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Nala gets a home

Janet Roberts, of Powell Butte, holds newly adopted Nala, 5, left, and her other dog, Grizzly, 14, on Thursday at the Humane Society of Redmond. After a trial sleepover, Roberts adopted Nala. “She was ever so sweet, and fit in really well,” said Roberts.

Nala, who became a hero after saving a blind cocker spaniel from freezing to death in a ditch one snowy week in December, has been officially adopted by Janet Roberts, 63, of Powell Butte. “I couldn’t think of a good reason why I shouldn’t adopt her,” said Roberts. “I really think that if you can do something, you really need to do it.” See Nala / A4

By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Thanks to the power of social media, Nala, a pit bullLabrador mix who made headlines after saving another dog’s life at the Humane Society of Redmond, has finally found a permanent home. “We’re just beside ourselves here,” said Monica Rendon, a trainer at the Humane Society. “It just shows you what the Internet can do.”

U.S. groups helped fund Arab revolts By Ron Nixon

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Biedscheid booked, released in hit-run

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Even as the United States poured billions of dollars into foreign military programs and anti-terrorism campaigns, a small core of U.S. government-financed organizations were promoting democracy in authoritarian Arab states. The money spent on these programs was minute compared with efforts led by the Pentagon. But as U.S. officials and others look back at the uprisings of the Arab Spring, they are seeing that the democracy-building campaigns played a bigger role in fomenting protests than was previously known, with key leaders of the movements having been trained by the Americans in campaigning, organizing new media and monitoring elections. A number of the groups and individuals directly involved in the revolts received training and financing from groups like the International Republican Institute, the National Democratic Institute and Freedom House, according to interviews and U.S. diplomatic cables obtained by WikiLeaks. See Arab / A6

TOP NEWS INSIDE BUDGET: Congress OKs $38.5B in cuts, Page A3

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Reducing school days, benefits also considered to cut spending By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — The Crook County School District faces a series of difficult decisions as it attempts to mend a $2.2 million shortfall in funding for the upcoming school year. Among the options to reduce spending for the 2011-12 budget cycle are closing schools, reducing school days and negotiating concessions of benefits with staff members. “These are the large-ticket items available to you,” Superintendent Ivan Hernandez said during a budget meeting Tuesday night. “All of the smallticket items together won’t do it.” Hernandez said “small-ticket items” such as reducing hours for staff members and eliminating minor programs will also be considered in the process. The shortfall is the result of declining revenue from multiple sources. Federal stimulus funds are not being renewed, property taxes in Crook County are continuing to decline, and dwindling student enrollment is resulting in less money from the state. As members of the school board and budget committee discuss ways to balance the shrinking budget, it is clear the options are not palatable for a district that has made large cuts to staffing, benefits and athletics in the past. “Closing a school is a big deal,” said Patti Norris, vice chairwoman of the school board. “I want to make sure before we make a decision like this we conduct our due diligence and understand all of the impacts.” The two candidates for closure are Ochoco Elementary School and Paulina Elementary School. See Crook schools / A5

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Les Schwab accounting director posts bail after arraignment for charges in January fatal incident

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

People fill a makeshift food market in San Francisco’s Mission District. The underground market helps vendors avoid the fees required by legitimate farmers markets.

The Bulletin

In a story headlined “Prominent Sunriver man slain in Calif.,” which appeared Thursday, March 14, on page A1, George Mendenhall’s age was incorrectly reported due to inaccurate information provided to The Bulletin. He was 71. The Bulletin regrets the error.

District may close 2 schools

Bret Lee Biedscheid, right, attends his arraignment at the Deschutes County Justice Building in downtown Bend on Thursday morning. Biedscheid, 38, faces charges in the death of Anthony “Tony” Martin, of Bend, who died Jan. 26.

By Scott Hammers

Correction

CROOK COUNTY

Formal charges were read Thursday against the Bend man indicted in a fatal January hit and run. Bret Lee Biedscheid, who appeared in Deschutes County Circuit Court, was then ordered by Judge Barbara Haslinger to report to county jail for booking. Biedscheid, 38, faces charges of criminally negligent homicide and failure to perform the duties of a driver when a person is killed in connection with the death of Anthony “Tony” Martin, of Bend. Martin, 48, was pushing his bicycle across Third Street at around 11 p.m. Jan. 26, when he was struck by a southbound pickup truck. At Thursday’s arraignment, Haslinger instructed Biedscheid to proceed from the courthouse to the jail to be fingerprinted and photographed. Bail was set at $250,000, and Biedscheid was ordered to stay out of businesses that primarily sell alcohol and to abstain from drinking. Biedscheid will be back in court on June 27 to enter pleas to the charges against him. Police and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office declined to identify Biedscheid as the target of their investigation for nearly a month after the crash, until District Attorney Patrick Flaherty confirmed he was considered a “person of interest.” A grand jury indicted Biedscheid on Tuesday. Arriving more than 20 minutes ear-

Food raves: Not-so-secret informal feasts By Patricia Leigh Brown New York Times News Service

Kelly Carter and David Crouse, friends of Anthony “Tony” Martin, react after Bret Biedscheid passes them outside the Deschutes County Courthouse following Biedscheid’s arraignment Thursday morning in Bend. Martin was killed Jan. 26 when he was struck by a pickup truck. The driver fled. ly to his hearing, Biedscheid sat in the front row of Haslinger’s small courtroom dressed in a dark blue suit. He did not interact with the two women sitting with him, or anyone else in the courtroom until the arrival of his attorney, Stephen Houze of Portland.

Houze and Deschutes County Chief Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson told Haslinger they had been in contact prior to the hearing to discuss release conditions for Biedscheid. See Hit-run / A5

SAN FRANCISCO — Along with big-wave surfing and high-altitude ultramarathons, eating is an extreme sport here. Which explains why, on a recent Saturday night, Tipay Corpuz, 21, a technology specialist for Apple, took a break from blogging about her obsession with fried chicken and waffles to join 2,500 fellow food geeks at the Underground Night Market. At this quasi-clandestine monthly event, a tribal gathering of young chefs, vendors and their iron-stomached followers are remaking the traditional farmer’s market as an indie food rave. At midnight, the smell of stir-fried pork bellies was wafting through the Mission District. There was live music, liquor, bouncers, a disco ball — and a line waiting to sample hundreds of delicacies made mostly on location, among them bacon-wrapped mochi (a Japanese rice paste) and ice cream made from red beets, Guinness and chocolate cake. In a sense, it is civil disobedience on a paper plate. See Food / A5


A2 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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A rendering showing an 11-foot-tall and 60-foot-long model of a Mamenchisaurus, which is the centerpiece display of “The World’s Largest Dinosaurs,” exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan. The model will be fleshed-out featuring skin texture on one side, and video projections illustrating sauropod anatomy on the other.

Long-necked giant sauropods scarfed down fast-food feasts

H. Train / AMNH via New York Times News Service

A small head, of course, took a load off the sauropod neck, presumably allowing it to grow longer. Even so, the neck had to be bolstered with more vertebrae than mammals have. These bones are light for their large size, because they are hollowed out with many air pockets. Mammals, even the giraffe with a 6-foot neck, are limited to no more than seven neck vertebrae; the Mamenchisaurus neck had 19. Sauropods took a long while evolving their body plan, which, in silhouette, became the ubiquitous logo of Sinclair oil back in the mid-20th century. But the retention of another of its primitive features, egg-laying, increases the number of offspring and thus improves the chances of long-term survival of a family of species. In a 2008 summary in the journal Science of the project’s preliminary findings, Sander and Marcus Clauss, a dinosaur specialist at the University of Zurich, wrote that sauropods gradually evolved what appeared to be a high growth rate, a birdlike respiratory system and a flexible metabolic rate.

By John Noble Wilford New York Times News Service

Nothing in the dinosaur world was quite like the sauropods. They were huge, some unbelievably gigantic, the biggest animals ever to lumber across the land, consuming everything in sight. Their necks were much longer than a giraffe’s, their tails just about as long and their bodies like an elephant’s, only much more so. Wide-eyed first-graders are not the only ones fascinated by sauropods, particularly those outsize friends Apatosaurus (formerly known as Brontosaurus), Brachiosaurus and Diplodocus. Scientists are redoubling their study of the unusual biology of these amazing plant-eaters. They are asking questions not unlike, in spirit, those of schoolchildren. By what physiological strategy of heart, lungs and metabolism were the largest of sauropod species able to thrive over a span of 140 million years? How did they possibly get enough to eat to grow so hefty, to lengths of 15 to 150 feet and estimated weights of up to 70 tons? A mere elephant has to eat 18 hours a day to get its fill. Even in the Mesozoic era, there were only 24 hours in a day. For more than seven years, a group of German and Swiss scientists has made a concerted effort to test the limits of body size in terrestrial vertebrates and, in the process, try to answer these and other questions related to the enigma of sauropod gigantism. Findings by many other scientists have been reviewed and analyzed, then tested with new experiments and more observations. “We actually have been re-engineering a sauropod,” said P. Martin Sander, a paleontologist at the University of Bonn and leader of the research team. “We are looking for physical advantages it had over other large animals and assessing various hypotheses.” One clear explanation has emerged: These were the ultimate fast-food gourmands. Reaching all around with their long necks, these giants gulped down enormous meals. With no molars in their relatively small heads, they were unequipped for serious chewing. They let the digestive juices of their capacious bodies break down their heaping intake while they just kept packing away more chow. This was seemingly the only efficient way for sauropods to satisfy their appetites and to diversify into some 120 genera, beginning more than 200 million years ago. They eventually dominated

Mummies cursed by a modern malady: atherosclerosis By Alan Bavley McClatchy-Tribune News Service

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — She didn’t smoke. Never ate a double bacon cheeseburger. Never sacked out on the couch watching cable. Yet, by the time she reached her early 40s, she was a candidate for a heart attack. That was nearly 3,600 years ago. Princess Ahmose-MeryetAmon of Egypt’s 17th Dynasty had the world’s oldest known case of coronary heart disease, researchers say. Atherosclerosis — commonly called hardening of the arteries — was surprisingly widespread in ancient times, at least among the Egyptian mummies examined by an international team of scientists and heart specialists. Their research, presented at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology, found that 45 percent of the mummies they put through CT scans had signs of atherosclerosis. That raises questions about whether hardening of the arteries is the disease of modern civilization that we thought it was. “We found it so easily and frequently that it appears to have been common in this society,” said Randall Thompson, a cardiologist.

Respiratory, digestive systems Chang W. Lee/ New York Times News Service

A life-size model of the Mamenchisaurus at “The World’s Largest Dinosaurs” exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan. The new show, devoted to the group of dinosaurs known as sauropods, focuses not on artifacts but on how the creatures’ bodies worked. the landscape for a long run through the Cretaceous, only to die out with all nonavian dinosaurs 65 million years ago.

New exhibit in Manhattan The German-Swiss team of paleontologists, biologists and other scientists, financed by the German Research Foundation, has now weighed in with its comprehensive report “Biology of the Sauropod Dinosaurs,” a book published last month by Indiana University Press. Sander is one of the book’s editors and also guest curator of a major exhibition, “The World’s Largest Dinosaurs,” which opened last week at the American Museum of Natural History in Manhattan and scheduled to run until Jan. 2. A centerpiece of the show will be a lifesize model of a 60-foot female Mamenchisaurus, whose fossilized bones were discovered in China. An early and not especially large sauropod, it lived 160 million years ago, laid eggs and possibly lived in a herd. It weighed 13 tons and ate 1,150 pounds of vegetation a day. The model focuses attention on the animal’s 30-foot neck and small skull and jaws to illustrate the remarkable biology and behavior of sauropods.

Sander noted in the book that the new study was one of the few dinosaur projects in which paleontologists were outnumbered by nonpaleontologists, mainly biologists. Mark Norell, a dinosaur paleontologist at the American Museum and principal curator of the exhibition, remarked, “This shows how biological our field has become.” In a recent interview televised from his office in Bonn, Sander pointed to an illustration of the dinosaur’s anatomy. “What makes a sauropod a sauropod is its most conspicuous feature, its enormously long neck,” he said. The animals had the longest necks for their body size of any dinosaur known. Sander and his colleagues think that two of the sauropod’s primitive inheritances probably account for this. One was the absence of mastication, and the other its egg-laying reproduction. By not chewing their food, the animals had no need for a full set of large teeth or strong jaws and associated muscles. They had only incisors up front for cropping and cutting vegetation. As a result, their heads remained small and lightweight. A plant-chewing African elephant, for example, has a 1,000-pound head; a Mamenchisaurus head weighed 45 pounds.

Sander cited the bird-lung model as an important innovation. If correct, he said in the interview, this and other evidence suggests that sauropods were warm-blooded to some extent. “If an elephant had birdlike lungs, it would grow even bigger,” he speculated. The fact that dinosaurs’ distant relative the crocodile has a respiratory system somewhat like a bird’s suggested to scientists that it might also have been true of sauropods. All the air-sac cavities in their long neck and torso resemble those in birds. Also, it might explain how animals with such long windpipes managed to draw in and absorb sufficient oxygen. In time, however, sauropods seemed to feast on their enormous size. Writing in the project’s book, Clauss said that these giants “might represent a rare example of herbivores that actually benefit from an increase in body size, in terms of a larger gut and a longer retention of food in that gut.” The bigger they got, in other words, the greater their capacity to store vast food intake in digestive chambers. Galapagos tortoises, which eat and don’t chew, have stomach chambers that hold food for up to 11 days, giving microbes time to break it down and extract the nourishment. Clauss of Zurich and Juergen Hummel of the University of Bonn conducted fermentation experiments mixing micro-organisms with contents of sheep stomachs and various plants, including horsetail plants, cycads, pine needles and ginkgo leaves known to have been growing when sauropods foraged. From this and other evidence, they estimate that the giants probably took two weeks to digest an all-day dinner.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 A3

TS  House, Senate pass budget compromise By Jennifer Steinhauer New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Congress voted Thursday to keep the government financed through September, putting an end to a raucous first skirmish in this year’s showdown between Democrats and Republicans over federal spending while presaging bigger ones to come. Scores of House Republicans deserted their leadership to vote against the bill, which cut $38 billion in spending, saying it did not go far enough. As a result, Speaker John Boehner was forced to rely on large numbers of Democrats to pass the measure, which subsequently sailed through the Senate, 81-19. It went to President Barack Obama for his signature. Over the past several days, House Republican leaders repeatedly defended the bill, the product of a bipartisan compromise last week less than two hours before the government would have shut down. They said that while it fell short of their goal of cutting $61 billion

Evan Vucci /The Associated Press

House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks at a news conference in Washington on Thursday. from spending this year, it nonetheless established the principle that the budget would have to be substantially reined in. The House vote was 260-167, with 59 Republicans breaking ranks to vote against the deal. The large number of defections highlighted the challenge facing

Boehner as he tiptoes between conservatives who ran on a shake-it-up agenda and the limitations of what the House can do when Democrats control the Senate and the White House. For all its last-minute drama and attendant partisan theatrics, the bill — made necessary after Democrats failed to pass a 2011 budget in the previous Congress — was just an opening act for more consequential battles to come before this Congress. Thursday’s vote was the precursor to an expected vote today in the House on a budget blueprint for the next fiscal year that will call for a sea change in the structures of the Medicare and Medicaid entitlement programs, a measure almost certainly dead on arrival in the Democrat-controlled Senate. That fight, in turn, could be linked to the politically and economically explosive question of whether to approve an increase in the federal debt ceiling, a step many conservatives say they will resist unless Obama and his party agree to deep spending cuts for 2012 and beyond.

Deal includes $8.6 billion in cuts that might never have been spent By David A. Fahrenthold The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — More than one-fifth of the $38.5 billion budget cut that Congress will consider on Thursday comes from eliminating funds that never existed — except on paper — and, even without the deal, might never have been spent at all. This theoretical pile of money, about $8.6 billion worth, is one reason why the budget cuts have seemed to shrink upon closer inspection this week. The reductions were touted as historic by both parties last Friday night, after they reached an agreement just minutes before a government shutdown. But the Congressional Budget

Office has since found that the compromise will cut just $352 million in expected “nonemergency” government spending during this fiscal year. That figure is just 1 percent of the $38.5 billion, and has left some conservatives saying the bill was not the blockbuster they were promised. “The traditional laws of addition and subtraction must not apply in Washington,” Rep. Tim Huelskamp, R-Kansas, said. “With 308 million people in the United States, that’s a savings of $1.14 per person, enough to buy one item at the dollar store.” It is unclear how deep this sentiment runs: Conservatives will have a chance to register their displeasure on Thursday, when

the House is to vote on the compromise bill. The rest of the $38.5 billion in “cuts” includes changes that are supposed to end spending in future years. And it includes the elimination of these paper funds, moves called “rescissions” in Hill-speak. What Congress did, in these instances, was cancel nearly 100 very large IOUs that it had issued to government agencies — but which those agencies had never used. Then, Congress totaled up the value of those IOUs and pronounced all that money “cut” from the budget. A closer look shows that some of the IOUs were unlikely ever to be cashed in.

FAA chief Japan orders plant operator to compensate evacuees resigns By Timothy Williams New York Times News Service

The official in charge of air traffic controllers for the Federal Aviation Administration resigned Thursday after a series of episodes in which controllers across the country slept as airplanes landed. Henry Krakowski, the chief operating officer of the FAA’s Air Traffic Organization, tendered his resignation one day after the agency changed its policy of having a single air traffic controller on duty at each of 27 airports across the country overnight. Each of those will now have at least two controllers at night. In recent weeks, several controllers — including one at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport — were found to have been asleep while on duty as pilots seeking to land tried to contact the control tower. The episodes have prompted angry responses from members of Congress and scathing criticism from the federal officials charged with overseeing air safety. The most recent case involving an apparently sleeping controller, which occurred early Wednesday in Reno, Nev., led to Krakowski’s ouster Thursday. J. Randolph Babbitt, the administrator of the FAA, said Thursday in a statement: “Over the last few weeks we have seen examples of unprofessional conduct on the part of a few individuals that have rightly caused the traveling public to question our ability to ensure their safety. This conduct must stop immediately.” Krakowski, who had led the Air Traffic Organization since 2007, was previously United Air Lines’ vice president of corporate safety, security and quality assurance.

By Shino Yuasa and Mari Yamaguchi The Associated Press

TOKYO — Japan’s government ordered the operator of a tsunami-damaged nuclear plant leaking radiation to pay $12,000 to each household forced to evacuate from the area, but some of the displaced said today the handout was not enough. Tens of thousands of residents unable to return to their homes near the nuclear plant are bereft of their livelihoods and possessions, unsure of when, if ever, they will be able to return home. Some have traveled hundreds of miles to Tokyo Electric

Power Co.’s headquarters in Tokyo to press their demands for compensation. Hiroaki Wada, a Trade Ministry spokesman, said today that TEPCO will pay compensation as soon as possible, with families forced to evacuate getting 1 million yen (about $12,000) and individuals getting 750,000 yen (about $9,000). Payments are due to begin April 28. “There are around 150 evacuation centers alone. It will take some time until everyone gets money. But we want the company to quickly do this to support people’s lives,” Trade Minister Banri Kaieda said at a news conference.

Study: Human languages grew from seed in Africa By Nicholas Wade New York Times News Service

A researcher analyzing the sounds in languages spoken around the world has detected an ancient signal that points to southern Africa as the place where modern human language originated. The finding fits well with the evidence from fossil skulls and DNA that modern humans originated in Africa. It also implies, though does not prove, that modern language originated only once, an issue of considerable controversy among linguists. The detection of such an ancient signal in language is surprising. Because the words change so rapidly, many lin-

guists think languages cannot be traced very far back in time. The oldest language tree so far reconstructed, that of the IndoEuropean family, which includes English, goes back 9,000 years at most. Quentin Atkinson, a biologist at the University of Auckland in New Zealand, has shattered this time barrier, if his claim is correct, by looking not at words but at phonemes — the consonants, vowels and tones that are the simplest elements of language. He has found a simple but striking pattern in about 500 languages: A language area uses fewer phonemes the farther that early humans had to travel from Africa to reach it.


A4 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

Strains in NATO felt in Libya By Steven Lee Myers and Judy Dempsey New York Times News Service

BERLIN — NATO’s foreign ministers, showing the strains of fighting two wars at once, tried to play down divisions over the intensity of the air campaign against Libya on Thursday, urging patience and resolve as the alliance carries out what one official called “a significant level” of attacks on Moammar Gadhafi’s forces. “As our mission continues, maintaining our resolve and unity only grows more important,” Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, responding to the unusually public divisions among NATO leaders over a military operation now nearly a month old. “Gadhafi is testing our determination.” In an opinion article published today in The International Herald Tribune, three of the coalition’s senior leaders — President Barack Obama, Prime Minister David Cameron of Britain and President Nicolas Sarkozy of France — said their nations were “united on what needs to happen” to end the turmoil in Libya. NATO will continue to protect civilians, they wrote. And while

Nala Continued from A1 After news of Nala’s heroism became known back in December, the Humane Society thought the pooch had a good chance at being adopted. But they was unable to find the right fit for the dog, which has behavioral issues. As of March, Nala had been at the shelter for a full year. A week ago, the Humane Society decided to get Nala more publicity, and arranged to have Nala featured in a free photo shoot with a local photographer. Then a Facebook page was created for the dog. Reese Mercer, a board member with the Humane Society, kept the Facebook site current, posting first-person, or “first-dog” updates from Nala’s perspective about her hunt for a home. “We had no idea the page

Ben Curtis / The Associated Press

A rebel fighter mans an anti-aircraft gun outside Ajdabiya, Libya, on Thursday. Forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi shelled a besieged western city Thursday, killing at least 13 people. the coalition’s mandate does not include removing Gadhafi by force, they said, “It is impossible to imagine a future for Libya with Gadhafi in power.” The leaders said in the article, which also appeared in The Times of London and Le Figaro, that as long as Gadhafi was in power, “NATO must maintain its operations so that civilians remain protected and the pressure on the regime builds.”

While NATO leaders meeting in Berlin said they were united in forcing Libya’s military to end its assaults on civilians in rebellious cities — and ultimately in forcing Gadhafi to leave power — rifts remained over how to accomplish those goals. Only 14 of the alliance’s 28 members are actively participating in the operation — joined by other nations like Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Swe-

would be so big,” said Mercer. “People who love dogs just really resonated with her story.” With more than 600 Facebook ‘likes,’ the page is populated with posts from people all over the country rooting for Nala to find a home. The dog even has fans in Finland and Canada, said Mercer. Though the page did a lot to publicize Nala’s search for a home, nothing came of it after a week. “On the page, a lot of people were wishing they could adopt her, but it just wasn’t happening,” said Roberts. “That’s what really pushed me to do it.” Roberts had first heard about Nala’s story back in December, and said she thought the dog would have no trouble finding a home after all the publicity. But when Nala was still without a home months later, Roberts said she couldn’t stop thinking about her. Roberts, a court transcriber

who lives in Powell Butte with her husband, Philip, contacted the shelter and decided to have a test run with Nala out on her 80acre property. Because Roberts has four cats, two horses and an older dog, she wanted to make sure Nala fit in with the other animals before committing to adoption. The dog spent a night at the Roberts’ home Tuesday evening. In the morning, Roberts decided there was no other option but to adopt her. “She was ever so sweet, and fit in really well,“ said Roberts. “She was so respectful of everyone here.” Though there were a few hiccups during the sleepover, such as Nala being so terrified of the stairs that Roberts’ husband had to carry her from the second floor to the first, Roberts said that any issues the dog has are workable. “She really wants to please people, which is really endear-

den — and only six of those are striking targets on the ground in Libya. That has prompted France and Britain to call for an intensification of the war effort by more allies. NATO officials and commanders, joined by the United States, insisted that the coalition was already doing everything it could within the United Nations mandate to halt attacks by Gadhafi’s forces. Those attacks continued even as the ministers met, including most fiercely in Misurata, where, Clinton said, the alliance was “especially concerned about the atrocities unfolding.” NATO’s secretary general, Anders Fogh Rasmussen, said he was optimistic that more allies who had not already contributed forces would “step up to the plate.” The leaders in Qatar — including many NATO ministers also in Berlin — pledged to consider additional ways to support the newly formed opposition council in Libya, including transferring Gadhafi’s frozen assets and supplying rebel fighters with arms. The latter has also divided NATO, which continues to enforce an arms embargo ordered by the United Nations Security Council.

ing,” said Roberts. With the official adoption taking place Thursday, Nala now has a permanent home. Though, for some at the shelter, Nala’s adoption is bittersweet. “I’m really happy. This is what I’ve worked for, for so long,” said Alan Borland, Nala’s walker for the past eight months. “But I’ve been emotional and sad about it, too. It’s going to be tough to say goodbye.” Borland, who was walking Nala when she saved the cocker spaniel, has become close to the dog. Borland says he won’t visit Nala, even though the couple has invited him. “I’m gonna let her go now,” said Borland. “She needs to get on with her life, and forget about the year she spent at the shelter.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Report: Mining claims threaten to mar parks By Neela Banerjee Los Angeles Times

WASHINGTON — Mining claims threaten to mar the borders of 10 iconic national parks and wilderness areas, particularly the Grand Canyon, where uranium claims have increased 2,000 percent since 2004, according to a new report by the Pew Environment Group. Mining companies have filed claims to the rights to copper, gold and other metals in addition to uranium in areas around Mount Rushmore, Joshua Tree National Park and other famous refuges at an increased rate in the last five to seven years because of rising global prices, the Pew report said. Claims in such sensitive places are facilitated by an outmoded 1872 law, critics say. The law allows corporations to stake out rights to federal lands for mining without a competitive bid and to extract resources without paying royalties. “The 1872 law as it applies everywhere is carte blanche: You extract everything you can and don’t pay royalties on it,” said Rep. Raul Grijalva, DAriz. “We’re still dealing with an antiquated law that in its wake has left huge cleanup and contamination problems all over.” Concerns about the boom in uranium claims near the Grand Canyon prompted the Obama administration in 2009 to withdraw 1 million acres from further staking of claims for two years. Now the administration is weighing a 20-year extension of that withdrawal. But mining on existing claims around the Grand Canyon would go forward, and territory neighboring other parks remains open to more claims and mining. Although the pace of claims has slowed recently, there are about 3,500 uranium claims around the canyon, according to Pew and the federal Bureau of Land Management. About 50 of the claims are being actively mined, said Rody Cox,

a geologist with the bureau’s Arizona Strip district office. Uranium mining in the Southwest has a history of contamination. The Metropolitan Water District of Los Angeles and the Southern Nevada Water Authority have voiced concerns about possible damage to the Colorado River watershed, which could affect as many as 25 million people, if uranium mining occurs around the Grand Canyon. The Environmental Protection Agency has said removing contamination that stems from hard-rock mining could be among the greatest costs to the Superfund program for cleaning up toxic sites. Compared with the Grand Canyon, claims near other parks are fewer, the Pew report noted, but they are climbing. For example, about 950 claims have reportedly been made within five miles of the boundaries of Arches and Canyonlands national parks in Utah, nearly all since 2005. Environmentalists and some politicians have long pushed Congress to amend the 1872 law to include a competitive bid process and royalty payments, without success. Reform seems just as unlikely now. The Republican-controlled House is committed to protecting industry in general, and the Senate is led by Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., whose state includes vast gold mines. The powerful National Mining Association opposes competitive bids and royalties on gross proceeds from mineral sales. To stake a claim, one merely has to fill out paperwork at a BLM office and with the county government and pay a $140 fee. Companies must undergo an environmental assessment to get a BLM permit to mine, but they pay no royalties on the proceeds of their sales. In contrast, oil and gas companies pay gross royalties of 12.5 percent for onshore production, and coal concerns with federal underground mine leases pay 8 percent.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / Associated Press

President Barack Obama wears a Chicago Bulls cap after speaking at a DNC fundraiser in Chicago on Thursday.

Obama kicks off fundraising in Chicago By Perry Bacon Jr. The Washington Post

CHICAGO — President Barack Obama returned home Thursday to start his re-election campaign, attending fundraisers in Chicago in his first events since he announced officially last week that he would seek a second term, and he wasted little time in launching a series of sharp attacks on Republicans. While not using the phrase “I’m running for re-election” or attacking any potential GOP opponents by name, Obama called himself a candidate and said his Wednesday speech about the two parties’ visions for reducing the federal deficit illustrated an ideological gulf that would define the 2012 race. “The speech I gave yesterday was not a partisan shot at the other side, it was an attempt to clarify the choice we have as a country right now,” Obama said at the N9NE steakhouse, one of two Chicago restaurants where he addressed big-money donors.. The Republican budget plan is “entirely sincere,” Obama told a crowd of more than 100. But it says “we can’t afford to be compassionate. ... We can’t afford Medicare, so let’s make sure that seniors get a voucher.” Democratic officials said the events were not an official kickoff to Obama’s campaign, which in truth started when he sent an email to supporters last week that launched his re-election bid. The president’s only specific reference to running in 2012 was to tell his supporters, “Your candidate is a little older and a little grayer.”

Crook schools Continued from A1 Closing Ochoco would net the district a savings of around $565,000 per year, while Paulina’s closing down would save around $351,000 per year. Most teaching staff would remain with the district through any closures, as there is enough capacity to move students and teachers to open classrooms at other buildings. Savings would come from removing operating costs and eliminating classified positions such as janitorial and support staff. Also being considered are partial closures of the schools where the building operates in a reduced capacity with just a gymnasium available to the community or only certain grades attending. Multiple options for reduction in days are being considered, including moving the district to a four-day school week. Jan Brieske, business manager for the district, said removing a single day of instruction from the school year would be equivalent to around $78,000 in savings. The decision to close a school can be made by the school board alone, but any reduction in school days must be negotiated with associations representing staff members in the district. Board members have yet to discuss in depth any concessions they may seek from staff, but Hernandez said he expects that will be addressed. “I think what will happen in the end is a combination of many options,” Hernandez said. “No decisions have been made yet, and we trust we can collaborate with the associations to make concessions that benefit the students in the end.” The district’s budget committee plans to have a budget approved by May 16 and hold a public hearing on it in June. The budget will then be sent to the school board for final approval. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 A5

Food

Hit-run

Continued from A1 The underground market seeks to encourage food entrepreneurship by helping young vendors avoid roughly $1,000 a year in fees — including those for health permits and liability insurance — required by legitimate farmers markets. Here, where the food rave — call it a crave — was born, the market organizers sidestep city health inspections by operating as a private club, requiring that participants become “members” (free) and sign a disclaimer noting that food might not be prepared in a space that has been inspected. Members of the gathering have few qualms about the sampling. “I want something savory and awesome,” said David McDonald, who works with Corpuz and estimates that he spends 40 percent of his income on dinners. “I want food that will put me in a coma before I go to sleep.” Fueled by Twitter and food blogs, the market has spawned a host of underground imitators in places like Washington and Atlanta, where about 1,000 people showed up for the first of a series of monthly Saturday night craves — and where Tim Ho, a young Taiwanese-American who cooks part time, boasted that his jellyfish salad has a crunch he compared to “tendons and ligaments.” There are outposts as far as London and Amsterdam. Even mainstream farmers’ markets are creeping toward nighttime, including a Friday evening market in Nashville near the state Capitol where homeward-bound workers can drink wine as they chat about kale. The “underground” strategy adds cachet. Participants “have to know the ins and outs of the belly of the city just to find the place,” said Roger Feely, a San Francisco chef well-known for giving “pop-up” dinner parties

Continued from A1 Biedscheid posted the required 10 percent of bail, $25,000, and was released from custody Thursday morning, jail officials said. Tony Martin’s stepson, Olen Grimes, was among the friends and family of the victim who attended Thursday’s hearing. Grimes, 33, said he remains concerned that Biedscheid’s standing in the community — he is the director of accounting at Les Schwab Tire Centers — has allowed him to enjoy preferential treatment following the crash that killed Martin. People without Biedscheid’s resources likely would have been arrested shortly after the crash, Grimes said, and would still be in jail unable to post bail. “His status, my stepfather’s status, regardless, somebody’s life was taken, period,” Grimes said. Grimes said he’d like to see the District Attorney’s Office steer clear of a plea deal with Biedscheid. A jury, he said, would judge Biedscheid fairly for leaving the scene of the crash. “I’m sure anybody who’s got any kind of conscience or any kind of morals knows a life has been taken, period,” Grimes said. “Tony could be alive today. A life could have been saved.”

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

Cara Levine, Craig Edelman and Keren Amit eat dinner purchased at an underground farmers market in San Francisco’s Mission District. in alleyways. (New York City, too, has a plethora of pop-up restaurants of various kinds, but it has been less hospitable to unlicensed vendors.) Where psychedelic drugs famously transported another selfconscious San Francisco generation, the rebel act of choice by Valerie Luu, 23, a first-generation Vietnamese chef, is deep-frying string cheese in a cast-iron pan. “When I was their age, I was doing drugs and going to rock shows,” said Novella Carpenter, an urban farmer and author who recently got into a spat with the city of Oakland for selling chard and other produce at a pop-up farm stand without a permit. “That’s not their culture,” she continued. “Their culture is food — incredible yummy-tasting food.” Some see the growth of the underground markets as part of a high renaissance of awareness for a Fast Food Nation generation, with its antipathy for the industrial food machine. In the recesses of

the markets, a certain self-expressive, do-it-yourself “craftness” flourishes. “It connects the DIY movement with the locavore movement,” said Maya Robinson, an accountant who does work for the U.S. Treasury who founded Grey DC, an underground market in Washington modeled on the San Francisco idea. “That cross-section is what’s so exciting.” The underground market here, which also has a less-chic daytime component, was started by Iso Rabins, 30, founder of ForageSF, a company that began with foraging walks and dinners featuring dishes like wild nettle soup with creme fraiche. He started in 2009 from a private home after observing that many friends could not afford to sell at farmer’s markets, which requires business and product liability insurance (around $250), space rental ($40 to $55 a day), yearly member fees (around $110), and a health and safety permit

(about $500). The use of commercial kitchens would cost an additional $45 to $75 an hour, Rabins noted, and making jam can take eight hours or more. “The small batch economics just don’t work,” he said. The goal is to be an incubator for culinary startups and be a profit-making venture. Vendors pay $50 to reserve a cooking space and return 10 percent of sales over $500 to ForageSF. “The feeling in the food community is that if you’re making money, it’s not something you’re passionate about,” Rabins said. “But if we actually want to change anything — dedicate our lives to it — we need to make money doing it,” he said. Amateur cooks around the country are pushing to have the right to sell unlicensed goods directly to consumers. So-called “cottage food” laws that allow products considered nonhazardous, like pies and cookies, exist in 18 states, with five more considering similar legislation.

OPEN SATURDAY 1-4

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Contact your public officials Find an easily searchable list of contact information for federal, state, county and city officials at www.bendbulletin .com/officials.

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AWBREY PARK - 4 bedroom 4230 sq. ft. home. 2 bedroom suites on main. Great room plan, private ½ acre. Great use of woods & windows. MLS#201102272 $819,000 DIRECTIONS: NW Mt. Washington Dr. to NW Denali Ln. 3468 NW Denali Ln.

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Beautiful views across the 13th fairway at Rivers Edge Village. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, 3045 sq. ft., .48 of an acre lot. 4-car garage. MLS#201009824 $548,500 DIRECTIONS: 3rd St north to West on Mt. Washington Dr., right on Fairway Heights, 3098 NW Fairway Heights.

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.77 acre setting, 1200 sq. ft. deck overlooking Deschutes River. 4 bedroom, 4 bath, 4173 sq. ft. home. Great room with stone fireplace. MLS#201009509 $945,000 DIRECTIONS: Century Dr. to left into Sunrise Village on Mammoth Dr., left on Sunshine Way. 19713 Sunshine Way

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Beautiful home in gated community of Awbrey Glen. 2984 sq. ft., master on main, large bonus room with 2 separate offices. Next to a green belt. A Must See! MLS#201102248 $475,900 DIRECTIONS: Mt. Washington, left on Awbrey Glen, left on Champion Cir., right on NW Whitworth. 2700 NW Whitworth Way

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A6 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

Another Lindbergh making his mark

ABC plans to cancel 2 long-running soaps

By Jack Broom The Seattle Times

By Bill Carter

SEATTLE — Of all the things Erik Lindbergh remembers about his famous grandfather, one that sticks with him best is their debate over how to pronounce the word “helicopter.” Charles Lindbergh, who had made the first solo flight across the Atlantic in 1927, brought a toy helicopter to his grandson on Bainbridge Island in the early 1970s, and Erik thanked him for the “HELL-i-cop-ter,” the pronunciation used today. But Charles Lindbergh, who had long ago collaborated on projects with helicopter pioneer Igor Sikorsky, said “HEE-li-copter,” the pronunciation he’d heard from the man many consider the father of the modern helicopter. “We were both stubborn and wouldn’t give in. And in a way we were both right,” said Erik Lindbergh, adding with a smile: “But my pronunciation won out over time.” One gets the impression that even if Erik Lindbergh, 46, weren’t a grandson of an aviation icon, he still might be dedicated to making the world a better place. He just might not have as large a microphone. As it is, this pilot, artist and philanthropist is parlaying his famous surname, along with his connection to other aviation pioneer families, into endeavors reaching far beyond what he could achieve on his own: • At an air show in Germany this week, he will announce the second set of winners of the Lindbergh Electric Aircraft Prize (LEAP), created to honor and encourage achievement in the development of electrically powered aircraft. • The nonprofit organization he founded is creating “LEAP Student Teams” — at three high schools to date, two in the Puget Sound area — to explore the work of innovators in a variety of fields, and tell their stories in video productions. Among the luminaries gathering in Germany at the Aero Friedrichshafen convention that runs through Saturday is Prince

New York Times News Service

Arab Continued from A1 The work of these groups often provoked tensions between the United States and many Middle Eastern leaders, who frequently complained that their leadership was being undermined, according to the cables. The Republican and Democratic institutes are loosely affiliated with the Republican and Democratic parties. They were created by Congress and are financed through the National Endowment for Democracy, which was set up in 1983 to channel grants for promoting democracy in developing nations. The National Endowment receives about $100 million annually from Congress. Freedom House also gets the bulk of its money from the U.S. government, mainly from the State Department. No one doubts that the Arab uprisings are homegrown, rather than resulting from “foreign influence,” as alleged by some Middle Eastern leaders. “We didn’t fund them to start protests, but we did help support their development of skills and networking,” said Stephen McInerney, executive director of the Project on Middle East Democracy, a Washington-based advocacy and research group. “That training did play a role in what ultimately happened, but it was their revolution. We didn’t start it.” Some Egyptian youth leaders attended a 2008 technology meeting in New York, where they were taught to use social networking and mobile technologies to promote democracy. Among those sponsoring the meeting were Facebook, Google, MTV, Columbia Law School and the State Department. “We learned how to organize and build coalitions,” said Bashem Fathy, a founder of the youth movement that ultimately drove

Alan Berner / Seattle Times

Erik Lindbergh, the grandson of aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh, is touting the use of electricpowered aircraft. He is shown at the Museum of Flight in Seattle, under a Ryan M-1 that is similar in appearance to his grandfather’s Spirit of St. Louis. Albert II of Monaco, a wellknown booster of clean-flight technology. He’ll join Lindbergh on a panel with a veritable who’s who of aviation-history names, including Amanda Wright Lane, great-grandniece of Orville and Wilbur Wright; Sergei Sikorsky, son of Igor Sikorsky, who created the first single-rotor, mass-produced helicopter; and Wolfgang von Zeppelin, greatgreat-grandnephew of airship developer Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin. It promises to be a busy week, not just for Lindbergh but also for Kevin Schilling, a junior at Aviation High School in Des Moines, Wash., the first school to host a LEAP team. “This will be amazing,” said Schilling, 17. “I’ve never been to Europe and I’ve never seen something on this scale.” Schilling will work with other students from the U.S., Germany and Monaco to shoot and edit videos telling stories of the Friedrichshafen air show. LEAP awarded its first set

of Lindbergh Electric Aircraft Prizes last summer, honoring China-based Yuneec, makers of a small, electrically powered plane; Wisconsin-based Sonex Aircraft for an electric propulsion system; and Axel Lange of Germany for the development of an electric production aircraft, the Antares 20E. The three winners split a prize pool of $25,000 — the same amount Charles Lindbergh won for his trans-Atlantic flight. Erik Lindbergh said the cash award was a last-minute feature of the prize, and two of the honorees immediately donated their winnings back to LEAP, a nonprofit formed in 2007. Subsequent LEAP prizes, to be announced twice a year, will not carry cash awards, said Lindbergh, who hopes the recognition alone is sufficient motivation. Efforts to make flight cleaner, greener and more sustainable are being pursued by a variety of companies and agencies, including 13 teams from around the U.S. that are competing for $1.65

million in NASA’s CAFE Green Flight Challenge. The goal is to create an aircraft that can fly 200 miles in under two hours, using less than the energy equivalent of one gallon of gasoline per occupant. LEAP also has established teams at Eagle Harbor High School on Bainbridge Island and Hale Academy in Ocala, Fla. As the organization expands, Yolanka Wulff, a co-CEO of LEAP with Lindbergh, said she expects the range of topics it explores to broaden. “The topic can be anything... The key is that students become creative, critical thinkers by looking at a problem, looking at the people who are coming up with real solutions, and sharing their story with the wider world.” Lindbergh added, “The only way we can solve the problems of today is to create a whole generation of students motivated to seek out to solutions to problems as potential opportunities. ... If we can do that, there’s hope for the future.”

the Egyptian uprisings. Fathy, who attended training with Freedom House, said, “This certainly helped during the revolution.”

