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• April 16, 2011 50¢

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Job training programs are axed in budget deal

No charges in Trono shooting By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Stephen Trono

The Bend woman who allegedly mistook her husband for an intruder and shot him multiple times last July will not be charged, her lawyer said Friday. According to attorney Jon Springer, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office decided last week that it will not file charges against

Angelicque Trono, 40, who shot her husband, prominent local developer Stephen Trono, 61. “We have so far not issued any charges,” said Chief Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson. “We are still in the middle of formulating that final decision, but so far there is not sufficient evidence to go forward.” Anderson said she expects to issue a decision next week.

According to Bend Police, around 12:30 a.m. on July 29, Mathew Trono, then 18, called 911 to report that his mother, Angelicque, had accidentally shot his father, Stephen, six times with a .22-caliber revolver. She later told officers she’d been startled awake and sent her husband to investigate. When he came back into the house, she said she mistook him for an intruder. See Trono / A7

By Peter Whoriskey The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Facing recession-weary audiences across the country, President Barack Obama frequently highlighted the possibilities of job training for the unemployed. The new fields of green technology, advanced manufacturing or clean energy would require new skills that job training programs could provide. More education would bolster the workforce and the economy. And at a community college “summit” in October, Obama touted the colleges’ Inside role in provid• House passes ing workers Ryan’s budget with skills to take advanfor 2012, tage of new Page A3 opportunities. “These are places where workers can gain new skills to move up in their careers,” he said. “These are places where anyone with a desire to learn and to grow can take a chance on a brighter future for themselves and their families.” But details that emerged this week of the spending compromise between the president and congressional leaders show federal funding for job training programs took a significant hit — more than $870 million in all. Included are cuts to occupational training grants at community colleges, green jobs classes and a program to help low-income older people acquire work skills. Although some liberal groups decried the reductions, they noted that the budget deal essentially fended off much deeper cuts to job training programs proposed by Republicans. See Budget / A6

Facebook shows its stuff

Facebook employee Jay Park explains to a tour group the details about the many computer servers inside the facility on Friday.

By Vikki Ortiz Healy Chicago Tribune

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Prineville Data Center employee Sam Viles adjusts cords on a cart as a group tours the facility on Friday during the grand opening ceremony. A manager said last week the facility had about 47 employees, including contractors.

TOP NEWS INSIDE LIBYA: Cluster bombs hit civilian areas, Page A2 Correction A Washington Post graphic comparing the spending plans put forward by the president and by House Republicans, which appeared Thursday, April 14, on Page A2, inadvertently swapped the key colors for the two plans. A corrected version appears on Page A6.

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By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — Facebook’s Prineville Data Center has a new status update: User data is now flowing. At a grand opening ceremony held inside a tent beside the data center Friday, Facebook leaders said the center’s construction is on schedule. “And it’s now handling millions of status updates,” Tom Furlong, Facebook’s director of site operations, told the crowd, a mix of about 75 media members, public officials, Facebook employees and others. Prineville Mayor Betty Roppe and Crook County Judge Mike McCabe thanked Facebook for making friends with the city and county. State Treasurer Ted Wheeler said it’s exciting for Oregon

to be involved with Facebook, which, he said, “has changed everything,” in terms of both business practices and personal relations. Directing his words to Facebook’s delegation, Wheeler said, “We hope that you will help friend other businesses” and encourage them to locate in Oregon. Sen. Ron Wyden and Sen. Jeff Merkley, both D-Ore., gave congratulatory words via a taped message, as did Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River. “Facebook, we are writing on your wall, ‘Welcome to Oregon,’ ” Wyden said. Speakers at the event gathered around a podium in front of the stage and, with their hands, together depressed a “Like” button in the Facebook style roughly the size of a long microwave, which then illuminated with white light. Laughter and

applause followed. The data center has already come a long way. It has been under construction off state Highway 126 just east of the Prineville Airport for 15 months, said Jonathan Heiliger, Facebook’s vice president of technical operations, and only now has started to allow user data to flow through the servers. “Today is obviously a big day for us,” he said. It’s “a significant milestone for the growth of our business.” A quarter of the data center’s servers are serving Facebook users, Heiliger said. The rest are in development. The arrival of the data center comes at a time when the area needs it. Unemployment in Crook County has hovered between 15 and 19 percent since 2009. See Facebook / A7

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Vol. 108, No. 106, 68 pages, 6 sections

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Prineville’s newest employer opens its doors for business

CHICAGO — In the two years since her father was deported, 13-year-old Elisabeth and her three younger siblings have settled into an after-school routine while their mother, Maria Lourdes works long hours at a beauty salon. The family shares a cramped bedroom in a Waukegan, Ill., apartment. When school friends wonder why her father is no longer in the picture, Elisabeth has learned to change the subject. “I don’t answer,” she said. “It’s such a long “I cry every story.” Friday After Elizabeth’s father when I was deported, hear the the family moved briefly stories. to Mexico. But It’s not just domestic discord led Maria a moral Lourdes to re- issue here. turn to WaukeTo me, gan with her children, who it’s basic were born human here and are U.S. citizens. rights.” She, like her husband, is — Elena undocument- Segura, ed, but has ap- immigration plied for a visa advocate to remain in the country. Now, the four children carry on in America as best they can, just like a growing number of young people who were born in this country and have seen one or both parents deported. Those who work with such children say they’ve seen an increase in the cases. Churches, schools and advocacy groups are left scrambling to help once-stable households deal with poverty, foreclosures and other problems that come when socalled “mixed immigration status” families are split up. The separation creates an “angry generation” of children who feel traumatized and disaffected but still choose to stay in the United States. See Deportation / A3

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This school bus brought to you by a pizza parlor By Catherine Rampell New York Times News Service

Cash-hungry states and municipalities, in pursuit of even the smallest amounts of revenue, have begun to exploit one market that they have exclusive control over: their own property. With the help of a few eager marketing consultants, many governments are peddling the rights to place advertisements in public school cafeterias, on the sides of school buses, in prison holding areas and in the wait-

ing rooms of welfare offices and the Department of Motor Vehicles. The revenue generated by these ads is just a drop in the bucket for states and counties with deficits in the millions or billions of dollars. But supporters say every penny helps. Still, critics question whether the modest sums are worth further exposing citizens — especially children — to even more commercial pitches. “I have a 5-year-old who doesn’t understand what ads are,” says Megan Keller, 30, of Provo, Utah, who

says her son Collin, a kindergartner, sees seductive posters for sugary cereals every day in the lunchroom of his public school. “I don’t like that he thinks, ‘Oh, this is good because it comes from my school,’ and I’m having to explain to him why that’s not true.” Because Utah will soon start selling ads on the sides of school buses, Keller has decided to transfer Collin to a nearby charter school that has sworn off commercialism. See Buses / A6

Matthew Staver / New York Times News Service

A school bus advertises for Next Care at Smoky Hill High School, in Aurora, Colo.


A2 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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LIBYA

Gadhafi using cluster bombs to kill civilians By C.J. Chivers

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New York Times News Service

MISRATA, Libya — Military forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi have been firing into residential neighborhoods with heavy weapons, including cluster bombs that have been banned by much of the world and groundto-ground rockets, according to witnesses and survivors, as well as physical evidence. When fired into populated areas, these so-called indiscriminate weapons place civilians at grave risk. The dangers were evident Friday at the site of an impact crater, where eight people had been killed while standing in a bread line. The use of such weapons in these ways could add urgency to the arguments by Britain and France that the alliance needs to step up attacks on the Gadhafi forces, to better fulfill the U.N. mandate to protect civilians. It could also apply conflicting

pressures on the United States. President Barack Obama has spoken strongly about how U.S. air power helped avert a humanitarian crisis in Libya but also insisted on ceding control of the campaign to NATO earlier this month. The United States, itself, has used cluster munitions, in battlefield situations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and in a strike on suspected militants in Yemen in 2009. The cluster munitions were visible late Thursday night, in the form of what appeared to be at least three 120-millimeter mortar rounds that burst in the air over the city, scattering highexplosive bomblets below. The same munitions were fired Friday, amid a fierce barrage of fire from the Gadhafi forces. Remnants of expended shells, examined and photographed by The New York Times, show the rounds to be MAT-120 cargo mortar projectiles, each of which

Ben Curtis / The Associated Press

A weak evacuee, center, is helped by another, left, and an aid worker, right, as nearly 1,200 migrant workers who were evacuated from Misrata by boat arrive at the port in Benghazi, Libya, on Friday. Many of the evacuees were suffering from dehydration. Moammar Gadhafi’s troops launched a powerful assault with tanks and rockets Friday on Misrata, witnesses said. carries and distributes 21 submunitions designed both to kill people and to penetrate light armor. Components, according to their markings, were manufactured in Spain in 2007 — one year before Spain signed the international Convention on Cluster Munitions and pledged to destroy its stocks. Libya, like the United States, is

Syrians defy leaders in biggest demonstration yet in capital By Liam Stack and Katherine Zoepf New York Times News Service

CAIRO — The largest group of protesters yet thronged the Syrian capital, Damascus, in a widening challenge to the government, defying a nationwide crackdown in which hundreds of demonstrators have been killed by security forces. Tens of thousands of protesters chanted, “Freedom! Freedom!” and “The people want to overthrow the regime!” as they marched into Damascus from its restive sub-

urbs Friday afternoon, according to Razan Zeitouneh, a human rights activist. Previously, the government had managed to hold a tense calm for weeks in the capital. Security forces responded with live ammunition and tear gas, she said, but no deaths were reported and a witness said that the forces were firing into the air. At midday, the march was continuing to push toward Abbasayeen Square in the heart of

Damascus, where traitors have traditionally been hanged. By the time the column of marchers had reached the city limits, it had snowballed into a potentially serious challenge for the government of President Bashar Assad, whose 11-year tenure has been badly shaken by the recent weeks of unrest. Analysts said the less aggressive response to the demonstrations Friday represented a sudden change in tack by the Assad government.

not a signatory to the convention. The Spanish Defense Ministry had no immediate comment. The cluster munitions are not the only indiscriminate heavy weapon system to imperil the city’s neighborhoods. The Qasr Ahmed residential district was struck Thursday by multiple rockets, known as Grads.

The Grad is an area weapons system designed in the Soviet Union to blanket a battlefield with multiple and virtually simultaneous rocket blasts. The rockets were readily identified and some fragments bore markings indicating they had been manufactured during the Cold War.

POLITICAL POWER PLAY?

Mikhail Metzel / The Associated Press

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin takes part in an ice hockey session with teenage players in Moscow on Friday.

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Competing demonstrations in Yemeni capital swell

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

22 23 33 39 48 29 x3 Nobody won the jackpot Friday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $12 million for Tuesday’s drawing.

Muhammed Muheisen / The Associated Press

A female supporter of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh holds her daughter with markings on her face that read in Arabic, “Yes Papa Ali,” during a rally in Sanaa on Friday.

SANAA, Yemen — More than 100,000 demonstrators returned to the streets of the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, on Friday, some chanting for President Ali Abdullah Saleh and, about two miles away, many against. In what has become a weekly ritual, Saleh delivered a speech in front of tens of thousands of supporters following midday prayers. Many carried banners with proSaleh slogans or slurs against the

political opposition and Al-Jazeera, the satellite news channel. Others climbed to the top of flagpoles and waved Saleh posters. There were clashes reported in the central city of Taiz between plainclothes government supporters and protesters. More than a dozen protesters were injured by thrown rocks and daggers, according to a local doctor. “I swear, we knew that they were going to attack us today,” said Mahmud al-Shaobi, 33, an anti-government activist at the Taiz demon-

stration, who said that men dressed in civilian clothes attacked the protesters with rocks and the traditional Yemeni dagger called the jambiya. “But we, the sons of Taiz, came to protest anyway. And we will keep doing it until Ali Abdullah Saleh leaves.” By contrast, the opposing demonstrations in the capital took on a more relaxed — at times, even jovial — feel, a month after governmentlinked snipers opened fire on antigovernment protesters here, killing 52 people.


T OP S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 A3

Republicans muscle through spending plan to cut trillions By Carl Hulse New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — House Republicans on Friday muscled through a budget plan that pares federal spending by an estimated $5.8 trillion over the next decade while reshaping Medicare in a proposal that immediately touched off a fierce clash with Democrats. Just one day after Congress concluded its fight over this year’s spending, the House voted 235-193 to approve the fiscal blueprint for 2012 drafted by Rep. Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., chairman of the Budget Committee. Besides reconfiguring the Medicare program that now serves those 65 and older, the proposal

would cut the top corporate and personal income tax rates while also overhauling the Medicaid health program for the poor. The vote represents the most ambitious effort yet by the new Republican majority in the House to demonstrate that it intends to aggressively rein in spending and shrink government. It doubles as a challenge to President Barack Obama over which party is more determined to force a sharp shift in the handling of federal dollars. “The spending spree is over,” Ryan said. “We cannot keep spending money we don’t have.” Almost as soon as the budget was approved, Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., the majority leader, vowed

that the plan would never pass the Senate, setting up another tense showdown with House Republicans over spending as well as over an administration request to raise the federal debt limit. Not a single Democrat voted for the proposal, which will effectively serve as the House Republican bargaining position in talks with the White House and the Democratic Senate over how to reduce annual federal deficits and the accumulated national debt. Four Republicans also voted against it. Within minutes of the vote, Democrats began attacking Republican lawmakers for supporting the plan. “Unbelievable! Dean Heller Votes to End Medicare,” the

Authorities crack down on 3 poker sites By Matt Richtel New York Times News Service

In an aggressive attack on Internet gambling, federal prosecutors Friday unsealed fraud and money laundering charges against operators of three of the most popular online poker sites. The government also seized the Internet addresses of the sites, a new enforcement tactic that effectively shuttered their doors. Prosecutors charged that the operators of Full Tilt Poker, PokerStars and Absolute Poker tricked banks into processing

billions of dollars in payments from U.S. customers. They said the actions violated a federal law passed in 2006 that prohibits illegal Internet gambling operations from accepting payments. The sites have their headquarters in places where online gambling is legal — Antigua and the Isle of Man — a hurdle that has made it difficult for U.S. authorities to crack down on the industry. The indictment shows the intensifying game of cat-andmouse between prosecutors and

gambling sites that generate billions of dollars in transactions. The online poker operators sought to avoid detection by banks and legal authorities by funneling payments through fictitious online businesses that purported to sell jewelry, golf balls and other items, according to the indictment. It says that when some banks processed the payments, they were unaware of the real nature of the business, but the site operators also bribed banks into accepting the payments.

Suicide bomber kills Afghan police chief By Joshua Partlow The Washington Post

KABUL, Afghanistan — The man who arrived at the police chief’s home one afternoon in early February carried a piece of paper. He needed a signature, the man told the chief’s brother, handing him the document. Was the commander home? “I took the document, and I was on my way through the house when I heard this incredible boom,” recalled Niaz Mohammad, the brother of Kanda-

har’s provincial police chief. “I don’t know what happened. I just blacked out.” The car bomb explosion that crumbled Gen. Mohammad Mojayed’s home that day was but one in a relentless series of assassination attempts against Kandahar’s top police official. He survived at least three in recent months, but Friday afternoon his luck ran out. A man wearing a suicide vest under a police uniform slipped into the courtyard of the police

headquarters and approached Mojayed as he came out of his office. The explosion killed him and two other policemen and wounded three more. The Taliban took credit for the attack. Mojayed’s death is a major setback for American military efforts in Kandahar, the heartland of the Taliban and a focus of the U.S. counterinsurgency campaign. He was considered a brave and capable leader who had first earned his reputation in the war against the Soviets.

Georgia joins Arizona with tough immigration bill By Kim Severson New York Times News Service

ATLANTA — With Gov. Nathan Deal’s acknowledgement that he would sign a tough immigration law, Georgia was thrust Friday into the center of the national fight over how much control states have in curbing illegal immigration. The state legislature this week passed a bill that puts Georgia in a league with Arizona, the

Deportation Continued from A1 For some, advocates say, life in America is all they know. “It’s a horrific situation,” said Josh Hoyt, director of the Illinois Coalition for Immigrant and Refugee Rights. “Given that we have this vastly increased number of deportations ... we’re trying to create infrastructure or support, specifically for people that have done nothing criminal other than come here to work, many who have U.S. citizen children.” But those who favor stricter enforcement of immigration laws assert that the struggles of families who have had a loved one deported highlight the need to keep people from entering the U.S. illegally. “Issues surrounding U.S. born children (with undocumented parents) remind us that the longer you don’t enforce your immigration laws, the harder it becomes to do so,” said Steven Camarota, director of research for the Center for Immigration Studies in Washington. In an estimate published by the Urban Institute in 2010, over 100,000 immigrant parents of U.S. citizen children have been deported in the last 10 years. At the same time, the number of deportations has increased dramatically nationwide, from 265,000 in 2002 to 392,000 in 2010, with an emphasis on crim-

first state to empower the local and state police to demand documentation of residency and to detain people they reasonably suspect are in the country illegally. On Monday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld a trial judge’s ruling blocking the most contentious parts of Arizona’s law, which raised hope among Georgia residents fighting the bill. But the bill

went back and forth between chambers until it was passed in the final hours of Georgia’s legislative session Thursday. Lawmakers modified the Georgia bill slightly from Arizona’s and softened requirements surrounding use of the federal E-Verify program, which helps employers confirm online whether potential employees can legally work in the United States.

inal deportations. After seeing an increase in such cases in recent years, Bill Bautista, a social worker at Community High School in West Chicago, has come to recognize the signs of teens dealing with a deportation at home. These students often come to him seeking advice on how to get a job that earns money quickly. When he checks their academic records, it’s not unusual to see an increase in absences, or a drop in grades, he said. “There’s a lot of privacy with this,” he said. “They don’t always share that with the school and I wish they would because there are a lot of resources out there.” Advocates such as Elena Segura are trying to provide solutions, or at least assistance, to families caught up in these situations. Segura carries a notebook each week to the detention center in Broadview, where immigrants are deported every Friday. Whenever she sees children crying as they say goodbye to a loved one, she jots down their names. Later, she tries to connect them with a program she began in 2009 as director for Immigrant Affairs and Immigration Education for the Archdiocese of Chicago. Called Pastoral Migratoria, it was developed to help the growing number of families dealing with immigration issues and life after deportation.

“I cry every Friday when I hear the stories,” she said. “It’s not just a moral issue here. To me, it’s basic human rights.” In Cicero, Arturo Gonzalez juggles a list of families struggling with deportation. A community organizer for the Interfaith Leadership Project, he makes sure parents leaving the country have their U.S. citizen children registered, so the kids can visit them abroad without having trouble re-entering. He also gives “Know Your Rights” presentations, informing families about what to expect from deportation proceedings. Camarota, whose organization advocates tougher immigration controls, notes that immigration law grants legal status each year to several thousand undocumented immigrants who argue hardship, including the presence of a U.S. born child. More than 3,200 people were granted so-called “cancelation of removal” in 2009, according to data from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Families are making the choice to separate after deportation, not the U.S. government, Camarota said. “My sense of these things is we are going to have to start enforcing the law first,” he said. “Some will have to go home in significant and large numbers.” Immigration advocates, however, contend that such solutions are oversimplified and come too little, too late.

Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee headlined an email broadside against Rep. Dean Heller, a Republican running for an open Senate seat in Nevada. On the House floor, Democrats ridiculed the notion that Ryan’s $3.5 trillion plan for next year was bold for zeroing in on health programs despite political risks. They accused Republicans of promoting a morally skewed vision of America by taking savings out of medical care for older Americans and the poor while supporting tax breaks for corporate America and the affluent. The budget proposal would maintain the tax rates enacted during George W. Bush’s presidency and extended last year.

MEXICO

Mass grave body count rises to 145 By Tracy Wilkinson Los Angeles Times

MEXICO CITY — The number of bodies pulled from mass graves in northeastern Mexico has risen to 145, officials said Friday, following the arrest of 16 police officers for allegedly providing cover to drug-cartel gangsters suspected in the grisly slayings. Morelos Canseco, a senior government official for the state of Tamaulipas where the clandestine burials were discovered, said another 23 bodies were extracted Thursday. Unlike the previous victims who are thought to be passengers kidnapped recently from buses, the latest corpses had apparently been buried for a much longer time, Canseco said in a radio interview. Canseco said none of the bus companies whose passengers were kidnapped ever informed authorities about the crimes. The newspaper Reforma reported Friday that there are 400 unclaimed suitcases at bus depots in the route’s final destination city of Matamoros. President Felipe Calderon on Friday condemned the Tamaulipas killings as “barbaric cowardice” and pledged more troops for the area and to search for additional suspects.

Sue Ogrocki / The Associated Press

Jerome Whittington tries to salvage belongings from his car in Tushka, Okla., after a tornado hit Thursday night.

2 people killed as storms tear through Oklahoma By Kristi Eaton The Associated Press

TUSHKA, Okla. — A large tornado ripped through a tiny southeastern Oklahoma town late Thursday, killing at least two people and leaving more than two dozen others injured, authorities said. The state Medical Examiner’s Office confirmed two fatalities in the town of Tushka, about 120 miles southeast of Oklahoma City, the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management said. It was not yet clear how much damage the storm did in the town of 350 people, but several people said their homes were no longer habitable and officials said Tushka’s only school was among the buildings that were hit. Efforts to assess the damage were hampered because the tornado struck after dark. Also, downed power lines and trees had made road travel difficult. Tushka resident Jennifer Buffington said she, her husband, Tony Stiles, and their seven children initially sought shelter in the closet of their home but fled to a friend’s storm cellar when the sirens sounded. “It felt like a bomb,” said Buffington, 36, whose children ranged in age from 1 to 20.

When the family emerged, they found their house had no windows and was heavily damaged, Buffington said. “Everything in my house looks like shambles,” she said. The family was spending the night at the First Baptist Church in Atoka. Paul Reano, CEO of Atoka County Medical Center, said 25 people were being treated for injuries related to the storm — ranging from cuts and scratches to more serious injuries. Reano did not have details on the more serious injuries. Northbound U.S. 69, the main highway through the area, was closed in Tushka because semitrailers and trees were scattered on the highway, emergency management officials said. Tara Pittman, 36, was at a Walmart buying food and wasn’t aware of the storm until her husband, Bill, called and told her to take cover. The couple found out later that their mobile home was heavily damaged and they couldn’t stay there. “I’m thankful because my family is OK; some people’s aren’t,” Pittman said.

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541.389.6655


A4 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

R R  B Guest speaker Luke Hendrix, executive pastor of Imago Dei in Portland, will share the message “The Palm Sunday Message” at both the 8:45 and 10:45 a.m. services, and will lead the Redux Q-and-A between services Sunday at Antioch Church, held at Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend. • Pastor Dave Miller will share the message at 10 a.m. Sunday at Bend Christian Fellowship, 19831 Rocking Horse Road. The 4twelve youth group meets Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Virgil Askren will share a sermon titled “So You Had a Bad Day” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at Bend Church of the Nazarene, 1270 N.E. 27th St. • Pastor Dave Leistekow will share the message “Confession and Forgiveness” as part of the series “What Every Christian Needs To Know” at 9:30 a.m. Sunday at Trailhead Ministry/Christ Our Redeemer Lutheran Church, 2065 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend. • Elder Craig Perryman will share the message “Real People Ask for Directions,” based on Jeremiah 29:11-13, at 11 a.m. Sunday following the 10:45 a.m. song service at Community of Christ, 20380 Cooley Road, Bend. • Pastor Dave Drullinger will share the message “A Discarded Practice,” based on Matthew 18:15-20, at 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Discovery Christian Church, 334 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend. • Pastor John Lodwick will share the message “...Even When We Seem Insignificant,” based on John 13, as part of the series “God Loves Us Even When...” at 6 p.m. today and at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Eastmont Church, 62425 Eagle Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Johnson will share part two of the message “Going, Growing, Giving, Becoming: A View from the Top of the Stone” at 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Faith Christian Center, 1049 N.E. 11th St., Bend. “Restored” youth services are held Wednesdays at 7 p.m. • Pastor Randy Wills will share the message “The Sword or the Trowel” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Father’s House Church of God, 61690 Pettigrew Road, Bend. • Pastor Syd Brestel and Elijah Myers will share the message “Keeping the Central Message Central” at 10:15 a.m. Sunday at First Baptist Church, 60 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Jenny Warner will speak on the topic “Forgiveness Is Freedom from Fear” at the 9 a.m. contemporary service, 10:45 a.m. traditional service and 5:01 p.m. evening service Sunday; a Maundy Thursday service will be held Thursday at 7 p.m. for a time of reflection and communion; and a Good Friday service will be held 7 p.m. Friday with the stations of the cross and sacred music at First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend. • Pastor Thom Larson will share the message “Unbroken,” based on Matthew 21:1-11 and 27:11-54, at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend. • Pastor Dan Dillard will share the message “The King and His City” at 10:30 a.m. and “Purification” at 6 p.m. Sunday at Grace Reformed Presbyterian Church, 62162 Hamby Road, Bend. • Pastor Keith Kirkpatrick will share the message “Transform — Becoming Who God Wants You To Be” at 10 a.m. Sunday at Journey Church, held at Bend High School, 230 N.W. Sixth St., Bend. • Pastor David A. Carnahan will share the message “Who Is This?,” based on Matthew 21:111, at the 8 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday; a Maundy

Thursday worship service will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday; and a Tenebrae worship service will be held 7 p.m. Friday at Trinity Lutheran Church & School, 2550 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend. • Pastor Mike Yunker will share the message “The Return of the King,” based on John 12:12-36, at 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday at Real Life Christian Church, 2880 N.E. 27th St., Bend. • Tom Wykes will lead the discussion “Loving Your Enemies,” based on a sermon by Martin Luther King Jr., at 11 a.m. Sunday at Unitarian Universalists of Central Oregon, held at The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend. • The Rev. Jane Meyers will speak on the topic “Blessing the Physical World” at 10 a.m. Sunday at The Unity Community of Central Oregon, held at High Desert Community Grange, 62855 Powell Butte Highway, Bend. • Pastor Mike Alexander will share part two of the message “Blessed” at 6:30 p.m. today and at 8, 9 and 10:45 a.m. Sunday at Westside Church, 2051 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend. • Pastor Scott McBride will share part two of the message “Blessed” at 10 a.m. Sunday at the Westside South Campus, held at Elk Meadow Elementary School, 60880 Brookswood Blvd., Bend. • Pastor Myron Wells will share the message “You Were Made for a Mission” at the 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. services Sunday at Christian Church of Redmond, 536 S.W. 10th St. • Palm Sunday with Musical Cantatas, “Come Walk with Me” by Pepper Choplin, will be presented by the praise team and Chancel Choir and Orchestra at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond. • Pastor Eric Burtness will share the message “From Palms to Passion” at the 8:30 a.m. contemporary service and the 11 a.m. traditional service Sunday at Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 Black Butte Blvd., Redmond. • The Rev. Willis Jenson will share the message “God Humbled Himself unto the Death of the Cross for the Sins of All Men to Save Them from Their Sins,” based on Philippians 2:8, at 11 a.m. Sunday; the message “That God Made a Testament Means God Would Become Man and Die; and God Bequeaths to Men the Remission of Sins and Life Everlasting Through the Gospel of Christ-Crucified,” based on Hebrews 9:16 at the Maundy Thursday Service 7 p.m. Thursday; and the message “Christ Obeyed God Even When God Forsook Him on the Cross and Thereby Burst the Gates of Hell and Established Eternal Salvation for All Men,” based on Hebrews 5:7, at the Good Friday Service 7 p.m. Friday at Concordia Lutheran Mission held at Terrebonne Grange Hall, 8286 11th St., Terrebonne. • The Justice and Peace Committee of St. Edward the Martyr Church is sponsoring a series on the Christian responsibility of protecting and preserving the environment of our planet, this week a workshop is offered: “Awakening the Dreamer”; 6:30 p.m. today; 541-549-9391; St. Edward’s Parish Hall, 123 Trinity Way, Sisters. • Dr. H. Derek Palmer, a physician with Redmond Internal Medicine Clinic, will take on leadership as stake president of the North Central Oregon area of Redmond, Madras, Prineville and Sisters for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; working with Dr. Palmer are two counselors: David Liddel, of Sisters, who with his family owns Sisters Screen Printing & Embroidery, and John A. Morgan, of Prineville, who is self-employed.

Local churches

For contact information and Web links to local churches, visit www.bendbulletin.com/churches.

The Bulletin

P assover’s message is for everyone By Helen T. Gray McClatchy-Tribune News Service

It’s a familiar story to everyone, evoking images of Charlton Heston as Moses with his arms outstretched as God opens the Red Sea for the Israelites. After a series of plagues, God passed over the Israelite houses, sparing their firstborn sons and finally persuading Pharaoh — whose son died — to let the Israelites leave Egypt, and their bondage. Every year Jews retell the story at the Seder ritual meal. Now many Jewish families are in the process of readying their homes in preparation for the festival. Only unleavened bread is eaten at the Seder to symbolize that the Israelites left Egypt in such haste that they didn’t have time to let their dough rise. Passover begins this year at sundown Monday, when the first Seder takes place. The basic dramatic story remains the same from year to year, as told in what is called the Haggadah. But what are the messages for today? Several rabbis shared their views. Like the Israelites, people in many parts of the world are crying out for freedom, said Rabbi Scott White of Congregation Ohev Sholom in Prairie Village, Kan. Today’s technology is showing people living under autocratic regimes what they have been missing, and they want freedom, he said. “I think it is an unstoppable tsunami of the yearning to be free,” White said. “I think it’s just a matter of time for those regimes to fall, for those people to rise up, with support from the free world.” He said he believes this eventually will include Iran and North Korea. “You can’t stop masses of people who want to be free,” he said. “They now know what freedom is, and they want it.” White said a discussion of freedom will be part of the discussion at his Seder, and he said he hopes it will be at others. “The Seder should apply the lessons and principles of our story to today,” he said. “It is the Exodus story for these people as well.” Among the challenging aspects of freedom is for young people to learn how to think for themselves, he said. “The more you think for yourself, the less likely you are to be enslaved to causes that are not in their own interests,” he said. Rabbi Alexandria ShuvalWeiner said women’s voices in Jewish ritual life had long been questioned. In fact, a story evolved, in classic folk practice, that women’s involvement was like placing an orange on

Vincent Laforet / New York Times News Service

Passover begins at sundown on Monday, when the first Seder takes place.

A quick history of Passover Passover is an important holiday and the most widely celebrated one for the Jewish people, recalling the story of their ancestors’ deliverance from Egyptian bondage. The telling of the story takes place during a ritual meal called the Seder, held the first night for some Jews and the first two nights for others. Participants use a book called the Haggadah. Passover is celebrated for seven days by Jews in Israel and Reform Jews, and eight days by Orthodox and Conservative Jews. a Seder plate. (Oranges are not among the Passover symbols.) In the last 20 years, a custom developed — as one of several feminist rituals — to include the orange. Today, many Jewish families do this as a symbol of women’s involvement in Jewish life, she said. Others use the orange to symbolize the place of any marginalized people lacking a voice in our society. Women have come a long way, she said, with more and more taking prominent roles, such as becoming rabbis in the Reform, Conservative and Reconstructionist movements. “Passover is the most celebrated ritual within Jewish life,” said Shuval-Weiner, associate rabbi at Congregation B’nai Jehudah in Overland Park, Kan. “It brings together family, friends and traditions.” But she said there has been a sense of women’s voices being left out for many years. “The traditional Haggadahs have a very masculine telling of the story,” she said. It is important that women continue to discover their voices because, “Passover is the core of our biblical story.”

“In the biblical narrative, Moses leads the people out of Egypt,” she said. “But there also is Miriam. As a child, she guided Moses along the Nile and let Pharaoh’s daughter know where he came from.” The midwives went against Pharaoh’s edict not to bring Israelite children into the world. “In the desert, Miriam is dancing and celebrating, bringing passion to the experience.” Often as part of the feminist ritual, there is a Miriam cup, filled with water. “This is a fairly new ritual,” Shuval-Weiner said. “There is the idea of bringing women together to participate in the narrative in a unique way to share our stories. These are woven throughout the Seder. “At many a traditional Seder, you (as a woman) cook the food, then you sit at the table ... the male is head of the table, and the ritual often reflects that male perspective,” she said. “Women have brought a different style of creativity and passion to the Seder.” One can look at slavery as anything that has a person confined, she said. “The gift women have brought is the thought of how are we in the narrow, confined places,” she said. “What are our confined places today? What are our hopes and dreams today? “Many women are facing homelessness or they live in countries where they are restricted or abused. They want to live in freedom, to break out and allow their minds and hearts to soar. “For everyone, you have to find the power within yourself to break out of these confining places.” Haggadahs look at the Passover story through different lenses, said Rabbi Jonathan Rudnick, Jewish community chaplain of Greater Kansas City, based at Jewish Family Services. “The rabbinic perspective is that you have to take this story in

the Torah and keep telling it, remembering the history but also retelling it from where we are today. “The mere fact that our lives have changed over the last year means our telling of the story this year will not be the same as last year. We are all in a different place.” This year someone could be facing a health issue or a financial challenge or perhaps someone who was at the table last year will not be there this year, he said. “This is not just a particular story that happened to a particular people,” Rudnick said. “This is a story for everyone who feels they have been pushed or pressed or squeezed. That can be physical, spiritual or social. “Then you think of what Egypt is today. We have to name it and include that in the telling of the story.” Rudnick said many families have traditions that they add to their Seders. For instance, at his family’s Seder, according to an Iraqi Jewish custom, a mirror is passed around the table, he said. “While looking in the mirror, we say that in every generation every person is obligated to see himself or herself as personally going out of Egypt,” he said. “The kids dress up liked ragged slaves and go out and knock on the door. They say they are coming from Egypt and going into the Promised Land. “Everyone is obligated to see themselves as if they left Egypt. Also, taking this leaving Egypt experience, ask, ‘Where am I enslaved in my life today? And have I the intention of getting out of that slavery today, whether it involves, money, job, etc.?’ ” Rudnick said that by retelling the story each year and remembering that their ancestors were slaves, Jewish people are motivated to help the less fortunate.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 A5 “The Wheel of Dharma” Buddhism

“Celtic Cross” Christianity

“Star of David” Judaism

You Are The Most Important Part of Our Services “Omkar” (Aum) Hinduism

“Yin/Yang” Taoist/Confucianism

“Star & Crescent” Islam

See Easter Celebration ads on Tuesday, April 19th

Assembly of God

Bible Church

FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER 1049 NE 11th St. • 541-382-8274 SUNDAYS: 9:30 am Sunday Educational Classes 10:30 am Morning Worship

CROSSROADS CHURCH Come join us as one family of Believers, young and old, to worship our great God. You can expect a time of Christ-centered meaningful worship and verse by verse practical biblical teaching. We believe the gospel of Jesus Christ is the central theme of Scripture and speaks to every area of the Christian life.

This Sunday at FAITH CHRISTIAN CENTER Pastor Mike will be sharing his message titled “Going, Growing, Giving, Becoming; The View from the Top of the Stone” beginning at 10:30 am On Wednesday “Restored” youth service begins at 7:00 PM. Childcare is provided in our Sunday morning service. A number of Faith Journey Groups meet throughout the week in small groups, please contact the church for details and times. The church is located on the corner of Greenwood Avenue and NE 11th Street. www.bendfcc.com REDMOND ASSEMBLY OF GOD 1865 W Antler • Redmond • 541-548-4555 SUNDAYS Morning Worship 8:30 am and 10:30 am Life groups 9 am Kidz LIVE ages 3-11 10:30 am Evening Worship 6 pm WEDNESDAYS FAMILY NIGHT 7PM Adult Classes Celebrate Recovery Wednesday NITE Live Kids Youth Group Pastor Duane Pippitt www.redmondag.com

Sunday mornings at 9:30. Acts Series: Christ on the Crossroads. 1st Sunday of each month is HomeFront Sunday; we focus on scriptural truths in our roles and relationships in life. Extended fellowship time follows. www.crossroadschurchbend.com 63945 Old Bend-Redmond Hwy (On the corner of Old Bend-Redmond Hwy and Highway 20 on the NW side of Bend) REDMOND BIBLE FELLOWSHIP Big Sky Conference Center 3732 SW 21st Street, Suite 103 (Next to Color Tile) Expositional, verse by verse teaching with emphasis on Paul’s Epistles. Great fellowship beginning at 10 am, ending at 11:30 every Sunday morning. For more information call Dave at 541-923-5314 or Mark at 541-923-6349

Baptist

Calvary Chapel

EASTMONT CHURCH NE Neff Rd., 1/2 mi. E. of St. Charles Medical Center Saturdays 6:00 pm (Contemporary)

CALVARY CHAPEL BEND 20225 Cooley Rd. Bend Phone: (541) 383-5097 Web site: ccbend.org Sundays: 8:30 & 10:30 am Wednesday Night Study: 7 pm Youth Group: Wednesday 7 pm Child Care provided Women’s Ministry, Youth Ministry are available, call for days and times. “Teaching the Word of God, Book by Book”

Sundays 9:00 am (Blended worship style) 10:30 am (Contemporary) Sundays 6:00 pm Hispanic Worship Service Weekly Bible Studies and Ministries for all ages Contact: 541-382-5822 Pastor John Lodwick www.eastmontchurch.com FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH CBA “A Heart for Bend in the Heart of Bend” 60 NW Oregon, 541-382-3862 Pastor Syd Brestel SUNDAY 9:00 AM Sunday School for everyone 10:15 AM Worship Service This Sunday at First Baptist, Syd Brestel and Elijah Myers will present a message from The Acts, “Keeping the Central Message Central”. For Kidztown, Middle School and High School activities Call 541-382-3862 www.bendchurch.org FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH Sundays Morning Worship 10:50 am Bible Study 6:00 pm Evening Worship 7:00 pm Wednesdays Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 pm Tom Counts, Senior Pastor Ernest Johnson, Pastor 21129 Reed Market Rd, Bend, OR 541-382-6081 HIGHLAND BAPTIST CHURCH, SBC 3100 SW Highland Ave., Redmond • 541-548-4161 SUNDAYS: Worship Services: 9:00 am & 6:00 pm Traditional 10:30 am Contemporary Sunday Bible fellowship groups 9:00 am & 10:30 am For other activities for children, youth & adults, call or go to website: www.hbcredmond.org Dr. Barry Campbell, Lead Pastor PARA LA COMUNIDAD LATINA Domingos: Servicio de Adoración y Escuela Dominical - 12:30 pm Miércoles: Estudios biblicos por edades - 6:30 pm

Bible Church

Catholic HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC PARISH Fr. Jose Thomas Mudakodiyil, Pastor www.holyredeemerparish.net Parish Office: 541-536-3571 HOLY REDEEMER, LA PINE 16137 Burgess Rd Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday Mass 9:00 AM Sunday Mass — 10:00 AM Confessions: Saturdays — 3:00–4:00 PM HOLY TRINITY, SUNRIVER 18143 Cottonwood Rd. Thurs. Mass 9:30 AM; Sat. Vigil Mass 5:30 PM Sunday mass 8:00 AM Confessions: Thurs. 9:00 - 9:15 AM OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS, Gilchrist 120 Mississippi Dr Sunday Mass — 12:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 12:00 –12:15 PM HOLY FAMILY, near Christmas Valley 57255 Fort Rock Rd Sunday Mass — 3:30 PM Confessions: Sundays 3:00–3:15 PM ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC CHURCH 541-382-3631 Pastor Fr. Francis X. Ekwugha Associate Pastor Fr. Joseph Levine

“Transforming Lives Through the Truth of the Word” All are Welcome! Pastor Glen Schaumloeffel will preach a message from John 10:11-14 entitled, “I AM the Good Shepherd” in the series entitled “Who Do You Say That I Am?”, Palm Sunday 9:30 service, April 17 SUNDAY WORSHIP AND THE WORD - 9:30 AM. Coffee Fellowship - 10:45 am Bible Education Hour - 11:15 am Nursery Care available • Women’s Bible Study - Tuesdays, 10 am • Awana Kids Club (4 yrs - 6th gr.) Sept. - May • Youth Ministry (gr. 7-12) Wednesdays 6:15 pm • Men’s Bible Study - Thursdays 9 am • Home Bible Studies are also available Preschool for 3 & 4 year olds Call for information Senior Pastor: Glen Schaumloeffel Associate Pastor: Jake Schwarze visit our Web site www.cbchurchsr.org Listen to KNLR 97.5 FM at 9:00 am. each Sunday to hear “Transforming Truth” with Pastor Glen.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 230 NE Ninth, Bend (Across Ninth St. from Bend High) All Are Welcome, Always!

REAL LIFE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Like Hymns? We've Got 'em! at the RLCC Church, 2880 NE 27th Sunday Services 8 am Traditional Service (No child care for 8 am service) 9:30 am Contemporary Service with full child care 11 am Service (Full child care) For information, please call ... Minister - Mike Yunker - 541-312-8844 Richard Belding, Associate Pastor “Loving people one at a time.” www.real-lifecc.org

Christian Schools CENTRAL CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Christ Centered Academic Excellence Fully Accredited with ACSI & NAAS Comprehensive High School Educating Since 1992 15 minutes north of Target 2234 SE 6th St. Redmond, 541-548-7803 www.centralchristianschools.com EASTMONT COMMUNITY SCHOOL “Educating and Developing the Whole Child for the Glory of God” Pre K - 5th Grade 62425 Eagle Road, Bend • 541-382-2049 Interim Principal Lonna Carnahan www.eastmontcommunityschool.com MORNING STAR CHRISTIAN SCHOOL Pre K - 12th Grade Serving Christian Families and local churches to develop Godly leaders by providing quality Christ centered education. Fully Accredited NAAS. Member A.C .S.I. Small Classes Emphasizing: Christian Values A-Beka Curriculum, High Academics. An interdenominational ministry located on our new 18 acre campus at 19741 Baker Rd. and S. Hwy 97 (2 miles south of Wal-Mart). Phone 541-382-5091 Bus Service: from Bend, La Pine & Sunriver. www.morningstarchristianschool.org SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI SCHOOL Preschool through Grade 8 “Experience academic excellence and Christian values every day.” Limited openings in all grades. 2450 NE 27th St. Bend •541-382-4701 www.saintfrancisschool.net

Christian Science FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 1551 NW First St. • 541-382-6100 (South of Portland Ave.) Church Service & Sunday School: 10 am Wed. Testimony Meeting: 7:30 pm Reading Room: 115 NW Minnesota Ave. Mon. through Fri.: 11 am - 4 pm Sat. 12 noon - 2 pm

Eastern Orthodox ST. JACOB THE ENLIGHTENER OF ALASKA ORTHODOX MISSION 1900 NE Division St. Suite 109, Bend Fr. James McKee – Priest-in-charge 541-508-5420 Located in the Whistle Stop business Center next to the Angel Thai Restaurant. Saturday: Vespers 6:30 pm Confessions afterwards Sunday: Hours 9:40 am followed by Divine Liturgy at 10:00 am Bridegroom Matins 6:00 pm

*No confessions will be heard during Mass. ST. THOMAS CATHOLIC CHURCH 1720 NW 19th Street Redmond, Oregon 97756 541-923-3390 Father Todd Unger, Pastor Mass Schedule: Weekdays 8:00 a.m. (except Wednesday) Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m. First Saturday 8:00 a.m. (English) Sunday 8:00 a.m., 10:00 a.m. (English) 12:00 noon (Spanish) Confessions on Wednesdays from 5:00 to 5:45 p.m. and on Saturdays from 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.

Christian CHRISTIAN CHURCH OF REDMOND 536 SW 10th Redmond, OR 97756 541-548-2974 Fax: 541-548-5818 2 Worship Services 9:00 A.M. and 10:30 A.M. Sunday School-all ages Junior Church Kidmo Friday Night Service at 6:30 P.M. Pastors Myron Wells Greg Strubhar Darin Hollingsworth Friday, April 22nd and Easter Sunday, April 24th Sermon Title: “Remember the Lamb” Speaker: Pastor Myron Wells

Sunday Worship Services: Daybreak Café Service 7:30 am Celebration Services 9:00 am and 10:45 am Wednesday Services High Definition (Adult) 7:00 pm UTurn - Middle School 7:00 pm Children’s Ministries 7:00 pm Thursdays High School (Connection) 6:30 pm Home Bible Studies throughout the week City Care Clinic also available. Kidz Center School, Preschool www.citycenterchurch.org “Livin’ the Incredible Mission” DAYSPRING CHRISTIAN CENTER Terrebonne Foursquare Church enjoys a wonderful location that overlooks the majestic Cascade Range and Smith Rock. Our gatherings are refreshing, our relationships are encouraging, and family and friend oriented. Come Sunday, encounter God with us, we look forward to meeting you! Adult Bible Study, Sunday 9:30 AM Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 AM DYG (High School) & Trek (Middle School) Monday 6:30 PM

Come and meet our pastors, Mike and Joyce Woodman. 7801 N. 7th St. Terrebonne West on “B” Avenue off of Hwy. 97; South on 7th St. at the end of the road 541-548-1232 dayspringchristiancenter.org

Jewish Synagogues JEWISH COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Serving Central Oregon for 20 Years. We Are a Non-Denominational Egalitarian Jewish Community All are Welcome! Our Synagogue is located at 21555 Modoc Lane, Bend, Oregon 541-385-6421 - www.jcco.bend.com Resident Rabbi Jay Shupack Rebbetzin Judy Shupack

Join people from all walks of life in celebrating a life lived in harmony with Divine Spirit. We will explore and discuss the gifts to be found through daily practice of the spiritual principles of Eckankar. This free discussion includes Karma, Reincarnation and how singing HU, a sacred name for God, opens the heart to Divine Love. There will be an opportunity to share your gifts of insights, stories and inspirations on the topic in this group discussion. WHEN: Saturday, April 30 @2:00-3:00PM WHERE: COCC Campus Center 2600 College Way. In the Conference Room, (Downstairs) For more info: 541-728-6476, or WWW.eckankar.org

Episcopal ST. ALBANS - REDMOND 3277 NW 10th • 541-548-4212 www.saintalbansepis.org Sunday Schedule 9:00 am Adult Education Presider for Sunday is The Rev. Paul Morton. Holy Eucharist Tuesday - 3 pm Bible Study Wednesday - 12:00 noon Holy Eucharist The Rev. Paul Morton The Rev. Dcn. Ruth Brown TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 469 NW Wall St. • 541-382-5542 www.trinitybend.org Sunday Schedule 8 am Holy Eucharist 9:30 am Christian Education for all ages 10:30 am Holy Eucharist (w/nursery care) 5 pm Holy Eucharist The Rev. Christy Close Erskine, Pastor

Evangelical THE SALVATION ARMY 755 NE 2nd Street, Bend 541-389-8888 SUNDAY MORNING WORSHIP Sunday School 9:45 am Children & Adult Classes Worship Service – 11:00 am Major’s Robert & Miriam Keene NEW HOPE EVANGELICAL 20080 Pinebrook Blvd.• 541-389-3436 Celebrate New Life at New Hope Church! Saturday 6:00 pm Sunday 9:00, 10:45 am, Pastor Randy Myers www.newhopebend.com

Women’s Bible Study Tuesday 9:15 a.m. Men’s Bible Study Wednesday 7:15 a.m. High School Youth Group Wednesday 6:00 p.m. Pastor Joel LiaBraaten Evangelical Lutheran Church in America www.gflcbend.org NATIVITY LUTHERAN CHURCH 60850 Brosterhous Road at Knott, 541-388-0765 SERVICE TIMES 9:00 AM Informal Service Children will be dismissed from service at 9:15 AM for the Junior Church for kids preschool to 5th grade 11:00 AM Formal Service Palm Sunday 9:00 am Informal Service and 11:00 am Formal Service Pastor David C . Nagler will be doing the sermon 9:15 Junior Church Both the 9:00 AM and 11:00 AM services to be posted with the Junior Church at 9:15 AM. Come worship with us. (Child care provided on Sundays.) www.nativityinbend.com Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA Worship in the Heart of Redmond Sunday Worship Service 8:30 am Contemporary 11:00 am Liturgical Sunday School for all ages at 10:00 am Children’s Room available during services Come Experience a warm, friendly family of worshipers. Everyone Welcome - Always. A vibrant, inclusive community. A rich and diverse music program for all ages Coffee, snacks and fellowship after each service Wednesday Lenten Soup Supper 6:15 pm and Worship Service 7:00 pm M-W-F Women’s Exercise 9:30 am Wed. Bible Study at noon 3rd Th. Women’s Circle/Bible Study 1:00 pm 3rd Tues. Men’s Club 6:00 pm, dinner Youth and Family Programs Active Social Outreach 1113 SW Black Butte Blvd. Redmond, OR 97756 ~ 541-923-7466 Pastor Eric Burtness www.zionrdm.com

Mennonite

Seder Sunday April 17 Community Seder at Modoc Lane, Saturday April 23 – All welcome Intro to Judaism and Jewish Roots of Christianity led by Rabbi Jay Wednesday evenings 4/6 - 5/25 All denominations are encouraged.

Rabbi Glenn Ettman

ECKANKAR Religion of the Light and Sound of God

EASTER SUNDAY SERVICES 8:00 am, 9:30 am and 11:00 am (Childcare Available)

Church Office: 541-389-8787 E-mail: theriver@mailshack.com Send to: PO Box 808, Bend OR 97709 www.therivermennonite.org

Eckankar

Friday: Royal Hours 9:00 am Vespers 1:00pm Mains 6:00 pm

Maundy Thursday Service 7:00 pm Good Friday Service 7:00 pm Vigil of Easter Service Saturday 7:00 pm

THE RIVER MENNONITE CHURCH Sam Adams, Pastor Sunday, 3 pm at the Old Stone Church, 157 NW Franklin Ave., Bend Sunday School 2 years - 5th grade Nursery 0-2 years Visitors welcome

All services are in English

Thursday: 1st Hour 10:30 am, followed by Liturgy at 11:00 am Gospel Matins 6:00 pm

Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m. (Child Care Available) Sunday School 10:50 a.m. Education Hour 11:15 a.m.

Shabbat and High Holiday Services Religious Education Program Bar/Bat Mitzvah Training Weekly Torah Study Adult Education

TEMPLE BETH TIKVAH Temple Beth Tikvah is a member of the Union for Reform Judaism. Our members represent a wide range of Jewish backgrounds. We welcome interfaith families and Jews by choice. Our monthly activities include social functions, services, religious education, Hebrew school, Torah study, and adult education

Monday through Wednesday: Pre-Sanctified Liturgy 10:00 pm Bridegroom Matins 6:00 pm

“Spiritual Wisdom on Prayer, Meditation and Contemplation”

Reconciliation Schedule* New Church at Catholic Center Wed: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 6:00 - 7:00 PM Saturday 3:00 - 5:00 PM Historic Downtown Church Tues: 7:30 - 8:00 AM & 5:00 - 5:45 PM Saturday 9:00 - 10:00 AM

COMMUNITY BIBLE CHURCH AND CHRISTIAN PRESCHOOL 541-593-8341 Beaver at Theater Drive, PO Box 4278, Sunriver, OR 97707

Presbyterian

GRACE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend 541-382-6862

HISTORIC DOWNTOWN CHURCH Corner of NW Franklin & Lava Tues. & Thurs. 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM Sat., 8:00 AM Exposition & Benediction Tuesday 3:00 - 6:00 PM

Near Highland and 23rd Ave. 2378 SW Glacier Pl. Redmond, OR 97756

Pastor Ed Nelson 541-777-0784 www.berean-bible-church.org

\Lutheran

CITY CENTER A Foursquare Fellowship Senior Pastors Steve & Ginny McPherson 549 SW 8th St., P.O. Box 475, Redmond, OR 97756 • 541-548-7128

Saturday: Vesperal Liturgy 1:00 pm Pascal Matins & Liturgy 11:30 pm

Liturgy of the Hours will be recited at 6:40 AM, before Mass each weekday, except Saturday: 7:40 AM

Sunday Worship Service - 10:30 a.m. Bible Study - Thursday, 10:30 a.m.

Foursquare

Masses NEW CHURCH – CATHOLIC CENTER 2450 NE 27th Street Saturday - Vigil 5:00 PM Sunday - 7:30, 10:00 AM 12:30 PM Spanish & 5:00 PM Mon., Wed., Fri. - 7:00 AM & 12:15 PM St. Clare Chapel - Spanish Mass 1st, 3rd, 5th Thursdays 8:00 PM

BEREAN BIBLE CHURCH In Partnership with American Missionary Fellowship

We preach the good news of Jesus Christ, sing great hymns of faith, and search the Scriptures together.

Christian POWELL BUTTE CHRISTIAN CHURCH Cowboy Fellowship Saturdays Potluck 6 pm Music and the Word 7 pm Sunday Worship Services 8:30 am - 10:15 am - 11 am Nursery & Children’s Church Pastors: Chris Blair, Glenn Bartnik & Ozzy Osbourne 13720 SW Hwy 126, Powell Butte 541-548-3066 www.powellbuttechurch.com

Saturday, April 16 at 9:00 am - Torah Study Saturday, April 16 at 10:30 am Torah Service Sunday, April 17 at 11:00 am Adult Education (call for information) Annual Community Passover Seder Monday, April 18 at 6:00 pm For information and reservations call: 541-330-0609 All services are held at the First United Methodist Church 680 NW Bond Street Sunday School, Hebrew School and Bar/Bat Mitzvah Classes For more information about our education programs, please call: David Uri at 541-306-6000 For more information and complete schedule of services go online to www.bethtikvahbend.org or call 541-388-8826

Lutheran CONCORDIA LUTHERAN MISSION (LCMS) The mission of the Church is to forgive sins through the Gospel and thereby grant eternal life. (St. John 20:22-23, Augsburg Confession XXVIII.8, 10) 10 am Sunday School 11 am Divine Service Lent and Holy Week Schedule: 21 April 2011: The Festival of Maundy Thursday, 7:00 pm 22 April 2011: The Festival of Good Friday, 7:00 pm The Rev. Willis C . Jenson, Pastor. 8286 11th St (Grange Hall), Terrebonne, OR www.lutheransonline.com/ condordialutheranmission Phone: 541-325-6773

Nazarene BEND CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 1270 NE 27 St. • 541-382-5496 Senior Pastor Virgil Askren SUNDAY 9:00 am Sunday School for all ages 10:15 am Worship Service 5 pm Hispanic Worship Service Nursery Care & Children’s Church ages 4 yrs–4th grade during all Worship Services “Courageous Living” on KNLR 97.5 FM 8:30 am Sunday WEDNESDAY 6:30 pm Ladies Bible Study THURSDAY 10:00 am 50+ Bible Study WEEKLY Life Groups Please visit our website for a complete listing of activities for all ages. www.bendnaz.org

Non-Denominational CASCADE PRAISE CHRISTIAN CENTER For People Like You! NE Corner of Hwy 20 W. and Cooley Service Times: Sunday, 10 am Wednesday, 7 pm Youth: Wednesday, 7 pm Nursery and children's ministries Home fellowship groups Spirit Filled Changing lives through the Word of God 541-389-4462 • www.cascadepraise.org SOVEREIGN GRACE CHURCH Meeting at the Golden Age Club 40 SE 5th St., Bend Just 2 blocks SW of Bend High School Sunday Worship 10:00 am Sovereign Grace Church is dedicated to worshipping God and teaching the Bible truths recovered through the Reformation. Call for information about other meetings 541-420-1667 http://www.sovereigngracebend.com/

Open Bible Standard CHRISTIAN LIFE CENTER 21720 E. Hwy. 20 • 541-389-8241 Sunday morning worship 8:45 AM & 10:45 AM Wednesday Mid-Week Service & Youth Programs 7:00 PM Nursery Care provided for all services. Pastor Daniel N. LeLaCheur www.clcbend.com

Presbyterian COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 529 NW 19th Street (3/4 mile north of High School) Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 548-3367 Rev. Rob Anderson, Pastor Rev. Heidi Bolt, Associate Pastor 8:30 am - Contemporary Music & Worship 8:30 am - Church School for Children 9:45 am - Adult Christian Education 11:00 am - Traditional Music & Worship 12:15 pm - Middle School Youth 5:00 pm - Senior High Youth Wednesday: 4:30 pm - Elementary School Program Small Groups Meet Regularly (Handicapped Accessible) www.redmondcpc.org

Rev. Dr. Steven H. Koski Senior Pastor Palm Sunday Worship “Forgiveness is Freedom from Fear” Rev. Jenny Warner 9:00 am Contemporary 10:45 am Traditional 5:01 pm Come as You Are! Child care at all services Holy Week 7:00 pm Maundy Thursday Communion 7:00 pm Good Friday Stations-of-the-Cross Through the Week Youth Groups (See Youth Blog: http://bendfpyouth.wordpress.com) Choirs, music groups, Bible study, Fellowship and ministries every week Wednesdays 6:00 pm Contemplative Worship 230 NE Ninth, Bend www.bendfp.org 541 382 4401

Unitarian Universalist UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON “Diverse Beliefs, One Fellowship” We are a Welcoming Congregation Sunday April 17 11:00 am Discussion Sunday with Tom Wykes: “Loving Your Enemies” a sermon by Martin Luther King, Jr.: “Far from being a pious injunction of a Utopian dreamer, the command to love one’s enemy is an absolute necessity for our survival. Love even for enemies is the key to the solution of the problems for the world.” This sermon was delivered at the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama at Christmas, 1957. Martin Luther King wrote it while in jail for committing nonviolent civil disobedience during the Montgomery bus boycott. Childcare and Religious Education is provided! Everyone is Welcome! See our website for more information Meeting place: OLD STONE CHURCH 157 NW FRANKLIN AVE., BEND Mail: PO Box 428, Bend OR 97709 (541) 385-3908 www.uufco.org ALL PEOPLES UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Diverse spiritual journeys welcomed. United by the teachings of Christ. Come worship with a truly inclusive, progressive congregation at Summer Creek Clubhouse, 3660 SW 29th St. in Redmond. Worship is at 11 am or come early for adult study and discussion at 10 am. Our next services are Sunday, April 17th and Sunday, May 1st. For details, directions and possible help with car-pooling, call: 541-388-2230 or, email: prisbill@earthlink.net

Unity Community UNITY COMMUNITY OF CENTRAL OREGON Join the Unity Community Sunday 10:00 am with Rev. jane Meyers Youth Program Provided The Unity Community meets at 62855 Powell Butte Hwy (near Bend Airport) Learn more about the Unity Community of Central Oregon at www.unitycentraloregon.com or by calling 541-388-1569 United Church of God

United Methodist FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH (In the Heart of Down Town Bend) 680 NW Bond St. / 541-382-1672 Everyone is Welcome! Pastor Thom Larson Sixth Sunday in Lent Palm Sunday Sermon Title: “Unbroken” Scripture: Matthew 21:1-11/27:11-54 8:30 am - Praise & Worship 9:45 am Sunday School for all ages 11:00am - Traditional Service Childcare provided on Sunday *During the Week:* Financial Peace University following the 2nd Service, Womens Groups, Mens Groups, Youth Groups, Quilting, Crafting, Music & Fellowship. Open Hearts. Open Minds. Open Doors. Rev. Thom Larson firstchurch@bendumc.org

CHURCH & SYNAGOGUE DIRECTORY LISTING 4 Saturdays and TMC:

$105 5 Saturdays and TMC:

$126 The Bulletin: Every Saturday on the church page. $21 Copy Changes: by 5 PM Tuesday CO Marketplace: The First Tuesday of each month. $21 Copy Changes: by Monday 1 week prior to publication

Call Pat Lynch 541-383-0396 plynch@bendbulletin.com

Directory of Central Oregon Churches and Synagogues


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A6 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE PLAN UNVEILED WEDNESDAY

$6 trillion

Judging Obama’s plan against Ryan’s President Barack Obama has outlined sharp differences with House Republicans over how to tackle the rising national debt. On Wednesday, Obama responded to a Republican blueprint proposed recently by House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan that would cut spending by $6 trillion compared with Obama’s 2012 budget, proposed in February, largely by reductions to Medicare and Medicaid. On Wednesday, Obama insisted on the need for a combination of cuts to defense spending, a reduction in Medicare and Medicaid costs and increases in taxes on the rich. An examination of Ryan’s plan and Obama’s 2012 budget proposals:

REVENUE

Obama 5

5

Obama 4

Obama 2012 budget plan

Ryan

4

Ryan 3

3 0

2

DEFICIT Ryan

–$995 –$1,163 2012

1

Obama

In billions

2

–$391

1

–$1,158 2021

0 2012

KEY

Budget

SPENDING

$6 trillion

2012

2021

2021

Ryan plan

XXX XXX-XX-X John Doe

SOCIAL SECURITY

INCOME SECURITY

DEFENSE

MEDICARE

HEALTH

EDUCATION

$1.4 trillion 1.2 $1.3 trillion 1.0

$871

0.8

$724 billion

$767 billion 0.6

$707

$785 $742 $741

$532 billion

$567

$809

$495 billion

$362 billion

0.4

$501

$478

$482

$401 $347

0.2 0 2012

2021

With spending projected to soar as the population ages and baby boomers retire, neither Obama nor Ryan is proposing any changes to the program. In public remarks, Obama has played down the need for reform. Ryan, in contrast, has praised proposals to raise the retirement age and curtail benefits for well-off retirees, while proposing legislation that would force an overhaul as soon as next year.

2012

2021

Obama and Ryan take the same approach to defense spending, seeking savings recommended by the Pentagon but otherwise allowing spending to continue to rise gradually over the next decade. Ryan would also fully fund Obama's request for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

2012

2021

Income security includes things such as food stamps, unemployment insurance and housing assistance. Ryan would cut funding for this category. His plan would overhaul the way the government gives out food stamps, limiting the amount of money each state can receive and making the aid contingent on work or job training.

2012

2021

Obama has proposed no significant changes to the program since signing a health care initiative last year that would sharply restrain spending. Ryan proposes to radically overhaul the program beginning in 2022, replacing traditional Medicare benefits with government support to purchase private insurance.

2012

$117 billion

2021

Ryan proposes a repeal of Obama’s far-reaching initiative to extend coverage to the uninsured, reining in spending on Medicaid and on subsidies, and tax breaks for middle- and lower-income people to buy insurance.

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The Wa shing to n Po st

WASHINGTON — The budget deal that’s keeping the federal government running slashed the $88 million that the Department of Housing and Urban Development grants to housing counselors, a move that could raise costs for those services or wipe them out in some areas. The money enabled the counseling agencies to offer their services — everything from advice on foreclosure prevention to rental assistance — free of charge or

Buses Continued from A1 Utah became the latest state to allow school bus advertising when its governor signed a law last month authorizing the practice. The strategy began in the 1990s in Colorado, then spread to Texas, Arizona, Tennessee and Massachusetts. In the past year, at least eight other states have considered similar legislation. One of them, New Jersey, approved school bus advertising in January, and the state’s Board of Education is now writing guidelines for size and sponsorship restrictions. So far, four districts have expressed interest in participating, according to Frank Belluscio, a spokesman for the New Jersey School Boards Association. Idaho’s Legislature rejected a similar proposal this month. Districts with 250 buses can expect to generate about $1 million over four years by selling some yellow space, according to Michael Beauchamp, president of Alpha Media, a company based in Dallas that manages ad-

for a nominal fee. But congressional lawmakers concluded the money was not well spent. At a recent hearing, Rep. Tom Latham, R-Iowa, criticized HUD for taking too long to distribute the grants. Latham also said the program is too similar to a federally funded foreclosure-prevention initiative run by NeighborWorks America. The cuts come in the midst of a housing crisis that has left many homeowners in need of help as they struggle to stay in their homes or find rentals after

eviction. Housing counseling agencies doubt the funds will be restored and fear that they won’t be able to make up the shortfall from alternative sources. “It’s a huge hole in the budget of the counseling infrastructure,� said Janis Bowdler, a director at the National Council of La Raza, which has dozens of housing counseling affiliates. “We estimate our network of 55 organizations providing these services will shrink down to 20.� The most immediate impact may be felt by seniors who want

to take out reverse mortgages, which allow them to withdraw equity from their homes. These loans, which are usually backed by HUD’s Federal Housing Administration, have become more attractive to seniors as the economy has soured. But the financing is complex, which is why the FHA has long required seniors to take part in HUD-approved counseling sessions before these loans are approved. That requirement has not gone away, but now the funds that supported the counseling sessions

vertising on 3,000 school buses in Texas and Arizona. Officials say that the revenue, while small, can still make the difference between having new textbooks — or a music teacher or a volleyball team — and not having them. “If the alternative is huge classroom sizes and losing teachers and losing qualified personnel, yes, this seems like something we should consider,� said Valery Lynch, 48, a fourth-grade teacher in The Woodlands, Texas, north of Houston. “But I know that it’s a bag of worms, and people are going to ask, ‘What’s next? An ad on the classroom clock?’� Some schools have been selling advertising space on their school websites and in campus parking lots, in addition to the lunchroom and the school buses. An online ad usually generates about $100 a month for a school, according to Jim O’Connell, president of Media Advertising in Motion, a company in Scottsdale, Ariz., that sells advertising for school districts. Critics say exposing impressionable young children to ads that appear to be endorsed by their educators is problematic.

“Mandatory education laws are based on the idea that education is good for society, and is good for kids,� said Josh Golin, associate director of Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, a nonprofit organization. “That argument falls apart when you’re talking about mandatory exposure to advertising.� The companies that help place the ads say that children are exposed to advertising just about everywhere they look anyway, including — for many decades — in their high school yearbooks and sports stadiums. They say that the primary audience for ads on the outside of school buses is adults, not children, and that

much of the space is being purchased by dentists, banks and insurance companies. “School bus advertising is not for the kids in the bus, but for the cars around the bus that see the advertising when they’re at a stop sign or driving down the highway,� said Bryan Nelson, a Republican state representative from Florida’s 38th District, outside Orlando. Nelson is sponsoring legislation that would allow school bus ads and direct much of the revenue toward defraying the buses’ fuel costs. “When you think about how many people are going to see those ads, you get a lot of exposure, so we can charge a premium price,� he said.

