozens dead. While mediators move toward establishing a transitional government, Saleh’s condition — and his prospects for recovery — emerged as the crucial factor in determining who will rule the nation, which is an important U.S. ally in fighting terrorism. While Washington and Riyadh have wanted Saleh to step down in the face of months of protests and increasing violence, there was no agreement Tuesday on how to proceed while he is in a Riyadh hospital.

Cracks in Syrian regime starting to show BEIRUT — A deadly mutiny of Syrian soldiers and loss of control over a tense northern town appeared to show extraordinary cracks in an autocratic regime that has long prided itself on its iron control. Details about the events in Jisr al-Shughour remained murky on Tuesday. The government said 120 forces were dead, without explaining the enormous loss of life, and acknowledged losing “intermittent” control of the area. But the reports Tuesday from residents and activists — and the television appearance of a soldier who says he switched sides after his hometown was bombarded — were the clearest sign yet that the weekly protests of thousands of Syrians are eroding President Bashar Assad’s grip.

NATO air bombings destroy much of Gadhafi compound By John F. Burns New York Times News Service

TRIPOLI, Libya — In a sudden, sharp escalation of NATO’s air campaign over Libya, warplanes dropped more than 80 bombs on targets in Tripoli in an assault that began Tuesday morning and continued into the predawn hours of Wednesday, obliterating large areas of Moammar Gadhafi’s Bab al-Aziziya command compound and what NATO identified as other military targets around the capital. In response, Gadhafi posted an audio recording on Libyan state television vowing never to surrender or accept defeat. “We welcome death,” he said. “Martyrdom is a million times better.” The unusual daylight raids, the most intense on the Libyan capital since the aerial campaign started more than 11 weeks ago, began midmorning and con-

tinued well past midnight — fulfilling NATO commanders’ recent warnings of an impending rise in the intensity of attacks. What appeared to be bunker-busting bombs laid waste to an area of about two acres in one corner of the compound, destroying six or seven major buildings and leaving a twisted, smoking mass of steel and concrete. With the repeated bombing of his Tripoli compound, Gadhafi has become a fugitive in his own capital, so NATO and people in the rebel underground in Tripoli have said, forced to stay constantly on the move in the hope of cloaking his whereabouts from NATO. Gadhafi’s isolation has been compounded by the growing numbers of defections from the top ranks of the government and army. On Tuesday, Libya’s labor minister, Al-Amin Manfur declared at a meeting in Geneva of the

Weiner battles for political survival By Michael Amon Newsday

NEW YORK — Rep. Anthony Weiner battled for political survival Tuesday, as Democratic support eroded and Republicans demanded his resignation after he admitted lying about sending lewd photos to women on the Internet. The brash seven-term New York Democrat found few supporters Tuesday. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., sent a request to the House Ethics Committee for an investigation. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, DNev., said he could not defend Weiner’s actions. Last week, Weiner lied about the Twitter photo to Rep. Steve Israel, angering the New York Democrat who is in charge

of party efforts to retake the House, according to two Democrats with knowledge of the conversations. “He’s effectively going to be a walking ghost until the next election and I wonder whether or not he can, in the end, run for Congress,” said Jamie Chandler, a political science professor at Hunter College. Weiner, once a rising Democratic star and who aspired to run for New York City mayor, spent Tuesday hunkered down in his Queens office with advisers. On Monday, he said he lied repeatedly about posting a lewd photo of himself on Twitter and carried on online relationships with six women. But he said he would not resign and would seek re-election.

Germany criticized over handling of E. coli PARIS — The German government came under increased attack on Tuesday by critics at home and abroad, accusing it of mismanaging the crisis surrounding an E. coli outbreak that has killed at least 22 people. German officials, however, reported a slight fall in the rate of newly reported infections. “There is much to suggest that we have put the worst behind us,” said Daniel Bahr, the federal health minister. Still, officials said they did not know the source of the outbreak. According to the Robert Koch Institute, Germany’s disease control agency, as of Tuesday, 2,325 confirmed and suspected cases of E. coli infection have been reported across Germany since early May, around 642 of them involving a virulent and potentially lethal complication affecting the kidneys and the nerve system.

Report: U.S.’s Afghan programs unsustainable WASHINGTON — The hugely expensive U.S. attempt at nation-building in Afghanistan has had only limited success and may not survive an American withdrawal, according to the findings of a two-year congressional investigation to be released today. The report calls on the administration to rethink urgently its assistance programs as President Barack Obama prepares to begin drawing down the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan this summer. The report, prepared by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Democratic majority staff, comes as Congress and the American public have grown increasingly restive about the human and economic cost of the decade-long war and reflects growing concerns about Obama’s war strategy even among supporters within his party. — From wire reports

International Labor Organization that he was supporting the rebel government, the National Transitional Council, Agence France-Presse reported. The intensified campaign comes in advance of a NATO ministerial meeting in Brussels today, where NATO officials are hoping to get more countries involved in Libya. At a news conference in Washington on Tuesday held by President Barack Obama and German chancellor Angela Merkel, Obama said: “What you are seeing across the country is an inexorable trend of the regime forces being pushed back, being incapacitated. I think it is just a matter of time before Gadhafi goes.”

B E N D R I V E R P R O M E N A D E , B E N D • 5 4 1 . 3 17. 6 0 0 0

Richard Drew / The Associated Press

After days of denials, U.S. Rep. Anthony Weiner, D-N.Y., confessed Monday to sending lewd photos of himself to a young woman and admitted to “inappropriate” exchanges.

The July 1, 1971, cover of The New York Times.

40 years later, Pentagon Papers are declassified By Michael Cooper and Sam Roberts New York Times News Service

It may be a first in the annals of government secrecy: Declassifying documents to mark the anniversary of their leak to the press. But that is what will happen Monday, when the federal government plans to finally release the secret government study of the Vietnam War known as the Pentagon Papers 40 years after it was first published by The New York Times. The study has already been published by The Times and other newspapers, resulting in a landmark First Amendment decision by the Supreme Court. It has been released in book form more than once. But it turns out that those texts have been incomplete: When all 7,000 pages are released Monday, officials say, the study can finally be read in its original form. “It’s absurd,” said Daniel Ellsberg, the former RAND Corp. analyst who worked on the report and later provided it to The Times, adding: “The reasons for the prolonged secrecy are to conceal the fact that so much of the policymaking doesn’t bear public examination.” Leslie Gelb, the president emeritus of the Council on Foreign Relations, director of the task force that wrote the report, said, “It should have been declassified a long, long time ago.” There is intrigue in the release itself. Archivists touched off a new round of feverish speculation when they originally announced that 11 neverbefore-published words of the 7,000-page report would remain redacted all these years later, only to reverse themselves and announce Tuesday that the 11 words would be published after all.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Geese Continued from A1 On Tuesday, Fell was outside the Deschutes County Library collecting signatures in an effort to get the park district to reconsider killing geese. He also atttended the Park & Recreation District Board meeting Tuesday night with other goose advocates to protest the potential slayings. One of the larger concerns for Fell and others is that the district has no way of telling which geese are only in Bend temporarily during the molting season,

Districts Continued from A1 Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, needed to shed about 27,888 people in her district, and Conger needed about 17,598 to be drawn out of his House district. Telfer was a co-chair of the Senate Redistricting Committee. She said the latest maps were the result of hours of negotiations and listening to public testimony. “I don’t know if it’s possible to understate what this accomplishment represents,” Telfer said. “I think it’s an accomplishment Oregon can be proud of. It’s been more than 60 years since the Legislature has last been able to draw legislative boundaries.” Once every decade, the Legislature redraws the state legislative and U.S. congressional districts. The proposed maps still need to be approved by both chambers and signed by the governor, who has indicated he would not veto a bipartisan map. Lawmakers are hoping the maps will be approved by the end of next week. If the two sides don’t reach a consensus, the Democratic Secretary of State Kate Brown would be responsible for redrawing the maps. The fact that the task would be given to a Democrat if the two sides couldn’t agree was a factor in the negotiations, according to some Republicans. Under the plan, Conger said he would be going from a Democratic advantage of about 3 percentage points over Republicans to one that gives Democrats a 5.63 percent advantage. Under the current proposal, Conger’s district — which includes Bend — would shrink, with a northwestern portion going to Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver, and an eastern slice going to Rep. Mike McLane, R-Powell Butte. Under the most recent maps, Whisnant would no longer rep-

Hackers

and which ones are the habitual offenders that defecate in the walkways year-round. Because of this, he said, the district really has no way of knowing whether it’s killing the problem geese or just the passers-through. Fell also says the killings are unnecessary because the district’s nonlethal goose management programs, such as hazing with dogs and oiling eggs so they don’t hatch, have been successful. Last year — before the district killed 109 geese and donated the meat to a local food bank — there were nearly 400 birds on district property during the June molt-

ing season. Today, park officials say there might be somewhere around 250, though officials numbers were not available Tuesday. Fell also takes issue with euthanization because he is worried about the survival of offspring. “The actual killing of the adults is only the beginning of the uncertainty and death,” Fell said. “Then the goslings are left on their own to face an uncertain future.” Before any killings take place, the USDA Wildlife Services, will perform counts this month to figure out if lethal management is even needed. If it’s more than the 150 threshold, that means the

resent La Pine or Sisters but pick up parts of Bend. McLane would represent La Pine and a portion of Deschutes County, but no longer represent Lakeview. Telfer would no longer represent Sisters, La Pine or Terrebonne. Whisnant said when he saw the maps, his reaction was, “it’s basically similar to the one Democrats (first) proposed.” The legislator has called redistricting the most political process the Legislature undertakes. McLane said after seeing the maps, he believes it’s clear that the process needs to be taken “out of the Capitol and into the hands of an independent commission.” Conger said he will also be pushing to put an initiative on the ballot in the future so the process of redistricting could be decided by an independent group of people. Rep. Shawn Lindsay, R-Hillsboro, was part of the four-member negotiating team. He said no one, including himself, would be 100 percent happy with the redistricting results. That, he said, was a credit to the bipartisan progress. Ten years ago, lawmakers could not reach an agreement and then-Secretary of State Bill Bradbury, a Democratic, drew the maps. Republicans have long said the maps clearly favored Democrats. The recently released maps do not veer far from the maps used in the past decade. Rep. Chris Garrett, D-Lake Oswego, pointed to the fact that both parties have controlled the state House and it is currently evenly split 30-30 between the two parties. “That is a map that has proven itself to be more even-handed than some would suggest,” he said.

Central Oregon districts

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

tial international law enforcement cooperation and intelligence sharing, said Martinez, Continued from A1 whose agency has jurisdiction Attacks are coming from or- over bank cyber crime. ganized crime groups based In the meantime, the attacks in Eastern Europe and Russia, are taking a rising toll on comfrom industrial spies in China panies and even government and from groups such agencies, raising conas LulzSec, whose memcerns about whether the bers appear to reside Inside FBI and other enforcemostly in the U.S. and ment units can handle • Hackers Europe and seem more what appears to be an grow more interested in publicity increasing surge of cyaudacious than in making a profit ber-criminal conduct, with attacks, dating back almost two from their crimes. Page B5 LulzSec took credit years. for hacking into Ninten“These are turning do’s computers, an inpoints we’re witnesstrusion the Kyoto, Japan-based ing,” said Anup Ghosh, founder company disclosed Sunday, of the Fairfax, Va.-based cyber describing it as unsuccessful. security firm Invincea Inc. and a Last week it was Google, which former Pentagon cyber scientist. revealed an attempted hack, “What you’re seeing is the loss originating in China, into the of the U.S.’s competitive position Gmail accounts of U.S. govern- on a global scale,” he said. ment officials, military personLaw enforcement is hampered nel and journalists. Days before by the borderless nature of the that, it was military contractor Internet and by sophisticated Lockheed Martin, which said its methods used by attackers, cynetwork had been penetrated by ber experts said. an unknown intruder. “If you are looking at the LulzSec said Friday it also had Google systems that are beattacked the Atlanta chapter of ing hacked from a country like InfraGard, an information-shar- China, there is no ability to track ing organization of companies those activities back to individuthat is affiliated with the FBI to als,” said Nicholas Percoco, head thwart cyber crime. of Trustwave Corp.’s SpiderLabs. “We are facing a very innovaA spokesman for China’s fortive crime, and innovation has to eign ministry said Thursday be the response,” Gordon Snow, that blaming the country for the FBI assistant director of the hacking of Google customer accyber division, said in an inter- counts is “unacceptable” and view at the agency’s Washing- added that the Chinese governton headquarters before news ment disapproves of and punof the InfraGard breach broke. ishes Internet hacking. “Given enough money, time and “I can go into a Starbucks in resources, an adversary will be Chicago, break into a system in able to access any system. Com- Bulgaria, and use that system to panies need to understand that.” launch an attack on Google so Pablo Martinez, who heads up that it looks like it’s coming from cybercrime efforts at the Secret there,” Percoco said. Service, compared the current Attackers deliberately base challenge to early efforts the their operations in countries U.S. made to combat drug car- that provide limited law enforcetels in the 1980s. ment cooperation with the U.S. “What the Secret Service has or where long-standing relationto do is take the successful mod- ships between agencies don’t exel that we introduced in South ist. Prominent examples include America to defeat some of that Ukraine, Romania, Russia and stuff and incorporate it in what China, U.S. officials said. we do in cyber,” he said. “I can talk to the Ukraine all That would require substan- day and even identify who is re-

Once every decade, the Legislature is tasked with redrawing legislative districts. On Tuesday, a bipartisan set of state house and INSET senate district map AREA proposals was released.

Existing state House districts D18

WASCO

D57

D59

GR ANT

D17

J E F F.

WHE.

D54

LINN LANE

D7

D55

CROOK

D53

DESCH.

D60

LAKE

KLA.

Proposed House districts D18 D17

D57 WASCO GR ANT

D59

J E F F.

WHE.

D54

LINN

D60

LANE

CROOK

D53 D7

DESCH. KLA.

D55

LAKE

HARNEY

Existing state Senate districts D29 WASCO

WHE.

D9

GRANT

J E F F. LINN LANE

D4

CROOK

D27

DESCH.

LAKE

KLA.

D30

D28

HARNEY

Proposed Senate districts D29 WASCO

WHE.

D9

GRANT

J E F F. LINN LANE

D4

CROOK

D27

D30

population could be thinned. Getting to that number, though, took some work, said Amy Stuart of ODFW. She said representatives from her agency met with officials from both the district and the USDA to determine a workable solution to Bend’s perceived goose overpopulation problem. After evaluating what the district can do to avoid lethal measures, including building up riparian areas with plants other than goose-friendly turf, she said it was determined that 150 was a good compromise. “The parks would have liked less, but we would have liked

Anchors Continued from A1 On Tuesday, Beck became the latest to take the leap, announcing his own Internet network for subscribers. The promise is that different ways of delivering content, like cable, syndication and the Web, will prove to be more lucrative for star anchors and hosts — still largely an unproven proposition. As the media industry recovers from the recession, millions of dollars stand to be made. That opportunity has given rise to what might be perceived as an Anchor Bubble, something akin to the dotcom bubble of the late 1990s. “The changes have been nothing less than seismic — so seismic, in fact, that the next generation needs to work even harder to try to put the pieces back together or get some semblance of an audience,” said Jonathan Wald, who produces Piers Morgan’s nightly program on CNN. Morgan replaced Larry King in January. Just as the Internet is emboldening stars, it is emboldening media companies: Comcast, which successfully bid Tuesday for eight more years of Olympic Games, intends to make more of the games available online, and Disney intends to turn its main website, Disney.com, into an online video destination not unlike Netflix or Hulu. Winfrey’s arrangement for her new cable channel, called OWN: The Oprah Winfrey Network, may be an inspiration for others: Her production

more, so we met in the middle,” Stuart said. “The idea was that they could manage down to 150 but they couldn’t go below that. We would not agree to euthanizing anything below that.” The district will be able to move juveniles to places outside of district boundaries, such as to the Summer Lake Wildlife Area. Paul Stell, the park district’s natural resources manager, said goose counts are scheduled to take place over the next few weeks. It’s then that the district will make the call whether to euthanize. While he said he’d prefer not to kill any geese, he added that

it’s become a necessary part of park maintenance. The hope for the future, Stell said, is that the hazing and egg-oiling efforts will eventually reduce the population enough to make euthanization a thing of the past. “That’s the goal is to get it down to a manageable population and maintain that,” he said. “It’s no fun at all to round up birds and euthanize them. It’s kind of a grim task. But it’s just another management activity you have to do.”

company owns half of OWN, so if it is a success, Winfrey, 57, already a billionaire, could earn far more money than she did on an annual basis on “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” the 25-year-old broadcast talk show that ended last month. All of these comings and goings, of course, hinge on consumers’ willingness to accept change and to follow their favorite hosts to new media homes. In an interview, Winfrey said she smiled when she read a viewer’s comment on an Oprah.com message board that said her move from broadcast to cable created no problem “that my changing channels cannot fix.” But Winfrey acknowledged that finding OWN on the cable lineup has been a big problem for some people, and said she wished more people were watching. Couric announced Monday that she was creating a daytime talk show not unlike Winfrey’s for the fall of 2012. The fact that Couric, 54, owns the show with a partner made it an especially attractive proposition for her. Similarly, Olbermann walked away from MSNBC in January for a job — and an equity stake — at Current, where he starts June 20, and Beck will leave Fox News at the end of this month. Beck will wholly own his new online network, GBTV, which will charge $5 to $10 a month. Sweeping changes in the media industry have made this an especially stressful time for talent. For some, there is a more cautionary model in mind for the future: Johnny Carson, who rarely appeared in public after exiting “The Tonight Show” in 1992 and was said to be deeply unhappy. No stars this year seem to be taking that approach. In the fall, for instance, Philbin,

79, is leaving his daytime talk show, “Live with Regis and Kelly,” after 28 years. “Time for the old guard to go!” Philbin said, laughing, in an interview last week. But this does not mean he is retiring. In fact, Philbin went out of his way to say he was not. “I’m getting to the end of the line, and I thought, ‘Maybe I’d like to try to do something a little different,’ ” Philbin said, declining to disclose any details about his next show or shows. It may be easy to leave a television show, but it is certainly hard to stay away. Philbin’s friend, King, has acknowledged that fact in interviews, saying that his instinct on big news nights is still to head into the studio. For some, Tom Brokaw is the model. He stepped down from “NBC Nightly News” in 2004, but he helms documentaries, writes books and offers commentary on NBC. “I more than keep my hand in, and yet I’m not chained to a desk,” he wrote in an e-mail message Tuesday night. Lehrer, 78, who had gradually reduced his role on the “News Hour” for two years before deciding to stop being a regular anchor, will continue to weigh in on editorial decisions, and will anchor on some Fridays. Vieira, 57, who will be toasted by her co-hosts this morning, told “Today” viewers last month that “I’ve really had a great time, but time is one of those weird things — you can never get enough of it.” She said she wanted more time with her family. Like King and Lehrer, Vieira will still have a parttime job: She is expected to meet this month with NBC News executives to talk about becoming a contributor to a prime-time newsmagazine that NBC is creating.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

D28

DESCH. KLA.

Source: Oregon Legislature

LAKE

HARNEY

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

sponsible, but that doesn’t mean they are going to jail,” said E.J. Hilbert, a former FBI cyber investigator who is president of the New York City-based cyber-security firm Online Intelligence. The Justice Department, FBI and Secret Service say they have allocated more resources to the fight against cyber crime. Each can point to some successes. Last fall, the Justice Department announced the arrest of 39 individuals in Operation Trident Breach, a takedown of a $70 million international bank-fraud ring that used computer worms to steal account information. U.S. agents only arrested the so-called money mules responsible for setting up bogus bank accounts designed to move stolen money abroad. They weren’t able to detain any of the kingpins they believed had organized the crime spree from the safety of Eastern Europe. One of the most successful U.S. prosecutions followed the indictment of Albert Gonzalez in August 2009 on charges related to the theft of 130 million credit card numbers from Heartland Payment Systems Inc., the Princeton, N.J.-based payment processor. Gonzalez, a Miami resident who worked as a federal informant and admitted that he led an international right, was later sentenced to 15 to 25 years in prison. Other members of his gang, believed to be located in Russia or Eastern Europe, haven’t been charged in the case, U.S. officials said. Snow cited the recent Justice Department dismantling of the Coreflood botnet, a network of more than 2 million infected computers that was used by Russian cyber thieves to steal financial information. The operation was the first time U.S. authorities had targeted command-and-control servers used to direct such botnets. Snow said it showed law enforcement is now taking some innovative approaches. “I don’t think it’s right to conclude that because there are not a lot of arrests that law enforcement is not doing its job,” he said.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 A5


C OV ER S T ORY

A6 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Thousands flee as Arizona fire spreads By Susan Montoya Bryan and Bob Christie The Associated Press

SPRINGERVILLE, Ariz. — Flames from a mammoth forest fire licked the ridges surrounding the eastern Arizona town of Eagar on Tuesday afternoon, forcing the evacuation of about half the 4,000 residents as surrounding towns also prepared to empty. People started streaming out of Eagar as sheriff’s deputies and police officers directed traffic. Flames were spotted on a ridge on the southeastern side of nearby Springerville and columns of orange smoke rose from the hills. Ash rained from the sky, which was filled with thick smoke, and when the sun peeked through, it was blood-red. Angie Colwell, her husband Mike and their two children were loading up their belonging as authorities ordered their Eagar neighborhood to evacuate. “We love the mountains and we’re just afraid of what’s going to be left after the fire comes through,” the longtime resident said. The blaze has burned 486 square miles of ponderosa pine forest, driven by wind gusts of more than 60 mph since it was sparked on May 29 by what authorities believe was an unattended campfire. It officially became the second-largest in Arizona history on Tuesday. No serious injuries have been reported, but the fire has destroyed five buildings so far.

Hayes Continued from A1 The two reports differ, however, in how they assign blame. One, produced by a judge hired by then-Gov. Ted Kulongoski, said the state should fire all four employees involved with the contract. The other report, produced by two Portland lawyers hired by the state, paints a picture of an understaffed Department of Energy struggling with leadership issues. It argued that the four employees should keep their jobs. The Oregon Department of Justice investigated the DOE last year after a whistle-blower reported potential violations of state contract rules involving a Federal Energy Assurance Grant. At issue was whether employees gave Hayes preferential treatment because of her relationship with Kitzhaber, who was then running for governor. According to documents released Tuesday, Hayes pushed the state to apply for the grant, then bid for it through a company she helped form, Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities (TEEM). Though the $200,000 grant was issued, instead, to a Seattlebased engineering and consulting firm called R.W. Beck, TEEM received a subcontract. The state employees were accused of urging R.W. Beck to hire Hayes’ company, but the DOJ found in December that it could not prove wrongdoing beyond a reasonable doubt. Last year, Kulongoski hired Malheur County Circuit Court Judge Frank Yraguen to review the case.

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

Firefighter Rigoberto Torres, of Orange Cove, Calif., watches the Wallow fire in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest near Springerville, Ariz., on Tuesday. Officials say winds have been driving the flames 5 to 8 miles a day since the fire began a week ago. It has cast smoke as far east as Iowa and forced some planes to divert from Albuquerque, N.M., some 200 miles away. The Apache County Sheriff’s Office issued the evacuation order for areas south of Highway 260 and east of Greer just before 4 p.m. The highway will be closed after the evacuation is complete. Eagar has about 4,000 residents, while Springerville has another 2,000. In all, about 7,000 people have been ordered to prepare for evacuation in recent days. Several tiny resort towns in the nearby Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest were evacuated

earlier. Winds whipping the fire Monday drove the last holdouts from the small resort town of Greer. Earlier in the day, bulldozers scraped away brush and trees to create a barrier between the towns and the approaching flames in the surrounding mountains. Other crews removed brush from around homes and firefighters were sent to protect buildings from the flames. Thousands of firefighters, including many from several western states and as far away as New York, hope to keep the flames from getting into Springerville and Eager, which sit in grassland

Yraguen said TEEM landed the subcontract through contract manipulation. The four employees the investigation focused on are Mark Long, then acting director of the Department of Energy; Joan Fraser, then acting deputy director of the DOE; and two subordinates, Paul Seesing and Shelli Honeywell. “When the ODOE Evaluation Committee chose R.W. Beck rather than TEEM for the contract award, Mark Long told Shelli Honeywell and Joan Fraser to fix the matter and to include an Oregon presence,” Yraguen’s report reads. It was clear to employees, the judge continued, that “fixing” the contract to include an Oregon presence meant that Hayes’ company should receive some of the funding. “A logical question,” Yraguen wrote, “is why Mark Long would become so entwined in the energy assurance contract matter. Although Mr. Long claims that it was to gain Oregon jobs, it is just as likely that it was to, as Joan Fraser explained when asked the same question, ‘Well, Mark wants to be director of something. He wants to be director.’ ... However, only Mr. Long has the answer to why he would put his career at jeopardy over a matter such as this.” Long temporarily worked for the Oregon Department of Energy, but has since moved back to his post with the Department of Consumer and Business Services. Fraser also is an employee with DCBS who temporarily worked for the DOE. Honeywell works permanently for the Department of Corrections, but again was on a temporary rotation at the DOE. Seesing is a project manager at DOE.

The second report was written by Portland lawyers Ed Harnden and Paula Barran, who were hired by the DOE, DCBS and the Department of Corrections. The report points to “irregularities” in the handling of the grant funding, but notes that the lawyers could not find evidence that any of the employees deliberately evaded the law. Instead, the report points to “significant department turmoil at DOE related to a top-down reorganization and contemporaneous influx of funding and staff.” It also points to staff with little experience in dealing with the technicalities with grant funding. Furthermore, the report criticizes Yraguen for, among other things, giving the four employees insufficient time to challenge his findings and relying heavily on the testimony of Honeywell, which both reports say “lacks credibility.” Following the latter report’s recommendations, the Oregon Department of Administrative Services announced Wednesday the employees were cleared to return to work and do not face any disciplinary actions. Hayes said she is ready for the investigation to be over. “I’m relieved to have the process coming to a close,” she said. “I’m just looking forward to focusing exclusively on my work and my work as first lady and moving on.” Both reports and related documents can be found on the Oregon Department of Administrative Services website: www.oregon.gov/DAS/pr_energy.shtml. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

COMMUNITY EDUCATION SERIES Partners In Care Hospice and Home Health invites you to

Problem Solving in Dementia Care • An interactive discussion: problem solving real issues in dementia care • Review of what dementia is and is not • Update on available treatment • Understanding goals of treatment

Friday, June 17 | NOON – 1:00pm Partners In Care; large conference room 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend Lunch provided with RSVP Presenter: Tim Malone, LCSW Gero-psychiatric Specialist Supervisor, Deschutes County Health Services, Seniors Mental Health Program RSVP TO Lisa H. 541-382-5882 or email at: lisamh@partnersbend.org

at the edge of the forest. “The worst-case scenario is we’re going to order an evacuation and the fire is going to burn up to the homes here,” fire incident command spokesman Steve Miller said before the order was issued. “Or to wherever we stand and defend, hopefully not further than that.” With a blaze as large as this being driven by unpredictable and gusty winds, putting the fire out is a gargantuan task. All fire managers can do is try to steer it away from homes and cabins by using natural terrain, burning out combustible material first and trying to put out spot fires sparked by embers blowing in front of the main fire front. New mapping showed that some fire breaks have held but the wildfire was still considered zero percent contained Tuesday. Dozens of firefighters worked Tuesday alongside a stretch of Highway 191 about two miles outside of Springerville, burning combustible material such as vegetation along one side of the road in an effort to keep the

approaching fire from jumping across and heading into town. Puffs of smoke billowed from underneath juniper and pinyon trees as flames licked at the trees. Jeff Brink, a member of an Idaho-based Bureau of Land Management fire crew, had spent the better part of Tuesday doing burnouts and making sure the flames stayed on one side of the highway while warily watching the weather. “Obviously, with these winds, when we’re burning out the wind can shift,” Brink said. The American Red Cross has an evacuation center at the high school about 15 miles west in Lakeside, Ariz. that can handle several thousand people, spokesman Mark Weldon said. The center was opened at Blue Ridge high after last week’s evacuation of about 2,700 people from nearly mountain communities, but only about 50 were there before the new evacuations on Tuesday. Extra cots, blankets and comfort kits were rushed to the school early Tuesday as the threat heightened.

Mass grave report in Texas proves false HARDIN, Texas — The police in East Texas were led on a fruitless search on Tuesday evening when a woman, claiming to be a psychic, called in a sensational tip, saying she knew of a mass grave where dozens of dismembered bodies were buried. Equipped with a search warrant and cadaver-sniffing dogs, deputies from the Liberty County Sheriff’s Office converged on a home on a narrow country road in Liberty County — about an hour outside Houston — in search of a macabre crime scene. The news of a mass grave set off a media frenzy: Reporters camped outside the home, two news helicopters circled above, and cable news stations flashed alerts that up to 30 bodies had been found. But in the end, there was no grave, there were no bodies and there was no sign that any crime had been committed — except, perhaps, the misleading call that created the spectacle. — New York Times News Service


B

B

At Work In-house doctors patch holes in health coverage, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011

MARKET REPORT

t

2,701.56 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -1.00 -.04%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Paper apologizes for hacking phone LONDON — The News of the World formally apologized to actress Sienna Miller on Tuesday for systematically, and illegally, intercepting her cellphone messages in the mid-2000s and using the information to publish articles about her private life. The apology comes as part of a settlement between Miller and the newspaper, which also agreed to pay her 100,000 pounds in legal fees and damages, about $164,000. It is the latest development in a long-running drama in which the newspaper has had to contend with growing evidence that its practice of hacking into the cellphones of public figures, politicians and celebrities was widespread and pervasive.

t

12,070.81 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -19.15 -.16%

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1,284.94 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -1.23 -.10%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.01 treasury CHANGE +.33%

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$1543.30 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$3.20

California insurer plans to cap profits Blue Shield of California, a large nonprofit health insurer that has come under sharp criticism in recent months for its double-digit rate increases, said Tuesday that it planned to cap its profits and refund the bulk of any excess income to its policyholders. The insurer said it would limit its profit to no more than 2 percent of its revenue and said it already planned to return $180 million, the profit the company says it made above its 2010 target. While it is unclear whether other insurers will make similar pledges, the federal health care law is aimed at making sure insurers are not able to set their premiums too much above their costs. Some experts expect other insurers to take similar actions as the law goes into effect. Blue Shield of California said it would refund $167 million to policyholders, typically giving them a 30 percent credit toward one month’s premiums. — From wire reports

Television’s Top 10 (Program, shares, millions of people)

Brewery’s assembly line offers opportunities Openings Ed Merriman The Bulletin

The joy of working together shined on the faces of an assembly-line crew repacking Deschutes Brewery beer into variety packs at Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living (CORIL) in Bend. Michael LaLonde, chief operating officer for Deschutes

Brewery, said workers at CORIL are taking 12-packs of individual varieties of Deschutes Brewery beers, including Black Butte Porter, Mirror Pond, Inversion IPA and Twilight seasonal beer, and repacking them into variety packs. The variety packs will then ship to markets where the brewery is introducing

its beers. “We worked with CORIL for a number of years with our recycling program. It is a great organization, and we thought this would be a great way to keep special-needs people employed,” LaLonde said. He said the brewery lacked the space to set up a varietypack assembly line and after

looking at other options, including having the work done in Portland, chose to partner with CORIL and the Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership, which provided $25,000 in grant funding to set up the assembly line and create jobs locally for people with disabilities. See CORIL / B6

Bloomberg News

Carnivore’s cornucopia: Butchers offer local, humane product

Network ratings 4.7

4.3

3.4

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Shin Nakato, a co-owner of Pono Farm & Fine Meats, mans the counter at the north Bend shop.

Making the cuts in Bend By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

Bend is getting meatier. About three months ago, Pono Farm & Fine Meats opened a market and small dining establishment on Cooley Road just inside city limits in north Bend. Most of the meat comes from the farm near Culver that shop owners Ted and Shin Nakato also own and run. The owners pride themselves on raising their cows and pigs slowly and humanely, without hormones, on grass and hay, and then selling the meat directly to customers. In about two weeks, another butcher shop, Primal Cuts Meat Market LLC, will open its doors for business on Galveston Avenue in west Bend, to sell meat from Central Oregon ranches such as Pine Mountain Ranch east of Bend and DD Ranch in Terrebonne. Owner Bryan

“We’re just doing what people have been doing for hundreds of years.” — Shin Nakato, co-owner, Pono Farm & Fine Meats Tremayne wants to showcase the great products coming from the ranches, for the benefit of customers and ranchers alike. Each shop retains an experienced chef on staff. Pono cooks and serves its own meat products — such as sausage and bratwurst, in addition to sandwiches and Southern-inspired side dishes such as grits and collard greens. Primal Cuts will also offer cooked dishes. And just as Pono sells premium kinds of raw, fresh

meat, Primal Cuts will, too. It’s not a new business, Shin Nakato said. “We’re just doing what people have been doing for hundreds of years,” he said. The number of meat markets dwindled in recent decades, Tremayne said, but such stores are starting to pop up again. What is new about the businesses is the emphasis on offering more fresh, healthy, better-tasting and locally sourced meat to customers, even if it might be more expensive. Shin Nakato said consumers can rest assured the animals are treated well, and he ensures that by running the farm personally. “We try to give (the animals) a happy life, the best life that you can have,” he said. See Meat / B6

2.6

Source: Nielsen Media Research

AP

WASHINGTON — Job openings decreased in April for the first time in three months, showing companies started to lose confidence in the expansion’s durability even before hiring slumped in May. The number of positions waiting to be filled fell by 151,000 to 2.97 million, the fewest since January, the Labor Department said Tuesday in a statement posted on its website. The number of people hired and the number of workers fired also decreased. The unemployment rate rose to 9.1 percent in May while employers added the fewest workers in eight months, Labor Department data showed last week. More job gains are needed to drive consumer spending after economic growth slowed in the beginning of the year. “We’ve got a very weak, very mild recovery, which does not create enough demand for labor,” said Henry Mo, an economist at Credit Suisse in New York. “Even if all the open positions were filled overnight, we’d still have almost 11 million workers without jobs.” Job openings decreased 4.8 percent in April from a revised 3.12 million in March, the Labor Department report showed. The loss in vacancies was led by a 91,000 decrease in professional and business services, followed by a 65,000 drop in education and health services. The construction industry had a 28,000 increase in openings in April. Tuesday’s report helps shed light on the dynamics behind the monthly employment figures. Payrolls rose in May by 54,000 after a 232,000 gain the prior month, Labor Department figures showed on June 3. Employers took on 3.97 million workers in April, or 95,000 less than the previous month, according to the report. Total separations, which include retirements and those who left their jobs voluntarily, decreased to 3.74 million from 3.8 million a month before. The number of firings fell to 1.53 million from 1.61 million. In the 12 months ended in April, the economy created a net 1.2 million jobs, representing about 47.7 million hires, compared with about 46.4 million separations, Tuesday’s report showed. See Jobs / B5

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Florida Panhandle tourism up, but questions linger since spill McClatchy-Tribune News Service

One rating point represents 1% or 1,159,000 TV households.

decrease for first time in 3 months By Alex Kowalski

By Laura Figueroa

1. NBA Finals ABC, 16, 15.5 2. NBA Finals ABC, 5, 15.3 3. America’s Got Talent NBC, 14, 15.3 4. NBA Finals on ABC, 15, 15.2 5. The Voice NBC, 14, 14.4 6. NCIS CBS, 12, 11.3 7. NCIS: Los Angeles CBS, 10, 9.9 8. 60 Minutes CBS, 12, 9.5 9. The Mentalist CBS, 10, 8.8 10. So You Think You Can Dance FOX, 8, 8.6

$37.040 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.264

JOBS

$62.5M in Madoff settlement HSBC agreed Tuesday to pay $62.5 million to settle class-action claims by investors in a fund that had invested with Bernard L. Madoff Securities. HSBC, which was named as a defendant in several lawsuits, serviced several funds outside the United States, including the Thema International Fund in Ireland, which invested assets with Madoff’s firm. HSBC had acted as a custodian and provided administration and other services, the bank said in a statement.

s

MIAMI — All-terrain vehicles still rumble across the eight-mile stretch of Pensacola Beach each morning, driven by workers looking for tar balls. One year after crude from the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion reached Florida’s shores, cleanup crews are still unearthing the sticky hardened bits of oil. “They’re about the size of your finger nail,” said Buck Lee, a lifelong Pensacola native and executive director of the Santa Rosa Island Authority, which oversees beach projects. While the oil rig exploded on April 20, 2010, it wasn’t until June 4 that tar patties made landfall on Pensacola. The plumes of oil sheen slowly drifted across nearly 200 miles of the Panhandle’s

New York Times News Service ile photo

Beachgoers look on as cleanup workers contracted by BP collect tar balls at the shore in Pensacola Beach, Fla., last June. beaches — from quaint beach towns like Watercolor and Seaside in Walton County to the spring-break metropolis of Panama City Beach. Though much of the goop has

been skimmed from the water and plucked from the sand, the region is still paying the price of one of the nation’s most devastating oil spills. See Oil spill / B5


B USI N ESS

B2 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed June 1

Jon W. and Lynette M. Spencer, 22811 Alfalfa Market Road, Bend David J. and Janie M. Shores, 63912 Sunset Drive, Bend Michael W. Monaghan, 244 S.W. Rim Rock Way #24, Redmond William R. and Janice A. Smith, 52950 Forest Way, La Pine Filed June 2

Thomas J. Oller, P.O. Box 6194, Bend and Mia L. Oller, 1576 N.W. City Heights Drive, Bend Russell D. Rose, P.O. Box 1752, La Pine Julia A. Peterson, 179 S.W. Hayes Ave #1, Bend Brian S. and Sheril J. Huber, 306 S.E. Dunham St., Prineville Elizabeth White, P.O. Box 325, Prineville Leo Tsou, P.O. Box 585, Madras Filed June 3

James L. and Gail M. Omta, 4821 S.W. Jackpine Ave., Redmond Carmen Tillenburg, 2236 N.E. Mays, Bend Oscar S. P. and Jane H. Chen, 2479 N.W. Todds Crest Drive, Bend Jeffrey M. and Ariana G. Mullins, 1447 N.W. Fifth St., Bend JoAnne M. and Matthew S. White Sr., 61284 Bronze Meadow Lane, Bend Melissa A. Mahar, P.O. Box 1106, Sisters Mike R. and Carrie A. Gandy, 262 N.E. Jefferson St., Madras Sonny J. and Joy L. Bachman, 20612 Independence Way, Bend Jeffrey P. and Jennette E. Smith, 19375 Galen Road, Bend Filed June 6

Evelyn L. Orlob, P.O. Box 3239, P.M. Box 318, La Pine Gerald D. and Judith A. Anderson, 795 Hodia Loop, Prineville Michael C. and April D. Griggs, 19210 Choctaw, Bend Chapter 11 Filed June 3

Harry P. Burns, 152 N.W. Champanelle Way, Bend Chapter 13 Filed June 3

Richard J. Stevens, 336 N.E. Hemlock Ave. Suite 6-9, Redmond Lynn F. Nicholson, 7250 N.W. Lone Pine Lane, Terrebonne

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541550-6603. PROTECTING YOUR COMPETITIVE EDGE: Jon Napier, Kurt Barker and Clint Todd, attorneys with Karnopp Petersen LLP, discuss protecting intellectual property for profit and nonprofit organizations; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www .bendchamber.org. BUSINESS LENDING: The Risk Management Association, Economic Development for Central Oregon, Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center and Opportunity Knocks present three sessions on business lending: 9 to 11 a.m. is for lenders and focuses on financing made easy; a lunch event from 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. is a panel discussion about current lending trends; and the final event of the day, from 1:45 to 3 p.m., is a networking event. Registration required; $25 for lunch event; two other events of the day are free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Touchmark at Mt. Bachelor Village, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way, Bend; 541-3883236 or events@edcoinfo.com. BANKS AND OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541318-7506, ext. 109. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Free; 5:30 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, 8222 N. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 2110; 541-923-2679 or www.crrchamber.com.

p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-3181794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com. RIBBON CUTTING: Bend Chamber of Commerce event; free; 4:15 p.m.; Schmid Malone LLC, 1123 N.W. Bond Street, Bend; 541-382-3221 or www. bendchamber.org.

EXCEL 2007 BEGINNING: Twoafternoon class. Registration required; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOME-BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

FRIDAY

THURSDAY

SUSTAINABLE BUILDING ADVISOR COURSE INFORMATIONAL MEETING: Learn about Central Oregon Community College’s nine-month program for building professionals looking for training to apply sustainable concepts; free; 1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu/building/ default.aspx. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

June 16

MONDAY WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 20310 Empire Ave., Suite A110, Bend; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

TUESDAY June 14 HOME-BUYING CLASS: Registration required; free; 5:30-9:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-6109125. SPEND AND MANAGE DEBT WISELY: Learn how to save for the future while paying for the past. Registration required; free; noon-1

June 15

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 11 a.m.1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. GET STARTED WITH INVESTING: Understand the basics of risk, asset allocation, diversification and feel more confident making investment decisions. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY June 17 FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www .facebook.com/Zoomtax.

TUESDAY June 21 RIBBON CUTTING: Bend Chamber of Commerce event; free; 4:15 p.m.;

BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603.

Encore Furniture Consignment, 1875 N.E. Division St., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Midstate Electric Cooperative, 16755 Finley Butte Road, La Pine; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 22 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. CENTRAL OREGON VISITORS ASSOCIATION 40TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON: Keynote provided by Peter Yesawich, chairman and chief executive officer of Ypartnership; $30 for Central Oregon Visitors Association members; $40 for others; corporate tables also available; 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 800-800-8334, laura@visitcentraloregon.com or http://visitcentraloregon.com/. BEND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: Celebrate Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home 100 years of service; free; 5 p.m.; Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 105 N.W. Irving Ave.; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. UNDERSTANDING AND MANAGING CREDIT: Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY

Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz. soutomaior@schwab.com or www .schwab.com. RIBBON CUTTING: Welcome new acupuncturist Rachel Pearce. A Bend Chamber of Commerce event; free; 4:15 p.m.; Healing Response Acupuncture, 326 N.E. Clay Ave., Bend; 541-3823221 or www .bendchamber.org.

FRIDAY June 24 WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of ODOT’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www. facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY June 27 WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

June 23 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: Starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E.

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Over Ye ars i4n0 Cent Oregornal

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2011

EU banks’ capital deficit means Greek default not an option By Aaron Kirchfeld and Elena Logutenkova Bloomberg News

FRANKFURT — A failure by European regulators to make banks raise enough capital to withstand a sovereign default is complicating efforts to resolve Greece’s debt crisis. The “fragilities” of Europe’s banking industry mean a Greek default isn’t an option, European Union Economic and Monetary Affairs Commissioner Olli Rehn said in New York last week. By delaying a decision some investors consider inevitable, policymakers risk increasing the cost to European taxpayers and prolonging Greece’s economic pain. “European officials are trying to buy time for the troubled economies to get their house in order and the banks to be strengthened,” said Guy de Blonay, who helps manage about $41 billion at Jupiter Asset Management in London. While estimates of the capital shortfall vary, the vulnerability of European banks to a sovereign shock isn’t disputed. Independent Credit View, a Swiss rating company that predicted Ireland’s banks would need another bailout last year, found in a study to be published Thursday that 33 of Europe’s biggest banks would need $347 billion of additional capital by the end of 2012 to boost their tangible common equity to 10 percent, even before any sovereign default. European banks had $188 billion at risk from the government debt of Greece, Ireland, Portugal and Spain at the end of 2010, according to a report this week from the Bank for International

Settlements. European lenders held $52.3 billion in Greek sovereign debt, with German banks owning the biggest share, the BIS data showed. A year after the rescue that aimed to stop the spread of the debt crisis, Greece remains mired in recession, shut out of financial markets and saddled with Europe’s biggest debt load in proportion to its economy. Moody’s Investors Service said June 1 that it sees a 50 percent chance of a Greek default. In a Bloomberg survey last month, 85 percent of international investors said Greece will probably default. European officials are preparing a new aid package for Greece that includes a “voluntary” role for investors after the EU and the International Monetary Fund approved the fifth installment of Greece’s $160 billion bailout last week. Policymakers in Europe have been debating how to let private investors, including banks, join Greece’s bailout without triggering a default. One option they’re considering is asking investors to reinvest in new debt when existing bonds mature, Rehn, 49, said last week. Concern that European lenders lack the reserves to weather losses on an estimated $136 billion in foreign claims on Greece’s government, banks and companies led Laurence Fink, chief executive officer of BlackRock Inc., the world’s largest money manager, to say on May 31 that Europe is going to need a “giant TARP,” referring to the Troubled Asset Relief Program that the United States introduced to rescue financial firms.

pet pals PHOTO CONTEST ENTER TODAY 3 EASY WAYS:

Look for your pet’s photo online at bendbulletin.com/petpals and in the Pet Pals keepsake Guide Book, publishing June 15

1. ENTER YOUR PHOTO ONLINE

to www.bendbulletin.com/petpals

2. MAIL YOUR PHOTO to Pet Pals Contest,

THE PHOTO ENTRY DEADLINE IS JUNE 8TH

The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708-6020

3. DROP YOUR PHOTO OFF at 1777 SW Chandler Avenue, Bend

Include your pet’s name and your contact information including email address. Each entry requires a $5 entry fee. Make your check payable to: The Bulletin/Pet Pals The 2011 Pet Pals Photo Contest supports the NIE program and is a product of:

For more info call Shannon at 541-617-7852 or email her at petpals@bendbulletin.com For official rules visit www.bendbulletin.com/petpals.

YOU CAN WIN PRIZES FROM THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES!

WHAT IS NIE (NEWSPAPERS IN EDUCATION)? NIE provides newspapers to classrooms throughout Central Oregon. Kids who use newspapers in school score higher in social studies, language arts, and mathematics.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 B3

A W EMPLOYEE HEALTH CARE

Bruce Bisping / (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

Health Partners family nurse practitioner Jana Dahn, left, speaks with an Anoka County employees during the open house of the new medical clinic inside the Anoka County Courthouse in Anoka, Minn., on Tuesday.

In-house doctors help patch holes in coverage By Jackie Crosby (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

MINNEAPOLIS — April Sedgwick was thrilled when the employee health clinic opened at the Anoka County Courthouse this month. A case aide in the Family Services Department, Sedgwick couldn’t help but think of the work time she lost recently, shuttling her kids to their sports physicals. “I was gone an hour and a half,” she said. “I could have had them over here in 15 minutes, instead of going down to the clinic, checking in, waiting with them and then getting them back to school.” At Anoka County and workplaces across Minnesota and beyond, the company doctor is making a comeback. Businesses and government entities are sinking thousands of dollars into onsite clinics to try to curb medical costs, boost productivity and retain workers. “Employers are taking this tack — which for most businesses is pretty extreme — that they need to get more directly involved in providing health care for their workers,” said Dr. Bruce Hochstadt, who specializes in on-site clinics for Mercer, a benefits consulting firm.

Demand on rise Demand for workplace health clinics has been rising for the past five years, according to the Center for Studying Health System Change in Washington, D.C. About 42 percent of workplaces with 500 or more employees now have clinics that provide basic immunizations, throat cultures and other care typically gotten at the doctor’s office, Mercer surveys show. While many businesses scaled back or delayed plans during the recession, 27 percent of large employers say they’re considering adding a clinic this year or next. “For employers, the delivery system as we know it is failing them,” Hochstadt said. “It’s not getting the job done from access, from convenience, for affordability and in some settings, from a quality standpoint.”

“For employers, the delivery system as we know it is failing them. It’s not getting the job done from access, from convenience, for affordability and in some settings, from a quality standpoint.” — Dr. Bruce Hochstadt, benefits consultant

HealthPartners, which is staffing and doing the lab work for Anoka County and its 3,600 enrollees, has built five worksite clinics since 2005. John Hansen, HealthPartners’ director of worksite health, said he made 25 or 30 presentations to employers last year, twice as many as the year before. “Some have high emergency room costs; some have high workmen’s comp costs; some do it because they want to attract and retain employees,” he said. “Generally speaking, money talks. They want to find a way to help reduce medical costs. Productivity is key, too. They want to keep people at work.” The workplace doctor dates back to the 1800s and the Industrial Revolution but fell out of favor in the 1930s and ’40s as companies took heat for using them to put productivity over patient care. In the 1950s, workplace safety issues led to a growth in clinics at factories, mines and logging companies.

Focus on prevention In recent years, people have grown accustomed to seeing physician assistants and nurse practitioners at retailers and grocery stores, helping to spur interest in workplace clinics. Employers, which lose $1.3 billion in earnings each year when workers are ill, focus on prevention and on helping workers deal with such chronic conditions as diabetes and heart disease, which

account for as much as 60 percent of costs. Many have nutritionists and pharmacists on site and can do blood tests and other basic lab work. Some offer chiropractic care and OB/GYN services. “We have people who come in almost daily for blood pressure checks,” said Brent Sabin, vice president of benefits at Ameriprise. About two years ago, the clinic expanded its mission to become a “health coach,” as Sabin put it, giving the 5,000 employees more opportunities to work oneon-one with clinical staff. At General Mills — a pioneer in establishing a headquarters clinic more than 25 years ago — employees can also get their teeth cleaned and eyes examined and receive basic dermatology care. Staff includes two physicians, three physician assistants, four nurses and lab technicians. “A lot of what we do is advocacy,” said Dr. Julia Halberg, General Mills’ chief medical officer. “People have a new diagnosis or chronic concerns. The health care system is confusing — and if you’re ill, even more so.”

Critics and cost Some critics have voiced privacy concerns when employers are so closely aligned with health care providers. Many companies try to allay such fears by using third-party providers. But some, like General Mills, put the health care staff on the payroll. Halberg and other company executives said patient confidentiality is vital. “We have a firewall at our clinic,” Halberg said. “All information is kept confidential. It’s a trust issue.” It’s also unclear how the new health care law will affect decisions to build on-site clinics. One provision encourages employers to offer wellness and prevention programs by providing $200 million in grants for small businesses and by allowing employers to spend up to 30 percent of premiums on wellness incentives by 2014. On the other hand, the law aims to penalize actions that increase costs — and on-site clinics are expensive.

