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Boneyard Beer celebrates 1 year in Bend

Two-time runner-up Andrew Boone may set pace in men’s elite race • SPORTS, D1

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Horse virus ASCOCC averts shutdown for now casts pall over equine events By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

A possible shutdown of Central Oregon Community College’s student government has apparently been avoided, though the student organization remains on the verge of running out of money.

The Associated Students of COCC (ASCOCC) has been locked in controversy since October, when the group hired a lawyer and a public relations specialist to help define the student government’s role. The college has had a student government since the 1950s, but a formal policy on ASCOCC

did not exist until an amended constitution was approved in April. ASCOCC spent about $56,000 for the lawyer and for public relations. Though details are yet to be finalized, a deal to keep ASCOCC from shuttering for the year is near, according to Director of College Rela-

tions Ron Paradis. That deal could involve the college helping to cover some of ASCOCC’s remaining expenses, he said. Paradis said it was uncertain how much money ASCOCC has committed and how much cash it has left. See ASCOCC / A4

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

The outbreak of a deadly equine virus has cast a pall over horse events in Oregon and across the West, with several events cancelled and attendance down at shows that are continuing. A form of equine herpes, EHV-1 was most recently detected in horses that participated in the National Cutting Horse Association Western National Championship, held in Ogden, Utah, between April 30 and May 8. Eighteen Oregon horses were at the event. Don Hansen, Oregon state veterinarian, said he has confirmed one case of EHV-1 in Oregon, in a horse that had “nose-to-nose” contact with one of the horses at the Ogden show. Five horses have died or been euthanized due to symptoms of the virus in California, Colorado, Idaho and Utah, with fewer than two dozen cases of infection confirmed in various Western states. Candi Bothum, state chairwoman for the Oregon High School Equestrian State Championships scheduled for this weekend at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, said she anticipates 10 to 15 percent of the 500 competitors originally expected will skip the event due to concerns about the virus. See Horse / A5

JOHN DAY Angel Carpenter / Blue Mountain Eagle

Grant School District No. 3 Superintendent Mark Witty surveys the damage at Grant Union High School’s track Monday in John Day, after floodwaters receded. The school, along with many other businesses and homes, was damaged earlier this week. Officials are concerned the flooding could continue.

A region at risk of floods As Eastern Oregon recovers, Deschutes Basin likely to withstand large runoff

Marriages are fewer but longer-lasting By Carol Morello The Washington Post

Americans may be postponing marriage, and fewer are wedding at all. But what about the people who do get married? They’re staying together longer than they have in years. Three in four couples who married after 1990 celebrated a 10-year anniversary, according to census statistics reported Wednesday. That was a rise of three percentage points compared with couples who married in the early 1980s, when the nation’s divorce rate was at its highest. One reason for the increase, said demographers and sociologists, is that people are marrying later in life, after they have completed their education. Not only are they more mature, but they also are more financially secure. “People seem to be finding a new marriage bargain that works for 21st-century couples,” said Andrew Cherlin, a Johns Hopkins University sociologist. “It’s based on pooling two incomes, replacing the old breadwinner-homemaker bargain that worked well in the ’50s.” See Marriage / A5

BURNS

TOP NEWS INSIDE

Randy Parks / For The Bulletin

PLANETS: New research finds billions floating across cosmos, Page A3

A home northeast of Burns was flooded Wednesday. Crews used sandbags to strengthen a levee to try to prevent flooding in other areas of town, and the National Guard responded to help out.

By Kate Ramsayer

Although the Prineville Reservoir was listed as 104 percent full Wednesday, it was designed to hold additional water and spill some through the spillway. Officials don’t expect flooding to be a major problem in the Crooked River drainage.

The Bulletin

ELECTION UPDATE: Measures and races in Deschutes County, Page A4

I

n Burns Wednesday, volunteers and crews were filling sandbags to help shore up a levee

that stands between the Silvies River

Correction In a story headlined “Bond passes handily,” which appeared on A1 on Wednesday, May 18, 27th Street was misidentified. The Bulletin regrets the error.

and part of the town, and the National Guard was on its way to help out. Tuesday evening, road crews cut a

Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

trench through U.S. Highway 20 to

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“The Silvies River has gotten out of its bank, it’s made a new lake there that wasn’t there last Sunday,” said Steve Grasty, a top Harney County official. “We have never seen the flows like this.” In John Day, water from Canyon Creek that flooded the high school and many homes and businesses is receding, reports Grant County Sheriff Glenn Palmer. But officials are leaving the thousands of sandbags in place — in case the rain and snowmelt from higher-than-

PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR average snowpacks pulses back into town. “We’re in the recovery, but we’re leaving things in place until we make sure that the water isn’t going to come back up,” Palmer said. But the Deschutes and Crooked rivers have avoided major flooding so far, although some stretches and tributaries are seeing higher than normal flows. And water managers say the geology of the local river basins, along with lighter rainfall this week, means that Central Oregon will

probably not face the flooding issues swamping parts of Eastern Oregon. “Every little stream’s a little different,” said Kyle Gorman, south central region manager with the Oregon Water Resources Department. The Crooked River Basin, however, is like the John Day River Basin in that when it rains, the water can run off the fine grained, claylike soils and cause flashy river flows, Gorman said. See Floods / A4


A2 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

7 12 13 42 49 16 Power Play: 4. The estimated jackpot is $120 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

1 11 16 19 28 43 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $14 million for Saturday’s drawing.

Learning to read in native tongue helps students master a second

In Georgia, court ruling poses peril for charters By Sam Dillon

By Teresa Watanabe

New York Times News Service

Los Angeles Times

A ruling by the Georgia Supreme Court cast doubt on the future of 17 charter schools there, leaving thousands of families uncertain about whether classes will continue through the end of the academic year and how students will continue in the fall. In a 4-3 decision, the Georgia court on Monday struck down a law empowering a special statewide commission to approve and finance charter schools even over the objections of local school boards. National charter school advocates, who had closely watched the case, said they feared the ruling could encourage a new wave of litigation against charter schools, which are publicly financed but independently run. Since the law established it in 2008, the Georgia Charter School Commission had authorized operations and public financing for 17 schools, officials said. Nine of them, with a collective enrollment of about 8,000 students, are in operation this year; eight new ones were to open this fall with an additional enrollment of about 7,000 students, said Tony Roberts, president of the Georgia Charter Schools Association. The ruling threw the nine existing schools into some turmoil, raising questions about whether the state would finance their operations through the end of the classes, about another three weeks. “All these schools are getting anguished calls today from students and parents, with everybody asking the same thing, ‘Am I still going to have a school?’ ” Roberts said. Georgia’s school superintendent, John Barge, said the state “stands ready to help in whatever way necessary to ensure that the education of the students in these schools is not compromised.” In a 24-page ruling, Chief Justice Carol Hunstein said that only local boards of education were empowered by Georgia’s constitution to open and finance public schools.

LOS ANGELES — In a Glendale, Calif., public school classroom, the immigrant’s daughter uses no English as she conjugates verbs and writes sentences about cats. More than a decade after California voters eliminated most bilingual programs, first-grader Sofia Checchi is taught in Italian nearly all day — as she and her 20 classmates at Franklin Elementary School have been since kindergarten. Yet in just a year, Sofia has jumped a grade level in reading English. In the view of her mother — an Italian immigrant — Sofia’s achievement validates a growing body of research indicating that learning to read in students’ primary languages helps them become more fluent in English. The Glendale Unified School District has become one of the nation’s leading laboratories for such dual-language immersion, offering programs in Italian, German, Spanish, Armenian, Japanese and Korean. At Franklin, instruction is 90 percent in Italian and 10 percent in English in kindergarten and first grade, a proportion that will shift to 50-50 by fifth grade. Although Sofia is classified as an English-language learner, most of her classmates are native English speakers whose parents want them to learn Italian. Growing in popularity, duallanguage immersion programs are the new face of bilingual education — without the stigma. Though bilingual education was often perceived — and resented by some — as public handouts only for immigrant families, dual programs offer the chance to learn a second language to native-born American children as well. “Bilingual education has basically become a dirty word, but dual-language programs seem to have this cachet that people are glomming onto,” said Julie Sugarman of the Center for Applied Linguistics, a Washington, D.C.-based research organization. “They are successful for English-language learners. And white, middle-class parents want these programs to give their children an edge in the increasingly globalized world.”

Programs on the rise Sugarman estimated that duallanguage immersion programs have grown in the last few years from a few hundred to 1,000 or more nationwide, with California and Texas leading the way. California had 224 programs in 100 school districts as of 2008 — a number that officials say has risen considerably in recent years. About 1.5 million students, or one-quarter of California’s school-age population, are English-language learners. The vast majority are placed in Englishonly programs, an approach essentially mandated by Proposition 227 in 1998. The voter-approved initiative, successfully pushed by Silicon

Don Bartletti / Los Angeles Times

Kylie Hwang, right, reads in Korean to her second-grade class at Keppel Elementary in Glendale, Calif. The dual-immersion class is designed to teach a foreign language to native and non-native speakers. Valley entrepreneur Ron Unz, scrapped most bilingual programs and decreed that English learners should be taught “overwhelmingly in English.” Parents may still request bilingual instruction in certain circumstances, but less than one-third of the state’s English-language learners have done so, according to state data. Yet a vast body of research indicates that Proposition 227’s core assertion — that English immersion is more successful than bilingual education — is simply wrong, according to many education experts. State standardized test scores from 2003 to 2010 show that the gap between English learners and all students has widened, with their progress in English and language arts falling behind that of all other students.

Despite findings, some boards not convinced In a 2008 review of more than 500 studies on English-language learners, Stanford University education professor Claude Goldenberg wrote that one major consistent finding was that learning to read in a child’s first language boosts reading achievement in the second language. Kathryn Lindholm-Leary, a San Jose State University professor, said the counterintuitive effect occurs because children are able to take reading skills learned in their first language — such as linking sounds to words — and apply them to their second. So far, dual-language programs have not stirred the controversy that surrounded bilingual education. Some school boards have rejected them because they lack the resources or remain skeptical of the results. Advocates of traditional bilingual programs, meanwhile, have hailed dual immersion for mixing English learners with native English speakers instead of isolating

them in special classrooms. Unz said he sees some value in the dual-language programs, although he dismissed most of the research showing their effectiveness. “They’re probably beneficial for some students and not beneficial for others,” he said. He added that “affluent, middleclass, English-speaking families” are supporting them — a politically potent constituency that has helped spread their use. Such families have flocked to Franklin, which was in danger of closing a few years ago until district officials decided to offer Italian, German and Spanish immersion programs. The school has grown from fewer than 300 students in 2007 to 530 projected for this fall. There are waiting lists, particularly for the Spanish program. Diversity has increased, with the proportion of low-socioeconomic families falling from 77 percent to 53 percent, school officials say. Only two families — both Spanish-speaking — declined to select dual programs for their children this fall; they will be offered spots in all-English kindergartens at other schools. Meanwhile, a new group of “crazy involved parents,” as one mother put it, has revitalized the PTA and started a foundation that raised $20,000 the first year for an after-school enrichment program offering art, yoga, science and music. “It’s been a huge turnaround,” said Jennifer Freemon, whose daughter, Kyra, is in the firstgrade Spanish-English class. “It’s keeping good, strong families in public schools.”

classroom. But she and her husband trust the research showing that children in dual-language classes usually lag a bit behind in English skills for the first few years, then tend to surpass their counterparts in English-only classes by fifth and sixth grade. For her part, Kyra, 6, said she enjoys her lessons. “It’s really fun because your brain gets to work with two different languages and your tongue gets to do two different sounds.” Isaiah Coyotl, a sixth-grader in the Spanish-English program at Glendale’s Edison Elementary School, is excelling — in both languages. The son of Mexican immigrants, he knew very little English when he began kindergarten at the school. His state standardized test scores in English improved from a basic level of 334 in third grade to an advanced level of 467 in fifth grade, based on a scale of 600 points. Articulate and fluent in both languages, he said that strengthening his Spanish allows him to communicate with his family in Mexico — unlike many of his cousins here who have lost most of their home language. “This is an amazing program and people should consider putting their children in it,” he said. “It could help a lot of boys and girls get better jobs, speak two languages and help people in need.”

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

Improvement shown Freemon, a teacher, said it was “a little nerve-wracking” to see her daughter struggling with English while immersed in a 90 percent Spanish-language

Yale frat restricted over sexist chant By Lisa W. Foderaro New York Times News Service

A Yale fraternity whose alumni include President George H.W. Bush and President George W. Bush has been banned from conducting any activities on campus for five years, including recruiting, as punishment for an incident in October in which members led pledges in chants offensive to women, the university announced Tuesday. Yale’s publicizing of its disciplinary actions is highly unusual, but officials said that their move followed a remarkably public and far-reaching episode. After the chanting in a residential quadrangle by members of the fraternity chapter, Delta Kappa Epsilon, 16 students and alumnae filed a complaint with the federal Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, accusing the university of failing to eliminate a hostile sexual environment on campus. The department con-

firmed last month that it had started an investigation. In a letter to students and faculty members Tuesday, Mary Miller, dean of Yale College, said that the Executive Committee, the college’s disciplinary board, had imposed sanctions on the chapter, which is not an official student organization. The fraternity will no longer be able to communicate with students via the Yale bulletin board or Yale e-mail, and its use of the university name will be severely limited. As for the students who took part in the sexually explicit chanting — which included “No means yes!” — Miller said that federal privacy laws prevented the college from releasing details about individual punishments. But she said that the Executive Committee issued penalties after finding that “several fraternity members” had violated undergraduate regulations. “After a full hearing, the

committee found that the DKE chapter, as an organization, one comprised of Yale students, had threatened and intimidated others, in violation of the Undergraduate Regulations of Yale College as they pertain to ‘harassment, coercion or intimidation’ and ‘imperiling the integrity and values of the university community,’ ” Miller wrote. The letter said that Yale had formally asked the national organization to suspend the chapter for five years. But Doug Lanpher, executive director of Delta Kappa Epsilon International Fraternity, declined to say whether it would do so and called the other restrictions excessive, saying that the organization had already put the chapter on probation. The Yale chapter, established in 1844, was the first for the fraternity, which now counts 50 chapters in the United States and Canada.

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T S IMF director resigns By Gerry Mullany New York Times News Service

Dominique Strauss-Kahn resigned Wednesday as head of the International Monetary Fund after explosive allegations that he had sexually attacked a cleaning woman in a midtown Manhattan hotel room. “It is with infinite sadness that I feel compelled today to present to the Executive Board my resignation from my post of Managing Director of the IMF,” he said in a statement issued Wednesday. “I think at this time first of my wife — whom I love more than anything — of my children, of my

Obama in spotlight as tensions soar across Mideast By Helene Cooper and Ethan Bronner New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Few game-changing proposals are emerging to defuse soaring tensions in the Middle East as a busy week of diplomacy unfolds with President Barack Obama’s address to the region and his meeting with Israel’s prime minister. Against the backdrop of Middle East uprisings that have intensified animus toward Israel and growing momentum for global recognition of a Palestinian state, U.S. and Israeli officials are struggling to balance national security interests against the need to adapt to a transformative movement in the Arab world. The White House unveiled a $2 billion multiyear economic aid package for Egypt, which officials say would largely shift existing funds. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel prepared to arrive in Washington with a familiar package that he hoped would shift the burden of restarting the peace process from Israel to the Palestinians. Obama, who is set to address Americans — and, more significantly, Muslims around the world — from the State Department on Thursday morning, may yet have something surprising to say. One administration official said that there remained debate about whether Obama would formally endorse Israel’s pre-1967 borders as the starting point for negotiations over a Palestinian state, a move that, while not necessarily a policy shift, would send an oratorical signal that the United States expected Israel to make concessions.

family, of my friends.” His resignation comes just days after he was taken off an Air France plane at Kennedy International Airport and arrested in connection with the alleged attack. Strauss-Kahn, a former French finance minister, had been expected to declare his candidacy for the French presidency soon. He was seen as the figure most likely to oust President Nicolas Sarkozy. In issuing his resignation Wednesday, Strauss-Kahn said, “I want to say that I deny with the greatest possible firmness all of the allegations that have been

made against me.” News of the arrest produced an earthquake of shock, outrage, disbelief and embarrassment throughout France. Though Strauss-Kahn received generally high marks for his stewardship of the bank, his reputation was tarnished in 2008 by an affair with a Hungarian economist who was a subordinate there. The fund decided to stand by him despite concluding that he had shown poor judgment in the affair. Strauss-Kahn issued an apology to employees at the bank and his wife, Anne Sinclair, a U.S.-born French journalist.

Libya releases 4 foreign journalists New York Times News Service TRIPOLI, Libya — Four foreign journalists held for several weeks by the Libyan government were released Wednesday and taken to a Tripoli hotel, with government officials saying they would be provided with transport to a border crossing with Tunisia on Thursday. In addition, a journalist from Al Jazeera who had been detained in Syria and then held in Iran for almost three weeks has been released, her family and thenetwork said Wednesday. That journalist, Dorothy Parvaz, disappeared in Syria last month while covering antigovernment protests. The journalists released in Tripoli were James Foley and Clare Morgana Gillis, who are Americans; Manu Brabo, who is from Spain; and Nigel Chandler from Britain. Libyan officials said they had no information about a fifth journalist who has been missing for weeks, Anton Hammerl,

Darko Bandic / The Associated Press

Freed American freelance journalist Clare Morgana Gillis arrives at her hotel in Tripoli, Libya, on Wednesday. Four journalists held for allegedly illegally entering the country were freed. a freelance photographer who holds South African and Austrian citizenships. The decision to release the four appeared to be linked to a new effort by Moammar Gadhafi’s government to find a way out of

Obama imposes sanctions on Syrian leader, 6 aides By Joby Warrick and Liz Sly The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration imposed sanctions Wednesday on Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and six of his government’s top officials as the White House sought to increase pressure on Assad to halt violence against anti-government protesters. President Barack Obama approved the financial penalties as part of an executive order accusing Assad of human rights abuses during a brutal, twomonth crackdown that has left hundreds of civilians dead and thousands behind bars. In Syria, widespread demonstrations were reported after nightfall Wednesday, a possible indication that the opposition is feeling encouraged by the

mounting international pressure on Assad. It was the second round of sanctions against Syria in three weeks, and the first to single out Assad by name. A senior administration official involved in preparing the sanctions said the White House was responding to sharply deteriorating conditions in Syria, where unarmed demonstrators have been attacked by tanks in at least two cities. “President al-Assad and his regime must immediately end the use of violence, answer the calls of the Syrian people for a more representative government, and embark upon the path of meaningful democratic reform,” said David Cohen, the Treasury Department’s acting undersecretary for terrorism and financial intelligence.

End of the world? How about a party instead? By Tom Breen The Associated Press

For some, it’s Judgment Day. For others, it’s party time. A loosely organized Christian movement has spread the word around the globe that Jesus Christ will return to earth on Saturday to gather the faithful into heaven. While the Christian mainstream isn’t buying it, many other skeptics are milking it. A Facebook page titled “Post rapture looting” offers this invitation: “When everyone is gone and god’s not looking, we need to

pick up some sweet stereo equipment and maybe some new furniture for the mansion we’re going to squat in.” By Wednesday afternoon, more than 175,000 people indicated they would be “attending” the “public event.” The prediction is also being mocked in the comic strip “Doonesbury” and has inspired “Rapture parties” to celebrate what hosts expect will be the failure of the world to come to an end. In the Army town of Fayetteville, N.C., the local chapter of

the American Humanist Association has turned the event into a two-day extravaganza, with a Saturday night party followed by a day-after concert. “It’s not meant to be insulting, but come on,” said organizer Geri Weaver. “Christians are openly scoffing at this.” The prediction originates with Harold Camping, an 89-year-old retired civil engineer from Oakland, Calif., who founded Family Radio Worldwide, an independent ministry that has broadcast his prediction around the world.

Gates: ‘Somebody’ knew of hideout, but not top officials By David S. Cloud McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Osama bin Laden’s hideout was probably known to “somebody” in Pakistan before the U.S. raid that killed him, but there is no sign that senior Pakistani officials were aware of the al-Qaida lead-

Strauss-Kahn’s extramarital affairs have long been considered an open secret. But the legal charges against him — which include attempted rape, forced oral sex and an effort to sequester another person against her will — are of an entirely different magnitude, even in France and elsewhere in continental Europe, where voters have generally shown more lenience than Americans toward the sexual behavior of prominent politicians. In a statement issued Wednesday night, the IMF said that John Lipsky would remain as acting managing director.

er’s location, Defense Secretary Robert Gates said Wednesday. In fact, since the operation, the U.S. has seen some indications that top Pakistani officials were unaware that bin Laden was hiding in the town of Abbottabad until after a team of U.S. Navy SEALs killed him in his bed-

room May 2. “I have seen no evidence at all that the senior leadership knew. In fact, I’ve seen some evidence to the contrary,” Gates said at a Pentagon news conference. “We have no evidence yet with respect to anybody else. My supposition is, somebody knew.”

its isolation through diplomatic negotiations. That bid has been rebuffed by rebel officials and by Western governments backing the NATO bombing campaign, who have said Gadhafi must step down as a condition for any talks.

A method known as gravitational microlensing has indicated that for each of the Milky Way’s 200 billion stars, there are at least two Jupitersize planets. New York Times News Service

New research finds billions of lone planets in cosmos By Dennis Overbye New York Times News Service

Is the galaxy full of orphans? Astronomers said Wednesday that space was littered with hundreds of billions of planets that had been ejected from the planetary systems that gave them birth and either were going their own lonely ways or were only distantly bound to stars at least 10 times as far away as the sun is from the Earth. There are two Jupiter-mass planets floating around for each of the 200 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy, according to measurements and calculations by an international group of astronomers led by Takahiro Sumi, of Osaka University in Japan, and reported in the journal Nature. Before this research, it was thought that only about 10 percent or 20 percent of stars harbored Jupiter-mass planets. Now it seems as if the planets outnumber the stars. Astronomers said the results would allow them to tap into an unsuspected realm of exoplanets — as planets outside our solar system are called — causing scientists to re-evaluate how many there were, where they were and how they were created, even as astronomers pondered

whether the new planets in question were in fact floating free or are just far from their stars, at distances comparable to those of Uranus and Neptune in our own solar system. In the past two decades, astronomers have identified some 500 planets that are circling other stars, and this year scientists using NASA’s Kepler satellite announced 1,235 more candidates. But these were found using methods that favored the detection of planets close to their stars. The new work was done using a method known as gravitational microlensing. It relies on the ability of a gravitational field — in this case of a planet and its star — to bend light and act as a magnifying lens. Astronomers from two groups — Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics, based in New Zealand and Japan, and the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, based in Poland and Chile — monitor the light from a vast field of background stars, looking for brief blips of increased brightness caused by a planet and its host star passing in the foreground. The group recorded 10 such events consistent with being caused by planet-size objects but did not detect the corresponding blips from these planets’ host stars, suggesting either that they did not belong to any star.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

May 17 election update Below are the latest unofficial results for contested races and ballot measures in Deschutes County as reported Wednesday by the county clerk’s office. Results published in Wednesday’s Bulletin from Crook and Jefferson counties remain unchanged. Those tallies, reported on election night, are final unofficial results for Crook County; the Jefferson County clerk’s office is awaiting tallies from other counties’ ballots to finalize its count.

Voter turnout Deschutes: 28.3% • Crook: 23% • Jefferson: 47.1%

Continued from A1 “When it rains, it runs off almost immediately, or if the snow melts it runs off very rapidly,” he said. “The water doesn’t infiltrate.” The John Day Basin is much bigger, however, and there’s more higher elevation areas where the snow can melt off — the Crooked River has a flow of around 3,000 cubic feet per second, Gorman said, while the John Day is about 10 times that much. And this last week saw more rain in the John Day area compared to in the Crooked River basin. “Had we seen more precipitation, we would have seen a similar response,” he said. In addition, although the flows of the Crooked River and Ochoco Creek picked up this week, there was space to store that extra water in the reservoirs on both waterways, said Mary Mellema, a hydrologist with the Bureau of Reclamation.

Reservoirs near capacity but unlikely to overflow

On the Web • For your full updated election scorecard, visit www.bendbulletin.com/results. • Find full coverage of the May election, including updated and archived stories, at www.bendbulletin.com/may17.

KEY Contested races/measures

Floods

Votes and percentages

— Winners and passed ballot measures

Prineville Reservoir is currently at 104 percent full — but that just means that water is flowing out of the spillway at Bowman Dam, like it was designed to, she said. And there’s room for a lot more water, she added. “The water’s going to keep coming over that spillway, and eventually it’ll just be such a little bit of water,” Mellema said. Ochoco Reservoir is 97 percent

full, but with the weather drying up a bit and the amount of water flowing into the reservoir dropping off, Mellema said it was unlikely to fill — and if it does, it will simply go over the spillway as well. “We’re thinking things are sitting pretty good,” she said. “We don’t expect any major peaks (of water flow) coming from the snow.” If the reservoirs remain full and weather forecasters start predicting major rainstorms, the Bureau of Reclamation can let more water out of the reservoirs, but currently that is an unlikely situation, she said. Rob Tanner, hydrologist with the Deschutes and Ochoco national forests, saw that Ochoco Creek was full for almost seven weeks earlier this spring, and is back up again. Another rainstorm, especially in warm temperatures, could cause a lot of snow to melt and run into the river, creeks and tributaries. “The biggest concern is if we get rain when it’s really warm, or relatively warm, and the snow is melting,” he said. “We can get a big push.” And that could cause flooding, Tanner said, if the Bureau of Reclamation lets more water out of the reservoirs because the storage areas have gone over their capacity — which is what happened during the floods of 1998.

the porous, volcanic soils in the basin and filters down to the aquifer, instead of flowing across the ground’s surface to join up with a river. And the Deschutes River is fed by springs that provide a steady flow from that aquifer, which Tanner said has been compared to the size of the Great Salt Lake. “It’s a much slower response,” he said. “It takes a while for things to go through the ground and pop back out, there’s less flashiness.” But while the main Deschutes River is spring-fed, the Little Deschutes River gets its flow from both springs and run-off, said Gorman, with the Water Resources Department. “We’re keeping our eye on the Lower Deschutes,” he said. “It can, and has in the past, risen significantly. It’s not fast, but it will rise.” Flows on the Lower Deschutes are currently about 540 cubic feet per second, he said, and normal highs are between 400 and 500 cfs. And, if a warm rain continues to melt snow, it could get up to 700 or 800 — or even 1,000 — cubic feet per second in the next 45 days, he said. “We’ve seen 1,000 in the past,” Gorman said. “The river gets really wide at that point, it may come up onto people’s properties in areas that they’re not used to, but it’s not a real rapid thing.” Elsewhere in the Deschutes Basin, Tumalo Creek and Whychus Creek are also flashy creeks that can rise or fall based on rainfall and snowmelt — but spring isn’t their problem season, Gorman said. This time of year, the snowpack in

Different geology in Deschutes Basin In the Deschutes Basin, however, the geology of the area creates a different response to spring rains. Rainfall and snowmelt seeps into

those drainages is deep enough that the rain falling onto snow can be absorbed, he said, and then slowly melt off later. Floods from those creeks come in the late fall or early winter, he said, when rain hits light, fluffy snow and melts it all at once. In Harney County, however, about 1.5 inches of rain fell over much of the drainage that feeds the Silvies River, Grasty said, and melted a higher-than-normal snowpack. “It just started coming off,” he said. Already, some houses are flooding and some residents are being warned to think about moving their things to prepare for a foot or so of water. If areas are flooded, it won’t come in a fast wave, Grasty said, but will still cause damage. And it’s not just a concern from the river, he said. “The water table’s raised so high, we’ve got a lot of little ponds and lakes scattered around town,” he said. Due to the flooding, Highway 20 was closed at milepost 134 as of Wednesday evening. In John Day, even though the waters have gone down considerably, businesses are still pumping basements and some county roads are still closed, Palmer said. Damage to the school alone is expected to be between $700,000 and $1 million, he said. There were also high flows off the north fork of the John Day River. “I’ve never seen that river doing what it was doing,” he said. Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

— Races that remain too close to call

78.1%

2,796

21.5%

Zone 6 At Large: • Peggy Kinkade • Kim Page

New York Times News Service

10,512

78.2%

2,872

21.4%

BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT Position 1: • Dallas Brown

6,839

60%

• Dan Fishkin

4,519

39.7%

497

4.6%

• Justin Gottlieb

2,604

24.3%

• Scott Wallace

7,568

70.7%

• Johnny Corbin

2,459

*

• AJ Losoya

2,523

*

• Luke McCullough

1,294

*

• Bob Perry

2,315

*

Position 2: • Foster Fell

REDMOND SCHOOL DISTRICT Position 3:

Position 5:

• Paul Lawrence Rodby

By Donald G. McNeil Jr.

1,477

*

• Andrew Gorayeb

946

*

• Cort Horner

455

*

SISTERS SCHOOL DISTRICT Position 4:

LA PINE PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT Position 1 • Gerald Anderson

353

36.7%

• Bob Metcalf

603

62.8%

• Sheila O’Malley

538

52.2%

• Robert Ray

489

47.4%

Position 5:

LA PINE SPECIAL SEWER DISTRICT Position 1: • Dennis Carter

28

32.6%

• William Sawders

58

67.4%

• Wayne Kovacs

57

65.5%

• James Newton

30

34.5%

Position 2:

Position 3: • Brian Earls

49

53.9%

• David Harms

42

46.2%

LA PINE WATER DISTRICT Position 1: • Dennis Carter

35

40.2%

• David Harms

52

59.8%

• Wayne Kovacs

65

72.2%

• BarbeAnn Nelson-Dodson**

25

27.8%

• James Newton

35

39.9%

• William Sawders

53

59.6%

Position 2:

Position 5:

TERREBONNE DOMESTIC WATER DISTRICT Position 1: • Curt Hinshaw

50

49.5%

• Sharon Struck

51

50.5%

MEASURES 9-83 (Bend): Issues $30 million in general obligation bonds for road improvements. Yes: 8,427 (56.1%) • No: 6,590 (43.9%) 9-84 (La Pine): Enacts a municipal charter. Yes: 127 (81.9%) • No: 28 (18.1%) Notes: *Percentage totals were not available from the clerks’ offices on starred races because the races were spread across ballots in multiple counties. These results do include tallies from other county clerks’ offices. **Nelson-Dodson resigned in March and removed herself from the race, but too late to have her name taken off the ballot.

China has slashed AIDS mortality by nearly two-thirds since it began distributing free antiretroviral drugs in 2002, Chinese government scientists are reporting. About 63 percent of all those needing AIDS drugs are getting them, up from virtually zero in 2002. That has caused a 64 percent drop in mortality in “person-years,” as China measures it, an estimate of how long someone would have lived without the disease. AIDS mortality dropped to 14.2 per 100 person-years in 2009, from 39.3 in 2002. The study, led by China’s national center for control and prevention of AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases,

was published online on Wednesday by Lancet Infectious Diseases. China’s success in such a short time “is a testimony to the young midlevel scientists who convinced the leadership that this was the right thing to do,” said Dr. Myron Cohen, an AIDS specialist from the University of North Carolina who has lived in China and helped it battle the epidemic. A different report, released Wednesday by the International Labor Organization of the United Nations, criticized China’s health-care system, saying that people infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, were frequently turned away by hospitals. China’s national center for AIDS control, a co-author of the report, agreed that hospital discrimination was a problem.

MAKE TRACKS

ASCOCC Continued from A1 “There is no final decision now on what we’re going to do, but there is no scheduled shutdown,” Paradis said. “In general, we’re continuing to look for the best options for moving forward and continuing to fund various clubs and activities, and setting a foundation for a positive 2011-12.” An ASCOCC shutdown could have happened as soon as this week, Paradis said. To avoid that, several options are being considered — including getting some of ASCOCC’s bills waived. In April, the college suspended ASCOCC’s vendor contracts. That policy became effective the first week in May and remains in place, Paradis said. Of ASCOCC’s funds, Paradis said there was “very little, not enough” money to get through the summer. “(A solution) is being worked on, so there’s still a lot of conversations left to take place,” Paradis said. ASCOCC’s Legislative Coordinator Terry Link had heard from college administration that a shutdown was possible by May 21. On Wednesday, he called the college’s fiscal services office to check the student government’s finances. Link said ASCOCC can afford to make it through the end of the fiscal year, if by a narrow margin. The fiscal year ends June 30. Even though he believes ASCOCC does not need the college’s help, Link was relieved to find out the student government would remain open. “We’re thankful for that. We’re very much looking forward to continuing to serve students,” Link said. According to Dustin Moore, who Friday was voted off as ASCOCC’s finance coordinator, the college’s administration should have more oversight of how a student government spends money. Still, he said, ASCOCC needs independence on how best to spend the money it has from student fees. “We do things for students that would not get done for students if the government didn’t do them,” Moore said. “I believe in a student government.” Link, for his part, agrees “more eyes” on ASCOCC’s finances would be a good thing, but he wants a finance specialist instead of broad college oversight. “Somebody from the accounting department that knows what they’re doing would be a benefit,” Link said. “Another hurdle from the administration would not be a benefit.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 A5

In symbolic move, Queen visits ‘Bloody Sunday’ massacre site By Alan Cowell New York Times News Service

The Associated Press

Queen Elizabeth II, center, Irish President Mary McAleese, right, and Christy Cooney, president of the Gaelic Athletic Association, look out at Dublin’s Croke Park Stadium, site of a notorious massacre where British troops killed 14 Irish civilians in 1920. The Queen’s visit the stadium Wednesday highlights the improvement in Anglo-Irish relations over the years.

Horse

Marriage

Continued from A1 Bothum said she’s been in regular contact with Hansen, and has been assured the risk of going forward with the event is minor. The horses at the event in Ogden are “very high-level cutting horses,” Bothum said, that are unlikely to have been in contact with the horses ridden by high school competitors. Organizers of the high school championships are recommending competitors avoid sharing brushes, hoses and water buckets while at the event to reduce the risk of virus transmission. While the odds of infection are relatively low, Bothum understands why owners are vigilant. “There’s a very emotional attachment, and people are reacting that way. There’s a lot of reaction based on that emotion,” Bothum said. “We’ve made our decision based on the facts, and they’ve made their decision based on what they feel the risk is.” The Oregon Cutting Horse Association has cancelled a competition scheduled for this weekend at the Yamhill County Fairgrounds as a result of the outbreak. Similar cutting horse events around the West have also been cancelled. Tuesday, competitors at the Can Chaser barrel race at the Crook County Fairgrounds said concerns about the virus seemed to be keeping attendance down, and Wednesday, the Bureau of Land Management cancelled a scheduled wild horse adoption event in Klamath Falls. Horses infected with EHV-1 will typically experience fever, lethargy and loss of coordination, and nasal discharge. The virus is spread through both physical contact and by airborne respiratory secretions passed from horse-tohorse over short distances. Hansen said although the “case mortality rate” for infected horses is high — 30 to 60 percent of horses that contract the virus will likely die — there is little evidence to suggest the virus is spreading. But some caution is warranted. “For the person who has a tremendously valuable horse, either in dollars or time invested and affection, the risk is pretty high,” he said. “I totally understand that.” Horses exposed to the virus will typically begin showing symptoms of the infection within two to 14 days. Hansen said the delay means it’s too soon to know if new infections will emerge soon or the virus has been contained. “All bets are off. We’re looking at where we are today,” Hansen said. “Over this weekend and over the next several days, the outbreak that could happen. ... Everything we’re saying could be wrong.” Tim Phillips, a veterinarian with the Desert Valley Equine Center in Redmond, said horses infected with the current strain of EHV-1 seem to be displaying more neurological problems, Phillips said, while past outbreaks of the virus were characterized by less-serious respiratory problems. Phillips, too, expects it will be a few more days before the full scope of the outbreak is known. Horse owners are more willing and able to travel long distances to events than in past years, Phillips said, leading to an increased risk of an infection to spread rapidly across multiple states. “Just like the movement of people on airlines, the possibility of spreading contagious disease has gone up quite a bit,” he said.

Continued from A1 Researchers increasingly are finding a connection between marriage and education. In 2009, 31 percent of brides had a college degree, up from 21 percent in 1996. “Marriage has become a much more selective institution in today’s society,” said W. Bradford Wilcox, director of the National Marriage Project at the University of Virginia. “People who are college-educated, more affluent or more religious are more likely to get married and stay married. People who are not are less likely to get married in the first place, and if they do marry, they’re more likely to divorce.” The Marriage Project has found that people without a college degree are three times as likely to divorce in the first

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

BEND

RIVER

10 years as those with a college degree. “The odds of getting divorced are much lower for educated and affluent Americans, the escapades of Schwarzenegger and John Ensign notwithstanding,” Wilcox said, referring to the former governor of California and the former senator from Nevada. Most Americans marry once and stick to it. According to the census statistics, more than half of the nation’s married couples have been together at least 15 years. About a third have marked their 25th anniversaries, and 6 percent have been married more than 50 years. Tom Ruggieri, who met his wife in college, has been married for 30 years. In his family, long marriages are the norm. His parents have been married for 65 years, and his wife’s parents wed 55 years ago. “That model really does have an impact,” said Ruggieri, the

PROMENADE,

BEND

LONDON — On the second day of a historic visit to the Irish Republic, Queen Elizabeth II on Wednesday visited the site of a massacre more than 90 years ago that still evokes memories of fierce hostilities between Ireland and Britain. The queen’s visit, the first to Ireland by a reigning British monarch since the creation of the Irish Free State in 1922, has been heavy on both symbolism and security with thousands of police officers mobilized to protect the queen and streets cordoned off, restricting access to her. On Wednesday, the queen visited the Croke Park stadium where British soldiers shot and killed 14 people in 1920 apparently in reprisal for the killing of 14 British military personnel. The event is remembered in

Ireland as “Bloody Sunday” and the queen’s visit to the 82,000-seat stadium was seen by analysts in Britain as a token of her readiness to confront a past whose violent passions still linger. The stadium’s seats were empty on Wednesday, news agencies reported, an indication of security surrounding her visit. The day before and hours before the queen arrived, the Irish Army carried out a controlled explosion of a pipe bomb discovered in a tote bag in the luggage compartment of a bus heading for the capital, police officials said. News agencies reported that the Irish police had also found a sham device, harmless but meant to appear to be a bomb, at a tram station in North Dublin. On Monday, a bomb threat received in London was first taken by the police as credible, but later described as a probable hoax.

“The odds of getting divorced are much lower for educated and affluent Americans, the escapades of Schwarzenegger and John Ensign notwithstanding.” — Bradford Wilcox, director of the National Marriage Project

head of the employee assistance program at the University of Maryland who often counsels couples in his private practice. “I think people who come from a divorced family haven’t always seen parents work stuff out. Their model is, if people fight and they can’t agree, the marriage ends. So they’re afraid to fight and disagree. You can’t have a marriage without disagreement.” Nationwide, divorce rates have leveled off since peaking in the 1980s. Roughly four in 10 marriages end in divorce. But the rate varies significantly among different races and ethnicities.

5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0

Among black women, half of first marriages end in divorce, a rate that is far greater those for white, Hispanic and Asian women. Couples who split seem to recognize their marriage isn’t working long before they get to a landmark anniversary. Most had divorced within eight years of their wedding. Nearly a third of adults never marry at all. That number has marched upward in every age group over the past decade and a half. In 1986, one in four people ages 25 to 29 had never married. In

Despite the alarms, the queen and her husband, Prince Philip, flew into a military airfield outside Dublin, shielded by security operations intended both for her visit and for President Barack Obama, who is scheduled to visit the country early next week. In more recent times, British and Irish governments have worked closely on issues such as the effort to cement the 1998 Good Friday peace accord in Northern Ireland and within the European Union, of which they are both members. The Good Friday agreement led to the formation of a powersharing government in Northern Ireland that includes unionists, who are mainly Protestant and want the province to remain part of Britain, and republicans, who are mainly Catholic and want a united Ireland.

2009, that was true of almost half in that age group. The number of adults 50 to 54 who have never married also jumped during the same time period to one in 10. As with divorce, marriage rates vary with race and ethnicity. Seven out of 10 black women in their 20s have never married, a dramatic increase from the mid-1980s. Census demographers noted that the percentage of nevermarried black women 55 and older rose to 13 percent in 2009. The magnitude of the change suggests that many more black women than white women will never marry, the report said. The census also showed that a higher proportion of people who have married recently are Hispanic, which is the fastestgrowing minority group in the country. In 1996, about one in 10 recently married adults was Hispanic. By 2009, it had increased to one in five.


A6 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Drinking coffee may cut prostate cancer risk By Rob Stein The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — In case you needed one, here’s another possible reason to have that cup of coffee in the morning: Men who regularly drink coffee appear to be less likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer, especially the most lethal kind, according to new research. Lorelei Mucci of the Harvard School of Public Health and colleagues analyzed data collected from 47,911 U.S. men who participated in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study, a large, ongoing examination of a variety of health issues for men. As part of the study, the men reported their coffee consumption every four years between 1986 and 2008. During that period, 5,035 cases of prostate cancer were reported, including 642 fatal cases. The men who consumed the most coffee, which was defined as six or more cups every day, were nearly 20 percent less likely to develop any form of prostate cancer, the researchers reported in the May 17 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. But, most strikingly, the heavy coffee drinkers were also 60 percent less likely to be diagnosed with a lethal prostate tumor. Those who drank between one and three cups a day were 30 percent less likely to develop a lethal case. The risk was cut regardless of whether the men drank decaffeinated or regular coffee, the researchers reported.

Are private prisons really cost-effective? By Richard A. Oppel Jr. New York Times News Service

PHOENIX — The conviction that private prisons save money helped drive more than 30 states to turn to them for housing inmates. But Arizona shows that popular wisdom might be wrong: Data there suggest that privately operated prisons can cost more to operate than state-run prisons — even though they often steer clear of the sickest, costliest inmates. The state’s experience has particular relevance now, as many politicians have promised to ease budget problems by trimming state agencies. Florida and Ohio are planning major shifts toward private prisons, and Arizona is expected to sign deals doubling its private-inmate population. But hopes of big taxpayer benefits might end in disappointment, independent experts say. “There’s a perception that the private sector is always going to do it more efficiently and less costly,” said Russ Van Vleet, a former co-director of the University of Utah Criminal Justice Center. “But there really isn’t much out there that says that’s correct.” Such has been the case lately in Arizona. Despite a state law stipulating that private prisons must create “cost savings,” the state’s own data indicate that inmates in private prisons can cost as much as $1,600 more per year, while many cost about the same as they do in state-run prisons. The research, by the Arizona Department of Corrections, also reveals a murky aspect of private prisons that helps them appear less expensive: They often house only relatively healthy inmates. “It’s cherry-picking,” said State Rep. Chad Campbell, leader of the House Democrats. “They leave the most expensive prisoners with taxpayers and take the easy prisoners.” Matthew Benson, spokesman for Gov. Jan Brewer of Arizona, a Republican, did not dispute the state research. But he said officials had a “pretty wide lens” to interpret the cost-savings mandate, like taking into account the ability of private companies to recoup hundreds of millions in construction costs over the life of contracts. Privatization advocates play down the data. Leonard Gilroy, director of government reform for the Reason Foundation, a libertarian research organization, questioned whether all costs were included and said the figures were too narrowly drawn, particularly on medium-security prisons, to prompt conclusions. “It is looking at a limited slice,” Gilroy said.

N AT ION / WOR L D

Trauma breeds mental illness among Afghans maybe it’s because of the war, but there is a recognition that people need help when they suffer.”

By Molly Hennessy-Fiske Los Angeles Times

KABUL, Afghanistan — The group therapy session at Afghanistan’s flagship mental health hospital began, as many do, with sharing. Foruzan, 28, a slight woman in a black-and-silver head scarf, told the psychologist she was possessed by an evil spirit, or jinn. She sought help at a local shrine, she said, and thought she was healed. But then the heartburn returned. Beside her, Parvin, 20, a rosy-cheeked student, who like other patients at the hospital asked that only her first name be used, said she suffers intense headaches and needs medication in order to think clearly at school. Worst off was Shaima, 35, hunkered in a corner and weeping into her blue burqa. Her husband beat her, she said, and threw her out of their house the night before, leaving her at the mercy of her brother, who calls her crazy because she is always crying. It was a typical morning for Abdul Wahab Yarzada, a psychologist at the 60-bed Kabul Psychiatric and Drug Dependency Treatment Center. Each day, he hears a flurry of maladies, many related to the ongoing conflict, from fishar (stress) to asabi (nerves) to jigar khun, which literally means “liver blood,” but describes a sense of hopelessness. Some have already chosen to, as they say in Dari, “leave this world” — withdraw rather than confront the adversities of life in the warravaged country. Experts estimate 60 percent of the Afghan populace suffers mild to severe mental illness. Yarzada and the rest of the hospital’s three dozen psychiatrists and psychologists see up to 160 patients a day at the crumbling 26-yearold facility that they are still rebuilding after a bombing six months ago.

Society has limits

Molly Hennessy-Fiske / Los Angeles Times

Patients in the 60-bed Kabul Psychiatric and Drug Dependency Treatment Center suffer from a variety of maladies, including stress and despair stemming from war, poverty and domestic abuse. ceived a $1.6 million grant from the European Union to renovate the buildings, provide medical supplies and staff training. At the group therapy session, women took turns, going around the circle of folding chairs set up in the high-ceilinged former German factory. The only decorations on the chipped aqua walls were a map of Afghanistan and a diagram of the brain. Parwin said talking about her problems has helped relieve her depression as much as the antidepressant medication a private doctor had prescribed. “When I speak out, I say what is inside me and they understand and give me direction on what to do,” she said. Dr. Peter Ventevogel, an Amsterdam-based psychiatrist who has worked to improve Afghanistan’s mental health care through

the nonprofit Healthnet TPO, said the hospital’s staff has advanced in recent years. “It’s a new way of thinking that a patient with a mental disorder is someone you have to consult,” Ventevogel said. “Those are notions that are not yet ingrained in the health care system in Afghanistan. The whole idea of client participation is a difficult one.”

Transcultural therapy In addition to talk therapy, Yarzada and other Afghan therapists at the hospital have been training with a medical anthropologist to practice more transcultural therapy, which incorporates patients’ traditional beliefs about mental illness, treating them for what they believe ails them. It is still common in Afghanistan for families to chain the

severely mentally ill at home or at Sufi shrines such as Mia Ali Baba outside Jalalabad, where they are left to subsist for weeks on water and peppered bread. Patricia Omidian, a medical anthropologist who has studied Afghanistan’s mental health system, said the Kabul hospital is confronting overwhelming need. Though doctors cannot provide all the social supports patients come looking for, they have come a long way since 2003, she said, when she saw patients chained to the metal-framed beds. “They got the shackles off. There was a real effort,” Omidian recalled. “I work in Pakistan, and there are still shackles in some of the mental institutions. In some ways I think Pakistan is actually behind Afghanistan. For instance, in Afghanistan you can talk more openly about mental health and,

The greatest challenge for the Afghan therapists moving forward will likely be the limits on what they can accomplish in a society that, even after NATO coalition forces leave, will remain in crisis, said Ken Miller, a Cambridge, Mass.-based psychologist who has published several studies about mental health in Afghanistan. “We think about war zones and attribute many of those mental health problems to the war. And there is certainly some truth to that. But the conditions of everyday life have a tremendous impact on mental health,” Miller said. “That makes it harder for mental health professionals — it’s much harder to reduce someone’s depression when that depression is related to extreme poverty. People go home to these extreme adversities and that’s where they live their lives.” For Shaima, the woman fleeing an abusive husband, the psychologist suggested family therapy. She frowned. “You have to bring your husband or your brother here so we can find out what is happening,” Yarzada said. Shaima was not sure she could persuade her husband, an unemployed teacher about 30 years her senior, to attend therapy sessions. He is a private person and has relatives who work at the hospital, she said. As for her brother, she was afraid she would cause more family problems if she told him about the beatings. The doctor nodded, then rose to leave. They were out of time. Her problems would have to wait until next week. “I get well here sometimes,” Shaima said as she left the hospital, “but when I go home, all that bad behavior makes me sick again.”

Funds haven’t arrived Afghan leaders have vowed to use an infusion of international aid to improve medical services and have made mental health a priority. Yet the Kabul hospital is struggling to improve therapy and expand neighborhood clinics in an extremely poor country where mental health treatment remains a luxury. The hospital is supposed to receive $300,000 from the Afghan government this year, but it has not yet been paid, said the hospital’s director, Dr. Timono Shah Musamim. The hospital recently re-

78 *APR – Annual Percentage Rate. Rate is based on credit profile, so your rate may differ. Variable rate is adjusted monthly. Rate is current as of 5/17/11 and is subject to change without notice.


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THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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can direct him or her to the right person or organization in Central Oregon’s network for business support, such as Economic Development for Central Oregon or the city of Bend’s recently appointed business advocate, Jon Skidmore. “Everybody really has the goal to see the Central Oregon community become vibrant and economically diverse, and so as much as we can work together to refer each other so that businesses are getting the best help that they need for the issues that they’re facing, I would love to, you know, build that culture of sharing and … of working together along the lines,” Curley said. See Gardener / B5

The Bulletin

The McDonald’s on Northeast Third Street in Bend, which has been closed for rebuilding since late January, will reopen Tuesday, according to a news release. The new building sports free wireless Internet access inside and a 24-hour, double-lane drive-thru. The restaurant, which opened in 1973, was the first McDonald’s in Central Oregon. Now there are seven, under the locally owned McDonald’s of Bend, Sisters and La Pine franchise.

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COCC hires economic gardener Citi, reviving, to help small businesses grow awards CEO By Jordan Novet

Bend McDonald’s to reopen Tuesday

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The Small Business Development Center at Central Oregon Community College is adding a gardener to its staff — an economic gardener, that is. Steve Curley, who has abundant experience in branding and marketing, will head the center’s new economic gardening program. For no charge, Curley will advise Central Oregon smallbusiness owners on how to grow their companies and expand into markets outside the region, which in turn can add more living-wage jobs to the local workforce. When a business owner’s requests are beyond Curley’s scope, he

What is economic gardening? The concept of economic gardening, pioneered in Littleton, Colo., in the 1980s, is different from the more conventional economic development model. While the latter focuses on drawing big companies to a place, the former has more to do with developing, or growing, what entrepreneurship is already there.

big pay deal By Eric Dash New York Times News Service

After spending years as one of Wall Street’s lowest paid chief executives, Vikram Pandit received a $23.2 million retention package that could catapult him to the top of the list. Pandit earned a token annual salary of $1 as he steered Citigroup back into the black over the last two years. But on Wednesday, Citi’s board awarded him as much as $16.5 million in stock and options as well as a cash payment valued at more than $6.65 million as part of a special profit-sharing program for top executives. See Citigroup / B5

Fed signals new focus on interest rates A majority of Federal Reserve policymakers said at their most recent meeting that the best next step in their program to stimulate the economy would be to reduce the balance sheet and then focus on interest rates, according to minutes of the April meeting released Wednesday. But they also said that simply discussing interest rates and other options did not mean that any move “would necessarily begin soon.” The minutes, closely watched for any signs of change in Federal Reserve monetary policy, were released as the central bank was nearing the close of its program to buy $600 billion in Treasury securities by the end of June — its main effort to pump money into the economy as a stimulus. Economists and the financial markets will be parsing the language of the central bank and its officials in the coming weeks for signs of what the central bank might do when that program ends.

WTO upholds ruling on Airbus subsidies A World Trade Organization appeals panel Wednesday upheld a ruling that Boeing lost market share to its European rival, Airbus, as a result of billions of dollars in low-cost government loans, according to European and U.S. officials. But the panel rejected U.S. claims that state financing for the Airbus A380 superjumbo jet was automatically prohibited under global trade rules, the officials said. Appeals judges at the trade body, which is based in Geneva, concurred with the initial finding that loans extended to Airbus over the course of four decades did constitute unfair subsidies that had caused Boeing to lose aircraft sales. — From staff and wire reports

ABOVE: Boneyard Beer coowner Anthony Lawrence holds a four-pack of cans with RPM IPA labeling on them, similar to the cans that will be released in upcoming months. LEFT: Clay Storey, left, checks a fermenting tank filter while assistant brewer Brit Nelson checks levels in a fermenting tank and Lawrence pours bags of malt into the tank, during a morning IPA brewing session at Boneyard Beer in Bend on Tuesday.

B-day at the

Boneyard By Ed Merriman • Photos by Andy Tullis • The Bulletin

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ou won’t find any monsters or mad scientists there, but Bend’s Boneyard Beer is the Frankenstein creation of Tony Lawrence, who scavenged parts from Army surplus stores,

junkyards and brewery warehouses across North America to build what he says is the area’s first wholesale brewery. Lawrence said before he founded Boneyard Beer a year ago with partners Clay Storey, 38, and Melodee Storey, 37, he worked for 23 years as a brewer and brewery equipment builder, innovator, designer

Factory output and capacity utilization

and installer across the United States, Mexico, Canada and France. Boneyard Beer co-owners, from left, Anthony Lawrence, Melodee Storey and husband Clay Storey share a celebratory cheer while discussing their first year of business in the Boneyard Beer tasting room in Bend on Tuesday. Boneyard is celebrating its one-year anniversary with the Boneyard Birthday Bash, or B.B.B., which will be open to the public, 21 and older, from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday at The Old Stone in Bend. The party will feature a new beer brewed by Boneyard specially for the event, as well as music by Truth Hero, food by Island Wild fish tacos and photos by the Photo Lounge.

Industrial production index 2007=100 96

93.1 94 92

Lawrence, who migrated to Bend from Santa Barbara, Calif., in 1988, and the Storeys, who came here together from Portland in 1991, described themselves as ski bums who originally came to Central Oregon for the snowboarding and skiing at Mt. Bachelor. See Boneyard / B2

90 AM J J A S O N D J F M A 2010 2011

Capacity utilization index 2007=100 78

Jobs outlook bleak for college graduates, studies show

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By Catherine Rampell New York Times News Service

74 72 AM J J A S O N D J F M A 2010 2011 NOTE: All figures seasonally adjusted SOURCE: Federal Reserve Board AP

The individual stories are familiar. The chemistry major tending bar. The classics major answering phones. The Italian studies major sweeping aisles at Walmart. Now evidence is emerging that the damage wrought by the sour economy is more widespread than just a few careers led astray or postponed. Even for college graduates — the people who were most

protected from the slings and arrows of recession — the outlook is rather bleak. Employment rates for new college graduates have fallen sharply in the past two years, as have starting salaries for those who can find work. What’s more, only half of the jobs landed by these new graduates even require a college degree, reviving debates about whether higher education is “worth it” after all. “I have friends with the same degree as

me, from a worse school, but because of who they knew or when they happened to graduate, they’re in much better jobs,” said Kyle Bishop, 23, a 2009 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh who has spent the past two years waiting tables, delivering beer, working at a bookstore and entering data. “It’s more about luck than anything else.” The median starting salary for students graduating from four-year colleg-

es in 2009 and 2010 was $27,000, down from $30,000 for those who entered the workforce in 2006 to 2008, according to a study released Wednesday by the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University. That is a decline of 10 percent, even before taking inflation into account. Of course, these are the lucky ones — the graduates who found jobs. See Graduates / B5


B2 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

SEC proposes rule changes for ratings agencies By David S. Hilzenrath The Washington Post

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Beer lovers sip samples as Boneyard Beer tasting room employee Alison Wood, back left, and brewery partner Melodee Storey, back right, fill up growlers for their customers during a discount Wednesday growler fill afternoon earlier this month.

Boneyard Continued from B1 Lawrence got his start at Deschutes Brewery & Public House, working there from 1988 to 2001. In his travels over the years installing brewery equipment around the country, Lawrence said, he collected a combination of stainless steel tanks and other parts needed to “cobble together” a brewery of his own on a workingman’s budget. “I traded labor and made deals with 13 breweries to get the equipment to make what we have now,” said Lawrence, 47. Once he had the initial equipment, he needed a place to put it, but Lawrence said he didn’t want to go into debt to buy one. In his search for an affordable site to rent, Lawrence came across the Storeys, who were leasing a large warehouse building at 37 Lake Place, Suite B, but were struggling to find enough work to keep their Gutter Guys business going after the housing market crashed. Clay Storey said he and Melodee decided to shut down Gutter Guys, enter into a partnership with Lawrence and sublease the building to the brewery about a year ago. Clay Storey helps Lawrence brew the beer and Melodee Storey is in charge of promotion and planning events, including

Regular Boneyard Beer patron Jim Mahler, of Tumalo, loads a pair of growlers into his 1940 two-door standard Ford after having the reusable glass bottles filled with his favorite beers at the brewery. a lineup of summer brewfests where Boneyard Beer will be featured. “Our first brew batch was on April 18, 2010. That was our brand called Brand 13, and it was 13 barrels. Today we are on brew batch 86,” Lawrence said. “In our first year we did 1,300 barrels, and in our second year we are going to probably hit 3,500 to 4,000 barrels.” When the partners brewed their first batch of beers they had four used brewing and fermenting tanks ranging in size from five to 14 barrels, and now all but one of those original tanks have

been replaced with five 20-barrel tanks and one 40-barrel tank, and three more 40-barrel tanks set to arrive in the next few weeks will more than double Boneyard Beer’s capacity, he said. When asked what brand of Boneyard Beer is the best seller, Lawrence said, “without a doubt it’s our RPM IPA,” which he said will be available in six to eight weeks in 16-ounce cans featuring the Boneyard Beer black label with a white skull and crossed blades. Other than the soon-to-be released canned Boneyard Beer, which will be distributed from

Boneyard Beer co-owner Anthony Lawrence checks the depth of a batch of beer brewing in one of the fermentation tanks at the company’s brewing headquarters in Bend last month.

EU officials investigate possible price fixing at shipping companies By Matthew Saltmarsh New York Times News Service

PARIS — European competition officials on Wednesday were examining the offices of many of the world’s largest container shipping companies, investigating possible price fixing and market manipulation in the sector. The European Commission, the executive arm of the EU and its antitrust body, was conducting the unannounced inspections alongside the national competition authorities at shipping offices in several European countries. “The companies concerned may have violated the antitrust rules that prohibit cartels and restrictive business practices” as well as possibly engaging in “abuse of a dominant market position,” the commission said Tuesday. Amelia Torres, a commission spokeswoman, declined to elaborate on the inquiry on Wednesday. But she emphasized that it was “completely premature to be making any conclusions about whether these companies are engaged in anticompetitive behavior.” The preliminary investigation covers the period from around

2008, according to the Danish company A.P. Moller-Maersk, which owns the world’s largest container liner. That was the year when liner shipping cartels known as “conferences” were banned in Europe. A year later, many liners were pushed close to collapse by the global financial crisis and an ensuing decline in trade. This exposed overcapacity and led liners to scrap orders, conduct “slow steaming” — whereby ships operate at reduced speeds — or leave ships idle. Since then, the industry has recovered, helped to a large degree by the robust Chinese economy, and in some cases profit returned to record levels in 2010 — although concerns have since resurfaced, notably surrounding high oil prices and difficult financing conditions. The crisis and its immediate aftermath were also a period of particularly volatile freight prices for transportation to and from Europe. For example, rates for key routes from the Far East to Europe surged to about $2,000 per standard unit in 2010 from below

$500 in early 2009. Rates declined again in 2011. Jesper Kjaedegaard, a partner with the consulting firm Mercator International in London, said it was probably this intense swing in rates over a year — and the industry’s shift from loss to strong profitability — that was being investigated. “How quickly the situation changed is astounding and may have raised eyebrows in Brussels,” he said. Christian Kledal, head of legal affairs at A.P. Moller-Maersk, said Wednesday that at least 16 officials from the commission were at its headquarters in Copenhagen and that they would remain there for a few more days with the company’s full assistance. Inspectors were checking computers and collecting any documents they deemed relevant, including minutes from meetings, he added. “We do not have any reason to believe that the company has behaved in a manner that is not in compliance with the rules,” Kledal said, adding it was “far too early to speculate about what the outcome of the investigation will be, including the possibility of fines.”

Seattle to San Francisco as well as in the Bend area, Lawrence said Boneyard primarily manufactures beer “pretty much for the wholesale trade” to sell to bars and restaurants. “We’re not like all of the woodsy, outdoorsy brewpubs in the area. We don’t have a restaurant in our brewery,” Lawrence said. “We aren’t brewery intellectuals. We’re gearheads. We work on cars, we ride motorcycles and we brew beer.” In the company’s first year of operation, beer orders have grown so much that the partners have hired three employees to help with everything from packing hops and helping with brewing to janitorial work, said Clay Storey. “It is good working in a business that is on the positive side, unlike construction, which was on the down side,” he said. The brewery is celebrating its first year in business Saturday with a party featuring live music by the band Truth Hero from 7 to 9 p.m. at The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Blvd., Bend. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

WASHINGTON — Regulators took new steps Wednesday to overhaul the firms whose rosy credit ratings inspired overconfidence in investments tied to toxic mortgages. The Securities and Exchange Commission proposed rules meant to improve the system by which such firms as Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s assign ratings. Some of the proposals are intended to address conflicts of interest that could undermine the objectivity of the ratings. For example, if an analyst who helped assign a rating to a company is later hired by that company, the rating firm would have to conduct a “look-back” to determine if the rating was improperly influenced. If warranted, the firm would have to change the rating. Similarly, rating agency employees who help shape the ratings would be prohibited from participating in sales or marketing for the ratings firm. But small rating firms could seek an exemption from that rule. The proposals would not change the rating industry’s fundamental conflict of interest. Ratings firms would still be paid by the very companies they are rating or whose investment products they grade. That can give them an incentive to win clients by assigning favorable ratings Ratings have been faulted for compounding the damage from the subprime mortgage meltdown. The five SEC commission-

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ers voted unanimously to invite public comment on the proposals, which are subject to revision and a final vote. The agency was acting at the behest of Congress, which demanded changes in the ratings business as part of the DoddFrank law enacted last year in response to the financial crisis. Moody’s spokesman Michael Adler said the firm “believes that regulatory change is healthy for the markets, and we are committed to embracing that change and to implementing provisions specific to our industry as effectively as possible.” Standard & Poor’s spokesman David Wargin said his firm has already taken many of the steps the SEC proposed. “S&P supports the SEC’s efforts to increase accountability, transparency and oversight of credit rating firms while maintaining analytical independence,” Wargin said. Under the proposals, rating agencies would have to disclose more standardized information about their track records, including how often companies or products that they rate end up defaulting on obligations. Ratings had become such a cornerstone of the financial system that many federal regulations mandated their use as benchmarks of investment quality. The Dodd-Frank law ordered regulators to purge the rules of such references, and in other recent actions the SEC has set about rewriting the rules to avoid reliance on ratings.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 B3

P F   Picking the right card Veteran money manager advises: for travel perks, miles Preserve gains by avoiding risk INVESTING

By Jonathan Burton MarketWatch

J. Emilio Flores / New York Times News Service

Tim Winship, founder of FrequentFlier.com, says business travelers are coveted customers for credit card companies, and the right card can offer perks suited to the way you travel.

By Jane L Leve New York Times News Service

Credit card issuers have begun aggressively marketing to business travelers because they often have many of the attributes the issuers look for, like good jobs and higher incomes. Tim Winship, publisher of FrequentFlier.com, said credit card issuers had gone “from no activity to a frenzy of activity” in the past year or two. “They’ve turned up the wick in the intensity,” he said, in marketing cards to business travelers. “The frequent-traveler demographic tends to be someone with a higher household income, and a better job and credit rating,” he added. “That’s why issuers are focusing so aggressively on this segment of the market.” Winship recommended that travelers determine where they are on the credit continuum before choosing a card. “Are you a frequent buyer or a frequent flier? If you’re a frequent buyer and earn the majority of your miles by using your credit card and not traveling, there’s no compelling reason to sign up for an airline co-branded card. You’re probably better off with a Capital One Venture card, an American Express or Citi ThankYou Premier card — you won’t face restrictions getting reward flights because they buy the tickets.” But frequent fliers who opt for cards issued by their airline loyalty programs can earn miles not only by flying but also from hotel stays, car rentals and even mortgage payments. “If you earn a significant number of miles through traveling, you’re better off sticking with an airlinelinked card, since miles you get from purchases can be linked with miles you get from traveling,” Winship said.

Another option is the Starwood Preferred Guest American Express card, which lets travelers earn points that can be redeemed for stays at Starwood hotels or converted into mileage for airline tickets; the American Express Membership Rewards program offers similar flexibility. There are also cards that give users a cash rebate of 1 or 2 percent of their purchases, which also affords flexibility. According to an analysis by Winship, certain cards are better for specific perks than others. Here is a sampling:

For airport lounge access He suggested American Express Platinum and Centurion cards, whose annual fees cover entry into lounges of American Airlines, Delta Air Lines and US Airways, as well as annual membership in Priority Pass Select, a program that provides access to 600 lounges worldwide. Certain Continental and United cards also offer annual memberships to their lounges. All cards have annual fees of $375 or more.

To avoid foreign fees Winship estimated that foreign transaction fees can add as much as 3 percent to the cost of goods and services purchased overseas. He said travelers should consider cards that have eliminated these fees, including American Express Platinum and Centurion cards; certain Visa cards issued by Continental, British Airways, IHG, Marriott and Hyatt; Chase’s Sapphire Preferred; and Citi’s ThankYou Premier and ThankYou Prestige cards. Some cards charge hefty

annual fees, but others — like Marriott’s $30 charge and IHG’s $49 — are minimal.

To waive bag-checking fees Consider Continental’s various MasterCards as well as Delta’s SkyMiles credit cards. Depending on restrictions, these will cover one or two bags per traveler per flight. The American Express Platinum and Centurion cards also give users a $200 annual credit toward miscellaneous airline fees, including baggagechecking fees.

To cut mileage requirements

The Dallas Morning News

Along with the efforts to make Americans more financially literate, I’d like to add another goal: to have more financial service companies and advisers talk in plain English. Many are already doing this, and that’s good. But more — a lot more — needs to be done. Every industry has its jargon. But in business and finance, that jargon can cost you dearly if you don’t understand it. That’s why it’s so important for those communicating with consumers to demystify and explain financial concepts and products in easily understandable language. For example, instead of using a term like “annuitize,” just say that the lump sum an investor is using to buy an annuity will be converted into a stream of periodic payments to them. Or, instead of saying “equities,” why not just say “stocks”? There are some good examples of financial firms that make it their mission to talk plainly to

C O M M E N TA RY their customers. For example, here’s how Internet bank ING Direct explains annual percentage rate: “Annual percentage rate is the rate, as a percentage of the loan amount, that a bank, credit card company or other lender charges you for borrowing each year. “Because the APR includes any fees the lender charges, it may be higher than the loan’s interest rate. The lower the APR, the less it may cost you to borrow the same amount of money for the same term.” One expert on plain language says there’s still much to be done, particularly with financial disclosure forms. “They’re not written to communicate,” said William Lutz, the president of the Plain Language Association International. Lutz has strong words for financial firms that use opaque language. Their attitude, he said, is, “I

tured the best of the presidential cycle, Grantham said. Using history as a guide, he added, an investor could “go away” from U.S. stocks until October 2014 when the next Year 3 begins and then plow into the U.S. market for seven months. That’s the theory. The reality, Grantham points out, is that the S&P 500 rose 21 percent from October 2010 through April — mirroring the historical average gain. Further, the S&P at 1360 (where the index stood at the time of Grantham’s writing) is just 3 percent below his fivemonth target of 1400, he noted. Rising commodities prices is also a factor in Grantham’s cautious view. While oil and precious metals in particular have given up ground lately, the general trend toward higher prices disturbs Grantham. “The relentless rise in resource prices is beginning to act as an economic drag as a primary effect, and as a secondary effect, it is causing inflation pressures to increase, particularly in developing countries,” Grantham wrote. Higher inflation leads to interest-rate increases, which could negatively affect business confidence in the developed world, Grantham said.

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Look into American Airlines’ Citi cards and USAirways’ MasterCards, which offer discounts on the number of miles required to book an award ticket.

To earn qualifying miles Consider the top-tier credit cards offered by Continental, Delta, United and US Airways to build up the miles that help travelers qualify for elite status in airline loyalty programs. These cards let holders earn elite miles if they spend a certain amount of money, though they also limit the number of elite miles that can be earned this way. One other significant perk is automatic loyalty program status upgrades, available through Marriott, Hilton and IHG cobranded cards. The American Express Platinum and Centurion cards also reimburse holders for the $100 application fee for Global Entry, a program that expedites customs and immigration clearance at airports in the United States.