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2021

Obama’s budget seeks a modest boost in education funding for teacher training, research and early-childhood education. Ryan’s plan cuts spending, but restores funding for a voucher program in Washington, D.C., public schools.

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Deal slashes grants to housing counselors By Dina ElBoghdady

$127

Continued from A1 “It’s substantially better than what the House had proposed,� said Steve Savner, policy director for the Center for Community Change. But the cuts are still “significant and troublesome,� he said. The move comes amid some doubts about the effectiveness of the programs, however. In January, a report from the Government Accountability Office noted that funding for federal employment and training programs had gone up $5 billion, to $18 billion, between 2003 and 2009. “Little is known about the effectiveness of most programs,� it said, while noting that some of them overlapped. Congressional critics of such programs seized on the report to argue they should be dismantled. Even some Democrats profess doubts about their effectiveness. “Are job training programs a good thing? Yes. Is it God’s gift to workers? No,� said Gordon Lafer, a Democrat who is a professor at the University of Oregon and author of a book, “The Job Training Charade.� “Much more important than training is creating jobs.� Advocates of the programs note that it is difficult to measure their effectiveness because it requires tracking over long periods of time and sophisticated analysis to determine what role the job training had in students getting jobs and what role other factors, such as innate intelligence, have. Advocates point to the specific programs and the help they provide to students. Among the cuts made in the budget deal: A green jobs program took a $40 million hit; a program to get ex-offenders into the workforce lost $23 million; and another to help disadvantaged youths get high school diplomas and job skills lost $20 million. The budget plan eliminated a $125 million grant program that allowed community colleges and other groups to run job training programs.

have dried up, said Peter Bell, president of the National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association. Of the $88 million that was cut, $8 million was for reverse mortgage counseling. That money helped to defray counseling costs for seniors.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 A7

Sexism charges divide surgeons group By Pauline W. Chen, M.D. New York Times News Service

A Valentine’s Day editorial in the official newspaper of the American College of Surgeons has set off a firestorm of controversy that has divided the largest professional organization of surgeons and raised questions about the current leadership and its attitudes toward women and gay and lesbian members. The editorial, written by Dr. Lazar Greenfield, an emeritus professor of surgery at the University of Michigan School of Medicine and president-elect of the American College of Surgeons, extols the mood-enhancing effects of semen on women. It begins with a reference to the mating behaviors of fruit flies, then goes on to discuss studies on the menstrual cycles of heterosexual and lesbian women who live together. Citing the research of evolutionary psychologists at the State University of New York, it describes how female college students who had been exposed to semen were less depressed than their peers who had not, concluding: “So there’s a deeper bond between men and women than St. Valentine would

have suspected, and now we know there’s a better gift for that day than chocolates.” This month, in response to complaints, the editorial was retracted and pulled from the group’s website, and Greenfield was asked to step down from his position as editor-in-chief of the association’s newspaper. But criticisms continue to mount. “I was aghast,” said Dr. Colleen Brophy, a professor of surgery at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville and a member of the organization for more than 20 years. Brophy, who served as chairwoman of its surgical research committee, publicly resigned from the association Thursday. “I’ve gone back and reviewed the science, and it’s erroneous,” she said. “But I’m resigning from the college not so much because of the editorial but because of the leadership’s response to it.” The organization has more than 75,000 members (I am one). Roughly 10 percent are women. There are five women on the organization’s 22-member governing board; this month, they issued a letter requesting that Greenfield step down as presi-

dent-elect. The entire board is set to vote on the issue Sunday. Greenfield has not issued a formal statement and could not be reached for comment, but in an e-mail to his colleagues in response to the criticism, he wrote that his editorial “was considered by the Women in Surgery Committee and the Association of Women Surgeons as demeaning to women. Despite my apologies, they brought the issue to the Board of Regents.” Dr. L.D. Britt, the current president of the organization and chairman of surgery at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, also did not respond to requests for comment. But at surgical meeting this month, he invoked the experience of “oppressed” South Africans who chose “reconciliation,” adding, “If someone is truly apologetic, we have to consider that.” While women now make up almost half of all entering medical school classes in the United States, fewer than a third choose to go into surgery, in part because of a perceived male bias, negative attitudes of surgeons and a lack of female mentors. Once in practice, studies have shown,

well over half of all women surgeons report feeling demeaned, and nearly a third say they have been the objects of inappropriate sexist remarks or advances. Until this editorial, Greenfield has had what many believe is an exemplary career not only as a surgeon but also as a longtime mentor and advocate of women in surgery. He is the editor of one of the major textbooks of surgery and the inventor of the Greenfield Filter, a device that has been used in hundreds of thousands of patients to prevent life-threatening blood clots from entering the lung. And Greenfield has been a mentor to countless surgeons, many of them women, while serving as chairman of surgery first at Virginia Commonwealth University and then at the University of Michigan. “He has always been above reproach,” said Dr. Mary Hawn, an associate professor of surgery at the University of Alabama School of Medicine in Birmingham, who worked as a medical student, surgeon-in-training and faculty member under Greenfield. “Our understanding was that he went out of his way to recruit women on the trainee and

faculty level.” Dr. Diane Simeone, a professor of surgery at the University of Michigan who recently coauthored an article on barriers faced by women in academic surgery, agrees. “There still is a lot of gender bias in surgery, and I have seen it myself on multiple fronts,” she said. “That was never evident from Dr. Greenfield. I think it’s important to know that this is one event and to weigh it against a long career where he has always been completely above board and a role model for supporting women in surgery.” It is less clear what attitudes Greenfield or other leaders of the organization have toward the college’s gay and lesbian members. “I think race and religion have made a lot more progress in the college than women, and particularly gay women or men,” Brophy said. “This is probably the first time I’ve ever seen the word ‘lesbian’ used in a piece or associated with the college. Ever. Everybody usually just crawls into the closet and closes the door when they show up for the meetings.”

Virginia Tech marks 4 years since rampage The Associated Press BLACKSBURG, Va. — Four years after a troubled student gunned down 32 in a campus rampage, Virginia Tech officials remain adamant that they did nothing wrong by waiting two hours to warn the campus of the gunman. Today the school will mourn the victims of the April 16, 2007, mass shooting — the worst in modern U.S. history — with a 3.2-mile Run for Remembrance and a candlelight vigil. Meanwhile, school officials are strongly leaning toward appealing a $55,000 fine for violating federal law with its response the day of the shootings. They have until April 29 to decide. Many victims’ families say the school can’t simultaneously mourn the tragedy and deny its mistakes.

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A holiday in N. Korea amid tension Trono New York Times News Service SEOUL, South Korea — North Korea celebrated its biggest annual holiday Friday — the 99th birthday of the late dictator Kim Il Sung — and despite a few recent signs of an easing of tensions between the Koreas, hopes for rapprochement remained dim. Pro-democracy activists re-

leased hydrogen balloons carrying $1 bills and tens of thousands of ant-regime leaflets from a tourist park at Imjingak, just a few miles upwind of North Korea. There was no gunfire although North Korea has threatened to shell Imjingak and other South Korean border towns if the balloon launches continue.

Facebook Continued from A1 Roppe said Facebook’s entry into Prineville has caused businesses in several industries to consider following the social networking company to the city or county. She said she is confident when growth returns to the area there will be abundant jobs for newcomers because some of those businesses will come. Ken Patchett, manager of the data center, said last week the facility had about 47 employees, which includes contractors. Other local concerns are water and power for Facebook. Heiliger said there are no plans for Facebook to expand the data center further. Original plans called for a smaller facility. Roppe said the city of Prineville is making all efforts it can to ensure sufficient water and power would be available should Facebook decide to expand the facility, which measures 306,000 square feet. Furlong said Facebook, based in Palo Alto, Calif., chose Prineville for its first data center location, among other reasons, because it felt the area could support expansion. Indeed, in January the state of Oregon certified 81 acres of industrial land near the data center as being shovelready — in essence, it speeds up development times. Furlong also said the company has been in ongoing discussions with PacifiCorp and the Bonneville Power Administration about whether there would be enough power to support expansions.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Cables, computers and outlets connect into a net of data inside the Facebook Prineville Data Center. “We should be able to get the service we need when we need,” he said. Acknowledging the environmental organization Greenpeace’s campaign to persuade Facebook to stop powering the data center with coal and natural gas, among other sources, through PacifiCorp, Furlong emphasized the energy efficiency of the data center. He also said revealing specifications of the building and its servers, as Facebook did last week, can help companies constructing data centers to save more energy in the long run.

Continued from A1 Stephen Trono remained at Oregon Health & Sciences University through mid-October. In previous interviews, his friend Patrick Gisler said he’d visited him in the hospital and said Trono had undergone several surgeries to repair injuries he suffered from bullet wounds to the abdomen and wrist. Detectives searched the house on Mt. Shasta Drive in northwest Bend and interviewed several people who know the couple. For more than two months, investigators could not talk to Stephen Trono because of his medical condition. Police interviewed Trono once, on Sept. 30, when he was still in the hospital in Portland. “The investigation has been completed since at least last October, so for six or seven months it’s been fully completed,” Springer said. “No new information has come forward since that time.” Springer said he left messages regularly with the District Attorney’s Office but received no response until Patrick Flaherty took over the office in January. “I don’t know why it is that the prior administration couldn’t make a decision in this case,” he said. “I’m thankful to Traci (Anderson) and Tom Howse for getting on this and looking at it and making a decision.” In the months since she joined the office, Anderson

said, she and two other deputy DAs have reviewed the case. “I can’t speak really to what happened before I got here,” she said. “I did get information from the detectives that the case was originally referred to this office in, I think, either July or October of last year, but no decision had been made on that.” Springer said Angelicque Trono fully cooperated with the investigation. “She gave a full statement that night and spent hours with the police before she ever called me the next day,” he said. “She provided a computer and cellphones and full access to the children, all of whom were interviewed with the police.” The .22-caliber revolver “was a legal weapon, she was lawfully in possession of it, and she reasonably believed she needed to use it,” Springer said. But he admitted the number of shots fired was hard to imagine, noting in the years he’s worked as an attorney he’s repeatedly seen this situation. “Handguns are incredibly dangerous,” he said. “Angelicque had never fired this gun before that night. How crazy is that?” He also noted the .22-caliber revolver had no kick to it and took very little to pull the trigger. “She was really kind of unaware of what she was really doing,” he said. “She told me she didn’t feel any kick. ... But Stephen told her if he did not answer when she called out his name to empty the gun, and she did.” Since the shooting, the Tronos have relocated to Vancouver, Wash., in part to be near OHSU as Stephen Trono recovered. Last week, Trono underwent

major abdominal reconstructive surgery. He was released from the hospital on Thursday. “They are a strong family, and they’re doing their best to recover and move on,” Springer said. “These are, of course, very serious injuries with a long road to recovery, but it looks like he’s going to be fine.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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A8 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


CL

FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT

COMMUNITY LIFE

Inside

The hosing of soaps The popularity of cheap talk shows pushed ABC to clear the deck by axing long-running soap operas, Page B2

B

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011

JULIE JOHNSON

Kids offer hope for our planet

T

here are the environmental disasters: the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in Japan, last year’s BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. There are the less immediate, but still worrisome long-term disasters: global climate change, deforestation of tropical rainforests, groundwater pollution, the proliferation of plastics in the environment. And there are the small-scale blunders that individually don’t amount to much, but collectively may have a lasting impact on the health of the planet: forgetting to recycle that yogurt cup in the morning, leaving the reusable shopping bags at home when you go to the grocery store. Individually, these bits of bad news about the environment are depressing. When taken together, they’re enough to make me want to crawl into my underused compost bin and hide until humanity has figured out how to live on the planet without damaging it. But just when it seems my generation and the ones ahead of me aren’t doing our part to reduce, reuse and recycle our way to a healthy Earth, along comes a group of elementary school students to give a little hope that our future won’t be one of environmental decline. The Earth Day Club at Pine Ridge Elementary School in Bend is an ambitious group of about two dozen first- through fifth-graders bent on making the world a better place to live, a little at a time. These kids — the club is made up of the school’s talented and gifted students, plus others who are likely on that track — have been working to reduce lunchroom waste at their school, and hope to implement their plan to recycle leftovers and service items from lunch in the next few weeks. “I would go in the cafeteria and there would be nothing in the recycling and the garbage would be full,” said secondgrader Evan Lilly. “It didn’t make me very happy.” So the kids decided to check out a pilot program at Bear Creek Elementary School, where students have been recycling lunchroom waste since January. “We learned we could compost the food and recycle the boats,” said Jessica Orrell, a first-grader, referring to the paper “boats” cafeteria food comes in. Said third-grader Jay Kim, “We should do this, because if the Earth gets too much pollution, we might pollute the atmosphere.” Well said, Jay. Club leader Anissa Wiseman, Pine Ridge’s student services specialist (that’s like an assistant principal) said her group has big goals. “I wasn’t sure how much an effect we could have,” said Wiseman. “I suggested a 25 percent reduction in waste (from the lunchroom). They said ‘No. Half.’ They were certain they could make a big change.” Big change indeed. If the kids meet their goal, the school will go from 10 bags of garbage each day at lunch to five. They’ll also educate the other students about how to make the recycling program work — food waste goes into the compost bin, clean paper boats into the recycling. And the kids, with Wiseman’s help, are planning an Earth Day fair for Wednesday. The fair will include education and activities and cabbage plants and tree seedlings for students. “This is a great way for them to find their own focus and be leaders,” Wiseman said. It’s also a great way to assure those of us who remember when recycling didn’t exist that the planet may be in good hands after all. It’s discouraging to hear about how plastic shopping bags and carbon emissions might be destroying the environment. But it’s encouraging to see kids like Pine Ridge’s Earth Day Club doing something about it. Plus, as second-grader Isabelle Armstrong said, recycling can be fun. She went to the recycling center with her grandfather over the weekend and learned that cardboard is fun because you get to smash it, and glass is fun because you get to break the bottles. Julie Johnson can be reached at 541383-0308 or jjohnson@bendbulletin.com.

Throwin’ them

Bunco is a game of dice, played in rounds with players taking turns rolling the dice and trying to accumulate as many points as possible before the turn ends. The game is played at three tables of four with teams of two competing.

BONES in Central Oregon

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Connie McCurdy, right, celebrates after rolling her fifth bunco of the night while playing with friends on Wednesday.

Women build social groups around dice game By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

C

onnie McCurdy whooped and pumped her arm into the air. “Bunco!” she yelled, proudly donning the winner’s feather boa. Her friendly competitors couldn’t believe she had just notched her fifth big-scoring roll of the night. The dice game is pure chance, but a few of the women rolled their eyes and joked that McCurdy, also known as the Bunco Queen, must have something more going for her than luck. “Look at the way she rolls, she’s so fast,” said Brandi Dutton, watching the dice skid on the table. “It’s something in

State agency veteran will speak on nonprofits Join the City Club of Central Oregon for its next presentation, a luncheon with former Oregon Child Welfare Services Director Benjamin deHaan, on Thursday. “Redesigning Nonprofits for a New Age” will be the topic of deHaan’s presentation, which will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the St. Charles Center for Health and Learning, 2500 N.E. Neff Road in Bend. He

“It is like a book club, but there’s no homework.” — Jaimie Sines, founder of local bunco club the wrist.” The recent evening gathering in a northeast Bend home had been one of 30-somethings gabbing, gossiping and giggling while playing what a century ago was a Victorianera parlor game. Today, bunco is back. And like the bridge clubs of yesteryear, bunco groups are popping up around Central Oregon among those seeking to escape work and home for

a bit of harmless fun. “It is like a book club,” said Jaimie Sines, holding a glass of wine, “but there’s no homework.” Sines, a 32-year-old, stayat-home mom, formed the club several months ago. Her mother played bunco when she was growing up, and she had so much fun subbing in a bunco club recently that she decided it was time have one of her own. She asked friends from different parts of her life to form a group of 12, which met for its third time in March. “Now that we’re all moms and working, we’re all 30somethings, we don’t go out anymore,” Sines said. “Bunco gets the girls together.” See Bunco / B8

SPOTLIGHT will discuss how as the public sector contracts, a greater need for social services will arise and put pressure on nonprofit organizations. Those organizations therefore need to change business practices to meet that coming demand. In addition to working for the state of

Bunco terms Bunco: Rolling three of a kind of the number being rolled in the round. A bunco is worth 21 points for yourself and your teammate. A player at the head table who rolls a bunco immediately rings the bell to signal the end of that round. A player who rolls a bunco keeps an item — be it a hat, a scarf or a feather boa — until the next bunco is rolled. Round: A round is a full turn of the number currently being rolled. As noted on the score sheet, each set is broken down into six rounds. Set: The game is divided into four sets. One set equals six rounds. Die: Singular for dice. Head table: The head table controls the pace of the game. Players get to the head table by winning rounds, but one loss can rotate players off the head table. Ghost: If there are not enough players, a ghost player can be substituted. The empty seat, or ghost, rotates, and the person who is seated across from the ghost rolls instead. Source: World Bunco Association

Oregon, deHaan has served as an associate professor at Portland State University and was the founding president of the Children’s Justice Alliance. He is the executive director of Partners for Our Children, a public-private partnership to improve the lives of foster children in Washington state. The luncheon costs $15 for City Club members and $30 for nonmembers. Reservations are required and will be taken through Monday. Contact: www.cityclubco.com or 541-633-7163.

‘Lotus Eaters’ author visits Tatjana Soli, author of the bestselling novel “The Lotus Eaters,” will share the genesis of the book and read excerpts at an 11:30 a.m. luncheon today at Between the Covers book store in Bend. Pho Viet Cafe will cater the luncheon. Tickets are $35, or $30 for those who purchase a copy of “The Lotus Eaters” at the bookstore, located at 645 N.W. Delaware Ave. Contact: betweenthecoversllc@ gmail.com or 541-385-4766.


T EL EV ISION

B2 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Tip housekeeper Budget pencil burst soaps’ bubble at hotel to get special treatment By Eric Deggans

St. Petersburg (Fla.) Times

Dear Abby: My wife and I had a disagreement regarding hotel service and towels. My wife thinks we should hang towels to dry daily for reuse later. I say the cost of washing the towels is included in the price of the room, and I want a fresh towel daily. The other issue is my wife feels obligated to tip the housekeeping staff. I have never felt that obligation. Not a single housekeeper has been exceptional. We’re hoping you could shed some light on hotel etiquette. — West Virginia Traveler Dear Traveler: Your wife appears to be a conservationist. Many travelers forgo daily towel service to help hotels conserve water and save energy. If you prefer to do otherwise, that’s your privilege. As to tipping the housekeeping staff, has it occurred to you that you have never received exceptional service because you never offered a tip? Some hotel guests talk to the housekeeper at the time they arrive to request extra hangers, soap, washcloths, etc. — and offer a gratuity at that time. When they do, the staff usually goes out of their way to be accommodating. Try it and they’ll spoil you if you let them. Dear Abby: My husband, “Parker,” and I have a 4-year-old son, “Ethan.” Recently, my mother-in-law suggested we have a will drawn up, stating who will take care of Ethan if something happens to us. She’s an attorney and has offered to do it for us. Parker and I agree that it is a good idea and appreciate her offer. The problem? We don’t want her raising our son. We have another relative in mind. My mother-in-law is a nice enough person and would not be

DEAR ABBY abusive to Ethan, but she was not a good mother to Parker and his siblings. We know she’ll be offended if we don’t name her as our child’s guardian. I would like to hire another attorney, but she will take offense to that as well. She hasn’t stopped hounding us about this issue. Tell us how to handle this. — Trapped in the Golden State Dear Trapped: Hire an attorney and have the document drawn up. And when your mother-inlaw raises the subject again, you and Parker should thank her and tell her it has already been done. The woman may be selfish and self-absorbed, but she is right that you should have your wishes put in writing. Dear Abby: My husband and I were taught differently regarding how to serve ourselves a meal. Typically, we each “plate up” our food in the kitchen, where it is prepared, rather than bring serving dishes to the table. Then we carry our plates to the table to eat. Should my husband serve himself first (as I was taught the cook/hostess is served last), or should I go first (as he was taught women precede men)? — Diners’ Dilemma Dear D.D.: You’re not “the hostess”; you are the wife. If your husband wishes to defer to you, let him spoil you. You’ll both be happier that way.

Thirty years after her mother’s death, Christy Chamness still treasures the memory of joining her mom to watch the doings in Pine Valley through daily doses of ABC’s classic soap opera “All My Children”. After September, Chamness will have to find a new spark for those happy thoughts, following news that ABC is scheduled to pull “All My Children” from the air this fall after 41 years. A few months later, the network will also end the 43-year run of another classic soap opera, “One Life to Live,” benching that show in January. ABC announced Thursday that both series would end, saying research revealed viewers wanted different programming in daytime. If so, someone forgot to ask fans like Chamness, who said the cancellation felt like losing a friend or family member. “This is breaking my heart. … I’ve known these characters for so long,” she said from her home in St. Petersburg, Fla. “You can kind of take a break from your own problems and get into theirs. For me, it’s been a wonderful escape.” Her dismay was echoed by famous fans such as “The Office” star Rainn Wilson, who noted on Twitter: “RIP ‘One Life to Live.’ The show that gave me my 1st TV gig. 1997. Casey Keegan, homicidal stand-up comic. .truestory” But the cancellations also herald a new age in television, as daytime programming turns to cheaper, easier-to-produce talk shows and a changing audience. ABC will replace “All My

Children” with a program featuring chef Mario Batali called “The Chew.” “One Life to Live” steps aside for a weight loss-makeover show starring “Project Runway’s” Tim Gunn and “American Idol” alum Kimberly Locke dubbed “The Revolution.” “While we are excited … I can’t help but recognize how bittersweet the change is,” Brian Frons, president of daytime for Disney/ABC, said in a statement that cited ABC’s daytime talk show “The View” as inspiration. But another motivation may have come from a competitor: “The Talk.” When CBS replaced longrunning soap “As the World Turns” with the chatfest “The Talk” in October, first-week ratings rose nearly 30 percent among young female viewers, threatening the time-slot dominance of another soap: ABC’s “One Life to Live.”

“Jersey Shore” over the scripted predictability of “Law & Order,” it’s not hard to see why soaps have fallen on hard times. “In one sense it’s not surprising or sad that soaps are disappearing — don’t we want women to have fulfilling careers, after all?” wrote University of California at Berkeley assistant professor Abigail De Kosnik, co-editor of the book, “The Survival of Soap Operas.”

Unique storytelling Still, soaps also offer unique storytelling opportunities. “You could watch young couples become parents and then grandparents and you could see fresh young actors come (in) with a network of relationships they fit right into,” De Kosnik wrote. “Only from soaps can you get that sweeping sense of individuals’ and families’ histories.” Another loss with the vanishing soap opera: a training

Money talks The numbers are simple: Soap operas produce up to 260 episodes annually with huge casts making shows with sinking ratings. Talk shows have smaller staffs, make fewer episodes and are gaining audience. “Even if the ratings (for the talk shows) aren’t as high, the network can make more money because the costs are lower,” said Stephanie Sloane, editor of Soap Opera Digest magazine. These days, there are fewer housewives at home, once a captive audience for stories of escape. And in a TV world that values the kinetic energy of

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby. com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

ground for young actors. “It’s a special kind of acting all its own,” said Ray Bouchard, a Dunedin resident who had small roles on “All My Children” and other soaps in the 1980s. “The experience of being on set and following cues — it was an amazing learning experience.” Still, fans say they will support the four soaps that remain, hopeful to keep a tradition alive reaching back to broadcast entertainment’s earliest days. “I think (these cancellations) will hurt TV,” said Jason Dowd, 32, of Tampa, who once watched soap operas with his mother and kept synopses of “All My Children” episodes on his website, TheExpressionist.com. “I mean, how many more judge shows can you watch, anyway?”

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KATU News at 11 Comedy.TV ‘14’ News Sat. Night Live News (11:35) Cold Case Entourage ‘MA’ Curb Enthusiasm Fringe ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å According to Jim South Park ‘14’ Masterpiece Mystery! ’ ‘PG’ News Sat. Night Live Stargate Universe Lost ‘PG’ Å Burt Wolf: Taste Everyday Food Song of the Mountains ’ ‘G’ Å

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Å Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ Dogs 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å It’s Me or the Dog (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Cats 101 ’ ‘PG’ Å Cats 101 (N) ’ ‘PG’ It’s Me or the Dog ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘PG’ (4:00) The Celebrity Apprentice ‘PG’ House House vs. God ’ ‘PG’ Å House Euphoria ‘PG’ Å House Euphoria ‘PG’ Å House Forever ’ ‘14’ Å House Who’s Your Daddy? ’ ‘14’ House No Reason ’ ‘14’ Å 137 44 Hogan Knows ››› “Lethal Weapon” (1987, Action) Mel Gibson, Danny Glover, Gary Busey. ’ Å (8:45) ››› “A Few Good Men” (1992, Drama) Tom Cruise. A Navy lawyer defends two Marines in a comrade’s death. ’ Å 190 32 42 53 Hogan Knows The Suze Orman Show (N) Å Debt Do Us Part Debt Do Us Part American Greed Marc Dreier The Suze Orman Show Å Debt Do Us Part Debt Do Us Part Trade FX Recession Profits 51 36 40 52 American Greed Marc Dreier Piers Morgan Tonight Newsroom Wedding News Murder in Mexico: Falcon Lake Piers Morgan Tonight Newsroom CNN Presents ‘PG’ 52 38 35 48 Murder in Mexico: Falcon Lake ›› “The Girl Next Door” (2004, Romance-Comedy) Emile Hirsch, Elisha Cuthbert. Å › “Fired Up” (2009, Comedy) Nicholas D’Agosto. Premiere. Å ›› “Jackass: The Movie” (2002) 135 53 135 47 (4:30) ›› “The Slammin’ Salmon” (2009) Å Desert Paid Program Get Outdoors Visions of NW Joy of Fishing Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Word Travels ’ Paid Program Joy of Fishing Ride Guide ‘14’ City Edition 11 American Perspectives C-SPAN Weekend 58 20 12 11 American Perspectives Wizards-Place Sonny With a Chance ‘G’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Shake It Up! ‘G’ Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Secrets of the Secret Service ‘PG’ The Real King’s Speech (N) ’ ‘G’ Filthy Cities Medieval London ‘PG’ Filthy Cities New Stinking York ‘PG’ Pompeii: Back From the Dead ‘14’ Filthy Cities Medieval London ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Bermuda Triangle Exposed ’ ‘G’ NBA Basketball Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 (4:00) NBA Basketball Atlanta Hawks at Orlando Magic Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å NBA Tonight (N) NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: Aaron’s 312 22 24 21 24 High School Basketball 2011 Jordan Brand Classic From Charlotte, N.C. Boxing: 2001 Augustus vs. Ward Boxing 1998 Judah vs. Ward Å 2007 World Series of Poker Å 2007 World Series of Poker Å 2007 World Series of Poker Å 2007 World Series of Poker Å 23 25 123 25 Boxing: 1999 Green vs. Ward ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) ESPNEWS (Live) Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ›› “Evan Almighty” (2007, Comedy) Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman. ›› “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective” (1994, Comedy) Jim Carrey. Premiere. ›› “Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls” (1995) Jim Carrey. Premiere. 67 29 19 41 (4:00) ›› “Bruce Almighty” (2003) Justice With Judge Jeanine Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Journal Editorial FOX News Watch Justice With Judge Jeanine Geraldo at Large ’ ‘PG’ Å Red Eye 54 61 36 50 Huckabee Challenge Donut Champions Bobby Flay Bobby Flay Candy Store Candy Store Easter Basket Unwrapped (N) Easter Unwrapped Iron Chef America 177 62 98 44 Iron Chef America (3:30) ›› “Spider-Man 3” (2007, Action) Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst. › “Max Payne” (2008, Action) Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis, Beau Bridges. 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A prejudiced soldier is ››› “Fire Down Below” (1957, Drama) Rita Hayworth, Robert Mitchum, Jack Lem›› “Ring of Fire” (1961) David Janssen. Punks hold deputy ››› “Ball of Fire” (1941, Comedy) Gary Cooper, Barbara Stanwyck. A nightclub 101 44 101 29 singer helps a scholar research American slang. Å suspected of killing a Jewish man. Å mon. West Indies smugglers vie for a gal with no passport. sheriff hostage, followed by forest fire. Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å 178 34 32 34 Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å ›› “Get Smart” (2008, Comedy) Steve Carell, Anne Hathaway. Å › “Rush Hour 3” (2007, Action) Jackie Chan. Å (10:44) ››› “The Matrix Reloaded” (2003) Å 17 26 15 27 ››› “The Bourne Supremacy” (2004, Suspense) Matt Damon. Å ›› “Space Jam” (1996, Comedy) Michael Jordan, Wayne Knight. King of the Hill King of the Hill Venture Brothers Family Guy ‘14’ The Boondocks The Boondocks ›››› “Pokémon: Zoroark: Master of Illusions” (2010, Action) 84 Most Terrifying Places Ghost Adventures: Scariest Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å 179 51 45 42 Border Patrol (N) Border Patrol (N) Most Terrifying Places in America 7 Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Sanford & Son NCIS Bait ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Escaped ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Witch Hunt ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS A survivalist is wanted. ’ ‘PG’ “Underworld: Rise of the Lycans” 15 30 23 30 (4:25) ››› “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984) Å Saturday Night Live in the ’90s: Pop Culture Nation ’ ‘14’ Å Bad Boys (Premiere) ’ ‘14’ Bad Boys ’ ‘14’ 191 48 37 54 (4:30) Saturday Night Live ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 Dylan Walsh. Å (6:20) ›› “Daddy Day Care” 2003 Eddie Murphy. ‘PG’ ›› “Absolute Power” 1997, Suspense Clint Eastwood. ’ ‘R’ Å (10:05) ›› “All About the Benjamins” 2002 Ice Cube. (11:45) › Cobra ››› “Bedazzled” 1967, Comedy Peter Cook, Dudley Moore. ‘NR’ Å ›› “Unfaithfully Yours” 1984, Comedy Dudley Moore. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Bedazzled” 1967 ‘NR’ Å ›› “Unfaithfully Yours” 1984, Comedy Dudley Moore. ‘PG’ Å Terje’s Season Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania Å Shark Fights 13 UFC Primetime: Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania Å Shark Fights 13 College Exp. Cubed ‘14’ PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, Third Round From San Antonio. Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Nationwide: Fresh Express Classic, Third Round The Golf Fix School of Golf “Love Takes Wing” (2009) Cloris Leachman, Sarah Jones. ‘PG’ Å “Love Finds a Home” (2009, Drama) Patty Duke, Sarah Jones. ‘PG’ Å “The Shunning” (2011, Drama) Danielle Panabaker. Premiere. ‘PG’ Å “The Shunning” (2011) ‘PG’ Å (4:45) ›› “Terminator Salvation” 2009 Christian Bale. Humanity (6:45) Boxing Andre Berto vs. Victor Ortiz, Welterweights Andre Berto takes on Victor Ortiz in a welterweight ›› “Lottery Ticket” 2010, Comedy Bow Wow. A young man wins (10:45) ›› “Edge of Darkness” 2010 Mel Gibson. A Boston HBO 425 501 425 10 fights back against Skynet’s machine army. ’ bout; Amir Khan vs. Paul McCloskey. (N) ’ (Live) Å a multimillion-dollar prize. ‘PG-13’ Å detective investigates his daughter’s murder. ‘R’ ›› “Saw” 2004, Horror Cary Elwes, Danny Glover, Monica Potter. ‘R’ (7:15) ›› “The Center of the World” 2001, Drama Peter Sarsgaard. ‘NR’ (9:15) ››› “Buffalo Soldiers” 2001 Joaquin Phoenix, Ed Harris. ‘R’ (11:15) ›› “Saw” 2004, Horror ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:30) ›› “X-Men Origins: Wolverine” (6:15) ››› “Get Him to the Greek” 2010, Comedy Jonah Hill. An executive must drag (8:15) ›› “Jennifer’s Body” 2009, Horror Megan Fox. A possessed cheerleader has ›› “Clash of the Titans” 2010 Sam Worthington. Perseus, son (11:45) “Dangerous MAX 400 508 7 2009 Hugh Jackman. ‘PG-13’ a boozy rock star to Hollywood. ’ ‘NR’ Å an insatiable appetite for her classmates. ’ ‘R’ Å of Zeus, embarks on a dangerous journey. ’ Attractions” China’s Valley of the Kings (N) ‘PG’ Shark Men Murky Waters ‘PG’ Shark Men Hot Water ‘PG’ China’s Valley of the Kings ‘PG’ Shark Men Murky Waters ‘PG’ Shark Men Hot Water ‘PG’ Ultimate Factories Ferrari ‘G’ NGC 157 157 T.U.F.F. Puppy T.U.F.F. Puppy Power Rangers The Troop ’ ‘G’ SpongeBob SpongeBob OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Glenn Martin Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Arm. Iron Man: Armor NTOON 89 115 189 Trophy Hunt Best of West Outdoors Steve’s Outdoor Lethal Game Chasers Outdoors American Archer Ted Nugent Hunt Masters Fast and Furious Outdoor America Best of West FlyFishing OUTD 37 307 43 (5:15) ›› “The Joneses” 2009, Comedy-Drama David Duchovny, Demi Moore. iTV. The Borgias The Moor Rodrigo seeks Nurse Jackie Play United States of Aries Spears: Hollywood, Look I’m Smil- Fight Camp 360 Boxing Juan Manuel Lopez vs. Orlando Salido (iTV) SHO 500 500 Tara ‘MA’ Å Stealth marketers move into a wealthy neighborhood. ‘R’ funds. ’ ‘MA’ Å Me ’ ‘MA’ ing (iTV) (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å (4:30) NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Aaron’s 499, Qualifying NASCAR Perfor. AMA Supercross Special Seattle From Qwest Field in Seattle, Washington. (N) (Live) Formula 1 Debrief Formula 1 Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (4:10) “The Fast and the Furious” (6:05) ›››› “Toy Story” 1995 Premiere. ’ ‘G’ Å (7:26) ›››› “Toy Story 2” 1999, Comedy ‘G’ Å ››› “Toy Story 3” 2010 Voices of Tom Hanks. Premiere. ’ ‘G’ Å (10:50) › “The Ugly Truth” 2009 ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (3:35) “Shadow“Suck” 2009 Malcolm McDowell. Premiere. A rock ’n’ roll band (10:35) ›› “Doppelganger” 1993 Drew Barrymore. A writer’s ››› “The Times of Harvey Milk” 1984 Harvey Milk. Profiles the ›› “Nine” 2009, Musical Daniel Day-Lewis, Marion Cotillard. A famous director enTMC 525 525 heart” 2009 ’ slain San Francisco gay-rights activist. ‘NR’ dures creative and personal crises. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å will do anything to be famous. ’ ‘R’ Å new lover flees from her ghostly double. ’ ‘R’ NHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins (N) Hockey Central NHL Hockey Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks (N) (Live) Hockey Central College Football Notre Dame Blue/Gold Game VS. 27 58 30 Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Bodyguard” 1992, Drama Kevin Costner, Gary Kemp. ‘R’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 B3

CALENDAR TODAY GOAT JAMBOREE: Featuring classes, shopping and a raffle; $7 or $20 per family; 8 a.m.-3:15 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave.; 541-548-2226 or COGA2010@aol.com. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: With a silent auction; proceeds benefit band, choir, drama and orchestra programs at the school; donations accepted; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6360. EARTH DAY CELEBRATION AND GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help prepare the Common Table Community Garden, located behind the church; bring a dish to share and a shovel; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-5986029. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Waves Water Polo Club; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 1861 S.E. Autumnwood Court, Bend; 541815-7927. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www. nwxevents.com. COW PIE BINGO: Watch cows wander a grid set on the school’s soccer field, marking squares with droppings; with face painting, a petting zoo and more; proceeds benefit the Bend FFA Alumni; $5 per square; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-318-5778. AUTHOR LUNCHEON: Tatjana Soli reads from and discusses her book “The Lotus Eaters”; with a catered lunch; $35, $30 for those who purchase the book at the store; 11:30 a.m.; Between the Covers, 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766 or betweenthecoversllc@gmail.com. OREGON OLD-TIME FIDDLERS: Listen to fiddle music; a portion of proceeds benefits the community center; $5 suggested donation; 1-3 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. ISLAM 101: Rick Colby talks about basic beliefs and practices common to Muslims, and discusses the role of Islam in “Kapitoil”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541617-7040 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. DINNER FUNDRAISER: Spaghetti dinner, with an auction; followed by dancing and live music; registration recommended; proceeds benefit the Ladies Auxiliary fund for Cancer Aid & Research; $8 dinner, $6 or $4 for members for dance; 5:30 p.m., 7 p.m. dance; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-5484108. “HOT FLASHES”: A presentation of the musical comedy about a five-woman band in their 40s to 70s; proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society and Bend Relay for Life; $35 or $40; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. COMEDYCORE UNDERGROUND: Central Oregon comedians perform; ages 21 and older; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; ryan@thewhitebull.com or www.bendticket.com or www. comedycore.org. TRIAGE: Local improvisational comedy group performs, with musical guest Jumpin’ Joyce Respess; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. bendimprov.com. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring

performances by Five Pint Mary and Dahl and Roach, with a raffle; proceeds benefit Craig Richards, who has throat cancer, and his family; $10 suggested donation; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or asugirl1040@hotmail.com. ANDRE NICKATINA: The San Francisco-based hip-hop artist performs, with Mumbls, Endr Won, Maintain and Logy B; $23 plus fees in advance, $28 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com. GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV: The Colorado-based folk musician performs, with Fairchildren and Lo, and Behold; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit PoetHouse Art; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www. bendticket.com.

SUNDAY LIGHT OF HOPE: Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon hosts a 10K, 5K and 1K run/walk; proceeds benefit CASA; $30 or $20 for the 10K and 5K races, $10 for the 1K; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-1618 or www. casaofcentraloregon.org. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www. nwxevents.com. ECONOMIC MORALITY AND “KAPITOIL”: Timothy Duy talks about economic morality in “Kapitoil,” by Teddy Wayne, using the works of Adam Smith; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: Il Voce performs a vocal popera concert; $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org. LUAU FUNDRAISER: A buffet-style meal, with music by Bill Keale and art giveaways; proceeds benefit Feedin’ the People; $25; 5-9 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-420-6278. SAPIENT: The Northwest-based hip-hop artist performs, with IAMe, Northern Lights, Cast Iron and DJ Nykon; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

MONDAY SPOKEN WORD SHOWCASE: Students from Pilot Butte Middle School perform poetry, emceed by Jason Graham; free; 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or www. thenatureofwords.org. THE SWINGLE SINGERS: The pop a cappella group performs; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE PRESERVATION: The Austin, Texas-based roots-rock act performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend;

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

541-388-6868.

TUESDAY “HATCH, MATCH & DISPATCH — A CLOSER LOOK AT VITAL RECORDS RESEARCH”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Nancy Noble; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-8978,541317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/ deschutes/bend-gs. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: River Jordan talks about her book “Praying for Strangers”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134.

WEDNESDAY MOUNTAINSTAR 10-YEAR CELEBRATION: Featuring facility tours, a bounce house, face painting, food and more; free; 4:30-6 p.m.; MountainStar Family Relief Nursery, 2125 N.E. Daggett Lane, Bend; 541-322-6820 or www. mountainstarfamily.org. VOLUNTEER CONNECT BOARD FAIR: Learn about board service opportunities with nonprofit organizations; free; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-385-8977 or betsy@ volunteerconnectnow.org. FOX CENTRAL OREGON IDOL: Semifinal round for the singing competition; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-2121. PALEFACE: The acoustic anti-folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. “THE GRATEFUL DEAD MOVIE EVENT”: A screening of the documentary featuring legendary Grateful Dead concerts from 1974; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. THE ENVELOPE PEASANT: The indie folk act performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

THURSDAY BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. HOME AND BELONGING: Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad talks about identity and belonging, and how migration affects immigrants’ relationships with former homes; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FLAMENCO EN LAS AMERICAS: Savannah Fuentes performs traditional flamenco; $18 in advance, $23 at the door, $10 students, $7 children; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: The Philadelphia-based hip-hop band performs, with The Belle Brigade; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www. randompresents.com.

FRIDAY HOME AND BELONGING: Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad talks about identity and belonging, and how migration affects immigrants’ relationships with former homes; free; noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

“TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-5261491. ’80S PROM WITH RADICAL REVOLUTION: The band performs 1980s high-school hits during the dance; with a costume contest; ages 21 and older; $15; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “RED”: A screening of the 2010 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY April 23 REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; $5, $3 ages 11 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541480-4495. BACKYARD BAKE SALE: Proceeds benefit NeighborImpact’s food bank; free admission; 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Celebrate the Season, 61515 American Lane, Bend; 541-244-2536 or sandyk@neighborimpact.org. GREAT CLOTH DIAPER CHANGE: Participate in a worldwide attempt to set a record for the most simultaneous cloth diaper changes; free; 9-10 a.m.; Bambini of Bend, 1052 N.W. Newport Ave., Suite 102; 541-385-1806 or www.greatclothdiaperchange.com. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, CAPRICCIO”: Starring Renee Fleming in a presentation of Strauss’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. EARTH DAY FAIR: Featuring booths, volunteer projects, live music, craft and costume making, a parade of creatures and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; American Legion Park, 850 S.W. Rimrock Way, Redmond; www. redmondearthday.com. EARTH DAY FAIR AND PARADE: Includes interactive displays, art, live music and hands-on activities; the costumed parade through downtown Bend, featuring costumes inspired by the natural world, will kick off festivities; free; 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 10:30 a.m. parade staging; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-385-6908, ext. 15, info@envirocenter.org or www. envirocenter.org. SPRING CELEBRATION: Featuring Nepali food, a silent auction, live music, children’s activities and more; proceeds benefit Ten Friends; $10 suggested donation for food; 5:30 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-480-3114 or www.tenfriends.org. “TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL: A screening of a collection of action, environmental and adventure films about mountains; proceeds benefit Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School; $20; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by the High Country Dance Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3308943. THE SPIRIT OF POLYNESIA: Featuring traditional hula and Tahitian dancing, with Polynesian drumming; $12, $5 ages 12-4, free ages 3 and younger; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-633-8992.

M T REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

ARTHUR (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:45, 10:20 JANE EYRE (PG-13) 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:15 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10 OF GODS AND MEN (R) 11:25 a.m., 2:05, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) Noon, 2:40, 5:20, 8, 10:30 WIN WIN (R) 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:25

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

ARTHUR (PG-13) 1:15, 4:40, 7:50, 10:35 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (PG) 2, 4:55, 7:30, 9:50 HANNA (PG-13) 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:45

HOP (DP — PG) 1:25, 4:35, 7:20, 10:10 HOP (PG) 12:20, 3:20, 6:15, 9:20 INSIDIOUS (PG-13) 12:10, 3:05, 6:20, 9:55 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 12:05, 3:10, 7:55, 10:30 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 12:45, 3:45, 6:30, 10:20 PAUL (R) 1:50 RANGO (PG) 12:25, 3:25, 6:05, 9:30 RIO (G) Noon, 3, 6, 9:15 RIO (3-D — G) 1:05, 3:55, 6:40, 10:05 SCREAM 4 (R) 12:55, 3:35, 4:50, 6:50, 8:05, 9:40, 10:40 SOUL SURFER (PG) 12:35, 5, 7:40, 10:15 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 1:55, 4:15, 7, 9:25 YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 1:40, 4:05, 8:10, 10:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an

additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE KING’S SPEECH (PG-13) 6 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 9:15

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

ARTHUR (PG-13) 10:15 a.m., 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:30 HOP (PG) 10:45 a.m.,

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

Sheen, Warner Bros. sing different tunes about negotiations By Scott Collins Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — This is the level to which the Charlie Sheen case has sunk: The former sitcom star and his ex-bosses are slinging mud over whether they have even talked about him coming back to work. Sheen has been telling reporters that he has had “discussions” about returning to his role as irrepressible bachelor Charlie Harper on “Two and a Half Men,” the CBS sitcom smash from which he was fired after months of erratic behavior and drug-abuse treatment. Nonsense, says Warner Bros., the studio that makes the show. “There have been no discussions, there are no discussions, and there will be no discussions,

regarding his returning to or having any involvement with the series,” John W. Spiegel, a lawyer representing the studio, wrote in a letter sent to Sheen attorney Marty Singer on Thursday. But Singer told the website TMZ: “There have been discussions as late as Tuesday.” “Marty Singer’s comments speak the truth,” Sheen’s manager, Mark Burg, wrote to the Los Angeles Times in an e-mail. At this point, it’s impossible to say for sure whether there’s something here or this isn’t just more dust kicked up by Sheen and his handlers. What is clear is that CBS has to reveal its fall schedule in a month, by which time some decision on the future of TV’s No. 1 comedy will have to be made. And announced.

The Associated Press ile photo

Charlie Sheen appears onstage at his “Violent Torpedo of Truth” show at Radio City Music Hall in New York on April 8.

‘Love Triangle’ host has firsthand experience By Mesfin Fekadu The Associated Press

1:15, 3:45, 6:15, 8:45 RIO (PG) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15 YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

ARTHUR (PG-13) 2:45, 5, 7:45 HANNA (PG-13) 2:45, 5:15, 7:45 LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 3:15 RIO (G) 3, 5:15, 7:30 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 5:45, 8

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ARTHUR (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 1:10, 4, 7 RIO (G) 11 a.m., 1, 3:10, 5:30, 7:45 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

NEW YORK — Wendy Williams may be the perfect host for the new show “Love Triangle” — she says she once was involved in one. The 46-yearold acknowledges she’s dated two men at the same time while single and that Wendy it was “easy” Williams juggling them. The Game Show Network show features men or women involved with two people. Williams helps them choose one.

June

30

Friday

Love Triangle Where: Game Show Network When: Weeknights, 6 p.m.

She says the program “is an adult show” and that she doesn’t want “to hear about an 18- or 21year-old being in a love triangle.” She’s more interested in “that 35year-old who’s been seeing two people, sleeping with both but neither one knows about each other.” The talk show host has been married for 12 years and is the mother of a 10-year-son. Williams was eliminated from ABC’s “Dancing With the Stars” earlier this month.

Event calendar

Find out what’s going on in Central Oregon at www.bendbulletin.com/events. Easily searchable by date, city or keyword.

The Bulletin


B4 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 B5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Saturday, April 16, 2011: This year, you have more impact than you have experienced in many years. You also are setting up a new life cycle, and it could be a very fortunate one if you handle stress well. If you are single, many people would like to be your sweetie. You have quite the lineup of admirers! But who do you want? Be pro-active. If you are attached, the two of you can have a lot of fun, if you juggle your roles well. LIBRA reflects many of your issues. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You might be juggling two different interests regarding the same situation. What you wish and what seems possible could be in direct conflict with each other. Can you merge these interests? Do they have anything in common? Curb your temper. Tonight: Where the action is. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH Dig into a project, even if you feel semi-lazy. Just don’t add any unnecessary pressure. You need some time off as well. Share more of what is on your mind with a friend or loved one. This person’s support helps. Tonight: Remember, it is your Saturday night, too. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH You are very playful and full of fun. Lighten up when dealing with an older friend. You could be amazed by what you see. Remember what is ultimately important in your relationships. Allow the child within you out

when with a loved one. Tonight: Enjoying every single moment. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH You absolutely are a sign that adores your family, and often your deepest friends come from your family. A little argument doesn’t need to be anything else, if you play it smart. Know when to remain quiet. Let the other party regain his or her senses. Tonight: Laugh at confusion. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH The situation could be volatile if you are not careful. Make it easy for others to express their seemingly controversial feelings while at the same time let them know what you think and feel. Take an overview if possible. Tonight: Make sure you have company. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Curb a need to go overboard. You can enjoy yourself without an extravaganza. Understand what it takes to help someone relax. Your sense of humor comes out with a very close friend. You have a lot in common. Tonight: Treat someone to dinner. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Use the moment. Has there been someone you have wanted to speak to or share with? Make your approach, even if you have to deal with another person’s anger or a general attitude of confusion. You can and will get past the issue. Your sense of direction makes a big difference. Tonight: Do only what you want. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Take some time for yourself. You are a sign that gets into reflection. You know what you need. You could be pushed or handling more

responsibility than before. You might be angry as a defense to being hurt. Take some time to work through a problem. Tonight: Mystery works. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Happiness occurs when your friends surround you. Your creativity likes interacting and brainstorming. A child or new friend adds more spice and excitement to your plans. Enjoy the moment and let go of recent stress. Tonight: Where the crowds are. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Shore up some details with a boss or older relative or friend. Free yourself to go and be with the people you want to spend time with. Understand what is happening and that you might want to take the lead in an event. Tonight: A must appearance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Take another look at what is happening with a detached and/or non-triggered attitude. Use time as an ally. You need more space to make a solid decision. If need be, find an expert or two. Tonight: Where your mind can relax. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Deal with partners and friends individually. You could be overly tired and cranky. If that is the case, do yourself a favor — slow down and take a nap before having a hot discussion. The end results will be better. Tonight: Chat over dinner.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


B6 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Making a rural comeback: the old gravel road Funding cuts grind paved streets to dust By Pam Louwagie (Minneapolis) Star-Tribune

Pam Louwagie/ (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

Freeborn County Commissioner Glen Mathiason stands near a small stretch of County Road 30 that workers reverted to gravel because it was too expensive to maintain pavement on marshy ground in Minneapolis. Paved roads, a symbol of progress in rural America, have been getting turned back to gravel across the Midwest as governments face tight budgets.

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— Brian Ridenour, engineer, Allamakee County, Iowa

Political suicide

“It’s no fun going backwards,” said Ken Skorseth, a program manager for the South Dakota Local Transportation Assistance Program. “We’ve been through that already in South Dakota, so that shock is in the past for me. But my friends in Minnesota are facing it head-on right now.” In Minnesota’s Freeborn County, Sue Miller, the county engineer, has been warning county commissioners about the possibility in future years. The rising cost of maintaining 634 miles of road in her county presents “a pretty grim picture,” Miller said. She helped launch a study with the state Local Road Re-

search Board to come up with alternatives. The board is looking at what other states have tried, including putting additives into gravel to make it harder and more durable and building stronger road bases that can use just a thin layer of pavement. Miller has already presided over reversion on a small scale.

While that decision made easy engineering sense, returning other roads to gravel wouldn’t sit well with residents, said County Commissioner Glen Mathiason. A farmer who lives on a road paved nearly 40 years ago, Mathiason said commissioners would have to go through “a pretty lengthy explanation.” Skorseth has seen it play out

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Country residents driving cars and pickup trucks hate the gravel for its slushy texture in spring, the dust in summer and the washboard-like ridges that sometimes emerge.

Workers in her county tore up a 1,500-foot stretch of pavement that kept sinking on marshy land. It was simply too expensive to keep fixing.

wy 2 0

Poor reception

“I get a lot of calls. They’ll say, ‘Is this really your mission to close our roads or go to gravel?’ I’m like, ‘No, it is not.’ ... You’re forced to do these things; this is not something I’m promoting.”

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timated that 120 miles of pavement have been ground up or left to crumble back to gravel. Many rural roads are deteriorating faster than they used to because farm and industrial equipment are heavier than ever. Meanwhile, the cost of pavement has risen dramatically in recent years. Some engineers estimate it costs up to $300,000 to replace a mile of paved road surface now. Gravel isn’t free, but it’s far less expensive. With maintenance costs included, engineers have often used a rule of thumb that a road needs 150 to 200 cars a day, or the equivalent in heavy-weight traffic, to be worth paving.

Hwy

LANSING, Iowa — In the rolling countryside along the Minnesota border, the lonesome, dusty roads seemingly outnumber the people. So when Tony and Gertie Monat were looking for a place to live 14 years ago, they were happy to find a house with the bonus of a paved surface in front of it. Now that pavement has been pulverized. The county government couldn’t afford to resurface it, and the road in front of the Monats’ white rambler is back to soft gravel. Amid the regular swirl of dust and flying stones, they can’t help but feel they’ve lost a piece of modern life. “We definitely miss the hard surface,” Gertie Monat said. “I’m like, ‘How can you take that away now?’ ” The paved roads that finally brought rural America into the 20th century are starting to disappear across the Midwest in the 21st. Local officials, facing rising pavement prices, shrinking budgets and fewer residents, are making tough decisions to regress. In some places, they have even eliminated small stretches of gravel road altogether. In states like South Dakota and Michigan, the reversions are bringing substantial changes to the landscape. Minnesota has managed to mostly escape so far, but at a conference in Shoreview last month some engineers acknowledged changes might be looming. “In a way, this is a step backwards,” Otter Tail County Engineer Rick West told the group, as he kicked off the discussion about reverting to gravel. “But I think it’s reality.” Michigan has changed more than 100 miles of pavement to gravel. After one road was torn up a year and a half ago, the County Road Association of Michigan bottled the millings and asphalt and sent them to state legislators as a message. In North Dakota, a couple of stretches nearly 10 miles long have gone to gravel along with a sprinkling of smaller patches. County leaders are discussing more such changes, a transportation official there said. South Dakota may hold the distinction of being the most torn-up state in the Midwest. A state transportation official es-

many times in South Dakota: “To be bluntly honest ... it can be political suicide for an elected official unless they can clearly communicate convincingly the predicament that they’re in.” Minnesota has been able to escape large-scale reversion so far partly because the Legislature raised the state’s gas tax by 8.5 cents in February 2008, with the increase phased in through next year. Counties get part of that tax, plus property taxes and other small sources of income for their roads. Still, state and county transportation officials have warned it won’t be enough to keep up with maintenance demands. In Iowa, Allamakee County Engineer Brian Ridenour said things are more desperate because the state hasn’t passed a gas tax increase. He maneuvered his county pickup truck through the slushy roads on a thawing day recently, pointing out “there used to be a gravel road here” or “this used to be sealcoated.” With 900 miles of county roads for 14,000 residents, the budget is tight. A few years ago, faced with three aging bridges on the Upper Iowa River, the county decided to build just one new span to replace them. Some gravel roads leading to those bridges became farmland again. “I get a lot of calls. They’ll say, ‘Is this really your mission to close our roads or go to gravel?’ ” Ridenour said of local residents. “I’m like, ‘No, it is not.’ ... You’re forced to do these things; this is not something I’m promoting.” Once people learn the numbers, he said, they’re more understanding. To tear up a thinly paved road and add some new gravel, Ridenour said, costs his county about $5,000 a mile. Resurfacing can run about $100,000. Tony Monat said he understands why the quarter-mile of pavement leading up to his property was ripped up. At least the gravel is smoother than the patchwork of potholes he used to dodge. “I’d rather have concrete, but it’s just so expensive,” he said. “And really, why should everybody in the rest of the county help pay for my hard surface road?”

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 B7


C OV ER S T ORY

B8 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E-readers complicating book clubs

Bunco Continued from B1 Bunco initially became popular in the U.S. in the late 1800s, said Leslie Crouch, founder of the World Bunco Association. Gold miners in Northern California played it and bunco parlors popped up in San Francisco. By World War I, bunco was considered both a respectable game played by families and part of the gambling world, Crouch said. She believes the negative connotation to the word “bunco,” which dictionaries define as slang for a scam, grew out of its gambling connection. After the 1930s, however, interest in the dice game ebbed. It didn’t grow again, Crouch said, until recently.

By Richard Scheinin San Jose Mercury News

Survey: 17 million players in U.S. A World Bunco Association survey from 2006 found there were then 17 million bunco players in the U.S., and bunco-devoted websites have sprung up accordingly. For people seeking bunco groups, there is even Buncospace. com, where groups like the Portland Dice Maniacs and the Clackamas Women’s Bunco Mamas seek new players. Bunco typically involves 12 players seated at three tables. First, players start a round, which is to try to roll a number with three dice. The rounds go progressively — players try to roll ones, twos, threes, and so on. Players earn various points for different rolls. Then at the end of the round, players switch tables based on whether they won or lost more points than their opponents. A bunco is rolling three of a kind of the number up in that round. Each round keeps going until someone at the head table reaches 21 points. The game is fast-paced, with dice repeatedly clicking on three tables, a cowbell ring punctuating the starts and stops of rounds and players bustling among tables for seats like musical chairs. It all sounds complex. Yet once players sit down to roll, it’s exceedingly simple. That’s one reason for its return to popularity, Crouch said. Anyone can play, and they can probably chat and enjoy a drink at the same time. The ease of the game also lends itself to group events, Crouch said. Bunco is trendy for fund-

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Connie McCurdy, center, rolls the dice while playing a game of bunco with friends on Wednesday.

“I think it’s about the social interaction with women, being able to let loose and get away from it all.” — Leslie Crouch, founder, World Bunco Association raisers, like one that took place in Prineville in March to raise money for the Humane Society of the Ochocos. And the World Bunco Association’s 2010 Las Vegas Tournament, for instance, drew 2,000 players. Yet Crouch said the association’s 2006 market research shows that the largest bunco-playing demographic is women ages 35 to 55. “I think it’s about the social interaction with women, being able to let loose and get away from it all,” she said. And it’s surprisingly engaging. “I’m addicted. I’m absolutely addicted,” said Dutton, who during the first get-together had planned to just watch. “I think we all look forward to this.”

Flair for fun The women in Sines’ newly formed bunco club pay dues so the host of the month can pur-

chase prizes. Jenny Long, host of the March gathering, bought gift cards to Target and Backporch Coffee Roasters and small herb pots. The big prize — for the person with the most buncos — was a certificate for an hourlong massage. “Being that most of us are moms,” Sines said, “we’d love to go have a massage.”

Charity bunco The group also decided to have a charitable bent: The host picks a charity and each woman brings items for donation. Long selected the Humane Society of Central Oregon. After a social hour for dinner, the women got down to the business of bunco. They zipped among the tables, dashing to refill wine and water glasses along the way. They took turns holding 4-month-old Fisher,

who came to the gathering with mother, Cody Menasco. Yelling and cheers were regularly punctuated by the clang of the cowbell. The feather boa rotated among the women as somebody new rolled a bunco. The item donned for a bunco varies depending on who is hosting. Sometimes it’s a hat, the next month it might be a scarf. Not all the women knew each other beforehand, but they’re forming new connections along the way. McCurdy, who at 56 is the oldest in the club, said she knows what this group may mean to these women. McCurdy belongs to another bunco group that she joined when she first moved to Bend. She knew nobody when she came to town. That was 14 years ago now. “We’ve done baby showers and wedding showers,” McCurdy said of her experience. “We’ve really been there for each other. We’ve formed friendships.” H eidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

SAN JOSE, Calif. — Sandy Harris has long enjoyed laidback conversations about literature with the other members of her book club. Lately, though, technology is complicating the routine: “We’re definitely divided into the Kindle people and the not-Kindle people,” Harris says, alluding to Amazon’s popular digital reading device. Welcome to the changing landscape of book clubs, those ubiquitous living-room forums where dog-eared tomes often now share space with Kindles, Nooks, iPads, iPhones and other portable devices. Resentments simmer. Protocols are upended — and last December, Harris, a high school special-education teacher, wondered whether her group’s annual Christmas book swap was endangered, with so many members downloading e-books rather than buying old-fashioned hardbacks and paperbacks. The numbers of digital converts — like Harris, a Kindle user — keep multiplying in book clubs. Those who own the devices can digitally write comments about specific passages, save the locations and jump straight to them during discussions. There’s no need to carry bulky printed books while traveling, and precious shelf space is preserved at home.

Who needs a gadget? Yet, for many, there’s still something to be said for holding a book, savoring its yellowed pages, flipping ahead to see where the next chapter ends. And who needs a gadget, anyway, when passages can be marked by pencil or highlighter, and footnotes marked with a Post-it? Sometimes, a cultural divide pits old-school purists against the vanguard: “What is it that

disgusts me?” ponders Santa Cruz, Calif., book club member Mary Offermann, an artist who treasures “the heft, the feel, the visual pleasure of a well-designed book. “Well, ‘disgust’ might be too strong a word, but it is close,” she says, describing the “avidity with which, when we’re ready to discuss what book to read at our next meeting, my friends jump to their Kindles. It’s as though the other people aren’t even in the room.”

Digital advantage E-readers allow users to sprint online to the e-book catalog and instantly download a title at a fraction of the typical hardback’s cost — and even for less than many paperbacks. Busy members can read them almost anywhere, any time. Book club member Lauren Angelo reads an e-book on her iPhone while standing in line at the grocery store. Waiting for a friend at the gym, she reads it some more. And unlike some of her friends, tethered to less toteable “physical books,” Angelo will finish on time. “Reading on all my devices,” book club deadlines are never a problem, says Angelo. Angelo, whose club is a subgroup of the Parents’ Club of Palo Alto and Menlo Park, notes that, while she and other members read digitally, no one is “hidden behind electronic devices” at meetings. In fact, most members, even those owning e-readers, bring plain old books to their discussions, and Angelo enjoys perusing the supplemental materials often left out of digital versions: author interviews, discussion questions, critics’ quotes. “We transcend the medium,” she says. “When you boil a book down to its essence, it’s about the writing. It’s not about the physical package.”

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BUSINESS Spring eases produce shortage, see Page C3. OREGON Oregon medical board orders review of surgeon, see Page C8. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011

IN BRIEF Road work scheduled in Bend next week On U.S. Highway 97 from the Lava Butte to the S. Century interchange, southbound traffic will remain in a single lane on the far left side of the roadway. Northbound traffic will continue to be reduced to a single lane at each end of the project. An advisory speed of 45 mph will be posted through the construction zone. On U.S. Highway 20, construction will take place at the Revere Avenue intersection, with single-lane closures to take place on Revere Avenue. At the intersection of Greenwood Avenue and Third Street, construction will occur, though no lane closures are expected. At the intersection of Greenwood and 12th Street, the sidewalks and crosswalks will be closed. From 8 p.m. to 6 a.m., there will be single-lane closures in each direction on Greenwood. Work will also continue on Reed Lane and Badger Road, as crews install upgraded pedestrian crossing signs. All work is dependent on weather conditions.

Sisters water debate turns to fire safety

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Bend man arrested in heroin bust The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team announced the arrest of a Bend man suspected of heroin possession. Nathan James Block, 30, was arrested April 8 following a traffic stop on U.S. Highway 97 between Redmond and Madras. In a news release, CODE indicated detectives had been investigating Block for five months. Detectives seized approximately three ounces of heroin, scales, packaging materials, drug records and a small amount of methamphetamine, the release stated. Block was booked into the Deschutes County Jail on charges of possession of heroin. — From staff reports

More local briefing, plus news of record, on Page C2.

EVENT CLOSURE Bend Spring Festival The streets below are closed through 2 a.m. Monday.

Singer stabs self to death at cafe

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Sisters Public Works employee Josh Stotts, left, and Sisters Maintenance Supervisor Andy Duran rush to turn off the water supply as they try to determine the cause of a leak at Pine Meadow Ranch in Sisters on Wednesday.

Fire district chief backs plan for rate increase, citing hydrant concerns

Duran checks the chlorine gas level during a monitoring of pumphouse 1 in Sisters on Wednesday. The city has made major water infrastructure improvements in recent years, including a new well and pump.

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

SISTERS — The long-running debate over a proposal to hike water rates in Sisters took a new course when the chief of the Sisters-Camp Sherman Fire District backed the plan for safety reasons. In his letter to Sisters City Council, Chief Tay Robertson describes a March test of three hydrants that revealed substandard water pressure in some parts of town. The city’s water system is a patchwork of new and old pipes. It is the latter, some of which were installed in the 1940s, and Sisters’ oldest well that worry Robertson. Backers of a rate increase argue Sisters’ aging water system needs upgrades. Opponents, many of whom accept the need for better infrastructure, want to delay the rate hike until the economy recovers. Since the release of a 2005 water

study, the fire district has wanted system improvements, Robertson said in an interview. The city has made major water infrastructure improvements since the study was completed, in particular adding a new well and pump. This year, the city expects to complete pipe replacement projects around downtown and on Sisters’ western edge. Still, says Robertson, a problem remains.

“We’ve been watching them try to upgrade it, and we’re still not getting there,” he said. In his letter, Robertson writes that the city’s current water system fails to meet flow rates in the state fire code. The consequences of that are at least twofold: Insurance rates across Sisters could jump, and fighting a large fire could be difficult. Delaying changes will only make the system worse, he maintains. See Sisters / C7

The man who stabbed himself to death during an openmic night at a Bend coffee shop Thursday had only lived in Bend a short time, having moved from Alaska with childhood friends last summer. Kipp Rusty Walker, 19, was singing and playing an electric keyboard at Strictly Organic Coffee Co. when he took out a knife and began stabbing himself in the chest a little after 6:30 p.m. Bystanders attempted first aid while medics from the Bend Fire Department responded. Walker was taken to St. Charles Bend, where he died of his injuries. A.J. Pryzbyla, a friend of Walker’s from Anchorage and his roommate until a recent eviction, said he was about 10 feet from Walker when Walker stabbed himself. Walker had started teaching himself to play the piano about a week earlier, he said, and was playing a song he’d recently picked up. “It seemed like he was hesitant to finish, like he was rethinking what he was doing or something,” he said. “He finally finished, after five or 10 minutes, and stood up and turned to the crowd and went all-out.” Sgt. Chris Carney of the Bend Police Department said 10 to 15 customers witnessed the incident. “This is just one of those things that isn’t normal,” he said. “We don’t see this kind of activity — and we see a lot of activity, obviously. This is not the norm.” Terrence Mitchell, a classmate of Walker’s at Bartlett High School in Anchorage, said he only saw him a few times after they left high school. “I knew of him in high school, really quiet, shy guy that kept to himself but loved to skateboard,” Mitchell said. See Suicide / C7

Mt. Washington Dr.