U.S. officials frequently assured skeptical governments that the training was aimed at reform, not promoting revolutions. Last year, for example, a few months before national elections in Bahrain, officials there barred a representative of the National Democratic Institute from entering the country. In Bahrain, officials worried that the group’s political training “disproportionately benefited the opposition,” according to a January 2010 cable. In Yemen, where the United States has been spending millions on an anti-terrorism program, officials complained that U.S. efforts to promote democracy amounted to “interference in internal Yemeni affairs.” But nowhere was the opposition to the U.S. groups stronger than in Egypt. Egypt, whose government receives $1.5 billion annually in military and economic aid from the United States, viewed efforts to promote political change with deep suspicion, even outrage.

Diplomatic cables show that Egyptian officials complained the United States was providing support for “illegal organizations.” Gamal Mubarak, the former president’s son, is described in an Oct. 20, 2008, cable as “irritable about direct U.S. democracy and governance funding of Egyptian NGOs.” The Egyptian government even appealed to groups like Freedom House to stop working with local political activists and human rights groups. “They were constantly saying: ‘Why are you working with those groups; they are nothing. All they have are slogans,’” said Sherif Mansour, an Egyptian activist and a senior program officer for the Middle East and North Africa at Freedom House. When their appeals to the U.S. government failed, Egyptian authorities reacted by restricting the activities of the U.S. nonprofit organizations. Hotels that were to host training sessions were closed for renovations. Staff members of the groups were followed, and local activists were intimidated and jailed. Stateowned newspapers accused activists of receiving money from U.S. intelligence agencies. Affiliating themselves with the U.S. organizations may have tainted leaders within their own groups. According to one diplomatic cable, leaders of the April 6 Youth Movement in Egypt told the U.S. Embassy in 2009 that some members of the group had accused Ahmed Maher, a leader of the January uprising, and other leaders of “treason” in a mock trial related to their association with Freedom House, which more militant members of the movement described as a “Zionist organization.” A prominent blogger, according to a cable, threatened to post the information about the movement leaders’ links to Freedom House on his blog.

Training protest leaders Entsar Qadhi, the Yemeni youth activist, attended U.S. training sessions in Yemen. “It helped me very much because I used to think that change only takes place by force and by weapons,” she said. Now, she said, it is clear that results can be achieved with peaceful protests and other nonviolent means. But some members of the activist groups complained in interviews that the United States was hypocritical for helping them at the same time it was supporting the governments they sought to change. “While we appreciated the training we received through the NGOs sponsored by the U.S. government, and it did help us in our struggles, we are also aware that the same government also trained the state security investigative service, which was responsible for the harassment and jailing of many of us,” Fathy said. Interviews with officials of the nongovernmental groups and a review of diplomatic cables obtained by WikiLeaks show the democracy programs were constant sources of tension between the United States and many Arab governments. The cables, in particular, show how leaders in the Middle East and North Africa viewed these groups with deep suspicion and tried to weaken them. Today the work of these groups is among the reasons that governments in turmoil claim Western meddling was behind the uprisings, with some officials noting that leaders like Qadhi were trained and financed by the United States. Diplomatic cables report how

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Leaders skeptical Hosni Mubarak, then Egypt’s president, was “deeply skeptical of the U.S. role in democracy promotion,” said a diplomatic cable from the U.S. Embassy in Cairo dated Oct. 9, 2007. At one time the United States financed political reform groups by channeling money through the Egyptian government. But in 2005, under a Bush administration initiative, local groups were given direct grants, much to the chagrin of Egyptian officials. According to a September 2006 cable, Mahmoud Nayel, an official with the Egyptian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, complained to U.S. Embassy officials about the U.S. government’s “arrogant tactics in promoting reform in Egypt.” The main targets of the Egyptian complaints were the Republican and Democratic institutes.

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The demise of one of broadcasting’s oldest institutions, the daytime soap opera, crept closer Thursday as ABC announced it would end two of its long-running daily serial dramas, “All My Children” and “One Life to Live.” The decision will leave ABC will just one soap on its schedule, “General Hospital.” CBS, with “The Young and the Restless” and “The Bold and the Beautiful,” will become the last network with more than one soap on its schedule. NBC has only one left, “Days of Our Lives.” Ratings for “All My Children” have fallen since 2006, to 2.4 million from 3.2 million viewers and to a 0.9 rating, from a 1.8 in the major category for soap operas, women between the ages of 18 and 49. For “One Life to Live,” the audience fell to 2.6 million from 3.2 million in 2006, and to a 1.0 rating from a 1.8 rating in women 18 to 49. ABC said it would replace the daytime dramas with much less expensive, unscripted programs.

One show, “Chew,” will be devoted to cooking and nutrition, featuring the chef Mario Batali, among other hosts. The other program, “The Revolution,” will focus on issues relating to health, weight loss and “lifestyle transformations” and will devote each week to the efforts of one woman to lose weight over a five-month period. The hosts include Tim Gunn of “Project Runway” and Kimberley Locke, a former “American Idol” contestant who has become a plus-size fashion model. “One Life to Live” has been on the air 43 years. “All My Children” has run for 41 years and became perhaps best known for the creation of the villainous Erica Kane, played by Susan Lucci. Brian Frons, the president of ABC’s Daytime division, acknowledged in a statement “how bittersweet change is.” “All My Children” will conclude in September and “One Life to Live” in January. “Chew” will have its premiere in September and “The Revolution” in January.

Lady Liberty postage stamp depicts a Vegas replica By Kim Severson and Matthew Healey New York Times News Service

As if further proof were needed that New York is not the center of the universe. The U.S. Postal Service has issued a new stamp featuring the Statue of Liberty. Only the statue it features is not the one in the harbor but the replica at the New York-New York casino in Las Vegas. You might think that the post office would have just gone with the original, the one off Lower Manhattan that for 125 years has welcomed millions of New York’s huddled masses yearning to breathe free. Instead, they accidentally used the 14-year-old statue that presides over thousands of gamblers a week. The post office, which had thought the Lady Liberty “forever” stamp featured the real thing, found out otherwise when a clever stamp collector who is also what one might call a superfan of the Statue of Liberty got suspicious and contacted Linn’s Stamp News, the essential read among philatelists. But the post office is going with it. “We still love the stamp design and would have selected this photograph anyway,” said Roy Betts, a spokesman. Betts did say, however, that the post office regrets the error and is “re-examining our processes to prevent this situation

from happening in the future.” The service selected the image from a photography service and issued rolls of the stamp bearing the image in December. This month, it issued a sheet of 18 Lady Liberty and flag stamps. Information accompanying the original release of the stamp included a bit of history on the real Statue of Liberty. Las Vegas was never mentioned. The whole mess was exposed by the stamp magazine, which this week ran photographs of both statues. The post office, while perhaps chagrined, is standing by the stamp but changing its informational material about it. At the New York-New York casino, where a permanent memorial to the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, is positioned in front of the fake New York Harbor in which the fake Statue of Liberty sits, there is nothing but pride. “Everyone thought the post office was honoring just one great American institution when in reality they were honoring two — the Statue of Liberty and Las Vegas,” said Gordon Absher, spokesman for MGM Resorts International. Meanwhile, back in the real New York, Edward I. Koch, who declared that the city was the center of the universe when he was mayor, offered some insight into what it all means: “It simply means the post office is doing a stupid thing.”


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 A7

It may get worse.

You may not need surgery to make it better.

Ask your doctor about XIAFLEX®, the only nonsurgical, FDA-approved treatment for adults with Dupuytren’s contracture when a cord can be felt.

Call 1-877-XIAFLEX or visit MYXIAFLEX.com to find a hand specialist near you.

XIAFLEX® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren’s contracture when a “cord” can be felt. Over time, the thickening of this cord in your hand can cause one or more fingers to bend toward your palm, so that you cannot straighten them. XIAFLEX should be injected into the cord by a healthcare provider who is experienced in injection procedures of the hand and treating people with Dupuytren’s contracture. XIAFLEX helps to break down the cord that is causing the finger to be bent.

Before receiving XIAFLEX, tell your healthcare provider if you have had an allergic reaction to a previous XIAFLEX injection, or have a bleeding problem or any other medical conditions. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Be sure to tell them if you use blood thinners such as aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix®), prasugrel hydrochloride (Effient®), or warfarin sodium (Coumadin®).

If you have Dupuytren’s contracture, the rope-like cord you feel in the palm of your hand will continue to cause your fingers to bend toward your palm, and may worsen over time.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION XIAFLEX can cause serious side effects, including: • Tendon or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged

tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit. • Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider if you get numbness, tingling, or increased pain in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit. • Allergic reactions. Allergic reactions can happen in people who have received an injection of XIAFLEX because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX: hives; swollen face; breathing trouble; or chest pain.

Please see Brief Summary of the Full Prescribing Information on adjacent page. XIAFLEX® is a registered trademark of Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Plavix® is a registered trademark of Sanofi Aventis/Bristol-Myers Squibb. Effient® is a registered trademark of Daiichi-Sankyo/Eli Lilly and Company. Coumadin® is a registered trademark of Bristol-Myers Squibb.

© 2011 Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All rights reserved. 0111-019.a

Common side effects with XIAFLEX include: swelling of the injection site or the hand, bleeding or bruising at the injection site; and pain or tenderness of the injection site or the hand, swelling of the lymph nodes (glands) in the elbow or underarm, itching, breaks in the skin, redness or warmth of the skin, and pain in the underarm.


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A8 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

For many Chinese men, no deed means no dates By Andrew Jacobs New York Times News Service

BEIJING — In the realm of eligible bachelors, Wang Lin has a lot to recommend him. A 28-yearold college-educated insurance salesman, Wang has a flawless set of white teeth, a tolerable karaoke voice and a 3-year-old Nissan with furry blue seat covers. “My friends tell me I’m quite handsome,” he said in confident English one recent evening, fingering his car keys as if they were a talisman. But by the exacting standards of single Chinese women, it seems, Wang lacks that bankable attribute known as real property. Given that even a cramped, twobedroom apartment on the dusty fringe of the capital sells for about $150,000, Wang’s $900-amonth salary means he may forever be condemned to the ranks of the renting. Last year, he said, this deficiency prompted a high-end dating agency to reject his application. In recent months, half a dozen women have turned down a second meeting after learning that he had no means to buy a home. “Sometimes I wonder if I will ever find a wife,” said Wang, who lives with his parents, retired factory workers who remind him of his single status with nagging regularity. “I feel like a loser.” There have been many undesirable repercussions of China’s unrelenting real estate boom, which has driven prices up by 140 percent nationwide since 2007, and by as much as 800 percent in Beijing over the past eight years. Working-class buyers have been frozen out of the market while an estimated 65 million apartments across the country bought as speculative investments sit empty. The frenzy starts with the local governments that sell off land at steep prices, and is frothed up by overeager developers who force residents out of old neighborhoods, sometimes prompting self-immolations among the dispossessed. But largely overlooked is the collateral damage to urban young professionals, especially men, who increasingly find themselves lovelorn and despairing as a growing number of women hold out for a mate with a deed.

Women’s desires Although there are few concrete ways to measure the scope of involuntary bachelorhood, more than 70 percent of single women in a recent survey said they would tie the knot only with a prospective husband who owned a home. Among the qualities they seek in a mate, 50 percent said that financial considerations ranked above all else, with good morals and personality falling beneath the top three requirements. (Not surprisingly, 54 percent of single men ranked beauty first, according to the report, which surveyed 32,000 people and was jointly issued by the Chinese Research Association of Marriage and Family and the All-China Women’s Federation.) The marriage competition is fierce, and statistically, women hold the cards. Given the nation’s gender imbalance, an outgrowth of a cultural preference for boys

New York Times News Service

SEOUL, South Korea — The North Korean government is preparing to indict an American it has detained on unspecified charges, saying the man has already “admitted his crime,” the state news agency reported Thursday. In Seoul, meanwhile, a South Korean news agency, Yonhap, citing sources in the United States that it did not name, said the man was Jun Young-su, a Korean-American businessman in his 60s from Orange County, Calif. Yonhap said Jun was arrested last November in connection with illegal religious activities in the North. Other details in the Yonhap report could not immediately be confirmed. A State Department spokesman, Mark Toner, confirmed Tuesday that an American was being held by the North, but he and other U.S. officials declined to name the detainee and offered

3rd reporter arrested in hacking case LONDON — Police officials said Thursday that they had arrested a third journalist in connection with an expanding case of phone-hacking by reporters at The News of the World, a British tabloid. The Metropolitan Police issued a statement announcing the arrest of a man early Thursday morning “on suspicion of unlawfully intercepting mobile phone voice mail messages” but did not identify the suspect, who remained in custody for questioning. A person with knowledge of the investigation, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the delicate nature of the investigation, said the suspect was James Weatherup, an assistant editor at the News of the World who also has worked as a reporter and news editor there. British news media also identified Weatherup as the suspect.

they expect to find more bodies. On Wednesday, officials from the northern border state of Tamaulipas said they uncovered 10 more bodies, bringing the total to 126 since the first were uncovered last week.

Berlusconi reportedly won’t seek re-election LONDON — Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi told a group of foreign journalists this week that he does not plan to seek re-election after his term ends in 2013, Italian and foreign news reports said Thursday. The 74-year-old Italian leader’s comments during an off-the-record gathering Tuesday night were leaked to the ANSA news agency. Subsequent television and print reports quoted Berlusconi as saying he planned to continue serving as a member of his People of Freedom party. “If I will still be needed as a father figure, I am available ... but I don’t want an operational role,” he said.

Pirate attacks set More arrests, bodies record for first quarter found in Mexico LONDON — Pirates attacked

Gilles Sabrie / New York Times News Service

A couple rides their bike past a billboard promoting a real estate development in Beijing. Amid a real estate boom in China, men are finding themselves lovelorn as women hold out for a mate with property.

“This fixation on real estate has twisted the popular notion of love and marriage. Women are putting economic factors above everything else when looking for a mate, and this is not a good thing for relationships or for society.” — Zhang Yanhong, a matchmaking consultant and China’s stringent familyplanning policies, as many as 24 million men could be perpetual bachelors by 2020, according to the report. Zhang Yanhong, a matchmaking consultant at Baihe, one of the country’s most popular dating sites, said many disheartened men had simply dropped out of the marriage market. “This fixation on real estate has twisted the popular notion of love and marriage,” she said. “Women are putting economic factors above everything else when looking for a mate, and this is not a good thing for relationships or for society.”

Real estate boom The nation’s real estate obsession is especially noteworthy given China’s relatively recent embrace of home ownership. The sale of residential property was not allowed until the late 1980s, and even then under a leasehold system that gives purchasers 70 years of ownership. Today, about two-thirds of all Chinese under 40 own their own homes, slightly higher than the average for Americans of the same age group. With few other outlets for investment (those who park their money in a Chinese bank effectively lose money, given low interest rates and high inflation), many families have been plowing their savings into apartments, spurring what some economists describe as a bubble. Han Han, one of China’s most widely read bloggers, frequently assails the government policies that he and many economists say have contributed to rapidly rising prices. In an interview, he said one consequence of the singleminded focus on real estate, or on earning the money to make mortgage payments and repay

family loans, is that young people have little time for anything else. “We’ve created a generation of young people whose sole ambition is to have a piece of property under their name,” he said. Like many anxious bachelors, Yang Xuning, 29, a sportswriter from Beijing, said much of the pressure comes from parents who are taunted by the wealth around them. He recalls his first meeting with his girlfriend’s parents in Shanghai last winter, when he was asked about his salary and his nesting plans. “I tried to reason with her mother, explaining that it’s not practical to buy something at this stage in our lives but she wouldn’t hear it,” he said. He stood his ground, she stood hers, and a few months later, on the second anniversary of their relationship, Yang’s girlfriend called it quits. “A lot of girls, encouraged by their parents, see marriage as a way of instantly changing their status without the hard work,” he said bitterly.

Traditional priorities Many women are unapologetic about their priorities, citing the age-old tradition in which men provided a home for their brides, even if that home came with a mother-in-law. There are also other concerns, including the instability of starting a family in rented premises and the endless badgering of parents. Status also plays a role, but so, too, do fears that those who put off buying will be priced out of the market indefinitely. Gao Yanan, a 27-year-old accountant with a fondness for RayBans and Zara pantsuits, said the matter was not up for debate. “It’s the guy’s responsibility to tell a girl right away whether he owns an apartment,” she said. “It gives her a chance not to fall in love.”

N.Korea set to indict detained American By Mark McDonald

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no personal details, citing privacy rules. “We would call on the government of North Korea to release this citizen on humanitarian grounds,” Toner said. “We would ask that they respect and treat this citizen in a manner consistent with international human rights law.” Toner said that the detained American had been visited by Swedish diplomats who checked on his condition. Swedish officials act on Washington’s behalf in North Korea because the U.S. does not have formal diplomatic relations with the North Korean government. Former President Jimmy Carter is scheduled to travel to North Korea this month, but it was not clear whether he would try to secure the detainee’s release. Carter has said that his trip will be focused on denuclearization issues. The State Department has stressed that it is a private, unofficial journey.

Carter has been successful at freeing jailed Americans in the past. He made a private trip to Pyongyang, the North’s capital, last August to win the release of Aijalon Mahli Gomes, 31, of Boston, who had been convicted of illegally entering North Korea. Gomes had been sentenced in April 2010 to eight years of hard labor and was fined $700,000. The Carter Center said Gomes was granted amnesty by the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-il. Former President Bill Clinton traveled to Pyongyang in 2009 to gain the release of two American television journalists who had been detained after crossing into North Korea from China. Special amnesty again was granted by Kim to the journalists, although Secretary of State Hillary Clinton was adamant that Bill Clinton had not apologized to Kim to win the women’s release.

With such women on the prowl, even men who do have their own homes have come up with techniques to weed out the covetous and the inordinately materialistic. Liu Binbin, 30, an editor at a publishing house in Beijing, said he often arrived at first dates by bus, even though he owned a car. “If they ask me questions like ‘Do you live with your parents?’ I know what they’re after,” he said. Liu said he went on 20 unfulfilling blind dates until finding a suitable girlfriend last year. He said he knew she was the one after passing the three-month mark. “The whole time she thought I didn’t own an apartment, and she still wanted me,” he said. “Someone like that is rare.”

Important Product Information XIAFLEX® (Zï a flex) (collagenase clostridium histolyticum) What is the most important information I should know about XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX can cause serious side effects, including: • Tendon or ligament damage. Receiving an injection of XIAFLEX may cause damage to a tendon or ligament in your hand and cause it to break or weaken. This could require surgery to fix the damaged tendon or ligament. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have trouble bending your injected finger (towards the wrist) after the swelling goes down or you have problems using your treated hand after your follow-up visit. • Nerve injury or other serious injury of the hand. Call your healthcare provider if you get numbness, tingling, or increased pain in your treated finger or hand after your injection or after your follow-up visit. • Allergic Reactions. Allergic reactions can happen in people who take XIAFLEX because it contains foreign proteins. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an allergic reaction after an injection of XIAFLEX: • hives • swollen face • breathing trouble • chest pain What is XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with Dupuytren’s contracture when a “cord” can be felt. In people with Dupuytren’s contracture, there is thickening of the skin and tissue in the palm of your hand that is not normal. Overtime, this thickened tissue can form a cord in your palm. This causes one or more of your fingers to bend toward the palm, so you cannot straighten them. XIAFLEX should be injected into a cord by a healthcare provider who is skilled in injection procedures of the hand and treating people with Dupuytren’s contracture. The proteins in XIAFLEX help to “break” the cord of tissue that is causing the finger to be bent. It is not known if XIAFLEX is safe and effective in children under the age of 18.

MEXICO CITY — Sixteen police officers in northeastern Mexico have been detained on suspicion of protecting a criminal gang that allegedly filled mass graves with 126 bodies uncovered there, according to Mexican officials who announced the arrests Wednesday night. Investigators searching shallow pits in San Fernando, a town about 90 miles south of Brownsville, Texas, say

a record number of ships in the first quarter, taking 344 sailors hostage and killing seven, according to the International Maritime Bureau. A total of 142 attacks were reported worldwide, the most for the period since monitoring began in 1991, the London-based IMB said in a report Thursday. Attacks off Somalia jumped to 97 from 35 a year earlier, with 15 vessels seized out of a global total of 18, the IMB said.

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What should I tell my healthcare provider before starting treatment with XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX may not be right for you. Before receiving XIAFLEX, tell your healthcare provider if you: • have had an allergic reaction to a previous XIAFLEX injection. • have a bleeding problem. • have any other medical conditions. • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. It is not known if XIAFLEX will harm your unborn baby. • are breastfeeding. It is not known if XIAFLEX passes into your breast-milk. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to feed your baby if you receive XIAFLEX. Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your healthcare provider if you use: a blood thinner medicine such as aspirin, clopidogrel (PLAVIX®), prasugrel hydrochloride (EFFIENT®), or warfarin sodium (COUMADIN®). If you are told to stop taking a blood thinner before your XIAFLEX injection, your healthcare provider should tell you when to restart the blood thinner. How will I receive XIAFLEX? Your healthcare provider will inject XIAFLEX into the cord that is causing your finger to bend. After an injection of XIAFLEX, your affected hand will be wrapped with a bandage. You should limit moving and using the treated finger after the injection. Do not bend or straighten the fingers of the injected hand until your healthcare provider says it is okay. This will help prevent the medicine from leaking out of the cord. Do not try to straighten the treated finger yourself. Keep the injected hand elevated until bedtime. Call your healthcare provider right away if you have: • signs of infection after your injection, such as fever, chills, increased redness, or swelling • numbness or tingling in the treated finger • trouble bending the injected finger after the swelling goes down Return to your healthcare provider’s office as directed on the day after your injection. During this first follow-up visit, if you still have the cord, your

healthcare provider may try to extend the treated finger to “break” the cord and try to straighten your finger. Your healthcare provider will provide you with a splint to wear on the treated finger. Wear the splint as instructed by your healthcare provider at bedtime to keep your finger straight. Do finger exercises each day, as instructed by your healthcare provider. Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about when you can start doing your normal activities with the injected hand. What are the possible side effects of XIAFLEX? XIAFLEX can cause serious side effects. See “What is the most important information I should know about XIAFLEX?”. Common side effects with XIAFLEX include: • swelling of the injection site or the hand • bleeding or bruising at the injection site • pain or tenderness of the injection site or the hand • swelling of the lymphnodes (glands) in the elbow or underarm • itching • breaks in the skin • redness or warmth of the skin • pain in the underarm These are not all of the possible side effects with XIAFLEX. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. General information about XIAFLEX Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed here. This is a summary of the most important information about XIAFLEX. If you would like more information, talk to your healthcare provider. You can ask your healthcare provider for information about XIAFLEX that is written for health professionals. For more information visit www.XIAFLEX.com or call 1-877-663-0412. © 2011 Auxilium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. For US residents only. 40 Valley Stream Parkway Malvern, PA 19355 www.auxilium.com


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Auto News McLaren is democratizing the stuff of “supercars,” see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,760.22 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -1.30 -.05%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Scanlon’s restaurant reshaping its menu Scanlon’s restaurant, located at the Athletic Club of Bend, will close April 24 to rejuvenate and reshape its food offerings, according to a news release Thursday. Scanlon’s is projected to reopen in early June with a new menu focusing on healthy, fresh, organic and locally sourced foods. The restaurant, which opened in 1992, also will undergo some physical changes. “Over the years, as Bend has grown and changed, we’ve discovered an emerging need to serve the segment of the dining public looking for healthier alternatives on a restaurant menu,” club General Manager Kip Heilman said in the release. “The fact that the restaurant is housed in the Athletic Club of Bend creates a natural opportunity for us to advance our company’s mission of health and wellness.” Scanlon’s Express Café and Scanlon’s Bar will stay open during the transition, and both are open to members and the public.

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12,285.15 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +14.16 +.12%

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1,314.52 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +.11 +.01%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.48 treasury CHANGE +.58%

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Space Age, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . .$3.78 • Ron’s Oil, 62980 N. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . .$3.83 • Chevron, 2100 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend . . . . . . .$3.90 • La Pine Mini Mart, 52530 Highway 97, La Pine . . . . .$3.90 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$3.88 • Chevron, 2005 S. Highway 97, Redmond . . . . . . . . . . .$3.90 • Chevron, 1001 Railway, Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.90

DIESEL • Chevron, 2100 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend . . . . . . .$4.40 • Chevron, 1210 S.W. Highway 97, Madras . . . . .$4.30 • Chevron, 2005 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond . . .$4.36 Marla Polenz / The Bulletin

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$1471.70 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$16.80

Central Oregon housing data shows no discernible trends Experts expect instability as market works through foreclosures By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Depending on the day and the data, most statistics from the Central Oregon real estate market seem to show no real trends. On a chart, many of the data points make zigzag lines, at least from month to month or quarter to quarter. Stretch the time period out four or five years, however, and most of the lines trend downward. So, what does it all mean?

“It’s an interesting question,” said Lester Friedman, the 2011 president of the Central Oregon Association of Realtors. “It’s something that we’re all trying to ponder and make heads or tails out of.” The association released first-quarter statistics this week showing the number of residential sales for cities in Deschutes County increased or nearly equaled those from the first quarter of 2007 — before the bubble burst. See Housing / B2

Inside • Housing data for cities and counties, Page B2

Bend $300K

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$189K Redmond

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S O N D J FMAM J J A S O N DJ FMAM J J A S O N D J FMAM J J A S O N DJ FM

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2008

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Median sales price — Sisters, Sunrive r, La Pine, Jefferson County and Crook County (measured quarterly) $700K

Sunriver

Daniel Crothers, a forklift operator for West Coast Tomato, prepares to load a truck with produce at the company’s facility in Palmetto, Fla. Shortly after the price of Florida tomatoes skyrocketed following freezes that badly damaged crops in Mexico, a gang of thieves stole six tractortrailer loads of tomatoes from Florida growers. Josh Ritchie New York Times News Service

As tomato prices shot up, a group of thieves added a new wrinkle to a surge in cargo theft By William Neuman New York Times News Service

The high price of produce, especially for tomatoes after the deep winter freezes, has attracted more than heightened attention from consumers. A ring of sophisticated vegetable bandits was watching, too. Late last month, a gang of thieves stole six tractor-trailer loads of tomatoes and a truck full of cucumbers from Florida growers. They also stole a truckload of frozen meat. The total value of the illegal

haul: about $300,000. The thieves disappeared with the shipments just after the price of Florida tomatoes skyrocketed after freezes that badly damaged crops in Mexico. That suddenly made Florida tomatoes a tempting target, on a par with flat-screen TVs or designer jeans, but with a big difference: Tomatoes are perishable. “I’ve never experienced people targeting produce loads before,” said Shaun Leiker, an assistant manager at Allen

$41.661 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$1.426

Renters insurance increasingly required The Bulletin

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By Jordan Novet

Median sales price — Bend and Redmo nd (measured monthly)

The mysterious case of the produce bandits

Deschutes moves up in beer rankings The Brewers Association on Wednesday ranked Deschutes Brewery 11th in its Top 50 Brewing Companies list and fifth in its Top 50 Craft Brewing Companies list for 2010, up from 13th and sixth, respectively, in 2009. The nonprofit trade association in Boulder, Colo., bases its rankings on volume of beer sold. It only considers breweries producing less than 6 million barrels per year to be craft breweries. The brewery has moved up in the Brewers Association rankings before. The rankings for 2008 had Deschutes listed in seventh place among craft brewers. For 2010, Boston Beer Co., Sierra Nevada Brewing Co., New Belgium Brewing Co. and Spoetzl Brewery outpaced Deschutes Brewery, in that order. Deschutes Brewery replaced Pyramid Breweries Inc. in the No. 5 position after North American Breweries bought Pyramid’s parent company, Independent Breweries United, last year. — From staff reports

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Lund, a trucking broker in Oviedo, Fla., that was hit three times by the thieves. “It’s a little different than selling TVs off the back of your truck.” Industry and insurance company officials said it appeared to add a new wrinkle to a nationwide surge in cargo theft. In the case of the stolen tomatoes, the thieves seemed deeply versed in the ways of trucking companies and the produce industry. Transportation company executives and a law enforcement official said the criminals appeared to have set up a bogus trucking company with the intention of stealing loads of produce and other goods. See Bandits / B5

More local property management companies appear to be moving toward requiring tenants to have renters insurance before moving into properties. About five years ago, after seeing the number of claims for damage climbing, Plus Property Management owner Lawnae Hunter decided to start requiring her tenants to have the insurance, which commonly covers damages to tenants’ property stemming from certain events and includes a personal liability element. “I think we live in a world now that more people are going to be tenants longer, and they acquire nicer things, and so part of our job is to really educate them, so that they’re aware that this is available, they should have it and they should protect their personal belongings,” said Hunter, who serves as president of the Central Oregon Rental Owners Association. Hunter believes tenants can benefit from having renters insurance. She also thinks if tenants have renters insurance, homeowners could be protected from spending to replace damaged parts of their properties. The average cost of renters insurance in Oregon has floated around $150 a year for the past few years, said Cheryl Martinis, a spokeswoman for the state of Oregon’s Insurance Division. That’s lower than the national average, which was $176 a year as of 2008, according to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners. “We require (renters insurance) on all of our properties before we turn over keys,” said Dakotah Satre, a property manager at Deschutes Property Management. She said the company’s policy on requiring the insurance has firmed up in the past year. In the past, Satre said, the company has had issues with damage such as fish tank leaks. “It flooded upstairs, and it caused major electrical damage and things like that,” she said. The tenants’ deposit didn’t cover the cost of the damage, and neither the tenants nor the owner could pay for it on their own. “If (the tenants) had renters insurance, that would be covered, easily,” she said. Laura Hayden, a property manager at Bend’s Morris Hayden Property Management, said the company is considering instituting a requirement for renters insurance, because, she said, it can help tenants and, as far as insurance goes, it doesn’t cost much. See Insurance / B5

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While Goldman Consumer groups raked in profits, call for the breakup clients squirmed of CVS Caremark By Greg Gordon

By Reed Abelson and Natasha Singer

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Traders for Morgan Stanley gnashed their teeth for weeks in early 2008, watching helplessly as their $1.2 billion investment in an exotic offshore deal, which was marketed by Wall Street rival Goldman Sachs, began to shrivel. With the housing market deteriorating rapidly, Morgan Stanley traders wanted to sell Inside off hundreds of millions of dol• Details of lars in securities positions that WaMu’s had been downgraded by cred“troubling” it ratings agencies and recover practices, what money they could. But as Page B2 the deal’s liquidation manager, Goldman Sachs held sole control over the disposal of any of the securities contracts, and it was resisting. On Feb. 6, 2008, Morgan Stanley trader John Pearce wrote a colleague that he got so exasperated with a Goldman representative that “I broke my phone.” See Goldman / B2

CVS Caremark is coming under increasing pressure from consumer groups and shareholders to split up, at the same time that federal and state regulators are looking into accusations of anti-competitive behavior by the merged company. The 4-year-old merger of the drugstore chain and the pharmacy benefit manager is the subject of an investigation by the Federal Trade Commission and a multistate inquiry by the attorneys general of 24 states, according to earlier disclosures by CVS Caremark. The company says it is “cooperating fully” with the inquiries. “We remain confident that our business practices and service offerings are being conducted in compliance with antitrust laws,” said Carolyn Castel, a company spokeswoman. But on Thursday, five consumer groups wrote a letter to Jon Leibowitz, the commission’s chairman, claiming “there is strong evidence that the CVS Caremark merger has harmed consumers.” See CVS / B5

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

B2 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BP gets more time to salvage Russia oil deal By Julia Werdigier New York Times News Service

LONDON — The British oil giant BP won a last-minute respite Thursday in its efforts to salvage a share exchange and Arctic exploration agreement with Rosneft, the state-controlled Russian oil company. BP said the two companies had agreed to extend by another month the deadline to complete the deal, giving BP time to try to resolve a dispute with partners in a separate Russian joint venture, TNK-BP, which have been trying for three months to block the agreement with Rosneft. BP said that it had offered its TNK-BP partners cash or a role in its deal with Rosneft, but that it would not offer a significant stake in BP as an inducement. The BP chief executive, Robert Dudley, speaking to investors at BP’s annual shareholder meeting in London, played down the severity of the dispute, saying the company’s relationship with its TNK-BP partners was “noisy” but not “dysfunctional.” “We’ve offered participation in the Arctic, we’ve offered cash, we’ve offered participation in international ventures,” Dudley said. “But we won’t offer a large amount or significant stake in BP because it’s not in the interest of shareholders.” BP’s partners in TNK-BP re-

jected Dudley’s claims and said “BP has never made a constructive proposal to turn the Rosneft deal over to TNK-BP.” The Russian partners are “not interested in the selective parts of the deal that BP feels it can give up,” Stan Polovets, a spokesman for the group, said in an e-mailed statement. “Now is the time for sensible proposals from BP to resolve the problems that have been created.” Dudley said BP would be “working to bring about a resolution,” adding that “Russia is one of the world’s most important sources of oil and gas as well as a massive market. BP needs to be there. It is part of our strategy.” BP now has until May 16 to persuade an arbitration tribunal to lift the block or settle with its partners in TNK-BP to allow the Rosneft deal to go ahead. The TNK-BP shareholders oppose the deal because they say it violates their shareholder agreement. BP’s shares fell 0.9 percent on Thursday in London. BP made clear that it remained committed to TNK-BP and its business in Russia despite recent difficulties there. “While life has not always been easy, TNK-BP has been a successful venture with superior returns,” BP’s chairman, CarlHenric Svanberg, said.

Zipcar has strong IPO, despite elusive profits By Shawn Langlois MarketWatch

SAN FRANCISCO — Zipcar Inc. shares shot 56 percent higher in their stock market debut on Thursday, marking the latest splash in what is already shaping up to be a strong year for IPOs. Zipcar’s newly minted shares closed up $10 at $28. Late Wednesday, Zipcar had priced its initial public offering at $18 — above the previously expected range of $14 to $16 a share — to raise more than $170 million. About 9.68 million shares were sold in the offering, which was underwritten by Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. Zipcar is one of many companies going public in a resurgent year for public offerings. According to a report this week from Hoover’s Inc., 28 companies went public in the first quarter, raising

$12 billion in market capitalization. That’s more than twice the $4.5 billion raised through IPOs in the first three months of 2010. Zipcar operates a car-sharing service in 14 cities and at more than 230 college and university campuses across the U.S. and U.K. It offers self-service cars for use by the hour or by the day, and claims 560,000 members. “Zipcar has almost a cult following,” said Scott Sweet, senior managing partner at IPO Boutique. “They’re strategically located in big cities where parking is tough, as well as many universities.” To this point, however, profits have been elusive. In the most recent quarter, the company reported a net loss of $1.1 million, on revenue of $52.1 million, compared with a profit of $1.3 million, on revenue of $35.8 million for the year-earlier period, according to an SEC filing.

Geithner: U.S. has room to raise taxes without doing harm Republicans over the nation’s priorities. Obama called for endWASHINGTON — Treasury ing the Bush-era tax cuts for the Secretary Timothy Geithner said wealthiest Americans, which are Thursday that the federal gov- set to expire in 2012. ernment has room to raise taxes Financial markets have “confibecause its revenue makes up a dence” in the U.S. fiscal position, much smaller percentage of the Geithner said, adding that he execonomy than in other pected Congress would advanced economies. act to raise the debt limit “We have the capacbefore it created enough ity, with very modest uncertainty to damage fichanges in tax reform, to nancial markets. It would get ourselves in position be “deeply irresponsible” where we’ve restored to allow markets to quessustainability without tion whether the federal the risk that we’re going government can meet its to hurt future growth,” Timothy obligations, he said. Geithner said in remarks Geithner The Treasury Deat an event in Washingpartment estimated last ton sponsored by the week that the debt limit Bertelsmann Foundation. of $14.29 trillion will be reached The changes the Obama ad- May 16. Congressional action is ministration is seeking pose “no required to raise the cap, though plausible risk” to how the econ- the Treasury said it can probably omy grows or whether business stave off default until early July. will continue to invest, the TreaThere is “a lot of confidence in sury chief said. He also said he markets that the American politidid not expect any “enthusiasm” cal system will be able to get our for a U.S. value-added tax. fiscal path in a sustainable posiPresident Barack Obama on tion,” Geithner said. “If you look at Wednesday proposed cutting what we pay to borrow, the world $4 trillion in cumulative deficits basically believes that our probwithin 12 years through a com- lems are more manageable, our bination of spending cuts and system will solve it. But we want tax increases, setting the stage to make sure that we’re earning for a fight with congressional that confidence every day.”

By Rebecca Christie and Ian Katz Bloomberg News

Report details Washington Mutual’s ‘troubling compensation practices’ By James Sterngold, Carter Dougherty and Donal Griffin Bloomberg News

Washington Mutual Inc., once the largest U.S. thrift, rewarded bankers for overcharging customers on subprime mortgages and selling the worst-performing loans to investors, a Senate panel has concluded. The lender gave its top producers free trips to places like Hawaii and the Bahamas in return for increasing mortgage volume, even as performance of the loans deteriorated, according to the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations report on the financial crisis. “Loan officers and processors were paid primarily on volume, not primarily on the quality of their loans, and were paid more for issuing higherrisk loans,” the panel found. “Loan officers and mortgage brokers were also paid more when they got borrowers to pay higher interest rates, even if the borrower qualified for a lower rate — a practice that enriched WaMu in the short term, but made defaults more likely.” The report of more than 600 pages, released Wednesday, is based on internal documents and testimony from executives and regulators. The subcommittee concludes that WaMu’s

Housing Continued from B1 But the median prices for those first-quarter sales were less than half the median prices in 2007. Distressed sales — either foreclosures or short sales — made up the majority of the transactions in the first three months of this year. Data from the Bratton Appraisal Group released this week showed the median price for a single-family home in Bend in March reached $189,000, an increase of $19,000 over February’s median price. But December’s median price was $168,000, and two months before that Bend’s median price had hit $205,000, according to the Bratton Report. Nearly all real estate experts agree the market will not stabilize until the bulk of foreclosed properties, which hold prices down, work their way through the system. Nationally, foreclosure filings dropped 27 percent in the first quarter of this year compared with the first quarter of 2010, RealtyTrac, a California company, reported Wednesday. In Deschutes County, default notice filings have dropped for five straight months, and more than 50 percent for the first three months of this year compared with the same period in 2010. That seems to suggests the worst is over, but experts say not so fast. Foreclosure filings have dropped because banks — under scrutiny from federal regulators and, separately, state attorneys general — have dramatically slowed their foreclosure efforts. Many homeowners are still in financial distress, Friedman said. Filings have fallen because banks are under pressure. “The banking industry has been taken to task for its actions,” he said. But the delay could be beneficial for financially strapped homeowners, Friedman said. It could give them time to improve their finances or prompt banks to offer loan modifications. “Anything that delays the foreclosure of properties for people in distress, gives people more time to get (help or work things out,)” he said.

primary regulator, the Office of Thrift Supervision, identified hundreds of the lender’s failings without taking effective action and impeded the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. from ordering corrective steps. Kerry Killinger, the former chief executive officer of WaMu, and another executive were sued by the FDIC last month. They were accused of taking extreme risks with the bank’s mortgage portfolio, causing billions of dollars in losses. Barry Kaplan, Killinger’s attorney, declined to comment yesterday when asked about the Senate report. WaMu’s “troubling compensation practices went right to the top,” the panel found. Killinger received a $15 million severance payment in 2008 “when he was asked to leave the bank that failed under his management,” according to the report. The Seattle-based lender was sold to JPMorgan Chase in September 2008, as it collapsed. “The activities described in the subcommittee staff’s report obviously took place before we purchased Washington Mutual’s assets,” Joseph Evangelisti, a spokesman for JPMorgan, said Wednesday. WaMu, which had $300 billion of assets and 2,300 branches when it collapsed, began a strategy of emphasizing high-

risk loans in 2004, the subcommittee said. The panel found that the bank’s efforts to boost loan volume involved fraud. “WaMu management was provided with compelling evidence of deficient lending practices in internal e-mails, audit reports and reviews,” the panel said. “Internal reviews of WaMu’s loan centers, for example, described ‘extensive fraud’ from employees ‘willfully’ circumventing bank policy.” An internal audit of a Washington Mutual subprime subsidiary in 2005 identified “predatory” lending practices and found that staff sometimes failed to provide proper documentation. The review of early-default cases found that fraud should have been “easily detected,” the panel said. WaMu officers who had responsibility for loan quality tried to reject some loan applications, and found that their decisions were sometimes overridden, according to the report. Diane Kosch, a quality-assurance officer in Dublin, Calif., told the panel about “enormous” pressure to keep up with loan volume. “Often, when she tried to stop the approval of a loan that did not meet quality standards, it would be referred to management and approved anyway.”

Median sales price — Bend and Redmond (measured monthly) $400K

Bend

$300K $189K $200K Redmond $100K

$115K

S O N D J FMAM J J A S O N DJ FMAM J J A S O N D J FMAM J J A S O N DJ FM

2008

’07

2009

2010

’11

Median sales price — Sisters, Sunriver, La Pine, Jefferson County and Crook County (measured quarterly) $700K

Sunriver

$500K $300K

Sisters

$330K

La Pine Crook Co.