Financial advice should be in plain English By Pamela Yip

SAN FRANCISCO — Early to sell and later to buy makes an investor wealthy and wise. With apologies to Benjamin Franklin, that’s the warning veteran market observer Jeremy Grantham is giving investors to handle the heightened risk he sees in the market. In a quarterly letter last week to institutional clients of Boston-based money manager GMO, the firm’s chief investment strategist said shareholders should take risk off the table now, rather than by October as he had advised earlier this year. “The environment has simply become too risky to justify prudent investors hanging around, hoping to get lucky,” Grantham said. “Investors should take a hard-nosed value approach, which at GMO means having substantial cash reserves around a base of high-quality blue chips and emerging-market equities.” Grantham acknowledged that he is probably too early with the call to lighten up on risk and bet against the broad U.S. stock market. In the past, he admitted, such definitive moves have come months, sometimes years, before a market actually turned, and investors who followed his advice would have missed the last, highly lucrative parts of a rally. “The market may still get to, say, 1,500 before October, but I doubt it,” Grantham said, in reference to the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index. High-quality blue chips and emerging-market equities share what Grantham called “semi-respectable real imput-

ed returns of over 4 percent real on our 7-year forecast.” Grantham’s call now for investors to back away from the broad U.S. stock market may be another “two years too early” trade, he said. But he added that he can no longer “go with the flow,” as he has been doing in this third year of the “presidential cycle” — an October-to-October period that historically has been the most lucrative for U.S. stocks out of the cycle’s four years. The money manager’s change of heart also respects the old Wall Street adage to “sell in May and go away.” Combining that directive with the presidential cycle history, Grantham found that in the first seven months of Year 3 since 1960, U.S. stocks returned an average of 2.5 percent per month for a total gain of 20 percent after factoring for inflation. In contrast, the last five months of Year 3 returned 0.5 percent per month, or 2.5 percent, which also happens to be the average total return for Year 4 of the cycle. Put those numbers up against what Grantham calculates as a 21 percent average cumulative real return for the entire 48month presidential cycle, and the strategist’s thinking becomes clear. The 20 percent average gain for the first seven months of Year 3 — October 2010 through May — reflects most of the cycle’s return. So an investor who has been in U.S. stocks for the past seven months has likely cap-

am going to show you that I am a member of the magical, mystical priesthood of financial advisers using these magical, mystical terms.” Lutz, who is also a professor emeritus in Rutgers University’s English department, helped write “A Plain English Handbook” for the Securities and Exchange Commission, which is a guide to writing clear disclosure documents, in 1998. Here’s one example from the book: “The foregoing Fee Table is intended to assist investors in understanding the costs and expenses that a shareholder in the Fund will bear directly or indirectly.” The revised, clearer version: “This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the fund.” Quite a difference. Investors, if something’s not clear, speak up and ask questions. Only then will you be able to make informed decisions about your money.

Every spring the Bulletin honors Central Oregon high school students with a special section spotlighting each school, a list of graduates, salutatorian and valedictorian. Be a part of this well received keepsake magazine to show support of our local graduates.

Advertising Deadline: 5:00pm, Wednesday, May 25, 2011 Publishes: Wednesday, June 8, 2011 Call your Bulletin Advertising Representative today

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B4 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMR AOL ARCA bio ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh Accelrys Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Accuride n AcetoCorp Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Adventrx AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agria Cp Agrium g AirLease n AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlaskCom Albemarle AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AllnceRes AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish rs AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlonUSA AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AltairN rs AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria AlumChina AmBev s AmTrstFin Amarin Amazon AMCOL Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Ameresco n Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn AmCasino Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amsurg Amylin Amyris n Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGM n ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldEner h ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach Apricus rs Aptargrp AquaAm Arbitron ArcelorMit ArchCap s ArchCoal ArchDan ArchD pfA ArcosDor n ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen Atheros AtlPwr g AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g Authentdte AutoNatn

3.53 -.07 1.12 26.32 +.10 1.32 69.35 +.76 12.66 +.26 1.20 50.45 -3.40 51.32 +1.70 1.80 40.77 +.21 0.20 14.65 +.32 1.12 35.29 +.44 6.58 -.15 19.15 +.41 2.27 -.08 0.58 40.35 +.72 1.72 31.20 +.08 17.34 +.29 7.77 +.28 1.73 -.01 7.82 +.22 0.05 27.60 +.34 2.92 +.02 1.92 53.82 +.32 0.70 75.69 +2.52 0.42 7.13 -.05 17.65 -.21 24.48 -.12 4.08 +.30 38.99 +.04 2.04 -.01 7.22 +.13 0.90 56.92 +.18 8.86 -.12 7.59 -.05 13.11 +.24 0.20 7.08 +.05 5.20 +.08 76.37 +2.51 26.41 +.01 2.24 +.03 0.17 11.53 +.17 0.04 24.79 -.07 0.52 59.66 +1.10 13.63 +.05 .88 +.02 34.87 +.15 0.36 41.90 +.79 0.25 6.14 +.35 0.24 70.66 +.94 1.60 +.06 14.92 +.58 8.67 +.13 0.06 5.98 +.19 7.98 +.11 2.40 -.03 27.77 -.14 0.04 9.04 +.23 7.00 +.11 13.59 21.45 +.30 2.11 -.03 0.60 45.41 +1.35 103.00 +1.69 6.61 -.15 6.19 +.04 .94 -.01 1.26 +.07 51.73 +.56 0.64 62.55 +.11 1.30 0.11 81.93 +1.68 29.00 +.45 2.32 91.41 +1.90 7.61 +.08 3.48 -.04 0.40 12.17 +.33 1.16 66.81 +.31 0.88 39.40 +.70 32.48 +.08 6.89 +.04 0.86 8.95 -.01 0.66 69.38 +2.10 5.94 +.21 0.12 16.69 +.24 40.68 +.32 1.80 79.58 +1.05 7.63 +.29 96.66 -.53 1.40 23.71 +.30 17.95 -.14 0.72 66.88 +.12 0.20 83.95 +2.46 90.41 +.26 3.91 +.08 3.56 71.68 +3.37 0.48 7.71 -.02 1.27 21.37 -.06 1.70 40.66 +.16 2.92 -.14 34.01 +.88 0.80 61.17 -.06 2.47 -.01 20.48 +1.39 0.84 32.45 +.03 3.66 +.21 0.16 11.67 +.70 51.15 +.98 3.61 +.25 0.40 7.27 +.05 0.66 6.25 +.06 0.74 15.69 +.23 1.40 -.07 0.24 48.05 +1.62 0.48 22.12 +.25 25.11 +.18 1.52 27.87 +.21 0.04 22.22 +.80 1.16 31.45 -.10 0.32 20.99 +.32 16.57 +.16 197.09 +2.28 0.72 34.98 -.06 29.88 +.52 32.17 +.10 1.54 29.58 -.24 15.28 +.70 69.85 +2.02 0.52 50.05 +.49 1.02 -.02 11.27 +.13 1.35 34.57 +.49 5.60 29.75 +.23 9.99 +.36 0.44 14.67 +.11 1.84 38.74 -.11 0.10 13.03 +.21 0.72 51.06 +.30 0.65 35.42 +.48 0.60 23.48 +.40 9.32 +.20 30.83 +.03 29.86 +.01 1.25 -.01 10.94 +.35 52.16 -.04 0.88 28.92 +.16 0.92 62.89 +1.39 0.42 41.84 -.20 0.42 22.95 +.69 0.24 43.05 +.88 61.17 +.28 6.70 +.07 0.06 55.22 +.62 25.75 -.16 13.65 +.62 27.54 -.01 0.36 72.96 +.41 2.89 -.05 1.00 42.60 +2.37 40.56 +1.47 0.20 45.21 +.08 1.16 59.99 -.01 3.25 69.20 +.72 30.81 +.45 2.62 17.88 +.04 .81 56.07 +.92 1.68 +.02 1.00 7.16 +.02 0.60 52.47 +.10 5.88 -.01 0.60 123.29 +1.86 0.48 26.43 +.41 17.85 +.67 41.26 -.12 1.12 11.05 +.22 339.87 +3.73 .50 +.03 0.76 35.04 +.08 0.32 14.50 +.19 10.00 +.04 24.10 +1.31 5.29 -.07 0.72 53.23 +1.23 0.62 22.44 +.15 0.40 42.38 +1.27 0.75 33.68 +.31 34.49 +.11 0.44 29.40 +.29 0.64 31.76 -.05 3.13 39.94 -.07 22.35 +.60 24.96 +.32 1.29 +.01 1.40 16.93 +.19 9.21 +.08 32.68 +1.62 0.12 24.23 +.36 0.09 28.83 +1.21 1.44 7.62 +.05 2.77 +.02 10.94 +.23 46.18 +2.21 0.24 14.67 -.03 32.50 +1.53 16.59 +.37 32.04 +.80 0.40 12.95 +.32 0.60 60.76 +.30 19.30 -.15 0.60 27.42 +.04 16.76 +.30 0.04 14.44 +.16 0.68 16.52 +.35 0.72 37.95 -.33 0.18 16.76 +.03 0.52 14.38 +.02 2.55 51.69 +.20 44.60 -.02 1.09 15.12 +.12 62.42 +1.01 0.28 23.26 +.65 1.60 35.13 +.79 14.51 +.51 1.36 33.56 +.19 43.22 +1.45 4.28 +.38 5.55 +.03 1.21 +.07 33.70 +.35

Nm Autobytel Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AVEO Ph AveryD AvisBudg Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BB&T pfB BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BT Grp BabckW n Baidu BakrHu BallCp s BallardPw BallyTech BalticTrdg BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoMacro BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankUtd n BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BiPGrain Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconP rs BeacnRfg BeazerHm BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BigBandN BBarrett BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioMimetic Bionovo rsh BioSante BioScrip BiostarPh BioTime BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEEqDv BlkGlbOp BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BdwlkPpl BodyCen n Boeing Boise Inc BorgWarn BostProp BostonSci BoydGm BradyCp Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq BristowGp BritATob Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldOfPr BrkfldOP rt BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Buckeye Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CKX Inc CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalmsAst CalaStrTR Calgon Calix CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet CapOne CapProd CapitlSrce CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celanese Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh CelldexTh Celsion Cemex

D 1.13 -.01 44.28 +.79 1.80 75.56 +.82 1.44 54.24 +.56 282.50 +1.02 22.39 +.13 0.32 34.63 +.36 7.04 +.18 3.57 128.00 +.32 4.42 +.24 19.69 +.69 1.00 42.18 +.39 17.71 +.32 1.10 25.00 -.01 37.13 +1.76 0.92 30.15 1.86 +.05 0.92 33.30 +.18 0.64 27.07 -.02 2.40 27.48 -.57 2.07 39.78 +.74 37.96 +1.07 0.68 8.15 1.82 94.84 +.99 1.82 77.74 +.68 49.25 +1.45 52.19 +.90 54.54 +.56 0.42 43.27 +.47 4.07 +.23 1.50 49.42 +.44 0.18 18.31 -.18 1.04 31.98 -.06 28.43 +.84 131.84 +.03 0.60 70.82 +1.96 0.28 39.26 +.81 1.65 -.03 40.53 -.08 0.49 6.53 +.04 0.56 11.63 +.15 0.81 18.95 -.38 2.08 34.45 +.71 0.79 11.53 +.10 0.70 10.91 -.13 0.04 13.14 +.06 0.04 11.79 -.11 6.56 +.01 1.95 1.04 1.80 +.03 2.80 63.71 +.64 0.52 28.72 +.31 2.08 60.15 +.28 0.56 27.00 -.09 0.04 2.74 +.08 3.21 +.04 49.02 +.93 26.08 +.67 54.02 +.94 54.92 +2.30 0.36 17.67 -.14 23.05 -.64 51.54 -.21 0.72 112.91 +2.27 13.98 0.32 24.27 +.44 0.48 45.35 +.11 24.80 +1.04 1.24 60.26 +.68 2.40 54.46 +1.69 1.26 -.03 20.16 +.81 3.77 +.07 0.76 82.93 -.05 1.64 89.47 +1.47 55.15 +.31 0.20 37.20 +1.31 0.24 7.47 +.03 0.96 33.11 +.58 0.32 33.02 +.65 79.62 +.69 0.30 48.34 +3.49 0.60 32.22 +.26 37.74 -.12 2.35 +.16 41.79 +.19 97.76 +.19 0.05 4.51 +.09 26.11 +.12 0.80 19.76 +.15 7.68 -.08 .61 -.01 2.43 +.07 7.41 -.05 1.46 -.06 5.02 -.06 1.46 30.70 -.10 1.04 9.68 +.13 44.39 +1.60 5.50 193.25 +2.71 0.32 4.31 +.03 0.98 8.72 +.03 2.28 18.57 +.18 1.36 10.39 +.11 0.40 17.14 +.27 0.60 16.49 +.44 24.42 +.75 2.09 29.06 +.93 25.07 -.63 1.68 77.14 +.46 0.80 8.03 +.13 70.87 +.28 2.00 105.71 +1.30 6.81 -.02 9.72 +.27 0.72 35.00 -2.55 0.60 12.21 +.18 1.05 29.51 +.80 1.67 20.04 +.47 21.00 +.88 0.44 20.85 -.11 28.97 +1.52 9.04 +.31 1.47 +.06 0.56 25.22 +.27 1.32 28.86 +.21 0.60 42.82 +1.76 3.66 87.56 +.37 0.36 34.24 +1.25 0.60 22.48 +.05 38.57 +1.20 1.75 +.11 6.18 +.04 25.45 +.35 0.52 33.49 +.64 0.56 19.24 +.15 .11 -.01 0.34 8.81 +.24 11.67 +.27 0.32 26.25 +.54 0.28 11.27 +.28 19.25 +.20 0.05 21.47 +.16 4.00 62.00 +1.36 0.80 47.90 +1.27 0.10 91.26 -.07 0.49 40.40 +.48 0.92 74.40 +.94 0.20 22.97 +.14 27.02 +1.00 0.84 18.80 +.13 0.40 27.86 -.18 0.40 27.04 +.98 0.40 140.19 +5.94 1.16 80.24 +1.02 0.04 49.65 +1.52 42.19 -.01 5.48 +.02 1.12 34.92 +.17 5.60 297.24 +2.00 0.84 20.16 +.08 41.73 +1.42 7.49 -.03 5.91 234.20 +5.95 0.26 16.20 -.70 1.44 75.44 +1.63 0.76 19.15 +.70 0.34 9.22 +.06 19.97 +1.58 18.23 -.43 0.50 38.55 -.07 23.60 +.51 0.60 33.73 +.37 0.72 42.36 +1.67 0.12 55.25 +1.76 7.73 +.19 10.91 +.36 6.06 +.16 0.38 15.02 +.16 0.63 9.71 +.06 17.01 +.29 22.78 +.87 0.04 6.94 +.11 6.15 -.02 6.82 +.25 16.16 +.05 1.37 +.01 1.96 62.29 +.54 0.40 27.49 +.77 15.81 -.42 48.01 +.24 1.16 35.28 +.18 0.64 12.59 +.17 1.30 75.87 +.89 0.36 41.95 +1.09 1.20 61.42 +.49 9.18 +.01 .39 +.03 0.20 55.37 +.50 0.93 10.05 +.06 0.04 6.22 -.01 0.30 11.78 +.07 1.52 13.07 +.05 1.77 +.08 0.80 149.23 -3.00 0.86 45.54 +.76 5.40 -.16 5.66 +.16 .29 +.02 22.00 -.14 29.14 +.02 22.07 -.33 30.20 1.00 40.22 +.10 0.72 52.21 +1.37 34.76 +1.97 29.75 +.23 0.54 39.73 +.01 62.97 +.47 1.76 105.25 +3.17 0.04 15.68 +.07 46.65 +2.31 0.36 5.46 +.31 .62 -.01 0.24 50.43 +1.30 10.19 +.09 60.80 +.32 1.76 +.23 3.31 -.57 2.68 -.06 0.43 8.28 +.03

Nm Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBras pf CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenGrdA lf CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng ChespkLdg Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChinaDigtl ChiGengM ChinaInfo CKanghui n ChinaLife ChinaMble ChNBorun n ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaTcF ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco CitiTrends Citigp pfJ Citigp pfN Citigrp rs CitiTdecs Citigrp pfU CitzRepB h CitrixSys CleanEngy Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd CmGnom n CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Comverge Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold CopanoEn Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts CornstProg Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Crane Cray Inc Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus Crocs CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubistPh Cummins Curis CurEuro CurtisWrt Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DUSA DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g Delcath Delek Dell Inc DelphiFn DeltaAir DeltaPtr h DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBull DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DirDGldBll DrxEMBull

D 1.89 19.36 -.10 0.80 34.84 +1.17 35.01 +.70 0.79 18.98 +.35 0.03 18.01 +.26 1.56 14.26 +.19 11.02 -.26 0.01 20.65 +.63 10.16 -.01 15.85 +.11 2.90 43.00 +.30 6.49 +.35 79.67 -.03 30.96 +.77 122.84 +4.92 3.01 +.07 39.08 +.15 4.17 +.02 44.37 +1.71 57.36 +1.18 54.51 +.58 30.87 +.42 4.55 +.08 17.75 +.47 7.76 +.23 0.30 29.95 +.86 0.80 17.72 +.43 3.12 102.86 +2.45 0.20 37.52 +.79 0.20 14.43 -.78 54.27 +.40 0.66 3.87 +.02 12.06 +.45 6.56 +.18 2.00 5.75 +.17 2.30 +.18 2.72 -.03 24.63 +1.04 0.91 52.07 +.89 1.93 44.75 +.13 9.23 -.18 1.37 +.02 5.20 4.49 +.30 6.74 +.47 0.23 19.76 +.25 4.02 +.24 1.50 25.57 +.69 278.75 +4.24 14.61 +.14 1.56 65.85 +.52 1.36 82.06 -.51 6.16 +.18 25.66 +.11 0.40 92.21 +.66 3.13 -.04 1.60 31.14 +.21 0.84 21.01 +.11 0.49 31.98 +.21 15.88 -.11 0.24 16.65 +.01 17.13 -4.28 2.13 26.15 -.32 1.97 28.04 -.12 0.04 41.24 -.30 7.50 120.22 -.48 1.63 24.78 +.12 .80 +.04 82.81 +1.25 13.67 +.38 4.49 +.22 6.80 -.14 0.56 89.13 +2.63 2.20 70.35 -.38 20.87 +.32 0.60 59.81 +1.01 14.36 +1.02 1.88 68.30 +.31 0.52 29.20 +.44 25.50 +.22 0.40 5.88 -.02 14.35 +.31 0.36 33.40 +.31 73.37 -.35 6.65 -.27 0.72 10.16 +.08 53.10 +.60 2.34 -.58 2.32 86.21 -.06 19.46 -.16 0.60 20.32 +.13 0.20 18.26 +.30 3.26 +.07 0.45 25.37 +.35 0.45 23.87 +.36 0.40 37.35 +.13 0.92 43.26 +.60 0.48 15.20 -.13 2.00 25.72 +.05 28.59 +.47 38.42 +1.22 0.38 41.70 -.36 1.44 15.66 +.25 14.72 -.13 30.50 +1.77 0.80 44.51 +.09 10.80 +.10 27.17 +.65 1.00 28.00 +.04 3.66 -.06 0.40 37.58 +.46 0.92 25.35 +.15 12.53 +.27 92.53 +1.81 49.89 +1.28 2.64 72.81 +1.27 0.40 49.15 +.72 2.40 53.63 -.04 25.79 +.02 22.71 -.07 0.96 36.91 -.30 63.15 +2.14 13.41 +.14 .17 +.01 0.06 75.32 +.34 1.16 62.91 +1.10 0.42 23.97 +.37 1.09 63.15 +.80 2.30 32.43 +1.20 0.38 27.39 -.06 1.00 97.14 +1.48 18.37 +.07 4.27 +.03 0.56 53.85 +.77 1.24 7.06 +.21 0.20 20.31 +.03 1.65 34.56 +.22 23.78 -.12 10.93 -.02 0.96 83.24 +.53 8.44 +.17 0.18 8.54 +.06 61.55 +1.24 0.30 16.87 +.02 35.42 +1.04 0.80 57.40 +1.28 0.92 47.70 +1.29 6.59 +.22 1.95 104.80 -.28 21.88 -1.25 1.40 41.57 -.02 0.32 3.29 +.06 41.81 +2.50 0.74 11.25 +.16 22.02 +.50 41.41 +.34 40.74 .12 +.00 43.30 -.88 35.20 +.81 1.05 108.19 +1.97 3.67 +.10 0.05 141.85 +.16 0.32 35.00 +.54 1.59 -.04 48.62 +.90 0.36 22.40 +1.20 2.40 12.59 +.11 .86 +.01 0.50 54.83 +.69 1.44 +.05 5.60 -.20 0.28 5.53 +.05 0.78 9.90 +.17 1.33 30.10 -.06 0.15 11.65 +.19 0.70 47.26 +.25 44.10 +.17 2.35 51.68 -.44 5.40 -.22 17.53 +.33 0.08 54.89 +1.34 1.28 50.83 +.74 17.60 +.40 86.65 +.61 0.24 52.68 +.31 13.54 +.11 90.28 +1.92 1.40 86.50 -.46 .34 +.02 5.80 -.07 0.15 14.38 +.34 16.75 +.85 0.48 29.57 +.17 10.93 -.08 .70 +.02 14.60 -.16 20.88 +.42 38.42 +1.02 2.11 +.11 4.00 +.16 0.20 39.63 +.44 8.01 +.17 0.93 60.24 +.35 14.66 +1.08 46.20 +.61 6.93 -.08 0.16 14.46 +.25 0.68 83.01 +1.19 2.50 -.15 15.31 +.17 2.46 82.98 -.01 0.18 69.81 -.52 0.50 72.75 +2.10 0.32 10.91 +.09 11.32 +.18 15.02 +.56 38.94 -.48 1.12 32.69 +.19 2.72 61.58 +.88 31.13 +.52 24.84 +.65 0.16 53.93 +.97 30.13 +.83 50.24 +.95 1.35 47.72 +1.26 35.26 -1.68 41.84 -.74 33.83 -1.00 30.76 +.42 0.84 38.31 +1.69

Nm

D

DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFnBull Dir30TrBear DrxREBull DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DougDyn DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DyaxCp Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

20.36 -.56 12.23 -.37 15.58 -.98 0.01 56.58 +3.02 18.29 -.95 28.55 +.48 37.94 +1.39 0.39 75.83 +2.60 84.48 +3.60 0.16 86.74 +2.45 0.05 72.56 +4.05 0.24 25.33 +.07 45.19 +1.35 39.76 +1.02 2.60 +.24 29.94 +1.05 0.40 41.42 +.41 0.24 37.00 +.05 49.19 +.68 13.56 +.22 34.06 +.44 80.60 +.15 61.33 +1.03 1.97 47.97 -.36 24.33 +.70 1.40 103.93 +1.29 1.04 20.95 +.55 1.77 0.80 15.05 -.10 0.40 20.40 +.31 1.10 63.71 +1.01 1.00 36.97 +.44 1.00 41.64 -.58 25.70 +.10 47.78 +1.26 0.52 4.92 +.04 68.75 +1.64 3.79 +.01 4.04 +.05 1.64 53.29 +.99 0.48 25.03 +.83 0.98 19.14 -.09 0.68 14.45 +.18 1.90 +.02 2.52 -.04 5.81 +.04 1.08 9.73 +.04

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House ETrade rs eBay ECAMTrI n EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp EV Engy EagleBulk EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton s EatnVan EV EEq2 EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc Ecolab eDiets.cm h EdisonInt EducMgmt EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts ElizArden eLong h eMagin Embraer Emcore lf EMS EmersonEl EmployH EmpIca Emulex EnbrEPt s Enbridge EnCana g EncoreCap EndvrInt rs EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyPtrs EnrgyRec EngyTEq EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EntGaming EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver Euronet EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExamWk n ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FXCM n FairIsaac FairchldS FairptCm n FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedMogul FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FifthTh pfC FinclEngin Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FstMarblhd FMidBc FstNiagara FstRepB n FstSolar FT HlthCr FT Tech FT Utils FT Platnm FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstB rs Flagstone Flextrn Flotek FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FrTmpLtd

20.64 +.72 0.25 10.46 +.33 15.89 +.25 32.88 +.23 1.71 25.26 +1.66 27.76 +.34 30.29 +.11 2.67 48.70 +.47 0.64 106.62 +1.01 0.88 50.44 +.35 3.04 51.18 +2.81 2.76 -.16 0.60 10.99 +.61 0.20 7.79 +.06 0.20 20.60 -.11 1.88 104.72 +2.91 3.60 +.48 1.36 50.08 +.43 0.72 32.15 -.04 1.11 12.30 +.10 1.25 16.32 +.07 1.28 12.21 +.09 1.23 15.16 +.08 1.16 11.12 +.14 1.14 10.83 +.13 1.21 12.36 +.15 20.08 +.23 0.70 52.86 +1.50 .40 -.01 1.28 39.29 -.30 21.85 +1.03 89.50 +1.03 2.93 +.08 0.04 18.96 +.42 1.76 34.31 +.82 8.73 -.02 0.10 15.12 -.33 23.72 +.34 30.27 +.02 25.11 -1.47 7.01 -.11 0.64 32.63 +.34 2.49 +.11 63.94 +.04 1.38 54.07 +1.25 0.24 16.37 +.14 9.69 +.08 9.51 +.03 2.06 30.34 +.64 1.96 64.09 +1.15 0.80 32.90 +.46 30.46 -.34 12.54 +.34 8.82 +.45 40.89 -.35 8.11 +.06 1.20 41.55 +.28 1.48 -.14 19.13 -.08 0.54 58.32 +1.80 75.95 +.20 1.56 -.01 15.45 +.45 2.98 +.10 2.24 40.36 +.50 3.58 47.81 +.93 33.38 +.90 5.36 +.02 2.16 31.63 +.60 0.79 22.11 +.68 35.95 +.85 43.66 +.51 1.40 56.12 +2.01 8.87 +.23 3.32 68.84 -.15 2.39 40.74 +1.14 .38 -.01 8.60 +.33 11.00 -.27 0.64 37.51 +.48 99.62 +.47 0.88 19.76 +.06 1.47 59.77 +.32 0.37 14.97 +.21 4.16 134.60 +.16 0.75 102.00 +1.77 34.89 +1.13 17.53 -.09 1.92 90.75 +.89 1.94 +.05 1.02 -.03 7.20 +.05 24.76 -.48 3.43 -.03 0.16 20.30 -.06 11.66 +.51 2.10 41.64 -.34 4.57 9.51 +.25 0.28 26.64 +1.08 0.50 52.71 +.62 22.49 +.20 60.14 20.39 +.61 0.56 21.60 +.35 3.23 +.13 1.88 81.74 +1.33 108.52 +4.68 39.30 +.42 0.24 36.47 +.46 0.60 83.75 +1.21 42.01 +.42 0.48 10.55 +.01 4.90 +.07 37.82 +.28 7.81 +.05 0.24 9.08 -.09 0.08 28.90 +.29 19.32 +.58 9.76 +.17 0.72 54.03 +.80 1.04 66.34 +.60 0.48 93.65 +1.06 23.78 -.17 2.68 86.22 +.69 0.24 6.27 +.06 0.96 26.04 +.07 6.20 +.08 12.26 +.56 14.88 +.01 0.48 15.94 +.28 0.20 32.07 +.25 1.28 12.43 +.36 0.24 12.90 +.11 2.22 25.20 -1.48 25.40 -.77 23.66 +.87 0.20 21.85 +.42 0.24 15.92 +.32 0.12 5.84 -.01 0.04 10.53 -.03 11.68 +.14 17.73 +.77 1.84 +.03 0.04 12.25 +.04 0.64 14.08 +.21 31.74 +.05 129.24 +2.62 0.03 30.60 +.40 0.01 24.82 +.43 0.44 18.51 +.04 0.12 29.24 +.55 0.05 21.55 +.39 2.20 44.87 -.67 0.64 16.94 -.04 63.08 +1.06 7.82 +.21 1.38 +.02 0.16 8.39 +.20 6.69 -.08 8.18 +.02 0.80 31.08 -.05 1.28 121.80 +3.39 0.50 68.39 +.45 32.79 +.22 1.16 62.44 +.58 0.66 22.50 +.65 4.88 +.06 15.12 +.15 6.37 +.13 18.71 +.05 35.15 +.68 30.46 +.74 9.95 +.28 47.31 +.66 5.33 +.11 0.76 64.20 +.05 102.13 -.09 33.12 +.82 1.96 22.37 +.16 1.00 127.08 +.99 1.00 14.07 +.23

Nm

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm FMCG s FreshMkt n FriendFd n FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelCell FultonFncl FurnBrds GATX GMAC CpT GMX Rs GSI Cmce h GT Solar GabGldNR Gafisa SA GainCap n Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GMot wtA GMot wtB GM cvpfB GenSteel Gensco GenesWyo GeneticT h GenOn En Genpact Gentex GenuPrt Genworth GeoGrp Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GileadSci GlacierBc Glatfelter GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GblEagl un GloblInd GlobPay GloblTraff GlbXSilvM GlbXCopM GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GolarLNG n GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GrWlfRes GreenMtC s GreenPlns GrnHCmdty GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp Harsco HarteHnk HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx HrtldPay Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife s HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HiSoft n HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl HorMan HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck Hospira HospPT HostHotls

D 1.00 48.62 +1.79 40.94 +.57 5.85 +.10 0.75 8.79 -.04 0.24 28.64 +1.68 1.85 20.58 1.63 +.03 0.16 11.23 -.10 4.18 -.05 1.16 39.04 +.58 26.37 +.07 4.77 +.22 29.17 -.04 12.35 +.87 1.68 17.66 +.29 0.29 10.65 -.15 6.17 -.01 1.32 29.07 +.33 26.68 +.33 9.70 +.11 0.16 14.46 +.06 0.45 23.08 +.09 0.20 81.16 +2.05 34.98 +.14 38.37 +.24 .34 +.00 3.63 +.15 31.10 +.48 86.66 +7.41 7.55 +.07 40.53 +.44 1.88 74.00 +.50 0.60 19.76 +.17 0.40 16.14 +.09 1.96 +.03 1.12 39.89 +.02 4.25 +.13 31.52 +.42 22.48 +.48 16.47 +.42 2.38 49.34 +.35 2.07 -.01 41.53 +.41 58.02 +1.37 7.85 +.55 3.75 +.09 0.18 16.94 +.06 0.48 30.27 +.36 1.80 55.38 +.41 11.24 +.04 25.46 +.71 23.50 +.69 29.73 +1.85 0.27 10.50 +.05 4.74 +.04 0.18 8.20 -.31 40.34 -.13 0.52 14.56 +.09 0.36 14.91 +.18 2.11 43.10 +.02 1.92 +.03 0.40 9.61 +.03 3.20 +.12 28.17 +.45 10.00 -.01 6.05 +.39 0.08 52.91 +1.09 11.05 +.24 0.25 23.93 +.49 0.10 19.00 +.57 0.15 21.40 +.36 3.43 +.10 0.12 13.01 0.75 29.03 +2.07 25.32 +1.09 0.19 15.52 +.11 0.31 28.50 +.62 0.41 48.65 -.06 2.68 +.10 1.53 24.76 +.05 1.40 140.84 +.03 1.16 91.32 +1.07 17.93 +.39 17.44 +.45 529.81 -.65 44.78 +1.58 0.84 49.04 +1.16 21.23 +.60 2.64 151.74 +2.65 2.18 7.38 +.11 13.19 -.23 0.52 27.21 +.46 5.30 +.05 2.07 +.06 0.07 6.36 +.09 3.01 +.22 0.83 20.84 -.09 2.94 +.04 76.51 +2.23 10.79 -.01 34.23 +.58 24.61 +.94 1.80 55.67 +1.63 0.44 39.75 +.45 0.05 12.90 +.21 23.47 +.29 0.80 43.26 +.34 0.44 29.85 +.46 4.38 +.20 27.79 +2.24 35.07 +.53 0.58 32.55 +.05 1.92 37.10 +.14 1.80 51.79 +.10 33.29 +1.19 33.56 +.33 0.36 46.96 +1.63 6.48 -.09 0.96 32.06 +.07 30.93 +.17 1.21 +.01 1.10 41.71 +.26 2.87 +.29 68.11 +1.04 5.52 +.09 17.99 +.69 0.50 37.20 +.37 0.10 48.48 +.87 7.69 +.14 0.07 13.48 +.21 1.00 49.26 +.68 0.82 33.49 +.63 0.32 8.48 +.07 0.40 27.53 +.13 11.64 +.73 1.20 47.51 +.58 4.20 28.74 +.22 1.24 25.45 -.20 5.82 -.16 3.61 +.14 2.86 51.49 +.35 11.29 +.30 1.20 21.35 32.20 +.78 28.16 +.58 44.24 +.89 0.08 16.31 +.27 0.04 19.26 -.01 5.88 +.29 8.14 +.06 1.80 53.40 +.52 16.08 +.66 0.24 60.02 +2.27 73.02 +1.33 0.50 53.29 +1.36 6.15 +.25 0.88 10.54 +.17 0.20 6.06 +.13 1.38 55.48 -1.60 16.18 +.50 0.40 77.19 +1.73 0.32 36.49 -.42 21.49 +.63 13.02 +.10 37.78 +.74 15.65 +.40 1.70 35.92 +.25 0.45 46.45 +1.05 15.28 -.03 0.60 59.77 +3.65 10.14 +.16 21.54 +.40 1.00 37.46 +.06 38.33 +.06 2.48 60.81 +1.01 24.00 +.59 37.90 -.46 1.33 59.55 +.91 0.44 16.84 -.12 1.01 +.06 0.51 30.09 +.27 25.45 +.74 55.08 +.50 1.80 24.19 -.05 0.08 16.97 +.15

Nm HotTopic HovnanE HHughes n HudsCity HudsonHi HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.28 0.32 1.00 0.52 0.04 0.40

7.66 -.03 2.53 +.02 67.16 +.38 9.34 -.02 4.72 +.15 28.20 +2.01 80.05 +2.39 46.45 +1.07 6.54 -.03 38.50 -.28 19.12 +.26 45.00 +.63 9.67 +.38 3.96 +.78

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 34.52 +.32 IAMGld g 0.08 20.07 +.59 ICICI Bk 0.63 46.35 +.38 ICO Glb A 2.66 +.09 IDT Corp 0.88 26.41 -.06 iGateCorp 0.15 18.61 +.11 ING GRE 0.54 8.37 +.07 ING GlbDv 1.20 11.17 +.08 ING 12.04 +.04 INGPrRTr 0.31 6.18 -.02 ION Geoph 9.62 +.46 IPG Photon 66.92 +2.84 IQ CdaSC 0.47 32.66 +.53 iRobot 30.79 +.52 iShGold s 14.59 +.09 iShGSCI 35.50 +.78 iSAstla 0.82 26.65 +.24 iShBraz 2.53 72.75 +.01 iSCan 0.50 32.40 +.49 iShGer 0.29 26.88 +.22 iSh HK 0.45 19.17 +.17 iShItaly 0.33 18.54 +.11 iShJapn 0.14 10.27 +.08 iSh Kor 0.44 65.34 +1.39 iSMalas 0.34 14.79 +.23 iShMex 0.54 60.80 +.99 iShSing 0.43 14.10 +.19 iSPacxJpn 1.56 48.68 +.43 iShSoAfr 1.82 70.53 +1.09 iSSpain 2.15 42.30 +.17 iSSwitz 0.32 27.42 +.14 iSTaiwn 0.29 15.64 +.21 iSh UK 0.43 18.19 +.12 iShTurkey 1.28 62.85 -.14 iShSilver 34.23 +1.14 iShS&P100 1.09 59.75 +.46 iShDJDv 1.75 54.16 +.32 iShBTips 3.35 110.43 -.06 iShAsiaexJ 0.97 63.35 +1.15 iShChina25 0.63 44.14 +.99 iShDJTr 1.05 98.47 +1.53 iSSP500 2.46 134.83 +1.22 iShBAgB 3.88 106.97 -.17 iShEMkts 0.64 47.76 +.76 iShiBxB 5.15 110.89 -.28 iSh ACWI 0.81 48.98 +.40 iShEMBd 5.59 108.82 +.27 iSSPGth 1.20 70.19 +.62 iShNatRes 0.64 43.42 +.80 iShSPLatA 1.18 51.00 +.31 iSSPVal 1.27 63.58 +.50 iShB20 T 3.99 95.31 -1.28 iShB7-10T 3.22 95.35 -.55 iShB1-3T 0.80 84.20 -.04 iS Eafe 1.42 61.00 +.37 iSRusMCV 0.91 48.62 +.56 iSRusMCG 0.59 62.43 +.91 iShRsMd 1.59 110.86 +1.47 iSSPMid 1.00 99.19 +1.43 iShiBxHYB 7.54 92.65 +.11 iShC&SRl 1.90 73.75 +.77 iSSPGlb 1.37 66.38 +.49 iShCnsSv 0.71 74.06 +.75 iSR1KV 1.25 69.48 +.63 iSR1KG 0.76 61.44 +.61 iSRus1K 1.18 74.86 +.70 iSR2KV 1.24 73.97 +.95 iShBarIntC 4.38 106.72 -.39 iShBarc1-3 2.76 104.82 -.08 iSR2KG 0.53 95.12 +1.66 iShR2K 0.89 83.29 +1.26 iShUSPfd 2.90 40.09 -.01 iShDJTch 0.28 66.66 +.61 iShREst 1.98 61.54 +.68 iShDJHm 0.07 12.91 +.18 iShFnSc 0.61 58.17 +.30 iShSPSm 0.74 73.53 +.94 iShDJMd 0.04 69.02 +.83 iShDJHlt 0.10 67.20 +.92 iShBasM 0.93 79.20 +1.58 iShPeru 0.97 44.02 -.48 iShDJOE 0.24 61.20 +1.63 iShDJOG 0.29 68.62 +1.31 iStar 8.52 +.19 ITT Corp 1.00 56.72 +.47 ITT Ed 69.41 -1.44 Icagen rs 2.66 +.18 IconixBr 23.93 +.72 Ikanos 1.46 +.13 ITW 1.36 57.75 +.77 Illumina 73.47 +.81 Imax Corp 35.68 +.14 Immersion 8.25 +.04 Immucor 20.44 +.27 ImunoGn 13.06 +.37 Imunmd 4.09 +.09 ImpaxLabs 27.10 +.65 ImpOil gs 0.44 47.77 +1.27 Incyte 19.31 -.01 Inergy 2.82 36.45 +.88 Infinera 7.25 +.14 InfoSpace 8.95 +.17 Informat 54.88 +2.02 InfosysT 1.35 63.16 +.52 IngerRd 0.48 49.21 +.76 IngrmM 18.83 +.27 Inhibitex 3.59 +.16 InlandRE 0.57 8.97 +.10 Innovaro 2.13 -.05 InsitTc 25.65 +.91 Insulet 21.09 +.60 IntegLfSci 50.86 +.08 IntegralSy 11.98 -.09 IntgDv 8.52 +.23 IntegrysE 2.72 53.56 -.05 Intel 0.84 23.88 +.33 InteractBrk 0.40 16.94 +.11 IntcntlEx 122.37 +1.89 InterDig 0.40 42.85 -.23 InterMune 38.74 +1.30 InterNAP 7.74 +.09 IBM 3.00 170.44 -.06 Intl Coal 14.51 +.04 IntFlav 1.08 63.71 +1.40 IntlGame 0.24 17.95 +.05 IntPap 1.05 31.69 +.46 IntlRectif 30.36 +.42 InterOil g 56.76 -.68 Interpublic 0.24 11.71 +.56 Intersil 0.48 14.31 +.28 IntraLks n 20.55 +.08 IntPotash 30.19 +1.07 Intuit 54.28 -.45 IntSurg 352.78 +2.86 Invesco 0.49 24.69 +.51 InvMtgCap 3.71 22.76 +.09 InvVKDyCr 0.87 12.79 -.05 InVKSrInc 0.29 5.15 InvTech 15.30 +.37 IridiumCm 8.64 +.04 IronMtn 0.75 33.18 +.24 Isis 8.84 +.12 iSoftStn n 16.77 -.23 IstaPh 9.81 +.21 ItauUnibH 0.67 21.89 -.22 Itron 53.27 -.07 IvanhoeEn 2.47 +.02 IvanhM g 1.48 25.27 +1.63 Ixia 16.00 +.06 JA Solar 5.83 +.09 JDS Uniph 20.42 +.73 JPMorgCh 1.00 44.08 +.27 JPMAlerian 1.78 36.41 +.80 JPMCh pfB 1.80 26.13 -.24 JPMCh pfZ 2.00 26.13 -.29 Jabil 0.28 20.87 +.13 JackHenry 0.42 31.16 +.27 JackInBox 21.08 +.79 JacobsEng 46.37 +.67 Jaguar g 5.31 +1.00 Jamba 2.25 -.05 JamesRiv 21.42 +.51 JanusCap 0.20 10.48 +.34 Jarden 0.35 34.86 +.65 JazzPhrm 27.99 +.93 Jefferies 0.30 23.14 +.55 JetBlue 6.25 -.10 Jiayuan n 11.00 +.12 JinkoSolar 26.09 +.30 JoesJeans .85 -.01

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

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D 2.28 0.64 0.20 0.30

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2.80 89.38 +1.41 8.95 -.24 0.68 6.50 +.10 1.00 25.36 +.82 0.65 23.38 +.18 3.28 +.26 10.57 +.07 7.96 +.12 0.94 8.09 +.01 0.55 6.21 -.09 7.80 -.03 15.05 +.50 7.75 +.09 0.60 26.19 +.42 2.64 -.04 37.11 +.83 2.00 52.02 +.85 1.80 34.45 +.33 0.40 29.20 +.80 1.76 +.08 51.80 +.59 3.08 57.69 +1.12 5.76 +.03 6.47 +.25 1.00 49.59 +.92 6.84 +.19 0.28 8.29 +.09 2.76 -.08 28.59 +1.20 0.24 2.52 -.05 0.08 18.07 +.42 4.01 +.12 0.80 63.31 +1.61 0.52 17.98 +.29 1.00 51.53 +1.50 .24 -.01 0.40 55.39 +.38 25.94 +.47 0.18 37.49 +.70 2.93 35.39 +.92 0.33 53.86 +.85 0.27 31.56 +.63 0.19 47.71 +1.02 2.68 44.36 +1.41 0.40 36.57 +.80 0.84 30.31 +.31 0.04 7.97 +.10 1.60 86.65 +.12 14.54 +.24 0.30 13.41 +.34 0.75 29.77 -.10 0.24 61.81 +1.21 21.87 +.57 0.60 281.35 -.70 0.92 26.82 +.10 1.78 +.04 0.84 27.73 +.40 2.77 +.02

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D 1.12 50.32 +.26 21.03 +.91 2.44 81.50 +.57 1.00 43.22 +.73 0.72 86.88 +2.10 17.35 +.66 1.04 67.47 +.20 1.00 33.47 +.33 25.74 +.36 9.40 +.19 15.56 +.06 64.65 -.06 0.80 11.71 +.20 17.01 +.31 0.32 37.18 +.89 24.64 +.35 22.65 -.52 12.10 +.12 0.90 43.20 +.54 10.10 +.29 0.48 32.74 +.24 14.85 +.34 0.32 88.00 +1.58 12.25 -.11 1.52 37.58 +.31 1.02 31.96 +.16 5.75 +.05 23.21 +.75 16.72 +.24 17.88 +.12 5.83 +.20 0.74 44.72 +.39 18.69 +.62 0.14 12.29 +.12 1.38 40.13 +.88 6.18 +.08 10.06 +.12 49.71 +1.52 22.86 +.33 0.64 24.69 +.17 1.26 +.02 1.58 +.01 6.00 109.86 -.05 1.86 +.14 0.30 30.07 +.05 8.70 +.20 12.69 +.17 4.73 +.08 3.25 +.10 1.06 19.93 +.08 67.17 +1.00 0.80 27.14 +.65 40.49 +.45 1.12 46.27 +.02 58.36 -.63 18.84 +.43 14.82 +.13 0.32 32.43 +.58 1.12 65.62 +2.45 14.99 -.03 0.40 18.48 +.41 0.56 38.77 +.44 40.35 +.72 0.20 24.37 +.17 0.20 68.50 -.06 47.08 +.56 23.59 +.16 8.73 -.20 2.08 +.04 0.07 4.32 +.03 1.10 67.08 +.99 23.91 +.27 24.89 +.72 19.43 +.38 40.91 +1.53 1.80 19.10 +.41 42.13 -.26 15.29 -.51 9.89 +.45 24.78 +.14 0.48 15.74 +.04 28.72 +.96 1.20 35.16 +.66 26.74 +.96 0.14 28.88 +.35 15.78 +.51 2.34 -.04 26.19 +.24 0.29 1.35 -.02 0.80 16.72 +.66 1.38 68.86 +.60 7.04 50.30 -.20 0.40 29.20 +.56 0.44 67.74 +2.34 0.04 7.62 +.13 1.52 26.06 +.21 0.40 24.45 +.04 1.92 42.79 +.39 2.16 31.82 +1.23 0.24 5.22 +.08 1.72 19.40 +.42 68.28 +1.28 9.87 -.01 1.67 -.04 5.23 +.13 37.67 +.42 53.61 +1.33 45.94 +.09 242.54 +5.60 7.09 -.55 1.58 9.53 +.02 35.12 +.90 1.58 -.01 7.28 +.03 16.70 +.32 6.06 +.72 .05 +.00 3.59 +.25 9.48 +.16 120.87 +4.87 1.00 16.36 -.04 7.86 +.67 5.40 +.26 0.32 18.32 +.06 73.01 +3.58 0.80 53.80 +.27 8.92 -.01 0.15 17.51 +.28 0.15 18.29 +.26 0.20 22.89 +.71 2.20 58.50 -.10 0.92 20.36 +.07 1.86 54.94 +.06 32.03 -.03 1.24 84.83 -.06 20.49 +.23 23.61 +.16 11.43 +2.79 1.06 40.47 +.79 0.72 89.96 +2.05 0.55 8.59 +.03 4.91 -.03 1.40 23.96 +.13 0.42 52.27 +1.46 0.92 46.18 +.32 1.60 72.11 +1.26 7.61 -2.56 3.65 +.11 1.10 36.31 +.05 11.13 +.03 20.72 +2.17 1.12 49.49 +.45 2.84 -.03 2.00 64.69 +.15 0.40 4.39 +.11 0.44 12.34 +.02 10.35 +.05 2.53 61.46 +.66 4.99 -.06 2.46 +.03 36.79 +.86 0.54 37.84 +.54 31.44 +.45 21.75 +.01 1.45 42.93 +.37 4.30 61.02 +1.03 0.70 14.18 +.20 0.47 9.18 -.03 0.94 13.93 +.28 0.72 8.87 -.02 0.76 9.22 0.66 8.40 +.03 18.04 +.41 19.23 +.19 6.58 -.05 1.50 50.94 +.68 60.19 +.68 28.35 +1.70 1.84 102.20 +.80 1.20 81.54 +2.03 1.05 14.64 +.24 9.81 +.31 11.73 +.02 4.16 -.24 8.26 -.69

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106.40 +1.73 PPG 2.28 89.08 +1.66 PPL Corp 1.40 28.15 -.04 PPL pfW 54.33 +.03 PSBPk pfO 1.88 25.25 -.03 PSS Wrld 29.06 +.15 Paccar 0.48 51.01 +.86 PacerIntl 5.30 -.05 PacEth h .39 -.01 PacSunwr 3.64 -.03 PackAmer 0.80 29.02 +.49 PaetecHld 3.82 -.02 PallCorp 0.70 55.13 +.97 PanASlv 0.10 32.77 +.50 Pantry 18.55 +.41 ParPharm 34.73 +.42 ParagShip 0.20 2.89 ParamTc h 23.10 +.44 ParaG&S 2.81 +.02 ParkDrl 5.82 +.42 ParkerHan 1.48 87.05 +1.80 Patni 0.13 14.58 -.75 PatriotCoal 22.99 +.67 Patterson 0.48 36.72 +.52 PattUTI 0.20 27.91 +1.29 Paychex 1.24 31.91 PeabdyE 0.34 60.64 +1.98 Pengrth g 0.84 13.06 +.40 PnnNGm 38.96 +.61 PennVa 0.23 13.99 +.52 PennVaRs 1.92 25.31 +.66 PennWst g 1.08 25.63 +.33 PennantPk 1.08 11.93 -.13 Penney 0.80 37.69 +.98 PenRE 0.60 15.70 +.22 Penske 0.28 21.19 +.27 PensonWw 3.44 +.38 Pentair 0.80 39.38 +.53 PeopUtdF 0.63 13.37 -.03 PepBoy 0.12 13.84 +.40 PepcoHold 1.08 20.18 -.07 PepsiCo 2.06 71.27 +.16 PerfectWld 23.51 -.43 PerkElm 0.28 28.23 +.47 Prmian 1.36 20.39 +.57 Perrigo 0.28 86.11 +1.01 PetMed 0.50 12.93 +.14 PetChina 4.86 137.14 +2.31 Petrohawk 24.32 +.57 PetrbrsA 1.34 30.51 -.05 Petrobras 1.28 34.26 -.01 PetroDev 32.47 +1.44 PtroqstE 7.48 +.05 PetsMart 0.50 42.49 -.21 Pfizer 0.80 21.18 +.04 PhrmAth 3.69 -.02 PhmHTr 3.34 72.55 +.33 PharmPdt 0.60 28.52 +.29 Pharmacyc 6.68 +.26 Pharmasset 100.49 +.33 PhilipMor 2.56 69.28 +.69 PhilipsEl 1.02 27.92 -.31 PhlVH 0.15 68.02 +.73 PhnxCos 2.33 -.01 PhxNMda n 12.45 +.32 PhotrIn 9.40 +.44 PiedmOfc 1.26 20.43 +.27 Pier 1 11.60 +.44 PilgrimsP 5.60 +.03 PimCpOp 1.38 20.21 -.11 PimcoHiI 1.46 14.40 +.13 PinnclEnt 13.15 +.06 PinWst 2.10 45.28 -.21 PionDrill 12.92 +1.03 PioNtrl 0.08 91.83 +2.39 PitnyBw 1.48 24.63 +.22 PlainsAA 3.88 60.82 +1.62 PlainsEx 34.34 +.99 Plantron 0.20 36.31 -.13 PlatUnd 0.32 35.81 +.17 PlugPwr h .45 -.05 PlumCrk 1.68 40.87 +.42 PluristemT 2.99 +.16 Polo RL 0.80 134.01 +2.65 Polycom 56.34 +1.26 PolyMet g 1.75 +.11 PolyOne 0.16 14.31 +.61 Polypore 69.67 +3.69 Poniard h .25 -.02 Pool Corp 0.56 29.43 +.06 Popular 3.01 +.02 PortGE 1.06 25.75 +.14 Potash s 0.28 55.08 +1.29 PwrInteg 0.20 37.75 +.42 Power-One 9.07 +.28 PSCrudeDS 46.78 -1.62 PSBMetDS 11.47 -.37 PwshDB 29.31 +.58 PS Silver 61.42 +2.09 PS Agri 33.07 +.62 PS Oil 29.98 +.78 PS USDBull 21.59 -.01 PwSClnEn 9.53 +.14 PwSWtr 0.11 19.63 +.25 PSFinPf 1.27 18.39 +.03 PwShPfd 0.97 14.46 +.01 PShEMSov 1.53 27.06 +.02 PSIndia 0.24 22.42 +.16 PwShs QQQ 0.39 58.04 +.48 Powrwav 3.98 +.10 Praxair 2.00 104.52 +2.31 PrecCastpt 0.12 154.72 +2.28 PrecDrill 14.28 +.50 PriceTR 1.24 63.28 +1.10 priceline 518.38+13.98 PrideIntl 42.25 +.92 Primedia 0.28 7.04 Primerica 0.04 21.75 +.39 PrinctnR h .19 -.01 PrinFncl 0.55 31.75 +.51 PrivateB 0.04 15.91 +.35 ProAsr 69.36 +.38 ProShtDow 40.14 -.32 ProShtQQQ 32.10 -.28 ProShtS&P 40.54 -.38 PrUShS&P 20.28 -.36 ProUltDow 0.32 64.64 +.93 PrUlShDow 16.95 -.24 ProUltMC 0.01 75.60 +2.20 ProUltQQQ 91.65 +1.59 PrUShQQQ rs 49.58 -.82 ProUltSP 0.39 54.55 +.92 PrUShtFn rs 58.89 -.64 ProUShL20 34.15 +.85 PrUltSCh25 26.93 -1.29 ProUltSEM 29.97 -.98 ProUltSRE 14.23 -.29 ProUltSOG 29.48 -1.25 ProUltSBM 17.39 -.73 ProUltRE 0.43 61.37 +1.24 ProUltFin 0.05 67.43 +.67 PrUPShQQQ 24.28 -.63 ProUPShD30 31.01 -.69 PrUPShR2K 17.38 -.84 ProUltO&G 0.21 54.02 +2.05 ProUBasM 0.03 52.16 +2.02 ProShtR2K 29.61 -.45 ProUltR2K 0.01 47.98 +1.42 ProSht20Tr 42.33 +.56 ProUSSP500 15.19 -.40 PrUltSP500 s 0.11 82.49 +2.17 ProSUltGold 76.66 +.95 ProUSSlv rs 19.73 -1.44 PrUltCrde rs 47.96 +2.24 PrUShCrde rs 44.94 -2.41 ProVixSTF 49.95 -1.42 ProUltSGld 24.49 -.29 ProSUltSilv 172.85+11.39 ProUltShYen 15.61 +.11 ProUShEuro 17.53 -.05 ProctGam 2.10 67.38 -.04 ProgrssEn 2.48 48.75 -.21 ProgrsSft s 28.03 +.55 ProgsvCp 1.40 21.29 +.13 ProgWaste 0.50 24.99 +.15 ProLogis 0.45 15.77 +.30 ProUSR2K rs 42.08 -1.28 ProspctCap 1.21 11.34 +.20 ProspBcsh 0.70 44.23 -.22 ProtLife 0.64 24.11 -.10 ProvEn g 0.54 8.82 +.07 ProvidFS 0.48 14.14 +.06 Prudentl 1.15 63.99 +.71 PSEG 1.37 33.93 +.11 PubStrg 3.80 117.69 +.65 PulteGrp 7.57 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D 16.99 +.15 0.86 56.45 +.10 19.42 +.29 3.14 +.35 3.91 +.03 6.28 +.40 0.40 58.35 +.42 22.79 +.12 0.61 17.04 +.28 22.04 +.17 2.83 +.13 14.40 +.29 4.52 15.47 -.14 0.03 2.00 -.14 6.08 +.21 18.04 +.04 0.28 23.35 +1.29 0.84 23.29 +.20 11.92 +.05 2.93 +.12 38.29 -.44 .92 +.04 42.33 +1.21 4.87 +.33 0.01 4.71 +.03 20.04 +.39 .29 +.01 2.88 -.01 0.25 16.06 +.16 90.51 +1.01 1.53 -.04 14.15 +.98 0.20 77.78 +1.05 0.16 52.35 +.56 4.08 -.10 11.60 -.13 0.52 34.98 +1.19 2.16 66.70 +.73 1.72 49.27 +.42 35.00 +.99 3.59 29.40 +.13 1.73 35.35 +.38 45.59 +.39 10.58 +.40 1.00 15.08 -.03 0.72 71.35 +1.01 0.84 14.13 +.29 1.85 46.04 +.88 1.86 25.44 +.12 1.78 25.35 +.63 55.64 +2.12 0.66 83.12 +.44 0.04 7.13 -.12 0.24 15.36 -.14 37.35 +.19 0.48 62.63 +.60 0.48 52.24 +.89 1.04 70.83 +.58 7.66 +.09 13.70 +.97 0.64 32.02 +.73 1.01 +.11 5.07 -.01 0.80 32.91 +.60 45.43 +1.65 31.51 +.05 16.69 -.14 1.00 6.57 +.08 15.04 +.55 2.34 112.94 +.49 0.36 10.93 +.35 3.73 +.04 12.68 +.65 1.31 +.05 2.12 38.73 +.06 7.65 +.15 30.83 +.64 1.08 68.22 +.83 0.42 27.25 +.40 1.17 -.01 37.98 +1.42 0.18 42.24 +1.41 0.56 28.21 +.75 0.80 72.01 +2.23 1.40 83.62 +3.17 0.96 61.51 +.28 51.63 +1.83 1.42 37.83 +.67 0.28 19.98 +.25 0.44 82.99 +.84 .45 +.01 46.37 +2.16 0.88 81.86 +.86 58.59 +1.48 39.45 +1.72 2.00 61.57 +.69 13.63 -.11 40.56 +.37 3.36 70.75 +.82 3.36 70.04 +.61 0.44 59.32 +1.48 3.18 +.28 4.44 +.11 23.79 +.87 10.62 +.09 2.29 29.85 1.08 55.24 +.88 0.70 51.57 +.53 0.12 16.80 +.49 7.05 +.06 17.48 +.17 0.82 62.82 +.80 38.99 +.53 1.94 41.75 -.09 0.20 23.26 +.33 10.03 +.08 19.66 +.37 0.40 86.01 +2.16 0.40 16.31 +.30 0.10 64.26 +1.98 3.00 125.71 +.90 145.60 +.86 1.55 180.42 +2.72 2.34 134.36 +1.19 1.74 55.43 +.40 0.31 18.51 +.27 0.15 25.14 +.07 4.38 40.84 +.07 0.99 22.80 +.03 0.36 26.00 +.10 0.50 53.60 +.55 0.49 58.08 +1.97 0.41 69.73 +1.03 1.00 81.80 +1.76 30.90 +.07 15.01 +.48 0.40 11.58 +.18 16.19 +.61 58.69 +.49 0.04 6.44 +.10 58.88 -.09 2.39 59.40 +2.30 0.60 7.77 -.04 19.82 +.59 0.48 25.28 +.08 23.81 -.18 0.84 52.50 +.80 11.43 +.23 134.25 +4.17 39.90 +.07 16.30 +.65 2.70 +.08 25.98 +.67 0.68 47.32 -.34 46.45 +.11 10.70 +.47 6.21 +.08 11.19 -.02 1.82 38.59 +.66 2.46 14.52 +.22 0.46 19.56 +.13 1.53 52.13 +1.11 2.73 +.44 8.20 +.13 39.23 -.08 1.00 83.75 +1.69 0.49 32.06 +.29 0.24 17.67 +.31 5.64 +.08 9.90 +.11 1.00 57.08 +.21 0.30 51.76 +1.45 9.05 +.04 1.82 +.01 2.74 34.79 +1.62 0.72 16.86 +.25 0.52 25.77 +.21 2.77 +.01 75.85 +.65 0.75 17.19 +.01 18.65 +.25 16.69 +.45 9.21 +.12 25.68 +.52 0.57 36.44 +.79 5.11 -.03 1.92 54.89 -.06 28.98 +1.56 1.48 23.56 +.21 35.08 +.76 0.84 37.31 +.24 7.92 0.20 11.60 +.36 19.25 +.66 7.11 +.49 38.58 -.21 1.46 86.04 +.81 1.52 20.07 +.46 0.39 95.24 +1.88 10.86 +.17 57.10 +3.14 0.81 14.20 +.07 3.72 131.58 +.03 4.62 +.30 14.08 -.14 0.72 69.92 +1.45 43.27 +.93 0.44 45.26 +.89 17.80 +.25 7.93 +.08 45.28 +1.67 12.49 +.79 0.41 6.78 +.10 .78 +.10 28.09 +.48 0.12 34.47 +.15 0.08 10.38 +.36 3.20 116.65 +1.09 0.50 26.93 +.21 111.40 -1.54 0.48 10.60 +.57 2.65 -.07 1.35 -.06 2.18 +.04 54.40 +1.99 18.04 +.22 11.52 +1.13 0.16 15.65 +.18

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0.50

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0.66 0.80 2.64 1.63 3.16 0.28 0.30 0.58 0.48 1.68 0.84 0.79 1.64

0.36

1.20 0.66 1.00

Nm 27.75 +1.11 5.68 +.01 9.17 +.03 9.72 -.01 1.91 -.04 56.20 +.72 5.19 +.05 20.52 +.23 76.32 -.39 39.52 +.77 60.17 +1.53 20.75 -.06 57.37 +1.01 53.99+10.26 84.38 +.84 23.33 +.17 57.96 +.99 23.57 +.73 13.44 +.13 11.50 +.22 35.23 +.27 2.89 +.10 27.80 -.27 41.95 +1.49 21.80 +.61 24.21 +.72 40.49 -.11 35.78 +2.12 28.23 +.54 12.27 +.05 42.21 +.36 18.69 +.35 27.34 +.41 34.84 +.23 7.64 +.14 22.90 +.33 19.58 +.29 5.23 +.12 15.99 +.56 12.88 +.22 17.12 +.51 43.84 +.56 38.91 +.85 36.42 +.28 32.24 +.05 40.53 +.47 74.71 +1.48 15.94 +.07 37.53 +.50 26.27 +.19 34.09 -.11 3.63 +.12 75.36 +2.05 16.63 -3.02 2.21 -.05 4.13 +.07 36.61 +1.31 57.44 +.88 21.61 +.10 47.08 +.67 26.08 +.40 17.29 +.17 10.71 -.04 .71 -.03 92.66 +.87 35.94 +.50 8.73 +.01 17.79 +.04 15.02 +.23 53.59 +.13 7.75 +.15 40.12 +.56 18.31 +.64 30.06 +1.49 6.66 +.12 64.00 +.20 32.86 +.49 .07 -.00 6.03 +.23 31.30 +.27 20.60 +.81 40.72 +1.04 2.59 -.04 40.24 +1.26 7.55 +.16 21.10 +.09 20.89 +.09 9.78 +.13 9.73 +.06 8.17 +.12 28.59 +.29 2.46 +.06 2.69 -.08 35.05 +1.21 1.20 +.20 10.80 +.12 8.69 +.04 7.62 +.33 10.90 +.32 9.64 +.22 38.88 +.67 13.60 +.30 6.08 19.68 +.01 13.39 +.19 30.17 +.85 66.48 +.84 27.73 +.51 2.40 +.04 2.61 +.25 1.90 +.02 32.65 +.28 34.21 +1.26 21.36 +.07 45.80 +.58 15.79 +.06 21.12 +.65 36.21 +.19 19.09 +.09 10.45 -.02 5.96 +.12 4.17 +.07 10.12 +.09 48.40 +1.34 52.66 +.60 54.58 +.77 16.63 +.30 22.32 +.08 13.53 +.14 17.07 -.03 5.04 -.03 28.20 +.18 37.36 +.26 21.18 +.36 27.30 +.13 7.02 -.05 32.82 +.67 49.96 -.82 4.97 +.07 4.54 +.14 25.95 -.20 58.92 +.59 1.25 -.11 53.39 +1.47 50.20 +2.08 32.88 +.67 9.25 +.32 8.66 +.19 5.20 +.04 16.57 +.12 9.17 +.16 13.95 +.09 24.07 +.06 18.78 +.32 15.10 +.02 33.17 +.32 28.95 +.03 .70 +.01 4.56 +.03 23.47 +.22 64.72 +1.59 47.31 -.12 6.42 +.12 1.53 +.07 41.63 +1.66 54.25 +.58 15.78 +.29 29.63 +.66 31.64 +.12 18.61 +.99 26.35 +.39 24.42 +1.01 19.16 +.97 23.92 +.11 13.21 +.43 45.58 +1.45 49.78 +.15 35.18 +.74 16.49 +.09 23.62 +.17 62.74 +.86 55.45 -.08 10.64 +.07 38.84 +.06 34.64 +1.55 37.08 +.62 93.94 +.63 28.95 +.28 57.12 +1.97 70.13 +1.68 33.05 +.06 77.63 +1.06 36.77 +.94 50.32 +1.15 27.86 +1.30 26.23 +.13 19.33 +.21 9.49 +.18 20.38 +.22 2.70 -.16 67.19 +.31 5.20 +.14 63.00 +.28 86.05 +.35 26.00 +.33 56.56 +.07 18.95 +.33 1.20 -.01 62.82 +.72 81.39 +.02 60.23 +1.45 9.75 +.04 43.39 +.48 48.17 +1.45 2.21 +.07 67.92 +.91 3.06 6.43 -1.09 63.00 +.43 68.95 +3.43 .66 +.02 6.43 +.27 43.01 +1.11 22.74 -.37 32.61 +1.29 12.63 +.21 28.26 +.57 .82 +.02 62.69 +1.18 14.30 -.03 20.48 +.35

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 B5

LinkedIn prices its IPO at top of forecast While many Internet companies plan to go public in the next 12 months, LinkedIn is the first social media company to do so in the United States. At $352.8 million, LinkedIn’s offering will be the fifth-largest for the Internet software and services sector in the United States, according to data from Capital IQ and Standard & Poor’s. Google’s offering in 2004 still stands as

the largest, at $1.67 billion. LinkedIn’s valuation has surged in the past month, amid rising investor demand for social media companies. Early this month, the company set its price range at $32 to $35 a share, at a roughly $3 billion valuation. Private shares of LinkedIn, meanwhile, traded at an implied valuation of $2.5 billion on SharesPost, a secondary market.

sition comes from grant dollars courtesy of last year’s federal Small Business Jobs Act, said Beth Wickham, director of the college’s Small Business Development Center, which already provides other kinds of free business advising. Wickham said COCC also is paying for Curley’s employment. She said she is looking into supplementing the funding with another grant.

Wickham said having the new position at the college adds another layer of valuable help for business owners in Central Oregon. “We have lots of access to (market research) statistics, but to hand that to a business doesn’t do them any good,” she said. Curley will interpret the data and use it to come up with actionable steps for businesses to take, for the sake of growth. As for Skidmore, he said he’s glad the community college obtained the funding for the new position, so he can point business owners to data they could find useful. At COCC, Curley said he is an adviser, not a consultant. People do not pay him for the information he can provide; he simply offers it to them, he said. Whether they decide to implement his suggestions is up to them. Curley said his advising has

some criteria, designed to optimize his effectiveness. To work with Curley, entrepreneurs must want to grow their businesses, for instance. Also, the companies most likely to benefit from his assistance are between one and five years old, with 10 to 99 employees. But he said he wants to be flexible about the employment criterion. Susie Stevens, executive director of the Bend nonprofit Opportunity Knocks, said she’s in favor of the creation of Curley’s position. “Anytime that we can help to provide more resource tools, information to the small business community and owners, we’re making the effort to strengthen the region as a whole,” she said.

graduates under 25. Young graduates who majored in education and teaching or engineering were most likely to find a job requiring a college degree, while area studies majors — those who majored in Latin American studies, for example — and humanities majors were least likely to do so. Among all recent education graduates, 71.1 percent were in jobs that required a college degree; of all area studies majors, the share was 44.7 percent. An analysis by The New York Times of Labor Department data about college graduates aged 25 to 34 found that the number of these workers employed in food service, restaurants and bars had risen 17 percent in 2009 from 2008, although the sample size was small. There were similar or bigger employment increases at gas stations and fuel dealers, food and alcohol stores, and taxi and limousine services. This may be a waste of a college degree, but it also displaces

the less-educated workers who would normally take these jobs. “The less schooling you had, the more likely you were to get thrown out of the labor market altogether,” said Sum, noting that unemployment rates for high school graduates and dropouts are always much higher than those for college graduates. “There is compete displacement all the way down.” Meanwhile, college graduates are having trouble paying off student loan debt, which is at a median of $20,000 for graduates of classes 2006 to 2010. Bishop, the Pittsburgh grad, says he is “terrified” of the effects his starter jobs might have on his ultimate career, which he hopes to be in publishing or writing. “It looks bad to have all these short-term jobs on your résumé, but you do have to pay the bills,” he said. Many graduates will probably take on more student debt. More than 60 percent of those who graduated in the past five years

say they will need even more formal education to be successful in their chosen careers. “I knew there weren’t going to be many job prospects for me until I got my Ph.D.,” said Travis Patterson, 23, a 2010 graduate of California State University in Fullerton. He is working as an administrative assistant for a property management company as he puts himself through graduate school in psychology. While it may not have anything to do with his degree, “it helps pay my rent and tuition, and that’s what matters.” While young people who have weathered a tough job market may shy from risks during their careers, the best way to nullify an unlucky graduation date is to change jobs when you can, says Till von Wachter, an economist at Columbia. “If you don’t move within five years of graduating, for some reason you get stuck where you are. That’s just an empirical finding,” von Wachter said.

lion shares. The underwriters have the option to sell an additional 1.1 million shares, which would increase the total amount raised to $405 million. LinkedIn, which is set to go public Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange, is a popular site and one of the most eagerly awaited initial public offerings in years.