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

La Pine park board 8 candidates vying for 3 seats candidates share goals on Jefferson’s MAY ELECTION water board By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

HOW TO CO N TAC T Your state legislators SENATE • Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Dist. 27 Phone: 503-986-1727 E-mail: sen.christelfer@state.or.us • Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Dist. 28 Phone: 503-986-1728 E-mail: sen.dougwhitsett@state.or.us • Sen. Ted Ferrioli, R-Dist. 30 Phone: 503-986-1950 E-mail: sen.tedferrioli@state.or.us

HOUSE • Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Dist. 53 Phone: 503-986-1453 E-mail: rep.genewhisnant@state.or.us • Rep. Jason Conger, R-Dist. 54 Phone: 503-986-1454 E-mail: rep.jasonconger@state.or.us • Rep. Mike McLane, R-Dist. 55 Phone: 503-986-1455 E-mail: rep.mikemclane@state.or.us • Rep. John Huffman, R-Dist. 59 Phone: 503-986-1459 E-mail: rep.johnhuffman@state.or.us

By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Jefferson County’s most contentious election this May is for three open seats on the Deschutes Valley Water District. Eight candidates, including two incumbents and two former members of the board, have applied. The positions are determined by overall vote with the three candidates receiving the most votes on May 17 being appointed to the board for four-year terms. The district provides water service from their source at Opal Springs to 5,000 residents of Jefferson County. About 1,000 of those accounts For full coverage are managed by the city of of this election, see Madras through a city utility www.bendbulletin with the remaining custom- .com/may17. ers in Culver, Metolius and rural Jefferson County paying rates to the water district directly. The district also serves as the water source for Culver-based water bottling company Earth2o. “One of the benefits of living out here is the quality of our water,” said Ed Pugh, general manager of the district. See Water / C2

MAY ELECTION

LA PINE — Janelle Fincher, 13, concentrated intently on her sketchbook Thursday, as she drew profiles of people’s faces during a class at a new after-school program. “It’s actually really cool because it doesn’t matter if you’re perfect or not,” Fincher said of the drawing class. The class, in a modular classroom at La Pine Middle School, is part of the program launched a week ago by the La Pine Park & Recreation District and Bend-La Pine Schools. Programs such as this are a big deal for the park district, which just two years ago was struggling to keep its facilities open and had to shut down an after-school program for teens.

For full coverage of this election, see www.bendbulletin.com/may17.

Stiles plans to resign position at DA’s office By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

The district got a fresh start when voters approved its tax base in 2009. Now, with major projects on the horizon, members of the community are excited to get involved with the district. Three seats on the board of directors are up for election on May 17, and there are contested races for two of them. See Park board / C7

Janelle Fincher, 13, discusses drawing projects Thursday during an after-school program organized by the La Pine Park & Recreation District and Bend-La Pine Schools. Rob Kerr The Bulletin

Former Deschutes County Sheriff Les Stiles announced plans to resign from his position with the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office on Friday, stating he has completed most of the work he set out to do when he joined District Attorney Patrick Flaherty’s staff in January. Stiles, who was sheriff between 2001 Les Stiles and 2007, was hired along with retired Bend Police Lt. Jerry Stone as a part-time investigator in January. At the time, Flaherty said the two men would relieve some of the pressure on detectives at local law enforcement agencies by taking on some of the long-term investigative work needed to prosecute cases. See Stiles / C7


C2 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Water Continued from C1 “The way we operate, with our business model, the water is available for a very reasonable price.� The Deschutes Valley Water District is unique in that it does not levy a tax on county residents. Water rates remain low because the district owns and operates a hydroelectric plant located on the Crooked River. That energy is sold to PacifiCorp and provides revenues of around $3.5 million to the district. The district charges residential users $18 a month for 700 cubic feet of water and brings in an additional revenue of $1.5 million through water services. That business model means the district is able to make improvements and repairs to their system without asking the public for a levy or bond. The last time a tax was assessed by the district was 1985 — the first year the power plant went into operation. Candidates for the three positions include two incumbents, Richard Avila and Eldon Barker, and six others: Bill Bellamy, Kenny Bicart, Carl Breazeale, Bob McConnell, Kevin O’Meara and Sig Skavtan III.

Richard Avila Avila, a 47-year-old farmer, was appointed to his position by the board last June. He served on the budget committee for the water district before the appointment and said he took a quick liking to the process of governing the district. “I would like to retain my seat as it’s been a good way to give back to the community,� Avila said. “I’ve learned a lot since I’ve been on the board, and I’m still learning. I’m getting really involved in the projects we have coming up, and I want to see them through.� Avila said his main focus if

re-elected would be to continue working on a fish ladder project at the power plant that is in its early stages.

Barker, an 81-year-old retired business owner and road worker, has served on the district’s board for 16 years. He said his goal moving forward is to keep the district operating efficiently. “We’ve run a pretty good district in my time there,� Barker said. “We want to provide the constituents with what they want — to keep rates low and provide an excellent product. The main thing is no taxes. We’re able to operate safe fiscally without them, and we want to keep operating in the black by doing that.�

son County Farm Bureau and as a member of the Jefferson County Fair Board. He said his government experience also includes stints as a lobbyist at the state level where he worked on gathering support for water rights in rural areas. “I know what’s going on with the district, and I know some of the issues coming up, and I hope I can help,� Bicart said. Bicart said he wanted to explore the relationship the district has with Earth2o, which pays 1 cent per gallon as a commercial customer. “They charge them more than they charge the rest of the public, and I know people feel pretty strongly about that on both sides,� Bicart said. “I want to have a talk about that and see if it’s an issue.�

Bill Bellamy

Carl Breazeale

Bellamy, a 62-year-old Realtor, has served in government for nearly three decades. Bellamy was a state representative from 1979 to 1988 and a Jefferson County commissioner from 1996 to 2008. He also served four years on the Central Oregon Community College board. Bellamy said after a short break from public service he is ready for more. “I have always had a real interest in the district and find it’s a wonderful source of water in the area,� Bellamy said. “When I was in the Legislature, I worked very hard on the bill that allowed districts to produce and sell electricity, which, when passed, allowed them to sell the electricity. I’m proud of that and have a real interest in it.� Bellamy also said he supported the fish ladder project being undertaken by the district.

Breazeale, 62, who has owned Metolious Market and Gas for 14 years, said he wants to bring a business mind-set to the board. “I have a background in retail and wholesale of 40 years and I think that can be of benefit to the board,� Breazeale said. “From the outside they appear to be operating pretty good, and I don’t want to go in there and micromanage anyone, but I think with my business traits I can bring something to the board.� Breazeale previously served for two years on the City of Metolius Planning Commission.

Eldon Barker

Kenny Bicart Bicart, a 64-year-old farmer and business owner, previously served as president of the Jeffer-

Bob McConnell McConnell, a 61-year-old manager at Central Electric Cooperative, has worked for electric utilities for over 40 years and said that experience can benefit the district. “I don’t have a big agenda, but I have a lot of experience and I believe that will be of use,� McConnell said. “The district has been run very well and it’s a solid economic driver for the community

with it’s resources. I want to see it continue as such but maybe with a little higher profile in community involvement. It’s a real gem for the community and it could maybe be marketed a bit better.� McConnell previously served for six years on Madras City Council.

Kevin O’Meara O’Meara, a 54-year-old business owner, is a Madras city councilor who was previously appointed to the Deschutes Valley Water District on a two-year term. He said his familiarity with the board will be useful. “I have experience with them and I’m familiar with what they’ve done,� O’Meara said. “I think they are heading down the right direction now and I would like to eventually pursue a secondary power plant in the area to provide additional funds.� O’Meara said if elected he will continue to serve on the city council.

Sig Skavtan III Skavlan, a 69-year-old retired customer service officer for Pacific Power, previously served on the district board between 1981 and 2005. He said he is running again because he still has an interest in the district and wants to keep it going on the same path. “I’m running because of my enjoyment with the previous 24 years,� Skavlan said. “When I first got to town, and started serving, the district was in a taxing situation. I was there when we built the power station and those were fascinating times. Still, there are always new challenges and as the district continues to grow I want to help keep the focus on running a squeaky-clean system as the district has in the past.� Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@ bendbulletin.com.

The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:52 p.m. April 14, in the 300 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:05 p.m. April 14, in the 2600 block of Northwest College Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 7:54 p.m. April 14, in the area of Sunflower Lane and the railroad tracks. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:38 p.m. April 14, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20.

DUII — Andrew Robert Tegland, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:29 p.m. April 14, in the 600 block of Southeast Third Street. DUII — Joseph John Castillo, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:35 a.m. April 15, in the area of Southwest Bond Street and Southwest Upper Terrace Drive. Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 7:44 p.m. April 14, in the 800 block of Southwest Seventh Street. Unlawful entry — Multiple vehicles were reported entered and arrests were made at 3:18 p.m. April 14, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:02 p.m. April 14, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Criminal mischief — An act of

criminal mischief was reported at 11:38 p.m. April 14, in the 2800 block of Southwest 13th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:12 a.m. April 14, in the 700 block of Southwest Deschutes Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 8:14 a.m. April 14, in the 1900 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Prineville Police Department

Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 6:14 a.m. April 14, in the area of Northeast Holly Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:45 p.m. April 14, in the area of Northeast McRae Court. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — Gasoline was reported stolen at 6:23 p.m. April 14, in the 52400 block of Skidgel Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:10 a.m. April 14, in the 17300

Apollo 16 launches into space on mission to the moon in 1972 The Associated Press Today is Saturday, April 16, the 106th day of 2011. There are 259 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY: On April 16, 1789, Presidentelect George Washington left Mount Vernon, Va., for his inauguration in New York. ON THIS DATE In 1862, President Abraham Lincoln signed a bill ending slavery in the District of Columbia. In 1879, St. Bernadette, who’d described seeing visions of the Virgin Mary at Lourdes, died in Nevers, France. In 1910, Boston Arena (now Matthews Arena) first opened. In 1917, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin returned to Russia after years of exile. In 1947, the French ship Grandcamp blew up at the harbor in Texas City, Texas; another ship, the High Flyer, exploded the following day. The blasts and resulting fires killed nearly 600 people. In 1960, shortly before midnight, rock ’n’ roll performer Eddie Cochran, 21, was fatally injured in a taxi crash in Chippenham, Wiltshire, England (he died the next day). In 1972, Apollo 16 blasted off on a voyage to the moon. In 1991, Sir David Lean, director of “The Bridge on the River Kwai,� “Lawrence of Arabia� and “Doctor Zhivago,� died in London at age 83. In 1996, Britain’s Prince Andrew and his wife, Sarah, the

T O D AY I N HISTORY Duchess of York, announced they were in the process of divorcing. In 2007, in the deadliest shooting rampage in modern U.S. history, student Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people on the campus of Virginia Tech before taking his own life. TEN YEARS AGO Israel launched an airstrike against a strategic Syrian radar station in Lebanon, killing three Syrian soldiers. The Oregonian of Portland won two Pulitzer Prizes. In breaking news reporting, The Miami Herald won for its coverage of the predawn raid by federal agents who took custody of Elian Gonzalez; the story also produced the breaking news photography award for Alan Diaz of The Associated Press. Michael Chabon won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay�; David Auburn won for his play “Proof.� Lee Bong-ju of South Korea won the 105th Boston Marathon; Catherine Ndereba of Kenya won the women’s race for the second consecutive year. FIVE YEARS AGO In his first Easter message as pontiff, Pope Benedict XVI urged nations to use diplomacy to defuse nuclear crises and prayed that Palestinians would one day have their own state alongside Israel.

ONE YEAR AGO The U.S government accused Wall Street’s most powerful firm of fraud, saying Goldman Sachs & Co. had sold mortgage investments without telling buyers the securities were crafted with input from a client who was betting on them to fail. (In July 2010, Goldman agreed to pay $550 million in a settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission, but did not admit legal wrongdoing.) TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Pope Benedict XVI is 84. Actor Peter Mark Richman is 84. Singer Bobby Vinton is 76. Denmark’s Queen Margrethe II is 71. Basketball Hall-of-Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is 64. NFL coach Bill Belichick is 59. Rock singerturned-politician Peter Garrett is 58. Actress Ellen Barkin is 57. Rock musician Jason Scheff (Chicago) is 49. Singer Jimmy Osmond is 48. Rock singer David Pirner (Soul Asylum) is 47. Actor-comedian Martin Lawrence is 46. Actor Jon Cryer is 46. Rock musician Dan Rieser is 45. Actor Peter Billingsley is 40. Actor Lukas Haas is 35. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The only graceful way to accept an insult is to ignore it; if you can’t ignore it, top it; if you can’t top it, laugh at it; if you can’t laugh at it, it’s probably deserved.� — Russell Lynes, American writer (1910-1991).

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Redmond woman arrested in car chase

Bend writer wins UO magazine contest

A car chase and foot pursuit led to the arrest of a Redmond woman Friday morning. Police said Kimberly Piercey, 53, was arrested on suspicion of felony attempt to elude a police officer, misdemeanor attempt to elude a police officer, and reckless driving after failing to stop when a police car signaled to pull her over. At 4:28 a.m. on Friday, a Redmond police officer attempted to stop a 1989 Honda sedan near the intersection of W. Antler Avenue and S.W. 27th Street in Redmond. The car, driven by Piercey, kept going through Redmond, eventually ending up westbound on U.S. Highway 126 toward Sisters. Deschutes County sheriff’s deputies joined the pursuit, and helped deploy tire deflation devices near the intersection of U.S. Highway 126 and Cloverdale Road. They stopped the car, and Piercey fled on foot before being caught.

A Bend resident is one of six winners of an Oregon Quarterly essay contest and will read at an event at the University of Oregon on May 4. Kim Cooper Findling, of Bend, won the open category of Oregon Quarterly’s Northwest Perspectives Essay Contest. She will read her essay, “The Friday’s Trilogy,� at a May 4 event. The event, which will take place in the Gerlinger Alumni Lounge at 7 p.m., will also feature readings from the other essay winners. The event is free and open to the public.

2nd Street Theater

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Self Referrals Welcome

Friday, April 29 & Sat., April 30, 2011 8:00 pm www.2ndstreettheater.com

541.312.9626

541-706-6900

20% off all Hummingbird Feeders

N  R POLICE LOG

L B  

Friday - Sunday, April 15-17

Spring River Road in La Pine. Oregon State Police

DUII — Monica Lynn Horton, 42, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:54 p.m. April 14, in the Southwest Seventh Street and Southwest Deschutes Avenue in Redmond.

Gifts for Mom and Mother Nature. Forum Center, Bend 541-617- 8840

www.wbu.com/bend


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www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,764.65 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +4.43 +.16%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages C4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Consumer prices rise .5% in March The cost of living for Americans rose in March, but the inflationary pressures were mostly limited to food and energy costs, a government report said Friday. While consumers are feeling the pinch at gas stations and grocery stores, economists emphasized that the March results were in line with the Federal Reserve’s view of the economy and should keep the policymaking board from raising its benchmark rate or ending its economic stimulus. The Labor Department said the Consumer Price Index rose 0.5 percent in March, matching a 0.5 percent rise in February. Gasoline and food prices accounted for almost three-quarters of the increase, but outside of those two areas, prices remained subdued. In the past 12 months, the index has increased 2.7 percent. The core index, which excludes food and energy, rose 0.1 percent in March, compared with a 0.2 percent rise in February. The core index rose 1.2 percent in the past 12 months.

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12,341.83 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +56.68 +.46%

1,319.68 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +5.16 +.39%

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Ten-year CLOSE 3.40 treasury CHANGE -2.30%

By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

The tardy but welcome arrival of spring weather is easing shortages of eggplant, tomatoes, romaine lettuce and other produce hit by a freaky February freeze from Florida to Texas and as far south as Mexico. After more than a month of shortages and higher prices for some winter produce grown in the southern United States and Mexico, Bend-area grocery stores and restaurants reported Friday that produce supplies and wholesale prices were beginning to level out due to the return of warmer spring weather and the arrival of more locally grown green-

house produce. “A week ago we had people coming in looking for eggplant, saying we were the only store in town that had it,” said Jesse Kamphuis, produce team leader at the Whole Foods Market on Bend’s east side. But that was last week, and things are looking up this week, he said. Kamphuis said the unusually cold Southern weather from mid-February and early March caused some temporary shortages and spikes in the prices Whole Foods Market paid for some produce, including eggplant, roma tomatoes and romaine lettuce. See Produce / C5

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

$42.566 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.905

By Michael J. de la Merced New York Times News Service

Ed Merriman / The Bulletin

Jesse Kamphuis, produce team leader at Whole Foods Market on Bend’s east side, stocks produce shelves with eggplant — one of several types of produce that shot up in price and were in short supply at some grocery stores in March and early April due to a late freeze in the Southern United States and Mexico.

Public employee unions woo airport screeners Marie LeClair, a screener at Logan International Airport in Boston for eight years, says it’s a stressful work environment. “We’re the black sheep of the federal government. There are no work-floor regulations for us, so when there’s an issue, management’s attitude is: ‘It’s our way or the highway.’ ”

C.J. Gunther New York Times News Service

Effort is largest of its kind in nation’s history By Steven Greenhouse New York Times News Service

Public employee unions may be taking a shellacking in Wisconsin and Ohio, but that has not discouraged the unions representing federal employees from vying to recruit 44,000 airport screeners. It is the largest unionization effort of federal workers in the nation’s history. By Tuesday, the screeners, employees of the Transportation Security Administration, are to finish casting their votes

on whether to unionize. Almost everyone agrees that they will choose to do so. That may seem surprising when so many public employee unions are being forced into wage freezes and paying more toward health coverage and pensions, and when they have become the target of widespread public criticism. Many Republican leaders say public employees should not be allowed to bargain collectively, asserting that it pushes up costs for taxpayers and impedes management’s flexibility.

What is more, they warn, letting airport screeners unionize could jeopardize national security if strikes and work slowdowns crippled airports and resulted in inadequate security checks. “FBI, CIA and Secret Service personnel do not have collective bargaining for good reason, and TSA personnel should be no different,” said Sen. Roger Wicker, a Mississippi Republican who sponsored a bill that would have stripped the screeners of the right to unionize. The Democratic-controlled Senate voted it down in February on a party-line vote. See Screeners / C5

What’s going up? Wilson Ave. 97

Goody’s factory

BUS 97

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What: Ice cream and chocolate factory, and store for Goody’s Candy Store Inc. Where: 1111 S.E. Division St., Bend Owner: Naseco, Sunriver General contractor: Clint Potter, Potter Construction Inc., Bend Architect: Charles Rowles, C A Rowles Engineering PC, Bend Contact: 541-385-7085 Details: Bend-based Goody’s Candy Store Inc. will soon move into an expanded building in the Scandia Square development in south Bend, which will contain a warehouse, an office, a retail store and a kitchen for the company. The new facility also will feature “a huge 8- or 9-foot cacao tree,” to give visitors an idea of the source of chocolate, said Goody’s coowner Jvon Danforth. Visitors will be able to stop by “an educational room where people can learn about the history of chocolate and ice

rd S

There were 35 single-family building permits taken out in the cities of Bend and Redmond, the rest of Deschutes County and Crook and Jefferson counties in March, 7.9 percent less than in March 2010, according to Don Patton, publisher of The Central Oregon Housing Market Letter and owner of Cascade Central Business Consultants. In the first three months of 2011, 93 permits were taken out, 17.7 percent March total fewer than in for Deschutes, the first three Crook and months Jefferson of 2010. counties 38 35 Bend 23 24

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& Johnson, Synthes said to be in talks

Eggplant, tomatoes, romaine lettuce back in supply after February freeze

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Number of Central Oregon building permits declines in March

$1485.30 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$13.60

Spring eases produce shortage Johnson

U.S., China will take part in risk analysis WASHINGTON — The United States and China agreed Friday to participate in a new international process that will review the risks that major economic powers pose to each other and to global growth and development. The deal, completed at a meeting of finance ministers from the Group of 20 nations, was hailed by several of those ministers as a milestone in efforts to increase China’s accountability to the concerns of other nations. The United States hopes the process will raise international pressure on China to stop increasing exports by keeping its currency artificially cheap. In return, the United States is likely to get a dose of strong international criticism for running up immense deficits to finance unaffordable levels of consumption. — From wire reports

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Division St.

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BEND Brosterhous Rd. Greg Cross / The Bulletin

cream, she said. “Basically it’s like a chocolate museum,” she said. “ It’s going to be really cool.” Several windows in the hallway revealing parts of the factory will allow the public to watch stages of production of the company’s products. After the renovations, the new facility will span 6,000 square feet, six times larger than the current building. The total cost of the project is

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Goody’s new building in south Bend will contain a warehouse, an office, a retail store and a kitchen. about $250,000, Danforth said. The property owner, Naseco, is funding the expansion, and Goody’s and Naseco are sharing the tenantimprovement costs. Construction on the expansion

started in March and should be complete by the end of April. The Danforths plan to be out of their current facility and open the facility to the public by June 1. — Jordan Novet, The Bulletin

Johnson & Johnson is in talks to buy Synthes, a Swiss-American medical equipment maker, for a deal potentially worth $20 billion, according to a person briefed on the matter. A sale would be among the biggest health care mergers in recent years and the largest ever by Johnson & Johnson. Discussions are continuing and may still fall apart, this person cautioned. Shares in Synthes closed up 6.2 percent Friday at 138.70 Swiss francs, amid speculation that the company was in talks for a potential transaction. The company’s market value as of Friday was about 16.5 billion Swiss francs ($18.5 billion). Representatives for Johnson & Johnson and Synthes were not immediately available for comment. A deal would be the latest in the health care sector, as medical companies seek to fill in holes in their businesses. Earlier this year, Sanofi-Aventis agreed to buy a biotechnology pioneer, Genzyme, for about $20.1 billion. Johnson & Johnson, the giant maker of health and consumer products, has long been seen as ready to strike a big deal. Analysts at Bank of America Merrill Lynch wrote in a research note last month that the company had a relatively low amount of debt, as well as $28 billion in cash and short-term investments and $14 billion in annual free cash flow. See Merger / C5

Mortgage woes still stalling Bank of America’s comeback By Ben Protess New York Times News Service

As big banks slowly shake off losses from the financial crisis, Bank of America provided another reminder Friday of how hard it is to shed the legacy of the past. Bank of America, the nation’s largest bank, reported that firstquarter earnings dropped 37 percent to $2 billion, reflecting the persistent burden of Countrywide Financial, the subprime mortgage lender it bought in 2008. Two days earlier, its rival JPMorgan Chase announced that profits rose 67 percent over the same period, despite continued problems in its mortgage lending unit. The different results between the two financial giants underscore the continued challenges that Bank of America’s chief executive, Brian Moynihan, faces as he tries to rebuild a company weighed down by a troubled mortgage business in an uncertain economy. “Other than the mortgage issue, Bank of America is having the same kind of recovery everybody else is,” said Chris Kotowski, an analyst at Oppenheimer & Co. In many ways, Bank of America and JPMorgan followed similar paths in the first quarter. Credit quality markedly improved, allowing the banks to release billions of dollars of reserves previously set aside to cover losses. Commercial lending is on the mend, and investment banking fees are rising. See BofA / C5


B USI N ESS

C4 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

The weekly market review New York Stock Exchange Name

Last

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A-B-C ABB Ltd 24.50 ACE Ltd 65.88 AES Corp 12.83 AFLAC 52.25 AGCO 51.92 AK Steel 15.35 AMB Pr 36.41 AMR d5.65 AOL 19.78 AT&T Inc 30.65 AU Optron 8.67 AbtLab 51.90 AberFitc u70.01 Accenture u54.67 Actuant 27.28 AdvAuto 63.84 AMD 8.27 AdvSemi 5.09 AecomTch 26.13 AegeanMP 9.16 Aegon 7.66 AerCap 14.60 Aeropostl 26.03 Aetna 37.43 AffilMgrs 104.41 Agilent u47.50 Agnico g 65.24 Agrium g 88.53 AirProd 91.82 Airgas 66.69 AirTran 7.37 Albemarle 58.15 AlcatelLuc u5.96 Alcoa 16.52 AllegTch 67.41 Allergan u77.00 AlliData 83.66 AlliBInco 7.63 AlliantEgy 38.83 AldIrish rs 3.26 Allstate 31.41 AllyFn pfB u25.85 AlphaNRs 55.13 AlpTotDiv 6.23 Altria u27.01 AmBev s 30.05 Amdocs 29.35 Ameren 28.83 Amerigrp 62.85 AMovilL 58.27 AmAxle 11.35 AEagleOut 16.03 AEP 35.46 AEqInvLf 12.36 AmExp 46.25 AmIntlGrp 33.46 AmOriBio 1.53 AmTower 50.58 AmWtrWks 28.67 Ameriprise 61.61 AmeriBrgn 39.59 Ametek s u44.79 Amphenol 53.03 Anadarko 80.42 AnalogDev 38.16 AnglogldA 49.30 ABInBev 61.54 Ann Inc u31.18 Annaly 17.41 Anworth 6.99 Aon Corp 52.47 Apache 122.40 AptInv 25.11 ApolloGM n 18.50 ArcelorMit 34.96 ArchCoal 33.74 ArchDan 34.83 ArcosDor nud21.36 ArmourRsd 7.24 ArrowEl 42.61 Ashland 56.83 AspenIns 28.14 Assurant 37.91 AssuredG 17.60 AstoriaF 14.73 AstraZen 49.34 AtlasEngy u25.95 AtlasPpln u36.30 AtwoodOcn 43.18 AutoNatn 32.95 Autoliv 70.43 AvalonBay 121.10 AveryD 41.85 Avnet 33.30 Avon 28.34 AXIS Cap 35.82 B&G Foods 18.76 BB&T Cp 26.53 BHP BillLt u99.80 BHPBil plc u82.20 BJs Whls 49.27 BP PLC 44.96 BPZ Res 4.61 BRFBrasil u19.82 BabckW n 31.38 BakrHu 70.48 BallCp s 36.79 BallyTech 37.15 BcBilVArg 11.97 BcoBrades 20.22 BcoSantSA 11.87 BcoSBrasil 11.61 BkofAm 12.82 BkAm wtB 2.33 BkIrelnd 2.03 BkMont g 64.52 BkNYMel 29.72 Barclay 19.68 Bar iPVix rs d27.55 BarVixMdT 55.65 BarnesNob 9.07 BarrickG 53.33 BasicEnSv 25.83 Baxter 54.96 BeazerHm 4.45 BectDck 83.45 Belo 7.97 Bemis 32.05 Berkley 31.67 BerkH B 80.89 BestBuy 28.85 BigLots 43.53 BBarrett 40.45 BioMedR 18.74 BlackRock 193.24 Blackstone 18.58 BlockHR 17.66 Boeing 72.60 Boise Inc 8.90 BorgWarn 71.98 BostProp u97.14 BostonSci 7.08 BoxShips nud11.30 BoydGm 8.99 Brandyw 12.19 Brinker 25.18 BrMySq 27.88 Brookdale 26.12

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BrkfldAs g 31.55 BrkfldPrp 18.80 Brunswick 23.95 Buckeye 62.60 Buenavent 39.21 BungeLt 72.07 CB REllis u28.91 CBL Asc 17.74 CBS B 24.34 CF Inds 129.98 CIGNA 44.48 CIT Grp 40.50 CMS Eng 19.28 CNO Fincl 7.30 CSX 76.66 CVR Engy 23.54 CVR Ptrs n d17.88 CVS Care 35.87 CablvsnNY 33.63 CabotO&G 53.50 CalDive 7.60 Calgon 16.84 CallGolf 6.76 Calpine 16.23 CamdenPT 58.35 Cameco g 28.46 Cameron 53.35 CampSp 33.84 CdnNRy g 72.70 CdnNRs gs 45.41 CapOne 50.03 CapitlSrce 6.93 CapsteadM 12.95 CardnlHlth 40.97 CareFusion 29.30 CarMax 33.20 Carnival 37.98 Caterpillar 107.21 Celanese 45.29 Cemex 8.86 Cemig pf 19.73 CenovusE 37.47 CenterPnt 17.88 CnElBras lf 15.40 CntryLink 40.03 ChRvLab u42.26 ChesEng 32.73 Chevron 106.24 ChicB&I 40.45 Chicos 14.85 Chimera 3.92 ChinaMble 46.88 ChinaSecur 4.32 ChinaUni u19.34 Chipotle u285.13 Chubb u61.87 CIBER 6.20 Cimarex 107.68 CinciBell 2.71 Cinemark 19.36 Citigrp 4.42 CliffsNRs 94.35 Clorox 69.64 CloudPeak 19.88 Coach 54.46 CobaltIEn 14.02 CocaCola u68.01 CocaCE u28.17 Coeur 31.30 ColgPal 81.81 CollctvBrd 21.84 Comerica 37.94 CmclMtls 16.27 CmtyHlt d31.90 CompPrdS 29.89 CompSci 50.05 ComstkRs 29.16 ConAgra 24.69 ConchoRes 102.10 ConocPhil 79.12 ConsolEngy 50.84 ConEd 50.71 ConstellA 22.03 ConstellEn 33.56 ContlRes 65.95 Cooper Ind 67.11 CoreLogic 17.90 CornPdts u52.29 Corning 19.77 CorpOffP 35.30 CorrectnCp 24.33 Cosan Ltd 12.14 Cott Cp 8.54 CousPrp 8.39 Covance 61.62 CovantaH 16.56 CoventryH 30.91 Covidien u53.80 Credicp 95.39 CSVS2xVxS d31.70 CredSuiss 43.80 CreXus d11.00 CrwnCstle 42.73 CrownHold 39.47 Cummins 105.13 CurEuro u143.69 CypSharp 12.09

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Name

Last

DomRescs 44.47 +.44 -.35 Dominos 18.06 -.08 +.01 Domtar grs 89.13 +.41 +.64 DEmmett u19.35 +.36 +.54 Dover 65.32 +.97 +.23 DowChm 37.78 +.85 -.74 DrPepSnap 38.31 -.35 +.85 DresserR 51.47 +.15 -1.84 DuPont 54.89 +.78 -.51 DuPFabros 23.47 +.07 +.07 DukeEngy 18.37 +.16 -.04 DukeRlty u14.46 +.38 +.86 DuoyGWat 3.87 +.02 +.65 Dynegy rs 5.75 +.02 +.02 DynexCap 9.58 -.20 -.45 ECDang n 19.41 -.09 -.93 EMC Cp 26.91 +.28 +.78 ENI u49.66 -.33 -1.58 EOG Res 111.04 +.32 -3.46 EQT Corp 47.00 +.16 -2.41 EastChm 98.66 +1.64 -1.33 EKodak 3.37 +.13 -.06 Eaton s 52.35 -.02 -1.91 EatnVan 33.04 +.38 +.01 EVTxMGlo 10.64 +.11 -.05 Ecolab 50.94 +.48 -.58 EdisonInt 38.72 +.52 +1.45 EdwLfSci s 83.95 +.05 +.89 ElPasoCp 18.28 +.02 +.56 Elan 7.88 +.17 +.01 EldorGld g 18.06 +.18 +.01 Embraer 32.31 -.02 -1.15 EmersonEl 57.55 +.14 -.20 Emulex 9.97 ... -.40 EnCana g 32.95 -.10 -1.44 EndvSilv g 11.98 +.19 -.39 Energizer 69.63 -.48 -2.23

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FrontierOil 29.71 Frontline d22.51

+.28 +.47 -.03 -1.04

G-H-I GMAC CpT 26.00 +.05 -.08 GMX Rs 5.83 +.20 -.31 GNC n u19.70 +.73 +2.15 GabGM rt d.21 ... -.04 Gafisa SA 12.78 -.20 -1.48 GameStop u26.40 +.99 +2.59 GamGld g u10.37 -.23 -.13 Gannett 14.80 +.33 -.02 Gap 22.47 +.24 +.22 GencoShip d9.68 -.25 -.80 GenCorp 6.69 +.07 -.20 GnCable u45.41 +1.29 +.91 GenDynam 71.88 +.42 -2.63 GenElec 20.04 +.04 -.15 GenGrPr n 15.44 -.01 +.53 GenMarit 2.27 -.01 -.10 GenMills s 37.35 +.30 +1.14 GenMot n d30.24 -.34 -1.28 GM cvpfB d47.25 -.16 -1.34 GenOn En 3.66 -.02 -.28 Genpact 15.28 -.32 -.42 GenuPrt 52.14 -1.87 -1.12 Genworth 12.26 ... -.73 GaGulf 37.50 +.08 -1.09 Gerdau 12.20 +.16 -.59 GiantIntac u8.38 -.02 +.72 Gildan u35.57 +.18 +3.20 GlaxoSKln 41.13 +.38 +1.21 GlimchRt 9.05 +.05 +.14 GblX Uran 14.86 +.07 -.59 GlbXSilvM 28.93 +.10 -1.94 GolLinhas 13.46 +.07 -.04 GoldFLtd 17.88 -.09 -.67

Name

How to Read the Market in Review Here are the 1,133 most active stocks on the New York Stock Exchange, the 830 most active on the Nasdaq National Market and 255 most active on American Stock Exchange. Stocks in bold changed 10 percent or more in price. Name: Stocks are listed alphabetically by the company’s full name (not its abbreviation). Company names made up of initials appear at the beginning of each letter’s list. Last: Price stock was trading at when exchange closed for the day. Chg: Loss or gain for last day of week. No change indicated by “…” mark. Wkly: Loss or gain for the week. No change indicated by … Name: Name of mutual fund and family. Sell: Net asset value, or price at which fund could be sold, for last day of the week. Wkly: Weekly net change in the NAV. Stock Footnotes: cc – PE greater than 99. cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. dd – Loss in last 12 mos. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - temporary exmpt from Nasdaq capital and surplus listing qualification. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. q – Closed-end mutual fund; no PE calculated. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi - Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd - When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c - Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i - Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r - Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. Mutual Fund Footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend.

Source: The Associated Press and Lipper, Inc. Sales figures are unofficial.

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MonstrWw 16.79 +.09 -.32 Moodys 35.86 +.39 +.56 MorgStan 26.98 +.19 -.27 Mosaic 73.85 -1.64 -4.56 MotrlaSol n 43.81 -.14 -.05 MotrlaMo n d23.75 +.53 -.28 MuellerWat 4.12 +.07 -.13 MurphO 74.35 +.68 -2.65 NCR Corp 18.78 +.09 -.27 NRG Egy 21.66 +.32 +.14 NV Energy 14.87 +.09 -.16 NYSE Eur 39.01 +.11 +.31 Nabors 31.34 +.73 -.22 NalcoHld 27.01 +.41 -.63 NBkGreece 1.68 -.02 -.12 NatFuGas 71.39 +.45 -3.00 NOilVarco 76.50 +.50 -3.13 NatRetPrp 25.66 +.23 +.10 NatSemi 24.12 +.01 +.08 NatwHP 43.50 +.69 +1.75 Navios 5.32 +.03 -.34 Navistar 65.87 +.06 -.76 NeuStar 26.15 +.05 +.40 NY CmtyB 17.02 +.06 -.24 NY Times 8.86 +.06 -.62 NewAlliBc 14.78 +.11 +.15 Newcastle 5.81 +.12 -.05 NewellRub 19.13 +.08 +.32 NewfldExp 71.10 +.92 -4.86 NewmtM 57.75 +.22 -.24 NewpkRes 7.03 +.14 -.44 Nexen g 23.21 -.15 -1.73 NextEraEn 55.12 -.04 -.88 NiSource 19.17 +.25 +.19 NielsenH n u28.02 +.36 +.99 NikeB 78.73 -1.35 +1.34 99 Cents u20.06 +.08 +.26

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PerkElm 26.71 Petrohawk u26.31 PetrbrsA 33.86 Petrobras 37.81 PtroqstE 8.51 Pfizer u20.53 PhilipMor u66.56 PhilipsEl 30.59 PhlVH 66.40 PiedmOfc 19.70 Pier 1 11.82 PilgrimsP 7.19 PimCpOp 19.00 PinnclEnt 13.02 PioNtrl 100.04 PitnyBw 25.51 PlainsEx 34.50 PlumCrk 42.37 PolyOne 13.29 Polypore 54.81 PortGE 23.87 PostPrp 38.40 Potash s 55.70 PSCrudeDS 40.54 PwshDB 31.17 PS Agri 33.89 PS USDBull d21.46 Praxair 103.15 PrecCastpt 144.09 PrecDrill u14.59 PrideIntl 42.04 Primerica 23.00 PrinFncl 31.40 ProShtS&P 41.35 PrUShS&P 21.09 ProUltDow 62.16 PrUlShDow 17.73

Name

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Pick up a copy of the most comprehensive visitor’s guide in Central Oregon: • The Bulletin • Oregon Border Kiosks • Deschutes County Expo Center • Bend Visitor and Convention • Other Points of Interest • Chambers of Commerce Bureau • Central Oregon Visitor’s Association This guide features a wide variety of informative maps, points of

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ArkBest 25.48 ArmHld 29.28 ArrayBio 3.05 Arris 12.62 ArubaNet 31.97 AscenaRtl 33.13 AscentSol 1.63 AsiaInfoL 18.98 AspenTech 14.95 AsscdBanc 14.81 athenahlth 45.00 Atheros 44.70 AtlasAir 65.11 Atmel 13.35 Autobytel 1.35 Autodesk 43.09 AutoData 52.12 Auxilium 23.00 AvagoTch 31.74 AvanirPhm 3.86 AviatNetw 5.15 AvidTch 21.39 AvisBudg 18.47 Axcelis 2.22 BE Aero 36.66 BGC Ptrs 9.12 BJsRest u42.19 BMC Sft 50.86 BallardPw 2.10 BannerCp 2.42 BeacnRfg 21.76 BebeStrs 6.46 BedBath u55.84 Biodel 2.22 BioFuelEn d.63 BiogenIdc u82.96 BioMarin 26.76 BioSante 2.08 BiostarPh d1.66 BlkRKelso 9.99 Blkboard 37.93 BlueCoat 28.36 BonTon 14.31 BostPrv 6.92 BreitBurn 21.38 BrigExp 33.58 Brightpnt 10.54 Broadcom 38.23 BroadSft n 43.31 Broadwind 1.40 BrcdeCm 5.86 BroncoDrl 11.00 BrklneB 10.40 BrooksAuto 12.22 BrukerCp 19.63 Bucyrus 91.20 BuffaloWW u59.27 BldrFstSrc 2.75 CA Inc 24.18 CDC Cp rs d2.82 CEVA Inc u29.96 CH Robins 76.64 CKX Inc 4.42 CME Grp 306.80 CNinsure 14.03 CTC Media 22.60 CVB Fncl 9.24 CabotMic 48.84 CadencePh 8.31 Cadence 9.80 CalumetSp 22.15

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D-E-F

Chg Wkly

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Chg Wkly

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B USI N ESS

Merger

PEOPLE ON THE MOVE Sean Leavitt joins Zolo Media as the newest member of its sales team. Leavitt has 36 years of experience in marketing, advertising, radio and television. Laura Furgurson has joined The Cascade School of Music as director of marketing and events. Furgurson has more than 20 years of experience in business management and marketing including owning and managing her own business. The Cascade School of Music, founded in 2002, offers group and individual music instruction and serves between 325 and 375 students per week in classes, ensembles and individual lessons. Melissa Sudduth has been named vice president of development at Kilns College, located in Bend. Melissa has a bachelor’s degree in broadcast journalism and political science, and a master’s degree in higher education administration. Kilns College is a Christian college offering a one-year biblical studies diploma and a one-year Bible and arts diploma. AAMCO of Bend has hired technician Rex Poppe. Poppe has an associate of science degree in automotive technology, Automotive Service Excellence certification and 23 years of experience. Mandy Long has been promoted to manager of the Wells Fargo Bank branch at 450 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive in Bend. Long is responsible for the customer service, sales, professional development and community involvement efforts of the branch’s 13 employees.

Screeners Continued from C3 At the same time, it is hard to see the benefit of a union for the screeners because federal employee unions, except postal workers, are generally not allowed to bargain over wages, health benefits or pensions, all of which are usually set by law. The air traffic controllers are represented by the National Air Traffic Controllers Association, which was founded in 1987, six years after President Ronald Reagan disbanded a previous air traffic controllers’ union for engaging in an illegal strike. But the Obama administration asserts that unionization will improve low morale and lead to better performance and service to the public from screeners, who have the often-difficult job of herding impatient passengers and deciphering X-rays.

Poor morale Many TSA workers are eager to have a union bargain for them over uniform allowances, parking and clearer rules on sick leave, work shifts, transfers to different airports and awarding promotions. And ask a few screeners about morale, and you will quickly get an earful. “It’s a tough place to work, and I’ve seen a lot of people leave because of the stress,” said Marie LeClair, a screener for eight years at Logan International Airport in Boston. “We’re the black sheep of the federal government. There are no work-floor regulations for us, so when there’s an issue, management’s attitude is: ‘It’s our way or the highway.’ ” Stacy Bodtmann, who earns $39,000 after nine years as a screener at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, said screeners “don’t have any voice on the job.” “People are very enthusias-

Melissa Sudduth

Mandy Long

Jo Ussery

Mike Sullivan

Myra Girod

John Snippen

Lester Friedman

Teresa Y. Riemer

Cascades Sotheby’s International Realty has added new agents to its Sunriver office: Keith Petersen, Dan Cook, Greg Barnwell, Jo Ussery, Mike Sullivan and Traci Kemnitz. Myra Girod also joins Sotheby’s at the Bend Old Mill office. John Snippen, a broker with Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, was recognized with the Coldwell Banker International President’s Circle Award for his 2010 sales production. The award goes to the top 8 percent of all sales associates and representatives worldwide in the Coldwell Banker system. Lester Friedman, broker with Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate, has been re-elected chairman of the Central Oregon Community College Budget Committee.

tic about a union,” she added. “People feel the union is going to change things and help improve morale, help with scheduling and training and pay issues.” Even though Congress sets their pay levels, many TSA employees hope a union will help change the agency’s system for determining how workers get raises, a system they say is opaque and riddled with favoritism. “What they’re looking for is fairness and transparency and not a workplace that is driven by favoritism or who you know,” said Colleen Kelley, president of the National Treasury Employees Union, which, along with the American Federation of Government Employees, is trying to woo the workers. Justin Bourque, a former Army corporal and now a behavior detection officer at Newark, said TSA workers were not treated with respect. “I was treated with more respect and more like an adult when I was in the military, where I had no rights,” he said, complaining that when a worker made a mistake, there was no effort to retrain, often just a blanket admonition not to repeat the error. “The management staff treats us like we’re children.”

Maintaining priorities The federal agency conducting the election has given each TSA worker a personal identification number, allowing votes by computer or telephone. The winning union will be announced Wednesday. Until February, the screeners had no right to unionize. But at that time, the agency’s administrator, John Pistole, reversed the stance of his Republican predecessor and gave TSA employees the ability to bargain collectively. He declared that they could bargain over policies on shifts, dress code, break time and awards, but not wages, benefits, job quali-

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 C5

Winning Over Anger and Violence has elected Teresa Y. Riemer as member of the board of directors. Win- Patti Wieland ning Over Anger provides services to resolve interpersonal violence, anger and destructive behaviors. Healing Reins volunteer Patti Wieland was honorably recognized by the organization’s instructors and staff for her contributions in the first quarter. Healing Reins Therapeutic Riding Center provides therapeutic riding experiences to children and adults with physical and emotional challenges.

fications, discipline standards or anything related to national security. Moreover, he declared that agency employees would not be allowed to strike or engage in a slowdown and would be fired for doing so. “The safety of the traveling public is our top priority and we will not negotiate on security, but morale and employee engagement cannot be separated from achieving superior security,” said Kristin Lee, Pistole’s spokeswoman. Still, many Republicans remain opposed to the idea of a screeners’ union. “Clearly the TSA’s first mission has to be to protect Americans, to protect the homeland and the people,” said Edwin Feulner, president of the Heritage Foundation. “Frankly, letting them unionize removes TSA employees’ focus in that area — into ‘Am I going to get short shortchanged on my coffee break?’ or ‘I don’t want to move from Dulles to Reagan Airport because that means more traffic for me?’ That’s all a distraction from what they should be focusing on.” Feulner noted that in 2006, airport screeners in Toronto conducted a slowdown by inspecting every piece of luggage by hand, creating such a snarl that management let 250,000 passengers through with minimal or no screening — a move a government investigation later found was a major security breach. But many airport screeners resent assertions that their unionizing would endanger national security. They note that the customs and border patrol officers who work alongside them at the nation’s airports are unionized.

Continued from C3 Johnson & Johnson has struck about six deals worth more than $1 billion since 1998. Its largest takeover to date was its $16.6 billion purchase of Pfizer’s consumer health care division in 2006. That same year, the company lost a bidding war for Guidant, a maker of stents and pacemakers, to Boston Scientific, which ultimately paid nearly $27 billion. In late December, Johnson & Johnson bid $2.4 billion for the shares in Crucell, a Dutch biotechnology company, that it did not already own. Although it is perhaps best known for making Tylenol, baby shampoo and many other consumer products, Johnson & Johnson has increasingly shifted more of its business to medical devices, which was its biggest source of sales last year at $24.6 billion. Among the division’s existing offerings are knee and hip replacements, as well as endoscopy and sterilization products and Acuvue contact lenses. Last year, the company struck a $480 million deal for Micrus Endovascular, a maker of catheters and other devices used to treat stroke victims. Johnson & Johnson also reportedly approached Smith & Nephew, a major British orthopedics company, about

Produce Continued from C3 Other grocery stores reported shortages and higher costs for bell peppers, green beans, avocados and cucumbers. “Our costs went up considerably for romaine lettuce,” Kamphuis said, reporting a 50 percent hike in the wholesale price. He said the wholesale prices also jumped about 25 percent for eggplant and around 50 percent for roma tomatoes. “I’ve heard instances of restaurants that stopped selling eggplant Parmesan, and stopped putting romaine lettuce in their Caesar salads,” Kamphuis said. Rich Jeffers, director of media relations for the Darden chain of restaurants, which includes Olive Garden, said the shortages of eggplants, tomatoes other produce didn’t have much effect because the company obtains produce from around the world, and when freeze damage hit supplies from the Southern United States and Mexico, the company simply brought in more produce from other winter growing regions around the world. “We have not had an issue of not being able to get eggplant or other produce,” Jeffers said. With surging consumer demand for organic and locally grown food, Matt Collins, marketing specialist with the Bend-area Whole Foods Market, said Whole Foods is offering low-interest loans to local growers to help them purchase seed, equipment, erect greenhouses and other projects to boost production. “We are doing the best we

a deal in December, but was rebuffed. Johnson & Johnson has run into trouble with some of its existing device businesses. In August, the company recalled two kinds of hip implants amid more than 400 complaints received by the Food and Drug Administration that the devices failed early in some patients, requiring new hip replacements. Synthes, which is based in West Chester, Pa., but is listed on the Swiss stock exchange, is a big manufacturer of implants to repair bone fractures, as well as surgical power tools. The company has consistently increased its revenue and profits annually, reporting about $3.7 billion in revenue and $907.7 million in net income last year. North America accounts for about 60 percent of the company’s revenue. Analysts at Morgan Stanley wrote in a research note Friday after The Wall Street Journal first reported the talks that a purchase of Synthes would let Johnson & Johnson productively spend cash held overseas and increase its global presence. The analysts added that the potential deal would likely entail “substantial” cost savings over three years. The largest shareholder in Synthes is its chairman and chief executive, Hansjorg Wyss, who with his family owns about 47.8 percent of the company.

can to carry as much local and organic produce as we can,” Collins said. “That way we are supporting the local farmers and the local community.” Jeff Nash of Erickson’s Thriftway in Bend said the store ran out of eggplant for about two weeks and still hadn’t gotten any in. “The biggest price spikes we saw from the freeze was for bell peppers, which went from $2 to $3,” Nash said. He said head lettuce prices also shot up to nearly $2 a head in late March and early April, but this week the price of bell peppers is back down to $2 and head lettuce prices have dropped down to a low of 88 cents as of Friday. The emergence of locally grown produce from farms and greenhouses in the past week or so has helped ease shortages and stabilize prices, Kamphuis said. Organic produce suppliers also appeared to be less affected by the Southern freeze, which tended to lessen the impact on Whole Foods, which he said sells 75 percent organic produce and 25 percent conventionally grown produce.

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Continued from C3 The two banks are even struggling in the same ways, with revenues declining in the first quarter. Both were hit by new government regulations that limited overdraft fees and other lucrative sources of income. And their home lending businesses continued to lose money, although loans were souring at a slower rate. At Bank of America, net chargeoffs for the quarter were $6 billion, compared with $10.8 billion a year ago. “We’re cautiously optimistic,” the departing chief financial officer, Charles Noski, said. Except for “our legacy issues, you have a business that has articulated its strength and we’re executing on it.” But Bank of America won’t be able to escape its mortgage woes anytime soon. Its problems are not unique. Like its peers, Bank of America is dealing with a wave of litigation and government investigations related to its mortgage business — albeit on a grander scale given its acquisition of Countrywide, once the nation’s largest mortgage lender. The bank put aside another $1 billion in the first quarter to cover claims linked to Countrywide. Compared with competitors, the bank has more loans on its books that are past due and nonperforming, according to a recent report by Oppenheimer. And it is unclear just how much liability the bank ultimately will face, a situation that continues to plague the bottom line. “With Bank of America, you’ve got this special asterisk: There’s no precedent to judge their exposure,” Kotowski said. “If not for that, I would be recommending the stock.” In a nod to its legal issues, Bank of America on Friday announced the creation of a new position, the global chief of legal, compliance, and regulatory relations. The bank named Gary Lynch, formerly of Morgan Stanley and the Securities and Exchange Commission, to fill the role. Lynch, the SEC’s enforcement director in the 1980s, carries clout on Wall Street and in Washington. Bank of America also said that Noski would leave his post after only a year to tend to “a serious illness of a close family member.” Noski — who will be replaced by Bruce Thompson, the bank’s current chief risk officer — will remain at the company as vice chairman. Shares of Bank of America closed at $12.82 on Friday, down nearly 2.4 percent.

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

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The weekly market review American Stock Exchange Name

Last

AbdAsPac 7.01 AbdAustEq 12.17 AbdnChile 21.58 Accelr8 3.56 AdeonaPh 1.22 AdvPhot 1.65 Advntrx rs 2.20 AlexcoR g 9.64 AlldNevG 39.11 AlmadnM g 4.53 AlphaPro d1.31 AmApparel .95 AmDGEn 2.15 AmDefense .15 AmLorain d2.01 Anooraq g 1.01 AntaresP 1.63 AoxingPh 1.95 ArcadiaRs .14 Armour wt .05 Augusta g 4.84 Aurizon g 6.78 AvalRare n u9.45 BMB Munai .93 Bacterin n 3.20 Ballanty 6.85 Banks.com .19 Banro g 2.83 BarcUBS36 u51.61 BarcGSOil 28.97

Chg Wkly ... -.08 +.27 -.06 -.51 -.02 +.03 -.01 -.26 +.14 +.01 +.16 -.01 ... -.07 -.05 -.02 +.08 +.01 -.01 -.06 -.11 -.29 -.01 +.19 +.06 +.00 -.06 +.07 +.31

+.03 -.25 -.46 -.01 -.57 -.08 -.14 -.14 -1.45 -.16 ... +.15 -.06 -.01 -.36 -.34 -.05 -.22 -.01 -.01 -.30 -.47 +.17 -.05 -.20 -.02 -.00 +.13 -1.10 -1.01

BiP Tin u77.97 +.98 +.17 BrcIndiaTR 72.00 -1.35 -1.14 BioTime 7.63 +.17 +.36 BlkMuIT2 13.05 ... -.22 BlkMunvst 8.90 -.02 -.14 Brigus grs 1.58 +.02 -.08 BritATob u84.34 +.62 +1.54 CAMAC En 1.83 -.19 +.36 CanoPet .51 ... -.08 CaracoP 5.23 +.02 +.02 Cardero g 1.89 -.01 ... CardiumTh .36 -.01 +.00 CelSci .70 +.01 +.05 CFCda g 23.28 +.32 +.28 CentGold g 55.67 +.67 +.67 CheniereEn 8.39 +.54 -.26 CheniereE 18.19 -.33 -.42 ChiArmM d2.06 +.01 -.33 ChiBotanP 1.51 -.02 -.09 ChiGengM 3.03 -.07 -.02 ChiMarFd 3.52 +.02 -.31 ChiMetRur 4.15 +.03 -.49 ChinNEPet 4.27 -.03 -.18 ChinaPhH 2.51 -.02 ... ChinaShen 6.26 -.19 +.55 ClaudeR g 2.35 -.03 -.23 CloughGEq 14.88 +.02 -.43 ClghGlbOp 13.39 +.10 -.24 Contango 60.27 -.74 -3.08 CornstProg 7.52 -.03 -.26 CornstTR 9.37 -.07 +.01 CornerstStr 10.40 -.15 -.07

CrSuisInco 3.63 CrSuiHiY 3.10 Crossh g rs 1.08 Crystallx g .14 CubicEngy .65 DejourE g .42 DenisnM g 2.38 DocuSec 3.43 Dreams 2.20 EV LtdDur 15.96 EVMuniBd 11.43 EllieMae n ud6.77 eMagin 8.06 EngyInco 29.54 EngySv wt .37 EnovaSys 1.04 EntGaming .29 EntreeGold 2.80 EvolPetrol 7.92 ExeterR gs 5.38 Express-1 2.16 ExtorreG g u7.29 FT WindEn 11.77 FortuneI .63 FrkStPrp 13.69 FrTmpLtd 13.15 FullHseR 3.99 GSE Sy 2.40 GabGldNR 18.85 GascoEngy .42 Gastar grs 4.60 GnEmp .46

+.01 +.01 ... +.00 +.05 +.01 +.02 +.03 ... -.04 +.05 ... ... +.15 -.02 +.04 -.01 -.03 +.10 -.02 ... +.06 -.11 ... +.09 +.03 -.04 ... +.11 +.01 +.10 +.02

-.01 -.01 -.12 +.01 -.01 -.03 -.11 -.50 -.04 +.11 +.01 ... -.42 -.06 -.03 -.15 -.03 -.15 -.03 -.12 -.04 -.37 -.02 -.02 -.11 -.03 -.20 +.03 -.31 -.05 -.11 ...

GenMoly GeoGloblR Geokinetics GeoPetro GoldRsv g GoldResrc GoldenMin GoldStr g GldFld GrahamCp GranTrra g GrtBasG g GtPanSilv g GugFront HKN HearUSA Hemisphrx HooperH HstnAEn Hyperdyn IEC Elec iBio iMergent ImpOil gs IndiaGC Innovaro InovioPhm Intellichk IntTower g InvVKAdv2 IsoRay Iteris

5.27 +.02 -.37 d.49 +.03 -.04 8.27 -.08 -.46 .67 +.01 -.05 1.74 +.05 -.02 28.85 +1.30 -.15 22.95 -.44 -1.21 3.02 -.01 -.08 .38 ... -.02 25.04 +.02 -.18 7.36 +.15 -.62 2.55 -.06 -.17 4.08 -.08 -.22 22.39 -.06 -.37 2.84 -.07 -.21 d.39 -.02 -.08 .48 +.01 +.00 .74 +.02 -.05 14.74 -.07 -.83 4.28 -.03 -.33 8.50 +1.41 +.57 3.40 +.25 +.61 u7.38 +.09 +.76 51.73 -.16 -3.25 .56 ... ... 2.24 -.11 -.58 1.04 -.03 -.10 d1.12 +.24 +.20 10.17 -.06 -.03 11.03 -.02 -.25 1.12 -.04 -.06 1.42 -.03 -.10

IvaxDiag .73 KeeganR g 9.26 KimberR g 1.78 KodiakO g 6.48 LGL Grp 13.04 LaBarg 19.05 LadThalFn 1.22 Lannett 5.56 Libbey 16.13 LongweiPI d1.64 LucasEngy 3.45 MAG Slv g 13.18 MGT Cap .25 MadCatz g 2.13 MagHR pfC 25.90 Medgenic n d4.20 Metalico 5.59 Metalline 1.12 MetroHlth 3.92 MexcoEn 12.61 MdwGold g 2.07 MincoG g u2.57 Minefnd g u15.60 MinesMgt 2.71 MtnPDia g 6.31 NTN Buzz .48 NeoStem 2.01 Neoprobe 4.03 NeuB HYld 14.33 NBRESec 4.16 Neuralstem 1.75 NevGCas u1.56

-.01 +.13 -.01 +.16 +.39 -.05 ... +.12 +.06 +.12 -.02 -.29 +.01 -.07 +.31 +.16 -.05 +.05 -.04 +.24 +.01 -.13 +.08 -.17 -.14 +.01 +.02 +.03 -.02 +.04 -.01 +.10

+.10 -.17 -.21 -.14 -.72 +.07 -.01 +.27 -.91 -.16 -.60 -1.30 -.03 -.04 +.53 -.14 -.48 -.10 -.49 -.29 -.06 +.01 +.29 -.38 -.19 ... +.21 +.03 -.31 +.07 -.32 -.02

Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NthgtM g NovaGld g NvDCmdty NuvDiv2 NuvDiv3 NICADv NvInsDv NuvInsTF NMuHiOp NuvREst NvTxAdFlt Oilsands g OpkoHlth OrientPap OrionEngy OrsusXel h PHC Inc Pacholder Palatin rs ParaG&S PhrmAth PionDvrsHi PionDrill PlatGpMet PolyMet g

Biggest mutual funds 6.33 .04 3.94 10.65 5.87 14.58 23.36 2.88 13.27 28.11 12.86 13.01 13.02 13.21 13.12 11.68 u11.20 2.37 .46 3.74 d3.83 3.90 .14 2.26 8.94 .93 3.21 3.30 u21.90 u14.95 2.16 2.06

-.21 +.00 -.17 -.18 -.31 +.03 -.36 +.01 +.05 +.24 -.01 +.05 +.02 +.04 -.01 +.12 +.17 -.03 +.04 +.04 -.09 +.04 -.00 -.01 +.14 +.01 -.15 +.04 -.06 +.57 -.01 +.04

-.35 ... -.44 -.84 -.76 -1.17 -2.56 +.13 -.49 -.00 -.13 -.06 -.13 -.21 -.01 +.02 +.21 -.01 -.02 -.01 -.28 -.08 -.01 -.31 +.20 -.04 -.77 +.05 -.04 +.28 -.11 -.05

Procera rs ProlorBio Protalix PudaCoal PyramidOil Quaterra g Quepasa RadientPh RaeSyst RareEle g ReavesUtl RELM Rentech RexahnPh Richmnt g Rubicon g SamsO&G SeabGld g SearchMed SearchM wt Senesco SinoHub Solitario SondeR grs SprottRL g SulphCo SunLink TanzRy g Taseko Tengsco TianyinPh TimberlnR

9.34 5.52 7.10 6.00 6.40 1.64 5.48 .38 u1.88 15.62 23.14 d1.53 1.18 1.19 u8.32 5.23 3.42 33.62 2.32 .28 .27 1.69 3.03 3.20 1.86 d.11 2.55 6.32 5.52 1.03 2.35 .98

+.14 -.72 -.28 -.46 -.04 +.46 ... ... +.01 -.35 -.01 -.19 -.06 -.60 +.03 -.05 +.02 +.01 -.52 +1.20 +.36 +.41 +.01 +.21 -.02 -.05 -.03 -.03 +.51 +.83 -.15 -.52 -.03 -.43 +.61 -.61 +.02 +.48 ... +.10 +.01 +.00 +.02 +.03 +.28 -.45 +.06 -.22 -.01 +.11 -.00 -.02 +.01 +.63 +.11 -.12 -.05 -.43 +.03 -.12 -.01 +.05 -.01 -.07

TrnsatlPet 2.94 TravelCtrs 7.03 TriValley .69 TriangPet 8.15 Tucows g .82 TwoHrb wt .37 UQM Tech 2.81 US Geoth 1.02 Uluru .07 Univ Insur 5.49 Ur-Energy 1.65 Uranerz 3.13 UraniumEn 4.09 VangTotW 50.09 VantageDrl 1.90 VantDrl wt .00 VirnetX 22.87 VistaGold 3.38 VoyagerOG 3.85 WalterInv 17.86 WFAdvInco 10.24 WFAdMSec 14.85 WFAdUtlHi 11.90 WstCopp g 3.86 Westmrld u16.06 WidePoint 1.15 WT DrfChn 25.47 WT Drf Bz u28.58 WizzardSft .19 Xfone 1.35 YM Bio g 2.74 ZBB Engy 1.26

-.02 -.07 +.01 +.14 +.00 +.01 +.04 ... -.00 +.08 -.01 -.07 +.06 +.02 +.05 ... +.13 -.09 -.04 +.01 -.04 ... +.07 -.18 +.31 +.02 -.02 -.03 ... -.01 +.22 +.02

-.13 -.07 -.11 -.48 -.04 +.00 -.09 -.02 -.00 +.03 -.09 -.16 -.10 -.39 -.10 -.00 -4.62 -.43 -.54 -.14 +.20 +.14 +.16 -.38 +.23 -.02 -.01 -.16 -.05 -.05 +.18 +.07

Name

Total AssetsTotal Return/Rank Obj ($Mins) 4-wk

PIMCO Instl PIMS: TotRet n American Funds A: GwthFdA p Fidelity Invest: Contra n Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk n American Funds A: CapInBldA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InstIdx n American Funds A: CapWGrA p Vanguard Admiral: 500Adml n American Funds A: IncoFdA p Vanguard Admiral: TotStkAdm n American Funds A: InvCoAA p Dodge&Cox: Intl Stk Dodge&Cox: Stock American Funds A: WshMutA p American Funds A: EupacA p Vanguard Instl Fds: InsPl n Frank/Temp Frnk A: IncoSerA p American Funds A: FundInvA p Vanguard Idx Fds: TotlIntl n American Funds A: NewPerA p

IB LC LG XC BL SP GL SP BL XC LC IL LV LC IL SP BL LC IL GL

136,166 67,270 63,411 60,842 59,258 58,420 55,597 54,608 54,296 51,453 49,590 45,650 44,807 40,310 39,416 37,574 36,439 35,114 34,777 33,932

+0.9 +3.4 +3.8 +3.6 +4.1 +3.3 +4.8 +3.3 +3.2 +3.7 +3.1 +5.2 +3.1 +3.8 +5.8 +3.3 +2.8 +3.5 +5.5 +4.6

12-mo

Min 5-year

Init Invt

Percent Load

NAV

+7.4/B +9.0/C +13.2/B +12.4/C +10.2/B +11.1/A +9.2/D +11.1/A +12.5/A +12.5/B +8.0/D +10.2/C +8.8/C +12.8/A +10.5/C +11.1/A +12.9/A +12.2/A +10.1/C +11.5/B

+52.2/A +13.1/C +25.5/A +16.9/B +23.6/B +14.0/A +24.3/B +13.9/A +25.4/B +17.5/B +12.7/C +18.9/B +0.8/D +13.1/C +27.1/A +14.1/A +35.6/A +21.7/A +17.4/B +31.4/A

1,000,000 250 2,500 3,000 250 5,000,000 250 100,000 250 100,000 250 2,500 2,500 250 250 200,000,000 1,000 250 3,000 250

NL 5.75 NL NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL 5.75 NL NL 5.75 5.75 NL 4.25 5.75 NL 5.75

10.97 31.82 70.37 33.29 51.68 120.80 37.30 121.65 17.32 33.30 29.15 36.93 113.77 28.76 43.37 120.81 2.26 38.83 16.43 29.88

G – Growth. GI – Growth & Income. SS – Single-state Muni. MP – Mixed Portfolio. GG – General US Govt. EI – Equity Income. SC – Small Co Growth. A – Cap Appreciation. IL – International. Total Return: Change in NAV with dividends reinvested. Rank: How fund performed vs. others with same objective: A is in top 20%, E in bottom 20%. Percent Load: Sales charge. Min Init Invt: Minimum $ needed to invest in fund. NA – Not avail. NE – Data in question. NS – Fund not in existence.


C6 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Nala is among the lucky dogs

I

t’s hard not to read about Nala, the pit bull-Labrador mix at the Humane Society of Redmond, without getting a warm, fuzzy feeling. Nala is, after all, a real success story.

Nala came to the Redmond society just about a year ago. Though she proved herself good with people, her dog skills were less positive, and she languished. When she saved a blind dog lost in the cold in December, she began getting the kind of attention it would take to place her in an appropriate home. Still, it took months to find just the right match. After an overnight visit last Tuesday, Nala became a full member of Janet Roberts’ family in Powell Butte. Nala was lucky. She got an extraordinary amount of publicity about her rescue of the blind cocker spaniel. Her shelter “family” was patient and worked to make her as adoptable as possible. Unfortunately, Nala’s tale is all too common. Local shelters have dogs aplenty, and most will never receive the kind of public attention that Nala got. That does not mean they won’t make good pets, however. All they need is some human to recognize their potential and adopt them. Central Oregon’s four shelters, in Bend, Redmond, Madras and Prineville, had almost 150 dogs available for placement as of Friday. The Humane Society of Central Oregon in Bend had the fewest, with just a dozen. The Jefferson County/Madras Humane Society had 30, the Redmond society had 49, and the Humane So-

About 4 million cats and dogs are put down in U.S. shelters each year. If you’re in the market for a new dog, keep those numbers in mind. ciety of the Ochocos in Prineville had about 50. There’s also All for Dogs Rescue of Central Oregon. It usually has 20 dogs for adoption on any given day. The dogs at these shelters and the rescue run the gamut of ages and breeds. With that many available, it’s hard to believe that all but the pickiest families can’t find the perfect pooch at the local shelter. About 4 million cats and dogs are put down in U.S. shelters each year. If you’re in the market for a new dog, keep those numbers in mind. Shelter dogs are not free — most shelters charge a fee for adoption — and new owners generally agree to have them neutered if that hasn’t already been done. At the same time, they’re far less expensive than purebred animals and are much less likely to come equipped with the genetic problems that can be associated with specific breeds. Moreover, they need homes in the way purebreds often do not.