It’s your job to help the jobless By Diane Stafford McClatchy -Tribune News Service

B

radley Brooker has been unemployed twice. What sticks with him most about those two periods were the people who kept in touch with him. “If you hear of a friend who has lost a job, then reach out,” Brooker said. “Let them know you sincerely care and will do whatever you can to help.” Organizers of job loss support groups note that the unemployed sometimes seem invisible to the employed. The churches and colleges that house job transition groups often lack any formal networking structure to connect job hunters with business owners and

other employed members of the congregation. Yet “networking is key,” Brooker said. He suggests organizing meetings in which job-hunters can let people know what positions they’re interested in. But here’s the deal: Those who have jobs need to show up. Too often, job transition assistance consists of job-hunters talking to each other, guided by one or two good-hearted jobclub conveners. Brooker was especially grateful that a former boss at Sprint, Joanna Redding, reached out to him and provided lists of job opportunities and helped him land an interview. Don’t wait for job-hunting

friends to call you “because they most likely won’t — and they do want help,” he said. Brooker believes it’s our responsibility as members of our community to provide referrals and emotional support to job-hunters. Each of us can use our business connections and friendships to recommend a job-hunter. Employers value referrals from people they know and trust. So here’s the challenge for us all: Pay attention to those who need help. Listen to their needs. Then act. Diane Stafford is the workplace and careers columnist at The Kansas City Star.

bendbulletin.com/b boocoo


B4 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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D

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2.55 1.12 26.11 +.03 0.56 22.41 +.16 1.34 67.31 +.07 12.33 +.03 1.20 45.48 -.07 48.20 -.53 1.08 10.71 +.08 1.80 39.51 -.18 0.20 14.53 +.12 5.80 +.06 19.85 -.66 0.58 38.69 +.77 1.72 30.31 -.05 16.50 -.42 7.98 +.01 1.58 +.03 7.75 +.17 0.05 27.35 +.21 2.92 +.07 1.92 51.38 +.36 0.70 69.90 -.55 0.42 7.17 5.00 73.58 +.94 3.64 -.06 34.02 +.40 1.65 -.06 5.57 +.37 0.90 56.27 +.49 23.16 -.57 6.78 -.20 12.89 -.14 7.02 71.12 -.74 31.03 +.15 2.46 +.16 0.17 11.57 -.13 0.04 22.83 -.14 0.52 57.03 +.18 4.75 -.39 12.59 +.19 12.68 -.02 .99 +.04 33.01 +.17 0.36 40.02 +.28 0.24 58.43 -.46 6.06 +.03 1.38 -.05 14.42 +.07 7.71 -.09 0.06 6.29 +.08 8.14 -.04 27.51 +.17 0.04 7.72 +.01 6.71 +.09 12.64 -.02 17.49 +.02 2.35 +.07 0.60 42.59 +.06 94.63 +.41 6.37 +.02 7.16 -.05 .86 -.04 1.08 +.02 47.70 +.64 7.85 +.45 0.64 63.77 +.20 0.11 83.06 -1.36 24.93 -.82 2.32 90.60 +.99 3.14 -.14 0.40 12.05 -.03 1.16 66.37 +.57 31.37 -.47 6.76 +.34 63.71 +.55 0.86 8.72 +.06 0.66 66.04 +.18 5.54 +.07 0.12 15.69 +.08 36.81 +.74 1.80 78.67 +1.13 7.44 -.09 47.94 +.59 1.63 -.04 23.50 +.03 18.09 +.26 0.72 61.41 -.85 0.20 81.04 +1.30 88.09 +.36 3.62 -.04 0.48 7.91 +.01 1.27 19.35 1.70 39.89 2.44 -.04 2.55 -.03 32.99 +.33 0.80 59.65 +.40 2.15 +.05 19.46 -.09 0.84 30.17 +.01 2.13 26.15 -.12 3.27 48.23 -.24 3.49 +.07 0.40 7.32 -.02 0.66 6.09 +.01 0.74 15.62 -.01 0.24 46.09 +.61 0.48 22.14 +.20 1.52 27.10 -.15 1.18 31.60 +.20 16.61 -.57 187.55 +1.86 29.19 -.30 27.55 -.44 1.54 28.75 +.10 66.76 +.20 0.52 48.92 +.66 .00 -.00 10.22 -.10 1.35 34.65 +.35 5.60 30.55 +.24 8.95 -.13 0.44 12.75 -.05 1.84 37.57 -.01 0.10 12.21 -.10 0.72 48.89 +.11 0.65 34.31 -.05 0.60 22.79 +.21 27.42 +.19 29.93 1.14 -.03 7.93 -.06 51.29 -.48 0.88 28.75 -.04 0.92 56.44 -.48 0.42 40.91 +.46 0.42 20.86 -.37 0.24 42.42 +.53 58.83 +.23 5.97 -.02 0.06 52.00 -.12 25.24 +.47 13.47 +.26 0.36 73.74 -1.01 3.18 +.07 1.00 39.44 +.44 36.64 -.53 0.20 43.87 +.14 1.16 58.83 +.07 26.10 +.07 2.62 18.29 +.09 53.48 -.36 1.89 +.05 1.00 7.25 +.07 0.60 51.63 +.14 5.28 -.11 0.60 117.90 +.73 0.48 25.82 +.57 44.57 -.14 1.12 10.79 +.02 332.04 -6.00 0.32 13.03 +.14 9.62 +.04 24.08 -1.40 0.62 21.36 -.16 6.40 +.02 2.20 +.13 .11 0.75 32.69 +.67 33.44 -.11 0.80 33.55 -.15 0.44 26.73 -.02 0.64 30.13 -.13 0.06 23.15 +.49 1.26 -.05 1.40 16.87 +.05 8.65 +.74 31.72 +.58 0.12 21.51 +.11 0.13 28.44 +.23 1.44 7.64 +.07 2.40 -.04 10.66 +.04 40.70 +.08 0.24 12.47 -.06 27.69 +.61 15.53 +.29 31.38 -.12 1.19 -.01 0.40 13.74 -.21 0.70 62.71 -1.06 14.88 -.34 0.60 26.74 +.09 15.81 -.05 0.04 13.41 +.01 0.72 34.97 -.52 0.18 15.57 -.14 0.52 13.76 -.11 2.55 52.12 +.69 41.04 1.60 33.86 +.40 14.33 +.17 1.36 31.74 -.04 41.47 +.16 5.44 +.05 33.79 +.70 16.83 -.18 39.54 -.74 1.80 72.62 -.09 1.44 52.99 -.16 284.50 -1.14 22.41 +.41 0.32 34.05 +.72 6.72 +.14 3.57 132.28 +2.31 3.87 -.30 1.00 37.00 -1.44 4.43 -.11 16.09 -.04 1.10 24.20 +.04 32.55 +.30 0.92 27.92 -.13 1.71 -.05 0.92 32.18 +.02 0.64 25.80 +.07 2.07 39.25 +.16 36.69 +.75

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D 0.68 7.53 -.01 1.82 92.63 +1.29 1.82 76.68 +1.39 47.70 -.20 52.96 -.28 0.42 44.00 +.06 3.59 -.01 1.50 50.68 +.96 0.18 17.91 +.12 27.47 +.09 124.82 -2.15 0.60 72.58 +.35 0.28 38.75 +.76 36.82 -.42 1.36 66.00 +2.11 0.56 11.42 +.15 0.80 19.88 +.39 0.79 11.56 +.10 0.70 11.00 +.11 0.04 12.03 +.08 0.04 10.65 -.18 5.67 -.10 1.50 -.05 2.16 26.13 -.12 1.80 45.69 +.14 1.24 -.12 2.80 61.89 -.02 0.52 26.55 -.04 2.08 59.15 +.25 0.56 27.64 +.54 49.87 +.25 25.74 +.04 0.36 17.25 +.25 22.48 -.27 51.43 -.09 0.72 108.32 +.39 18.97 +.67 0.32 22.19 -.09 0.48 45.33 -.16 25.90 +.16 1.24 58.14 +.49 2.40 54.16 +.09 1.21 +.01 3.64 -.05 0.76 83.31 +.07 1.64 84.97 +.17 52.51 +.86 0.20 33.18 +.12 0.24 7.23 -.04 0.96 32.18 +.77 16.06 -.19 0.32 32.58 -.02 74.86 -.48 0.30 47.15 -.50 0.60 28.93 -.95 32.35 +.98 42.19 +.42 2.05 +.01 93.30 +.14 27.46 +.23 0.80 19.87 +.25 6.33 -.31 .75 +.02 3.03 +.03 7.38 +.04 4.23 +.08 1.46 29.40 -.08 1.04 9.67 +.01 40.80 +.22 5.50 189.64 +1.79 1.42 18.59 -.21 0.83 12.62 +.01 0.32 4.31 -.03 1.44 14.64 -.02 0.68 8.26 +.06 1.36 10.66 +.07 0.40 16.18 +.02 0.60 15.93 +.04 22.00 +.16 2.09 27.91 -.22 1.68 74.18 -.40 0.80 7.89 +.42 .42 +.17 17.85 +.17 67.94 -.45 0.04 6.05 +.05 2.00 104.49 +1.28 6.82 -.03 8.33 -.01 0.60 11.82 +.10 1.05 32.15 +.40 1.67 19.51 +.31 24.94 +.16 0.44 19.14 -.04 27.58 +.32 7.77 -.04 1.54 +.03 0.56 23.94 +.17 0.40 27.53 +.19 1.32 27.99 +.02 3.66 89.93 +.28 0.36 34.27 +.25 0.60 22.61 -.06 38.89 +2.77 1.55 +.01 7.00 +.04 22.86 -.25 0.52 32.18 -.12 1.24 24.92 +.40 0.56 19.05 +.13 .00 -.01 10.06 -.05 0.34 8.43 +.01 10.76 -.01 0.32 25.79 -.06 0.28 9.08 +.15 17.68 -.23 0.05 18.05 -.49 4.00 60.85 -.68 0.20 23.87 +.38 0.80 40.21 +.30 0.10 91.72 -.02 0.49 36.17 +.42 58.18 -.77 6.64 +.03 1.00 69.55 -.80 0.20 22.44 -.04 25.38 +.59 0.84 17.92 +.07 0.40 24.36 -.21 0.40 26.55 +.09 2.36 0.40 147.07 -1.03 22.92 1.16 76.83 -.14 0.04 48.23 +.25 42.60 -.49 5.50 +.01 1.12 34.22 +.19 5.60 265.98 -.16 0.84 19.48 -.09 7.24 -.10 15.98 +.70 1.00 14.06 -.10 1.44 74.69 -.01 0.76 19.34 +.33 0.34 8.45 +.02 20.92 +.85 20.01 -.16 0.50 37.37 +.12 22.43 +.17 0.60 35.65 +1.53 0.72 39.20 +.02 0.12 55.91 +.89 9.51 +.19 10.44 -.26 6.18 -.04 0.63 9.47 -.02 16.45 +.29 18.39 +.01 19.77 -.23 0.04 6.34 +.01 5.78 +.14 6.36 +.09 15.17 +.13 1.29 +.06 1.96 64.46 +.68 0.40 27.15 -.03 15.33 +.17 45.29 +.50 1.16 33.73 +.07 3.48 78.94 +.14 1.30 76.41 +1.09 0.36 40.72 +.26 1.20 61.18 +.44 9.82 +.67 .36 -.03 46.51 -.99 0.20 50.16 -.57 0.93 8.35 +.01 3.53 +.21 0.04 6.07 +.04 0.30 11.78 +.11 1.52 13.18 +.06 1.67 +.02 0.80 145.14 -.32 0.86 44.05 -.07 27.69 +.28 23.00 -.30 27.37 -.04 1.00 36.79 +.36 0.72 49.81 -.73 35.01 -.71 29.58 +.13 0.54 40.08 +.47 53.69 -.12 1.57 +.10 1.76 99.88 +.02 0.04 15.15 -.04 41.80 +.68 13.18 -.25 0.36 5.45 -.02 .57 +.01 0.24 47.95 +.11 9.39 -.20 59.29 +.83 2.22 +.03 3.64 29.98 +.43 3.28 +.21 8.26 +.06 1.89 19.75 +.01 0.80 35.28 +.62 33.88 +.23 5.54 -.50 0.79 19.09 1.56 13.95 -.19 11.79 +.06 20.78 +.24 0.01 21.42 +.11 9.77 -.20 14.70 +.02 2.90 40.34 -.40 6.01 79.70 +.03 41.18 +.45 116.69 -.47 2.81 +.10 36.13 +.11 38.96 +1.21 4.00 -.08 57.87 +.49

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D 54.50 +.06 29.63 +.01 4.33 +.08 17.60 -.39 10.02 +.02 0.30 29.73 +.05 3.12 99.47 -.21 0.20 34.91 -.48 0.20 13.66 -.26 45.89 -.10 0.66 3.70 -.03 1.60 +.15 4.83 -.30 4.73 -.21 1.07 +.03 1.44 -.16 0.91 50.66 +.38 7.65 -1.54 6.27 -.14 1.93 44.90 +.09 5.13 2.80 -.16 3.16 98.13 -.01 1.06 -.06 4.53 -.02 3.49 -.15 2.17 -.10 4.37 -.04 0.12 21.66 +.50 1.50 20.50 -.25 9.40 -.47 281.30 +.56 13.21 -.39 0.74 33.45 -.14 1.56 65.03 +.08 33.76 +.50 0.68 39.97 -.42 5.51 +.11 24.21 +.13 0.40 87.57 -1.90 2.88 +.02 1.60 29.28 +.10 0.84 19.32 +.03 0.49 31.71 +.20 15.16 0.24 15.51 -.48 1.97 27.84 -.10 0.04 37.58 -.49 .67 +.02 .75 -.03 81.98 -.17 0.42 41.05 +.32 1.89 -.05 5.65 -.84 13.37 -.26 97.47 +2.16 1.42 21.21 -.08 4.11 +.14 0.56 85.63 -1.22 2.40 67.37 +.10 19.23 -.22 0.90 59.85 -.43 12.41 -.09 1.88 65.20 -.22 0.52 28.40 +.40 24.92 -.09 0.40 6.12 +.02 14.95 -.04 74.24 +.03 48.44 -.11 1.65 +.05 2.32 83.89 -.54 13.79 -.28 0.60 20.40 +.30 3.41 +.14 0.45 24.02 +.10 0.45 22.66 +.09 0.40 34.07 +.16 0.92 41.16 +.08 0.48 14.11 +.04 2.00 25.06 -.10 1.81 24.77 +.01 25.78 +.35 40.16 +.27 0.38 42.42 -.20 16.60 -.51 31.61 +.11 0.80 38.00 +.12 9.60 26.54 +1.09 28.66 +.06 1.00 26.74 -.42 0.40 35.91 +.24 0.92 24.33 -.03 12.77 -.06 87.93 -1.09 47.01 -.14 2.64 70.87 -.05 0.40 49.23 +.16 2.40 52.30 +.15 22.32 -.58 21.22 +.35 0.96 36.66 -.06 60.15 -.30 12.40 +.08 .16 -.00 0.06 74.11 +.41 1.16 61.11 +.18 0.42 21.87 -.33 1.64 62.41 +1.58 44.10 +.45 0.66 25.68 -.17 4.40 -.03 1.00 99.99 -.26 17.61 -.11 4.69 -.20 0.64 54.79 +1.14 0.20 18.89 +.03 0.60 39.61 +.14 1.65 33.04 -.06 21.49 -.24 12.29 +.29 0.96 78.36 +.67 8.20 -.12 0.18 8.57 +.14 56.30 -.20 0.30 16.09 -.11 33.45 -.04 0.80 54.31 +1.03 3.95 0.88 44.67 +.24 0.92 47.17 +.37 6.13 +.13 1.95 85.73 +3.18 20.59 -.55 0.32 3.83 -.17 1.40 41.73 -.23 0.32 3.33 +.07 39.51 -.11 0.74 10.56 -.13 21.83 +.31 .86 +.02 0.36 11.25 +.26 1.16 17.21 -.24 40.20 +.15 38.64 +.44 42.30 -.31 36.22 +.13 1.05 100.98 +1.03 3.62 +.08 0.10 146.24 +1.19 0.32 32.89 +.44 27.26 +.77 1.37 +.01 0.36 22.56 +.40 2.40 13.08 +.17 .85 0.50 53.68 +.26 1.28 5.09 +.04 0.28 5.23 +.05 31.75 -.02 0.40 3.72 -.08 0.78 9.90 +.03 1.33 30.08 0.15 11.10 -.22 46.62 +1.05 2.35 49.96 -.04 6.01 +.08 17.06 +.19 0.08 51.94 +.32 1.28 47.87 +.25 17.97 -.05 82.70 -.23 0.24 59.19 +.27 13.23 +.01 83.10 +.96 0.20 6.52 1.64 81.21 -.49 .35 +.00 5.26 -.44 0.15 14.36 +.37 15.90 -.01 9.26 -.07 .63 -.04 1.00 23.01 -.21 20.04 +.05 40.18 +.19 2.01 -.02 3.91 +.02 0.20 37.06 -.11 8.94 +.19 1.07 58.56 +.82 49.37 -.04 6.52 0.16 13.73 +.12 0.68 80.73 -.79 2.01 -.09 2.46 84.02 +.18 0.50 68.88 -.36 0.32 10.76 +.02 8.55 -.42 10.99 +.14 13.50 +.50 36.47 -.04 1.12 31.09 +.22 2.72 63.24 +1.27 30.73 +.33 24.67 +.17 0.20 51.24 -.98 48.05 -1.16 47.62 +.03 1.35 42.22 -.54 39.52 -.31 49.32 +.10 37.96 +.08 0.84 37.38 +.80 22.65 +.24 12.51 -.44 16.20 +.07 0.01 48.82 +.71 18.40 -.46 23.75 -.02 36.45 -.55 0.39 72.28 +2.40 73.56 +.42 0.16 76.42 -.08 0.05 68.58 -.26 0.24 22.79 +.36 41.38 +.32 36.85 +.31

Nm

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Nm 2.18 -.17 28.65 +.08 39.35 -.05 9.46 -.13 44.50 +.24 32.43 +.18 81.44 -.39 62.68 +1.18 47.40 +.50 23.86 +.26 96.88 +.91 55.68 -.33 20.13 -.25 1.94 -.05 7.18 +.53 20.45 +.21 62.38 +.20 35.18 +.12 40.17 +.10 5.69 +.12 21.93 -.44 50.88 +.52 5.05 -.01 66.90 -.14 3.86 -.07 50.29 +.44 25.80 +.33 18.38 +.01 14.21 +.21 76.16 +.37 2.95 +.03 15.03 +.18 2.52 +.03 5.86 +.07 9.67 -.03

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15.56 -.83 8.39 +.46 14.01 -.01 29.92 +.36 27.06 -.26 29.10 -.03 2.67 46.83 +.51 0.64 108.05 -1.01 0.14 15.22 +.07 0.88 51.51 +.17 3.04 51.83 -.62 2.62 -.06 0.40 27.67 +.14 0.20 7.57 -.04 0.20 18.42 +.07 1.88 101.53 +1.40 3.14 -.01 1.36 47.57 -.72 0.72 29.48 +.12 1.28 12.10 -.01 1.16 10.80 +.09 1.14 10.55 +.09 1.21 12.37 +.06 1.33 12.99 +.05 18.39 +.04 0.70 54.10 +.22 1.39 46.00 +.39 1.28 38.76 +.25 24.32 -.19 0.20 8.62 +.15 86.47 +.46 3.77 +.62 0.04 19.89 +.02 1.76 33.68 +.01 9.93 +.56 0.10 14.52 -.23 0.80 15.42 +.34 23.35 -.45 0.64 30.87 -.24 2.35 +.03 19.99 -.39 1.38 51.44 +.09 19.30 -.12 8.64 -.03 2.06 29.36 -.10 0.98 31.45 -.18 0.80 32.83 +.13 1.96 20.67 -.04 13.57 +.03 8.71 +.15 40.52 +.31 1.20 40.38 +.39 1.22 -.05 16.28 -.15 0.54 59.36 -.22 72.49 +.76 1.28 +.10 15.04 -.18 2.24 42.39 -.22 3.58 45.56 +.13 30.63 +.16 4.62 -.09 2.16 31.24 +.19 0.79 21.75 +.07 32.64 -.21 1.40 55.09 +.20 9.00 +.31 3.32 67.13 +.69 2.39 40.48 -.69 4.40 +.60 8.10 +.07 10.26 +.12 0.64 36.11 +.08 97.84 +.72 1.50 61.50 -.20 0.88 18.99 +.21 1.47 60.77 +.96 0.37 14.64 +.04 4.16 137.17 +2.40 0.75 96.79 -.32 74.74 +.25 36.85 +.41 0.28 19.56 +.05 .70 -.01 7.18 +.10 3.17 0.16 18.63 +.18 9.76 +1.07 2.10 41.44 -.09 4.80 7.40 +.05 0.28 26.89 -.04 0.50 48.86 -.42 19.22 -.21 56.68 +.43 19.63 -.14 1.91 24.92 +.62 11.09 -.41 0.56 20.94 +.28 1.88 80.00 -.29 31.46 +1.04 112.01 +4.95 38.72 -1.12 0.24 33.63 -.48 0.60 78.98 -.13 41.91 -.18 0.48 10.11 +.01 3.91 37.26 +.28 8.09 +.14 0.24 10.05 +.22 0.08 28.60 +.33 17.06 +.14 0.72 52.19 +.29 0.52 31.38 0.52 86.76 -.99 2.68 84.71 +.53 0.24 5.85 +.01 0.96 24.04 +.05 5.48 -.09 2.00 22.65 -1.57 12.48 +.02 1.19 -.04 14.41 -.01 0.48 15.48 -.07 0.20 31.59 +.46 1.28 11.99 0.24 12.30 +.16 47.66 -7.34 23.39 -.04 19.96 -.46 0.20 21.67 +.36 0.24 15.25 +.26 38.83 +.26 0.12 5.41 -.09 0.04 9.81 -.01 11.45 +.03 18.62 -.04 0.04 11.71 +.16 0.64 13.88 +.05 33.97 +.64 117.86 +1.23 0.10 25.95 +.01 0.04 35.13 +.13 0.38 24.50 +.24 0.05 21.24 +.02 13.83 +.03 0.84 14.46 -.08 2.20 43.36 +.03 0.64 15.91 +.13 63.40 +1.08 1.20 -.03 6.85 -.03 8.45 +.41 0.90 31.85 -.06 1.28 111.46 -.94 0.50 63.42 +.17 28.10 -.54 1.16 63.08 +.62 0.66 22.70 -.15 4.53 -.02 13.95 +.04 5.30 +.05 18.66 -.05 37.00 +.69 27.96 -.41 9.22 +.06 24.20 +.50 4.86 -.03 0.76 63.00 +.25 101.79 +1.72 32.27 +.23 1.96 21.23 +.17 1.00 122.47 +.52 0.20 14.22 +.20 1.00 49.76 -.03 18.12 -.12 31.44 -.92 5.98 +.98 0.75 8.05 -.13 0.24 28.31 +1.58 1.20 17.10 -.12 23.97 1.61 -.17 0.30 20.92 +.30 0.16 10.56 -.05 6.58 +.10 4.19 -.22 1.16 36.69 -.01 0.20 4.34 -.02 26.10 -.05 4.64 -.09 18.45 -.30 29.19 -.02

0.25

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D 12.87 +.23 33.98 -4.49 6.27 +.27 0.96 16.07 -.08 0.56 6.03 +.05 1.68 17.78 -.23 0.29 10.60 +.09 1.32 28.44 +.14 26.18 -.39 9.37 -.09 0.16 13.57 -.01 0.45 17.91 +.08 0.20 80.09 2.00 33.15 -.14 36.90 +.01 .33 +.00 3.43 +.05 29.66 -.37 73.24 +1.83 6.86 -.22 5.98 +.04 35.79 -.45 1.88 70.66 -.04 0.60 18.48 +.02 0.40 16.15 +.11 1.70 -.03 1.12 37.85 +.04 4.42 +.10 28.78 +.22 19.86 +.25 14.50 +.19 2.38 46.73 +.12 42.94 +.56 3.92 +.01 0.18 15.17 +.02 26.57 -.18 21.74 -.55 1.80 51.09 -.43 10.59 +.15 23.30 -.21 1.09 -.19 21.57 +.07 26.69 +.43 0.27 10.46 +.05 4.30 +.07 0.18 7.79 +.10 1.16 -.01 0.30 35.50 -.06 41.03 +.12 0.52 13.75 +.12 0.36 14.39 +.22 2.11 42.83 +.32 2.06 +.02 0.40 9.61 -.04 2.96 -.07 33.32 -.54 5.55 -.13 0.08 49.82 -.80 0.25 23.91 +.22 1.12 +.03 0.15 21.59 +.01 4.78 -.13 0.12 12.94 +.09 1.00 32.19 +1.19 0.19 14.98 +.11 0.41 47.99 -.39 2.44 -.07 1.40 132.99 -.91 1.16 86.31 +1.24 18.51 -.33 16.01 -.05 519.03 -2.03 43.01 -.31 0.84 48.91 -.06 19.26 +.02 2.64 143.61 -.42 2.25 +.01 6.44 -.19 13.22 -.41 0.52 25.20 +.36 5.14 +.34 1.94 -.02 0.08 5.53 -.02 2.67 -.07 0.83 20.57 +.06 34.26 -.34 76.47 -1.63 21.80 -.39 1.80 49.23 -.58 7.28 +.03 0.44 36.46 +.32 0.15 22.52 -.02 0.80 41.69 +.44 0.51 21.11 +.18 3.03 +.23 26.59 +.16 2.78 +.63 34.52 +.78 0.58 31.91 -.05 1.92 36.43 +.07 1.80 51.11 +.16 2.00 27.10 -.05 33.58 +.24 0.36 48.10 +.06 6.23 +.14 0.96 31.33 -.13 27.74 -.03 1.13 1.10 39.69 +.09 2.75 -.02 71.68 -.43 5.82 +.16 14.57 +.89 0.50 36.57 -.29 0.10 44.92 -.83 7.12 +.03 0.07 13.57 +.06 1.00 46.26 +.09 16.28 +.16 0.82 31.60 -.10 0.32 7.83 +.14 0.40 24.76 -.15 10.69 -.32 1.20 43.53 -.82 4.20 29.03 -.22 1.24 23.72 -.04 5.49 +.08 3.12 -.05 2.86 51.46 +.26 10.48 -.06 1.20 20.98 30.42 -.08 25.90 +.08 41.42 +.55 0.08 15.41 -.03 0.04 18.64 +.34 5.90 +.15 .49 +.04 7.73 +.06 1.92 53.06 +.16 15.65 -.05 0.28 61.51 +.39 .42 -.03 68.80 +.42 0.50 54.49 +.18 5.57 -.03 0.24 5.75 +.13 1.38 54.16 -.02 14.83 -.01 0.40 74.53 +.15 0.48 35.57 -.39 19.95 +.26 14.93 +.55 39.41 +1.38 15.75 +.19 1.70 34.35 +.38 5.71 -.46 0.45 45.92 +1.91 0.12 1.98 -.03 0.60 58.97 +3.21 7.93 +.08 20.20 -.01 1.00 34.33 +.04 38.01 -.43 2.48 60.75 +1.40 37.42 +.15 1.33 56.85 -.60 1.11 -.03 0.51 28.40 -.04 24.61 -.32 11.33 -.38 54.25 +.35 1.80 22.88 +.14 0.08 16.64 +.12 0.28 7.09 -.06 2.34 +.01 1.52 64.38 +.43 0.32 8.41 -.03 26.02 +.19 1.00 77.29 +.18 0.52 43.40 +.21 0.04 6.21 +.15 36.44 +.46 0.40 17.96 +.37 40.82 -.29 10.00 +.16

Nm Hyperdyn

D 4.23 +.11

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35.46 -.24 20.33 +.02 47.21 +.78 17.08 +.08 8.44 +.09 11.16 +.01 11.84 +.20 2.13 25.39 +.07 0.31 6.17 -.05 9.30 +.29 71.17 -.41 15.07 -.01 35.70 +.25 0.82 25.98 +.20 2.53 73.31 +.22 0.50 31.36 +.04 0.95 39.18 +.50 0.29 26.74 +.31 0.45 18.92 +.02 0.33 18.33 +.21 0.14 10.04 +.08 0.44 64.38 +.32 0.34 15.01 +.09 0.54 59.83 +.37 0.43 13.93 +.07 1.56 47.62 +.29 1.82 71.47 +1.14 2.15 42.41 +.57 0.32 27.75 -.15 0.29 15.80 +.13 0.43 18.23 +.16 36.12 +.41 1.09 57.39 -.18 1.75 51.69 -.03 3.86 110.58 +.16 0.63 43.55 +.27 1.05 93.50 -.01 2.46 129.38 -.12 3.87 107.56 +.22 0.64 47.47 +.37 5.13 110.99 +.38 1.20 67.71 -.05 0.64 42.71 1.18 50.63 +.28 4.01 96.04 +.44 3.20 97.06 +.18 0.79 84.41 +.06 1.42 60.69 +.55 0.91 46.67 +.13 0.59 59.96 +.15 1.59 106.43 +.23 1.00 95.09 +.32 7.43 90.59 -.07 0.31 56.55 +.23 0.51 106.04 +1.25 1.90 72.90 +.90 6.15 107.32 +.19 1.25 66.54 0.60 107.56 +.43 0.76 59.17 -.04 1.18 71.93 1.24 71.10 +.13 4.37 107.09 +.06 2.71 104.96 +.04 0.53 90.78 +.29 0.89 79.74 +.19 2.87 39.51 1.25 82.05 +.29 0.72 24.45 -.08 1.98 60.75 +.72 0.07 12.40 -.10 0.61 54.88 -.02 0.74 70.52 +.21 0.04 65.90 +.29 0.93 76.35 +.19 1.06 39.07 +1.54 0.24 61.00 +.06 0.98 43.01 +.40 0.61 77.50 +.36 7.59 -.08 1.34 68.79 -.12 1.00 55.42 +.16 82.64 +.04 1.01 22.06 -.12 1.20 38.56 -.02 4.91 2.37 +.01 0.68 42.83 +.23 1.41 +.06 1.36 55.71 -.06 72.71 +.76 35.99 -.01 19.79 +.06 11.79 +.27 4.01 -.09 23.49 +.20 0.44 46.69 +.23 0.08 21.42 -.32 17.00 +.10 1.50 34.97 -.21 2.82 35.01 -.25 6.51 -.04 56.20 +.34 1.35 64.20 +.92 0.48 45.83 -.36 17.69 +.01 4.26 +.30 0.57 8.90 +.05 .77 +.02 18.42 +.12 11.19 7.76 +.07 2.72 50.31 -.04 0.84 22.06 +.23 0.40 16.01 -.12 113.85 +.10 0.40 37.11 -.26 0.08 17.51 -.22 34.24 +.31 3.00 163.69 -1.06 14.58 +.02 1.08 61.46 +.89 0.24 16.10 -.17 1.05 29.78 +.13 26.69 +.11 7.50 +.18 0.24 11.40 +.15 0.48 13.58 +.16 12.86 +.15 18.55 -1.56 29.68 +.17 51.56 +.38 0.49 22.78 +.23 3.71 22.45 +.02 0.29 5.06 -.04 13.90 -.03 13.92 -.06 0.69 9.36 +.10 26.33 +.21 8.52 +.15 0.75 32.20 +.13 9.06 +.32 13.80 -.28 8.29 +.24 0.67 22.55 +.25 49.75 +.29 2.04 +.03 1.48 22.46 -.50 14.22 +.06 5.70 -.00 18.41 +.45 1.00 40.72 +.19 1.95 35.59 -.14 2.00 25.89 +.03 0.28 19.89 +.08 0.42 29.55 -.03 20.68 -.32 42.44 -.21 4.75 +.11 2.10 -.04 19.82 -.06 0.20 9.28 -.03 0.35 32.01 +.45 28.17 +.14 0.30 21.19 +.19 5.59 +.01 23.22 +.99 .75 -.02 2.28 65.50 -.55 0.64 36.88 -.55 0.20 10.43 -.33 0.30 94.86 +1.88 46.49 -.11 0.70 89.44 -.60 32.62 +1.17 9.53 +.12 0.25 11.07 -.16 0.20 36.44 +.50 11.73 +.35 0.73 16.29 -.09 0.64 9.94 +.23 1.00 41.12 +.56 0.08 0.63 0.15 0.54 1.20

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D 18.36 3.35 55.44 15.03 0.76 34.07 1.62 55.33 13.55 27.63 0.48 38.91 4.75 16.94 0.12 7.94 12.83 1.40 40.19 1.72 2.80 65.90 0.72 18.34 4.56 72.35 1.16 29.79 4.56 63.23 23.53 55.96 0.10 15.44 53.74 11.40 0.24 15.85 5.99 1.00 50.92 13.05 20.76 18.02 1.16 34.04 38.71 8.26 0.42 23.30 0.60 27.82 3.52 11.15 4.81 11.19 1.80 79.58 0.62 28.08 7.10 15.71 25.15 36.39 7.09 9.10 .29 96.11 1.27 46.01 27.45 0.20 43.76 40.33 0.44 25.69 6.29 11.12 0.64 36.02 16.32 4.19 0.50 49.72 .99 0.32 31.09 1.08 23.81 0.40 24.91 0.16 17.04 0.72 43.22 0.25 33.32 2.16 1.61 0.46 8.85 27.59 0.33 5.05 43.39 41.23 17.54 85.61 77.98 1.90 33.83 0.80 3.67 51.11 33.70 39.15 1.96 37.26 5.02 0.80 36.21 0.80 28.54 0.31 35.98 0.20 26.77 0.96 32.50 77.82 2.64 37.70 2.76 5.97 10.20 11.33 5.68 3.08 3.53 3.00 77.29 0.25 40.88 12.35 39.69 12.02 1.51 5.20 97.20 7.50 0.56 22.99 1.44 134.28 2.91 0.50 86.31 83.09 23.80 0.10 38.88

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Nm Sky-mobi n SkyWest SkywksSol SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithAO s SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm SolarCap SolarWinds Solazyme n Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys SouFun s Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy SpectraEn SpectPh Spherix rs SpiritAero SpiritAir n Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold StageStrs StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdMic StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stereotaxis Stericycle SterlBcsh Sterlite StewEnt StifelFn s StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels Strayer Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SumitMitsu SunHlth n SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP rs Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperMicro SupcndTch SuperGen SupEnrgy Supvalu SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrns n SwisherH n Symantec Synaptics Synergetc Syneron Synopsys Synovus Sysco TAL Intl TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TE Connect TECO TFS Fncl THQ TICC Cap TIM Partic TJX TRC Cos TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots Talbots wt TalismE g Tanger s TanzRy g TargaRsLP Target Taseko TataMotors Taubmn TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelSPaulo Teledyne TelefEsp s TelMexL TeleNav TelData Telestone Tellabs Telvent TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTech TevaPhrm TexInst TexRdhse Textron Theravnce ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thoratec 3D Sys s 3M Co TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany THorton g Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMach TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk TorDBk g TortMLP n Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowersWat Toyota TractSup s TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPet TransDigm Transocn TravelCtrs Travelers Travelzoo TriValley TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSolar Trinity TriQuint Triumph TrueBlue TrueRelig Trustmk Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini 21Vianet n TwoHrbInv TycoIntl Tyson

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Nm

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U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold UQM Tech URS US Airwy US Gold USA Mobl USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Ultrapar s Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever Unilife UnionPac Unisys UtdCBksGa UtdContl UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US NGs rs US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp UnvAmr UnvslCp UnivDisp UnivHlthS Univ Insur UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UranmRs UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE VailRsrt Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceT h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValVis A ValueClick VanceInfo VandaPhm VangIntBd VangSTBd VangTotBd VangGrth VangSmCp V G M & R D W m N R D M m G

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OG M W& O WG H WM W W O W R W M W W W W W W M W R W WR W W M W W W W W W W m W MD W W WW W R W W W W W W W m W W H W H O WD W R W U W W m W W W W W W W W Wm Wm W G W W m W D W W W W mD W W W WW W w W W W M W W m W U G

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0.28 10.72 18.56 0.74 25.04 1.04 30.79 1.73 31.53 2.16 42.25 8.56 6.19 1.00 15.28 2.24 3.63 13.16 0.06 19.93 1.79 49.61 47.21 0.47 17.12 0.20 11.24 64.66 1.68 36.27 1.17 32.73 1.17 32.50 4.58 1.90 100.67 25.68 2.03 21.90 0.08 2.65 40.43 0.40 5.62 2.08 69.75 23.68 0.50 23.85 12.23 39.05 0.20 42.85 1.92 83.25 59.51 0.65 47.97 9.14 1.92 37.86 37.60 0.20 51.46 0.40 5.01 0.42 25.02 1.50 3.11 3.10 1.73 29.28 22.16 2.52 93.88 6.29 43.69 28.04 0.90 31.19 0.90 28.19 0.38 53.51 1.16 0.20 25.57 1.00 31.19 0.69 13.15 0.72 36.34 7.01 16.85 22.56 6.99 4.15 84.86 2.17 81.18 3.04 81.72 0.69 62.97 0.85 75.22

+.10 -.21 +.39 -.25 -.01 +.01 -.09 +.01 -.21 -.01 +.17 -.19 +.01 -.28 -.02 -.09 -.58 +.04 -.02 -.47 +.10 +.39 +.31 +.26 +.54 +.08 -.06 -.09 +.02 +.21 -.61 -.22 -.26 +.01 +.05 -.02 -.46 +.51 -.18 +.32 -.70 -.35 -.07 -.06 -.01 -.01 +.20 -.02 +.07 +.38 +.06 -.02 -.13 -.68 -.24 -.07 +.05 +.81 +.47 -.23 +.12 +.20 +.33 +.03 +.24 -.02 +.20 +.05 +.10 -.03 +.26


B USI N ESS

Jobs

ber of jobless rose to 13.9 million in May, pushing the unemployment rate up to 9.1 percent from 9 percent the previous month, the Labor Department reported last week. May’s employment figures imply the Federal Reserve will keep its benchmark interest rate near zero into next year and pose a challenge to President Barack

Continued from B1 Compared with the 13.8 million Americans who were unemployed in April, today’s figures indicate there were 4.6 people vying for every opening, up from about 1.8 when the recession began in December 2007. The num-

Obama, whose re-election prospects depend on pushing the jobless rate lower. “The current accommodative stance of U.S. monetary policy continues to be appropriate because the unemployment rate remains elevated and inflation is expected to remain subdued over the medium run,” Fed Vice Chairman Janet Yellen said in a

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 B5

Tokyo speech last week. Companies still reducing their workforce include H.J. Heinz Co., the world’s biggest ketchup maker, which in May announced plans to slash as many as 1,000 jobs worldwide and close five factories. Dean Foods Co., the largest U.S. milk processor, said it cut 600 positions last quarter and 140 early this quarter.

CYBER CRIME

Hackers growing more audacious By Michael Riley, Greg Farrell and Ann Woolner Bloomberg News

“The bed-tax numbers may show that we weren’t down as much as we said, but that doesn’t take into account the fact that so many BP workers stayed in the Panhandle and weren’t paying full prices at the hotel, or weren’t shopping at the souvenir shops, or eating out at the restaurants or renting watercrafts.”

Oil spill Continued from B1 Workers and mechanical sifting machines continue to remove unsightly tarball specs from the Panhandle’s pristine beaches, many business owners are still fighting to recoup lost profits from BP, and the future impact on the rest of the economy and environment may take years to truly learn. For now, there’s some positive news: Visitors are returning to the Panhandle beaches in record numbers and spending at hotels and storefronts that were hurting for cash last summer. “What a year it’s been,” said Lee, who spent the last year in countless conference calls and meetings with BP and federal officials. “It’s been terrible, but finally things are finally looking up.” At the Paradise Inn, a quaint one-story hotel on Pensacola Beach, rooms have been selling out since Memorial Day weekend. “We’re kicking butt and taking names later,” said Karl Hedlund, a front-desk clerk at the inn that boasts of having “old Florida charm.” Last summer, the phones hardly rang at the 56-room hotel. This year, rooms are being sold out three to four weeks in advance, Hedlund said. Lee, with the Santa Rosa Island Authority, which is funded through hotel and sales taxes on the beach, said that sales during the spring break season of March, April and May were up anywhere from 30 percent to 50 percent compared to the same period in 2009, “We knew once the beach was clean, and people knew the Gulf was safe, the people would come back, and they sure did,” Lee said, noting that based on toll receipts, 10,000 more vehicles entered Pensacola Beach for the Memorial Day weekend than last year.

it poses a hazard,” Pierce said. “It has to be observed over time.” BP knows it is unwelcome in the beachside communities of the Panhandle, where the oil giant’s environmental disaster unleashed an economic disaster for local businesses and residents who make their living on the water or in by staffing the hotels and restaurants frequented by tourists. The company has tried to establish goodwill by doling out grants to local volunteer groups and keeping some 200 Florida residents on the payroll in Florida by hiring them for such tasks as beach cleanups and community outreach. BP representatives also point to a brick office near Fort Walton Beach as proof that the company is willing to stick around. “We’re committed to staying here, however long it takes,” said Craig Savage, spokesman for BP’s Florida efforts. Since June 2010, the oil company has paid close to $1.9 billion in Florida, with most that money — $1.7 billion — used to compensate business owners and employees who could prove spillrelated financial losses. BP set aside $20 billion to pay claims, which are being reviewed by the Gulf Coast Claims Facility. It’s headed by Kenneth Feinberg, who also managed the agency that had handled claims for Sept. 11 victims. Some business owners say the money is only a fraction of what they would have earned made in a regular season, and that it comes after “browbeating” claims officials for a response. “It’s frustrating,” said Grover Robinson IV, an Escambia, Fla., county commissioner whose real estate business has seen dwindling income from numbers on beachfront properties. “There are still people who have not received their claims, and a lot of people may never see a dime.”

— Carol Dover, chief executive, Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association

While Visit Florida, the state’s tourism agency, has not pegged an exact dollar figure for losses related to the spill, last summer many Panhandle hotels and restaurants reporting seeing sales down by 50 percent in the peak summer months. “It’s very hard to have a solid statistical number,” said Carol Dover, chief executive of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association. “The bed-tax numbers may show that we weren’t down as much as we said, but that doesn’t take into account the fact that so many BP workers stayed in the Panhandle and weren’t paying full prices at the hotel, or weren’t shopping at the souvenir shops, or eating out at the restaurants or renting watercrafts.” BP gave the state $25 million to fund an “Our Coast is Clear” advertising campaign. The money was used for digital billboards and TV commercials in key markets like Atlanta and New York. But the state has since changed gears on its advertising approach. “As the calendar year turned we put the oil spill to bed,” said Chris Thompson, chief executive of Visit Florida. “As far as marketing the state, we’re getting back to our regular advertising. The Florida brand is a strong brand, it’s very resilient. Once we get them here they will come back.” Out on the Gulf coast’s emerald waters, state scientists and uni-

versity researchers scoop up containers of sea water on a weekly basis, testing for signs of oil residue. The results have mostly yielded clean water for the past six months — nothing as dire as in June and July of last year, when some Panhandle counties were forced to post signs at beach entrances warning visitors to stay out of the oil-contaminated water. Still, researchers say they’ve struggled to have having a baseline to compare their current findings because so few studies had been have been conducted in the Gulf Coast in previous years. “We know less about the Gulf of Mexico then we do about certain parts of the moon,” said Richard Pierce, director of the Center for Ecotoxicology at Mote Marine Laboratory, a Sarasota, Fla.based research center. “It could be another three years before we have some definitive answers about the environmental impacts,” Pierce said. “What is ahead is a tremendous amount of research and monitoring.” BP has pledged $500 million toward sponsoring research projects throughout the Gulf Coast states of Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. So far, some initial findings in Florida show fish with lesions and discolorations, and oil found buried 6 to 12 inches beneath the sand in many locations. “The oil has been finely dispersed, but we don’t know yet if

WASHINGTON — Cybersecurity experts said hacking attacks haven’t necessarily increased in recent months. They’ve just become more brazen and public. A self-styled group of hacker-activists known as Anonymous began launching highprofile cyber attacks in December, announcing its efforts on websites and openly discussing details on web boards known as Internet relay chats or IRC’s. Such so-called hacktivists have said they are motivated by punishing activities they dislike. Anonymous took credit for taking down the websites of MasterCard and Visa in December as payback for the payment processors’ suspending use of their networks by WikiLeaks, an organization that publishes secret documents on its website.

Other attacks In February, Anonymous hackers ransacked the computer files of HB Gary, a Sacramento-based cyber-security firm, posting online 60,000 captured internal e-mails. Officials at Tokyobased Sony said they found a folder named Anonymous inside their computer networks following the loss of account holder information, with a file that read “we are legion,” an Anonymous motto.

Former FBI cyber investigator E.J. Hilbert said LulzSec appears to be loosely linked to Anonymous and has some of the same members. The group took responsibility for defacing the website of the nonprofit broadcast service PBS at the end of May, as well as for a later attack against Sony and another against News Corp.’s Fox television network.

Groups vulnerable Unlike Chinese or Eastern European-based hackers, members of Anonymous and LulzSec may be more vulnerable to arrest because of the methods they use and the way they are organized, according to cyber-security experts who track them. Leaders are based across several countries in Western Europe and in the United States. They often discuss illegal acts on web boards using pseudonyms that investigators may ultimately be able to link to real identities, the experts said, asking not to be identified because of fear of retaliation by the groups. In December, the FBI seized evidence, including server logs, computers and telephones from Anonymous leaders in multistate raids. Snow said he couldn’t comment on a continuing investigation.

Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

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Market update Northwest stocks Name

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AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .88f .96f ... .24 .48f .22 .84f .12f .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

8 13 19 10 16 16 17 26 24 ... 22 9 ... 10 11 13 13 ... 16 32 6

63.71 +.55 +12.4 24.20 +.04 +7.5 10.65 -.18 -20.2 14.09 +.17 -9.4 74.18 -.40 +13.7 8.99 +.69 +6.4 46.21 -1.80 -2.3 60.51 -.18 +.3 78.36 +.67 +8.5 9.55 +.08 +29.2 33.63 -.48 +13.0 35.57 -.39 -15.5 10.75 -.01 -12.4 22.06 +.23 +4.9 7.94 +.01 -10.3 23.30 +.14 +4.2 6.29 +.20 +3.8 7.50 -.01 -20.7 22.46 +.20 +10.8 13.23 +.19 +10.3 24.06 +.05 -13.8

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB rs Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .58f .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .48f ... .60

19 15 17 10 30 ... 39 22 14 15 18 10 25 11 39 12 12 11 32 ...