By Evelyn M. Rusli New York Times News Service

The professional social network LinkedIn priced its public offering at $45 per share late Wednesday, at the top of its expected price range. At that price, LinkedIn will raise $352.8 million, valuing the company at $4.3 billion. It is set to offer 7.8 million shares, with shareholders selling about 3 mil-

Gardener

For more information

Continued from B1 Meanwhile, in Salem, the Oregon Legislature has been evaluating House Bill 2879, which would delay the sunset of a statewide economic-gardening program approved in last year’s special session from July 1 of this year to Jan. 2, 2016. Curley’s new job is a part-time commitment. As the sole operator of the brand and market development consulting firm Blue Space Markets, he continues to be a small-business owner himself. Previously he did strategy, client management and creative work at Bend-based Brand Navigation. Before that, he held sales and marketing roles for Multnomah Publishers Inc. when it was based in Sisters. Most funding for the new po-

Business owners can contact the Small Business Development Center at Central Oregon Community College to learn more about Steve Curley’s economic-gardening program by calling 541-383-7290.

Graduates Continued from B1 Among the members of the class of 2010, just 56 percent had held at least one job by this spring, when the survey was conducted. That compares with 90 percent of graduates from the classes of 2006 and 2007. (Some have gone for further education or opted out of the labor force, while many are still pounding the pavement.) Even these figures understate the damage done to these workers’ careers. Many have taken jobs that do not make use of their skills; about half of recent college graduates, like Bishop, said that their first job did not require a college degree. The choice of major is quite important. Certain majors had better luck finding a job that required a college degree, according to an analysis by Andrew Sum, an economist at Northeastern University, of 2009 Labor Department data for college

Citigroup

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

A retention package

Continued from B1 The payouts will be spread over the next four years and are subject to Pandit’s meeting certain performance goals. They will be in addition to his regular salary and annual bonuses. The announcement comes as Citigroup recently posted its fifth consecutive quarterly profit and completed a reverse stock split that, with the stroke of a pen, ratcheted its share price to more than $40 from $4.

End of a pay era? Just three short years ago, Citigroup was in such dire straits that it twice needed to be rescued by the government. With the bank receiving more than $45 billion of federal aid, questions swirled about whether Pandit would remain at the helm. The large retention award seems to put those questions to rest. “Vikram has done an outstanding job since coming on board as the financial crisis began,” Richard Parsons, Citigroup’s chairman, said in a statement. “This award is designed to retain Vikram as our CEO and reward him for future performance benefiting the company and our shareholders.” The retention package also could signify the unofficial end of the post-bailout pay era. Most banks made minor adjustments to compensation practices amid the uproar over bonuses, shifting more pay into stock from cash but still awarding hefty sums. Others like Citigroup and Bank of America, which accepted multiple government rescues, needed a federal pay overseer to formally approve the awards for their 25 highest earners. Pandit helped avert an even bigger backlash toward his bankers when he pledged at a 2009 congressional hearing to accept a mere $1 a year in salary until Citigroup turned a profit. Even so, he continued to benefit from the Citi board’s largess. Throughout the crisis, Pandit was allowed to hold about $79.7 million in cash from the sale of Old Lane Partners, an investment firm he founded that was acquired by Citi in April 2007. Pandit would have to forfeit that money if he left the company before July 2011, giving the board a strong incentive to extend the retention package now.

Careful not to call it a bonus — Parsons referred to it as a “long-term, multiyear performance-based” award — Citigroup’s board broke the retention package into three parts. It also has the power to claw back any ill-gotten pay. The largest part of the award is deferred stock valued at $10 million, which will vest in three equal installments from the end of 2013 to 2015. Pandit must meet largely subjective performance goals, including developing senior managers, satisfying certain regulatory goals like improved risk management and steering the bank toward a culture focused on socalled responsible finance. The second part of the retention package is a special profit-sharing plan for top employees based on the company’s financials. If Citigroup’s core operations over the period earn at least $12 billion in pretax income during each of the next two years, Pandit could take home more than $6.65 million. About two dozen or so other top executives participate in the program — including John Havens, Citi’s chief operating officer, who could receive almost $5.2 million. The bank earned $19 billion in pretax income last year. Citigroup also awarded Pandit more than 500,000 options, which the company valued at as much as $6.5 million. The options carry strike prices ranging from $41.54 to $60. Citigroup shares currently trade at $41.24. Citigroup’s board had signaled a pay increase for Pandit last fall when they granted stock awards to several of his top lieutenants and announced plans to restore his compensation so that it would be in line with other Wall Street chiefs. In January, Citi’s board raised Pandit’s $1 salary to $1.75 million a year. The additional $5.5 million a year in retention payouts will set the stage for him to be paid as much, if not more, than his peers. Bank of America’s chief executive, Brian Moynihan, received about $10.2 million in total compensation for 2010, according to Equilar, a compensation research and consulting firm. Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan’s chairman and chief executive, was awarded a $23.6 million pay package last year, making him the highest paid of any Wall Street chief. The heads of Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo were paid somewhere in between.

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.10 .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .88f .96f ... .24 .32 .22 .84f .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 13 21 11 17 14 22 28 26 ... 24 9 ... 11 11 14 15 ... 17 68 6

68.58 +.14 +21.0 25.00 -.01 +11.0 11.79 -.11 -11.6 15.98 +.17 +2.8 77.14 +.46 +18.2 8.08 +.11 -4.4 41.77 +1.91 -11.7 66.85 +.80 +10.9 83.24 +.53 +15.3 9.70 +.21 +31.3 36.47 +.46 +22.6 36.49 -.42 -13.3 10.67 +.09 -13.0 23.88 +.33 +13.6 8.56 +.04 -3.3 25.36 +.05 +13.4 6.91 +.17 +14.0 8.24 +.14 -12.9 23.38 +.18 +15.3 14.85 +.34 +23.8 24.69 +.17 -11.5

Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

1.24 .92 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46 .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .48f ... .60

20 17 17 13 32 ... 40 22 16 15 19 11 26 11 40 13 13 12 35 ...

84.83 -.06 -.7 46.18 +.32 +9.0 45.17 +.01 -2.8 8.26 -.69 -53.3 51.01 +.86 -11.0 2.93 +.11 +41.5 40.87 +.42 +9.1 154.72 +2.28 +11.1 25.28 +.08 +12.4 56.32 +1.27 -15.2 86.04 +.81 +2.7 43.84 +.56 -2.9 36.61 +1.31 +13.9 12.63 +.21 +8.0 11.70 +.19 -3.9 25.74 +.15 -4.6 15.62 +.09 -7.7 28.92 +.17 -6.7 3.45 +.01 +22.3 22.21 +.71 +17.3

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1494.00 $1495.60 $35.094

Market recap

Pvs Day $1480.00 $1479.80 $33.488

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

BkofAm S&P500ETF iShSilver EKodak iShR2K

1511718 1145877 574846 546432 491577

11.79 -.11 134.36 +1.19 34.23 +1.14 3.60 +.48 83.29 +1.26

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Jaguar g IFM Inv EKodak WhtMtIns Solutia wt

Last

Chg %Chg

5.31 +1.00 2.42 +.45 3.60 +.48 395.18 +51.55 2.60 +.30

+23.2 +22.8 +15.4 +15.0 +13.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name NoAmEn g PitnB pr iP SER2K ChinHydro OfficeMax

Last

Chg %Chg

7.61 -2.56 -25.2 404.54 -75.46 -15.7 26.98 -2.72 -9.2 5.04 -.44 -8.0 8.26 -.69 -7.7

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

NA Pall g Hyperdyn KodiakO g GtPanSilv g NthnO&G

Last Chg

49430 3.65 +.11 47455 3.96 +.78 41665 6.46 +.47 30644 3.01 +.22 30369 20.72 +2.17

Gainers ($2 or more) Name T3 Motn rs B&HO Hyperdyn Nevsun g NthnO&G

Last

8.59 +4.19 +95.2 3.68 +.78 +26.9 3.96 +.78 +24.5 6.06 +.72 +13.5 20.72 +2.17 +11.7

Name TravelCtrs ImpacMtg AmLorain BowlA InfuSystem

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Cisco SiriusXM Intel Dell Inc Staples

916253 734331 650391 640546 533291

Name

Last

NobelLrn DonegalB AsiaEntRs SodaStrm n HampRB rs

2,395 660 106 3,161 122 23

Chg %Chg

6.43 -1.09 -14.5 2.86 -.24 -7.7 2.08 -.13 -5.9 12.60 -.60 -4.5 2.45 -.10 -3.9

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 16.65 2.18 23.88 16.75 16.63

+.01 +.04 +.33 +.85 -3.02

Chg %Chg

11.43 +2.79 17.43 +3.52 7.38 +1.43 53.99 +10.26 16.70 +2.10

+32.3 +25.3 +24.0 +23.5 +14.4

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

CitiTrends ColdwtrCrk Staples CelldexTh KipsBMd n

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

17.13 -4.28 -20.0 2.34 -.58 -19.9 16.63 -3.02 -15.4 3.31 -.57 -14.7 3.41 -.58 -14.5

Diary 335 140 30 505 7 2

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,916 669 115 2,700 50 48

12,876.00 5,565.78 441.19 8,718.25 2,490.51 2,887.75 1,370.58 14,562.01 868.57

9,614.32 3,872.64 346.95 6,355.83 1,689.19 2,061.14 1,010.91 15.80 587.66

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,560.18 5,421.10 439.38 8,407.48 2,357.62 2,815.00 1,340.68 14,205.13 833.45

+80.60 +85.73 -1.03 +74.41 +31.81 +31.79 +11.70 +144.46 +13.09

YTD %Chg %Chg +.65 +1.61 -.23 +.89 +1.37 +1.14 +.88 +1.03 +1.60

52-wk %Chg

+8.49 +6.16 +8.49 +5.57 +6.76 +6.11 +6.60 +6.32 +6.35

+20.26 +23.92 +18.31 +21.37 +31.87 +22.48 +20.23 +21.43 +23.58

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

349.10 2,700.82 3,978.00 5,923.49 7,303.53 23,011.14 35,364.33 21,444.04 3,559.55 9,662.08 2,135.78 3,141.21 4,765.30 6,012.85

+.40 s +.15 s +.92 s +1.07 s +.65 s +.48 s +1.56 s +.16 s +.04 s +.99 s +1.59 s +.15 s +.26 s +.61 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0613 1.6142 1.0283 .002120 .1537 1.4226 .1286 .012250 .085234 .0356 .000916 .1584 1.1346 .0347

1.0622 1.6251 1.0279 .002123 .1537 1.4229 .1286 .012280 .085245 .0355 .000920 .1580 1.1355 .0346

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.74 +0.14 +6.4 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.69 +0.14 +6.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.64 +0.04 +6.4 GrowthI 27.50 +0.31 +6.4 Ultra 24.27 +0.29 +7.2 American Funds A: AmcpA p 20.21 +0.14 +7.3 AMutlA p 27.05 +0.16 +7.5 BalA p 18.88 +0.11 +5.9 BondA p 12.36 -0.02 +2.7 CapIBA p 52.37 +0.17 +5.9 CapWGA p 37.67 +0.22 +5.9 CapWA p 21.00 +3.7 EupacA p 43.08 +0.30 +4.1 FdInvA p 39.16 +0.39 +7.0 GwthA p 32.12 +0.31 +5.5 HI TrA p 11.59 +5.6 IncoA p 17.58 +0.08 +7.3 IntBdA p 13.51 -0.02 +1.5 ICAA p 29.50 +0.17 +5.2 NEcoA p 27.09 +0.23 +6.9 N PerA p 29.98 +0.21 +4.8 NwWrldA 55.54 +0.37 +1.7 SmCpA p 40.11 +0.32 +3.2 TxExA p 12.05 +0.01 +3.5 WshA p 29.35 +0.24 +8.5 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.47 +0.29 +1.1 IntEqII I r 12.59 +0.12 +1.0 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.79 NA IntlVal r 28.33 NA MidCap 36.28 NA MidCapVal 22.41 NA Baron Funds: Growth 55.63 +0.71 +8.6 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.96 -0.03 +3.2 DivMu 14.50 +0.01 +2.9 TxMgdIntl 15.95 +0.11 +1.4

BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.81 +0.15 GlAlA r 20.15 +0.10 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.77 +0.10 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.85 +0.15 GlbAlloc r 20.25 +0.10 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 56.84 +0.90 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 31.25 +0.48 DivEqInc 10.70 +0.09 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 32.30 +0.49 AcornIntZ 42.07 +0.19 ValRestr 52.19 +0.67 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.46 +0.23 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.75 +0.07 USCorEq2 11.79 +0.14 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.27 +0.29 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.68 +0.29 NYVen C 34.98 +0.28 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.35 -0.02 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.16 +0.18 EmMktV 35.83 +0.29 IntSmVa 18.00 +0.08 LargeCo 10.60 +0.09 USLgVa 21.96 +0.26 US Small 22.90 +0.36 US SmVa 26.85 +0.42 IntlSmCo 17.87 +0.10 Fixd 10.35 IntVa 19.19 +0.13 Glb5FxInc 11.11 -0.02 2YGlFxd 10.19 -0.01 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 74.85 +0.52 Income 13.51 -0.02

+7.8 +3.8 +3.5 +7.9 +3.8 +6.5 +6.9 +6.3 +7.0 +2.8 +3.5 +1.3 +4.6 +7.7 +5.6 +5.7 +5.3 +3.3 -0.9 +4.7 +7.4 +9.4 +7.3 +5.0 +4.1 +0.5 +4.7 +2.1 +0.4 +7.1 +3.2

IntlStk 37.16 +0.26 Stock 116.28 +1.11 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 11.13 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.92 +0.14 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09 GblMacAbR 10.20 +0.02 LgCapVal 18.98 +0.14 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.89 +0.05 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.38 +0.12 Fairholme 33.24 +0.05 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.74 +0.06 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.83 +0.25 StrInA 12.68 -0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.05 +0.25 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.11 +0.07 FF2015 11.79 +0.06 FF2020 14.38 +0.09 FF2020K 13.59 +0.08 FF2025 12.05 +0.09 FF2030 14.41 +0.11 FF2030K 14.04 +0.11 FF2035 12.03 +0.11 FF2040 8.41 +0.08 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.17 +0.15 AMgr50 16.02 +0.06 Balanc 19.14 +0.11 BalancedK 19.14 +0.11 BlueChGr 48.56 +0.62 Canada 59.91 +0.81 CapAp 26.81 +0.31 CpInc r 9.86 +0.04 Contra 70.99 +0.86 ContraK 70.99 +0.86 DisEq 24.17 +0.25 DivIntl 31.06 +0.20

+4.1 +8.3 NA +4.1 +3.0 +1.0 +4.2 +8.2 +5.9 -6.6 +4.4 +4.5 +4.5 +4.7 +4.2 +4.4 +4.7 +4.7 +5.0 +5.1 +5.1 +5.3 +5.4 +6.5 +4.2 +5.3 +5.4 +7.1 +3.0 +5.8 +6.5 +4.9 +5.0 +7.3 +3.0

DivrsIntK r 31.05 DivGth 30.08 EmrMk 26.39 Eq Inc 47.12 EQII 19.44 Fidel 34.65 FltRateHi r 9.88 GNMA 11.66 GovtInc 10.54 GroCo 91.33 GroInc 19.44 GrowthCoK 91.32 HighInc r 9.21 Indepn 25.90 IntBd 10.70 IntlDisc 33.75 InvGrBd 11.58 InvGB 7.53 LgCapVal 12.30 LatAm 57.09 LevCoStk 30.83 LowP r 41.81 LowPriK r 41.81 Magelln 74.95 MidCap 31.05 MuniInc 12.53 NwMkt r 15.91 OTC 60.32 100Index 9.26 Ovrsea 33.56 Puritn 18.82 SCmdtyStrt 12.63 SrsIntGrw 11.72 SrsIntVal 10.40 SrInvGrdF 11.58 STBF 8.51 SmllCpS r 21.24 StratInc 11.35 StrReRt r 9.91 TotalBd 10.91 USBI 11.47 Value 73.96 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 46.97

+0.20 +0.36 +0.28 +0.34 +0.15 +0.43 -0.02 -0.03 +1.34 +0.12 +1.34 +0.42 -0.03 +0.24 -0.03 -0.02 +0.12 +0.27 +0.59 +0.36 +0.36 +0.90 +0.44 +0.01 +0.03 +0.88 +0.07 +0.21 +0.12 +0.26 +0.07 +0.06 -0.03 -0.01 +0.26 +0.06 -0.03 -0.03 +0.80

+3.1 +5.8 +0.2 +6.7 +6.8 +7.8 +1.9 +3.0 +1.9 +9.8 +6.5 +9.9 +5.4 +6.4 +2.6 +2.1 +2.7 +3.1 +7.3 -3.3 +8.5 +8.9 +9.0 +4.7 +7.6 +3.8 +3.8 +9.8 +5.9 +3.3 +5.4 -0.1 +3.8 +4.6 +2.7 +1.2 +8.4 +4.5 +3.9 +3.1 +2.4 +7.7

+0.31 -8.1

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 40.75 +0.62 500IdxInv 47.57 +0.42 IntlInxInv 36.76 +0.21 TotMktInv 39.07 +0.40 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 47.57 +0.42 TotMktAd r 39.07 +0.40 First Eagle: GlblA 48.46 +0.28 OverseasA 23.27 +0.12 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.66 FoundAl p 11.29 +0.07 HYTFA p 9.84 IncomA p 2.28 USGovA p 6.82 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv 13.83 +0.05 IncmeAd 2.27 +0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.30 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 22.15 +0.20 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.58 +0.04 GlBd A p 13.87 +0.05 GrwthA p 19.43 +0.14 WorldA p 15.93 +0.10 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.90 +0.05 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.63 +0.35 GMO Trust III: Quality 21.65 +0.09 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.98 +0.15 Quality 21.66 +0.09 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 38.48 +0.50 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.48 MidCapV 38.81 +0.51 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.36

+8.1 +7.4 +4.9 +7.5 +7.4 +7.6 +4.5 +2.7 +4.5 +7.9 +4.2 +7.3 +2.6 +4.0 +7.4 +7.0 +7.3 +8.6 +3.9 +9.2 +7.3 +3.8 +6.0 +8.2 +2.6 +8.3 +7.2 +5.5 +7.4 +2.9

CapApInst 39.41 +0.44 +7.3 IntlInv t 63.30 +0.30 +5.5 Intl r 63.97 +0.31 +5.6 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.63 +0.32 +2.9 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.67 +0.32 +3.0 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.60 +0.41 +5.3 Div&Gr 20.94 +0.13 +7.4 TotRetBd 11.23 -0.02 +3.1 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.40 +0.02 +0.9 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.45 +0.07 +4.4 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.46 +0.13 +8.0 CmstkA 16.88 +0.12 +7.7 EqIncA 9.05 +0.05 +5.8 GrIncA p 20.47 +0.16 +6.8 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 25.00 +0.34 +5.4 AssetStA p 25.79 +0.35 +5.7 AssetStrI r 26.03 +0.36 +5.8 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.59 -0.02 +2.3 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.58 -0.02 +2.3 HighYld 8.40 +5.6 IntmTFBd 11.01 +0.01 +3.4 ShtDurBd 11.00 -0.01 +0.8 USLCCrPls 21.62 +0.19 +4.6 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 49.07 +0.47 -3.1 PrkMCVal T 24.26 +0.19 +7.5 Twenty T 67.32 +0.48 +2.4 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.53 +0.09 +5.3 LSGrwth 13.56 +0.12 +5.6 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.41 +0.02 -1.7 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.79 +0.03 -1.8 Longleaf Partners: Partners 31.11 +0.41 +10.1

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.97 +0.02 +6.8 StrInc C 15.64 +0.03 +6.8 LSBondR 14.91 +0.01 +6.6 StrIncA 15.56 +0.03 +7.1 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.51 -0.01 +4.9 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.13 +0.14 +5.0 BdDebA p 8.10 +0.01 +6.0 ShDurIncA p 4.62 -0.01 +2.1 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.65 -0.01 +1.8 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.76 +0.05 +5.4 ValueA 24.51 +0.15 +7.8 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.62 +0.15 +7.8 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.28 +0.05 +7.8 MergerFd 16.25 +0.02 +3.0 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.54 -0.01 +3.2 TotRtBdI 10.54 -0.01 +3.4 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 41.59 +0.57 +11.4 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.95 +0.15 +6.0 GlbDiscZ 31.35 +0.15 +6.2 QuestZ 18.80 +0.15 +6.3 SharesZ 22.34 +0.20 +7.5 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 50.18 +0.75 +9.2 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.96 +0.78 +9.1 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.54 -0.01 +6.1 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.36 +0.22 +5.8 Intl I r 20.32 +0.08 +4.7 Oakmark r 45.04 +0.41 +9.1 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.19 +0.04 +6.2 GlbSMdCap 16.60 +0.17 +7.3 Oppenheimer A:

DvMktA p 35.77 +0.21 GlobA p 65.48 +0.39 GblStrIncA 4.40 IntBdA p 6.66 +0.01 MnStFdA 33.55 +0.25 RisingDivA 16.65 +0.16 S&MdCpVl 34.91 +0.44 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 15.08 +0.14 S&MdCpVl 29.86 +0.38 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 15.03 +0.14 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.42 +0.21 IntlBdY 6.66 +0.01 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.03 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.97 +0.03 AllAsset 12.59 +0.03 ComodRR 9.44 +0.23 DevLcMk r 11.01 +0.04 HiYld 9.53 -0.01 InvGrCp 10.78 -0.02 LowDu 10.51 RealRtnI 11.66 ShortT 9.92 TotRt 11.03 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.66 TotRtA 11.03 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.03 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.03 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.03 -0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 48.02 +0.42 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 43.23 +0.44 Price Funds: BlChip 40.57 +0.50 CapApp 21.67 +0.12 EmMktS 34.87 +0.23

-1.9 +8.5 +4.9 +3.0 +3.6 +7.6 +9.0 +7.2 +8.6 +7.3 -1.8 +3.1 +2.9 +4.5 +5.0 +4.4 +4.6 +5.3 +4.9 +2.1 +4.2 +1.1 +3.0 +4.1 +2.8 +2.5 +2.9 +2.9 +4.8 +5.7 +6.4 +6.7 -1.2

EqInc 25.11 EqIndex 36.20 Growth 33.92 HlthSci 36.38 HiYield 6.99 IntlBond 10.26 Intl G&I 14.20 IntlStk 14.70 MidCap 63.92 MCapVal 25.49 N Asia 19.53 New Era 53.12 N Horiz 37.51 N Inc 9.59 R2010 16.10 R2015 12.52 R2020 17.35 R2025 12.74 R2030 18.31 R2035 12.98 R2040 18.47 ShtBd 4.86 SmCpStk 37.62 SmCapVal 38.09 SpecIn 12.66 Value 25.18 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.34 VoyA p 24.03 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r 18.93 PennMuI r 12.56 PremierI r 22.20 TotRetI r 13.96 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.97 S&P Sel 21.01 Scout Funds: Intl 33.84 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.80 Sequoia 144.97 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.35 Third Avenue Fds:

+0.19 +6.4 +0.32 +7.3 +0.41 +5.5 +0.43 +20.1 +5.9 -0.01 +4.1 +0.08 +6.7 +0.06 +3.3 +1.00 +9.2 +0.24 +7.5 +0.13 +1.8 +0.90 +1.8 +0.61 +12.0 -0.02 +2.4 +0.07 +5.0 +0.07 +5.3 +0.12 +5.5 +0.10 +5.8 +0.15 +6.0 +0.12 +6.1 +0.16 +6.0 -0.01 +1.1 +0.57 +9.3 +0.58 +5.4 +4.0 +0.25 +7.9 +0.11 +6.1 +0.17 +1.3 +0.26 +0.16 +0.24 +0.16

+3.7 +7.8 +9.1 +6.2

+0.39 +7.5 +0.19 +7.4 +0.21 +4.5 +0.33 +5.8 +0.96 +12.1 +0.11 +6.5

ValueInst 52.31 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.52 IntValue I 30.18 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.97 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.45 CAITAdm 10.97 CpOpAdl 81.78 EMAdmr r 40.01 Energy 131.25 ExtdAdm 44.78 500Adml 123.82 GNMA Ad 10.92 GrwAdm 33.61 HlthCr 59.40 HiYldCp 5.87 InfProAd 26.42 ITBdAdml 11.35 ITsryAdml 11.48 IntGrAdm 63.97 ITAdml 13.57 ITGrAdm 10.00 LtdTrAd 11.09 LTGrAdml 9.57 LT Adml 10.89 MCpAdml 101.20 MuHYAdm 10.27 PrmCap r 73.51 ReitAdm r 86.77 STsyAdml 10.74 ShtTrAd 15.91 STIGrAd 10.78 SmCAdm 37.68 TtlBAdml 10.71 TStkAdm 33.84 WellslAdm 55.11 WelltnAdm 56.49 Windsor 48.74 WdsrIIAd 49.45 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 26.13 CapOpp 35.40

+0.34 +1.1 +0.23 +5.4 +0.24 +5.6 +0.12 +4.8 +0.11 +5.6 +0.01 +4.0 +1.14 +6.5 +0.39 +0.4 +2.23 +8.5 +0.69 +8.5 +1.10 +7.4 -0.01 +2.9 +0.34 +6.6 +0.56 +15.9 -0.01 +5.8 -0.02 +4.1 -0.05 +3.1 -0.03 +2.3 +0.35 +4.0 +0.01 +3.8 -0.03 +3.5 +0.01 +1.7 -0.08 +4.7 +0.01 +3.7 +1.39 +9.8 +0.01 +3.5 +0.70 +7.7 +0.85 +11.4 -0.01 +0.9 +0.8 -0.01 +1.6 +0.59 +8.3 -0.03 +2.3 +0.34 +7.6 +0.05 +5.8 +0.13 +5.9 +0.49 +6.9 +0.39 +8.5 +0.19 +6.9 +0.50 +6.5

DivdGro 15.63 Energy 69.89 EqInc 22.30 Explr 80.29 GNMA 10.92 GlobEq 18.97 HYCorp 5.87 HlthCre 140.74 InflaPro 13.45 IntlGr 20.10 IntlVal 33.05 ITIGrade 10.00 LifeCon 16.96 LifeGro 23.35 LifeMod 20.56 LTIGrade 9.57 Morg 19.33 MuInt 13.57 PrecMtls r 25.87 PrmcpCor 14.85 Prmcp r 70.83 SelValu r 20.54 STAR 20.10 STIGrade 10.78 StratEq 20.55 TgtRetInc 11.65 TgRe2010 23.31 TgtRe2015 13.02 TgRe2020 23.22 TgtRe2025 13.30 TgRe2030 22.91 TgtRe2035 13.87 TgtRe2040 22.79 TgtRe2045 14.31 USGro 19.65 Wellsly 22.75 Welltn 32.71 Wndsr 14.44 WndsII 27.86 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.27 TotIntlInst r 109.10 500 123.80 Growth 33.60

+0.11 +8.7 +1.19 +8.5 +0.20 +10.1 +1.42 +10.1 -0.01 +2.9 +0.16 +6.2 -0.01 +5.8 +1.32 +15.8 -0.01 +4.1 +0.11 +3.9 +0.21 +2.8 -0.03 +3.5 +0.05 +4.1 +0.18 +5.8 +0.10 +5.1 -0.08 +4.7 +0.25 +7.2 +0.01 +3.7 +0.35 -3.1 +0.14 +7.8 +0.67 +7.6 +0.22 +9.5 +0.09 +5.3 -0.01 +1.6 +0.31 +12.2 +0.02 +3.8 +0.07 +4.5 +0.06 +4.8 +0.12 +5.1 +0.09 +5.4 +0.16 +5.7 +0.11 +6.0 +0.19 +6.0 +0.12 +6.0 +0.21 +7.7 +0.03 +5.7 +0.08 +5.8 +0.14 +6.9 +0.22 +8.5 +0.20 +0.80 +1.11 +0.34

+3.5 +3.5 +7.3 +6.6

MidCap

22.29 +0.31 +9.8

SmCap

37.63 +0.59 +8.3

SmlCpGth

24.21 +0.45 +10.5

SmlCpVl

16.98 +0.22 +6.1

STBnd

10.60 -0.01 +1.3

TotBnd

10.71 -0.03 +2.3

TotlIntl

16.30 +0.12 +3.4

TotStk

33.83 +0.35 +7.6

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.45 +0.06 +4.7

ExtIn

44.77 +0.68 +8.5

FTAllWldI r

97.24 +0.72 +3.6

GrwthIst

33.60 +0.33 +6.6

InfProInst

10.76 -0.01 +4.1

InstIdx

122.96 +1.10 +7.4

InsPl

122.96 +1.09 +7.4

InsTStPlus

30.60 +0.30 +7.7

MidCpIst

22.35 +0.30 +9.8

SCInst

37.68 +0.59 +8.4

TBIst

10.71 -0.03 +2.3

TSInst

33.84 +0.34 +7.6

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

102.28 +0.91 +7.4

STBdIdx

10.60 -0.01 +1.3

TotBdSgl

10.71 -0.03 +2.3

TotStkSgl

32.66 +0.33 +7.6

Western Asset: CorePlus I

11.00 -0.02 +3.5

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

18.17 +0.13 +9.9


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. COMMUNITY ASSOCIATIONS INSTITUTE MANAGERS BREAKFAST: A discussion about working with board leaders, achieving management goals and setting a positive tone; $10 for Community Associations Institute members; $15 for others; 7:30-9 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436, kmerryman@ caioregon.org or www.caioregon.org. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION COURSE: Enables contractors to obtain their construction contractor board license. Registration required; $275; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 10 a.m.-noon; Crook County School District, 471 N.E. Ochoco Plaza Drive, Prineville; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. ETF’S EXPLAINED: Better understand ETF’s. What they are, how they work and how ETF’s can be useful investments. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com. GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING WORKSHOP: Basics of doing business with the federal government. Registration required; free; 2:30-5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. CONCORDIA NETWORKING AND INFORMATION EVENING: Learn about Concordia’s admission requirements; free; 5:30 p.m.; The Loft, 919 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 800-321-9371 or www.concordiamba.com. BEGINNING ILLUSTRATOR: Threeevening class. Registration required; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING WORKSHOP: Learn the process

involved in obtaining a General Services Administration’s Schedule contract for your business. Registration required; free; 9 a.m.noon; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras COIC Office, 243 S.W. Third St., Suite A; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. UNDERSTANDING APPRAISALS IN TODAY’S MARKET: A Women’s Council of Realtors Central Oregon Chapter event. RSVP by May 18; $15 for Women’s Council of Realtors members; $20 for others; 9-10:30 a.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-9774861 or katella@katellab.com. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of ODOT’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

MONDAY WORRIED ABOUT MAKING HOUSE PAYMENTS?: Learn what to do if you fall behind on your housing payments. Registration required; free; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

TUESDAY THRIVING ON DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS: Presented by business trainer Paul Spindel, learn to thrive during difficult conversations rather than avoiding them. Registration by May 17 required by contacting Denise Pollock; $50 per person; 7:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-6024 or denise.a.pollock@state.or.us. KNOW MORE EMAIL: Reservations encouraged; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. GET THE MOST FROM YOUR EMPLOYEES: Presented by Cindy

O’Neal, the director of human resource services for Cardinal Services, learn how to effectively manage and motivate without micromanaging. Registration required; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. KNOW EXCEL BUDGETS: Reservations encouraged; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7080. 10+ ILLEGAL THINGS LANDLORDS DO: Learn the rules for managing rentals; $10 for Community Associations Institute members; $15 for others when registered by May 20; 5:30-8 p.m.; COAR Building, 2112 N.E. 4th St., Bend; 541-693-2020 or beckyo@beckyo.com. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Presented by Beth Wickham of Central Oregon Community College Business Development Center. Registration required; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795 or www.midoregon.com.

WEDNESDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-550-6603. NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT: NorthWest Crossing businesses and restaurants will offer specials, entertainment and giveaways. Held the last Wednesday of each month; free; 5-8 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend. BUILDING A SUCCESSFUL YOUTUBE CHANNEL: Registration required; $59; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY May 26 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. PUT YOUR INVESTMENT PLAN INTO ACTION: Learn basic strategies to optimize your investment portfolio. Registration required; free; noon-1

p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-3181794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

FRIDAY May 27 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

TUESDAY May 31 ADVANCED PHOTOSHOP: Twoevening class. Registration required; $69; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. EXCEL 2007 INTERMEDIATE: Twoevening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 1 FLASH ANIMATION, BEGINNING: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

NEWS OF RECORD $59; 6-9 p.m.; Sky View Middle School, 63555 N.E. 18th St., Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

PERMITS City of Bend

FRIDAY June 3 INSURANCE BILLING BASICS: Two-afternoon class. Registration required; $59; 1-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY June 4 BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras COIC Office, 243 S.W. Third St., Suite A; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

MONDAY June 6 WHAT’S HAPPENING ON YOUR WEBSITE?: Learn how to analyze website statistics and track the type of traffic the website is attracting. Registration required; $39; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY June 8 FINANCIAL FITNESS: Learn about banks and other financial services. Registration required; free; 5:30 p.m.; NeighborImpact, 2303 S.W. First St., Redmond; 541-318-7506, ext. 109.

THURSDAY

THURSDAY

June 2

June 9

GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@ schwab.com or www.schwab.com. GET MORE OUT OF YOUR IPAD: Twoevening class. Registration required;

SPEND AND MANAGE DEBT WISELY: Learn how to save for the future while paying for the past. Registration required; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com.

Building Partners for Affordable Housing, 20066 S.E. Shady Pine, $189,226 OSM Construction LLC, 2045 N.W. Lakeside, $243,174 Building Partners for Affordable Housing, 61382 S.E. Geary, $150,393 Deschutes Properties LLC, 929 S.W. Simpson, $650,000 Paul K. Flynn, 61024 Sky Harbor, $278,606 Michael L. O’Farrell, 61446 Tam MacArthur, $430,222 Amy K. Cawrse, 1741 S.W. Troon, $217,998 City of Redmond

Luke Guynup, 1751 S.W. 24th, $162,172 City of Sisters

David Godfrey, W. Hope Ave., $303,863.00 Sisters Habitat for Humanity, S. Timber Pine Place, $155,001.00 Deschutes County

Taylor Living Trust, 70195 N.W. 93rd St., Terrebonne, $246,419.70 Frogmore LLC, 67785 Cloverdale Road, Sisters, $197,369.25 Greg and Kim Zadow, 69960 Camp Polk Road, Sisters, $409,135.70 Bella Villa Homes, 56869 Dancing Rock, Bend, $410,570.56 Veronica A. Kreuger, 61665 Harmony Land, Bend, $107,913.60 Keith Buehmer, 19271 Cherokee Road, Bend, $203,746.70 The Inn of the Seventh Mountain, 18577 Century Drive, Bend, $470,000 Justin A. Robinson, 56276 Trailmere Circle, Bend, $347,868 Kimberly C. Cunningham, 70630 Dewberry, Black Butte Ranch, $119,720.70

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day


L

Inside

OREGON Bonneville Power Administration shuts out wind power, see Page C2. Judge orders first execution in 14 years, see Page C3. Senate urges Congress to continue timber payments, see Page C6.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2011

IN BRIEF Redmond school race remains close The race for a Redmond School Board seat between Johnny Corbin and incumbent A.J. Losoya remained close after the Deschutes County vote count was updated Wednesday morning. Corbin said Wednesday that he had not conceded and was waiting for a final count before accepting the results. In December, Losoya was appointed to his seat, which was open because of Dan Murphy’s resignation. Corbin, a substitute teacher and vocational educator, was passed over for appointment at that time.

Change to Response times falling behind fish’s class Chiefs tell City Council they can’t keep up without more staff eases fears of redress BEND POLICE AND FIRE DEPARTMENTS

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Bend’s police and fire chiefs both say residents will see increasing emergency response times unless more public safety personnel are hired to keep up with a growing population.

Each unveiled statistics at Wednesday’s City Council meeting showing the police and fire staffing and services levels tend to fall below state and national averages. Fire Chief Larry Huhn displayed a graph showing that his

department’s average response time to a call hovers above six minutes, though there are many instances where that number is around the 10-minute mark. Both figures are above the fiveminute response time the National Fire Protection Associa-

tion sets as its target. In rural areas, which the Fire Department is also responsible for covering, this number can jump up to 12 or 13 minutes, though the average is closer to 9 or 10. “We’re really challenged with the ability to provide effective response forces,” Huhn said. See Response / C5

The Oregon Department of Transportation will temporarily close the southbound exit on Highway 97 to Cottonwood Road today as crews work to level out the pavement. The closure will start at 8 a.m. and is expected to last through the morning. Traffic will be routed to Sunriver through the South Century Drive interchange. The exit should be reopened later in the day for the southbound evening commute.

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

With “one-minute to go,” Bend High School Team No. 5 students Kenzi Boehme, 18, left, and Sami Avieras, 18, work together to finish their “Tropical Trio” entry in a plated dessert mousse culinary competition at Central Oregon Community College on Wednesday.

Sweet schooling By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

SENATE Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

HOUSE Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

Your D.C. delegation U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore. Phone: 202-225-6730 Bend office: 541-389-4408 Web: walden.house.gov U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-3753 Bend office: 541-318-1298 Web: merkley.senate.gov U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore. Phone: 202-224-5244 Bend office: 541-330-9142 Web: wyden.senate.gov

HOW TO SUBMIT School news and Teen Feats: • E-mail notices of general interest to smiller@bendbulletin.com. • E-mail announcements of a student’s academic achievements to youth@bendbulletin.com. • More details: The Bulletin’s Local Schools page publishes Wednesday in this section.

The Bulletin

Shield from litigation

Suspect arrested in hit-run crash

News of Record on Page C2.

By Andrew Clevenger WASHINGTON — The National Marine Fisheries Service announced Wednesday that it plans to change the designation of hatchery-grown steelheads reintroduced to the Deschutes Basin above the Pelton Round Butte dam complex. By designating hatchery steelhead as experimental and nonessential, the proposal would exempt irrigation districts, local governments and others from sanctions for the next 12 years if the protected steelhead were inadvertently harmed. At the same time, it would provide a window that would allow the fish to be studied while they regenerate.

Cottonwood exit closed this morning

A Bend man suspected of causing a hit-and-run crash Tuesday afternoon was arrested on suspicion of DUII and assault. Police said Robin Elbek, 51, ran a stop sign at the intersection of Dean Swift Road and U.S. Highway 20, causing a crash, and fled the scene. —Bulletin staff reports

C

ulinary students from local high schools spent Wednesday slaving away in the kitchen making mousse as part of the Cascade Culinary Institute’s High School Culinary Competition. “I was blown away by the energy and enthusiasm they brought to the event,” said Gene Fritz, the institute’s director and executive chef. About 21 teams comprising some 80 high school students participated in the event at Central Oregon Community College, home of the institute.

C

A team from Redmond High School placed first. Teams from Sisters High School won the second- and thirdplace awards. Students were judged on a variety of criteria, including food safety and sanitation, organization, teamwork and technique. As part of the competition, each team prepared a mousse and submitted it to the competition judges — Cascades faculty members and an industry professional — with an oral presentation. Fritz said the winning team was selected because it displayed a high level of skill and competency. See Dessert / C5

Samantha Romero, 17, left, and Keith Gates, 17, members of a Sisters High culinary team, are judged by Cascade Culinary Institute student Kevin Chen, 33, during the knife skills portion of the competition.

Bulletin staff report Most state offices will be closed Friday as part of a state furlough program. The program has required state employees to take an unpaid day off on 10 Fridays since October 2009. Affecting 26,500 state employees, the move saves the state approximately $2 million in payroll costs each furlough day, according to the Oregon Department of Administrative Services. Oregon residents will be

able to do some business with a handful of state agencies on Friday. Among them are the Driver and Motor Vehicle Services, although all physical locations will be closed. The Oregon DMV can process vehicle registration renewals, changes of address, and notice of vehicle sales through its website. State workers who provide public safety services will remain on duty. See Furlough / C5

DA pursues prosecutor for juveniles By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Sisters High School Team No. 2’s “Lavender Vanilla Mousse” is displayed on a table with other area high school culinary competitor entries Wednesday at COCC. “The articulation level is outstanding,” judge Gene Fritz said of the work being done at the competition.

Furloughs will close state offices Friday

The designation is unlikely to check the momentum of the region’s already considerable conservation efforts, but it does give local stakeholders assurances that they don’t have to worry about a running afoul of the Endangered Species Act. It also shields them from expensive third-party litigation, which can stall projects for years and invite major enforcement in the form of civil and criminal penalties from federal regulators. “It gives everybody a little breathing room,” said Steve Johnson, manager of the Central Oregon Irrigation District and president of the Deschutes Basin Board of Control. “We think it makes sense physically, scientifically and legally.” See Steelhead / C5

Deschutes County District Attorney Patrick Flaherty told budget officials Wednesday that prosecutors in his office are working hard and that he needs to hire one more attorney to handle juvenile cases. Flaherty was responding to questions from County Administrator Dave Kanner, who asked in March for information on deputy district attorneys’ caseloads. The District Attorney’s Office never provided that information. But by the end of the meeting Wednesday, Flaherty said his office would provide the caseload information to the county. He deferred to Deputy District Attorney J. Pat Horton regarding how long it would take to gather that information. Horton could not be reached Wednesday. See Budget / C5

BOAT-BUILDING BUOYS AWARENESS OF POLLUTION Marcus Eriksen, co-founder of 5 Gyres of Santa Monica, Calif., shows second-graders from Bear Creek Elementary how to build a “cola kayak” out of plastic bottles in Bend’s Drake Park on Wednesday. Eriksen helped the students build a river craft and launch it in the Deschutes River to raise awareness about plastic refuse that makes its way from rivers to the oceans. For more information on Eriksen’s work, visit www.5gyres.org. Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin


C2 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:04 a.m. May 17, in the 1300 block of Northeast Watson Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:45 a.m. May 17, in the 2200 block of Northwest Awbrey Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:38 p.m. May 17, in the 1800 block of Northeast Cliff Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:13 p.m. May 17, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:46 p.m. May 17, in the 20000 block of Sally Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 2:48 p.m. May 17, in the 19600 block of Aspen Ridge Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:16 p.m. May 17, in the 2000 block of Northeast Mistletoe Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:38 p.m. May 17, in the 1900 block of Southeast Cooper Place. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 4:22 p.m. May 17, in the 20100 block of Pinebrook Boulevard. DUII — Robin Elbek, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5 p.m. May 17, in the area of Dean Swift Road and Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 6:04 p.m. May 17, in the 1000 block of Northeast Dekalb Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:53 p.m. May 17, in the 600 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Aspen Chelsea Koester, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:35 a.m. May 18, in the 300 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 10:31 p.m. May 17, in the 2000 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:43 p.m. May 17, in the 1600 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — Prescription medication was reported stolen at 6 p.m. May 17, in the 2400 block of Southwest 23rd Street.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:02 p.m. May 17, in the 1900 block of Southwest 33rd Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:50 p.m. May 17, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:36 p.m. May 17, in the 1300 block of Southwest Canal Boulevard. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Cindy Lou Braswell, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:15 p.m. May 17, in the area of Northwest Seventh Street and Northwest Quince Avenue in Redmond. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:59 p.m. May 17, in the area of Todd Lake. Criminal mischief — Damage to trees was reported at 2 p.m. May 17, in the 16800 block of Cagle Road in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:30 p.m. May 17, in the 17600 block of Brandywine Road in Cloverdale. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:59 a.m. May 17, in the 62600 block of Hamby Road in Bend.

Today is Thursday, May 19, the 139th day of 2011. There are 226 days left in the year.

The Associated Press PORTLAND — Tax proposals to boost the budgets of two major Oregon school districts were both headed for defeat as voters decided a number of local election measures across the state. With about 85 percent of the ballots counted, voters in Portland had narrowly rejected a $548 million bond package to pay for repairs to every school in the district, The Oregonian reported. The heavily promoted measure would have fully rebuilt eight aging schools and made smaller fixes and updates at the other 77, many of which date to the 1920s or 1940s. Portland voters approved a separate property tax increase to fund school operations for the next five years, preserving 200 jobs for teachers and other educators. Incomplete returns showed that 58 percent of district voters said yes to that levy.

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

The Columbia River flows through the Bonneville Dam near Cascade Locks on Monday. The Bonneville Power Administration early Wednesday shut down most of the region’s power generation except that from government-run dams.

Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:35 p.m. May 17, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 13. DUII — Abraham Cain Smith, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:35 a.m. May 18, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Burnside Avenue in Bend.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 29 — Medical aid calls. Tuesday 30 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Rottweiler mix — Young male, black and tan, with a black and white collar; found near Southwest Newberry Avenue.

In 1943, Churchill vows support against Japan The Associated Press

Voters reject schools measures in Portland and Eugene

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION

T O D AY IN HISTORY

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On May 19, 1967, the Soviet Union ratified a treaty with the United States and Britain banning nuclear and other weapons from outer space as well as celestial bodies such as the moon. (The treaty entered into force in Oct. 1967.)

namo Bay, saying the indefinite detention of terror suspects there violated the world’s ban on torture; the report by the Committee Against Torture came as the U.S. military disclosed that prisoners wielding improvised weapons had clashed with guards trying to save a detainee who was pretending to commit suicide.

ON THIS DATE In 1536, Anne Boleyn, the second wife of England’s King Henry VIII, was beheaded after being convicted of adultery. In 1780, a mysterious darkness enveloped much of New England and part of Canada in the early afternoon. In 1921, Congress passed, and President Warren G. Harding signed, the Emergency Quota Act, which established national quotas for immigrants. In 1943, in an address to the U.S. Congress, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill pledged his country’s full support in the fight against Japan. In 1962, during a Democratic fundraiser at New York’s Madison Square Garden, actress Marilyn Monroe sang “Happy Birthday to You” to guest-of-honor President John F. Kennedy. In 1964, the State Department disclosed that 40 hidden microphones had been found in the U.S. embassy in Moscow. In 1994, former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died in New York at age 64.

ONE YEAR AGO President Barack Obama condemned Arizona’s crackdown on illegal immigration and pushed instead for a federal fix he said the nation could embrace, showing solidarity with his guest of honor, Mexican President Felipe Calderon, who called Arizona’s law discriminatory. Rioters in Bangkok torched the stock exchange and other landmark buildings after a deadly army assault on an anti-government encampment ended a two-month siege.

TEN YEARS AGO The Arab League called on Arab governments to sever political contacts with Israel until the Jewish state ended military action against Palestinians.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS PBS newscaster Jim Lehrer is 77. TV personality David Hartman is 76. Actor James Fox is 72. Actress Nancy Kwan is 72. Author-director Nora Ephron is 70. Actor Peter Mayhew is 67. Rock singer-composer Pete Townshend (The Who) is 66. Concert pianist David Helfgott is 64. Rock singer-musician Dusty Hill (ZZ Top) is 62. Singer-actress Grace Jones is 59. Rock musician Phil Rudd (AC-DC) is 57. Actor Steven Ford is 55. Rock musician Iain Harvie (Del Amitri) is 49. Actor Jason Gray-Stanford is 41. Rock singer Jenny Berggren (Ace of Base) is 39. Actor Drew Fuller is 31. Christian rock musician Tim McTague is 28. Actor Eric Lloyd is 25.

FIVE YEARS AGO A key U.N. panel joined European and United Nations leaders in urging the Bush administration to close its prison in Guanta-

THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The most exciting happiness is the happiness generated by forces beyond your control.” — Ogden Nash (1902-1971)

As planned, wind power is cut out of region’s grid In Wednesday’s wee hours, Pacific Northwest was being powered mostly by region’s dams By Tim Fought The Associated Press

PORTLAND — For five hours early Wednesday the Pacific Northwest was running green, almost all of its electricity coming from hydroelectric dams in a river system flush with spring runoff. That’s a tiny carbon footprint. But it could also be a blow to the region’s burgeoning wind industry, and could kill endangered fish in their spring migration. The Bonneville Power Administration said Wednesday it followed through on a plan announced last week to shut down most of the region’s power generation except that from government dams now running at full capacity. The shutdown started at midnight and ended at 5 a.m. — while most in the region slept and electricity demand was low. “Push came to shove,” spokesman Michael Milstein said. “We didn’t want to do this, and we will only to the extent that we have to.” The shutdown could be repeated overnight tonight, he said. And depending on how quickly the water flows to the Pacific Ocean, the region is expected to be using hydropower heavily for at least a few weeks. The volume of runoff is the greatest in more than a decade. The agency says that strains the ability of river managers to balance numerous interests, such as protecting endangered salmon and steelhead, and preventing floods. Among electricity producers, the spring rise is an expected part of operations, but it’s causing a problem for

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the wind segment. High water can be shunted around the dams through spillways, but that subjects fish to dangerous levels of nitrogen gas bubbles in the churning water, causing something like the bends that human divers sometimes get. Milstein said water quality in the basin now violates standards in both Oregon and Washington state, a key part in a long-running legal battle over running the dams.

Options limited Milstein said a federal court order recognizes that the agency has little choice when the water is so high and must put dangerous volumes through the spillways. “There’s no question that fish are being harmed,” he said. But a salmon advocate said the high flows are giving young fish, known as smolts, a quick ride to the ocean, like the one their forebears got before the dams were built. That gives more fish a chance at surviving to reproduce a few years later. “The benefits of moving those little guys quickly to the ocean, as opposed to letting them get lost in the reservoirs, are greater,” said Pat Ford of Save Our Wild Salmon. The Bonneville Power Administration markets about a third of the region’s power, from 31 dams and from a nuclear plant on the Hanford nuclear reservation in eastern Washington. It manages transmission for about threequarters of the region’s power,

but the high water in the river system has a spillover impact on plants not tied to its system. Because the region is awash in federal power, the wholesale price of electricity on the spot market is effectively zero. That enables owners of fossil fuel plants to shut down, save on fuel costs and still supply their customers with federal power. Thermal plant owners in the basin often schedule maintenance and repairs to coincide with the spring rise. This year’s rise is the largest since 1997, but only the seventhlargest in the past 40 years. In the past decade, wind farms nurtured by government regulations and tax benefits have come on-line in large numbers — and are expected to double within the next decade. But they don’t share the operational benefits of fossil fuel plants. The wind is free, so they can’t save on fuel, and many rely on tax credits pegged to their production. That’s why they’ve objected to being shut down without compensation. They say the shutdown isn’t necessary, will cost them millions in tax benefits and will discourage investment in the business. Traditional customers of the Bonneville Power Administration, such as public power districts prominent in Washington state, say they’d have to bear that cost so they object to the idea of compensating wind farms.

Vastly rejected In Eugene, a proposed income tax for schools was overwhelmingly rejected by voters, 64 percent to 36 percent, The Register-Guard reported. The tax would have raised an estimated $12 million for Eugene and $4.8 million for the Bethel school districts in each of the next four years. Although the income tax measure for schools failed, a $70 million facilities bond measure for the school district was passing by 62 percent to 38 percent. Unlike the controversial city income tax measure, the bond measure faced no organized opposition. It will provide immediate money for new roofs, remodeling and technology and also is expected to funnel $1 million annually into the district’s general fund to help with teachers’ salaries and classroom expenses by covering maintenance and repair costs that now come straight out of the district’s regular operating budget.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 C3

O Judge orders execution Haugen determined competent, waives appeals; sentence scheduled for Aug. 16 By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

SALEM — Oregon’s first inmate scheduled for execution in more than a decade told a judge he hopes his death brings relief to the family of his victim and said waiving all of his appeals and killing him would save taxpayers money. On Wednesday morning, Marion County Circuit Judge Joseph Guimond sentenced killer Gary Haugen to die. Haugen’s execution is scheduled for Aug. 16. If carried through, the execution will be the state’s first in 14 years. The Wednesday hearing was set to determine Haugen’s competence. Guimond asked Haugen 20 questions and decided that he answered them satisfactorily, proving he could fairly decide for himself whether he wanted to waive his appeals. The judge last week rejected an argument from Haugen’s attorneys that the inmate may not be qualified to waive appeals. His attorneys also said a defense expert had determined Haugen suffers from fetal alcohol syndrome and attention deficit disorder. Haugen, 49, had written to court officials since 2008 asking to drop his appeals, complaining about a “costly broken system” and a criminal justice process he called arbitrary and vindictive. Three drugs necessary for a lethal injection have been obtained by the state Department of Corrections, but pentobarbital will be substituted for sodium thiopental, which has been in short supply and delayed executions in some states since its only U.S. manufacturer stopped making it. Sodium thiopental and pentobarbital are fast-acting barbiturates that can quickly stop a per-

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Convicted killer Gary Haugen leaves Marion County Courthouse after a hearing in Salem on Wednesday. Marion County Circuit Court Judge Joseph Guimond issued a death warrant for Haugen, 49, who was convicted twice of brutal murders. Haugen’s execution is scheduled for Aug. 16. son’s breathing and cause death within minutes. Oregon’s last execution was in 1997. The state has executed two inmates since voters reinstated the death penalty in 1984, and both had waived their appeals. Oregon has 35 men and one woman on death row, including Haugen. Haugen has repeatedly asked to be killed. He said Wednesday that the justice system’s delay is akin to stopping a woman from carrying out an abortion.

“It’s like a woman’s right,” Haugen told. “This is my right to choose. They’re trying to take that away from me. It’s damaging my spirit.” Haugen was convicted of killing an inmate in 2003 and sentenced to death in a jury trial. The murdered inmate’s wife, Clarinda Polin Perez, shook her head and rested her head in her hand when Haugen said he was willing to sacrifice himself to “a system that has failed.” Her husband, David Polin, was

O  B GOP blocks cultural competency bill SALEM — A bill aimed at promoting cultural competency in health care has failed in the state House on a party-line breakdown. The House voted 30-30 on the measure Wednesday, with all Democrats voting in favor and all Republicans voting against it. The bill would have required health licensing agencies to come up with standards for teaching doctors and other providers to respond effectively to people of all cultures, languages and ethnic backgrounds. Democrats said the bill would help medical professionals respond better to the unique chal-

lenges that minorities face. But Republicans said they were concerned about cost, and that licensing boards are free to adopt standards on their own.

reported infection rates more than double the state average.

Some infections drop sharply at hospitals

PORTLAND — Cold case detectives have arrested a transient suspected of killing a man 17 years ago in Portland. Sixty-two-year-old Raymond Lee Johnson was found dead in his home in 1994. Police reopened the case last year and developed information that led to the arrest of 40-year-old Terry Lavell Haynes when he was spotted Tuesday night in Portland. He’s held in the Multnomah County Jail for investigation of murder. — From wire reports

PORTLAND — The annual report on Oregon hospital infection rates shows a steep reduction in bloodstream infections last year but a rise in infections involving heart bypass surgery. The Oregonian reported the annual figures also show there are big differences between the best and the worst performers. While 28 hospitals reported zero bloodstream infections associated with a certain type of catheter, others

Suspect arrested in 1994 Portland murder

found with 84 stab wounds and a crushed skull in 2003. Haugen and another inmate were convicted of his murder in 2007. Haugen implied that, if returned to death row, he would kill again. “I’ve had enough,” Haugen said. “I feel like a dinosaur. I’m old school. I’m not going to rub elbows with guys that cut the vaginas out of babies. ... The way I am, I will put one down.” Haugen has acknowledged in a letter to a court administrator this year that much of what he says is intended to draw media attention to a justice system that he said has failed him so far in his effort to die. Moments after Guimond sentenced him, Haugen said “Hail Odin and 88,” the latter a whitesupremacist prison gang reference short for “Hail Hitler,” as H is the eighth letter of the alphabet. Haugen cuts an imposing figure. At well over 6 feet tall and with a body hardened in prison since a 1981 murder conviction, his long brown hair is just beginning to go gray. Dressed in a red prison transport uniform, Haugen was permitted to have his hands freed from shackles during the hearing. Two prison guards seated behind Haugen leaned forward and tensed up as a third guard leaned over him to unshackle him. The moment passed, but the guards continued leaning forward for the rest of the hearing. Prosecutors had asked that the judge set a July 28 date for the execution, but Haugen asked that he instead be scheduled for Sept. 2, the eighth anniversary of Polin’s murder. Then, Perez began to cry. She left the courtroom without commenting.

Ex-troopers revive bill to tighten restrictions on medical marijuana By Jeff Barnard

So the current bill went to the Rules Committee, which has latGRANTS PASS — Former er deadlines, making it a haven state troopers in the Legislature for bills that fail to get traction. More than 38,000 Oregohave revived a bill that would make it harder for people to nians hold medical marijuana qualify for a medical marijua- patient cards, 1 percent of the na card, and tighten controls population. More than 24,000 are registered growers. Paon the people growing it. tients have to grow House Bill 3664 their own marijuana gets a hearing Thursor get it from an auday afternoon in Sathorized grower, who lem in the Joint Rules cannot charge beyond Committee. expenses. CardholdThe bill sets a highers are limited to six er standard for doctors IN THE mature plants and a to authorize medical LEGISLATURE pound and a half of marijuana cards for processed cannabis patients, and imposes at one time. Voters tougher restrictions on authorizing marijuana for turned down a measure last people under 18. And it would year that would have allowed open the entire registry of med- cardholders to buy marijuana ical marijuana growers to po- from dispensaries. Rep. Andy Olson, R-Albany, lice four times a year, whether they are investigating a crime is a retired state police lieutenant, lead sponsor of the bill, or not. Robert Wolfe of the Oregon and co-chairman of the Rules Marijuana Policy Initiative said Committee. He did not immeit was left out of meetings to diately respond to telephone draft the bill, and believe the calls seeking comment, but last bill sets such a high standard month said medical marijuana for doctors that they would not was “out of control,” with pabe able to issue any medical tients, growers and caregivers all abusing the intent of voters marijuana cards to patients. Voters in 1998 made Or- when they approved the law. Sen. Floyd Prozanski, D-Euegon one of the first states in the nation to allow people to gene, advised backers of the use marijuana to treat medical original initiative and is chairconditions. The Legislature re- man of the Senate Judiciary vised the law in 2005 to ease re- Committee. He said he found strictions on how much pot pa- it reasonable to tighten up the tients and growers could have law by requiring a nationwide on hand. This year, lawmakers criminal background check for offered more than a dozen bills cardholders, and limiting cards to revise the law. A working to Oregon residents. But he obgroup of former state troopers jected to making it harder for offered a bill combining some doctors to authorize medical of the measures, but it failed to marijuana, and throwing open make a deadline to get through to authorities the confidential list of growers. normal channels. The Associated Press

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C4 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Bidding bill a bad deal for Oregon

O

regonians have the absolute right to expect at least four things when public money is spent: Whatever is being done is necessary.

It will work. It’s the best deal. And there is money to pay for it. House Bill 3000 fails. It will sprout bad deals.

On Tuesday, Gov. John Kitzhaber highlighted the bill and a package of other items he would like to see to create jobs in Oregon. HB 3000 may not have needed a push. It passed the Oregon House easily and awaits action in the Senate. All the Central Oregon House members supported it. It’s the kind of bill that attracts politicians like moths to a flame. The bill would basically allow any public agency in Oregon to give preference to goods and services from Oregon as long as the cost was not higher than other bids by more than 10 percent. Under Oregon’s current bidding rules, public entities generally have to pick the best product for the best price. HB 3000 would tilt the playing field so Oregon products and services could cost 10 percent more and still win the bid. The bill allows a contracting agency to go even higher than 10 percent if the agency writes up an explanation. In a decision between Oregon competitors, the bill also allows prefer-

ence to be given to one headquartered in the state. The justification for the bill is obvious. Oregonians have suffered in the recession. Keeping the money in the state is way for Oregonians to help Oregonians. But the bill invites all kinds of trouble. It means Oregonians will pay more when government is struggling to come up with enough money. It means Oregonians will pay more when taxpayers could use some relief. Also, just imagine the justifications that politicians and public employees might try to sneak through to pay their buddies more. They can do it as long as they write up a justification. The justification doesn’t have to be logical, either. Best product for the best price is the best deal for Oregon. This bill’s pandering to the siren call of the homegrown will cost Oregon more and rationalize bad deals.

Central Oregonians support their towns I

f Central Oregonians are in a self-congratulatory mood this week, they earned it. Majorities in Bend, Jefferson County and La Pine voted for their communities, not just themselves. In La Pine, voters approved a charter for the young city by a hefty margin. With the charter in place, officials will be able to write the ordinances that will govern life in La Pine. Meanwhile, voters in the La Pine area’s sewer and water districts, which extend a bit beyond city limits, voted in directors committed to allowing the city to absorb the two. It’s a good move for all concerned: The city will be able to use employees more efficiently than either district can by itself, which should result in better services for local residents. To the north, Jefferson County’s jail operating levy also was approved by a wide margin, after having been rejected last November. County Sheriff Jim Adkins had made clear that defeat of the proposal would mean cuts at the jail and the resultant release of some men and women currently being held there. The new levy, which is good for three years, will not mean an increase in taxes to support the jail. Instead, it extends the current assessment of 98 cents

per $1,000 of taxable property value. Bend residents also agreed to a proposal that will not raise taxes but rather keep them from dropping next year. The $30 million bond measure will bring improvements to major intersections and some of the community’s busiest streets. The 27-cent per $1,000 tax will replace a similar tax that went to make improvements downtown. Again, the margin of victory was substantial. In all three areas, it was the community, not the individual, that came out the winner. That wasn’t necessarily true elsewhere in Oregon, where voters in Eugene, for example, rejected a tax that would have gone to support schools. Voters in Portland supported school operations but appeared to be defeating the state’s largest school bond issue ever, which would have gone to replace or repair every school in the district. And voters in Clackamas County, many of whom use Portland’s aging Sellwood Bridge to travel to and from work each day, declined to help defray the cost of replacing that structure. Central Oregonians long have looked out for their neighbors on a personal level. This time, that support was a much more public affair.

My Nickel’s Worth State bank for Oregon

No on a state bank

A month or so ago, The Bulletin ran an article about the Legislature talking about an Oregon State Bank. The legislative session is about to end, and maybe the governor will support an extension. Only one state, North Dakota, has its own state bank. From what I understand, it has been very helpful in advancing the growth of that state. Back in 1933, Congress passed the Glass-Steagall Act, which separated the business of securities underwriting from commercial banking to their affiliates. Otherwise Wall Street could not bundle loans — including mortgages — and sell them to a national market. This law kept local commercial and private savings from leaving the individual state unless the private owner of those savings decided to do so apart from the bank. The elimination of this congressional act allowed the financial fiasco to happen in 2008. And Wall Street and Congress knew this. They were bound by the law. In the mid-’80s it was watered down, and in the ’90s eliminated all together. Without this type of regulation in place, Wall Street will soon forget. So it only makes sense that individual states should establish their own banking systems with the intent to keep financial gains in the local community for small businesses and local commercial business. There has been no substantial financial regulation put in place since the crises to keep this from happening again. Let’s hear more discussion and planning about a state bank from our Legislature. Phillip J. Osborne Redmond

Rep. Phil Barnhart, D-Central Lane, and the committee on revenue propose a “state bank” to provide venture capital to private business engaged in economic development. This is a bad idea, in my opinion, here’s why: • It would be capitalized with “state funds” which is another word for “taxpayer funds.” • It would create another bureaucracy that would be never-ending. • It is another step toward socialism by encroaching into the private enterprise domain. • It would never subject loan applicants to the same high level of scrutiny that is applied to loan applicants at forprofit lenders regarding the ability to repay the loan or the management capability of the applicant. • It would add to the already overstaffed state agencies that are supported by taxpayer-funded wages, health care, retirement benefits, all driven by unions, that are far more liberal than private-sector counterparts. • The notion that loans are expected to be repaid may escape the analysis process. There is a line between loans and investments. Loans are expected to be repaid from profits or conversion of assets to cash. Investments are not repaid, they are bought and sold in the market place. Investors expect to share in profits as dividends. No profits means no repayment and no dividends. The role of government, among other things, is to foster an environment that allows private enterprise to flourish. It is not the role of government to use taxpayer funds for venture capital. Venture capital by definition means high risk.

I suggest that Barnhart and his committee refocus their efforts. Dennis Harrison Redmond

Public fleeced again The Deschutes DA office debacle is deplorable. For most of the public who is out of the loop, the personal and legal mumbo jumbo is tough to decipher. But we the public are being fleeced again, and doused with huge expenses incurred by this vendetta-like conflict. The public should be screaming with outrage to the point where they are foaming from their mouths. We citizens should insist that our representatives (do we have any?) impose a “You pay out of your own pocket” ordinance when such “irregularities” surface. A form of disciplinary ordinance that applies across the board affecting any elected government office(s). For the future, that might also reign in the million-dollar boondoggles bestowed on the public in the past 10 years, such as … well, you know which ones they are. The public is funding these infantile outbursts of: “I want my ice cream now, and you can’t have any” to the tune of $500 hourly rates, plus. Actually, I’m surprised “they” haven’t consulted a consulting firm from Portland to tell them how to proceed, which would mean thousands more dollars being robbed from the tax base — money that isn’t there. But it can continue as long as the huddled masses are subdued in a stupor. It’s playing out like an old “Bonanza” Western odyssey. The absence of replies by legal professionals in this section to this or any other matter is staggering. Pure fear, or what? Paul Grayber Bend

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Teachers shouldn’t have to choose between pay, school days By Kimberly Ullmann Bulletin guest columnist

T

his is in response to your May 6 editorial “For the children,” wherein you state that teachers feel their paychecks are more important than the students they teach. I have one question for you: Really? After witnessing over the past 20 some years all the marvelous work that has been going on in our schools, you can make statements like, “They’re doing it for their paychecks and, to some extent, the kids be damned”? How dare you! It is quite evident that you have not spent much time in a classroom. Let me enlighten you as to how much we do care. We love your kids, which is why we have forgone pay raises, taken pay cuts (cut days mean our pay is cut), agreed to more out-of-pocket benefit expenditures and added more students to our classrooms. This is something that is never

brought up or mentioned every year when it is time to balance the budget. We have given every year just like “nearly every other resident of Central Oregon.” We spend many hours on the weekends or before/after school preparing for our students without pay. So many of our workdays have been cut that we now need to spend more and more of our own time to meet the students’ needs. We have and are being asked to do more with less. We’ve done that because, even with all the cuts, we are dedicated to the success of every child. Teachers should not have to choose between pay cuts and school days. That’s like asking a parent which one of their children they could do without. Because the Redmond teachers decided to protect what little money they get, which doesn’t go far these days, for the sake of their own families’ needs, you berate them. The role of the teacher has changed drastically over the course of years. We not only teach academics

IN MY VIEW but social skills, compassion, kindness, manners, to name only a few. Our society is struggling right now, and your children come to us with so many needs that far exceed just academics. Your child spends more waking hours with us than with you during the day. Instead of berating us, you should be thanking us for the love, compassion and education we give your children every day regardless of their circumstances. If you think the stress of our society doesn’t affect them, think again. My advice to you, before you pass judgment on us, is to spend time in a classroom. You will find that teaching is indeed more than academics. On any given day one might observe a teacher hugging and comforting a child after that child has tossed his desk or kicked his chair across the room because he doesn’t know how to handle the cir-

Your child spends more waking hours with us than with you during the day. Instead of berating us, you should be thanking us for the love, compassion and education we give your children every day regardless of their circumstances. cumstances of his life. You would observe how often we go without lunch or breaks during the day to help a child become a better reader or help with a project that they were unable to get help with at home. You would also observe many classrooms having class meetings to deal with social issues and teaching how to become a kinder friend. Our teachers only have the success of your child in mind and have shown this every day of every year of their teaching careers. They put their heart and soul into their students and only want them to reach the full potential that they are capable of reaching.