FROM THE ARCHIVES Editor’s note: The following editorial from Aug, 7, 1980, does not necessarily reflect the views of The Bulletin’s editorial board today.

Neither idea is the answer Oregon’s current financial situation, and the resulting special session of the state’s legislature, has brought two old ideas to the surface once more. Oregon legislators should meet in annual session, one group holds. Supreme Court Justice Hans Linde, when he was a law professor, and State Rep. Dave Frohnmayer have suggested a full-time Senate meeting continuously throughout the year, and a part-time House of Representatives, meeting at regular intervals for short sessions. Neither idea really would help the present problem. First, the annual session idea. At first blush it sounds attractive, but as envisioned it would be no improvement over the present system. Most advocates point to California, where the Legislature meets for one year on budget matters and the following year on other matters. That would leave Oregon where it is now, with budget projections made as far as three years in advance, and with two-year budgets. It was that long lead time — state agencies now are estimating income and expenses clear out to June 30, 1983 — which was a good part of the cause of the

state’s current problems. Then there’s the Linde-Frohnmayer suggestion, and it isn’t much better. It would create a professional state Senate, composed of full-time members who would be able to get back home to check with the voters about as often as most members of the U.S. Congress do. As two of Oregon’s current four members of the U.S. House of Representatives have learned this year, that isn’t often enough. A parttime House would not be enough of a check against a full-time Senate. The real problem, however, with the Linde-Frohnmayer plan is that it would further the trend away from the Oregon tradition of citizen legislators. It’s hard enough now for a man or woman in business or the professions or with a job in which he or she hopes to advance to take off a full six months every other year, plus interim duties. It would be almost impossible to drop everything else for a full-year Senate term. That, it seems to us, would clear the way for a Senate whose members — to too great an extent — would owe their jobs to various special interest groups. It would, we think, lead to a Senate composed for the most part of members who owe their jobs to someone who has an ax to grind, whether that someone be a labor group or an industry group. That is not what most Oregonians would want.

My Nickel’s Worth No way to work I found Desera Nelson’s letter about at-will employment from April 6 very interesting, and just had to add my 2 cents’ worth. I am also a victim of this stupid and unnecessary law. This is the 21st century. This law needs to be changed. In my youth, being raised in the South, we were taught at an early age that if a person worked hard and showed up every day that the employee would be rewarded with raises and promotions. In today’s workplace that does not apply. The one that works hard and shows up every day stays at the bottom, because he gets the job done, and the person that sucks up to the boss gets the raises and promotions. It’s all backwards. Which brings to mind the example of the assistant district attorneys who are suing because they feel they have been dealt an injustice, because they were fired by the new district attorney. Too bad. Welcome to a right-to-work state. If they don’t like it, change the laws. I say welcome to reality. File for unemployment like the rest of us. Joseph Dial Redmond

All schools should be equal I was appalled to read some of the statements made by parents in regard to the proposal to redefine boundaries. A main concern expressed was the socioeconomic status of the children attending Pilot Butte Middle School. Is there really some notion out there that children of lower-income families are somehow less intelligent, unworthy of quality programs in the public school system than those of higher-income families? Why is the argument that higher-income children should have

the right to stay where the programs are of “higher quality” rather than that children of all income levels have the right to the same quality of education within the public schools? If parents are genuinely concerned that some of the programs their children may enjoy at one school will be missed at the other, then perhaps their energy would be better spent making sure that those are available for all children rather than a privileged few. Every child deserves such quality and opportunity for success. That is where efforts need to be focused, on making the schools equal and of the greatest quality for everyone, on both sides of town. Karen Sipes La Pine

Harmony at sno-parks My dog and I often ski the dozens of dog-friendly, groomed trails surrounding the Wanoga Sno-Park. We share these trails with the snowmobilers. I just wanted to thank the snowmobilers for being so courteous to us. Every snowmobiler we have ever encountered has slowed to a very safe speed and carefully maneuvered around us. Most give us a friendly nod and/or wave. Your good manners are most appreciated, and we try to reciprocate by getting out of your way as best we can. James Cagney Bend

Boundary disappointment From the recent middle school boundary change meeting, I would like to express my disappointment in the process. Below are my thoughts and opinions. The committee didn’t consider any other options besides 1B. They didn’t

appear interested in working to find a solution with a stronger consensus. The facilitator didn’t look at what the vote would be if those who were affected didn’t vote (it seemed to be an even split). The committee didn’t consider some other options that were presented at the last public forum (1B itself originated after a public forum). The vote was on a scale from 1 to 5 with 1 being “I’ll sabotage the process” and a 5 being “I think it is the best option.” 1B received an average slightly above an “I’ll live with it” vote. This isn’t a recommendation or a consensus. 1B creates an economically elite school in the district. If there were two options relatively equal on the main criteria, split evenly amongst the committee, why wouldn’t socioeconomic status be a contributing factor? I feel the process broke down recently. There was not a clear-cut recommendation. Also, it appears the committee was not created in a scientific manner and that it lacked equal representation amongst the Bend-La Pine District. “A strong school system is essential to a healthy community.” This is a quote from the superintendent message. I feel that the adoption of 1B will be harmful to the school system and, by extension, the community at large. Jay Kolar Bend

Recall time? I hear Obama is going for a second term! We can’t afford him. As for Patrick Flaherty, Deschutes County’s district attorney, we can’t afford him either. Is it recall time? David Taylor Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Possible solution for disclosure of concealed handgun licenses By Dennis R. Dietrich Bulletin guest columnist

G

ladys Biglor made some excellent points in her In My View piece published on March 5. She countered The Bulletin’s previously expressed support of public disclosure of the names of those holding concealed weapons licenses. She clearly pointed out that “Protection of their [licensees’] personal information is necessary for their safety.” Unfortunately, in its March 21 editorial, The Bulletin continued to support this disclosure. It criticized the House and our local representatives personally for passing the bill prohibiting disclosure, and encouraged the Senate to take “a more reasoned approach” to the issue. I can understand why The Bulletin has taken this position on the issue. The news media have a responsibility to their owners, stockholders and readers not only to accurately report the news and stimulate public discussion on is-

sues by publishing opinions, but to be a watchdog of public servants and government activities. The current dispute with the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office over requesting and receiving certain information, which has been regularly on the front page lately, is a good example of this role. And it is an important role, which The Bulletin generally does a pretty good job of filling. I can also readily understand Biglor’s position on this issue. She clearly points out the issue of the licensees’ safety. This is a very important aspect of this issue. She challenged The Bulletin to justify why “its belief that intrusion into the lives of Oregonians with licenses … is necessary.” Unfortunately, the Bulletin editorial on March 21 again failed to address this part of the issue. The Bulletin apparently places public disclosure first and foremost, and does not feel compelled to address the public safety side of the issue. All sides of such an

IN MY VIEW important issue must be addressed for any public dialogue to be productive in resolving the issue. People and organizations are readily labeled as “pro-gun” and “anti-gun.” In fact, all people and all organizations are the same: We are all “pro-safety” for ourselves and our families. What we disagree on is how we assure safety for ourselves and our families. Do we arm ourselves, or do we disarm ourselves while we attempt to disarm the criminals? Complex issues such as this often polarize people, but they ultimately require that a single decision is made at the legislative level. Hopefully the Senate’s “reasoned approach” to this issue will be the same as the House’s, because disclosure of the names of individual licensees makes those persons’ addresses and other personal information readily

available through an Internet or phone book search. Criminals can then use this information to target homes where firearms are present, giving them a great opportunity and motive to break into homes to steal valuable firearms. If such an event occurs and the homeowner is at home, a potentially violent confrontation will take place. All this will happen because law-abiding citizens’ names were made public to meet a perceived need of public disclosure. We do not need to place honest and lawabiding citizens’ lives in danger in the pursuit of public disclosure issues. Refusing to disclose personal information of licensees is not “secrecy,” as The Bulletin opined; it is respect and caring for the safety of our fellow human beings. There are thousands of people out there carrying a handgun without a license to carry it concealed. Why are so many people focused on intimidating and attacking those that do it legally by obtaining a license? They are

the good guys! If we want to do something to stop violence and show respect for law-abiding citizens, we need to focus on the bad guys. There is a possible solution to The Bulletin’s need to monitor the sheriffs’ process to decide whether to issue a permit. They could request information, but the names and addresses of licensees must be redacted from any information provided. This would protect the safety of the licensees and their homes, and allow monitoring of the activities of sheriffs’ departments. The Bulletin would, of course, have to pay the cost of providing the requested information in this way, but, if it is so important, that cost should be easily acceptable. Perhaps The Bulletin will consider this as a solution, and express support for such a revised bill in a subsequent editorial, editor’s column, or in an open letter to our state senators. Dennis R. Dietrich lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 C7

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N   Patricia Jean Hepperle, of Powell Butte Oct. 31, 1945 - April 13, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 N.E. 4th Street, Prineville, Oregon. 541-416-9733. Services: A Celebration of Life will be held 11:00 A.M. Monday, April 18, 2011, at Powell Butte Christian Church, 13720 S.W. Highway 26 Powell Butte, Oregon. Contributions may be made to:

Charity of your choice. There will be a memorial fund set up in Pat's name at the Yellowstone Boys' and Girls' Ranch, 2050 Overland Avenue, Billings, Montana 59102.

Sarah Colleen Powell, of Prineville May 7, 1945 - April 13, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A celebration of her life will be held on Sunday April 17, 2011 at 11:00a.m. at her home at 1799 SE Paulina Hwy., Prineville. Private burial will be held at Juniper Haven Cemetery, Prineville. Contributions may be made to:

American Cancer Society at 2350 Oakmount Way, Suite 200, Eugene, OR 97401 or by phone (800) 227-2345.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Lipscomb, 91, chemist who won Nobel New York Times News Service William N. Lipscomb Jr., a Harvard chemistry professor who won a Nobel Prize in 1976 for his research on the structure of molecules and on chemical bonding, died Thursday in Cambridge, Mass. He was 91. A protege of the two-time Nobel laureate Linus Pauling, Lipscomb was a pioneering researcher whose work on the chemical structure of boranes — compounds of boron and hydrogen — continued Pauling’s work at the California Institute of Technology in the 1940s. In terms of practical applications, boron compounds have shown some promise in radiation therapy for treating brain tumors. But mainly the work significantly advanced basic knowledge of the way atoms bond. As Lipscomb said: “For me, the creative process, first of all, requires a good nine hours of sleep a night. Second, it must not be pushed by the need to produce practical applications.”

Patricia ‘Pat’ Jean (Veit) Hepperle

Stiles

October 31, 1945 - April 13, 2011

Continued from C1 Friday, Stiles said he’s done only a limited amount of investigating over the past three months. Instead, he has primarily been studying the work flow and management structure of the District Attorney’s Office, security concerns at the courthouse, and information technology considerations as the office tries to move toward storing more information electronically. A news release issued by Flaherty on Friday made note of the projects Stiles had taken on, and said he had completed them “well ahead of schedule.” Flaherty wrote that he had anticipated savings created by Stiles’ efforts would free up funding for an expanded investigative staff. “Because of the efficiencies they would bring to our office, I had hoped that we could create two half-time DA investigator positions prior to the end of this fiscal year,” the release said. “Unfortunately, due to budgetary constraints faced by all county-funded departments, that was not possible.” Stiles will leave the District Attorney’s Office on or before May 1, two months before the start of the next fiscal year. In an e-mail Friday, County Administrator Dave Kanner wrote that the District Attorney’s Office had not requested funding for Stiles’ or Stone’s positions in next year’s budget. Stiles said he had an understanding with Flaherty as to what he would be doing before taking the job, and that his formal title was unimportant. “He had to plug me in somewhere, and so that’s what he called me,” he said. “Was it inaccurate? I did some of those things and some of those functions on an as-needed basis, but it was so mi-

Patricia (Pat) Jean (Veit) Hepperle was called home to her Heavenly Father, April 13, 2011. A Celebration of Life will held Monday, April 18, at 11:00 a.m., at the Powell Butte Christian Church, Powell Butte, Oregon Patricia ‘Pat’ She was born Jean (Veit) October 31, Hepperle 1945, in Lodi, California to Walter R. and Lydia (Rau) Veit. She was a total surprise to her parents as she has a twin brother. She always said they really tricked their mom, being born on Halloween. She attended school in Lodi and Elk Grove, California, and graduate from Elk Grove High School in 1963. She got engaged on graduation day and married on Thanksgiving, her parents 28th wedding anniversary, November 28, 1963, to her husband of 47 plus years. The week after graduating from High School she was employed by the Welfare Department of Sacramento County as a secretary. She worked for the welfare department for seven years at which time she and her husband adopted their son, and named him Darren. In 1972, she moved with her husband and son to a farm in Powell Butte, Oregon, where she resided until her passing. She made a wonderful farmer/ranchers wife even though she was a city girl. She helped with birthing pigs and feeding them, even getting a ride backwards on her name's sake, a mother pig. She helped with the cattle and even harrowing the fields -not too straight, but she would get the job done. She became quite mechanical repairing the wheel lines when Don was off on one of his many trips with the company he worked for. It always seemed that as soon as Don would leave, the cows would get out or one of the wheel line movers would break a chain, but she always got it handled. She worked side by side with her husband as youth sponsors for over 14 years and taught many kids how to water ski. She also had many bible studies with high school girls. Besides loving her Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ, and serving Him, her next priorities were her husband, son and grandchildren. She was always doing crafts with her granddaughters or mending something for one or more of her grandchildren. She was "Nana" to her grandchildren, and if something needed to be fixed in one way or another, Nana could do the job. If she couldn't fix it, nobody could. Pat is survived by her husband, Don; son, Darren of Flint, Michigan;, granddaughters, Destiny, Abbigail, and McKennah of Terrebonne, Oregon; granddaughter, Miranda of Rainier, Oregon; grandson, DJ of Flint, Michigan; and grandson, Darien of Alfalfa, Oregon; twin brother, Richard (Marcy) Veit of Cuppertino, CA; sister, Roberta Veit of Burbank, CA. Pat is preceded in death by her parents. In lieu of flowers please donate to your choice of charity. There will be a memorial fund set up in Pat's name at the Yellowstone Boys' and Girls' Ranch, 2050 Overland Avenue, Billings, Montana, 59102. Whispering Pines Funeral Home is assisting the Hepperle family with the arrangements. 541-416-9733.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Park board Continued from C1 The candidates all agree the district is headed in a positive direction, and they generally cited the same projects and programs as priorities. At the top of their lists is an extensive remodeling project at the La Pine Event Center, which is estimated to cost $1.7 million. The first phase, which will cost $500,000, is scheduled to start this summer and it will add a new heating system, a fire sprinkler system, natural lighting from a roll-up glass door, and improvements to make the building accessible to people with disabilities. Meanwhile, the district has launched a fundraising campaign with the goal of bringing in $40,000 in increments of $20 or more,for the event center and an after-school program, said district director Justin Cutler. So far, the district has raised $2,000. This summer, the park district plans to install the first preschool playground structure in La Pine, at the Finley Butte ball fields. “Currently, there’s no public preschool playground in La Pine,” Cutler said.

Sisters Continued from C1 “Our concern is that without upgrades, the water system will further degrade,” Robertson writes. All three recent tests showed flow rates above the base state requirements. At one fire hydrant, near the Edge of the Pines neighborhood, the flow rate was 1,891 gallons per minute. A hydrant near the city’s industrial section produced water at about 1,700 gallons per minute, as did a hydrant on Sisters’ western edge. According to the state fire code, a home of up to 3,600 square feet must be protected by a hydrant with a flow rate of at least 1,000 gallons per minute. Commercial buildings require at least 1,500 gallons per minute, a number that increases with factors that include the size and purpose of a structure. Dave Wheeler, fire marshal of the Sisters-Camp Sherman Fire District, said the results worry him. If a fire required two hydrants, the system could not handle the demand and so would not meet code, he said. Inside the Edge of the Pines the flow dips to 500 gallons per minute, an amount half of what

nor as to be, well, minor.” Efforts to modernize the office’s information technology systems stalled during the grand jury investigation into the release of personnel files to The Bulletin, Stiles said. During that time, it was difficult for him to have open conversations about network security with the county’s IT staff without being perceived as having a “hidden agenda,” he said, adding that relations have improved since the grand jury investigation was stopped. Stiles said he always anticipated he would only be working with the District Attorney’s Office for a short time. “If people made the assumption when Patrick brought me on that I was on for the long haul, they made an erroneous jump in logic,” he said. Calls to Flaherty and Pat Horton, hired by a management analyst by the District Attorney’s Office, were not returned Friday afternoon. While the district attorney did not request funding for the investigator positions in next year’s budget, his budget proposal covers other personnel changes. The proposal calls for the creation of one new job, a computer and network specialist to implement new case management software. And the proposal says that in response to Kanner’s call for departments to budget for a 4 percent cut in general fund money, the district attorney plans to eliminate one of two deputy district attorneys who work with juvenile offenders. “This reduction would cause a loss in services to the juvenile population,” according to the DA’s budget impact statement. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@ bendbulletin.com.

The district has plans to improve Rosland Campground, although Cutler is waiting to find out whether the district will receive a $142,000 grant that would fund the work.

Metcalf vs. Anderson

Paul Violi, 66, poet New York Times News Service Paul Violi, a poet with an easy, conversational style and satiric bent who reworked arcane historical verse forms and invented his own in poems that mimicked glossaries, errata slips, travel brochures and cover letters, died April 2 in Cortlandt Manor, N.Y. He was 66 and lived in Putnam Valley, N.Y. The cause was cancer, his wife, Ann, said. Violi began writing poetry under the influence of the New York School, sharing its interest in contemporary speech, the visual arts and the urban scene, but he soon embarked on his own wayward path.

Suicide Continued from C1 “He always was independent and had really good friends and was a cool guy.” Pryzbyla said Walker was known for keeping to himself but would open up to certain people. “He wasn’t as social as most others, but if you knew him well and how to communicate with him, talk about interesting things, you could communicate with him,” he said. “He didn’t like the day-to-day talk.” Pryzbyla said it wasn’t always easy to read Walker’s mood, but he suspects he was “done with life, sick of this world or something.” Rhonda Ealy, owner of Strictly Organic, said Walker

retired, but said he did maintenance work for 25 years at a park district in Modesto, Calif., and more recently at a Sunriver golf course. Keeping everything running smoothly at the park district would be a priority for Anderson, as would remodeling the event center. “I think it’s everybody’s (priority),” Anderson said of the event center. He also supports plans to improve Rosland Campground.

Incumbent Bob Metcalf, 36, and challenger Jerry Anderson, 68, are running for one of the seats on the park district board. Metcalf, a social studies teacher and football coach at La Pine High School, has served on the park district’s board for the past seven months, and said he’s probably served a total of two years on the board at various points in time. Metcalf said his top priorities are to renovate the La Pine Event Center, expand youth sports programs and continue working on programs in coordination with Bend-La Pine Schools. Metcalf cited his ties to La Pine as something that differentiates him from Anderson. Metcalf’s family moved to La Pine in 1982 and he attended La Pine schools. Anderson said that when he filed for election, he assumed no one else was running for that seat and he did not intend to run against Metcalf. Anderson is

The second contested race is between incumbent Sheila O’Malley, 50, who works at McDonald’s, and challenger Robert Ray, who owns Auto Parts Mart on U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine with his brother. O’Malley said she has served on the park board since the tax base was approved in 2009, and she walked door-to-door seeking voters’ support. “I have two kids in the district, and that makes me really want to see things happen for the district,” O’Malley said. She listed her top priorities as the remodeling of the event center, and getting grants to pay for improvements at Rosland Campground. O’Malley said it’s also important

the code requires, according to Wheeler. The district determines how many hydrants can be opened in one area by using two pressure measurements: static and residual. After a hydrant is opened, at least 20 pounds per square inch of residual pressure must be left in the system, Wheeler said. Near the Edge of the Pines, only one hydrant can be open under that standard. Only the hydrant test near the city’s northern industrial area showed two hydrants could be opened at once, according to the district’s tests. City Councilor Sharlene Weed recently was skeptical about Robertson’s letter, wondering what had changed since the 2005 water study, which deemed fire flow capacity “generally adequate.” But the report hedged on four-inch water lines — like those in the Edge of the Pines area — as having “low capabilities for fire protection.” The study concluded that such lines “need to be replaced because of age and service to residents, and will provide major benefit to fire capabilities throughout the City... the duration and reliability of adequate fire flows is limited, and continued growth will further

stress the system.” Sisters’ population probably has not grown much since the middle of the last decade, but construction continued apace for a few years after. City officials have said that building growth has put an increased pressure on the system. Beginning sometime around 2000, the city began issuing more than two dozen home building permits a year. The housing construction boom appears to have peaked in 2005. Between that year and 2008, Sisters issued a total of 296 home building permits, according to city data. In 2009, housing permits fell to just seven. For much of the last decade, commercial permits were being pulled at a fairly steady rate of between four and eight a year. In 2006, the year after the study, 29 commercial permits were issued. Construction apparently plummeted after that, with a total of 11 permits issued over the next three years. The new pipes should handle the city for decades to come, said Public Works Director Paul Bertagna. “All of these projects are replacing old, undersized water lines,” Bertagna said. “We want these lines to be in the ground for

O’Malley vs. Ray

“Index,” his most anthologized poem, consists of index entries, followed by page numbers, that hint at the bizarre life and career of Sutej Hudney, a painter and poet. “Arrested for selling sacks of wind to gullible peasants,” one entry reads. Another offers the following cryptic clue: “Dispute over attribution of lines: ‘I have as large supply of evils/as January has not flowerings.’” He published more than a dozen poetry collections, including “Splurge” (1982), “Likewise” (1988) and “Overnight” (2007), as well as the prose work “Selected Accidents, Pointless Anecdotes” (2002).

was not familiar to her staff, or to the many regulars who attend the open-mic night every Thursday. Two of the shop’s employees who witnessed the incident took the day off Friday, Ealy said, while two others returned to work. Nessa Parker said she went to high school with Walker and remembered “Kippy” as “one of the most amazing and nicest people I’ve ever met.” “He was the best skater in Anchorage, and anyone up here would agree,” Parker said. “I don’t think I’ve ever met anyone who had anything negative to say about him. He was loved and will definitely be missed.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

for the district to improve the Finley Butte baseball fields. The park district has also increased its transparency since the tax base was approved by posting budgets and other documents on its website, O’Malley said. Ray said his top priorities are the event center and Finley Butte projects. Ray said he simply wanted to run for a spot on the district’s board, and there is no particular reason why he chose to run against O’Malley. “I thought it was something good to do for the community, to get involved,” Ray said.

John Wurst A fifth candidate, incumbent John Wurst, 59, is running unopposed. Wurst said he’s most excited to work on Rosland Campground, and as a retiree he enjoys doing volunteer work for the district such as demolition and miscellaneous maintenance. “It’s what you’re supposed to do when you retire,” said Wurst, who worked as a property appraiser for Deschutes County and then in Haines, Alaska. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@ bendbulletin.com.

the next 30, 40, 50 years.” The state’s fire code does not address pipe sizes for water flow, but a city the size of Sisters would today probably install water pipes at least 10 inches wide, according to Jason Green, executive director of the Oregon Association of Water Utilities. The four-inch pipes in Sisters are made of steel or cement, and the newest of those dates to the early 1970s. Evaluating water systems has grown more complex since then, Green said. “Our attention to fire and safety has increased in the last 20 or 30 years,” Green said. The effect of Robertson’s letter on councilors is unclear. Weed, for example, remained unconvinced by his argument. She does not dispute that new pipes would improve the fire flow, but maintains the system is not at a crisis point. Installing new pipes in Edge of the Pines would cost the city about $459,000. To fund that, the city needs to raise rates, something Weed believes should be done once the economy improves. “If there was an emergency, I’d say ‘yes,’ ” Weed said. “If we don’t have to, let’s wait.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@ bendbulletin.com.


C8 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, APRIL 16 Today: Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers, mild, afternoon breezes.

HIGH Ben Burkel

58

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

61/35



61/40

54/30



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Mitchell

Madras

58/33

55/30

55/29

Chemult



 Missoula 51/31

Eugene 58/37

57/33

Boise

58/33

62/43

61/44

Eastern

53/30

Bend

Grants Pass

Idaho Falls

Elko

Christmas Valley

Reno

73/51

55/33

Scattered rain and mountain snow showers will be possible.

Crater Lake 43/31

59/41

65/38

Redding

57/32

69/46

San Francisco



 Salt Lake City

65/53

64/47



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

Moon phases Full

HIGH

LOW

Last

New

April 17 April 24 May 2

First

May 10

Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 52/41/0.73 . . . . . 50/37/sh. . . . . . 50/35/pc Baker City . . . . . . 47/30/0.03 . . . . . 56/34/sh. . . . . . 53/28/pc Brookings . . . . . . 51/46/2.54 . . . . . 54/45/sh. . . . . . 54/42/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 48/27/0.11 . . . . . 58/36/sh. . . . . . 56/30/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 56/45/0.45 . . . . . 58/37/sh. . . . . . 55/34/pc Klamath Falls . . . 49/34/0.20 . . . . . 57/37/sh. . . . . . 56/33/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 45/32/0.04 . . . . . 56/38/sh. . . . . . 54/31/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 50/31/0.16 . . . . . 56/29/sh. . . . . . 53/23/pc Medford . . . . . . . 53/44/0.19 . . . . . 62/46/sh. . . . . . 61/41/pc Newport . . . . . . . 52/45/0.83 . . . . . 51/42/sh. . . . . . 51/38/pc North Bend . . . . . 57/46/0.21 . . . . . 53/44/sh. . . . . . 52/39/pc Ontario . . . . . . . .54/33/trace . . . . . 64/43/sh. . . . . . 58/37/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 53/38/0.05 . . . . . 58/35/pc. . . . . . 59/36/pc Portland . . . . . . . 49/43/0.92 . . . . . 53/38/sh. . . . . . 53/36/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 54/37/0.03 . . . . . 54/34/sh. . . . . . 57/24/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 59/37/0.04 . . . . . 56/30/sh. . . . . . 56/26/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 59/46/0.28 . . . . . 60/46/sh. . . . . . 59/36/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 55/46/0.59 . . . . . 57/37/sh. . . . . . 54/34/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 54/31/0.02 . . . . . 56/32/sh. . . . . . 54/22/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 48/42/0.41 . . . . . 61/39/pc. . . . . . 57/35/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54/37 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.02” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 in 1985 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.19” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 in 1955 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.33” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.95” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.14” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.93 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.34 in 2004 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:50 a.m. . . . . . .6:39 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:19 a.m. . . . . . .5:03 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .5:51 a.m. . . . . . .6:28 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:08 a.m. . . . . . .7:03 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:20 p.m. . . . . . .6:09 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:29 a.m. . . . . . .5:35 p.m.

3

LOW

53 22

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Sunday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and cool. HIGH

52 21

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

Helena



57/31

Silver Lake

54/27

Calgary

53/38

Hampton Fort Rock





50/38

51/37

56/31

Crescent

49/23

Vancouver

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:21 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:50 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:19 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:52 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 6:39 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 5:08 a.m.

WEDNESDAY Partly cloudy and cool.

51 21

BEND ALMANAC

Portland

Burns

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 59° Redmond • 27° Burns

TUESDAY Partly cloudy and cool.

56 22

Seattle

Chance of rain and mountain snow showers.

Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of showers, LOW PM breezes.

NORTHWEST

50/30

Brothers

MONDAY

Expect scattered showers over most of the region today. Skies will be partly to mostly cloudy.

Paulina

La Pine 54/28

HIGH

33

Central

56/29

Crescent Lake

LOW

33/22

54/31

Sunriver

46/21

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of a few showers.

56/35

Camp Sherman 53/30 Redmond Prineville 58/33 Cascadia 54/34 57/34 Sisters 56/32 Bend  Post 55/32

Partly to mostly cloudy with a chance of showers.

60/39 59/38

Oakridge Elk Lake

57/33

53/32



39/24

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

SUNDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 38-107 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . 103-167 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 . . . . 155-178 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . 157 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . 86-103 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 . . . . . . . 203 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 50-132 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

. . . no report . . . . 175-270 . . . . . . . 122 . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . 46-86 . . . no report . . . . . . . . 78

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 50/38

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Calgary 33/22

S

Saskatoon 39/24

Seattle 51/37

Boise 62/43

Billings 54/35

• 96° McAllen, Texas San Francisco 65/53

Monarch, Colo.

• 5.77” Columbus AFB, Miss.

Salt Lake City Las 64/47 Vegas 86/66

Los Angeles 78/60 Phoenix 96/67

Honolulu 86/70

Anchorage 46/27

St. Paul 45/32

Oklahoma City 70/45

Juneau 48/29

Mazatlan 88/64

S

S S

Quebec 45/37

To ronto 49/40

Green Bay 43/34

St. Louis 53/44

Houston 81/53

Detroit 56/36

Buffalo

49/38

Columbus 57/41 Louisville 57/42

Halifax 46/31

Boston New York 46/42 52/48 Philadelphia 57/50 Washington, D. C. 61/50

Charlotte 70/46 Nashville 59/40

Little Rock 66/47

Dallas 73/49

Chihuahua 92/55

S

Portland 44/40

Kansas City 61/45

Tijuana 79/57

La Paz 93/59

S

Des Moines 56/36 Chicago Omaha 52/37 56/39

Denver 68/41 Albuquerque 78/44

S

Thunder Bay 35/23

Rapid City 55/33

Cheyenne 61/33

• 7°

S

Winnipeg 39/26

Bismarck 43/30

Portland 53/38

(in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Birmingham 68/44 New Orleans 78/53

Atlanta 71/43

Orlando 90/67 Miami 88/73

Monterrey 89/63

FRONTS

History, art societies may vie for Eugene post office building By Matt Cooper The Register-Guard

EUGENE — As a museum director, you know it’s time for a bigger building when you’re storing artifacts in an old bathroom. On a recent tour of the Lane County Historical Museum at the county fairgrounds, Executive Director Bob Hart displayed Exhibit A: a dark, dank bathroom now used to store an early 20th-century washing machine, antiquated photography equipment and enough clutter to make the room virtually inaccessible. Not exactly the Smithsonian. “It means deterioration of the very things you’re trying to protect,” Hart said. “We’re not exhibiting the best practices because of the limitations our facility has put on us.” Hart may have a solution. The museum’s historical society continues to eye the historic U.S. post office building for sale in downtown Eugene, and Hart recently got the blessing of the Lane County Board of Commissioners to go after the building. But his group and another would-be suitor still have a basic question to answer: Where will

they get the money? The U.S. Postal Service wants $2.5 million for the 70-year-old post office at Fifth Avenue and Willamette Street, a historic structure that is Eugene’s only art deco public building. The Postal Service would like to stay and lease back from a buyer part of the 32,000-square-foot building, but that’s not a requirement, spokesman Ron Anderson said. The county board voted unanimously recently to support relocation of the museum to the post office or another site, and to provide staff help if needed. The county could help the historical society by finding land trades beneficial to the group’s proposal to the Postal Service. Hart said he will spend the rest of the year analyzing the building and will determine by next March whether to pursue it, and whether there is federal or other money available to the project. The historical society could potentially raise the estimated $7 million needed to convert the building for museum use, Hart said. “We’re hoping for a lot of pro bono help on this,” he added. The $7 million doesn’t include

purchase money. But the historical society isn’t the only group eyeing the post office and looking for the money to buy it. The group POEM — Post Office Eugene Museum — is seeking partners and funding to convert the building into a fine arts museum that would house historical and contemporary Pacific Northwest art. “There is not a museum in this area that is specifically dedicated to being a depository and repository for the wealth of Pacific Northwest art,” said member Robert Long, a research administrator at the University of Oregon. “You have vibrant galleries and you have collectors and you have a lot of work that gets stored in people’s houses or in their children’s houses after they die.” The group — which can be found online at poempnw.wordpress.com — hopes to compete for state, federal and foundation dollars. But POEM is not competing with the historical society and has talked with the society about the best use of the structure, Long said.

Oregon Medical Board orders review of surgeon’s decisions By Tim Fought The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Oregon regulators said Friday a mentor will begin reviewing the operating decisions of a Portland neurosurgeon who figures in a Wall Street Journal investigation of Medicare billing and multiple spinal surgeries on the same patient. The Oregon Medical Board released an agreement Friday it said was necessary while it completes an investigation of Dr. Vishal James Makker. He signed the order. The board said it got “credible

information” this year about four patients but gave no other details. It did not refer to two recent stories in the Wall Street Journal that have said Makker’s name “popped up” when it searched the Medicare claims database for surgeons who performed multiple spinal fusions on numerous patients. The Journal has reported that Makker had the highest rate of multiple spinal-fusion surgeries among 3,407 surgeons who performed the procedure on 20 or more Medicare patients in 2008 and 2009.

In those years, the paper said, he did spinal fusions on 61 patients, and for 16 performed a total of 24 additional fusions. He denied wrongdoing, telling the paper he acted in the best interest of the patients and attributing multiple surgeries to failures of spinal implants and referrals from doctors who don’t accept Medicare patients. He said he is “the dumping ground for Medicare patients, especially the difficult ones that everyone knows are going to be difficult to fix with one or even two surgeries.”

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .74/53/0.00 . . .77/54/s . . 89/62/pc Akron . . . . . . . . .70/42/0.00 . .59/38/sh . . 55/38/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .53/32/0.00 . .48/43/sh . . 58/32/pc Albuquerque. . . .68/43/0.00 . . .78/44/s . . . 81/47/s Anchorage . . . . .50/26/0.00 . . .46/27/s . . . 48/30/s Atlanta . . . . . . . 72/56/trace . . .71/43/t . . . 76/53/s Atlantic City . . . .54/41/0.00 . .53/46/sh . . . 64/45/s Austin . . . . . . . . .83/65/0.00 . . .82/45/s . . 84/65/pc Baltimore . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .59/49/t . . . 66/47/s Billings. . . . . . . . .55/31/0.00 . .54/35/sh . . .47/31/rs Birmingham . . . .67/59/0.77 . . .68/44/s . . 74/48/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .32/28/0.39 . . .43/30/c . . .42/28/rs Boise . . . . . . . . . 58/41/trace . .62/43/sh . . 58/36/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .46/37/0.00 . . .46/42/c . . 60/45/sh Bridgeport, CT. . .52/43/0.00 . .46/44/sh . . 61/44/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .47/32/0.00 . . .49/38/r . . . 45/34/c Burlington, VT. . .41/26/0.00 . .48/43/sh . . . .52/31/r Caribou, ME . . . .32/19/0.00 . . .47/27/s . . . .46/32/r Charleston, SC . .78/55/0.00 . . .80/54/t . . . 76/54/s Charlotte. . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .70/46/t . . . 72/47/s Chattanooga. . . .66/51/1.72 . . .64/43/c . . 72/48/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .48/29/0.00 . 61/33/pc . . 65/35/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .51/37/0.24 . .52/37/sh . . 57/43/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .72/46/0.05 . . .57/41/r . . 63/46/pc Cleveland . . . . . .58/40/0.00 . .58/38/sh . . 54/39/pc Colorado Springs 59/31/0.00 . 64/38/pc . . 68/39/pc Columbia, MO . .65/48/0.81 . . .56/40/r . . 67/49/pc Columbia, SC . . .81/52/0.00 . . .77/49/t . . . 76/49/s Columbus, GA. . 81/55/trace . 76/48/pc . . . 77/51/s Columbus, OH. . .76/47/0.00 . .57/41/sh . . 59/46/pc Concord, NH . . . .54/29/0.00 . . .48/38/c . . 58/35/sh Corpus Christi. . .90/71/0.00 . . .83/59/s . . 83/72/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .74/57/0.00 . . .73/49/s . . 80/64/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .71/44/0.00 . .55/39/sh . . 59/45/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .57/31/0.00 . 68/41/pc . . 71/43/pc Des Moines. . . . .47/41/0.61 . 56/36/pc . . 59/42/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .51/36/0.00 . .56/36/sh . . . 51/43/c Duluth . . . . . . . . 36/28/trace . . 39/27/rs . . 43/25/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .77/51/0.00 . . .85/56/s . . . 88/57/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .42/15/0.00 . . . .44/2/s . . . 45/16/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .37/30/0.29 . . .41/25/c . . 41/30/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .59/21/0.00 . . .70/32/s . . . 67/34/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .52/33/0.00 . .55/34/sh . . 49/37/pc Green Bay. . . . . .43/34/0.00 . .43/34/sh . . 49/31/pc Greensboro. . . . .73/47/0.00 . . .71/48/t . . . 70/48/s Harrisburg. . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . .54/47/r . . 60/43/pc Hartford, CT . . . .57/41/0.00 . .49/43/sh . . 61/40/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .55/26/0.00 . .57/33/sh . . 54/32/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .81/73/0.06 . . .86/70/r . . . 84/71/s Houston . . . . . . .85/73/0.01 . . .81/53/s . . 82/67/pc Huntsville . . . . . .63/57/1.43 . 64/42/pc . . 70/47/pc Indianapolis . . . .62/48/0.07 . . .53/39/r . . 61/45/pc Jackson, MS . . . .77/67/0.40 . . .73/46/s . . 79/56/pc Madison, WI . . . .46/35/0.22 . .46/33/sh . . 54/34/pc Jacksonville. . . . .82/56/0.00 . . .87/58/t . . . 78/52/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . 48/29/pc . . . 49/31/s Kansas City. . . . .59/43/0.85 . 61/45/pc . . 68/49/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . .54/33/sh . . 49/37/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .78/51/0.00 . . .86/66/s . . . 87/67/s Lexington . . . . . .67/51/0.37 . . .56/41/r . . 64/46/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .52/35/0.80 . 59/41/pc . . 62/42/pc Little Rock. . . . . .72/57/0.10 . . .66/47/s . . 75/55/pc Los Angeles. . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .78/60/s . . 68/57/pc Louisville . . . . . . .68/56/0.21 . . .57/42/r . . 64/47/pc Memphis. . . . . . .78/57/0.66 . 65/47/pc . . 76/56/pc Miami . . . . . . . . .88/74/0.00 . 88/73/pc . . 88/73/pc Milwaukee . . . . .44/36/0.62 . .47/36/sh . . 54/36/pc Minneapolis . . . .49/38/0.00 . . .45/32/c . . 50/36/pc Nashville . . . . . . .61/55/0.84 . . .59/40/c . . 73/50/pc New Orleans. . . .85/75/0.00 . . .78/53/s . . 78/62/pc New York . . . . . .56/45/0.00 . .52/48/sh . . 65/45/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .53/45/0.00 . .52/48/sh . . 66/45/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .63/48/0.00 . . .72/54/t . . . 70/51/s Oklahoma City . .62/47/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . 79/59/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .49/37/1.46 . 56/39/pc . . 60/42/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .84/65/0.00 . 90/67/pc . . 86/63/pc Palm Springs. . . .90/57/0.00 . . .96/67/s . . . 94/64/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .58/46/0.31 . .51/38/sh . . 61/45/pc Philadelphia . . . .57/46/0.00 . . .57/50/r . . . 64/46/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .88/58/0.00 . . .96/67/s . . . 95/68/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . .59/41/r . . 57/41/pc Portland, ME. . . .45/31/0.00 . 44/40/pc . . . .56/39/r Providence . . . . .51/39/0.00 . . .49/44/c . . 60/43/sh Raleigh . . . . . . . .76/49/0.00 . . .76/49/t . . . 73/49/s

Yesterday Saturday Sunday Yesterday Saturday Sunday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . . .55/33/c . . 53/34/sh Savannah . . . . . .78/57/0.00 . . .82/54/t . . . 76/56/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .65/40/0.00 . . .69/46/c . . . 68/43/c Seattle. . . . . . . . .53/38/0.09 . .51/37/sh . . 50/36/pc Richmond . . . . . .71/43/0.00 . . .70/50/t . . . 72/48/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .39/34/1.24 . . .45/30/s . . 49/35/pc Rochester, NY . . .44/32/0.00 . . .48/40/r . . . 48/34/c Spokane . . . . . . .45/34/0.10 . 55/31/pc . . 49/29/pc Sacramento. . . . .74/46/0.00 . . .74/53/c . . . 72/49/c Springfield, MO. .59/43/0.89 . 60/39/pc . . 71/51/sh St. Louis. . . . . . . .69/50/0.81 . . .53/44/r . . 68/49/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . 86/67/pc . . 84/64/pc Salt Lake City . . .58/32/0.00 . 64/47/pc . . 67/46/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .86/47/0.00 . . .93/59/s . . . 92/61/s San Antonio . . . .83/65/0.00 . . .84/53/s . . 84/68/pc Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .50/45/0.39 . . .67/48/s . . 77/59/pc San Diego . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .75/58/s . . 67/58/pc Washington, DC .65/48/0.00 . . .61/50/t . . . 67/49/s San Francisco . . .65/49/0.00 . . .64/52/c . . . 64/52/c Wichita . . . . . . . .47/42/0.08 . . .66/46/s . . 75/51/pc San Jose . . . . . . .71/47/0.00 . 72/52/pc . . 69/53/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .48/31/0.10 . 58/30/pc . . 57/30/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .65/29/0.00 . 71/37/pc . . 75/39/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .90/57/0.00 . . .97/65/s . . . 95/64/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .61/41/0.00 . . .59/44/c . . 62/45/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .65/49/0.00 . .62/51/sh . . 55/48/sh Auckland. . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .65/57/r . . 65/59/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .91/64/s . . . 93/66/s Bangkok . . . . . . .93/79/0.00 . 94/77/pc . . 95/78/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .78/52/s . . 65/45/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . 78/59/pc . . 82/64/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . . .59/40/s . . 60/42/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .63/54/0.31 . . .61/53/r . . 63/53/sh Budapest. . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . 60/44/pc . . . 62/40/s Buenos Aires. . . .68/52/0.00 . . .70/53/s . . 72/53/sh Cabo San Lucas .88/64/0.00 . . .89/61/s . . . 87/60/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .91/66/0.00 . . .94/69/s . . 100/70/s Calgary . . . . . . . .32/23/0.00 . .33/22/sn . . .32/18/sf Cancun . . . . . . . .84/73/0.00 . . .85/74/s . . . 86/74/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .59/46/0.00 . 60/43/pc . . 62/44/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . 57/42/pc . . . 60/45/c Geneva . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .62/40/s . . . 65/40/s Harare . . . . . . . . .79/55/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . . 80/56/s Hong Kong . . . . .84/72/0.00 . 86/74/pc . . . .82/73/t Istanbul. . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . .56/44/sh . . 58/48/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . 83/57/pc . . . 89/59/s Johannesburg . . .68/50/0.07 . . .63/53/t . . . .63/51/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .75/64/0.00 . 75/64/pc . . 73/63/pc Lisbon . . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . 76/55/sh London . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .61/47/sh . . 62/47/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . 72/45/pc . . 70/47/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .93/76/s . . . 93/77/s

Mecca . . . . . . . . .97/81/0.00 . 98/76/pc . 100/75/pc Mexico City. . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .79/54/t . . . .80/53/t Montreal. . . . . . .37/25/0.00 . .49/40/sh . . 48/36/sh Moscow . . . . . . .46/32/0.00 . 51/35/pc . . . 52/36/c Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .80/59/t . . 78/56/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .90/75/0.70 . 87/74/pc . . . .84/74/t New Delhi. . . . . .97/73/0.00 . 97/73/pc . . 95/74/sh Osaka . . . . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . . .65/45/s . . . 65/43/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . 59/38/pc . . . 62/42/c Ottawa . . . . . . . .39/25/0.00 . .50/40/sh . . 48/36/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . 65/45/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .88/75/0.00 . . .91/75/s . . . 89/74/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.82 . .63/44/sh . . 65/45/pc Santiago . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . . .73/46/s . . . 73/44/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/66/0.00 . 85/68/pc . . . 80/65/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . .52/38/sh . . . 52/34/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .63/45/0.00 . . .65/40/s . . 65/41/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . 70/55/pc . . . 72/54/s Singapore . . . . . .90/79/1.29 . . .89/75/t . . . .88/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .55/32/0.00 . . .56/41/c . . 59/42/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . .68/60/sh . . 68/59/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .86/70/0.00 . .81/72/sh . . 79/69/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .79/50/0.00 . 81/59/pc . . . 86/61/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .72/61/0.00 . .73/52/sh . . . 63/47/s Toronto . . . . . . . .43/30/0.00 . .49/40/sh . . 48/34/sh Vancouver. . . . . .50/32/0.50 . 50/38/pc . . 48/36/pc Vienna. . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . . .63/42/s . . . 64/41/s Warsaw. . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . 60/39/pc . . 62/40/pc


S

NHL Inside Tampa Bay blasts Pittsburgh, see Page D6.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 2011

L O C A L LY OSU volleyball coach to speak Tuesday in Bend Terry Liskevych, head volleyball coach at Oregon State University, will be the featured speaker at an Oregon State University-Cascades Campus Science Pub lecture event on Tuesday. The presentation — “Sports in our Society: Does it Build Character or Characters?” — will take place in Father Luke’s Room at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in downtown Bend. Doors open at 5 p.m. Food and beverage service begins at 5:30, and the presentation is set to begin at 6 p.m. Admission is free, but RSVP is required at info@osucascades.edu or 541-322-3100. Liskevych, who has coached at OSU in Corvallis since 2005, also has coached the U.S. Olympic women’s volleyball team and the USA national team. In his lecture, he will provide an analysis of sport worldwide, from youth sports to the Olympic and professional levels, and he will suggest a collegiate model that would change the landscape of the present system. He also will present an overview of athletics at OSU and a glimpse into the life of an OSU volleyball player. For more information, go to OSUcascades.edu/sciencepubs. — Bulletin staff report

Take the Central Oregon golf survey The Bulletin would like to know what golfers think about golfing in Central Oregon. Go to www.bendbulletin. com, click on the “sports” link and take a few minutes to complete our annual survey. Results will be published in our annual Central Oregon Golf Preview on May 1.

CORRECTION A listing of Central Oregon placers at the USA Snowboard Association National Championships that appeared in the Adventure Sports Scoreboard in Friday’s Bulletin on Page D5 omitted two Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation riders. Jake Mageau, 13 and of Bend, finished second in the boys 13-15 halfpipe. Another rider with Bend-based MBSEF, Emma Gosser, 16 and of Portland, was the overall girls 16-18 national champion. She also finished second in her division in both skiercross and halfpipe, and she received the Hot Shot award in the halfpipe. The Bulletin regrets the omissions.

D

PREP GIRLS TENNIS

PREP BASEBALL

Mountain View rallies for victory over Bend High

Redmond off to solid start in rainy Bend High invite

Bulletin staff report

Bulletin staff report Rain proved to be the toughest challenger Friday during the first day of the Bend Invitational girls tennis tournament. Matches were delayed — some for hours — or called before completion because of intermittent showers. “It was brutal,” explained Bend High coach and tournament coordinator Kevin Collier of the wet and windy spring conditions. The first round of matches did not start until 1:30 p.m. on Friday, five hours after their original start times. In an effort to speed up the tournament, players played pro sets, matches in which the first player to win eight games wins the match. Pro sets are also scheduled for today’s second-round matches as well as all of today’s consolation matches. Still, some teams found dry courts on which they could squeeze in some wins. Redmond topped Tualatin 5-3 in the first round before the Panthers’ second-round match against Central Catholic was postponed due to the weather. See Tennis / D7

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bend’s Cassidy Taylor stretches to return the ball while competing against Crescent Valley during the Bend High Invitational on Friday. The Lava Bears lost the match.

No lead is safe against Mountain View. Trailing 9-4 after four innings at Bend High on Friday, the Cougars rallied back to defeat the Lava Bears 13-10. With the win, Mountain View improved to 8-1 in Intermountain Hybrid play and 12-4 overall. Matt Miller went three for three with a double, two runs scored and two runs batted in, and Kyler Ayers added two doubles, two runs scored and two RBIs to pace a Cougar offense that recorded 11 hits, six of which went for extra bases. Alex Robinett added a home run for Mountain View, which has won 11 of its last 12 games. The Cougars scored six runs in the top of the fifth inning with some timely hitting, which was aided by several Bend miscues. With the bases loaded, the Lava Bears (3-4 Intermountain Hybrid, 11-4 overall) walked in two runs before Jacob Hollister hit a sacrifice fly to make the score 9-7. Ayers then knocked a two-run double to tie the score 9-9. Cody Hollister gave Mountain View its first lead of the game one batter later, hitting in Ayers with a double of his own. Jansen Marshall went two for four with four RBIs and a run scored to lead the Lava Bear offense, which posted nine hits. Grant Newton added two hits and two RBIs. The two teams play again at Bend Monday.

N B A P L AYO F F S

Trail to a title THE BLAZERS Next up • NBA playoffs, first round, Game 1 Portland Trail Blazers vs. Dallas Mavericks • When: Today, 6:30 p.m. • TV: ESPN

Does Aldridge’s breakout year mean playoff success for Portland this year? By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Trail Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge is from Dallas, which may explain why he’s played some of his best games against the Mavericks. A hometown pride kind of thing. Then again, perhaps his success is the result of poor matchups, or simply an anomaly. Even Aldridge is stumped. “I don’t know what it is,” he said. “Just playing well. Hopefully I will play well now, too.” Aldridge and the Blazers travel to Dallas to face the Mavericks in the opening game of their first-round playoff series today. See Blazers / D5

INSIDE MLB Tigers ............8 A’s ..................4

Cardinals ..... 11 Dodgers .........2

Indians ...........8 Orioles ...........2

Nationals .......4 Brewers..........3

Rangers .........5 Yankees .........3

Marlins ..........4 Phillies...........3

Blue Jays .......7 Red Sox .........6

Pirates ...........6 Reds...............1

Rays ...............5 Twins .............2

Padres ...........4 Astros ............2

Angels ...........4 White Sox ......3

Rockies ..........5 Cubs ..............0

Royals ............6 Mariners ........5

Giants ............5 D’backs ..........2

PLAYOFF OUTLOOK

Lakers’ road to repeat could go through Chicago, but the way is far from clear By Brian Mahoney The Associated Press

Roundup, see Page D3

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 NBA ................................... D4-D5 NHL .......................................... D6 Auto racing ............................... D6 College sports .......................... D6 Prep sports ................................D7 Golf ............................................D8

Portland Trail Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge

Kobe Bryant has all that championship experience, and perhaps the NBA’s best supporting cast. The Miami Heat have the promise of what LeBron James and Dwyane Wade can deliver in their first postseason together, and the Boston Celtics think their playoff-tested group can do it again. “You don’t ever know if you’re going to win a championship until you get there, but you know you have the pieces that can compete for one,” Wade said. “That’s where we’re at right now.” See Playoffs / D5

Rich Pedroncelli / The Associated Press

Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Inside • A series-by-series look at the first-round playoff matchups, Page D4


D2 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Track: Redmond, Summit, Madras, Culver, Gilchrist at La Pine Invitational, 11 a.m.; Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Crater Classic in Central Point, 10:45 a.m.; Crook County at Lower Columbia Invitational in St. Helens, 12:30 p.m.; Culver at Meet of Champions in Salem, 11:30 a.m. Baseball: Culver at Burns (DH), 1 p.m.; Marshall at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Softball: Marshall at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Boys tennis: Summit at Jesuit Tournament, 10 a.m.; Sisters at Central, noon Girls tennis: Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA; Sisters at Madras, 8:30 p.m. Girls lacrosse: Bend United vs. Marist in Corvallis, 11 a.m.; Bend United at Corvallis, 1 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Hermiston at Bend, 1 p.m.

6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, third round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Texas Open, third round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, third round, CBS. 1 p.m.— Champions Tour, Outback Steakhouse Open, second round, NBC. 3:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, third round, Golf Channel.

SOFTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Tennessee at LSU, ESPN2. 1:30 p.m. — College, Oklahoma at Missouri, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 10 a.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Phoenix Coyotes at Detroit Red Wings, NBC. 4 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Indiana Pacers at Chicago Bulls, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Philadelphia 76ers at Miami Heat, ABC. 4 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Atlanta Hawks at Orlando Magic, ESPN. 5 p.m. — Boys high school, Jordan Brand Classic, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks, ESPN.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals, Root Sports. 1 p.m. — MLB, regional coverage, New York Mets at Atlanta Braves or Los Angeles Angels at Chicago White Sox or Minnesota Twins at Tampa Bay Rays, Fox. 4 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at Houston Astros or Florida Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies, MLB network.

FOOTBALL 11 a.m. — College, Notre Dame Blue/Gold Game, VS. network.

AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Aaron’s 312, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — NHRA, VisitMyrtleBeach.com 4-wide Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2 (same-day tape). 3 p.m. — IndyCar, Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, qualifying, VS. network (taped).

LACROSSE 1:30 p.m. — National Lacrosse League, Calgary Roughnecks at Colorado Mammoth, VS. network (taped).

SOCCER 3:30 p.m. — Major League Soccer, Seattle Sounders at Philadelphia Union, Root Sports (same-day tape).

SUNDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Texas Open, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m.— Champions Tour, Outback Steakhouse Open, final round, NBC. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, final round, CBS. 4 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, final round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING 9 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Aaron’s 499, Fox. 11 a.m. — IndyCar, Firestone Indy Lights, VS. network (taped). 2 p.m. — Le Mans Series, Tequila Patron American Le Mans at Long Beach, ESPN2 (taped). 4 p.m. — NHRA, VisitMyrtleBeach.com 4-wide Nationals, ESPN2 (same-day tape). 7 p.m. — Global Rallycross Championship, ESPN2 (taped).

HOCKEY Noon — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Washington Capitals at New York Rangers, NBC. 5 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Vancouver Canucks at Chicago Blackhawks, VS. network.

BOWLING 10 a.m. — PBA, Lumber Liquidators Dick Weber Playoffs, championship round, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — College, NCAA Championship, ESPN.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — College, Vanderbilt at South Carolina, ESPN2. 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Toronto Blue Jays at Boston Red Sox, TBS. 11 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals, Root Sports. 5 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Memphis Grizzlies at San Antonio Spurs, TNT. 12:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, New Orleans Hornets at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC. 4 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, New York Knicks at Boston Celtics, TNT. 6 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Denver Nuggets at Oklahoma City Thunder, TNT.

SOFTBALL 1 p.m. — College, Oklahoma at Missouri, ESPN.

SOCCER 3 p.m. — Major League Soccer, FC Dallas at Portland Timbers, Root Sports.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Stanford, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. — NBA playoffs, first round, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks, KBND-AM 1110, KRCOAM 690.

SUNDAY BASEBALL 1 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Stanford, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

44. Natalie Gulbis 45. Kyeong Bae 46. Vicky Hurst 47. Meaghan Francella 48. Chella Choi 49. Paige Mackenzie 50. Pornanong Phatlum

IN THE BLEACHERS

ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Friday Monte Carlo, Monaco Singles Quarterfinals David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Viktor Troicki (11), Serbia, 6-3, 6-3. Jurgen Melzer (7), Austria, def. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, 6-4, 6-4. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, 6-1 6-3. Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Frederico Gil, Portugal, 6-2, 6-1.

U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association 2011 Western Region Spring Speed Series At Mt. Bachelor, Westridge/Cliffhanger Friday’s Results Super-G Men (Top 10) 1, Prescott McLauglin, 1:02.86. 2, Scott Snow, 1:03.61. 3, Kevin Francis, 1:03.77. 4, Alec Jones, 1:03.90. 5, Bryce Eller, 1:04.04. 6, Kipling Weisel , 1:04.60. 7, Paul Meyer, 1:04.61. 8, Bruce Bennett, 1:04.64. 9, Stephan Splitstoser, 1:04.66. 10 (tie), Jerry Todd Abate, 1:04.83; Forrest Ferguson, 1:04.83. Women (Top 10) 1, Rose Caston, 1:06.26. 2, Laurenne Ross, 1:06.73. 3, Jacqueline Wiles, 1:07.00. 4, Ali Gunesch, 1:07.76. 5, Sierra Fox, 1:07.89. 6, Haley Hanseler, 1:07.94. 7, Lily Eriksen, 1:08.13. 8, Lila Lapanja, 1:08.60. 9, Anna Rischitelli, 1:09.29. 10, Moe Hanaoka, 1:09.43.

NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington 2, New York Rangers 0 Wednesday, April 13: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Friday, April 15: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 0 Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, noon Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, noon x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Thursday, April 14: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Today, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, noon x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Montreal 1, Boston 0 Thursday, April 14: Montreal 2, Boston 0 Today, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 1 Wednesday, April 13: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay 5, Pittsburgh 1 Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Wednesday, April 13: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday, April 15: Vancouver 4, Chicago 3 Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday, April 14: San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2, OT Today, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, April 13: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Today, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Nashville 1, Anaheim 1 Wednesday, April 13: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday, April 15: Anaheim 5, Nashville 3 Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBD

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Playoffs All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Chicago vs. Indiana Today, April 16: Indiana at Chicago, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Indiana at Chicago, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Indiana, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Chicago at Indiana, 11:30 a.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Indiana at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Chicago at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Indiana at Chicago, TBD Miami vs. Philadelphia Today, April 16: Philadelphia at Miami, 12:30 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Miami, 4 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Miami at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Miami at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD Boston vs. New York Sunday, April 17: New York at Boston, 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: New York at Boston, 4 p.m. Friday, April 22: Boston at New York, 4 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Boston at New York, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New York at Boston, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Boston at New York, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: New York at Boston, TBD Orlando vs. Atlanta Today, April 16: Atlanta at Orlando, 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Atlanta at Orlando, 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 22: Orlando at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Orlando at Atlanta, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio vs. Memphis Sunday, April 17: Memphis at San Antonio, 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 20: Memphis at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: San Antonio at Memphis, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 25: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD L.A. Lakers vs. New Orleans Sunday, April 17: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 22: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, April 24: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, TBD Dallas vs. Portland Today, April 16: Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Dallas at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Dallas at Portland, 2 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Portland at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Dallas at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City vs. Denver Sunday, April 17: Denver at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m.

$40,291 $40,084 $39,258 $38,752 $37,966 $37,280 $35,296

TENNIS ATP Tour

ALPINE SKIING

HOCKEY NHL

5 5 5 4 3 3 4

SOCCER MLS

Wednesday, April 20: Denver at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Oklahoma City at Denver, 7 p.m. Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Denver, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Denver, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD

GOLF PGA Tour TEXAS OPEN Friday At TPC San Antonio San Antonio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,435; Par 72 Second Round Rich Beem Geoff Ogilvy Kevin Sutherland Brandt Snedeker Charley Hoffman Kevin Chappell Brendan Steele Adam Scott Cameron Tringale Matt Every Dean Wilson Michael Connell Ricky Barnes Jeff Maggert Vaughn Taylor J.B. Holmes Kris Blanks John Merrick Tag Ridings Chad Campbell Jim Renner Jhonattan Vegas Bill Lunde Charles Howell III Brandt Jobe Brendon de Jonge Scott Stallings Joseph Bramlett Shaun Micheel Stewart Cink Pat Perez Paul Goydos Nick O’Hern Billy Mayfair J.J. Henry Blake Adams Brian Gay Troy Matteson Kevin Streelman John Senden Jarrod Lyle Hunter Haas Billy Horschel Martin Piller Briny Baird Chris Kirk Martin Laird Keegan Bradley Colt Knost Steven Bowditch Fabian Gomez William McGirt Woody Austin Chris Riley J.P. Hayes Johnson Wagner Frank Lickliter II Kevin Stadler Steve Flesch Ryuji Imada Bob Estes Scott Verplank Fredrik Jacobson James Driscoll David Duval Bio Kim Jim Herman Ben Martin Bryce Molder Nathan Green Arjun Atwal Scott Gutschewski Roland Thatcher Justin Leonard Bo Van Pelt Tim Petrovic Justin Hicks Bobby Gates

Failed to Qualify Angel Cabrera Jimmy Walker Josh Teater Peter Tomasulo Andres Gonzales Carl Paulson Kent Jones Cameron Beckman Chez Reavie Derek Lamely John Rollins Chris DiMarco Jeff Klauk Spencer Levin Michael Sim Chris Stroud Paul Stankowski David Hearn Aron Price Zack Miller Parker LaBarge Tommy Gainey Robert Gamez Alexandre Rocha Will Strickler Jesper Parnevik Michael Putnam Scott Gordon Joe Affrunti Steve Elkington Alex Prugh Ryan Palmer Anthony Kim Brad Lardon Tim Herron Marc Leishman Omar Uresti Scott McCarron Harrison Frazar Rocco Mediate Marc Turnesa Anders Hansen Kyle Stanley D.J. Brigman Michael Arnaud Joe Ogilvie David Mathis Michael Thompson Nate Smith Duffy Waldorf Jerod Turner Matt Jones Garrett Willis

Eric Axley Kevin Na Kevin Kisner Matt McQuillan Daniel Summerhays Ted Purdy Chris Smith Sunghoon Kang Mike Weir Jin Jeong Chris Baryla Richard S. Johnson Garth Mulroy

76-80—156 80-77—157 82-75—157 82-75—157 83-74—157 77-81—158 77-82—159 79-80—159 79-83—162 79-84—163 77-87—164 75-WD 73-WD

Champions Tour 71-70—141 69-72—141 71-70—141 69-72—141 68-73—141 68-73—141 69-72—141 68-74—142 71-71—142 73-69—142 70-72—142 73-70—143 73-70—143 71-72—143 68-75—143 70-73—143 71-73—144 72-72—144 70-74—144 71-73—144 72-72—144 68-76—144 71-73—144 71-73—144 75-69—144 72-72—144 71-73—144 70-74—144 72-73—145 67-78—145 71-74—145 71-74—145 73-72—145 72-73—145 67-78—145 71-74—145 71-74—145 69-76—145 69-76—145 71-74—145 74-71—145 75-70—145 71-74—145 70-75—145 71-75—146 70-76—146 72-74—146 73-73—146 73-73—146 77-69—146 72-74—146 73-73—146 73-73—146 74-72—146 73-73—146 71-75—146 70-77—147 70-77—147 71-76—147 72-75—147 71-76—147 75-72—147 72-75—147 74-73—147 75-72—147 78-69—147 69-78—147 73-74—147 73-75—148 75-73—148 71-77—148 76-72—148 74-74—148 73-75—148 75-73—148 72-76—148 77-71—148 70-78—148 71-78—149 75-74—149 72-77—149 71-78—149 73-76—149 71-78—149 72-77—149 72-77—149 74-75—149 72-77—149 72-77—149 72-77—149 76-73—149 73-77—150 71-79—150 74-76—150 75-75—150 71-79—150 70-80—150 72-78—150 73-77—150 74-76—150 74-76—150 75-75—150 76-74—150 73-78—151 71-80—151 76-75—151 72-79—151 72-79—151 78-73—151 71-80—151 73-78—151 80-71—151 75-77—152 77-75—152 77-75—152 73-79—152 77-75—152 73-79—152 74-79—153 74-79—153 78-75—153 72-81—153 76-77—153 76-78—154 76-78—154 72-82—154 77-77—154 78-77—155 79-76—155 74-81—155 78-78—156

OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE OPEN Friday At TPC Tampa Bay Lutz, Fla. Purse: $1.7 million Yardage: 6,828; Par 71 (35-36) First Round Russ Cochran 31-33—64 John Cook 31-35—66 Jay Don Blake 31-35—66 Kenny Perry 30-37—67 Joey Sindelar 33-35—68 Tom Purtzer 32-36—68 David Frost 32-36—68 Mike Goodes 32-36—68 Tom Pernice, Jr. 37-31—68 Ted Schulz 32-36—68 Tim Simpson 31-37—68 Mark Calcavecchia 32-37—69 Don Pooley 34-35—69 Lee Rinker 34-35—69 Peter Senior 33-36—69 Bob Gilder 32-37—69 Chien Soon Lu 35-34—69 Joe Ozaki 34-35—69 John Jacobs 32-38—70 Andy Bean 33-37—70 Hale Irwin 31-39—70 Bobby Wadkins 35-35—70 Jay Haas 36-34—70 Scott Hoch 32-38—70 Larry Mize 36-34—70 Mark Wiebe 33-37—70 Tom Wargo 33-37—70 Olin Browne 34-36—70 Rod Spittle 35-35—70 Loren Roberts 35-35—70 Dana Quigley 37-34—71 Nick Price 33-38—71 Ben Crenshaw 34-37—71 Tom Kite 35-36—71 Jeff Sluman 34-37—71 Steve Lowery 33-38—71 Mike Reid 32-39—71 Chip Beck 35-36—71 Michael Allen 35-36—71 Fuzzy Zoeller 35-37—72 Jim Thorpe 35-37—72 Tommy Armour III 34-38—72 Mark O’Meara 37-35—72 Fred Funk 35-37—72 Bill Glasson 35-37—72 Tom Jenkins 35-37—72 Bruce Fleisher 38-34—72 J.L. Lewis 35-37—72 Roger Chapman 37-35—72 Dan Forsman 36-37—73 Phil Blackmar 36-37—73 Corey Pavin 35-38—73 Tom Lehman 33-40—73 Hal Sutton 34-39—73 D.A. Weibring 37-36—73 Morris Hatalsky 35-38—73 Keith Fergus 34-39—73 Keith Clearwater 35-38—73 Craig Stadler 38-36—74 Bob Tway 37-37—74 Peter Jacobsen 35-39—74 David Eger 36-38—74 Walter Hall 37-38—75 John Morse 36-39—75 Wayne Levi 36-39—75 Frankie Minoza 35-40—75 Brad Bryant 37-38—75 Vicente Fernandez 36-39—75 Larry Nelson 38-38—76 Mike McCullough 38-38—76 Mark Brooks 35-41—76 Leonard Thompson 36-41—77 David Peoples 36-42—78 Allen Doyle 39-39—78 Gary Hallberg 37-41—78 Jim Gallagher, Jr. 39-40—79 Jay Sigel 37-43—80 Dave Eichelberger 44-42—86

LPGA Tour MONEY LEADERS Through April 3 1. Yani Tseng 2. Karrie Webb 3. Stacy Lewis 4. Sandra Gal 5. I.K. Kim 6. Michelle Wie 7. Jiyai Shin 8. Morgan Pressel 9. Cristie Kerr 10. Paula Creamer 11. Angela Stanford 12. Brittany Lincicome 13. Sun Young Yoo 14. Na Yeon Choi 15. Katie Futcher 16. Juli Inkster 17. Mika Miyazato 18. Amy Yang 19. Suzann Pettersen 20. Anna Nordqvist 21. Mindy Kim 22. Catriona Matthew 23. Maria Hjorth 24. Stacy Prammanasudh 25. Sophie Gustafson 26. Ai Miyazato 27. Song-Hee Kim 28. Beatriz Recari 29. Shanshan Feng 30. Se Ri Pak 31. M.J. Hur 32. Julieta Granada 33. Inbee Park 34. Jimin Kang 35. Kristy McPherson 36. Amanda Blumenherst 37. Karine Icher 38. Katherine Hull 39. Momoko Ueda 40. Marcy Hart 41. Christel Boeljon 42. Seon Hwa Lee 43. Karen Stupples

Trn 5 5 5 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 5 4 5 4 4 3 4 4 5 5 4 5 5 5 4 5 3 4 5 5 5 5 5 4 3 3 5 5

Money $570,478 $486,443 $371,690 $302,379 $271,144 $258,881 $217,112 $211,721 $205,476 $194,116 $174,657 $162,739 $157,931 $144,049 $128,610 $118,479 $117,964 $109,094 $106,994 $86,024 $84,344 $82,644 $75,980 $66,619 $62,464 $62,227 $59,453 $55,272 $54,401 $53,251 $52,413 $50,608 $50,280 $49,288 $49,166 $49,020 $48,017 $47,733 $46,376 $46,046 $42,970 $42,311 $41,141

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 3 1 0 9 3 Toronto FC 1 1 3 6 6 New England 1 1 3 6 5 Houston 1 1 2 5 5 New York 1 1 2 5 2 Columbus 1 1 2 5 3 Chicago 1 2 1 4 7 Sporting Kansas City 1 1 1 4 8 D.C. 1 2 1 4 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 4 0 0 12 8 Colorado 3 2 0 9 8 Los Angeles 2 1 3 9 5 Seattle 1 2 2 5 5 San Jose 1 1 2 5 5 Vancouver 1 2 2 5 9 Portland 1 2 1 4 6 FC Dallas 1 2 1 4 4 Chivas USA 0 2 2 2 3 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games Seattle FC at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Chivas USA at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at New York, 4:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Chicago, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Portland, 3 p.m. New England at Houston, 4 p.m.