81.90 +2.13 -4.1 42.58 -.31 +.5 44.07 +.02 -5.2 6.61 -.37 -62.7 48.00 +.29 -16.3 2.93 -.12 +41.5 39.79 +.77 +6.2 152.82 -.44 +9.8 22.09 +.08 -1.8 56.14 +.27 -15.4 83.13 +.39 -.7 40.39 -.23 -10.5 35.93 +.19 +11.8 12.12 +.23 +3.7 11.24 -.02 -7.7 23.85 -.26 -11.6 14.98 -.02 -11.5 25.77 -.49 -16.8 15.83 -.06 +12.3 21.53 +1.03 +13.7

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1545.50 $1543.30 $37.040

Market recap

Pvs Day $1546.00 $1546.50 $36.776

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

BkofAm S&P500ETF SprintNex SPDR Fncl FordM

1554583 1453614 874187 708512 698859

Last Chg 10.65 128.96 5.49 14.90 13.95

-.18 -.09 -.11 -.04 +.04

Gainers ($2 or more) Name TempleInld GushanE rs VlyNB wt18 Qihoo360 n ZuoanF n

Last

Chg %Chg

29.49 +8.48 +40.4 2.78 +.63 +29.3 2.61 +.41 +18.6 23.80 +3.55 +17.5 5.98 +.86 +16.8

Losers ($2 or more) Name Talbots PepBoy ChinaDEd PhxNMda n NoahHld n

Last 2.63 11.20 3.16 11.81 10.30

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

Neoprobe VantageDrl KodiakO g CheniereEn NwGold g

Last Chg

58312 3.88 -.40 53692 1.97 +.10 36376 5.99 +.10 27096 10.02 +.02 26464 9.28 -.10

Most Active ($1 or more) Vol (00)

Cisco SiriusXM Intel PwShs QQQ MicronT

1061575 15.51 -.48 607933 2.15 +.02 583465 22.06 +.23 408245 55.79 -.10 407621 8.95 -.09

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Innsuites WalterInv FlexSolu SagaComm Accelr8

Last

-40.5 -17.0 -11.0 -10.5 -9.7

1,719 1,315 123 3,157 38 56

2.06 +.20 +10.8 17.89 +1.67 +10.3 2.39 +.20 +9.1 36.70 +2.81 +8.3 5.57 +.37 +7.1

Name

Last

AltoPlrm FriendFd n TransitnT g Exelixis Servidyne

Chg %Chg

24.20 +4.00 +19.8 5.98 +.98 +19.6 3.24 +.38 +13.3 9.76 +1.07 +12.3 2.47 +.25 +11.3

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

OrsusXel rs Arrhythm Medgenic n StreamGSv Neoprobe

2.23 4.80 3.15 3.39 3.88

-.85 -27.6 -.79 -14.1 -.35 -10.0 -.36 -9.6 -.40 -9.3

Zion wt12-12 ChinaMed FFinSvc 51job G-III

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Last

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -1.79 -2.30 -.39 -1.39 -1.11

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

2.51 -.61 -19.6 7.65 -1.54 -16.8 3.06 -.48 -13.6 47.66 -7.34 -13.3 33.98 -4.49 -11.7

Diary 225 242 40 507 2 14

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,443 1,126 136 2,705 20 112

12,876.00 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,565.78 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 441.86 353.53 Dow Jones Utilities 8,718.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,490.51 1,770.05 Amex Index 2,887.75 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,370.58 1,010.91 S&P 500 14,562.01 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 868.57 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,070.81 5,147.10 425.38 8,131.69 2,355.64 2,701.56 1,284.94 13,624.65 797.55

-19.15 -3.07 +.40 +15.82 +2.90 -1.00 -1.23 -1.74 +2.23

YTD %Chg %Chg -.16 -.06 +.09 +.19 +.12 -.04 -.10 -.01 +.28

52-wk %Chg

+4.26 +.79 +5.03 +2.11 +6.67 +1.84 +2.17 +1.98 +1.77

+21.44 +25.86 +17.80 +23.28 +30.48 +24.46 +20.99 +22.60 +29.12

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed yesterday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

% Change

338.93 2,622.32 3,871.92 5,864.65 7,103.25 22,868.67 34,895.83 20,574.49 3,505.61 9,442.95 2,099.71 3,115.95 4,641.10 5,827.97

-.07 t +.20 s +.22 s +.03 s +.26 s -.35 t +.64 s +.24 s -.26 t +.67 s -.65 t +.07 s -.16 t -.63 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0736 1.6451 1.0269 .002140 .1542 1.4695 .1285 .012470 .085308 .0361 .000926 .1628 1.1941 .0348

1.0710 1.6352 1.0198 .002136 .1543 1.4587 .1285 .012480 .085135 .0359 .000924 .1616 1.1951 .0349

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.79 -0.02 +1.5 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.78 -0.02 +1.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.39 +2.9 GrowthI 26.44 -0.01 +2.3 Ultra 23.56 -0.03 +4.0 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.43 +3.2 AMutlA p 26.12 +3.8 BalA px 18.30 -0.11 +3.2 BondA p 12.41 +3.3 CapIBA p 52.08 +0.18 +5.3 CapWGA p 37.33 +0.20 +4.9 CapWA p 21.30 +0.04 +5.2 EupacA p 43.23 +0.38 +4.5 FdInvA p 38.05 +0.08 +4.0 GwthA p 31.07 +0.04 +2.1 HI TrA p 11.51 +5.2 IncoA p 17.29 +0.05 +5.5 IntBdA p 13.58 +2.2 ICAA p 28.43 +1.4 NEcoA p 26.45 +0.12 +4.4 N PerA p 29.57 +0.15 +3.3 NwWrldA 55.67 +0.39 +2.0 SmCpA p 39.50 +0.15 +1.6 TxExA p 12.07 +3.9 WshA p 28.29 -0.01 +4.6 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.49 +0.15 +1.2 IntEqII I r 12.62 +0.07 +1.3 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.92 +0.10 +5.6 IntlVal r 28.59 +0.19 +5.5 MidCap 35.52 +0.16 +5.6 MidCapVal 21.73 +0.01 +8.2 Baron Funds: Growth 54.05 +0.12 +5.5 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.99 -0.02 +3.6 DivMu 14.50 -0.01 +3.1 TxMgdIntl 15.94 +0.10 +1.3

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.13 +0.03 GlAlA r 19.99 +0.03 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.61 +0.03 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.17 +0.03 GlbAlloc r 20.10 +0.04 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 54.81 +0.09 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 30.17 +0.06 DivEqInc 10.22 -0.02 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.19 +0.06 AcornIntZ 42.57 +0.18 ValRestr 50.01 -0.02 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.63 +0.04 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.70 +0.08 USCorEq2 11.27 +0.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.54 -0.07 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 34.94 -0.06 NYVen C 33.30 -0.06 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.39 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.22 +0.16 EmMktV 35.75 +0.29 IntSmVa 17.98 +0.11 LargeCo 10.17 -0.01 USLgVa 21.02 -0.01 US Small 21.92 +0.05 US SmVa 25.64 +0.04 IntlSmCo 17.98 +0.09 Fixd 10.36 IntVa 18.97 +0.15 Glb5FxInc 11.22 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.21 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 72.73 -0.13 Income 13.57

+3.9 +2.9 +2.6 +4.0 +3.1 +2.7 +3.2 +1.5 +3.3 +4.0 -0.8 +3.1 +4.2 +2.9 +0.6 +0.7 +0.3 NA +0.3 -1.1 +4.5 +3.0 +4.8 +2.7 +0.3 +4.7 +0.6 +3.5 +3.1 +0.6 +4.1 +3.7

IntlStk 36.78 +0.22 Stock 111.72 -0.22 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.13 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.15 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.07 GblMacAbR 10.18 LgCapVal 18.21 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.33 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.02 +0.04 Fairholme 31.20 -0.03 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.25 +0.03 StrInA 12.70 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.47 +0.04 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.00 +0.03 FF2015 11.69 +0.02 FF2020 14.23 +0.04 FF2020K 13.45 +0.03 FF2025 11.88 +0.03 FF2030 14.20 +0.04 FF2030K 13.84 +0.03 FF2035 11.82 +0.03 FF2040 8.26 +0.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.71 +0.02 AMgr50 15.86 +0.03 Balanc 18.79 +0.02 BalancedK 18.80 +0.03 BlueChGr 46.89 +0.02 Canada 58.55 +0.26 CapAp 26.00 +0.01 CpInc r 9.70 Contra 68.94 +0.09 ContraK 68.94 +0.08 DisEq 23.32 +0.02 DivIntl 31.15 +0.22 DivrsIntK r 31.14 +0.22 DivGth 28.94 +0.03

+3.0 +4.0 NA -0.2 +2.9 +1.0 +4.6 +4.6 -12.3 +1.6 +4.8 +1.8 +3.4 +3.5 +3.6 +3.6 +3.5 +3.5 +3.6 +3.4 +3.5 +2.8 +3.2 +3.4 +3.5 +3.4 +0.7 +2.6 +5.1 +1.9 +2.0 +3.5 +3.3 +3.4 +1.8

EmrMk 26.50 Eq Inc 45.15 EQII 18.64 Fidel 33.41 FltRateHi r 9.85 GNMA 11.77 GovtInc 10.63 GroCo 88.53 GroInc 18.73 GrowthCoK 88.53 HighInc r 9.13 Indepn 24.96 IntBd 10.78 IntlDisc 33.87 InvGrBd 11.66 InvGB 7.58 LgCapVal 11.78 LevCoStk 29.28 LowP r 40.67 LowPriK r 40.67 Magelln 72.03 MidCap 29.94 MuniInc 12.55 NwMkt r 15.91 OTC 58.28 100Index 8.89 Ovrsea 33.69 Puritn 18.45 SCmdtyStrt 12.83 SrsIntGrw 11.72 SrsIntVal 10.39 SrInvGrdF 11.66 STBF 8.54 SmllCpS r 19.98 StratInc 11.37 StrReRt r 9.95 TotalBd 10.97 USBI 11.56 Value 70.79 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 47.07 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 39.16 500IdxInv 45.63

+0.25 -0.05 -0.02 +0.04 +0.02 +0.01 +0.21 -0.02 +0.21 -0.01 +0.04 +0.01 +0.25 +0.02 -0.02 +0.06 +0.08 +0.08 +0.10 +0.06 -0.01 +0.02 -0.09 -0.03 +0.28 +0.01 +0.06 +0.07 +0.10 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.01 +0.03 +0.01 +0.02 +0.03

+0.6 +2.3 +2.4 +4.0 +1.8 +4.1 +2.9 +6.5 +2.6 +6.5 +4.8 +2.5 +3.5 +2.5 +3.5 +4.0 +2.8 +3.0 +6.0 +6.0 +0.6 +3.8 +4.2 +4.1 +6.1 +1.7 +3.7 +3.4 +1.5 +3.8 +4.5 +3.6 +1.6 +1.9 +4.9 +4.3 +3.9 +3.4 +3.1 -7.9

+0.11 +3.9 -0.04 +3.0

IntlInxInv 36.77 +0.28 TotMktInv 37.50 -0.01 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 45.63 -0.05 TotMktAd r 37.50 -0.01 First Eagle: GlblA 47.88 +0.07 OverseasA 23.34 +0.05 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.67 -0.01 FoundAl p 11.09 +0.02 HYTFA p 9.89 -0.01 IncomA p 2.23 USGovA p 6.86 +0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.93 +0.01 IncmeAd 2.22 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.25 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.57 +0.01 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.62 +0.04 GlBd A p 13.97 +0.02 GrwthA p 19.21 +0.05 WorldA p 15.73 +0.06 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 14.00 +0.02 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 40.99 -0.06 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.09 -0.07 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.10 +0.14 Quality 21.10 -0.06 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.00 +0.10 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.41 MidCapV 37.32 +0.10 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.42 CapApInst 38.20 +0.05 IntlInv t 63.69 +0.33 Intl r 64.38 +0.34

+4.9 +3.2 +3.0 +3.2 +3.3 +3.0 +5.0 +6.0 +5.0 +5.5 +3.5 +4.7 +5.6 +5.2 +4.5 +9.2 +4.7 +8.0 +6.0 +4.5 +1.9 +5.4 +3.4 +5.5 +3.1 +5.0 +3.2 +3.4 +4.0 +6.1 +6.3

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.86 -0.01 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.90 -0.01 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.67 +0.01 Div&Gr 20.14 -0.03 TotRetBd 11.25 -0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.40 +0.02 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.33 +0.05 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.96 +0.03 CmstkA 16.12 -0.02 EqIncA 8.75 -0.01 GrIncA p 19.54 -0.02 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.61 -0.05 AssetStA p 25.41 -0.05 AssetStrI r 25.64 -0.05 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.64 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.63 HighYld 8.30 -0.01 ShtDurBd 11.03 +0.01 USLCCrPls 20.69 -0.04 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 47.33 +0.22 PrkMCVal T 23.31 +0.04 Twenty T 64.68 -0.04 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.28 +0.02 LSGrwth 13.23 +0.03 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.60 +0.16 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.97 +0.16 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.36 -0.02 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.94 +0.03 StrInc C 15.58 +0.02 LSBondR 14.88 +0.02

-2.2 -2.1 +0.7 +3.3 +3.2 +0.9 +3.6 +4.9 +2.8 +2.3 +1.9 +3.7 +4.1 +4.2 +3.0 +3.1 +5.0 +1.2 +0.1 -6.5 +3.3 -1.6 +3.4 +3.0 -0.8 -1.0 +7.4 +7.0 +6.8 +6.8

StrIncA 15.50 +0.02 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.53 +0.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.57 -0.03 BdDebA p 8.03 -0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.61 -0.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.64 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.40 -0.01 ValueA 23.50 -0.03 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.62 -0.03 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.27 +0.02 MergerFd 16.21 +0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.54 -0.01 TotRtBdI 10.54 -0.01 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 40.64 +0.08 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.35 -0.01 GlbDiscZ 30.75 -0.01 QuestZ 18.44 +0.01 SharesZ 21.76 +0.02 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 48.45 +0.10 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 50.16 +0.11 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.48 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.67 +0.04 Intl I r 20.19 +0.13 Oakmark r 42.95 -0.03 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.14 +0.01 GlbSMdCap 16.27 +0.09 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 36.08 +0.24 GlobA p 64.31 +0.36 GblStrIncA 4.41 IntBdA p 6.79 +0.02

+7.2 +5.5 +0.1 +5.5 +2.1 +1.8 +3.0 +3.3 +3.4 +7.7 +2.7 +3.5 +3.7 +8.8 +4.0 +4.1 +4.2 +4.7 +5.4 +5.3 NA +3.4 +4.0 +4.0 +5.6 +5.2 -1.1 +6.5 +5.5 +5.2

MnStFdA 32.35 -0.03 RisingDivA 16.10 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 33.42 +0.03 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.58 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 28.57 +0.03 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.53 +0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.74 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.73 +0.24 IntlBdY 6.79 +0.02 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.06 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.06 +0.01 AllAsset 12.61 +0.01 ComodRR 9.67 +0.05 DevLcMk r 11.15 +0.05 DivInc 11.65 HiYld 9.46 -0.01 InvGrCp 10.79 +0.01 LowDu 10.52 RealRtnI 11.72 +0.02 ShortT 9.91 TotRt 11.06 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.72 +0.02 TotRtA 11.06 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.06 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.06 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.06 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.32 +0.09 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.52 +0.04 Price Funds: BlChip 39.11 +0.01 CapApp 21.13 -0.01 EmMktS 35.13 +0.22 EqInc 24.08

-0.1 +4.1 +4.3 +3.7 +3.9 +3.7 +5.0 -0.9 +5.3 +3.3 +5.3 +5.2 +6.9 +6.0 +4.4 +4.9 +5.3 +2.3 +5.3 +1.0 +3.4 +5.1 +3.3 +2.9 +3.3 +3.4 +5.5 +1.5 +2.6 +4.0 -0.4 +2.0

EqIndex 34.72 Growth 32.70 HlthSci 35.47 HiYield 6.92 IntlBond 10.49 IntlStk 14.80 MidCap 61.51 MCapVal 24.60 N Asia 19.60 New Era 52.32 N Horiz 35.89 N Inc 9.63 R2010 15.88 R2015 12.31 R2020 17.01 R2025 12.46 R2030 17.88 R2035 12.65 R2040 18.00 ShtBd 4.87 SmCpStk 36.05 SmCapVal 36.58 SpecIn 12.63 Value 24.17 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.66 VoyA p 22.78 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r 18.50 PennMuI r 12.05 PremierI r 21.49 TotRetI r 13.42 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.36 S&P Sel 20.16 Scout Funds: Intl 33.64 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.77 Sequoia 141.31 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.41 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 51.66 Thornburg Fds:

-0.03 +2.9 +0.01 +1.7 +0.27 +17.1 -0.01 +5.3 +0.03 +6.6 +0.07 +4.0 +0.19 +5.1 +0.12 +3.8 +0.09 +2.2 +0.10 +0.3 +0.12 +7.2 +0.01 +3.0 +0.02 +3.5 +0.02 +3.5 +0.02 +3.5 +0.02 +3.5 +0.04 +3.5 +0.03 +3.4 +0.03 +3.3 +1.4 +0.08 +4.7 +0.09 +1.2 +0.01 +4.0 +0.01 +3.6 -0.03 +1.1 -0.08 -3.9 +0.04 +0.02 +0.03 +0.01

+1.4 +3.4 +5.6 +2.1

-0.02 +3.2 -0.01 +3.0 +0.19 +3.9 -0.07 +0.9 +0.28 +9.3 +0.12 +6.8 +0.18 -0.2

IntValA p 29.60 IntValue I 30.27 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.70 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.98 CAITAdm 10.97 CpOpAdl 78.52 EMAdmr r 40.13 Energy 130.43 ExtdAdm 43.00 500Adml 118.78 GNMA Ad 11.01 GrwAdm 32.40 HlthCr 58.27 HiYldCp 5.83 InfProAd 26.70 ITBdAdml 11.50 ITsryAdml 11.64 IntGrAdm 64.03 ITAdml 13.57 ITGrAdm 10.07 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.59 LT Adml 10.91 MCpAdml 97.14 MuHYAdm 10.30 PrmCap r 70.56 ReitAdm r 85.65 STsyAdml 10.79 STBdAdml 10.65 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.81 SmCAdm 36.04 TtlBAdml 10.79 TStkAdm 32.48 WellslAdm 54.70 WelltnAdm 55.35 Windsor 46.51 WdsrIIAd 47.51 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.07 CapOpp 33.99 DivdGro 15.12

+0.14 +5.7 +0.15 +5.9 -0.01 +3.7 +0.01 +3.4 -0.01 +4.2 +0.03 +2.3 +0.31 +0.7 +0.39 +7.8 +0.12 +4.2 -0.11 +3.0 +0.02 +4.0 -0.02 +2.8 +0.22 +13.7 +5.5 +0.05 +5.2 +0.02 +4.7 +0.02 +3.8 +0.37 +4.1 -0.01 +4.0 +0.02 +4.5 +1.9 +0.03 +5.2 +4.2 +0.21 +5.4 +4.1 -0.01 +3.4 +0.93 +10.0 +0.01 +1.4 +0.01 +1.9 +0.9 +0.01 +2.0 +0.11 +3.6 +0.02 +3.3 +3.3 +0.08 +5.0 +3.7 -0.03 +2.0 -0.01 +4.3 -0.02 +2.5 +0.02 +2.3 -0.01 +5.1

Energy 69.45 EqInc 21.51 Explr 76.87 GNMA 11.01 GlobEq 18.62 HYCorp 5.83 HlthCre 138.08 InflaPro 13.59 IntlGr 20.12 IntlVal 32.78 ITIGrade 10.07 LifeCon 16.77 LifeGro 22.75 LifeMod 20.19 LTIGrade 9.59 Morg 18.59 MuInt 13.57 PrecMtls r 25.94 PrmcpCor 14.31 Prmcp r 67.98 SelValu r 19.51 STAR 19.78 STIGrade 10.81 StratEq 19.68 TgtRetInc 11.61 TgRe2010 23.10 TgtRe2015 12.84 TgRe2020 22.84 TgtRe2025 13.04 TgRe2030 22.41 TgtRe2035 13.53 TgtRe2040 22.21 TgtRe2045 13.95 USGro 18.97 Wellsly 22.58 Welltn 32.04 Wndsr 13.78 WndsII 26.76 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.21 TotIntlInst r 108.86 500 118.75 MidCap 21.39 SmCap 35.99

+7.8 +6.2 +5.4 +3.9 +4.3 +5.4 +0.54 +13.7 +0.02 +5.2 +0.12 +4.0 +0.27 +1.9 +0.02 +4.5 +0.02 +2.9 +0.03 +3.1 +0.03 +3.2 +0.03 +5.2 +0.01 +3.1 -0.01 +3.9 -0.03 -2.8 +0.01 +3.9 -0.02 +3.3 -0.01 +4.0 +0.04 +3.7 +0.01 +2.0 +0.06 +7.4 +0.01 +3.5 +0.03 +3.5 +0.02 +3.4 +0.03 +3.3 +0.02 +3.3 +0.04 +3.4 +0.03 +3.4 +0.04 +3.3 +0.03 +3.3 +0.03 +3.9 +0.04 +5.0 +3.7 -0.01 +2.0 -0.01 +4.2

SmlCpGth

23.10 +0.05 +5.4

SmlCpVl

16.28 +0.07 +1.7

+0.19 +0.75 -0.11 +0.05 +0.11

CorePlus I

+0.20 +0.01 +0.10 +0.02 +0.08

+3.3 +3.3 +3.0 +5.3 +3.6

STBnd

10.65 +0.01 +1.9

TotBnd

10.79 +0.02 +3.2

TotlIntl

16.27 +0.12 +3.2

TotStk

32.46 -0.01 +3.3

Vanguard Instl Fds: BalInst

21.99 +0.01 +3.4

DevMkInst

10.43 +0.08 +4.5

ExtIn

42.99 +0.11 +4.2

FTAllWldI r

97.05 +0.68 +3.4

GrwthIst

32.40 -0.02 +2.8

InfProInst

10.87 +0.02 +5.2

InstIdx

117.95 -0.11 +3.0

InsPl

117.96 -0.11 +3.0

InsTStPlus

29.37 -0.01 +3.3

MidCpIst

21.46 +0.05 +5.4

SCInst

36.04 +0.11 +3.7

TBIst

10.79 +0.02 +3.3

TSInst

32.48 -0.01 +3.3

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

98.11 -0.09 +3.0

MidCpIdx

30.65 +0.06 +5.4

STBdIdx

10.65 +0.01 +1.9

TotBdSgl

10.79 +0.02 +3.3

TotStkSgl

31.34 -0.01 +3.3

Western Asset: 11.02 -0.01 +3.9

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.56 -0.07 +6.2


B6 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

B USI N ESS

Meat

Photos by Ed Merriman / The Bulletin

Richard Robertson — who earned celebrity status for his role in the movie “The Postman,” starring Kevin Costner — loads 12-packs of beer from Deschutes Brewery onto slanted chutes at one of the four color-coded stations along an assembly line, where co-workers with Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living, including Linda Stevens, left, and Chad O’Reilly repack bottles of Black Butte, Mirror Pond, Inversion IPA and Twilight seasonal summer beer into variety packs.

CORIL Continued from B1 Tim Johnson, director of the CORIL work center in northeast Bend, said the project incorporates a Toyota-based lean manufacturing system, which seeks to maximize efficiency and eliminate mistakes. With a few twists designed for special-needs workers, Johnson said, CORIL’s beerrepack assembly line is working so well it could serve as a model for other types of businesses. “We finished setting up the assembly line and started repacking beer on May 16, and we’ve been doing it nonstop since then,” Johnson said, adding that the hours of operation currently are 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, which has created jobs for eight to 10 people who participate in CORIL programs. Linda Stevens said she enjoys working on the CORIL beer repacking crew partly because she needs money since her rent went up, and partly for the joy of working with others. “I just like everybody around here,” Stevens said. “I guess all the people around here are kind of funny and nice.” In all, Johnson said between 45 and 65 people participate in CORIL programs where they learn independent living skills, participate in recreational activities and work with a variety of businesses and organizations. He said these workers are paid based on a piece rate, with the average pay ranging from $9 to $10 per hour. “These folks all worked here (for CORIL) periodically before, but it was not steady,” he said, adding that most prior business projects have been temporary, while the work for Deschutes Brewery is intended to provide long-term jobs. Kleve Kee, a local consultant with the nonprofit consulting group Oregon Manufacturing Extension Partnership, said he helped a number of manufacturing companies in Central Oregon adopt the Toyota-based lean manufacturing system, including Consolidated Pine, Advanced Machining Services, VocalBooth, PV Powered and MICHI Designs. The partnership with Deschutes Brewery is one of the first adaptations of the lean manu-

Tim Johnson, work center director at Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living, displays the photo a worker at a station should match when creating a variety pack. facturing system to an assembly line designed for special-needs workers, he said. For example, Kee said the use of a different color striping on palettes of each type of beer — to denote which variety is to be packed at which station on the assembly line — is a lean manufacturing strategy. Richard Robertson, who earned celebrity status among his co-workers for his role in the movie “The Postman,” starring Kevin Costner, handles the heavy job of loading boxes of beer onto slanted slides at one of four color-coded stations along an assembly line.

‘Teamwork’ “We built these slides for the beer boxes to slide down so the workers on the assembly line don’t have to lift heavy boxes,” Johnson said, adding that the slides, as well as a system of rollers used to move the beer boxes from one station to the next, make it easier for people with disabilities to handle the boxes. “We work like teamwork,” Robertson said. Photos posted at each station along the line show the tops of beer bottles to be inserted in variety packs, so workers can look to verify they’re packing the right bottles, Johnson said. “Each type of beer has a station with a visual control,” Johnson said. “The goal is to

eliminate errors and eliminate waste.” He said the lean manufacturing system gives CORIL and its participants credibility with manufacturers. While the variety beer packs are only available temporarily in areas where Deschutes Brewery is introducing its beer to new markets, LaLonde said there are so many untapped markets he expects the repacking agreement with CORIL to continue for a long time. “We think we are going to continue to pack this pack yearround for the foreseeable future, for our fans that don’t get our beer in certain parts of the country” LaLonde said. Jim Lee, CORIL executive director, said CORIL is one of 105 nonprofit organizations in Central Oregon that benefits from the Deschutes Brewery’s Sagebrush Community Challenge, which has raised more than $2 million for non profits over the past 22 years through the annual Sagebrush Classic golf tournament and feast. “We are utilizing this partnership to raise awareness and funds to expand job opportunities for people with disabilities in our community, of which our beer fulfillment initiative with Deschutes is just one such example,” Lee said.

Continued from B1 He and Tremayne both said they noticed Bend lacked a bona fide butcher shop. Soon, with the opening of Primal Cuts, there will be two such places in the city. Sure, supermarkets offer a wide variety of choices for carnivores. But Shin Nakato said the cuts at Pono don’t come from boxes, suggesting processing at an earlier time. They are cut on premises, after a local slaughter, he said. Plus, he knows every one of the animals that will eventually end up being hung on rails and cut up in the back of the store — more than 200 cows and more than 200 pigs, on the 200-acre farm near Culver. “That’s No. 8 in there,” he said, as he walked by a cooler where cuts sat bagged in clear plastic. At Pono, customers can sit down and eat plates of food cooked to order. During a visit Tuesday, red beans and rice and pork schnitzel were both available for purchase along with several side options. Shin Nakato was born in Japan and raised in North Carolina, where he worked in the family business of Japanese restaurants. He and his brother now own two of the Nakato restaurants in North Carolina, another restaurant in Springfield, Mo., the Culver-area farm and the Pono shop in Bend. Shin Nakato usually oversees work in Central Oregon, while his brother runs the restaurants in North Carolina and Missouri. He raised his first steer, he said, while living in Whitefish, Mont. About 12 years ago, he and his wife settled on land near Culver beside the future farm site. He said he wanted to produce the best possible meat ingredients for food, as he and his brother come from a restaurant background. And so, with help from a local rancher, he set about putting together a farm for pigs and cows, with the aim to start a meat shop one day, he said. Now the shop is open, and people are eating the meat of

Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Painting contractor Alan Masters removes masking after painting the exterior of Primal Cuts Meat Market in Bend.

New butcher shops in Bend PONO FARM & FINE MEATS Where: 63595 Hunnell Road, Suite 100, Bend Hours: Mondays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; kitchen opens at 11 a.m. Phone: 541-330-6328 Website: www.ponofarm.com

PRIMAL CUTS MEAT MARKET LLC Where: 1244 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend Hours: Tuesdays through Saturdays, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Phone: 503-866-8530 Website: www.facebook. com/pages/Primal-Cuts-MeatMarket/184769351572562

animals he has raised for years. At Primal Cuts, where contractors were working and some equipment was already on premises Tuesday, there will be no place for customers to dine in, and Tremayne said there are no plans to add tables or chairs. Tremayne said he believes a meat market without on-the-spot eating opportunities can be profitable, if done right. “In the business plan, it shows to be profitable,” he said jokingly. At his shop — in addition to beef and pork cuts — chicken, turkey and duck will also be on

OSU-CASCADES

hand for purchase, Tremayne said. He also would like to sell his meats in bulk to Central Oregon restaurants. Tremayne, a Utah native, took interest in butchering when he did research-and-development work for Pacific Natural Foods in Portland. He incorporated meats into soups and other products the company was making, he said. More recently, he worked as a line cook at the Zydeco restaurant in downtown Bend. In the past two years, he has formulated the concept for Primal Cuts, with a passion for giving eaters a better idea of the history of their food. “I think people need to question where your food comes from,” he said. Buying locally produced food can support local business people, Tremayne said. Consumers can benefit, he said, because they can see for themselves how their food is created. “I’d like to know where my food comes so I can kind of watch the whole trail of seeing it get to me, seeing it grown,” he said. He plans to have marketing materials from the ranches sourcing his meats, to serve as “a liaison between the farms and the customer.” Perhaps ranchers will be on hand sometimes, he said, to meet with customers. It’s the way he likes to shop for meat, and he’s confident other people will like the idea, too. Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

Amanda DeVall | Student

2001–2011

Natural Resources

CELEBRATING

10

YEARS AS CENTRAL OREGON’S

UNIVERSITY

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

Year after cities OK’d boycott of Arizona, little has changed By Kate Linthicum Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — In May 2010, Los Angeles was a part of wave of cities that voted to boycott Arizona after lawmakers in that state passed a controversial law targeting illegal immigrants. City Hall staffers were ordered to review contracts with Arizona companies for possible termination, and official travel to Arizona was supposed to be suspended. But a year later, little has changed in the way Los Angeles does business with the state next door. The city still buys street sweeper parts from one Arizona firm and has a contract for emergency sewer repairs with another, officials say. The Harbor Department alone has four contracts with Arizona companies that total nearly $26 million. A similar pattern can be seen across California. Boycotts in Oakland, San Francisco and Los Angeles County made headlines

last year but have since delivered little punch. None of those jurisdictions has canceled a contract with an Arizona-based company because of the boycott — leading some immigrant rights activists to dismiss the high-profile calls for economic sanctions as empty symbolism. The disappointment is especially felt in Los Angeles, where Latino elected leaders strongly backed the sanctions.

‘Moment of hypocrisy’ “This is a moment of hypocrisy if the city of Los Angeles says one thing and does another,” said Rabbi Jonathan Klein, executive director of the Los Angeles chapter of Clergy and Laity United for Economic Justice. Klein was speaking to a crowd of protesters gathered at City Hall to demand follow-through on the business ban. Protesters have complained about several exemptions the

City Council has granted in the last year, including approvals of contracts for made-in-Arizona Taser guns and red-light traffic cameras, as well as a contract with a Los Angeles International Airport shuttle provider that has offices in the state. Councilman Ed Reyes, who wrote the boycott, voted to approve those exceptions. He said the deals were in the best interest of the city. Reyes said he, too, was disappointed with the boycott’s slow progress, but he blamed City Attorney Carmen Trutanich’s office for taking more than a year to draw up an ordinance specifying the terms of the ban. A spokesman for Trutanich said an ordinance is still in the works. Despite the lack of clear guidelines, Reyes said there had been at least one boycott victory: Last year the Los Angeles Police Department opted not to send a team of helicopter pilots to a training conference in Phoenix.

I am Sustaining Community

At OSU-Cascades, we are sustaining community. Our faculty and students make a positive difference in Central Oregon through internships and locally focused projects. And our graduates go on to make lasting contributions to our region’s quality of life. In Amanda DeVall’s sustainable communities class, her team analyzed energy use, recycling and other practices in the Old Mill District with the goal of helping businesses in our community be even more successful— economically, environmentally and socially.

Learn more at OSUcascades.edu Central Oregon’s university.


L

Inside

OREGON Couple who relied on faith healing found guilty, see Page C2. LOCAL SCHOOLS Student scientists display their experiments, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Frankie Toler, former Allman Brothers drummer, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011

IN BRIEF Redmond teachers offer pay proposal The union representing teachers in the Redmond School District has offered a new budget cut proposal this week that includes some salary increases. The Redmond Education Association’s latest offer delays step raises — those given for experience — to the middle of the 2011-12 year. Staff not eligible for a step would collect a 1.8 percent cost-of-living raise beginning in March 2012. That cost-ofliving raise was deferred from the current year. The union’s proposal gives up an additional cost-of-living raise that was scheduled to begin next school year. The union also calls for cutting eight days — five nonstudent days and three class days — from next year’s calendar. That’s an increase from the six days cut from the current year’s schedule. This proposal is a response to the district’s latest effort to overcome an $8 million shortfall. Under the district’s latest proposal, no district employees would receive raises. The district’s proposal also maintains this year’s calendar, which is a six-day reduction from a normal year. Union and district leaders are next scheduled to negotiate the contract on June 13.

County wants DA lawsuit narrowed Deschutes argues it’s not liable because fired prosecutors worked for the state By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Attorneys for Deschutes County filed court documents Monday asking a federal judge to dismiss the portions of a roughly $22.5 million lawsuit that involve the county and its officials. The attorneys say the county

government does not control the day-to-day activities of deputy district attorneys, so it is not liable for the firing of three prosecutors in January. County commissioners are also protected from liability under a doctrine that provides immunity for officials engaged in legislative work, the county’s defense at-

torneys argue. If a judge agrees, that would pare down the lawsuit significantly and leave Deschutes County District Attorney Patrick Flaherty the sole defendant in the lawsuit. Flaherty fired five prosecutors after he took office in January. In April, three of them — Brentley Foster, Jody Vaughan and Phil Duong — filed a lawsuit against Flaherty and county officials, seeking reinstatement as well as millions of dollars in

punitive, economic and other damages. The former prosecutors allege wrongful discharge, unfair labor practices, sex discrimination, and violations of their First Amendment rights to free speech and association.

Flaherty’s attorney requests more time An attorney for Flaherty filed documents Tuesday asking the court for more time to respond to the plaintiffs’ complaint.

Class of 2011, signing off

By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Public employees at La Pine’s tiny sewer and water districts are days away from forming two unions after Oregon’s labor relations board tallied up employees’ votes Tuesday. It didn’t take long to count the votes: the sewer district has two employees and the water district has three, said Sandra Elliott, elections coordinator for the Oregon Employment Relations Board. The employees’ efforts to organize arose during changes in leadership at the districts. The city of La Pine has sought since last year to take over the two districts. In May, voters elected several new district commissioners who said they supported the city’s annexation plans. In recent months, city officials alleged of conflicts of interest and nepotism at the district, including that commissioners hired family members to work there. For example, former Water District Commissioner BarbeAnn Nelson-Dodson’s daughter Ashley Williams has worked as an administrative assistant for the districts since January 2009. In March, the sewer and water districts’ five employees — including operations manager Donna Zigler — decided to organize through Teamsters Union Local No. 962. Now, the districts’ employees and board members have 10 days to raise any objections they might have to the election, Elliott said. If none are raised, Elliott said she will certify the union, probably around June 20. At that point, the unions and management teams can proceed with bargaining over contracts.

Two Central Oregon residents were arrested early Tuesday morning after police said they broke into the Bend pawn shop, Cash Connection, and fled the scene on foot. La Pine resident Christian Taylor, 20, and Bend resident Ryeann Rogers, 18, were arrested on suspicion of burglary, criminal mischief and theft relating to the incident that took place early Tuesday. A Bend police officer was on patrol in the area when he heard an alarm coming from Cash Connection on Northeast Fifth Street. The officer discovered a broken front window, and two people fleeing. Police officers and a police dog responded to the area. After a 25-minute search, police received a tip about one of the suspects running north on Northwest Sixth Street. Anyone with information on this crime is asked to contact the Police Department at 541693-6911.

Prineville BLM employee honored

HOW TO SUBMIT

Leon Pantenburg / The Bulletin

L

a Pine High senior Alex Price ends his high school career by signing the Class of 2011 banner as Principal Jay Mathison supervises. The banner will be posted in the school cafeteria as a new tradition for graduating classes. It will replace the old student-painted ceiling

tiles that used to be in the high school gym hallway.

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Bill to end outerwear tariff could aid Oregon companies By Andrew Clevenger The Bulletin

Letters and submissions: • Mail: My Nickel’s Worth or In My View, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: bulletin@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section. Civic Calendar notices: • E-mail: news@bendbulletin.com • Please write “Civic Calendar” in the subject line and include a contact name and daytime phone number. School news and Teen Feats: • E-mail notices of general interest to pcliff@bendbulletin.com. • E-mail announcements of a student’s academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. • More details: The Bulletin’s Local Schools page publishes today in this section. Obituaries and death notices: • Mail: Obituaries, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 • E-mail: obits@bendbulletin.com • More details inside this section.

Deschutes County officials declined to comment on their attorneys’ motion to dismiss, and Andrew Altschul, an attorney who represents Foster and Vaughan, did not respond to a call for comment. In court documents, attorneys Peter Mersereau and Thomas McPherson, of the Portland firm Mersereau & Shannon LLP, asserted that Deschutes County was not the deputy district attorneys’ employer. See Lawsuit / C5

In La Pine, 5 workers forming 2 unions

2 held in break-in at Bend pawn shop

The outdoor recreation planner for the Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management was named the National River Manager of the Year. Heidi Mottl, a Crook County resident, was presented with the award Monday for her leadership in promoting and protecting natural and cultural resources on the John Day River. She has worked for Prineville BLM for 15 years. — Bulletin staff reports

C

WASHINGTON — Two Oregon congressmen are part of a bipartisan effort to eliminate a tariff on outdoor apparel, a move that could provide a slight boost to the state’s recreation industry. Last week, Rep. Dave Reichert, R-Wash., introduced the U.S. Optimal Use of Trade to Develop Outerwear and Outdoor Recreation, or OUTDOOR Act, which would eliminate duties owed on imported recreational apparel. The measure was co-sponsored by Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., and Earl Blumenauer, D-Ore. “More than 75 percent of Americans participate in active outdoor recreation each year, experiencing America’s wild lands in ways large and

small, expanding rural economies, and supporting the great companies that create innovative gear,” Blumenauer said in a prepared statement. “I’m proud that this legislation will reduce the high tariffs on performance outerwear and expand consumer choice.” A miniscule fraction of recreational outerwear is manufactured domestically, so the tariff doesn’t protect any American textile businesses, Blumenauer spokesman Derek Schlickeisen said Monday. “The U.S. has no substantial domestic production of these goods, which means that this tariff was meant to protect an industry that we essentially don’t have. “What Portland and other areas do have is an entrepreneurial group of textile design-

IN CONGRESS

ers,” he said. Tariffs on this type of clothing can be as high as 28.2 percent, according to the legislation. Eliminating them would benefit American designers and retailers, like Oregon-based Columbia Sportswear, which applauded the legislation’s introduction. “We support passage of this important legislation because it will help spur product innovation, make performance outerwear more affordable, promote healthy outdoor-focused lifestyles and stimulate job growth,” said Tim Boyle, president and CEO of Columbia, in a prepared statement. A 2009 study by the Congressional Budget Office concluded that eliminating the tariff would reduce roughly $59 million a year in costs, which are passed along to consumers, Schlickeisen said. See Tariff / 5

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C2 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O 

B 

N  R Theft — An iPod was reported stolen at 10:25 a.m. June 6, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A trailer was reported stolen at 8:53 a.m. June 6, in the 1900 block of Southeast 1st Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 8:43 a.m. June 6, in the 3200 block of Southwest Indian Place. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:38 a.m. June 6, in the 2200 block of Southwest Metolius Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:44 a.m. June 6, in the 900 block of Southwest 17th Street.

POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

House sends insurance exchange to governor SALEM — The Legislature has voted to create a health insurance exchange to connect individuals and small businesses with more affordable health care. The House passed the measure Tuesday, sending it to Gov. John Kitzhaber, who says he will sign it. An insurance exchange is designed to help boost the buying power of individuals and small businesses, which often face health care costs that are significantly higher than those who get coverage through large employers. The exchange also would determine whether people qualify for federal subsidies under the health care overhaul signed last year by President Barack Obama.

Immigrant tuition bill appears dead SALEM — An effort to revive a bill that would allow some illegal immigrants to pay in-state college tuition has failed in the Oregon House. Democrats tried to collect 31 signatures to force a floor vote on the measure, but they were five short when a deadline passed Tuesday evening. Proponents of the measure are running out of options to pass it as legislators race to adjourn the legislative session. The effort’s failure became clear when Republican Rep. Bob Jenson, who is a sponsor, said on the House floor late Tuesday that he would not buck his party’s leadership to side with Democrats on a procedural maneuver.

Texas man injured in fall in Bridal Veil area PORTLAND — A 64-year-old Texas man who fell about 30 feet into a ravine while hiking in the Bridal Veil area of the Columbia River Gorge is reported in critical condition. Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Lt. Mary Lindstrand says rescuers recovered Benton Springer of San Marcos, Texas, after his fall Tuesday afternoon. He was brought to Rooster Rock State Park, where a helicopter picked him up and took him to a Portland hospital. — From wire reports

Bend Police Department

Brian Feulner / The Oregonian

Timothy and Rebecca Wyland react in an Oregon City courtroom after the jury finds the couple guilty of first-degree criminal mistreatment for failing to provide medical care for their daughter. The Wylands belong to the Followers of Christ church, which embraces faith healing and rejects medical care.

Faith-healing couple found guilty in mistreatment trial The Associated Press OREGON CITY — An Oregon jury took just an hour Tuesday to convict a couple of felony criminal mistreatment for relying on faith healing instead of taking their infant daughter to a doctor. Timothy and Rebecca Wyland’s daughter Alayna, born in December 2009, developed an abnormal growth of blood vessels that covered her left eye and threatened her vision. Now 1½ years old, she has improved under state-ordered medical care. She remains in state custody but lives with her parents. The Wylands belong to the Followers of Christ, an Oregon City congregation that relies on faith healing. Rather than taking their daughter to a doctor, they relied on prayer, anointing with oil and laying on of hands. The couple testified during a juvenile court custody hearing last July that they wouldn’t have willingly taken Alayna to a doctor because it would violate their religious beliefs. Jurors heard a recording of that hearing. Timothy Wyland slipped his arm around his wife’s waist as the verdict was read, The Orego-

nian reported. The couple made no comment as they walked from the courtroom, surrounded by about 20 supporters from their church, some of them crying. Defense lawyers Mark Cogan and John Neidig declined comment.

Sentencing June 24 Sentencing was set for June 24. The penalty for first-degree criminal mistreatment is a maximum five years in prison but the Wylands are considered likely to receive probation or possibly some jail time. Cogan told jurors the Wylands were the victims of inflexible bureaucrats and religious persecution because of their faith-healing beliefs. The defense also focused on the couple’s actions after the state intervened last summer. They portrayed the Wylands as loving parents who fully cooperated with court orders, taking the child to doctor’s appointments and giving her prescribed medication. However, lead prosecutor Christine Landers told ju-

rors in her closing argument that the defense was just a smokescreen. The couple had 6 ½ months to seek medical attention before the state intervened but they did not, Landers said. Because of their faith, “they never would have,” she said. In the past two years, Clackamas County has prosecuted two other couples from the same church whose children died from untreated ailments. Jeff and Marci Beagley were convicted of criminally negligent homicide last year and sentenced to 16 months in prison after their 16-year-old son, Neil, died of complications from an untreated urinary tract blockage. In 2009, the Beagleys’ daughter, Raylene Worthington, and her husband, Carl Brent Worthington, were acquitted of second-degree manslaughter in the death of their young daughter, Ava, who died in 2008 of bronchial pneumonia and a blood infection. Brent Worthington was convicted of the lesser charge of criminal mistreatment and sentenced to 60 days in jail.

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:02 a.m. June 6, in the 61000 block of Brosterhous Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:21 p.m. June 6, in the 1000 block of Northwest Albany Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:59 p.m. June 6, in the 800 block of Southeast Third Street. DUII — Daniel Cheney, 57, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:07 p.m. June 6, in the 100 block of Northeast Franklin Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 1:14 a.m. June 7, in the 1000 block of Northeast Fifth Street.

Prineville Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:42 a.m. June 6, in the area of Southeast First and Holly streets. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Redmond Police Department

Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 10:41 p.m. June 6, in the 2100 block of Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:27 p.m. June 6, in the area of Southwest 15th Street and Southwest Quartz Avenue. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 6:44 p.m. June 6, in the 1200 block of Southwest 33rd Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:16 p.m. June 6, in the 1100 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:44 p.m. June 6, in the 2100 block of Northwest Maple Tree Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 11:59 a.m. June 6, in the 2900 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:47 a.m. June 6, in the 300 block of Northwest 23rd Street.

DUII — Stewart Charles Cannon, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:59 p.m. June 6, in the area of Stellar Drive and Elsinore Road in Bend. DUII — Carrie Ruth McInerney, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 4:03 p.m. June 6, in the area of Hopi and Navajo roads in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:52 p.m. June 6, in the area of Southwest Quarry Avenue and South Canal Boulevard in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:06 a.m. June 6, in the 15700 block of Camino De Oro in La Pine. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:42 p.m. June 3, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 217. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:14 p.m. June 6, in the area of State Highway 126 near milepost 7.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 12 — Medical aid calls.

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I n 1966, merger of AFL and NFL announced T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, June 8, the 159th day of 2011. There are 206 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On June 8, 1861, voters in Tennessee approved an Ordinance of Secession passed the previous month by the state Legislature. ON THIS DATE In A.D. 632, the prophet Muhammad died in Medina. In 1845, Andrew Jackson, seventh president of the United States, died in Nashville, Tenn. In 1864, Abraham Lincoln was nominated for another term as president during the National Union (Republican) Party’s convention in Baltimore. In 1905, President Theodore Roosevelt offered to act as a mediator in the Russo-Japanese War. In 1915, Secretary of State William Jennings Bryan resigned in a disagreement with President Woodrow Wilson over U.S. handling of the sinking of the Lusitania. In 1953, the Supreme Court ruled that restaurants in the District of Columbia could not refuse to serve blacks. In 1966, a merger was announced between the National and American Football Leagues, to take effect in 1970. In 1967, 34 U.S. servicemen were killed when Israel attacked the USS Liberty, a Navy intel-

ligence-gathering ship in the Mediterranean. (Israel later said the Liberty had been mistaken for an Egyptian vessel.) In 1978, a jury in Clark County, Nev., ruled the so-called “Mormon will,” purportedly written by the late billionaire Howard Hughes, was a forgery. In 1995, U.S. Marines rescued Capt. Scott O’Grady, whose F-16C fighter jet had been shot down by Bosnian Serbs on June 2. TEN YEARS AGO A knife-wielding man killed eight children at a Japanese elementary school on the outskirts of Osaka. (The killer, Mamoru Takuma, was executed in September 2004.) FIVE YEARS AGO The Food and Drug Administration approved a vaccine against HPV, the virus that causes cervical cancer. Sheikha Haya Al Khalifa, a lawyer from Bahrain, was elected U.N. General Assembly president, the first woman from the Middle East to take the post. ONE YEAR AGO In several high-profile Republican primaries, Meg Whitman won the nomination for California governor while Carly Fiorina got the nod to oppose three-term Democratic Sen. Barbara Boxer;

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in Nevada, Sharron Angle won the right to oppose Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. (All three ended up losing their respective contests.) In South Carolina, political unknown Alvin Greene won the Democratic primary to challenge U.S. Sen. Jim DeMint. (Greene lost in November). TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Former first lady Barbara Bush is 86. Actor-comedian Jerry Stiller is 84. Comedian Joan Rivers is 78. Actress Millicent Martin is 77. Actor James Darren is 75. Actor Bernie Casey is 72. Singer Nancy Sinatra is 71. Singer Chuck Negron (Three Dog Night) is 69. Musician Boz Scaggs is 67. Actor Don Grady is 67. Rock musician Mick Box (Uriah Heep) is 64. Author Sara Paretsky is 64. Actress Sonia Braga is 61. Actress Kathy Baker is 61. Country musician Tony Rice is 60. Actor Griffin

Dunne is 56. “Dilbert” creator Scott Adams is 54. Actor-director Keenen Ivory Wayans is 53. Singer Mick Hucknall (Simply Red) is 51. Musician Nick Rhodes (Duran Duran) is 49. Rhythm-and-blues singer Doris Pearson (Five Star) is 45. Actress Julianna Margulies is 44. Actor Dan Futterman is 44. Actor David Sutcliffe is 42. Rhythm-and-blues singer Nicci Gilbert is 41. Actress Kelli Williams is 41. Actor Mark Feuerstein is 40. Contemporary Christian musician Mike Scheuchzer (MercyMe) is 36. Rapper Kanye West is 34. Blues-rock musician Derek Trucks (The Derek Trucks Band) is 32. Folk-bluegrass singer-musician Sara Watkins (Nickel Creek) is 30. Actress Torrey DeVitto (TV: “Pretty Little Liars”) is 27. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Don’t talk about what you have done or what you are going to do.” — Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States (1743-1826)

541-382-3402 Dale L. Smith, Attorney 622 NE 4th St., Bend, OR 97701 We are a debt relief agency. We proudly help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 C3

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A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

Students put their science to the test St. Francis School in Bend turns into experiment expo for yearly fair By Megan Kehoe

rate because when they were cooled down, the paint inside avis Dudley, 14, spent a re- compressed, creating dimples,” cent Thursday evening pa- said Davis. “It made them less trolling St. Francis School aerodynamic.” with a paintball gun. Other students based their exBut Davis wasn’t there to cause periments on proving or disprovtrouble, blasting the walls of the ing rumors. Madison Lillesve, 12; Bend school with explosions of Sophie Burgess, 12; and Amanda paint. Instead, Davis was at St. Rich, 12, decided to take on the Francis as a scientist. old rumor about Coca-Cola disThe hallways of the Bend solving tooth enamel. school were transformed into a Using carefully controlled science fair. variables, the girls placed a variMiddle school students lined ety of protein-based items in jars the walls with cardboard dis- of Coca-Cola, such as a chicken plays and presented science proj- drumstick, for several days to ects they had been working on see if the rumors were true. The for several weeks. result? Led by science teacher Steve “I’m never drinking Coca-Cola Buchholz, students shared with again,” said Sophie, shaking her parents, teachhead. ers and other According students some of “Rather than to the girls, the the lessons they weight of the learned through just learning chicken they their innovative from textbook placed in Cocaexperiments. Cola dropped “Rather than examples, they from 3 ounces to just learning from get to take the 2 over five days. textbook examThe result was ples, they get to scientific inquiry gross, said the take the scientific process and apply girls, with the inquiry process it to things they’re chicken fat floatand apply it to ing at the top of things they’re in- interested in.” the Coca-Cola, terested in,” said eventually moldBuchholz, who — Steve Buchholz, ing at the end of has organized the science teacher at St. the experiment. annual science Francis School, Bend Many students fair for several used the science years. experiments to It was clear from the projects answer burning questions. One lining the walls that many of the group called its project, “Bactestudents took this concept and rial Growth in Human, Dog and ran with it. Davis and his lab Cat Saliva.” partner, Chase Strain, 14, comPitting the three against one bined science with something another, students took samples they love: paintball. of saliva from a cat, a dog and With a project titled “Frozen a human, put them in separate Accuracy,” Davis and Chase in- petri dishes for a week, and meavestigated whether frozen paint- sured the amount of bacterial balls would be more accurate growth. than paintballs kept at room The students thought the dog temperature. The boys gathered saliva would produce the most 20 paintballs and froze half of bacteria because of all the questhem. They set up a target, fired tionable items dogs tend to eat, away and recorded each hit and but the students discovered that miss. they were wrong. In fact, the Aside from the obvious fact cat’s saliva had the most bacteria the frozen ones hurt a lot more, growth. the boys found something they hadn’t expected. Megan Kehoe can be “We discovered that the fro- reached at 541-383-0354 or at zen paintballs were less accu- mkehoe@bendbulletin.com. The Bulletin

D

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Parents and students fill a hallway in St. Frances School in Bend to view science fair projects students had been working on for weeks.

Emily Edgren, right, and Mikayla Shelton assemble their science fair project on the difference between store-bought and farmfresh eggs on a recent Thursday evening at St. Francis School. Children interact with Kate Hodson’s science fair project.