As I mentioned before, our society is struggling, not only with the economy but also with the stress that comes with no jobs, no income, no housing, etc. It is not a pretty picture. We need to band together and support each other and show our children the kind of compassion and kindness we want them to emulate. I, for one, think our children deserve the very best. We have caring, dedicated teachers in our classrooms. I think we need to do everything we can to keep them there. Kimberly Ullmann is a second-grade teacher in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 C5

O D N   Eugene “Gene” T. Stone, of Bend Feb. 13, 1940 - May 17, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, Bend 541-318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.com Services: Celebration of Life, 2:00-4:00 p.m. Friday, May 20, 2011 at Jake’s Diner, 2210 NE Highway 20, Bend, Oregon 97701. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701.

Lilly Laverne Brawner, of Crooked River Ranch July 13, 1934 - May 16, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services are planned at this time.

Mary L. Galloway, of Madras Aug. 2, 1930 - May 15, 2011 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Funeral services will be held on Monday, May 23, 2011 at 10:00 AM at BEL-AIR COLONIAL CHAPEL in Madras. Burial will follow at MT. JEFFERSON MEMORIAL PARK. Visitation will be held on Saturday & Sunday between the hours of 10:00 AM - 7:00 PM at Bel-Air Chapel. Contributions may be made to:

St. Charles Hospital

Roland "Bo" Warner Tauchert, of Bend Mar. 28, 1937 - May 10, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals (541) 318-0842 www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A Celebration of Life was held 4pm, Wednesday, May 18, 2011, Bend Elks Lodge, 63120 Boyd Acres Road, Bend, OR 97701. Contributions may be made to:

Hospice of Bend, 2075 NW Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701.

Rose A. Davidson, of Tumalo June 27, 1914 - May 15, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services are planned at this time.

Steelhead Continued from C1 Decades ago, steelhead populated much of the Deschutes Basin, but a series of dams cut off their access to spawning areas. When Portland General Electric and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs relicensed the Pelton Round Butte dam in 2005, they agreed to reintroduce steelhead above the dam and spent more than $100 million on a fish bypass that would allow the fish to move safely through the facility. The 12-year time frame, built around three of the steelhead’s four-year lifecycles, would also allow scientists enough time to study how effective the reintroduction efforts have been. “One of the things we don’t know about a reintroduced population is where the fish want to go [to spawn and grow],” said Julie Keil, director of hydrolicensing for Portland General Electric. “I think it is a rationally chosen time frame.” Ryan Houston, executive director of the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council, said many of the basin’s conservation and restoration projects would

Furlough Continued from C1 Oregon State Police and state corrections officers will be working Friday, as will many employees at the state hospital, substance abuse treatment facilities and the Oregon Depart-

James Judson Palmer, of Bend Oct. 27, 1973 - May 13, 2011 Arrangements: Band Memorial Chapel of La Pine 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: La Pine Rural Fire Protection District and Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine are coordinating services. A viewing for family and friends will be held at Baird Memorial Chapel, on Saturday, May 21, 2011, from 10:00 a.m. - 12 p.m., followed by a Funeral Service at the La Pine High School Auditorium at 2:00 p.m. Final lnterment will take place at Riverview Cemetery, located at 8421 SW Macadam Ave. in Portland. Contributions may be made to:

The Family through US Bank - James Palmer Memorial Fund.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

likely continue without the designation, but this way provides predictability and stability for local stakeholders. “That regulatory hammer is still out there, it’s just far enough out there that it doesn’t cause panic,” he said.

Walden lauds change Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., who along with the rest of Oregon’s congressional delegation wrote to the federal agency last year urging it to adopt the designation for the reintroduced steelhead, praised Wednesday’s proposal, which will remain open for public comment for 60 days. “The restoration efforts in the Deschutes Basin are a model for locally organized projects that benefit fish, farmers and the local economy at the same time,” he said in a prepared statement. “This unique designation will play a very helpful role in speeding along species and habitat restoration and promote the central Oregon economy.” Andrew Clevenger can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at aclevenger@bendbulletin.com.

ment of Transportation. The state court system and liquor stores licensed by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission will not be affected by the furloughs. Information about how each state office is affected by the furloughs is available through www.Oregon.gov.

Paul John Speck

Marilynn Schuman

Dec. 16, 1945 - May 16, 2011

Dec. 12, 1920 - May 16, 2011

Paul John Speck, born on Dec. 16, 1945, passed away on May 16, 2011, from complications related to ALS (amyotropic lateral sclerosis). Born in Washington, DC, to Gene and Dorothy Speck, Paul and his family moved from Washington, DC. Paul’s family eventually settle in Paul John California. Speck Graduating from Davis High School, the oldest of nine children, Paul enjoyed high school football, basketball, and baseball. Paul went onto college, playing sports and lettering in football at the University of San Francisco and UC Davis. After majoring in political science in 1967, at UC Davis, Paul went on to law school at the University of Oregon. Paul’s early law career included practicing law in the District Attorney’s office in North Bend/Coos Bay, eventually settling in Bend in 1975. In Bend, Paul continued with the District Attorneys Office and later went into private practice with different partners over the years, with the last several years as a sole practicioner in general law. Fishing, hiking, biking, and skiing were all outdoor passions that matched the beautiful surroundings offered in Bend, Oregon. Additionally Paul developed a keen interest in photography, capturing nature scenes and the outdoors. Recently, as a budding author, Paul started writing a novel incorporating his life journey through a narrative of a steelhead on his journey starting from the Deschutes River out to the Pacific Ocean, and his return back. The Sign of Solomon Steelhead will be finished by his family and friends. Diagnosed with ALS in Sep-

Response Continued from C1 The Police Department also has longer response times. Police Chief Sandi Baxter told the council her department’s 2010 emergency response time of 5 minutes and 43 seconds is more than a minute above the average reported through the International City/County Management Association for cities with fewer than 100,000 people. Baxter said these longer waiting times are coming when the Police Department has seen double-digit percentage increases

Budget Continued from C1 Other public safety jobs also came up for discussion Wednesday, as Community Justice Director Ken Hales asked officials to fill two open parole and probation officer positions. Meanwhile, the three citizen members of the county budget committee decided to freeze elected officials’ pay for the upcoming budget year. The budget committee will make decisions on the upcoming year’s budget today. Earlier this year, Kanner asked certain county department heads to tell him how they could cut 4 percent from their budgets. The District Attorney’s Office proposed to do so by eliminating one deputy district attorney position currently unfilled in the county’s Juvenile Community Justice division, but on Wednesday Flaherty said that job is important. Flaherty defended the work of his office to the county budget committee, citing progress in the months since he took office in January. The three new deputy district attorneys who handle misdemeanor cases have already processed more than 500 cases in 2011, Flaherty said. Meanwhile, two other deputy district attorneys focused solely on the Darrell Middlekauff murder trial for 12 weeks. “We are working very hard in the DA’s office,” Flaherty said. He described deputy district at-

tember 2009, Paul’s life started to change dramatically. Paul’s attitude to the disease was perfectly captured in a Bend Bulletin feature article in December, 2010: “Hell, I’m not the only guy in the world who’s got issues. I’m trying to live until I die.” From trips with his friends and family to the land of the 10 thousand lakes, Florida Keys, Zion National Park, Death Valley, DUCK football games, the Northwest, and floating the Deschutes River, he spread the gift of love to all he encountered, never letting his ALS progression slow him from adventure. Besides his love of family and the pride he had in the growth and strength of his family, one of his greatest last adventures was his trip in January to the BCS football game in Arizona. Paul is survived by his wife, Rose Speck; his father, Gene Speck; his siblings, Mary Speck, Cathy Speck, Jim Speck, Peggy Speck-Grady, Barbara Salonius; his children, Rebecca (Speck) Neal, Joe Speck and his wife, Katie, Joe Dusan and his wife, Christy, John Dusan and his wife, Alana, Anne (Speck) Durgan and her husband, Jacob, Peter Dusan and his wife, Alisa, and Mark Speck and his girlfriend, Caitlin Maloney; grandchildren include, Miyah Neal, Hadassah Dusan, Victoria Dusan, Kyler Dusan, Genevieve Dusan, Colten and Riley Speck, and Dallas Durgan. Services will be held Thursday, May 19, at 3:00 pm, at Saint Francis of Assisi, Downtown Bend, OR. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that any donation is made to The ALS Association Oregon and SW Washington Chapter, P.O. Box 1855, Bend, OR 97709 (www.alsa-or.org). Please feel free to sign Paul’s guestbook at www.niswonger-reynolds.com.

The life of Marilynn Schuman came to a peaceful conclusion on May 16, 2011, at the age of 90. Born in Chicago, IL., Marilynn was a long time resident of Bend. Survivors include her husband of 63 years, Dr. Don Schuman; children, Garry, Randy, Janet, Alan, and Keith; four grandchildren, Mike, Jake, Quinten Schuman and Kaci Price; and three great-grandchildren. A celebration of her life will be held at the First Baptist Church of Bend, 60 N.W. Oregon Avenue, on May 21, 2011, at 2:00 PM. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Michael Oren April 12, 1946 - May 13, 2011 Died May 13, surrounded by family at Hospice of the Valley, Sun City, AZ, after a brief illness. He is survived by his wife, Pat; sister, Marilyn; five children; three grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Mike worked at Palo Verde Nuclear Plant for 20 years, and retired to Oregon 7 years ago, but spent the winters with his family in Phoenix. The services will be private. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to Autism Speaks.

Dessert Continued from C1 The team won with its presentation of a dish it called “chocolate mousse wrapped in a white chocolate shell with a honey, maple and cinnamon granola with raspberry coulis.” The student teams practiced for the event for two to three months, with Cascade Culinary faculty members going into the high schools and helping students with their techniques. The visiting faculty members also worked with teachers at the participating high schools. “Our goal with this competition is to give students the opportunity to see what they can achieve here,” Fritz said. “They can see what the big picture is about.” All high schools that fall within the COCC education district were invited to participate in the competition. In the future, Fritz said, the culinary institute will expand the program and will offer scholarships to the top three winning teams. “Next year, I’d love to see over 100 competitors participating in the event, and we’ll have them working in three kitchens instead of one,” Fritz said. “I’d love to see it turn into a really dynamic event.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Bill Skiles, clown in Skiles and Henderson New York Times News Service Bill Skiles, the frenzied, jabbering, sound-effecting clown to the straight man Pete Henderson in the comedy team Skiles and Henderson, died on Monday at his home in St. Cloud, Fla. He was 79. The cause was cancer, his wife, Arlene, said. For more than 50 years — in nightclubs and concert halls, on television and, in recent

years, on cruise ships — Skiles amused audiences with his vocally produced steam whistles, bagpipes, animal sounds, a grinding gramophone and impressions of famous people, as Henderson egged him on. Anything he touched could be a prop: A microphone stand became a metal detector, drumsticks became chopsticks, a bowtie started an outboard motor.

over the years in assaults, domestic violence incidents and mental health-related calls. “We’ve been really lucky so far on some of these incidents,” she said. “It’s pretty dangerous if we keep heading down this path.” Much of the information Baxter and Huhn shared was not new to most councilors. They heard similar presentations last year as the city was struggling to find a way to bolster its police and fire forces without sacrificing its general fund. The city’s general fund goes toward paying for services, such as public safety, street maintenance, code enforcement and economic development. About 80

percent of that fund goes to police and fire services. Last year, city officials projected that if they hired enough officers and firefighters to maintain status quo service levels, the general fund would experience a shortfall of up to $27 million over the next five years. That scenario was contingent on hiring 25 new public safety employees. The city also formed a public safety funding advisory committee last year to look for ways to deal with the shortfall while maintaining an adequate number of officers and firefighters. That group came up with a plan that would have reduced the

shortfall by about $15 million by 2016. That plan included cuts to employee wages and benefits, public safety hiring delays and decreases in street maintenance and community development subsidies. There are currently five vacancies in both the police and fire departments. The city’s 2011-2013 proposed budget includes hiring three police officers and three firefighters. The firefighter positions will be paid for through grant funding.

torneys returning to the office as late as midnight to continue working and coming in as early as 6 a.m. on a Sunday. Mike Maier, a member of the county budget committee, said the county requests data to measure performance in all of its departments, and information comparing prosecutors’ caseloads to those in other counties could be helpful. Maier is a former Deschutes County administrator. “I don’t question that we’re working harder, but are we working smarter?” Maier said. Flaherty said a better way to assess performance would be qualitative measures, such as local law enforcement and judges’ satisfaction with the District Attorney’s Office, the ratio of convictions to cases charged and restitution completed. The National District Attorneys Association suggests these measures, Flaherty said. The district attorney also explained a reorganization of his office in which one deputy district attorney, Horton, focuses on administrative work. The idea is “to free up the deputy DAs, what I call the trial dogs, to focus on the trial work and not be burdened with more of the administrative tasks,” Flaherty said. As for the county’s decision last year to lay off five employees at the juvenile detention center and close one of the three open cell blocks, Flaherty said it does not mean juvenile crime is down, and the juvenile workload in his

office is steady. In fact, the number of youths in the Deschutes County juvenile system declined 9 percent from 2009 to 2010, down to 1,189, according to the Oregon Juvenile Justice Information System. The total includes everything from criminal cases to runaways and minors in possession of alcohol. During the same time period, the number of youths who wound up in the county juvenile justice system for criminal cases increased by 21, for a total of 193 kids in 2010, according to the state. Hales took questions from the budget committee Wednesday on why the county should fill two open parole and probation officer jobs. The Parole & Probation Department receives state funding to supervise felons, but the county’s policy has been to also monitor misdemeanor sex offenders and domestic violence offenders. County officials expect state funding to be cut, so they must decide whether to replace it with more county money. Hales told the budget committee he would have to eliminate supervision of the domestic violence offenders if he cannot fill the two open parole and probation officer jobs. Maier asked Hales why these jobs need to be filled, since they have been open all year. Hales said officers have been unable to complete all the tasks they should be doing with offenders, such as field visits.

“One thing that will break the staff’s morale is when they are unable to do a good job, and that is the situation they are in,” Hales said. The three citizen members of the budget committee also decided Wednesday to freeze the pay of elected officials, including the county commissioners, clerk, sheriff, justice of the peace and assessor. The elected officials will have the opportunity to receive a county match of up to 2 percent of their incomes in a retirement account. They also have that option in the current budget year. Kanner said Oregon law does not allow the committee to set the amount the county pays Flaherty on top of his $105,00 state salary. In March, County Commissioner Tony DeBone said he wanted to reduce the district attorney’s salary to offset the cost of a grand jury investigation Flaherty’s office initiated in February into the county’s release of deputy district attorneys’ job applications in response to a public records request from The Bulletin. The county supplements the district attorney’s salary with an additional $26,000. The three citizens on the budget committee recommended Wednesday the County Commission freeze that amount for the upcoming budget year.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, MAY 19

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE 

Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

72/42

69/41

76/42

57/33

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

71/40

64/30

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

68/33

56/21

65/30

65/29

59/23



Vancouver 63/48

65/31

Hampton 63/30

Fort Rock

Portland

71/38

64/27

Bend

72/47



Idaho Falls Elko

79/50

66/32

61/43

Boise

68/33

Redding

64/34

70/46

Helena



Christmas Valley Silver Lake

Missoula



75/42

67/31

Chemult

City

Eugene Grants Pass

61/42



56/40

Reno



Partly cloudy skies today. Continued partly cloudy tonight.

Crater Lake 52/33

65/44

San Francisco

Sunrise today . . . . . . 5:35 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 8:29 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 5:34 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 8:30 p.m. Moonrise today . . . 11:14 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 7:24 a.m.

Salt Lake City

62/50

52/45

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

New

First

Full

May 24 June 1

June 8

June 15

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of a few showLOW ers, cooler.

HIGH

62 35

PLANET WATCH

Moon phases Last

MONDAY

TEMPERATURE

FIRE INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 61/43/0.00 . . . . . . 62/41/s. . . . . . 62/48/pc Baker City . . . . . . 60/34/0.01 . . . . . 67/42/pc. . . . . . 70/42/pc Brookings . . . . . . 62/40/0.00 . . . . . . 62/46/s. . . . . . 60/47/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . .57/33/trace . . . . . 67/40/pc. . . . . . 73/44/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 67/47/0.24 . . . . . . 71/38/s. . . . . . 72/45/pc Klamath Falls . . . 55/33/0.06 . . . . . 65/35/pc. . . . . . 69/40/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 52/34/0.22 . . . . . 61/39/pc. . . . . . 70/42/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 54/34/0.16 . . . . . 66/29/pc. . . . . . 71/35/pc Medford . . . . . . . 63/42/0.10 . . . . . . 75/45/s. . . . . . 79/47/pc Newport . . . . . . .55/46/trace . . . . . . 58/39/s. . . . . . 58/46/pc North Bend . . . . . 57/46/0.00 . . . . . . 59/45/s. . . . . . 59/48/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 67/44/0.09 . . . . . 75/50/pc. . . . . . 76/49/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 68/39/0.00 . . . . . 76/46/pc. . . . . . 76/47/pc Portland . . . . . . . 71/47/0.00 . . . . . . 72/46/s. . . . . . 74/49/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 53/39/0.04 . . . . . 66/34/pc. . . . . . 72/40/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 58/41/0.17 . . . . . 69/34/pc. . . . . . 74/40/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 65/48/0.02 . . . . . 74/44/pc. . . . . . 70/48/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 70/47/0.31 . . . . . . 72/42/s. . . . . . 73/47/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 57/38/0.10 . . . . . 66/32/pc. . . . . . 71/38/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 74/47/0.02 . . . . . 76/45/pc. . . . . . . 78/50/s

Mod. = Moderate; Ext. = Extreme

To report a wildfire, call 911

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

0

MEDIUM 2

4

7

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

POLLEN COUNT Updated daily. Source: pollen.com

LOW

59 34

PRECIPITATION

WATER REPORT

Bend, west of Hwy. 97......Low Sisters.................................Low Bend, east of Hwy. 97.......Low La Pine................................Low Redmond/Madras...........Low Prineville ...........................Low

LOW

HIGH

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of a few showLOW ers, cooler.

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.12” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 in 2009 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.56” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 in 2003 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.51” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.84” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 5.02” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.91 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.96 in 2004 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .4:47 a.m. . . . . . .6:24 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:39 a.m. . . . . . .6:21 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .4:37 a.m. . . . . . .6:29 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .4:15 a.m. . . . . . .5:33 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .4:01 p.m. . . . . . .3:54 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .3:22 a.m. . . . . . .3:33 p.m.

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

68/46 72/46

Burns

65 35

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 74° Hermiston • 28° Meacham

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of a few showLOW ers, cooler.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Seattle

Sunny to partly cloudy today. Clear to partly cloudy tonight. Eastern

LOW

73 44

NORTHWEST

60/30

66/29

64/28

HIGH

Dry and quiet conditions can be expected across the region, with partly to mostly sunny skies.

Paulina

La Pine

Crescent

Crescent Lake

LOW

33

Central

Brothers

Sunriver

Mostly sunny start, mostly cloudy finish, mild.

59/46

64/31

SATURDAY

Tonight: Mainly clear and chilly.

66/35

Camp Sherman 63/30 Redmond Prineville 68/33 Cascadia 66/34 67/34 Sisters 66/32 Bend Post 65/32

Mostly sunny skies today. Mostly clear skies tonight.

70/39 69/38

Oakridge Elk Lake

Today: Mostly sunny and significantly warmer.

68

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

FRIDAY

MEDIUM

HIGH

The following was compiled by the Central Oregon watermaster and irrigation districts as a service to irrigators and sportsmen. Reservoir Acre feet Capacity Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49,223 . . . . .55,000 Wickiup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183,641 . . . .200,000 Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . 76,661 . . . . .91,700 Ochoco Reservoir . . . . . . . . . 43,080 . . . . .47,000 Prineville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155,840 . . . .153,777 River flow Station Cubic ft./sec Deschutes RiverBelow Crane Prairie . . . . . . . . . . . 360 Deschutes RiverBelow Wickiup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 904 Crescent CreekBelow Crescent Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Little DeschutesNear La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 543 Deschutes RiverBelow Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Deschutes RiverAt Benham Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,758 Crooked RiverAbove Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 2,595 Crooked RiverBelow Prineville Res. . . . . . . . . . . 1,762 Ochoco CreekBelow Ochoco Res. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Crooked RiverNear Terrebonne . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,220 Contact: Watermaster, 388-6669 or go to www.wrd.state.or.us

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 68/46

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 63/43

S

Saskatoon 73/50

Seattle 68/46

S Winnipeg 77/55

S

S

Thunder Bay 62/50

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 70/56

Halifax 69/52 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland 52/51 (in the 48 56/42 68/55 72/46 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 70/59 61/49 Boise 57/52 Rapid City 72/47 Detroit Buffalo 50/47 New York • 101° 68/53 62/53 69/58 Des Moines Laredo, Texas Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 70/58 Chicago 49/36 64/54 75/60 60/51 • 18° Omaha San Francisco Washington, D. C. Salt Lake 69/61 West Yellowstone, Mont. 62/50 Kansas City City 76/60 Las Denver 70/63 Louisville 52/45 Vegas • 2.28” 57/42 74/58 St. Louis 74/60 Charlotte Caldwell, N.J. 75/61 78/55 Oklahoma City Albuquerque Los Angeles Nashville Little Rock 84/67 66/45 67/57 78/58 82/66 Phoenix Atlanta 79/64 Honolulu 80/61 Birmingham 87/73 Dallas Tijuana 83/58 85/72 65/55 New Orleans 85/72 Orlando Houston 89/67 Chihuahua 87/75 89/55 Miami 88/75 Monterrey La Paz 103/74 85/55 Mazatlan Anchorage 83/61 56/41 Juneau 61/41 Bismarck 68/54

FRONTS

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .95/67/0.00 . 91/68/pc . . 90/65/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .69/55/0.98 . .63/50/sh . . . 74/52/c Albany. . . . . . . . .70/55/0.06 . . .70/56/t . . 74/56/sh Albuquerque. . . .75/51/0.00 . 66/45/pc . . 68/50/pc Anchorage . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .56/41/sh . . 54/44/sh Atlanta . . . . . . . .67/44/0.00 . 80/61/pc . . 86/64/pc Atlantic City . . . .68/62/0.19 . . .70/56/t . . 70/57/sh Austin . . . . . . . . .89/64/0.00 . . .89/75/t . . . .88/68/t Baltimore . . . . . .71/63/0.24 . . .76/57/t . . 75/58/sh Billings. . . . . . . . .60/39/0.00 . .56/42/sh . . 53/47/sh Birmingham . . . .71/44/0.00 . 83/58/pc . . 87/63/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .70/41/0.00 . . .68/54/c . . 61/56/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .58/47/0.11 . 72/47/pc . . 73/48/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .54/50/0.03 . .57/52/sh . . 62/53/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .61/57/2.24 . . .67/55/t . . 66/55/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .73/52/0.96 . .62/53/sh . . . 62/53/c Burlington, VT. . .68/50/0.00 . .69/54/sh . . 73/55/sh Caribou, ME . . . .67/46/0.26 . .73/52/sh . . 73/51/sh Charleston, SC . .76/54/0.00 . 82/63/pc . . 84/66/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .67/46/0.00 . 78/55/pc . . 82/58/pc Chattanooga. . . .64/44/0.00 . 79/55/pc . . 86/60/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .52/34/0.03 . .49/36/sh . . 53/38/sh Chicago. . . . . . . .57/48/0.06 . . .60/51/c . . 64/57/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .61/51/0.07 . .66/55/sh . . 75/57/pc Cleveland . . . . . .70/48/0.89 . .64/53/sh . . . 68/55/c Colorado Springs 58/44/0.00 . . .56/35/t . . 62/42/pc Columbia, MO . .68/42/0.00 . . .73/60/t . . . .79/64/t Columbia, SC . . .71/55/0.00 . 82/59/pc . . 85/62/pc Columbus, GA. . .75/46/0.00 . 85/59/pc . . . 90/62/s Columbus, OH. . .61/51/0.02 . .64/54/sh . . 73/56/pc Concord, NH . . . .56/50/0.41 . .54/51/sh . . 70/51/sh Corpus Christi. . .82/75/0.00 . . .80/80/t . . . .87/77/t Dallas Ft Worth. .87/66/0.00 . . .85/72/t . . . .84/70/t Dayton . . . . . . . .57/50/0.08 . .65/55/sh . . 74/58/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .56/41/0.74 . . .57/42/t . . . .60/43/t Des Moines. . . . .71/45/0.00 . .70/58/sh . . . .74/62/t Detroit. . . . . . . . .63/51/0.32 . .68/53/sh . . . 73/54/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .66/42/0.00 . . .50/47/c . . 62/50/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .87/64/0.00 . . .83/57/s . . . 80/57/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .68/49/0.00 . 72/46/pc . . . 66/40/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .74/45/0.00 . . .73/57/c . . 70/59/sh Flagstaff . . . . . . .43/33/0.47 . . .51/33/c . . 60/37/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .64/52/0.04 . .68/49/sh . . 73/53/pc Green Bay. . . . . .60/46/0.03 . . .61/49/c . . 67/51/pc Greensboro. . . . .68/50/0.00 . 74/55/pc . . 80/57/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .68/60/1.51 . . .72/57/t . . 73/56/sh Hartford, CT . . . .64/53/0.05 . . .66/55/t . . 69/53/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . 61/43/pc . . 60/43/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .82/70/0.01 . . .87/73/s . . 87/75/pc Houston . . . . . . .80/63/0.00 . 87/75/pc . . . .90/75/t Huntsville . . . . . .69/45/0.00 . 80/56/pc . . 86/61/pc Indianapolis . . . .59/51/0.05 . .69/54/sh . . 78/56/pc Jackson, MS . . . .79/44/0.00 . . .86/65/s . . 88/69/pc Madison, WI . . . .59/43/0.07 . . .68/51/c . . 72/57/pc Jacksonville. . . . .80/46/0.00 . 85/62/pc . . 89/65/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .50/45/0.02 . 61/41/pc . . 62/41/sh Kansas City. . . . .67/48/0.00 . . .70/63/t . . . .75/63/t Lansing . . . . . . . .63/49/0.13 . .69/52/sh . . 74/52/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .67/56/0.00 . 74/60/pc . . . 82/66/s Lexington . . . . . .55/48/0.06 . .68/55/sh . . 76/62/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .68/47/0.00 . . .69/60/t . . . .77/61/t Little Rock. . . . . .78/49/0.00 . 82/66/pc . . . .82/67/t Los Angeles. . . . .64/54/0.36 . . .67/57/s . . . 67/59/s Louisville . . . . . . .59/51/0.05 . .74/58/sh . . 82/64/pc Memphis. . . . . . .74/48/0.00 . 85/66/pc . . 88/69/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .85/70/0.00 . 88/75/pc . . 88/75/pc Milwaukee . . . . .55/45/0.16 . . .58/49/c . . 57/50/pc Minneapolis . . . .73/49/0.00 . . .70/59/c . . 72/60/sh Nashville . . . . . . .65/48/0.00 . 78/58/pc . . 86/64/pc New Orleans. . . .81/58/0.00 . . .85/72/s . . 87/72/pc New York . . . . . .67/55/1.58 . . .69/58/t . . 70/56/sh Newark, NJ . . . . .72/57/1.98 . . .71/58/t . . . .73/56/r Norfolk, VA . . . . .80/57/0.68 . 79/60/pc . . 77/60/sh Oklahoma City . .80/60/0.00 . . .84/67/t . . . .84/62/t Omaha . . . . . . . .70/47/0.00 . . .69/61/t . . . .77/62/t Orlando. . . . . . . .85/57/0.00 . . .89/67/s . . 91/68/pc Palm Springs. . . .76/59/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 88/64/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .72/55/c . . . .77/61/t Philadelphia . . . .70/60/0.24 . . .75/60/t . . 73/59/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .77/65/0.00 . . .79/64/s . . . 85/67/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .66/57/0.24 . .66/53/sh . . . 72/52/c Portland, ME. . . .53/50/0.10 . .52/51/sh . . 63/52/sh Providence . . . . .63/50/0.09 . .64/54/sh . . 67/55/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 76/56/pc . . 82/58/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .56/46/0.11 . .50/47/sh . . 59/48/sh Savannah . . . . . .78/49/0.00 . 85/62/pc . . 88/66/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .60/37/0.04 . 65/44/pc . . 72/49/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . 70/50/pc Richmond . . . . . .78/58/0.32 . . .78/59/t . . 77/58/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .69/36/0.00 . . .69/58/t . . . .72/59/t Rochester, NY . . .73/48/0.02 . . .71/54/t . . . 72/54/c Spokane . . . . . . .68/39/0.00 . 71/49/pc . . . 73/48/c Sacramento. . . . .69/51/0.30 . . .78/50/s . . . 78/51/s Springfield, MO. .64/44/0.01 . . .76/65/t . . . .78/64/t St. Louis. . . . . . . .73/53/0.00 . . .75/61/c . . . .81/65/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .80/64/0.00 . . .84/68/s . . 90/71/pc Salt Lake City . . .48/43/0.29 . .52/45/sh . . 58/46/sh Tucson. . . . . . . . .78/57/0.00 . . .74/53/s . . . 80/58/s San Antonio . . . .89/70/0.00 . . .89/76/t . . . .89/74/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .70/54/0.22 . . .80/69/t . . . .81/64/t San Diego . . . . . .67/58/0.19 . . .66/56/s . . . 68/56/s Washington, DC .72/62/0.19 . . .76/60/t . . 75/59/sh San Francisco . . .57/51/0.11 . . .64/50/s . . . 65/51/s Wichita . . . . . . . .61/53/0.01 . . .77/64/t . . . .78/61/t San Jose . . . . . . .62/52/0.06 . . .72/50/s . . . 73/50/s Yakima . . . . . . . 74/38/trace . 75/47/pc . . . 78/46/s Santa Fe . . . . . . .68/40/0.00 . 59/36/pc . . 62/42/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .80/60/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 87/62/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .61/55/0.00 . 68/54/pc . . 68/53/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .71/57/0.00 . . .73/58/t . . 76/59/pc Auckland. . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . 64/54/pc . . 64/55/sh Baghdad . . . . . .104/82/0.00 101/82/pc . . . 97/76/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .93/79/t . . . .93/80/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . 78/58/pc . . . 75/56/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .75/70/0.00 . 80/65/pc . . 82/66/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . .74/56/sh . . . .73/55/t Bogota . . . . . . . .66/52/0.00 . .68/50/sh . . 67/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .77/45/0.00 . 79/55/pc . . 79/57/pc Buenos Aires. . . .68/50/0.00 . . .68/49/s . . . 70/51/s Cabo San Lucas .82/63/0.00 . . .83/64/s . . . 85/66/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . 90/69/pc . . 93/70/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .64/43/0.00 . . .63/43/r . . 67/44/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .88/68/0.00 . 87/73/pc . . 85/75/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . .56/46/sh . . 58/46/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .57/46/0.00 . 57/43/pc . . 56/48/sh Geneva . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .75/53/t . . . .75/54/t Harare . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .78/59/t . . . .77/59/t Hong Kong . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .84/75/t . . . .85/74/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/57/0.00 . . .74/57/t . . 75/55/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .81/58/0.00 . . .82/60/s . . 86/63/pc Johannesburg . . .68/52/0.00 . . .68/47/s . . 66/47/pc Lima . . . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . . .74/61/s . . . 73/61/s Lisbon . . . . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . . .73/61/t . . 78/63/pc London . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . 65/48/pc . . 67/49/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .77/55/0.00 . .73/55/sh . . 77/53/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .97/79/0.00 . . .91/79/t . . . .90/79/t

Mecca . . . . . . . .106/82/0.00 108/85/pc . 106/85/pc Mexico City. . . . .84/59/0.00 . . .84/58/t . . . .84/57/t Montreal. . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .70/56/sh . . 73/55/sh Moscow . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . . .66/48/s . . 71/51/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .73/61/0.00 . . .77/62/t . . . .77/63/t Nassau . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 89/73/pc . . 88/74/pc New Delhi. . . . .111/88/0.00 . .109/86/s . . 106/84/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .77/54/0.00 . . .76/60/s . . 77/61/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .52/37/0.00 . 61/42/pc . . 61/40/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .70/56/sh . . 74/55/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 . . .74/58/c . . 76/54/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .73/63/0.11 . .79/68/sh . . 80/69/sh Rome. . . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . 77/54/pc . . 78/56/pc Santiago . . . . . . .66/36/0.00 . 64/41/pc . . 63/37/pc Sao Paulo . . . . . .63/54/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . . 74/55/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .68/68/0.00 . .66/52/sh . . 66/54/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . .73/55/sh . . 71/57/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .86/68/0.00 . . .90/69/s . . . 91/70/s Singapore . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .88/78/t . . . .89/78/t Stockholm. . . . . .63/45/0.02 . . .63/48/s . . . 63/44/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .70/50/s . . 72/51/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . . .84/70/s . . 84/71/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . . .80/64/s . . 84/65/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . .76/61/s . . 78/63/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .64/55/0.00 . .68/55/sh . . 69/55/sh Vancouver. . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . . 69/50/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .72/45/0.00 . 78/55/pc . . 79/56/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . 78/57/pc . . 77/57/sh

Congress urged to continue aid to timber counties By Tami Abdollah The Associated Press

SALEM — In rural Western Oregon, one sheriff’s deputy patrols nearly 80 miles of coastline alone. And for several hours a day, no one does. Such are the daily realities of Curry County, a coastal community of about 22,000 people, which has had to cut services due to budget woes. The county depends on a federal timber-related subsidy for nearly half its operating budget. Without it, the county will be bankrupt in one to two years, said county Commissioner Bill

IN THE LEGISLATURE Waddle. Other counties in the state are not far behind, state officials say. Oregon state senators unanimously passed a measure Wednesday urging Congress to continue federal funding to “timber counties” such as Curry County. “The federal government owes the state of Oregon,” said Sen. Larry George, R-Sherwood, who

carried the bill. “They have hurt our schools; they have hurt our local governments. … Our rural economy is falling apart.” With about half of Oregon designated as federal land, the state receives the largest share of such funding. The payments came into existence initially as a series of safety nets in the 1990s while restrictions to protect fish and wildlife diminished logging activity and county revenue. Federal lands cannot be taxed by counties or be developed. In 2008, the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-

Determination Act of 2000 was appropriated for four years, sharing about $3.3 billion with more than 700 counties in 41 states. Final payments go out this year. In Oregon, 33 of 36 counties will receive more than $100 million in fiscal year 2011, according to Eric Schmidt, a spokesman for the Association of Oregon Counties. Depending on the land, a portion of the federal money is spread throughout the state for education. In 2008, $33 million of the $230 million went to education. Some of the money also goes to general-fund areas such

as law enforcement, while a certain portion must go to building roads and bridges. Oregon counties are struggling to find new sources of revenue in a difficult economy, and many of the timber counties face doubledigit unemployment. Meanwhile, voters consistently have turned down measures to raise property taxes, county officials said. Yet voters in Curry and Josephine counties in Southern Oregon all turned down publicsafety levies last year. Klamath County voters on Tuesday voted down a measure that would help keep their jails fully open. None

of the jails have money to operate at full capacity. In Curry County, nearly 65 percent of its land is U.S. Forest Service or Bureau of Land Management lands. Only about 5.5 percent of the land provides a substantive tax base, Waddle said. Waddle said he spent all morning with the sheriff discussing the “bare-bones” budget. “One murder case, one episode in jail where we have to hospitalize an inmate — anything like that will absolutely throw him upside down in his budget,” Waddle said.


S

Heat even series with Bulls, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2011

C YCLING

SAN JOSE, Calif. — With a quick uphill burst, Bend’s Chris Horner rode away from teammate Levi Leipheimer in the final 2 miles and pedaled into the race lead at the Tour of California on Wednesday. Horner, a member of Team RadioShack who last year finished 10th in the Tour de France as the top American, completed the 81.8-mile Livermore to San Jose road race in 3 hours, 27 minutes and 51 seconds. Andy Schleck (LeopardTrek) of Luxembourg, the 2009 and 2010 Tour de France runner-up, finished second, 1 minute and 15 seconds behind. Rory Sutherland (United Healthcare) of Australia was third, just behind Schleck. Horner, who finished fourth overall last year in the Tour of California, leads the sevenday race by 1:15 over Leipheimer, the three-time race winner. “I was riding in support of Levi (Leipheimer); I always gave him room,” said Horner, who began his pro career in 1995 and at 39 is the secondoldest rider in the race. With teammates providing support through the stage, which included four categorized climbs, Horner waited until the base of the final 3.5-mile climb to the finish to launch his move. Leipheimer followed, but it was soon apparent Horner was the strongest rider. “I wanted to break the race apart,” Horner said following the first mountaintop finish in the six-year race’s history. The seven-day race continues today. — The Associated Press

Large number of track stars eye state titles Bulletin staff report

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Andrew Boone, out for a paddle on the Deschutes River Monday morning, is one of the favorites to win the men’s elite individual competition in the Pole Pedal Paddle race on Saturday.

New champ? With five-time winner Marshall Greene out of the mix, Bend cyclist Andrew Boone emerges as the favorite to win the elite men’s race in the PPP By Mark Morical The Bulletin

Andrew Boone was about 5 years old when he first participated in the U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle, sitting between his father’s legs as his dad paddled a windsurf board along the Deschutes River. He would continue to race in the PPP with his parents, siblings and friends over the years while growing up in Bend.

Chris Horner celebrates his win in Wednesday’s stage of the Tour of California in San Jose, Calif.

CORRECTIONS In a story headlined “Finding a spark” that appeared Tuesday, May 17, on Page D1, the High Desert Lightning’s website was spelled incorrectly. The correct spelling is www.highdesertlightning. com. The Bulletin regrets the error. A prep sports roundup headlined “Summit boys golf takes fourth, Bend fifth at 5A state final” that appeared on Wednesday, May 18, on Page D4 contained multiple errors regarding Redmond’s baseball victory over Century. Lane Rutherford hit a home run for the Panthers and Parker Vernon earned the win for Redmond. Also, Noah Westerhuis went two for two with a two-run home run. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Horse racing ..............................D2 MLB .................................. D3, D4 Golf ........................................... D4 NBA .......................................... D4 NHL .......................................... D4 Hunting & Fishing .................... D6

S TAT E P R E V I E W: PREP TRACK & FIELD

P O L E P E DA L PA D D L E

Bend’s Horner wins stage, takes overall lead in California

D

NBA Inside

Boone first competed as an elite individual in 2008, finishing eighth. He placed second each of the past two years to five-time PPP champion Marshall Greene, who moved to Wisconsin last fall. Now that Greene is out of the picture, Boone, 30, appears to be the favorite in the elite men’s race for Saturday’s 35th edition of the Pole Pedal Paddle. “I have a long history with the race,” Boone says. “It means a lot to me. I always looked up to those guys in the elite field. It’s an honor to be a factor in this race.” Boone will likely face stiff compe-

tition from Bend’s Brayton Osgood, Boone’s teammate on the XC Oregon elite nordic ski team. Another potential challenger is David Bergart, of Victor, Idaho, a relative unknown who has fared well competing in a similar multisport race — also called the Pole Pedal Paddle — staged each year in Jackson Hole, Wyo. Other competitors from Bend looking to challenge Boone include Michael Condon and Jason Adams. But if Boone were to win here on Saturday, he would be the first PPP men’s champion without a long history in competitive cross-country skiing. See PPP / D5

35th Annual U.S. Bank Pole Pedal Paddle Wha t: A six-stage multisport race that includes a downhill ski/snowboard stage, an 8-kilometer nordic ski, a 22-mile bike ride, a 5-mile run, a 2-kilometer paddle and a half-mile sprint Where: A course that starts at Mt. Bachelor ski area and finishes at Bend’s Les Schwab Amphitheater Who: More than 3,000 participants competing as individuals or as members of teams When: Saturday, May 21; start waves go from 9:15 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.; first finisher is expected just before 11 a.m.

Coming Friday • Look in Friday’s Bulletin for a special section breaking down this year’s PPP with maps and a spectator’s guide

The storylines for this weekend’s state track championships are almost as staggering as the sheer number of local participants. More than 120 Central Oregon athletes Inside are headed to • A look at the campuses area athletes of the Universiwho will ty of Oregon in compete in Eugene (Class state track 6A, 5A and 4A) meets, and Western Oregon UniPage D5 versity in Monmouth (Class 3A, 2A, 1A) on Friday and Saturday for their respective state tournaments. And local athletes figure to be in the thick of just about every championship except Class 3A. Here are some of the stories we’ll be following over the next couple of days: Class 6A: Redmond jumper Travis Simpson — The Panthers’ senior standout is one of only five high jumpers in the entire state to clear 6 feet, 6 inches this season. Simpson, who also advances to state in the long jump and triple jump, could be the first Redmond male to win an individual state track title since Denny Charlton won the discus in 1960. See Track / D5

S TAT E P R E V I E W: PREP TENNIS

Boom times for prep tennis Bulletin staff report

A place for youngsters to learn Central Oregon is a great place for kids to start picking up the sport of shooting

“P

ull!” Bill Grafton pushed a button and a clay target streaked away from a concrete bunker. Paxton crushed it. His 14year-old sister Alexa was next. When she fired, the orange disc broke in pieces. My daughter Mikayla’s first shot missed to the right. On a concrete pad marked with five shooting lanes, the kids changed positions, reloaded, and moved with the targets. At their feet, empty hulls skittered along the ground, blown by the wind. This was the kids’ first exposure to the game called trap shooting, a discipline that requires the shooter to engage a rapidly moving target in the air. Alexa started thinking about her targets and lost a few. Mikayla struggled. If I remember right, Paxton missed just two of the 25. We moved on to the Continental course and the kids gave that a try. Arvard Martin, president of the Bend Trap Club, tried to help Mikayla overcome her shooting slump. It was on the sporting clays course when she took off her glasses in frustration and put them in her jacket pocket. She broke the next three in a row and began to call for the targets with gusto. “Give me the rabbit,” she said, and an orange disc bounced along the ground like a jackrabbit in fifth gear. Behind us, real jackrabbits bounced in and out of the manicured lawns. See Shooting / D6

GARY LEWIS

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Arvard Martin, president of the Bend Trap Club, coaches Alexa Eicher on the sporting clays course.

High school tennis is booming in Central Oregon. Redmond, Bend, Summit, Mountain View, Sisters and Crook County are sending 35 participants — the largest number in recent memory — to the various state tournaments today, Friday and Saturday. The Summit boys advanced six players to the Class 5A state champi- Inside onship while • A look at the Redmond, area athletes Bend, Sumwho will mit and Crook compete in County girls state tennis teams all won their district tournaments, tournaments. Page D5 (Bend and Summit were co-champions of their district tourney.) “Tennis seems more popular than it’s ever been,” said Lava Bear girls coach Kevin Collier, whose team has four players competing at the 5A state championship in Beaverton this year. “It’s pretty exciting. Redmond, Summit, us, Crook County, we all used to be in the same league (the Intermountain Conference). They split us up and we all won districts. It’s a good sign for Central Oregon.” See Tennis / D5


D2 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

Prep sports ON DECK

TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6 a.m. — European Tour, Volvo World Match Play, first round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, first round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza Invitational, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Sybase Match Play Championship, first round, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 9:30 a.m. — MLB, Pittsburgh Pirates at Cincinnati Reds or Washington Nationals at New York Mets, MLB Network. 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Los Angeles Angels at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Detroit Tigers at Boston Red Sox or New York Yankees at Baltimore Orioles, MLB Network.

CYCLING 2 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 5, Versus network.

TRACK & FIELD 5 p.m. — College men and women, Pac-10 championships, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, Eastern Conference finals, Boston Bruins at Tampa Bay Lightning, Versus network.

BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA, Western Conference finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Dallas Mavericks, ESPN.

FRIDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — European Tour, Volvo World Match Play, second round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — Nationwide Tour, BMW Charity Pro-Am, second round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Crowne Plaza Invitational, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — LPGA Tour, Sybase Match Play Championship, second round, Golf Channel.

TRACK & FIELD Noon — College men and women, Big 12 championships, Root Sports.

HORSE RACING 1 p.m. — Black-Eyed Susan Stakes, Versus network.

CYCLING 2 p.m. — Tour of California, stage 6, Versus network.

SOFTBALL 2:30 p.m. — College, NCAA tournament, regionals, Kentucky vs. Notre Dame, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — College, NCAA tournament, regionals, Western Michigan vs. Michigan, ESPN.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Chicago Cubs at Boston Red Sox or New York Mets at New York Yankees, MLB Network. 7 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at San Diego Padres, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 6 p.m. — NHL, Western Conference finals, Vancouver Canucks at San Jose Sharks, Versus network.

Today Boys tennis: Class 5A state championships in Portland, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships in Eugene, 5 p.m. Girls tennis: Class 5A state championships in Beaverton, 9 a.m. Softball: Redmond at Barlow, 4:30 p.m.; Class 5A play-in game, Lebanon at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Class 5A playin game, Corvallis at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Class 4A play-in game, Siuslaw at Crook County, 5 p.m.; Class 4A play-in game, Sisters at Central, 4:30 p.m.; Class 4A play-in game, Tillamook at Madras, 3:30 p.m.; Culver at Perrydale, 3 p.m. Baseball: Class 5A play-in game, Summit at West Albany, 4:30 p.m.; Class 5A play-in game, Lebanon at Bend High, 4:30 p.m.; Class 5A play-in game, South Albany at Mountain View, 4:30 p.m.; Class 4A play-in game, Cascade at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; Class 4A play-in game, Madras at Astoria, TBA Equestrian: Oregon High School Equestrian Teams State Meet at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Redmond, 11 a.m.

Saturday Boys tennis: Class 5A state championships in Beaverton, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships, 8 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 5A state championships in Beaverton, 9 a.m. Track: Class 6A, 5A, 4A state championships in Eugene, 9:30 a.m.; Class 3A/2A/1A state championships in Monmouth, 10:30 a.m. Equestrian: Oregon High School Equestrian Teams State Meet at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Redmond, 8:30 a.m. Sunday Equestrian: Oregon High School Equestrian Teams State Meet at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Redmond, 8:30 a.m.

PREP SPORTS Baseball Wednesday’s results ——— CLASS 6A NONCONFERENCE ——— West Salem 001 000 0 — 1 3 2 Redmond 000 100 1 — 2 6 1 Keene and Boehman; Lau and Branham. W — Lau. L — Keene. 2B — Redmond: Vernon.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF New York 4 2 3 15 13 Philadelphia 4 3 2 14 6 Houston 3 3 4 13 13 Columbus 3 2 4 13 8 New England 3 3 4 13 9 D.C. 3 4 3 12 13 Toronto FC 2 4 5 11 11 Chicago 1 3 5 8 12 Sporting Kansas City 1 5 1 4 11 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Los Angeles 5 2 5 20 17 FC Dallas 5 3 2 17 13 Real Salt Lake 5 1 1 16 9 Colorado 4 3 3 15 12 Seattle 3 3 5 14 13 Portland 4 3 2 14 12 Chivas USA 3 3 3 12 11 San Jose 2 4 3 9 10 Vancouver 1 5 5 8 12 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Saturday’s Games Chicago at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. New York at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Los Angeles at Chivas USA, 7 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Seattle FC, 7 p.m. New England at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Columbus at Portland, 8 p.m. Sunday’s Games Real Salt Lake at FC Dallas, 4 p.m. Toronto FC at Colorado, 4 p.m.

GA 6 6 10 9 12 18 17 15 17 GA 12 10 2 10 11 14 9 11 16

BASKETBALL NBA

BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, USC at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940.

Wednesday’s Summary

BOXING

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — NBA, Western Conference finals, Oklahoma City Thunder at Dallas Mavericks, KICE-AM 940.

FRIDAY

LPGA Tour

0-0 0, Chalmers 0-1 0-0 0, Howard 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-68 18-24 85. CHICAGO (75) Deng 5-15 2-2 13, Boozer 3-10 1-2 7, Noah 4-9 1-2 9, Rose 7-23 7-10 21, Bogans 2-5 0-2 5, Brewer 2-4 3-4 7, Watson 0-2 2-2 2, Asik 0-0 0-1 0, Gibson 4-7 0-1 8, Korver 1-7 0-0 3. Totals 28-82 16-26 75. Miami 19 29 23 14 — 85 Chicago 26 20 19 10 — 75 3-Point Goals—Miami 3-13 (James 2-6, Bibby 1-5, Chalmers 0-1, Miller 0-1), Chicago 3-20 (Bogans 1-4, Korver 1-5, Deng 1-7, Watson 0-1, Rose 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 55 (James 10), Chicago 51 (Noah, Boozer 8). Assists—Miami 18 (James 5), Chicago 15 (Rose 8). Total Fouls—Miami 26, Chicago 25. A—23,007 (20,917).

TENNIS ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Open de Nice Cote d’Azur Nice, France Wednesday Singles Second Round Nicolas Almagro (3), Spain, def. Carlos Berlocq, Argentina, 6-7 (5), 6-4, 6-3. Alexandr Dolgopolov (5), Ukraine, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 7-6 (5), 7-6 (5). David Ferrer (1), Spain, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy, 6-3, 6-2. Robin Haase, Netherlands, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky (7), Ukraine, 6-2, 6-4. Victor Hanescu, Romania, def. Michael Russell, United States, 7-5, 6-2. Pablo Andujar, Spain, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 6-3, 6-4. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, def. Denis Istomin, Uzbekistan, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. Tomas Berdych (2), Czech Republic, def. Adrian Mannarino, France, 6-1, 6-4. Power Horse World Team Cup Duesseldorf, Germany Wednesday Round Robin Blue Group Spain 2, Germany 1 Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 6-4, 2-6, 6-3. Marcel Granollers and Marc Lopez, Spain, def. Christopher Kas and Philipp Petzschner, Germany, 7-6 (7), 6-3. Serbia 2, Russia 1 Igor Andreev and Dmitry Tursunov, Russia, def. Janko Tipsarevic and Viktor Troicki, Serbia, 6-3, 4-6, 10-5 tiebreak. Red Group United States 2, Kazakhstan 1 Mardy Fish and John Isner, United States, def. Andrey Golubev and Mikhail Kukushkin, Kazakhstan, 6-3, 7-6 (10). Argentina 2, Sweden 1 Robin Soderling, Sweden, def. Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 6-1, 6-4. Juan Ignacio Chela and Juan Monaco, Argentina, def. Simon Aspelin and Robert Lindstedt, Sweden, 7-6 (1), 6-0.

WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Brussels Open Brussels, Belgium Wednesday Singles Second Round Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Galina Voskoboeva, Kazakhstan, 2-6, 6-4, 6-3. Peng Shuai (8), China, def. Abigail Spears, United States, 6-2, 6-0. Yanina Wickmayer (6), Belgium, def. Alison Van Uytvanck, Belgium, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, def. Jelena Jankovic (4), Serbia, 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. Ayumi Morita, Japan, def. Casey Dellacqua, Australia, 1-6, 6-0, 7-5. Francesca Schiavone (3), Italy, def. Irina Falconi, Italy, 6-4, 6-4. Alexandra Dulgheru (7), Romania, def. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-2. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 6-4, 7-6 (5).

Heat 85, Bulls 75 Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Boo Weekley, 71.55%. 6, Chad Campbell, 71.50%. 7, Bill Haas, 70.54%. 8 (tie), John Senden and Bill Lunde, 70.41%. 10, 2 tied with 70.37%. Total Driving 1, John Merrick, 65. 2, Boo Weekley, 74. 3, Adam Scott, 78. 4 (tie), Chris Couch and John Rollins, 83. 6, Nick Watney, 84. 7, Bo Van Pelt, 86. 8, John Senden, 87. 9, Tom Gillis, 90. 10, Bubba Watson, 105. Putting Average 1, Lucas Glover, 1.691. 2, Luke Donald, 1.699. 3, Brandt Snedeker, 1.702. 4 (tie), Steve Stricker and Greg Chalmers, 1.704. 6, Kevin Na, 1.710. 7, Rickie Fowler, 1.711. 8 (tie), Chris Couch and Jason Day, 1.717. 10, Vaughn Taylor, 1.725. Birdie Average 1, Hunter Mahan, 4.62. 2, Dustin Johnson, 4.53. 3, Steve Stricker, 4.50. 4, Phil Mickelson, 4.45. 5, Aaron Baddeley, 4.43. 6, Luke Donald, 4.38. 7, Nick Watney, 4.35. 8 (tie), Bubba Watson and Rickie Fowler, 4.32. 10, 3 tied with 4.31. Eagles (Holes per) 1, Sunghoon Kang, 49.5. 2, Scott McCarron, 64.3. 3, Bubba Watson, 73.8. 4, Bobby Gates, 82.0. 5, Derek Lamely, 93.0. 6 (tie), Bill Haas and Steve Marino, 96.8. 8, Robert Karlsson, 99.0. 9, Kevin Stadler, 101.3. 10, Scott Stallings, 102.0.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Friday Boys tennis: Class 5A state championships in Portland, 9 a.m.; Class 4A/3A/2A/1A state championships, 8 a.m. Girls tennis: Class 5A state championships in Beaverton, 9 a.m. Track: Class 6A, 5A, 4A state championships in Eugene, 10 a.m.; Class 3A/2A/1A state championships in Monmouth, 11 a.m. Baseball: Class 4A play-in game, Crook County at Baker, 5 p.m.; Kennedy at Culver, 3 p.m. Softball: Kennedy at Culver, 3 p.m. Equestrian: Oregon High School Equestrian Teams State Meet at Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, Redmond, 8 a.m.

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Playoffs All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Chicago 1, Miami 1 Sunday, May 15: Chicago 103, Miami 82 Wednesday, May 18: Miami 85, Chicago 75 Sunday, May 22: Chicago at Miami, 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 24: Chicago at Miami, 5:30 p.m. x-Thursday, May 26: Miami at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. x-Saturday, May 28: Chicago at Miami, 5:30 p.m. x-Monday, May 30: Miami at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Dallas 1, Oklahoma City 0 Tuesday, May 17: Dallas 121, Oklahoma City 112 Today, May 19: Oklahoma City at Dallas, 6 p.m. Saturday, May 21: Dallas at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. Monday, May 23: Dallas at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 25: Oklahoma City at Dallas, 6 p.m. x-Friday, May 27: Dallas at Oklahoma City, 6 p.m. x-Sunday, May 29: Oklahoma City at Dallas, 6 p.m.

6 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, Joel Julio vs. Antoine Smith, ESPN2.

S   B

MIAMI (85) James 12-21 3-7 29, Bosh 4-8 2-2 10, Anthony 0-1 0-0 0, Bibby 1-6 2-2 5, Wade 8-16 8-10 24, Magloire 1-2 0-0 2, Haslem 5-10 3-3 13, Miller 1-2 0-0 2, Jones 0-0

Internationaux de Strasbourg Strasbourg, France Wednesday Singles Second Round Andrea Petkovic (2), Germany, def. Zhang Shuai, China, 6-1, 6-3. Maria Kirilenko (5), Russia, def. Laura Pous-Tio, Spain, 6-3, 3-6, 7-6 (5). Nadia Petrova (4), Russia, def. Alize Cornet, France,

2-6, 6-2, 6-2. Lucie Hradecka (8), Czech Republic, def. Stephanie Foretz Gacon, France, 6-2, 6-4. Mirjana Lucic, Croatia, def. Jelena Dokic, Australia, 6-2, 6-2. Daniela Hantuchova (6), Slovakia, def. Mathilde Johansson, France, 6-4, 6-2. Anabel Medina Garrigues (7), Spain, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 6-2, 6-0. Marion Bartoli (1), France, def. Elena Baltacha, Britain, walkover.

BASEBALL College Pacific-10 Conference All Times PDT ——— Conference W L Oregon State 16 5 Arizona State 14 7 UCLA 14 7 California 12 9 Arizona 11 10 Stanford 10 11 USC 10 11 Oregon 7 14 Washington State 6 15 Washington 5 16 ——— Tuesday’s Games x-California at UC Davis, suspended x-San Francisco at Stanford, canceled x-Washington State 11, Portland 5 x-Oregon 6, Gonzaga 0 x-Cal State Fullerton at UCLA, canceled x-UC Irvine 9, USC 2 Wednesday’s Games x-Oregon 9, Gonzaga 0 x-California 8, UC Davis 3 Friday’s Game Oregon at Washington State, 5:30 p.m. Arizona at Stanford, 5:30 p.m. USC at Oregon State, 5:35 p.m. Cal at UCLA, 6 p.m. Arizona State at Washington, 6 p.m. x-nonleague

Overall W L 37 12 36 13 28 19 29 16 32 17 28 18 21 27 28 24 22 24 15 32

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— CONFERENCE FINALS (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Tampa Bay 1, Boston 1 Saturday, May 14: Tampa Bay 5, Boston 2 Tuesday, May 17: Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5 Today, May 19: Boston at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m. Saturday, May 21: Boston at Tampa Bay, 10:30 a.m. x-Monday, May 23: Tampa Bay at Boston, 5 p.m. x-Wednesday, May 25: Boston at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m. x-Friday, May 27: Tampa Bay at Boston, 5 p.m. WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 2, San Jose 0 Sunday, May 15: Vancouver 3, San Jose 2 Wednesday, May 18: Vancouver 7, San Jose 3 Friday, May 20: Vancouver at San Jose, 6 p.m. Sunday, May 22: Vancouver at San Jose, noon x-Tuesday, May 24: San Jose at Vancouver, 6 p.m. x-Thursday, May 26: Vancouver at San Jose, 6 p.m. x-Saturday, May 28: San Jose at Vancouver, 5 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour STATISTICS Through May 15 Scoring Average 1, Luke Donald, 69.16. 2, Steve Stricker, 69.93. 3, Matt Kuchar, 69.98. 4, Nick Watney, 70.01. 5, Brian Gay, 70.03. 6, Phil Mickelson, 70.04. 7, Spencer Levin, 70.05. 8, Charl Schwartzel, 70.06. 9, Webb Simpson, 70.09. 10, Rory Sabbatini, 70.10. Driving Distance 1, J.B. Holmes, 316.0. 2, Bubba Watson, 311.7. 3, Dustin Johnson, 305.0. 4, Robert Garrigus, 303.9. 5, Steven Bowditch, 303.8. 6, Gary Woodland, 301.9. 7, Angel Cabrera, 300.3. 8, Scott Stallings, 299.1. 9 (tie), Martin Laird and Kyle Stanley, 298.4. Driving Accuracy Percentage 1, Brian Gay, 78.49%. 2, David Toms, 74.20%. 3, Ben Curtis, 74.16%. 4, Jerry Kelly, 72.64%. 5, Joe Durant, 72.07%. 6, Zach Johnson, 71.43%. 7, Heath Slocum, 71.22%. 8, Ben Crane, 69.34%. 9, Brian Davis, 69.07%. 10, 2 tied with 69.06%. Greens in Regulation Pct. 1, Bubba Watson, 73.85%. 2, David Toms, 71.90%. 3, Justin Rose, 71.83%. 4, Heath Slocum, 71.57%. 5,

STATISTICS Through May 1 Scoring 1, Yani Tseng, 70.2860. 2, I.K. Kim, 70.6880. 3, Sandra Gal, 71.0530. 4, Karrie Webb, 71.0870. 5, Stacy Lewis, 71.1740. 6, Cristie Kerr, 71.4290. 7, Na Yeon Choi, 71.4500. 8, Suzann Pettersen, 71.5500. 9, Morgan Pressel, 71.6520. 10, Amelia Lewis, 71.6670. Driving Distance 1, Brittany Lincicome, 276.0. 2, Michelle Wie, 274.0. 3, Se Ri Pak, 273.0. 4, Yani Tseng, 272.0. 5, Ryann O’Toole, 271.0. 6, Maria Hjorth, 269.0. 7, Hee Young Park, 268.0. 8, Karen Stupples, 267.0. 9, Nicole Hage, 266.0. 10, 2 tied with 265.0. Greens in Regulation Pct. 1, Momoko Ueda, 76.40%. 2, Na Yeon Choi, 75.90%. 3, Suzann Pettersen, 75.50%. 4, Catriona Matthew, 75.00%. 5, Jiyai Shin, 74.70%. 6, Maria Hjorth, 74.50%. 7, Angela Stanford, 74.40%. 8, Shanshan Feng, 73.30%. 9, Paula Creamer, 73.00%. 10, 3 tied with 72.20%. Putting Average 1, Lee-Anne Pace, 0.718. 2, Jean Reynolds, 1.574. 3, Jennifer Song, 1.657. 4, Sophie Gustafson, 1.677. 5, Jessica Shepley, 1.680. 6, Nannette Hill, 1.686. 7, Jennifer Johnson, 1.692. 8, Sandra Gal, 1.699. 9, Juli Inkster, 1.712. 10, Cristie Kerr, 1.718. Sand Save Percentage 1 (tie), Jennifer Johnson and Michelle Ellis, 100.00%. 3 (tie), Stephanie Louden and Sarah Lee, 85.71%. 5 (tie), Momoko Ueda, Sun Young Yoo, Ryann O’Toole and Jennie Lee, 75.00%. 9 (tie), Stacy Lewis and Hee Kyung Seo, 72.73%.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Placed INF Cesar Izturis on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 13. Recalled INF Brandon Snyder from Norfolk (IL). BOSTON RED SOX—Placed RHP Daisuke Matsuzaka on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 17. Recalled RHP Michael Bowden from Pawtucket (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYAZLS—Selected the contract of RHP Danny Duffy from Omaha (PCL). Placed RHP Kyle Davies on the 15-day DL. SEATTLE MARINERS—Activated OF Franklin Gutierrez from the 15-day DL. Optioned RHP Tom Wilhelmsen to Jackson (SL). TEXAS RANGERS—Recalled C Taylor Teagarden from Round Rock (PCL). Optioned RHP Ryan Tucker to Round Rock. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Reinstated INF Willie Bloomquist from the 15-day DL. Selected the contract of INF Sean Burroughs from Reno (PCL). Designated RHP Armando Galarraga for assignment. Placed INF Melvin Mora on the bereavement list. NEW YORK METS—Placed 3B David Wright on the 15-day DL, retroactive to May 16. Selected the contract of INF Nick Evans from Buffalo (IL). ST. LOUIS CARDINALS—Placed INF Nick Punto on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Pete Kozma from Memphis (PCL). FOOTBALL National Football League MIAMI DOLPHINS—Named Matt Winston Southwest Region area scout. Promoted Adam Howe Northeast Region area scout. HOCKEY National Hockey League COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS—Announced the resignation of assistant coach Bob Boughner. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Signed D Zach Miskovic. COLLEGE BYU—Named Mark Pope men’s assistant basketball coach. DOMINICAN (CA)—Named Booker T. Harris men’s basketball coach. ELON—Named Eric Estes director of football operations. GEORGE WASHINGTON—Announced women’s basketball G Kye Allums is leaving the team. KANSAS STATE—Announced the resignation of men’s assistant basketball coach Dalonte Hill to take a similar position at Maryland. MARQUETTE—Named Stephen Brundage men’s assistant lacrosse coach. MISSISSIPPI STATE—Fired softball coach Jay Miller. OKLAHOMA STATE—Named Kevin Blake trainer. QUEENS (NY)—Named Chris Bonawandt men’s assistant soccer coach. RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE—Reinstated the women’s gymnastics program. RUTGERS—Announced junior men’s basketball F Wally Judge is transferring from Kansas State. SAINT FRANCIS (PA)—Announced the resignation of director of athletic communications Bob Volkert. THE CITADEL—Announced men’s tennis coach Toby Simpson will not return next season. WAKE FOREST—Promoted Walt Corbean to men’s assistant basketball coach. WINTHROP—Named Christena Hamilton women’s assistant basketball coach. WISCONSIN-EAU CLAIRE—Named Kyle Green men’s basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 1,788 1,976 51 6 The Dalles 1,415 1,599 14 1 John Day 1,992 1,648 18 1 McNary 2,964 1,901 7 1 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 154,079 32,414 4,507 1,713 The Dalles 111,204 23,127 1,347 735 John Day 88,930 19,240 2,696 1,728 McNary 75,940 10,225 2,550 1,572

HORSE RACING

Animal Kingdom is 2-1 favorite for Preakness By Beth Harris The Associated Press

BALTIMORE — Things are falling nicely into place for Kentucky Derby winner Animal Kingdom. He’s training in the Maryland countryside, he’s been made the early 2-1 favorite for the Preakness Stakes and he drew a decent post for Saturday’s race. “It’s great. I couldn’t be happier,” trainer Graham Motion said after his colt landed in the No. 11 post on Wednesday. A full field of 14 is set for the 1 3⁄16 -mile Preakness at Pimlico, located about 60 miles from Fair Hill Training Center, where Animal Kingdom will be until the morning of the race. It will be the first time since 2005 that 14 horses are set to run in the second leg of the Triple Crown series. That’s five fewer horses than ran

in the Derby, where the far outside post was a much bigger concern than it will be in the Preakness. “I would just rather be on the outside than stuck down on the inside. I was a little worried when 1 and 14 were still left,” Motion said. “It would not have been the end of the world, but I much prefer to be in the middle to the outside, where I am.” Just two winners since 1926 have come out of the No. 11 post, the last being Point Given trained by Bob Baffert in 2001. Seventy favorites have won in the previous 135 runnings, including 2009 champion Rachel Alexandra and Big Brown, who was the 1-5 favorite in 2008. “Now we’re a pretty solid favorite. It feels great,” said Barry Irwin, who represents the 20 people who own Animal Kingdom under the

partnership of Team Valor International. Velazquez is keeping his mount on Animal Kingdom after replacing injured Robby Albarado the day before the Derby. Albarado picked up a Preakness mount with King Congie. Dialed In, the beaten Derby favorite, is the 9-2 second choice of Pimlico oddsmaker Frank Carulli. The colt drew the No. 10 post Wednesday. Dialed In finished eighth in the Derby nearly two weeks ago. “I don’t think it matters with him because of his style of running,” trainer Nick Zito said about Dialed In’s post. “Would I want a 14? Probably not. But 10 will be fine.” If Dialed In wins the Preakness, he is eligible for a $5.5 million payday in addition to the $600,000 winner’s share. The majority of that would go to owner Robert LaPenta, while Zito would receive $500,000.

• Panthers win final regular-season baseball game: Conner Lau struck out seven and allowed just three hits to lead host Redmond past West Salem 21 in a Class 6A nonleague game Wednesday. Parker Vernon went two for three with a double at the plate to lead the Panther offense. With the score tied 1-1 in the bottom of the seventh inning, Dalton Hanks hit an RBI single to win the game. Redmond (16-11 overall) hosts a yet-to-be-determined opponent on Monday in the first round of the 6A state playoffs.

Baseball • Ducks continue winning streak: For the second straight day, Oregon shut out its opponent while the offense inflicted damage in a 9-0 victory over Gonzaga at PK Park in Eugene Wednesday. Making his second start in five days, Alex Keudell (6-3) pitched 7 1⁄3 shutout innings, scattering six hits and issuing just one walk while striking out four. Scott McGough tossed 1 2⁄3 innings to close out the game, fanning two. Freshman Aaron Jones led Oregon with a three-for-five performance as he drove in two runs. Fellow freshman Ryon Healy was two for four with two RBIs, a double and two runs scored, while sophomore Andrew Mendenhall was two for two at the plate. • Rangers’ Hamilton cleared to begin rehab games: Reigning AL MVP Josh Hamilton plans to be careful during his minor league rehab assignment, a scheduled five-game stint that could lead to him rejoining the Texas Rangers early next week. Hamilton was sent to Double-A Frisco to begin rehab Wednesday as a designated hitter. An examination earlier in the day by team physician Dr. Keith Meister showed “significant healing” in the broken bone in the slugger’s upper right arm. • Red Sox RHP Matsuzaka goes on disabled list: Red Sox right-hander Daisuke Matsuzaka could miss a month with a sprained ligament in his pitching elbow, marking the third straight season he’ll be out for quite a while. Matsuzaka was put on the 15-day disabled list Wednesday. Boston manager Terry Francona said it will be two weeks before Matsuzaka is examined again and that he won’t throw until then. The 30-year-old Matsuzaka was diagnosed with a sprained ulnar collateral ligament.