$173K La Pine $75K, Jefferson Co. $73K

$100K Jefferson Co.* Q3 Q4 Q1

’07

Q2 Q3

Crook Co. $71K

Q4 Q1

2008

Q2 Q3

Q4 Q1

Q2 Q3

2009

2010

Q4 Q1

’11

Number of homes sold — Bend and Redmond (measured monthly) 200 150

152

Bend

100 61 50 Redmond

0

S ON D J F M AM J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A SO N D J F M

’07

2008

2009

’11

2010

Number of homes sold — Sisters, Sunriver, La Pine, Jefferson County and Crook County (measured quarterly) 80 60

Crook Co. Sisters

50

Jefferson Co.*

Jefferson Co. 25 Sisters 25

40 20

Sunriver La Pine

0 Q3

’07

Q4

Q1

Q2 Q3

Q4

2008

Q1

Q2 Q3

Q4 Q1

2009

Q2 Q3

2010

21 17 Q4 Q1

’11

Goldman Continued from B1 A day later, he wrote to a Goldman Sachs counterpart: “One day I hope I get the real reason why you are doing this to me.” It turns out, Senate investigators revealed this week, that Goldman Sachs had plenty of reasons to delay a selloff. The investment banking giant had secretly wagered on the default of the securities around which the $2 billion deal was structured. The farther their value dropped, the bigger Goldman Sachs’ profits. Ultimately, a Morgan Stanley lawyer lodged a formal protest, charging that Goldman Sachs had breached its contractual duty to sell off downgraded securities, and that the delays had already cost Morgan Stanley $150 million. Known as Hudson-Mezzanine-2006-1, the deal totally collapsed in November 2008, barely more than two years after its creation. Goldman Sachs reaped $1.35 billion. Morgan Stanley lost $930 million. The story of the deal, which drew outrage from Democratic Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan at a news conference Wednesday, is unveiled among hundreds of newly disclosed documents released by his Senate Permanent Investigations Committee, culminating a two-year inquiry into the financial crisis. It provides another closeup glimpse of how Goldman Sachs deftly scaled back its risks as the housing market crested in late 2006 and then, at the expense of its investor clients, earned billions of dollars from a full-scale blitz of secret bets that the value of home mortgage securities would crash. Goldman Sachs was the only major Wall Street firm to escape relatively unscathed from the nation’s economic meltdown. The subcommittee reported that Goldman Sachs packaged at least four offshore deals with a total value of $4.5 billion that were rife with conflicts of interest, including one for which the firm paid $550 million in fines to the Securities and Exchange Commission last summer to settle a civil fraud suit. Levin charged that Goldman Sachs deceived investors on the Hudson deal by failing to disclose that it was betting the other way. And, he alleged, the company misled the subcommittee during a marathon hearing last year in which he repeatedly pressed Chief Executive Lloyd Blankfein and a halfdozen other current and former Goldman Sachs execs to acknowledge the firm bet massively on a housing downturn in 2006 and 2007. A spokesman for Goldman Sachs, which says its executives testified truthfully, declined to comment on the Hudson deal. Sylvain Raynes, an expert in structured products, said the Hudson deal was “full of conflicts of interest,” including Goldman’s dual role as liquidation agent. “This deal should never have gone to market, due to the lack of transparency and the fact that Goldman was holding both ends of the deal,” he said. However, Goldman Sachs could mitigate liability due to standard language in the contract documents informing investors that it may initially take the short position and that it may have conflicts of interest. For its role as liquidation agent, the subcommittee said, Goldman Sachs collected an additional $3.1 million in fees.

* Includes Jefferson County and Crooked River Ranch Source: Bratton Appraisal Group Greg Cross / The Bulletin

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B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 B3

A N McLaren democratizing the stuff of ‘supercars’ Use of carbon fiber may trickle down to broader market

Claudio Santoni, a group manager at McLaren, sits in a rolling chassis of the 2012 McLaren MP4-12C. The twoseater’s 592horsepower twin-turbo V-8 will launch it to terminal velocity of 205 mph — at about half the cost of any previous effort.

By Norman Mayersohn New York Times News Service

WOKING, England — “Supercar” is a title without official qualifications, a mark of achievement awarded by popular acclaim, not based on codified statutes. Simply put, we know one when we see one. Or we used to. Lately, admission to the pantheon inhabited by the likes of the Ferrari Enzo or the Lamborghini Murcielago has become a squishy affair. A top speed beyond 200 mph, once the sole province of tightly wound 12-cylinder exotics, is available in places as prosaic as a Chevy showroom. Now, membership seems to hinge as much on exclusivity — annual production no greater than the hundreds, ideally — to make the case for supercar eligibility. A price tag that crowds half a million dollars would clinch the deal. The Bugatti Veyron, with more than 1,000 horsepower and a price that sneaks up on $2 million, easily qualifies. Then how to classify the 2012 McLaren MP4-12C, a two-seat projectile with a window sticker of $231,400 whose 592-horsepower twin-turbo V-8 will launch it to terminal velocity of 205 mph? McLaren, long a dominant force in Formula One racing, says the 12C will outperform competitors widely acknowledged as supercars: The blast to 120 mph takes but nine seconds.

Ford expands recall of F-150 to 1.2 million pickup trucks By Jerry Hirsch Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Ford Motor Co. on Thursday expanded a recall of its popular F-150 pickup truck to about 1.2 million vehicles because front-seat airbags could inflate without the vehicle being involved in a collision. Federal safety regulators said there have been at least 269 incidents, making it the most “ever recorded in any inadvertent airbag deployment investigation or recall” in the history of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Earlier this year, Ford recalled 144,000 of the pickups, saying that the problem was mostly isolated to trucks built at Ford’s nowclosed Norfolk, Va., factory that were sold in the 2005 and 2006 model years. But the small size of the recall drew the interest of federal safety regulators who thought that the automaker should have called far more trucks. Ford is now recalling trucks built at factories in Dearborn, Mich., and in Kansas City, Mo., during the 2004 through 2006 model years. It also is recalling the Lincoln Mark LT, which was built in Dearborn for the 2006 model year but not previously identified with the problem. In a letter to the NHTSA, Ford said that “after continuing discussions with the agency, and to reassure customers of Ford’s commitment to safety, and to eliminate any possible customer confusion, Ford is voluntarily recalling the remaining population of vehicles.” NHTSA Administrator David Strickland said he was “pleased” with Ford’s decision to expand the recall. “We hope to continue working cooperatively with auto manufacturers to ensure safety defects are addressed quickly for the driving public,” he said. The NHTSA said there have been at least 98 injuries from the surprise airbag deployments, including two drivers who sustained permanent vision damage. Other drivers reported chipped teeth and neck and back injuries. Previously, Ford has said it was aware of 238 incidents of inadvertent airbag deployment in the trucks, causing 77 injuries but no deaths.

New York Times News Service

On the other hand, ownership will not be restricted to a privileged few. Production this year is projected at 1,000 cars, with more than double that number for 2012, so there’s the chance this made-inEngland upstart will not embody the snob appeal of alternatives from Continental Europe. Giving the McLaren some supercar bona fides is a distinction that the MP4-12C shares only with card-carrying supercars: a chassis made of carbon-fiber composites. Long proven on the Formula One circuit and widely accepted in aerospace roles, the carbon cloth, formed of bundled black strands and used instead of stamped metal panels, imbues the McLaren not only with high strength at low weight but also the allure of the exotic. Still, what really makes the

McLaren important to the broader automaking industry is its price: At about half the cost of any previous effort, it is the cheapest car yet with a carbon chassis. Indeed, the advances McLaren has made toward democratizing carbon fiber could well trickle down into the family sedans of the future.

Streamlined process As a structural material, it is carbon fiber’s tortuous production process that has sequestered it in the vehicular stratosphere. Yet its potential to revolutionize passenger cars both for safety (it is incredibly strong) and for fuel efficiency (its strength enables reduced weight) has made it a subject of research at carmakers around the world.

McLaren surely has the credentials to make this leap. In 1981 its racing team was the first to use a carbon-fiber monocoque in Formula One. The first road car to use a carbon fiber structure was the three-seat McLaren F1 of 1992, and a decade later the company began a run that produced some 2,150 Mercedes SLR McLarens over a half-dozen years. The advances in carbon-fiber fabrication, improving from the 3,000 hours needed to make the million-dollar F1 road car chassis to the 400 hours required for each SLR, were remarkable. But the process needed further streamlining to make possible highervolume production of less expensive cars. Such a course of technology development is a handy winkwink long used by automakers to

justify spending millions on racing. Advances like paddle shifters and the dual clutch transmission have migrated to the streets from Ferrari’s Formula One cars and Porsche’s endurance racers, and we are better off for it. Formula One teams are forever in search of an edge; that part of McLaren’s tradition figured strongly into the development of a method to produce the 12C’s chassis more efficiently. Racecar structures — the “tub” that encloses the driver, with attachment points front and rear for the suspension and powertrain — are built up from sheets of woven carbon-fiber cloth. The cloth, impregnated with epoxy resin, is laid by hand into a mold and cured in a special oven, called an autoclave, for hours. The process used to make the 12C chassis, which the company calls a MonoCell, has been radically abbreviated. Working with Carbo Tech of Austria, the engineers adapted a technology known as resin transfer molding to speed production. The carbonfiber cloth is loaded into a mold, where both heat and pressure are applied and an epoxy resin is injected. Claudio Santoni, McLaren’s group manager in charge of the car’s body, said that the finished tub took four hours to make, including curing time in the mold — a vast reduction from the 3,000 hours it took to produce a McLaren F1 chassis in the 1990s. Moreover, the new process makes possible large hollow sections in the chassis (the rocker panels, for example), something that previously required a time-intensive bonding

process. The 12C’s tub weighs a mere 165 pounds. Among the traits that have made carbon-fiber materials attractive to consumers is its visual appeal: the handsome weave of a premium fabric, encased in a transparent resin that showcases the fine texture under a smooth, glossy surface. It looks expensive in the way a fine silk suit whispers luxury. In the McLaren 12C, where form follows miles behind function, decorative displays of structural carbon are found nowhere (though an interior package of cosmetic carbon trim will be offered). There’s a good reason for this: The carbon cloth chosen by McLaren is a non-crimp fabric made of parallel strands that are stitched together — think of bamboo window shades — rather than woven. Each strand is a bundle of 24,000 filaments. Looking beyond the chassis structure, Santoni sees plenty of room for expansion — cars’ crash structures and engines are candidates for a high-fiber diet. But highly visible exterior body panels like the roof, hood and fenders, which are aluminum on the 12C, are not as likely to make the transition, Santoni said, “because they need a Class A surface.” So while McLaren’s new baby may be the end of an era in which supercars are defined by their carbon-fiber skeletons, it is also the beginning of a movement toward mainstream applications. How far downmarket might carbon fiber eventually go? “I keep thinking in 30 years that the VW Golf would be possible,” Santoni said.


B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd ADA-ES AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds Accuray Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch AllegiantT Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AllnceRes AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish rs AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlmadnM g AlonUSA AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria AmBev s AmTrstFin Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev Ann Inc Annaly Anooraq g Answers Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache Apache pfD AptInv ApolloGM n ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Apricus rs AquaAm ArQule ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArchD pfA ArcosDor n ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlPwr g AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn Aurizon g AuthenTec Authentdt h AutoNatn Autobytel Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD

4.19 +.12 1.12 24.19 -.05 0.56 24.36 +.27 1.32 66.20 -.20 12.33 +1.47 12.78 +.03 1.20 52.00 -.41 51.43 +1.03 1.80 39.22 +.21 0.20 15.44 +.24 1.12 35.79 +.85 7.93 -.05 5.72 -.07 19.55 -.27 0.54 39.76 +.13 1.72 30.29 +.11 16.80 +.15 8.80 +.01 1.66 -.06 0.22 15.25 -.05 6.15 +.07 0.05 25.47 -.39 2.59 +.03 1.92 51.00 +.55 0.70 68.03 -.56 0.42 7.01 +.03 15.09 -.79 26.08 +.03 5.00 +.10 36.45 +2.41 1.75 +.02 0.72 19.24 +.59 0.90 55.56 -.99 9.42 +.06 9.35 +.01 6.44 -.33 72.83 +.54 27.13 +5.71 2.75 +.24 0.17 11.21 +.08 0.04 27.02 +.17 0.52 57.88 -.46 14.70 -.13 1.73 -.01 34.33 +.12 0.36 40.67 -.48 0.25 4.79 -.15 0.24 63.97 -.03 2.15 +.02 14.38 +.03 8.19 -.01 0.06 5.24 +.01 8.32 -.10 25.90 -.13 0.04 8.17 -.27 7.75 -.07 14.74 +.01 25.81 -.17 1.82 -.02 0.60 37.49 +.05 102.54 -1.17 6.33 -.14 5.62 +.04 1.70 -.11 46.63 +.04 0.64 65.38 +.63 0.11 88.20 -.70 2.32 90.57 +.49 4.90 -.06 0.40 12.20 -.07 1.16 65.84 -.27 7.36 -.01 0.18 41.56 -1.59 37.38 -.16 6.05 +.28 60.27 -.55 0.86 10.24 -.07 0.66 57.83 0.34 37.30 5.98 -.08 0.12 16.55 38.72 -.16 1.26 52.50 +.33 1.80 77.41 +1.43 9.65 +.97 101.13 -.17 1.59 +.02 21.45 +.40 13.41 -.16 0.72 63.99 -.19 0.75 40.49 -1.81 0.20 75.83 +.60 83.61 -.64 4.04 3.44 74.86 -3.44 0.48 7.60 1.31 21.71 +.03 1.70 38.29 +.08 0.80 68.57 -.84 3.50 -.16 39.37 +1.50 0.80 63.20 -1.16 3.06 +.07 21.13 +.68 0.84 31.40 -.44 2.13 25.45 -.02 4.39 -.12 0.16 13.94 +.50 53.45 -.44 3.00 +.03 0.40 7.12 +.06 0.66 6.21 +.04 0.49 16.37 +.03 0.24 42.19 -.55 0.48 21.95 -.51 1.52 26.89 +.21 1.16 29.82 +.96 0.32 18.68 +.03 8.53 +.07 181.82 -.47 29.52 33.78 +.16 1.54 28.25 +.14 62.84 -.80 0.52 57.90 -.30 .79 +.02 11.39 -.32 1.35 32.66 +.36 5.60 28.70 +.65 9.55 +.03 0.44 15.64 -.22 1.84 35.17 +.25 0.10 12.39 -.14 0.72 45.88 -.22 0.65 34.77 -.22 33.54 -.32 29.47 1.56 13.01 +.29 50.18 -.18 0.88 28.36 +.19 0.72 61.42 -.42 0.40 39.64 -.01 0.24 42.34 -.47 54.83 -.11 6.40 +.04 0.06 52.45 -.28 23.27 +.05 11.26 -.16 0.36 79.38 +1.04 3.96 -.08 0.88 37.67 -.18 33.74 -.47 0.20 49.26 +.35 0.49 60.61 +.43 30.58 +.04 2.62 17.47 +.18 1.06 -.01 10.49 +.08 52.83 -.36 1.65 +.04 1.00 6.99 +.08 0.60 52.24 -.27 5.54 +.25 0.60 122.41 +.15 3.00 65.60 -.04 0.48 24.99 +.13 18.25 +.15 39.96 +.08 1.12 11.56 -.01 332.42 -3.71 0.32 14.78 -.10 9.90 +.08 5.05 +.09 0.62 21.94 +.09 7.12 +.17 .14 0.75 35.56 -.06 101.53 -.97 0.40 33.35 -.12 0.64 35.04 -.10 3.13 44.22 -.08 21.20 1.28 -.01 1.40 16.95 +.06 7.88 -.01 31.95 +.31 0.09 29.22 +.12 1.44 7.17 +.02 12.58 +.02 42.41 -.22 0.24 16.37 +.07 31.84 +.48 17.27 -.32 32.71 -.27 1.67 -.03 0.40 11.05 +.06 0.60 55.81 -.62 19.42 -.24 0.60 28.22 -.37 0.04 14.83 +.41 0.64 37.78 +.06 0.18 14.17 -.42 0.52 14.75 -.16 2.55 49.00 -.05 45.97 +.13 44.70 -.01 1.09 14.58 +.10 64.32 +1.04 0.28 25.49 +1.95 1.48 35.76 +1.41 13.09 +.08 1.36 33.19 +.18 42.62 +.16 6.89 +.10 3.01 -.04 1.14 +.06 32.36 -.64 1.34 +.06 42.70 +.07 1.72 69.55 +.15 1.44 52.04 -.02 278.85 -.91 22.44 +.61 0.32 31.07 -.73 9.74 +.10 3.57 119.45 +.45 3.83 -.01 1.00 41.14 +.02

Nm AvidTch AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods B2B Inet BB&T Cp BBVABFrn BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu BallCp s BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoMacro BcoSantSA BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BankMutl BkofAm BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h BankUtd n BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BiPNG Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BiostarPh BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkIT BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoxShips n BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker Brinks BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Buckeye BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BldrFstSrc BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBL Asc CBS B CDC Cp rs CDC Soft CEVA Inc CF Inds CGG Verit CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVR Ptrs n CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotMic CabotO&G CACI CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CambLrng CamdenPT Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapellaEd CapOne CaptlTr CapitlSrce CapFdF rs Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CardnlHlth Cardiom g CareFusion CareerEd CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet Cbeyond CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Celsion h Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenGrdA lf

D 21.39 +.06 18.29 +.10 33.07 -.16 0.92 28.21 +.21 2.24 0.92 35.67 -.46 0.84 18.72 +.60 1.21 +.01 0.64 26.46 -.39 0.68 11.50 -.13 1.97 37.10 +.23 36.06 -.54 0.56 8.88 -.09 1.82 100.42 +.17 1.82 82.84 +.47 49.03 +.13 50.67 -.04 0.42 45.54 +.14 4.55 -.02 1.50 47.21 +.60 0.18 19.93 +.51 31.03 +.56 147.01 +1.32 0.60 69.31 +1.00 0.28 36.44 +.19 2.13 +.03 37.00 -.42 1.36 62.02 +.04 0.56 12.18 -.23 0.82 20.22 -.14 0.89 39.63 -1.56 0.79 12.02 -.17 0.70 11.42 -.12 0.44 15.21 -.10 0.12 3.71 +.06 0.04 13.13 -.14 7.27 -.29 2.41 -.05 1.80 47.09 -.15 1.04 2.14 -.05 2.80 64.60 +.20 0.52 29.79 +.16 2.08 59.85 -.30 .91 +.02 0.56 29.21 +.30 0.04 2.42 +.04 2.89 +.44 51.54 +.29 28.66 +.35 57.06 +.31 8.62 +.26 0.35 19.91 -.13 28.19 -.24 55.81 -.08 0.72 101.24 +.68 9.03 -.20 0.32 20.60 +.06 0.48 53.42 +1.26 25.85 +1.09 1.24 53.77 -.37 2.40 59.16 -.02 21.60 -.42 4.39 -.12 0.10 6.42 +.03 0.76 83.01 +.01 1.64 81.81 -.06 54.94 +.42 8.07 -.17 0.96 31.88 +.04 16.85 +.25 0.28 31.72 -.12 80.74 -.02 0.30 49.79 +1.11 0.60 29.46 -.79 43.68 +.14 40.82 +.52 2.30 -.09 .64 -.04 82.19 +1.23 0.05 6.25 +.24 26.37 -.10 0.80 18.50 +.17 2.07 +.03 1.68 -.07 1.46 32.44 -.22 1.28 9.92 -.01 37.19 -.12 5.50 193.38 -1.30 0.32 4.02 -.04 0.32 6.74 +.03 1.36 10.23 -.07 0.40 18.36 +.08 0.60 17.60 -.01 26.69 -.22 2.08 32.12 -.23 1.68 72.30 +.17 0.40 8.83 +.18 71.38 -.89 0.04 6.86 +.04 2.00 95.77 +1.71 7.13 +.15 11.00 8.94 -.08 0.60 11.96 +.22 1.66 30.49 +1.09 1.65 21.10 +.16 16.87 +.38 0.44 22.27 -.11 33.80 +.39 10.52 -.09 1.56 +.01 0.56 24.69 +.70 0.40 32.62 +.71 1.32 27.61 +.28 0.36 38.15 +.03 0.60 22.87 +.04 43.96 +1.87 1.28 -.02 5.74 -.09 10.40 +.75 26.09 +.09 0.52 31.67 +.28 1.24 23.24 +.14 0.56 18.60 +.13 0.34 10.26 -.02 12.06 -.01 0.32 26.15 -.22 0.28 12.29 -.11 1.28 69.93 +.53 19.88 -.10 0.05 23.77 -.78 3.95 60.35 -1.06 0.20 25.26 -.10 0.80 44.47 +.86 0.10 91.20 -.05 0.49 38.96 +.14 58.02 +2.79 3.00 -.15 0.92 71.60 +.23 0.16 23.96 -.09 28.26 +.45 0.84 17.48 +.36 0.20 24.25 -.20 2.96 +.57 4.90 +.13 29.79 +1.12 0.40 133.69 -.40 33.30 -.95 21.68 +.62 1.16 75.39 +1.02 0.04 44.33 +.08 40.70 +1.10 1.00 34.58 +.31 5.60 305.53 +.90 0.84 19.04 +.08 44.98 -.30 7.49 +.04 0.26 13.71 -.03 1.04 76.11 0.61 22.80 +.10 0.34 9.20 +.02 22.48 +.15 17.00 -.36 0.50 35.61 -.01 25.21 +.02 0.50 33.65 -.07 0.72 44.76 -.04 48.56 +.05 0.12 52.56 +.68 60.20 8.36 -.21 9.74 -.09 7.42 +.11 0.63 9.61 +.01 16.49 +.25 0.04 6.66 +.05 6.64 -.02 16.16 +.08 2.02 +.15 3.27 -.05 1.96 57.57 +.42 0.40 28.04 -.10 19.91 +.39 53.37 -.20 1.16 33.79 +.10 1.30 72.53 -.43 0.36 44.35 -.92 1.08 62.53 -.16 10.20 -.20 .51 -.00 43.96 +.78 49.40 +.35 0.20 50.25 -1.28 3.39 -.07 0.04 6.89 -.01 0.30 11.20 +.06 0.26 5.43 +.18 1.52 13.02 +.26 1.82 0.78 40.65 -.43 4.37 -.02 29.18 +.84 21.93 -.43 32.26 -.04 1.00 37.47 -.16 0.72 41.05 +.27 35.74 +.19 29.53 -.10 56.09 +.26 1.76 107.58 -.05 0.04 16.82 -.04 42.74 -.36 12.10 +.11 .69 -.01 0.20 44.53 -.02 8.07 -.01 10.56 -.14 56.34 +.41 .37 -.01 3.77 31.26 -.30 4.09 -.04 2.23 -.15 0.43 8.76 +.05 1.19 19.88 +.08 0.80 37.57 -.20 0.79 17.64 +.32 1.56 15.48 +.09 10.39 +.04 21.23 -.09 0.01 22.96 +.58 9.22 -.04

Nm CentAl CntryLink Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds CharterCm ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake Chemtura n CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAuto lf ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChinaDigtl ChinaDEd ChinaEd ChiFnOnl ChinaFire ChiGengM ChinGerui ChinaGreen ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChiMarFd ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaUni ChiValve ChXDPlas ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinedigm Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitiTdecs CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy Clearwire h ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CogdSpen CogentC CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColonyFncl ColBnkg ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompDivHd CmGnom n CompPrdS CompCrd h CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Cosi Inc CostPlus Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurJpn CurtisWrt CyberDef Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE DUSA Daktronics DanaHldg Danaher s DanversBc Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaCon n DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards Diodes

D 18.04 -.19 2.90 40.00 -.22 75.54 -.31 29.78 +1.03 111.61 +.22 2.80 +.11 41.97 +.51 4.43 +.06 47.65 -2.07 55.28 +.41 53.56 +1.58 20.27 +.02 29.03 +.28 17.23 +.32 7.85 +.05 1.70 18.52 +.25 0.30 32.65 +.25 2.88 104.88 +1.07 0.05 39.75 +.02 0.20 14.86 -.11 52.78 -.10 0.66 3.93 +.04 9.70 -.26 1.62 -.04 7.46 -.29 5.72 +.28 2.00 6.93 -.20 3.44 -.03 1.48 +.21 4.98 +.43 6.59 +.69 3.10 -.06 5.13 +.20 6.42 -.25 2.34 -.05 2.12 +.20 0.91 57.25 -.06 3.50 -.13 1.93 46.95 -.09 5.73 +.01 9.00 -.56 4.30 +1.05 3.16 102.92 -1.21 4.36 +.34 6.45 +.21 0.23 18.96 +.14 4.08 +.16 4.19 -.07 16.00 -.18 282.91 +1.60 14.89 +.10 1.56 61.69 -.18 31.40 +.40 6.19 -.56 26.70 +.16 0.40 107.79 +.48 2.78 +.14 1.60 32.03 -.25 2.00 +.14 0.84 19.07 -.76 0.49 30.15 +.29 18.10 +.10 0.24 17.17 -.08 2.13 26.27 -.05 4.43 -.07 7.50 126.94 -1.74 .89 +.01 74.07 -.74 0.80 57.95 +.60 2.38 +.05 16.45 -.11 5.95 7.65 -.29 0.56 95.43 +.16 2.20 69.64 +.22 20.64 -.45 0.60 54.42 +.45 14.01 -.51 1.88 68.31 +1.03 0.48 27.95 +.11 31.08 -2.68 0.40 5.88 13.06 -.40 80.78 +.53 7.80 -.05 0.72 9.83 +.18 48.39 -.73 2.52 -.01 2.32 81.84 +.23 21.53 +.20 0.60 19.22 +.40 1.28 18.25 -.16 0.12 18.15 -.23 3.46 -.05 0.45 24.25 +.05 0.45 22.90 +.09 0.40 38.02 -.37 0.92 40.68 +.19 0.48 16.11 -.09 2.00 26.54 +.39 32.62 -.21 38.55 -.19 0.41 42.40 +.57 1.44 14.97 +.28 11.70 +.43 29.08 +.94 4.88 +.04 0.80 49.63 +.72 11.17 -.02 28.78 -.08 1.00 28.62 +.03 0.40 37.95 +.50 0.92 24.16 +.56 100.09 +1.19 54.78 -.29 2.64 78.28 +.62 0.40 50.28 -.17 2.40 50.09 -.01 34.29 -.50 21.84 +.22 0.96 33.12 +.09 65.52 -1.11 14.07 +.04 .26 +.03 0.06 73.62 +1.00 1.16 66.46 -.13 0.42 24.69 -.12 2.30 35.73 +.49 44.47 -.11 0.38 27.97 +.03 1.00 93.81 -1.16 17.80 -.02 4.27 -.03 0.56 51.41 -.14 0.20 19.62 +.28 1.65 34.92 +.37 23.86 +.07 12.07 +.42 1.32 +.02 10.72 -.09 0.82 76.34 -.07 8.60 -.12 0.18 8.22 +.06 60.77 -.09 0.30 16.60 -.08 31.79 +.02 0.80 52.80 +.41 4.27 -.04 0.88 48.80 +.65 1.95 95.00 -1.98 33.26 -.58 1.40 44.24 -.42 0.32 3.09 -.03 40.82 -.34 0.74 11.06 +.03 18.64 +.05 1.08 +.02 42.73 -.13 38.84 +.37 .14 +.00 45.17 +.30 .60 -.01 30.36 +.39 1.80 59.85 +.26 1.05 105.32 -.57 3.87 +.07 0.01 144.39 +.50 118.31 +.45 0.32 32.73 -.35 1.90 +.07 1.23 -.04 50.48 +.40 18.22 +.12 2.40 12.08 +.13 .81 +.00 1.50 -.02 7.71 -.17 0.28 5.44 +.09 0.40 4.55 +.01 0.78 9.56 -.06 1.33 27.54 +.32 0.15 11.41 -.07 42.72 -.26 2.24 48.37 -.11 5.76 +.03 0.10 10.20 +.02 16.98 -.26 0.08 51.92 -.24 0.16 21.52 -.11 1.28 47.38 +.84 15.38 +.23 86.95 +.25 0.24 52.75 +.30 9.88 -.02 91.74 -1.07 0.20 7.91 +.27 1.40 94.25 +.67 .41 -.01 8.59 -.04 14.95 -.47 9.35 -.23 .88 1.00 26.74 -.21 20.17 -1.36 22.35 -.04 41.57 +2.79 2.36 +.04 4.01 0.20 35.94 -.01 8.44 +.28 0.93 60.57 -.81 14.20 -.19 45.45 +1.14 7.28 -.20 0.16 13.44 +.18 0.68 87.77 +.05 15.96 -.29 2.46 78.27 +.45 0.18 60.50 +.30 0.50 75.69 -.27 0.32 10.66 +.18 13.00 -.10 11.63 +.02 15.94 +.44 40.62 -.11 1.12 34.90 -.01 2.72 58.00 +1.22 35.63 -.44 28.40 +.07 0.16 43.71 +.76 32.31 -.94

Nm

D

DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DolbyLab DoleFood DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DotHillSy DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynatronic Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

1.35

0.84

0.01

0.39 0.16 0.05 0.24

0.40

1.97 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 1.00 1.00 0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.44

1.08

Nm 46.60 +.10 45.26 -.37 36.89 -.53 41.55 +.85 36.40 -.03 42.14 +.31 21.88 +.17 14.36 -.69 14.86 -.18 53.54 +.11 17.33 -.07 29.14 -.57 43.94 +.01 65.56 +2.73 83.36 +1.20 81.71 +.21 79.40 +1.71 23.95 -.28 40.11 -.16 35.63 -.20 23.43 +.17 41.02 -.68 46.10 -3.77 13.30 -.10 20.55 +.03 31.45 -.28 68.61 +.15 56.39 -.10 44.03 +.48 18.14 +.11 88.72 +1.45 19.23 -.02 2.84 -.02 18.99 +.21 64.35 -.10 36.93 +.23 38.66 +.11 26.64 -.81 51.32 +.30 4.66 -.01 73.53 +.17 3.76 -.02 4.71 -.05 54.11 +.29 23.40 +.45 18.21 +.13 14.08 +.24 81.21 +.04 3.85 +.34 3.09 -.06 1.69 +.02 15.11 +.28 1.74 +.14 2.57 +.03 5.73 +.03 9.78 +.09

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House ETrade rs eBay ECAMTrI n EDAP TMS eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENGlobal ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETF Pall EV Engy EXFO g EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton s EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc Ecolab eDiets.cm h EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EFII ElsterGp n Embraer Emcore lf EMS EmersonEl EmpirRst h EmployH EmpIca Emulex EnCana g EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endocyte n Endologix EndurSpec Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EverestRe EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl Express n ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtorreG g ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tch s FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst Feihe Intl FelCor Ferro FiberTwr FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FstNiagara FstPotom FstSolar FT WindEn FT RNG FT MCCore FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek FlowInt FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG s FreshMkt n FrontierCm FrontierOil

19.50 -.20 0.25 12.72 -.06 15.67 -.02 30.85 +.18 1.19 28.80 -.13 4.06 +.30 12.72 +.08 26.63 -.06 29.69 +.01 3.59 -.50 2.67 49.99 +.16 0.64 110.72 +.11 0.88 46.84 -.02 76.90 +.70 3.04 54.04 +.22 8.59 +.05 3.56 -.11 0.40 28.46 -.54 0.60 11.68 +.13 0.20 7.95 -.11 0.04 22.39 +.28 1.88 97.02 +.77 3.24 -.08 1.36 52.37 +.07 0.72 32.66 +.06 1.25 16.00 +.05 1.28 12.74 +.06 1.16 10.95 1.14 10.53 -.01 1.21 12.14 +.01 22.52 +.18 0.70 50.46 .43 +.00 1.28 38.20 +.03 0.20 8.14 +.14 83.90 -.56 2.84 -.04 0.04 18.26 +.96 1.76 36.21 -.31 7.71 +.35 0.10 17.88 +.22 19.95 +.06 16.66 -.17 15.42 +.12 0.64 32.33 -.21 2.17 -.08 63.71 1.38 57.41 +.17 .81 +.14 0.24 19.28 +.03 9.34 -.03 9.97 -.03 0.80 33.05 +.09 11.79 +.62 39.38 -.64 9.05 -.37 7.44 +.63 1.20 46.40 -1.21 2.78 -.03 17.23 0.54 60.40 +.14 70.11 +.21 2.08 -.08 3.58 52.59 -.05 33.85 +.36 5.35 -.08 2.16 30.66 -.01 0.61 20.78 -.01 36.04 -.28 1.40 56.46 -.13 7.79 -.01 3.32 65.76 +.23 2.36 42.54 +.04 2.80 45.59 +.58 7.85 +.40 11.02 +.03 12.60 +.07 0.64 37.31 +.04 92.00 +.41 0.88 18.60 +.21 1.47 56.22 +.38 0.35 12.44 -.06 4.16 123.88 +.39 0.75 94.95 -1.03 41.87 +1.53 1.92 91.21 -.48 1.87 +.23 7.26 -.07 4.26 +.02 0.16 20.78 11.80 +.26 2.10 40.20 +.30 5.40 +.10 9.83 -.05 0.28 23.65 -.34 0.40 50.34 -.17 20.65 +.05 55.10 -.56 22.17 +.27 7.23 +.07 0.56 20.15 +.64 2.99 +.01 1.76 83.44 +.28 28.47 +.11 96.17 -.53 31.32 +.39 0.24 33.13 -.22 0.60 84.60 +.75 46.15 +.15 0.48 10.43 +.08 3.95 -.15 38.45 -.15 8.15 +.01 18.31 -.87 0.72 51.39 1.04 65.03 +.36 0.48 92.94 -.49 2.68 82.67 +1.57 0.24 6.35 +.08 0.96 26.15 -.02 7.96 +.66 6.00 -.01 15.38 -.07 1.44 -.08 15.25 -.11 0.48 14.75 -.02 0.20 33.14 -.07 1.28 13.09 -.09 0.24 13.65 +.05 24.68 -.16 0.20 20.26 +.04 0.24 15.50 +.06 0.12 6.29 -.03 0.04 10.90 -.12 12.30 +.24 24.02 +.97 0.64 14.02 +.10 0.80 15.63 +.08 140.90 -3.83 0.09 11.88 +.01 0.05 22.38 +.13 0.15 35.30 -.06 2.20 38.11 +.39 0.64 16.87 -.07 62.48 +.02 1.32 -.02 7.02 +.02 8.71 -.06 3.90 -.18 0.80 29.07 +.70 1.28 127.58 -.10 0.50 66.82 -.69 33.60 +1.51 0.64 61.37 +.10 0.66 20.47 -.02 4.53 +.01 14.81 -.17 6.24 -.15 18.02 +.30 33.75 -.14 34.71 -.34 9.59 +.28 40.16 -.13 5.72 -.01 0.76 63.22 +.08 93.64 -1.03 34.28 +.05 1.77 22.72 +.11 1.00 122.56 -1.26 1.00 51.93 -.38 39.00 +.75 0.75 8.06 -.02 0.24 29.43 -.33

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl FurnBrds FushiCopp FuweiFlm GATX GMAC CpT GMX Rs GNC n GSI Cmce h GT Solar GTx Inc GabDvInc GabelliET GabGldNR GabGM rt Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel Gensco GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth GeoGrp Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GlbShipLs GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GolarLNG n GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HackettGp HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg Healthwys HrtlndEx Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HiTchPhm Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HilltopH HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic

D 1.85 22.54 -.60 28.26 +.52 1.84 0.30 21.07 +.23 0.16 11.00 +.03 4.47 -.09 7.74 -.08 3.60 -.96 1.16 39.32 +.21 25.95 -.12 5.63 18.97 +1.04 29.27 +.11 9.62 -.40 3.80 +.12 0.84 16.28 -.06 0.52 6.10 -.04 1.68 18.74 -.01 .21 -.02 0.14 12.98 -.31 1.32 30.06 +.04 25.41 +.05 10.60 +.28 0.16 14.47 -.35 0.45 22.23 -.30 0.20 76.29 -.53 1.50 33.76 +.20 41.10 +.38 .42 -.01 32.88 -.18 68.82 +.71 9.93 -.18 6.62 -.04 44.12 +.01 1.88 71.46 -.35 0.56 20.00 +.06 0.40 15.45 +.45 2.28 1.12 37.05 +.46 5.25 -.04 30.58 -.28 2.38 47.41 -.47 2.15 +.02 39.36 -.11 3.68 -.05 0.18 15.60 -.09 0.48 27.01 -.18 26.80 -.20 1.80 54.01 +.36 .36 -.00 12.26 -.29 25.98 -.09 27.49 -.13 37.42 -.20 0.25 12.04 +.07 4.99 +.09 0.18 8.40 +.54 1.36 +.02 0.30 35.39 +.25 41.85 +.50 0.52 14.33 -.06 2.04 40.75 +.25 0.40 9.00 +.24 3.09 +.06 25.76 +.76 9.37 +.17 0.08 51.86 -.57 6.47 -.06 0.40 14.79 +.28 0.25 28.84 -.07 1.13 -.03 0.15 21.50 -.28 4.10 +.23 13.39 +.08 0.75 26.47 -.32 24.50 -.13 0.19 17.97 +.20 0.27 27.55 +1.05 0.41 53.96 +1.23 3.03 1.40 155.79 -4.38 1.16 84.36 +.08 20.40 -.02 14.84 -.17 578.51 +2.23 37.70 +.18 0.84 43.27 -.12 20.20 +.14 22.62 +.40 2.16 142.24 +.59 3.94 +.08 7.21 +.06 13.69 +.18 0.52 26.17 +.34 4.91 -.14 2.61 +.04 4.16 +.16 0.83 20.01 65.67 -1.13 24.67 +.17 1.80 59.67 +.42 0.44 40.58 -.56 .68 +.02 13.28 -.19 22.73 -.10 0.80 38.21 -.48 0.03 8.37 -.09 4.61 -.19 32.66 -.52 32.14 +.08 0.58 32.02 -.08 1.92 37.50 +.73 1.80 53.56 -.18 4.21 +.01 32.34 +1.84 0.36 46.14 +.63 6.45 -.10 0.96 32.60 +.24 27.64 -.22 1.29 2.91 +.03 62.60 +.52 6.77 -.23 19.71 +1.11 0.40 40.47 +.32 0.10 45.01 -.35 8.99 +.02 0.07 14.90 +.07 1.00 50.03 +.29 16.88 0.82 34.48 -.06 0.40 26.39 -.13 14.48 +.22 1.20 44.40 -1.39 4.20 27.81 +.44 1.24 24.42 +.06 5.49 -.08 5.60 +.20 2.76 52.17 +.44 0.63 17.51 -.02 10.24 -.10 1.20 22.82 +.35 31.46 +.02 24.40 -.01 37.91 +.34 14.25 -.26 0.08 17.79 +.42 6.35 .83 +.06 9.53 +.34 1.80 50.21 +.67 16.11 +.22 0.24 66.29 +.81 .47 69.75 -.28 1.00 84.62 -.68 5.59 -.01 0.20 5.67 +.04 1.38 56.75 +.23 16.48 -.09 0.40 79.65 -.02 0.32 40.36 -.77 18.78 -.01 13.36 -.41 25.72 +2.22 36.42 +.22 14.64 +.33 1.70 34.37 +.75 0.41 40.28 +.72 9.60 -.03 0.60 61.07 -.40 12.74 -.36 21.88 +.09 1.00 37.84 +.17 41.88 -.12 2.48 59.41 +.52 35.26 +.21 1.33 57.50 +.19 1.87 -.01 0.51 28.38 -.02 28.62 +.33 15.48 -.30 55.72 -.86 1.80 23.20 +.15 0.08 16.79 +.03 0.28 6.35 -.09

Nm HovnanE HHughes n HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn Hypercom Hyperdyn

D

1.52 0.60 0.52 0.04 0.40

3.28 -.01 63.49 +.45 38.23 +1.00 67.99 +.02 9.69 -.01 29.20 -.24 71.19 +.48 47.53 +2.93 6.50 -.04 38.77 +.77 19.32 +.65 11.83 -.30 4.31 +.20

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk ICO Glb A iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon IRSA iRobot iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iShEMU iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSTaiwn iSh UK iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iSSPGth iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iShPolnd n iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iSRus3K iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShSPSm iShDJMd iShDJHlt iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOE iShDJOG iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed Iberiabnk iBio IconixBr Idacorp IdenixPh Identive IDEX iGo Inc ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Incyte IndiaGC Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InlandRE InovioPhm InspPhar IntgDv IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk interClick IntcntlEx InterDig Intermec InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterOil g Interpublic Intersil IntervalLs IntervestB IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InvVKDyCr InVKSrInc InvTech InvBncp InvRlEst IridiumCm IronMtn IronwdPh Isis IsleCapri IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JA Solar JDASoft JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMCh wt JPMAlerian JPMCh pfB Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden

30.53 +.05 0.08 21.92 +.42 0.53 50.00 -.25 2.72 -.02 0.15 17.19 -.41 0.54 8.08 +.03 1.20 10.98 -.03 12.80 -.37 0.31 6.25 +.12 12.40 +.12 55.06 -.04 0.52 13.29 -.14 34.80 -.86 14.41 +.18 38.03 +.10 0.82 27.36 +.06 2.53 76.50 +.23 0.50 33.19 +.02 0.95 39.65 +.07 0.29 26.83 +.10 0.45 19.48 +.15 0.14 10.04 +.07 0.44 65.53 +.74 0.34 14.70 -.03 0.54 63.14 -.29 0.43 14.07 +.12 1.56 49.78 +.32 1.82 72.03 -.31 0.29 15.20 +.05 0.43 18.35 +.05 0.54 73.80 +.82 1.28 68.98 +.14 41.07 +1.50 1.09 58.88 1.75 51.85 +.22 2.92 109.55 -.14 0.63 45.55 +.07 1.05 95.02 +.31 2.46 131.99 +.11 3.88 105.07 -.10 0.64 49.07 +.15 5.18 108.33 -.27 0.81 48.62 +.06 1.20 68.21 +.08 0.64 45.18 +.28 1.18 53.01 +.19 1.27 62.76 -.01 3.91 91.43 -.07 3.25 92.73 -.31 0.81 83.80 -.08 1.42 61.04 +.27 0.91 47.48 +.04 0.59 60.59 1.59 107.98 +.05 1.00 97.24 -.05 7.61 91.72 -.37 0.51 103.71 +.82 1.90 69.88 +1.01 1.25 67.99 +.02 0.36 38.51 +.34 0.60 108.97 -.03 0.76 60.07 1.18 73.27 +.04 1.24 73.59 +.39 2.85 104.35 -.06 0.53 94.15 +.49 0.89 82.63 +.38 2.94 39.37 -.01 1.25 78.60 +.02 0.72 23.96 +.07 1.98 58.99 +.79 0.07 13.10 -.02 0.61 58.47 -.33 0.74 72.21 +.44 0.04 66.01 +.42 0.10 61.49 +.10 0.93 79.57 +.22 0.92 39.60 -.48 0.24 63.95 +.53 0.29 70.34 +.22 9.08 +.24 1.00 57.79 +.02 68.06 +.30 1.36 58.52 -.66 3.15 +.23 21.19 -.03 1.20 38.39 +.24 4.19 +.37 3.45 -.18 0.68 43.64 +.40 2.45 -.11 1.36 53.19 -.12 67.28 -.68 31.20 +.21 21.07 +.10 12.29 +.18 3.85 +.07 27.23 +.08 0.44 51.89 -.17 17.55 +.04 .56 -.02 8.01 +.12 53.07 -.27 0.90 73.01 +.02 0.48 46.72 -.61 20.06 -.58 3.96 -.16 0.57 9.32 +.24 1.07 -.02 4.97 7.13 -.08 2.72 49.62 +.14 0.72 19.58 -.20 1.79 15.90 -.02 6.75 -.25 120.64 -.55 0.40 46.08 +.76 11.34 +.19 51.08 +4.13 6.90 +.17 2.60 164.97 +1.02 11.04 +.43 1.08 61.87 -.18 0.24 15.57 -.21 1.05 29.25 +.42 32.00 -.39 10.23 +.34 65.07 -.86 0.24 11.96 -.06 0.48 13.68 -.08 15.15 -.38 2.96 +.14 28.30 +.04 33.10 -.43 54.28 +1.14 363.32 +.89 0.44 24.58 -.01 3.71 21.13 +.22 0.87 12.88 +.04 0.29 5.15 +.03 16.77 -.13 14.30 -.04 0.69 9.37 +.14 7.94 -.07 0.75 34.61 +1.65 15.51 +.60 8.83 +.13 9.30 +.26 9.96 -.42 0.67 23.52 -.16 54.63 -.12 2.75 +.08 1.48 26.38 -.30 15.62 +.59 6.43 -.13 28.76 -.58 18.63 -.05 1.00 44.97 -1.28 16.01 -.69 1.78 37.83 +.04 1.80 25.88 -.01 0.28 18.95 -.32 0.42 33.18 -.10 20.87 -.27 .53 -.03 48.13 +.16 5.15 -.04 2.16 +.03 22.03 -.16 0.04 12.07 -.22 0.35 35.53 +.63

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2.80 85.20 -.74 13.47 -.13 8.93 -.30 0.85 6.24 -.05 1.00 26.58 -.01 0.65 22.82 -.03 11.80 -.12 8.29 -.15 0.94 7.82 +.13 0.55 6.10 +.03 8.52 -.15 13.94 +.24 9.81 +.21 0.60 29.53 -.01 3.19 -.04 34.95 -.78 24.76 +.41 2.00 49.14 +1.01 1.80 33.62 +.79 0.20 24.44 -.24 2.20 +.15 47.63 -.04 6.22 +.04 6.63 +.11 1.00 45.42 -.34 8.05 +.06 3.77 +.44 32.50 +2.76 25.73 +.14 0.24 2.38 +.05 0.08 21.34 +.45 3.60 -.04 0.74 62.97 +1.32 0.52 17.39 +.38 1.00 51.17 +.84 .55 -.03 0.40 61.64 +.78 28.19 +.44 0.18 40.63 -.31 2.93 41.00 +1.16 0.33 55.03 +.30 3.58 57.97 +.30 0.34 24.13 +.24 0.19 49.07 +.02 0.35 34.06 -.13 0.84 29.34 -.08 0.04 7.97 3.85 +.16 1.60 88.72 +.01 15.66 +.01 0.30 13.43 0.75 33.94 -.34 0.24 63.00 -.25 19.78 -.02 0.60 268.87 -.89

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D 0.92 25.74 +.31 0.84 24.64 -.23 3.33 -.05 1.12 47.74 +.17 23.89 +.07 2.44 77.07 +.18 1.00 38.63 -.53 0.72 78.77 +.67 17.36 +.16 1.04 60.25 +.64 0.16 10.25 1.00 31.18 +.20 28.27 -.68 9.99 -.25 55.53 +.46 0.80 11.69 +.24 15.72 -.22 0.32 34.75 +.07 16.82 +.08 20.97 +.41 67.19 -.43 0.90 40.72 +.63 8.69 +.02 0.48 27.02 -.23 14.21 +.01 0.32 85.23 -.11 13.72 +.01 1.52 33.86 +.39 1.02 34.04 -.87 5.03 +.02 21.81 +.47 24.52 +.01 15.70 -.38 16.31 +.61 5.64 -.08 1.07 -.01 0.74 44.13 -.04 16.60 -.15 3.96 +.02 0.14 12.70 +.02 1.38 37.53 +.09 6.00 +.07 10.65 +.03 50.88 -.56 21.21 +.21 0.64 25.42 -.21 1.24 -.01 2.06 +.08 6.07 -.04 0.09 24.62 -.30 6.00 97.70 -.15 2.70 +.25 0.30 26.67 +.28 8.05 -.03 15.52 +.04 4.74 +.06 3.21 +.04 20.61 +.03 15.98 -.46 59.50 -.41 0.70 24.47 -.13 40.90 +.62 1.12 47.27 +.55 73.37 +3.28 15.69 -.24 14.27 +.04 0.32 31.78 -.11 1.12 67.64 -.51 16.70 -.10 0.40 17.82 +.13 0.46 35.47 -.10 0.20 26.79 8.23 -.04 0.20 75.49 -1.30 43.95 -.23 23.22 +.11 13.16 -.07 2.15 +.08 0.07 4.05 -.01 1.10 73.67 +.27 23.17 -.32 20.10 +.18 18.69 -.09 32.42 -.04 1.80 18.42 -.01 0.25 11.99 +.09 38.73 -.46 9.10 -.14 21.34 +.03 0.48 14.78 +.10 32.20 +.66 1.20 38.90 +.64 30.61 +.85 0.14 26.60 -.19 27.81 +.05 0.29 1.70 -.10 15.51 +.56 1.38 70.94 -.51 7.04 48.98 +.21 0.40 31.39 -.23 0.44 76.00 +.93 0.04 7.77 +.07 1.52 25.43 +.23 0.40 24.11 +.05 1.92 42.81 +.47 2.16 33.96 -.22 16.80 -.02 0.24 5.29 -.08 1.72 20.25 -.09 65.81 +.15 9.61 +.09 1.99 +.03 4.00 -.02 8.67 -.03 39.81 -.02 48.42 -.16 53.32 +.43 236.73 -2.02 2.47 +.04 25.49 -.12 1.71 -.01 2.05 +.04 .56 -.00 7.77 +.08 26.10 +.03 6.54 +.12 .04 10.83 -.03 115.23 +1.44 1.00 16.96 -.15 8.80 -.36 0.28 14.67 -.11 5.69 +.07 0.20 19.05 +.12 70.18 -.52 0.60 57.53 +1.21 6.89 0.15 16.98 -.22 0.15 18.14 -.16 0.20 23.36 -.27 2.20 55.16 +.19 0.92 18.92 +.17 1.24 80.08 +.67 19.98 -.11 22.60 +.11 0.98 42.73 -.62 0.72 92.75 +.24 0.55 8.68 -.06 4.99 -.01 14.74 -.37 1.70 23.37 -.04 0.42 55.39 -.01 0.92 46.07 +.12 1.60 66.98 -.85 6.18 +.04 1.10 33.77 -.11 14.55 -.01 23.72 -.67 1.12 51.63 -.01 2.87 +.11 1.88 61.29 -.24 0.40 4.92 +.02 0.40 12.30 +.10 13.22 +.36 2.53 55.71 +.44 5.15 +.14 2.44 +.05 6.05 +.03 33.87 -.04 1.82 127.31 -.96 1.70 43.96 -.18 0.54 29.85 -.14 26.87 +.26 19.38 -.03 1.45 44.97 +.12 0.70 14.19 -.11 0.47 9.01 +.04 0.72 8.54 +.04 0.76 8.94 +.04 0.62 8.22 +.15 18.51 +.75 9.91 +.02 1.50 50.91 +.39 55.84 +.46 29.81 -.27 1.84 97.55 +.66

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Oceaneer 85.66 -.36 OceanFr rs .58 -.01 Och-Ziff 1.01 16.04 -.02 Oclaro rs 10.70 -.09 OdysMar 3.36 +.25 OfficeDpt 4.15 -.08 OfficeMax 12.44 -.25 OilSvHT 2.42 155.97 +.96 OilStates 76.13 +2.26 Oilsands g .42 -.02 OldDomF s 34.79 +.42 OldNBcp 0.28 10.54 +.08 OldRepub 0.70 12.82 -.05 Olin 0.80 24.33 +.25 OmegaHlt 1.52 23.75 +.46 OmegaNav .75 -.14 Omncre 0.13 30.42 -.18 Omnicom 1.00 48.02 -.01 OmniVisn h 31.03 -.81 Omnova 7.98 -.02 OnSmcnd 9.48 -.15 OnTrack 2.69 +.39 ONEOK 2.08 64.45 +.01 Onstrm rsh 1.38 +.17 OnyxPh 33.66 +.04 OpenTable 104.74 -2.24 OpnwvSy 2.04 -.03 OpkoHlth 3.70 +.05 OplinkC 18.44 +.27 Opnext 2.32 -.08 OptimerPh 12.55 -.12 optXprs 4.50 18.37 +.13 Oracle 0.24 33.80 +.10 OrbitalSci 17.98 -.23 Orexigen 2.93 +.06 OrientEH 11.42 +.09 OrientPap 3.92 +.32 OrionMar 9.93 -.12 Orthovta 2.14 -.01 OshkoshCp 32.86 +.18 OvShip 1.75 28.28 +.24 OwensMin 0.80 32.81 +.06 OwensCorn 37.05 +.19 OwensIll 29.91 +.46 OxfordInds 0.52 33.48 +2.20 Oxigne rsh 1.63 +.04 PDL Bio 0.60 6.19 +.07 PF Chng 0.92 45.16 +.54 PG&E Cp 1.82 44.06 +.20 PHH Corp 20.70 -.23 PLX Tch 3.58 +.01 PMC Sra 7.19 -.03 PMI Grp 2.18 -.07 PNC 1.40 61.87 -.32 PNM Res 0.50 14.63 +.06 POSCO 0.53 111.94 +.95 PPG 2.20 92.49 +.22 PPL Corp 1.40 26.75 -.04 PSS Wrld 27.42 -.26 Paccar 0.48 50.00 -.13 PacerIntl 5.13 +.30 PacEth h .51 +.02 PacSunwr 3.64 +.03 PackAmer 0.80 27.85 -.10 PaetecHld 3.67 +.03 PainTher 2.00 8.93 -.31 PallCorp 0.70 57.05 +.02 PanASlv 0.10 37.35 -3.74 Panasonic 0.11 12.19 +.13 PaneraBrd 123.42 +.04 ParPharm 33.53 -.01 ParagShip 0.20 2.90 ParamTc h 23.43 +.21 ParaG&S 3.36 -.03 Parexel 25.52 -.56 ParkDrl 6.99 +.44 ParkerHan 1.28 93.91 +.33 PartnerRe 2.20 79.64 -1.01 PatriotCoal 24.53 +.47 Patterson 0.48 33.28 +.10 PattUTI 0.20 29.09 +1.05 Paychex 1.24 32.40 +.05 PeabdyE 0.34 65.76 +.58 Pearson 0.62 18.13 +.28 Pebblebrk 0.48 20.83 +.25 Pengrth g 0.84 13.64 +.02 PnnNGm 36.98 -.12 PennVa 0.23 14.89 +.12 PennVaRs 1.88 26.90 -.23 PennWst g 1.08 25.84 -.25 PennantPk 1.08 11.62 +.10 PenPkFR n 13.35 +.19 Penney 0.80 37.15 -.20 PenRE 0.60 14.06 +.27 Penske 19.52 +.16 Pentair 0.80 37.70 -.27 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.81 -.05 PepBoy 0.12 13.26 -.06 PepcoHold 1.08 18.35 +.11 PepsiCo 1.92 66.70 +.25 PeregrineP 2.54 +.04 PerfectWld 24.53 +.39 PerkElm 0.28 26.24 -.26 Prmian 1.38 21.60 +.32 Perrigo 0.28 88.19 +.69 PetChina 4.86 151.36 +.69 Petrohawk 25.14 +.20 PetrbrsA 1.41 33.17 -.13 Petrobras 1.41 36.94 -.26 PetroDev 41.95 -.57 PtroqstE 8.44 +.16 PetsMart 0.50 41.61 -.09 Pfizer 0.80 20.49 +.03 PFSweb 5.99 +.48 PhrmAth 3.26 +.09 PharmPdt 0.60 30.75 -.07 Pharmacyc 6.49 +.20 Pharmasset 98.57 +.06 Pharmerica 11.95 +.06 PhilipMor 2.56 66.19 +.08 PhilipsEl 1.02 30.98 -.06 PhlVH 0.15 66.61 +.48 PhnxCos 2.49 PhotrIn 8.53 -.05 PiedNG 1.16 29.52 +.20 PiedmOfc 1.26 19.65 +.36 Pier 1 11.80 +.43 PilgrimsP 7.10 -.05 PimCpOp 1.38 19.33 +.22 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.87 +.03 PinnclEnt 12.96 +.01 PinWst 2.10 42.53 +.45 PionDrill 14.38 +.51 PioNtrl 0.08 98.24 +.84 PitnyBw 1.48 25.13 +.18 PlainsAA 3.88 63.82 -.01 PlainsEx 34.16 -.09 Plantron 0.20 34.84 -.14 PlatGpMet 2.17 -.03 PlatUnd 0.32 37.26 -.15 PlugPwr h .62 +.01 PlumCrk 1.68 42.50 +.50 Polaris 1.80 91.10 +.05 Polo RL 0.80 128.00 -.39 Polycom 49.01 +.55 PolyMet g 2.02 +.03 PolyOne 0.16 13.24 +.22 Polypore 55.33 -.79 Poniard h .35 -.02 Pool Corp 0.52 25.50 +.24 Popular 3.11 +.01 PortGE 1.04 23.85 +.38 PostPrp 0.80 38.15 +.26 Potash s 0.28 56.19 -.49 Power-One 7.50 +.02 PSCrudeDS 41.35 -1.06 PwshDB 31.01 +.08 PS Agri 33.99 +.07 PS Oil 32.82 +.39 PS BasMet 24.74 +.05 PS USDBull 21.42 -.08 PwSClnEn 10.12 +.07 PwShHiYD 0.33 8.81 +.04 PwShLeis 0.15 18.62 +.02 PS OilSv 0.08 24.93 +.23 PSFinPf 1.27 18.16 -.02 PwShPfd 0.97 14.33 +.01 PShEMSov 1.55 26.55 PSIndia 0.24 24.30 +.17 PwShs QQQ 0.39 56.75 -.10 Powrwav 4.24 -.01 PranaBio 2.41 -.04 Praxair 2.00 101.85 +.47 PrecCastpt 0.12 142.24 -1.44 PrecDrill 14.24 +.04 PrfdBkLA 1.50 +.01 PriceTR 1.24 66.56 -.52 priceline 512.65 -2.16 PrideIntl 42.28 -.14 Primerica 0.04 23.42 +.01 PrinctnR h .35 -.02 PrinFncl 0.55 30.93 -.32 PrivateB 0.04 14.10 -.09 ProShtDow 41.20 -.11 ProShtQQQ 32.93 +.08 ProShtS&P 41.48 -.05 PrUShS&P 21.23 -.02 ProUltDow 0.32 61.58 +.20 PrUlShDow 17.89 -.07 ProUltQQQ 87.76 -.38 PrUShQQQ rs 52.16 +.18 ProUltSP 0.39 52.42 +.09 PrUShtFn rs 58.67 +.70 PrUShtSm rs 53.10 +.13 ProUShL20 37.63 -.03 PrUSCh25 rs 25.65 -.11 ProUSEM rs 28.77 -.16 ProUSRE rs 15.57 -.40 ProUSOG rs 28.40 -.35 ProUSBM rs 17.45 -.09 ProUltRE rs 0.43 56.53 +1.46 ProUFin rs 0.05 68.19 -.77 PrUPShQQQ 26.28 +.13 PrUPShR2K 18.13 -.29 ProUltO&G 0.21 57.24 +.68 ProUBasM 0.03 52.92 +.20 ProShtR2K 29.99 -.14 PrUltPQQQ s 81.96 -.45 ProUltR2K 0.01 47.38 +.44 ProSht20Tr 44.43 ProUSSP500 16.29 -.04 PrUltSP500 s 0.11 77.74 +.18 ProSUltGold 75.06 +1.86 ProUSSlv rs 18.38 -1.47 PrUltCrde rs 58.60 +1.36 PrUShCrde rs 39.71 -.93 ProUSGld rs 25.29 -.67 ProSUltSilv 278.64+19.66 ProUltShYen 16.35 -.13 ProUShEuro 17.04 -.11 ProctGam 2.10 63.30 +.31 ProgrssEn 2.48 46.01 +.40 ProgrsSft s 30.16 +.39 ProgsvCp 1.40 21.13 -.28 ProLogis 0.45 15.89 +.29 ProUSR2K rs 43.20 -.45 ProspctCap 1.21 11.51 +.11 ProspBcsh 0.70 43.20 +1.29 ProtLife 0.56 25.75 -.09 ProvEn g 0.54 9.01 -.09 ProvidFS 0.44 14.15 -.05

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1.15 60.40 -.40 0.76 24.21 +.16 1.37 30.87 -.09 3.20 109.65 +1.88 1.63 24.50 7.66 -.03 1.18 -.04 0.71 6.58 +.01

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D 0.48 11.00 -.04 6.23 +.87 1.81 -.03 20.27 -.04 14.80 +.06 14.60 +1.59 0.16 15.67 -.07 26.40 -.25 8.26 +.28 9.98 -.16 3.01 -.07 3.52 +.04 0.56 42.24 +.15 9.11 +.23 23.24 1.76 74.42 +.09 38.04 -.02 0.73 57.73 +.32 44.79 -.23 96.14 -.18 24.11 -.23 0.30 50.86 -.27 2.75 -.01 24.19 -.34 2.85 -.02 0.10 12.98 -.20 8.92 -.03 1.12 35.09 -.05 3.52 -.09 0.28 29.69 -.09 0.20 49.00 -.08 22.20 +.98 1.82 37.84 +.26 1.83 35.87 -1.22 0.60 27.65 +.07 0.02 11.60 -.15 39.01 +.60 1.04 27.11 +.15 28.91 +.67 8.96 +.06 23.68 -.37 20.05 -.60 4.96 +.15 19.25 +1.03 12.90 +.30 1.87 -.10 0.30 19.06 +.01 1.23 39.10 +.12 0.61 33.62 +.18 0.81 30.71 +.18 0.56 39.06 -.09 1.05 76.56 +.52 0.16 16.13 -.15 0.64 37.00 0.33 25.79 -.05 1.31 31.75 +.19 3.68 -.04 1.64 75.88 +.99 0.40 20.02 +.04 3.75 +.49 0.52 35.97 +.16 0.30 56.58 -.46 1.68 21.83 +.28 0.72 45.15 -.43 1.10 28.08 +.27 0.40 17.93 -.22 0.24 11.18 -.01 0.50 10.63 +.25 .77 -.01 3.97 +.17 90.66 -.03 0.06 8.88 -.10 0.08 15.34 48.72 -.75 0.12 7.99 +.04 21.13 -.09 32.41 +.28 14.25 +.19 49.73 +.37 6.10 +.10 4.00 122.66 -1.72 0.72 59.87 +.03 38.38 +.10 .11 +.00 6.14 +.12 3.88 -.03 1.44 30.97 +.09 0.40 43.90 +.10 0.60 42.83 -.23 7.35 +.10 16.23 -.21 15.88 -.18 9.00 -.80 9.68 +.20 9.32 -.02 0.04 28.19 -.81 2.95 -.01 2.64 -.02 38.81 +.19 0.35 10.61 +1.53 0.04 9.24 +.03 11.07 -.09 10.19 +.06 38.87 -.58 14.26 +.26 9.85 +.57 18.44 +.11 0.20 13.71 +.01 25.69 +.03 33.23 +2.11 1.13 67.42 -.37 26.80 -.18 0.04 2.66 3.29 +.05 1.94 -.04 1.04 28.48 +.29 1.80 36.84 +.07 0.72 19.41 +.18 0.20 15.09 0.20 21.67 +.27 0.64 35.27 +.37 0.85 18.68 +.16 4.36 -.05 0.71 46.40 -.24 0.76 51.13 -.13 12.00 37.30 -.82 50.08 -1.29 17.02 +.14 19.38 +.02 0.47 12.31 +.05 15.27 +.14 6.05 -.11 28.11 +.71 33.63 -.54 0.25 23.16 -.07 0.80 25.74 +.48 6.21 -.08 1.09 33.27 -.26 1.00 50.02 -.07 5.57 -.09 3.89 +.08 0.20 3.97 -.01 0.32 28.08 +.02 1.75 54.42 +1.03 51.04 -.19 0.60 52.30 -.59 1.27 35.06 +.06 1.24 10.16 -.04 7.72 18.98 +.35 1.61 23.28 -.25 0.72 7.76 -.01 0.81 15.49 +.23 3.03 27.09 +.36 1.36 60.09 +1.96 1.75 25.93 -.08 0.83 18.24 -.14 0.47 32.95 -.32 5.31 -.11 0.08 5.15 -.01 2.10 48.43 +.09 0.52 22.45 +.43 57.98 -.49 0.68 49.40 +.06 6.60 +.06 1.00 39.97 -.64 50.21 -.18 16.88 -.14 33.32 +.26 0.50 32.55 -.55 25.14 +.21 26.13 -.12 14.26 +.24 0.78 49.90 +.23 0.52 34.71 +.37 0.32 16.27 +.22 0.08 26.27 -.33 26.32 +.15 54.87 -.53 58.50 +.58 11.99 -.39 1.24 39.60 +.12 0.40 29.80 -.07 27.29 -.26 49.00 -.81 2.20 92.94 +.08 29.09 +.23 1.00 56.70 +.28 1.00 63.16 +.85 0.68 47.44 +.53 43.57 +.71 .99 +.01 1.92 71.75 -.62 0.94 35.62 -.02 0.72 49.62 -.95 0.02 25.67 +.04 28.34 +1.43 17.88 +.01 8.80 -.06 19.94 -.22 4.64 -.02 0.64 65.99 -.60 8.45 +.53 2.64 86.26 -.31 3.16 60.48 -.03 0.28 18.83 +.41 1.38 -.01 4.02 +.12 0.58 77.88 -.10 0.28 63.89 +.90 7.24 +.02 1.68 41.30 +.35 0.84 49.00 -.61 2.96 -.04 0.79 77.99 -.37 4.61 -.32 1.44 59.63 -.30 77.77 +1.70 .68 -.04 49.33 -.08 29.52 -.11 0.32 35.55 +.05 11.71 +.10 0.16 81.01 -1.13 26.75 +.40 4.85 +.01 1.20 59.03 +.78 0.66 14.87 +.06 1.52 10.26 +.12

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Insurance

Bandits

Continued from B1 “I think more and more property managers are really starting to think ... and start requiring it,” Hayden said. Jeff Aeschliman, Oregon spokesman for State Farm Insurance, said requiring tenants to have the insurance is becoming more popular. “Most definitely ... we are seeing this, more and more landlords requiring their tenants to carry renters insurance,” he said. “I can’t really put any hard data on it. This is more anecdotal. But certainly this is not something that we saw 10 years ago.” Loretta Worters, vice president at the New York-based Insurance Information Institute, told Smart Money magazine, for an article published on its website in February, that she has seen anecdotal evidence showing more and more landlords requiring tenants to get the insurance. Mike Hoover, owner of Windermere/Central Oregon Real Estate, said his company does not require prospective tenants to have renters insurance before moving in. “We haven’t chosen to go down that road,” he said. “It’s never even come up in discussion.” Hoover said he wasn’t sure of the purpose of requiring tenants to sign up for renters insurance. “(Property managers) may want to give (tenants) advice,” he said, “but to demand it — I mean, you know, there’s plenty of demands in the system.” Mark Peterson, a clinical professor of law at Lewis & Clark Law School, said he does not know of any state legislation prohibiting a property manager or landlord from requiring renters insurance. “It’s not a terrible thing for anyone to have ... insurance,” Peterson said, as it can keep tenants from having to spend money to replace damaged possessions.

Continued from B1 The company, based in Miami, was called E&A Transport Express, according to Master Cpl. David Vincent of the Florida Highway Patrol’s cargo theft task force. The company registered with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration in late February, according to the agency’s online database. That was right around the time produce prices were soaring. “They were just sitting and waiting, watching the produce because they knew it was climbing,” said Clifford Holland, owner of the transportation brokerage firm Old North State, which was a victim of the gang. “It was like a snake in the grass, and they struck.” In the produce industry, buyers and sellers typically use freight brokers as middlemen to hire the trucking companies that carry goods. The thieves apparently began watching websites where brokers posted notices trying to connect trucking companies with loads they need carried. In late March, they contacted Allen Lund. The broker carried out a standard series of checks,

CVS Continued from B1 The groups, which called for breaking up the $27 billion merger, also accused the company of using confidential patient information from Caremark, which manages prescription benefits for health plans, to steer consumers to CVS pharmacies. The company’s practices effectively gave CVS an unfair advantage over other pharmacies, reducing competition and limiting consumer choice, according to the letter, which was signed by Community Catalyst, Consumer Federation of America, Consumers Union, the National Legislative Association on Prescription Drug Prices and U.S. PIRG. CVS Caremark denied accusations it had engaged in improper business practices, saying the charges were “false, unfounded and misleading.” It defended its privacy protections, saying it

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@bendbulletin.com.

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 B5 Tomatoes are sorted out and separated for packing at a West Coast Tomato’s facility in Palmetto, Fla. A group of thieves stole a load of about 40,000 pounds of tomatoes worth about $42,000 from the company.

and Punta Gorda. At each pickup, a driver working for E&A showed up at the wheel of a tractor with a refrigerated trailer. The shippers loaded the pallets of tomatoes or the other goods into the trucks, and the driver drove off. None of the loads got to their destinations. The load of frozen meat, worth about $48,000, was picked up from a meatpacker north of Miami. It was bound for Salem. It is missing, too.

‘A smart organization’

including verifying the company’s federal registration and its insurance coverage. Then it assigned the company to pick up a load of tomatoes from a shipper in Miami on March 28. Over the next four days, work-

ing through Lund and three other freight brokers, E&A Transport picked up four more loads of tomatoes, a load of cucumbers and a load of frozen meat from shippers across Florida, including in the Miami area, Palmetto

“This was definitely a smart organization,” said Holland, who was the broker on the load of meat. “They were smooth as silk.” The thieves sought out loads headed for Detroit; Hartford, Conn.; New York; Los Angeles; and Sacramento, Calif. Holland said that gave them time to carry out multiple thefts before the alarm was sounded, since in each case it would be from two to four days before the loads were due at their destinations. Brokers and shippers suspect the thieves had a buyer for the produce. Tomato growers said there had been occasional thefts in the

maintained a firewall to ensure that Caremark and CVS did not share “certain competitively sensitive information,” Castel said in an e-mail. The company did not improperly steer patients to CVS pharmacies, she said. She also said “there are no plans to split up the company.” A spokeswoman for the FTC, Cecelia Prewett, confirmed the commission had received the letter, but said it could not comment on an open investigation. For the last several years, some consumer groups as well as independent pharmacists, who have argued they are now at a competitive disadvantage, have been calling for regulators to review the merger. Some investors have also been frustrated by the lack of financial results from the merger, and some industry analysts are saying the company would be valued more by investors as two distinct businesses. CVS Caremark had revenue of $96.41 billion in 2010, down from $98.73 billion in 2009.

Given the lackluster performance of the stock, which has treaded water since the merger and closed Thursday at $35.61, some investors have grown restless and are pushing management to reconsider the merger. “The pressure is currently rising on them,” said Jeffrey Jonas, who follows CVS Caremark for Gabelli mutual funds, one of the company’s investors. In late March, Citigroup analysts issued a report that concluded the company would be worth more as separate entities. The Citigroup analysts said any breakup would probably not occur before 2012 because of the tax advantages of waiting until the merger was at least 5 years old. “They now have roughly one year to make their case,” said Adam Fein, who runs Pembroke Consulting, a Philadelphia firm that follows the industry. He predicted that without a clear sign customers were beginning to be persuaded the combination deliv-

ered better results, “the clamor to separate the business will be deafening.” At the same time, CVS Caremark has been accused by consumer advocates of not fulfilling promises made at the time of the merger; executives said then they would erect a firewall between the CVS and Caremark businesses and would be agnostic about where consumers filled their prescriptions. In their letter, the consumer groups charged the merged company had engaged in unfair practices that favored companyowned pharmacies, including sharing information Caremark obtained in processing prescriptions to help solicit non-CVS customers to fill their prescriptions at CVS drugstores. CVS Caremark says the merger is helping its customers by reducing costs and improving health outcomes. “The innovative products we have introduced into the marketplace since the merger

Josh Ritchie New York Times News Service

past when prices were high, but the sophistication of this trucking ring was something new. “We’ve never seen anything like this,” said Bob Spencer, an owner of West Coast Tomato in Palmetto, which lost a load of about 40,000 pounds of tomatoes that he said was worth about $42,000. Interviews with several police departments in Florida revealed an investigation that might be lacking coordination. The thieves appear to have benefited by stealing loads in several jurisdictions, with the result that some police departments were slow to share information about the crimes. The Florida Highway Patrol said the cargo theft unit of the Miami-Dade Police Department was leading the investigation. But Detective Roy Rutland, a spokesman for the Miami-Dade police, initially denied that the department was aware of the thefts. He later said the department had been asked to assist in the investigation, but it was not taking a lead role. “We’re trying to figure out who’s handling this,” Rutland said Wednesday. “We just learned that most of this occurred outside of our jurisdiction.”

are gaining traction,” Castel said, and will “enhance shareholder value.” The company also said it “places a high priority on protecting the privacy of its customers and plan members.” Castel said CVS Caremark used patient data internally for “appropriate purposes,” like identifying potentially adverse drug reactions. In addition, some investors say the sharing of patient information is central to any claims by CVS Caremark that the combination of the drugstore chain and pharmacy benefit manager can better serve patients by coordinating information and reducing costs. “What some people are calling antitrust is in the customers’ favor,” Jonas said.

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

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-.55 +.11 -.14 +.58 +.17 +.11 +.78 -.35 -.07 +.19 -.22 -.77 +.01 -.20 -.10 +.50 +.02 +.06 -.03 +.01 -.21

Name

+6.3 +2.8 -1.6 +.4 +10.8 -8.9 -1.5 -.3 +5.7 +22.2 +11.4 -4.1 -10.5 -6.9 -1.1 +10.5 -2.0 -3.7 +12.6 +18.4 -8.9

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1474.00 $1471.70 $41.661

Pvs Day $1458.00 $1454.90 $40.235

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46f .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .20a ... .60

19 17 16 16 40 ... 34 21 16 16 20 10 26 10 74 15 13 14 88 6

80.08 +.67 -6.3 46.07 +.12 +8.7 44.31 -.15 -4.6 12.44 -.25 -29.7 50.00 -.13 -12.8 2.44 -.01 +17.9 42.50 +.50 +13.5 142.24 -1.44 +2.2 24.86 +.81 +10.5 59.94 -.63 -9.7 84.30 +.40 +.7 45.37 -.28 +.5 35.97 +.16 +12.0 11.71 +.10 +.2 11.17 +.03 -8.3 25.84 -.15 -4.2 15.64 -.95 -7.6 30.15 -.53 -2.7 3.53 -.03 +25.2 22.49 +.06 +18.8

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm SprintNex ArcosDor n

3930080 4.43 -.07 1419812 131.56 +.10 1113979 13.13 -.14 708827 4.96 +.15 637232 21.20 ...

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Supvalu Goldcp wt Qihoo360 n Youku n DuoyGWat

Last

CIBER SunriseSen Coeur LeeEnt Solutia wt

10.61 +1.53 +16.9 6.65 +.85 +14.6 29.10 +3.45 +13.5 64.36 +6.97 +12.1 3.85 +.34 +9.7

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

RareEle g AvalRare n GtPanSilv g CAMAC En ChinaShen

Last Chg

71891 16.14 +.68 51814 9.74 +.10 41385 4.16 +.16 39945 2.02 +.15 36935 6.45 +.21

Last

ChinNEPet Banro g AlexcoR g Uranerz MincoG g

4.30 +1.05 +32.3 2.89 +.44 +18.0 9.65 +.97 +11.2 3.20 +.31 +10.7 2.70 +.25 +10.2

Name

-8.3 -8.2 -7.9 -7.7 -7.7

ContMatls Inuvo rs SuprmInd TelInstEl NewConcEn

1,620 1,387 139 3,146 53 24

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Cisco Microsoft Intel PwShs QQQ Level3

Chg %Chg

572067 544056 519112 461294 347626

Name

Last

AcordaTh CDC Cp rs BkCarol OnTrack L&L Engy

Last Chg 17.17 25.42 19.58 56.75 1.73

-.08 -.21 -.20 -.10 +.05

Chg %Chg

27.13 +5.71 +26.7 2.96 +.57 +23.8 2.30 +.34 +17.3 2.69 +.39 +17.0 5.75 +.75 +15.0

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

17.00 -1.88 -10.0 2.30 -.25 -9.7 2.35 -.20 -7.8 7.50 -.43 -5.4 3.16 -.17 -5.1

Name

Last

FuweiFlm ENGlobal PanASlv BBC pf II FFBcArk

Chg %Chg

3.60 -.96 -21.1 3.59 -.50 -12.2 37.35 -3.74 -9.1 8.75 -.85 -8.9 2.70 -.25 -8.5

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

6.19 -.56 9.00 -.80 31.08 -2.68 2.65 -.22 2.64 -.22

Nasdaq

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Indexes

Diary 241 212 38 491 5 4

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,452 1,118 121 2,691 49 50

12,450.93 5,404.33 422.43 8,545.78 2,453.68 2,840.51 1,344.07 14,276.94 859.08

9,614.32 3,872.64 346.95 6,355.83 1,689.19 2,061.14 1,010.91 15.80 587.66

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,285.15 5,250.04 411.88 8,374.16 2,402.00 2,760.22 1,314.52 13,962.17 827.47

+14.16 +17.66 +2.43 +6.85 +12.03 -1.30 +.11 +3.26 +3.55

YTD %Chg %Chg +.12 +.34 +.59 +.08 +.50 -.05 +.01 +.02 +.43

52-wk %Chg

+6.11 +2.81 +1.70 +5.15 +8.77 +4.05 +4.52 +4.51 +5.59

+10.23 +11.11 +7.36 +8.48 +22.28 +9.72 +8.49 +9.80 +14.26

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

359.48 2,695.00 3,970.39 5,963.80 7,146.56 24,014.00 37,069.96 21,833.72 3,454.48 9,653.92 2,141.06 3,158.92 4,972.40 5,799.70

-.90 t -.89 t -.89 t -.78 t -.44 t -.50 t -.74 t -1.19 t -.09 t +.13 s +.90 s -.41 t -.54 t -.28 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0540 1.6353 1.0411 .002112 .1531 1.4490 .1286 .011970 .085286 .0354 .000921 .1609 1.1205 .0344

1.0501 1.6274 1.0385 .002118 .1530 1.4441 .1286 .011930 .084903 .0354 .000918 .1597 1.1157 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.40 -0.06 +4.6 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.37 -0.05 +4.5 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.44 +0.01 +3.6 GrowthI 27.10 +4.9 Ultra 23.72 -0.03 +4.7 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.72 -0.03 +4.7 AMutlA p 26.35 +0.06 +4.7 BalA p 18.54 +4.0 BondA p 12.20 +1.0 CapIBA p 51.54 +0.07 +4.2 CapWGA p 37.26 -0.02 +4.8 CapWA p 20.78 +0.04 +2.7 EupacA p 43.39 -0.01 +4.9 FdInvA p 38.71 -0.01 +5.8 GovtA p 13.83 -0.01 GwthA p 31.75 -0.03 +4.3 HI TrA p 11.56 +4.5 IncoA p 17.25 +0.02 +5.3 IntBdA p 13.39 -0.01 +0.4 ICAA p 29.08 +3.7 NEcoA p 26.57 -0.03 +4.9 N PerA p 29.85 -0.02 +4.3 NwWrldA 55.86 -0.02 +2.3 SmCpA p 40.50 +0.10 +4.2 TxExA p 11.72 +0.02 +0.3 WshA p 28.59 +0.06 +5.7 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 31.30 -0.05 +3.8 IntEqII I r 12.94 -0.01 +3.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.04 +0.03 +6.2 IntlVal r 28.17 +0.02 +3.9 MidCap 35.89 -0.08 +6.7 MidCapVal 22.19 -0.02 +10.5 Baron Funds: Growth 55.11 +0.04 +7.6 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.74 -0.02 +1.2 DivMu 14.22 +0.01 +0.6

TxMgdIntl 16.04 +0.01 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.57 +0.02 GlAlA r 20.16 +0.04 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.80 +0.05 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.61 +0.02 GlbAlloc r 20.26 +0.04 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 56.41 +0.01 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 30.66 +0.01 DivEqInc 10.58 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.69 +0.02 AcornIntZ 41.91 +0.11 ValRestr 52.17 -0.04 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.85 +0.02 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.84 +0.04 USCorEq2 11.64 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.90 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.30 NYVen C 34.65 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.24 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.69 +0.04 EmMktV 37.02 +0.01 IntSmVa 18.29 +0.11 LargeCo 10.37 USLgVa 21.68 US Micro 14.54 +0.07 US Small 22.75 +0.06 US SmVa 27.06 +0.04 IntlSmCo 18.06 +0.12 Fixd 10.34 IntVa 19.42 +0.03 Glb5FxInc 10.93 -0.01 2YGlFxd 10.17 Dodge&Cox:

+2.0 +6.0 +3.8 +3.6 +6.0 +3.9 +5.7 +4.9 +5.1 +5.0 +2.4 +3.5 +5.5 +5.4 +6.3 +4.5 +4.6 +4.3 +1.6 +2.4 +2.4 +6.3 +5.1 +8.0 +5.7 +6.6 +5.8 +5.2 +0.3 NA +0.5 +0.2

Balanced 73.04 -0.04 Income 13.32 IntlStk 36.91 -0.08 Stock 113.12 -0.09 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 10.98 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.57 -0.02 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09 GblMacAbR 10.22 +0.01 LgCapVal 18.62 -0.02 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.44 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.05 +0.02 Fairholme 34.18 -0.04 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.70 -0.01 StrInA 12.58 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.91 -0.01 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.08 FF2015 11.76 -0.01 FF2020 14.36 FF2020K 13.74 FF2025 12.04 FF2030 14.42 +0.01 FF2030K 14.24 FF2035 12.05 +0.01 FF2040 8.42 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.99 AMgr50 15.89 -0.01 Balanc 18.85 -0.01 BalancedK 18.85 -0.01 BlueChGr 47.51 Canada 61.92 +0.18 CapAp 26.22 CpInc r 9.80 Contra 70.47 -0.02 ContraK 70.47 -0.01 DisEq 23.95 -0.07 DivIntl 31.45 +0.03

+4.5 +1.7 +3.4 +5.3 NA +2.2 +2.6 +0.8 +2.2 +5.3 +4.7 -3.9 +3.9 +3.3 +4.0 +3.6 +3.7 +4.1 +4.2 +4.5 +4.7 +4.7 +5.1 +5.1 +5.1 +3.4 +3.7 +3.8 +4.8 +6.5 +3.5 +5.4 +4.2 +4.2 +6.3 +4.3