Report on L.A. schools backs full latitude in hiring of teachers By Howard Blume Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — School principals should be able to hire any teacher of their choosing, and displaced tenured teachers who aren’t rehired elsewhere within the system should be permanently dismissed, according to a controversial new report on the Los Angeles Unified School District. The report will be presented to the Board of Education. The research, paid for largely by funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, offers a road map for improving the quality of teaching in the nation’s second-largest school system, with recommendations strongly backed by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. The report gave L.A. Unified credit for improvement in some areas, noting, for example, that more teachers are being fired for poor performance, a sign of better quality control, said researchers from the Washington, D.C.-based National Council on Teacher

Quality. In 2008, the district dismissed seven tenured teachers. The number for the current year, through April, was 94; 105 others have resigned to avoid dismissal. The teachers union denounced several recommendations as emblematic of an ineffective corporate-style, market-driven approach to education. The recommendations would revamp teacher hiring. One would do away with the guarantee of a job for a so-called must-place teacher. These instructors include those who lose positions because of poor teaching, conflict with an administrator, declining enrollment or budget cuts. The list also includes teachers returning from illness or parental leave. Principals are under pressure to hire from this group, although district rules and state law do not always require that they do. “Three-quarters of principals surveyed … said that teachers on the must-place list are rarely if ever a good fit for their school,”

the report says. “It is critical that we do away with the must-place list,” said Arielle Goren, a spokeswoman for Villaraigosa. The report recommends that principals be able to hire any qualified applicant, including those from outside the school system, and that displaced teachers lose their right to district employment after a year. Employees should not be punished for factors beyond their control, countered A.J. Duffy, president of United Teachers Los Angeles. He said about 150 teachers will be displaced because district officials elected to turn over campuses to independent, mostly nonunion charter schools, which frequently opt for less experienced, less expensive instructors. “Many must-place teachers are fine teachers,” Duffy said. The report also calls for stepping up teacher evaluations: 40 percent of tenured teachers and 70 percent of nontenured teachers are evaluated annually.

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: pcliff@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have

been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

Event calendar

June

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Explorers Summer Camp Ages 6 years to 12 years Fill your summer with adventure and lasting memories. If you are 6 to 12 years old, our themed weekly camps will keep explorers engaged and interested. Our exciting program includes 3 outdoor weekly field trips, swimming, hiking, fishing, nature studies, canoeing, cooking, caving, sports, creative art, crafts, and camp games. We provide daily academic review and snacks.

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C4 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Let public choose new park projects

B

end Park & Recreation District officials have managed in recent years to finance new facilities without having to ask voters for new taxes. The new district headquarters

near the Old Mill District was paid for in just that way. Yet the park district is faced with declining revenues these days, and that means several worthwhile large projects cannot be paid for without additional income. The district may ask voters to approve a bond measure sometime in the future. Several large projects are being considered, though nothing has been chosen yet. Officials would like to build a passageway through the Colorado Avenue dam for floaters and kayakers; they need additional facilities at Pine Nursery Park; they’re considering chipping in to solve Mirror Pond’s sediment problems, and they’re discussing whether the community needs a second major recreation facility like Juniper Swim & Fitness Center. None of those is cheap, but a case can be made that each would enhance the district and the community at large. Some, like the Colorado passageway, would make the river more of a draw to some; others would allow more local residents to use park district facilities easily. The Mirror Pond project is in a class by itself. District officials know they have plenty of homework to do on their likely proposal, which they told The Bulletin might be akin to the city of Bend’s recently approved measure for road improvements. That bond, you

might recall, was designed to finance several major projects at one time. Officials says they’ll look at what improvements they believe are needed most and ask for plenty of public discussion of them before voters are approached. It’s a good way to proceed, though one thing would make it better. Nothing on the district’s current list could be considered vital to the safety and well-being of the community. Each would enhance the area, no doubt about it, but none is a life-or-death proposition. That argues for putting not a single all-encompassing bond measure on the ballot, but a menu of a few carefully selected measures that would allow district residents to agree to finance those they felt were most important. Timing, too, is critical, and the district is wise not to be in a rush to ask voters for millions in new tax dollars. Bend residents are justifiably proud of their parks and the recreation opportunities parks create. We suspect they’ll support reasonable requests for money to enhance and expand upon what is already here. A menu of options would allow voters to choose what they believe is important, not simply reject everything because the price is high.

Don’t let eCourt fail O

regon’s eCourt program cannot be allowed to become another in the list of big, complicated state technology projects that flounders or fails. The state doesn’t have a brilliant track record on big, complicated technology projects. The $63 million State Data Center had power and security problems and just plain didn’t work right. OWIN, the state’s proposed $500 million plus emergencyradio network, was worse. Officials lowballed the price and deceived the state and public about progress, concealing that it was two years behind schedule. The eCourt is a projected $90 million overhaul that will transform how the state’s court system works. It basically shifts from tens of millions of pieces of paper in files in 36 counties to a digital system and the Web. Court documents should be available 24 hours a day, instead of only at the courthouse during business hours and as long as someone else is not using them. Safeguards are planned to protect information that should not be released to the public, such as Social Security numbers. It’s a big undertaking to build such a system. There are bound to be problems. But there are issues that have raised eyebrows among legislators,

as The Willamette Week reported earlier this month. The program is behind schedule. Sometimes, deadlines have just been rewritten so it appears that it is not behind schedule. Some $23 million has been spent, and only part of the system is complete. From $6 million to $8 million was spent pursuing what became a software dead end. That all sounds all too familiar. And that makes some lawmakers uncomfortable. There’s another complication. Oregon eCourt is also a product of the judicial branch of Oregon government. Legislators provide the money for the project that taxpayers provide to them. But because it is an effort by the judicial branch, lawmakers do not have direct oversight. Chief Justice Paul J. De Muniz of the Oregon Supreme Court has overall responsibility for the project. What legislators can and should do is link more money to specific objectives and deadlines within the larger project. If objectives and deadlines aren’t met, the response should be more accountability, not just another check. It’s up to De Muniz to ensure that Oregon eCourt does not become another big, complicated project Oregonians regret.

My Nickel’s Worth Recycling needs education

local governments in Central Oregon to translate their desire for a healthy environment into practical, local action that makes a difference. We look forward to continuing that role. Mike Riley executive director of The Environmental Center in Bend

I agree with The Bulletin’s editorial board: Education should be part of the strategy to solve one of our state’s waste challenges, single-use plastic bags. Smart business people know that if you want customers to choose your product or service, you need to invest in education and promotion. Getting people to adopt new behaviors — to prevent waste, to reuse as much as possible, and to recycle and compost the rest — to choose reusable cloth bags instead of single-use plastic bags — is no different. We recycle a lot here in Deschutes County — 45 percent in 2009. But we’re also throwing away more than ever before: 117,000 tons of stuff went to the landfill in 2009. Back in the 1980s, when recycling was just beginning in Oregon, a full recycling bin was the right stretch goal. Today, we need a new stretch goal: a full recycling bin and an empty garbage can. We’ll protect the environment and extend the life of Knott landfill, our county’s lowest-cost disposal option. Education and promotion will be needed to achieve that new waste-prevention goal. And I know of a great local organization that can get that education job done: The Environmental Center. For 23 years, we have partnered with individuals, businesses and

Throw the rascals out On Sunday, May 29th, The Bulletin featured an article on the sad state of Oregon’s roads. Whether we are drivers, passengers, bike pilots or pedestrians, the state of our roads affects us all. The Sunday article cited numerous reasons given for the conditions of our roads, but I would add three more: indifference, ineptitude and corruption on the part of government officials, employees and contractors. Plus, they are spending other people’s money, not their own, and they aren’t held accountable. While the article focused on the state of the roads, think about how the defensive, dismissive and arrogant positions taken by officials are rampant throughout city, county, state and federal government. Consider how long it takes to investigate issues and the lack of results. Consider the taxpayer cost and lack of taxpayer benefit from most entities in our government. The only solution government offers is to give them more money. We taxpayers are

being taken for a ride by all levels of government. Their answer is almost always the same: “We’re overworked and underpaid. Pay more in taxes and you’ll get better [insert service here].” Ha! Ultimately, it’s our fault for electing people who look the other way, tolerate indifference, look for personal profit, and those who refuse to take personal responsibility and clean house. Unless the people rise up and throw out every single one of the rascals that refuse to stand up and do what’s right, take names and kick butt, we are all doomed. Dennis Douglas Bend

Bitterbrush not noxious The writer from La Pine (May 27), who described bitterbrush as a noxious weed that needs to be eliminated, could not be more wrong. To the contrary, bitterbrush is a native plant species that has mostly positive characteristics. Because it is an evergreen species, it provides critical winter browse for deer and is important for cattle, sheep, goats and many wildlife species. It may be wise to clear bitterbrush if it is near structures, to reduce fire hazard, but leave the rest for the wildlife! Fred Shick Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

If only politicians, citizens lived up to Pledge of Allegiance By Bill Bodden Bulletin guest columnist

I

t is understandable that a recent letter writer was impressed by children at a local school reciting the Pledge of Allegiance, but a question follows: How long will it be before these children recognize that reciting the pledge is a meaningless exercise for most adults? The pledge has its virtues, but it does have flaws. The phrase about pledging allegiance to the flag and the republic for which it stands is open to interpretation. It is commendable if we understand it to mean a democratic republic, but what happens if another form of republic prevails? A people’s republic — China or North Korea? Or a Mussolini-style social republic with a corporate-government alliance? Sound familiar? A nation ruled by fascists would still be a republic. Fortunately, during the FDR era, when some people appeared inclined to install fascism in the United States, two-time Medal of Honor winner and retired Marine Gen. Smedley

Butler interpreted his pledge to mean a democratic republic. He thwarted this threat to overthrow the government and achieved what was probably the greatest victory of his life. The next phrase — one nation, under God, indivisible — has some virtue but a couple of problems. There is a sizable minority of citizens who reject a belief in any god. The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals said in 2002 that “under God” was unconstitutional. Some people who disagreed said “under God” should remain in the pledge, but if people don’t want to say those words they can omit them. Congressman Jim McDermott of Washington tried that when he led the House of Representatives in the pledge and was attacked ferociously. In 2010 the court reversed the 2002 decision on a split vote. Then there are the words that imply we are all citizens of “one nation ... indivisible.” How can that be when we are divided in countless ways and some people work diligently and callously to divide us even more? The great journalist Wal-

IN MY VIEW ter Karp wrote an essay on the pledge sometime during the Carter-Reagan era in which he recognized the many differences that existed among the American people, but he noted that the Constitution united us as a nation. Unfortunately, the Constitution has since been debased, applied and violated according to political expediencies and prejudices by politicians in the White House and Congress and judges in courts with the acquiescence of a majority of the American people. What’s next? Anarchy? The late Sen. Robert Byrd was considered the leading authority on the Constitution in the Senate. Before Congress voted to give President Bush authorization to use military force against Iraq, he warned our elected representatives they would be violating their oaths to uphold the Constitution if they voted affirmatively. Nevertheless, about three-fourths of Congress voted for this authorization

with the approval of around 70-plus percent of the American people. Recently, 295 constitutional scholars — including Laurence Tribe, who taught Barack Obama constitutional law at Harvard — signed a letter to President Obama criticizing him for condoning abuse of the constitutional rights of an army private in the Quantico Marine Base brig before even being charged with a crime but of which the president has already declared him guilty. If only we were as devoted to the final phrase of the pledge — “with liberty and justice for all” — as we should be. Unfortunately, many, if not most, of the politicians the people elect to offices from town councils to Congress and the White House have rendered that fine sentiment into an act of national hypocrisy with the approval of voters who re-elect them. How much liberty can the millions of people living in poverty enjoy? Very little, if any, but some among us would reduce the minimum wage, which already guarantees living in poverty.

Where is the justice in a system that promotes tax breaks for the very wealthy while passing the burden of balancing the budget onto people in the lower economic strata? For relatively minor infractions of the law, some people can get excessively long sentences to prison in miserable and humiliating conditions, but banksters on Wall Street who allegedly committed criminal acts that wreaked havoc across the nation are awarded bonuses in the millions of dollars. It is clear from our foreign policies our government has no interest in liberty and justice for all despite the fine speeches some politicians make. We have repeatedly condoned breaking of international laws and conventions and supported many regimes guilty of abusing people they dominate with the inevitable consequence of perpetrating injustice. The Pledge of Allegiance is endowed with words that express admirable sentiments. If only we lived up to them. Bill Bodden lives in Redmond


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 C5

O    D N Bertha Elizabeth Baker, of Bend April 14, 1918 - June 3, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals (541) 318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, June 11, 2011 Eastmont Baptist Church 62425 Eagle Road, Bend; Graveside Service to follow at Pilot Butte Cemetery. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care, 2075 Northeast Wyatt CT. # 1 Bend, OR 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Helen O. Fronabarger, of Bend July 30, 1920 - May 24, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: To Honor Helen's life please join the family at NiswongerReynolds Chapel, 105 NW Irving Ave., Bend, OR at 12:30 PM, Fri. June 10, 2011. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701.

Shelby Geron McAlister, of Prineville May 6, 1925 - May 29, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at the Prineville Church of Christ for all friends and family Saturday, June 11, 2011 at 1PM. Private inurnment will be held Saturday, June 11, 2011 at Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville. Contributions may be made to:

American Cancer Society, 2350 Oakmount Way, Suite 200, Eugene, OR 97401; by phone (800) 227-2345 in Shelby's name.

Roy James Campbell, Jr., of Terrebonne June 6, 1928 - May 25, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals - Redmond, 541-504-9485 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: Celebration of Life will be at 11 a.m. Saturday, June 11, 2011, City Center Four Square Church, 549 SW 8th St., Redmond, followed by graveside service at Redmond Memorial Cemetery; reception to follow back at City Center Four Square Church.

Robert Eugene Hall, of Prineville May 20, 1931 - June 4, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 541-416-9733 Services: A visitation will be held at Whispering Pines, 185 NE 4th Street, Prineville, OR on June 12, 2011 from 3 PM to 5 PM. A graveside service will be held at Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville, OR on June 13, 2011 at 10 AM. Contributions may be made to:

Pioneer Memorial Hospice, 1201 NE Elm St., Prineville, OR 97754.

Tariff Continued from C1 The outdoor industry contributes $790 billion to the American economy each year, according to the legislation, which has bipartisan support. “It’s common sense to remove a tariff that protects an industry that we don’t have,” he said. “It’s something everybody ought to be able to agree on.”

Tax when imported Typically, the garments are designed in the United States and manufactured in south-

Robert “Bob” S. Hrbeck, of La Pine Oct. 30, 1944 - June 6, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A Graveside Service will be held at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland on Thursday, June 9, 2011, at 12:30 p.m. A separate gathering for family and friends will also be held. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701, www.partnersbend.org OR Salvation Army 1-800-SAL-ARMY

Mary M. Slavkovsky, of Bend Oct. 16, 1918 - June 3, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Rosary: Friday, June 10, 7:30 PM, Deschutes Mausoleum Chapel, 63875 N. Hwy 97, Bend. Funeral Mass: Saturday, June 11, 10:30 AM at St. Francis of Assisi (Historical) Catholic Church, Franklin & Lava St., Bend. Visitation: Friday, June 10, 10 AM to 5 PM at Deschutes Chapel. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt St., Bend, 97701 or MOW (Meals on Wheels), 1600 SE Reed Market Road, Bend, OR 97702.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. D E A D L IN E S: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

east Asia, and face the tariff when they are imported, he said. “We can help American designers and give consumers lower costs and more choices by ending this outdated tariff,” he said. The proposed legislation, which would make recreational outerwear duty-free, was referred to the House Ways and Means Committee. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Sen. Mike Crapo, R-Idaho, introduced similar legislation in the Senate in April. Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

Donald L. James

Pearl D. Holley

July 5, 1923 - June 3, 2011

March 31, 1923 - May 18, 2011

Donald L. James, 87, of Redmond, Oregon, died at his home among family on Friday, June 3, 2011. Donald was born in Forest Grove, Oregon, on July 5, 1923, the youngest of the eight children of Judson and Virginia Varley James. During his life, he lived in Gales Creek, Donald James Hillsboro and Redmond, Oregon. He worked for Kummer Meat Company in Hillsboro for 30 years before moving to Redmond as a partner in B&J Meats. He married Betsy Ross of Redmond in 1979. Don served his country in the US Army, 79th Division, and was a WWII Veteran, honorably discharged as a Sergeant. His medals include The Bronze Star, Belgian Fourragere Victory Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Service Medal, and a Good Conduct Medal. He was a 65-year member of the American Legion. He loved to hunt, fish, travel and garden. Whale watching on the Central Oregon Coast was a favorite pastime. He loved telling "George and Don" stories to the amusement of the family. He is survived by his wife, Betsy James, brother, George James (Dorothy) of Cornelius, Oregon, and son, David James (Carol) Newberg, Oregon. Surviving him also are two stepsons, Lance Farleigh (Jennifer) of Bend, and Jim Farleigh of Redmond, along with seven grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, and numerous nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by three sons, one stepson, four sisters, two brothers and his parents. Funeral services will be held at 11:00 a.m., June 10, 2011, at Redmond Memorial Chapel, 717 SW 6th St., with grave side to follow at Redmond Memorial Cemetery. The family requests donations be made in his name to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701, or American Legion Post 44, 707 SW 8th Street, Redmond, OR 97756. Please sign our guestbook at www.redmondmemorial.com

Pearl D. Holley passed away in her sleep on Wednesday, May 18, at the age of 88. Pearl moved to Bend in 1975, after retiring from Teamsters Local 481 in San Diego, CA. In Bend, she worked as a tax preparer until 1986. Pearl was active all of her life with camping, fishing, waPearl D. Holley ter ballet, water skiing, volley tennis, hiking, and Primetime Players of Lemon Grove, CA. She is preceded in death by her husband, Leon Holley. Surviving family include her brother, Al of Phoenix, AZ; adult children, Roy of Bend, OR; Charlene of Bend, OR; John of Tujunga, CA; stepdaughter, Vicki of Medford, OR; and eight grandchildren. In lieu of a memorial or flowers, the family would like donations to go to Hospice of Bend or Trinity Lutheran School. Please sign our guestbook at www.niswonger-reynolds.com.

Allman Brothers Band drummer Frankie Toler, 59 By Wade Tatangelo McClatchy -Tribune News Service

BRADENTON, Fla. — David “Frankie” Toler — former Allman Brothers Band, Gregg Allman Band and Marshall Tucker Band drummer — died Saturday at Tidewell hospice care in Bradenton after a prolonged illness following a liver transplant. Toler, a key player in the Southern rock scene, was 59. Marshall Tucker Band lead singer Doug Gray worked with his friend from 1992 to ’94. “Frankie’s personality was so big — it stuck out farther than his mighty drumsticks,” Gray said when reached by phone Monday. “I didn’t know anybody who couldn’t talk to him.” Gray paused and added, “There are a lot of people who love Frankie. I’m just one.” Toler is survived by his wife, Marsha; their daughter, Aja

John Henry Johnson, durable fullback in NFL By Matt Schudel The Washington Post

John Henry Johnson, a durable Hall of Fame fullback who was known as one of the toughest players in the hard-nosed National Football League of the 1950s and 1960s, died June 3 in Tracy, Calif. He was 81. The cause of death was not announced, but he had reportedly had Alzheimer’s disease for several years. Johnson, who played from 1954 to 1966, began his NFL career with the San Francisco 49ers as part of the team’s “Million Dollar Backfield” and went on to become one of football’s top ground gainers in the early 1960s with the Pittsburgh Steelers. In 1962, at the advanced football age of 33, he became the first Steeler to rush for more than 1,000 yards in a season. He duplicated the feat when he was 35. Earlier, he helped lead the

Detroit Lions to the NFL championship in 1957. Johnson, who was known by all three of his names, emerged in the NFL when pro football games sometimes resembled back-alley brawls. Players throughout the league came to fear No. 35, whose crushing blocks and tackles broke the jaws of at least two players, including one teammate in an intra-squad scrimmage. “What did you want me to do?” an unapologetic Johnson asked. “Kiss the guy or tackle him?” Despite the dangers of his sport, Johnson wore just a single-bar face mask on his helmet and no pads or gloves on his hands. At 6 feet 2 and 225 pounds, he had excellent speed but was better known as a powerful runner and punishing blocker. His stiff-arm — essentially an open-palm punch to the jaw while running at full speed — was devastating.

Joan Luther, 83, restaurant publicist By Betty Hallock Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Joan Luther, a longtime restaurant publicist who began her career at the Brown Derby and Hollywood Park in the late 1940s and helped promote nearly every major chef in Los Angeles, died Monday at her Beverly Hills home after a series of strokes, according to her assistant. She was 83. “She was a legend,” said chef Alain Giraud, who worked with Luther when he was at Bastide, the erstwhile West Hollywood

Lawsuit Continued from C1 District attorneys, not counties, have the authority to hire, fire and control the performance of deputy district attorneys, Mersereau and McPherson wrote. The question of who qualifies as the former deputy district attorneys’ employer is important, since many of the claims in their lawsuit — such as wrongful discharge — can only be brought against an employer, according to court documents. The county pays the salaries and benefits of all the employees in the District Attorney’s Office with the ex-

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

restaurant that was owned by commercial director Joe Pytka. “She knew everybody in town. She had something more than just connecting press with restaurants. She understood the business. She understood the vibe of L.A.” Luther was born Joan Batz on Feb. 9, 1928, in Los Angeles, the only child of Basque German parents. She grew up in the Miracle Mile district and attended the University of Southern California. After abandoning the idea of becoming an actress, she began

working in publicity in 1948 at the Derby, feeding names such as Errol Flynn and Lana Turner to gossip columnists Hedda Hopper and Louella Parsons. She eventually became the publicist for Hollywood Park and later Santa Anita Park, collecting more than 25 years of influential contacts for which she became known. “I met the world in the director’s room, sweetie,” she told a Los Angeles Times reporter in 2003. “Omar Bradley, Nixon, Reagan, Alfred Vanderbilt, Paul Mellon — you know.”

ception of the district attorney, whose salary comes mostly from the state.

signed the defense of defendant Patrick Flaherty in this case due to a conflict which arose with his former attorneys,” Bauer wrote in a court document. District attorneys are state employees, so normally the Oregon Department of Justice would defend the official actions of a district attorney. In this case, the department determined last month it would have to hire an outside attorney because employees at the Department of Justice could be called as witnesses regarding Flaherty’s conduct before taking office. In a court document filed in April, the fired prosecutors claim that Sean Riddell, chief of the department’s criminal justice division, told Flaherty not to fire the deputy district attorneys last fall.

‘Right to control’ In a memorandum, Mersereau and McPherson cite several cases to support their claim that the county is not the deputy district attorneys’ employer, including a 2003 case in which “this court held that deputy district attorneys are State employees, not employees of the county in which they work.” Mersereau and McPherson write, “The right to control — not the payment of wages — is the decisive factor for determining employment.” Court documents filed on Flaherty’s behalf Tuesday identified for the first time the Salembased attorney, Keith Bauer, who will defend the district attorney for his actions since taking office in January. “I have just recently been as-

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Kayle; and his older brother, guitarist Dan Toler, who played with Frankie in the Allman Brothers Band, the Gregg Allman Band and several other projects. “Frankie was absolutely the best drummer I have ever played with in my entire life,” Dan Toler said in a statement. “He was a part of my life for the past 60 years and to lose him now is just devastating. “But I did have the opportunity to grow up with one of the best rock ‘n’ roll drummers in the world and it was truly a gift from God. “I was blessed to have known him.” Toler’s health had been in decline for several years and had prevented him from recording and going on tour. But after receiving a liver transplant two years ago, he had been able to play at some band rehearsals.

Lilian Jackson Braun, writer of ‘Cat Who’ mysteries, 97 By Margalit Fox New York Times News Service

Lilian Jackson Braun, a mystery novelist whose bestselling “Cat Who” series repeatedly plumbed the hearts, minds and digestive tracts of her crime-solving feline heroes, died on Saturday in Landrum, S.C. She was 97. Her death was announced by her publisher, G.P. Putnam’s Sons. The series began in 1966 with “The Cat Who Could Read Backwards” and concluded in 2007 with “The Cat Who Had 60 Whiskers,” its 29th volume. In between were, among other titles, “The Cat Who Played Brahms”; “… Knew Shakespeare”; “… Sniffed Glue”; “… Said Cheese”; and “… Smelled a Rat.” The novels, which have sold millions of copies and been translated into 16 languages, appeared regularly on The New York Times’ best-seller list. Their human protagonist is Jim Qwilleran, a newspaperman, amateur sleuth and all-round sensitive guy who lives in an unspecified northerly state that seems to have a disproportionate share of homicide. Qwilleran’s sidekick — in the opinion of many, the book’s real star — is his intrepid, preternaturally intelligent Siamese shamus, Koko. Koko’s sidekick is Yum Yum, also a Siamese. (Like her namesake of Gilbert and Sullivan fame, Yum Yum is dainty and not precisely a cognitive giant, but she proves useful throughout the series for her dexterous, conveniently larcenous paws.) Critical response to the books was generally favorable, with many reviewers praising their essential warmth and cozy charm. Others, however, faulted what they saw as scanty plotting and an overreliance on formulaic set pieces. But for cat lovers, those set pieces offered dependable pleasures. In book after book, readers could luxuriate in tenderly described scenes of cats purring, cats grooming, cats eating — Qwilleran fed them high-end fare like lobster and crabmeat — cats frolicking and, of course, cats sleeping. At opportune moments, Qwilleran’s cats throw up clues, as when they pull highly significant books down from shelves. They also throw up hairballs, as cats are wont to do.


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, JUNE 8

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

70/45

70/42

63/34

 Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

66/39

Camp Sherman 62/34 Redmond Prineville 67/37 Cascadia  64/38 66/38 Sisters 65/36 Bend Post 67/37

64/36

55/25

62/34

La Pine

64/33



64/33

63/35

Hampton 62/34

Fort Rock

Chemult 62/31

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 76° Medford • 33° Klamath Falls

Vancouver

Seattle

67/46



Bend

67/45

Idaho Falls



63/35



58/43

Boise

67/37



85/56

A few mountain showers today. Partly cloudy skies tonight.

61/44

Helena

76/48

63/36

70/39

Missoula

Eugene

Redding

Crater Lake

City

63/51



Elko 70/41

Reno

Salt Lake City

78/51

San Francisco

66/42

72/49

61/54

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

First

June 8

LOW

Full

Last

New

June 15 June 23 July 1

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 60/52/0.01 . . . . . 61/49/pc. . . . . . 62/52/pc Baker City . . . . . . 69/49/0.05 . . . . . 60/40/sh. . . . . . 68/42/sh Brookings . . . . . . 63/52/0.00 . . . . . 65/52/pc. . . . . . 64/52/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . 69/46/0.01 . . . . . 64/41/pc. . . . . . 70/44/pc Eugene . . . . . . . .63/51/trace . . . . . 67/46/pc. . . . . . 74/47/pc Klamath Falls . . . 70/33/0.00 . . . . . 70/40/pc. . . . . . 75/44/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 64/34/0.00 . . . . . 70/41/pc. . . . . . 73/43/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 66/43/0.00 . . . . . 64/33/sh. . . . . . 70/41/pc Medford . . . . . . .76/53/trace . . . . . 78/49/pc. . . . . . . 83/53/s Newport . . . . . . . 59/52/0.04 . . . . . 59/47/pc. . . . . . 61/48/pc North Bend . . . . . 61/52/0.04 . . . . . 59/48/pc. . . . . . 58/49/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 72/54/0.05 . . . . . 69/49/pc. . . . . . 72/50/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 67/52/0.18 . . . . . 67/47/pc. . . . . . 77/52/pc Portland . . . . . . . 65/54/0.01 . . . . . 65/51/pc. . . . . . 74/53/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 62/40/0.00 . . . . . 64/38/sh. . . . . . 73/45/pc Redmond. . . . . . .66/37/trace . . . . . 68/39/pc. . . . . . 76/44/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 67/53/0.00 . . . . . 75/51/pc. . . . . . 80/52/pc Salem . . . . . . . . .63/53/trace . . . . . 67/49/pc. . . . . . 75/49/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 60/37/0.00 . . . . . 65/36/sh. . . . . . 73/38/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 68/56/0.00 . . . . . 71/49/pc. . . . . . 81/56/pc

WATER REPORT

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

4

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64/45 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .90 in 1931 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.11” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 in 1974 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.21” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.27” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.62” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.97 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.31 in 1964 *Melted liquid equivalent

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Low Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine................................Low Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

LOW

73 42

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and mild. HIGH

71 40

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases

SUNDAY Mostly sunny and mild.

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:06 a.m. . . . . . .8:30 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:25 a.m. . . . . . .7:10 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .3:56 a.m. . . . . . .6:28 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .3:07 a.m. . . . . . .4:37 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:40 p.m. . . . . . .2:34 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .2:05 a.m. . . . . . .2:17 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 59/43

Grants Pass

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:23 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:46 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:47 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 12:47 p.m. Moonset today . . . 12:43 a.m.

LOW

72 42

BEND ALMANAC

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

66/35

58/27

LOW

75 45

NORTHWEST

65/51

Burns

HIGH

64/51

SATURDAY Mostly sunny and mild.

There will be a few mountain showers north and east, but most locations will be dry.

60/34

Brothers

Sunriver

62/32

LOW

Portland

Partly cloudy skies today. Continued partly cloudy tonight. Eastern

FRIDAY Mostly sunny and significantly warmer.

Tonight: Mostly clear and cool.

37

Paulina

64/35

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Becoming partly cloudy today. Partly to mostly cloudy tonight. Central

69/41 68/40

Oakridge Elk Lake

64/45

61/44

48/37

Warm Springs

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Marion Forks

Today: Partly to mostly cloudy, mild, afternoon breezes.

67

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

THURSDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48,154 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181,881 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 79,761 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 42,726 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149,938 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 474 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 987 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,646 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . 952 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1,308 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,513 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 64/51

S

S

Calgary 59/43

S

Saskatoon 69/48

Seattle 63/51

S Winnipeg 57/46

S

S

S

Thunder Bay 67/43

S

S

S S

Quebec 85/68

Halifax 72/52 P ortland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 80/62 60/45 90/70 65/51 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 89/61 80/50 88/72 Buffalo Rapid City Boise Detroit 80/69 New York 60/45 67/45 • 106° 92/74 95/76 Des Moines Laredo, Texas Philadelphia Columbus 93/62 Salt Lake Cheyenne Chicago 93/70 97/76 City 68/45 97/70 • 24° Omaha San Francisco Washington, D. C. 72/49 86/60 Grand Canyon Airport, 61/54 Denver St. Louis 97/74 78/52 97/75 Ariz. Louisville Kansas City 96/72 Las 96/71 • 1.90” Charlotte Vegas 94/69 Hattiesburg, Miss. Los Angeles 90/68 Nashville Oklahoma City Little Rock 66/59 94/70 98/74 94/73 Phoenix Albuquerque Atlanta 91/62 97/71 Honolulu 93/70 Birmingham 88/74 Dallas Tijuana 95/71 95/71 69/55 New Orleans 95/74 Orlando Houston 91/70 Chihuahua 95/73 99/64 Miami 87/77 Monterrey La Paz 102/73 99/68 Mazatlan Anchorage 89/67 59/47 Juneau 60/45 Bismarck 61/42

FRONTS

Water wings in McMinnville

Photos by Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Dave Garske, left, and Jennifer Moody are dwarfed by a Boeing 747 sitting atop the roof of Wings and Waves water park during the park’s opening in McMinnville on Monday. The water park, which is next to the Evergreen Air Museum containing the Spruce Goose, features 10 water slides — four of them exiting directly out of the fuselage of the jumbo jet.

M

ore than 200 children helped christen a new water park at the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum in McMinnville. At Wings and Waves, kids can climb out of an actual Boeing 747 jetliner to slide down a 62-foot water slide. The News-Register says eight winners of a school water science essay and drawing contest — and their classmates — were special guests Monday during the first hour the water park was open. The public opening came at 11 a.m. Evergreen Founder and Chairman Del Smith and museum Director Larry Wood urged the students to have fun on the water park slides and in the children’s museum upstairs. That museum features handson exhibits about space explora-

tion and the water cycle. The aviation museum opened 10 years ago and the space museum opened three years ago.

The Wings and Waves water park as seen from a nearby vineyard on the park’s opening.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Fridays In

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . .101/75/0.00 . 99/73/pc . . 99/73/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .79/63/1.47 . 92/68/pc . . . .88/64/t Albany. . . . . . . . .89/56/0.00 . 93/67/pc . . . .95/66/t Albuquerque. . . .92/58/0.00 . . .91/62/s . . . 91/61/s Anchorage . . . . .55/50/0.06 . .59/47/sh . . . 59/47/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .93/70/s . . . 93/70/s Atlantic City . . . .90/64/0.00 . . .89/72/s . . 91/73/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .98/66/0.00 . 96/70/pc . . 97/71/pc Baltimore . . . . . .90/60/0.00 . . .96/72/s . . 99/73/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .91/51/0.34 . 60/45/pc . . 57/45/sh Birmingham . . . .96/75/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . . 95/69/s Bismarck . . . . . . .77/60/0.19 . . .61/42/c . . 64/44/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .66/54/0.24 . 67/45/pc . . 68/46/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .82/60/0.00 . . .88/72/s . . 93/71/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .86/64/0.00 . . .86/71/s . . 87/68/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .77/59/0.17 . 80/69/pc . . . .78/58/t Burlington, VT. . .86/54/0.00 . 94/72/pc . . . .91/66/t Caribou, ME . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .77/59/t . . . .77/58/t Charleston, SC . .89/70/0.00 . . .89/69/s . . . 90/72/s Charlotte. . . . . . .90/65/0.00 . . .94/69/s . . . 95/70/s Chattanooga. . . .95/69/0.00 . 95/69/pc . . 94/68/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .77/50/0.01 . . .68/45/t . . . .64/43/t Chicago. . . . . . . .96/75/0.00 . . .97/70/t . . . .70/52/t Cincinnati . . . . . .93/64/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . . .88/69/t Cleveland . . . . . .82/65/0.76 . 91/70/pc . . . .84/65/t Colorado Springs 89/59/0.00 . 79/49/pc . . 75/49/pc Columbia, MO . .93/69/0.00 . 94/70/pc . . . .91/68/t Columbia, SC . . .92/68/0.00 . . .95/71/s . . . 96/70/s Columbus, GA. .100/72/0.00 . . .95/68/s . . . 95/68/s Columbus, OH. . .90/69/0.05 . 93/70/pc . . . .88/67/t Concord, NH . . . .88/49/0.00 . 92/65/pc . . 95/63/pc Corpus Christi. . .96/68/0.00 . 85/77/pc . . 87/77/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .97/72/0.00 . 95/71/pc . . 94/74/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .92/71/0.00 . 93/70/pc . . . .88/68/t Denver. . . . . . . . .86/53/0.00 . 78/52/pc . . 72/49/pc Des Moines. . . . .94/74/0.00 . . .93/62/t . . . 75/59/c Detroit. . . . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . 92/74/pc . . . .84/61/t Duluth . . . . . . . . .71/59/0.15 . 72/42/pc . . 52/42/pc El Paso. . . . . . . .100/71/0.00 . .100/74/s . . 100/74/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .76/47/0.00 . .71/50/sh . . 69/50/sh Fargo. . . . . . . . . .94/65/0.00 . . .58/45/c . . 65/46/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .72/28/0.00 . . .73/37/s . . . 75/38/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .94/74/0.00 . . .92/69/t . . . .76/51/t Rapid City . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .60/45/c . . . 59/49/c Green Bay. . . . . .97/64/0.00 . . .89/61/t . . 65/46/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .72/40/0.00 . . .78/51/s . . . 78/52/s Greensboro. . . . .92/66/0.00 . . .93/70/s . . 94/69/pc Richmond . . . . . .89/62/0.00 . . .97/72/s . . . 98/75/s Harrisburg. . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . .94/70/s . . . .96/70/t Rochester, NY . . .83/59/0.00 . 90/71/pc . . . .87/61/t Hartford, CT . . . .91/61/0.00 . . .95/70/s . . 96/68/pc Sacramento. . . . .78/48/0.00 . . .81/53/s . . . 84/54/s Helena. . . . . . . . .58/51/1.01 . .58/43/sh . . 62/43/sh St. Louis. . . . . . . .96/77/0.00 . 97/75/pc . . . .92/73/t Honolulu . . . . . . .84/72/0.01 . 88/74/pc . . 88/75/pc Salt Lake City . . .72/47/0.00 . 72/49/pc . . 67/47/pc Houston . . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . 95/73/pc . . 95/74/pc San Antonio . . . .98/75/0.00 . 95/72/pc . . 96/72/pc Huntsville . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . 94/69/pc . . . 94/69/s San Diego . . . . . .69/61/0.00 . . .66/56/s . . . 66/55/s Indianapolis . . . .91/71/0.00 . 95/74/pc . . . .88/68/t San Francisco . . .67/53/0.00 . . .63/54/s . . . 69/55/s Jackson, MS . . .100/68/0.40 . 93/71/pc . . 94/69/pc San Jose . . . . . . .73/56/0.00 . . .71/52/s . . . 76/54/s Madison, WI . . . .96/76/0.00 . . .91/62/t . . . 69/48/c Santa Fe . . . . . . .86/48/0.00 . . .83/49/s . . . 84/50/s Jacksonville. . . . .89/70/0.00 . . .88/66/s . . . 89/68/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .72/40/0.00 . . .60/45/c . . . 59/46/c Kansas City. . . . .92/73/0.00 . 96/71/pc . . . .84/66/t Amsterdam. . . . .66/52/0.00 . .64/51/sh . . 64/50/sh Lansing . . . . . . . .93/75/0.00 . 92/71/pc . . . .80/53/t Athens. . . . . . . . .84/60/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . 90/69/s Las Vegas . . . . . .91/62/0.00 . . .90/68/s . . . 93/70/s Auckland. . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .61/52/sh . . 60/51/sh Lexington . . . . . .91/67/0.00 . 93/70/pc . . . .90/69/t Baghdad . . . . . .113/84/0.00 . .110/84/s . . 107/82/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .98/76/0.00 . 85/60/pc . . . 72/59/c Bangkok . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . .91/79/t . . . .92/79/t Little Rock. . . . . .96/72/0.00 . 94/73/pc . . 93/73/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .95/64/0.00 . 90/68/pc . . 91/69/pc Los Angeles. . . . .71/55/0.00 . . .66/59/s . . . 65/58/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .79/72/0.00 . . .84/71/s . . . 85/72/s Louisville . . . . . . .93/70/0.00 . 96/72/pc . . . .93/71/t Berlin. . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . . .81/62/t . . 65/51/pc Memphis. . . . . . .98/76/0.00 . 95/75/pc . . 95/75/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . .68/50/sh . . . .70/51/t Miami . . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . 87/77/pc . . . .87/76/t Budapest. . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . . .82/62/t . . 77/55/pc Milwaukee . . . . .97/70/0.00 . . .92/60/t . . 60/47/sh Buenos Aires. . . .55/37/0.00 . 62/46/pc . . . 62/48/c Minneapolis . . .103/78/0.00 . 80/50/pc . . 67/50/pc Cabo San Lucas .86/82/0.00 . . .92/73/s . . . 94/72/s Nashville . . . . . . .96/69/0.00 . 94/70/pc . . 94/70/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .95/70/0.00 . . .95/73/s . . . 98/73/s New Orleans. . . .94/73/0.00 . 95/74/pc . . 94/77/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .59/48/0.00 . .59/43/sh . . 69/46/pc New York . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .95/76/s . . 97/78/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . .86/75/t . . . .85/76/t Newark, NJ . . . . .92/65/0.00 . . .97/76/s . . . .99/75/t Dublin . . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .56/45/sh . . 53/44/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .94/72/s . . . 95/76/s Edinburgh . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . 56/45/sh Oklahoma City . .96/71/0.00 . 98/74/pc . . 97/73/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .75/54/0.00 . .65/53/sh . . 67/52/sh Omaha . . . . . . . .98/77/0.00 . 86/60/pc . . . 73/58/c Harare . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . 77/57/pc . . 75/56/sh Orlando. . . . . . . .93/69/0.00 . . .91/70/s . . 91/71/pc Hong Kong . . . . .93/84/0.00 . . .89/80/t . . . .88/78/t Palm Springs. . . .92/61/0.00 . . .94/64/s . . . 97/64/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .86/67/s . . . 88/67/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .93/71/0.00 . . .96/73/t . . . .83/60/t Jerusalem . . . . . .90/53/0.00 . . .87/66/s . . . 90/68/s Philadelphia . . . .89/66/0.00 . . .97/76/s . . 98/73/pc Johannesburg . . .64/46/0.00 . .54/42/sh . . 53/37/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .96/70/0.00 . . .97/71/s . . . 99/72/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . . .71/64/s . . . 73/65/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .78/64/0.30 . 92/68/pc . . . .87/64/t Lisbon . . . . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .74/59/s . . 72/57/pc Portland, ME. . . .75/52/0.00 . 80/62/pc . . . .88/62/t London . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . 61/49/pc . . 62/48/sh Providence . . . . .87/54/0.00 . . .89/71/s . . 95/69/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . 71/54/pc . . 74/56/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .93/64/0.00 . . .95/71/s . . . 96/71/s Manila. . . . . . . . .93/82/0.00 . . .90/78/t . . . .91/78/t

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .93/69/0.10 . . .90/67/s . . . 91/70/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .64/50/0.17 . 63/51/pc . . 67/50/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .93/72/0.00 . 72/48/pc . . 64/51/pc Spokane . . . . . . .69/52/0.01 . .61/45/sh . . 69/52/pc Springfield, MO. .91/68/0.00 . 91/69/pc . . . .89/69/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .94/75/0.00 . 91/73/pc . . . .90/74/t Tucson. . . . . . . . .99/63/0.00 . . .97/64/s . . . 96/64/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .96/73/0.00 . 96/75/pc . . 94/74/pc Washington, DC .92/68/0.00 . . .97/74/s . . 99/74/pc Wichita . . . . . . .102/74/0.00 . 99/72/pc . . 93/67/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .74/56/0.00 . 69/49/pc . . 79/53/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .95/64/0.00 . . .97/66/s . . . 98/65/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . .108/93/0.00 112/88/pc . . 111/86/s Mexico City. . . . .82/54/0.00 . . .83/57/t . . . .84/57/t Montreal. . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . 87/70/pc . . 81/58/sh Moscow . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . 73/55/pc . . . .73/56/t Nairobi . . . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . 78/59/pc . . 77/58/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .88/81/0.00 . 89/77/pc . . . .89/76/t New Delhi. . . . .111/86/0.00 108/86/pc . 106/85/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . 80/64/pc . . 81/66/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . .73/55/sh . . . .69/56/r Ottawa . . . . . . . .84/59/0.00 . 88/70/pc . . 81/58/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .63/55/0.00 . 65/50/pc . . 64/50/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .84/64/0.00 . . .79/64/s . . 74/63/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . . .78/61/t . . . .78/59/t Santiago . . . . . . .55/45/0.00 . 57/40/pc . . . 65/47/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .77/57/0.00 . . .66/49/s . . 65/51/sh Sapporo. . . . . . not available . 70/54/pc . . 69/54/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . 81/60/pc . . 83/62/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .72/66/0.00 . . .87/70/s . . . 90/72/s Singapore . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .86/77/t . . . .90/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .84/61/0.00 . .75/57/sh . . 79/59/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . . .55/41/s . . 59/45/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . . .92/79/t . . . .90/77/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .86/69/s . . . 89/70/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/66/0.00 . 77/64/pc . . 78/64/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . 89/70/pc . . 81/58/sh Vancouver. . . . . .61/54/0.00 . 64/51/pc . . 66/52/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .79/60/t . . 68/56/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . . .87/66/t . . . .78/57/t


S

D

Sports Inside Ohio State quarterback Terrelle Pryor won’t play his senior season, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011

TEE TO GREEN

SKIING

LOCAL GOLF

Bend’s Tommy Ford likely to ski for U.S. Alpine A Team Bend skier Tommy Ford was nominated for the U.S. Alpine A Team this week, according to www.skiracing. com. Ford was one of nine men nominated for the A Team, according to the report. Others include giant slalom world champion Ted Ligety and two-time World Cup overall champion Bode Miller. Ford competed on the B Team the past two years. He won national championships this past season in both super-G and giant slalom. Laurenne Ross, of Klamath Falls, was nominated for the women’s U.S. Alpine A Team. She was one of seven women nominated. Others include World Cup and Olympic stars Lindsey Vonn and Julia Mancuso. Nominated skiers have qualified for the teams according to published criteria, the website reported. The actual roster will be announced this fall. —Bulletin staff report

GOLF Bend’s Vijarro qualifies for U.S. Public Links Andrew Vijarro, a University of Oregon golfer from Bend, earned medalist honors at a Portland qualifier for the 2011 U.S. Amateur Public Links Championship. Vijarro, who competed in the APL and U.S. Amateur Championship last year, shot an 8-under-par 136 Sunday at a 36-hole qualifier at Heron Lakes Golf Course. That was five strokes better than a tie for second place between Gaston De La Torre, a New Mexico State University golfer from Brush Prairie, and Oregon State’s Alex Moore, of Richland, Wash. Vijarro, a junior at UO who lost in the first round of match play at last year’s APL in North Carolina, will have to travel a considerably shorter distance this year. The 2011 APL is scheduled for June 27 through July 2 at Bandon Dunes Golf Resort on the southern Oregon Coast. Vijarro, a Bend High graduate, has had some success with match play events at the famed links course, winning the 2009 Oregon Amateur Championship there. The APL is limited to amateur golfers who are bona fide public-course players with a United States Golf Association handicap index of no more than 4.4. — Bulletin staff report

Tiger to skip U.S. Open with injuries JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Tiger Woods pulled out of the U.S. Open on Tuesday because of lingering issues with his left leg, leaving him uncertain how soon he can resume his pursuit of Jack Nicklaus’ record for major titles. It will be the first time Woods has missed the U.S. Open since 1994, when he had just graduated high school. “I am extremely disappointed that I won’t be playing in the U.S. Open, but it’s time for me to listen to my doctors and focus on the future,� Woods wrote on his website. “I was hopeful that I could play, but if I did, I risk further damage to my left leg. My knee and Achilles tendon are not fully healed.� — The Associated Press

Portland senior is going for four Chris Maletis will try to win again at a regional senior amateur event being held at Black Butte By Zack Hall The Bulletin

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A golfer hits his drive from the second tee at Desert Peaks Golf Course in Madras last week.

CENTRAL OREGON GOLF COURSE TOUR

Desert Peaks Not much is difficult about the Madras course, unless your game gets in the way Editor’s note: This is another in a seasonlong series visiting each public and semiprivate golf course in Central Oregon. MADRAS — osing a golf ball at Desert Peaks Golf Course is no easy task. With few trees, little sand and only a splash of water actually in play, the relatively flat, municipal golf course in an industrial section of Madras is a welcoming place for golfers not accustomed to finding fairways. So it almost seemed like a waste when I started a recent round at the nine-hole course with four consecutive accurate drives (a rarity for me these days). Then I greeted the fifth hole — a 561yard par 5 — with two embarrassing shots, both of which would have made for a disaster at most tree-lined Central

L

Breaking down the course

Oregon tracks. Despite the shanks, I finished the hole — and the round — with the same TaylorMade ball and a respectable score. That is Desert Peaks. A course so open that most golfers can recover even after terrible golf is played. Sure, Desert Peaks bears little resemblance to the high-end golf that can be found in Bend, Redmond, Sunriver and Sisters. But at $10 for nine holes during weekdays, the price tag looks much different, as well.

General information about Desert Peaks Golf Course: Number of holes: Nine-hole municipal Status: Open year-round, weather permitting Location: 565 N.W. Adler St., Madras Tee times: 541-475-6368 Course stats: Par 36, 3,231 yards Green fees: $10 for nine holes and $17 for 18, weekdays; $12 for nine and $20 for 18, weekends Power cart: $20 (can be shared) Extras: Putting green, driving range (at separate site), clubhouse E-mail: desertpeaks@clearwire.net Website: www.desertpeaksgolf.com

That is the appeal of Desert Peaks: It’s a course run by locals for locals of all kinds. See Desert / D5

A closer look at Desert Peaks. For more information on the items below, see Page D5.

DIFFICULTY

STRATEGY

EXTRAS

Few obstacles rest between Desert Peaks’ tee boxes and its greens. That makes the golf course relatively easy to play and score well. At 3,231 yards, Desert Peaks is not a short golf course, so shorter hitters could struggle to reach some greens in regulation.

With little stopping a golfer from going for broke on nearly every shot, play aggressively. Desert Peaks’ decent length is the biggest challenge, so use a driver often. For medium to long hitters, that could mean short approach shots into receptive greens.

Those golfers who prefer to warm up at a driving range before a round should plan ahead. Willow Creek, Madras’ affiliated driving range, is just east of downtown and about four miles away from Desert Peaks. The golf course does offer a practice putting green.

If you go What: PNGA Senior and Super Senior Men’s Amateur Championship When: Today’s second round begins at 7:30 a.m.; Thursday’s final round begins at 7:30 a.m. Admission: Free

NBA FINALS

Dallas ties series at 2-2

PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Experience‌

By Jaime Aron The Associated Press

DALLAS — Coughing and wheezing, his temperature spiking to 101, worn out from hardly sleeping the night before, Dirk Nowitzki went through three miserable quarters in Game 4 of the NBA finals. Yet the fourth quarter was his time to shine. Again. And now the Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat are starting over in the NBA finals, this bestof-seven series reduced to a best-of-three. Nowitzki fought through a sinus infection and everything else that ailed him and his team to power a 21-9 run over the final 10:12, lifting the Mavericks to a memorable 86-83 victory Tuesday night. He scored 10 of his 21 points — including a driving right-handed layup that spun in off the backboard with 14.4 seconds left — and grabbed five of his 11 rebounds in the final period as Dallas pulled off its second stunning finish this series. See NBA / D4

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 College baseball and softball ....D2 MLB ...........................................D3 College football ........................ D4 Horse racing ............................. D4 NHL .......................................... D4 Tee to Green....................... D5-D6

ZACK HALL

The basics

BLACK BUTTE RANCH — Chris Maletis looked exhausted Tuesday after playing 18 holes at wind-swept and sunny Black Butte Ranch. Who could blame him? Maletis, who is in the middle of a busy stretch of tournament golf, is in Central Oregon this week to defend his title in the Pacific Northwest Golf Association Senior Men’s Amateur Championship. The 54-hole strokeplay tourna- Chris Maletis ment began is one of the Tuesday at top senior Black Butte’s golfers in the Big Meadow country. course. The 62year-old from Portland has won this tournament three times, including the past two. But it is just one of many golf tournaments in which he has played. Over Memorial Day Weekend, he beat a field of top seniors in Texas at the 2011 Trans-Mississippi Senior Championship, winning that tournament for the fourth time. And in April, he outpaced another strong field at the 2011 Golfweek Senior Amateur in California. Those wins have pushed him to No. 3 in the country in the latest Golfweek/Wilson Golf Senior Amateur Rankings, a ranking of golfers over 50. But all that high-level golf comes at a cost. “Right now I am competitive all year round,� Maletis said, running down a long list of towns he has traveled to this year. “I’m a little burned out.� See Senior / D4

‌ Pronghorn TWILIGHT FOR LOCALS

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101++Kmjibcjmi>gp]?mw0/,(14.(0.++wrrr)kmjibcjmi^gp])^jh David J. Phillip / The Associated Press

Dallas Mavericks’ DeShawn Stevenson reacts during the second half of Game 4 of the NBA finals against the Miami Heat, Tuesday in Dallas.