Football • NCAA tells DoJ playoff out of its hands: NCAA President Mark Emmert told the Justice Department Wednesday that its questions about the lack of a playoff system for college football are best directed to another group — the Bowl Championship Series. Other than licensing the postseason bowls, “the NCAA has no role to play in the BCS or the BCS system,” Emmert wrote in a letter to the department’s antitrust chief, Christine Varney. He added that short of member colleges and universities discontinuing the BCS and proposing an NCAA championship, “there is no directive for the (NCAA) to establish a playoff.”

Basketball • Timberwolves president ‘joking’ about fixed draft: Minnesota Timberwolves president David Kahn says his comments about the NBA draft lottery were intended as a joke, simply a tongue-in-cheek resignation that fate gave Cleveland the first pick ahead of luck-lacking Minnesota. After the Cavaliers beat out the T’wolves for the top spot Tuesday, Kahn said with a smirk to a group of reporters, “This league has a habit — and I am just going to say habit — of producing some pretty incredible story lines.” Kahn pointed to Washington sending the widow of longtime owner Abe Pollin last year and getting the first pick. Cleveland had owner Dan Gilbert’s 14-year-old son, who has battled disease since birth, on hand for good luck this time. There was no immediate word from the NBA on Wednesday about whether Kahn will be reprimanded or punished, despite his joking intent. • Moore first female hoopster to join Jordan’s brand: Top WNBA draft Maya Moore has become the first female basketball player to sign an endorsement deal with the Jordan Brand, a division of Nike Inc. The Oregon-based sportswear business in basketball great Michael Jordan’s name announced the agreement Wednesday. Moore was selected by the Minnesota Lynx out of the University of Connecticut last month. • Transgender player no longer playing for GW women: The openly transgender member of the George Washington women’s basketball team, whose groundbreaking season was cut short by a pair of concussions, says he won’t play in his senior year. The school announced that Kye Allums “has decided that it is in his best interest to no longer participate in intercollegiate athletics.” The statement offered no further details, although GW said Allums has enrolled in classes for the fall semester. Allums did not immediately respond to an e-mail request for an interview Wednesday.

Tennis • Jankovic beaten by Arvidsson in Brussels: Fourth-seeded Jelena Jankovic of Serbia was upset by Sofia Arvidsson of Sweden 3-6, 6-3, 6-3 at the Brussels Open on Wednesday. It was the latest setback on clay this spring for Jankovic, who failed to progress beyond the second round of three of the four tournaments she has played on the surface. Last week, she reached the quarterfinals in Rome for her best clay-court result this year. Jankovic reached the semifinals at the French Open three of the past four years.

Cycling • Thousands gather at Weylandt funeral: Some 2,000 fans, riders and cycling officials gathered Wednesday in Ghent, Belgium, for the funeral of Wouter Weylandt, the Belgian who died in a crash during the Giro d’Italia last week. Several of Weylandt’s Leopard-Trek teammates, including Fabian Cancellara and Frank Schleck, attended the ceremony at Saint Peter’s church in western Ghent. The 26year-old Weylandt crashed when his pedal clipped a wall during a sharp descent late in the third stage of the Giro. He died almost instantly from his injuries. • Gadret wins 11th stage, Contador retains Giro lead: Frenchman John Gadret used a late attack to win the 11th stage of the Giro d’Italia on Wednesday, while Alberto Contador retained the overall lead. Gadret attacked on the uphill finish with a few hundred meters to go and clocked 3 hours, 33 minutes, 11 seconds over the hilly 89-mile route from Tortoreto Lido to Castelfidardo. Joaquin Rodriguez of Spain crossed second and Italian champion Giovanni Visconti was third.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 D3

MA JOR L E A GUE B A SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES White Sox 1, Indians 0 Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf C.Santana 1b T.Buck lf O.Cabrera 2b Duncan dh Hannahan 3b Marson c a-LaPorta ph Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 2 1 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0

SO 3 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 8

Avg. .294 .287 .239 .227 .262 .280 .240 .239 .278 .265

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .242 Vizquel ss-3b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .348 A.Dunn dh 2 0 1 1 0 1 .202 Konerko 1b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .306 Quentin rf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .245 Pierzynski c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .254 McPherson 3b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .250 Al.Ramirez ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .263 Lillibridge cf 2 0 1 0 1 0 .297 Beckham 2b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .210 Totals 26 1 5 1 2 8 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Chicago 100 000 00x — 1 5 0 a-flied out for Marson in the 9th. LOB—Cleveland 2, Chicago 4. 2B—Pierre (3), A.Dunn (10), Lillibridge (1). RBIs—A.Dunn (17). SB—Choo (7). CS—Choo (2), Vizquel (2), Lillibridge (3). SF—A.Dunn. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 1 (T.Buck); Chicago 3 (Quentin 2, Pierre). Runners moved up—McPherson, Beckham. DP—Cleveland 2 (Marson, Marson, Hannahan), (Marson, Marson, Hannahan). Cleveland IP H R ER Mstersn L, 5-2 8 5 1 1 Chicago IP H R ER Peavy W, 1-0 9 3 0 0 T—2:01. A—18,580 (40,615).

BB 2 BB 0

SO 8 SO 8

NP 115 NP 111

ERA 2.52 ERA 2.40

Rays 6, Blue Jays 5 Tampa Bay Fuld lf Zobrist 2b Damon dh Longoria 3b Joyce rf B.Upton cf Kotchman 1b E.Johnson ss Jaso c Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 3 4 5 3 3 34

R 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 6

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 1 9 6 5

SO 1 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 1 7

Avg. .233 .282 .266 .246 .365 .253 .330 .283 .217

Toronto AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Y.Escobar ss 4 0 0 1 1 1 .287 C.Patterson lf 5 2 2 0 0 2 .281 Bautista rf 2 0 1 0 2 0 .372 A.Hill 2b 4 1 1 2 0 1 .238 Encarnacion 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .244 Arencibia c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .225 E.Thames dh 3 1 1 1 1 2 .333 R.Davis cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .245 J.Nix 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Totals 33 5 6 4 5 9 Tampa Bay 033 000 000 — 6 9 1 Toronto 000 112 001 — 5 6 5 E—Zobrist (2), Encarnacion 2 (10), Bautista (2), Litsch 2 (2). LOB—Tampa Bay 10, Toronto 6. 2B—Longoria (7), C.Patterson (10), A.Hill (7), R.Davis (3). 3B—E.Johnson (1), C.Patterson (3). HR—Joyce (7), off Litsch. RBIs— Fuld (16), Joyce 2 (21), E.Johnson 3 (7), Y.Escobar (13), A.Hill 2 (16), E.Thames (1). SB—Damon (6), A.Hill (7), R.Davis (12). S—Fuld. SF—E.Johnson. Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 6 (Damon, Fuld, Joyce, Jaso, Kotchman 2); Toronto 3 (Arencibia, R.Davis, A.Hill). Runners moved up—Kotchman, Y.Escobar. GIDP— Zobrist, J.Nix. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (E.Johnson, Kotchman); Toronto 2 (J.Nix, A.Hill), (A.Hill, Y.Escobar, Encarnacion). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hllcksn W, 5-2 5 2-3 5 4 3 3 6 89 3.18 J.Cruz H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 12 2.70 C.Ramos H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 4.05 Jo.Peralta H, 7 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 13 2.82 Frnswth S, 9-10 1 1 1 1 0 1 12 1.76 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Litsch L, 4-3 5 7 6 5 3 1 111 4.66 Villanueva 2 1 0 0 0 4 25 1.48 Janssen 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 1.53 Frasor 1 1 0 0 2 1 30 1.53 Inherited runners-scored—J.Cruz 2-0, C.Ramos 1-0, Jo.Peralta 2-0. IBB—off C.Ramos (Bautista), off Frasor (Joyce). HBP—by Litsch (B.Upton, Longoria). WP—Litsch. T—3:18. A—14,415 (49,260).

Red Sox 1, Tigers 0 Detroit A.Jackson cf S.Sizemore 2b Boesch rf Mi.Cabrera 1b V.Martinez dh 1-Dirks pr Jh.Peralta ss Avila c Raburn lf Inge 3b Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 4 0 3 4 4 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 5 0 1 10

Avg. .232 .244 .275 .306 .314 .500 .299 .276 .206 .200

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Ellsbury cf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .297 Pedroia 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .245 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .322 Youkilis 3b 2 0 1 0 1 0 .258 Ortiz dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .281 Lowrie ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .320 Cameron rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .163 Crawford lf 2 1 0 0 1 2 .205 Saltalamacchia c 3 0 1 1 0 1 .221 Totals 26 1 4 1 2 4 Detroit 000 000 000 — 0 5 1 Boston 000 000 01x — 1 4 0 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 9th. E—Jh.Peralta (2). LOB—Detroit 8, Boston 4. 2B—A.Jackson (8), Mi.Cabrera (12), V.Martinez (10), Avila (9), Saltalamacchia (6). RBIs—Saltalamacchia (10). S—S.Sizemore. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 6 (V.Martinez, Inge, Mi.Cabrera, A.Jackson 2, Raburn); Boston 1 (Pedroia). Runners moved up—Jh.Peralta. GIDP—Ad.Gonzalez 2. DP—Detroit 3 (S.Sizemore, Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera), (Mi.Cabrera), (Coke, Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Coke 7 3 0 0 1 4 78 3.88 Perry 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 7.27 Schlereth L, 0-1 0 1 1 1 1 0 14 3.21 Alburquerque 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.38 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Buchholz 7 4 0 0 1 7 127 3.42 Bard W, 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 2.86 Papelbon S, 8-9 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 2.55 Schlereth pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Alburquerque 2-0. HBP— by Schlereth (Ellsbury), by C.Buchholz (Jh.Peralta, Inge). T—3:02 (Rain delay: 0:26). A—37,311 (37,493).

Yankees 4, Orioles 1 (15 innings) New York AB R H Jeter dh-ss 7 0 2 Granderson cf 6 0 1 Teixeira 1b 6 1 2 Al.Rodriguez 3b 7 2 4 Cano 2b 6 1 2 Swisher rf 2 0 0 Dickerson rf 2 0 1 3-A.J.Burnett pr 0 0 0 Noesi p 0 0 0 An.Jones lf 2 0 0 1-Gardner pr-lf 2 0 0 E.Nunez ss-rf 6 0 1 Cervelli c 3 0 0 a-Martin ph-c 4 0 2 Totals 53 4 15 Baltimore Pie lf Ad.Jones cf Markakis rf Guerrero dh 2-B.Snyder pr-dh Scott 1b Wieters c Hardy ss Mar.Reynolds 3b Andino 2b

AB 7 5 6 5 0 7 7 6 5 5

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

BI 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 5

SO 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 12

Avg. .255 .266 .257 .266 .287 .215 .400 ----.209 .261 .276 .188 .261

H BI BB 2 0 0 2 0 1 2 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1

SO 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 3 2 2

Avg. .260 .287 .248 .298 --.227 .273 .265 .184 .267

Totals 53 1 12 1 6 12 NY 000 100 000 000 003 — 4 15 1 Balt. 000 000 001 000 000 — 1 12 2 a-singled for Cervelli in the 10th. 1-ran for An.Jones in the 7th. 2-ran for Guerrero in the 13th. 3-ran for Dickerson in the 15th. E—Cervelli (2), Andino (5), Ad.Jones (2). LOB— New York 14, Baltimore 15. 2B—Cano (8), Scott (6). RBIs—Cano 2 (27), Swisher (15), Gardner (10), Guerrero (16). SB—E.Nunez (5), Martin (3), Mar.Reynolds (2). S—Gardner, E.Nunez, Ad.Jones. SF—Swisher, Gardner, Guerrero. Runners left in scoring position—New York 7 (E.Nunez, Jeter 3, Gardner 2, Granderson); Baltimore 9 (Hardy 2, Scott, Andino, Wieters 2, Markakis 2, Mar. Reynolds). Runners moved up—Jeter, Cano 2, Markakis, Guerrero, Wieters. GIDP—Al.Rodriguez. DP—New York 1 (Colon, Teixeira); Baltimore 2 (Scott, Scott, Hardy, Andino), (Mar.Reynolds, Andino, Scott). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Colon 8 3 0 0 1 7 87 3.16 Ma.Rivera 1 2 1 1 0 0 9 1.80 Ayala 1 1-3 3 0 0 1 0 25 1.86 Logan 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 3.75 Noesi W, 1-0 4 4 0 0 4 4 66 0.00 Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Britton 7 6 1 0 3 4 102 2.14 Rapada 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 9.95 Berken 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 7 5.06 Gregg 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.31 Uehara 1 1 0 0 0 3 17 2.50 Ji.Johnson 2 2 0 0 0 1 28 3.75 Accardo L, 2-1 2 5 2 2 1 2 55 5.21 M.Gonzalez 0 1 1 0 0 0 4 8.53 Guthrie 1 0 0 0 0 0 7 3.91 Accardo pitched to 2 batters in the 15th. M.Gonzalez pitched to 2 batters in the 15th. Inherited runners-scored—Logan 3-0, M.Gonzalez 2-2, Guthrie 2-1. IBB—off Ayala (Markakis), off Noesi (Hardy), off Accardo (Cano). HBP—by M.Gonzalez (Dickerson). WP—Britton. T—4:56. A—20,589 (45,438).

Rangers 5, Royals 4 (11 innings) Texas AB R En.Chavez rf 3 2 A.Blanco ss 4 0 a-Andrus ph-ss 1 0 Kinsler 2b 3 1 Mi.Young 1b 2 0 C.Davis 1b 0 0 A.Beltre 3b 6 0 Moreland dh 4 0 Napoli c 4 0 Dav.Murphy lf 5 0 Gentry cf 3 2 Totals 35 5

H BI BB 2 0 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 3 0 0 1 2 3 0 1 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 8 4 13

SO 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 8

Avg. .333 .267 .274 .239 .339 .233 .255 .286 .195 .246 .143

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gordon lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .277 Me.Cabrera cf-rf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .267 Hosmer 1b 5 1 1 1 0 2 .262 Francoeur rf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .285 1-Dyson pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Butler dh 3 0 0 0 1 0 .279 2-Aviles pr-dh 1 0 0 0 0 0 .233 Betemit 3b 4 2 2 0 1 1 .316 Treanor c 2 1 0 0 1 1 .237 b-Maier ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .357 B.Pena c 1 0 1 1 0 0 .203 Getz 2b 4 0 2 1 0 1 .218 A.Escobar ss 3 0 2 1 0 0 .228 Totals 37 4 9 4 5 9 Texas 001 100 001 02 — 5 8 0 KC 020 000 001 01 — 4 9 0 a-singled for A.Blanco in the 9th. b-singled for Treanor in the 10th. 1-ran for Francoeur in the 9th. 2-ran for Butler in the 9th. LOB—Texas 13, Kansas City 7. HR—Hosmer (3), off Feliz. RBIs—Andrus (16), A.Beltre 3 (37), Hosmer (7), B.Pena (7), Getz (11), A.Escobar (11). SB—En.Chavez (2), Kinsler (8), Napoli (1), Gentry 2 (4). CS—Betemit (1). S—En.Chavez, Andrus, Kinsler, Getz, A.Escobar. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 8 (A.Beltre, Gentry 2, Moreland 2, A.Blanco, Napoli, Mi.Young); Kansas City 4 (Gordon, Me.Cabrera, Hosmer 2). Runners moved up—Kinsler, Gordon. GIDP—Kinsler, A.Beltre, Moreland. DP—Kansas City 3 (A.Escobar, Getz, Hosmer), (Betemit, Getz, Hosmer), (Getz, A.Escobar, Hosmer). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ogando 7 4 2 2 1 5 116 2.13 Oliver 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 2.50 Feliz BS, 1-9 1 1-3 3 1 1 2 1 26 1.32 Rhodes W, 2-2 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 9 3.97 M.Lowe S, 1-2 1 1 1 1 1 2 22 5.87 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duffy 4 4 2 2 6 4 94 4.50 L.Coleman 1 0 0 0 2 0 16 1.50 Collins 2 0 0 0 0 2 30 2.96 Crow 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 0.84 Soria 1 1 1 1 1 0 19 4.32 Bl.Wood 1 1 0 0 1 1 22 3.12 Jeffress L, 1-1 1-3 1 2 2 3 0 23 4.70 Teaford 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 4.50 Duffy pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—Rhodes 2-0, L.Coleman 1-0, Teaford 2-0. IBB—off L.Coleman (Moreland). WP—Duffy. PB—Treanor. T—3:53. A—13,789 (37,903).

Twins 4, Athletics 3 (10 innings) Minnesota Span cf Plouffe ss Kubel dh Morneau 1b Cuddyer rf Valencia 3b Revere lf Butera c b-D.Young ph R.Rivera c A.Casilla 2b Totals

AB 5 4 5 4 4 4 4 3 1 0 4 38

R H 1 2 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 4 10

BI 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .280 .300 .318 .231 .253 .212 .179 .104 .203 .067 .194

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. DeJesus rf 5 0 0 0 0 0 .232 Barton 1b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .215 Willingham lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .230 Matsui dh 4 0 2 1 0 0 .241 K.Suzuki c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .259 Sweeney cf 3 1 2 0 1 0 .333 M.Ellis 2b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .204 Kouzmanoff 3b 3 0 1 2 0 1 .216 a-C.Jackson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .276 An.LaRoche 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Pennington ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .233 Totals 37 3 8 3 1 5 Minnesota 102 000 000 1 — 4 10 1 Oakland 020 001 000 0 — 3 8 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Kouzmanoff in the 9th. b-singled for Butera in the 10th. E—Plouffe (1), Barton (6). LOB—Minnesota 5, Oakland 5. 2B—Span (5), Kubel (11), Barton (11), K.Suzuki (6). RBIs—Plouffe 3 (5), Morneau (11), Matsui (16), Kouzmanoff 2 (15). SF—Plouffe. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 2 (Kubel 2); Oakland 1 (C.Jackson). Runners moved up—Willingham. GIDP—Kubel, Morneau, K.Suzuki. DP—Minnesota 2 (Valencia, A.Casilla, Morneau), (Cuddyer, Morneau); Oakland 2 (Barton, Pennington), (M.Ellis, Pennington, Barton). Minnesota IP H R ER Pavano 7 6 3 1 Perkins 1 1-3 1 0 0 Nathan W, 1-1 2-3 1 0 0 Capps S, 7-9 1 0 0 0 Oakland IP H R ER McCarthy 7 9 3 3 Balfour 1 0 0 0 Wuertz 1 0 0 0 Fuentes L, 1-4 1 1 1 0 IBB—off Nathan (Sweeney). T—2:38. A—15,355 (35,067).

BB 0 0 1 0 BB 0 0 0 0

SO 2 2 1 0 SO 1 2 0 0

NP 95 16 18 14 NP 91 12 12 12

ERA 5.30 0.82 7.07 3.54 ERA 3.39 1.37 0.84 3.98

Mariners 3, Angels 0 Los Angeles Aybar ss Abreu dh M.Izturis 2b Tor.Hunter rf H.Kendrick lf Callaspo 3b Trumbo 1b Mathis c a-Conger ph-c Bourjos cf b-Amarista ph Totals

AB 3 4 3 3 3 4 3 3 1 3 1 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Seattle I.Suzuki rf

AB R 3 1

H BI BB SO 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 5 0 5 10

Avg. .320 .258 .322 .223 .312 .307 .246 .193 .270 .252 .176

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 0 1 1 .303

DP—Washington 1 (Morse, W.Ramos, Espinosa).

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Tampa Bay New York Boston Toronto Baltimore Central Division Cleveland Detroit Kansas City Chicago Minnesota West Division Texas Oakland Los Angeles Seattle

W 25 22 22 21 19 W 26 22 20 19 14 W 23 22 22 18

L 18 19 20 21 22 L 14 20 22 25 27 L 20 21 22 24

Pct .581 .537 .524 .500 .463 Pct .650 .524 .476 .432 .341 Pct .535 .512 .500 .429

GB — 2 2½ 3½ 5 GB — 5 7 9 12½ GB — 1 1½ 4½

Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Yankees 4, Baltimore 1, 15 innings Tampa Bay 6, Toronto 5 Boston 1, Detroit 0 Chicago White Sox 1, Cleveland 0 Texas 5, Kansas City 4, 11 innings Minnesota 4, Oakland 3, 10 innings Seattle 3, L.A. Angels 0

NATIONAL LEAGUE WCGB — — ½ 1½ 3 WCGB — ½ 2½ 4½ 8 WCGB — 1 1½ 4½

L10 6-4 4-6 8-2 6-4 5-5 L10 5-5 7-3 3-7 7-3 2-8 L10 6-4 5-5 3-7 3-7

Str W-1 W-2 W-5 L-1 L-2 Str L-1 L-2 L-5 W-2 W-2 Str W-1 L-1 L-4 W-1

Home 11-13 13-11 13-9 9-9 10-12 Home 15-4 11-8 15-11 7-12 4-11 Home 15-9 11-11 9-10 10-12

Away 14-5 9-8 9-11 12-12 9-10 Away 11-10 11-12 5-11 12-13 10-16 Away 8-11 11-10 13-12 8-12

Today’s Games Minnesota (Blackburn 2-4) at Oakland (T.Ross 3-2), 12:35 p.m. L.A. Angels (Haren 4-2) at Seattle (Fister 2-4), 12:40 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (Sabathia 3-3) at Baltimore (Guthrie 1-6), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (W.Davis 4-3) at Toronto (R.Romero 3-4), 4:07 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 4-3) at Boston (Beckett 3-1), 4:10 p.m. Cleveland (Carmona 3-3) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 4-3), 5:10 p.m. Texas (Holland 3-1) at Kansas City (Hochevar 3-4), 5:10 p.m.

East Division Philadelphia Florida Atlanta New York Washington Central Division Cincinnati St. Louis Milwaukee Pittsburgh Chicago Houston West Division San Francisco Colorado Los Angeles Arizona San Diego

W 26 24 25 20 20 W 25 25 21 19 18 15 W 23 22 20 19 18

L 16 17 20 22 22 L 18 19 22 23 23 28 L 19 19 24 23 25

Pct .619 .585 .556 .476 .476 Pct .581 .568 .488 .452 .439 .349 Pct .548 .537 .455 .452 .419

GB — 1½ 2½ 6 6 GB — ½ 4 5½ 6 10 GB — ½ 4 4 5½

Wednesday’s Games Philadelphia 2, Colorado 1 Chicago Cubs 7, Florida 5 Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 0 N.Y. Mets 3, Washington 0 St. Louis 5, Houston 1 Arizona 5, Atlanta 4, 11 innings Milwaukee 5, San Diego 2 San Francisco 8, L.A. Dodgers 5

WCGB — — 1 4½ 4½ WCGB — ½ 4 5½ 6 10 WCGB — 2 5½ 5½ 7

L10 4-6 5-5 6-4 6-4 5-5 L10 8-2 6-4 7-3 4-6 4-6 2-8 L10 7-3 4-6 5-5 4-6 5-5

Str W-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str L-1 W-3 W-1 W-1 W-1 L-4 Str W-1 L-1 L-1 W-2 L-2

Home 14-7 12-10 14-10 9-12 11-9 Home 15-10 13-9 13-6 7-11 9-13 9-13 Home 10-5 11-10 11-13 12-10 7-15

Away 12-9 12-7 11-10 11-10 9-13 Away 10-8 12-10 8-16 12-12 9-10 6-15 Away 13-14 11-9 9-11 7-13 11-10

Today’s Games Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 2-3) at Cincinnati (Cueto 2-0), 9:35 a.m. Washington (L.Hernandez 3-5) at N.Y. Mets (Gee 2-0), 10:10 a.m. Houston (Happ 3-4) at St. Louis (McClellan 5-1), 10:45 a.m. Colorado (Chacin 4-2) at Philadelphia (Blanton 1-2), 4:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (C.Coleman 1-3) at Florida (Volstad 2-2), 4:10 p.m. Atlanta (Jurrjens 5-0) at Arizona (Collmenter 2-0), 6:40 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 2-3) at San Diego (Harang 5-2), 7:05 p.m. San Francisco (Bumgarner 0-6) at L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 2-3), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Red Sox 1, Tigers 0: BOSTON — Jarrod Saltalamacchia doubled off the wall in left in the eighth inning, scoring Carl Crawford from first to send Boston to its fifth straight victory, over Detroit. Boston’s Clay Buchholz and Detroit’s Phil Coke each pitched seven shutout innings. • White Sox 1, Indians 0: CHICAGO — Jake Peavy pitched a three-hitter in his home debut this season, outdueling Justin Masterson and making Adam Dunn’s sacrifice fly in the first inning stand up in the Chicago White Sox’s victory over Cleveland. Peavy (1-0) struck out eight to cool off a Cleveland lineup that scored 31 runs in its three previous games. • Rays 6, Blue Jays 5: TORONTO — Matt Joyce homered, and Elliot Johnson had three RBIs to help Tampa Bay snap Toronto’s winning streak at six games. Rays rookie right-hander Jeremy Hellickson (5-2) won his fourth straight start, allowing four runs, three earned, and five hits in 5 2⁄3 innings. • Yankees 4, Orioles 1: BALTIMORE — Robinson Cano doubled in two runs in the 15th inning, and the New York Yankees beat Baltimore after Mariano Rivera blew a one-run lead in the ninth. After Mike Gonzalez gave up Cano’s double, he struck Chris Dickerson in the head with a fastball. Gonzalez was immediately ejected, and Dickerson remained motionless on the ground for several minutes. After being helped to his feet, Dickerson walked to first base before leaving the game. • Rangers 5, Royals 4: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Adrian Beltre hit a two-run single off Jeremy Jeffress in the 11th inning, lifting Texas past rookieladen Kansas City. Jeffress (1-1) walked the bases full with one out in the ninth, running Kansas City’s walk total for the night to 13. Beltre, who also had an RBI fielder’s choice in the third, delivered a solid single into center, allowing Endy Chavez to score easily and Ian Kinsler to score on a close play at the plate. • Mariners 3, Angels 0: SEATTLE — Jason Vargas went seven innings for Seattle to run his scoreless streak to 16 innings, denying Jered Weaver another chance at becoming the first pitcher in the majors to reach seven wins. Vargas (3-2) allowed four singles in seven innings. Jack Cust had two RBI singles, and Justin Smoak added an RBI double. • Twins 4, Athletics 3: OAKLAND, Calif. — Trevor Plouffe hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning for his season-high third RBI, and Minnesota beat Oakland for its second straight victory following a ninegame losing streak. Pinch-hitter Delmon Young singled to open the inning and advanced to third when Daric Barton threw Alexi Casilla’s bunt into the outfield.

• Mets 3, Nationals 0: NEW YORK — Jonathon Niese pitched seven sharp innings, some of them in heavy rain, and Justin Turner added to his surprising tear with a two-run double that sent the New York Mets to a victory over light-hitting Washington. With maybe a few thousand hardy souls in the stands on another wet night at Citi Field, the Mets’ depleted lineup scratched out enough offense to help Niese (3-4) win his second consecutive start. • Phillies 2, Rockies 1: PHILADELPHIA — Cole Hamels threw eight impressive innings, Jimmy Rollins drove in the go-ahead run with a sacrifice fly and Philadelphia beat Colorado to snap a four-game losing streak. Hamels (5-2) allowed one run and five hits, striking out eight for his first career win against the Rockies. • Pirates 5, Reds 0: CINCINNATI — Charlie Morton shut down Cincinnati’s powerful lineup again, throwing a five-hitter for his second career shutout, and Pedro Alvarez hit a three-run homer, leading Pittsburgh to a victory that snapped its sixgame losing streak. • Cubs 7, Marlins 5: MIAMI — Marlon Byrd hit a tiebreaking solo homer in the eighth inning, and the Chicago Cubs beat Florida to end a three-game losing streak. Reed Johnson hit his third career pinch-hit home run for the Cubs to make the score 5-all in the sixth. They took the lead on Byrd’s second homer against Edward Mujica (4-2) leading off the eighth. • Cardinals 5, Astros 1: ST. LOUIS — Kyle Lohse threw eight dominant innings to beat Houston for the second time in less than a month, leading St. Louis to its third straight victory. Lohse (5-2) allowed a run on six hits in eight innings, his fourth outing of eight or more innings, and has a 2.17 ERA. • Diamondbacks 5, Braves 4: PHOENIX — Ryan Roberts scored from third base on Justin Upton’s grounder with a drawn-in infield to give Arizona a win in 11 innings over Atlanta. Roberts beat second baseman Dan Uggla’s throw home on the play, the second display of hustle Roberts put forth on a night when it made a big difference. • Brewers 5, Padres 2: SAN DIEGO — Yovani Gallardo struck out nine to win his third straight start and Mark Kotsay had three hits and two RBIs as Milwaukee, the NL’s worst road team, beat San Diego. Even with the win, the Brewers are only 8-16 on the road. The Padres dropped to 7-15 at Petco Park, the NL’s worst home mark. • Giants 8, Dodgers 5: LOS ANGELES — Cody Ross hit a tiebreaking three-run homer in the ninth inning, and San Francisco rebounded from the Dodgers’ three-run rally in the eighth for a victory over Los Angeles.

Figgins 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .224 Smoak 1b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .276 Cust dh 4 0 2 2 0 1 .225 F.Gutierrez cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .000 A.Kennedy 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .266 Olivo c 2 0 0 0 2 2 .203 Peguero lf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .143 L.Rodriguez ss 3 0 1 0 0 0 .182 Totals 32 3 8 3 3 5 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 5 2 Seattle 102 000 00x — 3 8 1 a-struck out for Mathis in the 8th. b-grounded out for Bourjos in the 9th. E—Aybar (2), Trumbo (2), Vargas (1). LOB—Los Angeles 11, Seattle 8. 2B—Figgins (8), Smoak (11). RBIs—Smoak (26), Cust 2 (14). SB—Trumbo (3), A.Kennedy 2 (3). S—Abreu. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (H.Kendrick, Bourjos, Conger 2); Seattle 5 (F.Gutierrez, A.Kennedy, Figgins, L.Rodriguez, Peguero). Runners moved up—Tor.Hunter, Figgins, Peguero. GIDP—Abreu, Smoak, F.Gutierrez. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Aybar, M.Izturis, Trumbo), (Aybar, M.Izturis, Trumbo); Seattle 1 (A.Kennedy, L.Rodriguez, Smoak). Los Angeles IP H R ER Weaver L, 6-4 6 7 3 3 Takahashi 2 1 0 0 Seattle IP H R ER Vargas W, 3-2 7 4 0 0 J.Wright H, 9 1 1 0 0 Lgue S, 10-13 1 0 0 0 IBB—off Takahashi (Olivo). (H.Kendrick). WP—Weaver. T—2:50. A—16,992 (47,878).

BB SO NP ERA 1 4 115 2.45 2 1 29 4.82 BB SO NP ERA 2 9 115 3.39 2 1 30 1.80 1 0 11 6.50 HBP—by Vargas

NL BOXSCORES Phillies 2, Rockies 1 Colorado Fowler cf Amezaga 2b b-S.Smith ph C.Gonzalez lf Tulowitzki ss Helton 1b Jo.Lopez 3b c-Giambi ph Spilborghs rf Iannetta c De La Rosa p Totals

AB 4 2 1 4 4 3 3 1 3 3 2 30

R 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 6 1 2 11

Avg. .247 .278 .286 .242 .248 .323 .184 .115 .235 .232 .238

Philadelphia Rollins ss M.Martinez cf Polanco 3b Howard 1b

AB 3 3 3 3

R 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Avg. .271 .219 .331 .247

SO 0 1 0 0

Mayberry rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .255 Ibanez lf 3 1 1 0 0 1 .225 Ruiz c 2 0 1 0 0 1 .216 W.Valdez 2b 3 1 2 1 0 0 .247 Hamels p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .238 a-Victorino ph 0 0 0 0 0 0 .284 Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 25 2 5 2 0 4 Colorado 000 000 100 — 1 6 0 Philadelphia 000 010 01x — 2 5 0 a-sacrificed for Hamels in the 8th. b-doubled for Amezaga in the 9th. c-struck out for Jo.Lopez in the 9th. LOB—Colorado 5, Philadelphia 3. 2B—S.Smith (12), C.Gonzalez (6), Helton (10). RBIs—Helton (20), Rollins (12), W.Valdez (9). SB—Rollins (9). CS—Spilborghs (2). S—De La Rosa, M.Martinez, Victorino. SF—Rollins. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 3 (Jo. Lopez, Fowler, Giambi); Philadelphia 3 (Rollins, Hamels, Howard). Runners moved up—W.Valdez. GIDP—Hamels. DP—Colorado 1 (Tulowitzki, Helton). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP DLRosa L, 5-2 8 5 2 1 0 4 96 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP Hamels W, 5-2 8 5 1 1 1 8 107 Madson S, 7-7 1 1 0 0 1 3 24 IBB—off Madson (Helton). HBP—by De La (Ruiz). WP—De La Rosa. PB—Iannetta. T—2:27. A—44,665 (43,651).

ERA 3.34 ERA 2.92 0.53 Rosa

Pirates 5, Reds 0 Pittsburgh AB R A.McCutchen cf 5 1 Tabata lf 3 0 G.Jones rf 4 0 Walker 2b 3 1 Overbay 1b 4 1 Alvarez 3b 4 1 C.Snyder c 4 0 Cedeno ss 4 1 Morton p 3 0 Totals 34 5

H BI BB 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 2

SO 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 3 6

Avg. .241 .227 .250 .279 .237 .211 .258 .252 .056

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Stubbs cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .278 Janish ss 3 0 0 0 1 1 .242 Votto 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .340 B.Phillips 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .327 Rolen 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .277 F.Lewis rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .292 J.Gomes lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .183 LeCure p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Hanigan c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .259 Arroyo p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .235 Heisey lf 1 0 1 0 0 0 .271 Totals 31 0 5 0 2 5 Pittsburgh 000 300 200 — 5 8 0 Cincinnati 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 LOB—Pittsburgh 5, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Overbay (8),

Cedeno (6), B.Phillips (9). HR—Alvarez (2), off Arroyo; A.McCutchen (8), off Arroyo. RBIs—A.McCutchen 2 (23), Alvarez 3 (10). S—Morton. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 2 (Overbay, C.Snyder); Cincinnati 4 (Rolen 2, J.Gomes, Votto). Runners moved up—Alvarez. GIDP—B.Phillips. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Alvarez, Walker, Overbay). Pittsburgh IP H R ER Morton W, 5-1 9 5 0 0 Cincinnati IP H R ER Arroyo L, 3-4 7 7 5 5 LeCure 2 1 0 0 T—2:17. A—16,543 (42,319).

BB 2 BB 2 0

SO 5 SO 4 2

NP 106 NP 107 23

ERA 2.62 ERA 4.11 3.23

SO 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .293 .218 .238 .269 .177 .258 .199 .229 .000 --.143 ----.306

Mets 3, Nationals 0 Washington Bernadina cf Desmond ss Werth rf W.Ramos c Ad.LaRoche 1b Morse lf Espinosa 2b Hairston Jr. 3b Gorzelanny p H.Rodriguez p a-Bixler ph Coffey p Slaten p c-L.Nix ph Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 3 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 0 2

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 4 2 3 0 1 0 .322 Turner 3b 4 0 2 2 1 0 .333 Beltran rf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .285 Bay lf 2 0 0 1 1 1 .213 Dan.Murphy 1b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .239 R.Paulino c 3 0 0 0 1 3 .313 Hairston cf 3 1 2 0 0 1 .229 Pridie cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .242 R.Tejada 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .333 Niese p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .118 Isringhausen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Evans ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 --Fr.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 31 3 9 3 6 9 Washington 000 000 000 — 0 8 1 New York 100 002 00x — 3 9 0 a-singled for H.Rodriguez in the 7th. b-walked for Isringhausen in the 8th. c-flied out for Slaten in the 9th. E—Gorzelanny (1). LOB—Washington 10, New York 11. 2B—Morse (3), Espinosa (5), Turner 2 (5), Hairston (2). RBIs—Turner 2 (12), Bay (7). SB—Desmond (14). S—Espinosa. SF—Bay. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 6 (Ad. LaRoche 2, Gorzelanny, Bernadina 3); New York 6 (Niese, Dan.Murphy, Jos.Reyes, R.Paulino, Beltran, Turner). Runners moved up—W.Ramos, R.Tejada.

Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Grzlnny L, 2-3 5 2-3 8 3 3 5 7 116 3.56 H.Rodriguez 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 1.50 Coffey 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.30 Slaten 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 1.74 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese W, 3-4 7 6 0 0 1 7 112 4.39 Isringhsn H, 10 1 1 0 0 0 1 17 1.93 Rdrgz S, 13-14 1 1 0 0 1 0 18 0.83 Inherited runners-scored—H.Rodriguez 1-0. IBB—off Gorzelanny (Bay, Jos.Reyes). T—2:51. A—24,527 (41,800).

Cubs 7, Marlins 5 Chicago Fukudome rf Barney 2b S.Castro ss Ar.Ramirez 3b C.Pena 1b Byrd cf A.Soriano lf 1-Campana pr-lf K.Hill c Dempster p a-Re.Johnson ph Samardzija p c-DeWitt ph d-Je.Baker ph Marshall p Marmol p Totals

AB 4 4 5 5 4 4 4 0 3 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 36

R H 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 3 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 13

BI 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 6

BB 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .330 .333 .329 .290 .232 .307 .259 1.000 .242 .067 .400 .000 .265 .347 -----

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Coghlan cf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .245 H.Ramirez ss 5 2 2 1 0 1 .211 Morrison lf 4 0 1 0 1 1 .307 G.Sanchez 1b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .325 Dobbs 3b 5 1 2 2 0 2 .341 Stanton rf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .262 J.Buck c 4 0 1 0 0 0 .221 Infante 2b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .239 Nolasco p 0 1 0 0 1 0 .067 b-Cousins ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --e-Helms ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .216 Badenhop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 36 5 10 5 5 8 Chicago 001 022 020 — 7 13 0 Florida 100 040 000 — 5 10 2 a-homered for Dempster in the 6th. b-struck out for Nolasco in the 6th. c-was announced for Samardzija in the 8th. d-reached on a failed fielder’s choice for DeWitt in the 8th. e-walked for M.Dunn in the 8th. 1-ran for A.Soriano in the 8th. E—Dobbs (1), Morrison (3). LOB—Chicago 7, Florida 10. 2B—K.Hill (2), Morrison (7), Dobbs (7). HR—Re.Johnson (2), off Nolasco; Byrd (2), off Mujica; H.Ramirez (3), off Dempster. RBIs—Barney 2 (21), Byrd (9), Re.Johnson 2 (10), Je.Baker (12), H.Ramirez (15), G.Sanchez (26), Dobbs 2 (16), Stanton (20). SB—Campana (1), Coghlan (4), H.Ramirez (9), Infante (3). CS— Fukudome (1). S—K.Hill, Dempster. SF—Barney. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 4 (S.Castro, A.Soriano, C.Pena 2); Florida 5 (Morrison 3, Infante, Stanton). Runners moved up—Barney, Morrison. GIDP— C.Pena, A.Soriano, J.Buck. DP—Chicago 1 (S.Castro, Barney, C.Pena); Florida 2 (H.Ramirez, Infante, G.Sanchez), (Infante, H.Ramirez, G.Sanchez). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dempster 5 8 5 5 2 3 90 6.91 Smrdzja W, 3-0 2 1 0 0 2 3 40 2.96 Marshall H, 9 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 20 1.53 Marmol S, 9-11 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 21 1.42 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nolasco 6 9 5 4 2 5 102 3.32 Mujica L, 4-2 1 1-3 4 2 2 0 0 18 3.74 M.Dunn 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 12 1.89 Badenhop 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 1.69 Inherited runners-scored—Marmol 1-0, M.Dunn 1-1. HBP—by Dempster (Nolasco). T—3:21. A—14,422 (38,560).

Cardinals 5, Astros 1 Houston AB R Bourn cf 4 0 Ang.Sanchez 2b 4 0 Pence rf 4 0 Ca.Lee lf 4 1 Wallace 1b 4 0 C.Johnson 3b 2 0 Barmes ss 3 0 Quintero c 3 0 Norris p 2 0 Escalona p 0 0 Del Rosario p 0 0 b-Bogusevic ph 1 0 J.Valdez p 0 0 Totals 31 1

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 1

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .267 .260 .280 .244 .312 .212 .196 .245 .125 ----.333 ---

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Theriot ss 4 1 2 0 0 0 .304 Jay cf 4 1 2 2 0 1 .322 Pujols 1b 4 0 1 1 0 0 .269 Holliday lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .357 M.Hamilton lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Greene 2b-rf 1 1 0 0 0 0 .232 Berkman rf 1 0 0 0 1 0 .349 a-Kozma ph-2b 1 0 1 1 1 0 1.000 Craig 2b-lf 3 0 0 1 1 2 .255 Y.Molina c 4 1 3 0 0 1 .323 Descalso 3b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .221 Lohse p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .125 c-Rasmus ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .303 E.Sanchez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 30 5 10 5 4 6 Houston 000 000 100 — 1 6 0 St. Louis 004 010 00x — 5 10 0 a-doubled for Berkman in the 5th. b-grounded into a double play for Del Rosario in the 8th. c-grounded out for Lohse in the 8th. LOB—Houston 4, St. Louis 7. 2B—Ca.Lee (7), Kozma (1), Descalso (7). RBIs—C.Johnson (17), Jay 2 (11), Pujols (25), Kozma (1), Craig (11). SB—Jay (1), Greene (6). CS—Descalso (1). S—Lohse. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 5 (Y.Molina 2, Craig, Greene, Rasmus). Runners moved up—Wallace, M.Hamilton. GIDP— Bogusevic, Descalso. DP—Houston 1 (Ang.Sanchez, Barmes, Wallace); St. Louis 2 (Jay, Theriot, Pujols), (Kozma, Theriot, Pujols). Houston IP H R ER Norris L, 2-3 5 7 5 5 Escalona 1 1 0 0 Del Rosario 1 1 0 0 J.Valdez 1 1 0 0 St. Louis IP H R ER Lohse W, 5-2 8 6 1 1 E.Sanchez 1 0 0 0 IBB—off Norris (Berkman). (Greene). T—2:26. A—35,298 (43,975).

BB SO NP ERA 3 4 91 3.93 0 1 6 4.50 0 0 11 4.32 1 1 27 6.75 BB SO NP ERA 1 3 102 2.17 0 1 9 2.65 HBP—by Norris

Diamondbacks 5, Braves 4 (11 innings) Atlanta AB Prado lf-3b 4 Heyward rf 5 C.Jones 3b 4 1-Mather pr-lf 0 McCann c 4 Uggla 2b 4 Freeman 1b 4 Venters p 0 d-Di.Hernandez ph 1 Kimbrel p 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 McLouth cf 4 Teheran p 2 Sherrill p 0 Linebrink p 0 b-Conrad ph 1 Proctor p 0 O’Flaherty p 0 Hinske 1b 1 Totals 38

R H 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 11

BI 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 2 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .295 .221 .278 .286 .285 .198 .227 --.286 --.257 .250 .000 ----.150 ----.344

Arizona R.Roberts 3b K.Johnson 2b J.Upton rf S.Drew ss C.Young cf Montero c Miranda 1b Heilman p G.Parra lf J.Saunders p a-Nady ph Vasquez p Da.Hernandez p c-Bloomquist ph Putz p Branyan 1b 2-Jo.Wilson pr Totals

R H 2 2 0 1 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 5 12

BI 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 0 0 2 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .286 .186 .262 .275 .218 .258 .225 .000 .264 .267 .250 ----.302 --.210 .222

AB 4 4 6 4 5 5 4 0 5 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 41

Atlanta 000 001 200 01 — 4 11 1 Arizona 100 100 100 02 — 5 12 0 One out when winning run scored. a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for J.Saunders in the 6th. b-doubled for Linebrink in the 7th. c-grounded out for Da.Hernandez in the 9th. d-singled for Venters in the 11th. 1-ran for C.Jones in the 11th. 2-ran for Branyan in the 11th. E—C.Jones (3). LOB—Atlanta 7, Arizona 12. 2B—C.Jones (14), Conrad (1), S.Drew (10), Miranda (3). HR—J.Upton (9), off Teheran. RBIs—Prado (28), McCann (24), Di.Hernandez (1), Conrad (2), R.Roberts (18), K.Johnson (8), J.Upton 2 (23). CS—C.Young (4). S—K.Johnson, J.Saunders. SF—Prado, McCann. Runners left in scoring position—Atlanta 4 (Uggla, Teheran, Prado, McLouth); Arizona 7 (R.Roberts 2, C.Young, K.Johnson, G.Parra, S.Drew 2). Runners moved up—McLouth, J.Upton. GIDP— Prado. DP—Arizona 2 (S.Drew, K.Johnson, Miranda), (G.Parra, G.Parra, R.Roberts). Atlanta IP H R ER BB Teheran 4 6 2 2 2 Sherrill 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 Linebrink 1-3 0 0 0 0 Proctor BS, 1-1 1 0 1 1 1 O’Flaherty 1 1 0 0 0 Venters 2 0 0 0 1 Kimbrel L, 1-2 1-3 4 2 2 0 Arizona IP H R ER BB J.Saunders 6 7 1 1 2 Vasquez 1 1 2 2 1 Da.Hernandez 2 0 0 0 0 Putz 1 0 0 0 0 Heilman W, 2-0 1 3 1 1 1 Inherited runners-scored—Linebrink Venters (K.Johnson). WP—Proctor. T—3:19. A—19,773 (48,633).

SO NP ERA 1 83 5.19 2 23 1.86 0 3 6.75 0 14 4.50 2 14 1.13 2 24 0.68 0 10 3.00 SO NP ERA 1 89 5.02 1 17 2.87 3 27 1.74 2 11 2.25 0 18 7.11 1-0. HBP—by

Brewers 5, Padres 2 Milwaukee Weeks 2b C.Hart rf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Kotsay cf Estrada p Hawkins p Axford p Y.Betancourt ss Lucroy c Gallardo p C.Gomez cf Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 4 0 0 0 3 3 3 1 37

R H 0 0 1 3 1 1 2 2 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 10

BI 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 6

Avg. .292 .270 .304 .286 .267 .273 .250 ----.222 .315 .208 .228

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Denorfia rf 5 0 2 0 0 1 .351 Bartlett ss 4 0 2 0 1 1 .267 Headley 3b 5 0 1 0 0 3 .261 Hawpe 1b 5 1 1 0 0 2 .244 Ludwick lf 3 1 2 2 1 0 .227 E.Patterson cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .190 K.Phillips c 2 0 0 0 2 1 .188 1-Ro.Johnson pr-c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .212 Alb.Gonzalez 2b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .207 b-Cantu ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .208 Moseley p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Frieri p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Maybin ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .272 Scribner p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Venable ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .232 Totals 35 2 10 2 4 12 Milwaukee 000 102 200 — 5 10 0 San Diego 000 200 000 — 2 10 2 a-fouled out for Gregerson in the 7th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Alb.Gonzalez in the 8th. c-struck out for Scribner in the 9th. 1-ran for K.Phillips in the 8th. E—Bartlett 2 (7). LOB—Milwaukee 9, San Diego 11. 2B—Braun (5), Fielder (11), Kotsay (4). 3B—C.Hart (1). HR—Ludwick (8), off Gallardo. RBIs—Braun (34), Fielder (33), Kotsay 2 (7), Lucroy (16), Ludwick 2 (28). SB—C.Hart (1), Braun (9), E.Patterson (4). CS—C.Hart (2). S—Moseley. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 5 (McGehee, Lucroy 2, Weeks 2); San Diego 3 (Headley, Cantu, Hawpe). Runners moved up—Y.Betancourt, Denorfia. Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gallardo W, 5-2 6 5 2 2 3 9 114 4.70 Estrada H, 4 1 2 0 0 0 0 12 3.82 Hawkins H, 4 1 1 0 0 1 0 16 0.93 Axford S, 10-12 1 2 0 0 0 3 19 4.42 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moseley L, 1-6 5 1-3 6 3 2 2 3 86 3.40 Frieri 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 13 1.96 Gregerson 1 4 2 2 0 1 25 3.26 Scribner 2 0 0 0 0 0 18 2.45 Inherited runners-scored—Frieri 3-1. IBB—off Moseley (Y.Betancourt). HBP—by Moseley (Fielder), by Frieri (Lucroy). PB—K.Phillips. T—3:13. A—16,901 (42,691).

Giants 8, Dodgers 5 San Francisco Rowand cf Ford cf F.Sanchez 2b Posey c Burrell lf Schierholtz rf C.Ross rf-lf Huff 1b M.Tejada ss-3b DeRosa 3b a-Fontenot ph-ss Cain p Ja.Lopez p Romo p Br.Wilson p Totals

AB 4 0 5 5 4 1 4 5 4 1 1 4 0 0 0 38

R H 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 1 1 1 0 3 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 13

BI 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 2 1 0 2 0 0 0 10

Avg. .250 .222 .276 .275 .241 .282 .260 .228 .214 .162 .219 .050 .000 -----

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carroll ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .308 Miles 2b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Ethier rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .325 Kemp cf 4 2 2 1 0 2 .325 Uribe 3b 3 1 1 2 1 2 .216 Loney 1b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .233 1-Gwynn Jr. pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .224 Gibbons lf 2 1 0 0 2 0 .111 Sands 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Barajas c 4 0 2 1 0 1 .228 Kershaw p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .211 b-Ju.Castro ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Elbert p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guerra p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Navarro ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .158 MacDougal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Cormier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Mitchell ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Totals 34 5 7 5 3 9 San Francisco 001 300 013 — 8 13 0 Los Angeles 000 010 130 — 5 7 1 a-walked for DeRosa in the 4th. b-flied out for Kershaw in the 5th. c-flied out for Guerra in the 7th. d-struck out for Cormier in the 9th. 1-ran for Loney in the 8th. E—Kemp (3). LOB—San Francisco 7, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Uribe (7), Barajas (4). HR—C.Ross (3), off Cormier; Kemp (9), off Cain. RBIs—Rowand (10), F.Sanchez (12), C.Ross 3 (10), M.Tejada 2 (13), Fontenot (8), Kemp (29), Uribe 2 (20), Loney (13), Barajas (15). SB—C.Ross (2). CS—M.Tejada (2). SF—Rowand. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 3 (Posey, F.Sanchez 2); Los Angeles 4 (Carroll 2, Navarro, Miles). Runners moved up—Carroll. SF IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain 7 1-3 3 3 3 3 7 111 3.28 Ja.Lopez H, 7 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.13 Romo 0 1 1 1 0 0 3 1.74 Br.Wlsn W, 4-1 1 1-3 3 1 1 0 1 29 4.34 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw 5 7 4 4 1 6 85 3.09 Elbert 1 1 0 0 0 2 18 0.00 Guerra 1 1 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 MacDougal 2-3 1 1 1 2 0 25 1.84 Cormier L, 0-1 1 1-3 3 3 3 0 1 29 10.03 Romo pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Ja.Lopez 1-0, Romo 1-0, Br.Wilson 2-2, Cormier 1-0. HBP—by Cain (Loney). T—3:18. A—30,421 (56,000).


D4 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BASEBALL C O M M E N TA RY

N B A P L AYO F F S

N H L P L AYO F F S

Canucks rout Sharks in Game 2

Killebrew was baseball’s Paul Bunyan

The Associated Press

By Mark Herrman Newsday

H

armon Killebrew’s moniker, “Killer,” was more than just a play on his last name. It was an ironic perfect fit, the way the quietest person is called “Gabby” and the biggest guy in the class is called “Tiny.” That is to say, Killebrew was menacing only to baseballs, not to people. One of the greatest sluggers of all time was a true gentle man, with a deliberate space between the two words. The Hall of Famer and Minnesota Twins great retained his dignified personality right through the final days of his 74 years, to the week before his death Tuesday morning of esophageal cancer at his Scottsdale, Ariz., home. He issued a release through the Twins and the Baseball Hall of Fame last Friday saying that his condition had become untreatable and that he would enter the final phase of his life in hospice care. He praised hospice practice, for which he had been an advocate since he was treated for a life-threatening collapsed lung in 1990. Killebrew was genuinely modest about ranking 11th on baseball’s all-time home run list with 573. His approach to life was mild and patient, except when he got in the batter’s box and unleashed a swing strengthened by teenage summers in Idaho, lifting 10-gallon jugs working on a milk truck. The Twins power hitter was a major star in the 1960s, when baseball was indisputably the national pastime and when the home run was the game’s great calling card. Killebrew was known as much for his high, majestic shots as for having been the American League’s Most Valuable Player in 1969. “He was baseball’s version of Paul Bunyan,” Hall of Fame president Jeff Idelson said. “Off the field … he was so down to earth, you would never realize he was a baseball legend.” Twins president Dave St. Peter said Tuesday on Sirius-XM’s MLB Network channel: “If there’s a Mount Rushmore for Minnesota sports, Harmon is on it.” He remained true to his Idaho upbringing. At his 1984 Hall of Fame induction, Killebrew spoke about how he and his brother used to play exuberantly in the front yard, causing their mother to worry about the lawn. Their father replied, “We’re not raising grass, we’re raising boys.” As a big-leaguer, Killebrew was unfazed at having his best work overlooked. His 44 homers in 1967 tied for the league lead but were overshadowed by the fact that he shared the title with Carl Yastrzemski, who was credited with the Triple Crown. Perhaps Killebrew’s greatest year was 1961, when he hit 46 home runs, had 122 runs batted in and finished with a career-high .288 batting average. It was totally overshadowed by the home run race between Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle, won by Maris’ then-record 61. The New York chapter of the Baseball Writers Association of America saluted the 50th anniversary of Killebrew’s overshadowed season this past January. At its annual awards banquet, the writers honored the slugger with their Casey Stengel You Could Look It Up Award. This reporter was assigned to do a story with Killebrew for the program. In late December, he finally returned a phone call and profusely apologized for having taken so long to do so. “There’s been just so much going on,” he said, not mentioning that what had been “going on” was a series of tests that days later would reveal he had cancer. During the interview, he was good-natured in remembering how, unlike many New Yorkers, he rooted for Maris down the stretch in 1961 — an Idaho guy pulling for a North Dakota guy. He cheerfully recalled going on a barnstorming tour that winter with Maris and Baltimore Orioles slugger Jim Gentile. They had a home run contest and Killebrew won it. “Wherever we went, everyone wanted to talk to Roger, so Jim and I just hit,” he said. The Twins erected a statue of him outside their new ballpark and have dedicated Gate 3 in honor of his retired number. The street leading to the Mall of America — site of the old Metropolitan Stadium — is called Killebrew Drive. “I’m an Idaho guy,” he said, “and I found that Minnesota people were a lot like me.” Baseball people might argue that there was no one quite like Harmon Killebrew.

Nam Y. Huh / The Associated Press

Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade (3) goes up for a shot against Chicago Bulls forward Taj Gibson (obscured) during the second quarter of Game 2 of the NBA basketball Eastern Conference finals on Wednesday in Chicago. The Heat took an 85-75 victory.

James, Wade lead Heat to tie with Bulls By Andrew Seligman The Associated Press

CHICAGO — LeBron James came up big down the stretch and scored 29 points, Dwyane Wade added 24 and the Miami Heat beat the Chicago Bulls 85-75 Wednesday night to tie the Eastern Conference finals at one game apiece. The Heat can breathe a little easier after escaping with a win and stealing home-court advantage. Coming off a lopsided loss in Game 1, they recovered down the stretch after blowing an 11point lead to pull even in the series, with Game 3 in Miami on Sunday. James shook off a brutal opener and scored nine points over the final 4:27, starting with a three-pointer that put Miami ahead for good, 76-73. He also had 10 rebounds, and Miami outrebounded the Bulls 45-41 after getting pounded 45-33 on the glass in the opener. Despite battling a head cold, it was a big turnaround after he managed just 15 points on fivefor-15 shooting while being harassed by Luol Deng in Game 1. “I put it all on the line tonight and did whatever it took for our team to win,” James said. Wade also looked more like a superstar after scoring 18 on Sunday. Udonis Haslem, whom Heat coach Erik Spoelstra called “an absolute championship warrior,” provided a spark off the bench with 13 points, and the Heat beat the Bulls for the first time this season even though Chris Bosh scored just 10 after pouring in 30 in the opener. Derrick Rose led Chicago with 21 points but scored just two in the fourth quarter. Deng, the only other Bulls player in double figures, added 13 but had just four after the opening period. Joakim Noah had nine points but only eight rebounds. Taj Gibson provided a spark in the fourth quarter, scoring all of his eight points. Carlos Boozer, however, was a non-factor with seven points and eight rebounds. The Bulls missed countless layups and got outshot 47.1 percent to 34.1 percent. They were just three of 20 on three-pointers and 16 of 26 at the foul line while getting beat on the glass. They had no answer for James down the stretch, either, and came up short when it looked like they might find a way to pull this one out. “We played a low-energy offense, a low-energy defense and the result was not good,” coach Tom Thibodeau said. The Heat led by 11 late in the third, only to see the Bulls wipe it all out in the fourth, with Gibson providing a big spark.

He cut it to 71-69 early in the fourth with backto-back jumpers for his first points of the game, pumping both arms after the second shot went in. Then, he tied it at 73 with 7:16 left after Haslem lost the ball out of bounds, drawing more roars from the crowd, but the teams traded misses for about three minutes before James put Miami ahead with a three. Then, he scored again with 3:15 left to make it 78-73. Gibson delivered a slam over three defenders and got fouled by Wade, the same guy he delivered a poster-worthy dunk on in Game 1, to make it a three-point game with 2:29 left, but missed the free throw. James then put back his own miss and nailed a 20-footer to make it 84-75 with 47 seconds left. “That fourth quarter is going to epitomize this entire series,” Spoelstra said. “It’s an absolute street fight for both teams.” The Heat looked like they were ready to pull away in the third, going on a 10-0 run after Rose hit two free throws to cut it to 57-56 with 5:14 left. Haslem blocked Deng and dunked on Keith Bogans for a three-point play to start the run. James then stole a pass from Noah and broke the other way for a three-point play, then picked off another by Deng, leading to a layup for Wade. Haslem, who hadn’t been playing much, threw down another vicious fast-break dunk on Rose to finish the run, crashing to the court as the lead reached 11, but the Bulls answered with six straight to stay in it. “I talked to him two days ago, and there was a look in his eye,” Spoelstra said of Haslem. “I’ve been through a lot of battles with that warrior, and I knew it was time to put him in.” The Heat got 17 points from Wade in the first half, 14 from James and hit 17 of 33 shots. Even so, they were only up 48-46. One reason: turnovers. They committed nine in the half, leading to 11 points for the Bulls. Deng also got off to a good start for Chicago, scoring nine in the first quarter. He started and ended a 12-1 run late in the period with dunks, turning a 14-9 deficit into a 21-15 lead. His most impressive shot, though? That was at the end of the quarter. Miami’s Mike Miller had just scored on a layup after Gibson blocked a driving Juwan Howard, when Deng launched a 41-footer from the right side that swished threw the net as the buzzer sounded, making it 26-19 and sending the crowd into a frenzy.

VANCOUVER, British Columbia — The harder the San Jose Sharks tried to get back at the Vancouver Canucks, the further they fell behind. Daniel Sedin netted his second power-play goal of the game, Chris Higgins added another, and Mason Raymond scored just after a penalty expired in the third period for the Canucks, who routed the undisciplined Sharks 7-3 and took a 2-0 lead in the Western Conference finals on Wednesday night. “If we had a bad power play they could take some liberties against us, but when you’ve got a power play as good as us it makes them second guess trying to finish hits,” said Higgins, who also had two assists. “It’s a big weapon for us. If we can get them to take bad penalties, all the better.” The game became a blowout in the third period, but it turned on a breakaway by defenseman Kevin Bieksa, and his one-sided fight with Sharks forward Patrick Marleau six minutes later. Marleau admitted to dropping his gloves first, and he has two inches and 20 pounds on Bieksa. But Marleau hasn’t fought in five years and was clearly overmatched. “I’ve got an older brother, too, so I’m used to getting that,” said Marleau, who also scored his third goal in three games during a first-period power play. Still, the lopsided bout upset the Sharks — especially Ben Eager. San Jose’s tough guy yelled at the Vancouver bench, then ran Daniel Sedin face first into the boards on his next shift 90 seconds later, earning a boarding penalty. “Eager was ranting and raving at his bench going berserk, but it wasn’t Kevin that dropped the mitts, it was Marleau,” Canucks coach Alain Vigneault said. “So I’m not sure what he (Bieksa) was supposed to do there.” Eager took another penalty for tripping Raymond 6:57 into the third period, Higgins made it 4-2 on the ensuing power play, and the rout was on. “I can’t see in their heads, but I’m not sure what got them rattled,” said Bieksa, who added an assist on Higgins’ goal to complete the Gordie Howe hat trick. “I don’t really care too much about how they’re feeling. ... That’s been the strength of our team all year, our power play. A lot of the times we’ve won by three, four goals. They were close games until the other team started to get undisciplined. And on our power play we capitalized.” Eager scored with 2:33 left, but even then he ended up in the penalty box for yapping at Roberto Luongo and sparking a scrum. Eager finished with five minor penalties and a 10-minute misconduct as the Sharks combined for 53 minutes in penalties while losing for the fifth time in six games. San Jose’s lone win was in Game 7 of the second round over Detroit, which got the Sharks into the conference finals for the second straight year. If they don’t quickly regain their composure, their stay will be short.

Jonathan Hayward / The Associated Press

San Jose Sharks goaltender Antti Niemi watches as a goal by Vancouver Canucks’ Chris Higgins goes past him during the third period of Game 2 of the Western Conference finals, Wednesday in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Donald aims for No. 1 ranking at World Match Play Championship By Steve Douglas The Associated Press

CASARES, Spain — England’s Luke Donald has another chance to take the No. 1 spot from Lee Westwood at the World Match Play Championship, where he is bidding to complete a unique double in the one-on-one format. The 24-man field will play at Spain’s Costa del Sol, where the European Tour returns after a one-year absence. The tournament, which starts today, features five of the top six players. Donald won the Accenture World Match Play title at Arizona in February, never falling behind in any of his six matches. He is looking to become the first player to win both match-play tournaments. Given his success in the match play format at recent Ryder Cups, the No. 2-ranked Donald is the man to beat this week. However, Westwood has won his past two tournaments — in Indonesia and South Korea. “My confidence is very high right now,” said Donald, who has finished in the top 10 in 13 of his past 14 events. “I’ve been playing

GOLF very consistently now for a good six months, and I think the win at the Match Play really elevated that confidence level. “Obviously, I enjoy match play; my record is very good. My record in Ryder Cups, Walker Cups, the Match Play event this year, they speak for themselves. I enjoy the challenge of that oneagainst-one over 18 holes.” Westwood knows all about the caliber of Donald’s match play — the two paired for the 2010 Ryder Cup to devastating effect, thrashing Tiger Woods and Steve Stricker 6 and 5 in the second day’s opening foursomes. He’s not surprised to see Donald move up the rankings this year. “He hits the ball straight off the tee, his iron play is nice, he’s got a great short game and he’s a nice putter,” Westwood said Wednesday. “He’s very reliable.” No. 3-ranked Martin Kaymer, who split with his Scottish caddie Craig Connelly on Sunday, joins the Englishmen in the strong field

Woods to fall out of top 10 VIRGINIA WATER, England — Tiger Woods will fall out of the top 10 in the world ranking next week, ending an amazing streak of being top 10 in the world for 14 consecutive years. Woods’ last win was 18 months ago in Australia. He started this year at No. 2 and has been steadily dropping points. With more points coming off his twoyear ledger, the highest he can be in the next ranking is No. 11. The last time Woods was not in the top 10 was April 6, 1997, when he was at No. 13. He won the Masters the next week for the first of his 14 majors, and has stayed in the top 10 since.

and there are enough points to allow the German to move back to the top of the rankings, too. Kaymer lost to Donald in the final at Arizona and acknowledged the talent of the world’s top two. “I think the perfect player at

the moment would be the long game from Lee Westwood and the short game from Luke Donald,” Kaymer said. Fourth-ranked Phil Mickelson is the only player in the top six not featured at the Finca Cortesin course near Marbella, where there is a total prize purse of $4.8 million. The winner will receive $1.14 million, the highest amount on the European Tour outside of the majors, World Golf Championship events and the Dubai World Golf Championship. The four current major champions will compete — Louis Oosthuizen (British Open), Graeme McDowell (U.S. Open), Kaymer (U.S. PGA) and Charl Schwartzel (The Masters). The field has been divided into eight groups of three, with the top two in each going through to the knockout stages on Saturday and Sunday. Fierce winds and heavy rain swept across the course on Wednesday and the inclement weather is expected in the south of Spain all four days. Donald has defending champion Ross Fisher, who defeated An-

thony Kim of the United States 4 and 3 in the 36-hole final in 2009, in his group along with American Ryan Moore. “To be the World Match Play champion for almost two years has quite a nice ring to it,” said Fisher, who will not start the defense of his title until Friday. “I’ve got good memories of this place,

so hopefully they’ll come flooding back. I’ll just try to do the same things I did two years ago.”

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

541-388-4418


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 D5

Boys state track and field championships A look at area schools and athletes competing in state track meets this weekend:

CLASS 6A Redmond — Trenton Kershner, sr., (3,000, 1,500); Ryan Wilson, sr., (800); Cody Simpson, fr., (pole vault); Travis Simpson, sr., (triple jump, high jump, long jump); Jacob Crivellone, jr., (shot put); Tanner Manselle, jr., (javelin)

CLASS 5A Bend — Cody Maguire, fr., (400 relay); Gavin Gerdes, jr., (400 relay); J.C. Grim, jr., (400 relay, triple jump, javelin, high jump); Caleb Buzzas, sr., (400 relay, long jump); Body Hadley, so., (400 relay); Danny Verdieck, jr., (110 hurdles); Joel Johnson, fr., (pole vault) Mountain View — Brady Hardin, (wheelchair 100, wheelchair 400, wheelchair 200); Chase Nachtmann, sr., (1,600 relay); Matt Murphy, sr., (1,600 relay); Dimitri Dillard, jr., (1,600 relay); Mitch Modin, so., (1,600 relay, high jump, long jump); Chris McBride, so., (1,600 relay, 800); Josh Smith, jr., (1,600 relay); Hayden Czmowski, jr., (discus); Riley Anheluk, jr., (800); Blake Bosch, jr., (high jump) Summit — Alex Needham, sr., (400 relay, 300 hurdles, 1,600 relay); Jesse Sanderson, sr., (400 relay, 400, 200, 1,600 relay); Cole Thomas, jr., (400 relay, 100, 200); T.J. Peay, jr., (400 relay, 100); Michael Wilson, so., (400 relay, 400, 300 hurdles, 1,600 relay); Ben Ritchey, so., (400 relay); Travis Neuman, so., (3,000, 1,500); Zach Weishaupt, sr., (1,600 relay); Brandan Hamann, sr., (1,600 relay); Nathan Guyer, jr., (1,600 relay); Will Butler, jr., (triple jump); Erik Jorgensen, sr., (pole vault); Evan Bassford, sr., (pole vault); Luke Hinz, so., (1,500)

CLASS 4A Crook County — Jordan Reeher, sr., (400 relay, 110 hurdles, 300 hurdles, long jump); Tyler Rockwood, jr., (400 relay); Mitch Van Domelen, sr., (400 relay, 400, 200); Hunter Bourland, jr., (400 relay, high jump); Alex Greaves, jr., (400 relay); Erik Patchett, jr., (400 relay, 400); Grayson Munn, fr., (3,000); Cody Smith, sr., (discus, shot put); Tevin Cooper, jr., (javelin) La Pine — Spencer Wilson, sr., (400 relay, 400, 200); Jeremy Desrosiers, so., (400 relay, long jump); Deion Mock, jr., (400 relay, pole vault); Kole Kimmel, so., (400 relay); Zach Neet, jr., (400 relay); Josephy Swayze, so., (400 relay); Dylan Seay, jr., (pole vault); Travis Harrison, jr., (shot put) Madras — Adrian Phillips, sr., (discus) Sisters — Taylor Steele, sr., (3,000, 1,600 relay, 1,500); Easton Curtis, jr., (800, 1,600 relay); David Cowan, sr., (1,600 relay); Devon Prescott, sr., (1,600 relay); Mason Calmettes, jr., (1,600 relay); Landon Prescott, fr., (1,600 relay); Brandon Pollard, fr., (1,500)

CLASS 2A Culver — Tyler Funk, sr., (300 hurdles, 400 relay, pole vault); Jesus Retano, jr, (400 relay); Chris Sledge, sr., (400 relay, pole vault); Kyle Belanger, so., (400 relay); Josue Gonzalez, jr., (400 relay); Preston Quinn, sr., (400 relay)

CLASS 1A Gilchrist — Zane Anderson, so., (shot put); Dillon Link, so., (discus)

Girls state track and field championships A look at area schools and athletes competing in state track meets this weekend:

Tennis Continued from D1 In the boys ranks, the Storm expect to contend for their second state championship. Summit junior Paxton Deuel is the No. 1 seed in the singles bracket and brothers Bo and Liam Hall are the No. 3 seed in the doubles bracket. “There’s four teams in the 5A boys tournament that have a shot at state, and we’re one of them,” Summit coach Josh Cordell said. “Having four entries (two doubles teams and two singles players), it really gives us a chance. But there’s other good teams. We’ll need to score points at every position to win it.” Bend and Summit highlight the three girls tournaments. Lava Bear senior Bryn Oliveira is back for her fourth state tournament, which included a doubles state title in 2009 with Skyler Nelson. This year Oliveira is teamed with Hannah Palcic, a four-year varsity player for Collier who is making her state tournament debut. The two seniors are the No. 3 seed in the 5A doubles bracket. “It doesn’t hurt us that she’s up there for the fourth time,” Collier said about Oliveira. “There’s some young teams up there, but we’re bringing three seniors.” Youth has served Summit well this season as a pair of freshmen, Haley Younger and Lindsey Brodeck, won the Special District 1 district doubles tournament. The two youngsters enter this weekend’s state tournament as the No. 2 seed in the 5A doubles bracket. Also looking to score points for the Storm is junior Hannah Shepard. Playing singles this season, Shephard won the 5A state doubles title last season with Jessie Drakulich, who graduated last year.