GA 1 6 6 4 2 3 9 8 8 GA 1 6 6 6 4 10 8 5 5

BASEBALL College Pacific-10 Conference ——— All Times PDT Conference Overall W L W L Oregon St 6 1 25 7 UCLA 7 3 17 12 California 7 3 21 9 Arizona State 6 4 23 9 Arizona 5 5 23 11 Stanford 3 4 16 10 USC 4 6 13 20 Oregon 2 5 17 14 Washington 2 5 10 21 Washington St 2 8 14 15 Friday’s Games Oregon State 1, Stanford 0 Arizona 5, UCLA 4 California 6, Washington 2 Oregon 4, USC 2 Arizona State 3, Washington State 1 Today’s Games Oregon State at Stanford, 1 p.m. Arizona at UCLA, 2 p.m. California at Washington, 2 p.m. Oregon at USC, 2 p.m. Washington State at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Oregon at USC, noon Washington State at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. Arizona at UCLA, 1 p.m. California at Washington, 1 p.m. Oregon State at Stanford, 1 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Agreed to terms with 1B Adrian Gonzalez to a seven-year contract extension through the 2018 season. CLEVELAND INDIANS—Activated RHP Joe Smith from the 15-day DL. MINNESOTA TWINS—Selected the contract of C Steve Holm from Rochester (IL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed RHP Phil Hughes on the 15-day DL. Called up RHP Lance Pendleton from Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). TEXAS RANGERS—Recalled LHP Michael Kirkman from Round Rock (PCL). Placed RHP Colby Lewis on the paternity leave list. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Recalled LHP Luis Perez from Las Vegas (PCL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Placed RHP Aaron Heilman on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Josh Collmenter from Reno (PCL). HOUSTON ASTROS—Placed RHP Wilton Lopez on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 14. Selected the contract of RHP Jose Valdez from Oklahoma City (PCL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Selected the contract of LHP Joe Beimel from Indianapolis (IL). Designated LHP Garrett Olson for assignment. HOCKEY National Hockey League NHL—Suspended Los Angeles F Jarret Stoll one game for delivering a check from behind on San Jose D Ian White in an April 14 game. CAROLINA HURRICANES—Agreed to terms with D Justin Faulk on a three-year contract. TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Reassigned F Alex Hutchings to Norfolk (AHL) from Florida (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer MLS—Suspended Seattle MF Servando Carrasco one game and fined him $500 for a reckless challenge on Chicago F Patrick Nyarko in an April 9 game. Suspended Los Angeles MF Jovan Kirovski one game in addition to the automatic one-game ban and fined him an additional $750 for drawing a red card and his verbal abuse of an official in an April 9 game against D.C. United. HOUSTON DYNAMO—Signed F Sergio Koke and MF Je-Vaughn Watson. SPORTING KANSAS CITY—Signed D Aurelien Collin. TORONTO FC—Acquired D Richard Eckersley on loan from Burnley (Npower, England). COLLEGE FLORIDA—Announced freshman WR Chris Dunkley and freshman WR Javares McRoy are transferring. LSU—Signed athletic director Joe Alleva to a contract extension through 2016. PITTSBURGH—Announced sophomore basketball F J.J. Richardson has been granted a release from his scholarship and will transfer. SOUTH CAROLINA—Signed women’s basketball coach Dawn Staley to a three-year contract extension through 2016.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 85 0 40 14 The Dalles 37 0 19 13 McNary 7 0 55 32 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Thursday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 949 1 3,104 1,331 The Dalles 198 0 845 500 John Day 104 0 1,831 1,159 McNary 73 1 1,712 1,031

Basketball • Union to get new CBA offer; Maloofs get extension: NBA Commissioner David Stern said Friday the league plans to submit to the players’ union a revised proposal for a new collective bargaining agreement within the next couple of weeks. Stern also said Sacramento Kings owners Gavin and Joe Maloof have been granted an extension until May 2 to file paperwork requesting a move to Anaheim. The league’s labor situation and the Kings’ future were the key items on the owners’ agenda during two days of meetings that wrapped up Friday in New York. Neither Stern nor deputy commissioner Adam Silver would offer details of what would be in their proposal to replace the current CBA, which expires June 30, though Stern said during a conference call later that it would indicate to the players “some modicum of flexibility in our approach and we’re trying to engage the union in a dialogue.” • NBA sees increases in viewers, sales, attendance: The NBA says its three national TV partners all had their most viewers ever this season, topped by a 42 percent increase for TNT. ABC was up 38 percent and ESPN had a 28 percent jump, the league says Friday. Turner Sports also says its 1.6 rating was its highest in 27 years of NBA coverage and that it televised three of the five mostwatched NBA regular-season games ever on cable this season. Despite fears of a labor stoppage after the season, the NBA reported success across many platforms. Arena capacity was 90.3 percent, its seventh straight year of 90 or better, and the 17,306 average was up 1 percent from last year and was its fifth highest. Merchandise sales jumped more than 20 percent and NBA.com saw an increase of more than 140 percent in video views.

Baseball • Red Sox guarantee $154 million to Gonzalez: Adrian Gonzalez signed a $154 million, seven-year contract with the Boston Red Sox on Friday. Gonzalez is making $6.3 million in the final year of the contract he had when the Red Sox obtained him from the San Diego Padres for three prospects on Dec. 6. Gonzalez, a three-time All-Star first baseman, gets a $6 million signing bonus, salaries of $21 million a season from 2012-16 and $21.5 million in each of the final two years. • Injured Twins C Mauer also recovering from illness: Minnesota Twins star Joe Mauer is injured — and sick. Minnesota manager Ron Gardenhire said before Friday night’s game against Tampa Bay that Mauer has a viral infection, which the team believes increased the catcher’s body soreness recently. Mauer was placed on the 15-day disabled list Thursday because of leg weakness stemming from offseason arthroscopic surgery on his left knee. Gardenhire hopes Mauer will be able to return in a couple weeks.

Cycling • Puncture deflates Contador’s Castilla chances: Alberto Contador fell out of contention at the Vuelta de Castilla and Leon on Friday in Spain, falling victim to a couple of flats in a mountainous third stage won by Filippo Savini. The Tour de France champion had to deal with a pair of flats for the second time in three days, with the second puncture coming just two kilometers from the finish of the 98-mile stage. “I had some bad luck,” said Contador, who was nearly 3 minutes behind Savini in 28th. “Let’s see if I have better luck in (today’s) time trial.”

Football • No progress in NFL mediation: Negotiators for the NFL and its locked-out players wrapped up a second day of court-ordered talks Friday in Minneapolis, with no signs of significant progress. They plan to sit down again next week. The two sides left the federal courthouse in Minneapolis after about four hours of talks, following nine hours of meetings on Thursday. They will meet again Tuesday. Hall of Famer Carl Eller, who is representing retired players in the antitrust lawsuit against the league, said he thinks the two sides are “moving forward” but the process “slowed a little bit” Friday.

Tennis • Federer loses: Roger Federer lost to Jurgen Melzer 6-4, 6-4 in swirling wind at the Monte Carlo Masters quarterfinals Friday in Monaco, his earliest exit in a tournament since Wimbledon last year. Rafael Nadal beat Ivan Ljubicic 6-1, 6-3 for his 35th straight win at the tournament. Nadal will next face thirdseeded Andy Murray, who downed Portuguese qualifier Frederico Gil 6-2, 6-1. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL NL BOXSCORES Cardinals 11, Dodgers 2 St. Louis Theriot ss Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Motte p Berkman rf Jay rf Freese 3b Y.Molina c Schumaker 2b Lohse p Miller p c-Greene ph-lf Totals

AB 6 5 5 5 0 4 1 5 4 4 3 0 1 43

R 0 2 2 1 0 2 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 11

H 1 3 2 2 0 2 0 3 4 0 1 0 1 19

BI 1 0 3 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 10

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 2

SO 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 6

Avg. .298 .397 .241 .393 --.327 .250 .372 .268 .241 .200 --.333

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gwynn lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .290 Blake 3b 3 1 1 0 0 1 .304 Hawksworth p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Guerrier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-De Jesus ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Cormier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Ethier rf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .358 Kemp cf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .449 Loney 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .170 Uribe 2b-3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .156 Barajas c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Carroll ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .362 Garland p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Jansen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Thames ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .222 Miles 2b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .231 Totals 34 2 7 1 1 8 St. Louis 030 120 104 — 11 19 0 Los Angeles 000 200 000 — 2 7 0 a-popped out for Jansen in the 5th. b-grounded out for Guerrier in the 8th. c-singled for Miller in the 9th. LOB—St. Louis 8, Los Angeles 6. 2B—Rasmus 3 (5), Holliday (3), Gwynn (4), Blake (2). HR—Berkman 2 (6), off Garland 2; Pujols (3), off Jansen; Pujols (4), off Hawksworth. RBIs—Theriot (6), Pujols 3 (10), Holliday (8), Berkman 2 (13), Schumaker (8), Greene 2 (3), Kemp (9). S—Lohse. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 5 (Holliday, Theriot 3, Schumaker); Los Angeles 3 (Barajas, Ethier 2). Runners moved up—Pujols 2. GIDP—Schumaker. DP—Los Angeles 1 (Miles, Loney). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lohse W, 2-1 7 1-3 6 2 2 1 6 104 2.82 Miller 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Motte 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 2.57 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Garland L, 0-1 4 9 5 5 0 2 83 11.25 Jansen 1 3 1 1 0 3 31 7.36 Hawksworth 2 1 1 1 0 1 21 4.00 Guerrier 1 2 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Cormier 1 4 4 4 2 0 33 11.57 Garland pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Inherited runners-scored—Jansen 1-1. WP—Lohse. Balk—Garland. T—3:04. A—36,282 (56,000).

Giants 5, Diamondbacks 2 San Francisco Rowand cf-lf F.Sanchez 2b Huff rf-lf Ford cf Posey c P.Sandoval 3b Burrell lf Schierholtz rf Belt 1b Tejada ss Cain p Affeldt p R.Ramirez p b-Fontenot ph Ja.Lopez p Br.Wilson p Totals

AB 5 5 3 0 4 3 3 0 4 4 3 0 0 1 0 0 35

R 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 3 1 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 3 12

Avg. .314 .292 .245 --.304 .356 .167 .235 .200 .265 .000 .000 --.154 -----

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist lf 4 0 1 2 0 1 .340 K.Johnson 2b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .157 J.Upton rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .313 Branyan 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .348 C.Young cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .269 S.Drew ss 3 1 1 0 1 0 .357 Mora 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Montero c 2 1 0 0 2 1 .421 D.Hudson p 1 0 1 0 0 0 .600 Demel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Nady ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .300 Vasquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-R.Roberts ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .364 Totals 31 2 6 2 4 6 San Francisco 300 110 000 — 5 8 0 Arizona 000 000 101 — 2 6 1 a-walked for Demel in the 7th. b-struck out for R.Ramirez in the 9th. c-singled for Vasquez in the 9th. E—Montero (4). LOB—San Francisco 6, Arizona 9. 2B—Tejada 2 (5), S.Drew (4). HR—P.Sandoval (3), off D.Hudson. RBIs—P.Sandoval 3 (9), Tejada (6), Bloomquist 2 (7). SB—Huff (1), Posey (2), Bloomquist (7), J.Upton (2). S—D.Hudson. SF— Bloomquist. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 4 (Rowand 2, Burrell, F.Sanchez); Arizona 6 (J.Upton, Bloomquist, C.Young, K.Johnson 3). San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cain W, 2-0 6 4 1 1 2 3 102 1.42 Affeldt 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 3.86 R.Ramirez H, 2 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 23 1.00 Ja.Lopez 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 20 1.80 Wilson S, 3-4 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 8 12.27 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hudson L, 0-3 6 6 5 4 3 10 98 4.26 Demel 1 1 0 0 0 0 17 4.76 Vasquez 2 1 0 0 0 2 26 0.00 Cain pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Affeldt 2-0, R.Ramirez 3-1, Br.Wilson 2-1. HBP—by Cain (Mora). WP—R.Ramirez. T—2:58. A—23,090 (48,633).

Rockies 5, Cubs 0 Chicago S.Castro ss Barney 2b Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b C.Pena 1b A.Soriano lf Colvin rf Soto c Garza p Samardzija p a-DeWitt ph J.Russell p Totals

AB 4 3 4 4 3 4 3 3 2 0 1 0 31

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 2

SO 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .362 .313 .327 .360 .200 .250 .135 .227 .000 .000 .111 .000

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 0 1 0 0 2 .278 Herrera 2b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .444 C.Gonzalez lf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .241 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .354 Helton 1b 4 1 2 1 0 0 .364 S.Smith rf 3 1 0 0 1 1 .286 Jo.Lopez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .171 Iannetta c 3 1 1 3 0 1 .219 Chacin p 3 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Totals 31 5 7 4 2 8 Chicago 000 000 000 — 0 6 1 Colorado 040 010 00x — 5 7 0 a-grounded out for Samardzija in the 8th. E—S.Castro (2). LOB—Chicago 6, Colorado 4. 2B—Ar.Ramirez (5), Fowler (4). 3B—Iannetta (1). RBIs—Helton (6), Iannetta 3 (5). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Colvin, A.Soriano, C.Pena); Colorado 2 (C.Gonzalez, S.Smith). GIDP—A.Soriano, Colvin. DP—Colorado 2 (Herrera, Tulowitzki, Helton), (Jo. Lopez, Herrera, Helton). Chicago IP H R Garza L, 0-2 6 7 5 Samardzija 1 0 0 J.Russell 1 0 0 Colorado IP H R Chacin W, 3-0 9 6 0 T—2:22. A—30,285 (50,490).

ER 5 0 0 ER 0

BB 2 0 0 BB 2

SO 5 2 1 SO 7

NP 119 10 7 NP 114

ERA 6.27 6.43 7.71 ERA 1.64

Padres 4, Astros 2 San Diego Maybin cf Headley 3b O.Hudson 2b Cantu 1b Hundley c Denorfia rf Ludwick lf Bartlett ss

AB 3 4 4 3 4 3 4 4

R 0 0 0 0 1 2 1 0

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 0

SO 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 0

Avg. .250 .233 .319 .167 .350 .227 .116 .132

Harang p a-E.Patterson ph Gregerson p Adams p Bell p Totals

1 0 0 0 0 30

0 0 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 8

0 1 0 0 0 4

0 0 0 0 0 2

0 .000 0 .200 0 --0 --0 --5

Morel 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .227 Totals 33 3 5 3 1 5 Los Angeles 000 400 000 — 4 10 2 Chicago 001 002 000 — 3 5 1 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 8th. E—V.Wells (1), Callaspo (3), Morel (4). LOB—Los Angeles 10, Chicago 5. 2B—M.Izturis (4), Trumbo (4). HR—A.Dunn (2), off Weaver. RBIs—M.Izturis 2 (7), Trumbo (4), Conger (2), Beckham (8), A.Dunn 2 (7). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 6 (Tor. Hunter, Bourjos, H.Kendrick, M.Izturis 3); Chicago 5 (A.Dunn 2, Pierre, Quentin 2). Runners moved up—H.Kendrick, Konerko, Morel. GIDP—H.Kendrick. DP—Chicago 1 (Al.Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko).

AN IMPERFECT 10

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .264 Ang.Sanchez ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .327 Pence rf 3 0 1 1 1 0 .286 Ca.Lee lf 4 1 1 0 0 0 .214 Wallace 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .283 Hall 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .196 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .171 Quintero c 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 c-Michaels ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Happ p 2 0 0 0 0 2 .400 b-Inglett ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .083 Fulchino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 2 7 2 1 9 San Diego 000 010 300 — 4 8 1 Houston 000 001 001 — 2 7 1 a-hit a sacrifice fly for Harang in the 7th. b-popped out for Happ in the 7th. c-flied out for Quintero in the 9th. E—Cantu (1), Ang.Sanchez (4). LOB—San Diego 4, Houston 6. 2B—Denorfia (1), Pence (5). HR—Denorfia (1), off Happ. RBIs—Denorfia (2), Ludwick 2 (6), E.Patterson (2), Pence (10), C.Johnson (4). SB—Denorfia (1), Bourn (6), Pence (1). CS—Maybin (1). S—Harang. SF—E.Patterson. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 1 (Maybin); Houston 4 (Ca.Lee 2, Wallace, Inglett). Runners moved up—Bartlett, Pence. GIDP—Cantu. DP—Houston 1 (C.Johnson, Hall, Wallace). San Diego IP H R ER Harang W, 3-0 6 3 1 1 Gregerson H, 3 1 2 0 0 Adams H, 3 1 0 0 0 Bell S, 3-3 1 2 1 1 Houston IP H R ER Happ L, 1-2 7 7 4 4 Fulchino 1 0 0 0 Del Rosario 1 1 0 0 HBP—by Del Rosario (Denorfia). T—2:37. A—23,755 (40,963).

BB 1 0 0 0 BB 2 0 0

SO 8 1 0 0 SO 3 2 0

NP 99 13 13 22 NP 86 15 11

AB 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 3 0 1 0 0 0 2 2 38

R H 2 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 10

BI 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 7

Avg. .302 .205 .318 .340 .239 .205 .118 .250 --.000 ------.000 .300

Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Narveson 5 2-3 5 3 3 4 5 100 1.45 Mitre 2 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 26 0.00 Stetter 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 9 3.38 Green 2-3 0 0 0 2 0 16 3.38 Braddock L, 0-1 1-3 0 1 0 0 0 14 2.25 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Gorzelanny 6 5 2 2 2 4 85 5.56 Clippard H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 1.74 Storen H, 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 21 1.08 S.Burnett BS, 1 1 2 1 1 0 1 17 2.35 Gaudin W, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 19 5.68 Inherited runners-scored—Mitre 2-0. HBP—by Gorzelanny (Y.Betancourt), by Storen (Fielder). T—3:15. A—17,217 (41,506).

Marlins 4, Phillies 3 AB 4 4 3 4 0 0 0 4 3 4 4 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 33

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 4 2

Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 3b Bradley lf Cust dh A.Kennedy 1b Olivo c M.Saunders cf L.Rodriguez 2b Ryan ss a-Smoak ph 1-J.Wilson pr Totals

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Espinosa 2b 4 0 0 1 0 1 .250 Ankiel cf 5 0 0 0 0 2 .180 Werth rf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .196 Ad.LaRoche 1b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .214 W.Ramos c 3 1 2 0 1 0 .480 Morse lf 3 1 2 0 0 0 .182 1-L.Nix pr-lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Desmond ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .173 Hairston Jr. 3b 3 0 0 1 1 1 .043 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Gorzelanny p 1 0 0 1 1 0 .000 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Stairs ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Burnett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Cora ph-3b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .182 Totals 32 4 5 4 7 7 Mil. 000 020 001 0 — 3 10 1 Wash. 030 000 000 1 — 4 5 0 One out when winning run scored. a-grounded out for Clippard in the 7th. b-flied out for Mitre in the 9th. c-walked for S.Burnett in the 9th. 1-ran for Morse in the 6th. E—Y.Betancourt (2). LOB—Milwaukee 9, Washington 8. 2B—Weeks (3), Nieves (2), Morse (1). HR—Weeks (4), off Gorzelanny. RBIs—Weeks 2 (7), Gomez (3), Espinosa (8), Ad.LaRoche (4), Hairston Jr. (3), Gorzelanny (1). SB—Werth (2), Desmond (5). CS—W.Ramos (2). SF—Espinosa. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 2 (Fielder, Almonte); Washington 4 (Ankiel, Morse, Hairston Jr., Espinosa). Runners moved up—Hairston Jr.. GIDP—Weeks, Morse. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Y.Betancourt, Weeks, Fielder); Washington 1 (Desmond, Espinosa, Ad.LaRoche).

Florida Coghlan cf Infante 2b H.Ramirez ss Stanton rf Choate p Hensley p L.Nunez p Morrison lf G.Sanchez 1b J.Buck c Do.Murphy 3b c-Helms ph-3b Vazquez p a-Bonifacio ph Mujica p b-Dobbs ph R.Webb p Cousins rf Totals

Royals 6, Mariners 5

ERA 1.50 1.23 1.29 1.50 ERA 5.79 2.57 2.35

Nationals 4, Brewers 3 (10 innings) Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Y.Betancourt ss Almonte rf Nieves c Mitre p b-Counsell ph Stetter p Green p Braddock p Narveson p Lucroy c Totals

Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver W, 4-0 7 4 3 2 0 4 104 1.30 Rodney H, 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 21 2.70 Walden S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Humber L, 1-1 5 6 4 2 1 4 94 3.46 Gray 2 2-3 4 0 0 1 2 40 0.00 Ohman 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 10.80 Santos 1 0 0 0 1 2 21 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Ohman 3-0. HBP—by Weaver (Pierzynski), by Humber (Conger). T—2:53 (Rain delay: 0:33). A—20,103 (40,615).

SO 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .286 .222 .238 .185 ------.320 .327 .220 .125 .357 .000 .250 --.444 --.222

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Victorino cf 3 2 0 0 2 0 .333 Polanco 3b 5 0 1 0 0 0 .345 Rollins ss 4 1 1 0 0 0 .315 Howard 1b 3 0 0 1 0 2 .286 Ibanez lf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .235 Gload rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .222 B.Francisco rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Ruiz c 4 0 1 0 0 1 .341 Orr 2b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .400 Oswalt p 2 0 0 0 1 0 .167 J.Romero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Madson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Contreras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Mayberry ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .500 Totals 32 3 6 3 5 3 Florida 000 011 200 — 4 7 0 Philadelphia 200 010 000 — 3 6 0 a-popped out for Vazquez in the 6th. b-singled for Mujica in the 7th. c-was announced for Do.Murphy in the 9th. d-walked for Contreras in the 9th. LOB—Florida 4, Philadelphia 8. 2B—Coghlan (7), Infante (3), Rollins (4), Ruiz (3). HR—Morrison (4), off Oswalt. RBIs—Infante (4), Morrison (10), Dobbs 2 (7), Howard (14), Ibanez 2 (9). SF—Howard. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 2 (Stanton, Infante); Philadelphia 2 (Oswalt, Gload). Runners moved up—H.Ramirez. GIDP—J.Buck. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Rollins, Orr, Howard). Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vazquez 5 5 3 3 4 1 73 7.43 Mujica W, 2-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 4.76 R.Webb H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 19 3.52 Choate H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 3.00 Hensley H, 5 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.23 L.Nunez S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 1 0 8 2.25 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Oswalt 6 4 2 2 1 6 89 2.50 J.Romero 0 1 1 1 0 0 5 4.50 Baez L, 1-1 1-3 2 1 1 1 0 13 2.84 Bastardo 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 0.00 Madson 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 0.00 Contreras 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 J.Romero pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Baez 1-1, Bastardo 2-0. IBB—off Vazquez (Orr). T—2:48. A—45,667 (43,651).

A scoreboard worker changes the Boston Red Sox loss total to 10 after falling to the Toronto Blue Jays 7-6 at Fenway Park in Boston Friday. The Red Sox dropped to 2-10, matching their poorest start in history.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division New York Toronto Baltimore Tampa Bay Boston Central Division Cleveland Kansas City Chicago Detroit Minnesota West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 7 7 6 5 2 W 9 9 7 7 4 W 10 8 6 4

L 5 6 6 8 10 L 4 4 6 7 9 L 3 5 8 10

Pct .583 .538 .500 .385 .167 Pct .692 .692 .538 .500 .308 Pct .769 .615 .429 .286

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — ½ 1 2½ 5 GB — — 2 2½ 5 GB — 2 4½ 6½

Friday’s Games Cleveland 8, Baltimore 2 Texas 5, N.Y. Yankees 3 Tampa Bay 5, Minnesota 2 Toronto 7, Boston 6 L.A. Angels 4, Chicago White Sox 3 Kansas City 6, Seattle 5 Detroit 8, Oakland 4, 10 innings

WCGB — 2 2½ 4 6½ WCGB — — 2 2½ 5 WCGB — 1 3½ 5½

L10 5-5 5-5 4-6 5-5 2-8 L10 8-2 7-3 5-5 6-4 3-7 L10 7-3 7-3 5-5 2-8

Str L-1 W-2 L-5 W-4 L-3 Str W-1 W-3 L-2 W-4 L-3 Str W-1 W-3 L-2 L-3

Home Away 6-3 1-2 4-2 3-4 3-3 3-3 2-5 3-3 2-4 0-6 Home Away 5-2 4-2 6-2 3-2 4-4 3-2 3-3 4-4 2-3 2-6 Home Away 6-0 4-3 4-2 4-3 1-4 5-4 2-4 2-6

Today’s Games Baltimore (Guthrie 1-1) at Cleveland (Tomlin 2-0), 10:05 a.m. Texas (Holland 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (F.Garcia 0-0), 10:05 a.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 1-1) at Kansas City (O’Sullivan 0-1), 10:10 a.m. Toronto (Jo-.Reyes 0-1) at Boston (Beckett 1-1), 10:10 a.m. L.A. Angels (Chatwood 0-1) at Chicago White Sox (Floyd 1-0), 1:10 p.m. Minnesota (S.Baker 0-2) at Tampa Bay (Niemann 0-2), 1:10 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 1-1) at Oakland (Braden 0-1), 6:05 p.m.

East Division Philadelphia Florida Washington Atlanta New York Central Division Cincinnati Milwaukee St. Louis Chicago Pittsburgh Houston West Division Colorado San Francisco San Diego Los Angeles Arizona

W 9 8 6 5 4 W 8 7 7 6 6 4 W 11 7 6 6 5

L 4 5 7 8 9 L 5 6 7 7 7 10 L 2 6 7 8 7

Pct .692 .615 .462 .385 .308 Pct .615 .538 .500 .462 .462 .286 Pct .846 .538 .462 .429 .417

GB — 1 3 4 5 GB — 1 1½ 2 2 4½ GB — 4 5 5½ 5½

Friday’s Games Florida 4, Philadelphia 3 Washington 4, Milwaukee 3, 10 innings Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 1 N.Y. Mets at Atlanta, ppd., rain San Diego 4, Houston 2 Colorado 5, Chicago Cubs 0 San Francisco 5, Arizona 2 St. Louis 11, L.A. Dodgers 2

WCGB — — 2 3 4 WCGB — 1 1½ 2 2 4½ WCGB — 1 2 2½ 2½

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 3-7 2-8 L10 5-5 7-3 6-4 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 9-1 6-4 4-6 3-7 4-6

Str L-1 W-3 W-1 L-2 L-5 Str L-2 L-1 W-3 L-1 W-1 L-1 Str W-7 W-3 W-1 L-4 L-2

Home Away 5-2 4-2 3-3 5-2 3-4 3-3 2-4 3-4 1-6 3-3 Home Away 5-2 3-3 5-2 2-4 2-4 5-3 3-3 3-4 1-5 5-2 3-5 1-5 Home Away 4-1 7-1 4-2 3-4 3-5 3-2 3-3 3-5 3-4 2-3

Today’s Games Milwaukee (Gallardo 1-0) at Washington (Marquis 0-0), 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh (Ja.McDonald 0-0) at Cincinnati (Leake 1-0), 10:10 a.m. N.Y. Mets (D.Carrasco 0-0) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 1-2), 1:10 p.m., 1st game Florida (Ani.Sanchez 0-1) at Philadelphia (Hamels 1-1), 4:05 p.m. San Diego (Latos 0-1) at Houston (Figueroa 0-2), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 0-1) at Atlanta (Jurrjens 0-0), 4:40 p.m., 2nd game Chicago Cubs (Coleman 0-0) at Colorado (Hammel 1-0), 5:10 p.m. San Francisco (Zito 0-1) at Arizona (J.Saunders 0-1), 5:10 p.m. St. Louis (McClellan 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Kershaw 2-1), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Rangers 5, Yankees 3: NEW YORK — Undefeated Matt Harrison and Texas tied an AL record by turning six double plays, and the Rangers picked up where they left off last October, beating the Yankees. The teams played for the first time since Texas battered the Yankees to win last year’s AL championship series in six games. • Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 6: BOSTON — Jose Bautista singled in the go-ahead run in a four-run seventh inning and Toronto deepened the misery of the struggling Red Sox. The Red Sox dropped to 2-10, matching their poorest start in history. • Indians 8, Orioles 2: CLEVELAND — Justin Masterson pitched seven strong innings for his third win, Asdrubal Cabrera had four RBIs and the surprising Indians kept the AL Central standings flipped upside down. Masterson (3-0) allowed just one run and four singles. • Rays 5, Twins 2: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Wade Davis pitched seven strong innings and Johnny Damon and Kelly Shoppach drove in two runs apiece, leading Tampa Bay over Minnesota. • Royals 6, Mariners 5: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Luke Hochevar gave up one hit in seven innings and Jeff Francoeur homered and drove in three runs to help Kansas City beat Seattle for its fifth victory in six games. • Angels 4, White Sox 3: CHICAGO — The Los Angeles bullpen extended its scoreless streak to 25 1⁄3 innings and the Angels held on to beat the White Sox. Maicer Izturis had three hits and drove in two runs. • Tigers 8, A’s 4: OAKLAND, Calif. — Brennan Boesch hit a go-ahead two-run double with the bases loaded in the 10th inning and Detroit rallied to beat Oakland for manager Jim Leyland’s 1,500th career win.

• Rockies 5, Cubs 0: DENVER — Jhoulys Chacin tossed a six-hitter for his first career complete game, Chris Iannetta hit a bases-clearing triple and the Rockies won their seventh straight. In windy and cool conditions, Chacin (3-0) struck out seven and walked two. • Nationals 4, Brewers 3: WASHINGTON — Adam LaRoche’s 10th inning fielder’s choice scored Jayson Werth with the winning run. Chad Gaudin (1-1), the Nationals’ fifth pitcher, pitched a scoreless 10th. • Padres 4, Astros 2: HOUSTON — Chris Denorfia doubled and homered and Ryan Ludwick drove in a pair of runs. San Diego starter Aaron Harang (3-0) allowed three hits and one run with eight strikeouts in six innings for the win. • Marlins 4, Phillies 3: PHILADELPHIA— Pinchhitter Greg Dobbs hit a go-ahead two-run single against his former team. It may have been a costly loss for the NL East-leading Phillies because Roy Oswalt left with a lower back strain. • Pirates 6, Reds 1: CINCINNATI — Charlie Morton pitched his second career complete game in gusty winds, limiting the NL’s most prolific lineup to five hits, and Pittsburgh ended its four-game losing streak. Garrett Jones and Neil Walker homered off Bronson Arroyo (2-1), who gave up a season-high five runs in only four innings. • Giants 5, Diamondbacks 2: PHOENIX — Matt Cain had his third strong outing in three appearances this season and Pablo Sandoval hit a three-run homer to lift San Francisco to its third straight victory. • Cardinals 11, Dodgers 2: LOS ANGELES — Albert Pujols and Lance Berkman each homered in consecutive at-bats. The Cardinals’ offense continued unabated as they reached .500 for the first time this season, with five wins in their last six games.

Pirates 6, Reds 1 Pittsburgh AB R H A.McCutchen cf 5 0 0 Tabata lf 5 1 4 Overbay 1b 4 2 2 Walker 2b 4 2 1 Alvarez 3b 5 0 1 G.Jones rf 3 1 2 Snyder c 5 0 3 Cedeno ss 5 0 1 Morton p 4 0 0 Totals 40 6 14 Cincinnati Stubbs cf Renteria ss Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf Bruce rf Cairo 2b Hanigan c Arroyo p Maloney p

AB 4 4 2 4 4 4 4 3 1 2

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

BI 0 0 1 2 0 1 2 0 0 6

BB 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 4

SO 4 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 2 9

Avg. .196 .354 .260 .269 .196 .219 .429 .189 .000

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

Avg. .283 .438 .426 .233 .243 .222 .250 .269 .200 .000

Ondrusek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 32 1 5 1 2 3 Pittsburgh 011 300 001 — 6 14 1 Cincinnati 000 000 001 — 1 5 1 E—Cedeno (3), Renteria (2). LOB—Pittsburgh 12, Cincinnati 6. 2B—Tabata (3), Alvarez (2), Snyder (1), Cedeno (1). HR—G.Jones (2), off Arroyo; Walker (3), off Arroyo; Bruce (1), off Morton. RBIs—Overbay (7), Walker 2 (11), G.Jones (2), Snyder 2 (2), Bruce (4). SB—Tabata (7), Stubbs 2 (4). S—Morton. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 8 (Alvarez, A.McCutchen 3, Cedeno 2, Overbay, Morton); Cincinnati 2 (Rolen, Gomes). GIDP—Overbay, Rolen. DP—Pittsburgh 1 (Cedeno, Walker, Overbay); Cincinnati 1 (Cairo, Renteria, Votto). Pittsburgh IP H R ER Morton W, 2-0 9 5 1 1 Cincinnati IP H R ER Arroyo L, 2-1 4 9 5 5 Maloney 4 4 0 0 Ondrusek 1 1 1 1 IBB—off Arroyo (G.Jones). T—2:36. A—21,312 (42,319).

BB 2 BB 2 0 2

SO 3 SO 4 4 1

NP 108 NP 92 50 22

ERA 1.64 ERA 4.24 9.45 1.17

AL BOXSCORES Angels 4, White Sox 3 Los Angeles M.Izturis ss H.Kendrick 2b Abreu dh Tor.Hunter rf V.Wells lf Callaspo 3b Trumbo 1b Conger c Bourjos cf Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 37

Chicago AB Pierre lf 4 Beckham 2b 4 A.Dunn dh 3 1-Lillibridge pr-dh 0 Konerko 1b 4 Quentin rf 4 Rios cf 4 Pierzynski c 3 Al.Ramirez ss 4

R H 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 3 1 2 1 0 0 1 4 10 R 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0

BI 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 4

BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 3

SO 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 9

Avg. .333 .296 .319 .241 .113 .356 .277 .235 .227

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0

SO 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0

Avg. .298 .283 .240 .333 .333 .300 .196 .238 .292

AB 5 5 3 3 3 4 4 2 3 0 0 32

R 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 5

H BI BB 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 5 5 6

SO 0 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 5

Avg. .276 .170 .240 .163 .296 .146 .207 .150 .194 .273 .207

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Getz 2b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .289 Me.Cabrera cf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .277 Butler dh 4 1 3 1 0 0 .375 Francoeur rf 4 2 3 3 0 0 .327 Ka’aihue 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .175 Aviles 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .167 Maier lf 2 0 0 0 2 2 .000 Treanor c 3 1 1 1 1 1 .192 A.Escobar ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .236 Totals 34 6 9 6 4 7 Seattle 100 000 013 — 5 5 1 Kansas City 102 111 00x — 6 9 0 a-walked for Ryan in the 9th. 1-ran for Smoak in the 9th. E—Bedard (1). LOB—Seattle 6, Kansas City 8. 2B—I.Suzuki (3), L.Rodriguez (2), Butler (4), Aviles (4). HR—Francoeur (2), off Bedard; Treanor (2), off Bedard. RBIs—I.Suzuki 2 (6), Cust (5), M.Saunders (6), Smoak (6), Butler (8), Francoeur 3 (11), Aviles (7), Treanor (6). SB—L.Rodriguez (1), A.Escobar (3). Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (Ryan, Bradley, Figgins); Kansas City 3 (Maier 2, Treanor). Runners moved up—Figgins, Ryan, Me.Cabrera. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bedard L, 0-3 4 2-3 7 5 4 3 6 106 8.56 Pauley 2 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 38 2.57 Laffey 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 0.00 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevr W, 2-1 7 1 1 1 2 4 100 4.21 Bl.Wood 1 3 1 1 0 0 19 9.00 Collins 0 0 2 2 2 0 12 2.57 Soria S, 4-5 1 1 1 1 2 1 28 7.04 Collins pitched to 2 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Pauley 2-0, Soria 2-2. WP—Soria. T—2:55. A—13,686 (37,903).

Blue Jays 7, Red Sox 6 Toronto Y.Escobar ss C.Patterson cf Bautista rf Lind 1b A.Hill 2b Arencibia c Snider lf J.Rivera dh J.Nix 3b Totals

AB 4 5 3 4 4 4 4 3 2 33

R 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 2 7

H BI BB 1 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 2 1 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 8 6 7

SO 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 1 6

Avg. .417 .368 .351 .250 .216 .286 .163 .111 .290

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crawford lf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .137 Pedroia 2b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .348 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 1 0 0 1 1 .244 Youkilis 3b 2 2 1 2 2 0 .200 Ortiz dh 2 1 0 0 2 0 .262 J.Drew rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .258 Saltalamacchia c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .138 a-Lowrie ph-ss 1 1 1 1 0 0 .471 Scutaro ss 3 0 1 2 1 0 .188 Varitek c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .100 Ellsbury cf 4 0 1 0 0 1 .195 Totals 33 6 5 6 6 7 Toronto 000 021 400 — 7 8 2 Boston 003 000 030 — 6 5 0 a-singled for Saltalamacchia in the 8th. E—Snider (3), Arencibia (2). LOB—Toronto 6, Boston 6. 2B—Snider (2), Scutaro (2). 3B—C.Patterson (1). HR—Pedroia (2), off Cecil; Youkilis (1), off Cecil. RBIs— C.Patterson 2 (6), Bautista (6), Lind (9), A.Hill (8), Snider (9), Pedroia (6), Youkilis 2 (4), Lowrie (2), Scutaro 2 (6). SB—Bautista (2), Lind (1), A.Hill 2 (4), Ellsbury (2). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 6 (A.Hill 2, Arencibia, Bautista, J.Rivera, Snider); Boston 4 (Ellsbury 3, Pedroia). Runners moved up—Y.Escobar, Lind. GIDP—Arencibia. DP—Boston 2 (Youkilis, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez), (Youkilis, Ad.Gonzalez). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cecil W, 1-1 6 2 3 3 4 5 92 6.19 Frasor 1 1 0 0 0 0 20 2.84 Rzepczynski 2-3 1 3 3 2 1 31 4.32 Janssen H, 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Rauch S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.70 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Buchholz 5 3 3 3 5 3 94 6.60 Aceves BS, 1-1 1 1 0 0 0 0 8 2.70 Jenks L, 0-1 1-3 4 4 4 1 1 26 8.31 Doubront 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 9.00 Wheeler 1 0 0 0 0 2 13 14.54 Papelbon 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 2.25 C.Buchholz pitched to 2 batters in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Janssen 2-2, Aceves 2-1, Doubront 1-0. WP—Rzepczynski, Jenks. T—3:47. A—37,467 (37,493).

Rangers 5, Yankees 3 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Mi.Young dh A.Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf Torrealba c Moreland 1b Borbon cf Totals

AB 3 3 4 4 3 4 3 2 3 29

R 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 5

H BI BB 0 1 2 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 4 3 7

SO 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 6

Avg. .196 .167 .346 .212 .302 .292 .222 .303 .200

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .255 Swisher rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .238 Teixeira 1b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .205 Al.Rodriguez 3b 3 1 1 0 1 0 .405 Cano 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .320 An.Jones lf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .250 a-Chavez ph 1 0 1 1 0 0 .500 1-Gardner pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .150 Posada dh 1 0 0 0 3 0 .184 2-E.Nunez pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Martin c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .262 Granderson cf 3 2 2 1 0 0 .231 Totals 31 3 9 3 4 3 Texas 011 030 000 — 5 4 1 New York 001 000 011 — 3 9 0 a-singled for An.Jones in the 9th. 1-ran for Chavez in the 9th. 2-ran for Posada in the 9th. E—N.Cruz (1). LOB—Texas 5, New York 5. 2B—Mi.Young (6), A.Beltre (3), Al.Rodriguez (5). HR—Granderson (3), off Harrison. RBIs—Kinsler (8), Mi.Young 2 (6), Swisher (8), Chavez (2), Granderson (4). CS—Kinsler (2). Runners left in scoring position—Texas 2 (A.Beltre, Dav.Murphy); New York 3 (Al.Rodriguez, Jeter, Martin). Runners moved up—Kinsler, Jeter. GIDP—Dav. Murphy, Jeter, Swisher, Teixeira, Al.Rodriguez, Cano, An.Jones. DP—Texas 6 (A.Beltre, Kinsler, Moreland), (Kinsler, Andrus, Moreland), (Kinsler, Andrus, Moreland), (Harrison, Andrus, Moreland), (Harrison, Andrus, Moreland), (Kinsler, Andrus, Moreland); New York 1 (Cano, Jeter, Teixeira). Texas IP Harrison W, 3-0 8 Feliz S, 5-5 1

H R ER BB SO NP ERA 7 2 1 3 3 104 1.23 2 1 1 1 0 18 1.23

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Nova L, 1-1 4 1-3 4 5 5 5 3 86 7.36 Robertson 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Logan 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 6.00 Pendleton 3 0 0 0 0 2 41 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Robertson 2-1. HBP—by Nova (Borbon). WP—Nova, Robertson 2. T—2:53. A—40,814 (50,291).

Rays 5, Twins 2 Minnesota Span cf Tolbert ss Kubel rf Morneau 1b D.Young lf Thome dh 2-Repko pr Cuddyer 2b Valencia 3b Butera c a-L.Hughes ph Holm c Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 3 3 0 4 3 2 1 0 30

R 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 4

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 3

Avg. .315 .267 .298 .224 .213 .200 .000 .222 .244 .133 .231 ---

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fuld lf 4 1 3 0 0 0 .366 Damon dh 4 1 1 2 0 0 .220 Joyce rf 4 0 3 0 0 1 .270 F.Lopez 3b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .308 1-Zobrist pr-2b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .178 B.Upton cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .261 S.Rodriguez 2b-3b 3 0 0 0 1 1 .167 D.Johnson 1b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .149 Kotchman 1b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Shoppach c 3 1 1 2 0 1 .227 Brignac ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .207 Totals 33 5 13 5 1 6 Minnesota 000 010 001 — 2 4 0 Tampa Bay 000 003 20x — 5 13 1 a-struck out for Butera in the 8th. 1-ran for F.Lopez in the 8th. 2-ran for Thome in the 9th. E—Brignac (3). LOB—Minnesota 5, Tampa Bay 5. 2B—Valencia (1), Fuld (5), Joyce (4), B.Upton (3). HR—Shoppach (1), off Blackburn. RBIs—Valencia (5), Damon 2 (11), B.Upton (5), Shoppach 2 (2). SB—Zobrist (2). CS—Fuld 2 (2). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (Valencia, Span, Cuddyer); Tampa Bay 3 (S.Rodriguez 2, Kotchman). Runners moved up—Damon. GIDP—B.Upton, Kotchman. DP—Minnesota 2 (Tolbert, Cuddyer, Morneau), (Morneau, Holm, Morneau). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Blackbrn L, 1-2 6 10 5 5 0 6 87 3.06 D.Hughes 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 7.94 Manship 1-3 2 0 0 1 0 11 8.10 Perkins 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 6 0.00 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Davis W, 1-2 7 4 1 1 2 1 100 3.26 Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 2.84 C.Ramos 1-3 0 1 0 1 0 14 2.08 J.Cruz 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 6.23 McGee H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 5.40 Farnsworth 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 1.69 J.Cruz pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Blackburn pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Perkins 3-0, J.Cruz 1-0, McGee 2-1, Farnsworth 1-0. IBB—off Manship (S.Rodriguez). T—2:34. A—15,342 (34,078).

Indians 8, Orioles 2 Baltimore B.Roberts 2b Andino 2b Markakis rf D.Lee 1b Guerrero dh Scott lf Ad.Jones cf Mar.Reynolds 3b Wieters c Fox c C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 4 0 4 3 4 4 4 4 3 0 4 34

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 2 1

SO 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 4

Avg. .235 .000 .244 .227 .260 .217 .200 .250 .194 .000 .286

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Brantley cf 3 2 2 0 1 0 .333 A.Cabrera ss 4 0 2 4 0 1 .302 Choo rf 4 0 2 1 0 1 .224 Duncan lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Kearns lf 1 0 0 0 0 1 .136 Hafner dh 2 1 1 2 1 1 .293 O.Cabrera 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .271 LaPorta 1b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .225 Marson c 4 2 1 1 0 0 .400 Everett 3b 4 2 2 0 0 1 .417 Totals 32 8 12 8 3 7 Baltimore 000 100 001 — 2 8 0 Cleveland 004 001 30x — 8 12 0 LOB—Baltimore 7, Cleveland 4. 2B—Choo (1). 3B— LaPorta (1). HR—Hafner (3), off Britton. RBIs—Scott (1), Mar.Reynolds (10), A.Cabrera 4 (14), Choo (5), Hafner 2 (8), Marson (2). CS—Brantley (1). SF—Hafner. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 4 (Ad. Jones, Scott, C.Izturis 2); Cleveland 2 (O.Cabrera 2). GIDP—Markakis, Marson. DP—Baltimore 2 (Markakis, Britton, B.Roberts), (C.Izturis, D.Lee); Cleveland 1 (A.Cabrera, O.Cabrera, LaPorta). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Britton L, 2-1 6 8 5 5 1 6 83 2.75 Rupe 1-3 4 3 3 1 0 27 6.43 Accardo 2-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.08 Uehara 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 0.00 Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Mastrsn W, 3-0 7 4 1 1 1 3 90 1.33 R.Perez 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 J.Smith 1 3 1 1 0 1 19 9.00 Inherited runners-scored—Accardo 2-0. IBB—off Accardo (Hafner). HBP—by J.Smith (Fox). T—2:26. A—16,346 (43,441).

Tigers 8, Athletics 4 (10 innings) Detroit AB Rhymes 2b 4 b-Jh.Peralta ph-ss 0 Raburn lf 4 Boesch rf 5 A.Jackson cf 0 Mi.Cabrera 1b 4 V.Martinez dh 5 Kelly cf 3 a-C.Wells ph-cf-rf 2 Inge 3b 4 Avila c 5 Santiago ss-2b 4 Totals 40

R H 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 3 0 0 2 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 8 10

BI 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 6

BB 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

SO 1 0 3 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 1 9

Avg. .220 .275 .256 .318 .184 .320 .218 .214 .273 .222 .278 .238

Oakland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crisp cf 5 2 1 1 0 0 .226 Barton 1b 5 0 2 0 0 2 .292 DeJesus rf 5 0 3 3 0 0 .234 Willingham lf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .208 Matsui dh 4 0 0 0 0 1 .224 M.Ellis 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .200 K.Suzuki c 4 1 3 0 0 0 .234 An.LaRoche 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .292 c-Sweeney ph 1 1 1 0 0 0 .250 Pennington ss 4 0 2 0 0 0 .229 Totals 38 4 12 4 2 7 Detroit 000 000 001 7 — 8 10 0 Oakland 001 000 000 3 — 4 12 3 a-struck out for Kelly in the 9th. b-was intentionally walked for Rhymes in the 10th. c-singled for An.LaRoche in the 10th. E—Fuentes (1), An.LaRoche (2), Barton (4). LOB— Detroit 7, Oakland 6. 2B—Boesch (4), Kelly (3), Barton (6). HR—Mi.Cabrera (5), off Fuentes. RBIs—Boesch 2 (9), Mi.Cabrera (11), V.Martinez (9), Inge (4), Avila (9), Crisp (3), DeJesus 3 (6). SB—Crisp (6). CS—Pennington (2). S—Santiago. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 2 (Inge 2); Oakland 3 (Matsui 3). Runners moved up—Inge, DeJesus. GIDP— Mi.Cabrera, Matsui, An.LaRoche. DP—Detroit 3 (Santiago, Mi.Cabrera), (Santiago, Rhymes, Mi.Cabrera), (Santiago); Oakland 1 (An.LaRoche, M.Ellis, Barton). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Porcello 6 7 1 1 1 4 103 6.19 Alburquerque 2 1 0 0 1 3 27 0.00 Schlereth 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 2.08 Villarreal W, 1-0 2-3 3 3 3 0 0 15 6.14 Benoit 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 1.29 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCarthy 6 2-3 6 0 0 1 7 114 2.45 Breslow H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 9.82 Balfour H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 3.38 Fuentes L, 0-2 1 1-3 2 6 4 3 1 37 6.75 Ziegler 2-3 2 2 1 0 0 18 2.25 Alburquerque pitched to 1 batter in the 9th. Villarreal pitched to 3 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Schlereth 1-0, Villarreal 1-0, Benoit 3-3, Breslow 1-0, Ziegler 3-3. IBB—off Fuentes (Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera). T—3:28. A—21,853 (35,067).


D4 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

NBA playoffs | First-round previews EASTERN CONFERENCE

Jim Mone / The Associated Press

Julio Cortez / The Associated Press

Michael Conroy / The Associated Press

John Raoux / The Associated Press

Chicago’s Derrick Rose.

Miami’s LeBron James.

Boston’s Rajon Rondo.

Orlando’s Dwight Howard.

No. 1 CHICAGO BULLS (62-20) vs. No. 8 INDIANA PACERS (37-45) Season series: Bulls, 3-1. Chicago limited Indiana to an average of 82.7 points while winning the first three meetings before the Pacers earned a 115-108 overtime victory on March 18 in the final matchup. Derrick Rose scored a season-high 42 points in that game and averaged 27 in the series for the Bulls, who had the pairing of Carlos Boozer and Joakim Noah together for only their 92-73 rout on Dec. 13. Storyline: With the best record in the NBA — and their best since Michael Jordan’s final season — the Bulls begin the quest for their first championship since Jordan left after winning his sixth in 1998. Key Matchup I: Luol Deng vs. Danny Granger. Deng, whose fine season was overshadowed by Rose’s brilliance, scored at least 15 points in all four meetings. Granger had a pair of 19-point outings and scored 22 in another, but the Pacers showed how much they need their leading scorer when they shot just 36 percent without him in the Dec. 13 loss. Key Matchup II: Noah vs. Roy Hibbert. Noah played only twice this season against Indiana and now will be counted on to continue the Bulls’ excellent defensive play against the 7-foot-2 Hibbert, who totaled just 10 points in the Pacers’ three losses before scoring 15 in their lone victory. X-Factor: Tyler Hansbrough. Wasn’t a part of the rotation for much of the season and played in only one of the first three meetings, then had 29 points and 12 rebounds in Indiana’s win. Prediction: Bulls in 5.

No. 2 MIAMI HEAT (58-24) vs. No. 7 PHILADELPHIA 76ERS (41-41) Season series: Heat, 3-0. Miami’s Big Three earned its first victory together with a 97-87 win at Philadelphia on Oct. 27, then beat the 76ers twice at home. Dwyane Wade averaged 30.7 points and the Heat held the 76ers to 92 per game. Storyline: The Heat, who closed the regular season playing at the level that was expected of them when LeBron James and Chris Bosh joined Wade in Miami, open with a Philadelphia team that exceeded expectations in Doug Collins’ first season as coach but struggled down the stretch. Key matchup I: James vs. Andre Iguodala. Iguodala’s defensive skills earned him a starting spot on the U.S. world championship team last summer. He’ll have to be at his best against James, who scored only 16 and 20 points in the first two games before going for 32 in Miami’s 111-99 victory on March 25. Key matchup II: Bosh vs. Elton Brand. Bosh got better in every game against the 76ers, topped by a 20-point, 10-rebound performance in the final meeting. Brand’s resurgence after a couple of forgettable seasons in Philadelphia was a good story and one of the keys to the Sixers’ success, but he had no game higher than 12 points against the Heat. X-factor: Thaddeus Young and Lou Williams. If the 76ers have any advantage in the series, it’s when the teams go to their benches. Young was in double figures all three games, while Williams scored 24 as a reserve in the March 25 game. Prediction: Heat in 4.

No. 3 BOSTON CELTICS (56-26) vs. No. 6 NEW YORK KNICKS (42-40) Season series: Celtics, 4-0. Boston completed the sweep on the final night of the season, when Amare Stoudemire was the only one of the combined six All-Stars on the teams who played. The Celtics won by four and then two in the first two meetings, then pulled away in the final three minutes of a 96-86 victory on March 21, the only one Carmelo Anthony played in. Storyline: Like last season, the Celtics hope to prove their late-season struggles were meaningless and start another run to the NBA finals against the Knicks, who are back in the playoffs for the first time since 2004 and believe they are a dangerous underdog in the 14th postseason matchup between the longtime rivals. Key matchup I: Paul Pierce vs. Anthony. The Celtics have long had one of the NBA’s best closers in Pierce, who made the tiebreaking jumper with 0.4 seconds left in their 118-116 victory at New York on Dec. 15. Now the Knicks have an answer in Anthony, who has an NBA-high 16 go-ahead field goals in the last 10 seconds since 2003. Key matchup II: Rajon Rondo vs. Chauncey Billups. Rondo’s sensational play was the catalyst for the Celtics’ run last spring and he must pick it up now after a mediocre finish to this season. Billups has all the experience and clutch ability a team could want, but not enough speed to stay with his much younger counterpart. X-factor: Toney Douglas. The Knicks are a different team when the streaky backup guard is making three-pointers, and they may have to call on him often to defend Rondo. Prediction: Celtics in 6.

No. 4 ORLANDO MAGIC (52-30) vs. No. 5 ATLANTA HAWKS (44-38) Season series: Hawks, 3-1. Atlanta won the last three meetings, doing a solid job on Dwight Howard and limiting the Magic to 79 points per game in its wins. Howard averaged 19.3 points and 14.3 rebounds, but his 43.1 percent shooting against the Hawks was his worst against any opponent. Joe Johnson, who had a nightmare series when these teams met in last year’s Eastern Conference semifinals, bounced back with 19.3 points per game against Orlando this season. Storyline: Rematch of last season’s secondround series, the most lopsided four-game sweep in NBA history. Orlando won by an average of 25.3 points and the Hawks would go on to change coaches, replacing Mike Woodson with Larry Drew. Key matchup I: Howard vs. Al Horford. After shooting 10 of 20 for 27 points in Orlando’s Nov. 8 victory, Howard was held below 50 percent in the last three games, including a four-for-13 showing in the Atlanta’s 85-82 victory on March 30. Horford had only 11 points in that game, but had a pair of 16-point games and scored 24 in another matchup. Key matchup II: Jameer Nelson vs. Kirk Hinrich. Nelson, perhaps Orlando’s best clutch player, dominated Mike Bibby in last year’s sweep and now hopes to duplicate that against Hinrich, acquired by the Hawks when they dealt Bibby to Washington in February. Nelson, limited to two games against the Hawks this season, scored 20 points and Hinrich managed just five on two-for-nine shooting in the lone matchup with Hinrich in Atlanta. X-factor: Josh Smith. The Magic don’t have a great option to defend the power forward spot, and the versatile Smith, who averaged 17.5 points, 10.5 rebounds, 4.0 assists and 2.3 blocks, could be able to take advantage of his matchup. Prediction: Magic in 6.

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Pat Sullivan / The Associated Press

Ben Margot / The Associated Press

Matt York / The Associated Press

Sue Ogrocki / The Associated Press

San Antonio’s Tony Parker.

Los Angeles’ Kobe Bryant.

Dallas’ Dirk Nowitzki.

Oklahoma City’s Kevin Durant.

No. 1 SAN ANTONIO SPURS (61-21) vs. No. 8 MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES (46-36) Season series: Tied, 2-2. San Antonio won the first two at home, and the Grizzlies won a pair in Memphis in March, averaging 110 points and shooting better than 52 percent in both. Tim Duncan missed one of those losses and was largely outplayed by Zach Randolph in the other three. Storyline: Back in the postseason for the first time since 2006 and still seeking their first victory in a playoff game after 12 losses, the Grizzlies start against a Spurs team that could open without AllStar Manu Ginobili, who sprained his right elbow in the regular-season finale and is doubtful for the opener. Key matchup I: Duncan vs. Randolph. Randolph had four 20-point, 10-rebound games, including a 24-21 game in the Spurs’ Dec. 18 victory. Duncan’s stats have been down in recent years and he didn’t score more than 13 against Memphis, but remains one of the top defenders at his position and should be more of a factor offensively playing more minutes in the postseason. Key matchup II: Tony Parker vs. Mike Conley. In his best season in the NBA, Conley averaged 15.5 points against the Spurs. He now faces one of the few players who can match his quickness in Parker, who had a 37-point outing against Memphis and likely will be looking to score as long as Ginobili is out. X-factor: Tony Allen. Has brought solid defensive play and postseason experience from his years in Boston, and has been a scorer against the Spurs. He scored 20 in both Memphis wins, and he’s likely the best option to defend Ginobili. Prediction: Spurs in 6.

No. 2 LOS ANGELES LAKERS (57-25) vs. No. 7 NEW ORLEANS HORNETS (46-36) Season series: Lakers, 4-0. Los Angeles posted three double-digit victories, the Hornets never cracked 100 points, and Chris Paul admitted “this is not a team we match up with good this year” after the final and most lopsided meeting, the Lakers’ 102-84 victory on March 27. Kobe Bryant had a pair of 30-point games and averaged 26.8. Storyline: Seeking a third straight NBA title, the Lakers open against the Hornets, whose surprisingly strong season was ruined when power forward David West was lost with a torn knee ligament. Key matchup I: Pau Gasol vs. Carl Landry. Landry’s solid play helped the Hornets hold on to a playoff spot after West went down, and he scored 24 points against the Lakers in the most recent meeting. But Gasol was dominant this season against New Orleans, averaging 22.3 points and 12.8 rebounds, and shooting 70.5 percent from the field. Key matchup II: Derek Fisher vs. Chris Paul. Fisher had paltry numbers against the Hornets, but the Lakers know they can count on him in the postseason. His role here is defense against Paul, who probably has to be at his sensational best with West out to give the Hornets a chance. X-factor: Emeka Okafor. In his first postseason, he has to not only defend against the Lakers’ depth inside but find a way to provide some offense as well. Prediction: Lakers in 4.

No. 3 DALLAS MAVERICKS (57-25) vs. No. 6 PORTLAND TRAIL BLAZERS (48-34) Season series: Tied, 2-2. Dallas won the first two meetings, and Portland took the last two at home later in the season after acquiring Gerald Wallace. Dallas guard Jason Kidd had a combined one point in the Mavericks’ losses, missing all six shots in a scoreless outing on April 3. Storyline: Following two straight first-round eliminations, the Blazers seem to be considered the trendy underdog pick this year, even though Dallas won its final four games to tie for the second-best record in the Western Conference. Key matchup I: Dirk Nowitzki vs. LaMarcus Aldridge. The Mavs won on Jan. 4 at home against Portland without their All-Star forward, who faces an opponent who also enjoys popularity in Dallas. Aldridge is a native of the city who played at Texas and had a pair of 30-point outings against his hometown team. Key matchup II: Tyson Chandler vs. Marcus Camby. Neither will be counted on for his offense, but they are two of the top rim protectors in the league, and their defense will be key in a series that doesn’t figure to be high scoring. X-factor: Rodrigue Beaubois. Both Kidd and Jason Terry had their struggles against Portland’s tough defense, and if that continues the Mavs will need a big contribution from Beaubois, who averaged 17 points in his two appearances against the Blazers. Prediction: Trail Blazers in 6.

No. 4 OKLAHOMA CITY THUNDER (55-27) vs. No. 5 DENVER NUGGETS (50-32) Season series: Thunder, 3-1. Oklahoma City won the season series with a pair of victories in April, including a 101-94 win on April 5 that was Kevin Durant’s first in Denver. The NBA’s leading scorer averaged 31.5 points in the series. Storyline: The Thunder are considered one of the top challengers to the Lakers in the Western Conference, but draw a dangerous first-round opponent in the Nuggets, who went 18-7 after trading Carmelo Anthony to the Knicks in February. Key matchup I: Russell Westbrook vs. Ty Lawson and Raymond Felton. The Nuggets have a solid duo to play against Oklahoma’s All-Star point guard, but Lawson, perhaps a better option because of his speed, sprained his left ankle in the season finale. Key matchup II: Kendrick Perkins vs. Nene. Perkins, acquired from Boston to bring some interior defense and toughness, exchanged some words and shoves with Nene in the last two meetings. The Brazilian center had only seven points on three-of10 shooting in the April 5 game, a poor outing for the NBA’s leading shooter. X-Factor: James Harden. Must provide the third scoring option behind Durant and Westbrook, especially because the Thunder bench could have difficulties matching the deeper Nuggets one. Prediction: Thunder in 7.

Capsules by the Associated Press


P L AYOF F S

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 D5

Mavericks aim to end cycle of early playoff exits By Jaime Aron Th e Associated Press

dealing center Kendrick Perkins to the Thunder, and though the Celtics quickly put things together last year after a lackluster finish to the regular season, there’s questions if they can do it again following such a major change to their roster. Doc Rivers said his team will be ready. “I think this is what our guys have been playing for all year,” he said. “You know, when you lose a Game 7, it sticks with you and that’s very difficult to get back through the regular season because the whole season you’re thinking about, ‘Gosh, we’ve got to go through 82 of these just to have a chance to get back to where we were at last year’ and now all that part is gone. And now we can start trying to get back to, and finish the job.” The Nuggets went 18-7 after trading their All-Star forward along with Chauncey Billups, moving up to the No. 5 seed by getting balanced contributions throughout the roster. Oklahoma City provided a tough first-round test for the Lakers last year and believes it’s better equipped to compete with the champs with Perkins patrolling the paint. The winner of that series might have to play the Spurs, then the Lakers just to reach the finals. “When you’re in the Western Conference, if you’re looking for something easy, you’ve come to the wrong place,” Dallas coach Rick Carlisle said. “In this conference, it’s a lot different than it’s been in the East. A lot of their playoff positioning has been settled for days and weeks. Out West, it’s been the epitome of high-level competition all year. It’s only going to be more competitive now.” The Lakers believe they can be the team to emerge from it. “Every team we can match up with in the playoffs, especially defensively,” Odom said.

ability, Carlisle has plenty of depth and versatility on his bench, from Terry, Haywood and J.J. Barea to late-season additions Peja Stojakovic and Corey Brewer. And, if Dallas can last long enough in the postseason, Butler could return. The Mavericks’ playoff road potentially includes the Lakers in the second round and the Spurs in the conference finals. Should they knock off the two-time reigning champions, they certainly would have the attitude that this could be the year, the chance for Kidd and Nowitzki to finally become champions. Actually, that goes for all of them, as no player on the Dallas roster has won an NBA title. “We know this is not an easy challenge, but we know it’s a challenge that is a great one,” Carlisle said. “So, embracing it and being energized by it is what we’re going to make it about.”