Next up • NBA finals, Game 5, Miami Heat at Dallas Mavericks; series tied, 2-2 • When: Thursday, 6 p.m. • TV: ABC

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D2 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

Chiefs, MLB Network.

TELEVISION TODAY CYCLING 2 p.m. — Criterium Dauphine Libere, Stage 4 (sameday tape), Versus network.

BASEBALL 9:30 a.m. — Chicago Cubs at Cincinnati Reds or Minnesota Twins at Cleveland Indians, MLB Network.

4 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Detroit Tigers, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees or Chicago Cubs at Philadelphia Phillies, MLB Network.

CYCLING 2 p.m. — Criterium Dauphine Libere, Stage 5 (taped), Versus network.

BASKETBALL

4 p.m. — MLB, Boston Red Sox at New York Yankees, ESPN.

5 p.m. — WNBA, Washington Mystics at Atlanta Dream, ESPN2.

5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Chicago White Sox, Root Sports.

6 p.m. — NBA finals, Miami Heat at Dallas Mavericks, ABC.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, Stanley Cup finals, Vancouver Canucks at Boston Bruins, Versus network.

THURSDAY GOLF

SOCCER 7 p.m. — MLS, Chicago Fire at Sporting Kansas City, ESPN2.

THURSDAY

Noon — PGA Tour, St. Jude Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

6 p.m. — NBA finals, Miami Heat at Dallas Mavericks, KICE-AM 940.

BASEBALL 7:30 a.m.— Minor league, Louisville Bats at Syracuse

BASKETBALL

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Playoffs All Times PDT ——— FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) Miami 2, Dallas 2 Tuesday, May 31: Miami 92, Dallas 84 Thursday, June 2: Dallas 95, Miami 93 Sunday, June 5: Miami 88, Dallas 86 Tuesday, June 7: Dallas 86, Miami 83 Thursday, June 9: Miami at Dallas, 6 p.m. Sunday, June 12: Dallas at Miami, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, June 14: Dallas at Miami, 6 p.m. Tuesday’s Summary

MIAMI (83) James 3-11 2-4 8, Bosh 9-19 6-8 24, Anthony 2-6 0-0 4, Bibby 0-1 0-0 0, Wade 13-20 6-9 32, Chalmers 1-5 3-3 5, Haslem 2-5 0-0 4, Miller 2-8 0-0 6, Howard 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 32-75 17-24 83. DALLAS (86) Marion 7-12 2-2 16, Nowitzki 6-19 9-10 21, Chandler 4-7 5-8 13, Barea 3-9 2-2 8, Kidd 0-3 0-0 0, Terry 6-15 4-6 17, Cardinal 0-1 0-0 0, Stevenson 3-7 2-2 11, Haywood 0-0 0-0 0, Stojakovic 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-73 24-30 86. Miami 21 26 22 14 — 83 Dallas 21 24 20 21 — 86 3-Point Goals—Miami 2-14 (Miller 2-5, Bibby 0-1, Wade 0-2, James 0-3, Chalmers 0-3), Dallas 4-19 (Stevenson 3-7, Terry 1-4, Cardinal 0-1, Barea 0-2, Nowitzki 0-2, Kidd 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 51 (James 9), Dallas 49 (Chandler 16). Assists—Miami 19 (James 7), Dallas 13 (Barea 4). Total Fouls—Miami 23, Dallas 18. Technicals—Dallas Coach Carlisle. A—20,430 (19,200).

WNBA

Running

World Cup tuneup.

• Thousands take part in Heaven Can Wait: More than 4,000 runners and walkers participated in Heaven Can Wait, a 5-kilometer run and walk held in Bend Sunday. The final number of participants was 4,084, according to race organizers. The event served as a fundraiser for the breast cancer awareness program Sara’s Project.

Basketball

Cycling • Degenkolb wins second stage of Criterium: John Degenkolb of Germany won a bunch sprint to take the second stage of the Criterium du Dauphine in France on Tuesday, while Alexandre Vinokourov of Kazakhstan retained the yellow jersey. Degenkolb completed the 111-mile stage in the unofficial time of 4 hours, 2 minutes, 39 seconds. Today, riders have a 26-mile individual time trial around Grenoble. The race, a warmup for the Tour de France, ends on Sunday.

Football • AP sources: Players, owners hold secret meetings: The NFL and its players held talks Tuesday in New York, seeking a resolution to the labor impasse. Three people familiar with the meetings confirmed to The Associated Press that the two groups met. They spoke on condition of anonymity because the meetings were supposed to be confidential. One of the people confirmed the sides met in New York. NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said the league has no comment on the meeting, first reported by the NFL Network. This is the second time in the past week the two sides have met, including a three-day session outside Chicago that included Commissioner Roger Goodell and NFL Players Association head DeMaurice Smith. The lockout is approaching its third month, with the first preseason game just two months away. • Tennessee AD Mike Hamilton announces resignation: Tennessee athletics director Mike Hamilton announced Tuesday he decided to resign so the Volunteers would have a “clean slate” when they go before the NCAA’s Committee on Infractions later in the week. Hamilton, who has been at the helm of Tennessee men’s athletics for eight seasons, said it was both a personal decision and one that he hoped would help reunite the Vols fanbase. During a three-year period, Hamilton fired a popular coach, hired a controversial one and now the athletic department faces 12 NCAA infractions against the football and basketball programs. • Wary of NFL lockout, BCS selects bowl dates: The Bowl Championship Series has chosen dates for its five bowl games in an effort to avoid conflicts that could arise because of the NFL lockout, with flexibility to move the title game. While the BCS title game in New Orleans remains scheduled for Jan. 9. a Monday night, it could be moved either up to Jan. 7 or back to Jan. 10. BCS executive director Bill Hancock said the mostly midweek dates were chosen in case the lockout causes the NFL schedule to be pushed back.

Soccer • U.S. starts Gold Cup with 2-0 win over Canada: Jozy Altidore scored in the first half and set up Clint Dempsey’s goal in the second, and the United States opened its Gold Cup schedule with a 2-0 win over Canada on Tuesday night in Detroit. The 21-year-old Altidore was playing his first game in a Gold Cup, which is the championship of North and Central America and the Caribbean. His goal in the 15th minute put the U.S. ahead, and Dempsey added one in the 62nd off a nice cross from Altidore. The U.S. bounced back after losing 4-0 to World Cup champion Spain in an exhibition game Saturday. The Americans have never lost a group stage game at the Gold Cup. The Americans didn’t field their best lineup against Spain, putting more emphasis on the Gold Cup. The tournament champion receives a berth in the 2013 Confederations Cup, an important

Sony Ericsson Open Tuesday Copenhagen, Denmark Singles First Round Johanna Larsson, Sweden, def. Vesna Dolonts, Russia, 6-3, 6-3. Mona Barthel, Germany, def. Alexa Glatch, United States, 6-2, 7-5. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (5), Czech Republic, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-2, 6-1. Simona Halep, Romania, def. Anastasija Sevastova (6), Latvia, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (4), 6-0. Lucie Safarova (4), Czech Republic, def. Johanna Konta, Australia, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3. Michaella Krajicek, Netherlands, def. Melanie Oudin, United States, 6-1, 7-5. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, def. Jelena Dokic (7), Australia, 6-3, 6-1. Zhang Shuai, China, def. Julia Boserup, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Irina Falconi, United States, 6-2, 6-3. Bethanie Mattek-Sands (3), United States, def. Malou Ejdesgaard, Denmark, 6-4, 6-0. Angelique Kerber, Germany, def. Karolina Pliskova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-2.

Mavericks 86, Heat 83

RADIO

6:30 a.m. — European Tour, Italian Open, first round, Golf Channel.

3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, LPGA State Farm Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

nia, 6-4, 6-2.

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASKETBALL NBA

• NBA owners, players hold long bargaining session: Given the sizable gap in their positions, it would be easy for NBA owners and players just to walk away. Instead, they followed a long negotiating session Tuesday by heading right back to the bargaining table as planned today. The meeting Tuesday lasted more than five hours. With the current collective bargaining agreement set to expire June 30, both sides say they hope frequent meetings can prevent a lockout. The union declined to comment until after today’s meeting. • AP source: 76ers could be week away from sale: The Philadelphia 76ers are on the market and a person familiar with the deal says the franchise once home to Wilt Chamberlain, Charles Barkley and Allen Iverson could be sold within the week. The person spoke to The Associated Press on Tuesday on condition of anonymity because the deal with the group led by New York-based leveraged buyout specialist Joshua Harris is not yet complete. Comcast-Spectacor, led by chairman Ed Snider, has owned the Sixers since 1996, but the group’s chief operating officer confirmed Tuesday there are ongoing discussions about the team’s future. The person familiar with the deal said the Harris-led group was not the only bidder but is now the lead bidder, adding the deal has been in the works for several months. The deal would need to be approved by the league’s Board of Governors.

Boxing • Mayweather to return against Ortiz in September: Floyd Mayweather Jr. is returning to the ring. The undefeated sixtime world champion announced Tuesday on Twitter that he will end a 16-month hiatus when he faces WBC welterweight champion Victor Ortiz on September 17. Mayweather (41-0, 25 KOs) hasn’t fought since a unanimous decision over Shane Mosley on May 1, 2010, and has repeatedly declined to accept a bout against WBO welterweight champ Manny Pacquiao. Ortiz (29-2-2, 22 KOs) is riding a six-match win streak, most recently defeating Andre Berto in April to claim the WBC crown in a fight many consider the year’s best.

Olympics • NBC retains Olympic rights for four games: NBC retained its hold on U.S. Olympic television rights Tuesday in a four-games deal through 2020 worth nearly $4.4 billion, defeating rival bids from ESPN and Fox. Now controlled by Comcast, NBC won the bid despite last month’s resignation of longtime sports and Olympics chief Dick Ebersol in a dispute with the new owners. NBC has broadcast every Summer Olympics since 1988 and every Winter Games since 2002, and it was the network’s experience and familiarity with the IOC — as well as its money — which won over the Olympic body again. NBC now will have exclusive rights to the 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, Russia, the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, as well as the 2018 Winter Games and 2020 Olympics, whose sites have not yet been chosen. IOC TV rights negotiator Richard Carrion said the deal is worth $4.382 billion overall. That includes $2.01 billion for the 2014/16 Games and $2.38 billion for the 2018/20 Olympics.

Baseball • Red Sox RHP Papelbon suspended three games, appeals: Boston Red Sox closer Jonathan Papelbon has been suspended three games for making contact with an umpire. The suspension was to begin Tuesday night against the New York Yankees, but Papelbon is appealing. Major League Baseball also fined Papelbon an undisclosed amount for his actions in the ninth inning last Saturday, when he blew a four-run lead as the Oakland Athletics tied it at 7. —From wire reports

DEALS Transactions

College

WOMEN’S NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— Eastern Conference W L Pct Connecticut 1 0 1.000 Indiana 1 0 1.000 New York 1 0 1.000 Atlanta 0 1 .000 Chicago 0 1 .000 Washington 0 1 .000 Western Conference W L Pct San Antonio 1 0 1.000 Seattle 1 0 1.000 Minnesota 2 1 .667 Los Angeles 1 1 .500 Phoenix 0 1 .000 Tulsa 0 2 .000 ——— Tuesday’s Game Minnesota 75, Tulsa 65 Thursday’s Games Washington at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Minnesota at Seattle, 7 p.m.

GB — — — 1 1 1 GB — — — ½ 1 1½

NCAA Division I Regionals Glance Double Elimination All Times PDT ——— Tuesday, June 7 Texas A&M 3, Arizona 0, A&M advances NCAA Division I Baseball Super Regionals Glance All Times PDT (Best-of-3) x-if necessary The visiting team plays as home team for Game 2 a coin flip determines home team for Game 3 At Hawkins Field Nashville, Tenn. Friday, June 10: Vanderbilt (50-10) vs. Oregon State (41-17), 5 p.m. Saturday, June 11: Vanderbilt vs. Oregon State, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, June 12: Vanderbilt vs. Oregon State, 1, 4 or 7 p.m.

SOFTBALL College

HOCKEY NHL

NCAA Division I World Series Oklahoma City x-if necessary Championship Series (Best-of-3) Monday, June 6: Arizona State 14, Florida 4 Tuesday, June 7: Arizona State 7, Florida 2, Arizona State wins national title

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— STANLEY CUP FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) Vancouver 2, Boston 1 Wednesday, June 1: Vancouver 1, Boston 0 Saturday, June 4: Vancouver 3, Boston 2 (OT) Monday, June 6: Boston 8, Vancouver 1 Today, June 8: Vancouver at Boston, 5 p.m. Friday, June 10: Boston at Vancouver, 5 p.m. x-Monday, June 13: Vancouver at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, June 15: Boston at Vancouver, 5 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— Today’s Game Real Salt Lake at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.

BASEBALL WCL

TENNIS ATP

WEST COAST LEAGUE ——— League standings East Division

ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Aegon Championships Tuesday London Singles First Round Juan Martin del Potro (12), Argentina, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-4, 6-2. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, def. Matthias Bachinger, Germany, 6-4, 6-4. Matthew Ebden, Austria, def. Somdev Devvarman, India, 7-5, 6-3. Michael Russell, United States, def. Denis Gremelmayr, Germany, 6-3, 7-5. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, def. Go Soeda, Japan, 6-1, 6-3. David Nalbandian (9), Argentina, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-3, 6-4. Janko Tipsarevic (14), Serbia, def. Blaz Kavcic, Slo-

Bellingham Bells Wenatchee AppleSox Walla Walla Sweets Kelowna Falcons West Division Klamath Falls Gems Kitsap BlueJackets Corvallis Knights Bend Elks Cowlitz Black Bears Tuesday’s Games Kitsap 3, Cowlitz 2 Corvallis 4, Klamath Falls 1 Wenatchee 2, Kelowna 0

W 3 3 2 0

L 0 1 1 4

W 2 2 2 1 0

L 2 2 2 2 1

venia, 6-4, 6-4. Adrian Mannarino, France, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 6-3, 6-3. Kevin Anderson (15), South Africa, def. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, 6-4, 7-6 (2). Second Round Andy Roddick (3), United States, def. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 7-6 (2), 6-7 (5), 6-4. Fernando Verdasco (7), Spain, def. Nicolas Mahut, France, 6-2, 6-3. Sam Querrey (13), United States, def. Rainer Schuettler, Germany, 7-6 (6), 5-7, 6-3. James Ward, Britain, def. Stanislas Wawrinka (4), Switzerland, 7-6 (3), 6-3. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (5), France, def. Michael Berrer, Germany, 6-0, 6-1. Michael Llodra (10), France, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 6-4, 7-5. Gerry Weber Open Tuesday Halle, Germany Singles First Round Philipp Petzschner, Germany, def. Dominik Meffert, Germany, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Viktor Troicki (5), Serbia, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 6-2, 6-3. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 1-6, 7-6 (5), 6-2. Milos Raonic (8), Canada, def. Pablo Andujar, Spain, 6-3, 6-1. Florian Mayer (6), Germany, def. Dustin Brown, Germany, 7-6 (6), 2-6, 6-3. Andreas Seppi, Italy, def. Tommy Haas, Germany, 6-2, 6-7 (6), 6-3. Tomas Berdych (2), Czech Republic, def. Ruben Bemelmans, Belgium, 5-7, 7-6 (8), 6-4. Gael Monfils (3), France, def. Florent Serra, France, 6-4, 6-3.

WTA WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Aegon Classic Tuesday Birmingham, England Singles First Round Naomi Broady, Britain, def. Caroline Garcia, France, 6-2, 6-7 (5), 6-4. Yaroslava Shvedova (11), Kazakhstan, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-2, 7-6 (5). Casey Dellacqua, Australia, def. Sandra Zahlavova, Czech Republic, 7-5, 7-6 (5). Misaki Doi, Japan, def. Edina Gallovits-Hall, Romania, 6-4, 6-2. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-3, 6-1. Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Sania Mirza, India, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2. Christina McHale, United States, def. Anastasia Rodionova, Australia, 3-6, 7-6 (7), 6-2. Ayumi Morita (9), Japan, def. Ajla Tomljanovic, Croatia, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (4). Second Round Aravane Rezai (8), France, def. Olga Govortsova, Belarus, 7-5, retired. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, def. Roberta Vinci (5), Italy, 6-7 (2), 7-6 (4), 7-5. Magdalena Rybarikova (14), Slovakia, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 6-2, 6-1. Arina Rodionova, Russia, def. Kaia Kanepi (1), Esto-

BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL—Suspended Washington RHP Jason Marquis five games, Arizona RHP Esmerling Vasquez three games and Washington manager Jim Riggleman and Arizona manager Kirk Gibson one game each and fined them undisclosed amounts for throwing at hitters after both teams had been warned during a June 5 game. Suspended Boston RHP Jonathan Papelbon three games for making contact with an umpire during a June 4 game against Oakland. American League BOSTON RED SOX—Activated SS Marco Scutaro from the 15-day DL. Sent RHP Scott Atchison to Pawtucket (IL). CLEVELAND INDIANS—Released INF Wes Hodges. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Activated OF Vernon Wells from the 15-day DL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Placed LHP Brett Anderson and 2B Mark Ellis on the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Jemile Weeks and recalled LHP Bobby Cramer from Sacramento (PCL). Transferred LHP Dallas Braden to the 60-day DL. National League CINCINNATI REDS—Recalled RHP Edinson Volquez from Louisville (IL). Optioned RHP Daryl Thompson to Louisville. COLORADO ROCKIES—Placed OF Dexter Fowler on the 15-day DL. Purchased the contract of OF Charlie Blackmon from Colorado Springs (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Designated RHP Jose Ascanio for assignment. Recalled LHP Tony Watson from Indianapolis (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association BOSTON CELTICS—Announced G Ray Allen exercised his 2011-12 contract option. NEW ORLEANS HORNETS—Announced the resignation of assistant coach Mike Malone to become an assistant coach with Golden State. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Vancouver D Aaron Rome four games for his blindside hit on Boston F Nathan Horton during Monday’s game. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Named Rod Brind’Amour and Dave Lewis assistant coaches, Ron Francis director of hockey operations and Tom Rowe pro scout. COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Announced the contracts of assistant general manager Don Boyd and director of pro scouting Bob Strumm will not be renewed. PHOENIX COYOTES—Traded the rights to G Ilya Bryzgalov to Philadelphia for F Matt Clackson, a 2012 third-round draft pick and future considerations. COLLEGE ALASKA—Named Mick Durham men’s basketball coach. BUFFALO—Announced sophomore men’s basketball F Will Regan is transferring from Virginia. OHIO STATE—Announced senior QB Terrelle Pryor will not play this season. OREGON—Announced C Martin Seiferth will transfer to Eastern Washington. TENNESSEE—Announced the resignation of athletic director Mike Hamilton, effective at the end of June. UCLA—Named Korey McCray men’s assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 2,578 995 103 30 The Dalles 1,297 806 20 1 John Day 844 759 11 1 McNary 867 860 9 2 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 180,192 57,393 5,852 2,059 The Dalles 128,059 42,773 1,514 765 John Day 104,245 40,582 2,861 1,760 McNary 99,276 29,632 2,659 1,584

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

COLLEGE SOFTBALL

Several Ducks, Beavers selected during second day of MLB draft

Arizona State sweeps Florida for second title

From wire and staff reports

The Associated Press

One day after University of Oregon left-hander Tyler Anderson was selected in the first round, 11 Oregon and Oregon State players were picked in rounds two through 30 on Tuesday in the 2011 Major League Baseball draft. For the Beavers, sophomore catcher Andrew Susac (second round, San Francisco Giants), junior pitchers Sam Gaviglio (fifth round, St. Louis Cardinals) and Josh Osich (sixth round, San Francisco), junior outfielder Brian Stamps (24th round, Atlanta Braves), senior catcher Parker Berberet (25th round, Milwaukee Brewers) and junior third baseman Carter Bell (29th round, Arizona Diamondbacks) all received phone calls from big league clubs Tuesday. The Ducks also had a busy day as junior pitchers Madison Boer (second round, Minnesota Twins), Scott McGough (fifth round, Los Angeles Dodgers), and Kellen Moen (seventh round, Kansas City Royals) as well as sophomore catcher Jack Marder (16th round, Seattle Mariners) and junior second baseman Danny Pulfer (19th round, Arizona) were all selected by Major League teams. In other draft news, Trevor Gretzky, the baseball-playing son of hockey Hall of Famer Wayne Gretzky, was selected in the seventh round by the Chicago Cubs. The younger Gretzky knocks in runs — not goals — as a left-handed, powerhitting, California high school first baseman. And the jersey number he wore? Well, No. 99, of course. He has a commitment to San Diego

State, where he could play under baseball Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn if he chooses not to sign with Chicago. The Cubs also took a name from their past, drafting California high school outfielder Shawon Dunston Jr. in the 11th round. Shawon Sr. was the No. 1 overall pick by Chicago in 1982 and the cannon-armed shortstop played 18 big league seasons. The sons of Ivan Rodriguez and Kevin Seitzer, and the great-nephew of Eddie Gaedel — who’s 6-foot-3, unlike his 3foot-7 great-uncle who drew a walk in one of baseball’s most famous publicity stunts 60 years ago — were also among some familiar names called Tuesday. Minnesota drafted Dereck Rodriguez, the son of the 14-time All-Star catcher, in the sixth round. The younger Rodriguez played center field and pitched for Monsignor Edward Pace High School in Miami. Cameron Seitzer, a slugging first baseman for Oklahoma, was taken in the 11th round by Tampa Bay. Valparaiso outfielder Kyle Gaedele — his last name has an extra ‘e’ at the end — was a sixth-round pick of San Diego. The highest-drafted player in school history, he hit .326 in three years with the Crusaders, with 17 home runs and 121 RBIs. Bryce Harper’s brother also went to Washington. South Carolina lefty Bryan Harper was drafted in the 30th round by the Nationals, who chose slugger Bryce with the No. 1 overall pick a year ago. The 2011 MLB draft continues today with rounds 31-50.

OKLAHOMA CITY — Freshman Dallas Escobedo and Arizona State kept the NCAA softball championship the property of the Pac-10. Katelyn Boyd and freshman Alix Johnson each drove in three runs, Annie Lockwood homered and the Sun Devils beat Florida 7-2 Tuesday night to win their second NCAA title in four years. The top-seeded Sun Devils (60-6) used a combination of holdovers from their first Women’s College World Series title in 2008 and some key freshmen to continue the Pac10’s dominance of the event. The conference has won 23 of the 29 championships, including the past six in a row. Arizona State joined UCLA, Arizona and Texas A&M as the only teams to win multiple softball titles. UCLA with 12 — including one that was vacated for NCAA rules violations — and Arizona with eight are the only programs to win more than two. “I’ll tell you what. It’s so hard to win one. To have the opportunity to win two, that’s just plain special,” coach Clint Myers said. “You get into an elite group. “We’re not UCLA or (Arizona) yet. But give us time.”


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 D3

M A JOR L E AGUE BA SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Red Sox 6, Yankees 4 Boston Ellsbury cf Pedroia 2b Ad.Gonzalez 1b Youkilis 3b Ortiz dh C.Crawford lf Saltalamacchia c J.Drew rf Scutaro ss Totals

AB 5 3 2 3 4 4 2 4 4 31

R 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 0 0 6

H BI BB 2 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 7 6 5

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 3

Avg. .301 .246 .340 .255 .324 .243 .236 .227 .236

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter dh 5 0 2 0 0 0 .263 Granderson cf 4 1 0 0 1 3 .269 Teixeira 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .258 1-Posada pr-1b 3 1 3 1 1 0 .195 2-Dickerson pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .308 Al.Rodriguez 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .280 Cano 2b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .277 Martin c 3 1 1 0 0 0 .238 Swisher rf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .222 An.Jones lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .215 E.Nunez ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .212 a-Gardner ph 0 1 0 0 1 0 .258 Totals 35 4 9 4 3 8 Boston 310 020 000 — 6 7 0 New York 100 020 001 — 4 9 0 a-walked for E.Nunez in the 9th. 1-ran for Teixeira in the 1st. 2-ran for Posada in the 9th. LOB—Boston 4, New York 9. 2B—Ellsbury (19), Pedroia (9), Swisher (10). 3B—Ad.Gonzalez (2). HR—Ellsbury (7), off F.Garcia; Ortiz (14), off Noesi. RBIs—Ellsbury (30), Pedroia (21), Ad.Gonzalez (51), Youkilis (36), Ortiz 2 (32), Posada (18), Cano (39), Swisher 2 (26). CS—Ellsbury (8). SF—Youkilis. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 2 (Youkilis 2); New York 5 (Swisher 2, Granderson, An.Jones, Al.Rodriguez). GIDP—Cano. DP—Boston 1 (Scutaro, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez). Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester W, 8-2 6 8 3 3 1 5 112 3.98 Jenks 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 6.57 Albers H, 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.52 Bard H, 12 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 2.87 Papelbon S, 12 1 1 1 1 1 2 27 4.50 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA F.Garcia L, 4-5 1 2-3 4 4 4 3 1 46 3.86 Ayala 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 26 1.47 Noesi 6 3 2 2 1 1 71 1.76 Jenks pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Albers 1-0, Ayala 3-0. IBB—off F.Garcia (Ad.Gonzalez). HBP—by Lester (Teixeira, Martin). T—3:24. A—48,450 (50,291).

Orioles 4, Athletics 0 Oakland J.Weeks 2b Barton 1b DeJesus rf Willingham lf Sweeney cf K.Suzuki c Matsui dh S.Sizemore 3b Pennington ss Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 5 0 1

SO 1 0 2 2 1 0 1 0 0 7

Avg. .000 .221 .241 .244 .293 .242 .209 .235 .264

Baltimore AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Hardy ss 4 1 1 1 0 1 .274 Markakis rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .236 Ad.Jones cf 4 1 3 1 0 1 .301 Guerrero dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .288 D.Lee 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .227 Wieters c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .275 Scott lf 3 1 2 1 0 0 .232 1-Pie pr-lf 0 1 0 0 0 0 .256 Mar.Reynolds 3b 2 0 1 1 1 1 .192 R.Adams 2b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .200 Totals 31 4 9 4 1 6 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Baltimore 100 011 10x — 4 9 0 1-ran for Scott in the 7th. LOB—Oakland 6, Baltimore 4. 2B—K.Suzuki (10), Scott (10), Mar.Reynolds (12). HR—Hardy (5), off Moscoso; Scott (7), off Moscoso; Ad.Jones (8), off Wuertz. RBIs—Hardy (17), Ad.Jones (32), Scott (20), Mar. Reynolds (30). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 2 (Matsui, K.Suzuki); Baltimore 2 (Wieters, Hardy). GIDP—D.Lee, R.Adams. DP—Oakland 2 (S.Sizemore, J.Weeks, Barton), (S.Sizemore, J.Weeks, Barton). Oakland IP H R ER Moscoso L, 2-2 5 5 2 2 Wuertz 1 1 1 1 Breslow 1 2 1 1 Cramer 1 1 0 0 Baltimore IP H R ER Jakbsks W, 1-0 5 3 0 0 Rapada H, 3 2-3 0 0 0 Accardo H, 2 2 1-3 2 0 0 Uehara 1 0 0 0 T—2:25. A—13,652 (45,438).

BB 1 0 0 0 BB 1 0 0 0

SO 2 0 3 1 SO 5 0 1 1

NP 78 9 16 12 NP 80 11 30 9

ERA 3.32 2.55 4.07 1.93 ERA 4.58 7.71 3.68 2.36

SO 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 7

Avg. .276 .248 .259 .229 .225 .247 .167 .217 .218 .150 .208

Indians 1, Twins 0 Minnesota Revere cf A.Casilla ss Cuddyer rf Morneau 1b D.Young lf L.Hughes 3b Dinkelman dh R.Rivera c a-Valencia ph Butera c Tolbert 2b Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 3 3 3 2 1 0 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Brantley lf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .288 A.Cabrera ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .307 G.Sizemore cf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .259 C.Santana 1b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .227 Duncan dh 3 0 0 1 0 1 .222 Choo rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .241 O.Cabrera 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .246 Hannahan 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .224 Marson c 2 0 0 0 1 0 .185 Totals 25 1 4 1 5 7 Minnesota 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 Cleveland 000 100 00x — 1 4 0 a-grounded out for R.Rivera in the 8th. E—D.Young (4). LOB—Minnesota 3, Cleveland 5. 2B—D.Young (5), C.Santana (11), O.Cabrera (8). RBIs— Duncan (17). SB—Brantley (8). CS—Marson (1). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 2 (R.Rivera, Cuddyer); Cleveland 2 (C.Santana, Marson). Runners moved up—A.Casilla, Duncan. GIDP— D.Young, C.Santana. DP—Minnesota 2 (Liriano, A.Casilla, Morneau), (Tolbert, Morneau); Cleveland 1 (A.Cabrera, O.Cabrera, C.Santana). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO Liriano L, 3-6 5 3 1 0 3 7 James 2 1 0 0 1 0 Dumatrait 1 0 0 0 1 0 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Carrasco W, 5-3 8 1-3 3 0 0 1 6 Perez S, 15-16 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—C.Perez 1-0. T—2:13. A—15,498 (43,441).

NP 81 31 16 NP 104 8

ERA 5.20 0.00 2.25 ERA 4.52 2.42

Tigers 8, Rangers 1 Detroit A.Jackson cf C.Wells lf-rf Boesch rf Dirks lf Mi.Cabrera 1b V.Martinez dh Jh.Peralta ss Avila c Raburn 2b Santiago 2b Worth 3b Totals

AB 6 6 4 0 5 5 5 5 4 1 4 45

R H 1 3 1 3 0 2 0 0 1 2 2 3 0 1 2 3 1 2 0 0 0 1 8 20

BI 3 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 8

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2

SO 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 9

Avg. .247 .254 .282 .250 .318 .308 .314 .289 .208 .240 .429

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 2 0 1 0 .235 Dav.Murphy lf 4 0 3 0 0 1 .250 J.Hamilton cf 4 0 0 1 0 0 .300 Mi.Young dh 4 0 1 0 0 0 .311 A.Beltre 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .252 N.Cruz rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .243 Moreland 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .310 Napoli c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .220 A.Blanco ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .207 Totals 34 1 8 1 3 5 Detroit 000 400 211 — 8 20 0 Texas 000 001 000 — 1 8 1 E—N.Cruz (3). LOB—Detroit 12, Texas 9. 2B—

C.Wells 2 (6), V.Martinez (16), Avila 2 (13), A.Beltre (15). RBIs—A.Jackson 3 (17), C.Wells (9), Mi.Cabrera (45), Jh.Peralta (32), Raburn 2 (21), J.Hamilton (20). SB—Kinsler (12). Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 7 (Raburn, Mi.Cabrera, Boesch, Avila, C.Wells, Worth, Jh.Peralta); Texas 5 (Mi.Young, J.Hamilton, N.Cruz, Dav.Murphy, Moreland). Runners moved up—Boesch, Santiago, J.Hamilton 2. GIDP—C.Wells, A.Blanco. DP—Detroit 1 (Porcello, Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera); Texas 1 (A.Blanco, Kinsler, Moreland). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello W, 6-3 6 6 1 1 1 2 87 3.58 Purcey 2 2 0 0 2 3 42 2.84 Schlereth 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 2.37 Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Harrison L, 5-5 4 8 4 3 2 5 89 3.48 Bush 2 1-3 6 2 2 0 1 36 5.06 M.Lowe 1 2-3 4 1 1 0 3 34 3.52 Tateyama 1 2 1 1 0 0 20 3.24 Inherited runners-scored—M.Lowe 2-1. WP—Porcello, Bush. T—3:13. A—35,165 (49,170).

Blue Jays 8, Royals 5 Toronto AB R Y.Escobar ss 2 1 McCoy ss 3 1 C.Patterson lf 4 0 Bautista rf 2 1 Lind 1b 3 2 Arencibia c 4 1 A.Hill 2b 4 0 Encarnacion dh 3 1 R.Davis cf 3 0 J.Nix 3b 4 1 Totals 32 8

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 3 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 9 7 3

SO 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 6

Avg. .286 .245 .281 .348 .317 .249 .246 .258 .268 .196

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Gordon lf 4 1 1 0 1 2 .280 Me.Cabrera cf 5 1 2 1 0 0 .275 Hosmer 1b 4 2 2 0 1 1 .310 Francoeur rf 5 0 2 3 0 0 .272 Butler dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .300 Aviles 3b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .217 Getz 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Treanor c 2 1 0 0 2 0 .211 A.Escobar ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .208 Totals 36 5 11 5 4 4 Toronto 310 020 020 — 8 9 0 Kansas City 101 021 000 — 5 11 2 E—Treanor (3), Me.Cabrera (2). LOB—Toronto 3, Kansas City 8. 2B—McCoy (2), Encarnacion (15), J.Nix (5), Getz (5). HR—Lind (10), off Mazzaro; Arencibia (10), off Collins. RBIs—McCoy (4), Lind 3 (33), Arencibia 2 (32), J.Nix (12), Me.Cabrera (35), Francoeur 3 (38), Butler (23). SB—Y.Escobar (2), A.Escobar (7). CS—R.Davis (8). S—C.Patterson, R.Davis. SF—Lind. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 4 (Butler, A.Escobar, Aviles, Hosmer). Runners moved up—Francoeur, Butler. GIDP—Butler. DP—Toronto 1 (Drabek, A.Hill, Lind). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Drabek W, 4-4 5 1-3 9 5 5 3 0 99 4.98 L.Perez H, 1 2 2-3 2 0 0 1 4 41 2.55 Rauch S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 0 0 11 3.65 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mazzaro L, 0-1 5 8 6 6 1 3 78 17.47 L.Coleman 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 18 2.70 Collins 1 1 2 2 2 1 30 3.24 Bl.Wood 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 15 2.70 Mazzaro pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—L.Perez 1-1, L.Coleman 1-0, Bl.Wood 1-0. WP—Drabek 4. T—2:55. A—16,539 (37,903).

White Sox 5, Mariners 1 Seattle I.Suzuki rf L.Rodriguez ss Smoak 1b Cust dh A.Kennedy 2b F.Gutierrez cf Olivo c Figgins 3b Peguero lf Totals

AB 4 3 4 3 3 4 3 4 3 31

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 6 1 3

SO 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 0 5

Avg. .260 .174 .245 .225 .286 .200 .242 .185 .230

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 4 1 0 0 0 1 .261 Vizquel ss 4 1 1 2 0 0 .278 Quentin rf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .268 1-Rios pr-cf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .199 Konerko dh 3 1 2 1 1 1 .318 Pierzynski c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .269 Lillibridge cf-rf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .284 Teahen 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .211 Beckham 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .236 Morel 3b 3 1 2 0 0 0 .266 Totals 33 5 8 5 2 6 Seattle 000 100 000 — 1 6 2 Chicago 014 000 00x — 5 8 0 1-ran for Quentin in the 7th. E—Figgins (7), L.Rodriguez (2). LOB—Seattle 7, Chicago 6. 2B—L.Rodriguez (6). 3B—Vizquel (1). HR—Konerko (14), off F.Hernandez; Quentin (15), off F.Hernandez. RBIs—Olivo (27), Vizquel 2 (7), Quentin 2 (42), Konerko (47). CS—Morel (4). SF—Olivo. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 4 (Cust, Smoak, Figgins, I.Suzuki); Chicago 3 (Pierre, Lillibridge, Pierzynski). Runners moved up—Teahen. GIDP—Figgins. DP—Chicago 1 (Beckham, Vizquel, Teahen). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Hrnandez L, 6-5 6 2-3 8 5 5 2 5 114 Ray 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP Humber W, 5-3 7 2-3 5 1 1 3 5 106 Sale 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 12 Inherited runners-scored—Ray 2-0, Sale WP—Humber. T—2:25. A—21,337 (40,615).

ERA 3.29 6.06 ERA 2.87 4.44 1-0.

Rays 4, Angels 1 Tampa Bay Damon dh Zobrist 2b Joyce rf B.Upton cf Kotchman 1b Ruggiano lf Jaso c S.Rodriguez 3b Brignac ss Totals

AB 5 5 4 5 4 4 3 3 4 37

R H 1 3 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 3 0 2 1 2 0 0 0 0 4 12

BI 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2

SO 0 0 2 2 0 1 1 1 0 7

Avg. .288 .256 .340 .228 .351 .250 .234 .208 .180

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aybar ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .296 H.Kendrick 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .304 Abreu lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .290 Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .234 Callaspo 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .294 Trumbo 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .262 V.Wells cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .179 Branyan dh 2 0 0 0 0 0 .120 a-M.Izturis ph-dh 1 0 0 0 0 1 .288 Conger c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Totals 33 1 7 1 0 8 Tampa Bay 101 100 010 — 4 12 1 Los Angeles 000 001 000 — 1 7 0 E—B.Upton (2). LOB—Tampa Bay 9, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Damon 2 (10), Kotchman (7), H.Kendrick (13), Abreu (16), Trumbo (12). 3B—Damon (2). HR—B.Upton (8), off Haren. RBIs—Damon (32), Zobrist (34), B.Upton (30), Jaso (14), Tor.Hunter (32). S—S.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4 (Damon 2, S.Rodriguez, B.Upton); Los Angeles 3 (Callaspo, Trumbo, Conger). Runners moved up—Zobrist 2, Brignac. GIDP— H.Kendrick. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (Brignac, Zobrist, Kotchman). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cobb W, 1-0 6 1-3 7 1 1 0 3 84 4.24 Howell H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 10 15.75 Jo.Peralta H, 10 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 3.64 Frswth S, 12-13 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.23 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Haren L, 5-4 7 8 3 3 1 6 113 2.41 R.Thompson 2-3 3 1 1 0 0 26 3.00 Jepsen 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 19 8.03 Inherited runners-scored—Howell 1-0, Jepsen 2-0. IBB—off Jepsen (Joyce). T—2:38. A—38,833 (45,389).

NL BOXSCORES Dodgers 6, Phillies 2 Los Angeles D.Gordon ss Blake 3b Ethier rf Kemp cf Uribe 2b Loney 1b Navarro c

AB 5 2 3 4 4 3 4

R 1 1 1 2 0 0 0

H BI BB 3 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0

SO 1 0 1 0 1 0 0

Avg. .600 .272 .324 .320 .228 .242 .200

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division New York Boston Tampa Bay Toronto Baltimore Central Division Cleveland Detroit Chicago Kansas City Minnesota West Division Texas Seattle Los Angeles Oakland

W 33 34 32 31 28 W 34 33 30 26 22 W 34 31 30 27

L 25 26 29 30 31 L 25 27 33 35 38 L 28 30 33 35

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Pct .569 .567 .525 .508 .475 Pct .576 .550 .476 .426 .367 Pct .548 .508 .476 .435

GB — — 2½ 3½ 5½ GB — 1½ 6 9 12½ GB — 2½ 4½ 7

Tuesday’s Games Boston 6, N.Y. Yankees 4 Cleveland 1, Minnesota 0 Baltimore 4, Oakland 0 Detroit 8, Texas 1 Chicago White Sox 5, Seattle 1 Toronto 8, Kansas City 5 Tampa Bay 4, L.A. Angels 1

WCGB — — 2½ 3½ 5½ WCGB — 1 5½ 8½ 12 WCGB — 3½ 5½ 8

L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 6-4 4-6 L10 3-7 8-2 6-4 3-7 5-5 L10 7-3 5-5 3-7 2-8

Str L-1 W-4 W-2 W-1 W-2 Str W-1 W-4 W-2 L-1 L-1 Str L-2 L-2 L-4 L-8

Home 17-14 19-13 14-16 15-14 18-16 Home 20-11 17-11 13-15 20-19 6-15 Home 19-13 18-15 14-17 14-15

Away 16-11 15-13 18-13 16-16 10-15 Away 14-14 16-16 17-18 6-16 16-23 Away 15-15 13-15 16-16 13-20

East Division Philadelphia Atlanta Florida New York Washington Central Division St. Louis Milwaukee Cincinnati Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division San Francisco Arizona Los Angeles Colorado San Diego

Today’s Games Minnesota (Pavano 3-5) at Cleveland (Masterson 5-4), 9:05 a.m. Boston (Wakefield 2-1) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 6-3), 4:05 p.m. Oakland (Outman 1-0) at Baltimore (Britton 5-4), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (Coke 1-5) at Texas (Ogando 6-0), 5:05 p.m. Seattle (Vargas 4-3) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 6-5), 5:10 p.m. Toronto (Villanueva 3-0) at Kansas City (Duffy 0-1), 5:10 p.m. Tampa Bay (Shields 5-4) at L.A. Angels (Weaver 7-4), 7:05 p.m.

W 36 33 31 29 27 W 37 34 32 29 23 23 W 34 33 29 28 28

L 25 28 28 31 34 L 25 27 30 30 36 38 L 27 28 33 32 34

Pct .590 .541 .525 .483 .443 Pct .597 .557 .516 .492 .390 .377 Pct .557 .541 .468 .467 .452

Tuesday’s Games Pittsburgh 8, Arizona 5 L.A. Dodgers 6, Philadelphia 2 Atlanta 1, Florida 0 Cincinnati 8, Chicago Cubs 2 St. Louis 7, Houston 4 N.Y. Mets 2, Milwaukee 1 San Diego 2, Colorado 0 Washington 2, San Francisco 1

GB — 3 4 6½ 9 GB — 2½ 5 6½ 12½ 13½ GB — 1 5½ 5½ 6½

WCGB — 1 2 4½ 7 WCGB — — 2½ 4 10 11 WCGB — 1 5½ 5½ 6½

L10 4-6 5-5 2-8 6-4 5-5 L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 6-4 1-9 4-6 L10 6-4 6-4 6-4 4-6 7-3

Str L-1 W-1 L-6 W-3 W-1 Str W-4 L-1 W-2 W-1 L-8 L-4 Str L-1 L-2 W-1 L-1 W-1

Home 20-11 17-13 14-17 15-17 14-12 Home 18-12 21-8 20-14 12-15 12-19 11-18 Home 16-10 20-13 15-16 13-15 13-22

Away 16-14 16-15 17-11 14-14 13-22 Away 19-13 13-19 12-16 17-15 11-17 12-20 Away 18-17 13-15 14-17 15-17 15-12

Today’s Games Chicago Cubs (Dempster 4-5) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 4-5), 9:35 a.m. Washington (Maya 0-1) at San Francisco (Cain 4-4), 12:45 p.m. Colorado (Cook 0-0) at San Diego (Moseley 2-6), 3:35 p.m. Arizona (Duke 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 2-7), 4:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 5-6) at Philadelphia (Hamels 7-2), 4:05 p.m. Atlanta (D.Lowe 3-4) at Florida (Nolasco 4-1), 4:10 p.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 6-1) at Houston (Norris 3-4), 5:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 3-4) at Milwaukee (Wolf 4-4), 5:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Red Sox 6, Yankees 4: NEW YORK — David Ortiz hit a two-run homer and Jonathan Papelbon labored through the ninth inning to earn his 200th save, leading Boston over the New York Yankees. Jacoby Ellsbury led off the game with a home run and Adrian Gonzalez hit an RBI triple as the Red Sox roughed up Freddy Garcia (4-5) early to move within two percentage points of the first-place Yankees in the AL East. • Indians 1, Twins 0: CLEVELAND — Carlos Carrasco took a shutout into the ninth inning and Cleveland pushed across an unearned run to defeat Minnesota, ending a season-high five-game skid. Carrasco (5-3) gave up three hits, struck out six and walked one over 8 1⁄3 innings as Cleveland avoided its first eight-game losing streak ever at Progressive Field. • Orioles 4, Athletics 0: BALTIMORE — J.J. Hardy, Luke Scott and Adam Jones hit solo homers, Chris Jakubauskas pitched five shutout innings and Baltimore beat Oakland to stretch the Athletics’ losing streak to a season-high eight games. Jones had three hits for the Orioles, who will try to complete a three-game sweep tonight. • White Sox 5, Mariners 1: CHICAGO — Paul Konerko and Carlos Quentin homered, and Phil Humber held Seattle’s offense in check as the Chicago White Sox beat the Mariners. Konerko’s solo shot in the second inning was his second in as many days and fourth in six games. The homer also marked the 1,000th run of his career. • Blue Jays 8, Royals 5: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Adam Lind and J.P. Arencibia each hit a two-run homer to lead Toronto to a victory over Kansas City. Lind homered off Vin Mazzaro (0-1) in a three-run first inning. Jose Bautista was aboard on a single. • Tigers 8, Rangers 1: ARLINGTON, Texas — Austin Jackson had three of Detroit’s seasonhigh 20 hits and Rick Porcello won for the sixth time in his past seven outings to help the Tigers beat Texas. Porcello (6-3) gave up a run over six innings against the AL West-leading Rangers as the Tigers improved to 8-1 in their past nine games. • Rays 4, Angels 1: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Rookie Alex Cobb pitched 6 1⁄3 strong innings to earn his first major league victory, B.J. Upton homered and Tampa Bay beat the Los Angeles Angels. The Rays won the series opener 5-1 a night earlier.

• Braves 1, Marlins 0: MIAMI — Tommy Hanson pitched six innings and Atlanta won with only two hits when they sent Florida to its sixth consecutive loss. Florida’s Brad Hand (0-1) went six innings in his major league debut and allowed just one hit — a homer by Alex Gonzalez leading off the fourth. • Dodgers 6, Phillies 2: PHILADELPHIA — Rubby De La Rosa pitched five effective innings in his first career start and Dee Gordon had three hits in his first start, helping the Los Angeles Dodgers beat Philadelphia. De La Rosa (2-0) allowed one run, constantly having to pitch out of trouble because he walked five and gave up four hits. • Pirates 8, Diamondbacks 5: PITTSBURGH — Lyle Overbay hit a three-run double to cap a five-run eighth inning and Pittsburgh rallied for a win over Arizona. The Diamondbacks were in position for their seventh consecutive road win after Daniel Hudson allowed only one earned run through seven innings, but Daniel Hernandez (2-2) did not retire any of the six batters he faced in the eighth. • Reds 8, Cubs 2: CINCINNATI — Miguel Cairo hit a grand slam to help make Edinson Volquez’s return to the majors a success and Cincinnati continued its dominance of the Chicago Cubs. Volquez (4-2), recalled earlier Tuesday from TripleA Louisville, lasted a season-high seven innings. • Cardinals 7, Astros 4: HOUSTON — Jake Westbrook shook off early trouble on the mound and helped his cause with a three-run, tie-breaking double to help St. Louis to a win over Houston. • Mets 2, Brewers 1: MILWAUKEE — Jose Reyes hit a two-run triple to give New York the lead in the seventh inning and the Mets held on to beat Milwaukee. Reyes’ triple came off reliever Marco Estrada. • Padres 2, Rockies 0: SAN DIEGO — Alberto Gonzalez and Tim Stauffer had consecutive RBI singles with two outs in the fifth against Ubaldo Jimenez to lift San Diego to a win over Colorado. The Padres have won four of six to start an 11-game homestand, their longest of the year. • Nationals 2, Giants 1: SAN FRANCISCO — Jordan Zimmermann pitched seven impressive innings and drove in the tiebreaking run to lead Washington over San Francisco. Ian Desmond had an RBI single and Wilson Ramos added two hits as the Nationals rebounded from Monday’s frustrating 13-inning loss to win despite stranding 11 runners.

Sands lf Guerra p R.De La Rosa p Hawksworth p a-M.Thames ph Guerrier p Elbert p c-Gwynn Jr. ph-lf Totals

4 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 32

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 6 10

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

.200 --.000 --.154 ----.227

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Victorino cf 4 1 0 0 1 0 .269 Polanco 3b 3 0 0 1 1 0 .315 Utley 2b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .231 Howard 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .243 Ibanez lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .241 Ruiz c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .246 Do.Brown rf 3 1 0 0 1 2 .283 W.Valdez ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .254 Oswalt p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .133 J.Romero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Gload ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .275 Stutes p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Herndon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Rollins ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .267 Totals 31 2 5 2 6 5 Los Angeles 013 000 020 — 6 10 0 Philadelphia 010 000 100 — 2 5 2 a-flied out for Hawksworth in the 7th. b-walked for J.Romero in the 7th. c-singled for Elbert in the 9th. d-flied out for Herndon in the 9th. E—Oswalt (1), Utley (2). LOB—Los Angeles 4, Philadelphia 8. 2B—Kemp (12), Uribe (8). 3B—Utley (1). HR—Kemp (17), off Stutes. RBIs—Blake (12), Ethier (30), Kemp 2 (50), Navarro (4), Polanco (33), Utley (4). SB—D.Gordon (1), Victorino (9). CS—Blake (1). S—Blake. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (Sands 2, Loney, Kemp); Philadelphia 4 (Ibanez, Utley 2, Howard). Runners moved up—D.Gordon, Uribe, Loney. GIDP—Blake, Sands. DP—Philadelphia 3 (W.Valdez, Howard), (Utley, W.Valdez, Howard), (Polanco, Howard, Howard, W.Valdez). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO DeLaRsa W, 2-0 5 4 1 1 5 4 Hawkswrth H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 Guerrier H, 9 2-3 0 1 1 1 0 Elbert H, 3 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 Guerra 1 0 0 0 0 0 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO Oswalt L, 3-4 6 8 4 4 2 1 J.Romero 1 0 0 0 1 1 Stutes 1 1 2 2 1 1 Herndon 1 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—Elbert 1-1. T—2:46. A—44,721 (43,651).