O LY M P I C S Boys state tennis championships A look at area players competing in state tennis tournaments this weekend:

CLASS 5A When: Today, Friday and Saturday Where: Portland Tennis Center (today and Friday) and Tualatin Hills Tennis Center in Beaverton (Saturday) Bend — Jeff Windsor, sr., (singles) Mountain View — Matt Larraneta, jr., and Matt Van Hemelryck, jr., (doubles) Summit — Paxton Deuel, jr., (singles); Parker Nichols, so., (singles); Bo Hall, jr., and Liam Hall, fr., (doubles); Sterling Dillingham, sr., and Scott Parr, so., (doubles)

CLASS 4A/3A/2A/1A When: Today, Friday and Saturday Where: University of Oregon, Eugene Crook County — Trevor Brown, sr., (singles); Brady Slater, jr., and Jared Anderson, jr., (doubles) Sisters — Ben Fullhart, sr., (singles); Colby Gilmore, sr., and Austin Williams, sr., (doubles)

Girls state tennis championships A look at area players competing in state tennis tournaments this weekend:

CLASS 6A When: Today, Friday and Saturday Where: Tualatin Hills Tennis Center, Beaverton Redmond — Monica Johnson, jr., (singles); Karlee Christensen, jr., and Emmalee Cron, sr., (doubles); Haley Hartford, sr., and Benita Bentlage, jr., (doubles)

CLASS 5A When: Today, Friday and Saturday Where: Tualatin Hills Tennis Center, Beaverton Bend — Cassidy Taylor, sr., (singles); Kaylee Tornay, so., (singles); Bryn Oliveira, sr., and Hannah Palcic, sr., (doubles); Summit — Hannah Shephard, jr., (singles); Haley Younger, fr., and Lindsey Brodeck, fr., (doubles)

CLASS 4A/3A/2A/1A When: Today, Friday and Saturday Where: University of Oregon, Eugene Crook County — Erin Crofcheck, sr., (singles); Barbara Furuie, sr., (singles); Catie Brown, jr., and Kayla Morgan, jr., (doubles); Braiden Johnston, jr., and Kelsi Kemper, jr., (doubles) Sisters — Elise Herron, jr., and Jen Houk, jr., (doubles)

CLASS 6A Redmond — Kendall Current, so., (400 relay, 200); Kiersten Ochsner, fr., (400 relay, 400, 1,600 relay); Karlee Nordstrom, sr., (400 relay, 1,600 relay); Tefna Mitchell, so., (400 relay, 200, 1,600 relay); Brianna Yeakey, fr., (400 relay); Dakota Steen, fr., (400 relay, 1,600 relay); Sarah MacKenzie, sr., (800, 1,600 relay); Monika Koehler, jr., (1,600 relay)

CLASS 5A Bend — Tesla Wright, so., (pole vault) Mountain View — Brianna Rosen, sr., (400 relay, 100, 200, 1,600 relay); Kryta Kroeger, so., (400 relay, 1,600 relay); Macauley Wilson, jr., (400 relay, 1,600 relay); Ayla Rosen, sr., (400 relay, 400, 1,600 relay, long jump); Kiegan Sheridan, sr., (400 relay); Tash Anderson, jr., (400 relay, 300 hurdles, 1,600 relay); Mikhaila Thornton, sr., (1,600 relay, 800); Courtney Shearer, jr., (javelin); Janelle Noga, sr., (javelin); Shaina Zollman, jr., (long jump, triple jump); Anna Roshak, so., (shot put); Meghan Ridling, sr., (shot put); Hopper Cashman, sr., (discus) Summit — Ricci Kitzmiller, fr., (400 relay, 400, 200, 1,600 relay); Sarah Frazier, jr., (400 relay, 100, 1,600 relay, triple jump); Alexa Thomas, fr., (400 relay) Meg Meagher, fr., (400 relay, 1,600 relay); Olivia Singer, so., (400 relay); Emily Ritchey, sr., (400 relay); Josie Kinney, so., (100 hurdles, 300 hurdles); Sarah Edwards, jr., (100 hurdles); Megan Fristoe, jr., (3,000, 1,600 relay, 1,500); Sarah Fristoe, jr., (3,000); Keelin Moehl, jr., (1,600 relay); Ashley Maton, jr., (1,600 relay, 1,500, 800); Lucinda Howard, jr., (high jump); Laney Hayes, so., (high jump); Sarah Taylor, jr., (high jump); Kira Kelly, jr., (1,500); Annie Sidor, so., (pole vault); Taylor Pierce, sr., (discus)

CLASS 4A Crook County — Makinsi Gregory, jr., (100, high jump); McKenzie Zirbel, fr., (100, pole vault); Kellie Foley, sr., (3,000, 1,500); Kellie Thurman, jr., (3,000); Marci Johnston, jr., (shot put) La Pine — Ashley Agenbroad, jr., (discus); Brittnie Haigler, fr., (triple jump) Madras — Laura Sullivan, jr., (high jump) Sisters — Natalie Ambrose, fr., (400, 200, 1,600 relay); Zoe Falk, fr., (800, 1,600 relay, long jump, 1,500); Chelsea Reifschneider, jr., (300 hurdles, 1,600 relay); Hayley Palmer, fr., (1,600 relay); Bailey Bremmer, fr., (1,600 relay); Jodie Reoch, jr., (1,600 relay); Alicia Haken, so., (high jump); Sara Small, jr., (pole vault)

CLASS 2A Culver — Ana Badillo, fr., (400); Lori Sandy, so., (triple jump)

CLASS 1A Gilchrist — Taylor Bean, jr., (400 relay); Brenna Gravitt, jr., (400 relay, 100, long jump, shot put); Ashley James, so., (400 relay, 400, discus); Sydney Longbotham, fr., (400 relay); Tierra Newton, fr., (400 relay); Leanna McGregor, jr., (javelin); Paige Kooker, so., (discus)

NOTE: The Class 6A, 5A and 4A state meets are Friday and Saturday at the University of Oregon. The Class 3A, 2A, and 1A state championships are at Western Oregon University in Monmouth the same days.

Track

posted the fastest short relay time in all of 4A this season.

Continued from D1 Class 5A: Summit girls fivepeat — Not having Kellie Schueler has not been a problem for the Storm this year. Summit, which eyes its fifth consecutive 5A girls state this weekend, sends 18 girls to state this weekend. Ashley Maton, (1,500), Megan Fristoe (3,000), Ricci Kitzmiller (200 and 400) and Lucinda Howard (high jump) all expect to contend for individual championships.

Class 2A: Culver pole vaulters Tyler Funk and Chris Sledge — The Bulldog seniors own two of the three best pole vault marks in 2A this season and expect to push one another for the individual title. Funk, who won the 2A crown last year, is the only 2A vaulter to clear 13 feet, 8 inches this season, while Sledge set a new personal best last week at the district meet, going 13-4.

Class 4A: Jordan Reeher and the Crook County boys — In their first year competing in Class 4A, the Cowboys should challenge for a trophy, if not a championship. Last year at the 5A state meet Reeher placed second in the 300, fourth in the long jump and fifth in 110 hurdles. He looks to improve on all those finishes this year. Crook County’s 400-meter relay squad, which Reeher runs on, also has a chance to medal as the Cowboys

Class 1A: Gilchrist’s all-everything Brenna Gravitt — A Renaissance woman of sorts, Gravitt will compete in the 100, long jump, 400-relay and shot put for the Grizzlies at the 1A state championship. While her best opportunity to score points appears to be in the long jump — she went 16 feet, 3 inches earlier this season, the fifth-best mark in 1A — count Gravitt out in the other events at your own risk. The Grizzly junior has recorded 10 victories in five different events this season.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Andrew Boone is one of the favorites to win the men’s elite race when the Pole Pedal Paddle takes place this Saturday in and near Bend.

PPP Continued from D1 A graduate of Bend’s Mountain View High School, Boone is an elite cyclist and runner who actually turned to nordic skiing to excel at the PPP. “I learned how to skate ski, basically, for the PPP,” he says. In last year’s Pole Pedal Paddle, Boone lost to Greene by just 1 minute, 11 seconds, and he was nearly five minutes ahead of third-place Osgood. Osgood calls Boone this year’s “overwhelming favorite.” “He’s in good shape, and he’s been winning bike races this spring,” Osgood says of Boone. “Last year, we came into town together (on the bike-to-run transition), and then it wasn’t close. On the run and boat he’s capable of putting a good deal of time into me.” In the 2009 PPP, Boone suffered a nasty crash during the alpine ski stage, but he recovered to finish second. His performance on the nordic leg was impressive enough that XC Oregon coach J.D. Downing invited him onto the Bend-based team. Boone’s nordic skiing has improved, but he considers himself a runner first and foremost. He ran cross-country and track distance events at Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y. Burnt out on running, Boone took up elite cycling in 2005, and he now considers that his primary sport. He races his road bike nearly every week-

end, March through August, as a Category 1 competitor in the Oregon Bike Racing Association series. Boone says he will have to come from behind to pass Osgood after the nordic ski stage Saturday. “Brayton (Osgood) will use his ski to establish some distance, and it would be stupid of me to try to hang with him,” Boone says. “I’ll try to use the bike/run combo to get back in the race.” Says Osgood: “I’ll have to build as much of a lead as I can on the ski.” Boone says he was unsatisfied with his time of 1:45:38 in last year’s PPP, and he claims he overtrained during the two weeks leading up to the race. This year, he does not have time to overtrain. A pharmaceutical sales representative, Boone travels to Portland each week for two nights of business school as he works toward earning a master’s in business administration through Willamette University. Also, his wife, Megan, is six months pregnant with their first child. Still, Boone has made time to train for the PPP. “I do (cycling) events that are more important around the country, but the excitement

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around the PPP makes it one of the most fun events of the year,” he says. “But not to take it too lightly ... we take it pretty darn seriously. “It (the race) goes by so fast, and really what people enjoy is the rest of the day, once it’s over.” Should Boone win, it could mark a shift in PPP history, proving that strong cyclists and runners can defeat the fastest nordic skiers. “We have some great multisport athletes who live in Bend,” Boone acknowledges. “But there’s this perception that you can’t win the race unless you’re an elite nordic skier — but it can be done.” Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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2018 Winter Games bid cities make their pitch By Stephen Wilson The Associated Press

LAUSANNE, Switzerland — Pyeongchang remains the city to beat in the race for the 2018 Winter Olympics. The South Korean resort maintained its front-runner status Wednesday as all three bid cities took their case directly to the International Olympic Committee, seeking to gain vital support just weeks ahead of the vote. Bid teams from Pyeongchang, Munich and Annecy, France, made pitches to IOC members in one of the most crucial phases of the global two-year campaign. IOC members said all three cities made convincing closed-door presentations, with no single candidate slipping up or standing out. “Nobody made a fool of themselves; nobody let themselves down,” Irish member Patrick Hickey told The Associated Press. “They were three extremely professional presentations.” The IOC members will vote for the winning bid on July 6 in Durban, South Africa. Third-time candidate Pyeongchang did what it needed to bolster its strong position, stressing it has kept all promises to the IOC through a decade of bidding and pitching the games to a new winter sports market in Asia. Munich enhanced its credentials as the main challenger, while Annecy showed it has improved dramatically in recent months and should not be counted out. “I think it’s very close,” IOC President Jacques Rogge said. “Don’t ask me numbers, but it’s going to be a close race, definitely. I don’t expect a big gap between the three cities.” The South Koreans brought new star power to the show, with reigning Olympic figure skating champion Kim Yu-na making her international debut to promote Pyeongchang’s bid. Another figure skating star, two-time Olympic gold medalist Katarina Witt, chairs the Munich bid. “I was so much more nervous than when I was competing in the Olympics, but I think it went well,” the 20-year-old Kim said. “I had a little bit of a mistake, but nobody noticed, I hope. I’m very satisfied and happy that I did well.” Asked what score she would give her performance Wednesday, Kim said: “10, yeah.” Each city had 45 minutes for presentations featuring speeches and videos, followed by another 45 minutes for questions and answers. Rogge said members asked a total of 27 questions. The IOC said 88 of its 110 members attended the briefings at the Olympic Museum. Today, the members will visit the candidate cities’ exhibition rooms at a Lausanne hotel and have face-to-face meetings with bid leaders. Pyeongchang, bidding again after narrow defeats in the voting for the 2010 and 2014 Olympics, has been widely considered the favorite from the start as it seeks to bring the Winter Games to a new hub in Asia.


H U N T I N G & F ISH I N G

D6 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Paulina Lake open for fishing today; Big Lava Lake thawing

FLY-TYING CORNER By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

Here’s a dry fly reminiscent of the Goddard’s Caddis, one of my all-time favorite caddis patterns. With its wing and antennae it rides stable on the water and its profile makes it a great choice in still water. Be ready to match a caddis hatch anytime between April and October. Caddis flies may appear between late afternoon and dusk. The Rocky Road Caddis represents an adult drying its wings. During a hatch, fish it dead drift to rising trout or skitter it on the surface. Tie the Rocky Road Caddis on a No. 12-16 dry fly hook. Spin deer hair for the body covering three quarters of the hook shank. Trim the deer hair body tight as shown. Tie

CENTRAL ZONE

BIG LAVA LAKE: Could be ice free and accessible by this weekend; for an update on conditions, call Lava Lake Lodge at 541-382-9443. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Rocky Road Caddis, courtesy Camp Sherman Fly Shop. in two stripped quills for the antennae. Wrap a fine dry-fly hackle at the head. Trim off

the top of the hackle and tie in a tan turkey tail wing and trim to size.

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FLY-FISHING SEMINAR: Saturday, May 21, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Wholesale Sports in Bend, 63492 Hunnell Road; topics include local trout fishing, steelhead, salmon and new products; a slideshow presentation is also scheduled; 541-693-5000. DESCHUTES RIVER SALMONFLY FESTIVAL: Saturday, June 4, from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. at Deschutes River Camp near Warm Springs; free; live music, food, beer and fly-fishing films; Deschutes River Camp is a fly shop and campground that offers fly-fishing products, boating safety items, lodging, fly-fishing schools, a shuttle service and guided fishing trips; 541-553-5555 or www.deschutesrivercamp.com. KOKANEE DERBIES: The Kokanee Power of Oregon (KPO) will host four kokanee derbies this year; entry fee is $50 for nonmembers and $35 for members; cash and tackle prizes for the winners; derbies are June 11 at Green Peter Reservoir near Sweet Home, July 23 at Wickiup Reservoir and Aug. 20 at Odell Lake; applications available at local sporting goods stores and online at kokaneepoweroregon. com; KPO is a nonprofit dedicated to enhancing inland fisheries; contact kent@kokaneepoweroregon.com. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting techniques; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-3064509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets

Shooting Continued from D1 The Bend Trap Club was formed more than 100 years ago by a group of hunters, fishermen and shooters that called itself the Bend Rod and Gun Club. The earliest mention of the club showed up in this newspaper in January 1913. By 1938, the Bend Trap Club was proclaimed one of the best places to shoot in the western United States. We visited the club’s 280-acre property east of Bend last week to shoot their trap, skeet and fivestand courses for the first time. It was a great chance to sharpen up shotgun skills that had lagged since last winter. After the kids and I had fired close to 50 rounds apiece, we repaired to the clubhouse for sodas. “We older fellows enjoy seeing someone new experience the joy of being successful as a shooter. We all love to experience again the feeling of accomplishment that comes with success on the range. To see a newcomer’s accomplishments really gives positive affirmation for the older shooter and affirmation for the younger shooter. It puts smiles on everyone’s faces,” Martin said. It’s an attitude shared by the people who run shooting ranges all over Central and Eastern Oregon. I’ve shot at most of them, and I haven’t found a range that didn’t welcome new members. Wherever you live in Central Oregon, there is a club nearby that offers a place to shoot and a few more-experienced men and women eager to help the newcomer. Each club’s activities reflect the interests of its membership. The Bend Trap Club (www. bendtrapclub.com) is focused on the shotgun sports, while the Bend Bowmen (www.bendbowmen.com) offer indoor target ranges and special events. The Redmond Rod and Gun

be good. Spring hatches are in full swing on the lower Deschutes and will increase as the month progresses. Spring chinook fishing opened on the Deschutes River April 15 from the mouth upstream to Sherars Falls and will remain open until the end of July. The limit is one adipose fin-clipped adult salmon and five adipose fin-clipped jack salmon. Anglers must stop fishing for the day if the limit of one adult is harvested. Anglers can expect good numbers of fish during the month of May.

ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: The lake is accessible and anglers have reported good trout fishing.

E C 

FISHING

FISHING REPORT

Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station; contact: www.sunriveranglers.org. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend; contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING HIGH DESERT ARCHERS: 40-target 3D trail shoot at Camp Sherman; May 21-22; 541-923-8347. YOUTH ARCHERY LEAGUE: At Top Pin Archery in Sisters; Thursdays at 3:30 p.m. through May 26; league fee is $45; 541-588-6339; www. toppinarcheryproshop.com; toppinarchery@bendbroadband.com. STICK & SAGE 3-D ARCHERY SHOOT: June 4-5; Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; off Forest Road 41 west of Bend; 40-target 3-D trail shoot and kids’ 3-D course; traditional/primitive bows only; individuals are $15 for two days or $10 for one day; families are $20 for two days or $15 for one day; hosted by Traditional Archers of Central Oregon and sponsored by the Bend Bowmen; 541-480-6743 or

Club (www.rrandgc.com) range provides trap, skeet, sporting clays and rifle and pistol ranges. Near Madras, the Mt. Jefferson Rifle, Archery & Pistol Association provides indoor pistol, rifle, archery and air gun ranges. The Burns Butte Sportsman Club (541-573-2099) provides 3-D archery, trap, sporting clays, rifle and pistol ranges. Located between Bend and Redmond, Central Oregon Sporting Clays (www.birdandclay.com) offers shotgun rental, sporting clays instruction and competition in a five-stand venue and on a 13-station walkthrough/golf cart course. Serving the Bend/Redmond/ Sisters area, the DeShoots Youth Sports program (541-420-4332) seeks to provide training opportunities to get kids involved in the shotgun sports. Twenty-three miles east of Bend, the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association (www.oregonshooting.com) is made up of many disciplines, including COSSA Kids, cowboy action, handgun silhouette, the Lady Hawkes shooting group and more. COSSA will host a youth day at the COSSA Shooting Sports Complex on Saturday, May 28. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Events will include a 22 rimfire varmint shoot, cowboy action rimfire, cowboy lever action rifle, archery antelope and wingshooting. Guns, ammunition, bows and arrows will be provided. Door prizes will include air rifles, archery equipment and outdoor gear. Thanks to a generous grant from the High Desert Friends of NRA, there is no entry fee. A barbecue lunch will be provided to all in attendance. To find COSSA, travel east from Bend on U.S. Highway 20 toward Burns. COSSA Shooting Park is located a half-mile past milepost 24 on the north side of the highway. Gary Lewis is the host of

drymtcamo@bendbroadband.com. BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-3881737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: Thirteen-station, 100-target course and five-stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2011 family memberships now available for $50; nonmembers are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541-318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

“Adventure Journal” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

CLEAR LAKE: Has not been stocked due to snow pack.

EAST LAKE: The road into the lake is scheduled to open Friday, May 27. East Lake Resort will open that day as well. The lake was still covered by ice as of Wednesday, but it could be thawed by May 27.

CRANE PRAIRIE RESERVOIR: Fishing is good with reports of large rainbows and brook trout. CRESCENT LAKE: No recent reports. If you’ve fished Crescent Lake recently, please send a report to ODFW Fishing Reports.

FROG LAKE: Has not been stocked due to snow pack.

NORTH TWIN: Fishing is good. ODELL LAKE: Kokanee fishing is starting to improve with warming weather. PAULINA LAKE: Opens for fishing today; road is plowed and gate will be unlocked. Lake is mostly ice free. The only accessible boat launch is at Paulina Lake Lodge, which opens today. PINE HOLLOW RESERVOIR: Pine Hollow has been stocked and should be great for spring trout fishing. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond has been filled and will be receiving trout and more bass soon. ROCK CREEK RESERVOIR: Rock Creek has been stocked and should be great for spring trout fishing. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is open to children 17 years old and younger with a bag limit of two fish. SOUTH TWIN LAKE: Fishing is good.

CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: High flows can limit success and anglers are encouraged to monitor flows before venturing out (river flows near Prineville). Anglers are reminded that angling methods are restricted to artificial flies and lures through May 28.

LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: The Metolius arm is open and anglers have been catching several bull trout less than 24 inches and occasional keepers. Anglers must obtain a tribal angling permit to fish in this zone; please reference the 2011 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.

SUTTLE LAKE: Spring sampling showed large brown trout in shoal areas.

CULTUS LAKE: The lake is now accessible and fishing pressure has been low.

LITTLE LAVA LAKE: The lake is starting to thaw. Contact the resort for up-todate information on access.

DAVIS LAKE: Please note this is a flyfishing only lake. Please check your synopsis for the regulations for this water body.

LOST LAKE: Has not been stocked due to snow pack.

WALTON LAKE: Walton Lake is now accessible. The lake is stocked with catchable rainbow trout and the traditional stocking schedule will be resumed this month. Please contact Ochoco National Forest at 541-416-6500 for more information on access.

METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. The river upstream of Allingham Bridge is closed to fishing until May 28.

DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the northern boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): Trout fishing from Maupin to Warm Springs should

TAYLOR LAKE: Taylor Lake should offer anglers a good opportunity to catch trout. The lake was stocked with legal and trophy trout last fall and this spring.

WICKIUP RESERVOIR: Fishing is good. Anglers have been reporting success jigging and trolling for kokanee.

HUNTING REPORT

Turkeys and squirrels are emerging for spring ville BLM for information on access and camping (BLM, 541-416-6700; Ochoco Nat. For. 541-416-6500).

Here is the weekly hunting report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by wildlife biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

TURKEY: Spring has finally arrived and turkeys appear to be moving to higher elevations across the Ochocos. Hunters should be probing higher elevations in the Ochoco National Forest looking for turkey signs and roosting areas.

CENTRAL ZONE OPEN: Spring bear, spring turkey, cougar.

COUGAR: Are present throughout the Maury, Ochoco and Grizzly units, but are more likely near where deer and antelope are concentrated. As snow levels recede and deer and pronghorn disperse to higher elevations, cougars will follow. The Maury and Ochoco units are recommended because of their greater amounts of accessible public land. Remember cougars must be checked in at an ODFW office within 10 days of harvest. Please consult the synopsis for all required parts and be sure to call

PRINEVILLE/OCHOCO WILDLIFE DISTRICT GENERAL: Snow remains at higher elevations, particularly on the shaded northern slopes of the Ochoco National Forest. Those considering venturing from surfaced roads should carry well-maintained coldweather gear and equipment, check weather forecasts and contact the Ochoco National Forest and Prine-

l se list e Di cia e Sp

first to make an appointment. COYOTES: Offer an exciting challenge and, like cougars, will be closely associated with deer and antelope. Hunters should scout and closely monitor the movements of deer and antelope as they disperse from wintering areas to higher elevations. Both the Maury and Ochoco have sizeable areas of public lands that provide hunting opportunities. Hunters should use caution and be properly equipped and prepared for whatever the weather might bring. GROUND SQUIRRELS: Have emerged and are active in agricultural fields throughout Crook and Jefferson counties. Higher numbers are in Crook County on private lands along the Crooked River between Prineville and Paulina. Permission from landowners is necessary to access and hunt these lands.

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Show off your high school grad in our special edition of CENTRAL OREGON

25

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Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Send us a BABY photo to include in our 2011 Graduation Edition, which will publish on Wednesday, June 8. Just bring in or mail your graduate’s baby photo along with the information requested below and a $25 fee by Tuesday, May 24. Photos will be returned only if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

P L E A S E T Y P E O R P R I N T C L E A R LY O N LY T H E F O L L OW I N G I N F O R M AT I O N :

Graduate’s Name Parents’ Names School

Graduate’s Name _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Parents’ Names _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ School _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (Please print graduate’s name on back of photo.) Phone # _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

OUTING

E

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2011

Photos by Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin

Larch Mountain Trail follows the creek that feeds Multnomah Falls and showcases less famous falls, including Ecola Falls above.

Larch madness Tame your curiosity by venturing beyond Multnomah Falls By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

ultnomah Falls might well be the single most-photographed spot in Oregon. After all, it’s just steps from the interstate and frequented by more than 2 million people a year. On any sunny day, the viewing platform at the base of the falls is crowded with cameratoting tourists. Many won’t venture even as far as the viewing bridge midway up the falls. And it’s the intrepid few that will tackle the 11 steep switchbacks to the top of the 620foot falls. But as spectacular as the falls are, there’s so much awaiting just beyond the paved path. Larch Mountain Trail starts among the throngs of tourists but climbs nearly 4,000 feet in 6.8 miles to its namesake peak, passing multiple waterfalls as it winds alongside Multnomah Creek, which feeds the showcase falls. And with snow still blocking the road to the top, it’s a perfect time to go and have the summit all to yourself. I felt a little silly donning my backpack with snowshoes strapped to the back in the parking lot at the falls last Friday.

M

Even on dry, sunny days, the trail to the top of Larch Mountain is generally wet through the spring as snowmelt trickles down.

Still time to sneak in snow play By Lydia Hoffman The Bulletin

Conditions are changing daily in what is still a winter-to-spring transition in the Deschutes National Forest. At lower elevations, the snow has melted and trails may be dry enough for hiking. But there’s still plenty of snow at higher elevations; Mt. Bachelor was expecting two to three more inches by Wednesday night. For winter recreation, Dutchman Flat Sno-park still has good conditions with an above-average 10 feet of snow. Sno-park permits are no longer needed, and dogs are now welcome at Dutchman. Ray Benson Sno-park, in the Willamette National Forest, is also accessible for winter sports, and the Frank Ellis/Wanoga Sno-park

TRAIL UPDATE is marginally accessible for snowmobilers, though it will be a bit rough until they reach higher elevations, said Chris Sabo, a U.S. Forest Service trails specialist. Three Creek Sno-park is closed, but Three Creek Lake still has six to eight feet of snow. The one- to two-foot snowpack at Swampy Lakes Sno-park is marginal to fair. The snow at higher elevations is challenging the snowplows, which leaves in question whether the Cascade Lakes Highway access to Elk and Lava lakes will be open for Memorial Day. It’s probably best to plan on that for

later in the season, said Sabo. In fact, for making Memorial Day plans, look to mid to lower elevations in general. Trails in the wilderness areas are not expected to be open, and elevations higher than 5,500 feet will have challenging access, though skiing, snowshoeing and snow camping are still possible. Parking is not easy, though, with three- to nine-foot snowbanks on the roads. In the Sisters area, the trails at Peterson Ridge are open for biking and hiking as well as equestrian use. At Suttle Lake, there is some construction on the trail between the two campgrounds through Monday or Tuesday. A detour is expected to be set up by the weekend, although bikers may have to walk it. See Trails / E3

The view of Mount Hood from the top of Larch Mountain. A viewing platform at 4,056 feet includes placards identifying the surrounding peaks. In the summer, you can drive almost to the top, but in springtime, you must earn the view. Most of the other folks were wearing shorts and sandals, while I had long pants, hiking boots and a fleece top. I figured the best way to proceed was to hike at top speed and leave the tourists behind. The route up Larch Mountain follows the paved path, across the viewing bridge

Rafting to fight breast cancer Sage Canyon Outfitters and the Imperial River Co. are hosting Splash for Pink, a benefit for breast cancer patients and research, June 25 in Maupin. The event includes a 13-mile whitewater rafting trip on the Deschutes River, a barbecue lunch, live music, activities for children, a raffle and a silent auction. Attendees can check-in at 9:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Registration is $69 per person until June 21, and $79 after. Lunch is $10. A portion of the proceeds will benefit St. Charles in Bend and Redmond; the rest will go to Celilo Cancer Center Fund and Oregon Health & Science University Knight Cancer Institute. The event will be held at Imperial River Co., 304 Bakeoven Road, Maupin.

and continuing for about a mile to the final switchback before the overlook at the top of the falls. At the last bend of the paved road, follow the signs for Larch Mountain Trail onto a dirt trail and across a footbridge. See Outing / E6

SPOTLIGHT

Contact: www.splashforpink .com or 541-980-7345.

Sunriver Resort hosts September marathon Sunriver Resort is hosting the Sunriver Marathon for a Cause Sept. 3-4 to promote breast cancer awareness and to benefit the Oregon and southwest Washington affiliates of Susan G. Komen for the Cure. The event will include a family 5K fun run/walk at 9 a.m. Sept. 3 and a marathon and half marathon at 7 a.m. Sept. 4. The start and finish lines will be at the resort’s main lodge. The course will wind through Sunriver and the resi-

dential communities of Crosswater and Caldera Springs. The event will include a race expo featuring sponsors and vendors, a complete finisher celebration area with refreshments, entertainment and massage treatments, and a “prerace carbo-load pasta dinner” from 4 to 7 p.m. Sept. 3. The dinner is $18 for adults and $12 for children. Cost to participate is $75 for the marathon, $55 for the half marathon and $25 for the 5K fun run/walk if registered by July 17. After July 17, prices will be $85 for the full marathon, $65 for the half marathon and $30 for the 5K fun run/walk. Registration is required. Online registration closes Sept. 1 at 7 p.m. In-person registration closes Sept. 3. Contact: 541-593-1000 or www.sunriver-resort.com/race. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISIO N

E2 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Angry student should make the most of college Dear Abby: May I respond to “Bound for College” (April 9), the high school senior who is distressed because she may have to go to a state university? This is America, the land of opportunity, NOT the land of entitlement. A college education is a luxury, not a right. How fortunate she is to have parents who can send her to college. It is my hope that her father does get that job at the university. What an excellent benefit he will have to get reduced tuition for his offspring. If, however, that is not good enough for her, it is her right to refuse that gift. Then she may go to the school of her choice AND pay for it herself. With the cost of tuition today, that will be quite an undertaking. There are a number of options: student loans, grants, scholarships, a job or an enlistment in the military. As you mentioned, Abby, in your response, education is what you make of it. My suggestion to “Bound for College” is, lose the attitude of entitlement, look at how blessed you are, rethink your priorities and make the most of your opportunities. — Mike M. in Bloomsburg, Pa. Dear Mike: Thank you for your letter. Readers unanimously agreed that “Bound” needs to make the most of the opportunities that come her way and start thinking and acting like an adult. Read on: Dear Abby: I could have written the same letter years ago. The similarities are uncanny. I was accepted to my dream school, but due to my family’s financial difficulties, I ended up attending my backup school, one of the largest public institutions in the country. During the first semester, I was bitter and angry. Slowly but surely, I began to appreciate the benefits unique to a large state university. I enrolled in an honors academic program, which allowed me to receive a rigorous education from an amazing fac-

DEAR ABBY ulty. I became exposed to people from different cultures with differing perspectives. There were numerous student organizations and clubs. I found new hobbies and became active in causes that were important to me. Although I was worried about the school’s party reputation, I quickly found other students who felt the same way I did. “Bound,” the college experience will be what you make of it. For me, it was instrumental in shaping my future. I took advantage of the many resources available on campus. It opened up avenues for me and, most important, helped me to discover myself. I will be starting graduate school as a financially independent adult, and I can finally do it on my own terms. — Sophia K., Arlington, Texas Dear Abby: Like “Bound,” my parents promised I could go to any school I wanted. I applied to one school and got in, but my parents told me I’d have to take out a loan if I wanted to go there instead of a state school (something that was never mentioned). I took the news hard and resented that I was being forced to make my first adult decision and would have debt when I graduated. I chose to stay in-state. The school was a party school, and I spent most of my freshman year angry that I was there. A year later, my anger was gone. Abby, please advise “Bound” that it’s what you make of the college experience that counts. — Been There in Richmond, Va. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘The Good Wife’ ends its season on timely note – with sex scandal By Ginia Bellafante New York Times News Service

Had the sexual assault charges against Dominique StraussKahn, managing director of the International Monetary Fund, never surfaced, “The Good Wife” would have invented them. It is easy to imagine that the writers are already mining a story from his ugly circumstances for a forthcoming script. (And then moving on to an episode about Arnold Schwarzenegger.) The details would change — the nationality of the accused might shift from French to Italian; the IMF might become the Fund for Global Monetary Alliance; the New York hotel suite where the police said the attack took place might become a hospital room in Chicago. “Recovering from a heart attack during a meeting of the G-8,” the synopsis on CBS.com would read, “Giovanni CaroMotti retains Lockhart Gardner to fight charges that he molested a nurse.”

Sexual politics Political sex scandal is the show’s inspiration and metier, its background and foreground. Upfront is the marriage of Peter and Alicia Florrick in the long aftermath of revelations that as state’s attorney Peter had forged too good a friendship with a prostitute named to confuse no one about her profession: Amber Madison. In the second season, which ended Tuesday night, we also learned that during those days Peter (Chris Noth) slept with a young investigator in his office who went on to work at Lockhart Gardner and befriend his wife. The sort of law firm that wouldn’t want to bother if you

simply needed to merge your midcap grain distribution company with an outfit in Minnesota, Lockhart Gardner is immersed in a world at the nexus of power, sex and big money. Its cases are never dull and rarely, if ever, lost. In a plotline this season echoing a situation faced by Al Gore not long ago, the firm chose to represent a hotel masseuse who hoped to sue a liberal demigod and Nobel Peace Prize winner who she claimed had groped her. “What he does in Africa on account of women,” the prospective plaintiff tells her lawyers, confoundedly, “and then he does this.” On the television screens that provide their own kind of surround sound on the series, there are frequent glimmers of situations similar to Peter and Alicia’s: a news flash, for instance, of a congressman’s wife receiving $1.3 million for a memoir about her husband’s infidelities, or the bogus musings of a morning news analyst examining the body language of forsaken political wives. Among the show’s running themes are the notions that public and private selves are virtually never integrated and that marriage is an institution really just for daredevils. The only stable and surviving one depicted is corporate: the partnership between the chic Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski), with her political convictions, and the more opportunity-minded Will Gardner

(Josh Charles). Theirs is a dance of admiration, one between soul mates with a dazzling shared sense of ambition. When the two are threatened by an interloper (a briefly tenured third partner), they avowedly recommit.

Imperiled marriages It is Diane and Will who are living the comedy of remarriage, to borrow the phrase of the philosopher Stanley Cavell. Peter and Alicia are not; their efforts at rekindling have gone awry. In the show’s evolving ideology, endangered careers can find rebirth, but imperiled marriages have a more difficult time steadying themselves. This season tracked Peter’s efforts to regain his spot as state’s attorney, and lo and behold, he won. Marketing a rehabilitated image, Peter defeated a female opponent with illegal-nanny issues, a turn reflecting the idea that men in the public sphere might weather the results of their domestic transgressions better than women. The show is acutely aware of the subtler mechanics of sexism. Buddy Cianci, the fabled mayor of Providence, R.I., returned to office in the 1990s even after having pleaded no contest to assaulting a man he believed to be his wife’s lover. Every weeknight on CNN Americans can consume the opinions of the former New York governor Eliot Spitzer, even though he was

exposed, three years ago, as a client of the escort service Emperor’s Club VIP. Arguably, the world has heard considerably less from the Clinton-era nannygate casualties Zoe Baird and Kimba M. Wood. Among the many modern realities to which “The Good Wife” is astutely attuned is the sense that the expansion of social media has put the contemporary political campaign in an insidious mode of constant response. For much of the season Eli Gold, the Democratic operative brilliantly played by Alan Cumming, maniacally ran around, forced to offer counternarratives to whatever viral video or act of citizen journalism threatened to shift Peter’s fortunes in the polls. The show’s fundamental tension comes from the sense that someone is always watching. No misbehavior or exercise in obfuscation ever goes unnoticed. In the final seconds of the season finale, an eerie shot of a long, empty hallway in a hotel, where Alicia (Julianna Margulies) has just embarked on her own affair, suggests the presence of a hidden eye and the presumption that the matter will not remain hushed. The show is one of the very few on television (Fox’s “House” is the only other that comes to mind) committed to the portrayal of elite intelligence at work. Here characters are permitted to use words like sophistry, and the belief in the viewer’s own sophistication is intact. For that alone, “The Good Wife” should serve as a calling to network executives everywhere.

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Among the show’s running themes are the notions that public and private selves are virtually never integrated and that marriage is an institution really just for daredevils.

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KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘14’ Burt Wolf Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Richard Bangs’ Adventures Burt Wolf Nightly Business

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ‘PG’ Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

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Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office Search Committee (N) ’ Parks/Recreat Parks/Recreat Big Bang Theory Engagement The Mentalist The CBI mole’s identity comes to light. (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Grey’s Anatomy (N) ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Private Practice (N) ’ ‘14’ American Idol (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Bones The Change in the Game ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Without a Trace Odds or Evens ‘14’ Without a Trace Patient X ‘14’ Å Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide Doc Martin On the Edge ‘PG’ Å The Story of India ’ ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office Search Committee (N) ’ Parks/Recreat Parks/Recreat Smallville Finale Part 1; Finale Part 2 Clark becomes the Man of Steel. ‘14’ House of Payne Meet the Browns Woodsmith Shop Moment-Luxury Watercolor Quest Joy/Painting Mexico Julia-Jacques Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide Doc Martin On the Edge ‘PG’ Å The Story of India ’ ‘PG’

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Shark Vacuum Ninja Kitchen 51 36 40 52 ››› “Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room” (2005, Documentary) Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ COTV Blazer Profiles PM Edition Cooking Oregon City Club of Central Oregon The Buzz Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ COTV Blazer Profiles Ride Guide ‘14’ HS Baseball 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Fish Hooks ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie ›› “High School Musical 3: Senior Year” (2008) Zac Efron. Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch Exit Wounds ’ ‘14’ River Monsters Silent Assassin ’ Swords: Life on the Line (N) Å Deadliest Catch Exit Wounds ’ ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Desert Car Kings Pontiac GTO ‘PG’ NBA Basketball Oklahoma City Thunder at Dallas Mavericks (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Countdown (Live) Å Football Live Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) Football Live Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight (N) SportsNation Å 22 24 21 24 SportsNation Å Car Auctions Car Auctions UWF Wrestling UWF Wrestling AWA Wrestling Å Boxing: 1961 Clay vs. Johnson Boxing: 1961 Griffith vs Paret II 23 25 123 25 College Football From Oct. 16, 2010. Å SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) SportsCenter (N) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ ››› “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone” (2001) Daniel Radcliffe. J.K. Rowling’s student wizard has his first adventure. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Iron Chef America Flay vs. Stein Challenge Steak cook-off in Texas. 24 Hour Restaurant Battle Deli Battle Chopped Canned Cheese, Please! 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (3:30) ›› “Click” (2006, Comedy) ››› “Ghost Town” (2008, Comedy) Ricky Gervais, Téa Leoni. Premiere. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “The Waterboy” (1998, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Kathy Bates. 131 Curb/Block Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Curb/Block Titanic’s Tragic Sister ‘PG’ Å Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Swamp People Deadly Skies ‘PG’ Swamp People Rising Sons (N) ‘PG’ Mounted in Al. Mounted in Al. 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The Dan Patrick Show (N) Table Tennis 20 45 28* 26 College Track and Field Pac-10 Men’s and Women’s Championships Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å iMPACT Wrestling (N) ’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles 133 35 133 45 Sarah Connor Chronicles Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord Å Live-Holy Land The Evidence Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens ›› “Con Air” (1997) Nicolas Cage. Vicious convicts hijack their flight. Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Skirts Ahoy!” (1952, Musical Comedy) Esther Williams, Joan Evans, Vivian Blaine. ›› “Dangerous When Wet” (1953, Musical Comedy) Esther Wil- (10:45) ››› “Easy to Love” (1953) Esther Williams. An aquatic ››› “Million Dollar Mermaid” (1952, Biography) Esther Williams, Victor Mature. A 101 44 101 29 crippled woman regains the use of her legs by swimming. Å Three join WAVES to see world, meet men. Å liams, Fernando Lamas, Jack Carson. Å performer tries to attract the man she loves. Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Pawn Queens ’ Pawn Queens ’ Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Pawn Queens ’ Pawn Queens ’ Police Women of Broward County 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss: Icing on the Cake ‘PG’ Law & Order Good Faith ’ ‘14’ Bones Two Bodies in the Lab ‘14’ Bones The Woman in the Tunnel ‘14’ ››› “Signs” (2002, Suspense) Mel Gibson, Joaquin Phoenix. 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Food ‘G’ Off Limits Los Angeles ‘G’ Å Bizarre Foods/Zimmern 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (11:13) Everybody Loves Raymond 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit 15 30 23 30 House Distractions ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live in the 2000s: Time and Again ’ ‘14’ Å Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Å Mob Wives ’ ‘14’ Å 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) › “The Ugly Truth” 2009 ‘R’ ››› “Rudy” 1993, Drama Sean Astin, Ned Beatty. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “My Best Friend’s Wedding” 1997 Julia Roberts. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:50) ››› “Chicago” 2002 Catherine Zeta-Jones. ’ (11:45) Year One ››› “Hello, Dolly!” 1969, Musical Comedy Barbra Streisand, Walter Matthau. ‘G’ Å ›› “The Jewel of the Nile” 1985, Adventure Michael Douglas. ‘PG’ Å Love-Ctastroph ›› “The Jewel of the Nile” 1985, Adventure Michael Douglas. ‘PG’ Å Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Moto: In Out Moto: In Out AMA MX Highlights 2011 (N) The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ Crusty’s Dirt Demons ’ ‘14’ AMA MX Highlights 2011 The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ LPGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial, First Round Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Nationwide: BMW Charity Pro-Am, First Round LPGA Tour Golf The Waltons The Achievement ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:30) › “All About Steve” 2009 Sandra (6:15) ›› “Ghosts of Girlfriends Past” 2009 Matthew McConaughey. Spirits of ex-lov- ›› “A Nightmare on Elm Street” 2010, Horror Jackie Earle Bridesmaids: HBO Treme Aunt Mimi and Davis’ record com- Taxicab Confessions: The City That HBO 425 501 425 10 Bullock. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ers show a cad his failed relationships. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Haley, Rooney Mara, Kyle Gallner. ’ ‘R’ Å First Look pany. ’ ‘MA’ Å Never Sleeps ’ ‘MA’ Å (5:03) ››› “Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World” 2003, Adventure Russell Crowe. ‘PG-13’ (8:05) ›› “The Notorious Bettie Page” 2006 Gretchen Mol. ‘R’ (10:05) ››› “After Dark, My Sweet” 1990 Jason Patric, Bruce Dern. ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:50) ›› “National Security” 2003 Martin Lawrence. Two feud- (6:20) ››› “The Informant!” 2009, Comedy-Drama Matt Damon, (8:15) ›› “Starsky & Hutch” 2004, Comedy Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson. Two detectives ›› “She’s Out of My League” 2010 Jay Baruchel. An average “Alien Sex Files 3: MAX 400 508 7 ing security guards go after murderous thieves. Scott Bakula, Joel McHale. ’ ‘R’ Å investigate a cocaine dealer. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. ’ ‘R’ Å Sex Wars” ’ Naked Science (N) ‘PG’ Known Universe (N) ‘PG’ Break It Down Jersey Prison (N) ‘PG’ Naked Science ‘PG’ Known Universe ‘PG’ Break It Down Jersey Prison ‘PG’ Alaska-Trooper Alaska-Trooper NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Speed Racer Power Rangers Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Speed Racer Power Rangers Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Adven./Jimmy Adven./Jimmy NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt Whitetail Nation Magnum TV Wardens Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Whitetail Pro Ted Nugent Trophy Quest Beyond the Hunt Wild Outdoors Outdoors Trophy Hunt Adv. Abroad OUTD 37 307 43 “See You in September” 2010 Justin Kirk. iTV. A couple dates ›› “Youth in Revolt” 2009 Michael Cera. iTV. A teen goes on a ››› “Adventureland” 2009, Comedy-Drama Jesse Eisenberg. iTV. A college graduate Nurse Jackie The Secret Diary of a Gigolos (N) ’ Secret Diary of a SHO 500 500 for one month without sleeping together. ‘NR’ carnal quest to lose his virginity. ’ ‘R’ Å takes a lowly job at an amusement park. ’ ‘R’ Å Astonishing ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Call Girl (N) ‘MA’ Call Girl ’ ‘MA’ Sprint Pit Crew Challenge Sprint Cup and Nationwide pit crews. (N) The 10 ‘PG’ NASCAR Race Hub NASCAR Hall of Fame Biography NASCAR Hall of Fame Biography NASCAR Hall of Fame Biography SPEED 35 303 125 Starz Studios ‘14’ (5:20) ››› “Michael Jackson’s This Is It” 2009 ‘PG’ (7:15) ››› “About a Boy” 2002 Hugh Grant. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “Salt” 2010 Angelina Jolie. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:40) › “When in Rome” 2010 Kristen Bell. ‘PG-13’ STARZ 300 408 300 “Race” 2007 Voices of James Hereth. Animated. Interplanetary (6:45) › “Miss Conception” 2008, Romance-Comedy Heather Graham, Mia Kirshner. ››› “Cairo Time” 2009 Patricia Clarkson. An unexpected love ››› “A Single Man” 2009 Colin Firth. A gay man contemplates (11:45) “The Ghost TMC 525 525 car races determine the fate of the universe. A woman searches for a man to father her child. ’ ‘R’ affair catches a pair by surprise. ‘PG’ Å suicide after his lover’s death. ’ ‘R’ Å Writer” ’ NHL Hockey Boston Bruins at Tampa Bay Lightning (N) (Live) Hockey Central Cycling Tour of California, Stage 5 World Extreme Cagefighting Ben Henderson vs. Anthony Pettis Cycling Tour of California, Stage 5 VS. 27 58 30 My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å My Fair Wedding With David Tutera WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins; bring a lunch; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-312-1092 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “GREEN FIRE — ALDO LEOPOLD AND A LAND ETHIC FOR OUR TIME”: A screening of the documentary about the conservationist Aldo Leopold; proceeds benefit National Forest Foundation’s local restoration efforts; $10; 6 p.m.; Sisters Movie House, 720 Desperado Court; 541-549-8833. FROM BOTTLE ROCKET TO JUNK RAFT: Marcus Eriksen talks about marine conservation and sailing 2,600 miles across the ocean on a 30-foot raft made from a fuselage and plastic bottles; $12, $10 High Desert Museum members, $3 students; 6 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE”: The Summit High School theater department presents an adaptation of Jane Austen’s tale of courtship and manners; $10, $7 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300 or https://touchbase.bend.k12.or.us. “THE WIZARD OF OZ”: The Redmond High School drama department presents a musical about Dorothy, Toto and their adventures in the land of Oz; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800, ext. 2125. “D’S PLACE”: A presentation of Howard Schor’s drama about a liberated woman who runs a parlor in 1864; $17; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beat tickets.org. STAR PARTY: Kent Fairfield presents, followed by stargazing; proceeds benefit Pine Mountain Observatory; donations accepted; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Redmond Proficiency Academy, 657 S.W. Glacier Ave.; 541-526-0882. EMPTY SPACE ORCHESTRA CD RELEASE: The instrumental post-rockers perform, with Diego’s Umbrella and The Quick & Easy Boys; $15; 8:30 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www .emptyspaceorchestra.com.

FRIDAY YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Cascade Chorale; free admission; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; 2116 N.E. Monterey Ave., Bend. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jean Nave reads from her children’s book “Harry and Lola with Smoki the Magical Cat”; free; 10 a.m.; Sisters Christian Academy, 15211 McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4133. SPAY-GHETTI BENEFIT DINNER: Spaghetti dinner and pastry auction; reservations recommended; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond’s spay and neuter program; $15 or $8 ages 12 and younger in advance, $18 or $10 ages 12 and younger at the door; 5-8 p.m.; The View Restaurant, Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-923-0882. ART & WINE AUCTION: Featuring wine and beer tasting, a dinner, live music and an auction; registration requested; proceeds benefit Deschutes Children’s Foundation; $99; 5:309:30 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541-388-3101, jacob@ deschuteschildrensfoundation.org or www.deschuteschildrensfoundation.org. UPSTREAM FUNDRAISER: Featuring food, live music and a silent auction; proceeds benefit The Upstream Project; $40; 6-9 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-382-6103, ext. 33 or www.restorethedeschutes.org.

AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rosanne Parry reads from her book “Second Fiddle”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “CAT’S-PAW”: The Rever Theatre Company presents the dramatic tale of an environmental terrorist who attempts to justify his actions; $12 or $10 students and seniors in advance, $14 or $12 students and seniors at the door; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-6555, revertheatreco@gmail. com or www.revertheatreco. ticketleap.com. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE”: The Summit High School theater department presents an adaptation of Jane Austen’s tale of courtship and manners; $10, $7 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300 or https:// touchbase.bend.k12.or.us. “THE CRUCIBLE”: The Crook County High School drama department presents Arthur Miller’s classic story of intolerance and hysteria during the Salem witch trials; $5; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900, ext. 3132. “THE WIZARD OF OZ”: The Redmond High School drama department presents a musical about Dorothy, Toto and their adventures in the land of Oz; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541923-4800, ext. 2125. JOSHUA ENGLISH: The Portlandbased roots rocker performs; free; 7-9 p.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, 436 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-5161128 or www.greenplowcoffee.com. “BLACK SWAN”: A screening of the R-rated 2010 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “D’S PLACE”: A presentation of Howard Schor’s drama about a liberated woman who runs a parlor in 1864; $17; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541312-9626 or www.beattickets.org. LAST BAND STANDING: A battle of the bands competition featuring local acts; tickets must be retrieved at participating venues; free; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; http://url.bb/LBS11. JENNIFER BATTEN: The New Yorkbased guitarist performs; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoon brewing.com.

SATURDAY FLAPJACK FRENZY: Eat pancakes as a benefit for Central Oregon Teen Challenge; RSVP requested; $6, $4 ages 10 and younger; 8-11 a.m.; Central Oregon Men’s Center, 435 N.E. Burnside Ave., Bend; 541678-5272. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Cascade Chorale; free admission; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; 2116 N.E. Monterey Ave., Bend. RHS FARMERS MARKET: Vendors sell fresh produce, herbs, flowers, plants, food and art; free admission; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800. RUMMAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Future Farmers of America; donations accepted; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-225-7902. POLE PEDAL PADDLE: Participants will race through multiple sports from Mt. Bachelor to Bend; the Les Schwab Amphitheater, which marks the end of the race, will host a festival with food, music and vendor booths; free for spectators; 9:15 a.m. start time on Mt. Bachelor; 10:30 a.m. booths open; Mt. Bachelor ski area, 13000 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-388-0002 or www .mbsef.org.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

JACKS OR BETTER FUNDRAISER: An easy 7.2-mile loop and poker; proceeds benefit the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Posse; $15 per hand; 9:30 a.m., 9 a.m. registration; Skull Hollow Camp and Trailhead, Lone Pine Road and F.S. Road 5710, Redmond; 541-647-7613. ICEBREAKER POKER RUN: South Central Oregon Outreach and Toy Run hosts a benefit featuring a poker ride open to all street-legal vehicles, followed by games and live music at Wickiup Station; $10 per hand, donations requested from those not participating in the poker run; 10 a.m.; Harvest Depot, 51453 U.S. Highway 97, La Pine; 541-536-2644 or www.scootr.org. STEPPING OUT TO CURE SCLERODERMA WALK: Walk to benefit scleroderma research; $20 in advance, $25 day of walk, free ages 13 and younger; 10 a.m., 9 a.m. registration; American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; 541-480-1958 or mzann@ bendbroadband.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook talks about his book “Bend, Overall”; free; 11 a.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. JAPANESE FESTIVAL: Featuring traditional arts and crafts, with dancing, drumming, eating competition and other performances; with a silent auction; proceeds benefit Ashinaga’s relief effort for orphans in Japan; donations accepted; noon-4 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3211 or ami.zepnewski@bend .k12.or.us. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR STAR PARTY: Professional and amateur astronomers share telescopes with novice stargazers, preceded by a night sky tour; daytime activities include exhibits, demonstrations and presentations; free; noon, star gazing begins at 10 p.m.; Prineville Reservoir State Park, 19020 S.E. Parkland Drive; 541-923-7551. KEEP IT LOCAL — VOLUNTEER EXPO: Community organizations will be on hand to answer questions about volunteering options; free; 1-4 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1086 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. LIBERTY SPEAKS!: Featuring songs and speeches about liberty and America’s future; free; 1-3 p.m.; Crossroad Community Church, 63945 Old Bend-Redmond Highway, Bend; 541-2805800. “THE WIZARD OF OZ”: The Redmond High School drama department presents a musical about Dorothy, Toto and their adventures in the land of Oz; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 1:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-9234800, ext. 2125. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE”: The Summit High School theater department presents an adaptation of Jane Austen’s tale of courtship and manners; $10, $7 students, seniors and children; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300 or https://touchbase.bend.k12.or.us. HOT HERO’S CHILI COOK-OFF: Sample chili prepared by police, firemen and military personnel; proceeds benefit Safety Outreach for Seniors; $5 for five tastes, free ages 5 and younger; 2-4 p.m.; Bend Villa Retirement, 1801 N.E. Lotus Drive; 541-548-8817 or mphillis@ councilonaging.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: William Sullivan talks about his book “Oregon Favorites: Trails and Tales”; with a slide show; free; 3 p.m.; East Bend Public Library, 62080 Dean Swift Road; 541-312-1032 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Fred Swisher and Sarah Whipple talk about their book “55 Myths, Tips and Secrets: Bend’s Essential Guide to Landscaping”; free; 4 p.m.; Costco, 2500 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-382-5188. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Scott Cook talks about his book “Bend Overall,” with a slide show; registration requested; free; 5 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541-593-2525. CENTENNIAL OF NAVAL AVIATION ARMED FORCES DAY: Featuring a dinner, displays, flight simulators and a movie; free; 5-8 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6408 or niels.farner@bend.k12.or.us. VFW DINNER: A dinner of turkey and mashed potatoes; $7; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. EAGLES DINNER: The Eagles Auxiliary hosts a Mexican dinner; $7; 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Rosanne Parry reads from her book “Second Fiddle”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “PRIDE AND PREJUDICE”: The Summit High School theater department presents an adaptation of Jane Austen’s tale of courtship and manners; $10, $7 students, seniors and children; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-322-3300 or https://touchbase.bend.k12.or.us. “THE CRUCIBLE”: The Crook County High School drama department presents Arthur Miller’s classic story of intolerance and hysteria during the Salem witch trials; $5; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900, ext. 3132. “THE WIZARD OF OZ”: The Redmond High School drama department presents a musical about Dorothy, Toto and their adventures in the land of Oz; $10 in advance, $12 at the door; 7 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-923-4800, ext. 2125. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs, with Shireen Amini; $5-$10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www.bendgospel .webs.com. ROOTDOWN: The Eugene-based reggae-pop band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins .com. COMEDYCORE UNDERGROUND: Central Oregon comedians perform; ages 21 and older; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436, ryan@thewhitebull. com or www.bendticket.com or www.comedycore.org. “D’S PLACE”: A presentation of Howard Schor’s drama about a liberated woman who runs a parlor in 1864; $17; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www .beattickets.org. VAGABOND OPERA: The Portlandbased bohemian operatic cabaret performs; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.bendticket.com.

SUNDAY PANCAKE BREAKFAST FUNDRAISER: Pancake breakfast, with games; proceeds benefit ministry community service projects; $8, $4 ages 10 and younger; 8:30-11:30 a.m.; Bend Seventh-day Adventist Church, 21610 N.E. Butler Market Road; 541-382-0098 or www .bendadventist.net.

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

ATLAS SHRUGGED (PG13) 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 THE CONSPIRATOR (PG13) 2, 4:35, 7:10 EVERYTHING MUST GO (R) 2:25, 5, 7:35 JANE EYRE (PG-13) 2:05, 4:40, 7:15 MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

AFRICAN CATS (G) 12:55, 3:25, 6:55, 9:20 ARTHUR (PG-13) 6:20, 9:45 BRIDESMAIDS (R) 12:45, 3:55, 7:05, 10

FAST FIVE (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 7:30, 10:30 FAST FIVE (DP — PG13) 3:10, 6:45, 9:40 HANNA (PG-13) 1:55, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50 HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (3-D — PG) Noon HOP (PG) 12:05, 3 JUMPING THE BROOM (PG13) 12:25, 3:05, 6:35, 9:35 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 2, 5, 8:10, 10:35 PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (3D — PG-13) Midnight PRIEST (3-D — PG-13) 1:40, 4:15, 7:50, 10:05 RIO (G) 12:35, 3:45, 6:10, 9:10 SOMETHING BORROWED (PG13) 1:15, 4:55, 7:45, 10:25 SOUL SURFER (PG) 12:10, 3:35, 6:15, 9:15 THOR (PG-13) 12:20, 3:20, 6:30, 9:25 THOR (3-D — PG-13) 1:05, 1:50, 4:05, 4:50, 7:35, 8, 10:10, 10:40 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG13) 1:35, 4:35, 7:25, 10:15

EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) 6 YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 9:15

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Die-hard fans want to keep ‘Code’ alive By Mary Schmich Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — By day, Michelle Ford is a mild-mannered worker at the University of Chicago’s student counseling center. But at night? She’s a warrior for “The Chicago Code.” “HOW DARE THEY CANCEL THIS SHOW!” she posted to her “Keep the Code” Facebook friends Monday night as the Fox show wound toward its harrowing climax. “They better not replace it with some ... crap!” She was sitting in her suburban basement, pounding at her laptop. Would sexy, brash Detective Wysocki cave to the malignantly seductive Alderman Gibbons? Would tender, brave Liam die? At every commercial break, Ford shot another bullet of indignation to her fellow fans. “High stress episode tonight or what?” she typed. “Oh yeah, this is the show that just got canceled right?” When Ford established her “Keep the Code” Facebook site a couple of months ago, she was on the early edge of a wave to save a show that last week was pronounced dead. Now Facebook throbs with fans, on various sites, desperate to see the show live for a second season. Last week, Justin Schroeder, a 27-year-old bakery team leader at Whole Foods in Evanston, Ill., started a Facebook “event,” urging people to watch the last two episodes. “I visited a few Facebook pages that seemed to be building some support, but to what end?” he emailed me Tuesday. It was fine to sign the “Save the Chicago Code” petition or write the head of Fox TV, but that struck him as firing spitballs at Goliath. “So what works?” he e-mailed. “Ratings work. It’s a numbers game. With two episodes remaining, what about building

Trails

M T For Thursday, May 19

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

FAST FIVE (PG-13) 3:45, 6:30 INSIDIOUS (PG-13) 5, 7:15 RIO (PG) 4:45, 7 THOR (PG-13) 3:30, 6:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

BRIDESMAIDS (R) 6:45 GREEN FIRE: ALDO LEOPOLD AND A LAND ETHIC FOR OUR TIME (NR) 6 JANE EYRE (PG-13) 6:30 THOR (PG-13) 6:45 WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13) Mon-Wed: 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

HOODWINKED TOO! HOOD VS. EVIL (PG) 6 THOR (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 4, 7 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room

Continued from E1 Black Butte is not fully accessible, and there are some trees down past the snow line. Crane Prairie and Wickiup reservoirs are accessible, though they currently have patchy snow. The trails at Cultus Lake are under snow, Sabo said, but the parking is cleared and the boat ramp is open. The snow is melting around Crescent, said Sabo, with only patchy snow still around Crescent Lake. Snowmobiling in that area is wrapped up for the season. Skiing and snowshoeing is still possible in the backcountry, though Sabo said recreationists should only go “with an extra margin of safety from an avalanche perspective.” Lava Cast Forest is still inaccessible from the road. Recent road work has improved access to Lava Lands Visitor Center, which recently moved to spring hours of Thursday through Monday. Benham Falls East day-use trailhead is pretty much open, Sabo said, and Tumalo Falls

support for more people to actually WATCH the show and hopefully make an impact to get Fox to reconsider or another network to take interest?” When “The Chicago Code” premiered in February, I was not an instant fan. The writing was better than average, the plots were ambitious, and Chicago, even in the broken neighborhoods, looked as gorgeous as a tourist brochure. Still, something was slightly off in the pace, the dialogue, the tone. But week by week, like a stiff new shoe that loosens up, the show has gotten better. The story, centered on a corrupt alderman played by the riveting Delroy Lindo, tightens like a blood pressure cuff. The annoyances — constant references to the Irish mob, some bad Chicago accents — have either diminished or I’ve gotten used to them. I’ve turned into a big fan and think there’s an untapped audience for the show. When word got around Tuesday that I was writing this column, I started hearing from fans from all over. Several Chicagoans said the show has introduced them to parts of the city they didn’t know existed. Out-of-towners said it made them want to visit. Some noted the jobs it brought to the city and the exposure it gave Chicago talent. And all of them raved about the good acting and uncommonly intelligent, adult plots. Sadly, those credentials don’t rival the allure of the show’s usual 9 p.m. time-slot competitor, “Dancing with the Stars” on ABC. Yet Ford and her fellow fans reach for crumbs of hope. Monday’s ratings were up 12 percent among viewers 18 to 49. And was it a happy omen that the comeon for next week’s show referred to the “season finale,” not the “series finale”?

opened this week with a clear trail up to the viewpoint. Lower-elevation trails with good access include the Deschutes River Trail, Phil’s Trail, Peterson Ridge, Paulina Creek Trail and Horse Butte Trail. Before you venture out, know that a Northwest Forest Pass is required and dogs in the Deschutes River corridor are required to be on leash from May 15 to Sept. 15. More mountain biking trails are starting to open. Farewell Trail connecting to Mrazek Trail and then to Shevlin Park may yet have moderate patches of snow in the shaded sections at the highest elevations. North Fork Trail is still closed to mountain biking. The Newberry Crater gate may open as soon as Thursday for access to the Paulina Lake Lodge. For campground availability in Deschutes National Forest, Sabo suggested checking out the Hoodoo website, http://hoodoo.com, and using the campgrounds pulldown menu. Lydia Hoffman can be reached at 541-383-0358 or at lhoffman@bendbulletin.com.


E4 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY J A C Q U E L I N E BI GA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, May 19, 2011: This year, you open up to new potential and a different lifestyle. Opportunities often come forward out of the blue. You do the necessary research to decide if they are a go or not. To many people, it might look as if you are carrying Lady Luck in your back pocket — that is not the case. You do your homework. If you are single, someone quite different comes into your life. He or she finds you intriguing. If you are attached, take a long-desired trip together. Your in-laws could play a big role in events. CAPRICORN understands you better than you think. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Explore your options before committing to a set path of action. To get where you want to be, you will have to assume the lead position. Ultimately, you might make a surprise decision. Tonight: Could go till the wee hours. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Relate on a one-on-one level with a key person. The caring between you evolves slowly but surely. Try to detach from a hot issue. Take a walk or do some creative visualization. You could be stunned by what comes up. Tonight: Reach out for a special person. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Deal with others directly if you want results. You could be delighted by a surprise revelation, though it might force you to go in

another direction. Someone you care about might be very uptight and worn out. Tonight: Make special time for a loved one. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Defer to others and use the spare time for yourself. Clearly someone acts in an unpredictable manner. Unfortunately, this person has clout. You might not be comfortable with events as they seem to occur. Imagine what it must be like to be this person. Tonight: Think about weekend plans. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Dig into work, and don’t hesitate to create more of what you need and want. Listen to what others share, realizing your present limits are not permanent. Stay centered and make strong decisions. A child or loved one spurs new ideas. Tonight: Run errands. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Your creativity opens up many new ideas. Realize when enough is enough. You might want to have a discussion, whereas a partner could bolt if he or she feels that a heavy conversation is heading in his or her direction. Tonight: Start your weekend early. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH You could be in a funk as you attempt to work through a poignant issue. You might feel as if you can no longer make headway or breeze through hassle after hassle. Possibly you are exhausted. Tonight: Head home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH You seem to be in the midst of the action. You could be surprised by what another person

shares. What is going on here? Laughter centers others and helps you gain a perspective. Whether it’s new technology or a novel approach, you could be challenged to grow. Tonight: Hang out with friends. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Others consider you to be quite savvy with money. Truth be told, you take risks and have a fine-tuned sense of when to do so. Knowledge and luck mix well for you. Tonight: Balance your checkbook first. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You might be presented with an offer that is too good to be true. Most of the time those types of opportunities are just that — too good to be true. In this case, you are likely to benefit from the offer. Make an important call late today. Tonight: Just be yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HH You have a lot on your mind. Staying anchored could be close to impossible. Loosen up when sharing with a child or loved one. What seemed to be impossible could happen. Keep your own counsel, with the exception of one trusted friend. Tonight: Vanish. Do your thing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH A meeting might be the source of your personal stimulus. Though you are tired, an opportunity heads in your direction. Recognize what is going on within a special relationship or friendship. Let the good feelings flow. Tonight: The more people the better.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS

or www.redmondoregonrotary.com.

TODAY

FRIDAY

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. DISABLED AMERICAN VETERANS: 6:30 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-389-0775. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-6287 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-9453. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889

BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND KNITUP: $1; 10 a.m.noon; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, Bend; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. TABLE TALK: 10 a.m.; Common Table, Bend; 541-633-7163.

SATURDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for

Outing Continued from E1 The creek here cascades over a series of steps with two large waterfalls and plenty of small ones. Pass Weisendanger Falls in another half mile and then Ecola Falls, about 800 feet above the Columbia River. Even on a dry day, the trail in early spring is constantly wet and sometimes muddy as snow melt trickles down every crack and valley. It’s amazing to see how calm and serene the water looks right up to the edge of the falls, no doubt taking the unsuspecting droplets of water by surprise before their violent plunge. At times, the trail is cut out of the rocky cliffs alongside the river, creating wet overhangs. Most of the route is shaded either by cliffs or tree cover, making it a wonderful outing for a hot and sunny day. Past the two named waterfalls, Larch Mountain Trail meets up with Wahkeena Falls Trail, which traverses along the gorge and meets Wahkeena Falls in another 2.5 miles. From these falls, it’s another mile back to the parking lot at Multnomah Falls Lodge, making a moderate 5.5mile loop. For the Larch summit, however, pass the turnoff for Wahkeena Falls and continue up the trail. The route crosses another three footbridges crossing back and forth across the creek. It’s never really difficult hiking, but the climb is sustained. There’s a section of the trail that’s impassable when the water is high, but signs point to a high-water detour if needed. Despite the recent warming trend, there’s still a lot of snow above 2,500 feet. More than half of the hike is on snow right now, albeit fairly solid, well-trodden snow. Larch Mountain is a pop-

Hood River 84 AREA OF INSET

location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. DAR: 1 p.m.; Meadow Lakes Golf Course, Prineville; 541-322-6996. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363.