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and confident they are dangerous with the Carmelo AnthonyAmare Stoudemire tandem; before scoring leader Kevin Durant and the Oklahoma City Thunder face the new-look Denver Nuggets in the nightcap. The Bulls may lack the star power of some other heavyweights, but they’ve spent the last few months making believers of all of them. Led by Rose, perhaps the MVP favorite, Chicago went 62-20 for its best record since finishing with the same mark in 1997-98, Jordan’s final season. “Chicago’s a good team and there’s a reason why they can keep coming at you in waves,” Knicks coach Mike D’Antoni said, “and they play hard.” Carlos Boozer and Joakim Noah provide a strong tandem inside and the Bulls not surprisingly were a top defensive club under coach Tom Thibodeau, the architect of the Boston defense that knocked out Wade, then James in last year’s playoffs on the way to the finals. That duo then joined Chris Bosh in Miami, and after some early struggles and more scrutiny than any team should endure, the Heat surged into the postseason with 15 wins in their last 18 games and perhaps can still meet the expectations that were raised last July. “All these teams we’re talking about, they’re all flawed. There’s no perfect team to be honest with you. So if you’ve got two of the five best players, they are very dangerous,” Hall of Famer and TNT analyst Charles Barkley said. The two most intriguing firstround series could involve Anthony’s current and former teams. New York struggled last month as it adjusted to the trade with Denver, but won seven straight down the stretch to set up the 14th Celtics-Knicks series. Boston had its own problems since

the playoffs like last year. Then there’s the difficulty of the first-round matchup. The Trail Blazers are a tough draw, and their star, LaMarcus Aldridge, is from the Dallas area. Yet there is plenty to rally the pro-Mavs faction. Although Dallas lost both games in Portland this season, the Mavericks tied Miami for the most road wins in the NBA. They also allowed the 10th-fewest points this season, while scoring the 11th-most; only the Heat and the Lakers were that good on both ends of the court. “We’ve got to play great defense — that’s the thing that’s got to be our calling card in this series,” Carlisle said. “If we do that, it’s always going to enhance our offense.” Carlisle is expected to revert to his best defensive starting lineup, which includes DeShawn Stevenson. Stevenson started most of the season, including the majority of the Mavericks’ 18-1 spurt from late January to early March, then gave way when secondyear guard Rodrigue Beaubois returned from a broken left foot. Expectations were high that Beaubois would be a big lift, but he struggled so badly that on Wednesday night he lost his starting job to Stevenson, then wound up spraining his troublesome left foot in that game. Regardless of Beaubois’ avail-

HW Y 97

Continued from D1 But to win an NBA title, those teams may have to go past Michael Jordan. Well, past his likeness anyway. The Chicago Bulls, with dynamite point guard Derrick Rose, earned home-court advantage by finishing with the league’s best record for the first time since Jordan ruled the NBA. Keep on winning, and the Bulls would open the finals at the United Center, with its statue of Jordan outside. And what a story it would be if his old coach was on the opposing sideline. Phil Jackson, who led Jordan and the Bulls to six NBA titles, is expected to retire after this season. The Lakers would love to send him off with a sixth title in Los Angeles and a remarkable fourth three-peat. They are the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference and endured a five-game losing streak late in the season. But they still have Bryant, seeking to tie Jordan with a sixth ring, and loads of interior depth with Pau Gasol, Lamar Odom and they hope a healthy Andrew Bynum. And they might be back on track after closing the regular season with two straight victories. “Maybe we turned a corner the last two nights,” Jackson said. “We can’t do anything easy. We’re bipolar.” The playoffs start today, with Chicago hosting Indiana in the opener. Also today, the Heat play Philadelphia; Atlanta and Orlando meet in a postseason rematch, and Portland visits Dallas. The Lakers get started Sunday against New Orleans, after West No. 1 seed San Antonio welcomes the Memphis Grizzlies. The Celtics drew the New York Knicks, in their first postseason since 2004

has always been that they’re soft, relying too much on jump shots. The label will linger until they prove otherwise. Heck, coach Rick Carlisle even said it a few weeks ago. Fingers are mostly pointed at Nowitzki because everything about this club starts with him. While he should be beyond questions about his skills and toughness, his ability to lead will be questioned until he wins a title. In the playoffs, teams have been willing to smother Nowitzki and take their chances with everyone else. Whether he gets enough help this time around might answer the question of how long Dallas lasts. Things were looking good early, when Caron Butler was the wing man. Then he tore up a knee. Jason Terry resumed the role as the second-leading scorer with mixed results. An emotional leader capable of hitting big shots, Terry also can be inconsistent. His emotions have gotten the best of him the last few weeks. He’s started a fight, got a technical foul late in a close game, yelled at a teammate in the huddle and appeared to lose track of the score in the final seconds of a game. The offense runs best when Jason Kidd is going strong, but how strong can his 38-year-old body be this time of year? He missed two recent games for rest and came back refreshed. He’ll need to pace himself to avoid fading in

BUS INE SS

Playoffs

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Dallas Mavericks’ Dirk Nowitzki, center, sits with his teammates at the end of a loss against Portland earlier this month. The two teams meet in the playoffs starting today.

Continued from D1 Aldridge has averaged 27.8 points in the four-game season series against the Mavericks. The home team has won in each of the games, putting the series at 2-all. His success against Dallas highlights a breakthrough in the 6-foot-11 power forward’s career. Aldridge, in his fifth NBA year, is leading the Blazers with an average of 21.8 points and 8.8 rebounds a game. “We want the ball in L.A.’s hands,” forward Gerald Wallace said. “We want him to finish for us. He can make the big shots.” While in the past he has played in the shadow of threetime All-Star Brandon Roy, Aldridge has accepted a leadership role this season while Roy has struggled with knee injuries and a diminished presence. Aldridge can trace his emergence this season back to the Blazers’ Dec. 15 game at Dallas. While the Blazers lost 10398, Aldridge scored 35 points and had 10 rebounds. It was also Roy’s last game before sitting the next 30 because of his knee problems. Aldridge went on to average 23.8 points and 9.2 rebounds over the season’s next four months. Over the stretch, Aldridge was named Western Conference Player of the Week twice. He was the conference’s Player of the Month for February — joining Clyde Drexler as Portland’s only recipients of the honor. Mavs forward Dirk Nowitzki says he is a fan. “He took it to the next level this year by really pounding it in the paint. I think he really gets deep in the paint. When Roy went out with the injury, he took the team on his back,” Nowitzki said. “He had a great season, probably deserved to be an All-Star. That’s the high level he played on.” On Jan. 4, Aldridge had 28 points and 10 rebounds in an 84-81 Mavs win again in Dallas. He had 30 points and eight rebounds in a 104-101 victory in Portland on March 15, before closing out the regular season series with 18 points

and eight rebounds in a 104-96 victory on April 3. The second overall pick in 2006 acquired by the Blazers in a draft-day deal with the Chicago Bulls, Aldridge is well ahead of where he was last season, when he averaged 17.9 points and eight rebounds per game. Last year when the Blazers faced Phoenix in the playoffs, Aldridge was unexpectedly thrust into a starring role when Roy had arthroscopic knee surgery just before the opening game. Even though Roy made a dramatic return in Game 4, the Blazers were bounced by the Suns in six games. This season, it would seem that Aldridge is better prepared to lead his team. “This is where he is. So is he? I can’t answer that until we get in the game,” coach Nate McMillan said. “But he has taken on the role this year for us. This year he will be going into the playoffs as that guy.” Aldridge also deflects the assertion. “I don’t see it any different this year,” he said. “I think we have to have everybody. The playoffs aren’t won by one person, or by two. It’s by the whole team.” This season, while assuming a new role on the court, Aldridge has also seen dramatic changes in his personal life. He became a father last summer. His mother, Georgia, has been battling cancer and he’s dedicated his season to her. Because his mom has been unable to fly, she hasn’t seen him play much this season. But she’ll be able to attend the playoff games at American Airlines Center. When Aldridge was a kid, he played about 15 minutes from the neighborhood where the arena stands today. He still lives in the Dallas area in the offseason. So is all of that — his development as the team’s go-to guy combined with the local ties — giving him pause as he readies to face Dallas? Not really. “I’m probably harder on myself than anyone else could be,” he said. “So I just have to go out and try to do what I’ve done all season. And that’s to be consistent.”

97

DALLAS — The playoffs are here and so are the Dallas Mavericks. Of course. With 11 straight 50-win seasons, the only question each spring seems to be where they’ll be seeded. Followed by another question: How early will they get bounced? Since reaching the NBA finals for the first and only time in 2006, Dirk Nowitzki and the Mavs have won a single playoff series. They’ve gone out in the first round three of the last four years. This postseason, they’re seeded third in the Western Conference and will play Portland in a series that begins tonight in Dallas. Sentiment is building that Dallas is as vulnerable as ever. Lakers guard Matt Barnes and Nuggets coach George Karl made comments in recent weeks suggesting the Mavericks are the team everyone wants to play. It’s not just mind games. Four straight wins to close the regular season bumped them to a mere 12-9 since early March. Until beating New Orleans on Wednesday night, they’d lost nine straight against Western playoff teams, including two against the Trail Blazers. “I hope whoever we’re facing is thinking, ‘Same old Mavs, a team that’s going to come in and get knocked out early,’ because that’ll give us an advantage,” center Tyson Chandler said. “Sometimes it’s good to be the hunter instead of the hunted.” Then again, Chandler is a newcomer. He doesn’t know the here-we-go-again frustration in and around the organization. A few years ago, in fact, Chandler helped the Hornets add to the Mavs’ misery with one of those first-round oustings. Yet his presence is one of the reasons Dallas is hoping things will be different. He and Brendan Haywood give the Mavericks the best depth and flexibility they’ve ever had at center. “(Chandler) is the most athletic big man I’ve ever played with,” Nowitzki said. “If our two big guys play like (Dallas expects), we can beat some people in the playoffs.” So, which is it going to be — same old, same old or something new? Only three other teams have put together as many 50-win seasons as Dallas — Bill Russell’s Celtics, Magic Johnson’s Lakers and Tim Duncan’s Spurs. Each of those clubs won at least three championships along the way. San Antonio’s run is still going. The knock on the Mavericks

Blazers

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D6 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

COLLEGE BASEBALL

OSU shuts out Stanford, 1-0 From wire reports

Gene J. Puskar / The Associated Press

Pittsburgh Penguins’ Craig Adams, left, wrists a shot past Tampa Bay Lightning’s Adam Hall (18), Victor Hedman (77) and goalie Dwayne Roloson (35) during the second period of Game 2 of a first-round playoff series against the Tampa Bay Lightning in Pittsburgh Friday.

Lightning’s offense lights up Penguins The Associated Press PITTSBURGH — Martin St. Louis didn’t need three broken teeth to provide any more motivation in helping the Tampa Bay Lightning bounce back in their first-round series against the Pittsburgh Penguins. “My motivation is we were down 1-0,” St. Louis said. “It’s not because I lose teeth.” Either way, the diminutive forward put some bite back in a Lightning offense by scoring a goal and adding an assist in a 5-1 victory Friday night in Game 2 of the best-of-seven series. Defenseman Eric Brewer led the charge with a goal and two assists and the Lightning rediscovered their high-powered offense to blow the game open with a threegoal first period. The five goals — capped by Mattias Ohlund’s empty-netter — were the most the Lightning have scored in a road playoff game. The eruption came two nights after they were utterly stymied by Marc-Andre Fleury’s acrobatic 32-save performance in a 3-0 series-opening loss. And it was a forgettable game for St. Louis, which was livid no penalty was called after he was cracked across

N H L P L AYO F F R O U N D U P the face by Zbynek Michalek’s errant stick in the second period. Lightning captain Vincent Lecavalier wasn’t surprised by how St. Louis responded. “I don’t think three teeth would hold him off for tonight,” said Lecavalier, who scored a goal. Nate Thompson also scored, while Simon Gagne had three assists. Dwayne Roloson made 35 saves, including 14 in the final period. Craig Adams scored for the Penguins, who came out flat and will have two days to regroup for Game 3 at Tampa Bay on Monday night. Pittsburgh was undone by subpar goaltending from Fleury, uncharacteristic defensive miscues and a more familiar problem of lacking finish. That’s something the team’s struggled with in playing much of the final half of its season without captain Sidney Crosby (concussion) and Evgeni Malkin (knee). Fleury wasn’t pleased with his 16-save outing. “They do have a good offense, but I was still hoping to definitely

do better than tonight,” Fleury said. “I’ll have to if we want to keep winning.” Another concern is the Penguins’ anemic power play, which went zero for seven. Pittsburgh is zero for 13 in the series and has converted just six of its past 79 power-play opportunities over the past 25 games. “I think we have to understand what the problem and the situation is and we didn’t execute very well on the power play tonight,” coach Dan Bylsma said. “We have to be much better to think we’re going to have a chance to have success.” In other first-round playoff series on Friday: Cap itals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 WASHINGTON — Jason Chimera and Jason Arnott scored in a 1:57 span in the second period, Michal Neuvirth made 22 saves and Washington beat New York to take a 2-0 lead in the Eastern Conference series. After playing a scoreless and somewhat jittery first period, the Capitals dominated the Rangers the rest of the

way. Chimera scored 2:11 into the second period off a feed from Marcus Johansson, and Arnott added to the lead at the 4:08 mark with a power-play goal from the left circle. Canucks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blackhawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Daniel Sedin scored his second goal midway through the third period and added an assist to lead Vancouver to a 2-0 lead over Chicago in the Western Conference series. Jannik Hansen opened the scoring on a nice pass from Sedin, Alexander Edler scored with 13.1 seconds left in the second period, and Roberto Luongo made 22 saves for Vancouver. Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Predators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Ryan Getzlaf had a goal and two assists, Ray Emery made 31 saves in his first playoff start in nearly four years, and Anaheim beat Nashville to tie the Western Conference series 11. Bobby Ryan scored two goals, while Corey Perry and Teemu Selanne scored power-play goals in the opening minutes as the Ducks reclaimed their offensive swagger after nearly getting shut out in the series opener.

AUTO RACING: NASCAR

Expect plenty of radio chatter at Talladega By Paul Newberry The Associated Press

TALLADEGA, Ala. — Some compare it to trying to land a date for the prom. Really, it’s just two parties haggling over a potentially lucrative business deal. Only in this case, the negotiations are taking place at nearly 200 mph. Drivers who usually only talk to their crew chiefs, spotters and perhaps a teammate will be chatting it up with a bunch of guys they’re trying to beat during Sunday’s restrictor-plate race at Talladega Superspeedway, all looking for someone to go along with a one-car-leads, one-car-pushes, then-we’ll-switch arrangement. “There will be a lot of pleading, a lot of begging,” Clint Bowyer said. At Talladega and Daytona, the two NASCAR tracks where horsepower is limited by devices that keep speeds from getting out of hand, teams have learned that two cars paired together can go much faster than drafting in a larger pack, which used to be the norm on these big triovals. One car runs out front with another right on his bumper, shoving him along. After a few laps, they must switch positions to keep the pusher from overheating his engine. During practice sessions on a gloomy, windy Friday, that’s about all anyone worked on: running in tandem and perfecting the all-important switch. Those tactics will be crucial in the Sprint Cup race. But the more intriguing subplots can only be heard, not seen, as drivers flip from one channel to another on their radios, looking for a partner during the ebbs and flows of a typical race. Offers will be made. Agreements reached. Whoever plays “Let’s Make A Deal” the best is likely to take the checkered flag in the Aaron’s 499.

Glenn Smith / The Associated Press

Carl Edwards stands near his car in the garage during practice for the Aaron’s 499 Friday in Talladega, Ala. “It’s going to be interesting at the end of this thing,” Bowyer said. “It will be quite humorous.” He wasn’t laughing at the Daytona 500. After working much of the race with teammate Jeff Burton, Bowyer had to make alternate arrangements when the No. 31 car blew its engine. He worked out a deal with Kyle Busch, but couldn’t find him on the radio. “We couldn’t communicate as good with one another the way we would have liked. If we could have, the outcome would have been a lot better,” said Bowyer, who finished 17th, while Busch settled for eighth. “You just go through (the channels) and say, ‘Is this Kyle?’ and they say, ‘No, get off my radio!’ And you say, ‘Hello, is this Kyle,’ and you just keep switching ’til you find him.” He never did, forcing them to pass messages to each other through their respective spotters. That was no match for guys who were talking directly to each other on the radio, allowing them to make split-second decisions. “It was complete chaos,” Bowyer said. “Now, you are able to

switch over and tell him. You don’t have to go through two spotters and wait for the response and then get back and then, by the way, you missed your opportunity and we are no longer leading the race because somebody else was talking and did it way better than you did.” Busch was getting all kinds of offers at Daytona, including one from eventual race winner Trevor Bayne. “Looking back,” Busch mused Friday, “I probably should have gone with Trevor.” Some drivers are resisting the urge to load up their radio with the frequencies of their competitors. Matt Kenseth, for instance, has given his signal to several other teams, if they want to call him, but his radio will be programmed only to his spotter, crew chief and Roush Fenway Racing teammates. Hey, they have laws against texting and driving. Kenseth, coming off a win at Texas, doesn’t want to get distracted from his main duty — driving a race car — because he’s

fiddling with his radio. “There’s a potential for a lot to go wrong,” he said. “I’m not the smartest guy in the world, and I worry about getting confused. Next thing you know, you don’t get a full tank of gas on a greenflag pit stop and your crew chief can’t get you because you’re talking to someone else.” For those outside the sport, this must all seem a little strange. Just imagine NFL coach Bill Belichick on his headset, going over strategy with his counterpart on the opposite sideline. But the drivers say it’s a safety issue, necessitated by this new style of racing. The driver of the car that’s pushing can’t see anything except the machine on his front bumper. If anything happens in front of a tandem, it’s imperative they’re able to communicate. Also, the lead car’s spotter usually takes the role of being the eyes for both cars, another unusual situation. “I’m not totally comfortable with it,” Jeff Gordon said, “but I think it makes sense because you’re basically blind when you’re the car behind. So it’s really up to the guy up front and that spotter is trying to get that guy through.” Not surprisingly, Gordon would prefer to run at the front of a tandem most of the day, putting less stress on his car. But when it comes down to the final lap, he wants to be the one in the back, positioned to pull off one of those famous slingshot moves at Talladega. “The guy in second,” Gordon said, “is going to win.” Busch chuckled when someone asked if trying to line up a racing partner is sort of like landing a date to the prom. “I never had to do that, because I never went,” he said, still smiling. “I’d imagine that’s probably what it’s like. It’s probably the best analogy anybody can come up with.”

STANFORD, Calif. — Sam Gaviglio scattered four hits over eight innings and Kavin Keyes drove in the game’s only run in the first inning as the ninth-ranked Oregon State baseball team opened its series with a 1-0 win over No. 17 Stanford Friday night at Sunken Diamond. Keyes drove an 0-2 pitch from Stanford starter Mark Appel up the middle with two outs in the first, driving in Michael Miller from second for the game’s lone run. It pushed the Beavers to a seven-game win streak and improved their record to 25-7 on the year and 6-1 in Pacific-10 Conference play. Gaviglio went eight full innings in his ninth start of the season, limiting Stanford to four hits and two walks to improve to 7-1 this season. He

struck out eight and threw his eighth quality start of 2011. Gaviglio allowed just three runners to reach or get past second base. He was threatened in the fourth when Stanford loaded the bases with two outs, but the right-hander got Stanford’s No. 8 batter, Lonnie Kauppila, swinging on a 2-2 count. The junior lowered his earned run average to 1.19 with the eight shutout innings, and has 68 strikeouts in 68 1⁄3 innings this season. Sophomore Tony Bryant came on for his fourth save of the season in the ninth and struck out all three batters he faced. Senior Michael Miller led the Beavers with three hits, and was followed by Jared Norris, who had two of his own. Oregon State and Stanford continue their three-game series today at 1 p.m.

Oregon opens USC series with 4-2 win From wire reports LOS ANGELES — Tyler Anderson pitched 8 2⁄3 innings and Stefan Sabol homered as Oregon opened its series at USC with a 4-2 victory over the Trojans on Friday night at Dedeaux Field. The Ducks (17-14, 2-5 Pac-10) and Trojans (13-20, 4-6) were tied at two through the seventh inning, but Sabol altered the game with a home run over the left field wall with one out in the eighth. Oregon added an insurance run in the top of the ninth as Danny Pulfer battled with USC reliever Brandon Garcia for a two-out single to center. He stole second to get into scoring position and Brett Thom knocked him in with a deep double to center field.

For Sabol, it was the first home run of his Oregon career and the ninth of the year overall for the Ducks. Anderson (5-1) recorded the first out of the ninth, but surrendered a one-out single to USC’s Matt Foat as the Ducks went to the bullpen and brought out closer Kellen Moen. Moen needed just one pitch to earn his sixth save of the season as Adam Landecker lined into a double play. Anderson allowed two unearned runs on five hits while striking out 10. After issuing a walk — his only one of the game — to lead off the fourth, Anderson retired 14 consecutive batters until allowing a single to Kevin Roundtree in the eighth. Oregon and USC return to action today at 2 p.m.

COLLEGE GYMNASTICS

OSU bows out of team hunt; four advance at NCAAs From wire service reports CLEVELAND — Oregon State was knocked out of the team competition Friday, but four Beaver athletes advanced to the individual event finals of the NCAA women’s gymnastics championships. The Beavers finished fifth in the evening session and eighth overall. UCLA grabbed the last qualifying spot in the morning preliminary round, keeping alive its quest for a second straight national title. Oklahoma (196.775) and Michigan (196.7) were in the top two positions following the morning session, and UCLA (196.5) was third. Alabama (197.05), Nebraska (196.85) and Utah (196.2) led the night quali-

fying round and also will compete in today’s finals at Cleveland State’s Wolstein Center. In the second preliminary session, Alabama and Nebraska pulled away early, leaving top-ranked Florida and Utah to fight for one spot. Junior Stephanie McAllister had a 9.9 on the vault to help the Utes advance to the finals for the 12th consecutive year. The Gators (196.125) fell exactly 0.75 short, while Oregon State (196.1) and Kent State (195) rounded out the session. Advancing to the individual finals for Oregon State were Jen Kesler (uneven bars), Leslie Mak (balance beam), Makayla Stambaugh (bars, floor exercise) and Olivia Vivian (bars).

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 D7

Summit girls take top two spots, win golf tourney Bulletin staff report Summit junior Kristen Parr bested teammate Madi Mansberger by one stroke for medalist honors Friday, winning the fiveteam Summit Invitational girls golf tournament with a 9-over-par 81. Mansberger finished second with an 82 as the host Storm rolled to victory at Broken Top Club, shooting a tournament-low 341. Bend placed second with a 370 and Redmond took third with a 402. Rebecca Kerry added an 87 for Summit, giving the Storm three golfers who broke 90. Megan Mitchell added a 91 and Anna Schwab carded a 96 for Summit. The Lava Bears’ Heidi Froelich (86) and Kayla Good (87) finished third and fourth, respectively in the individual standings to pace Bend High. Rheannan Toney led the Panthers with a 94 to highlight the Redmond scorecard. In other prep events Friday: BOYS GOLF Jesuit wins 13-team event at Eagle Crest REDMOND — All five of Jesuit’s golfers finished in the top 16 as the Crusaders beat runner-up Corvallis in a 13-team event at Eagle Crest’s Ridge Course. The host Redmond Panthers finished third, led by Jared Lambert’s team-low 74. Individual medalist honors went to Marcus Potter of Tualatin, who shot a 1-under 71 on a windy and cold day. Jesuit had a pair of golfers shoot in the 70s, with Steven Dasilva totaling a 73 and Trey Johnson carding a 77. Bend’s low round went to Robbie Wilkins, who posted an 82 and helped his team to an eighth-place finish. Crook County ended the day in 10th with Kurt Russell’s 78, the low round for the Cowboys. BASEBALL Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PRINEVILLE — Storm pitcher D.J. Wilson recorded his second consecutive complete-game victory in the Intermoun-

PREP ROUNDUP tain Hybrid win over the Cowboys. “He was just in the zone and keeping guys off balance,” said Summit coach C.J. Colt. Wilson struck out four against one walk. Nick Sweet posted three hits and drove in two runs for the Storm, and Max Lindsay added two hits and scored two runs. The Cowboys host Portland’s Marshall High in a Class 4A Special District 1 doubleheader today. Gladstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MADRAS — Gladstone grabbed an early lead, posting two runs in the first inning before adding another in the third to stay ahead of a late-surging Madras. The White Buffaloes (1-3 Tri-Valley Conference, 211 overall) put up two runs in the fourth inning and three in the fifth but failed to draw even with the visiting Gladiators, despite out hitting their opponents 7-4 in game that was called after six innings due to darkness. Madras resumes league play Tuesday, hosting Estacada. Regis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CULVER — Pete Henberger hit a grand slam in the first inning, putting Regis on track early for the Class 2A/1A Special District 2 win. The Rams went on to add nine runs in the second inning and three more in the fourth as they cruised to victory in five innings, due to the 10-run mercy rule. Kyle Bender and Sergio Saldana both posted doubles for the Bulldogs (3-2 league, 610 overall), who struggled defensively and committed five errors in the home loss. Culver travels to Burns today to face the Hilanders’ junior varsity squad. SOFTBALL Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 - 11 Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 - 1 REDMOND — Panther pitchers limited

the Storm to eight hits in two games as Redmond moved to 8-0 in Intermountain Hybrid play. Justine Callen earned the win in the opener, striking out four in six innings of work. Ashley Pesek recorded the victory in the second game, allowing just three hits over six innings. Cheyenne Friend paced the Panther offense, going three for three with a double and two home runs in game one. In the late contest, Brandy Knowles and Alyssa Nitschelm each posted a triple. Redmond (13-1 overall) is at Mountain View on Wednesday. The Storm (1-3 Intermountain Hybrid, 2-6 overall) host Bend the same day. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0 - 12 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 - 5 The Lava Bears and Cowboys split the Intermountain Hybrid doubleheader at Bend High, with just one run scored in the first game followed by 17 in the second contest. In the opener, Bend pitcher Kaydee Tarin scattered five hits and tossed a 1-0 shutout. Lisa Sylvester drove in the game’s only run in the fifth inning, scoring Kendra Smith to give the Bears’ the go-ahead run. When the wind picked up in the second game, fielders from both teams struggled as the two squads combined for seven errors. Crook County scored nine runs in the final two innings of the second game for a come-from-behind victory. Bend (1-3 Intermountain Hybrid, 2-7 overall) is at Summit on Wednesday, while the Cowgirls (2-6 Intermountain Hybrid, 6-7 overall) host Portland’s Marshall High today in a Class 4A Special District 1 doubleheader. Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Gladstone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes banged out 15 hits en route to the Tri-Valley Conference victory, improving to 4-0 in league and 10-4 overall. Jamie Moe went two for three with a three-run home run, and Sarah Brown ended the day three for

three with a triple and a run batted in to lead Madras. Moe also earned the win in the circle for the Buffs. Madras is at Estacada at Tuesday. Regis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 CULVER — Regis pitcher Emily Perlich struck out 12 and held the Bulldogs to four hits en route to the Class 2A/1A Special District 3 shutout. Mariah Dougherty posted a double to highlight Culver’s offense. The Bulldogs (3-3 SD3, 11-4 overall) are off until Friday, when they play at Kennedy in another league contest. BOYS TENNIS Summit third after first day at Jesuit PORTLAND — Summit’s Paxton Deuel in singles play and the Storm’s doubles team of Sterling Dillingham and Scott Parr all went undefeated during the first day of the Jesuit Tournament. The Storm enter today’s round in third place with 6 1⁄2 points. Host Jesuit led the field after the first day with 15 points and was followed by Portland’s Lincoln High (111⁄2 points). GIRLS LACROSSE Bend United. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Crescent Valley. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 — West Salem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Bend United. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 CORVALLIS — Bend United split a pair of road games and now are 3-2 on the season. Bend United, which is made up players from Bend, Mountain View, Summit and La Pine high schools, plays Marist and Corvallis today at Corvallis High. BOYS LACROSSE Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Hermiston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Nine different players scored for the Storm in the home-field victory. Summit led 12-0 at halftime and cruised to the win. The Storm travel to Eugene on Wednesday to face Churchill.

PREP SCOREBOARD BASEBALL Friday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID Mountain View 002 262 1 — 13 11 5 Bend 105 310 0 — 10 9 5 Deadmond, C. Hollister (4), Robinett (7) and Ayers; Marshall, Koski (5) and Newton. W — C. Hollister. L—Koski. S —Robinett. 2B—Mountain View: Ayers 2, Miller, Jo Carroll, C. Hollister. Bend: Newton, Lammers, Bailey. HR — Mountain View: Robinett. ——— Summit 101 300 1 — 6 9 3 Crook County 010 200 0 — 3 6 3 Wilson and Mingus; Pfau, Larimer (5) and Cleveland. W—Wilson. L—Pfau. 2B—Summit: Mingus. Crook County: Martin. 3B—Crook County: Cleveland. ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE (Six innings) Gladstone 201 031 — 7 4 2 Madras 001 230 — 6 7 4 Campos, Walters (5) and Simac; Palmer, Moe (6) and Brown. W—Campos. L—Palmer. 2B—Gladstone: Simac; Madras: Palmer, Main. ——— CLASS 2A/1A SPECIAL DISTRICT 2 (Five innings) Regis 490 03 — 17 15 1 Culver 001 00 — 1 3 5 Butler and Campbell; Gonzalez, Gibson (3) and Barany. W— Butler. L—Gonzalez. 2B—Regis: Henberger, McGill Westenhouse; Culver: Bender, Saldana. HR—Regis: Campbell, Henberger.

SOFTBALL Friday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID First game Summit 000 002 0 — 2 5 1 Redmond 004 313 x — 11 14 0 Amodeo and Berge; Callen, Pesek (7) and McCarthy. W — Callen. L — Amodeo. 2B — Redmond: Friend, Knowles, Aubrey Nitschelm, Callen, Alyssa Nitschelm. 3B — Redmond: Heiberger. HR — Redmond: Friend 2. Second game (Six innings) Summit 001 000 — 1 3 2 Redmond 120 152 — 11 14 1

Tennis Continued from D1 Heading into today, Redmond holds a 4-2 lead over Portland’s Central Catholic with the remaining No. 3 and No. 4 singles matches set to start at 8:30 a.m. “It was just dry enough where we could get some matches in,” Redmond coach Nathan Saito said. Saito noted that Monica Johnson at No. 1 singles and Karli Christensen and Emmalee Cron at No. 1 doubles have been tough competitors for the Panthers thus far. The host Lava Bears fell to Crescent Valley of Corvallis in

Defoe, Amodeo (5) and Berge, (Second catcher not available); Pesek and McCarthy. W — McCarthy. L — Defoe. 2B —Redmond: McCarthy. 3B — Redmond: Knowles, Alyssa Nitschelm. ——— First game Crook County 000 000 0 — 0 5 0 Bend 000 010 x — 1 3 1 Christianson and Walker; Tarin and Sylvester. W—Tarin. L—Christianson. 2B—Bend: Kramer. Second game Crook County 300 004 5 — 12 10 3 Bend 000 401 0 — 5 4 4 Smith and Walker; Holmgren, Tarin (3) and Sylvester. W—Smith. L—Holmgren. 3B—Crook County: Christianson. Bend: Williams. ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— Gladstone 101 000 0 — 2 7 0 Madras 033 311 x — 11 15 3 Janet, Douglas (4) and Miller; Moe, Martin (5) and Smith. W — Moe. L — Jannet. 3B — Madras: Brown. HR: Madras: Moe. ——— CLASS 2A/1A SPECIAL DISTRICT 3 ——— Regis 100 400 1 — 6 6 1 Culver 000 000 0 — 0 4 3 Perlich and Toss; McKinney and Donnelly. W — Perlich. L— McKinney. 2B — Regis: Buck, Minten; Culver: Dougherty.

GOLF Boys Friday’s results ——— 2011 High Desert Challenge Eagle Crest Resort Ridge Course Par 72 Team scores — Jesuit 311, Corvallis 311, Redmond 322, Barlow 328, Roseburg 331, Tualatin 333, Sprague 337, Bend 341, Crater 348, Crook County 354, Crescent Valley 361, Redmond ‘B’ 395, Madras 460 Medalist — Marcus Potter, Tualatin, 71 REDMOND (322) — Jared Lambert 38-36—74, Riley Cron 40-38—78; Mason Rodby 43-42—85, Tim Messner 40-45—85, Ben Moore 45-45—90. JESUIT (311) — Steven Dasilva 36-37—73, Trey Johnson 4037—77, Thomas Arand 43-37—80, Eric Cech 41-40—81, Evan Kolomiris 41-40—81. TUALATIN (333) — Marcus Potter 35-36—71, Ray Richards

the first round but bested Ashland 6-2 in consolation play. Bryn Oliveira and Hannah Palcic, who are undefeated this season in doubles play, again played tough, recording wins against both Crescent Valley and Ashland. Crook County topped Corvallis 7-1 in first-round action and faces Sherwood this morning. Summit also advanced past the first round Friday with a 7-1 win over Benson of Portland and leads Wilsonville 2-1 in a match set to resume today at 8:30 a.m. “I’m hoping for better weather tomorrow,” said Collier, who expects the semifinal matches to begin at 11:30 a.m. with the finals tentatively slated for 3:30 p.m.

AP source: Armstrong, banned doctor met before 2010 Tour de France The Associated Press ROME — Lance Armstrong and a banned Italian physician have met repeatedly in Europe since severing formal ties in 2004, including as recently as last year before Armstrong’s final Tour de France, a high-ranking Italian law enforcement official told The Associated Press on Friday. Michele Ferrari was cleared in 2006 of criminal charges accusing him of distributing doping products to athletes, but he remains barred for life by the Italian Cycling Federation. Italian authorities suspect Ferrari of continuing to work with

20 to 30 top level cyclists despite his ban, including Armstrong, and are actively pursuing that line of investigation, the law enforcement official said. Padua prosecutor Benedetto Roberti ordered raids Thursday across Italy involving cyclists believed to have ties to Ferrari. Italian riders who work with the doctor risk bans of three to six months. The law enforcement official, who is not authorized to speak publicly because the inquiry is still under way, said that Armstrong met with Ferrari frequently over the past several years, usually in St. Moritz, Switzerland, or Monte Carlo, Monaco.

38-42—80, Chris Ralston 44-46—90, Alec Rietman 43-49—92, Jack Iba 50-49—99. BEND (341) — Ryan Crownover 40-43—83, Robbie Wilkins 41-41—82, Jaired Rodmaker 43-47—90, Chapin Pedersen 4247—89, Sam Nielsen 43-44—87. CORVALLIS (311) — Chase Lamothe 36-40—76, Hogan Arey 40-39—79, Sean Adams 42-43—85, Brad Rondeau 3736—73, Gavin Nickerson 45-43—88. ROSEBURG (331) — Arie Yraguen 36-41—77, Brad Seehawer 40-42—82, Garrick Knowles 39-41—80, Drew Groshong 40-53—93, Michael Ingram 45-47—92. MADRAS (460) — Drew Pennington 50-57—107, Cyrus Conner 60-50—110, Justin Queahpama-Mehlberg 63-69—132, Tim Devore 68-63—131, Devon Thompson 48-64—112. REDMOND ‘B’ (395) — Tyler Herrmann 42-46—90, Erik Freund 46-52—98, Jacob McIntosh 50-55—105, Brenon Thornton 50-55—105, Brendon Dixon 52-52—104. CRATER (348) — Jake Grondin 42-41—83, Jordan Roberts 44-39—83, Luke Parent 49-45—94, Corey Marineau 46-43—89, Ben Kosmatka 46-47—93. CRESCENT VALLEY (361) — Mark Geniza 40-42—82, Cameron Wilson 41-41—82, Jacob Siefarth 44-52—96, Brian Fagan 45-56—101, Bobby Cleary 54-49—103. CROOK COUNTY (354) — Jared George 39-51—90, Dillon Russell 42-51—93, Ben Mclane 43-50—93, Kurt Russell 3840—78, Hadley Reece 42-51—93. SPRAGUE (337) — Bodhi Parkin 39-43—82, Tannen Potter 48-42—90, Thomas Hoffman 40-47—87, Reed Suthers 44-42— 86, Lincoln Cook 40-42—82. BARLOW (328) — BJ Fraser 41-40—81, Nick Strebin 3742—79, Matt Holton 42-42—84, Seth Misenhimer 42-46—88, Conner Johnson 42-42—84.

County 408, La Pine 436 Medalist — Kristen Parr, Summit, 81 SUMMIT (341) — Kristen Parr 42-39— 81; Madi Mansberger 41-41— 82; Rebecca Kerry 46-41— 87; Megan Mitchell 45-46— 91; Anna Schwab 48-48— 96. BEND (370) — Heid Froelich 44-42— 86; Kayla Good 4443— 87; Lili Bornio 48-45— 93; Danae Walker 50-54— 104. REDMOND (402) — Rheannan Toney 51-43— 93; Emily Roundtree 48-49— 97; Cayla Lussier 50-52— 102; Rachel Westendorf 57-52— 109. CROOK COUNTY (408) — Kirsti Kelso 48-43— 91; Jaci McKenzie 46-49— 95; Katie Solomon 55-49— 104; Sierra Morgan 54-64— 118; Hannah Seely 65-64—129. LA PINE (436) — Taylor Tavares 42-56— 98; Sammy McPherson 57-48— 105; Haley Clark 55-50— 105; Bridget McDonald 63-65— 128; Breanna Cram 58-77— 135. MADRAS (inc.) — Hailey Ostrom 40-48— 88; Venesa Woolhiser 53-55— 108; Kelsey Polk 58-63— 121.

TENNIS Boys Friday’s results ——— JESUIT TOURNAMENT First day results Team scores — Jesuit 15, Lincoln 11.5, Summit 6.5, West Linn 6, Lakeridge 6, Grant 5, Oregon Episcopal School 4, South Salem 2 Summit results No. 1 singles: Paxton Deuel, 1-0

No. 2 singles: Parker Nichols, 1-1 No. 3 singles: Dylan Lowes, 1-1 No. 4 singles: Alex Virk, 1-1 No. 1 doubles: Bo Hall/Liam Hall, 1-1 No. 2 doubles: Sterling Dillingham/Scott Parr, 2-0 No. 3 doubles: Wes Franco/Ian Eland, 0-2 No. 4 doubles: Drew Peters/William Dalquist, 1-1

LACROSSE Girls Friday’s results ——— Bend United 13, Crescent Valley 11 West Salem 14, Bend United 9

Boys Friday’s results ——— Summit 17, Hermiston 1

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D8 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

G OL F

In pro’s score of 16, hackers Seven tied for lead after see a feat they can relate to two rounds at Texas Open ROUNDUP

By Bill Pennington

New York Times News Service

The Associated Press SAN ANTONIO — PGA Tour rookie Brendan Steele wrangled the winds and nearly emerged at the Texas Open solely atop the leaderboard. But on the tour’s toughest day in years, no one got off that easy. Steele carried the lead before double-bogeying on the par-4 15th, then blew a chance to reclaim it by missing a 6-footer for birdie on the final hole, keeping him in a rare seven-way tie atop the leaderboard at 3 under Friday. That is tied for the second-most crowded leaderboard in the PGA Tour after 36 holes since 1970. Strong winds prevented anyone from breaking out, and Friday’s average round of 75.289 was the highest on the tour since the 2008 British Open. “I got pretty beat up out there,” Steele said. “I think we all kind of did.” After missing what would’ve been his fifth birdie, Steele tapped in No. 18 to finish at par-72. He shared the lead with Geoff Ogilvy (72), Rich Beem (70), Kevin Sutherland (70), Charley Hoffman (73), Brandt Snedeker (72), and Kevin Chappell (73). A day that began with 5 under leading the pace was undone by winds that whipped higher than 30 mph. Players helplessly watched tee shots sail into the woods, and just 13 players shot under par Friday after there 50 sub-par scores in the opening round. Defending champion Adam Scott followed his opening-round 68 with a 74. But on a day like this, 2 over was good enough to leave the Masters runner-up and three others just a stroke back. “I can’t imagine anyone really running away with it,” Scott said. A seven-way tie after 36 holes hasn’t been seen on the tour since the 1977 Westchester. The record was an eight-way tie at the 2001 Greater Hartford Open. “It was blowing when it was dark this morning. It’s more like windy Texas days,” Ogilvy said. “Happy to get out of it with no damage done and still looking forward to the weekend.” Beem, playing the tour on a major medical extension, had not

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Geoff Ogilvy, of Australia, hits from a fairway bunker on the second hole during the second round of the Texas Open Friday in San Antonio. Ogilvy is one of seven golfers tied for the lead. only a share of the lead but made his first cut since the Houston Open last year. He missed the next six months after undergoing surgery for a bulging disc in his neck. Beem, whose home in Austin is just north of TPC San Antonio, bogeyed just one hole and finished his final nine shooting par or better. “This golf course kind of captures your attention,” Beem said. “You have to focus on every single hole and every single shot.” The cut was set at 4-over 148, tied for second highest on the tour this season. Among those cut was Kevin Na, who in the windy conditions never stood a chance at overcoming his 16-stroke meltdown on No. 9 in the first round. He finished at 13 over. The par-4 ninth also claimed another victim Friday: Richard Johnson, who withdrew after needing nine strokes to get through the hole. He then hopped on his Twitter account and wrote his shoulder was still feeling sore. “Had a little Kevin Na hole on 9. Made a nice 9,” he wrote. Garth Mulroy also didn’t make it through No. 9 — but for an entirely different reason. He was 2 over when he withdrew because his wife went into labor. Also on Friday:

Cochran leads Champions Tour LUTZ, Fla. — Russ Cochran shot a 7-under 64 to take a twostroke lead after the first round of the Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am. The 52-year-old left-hander started with birdies on Nos. 10-12 and went on to a bogey-free round in the Champions Tour event. John Cook and Jay Don Blake shot 66s and were a stroke ahead of Kenny Perry. Perry birded five holes on his back nine after shooting 1-over on the front, making his Outback Pro-Am debut in his third Champions Tour tournament. Cochran hit just 10 of 14 fairways, while averaging just 270 yards off the tee. Fifth in the Charles Schwab Cup standings, he has finished in the top 10 in four of his five Champions Tour events this season and won twice in 2010. McIlroy in front in Malaysia KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Rory McIlroy is shaking off his final round collapse at the Masters last week and shares the lead at the Malaysian Open after a rain-shortened second round. McIlroy shot an 8-under 64 on Friday for a two-day total of 11under 133. Alexander Noren of Sweden is tied with McIlroy after a second-round 69 in a round cut short by thunder and lightning.

The Masters highlights the growing pains of global golf By Doug Ferguson The Associated Press

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Masters champion Charl Schwartzel first showed his potential on a big stage last year in the World Golf Championship at Doral when he went toe-to-toe with Ernie Els until losing ground at the end. As the two South Africans shook hands on the 18th green, Els took note of the $850,000 that Schwartzel received as runnerup and said to his protege, “Congratulations. That’s your tour card for the U.S.” Schwartzel became a PGA Tour member this year, as did U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell and British Open champion Louis Oosthuizen. For all the talk about Americans being without a major for the first time in 17 years, their tour remains as strong as ever. With few exceptions — including Martin Kaymer and Lee Westwood, the top two players in the world ranking — the U.S. tour continues to attract the best from all over the world. That much appears to be lost on the commissioner of the Sunshine Tour in South Africa. “The internationals now hold the power in golf,” Gareth Tindall said Tuesday in announcing a new World Golf Championship for South Africa. “For how long, we don’t know.” Part of Tindall was speaking from national pride, and rightfully so. South Africans historically have had to travel the most and the greatest distance to develop their games on a worldwide scale. Yet they now have won two of the last three majors, and they have five major champions in the last nine years, a list that includes Els, Retief Goosen and Trevor Immelman. All of them are PGA Tour members now, but it’s important to remember where they started. So when PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem says it’s good for

golf that other tours are strong, that’s because it makes his tour even stronger. There is speculation that a new WGC for South Africa was the product of a compromise. The global schedule in golf is getting so crowded that the South African Open was placed during the same week as the Presidents Cup in Australia. This became a problem when five South Africans occupied the first six spots in the Presidents Cup standing — all five placing among the top 10 in their national open, with Els as the defending champion. That led to threats the South Africans wouldn’t play the Presidents Cup. Some questions remained unanswered. The Presidents Cup announced its dates — Nov. 17-20 — more than a year before the South African Open said it would be played at the same time. Why would the South African Open take that spot on the schedule unless it knew it could use that to its advantage in trying to land a World Golf Championship? Els was furious in January when he learned of the conflict. Why wouldn’t South Africa have spoken to him first? The date clash was resolved last week at the Masters when Sunshine Tour officials agreed to move the South African Open one week later, swapping dates with another South African event. It also picked up a World Golf Championship, although some critical details have yet to be filled in. One is the sponsorship of a tournament with a $10 million purse. The other is when it would be played. The International Federation of PGA Tours met last week at the Masters to sort out this mess. “The sense was that a World Golf Championship event in South Africa would be a good thing if it could be worked out in terms of sponsorship and a date, and we gave them the OK to look

into it,” said Ed Moorhouse, the PGA Tour’s co-chief operating officer. “There’s no secret it’s a pretty busy time of the year. We still have a lot of elements that need to be worked out, not the least of which is the date.” Tindall said he was looking at the first week of December, which presents only more problems. That’s the date of Chevron World Challenge that Tiger Woods hosts in California, not to mention the Nedbank Challenge in South Africa. Greg McLaughlin, who runs the Chevron World Challenge, said he would consider a date change, though the options are limited. “It’s a very ideal date for us, the first weekend in December, and it works well for the network, our sponsor and all the players,” he said. “We’d look at other options, but there’s really not many options around that time frame.” This is where golf has to be careful. It’s great to see the game moving around the world, especially with so many great players coming from so many countries. Sunday at the Masters was a snapshot of modern golf — players from every continent where golf is played atop the leaderboard at some point during the final round at Augusta National. But it won’t work without cooperation. The last two months of the year are busier than ever. Europe concludes its season in Asia with the Race to Dubai, Australia is in the prime of its season, Japan has some of its biggest events, and the World Cup is held every other year in China. Is there room for two World Golf Championships a month apart separated by 7,000 miles on opposite sides of the hemisphere? Schwartzel said last week that while America is big, “the world is bigger.” But the more golf grows around the world, the more crowded it gets.

Kevin Na, a little-known professional golfer, chased his ball into some woods and brambles Thursday during a PGA Tour event in Texas. About five minutes and 16 frenzied, desperate and comical strokes later, he emerged a folk hero. Na, 27, an American who grew up in South Korea, took his 16 shots without losing his ball, hitting it in a hazard or breaking a club over his knee. He walked off the par-4 ninth hole at the Texas Open in San Antonio plucking thorns and barbs from his arms and legs as his caddie brushed leaves and dirt off his back and shoulders. On Friday, Everyman golfers rejoiced. “That’s great, welcome to our world,” Tom Magazeno said as he prepared to tee off at Black Bear Golf Course, a public course in Franklin, N.J. “A real golfer never gives up, and a real golfer counts every stroke. He is a hero.” Playing behind Magazeno, Mike White of Verona, N.J., predicted that Na’s golfing calamity would become a YouTube sensation. “It’s good for golf,” he said. “It’s a pro golfer with integrity. That must have cost him a lot of money and he had to be embarrassed, but he pressed on. Good for him.” Most amateur golfers would have picked up their ball. Some might have played on. Few would have known to count their penalty strokes. Fewer still would have written “16” on their scorecard: A what? Double quadruple bogey? “I’ve seen guys shoot a 16 on one hole, but I’ve never seen someone write 16 down,” said Bill Hindon of Ringwood, N.J., sitting in a cart alongside the first hole at Black Bear. The social-media popularity of Na’s misadventure will be enhanced by the distinctive setting of his escapade. Showing him ducking and tromping through an almost impenetrable thicket of vines, scrub bush and trees, the video — all 16 strokes were captured — looks like a Golf Channel presentation of “Animal Planet.” All the while, because Na had agreed to wear a wireless microphone during the round, he and his caddie narrate the ruinous set of events as they unfold. “You’ve got nothing — nothing!” the caddie, Kenny Harms, says early on, weaving through the overgrowth. “Oh, come on!” Na shouts as his 11th shot caroms off a tree and almost hits him. The Golf Channel broadcasters watching added to the sense of comedy. “We could be here awhile,” one said as Na pursued his ball deeper into the forest. Laughter can be heard in the background at times and fans give Na a hearty round of applause when his 13th shot finally — and barely — flies out of the woods.

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Kevin Na watches his second drive off the ninth tee during the Texas Open Thursday in San Antonio. Na took a 16 on the hole. At courses across the New York metropolitan region, it was difficult to find golfers who were not astonished by Na’s travails. But many could recall playing similarly disastrous holes. “I relived it,” Rodney Stilwell, 53 and a lawyer, said from the clubhouse at Silver Lake Golf Course on Staten Island. Three years ago, playing in a tournament at Silver Lake, Stilwell hit a shot that landed halfsubmerged in water on No. 15. “I tried and tried to hit it out,” Stilwell said. “There was a lot of splashing.” Stilwell said that one thought kept coming back: He should have gone back to the tee and hit again. He could almost hear those same words inside Na’s head. “It was the same thing,” Stilwell said. “I was laughing inside, and you could see on TV Kevin was laughing outside.” Jim McLean, a teacher to top PGA Tour pros who is frequently ranked among the top five U.S. golf instructors, said there were lessons for the recreational golfer in Na’s episode. “There comes a point when you just snap and start whaling away like Bill Murray in ‘Caddyshack’ or something,” McLean said. “But that usually can be avoided if you slow yourself down. Take a walk away from the ball and gather your thoughts. “I guess this proves even top pros can get disoriented. It’s pretty impressive, though, that he finished the round strong.” Na went on to make three birdies and no bogeys on the back nine and shoot 80, which means he was four under par Thursday if the ninth hole was excluded. When asked to elaborate on his day, he sounded like any other golfer. “It was really just one bad shot,” he told reporters. “Well, two actually. But that’s what started the whole thing. It kind of gets out of hand. That’s what happens in this crazy game.”

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For homes online

THE BUL L ETIN

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S AT U R D AY, A P R I L 16 , 2 0 11

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www.bendhomes.com

ADV ERTISIN G SECTION E

$3,500 IN UPGRADES ON US!

46 Acre Tumalo Hay/Horse Ranch 46 mountain-view acres with 32 acres of irrigation water rights. The computerized in-ground irrigation system produces high quality hay and pasture with minimal labor. The 3,900 sq. ft. home offers radiant floor heat, two fireplaces, high vaulted ceilings and mountain views from nearly every room. The outbuildings include a 4-stall barn, shop, and hay/RV barn. Take a virtual tour at www.OregonRanchandHorse.com to view more photos. $1,250,000

Just like baby boomers, Hayden Homes has only improved with age. In our 22nd year, our homes are better than ever. This year, Hayden Homes continues to evolve with the implementation of new, fresh colors and products – staying chic without compromising on quality or value. Come visit one of our communities in Central Oregon or find us on the web at www.hayden-homes.com for more information.

HAYDEN HOMES WWW.HAYDEN-HOMES.COM 541-549-6681

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Investment Protection

A home warranty can help protect a buyer’s new investment and offer peace of mind. by CMS, for The Bulletin Advertising Department Buying a home is arguably one of the largest purchases a person will make. It can also be one of the most stressful, especially if systems or appliances fail after buying the home. Even after careful consideration of funds and budgeting, it’s easy to become overextended if money is needed to make expensive repairs. A home warranty, however, can take some of the bite out of unexpected expenses. Although home buyers are urged to hire an inspector and check a property and structure from top to bottom before signing on the dotted line, a home inspector cannot foresee everything that may crop up after a person moves into a home. Home warranties can be a smart investment that takes some of the financial pressure off of new homeowners. They can also be negotiated into the sale terms of the home so that the seller is responsible for providing the warranty to the new buyer. Home warranties do not negate the need for homeowner’s insurance, but they can add protection against large monetary payouts to repair many items around the house. Policies may differ as to specific coverage, but most home warranties will cover major systems of the home, such as heating and cooling, plumbing, electrical, as well as certain appliances. To decide if a warranty is the right investment, home buyers should consider the following: • Home warranties are only as good as the company backing them. Careful investigation into

the trustworthiness of the warranty company and its track record should be completed. • Read the fine print of the warranty. Learn what exclusions exist, which may not make the warranty practical. • Keep in mind that the warranty company reserves the right to determine if a repair or replacement is adequate in a claim situation. • In general, warranty companies work with their own set of contractors. This means a homeowner may not be able to hire his or her own preferred contractors to do work. • There may be a deductible or a fee charged prior to having a technician assess a repair situation. • The warranty company may require inspection of the house to be sure items are in good working order before offering a plan. • If a warranty is offered through a home seller, there may be no negotiation on the coverage or company used. Home buyers should keep in mind that there are many unforeseen expenses that can arise when purchasing a new home. Having some additional protection, such as a home warranty, could mean saving money on out-of-pocket repairs.

H ome heating and cooling systems are among a long list of household systems and appliances that are oftentimes covered under home warranties.


E2 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 634

642

656

687

730

732

745

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Commercial for Rent/Lease

New Listings

Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale

Homes for Sale

Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2342 NE Mary Rose Pl., #2 $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Studio apt., $410 mo., 613 SW 9th, w/s/g/ + cable paid. No smoking/pets. 541-598-5829 until 6 p.m.

2 Bdrm 2 bath, in Westridge Subdivision. Newly remodeled, on ½ acre, near Ath. Club of Bend. No smoking. $1195. Call 541-388-8198

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Call for Specials!

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space 682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condominiums & Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave. - $590/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Rentals

600 630

Rooms for Rent No smoking, male preferred, $270/mo. +$50 dep. Kitchen facilities. 541-420-6625. Room w/private bath, kitchen privileges, laundry facilities. In Tumalo on acreage. Dog or horse???. $500+utils in winter months.541-389-8142 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $575.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

3018 NE Canoe Newer 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, all appliances, gas fireplace, 1130 sq. ft. , garage, deck, w/d paid, cat ok. $775 Call 382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

631

899 NE Hidden Valley #2 2 bdrm, all appliances, gas fireplace, utility room, garage, w/s paid. $650. Call 541-382-7727

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932 805 NW Saginaw #3 $1,150/Fully Furnished, 2/2 near COCC. Dbl car garage, W/D, W/S/Yard included!

7 Days a week• 389-2486 www.investoregon.com

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

NOW

www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

First Month’s Rent Free 130 NE 6th 1-2 bdrm/ 1 bath, W/S/G paid, onsite laundry, no pets, $450-$525+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

SPRING

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! Spring On In !! $150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

ONE MONTH FREE with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. Rimrock Apartments All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $675/mo. 541-480-3666

WEST SIDE STUDIO. Private fenced yard, 2 decks, laundry, newly remodeled, includes utilities. $650 month. 541-317-1879.

Westside Village Apts. 1459 NW Albany (1/2 off 1st month rent!) Studio $475 1 bdrm $495 2 bdrm $575 Coin-op laundry. W/S/G paid, cat or small dog OK with dep. 541-382-7727 or 388-3113

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

638 562 SE 4th 2 bdrm, all appl., gas heat, w/d hook-up, garage, fenced yard, small pet ok. $650 Call 382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Country Terrace 61550 Brosterhous Rd. ½ off first month rent ! 1 Bdrm $425 • 2 Bdrm $495 All appliances, storage, on-site coin-op laundry BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-7727 www.bendpropertymanagement.com

SE Duplex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage, small fenced yard, W/D hookup, kitchen appl., $725/ mo., 541-990-0426 or 541-258-5973.

640

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 2 BDRM., 1 BATH flat near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $600/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General 2 Bdrm 2 bath Spotless, custom stick-built ranch at CRR. New floors, views, double garage, no smoking. $695/mo. 541-548-4225 Rented your property? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad!

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Why Rent? When you Can own! For as low as $1295 Down. 541- 548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 1800 sq ft. Very clean! New bathroom, lrg fam rm, sprinklers, attch garage. No smkg; pets poss. 1150 NE 6th St. Avail now! $950/mo, $600 refundable. 541-389-4985 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2 car garage w/opener, appl., fenced yard. auto sprinklers. Avail. 5/1. $925 + dep. 541-549-1671 or 541-419-2982. When buying a home, 83% of Central Oregonians turn to

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townhouse apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great location, starting at $565. 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133

SPECIAL

1/ 2 OFF SOME MOVE-IN RENTS w/ Lease Agreements

call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad

FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES ***** CALL 541-382-0053

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 2 bdrm, appliances, electric heat, well water, dog ok. $525. Call 541-382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

$800 3+/1 close to downtown, easy access to bypass! w/d hookup, deck, AC. 120 NE Elm $850 3/2 dbl garage, w/d hookup, central air, fenced, sprinkler system. 2240 NE 5th St. $850 3/2 dbl garage w/opener, w/d hookup, fenced. 400 SW 28th St. $925 3/2 dbl garage, gas forced air heat, w/d hook up, fireplace. 1069 NW Spruce Ave. $995 $200 off 1st month! dbl garage w/opener, w/d hookup, family room. 2103 SW 37th St. $1100 4/2 dbl garage w/opener, w/d hookup, forced air heat, fenced, sprinklers 2209 NW Quince Ct.

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

NEW 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1731 sq.ft., bonus room, fenced yard, 20269 SE Knights Bridge Pl. $1095/mo. 1 yr lease, no pets. 541-350-2206

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend 1037 NE Hidden Valley $775 / 2 bedroom, 2 bath duplex with a 1 car garage and a deck near the hospital and good shopping. ABOVE & BEYOND PROP MGMT - 541-389-8558 www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com

19610 Apache, DRW 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances, fireplace w/insert, utility room, RV Parking, garage, 2.1 acres, additional storage, pet considered. $895 Call 541-382-7727 BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

345 NE Greenwood Great Location, 450 sq. ft., private entrance and bath, no smoking. $450. 382-7727

BEND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT www.bendpropertymanagement.com

455 Sq.ft. Office Space, high visibility on Highland Ave in Redmond, $400 per mo. incl. W/S/G, Please Call 541-419-1917.

738

Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495 First Month’s Rent Free 1018 NW Birch Ave. 2 bdrm/ 1 bath, 720 sq ft. house,located on large lot. Pets neg. $550+dep. CR Property Management 541-318-1414

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver VILLAGE PROPERTIES Sunriver, Three Rivers, La Pine. Great Selection. Prices range from $425 - $2000/mo. View our full inventory online at Village-Properties.com 1-866-931-1061

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, gas appls & fireplace. Crescent Creek subdivision, w/Fitness Ctr. No smoking; pets neg. $675/ mo.$775/dep. 541-815-5494

671

RV Parking Hookup for RV in quiet Tumalo area. Dog or cat ok. Beautiful view. $550/mo. Electricity extra in winter. 541-389-8142

676

Mobile/Mfd. Space RV/Trailer Space in NE Redmond, near Crooked River Dinner Train, additional 17x20 finished bldg. w/deck, fenced area, incl. W/S, $400/mo, Call 541-419-1917.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease ATV - Snowmobile storage etc. Shop 22’x36’ block building w/3 rooms, between Redmond & Terrebonne. $250/mo. 541-419-1917

Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998. RV-Boat Storage, etc. Shop 36’x42’ with 2 roll-up doors, between Redmond, & Terrebonne. $350/mo. Call 541-419-1917

Tumalo Conveniently located in Tumalo is this beautiful 5.40 Acres, which includes 2.50 acres of Swalley irrigation, and a private park like setting. Property is complete with mature landscaping, water features, and a cascade mountain view! The spacious 2,444 Sq.ft. home offers an open floor plan, with 4 bedrooms, 2 bath, and includes features such as hardwood flooring, vaulted ceiling, and newer pellet stove. MLS#201101820 $389,000 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Multiplexes for Sale

NW BEND - $190,000 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2422 sq. ft. home on a quiet cul-de-sac. close to Sawyer Park, river trails & shopping. freshly painted interior. This is a Fannie Mae HomePath property. MLS#201102172 Darryl Doser, Broker, CRS 541-383-4334

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

700

Cute remodel This is a cute remodeled home Duplex overlooking the canyon, new Your chance to own multiple carpet, fresh paint inside and investment properties. Loout, 3 bedrooms 1.75 bathcated on a corner lot & conrooms, 1993 sq. ft., larger veniently located bonus room, close to shopMLS#201003248 ping and easy access to the $119,500 bypass MLS#201010087 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC $89,900 Redmond 541-923-8664 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Madras 541-475-3030 Redmond 541-923-8664 $129,900 -Coming Soon! (2) Madras 541-475-3030 Duplex! Great investment, SW Redmond short sales, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, Nice 3 bedroom 2 bath home Redmond. MLS #2807750 on .24 of an acre, back yard Call Virginia, Principal Broker is fenced, great floor plan, 541-350-3418 SW side of town easy access Redmond Re/Max Land & to HWY 97 and Bend Homes Real Estate MLS#201007940 $85,900 Bank Owned! 3972 sq.ft., D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Duplex Project! $159,900. Redmond 541-923-8664 Ad #3302 Madras 541-475-3030 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 Find It in www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

New Listings BANK OWNED $136,500 Great horse property. 1.17 acres 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1822 sq. ft. home. 2-car attached garage, detached shop and 5 stall barn. MLS#201102124 Mark Valceschini, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

BANK OWNED $87,900 Single story 1220 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in Redmond. Electric baseboard heat, wood burning fireplace. On .46 of an acre. Sold As-is. MLS#201102032 Mark Valceschini, P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Duplex Investment Opportunity! $119,900 Ad#8242. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

730

541-923-8222

675

3 bdrm 3 bath 3500+ sq. ft. home, all appliances, family room, office, triple garage, 2 woodstoves, sunroom, lrg. utility room including w/d, pantry, pet OK. $2500 mo. 541-382-7727

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

www.MarrManagement.com

Country Home!

652

Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

NE BEND - $399,900 Remodeled 3 bedroom, 2.5 Two homes on large C2 lot bath, 2054 sq. ft. home on used as rentals currently, but 4.8 acres, 1.70 irrigated, use your imagination. The pond, 4 stall barn & Mtn. homes sit on .33 of an acre views. Desirable Los Serraand are close to the HWY nos neighborhood minutes with great access. Additional from schools, shopping, tax lot on Markuson Drive parks and hospital. with the purchase of these MLS#201102081 homes for free. This gives Greg Miller, you a bunch to work with and P.C., Broker, CRS, GRI run a business because this is 541-322-2404 in excess of an acre all together. Agent owned, might do some trading. Asking $199,900! Heather Hockett, PC, Broker, 541-420-9151 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

Real Estate For Sale

Houses for Rent NW Bend

654

*****

3 Bdrm+offc, 1 bath, 1800+/sq ft ranch style in Redmond. Gas heat + AC; near Sr. Center & hospital, fenced yard, new paint & carpet, $900/mo, pets considered. 541-408-2000; 541-480-4248

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Houses for Rent SE Bend • 1 Bdrm/1 Bath, Cozy, clean end unit Central location. Fenced back yard. Off street parking. No Pets. $425 WST • Near Pioneer Park - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs units. Coin-op laundry on site. Private balconies. $495 WST • Near Costco - 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Duplex. Carport. Laundry room. Totally refurbished. No Pets. $585 WS • Newly Refurbished SE Unit - 2 Bdrm/1Bath. Private fenced patio. Coin-op laundry. Detached carport. Huge common yard. Ask about Pets. $595 WST • Totally Furnished Mt. Bachelor Resort Unit. 1 Bdrm/1 Bath + Murphy bed. $645 WST • Charming Home Close In - 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath. Must See! Washer & dryer included. Large partially fenced yard. Pet considered. Fireplace, GFA. $775 • NW TOWNHOME - Lovely 2 Bdrm/2.5 Bath with Laundry room. Single garage. Vaulted ceilings. Great location. GFA. Fireplace. $775 WS • Large 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath Home in Central Location. W/D Included. Single garage. Large yard. Garden area. Small pets considered. $775 • Great SW Location - Older ranch-style 3 Bdrm/2 Bath home with Double Garage. Huge corner lot. Fenced back yard. Pets considered. $795 per mo. • 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath Plus bonus room - NE Home. 1812 sq. ft. Master on main floor. RV parking. Double garage. Pets considered. $975 mo.

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

61438 Brookswood "B" 3 bdrm, 2 bath, all appliances w/d hook-up, gas heat, deck, dbl garage, 1254 sq. ft. cat ok $825. 541-382-7727

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

5135 "A" NE 15th St.

DOWNTOWN AREA close to library! Small, clean studio, $450+ dep., all util. paid, no pets. 541-330-9769 or 541-480-7870.

LEASING!!!

Reserves at Pilot Butte 1-2-3 Bedroom luxury condos. Stop by today! Office Hours: Mon-Sat, 9-5 541-318-4268

2 Bdrm., 2 bath, duplex, FREE 1st mo., $625, clean, quiet dishwasher, garage, W/D hookup, gas, new paint 2031 NW Cedar,no smoking, 541-815-9848

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz A small studio, $385 + dep. No pets/smoking. Applications at 38 #2 NW Irving Ave., 3 blocks from downtown Bend. Call 541-389-4902 Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, no pets, $675/mo., utils incl., call Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 634

1/2 OFF 1ST MONTH!