NP 96 13 15 24 15 NP 94 15 15 11

ERA 1.80 2.79 3.26 0.00 2.89 ERA 3.05 3.60 2.87 5.94

Reds 8, Cubs 2 Chicago Fukudome rf Barney 2b S.Castro ss C.Pena 1b Ar.Ramirez 3b DeWitt lf Campana cf b-Montanez ph Soto c

AB 3 4 4 3 4 4 3 1 4

R 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0

SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1

Avg. .304 .309 .301 .216 .287 .316 .235 .313 .214

D.Davis p R.Lopez p a-B.Snyder ph Grabow p Samardzija p c-LeMahieu ph Totals

1 0 1 0 0 1 33

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 10

0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 5

.000 .000 .250 --.000 .143

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Stubbs cf 4 1 2 1 0 1 .266 B.Phillips 2b 4 1 1 0 1 2 .287 Votto 1b 3 1 1 1 2 0 .336 Bruce rf 3 2 1 0 1 1 .299 J.Gomes lf 3 0 1 1 0 2 .197 Masset p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Horst p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Cairo 3b 4 1 2 4 0 0 .290 R.Hernandez c 3 0 0 1 0 0 .312 Janish ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .225 Volquez p 1 1 1 0 0 0 .059 Heisey lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Totals 30 8 10 8 4 7 Chicago 010 000 001 — 2 10 1 Cincinnati 001 120 40x — 8 10 0 a-singled for R.Lopez in the 7th. b-singled for Campana in the 9th. c-grounded out for Samardzija in the 9th. E—S.Castro (11). LOB—Chicago 7, Cincinnati 7. 2B—Ar.Ramirez (16), DeWitt 2 (6), Stubbs (12), B.Phillips (12). HR—Cairo (2), off Grabow. RBIs—DeWitt (6), Montanez (3), Stubbs (28), Votto (38), J.Gomes (25), Cairo 4 (12), R.Hernandez (18). S—D.Davis, Volquez 2. SF—J.Gomes, R.Hernandez. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 4 (C.Pena, Barney 2, Ar.Ramirez); Cincinnati 3 (Votto, Cairo, Stubbs). Runners moved up—S.Castro 2. GIDP—Ar.Ramirez, Soto 2, R.Hernandez. DP—Chicago 1 (S.Castro, Barney, C.Pena); Cincinnati 3 (Janish, B.Phillips, Votto), (Janish, B.Phillips, Votto), (B.Phillips, Janish, Votto). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO D.Davis L, 0-5 4 1-3 7 4 4 3 4 R.Lopez 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 Grabow 1 3 4 4 1 1 Samardzija 1 0 0 0 0 1 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO Volquez W, 4-2 7 7 1 1 2 5 Masset 1 1 0 0 0 0 Horst 1 2 1 1 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—R.Lopez 3-1. Samardzija (Stubbs). T—2:53. A—24,921 (42,319).

NP ERA 79 6.38 14 8.59 24 5.04 16 4.54 NP ERA 105 5.74 11 4.18 23 3.24 HBP—by

Braves 1, Marlins 0 Atlanta AB R Schafer cf 3 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 1 Prado lf 4 0 C.Jones 3b 4 0 Freeman 1b 3 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 D.Ross c 2 0 Mather rf 3 0 Hanson p 2 0 O’Flaherty p 0 0 b-Hinske ph 1 0 Venters p 0 0 Kimbrel p 0 0 Totals 29 1

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 2

SO 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .190 .263 .277 .251 .273 .170 .293 .259 .095 --.296 -----

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Coghlan cf 2 0 1 0 3 0 .242 Infante 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Morrison lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .295 G.Sanchez 1b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .311 Dobbs 3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .338 1-O.Martinez pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .077 Stanton rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .254 J.Buck c 4 0 2 0 0 2 .220 Bonifacio ss-3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .252 Hand p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Helms ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .228 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Cousins ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .149 Totals 29 0 4 0 7 9 Atlanta 000 100 000 — 1 2 0 Florida 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 a-fouled out for Mujica in the 7th. b-popped out for O’Flaherty in the 8th. c-walked for R.Webb in the 9th. 1-ran for Dobbs in the 8th. E—Hand (1). LOB—Atlanta 3, Florida 10. 2B—Coghlan (18). HR—Ale.Gonzalez (6), off Hand. RBIs—Ale.Gonzalez (17). SB—Schafer (2), Prado (2), Coghlan (7). S—Bonifacio. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 2 (C.Jones 2); Florida 4 (G.Sanchez, Stanton 2, Infante). GIDP—Infante. DP—Atlanta 1 (Uggla, Ale.Gonzalez, Freeman); Florida 1 (Stanton, G.Sanchez). Atlanta IP H R ER Hanson W, 7-4 6 2 0 0 O’Flaherty H, 10 1 1 0 0 Venters H, 13 1 1 0 0 Kimbrel S, 18 1 0 0 0 Florida IP H R ER Hand L, 0-1 6 1 1 1 Mujica 1 0 0 0 R.Webb 2 1 0 0 T—2:41. A—13,302 (38,560).

BB 5 1 0 1 BB 1 0 1

SO 6 0 2 1 SO 6 1 2

NP 101 12 16 12 NP 100 14 26

ERA 2.59 1.59 0.49 2.70 ERA 1.50 3.45 3.81

Pirates 8, Diamondbacks 5 Arizona AB R H R.Roberts 3b 5 1 1 K.Johnson 2b 5 1 2 J.Upton rf 4 0 2 S.Drew ss 5 0 1 C.Young cf 4 1 1 Montero c 3 0 0 Miranda 1b 4 1 4 G.Parra lf 4 0 0 D.Hudson p 3 1 1 b-Burroughs ph 1 0 1 Da.Hernandez p 0 0 0 Vasquez p 0 0 0 Totals 38 5 13 Pittsburgh AB R Tabata lf 4 1 J.Harrison 2b 4 1 Hanrahan p 0 0 Paul rf 3 1 A.McCutchen cf 2 3 Overbay 1b 4 1 C.Snyder c 2 0 Br.Wood 3b 4 0 Cedeno ss 4 0 Correia p 1 0 a-Ciriaco ph 1 0

BI 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 5

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .266 .227 .272 .283 .241 .266 .259 .260 .259 .263 -----

H BI BB 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 2 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 1 0

Avg. .239 .240 --.292 .275 .240 .263 .200 .239 .000 .000

Moskos p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Meek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-G.Jones ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .232 Walker 2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Totals 30 8 7 8 2 7 Arizona 100 030 010 — 5 13 1 Pittsburgh 020 100 05x — 8 7 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Correia in the 5th. b-singled for D.Hudson in the 8th. c-doubled for Resop in the 8th. E—Miranda (3). LOB—Arizona 8, Pittsburgh 3. 2B—R.Roberts (9), J.Upton (13), Tabata (12), A.McCutchen (12), Overbay (12), Cedeno (9), G.Jones (7). HR—K.Johnson (12), off Correia; Miranda (6), off Correia; C.Young (11), off Meek. RBIs—K.Johnson 3 (27), C.Young (33), Miranda (17), Tabata (12), J.Harrison (3), Overbay 3 (25), C.Snyder 2 (17), Cedeno (18). CS—J.Upton (5). S—Paul. SF—C.Snyder 2. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 6 (G.Parra, Montero, C.Young 2, S.Drew, R.Roberts); Pittsburgh 2 (J.Harrison, Cedeno). Runners moved up—Overbay, C.Snyder. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (J.Harrison, Overbay). Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA D.Hudson 7 3 3 1 1 7 105 3.98 Hernndz L, 2-2 0 4 5 5 1 0 23 3.29 Vasquez 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.47 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Correia 5 8 4 4 2 3 85 3.64 Moskos 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 Meek 1 2-3 4 1 1 0 0 28 4.40 Resop W, 2-1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 3.58 Hanrahan S, 15 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 1.63 Da.Hernandez pitched to 6 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Vasquez 1-0, Resop 2-0. WP—Correia. PB—C.Snyder. T—2:44. A—12,378 (38,362).

Padres 2, Rockies 0 Colorado C.Gonzalez cf Nelson 2b Helton 1b Tulowitzki ss S.Smith rf Wigginton 3b Blackmon lf J.Morales c Jimenez p a-Giambi ph Brothers p Totals

AB 3 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 2 1 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 1

SO 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 1 0 8

Avg. .250 .278 .300 .252 .304 .257 .000 .224 .000 .227 ---

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Denorfia cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .302 Bartlett ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .259 Headley 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .274 Ludwick lf 3 0 1 0 0 2 .256 Hawpe rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .234 H.Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cantu 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .185 K.Phillips c 3 1 1 0 0 1 .233 Alb.Gonzalez 2b 3 1 1 1 0 0 .202 Stauffer p 2 0 2 1 0 0 .227 b-Cnningham ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Totals 29 2 6 2 1 8 Colorado 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 San Diego 000 020 00x — 2 6 0 a-struck out for Jimenez in the 8th. b-flied out for Stauffer in the 8th. LOB—Colorado 6, San Diego 4. 2B—C.Gonzalez (9), S.Smith (17), Bartlett (7). RBIs—Alb.Gonzalez (10), Stauffer (3). Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 4 (Nelson 2, Wigginton 2); San Diego 1 (Hawpe). GIDP—Hawpe. DP—Colorado 1 (Tulowitzki, Helton). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO Jimenez L, 1-6 7 6 2 2 0 8 Brothers 1 0 0 0 1 0 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO Stauffer W, 2-4 8 4 0 0 1 8 H.Bell S, 17-18 1 1 0 0 0 0 WP—Jimenez, H.Bell. PB—J.Morales. T—2:11. A—17,732 (42,691).

NP 104 13 NP 97 11

ERA 4.73 0.00 ERA 3.58 1.73

Cardinals 7, Astros 4 St. Louis Theriot ss Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Berkman lf Craig rf Jay rf Salas p Y.Molina c Schumaker 2b-rf Descalso 3b-2b Westbrook p Motte p b-Greene ph Batista p Miller p E.Sanchez p M.Carpenter 3b Totals

AB 5 5 4 3 1 3 0 4 4 3 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 36

R 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

H BI BB 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 7 2

SO 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 8

Avg. .298 .269 .278 .329 .336 .323 .000 .319 .223 .244 .143 --.212 ----.000 .100

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .273 Barmes ss 5 0 0 0 0 0 .226 Pence rf 4 1 2 0 1 1 .313 Ca.Lee lf 3 2 2 2 2 0 .262 Keppinger 2b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .300 Wallace 1b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .318 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 2 1 1 1 .227 Towles c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .194 d-Bourgeois ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .393 Myers p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .167 a-M.Downs ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .274 Escalona p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Michaels ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .146 Fe.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 4 10 4 7 7 St. Louis 200 300 011 — 7 9 1 Houston 200 001 001 — 4 10 0 a-was hit by a pitch for Myers in the 6th. b-struck out for Motte in the 7th. c-walked for Del Rosario in the 8th. d-struck out for Towles in the 9th. E—Theriot (11). LOB—St. Louis 4, Houston 13. 2B—Theriot (11), Westbrook (2), Ca.Lee (13), C.Johnson (10), Towles (5). HR—Berkman (13), off Myers; Pujols (14), off Del Rosario; Ca.Lee (5), off Westbrook. RBIs— Theriot (22), Pujols (39), Berkman 2 (42), Westbrook 3 (4), Ca.Lee 2 (31), C.Johnson (28), M.Downs (14). CS—Wallace (1). Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 2 (Theriot, Rasmus); Houston 8 (Keppinger 2, Myers, Barmes 2, Pence 2, Bourgeois). GIDP—Towles. DP—St. Louis 1 (Descalso, Schumaker, Pujols). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Wstbrk W, 6-3 5 1-3 8 3 2 3 3 100 5.01 Motte H, 6 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.13 Batista H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 14 2.03 Miller H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 2.25 E.Sanchez 0 0 0 0 2 0 11 2.10 Salas S, 11-12 2 2 1 1 1 3 44 1.88 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Myers L, 2-5 6 6 5 5 1 4 83 5.02 Escalona 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 2.45 Del Rosario 1 2-3 1 1 1 1 1 26 3.45 Fe.Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 0 2 16 1.59 E.Sanchez pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Motte 3-1, Miller 1-0, Salas 2-0. IBB—off Myers (Descalso). HBP—by Motte (M.Downs). WP—E.Sanchez. PB—Towles. T—3:10. A—23,277 (40,963).

Mets 2, Brewers 1 New York Jos.Reyes ss Turner 3b Beltran rf Dan.Murphy 1b Pagan cf Bay lf Thole c b-R.Paulino ph-c R.Tejada 2b Capuano p a-Pridie ph Beato p Isringhausen p c-Harris ph Fr.Rodriguez p Totals

AB 5 3 4 3 3 3 2 1 4 2 1 0 0 1 0 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 5

SO 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .339 .300 .278 .304 .232 .212 .230 .300 .317 .111 .242 ----.218 .000

Milwaukee R.Weeks 2b C.Hart rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Y.Betancourt ss Estrada p Braddock p Hawkins p d-Morgan ph Lucroy c

AB 3 3 4 4 4 3 0 0 0 1 4

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0

SO 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Avg. .284 .282 .304 .291 .230 .239 .250 ----.338 .296

C.Gomez cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .220 e-Kotsay ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .257 Marcum p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .115 Counsell ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .191 Totals 33 1 6 1 2 7 New York 000 000 200 — 2 5 0 Milwaukee 000 001 000 — 1 6 0 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Capuano in the 7th. b-struck out for Thole in the 8th. c-flied out for Isringhausen in the 9th. d-struck out for Hawkins in the 9th. e-struck out for C.Gomez in the 9th. LOB—New York 8, Milwaukee 7. 2B—R.Tejada (2), Y.Betancourt (10), Lucroy (7). 3B—Jos.Reyes (11). HR—Fielder (15), off Capuano. RBIs—Jos.Reyes 2 (23), Fielder (50). SB—Pagan (7). Runners left in scoring position—New York 3 (Pagan, Capuano, R.Paulino); Milwaukee 4 (C.Gomez 3, Braun). Runners moved up—C.Hart. New York IP H R ER Capuano W, 4-6 6 6 1 1 Beato H, 2 1 0 0 0 Isrnghsn H, 13 1 0 0 0 Rdrgez S, 17-18 1 0 0 0 Milwaukee IP H R ER Marcum 6 2 0 0 Estrada L, 1-3 1 2 2 2 Braddock 1 1 0 0 Hawkins 1 0 0 0 T—3:00. A—27,064 (41,900).

BB 2 0 0 0 BB 4 1 0 0

SO 5 0 0 2 SO 1 0 3 0

NP 106 8 9 13 NP 108 22 14 8

ERA 4.86 3.12 2.70 3.03 ERA 2.58 4.12 2.45 0.59

SO 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 9

Avg. .254 .229 .217 .302 .254 .197 .245 .120 .247 .292 .200 .243 .000 ---

Nationals 2, Giants 1 Washington Bernadina lf Desmond ss Espinosa 2b Morse 1b W.Ramos c Ankiel cf Hairston Jr. 3b 1-Bixler pr-3b Cora 3b L.Nix rf Zimmermann p b-Werth ph Clippard p Storen p Totals

AB 4 4 5 3 4 4 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 2 6

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Torres cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .264 S.Casilla p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gillaspie 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .400 F.Sanchez 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .291 Huff 1b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .221 Schierholtz rf 4 0 1 1 0 0 .262 Rowand lf-cf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .239 B.Crawford ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .237 C.Stewart c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 J.Sanchez p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .250 a-Burrell ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .224 R.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ja.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 c-C.Ross ph-lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .267 Totals 31 1 5 1 2 4 Washington 001 100 000 — 2 7 0 San Francisco 010 000 000 — 1 5 2 a-lined out for J.Sanchez in the 5th. b-grounded out for Zimmermann in the 8th. c-walked for Ja.Lopez in the 8th. 1-ran for Hairston Jr. in the 5th. E—Huff (3), Torres (1). LOB—Washington 11, San Francisco 5. 2B—Morse (9), Ankiel (6), Schierholtz (7). 3B—Huff (1). RBIs—Desmond (17), Zimmermann (3), Schierholtz (17). SB—Bernadina (8). CS—B.Crawford (1). S—Zimmermann 2. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 7 (Hairston Jr., W.Ramos 2, Desmond, L.Nix 2, Espinosa); San Francisco 1 (C.Stewart). Runners moved up—Hairston Jr., Rowand. GIDP— Espinosa 2. DP—San Francisco 3 (B.Crawford, F.Sanchez, Huff), (R.Ramirez, B.Crawford, Huff), (B.Crawford). Washington IP H R ER BB SO Zmrmn W, 4-6 7 5 1 1 1 3 Clippard H, 14 1 0 0 0 1 1 Storen S, 12-13 1 0 0 0 0 0 SF IP H R ER BB SO Sanchez L, 4-4 5 4 2 2 5 6 R.Ramirez 2 2 0 0 1 2 Ja.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 1 S.Casilla 1 1 0 0 0 0 IBB—off J.Sanchez (Morse). HBP—by (Bernadina). T—2:37. A—41,786 (41,915).

NP ERA 91 3.39 14 2.02 6 2.59 NP ERA 97 3.51 34 1.40 12 2.35 5 1.59 J.Sanchez

LEADERS Through Tuesday’s Early Games ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—Bautista, Toronto, .348; Joyce, Tampa Bay, .340; AdGonzalez, Boston, .340; Ortiz, Boston, .324; Konerko, Chicago, .318; MiCabrera, Detroit, .318; JhPeralta, Detroit, .314. RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 48; Granderson, New York, 47; MiCabrera, Detroit, 45; ACabrera, Cleveland, 40; Ellsbury, Boston, 40; AdGonzalez, Boston, 40; Kinsler, Texas, 40. RBI—AdGonzalez, Boston, 51; Konerko, Chicago, 47; MiCabrera, Detroit, 45; Beltre, Texas, 43; ACabrera, Cleveland, 42; Quentin, Chicago, 42; Bautista, Toronto, 41; Granderson, New York, 41; Teixeira, New York, 41. HITS—AdGonzalez, Boston, 84; ACabrera, Cleveland, 75; MiYoung, Texas, 75; Ellsbury, Boston, 72; Konerko, Chicago, 71; Ortiz, Boston, 70; AlRamirez, Chicago, 70. DOUBLES—Quentin, Chicago, 20; Ellsbury, Boston, 19; AdGonzalez, Boston, 18; AGordon, Kansas City, 18; MiYoung, Texas, 18; MiCabrera, Detroit, 17; Youkilis, Boston, 17; Zobrist, Tampa Bay, 17. TRIPLES—Bourjos, Los Angeles, 6; Crisp, Oakland, 5; Granderson, New York, 5; RDavis, Toronto, 4; 15 tied at 3. HOME RUNS—Bautista, Toronto, 20; Teixeira, New York, 18; Granderson, New York, 17; Quentin, Chicago, 15; NCruz, Texas, 14; Konerko, Chicago, 14; Ortiz, Boston, 14. STOLEN BASES—Ellsbury, Boston, 22; Andrus, Texas, 19; Crisp, Oakland, 18; RDavis, Toronto, 18; Aybar, Los Angeles, 14; Fuld, Tampa Bay, 14; ISuzuki, Seattle, 14. PITCHING—Lester, Boston, 8-2; Scherzer, Detroit, 7-2; Sabathia, New York, 7-3; Tomlin, Cleveland, 7-3; Hellickson, Tampa Bay, 7-3; Arrieta, Baltimore, 7-3; Weaver, Los Angeles, 7-4; Price, Tampa Bay, 7-5. STRIKEOUTS—FHernandez, Seattle, 97; Shields, Tampa Bay, 85; Weaver, Los Angeles, 85; Price, Tampa Bay, 83; Verlander, Detroit, 83; CWilson, Texas, 82; Haren, Los Angeles, 80. SAVES—League, Seattle, 16; MaRivera, New York, 16; CPerez, Cleveland, 15; Valverde, Detroit, 15; Feliz, Texas, 13; Walden, Los Angeles, 13; Farnsworth, Tampa Bay, 12; Papelbon, Boston, 12. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—JosReyes, New York, .339; Votto, Cincinnati, .336; Berkman, St. Louis, .329; Ethier, Los Angeles, .324; Kemp, Los Angeles, .320; YMolina, St. Louis, .319; Wallace, Houston, .318. RUNS—Stubbs, Cincinnati, 45; Bruce, Cincinnati, 44; Braun, Milwaukee, 43; Pujols, St. Louis, 43; Votto, Cincinnati, 43; Weeks, Milwaukee, 43; JosReyes, New York, 41. RBI—Fielder, Milwaukee, 50; Kemp, Los Angeles, 50; Howard, Philadelphia, 47; Bruce, Cincinnati, 46; Pence, Houston, 44; Braun, Milwaukee, 43; Berkman, St. Louis, 42. HITS—JosReyes, New York, 84; Pence, Houston, 79; SCastro, Chicago, 75; Polanco, Philadelphia, 75; Votto, Cincinnati, 74; Kemp, Los Angeles, 73; Prado, Atlanta, 71; GSanchez, Florida, 71. DOUBLES—Beltran, New York, 19; Coghlan, Florida, 18; JosReyes, New York, 18; CYoung, Arizona, 18; Headley, San Diego, 17; Pence, Houston, 17; Prado, Atlanta, 17; SSmith, Colorado, 17. TRIPLES—JosReyes, New York, 11; Rasmus, St. Louis, 6; SCastro, Chicago, 5; Fowler, Colorado, 5; Victorino, Philadelphia, 5; SDrew, Arizona, 4; Espinosa, Washington, 4. HOME RUNS—Bruce, Cincinnati, 17; Kemp, Los Angeles, 17; Fielder, Milwaukee, 15; Pujols, St. Louis, 14; Berkman, St. Louis, 13; Braun, Milwaukee, 13; Stanton, Florida, 13. STOLEN BASES—Bourn, Houston, 25; JosReyes, New York, 19; Desmond, Washington, 18; Stubbs, Cincinnati, 17; Braun, Milwaukee, 14; CGomez, Milwaukee, 14; Kemp, Los Angeles, 14; Rollins, Philadelphia, 14; Tabata, Pittsburgh, 14. PITCHING—Gallardo, Milwaukee, 8-2; Halladay, Philadelphia, 8-3; Correia, Pittsburgh, 8-4; Jurrjens, Atlanta, 7-2; Hamels, Philadelphia, 7-2; Lohse, St. Louis, 7-2; Hanson, Atlanta, 7-4. STRIKEOUTS—ClLee, Philadelphia, 100; Halladay, Philadelphia, 97; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 96; Lincecum, San Francisco, 93; Hamels, Philadelphia, 82; Norris, Houston, 79; AniSanchez, Florida, 79. SAVES—LNunez, Florida, 19; Kimbrel, Atlanta, 18; Putz, Arizona, 17; FrRodriguez, New York, 17; BrWilson, San Francisco, 17; HBell, San Diego, 17; Axford, Milwaukee, 16; Street, Colorado, 16.


D4 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

NHL FINALS

QB Pryor is giving up senior season at Ohio State

Game 3 shows league is still struggling with violence on the ice By Greg Beacham The Associated Press

By Rusty Miller The Associated Press

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Terrelle Pryor’s career at Ohio State, which started with so much promise and potential, came to an abrupt and scandal-ridden end. The Ohio State quarterback announced through his attorney Tuesday that he would not play for the Buckeyes this season. He had already been suspended for the first five games for breaking NCAA rules by accepting improper benefits from the owner of a tattoo parlor. “In the best interests of my teammates, I’ve made the decision to forgo my senior year of football at The Ohio State University,” Pryor said in a statement issued by Columbus lawyer Larry James. Pryor will most likely make himself available for an NFL supplemental draft. “I would hope so. Also, he would hope so,” said James, who added that Pryor was not available for comment. “But he’s going to take the next couple of days to get his head together.” The Cleveland Plain Dealer first reported Pryor’s announcement. The NCAA is looking into all aspects of Ohio State’s once-glittering program, from cash and tattoos given to players, cars deals for athletes and other potential violations. Pryor’s announcement comes just eight days after Buckeyes coach Jim Tressel was forced to resign for knowing about the players’ improper benefits but not telling any of his superiors. “He did not want to be a distraction to his teammates,” James said of Pryor. “This is something he came to consider after much thought.” Ohio State’s athletic director, Gene Smith, quickly issued a statement wishing Pryor the best. “We understand Terrelle’s decision and wish him well in this next phase of his life,” Smith said. “We hope he returns to The Ohio State University one day to finish his degree.” Luke Fickell, who will serve as Ohio State’s interim head coach in place of Tressel this fall, found out about Pryor’s decision on Tuesday night. “I was notified this evening that Terrelle has decided to pursue a professional career,” Fickell said. “I wish him the best in his pursuits.”

HORSE RACING

Mark Lennihan / The Associated Press

Hot walker Cathy Carpinteiro holds Nehro, Tuesday at Belmont Park in Elmont, N.Y. The Kentucky Derby runner-up is entered in Saturday’s Belmont Stakes.

No fiddling around for Nehro in Belmont Stakes By Richard Rosenblatt The Associated Press

NEW YORK — There is nobody more eager to show up in the winner’s circle after the Belmont Stakes than Ahmed Zayat. Sure, Saturday’s final leg of the Triple Crown is being trumpeted as the rubber match between Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom and Preakness winner Shackleford. But Zayat is confident his colt Nehro is poised to shed a runner-up reputation and win the 1½-mile Belmont, the longest and most grueling of the Triple Crown races. Nehro has finished second in his past three starts, including the Kentucky Derby. Zayat contends Nehro is the most consistent 3-year-old of the bunch and is certain his horse does not have “seconditis.” “We’ve been second, second, second every dance,” Zayat said the other morning at Belmont Park. “The mile-and-a-half is a non-issue. We’re very confident he’s ready. ... I don’t want to be a bridesmaid again.” Zayat is all too familiar with close calls. Two years ago, his Pioneer of the Nile finished second in the 2009 Kentucky Derby behind 50-1 shot Mine That Bird. A year ago his Derby favorite Eskendereya was sidelined with an injury less than a week before the race and was retired. No matter to the always optimistic Zayat. “We’re ready,” he said after the breeze. “I don’t want to sound arrogant, because I’m not, but this horse is honest, he always shows up, he’s versatile and all heart and that’s the sign of a good horse, if not a great horse.” Graham Motion, who trains Animal Kingdom, said Nehro could be a horse to watch Saturday. Horses like Nehro, Brilliant Speed, Master of Hounds, Santiva and Stay Thirsty skipped the Preakness, so they come to the Belmont after a five-week break. “They have an advantage,” Motion said. “It’s just common sense they have an edge in freshness. If I had one of those horses, I’d feel pretty good about it.”

Mark Humphrey / The Associated Press

Dallas’ Tyson Chandler, left, tries to shoot with Miami’s Dwyane Wade defending during the second half of Game 4 of the NBA finals, Tuesday in Dallas.

NBA Continued from D1 “Just battle it out,” Nowitzki said, sniffing throughout his postgame interview with his warm-up jacket zipped all the way up, still in his uniform instead of changing into street clothes like the NBA prefers. “This is the finals. You have to go out there and compete and try your best for your team. So that’s what I did.” The Mavs avoided going down 3-1, a deficit no team has ever overcome in the finals, and guaranteed the series will return to Miami for a Game 6 on Sunday night. Game 5 is Thursday night in Dallas, and Nowitzki vowed to be ready. “There’s no long term,” Nowitzki said. “I’ll be all right on Thursday. ... Hopefully I’ll get some sleep tonight, take some meds and be ready to go on Thursday.” Nowitzki wasn’t as dominant as Michael Jordan when he scored 38 points despite a 103-degree fever in Game 5 of the 1997 finals — but it was that kind of performance down the stretch. If the Mavericks wind up winning their first championship, this performance will go down in NBA lore, topping his effort in Game 2, when he bounced back from a torn tendon in the tip of his left middle finger to score the final nine points in Dallas’ 22-5 rally, including two lefthanded layups. By comparison, consider how meekly a healthy LeBron James played Tuesday. James scored only eight points, ending a double-figure scoring streak of 433 consecutive games, regular season and postseason. It was the first time in 90 playoff games that he scored so few points. He made only three of 11 shots — a tip-in, a 15-foot jumper and a breakaway dunk. Not only did he not score in the fourth quarter, he took only one shot while playing all 12 minutes. “I’ve got to do a better job of being more assertive offensively,” said James, who nonetheless contributed nine rebounds and seven assists. “I’m confident in my ability. It’s just about going out there and knocking them down.” Dwyane Wade led Miami with 32 points, but missed a free throw with 30.1 seconds left and fumbled an inbounds pass with 6.7 seconds left. He knocked the ball back to Mike Miller for a potential tying three-pointer, but it wasn’t even

Senior Continued from D1 Maletis is among the best-known golfers in a field of 144 players at Black Butte Ranch this week for the PNGA’s Senior (55 and older) and Super Senior (65 and older) Men’s Amateur Championship, which ends with Thursday’s final round. And tired as he was, Maletis still shot a 1-under-par 71 Tuesday to end the first round in second place, two shots behind Bob Burton, of Everett, Wash. Maletis, who co-owns Langdon Farms Golf Club in Aurora with his younger brother, Tom, is attempting to become the first four-time champion of the PNGA Senior, which was first played in 1965. But the friendly Maletis is not playing just for a win. “Obviously, winning would be

close to hitting the rim. Fans jumped to their feet and began roaring as soon as they could tell the ball was off-target. Dallas players savored it, too, except for Nowitzki, who walked off looking somewhat sullen, obviously ready for a hot shower and a warm bed. The illness hit Monday night. After struggling to get any rest, he showed up for shootaround but hardly did anything. His condition was kept a secret, and he helped keep it that way by hitting his first three shots. Then he missed 10 of 11 and it was obvious something was wrong. The biggest giveaway: He also missed a free throw for the first time since Game 4 of the conference finals. Mavs coach Rick Carlisle tried resting Nowitzki as much as he could. During timeouts, he stayed in his chair as long as possible, trying to conserve every ounce of energy. “You’ve got a guy that’s 7 foot, there’s a different kind of toll it takes on your body when you’re sick,” Carlisle said. “Everyone could tell looking at him that he labored.” This series is now more fascinating than ever. After the past two games were decided by two points, the first time that’s happened in the finals since 1998, this one was decided by three. In many ways, it was the best one yet because of how tight it was throughout. The Heat seemed to have taken control when they led 74-65, their biggest lead of the night. But Dallas went to a zone and Miami struggled. Jason Terry — who kick-started that comeback with six straight points — made consecutive baskets, and the surge was on. Terry ended up capping it with two free throws with 6.7 seconds left that forced Miami to need a three-pointer. Dallas finally got the balanced scoring attack it wanted. Terry had 17, Shawn Marion 16 and Chandler had 13 points and 16 rebounds. DeShawn Stevenson, who moved to the bench so J.J. Barea could join the starting lineup, scored 11 points for Dallas. Bosh scored 24 points for Miami, but the Heat got little beyond its three superstars. Miller scored six points, Mario Chalmers had five and Haslem and Joel Anthony each scored four points.

great,” said Maletis, who is the father of two adult daughters. “For whatever reason, I’ve never put any importance on winning, as much as just playing the best I can,” he added. “If it comes down to the last day and you’re in the last group and it turns into a kind of match play, then you really think about winning.” The route to the top of senior amateur golf for Maletis, a member of a family that owns a beer distributorship in Portland and a former partner in Bend’s High Desert Beverage, has been unconventional, to be sure. Once a baseball player for the University of Oregon, Maletis started taking golf lessons at age 40. And he did not begin to play golf competitively until age 43. His ascent up Northwest golf’s food chain has been impressive to his competitors.

BOSTON — Two players made two bad decisions in an instant, something that happens fairly often in the NHL. Boston’s Nathan Horton watched his pass an instant too long, and Vancouver’s Aaron Rome checked him an instant too late. Both players’ seasons ended in that instant during Game 3 of the Stanley Cup finals. Horton dropped to the ice, apparently unconscious on his back with his eyes open and his gloved right hand reaching up frighteningly into empty space, while Rome was sent to the Canucks’ dressing room under a vicious cascade of boos from Bruins fans. The NHL is a volatile cocktail of big men with sticks skating swiftly over a confined ice surface, and those elements collided with devastating impact in the sport’s biggest showcase Monday night. Horton is out for the rest of the NHL’s championship round with a severe concussion, and Rome received a four-game suspension — the longest in Stanley Cup finals history — beginning with the pivotal Game 4 tonight. “There’s no fun to this,” said Mike Murphy, the NHL executive in charge of discipline for the series. “There’s no enjoyment to this. Nobody wins in this. Everybody loses. The fans lose. We lost two good hockey players.” Hockey cultivates and even condones violence — fighting is still allowed, after all — yet still struggles to agree on standards to control it. The line between legally aggressive play and dirty tactics is minuscule, and it’s almost impossible to see in an instant. “Only people who have been on the ice can understand how fast it is, and how quick the decision-making process has to be,” said Vancouver defenseman Keith Ballard, who’s likely to step into Rome’s lineup spot. “You feel like there’s no way you can do the right thing sometimes.” Most coaches and players agree the NHL is trying. Concussion awareness has grown tremendously in recent years, with new rules and a safety protocol instituted to protect players from blindside hits and head shots. Yet several prominent players, including Pittsburgh star Sidney Crosby, Nashville’s Matthew Lombardi and Boston’s own high-scoring for-

ward, Marc Savard, still have been seriously hurt by hits of wildly varying legality. Reports of concussions are rising even while dangerous hits diminish. “It’s such a fast game now, not to say there weren’t injuries dating back,” said Boston forward Gregory Campbell, whose father, Colin, is giving up his job as the NHL’s top disciplinarian. “I think now the awareness of the injuries is what has brought the attention on these hits,” Campbell said. “It’s such a fast game now. Things happen quickly. Players are so strong. It’s unfortunate that the game has to deal with this. It’s kind of taken on a life of its own. It’s tough to try to make everybody happy. It’s almost impossible.” Rome’s hit changed the tenor of a tight, defense-dominated series that featured just six total goals in the first two games. The Bruins returned from the first intermission determined to win big for Horton, and they scored eight goals in the next 40 minutes as the game degenerated into a prolonged brawl, with nine misconduct penalties and 118 penalty minutes in the third period alone. “The times we play the best are when there’s been a lot of emotion in a very physical game,” Bruins defenseman Andrew Ference said. “(That’s) what our sport is all about — finding that line, playing hard. We’re allowed to be physical. That’s part of the fabric of our sport. We understand that it is a very fine line. A hit like that doesn’t mean the guy is a bad guy or anything. They are splitsecond decisions, but they’re split-second decisions that obviously can affect lives.” While the Bruins agreed it seemed a bit indelicate to credit Horton’s devastating injury for improving their play, that’s exactly what happened. Boston beat Vancouver 8-1 in the highest-scoring performance in a finals game in 15 years, battering the Canucks’ defense and holding their NHL-best power play scoreless in eight chances while Boston goalie Tim Thomas made 40 saves. “I’m supporting the league, knowing they’re trying to do the best they can,” Boston coach Claude Julien said. “There’s no easy decision. This is a contact sport. You can’t take the contact out of the game. Just got to try to take those situations where it becomes extremely dangerous out of the game.”

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

Boston Bruins right wing Nathan Horton is tended to after being checked to the ice by Vancouver Canucks’ Aaron Rome during the first period of Game 3 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup finals in Boston, Monday. Rome was suspended for four games because of the hit.

“If he’s in the field, he is definitely a guy that you are going to have to beat,” said Carey Watson, a Sunriver resident and a top senior golfer, who shot a first-round 73. “He never beats himself. He hits it long, he putts well and he thinks. He just has a great head on his shoulders.” Maletis’ head and skill helped him beat Larry Daniels, of Seattle, by two strokes at this event in 2009. “That’s why I hate him,” he joked within earshot of Maletis, who joined Daniels for lunch at Big Meadow. Daniels said Maletis is in a select group in the Pacific Northwest that includes first-round leader Burton, and Bellevue’s Tom Brandes, who at 54 is not yet eligible for the PNGA Senior Men’s Amateur. “Those are the three kings, and then there are probably 20 guys that are (at the next level),” Daniels said. “If we play well, and they don’t, we can beat them.”

But there is more to Maletis than just golf. “You want to hang out with him, too, because he knows where all the good restaurants are,” Watson joked. “He’s just a very, very downto-earth, nice guy.” This could be Maletis’ last PNGA Senior, he said. He would like to spend more time at the Greek Orthodox church in Portland he helped build. And he said he would like to volunteer more. “Even though I am playing really well right now, I wouldn’t be surprised if this was my last competitive year,” Maletis said. “I happened to be good at (golf), but it’s not my identity and it’s not my life. There are other things in life I would like to do.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-6177868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 D5

Desert

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708. PNGA SENIOR MEN’S AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP Tuesday At Black Butte Ranch Big Meadow Par 72 First Round Senior Championship Top 10 Bob Burton (Everett, Wash.) 69 Chris Maletis (Portland) 71 Larry Daniels (Seattle, Wash.) 72 Brian Brawley (Sechelt, B.C.) 72 Kevin Kosick (Vancouver, B.C.) 73 Carey Watson (Sunriver) 73 Jim Shindler (Milwaukie) 73 Mark Johnson (Mountlake Terrace, Wash.) 73 Kim Wenger (Eugene) 73 Tom Carlsen (Bend) 74 Paul Harris (Vancouver, B.C.) 74 Jim Sparkman (Moses Lake, Wash.) 74 Tom Rippon (North Vancouver, B.C.) 74 Rick Weihe (Bellingham, Wash.) 74 Senior Championship Locals T20 Patrick Woerner (Redmond) 77 T37 Mitchell Cloninger (Bend) 81 T50 Richard Funk(Bend) 85 Super Senior Championship Top 10 Gaylord Davis (Portland) Tom Liljeholm (Prineville) Ted King (Bellingham, Wash.) Noel Pumfrey (Victoria, B.C.) Charlie Wozow (Woodinville, Wash.) David Wilson (Portland) Xavier Rueda E (Canby) Gary Stein (West Linn) Don Miller (Bend) Roger Telford (Goldendale, Wash.) Ron Nakata (Portland) Travis Gamble (Gig Harbor, Wash.) Super Senior Championship Locals T13 Bob Hausman (Black Butte Ranch) T20 Gary Hoagland (Bend) Open Division Top 10 Mark Wilson (Oakland) Stein Swenson (Bend) Geoff Pearce (Victoria, B.C.) Linden Brown (Seattle, Wash.) Rolf Olson (Salem) Steve Fordney (Portland) Roy St. Denis (Victoria, B.C.) Allan Woo (Richmond, B.C.) Michael Gibbins (Victoria, B.C.) Glen Clark (Medford) Open Division Locals T22 Robert Shelton (Sisters) T26 Ray Braun (Redmond) 30 Phil McCage (Redmond)

73 74 75 77 77 78 78 78 79 79 79 79 81 82 73 74 75 75 76 76 77 77 78 78 85 86 87

Club Results BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Men’s Daily Game, June 2 Gross Skins 1st Flight (9 handicap or less) — Charlie Rice, Nos. 2, 7, 16; Craig Smith, No. 15; Franz Miller, Nos. 3, 13; Carl Ryan, Nos. 6, 17; Tom Archey, No. 5. 2nd Flight (10 or higher) — Jim Rodgers, No. 14; Jeff Markham, No. 15; David Baker, No. 12; Skip Marlatt, No. 11. DESERT PEAKS Wednesday Twilight League, June 1 Team Match Play Standings The Good, Bad & Ugly, 29-11. Brunoe Logging, 26-14. Try To Farms, 23-17. Cental Oregon Insurance, 23-17. Earnest Electric, 17-23. Gruner Chevrolet, 23-17. Oregon Embroidery, 13-27. Billy Baroo’s, 15-25. Schmidt House, 17-23. Willow Creek Driving Range, 19-21. Bel Air Funeral Home, 25-15. Good Old Boys, 1822. Shielding International, 21-19. Keith Manufacturing, 11-29. KPs — Flight 1: Mike Gardner, Francisco Morales. Flight 2: Rawlin Richardson. Flight 3: Rich Madden, George Jones. LDs — Flight 1: Chuck Schmidt, Jordan Say. Flight 2: Craig Weigand. Flight 3: Jim Ellsbury. Thursday Men’s Club, June 2 Net Stroke Play 1, Dick Pliska, 62. 2, George Jones, 67. 3, Dean Ditmore, 69. KP — Skip Ditmore. Long Drive — Skip Ditmore. Friday Night Couples, June 3 Net Chapman 1, Dick & Patty Pliska, 28.3. 2, T.C. Conner & Verna Conner, 36.2. Duffer’s & Dolls Couples Tournament, June 3-5 Chapman Flight A — Gross: 1, David & Suz Anne Greig, 149. 2, Carl & Teresa Lindgren, 154. Net: 1 (tie), Curt Olson & Margaret Sturza, 128; Jim & Lexi Wyatt, 128. Flight B — Gross: 1, Fred & Sharon Blackman, 257. 2, Jay & Jackie Yake, 160. Net: 1, Brad Mondoy & Juanice Schram, 120. 2, Bob Ringering & Shirley Cowden, 127. Flight C — Gross: 1, Jim & Debbie Cooper, 163. 2, Jim Bauman & Betty Cook, 171. Net: 1, Ed & Carol McDaniel, 120. 2, Jim & Patricia Bushling, 126. Friday Night Kicker, Chapman — 1, Jim & Lexi Wyatt, 32. 2, Curt Olson & Margaret Sturza, 32.3. 3, Jim Bauman & Betty Cook, 32.7. 4, Scott Ditmore & Vicki Moore, 32.8. Saturday Team Game — 1, Scott & Nancy Hakala/Jim & Debbie Cooper/Don & Beverly McKinney, 115. 2, Curt Olson & Margaret Sturza/Bob Ringering & Shirley Cowden/Jim & Patricia Bushling, 119. 3 (tie), David & Suz Anne Greig/Jay & Jackie Yake/ Dean Ditmore & Karyn Gorman, 120; Wayne & Carolyn Mays/Jim Wyzard & Phyllis Rice/Ed & Carol McDaniel, 120. Saturday Men’s KPs — Flight A: Gary Gruner. Flight B: Fred Blackman. Flight C: Jim Cooper. Saturday Women’s KPs — Flight A: Margaret Sturza. Flight B: Beverly McKinney. Flight C: Pat Bushling. Saturday Accurate Drives — Men: Curt Olson. Women: Carolyn Mays. Sunday Team Game — 1 (tie), Carl & Teresa Lindgren/Bob Ringering & Shirley Cowden/Jim & Debbie Cooper, 110; Dave & Suz Anne Greig/Brad Mondoy & Juanice Schram/Bruce & Jeanette Houck, 110. 3, Wayne & Carolyn Mays/Fred & Sharon Blackman/Jim & Patricia Bushling, 113. Sunday KPs — Men: Jim Wyzard. Women: Sharon Blackman. Sunday Longest Putt — Men: Bob Ringering. Women: Carol McDaniels. Sunday Accurate Drive — Men: Brad Mondoy. Women: Debbie Cooper. EAGLE CREST Central Oregon Women’s Golf Association, June 7 18-Hole Stroke Play at Ridge Course Class A — Gross: 1, Debbie Hehn, 79. 2, Jan Sandburg, 81. 3, Pam Chase, 87. 4, Melinda Bailey, 89. Net: 1, Marie Olds, 64. 2 (tie), Jan Carver, 71; Kathleen Mooberry, 71; Karen Wintermyre, 71; Joan Springer-Wellman, 71. Class B — Gross: 1, Patt Murrill, 87. 2, Mary Clark, 89. 3, Veron Rygh, 94. 4 (tie), Chris Fitzgibbons, 97; Kathie Johnson, 97; Carol Still, 97. Net: 1, Linda Thurlow, 64. 2, Donna Loringer, 70. 3 (tie), Lael Cooksley, 72; Phyllis Lees, 72.

Class C — Gross: 1, Shirley Cowden, 97. 2, Joan Mathews, 99. 3, Lori Cooper, 100. 4, Shar Wanicheck, 102. Net: 1, Jan Bull, 67. 2, Nancy Dolby, 69. 3 (tie), Ruby Kraus, 72; Judi Price, 72; Darlene Ross, 72. Class D — Gross: 1, Joan Johnson, 99. 2 (tie), Linda Goebel, 103; Karyn Gorman, 103. 4 (tie), Pat Majchrowski, 104; Pat Porter, 104; Deborah Cox, 104. Net: 1 (tie), Carole Leonard, 70; Anita Lohman, 70. 3 (tie), Marge Mewell, 71; Nancy Peccia, 71. KPs — Class A: Debbie Hehn. Class B: Jerry Markham. Class C: Peggy O’Donnell. Class D: Gen Clements. Accurate Drive — Class A: Marie Olds. Class B: Chris Fitzgibbons. Class C: Ruby Kraus. Class D: Deborah Cox. THE GREENS AT REDMOND Men’s Club, June 2 Stroke Play A Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Clyde Foster, 26. 2 (tie), Marv Bibler, 27.5; Steve Rupp, 27.5. 4 (tie), Don Offield, 29; Don O’Malley, 29. 18 Holes: 1 (tie), Steve Adamski, 54; Steve Rupp, 54. 3, Don O’Malley, 55. 4, Marv Bibler, 57. B Flight — Nine Holes: 1, Miles Hutchins, 27. 2, Tom Zowney, 29.5. 3 (tie), Dave Mcnaughton, 30; Phil Weimar, 30. 18 Holes: 1, Miles Hutchins, 57. 2, Arlie Holm, 59. 3 (tie), Phil Backup, 61; Bob Haak, 61; Dave Williamson, 61. KPs — Don Offield, No. 5; Miles Hutchins, No. 9; Steve Rupp, No. 13; Don O’malley, No. 17. Golfer of the Week — Clyde Foster. LOST TRACKS Bend Park and Recreation District Golf League, June 6 Nine-Hole Scramble Week One Results — 1 (tie), MacSema, 29; Baxters Golf, 29. 3 (tie), Want to be Golfers, 32; Groomers Golf, 32. 5, Rossa Golf, 33. 6 (tie), High Desert Auto Supply, 34; Corey’s Bar & Grill, 34. 8 (tie), Where’s the cart girl?, 37; T-Shirts “R” Us, 37. 10, 2006 Champions, 38. 11, Microsemi Chippers, 39. 12, Flakey Foursome, 40. 13, Team West, 41. Season Standings — 1 (tie), MacSema, 20; Baxters Golf, 20. 3 (tie), Want to be Golfers, 17; Groomers Golf, 17. 5, Rossa Golf, 14. 6 (tie), High Desert Auto Supply, 12; Corey’s Bar & Grill, 12. 8 (tie), Where’s the cart girl?, 10; T-Shirts “R” Us, 10. 10, 2006 Champions, 8. 11, Microsemi Chippers, 7. 12, Flakey Foursome, 6. 13, Team West, 5. MEADOW LAKES Senior Men’s League, June 7 Net Scramble 1, Mark Jones/Marcus Butcher/Boyd Joyce, 29. 2, Harold Simpson/Ron Powell/Roy Irwin/Charlie McDermott, 30. KPs —Alan Jones, No. 4; Mark Jones, No. 8. PRINEVILLE GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Ladies Marmot, June 3-4 36-Hole Chapman A Division — Gross: 1, Marla Stafford/Shelly Hollis, 149. 2, Jodi Gast/Sarah Crofcheck, 151. Net: 1, Mary Lou Milne/Karen Peccia, 120. 2, Sue Bullock/Shelley Brown, 121. B Division — Gross: 1, Janic Grout/Nancy Lynch, 168. 2, Julie Woodbury/Linda McClellan, 171. Net: 1, Janie Cole/Alyse Maghan, 117. 2, Phyllis Hughes/Teresa Moore, 122. LDs — A Flight: Cathy Thompson. B Flight: Mary Joe Grimes. KPs — A Flight: Terrie Harris. B Flight: Lisa Kelso. Long Putts — Saturday: Janie Cole. B Flight: Michelle Hollis. SUNRIVER RESORT Men’s Golf Club, June 1 Net Stroke Play at Woodlands Flight 1 — 1, Mike Calhoun, 72. 2, Dave Hill, 73. 3, Dave Roath, 75. 4, Dan Frantz, 76. Flight 2 — 1, Roger Mink, 67. 2, Scott Lucas, 71. 3, Tom Woodruff, 72. 4, Robert Hill, 73. Flight 3 — 1, Dave Hennessy, 65. 2, Tom Swezey, 68. 3, Virgil Martin, 73. 4, Greg Cotton, 73. Flight 4 — 1, Clair Spauding, 66. 2, Dixon Freeman, 73. 3, Gary Brooks, 75. 4, Howard Potts, 78. Flight 5 — 1, Rober Bristow, 71. 2, John Hensley, 76. 3, Jim Hanson, 77. 4, Jim Ouchi, 77. Flight 6 — 1, Don Larson, 68. 2, Kanzuo Yutani, 74. 3, Tom Ellis, 78. 4, Tom Gleason, 80. KPs — Mike Calhoun, No.5; Greg Cotton, No. 7; David Roath, No. 12; Don Martin, No. 17. Individual — Gross: 1, Mike Calhoun, 74. Net: Dave Hennessy, 65. First Flight Skins — Gross: Mike Calhoun, 3; Nick Fancher, Dave Roath. Flights 2-6 Skins — Gross: Paul Grieco, 4; Tom Woodruff, 4; Robert Hill, 2. Net: Tim Sweezey, 3; Brian Holmes. 19-36 Handicap Skins — Gross: Gregg Cotton, Frank Vulliet. Net: Don Larson, 2; Tom Gleason, 2; Clair Spaulding, John Hensely, Dennis Wood. Sunriver Cup, June 2-3 Sunriver Resort vs. Crosswater Team Match Play at Woodlands, June 2; at Crosswater, June 3 Crosswater def. Sunriver, 17-9. OREGON GOLF ASSOCIATION 67th OGA Tournament of Champions, June 4-5 36-Hole Stroke Play at par-72 OGA Golf Course (Woodburn) Top 5 and Locals Men’s Division — 1, Damian Telles (The Dalles) 144. 2, Pat O’Donnell, 144. 3 (tie), Charlie Rice (Bend), 145; Eric Fiskum (Salem), 145. 5 (tie), Daniel Griffiths (Eugene), 146; Tim O’Neal (Vancouver, Wash.), 146. Locals: 48 (tie), Lance Kuykendall (Bend), 163. 56, Clyde Foster (Redmond), 168. 65, John Smallwood (Crooked River Ranch), 176. Women’s Division — 1, Brie Stone (Veneta), 145. 2, Lara Tennant (Portland), 150. 3, Monica Vaughn (Reedsport), 151. 4, Anita Wicks (Roseburg), 158. 5, Loree McKay (Portland), 160. Locals: 6 (tie), Madison Odiorne (Bend), 162. 9, Rosie Cook (Bend), 166.