SUNDAY 99ER BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0069. BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BINGO: 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

MONDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678.

r Columbia Rive

TUESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge &

Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. BIRDING BY EAR: 7:30 a.m.; Sawyer Park, Bend; www.ecaudubon. org or 541-318-8998. CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room; 541-312-1046 or kevinb@ deschuteslibrary.org. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. REDMOND LIONS CLUB: 5:307 p.m.; Rumors, Redmond; tombessonette@gmail.com TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. VIETNAM VETERANS OF AMERICA: 6 p.m.; VFW Post 1643, Bend; 541-388-1512.

WEDNESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental

Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: $3; 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 6-8 p.m.; Summit Saloon & Stage, Bend; 541-383-3502. CASCADE BRIDGE CLUB: 6 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, Bend; 541-788-7077. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HIGH DESERT CORVETTE CLUB: Jacket night; 7 p.m.; Roszak’s Fish House, Bend; 541-549-6175. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:05-1 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, Prineville; 541-416-6549. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 7 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

Sherrard Point is the old volcanic plug atop Larch Mountain. The peak is cordoned off by the chain link fence, but a viewing platform provides ample reward for the spring climber.

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Multnomah Falls

The Dalles 35

CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

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1 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

If you go Getting there: Drive on Interstate 84 East from Portland to exit 31 and follow the signs for the Multnomah Falls parking area. Cross under the Interstate through a tunnel to the Multnomah Falls Lodge and the start of the hike. Difficulty: Strenuous (Moderate and easy options from the upper and lower trailheads on Larch Mountain Road will be accessible later this summer.) Cost: Free Contact: Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Hood River, 541-308-1700 ular training hike for Portland climbers and has seen a lot of traffic of late. Although I carried snowshoes, the snow was packed down enough that I never needed them. Even with the snow cover, the trail is easy to follow right now. The route is also marked with round trail markers on the trees. At about 3,200 feet, you’ll pass a dirt road that leads to a trailhead halfway up the

Larch Mountain Road. Some years, the road opens as early as the start of May, but this year’s snowfall will likely keep the road closed till July. Once open, the lower trailhead leaves a hike of about 3.2 miles, and 1,800 feet of elevation gain to the top. The road continues to the upper trailhead, about a quarter mile below the summit. But for the next month or so, if you want to see the view from the top, you’re going to have to earn it. Larch Mountain is a volcano whose crater has been scraped away by glaciers on its north side. The remaining arc is connected to a small outcropping called Sherrard Point at 4,056 feet. The point is the hardened lava plug of the volcano. Larch’s slopes are covered in trees, so you don’t really get a view of the crater rim or the summit until the very end. The plug is cordoned off with fences, but there’s a nice viewing platform with placards identifying the surrounding peaks: Hood, Jefferson, Adams, Rainier and St. Helens. It can get pretty windy on top, so come prepared with a wind jacket.

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The full climb to the top takes about three to five hours; budget extra time until the snow melts. You can return the 6.8 miles to the parking lot in two to four hours. It’s a challenging hike that will make you sweat the entire way. But as you cross the bridge in front of Multnomah Falls, the cool spray is so refreshing. Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

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IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Money Noise pollution inside hospitals is a growing concern, Page F2

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, MAY 19, 2011

MEDICINE

FITNESS

Smiling

Learning to swim at young age has benefits

again

By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

As Memorial Day approaches, families may be daydreaming about spending hot afternoons playing at the public pool or swimming at a mountain lake. But young children and big water can be a risky mix. Swim lessons can help improve children’s safety but in no way guarantee against drowning, the second highest cause of death for children. And that’s why the question about when to teach young kids to swim has been debated in recent decades. The American Academy of Pediatrics in 2000 advised against swim lessons for children between 1 and 3 years old because there was little evidence that lessons prevented drowning or resulted in better swimmers. And, the academy warned, swim lessons for that age group could potentially lead to less vigilant parental oversight near water. However, last year the academy softened its stance and became more open to the idea of classes for younger children, although it has not outright recommended lessons for the younger-than3 set. New evidence, the group said, shows that children ages 1 to 4 might be less likely to drown if they have had some formal swim instructions. The studies are small, however, and don’t prescribe any particular type of swim lessons. See Swim / F6

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Cheryl Karcher, 56, smiles outside her house in northeast Bend. She had a radical jaw surgery in March that left her with two scars, top photo, at her ear and on her jaw. The surgery is controversial, but for Karcher it relieved severe pain that had debilitated her for years. Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Innovative jaw joint surgery took bite out of Bend woman’s debilitating pain The artificial jaw

By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

B

efore jaw surgery, pain ruled Cheryl Karcher’s life. The Bend woman started having jaw problems as a teenager, was diagnosed with arthritis in her 30s and had two artificial hips before she turned 50. Now 56, she said arthritis had degraded her jaw so far that it was barely functional and caused unbearable pain. “It consumed my life,” she said. She quit working, quit attending family gatherings and even quit chewing; she pureed most of her food. Karcher’s pain was relieved using a rare surgery to replace her jaw joint, the joint just below the temple that allows the mouth to open. It is possible she is the first person to have the procedure done in Central Oregon. For Karcher, the surgery was a godsend. She says she can go out, eat and enjoy life in a way she has not been able to in years. But the wisdom of replacing the jaw joint with an artificial part is currently being debated. Major public health agencies including the National Institutes of Health and Food and Drug Administration have both raised questions about its safety. “Surgical treatments are controversial, often irreversible, and should be avoided where possible,” advises a patient information page on the NIH website. Surgeons say the procedure can benefit a very small number of patients who can’t find relief any other way. See TMJ / F4

The artificial jaw is made up of two parts that fit together. The upper section, made of polyethylene, is attached with screws to the skull, in line with the cheekbone. The lower section of the artificial jaw bone runs down one side of the face and is fixed to the existing jaw bone with screws. It is made of a metal alloy. The two-part design allows the jaw to bend so that recipients can chew and open their mouths.

Photo courtesy of Biomet Microixation

WH A T IS TMJ? TMJ is often used incorrectly. It refers to the joint itself, not to disorders associated with the joint or jaw. Saying ‘I have TMJ’ is akin to saying ‘I have an elbow.’ If you have something wrong with your TMJ, you may be said to have a TMJ disorder or TMJ dysfunction, but everyone has two TMJs, one on each side of the face.

Traci Winters helps her 9-month-old daughter Savannah during a Thursday night swim lesson at the Cascade Swim Center in Redmond.

NUTRITION

Vitamin D2 or D3? It really doesn’t matter By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Vitamin D is a popular supplement that regulates the absorption of calcium and phosphorus in the body, which helps keep bones strong. Vitamin D comes in many forms, but the two forms that are important to humans are vitamins D2 and D3. So which to choose? “I’d tell someone to take D3,” said Kyle Mills, a pharmacist with Bend Memorial Clinic. “But it’s not a big issue. They probably both work fine.” There have been arguments against D2, Mills said, but they are weak. Some research says D3 increases blood serum levels more efficiently. And D2 has a shorter life, he added, so a person couldn’t miss as many doses. If, for example, a person forgot to take his supplements on vacation, D3 would linger in the body longer than D2, he said, “but it’s so subtle it’s probably clinically irrelevant.” See Vitamin / F3

INSIDE

MEDICINE

NUTRITION

FITNESS

Vital stats

Did you know?

Exercise tips

Cancer incidence falls overall in Oregon, Page F4

Toenails reveal a slightly different view of mercury, Page F3

Which strength-training machine is right for you? Page F6

Correction In a story headlined “Financial swings ease at St. Charles hospitals,” which appeared Thursday, May 12, on Page F3, the number of layoffs at St. Charles in 2009 was incorrect. The health system laid off 74 people and reduced hours for an additional 45 people that year. The Bulletin regrets the error.


F2 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Next week Front-line health care workers are in high demand.

Hospitals drowning in noise

VITAL STATS Double trouble Double trouble Health care costs for a typical family of four with an employer-sponsored preferred provider organization plan have more than doubled over the past nine years, according to the 2011 Milliman Medical Index. The employee share of those costs, including premiums and out of pocket costs, has also more than doubled from $3,634 in 2002 to $8,008 in 2011.

Medical centers work to quiet beeps, alarms and chatter

Health care costs for a family of four

$9,325 $10,168

$11,192

$12,214

$14,500 $13,382

$15,609

$16,771

$18,074

$19,393

2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Source: Milliman Medical Index

2011

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Payson Flattery and Sather Ekblad have completed a Kennedy Decompression Technique certification program. The 24-hour training focused on spinal decompression, which is used to treat acute or chronic back pain. St. Charles Bend has been awarded the Get With The Guidelines: Stroke Silver Quality Achievement Award from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. The award recognizes the hospital’s compliance with requirements such as aggressive use of appropriate medications, therapy and smoking cessation. Chris Cooper, a physical therapist at Therapeutic Associates at The Athletic Club of Bend, has received certification for the K-Vest 3 sensor wireless 3-D motion analysis system. The system measures golf-swing efficiency as biofeedback for therapeutic exercise.

How to prepare for anesthesia By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

For many patients, anesthesia is the scariest part of surgery. But you can ease your fears — and help prevent the rare negative outcome — with awareness and good communication with doctors, says Dr. Paul Rein of Virginia Anesthesia VAPCS, a practice based in southeastern Virginia. Don’t panic. The chances of dying in a car crash are about 40 times greater than from an anesthetic, Dr. Rein says. “The reality is anesthesia has become very safe because of better techniques, better monitoring and better practitioners,” he says. Don’t cheat on “no food or drink” orders. As a rule, patients should have nothing for eight hours before surgery — even gum. If you get sick and vomit while under anesthesia, the contents can get into your lungs and be dangerous. Know your medical history. Tell your doctor the specific

names and doses of all drugs you take, as well as past surgeries. If you’ve had problems with anesthesia before — including nausea — speak up. Also pass along any known family history of complications. Stop taking herbal medications. Doctors generally advise avoiding these products for two weeks before an operation, as they can cause increased bleeding. Ask questions. Meet with your anesthesiologist and get all the answers you need before heading into the operating room. Learn about the types of drugs you will get; you may have a choice between general or regional anesthesia. Arrange for a caregiver. A responsible adult should drive you home and stay with you the day of an outpatient surgery, even after minor operations. Don’t take a taxi or get dropped off at home alone; on top of recovering from surgery, you’ll likely feel the effects of anesthetic drugs for several hours.

By Julie Deardorff Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — At 3:15 p.m. on a weekday, the busy eighth floor of Chicago’s Saint Joseph Hospital is buzzing with noise. Alarms beep incessantly. The elevator dings each time the doors open. During the shift change, the “cocktail effect” kicks in; people talk louder, straining to be heard over the hubbub. “When I get home at midnight, I can still hear it (in) my head,” nurse Pedro Arreza said, pointing to the electronic monitors. “But it comes with the territory.” Health care is noisier than ever. Worldwide, the sound levels inside hospitals average 72 decibels during the day and 60 decibels at night, far exceeding the standard of 40 decibels or less, set by the World Health Organization. The racket is generated by obvious bedfellows: human beings and technology. But the clamor of modern medicine can harm both patients and staff, a growing body of research on noise and health suggests. Unwanted sound wrecks sleep, raises stress levels, induces medical mistakes and contributes to alarm fatigue, which occurs when monitors shriek so often they are ignored or turned off, causing safety issues. In response to concerns, hospitals throughout Illinois and the U.S. are launching “quiet campaigns” that include eliminating intercom paging, replacing metal trash cans, installing sound-absorbing flooring and paneling, and dimming lights at night to remind staff to keep their voices down. Northwestern’s Prentice Women’s Hospital was designed with multiple smaller nurses’ stations rather than one central one to enhance privacy and reduce noise. In the neonatal intensive care unit at the University of Chicago, signs designed to protect babies’ underdeveloped nervous systems say: “Did you know …? Tapping on the top of an isolette (incubator) is equivalent to the sounds of heavy traffic during rush hour!” Helping health officials rethink hospital safety and design is the Healthcare Acoustics Research Team, an unusual collaboration of experts with experience in acoustics, engineering, architecture and psychology and medicine. Right now, “there simply aren’t enough companies manufacturing materials that absorb sound and are appropriate for use in hospitals,”

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said Ilene Busch-Vishniac, a HART team member and coauthor of an important Johns Hopkins study that showed day and nighttime sound levels have risen significantly in hospitals since 1960. “So what is available is expensive.” Redesigning hospitals is costly as well. “We don’t know what’s best,” said Abram Walton, an assistant professor of industrial technology at Purdue University, who is conducting a pilot study using a noise sensor tied to the lighting systems in Midwestern hospitals. “Closed rooms haven’t been shown empirically to unequivocally reduce noise.” Like libraries, hospitals used to be considered quiet zones. In her 1859 book “Notes on Nursing,” Florence Nightingale railed against unnecessary noise, calling it “the most cruel absence of care.” But the information age ushered in alarms, motorized beds, monitors, more alarms, automatic hand sanitizer machines, high-powered bone-cutting tools and even more alarms. In older buildings, one of the largest noise generators of all can be the airhandling system. Even environmental factors — such as a lack of trees on hospital grounds and power generators located nearby — can contribute to the din. Hospitals are also highly reverberant spaces “that contain the full spectrum of humanity, usually at their most vulnerable,” said Diana Pope, a nursing research scientist for the Department of Veterans Affairs at the Portland Medical Center and another HART researcher. The buildings feature hard, easy to clean surfaces such as tile floors. Porous or fuzzy materials are rarely used to absorb energy or deaden space in healthcare settings because they can harbor microorganisms.

Noise pollution Today noise — even more than hospital food — is one of the top hospital complaints. Patients exposed to the loudest sounds can lose up to two hours of sleep each night, according to University of Chicago researchers who studied how noise affects the elderly. Sleep deprivation can trigger a host of health problems, including high blood pressure and high blood sugar, fatigue and mood changes. “Hospital noises levels are far from acceptable, with maximums exceeding the noise level of a chainsaw,” concluded study co-authors Vineet Arora and Jordan Yoder.

Heather Charles / Chicago Tribune

Saint Joseph Hospital registered nurses talk quietly underneath the Yakker Tracker, which looks like a stoplight. The Yakker Tracker keeps a tab on noise levels on the floor. Studies also report that noise in hospitals increases heart rates, blood pressure, respiratory rates and cortisol levels. People in noisy recovery rooms requested more pain medication. Pre-term infants, perhaps the most sensitive population, are at increased risk for hearing loss, abnormal brain and sensory development and speech and language problems when exposed to prolonged and excessive noise.

Aiming for quiet Nevertheless, hospitals are doing what they can to turn down the sound. At Rush University Medical Center, a “silent” patient call button system has reduced intercom pages. Rush’s new hospital, scheduled to open in 2012, is trying to reduce noise by 90 percent from its current operation, said Mick Zdeblick, Rush’s vice president of campus transformation. The new patient care hallways will be carpeted, backed by a strong spot-maintenance cleaning program, said Zdeblick. In off hours, lights will be dimmed to encourage softer voices in the hallway. The building’s air flow has been designed to be more quiet. Committees are even looking at hanging more sound-absorbing artwork in the hallways, such as a canvas without glass, or decorative cloth reliefs. Many hospitals, including Swedish Covenant and Resurrection Health Care’s Saint Joseph, have installed Yacker Trackers, a kitschy sound meter that looks like a stoplight and flashes red when it gets too noisy. Marketed for school classrooms, the Yacker Tracker is hardly a scientific instrument. At St. Joe’s, it’s positioned above an 8th floor nurses station because an outlet was available.. And though it had been in use for less than two weeks, on a recent visit its novelty and effectiveness seem to have worn off. Between 2 and 3:30 p.m. on a Tuesday, the device hit red 301

times. Each time, much to the staff’s annoyance, a low-pitched siren went off, adding to the din. Still, nurse Arreza said it was a good reminder that patients need rest. And every so often, he lightens the mood by walking up to the Yacker Tracker and laughing at it, just to see what will happen.

‘Alarm fatigue’ “Alarm fatigue,” or the failure of medical staff to respond to incessantly beeping devices, is one of the top five conditions creating safety issues in hospitals, according to the national organization that accredits the facilities. “They’re constantly going off, and studies suggest the vast majority of time no action is taken,” said Ilene Busch-Vischniac, McMaster University provost and a noise researcher. “People don’t pay attention to alarms; they exist as much for legal liability reasons as much as for actually doing anything for patients.” Critical alarms can go off if a patient simply moves or gets up to use the bathroom. They may beep when one of five heart monitor leads comes off, even if the device still works. “Certain alarms we know aren’t critical so we don’t rush,” said Ana Garcia, manager for telemetry at Resurrection Health Care’s Saint Joseph Hospital. “I know some nurses do get fed up with them. You just have to adjust to their rhythm.”


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D I D Y O U K NOW? Is mercury in fish bad for our hearts? The answer lies in toenails

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

TESTING SUPPLEMENTS ConsumerLab.com, a company that tests supplements, published a report recently with results for 49 supplements that contained vitamin D. Products that earned an approval rating met the claims on their labels and ConsumerLab.com’s quality criteria. Those that did not meet approval were: • “DEVA Vegan Vitamin D.” Tests showed only 83 percent of the claimed amount of vitamin D2. • “Nature’s Life D-2,” vegetarian capsule. Tests found labeling infraction for not providing required FDA disclaimers. But the product did meet quality standards. • “Vitafusion vitamin D3” (gummy bears). Tests found only 32 percent of the claimed vitamin D3. • “AlgaeCal Plus,” vegetable capsules containing vitamin D, calcium and vitamin K. Tests found lead contamination in the supplements: 3.9 mcg and 5.2 mcg of lead, respectively, in suggested servings of three and four capsules. Also, labels did not provide required food allergen disclosure for people with sensitivity to soy. • “Pure Essence Labs Ionic-Fizz Super D-K Calcium Plus” (a powder). Tests found lead contamination: 2.1 mcg to 4.1 mcg of lead per day. Also, labels did not provide required food allergen disclosure for people with sensitivity to soy. • “Kirkman Calcium/Magnesium” liquid. Tests found only 44 percent of claimed vitamin D3. • “DaVinci Laboratories of Vermont Vitamin K2 Plus,” contains vitamin D3. Tests found only 74 percent of listed vitamin K2, and labels did not provide required food allergen disclosure for people with sensitivity to soy. • Children’s “Li’l Critters Calcium Gummy Bears with Vitamin D.” Tests found 250 percent of claimed vitamin D2.

Who knew so much science could be stored in our toenails? Thousands of donated toenails helped researchers conclude that there is no link between mercury exposure and heart disease or stroke. Toenails, which are easy to collect and store, are a good gauge of long-term exposure to metals such as mercury. Health experts have advised eating fish to improve heart health. But some also worried that the mercury in certain types of fish was harmful. Previous studies on mercury and heart problems have been inconsistent. To look at the relationship between mercury and heart health, scientists analyzed mercury and selenium levels in the toenails of 3,427 participants who had cases of coronary heart disease or stroke, and compared them with the toenails of an equal number of people who didn’t have cardiovascular problems. The recent study, funded by the

lation had sufficient vitamin D, about one-quarter were at risk of vitamin D inadequacy and 8 perContinued from F1 cent were at risk of deficiency. The difference is in chemical Vitamin D use increased 52 structure. Ergocalciferol, called percent over the past two years, vitamin D2, is derived from plant according to a ConsumerLab sources. Cholecalciferol, called .com survey of people who use vitamin D3, is found in animal supplements. sources, such as fish oils and “Vitamin D is the darling of eggs, and is synthesized in the vitamins. We’re finding a lot of human skin when it is exposed people are truly deficient,” said to sunlight. Lori Brizee, a registered dietiFoods may be fortified with vi- tian who has her own private tamin D2 or D3, and supplements practice. But she also cautioned could contain either. Sometimes that at extremely high levels, the a bottle label will just say vita- supplement has been associated min D. The supwith a risk of panplement facts in creatic cancer. small print on the “D3 manufacturers And, as with back might clar- lead people to most suppleify if it’s D3, or ments, there is a the ingredient list believe that it’s risk of toxicity for could contain the the way to go, but children. word “cholecalcifThe Institute erol” if it’s D3, for it really doesn’t of Medicine sugexample. gests that children matter.” Most suppleup to 6 months old ments, unless oth- — Tod Cooperman, can tolerate no erwise specified, president of more than 1,000 probably contain ConsumerLab.com IUs; children 6 D3, Mills said. months to 1 year “D3 manufacshould consume turers lead people to believe that no more than 1,500 IUs; those 1 it’s the way to go, but it really to 3 years old should consume doesn’t matter,” said Tod Cooper- no more than 2,500 IUs, and for man, president of Consumer those 4 to 8 years old, no more Lab.com, a company that tests than 3,000 IUs. pills and publishes ratings for Mills, the pharmacist, said alsubscribers. though food sources of vitamin ConsumerLab.com reported D are highly unlikely to accuthat years ago, studies indicated mulate to toxic levels, he recomthat at higher doses, such as mends adding up the intake of 4,000 international units, or IUs, the vitamin from food sources a day, D3 was better at maintain- when considering how much of ing blood serum levels of the vi- an additional supplement a child tamin. But newer studies, using would take. a more common dosage (1,000 Bend Memorial Clinic regisIUs), show the two forms to be tered dietitian Eris Craven added equally effective at raising and that toxicity levels for adults are maintaining the serum levels. above 10,000 IUs, which would Mills recommends most adults be impossible to obtain from consume about 1,000 IUs a day. food unless a person ate a lot of The recommended daily al- cod liver oil, which is the food lowance for most people is 600 source with the highest amount IUs, according to the National of vitamin D — 1,360 IUs per Institutes of Health. For com- tablespoon, she said. parison: One egg provides 41 IUs “You do not need to include of vitamin D. A 3-ounce piece of food sources of vitamin D, outcooked salmon has 447 IUs. And side of cod liver oil. Someone one cup of fortified milk has 115 would have to take 4 tablespoons to 124 IUs. of cod liver oil daily to reach the Research suggests vitamin D upper limit, and they still would could protect against osteoporo- be far from toxicity levels. To sis, high blood pressure, cancer prevent overdosing, one should and some autoimmune diseases. add up all the Vitamin D that is A couple of years ago, studies found in the variety of dietary said that most Americans were supplements they are consuming deficient in the vitamin. A U.S. daily.” Department of Health and Human Services brief from March Anne Aurand can be reached said that between 2001 and 2006, at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@ two thirds of the country’s popu- bendbulletin.com.

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Discover What The Pro Athletes Are Using To Get Out Of Pain -- Without Surgery Thinkstock

National Institutes of Health and published in The New England Journal of Medicine in March, suggested that mercury exposure from ingesting fish was not increasing coronary heart disease, stroke or cardiovascular disease. Participants with higher mercury exposures did not have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

Add a mango to your diet for added vitamin power By Jennifer LaRue Huget Special to The Washington Post

Vitamin

Central Oregon. I see people reduce pain medications, avoid surgery, and get their life back -- every day... and all that without surgery. Yes, you heard me right. I specialize in disc degeneration, herniated discs, bulging discs, spinal stenosis, and sciatica.

Mangoes should be at their peak starting this month. Sweet and juicy, the tropical fruit is an excellent source of vitamins A and C and is packed with fiber. You can peel and eat them just as they are (that’s my favorite way), add them to smoothies or build a salsa around them. Registered dietitian Keri Gans, author of “The Small Change Diet,” says adding mangoes to the shopping list can help fruit lovers add variety. “People need to be a little more adventurous in their diets,” she says. “Otherwise, they get bored.” Gans suggests trading your customary banana for a mango, “at least for a little while.” She likes to use mango

“People need to be a little more adventurous in their diets. Otherwise, they get bored.” — Keri Gans, author, “The Small Change Diet” slices to sweeten her oatmeal or plain Greek yogurt. A word of caution, though: With sweet fruits such as mango, portion control is key. “One half of a small mango is a serving size,” Gans says. “Even fruit has calories, and they have a way of adding up, even if they’re nutritious calories.”

If you haven’t heard of non-surgical decompression yet, it’s a shame. People all over the country are embracing this therapy. There are PGA pros, professional football players, and people just like you getting back to their old self -- Fast! Here is the “conventional” procedure for back pain patients. “Take these drugs and get some rest. Let’s see what happens in a month.” When that doesn’t work there’s always the option of getting a needle filled with steroids placed directly into your back. Down the road when it’s finally bad enough you may need surgery. This might seem like a good plan for some. I work with those who want to get their old life back without going under the knife. If you have fallen for that trap and Forgive Me For are in desperate need of relief of ad on. back pExpressing ain, you should reMy

Opinion About

Forgive Me For Expressing My Opinion ASurgery. bout Surgery -- I Hated

ToISee My Grandma Suffer Believe Surgery

Be does A Last HowShould many surgeries it take to getResort, it right? Two, three, four ... And That my sweet Grandma had seven There Effective before it was Are a success. Talk about suffering. Maybe you see Non-invasive why I believe surgery should be a lastSolutions resort. Do youAvailable. have that kind of time? I have a better solution. People in my office get out of pain fast, and can be back doing the things they love while they are being treated. And you don’t have to feel like you are a drug addict to feel good. The New Solution -- Fast And Long-Lasting Relief We have a non-surgical, non-drug solution. And it’s fast and effective.

Thinkstock

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Central Oregon Caregiver Conference Creating Moments of Joy May 24, 2011 7:30 am - 3:30 pm Mount Bachelor Village Resort 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive Bend, OR 97702

Keynote Speaker: Jolene A. Brackey, BA Author of “Creating Moments of Joy”

Other Speakers: Jodi Winnwalker, Director of Earthtones Music Therapy Services

Co-Sponsored by

Marya Kain, MS, Owner of Power of the Heart: Dementia Care Education and Behavior Coaching

Cost: $30 per person payable by check or a credit card (on-line) Register by mail or online. For more details please visit alz.org/ oregon. You can now register online at alzoregon.kintera.org/Bend2011

Programs and services in the Central Oregon region provided by The Recil & Violet Watson Center.

It’s It’s called callednon-surgical non-surgicalspinal spinal decompression. Let me give decompression. Let me giveyou youathe summary low downononthis thisgroundbreaking groundbreaking technology. technology.

This is a computerized decompression machine that stretches the spine in a unique way. It creates negative pressure deep in the diseased disc. The negative pressure acts like a vacuum that pulls the disc material away from the spinal cord and spinal nerves. Eliminating pain and symptoms. At Anthe d atsame the stime ame the timenegative the negpressure ative pulls ater aninto d pressnutrients, ure pulls nwater utrienand ts, woxygen the oxydisc. gen iYou nto tsee he dwith isc. disc You diseases, see with the disc discisdactually iseases, tsick! he diIt’s sc idehydrated. s actually And ratedis. Ahow nd smany hrinkiof ng . sick!shrinking. It’s dehydThat our Thapatients t is howregain many their of oulife. r patients

regain their life.

Do Any Of These Case Studies Sound Familiar To You? Case #125. Darlene D. After her surgery she was left in some serious pain. This pain lasted 32 years. She came in to us and in three weeks she was out of pain. In five weeks she was on her roof working with her husband. Do you see what we can do for you? We are offering a solution to your pain. To get your life back, FAST! Case #89. Bruce F. After a traumatic car accident, Bruce was left in pain. He went here and there but didn’t find relief. So he came to see us. The treatments were painless. He got out of pain. He now runs, walks the beach, and plays with his kid. All without pain. Does your current therapy offer you this kind of relief? What are you waiting for? Case #320. John M.’s MRI said, “Annular Tear,” Ouch! His episodes of pain put him on his back for two weeks every couple months. He began treatment and his pain decreased almost immediately. Over the course of treatment his back felt stronger and more flexible. No episodes to this day. Do you want to improve the quality of your life? Are your current therapies doing that for you? Case #25. Kevin. Headaches every day of his life since an accident. Headaches gone after first treatment. Peace could be defined as finding a solution to a problem that has you feeling completely crazy. Imagine how Kevin must have felt, and how he feels now! You don’t need a referral to see me. In fact, I want all to come and see me. You are invited to be evaluated by me. I will cover the cost. There is a catch -- you have to qualify. You see, I will not take anyone. I will only treat those I can help.

Don’t Delay Your Pain Relief Come And See If You’re A Good Candidate To Eliminate Your Pain This examination typically costs $245. Right now you can get it for free. That is -- if you qualify. Call now to see if you qualify for this exclusive evaluation. It is a great opportunity to be evaluated by a spinal expert.

It’s A Free Consultation This is what you will discover during your free consultation... ? Why you’re in so much pain? ... You’ll actually get a diagnosis that makes sense. ? How long it will take to get you better? ... It’s less time than you think.

Before you stop reading this, call our number to schedule your free appointment now!

(541) 923-2019 Redmond Wellness & Chiropractic 1655 SW Highland Ave., Suite 6 Redmond, OR 97756


F4 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M

Next week When you call the doc in the middle of the night, who answers?

TMJ

V ITA L STA TS

Continued from F1 “Careful diagnosis is necessary,” said Dr. Edmond Truelove, professor of oral surgery at the University of Washington and a national expert on disorders of the jaw joint. Very few patients fit it, he said. Truelove said that of the 1,000 patients referred to his practice each year, at most one would be recommended to have surgical joint replacement. “You have to make a determination that this person can’t function properly unless they have surgical intervention.”

Cancer in Oregon Cancer incidence in Oregon In Oregon, the incidence of cancer diagnoses fell overall. But some types, notably thyroid and cervical cancer, rose.

Five-year rate change for all demographics, 2003-2007 PERCENT CHANGE

Stomach Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Breastfeeding is universally recommended as the superior method for feeding infants because it’s linked to long-term prevention of various illnesses including asthma, diabetes and obesity. A study released Monday puts more emphasis on breast-feeding by showing it may have a lasting impact on metabolism. French researchers analyzed three years of data following 234 children and how they were fed after birth. One group of children

-2

Colon & Rectum

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

“There’s a number of nerves and arteries near the surgery area,” Krueger said. “We’ve got so much at stake on the patient’s face.” One wrong move, and Karcher might have lost the ability to smile, or move her face at all. Everything went well. When she woke up in room 351 at St. Charles Bend, she had no pain, she said. “Surgery was rough and it was long, but to me it’s a miracle. I just can’t tell you how happy I am.… This has given me my life back.”

A risky operation? Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

In an x-ray of Karcher’s jaw, the white image that looks like an upside down golf club is her artificial jaw. The white areas along her teeth are crowns or fillings. To train on how to implant an artificial jaw joint, Krueger spent three days in Pennsylvania with surgeons who worked with the joint manufacturer. At that same time, Karcher was getting ready as well. She weaned herself off morphine to take away her tolerance for the drug so it could be used when she was in surgery recovery. That part was awful, she said. She barely left the house because even walking jarred her head so much it was painful. In March, both were ready. They would give the artificial jaw joint a shot.

The surgery To do the surgery, Krueger made two incisions, one in front of the ear and one on the jaw line, about two-thirds of the way between the ear and chin. Going through the top incision, Krueger exposed the jaw bone, up near where it connected to Karcher’s skull. Then he used a saw to cut the top portion of it off. To form the socket as a fit for the artificial bone, Krueger used screws to attach the top part of the artificial joint, made of polyethylene, to her skull just past her cheekbones. He then inserted the artificial bone, a metal alloy that fit into the socket and ran from her temple down to her jaw. The entire surgery took about seven and a half hours. It was a delicate procedure, he said.

Krueger said he felt comfortable doing the surgery despite the FDA warnings. He said he was satisfied with data from the manufacturer, Biomet Microfixation, a Floridabased medical device company. “They have patients that are doing well many years out.” But the FDA’s warning, released earlier this year, concerns exactly that issue. After analyzing data from patients who had their devices implanted between April 2004 and August 2010, the agency said it found that a substantial number needed implant replacement within three years because of extreme pain. The agency noted that, based on the industry studies, the artificial jaw joints were supposed to last at least five years. “The problem is that the studies done are not highly sophisticated studies,” said Truelove. He said the industry-sponsored trials, such as those cited by the FDA, didn’t compare devices to each other in a way that gave meaningful results. He said there’s a paucity of that type of data. “There have been almost no studies when you look at joint replacement,” Truelove said. “The longevity (of the artificial joint) is not well known.” Truelove said there’s some evidence that the newer joints, such as the one Karcher got, may last longer. But the devices are new, so no one knows for sure. Still, Truelove said he has referred patients for the surgery. “I don’t want to suggest that this was an inappropriate surgery,” he said. “It sounds like the surgeon has been very cautious and that’s the way it should be.” Physicians, and perhaps regulatory agencies, are wary, Truelove said, because jaw implants have historically had problems. Several years ago, he said, artificial discs put into jaw joints

received only breast milk for the first four months of life. The other two groups were randomized to receive either a low-protein formula or a high-protein formula. Both of the formula types contained protein amounts that are within recommendations. The study showed that children who received breast milk for the first four months had a specific pattern of growth and metabolic profile that differed from the formula-fed babies. Even at 15 days of life, the breastfed infants had blood insulin levels that were lower than the

formula-fed infants. By 3 years of age, many of the metabolic and growth differences between the breast-fed and formula-fed infants had disappeared. However, blood pressure readings were higher in the infants who had been fed the highprotein formula compared with breast-fed infants. The blood pressure rates were still within the normal range. The study suggests that if breast-feeding is not possible, infants should be fed formula that has a metabolic profile as close to human breast milk as possible.

caused problems in patients leading to thousands of people needing surgery to remove the implant. “That turned out to be a complete disaster,” Truelove said. “Since then surgeons have become much more circumspect about whether they should be doing any TM joint surgery at all.” Karcher said she had been through as much as she could take. “(Krueger) really tried everything to save my jaw,” she said. Even if there are complications of surgery down the road, she said, she’d accept them, knowing that for her, the alternative was far worse. “There are some things that could go wrong, but do I want to be on drugs for the rest of my life or in such pain that you can’t even hang out with your family?” Karcher said. “There was no choice.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@bendbulletin.com.

4

6

8

10%

0

2

4

6

8

10%

-4.5 -4.3 -2.5 -1.8

Bladder

-1.2

Oral Cavity & Pharynx

-1

Brain & ONS

-.5

Esophagus

-.3

Prostate

-.3

Uterus

-.2

Pancreas

-.1

Breast (Female)

0

Melanoma of the Skin

1.3

Kidney & Renal Pelvis

2.4

Leukemia

2.5

Liver & Bile Duct

3.8

Breast (in situ)

4.8

Cervix

6.6

Thyroid

9

PERCENT CHANGE

2

-.8

Ovary

Cheryl Karcher demonstrates exercises she does to help open her jaw. Karcher had radical jaw surgery in March to relieve pain from severe arthritis of her jaw and now has an artificial joint.

0

-5.2

Lung & Bronchus

Breast-feeding appears to program an infant’s metabolism, study says By Sh ari Roan

-4

All Cancer Sites

Horrible pain The jaw joint, more officially called the temporomandibular joint and often abbreviated TMJ, connects your jaw to your skull. If you put your fingers just in front of your ears and open and close your mouth, you can feel it hinging. Disorders of the joint are relatively common and can cause pain, stiffness or problems with the bite. Often the pain manifests in areas around the head and neck, and people with TMJ issues often get headaches or stiffness in their neck and shoulders. For Karcher, the pain got worse with the years. She had her two jaw surgeries within just a few years. She tried acupuncture. She upped her medications. Nothing seemed to help. It hurt so bad, she said, that she couldn’t roll onto her side at night. Last year, she got the maximum dose of morphine she could take at home, she said. That’s when her pain specialist suggested she talk to Dr. Keith Krueger, a local oral surgeon, to see if there was anything left to do. “She has such bad degenerative joint disease,” said Krueger. “She’s a little more unique than other patients.” Krueger had never done a jaw joint replacement in Central Oregon. He said of all the patients he sees only 10 percent need surgery, and those surgeries are typically much less invasive than a full joint replacement. Most patients, surgeons say, get better with more conservative treatments. Time is the most potent treatment, Truelove said. He noted that many people who have problems in their 20s and 30s get better as they age. Studies have found that TMJ disorders tend to be more prevalent in younger adults, an unusual finding for a chronic pain condition. To relieve pain, the NIH recommends ice packs, soft foods and doing things to help relax. Pain killers may also help, as can Botox injections. For those who clamp down at night, a bite guard is recommended. Often the pain is caused by muscle tension, Truelove said, so treatments to target that pain rather than jaw dysfunction can help. Surgery is rarely used, and this radical a procedure is an even rarer occurrence. “There are indications for total joint (replacement),” said Dr. Leon Assael, an oral surgeon at Oregon Health & Science University. But he said the number of patients likely to benefit is very small. “It is an end-stage intervention.” Krueger said that in his practice he rarely sees someone that needs the level of work that Karcher did, and he had never done this surgery.

-6%

-6%

-4

-2

Source: National Cancer Institute Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 F5

K S A A

HEALTH PROFESSIONAL c/o The Bulletin • 1526 NW Hill St., Bend OR 97701

PERMANENT MAKEUP

Q

I can’t wait for summer. I love to get out in the sun & tan. I’ve had Permanent Makeup applied to my eyebrows & wondered if it’s okay to tan my face? UESTION:

A NSWER : We are all looking forward to warm weather & tan skin looks so good, BUT NO!!! Technically, Permanent Susan Gruber, Cosmetics are considered permanent Certified Permanent Cosmetic Professional because the color is implanted into the dermal layer of the skin & cannot be washed off. However, as with any tattoo, fading can & often does occur, requiring periodic maintenance, color re-enhancement or color re-freshing. Also as we age, the sun is not your friend. Check with any Dermatologist to assess the damage the sun can produce not only on our bodies but especially on our faces.

PERMANENT MAKEUP BY SUSAN, CPCP 1265 NW Wall Street • Bend 541-383-3387 www.permanentmakeupbysusan.com

COSMETIC DENTISTRY QUESTION: My child sucks his thumb. I’m not sure if I should discourage it or should I try to replace his thumb with a pacifier? ANSWER: Thanks for the great question. Thumb sucking is a developmentally harmful habit that is increasing in its prevalence. To understand why a child desires to suck his thumb requires some background into the developmental needs as well as the environmental impact. The suckling reflex is initiated just prior to birth and serves as a mechanism to provide nutrition to the baby. Proponents Kelley Mingus, of breast feeding believe that the suckling reflex is enhanced D.M.D. when the child isn’t meeting their nutritional needs. Regardless of the reason, a child with an enhanced suckling reflex will commonly get satisfaction from a digit, most commonly the thumb. Sucking on the thumb can and will cause serious developmental growth problems in the face. The onset of these problems begin as soon as the thumb sucking starts but may not be revealed for years, although the damage is done. Prevention of the habit as soon as it starts is critical to avoiding growth problems later. The use of a pacifier can be an option in preventing thumb sucking. It must be noted that you cannot use just any pacifier. An orthopedic pacifier such as a “NUK” style is preferred. Some pacifiers will have the same effect as a thumb. The results of thumb sucking can cause serious problems and have impacts that last far beyond the thumb sucking years. Thumb sucking will almost always have a negative impact on ones airway and can even be linked to sleep apnea resulting in life threatening conditions later in life. I would recommend prevention of thumb sucking with the use of an approved pacifier.

541-382-6565

QUESTION: In an otherwise healthy individual, what causes the nose to drip when eating soup, out skiing, or bowing head to brush teeth or look down?

ANSWER: Rhinorrhea or nasal drip is caused most commonly by allergies or viruses. What you are describing is positional rhinorrhea which is somewhat rare. This can be caused Kevin Rueter, by a variety of things including excessive M.D. nose blowing, history of sinus surgery, trauma, or nasal mucosal defects which cause small amounts of cerebrospinal fluid to leak into the nasal passages. The fluid leakage becomes more pronounced with positional changes or changes in intracranial pressure, such as when you bend forward or exert yourself (skiing). I would suggest speaking with your primary care physician to discuss testing of the secretion with a Beta-2 transferrin test. A CT scan or MRI of the sinuses and facial bones is also indicated in this case. Conservative treatments such as bed rest and less frequent nose blowing are recommended as well but, ultimately, referral to otolaryngology for surgical correction may be necessary.

QUESTION: What can be done for chronic dry eyes and red eyelids? I have taken good fish oil and a variety of eye drops for 2 years and I still have problems, I also run a humidifier constantly. ANSWER: Chronic dry eye can be a big issue for our patients in dry, arid Central Oregon. Winter Lewis, Dry eye can effect our daily living in the O.D., F.A.A.O. form of stinging and burning to variability of vision. The challenge with treating dry eye is that there can be several different underlying causes including rosacea, systemic medications, immune system abnormalities and reduced tear film components. Treatments for dry eye include over the counter moisturizing drops, prescription strength tear promoting topical therapy and simple office procedures to enhance the effects of your normal, physiologic tear film. See your eye care professional for a complete dry eye exam and focused treatment regimen.

WINTER LEWIS, O.D., F.A.A.O.

Bend - Downtown • 18 NW Oregon Ave Sisters • 354 W Adams St. Bend - Eastside • 1247 NE Medical Center Dr.

541.318.4249

WELLNESS

non-invasive treatment for acute or chronic back pain and pain and numbness radiating into the legs and arms. Even patients who have previously had surgery and continue to have pain can potentially benefit from spinal decompression. Commonly Sather Ekblad, N.D. treated conditions for spinal decompression include: Low back pain, Sciatica (leg and foot pain/numbness), Post surgical patients with continued pain, Neck pain and arm/hand symptoms. We offer spinal decompression alongside all of our other treatments and submit claims to insurance or offer reasonable cash prices per treatment, unlike other clinics which sell spinal decompression in packages with high pressure sales tactics. Many patients have been dealing with their pain for months or even years. As time progresses, this pain often becomes more persistent and may increase in intensity. Many of these cases are responsive only to decompression therapy. Please call our office for more information. 541-504-0250.

916 SW 17th ST. • Suite 202 • Redmond • 541-923-4257 www.CenterforIntegratedMed.com

QUESTION: I would like to exercise more but am afraid to. It seems like every time I start an exercise program I hurt myself. I have some back and knee pain that always gets in the way, and yet if I don’t start exercising, people tell me it will just get worse. ANSWER: Just starting a generic exercise program doesn’t work for everyone. Physical Therapy is a great way to get you started, safely. Your Allison Suran, physical therapists will thoroughly evaluate your PT, GCFP posture, strengths, weaknesses, tight muscles and movement patterns to determine what you might be doing that is causing your problem and interfering with your efforts for exercise. Then, your physical therapist will prescribe very specific exercises for you. Your P.T. will help monitor your progress with what works, and sometimes what isn’t working, and guide you on a path to wellness so that you can engage in regular exercise that is invigorating and not causing more problems. Physical Therapy is usually covered by your health insurance, and although your physical therapist can treat you without a physician’s order, most insurances require an order from your medical practitioner. This can include an MD, DO, Naturopathic Doctor (ND) (Nurse Practitioner (NP), or Chiropractor.

ALLISON SURAN, PT, FOUNDER WWW.HEALINGBRIDGE.COM 404 NE Penn Ave, Bend, OR 541-318-7041

24509 NE Mary Rose Pl, Ste 110 • Bend 541-318-8388 • www.infocus-eyecare.com

E L E C T R O LY S I S

PLASTIC SURGERY

QUESTION: What will Electrolysis cost me and how many treatments will I need?

ANSWER: While there is not a specific diet for Warfarin (Coumadin), there are certain foods that can alter the effectiveness of the blood-thinning medication. Certain foods and beverages actually can interfere Scott Neil, MSW with how the medication thins the blood. One nutrient that can lessen Coumadin’s effectiveness is Vitamin K. It is important to maintain a consistent level of this vitamin in your diet. Foods such as spinach, brussels sprout, parsley, and green tea have higher levels of Vitamin K, which can lead to bleeding problems. Drinks such as cranberry juice and alcoholic beverages also can cause bleeding.

ANSWER: I wish I had a crystal ball! Every person that walks through my door is entirely different from anyone else that has walked into my office. Each person has different amounts of hair, different areas of work to be done and different circumstances in Tana Anderson their lives. Fees for electrolysis are in keeping with Licensed Electrologist those for other professional health care and aesthetic services. In fact, the cost of a lifetime of temporary methods of hair removal is often much more expensive than electrolysis, which is permanent. Payment is made for each treatment according to how much time is used. For instance, 15 minutes of work on the face is $35 and 1/2 hr is $45. How often you need to come in, and how long your treatments will be, depends on the density, coarseness, and previous methods of hair removal. During your complimentary consultation I will ask you questions that will help me evaluate how often you will need to come in for treatments, your situation will be evaluated and appointments will be set up accordingly. Won’t it feel wonderful to be free from unwanted hair—forever!

SCOTT NEIL, MSW

ANSWER: Spinal decompression is a non-surgical,

INFOCUS EYE CARE

QUESTION: I have to take Coumadin. Can my diet affect how Coumadin works?

It’s essential that people taking Warfarin (Coumadin) have regular blood tests to monitor the medication effectiveness. Doctors then can alter the dose, if necessary.

traction for my back pain. How do I know if it will help me?

PHYSICAL THERAPY

EYE CARE

HIGH LAKES HEALTHCARE www.highlakeshealthcare.com

QUESTION: I’m interested in spinal decompression or

DISTINCTIVE DENTISTRY AT BROKEN TOP 1475 SW Chandler Ave., Suite 201, Bend www.bendcosmeticdentist.com

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N AT U R AL M E D I C I N E

ELECTROLYSIS BY TANA ANDERSON 1012 NW Wall St. • Bend

541.388.3730 www.electrolysisbytana.com

QUESTION: I lost 165 lbs after a gastric bypass 3 years ago. I’ve got a lot of excess skin that really bothers me. How do I know if I am a good candidate to remove this excess skin over my arms, chest, abdomen, hips and thighs? ANSWER: Congratulations on losing that weight! Good candidates for post bariatric surgery include those whose weight has stabilized, those who have few other medical problems that may impede wound healing and those who have realistic expectations and a positive outlook regarding what post bariatric surgery can provide. It is the ideal way to contour your body after losing such a massive amount of weight. Speak with a plastic surgeon who is specifically trained in post bariatric surgery to see if body contouring is right for you. At Bend Plastic Surgery we specialize in all aspects of post bariatric surgery. Adam Angeles, M.D.

ADAM ANGELES, M.D. BEND PLASTIC SURGERY 2460 NE Neff Rd., Suite B • Bend www.bendprs.com, drangeles@bendprs.com 541-749-2282

SPORT / SPINE Q UESTION: I have been diagnosed with a disc herniation in my lower back and am currently on a course of steroids. Can chiropractic treatments help disc herniations? A NSWER : In many cases, conservative treatments including manipulation, traction and flexion/distraction techniques utilized Brad Pfeiffer, by chiropracters can effectively reduce DC and eliminate back pain and the often accompanying radiating leg pain associated with lumbar intervertebral disc herniations. A recent study confirms that 80% of the study group patients with MRI documented lumbar disc herniations obtain a satisfactory clinical outcome with resolution of abnormal clinical examination findings. Anatomically, after repeat MRI scans, 63% of the patients studied demonstrated a reduced size or completely resorbed disc herniation. Seventy-eight percent of the patients were able to return to work in their usual occupations. If you have further questions, please feel free to contact our office.

Ask any Health Question in the area of: • Homeopathic/Holistic Medicine • Plastic Surgery • Permanent Make-up • Chiropractic • Ophthalmology • Pain Medicine • Electrolysis • Optometry • Wellness • Cosmetic Dentistry • Family Medicine • Aesthetics

Send, fax or email your question to:

Ask a Health Professional c/o Kristin Morris, The Bulletin, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708

Fax: 541-385-5802 • kmorris@bendbulletin.com Ask a Health Professional

My question is:

Brad Pfeiffer, DC • 541-383-4585

Send questions by fax: (541) 385-5802, email: kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or mail to P.O Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708


F6 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F EXERCISE TIPS Which strength-training machine is right for you?

2

1

Photos courtesy Life Fitness

Go into most gyms and you’ll see different kinds of strength-training machines. Here are some tips to figure out which machine is best for you. 1 Fixed-motion machines guide the motion of the exercise — a lift or push. By stabilizing and controlling the movement, fixedmotion machines allow you to work on specific muscle groups. The motion will remain consistent during repetitions. Most newcomers to a workout room are comfortable starting with fixed-motion machines, although more advanced exercisers will use them to build strength for specific body parts.

2 Cable-motion machines, which typically have pulleys, allow users to find their own paths of motion, creating more exercise variety, similar to free weights. Cable-motion machines require more joint and core stabilization, and make users work multiple muscle groups at once. They also build strength through movements that are similar to everyday activities or sport-specific actions. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin Source: Life Fitness, an international exercise equipment manufacturing company

CLASSES FITNESS DAY: Exhibits, activities and health services for seniors; free; 9 a.m.-noon Wednesday; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; www.bendparksandrec. org or 541-388-1133. HEALTH CENTER OPEN HOUSE: Tour the school-based health center, visit with a nurse and receive health information; clinic will serve ages 0-20; tour is free; 4-6:30 p.m. Tuesday; Redmond High School, 675 S.W.

Rimrock Way; 541-923-8920. STROKE TALK: Learn about strokes, stroke symptoms and treatments; free; 11 a.m.1 p.m. Wednesday; Prineville Soroptimists Senior Center, 180 N.E. Belknap St.; 541-706-4922. TALK: An informative talk on women’s urological health and exercise, with Q&A; RSVP requested; free; 7 p.m. May 26; FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www.footzonebend.com or melanie@footzonebend.com.

Stand up straight! By C. C laiborne Ray New York Times News Service

Q:

Can exercise correct kyphosis, the excessive forward curvature of the spine that is sometimes called widow’s hump? Certain kinds of exercise may prevent or delay progression of the abnormally hunched back called hyperkyphosis but have not been proved to correct it completely, medical authorities say. It normally progresses with age. Recent studies suggest exercises that extend the spine may help manage kyphosis in older people and sometimes improving it, though stronger evidence is needed before a general recommendation is made. In a study published in 2009

A:

in the journal Osteoporosis International, involving women who were 50-59 years old when the study began, progression of kyphosis was prevented in those who did exercises to strengthen the extension muscles of the spine, three times a week for a year. In another 2009 study, in Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, women ages 65-80 who already had noticeable kyphosis did exercises in groups for 12 weeks and then on their own for a year. Those who were followed up maintained a small improvement in their usual and best measures of kyphosis. Excessive kyphosis is sometimes a result of musculoskeletal disease and sometimes simply the wages of not following parental advice to stand up straight.

Next week “It’s never too late to start” is the theme of a running program for those older than 40.

Swim

“A lot of parents have the misconception, ‘Once my child can swim I don’t need to worry.’ But kids can still drown.”

Continued from F1 The revised policy also reinforces the academy’s recommendation that most children ages 4 and older should learn to swim. The academy advises parents, when considering the appropriate time to start swim lessons for their children, to balance many factors, including how often the child is exposed to water, his or her emotional and physical development, and health concerns related to pool chemicals. Local aquatic directors say a child’s success in learning to swim depends on many factors, including the child’s strength, coordination and previous experience with water. “I don’t think there’s a perfect time for every child across the board,” said Dr. Michelle Mills, a pediatrician at Bend Memorial Clinic.

— Dr. Michelle Mills, pediatrician at Bend Memorial Clinic

Staying vigilant And the question still lingers about whether swim lessons would instill a false sense of security about water safety. “Just because a child can swim doesn’t mean they’re safe from drowning,” Mills said. “A lot of parents have the misconception, ‘Once my child can swim I don’t need to worry.’ But kids can still drown. Kids get tired faster, get cold more easily. They play harder than we do. They can still get cramps or injuries in horseplay. They are not as strong to get themselves out of trouble.” No matter what age a child starts swimming, Mills tells parents they always need to stay within arm’s reach of the learner in a pool or lake. And parents should be trained in CPR. Drowning rates nationwide fell from 2.68 per 100,000 in 1985 to 1.32 per 100,000 in 2006, according to the academy. But drowning continues to be the secondhighest cause of death for children ages 1 to 19, and about 1,100 children drowned in 2006. Children younger than 2 have the highest rates of drowning in bathtubs, buckets and coolers, Mills said. Older toddlers tend to drown in pools. And teenagers have a higher incidence in natural bodies of water such as lakes, rivers and oceans, she said. The academy doesn’t recommend water safety programs for children younger than 1 year because no scientific study has demonstrated their effectiveness in preventing drowning. But local swim instructors say playful exposure to water in pools prior to age 1 — with parents

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Ethan Huddleston, 4, gets some help putting on a life jacket during a recent swim lesson at the Cascade Swim Center in Redmond. involved and a lifeguard’s oversight — teaches children to feel comfortable in the water, which sets them up for swimming success later.

Comfort levels Cascade Swim Center in Redmond and Bend’s Juniper Swim & Fitness Center both offer classes for babies starting at 6 months. Parents accompany children 6 months to 3 years old in the water adjustment programs that include games and songs. They’re meant to build comfort with the water, to get babies accustomed to having water splashed in their faces, in their hair. Later, when they’re ready for formal swim instruction, they have positive associations of the water and can remain calm and learn better, according to aquatic directors at both public facilities. Learning to float is the first basic safety skill, said Jessica Rowan, Cascade Swim Center aquatic director, and Ann Story, aquatic specialist at Bend’s Ju-

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME

niper Swim & Fitness Center. A negative or frightening water experience early on will make it harder to teach children how to float and swim. “We like to get people in the water as soon as possible, the earlier the better, especially living in an area with so much water-recreation opportunity, going to the lakes the rivers,” Rowan said. When children are truly ready to learn the multiple, complicated and coordinated mechanics of swimming depends on their in-

dividual bodies and experiences. Some kids are solid swimmers at age 5. Some are still learning basic strokes as young teenagers. “Some of that is accounted for by how early they got into the water,” she said. “Ninety percent of swimming is figuring out how to balance yourself in the water, how body position affects your buoyancy and your ability to swim. If you are fighting yourself, you use a lot of energy to not get anywhere. That stuff is intuitive if you get in the water early.” Story agrees about the benefits of early-age water exposure. She added that lessons for children younger than 3 are as much for the parents as the children. Teachers emphasize water safety and messages such as: Everyone has to be supervised. “There’s never a secret moment when parents can leave them at the pool,” she said. Having a friend to swim with is an additional safety measure. And they warn of extra risk involved when there’s no lifeguard on duty, for example at lakes or hotel pools. Story wants kids to learn to love to swim because it’s a healthy lifelong sport and safety skill. “Swimming is fun. Swimming can turn into a lifetime skill or a lifetime sport, for lifetime fitness,” Story said. “Trying to teach a kid how to swim and having them enjoy it is exactly what we want.” Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@ bendbulletin.com.

Have you been checked for

skin cancer?

Do it for Them... After years of enjoying the sun, it may have taken it’s toll on your skin. Early detection is key...

Call “The Skin Cancer Specialists” For Your Appointment Today!

Allison Dermatology & Skin Cancer Center Dawn S. Allison, M.D.

Cassidy Juda, PA-C

Call 541-322-9000 1510 SW Nancy Way, Ste 1 | On Bend’s west side (Near the Century/Colorado roundabout)


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

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On the web at: www.bendbulletin.com

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263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

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General Merchandise

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

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DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Elizabeth, 541-633-7006

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Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

English Springer Spaniel Field-bred AKC Puppies ready 5/28/11. Male $500 liver/white 541-523-7951 or www.millerbeavercreekkennels.com Free Blue Heeler/Australian Shepherd, Female, 3.5 yr, needs room to run, to good home, 541-923-4657. German Shorthair pups for sale asking $250, please call Rick @ 541-280-0915

Adorable Calico Kitty, 5 yrs, shots, wormed, great family pet, friendly family pet, in- GOLDEN RETRIEVER puppies purebred, 4 males, ready to door, $20, 541-548-5516 go! $350, Redmond 541-290-4023. AUSSIE'S Mini/Toy, AKC red tri's must see, family raised, Golden Retriever Pups exc. 1st shots, wormed parents quality, parents OFA, good on site 788-7799/598-6264 hips, $650. 541-318-3396. Australian Shepherd, beautiful Great Dane sweet 8 Month old black tri female, 5 yrs, 18” Blue AKC male. Crate trained, tall, $150. 541-548-3660 cage incl. $500 541-610-5944 Border Collie/New Zealand Shelley_M_B@yahoo.com Huntaway puppies, working parents, wonderful dogs, Jack Russell puppies, purebred, $250. 541-546-6171 1st shots. $300 each. 541-948-0337. Border Collie Pups, Purebred, working parents, 8 Jack Russells, Reg., 7 weeks, weeks old, 1st shots, $250, 1st shots & wormed, ready to 541-306-8251 go! $200. 541-385-8934 Boxer pups, AKC & CKC Regist. Only 5 left, all shots to date, $500-$650. 541-325-3376

Chihuahua, very tiny, fawn colored, 1st shots & wormed. 2 left, $250 ea, 541-771-2606. Companion cats free to seniors. Tame, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will always take back for any reason. 389-8420, 647-2181, www.craftcats.org for map, photos, hours, etc. Dachshund AKC mini puppies, See: www.bendweenies.com $325, Bend, 503-470-0729 DACHSHUND MINI AKC, Male $350, Female $400, Prineville, 541-633-3221

Kittens/cats avail. thru rescue group. Most at sanctuary, 389-8420, 647-2181. Baby kittens fostered, 815-7278. Fixed, shots, ID chip, vet exam incl. Hours, map, photos at www.crafcats.org.

Labrador Pups, AKC, Chocolates, & 1 Black male, sacrifice, $400. Dewclaws, shots & wormed. 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Lhasa Apso/Pug spring pups. Lhasa Apso mom, dad is reg. brindle Pug. Adorable, variety colors. Must see! you will fall in love. $295. Call for info 541-548-0747, 541-279-3588 Mini Dachshund Pups, 2 girls $275 ea., 2 boys $250 ea. Prineville. 360-607-0604.

Pit Bull mix, female guard dog, free to good home. Needs fenced yard. 541-416-0102

Pit Bull Terriers, BLUE American, UKC Reg. 4 males. Compact, thick, stocky, big heads! $1500. 541-914-3711 POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Call 541-475-3889

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Health and Beauty Items

Tools

Heating and Stoves

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Chair, Brown, Overstuffed, good cond., $100, 541-548-7137 Chest of Drawers, $29; Clothes rack, commercial, $45; childs wagon, $25, 541-420-2220 DINING SET Glass top matching set, 4 chairs w/overhanging lamp, $100. OBO, 541-306-4252. FUTON, Rising Star, full size, used once; cover, comforter, sheets, $400. 541-322-6281 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Nice couch & matching wide chair, in great cond., $180 OBO. 503-933-0814 Bend

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. Whirlpool commerical quality super capacity washer, like new, $150. 541-549-6523 The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

.44 Mag Ruger Super Redhawk, 7½”, leather Ruger holster, ammo, $800. 541-350-2993 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Custom hand-crafted fly poles, (2) with Pflueger reels, very nice $80 ea. 503-933-0814 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Antiques & Collectibles

GIANT Gun & Knife Show Portland Expo Center May 21 and 22nd, 2011 Sat., 9-6, Sun. 9-4 Admission $9 503-363-9564 wesknodelgunshows.com GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Kimber Model 82 Rifle, $550. Winchester Model 12, vent rib/trap, $450. NEF single shot 218 Bee, $175. 12 ga Skeeter SxS shot gun, $400. 541-548-3408

Mossberg 835 big bore. 12g, 18” barrel, home protection, $200. 541-647-8931

Antiques Wanted: Tools, fish- New England .223 single-shot rifle, sling, ammo, scope, ing, marbles, wood furniture, like new $200. 541-526-0617 beer cans. 541-389-1578 Remington 870 express mag 200, HK TAC .45 $1000, Sig Furniture 556 1100, Ruger MKII stainless $275, Ruger 10/22 bull barrel scope Fagen stock $350,w/extras 541-848-3619 Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

•Current treatments offering no relief? • Been told to “Live with it”? •Tired of taking drugs that don’t fix the problem or make it worse? There is Hope!

Rod & Reel Combo, Cortland/ Pflueger, with case, $80. 503-933-0814 Bend Ruger 22 Single-6 with extra mag cylinder,excellent cond, $325. 541-382-8973 S & W model 2213, Semi-auto pistol, hard to find, exc. cond., $275, 541-410-8921.

There is Hope! Call for FREE DVD Farewell To Fibromyalgia Call 866-700-2424

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 541-312-6709 Open to the public .

JUNIPER TIES & BOARDS Full Measure Timbers “ Rot Resistant ” Raised Bed Garden Projects Instantlandscaping.com 541-389-9663 For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

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Hot Tubs and Spas Balboa Spa, 4 person, w/cover & lift, 3 yrs old, see it work, new, was $4000, asking $1395 OBO, 541-408-7908 Hot Tub, 5 person Coleman , needs TLC, $595 OBO, 406-980-1907, 704-530-4051 (Terrebonne)

TV, Stereo and Video 30” TV bought in 2000. JVD D series, good condition, $100 OBO. 541-306-4252.

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Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 Sisters Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale Quality items. LOW PRICES! 150 N. Fir. 541 549-1621 Open to the public.

The Hardwood Outlet

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Hummingbirds Are Back!

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend Large Weedeater, Stinger, covers 1 acre, new in box, $50. 503-933-0814 Bend

Wood Floor Super Store

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

All Year Dependable Firewood: Dry lodgepole, avail. semi dry mix cords, Split, Del. 1 for $135, 2 $250. Cash, Check, Credit. Bend 541-420-3484

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft.

Musical Instruments ORGAN computer system by Hohner, 2 set headphones. $1200 OBO. 541-504-2567.

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Misc. Items Air conditioners, Kenmore window type, 12000 btu $150; 6000 btu $100. 541-389-9268 BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

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Heating and Stoves Beckwell Pellet Stove, T-22 , pipe/pad, needs work, $595, 406-980-1907; 704-530-4051 (Terrebonne)

Gas Furnace, Lennox, 4-ton heat hump, electronic air cleaner, thermostat, $1000, 541-385-7932. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. KARAOKE MACHINE, includes 5 disks. Records, plays CDs, $65 OBO. 541-647-2621 Meade LX10 8” SCT scope w/ Magellan I encoder, field tripod, electric focus w/hand box, 8” sun filter, lens tray, telrad finder, extra eye pieces. great cond, w/books etc. $450 firm. 541-598-7219 New king 7-pc comforter set, seamist green w/silk flowers, $50. 503-933-0814 Bend

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com Skateboard, Long Board, with custom trucks, good cond, $80. 503-933-0814, Bend Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Lodgepole Seasoned rounds: 1 cord $129; 2@$124ea; 3@ $119ea. Split: 1 cord $159; 2@$154 ea; 3@$149 ea. Bin price 4’x4’x4’, $59 ea. Cash. Delivery avail. 541-771-0800

541-322-0496

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

248

Chronic Pain & Fatigue, insomnia, brain fog, anxiety, migraines?

Building Materials

NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Fuel and Wood

12g Mossberg-Maverick 88, syn. stock pump shotgun, 18” bbl, $200. 541-526-0617

(2), Mossberg 12g, semi-auto & LAB PUPS AKC, black & yellow, pump shotguns, syn stocks, titled parents, performance $250 each. 541-647-8931 pedigree, OFA cert hips & el- Almond Maytag Microhood & bows, $500. 541-771-2330 matching Jennaire smooth .357 Ruger Police Service-6 www.royalflushretrievers.com top electric oven, $300 both, $400. Ruger 10/22 custom White 30" Whirlpool Fridge bull bbl, $400. 541-647-8931 Labradoodles, Australian $200. FREE Kitchenaid Washer Imports - 541-504-2662 38spl S&W 442, ammo, $350. 541-389-9553, SE Bend www.alpen-ridge.com S&W 7mm bolt rifle, Leupold !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! VX-2, $500. 541-647-8931 Labradoodles, F1-B, great disA-1 Washers & Dryers positions, ready 5/25, dews, $125 each. Full Warranty. 410 H&R Jr. Topper, Model shots,wormed, females $600, Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s 098, single shot, camo, wood males $500, 541-536-2250. dead or alive. 541-280-7355. stock, $160. 541-526-0617

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Call 866-700-1414 and find out how to get better today!

Health and Beauty Items

revolver, stainless, like new, $200. 541-526-0617

Compressors, new mitre saw & rotating vise, much more, low prices, 541-549-7587

Call for FREE DVD Thyroid Health Secrets Revealed.

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Mossberg 12g 500 camo pump hunting shotgun, 28”, like new, $200. 541-526-0617

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Fatigue, insomnia, cold hands, skin dryness, chronic pain?

Furniture & Appliances 22LR NAA 22 derringer 5-shot A/C Units (4), window, all with remote, 2 large, $100 ea., 2 small $60 ea, all for $295. 541-548-7137

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Puppies (6), Medium size, S&W Model 57 41 magnum mother Tri-color Heeler, fahandgun, nickel, 6 inch barther Corgi/? mix, $75, rel with wood presentation 541-390-3404 case. $700, private party, call 242 John, 541-771-9998. Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. Exercise Equipment Wanted: Collector seeks high 541-280-1537 quality fishing items. Call http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Body Solid Smith Machine with 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 260lbs olympic weights, all Schnauzer Mini AKC, 13 wks the barbells, dumbells, stor247 black, male, shots, trained, age racks, etc. Boxing speed, chipped, $550 541-728-0761. Sporting Goods double end & heavy bags included. $500. 541-306-6987 Scottie female pup, 8 weeks, - Misc. papers, 1st shot, parents on Schwinn Airdyne Exercise site, $500. 541-317-5624 bike, exc. cond., $250 OBO, Life Vest, self-inflatable, new, was $180; sell for $50. 541-504-8224. Shih-Poo puppies, ¾-poodle, ¼ 503-933-0814, Bend Shih-tzu, born 3/20. Real 246 cuties! $300. 541-744-1804 Working cats for barn/shop/ companionship, FREE. Fixed, shots. Will deliver! Call 541-389 8420

A v e . ,

Furniture & Appliances Buffet, 12 drawer, antique, cherry wood, $300; Oak table, 4 chairs, $195, 541-788-7372

ITEMS FOR SALE 201 - New Today 202 - Want to buy or rent 203 - Holiday Bazaar & Craft Shows 204 - Santa’s Gift Basket 205 - Free Items 208 - Pets and Supplies 210 - Furniture & Appliances 211 - Children’s Items 212 - Antiques & Collectibles 215 - Coins & Stamps 240 - Crafts and Hobbies 241 - Bicycles and Accessories 242 - Exercise Equipment 243 - Ski Equipment 244 - Snowboards 245 - Golf Equipment 246 - Guns & Hunting and Fishing 247 - Sporting Goods - Misc. 248 - Health and Beauty Items 249 - Art, Jewelry and Furs 251 - Hot Tubs and Spas 253 - TV, Stereo and Video 255 - Computers 256 - Photography 257 - Musical Instruments 258 - Travel/Tickets 259 - Memberships 260 - Misc. Items 261 - Medical Equipment 262 - Commercial/Office Equip. & Fixtures

C h a n d l e r

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

T h e

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

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Lost and Found Found: 5/16, 27th Near Reed Mkt., Coach Rx Sunglasses, call to ID, 541-678-4273.

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Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Found Black Lab: male,70-80 lbs, neutered, near Bend Wal Mart, 5/16 1 p.m., 541-771-8242

BarkTurfSoil.com

Found Camera: Near Swampy lakes Shelter, 5/13, had been buried in snow, Call to ID, 541-330-9639.

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

Chainsaw, Homelite, well maintained, starts 1st pull, $125. 503-933-0814 Bend Elec. Fencing + controllers, yard wire cages, list of all available, $775 OBO, 541-549-7587

Found Earrings, 2 sets, sterling silver, near Pine Tavern 5/10, call to I.D. 541-382-0173 LOST 5/8 at High Desert Museum - Rx Glasses, round frames. Please return. 541-382-4584

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Help Wanted

Week of May 16, 2011

Help Wanted

DRIVERS/COMPANY-Lease - CDL DRIVERS - Great pay! Tons of Texas frac work. Great company/pay. Work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable career opportunities. Company paid benefits. Must have bulk pneumatic trailer experience. *Trainee, *company driver, *lease Call today! 888-880-5922. operator, earn up to $51k. *Lease Trainers earn up to $80k. 877-369Career Assistance 7104. www.centraltruckdrivingjobs. MEDICAL MANAGEMENT careers com. start here - Get connected online. JOHN DAVIS Trucking in Battle Attend college on your own Mountain, NV. Hiring CDL-A drivers time. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial aid and mechanics. Must be willing if qualified. Call 800-481-9409, to relocate. Call 866-635-2805 for www.CenturaOnline.com. application or website www.jdt3d. net.