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com SHEVLIN RIDGE $475,900 Stunning 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 3118 sq. ft. home. Slab granite counters, custom cabinetry, stainless appliances. Master on main with well appointed bath. Backyard is meant for entertaining. MLS#201102248 Melanie Maitre, Broker 541-480-4186

Sunny, Warm So. Oregon! Trade your Bend area home for my 7-yr 4 Bdrm 2.5 Bath Central Point home, in planned development, with nice views. 541-941-6915

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Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale

COMMERCIAL BUILDING FOR LEASE Commercial Located between Bend and Redmond close to the Des- Wonderful corner double lot with high visibility and chutes Junction overpass for charm. Property has on-site easy access north and south storage shed and alley parkon Hwy 97. This building was ing. MLS#201100690 designed for truck repair but $258,900 could have many uses. D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC MLS#201102031 Redmond 541-923-8664 Rookie Dickens, Madras 541-475-3030 Broker, GRI, CRS, ABR 541-815-0436 $440,000. 4-CAR GARAGE plus an exceptional 2974 sq. ft. home. Granite slab counters, knotty alder cabinets & trim, travertine floors, stainless steel appliances and slate entry. Huge bonus room w/built-in TV, bar & views, AC, central vac, fully landscaped, and extensive stamped concrete. Heather Hockett, PC Broker, LANDON CONSTRUCTION 541-420-9151 • Decks • New Construction Century 21 Gold Country Realty • Remodeling • Additions Business • Garages Opportunities • Kitchens & Bathrooms in Chemult, OR. References Available Restaurant and Lounge. ResLandon Construction, Inc. taurant features country cuiBend, OR 97701 sine & the Lounge offers lotwww.LandonConstruction.net tery & keno. Steady tourist Phone: 541-948-2568 traffic. Includes a 924 sq.ft. NE BEND - $279,000 manufactured home to ocWell-appointed 3 bedroom, cupy, rent or use for staff. 2.5 bath, 2680 sq. ft. home in Owner will carry. $295,000. Jonahs Landing. Hardwood, MLS 201010596 slate, stainless appliances, Juniper Realty fenced & landscaped yard. 541-504-5393 Views of Mt. Jefferson from Chemult Motel master, lots of storage. Established 16 unit Motel with MLS#201102240 separate home for the manDarrin Kelleher, Broker ager. Centrally located on 541-788-0029 Hwy 97 between Bend & Klamath Falls. $450,000. MLS 201010626 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

• Commercially Zoned and Adjacent to Chemult Motel Updated 1,512 sq ft home on 1.2 acres. $125,000 MLS 201010650. • Home on 3.68 acres with NE BEND - $395,000 pole barn. $150,000 MLS Vintage 1925 Bend home201010653 stead with spacious farm- Owner will carry on all the house. 1 bedroom & bath properties. Purchase sepadownstairs and 2 bedrooms rately or as a package! up. 33.89 acres, 1925 barn, Juniper Realty workshop, large chicken coop 541-504-5393 with runs & spacious horse barn. MLS#201102146 Pine Room for Sale Lynne Connelley, Burns, Oregon. Dinner house Ecobroker, ABR, CRS and lounge plus weekend 541-408-6720 breakfast. Over 5,000 sq.ft. lounge and dance floor, banquet room plus dining room. Recent remodel. Great atmosphere. Perfect chance to own your own restaurant, owner terms. Come in and see us to discuss your options! $245,000. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206

Valleyview Fabulous 3 bedroom 2.5 bath home in Valleyview, 2520 sq. ft., large bedrooms, double www.BendOregonRealEstate.com garage, master on mail level, extra large bedrooms, come NE BEND DUPLEX look at the price of owner$225,000 ship, granite counter tops in View of Pilot Butte, large back the kitchen, larger master decks. Quiet neighborhood bathroom, fireplace in family on a cul-de-sac. Each unit is room, sit on the deck and en2 bedrooms, 1.75 baths, joy the views of the city and 1058 sq. ft. and has washer/ mountains MLS#201007771 dryer hookup. Nice sized liv$284,900 ing rooms. Window coverD & D REALTY GROUP, LLC ings included. MLS#2900544 Redmond 541-923-8664 Dorothy Olsen, Madras 541-475-3030 Broker, CRS, GRI 541-330-8498 Great Location This property is a great location with a home full of storage, large square footage for the price and much more to offer. MLS#201008044 $69,900 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Prineville - Great price on this cute, newer duplex in NW Prineville, near downtown and park. Located on a deadend street. Each unit is 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath, & includes range, dishwasher and frefer. w/D hookups and single attached garage. Garages are between units w/private entry into each. Great rental history, needs some TLC. Good investment opportunity. Bank owned. MLS#201101482. Just $79,900. Pamela Foster-Adamson, Broker, GRI 541-408-7843 All Star Real Estate

Cute and Quaint Cute & quaint & close to shopping, downtown & Shalee Park. Don’t miss this nicely updated home with a large backyard & room for your toys & animals with a fenced in front backyard. You can have it all. MLS#201007598 $49,900 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 Mountain Views Exceptional Mountain Views from this beautifully appointed 2,221 sq. ft. custom built home on .35 of an acre! Upon entering, quality will be apparent, from the elegant railing on the stairwell to the Brazilian Hardwood flooring & crown molding. The large open kitchen is a chief’s dream, complete with gran ite counters, custom Amish cabinets, tile back-splash and stainless steel appliances. Re lax in your private master suite, with walk-in closet, double sinks & large tiled shower. MLS#201009943 $254,000 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Prineville - Three well kept 4-plex units are located in a quiet area of town close to downtown shopping and near the hospital. Each unit has two bdrm with baths, laundry upstairs, and half bath downstairs with its own garage, patio and satellite dish. May be purchased separately or together. MLS # 201008692, 201008694, 201008696. $167,900. Pamela Foster-Adamson, Broker, GRI 541-408-7843 All Star Real Estate FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

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Condo / Townhomes For Sale Penthouse in the Heart of Bend. Amazing western and southern mountain views. Features two decks, 2 bdrms, 2 baths. Floor to ceiling windows and a gourmet kitchen. Great room with wet bar and gas fireplace. Two side by side garage parking spaces and storage. HOA fee includes water and sewer, garbage service, security and insurance. $825,000. Cate Cushman, Principal Broker 541-480-1884 www.catecushman.com

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Open Houses

Room for Toys This is a nice 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom home on a larger lot with a 2-car detached garage, close to downtown. Lots of room for all your toys. MLS#201102220. $35,000 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 Corner lot Semi-custom home located on a corner lot. Elevated deck extends into the tree filled backyard. Lower level finished in hardwood and carpet flooring. Kitchen equipped with granite tile counter tops, natural finished cabinets and breakfast bar. Great room has stone surround fireplace and ceiling fan. Upstairs Master bedroom is spacious with numerous windows, vaulted ceiling and fan. Master bathroom is tiled with large jet style tub, tile counters and shower is tiled and spacious. MLS#201100812 $250,000 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030

Half acre with view Located on just over a half acre of view property, you’ll find this beautiful 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home, offering 2,383 sq. ft. of open concept living space. Features include 745 granite counters, hardwood Homes for Sale flooring, 9 ft. ceilings, tile backsplashes, wired for surUpgrades round sound, gas fireplace, Lots of upgrades in this house! and large bonus room. Relax Tile entry, gas fireplace, in your very private master rounded corners, vaulted ceilsuite, complete with jetted ing, workable kitchen, great tub and walk-in shower. The floor plan, and mature landspacious backyard is comscaping with sprinklers front pletely fenced, providing priand back. Completely fenced. vacy for entertaining or simWhat more could you ask ply relaxing in the shade. for? MLS#201100658 MLS#201007542 $109,000 $263,772 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Redmond 541-923-8664 Madras 541-475-3030 Madras 541-475-3030

4 Bdrm 3.5 bath in Stonehaven, built 2006. Open Sat 11-3, Sun 11-2, 20418 Murphy Rd, Bend. By owner, $209,900. 541-979-1920

CLOSE TO DESCHUTES RIVER SUNDAY 12:00 - 3:00 PM 3 bedroom, 2.5 bathrooms, 2401 sq. ft., .29 acre. Open floor plan, single level, lots of natural light.

Hosted & Listed by: SHERRY ORTEGA Broker

541-410-1579

16741 Stage Stop Drive River Meadows, Three Rivers South Directions: Hwy. 97 south, turn right at Vandervert Rd, left on S. Century Drive, right on Bonanza Lane, Right on Stage Stop Drive.

$320,000


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 E3

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Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Homes for Sale

Northwest Bend Homes

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates!

Northwest lodge style home with views! $1,695,000 Ad# 2152 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

2641 NW Crossing Dr. Large lot This house is over 3000 Sq. ft. , 2 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1774 sq.ft., $359,900. Luxury townhome with an unfinished basement facing Compass Park feaand could accommodate tures two master suites with many design concepts. Located on 1+ Acres with fully tiled bathrooms, hardmountain views. Must See! wood floors and gourmet isMLS#201008130 land kitchen with granite tile $149,000 countertops and custom D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC hardwood cabinets. Tall ceilRedmond 541-923-8664 ing and gas fireplace in livMadras 541-475-3030 ing room. The Garner Group RV Parking 541-383-4360 Nice 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath home offers 1616 sq. ft. of living 3468 NW Denali - Awbrey Park .48 Acre. Northwest magnifispace, which includes an ad cent private 4 bdrm, + ofdition perfect for a home office, 4230 sq.ft., home, open fice or family room. Home great room floor plan with has newer energy efficient master suite and guest suite windows, newer paint, and on main level. Upstairs: 2 cedar fencing. This half acre bdrms, full bath, exercise, lot features a beautiful loft and bonus room Flat mountain view and room to backyard. $819,000. build a shop, and park your MLS #201102272 RV and toys. Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, MLS#201006711. $59,500 CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC COLDWELL BANKER Redmond 541-923-8664 Morris Real Estate Madras 541-475-3030 3880 Sq.ft. home, 60 x 50 shop Amazing View w/Apt. $699,000. Wonderful floor plan, very tall MLS#2905707 ceiling, fireplace, large open kitchen with pantry. Amaz- Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 ing view as well as half bath Crooked River Realty downstairs. MLS#201004272 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1328 sq.ft. $154,900 $149,000. MLS#2905473 D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker Redmond 541-923-8664 541-771-2585 Madras 541-475-3030 Crooked River Realty 10 acre Deschutes River 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, double Estate! $750,000. Ad#8842. garage- attached. $164,900. TEAM Birtola Garmyn MLS#201005643 Prudential High Desert Realty Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker 541-312-9449 541-771-2585 www.BendOregonReal Crooked River Realty Estate.com 3 Bdrm Home w/Shop on $115,000 -Bend! 3 Bdrm, Double Lot! $130,000 2.5 bath, 1328 sq.ft. Ad#2292. MLS #201010582 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Call Travis Hannan, Principal Prudential High Desert Realty Broker 541-788-3480 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate 3 Bedroom, 2 bath $103,900 $125,000 - Crooked River MLS#201008829 Ranch. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, Call Melody Curry, Broker 2176 sq. ft. MLS#201003888 541-771-1116 TRAVIS HANNAN, Crooked River Realty Principal Broker 541-788-3480 3 Bedroom, 2 bath frame with Redmond Re/Max Land & many high end upgrades. Homes Real Estate MLS#201102199 $209,999 1338 NW Fort Clatsop St. CASCADE REALTY 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1429 sq.ft., $334,000. Pride of owner- Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 ship shows in this attracwww.homes4oregon.com tively finished Craftsman home. Hardwood floors in 3 Bedroom, 2 bath with living room, central kitchen sunroom, 1400 sq. ft. shop, and rear dining area. Tile 576 sq. ft. garage and pond. countertops, built-in desk MLS#201101515 and walk-in pantry. Beautiful $145,000 tile bathrooms. Large heated CASCADE REALTY storage room off garage. Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker The Garner Group. 1-541-536-1731 541-383-4360 www.homes4oregon.com

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The Bulletin 1451 NW Remarkable, Bend. 4 Bdrm, 4 bath, 4218 +/sq.ft., .46 acres, mtn view, to be built. $1,190,000. Call Ken Renner, Principal Broker, 541-280-5352. krenner@SunriverRealty.com 19996 Birchwood Dr. 5 Bdrm, 3 bath, 3635 sq.ft., $589,900. Luxurious finishes inside plus unsurpassed Deschutes River view and access to riverside parks and trails. Expansive rooms with hardwood floors, slab granite countertops and hearths, coffered ceilings, upper and lower decks. Truly unique. The Garner Group. 541-383-4360 2007 built, like new home with views! $219,900 Ad#2622. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

20114 Carson Creek Ct. 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1,466 sq.ft., $164,500. New home in Bend’s southend designed with great room in the rear, bdrms and baths on upper level. Plenty of windows add brightness to living area. Kitchen features stainless appl., lots of cabinet space. The Garner Group. 541-383-4360 20240 Gaines Ct. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2436 sq.ft., $348,000. High ceilings and numerous windows give an open and bright feeling to this home near Bend Golf & Country Club. Bonus room over 3 car garage; large deck faces hugh landscaped backyard on .3 acre lot. The Garner Group. 541-383-4360 20911 Crystal Court, $183,000. Beautiful maintained home located on quiet cul-de-sac in Canal View subdivision. Ideal for the gardening enthusiast. Updated Kitchen with slab granite, stainlee appl. Big rooms and ideal bedroom separation. MLS# 201101863 Judy Meyers, Broker, CRS, GRI 541-480-1922 or 541-312-7272

3 Bedroom with 2 baths, MFG 2-car attached garage. MLS#201004467 $117,400 CASCADE REALTY Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 www.homes4oregon.com $429,000 -Gated! Eagle Crest! Custom home! Single level, panoramic views, on golf course. MLS #201101663 Call Virginia, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate 60815 Falcon Pointe Ln. 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2124 sq.ft., $343,000. Exceptional new home is finished with hickory floors, alder cabinets, granite kitchen countertops and tile bath surfaces. Fine cabinetry in den/office and dining room. Over 7,000 sq.ft. lot provides room for large fenced backyard. The Garner Group. 541-383-4360 60830 Falcon Pointe Ln. 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2080 sq.ft., $380,000. New home to be built features master suite on main level, den/office and 12 ft. ceilings in the foyer and great room. Granite tile kitchen countertops, tile bathroom surfaces are beautiful and practical. Hickory floors, vaulted dining area. The Garner Group. 541-383-4360 .62 ACRE LOT, 3 bdrm, 2 bath 1312 sq. ft. home, new appliances, fenced, mature trees, 1500 sq. ft. shop with two 12x16 doors and 200 amp service. MLS 201101220 $145,000. Pam Lester Principal Broker Century 21 God Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 $800,000 -West Powell Butte Estates! 5494 sq.ft. spectacular home, 4+ garage, shop, views, 20 acres. MLS #201006747 Call Virginia, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate Adorable turn key vacation chalet on one acre. Minutes from snowmobiling trails, skiing, mountain lakes. Great condition. MLS#2902363 $114,500 CASCADE REALTY Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 www.homes4oregon.com

2329 NW Lolo Drive 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2300 sq.ft., $539,000. This striking new Affordable Style, big yard, big comfort! $159,900. home showcases energy sav Ad #2972 ing Green technology. OverTEAM Birtola Garmyn hanging eaves shelter a split front courtyard and entry pa Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 tio. Main level master suite www.BendOregonRealEstate.com opens to the courtyard. Superb finishes throughout. A great opportunity to own the The Garner Group. perfect vacation getaway and 541-383-4360 just minutes from Mt Bachelor and Bend. 1 Bdrm, 2 2445 NW Dorion Way Bath. $99,900. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1526 sq.ft., Cate Cushman, $339,900. Thoughtful fea Principal Broker tures in this new single-level 541-480-1884 Craftsman bungalow inwww.catecushman.com cludes separate entry foyer Beautiful and large walk-pantry. Im Custom Home ported hardwood floors in great room and kitchen, that has been maintained and updated. 3 bedrooms, 2 cherry-stained alder cabinbaths, large master bedroom etry and premium tile counwith built in dresser and tertops and bathroom finthree closets. Tons of storishes. age, hot house, storage shed, The Garner Group shop, covered patio, paver 541-383-4360 blocks in backyard. Front 2487 NW Crossing Dr. yard sprinkler system, alley 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1544 sq.ft., access on two lots. $180,000 $329,900. Charm and livabil Fred Ryan, Broker ity are combined in this 541-410-5340 single-level Craftsman home. Central Oregon Hardwood floors in great Realty Group room and kitchen, tile counCatch the Desert Sky tertops and bath finishes, & Mountain Views vaulted ceiling and gas fireplace in living area. Paver pa- 39 Acres with Cascade Mtn. views. Custom home, overtio in rear is shaded by a per sized garage, 2275 sq ft, 3 gola roof. bdrm, 2.5 baths, 2 stall barn The Garner Group w/tack and hay storage, 541-383-4360 shop, 440 amp, fenced & 2600 Sq. ft. steel building with cross fenced, solar gate enpaved parking. try, very private. Perfect MLS#201003281 horse property borders BLM. $119,900 $699,000. CASCADE REALTY Vicci Bowen, Broker Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 541-410-9730. 1-541-536-1731 Central Oregon www.homes4oregon.com Realty Group

Close to Mt. Bachelor and the Deschutes River. 2 Bdrm, 2 bath frame. MLS#201101285 $135,300 CASCADE REALTY Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 www.homes4oregon.com Country home, 3 bedroom, 1 3/4 bath, 2168 sq. ft. with lots of upgrades. MLS#201003454 $149,900 CASCADE REALTY Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 www.homes4oregon.com Custom 3 bedroom, 2 bath with 5000 sq. ft. shop on 5 acres. MLS#201100372 $349,000 CASCADE REALTY Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 www.homes4oregon.com Cute home, 3360 sq. ft. shop $114,900 MLS#201005324 Call Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty Darling 4 bdrm, 2 bath, home, gas range, hot water and furnace in the home. Interior was recently painted. Nice covered front porch area, back patio with wood pergola, vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace, great room floor plan, nice landscaped yard, fenced, dbl attached finished garage. RV parking area, very well maintained home. $109,000. MLS #201101785 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Heating the Oustide? Trade in a heat bill for ours! $75/mo. average per month, 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com Highland Ranch Estate Great 3 bdrm, 2 bath, spacious home. New deck to enjoy the great views. Lots of elbow room and plenty of room for a shop on this 1.62 acre lot just outside of city limits. $205,000. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 IN THE HUB OF BEND, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, office, 1757 sq. ft., gas fireplace, near the Mill district, fenced, landscaped, covered front patio. MLS 201100252. $195,000 Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 In the Pines and Nestled into Widgi Creek Golf Course! $275,000. Ideal golf club residence or second home just minutes from Mt. Bachelor ski lifts! Can be used as a vacation rental. Vaulted ceilings, lots of windows with an open floor plan, two master suites, one of which can be used as a rental lock-out! Incredible location, on the way to Mt. Bachelor, just above the Deschutes River, hiking trails, fishing, and miles of world class mountain bike trails! Mike Wilson, Broker 541-977-5345 Hunter Properties

Large Corner Lot Burns, Oregon, 3 Bdrm, cute older home. Hardwood floors in Kitchen and dining. Extra room for office, etc. Covered front porch, fenced yard, workshop and storage barn. Fruit trees. Tons of elbow room $59,900. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 Large Hines Home A 4 bdrm, 1798 sq.ft. 2 story home. Very well maintained inside and out. Large fenced lot. 24x40 garage/shop. Mature landscaping and fenced garden area. Great patio area for family BBQ’s. $115,000. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 Like New Desirable River Rim! $339,000. Ad #8552 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

Lots of Charm Burns, Oregon. 1300 sq.ft. home with loads of built-in cabinets, cupboards, hutch. Large laundry area, 2 bdrm, plus room which could be extra bdrm. Covered front porch. Partial basement for storage, lots of mature trees on corner lot. $85,000. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 MAJESTIC 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1748 sq. ft., gardeners paradise (20+ fruit trees), lily pond, plenty of windows = plenty of light. 3 bdrms + bonus room. Newer tile counters in kitchen & bathrooms. Main floor master, and ceiling fans with lights. Handicap equipped w/grab bars throughout home & ext. $179,000. MLS#201001304 or visit johnlscott. com/68701. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L. Scott Real Estate 541-385-5500 Move in ready, 3 bedroom, 2 bath frame with all new appliances, paint and carpet. MLS#201102196 $87,900 CASCADE REALTY Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 www.homes4oregon.com

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Park Like Setting. $335,000. This beautiful, stately home is a short sale, with one lender. Nestled next to the meadow at Lane Knolls. Experience the soothing calm of country living yet have the convenience of being just minutes from town. This spacious, 2360 sq.ft. home is perfect for entertaining. Matt Robinson, Broker 541-977-5811 Hunter Properties Perfect full time or rental property! $70,000. Ad #2262 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

Priced to Sell! 3 Bdrm, 1 bath, 1064 sq.ft., attached garage plus storage shed. Put your touch on this cute home, great rental or starter home. fresh interior paint. $42,900. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 Price Reduced! $110,000. Easy, low maintenance living can be yours in this newer home in SE Bend. Perfect for first time buyer or someone looking to downsize. Open floorplan and tall ceilings giving the home a feel that is larger than its square footage. Don’t miss this little gem! Mike Everidge, Broker 541-390-0098 Hunter Properties Pride of Ownership Abound in This Lovely Home! $220,000 Conveniently located in the desirable Stonebrook neighborhood on Bend’s East side. Designer features and custom paint lend a Mediterranean feel. The gorgeous stone fireplace and terracotta style floors welcome you home! Suzanne Stephenson, Broker 541-848-0506 Hunter Properties Quality custom built 3 bdrm, 2 bath home, with attached dbl garage, F/A furnace. Wood stove, vaulted ceilings, oak cabinets in the large country kitchen, 32x48 shop, insulated with a finished office area and overhead storage deck. Two high doors, 10x12 for pull thru convenience. A truly one of a kind property. Fenced for horses. Garden area and full RV hook up. $349,900. MLS #201101850 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Residential Acreage! $599,995. Boonesborough is set in the high desert forest of Central Oregon, yet conveniently located between Bend and Redmond. BLM land is easily accessed for biking and hiking. This immaculate residence has all the amenities of the high end homes of Bend’s Westside. Finished triple garage & RV outbuilding garage. Call for a private showing. Mike Wilson, Broker 541-977-5345 Hunter Properties River Runs Through It! $575,000. Ad #2732 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

Single Level Contemporary Home! $279,900. Open living, warm and functional with quality. Custom work throughout. Soaring alcoves with extra lighting, beautiful hardwood floors, slate gas fireplace, located at the end of a cul-de-sac. Short stroll to river and trails. Mike Wilson, Broker 541-977-5345 Hunter Properties This 2 bdrm, 1 bath Gilchrist Townsite home has two fenced yards, double car garage and other amenities. MLS#201009962 OWC $79,000 CASCADE REALTY Dennis Haniford, Princ. Broker 1-541-536-1731 www.homes4oregon.com Traditional Sale! $170,000. Picturesque Mt. views, numerous upgrades and spacious floor plan in immaculate condition. Newer appliances and interior paint. Secure and peaceful living in this gated community. Amenities include pool, spa, sports court, and RV parking. Suzanne Stephenson, Broker 541-848-0506 Hunter Properties Traditional Sale! $299,500. Exceptional Palmer Craftsman home, former model features slab granite countertops in kitchen, butlers pantry with wine cooler and maple cabinets. White oak hardwood in entry, great room, dining area and gas fireplace. Oversized master with fireplace. Master has a soaking tub and travertine file, must see! Mike Everidge, Broker 541-390-0098 Hunter Properties

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Traditional Sale! On a Quiet Lot! $149,000. A great home surrounded by Ponderosa’s, in a fabulous mid-town location. Bursting with potential, yet maintains the charm of a classic time period. Just blocks from Pilot Butte. Matt Robinson, Broker 541-977-5811 Grant Ludwick, Broker 541-633-0255 Hunter Properties

Newer Craftsman - Style home! $99,000. Two story craftsman on a large private lot surrounded by ponderosa trees and outdoor living. New carpet, fresh interior and exterior paint makes this house an exceptional value. Room for RV parking, close to Sunriver, the Deschutes River and trails. Priced to sell! Mike Everidge, Broker 541-390-0098 Hunter Properties

Very Secluded 5 Acres with irrigation. Beautiful views of Smith Rock, Gray Butte and Cascades. Great private setting for your new home, surrounded by farms, near the Cooked River, has CUP’s in place and septic is approved. Also, there is another 29 acres with river view that adjoins this property for sale. $130,000. Jim Hinton, Broker 541-420-6229 Central Oregon Realty Group

Newer 5 Bedroom Bend Home on Corner Lot! $110,000 Ad#8802. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

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NW BEND - $299,000 Downtown and close to parks, this 2 bedroom, 1 bath, 2127 sq. ft. home with full finished basement and 2nd floor attic is a must see. On large lot with a detached garage and mature landscaping. MLS#2905709 Don Kelleher, Broker 541-480-1911

541-330-0420 What a Great Home in Eagle Crest! Backs to common area and BLM. All the upgrades-slab granite in kitchen, knotty alder raised panel cabinets, pantry, central vac. Walk in tile shower w/double shower heads, walk in closet. Custom lighting both in and out. Built-in speakers, computer friendly home and security sys. Large covered patio with fire pit and hot tub. Triple car garage plus Rec Rm. This home has it all, call today! $479,000 Jim Hinton, Broker 541-420-6229 Central Oregon Realty Group

NW BEND / MARKEN HEIGHTS - $369,000 New construction built by Dave Hasenoehrl. 2 story with main floor master & upstairs bonus room. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1902 sq. ft. Great room floor plan. MLS#201102340 Diane Robinson, Broker, ABR 541-419-8165

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Northwest Bend Homes 2494 Northwest Crossing 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms Master suite on main level. 1785 sq. ft. Hardwood flooring. Expanded 2-car alley entry garage. MLS#201101240 $369,900 www.liveincentral oregon.com Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 COLDWELL BANKER Morris Real Estate 498 NW State St., Bend Charming home on 1.5 lots in Bend’s most prestigious neighborhood. 5 Bdrm, 3 bath, encompassing 3872 sq.ft., 1 block from downtown and /Drake Park. Completely restored combining it historic period and modern amenities. $725,000. Daren Cullen, ABR, CDPE, CRS, CSP 541-410-2707 Bend Premier Real Estate

RARE ONE-STORY TOWNHOME - $419,000 One level townhome with sweeping Cascade Mountain views. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2120 sq. ft. gourmet kitchen with nook. Great room with custom fireplace. Formal dining area. Master suite and bath. MLS#201102309 Carolyn Priborsky, P.C., Broker, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

Sunset View Estates AWBREY BUTTE Northwest lodge on 2.5 $849,900 wooded acres. Approved for Northwest contemporary home horses. Custom quality inwith the highest of quality cludes knotty alder 7 ft. finishes and fabulous Casdoors, exposed beams, 4-car cade Mountain views. 4745 garage, intercom, built-in sq. ft., 4 bedrooms, 3.5 vac, security system, hug rec baths. MLS#201007491 room with mini kitchen and Deborah Benson, upper guest suite. Short sale. PC, Broker, GRI Requires 3rd party approval. 541-480-6448 $795,000. Cate Cushman, Principal Broker 541-480-1884 www.catecushman.com

AWBREY HEIGHTS. 5 Bdrm, 3.5 bath on 0.32 +/- acre. Perfect for family, developers or investors looking for a flexible floor plan. Masterfully landscaped for privacy. Located on 2+ RS lots just 1 block from the Deschutes River. Opportunity abounds w/the current redevelopment of the neighborhood. Double garage & covered carport too. Come preview this property – it’s not a drive by! $350,000. MLS# 2803755 or visit johnlscott.com/23648. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Beautiful Spacious Home. Looking for a home with elbow room? Beautiful custom home, lots of light, large open rooms and office space. Woodstove in living room that keeps the house cozy. in Starwood. $199,900. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

SW BEND - $837,000 This immaculate home on very quiet, private acreage with mountain views near Tumalo, features great room living, formal dining, 2 masters, huge bonus room, dream kitchen, oversized 4-car garage. Call Angie for more info, 541-408-3543. MLS#201007051 Darrin Kelleher, Broker 541-788-0029

West Hills 5 Bedroom 3883 sq. ft., gourmet kitchen, family room, bonus room plus heated salt water pool. Rooms for RV/boat, 1/2 acre lot. 1221 NW West Hills Ave. MLS#201101356 $595,000 www.liveincentral oregon.com Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 COLDWELL BANKER Morris Real Estate

747 BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393 Cascade Mtn. Views from Mt. Bachelor to Mt. Hood Exquisite home. Extraordinary setting. Exceptional location. Magnificent bonus/ rec room. 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. 4832 sq. ft., 0.58 acre. Professionally landscaped with 50+ trees. $1,200,000 MLS#201002623 Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 COLDWELL BANKER Morris Real Estate Charming NW Style HomeNear Hospital! $140,000 Ad#2362. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

Southwest Bend Homes Deschutes River Woods. 3 Bdrm, 1.75 bath 1329 sq. ft. custom home on an acre. Great room floor plan w/vaulted ceiling. All kitchen appliances are included. Both recessed & under-cabinet lighting in kitchen. Laundry room w/skylite & large pantry. New interior paint. Garage is heated and finished w/work bench. Super fenced yard w/mature ponderosa, storage building, double canopy carport or storage structure. This home is move-in ready. $259,000. MLS# 2802056 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

LUXURY TOWNHOME $425,000 Beautifully appointed and rarely available Tyrion Sky townhome in the gates of Broken Top. Like new 2310 sq. ft. with main level living. 3 bedroom 3.5 bath, office & formal dining. MLS#201100963 Jackie French, Broker 541-312-7260

MOUNTAIN VIEWS $1,179,000 Cascade mountain views, beautiful Awbrey Butte custom built home. Vaulted great room, 2 fireplaces, gourmet kitchen, master on the main. Bonus room, office & wine room. Upgrades throughout. 4190 sq. ft. MLS#201100008 Cathy Del Nero, Broker 541-410-5280

NICE SW BEND LOCATION. 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1414 sq. ft., .32 acre lot, mature landscaping, sprinkler system, RV parking. MLS 201009715 $129,200. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 SW BEND - $329,000 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1797 sq. ft. home. Natural light flows into this home with lots of windows, open floor plan, 9 ft ceilings. Tile counters, wood doors, fenced yard. MLS#2901345 60831 Scotts Bluff Pl. JJ Jones, Broker 541-610-7318 • 541-788-3678

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Northeast Bend Homes 1537 NE 4th St., Bend 1968+/- sq.ft., two floors plus basement, kitchen. Commercial. $250,000. Call Ken Renner, Principal Broker, 541-280-5352 krenner@SunriverRealty.com


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Northeast Bend Homes Southeast Bend Homes $439,900. MLS#201009349 This house has it all! Put this one 1st on your list and you will need to go no further! Nearly 5 beautiful irrigated acres, fenced with 2 ponds and 2 barns or one can be hay storage. Completely remodeled with too many upgrades to mention. Tile, travertine, granite throughout. Theatre room or extra bedroom attached office with separate entrance and full bath. New kitchen, baths, flooring and roof. You have to see the 3-car attached garage, it’s huge! Secluded setting on private drive just off Hamby Rd. It doesn’t get any closer or better than this! Sherry Brooks, Broker 541-420-6518 Prudential Northwest Properties

TILLICUM VILLAGE. 4 Bedrooms, 3 baths, 2608 sq. ft. on 1.46 acre. Your own park that’s adjacent to common ground. The grounds will astound you with their beauty. 2 ponds and 2 waterfalls plus spacious garden and gardening area. Remodel includes new cabinets, new birch floors and tile floors, new windows and doors, 2 gas furnaces, new hot tub, new lighting and ceiling fans. 2 water heaters, new Trex deck and paver patio. This home and its grounds are a must preview. $399,900 MLS#2803287 or visit johnlscott. com/17418 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 750

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Redmond Homes

Homes with Acreage

Homes with Acreage

NW Redmond Home. 3 Bdrm, Great horse property 2.5 bath, 1942 sq.ft., gas Nice gentle sloping lot on 2+ fireplace, vaulted ceilings, acres with small barn with kitchen island, tile countertwo stalls. Great horse proptops, landscaped, fenced. erty, or for those 4-H kids. 4 MLS201007857. $129,900. Bedrooms, 2.5 bath, recently Pam Lester, Principal Broker professionally cleaned. Nice Century 21 Gold Country sized deck, mature landRealty, Inc. 541-504-1338 scaping, plus a small greenhouse. MLS#201009070 REDMOND - $318,000 $179,900 Beautiful home in desirable D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Cascade View Estates with Redmond 541-923-8664 granite, hardwood, tile, Madras 541-475-3030 wrought iron and rock accents. Master on main, li- 10 acres bordering BLM - 2520 brary/bonus area, den, cussq ft 3 Bdrm, 2½ Bath. Large tom pavered patio & yard, RV horse barn, extra large deparking. MLS#201101374 tached garage, all well-built. Darryl Doser, Broker, CRS Extensive landscaping; 5 541-383-4334 miles west of Redmond. $355,000. Call 541-923-7261

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Redmond Homes

HIGH POINTE 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath in 1966 sq. ft. on 0.16 acre. Outstanding mountain view, great location close to shopping and schools. Custom dyed Dupont Stainmaster carpet, custom tile work in bathrooms, marble counter in master bedroom, granite counter tops in kitchen, Electrolux appliances in kitchen, fireplace surround of custom metallic tiles, french doors to deck, custom window treatments, and oak floors. Move in ready. $249,900 MLS #201101314 Bobbie Strome Principal Broker John L. Scott Real Estate 541-385-5500 Hunters Circle. 3 Bdrm, 1.5 bath on .25 acre lot. New trees, plants and fences 2007-2009. New roof 2009, shed 2008, water heater, interior paint, and laminate 2007, kitchen counters and backsplash, half bath & light fixtures 2008, washer 2009. $127,500. MLS#201005148 or visit johnlscott. com/89946. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Located in NE Bend, 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1782 sq. ft., slate entry, hardwood floors, fenced, alley access. MLS 201100247 $150,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 NE BEND - $169,500 Nice, well maintained home on a quiet cul-de-sac. 1812 sq. ft., 3 bedrooms, master on main level, plus a bonus room. Fully fenced yard. MLS#201009980 Bill Porter, Broker 541-383-4342

NE Bend Near Hollinshead Park, 3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1092 sq.ft., large fenced lot, newer Trex deck, covered entry, RV parking. MLS 201100245 $89,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Southeast Bend Homes Charming retreat in Woodside Ranch. 2 Bdrm + den (potential 3rd bdrm), 2 bath 1408 sq.ft. on .78 acre. Flagstone hearth in living room, ready for wood or gas stove. Kitchen tile floor, counters & back splash plus Whirlpool Estate appl. in silvertone. Garage has huge bank of cabinets. Home completely refurbished. Nestled in the trees w/easy care natural landscaping & a tree house, too! Tall vaulted ceilings, beams, natural wood and stone accents. leaded beveled glass in living room & foyer. Newer 30-yr. roof & ext. paint. $229,500. MLS#2711853 or visit johnlscott.com/66140 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker. John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 For Sale By Auction: 60837 Sawtooth Mountain Ln, Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1487 sq.ft,. Selling ON-SITE, Tues 5/3 at 10:30am. For local info call Mark Valceschini, Coldwell Banker Morris RE, 541-383-4364, call Hudson & Marshall at 866-539-1081 or go to BidNowOregon.com.

Great Golf Course Home in Mtn. High! $215,000. Ad#2132. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

MOUNTAIN HIGH $399,900 Spacious 3052 sq.ft. home on .42 of an acre wooded lot. Traditional sunken living room with fireplace & a great room/family room. Private setting at back of cul-de-sac. Large master suite. Brand new roof. MLS#201004189 Craig Smith, Broker 541-322-2417

North Redmond This well kept, open concept home offers 3 bedroom, 2 bath, and is conveniently loCanyon Views!! cated in North Redmond. Stunning $229,000. 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, Easy access to Highway 97, 2424 sq.ft., 10’ ceilings, huge Super Wal-Mart and neighliving & family rooms, spaborhood park. Recent up cious master suite separate grades include granite from other 3 bdrms, 30x32 counters, granite entry, trav shop with 30x16 onsulated ertine flooring, and a tile room. MLS #201007664. backsplash throughout the Karin Powers, Broker, kitchen. The spacious master suite is complete with large 541-410-0234, Century 21 Gold Country Realty walk-in closet, sitting area, and a private bath with over Summit Crest sized tub and double sinks. In a great SW Redmond locaMLS#201010106 tion. Large corner lot with $104,500 beautiful landscaping in front D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC and back. This immaculate 3 Redmond 541-923-8664 bdrm, 2.5 bath, shows the Madras 541-475-3030 pride of ownership. Home has upgraded countertops Near downtown Redmond throughout and a very nice High visibility corner lot close open floor plan. Hot tub is to downtown Redmond. included! $189,500. Great office space, has mul Jeff Larkin, Broker tiple uses. Currently rented 541-480-5606 as residential, but could be Central Oregon converted to commercial use. Realty Group Call city of Redmond for complete details. Well maintained 3 bdrm, 2 MLS#201005044 bath, 1580 sq. ft., corner lot, $199,900 landscaped, fenced, Super D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Good Cents, RV parking. Redmond 541-923-8664 MLS201009477. $159,900. Madras 541-475-3030 Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country ReNice upgrades alty, Inc. 541-504-1338 This well kept 4 bedroom, 2 bath home offers 2,020 sq. You will love the new kitchen in ft. of living space, and in this classic 1618 sq. ft. ranch cludes upgrades such as style home on a .62 acre lot granite counters, laminate in SW Redmond. Great views wood flooring, a spacious of Mt. Jefferson and Three walk-in tiled shower, and a Sisters. Kitchen was recently wood stove for those cold updated with gorgeous central Oregon nights. Recherry cabinets and stainless cent upgrades include new appliances. Bamboo wood appliances, windows, roof, floors and a large deck off and a fenced yard. This nicely the back of the home. treed .85 acre lot includes a $219,000. MLS#201101141 double detached garage, and Audrey Cook, Broker several outbuildings. 541-480-9883 MLS#201006126 Coldwell Banker $119,500 Mayfield Realty D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Redmond 541-923-8664 Looking for your next Madras 541-475-3030 employee? Place a Bulletin help $110,000 - NW Redmond! wanted ad today and 2240 sq.ft., 6 bdrm, RV parkreach over 60,000 ing, MLS #201009813 readers each week. Call Kelly Starbuck, Broker. Your classified ad will Redmond Re/Max Land & also appear on Homes Real Estate bendbulletin.com which $113,300 - Redmond currently receives over 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1875 sq.ft., 1.5 million page views quiet side of town. every month at MLS#201009312 no extra cost. Call TRAVIS HANNAN, Bulletin Classifieds Principal Broker Get Results! 541-788-3480 Call 385-5809 or place Redmond Re/Max your ad on-line at Land & Homes bendbulletin.com Real Estate 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1512 sq.ft. $184,900. MLS#201101144 Call Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty $65,000 -Redmond! Great investment, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, huge yard. MLS #201010780 Call Travis Hannan, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $69,000. Well kept, clean home. Vacant and easy to show. 3 bed., 2 bath, 1032 sq. ft. with 2-car garage, alley access. Call for appt. MLS#201003631 Call DON CHAPIN, Broker 541-350-6777 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $82,500 -1100 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath, close to schools & shopping. MLS #201101430 Call Travis Hannan, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $89,500 -Corner Lot! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, SW, 1488 sq.ft., MLS# 201101671 Call Jeanne Scharlund, Principal Broker 541-420-7978 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate BRING ALL OFFERS!! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1704 sq.ft., 1.2 acres, fenced pasture, mature landscaping, large garage w/ shop area. $174,900. MLS 2710632. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Christie Acres Estate; 3533 SW 63rd St., Redmond. Stunning private park like setting on 4.65 acres overlooking the Deschutes River with access and mountain views. Two master suites, 3 car garage, and detached 1816 sq.ft. shop/garage and studio. Underground irrigation, pond & water features. $1,300,000. Liz Shatterly, Broker 541-350-4136 Bend Premier Real Estate GRAND SMITH ROCK ESTATE! 4 Bdrm, 3.5 bath, 3500 sq. ft., 5 acres w/3 irrigation, guest apt., barn, shop, 2 triple garages, greenhouse. MLS201004770. $499,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Immaculate Home & Landscaping. $154,000. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1920 sq. ft., light & bright kitchen w/Pergo flooring, large master bdrm and bath, 26x36 shop/garage w/10’ doors, in quiet SUNRISE VILLAGE neighborhood. #201008574. $945,000 Karin Powers, Broker Picturesque .77 acre setting 541-410-0234 with 1200 sq. ft. deck overCentury 21 Gold Country Realty looking Deschutes River. 4 bedroom, 4 bath, spacious NE Redmond, corner lot, 3 4173 sq. ft. home makes a bdrm, 2 bath, 1562 sq. ft., great ski retreat! Huge great vaulted, great rm floorplan, room with stone fireplace. gas fireplace, hickory cabiWOW location! nets, near park. $99,000. MLS#201009509 Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Bonnie Savickas, Broker Century 21 Gold Country Re541-408-7537 alty, Inc. 541-504-1338 NW Redmond 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1393 sq.ft., den/office, master separation, gas fireplace, breakfast nook, RV parking, fenced. MLS# 201008548 • Only $80,000! Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Sisters Homes

$167,000 -Incredible Potential on 1.8 acres! 7 Bdrm, 3 bath, 3642 sq.ft., possible OWC. MLS #201006271 Call Charlie, Principal Broker 541-350-3419 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate 17.63 Acres, 2776 frame home, 4 bdrm, 2.5 bath, irrigation /farm deferral. $250,000. MLS #201009418 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty 1876 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2 bath, double garage, on 1.32 acres w/ Cascade views. $164,900. MLS #201010863 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty $259,766 Hard to find small acreage w/irrigation. Large 5 bdrm extensively remodeled home.. MLS#2911254 Call DON CHAPIN, Broker 541-350-6777 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate $315,000 -Acreage by Smith Rock, Reverse living w/ views, shop barn, fenced, set-up for horses. MLS #201004652 Call Don Chapin, Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, Green home! Computer room, den, double garage, shop, 1.52 acres. $199,500. MLS #2712181 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty 4.13 acres. 1890 sq.ft. 3 bdrm, 2 bath horse property. $169,900. Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty $425,000 - West Powell Butte Estates! 20 +/- acres, gorgeous 3472 sq.ft. home, barn shop. MLS #201007077 Call Virginia, Prinicipal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale 4.63 Acres, irrigated! 3bdrm, 2 bath, 1188 sq.ft., detached oversized garage, set up for horses, Cascade mtn. views. $176,000. MLS201000623. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1814 sq. ft., shop. $169,900. MLS#201006319 Call Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty

SUNRIVER - $360,000 4 Bdrm, 2 bath, 2588 sq. ft. 2131 sq. ft. custom 3 bed$254,000. MLS#2909612 room, 2 bath with large deck Call Melody Curry, Broker & retractable awning. Wet 541-771-1116 bar, 2 dining areas, stone Crooked River Realty fireplace and large solarium entry. Oversized garage with 5.24 Acres w/Gorgeous Smith Rock Views! 3 Bdrm, 2.5 office & shop area. bath, 2367 sq. ft., 3 acres MLS#201006729 COI, fenced, barn, shop, end Jack Johns, Broker, GRI of road privacy. MLS 541-480-9300 201006355 $384,500. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Sunriver/La Pine Homes 52103 Foxtail, La Pine. 2 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1496 sq.ft., 1.18 acres, peaceful setting. $184,000. Call Ken Renner, Principal Broker, 541-280-5352. krenner@SunriverRealty.com 55836 Black Duck Rd. Three Rivers S. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1522 +/- sq.ft., .48 lot., log home, hot tub. $295,000. Call Ken Renner, Principal Broker, 541-280-5352. krenner@SunriverRealty.com For Sale By Auction: 53678 Day Road, La Pine, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1344 sq.ft,, 1.090+/acres. Selling from 60837 Sawtooth Mountain Lane, Bend on Tues, 5/3 at 10:30am. For local info call Cheryl Morgan Maki, Morgan & Assoc Rlty, 541-447-1330, call Hudson & Marshall at 866-539-1081 or go to BidNowOregon.com. For Sale By Auction: 57216 Island Rd Unit 16, Sunriver, 2 bdrm., 2 bath, 1388 sq.ft, condo. Selling from 60837 Sawtooth Mountain Lane, Bend on Tues, 5/3 at 10:30am. For local info call Carol Raebel, John L Scott Real Estate La Pine, 541-536-1188, call Hudson & Marshall at 866-539-1081 or go to BidNowOregon.com.

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Jefferson County Homes CULVER, OR 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1440 sq. ft. open floor plan, vaulted ceilings, central air, bay window, wood entry , chain link dog run. mls# 201102058. $89,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Prime Hwy 97 Commercial! Updated in 2006, 850 sq.ft., plenty of parking in rear, central air. MLS201003034 $154,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

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Crook County Homes $89,900 - 3 Bdrm, 2 bath home, 1397 sq.ft., triple car garage, area of new homes in Prineville. MLS #201101876 Jeanne Scharlund, Principal Broker. Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

5 Acres, 2562 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, + Office & triple garage. $229,000. MLS# 201102127 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty 5 acres with mountain views, 3 bdrm, 2 bath 1620 sq. ft. home. 36x40 shop, fenced, extensive sprinkler system. $299,900. MLS2809225. Pam Lester Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty Inc. 541-504-1338 9+ acres with Cascade Mtn. views! $415,000 ad#8392 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

Amazing Mountain & Canyon Views. 1654 Sq. ft. home on 2 lots totaling 2 acres. Attached 2-car garage plus a 24 x 36 shop. $184,000. MLS# 201010094 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 Beautiful 5.6 Acre Horse Property! $324,000. 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1844 Sq.ft., 36x36 guest house, 36x48 horse barn, 24x36 garage/shop, fenced and cross fenced. Cascade mtn and Smith Rock views. MLS #201008599. Karin Powers, Broker 541-410-0234 Century 21 Gold Country Realty Beautiful Custom Built Home In Powell Butte with amazing views of the Cascade Mountains on 10.8 acres. 3762 sq.ft., 3 bdrm, 3 bath, granite counters, loft, bonus room, office and hobby/exercise room. Large shop, barn and property is fenced an cross fenced. $599,000. Vicci Bowen, Broker 541-410-9730 Central Oregon Realty Group Beautiful home on 99.5 acres. Outstanding views of the mountains, farmland and Buttes to the east. Custom home with living room and great room. Extensive hardwood and tile. Large master, 17.5 x 16, french doors. 36 x 24 two door shop, 3 bedroom plus 13.5 x 15.5 finished office space. Overlooking the Gateway Valley, near Trout creek. $499,000 MLS#201009449 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Breathtaking Smith Rock Views! 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2005 sq.ft., 4.79 acres, 4.3 acres of irrigation, passive solar design, radiant floor heat. MLS201009230. $399,999 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Canyon Rim Rambler! This lovely ranch style home is nestled on the Canyon Rim with great views to the West of the Cascades. This well maintained home has great character and charm, boasting plenty of storage, a 3 year new roof, furnace and remodeled kitchen. The shop is a handymans dream with organized storage. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 3743 sq. ft. On 1.53 acres lot in town! $334,900 MLS#201007075 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty CASCADE MOUNTAIN VIEWS. 1 bdrm, 1 bath, 884 sq.ft. on 2.07 acres. Super country location with peace & quiet & small cottage that is so cute! Irrigated pasture has had loving care. A big barn, shop, office awaits you with a loft fun room for parties, pool, ping pong. Easy to show. $250,000 MLS#2909664 or visit johnlscott. com/56207 Call Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Cascade view, 5 acre lot $ 79,900. MLS#201100921 Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty Cedar Home on 1.5 Acres in Sisters! $475,999. Ad#3252. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

Covered front porch and river rock accents. 5.83 acres with irrigation. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, main house has a floor to ceiling river rock fireplace. Great room with vaulted ceilings. Granite counters and custom tile back splash in the kitchen. Hardwood and tile. Attached double garage, 36 x 48 four stall barn, 24 x 24 shop with a 24 x 18 attached apartment that is 1 bed and 1 3/4 bath. 60 x 250 arena. $449,000 MLS#201004436 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Custom 2456 sq. ft. home. Built on 3.9 irrigated acres just above Lake Billy Chinook. Views of the Buttes and Cascade mountains. Custom tile, country kitchen, family room, with separate living room. Nice office, gas fireplace, and handicap accessible. Attached 3-car garage. 60 x 40 shop. Room for large RV, boat, lake toys, or farm equipment. $399,900 MLS#201008626 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Custom Built Home on 5.5 acres. 3 bdrm, 3 bath, 2213 sq. ft., guest suite, chef’s delight kitchen, covered porch, board & batten siding, oversized finished garage, breathtaking Cascade mtn views. $329,000. MLS call for details. Karin Powers, broker, 541-410-0234 Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. Deschutes River Views & Cascade Mountain Views Updated 1955 sq. ft. home on 2.4 acres MLS#201008904 $369,900. 5900 NW Zamia Ave, Redmond. www.liveincentral oregon.com Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 COLDWELL BANKER Morris Real Estate DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL. 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath in 2192 sq. ft. Home on 1.75 acres with loads of potential for development, zoned RS. 7+ lots were pre-approved through the city (paperwork is now expired). This package deal is priced for a quick sale. $425,000 MLS #201101308 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L. Scott Real Estate 541-385-5500 Gorgeous 5 bedroom, 3 bath home with 2 offices. Extensive Cherry wood flooring. Kitchen has double ovens and cherry cabinets. Great for family and entertaining. Formal dining and great room downstairs, family room upstairs. Back deck is perfect for entertaining with outdoor kitchen and covered patio area. 1.53 acres with irrigation. Mountain views. Triple attached garage and 26 x 51 shop. Buildings both have polyurethane floor coating. Dual heat pump system. $499,900 MLS#201101237 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Great Horse Property on over 5 private treed acres, minutes from town, Smith Rock and the feed store. Ride your horses to BLM right from your property. Nice fencing with corrals and a round pen. Barn with tack room, bay barn, shop, loaf shed and a green house with fenced garden area. You must view this great small farm. $189,900. Fred Crouch, Broker 541-350-1945 Central Oregon Realty Group Great one level ranch style home. Wood burning insert in living room and freestanding wood stove in family room. Extensive tile in the home. Large back deck for entertaining. Very nice 42x60 barn with concrete floor, tack room and wood deck for hay storage. Additional 40x12 stall bldg for horses. 12x14 dog kennel. 38x26 (3) bay RV/equipment shed. 120x200 outdoor arena area. Stock ready, 16 acres w/13 irrigated. All irrigation equipment included. Mountain views and views of Smith Rock. Traditional Sale. $557,000. MLS #201101857 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty HORSE TRAINING FACILITY 233 acres surrounded by the Crooked River National Grasslands. 2 bdrm, 2 bath home, indoor arena, bunk house, tack room and out door arena. Completely off the grid with a state of the art solar system, 1200 gal. water storage w/ private well. Culver. $485,000. MLS# 201002760 DESERT VALLEY REALTY 541-923-1376

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THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 E5

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Homes with Acreage

Homes with Acreage

Farms and Ranches

Lots

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Acreages

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Acreages

INCREDIBLE HORSE FACILITY 40 acres with 35 acres of irrigation that sits in the heart of Tumalo. 110 x 150 indoor arena, 12-stall barn plus additional 8-stall barn with apartment. Fenced and cross-fenced. 2185 sq. ft., 4 bedroom home. BLM access across the road. Bend. MLS# 201006129 $1,492,500 DESERT VALLEY REALTY 541-923-1376

Wonderful 3.5 acre parcel with irrigation just off Barnes Rd on Wainwright. Beautiful old trees frame this two level farm house, 3 bdrm, 1.75 bath, detached oversize single garage, shop, covered parking area for machinery and stock. Partially finished 24x36 pole barn. Fenced and stock ready. Great views of the farm valley and the buttes in the area. Traditional Sale. $210,000. MLS #201101945 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty

A beautiful building site & hay field, too! 3 bdrm, 1 bath, 1240 sq. ft. on 22.16 acres. Home is a charming old schoolhouse, extraordinary building site for replacement dwelling, with sweeping mtn. and ranch views. Huge barn with full meat packing facility & refrigeration. Pond lined, beautiful 15-acre hay field , weed-free. Impressive mature trees & the potential to raise goats, horses, cattle with numerous outbuildings. $484,500. MLS#201006994 johnlscott.com/14483 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

9148 sq. ft. lot - $35,000 Cul-de-sac, utilities stubbed in PUE, close to West Canyon Rim Park and access to the Dry Canyon Trail. MLS201005021. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Mountain View lot, 1.81 acres, approved for cap-fill septic system, power along the lot line. MLS 2907729. $24,900. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

4.24 Acres. Price reduced. Deschutes River and Cascade Views. $129,000. MLS #2906726 Call Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty

LODGE STYLE HOME ON DESCHUTES RIVER! 5 acres, approx. 575 sq. ft., of river front, Cascade views, 5 Bdrm, 5 bath, 4649 sq.ft., 2 master suites. horses OK. MLS 201007307 $799,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 LOOKING FOR UNIQUE? 5 Bedroom, 2 bath in 3262 sq.ft., on 3 acres. Large Kitchen with Madrone floors, close to Shevlin Park. Interesting spaces for a multitude of family activities. Lots of natural light and incredible sunset views. Not just a house but a lifestyle, no close neighbors and no rules. It’s your property and home to enjoy your own way. Entertain young and old with ease in this home and on this property! $475,000. MLS# 201004851 or visit johnlscott. com/24593 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Mt. Views on Acreage in Tumalo 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 1762 sq. ft., 9.81 acres w/1 acre irrigation. Extensive updating. 65300 Concorde Ln. $399,900 MLS#2809508 Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 COLDWELL BANKER Morris Real Estate NE BEND - $299,000 Lovely, private and meticulously maintained home on 2.7 acres. Master on main level. Cathedral ceilings. 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths plus bonus room. Storage galore! RV hook-up. Large deck area. MLS#201100777 Jane Strell, Broker 541-948-7998

Nice one level home on just under 1 acre with irrigation. Country living with the convenience of being close to town. Great kitchen with custom built knotty oak cabinets, Subzero fridge, convection oven as well as free standing range/oven. Great patio off the back of the home. Perfect for entertaining. Large yard, lots of room for RV parking. Home is 2184 sq.ft., w/ 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. Separate office with bath & Kitchenette. $210,000. MLS #201101606 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Pride of Ownership!! Burns, Oregon. This 69.2 acre parcel is only 1 1/2 miles north of Burns. Oldest water rights on the Silvies River. (1875). Totally remodeled 3100 sq.ft. home, new barn, new corrals with large roping arena. Property produces 220 to 250 tons of hay annually with free water. Reduced to $549,000. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 Private Locations - Burns, OR 36.78 Acres east of Burns, Like new cond., 3 bdrm, 2 bath home with lots of extras. Cedar decking. Property is cross fenced with several pastures. Set up for livestock. Barn, garden shed, storage shed. Etc. $159,500. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 Private Powell Butte Setting, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1652 sq.ft., 20 acres, fenced, oversized garage, wrap around deck. MLS 201100248. $299,999. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Serenity with mind, body and soul. Five bedrooms, 7 baths, 6804 sq. ft. single level. 3500 sq. ft. shop/garage. 6 acres of lush lawn, irrigated pastures and 25 acres in all. In-ground infinity pool with hot tub, cascading waterfalls. Separate pool house with full bath, walls of picture windows. Superior quality detail and finishes. Stunning Cascade vistas, outdoor fire pit. Offered at $1,999,000 Cate Cushman, Principal Broker 541-480-1884 www.catecushman.com SPECTACULAR CASCADE VIEW. This property has it all: 80 acres with 27+ acres of irrigation; 2693 sq. ft., 4 bed, 3 bath home with 2 master beds. 6-stall barn, covered hay shed, shop, heated RV garage, 4-bay equipment shed, 2 finished garages. Flood irrigated. Powell Butte. $1,250,000 OWC. MLS# 201000290 DESERT VALLEY REALTY 541-923-1376 Turn-key Ranch with Cascade mtn. views. Built in 1993, 38+ acres w/ 26+ irrigation, barn, shop, hay shed, fenced. MLS# 201003925. $550,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 Unique Dome House, 2295 sq. ft. 2 bdrm, 2 bath, central vac, 2 acres, 4 bay shop (1 for RV) + insulated area with hot water + 22- + dust collection. Property backs BLM with river access. $289,500 Karin Powers, broker, 541-410-0234 Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. Unobstructed Mountain Views Custom 1,841 sq.ft., 3 bedroom, 2 bath on completely fenced 4.81 acres. Floor to ceiling windows to take in the mountain views. $385,000. MLS 201101447 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

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Recreational Homes and Property 16 acres prime riverfront! North Fork John Day River Steelhead, Bass, 26” Catfish! Bear, Deer, Elk, Pheasants! 1000 sq. ft. cabin. $249,000. 541-934-2091. 4 Bedroom custom Craftsman resort home! $329,900 Ad# 2282 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

BLACK BUTTE RANCH $394,000 Fresh 3 bed, 2 bath cabin in the Pines & Aspens overlooking large common area. 669 sq. ft. deck, brick fireplace and new flooring. All new plumbing fixtures. Call John Kelley, Broker, at 541-948-0062. MLS#201002679 Dave Dunn, Broker 541-390-8465

A river runs through it- the place Les Schwab called home! $575,000 aD#2732. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

BEAUTIFUL SETTING. 570 acres, two homes, barns, cor rals, fencing plus 2 LOP tags available and abundant wild life. Johnson Creek runs through property. Reservoir for recreation. Private, sce nic, and approximately 4 miles east of Prineville. Property can be split. Prinev ille. MLS# 201010455 $1,712,000. DESERT VALLEY REALTY, 541-923-1376 Beautiful Working Cattle Ranch Beautiful Working Ranch on two sides of the Crooked River east of Post, Or. 2342 acres, 310 irrigated 9579 acres USPS, 80 BLM, 225+/cow capacity, 3 reservoirs creeks, several springs, 3 LOP tags, 2 homes, covered in ground pool/sauna, Large & small shops, machinery shed, large older barn. Don’t miss the opportunity to own this very scenic working ranch! Only 45 minutes to town. $3,100,000. Call Vicci Bowen, Broker 541-410-9730. Central Oregon Realty Group Big home, big shop, 13+ acres! $419,000. Ad#2482. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

Cabin for sale on the Metolius River Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. Go to: Lakehouse.com for specs. Ad#230071 or check under Oregon listings. Creekside Village Townhome Eagle Crest 3 bdrm, 2.5 baths, 1871 sq. ft. Great room. Master on main. Eagle Crest amenities. $315,000. MLS#2910584 www.liveincentral oregon.com Virginia Ross, Broker, ABR, CRS, GRI. 541-480-7501 COLDWELL BANKER Morris Real Estate Excellent Vacation Home Potential! $284,900 Ad#8012. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

Established Horse Ranch. Elk, deer, antelope, game birds and fishing on 1280 +/acres with 190 +/- acres of gravity flow irrigation. Log home, hunting lodge, frame home and 2 building sites. Meat locker, barn, bird sheds, great heated shop with equipment storage. Mitchell. MLS# 201005981 $1,975,000 DESERT VALLEY REALTY 541-923-1376 Great Little Ranch! 1 acre all irrigated, fenced and cross-fenced, outbuildings. Charming cottage, 2 detached single car garage, barn with 2 stalls and turn out area. $255,000. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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The Bunk House at Round Butte. Located in the Round Butte Recreational area just above Lake Billy Chinook. Open floor plan with lots of wood. Great fireplace in the living room. Two decks off the home. 1.58 acres. Paved driveway and lots of room for RV, boat, and additional parking. Lake and mountain views! $165,000 MLS#201008429 Audrey Cook, Broker 541-480-9883 Coldwell Banker Mayfield Realty Vacation home on .9 acre! $179,900 Ad#2472. Team Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

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Farms and Ranches PRIVATE SETTING. Incredible setting on 32 acres with 26 acres of irrigation. 2602 sq. ft., 3 bed, 2.5 bath home fea turing gourmet kitchen, for mal dining room, office, fam ily room, fireplace and more. Detached garage with 1 bdrm apt. Cascade views. Redmond. $895,000. MLS# 201100949 DESERT VALLEY REALTY, 541-923-1376 LARGE, QUALITY HOME. 4925 sq. ft., 5 bed, 3.5 bath home on 16 acres with 10 acres of irrigation. Country kitchen, great room, formal dining room, office, huge master, 2 fireplaces, wine cellar and more. Shop/barn with radi ant heat floors and bath. Cascade Mountain Views. Redmond. $845,000 MLS# 201007690. DESERT VALLEY REALTY, 541-923-1376 INCREDIBLE TUMALO PROP ERTY. Great horse facilities, 51 acres, 37 acres of irriga tion. 2524 sq. ft., 2 story home. Lighted indoor arena, 29-stall barn, 10 covered outside stalls, outdoor arena, cattle handling facilities, hay barn, round pen, shop & guest quarters. Access to BLM. Bend. MLS#201007620 $1,495,000. DESERT VALLEY REALTY, 541-923-1376 3,000 sq. ft. home, on 5 acres, located in Odin Falls Ranch. 360 degree view of Three Sisters, Broken Top, Mt. Bachelor and Smith Rock. Surrounded by hundreds of BLM acres. Large master bedroom, 2 additional bedrooms and a den with Murphy bed, gourmet kitchen featuring slab granite countertops, and stainless steel appliances. Attached oversized 3-car garage with detached 42x40 insulated, finished garage with 3 oversized doors, wired for 220. Outside kitchen with built-in BBQ, refrigerator, wine cooler, gas fire pit, In-ground swimming pool with propane heater and pool shed. 7 golf courses within 30 minutes, 10 min. to Redmond, 30 min. to Bend, Sisters or Prineville This home feels like a destination resort – but with complete privacy and the safety of a gated community. Offered by Dennis & Joni, owners, at $795,000. 541-948-5832 or 541-325-2684. Courtesy to brokers

Upgraded w/shop, fenced 1.3 acres! $147,000. Ad #3192 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

80 acre parcel in outdoor paradise! $350,000 Ad#8822. TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

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Million dollar views, 38 acres - 26 irrigated, outdoor riding menage & arena, 60’x120’ indoor riding arena, attached 16 stall barn with tack, medication, & feed rooms. Large orchard grass fields with wheel lines for raising your own feed or pasture. Comfortable 3191 sq. ft., 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath home with 2 bonus rooms. Large master suite on main level. $825,000 View this property at johnlscott.com/60324 Terry A Storlie, Broker, GRI John L. Scott Real Estate Southern & Central Oregon Office: 541-317-0123 Mobile: 541-788-7884 terrystorlie@johnlscott.com Powell Butte, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1232 sq. ft. $133,600 MLS#201008812 Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

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Lots 1/2 acre lot, Smith Rock views $63,500. MLS#201008725 Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty 1.71 Acres/Rim lot!!!! $114,900. MLS#201101342 Call Melody Curry Crooked River Realty 541-923-2000 2.7 acres, septic approved, water & power avail. $99,000. MLS#201008526 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty • 2 acres, close to Hwy 97 business. $29,950. Ad #2052 • 1.9 acres, Lake & mountain views. $50,000. Ad #8592 • 17 acres, near Willamette ski are. $55,000. Ad #3502 • 2 acres, Mountain Canyon views. $74,900. Ad #2072 • 1.21 acres, Owner financing. $75,000. Ad #8122 • 1 acre, Bend homesite Owner terms. $95,000. Ad #2572 • 1.4 acre, Nice corner lot. $99.900. Ad #2662 • 33 acres, Eagle Crest. $110,000. Ad #2032 • 5 acre parcel in the pines. $119,500. Ad #2332 • 5 acres, Ready for your dream home. $125,000. Ad #8572 • 1.83 acres, Deschutes River lot. $144,900. Ad #2182 • 5 acres on Bend’s West side. $219,000. Ad #3422 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449 www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

2 Acres, picture perfect, postcard Cascade view. Improved lot. $145,000. MLS #201008528 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty 5 Acre horse property near BLM with Cascade Mountain Views. Owner Terms w/low down. $119,000. MLS #201100946 5.72 Acres with gorgeous Smith Rock and Cascade Mountain Views. $179,500. MLS #201004185 Bring your RV! RV permits in place, power and septic installed, mountain views. Owner terms. $129,000. MLS #201008396 Karin Powers, Broker 541-410-0234 Century 21 Gold Country Realty

AMAZING WEST HILLS LOT Over 1/3 acre on uphill side of the street. Views to the south, southeast and city lights. Home site has been partially cleared. $159,000. MLS# 201010522 or visit johnlscott.com/50798 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L. Scott Real Estate 541-385-5500 A REAL FIND. A 5500 sq. ft. in-fill lot with large mature ponderosas Lot is flat and ready to build on. City services in the street. Close to shopping, Pilot Butte & the amenities of Juniper Park. $75,000. MLS#2801608 or visit johnlscott.com/77447 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $89,999, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

REDUCED! 19374 Rim Lake Ct., Bend. 1/2 +/- acre treed lot on cul-de-sac in Broken Top. Only $115,000. Call Ken Renner, Principal Broker, 541-280-5352 krenner@SunriverRealty.com