Hole-In-One Report June 2 CROOKED RIVER RANCH Ray Schulke, Sisters No. 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-iron June 3 CROOKED RIVER RANCH Myrna Harris, Terrebonne No. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-iron June 5 DESERT PEAKS Sharon Blackman, Madras No. 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 yards . . . . . . . . . pitching wedge

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@ bendbulletin.com. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES Mondays through Wednesdays — Three-day junior golf camps at Black Butte Ranch begin on June 13. (A camp is also scheduled for Tuesday, July 5, through Thursday, July 7, following the July Fourth holiday.) Instructional camp tailored to the age and abilities of each student. Sessions run 2-3:30 p.m. each day for golfers ages 6-9, 2-4:30 p.m. for ages 10-17. Class sizes limited to 15 golfers. Cost is $100 for ages 6-9; $160 for ages 10-17. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch.com or call 541-595-1500. Tuesdays and Thursdays — Six-week junior golf pro-

L G  B   Tournaments • Local golfer takes Bend Ladies lead: Bend golfer Amy Anderson shot an even-par 72 Tuesday at Bend Golf and Country Club to take the first-round lead in the Bend Ladies Invitational. Anderson, a former Weber State University golfer under her maiden name Mombert, is three strokes ahead of defending champion Kailin Downs, a Mountain View High product and assistant coach for Oregon State’s women’s golf team. Bend’s Tiffany Schoning, a current Portland State golfer who won the tournament in 2009, and Rosie Cook, a member of Awbrey Glen Golf Club, are each four shots back. The final round of the Bend Ladies Invitational is scheduled to tee off today at 8:30 a.m. • Bend golfers play well at Tournament of Champions: A pair

of Bend golfers earned top-10 finishes at last week’s 67th Oregon Golf Association Tournament of Champions at OGA Golf Course in Woodburn. Charlie Rice, a member of Bend Golf and Country Club, shot 1-over-par 73-72—145 to fall just one shot short of a two-way playoff between eventual winner Damian Telles, of The Dalles, and Pat O’Donnell, of Happy Valley. Rice finished in a two-way tie for third place out of 69 golfers in the men’s division. Madison Odiorne, a 14-yearold from Bend and a member of Broken Top Club, finished in a tie for sixth place out of 20 golfers in the women’s division after shooting 18-over 86-76—162. The Tournament of Champions is a 36-hole gross stroke play competition. All golfers in the tournament were gross club champions a their home clubs in 2009 or 2010.0 — Bulletin staff reports

gram at Desert Peaks Golf Club in Madras begins on June 14. Informal instructional program is meant to introduce young golfers to fundamentals and etiquette, taught by volunteers from Desert Peaks’ men’s and women’s clubs. Cost is $25 for the entire program and includes a season-ending tournament. For more information, call Carl Lindgren at 541-325-1396 or Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368. Wednesdays — Junior golf camp at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters. The eight-week camp, which will be held every Wednesday from June 15 through Aug. 3, is designed for golfers between ages 7 and 17 years old. Camp will include lessons on etiquette, and golf from tee to green. Classes will be held from 8:30-10 a.m. each day. Cost is $200. For more information or to register, visit www.aspenlakes.com or call 541-549-4653. June 18 — Swing into Spring free golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Club in Prineville. Meadow Lakes head pro Lee Roberts offers a review of golf fundamentals from 9-10:30 a.m. Everyone is welcome. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. Mondays through Fridays — Junior half-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend are open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 7-13. Camp runs 9 a.m.-noon daily, and campers will work on golf fundamentals including stance and grip, with emphasis on rules and etiquette. Cost is $295. Camp dates: June 20-June 24 and July 11-15. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. June 20-23 — Junior golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville for golfers of all ability levels ages 7-17. Clinic split into one-hour shifts each morning, and classes are divided by age. Registration begins in May. Cost is $15 and includes games, prizes, and limited golf privileges after completion of the clinic. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. Mondays, Tuesdays — Two-day junior golf clinics at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend begin on June 20. Instructional camps open for golfers ages 6 to 16. Camps are scheduled to run 1:30-3 p.m. or 3:30-5 p.m. Camp dates: June 20-21, July 11-12, July 25-26, Aug. 8-9, Aug. 22-23. Cost is $49 per student. To register or for more information, call Widgi Creek at 541-382-4449 or e-mail Widgi assistant golf pro Josh Bowles at jbowles@pga.com. Mondays through Fridays — Pee Wee Golf Clinics at Juniper Golf Course are open to beginning golfers ages 5-7. Classes begin at noon each day and are expected to last between 30 to 40 minutes each. Camp dates: June 20-24, June 27-30, July 11-14, July 18-21, July 25-28, Aug. 1-4. Cost is $25 per student. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541-548-3121 or email him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Mondays or Wednesdays — Junior Golfer Classes at Juniper Golf Course are open to golfers ages 8-17 from June 20 through Aug. 3. Classes for beginners are scheduled from 1:30-2:45 p.m.; intermediate golfers from 3:30-4:45 p.m. Cost is $75 and classes are limited to 20 students. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541-548-3121 or email him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Mondays and Wednesdays — Tournament Player Classes at Juniper Golf Course are open to advanced golfers ages 8-17 from June 20 through Aug. 3. Classes begin at 5 p.m. Cost is $35 and classes are limited to four students. For more information or to register, call Juniper pro Stuart Allison at 541-548-3121 or email him at pro@stuartallisongolf.com. Wednesdays — Sunriver Resort will host junior golf camps every Wednesday from June 22 through Aug. 17. Conducted by Sunriver’s instructional staff, camps run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and include instruction on all phases of the game, as well as lunch and a nine-hole playing lesson. Cost is $125. For more information or to register, visit www.sunriver-resort. com or call Mike Palen, Sunriver’s director of instruction, at 541-788-4249. Fridays and Saturdays — Junior golf camp for advanced golfers at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. Camps are designed to prepare experienced golfers for competitive golf. Camps are scheduled to run 3-4:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Camp dates: June 24-25, July 8-9, July 22-23, Aug. 5-6, Aug. 19-20. Cost is $50 per student. To register or for more information, contact Eagle Crest director of instruction Tam Bronkey at 541504-3879 or e-mail him at tamb@eagle-crest.com. Mondays through Fridays — Junior full-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend are open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 9-16. Camps runs 9 a.m.4 p.m. daily, and campers will work on putting, chipping, bunker play and the full swing. Nine holes of golf accompanied by instructors each day also included. Cost is $595 and includes all golf activities, lunch daily and amenity package. Camp dates: June 27-July 1 and July 18-22. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. Tuesdays through Thursdays — Ladies-only golf school at Black Butte Ranch creates a comfortable learning environment for women golfers of all skill levels. Three-day school runs from 9-11:30 a.m. each day. Dates for school include July 12-14, July 19-21, July 26-28, and Aug. 2-4. Cost is $425 and includes lunch, nine holes of golf each day, and on-course instruction. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch. com or call 541-595-1500. Wednesdays through Fridays — Adult-child three-day golf camp at Black Butte Ranch. Camp includes two hours of instruction each day and one round of golf. Classes from 9 to 11 a.m. each day. Cost is $350 and includes instruction for one adult and one child. Additional children $150 each. Camp dates: Aug. 10-12, Aug. 17-19. For more information or to register, visit www.blackbutteranch.com or call 541-595-1500. ——— TOURNAMENTS June 11 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel. com/amateurtour. June 11-12 — The 27th annual Riverhouse Invitational at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend is a 36-hole, four-man scramble tournament that benefits the Every Kid Fund. Begins at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start each day. Gross and net prizes awarded in each division along with awards for closest to the pin, longest drive and a $10,000 hole-in-one prize. Cost is $198 and includes green fees, golf cart, lunch both days, and awards dinner Saturday night. Practice round Friday for an additional $35. Field limited to the first 136 golfers. For more information or to register, call 541-389-3111 or visit www.riverhouse.com. June 12 — 2011 Scrimmage on the Links benefit golf tournament at Sunriver Resort’s Woodlands course. Four-person scramble begins with a 2 p.m. shotgun start. Entry fee: $150 per person or $600 per team and includes dinner, beverages, gifts and prizes. Benefits the Bend, Mountain View and Summit high school football teams. To register or for more information, contact Bend High football coach Craig Walker at 541-383-6300, Mountain View High coach Steve Turner at 541-647-0202, or Summit High coach Jerry Hackenbruck at 541-647-4802. June 12 — Oregon Rush Soccer hosts its fifth annual Golf Outing at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Entry fee for the fourperson scramble is $125 per player or $500 per team and includes green fees, cart, dinner and awards. Event, contest and hole sponsorships available. Proceeds benefit the Oregon Rush scholarship fund and field development fund. For more information or to register, visit www.oregonrush.com, or e-mail Keith Bleyer at keith@oregonrush.com. June 12 — The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort Junior is an Oregon Golf Association junior tournament at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino in Warm Springs. For more information or to register, call the OGA at 866-981-4653 or visit www.oga.org. June 12 — The Rex Underwood Memorial Golf Tournament at Quail Run Golf Club in La Pine. Four-person scramble benefits the Gilchrist Booster Club and Gilchrist High School student activities, sports and clubs. Cost is $55 per person. For more information, call Meria Paige at 541-433-2713. June 14-16 — Oregon Open Invitational at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend is an annual Pacific Northwest PGA event that

features 52 teams of two professional golfers and two amateur golfers competing in 36 holes of team competition and in a 54-hole individual stroke-play tournament. After the second round, field is cut to low 70 players. Competition handicap of 18 (although players may have higher handicaps). Admission and parking are free for spectators. For more information on the tournament or sponsorship opportunities, visit www.pnwpga.com or call the Pacific Northwest PGA at 360-456-6496. June 16-17 — The Central Oregon Open at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond is a four-person scramble tournament at the Ridge and Resort courses to benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities. Tournament begins at 8 a.m. Cost is $125 per player or $500 per team and includes green fees, cart and barbecue lunch. Deadline to register is June 1. Sponsorship opportunities available. All proceeds benefit Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Oregon. For more information or to register, call 541-318-4950, e-mail mardibruce@bendbroadband.com, or download the registration form at www.centraloregonopen.com. June 17 — Leadership Bend’s Chip-in for Children 100Hole Golf Marathon at Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Event begins at 7:30 a.m., and object is to finish as many golf holes as possible, up to 100. Cost to play is $2,500 per person, which includes golf, cart, prizes, breakfast, lunch, snacks and threecourse dinner for two. Proceeds from the event benefit Central Oregon youth programs and children’s charities including Cascade Youth and Family Services, YouthBuild (First Story), Family Access Network, Healthy Beginnings, and Children First for Oregon. For more information on sponsorship opportunities, visit www.bendchamber.org/LSB-golfmarathon. June 17 — Aspen Lakes Outlaw Open at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters is a tournament fundraiser for the Sisters High School football team. Four-person scramble begins with a 1 p.m. shotgun. Steak dinner and auction following the round. Register as a team or individually. Entry fee is $125 per player. Includes green fees, cart and dinner. For more information, call Suzanne Lind at 541-549-4045 or e-mail her at suzanne.lind@sisters. k12.or.us. June 17-19 — Best of Bend Best Ball at Pronghorn Club in Bend, the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte, and Tetherow Golf Club in Bend. Tournament is an amateur two-man best ball. The first round starts with a 1 p.m. shotgun start at Pronghorn, followed by 9 a.m. starts at Brasada and Tetherow. Cost is $550 per golfer or $1,100 per team and includes three rounds of golf, cocktail reception, lunch, and an awards dinner. For more information visit www.bestofbendbestball.com or call tournament coordinator Stein Swenson at 541-318-5155. June 18-19 — Central Oregon Scramble is a three-person scramble at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. For more information, call 541-548-3121, or download an entry form at www. playjuniper.com. June 19 — Father-Son-Daughter Golf Tourney at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Scotch Ball Tournament begins at 9 a.m. For more information or to register, call Meadow Lakes at 541-447-7113. June 20 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 23 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. June 24-26 — 2011 Mirror Pond Men’s Amateur Invitational, Central Oregon’s oldest golf tournament, at Bend Golf and Country Club attracts top amateur male golfers from Oregon and beyond for 36 holes of individual stroke-play competition over two days. A practice round is scheduled for June 24, followed by tournament play on both Saturday and Sunday. Invited guest entry fee is $220 and includes practice round, tee prize, hosted tournament dinner, stroke-play event, and additional contests. The field is limited to the first 140 paid entries. Players can register in three divisions: regular (age 18 and older), senior (age 50 and older) and super senior (age 65 and older). To register, call the Bend G&CC golf shop at 541-382-2878, e-mail at bendgolfshop@bendgolfclub.com or visit www.bendgolfclub.com. June 25 — The Central Oregon Builders Association is hosting two golf tournaments in one day at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend. Four-person shamble tees off with a 7:30 a.m. shotgun start. Four-person scramble tees off at 1:30 p.m. Cost is $125 per person or $450 per team to play in one tournament, or $200 per person or $800 per team to play in both tournaments. Fee includes lunch, tee and raffle prizes. Proceeds to benefit the COBA Government Affairs Program. For more information or to register, call Andy High at 541-389-1058, or e-mail him at andyh@coba.org. June 25 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel.com/amateurtour. June 25 — St. Thomas Academy Golf Tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Challenge Course in Redmond. Scramble begins with 8:30 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $75 per player or $300 per team and includes green fees, cart and barbecue lunch. Individual contests and prizes also included. All proceeds go to educational materials for the children at St. Thomas Academy in Redmond. For more information or to register, call St. Thomas at 541-548-3785. June 25 — The 17th Annual Three Sisters Open Women’s Golf Tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course in Redmond. The team scramble begins with an 8 a.m. shotgun start and is for women golfers of all abilities. Proceeds will benefit Quota International of Central Oregon and Bend Women’s Scholarship Fund. Cost is $100 per player and includes golf, use of a cart, continental breakfast, lunch, tee gift and prizes. Space is limited and entries will be accepted on a first-come basis. For more information or to register, call Kathy Wuest at 541-3822421 or e-mail her at kwuest@lumbins.com. June 27 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association tournament at Crooked River Ranch. Tee times begin at 8 a.m. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 27-July 1 — Rolex Tournament of Champions at Crosswater Club in Sunriver. American Junior Golf Association tournament features top boys and girls from around the country and beyond to play in 72 holes of stroke play with a 54-hole cut. For more information, call the AJGA at 770-868-4200 or visit www.ajga.org. June 28 — Central Oregon Junior Golf Association’s Summer Golf Experience at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Event is for 6- to 8-year-olds. Players must be at Awbrey Glen by 3 p.m., and golf begins at 3:30 p.m. Cost is $15 to register for three events, plus an $8 per-event fee. For more information, call Woodie Thomas at 541-598-4653, e-mail cojga@hotmail.com, or visit www.cojga.com. June 28 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. June 30 — Dollars for Scholars golf tournament at Eagle Crest Resort’s Resort Course in Redmond is hosted by the Redmond Realtors Association. Four-person scramble begins with 9 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $65 per person and includes cart, range balls and lunch. Proceeds to benefit the Redmond Realtors Scholarship Fund. To register or for more information, call Tina DeCamp at 541-504-7453. July 7 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com.

Continued from D1 It does not hurt that Desert Peaks is cheap to play, and at 3,231 yards from the back tees, plenty long enough to be considered real golf, even if the course has few obstacles in play. And the greens are well maintained, a necessity for a round to be enjoyable, no matter the cost. I played the course on a sunny and mild weekday. And like most others on that day, I was playing as a single. Desert Peaks — which does offer some panoramic views of the Cascades — seems made for golfers playing alone. Because it’s flat, Desert Peaks is easy to walk. And because the design has few hazards, it is easy to play the course quickly. Heck, I was cruising along, following another single. At least until my adventure on the fifth hole. How poorly played was that hole? The tee shot was a pull left into one of a few small pines left of the fairway about 60 yards from the tee box. Then I doubled down with the second shot, another dead pull that put me well left of a water hazard (one of only two on the course) and into the fairway on the parallel second hole. Now about 50 yards left of the correct fairway — not to mention a forced carry over a water hazard and the first green, neither of which should be in play on the third shot — I finally connected and neared safe ground. Lying three with a shade more than 200 yards still to go, a miracle 3-hybrid put me about seven feet from the hole for par. It was no easy shot with water right of the green. So what happened next? Of course, I missed the putt. Desert Peaks might be forgiving, but that is not enough to completely overcome bad golf.

Difficulty of course For most golfers, Desert Peaks is a breeze to play. Water comes into play on the approach shot to the first green and twice on the fifth hole. But for the most part, the course is wide open with generous fairways and few trees. Six holes have subtle doglegs, but with trees not an issue, those turns are relatively easy to navigate. Shorter hitters, however, might have trouble with Desert Peaks’ length, which ranges from 2,767 yards to 3,231 yards.

Favorite hole

Desert Peaks SCORECARD Hole Par Yardage No. 1 Par 4 353 yards No. 2 Par 4 355 yards No. 3 Par 4 392 yards No. 4 Par 4 412 yards No. 5 Par 5 561 yards No. 6 Par 3 172 yards No. 7 Par 4 316 yards No. 8 Par 3 101 yards No. 9 Par 5 569 yards Out Par 36 3,231 yards *All distances from back tees

that collects wayward shots that miss left or long, making it easily the most hazardous approach at Desert Peaks.

Strategy With few trees and even fewer hazards, there is little to prevent golfers from being aggressive. Most golfers can tee off with driver on seven of nine holes, and the 316-yard seventh hole is reachable from the tee if the wind is at a golfer’s back. Neither par 5 (Nos. 5 and 9) is reachable for most golfers, but neither is troublesome either. A driver followed by a 3-wood should leave a simple approach on both holes.

Extras Desert Peaks’ small clubhouse does not have a bar or restaurant, but it does offer snacks, drinks and some equipment. Its mediumsized putting green is just off the first tee box, which is always convenient when waiting to tee off. For those golfers who want to warm up before teeing off, Desert Peaks does have an affiliated driving range. But plan ahead, because the driving range, named Willow Creek, is nestled in some farmland just east of downtown Madras and about four miles away from Desert Peaks.

Value At $10 for a weekday nine, Desert Peaks’ green fees are the lowest of any course in Central Oregon. Even during weekends Desert Peaks is inexpensive: just $20 for 18 holes or $12 for nine. The clubhouse offers some deals, too. At $1.50 per can, Desert Peaks offers some of the least expensive beer in the area, particularly at a golf course. Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

The par-4 first hole, a 353-yard dogleg left, has the most interesting green at Desert Peaks. The fairway offers plenty of room, and a decently struck drive will put a golfer at around 100 yards from pay dirt. But the green is surrounded by a pond

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D6 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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T O G R EEN

G W PGA TOUR ST. JUDE CLASSIC Site: Memphis, Tenn. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: TPC Southwind (7,239 yards, par 70). Purse: $5.6 million. Winner’s share: $1,008,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, noon-3 p.m., 5:30-8:30 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday-Sunday, noon-3 p.m.). Last year: England’s Lee Westwood won his second PGA Tour title, beating Sweden’s Robert Karlsson with a birdie on the fourth hole of a playoff. Last week: Steve Stricker won the Memorial for his 10th PGA Tour title and sixth in three years. He moved to No. 4 in the world, becoming the highestranked American for the first time. Matt Kuchar and Brandt Jobe tied for second, a stroke back.

Alastair Grant / The Associated Press

Luke Donald, of England, is one of three joint favorites — along with Lee Westwood and Phil Mickelson — to win the U.S. Open now that Tiger Woods has pulled out of the competition because of lingering issues with his left leg.

More players shining in Tiger’s absence By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — As far as William Hill is concerned, all bets are off. At least when it comes to Tiger Woods and the U.S. Open. Not long after Woods decided to sit out the next major and rest his ailing left leg, the British bookmaker announced Tuesday it was refunding all wagers that had been placed on Woods at Congressional. The joint favorites now are Luke Donald, Lee Westwood and Phil Mickelson at 12-to-1. One of them is No. 1 in the world, the other one used to be No. 1 and the third is the most talented player of that bunch, with four majors and five runner-up finishes in the U.S. Open. “Without him,” Hill spokesman Rupert Adams said of Woods, “the field looks very open.” Golf has looked like that just about every week over the last 18 months, even when Woods was playing. There was some concern going into the start of the 2010 season — when Woods disappeared to try to repair a personal life that was in shambles — that golf was in deep trouble without its biggest star. But dating to his last win in November 2009 at the Australian Masters, a new generation of players is starting to emerge. Graeme McDowell won the U.S. Open last year, setting off a streak of four first-time major champions. Rory McIlroy won at Quail Hollow last year with a 62 in the final round, just two days before he turned 21. Matteo Manassero won his second European Tour event two days before his 18th birthday. If not for being impatient at Pebble Beach and unaware he was in a bunker at Whistling Straits, 26-year-old Dustin Johnson might have won two majors last year. Martin Kaymer won

the PGA Championship at 25 and became the youngest player since Woods to be No. 1 in the world. Bubba Watson has won three times on the PGA Tour in the last year. Rickie Fowler was the first PGA Tour rookie to play in the Ryder Cup, where he birdied the last four holes. The list is long. And maybe the absence of Woods — if not from the game, from his game — has something to do with that. Jim Furyk took exception to the notion that this latest crop of talent has more good players than the previous generation. Furyk came along in the era of Mickelson, Westwood, Ernie Els, David Duval, Justin Leonard, Darren Clarke. Not until they won majors or became No. 1 in the world did they get the same amount of attention as this generation because every conversation started with Tiger Woods. As for what seems to be greater parity in golf? “We’ve always had it,” Furyk said. “Take Tiger out of there, and it was an open ball game. If he doesn’t win 14 majors, it’s an open ball game. And now that he hasn’t been playing, it’s wide open.” Imagine if Woods had never climbed down from a high chair and started swinging a golf club. Donald joined some exclusive company when he won at Wentworth to become only the 15th player to be No. 1 in the 25 years of the world ranking. To put the achievement into perspective, 62 players have won majors since the world ranking began in April 1986. That number is skewed, of course, because Woods has hogged the top spot for nearly 12 years. If not for Woods, turnover in the world ranking would not be unusual, and the hype over No. 1 might not have been so great.

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Among those who would have been No. 1 if Woods were not around — Mickelson, Furyk, Colin Montgomerie, Davis Love III, Steve Stricker, Sergio Garcia and Mark O’Meara. “It’s funny how people quickly categorize a player for winning one, two or three tournaments as a great player,” O’Meara said. “I don’t get that. I won 16 times, and I think I’m a good player, I’ve had a wonderful career for me. Where do you draw the line?” Stewart Cink has been in Woods’ shadow since he was a teenager. He recalls one year being at a junior tournament, and when his round was over, he noticed his mother headed back onto the golf course because she wanted to watch Woods. “Maybe he’s won so many tournaments that there were less available to win,” Cink said. “He was definitely the lightning rod of golf, and still is for different reasons. I think he set the standard higher, so that Jim, me or anyone in our age group, if we had the same career and you take away Tiger, we might have got more respect than we got.” It looks as though a new generation is ready to take over because Woods is not around. Had his personal life and health crumbled five years ago, there might have been just as many players ready to thrive. “It seems like there’s a huge transition going on, only because No. 1 is wide open,” Curtis Strange said. “We’re going to have that until Tiger comes back. There will be a revolving door for No. 1 in the world. But if Tiger came back tomorrow and played like he used to — or not even as good as he used to — he’d dominate this game. Will he do that? I don’t know.” There were questions whether Woods could get his game back when he was playing. It’s even tougher to answer when he’s not.

Notes: The U.S. Open is next week at Congressional in Bethesda, Md. ... Westwood, ranked No. 2 in the world, is attempting to defend his title. He won the European Tour’s Ballantine’s Championship in South Korea and the Asian Tour’s Indonesian Masters in consecutive weeks in late April and early May.

Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Royal Park I Roveri (7,272 yards, par 72).

NATIONWIDE TOUR REX HOSPITAL OPEN

Purse: $2.2 million. Winner’s share: $366,075.

Site: Raleigh, N.C.

Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, 6:30-10 a.m.; Saturday, 5:30-8:30 a.m., 1:30-3:30 p.m.; Sunday, 5:30-9 a.m., 1:30-3:30 p.m.).

Course: TPC Wakefield Plantation (7,257 yards, par 71).

Last year: Sweden’s Fredrik Andersson Hed won his first European Tour title, beating England’s David Horsey by two strokes. Last week: Sweden’s Alexander Noren won the Wales Open for his second European Tour title, closing with a 1-under 70 for a two-stroke victory at Celtic Manor. Notes: Italian stars Matteo Manassero, Francesco Molinari and Costantino Rocca are in the field along with Hed, Darren Clarke, Colin Montgomerie and Thomas Bjorn. ... The Saint Omer Open is next week in France, opposite the U.S. Open.

Schedule: Thursday-Sunday.

Purse: $550,000. Winner’s share: $99,000. Television: None. Last year: John Riegger won the rainshortened tournament by five strokes for his second Nationwide Tour title. Riegger, then 46, finished 54 holes at 20 under. Last week: Steve Wheatcroft won the Melwood Prince George’s County Open with the lowest 72-hole score in Nationwide Tour history, finishing at 29-under 255 for a tour-record 12stroke victory. Notes: Wheatcroft failed to qualify for the U.S. Open, withdrawing after an opening 74 at Woodmont in Rockville, Md.

LPGA TOUR LPGA STATE FARM CLASSIC Site: Springfield, Ill. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Panther Creek Country Club (6,746 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.7 million. Winner’s share: $255,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 3:305:30 p.m.; 9-11 p.m.; Friday, 3:30-5:30 p.m., 11 p.m.-1 a.m.; Saturday, 4-6:30 p.m., 9:30-11:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4:306:30 p.m., 9-11 p.m.). Last year: Cristie Kerr won in a Monday finish, beating Anna Nordqvist and Na Yeon Choi by a stroke. Kerr shot 6767-63-69 to finish at 22 under. Last week: Brittany Lincicome won the ShopRite LPGA Classic for her fourth tour title, birdieing the final hole to beat Kerr and Jiyai Shin by a stroke. Notes: Lincicome and the fourth-ranked Kerr are in the field along with No 1. Yani Tseng, No. 2 Suzann Pettersen, No. 3 Shin, No. 5 Choi, No. 6 I.K. Kim, No. 7 Sun Ju Ahn, No. 8 Karrie Webb, No. 10 Michelle Wie and No. 11 Paula Creamer.

CHAMPIONS TOUR GREATER HICKORY CLASSIC Site: Conover, N.C. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: Rock Barn Golf and Spa, Jones Course (7,090 yards, par 72). Purse: $1.75 million. Winner’s share: $262,500. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 9:3011:30 a.m., 9-11 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., 6:30-9:30 p.m.). Last year: Gary Hallberg won his first Champions Tour title, closing with an 11-under 61 for a one-stroke victory over Fred Couples. Last week: Bob Gilder won the Principal Charity Classic in Iowa for his 10th Champions Tour title. The 60-year-old Gilder made a 30-foot birdie putt on the final hole, then escaped with a one-stroke victory when Mark Brooks bogeyed the hole. Notes: Fred Funk qualified for the U.S. Open, shooting 67-68 on Monday at Woodmont in Rockville, Md. ... Brooks is making his third Champions Tour start. ... The tour is off next week. Play will resume June 24-26 with the Dick’s Sporting Goods Open in Endicott, N.Y.

EUROPEAN TOUR ITALIAN OPEN Site: Turin, Italy.

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THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8, 2011

Who’s got Central Oregon’s Our panel of beer-loving experts judged the flagship IPA from each local brewery in a blind taste test. Here are their overall ratings, out of five. ABV = Alcohol By Volume; IBU = International Bitterness Units

THE JUDGES

THE BREWS

TOM GILLES,

BARBARA PETTERSEN,

GEOFF MARLOWE,

EVAN HENDRIX,

JON ABERNATHY,

co-owner of The Brew Shop in Bend

geneticist and beer blogger

owner of The Abbey Pub in Bend

beer specialist for Whole Foods Market in Bend

Web developer and beer blogger

4.2 FAV

1st Old Mill Brew Wërks Irreverence IPA

4.5 (out of 5)

3 “Some pepper aftertaste. Clean.”

“Well balanced. Finishes dry. Great example of American/NW IPA.”

FAV

4.5

“Nice hop flavor balanced with maltiness.”

7.2% ABV, 74 IBUs

4.16

2

nd

Three Creeks Brewing Co. Hoodoo Voodoo IPA

4.5 “Hop forward. Sweet malt. Dry finish.”

4

FAV

FAV

4.3

“Sharp bitterness. Very floral. Balanced.”

“Very drinkable. Great hops.”

6.2% ABV, 82 IBUs

3.74

3

rd

Silver Moon Brewing Hop Knob IPA

4

3 “Dry hop flavor with little to no malt.”

“Another good NW IPA. Less hop forward.”

4.2 “Medium hop flavor; earthy.”

5.9% ABV, 40 IBUs

3.72

10 Barrel Brewing Co. Apocalypse IPA

3.5

4

FAV

“Light hop front, rich malt backbone. Very good.”

“Very drinkable. A little too much bitter on the finish.”

4 “Strong hop bitterness. More English style.”

FAV

4.5

“Solid example of an American IPA. Big hop presence, well balanced with malt, and clean.”

“Good example4 of the style; big beer but balanced hop aroma. Bitterness with malt sweetness.”

FAV

“More of an 4 English style in body and malt, NW in hop profile. Fruity/ earthy but nice hop bitterness.”

3.5

“Fruity, big toasted malt, slightly sweet, mildly bitter finish.”

FAV

4.5

“Very good — citrus hops, sweet malt and really well balanced.”

4

FAV

“Clean, balanced, florally hoppy and quite good.”

3.5 “Earthy, spicy bitterness that’s soft and clean; a bit sweet.”

3.6 “Spicy hops with nice earthy bitterness; English style.”

6.5% ABV, 65 IBUs

3.46

Boneyard Beer RPM IPA

“Good hop 4 character. Dry finish. Balanced beer. A little young.”

2 “Sweet malt, earthy. Flavors (hop/malt) not blended well.”

4.3 “Medium NW IPA. A little sweet, but nice.”

“Pretty well balanced with good hop aroma, faint bitterness.”

4

3 “Not very bitter. Hops are more peppery, earthy.”

7.5% ABV, 75 IBUs

3.36

Bend Brewing Co. Elk Lake IPA

3.5 “Nice beer. Could use more finish hop. Bitter finish.”

3

3.8 “High hop bitterness. Could use more malt.”

“Hops too light in front. Good hops linger.”

6.3% ABV, 65 IBUs

3.08

McMenamins Sunflower IPA

4 “Drinkable, balanced. Dry finish.”

2 “Too peppery. Not enough hops.”

3.9 “Malt forward. Sweet. Some fruitiness.”

6.71% ABV, 53 IBUs

3.04

3.5 “Sweet, malty, cloying.”

3 “Pleasant to drink. Light on hops.”

3.7 “Good hop aroma. Too sweet, more like an amber.”

Deschutes Brewery Inversion IPA

3.5

“Very drinkable, 3 seems a bit light but would make a nice warm weather beer.”

“Very floral 3 and pretty clean, slightly earthy. Not enough malt. More of a hoppy pale.”

2.5

“Very floral and grassy nose, faint bitterness and earthy malt profile.”

2.5

“Big citrus pop upfront, but a lot of fruitiness right away. A lot of malt on this beer.”

“A little too sweet. Not very hoppy.”

2.5 “Over-balanced to malts, sweet and fruity — not very IPA like.”

6.8% ABV, 80 IBUs

2.8

Cascade Lakes Brewing IPA 6% ABV, 65 IBUs

3.5 “Easy drinker. A safe IPA for new people to try.”

2 “Mostly caramel malt; sweet, very little hop until the end.”

3.5 “High hop flavor. High malt flavor. More of a pale ale.”

“Very mild hop flavor and low bitterness. More like a solid American pale.”

2

“Light, crisp 3 and dry; hops come in at back of the mouth. Late bitterness. Doesn’t ‘pop.’”

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

During The Bulletin’s IPA test, we tried to be as fair as possible. Above, Barbara Pettersen tastes from a plastic cup. Each cup was presented unlabeled, and the beer was poured from growlers filled less than 24 hours before.

Tasting more an art than science By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

Give thanks Central Oregonians, for we live in a beer drinking paradise. In fact, what we might consider a problem others would accept with envy: There are so many beers offered among nine local breweries that it’s hard to keep track of which seasonal brew is coming out when without a flow chart. And several other newbie brewers are flirting with the scene, including soon-to-open No. 10 GoodLife Brewing Co. It’s enough to make a beer consumer wonder: Is there a way to know which brewery makes some of the best suds in Central Oregon? How would they fare in a face-off? The answer, of course, is sort of. Each brewery makes What is an array of an IPA? beers, appealWhat is an India ing to differpale ale? It’s in ent palates, at the hops, shown different times above, Page E6 of year. Any results would be subjective, based only in the present and nuanced by myriad factors. Nonetheless, we at The Bulletin couldn’t resist the idea of tasting local brews side-by-side. So we recruited five local beer aficionados to participate in a blind tasting of brews from all nine local proprietors. None of the tasters are employed by local breweries. But three of them are in the business of beer, and all of them have knowledge of and passion for the lovely liquid (see “Our tasters”). Then we picked one of the most popular and ubiquitous beer styles as our subject, the India pale ale, commonly referred to as IPA. While a number of the breweries offer several versions of IPA, such as a bold, heavily hopped Imperial, we opted to put to tasters the baseline version presently available on tap. We got the tasters together and put scorecards in front of them. They also had as a reference the characteristic guidelines from the American Homebrewers Association’s Beer Judge Certification Program. We kept the breweries unidentified until the very end. They swirled and sniffed and tasted, pondered and penned their thoughts. They launched into a few lively discussions, too, discussing sweetness, bitterness, aromas and malt. Overall, two themes emerged. See Taste test / E6


TELEVI SI ON

E2 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Single church teacher dodging dates should say ‘never on Sunday’ Dear Abby: I am a 48-year-old single male. I teach an adult Sunday school class. Two women who have joined our group have made it plain they would like to have a romantic relationship with me. I’m not sure how to handle this. I’d like to meet someone special, too, but I’m not certain this is the right way. Please advise. — Troubled Teacher in the South Dear Troubled Teacher: Tell the women you have a policy that you do not date your students. To do otherwise would be distracting and disruptive to the class. Once they have “graduated,” there is nothing to stop you from dating both of them. One may turn out to be that someone special you have been looking for, but if she’s not, you’ll have saved everyone from unnecessary drama. Dear Abby: We are a gay couple who have been together for 37 years. We were recently invited to the wedding of a close nephew in San Antonio. The invitation was addressed to us both, and we flew 5,000 miles to attend. At the ceremony, my partner, “Alan,” was seated in front with the groom’s family. While we were being shown to our seats, I was told by the groom’s father, “Sorry. You can sit somewhere else.” Alan and I were deeply offended. How should we express our displeasure and prevent this from happening again when the niece marries? Do we have a right to say anything? — Snubbed in Honolulu Dear Snubbed: Of course you do. The groom’s father was extremely rude to separate you. The person who issued the wedding invitation should be informed of how offensive it was. And if it happens again, the two

DEAR ABBY of you should respond, “We are a couple, and we sit together.” Dear Abby: My wife is a cancer survivor who is doing well. When a friend or relative learns she had cancer, a common response is, “Yeah, I knew someone who had the same kind of cancer. It was awful. It came back six months later and he/she died an agonizing, terrible death.” Abby, it’s hard to remain polite around such thoughtless, moronic individuals when they blurt out something like this in my wife’s presence. I can’t imagine the fear she must experience hearing such remarks. Can you offer an effective retort? — Baffled By the Ignorance Dear Baffled: Remarks such as you have described usually are made when people don’t know what to say, so they blurt out the first thing that comes to mind. A polite response would be, “Thanks for your concern. My wife is doing great.” Of course the appropriate thing for friends and relatives to say would be, “I’m so glad you’re better — I care about you and I was worried.” To raise the subject of someone who died from the disease is inappropriate and extremely insensitive. There’s an old Portuguese proverb: Never mention a rope in the house of a man who has been hanged. It definitely applies here. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Chefs make reality TV palatable By Mekeisha Madden Toby Detroit News

Celebrity chefs are kitchen rock stars melting our hearts and pleasing our palates with their sharp knives and cool names. Try saying Rocco or Giada without smiling a little. And no medium captures their cultural prevalence better than television. In a reality TV era where angry housewives and New Jersey hot-tub hoppers threaten to rob us of our sanity and decency, foodies can escape by simply turning to their favorite chefs and jotting down a recipe or two. Even when celebrity chefs aren’t doling out cooking tips, they’re entertaining us by recruiting new chefs, interviewing movie stars or attempting to improve our eating habits. “Celebrity chef shows are like theater and we love to watch them perform,” said Karen Shiffman, executive producer of National Public Radio’s “On Point with Tom Ashbrook,” which boasts gourmet luminaries such as Alton Brown of Food Network fame as past guests. “When you watch them, it’s fun to imagine yourself cooking the same dishes and sometimes you can.” To better understand the celebrity chef phenomenon, glance at a programming grid. Gordon Ramsay has three shows on Fox, two of them airing this summer. Then there’s Jamie Oliver, whose diet makeover show, “Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution,” is attracting millions of viewers on ABC. Not one to be left out, Rocco DiSpirito’s new series, “Rocco’s Dinner Party,” will allow him to chat up celebrities while aspiring chefs and professional cooks churn out sophisticated menus for him and his famous friends. “Rocco’s Dinner Party” debuts on

ALWAYS STIRRING UP SOMETHING GOOD

Call 541-389-9690

On TV ‘M ASTERCHEF’ When: 8 p.m. Mondays Where: Fox

‘JAMIE OLIVER’S FOOD REVOLUTION’ When: 9 p.m. Fridays Where: ABC

‘ROCCO’S DINNER PARTY’

The Associated Press

When: 11 p.m. June 15 Where: Bravo

‘ANTHONY BOURDAIN: NO RESERVATIONS’ When: 9 p.m. July 11 Where: Travel Channel Bravo on June 15. In the fall, Mario Batali’s new talk and cooking show “The Chew” replaces “All My Children.” But Ramsay is a reluctant star. Although his show “MasterChef” kicked off the second season this week, he says the public’s love affair with celebrity chefs has less to do with him and the other bignamed gastronomical gods and goddesses and more to do with people’s genuine love of food. “When you can relate to something you can see on TV, it inspires you,” said Ramsay in a teleconference earlier this week. “People are fascinated with food and they want to do better in their own homes and I think that’s quite refreshing. “It’s quite a subdued mood out there in terms of the economy. Everyone’s had a tough few years but cooking is something that doesn’t cost that much but can deliver so much.”

‘HELL’S KITCHEN’

Beyond the stove Culinary superstars shouldn’t be measured just by the number of shows they host. These days, they’ve moved beyond the kitchen, acting as spokespeople for various products. Crest hired celebrity chef Emeril Lagasse to sell toothpaste, cabinet manufacturer Merillat turned to “Top Chef Masters” host Curtis Stone to endorse dream kitchens and Subway executives looked to Robert Irvine to promote their new breakfast sandwiches at a recent event. Product endorsement is just one way to become a household name. On Bravo’s new “Rocco’s Dinner Party,” the name and handsome face behind the show is selling a glamorous lifestyle.

Mix of cool, competition Every week, DiSpirito will in-

When: 9 p.m. July 19 Where: Fox

vite famous and stylish types to chat and break bread with him. Meanwhile, three chefs compete against one another to create tantalizing meals and dining experiences for DiSpirito and his guests. The winning chef walks away with $20,000. The competition is one component of “Rocco’s Dinner Party.” The other is the cool people with whom he’ll be keeping time. The list includes Oscar-winning actress and performer Liza Minnelli, composer Marvin Hamlisch, comedian Sandra Bernhard and professional funnyman D.L. Hughley. “We’re not trying to create a salon of the most fascinating people in the world,” DiSpirito, 44, said. “We’re just trying to have fun.”

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Cake Boss ‘PG’ My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding ’ ‘PG’ My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding ’ ‘PG’ My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding ’ ‘PG’ Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon NY Ink ’ ‘14’ Å Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å The Mentalist Red Tide ‘14’ Å The Mentalist Ladies in Red ’ ‘14’ Franklin & Bash (N) ‘14’ Å Men of a Certain Age (N) ‘MA’ Å Franklin & Bash ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Bones Spaceman in a Crater ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Looney Tunes Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Border Patrol (N) Border Patrol (N) Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v Food Man v Food Sand Masters (N) Sand Masters Mancations ‘PG’ Mancations ‘PG’ 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 The Jeffersons ‘PG’ Å NCIS Lt. Jane Doe ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Under Covers ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Sharif Returns ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Friends and Lovers ‘PG’ Å NCIS A blind photographer. ’ ‘PG’ NCIS The Curse ’ ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS The Weak Link ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “The Brothers” (2001) Morris Chestnut, D.L. Hughley. Premiere. ’ Single Ladies ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ ››› “The Brothers” (2001) Morris Chestnut. ’ Single Ladies ’ 191 48 37 54 (4:30) Love & Hip Hop Reunion ‘14’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) ››› “Michael Jackson’s This Is It” 2009 ‘PG’ (6:20) ››› “The Princess and the Frog” 2009 ’ ‘G’ ›› “Radio” 2003, Drama Cuba Gooding Jr., Ed Harris. ’ ‘PG’ Å (9:50) ››› “Zombieland” 2009 Woody Harrelson. ‘R’ Buffy-Slayer ››› “Working Girl” 1988, Romance-Comedy Melanie Griffith. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Chase” 1994 Charlie Sheen. ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “Working Girl” 1988, Romance-Comedy Melanie Griffith. ‘R’ Å ›› “The Chase” 1994 Charlie Sheen. ‘PG-13’ Å Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania ‘14’ Ellismania ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Hometown Throwdown Ellismania ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ GolfNow D.C. Top 10 Top 10 (N) Haney Project Haney Project 19th Hole Golf Central Quest-Card Top 10 Haney Project Haney Project 19th Hole Quest-Card 19th Hole The Waltons The Burden ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ (4:30) › “Swimfan” 2002, Suspense Jesse ››› “Temple Grandin” 2010, Docudrama Claire Danes, Julia Ormond. The scientist ››› “How to Train Your Dragon” 2010, Fantasy Voices of Jay The Art of GetGame of Thrones The Pointy End Robb Real Time With Bill Maher Educator HBO 425 501 425 10 Bradford. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å becomes an advocate for autistics and livestock. ’ Å Baruchel, Gerard Butler. ’ ‘PG’ Å ting By rallies his father’s allies. ‘MA’ Melissa Harris-Perry. ’ ‘MA’ Å ›› “Meatballs” 1979, Comedy Bill Murray, Chris Makepeace. ‘PG’ ›› “Slums of Beverly Hills” 1998, Comedy Natasha Lyonne. ‘R’ ›› “Meatballs” 1979, Comedy Bill Murray, Chris Makepeace. ‘PG’ “Life Aquatic With Steve” IFC 105 105 (5:05) ››› “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” 2009, Fantasy Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint, Emma (7:45) ›› “Sherlock Holmes” 2009, Action Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law, Rachel McAdams. The detective › “Vampires Suck” 2010 Matt Lanter. A spoof of “Twilight” fea- ›› “The Losers” MAX 400 508 7 Watson. New dangers lurk for Harry, Dumbledore and their friends. ’ ‘PG’ Å and his astute partner face a strange enemy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å tures a love-struck vampire and werewolf. 2010 ‘PG-13’ Locked Up Abroad Bangkok ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad (N) ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad Bangkok ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Locked Up Abroad ‘14’ Border Wars Checkpoint Texas ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum Fanboy-Chum Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai NTOON 89 115 189 Shooting USA Å Cowboys ‘G’ Amer. Guardian Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Best Defense Shooting Gallery Shooting USA Å Amer. Rifleman Amer. Guardian Impossible Shots Cowboys ‘G’ OUTD 37 307 43 (4:30) “Love Chronicles: Secrets Re›› “Letters to Juliet” 2010, Drama Amanda Seyfried, Vanessa Redgrave. iTV. A United States of › “The Janky Promoters” 2009 Ice Cube. iTV. Shady concert Inside NASCAR ›› “Youth in Revolt” Nurse Jackie F... Inside NASCAR SHO 500 500 vealed” 2010 Vivica A. Fox. ‘NR’ young woman finds an old note to someone’s lover. ’ ‘PG’ Å promoters get in over their heads. ’ ‘R’ Å (iTV) ‘PG’ 2009 ‘R’ Tara Train Wreck the Lemurs ‘MA’ (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Car Warriors Race Cars ‘14’ Å Car Warriors ’00 Crown Vics ’ ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘PG’ Car Warriors Race Cars ‘14’ Å Car Warriors ’00 Crown Vics ’ ‘14’ Car Science ‘14’ Car Science ‘PG’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (3:30) John Q ’ (5:35) ›› “Disney’s A Christmas Carol” 2009 Voices of Jim Carrey. ‘PG’ (7:21) ›› “2012” 2009 John Cusack. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. ‘PG-13’ Camelot (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å The Pillars of the Earth ‘MA’ Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:00) ››› “The (5:45) ›››› “This Is England” 2006, Drama Thomas Turgoose, Jo Hartley. A boy “Finding Bliss” 2009 Leelee Sobieski. A filmmaker takes a job as › “Spin” 2007 Michael Biehn. Young and beautiful Californians “Extreme Movie” 2008 Michael Cera. Stories about teens and TMC 525 525 Others” ’ joins a gang of skinheads in 1980s Britain. ’ ‘NR’ Å juggle relationships and bedmates. ’ ‘R’ Å sex involve a geek and a chat room. ’ ‘R’ an editor of porno movies. ’ ‘R’ Å 2011 Stanley Cup Final Vancouver Canucks at Boston Bruins (N) ’ (Live) Å Hockey Central World Series of Poker ‘PG’ Bull Riding PBR Pueblo Invitational From Pueblo, Colo. World Series of Poker ‘PG’ VS. 27 58 30 ››› “Under the Tuscan Sun” 2003, Romance Diane Lane, Sandra Oh. ‘PG-13’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Secret Lives of Women Cults ‘14’ ››› “Under the Tuscan Sun” 2003, Romance Diane Lane, Sandra Oh. ‘PG-13’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY

FRIDAY

“THE SOUND OF MUSIC”: St. Francis of Assisi School presents the Broadway musical of the singing von Trapp family set in Austria during World War II; $5, $3 children, $20 families; 1 and 6 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-3824701 or www.saintfrancisschool.net. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 3-7 p.m.; Drake Park, eastern end; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. BOBBY BARE JR.: The alt-country musician performs, with Carey Kotsionis; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: A preview of Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $16; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org.

BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. WILDFLOWER SHOW: Peruse and buy wildflower specimens; with talks, solar viewing and exhibits; $5, $2 ages 2-12 and nature center members; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www. sunrivernaturecenter.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Marsha Blake reads from her book “Oklahoma Tumbleweeds”; with live music; free; 2-4 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. BEND FARMERS MARKET: Free; 2-6 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-408-4998 or www. bendfarmersmarket.com. REDMOND FRIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Free admission; 3-7 p.m.; Redmond Greenhouse, 4101 S. U.S. Highway 97; 541-604-5156 or redmondfridaymarket@gmail.com. “CIRQUE DU SO GAY”: A queer prom for all ages featuring snake charmers, stilt walkers, dancers, performers and more; part of Bend Pride week; $5-$20 donations; 7-10 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-3320. “TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. reception; Cascade Center of Photography, 390 S.W. Columbia St., Suite 110, Bend; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs music from the movies, including animated and Broadway films; $10; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-383-7512. SISTERS RODEO: A PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12, free ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “127 HOURS”: A screening of the 2010 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Opening night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; with champagne and dessert reception; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. ERIC TAYLOR: The Texas-based folk musician performs; call for Bend location; $15 suggested donation; 7:30 p.m.; 541-390-4036, markswearingen@bendcable.com or www.bluerubymusic.com. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $15-$20; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http:// url.bb/LBS11. SASSPARILLA JUG BAND: The Portland-based blues-punk band performs; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

THURSDAY SISTERS RODEO SLACK PERFORMANCE: Slack performance, with breakfast concessions; free; 8 a.m.; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. BIG BOOK SALE: A selection of books, puzzles and books on tape will be on sale; proceeds benefit the United Senior Citizens of Bend and the Bend Senior Center; 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon-1 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www. deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. “THE SOUND OF MUSIC”: St. Francis of Assisi School presents the Broadway musical of the singing von Trapp family set in Austria during World War II; $5, $3 children, $20 families; 1 and 6 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-4701 or www. saintfrancisschool.net. “ARMCHAIR TRAVELER — MEXICO’S BAJA PENINSULA”: A slide show of photos from Alan and Bonnie Smith’s trip to Baja, with information about planning a safe visit; free; 2 p.m.; Des Chutes Historical Museum, 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; 541-617-4663 or http://osher.uoregon.edu. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Bill Baber and Jarold Ramsey read from their joint poetry collection; free; 6:309:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; with champagne and dessert reception; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs under the direction of Andy Warr; $10, $8 students, seniors and children; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7260. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: A preview of Innovation Theatre Works’ presentation of the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $16; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

LOCK, STOCK AND BARREL: The Portland-based band performs; $5; 10 p.m.; Hardtails Bar and Grill, 175 N. Larch St., Sisters; 541-549-6114.