Legal Services

COMPANY DRIVERS (Solos and DIVORCE $135.Complete preparation. teams). Great pay, great miles. Includes children, custody, support, CDL-A required. If you are new to property and bills division. No trucking, we will train! We have a court appearances. Divorced in 1variety of Regional, Dedicated and 5 weeks possible. 503-772-5295, OTR positions available, based on www.paralegalalternatives.com, location. Call 866-692-2612, Swift. divorce@usa.com.


G2 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 270

270

Lost and Found

Lost and Found

Lost Black Cat 14th St. Redmond, $100 reward, name is Matty, very big black cat white on all paws white on chest and some on face if found or know any info contact Nicole Turner 541-419-3470 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

LOST CAT - black and white female, named Cookie, from east side of Pilot Butte (off Savannah). Missing some teeth including canines (fangs), white paws with black pads, saggy belly. Normally very friendly, but may be shy or scared. Call or text Shawna at 541-815-0724. REWARD!

LOST White Pit Bull, 2-yr male, black patch on left eye, black spots on ears, last seen Redmond 4/14, needs meds, $200 reward! 541-977-5156 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

280

300 325

Hay, Grain and Feed Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment

Estate Sales

Wanted 2-Horse trailer, Morgan, Circle J, Apache, etc., up to $2000 cash, 541-447-9199

Estate Sale, Fri. & Sat. 8-4, Chalk full of vintage, collectable, antiques, household & furniture. 20509 Woodside N. Dr., Bend. 509-713-5742.

345

Livestock & Equipment 6 Miniature Goats, $65 each or 2 for $100. Terms available. Alfalfa, OR. 541-388-8725

LOST: Garmin GPS 705, in Bend, around 5/13. Reward for return. 541-382-3034 Lost Orange Cat, fluffy very friendly, ‘Tigger’, Tumalo area, Cline Falls Hwy 1 mi. N. of Tumalo store & High Ridge Dr., 4/15, Reward, 541-385-0194.

Farm Market

GOATS for sale: Nubians, Boers & mixed does, wethers & buck. 541-548-1857

541-385-5809

Good, healthy Beef Steers, ready for grass. Please call 541-382-8393 leave msg.

345

476

Livestock & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

OVER 81 HEAD SELL!!!! NW Breeders Female Sale SUNDAY 5/22, 1 pm, Central Oregon Livestock Auction Yard, Madras. Angus, Limousin, Sim-Angus, Shorthorn. Semen, Pairs, Bred Females, Open Heifers. (916) 362-2697 www.jdaonline.com

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

541-383-0398

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282

284

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

ESTATE

SALE

Estate Sale - Follow-Up: Fri & Sat. 8-3, 1630 NW 11th, antiques, Mission, art, books, Christmas, clothes, decor.

Multi-Family Garage Sale Sat., 8am-3pm, 19434 Amber Meadow Dr (River Rim, next to Brookswood Plaza). Cobra fishing Kayak, large tent, sleeping bags, backpacks ...

Yard Sale Fri-Sat

290

Sales Redmond Area Yard Sale: 2592 NW Norse Dr, off 35th. 7 big trucks, tires, mobile home tires, parts, hydro cyls, truck lites, elec supplies, RV plugs, model trains, HO, S and Lionel, o-size signs & flags, tirechains, tilt bed tlr, tools, lots of office supplies, desks, computers, printers, white boards, u-haul boxes,exercise equip,antique organ, tv, shotgun, monitors. Fri 8 to 4, Sat 8 to 4 lots of parking

May 20-21, 9-4 Household Beautiful Drexel dinning set items, tools, clothes, pellet with lighted china cabinet, stove, misc. All proceeds Chippendale style desk, other to benefit Cystic Fibrosis. small furniture pieces, twin & Garage Sale: 1630 NW Overlook, Fri. 10-3, Spa, furniture, 21320 View Ln, Bend, cross full beds, dresser, entertain286 books, clothes, toys, dodge, street Deschutes Market. ment center, vintage china snowblower, misc. Cash Only Sales Northeast Bend 541-389-8326 sets, crystal, lots of silver, interesting small collectibles, 1170 NE PROVIDENCE DR., antique pictures & paintings, 284 288 Multi-Family Garage Sale, artwork, rugs, antique ski's, SAT. 5-21 ONLY 9am-4pm, Sales Southeast Bend W/D, side by side fridge, pa- Sales Southwest Bend 541-610-5806. tio set, Craftmans lawn mower, garage & outdoor Family Sale: Bikes, surfboard, 364 SE Sena Ct. 7 a.m. Sat., 21 household. Nice Clothing! COMMUNITY SALE - Friday, items, much more! 292 May. Books, desk, bedding, Noon-5, Saturday, 9-2, 2755 women’s S/M, girl’s 8-12, baby Friday & Saturday, 9-4 kitchenware, and lots more, Sales Other Areas NE Boyd Acres Rd. Items toys, gates, Sat. only 9-12, rain/shine! Crowd control numbers Galore, loads of stuff, corner 1737 SW Knoll Ave off 14th. Friday 8:00 a.m. of Boyd Acres, Butler Market. 3rd Annual Multi Family Ga- 50+ Years’ Collection of Stuff! Take Archie Briggs to May 21-22, 9 AM to dark. rage Sale. Saturday only, Falcon Ridge, to 912 NW Moving out of the Country 16195 Eagle Nest Rd. everything goes! Antiques, 8am - 3pm. Corner of Reed Greenbriar Ct. HH FREE HH La Pine - 541-536-7995 appliances, furniture. FriMarket and Orion Dr. Attic Estates & Appraisals Sat., 9-4. 55823 Wood Duck Garage Sale Kit 541-350-6822 Garage Sale: A little bit of ev- CRR Garage Sale - Fri-Sat, May Drive (OWW2 South of Sunfor pics & info go to www.at20-21, 9am-5pm, 14302 SW erything for everyone, Fri-Sat, river) 541-593-9847 Place an ad in The Bulletin ticestatesandappraisals.com Hummingbird Rd, just past 8-2:30, Cash Only, no earlies, for your garage sale and fire station. 2 sales on street! 21065 Wilderness Way. Patti & Angelo Torre receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! Garage Sale Fri only, 9am-3pm, Huge moving/downsizing 20974 Greenmont Dr. off 20010 Rodeo Drive, Bend sale. Saturday, 9-4, 67390 KIT INCLUDES: Reed Market. One man’s junk FRIDAY May 20th • SATURDAY May 21st Trout Ln., high end Furni• 4 Garage Sale Signs is another’s treasure! ture, antiques, linens, of• $1.00 Off Coupon To Use 8:00 to 5:00 GARAGE SALE Girls’ size MeCrowd control admittance numbers fice supplies, art work, Toward Your Next Ad dium clothes, wood art & issued at 7:45 am on Friday. books, kitchen appliances, • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale planters, & misc. Sat only, clothing, outdoor furniSuccess!” Shop opens at 8:00--House opens at 9:00. 9-3, 21024 Azalia Avenue. ture & tack . 541-639-2020 • And Inventory Sheet (Take HWY 20 west to Old Bend Redmond Hiway turn north and Moving Sale: Furniture, Antiques, follow for 1 and 1/2 miles, turn left on Rodeo Drive and go 1/2 PICK UP YOUR glassware, garden equip., Mtn. HUGE MOVING SALE---housemile end of road--Please Please go slow and be considerate of GARAGE SALE High, 60668 Thunderbird Ct, residents!!) PARKING ONLY IN FIELD!! KIT AT: hold goods, wood stove, furAnytime, Call 541-610-2064. 1777 SW Chandler Ave. niture, bicycle, tools and garHuge - Huge moving sale; Leather sofa and chair; 1940's ThomasBend, OR 97702 den stuff, 138 N. Wheeler ville walnut dresser and chest; Oak dining table and four chairs; Yard + 4-H Fundraiser Sale: Loop, Sisters May 20 & 21, great oak buffet; Old Butcher block; Eastlake style cylinder Sat. 8-3:30, Furniture, toys, 8am to 3 pm 541-549 1014 desk; Double door display cabinet; small oakdesk; large comtools, clothes, sports equip, puter desk; 50" projection TV--with extra new bulb; Hires large misc., 20662 Cherry Tree. enameled sign; Over 200 prints and pictures in nice old frames; NOTICE 15 pieces of Griswold; 9 pieces of Wagner ; 11 Kerosene lamps; Fundraiser Yard Sale to 290 Remember to remove benefit Cascade Chorale: 14 kerosene Lanterns; 18 Pitch forks; 26 shovels; 20 double your Garage Sale signs 2116 NE Monterey Ave, Many Sales Redmond Area blade axes; 10 single blade axes 22 rakes; 7 hoes; 4 quilts; 3 (nails, staples, etc.) after your choir member item contribuPendleton and other wool blankets; 140 pieces of pyrex cookESTATE Downsize SALE Sale event is over! THANKS! tions. Fri. & Sat. 8-4. ing and baking pieces; 300 books; 25 Tonka trucks and toys; Saturday, May 21, 9-4 From The Bulletin and your 48 wood and paper cigar boxes; 9 "antique" egg cartons; 7 3391 NE 29th St. , Redmond local Utility Companies milk bottles; 26 fruit and dovetailed wood boxes; 8 bottle Find It in Antiques, furniture, Oriental "coke" boxes; 30 planters; 24 telephones--three are Mickey rugs, Troybilt chipper, more! mouse; 15 galvanized water cans and washtubs; 14 hand The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809 scythes; 10 oil cans; 8 braces" antique"; 5 chicken feeder; 14 Garage Sale: Sat. 5/21, 9-3, www.bendbulletin.com bird houses; 9 lunch boxes; 40's license plates; 20 old suitcases; 2064 NW Poplar Pl., 45 and 33 records; 6 birdcages; 8 gal. Red wing crock; 10 wash Garage Sale FRIDAY ONLY, 8-4. plants, clothes, misc., lots of Retirement Carport Sale: Horse 2389 NE Lynda Lane, off boards; two cast iron small decorative stoves; 22 kerosene and great stuff! equip., tools, antique tools, Butler Market & Purcell. It’s a gas cans; 11 rubber duck decoys; 8 traps; 200 glasses and rocking chair, hunting clothes/ big one! Lots of variety... wineglasses; lamps; levis and 50's tablecloths; Singer sewing Moving Sale: Fri. & Sat., 8-?, stuff, bedding, deck chairs, machine; clothing; linens; 18 Bamboo fly rods; 75 old lures and Massive Multi Family Sale, Sat. King size bed, new snowtarp, & household items -Good plugs; 15 fishing reels; Hand tools; vise; wrenches; pliers; blower, tools, housewares, only, 8-4. Furniture, elecStuff. 67170 Gist Rd., 6 mi. E. hammers; 3/4 cord of firewood; Men and women's Magna bietc, 4124 SW Umatilla Ave tronics, toys, kitchen items, of Sisters off Hwy 20. Sat-Sun. cycles; Deer heads and horns; two composters; small fiberglass something for everyone. 9-5, no early birds, all must go! boat; eight benches; 40's magazines; dolls; yard art; eight ** Tools ** Tools ** Tools ** 20144 Elder Lane, (Swalley & wood snow sleds; wicker chairs and settees; RRX sign; gas rotoDeschutes Mkt Rd.) Tumalo, Lots of tools, table saw, band tiller, trimmer &blower; other signs; work bench; glassware; old saw, drill press, jointer, scroll Tollgate Multi-Family follow signs. kitchen tools; Pipes and humidors; Vanity dresser; wedding saw, belt sanders, many hand Garage Sale (Sisters). dress; pieces of glassware and china; vases; teapots. collection tools, lots of new hardware & TWO FAMILY GARAGE SALE Friday & Saturday, May 20& of Elephants; 50 purses; Side by Side refrigerator--older; refrigfurniture. Sat., May 21, Saturday, May 21, 9am-1pm. 21, from 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. erated water cooler; Oak 4 drawer file cabinet; Studded tires 9am-4pm. NO EARLY BIRDS/ 2 extension ladders; gardenDrive around Tollgate and and rims--P235/70/r15 2002 Ford Escape; Lots of other items; CASH SALES ONLY. Follow ing supplies; outdoor games; stop at the homes with gasigns from O’Neil Junction & home decor; tables; and rage sale signs in front of Handled by: Deedy's Estate Sales Co. LLC Terrebonne to 6566 NE Junimuch, much more. 63007 their home, indicating per Ridge Rd. Please call 541-419-2242 days 541-382-5950 eves Marsh Orchid Dr off Spinaker homes with items for sale. 541-633-9613 for more info. www.deedysestatesales.com or Empire to Desert Sage.

MOVING

SALE

Delivery Driver/Warehouse Bedmart is currently looking for Delivery Drivers with a clean driving record and appearance. Must be available weekends and holidays. Apply at 2220 NE Hwy 20, in Bend. DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Driver/ Equipment Operator:

Days, nights & weekends, in Redmond. Please call anytime, 541-389-6528

Class A CDL Required, Redi-Mix experience preferred. On-Call as needed. Wages DOE. Apply at Shevlin Sand & Gravel Mon.-Fri. 7-4. Copy of current DMV record required when applying. Call 541-312-4730 for more information.

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449

Janitorial Part-time

Judicial

Drug Treatment Court Coordinator Oregon Judicial Department, Crook and Jefferson County Circuit Courts, Prineville and Madras, Oregon. Full time position. Salary: $3,692 $6,010/month. For the complete job announcement and to apply visit http:// courts.oregon.gov/OJD/jobs and click on "Paid Positions." EOE.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Home Delivery Advisor

P Home Delivery Advisor P The Bulletin Circulation Department is seeking a Home Delivery Advisor. This is a full time position and consists of managing a delivery area and working with an adult carrier force to ensure our customers receive superior service. Must be able to create and perform strategic plans to meet department objectives such as increasing market share and penetration. Ideal candidate will be a self-starter who can work both in the office and in their assigned territory with minimal supervision. Early a.m. hours are necessary with company vehicle provided. Strong customer service skills and management skills are necessary. Computer experience is helpful. We offer benefits including medical, dental, 401(k), paid vacation and sick time. We believe in promoting from within so advancement within the company is available. If you enjoy dealing with people from diverse backgrounds, and you are energetic, have great organizational skills and interpersonal communication skills, please fill out an application at The Bulletin or send your resume to:

Job

Opening-Circulation The Bulletin PO Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 or circulation@bendbulletin.com

Material Planner Looking for an exciting new job? Microsemi is looking for a Wafer Fab Material Handler. This position would perform the physical and administrative tasks involved in the shipping and receiving of materials, parts, supplies and equipment. Unpacks and checks goods received against purchase orders or invoices, maintains records of received goods. Packs and ships customer products following Export regulations, prepares die/wafers shipments to subcons, receives incoming die/wafer shipments from subcons, foundries and intercompany transactions into MRP system. This position is a full time position hired through a temp agency. Requires 4-6 years of experience as a Material Handler in manufacturing and preferably in a semiconductor electronics components systems environment. Good Microsoft Office skills needed including excellent Excel skills, good written and verbal communication skills a must. Must have good organizational skills. Prefer to have experience in various shipping methods. Prefer to have MS Dynamics MRP system experience. Please submit a resume to Melissa.epperly@microsemi.com. EOE

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

No phone calls, please. The Bulletin is a drug-free workplace, EOE.

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

Reservationist Looking for a fun & professional person with a flexible schedule and knowledge of Central Oregon recreation to join our customer service team! Fast paced environment that helps guests Check In/Out at front desk, answer/transfer multi phone lines, direct guests to local activities, respond to email inquiries & help guests find the perfect vacation home in Sunriver. Email resumes to Ashleigh at ashleighw@sunriverlodging.com or Fax to (541) 593-6864. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 476

Finance & Business

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Rentals

500 600 528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

SALES - Miller Economy Auto in Redmond, OR. has an immediate opening for a sales professional. Qualified candidates will have experience in sales, preferably in the car business and possess computer skills. This position requires a valid Oregon driver’s license and ability to meet Miller Economy Auto’s driving requirements. 30 hours weekly, Saturdays required. Starting wages are $9/hr. plus possible sales-based incentive. Bring resume to Miller Economy Auto, 788 N. 6th Street, Redmond, Oregon. 97756. No phone calls please.

!! Spring On In !! $150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Fox Hollow Apts.

Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-848-6403 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $625.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 541-382-3402 LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

573

Business Opportunities Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc. Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928. Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2342 NE Mary Rose Pl., #2 $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Real Estate For Sale

3 Bdrm 1 bath w/attached single car garage; 24x36 shop w/220, fenced backyard w/patio & greenhouse, W/D hkups, appliances. Pets negotiable. $960/mo. 1st/ last + $150/dep. Available July 1st. 541-549-3523

700

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties 2 Bdrm. Starting at $525 1 Month FREE w/Lease or Month to Month Chaparral & Rimrock Apts Clean, energy efficient, w/patios,on-site laundry, storage avail. Near schools, pools, skateboard park & shopping. Large dog run, some large breeds OK w/mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

$565/mo, $275 dep.NEW tile floor, carpet & dishwasher. Call Diana, 541-279-6605 or Raul, 541-279-2000

648

Houses for Rent General

3/2.5 duplex, 2925 SW Obsidian Ln, quiet, 1425 sq.ft., fridge, W/D, fireplace, fenced, gardner, $750/mo, W/S paid, 408-209-8920, 541-385-5911

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

732

Commercial/Investment A quiet 4 bdrm, 2 bath, 1748 Properties for Sale sq.ft., living room w/wood stove, newer carpet & inside paint, pellet stove, big 1/2 acre fenced lot, dbl garage w/opener. $1195. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, clean, in great family neighborhood near Old Mill, fenced backyard, pet negotiable $995/mo + dep. 541-318-0047 541-410-1145

SWEET HOME RV PARK RV park on 6 acres overlooking the lake, large clubhouse, seasonal pool, store/gift shop, 81 camp & RV sites, 51 with full hookups, 2 furnished condos, manager’s apartment, camping cabins, tent areas, turn-key business $895,000 Ellen Clough, ABR, CRS, Broker, 541-480-7180 John L. Scott Real Estate, Bend JohnLScott.com/Bend

745

Homes for Sale

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 3 Bdrm. 2 bath, large fenced yard, no cats, dogs neg., no smoking, $775/mo., 3126 Pumice Ave, please call 541-480-2543.

861 NW Teak Ave, near schools, Home Depot & Wal-Mart, PUBLISHER'S spectacular Cascade mtn. NOTICE views, 1391 sq.ft., 2 story All real estate advertising in home, 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, 4 this newspaper is subject to car tandem garage, RV parkthe Fair Housing Act which ing, large fenced yard, covmakes it illegal to advertise ered porch, sprinklers, incl. "any preference, limitation or all appl., $900+$900 dep. No discrimination based on race, pets/smoking, 541-318-6146 color, religion, sex, handicap, 5 familial status, marital status Crooked River Ranch, acres horse property fenced, or national origin, or an in2 bdrm., 2 bath, W/D tention to make any such hookup, $800 plus deps. preference, limitation or dis541-420-5197,209-402-3499 crimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents NE Area, 3 bdrm., 2 bath home, hardwood floors, sunroom, or legal custodians, pregnant low maint landscaping, small women, and people securing pet neg., no smoking, $900 custody of children under 18. +$750 dep., 541-279-9324. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any adver671 tising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our Mobile/Mfd. readers are hereby informed for Rent that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 basis. To complain of dissq.ft. mfd., family room w/ crimination call HUD toll-free wood stove, all new carpet & at 1-800-877-0246. The toll paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, free telephone number for fenced for horses, $1095. the hearing impaired is 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 1-800-927-9275.

A CLEAN 2 bdrm. in 4-plex next to Park, 2 decks, storage, laundry on site, great location, W/S/G paid, no dogs, Powell Butte, in secluded area, $600/mo. 541-318-1973 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage,wood Unique Studio, Close to downstove, W/D hookup, first, town, laundry & utils incl., last, $400 dep, $600/mo, pet $360 or $400 furnished, negotiable. 541-447-4750. avail. now. Call The Bulletin is now offering a 541-647-8807. LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a 640 home to rent, call a Bulletin Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad 2 BDRM., 1 BATH Apt. near started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Old Mill, laundry, parking, $595/month. Victoria L. Why Rent? Manahan Real Estate, When you Can own! 541-280-7240. For as low as $1295 Down. 541- 548-5511 Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townwww.JandMHomes.com house apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great 650 location, starting at $565. Houses for Rent 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call NE Bend 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1200 sq.ft., big 642 wood stove, util. room, 1/2 acre lot, RV parking, dbl gaApt./Multiplex Redmond rage w/openers, $895. 541-480-3393 or 610-7803 2 bdrm, 1 bath $550 mo.

OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com Storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks and shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. ONE MONTH FREE w/6 mo. lease! 541-923-1907

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Se habla espanol. Newer 4plex,

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

541-383-0386

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse located in SE Bend. Up to 30,000 sq.ft., competitive rate, 541-382-3678 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $500/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

BANK OWNED Single level with mountain views. 19.2 acres with irrigation. Home is 2916 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, 3 baths w/large shop and hay storage area. $350,900 Peggy Lee Combs, Broker 541-480-7653 John L. Scott Real Estate, Bend www.JohnLScott.com/Bend GOLF COMMUNITY Single-level home in golf course community on Bend’s Westside. 3 bed, 2 bath, 2215 SF on landscaped .36 acre lot. Hardwood floors, hickory cabinets, granite counters, and beautifully landscaped. $389,900 Amber Shults, Broker 541-419-5219 John L. Scott Real Estate, Bend www.JohnLScott.com/Bend Heating the Oustide? Trade in a heat bill for ours! $75/mo. average per month, 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

746

Northwest Bend Homes

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

748

762

773

Northeast Bend Homes

Homes with Acreage

Acreages

Mtn. View Park (Gated) 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, many ammenities, open floor plan, living, dining & family room, w/view windows, looking east to large & private back area. Master bdrm. w/French doors to wrap-around covered porch, master bathroom w/soaking tub & separate shower, $174,500, consider lease to buy contract, 2416 NE Crocus Way. Cell: 480-357-6044.

PARADISE FOUND 37 Acres, 33 Acres Irrigation, Upgraded 2936 sq ft 3 bedroom, 3 bath, with a shop, barns. Killer views! $1,295,000. www.bendranchproperty.info Call Candice Anderson 541-788-8878 John L. Scott, Real Estate, Bend www.JohnLScott.com/Bend

Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

750

Acreages

Redmond Homes $121,837 - REDMOND Great 3 bedroom, 2 bath Redhawk home in Northwest Redmond. MLS#201101630 Call DON CHAPIN, Broker 541-350-6777 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

773 $795,000 - Redmond 109+/acres w/64 acres COI. Full Cascade Mtn. views. MLS#201006080 Call TRAVIS HANNAN, Principal Broker, 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate ***

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

NW CROSSING TOWNHOME 1813 sq ft, 3 bedroom, 2.5 baths with 2 master suites! Located directly across from Lewis & Clark Park, it has great views, peaceful and private street and many upgrades! $279,900 Kathy Caba, Broker, ABR 541-771-1761 John L. Scott Real Estate, Bend JohnLScott.com/Bend

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified ***

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes $20,000. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths 1232 sq. ft. 1992 Redman. Large living room ~ sunny kitchen with eating area, generous master suite with private bath. Separate laundry room includes washer/ dryer. An exceptional value in 55+ Suntree Village MHP. Call Marilyn Rohaly, Broker, 541-322-9954 John L. Scott Real Estate, Bend www.JohnLScott.com Brand New 3 Bdrm. 2 bath, delivered & Set Up, starting at $39,999, financing available, Call 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Welcome to The Bulletin’s new print and online Classifieds.

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

Check out our NEW color coded categories!

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

All Classified text ads appear in The Bulletin and at www.bendbulletin.com.

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

You’ll find NEW features including:

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Concrete / Paving

Home Improvement

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Old World Cobblestone Inc. Paver Installation Specialists Ask about special Spring Prices! oldworldcobblestoneinc.com 541-408-6947 • CCB 82623

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

Computer/Cabling Install QB Digital Living •Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107 fifi’s Hauling & More. Yard clean up, fuel reduction, construction & misc. clean up, 10 yd. hyd. trailers, 20 ft. flatbed, 541-382-0811.

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Handyman Service Repair & Remodel We Move Walls Small jobs welcome. Another General Contractor, Inc. CCB# 110431. 541-617-0613, 541-390-8085

Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

541-382-3883

Fertilizer included with monthly program

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD 4 Leaf Clover Lawn Service Spring clean-up time is here! Thatch & Aeration Special: 1 free mowing & fertilization with seasonal service! Edging, weed control, pruning, hedging, bark installation. Senior discounts. Knowledgable care with reasonable prices! 541-279-9174; 541-279-0746

DDDDDDDDDDDDDD

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!���

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Full color ad photos

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Remodeling, Carpentry

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

D.L. Concepts Remodeling Specializing in all aspects of wood, drywall, metal & fiberglass finishes. Make your old cabinets, doors or windows new again! Also expert in faux finishing - interior/exterior, 30+ years experience. Call Dan - 541-420-4009 CCB #115437

CHEVY BLAZER, 1991 4x4 Tahoe LT, tow, air, tilt, leather interior, custom wheels and trim, loaded, $8,900 OBO.

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

Color in your ads

DINING TABLE, oak, w/8 chairs $400; 5-piece oak dinette $100; Gold La-Z-Boy sofa sleeper & rocker recliner $200; 4-piece dble. maple bdrm. set $100. All items must go now!

Ad borders

DINING TABLE, oak, w/8 chairs $400; 5-piece oak dinette $100; Gold La-Z-Boy sofa sleeper & rocker recliner $200; 4-piece dble. maple bdrm. set $100. All items must go now!

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Full Season Openings. Senior discounts. Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364

Italic and bold headlines

Andrew Russell Construction, New construction, remodels, siding, decks, fences & much more! FREE ESTIMATES. 541-390-1005 CCB#164571

MINI BEAGLE PUPPIES 2 females,$250, 2 males, $350, AKC registered. Cute!

MINI BEAGLE PUPPIES 2 females,$250, 2 males, $350, AKC registered. Cute!

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Attentiongetting graphics

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

MINI BEAGLE PUPPIES 2 females,$250, 2 males, $350, AKC registered. Cute!

V Spring Clean Up! V Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

To place your ad, call 385-5809 or visit us online at www.bendbulletin.com

Rooing AMERICAN ROOFING Quick, efficient, quality work New • Re-roofs • Repairs Free Estimates CCB #193018 Call Jorge - 541-497-3556

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

www.bendbulletin.com 14003409D KM

Barns


G4 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Boats & RV’s

800

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles 870

880

Boats & Accessories

Motorhomes

12.5’ Valco, 6HP Evinrude, w/trailer & extras very good cond., $1050, 541-382-8973.

850

Snowmobiles

Last Chance Amah 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Harley Davidson Heritage Softail Classic 2006, Vance-Hines pipes, crash bar w/foot pegs, Power Command, Stage 1 backrest w/luggage rack, Dyno-tune, all work performed by Jerry’s Custom Cycle, exclnt cond, $14,500 OBO. 541-549-4834

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike! $9300 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, 15K mi, lots of upgrades, cstm exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage accessories, $15,500 OBO. 541-693-3975 HD Heritatage Soft Tail 2006, 13K, Extras, $12,900 OBO, 541-420-5855.

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

12’ alum. Klamath, 9.8 Merc., 2 new seats, Calkins trailer, $1200 obo. 541-504-0874

12’ Duroboat with E-Z loader trailer, custom seats, oars, anchor, other extras. Used twice, stored inside, excellent condition, $2500. 541-306-6505

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

880

882

Motorhomes

Fifth Wheels Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Winnebago Class C 2003, 28’, tow pkg, gen, 2 slides, awning, V-10 Ford 450, one owner, non-smkg, exc care, see to appreciate! $34,000 541-815-4121 541-593-7257

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $79,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

881

Travel Trailers JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Be Ready for summer vacations! 27’ 1995 Terry 5th wheel with BIG slide-out, generator and extras. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Komfort 31’ 2006, Model, 271TS. Like new, only used 4x. 14’ slide-out, 27” TV, AM/FM/CD stereo, DVD player & surround sound. 21” awning, couch w/queen hideabed, AC, heavy duty hitch w/sway bars, daylight shades, pwr front jack, & more! $25,000. 541-382-6731

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Springdale 25’ 2007, slide, fully equipped, excellent cond., $12,300 OBO. 541-388-1833

Beaver Santiam 2002, 2 slides, 48K, immaculate, 330 Cummins diesel, $75,000. Call for details: 541-504-0874

Best Buy Hurricane 32’ 2007, 12K mi.,

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

Holiday Rambler Alumascape 2000, 26’,rear kitchen, senior citizen bought new, no smoking or pets, extra clean, incl. auto Satellite dish, 2 slides, Reese 5th Wheel Airborn premium air ride hitch, A/C, cassette stereo, spare tire, many extras, $10,300, 541-595-2559.

Cherry Wood, leather, queen, 2 slides, 2 tv’s 2 air, jacks, camera, like new, non smoker, $61,000, 541-548-5216. BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., $5000 OBO! See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd. in La Pine.541-876-5106.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. FIND IT! cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg BUY IT! LR, Arctic insulation, all opSELL IT! tions $39,500. 541-420-3250

Honda Elite Scooter 2001, 1398 Mi., 2 helmets, exc. cond., $1550, 541-420-0235.

GAS

SAVER!

Honda Gold Wing GL 1100, 1980. 23,000 miles, full dress plus helmets, $3500 or best offer. Call 541-389-8410 Honda Shadow 750, 2008. Original adult owner and only 6500 miles. Beautiful blue with silver flames. $4200 firm. 541-322-9334.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer incl. 20-ft cabin, 12-ft rear swim deck & 6-ft covered front deck. New Price!! $17,500. 541-788-4844.

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435 875

Watercraft

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha YFZ450 Sport ATV 2008 Blue, Low hours very clean, freshly serviced. $4290. Will consider offers. See at JD Powersports, Redmond. 541-526-0757 • Richard 541-419-0712

16-ft aluminum Canoe, 2 sets paddles, 1 set life jackets, $300 OBO. 541-389-7952

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

HOMES DISE N A H C R ME

JOBS

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $109,000 OBO. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

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Trucks and Heavy Equipment

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow! Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

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Sport Utility Vehicles

DODGE RAM SLT HD 2004 4x4 3/4 ton, diesel, 6 speed

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

manual, crew cab, 4 door, spray in bedliner, clearance lights, air bags, custom wheels and large tires, 87k. Looks like new inside & out!

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

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Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

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Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories (4) Falken Uro M&S 195/60R15, 70%, $100. (4) Infinity factory aluminum 14” four hole wheels, $200. 541-480-5950. Ford fuel-injected 302 motor, runs good; rebuilt transmission out of 87 Ford Pickup; good running 351 motor; good transmission out 86 Ford van; real nice tires & turbine wheels off 86 Ford van. Call 541-480-8521 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Antique and Classic Autos

882

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, Terry Fleetwood Fifth Wheel 2007, 295RL Great shape & ready to roll. $15,500 For info call 888-583-1888 Code# 52184 or Taxt 52184 to 35620, or Call Scott at 541-408-6908

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cardinal 34.5 JRL (40’) 2009, 4 slides, convection oven + micro., dual A/C, fireplace, extra ride insurance (3 yr. remaining incl. tires), air sleeper sofa + queen bed, $52,900 OBO, must see to appreciate, 406-980-1907, Terrebonne

885

Canopies and Campers Carri-Lite Luxury 2009 by Carriage, 4 slideouts, inverter, satellite sys, frplc, 2 flat scrn TVs. $70,000. 760-644-4160

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

Winnebago 32VS 2000, Class A Adventurer. Super slide, 31K mi., new Toyo tires, 11 1/2 ft. overall height, perfect cond,$37,999. 541-312-8974

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as Wagon 1957, unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 Chevy 4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

S O AUT

New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Ford F-250 1990, 2WD, 187K mi., runs good, good work truck, $500, 541-382-6934.

Paying Top Dollar For Your Vehicle! We will pay CASH for your vehicle. Buying vehicles NOW! Call Mike Springer 541-749-4025

541-389-5355

Hwy 20 in Bend smolichmotors.com

933

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

$19,450! 541-389-5016 evenings. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Ford Explorer Eddie Bauer 2000, AWD, 146,500 mi., V-8, 5.0L, auto, fully loaded, extra set studs on rims, $5400, Mike 541-408-8330

Honda CRV 2007 AWD 18mpg City/26 Hwy! 62k mi, MP3, multi-disc CD, sunroof, tow pkg, $17,500. 541-389-3319

INFINITI

FX35

2004

AWD, leather, Moonroof, VIN#221609 $20,577 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

Jeep Commander 2007 AWD, Limited, Navigation, & More! 33K Miles & Warranty! Vin #530244

Only $25,688

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Jeep Grand Cherokee Special Edition, 2004, 4x4, V8, 91K, Auto, AC,541-598-5111 $8895

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Jeep Liberty Diesel AWD 2006 4 Cylinder auto, Warranty! Vin #274528

Sale Price $17,997

Pickups

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

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Sport Utility Vehicles Lexus RX 350 2009

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

AWD—NAV-Loaded. Vin109252 $36,995 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Subaru Outback 2008 Wgn, AWD, 24,000 miles. Vin# 360626. $22,277 541-598-3750

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

The Bulletin

Chevy El Camino 1979,

Where buyers meet sellers.

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition Chevy Corvette Coupe 2006, and much more. Original 8,471 orig miles, 1 owner, always garaged, red, 2 tops, paint, truck used very little. auto/paddle shift, LS-2, Corsa $5700, 541-575-3649 exhaust, too many options to Chevrolet S10 1998, excellent list, pristine car, $37,500. Second, great gas saver, daily rious only, call 541-504-9945 driver, 2.2L 4cyl engine, 5-spd, many cosmetic upgrades. $4250 obo. 541-306-8756 Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Ford Flatbed 1985, diesel, new tires, rims and glow plugs, gooseneck hitch and rear International Travel All 1967, hitch, 4WD., great condition, exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, $2500. 541-419-6593. or shocks, interior seat cover, 541-419-6552. everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual FORD Pickup 1977, and line setting ticket incl. step side, 351 Windsor, $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686 Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yes., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425. International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

WILLYS JEEP 1956 Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

$26,000 OBO. 541-433-2341 • 541-410-8173

Dodge pickup 1962 D100 classic, original 318 wide block, push button trans, straight, FORD F-150 1994, good shape, $3000 OBO; 2004 King Cab runs good, $1250 firm. bucket seats, gray, $250. Bend, 831-295-4903 541-280-8800.

Utility Trailers

Northland 880 Grizzly, 2002, 8½’ cab-over camper, exclnt cond, garaged when not in use, $9500 obo. 541-549-4834

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

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Pickups

The Bulletin Classiieds

Fifth Wheels

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $64,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

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Antique and Classic Autos

900

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Honda CBR954 2002 18,500 mi, Corbin seat, Ohlins shock, steering damper, race pipe, 2 jackets, gloves $3,900 541-207-2510

Autos & Transportation

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Jeep Wrangler 2010 Chevy LT Colorado Crewcab 2006 4X4, 5 Cyl., Automatic, Warranty! Vin #176919

Sale Price $14,450

Chevy

Avalanche 2007

Thousands Less than New! Only 3K Miles! Vin #158726

Sale Price $22,985

4X4, loaded, leather, moonroof, only 49K Miles! Warranty! VIN #309584

Now Only $26,978

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

366

Jeep Wrangler XT 2002, 4.0 w/5-spd., 34K mi., many extras, loaded, $12,800 OBO, call Mike 541-408-3114.

Where Buyers and Sellers Meet

s hicle e V s y t i Util home t r r o o t p o ’s • M ps • S V s R & Picku ts cycle r a o o t B o • rs • M biles e o l i m a r o T l Aut Trave • s ’ ATV

Thousands of ads daily in print and online To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, May 19, 2011 G5

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Nissan Pathfinder 2004 Armada LE, leather, nav, DVD, moonroof, -54k miles. Vin..#732384 $21,577 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

S m o li c h A u t o M a ll Mercedes GL450, 2007

Over 150 used to choose from!

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

West of 97 & Empire, Bend Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Dodge Challenger SRT8 2010

Smolich Auto Mall

Loaded, Navigation, Leather. Only 3K Miles! VIN #278674

Over 150 used to choose from!

Now Only $35,597

Mercury Grand Marquis 1992, 4-door, 130K miles, $1350, please call 541-388-4850 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

s m o li c h m o t o r s . c o m 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Nissan Xterra AWD 2004 55K Miles & Warranty! Vin #631269

Only $13,998

Subaru

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

366

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Smolich Auto Mall

2010

DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend Subaru Legacy 2006 AWD 42K, auto, pearl blue, rear spoiler $13,950. 541-815-2285

Over 150 used to choose from!

SUBARUS!!!

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 38K mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $59,750 firm. 541-480-1884

Impreza

sedan, AWD, 11000 miles. #504103. $18,277 541-598-3750

Ford Mustang GT 2006 Auto, 20’s, 19K Miles! Warranty! VIN #162080

Now Only $21,250

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Smolich Auto Mall

DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Over 150 used to choose from!

smolichmotors.com

Reach thousands of readers!

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Toyota Camry 2004

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Sale Price $10,998

FORD TAURUS LX 98 with 74K miles, gold color, one owner, non smoker, 27 mpg, V-6 motor, nice car and almost new! $3900 541-318-9999 or 541-815-3639

smolichmotors.com

Vin #880152

Suzuki Grand Vitara AWD 2010 2,000 Extra Low Miles, & Warranty!! VIN #100784

Now Only $19,999

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

366

Toyota FJ Cruiser 2008, Automatic/Silver 56k/loaded in exc cond. Plus 17" new tires/100k Toyota Warranty $24,900 (541-550-4922)

Over 150 used to choose from!

940

Vans

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van 1999, with tow package, good condition, $4800. Call 541-419-5693 CHEVY ASTRO EXT 1993 All Wheel Drive mini van, 3 seats, rear barn doors, white, good tires and wheels. Pretty interior, clean, no rips or tears. Drives excellent!!!. Only $1,950. (541) 318-9999 or (541) 815-3639 Ford E150 1988, short wheel base, 4.9 L, 6 cyl., owner auto tech. $1200.480-5950

975

Automobiles

Toyota Matrix 2009

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

15K Miles! Warranty! Must See - Very Clean! Vin #007444

Only $16,599

Smolich Auto Mall NISSAN

Over 150 used to choose from!

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Hyundai Santa Fe 2008 AWD, 48K Miles, Warranty! Vin #205588

Only $18,577

366

Volvo C70-T5, 2010 Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall

VW Super Beetle 1971, $3000, great cond., with sunroof, 541-410-7679.

Over 150 used to choose from!

5 4 1 -3 2 2 -7 2 5 3 Audi A4 1999, dark blue, automatic sunroof, runs great, comes w/studded snow tires, $5,000. Jeff, 541-980-5943

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Buick Park Avenue 1996, loaded, 27 mpg, $2700, 541-419-5060.

BUICKS ! LeSabre 1998 and 2000,$3900/ea 90k and 110k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999 Chevy El Camino 1972, all orig, loaded, runs great, camper shell, $4600. 541-548-7896

Hyundai Sonata 2010 32K Miles! Warranty! Vin #658777

Only $16,555

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Infiniti J30 1993 118.6K miles. 1 owner. Great shape. 4 separate studded tires on wheels incl. $3200. 541-382-7451

Jaguar SV6 2000 4-dr. Has new: tires, brakes, rotors, calipers, radio, battery. AC great! 84K mi, like new, $7500. 541-923-2595

Chrysler Sebring 2008 Touring Convertible NAV system. Vin #135502

$17,377 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

West of 97 & Empire, Bend

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950. Chysler La Baron Convertible 1990, Good condition, $3800, 541-416-9566

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

LEGAL NOTICE ADOPT: Loving, active, financially secure couple will cherish your baby. Expenses paid. Caroline & Mel, 1-866-440-4220. LEGAL NOTICE EXHIBIT "C" CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON NOTICE OF ROAD VACATION HEARING NOTICE IS HEARBY GIVEN THAT THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING ON JUNE 8, 2011 AT 10:00 A.M. IN THE DESCHUTES COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONER'S HEARING ROOM, DESCHUTES COUNTY SERVICES CENTER, 1300 NW WALL, BEND, OREGON, ON THE PROPOSED ROAD VACATION PROCEEDING DESCRIBED BELOW. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS MAY APPEAR AND BE HEARD. NOTICE TO MORTGAGEE, LIENHOLDER, VENDOR OR SELLER: ORS CHAPTER 215 REQUIRES THAT IF YOU RECEIVE THIS NOTICE, IT MUST PROMPTLY BE FORWARDED TO THE PURCHASER.

A utility easement will not be reserved on vacated public road right-of-way parcels unless there is physical evidence of an existing utility on the parcel, or a utility company provides evidence of an existing facility, or there is a specific request from a utility company to retain an easement for a planned future facility. Persons interested in obtaining more detailed information or a map of the proposed vacation may contact the Deschutes County Road Department, 61150 S.E. 27th Street, Bend, Oregon, (541) 322-7148.

TAMMY BANEY, CHAIR

Sale Price $22,649

Toyota Land Cruiser 2000, 4WD, natural white exterior, mocha leather interior, gold trim pkg., LOADED, 3rd row seats, 275K mi., $8750, 541-480-7201

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Legal Notices

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON

Over 150 used to choose from!

Loaded, Leather, Nav., low mi. Warranty! Vin #046676

HYUNDAI

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ORS 368.326 to 368.366 provides authority for road vacation.

Smolich Auto Mall Honda CR-V AWD 2007

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HYUNDAI

541-749-4025 • DLR

Smolich Auto Mall

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Legal Notices

NOTE:

541-389-1177 • DLR#366 Advertise your car! Add A Picture!

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Legal Notices

In response to a petition by landowners, Deschutes County initiated the vacation of a portion of the 1911 H.B. Ford Road, located in Deschutes County be vacated.

Subaru Legacy 2009 AWD. Special Edition. Vin# 218731 $19,477 541-598-3750

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Legal Notices

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

PUBLISHED: Bulletin - May 19, 2011 & May 27, 2011 POSTED: May 19, 2011 MAILED: May 4, 2011 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES In the Matter of the Estate of CLAYTON P. WORTHINGTON, Deceased. CASE No. 11PB0060BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o Paul Heatherman PC, PO Box 8, Bend, OR 97709, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyer for the personal representative, Paul B. Heatherman. Dated and first published on May 5, 2011.

/s/ Molly Louise Parrish Molly Louise Parrish Personal Representative PAUL HEATHERMAN PC Attorneys at Law 250 NW Franklin Ave., Suite 402- PO Box 8 Bend, OR 97709 Ph: 541-389-1010 Fax: 541-382-6875 mail@bendattorneys.com LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Budget Committee and Governing Board Meetings Accountable Behavioral Health Alliance (ABHA) Budget Committee Friday, May 27, 2011, 10:00 am to 12 pm And Accountable Behavioral Health Alliance (ABHA) Governing Board Friday, May 27, 2011, 1 pm to 3:30 pm Boardroom, Sisters City Hall 520 E. Cascade Ave. Sisters, OR 97759 The Accountable Behavioral Health Alliance (ABHA) Budget Committee will meet at the time and location stated above. The preliminary agenda is: I.Election of Chair & Vice Chair II.Report of Audit Committee III.Annual Financial Report IV.Review AND APPROVAL of Proposed FY 11-12 Budget V.Public Hearing and Comments The Accountable Behavioral Health Alliance (ABHA) Governing Board will meet at the time and location stated above. The preliminary agenda is: I.Election of Chair & Vice Chair II.Policy and Minutes Review III.Public Hearing to Review Recommended FY 11-12 Budget IV.State Healthcare Transformation: Strategic Planning V.PEO, Grants, and PDS Funds VI.County Subcontractor Agreement VII.Public Comment A second GOVERNING BOARD meeting is scheduled for Thursday, June 23, 2011, from 10am to 1:30 pm at Black Butte Ranch, The Sparks Room, 13899 Bishops Cap, Black Butte Ranch, Oregon 97759 for the purpose of HOLDING A PUBLIC HEARING and approving the budget. These are public meetings where deliberations of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear and speak to the committee at the time designated on the agenda. This meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Contact Brenda Larecy, Administrative Assistant, ABHA Administrative Office, 310 NW Fifth Street, Suite 206, Corvallis, OR 97330, weekdays between 8:30 am and 5 pm or call 541-753-8997 for copy of proposed budget and agenda or to request an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for person with disabilities. Requests should be made at least 48 hour before the meeting. Seth Bernstein, Ph.D. Executive Director LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON A public hearing regarding a proposed annexation, Baker-Donohue Annexation, to the Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2, will be held on May 25, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. in the Board of County Commissioners' Hearing Room, First Floor, 1300 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon.

To view the legal description of the boundaries of the proposed annexation, contact the Deschutes County Counsel's Office at 388-6623. The purpose of the proposed annexation is to provide fire protection services for the area proposed to be annexed. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Deschutes County conducts public meetings in locations which are wheelchair accessible. Deschutes County also provides reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. For persons who are deaf, or who have hearing or speech impairments, dial 7-1-1 to access the State transfer relay service for TTY. At meetings of the Board of County Commissioners the county will provide an interpreter for hearing impaired persons who give at least 48 hours notice of the request. Written information will be made available in large print or audio format. To request these services, please call (541) 388-6571. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Tammy Baney, Chair LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Diana Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: #1 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,500.00, Case #09-03-02655 seized 04/20/09 from Brett D. Burnham IN THE MATTER OF: #2 U.S. Currency in the amount of $1,100.00, Case # 10-04-33222 seized 08/06/10 from Chase O. Burkhart IN THE MATTER OF : #3 U.S. Currency in the amount of $6,145.00, Case # 10-10-63390 from Judith L. Flanders & Darryl G. Altman.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Carl W. Hopp, Jr., Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed described below, hereby elects to sell, pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes Sections 86.705 to 86.795, the real property described below at 10:00 a.m. on September 28, 2011 in the lobby of the office of Carl W. Hopp, Jr., 168 NW Greenwood Avenue, Bend, Oregon 97701. All obligations of performance which are secured by the Trust Deed hereinafter described are in default for reasons set forth below and the beneficiary declares all sums due under the note secured by the trust deed described herein immediately due and payable. GRANTOR: LARRY'S LAND COMPANY, LLC. BENEFICIARY: MID OREGON FEDERAL CREDIT UNION. TRUST DEED RECORDED: April 8, 2005, in Volume 2005, at page 21200 Official Records, Deschutes County, Oregon. PROPERTY COVERED BY TRUST DEED: See Exhibit "A": EXHIBIT “A”': Property Description - A tract of land located in the Northwest One-quarter of the Southeast One-quarter of Section Nine (9), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Center One-quarter corner of said Section 9, thence along the East-west centerline of said Section 9, North 89° 53' 59" East 194.51 feet to a point on the Easterly right of way of Clausen Drive; thence South 19° 16' 29" West along said Easterly right of way 139.10 feet; thence leaving said Easterly right of way South 62° 05' 34" East 204.29 feet to the True Point of Beginning; thence South 62° 05' 34" East 273.99 feet to a point on the Westerly right of way of the Dalles-California Highway; thence South 24° 11' 32" West along said Westerly right of way 321 .31 feet to the Northerly right of way of Grandview Drive; thence North 64° 47' 20" West along said Northerly right of way 65.46 feet; thence 87.28 feet along said Northerly right of way along a 120.00 foot radius curve right, the chord of which bears North 43° 5712" West 85.36 feet; thence 113.93 feet along said Northerly right of way along a 180.00 foot radius curve left, the chord of which bears North 41° 15' 00" West 112.03 feet; thence North 59° 20' 34" West along said Northerly right of way 4.58 feet; thence leaving said Northerly right of way North 19° 16' 29" East 260.00 feet to the True Point of Beginning. DEFAULT: Failure to pay: 1. Installment payments as follows: December 1, 2010 $4,926.07; January 1.2010 $4,992.11; February 1,2011 $4,992.11; March 1, 2011 $4,992.11; April 1,2011 $4,992.11; TOTAL $24,894.51. 2. Late charges of $500.00; 3. Taxes $20,848.06; 4. Other - Trustee's Sale Guarantee: $1,688.00. SUM OWING ON OBLIGATION SECURED BY TRUST DEED: Principal balance of $719,328.44 with interest at 5.380 percent per annum from February 28, 2011, until paid. Notice is given that any person named pursuant to Section 86.753, Oregon Revised Statutes, has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by curing the above-described defaults, by payment of the entire amount due (other than such portions of principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale. NOTICE TO TENANTS: If you are a tenant of this property, foreclosure could affect your rental agreement. A purchaser who buys this property at a foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out after giving you a 30-day notice on or after the date of the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease, you may be entitled to receive after the date of the sale a 60-day notice of the purchaser's requirement that you move out. To be entitled to either a 30-day or 60-day notice, you must give the trustee of the property written evidence of your rental agreement at least 30 days before the date first set for the sale. If you have a fixed-term lease and cannot provide a copy of the rental agreement, you may give the trustee other written evidence of the existence of the rental agreement. The date that is 30 days before the date of the sale is August 29, 2011, the name of the trustee and the trustee's mailing address are listed on this notice. Federal law may grant you additional rights, including a right to a longer notice period. Consult a lawyer for more information about your rights under federal law. You have the right to apply your security deposit and any rent you prepaid toward your current obligation under your rental agreement. If you want to do so, you must notify your landlord in writing and in advance that you intend to do so. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included within this notice. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information for where you can obtain free legal assistance is included within this notice. OREGON STATE BAR, 16037 SW Upper Boones Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon 97224, (503)620-0222, (800)452-8260, http://www.osbar.org. DIRECTORY OF LEGAL AID PROGRAMS: http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. Dated this 2nd day of May, 2011. CARL W. HOPP, JR., Successor Trustee, 168 NW Greenwood Avenue, Bend, OR 97701. (541)388-3606.

LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Westbrook Homes, NW, Inc., as Grantor, to U.S. Bank Trust Company, N.A. as Trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank N.A. as Beneficiary, dated January 3, 2007, recorded on January 4, 2007 in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, Record No. 2007-00663 and amended by the various amendments recorded as Amendment to Oregon Trust Deed recorded on February 4, 2008 in Record No. 2008-05202, June 23, 2008 in Record No. 2008-26727 and October 6, 2008 in Record No. 2008-40743, all in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon and which assigned to Acquired Capital I, L.P. in the Assignment of Oregon Trust Deed, Security Agreement and Assignment of Rents and Leases, recorded on October 25, 2010 in Record No. 2010-42332 in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in that county and state: Lots One (1), Four (4), Seven (7), Nine (9) and Eleven (11), WESTBROOK VILLAGE, PHASE III, Deschutes County, Oregon Michael E. Knapp was appointed successor trustee by an Appointment of Successor Trustee dated January 14, 2011 recorded on January 20, 2011 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Record No. 2011-02473. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: The principal sum of $374,999.99, due and payable in full on or before December 1, 2008, plus interest at the rate of Wall Street Prime plus 0.5% per annum, amounting to $24,880.08 as of July 21,

2010; delinquent property taxes, if any; cost of foreclosure report; attorney’s fees; together with any other sums due or that may become due under the Note or by reason of this foreclosure and any further advances made by Beneficiary as allowed by the Note and Deed of Trust. By reason of the default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to-wit: The principal sum of $374,999.99, due and payable in full on or before December 1, 2008, plus interest at the rate of Wall Street Prime plus 0.5% per annum, amounting to $24,880.08 as of July 21, 2010; prepayment premium, if applicable; cost of foreclosure report; attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, together with any other sums due or that may become due under the Note or by reason of this foreclosure and any further advances made by Beneficiary as allowed by the Note and Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned trustee will on August 12, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110 at the following place: Deschutes County Justice Building, 1100 NW Bond Street, Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor’s successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time

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prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying those sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. For more information, contact Michael E. Knapp, Successor Trustee, Michael E. Knapp P.C. 2355 State Street, Salem, Oregon 97301; (503) 391-0664. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-62188-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, IRVING K. ORTON AND SUSANNE C. ORTON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-15-2007, recorded 03-20-2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-16531 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trust Deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): 1.TRUST DEED INFORMATION: Grantor: Terry J. Duffin and Ann P. Duffin, as Tenants by the Entirety. Beneficiary: Columbia State Bank successor in interest to Columbia River Bank*. Trustee:Deschutes County Title. Successor Trustee:Heather J. Hepburn, 360 SW Bond Street, Suite 400, Bend, Oregon 97702, (541) 749-4044. Recording Date: August 9, 2006. Recording Reference:2006-54579. County of Recording:Deschutes. A modification of the Trust Deed was recorded on July 13, 2007, as Document No. 2007-38683, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. *An Assignment assigning Columbia River Bank's interest to Columbia State Bank was recorded on November 19, 2010, as Document No. 2010-46239, in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 2.LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY (the "Property") : Parcel II: That portion of the Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of Section 15, Township 16 South, Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, lying Northeasterly of the relocated McKenzie-Bend Highway. 3. DEFAULT: The Grantor or any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed. The default for which foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to do the following: Failure to make monthly payments on the note of $2,000.20 due December 20, 2009 and continuing through February 20, 2011, secured by the above referenced trust deed. 4. AMOUNT DUE: By reason of the default described above, the Beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following: Principal balance of $183,318.39, together with unpaid interest of $26,259.67 through October 5, 2010, late fees of $3,467.70 through October 5, 2010, Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, costs of foreclosure and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of the Trust Deed. Interest continues to accrue on the unpaid principal balance at the rate of 18% per annum from October 6, 2010, until paid. 5.ELECTION TO SELL: Both the Beneficiary and Trustee have elected to foreclose the Trust Deed by advertisement and sale as provided under ORS 86.705 to 86.795, and to cause the Property to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the described Property which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by the Grantor of the Trust Deed, together with any interest the Grantor or Grantor's successor in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed, including the expenses of the sale, compensation of the Trustee as provided by law and the reasonable fees of the Trustee's attorneys. A Notice of Default has been recorded as required by ORS 86.735(3). 6. DATE AND TIME OF SALE: Date: July 14, 2011. Time: 11:00 A.M. (in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110). Location: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. 7. RIGHT TO REINSTATE: Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following: a. payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred; b.curing any other default that is capable of being cured, by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed; and c.paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. If you believe you need legal assistance with this matter, you may contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. If you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines, you may be eligible for free legal assistance. Contact information and a directory of legal aid programs for where you can obtain free legal assistance is available at http://www.oregonlawhelp.org. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. DATED: March 10, 2011. /s/ Heather J. Hepburn. Heather J. Hepburn, Successor Trustee.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T11-76067-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DOUGLAS J. LAUDE AND NANCY J. LAUDE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of SOUTH VALLEY BANK & TRUST, as Beneficiary, dated 12-14-2005, recorded 12-15-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-86093 , and as modified by the Modification of Deed of Trust recorded on 10-04-2006, Book , Page , Instrument 2006-66941 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: VPN: 177284 A PARCEL OF LAND LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 14 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF SAID SECTION 28, THENCE NORTH 87º17'48" WEST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) 2626.64 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4); THENCE SOUTH 01º09'54" EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) 1309.26 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH DIAMETER REBAR: THENCE LEAVING SAID WEST LINE SOUTH 86º40'43" EAST, 1314.52 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH DIAMETER REBAR; THENCE NORTH 01º10'20" WEST 1098.48 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH DIAMETER REBAR; THENCE NORTH 79º50'50" EAST 684.44 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH DIAMETER REBAR; THENCE SOUTH 88º24'33" EAST 634.96 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) OF SAID SECTION 28; THENCE NORTH 01º10'54" WEST ALONG THE EAST LINE OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER (SE 1/4) 60.00 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. Commonly known as: 62605 DODDS ROAD BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes; the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 05/01'2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $3,621.48 Monthly Late Charge $157.34 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of 5488,861,63 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6,25% per annum from 04-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 09-01-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: April 25, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M, DAVIS, ASST SEC ASAP# 3982010 05/12/2011, 05/19/2011, 05/26/2011, 06/02/2011


G6 Thursday, May 19, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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State, to-wit: APN: 195540 LOT ONE HUNDRED FOURTEEN (114), AWBREY GLEN TOWNSITES, PHASE SIX, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3690 NW COTTON PLACE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 09/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $5,566.08 Monthly Late Charge $278.30 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $877,440.09 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 08-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 09-02-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187, S10, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: April 25, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASSISTANT SECRETARY ASAP# 3981993 05/12/2011, 05/19/2011, 05/26/2011, 06/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx4580 T.S. No.: 1320794-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Melanie A. Rhoads, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Loancity.com, A California Corporation., as Beneficiary, dated October 06, 2004, recorded October 13, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-61438 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 3, block 1, the Winchester Arms, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 1821 & 1823 NE Wichita Way Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,150.19 Monthly Late Charge $45.43. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $140,115.62 together with interest thereon at 5.875% per annum from November 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges

thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on August 16, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 11, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-377769 05/12/11, 05/19, 05/26, 06/02 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-59075-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CHAD ELLIOTT AND LOIS ELLIOTT, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-13-2008, recorded 05-19-2008, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No, at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-21554 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 115423 LOT THIRTEEN (13) BLOCK TT, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, RECORDED MARCH 22, 1952, IN PLAT BOOK 6, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19089 PUMICE BUTTE RD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 07/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE, Monthly Payment $2,159.85 Monthly Late Charge $71.86 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately doe and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $299,909.43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from 06-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 09-06-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by-payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), to-

gether with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: April 22, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3988863 05/19/2011, 05/26/2011, 06/02/2011, 06/09/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T11-76132-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, DAN HUNTER REY AND CONNIE J. REY, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORP., as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 10-17-2007, recorded 10Â23-2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-56462 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133029 LOT 37, BLOCK 8, FIRST ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21095 QUAIL LANE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86,735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 01/01/2011 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $2,565.54 Monthly Late Charge $111.71 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $446,878.52 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 12-01-2010 until paid; plus ail accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 09-16-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: May 03, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COM-

PANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASST. SEC. ASAP# 3988857 05/19/2011, 05/26/2011, 06/02/2011, 06/09/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0172190043 T.S. No.: 10-12257-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 9, 2007 made by, NICOLE MINTIENS , was the original Grantor to REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORP., was the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., was the original beneficiary, recorded on August 14, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-44673 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 123799 LOT SEVEN (7) IN BLOCK (15) OF MOUNTAIN VIEW ADDITION TO REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, EXCEPT FOR THE WESTERLY TEN FEET (W.10') THEREOF. Commonly known as: 1449 SW GLACIER AVE, REDMOND, OR The current beneficiary is: HSBC Bank USA, National Association as Trustee for Wells Fargo Asset Securities Corporation, Mortgage Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-AR7 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; and which defaulted amounts total: $15,739.24 as of April 14, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $168776.14 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.00000% per annum from March 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 23, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of

said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 25, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Chris Bradford, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3977363 04/28/2011, 05/05/2011, 05/12/2011, 05/19/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-62664-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SUE ANN SMITH as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-232006, recorded 06-01-2006, m official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No, at page No., fee/Tile/instrument/micro file/reception No. 2006-38163 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 100537 LOT NINETEEN (19), BLOCK ONE (1), NORTH PILOT BUTTE ADDITION, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1333 NE DEMPSEY DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 06/01/2009 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $ 1.205.74 Monthly Late Charge $52.13 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said stints being the following, to-wit: The sum of $181,989,83 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 05-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 09-02-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT EN-

TRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97703 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: April 25, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASSISTANT SECRETARY ASAP# 3981749 05/12/2011, 05/19/2011, 05/26/2011, 06/02/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE: Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Westbrook Homes, NW, Inc. as Grantor, to U.S. Bank Trust Company, N.A. as Trustee, in favor of U.S. Bank N.A. as Beneficiary, dated June 8, 2006, recorded on June 20, 2006 in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, Record No. 2006-42394 and amended by the various amendments to that certain Trust Deed, recorded on July 9, 2007 in Record No. 2007-37785, February 4, 2008 in Record No. 2008-05203, June 23, 2008 in Record No. 2008-26726 and October 6, 2008 in Record No. 2008-40742, all in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, and which was assigned to Acquired Capital I., L.P. in the Assignment of Oregon Trust Deed, Security Agreement and Assignment of Rents and Leases recorded on October 25, 2010 in Record No. 2010-42331 in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following described real property situated in that county and state: Lot 8 Westbrook Village, Bend, OR 97702, more fully described as follows: Lot Eight (8), WESTBROOK VILLAGE, PHASE II, Deschutes County, Oregon. Michael E. Knapp was appointed successor trustee by an Appointment of Successor Trustee dated February 22, 2011, recorded on February 28, 2011 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Record

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L523048 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017579/CROSSAN Investor No: 4004881022 AP #1: 111364 Title #: 110039667 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by TERRY G. CROSSAN, KATHERINE A. CROSSAN as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated May 26, 2006, Recorded June 5, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-38669 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 53, BLOCK PP, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 12 PYMTS FROM 02/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,590.09 $19,081.08 1 PYMT DUE 02/01/11 @ 1,626.15 $1,626.15 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $355.55 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $93.00 $93.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$21,155.78 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 19109 BAKER RD, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $215,436.34, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 01/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 14, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 02/04/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 934130 PUB: 04/28/11, 05/05/11, 05/12/11, 05/19/11

No. 2011-07675. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3). The default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: The principal sum of $133,698.65, due and payable in full on or before December 1, 2008, together with interest on the principal balance at the rate of Wall Street Prime plus 0.5% per annum; delinquent property taxes, if any; cost of foreclosure report; attorney’s fees; together with any other sums due or that may become due under the Note or by reason of this foreclosure and any further advances made by Beneficiary as allowed by the Note and Deed of Trust. By reason of the default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the trust deed immediately due and payable, those sums being the following, to-wit: The principal sum of $133,698.65, with interest on the principal balance at the rate of Wall Street Prime plus 0.5% per annum, amounting to $8,870.69 as of July 21, 2010; prepayment premium, if applicable; cost of foreclosure report; attorney’s fees, trustee’s fees, together with any other sums due or that may become due under the Note or by reason of this foreclosure and any further advances made by Beneficiary as allowed by the Note and Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned trustee will on August 12, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: Deschutes County Justice Building, located at 1100 NW Bond Street, Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor’s successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the

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performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying those sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. For more information, contact Michael E. Knapp, Successor Trustee, Michael E. Knapp P.C. 2355 State Street, Salem, Oregon 97301; (503) 391-0664. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0213182991 T.S. No.: 10-11481-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 26, 2009 made by, ANDREW O. PESLIN AND JASPER L. PESLIN AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY , was the original Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, was the original trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS INC. AS NOMINEE FOR BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER, was the original beneficiary, recorded on March 26, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-12443 and re-recorded on June 23, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-26578 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 256243 LOT FIFTY (50), SUNDANCE MEADOWS. DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, Commonly known as: 21136 COPPERFIELD AVE, BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: WELLS FARGO BANK NA Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $13,862.88 as of April 4, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $204,383.73 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000% per annum from July 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust.

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Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 22, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 21, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3974703 04/28/2011, 05/05/2011, 05/12/2011, 05/19/2011

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Reference is made to a trust deed made by HARRY W. CAMPBELL and MARITA F. CAMPBELL, jointly and severally, as Grantor, to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Pensco Trust Company Custodian, FBO Gary L. Boehmer Account #BO1HW as to an undivided forty percent (40%) interest; Pensco Trust Company Custodian, FBO Sybil L. Peters Account #PE1FJ as to an undivided forty percent (40%) interest; and Robert Allan and Dolores Watson Spurr, Trustees of the Robert Allan and Dolores Watson Spurr Revocable Trust as to an undivided twenty percent (20%) interest, as Beneficiary, dated July 17, 2008, and recorded on July 18, 2008 in the Deschutes County Official Records as Instrument No. 2008-30415, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to-wit: Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: 15782 Jackpine Road, La Pine, Oregon 97739, 15792 Jackpine Road, La Pine, Oregon 97739; and 15794 Jackpine Road La Pine, Oregon 97739, more particularly described on Exhibit A attached hereto and incorporated herein. EXHIBIT A: Real property in the County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: PARCEL 1: Beginning at the Center North one sixteenth corner of Section 16, Township 22 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, marked by a 1/2" rebar; thence South 89°09'10" West 333.21 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 00°26'11" West 1108.30 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 89°33'49" East 189.37 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING", thence continuing North 89°33'49" East 214.30 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence South 00°21'17" East 217.46 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence continuing South 00°21'17" East 744.70 feet to a point on the North line of Lot 1 of Block 1 of C.L. and D. RANCH TRACT marked by a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence South 89°31'53" West along said north line of Lot 1 a distance of 68.80 feet to a point on the north-south center section line of said Section 16, said point also being the northwest corner of said Lot 1, marked by a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence south 00°21'17" East along said north-south center section line 143.71 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: Beginning at the one-quarter corner of Sections 9 and 16, Township 22 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, marked by a 1/2" rebar; thence North 88°47'40" East along the north line of the Northwest one-quarter of the Northeast one-quarter of said Section 16 a distance of 1197.31 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "SCES"; thence departing said north line South 46°38'19" West, 650.63 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence South 88°47'40" West 652.66 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 02°21'17" West 217.46 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence South 89°33'49" West 214.30 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 00°26'11" West a distance of 216.35 feet to a point on the north line of the East half of the Northeast quarter of the Northwest quarter (E1/2 NE1/4 NW1/4) of Section 16 marked by a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 88°47'04" East along said north line 145.83 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 3: Commencing at the Center North one sixteenth corner of Section 16, Township 22 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, marked by a 1/2" rebar; thence North 00°21'17" East, along said north-south line, 143.71 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 89°31'53" East, along the north line of Lot 1 of Block 1 of C.L. & D. RANCH TRACT, a distance of 68.30 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING", the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said point North 00°21'17" West 744.70 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence North 88°47'40" East 652.66 feet to a point on the northerly line of Lot 13 of said Block 1 of C.L. & D. RANCH TRACT marked by a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence South 46°38'19" West, along the boundary line of said C.L. & D. RANCH TRACT, 280.91 feet to a 1/2" rebar; thence continuing along said boundary line South 02°50'06" West 436.36 feet to a 5/8" rebar with cap stamped "TYE ENGINEERING"; thence continuing along said boundary line south 58°31'53" West 245.15 feet to a ½" rebar; thence continuing along said boundary line South 89°31"53" West 213.01 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. The undivided twenty percent (20%) interest of Robert Allan and Dolores Watson Spurr, Trustees of the Robert Allan and Dolores Watson Spurr Revocable Trust was assigned to Pensco Trust Company FBO Cindi Claflin IRA #CL1BN by that certain Memorandum of Modification of Trust Deed and Assignment of Beneficiary's Interest in Trust Deed dated July 17, 2008, recorded November 30, 2009, at Instrument No. 2009-50312 in the records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The undersigned was appointed as Successor Trustee by the Beneficiary by an appointment dated March 22, 2011, and recorded on March 30, 2011, in the Deschutes County Official Records as Document No. 2011-11723. The address of the trustee is 693 Chemeketa Street NE, Salem, OR 97301. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.735(3), the default for which the foreclosure is made in grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: The sum of $250,000.00 in principal, together with interest and late fees. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $250,000.00, plus interest thereon at the rate of 17% per annum from August 1, 2009, until paid, plus late fees in the amount of $1,375.00, plus the cost of foreclosure report, attorney's fees, and trustee's fees; together with any other sums due or that may become due under the Note or by reason of the default, this foreclosure and any further advances made by Beneficiary as allowed by the Note and Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will on August 11, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 o'clock, a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110. at the main door of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1100 NW Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the real property described above which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of the sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying those sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee and attorney fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest if any. DATED: April 5, 2011. Gina Anne Johnnie, Successor Trustee.


Bulletin Daily Paper 05/19/11