DivrsIntK r 31.44 DivGth 29.93 EmrMk 27.12 Eq Inc 46.70 EQII 19.26 Fidel 34.14 FltRateHi r 9.89 GNMA 11.46 GovtInc 10.38 GroCo 89.59 GroInc 19.10 GrowthCoK 89.57 HighInc r 9.20 Indepn 25.58 IntBd 10.56 IntlDisc 34.11 InvGrBd 11.41 InvGB 7.43 LgCapVal 12.18 LatAm 58.58 LevCoStk 30.16 LowP r 41.07 LowPriK r 41.07 Magelln 74.18 MidCap 30.52 MuniInc 12.18 NwMkt r 15.68 OTC 59.62 100Index 9.12 Ovrsea 33.91 Puritn 18.63 SCmdtyStrt 13.23 SrsIntGrw 11.70 SrsIntVal 10.61 SrInvGrdF 11.41 STBF 8.47 SmllCpS r 20.54 StratInc 11.26 StrReRt r 9.92 TotalBd 10.77 USBI 11.30 Value 73.25 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 53.74

+0.03 +4.4 +5.3 +0.01 +2.9 -0.05 +5.8 -0.02 +5.8 -0.01 +6.2 +1.8 +0.9 -0.01 +0.1 +0.02 +7.7 -0.02 +4.6 +0.01 +7.8 +4.6 +0.02 +5.1 -0.02 +1.0 +0.05 +3.2 -0.01 +0.9 +1.4 +6.2 +0.04 -0.8 +6.1 +0.11 +7.0 +0.12 +7.1 +0.13 +3.5 -0.05 +5.8 +0.01 +0.5 -0.01 +1.8 +0.12 +8.5 -0.01 +4.3 +0.01 +4.4 -0.01 +4.4 +0.06 +4.7 +0.01 +3.6 -0.01 +6.7 -0.01 +0.9 +0.5 +0.01 +4.8 +0.01 +3.3 +0.03 +4.0 -0.01 +1.5 -0.01 +0.6 +0.04 +6.6 +0.78 +1.2

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 40.58 +0.09 500IdxInv 46.55 IntlInxInv 36.94 +0.02 TotMktInv 38.38 +0.02 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.55 TotMktAd r 38.38 +0.02 First Eagle: GlblA 47.98 +0.11 OverseasA 23.23 +0.08 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.27 +0.02 FoundAl p 11.10 HYTFA p 9.53 +0.02 IncomA p 2.26 +0.01 USGovA p 6.71 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p 13.89 +0.02 IncmeAd 2.24 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.28 +0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.70 +0.03 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.57 -0.02 GlBd A p 13.93 +0.03 GrwthA p 19.16 -0.04 WorldA p 15.77 -0.04 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.95 +0.02 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.05 -0.07 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.95 +0.06 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.50 -0.01 Quality 20.96 +0.06 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.33 -0.03 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.43 -0.01 MidCapV 37.63 -0.03 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.22

+6.3 +5.1 +5.0 +5.4 +5.1 +5.4 +3.5 +2.5 +0.6 +6.1 +0.4 +5.8 +0.6 +3.6 +5.5 +5.6 +5.1 +8.5 +3.6 +7.7 +6.3 +3.5 +4.5 +4.7 +6.2 +4.8 +4.0 +4.1 +4.1 +1.8

CapApInst 38.20 -0.04 IntlInv t 63.61 +0.14 Intl r 64.25 +0.13 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.23 -0.07 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.26 -0.07 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.06 -0.08 Div&Gr 20.55 +0.01 TotRetBd 11.04 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.17 -0.02 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.37 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.08 +0.03 CmstkA 16.59 -0.01 EqIncA 8.92 GrIncA p 20.16 -0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.94 +0.09 AssetStA p 25.72 +0.10 AssetStrI r 25.94 +0.09 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.46 -0.01 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.45 -0.01 HighYld 8.37 IntmTFBd 10.76 +0.02 ShtDurBd 10.97 USLCCrPls 21.27 -0.02 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 50.63 -0.36 PrkMCVal T 23.87 Twenty T 66.65 -0.05 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.38 +0.01 LSGrwth 13.42 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.82 -0.03 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.20 -0.04 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.63 -0.08

+4.0 +6.0 +6.1 +1.7 +1.8 +4.0 +5.4 +1.3 -1.0 +3.9 +5.6 +5.8 +4.3 +5.2 +5.1 +5.4 +5.4 +0.8 +0.9 +4.5 +0.8 +0.4 +2.9 +5.8 +1.4 +4.1 +4.5 +0.2

+8.4

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.76 +0.02 +4.8 StrInc C 15.40 +0.02 +4.8 LSBondR 14.70 +0.02 +4.7 StrIncA 15.32 +0.01 +5.0 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.37 +0.01 +3.3 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.01 -0.03 +3.9 BdDebA p 8.04 +4.7 ShDurIncA p 4.60 -0.01 +1.2 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 -0.01 +1.0 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.49 -0.02 +3.3 ValueA 24.00 -0.04 +5.5 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.11 -0.04 +5.6 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.12 +5.9 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 23.94 +0.16 +2.1 MergerFd 16.20 +0.01 +2.7 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.42 -0.01 +1.6 TotRtBdI 10.42 -0.01 +1.8 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 41.17 +0.07 +10.2 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.51 -0.04 +4.5 GlbDiscZ 30.89 -0.04 +4.6 QuestZ 18.48 +0.01 +4.5 SharesZ 21.88 +0.03 +5.2 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 49.74 +0.12 +8.2 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.51 +0.12 +8.1 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.50 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.96 +0.03 +4.4 Intl I r 20.15 -0.06 +3.8 Oakmark r 43.63 -0.09 +5.6 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.13 +0.01 +5.4

GlbSMdCap 16.30 +0.05 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 36.73 -0.02 GlobA p 63.95 -0.04 GblStrIncA 4.38 IntBdA p 6.64 +0.01 MnStFdA 33.05 -0.02 RisingDivA 16.24 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 33.91 +0.05 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.72 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 29.03 +0.05 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.67 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.36 -0.01 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.94 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.92 +0.01 AllAsset 12.49 +0.01 ComodRR 9.76 +0.03 HiYld 9.49 InvGrCp 10.63 -0.01 LowDu 10.47 RealRtnI 11.58 -0.01 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 10.94 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.58 -0.01 TotRtA 10.94 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.94 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.94 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.94 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.88 +0.26 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.44 -0.03 Price Funds: BlChip 39.76 -0.07 CapApp 21.20 -0.02 EmMktS 36.17 -0.05

+5.4 +0.7 +5.9 +3.9 NA +2.0 +5.0 +5.8 +4.7 +5.6 +4.7 +0.8 +1.7 NA +4.2 +7.9 +4.1 +3.0 +1.5 +2.9 +0.7 +1.8 +2.7 +1.7 +1.5 +1.7 +1.8 +4.5 +3.8 +4.3 +4.4 +2.5

EqInc 24.78 EqIndex 35.43 Growth 33.45 HlthSci 34.55 HiYield 6.95 IntlBond 10.20 IntlStk 14.74 MidCap 62.90 MCapVal 24.79 N Asia 19.56 New Era 55.45 N Horiz 36.75 N Inc 9.46 R2010 15.90 R2015 12.36 R2020 17.13 R2025 12.58 R2030 18.09 R2035 12.82 R2040 18.26 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 36.99 SmCapVal 38.01 SpecIn 12.53 Value 24.70 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.20 VoyA p 24.13 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r 19.35 PennMuI r 12.52 PremierI r 22.16 TotRetI r 13.82 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.14 S&P Sel 20.56 Scout Funds: Intl 33.86 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.34 Sequoia 143.69 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.41 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 54.13

-0.01 +5.0 +5.0 -0.09 +4.0 +0.17 +14.1 +4.6 +0.03 +3.3 -0.03 +3.6 -0.07 +7.5 +0.03 +4.6 +0.02 +2.0 +0.06 +6.3 +0.06 +9.7 -0.01 +0.7 +3.7 +4.0 -0.01 +4.2 +4.5 -0.01 +4.7 -0.01 +4.8 -0.01 +4.8 +0.7 +0.06 +7.4 +0.11 +5.2 +2.6 +5.8 NA -0.11 +1.8 -0.01 +6.0 +0.01 +7.5 -0.04 +8.9 +5.1 +0.01 +5.3 +5.1 +0.05 +4.6 +4.7 +0.09 +11.1 -0.06 +6.8 +0.17 +4.6

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.64 IntValue I 30.29 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.44 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.00 CAITAdm 10.71 CpOpAdl 80.24 EMAdmr r 41.13 Energy 134.89 ExtdAdm 44.06 500Adml 121.17 GNMA Ad 10.73 GrwAdm 32.84 HlthCr 55.54 HiYldCp 5.83 InfProAd 26.11 ITBdAdml 11.10 ITsryAdml 11.24 IntGrAdm 64.57 ITAdml 13.23 ITGrAdm 9.84 LtdTrAd 10.99 LTGrAdml 9.25 LT Adml 10.59 MCpAdml 98.53 MuHYAdm 9.98 PrmCap r 71.34 ReitAdm r 82.59 STsyAdml 10.67 STBdAdml 10.52 ShtTrAd 15.87 STIGrAd 10.74 SmCAdm 37.24 TtlBAdml 10.54 TStkAdm 33.14 WellslAdm 53.65 WelltnAdm 55.51 Windsor 47.83 WdsrIIAd 48.22 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.51 CapOpp 34.73

-0.04 +5.8 -0.04 +5.9 -0.04 +2.6 +3.5 +0.02 +1.1 +0.24 +4.5 +0.06 +3.2 +0.25 +11.5 +0.08 +6.8 +0.01 +5.1 +0.9 -0.01 +4.2 +0.15 +8.3 +0.01 +4.4 -0.03 +2.9 -0.02 +0.5 -0.02 -0.1 +0.23 +5.0 +0.02 +0.8 -0.01 +1.5 +0.6 +0.7 +0.02 +0.5 +6.9 +0.01 +0.2 +0.13 +4.5 +1.26 +6.1 -0.01 +0.1 -0.01 +0.4 +0.01 +0.5 -0.01 +0.9 +0.12 +7.1 -0.01 +0.4 +0.02 +5.4 +0.04 +3.0 -0.02 +4.0 -0.11 +4.9 -0.07 +5.8 +0.01 +4.3 +0.10 +4.5

DivdGro 15.15 Energy 71.83 EqInc 21.55 Explr 78.59 GNMA 10.73 GlobEq 18.83 HYCorp 5.83 HlthCre 131.61 InflaPro 13.29 IntlGr 20.29 IntlVal 33.18 ITIGrade 9.84 LifeCon 16.72 LifeGro 23.02 LifeMod 20.25 LTIGrade 9.25 Morg 18.88 MuInt 13.23 PrecMtls r 27.54 PrmcpCor 14.36 Prmcp r 68.74 SelValu r 19.91 STAR 19.75 STIGrade 10.74 StratEq 20.02 TgtRetInc 11.48 TgRe2010 22.97 TgtRe2015 12.83 TgRe2020 22.89 TgtRe2025 13.11 TgRe2030 22.61 TgtRe2035 13.69 TgtRe2040 22.50 TgtRe2045 14.13 USGro 19.19 Wellsly 22.14 Welltn 32.14 Wndsr 14.17 WndsII 27.16 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.52 TotIntlInst r 110.10 500 121.16 Growth 32.84

+0.03 +5.4 +0.13 +11.5 +0.04 +6.4 +0.04 +7.8 +0.8 +0.01 +5.4 +0.01 +4.4 +0.36 +8.3 -0.02 +2.9 +0.07 +4.9 +0.06 +3.2 -0.01 +1.4 +2.6 +0.02 +4.4 +0.01 +3.5 +0.6 -0.02 +4.7 +0.02 +0.8 +0.12 +3.2 +0.01 +4.3 +0.12 +4.5 -0.03 +6.1 +3.5 -0.01 +0.9 +0.01 +9.3 +2.3 +3.0 +0.01 +3.3 +0.01 +3.6 +3.9 +0.02 +4.3 +0.01 +4.6 +0.02 +4.7 +0.01 +4.7 -0.03 +5.2 +0.01 +2.9 -0.01 +4.0 -0.03 +4.9 -0.04 +5.8

MidCap

21.70

SmCap

37.20 +0.13 +7.1

+0.06 +0.24 +0.01 -0.01

Yacktman Funds:

+4.4 +4.4 +5.0 +4.2

+6.9

SmlCpGth

23.90 +0.09 +9.0

SmlCpVl

16.81 +0.05 +5.0

STBnd

10.52 -0.01 +0.3

TotBnd

10.54 -0.01 +0.4

TotlIntl

16.45 +0.03 +4.4

TotStk

33.13 +0.02 +5.4

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.46 +0.02 +4.8

ExtIn

44.06 +0.08 +6.8

FTAllWldI r

98.20 +0.16 +4.7

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32.84 -0.01 +4.2

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10.63 -0.02 +2.9

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120.33 +0.01 +5.1

InsPl

120.33 +0.01 +5.1

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29.97 +0.02 +5.4

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21.76

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37.24 +0.13 +7.1

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33.14 +0.01 +5.4

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Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

100.09 +0.01 +5.1

STBdIdx

10.52 -0.01 +0.4

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10.54 -0.01 +0.4

TotStkSgl

31.98 +0.01 +5.4

Western Asset: CorePlus I Fund p

10.86 17.59

+1.9 +6.3


B USI N ESS

B6 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY INSIDE MAY’S GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND: Review the proposed project recommendations for $30 million worth of road improvements with Bend City Manager Eric King, Transportation Engineering Manager Nick Arnis and Better Roads for Bend Co-Chair Amy Tykeson. Reservations encouraged; $30 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members, $40 at the door; 7:15-9 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by American Family Insurance; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-536-6237 or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SOCIAL CULTURE & THE SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY: Explore ways to promote an internal social culture and create a social media policy that will enhance and support online social

activity; free; 11 a.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-7198880, chevypham@gmail.com or http://host5.evanced.info/deschutes/ evanced/eventcalendar.asp. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 6 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-508-8681, rcooper@bendhabitat.org or www.bendhabitat.org.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 11 a.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-5088681, rcooper@bendhabitat.org or www.bendhabitat.org.

MONDAY WORD 2007, BEYOND THE BASICS: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON RETIRED EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION MEETING: $8.50 for lunch; 11:30 a.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-382-7044. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the

minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4-8 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY MARKETING TO YOUR BEST CUSTOMERS: Cheryl McIntosh of Studio Absolute will discuss ways to reach buyers, build brand loyalty and grow your business. Two three hour classes; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUYER STRATEGIES FOR TODAY’S REAL ESTATE MARKET: Presented by The Oregon and Beyond Real Estate Group of Steve Scott Realtors. Reservations encouraged; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First American Title Insurance Co., 395 S.W. Bluff, Bend; 541-693-2009.

WEDNESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Hosted by At Home Care Group; free; 5:30 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, 8222 N. U.S. Highway 97, #2110; 541-9232679 or www.crrchamber.com. ACCESS 2007, BEGINNING: Two- evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: Working with a business adviser and classroom peers, class participants learn how to start their business and develop a working plan. Class combines four one-hour sessions for coaching and three three-hour classes on Wednesday evenings. Registration required; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

D I SPATC H E S THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. DISCOVER WHAT IS HOLDING YOU BACK FROM SUCCESS: Brian Klemmer, author of “The Compassionate Samurai,” will discuss how to break through old habits and find new ways to address professional and personal challenges; $39 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $49 for others; 7:30-11:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. 18TH ANNUAL OREGONIANS AGAINST DISCRIMINATION BUSINESS LEADERS LUNCHEON: “Summit for a Stronger Oregon” with keynote speaker Gov. John Kitzhaber; $75; noon-1 p.m.; Oregon Convention Center, 777 N.E. Martin Luther King Blvd., Portland; 503-222-6151, juan@basicrights.org or https:// equalityfederation.salsalabs .com/o/35028/p/salsa/event/common/ public/?event_KEY=592. ABC’S OF INTERNET SECURITY: Learn how to minimize the risk of computer attacks; free; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 1386 N.E. Cushing Drive, Bend; 541-382-1795 or kyle@midoregon.com.

FRIDAY April 22 REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Free; 8:309:30 a.m.; Comfort Suites, 2243 S.W. Yew Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www .visitredmondoregon.com. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Two Friday mornings. Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PRACTICAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT: Two Friday sessions. Registration required; $349; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 11 a.m.1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-3837290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

Dr. Andy Himsworth opened his family dental practice at Masters of Dentistry in Bend at 628 York Drive, Suite 101. Dr. Himsworth accepts patients of all ages and offers evening appointments. Michelle Young, a hairstylist in Bend for more than 25 years, has opened Elegant Strands Hair Salon at 334 N.E. Irving Ave. Young can be reached at 541-385-3354. LaPaw Animal Hospital added 1,200 square feet to its location and remodeled the clinic’s existing 2,400-square-foot space in the Ray’s Food Place Shopping Center on Bend’s west side. The PleuraFlow Active Tube Clearance System has been awarded a 2011 Medical Design Excellence Award. The PleuraFlow is a chest tube clearance accessory, developed by Bendbased Clear Catheter Systems Inc. to maintain the chest tube opening after heart and lung surgery. The Medical Design Excellence Awards competition is the awards program for the medical technology community. Toyota of Bend has won Toyota Motor Sales USA Inc.’s President’s Award for outstanding sales and service. This is the ninth time the dealership has won this award. Visit Bend — The Bend Ale Trail has received the Oregon Tourism & Hospitality Tourism Development Award from the Oregon Tourism Commission. The 2010 Tourism and Hospitality Industry Achievement Awards were presented at the 2011 Governor’s Conference on Tourism in Eugene earlier this month. Fred Meyer Jewelers has achieved certification under

the Responsible Jewelry Council Certification System. The system audits companies in the jewelry industry on ethical, human rights, social and environmental standards. Fred Meyer Jewelers, which also operates as Littman Jewelers, is the second retailer in the world to receive this certification, according to a news release. The Responsible Jewelry Council is an international not-for-profit organization that promotes responsible ethical, human rights, social and environmental practices throughout the jewelry industry. More information can be found at www.Fred MeyerJewelers.com. Compass Commercial Real Estate Services has recently launched its redesigned website at www.compasscommercial .com. Compass Commercial staff, including Creative Director Lisa Nielsen, Marketing Coordinator Michelle Anderson, IT Manager Eric Covert and Office Manager Lupita Wesseler collaborated with Evan Earwicker of Bend-based Northwest Graphic to redesign and develop the site. To kick off the Week of the Young Child April 10-16, Bank of the Cascades and T-Mobile were presented Champions of Children awards by The Deschutes County Children & Families Commission. The awards were based on employee benefits provided by the employers. The Week of the Young Child honors the more than 35 million American children from birth through age 8, and the families, teachers and care providers who help children with their early learning. For more information, visit w w w.deschutescountykids .com.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


www.bendbulletin.com/local

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

George Mendenhall

The man who allegedly stabbed Sunriver resident George Mendenhall to death at his second home in Southern California was reaching for a nail gun when he was shot and killed by police a few hours later, the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department said Thursday.

Mendenhall, 71, was stabbed multiple times in the chest sometime before 7 a.m. Wednesday at his home in Borrego Springs, a small desert community about 90 miles northeast of San Diego. The man who deputies identified as his attacker, 52-year-old Craig Petersen, was killed at around 1 p.m., when a sheriff’s sergeant found him at a freeway rest stop and

shot as Petersen grabbed a nail gun in the back of his pickup truck. Sheriff’s homicide Sgt. Roy Frank said his department is continuing to investigate the stabbing of Mendenhall and the shooting of Petersen, and has not determined why Petersen would attack a man he’s known for around 10 years. Petersen had done handyman work for Menden-

hall and his wife, Kate Mendenhall, Frank said, but it’s unclear how close they were. Witnesses at the Mendenhall household said Petersen mentioned he was “looking for some tools” when he came to the house between 6:40 and 6:45 a.m. and asked to see George Mendenhall, Frank said. See Attack / C5

Trashformations: A day with Ken Sweetman, of Bend

From trash to art ... Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

From morning to late afternoon, Ken Sweetman spent Saturday picking through trinkets and trash at PAKIT Liquidators in Bend — all for fun. This is Sweetman’s fourth year participating in Trashformations. “My first year, I created ‘The War Wagon,’ and it was so heavy when I finished, we could not move it,” he said. He learned from that to keep his ideas (relatively) small.

Sweetman’s project this year: a creature creation made from a pair of matching satellite dishes. Above, sparks fly as Sweetman uses a torch to attach the bottom of a coffee can to a metal pipe to create a way to bolt the creature’s legs in position.

BEND

New solar panel plan for parking structure By Nick Grube The Bulletin

A nearly 5-year-old proposal to put solar panels on top of Bend’s downtown parking garage may yet see the light of day. The project has faced financial challenges that have nearly kept it from happening, including the dissolution of a public-private partnership to help pay for installation, the disappearance of green energy tax credits and the possibility of losing its $400,000 in Pacific Power grant funding. But just as the city was preparing to put its solar designs on the shelf and give back much of the grant money, officials were able to strike a deal this month that will greatly alter the size of the project while giving Bend complete ownership of the technology. “We’ve always felt it was a good demonstration project,” Bend Downtown Manager Jeff Datwyler said. “It’s something really visible for downtown Bend and something unique to complete the parking structure that will build in energy cost savings for the facility as well as provide some direction for the city in pursuing alternative and renewable energy sources.” The plan is to build a 33kilowatt solar array above the parking area on the garage, which is located on the corner of Minnesota Avenue and Lava Road. The array will not eliminate any parking spaces and should be able to produce about 57,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year, which is enough to power four homes. Based on the current rates the city pays for electricity at its parking garage — just over $0.06 per kilowatt hour not including certain charges — it would cost about $3,600 for 57,000 kilowatt hours. See Solar / C5

School districts receive grant money The education reform nonprofit Chalkboard Project today received $11.2 million in additional grant funding through the federal Teacher Incentive Fund, money that will go to implement education reform in several Central Oregon school districts. The Creative Leadership Achieves Student Success (CLASS) Project seeks to increase career paths for teachers, improve teacher evaluations, offer teachers more professional development and implement new pay structures. Bend-La Pine, Redmond and Crook County school districts are among seven Oregon school districts that are working with the Chalkboard Project to implement the initiatives. In October, Chalkboard Project received $13.2 million in TIF grant funding. This latest infusion will bring the grant total to $24.4 million. Bend-La Pine will receive another $2.1 million, Redmond will receive an additional $1.3 million and Crook County will receive another $1.1 million in additional grant funds. The funds will be used for educator compensation in high-need schools.

Nonprofits can apply for grants Deschutes County is accepting applications for funding through its community grant program. Nonprofits that provide services to county residents are eligible for grants ranging from $10,000 and $30,000. The county typically awards about 25 grants per year and is expecting to have roughly $300,000 available this year. Applications are due by 3 p.m. Friday, April 29. For more information, visit the Deschutes County website at www.deschutes.org. — From staff reports

More local briefing, plus news of record, on Page C2.

EVENT CLOSURE Bend Spring Festival The streets below will be closed from 11 p.m. today through 2 a.m. Monday. Ordway Ave.

NorthWest Crossing Crr Dr. John Fremont St. t t.

Sunriver man knew alleged attacker

IN BRIEF

Fort Clatsop St.

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

Mt. Washington Dr.

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Inside

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OREGON Denver airport assault on Oregon woman investigated, see Page C3. CALIFORNIA Salmon fishermen gear up for strong season, see Page C5. OBITUARIES World’s oldest man dies at 114, see Page C4.

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

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Above, Sweetman makes a few adjustments to the legs before attaching the satellite dish. At right, he carefully drills a hole in preparation to attach a pair of light fixtures for eyes.

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C2 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

L B  

GOLF COURSE WITH A VIEW

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Author Tatjana Soli to speak about ‘The Lotus Eaters’ Tatjana Soli, author of the best-selling novel “The Lotus Eaters,� will visit Central Oregon for events today in Sisters and Saturday in Bend. Soli will be at a book signing from 5 to 7 p.m. today at Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters, during the “My Own Two Hands Art Stroll.� At 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Between the Covers in Bend will host a ticketed luncheon with Soli, catered by Pho’ Viet Cafe. Soli will share the genesis of “The Lotus Eaters,� read excerpts and discuss the book. Tickets are $35, or $30 for those who purchase a copy of “The Lotus Eaters� at the bookshop, located at 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend. Contact: betweenthecovers llc@gmail.com or at 541-3854766.

Street closures set Traffic will be slowed today in Bend as work crews trim branches encroaching on power lines on the following roads: • The northbound lane of Jamison Street will close from 8 to 10 a.m. between Poe Sholes and a dead end. • Southbound Vogt Road will shut down between 9 and 11 a.m. from Mary Way to Raymond Court. • The southbound lane of Northeast Division Street will close from 10 a.m. to noon between Seward and Revere avenues. • Both lanes on Northeast Fourth Street will be closed from 12:30 to 3 p.m. between Addison Avenue and Northeast Underwood. • The eastbound lane on Northeast Olney Avenue will close from 2 to 4 p.m. between Fifth and Sixth streets. • The westbound lane on Northeast Neff will close from 3 to 4 p.m. between Cliff Drive and Northeast 12th.

Marc Lester / Anchorage Daily News

John Fortier, Robert Clary and Shane Borschnack, from left, walk the first hole at the Palmer Golf Course in Palmer, Alaska, after teeing off Wednesday, the day the course opened for the season.

Eugene dry-cleaner aids job seekers By Lauren Fox The (Eugene) Register-Guard

EUGENE — After graduating from Brigham Young University and then ceaselessly searching for a job for four months, Matthew Johnston was at a loss. And to make matters worse, his suit was far from being in pristine condition. After hitting the pavement hard, Johnston said, his light gray suit looked as worn out as he felt. “It needed to be cleaned,� Johnston said. He didn’t have a lot of extra cash lying around to pay for things such as dry cleaning, he said, but he decided that investing $20 to get his suit cleaned would be a good use of his limited funds. That’s when he noticed a sign in The Cleanery’s Santa Clara store window; “Free suit cleaning for anyone interviewing for a new job,� it read. “I was kind of skeptical, but I brought the suit in anyway,� Johnston said. “I figured it might not be a hoax and if it was, I really needed my suit cleaned anyway.�

Chris Pietsch / The (Eugene) Register-Guard

Ron Bowker, owner of The Cleanery in Eugene, stands next to a sign at one of his stores on April 7 advertising his offer to clean a suit for anybody looking for work. As it turned out, the sign wasn’t a gimmick. “I can’t even describe how nice it felt to know everything was tidy,� Johnston said. “I even told them that I could get proof that

the cleaning was for an interview, but they took me at my word.� The Cleanery’s owner, Ron Bowker, said that the idea to grant job hunters a little extra help came from the National Dry

Cleaners’ Association just a little more than a year ago. Bowker said he read an article in the association’s trade publication about a dry cleaner in New York who started offering clients a break on suit cleaning during the recession. Bowker promptly started a similar program at his three businesses. Since then, he said, the program has helped 15 to 20 job seekers every month. “I immediately thought, ‘Wow, we need to do that here,’� Bowker said. “It’s a feel-good thing. It is a simple thing and it has the ability to help somebody else.� Bowker said that The Cleanery has attracted a few new clients while doing good. But financial gain isn’t what motivated him, he said. “It is such a little thing for us that can be a huge thing for the recipients.� For some, such as Preston Barrett, the suit cleaning has even opened the door to a new job. After he got his suit cleaned, he said, he interviewed for, and got, a job in sales for a company in Arizona.

President Lincoln dies after being shot in 1865 T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y

The Associated Press Today is Friday, April 15, the 105th day of 2011. There are 260 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 15, 1861, following the Confederate takeover of Fort Sumter, President Abraham Lincoln declared a state of insurrection and called out Union troops. ON THIS DATE In 1817, the first permanent American school for the deaf opened in Hartford, Conn. In 1850, the city of San Francisco was incorporated. In 1865, President Abraham Lincoln died, nine hours after being shot the night before by John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s Theater in Washington. Andrew Johnson became the nation’s 17th president. In 1912, the British luxury liner RMS Titanic sank in the North Atlantic off Newfoundland, less than three hours after striking an iceberg; some 1,500 people died. In 1945, during World War II, British and Canadian troops liberated the Nazi concentration camp Bergen-Belsen. In 1947, Jackie Robinson, baseball’s first black major

league player, made his official debut with the Brooklyn Dodgers on opening day. (The Dodgers defeated the Boston Braves, 5-3.) In 1959, Cuban leader Fidel Castro arrived in Washington to begin a goodwill tour of the United States. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles resigned for health reasons. (He was succeeded by Christian A. Herter). In 1960, a three-day conference to form the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee began at Shaw University in Raleigh, N.C. (The group’s first chairman was Marion Barry.) In 1980, existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre died in Paris at age 74. In 1986, the United States launched an air raid against Libya in response to the bombing of a discotheque in Berlin on April 5; Libya said 37 people, mostly civilians, were killed. TEN YEARS AGO U.N. investigators arrested Bosnian Serb army officer Dragan Obrenovic in connection with the Serbian Army’s slaughter of some 7,000 Muslim men and boys. (Obrenovic later

pleaded guilty to five war crimes charges and testified against his one-time superior officers; he was sentenced to 17 years in prison.) Punk rock icon Joey Ramone, 49, died of lymphoma at a New York hospital. FIVE YEARS AGO A U.S. airstrike aimed at militants holed up in eastern Kunar province in Afghanistan mistakenly killed seven civilians. ONE YEAR AGO An ash cloud from an Icelandic volcano drifted over northern Europe, causing the largest disruption of flights since the 2001 terror attacks. President Barack Obama, visiting the Kennedy Space Center, predicted his new space exploration plans would lead American astronauts to Mars and back in his lifetime. Civil rights leader Benjamin Hooks, one-time executive director of the NAACP, died in

Memphis, Tenn., at age 85. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Michael Ansara is 89. Country singer Roy Clark is 78. Author and politician Jeffrey Archer is 71. Rock singer-guitarist Dave Edmunds is 67. Actor Michael Tucci is 65. Actress Lois Chiles is 64. Writer-producer Linda Bloodworth-Thomason is 64. Actress Amy Wright is 61. Columnist Heloise is 60. Actressscreenwriter Emma Thompson is 52. Bluegrass musician Jeff Parker is 50. Singer Samantha Fox is 45. Rock musician Ed O’Brien (Radiohead) is 43. Actor Flex Alexander is 41. Actor Danny Pino is 37. Actor-writer Seth Rogen is 29. Actress Alice Braga is 28. Rock musician De’Mar Hamilton (Plain White T’s) is 27. Actress Emma Watson is 21.

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 8:10 a.m. April 13, in the 61300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:27 a.m. April 13, in the 500 block of Northwest Sean Court. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:44 a.m. April 13, in the 1600 block of Northwest Fresno Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:12 p.m. April 13, in the 900 block of Northeast Penn Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:04 p.m. April 13, in the 2500 block of U.S. Highway 20. Redmond Police Department

Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen at 8:01 p.m. April 13, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Odem Medo Road. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:10 p.m. April 13, in the 1500 block of Odem Medo Road. Vehicle crash — An accident was

reported at 7:06 a.m. April 13, in the 1500 block of Southwest Highland Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:17 a.m. April 13, in the area of Southwest 19th Street and Southwest Reindeer Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 11:50 a.m. April 13, in the area of Southeast Lynn Boulevard. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:38 p.m. April 13, in the 65400 block of Swalley Road in Bend. Theft — Tires were reported stolen at 5:04 p.m. April 13, in the 52300 block of Red Currant in La Pine. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 1:36 p.m. April 13, in the 25300 block of Bachelor Lane in Alfalfa.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 3:58 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 21160 Wilderness Way. 6:30 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 19534 Baker Road. 14 — Medical aid calls. Wednesday 12:36 a.m. — Building fire, 2599 N.E. Studio Road. 13 — Medical aid calls.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 C3

O Lourdes Grotto Catholic shrine reconstructed near Salem church By Thelma Guerrero-Huston The Statesman Journal

Ed Andrieski / The Associated Press

Denver Police officer Robert McLean talks on his radio as he looks out over security check-in at Denver International Airport on Thursday. A woman who was flying from her home in Oregon to a convent in Peoria, Ill., was allegedly raped early Tuesday morning on Concourse A at the airport. The suspect, Noel Alexander Bertrand, 26, of Portland, appeared in district court Wednesday after his arrest on suspicion of sexual assault and was being held in lieu of a $50,000 bond.

Witnesses responded to airport assault, police say Victim’s family raised questions about bystanders By Sheila V. Kumar The Associated Press

DENVER — Denver police said Thursday they believe employees who witnessed an alleged sexual assault at the airport responded appropriately by calling for help, countering earlier statements by the woman’s family that some people may have walked by without helping. Police spokesman Sonny Jackson said Denver International Airport employees called security to report Tuesday’s incident in a near-empty concourse. Airport security then contacted police, who with airport officers were at the scene within three minutes, Jackson said. He would not say how many workers responded and declined to release additional details, saying the case was under investigation. Jenny Schiavone, a DIA spokeswoman, said an initial airport review found that employees followed proper procedure in responding to the incident. She did not release details of that review and said an informal review of whether all procedures were followed is under way. The family of the woman has raised questions about whether some employees witnessed the 12:30 a.m. attack in Concourse A without intervening. They said

she told them that three people, A family member said that whom she believed to be airport the victim was in tears Thursemployees, appeared to walk by day morning, two days after the without helping. attack. “We believe that the passersThe Associated Press does by that she saw notified authori- not use the names of people who ties,”’ Jackson said. report being sexually assaulted Noel Alexander Bertrand, 26, unless they agree to be identiwas being held Thursday in lieu fied. The AP also isn’t identifyof $50,000 bond after his arrest ing family members to protect on suspicion of sexual assault. the woman’s identity. The district attorney’s office Two Frontier Airlines mechansaid charges could be ics told KMGH-TV they filed as early as today. were working outside, Authorities said Beron the tarmac, early trand didn’t yet have an Tuesday when they saw attorney. something happening Police allege that Berthrough a concourse trand met the woman at window and realized an airport restaurant someone was being and later knocked her hurt. the floor in the nearly Noel Alexan“I saw the hair wavempty terminal. They der Bertrand ing and that is when I say Bertrand hit her in yelled at Mark and said, the left eye and choked ‘We got to go,’” said Kris her by her shirt collar, according Musil. a court document. “The first thing I saw as I went Two airport workers inter- through the door and was going vened and held Bertrand un- after him was he reared back and til police arrived, according to smacked the girl pretty hard,” Jackson. said fellow mechanic Mark Ad“This is so highly unusual,” ams. “Then (he) finally stopped said Jackson. “I mean 146,000 when I yelled at him.” people go through DIA a day ... “At one time the man said, ‘I and you don’t have incidences am going to go now,’ and I told like this happen.” him he wasn’t going anywhere,” Family said the woman was at said Musil. the airport after missing a con“I wish we could have got there necting flight Monday evening. a lot sooner,” Adams added. The woman spoke to KMGHFamily members said the womTV after agreeing to be inter- an was flying from her home in viewed. She said that the attack Oregon to Peoria, Ill., when she “could have happened to anyone.” was attacked. They say since the “I couldn’t reach anywhere. alleged assault she’s coped with I couldn’t touch anything. I a concussion and had severe couldn’t breathe,” she said. head pains.

Ringleader calls plot to kidnap Columbia chairwoman ‘desperate’ The Associated Press OREGON CITY — The ringleader of a failed kidnapping plot against the chairwoman of Columbia Sportswear Company asked for her forgiveness on Thursday as he was sentenced to 14½ years in prison. Nestor Gabriel Caballero Gutierrez called the plot a bad decision by “three desperate idiots” and said he wanted Gert Boyle to know that he and two co-defendants weren’t a band of criminals. Boyle, known for her “One Tough Mother” role in Columbia Sportswear commercials and for her book of the same name, was approached at her suburban Portland home in November by a man offering a gift basket who pulled a gun. Boyle was able to trigger a silent alarm, bringing police. The man escaped, but police say Cabellero was arrested hours later while carrying some of Boyle’s jewelry. The 87-year-old Boyle didn’t ap-

Nestor Gabriel Caballero Gutierrez reacts during his sentencing in Clackamas County Court on Thursday in Oregon City. Randy L. Rasmussen The Associated Press

pear at Thursday’s sentencing but released a statement through her attorney, saying the three defendants “caused me to suffer indignity, violence and indescribable fear.” She added that her life was forever changed by the incident. Presiding Judge Robert Herndon told Caballero that the plot was “a completely lame-brained scheme.” He described Boyle as an Oregon and American icon. “It couldn’t have been worse if you tried to kidnap Santa Claus,” Herndon said.

Boyle burnished her hardnosed reputation after her husband died of a heart attack and she took over Columbia, based in Oregon, in 1970. In the 1980s, a national ad campaign showed her putting her son and the products through extreme tests and her flexing her biceps tattooed with the words “Born to Nag.” It remains unclear why the three defendants targeted Boyle and what would have happened to her had they succeeded, prosecutor Rusty Amos said.

SALEM — As part of her Catholic faith, Fe De Lariate thanks the Virgin Mary for miracles she attributes to the saint. “When I was 13, my sister was very sick, critically sick,” De Lariate said. “The doctors told my mother that my sister had 48 hours to live. My mom prayed to the Virgin Mary at the Lourdes Grotto in our backyard, and the Virgin Mary heard her prayers. “My sister got better, and today she’s 80 and doing well,” she said. The Lourdes Grotto is a popular Catholic Shrine in the Philippines, De Lariate’s home country. In the Philippines and many other countries, the shrine draws thousands of devotees seeking blessings from the Virgin Mary. The original Lourdes Grotto is located in Lourdes, France, at the site where the Virgin Mary is said to have appeared to a 14year-old girl named Bernadette in 1858. “It’s one of the most visited religious places in the world,” said

Father Todd Molinari, a priest at St. Joseph Catholic Church. “People go there to get in the water for healing,” he said. Several months ago, De Lariate approached the priest about building a grotto on church property. The priest agreed. But after learning what it would cost to build such a shrine, she began to have some doubts. Then one day, a woman walked up to her after a worship service and donated $1,000 toward the project. “One thing I didn’t want was to ask for a second collection,” De Lariate said. “I did not want to use any money that people donate to the church to build the grotto.” As word spread in the community, more donations poured in. Before long, she and others involved in the project had received $8,000 in private donations. “Father asked me, ‘How did you do that?’” she recalled. “I told him, ‘It’s not me Father, it’s Mother Mary, she wants to get

out of there.’” Construction of the grotto started three weeks ago, with help from members of the church’s Knights of Columbus. “I’m very happy to see this going up at St. Joseph. It’s very positive, “said Tom Pavelek, a Knights of Columbus member. “People are excited to have a place to honor the Blessed Mother, and it’s a place where the community can also go to honor Mary.” Once complete, the grotto will feature a statue of the Virgin Mary and one of St. Bernadette anchored on two pedestals inside the grotto. For now, the two marble statues are safely locked away. The grotto is located just to the right of the church’s front entrance on Winter Street NE. It will feature a raised garden area. “The Lourdes Grotto is more than a devotion to the holy mother,” the priest said. “It’s meant to give a healing message from God, not just to our parishioners but also to the Salem community.”

O  B Oregon Zoo elephant celebrates birthday PORTLAND — It’s Packy the elephant’s 49th birthday, although the big celebration at the Oregon Zoo isn’t planned until Saturday. Packy has been a Portland celebrity since his birth on April 14, 1962. At the time, he was hailed as the first elephant born in the United States in 44 years. Saturday’s “Elephantastic”

party will include games, crafts, pastry elephant ears and birthday cake at noon. Packy now tips the scales at more than 6 tons. He has fathered seven elephant calves.

Zoo’s black rhino to get female friend PORTLAND — Pete, the Oregon Zoo’s black rhino, is getting some female companionship. Zuri arrived in Portland this week from the Cleveland Metro-

parks Zoo on breeding loan. She’s adjusting to her new surroundings and will be joining Pete when the staff feels she is ready. Oregon Zoo Director Kim Smith says black rhinos are among the most endangered mammals on the planet. Fewer than 3,700 survive. The zoo association breeding program aims to sustain a genetically diverse population of rhinos in North America. — From wire reports


C4 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O D

N   Dixie Lee Benson, of Culver April 8, 1943 - April 12, 2011 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Memorial services will be held on Saturday, April 16, 2011 at Culver Christian Church in Culver, Oregon.

Harry A. Sullivan, of Prineville May 17, 1927 - Mar. 30, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: At his request no public services will be held.

Lyle Horace Hibbard, of Prineville April 29, 1927 - April 12, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: At his request no public services will be held.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Jeanette L. Carver May 15, 1928 - April 2, 2011 Jeanette L. Carver was born May 15, 1928, to Grant and Myrtle (Sharp) Layer in Mill City, OR. She attended grade school in Vernonia, OR, and graduated from Nestucca Union High School in 1946. She attended Oregon State College. She married her high school sweetheart, Gene Carver, Jeanette Carver and they raised two daughters, Cathy and Kerri. The family lived in Neskowin and Lincoln City, OR. She was a wonderful homemaker and cook and loved nothing more than making delicious meals for her family and friends. Her pies and cinnamon rolls were special treats for the grandkids. Jeanette and Gene moved to Bend in 2005, and he preceded her in death on December 20, 2010. Survivors include daughters, Cathy Benneth of Lebanon and Kerri Martin of Bend, six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held at Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 Shevlin Park Road on April 25, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. Donations in her memory may be made to Grace Lutheran Church, Bend, or Lebanon Community School District, designated for Lebanon's Gift of Literacy. Please sign our guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Bernard Vincent Chiaravalle Sr.