SATURDAY LITTLE COMMUTERS PARADE: Decorate your bike, wagon or scooter in the west side parking lot, then parade across the footbridge and back; kicks off Commute Options Week; free; 8:30 a.m. decorating, 9:45 a.m. parade; Old Mill District, 661 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-330-2647 or www. commuteoptions.org. GREAT STRIDES: A 5K walk for cystic fibrosis; registration required; proceeds benefit the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation; donations accepted; 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. walk; Sam Johnson Park, Southwest 15th Street, Redmond; 541-480-6703, greatstrides.redmond@ gmail.com or www.cff. org/great_strides. WILDFLOWER SHOW: Peruse and buy wildflower specimens; with talks, solar viewing and exhibits; $5, $2 ages 2-12 and nature center members; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www. sunrivernaturecenter.org. CENTRAL OREGON SATURDAY MARKET: Featuring arts and crafts from local artisans; free admission; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; parking lot across from Bend Public Library, 600 N.W. Wall St.; 541-420-9015 or www. centraloregonsaturdaymarket.com. DISASTER PREPAREDNESS EXPO: Become informed about emergency preparedness; with workshops, demonstrations, products and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Brookswood Meadow Plaza, 19530 Amber Meadow Drive, Bend; 541-382-2142, ext. 7 or farleyt@oregonredcross.org. BEND PRIDE CELEBRATION: Gay pride festival includes live music, dance performances and vendors; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; McKay Park, 166 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive; 541385-3320. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a parade through downtown Sisters, and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12$18; 9:30 a.m. parade, 1 and 7 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-549-0121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. REFUGE TALK: Sandra Humphreys talks about Oregon’s outback and its wildlife, geology and recreation; included in the price of admission; $15 adults, $12 ages 65 and older, $9 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CASCADE CHORALE: The group performs music from the movies, including animated and Broadway films; $10; 3 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-383-7512. RISE UP SPRING JAMBOREE: Featuring performances by Larry and His Flask, Avery James and The Hillandales, The Autonomics, Capture the Flag and Third Seven, with a barbecue; $7 in advance, $10 at the door; 4 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.riseupinternational.com. DVA VAN DINNER: A dinner of barbecue chicken, corn on the cob and potato salad; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BABY BOOMERS DANCE PARTY: Listen or dance to music from the 1950s-70s, with trivia contests; $7; 7 p.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-598-7220 or bendbabyboomers@yahoo.com.

“SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $15-$20; 8 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www. innovationtw.org. LOCK, STOCK AND BARREL: The Portland-based band performs; $5; 10 p.m.; Hardtails Bar and Grill, 175 N. Larch St., Sisters; 541-549-6114.

SUNDAY WILDFLOWER SHOW: Peruse and buy wildflower specimens; with talks, solar viewing and exhibits; $5, $2 ages 2-12 and nature center members; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www. sunrivernaturecenter.org. SISTERS RODEO: Featuring a buckaroo breakfast and a PRCA rodeo performance with roping, riding, steer wrestling and more; $12-$18; 7-11 a.m. breakfast, 1 p.m. rodeo; Sisters Rodeo Grounds, 67667 U.S. Highway 20; 541-5490121 or www.sistersrodeo.com. “SEX, DRUGS & RICK ‘N’ NOEL”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents a play about a worker who enrolls in college and learns about life and himself; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. SECOND SUNDAY: Judith Montgomery reads from a selection of her works; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SUMMER SUNDAY CONCERT: Americana act The Chapmans performs; free; 2:30 p.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-3229383 or www.bendconcerts.com. JOPLIN RELIEF DINNER: An Ozarkinspired barbecue, with live music and a Skype feed with Josh Hart of Make it Habit; proceeds benefit Messenger College Disaster Relief and the American Red Cross; $20, $10 children; 5-9 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546. SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL YOUNG ARTIST SCHOLARSHIP CONCERT: A showcase of the top 2011 Young Artist Scholarship recipients; $10 suggested donation; 5 p.m.; Holy Trinity Church, 18143 Cottonwood Road; 541-5939310, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or www.sunrivermusic.org. “TICK, TICK ... BOOM!”: Innovation Theatre Works presents the autobiographical musical by Jonathan Larson about an aspiring writer struggling to make it in New York; $15-$20; 6 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or www.innovation tw.org. WINDANCE HOUSE CONCERT: Country music by Don Henry and Sally Barris; call for Bend location; $15 in advance, $17 at the door; 7 p.m.; 541-306-0048 or jherbgirl@yahoo.com.

MONDAY CHARITY AND CHUCKLES: A comedy showcase performed by local comedians; proceeds benefit Friends of the Badlands; $3; 7 p.m.; Old Mill Brew Werks, 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-633-7670.

M T For Wednesday, June 8

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 2, 4:40, 7:20 THE CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS (G) 2:25, 4:25, 6:55 EVERYTHING MUST GO (R) 2:20, 4:30, 7:05 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 2:45, 5:10, 7:35 MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) 2:15, 4:50, 7:10 WINTER IN WARTIME (R) 2:05, 4:35, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 12:25, 3:25, 6:35, 9:30 FAST FIVE (PG-13) 12:10, 3:35, 6:25, 10:35 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 12:35, 1:15, 1:55, 3:10, 4:15, 4:55, 6:10, 7:15, 7:55, 9:10, 9:50, 10:45 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 12:45, 345, 6:45, 9:40

KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) Noon, 3, 6, 7:30, 9, 10:10 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (DP — PG) 1:30, 4:30 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 12:55, 1:25, 4:25, 6:55, 7:25, 10:25 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES 3-D (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 3:55, 6:20, 9:20, 9:55 THOR (PG-13) 1:40, 7:45 THOR 3-D (PG-13) 4:45, 10:40 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG13) 1:45, 4:40, 7:40, 10:20 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 12:05, 2, 3:05, 5, 6:05, 8, 9:05 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (DP — PG13) 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:05 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) HANNA (PG-13) 9 RIO (G) 3 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 6

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 7:30 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

KUNG FU PANDA 2 (UPSTAIRS — PG) 5 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 4, 7

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 4:15, 6:45 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 4:45, 7 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 4:45, 7:30 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 5:15, 8

EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

MADRAS CINEMA 5 1101 S.W. Highway 97, Madras, 541-475-3505

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 4:10, 6:50

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 5, 7:30 THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 5:30, 8 KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG) 5:15

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

THE HANGOVER PART II (R) 5:15, 7:30 KUNG FU PANDA 2 3-D (PG) 5:10, 7:15 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13) 3:40, 6:40 X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13) 3:30, 6:30

Live from Tornado Alley, it’s all chases all the time By Aaron Barnhart McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — When Independence, Mo., tornado chasers Leslie and Dean Burton take to their 1999 Jeep Cherokee during severe storm season, there’s a new piece of equipment riding with them. A dash-cam streams to the Web live video of whatever they’re seeing through their windshield. And they’re not alone. More than 250 chasers roaming tornado country this year are allowing anyone with broadband to vicariously ride shotgun through the biggest storm season in 40 years. “It’s the second thing we turn on after the radar,” Leslie Burton said. The couple were in northern Nebraska last week chasing a storm with hail that had put a crack in their windshield. With the heightened interest in extreme weather this spring, TV is also picking up on the live-chase craze. After Jeff and Kathryn Piotrowski posted upclose video of the May 22 Joplin, Mo., tornado — the storm badly damaged their vehicle, and they wound up becoming first responders — Fox News Channel began carrying live video from the couple’s dash-cam as Jeff Piotrowski narrated. The Piotrowskis, who live in Oklahoma, have been on the media’s radar for years. What is new is the crowdsourcing of tornadoes. Now viewers can go to websites such as TornadoAlley Live.com and watch as dozens of professional and amateur chasers such as the Burtons encircle severe storms looking for the ideal view while staying barely out of harm’s way.

More info in a dash Click on the “Live Chase” button of these sites and you’re presented with a map of the 48 states, lines indicating the regions most likely to experience severe weather and tiny SUV icons, each one representing a chaser who is on the road and streaming from a dash-cam. Ever since the 1996 movie “Twister,” the community of storm chasers has grown steadily, and with it the cottage industry of up-close tornado videos. Concerns, as well, have grown over how much of this actually serves public safety and how much serves the demands of the audience for reality entertainment. In recent years, as mobile broadband networks have extended into the hinterlands, elite chasers have begun to stream from their dashboards, often as a premium feature offered to paying customers to their sites. Now, however, so many chasers are streaming that sites like Tornado Alley Live are able to aggregate them for free, usually in exchange for promotional plugs. The Burtons, for instance, insert a text crawl at the bottom of their video promoting their photography business, Intercept Images. Dean Burton said he’s glad people can watch his live video from their homes. “If we could bring a few minutes more warning and get peo-

ple to pay attention when weather is coming, eventually it will help save lives,” he said. It will be some time before public safety officials know whether having all this live video is worth the risks of so many entrepreneurs out on the wet, windy roads of the High Plains. But the archives of that video are already proving their value to researchers looking into the mysteries of tornadic weather. “How much data is enough? Just like money — a little bit more,” said Leslie Lemon, of the National Weather Service. Lemon, who has spent 30 years developing Doppler radar systems and is considered a pioneer in the field of severe storm prediction and research, said he has already found dashboard video an invaluable tool in studying how clouds form, dissipate and send down funnels from supercells. The interactive map, known as Imap, was developed by Weather Decision Technologies in Norman, Okla., which also put together the chaser network used by TornadoAlleyLive.com and about 50 other sites.

Not just a public service “It is definitely entertainment, but it definitely creates value, and we do work with the local weather services to provide value,” said Mike Eilts, the president of Weather Decision Technologies and former assistant director of the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Norman. It probably makes chasing a little safer, too. Until mobile broadband came along, most part-time chasers couldn’t afford in-vehicle radar, so they were, as Dean Burton put it, “driving blind.” Now they can track not only the progress of storms but of all the other chasers in their area using the Imap software, which uses the coordinates supplied by each team’s on-board GPS. Sometimes the teams will message one another and arrange a “chaser convergence” to discuss which route will yield the best results. Chip Mahaney, an executive at E.W. Scripps Co. in Cincinnati, developed TornadoAlleyLive. com for use by all the Scripps stations. While acknowledging that it will be more useful to its stations in Tulsa and Kansas City than, say, West Palm Beach or Cleveland, Mahaney said the two-month-old site was already “an overwhelming success in terms of getting audience.” He also said there is evidence of its public-service function. “Looking at some of the comments we get on our Facebook page, people are using this to stay in touch with each other,” Mahaney said. While on a recent chase in Indiana, Mahaney paid attention to his laptop, noting how the audience for his live stream spiked dramatically as his vehicle’s icon approached a supercell on the interactive map. “Within minutes 600 people were watching,” Mahaney said. “The crowd’s smart — they’ll flock to the best content, and they’ll flock very quickly.”


E4 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, June 8, 2011: This year, you sense an unusual amount of conflict surrounding you. If you listen, you might find a common theme or thread. Perhaps you are giving off mixed signals. Are you suppressing your feelings? If you are single, you meet people with ease, though it could be difficult this year to form a long-term bond. Don’t worry; you will have one very soon. If you are attached, the two of you need lots of downtime together to deepen the bond and each other’s understanding of one another. The relationship will benefit. VIRGO can be touchy. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH What happens today could be more significant than you might want to realize. Your ability to handle a boss or authority figure comes into play. Pull out of confusion and arguments. They are the fastest ways to waste time. Tonight: Go with a surprise. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Your creativity seems to come up each time there is an issue, and in between, too! Sometimes you are misunderstood. Rein in different interests, and proceed with one issue at a time. Trust yourself. You will know when to act. Tonight: Know that you are lucky. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH If you can, work from home. You are overwhelmed by everything

that is occurring. Think in terms of new possibilities if you feel hemmed in. Be willing to break past a selfimposed but possibly about-to-beidentified restriction. Tonight: Don’t be overly concerned with anything. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Your ability to accomplish a lot could be marred by a misunderstanding. Unfortunately, you might need to redo some work. Once more, a boss or parent proves to be unpredictable. Strap on your seat belt. Tonight: Catch up with a pal. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Keep your foot on the brake when dealing with finances. You might not be ready for a commitment of this nature. Pressure builds because of several misunderstandings within a group of people. Tonight: Your treat. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You certainly might feel empowered, no matter what you do or which way you proceed. You could be thrown a little off by someone’s behavior. A partner doesn’t act in the way you anticipated or might like. Tonight: As you like. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Be careful when dealing with family. The confusion that surrounds you forces more questions. Don’t take others’ inquiries personally. The unexpected appears to run through your personal ties. A partner is lucky for you financially. Tonight: Vanish while you can. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Stay on top of activities. Friendship plays a big role in

creating more of what you want. Others favor you in general and are willing to give a project that extra push. Deal with key people directly. Tonight: Extend a special invitation. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Pressure builds with a boss or higher-up. Understanding comes through confusion. Try not to be as reactive or challenging. Just let the dust settle. Then you will know what action to take. Tonight: A midweek break. Be naughty and nice. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Detach, and you will succeed. If you become reactive to the present confusion, you will tumble into the same mire that everyone else does. You find that a family member might say something that triggers your imagination. Let your mind wander from the here and now briefly. Tonight: Movie night. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You demonstrate the ability to relate deeply to a particular friend. Understand what this person expects. Don’t get plugged into a situation and become reactive. Detach. Then decide what to do. The result will be far better. Tonight: Invite a friend to join you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Others come forward with lots of information. The confusion that surrounds you could change if you can stay calm, cool and collected. Let others play out, not you. Try to tame a drifting mind. Tonight: Hang out.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Taste test

About the beers

Continued from E1 First, the panelists themselves seemed surprised by the beers they ranked at the top. Two of the ones they liked best came from breweries they haven’t frequented. Old Mill Brew Wërks is relatively new. It produces in Silver Moon Brewing’s brewery and has so far made just two batches of IPA. Several of the tasters said they had tried the first batch and felt more impressed by this second round. Another taster favorite, Three Creeks Brewing Co., is located in Sisters. But those who reside elsewhere in Central Oregon can enjoy Three Creeks without a trip, as several of its beers are available on tap in pubs and in 22-ounce bottles in stores. The lesson: If you try something — or someplace — new on occasion, you might be rewarded. The other result the tasters didn’t anticipate is that the IPA from Bend legend Deschutes Brewery, Inversion IPA, was not close to the top. The panel members discussed their high regard for Deschutes and clearly believed it would be a favorite. But in their comments, three of the five felt Inversion didn’t fit the IPA style, with two saying it seemed more like an amber ale. The Inversion is one of the top 10 best-selling IPAs in the country, said Mark Hegedus, director of sales and marketing for Deschutes Brewery. He said it’s been well received in the beer industry and by consumers. He also noted that here in the Pacific Northwest, beer drinkers’ palates have become more and more accustomed to beer with a strong hop flavor, and Deschutes strives to make Inversion a balanced beer with a strong malt to balance the hops. Whereas a panel of five from the Pacific Northwest might favor big hops, another five tasters might find hoppier beers less palatable. For example, he said, a Deschutes beer like Red Chair NWPA, which stands for Northwest pale ale, is called both a pale ale and an IPA by the brewery. It would be considered an IPA in some areas of the country, he said. But here, where beer consumers like more hops, Red Chair comes off as a pale ale, which is less hoppy than an IPA. “One of the things that’s fun about beer is … it’s not like there’s one perfect way,” Hegedus said. “For the average consumer, it’s about their taste buds.” Some breweries expressed surprise at the results. Others noted how subjective beer tasting can be. Brew Wërks, for instance, conducted its own IPA March Madness contest with eight local breweries represented and customers judging the beers, said Brew Wërks owner David Love. McMenamins wasn’t included in the event. The final four were: Old Mill Brew Wërks, Boneyard Beer, Deschutes Brewery and Three Creeks Brewing, said Love, with Boneyard’s RPM IPA winning top honors. No beer sampled by our tasters was considered bad. Which is significant, said 10 Barrel Brewing partner Chris Cox. “It tells you something about the quality of craft goods coming out of Bend,” he said. “It just means that there’s some cool things happening in beer in Central Oregon.”

How we did it We wanted as level a playing field as possible for our blind beer tasting. In our research, we consulted two regional beer buffs, Megan Flynn, editor in chief of Beer West magazine, and Christian DeBenedetti, a freelance writer who specializes in beer. DeBenedetti’s new book, “The Great American Ale Trail: The Craft Beer Lover’s Guide to the Best Watering Holes in the Nation” is slated for publication in September by Running Press. We didn’t tell the breweries of our plan and asked our tasters to stay

BEND BREWING CO. ELK LAKE IPA Bend Brewing Co. customers are often ordering a meal as well as brew. So when BBC Brewmaster Tonya Cornett makes a batch of Elk Lake IPA, she takes that into consideration. “I do kind of shoot for the middle of the road because we have to think about pairing with food,” she said, noting some of the tasters’ comments seemed fair. The Elk Lake IPA is a Pacific Northwest style, she said. For a big-hop flavor, Cornett also makes the Hop Head Imperial IPA, which has won several medals at beer competitions. Elk Lake IPA is available at the pub and in 22-ounce bottles.

BONEYARD BEER RPM IPA

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

An IPA for the blind tasting panel is poured from a growler into plastic cups at The Bulletin recently.

What is an IPA?

Geoff Marlowe, left, and Jon Abernathy sample an IPA during a recent blind beer tasting at The Bulletin. The panelists were quiet and focused while they assessed the beers. mum, as well. We picked up the beer on a Saturday from the brewery pubs in growlers — glass jugs used for transporting draft beer — since not all the breweries bottle. We held our tasting the next day. We came up with scorecards for the tasters to jot down notes and scores on a 1 to 5 scale, with 5 being the highest. The categories were appearance, aroma, flavor, mouth feel and overall. The overall score was not the cumulative score of the previous four but the overall impression, since the tasters felt that beer flavor, for instance, should be given more weight than appearance. There were a few variables we weren’t certain we could plan for. Most significantly, since all our tasters have a high beer IQ, would they automatically identify what they were drinking? So we included a slot on the scorecard for our panelists to guess. We asked them to not verbalize it until after all nine beers had been sampled. The highest number of correct guesses went to Evan Hendrix, beer specialist for Whole Foods Market in Bend. He named six: Bend Brewing Co., Boneyard, Cascade Lakes, McMenamins, 10 Barrel and Three Creeks. Tom Gilles, co-owner of The Brew Shop, guessed four. Several chose not to guess. The five panelists sampled the beer in random order, nibbling water crackers and sipping sparkling water to cleanse their palates between tastes. They fell silent as the beer arrived, becoming intent on taking small swallows and making comments. But they chatted with each other on their impressions between beers. For Hendrix, participating in a formal tasting was fun. “I try to get my friends to do this and they say, ‘Huh?’” In the end, Hendrix added, there is good beer, and there is good beer in context. “It depends on the weather, it depends on what you’re eating, it depends on the people you’re with.”

Beer in context Even if the same IPAs the tasters sipped two weeks ago are still on tap at the brewery, they might now taste slightly different.

One reason is that breweries regularly tinker with their formulas, although some more so than others. Beer involves agricultural products, such as hops, which have a harvesting season and then change in acidity over the course of a year in storage, said Tyler Reichert, owner of Silver Moon Brewing. Some breweries adjust for that with technology. Others tweak the formula the same way a baker might change a recipe for elevation — the goal is for the consumer not to notice the difference. Several of the brewers noted that they are constantly brewing new IPA batches, as the drinking public can’t get enough. “IPA is one of those that’s really come into vogue, it’s really mainstream,” said Tonya Cornett, brewmaster for Bend Brewing Co. Cornett said Elk Lake IPA is one of the BBC’s most popular beers and she is regularly on the verge of being too low in supply. “That means it’s really fresh,” Cornett said. “And an IPA is meant to drink fresh.” As the beer-drinking public has embraced IPAs, it’s also wanted the beer to have more and more hop flavor, Reichert said. “A lot of companies are making stronger, bigger, more robust IPAs by the day,” he said. “Everybody wants hops right now,” agreed Clay Storey, brewmaster at Boneyard Beer. “The IPA style is the leader in the Northwest.” The concept that there is a beerdrinking public interested in sipping a brew and making comments like it has a “citrusy aroma with hints of green apple” is heartening, several local brewers said. “In the wine industry, people understand that the 2006 pinot noir is different than the 2007,” Reichert said. “In the beer industry, people don’t expect it to change. But that mind-set is changing some as more complex beers come to market and become more commonplace.” Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

The American India Pale Ale, says the encyclopedic website Beer Advocate, is more flavorful than the original version, the English IPA. The color of the American IPA can range from very pale golden to reddish amber. The hops are typically American varieties with a big herbal and citric character, and the bitterness is high as well. It’s moderate to medium-bodied with a balancing malt backbone. One characteristic of an IPA is its higher level of IBUs, which stands for International Bittering Unit. It’s the scale used to measure the bitterness from hops, a flower used in brewing beer. The more bitter the “bite” of a beer, the more likely it has a higher IBU level, although a beer can have a high IBU level and be balanced by other elements in the beer like malt. For instance, an American pale lager’s IBUs are roughly from 10 to 15. An IPA’s ranges from 40 to 80. Although not listed as a style by an expert source like Beer Advocate, Pacific Northwest IPA is a description nearly all the local breweries used for their IPAs. There is some debate as to what it means to call a beer a Northwest IPA. Christian DeBenedetti, a Portland freelance writer who just completed a book about beer, said the Northwest-style IPA is what people used to call the extra tangy, aromatic form of India pale ale that was being brewed in the Northwest. That’s now just generally called American IPA throughout the industry. American hops are nearly all grown in the Pacific Northwest, he said, so that’s how it began. Mark Hegedus, director of sales and marketing for Deschutes Brewery, said a Pacific Northwest IPA isn’t an officially recognized style, it’s instead a regional trend. IPAs from this part of the country, he said, tend to contain stronger hop flavor than IPAs made elsewhere. This is known in the beer industry, he said, and is why regional brewers at times call their formulas Northwest IPA. The beers in this blind tasting ranged from 65 IBUs for Cascade Lakes IPA to 74 IBUs for Old Mill Brew Wërks Irreverence IPA to 80 IBUs for Deschutes Brewery Inversion IPA.

Our tasters All our tasters are local residents who love local beer. Two of them have judged beer before at competitions, although none have completed the American Homebrewers Association Beer Judge Certification Program, which Tom Gilles called lengthy. But as 10 Barrel Brewmaster Jimmy Seifrit put it, “They are people that people ask for advice about beer.”

The RPM IPA is a Pacific Northwest-style IPA meant to be hoppy, floral and citrusy with less emphasis on bitterness, said Boneyard Beer Brewmaster Clay Storey. It’s the brewery’s best-seller, although Storey said the brewers are still experimenting with it as well. “We are definitely still in the tinkering process,” he said. “We’re always trying to make it better.” He said he agreed with many of the tasters’ comments. Storey also said that while many drinkers want more hops, in his judgement that doesn’t always make for a better beer. Boneyard RPM IPA is available at the pub.

CASCADE LAKES BREWING CO. IPA The Cascade Lakes IPA is one of four IPAs available presently on draft at the brewery’s locations in Bend and Redmond. Out of the five IPAs the brewery regularly makes, Cascade Lakes co-owner Chris Justema called it the mainline beer. That means it’s a clean, drinkable session beer, Justema said, meaning its alcohol and International Bittering Unit levels, or IBUs, are such that the drinker can enjoy a few of them over a reasonable period of time without getting too tipsy. Justema said brewery makes a number of palatewowing beers. “If you talk to the nine breweries and say give me your best IPA, we’re not going to hand you the Cascades Lakes IPA. That’s the beer we put out there for the masses.” And while several tasters felt the Cascade Lakes IPA didn’t fit the classic IPA description, they found it very drinkable. Cascade Lakes IPA is available at the pub and in 22-ounce bottles.

DESCHUTES BREWERY INVERSION IPA Inversion IPA has relatively high IBUs but is balanced by a strong malt, said Mark Hegedus, director of sales and marketing for Deschutes Brewery. That means the IPA doesn’t have a strong aftertaste. It’s also among the top 10-selling IPAs in the country. “It’s designed like all our beers — to be very balanced,” he said. Deschutes uses whole-flower hops in its beers, Hegedus noted. He also said for those whose palates crave more hops, Deschutes makes other IPAs, like its Hop Henge, which has 90 IBUs. Inversion IPA is at the pub and in bottles.

MCMENAMINS SUNFLOWER IPA The Sunflower IPA wasn’t on tap when The Bulletin did its blind taste test, so it’s the only brew we poured from a 22-ounce bottle. It’s considered the company standard IPA, said Mike White, head brewer at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in Bend. That means it should taste the same no matter which McMenamins property you visit. White described it as an American-style IPA, not as hoppy as some, with a drier finish. Yet White said beer drinkers should note that McMenamins gives its local brewers freedom to experiment with other brews. So right now Old St. Francis taps are pouring a beer called Blind Perception IPA, a local creation. All beers on draft at McMenamins in Bend, White said, are brewed in Bend.

OLD MILL BREW WËRKS IRREVERENCE IPA Old Mill Brew Wërks is in its second batch of Irreverence IPA, which is being produced in Silver Moon Brewing’s brewery. Brew Wërks owner David Love described it as “a real hoppy beer that doesn’t burn your tongue.” The relatively new brewery, which has several of its own beers as well as a few made by others on tap, will soon be making batch three. And Love said they are still tinkering with the recipe. He anticipated that batch three might be different enough that they don’t call it Irreverence. “Our theory is you have five generations, and after the fifth generation your formula should be consistent.” But for now, the Irreverence IPA is still available at the Brew Wërks pub.

SILVER MOON BREWING HOP KNOB IPA Among the three IPAs presently available from Silver Moon Brewing, the Hop Knob IPA is the most mild, said brewery owner Tyler Reichert. It’s a Pacific Northweststyle IPA that you could enjoy a pitcher of with friends, he said. Some IPAs, like the brewery’s Hoptagon Imperial, for instance, contain enough hops and alcohol to make the drinker dream of a nap after a pint or two. Reichert said he believes one of the keys to Silver Moon’s brews is that it uses whole-flower hops instead of hops processed into pellets. “We believe it leads to a fuller hop presentation,” he said. Hop Knob is available at the pub and in 22-ounce bottles.

10 BARREL BREWING APOCALYPSE IPA

BARBARA PETTERSEN

JON ABERNATHY

EVAN HENDRIX

TOM GILLES

GEOFF MARLOWE

Age: 51 Occupation: Clinical director of a genetic diagnostics laboratory, beer blogger at barbonbeer.com Why I love beer: “I’m from Wisconsin and spent my college years avoiding the thin, tasteless, mass-produced lagers and ales that were popular at the time. I didn’t actually start drinking beer until we moved to Bend in 2001, at which time I became a rabid fan of the local craft brews — the bigger and hoppier the better. I moved quickly on to Imperials, barrel-aged and specialty beers, favoring those from the Pacific Northwest, of course. Last year my husband and I started a craft beer-based video blog called Barb On Beer geared to the lay person who wants the scoop on good craft beers. And it’s a great reason to try more beers.”

Age: 38 Occupation: Web developer, beer blogger at www.thebrewsite.com Why I love beer: “Variety, creativity, originality, it’s a completely accessible drink with a history as old as civilization itself. It tastes good, too. I am a big fan of barley wines, Oktoberfest-style beers and pumpkin beers of all kinds.”

Age: 27 Occupation: Specialty team leader and beer specialist for Whole Foods Market Why I love beer: “I love beer because it is so incredibly diverse and versatile. Beers locally and around the globe always reflect seasonality and beer can literally pair with any food that one might enjoy regardless of the time of day or location. Beer has such a rich culture and history and I love nothing more than to sit down with my family and close friends with a large spread of food and a pint of beer to go with.”

Age: 47 Occupation: Co-owner of The Brew Shop in Bend Why I love beer: “For me, there are so many options and so many creative breweries out there. I’ve enjoyed it since the craft beer movement started in Portland in the 1980s and I lived there.”

Age: 38 Occupation: Owner of The Abbey Pub in Bend Why I love beer: “I love pretty much everything about beer. I love the variety, the malt that comes through, the hops. I’ve been into it for about 10 or 15 years.”

The Apocalypse IPA, said 10 Barrel Brewing Brewmaster Jimmy Seifrit, is brewed with three different types of hops and yet kept drinkable with its biscuit malt. He said it’s a Pacific Northwest-style IPA, not the English style as some tasters mused. “English IPAs are really almost a misnomer,” he said. “They really aren’t that heavily hopped.” He continues to subtly change the Apocalypse in ways the consumer most likely doesn’t notice. And his goal is to produce a drinkable, enjoy-any-time IPA. “My goal is to make the best IPA,” he said. “Next year, I hope to win it all.” Apocalypse IPA is available at the pub and in 22ounce bottles.

THREE CREEKS BREWING CO. HOODOO VOODOO IPA Wade Underwood, general manager and co-owner of Three Creeks Brewing Co., said his goal is to produce a well-balanced IPA in the Hoodoo Voodoo. “We’re going for a more approachable Northwest IPA,” he said. “It’s aggressively hopped, but it’s got enough body that it carries it off.” Three Creeks Brewing Co. began making the Hoodoo Voodoo in 2008. And while the brewers have changed the formula subtly at times to adjust for the changes in ingredients such as hops, the recipe is largely set, Underwood said. The IPA is available at the pub and in 22-ounce bottles in Sisters and Bend.


{ Elks timeline}

Bend Elks Preview • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • The Bulletin

A look at the history of the Bend Elks franchise: 2004 — Bend defeats the Kelowna Falcons in the best-of-three PIL championship series in August for its first league title. In September, the Elks announce plans to join the newly created West Coast Collegiate Baseball League, precursor to the West Coast League. The team averages nearly 840 fans per game for the season. 2005 — Bend sets new club records for total attendance (23,657) and average attendance (875) despite going 23-29 overall.

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend’s Tommy Richards was named the West Coast League MVP last season as the Elks advanced to the WCL Championship Series for the first time. June 3, 2000 — The Elks open their inaugural season in the Pacific International League with a pair of games against the Seattle Studs. General admission is $2. Bend lost both games in front of 1,093 fans before defeating Seattle the next day, 7-6, for its first victory with 278 spectators on hand. 2001 — Bend advances to the PIL postseason for the first time but blows a six-run, ninth-inning lead at home to the Bellingham Bells in a playoff game. The Elks average just over 445 fans per game. 2002 — Madras High standout Jacoby Ellsbury hits .345 in Pacific International League play for the Elks and is named to the all-league first team. Ellsbury would go on to star for Oregon State and the Boston Red Sox. 2003 — The Elks advance to the PIL playoffs behind strong play from Central Oregonians Mike Rundle (Bend High) and Geoff Wagner (Redmond High).

2006 — The Elks go 24-18 in league play with two of the better players to come through Bend not named Ellsbury. Eric Sogard, who would go on to make his Major League Baseball debut in 2010 with the Oakland Athletics, led the WCCBL in hitting with a .347 average. The Elks also had outfielder Grant Desme on their roster, who was selected in the second round of the 2007 MLB draft by Oakland. Desme, who hit .288 with 31 home runs for two minor league teams in 2009, made national news when he walked away from baseball to attend seminary school. 2007 — Bend misses the playoffs but averages 986 spectators for the Elks’ 30 home games. The club sets a franchise record for attendance when 2,435 people attend a July 3 game against the Spokane RiverHawks. Two reserves from Oregon State’s back-to-back NCAA champion baseball team, Drew George and Koa Kahalehoe, play for the Elks.

Play ball!

2008 — Playing in a revamped Vince Genna Stadium — a new brick backstop was added before the season — the Elks draw 40,329 fans during the summer en route to their first WCCBL playoff appearance. Outfielder Drew Heid is named the league’s Most Valuable Player after hitting .403, a WCCBL record that still stands. 2009 — Two-way player Peter Lavin leads the Elks to the West Coast League playoffs, hitting .307 in 40 games in addition to posting a 3.19 earned-run average and a 2-1 record in nine starts on the mound.

The Bend Elks summer collegiate baseball team returns for a 12th season, looking to improve on last year’s run at a title

2010 — Local standout Tommy Richards, the son of Elks owner and general manager Jim Richards, is named league MVP after hitting a WCL-best .364 during the regular season. Bend comes within one game of winning the WCL title.

{ Elks schedule } The schedule for the Bend Elks’ season (subject to change):

June 3 4 5 10 11 12 14 15 16 17 17 18 18 19 20 21 22 24 25 26 27 28 28 29 29 30

Fri Sat Sun Fri Sat Sun Tue Wed Thu Fri Fri Sat Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Tue Wed Wed Thu

July at Klamath Falls L, 5-2 at Klamath Falls L, 3-2 at Klamath Falls W, 6-5 6:35pm Corvallis 6:35pm Corvallis 5:05pm Corvallis 6:35pm Bellingham 6:35pm Bellingham 6:35pm Bellingham 6:35pm Tumwater* 7:05pm at Kitsap 6:35pm Tumwater* 7:05pm at Kitsap 7:05pm at Kitsap 7:05pm at Kelowna 7:05pm at Kelowna 7:05pm at Kelowna 6:35pm Kitsap 6:35pm Kitsap 5:05pm Kitsap 6:35pm at Cowlitz 6:35pm San Fran.* 6:35pm at Cowlitz 6:35pm San Fran.* 6:35pm at Cowlitz 6:35pm Kelowna

1 2 3 4 5 8 9 10 12 13 14 15 16 17 19 20 21 22 23 24 26 27 28 29 30 31

Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Fri Sat Sun Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun

year after coming up one game short of their first West Coast League championship, the Bend Elks return for their 12th season reloaded with talent. Catcher Toby DeMello, who this past season at Saint Mary’s College hit .288 and was an all-West Coast Conference honorable mention selection, looks to guide the Elks from behind the plate. DeMello, a junior this spring, threw out 47 percent of the base runners who attempted to steal on him this year. Traditionally tough on the mound — Bend posted a 3.20 earned-run average in 2010, the second-best mark in the league — the Elks again look to have a host of capable arms. University of Washington sophomore-to-be Jeff Brigham went 4-1 and posted a 4.73 ERA for the Huskies this season. Brady Kirkpatrick, a freshman at the University of Maryland this spring — Sisters and La Pine high school fans may remember his prep exploits at Marist High in Eugene — struck out 56 batters in 58 1⁄3 innings for the Terrapins. Villanova’s Stephen Ostapeck (2.96 ERA in 2011) and the College of San Mateo’s Daniel Chavez (6-2 record, 2.35 ERA) also should contribute to Bend’s run for the 2011 WCL championship. Offensively, Oregon State sophomore shortstop Ryan Dunn could be a spark atop the Elks’ lineup this season. Dunn hit .296 this spring for the Beavers one year out of junior college ball. Bend’s home opener is Friday night against the Corvallis Knights. — Beau Eastes

A

Home game

August 6:35pm Kelowna 6:35pm Kelowna 7:15pm at Corvallis 7:15pm Corvallis 6:35pm Corvallis 6:35pm at Bellingham 6:35pm at Bellingham 5:05pm at Bellingham 6:35pm Cowlitz 6:35pm Cowlitz 6:35pm Cowlitz 6:35pm Wenatchee 6:35pm Wenatchee 6:35pm Wenatchee 6:35pm Klamath Falls 6:35pm Klamath Falls 6:35pm Klamath Falls 7:05pm at Wenatchee 7:05pm at Wenatchee 7:05pm at Wenatchee 4:00pm NW Honkers** 7:05pm at Walla Walla 7:05pm at Walla Walla 7:05pm at Walla Walla 6:40pm at Corvallis 12:15pm at Corvallis

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9

Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Tue

6:35pm Corvallis 6:35pm Walla Walla 6:35pm Walla Walla 6:35pm Walla Walla 6:35pm at Klamath Falls 6:35pm at Klamath Falls 6:35pm at Klamath Falls 4pm NW Star Acad.**

* nonleague **doubleheader • Tuesday home games are “$2 Tuesdays”; tickets, beers and hot dogs cost $2 each. • Kids get in free at Wednesday night home games.

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On the flip side Turn the page over for more information on the Elks, including their home stadium, an in-depth look at the roster and a breakdown of the West Coast League

Promotions to watch for Cap night, times two Fans receive a cap, while supplies last, for games on June 24 (vs. Kitsap) and August 4 (vs. Walla Walla).

Bobblehead night The team is giving away bobblehead dolls of Jacoby Ellsbury (former Elk, current Boston Red Sox) on July 21.

San Diego Chicken One of the most famous mascots around, the San Diego Chicken, is in town July 15 (vs. Wenatchee).

FRIDAY

JUNE 10

HOME OPENER ~ Honoring WWII Vets

FRIDAY

JUNE 17

American Red Cross Night ~ FREE Root Beer Floats

SATURDAY

JUNE 18

Father’s Day Special

FRIDAY

JUNE 24

Cap Night

MONDAY

JULY 4

American Traditions Celebrations ~ 4th of July Fireworks after the game

THURSDAY

JULY 14

Faith Night

FRIDAY

JULY 15

San Diego Chicken

SATURDAY

JULY 16

Ronald McDonald Night ~ FREE Hot Dogs

SUNDAY

JULY 17

Eberhard’s Dairy FREE Ice Cream

THURSDAY

JULY 21

Jacoby Ellsbury Bobble Head Night

MONDAY

AUGUST 1 Mini Bat Night

THURSDAY

AUGUST 4 Cap Night

TUESDAY WEDNESDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY FRIDAY

JUNE 14 JUNE 15 JUNE 17 JUNE 18 JUNE 24

Bellingham Bells Bellingham Bells TBA TBA Kitsap Bluejackets

6:35 PM 6:35 PM 7:05 PM 6:35 PM 6:35 PM

First, $2 Tuesday First, FREE Kids Wednesday American Red Cross Night ~ FREE Root Beer Floats Father’s Day Special, Sponsored by Central OR Council on Aging Cap Night, Sponsored by The Center & American Licorice

FRIDAY, JUNE 10 CORVALLIS KNIGHTS 6:35 PM Ticket Information:

General Admission Tickets or Hot Dogs & Sodas and More! Just $2 each! JUNE 14; JULY 5, 12, 19, 26; AUGUST 2, 9 Sponsored by: Sponsored by:

541.312.9259

WWW.BENDELKS.COM


Bend Elks Preview • Wednesday, June 8, 2011 • The Bulletin

{ The West Coast League }

{ Bend Elks roster }

A look at the Bend Elks’ league, with teams in Oregon, Washington and Canada:

A look at the players who will make up the roster for the Bend Elks this season, with position, latest school attended and year in school this spring.

Bellingham Bells

Kitsap BlueJackets

Yakima

90

Spokane

WASHINGTON

Portland

Walla Walla

84

Salem

97

Corvallis

Corvallis Knights

Eugene

Bend

5

West Division

CANADA

Wenatchee Moses Lake

Tacoma

5

Cowlitz Black Bears

Kelowna

Wenatchee AppleSox Seattle

5

5

• Klamath Falls Gems: Former Madras High standout Turner Gill looks to lead the Gems in their first season. Gill, a freshman at the University of Portland this spring, hit .332 this season and led the Pilots in hits (61), doubles (18) and on-base percentage (.393). An outfielder and designated hitter for UP this year, Gill should see time at first base with Klamath Falls this summer. • Kitsap BlueJackets: Western Illinois pitcher Richie Mascheri returns to Kitsap after leading the WCL with six wins in 2010. Brandon Rohde, who struck out 64 batters in 80 2⁄3 inning this spring at Central Washington, expects to come out of the bullpen for Kitsap. • Cowlitz Black Bears: The Black Bears expect to ride the arms of Mark Lambson of Arizona State and Matt Maurer of Pepperdine. Lambson went 2-0 with a 1.93 earned-run average for the Sun Devils this year, while Maurer posted a 3-6 record and a 4.63 ERA for the Waves, striking out 59 in 68 innings. • Corvallis Knights: David Andriese, a freshman at UC Riverside, hit .307 this spring and should provide a spark at the top of the Knights’ lineup. The West Division champion in 2010, Corvallis expects big things on the mound from Oregon State freshman Ben Wetzler, who went 6-3 for the Beavers this year with a 4.66 earned-run average. • Bend Elks: Looking for their first-ever WCL title, the Elks hope to receive major contributions from Saint Mary’s College catcher Toby DeMello, an allWest Coast Conference honorable mention selection this spring, and Maryland pitcher Brady Kirkpatrick, who made the Terrapins’ starting rotation as a true freshman.

Kelowna Falcons Bellingham

Vancouver

• Bellingham Bells: Gonzaga third baseman Eric Lane joins the Bells, who move to the East Division this year, after hitting .314 for the Bulldogs this spring. Lane, a junior this spring, started every game for Gonzaga and led team in hits and runs. • Wenatchee AppleSox: The two-time defending WCL champions again look to be tough with four players from 2011 Pac-10 champion UCLA. Freshman shortstop Pat Valaika started 46 games for the Bruins this season and will likely man the same spot for the AppleSox. • Walla Walla Sweets: In their second year of existence, the Sweets expect to improve on their 18-30 league mark from a season ago with an outfield full of potential. Washington State’s Brett Jacobs looks to rebound from a disappointing sophomore year in which he hit .244. As a freshman, Jacobs hit .340 for the Cougars in 37 starts. Hawaii outfielder Kalani Brackenridge, who was drafted by the Tampa Bay Rays in the 44th round of the 2009 Major League Draft, is also on the Sweets’ roster. • Kelowna Falcons: San Diego State starter Ethan Miller should lead the Falcon pitching staff after going 4-4 with 48 strikeouts in 55 2⁄3 innings for the Aztecs this spring.

OREGON

IDAHO

East Division

Walla Walla Sweets

Bend Elks

97

Klamath Falls Gems

Infielders

Pitchers

Jordan Brower 1B, Cal Poly, fr. The left-handed hitting Brower redshirted at Cal Poly this season after hitting .407 his senior year at Newbury Park (Calif.) High School.

Taylor Chris LHP, Cal Poly, fr. Chris made 11 appearances on the mound for the Mustangs this season, all in relief. In 13 innings, Chris posted a 4.14 earned-run average but struck out 15.

Stetson Olson 3B, Washington State, fr. Olson hit .148 in 27 at-bats for the Cougars this season, starting four games as a true freshman.

Jeff Brigham RHP, Washington, fr. In his first season for the Huskies, Brigham pitched 51 1⁄3 innings in 23 appearances, the second-highest mark on the team. Brigham went 4-1 with a 4.73 earned-run average.

Loren Gardner-Young INF, Nevada, fr. A three-year all-league player in high school, he missed his senior year with an injured left labrum. He redshirted for Nevada this season.

Nick Stiltner RHP, Corban College, jr. Stiltner posted a respectable 3.78 earned-run average. A transfer from Oregon State, Stiltner ended the year 2-10 with 51 strikeouts in 66 2⁄3 innings.

Medford df d Klamath Falls

Derek Blankenship INF, George Fox, fr. Blankenship started 37 of George Fox’s 38 games this season as a true freshman, hitting .254 with a .331 on-base percentage.

2010 standings East Division Wenatchee AppleSox 29-19 Kelowna Falcons 22-26 *Moses Lake Pirates 21-27 Walla Walla Sweets 18-30 *Moses Lake no longer fields a team in the WCL

West Division Corvallis Knights Bend Elks Bellingham Bells Kitsap BlueJackets Cowlitz Black Bears

East Divisional Series Wenatchee def. Kelowna, 2-0

West Divisional Series Bend def. Corvallis, 2-1

31-17 27-21 25-22 24-23 18-30

WCL Championship Series Wenatchee def. Bend, 2-1

Brandon Snyder LHP, Washington State, fr. Snyder struck out one and allowed no runs in the one inning he pitched for the Cougars this season.

Tyler Christian INF, San Jose State, so. Christian started 52 games this season for the Spartans, in which he hit .233 and scored 37 runs, the third-best mark on the team.

Cameron Cuneo LHP, UC Santa Barbara, fr. The 6-foot-5-inch Cuneo made 14 relief appearances for UCSB and one start, posting a 3.95 earnedrun average in 13 2⁄3 innings.

Riley Tompkins 1B, Seattle University, jr. The 6-foot-5-inch first baseman hit .266 in 29 games for the Redhawks.

A.J. Berglund RHP, UC Santa Barbara, fr. Berglund did not play in a game this season for UCSB.

Cullen Hendrickson INF, Seattle University, so. After hitting .290 as a freshman, Hendrickson batted .227 this season. The sophomore posted 22 runs batted in this year.

Johnny Melero LHP, San Jose State, fr. Melero went 3-3 with a 4.29 earned-run average this season, striking out 23 in 35 2⁄3 innings of work.

Ryan Dunn SS, Oregon State, so. Dunn hit .296 this season, his first at OSU, and started 41 of 55 games. An honorable mention Pac-10 selection.

Stephen Ostapeck RHP, Villanova, so. Ostapeck posted a team-low 2.96 earned-run average this season, striking out 27 in 45 2⁄3 innings, most of them out of the bullpen.

Michael Benjamin INF, Arizona State, fr. A 45th-round draft pick of the Colorado Rockies in 2010, Benjamin hit .190 in 21 at-bats with the Sun Devils in 2011.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile

With a full stadium behind him, Bend Elk pitcher Nick Stiltner throws a pitch to a Corvallis hitter during the 2009 West Coast League playoffs. The Elks led the WCL in attendance last season.

A look at the home of the Bend Elks, including ticket price and a map of the stadium grounds:

Stadium stats

Box seats • One season box seat, third-base side; $150 • One season box seat, first-base side: $125 • One season box seat, behind home plate: $125 • Four season box seats, third-base side: $600 • Four season box seats, first-base side: $500 • Four season box seats, behind home plate: $500 • Day of game: $9 each seat

• General admission tickets to all

games are available at the Pro Image store at the Cascade Village Shopping Center and at Vince Genna Stadium. • For more information contact the Bend Elks at 541-312-9259 or visit www.bendelks.com.

• Capacity: 2,500 • Opened: 1946 • Dimensions: Left field, 330

feet; center field, 390 feet; right field: 330 feet • 2009 highlights: The Elks led the West Coast League in overall attendance (52,263 fans) and league attendance (37,963) last season en route to their appearance in the WCL Championship Series. Bend’s average of 1,460 fans per WCL game was also the best mark in the conference.

Preferred seats • One season preferred seat: $110 • Two season preferred seats:$220 • Four season preferred seats:$400 • Day of game: $7.50 each seat

General admission

Tickets are $5 each and can be upgraded to preferred seats for $2.50 more the day of game. For $100, spectators can get 35 general admission seats for the season.

Parking

Beer garden Hot drink booth

Home team dugout

Infield

Outfield

Toby DeMello C, Saint Mary’s College, jr. DeMello started 51 of the Gaels’ 55 games this year and hit .280, the third-best mark on the team. He was all-West Coast Conference honorable mention.

Kurt Jahnke RHP, Saint Mary’s College, fr. Jahnke made 16 relief appearances for the Gaels this year, striking out 20 in 25 1⁄3 innings while posting a 4.26 earned-run average.

Kyle Buchanan C, Belmont Abbey (N.C.), jr. A transfer from Washington State, Buchanan hit .302 and started 44 of Belmont Abbey’s 46 games this season.

Daniel Chavez RHP, College of San Mateo, fr. Chavez went 6-2 with a 2.35 earned-run average for the Bulldogs, striking out 47 batters in 53 2⁄3 innings.

Michael Tevlin C, Seattle University, jr. Tevlin ended the 2011 season with a .196 average in 32 games for Seattle University. The left-handed hitter can also play in the outfield.

{ Vince Genna Stadium } Seating and tickets

Catchers

Joey McClung LHP, Middle Tennessee State, so. Pitching in relief, McClung posted a 6.68 earned-run average in 21 appearances in 2011. McClung struck out 20 and walked 22 in 31 innings.

Press box Scorekeeper and announcer

Daniel Grazzini RHP, College of San Mateo, fr. Grazzini recorded a 2.31 earnedrun average in 11 2⁄3 innings of work for the College of San Mateo, all of which came in relief.

Outfielders

Brandon Brennan RHP, Oregon, fr. A 40th-round draft pick by the Colorado Rockies in 2010, Brennan did not make an appearance for the Ducks in 2011.

Royce Bolinger OF, Gonzaga, jr. A two-year starter for the Bulldogs, Bolinger hit .283 this season with 11 doubles and three home runs.

Brady Kirkpatrick RHP, Maryland, fr. A graduate of Eugene’s Marist High, Kirkpatrick went 2-5 his first year at Maryland. He posted a 5.71 ERA but struck out 56 batters in 58 1⁄3 innings.

Kyle Mauch OF, Centenary (La.), so. Mauch, a graduate of Henley High in Klamath Falls, hit .250 in 24 atbats for Centenary this season.

Donald Collins OF, Saint Mary’s College, jr. Collins returns to Bend for a second consecutive summer after hitting .230 and stealing a teamhigh eight bases for the Gaels in 2011.

Josh McAlister RHP, Arizona State, fr. McAlister pitched four innings for ASU this season, striking out four while allowing one run.

Shawn O’Brien OF, Saint Mary’s College, so. O’Brien hit .260 in 50 at-bats this season, starting seven games for Saint Mary’s.

Jason Wilson RHP, Western Oregon, jr. A Summit High grad, Wilson went 3-0 with a 3.62 earned-run average in four starts.

Bo Walter OF, College of San Mateo, fr. Walter was second on his California junior college team in average (.327), starting 27 of 35 games.

Nick Wagner RHP, Oregon, fr. Wagner, who was selected in the 44th-round of the 2009 Major League Baseball draft by Toronto, redshirted after appearing in 17 games as a hitter in 2010.

Justin Maffei OF, College of San Mateo, fr. Maffei hit .324 and led the College of San Mateo in hits (44), runs (33), doubles (11), RBIs (25) and total bases (68).

Alex Bailey LHP, Pierce College (Wash.), so. Bailey, who did not play this spring, last competed for Pierce College in 2010 when he was an all-Northwest Athletic Association of Community Colleges second-team selection.

Visitor team dugout Concessions Entrance and ticket booth

How to get there

Concessions

Bend Fieldhouse

Wilson Ave.

Source: The Bend Elks

97

Fifth St.

Fourth St.

Division St.

Roosevelt Ave. BUS

Reed Market Road

Parking

Main office

Vince Genna Stadium

Second St. Third St.

97

Deck seating

330 feet

Parking

Completed in spring 2009, the Bend Fieldhouse is home to six indoor batting cages, the Elks’ office quarters, and restrooms for the public. When the batting cage nets are drawn back, the Fieldhouse boasts a regulation-size infield. Built for approximately $1 million, the Fieldhouse also houses an apparel and equipment shop, as well as the Elks’ ticket office. Graphic by The Bulletin

Cameron Newell OF Newell, who did not play for Oregon State this spring, last played competitively for Roseburg’s American Legion team in the summer of 2010.

No picture available

Nate King LHP, North Carolina State, so. King posted an earned-run average of 9.58 in 20 2⁄3 innings for North Carolina State in 2010, the last year he played for the Wolfpack.


Bulletin Daily Paper 06/08/11