4.38 Acre View Lot! Backs BLM, Cascade mtn & Smith Rock views, corner lot, approved for standard septic. MLS2809381 . $199,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Rim property, septic approved, water & power avail. $115,500. MLS#201008531 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

5.2 acres with shop. $108,430. MLS #2802042 Call Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty

RV lot, ready to go! $44,900. MLS#201008906 Call Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty Tetherow Crescent Homesite A best value building site in Tetherow. Fairway and Bachelor views. Includes Golf Membership in Tetherow Club. .43 of an acre. Motivated seller has priced lot to sell quickly. Call for details and maps. $199,000. Cate Cushman, Principal Broker 541-480-1884 www.catecushman.com The Highlands at Broken Top! 10 Acres, gated, private well, utilities at lot line, approved for cap-fill septic. MLS 2910445. $535,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Broken Top Homesite On the 4th Fairway of Broken Top Club. 166 ft. of width, double lot .52 acre. Gentle slope, perfect for many home designs. Private, quiet neighborhood. Southwesterly views and sunny exposure. Value priced by motived seller at $185,000. Cate Cushman, Principal Broker 541-480-1884 www.catecushman.com Buildable in Ochoco West. Two neighboring lots, each over 1/5 acre. $10,000. Power and water in the street. Buy both and build your dream home or buy one for a great place to park your RV. Features include: over 1,200 acres of Recreation Land, swimming pool, tennis courts, fishing lakes stocked with trout and bass, horse stables, riding trails & community center. Beautiful view of Prineville Valley. MLS #2806023 & 2806025 or visit johnlscott.com/94130 and 94216. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) CRR -Awesome 6.8 acre property just above the Crooked River! Watch the eagles soar above the river canyons. See all the mountain views and surrounding terrain including Smith Rocks. Enjoy all the amenities of Crooked River Ranch, including golf, tennis, swimming, hiking, and of course fishing. Well already drilled and septic approved. Close to the entrance of CRR for an easy commute to town. What more could you ask for? $195,000. MLS #201009182 Pamela Foster-Adamson, Broker, GRI 541-408-7843 All Star Real Estate

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CRR - Don’t miss out on this opportunity. Large, nicely treed 1.6 acre lot set up for RV usage. Build your dream home later. RV septic in, water and power at the road. Has been grandfathered as RV lot. Property backs up to CRR open space for walking and riding. Spend your summers at The Ranch and utilize all Central Oregon has to offer. Golfing, swimming, tennis and park at The Ranch. Fishing, hiking and skiing near by. What more could you ask for? Priced at only $72,900. MLS #201100913 Pamela Foster-Adamson, Broker, GRI 541-408-7843 All Star Real Estate Elbow Canyon Parcels Burns, Oregon. (2) 40 Acre parcels located north of town near Calamity Lookout. Water from springs. Qualify for 2 LOP tags for cow elk. Malheur Hunting unit. Surrounded by Forest Service. Great hunting property. $70,000 each parcel. Jett Blackburn Real Estate, Inc. 541-573-7206 Fairway & Mountain Views One of the largest homesites in the Crescent Neighborhood. Premier setting with fairway and mountain views. .64 of an acre. Protective CC&Rs and design guidelines. The best west side location for your custom home. $216,000. Cate Cushman, Principal Broker 541-480-1884 www.catecushman.com Horse Ridge East. Choose one of seven 10-acre parcels with mountain views. Your own piece of paradise where the deer, antelope and you can play. OWC for suitable buyer with 10% down. $25,000. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Improved 1.176 acres lot w/Cascade views! Possible owner terms, $69,900. MLS #201009226 Call Nancy Popp, Broker 541-815-8000 Crooked River Realty

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5 acres, 1200 sq. ft. shop $119,900. MLS#201100926 Linda Lou Day-Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty $795,000 - Redmond! 109+/acres with 64 acres COI. Full Cascade Mtn views. MLS #201006080. Call Travis Hannan, Principal Broker, 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

9.18 Buildable acres: $147,000, Great Location; only 1 mile from Eagle Crest Resort! 503-260-7750 wtaaffe@comcast.net $97,000 -2.59 acres, standard septic approved. MLS #201100751 Call Travis Hannan, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate Acreage for horse lovers. 40 acres backing to BLM to the east. Horse lovers dream, priced to sell at $149,900. Property to the south also listed for $199,900. Power in road in front of lot, power and phone available, CUP in place. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L. Scott Real Estate 541-385-5500

Vandevert Ranch Unique acreage homesite. Community offers 400 acres, gated access and only 22 homesites / landholdings . Little Deschutes River runs through the ranch. Community stables, dog kennels and ranch caretaker. Mt. Bachelor views. 2.02 acres. Exceptional price by a motivated seller! $295,000. Cate Cushman, Principal Broker 541-480-1884 www.catecushman.com Whispering Pines. Ready-tobuild 2.4 acres with easterly views on a paved road. Water & power to street and septic approval in place. $70,000. MLS #2802337 or go to johnlscott.com/83475 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 YOUR NEW HOMESITE! 10,000 +/- sq.ft., ready for construction with great building site and all the utilities in the site. Great mature trees and fenced too. Romaine Village offers access to Clubhouse/ Rec room and a pool. A must preview. $49,900. MLS# 201007937 or visit johnlscott.com/8158 Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500

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All Utilities are Installed. Crooked River, Smith Rock & mountain views from this 6.9 acre lot. Custom home plans designed specifically for the best views are included. $225,000. MLS# 201008671 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 Beautiful & Private 80 acres surrounded by over 275,000 acres of BLM. Excellent retreat property or a new off the grid place to call home. Only 7 miles southwest of Prineville. $137,500 Jeff Larkin, Broker 541-480-5606 Central Oregon Realty Group

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** EVANS WELL - 2117 Deeded acres in 14 legal lots. Rated for 250 - 300 pair, this ranch operates with BLM and Forest Service leases covering approximately 60,000 acres. All parcels are surrounded by public lands. With views of the Paulina and Cascade Mountains as well as Horse Ridge and miles of open range. These parcels offer absolute privacy and seclusion, an easy, peaceful 30-minute drive to anywhere in Bend. Keep the property for yourself or use the established legal lots to create a compound for family and friends. $2,275,000 MLS#2709172. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker John L Scott Real Estate. 541-385-5500 Investment Opportunity in Canyon City 14+ acres divided into 4 tax lots in the city limit of Canyon City. Zoned R1, lots could be divided further. Seller is a licensed Real Estate Broker. $99,900. MLS 201101817 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

Lowell, OR, Forest Service properties for sale. Pole Barn, 3730 sf on 0.83 ac; Vacant Lot on 1.77ac; sold as 2 sales. Call GSA 253-931-7709 for a bid package or visit www.auctionrp.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Own a Part of History. A portion of Crooked River Ranch’s original watering hole is located on the property. Nicely treed & private at the end of a cul-de-sac. Lot 5- 3.2 acres $60,000 MLS# 201009996 Lot 4- 4.78 acres $70,000 MLS# 201009997 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

PARADISE up the Mill Creek Valley just minutes outside of Prineville, Oregon. Beautiful custom home on over 300 acres. Property includes 2 large hay/feed barns, 5 stall horse barn, large shop, swimming pool, hot tub, and privacy all your own. This property is home to Elk, Deer, Turkey, Coyotes, and occasional bear. Home features a large gourmet kitchen, beautiful beam accents, large wood burning fireplace, large master bdrm on main fl. Landscaped yard with white fencing. Pride of Ownership! $1,329,000 Jeff Larkin, Broker 541-480-5606 Central Oregon Realty Group Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Well Priced Acreage borders BLM land on east and south side. Outcroppings, mature juniper, unbelievable privacy. Horse lovers, this is for you! 40 acres priced to sell at $149,900. CUP in place. Bobbie Strome, Principal Broker, John L. Scott Real Estate 541-385-5500 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

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Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Brand New 3 Bdrm. 2 bath, delivered & Set Up, starting at $39,999, financing available, Call 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

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Mfd./Mobile Homes with Land

541-385-5809 Price Reduced! 2.79 acres, walking distance to the Deschutes River & Steelhead Falls. Hike, bike, ride horses, fly fish. Quiet & natural setting is ideal for vacations or year round living. $75,000. MLS# 201009429 Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

1.76 Acres! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1536 sq.ft., large rear deck, shop w/240v power, greenhouse, storage building. MLS201004821. $99,000 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338 2 Bdrm, 1 bath, $79,900. MLS#201007467. Linda Lou -Day Wright, Broker 541-771-2585 Crooked River Realty People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Quiet Location! Level 1.14 acres that will be easy to build on. Well treed with an abundance of wildlife passing through. $41,500 MLS# 201102002. Juniper Realty 541-504-5393

The Bulletin Classifieds BANK OWNED - $69,900 3 bedroom, 2 bath, plus den, 1539 sq. ft., attached double garage on 1.23 acres in La Pine. New carpet and range. Bank owned, Special financing available. Only $69,900, Call today. MLS#201101978 Greg Floyd, P.C., Broker 541-390-5349

River Runs Through It. 5 Acre parcel in scenic Sumpter, OR. The Powder River runs through the property. Seller is a licensed Real Estate Broker. $50,000. MLS 201010258. Juniper Realty 541-504-5393 TETHEROW CROSSING $629,000 Pristine very private 18 Acres with 700 plus feet of middle Deschutes River frontage. Buildable, wildlife galore, 12 minutes to downtown Redmond. MLS#201009447 Geoff Chisholm, Broker 541-226-3599

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Single Level on 1 Acre! 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1716 sq.ft., master separation, office, fenced, flower garden, RV parking. MLS201007848. $150,000 Pam Lester, Principal Broker Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

The New Website

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Acreages $103,000 -3.39 acres, standard septic approved. MLS #201100748 Call Travis Hannan, Principal Broker 541-788-3480 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

www.sothebysrealty.com

10 ACRES - MTN. VIEWS $149,900 Excellent 10 Acre Cascade Mtn. view property in Bend. Adjoins BLM and miles of trails. Call Diane for affordable house plans, and build your mountain view dream home today! MLS#2800613 Diane Lozito, Broker 541-548-3598

Exposure 10 Acres S. of La Pine, Buildable, treed, septic approved, gravel drive, photos on request. $79,900 541-999-4325. 1.83 acres, utilities, barn $39,900 MLS#201010211 Call Melody Curry, Broker 541-771-1116 Crooked River Realty 1.9 acres, Prineville, ready for your home. $53,500. MLS#201008768 Julie Fahlgren, Broker 541-550-0098 Crooked River Realty

Presence

20 Acres, Christmas Valley, off Oil Dry (paved road), power at road, $15,000 or trade for ??? 541-728-1036. $275,000 -Majestic Mountain View! Private 20 acre. Close to Redmond, easy access to Bend/Sisters. Septic approved. MLS #2902643 Call Charlie, Principal Broker 541-350-3418 Redmond Re/Max Land & Homes Real Estate

36+ Acre Estate - Bend Cascade Nursery! $850,000. Ad #8452 TEAM Birtola Garmyn Prudential High Desert Realty 541-312-9449

70 Brokers 4 Offices Serving Central Oregon Why would you list your property anywhere else?

Each office is individually owned and operated.

www.BendOregonRealEstate.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Main Phone: 541-383-7600 Downtown Bend: 821 NW Wall Street, Bend

Old Mill District: 650 SW Bond Street, Suite 100, Bend

Sunriver: Building 4, Sunriver Village

Sisters: 625 Arrowleaf Trail, Sisters EQUAL HOUSING LENDER


E6 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

n i t s i l f o ds n m a o s c . u y o t r h t e p d o n r a p ts .bend n e g w A 2 5 ww

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Visit our office conveniently located at 486 SW Bluff Dr. in the Old Mill District, Bend Visit us online or call 541-382-4123

This Week’s New Listings BANK OWNED $78,900

COMMERCIAL LOT $160,000

SISTERS $204,000

NE BEND $234,500

SUNRIVER $235,000

COMMERCIAL LOT 3 bedroom, 1 bath, 1456 sq. ft. on 1.17 acres close to downtown La Pine. Needs TLC. Laminate flooring in the kitchen. Detached shop area with RV door. MLS#201102255

7300 sq. ft. commercial lot. Great location and exposure. Zoned Limited Commercial. 210 Wilson Ave. MLS#201102283

3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2800 sq. ft. home. Great investment property, needs work. Two fireplaces, hardiplank siding, vacation rental possibilities. Shop building. MLS#201102378

7.69 acres with BLM land on 2 sides! Driveway in place, drilled well, septic approved. Great mountain views and a lovely pond. MLS#201102253

Great 2nd home or rental, move-in condition. Beautiful setting. Knotty pine vaulted ceiling, spacious kitchen, cozy living area with wood burning fireplace. This is a Fannie Mae HomePath property. MLS#201102279

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., BROKER, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

BILL PORTER, BROKER 541-383-4342

GEOFF CHISHOLM, BROKER 541-226-3599

JULIA BUCKLAND, Broker, ABR, ALHS, CRS, GRI 541-719-8444

DARRYL DOSER, BROKER, CRS 541-383-4334

SW BEND $299,000

NW BEND $344,900

NW BEND/MARKEN HEIGHTS $369,000

RARE ONE STORY TOWNHOME $419,000

ROYAL OAK ESTATES $1,095,000

Superb location near Old Mill. Spacious 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2719 sq. ft. home located on quiet cul-de-sac, near Deschutes River trails, community park, pool, tennis court, & clubhouse. 3-car garage MLS#201102341

4 bedroom, 2.5 bath 2653 sq. ft. home in Shevlin Crest. Slate entry, arched doorways, hardwood kitchen floor. Many upgrades. MLS#201102315

New construction built by Dave Hasenoehrl. 2 story with main floor master & upstairs bonus room. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 1902 sq. ft. Great room floor plan MLS#201102340

One level townhome with sweeping Cascade Mountain views. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2120 sq. ft. Gourmet kitchen with nook. Great room with custom fireplace. Formal dining area. Master suite and bath. MLS #201102309

Rare 5 bedroom, 4.5 bath, 5600 sq. ft. custom home 6.45 acres. Colonial style, fully handicap equipped. Spacious main floor master, elevator, 6 car garage, RV door, private apartment with its own entrance. MLS#201102311

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, BROKERS 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

DARRIN KELLEHER, BROKER 541-788-0029

DIANE ROBINSON, BROKER, ABR 541-419-8165

CAROLYN PRIBORSKY, P.C., BROKER, ABR, CRS 541-383-4350

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., BROKER, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

SE BEND | $289,000

Visit us at: NO HASSLE OWNERSHIP | $99,900

BROKEN TOP | $175,000

WEST POWELL BUTTE ESTATES | $200,000

2 BLOCKS TO DESCHUTES | $229,900

Updated/upgraded NE Bend condo. New appliances, carpet and stone. 2 master suites with A/C, 2.5 baths. Great room with fireplace, fans. Large 2-car garage. Pool, Spa, Clubhouse, Tennis. All landscaping done for you! MLS#2808401 (740)

Turnkey townhome in the Courtyards. Fully furnished, vacation rental opportunity. Upstairs unit - 1 bedroom, open kitchen/living room, gas fireplace. Main floor unit is a studio. Singlecar garage. MLS#201101749 (747)

Bare land in unusual subdivision of 20-acre parcels, CC&R’s, executive homes, gated community, paved streets. Developer’s own parcel. Overlooking lush Powell Butte Valley. Easy access to Redmond. MLS#201010033 (773)

Pristine 2008 home with 4 bedrooms, office & 2 baths. Great room design, gourmet kitchen, Stainless appliances, big master. RV Package, 4-car garage! .49 acre lot, close to river access. Private marina. MLS#201102023 (755)

LESTER FRIEDMAN, P.C., BROKER 541-330-8491

SHELLY HUMMEL, BROKER, CRS, GRI, CHMS 541-383-4361

SUE CONRAD, BROKER, CRS 541-480-6621

JULIA BUCKLAND, BROKER, ABR, ALHS, CRS, GRI 541-719-8444

JUDY MEYERS, BROKER, GRI, CRS 541-480-1922

RIVER RIM/SW BEND | $309,900

SE BEND | $348,000

WONDERFUL WEST HILLS HOME | $374,900

SW REDMOND | $379,500

NW BEND | $375,000

Beautiful home on corner lot in River Rim. Home features 3 bedrooms plus office, great room/one level floor plan, 3-car tandem, tons of upgrades; granite, hardwood, slate entry, A/C, and much more! MLS#201101162 (747)

Gorgeous remodeled EW G 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath N TIN 2834 sq. ft. home. S LI Ebony wood island in kitchen, elm and juniper accents, new appliances, 2 gas fireplaces, oak hardwood floors, 3 car garage with RV parking. MLS#201102307 (749)

3 bedroom, 1.75 bath, 1952 sq. ft. Large south facing .29 of an acre lot. Beautiful landscaping & decks. Great living spaces, vaulted ceilings & large windows. Location is Key! MLS#201006837 (746)

Sparkling clean tri-plex with new paint in all 3 units. New appliances and new window coverings. Garage with each unit. Great location and rental history. MLS#2904198 (738)

Vintage 1925 Bend homestead with spacious farmhouse. 1 bedroom & bath downstairs and 2 bedrooms up. 33.89 acres, 1925 barn, workshop, large chicken coop with runs & spacious horse barn. MLS#201102146 (730)

MELANIE MAITRE, BROKER 541-480-4186

MARK VALCESCHINI, P.C., BROKER, CRS, GRI 541-383-4364

JOANNE MCKEE, BROKER, ABR, GRI, CRS 541-480-5159

SYDNE ANDERSON, BROKER, CRS, WCR 541-420-1111

LYNNE CONNELLEY, ECOBROKER, ABR, CRS 541-408-6720

WIDGI CREEK | $447,500

NORTHWEST CROSSING | $470,000

EAGLE CREST | $515,000

GATED COMMUNITY | $525,000

NW BEND | $570,000

3 bedroom, 3 bath, 2505 sq. ft. townhome overlooking the 18th fairway & pond. Slate entry, hallways & laundry room, hardwood in kitchen & dining area. 2 master suites; 1 on main level. MLS#201101845 (747)

4 bedroom, great room concept, master on main. Large kitchen with huge center island. Maple cabs and hardwood flooring. Upstairs suite with separate office could be 2nd master. Fenced back patio. MLS#201000475 (746)

This spacious home will delight you with all of its wonderful features. Situated on .39 of an acre backing to over 3 acres of common area. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, sunroom, bonus room, 3-car garage, and views. MLS#201008461 (745)

Two master suites, EW G additional guest N TIN S room, 2 decks and LI 3-car garage. Enjoy single level living on one of the largest lots in Mountain High. Well planned 3276 sq. ft. home for entertaining & privacy. MLS#201102434 (749)

NICHOLE BURKE, BROKER 661-378-6487

NANCY MELROSE, BROKER 541-312-7263

PAT PALAZZI, BROKER 541-771-6996

JOY HELFRICH, BROKER, E-PRO, GRI, GREEN 541-480-6808

VIRGINIA ROSS, BROKER, ABR, CRS, GRI 541-383-4336

SW BEND | $589,000

AWBREY PARK | $819,000

AWBREY BUTTE RETREAT | $845,000

SE BEND | $1,080,000

RIVER FRONT | $995,000

4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2943 sq. ft. contemporary, “Green” home is an oasis in the woods. Tucked away on a private .25 of an acre with a built in pool & hot tub surrounded by expansive mahogany decking. MLS#201009639 (747)

1st time on the market, NW inspired 4 bedroom 4230 sq. ft. home. 2 bedroom suites on main. Great room plan, office, family room & bonus room. Private ½ acre. Great use of woods & windows. MLS#201102272 (730)

Secluded acre lot with great city view! Tastefully finished, fabulous design, multiple living areas, main level master suite, warmth abounds, 3872 sq. ft. Enjoy the ample decking with city views & mature trees. MLS#201101249 (746)

24 shovel ready lots located on South Reed Market Rd & 4th St. with shops & restaurants right around the corner. Lots can be packaged in groups of 4. Great opportunity for an entry level development project. MLS#201004101 (732)

Located on the banks of the Deschutes River in the heart of downtown Bend. All the charm of older home. Fireplaces, formal dining, builtins, hardwood flooring. 4 bedroom, 3 bath. A must see. MLS#201009301 (746)

SCOTT HUGGIN, BROKER, GRI 541-322-1500

MARGO DEGRAY, BROKER, ABR, CRS 541-480-7355

JIM & ROXANNE CHENEY, BROKERS 541-390-4030 • 541-390-4050

LISA CAMPBELL, BROKER 541-419-8900

ROOKIE DICKENS, BROKER, GRI, CRS, ABR 541-815-0436

NW BEND | $1,140,000

NW BEND | $1,200,000

NW BEND | $1,390,000

23 ± Private easy care acres, custom built home with outstanding Cascade views. Owner will finance second depending on terms and conditions. MLS#201006284 (762)

4 bedroom, 3.5 bath, 5280 sq. ft. furnished COBA tour home. Open great room, gourmet kitchen, master suite with sauna, theater room, billiard room, exercise room, outdoor living & Cascade Mtn Views. MLS#201102110 (746)

Exquisite home with Old World Charm on .43 of an acre. Exceptional quality, detail & design. 5616 sq. ft. Dramatic cathedral living room with Tuscan fireplace & loft. Separate guest studio. MLS#201102057 (746)

SUSAN AGLI, BROKER, SRES 541-383-4338 • 541-408-3773

JOHN SNIPPEN, BROKER, MBA, ABR, GRI 541-312-7273 • 541-948-9090

SHERRY PERRIGAN, BROKER 541-410-4938

D IT I D WE AIN! AG LD SO

Top of the line home in Mountain High; formal living at its best. Backs to fairway, beautifully landscaped lot on cul-de-sac. Recently updated 2 bedroom, 2 bath + den. 1924 sq. ft. MLS#201102150 (749)

IN D L SO AYS! 2 D

ICE D PR UCE D E R

Contemporary 5 bedroom, 3883 sq. ft. Gorgeous kitchen, many living areas. Master suite on main level. Salt water swimming pool. MLS#201101356 (746) 1221 West Hills Ave.

W NE ICE PR

“The Mother of all Garage Sales & Diaper Drive” Saturday, June 18th - 8 am to 2 pm Coldwell Banker Morris is hosting The Mother of All Garage Sales and Diaper Drive with all the diapers and proceeds going to The Bend Community Center and the homeless community that they serve. *All donations are being accepted at Coldwell Banker Morris Real Estate.


THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 F1

C LASSIFIEDS

To place your ad visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

The Bulletin

General Merchandise

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Want to Buy or Rent CASH for old pens, watches, sunglasses and motorcycle helmets. Call 541-706-0891 CHEST OF DRAWERS WANTED, free, please call 541-388-2710

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Crafts and Hobbies

Misc. Items

Livestock & Equipment

Malti-Poos: phone correction made. 2 females, born 9/9/10. All puppy & rabies shots, dewormed & health checked, $375, no shipping. 541-350-5106, no AM calls.

Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 Quilting Frame, $200, please call 541-961-3776 for more info.

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

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Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

MINIATURE SCHNAUZERS two males, 8 weeks old, $300 each. 541-416-3677 Mini-Dachshunds, 2 young females, 1 black/tan, 1 piebald, $200 ea, 541-408-0763.

Papillon puppies, 5 month old sable $400. Tri colored 8 wks old $375. Exc. references. 541 504-9958

Boxers AKC Reg, fawns, whites, & brindles, 1st shots, very social.$500-$650. 541-325-3376

Dachshund, AKC 2-yr old male, $375. DNA, pedigree, red & white piebald. 541-420-6044

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Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Davenport & Love Seat, M. Jacob, floral design., $200 OBO, 541-382-8181,541-771-5108 Full size bed frame & dresser w/mirror, solid maple, from 1950s. $500. 541-382-0890 Furniture

Dachshund AKC miniature male puppy, 8 weeks, 1st shots, $325. 541-420-6044 Dog Crate & Carrier, small, like new, $50 OBO for both, Redmond 541-526-0897. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com English Bulldogs: adult, spayed female $500; 4month, intact male, $1200. 541-588-6490 FREE adult companion cats to seniors! Tame, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will always take back for any reason. Visit Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt, call 541-647-2181. 65480 78th, Bend. Gen. info: 541-389-8420. Photos, map, more at www.craftcats.org. Free Cats (2): Beautiful, need loving home, brothers, please call 541-788-3416. Free working cats for barn/shop /companionship. Fixed, shots; can deliver! 541-389-8420

German Shepherd Pups, AKC. Health guarantee. $850 509-406-3717 Kittens & cats thru local rescue group. 65480 78th, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by appt, call 541-647-2181. Small kittens in foster care, call 541-815-7278. Shots, altered, ID chip, more. Low fees. Info: 389-8420. Photos, map at www.craftcats.org. Lab, black female, 4-5 months old, $75. Call 503-310-2514 or 541-576-3701 Lab Puppies, AKC, 2 males left, 8 weeks, 1st shots & dewormed. 541-771-7511 Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Moving Sale - Ethan Allen dining room set, beds, desk & chair, armoire, arm chairs & more. Sale starts Mon 4/18. 541-318-7308 408-834-9776

BioMaster stationary fitness bicycle with electronics, Asking $50. 541-389-7472. TREADMILL - older model Precor in excellent cond., $350 obo. 541-416-1007

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing 20g New England youth single shot shotgun, wood stock, Ltd Ed. $150. 541-647-8931 22LR Remington 597 semi-auto rifle, synthetic stock, $175. 541-647-8931 22 Rifle, Winchester, model 190, $145; .38, 2” barrel, $275, 541-771-5648. .38, 6” barrel, $225; 12 ga., Remington 870 Wingmaster, 28”, $275, 541-771-5648.

BE PREPARED! Oregon’s Largest 3 Day GUN & KNIFE SHOW April 15-16-17 Portland Expo Center Featuring Preparedness and Survival Products I-5 exit #306B Admission $9 Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4 1-800-659-3440 www.collectorswest.com

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

Backpack, Lowe, Sirocco Backpack, great cond., $125, 541-318-5732

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

Sleeping Bag, North Face , sub-zero, like new, $200,541-318-5732

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TV, Stereo and Video

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store.

In the Forum Center

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Children’s Items Need To Sell: Baby Trend Expedition Jogging Stroller with infant car seat that clicks into stroller and base for the car. All included $200 obo call Lindsay 541-706-1078.

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Pedal Cars: Jeep w/matching Boat. Also Trunks & vintage Suitcases. 541-389-5408 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

GENERATE SOME EXCITEMENT IN YOUR NEIGBORHOOD. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Kettle Grill, $20. Big Turkey pot with metal burner, $40. 541-480-1337 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Water Tank, 250 Gallon Fiberglass Tank slip-on for type 6 wildland fire engine, used 2 seasons, has all hookups, $400, 541-961-3776.

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Medical Equipment Pride 2010 Jazzy Select GT power chair, used less than 1 mo., detachable/adjustable armrests, incl. battery & charger, $6695 new, asking $4500. See at 20989 Tumalo Rd., 541-389-8782 after 5pm gls2423@yahoo.com

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Commercial / Ofice Equipment &Fixtures Air Conditioner, Soleus, purchased at Home Depot for $500, due to moving to western Oregon will sell for $350 OBO, 541-382-0763 Office Partition, portable, like new, 6’x5’. $50, call 541-382-7241.

Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend RIDING LAWN MOWER with grass catcher, brand new, never used. $700. 541-548-2554. SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Sony under-cabinet Radio & CD Player, like new, $50. 541-548-7137 TC audio speakers (2), solid oak, on pedestals, $150 & Audio Super Bass, on rollers, in solid oak cabinet, $150. 541-419-0613.

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Computers

Medical Billing/ Collection Professional

A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516

Employment

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Schools and Training

FOUND bracelet: “Special Daughter Always” at Bend Advertise in 30 Daily newspaArea Transit Rte 1 Stop 110. pers! $525/25-words, 3Call to ID 503-475-1384. days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Found Dog: Sheltie, Beautiful, Oregon, Montana, WashingBaker Rd. in DRW, 4/9, call ton & Utah. (916) 288-6019 541-383-3709. email: elizabeth@cnpa.com Found: Fly Fishing Rod, Colfor the Pacific Northwest lege Way, 4/13, call to idenDaily Connection. (PNDC) tify, 541-948-5848. AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train Found LADDER that attaches to for high paying Aviation horse trailer? Apr. 4, Smith Maintenance Career. FAA apRock Way. 541-548-4674 proved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing FOUND Motorola Bluetooth in available. Call Aviation Inlittle bag 3 blks S of McMestitute of Maintenance. namins 4/1. 541-390-9087 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC) HELP YOUR AD TO stand out from the rest! Have the top ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Busiline in bold print for only ness, *Paralegal, *Account$2.00 extra. ing, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

DON'T MISS OUT on the unique opportunity to work at Central Oregon's finest resort. The Ranch has summer positions available in our food service division as well as our Welcome Center & Spa. Do you enjoy working with people, and have a "customer first" attitude? We are looking for enthusiastic, customer service oriented individuals to join Team BBR. There are just a few openings left in the following areas: •Restaurant/Banquet Servers •Restaurant Bussers •Bartenders •Line Cook •Restaurant Supervisor •Snack Shop Attendants •Beverage Cart Attendants •Guest Service Supervisor •Guest Service Agent •Vacation Sales Agent •Spa receptionist/ Sales Associate Benefits include golf privileges and 30% discount on food and merchandise. Apply on line at www.blackbutteranch.com . BBR is a drug free work place. EOE. Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Oregon Medical Training PCS

L O S T Mini-Pinscher R e ward “Paris” female chocolate & tan, brown collar, 4/10, near 6th & Olney, scared but comes to food, 503-422-2320

Lost: White Pit Bull, male, black patch on eye, spots on ears, Redmond, 4/13,541-977-5156, 541-771-5488. REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Farm Market

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Farm Equipment and Machinery AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

Pump - Hydromatic, 100 cfs for 25’ irrigation. $65. 503-933-0814.

Phlebotomy classes begin May 2nd. Registration now open: Immediate openings for feller www.oregonmedicaltraining.com buncher, delimber, loader 541-343-3100 operator and log truck. work in CA. Some relocation reimTRUCK SCHOOL bursement. 530-816-0656. www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Lot Attendant Student Loans/Job Waiting Full-time, Monday - Friday, Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 some weekends, benefits included. Must work in the Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the outdoor environment. Backclassiieds! Ask about our ground and drug test reSuper Seller rates! quired. Please see Beth at 541-385-5809 Carrera Motors, 1045 SE 3rd. St., Bend. No phone calls 454 please.

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403 Position and housing wanted Former heavy equip. operator & landscaper seeking small woodworking shop and rental in Bend area. Can pay or exchange for yard upkeep or improvement, fencing, rock work, etc. 760-525-5773 Seeking a Ranch Job, full or part time, 15 years exp. at Willows Ranch. Call Miguel 541-390-5033. For references, call Judy 541-549-1248

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Domestic & In-Home Positions

Medical - Billing and Collections Specialist La Pine Community Health Center is looking for an outstanding, organized, and team-focused Biller to join our FQHC billing team. Duties include accurate charge, payment, and data entry and following up on claims issues. FT, 8-5 p.m. M-F. Experience in medical billing preferred. To apply visit our website www.lapinehealth.org for full instructions.

Responsible for receptionist/office duties. Position is full-time; $10/hr plus bonuses. Must have experience in medical field and hold current certification in coding and billing. Email cover letter outlining qualifications/accomplishments. to drmacdonell@ bendbroadband.com Mig Welder for Manufacturing in Minot, North Dakota. Year round, full-time inside work, wage DOE. Contact Butch at 701-838-6346. OR Nurse

Full-time, 4 - 10 hr. shifts. Monday - Friday. Applicant must have scrub and circulation experience. Benefits. Interested persons should email their resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Deadline: open until filled.

Pharmacist

position. Need friendly, organized, motivated pharmacist to take care of our patients. Independent central Oregon community pharmacy, full or part-time, no Sundays, no nights. Competitive wage and benefits. Call Leah 541-419-4688.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

RN – Care Coordinator Will provide nursing care to patients utilizing process of assessment, planning, intervention and evaluation. Support clinical team in a medical home model approach. Experience in Triage and managing Anticoagulation clinic preferred. Qualified Candidates may visit our website at: www.lapinehealth.org to apply and to view full job description. Salary DOE and position is open until filled.

Education Concordia University (CU) MBA program in Bend seeks an adjunct business faculty member to teach a graduate level e-Commerce course in Bend starting in mid-July, 2011. Class meeting times are once per month on Friday evening and all day Saturday. This two-month long course uses case-based methodology and Harvard Business School materials. MBA or masters in a related field required. Significant experience in e-Commerce required. Proven success in college-level teaching strongly desired. Single course contract basis. The faculty employment application form can be downloaded via the CU website: http://www.cu-portland.edu/aboutcu/employment.cfm A complete application packet must include the CU Application Form, letter of interest, vita, and 3 references. Send application packet to Tom Daniels, MBA Program Director, Bend, at tdaniels@cu-portland.edu or by mail at 2611 NW Gill Ct, Bend, OR 97701. For information about Concordia’s MBA program in Bend, contact Tom Daniels at (541) 350-3553. Concordia University does not discriminate in the employment of individuals on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, disability, sex, or age. However, Concordia University is an institution of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, and, to the extent allowed by law, Concordia University reserves the right to give preference in employment based upon religion. Independent Contractor

BUNDLE

HAULER

A bundle hauler is needed to distribute The Central Oregon Nickel Ads publication. This independent contractor position requires a dependable vehicle capable of distributing approximately 75 Nickel bundles to various drop locations located in and around Deschutes County. Valid driver’s license and proof of insurance is required. This position drops bundles to locations every Thursday from approximately 9 a.m. till 3:30 p.m. and then also restocks the route on Saturdays. This position is not an employee position and profit is determined based upon the number of drops involved. If you meet the above qualifications, please submit your information to: circulation@bendbulletin.com or drop off your contact information to: The Bulletin Circulation Department 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702. No phone calls please.

Advertising Account Executive

Part-time day Caregiver for elderly, bedridden woman. Sun. 7:30-4:30, Mon. Tues. 7:30-11:30. 541-419-3405

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Employment Opportunities

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 267

Fuel and Wood All Year Dependable Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484 SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Seasoned Pine Firewood, only 1 cord, 16-20”, $120 delivered, 541-390-8188.

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with mul269 tiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ Gardening Supplies software, to disclose the & Equipment name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are Alpaca Manure - FREE - Great for your garden. You load & defined as those who sell one haul. 541-977-8013 computer.

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BarkTurfSoil.com

Misc. Items

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

25% off Select Signature WinWholesale Peat Moss Sales dow treatments. PLUS order 541-389-9663 10 window coverings or more and get an additional 10% off! *Not valid with any other Craftsman gas mower, 6.5hp, with rear catcher, good conoffers. Good thru 4/30/11 dition, $95. 541-419-5693 only. See ad in April issue of Picture Your Home magaHave Gravel Will Travel! zine. *Offer valid at time of Cinders, topsoil, fill material, etc. initial estimate only. Excavation & septic systems. Budget Blinds Call Abbas Construction 541-788-8444. CCB#78840, 541-548-6812. www.BudgetBlinds.com For newspaper delivery , Big decorative wall clock, call the Circulation Dept. $10. 541-480-1337 at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call Black Packasport, System 90, 541-385-5809 or email excellent condition, $450. classified@bendbulletin.com 808-635-8980 (local) BOXES - Great for moving or storage, $25 (cash). Call 541-454-0056

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

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Lost and Found

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Queen size Flexsteel hideabed, dark taupe, lightly used, $95. 541-419-0613

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates!

Garage door opener, complete kit with 2 remotes/ $85. 503-933-0814.

Food Service

Tame Miniature Goats, bottle babies & yearling. Nigerian, Pygmy & mixes, $65 ea., 2 / $100. Alfalfa, 541-388-8725

Farmers Column

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. CARTERS children clothes gift card $75 value, sell $50. 503-933-0814.

Feeder Steers or Heifers, healthy, locally grown & raised, delivery available, Culver, Call 541-546-8747 or 541-460-0841.

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541-389-6655

Sporting Goods - Misc. Backpack, Dana Design, Big Sky, nearly new, $75, 541-318-5732

541-598-4643.

Hummingbirds Are Back!

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

263 Browning BAR, Belgium made, .308, $525, please call Tools 541-948-6633. 2-ton Floor Jack, new, $20. CASH!! Handyman Jack, 48” $25. For Guns, Ammo & Reloading 541-480-1337 Supplies. 541-408-6900. Mini SpeedAire portable inColt MK-III Trooper, 4” .357 flating compressor with hose, mag., $500; Mars Pneumatic 60 psi, $45. 503-933-0814. Spear Guns, various sizes, 2x18”, 1x24”, $150 each. 265 541-549-6625. Building Materials GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. H & H FIREARMS Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign Across From Pilot Butte Drive-In 541-382-9352 MUZZLE LOADER KIT, 50 cal. Hawken rifle kit, #5113 manufactured by Thompson Arms, kit still in orig. box, collectors item, $350 Cabinet Refacing obo. 541- 416-1007 & Refinishing. Save Thousands! OR + UTAH CCW: Required class Oregon and Utah ConMost jobs completed in cealed License. Saturday 5 days or less. April 16 9:30 a.m. at Madras Best Pricing in the Industry. Range. $100 includes Photo required by Utah, Call Paul 541-647-8261 Sumner (541)475-7277 for preregistration and info REDMOND Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Remington 870 Express, home Quality at LOW PRICES defence, 12 ga., $195, 1242 S. Hwy 97 541-548-1406 Call 541-728-1036 Open to the public . Taurus .38 Spl. (lite) CC holster. $300. The 541-420-1066

NEED TO CANCEL YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel your ad!

Labrador Pups, AKC, ChocoAntiques & lates & Yellows, $500; Blacks, Collectibles $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & wormed. Call 541-536-5385 Castles of Europe (Danbury www.welcomelabs.com mint 1994), 7 porcelain, mint cond. if purchased as group price neg. 541-848-8230

Lhasa Apso/Pug Spring Pups. Lhasa Apso mother, dad is reg. brinde Pug. Adorable variety colors. Must see. You will fall in love. $400. Taking $75 dep. now. Call for info. 541-548-0747,541-279-3588

Girls’ Bike, Schwinn, 24” 7-spd, in good condition, $50. Call 541-383-4231 Iron Horse Bicycles(2), new, paid $150 ea, sell for $75ea, 541-382-8181,541-771-5108

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Pit Bull - purebred blue nose male, 3 yrs, not neutered, looking for good home, $200. We also have a puppy of his, 205 11 week old female, black in Items for Free color, $200. 541-771-3165 Chair, Very clean, dark maroon, Pomeranian Puppies CKC Reg, back reclines - no foot stool, 2 fem’s, 3 males; 2 rare gray, free, you haul, 541-408-3353 2 fancy red sables, 1 black. $500-600. 541-598-4443 Computer HP/CD-Writer+, POODLE Pups, AKC Toy ~10 yrs,Monitor & Keyboard, Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Dell, from COCC, ~5-6 yrs., Call 541-475-3889 FREE, 541-388-2710. Pueblan Milk Snake $75, 208 Golden Gecko & cage $40, Pets and Supplies Anole & cage $25, Long Tail Grass Lizard & cage $25. Call Leslie at 541-923-8555 The Bulletin recommends Queensland Heelers extra caution when purchasing products or Standards & mini,$150 & up. services from out of the 541-280-1537 area. Sending cash, checks, http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ or credit information may RAT TERRIER Trained! Great on be subjected to fraud. For hikes, people, dogs, love. more information about an Pretty & VERY sweet! 2yrs, advertiser, you may call the 14 lbs,neutered. Right home Oregon State Attorney $100. He's lonely for his new General’s Office Consumer forever buddy! 541-233-6727 Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392. Saint Bernard Rescue Now Adopting! saintrescue.org/oregon.htm Males & Females. Large breed exper. req’d. Foster homes Aussies, AKC Mini's, Toy's pardesperately needed, too! ents on site family raised Call Jeff: 541-390-1353 shots/wormed must see Shih Tzu Yorkie mix (2). Will be 541-598-6264/788-7799 1 yr in June. Great dogs for Border Collie/New Zealand kids. White w/brown markHuntaway puppies, 8 wks, ings. Up to date shots. Both working parents, wonderful male. $100 ea 541-728-6969 dogs, $300. 541-546-6171 Yorkie Puppy, no papers, Border Collie Puppies (10), 10 parents on site, $300. wks, 1st shots, well social541-550-0249, Redmond ized, $50 ea. 541-477-3327

Boxer Mix, 1 male, 1 female brindle color, 12 wks. Asking $75 each. 541-410-9928

Bicycles and Accessories

Exercise Equipment

Wanted: Used Rug, 9x12, shades of red color, please call 541-385-9289.

Boston Terrier Male AKC, 3 year old, not neutered. Plays well with others. Needs lots of attention. Very cute and loved $250 (541)279-4016

www.bendbulletin.com

Pets and Supplies

Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Elizabeth, 541-633-7006

Border Collies, black/white, tri, smooth coat, shots/wormed, 7 weeks $250. 541-948-7997

Find Classifieds at

Special Low 0% APR Financing New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23.5 HP, R-4 Industrial Tires, Power Steering.

Sale Price $11,999 Financing on approved credit.

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond Water Tanks, 1500 gallon capacity and less, 4 tanks in all, $250. 541-408-7358

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Irrigation Equipment IRRIGATION WATER RIGHTS - Tumalo TID, $5500, consider selling 1-5 acres, reduced rate on 1+ acre. 541-815-9974.

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) Dental Assistant Must be X-Ray certified, Tues.Thurs. to start. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. 541-382-2281. Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS Dental Surgical Assistant: Central Oregon Perio, looking for part time surgical assistant to work 2 days per week. Please Fax resume to 541-317-0355 or contact Julie at 541-317-0255. Environmental Services/Housekeeping

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Custom No-till Seeding Grass, Alfalfa & Grain Crops All of Central Oregon.

Call 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Horses and Equipment AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

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Livestock & Equipment AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

(40/hr. per week - Mon.Fri.) - Full Time - 5 X 8/hr. shifts per week - (4pm 12:30am), yet flexible based on patient census and job demands. Prior experience in sterile environment and infection control preferred. Must be able to stoop, bend, and lift 25lbs - be able to prioritize workload, and be efficient in duties. Email resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Deadline: open until filled. FIRE CHIEF JOB OPENING! In beautiful Big Sky, Montana. Applications accepted through 4/30/11 from experienced EMS/Fire professionals to lead combination department. Visit www.BigSkyFire.org for details. (PNDC)

The Bulletin is looking for a professional sales and marketing person to help our local customers grow their businesses with an expanding list of broad-reach and targeted products. This full time position requires a demonstrable background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting. 2-4 years of outside advertising sales experience is preferable however we will train the right candidate. The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: The Bulletin, Attn: Sean Tate, 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701. No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace


F2 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

SOCIAL SERVICES

RN Case Manager

TANF Case Manager

Partners In Care has two openings for full-time RN Case Managers to provide care to our home health and hospice patients. Applicants MUST have a current Oregon RN license. Qualified candidates are asked to submit a resume to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend OR 97701 Attn: HR, or via email to HR@partnersbend.org

$28,282 - $40,398 Full Benefits Non-Management, Regular, Full-Time This position is located in Chiloquin.

For more information contact: The Klamath Tribes PO Box 436 Chiloquin, OR 97624 jobs@klamathtribes.com 541-783-2219 x 113 Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Technical Operations Manager Highly technical position responsible for developing, implementing and supporting the technical projects and activities within the Payroll Department. Responsibilities will include date migration, report, analysis, data security and various systems issues. Degree in MIS or related field, 4+ yrs of related computer systems work exp. Position is located in Klamath Falls, OR. Visit www.jeld-wen.com for more info. Send resume to jobs@jeld-wen.com EOE.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

Tele-Marketing: Small company seeking individuals to fundraise for well-known non-profit organizations. Great for seniors, homemakers, students & others, Permanent part-time, 19 hours weekly, MonThur. 5-9 p.m & Fri. 4-7 p.m. $8.50 per hour plus bonuses. Some experience helpful, but will train those with great work ethic & ability to obtain contributions. 541-385-5371

Finance & Business

500 Loans and Mortgages BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H

A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

541-382-3402

800 You’ve Taken Care of Your Car’s Body...What about Your Body? Get Your FREE Insider’s Report •How hidden car accident injuries can lead to arthritis. •How even low impact collisions can lead to long term injuries. •Why pain medications may make you worse. •What test should you have to document your injuries so you get the settlement you deserve. Call For Your Free Report.

888--599-1717

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Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

Garage Sale: Woodworking & Mechanic tools, toolboxes, vices, antiques, furniture, household, women’s & kids clothes, much more! Fri.-Sat. 7-5, 19644 Clear Night Dr. No early sales.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

Double Moving Sale: Everything from A-Z, tools antiques, collectibles, Fri.-Sat, 8-4, 1407 NW Canyon Dr.

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Garage Sale - Kids stuff, miscellaneous and knickknacks, Saturday only, 9-3, 2165 NW Canyon Drive, Redmond.

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

GARAGE SALE Sat & Sun, 8am-5pm. 5305 NW 83rd, Redmond. (Take 101st off Hwy 126) Post-hole digger w/2 bits; deep well pump, hay elevator, Craftsman radial arm saw, golf clubs, Skill cordless set, Makita chop saw, small garden tools for garden tractor, hard-bound books, clothes, toys saddle, much more! 541-504-4282 or 408-710-7952

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

286

Sales Northeast Bend ESTATE/LIQUIDATION: All Items must go, furniture, sofa, chairs, end tables, dining room set, nice bedroom set, Wurlizter organ, Franciscan and Syracuse china, kitchenware, baking supplies, sewing supplies, hand knitted afghans, blankets, sheet sets, costume jewelry, misc. Grandma Goodies. CASH SALE, all items sold ‘as is’, and all sales are final. Small House, limited access to 15 buyers at a time. Saturday 8-12 p.m., Items under $20 1/2 price. 2074 NE Chanel Court, near Savannah & Purcell.

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Grandma’s Moving Sale! Fri-Sat, 9-4. 10466 NW 27th, Terrebonne. Sofa, bed, TV, W/D, crocks, tools, dishes, Moving Sale: Sat. 8-3, tramantiques, knickknacks, MORE! poline, furniture, bikes, toys, household items, more, 63089 Marsh Orchid Dr.

CRAFT SALE ORIGINAL CRAFTS SALE INCLUDING HANDMADE JEWELRY, WALLETS, HOME DECOR AND MUCH MORE! 18285 Snow Creek Lane, Sisters, Sat, Apr. 16, 12-4 Flea Market -The Best Bargains in Madras! 3rd & B Street Open every Fri-Sat-Sun, 9-5. Only $10 to rent a table - 2nd table 1/2-off! 541-604-4106

Move Sale - Rain

or shine. 20939 Gift Road, between Bend & Redmond, 8-5 Sat 4/16 & Sun 4/17. You think it, we could have it! Tan Bed, Dog Kennel; Refrigerator; womens professional clothes sizes 8-14; sewing stuff; books; old jars; building supplies, nails; doors, windows, some childrens, questions, phone 541-647-0647 NO EARLY SALES- driveway is circular

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Sales Southeast Bend

Snowmobiles AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

Garage Sale! 1 Day Sat. 4/16 8-4. 21126 Charity Ln, Bend. Tools, Women Shoes (7-8), Clothes & Misc. Don’t Miss! Garage Sale - Sat., 8-3 - Suntree Village, 1001 SE 15th St. Huge Moving Sale: Some #141 (main entrance, 1st Antiques + ‘48 Chevy, Fri & right past office to #141) Sat. 9-4, 3515 NW Ice, Lots of tools and MORE! Terrebonne.

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $15,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 Motorcycle Carrier, up to 400 lbs., fits into trailer jack, $50, 541-815-2042.

882

Fifth Wheels

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. New Price!!!!! $19,500. 541-788-4844.

LEATHER RIDING VESTS, size M & XXXL, $15 ea, or both $25 (cash). 541-454-0056

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

870

Boats & Accessories 12’ Aluminum Sea Nymph, $110; Evinrude 8HP good cond, $320, 541-593-9771. 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829 18’ Hewes 180 Sportsman 2007 Yamaha 115 & 8hp kicker, downriggers Excel cond, low hrs, $22,900. 541-815-3383 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $114,900 obo. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

The Bulletin Classiieds

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

875

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $84,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

881

Travel Trailers

KEYSTONE COUGAR 26’ 2004 5th wheel, slide, extras, like new $15,000, 541-389-9444

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Find It in A-Liner pop-up 15-ft 2010, 2-burner stove, frig, freshwater tank, furnace, fantastic fan, $9950. 541-923-3021 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077 One owner, low miles, generator, Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 excellent condition, $16,900, TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, 541-390-2504 backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, Motivated Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps seller. Just reduced and 6, slide-out, Arizona room, priced to sell at $10,950, range w/oven, micro, toilet & 541-389-3921,503-789-1202 shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt tone brown,perfect cond, 6 batteries, outside shower, brand new tires. eng. pertwin propane tanks, BBQ. fect, runs great, inside per$10,500. 541-312-9312 fect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., see to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd in La Pine. $8000. OBO 541-876-5106.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

880

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Wilderness 2-person Kayak w/ paddles, like new. $650 new; sell $375. 541-383-8528

Motorhomes

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Bounder 34’ 1994.

Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $350 OBO, 541-548-3711.

Harley Ultra Classic 2001, Best of everything. Garage kept. Madras. $9000 call 541-475-7459.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

865

850

CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

880

Motorhomes

Misc. Items

Motorcycles And Accessories

Multi-Family Yard Sale: DRW, Remodeling tools, materials, clothing, new air conditioner, new carpet & pad, too much to list, Sat. 8-5, Sun. 10-4, 18880 Choctaw Rd.

Honda Gold Wing GL 1100, 1980. 23,000 miles, full dress plus helmets, $3500 or best offer. Call 541-389-8410

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

860

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

870

Boats & Accessories

SAVER!

Boats & RV’s

Polaris Indy Trail 1989, $500; 1998 RMK 500, $1200; 2000 RMK 700 $1500, all exc. cond., 541-419-4890.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

286

GAS

Honda XR400 2001, $1900; Yamaha TT90 $650, Honda XR50, $400, 541-419-4890.

Last Chance

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

284

860

805

528

Operate Your Own Business

573

Business Opportunities Motorcycles And Accessories

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

882

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

885

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $7900 541-815-1523.

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

932

932

933

933

935

935

935

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Ford F150 SuperCREW 2005

Chevy HHR 2006

C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

THE BULLETIN • Saturday, April 16, 2011 F3

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

International Travel All 1967,

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649 Chevrolet Scottsdale 20, 1987. 4WD, 3/4-ton, A/C, Reese 15,000-lb Fifth wheel pin hitch, tilt wheel, deer guard, excellent 10-ply tires, hubs. $3000. For more details & equip, call John Keseley 541-932-4338 Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031. UTILITY TRAILER for tractor or lawn mower, $125. 503-933-0814.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Tire Chains for 50R15 tires, NEW, $25. 541-480-1337 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Now Only $7,788

Toyota Land Cruiser 1996, white, 217K, good

Like new, fresh trade, fully loaded, 3rd seat. 20K Miles! Warranty! Vin #076124

Chevy

Wagon

Ford F-250 1996, X-Cab, runs well, gas, tow pkg., $2000, 541-788-8575.

541-389-1178 • DLR • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

366

Toyota Sequoia SR5 2006

Smolich Auto Mall

541-389-5016 evenings.

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

NISSAN

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

$19,450!

GMC 3/4-Ton 1992, 4WD, with canopy, $1500 OBO, 541-382-5309.

1957, Plymouth

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

4X4

$20,999

Over 150 used to choose from!

VIN #270753

Smolich Auto Mall

DLR 181 • 541-548-2138

Asking $3,999 or make offer. 541-389-5355

933

Pickups Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

940

Over 150 used to choose from!

Jeep Grand Cherokee LIMITED 2008

Every Option, LOADED, Diesel! Low miles & Warranty! Vin #192631

Dodge Nitro AWD 2008

Call Today!

Now Only $16,877

smolichmotors.com

Great Fuel Miser! 4X4, Low miles! A Must See! Warranty! VIN #258369

smolichmotors.com

Ford Explorer XLT 2003, beautiful cond., 65K, loaded, $10,800. 541-337-8297

Paying Top Dollar For Your Vehicle!

541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Jeep Liberty Diesel AWD 2006

4 Cylinder auto, Warranty! Vin #274528

Sale Price $17,997 (photo for illustration use only)

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, tow pkg., 5.4L V-8, 4WD, bedliner, CD, air, winter & summer tires, great cond., 2ND REDUCTION, now $11,900 541-554-5212, 702-501-0600.

We will pay CASH for your vehicle. Buying vehicles NOW! Call Mike Springer 541-749-4025

935

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Buick Rendezvous 2004, clean & low mileage, $11,000 OBO. 541-410-7829;541-389-4506

The Bulletin

HYUNDAI

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Over 150 used to choose from!

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Hummer H2 Supercharge 2003

Big wheel and tire pkg., leather, low miles! Warranty! Vin #108600

366

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Electrical Services

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

J. L. SCOTT

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up

•Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing W e e d fr e e b a r k & fl o w e r b e d s

ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service.

JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Computer/Cabling Install

Same Day Response

QB Digital Living

Landscape Management

•Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co.

Clean Up/Yard Debris, Hauling. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

EXPERIENCED Senior Discounts

541-390-3436

Get 1 FREE Maintenance Service or Aeration ($40+ value)

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

• Evaluating Seasonal Needs • Pruning Trees and Shrubs • Thinning Overgrown Areas • Removing Undesired Plants • Hauling Debris • Renovation • Fertilizer Programs • Organic Options

when you sign up for a full season of maintenance!

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

“Pihl Bilt” Since 1981 S.E. Pihl Construction Remodeling specialist, addons, kitchen & bath, faux wall finishes, tile & stone, Energy Trust of Oregon Trade Ally, Window & door upgrades, no job to small. Call for Spring Specials, Call Scott, 541-815-1990, CCB#110370

We offer: • Residential & Commercial • Organic Products (kid and pet safe!) • Aerations & Thatching • Mulch, Hedging, Pruning • Irrigation Management • Spring & Fall Clean-ups • Fertilization • Weed Control

Licensed / Bonded / Insured FREE Estimates! Call today: (541) 617.TURF [8873] www.turflandscapes.com

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help!

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

SAVE THIS AD!!

Rototilling Backyard Gardens $25/hour • Min. 1 hour Call Jim, 541-633-7941 8am-6pm for appt; leave msg

*** Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

541-385-5809

The Bulletin Classified

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford Econoline 150 1988, fuel injected, 4.9 L 6, great work van. $1000. 480-5950

Ford Windstar GL1998.

Honda Oddysey EX 2001, 1 owner, immaculate, maint. records, great mpg., 79K mi., $9750, 541-383-1811.

Chrysler PT Cruiser 2005

Convertible! 56K Miles, Warranty! Vin #518414

Only $10,250

(Photo for illustration use only)

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Nissan Pathfinder 1989, 3 L V-6, exc. cond., runs great. $1500. 541-480-5950.

Over 150 used to choose from!

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

975

Automobiles

Ford Focus SES 2007 Beat the gas war! 38K Miles, Warranty! VIN #168467

Now Only $12,250

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Audi A4 1999, dark blue, automatic sunroof, runs great, comes w/studded snow tires, $5,000. Jeff, 541-980-5943

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990

1000

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0112296678 T.S. No.: 11-01007-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of October 23, 2009 made by, LACINDRA T. DROEGEMEIER was the original Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, was the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, was the original beneficiary, recorded on October 23, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-45377 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 254805 LOT THREE (3), EMILY ESTATES, RECORDED NOVEMBER 20, 2006, IN CABINET H, PAGE 127, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 616 N.W. GREEN FOREST CIRCLE, REDMOND, OR The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $4,786.65 as of March 4, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $167,893.82 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.00000% per annum from November 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on July 18, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes,

In the Matter of the Estate of Mary Louise Mack, Deceased.

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years!

541-382-3883

90 and 115k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

Thatching, aerating, spring cleanup, sprinkler turn-ons, weekly mows.

Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

BUICKS ! LeSabres 1998 and 2004 $1900-$4900.

Bend Landscaping & Maint.

SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration

FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Sale Price $19,999

541-749-4025 • DLR

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

Smolich Auto Mall

HYUNDAI

Barns

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Smolich Auto Mall

smolichmotors.com

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van 1999, with tow package, good condition, $4800. Call 541-419-5693

35,000 miles, 3 door, 3 seats, white, $4900 for an almost new van! 541-318-9999.

smolichmotors.com

Hwy 20 in Bend smolichmotors.com Sport Utility Vehicles

Vans

NISSAN

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

CHECK YOUR AD

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

cond., new tires, 1 owner, always garaged, $6200 937-723-0006

smolichmotors.com

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

personals Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

Don’t bother calling - hurry! Come on down! VIN #B90195

smolichmotors.com

(1) Brand new Radial all terrain T/A 31x10 50R15 + 5-hole rim, $100. 541-480-1337 Ready Lift Leveling Suspension, Fits Ford pickup & Expedition, $125, 541-493-2387.

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

366

Ford F250 4x4 1993. 5.8L engine, Auto, AC, shell, new brakes, tow package, 127K miles, $2800. 541-408-8330

Ford Expedition XLT AWD 2003

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

Hyundai VeraCruz AWD 2008

Only $24,995

Over 150 used to choose from!

Monte Carlo 1970, all original, Chevy El Camino 1979, many extras. MUST SELL 350 auto, new studs, located due to death. Sacrifice $6000. in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 541-593-3072 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Now Only $11,998

Only $22,250

Smolich Auto Mall

925 AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

4X4, Loaded, Lariat Pkg. Warranty. Vin #B15268

Great fuel economy. 60K Miles, comes with warranty! VIN #507847

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Mary’s Lawn Care

is seeking New Customers for •Lawn Maint. • Spring clean-up • Aerating • Thatching 541-350-1097 541-410-2953 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

V Spring Clean Up! V Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Case No. 11-PB-0005-BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Benjamin Lee Mack has been appointed personal representative of the above-entitled estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative at 60099 Cinder Butte Road, Bend, OR 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative, Jonathan G. Basham, 745 NW Mt. Washington Drive, Suite 308, Bend, OR 97701. DATED and first published this 16th day of April, 2011. Benjamin Lee Mack Personal Representative 60099 Cinder Butte Road, Bend, OR 97702

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF APPROVAL Notice is hereby given that Ordinance #2011-03, an ordinance of the City of Redmond approving the Twelfth Amendment to the Downtown Urban Renewal Plan was approved by the Redmond City Council on Tuesday, April 12, 2011. This notice is published in accordance with ORS 457.095, 457.115, and 457.135 which require that a notice of approval by published with four days of approval. Publish:Bend Bulletin Saturday, April 16, 2011

A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Bend Metropolitan Planning Organization (BMPO), Deschutes County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012 will be held in the Board Room, City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend. The meeting will take place on the 25th day of April, 2011 at 11:30 am. The purpose of this meeting is to hear the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 20, 2011 at the City of Bend Administration Office in City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, Bend, between the hours of 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM or on webpage www.bendmpo.org This is a public meeting where deliberations of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee. This meeting event/location is accessible. Please contact Jovi Anderson at (541) 693-2122, janderson@ci.bend.or.us and/or TTY (541) 389-2245. Providing at least 3 days notice prior to the event will help ensure availability of services requested. LEGAL NOTICE Symbiotics LLC, on behalf of Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC (PO Box 535, Rigby, ID 83442), submitted a Final License Application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the Wickiup Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 12965) on March 25, 2011. The project would add a 7.15-MW run-of-river generation facility to the existing Wickiup Dam in Deschutes County, Oregon. A copy of the Final License Application is available for public viewing at the La Pine Public Library. The document can also be downloaded at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp by searching for the project number.

State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 in construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 21, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3947954 03/26/2011, 04/02/2011, 04/09/2011, 04/16/2011


F4 Saturday, April 16, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

975

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Smolich Auto Mall

Smolich Auto Mall

SUBARUS!!!

Mercedes GL450, 2007

Need to sell a Vehicle? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 541-385-5809

Over 150 used to choose from!

Over 150 used to choose from!

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Sale Price $11,150

Volvo C70-T5, 2010

HYUNDAI

VIN #610024

Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437

DLR 181 • 541-548-2138

VW Cabrolet Convertible 1987, runs good, $995, please call 541-961-3776.

Sale Price $11,745

The Bulletin

541-749-4025 • DLR

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

Mercury Grand Marquis 2010

smolichmotors.com

HYUNDAI

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Honda CR-V AWD 2007

Warranty! Vin #112719

Moonroof, alloys, leather, stunning in Black! Warranty! Vin #905248

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $38,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Nissan Quest 2006

Nissan Altima 2005

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

366

366

Pontiac Grand Am 1995, 4 cyl, $100 as is; or $150 with studded tires. 541-382-4464

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Under 19K Miles.

$18,999

5 4 1 -3 2 2 -7 2 5 3

Loaded, Leather, Nav., low mi. Warranty! Vin #046676

Sale Price $24,495

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

*See dealer for details

Smolich Auto Mall

NEW 2011 NISSAN FRONTIER

Over 150 used to choose from!

Crew Cab, 4x4

$

+DMV VIN: 417806. MSRP $26,735; Smolich Discount $2,240, Rebate $1,500

Hyundai Sonata LIMITED 2009 Loaded, Leather, Navigation and more. 21K Miles, Warranty! Vin #421376

Only $18,545

NEW 2011 NISSAN JUKE SV 2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

2011 HYUNDAI SONATA

AWD, Nav., Moonroof, Bluetooth, 30 MPG

$

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

40

35

MPG

MPG

CHECK OUT THE GAS MILEAGE! MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

BLUETOOTH, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS

36 MONTH L E A S E

+DMV VIN: 017456. MSRP $24,505

MSRP $18,530, Cap Cost $18,530, Residual $12,229.80, Due at signing $1,999. 12,000 Mile/year, 36 mo. Acq. fee $595. On approved Credit.

CLASS LEADING INTERIOR ROOM

36 MONTH L E A S E

VIN: 175568, MSRP $21,230. Initial Cap Cost $20,950. Due at Signing $2,987, includes title and fees. Aqc. Fee $595. Residual $12,052.65. 36 mo. 12,000 Miles per Year. On approved credit.

NEW 2011 NISSAN MURANO AWD Traction Control, CD Changer, Intelligent Key

$

2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS AWD

AUTO, A/C, AM/FM/CD MSRP ...........................$14,510 Smolich Discount ..............$260 Rebate ..............................$500

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

MPG

VIN: 192899

Finance with HMFC to take off an additional $1,000

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

MPG

$13,750

ALL NEW 2011 NISSAN QUEST

MSRP .....................$24,695 Smolich Discount ........$700

+ DMV

$12,750

26,999

+DMV VIN: 170024. MSRP $31,240; Smolich Discount $3,241, Rebate $1,000

33

Sale Price

34

24,505

CHECK OUT THE GAS MILEAGE!

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GS

Mercedes-Benz S550 2007 This is a beautiful car w/only 40K mi. Pristine in & out. Leather interior looks showroom new. $42,000, 541-388-7944.

22,995

VIN: 212745

Sale Price

$23,995

NOW AVAILABLE! Innovation for Family!

54 1 .7 4 9. 4 0 25 SMOLICH HYUNDAI 2250 NE Highway 20

PowertrainLimitedWarranty

visit us at: www.smolichhyundai.com

SMOLICH NISSAN

541- 389 -1178

“ W e m a ke c a r b u y i n g e a s y. ”

VISIT SMOLICHNISSAN.COM

All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expire Sunday, April 17, 2011 at close of business.

2011 DODGE GR. CARAVAN Stunning new interior! 25 MPG HWY!

2011 JEEP PATRIOT Uconnect Bluetooth technology! 28 MPG HWY!

$

15,995

MSRP $18,265, Customer Cash $1,500, Smolich Discount $770. Stk#J10173; VIN:BD102823

2011 JEEP COMPASS All new and redesigned! 26 MPG HWY!

$

24,995

Stk#D10218; VIN:BR607049

2011 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY Leather, Loaded, All new 3.6 Pentastar motor!

$

29,995

MSRP $34,695, Customer Cash $1,500, Smolich Discount $3,200. Stk#C11003; VIN:BR610601

$

19,995

MSRP $22,795, Customer Cash $1,500, Smolich Discount $1,300. Stk#J11055; VIN:BD164342

2011 JEEP GR. CHEROKEE

2011 DODGE RAM 1500

X, Leather, 506-watt Amp, Power Seats, Uconnect Bluetooth, Heated Seats & much more!

Crew Cab 4x4

$

$

35,995

1.9% APR for 60 months on approved credit!! MSRP $36,995, Smolich Discount $1,000. Stk#J11061; VIN:BC522902

2011 JEEP WRANGLER $

21,995

Stk#J11043; VIN:BL566141

27,995

MSRP $34,805, Customer Cash $3,000, Smolich Discount $3,810. Stk#DT11007; VIN:BS588955

2011 DODGE RAM 2500 Crew Cab 4x4, 6.7L Cummins Turbo Diesel

$

37,995

MSRP $44,100, Customer Cash $2,500, Smolich Discount $3,605. Stk#DT11085; VIN:BG588713

541-389-1177 • 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend, Oregon CHRYSLER • DODGE • JEEP

All sale prices after dealer discounts, factory rebates and applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufacturer rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 4/17/2011.


Bulletin Daily Paper 04/16/11