Ruth Caroline Pinckney

Floyd Merwyn Gumpert

July 20, 1933 - April 11, 2011

Nov. 16, 1919 - April 11, 2011

July 4, 1931 - April 10, 2011

Bernie Chiaravalle Sr. ended his long battle with cancer and died peacefully at Clare Bridge of Bend, Oregon, on April 11, 2011. He was born July 20, 1933, in Monessen, PA, to Anthony and Frances (Mauro) Chiaravalle. Bernie joined the U.S. Bernard Vincent Navy in 1950 Chiaravalle Sr. and served during the Korean War until 1954. He met his devoted and beautiful wife, Doris Jean Wade, while in the military and married her on September 5, 1952, in Reno, NV. He then began his civil career as a service station operator in San Francisco and subsequently in San Rafael, CA. He then embarked on what became a long and prestigious career as a leading labor representative in the California Bay Area. Beginning as cable splicer, he quickly moved up within the union beginning as Vice-President, Steward in 1965, and then elected President and CEO of Local 9404 of the Communications Workers of America in Marin County, CA in 1968. He was re-elected for over 32 consecutive years until he retired in 2000. From 19782000, he also served as the Community Services Representative as Labor Liaison for the Marin County, CA Chapter of the United Way. Among Bernie's many professional accomplishments were; CWA Organizing Chairperson, Northern California (1970-1971), Marin County Grand Jury, Member (1976-1977), CommissionerComprehensive Employment & Training Act (1978-1980), Private Industry Council-Labor Representative (1982-1983) and Chairman, Marin County Personnel Commission (1986-1989). Apart from work, Bernie was also passionate about his Italian heritage and family, growing a beautiful vegetable and fruit garden, the music of Mario Lanza and Louie Prima, his many companion canines throughout the years, teaching his grandchildren the art of making ravioli and gnocchi, and forever advocating for the rights of the under-dog. Bernie is survived by his loving wife, Doris of almost 59 years; their sons and their spouses, Bernie Jr. and Gail, Bill and Leila, Brad and Kirsten; eight grandchildren and one great-grandchild.; he is also survived by his three brothers, Joseph, Tony and Ronnie, and his sister, Emily; he was preceded in death by his parents. A private family memorial will be held this Saturday, April 16, at Trattoria Sbandati in Bend, OR. We will celebrate the memories, culture and passion Bernie brought into our lives. The family requests donations be made to Partners In Care 541-382-5882 www.partnersbend.org.

Ruth Caroline Pinckney was born on November 26, 1919, to parents, Eva and Bert Glendening in Portland, Oregon. She passed away on April 11, 2011, in Bend after a brief illness. She was 91 years of age. Ruth had sibRuth Caroline three lings; two sisPinckney ters, Doris Gibson and Pat Mendenhall (both now deceased); and a brother, Raymond Glendening, living in Tigard, Oregon. Ruth met Harold Pinckney in Sunnyvale, California, and they were married on April 15, 1939. In 1945, Ruth and Harold moved to Lake Oswego, Oregon, where he worked as a building contractor and Ruth was a full-time Mom. Ruth and Harold were the proud parents of two sons, Alan Pinckney, born in 1941, and John Pinckney, born in 1947. She had four grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. In 1973, Harold's love of fishing lured him to La Pine, Oregon, where he and Ruth were the original founding partners and owners of La Pine Ace Hardware and Building Supply. Ruth was a homemaker and enjoyed her family, crafts and the arts. She had a passion for painting, genealogy, and gardening. She was an avid reader. For many years Ruth was an Avon representative in Lake Oswego. Probably one of Ruth's greatest challenges was loosing her sight in her mid-80s. She managed it with grace and courage and was able to live somewhat independently for many years. Most recently, Ruth resided at a foster home in Bend with the assistance of compassionate and supportive caregivers. Ruth is survived by her son, John Pinckney of Bend; and her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. No formal memorial service will be held at Ruth's request. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Partners In Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., #1, Bend, Oregon 97701 or the Oregon Commission for the Blind, 535 SE 12th Avenue, Portland Oregon 97214. Please sign our guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Born July 4, 1931, Bend, OR, passed away April 10, 2011, in Sun City West, AZ. Married to Marjorie (Marge) Boquist Gumpert, November 24, 1956, (San Francisco, CA). Survived by his loving wife; son, Thomas Floyd Merwyn (wife, Susan; grandchilGumpert dren, Stephen and Sarah); son, Charles (partner, Christopher); and his sister, Jeanne Sandiforth. Floyd graduated from the University of Oregon, and was a US Army Veteran. After a fulfilling life and career in Northern and Southern California, he enjoyed retirement in the Arizona desert. He enjoyed watercolor painting, playing games, gardening and Bonsai; and his involvement at Lord of Life Lutheran Church and many friends there, as well as “back home” in Garden Grove, CA, were among his greatest pleasures. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to: Lord of Life Lutheran Church (Organ Fund), 13724 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City West, AZ 85375 or Hospice of Arizona — Del Webb, 19702 N. Routzahn Way, Sun City West, AZ 85375 or Banner Boswell — Cardiovascular/ Surgical ICU, c/o Banner Health Foundation, 2025 North Third Street, Ste 250, Phoenix, AZ 85004.

Arthur Marx wrote about his father, Groucho New York Times News Service Arthur Marx, who wrote screenplays for film and television and a best-selling book about his father, “Life With Groucho,” died Thursday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 89. His death was confirmed by his son Steve. As a child, Marx spent several years on the road with Groucho Marx and the rest of the Marx Brothers’ vaudeville act before enjoying a celebrityfilled youth in Los Angeles as the brothers rose to stardom. His own show-business career was varied and long, writing Hollywood screenplays and scripts for some of television’s most popular sitcoms.

Home video game engineer brought variety to market By Bruce Weber New York Times News Service

Gerald Lawson, a largely selftaught engineer who became a pioneer in electronic video entertainment, creating the first home video game system with interchangeable game cartridges, died Saturday in Mountain View, Calif. He was 70 and lived in Santa Clara, Calif. The cause was complications of diabetes, said his wife, Catherine. Before disc-based systems like PlayStation, Xbox and Wii transformed the video game industry, before techno-diversions like Grand Theft Auto and Madden NFL and even before Pac-Man and Donkey Kong became the obsession of millions of electronic gamers, it was Lawson who first made it possible to play a variety of video games at home. In the mid-1970s, he was director of engineering and marketing for the newly formed video game division of Fairchild Semiconductor, and it was under his direction that the division brought to market in 1976 the Fairchild Channel F, a home console that allowed users to play different games contained on removable cartridges. Until then, home video game systems could play only games that were built into the machines themselves. Lawson’s ideas anticipated — if they did not entirely enable — a colossal international business.

In March, Lawson was honored for his innovative work by the International Game Developers Association, an overdue acknowledgment for an unfamiliar contributor to the technological transformation that has changed how people live. “He’s absolutely a pioneer,” Allan Alcorn, a creator of the granddaddy of video games, Pong, said in an interview with The San Jose Mercury News in March. “When you do something for the first time, there is nothing to copy.” Alcorn was the first design engineer at Atari, whose own cartridge console eventually dominated the home video game market. At 6 feet 6 inches and well over 250 pounds, Lawson cut an imposing figure. A modest man but a straight talker who was known to one and all as Jerry, he was among only a handful of black engineers in the world of electronics in general and electronic gaming in particular. Gerald Anderson Lawson was born in Brooklyn on Dec. 1, 1940, and grew up mostly in Queens. His parents encouraged his intellectual pursuits. As a boy, he pursued a number of scientific interests, ham radio and chemistry among them. As a teenager, he earned money repairing television sets. In the early 1970s, he started at Fairchild in Silicon Valley as a roving design consultant.

Dot Records founder Randy Wood By Valerie J. Nelson Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Dot Records founder Randy Wood was looking for a song for a young Pat Boone to record in 1955 and found it in the Fats Domino hit “Ain’t That a Shame?” Except Boone, then an English major, wanted to sing “Isn’t That a Shame?” After a few runthroughs, Wood insisted, “It’s got to be ‘ain’t’,” and Boone soon had his first No. 1 single. Wood’s practice of having white singers such as Boone cover rhythm and blues hits by black artists is credited by some with helping black musicians

— and early rock music — break into the commercial mainstream. Pop stations that had limited airplay mainly to white artists found room for the remakes, which helped introduce the black R&B sound to a white audience. Wood died Saturday at his La Jolla, Calif., home of complications from injuries suffered in a fall down stairs in his house, said his son John Wood. He was 94. Calling him “one of the people I owe my career to,” Boone said Wood “picked out all my early hits.” “He was just my mentor, my angel,” Boone, who stayed with

Dot Records for 13 years, told the Los Angeles Times in 2005. The R&B remakes were not without controversy. Dot Records, Boone and other singers were accused of stealing music and success from the black artists. “That’s a perversion of history,” Boone said. At one point in the mid-1950s, Dot had five of the top 10 hits on the Billboard charts, said Larry Welk, who is the son of the late band leader Lawrence Welk and first worked with Wood in 1960. “He was a true pioneer in the music business,” Welk said in a 2005 Times interview.

World’s oldest man dies in Montana at 114 By Matt Volz The Associated Press

GREAT FALLS, Mont. — Walter Breuning’s earliest memories stretched back 111 years, before home entertainment came with a twist of the radio dial. They were of his grandfather’s tales of killing Southerners in the Civil War. Breuning was 3 and horrified: “I thought that was a hell of a thing to say.” But the stories stuck, becoming the first building blocks into what would develop into a deceptively simple philosophy that Breuning, the world’s oldest man at 114 before he died Thursday, credited to his longevity. Here’s the world’s oldest man’s secret to a long life: • Embrace change, even when the change slaps you in the face. (“Every change is good.”) • Eat two meals a day (“That’s all you need.”) • Work as long as you can (“That money’s going to come in handy.”) • Help others (“The more you do for others, the better shape you’re in.”) Then there’s the hardest part. It’s a lesson Breuning said he learned from his grandfather: Accept death. “We’re going to die. Some people are scared of dying. Never be afraid to die. Because you’re born to die,” he said. Breuning died of natural causes in a Great Falls hospital where he had been a patient for much of April with an undisclosed illness, said Stacia Kirby,

Mike Albans / The Associated Press

Walter Breuning, 114, sits for an interview with a reporter for The Associated Press in the lobby of his senior residence in Great Falls, Mont, on Oct. 6. Officials at the retirement home say Breuning, the world’s oldest man, died Thursday. spokeswoman for the Rainbow Senior Living retirement home where Breuning lived. He was the oldest man in the world and the second-oldest person, according to the Los Angeles-based Gerontology Research Group. Besse Cooper, of Monroe, Ga. — born 26 days earlier — is the world’s oldest person. In an interview last October with The Associated Press at the retirement home where he lived in Great Falls, Breuning recounted the past century — and what its revelations and advances meant to him — with the wit and plain-spokenness that defined him. His life story is, in a way, a slice of the story

of the country itself over more than a century. At the beginning of the new century — that’s the 20th century — Breuning moved with his family from Melrose, Minn., to De Smet, S.D., where his father had taken a job as an engineer. That first decade of the 1900s was literally a dark age for his family. They had no electricity or running water. A bath for young Walter would require his mother to fetch water from the well outside and heat it on the coal-burning stove. When they wanted to get around, they had three options: train, horse and by foot. His parents split up and Breuning moved back to Min-

nesota in 1912. The following year, as Henry Ford was creating his first assembly line, the teenager got a low-level job with the Great Northern Railway in Melrose. “I’m 16 years old, had to go to work on account of breakup of the family,” he said. That was the beginning of a 50-year career on the railroad. He was a clerk for most of that time, working seven days a week. In 1918, his boss was promoted to a position in Great Falls, and he asked Breuning to come along. There wasn’t a lot keeping Breuning in Minnesota. His mother had died the year before at age 46, and his father died in 1915 at age 50. The Montana job came with a nice raise — $90 a month for working seven days a week, “a lot of money at that time,” he said. Breuning, young and alone, was overwhelmed at first. Great Falls was a bustling town of 25,000 with hundreds of people coming and going every day on trains that arrived at all hours. “You go down to the depot and there’d be 500 people out there all climbing into four trains going in four directions,” he said. The 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote in 1919 and the nation was riding a postwar wave into the Roaring ’20s. Walter Breuning bought his first car that year. It was a secondhand Ford and cost just $150.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

P acific salmon fishermen gear up for strongest season since 2007 By Jason Dearen The Associated Press

SAN FRANCISCO — West coast commercial salmon fishermen are getting ready for what is expected to be their most fruitful season in years, after federal fisheries regulators this week predicted a healthy Chinook salmon run this fall for the first time since 2007. The Pacific Fishery Management Council on Wednesday recommended that the season off the coast of California, Oregon and Washington open on May 1, and run into September. Fisheries managers estimated 730,000 Chinook would return to the Sacramento River this fall. This run of salmon provides many of the fish caught off of California and southern Oregon, and has been plummeting in numbers in recent years. In 2009, a record-low 39,500 Chinook returned after estimates predicted 122,000 of the fish would swim their way under the Golden Gate Bridge into San Francisco Bay, and up the river to spawn. “We are pleased to see that Sacramento River fall Chinook salmon have rebounded nicely for California and Oregon fisheries,” said Mark Cedergreen, chairman of the council, in a news release. The National Marine Fisheries Service will vote to approve the recommendation May 1. The news was welcome for California’s salmon industry, especially hard hit by recent years of cancelled or greatly curtailed fishing seasons. This is expected to be the first full Chinook salmon season in California waters since 2007. The collapse of the fishery led the federal government to declare it a disaster area and provide grants and low-interest loans to help the industry stay afloat. “Our people are going back to work, we’ve lost thousands of jobs because of these salmon closures,” said Zeke Grader, president of the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen’s Association, a commercial fishing industry group. While everyone seems to be rejoicing at the improved salmon numbers, there is a debate raging over just why it is occurring and what should be done in the future to safeguard the fishery.

Solar Continued from C1 Datwyler said the energy savings will go toward offsetting the power costs of the parking garage, which was built using a property tax levy that will expire later this year. It’s estimated that over the 35-year lifespan of the solar panels, the city could save around $160,000. A $400,000 grant through Pacific Power’s Blue Sky renewable energy program will help pay for the design and construction. A $45,000 grant from the Energy Trust of Oregon will go toward getting the project up and running. Datwyler said the city will pay only for operating and maintaining the system, which he estimated to cost around $500 a year. The initial plans were to build a 200-kilowatt system that would have provided the structure with about 50 percent of the energy it needs. In fact, the city had spent $107,000 of the Pacific Power grant for such a system, and had entered into an agreement with a private partner, SunEnergy Power Corp., in 2006 to install the panels. But when the financing stalled SunEnergy Power’s plans, the city in 2010 turned to another company based out of Eugene, Advanced Energy Systems, to move ahead with the proposal. That company was expected

Eric Risberg / The Associated Press

A fishing boat backs into its berth at Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco, on Thursday. California’s commercial salmon fishermen will benefit from the first full season in years after federal fisheries regulators estimated a healthy Chinook salmon run this fall. The Pacific Fishery Management Council on Wednesday recommended that the season open on May 1 and run into September, the first full season since 2007, when salmon populations plummeted.

“We are pleased to see that Sacramento River fall Chinook salmon have rebounded nicely for California and Oregon fisheries.” — Mark Cedergreen, chairman of the Pacific Fishery Management Council Most agree that improved ocean conditions have helped the Chinook — which start life in freshwater, migrate to the sea to grow then return to fresh rivers to spawn. In addition, after the collapse of the fishery in 2007, California wildlife managers began loading millions of baby salmon born in hatcheries into trucks. These salmon were driven around the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, where a vast series of pumps that move water around to farms and thirsty cities pose a threat to the fish. Many of the fish expected to

to use green energy tax credits to help pay for the cost of construction, though that plan failed when those incentives were not awarded. “We’ve had several obstacles over the years,” Datwyler said. “All of these things had to happen in concert and at the same time, and that’s what the difficulty has been.” After four years of problems and delays, Pacific Power decided earlier this year to abandon the project and ask the city for the remainder of its grant funds back. City Manager Eric King even told Bend city councilors during a public meeting that the panels were not going up. Earlier this month, however, that decision was reversed, and Pacific Power decided to give the city another chance. “There was nothing really wrong with the plans,” Pacific Power spokesman Tom Gauntt said. “So, in some way, the investment has already been made.” There are some deadlines the city must meet, he said. Those include completing a detailed construction plan by July 1, and having the facility online and producing electricity by Sept. 1. If those deadlines are not met, says Gauntt, whatever grant funds have not been spent will go back into the Blue Sky program fund. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

“Your Cure for the Common Cabinet”

return this year could be these hatchery fish. “We put them in acclimation pens and towed them out into the bay so they’d go out with the outgoing tide,” said Harry Morse, a public information officer with the California Department of Fish and Game. “We changed strategy on where we release these fish, and by doing so we helped to eliminate some of the problems they face in the midstretch of the Sacramento River and the delta,” he said. Some think natural fish are rebounding too, though it is too early to tell for sure. In 2008, a federal court imposed restrictions on the delta pumps while litigation over the salmon and the tiny Delta smelt were heard. “Courts did impose some pumping restrictions in 2008, which was the first time we had meaningful restrictions in the Delta, and the salmon returning this year are the first to benefit from those restrictions,” said Doug Obegi, a staff attorney for

Attack Continued from C1 But investigators are unsure if these statements are connected to the attack. Bruce Bischof, a Sunriver resident and close friend of George Mendenhall, said he knew Petersen had worked for the Mendenhalls in the roughly 10 years since they bought a home in Borrego Springs, but had never heard of any friction between them. Bischof said he knew George Mendenhall as a calm man and can only guess at what Petersen was thinking at the time. “I’m not sure we’ll ever know anything more than that. It’s not a matter of George owing him money. George is credible as far as taking care of people goes,” Bischof said. Bischof was already living in Sunriver when George and Kate Mendenhall moved there in 1979. Their children were close in age, and with shared interests in fishing and flying, the two men became friends. George Mendenhall excelled at everything he did, Bischof said. Coming out of college, he was offered an opportunity to sign a professional baseball

the Natural Resources Defense Council. But farmers who rely on these water deliveries have long fought the assertion that the delta pumps are to blame for the plight of the salmon. Tom Birmingham, general manager of the Westlands Water District, the largest water district in the country whose members include large agricultural concerns in California’s Central Valley, said it is too early to tell whether the pumping restrictions had any effect on the returns, or if it is just the result of improving ocean conditions. “I don’t think any reasonable scientist would draw a conclusion from a single year’s data,” Birmingham said. “Beyond that, the decline we saw of salmon populations in 2007 were declines that we saw up and down the west coast of North America. “And this year we have seen a record number of salmon returning to streams up and down the coast.”

contract, but instead joined the Navy and served as an officer during the Vietnam era. He founded an international food products distribution company based in Hong Kong and became an accomplished pilot and sailor, Bischof said, flying his own Lear Jet and twice winning a Hong Kong-toManila yacht race. “It’s one of those, ‘how can one guy have that many talents?’” Bischof said. “But I have never met anybody in my life who was that talented, and an extremely humble guy.” Frank said investigators are continuing to interview people and are looking into Petersen’s background to see if it yields any clues to a motive. He said he did not know if anything of note had been uncovered as of early Thursday afternoon. An incomplete examination of Petersen’s criminal history through the San Diego County court system shows little of note. Petersen was convicted of a felony DUII charge in 2001 and of driving without a license in 2007. S cott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 C5


C6 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Support Bend bond measure

L

aid end to end, Bend’s budget problems sometimes seem to stretch for miles, and for most there are no quick solutions in sight. That’s not true of one, however, if voters

are willing. The city is asking Bend residents to approve a bond measure of up to $30 million to finance a series of six major road improvements around town, and while taxpayers here would pick up the tab, they’d see no change in the rate they’re currently paying. Best estimates are that the levy, if approved, would cost 27 cents per each $1,000 of taxable property value, or just over $40 per year on a $150,000 home. In fact, officials plan to sell bonds in a staggered fashion aimed specifically at keeping their cost to that amount, a figure they chose because it is what we’re currently paying for improvements including the downtown parking garage. That levy expires next year. So what would the money buy? In northeast Bend, a multilane roundabout at 18th Street and Empire Avenue; also northeast, reconstruction of 27th Avenue from Connors to Butler Market; in southwest Bend, reconstruction of 14th Street from Simpson to Galveston and a roundabout at Simpson and Mount Washington Drive, and further southwest, a roundabout at Brookswood and Powers Road. Finally, the money would go to reconstruct Reed Market Road from Third Street to 27th Street.

That latter is the biggest project, and arguably the most sorely needed. Reed is one of the city’s few east-west streets that, in conjunction with Mount Washington, runs from one side of the city to the other, and as such it is heavily traveled all day long. It was not designed to handle the traffic it now receives. Delays are a part of driving on it. The bond measure would make Reed a threelane road its full distance, add a multilane roundabout at its intersection with 15th, and move and improve its intersection with American Lane. Together, the planned changes would make Reed a safer and more agreeable drive for the thousands of drivers who use it. While it is never pleasant to be asked for money, this is a bond measure that will make life easier for many if not most of Bend residents. The roadways and intersections that will be updated are among the most heavily used in the city, places in which waits can be long and traffic can be downright dangerous. Knowing that, city taxpayers should look at the bond measure request as a gift to themselves and their neighbors, one that will cost them no more than what they are already spending.

Andrew Gorayeb for Sisters schools V

oters in the Sisters School District have only one school board race to decide this spring, the contest between Cort Horner and Andrew Gorayeb. It is a contest between two good candidates though Gorayeb stands out as the stronger of the pair. Horner is a relative newcomer to Sisters, having moved to Central Oregon from the Portland area just over a year ago. While he is truly interested in schools, his newness to the community puts him at a strong disadvantage. His opponent, Gorayeb, has lived in Sisters for four years, and during that time he has immersed himself in the community. He currently serves on the community’s park board and is a member of the budget committees of the school district, the city and the fire protection district. His background includes commercial real estate development and banking. If Gorayeb’s tenure on the park district board is any indication, he’ll bring to the school district a fresh view and creative ideas about solving budget problems. Since Gorayeb came to the park board, that district has gone from an underfunded, overextended institution to one that works

in partnership with a variety of local groups to offer a broad range of programs to the community. He cannot accept all the credit for the turnaround, of course, but he has been a part of the change. His commitment to the community goes beyond committee and board meetings, as well. He is active in ASPIRE (Access to Student assistance Programs in Reach of Everyone), which pairs high school juniors and seniors with community mentors who help them think about career goals, find schools, find financing and the like. He coaches high school lacrosse, a sport he learned as a child on the East Coast. Like virtually every other school district in Oregon, Sisters faces budget challenges in the years ahead. Its board recently rejected an early-retirement proposal that was aimed at winnowing staff numbers without layoffs. That may not have closed its roughly $1 million budget gap, but it might have helped. Either way, it’s going to take creativity and hard work to protect a school system of which the community is rightfully proud. Gorayeb, familiar with the numbers and with the community as a whole, is well suited to the task.

My Nickel’s Worth We can’t afford it I keep hearing on the news about how the unions are fighting back in Wisconsin and other states because the governors want to do away with some of the collective bargaining on how much the employees will have to pay for their health care. The union employees pay very little or nothing at all. The states want them to pay their fair share of the cost and not put it on us, the taxpayer. The unions are upset about that. I’m really sorry for you. You want us, the taxpayer, to pay for your health care when we can’t afford health care for ourselves and our families. You people want more and more. I read in The Bulletin on April 5 that Deschutes County wants union employees to pay more for their health care. The county wants to raise it 20 percent, and they are upset about that. The union employees pay $50 per month, and the county pays $1,000 per month per employee. That’s what we, the taxpayer, pay for their health care. Can we afford that, can we keep paying for that, when we can’t afford that for ourselves? Just my thoughts. Mark O’Connell La Pine

Where are the fiscal conservatives? Bend City Council has proposed almost $200 million in new spending right after the elections; $82,000 went to a study to tell the council it could cut $3.5 million from the proposed $67 million water project. Why didn’t the council get competitive bids or tell the contractor its bid was too high? Then council members want to spend $100,000 on another study to tell them which com-

puter system to buy! Why don’t they just fire the head of their IT department and get someone who can get that info for free and earn their high salaries? How about the Deschutes County Commissioners hiring Dave Frohnmeyer at $500 per hour? Dave should ask $900; they’ll pay it! Finally, a new tax will be voted on May 17. How many Bend city councilors said they were fiscal conservatives and then put this thing on the ballot? Ed Barbeau Bend

No more grocery bags My husband and I were driving past the landfill the other morning and we saw two landfill employees walking across 27th Street picking up garbage. More than 80 percent of the garbage they were picking up, which had flown out of the landfill, was plastic grocery bags. These grocery bags were tangled in the sagebrush and holding on to the trees. Not a pretty sight. There is a simple fix to this problem: no more grocery bags! As the years go on, our country enables our society and overly caters to everyone’s needs. This is why we are becoming a country of entitlement. It may seem overblown when we are talking about grocery bags, but think about it. Years ago when shoppers went to the grocery store, they brought their own bags. If grocery stores no longer supplied bags, shoppers would have no choice but to bring their own — and if they didn’t, too bad. They would have no one to blame but themselves. And as they were piling their groceries into their car, they would be telling themselves they need to bring their bags on

their next shopping trip. It’s called being responsible. What an easy solution to a big problem that would never have started to begin with if we weren’t so worried about simplicity and catering to everyone’s needs. Darla Prater Bend

The merits of biomass So, if we are to believe the recent article on biomass power’s emissions, reprinted from the Seattle Times, biomass is potentially worse than coal from a greenhouse gas perspective. But wouldn’t a thinking person reading this ask this simple question: Is it better to dig or drill fossil fuels out of the ground and release carbon stored for millions of years, or is it better to utilize carbon that is already part of the aboveground carbon cycle for our energy? If we got all of our energy from this source sustainably, would we have a carbon problem? Of course not! While we can’t get close to all our energy from sustainable biomass, we can certainly increase its contribution. In Oregon, the existing and proposed biomass plants use mill waste materials, wood thrown away in landfills, forest slash and thinnings for fuel, in the process improving air quality, restoring forest health, lowering fire risk and even increasing forest resiliency so they can withstand climate change. The Manomet Study in Massachusetts dealt with the potential liquidation of forests for use as fuel, an entirely different dynamic (and economic impossibility), and certainly not Oregon’s issue. Bill Carlson Black Butte Ranch

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

System of negotiating public union contracts unfair to everyone By Daniel Re Bulletin guest columnist

A

s reported in The Bulletin on April 2, the Bend Police union and the Bend Firefighters union asked for private negotiations with the city regarding salary changes for 2012. Under Oregon law, labor negotiations are required to be held in open meetings, not private meetings, unless both sides request private meetings, and the law has been that way since 1995. The request for private meetings by the unions was not sufficient to exclude the public. That happened only because the city also agreed to private meetings. The city has refused to explain why it made that decision, but it is very convenient for both the members of the city negotiating team and the unions. Now, they get to secretly decide what the people of Bend are going to pay them for 2012. And the people of Bend will

know nothing about that decision until after it has been made. This procedure is clearly inconsistent with the city’s organizational chart, which places the people of Bend at the top. It makes no sense that city employees can negotiate their own salary and benefits, and they don’t have to tell the boss what they are doing until after they have done it. Either the secret negotiations should stop or the city should change the organizational chart and put the people at the bottom because that is where they are when union negotiations are secret. While the secret negotiation of public employee contracts is a concern, in my opinion there is a much more serious problem. That problem is that the people who make up the city negotiation team that negotiates with the unions on behalf of the people of Bend are Bend public employees. These management employees are not union mem-

IN MY VIEW bers, but they receive similar benefits to what they agree to give the union members. They get the same retirement and health care benefits, and they receive similar salary increases. There is nothing unfair about those increases because the management employees should maintain their relative financial position with respect to the union members. The problem is that they have a direct financial interest in the outcome of the negotiations, and that interest is the same interest that the unions have. Human nature makes them want to get the most they can for themselves, and that natural influence prevents the negotiating team from effectively representing the people of Bend. The only persons represented in the secret negotiations are the public employees who are sitting on both sides of the table.

If you think this system is fair, then you would agree that it would be just as fair to turn the tables and require the union members to be represented in the negotiations by a group of private citizens who are not union members. The city would also be represented by a similar group of private citizens. These two groups would meet in secret and then tell the public employees what salary and benefits they are going to receive. As absurd as this sounds, the reverse of it is exactly what is happening to the nonpublic employee citizens of Bend, and that probably goes a long way toward explaining the financial problems Bend is facing today. It is true that whatever agreement is negotiated between the city management team and the unions, that agreement must still be approved by the City Council, but I can find no record that the Bend City Council has ever

modified a negotiated union contract. To correct this problem, the Bend City Council can and should appoint a team of private citizens to negotiate with the unions. These citizens would not be public employees, and they would not have the same financial stake in the outcome of the negotiations that the union members have. The public employees have a team of very experienced Portland attorneys to represent their interests. They do not need any help from the city’s negotiating team. The current system is unfair to everyone involved in it, and it is especially unfair to the people of Bend who will have to pay for the secretly negotiated agreement. The current system does, however, explain why both the unions and the city prefer to keep the bargaining secret until an agreement has been reached. Daniel Re lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 C7


W E AT H ER

C8 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, APRIL 15

HIGH Ben Burkel

53

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Today: Mainly cloudy, widespread rain showers, afternoon breezes, cool.

STATE Western 56/38

51/36

60/41

42/29

50s Warm Springs

Marion Forks

56/40

49/33

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

51/38

54/39

53/36

Oakridge Elk Lake 41/24

Rain and snow above 6,500 feet today. Rain and snow showers tonight. Central

55/39

Camp Sherman 50/33 Redmond Prineville 53/36 Cascadia 51/37 52/37 Sisters 52/35 Bend 40s Post 50/35

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

50/32

50/31

Vancouver 48/41

Seattle

Chemult 49/30

50/34

48/33

Redding 51/35

Helena 53/35

Boise

53/36

57/43

Idaho Falls

50s

Elko

54/39

59/35

Reno

48/34

Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers today and tonight.

50s

Crater Lake

51/34

Bend

39/32

San Francisco

66/44

Salt Lake City

66/53

70s

60s

Sunrise today. . . . . . 6:22 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:49 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:21 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:50 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 5:19 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:39 a.m.

58/42

Moon phases Full

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

LOW

Last

New

April 17 April 24 May 2

First

May 10

Friday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 51/42/0.54 . . . . . . 53/42/r. . . . . . 51/40/pc Baker City . . . . . . 50/23/0.04 . . . . . 50/35/sh. . . . . . 54/28/sh Brookings . . . . . . 52/43/0.20 . . . . . 52/47/sh. . . . . . 55/44/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . .48/26/trace . . . . . .51/38/rs. . . . . . 56/30/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 55/40/0.14 . . . . . . 54/44/r. . . . . . 57/38/sh Klamath Falls . . . 51/27/0.00 . . . . . 54/40/sh. . . . . . 59/38/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 48/27/0.00 . . . . . 49/34/sh. . . . . . 54/31/sh La Pine . . . . . . . . 47/28/0.00 . . . . . .50/32/rs. . . . . . 54/30/pc Medford . . . . . . .58/38/trace . . . . . 58/49/sh. . . . . . 65/46/sh Newport . . . . . . . 50/41/0.34 . . . . . . 53/44/r. . . . . . 51/41/pc North Bend . . . . . 55/43/0.96 . . . . . . 52/50/r. . . . . . 54/44/sh Ontario . . . . . . . .54/29/trace . . . . . 55/45/sh. . . . . . 63/38/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 54/32/0.07 . . . . . 60/39/sh. . . . . . 60/38/pc Portland . . . . . . . 52/42/0.55 . . . . . . 55/44/r. . . . . . 55/41/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 50/31/0.00 . . . . . 51/37/sh. . . . . . 59/31/pc Redmond. . . . . . .52/28/trace . . . . . 52/39/sh. . . . . . 57/30/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 56/42/0.20 . . . . . 57/46/sh. . . . . . 59/40/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 53/42/0.30 . . . . . . 55/43/r. . . . . . 56/38/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 48/30/0.00 . . . . . 52/35/sh. . . . . . 56/29/sh The Dalles . . . . . .58/37/trace . . . . . 56/37/sh. . . . . . 59/40/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .83 in 1947 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.17” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .13 in 1977 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.31” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.93” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.12” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.16 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.79 in 1937 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:53 a.m. . . . . . .6:46 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:20 a.m. . . . . . .5:00 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .5:53 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:11 a.m. . . . . . .7:06 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:24 p.m. . . . . . .6:13 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:33 a.m. . . . . . .5:38 p.m.

2

LOW

53 23

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Partly cloudy and cool. HIGH

52 22

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES City

Missoula

64/51

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

40s

50/39

52/34

44/26

Calgary 47/23

Eugene Mostly cloudy with a 54/44 chance of showers today Grants Pass and tonight. 57/45 Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

BEND ALMANAC

TUESDAY Partly cloudy and cool.

52 22

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 61° Hermiston • 20° Meacham

MONDAY

Partly to mostly cloudy, cooler, afternoon LOW breezes.

HIGH

57 26

55/44

Burns

50/32

Crescent

Crescent Lake

HIGH

36

Portland

Brothers

50/33

LOW

Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers, warmLOW er, breezy afternoon.

NORTHWEST

45/33

La Pine

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers, not as cold.

SUNDAY

Low pressure will produce rain in the west with showers for much of the region today.

Paulina

49/34

Sunriver

SATURDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 38-107 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 102-166 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . 153-177 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . 148 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 82-98 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 . . . . . . . 194 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 50-132

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No report Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . . 1 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . 3 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . no report . . . . 175-270 . . . . . . . 124 . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . 46-86 . . . no report . . . . . . . . 77

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

Vancouver 48/41

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

• 101° Laredo, Texas

• 16° Truckee, Calif.

• 1.23” Bremerton, Wash.

Honolulu 85/70

Saskatoon 44/27 Winnipeg 39/29

Calgary 47/23

Seattle 50/39

Thunder Bay 46/30

Quebec 41/31

Halifax 42/24 Portland Bismarck Billings Green Bay To ronto Portland 46/28 42/29 56/35 51/39 Boise 55/44 42/35 St. Paul Boston 57/43 50/32 47/37 Bufal o Rapid City Detroit 52/37 New York 44/29 51/43 56/39 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 51/37 Chicago 68/53 57/43 Cheyenne 53/45 Omaha San Francisco 54/33 Salt Lak e Washington, D. C. 45/32 66/53 Louisville City 59/47 66/53 Denver Kansas City Las 58/42 56/32 54/39 Nashville Vegas St. Louis Charlotte 73/51 79/61 73/58 67/45 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Little Rock 71/42 78/58 65/36 71/44 Phoenix Atlanta 90/65 75/57 Birmingham Dallas Tijuana 77/52 75/45 77/56 Houston 86/49

Chihuahua 88/52

Anchorage 45/27

La Paz 92/59 Juneau 49/28

Mazatlan 89/62

Monterrey 94/64

FRONTS

New Orleans 84/62

Orlando 86/65 Miami 87/73

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .93/65/0.01 . . .77/43/s . . . 77/54/s Akron . . . . . . . . .67/39/0.00 . . .62/46/c . . 52/37/sh Albany. . . . . . . . .64/45/0.00 . . .57/29/s . . . .53/43/r Albuquerque. . . .63/46/0.00 . . .71/42/s . . . 75/49/s Anchorage . . . . .42/27/0.00 . . .45/27/s . . . 44/30/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .75/51/0.00 . . .75/57/t . . . .68/47/t Atlantic City . . . .69/45/0.03 . 51/40/pc . . . .53/49/r Austin . . . . . . . . .87/66/0.00 . . .84/47/s . . . 84/52/s Baltimore . . . . . .71/42/0.00 . 56/45/pc . . . .57/50/t Billings. . . . . . . . .52/38/0.04 . 56/35/pc . . .54/33/rs Birmingham . . . .79/51/0.00 . . .77/52/t . . 68/45/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .43/24/0.00 . .42/29/sn . . . 46/26/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .52/31/0.00 . .57/43/sh . . 62/37/sh Boston. . . . . . . . .65/43/0.02 . . .47/37/s . . . 49/44/c Bridgeport, CT. . .68/46/0.00 . . .50/38/s . . . .48/46/r Buffalo . . . . . . . .55/34/0.00 . 52/37/pc . . . .50/38/r Burlington, VT. . .51/39/0.05 . . .46/29/s . . . .50/39/r Caribou, ME . . . .46/34/0.18 . . .38/17/s . . 47/35/pc Charleston, SC . .77/49/0.00 . 73/63/pc . . . .79/55/t Charlotte. . . . . . .74/40/0.00 . 73/58/pc . . . .71/47/t Chattanooga. . . .77/46/0.00 . . .74/55/t . . . .65/45/r Cheyenne . . . . . .44/28/0.07 . . .54/33/s . . 57/33/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .53/41/0.00 . . .53/45/r . . 52/39/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .71/40/0.00 . . .65/52/t . . 55/40/sh Cleveland . . . . . .55/38/0.00 . . .57/45/c . . 51/37/sh Colorado Springs 57/36/0.02 . . .54/32/s . . 63/37/pc Columbia, MO . .76/55/0.00 . . .61/40/t . . 54/41/pc Columbia, SC . . .81/46/0.00 . 77/60/pc . . . .75/49/t Columbus, GA. . .81/51/0.00 . . .82/60/t . . . .74/49/t Columbus, OH. . .71/38/0.00 . . .68/53/t . . 55/40/sh Concord, NH . . . .61/37/0.00 . . .52/27/s . . . .48/38/r Corpus Christi. . .84/72/0.00 . 91/59/pc . . 82/59/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .84/65/0.00 . . .75/45/s . . . 77/54/s Dayton . . . . . . . .69/38/0.00 . . .63/51/t . . 53/39/sh Denver. . . . . . . . .51/33/0.03 . . .56/32/s . . 64/39/pc Des Moines. . . . .63/52/0.18 . . .51/37/r . . 54/36/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .56/45/0.00 . . .51/43/c . . 52/38/sh Duluth. . . . . . . . 31/24/trace . . .38/27/c . . .41/25/rs El Paso. . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . . .82/52/s . . . 89/56/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .39/17/0.00 . . . .43/6/s . . . . 40/9/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .49/27/0.00 . . .34/24/c . . . 38/25/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . . .62/27/s . . . 70/32/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .52/45/0.00 . .55/43/sh . . .56/35/rs Rapid City . . . . . .39/28/0.15 . 44/29/pc . . . 53/30/c Green Bay. . . . . .40/30/0.00 . . .42/35/c . . 42/33/sh Reno . . . . . . . . . .59/30/0.00 . . .66/44/c . . 69/41/pc Greensboro. . . . .73/43/0.00 . 73/57/pc . . . .70/49/t Richmond . . . . . .73/42/0.00 . 65/50/pc . . . .66/52/t Harrisburg. . . . . .70/44/0.00 . 58/40/pc . . . .54/45/r Rochester, NY . . .53/36/0.00 . . .51/36/s . . . .52/39/r Hartford, CT . . . .69/42/0.00 . . .59/35/s . . . .52/44/r Sacramento. . . . .66/39/0.00 . . .71/51/c . . 76/52/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .48/35/0.00 . .53/35/sh . . . 56/30/c St. Louis. . . . . . . .73/53/0.00 . . .67/45/t . . 53/40/sh Honolulu . . . . . . .82/75/0.00 . . .85/70/s . . . 83/70/s Salt Lake City . . .47/33/0.08 . 58/42/pc . . . 63/43/c Houston . . . . . . .82/71/0.00 . 86/49/pc . . . 81/55/s San Antonio . . . .88/70/0.00 . . .87/49/s . . . 86/56/s Huntsville . . . . . .79/49/0.00 . . .76/52/t . . 61/40/pc San Diego . . . . . .70/54/0.00 . . .73/58/s . . . 72/60/s Indianapolis . . . .69/42/0.00 . . .63/49/t . . 52/38/sh San Francisco . . .61/46/0.00 . 65/52/pc . . 64/51/pc Jackson, MS . . . .81/54/0.00 . . .80/51/t . . . 70/48/s San Jose . . . . . . .64/43/0.00 . 70/51/pc . . 69/51/pc Madison, WI . . . .51/37/0.01 . . .46/37/r . . 48/34/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .58/42/0.00 . . .66/30/s . . 71/38/pc Jacksonville. . . . .83/47/0.00 . . .81/65/t . . . .85/57/t Juneau. . . . . . . . .48/30/0.00 . .49/28/sh . . . 47/28/c Kansas City. . . . .78/56/0.00 . . .54/39/r . . . 60/45/s Amsterdam. . . . .54/45/0.00 . 58/41/pc . . . 59/43/c Lansing . . . . . . . .52/42/0.01 . . .54/43/c . . .56/35/rs Athens. . . . . . . . .68/53/0.00 . 64/50/pc . . 62/51/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .70/52/0.00 . . .79/61/s . . . 86/65/s Auckland. . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . . .68/58/c . . 64/56/sh Lexington . . . . . .69/40/0.00 . . .68/50/t . . 55/42/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .73/50/0.00 . . .86/64/s . . . 90/63/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .69/44/0.06 . . .45/32/r . . 58/40/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .86/79/0.03 . 93/78/pc . . 94/78/pc Little Rock. . . . . .81/53/0.00 . . .71/44/t . . 66/43/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .88/50/0.00 . . .74/46/s . . . 79/48/s Los Angeles. . . . .70/52/0.00 . . .78/58/s . . . 74/58/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .72/55/0.00 . . .72/57/s . . 77/59/pc Louisville. . . . . . .73/46/0.00 . . .66/53/t . . 55/44/sh Berlin. . . . . . . . . .48/43/0.00 . 55/36/pc . . . 58/36/s Memphis. . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . .75/49/t . . 64/45/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .66/50/0.00 . . .60/52/r . . . .63/53/r Miami . . . . . . . . .87/68/0.00 . 87/73/pc . . 87/74/pc Budapest. . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . .53/40/sh . . 59/40/pc Milwaukee . . . . .45/35/0.00 . . .42/39/r . . 46/36/sh Buenos Aires. . . .70/57/0.00 . 70/50/pc . . . 72/50/s Minneapolis . . . .48/35/0.00 . . .50/32/c . . . 45/30/c Cabo San Lucas .88/64/0.00 . . .91/61/s . . . 89/61/s Nashville . . . . . . .76/45/0.00 . . .73/51/t . . 58/39/sh Cairo . . . . . . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .87/65/s . . . 90/66/s New Orleans. . . .82/63/0.00 . . .84/62/t . . . 77/56/s Calgary . . . . . . . .39/30/0.82 . 47/23/pc . . . 34/22/c New York . . . . . .69/48/0.00 . 56/39/pc . . . .50/48/r Cancun . . . . . . . .88/62/0.00 . . .85/73/s . . . 86/74/s Newark, NJ . . . . .71/46/0.00 . 55/40/pc . . . .51/49/r Dublin . . . . . . . . .54/46/0.02 . .58/46/sh . . 59/43/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .63/51/0.00 . 64/50/pc . . . .68/54/t Edinburgh . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . 56/44/pc . . 56/41/pc Oklahoma City . .89/60/0.00 . 65/36/pc . . . 69/48/s Geneva . . . . . . . .57/45/0.00 . .58/39/sh . . . 61/39/s Omaha . . . . . . . .60/49/0.20 . . .45/32/r . . 56/38/pc Harare. . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . 79/56/pc . . 81/57/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .87/60/0.00 . . .86/65/t . . 88/64/pc Hong Kong . . . . .82/70/0.00 . 84/72/pc . . 86/74/pc Palm Springs. . . .82/52/0.00 . . .92/63/s . . . 98/67/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .59/45/0.94 . 58/39/pc . . . 56/42/c Peoria . . . . . . . . .70/45/0.00 . . .56/45/r . . 51/38/sh Jerusalem . . . . . .76/49/0.00 . . .75/53/s . . . 81/57/s Philadelphia . . . .69/47/0.00 . 57/43/pc . . . .53/51/r Johannesburg . . .66/54/0.15 . . .72/56/t . . . .66/54/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .81/57/0.00 . . .90/65/s . . . 94/68/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . .76/65/sh . . 75/64/sh Pittsburgh . . . . . .69/35/0.00 . 65/46/pc . . . .55/41/r Lisbon . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .82/60/s . . . 81/58/s Portland, ME. . . .62/37/0.03 . . .46/28/s . . 44/38/pc London . . . . . . . .55/46/0.00 . 59/45/pc . . 60/46/sh Providence . . . . .66/43/0.00 . . .52/36/s . . . .49/44/r Madrid . . . . . . . .81/46/0.00 . . .76/49/s . . . 72/45/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .75/43/0.00 . 72/58/pc . . . .75/51/t Manila. . . . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .93/76/s . . . 94/76/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .79/49/0.00 . 77/65/pc . . . .82/55/t Seattle. . . . . . . . .47/40/0.31 . .50/39/sh . . 53/42/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .42/35/0.01 . . 40/27/rs . . 45/29/pc Spokane . . . . . . .46/31/0.00 . .51/35/sh . . 54/33/pc Springfield, MO. .77/55/0.00 . .56/38/sh . . 58/40/pc Tampa . . . . . . . . . 86/-1/0.00 . 85/69/pc . . 84/67/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . . .88/54/s . . . 93/60/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .79/58/0.04 . .59/38/sh . . . 68/41/s Washington, DC .71/46/0.00 . 59/47/pc . . . .58/50/t Wichita . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . .54/34/sh . . . 66/47/s Yakima . . . . . . . 57/33/trace . .55/36/sh . . . 58/34/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .83/55/0.00 . . .92/61/s . . . 96/63/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . 96/75/pc . . 98/75/pc Mexico City. . . . .86/55/0.00 . 86/56/pc . . . .80/54/t Montreal. . . . . . .50/36/0.22 . . .48/32/s . . 49/39/sh Moscow . . . . . . .39/32/0.07 . .45/32/sh . . 50/33/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .79/59/t . . . .79/58/t Nassau . . . . . . . .91/70/0.00 . . .85/74/t . . 85/75/pc New Delhi. . . . . .95/72/0.00 . . .95/71/s . . 98/73/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .72/46/0.00 . .67/49/sh . . 65/48/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .54/27/0.00 . . .54/37/c . . 56/38/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .45/34/0.24 . . .48/33/s . . 50/39/sh Paris. . . . . . . . . . .59/45/0.00 . . .63/44/s . . 64/45/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .90/77/0.00 . 91/76/pc . . . 90/75/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .63/37/0.00 . .61/48/sh . . 60/47/sh Santiago . . . . . . .68/48/0.00 . . .70/45/s . . . 75/46/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .86/64/0.00 . . .81/67/t . . . .83/68/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .58/39/0.00 . 63/45/pc . . 54/38/sh Seoul . . . . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . . 65/41/s Shanghai. . . . . . .81/59/0.00 . 79/59/pc . . 64/53/sh Singapore . . . . . .90/73/1.29 . . .88/77/t . . . .87/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .57/37/0.00 . 54/41/pc . . . 55/41/c Sydney. . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . .70/60/sh . . 68/60/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .84/68/0.00 . 86/69/pc . . 85/72/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . . .75/56/s . . 81/60/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . 70/52/pc . . 70/50/sh Toronto . . . . . . . .54/43/0.00 . . .51/39/s . . 49/41/sh Vancouver. . . . . .45/37/0.25 . .48/41/sh . . 50/37/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .46/41/0.20 . .54/41/sh . . 59/39/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .54/39/0.06 . 53/36/pc . . 58/36/pc

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Football Inside In college, spring games are becoming big business, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

ADVENTURE SPORTS

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER

N B A P L AYO F F S

Blazers think they aren’t underdogs against Mavs

Timbers get first MLS win in front of home fans PORTLAND — The Portland Timbers got their first Major League Soccer victory in their rain-drenched home opener against the Chicago Fire on Thursday night. Jorge Perlaza scored two goals, while Rodney Wallace and Mamadou Dansu each added another for the Timbers in the 4-2 win at JeldWen Field. Portland (1-2-1) started the season on the road while $31 million in improvements were completed to make their downtown stadium more soccer friendly. The home fans saw the Timbers’ first goal in the 29th minute, when forward Perlaza beat Chicago keeper Sean Johnson on a breakaway. The Timbers (1-2-1) extended the lead with an unassisted goal by Wallace in the 37th minute. After the break, Perlaza scored on a rebound after Johnson misplayed an initial save in the 48th minute. League Commissioner Don Garber was at the soldout match, as was Portland Mayor Sam Adams. A number of the Portland Trail Blazers — the city’s other professional sports team — were also there, including Nicolas Batum, Rudy Fernandez, Patty Mills and Wesley Matthews. —The Associated Press

By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Trail Blazers coach Nate McMillan is dismissing any debate over the “underdog” in the series between Portland and the Dallas Mavericks. Simply put, there isn’t one, McMillan asserted Thursday. “We don’t fear Dallas. We respect them. We believe we can win,” McMillan said. “We were even this year. Both teams split and both teams won on their home court. We know where we are and who we’re playing against.” The sixth-seeded Blazers prepared for their firstround playoff series against the third-seeded Mavericks on Thursday at the team’s practice facility in Tualatin. The team will also practice at home this morning before leaving on Saturday for Dallas. The series kicks off on Saturday night at the American Airlines Center. See Blazers / D4

Next up • Playoffs, first round, Game 1, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks • When: Saturday, 6:30 p.m. • TV: ESPN • Full playoff schedule, Scoreboard, Page D2

GOLF 16! Na sets PGA Tour record for worst par-4 hole Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mountain biker Bill Hartrich pedals up a long singletrack climb at Horse Ridge east of Bend.

MOUNTAIN BIKE TRAIL GUIDE

Horse Ridge Spring is here, but this winter riding destination is a perfect way to start the season for Central Oregonians MARK MORICAL Editor’s note: Mountain Bike Trail Guide, by Bulletin outdoor writer Mark Morical, features various trails in Central Oregon and beyond. The trail guide appears on alternating Fridays through the riding season.

W

Kevin Na reacts to his third drive off the ninth tee during the first round of the Texas Open Thursday in San Antonio.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Golf ............................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 NHL .......................................... D4 NBA .......................................... D4 College football ........................ D4 Prep sports ................................D5 Adventure Sports.............. D5, D6

ith snow falling and wind ripping across the High Desert, I somewhat reluctantly pulled my mountain bike out of the garage. Sure, it is “springtime” and mountain biking season is here, but it sure hasn’t felt like it. Horse Ridge, southeast of Bend, is known as a winter mountain biking destination. And since winter continues to linger, the trails there have been in perfect shape. I made the 15-mile drive to Horse Ridge last week on a typical Central Oregon spring day — sunny at times, snowing at times, and windy all the time. Horse Ridge was recently designated by the Bureau of Land Management as a High Desert Special Recreation Management Area. The primary significance of that designation to mountain bikers is a new official trailhead, just half a mile west of the unofficial old trailhead. The trailhead features a paved parking area and a kiosk with a map of the trail. See Horse Ridge / D6

Breaking down the trail: Horse Ridge DIRECTIONS

20

To Bend

Horse Ridge Trailhead

0 y2 wa igh dH Ol

SAN ANTONIO — Kevin Na will remember the ninth hole at the Texas Open for a long time. Na set a new low Thursday for the worst par-4 hole in the PGA Tour record books, shooting a 16 with a nightmarish sequence of shots. His problems included an unplayable lie from the tee, a two-stroke penalty after the ball ricocheted off a tree and struck him, and five consecutive strokes from the woods. Na ended the first round thinking he shot a 15 on the hole. But another stroke was added after Na reviewed the video replay before signing his scorecard. He finished the round with an 8-over 80. The worst single-hole score at a PGA Tour event belongs to John Daly, who had an 18 on the par-5 sixth hole at Bay Hill in 1998. Ray Ainsley took 19 shots on the par-4 16th hole at Cherry Hills in the 1938 U.S. Open. For more on the Texas Open, see Page D2. — The Associated Press

From Bend, head east on U.S. Highway 20. About 15 miles from 27th Street, turn right at a stop sign Horse onto the Horse Ridge 20 Ridge frontage road. The turn 5,148 ft. is immediately before the 2015 highway begins climbing 2015 a long hill, and an Oregon Badlands Wilderness Millican DESCHUTES sign is located on the N ATION A L Valley left. Once on the frontage FOREST road, proceed .7 miles Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin west. Look for the new BLM trailhead on the left side of the road. There are two singletrack choices from the parking area. For an updated map of trails at Horse Ridge, visit this link from the COTA website: www.cotamtb.com/files/HorseRidge.pdf. SOURCE: Central Oregon Trail Alliance

LENGTH 10-15 mile loop options.

RATING Technically advanced, aerobically intermediate.

TRAIL FEATURES Plenty of singletrack with expansive views of the High Desert. Lava rocks make for lots of technical challenges. Trails are currently in ideal shape, but avoid riding them in the summer when they are extremely sandy.

Wesley Matthews and the Trail Blazers will try to break out the three-point goggles often as the NBA playoffs begin. Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

M L B C O M M E N TA RY

Hall of Fame? Judging Bonds will be a hot topic next year By Tyler Kepner New York Times News Service

B

arry Bonds’ statistics cannot be erased. Bonds did not get away with his actions in federal court, where on Wednesday he was convicted of a count of obstruction of justice. But in his era, Bonds was allowed to stay on the field and hit 762 home runs and win seven Most Valuable Player awards. Fans can judge those accomplishments howBarry Bonds ever they want, but may have they did happen, and trouble they are as historigetting cally valid as the 714 enough homers Babe Ruth votes to hit without facing a join the black pitcher. Hall of See Bonds / D5 Fame.


D2 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

GOLF

Today Baseball: Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Madras at Gladstone, 4:30 p.m. Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Bend (DH), 3 p.m.; Summit at Redmond (DH), 3 p.m.; Elimra at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond hosts Bend, Crook County, Madras at Eagle Crest, Ridge Course, 9 a.m. Girls golf: Summit hosts Bend, Mountain View, Redmond at Broken Top, noon Boys tennis: Summit at Jesuit, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA Girls lacrosse: Bend United at Crescent Valley, TBA; Bend United at West Salem, TBA Boys lacrosse: Hermiston at Summit, 8 p.m.

6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, second round, Golf Channel. 9:30 a.m. — Champions Tour, Outback Steakhouse Open, first round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, second round, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees or Florida Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, New York Rangers at Washington Capitals, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks, VS. network.

BOXING 6 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, junior welterweights, Ivan Popoca vs. Ruslan Provodnikov, ESPN2.

SATURDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, third round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Texas Open, third round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, third round, CBS. 1 p.m.— Champions Tour, Outback Steakhouse Open, second round, NBC. 3:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, third round, Golf Channel.

SOFTBALL 9 a.m. — College, Tennessee at LSU, ESPN2. 1:30 p.m. — College, Oklahoma at Missouri, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 10 a.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Phoenix Coyotes at Detroit Red Wings, NBC. 4 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, Indiana Pacers at Chicago Bulls, ESPN. 12:30 p.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, Philadelphia 76ers at Miami Heat, ABC. 4 p.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, Atlanta Hawks at Orlando Magic, ESPN. 5 p.m. — Boys high school, Jordan Brand Classic, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, Portland Trail Blazers at Dallas Mavericks, ESPN.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals, Root Sports. 1 p.m. — MLB, regional coverage, New York Mets at Atlanta Braves or Los Angeles Angels at Chicago White Sox or Minnesota Twins at Tampa Bay Rays, Fox. 4 p.m. — MLB, San Diego Padres at Houston Astros or Florida Marlins at Philadephia Phillies, MLB network.

FOOTBALL 11 a.m. — College, Notre Dame Blue/Gold Game, VS. network.

AUTO RACING Noon — NASCAR, Nationwide Series, Aaron’s 312, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — NHRA, VisitMyrtleBeach.com 4-wide Nationals, qualifying, ESPN2 (same-day tape). 3 p.m. — IndyCar, Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, qualifying, VS. network (taped).

LACROSSE 1:30 p.m. — National Lacrosse League, Calgary Roughnecks at Colorado Mammoth, VS. network (taped).

SOCCER 3:30 p.m. — Major League Soccer, Seattle Sounders at Philadelphia Union, Root Sports (same-day tape).

SUNDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m. — PGA Tour, Texas Open, final round, Golf Channel. 10 a.m.— Champions Tour, Outback Steakhouse Open, final round, NBC. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, final round, CBS. 4 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, final round, Golf Channel.

AUTO RACING 9 a.m. — NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Aaron’s 499, Fox.

x-Saturday, April 30: Indiana at Chicago, TBD Miami vs. Philadelphia Saturday, April 16: Philadelphia at Miami, 12:30 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Miami, 4 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Miami at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Miami at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD Boston vs. New York Sunday, April 17: New York at Boston, 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: New York at Boston, 4 p.m. Friday, April 22: Boston at New York, 4 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Boston at New York, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New York at Boston, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Boston at New York, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: New York at Boston, TBD Orlando vs. Atlanta Saturday, April 16: Atlanta at Orlando, 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Atlanta at Orlando, 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 22: Orlando at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Sunday, April 24: Orlando at Atlanta, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD

IN THE BLEACHERS

Saturday Track: Redmond, Summit, Madras, Culver, Gilchrist at La Pine Invitational, 11 a.m.; Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Crater Classic in Central Point, 10:45 a.m.; Crook County at Lower Columbia Invitational in St. Helens, Wash., 12:30 p.m.; Culver at Meet of Champions in Salem, TBA Baseball: Culver at Burns (DH), 1 p.m.; Marshall at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond hosts at Eagle Crest Challenge Course, TBA Softball: Marshall at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Boys tennis: Summit at Jesuit, 10 a.m.; Sisters at Central, noon Girls tennis: Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA; Sisters at Madras, 8:30 p.m. Girls lacrosse: Bend United at Marist, TBA; Bend United at Corvallis, TBA Boys lacrosse: Hermiston at Bend, 1 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour TEXAS OPEN Thursday At TPC San Antonio San Antonio Purse: $6.2 million Yardage: 7,435; Par 72 (36-36) First Round J.J. Henry 34-33—67 Stewart Cink 34-33—67 Charley Hoffman 35-33—68 Jhonattan Vegas 34-34—68 Vaughn Taylor 34-34—68 Kevin Chappell 37-31—68 Adam Scott 35-33—68 Troy Matteson 36-33—69 Kevin Streelman 36-33—69 Jim Herman 34-35—69 Brendan Steele 35-34—69 Geoff Ogilvy 36-33—69 Brandt Snedeker 37-32—69 Dean Wilson 36-34—70 J.B. Holmes 35-35—70 Joseph Bramlett 37-33—70 Martin Piller 36-34—70 Bobby Gates 34-36—70 Kevin Stadler 34-36—70 Frank Lickliter II 37-33—70 Chris Kirk 35-35—70 Tag Ridings 31-39—70 Aron Price 36-34—70 Jeff Maggert 36-35—71 Blake Adams 35-36—71 Carl Paulson 39-32—71 Brian Gay 36-35—71 Ryan Palmer 35-36—71 Bill Lunde 35-36—71 Johnson Wagner 34-37—71 Charles Howell III 36-35—71 John Senden 34-37—71 Scott Stallings 36-35—71 Billy Horschel 34-37—71 Kris Blanks 35-36—71 Rich Beem 35-36—71 Steve Flesch 36-35—71 Briny Baird 35-36—71 Angel Cabrera 33-38—71 Arjun Atwal 36-35—71 Bob Estes 34-37—71 Pat Perez 35-36—71 Michael Sim 36-35—71 Kevin Sutherland 35-36—71 Paul Goydos 35-36—71 Chad Campbell 34-37—71 Michael Putnam 36-35—71 Peter Tomasulo 37-34—71 David Hearn 34-37—71 Cameron Tringale 35-36—71 Kent Jones 36-36—72 Steve Elkington 36-36—72 Fredrik Jacobson 38-34—72 Cameron Beckman 38-34—72 Derek Lamely 36-36—72 John Rollins 37-35—72 Chris DiMarco 36-36—72 Brendon de Jonge 34-38—72 Tim Petrovic 35-37—72 D.J. Brigman 34-38—72 Michael Thompson 38-34—72 Shaun Micheel 33-39—72 Ryuji Imada 34-38—72 Martin Laird 35-37—72 John Merrick 36-36—72 Josh Teater 37-35—72 Billy Mayfair 33-39—72 Fabian Gomez 37-35—72 Zack Miller 36-36—72 Jim Renner 36-36—72 Joe Affrunti 35-37—72 Woody Austin 36-37—73 Ricky Barnes 38-35—73 J.P. Hayes 37-36—73 Justin Leonard 37-36—73 Anthony Kim 38-35—73 Rocco Mediate 37-36—73

Ben Martin Jesper Parnevik Spencer Levin Bryce Molder Michael Connell Nick O’Hern Scott McCarron Keegan Bradley Andres Gonzales Colt Knost Parker LaBarge Matt Every William McGirt Garth Mulroy Roland Thatcher Chris Riley Matt Jones James Driscoll Tommy Gainey Chez Reavie Robert Gamez Jarrod Lyle Marc Turnesa Anders Hansen Chris Stroud Bo Van Pelt David Duval Brandt Jobe Hunter Haas Alexandre Rocha Tim Herron Richard S. Johnson Nathan Green Scott Verplank Jimmy Walker Paul Stankowski Jeff Klauk Will Strickler Michael Arnaud Eric Axley Joe Ogilvie Scott Gordon Scott Gutschewski David Mathis Harrison Frazar Ted Purdy Chris Smith Justin Hicks Nate Smith Marc Leishman Omar Uresti Steven Bowditch Chris Baryla Alex Prugh Bio Kim Duffy Waldorf Garrett Willis Kyle Stanley Mike Weir Sunghoon Kang Jin Jeong Jerod Turner Brad Lardon Kevin Na Kevin Kisner Matt McQuillan Daniel Summerhays

36-37—73 37-36—73 37-36—73 36-37—73 38-35—73 35-38—73 35-38—73 37-36—73 40-33—73 38-35—73 38-35—73 36-37—73 35-38—73 39-34—73 39-35—74 39-35—74 38-36—74 36-38—74 40-34—74 37-37—74 34-40—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 37-37—74 38-37—75 37-38—75 39-36—75 40-35—75 39-36—75 36-39—75 37-38—75 38-37—75 37-38—75 38-37—75 36-39—75 37-39—76 38-38—76 37-39—76 36-40—76 38-38—76 37-39—76 39-37—76 38-38—76 39-38—77 36-41—77 36-41—77 37-40—77 39-38—77 38-39—77 38-39—77 37-40—77 39-38—77 39-39—78 36-42—78 41-37—78 41-37—78 37-41—78 41-38—79 41-38—79 43-36—79 41-38—79 40-40—80 47-33—80 42-40—82 42-40—82 43-40—83

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE Playoffs All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington 1, New York Rangers 0 Wednesday, April 13: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Friday, April 15: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m.

Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, noon Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, noon x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Thursday, April 14: Buffalo 1, Philadelphia 0 Saturday, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, noon x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Montreal 1, Boston 0 Thursday, April 14: Montreal 2, Boston 0 Saturday, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 13: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 1, Chicago 0 Wednesday, April 13: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday, April 15: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Thursday, April 14: San Jose 3, Los Angeles 2, OT Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, April 13: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Nashville 1, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 13: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday, April 15: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBD

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION Playoffs All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Chicago vs. Indiana Saturday, April 16: Indiana at Chicago, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Indiana at Chicago, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Indiana, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Chicago at Indiana, 11:30 a.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Indiana at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Chicago at Indiana, TBD

WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio vs. Memphis Sunday, April 17: Memphis at San Antonio, 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 20: Memphis at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: San Antonio at Memphis, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 25: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD L.A. Lakers vs. New Orleans Sunday, April 17: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 22: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, April 24: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, TBD Dallas vs. Portland Saturday, April 16: Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Dallas at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Dallas at Portland, 2 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Portland at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Dallas at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD Oklahoma City vs. Denver Sunday, April 17: Denver at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Denver at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Oklahoma City at Denver, 7 p.m. Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Denver, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Denver, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD NBA LEADERS Through regular reason ——— SCORING G FG FT Durant, OKC 78 711 594 James, MIA 79 758 503 Anthony, NYK 77 684 507 Wade, MIA 76 692 494 Bryant, LAL 82 740 483 Stoudemire, NYK 78 744 473 Rose, CHI 81 711 476 Ellis, GOL 80 726 340 Martin, HOU 80 553 594 Nowitzki, DAL 73 610 395 Howard, ORL 78 619 546 Griffin, LAC 82 696 446 Westbrook, OKC 82 614 531 Aldridge, POR 81 707 351 Bargnani, TOR 66 525 287 Granger, IND 79 535 395 Lopez, NJN 82 644 385 FG PERCENTAGE FG Hilario, DEN 402 Howard, ORL 619 Okafor, NOR 300 Gortat, PHX 338 Horford, ATL 513 Monroe, DET 303 McGee, WAS 332 Ibaka, OKC 335 Young, PHL 458 Millsap, UTA 525 REBOUNDS G OFF DEF Love, MIN 73 330 782 Howard, ORL 78 309 789 Randolph, MEM 75 326 588 Griffin, LAC 82 270 719 Humphries, NJN 74 225 546 Gasol, LAL 82 268 568 Lee, GOL 73 217 497 Jefferson, UTA 82 235 559 Okafor, NOR 72 230 454 Chandler, DAL 74 206 486 ASSISTS G Nash, PHX 75 Rondo, BOS 68 Williams, NJN 65 Paul, NOR 80 Calderon, TOR 68 Felton, DEN 75 Wall, WAS 69 Kidd, DAL 80 Westbrook, OKC 82 Rose, CHI 81

PTS 2161 2111 1970 1941 2078 1971 2026 1929 1876 1681 1784 1845 1793 1769 1414 1622 1673

AVG 27.7 26.7 25.6 25.5 25.3 25.3 25.0 24.1 23.5 23.0 22.9 22.5 21.9 21.8 21.4 20.5 20.4

FGA 654 1044 524 603 921 550 604 617 847 988

PCT .615 .593 .573 .561 .557 .551 .550 .543 .541 .531

TOT 1112 1098 914 989 771 836 714 794 684 692

AVG 15.2 14.1 12.2 12.1 10.4 10.2 9.8 9.7 9.5 9.4

AST 855 760 667 782 605 625 574 655 670 623

AVG 11.4 11.2 10.3 9.8 8.9 8.3 8.3 8.2 8.2 7.7

TENNIS ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Thursday At The Monte-Carlo Country Club Monte Carlo, Monaco Purse: $3.66 million (Masters 1000) Surface: Clay-Outdoor

Singles Third Round David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Milos Raonic, Canada, 6-1, 6-3. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Tomas Berdych (5), Czech Republic, 6-4, 6-2. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Richard Gasquet (13), France, 6-2, 6-4. Viktor Troicki (11), Serbia, def. Tommy Robredo, Spain, 3-6, 2-1, retired. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Marin Cilic (15), Croatia, 6-4, 6-3. Frederico Gil, Portugal, def. Gael Monfils (8), France, 7-6 (6), 6-2. Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Gilles Simon (16), France, 6-3, 6-3. Jurgen Melzer (7), Austria, def. Nicolas Almagro (9), Spain, 6-1, 6-4.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 3 1 0 9 3 Toronto FC 1 1 3 6 6 New England 1 1 3 6 5 Houston 1 1 2 5 5 New York 1 1 2 5 2 Columbus 1 1 2 5 3 Chicago 1 2 1 4 7 Sporting Kansas City 1 1 1 4 8 D.C. 1 2 1 4 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 4 0 0 12 8 Colorado 3 2 0 9 8 Los Angeles 2 1 3 9 5 Seattle 1 2 2 5 5 San Jose 1 1 2 5 5 Vancouver 1 2 2 5 9 FC Dallas 1 2 1 4 4 Portland 1 2 1 4 6 Chivas USA 0 2 2 2 3 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Thursday’s Game Portland 4, Chicago 2 Saturday’s Games Seattle FC at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Chivas USA at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at New York, 4:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Chicago, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Portland, 3 p.m. New England at Houston, 4 p.m.

GA 1 6 6 4 2 3 9 8 8 GA 1 6 6 6 4 10 5 8 5

BASEBALL College Pacific-10 Conference ——— Today’s Games Oregon State at Stanford, 5:30 p.m. Arizona at UCLA, 6 p.m. California at Washington, 6 p.m. Oregon at USC, 6 p.m. Washington State at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Optioned RHP Frank Herrmann to Columbus (IL). DETROIT TIGERS—Recalled RHP Al Alburquerque from Toledo (IL). Optioned RHP Robbie Weinhardt to Toledo. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Placed RHP Robinson Tejeda on the 15-day DL. Recalled RHP Blake Wood from Omaha (PCL). MINNESOTA TWINS—Placed C Joe Mauer on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 13. Select the contract of C Steve Holm from Rochester (IL). National League COLORADO ROCKIES—Optioned RHP Greg Reynolds to Colorado Springs (PCL). Selected the contract of RHP Alan Johnson from Colorado Springs. Transferred RHP Aaron Cook from the 15- to the 60-day DL. BASKETBALL Women’s National Basketball Association MINNESOTA LYNX—Signed F Maya Moore. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled F Rob Klinkhammer, F Jeremy Morin, F Brandon Pirri, D Brian Connelly, D Shawn Lalonde, D Ryan Stanton and G Alec Richards from Rockford (AHL). COLLEGE KANSAS—Announced freshman G Josh Selby has declared for the NBA draft.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 76 0 44 21 The Dalles 29 0 14 10 John Day 17 0 94 73 McNary 4 0 50 34 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Wednesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 864 1 3064 1317 The Dalles 161 0 826 487 John Day 104 0 1831 1159 McNary 66 1 1657 999

11 a.m. — IndyCar, Firestone Indy Lights, VS. network (taped). 2 p.m. — Le Mans Series, Tequila Patron American Le Mans at Long Beach, ESPN2 (taped). 4 p.m. — NHRA, VisitMyrtleBeach.com 4-wide Nationals, ESPN2 (same-day tape). 7 p.m. — Global Rallycross Championship, ESPN2 (taped).

HOCKEY

Cink, Henry lead Texas Open after Na’s meltdown

Noon — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Washington Capitals at New York Rangers, NBC.

The Associated Press

5 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Vancouver Canucks at Chicago Blackhawks, VS. network.

BOWLING 10 a.m. — PBA, Lumber Liquidators Dick Weber Playoffs, championship round, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — College, NCAA Championship, ESPN.

BASEBALL 10 a.m. — College, Vanderbilt at South Carolina, ESPN2. 10:30 a.m. — MLB, Toronto Blue Jays at Boston Red Sox, TBS. 11 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals, Root Sports. 5 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, Memphis Grizzlies at San Antonio Spurs, TNT. 12:30 p.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, New Orleans Hornets at Los Angeles Lakers, ABC. 4 p.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, New York Knicks at Boston Celtics, TNT. 6 p.m. — NBA, playoffs, first round, Denver Nuggets at Oklahoma City Thunder, TNT.

SOFTBALL 1 p.m. — College, Oklahoma at Missouri, ESPN.

SOCCER 3 p.m. — Major League Soccer, FC Dallas at Portland Timbers, Root Sports.

RADIO TODAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Stanford, KICE-AM 940, KRCOAM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Eric Gay / The Associated Press

Stewart Cink waves after a birdie putt on the ninth hole during the first round of the Texas Open Thursday in San Antonio. Cink is tied for the lead.

SAN ANTONIO — Kevin Na watched his first shot on No. 9 veer badly off course. His next stroke wasn’t any better. Or the next one. Or the 11 after that. Or maybe it was 12. Thirteen? Na himself couldn’t keep track. “I got done with the hole and I said (to my caddie), ‘I think I made somewhere between a 10 and a 15,” Na said. “But I think it’s close to a 15.” Try 16. J.J. Henry and former British Open champion Stewart Cink shot 5-under 67s to begin the Texas Open atop the leaderboard, but the spotlight belonged to Na, whose meltdown on the par-4 ninth ranked among the most dreadful in PGA Tour history and sunk his chances after an otherwise impressive first round Thursday. Adam Scott, riding the momentum of his runner-up finish at the Masters, began his defense of last year’s Texas Open championship strong and was a stroke back. The Australian shot a 68 and was tied with Charley Hoffman, Jhonattan Vegas, Vaughn Taylor and Kevin Chappell. If it wasn’t for No. 9, Na might’ve been right there with them. Na birdied No. 18 to go 4 under on the other 17 holes. But so dreadful was No. 9 that the score was adjusted three times — first a 14, then 15, and finally, following a lengthy review of a video replay before signing his scorecard, it changed yet again to a 16. Scott and Geoff Ogilvy, who finished the round two strokes back at 3 under, were in the group behind Na. They watched and

GOLF ROUNDUP waited to tee off as the 27-year-old hacked, whiffed and bumbled his way through a nearly 20-minute ordeal. “There’s some rocks in there and some pretty nasty stuff,” Ogilvy said of the 474yard ninth. “You don’t have to do a whole lot wrong to have three or four attempts to try and get it out. It becomes a comedy of errors sometimes.” Having a far better day was Cink, who didn’t decide to play at the Texas Open until he missed the cut at the Masters. He signed up 2½ hours after the deadline. The 2009 British Open winner was glad he did, shooting a bogey-free first round. “I didn’t really feel like I would go forward by taking another week off,” Cink said. “So I decided to add this one and just, you know, get right back to it instead of missing the cut at a major for another week.” Also on Thursday: Noren leads in Malaysia KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — Alexander Noren shot an 8-under 64 to take a twostroke lead in the weather-shortened first day of the Malaysian Open on Thursday. Masters champion Charl Schwartzel (73) struggled after only arriving in the country only a day earlier, while Rory McIlroy (69) was only three shots behind Noren in a tie for ninth. Most competitors finished the first round, but some will have to wait until this morning because inclement weather forced play to be stopped.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 D3

S  B

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Track and field • Bend decathlete Eaton improves PR in discus: Ashton Eaton, a track and field star from Bend, set a new personal record in the discus Thursday while competing in the Mt. SAC Relays Decathlon at Azusa Pacific University in Azusa, Calif. Eaton, a University of Oregon graduate now competing for OTC (Oregon Track Club) Elite, threw the discus 152 feet, 7 inches, on Thursday. His previous best in the event was 14411. Eaton was also scheduled to compete in the javelin and the pole vault.

Baseball • MLB leans toward extra replay for 2012: More replay could be coming for Major League Baseball next season. MLB is leaning toward expanding replay for 2012 to include trapped balls and fair-or-foul rulings down the lines, a person familiar with the talks tells The Associated Press. Commissioner Bud Selig and a group of umpires discussed the extra video review at spring training and were in agreement, said the person, who recently spoke on condition of anonymity because the matter is still being discussed. Baseball began using replay late in the 2008 season, though only to check potential home run balls.

Football • Mediation resumes in NFL, players dispute: The NFL and its locked-out players have completed their first day of mediation under a court order and will meet again today as they try to resolve their labor dispute. Commissioner Roger Goodell, Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson and New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft were among those on hand for the closed-door session at the federal courthouse in Minneapolis. NFL executive vice president Jeff Pash says “it was constructive to get together” but declined to be more specific after the meeting. NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith was joined by attorneys, linebackers Ben Leber and Mike Vrabel, as well as Hall of Fame defensive end Carl Eller.

Auto racing

NL BOXSCORES Cardinals 9, Dodgers 5 St. Louis Theriot ss Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Berkman rf Salas p f-Freese ph Franklin p Schumaker 2b Y.Molina c Descalso 3b J.Garcia p a-Craig ph Boggs p c-Jay ph-rf Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 4 0 1 0 5 4 3 2 1 0 1 41

R H 0 2 2 2 2 1 2 3 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 9 16

St. Louis IP H R ER J.Garcia W, 2-0 5 8 3 2 Boggs H, 1 2 0 0 0 Salas 1 2 1 1 Franklin 1 1 1 1 Los Angeles IP H R ER Kuroda L, 2-1 5 10 6 5 MacDougal 1 1 0 0 Cormier 2 4 3 1 Broxton 1 1 0 0 WP—Kuroda 3. PB—Y.Molina. T—3:04. A—34,288 (56,000).

Basketball

San Diego AB Venable rf 4 Headley 3b 2 O.Hudson 2b 2 Ludwick lf 4 Gregerson p 0 Hundley c 4 Hawpe 1b 2 a-Cantu ph-1b 2 Maybin cf 4 Bartlett ss 3 Moseley p 2 Luebke p 0 b-E.Patterson ph-lf 0 Totals 29

Colleges • KU ticket office official sentenced to 57 months: A former associate director in charge of the University of Kansas ticket office and “gatekeeper” for stolen tickets was sentenced Thursday to 57 months in prison for her role in the $2 million conspiracy. Prosecutors accused Charlette Blubaugh, 44, of providing tickets for basketball and football games to others who then sold them for personal profit. She was also sentenced to pay a share of the more than $2 million in restitution along with others convicted in the conspiracy, and was ordered to spend three years under court supervision once she is released from prison. Her husband has been sentenced to a 46-month prison term.

Cycling • Italian cycling federation calls for 4-year bans: The Italian cycling federation is calling for doping bans to be extended from two to four years and wants team directors and other squad members banned indefinitely for first offenses. The federation also wants lifetime bans for riders’ second offenses. The proposals were unveiled at an emergency meeting Thursday. They may be approved at the federation’s council meeting May 4, three days before the Giro d’Italia starts. • Ventoso wins 2nd Castilla stage: Spaniard Fran Ventoso won a second straight stage of the Vuelta de Castilla and Leon on Thursday in Spain, and Alberto Contador placed 14th to move into ninth overall after two legs. Ventoso covered the 132-mile leg in 5 hours, 6 minutes, 23 seconds to edge Sergio Ribeiro of Portugal and Russel Downing of Britain in a sprint finish. —From wire reports

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

AMERICAN LEAGUE SO 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 4

Avg. .314 .377 .226 .391 .311 --.342 --.260 .189 .286 .000 .250 .000 .267

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Carroll ss 5 2 3 1 0 0 .372 Broxton p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Blake 3b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .300 Ethier rf 4 0 1 0 1 0 .360 Kemp cf 5 2 3 2 0 1 .444 Uribe 2b-ss 4 0 1 1 1 1 .146 Loney 1b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .184 Hoffmann lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 d-Gwynn ph-lf 0 0 0 0 1 0 .296 A.Ellis c 4 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Kuroda p 1 0 0 0 1 0 .125 MacDougal p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Paul ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Cormier p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 e-Miles ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .240 Totals 38 5 11 4 4 5 St. Louis 021 120 300 — 9 16 0 Los Angeles 101 100 011 — 5 11 2 a-singled for J.Garcia in the 6th. b-struck out for MacDougal in the 6th. c-lined out for Boggs in the 8th. d-walked for Hoffmann in the 8th. e-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Cormier in the 8th. f-singled for Salas in the 9th. E—Blake (2), Cormier (1). LOB—St. Louis 6, Los Angeles 10. 2B—Holliday 2 (2), Y.Molina (3), Blake (1), Uribe (3). 3B—Rasmus (2). HR—Pujols (2), off Kuroda; Kemp (2), off Franklin. RBIs—Theriot (5), Pujols (7), Holliday 3 (7), Y.Molina 2 (5), Descalso (1), Carroll (2), Kemp 2 (8), Uribe (3). SB—Carroll (2), Kemp (8). SF—Descalso. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 2 (Y.Molina, Descalso); Los Angeles 5 (Hoffmann 2, Ethier 2, Blake). Runners moved up—Berkman, Blake, Loney. GIDP— Theriot, Rasmus. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Uribe, Loney), (Uribe, Carroll, Loney).

• 42 cars, four past winners line up for Indy 500: Four Indianapolis 500 winners will try to qualify for this year’s race. There are 35 driver-car combinations listed among the entrants for the race’s centennial celebration. Past winners trying to make this year’s traditional 33-car field are three-time winner Helio Castroneves, two-time winner and defending champ Dario Franchitti and former series points champs Scott Dixon and Dan Wheldon. The race is scheduled for May 29.

• NBA fines Lakers, Jackson $75,000 each: A person familiar with the decision says the Los Angeles Lakers and Phil Jackson each have been fined $75,000 for comments the coach made about collective bargaining. The person spoke to The Associated Press on the condition of anonymity Thursday because the league will not announce the fines. • Sacramento mayor makes pitch to keep the Kings: Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson watched part of the Kings’ season finale, then flew overnight across the country to meet with NBA owners. His goal: Make sure that wasn’t the last NBA game in California’s state capital. “We felt very strongly that the Sacramento Kings were worth fighting for. And if anybody thinks that we’re going to sit on our hands and roll over and just let somebody leave without putting up a good fight, they’d be gravely mistaken,” Johnson said Thursday after a presentation in front of NBA owners. Kings owners Joe and Gavin Maloof are considering a move to Anaheim and must file a relocation application with the league by Monday. The league’s owners are meeting in New York the next two days, and Johnson followed the Maloof group in speaking to them Thursday. • Nets’ Williams eager to stay: While he cannot comment on any new contract extension due to the pending end of the NBA’s collective bargaining agreement in July, Deron Williams would like to remain with the New Jersey Nets. Williams, who had wrist surgery Monday after playing just 12 games with the Nets, said that he feels comfortable with the Nets and would like to be part of the organization in the long run. “I like this organization a lot,” said Williams, the two-time NBA All-Star who was traded by the Utah Jazz to New Jersey in February. “I like the way they’re going. Everyone has made me feel comfortable here. I can definitely see myself staying here. It’s something that will obviously be brought up a lot this summer and a new CBA has to happen before I can even really address it. But once they made the trade for me, they told me that they were going to make me the face of the franchise as they move forward going to Brooklyn.” • Kansas freshman Selby leaving for NBA: Kansas says star freshman guard Josh Selby is declaring for the NBA draft. The 6-foot-3 Selby was rated overall No. 1 prospect in the nation when Kansas coach Bill Self signed him last year. He was suspended the first nine games by the NCAA for amateurism violations and missed several more with a foot injury.

BI 1 0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 8

BB 2 1 1 0 BB 0 0 0 0

SO 2 3 0 0 SO 3 0 0 1

NP 91 32 18 12 NP 83 5 43 15

ERA 1.35 2.25 9.00 9.64 ERA 3.48 1.80 7.50 3.38

H BI BB SO 0 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 10

Avg. .139 .256 .326 .103 --.361 .129 .148 .244 .118 .250 .000 .200

Astros 1, Padres 0 R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 4 0 1 1 0 1 .245 Ang.Sanchez ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .353 Pence rf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .283 Ca.Lee lf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .212 1-Bourgeois pr-lf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .364 Wallace 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .262 Hall 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .213 M.Downs 3b 3 0 2 0 0 1 .467 Quintero c 3 1 2 0 0 0 .333 Norris p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p 0 0 0 0 1 0 --Lyon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 28 1 7 1 4 2 San Diego 000 000 000 — 0 3 0 Houston 000 001 00x — 1 7 1 a-struck out for Hawpe in the 7th. b-reached on interference for Luebke in the 8th. 1-ran for Ca.Lee in the 8th. E—Quintero (1). LOB—San Diego 7, Houston 8. 2B—Wallace (2). RBIs—Bourn (4). SB—O.Hudson (6), E.Patterson (1), Bourn (5), Bourgeois (4). S—Norris. Runners left in scoring position—San Diego 4 (Hundley 2, Ludwick 2); Houston 5 (M.Downs, Ca.Lee, Bourn 2, Hall). Runners moved up—Venable, Hall. GIDP—Bartlett, Quintero. DP—San Diego 2 (Ludwick, O.Hudson), (Hawpe, Bartlett, Moseley); Houston 1 (M.Downs, Hall, Wallace). San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Moseley L, 0-3 6 2-3 7 1 1 2 1 100 1.83 Luebke 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 10.80 Gregerson 1 0 0 0 2 0 19 1.42 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Norris W, 1-1 6 2 0 0 3 7 116 5.06 Abad H, 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 4.76 Melancon H, 1 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 24 0.00 Lyon S, 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 6.23 Inherited runners-scored—Luebke 3-0, Melancon 1-0. IBB—off Gregerson (Wallace). Catchers’ interference—Quintero. T—2:57. A—20,045 (40,963).

Marlins 6, Braves 5 Florida AB Coghlan cf 4 Infante 2b 5 H.Ramirez ss 3 Stanton rf 5 Hensley p 0 L.Nunez p 0 Morrison lf 5 G.Sanchez 1b 5 Dobbs 3b 3 b-Helms ph 1 M.Dunn p 0 Cousins rf 1 J.Buck c 4 Nolasco p 1 Choate p 0 Sanches p 0 c-Do.Murphy ph-3b1 Totals 38

R H 1 2 0 1 1 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 13

BI 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6

BB 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4

SO 1 2 0 2 0 0 1 2 3 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 15

Avg. .288 .220 .256 .217 ----.304 .326 .412 .357 --.222 .217 .200 --1.000 .143

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Prado lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .268 McLouth cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .222 C.Jones 3b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .304 McCann c 4 1 2 3 0 2 .340 Uggla 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .160 Heyward rf 2 0 0 0 2 0 .237 Kimbrel p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 0 1 0 0 2 .234 Freeman 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .214 Beachy p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Moylan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Conrad ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Linebrink p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Venters p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ma.Young rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Totals 34 5 8 5 3 7 Florida 311 000 100 — 6 13 1 Atlanta 400 100 000 — 5 8 1 a-flied out for Moylan in the 6th. b-singled for Dobbs in the 7th. c-struck out for Sanches in the 7th. E—H.Ramirez (4), C.Jones (1). LOB—Florida 11, Atlanta 5. 2B—Stanton (4), Morrison (5), Freeman (3). HR—G.Sanchez (1), off Beachy; McCann (2), off Nolasco; Uggla (3), off Nolasco. RBIs—H.Ramirez (4), Stanton (2), Morrison 2 (9), G.Sanchez (5), J.Buck (8), C.Jones (10), McCann 3 (9), Uggla (3). SB—Heyward (1). CS—Cousins (1). S—Nolasco 2. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 8 (Dobbs, Stanton 5, Coghlan, Morrison); Atlanta 3 (Beachy, Conrad 2). Runners moved up—Freeman. GIDP—Prado. DP—Florida 2 (Nolasco, H.Ramirez, G.Sanchez), (G.Sanchez). Florida

IP

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES

H R ER BB SO NP ERA

East Division New York Baltimore Toronto Tampa Bay Boston Central Division Cleveland Kansas City Chicago Detroit Minnesota West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 7 6 6 4 2 W 8 8 7 6 4 W 9 7 6 4

L 4 5 6 8 9 L 4 4 5 7 8 L 3 5 7 9

Pct .636 .545 .500 .333 .182 Pct .667 .667 .583 .462 .333 Pct .750 .583 .462 .308

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — 1 1½ 3½ 5 GB — — 1 2½ 4 GB — 2 3½ 5½

WCGB — 1½ 2 4 5½ WCGB — — 1 2½ 4 WCGB — 1 2½ 4½

Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 4, Minnesota 3, 10 innings N.Y. Yankees 6, Baltimore 5, 10 innings Kansas City 5, Seattle 1, 8 innings Detroit 3, Oakland 0

L10 6-4 5-5 4-6 4-6 2-8 L10 8-2 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 5-5 2-8

Str W-2 L-4 W-1 W-3 L-2 Str L-2 W-2 L-1 W-3 L-2 Str L-2 W-2 L-1 L-2

Home Away 6-2 1-2 3-3 3-2 4-2 2-4 1-5 3-3 2-3 0-6 Home Away 4-2 4-2 5-2 3-2 4-3 3-2 3-3 3-4 2-3 2-5 Home Away 6-0 3-3 4-2 3-3 1-3 5-4 2-4 2-5

East Division Philadelphia Florida Washington Atlanta New York Central Division Cincinnati Milwaukee Chicago St. Louis Pittsburgh Houston West Division Colorado San Francisco Los Angeles Arizona San Diego

Tooday’s Games Baltimore (Britton 2-0) at Cleveland (Masterson 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Texas (Harrison 2-0) at N.Y. Yankees (Nova 1-0), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Blackburn 1-1) at Tampa Bay (W.Davis 0-2), 4:10 p.m. Toronto (Cecil 0-1) at Boston (C.Buchholz 0-2), 4:10 p.m. L.A. Angels (Weaver 3-0) at Chicago White Sox (Humber 1-0), 5:10 p.m. Seattle (Bedard 0-2) at Kansas City (Hochevar 1-1), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Porcello 0-2) at Oakland (McCarthy 1-0), 7:05 p.m.

W 9 7 5 5 4 W 8 7 6 6 5 4 W 10 6 6 5 5

L 3 5 7 8 9 L 4 5 6 7 7 9 L 2 6 7 6 7

Pct .750 .583 .417 .385 .308 Pct .667 .583 .500 .462 .417 .308 Pct .833 .500 .462 .455 .417

GB — 2 4 4½ 5½ GB — 1 2 2½ 3 4½ GB — 4 4½ 4½ 5

Thursday’s Games Colorado 6, N.Y. Mets 5, 1st game Colorado 9, N.Y. Mets 4, 2nd game Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 1 Philadelphia 4, Washington 0 Florida 6, Atlanta 5 Houston 1, San Diego 0 St. Louis 9, L.A. Dodgers 5

WCGB — — 2 2½ 3½ WCGB — — 1 1½ 2 3½ WCGB — 1 1½ 1½ 2

L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 3-7 2-8 L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 9-1 6-4 4-6 4-6 3-7

Str W-2 W-2 L-2 L-2 L-5 Str L-1 W-4 W-1 W-2 L-4 W-1 Str W-6 W-2 L-3 L-1 L-1

Home Away 5-1 4-2 3-3 4-2 2-4 3-3 2-4 3-4 1-6 3-3 Home Away 5-1 3-3 5-2 2-3 3-3 3-3 2-4 4-3 1-5 4-2 3-4 1-5 Home Away 3-1 7-1 4-2 2-4 3-2 3-5 3-3 2-3 3-5 2-2

Today’s Games Florida (Vazquez 1-1) at Philadelphia (Oswalt 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Milwaukee (Narveson 1-0) at Washington (Gorzelanny 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Pittsburgh (Morton 1-0) at Cincinnati (Arroyo 2-0), 4:10 p.m. N.Y. Mets (D.Carrasco 0-0) at Atlanta (D.Lowe 1-2), 4:30 p.m. San Diego (Harang 2-0) at Houston (Happ 1-1), 5:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Garza 0-1) at Colorado (Chacin 2-0), 5:40 p.m. San Francisco (Cain 1-0) at Arizona (D.Hudson 0-2), 6:40 p.m. St. Louis (Lohse 1-1) at L.A. Dodgers (Garland 0-0), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup • Rays 4, Twins 3: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Johnny Damon hit a two-run homer with one out in the bottom of the 10th inning, lifting Tampa Bay past Minnesota. Carl Pavano pitched eight shutout innings for the Twins, but was denied the victory when closer Joe Nathan gave up a two-run double to Matt Joyce in the ninth. • Yankees 6, Orioles 5: NEW YORK — Nick Swisher hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th inning and New York rallied from a five-run deficit.

• Tigers 3, Athletics 0: OAKLAND, Calif. — Detroit left-hander Phil Coke and two relievers combined on a three-hitter, and Ryan Raburn hit a two-out RBI double in the seventh to break a scoreless tie. • Royals 5, Mariners 1: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Bruce Chen pitched eight strong innings and Wilson Betemit and Alex Gordon drove in two runs apiece, leading Kansas City in a rain-shortened game.

National League roundup • Phillies 4, Nationals 0: WASHINGTON — Back at his best after an unusually brief outing, Cliff Lee struck out 12 in a three-hit shutout. Lee (2-1) walked one and faced 30 batters. • Rockies 6-9, Mets 5-4: NEW YORK — Troy Tulowitzki belted his major league-leading seventh homer during the second game of a doubleheader to help Colorado wrap up a four-game series sweep. Tulowitzki also homered in the opener before the Rockies’ bullpen held on in a wild ninth inning. The Rockies (10-2), off to the best start in franchise history, have won five straight. • Cardinals 9, Dodgers 5: LOS ANGELES — Albert Pujols homered for the second time this season and Matt Holliday drove in three runs and scored twice for St. Louis. Jaime Garcia (2-0) allowed three runs — two earned — and five hits in five innings, struck out two and walked two.

Nolasco 5 6 5 5 1 4 70 4.05 Choate 0 1 0 0 0 0 7 3.38 Sanches W, 2-0 1 0 0 0 2 1 18 0.00 M.Dunn H, 2 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 18 0.00 Hensley H, 4 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 1.35 L.Nunez S, 4-4 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 2.57 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Beachy 5 1-3 7 5 5 4 8 104 5.19 Moylan 2-3 1 0 0 0 2 11 4.15 O’Flherty L, 0-1 1-3 3 1 1 0 0 11 2.08 Linebrink 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 7 4.76 Venters 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 1.29 Kimbrel 1 1 0 0 0 2 19 0.00 Choate pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. Inherited runners-scored—Sanches 1-0, Moylan 2-0, Linebrink 2-0. IBB—off Beachy (Coghlan). WP—Beachy, Venters 2. PB—McCann. T—3:09. A—16,495 (49,586).

Brewers 4, Pirates 1 Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Y.Betancourt ss Almonte rf Morgan rf Lucroy c Wolf p Loe p c-Counsell ph Axford p Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 3 3 3 1 4 3 0 1 0 32

R 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 3 3

SO 0 2 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 7

Avg. .271 .200 .325 .372 .220 .225 .077 .476 .250 .167 --.000 ---

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf 3 0 0 0 1 3 .302 Walker 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .271 A.McCutchen cf 2 1 0 0 2 1 .220 Diaz rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .217 Pearce 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Overbay 1b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .239 Snyder c 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000 d-Doumit ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .241 Cedeno ss 2 0 1 0 0 1 .188 a-Bowker ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .143 J.Rodriguez ss 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Maholm p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Veras p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Alvarez ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .196 Hanrahan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 1 4 0 5 14 Milwaukee 200 000 002 — 4 7 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 001 — 1 4 1 a-grounded out for Cedeno in the 7th. b-struck out for Veras in the 8th. c-popped out for Loe in the 9th. d-walked for Snyder in the 9th. E—Walker (2). LOB—Milwaukee 5, Pittsburgh 7. 2B—McGehee (2), Morgan (2), Walker (4). RBIs— Fielder (15), Y.Betancourt (3), Morgan (2). SB—Braun (1), Tabata (6). CS—A.McCutchen (2). S—Maholm. SF—Y.Betancourt. Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 2 (Almonte, McGehee); Pittsburgh 5 (Diaz 2, Walker, J.Rodriguez 2).

• Brewers 4, Pirates 1: PITTSBURGH — Randy Wolf had 10 strikeouts and allowed only three hits in 6 2⁄3 shutout innings to lead Milwaukee to its fourth straight win and seventh in eight games. Price Fielder had a run-scoring single in the first — his NL-leading 15th RBI. • Marlins 6, Braves 5: ATLANTA — John Buck drove in the go-ahead run with a seventh-inning single to help Florida win its second straight road series. Brian McCann hit a three-run home run and Dan Uggla also homered for Atlanta. •Astros 1, Padres 0: HOUSTON — Bud Norris and the Houston bullpen combined on a three-hitter, and Michael Bourn singled home the only run for Houston. Norris (1-1) gave up two hits and struck out seven in six innings. He retired nine of the last 10 batters he faced.

Morse lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .133 Espinosa 2b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .281 Hairston Jr. 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .050 Zimmermann p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Storen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Slaten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Broderick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Flores ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 Totals 29 0 3 0 1 12 Philadelphia 000 002 020 — 4 6 0 Washington 000 000 000 — 0 3 2 a-singled for Broderick in the 9th. E—Hairston Jr. (2), Espinosa (2). LOB—Philadelphia 3, Washington 3. 2B—Victorino (4), Espinosa (3). HR—Ruiz (2), off Zimmermann. RBIs—Polanco (11), Rollins (1), Ruiz (8). CS—W.Ramos (1). Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 2 (Rollins, Howard). Runners moved up—Hairston Jr.. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Ruiz, Ruiz, Valdez). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cl.Lee W, 2-1 9 3 0 0 1 12 99 4.19 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zmrmnn L, 1-2 7 5 4 1 0 4 85 2.45 Storen 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 1.23 Slaten 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 3 0.00 Broderick 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 12.46 Zimmermann pitched to 3 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Storen 3-2, Slaten 2-0. T—2:06. A—24,875 (41,506).

Rockies 6, Mets 5 (First Game) Colorado AB R H Fowler cf 5 0 2 S.Smith rf 5 1 1 C.Gonzalez lf 4 1 1 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 3 Giambi 1b 3 1 0 Helton 1b 1 0 0 Jo.Lopez 2b 4 0 0 Stewart 3b 3 1 0 J.Morales c 3 1 2 G.Reynolds p 1 0 1 a-Wigginton ph 1 0 0 F.Morales p 0 0 0 Belisle p 0 0 0 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 0 Street p 0 0 0 Lindstrom p 0 0 0 Totals 34 6 10

BI 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

BB 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

SO 0 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .267 .308 .267 .350 .273 .292 .184 .050 .286 .500 .194 ------.000 ---

Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Rollins ss Howard 1b B.Francisco rf Ibanez lf Ruiz c Valdez 2b Cl.Lee p Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 34

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 4

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 0

SO 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 0 1 6

Avg. .354 .360 .320 .304 .255 .213 .351 .351 .000

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 4 1 2 1 1 0 .339 Dan.Murphy 2b 4 0 1 0 1 0 .231 D.Wright 3b 5 1 1 0 0 0 .300 I.Davis 1b 2 1 0 0 2 2 .326 Pagan cf 3 0 0 1 0 0 .205 Harris lf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .273 Hairston rf 4 1 2 3 0 1 .150 Thole c 4 0 2 0 0 0 .270 1-Hu pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .143 Dickey p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Parnell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Emaus ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .192 Byrdak p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Igarashi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Beltran ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .286 Totals 33 5 10 5 5 4 Colorado 000 012 300 — 6 10 0 New York 000 200 012 — 5 10 1 a-grounded out for G.Reynolds in the 6th. b-struck out for Parnell in the 7th. c-singled for Igarashi in the 9th. 1-ran for Thole in the 9th. E—Pagan (2). LOB—Colorado 8, New York 7. 2B—Fowler (3), S.Smith (5), J.Morales (1), Jos.Reyes (5), Dan.Murphy (3), D.Wright (4). HR—C.Gonzalez (1), off Dickey; Tulowitzki (6), off Parnell; Jos.Reyes (1), off Belisle; Hairston (1), off Street. RBIs—S.Smith (5), C.Gonzalez 2 (9), Tulowitzki (13), J.Morales 2 (2), Jos. Reyes (3), Pagan (6), Hairston 3 (5). SB—Jos.Reyes (4). CS—Harris (1). S—G.Reynolds, Belisle. SF—Pagan. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 7 (J.Morales 2, Tulowitzki 2, C.Gonzalez, Wigginton, Fowler); New York 4 (Dan.Murphy, Dickey, D.Wright 2). Runners moved up—S.Smith, Harris. GIDP—Tulowitzki, Dan.Murphy, Pagan. DP—Colorado 2 (Jo.Lopez, Tulowitzki, Giambi), (Tulowitzki, Giambi); New York 1 (Jos.Reyes, I.Davis).

Washington Desmond ss Ankiel cf Werth rf Ad.LaRoche 1b W.Ramos c

AB 4 4 4 3 2

R 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

SO 3 1 2 1 1

Avg. .180 .200 .217 .211 .455

Colorado Reynlds W, 1-0 F.Morales H, 2 Belisle H, 2 Reynolds H, 4 Street H, 1 Lindstrom S, 2

Milwaukee IP H R Wolf W, 1-2 6 2-3 3 0 Loe H, 4 1 1-3 0 0 Axford 1 1 1 Pittsburgh IP H R Maholm L, 0-2 7 4 2 Veras 1 0 0 Hanrahan 1 3 2 WP—Axford. T—2:50. A—10,517 (38,362).

ER 0 0 1 ER 2 0 2

BB 2 1 2 BB 3 0 0

SO 10 2 2 SO 6 1 0

NP 107 21 30 NP 98 12 15

ERA 4.32 1.13 8.44 ERA 2.33 5.79 3.68

Phillies 4, Nationals 0

IP 5 2-3 2 1-3 1-3 2-3

H 5 1 1 0 3 0

R 2 0 1 0 2 0

ER 2 0 1 0 2 0

BB 2 1 0 0 1 1

SO 1 0 2 1 0 0

NP 79 10 36 5 30 14

ERA 3.27 2.45 2.45 4.91 2.61 1.59

New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Dickey L, 1-2 6 1-3 8 5 5 4 4 109 4.15 Parnell 2-3 1 1 1 0 0 17 9.00 Byrdak 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 7.20 Igarashi 1 0 0 0 1 1 18 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Belisle 1-0, Lindstrom 20. WP—G.Reynolds. PB—Thole. T—3:23. A—0 (41,800).

Rockies 9, Mets 4 (Second Game) Colorado AB R H Fowler cf 5 2 2 Herrera 2b 5 1 2 C.Gonzalez lf 5 1 1 Tulowitzki ss 4 1 2 Wigginton 3b 4 0 1 Helton 1b 5 1 3 Spilborghs rf 5 1 1 Iannetta c 3 1 1 De La Rosa p 3 1 0 Mat.Reynolds p 1 0 0 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 F.Paulino p 0 0 0 Totals 40 9 13

BI 2 3 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9

BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

SO 2 1 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 10

Avg. .280 .458 .260 .364 .200 .345 .200 .207 .286 .000 -----

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 5 0 1 2 0 0 .328 Pagan cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .188 D.Wright 3b 2 0 1 0 2 0 .308 Beltran rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .256 I.Davis 1b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .304 Hairston lf 3 1 1 0 0 0 .174 b-Harris ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Emaus 2b 4 1 1 0 0 0 .200 Nickeas c 2 1 1 2 1 0 .200 c-Thole ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .263 Capuano p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .333 T.Buchholz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Hu ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Igarashi p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Isringhausen p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --F.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 d-Dan.Murphy ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Totals 32 4 5 4 4 9 Colorado 002 006 001 — 9 13 1 New York 020 200 000 — 4 5 0 a-struck out for T.Buchholz in the 6th. b-flied out for Hairston in the 8th. c-struck out for Nickeas in the 9th. d-struck out for F.Rodriguez in the 9th. E—Helton (1). LOB—Colorado 7, New York 6. 2B—Iannetta (3), D.Wright (5), Hairston (1), Nickeas (1). HR—Tulowitzki (7), off Capuano; Herrera (1), off T.Buchholz. RBIs—Fowler 2 (5), Herrera 3 (3), C.Gonzalez (10), Tulowitzki (14), Wigginton (4), De La Rosa (2), Jos. Reyes 2 (5), Nickeas 2 (2). SB—C.Gonzalez (2), D.Wright (2). S—Capuano. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 4 (Helton 2, Spilborghs 2); New York 4 (Beltran, Jos.Reyes, I.Davis, Hu). Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA DeLRsa W, 2-0 6 2-3 5 4 4 4 7 116 3.18 Mat.Reynolds 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.15 R.Betancourt 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 10 4.05 F.Paulino 1 0 0 0 0 2 16 1.59 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Capuano L, 1-1 5 2-3 8 7 7 2 5 101 8.76 T.Buchholz 1-3 1 1 1 0 0 8 2.57 Igarashi 1 1 0 0 0 1 15 0.00 Isringhausen 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 0.00 F.Rodriguez 1 3 1 1 0 2 20 3.86 Inherited runners-scored—Mat.Reynolds 1-0, T.Buchholz 2-2. HBP—by Capuano (Wigginton). WP— De La Rosa, Igarashi. PB—Nickeas. T—3:16. A—25,758 (41,800).

AL BOXSCORES Tigers 3, Athletics 0 Detroit A.Jackson cf C.Wells rf Raburn lf Mi.Cabrera 1b V.Martinez c Jh.Peralta ss Boesch dh Inge 3b Santiago 2b Totals

AB 4 3 5 3 5 2 2 2 3 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 3

Oakland Crisp cf Barton 1b

AB R 4 0 2 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 2 2 1 0 4 2 11

SO 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 7

Avg. .184 .333 .286 .326 .200 .275 .282 .244 .294

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 1 .229 0 0 2 1 .279

C.Jackson rf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .292 Willingham lf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Matsui dh 3 0 0 0 0 0 .244 M.Ellis 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .217 K.Suzuki c 3 0 1 0 0 0 .186 An.LaRoche 3b 2 0 0 0 0 0 .333 a-DeJesus ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .190 Kouzmanoff 3b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .171 Pennington ss 3 0 0 0 0 1 .194 Totals 29 0 3 0 2 5 Detroit 000 000 120 — 3 4 0 Oakland 000 000 000 — 0 3 1 a-flied out for An.LaRoche in the 8th. E—Willingham (1). LOB—Detroit 12, Oakland 4. 2B—Raburn (5). RBIs—Raburn (5), Santiago (3). S—A.Jackson. SF—Santiago. Runners left in scoring position—Detroit 7 (V.Martinez 2, Raburn 3, Inge 2); Oakland 1 (Matsui). Runners moved up—Willingham. GIDP— An.LaRoche. DP—Detroit 1 (Jh.Peralta, Santiago, Mi.Cabrera). Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Coke W, 1-2 7 3 0 0 2 2 94 2.25 Benoit H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 1.50 Valverde S, 3-3 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA G.Gonzalez 6 2 0 0 6 6 103 0.47 T.Ross L, 1-1 1 2 3 2 3 0 33 4.50 Blevins 2-3 0 0 0 2 1 20 2.57 Cramer 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 9 2.45 T.Ross pitched to 2 batters in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Blevins 2-2, Cramer 2-0. IBB—off T.Ross (Mi.Cabrera). WP—G.Gonzalez 2. T—2:48. A—11,129 (35,067).

Royals 5, Mariners 1 (7½ innings) Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 3b Bradley lf A.Kennedy dh Smoak 1b Olivo c M.Saunders cf Ryan ss J.Wilson 2b Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 3 3 3 31

R 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6 1 1

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1

Avg. .264 .167 .255 .333 .273 .162 .200 .212 .207

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Getz 2b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .317 Me.Cabrera cf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .300 Gordon lf 3 1 1 2 0 0 .345 Butler dh 3 0 1 1 0 0 .341 Ka’aihue 1b 2 1 1 0 1 0 .194 Francoeur rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .294 Betemit 3b 2 1 1 2 0 1 .387 B.Pena c 3 0 0 0 0 2 .273 A.Escobar ss 3 1 1 0 0 1 .235 Totals 26 5 8 5 1 5 Seattle 000 000 01 — 1 6 0 Kansas City 003 101 0x — 5 8 2 E—Betemit (1), Ka’aihue (1). LOB—Seattle 8, Kansas City 3. 2B—Figgins (3), Ryan (2), Gordon (7). HR— Betemit (1), off Fister. RBIs—A.Kennedy (1), Gordon 2 (9), Butler (7), Betemit 2 (7). S—Getz. SF—A.Kennedy, Betemit. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (Bradley, J.Wilson, Olivo). GIDP—Ka’aihue. DP—Seattle 1 (J.Wilson, Ryan, Smoak). Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP Fister L, 0-3 7 8 5 5 1 5 106 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP Chen W, 2-0 8 6 1 0 1 1 101 T—1:53 (Rain delay: 0:47). A—8,811 (37,903).

ERA 3.86 ERA 2.37

Yankees 6, Orioles 5 (10 innings) Baltimore B.Roberts 2b Markakis rf D.Lee 1b Guerrero dh Scott lf 1-Pie pr-lf Ad.Jones cf Mar.Reynolds 3b Wieters c C.Izturis ss Totals

AB 5 5 5 5 3 0 4 3 4 4 38

R H 0 1 2 3 0 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 2 5 11

BI 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 5

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 3 1 0 7

Avg. .213 .268 .195 .283 .211 .357 .195 .250 .212 .300

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 1 0 0 0 3 .150 Jeter ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .233 Teixeira 1b 4 1 1 1 1 2 .225 Al.Rodriguez 3b 3 1 3 1 1 0 .412 Cano 2b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .326 Swisher rf 3 1 0 1 1 0 .211 Posada dh 4 1 1 1 0 1 .189 Granderson cf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .194 Martin c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .289 Totals 37 6 11 6 3 7 Baltimore 002 120 000 0 — 5 11 0 New York 000 012 101 1 — 6 11 1 Two outs when winning run scored. 1-ran for Scott in the 8th. E—Martin (2). LOB—Baltimore 5, New York 7. 2B—Markakis (2), Scott (2), Teixeira (1), Al.Rodriguez 2 (4), Cano (6), Granderson 2 (3). HR—Markakis (2), off P.Hughes; Posada (5), off Gregg. RBIs—Markakis 3 (6), Guerrero (4), Mar.Reynolds (9), Teixeira (11), Al.Rodriguez (9), Cano (8), Swisher (7), Posada (8), Martin (9). SF—Mar.Reynolds, Al.Rodriguez, Swisher. Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 1 (Mar. Reynolds); New York 5 (Granderson, Cano, Gardner, Swisher, Jeter). Runners moved up—B.Roberts, Ad.Jones, Martin. GIDP—D.Lee, Cano. DP—Baltimore 1 (C.Izturis, D.Lee); New York 1 (Jeter, Cano, Teixeira). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Arrieta 6 5 3 3 1 2 90 7.04 Berken H, 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 24 1.69 Ji.Johnson H, 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 17 4.76 Gregg BS, 1-2 1 2 1 1 0 2 17 2.25 Gonzalez L, 0-1 2-3 1 1 1 1 0 16 8.10 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA P.Hughes 4 1-3 7 5 5 0 2 70 13.94 Colon 3 3 0 0 1 3 54 3.97 Chamberlain 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 2 13 3.68 M.Rivera W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 7 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Colon 1-1, Chamberlain 2-0. T—3:14. A—40,517 (50,291).

Rays 4, Twins 3 (10 innings) Minnesota AB Span cf 5 Cuddyer 2b-rf 5 Morneau 1b 5 Thome dh 5 D.Young lf 3 Kubel rf 4 Tolbert ss 1 Valencia 3b 4 Butera c 5 A.Casilla ss 3 a-L.Hughes ph-2b 1 Totals 41

R H 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 12

BI 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 6

Avg. .320 .220 .239 .222 .205 .318 .364 .238 .154 .125 .250

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fuld lf 5 1 2 0 0 1 .324 Damon dh 5 1 1 2 0 1 .217 B.Upton cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .262 F.Lopez 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .273 Zobrist 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .178 Joyce rf 4 0 3 2 0 1 .212 D.Johnson 1b 3 0 1 0 1 0 .136 Jaso c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Brignac ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Totals 35 4 8 4 3 7 Minnesota 000 002 000 1 — 3 12 0 Tampa Bay 000 000 002 2 — 4 8 1 One out when winning run scored. a-struck out for A.Casilla in the 8th. E—Brignac (2). LOB—Minnesota 11, Tampa Bay 6. 2B—Span (2), Cuddyer (1), Morneau (5), Kubel (4), F.Lopez (2), Joyce (3). HR—Damon (3), off Capps. RBIs—D.Young (6), Valencia (4), Butera (1), Damon 2 (9), Joyce 2 (2). SB—Fuld (7). SF—D.Young. Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 7 (Butera 2, Morneau, Cuddyer, Span 2, L.Hughes); Tampa Bay 3 (B.Upton, Jaso 2). Runners moved up—Butera, Damon. Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO Pavano 8 4 0 0 2 7 Nathan BS, 1-4 1 2 2 2 1 0 Capps L, 1-1 1-3 2 2 2 0 0 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO Shields 7 9 2 2 2 4 McGee 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 J.Cruz 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 C.Ramos 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 Frnswrth W, 1-0 2-3 2 1 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—J.Cruz 1-0. Shields (Valencia). WP—Shields. PB—Jaso. T—3:02. A—10,042 (34,078).

NP ERA 104 3.60 29 5.40 6 3.86 NP ERA 116 3.98 17 6.00 9 6.23 16 2.25 12 1.80 IBB—off


D4 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N H L P L AYO F F S R O U N D U P

Playoffs could showcase young stars like Durant, Rose By Tom Smith McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Matt Slocum / The Associated Press

Buffalo Sabres’ Patrick Kaleta (36) celebrates after scoring a goal past Philadelphia Flyers’ Sergei Bobrovsky (35), Danny Syvret (26) and Matt Carle (25) in the third period of Game 1 of a first-round NHL hockey playoff series Thursday in Philadelphia.

Sabres shut out Flyers 1-0 in playoff opener The Associated Press PHILADELPHIA — Ryan Miller stopped a shot from his knees and with six players in the crease. He saved one with Buffalo down two men. Any way Philadelphia tried to attack him, Miller never buckled. He was perfect in net and the Sabres took quick control of the series. Miller stopped 35 shots for his second career postseason shutout and Patrick Kaleta scored to lift the Buffalo Sabres to a 1-0 win over the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference playoff series Thursday night. “It’s important to establish that we can skate with these guys,” Miller said. “We like where we’re at, but that team over there has a lot of fight, and we’ll have to be ready for them.” Miller stopped every shot under all types of pressure and

carried the Sabres to the clutch opening win. The teams have met eight times in the postseason and the Game 1 winner won the series each time. Kaleta snapped the scoreless tie early in the third period when he powered a rebound past rookie Sergei Bobrovsky. No team was more resilient in last year’s playoffs than the Flyers. They trailed Boston 3-0 in the East semifinals before taking the series and playing until a Game 6 loss to Chicago in the Stanley Cup finals. The Sabres — 10 points out of a playoffs spot on Jan. 17 — cracked the scoreless tie 5:56 into the third period on Kaleta’s second career postseason goal. Buffalo won a fight for the puck along the boards and dumped it across the zone to Marc-Andre Gragnani. He fired a slapper from the top of the circle and Kaleta knocked in the

rebound from the low slot for the 1-0 lead. In other playoff games on Thursday: Canadiens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 BOSTON — Carey Price returned as Montreal’s starting playoff goalie with his third postseason shutout, Brian Gionta scored twice and the Canadiens opened the series with a win over Boston. Price started one of the Canadiens 19 playoff games last year when they reached the Eastern Conference finals. Sharks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SAN JOSE, Calif. — Joe Pavelski scored 14:44 into overtime to give San Jose a victory over Los Angeles in Game 1 of their all-California opening round playoff series. Dany Heatley and Logan Couture also scored for the Sharks.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Not meaningless? Spring games get more airtime By Rachel Cohen The Associated Press

The trees are budding and the birds are nesting — must be time to sit down and watch some of the least compelling matchups in college football: green vs. white, crimson against cream, blue takes on gold. Spring games are blossoming on television as sports networks discover the value of airing glorified scrimmages, tapping into fervent college fan bases — people who might otherwise be joining the tens of thousands at the stadium. It’s free advertising in the middle of the offseason for programs competing for the country’s top recruits. The Big Ten Network is scheduled to broadcast live all but one of its schools’ spring football games this year on TV or the Internet, including Iowa’s open practice (the Hawkeyes don’t play a spring game). ESPN’s networks are televising five games this year, up from two in 2008. That doesn’t include additional teams available online at ESPN3. com, some as replays or simulcasts of regional broadcasts. The only ones who don’t seem to be on the bandwagon are some college coaches, a bunch conditioned to fret over the tiniest of details. New Big Ten member Nebraska is the TV holdout in that conference, for instance. The Huskers don’t want to show their retooled offense to their new rivals. “I just prefer not to have it on,” said Oklahoma’s Bob Stoops, whose team’s spring game was aired by ESPN in 2006 and ’07. “Why would I let everybody see, who we’re going to play early, what we like to do?” Of the 25 schools in the AP’s

final poll last season, 12 are planning to have their games broadcast in some form this spring. Notre Dame’s spring game will be televised nationally for the first time. Saturday’s scrimmage is on cable channel Versus, which is now a sister network to NBC, the Irish’s TV partner, after the Comcast merger. “We are going to try to get as much gamelike scenarios as we can,” coach Brian Kelly said. “I think we will get some excitement,” he added, “more so than the typical spring game.” ESPN’s foray into spring football started mostly as an attempt to find programming to fill the schedule at new network ESPNU. The number that later caught executives’ eyes wasn’t a rating but an attendance figure. In 2007, an overflow crowd of more than 92,000 attended Nick Saban’s first spring game at Alabama. ESPN’s telecast of Texas’ spring game April 3 drew an audience of 226,000 households. The same time slot last year — which included a replay of the college basketball three-point and slam dunk competitions — attracted 337,000 households. Even if viewership isn’t great, the games are valuable in other ways to ESPN, which is so heavily invested in college football. “We’ve been trying to make a concerted effort in making it a year-round proposition,” said Burke Magnus, the network’s senior vice president of college sports programming. Magnus said schools had been receptive to having their games televised. LSU coach Les Miles would rather not have a spring game at all — he believes it’s an inefficient use of limited practice time. But these scrimmages bring in big bucks for the top

programs. So if he has to have one, Miles doesn’t mind it being on TV. “Your guys love to play on television,” Miles said before Saturday’s game, which was shown on ESPN. “It gives you the air of a big game. Your guys want to play better.” Still, coaches whose games are televised may be more likely to hold back certain plays they don’t want their opponents to see. Asked if he recorded Texas’ spring game, Oklahoma defensive coordinator Brent Venables deadpanned, “I don’t know if I did or not.” “Were they on?” he asked to the laughter of reporters. From the Sooners’ standpoint, Venables said, “I think we’re on TV as much if not more than anybody and we get plenty of exposure.” Nebraska athletic director Tom Osborne, the Cornhuskers’ former coach, was concerned televising the spring game would hurt attendance — which has been more than 77,000 in recent years. Osborne said the school makes $700,000 to $800,000 in revenue from the game. Coach Bo Pelini will be able to tune into his new conference’s network to watch the scrimmages of all his Big Ten counterparts. Plenty of passionate, midwestern football fans are sure to do so. They might even see something eyebrow raising, like last Saturday when Purdue’s Carson Wiggs connected on a 67-yard field goal — yes, 67. “Even though it’s not the most exciting broadcast or the most exciting brand of football,” said ESPN analyst Todd Blackledge, who called Saturday’s LSU game, “it kind of feeds that animal of college football.”

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — It’s no surprise that there has been a changing of the guard in the NBA this season. But as the playoffs prepare to begin on Saturday, the top-seeded team isn’t the squad that was favored when the season tipped off. Many observers had the NBA title going to South Beach when the Miami Heat brought in superstars LeBron James and Chris Bosh to complement Dwyane Wade. The Heat are seeded No. 2 in the Eastern Conference and could go a long way in the playoffs, but the overall top seed with home-court advantage as long as they are alive is the Chicago Bulls, led by 22-year-old standout Derrick Rose. And while veterans Tim Duncan of the San Antonio Spurs, Kobe Bryant of the Los Angeles Lakers and Dirk Nowitzki of the Dallas Mavericks have their teams seeded first, second and third, respectively, in the Western Conference, one of the hottest teams entering the playoffs is fourth-seeded Oklahoma City. The Thunder is led by 22-yearold Kevin Durant, the league scoring champion during the regular season at 27.7 points per game. Rose is on the cover of Sports Illustrated magazine this week — the first Bull to have that honor since Michael Jordan did it in 1999. He averaged 25 points (good for seventh in the league), 7.7 assists and 4.1 rebounds per game for the Bulls, who finished the regular season 62-20. Bulls general manager John Paxson said he didn’t know that Rose would be this good when Chicago drafted him No. 1 overall in 2008. “When you talk about the top five players in the league, Derrick Rose is in every conversation now,” Paxson told Chicago radio station WMVP.

Blazers Continued from D1 The underdog chatter was touched off by comments Dallas guard Jason Terry made after the Mavericks defeated the New Orleans Hornets 121-89 in the regular-season finale Wednesday night. The Lakers beat the Sacramento Kings, pushing Dallas to the third seed. Portland had already wrapped up the sixth spot. “All seven other teams wanted to play us,” Terry told the Dallas Morning News. “Now, we’re the underdog and we’re going out fighting every night.” The Blazers and the Mavericks split their regular season series, with each team winning twice on its home court. Each of the games was decided by eight or fewer points. Portland shot 47.8 percent from the field against the Mavs, while Dallas shot 51 percent against the Blazers. Overall, the Blazers lead the all-time series against the Mavericks 72-57, and lead 9-5 in playoff games. Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge, who leads the Blazers this season with an average of 21.8 points and 8.8 rebounds, speculated Terry was pulling out the underdog card to motivate his team. “They’re a really good team with a lot of options,” Aldridge said. “That’s what they’re saying. We still have to go out and play.” Portland forward Gerald Wallace wasn’t going to engage in the back-and-forth. “I don’t want to hear it,” Wallace said with a smile when a reporter asked about Terry’s comment. “I’m done, no comment.” The Blazers are in the playoffs despite a turbulent season. In December, the team got word that center Greg Oden required season-ending microfracture surgery. About that same time, it became apparent that three-time All-Star Brandon Roy was having trouble with his knees. Roy, who has said he lacks cartilage between his bones, finally underwent arthroscopic surgery on both knees in January. The former Rookie of the Year missed 35 games overall this season. The Blazers also lost veteran center Marcus Camby for more than a month earlier this year because of a knee injury. But Portland did improve when they acquired Wallace in a trade with the Charlotte Bobcats at the NBA deadline in late February. Wallace has been key down the stretch, averaging 15.8 points and 7.6 rebounds. He also has averaged two steals per game with Portland.

N BA C O M M E N TA RY “When we saw him in college (at Memphis), the combination of his strength and speed were unique. When you look at the point-guard position, it’s such a valuable position in our league. When he was 19, he still had a lot of things he had to improve upon, which is natural. “The thing he deserves all the credit for is improving his game to the point where he’s so difficult to defend. Where he can come up and knock down the perimeter shots. Not just the three — he’s had a very, very good year shooting the three, where people have to recognize that — but also that 17- to 19-foot shot.” Chicago is on a roll as it prepares to begin a first-round series against Indiana at noon Saturday. The Bulls finished the season with nine straight victories. They went 3-0 this season against Miami and 2-2 against Boston, the defending Eastern Conference champion, and Rose said the Bulls have had confidence all season. “I always said that we could compete with some of the best teams in the NBA,” Rose said. “At training camp and in the beginning of the year, I thought ‘My team’s ready to fight.’ I just saw what we were going through in training camp. Guys were keyed in and focused, making sure that they came in very, very hungry, wanting to win.” The Oklahoma City Thunder, which opens its series against Denver Sunday, is another team hungry for a long playoff run. The Thunder put a scare in the Los Angeles Lakers in last year’s first round before L.A. prevailed in six games and went on to win the championship. Oklahoma City won the Northwest Division title with a 55-27 record this season, and the Thunder played especially well

The Blazers have been to the postseason in each of the past two seasons, but both times they’ve been bumped in the first round — by the Houston Rockets in 2009 and the Phoenix Suns last year. “Being in the playoffs two years in a row, you feel a little more comfortable because you know what to expect,” said Aldridge, who was born in Dallas. The Blazers also played the Mavericks in the first round back in 2003. Dallas won the series in seven games. That series was memorable because of Rasheed Wallace’s famous “both teams played hard” news conference comments after Portland’s victory in Game 4. He was fined $30,000 by the NBA. It was also the series where then-Portland coach Maurice Cheeks rushed to the rescue of a 13-year-old girl who forgot the words to the national anthem before Game 3.

May 21, 2011

“First Timers” Pole Pedal Paddle Seminar Thursday, April 21 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm Downtown Branch of U.S. Bank 1025 NW Bond – Bend FREE A seminar will feature past winners discussing training, logistics and the course. Send your RSVP by e-mail to: molly@mbsef.org

down the stretch, going 19-5 after March 1. That’s a big improvement from winning just 23 games two seasons ago and making the playoffs with a 50-32 record last season. “A lot of people are overlooking that,” said Durant, who was picked second overall in 2007, when the team was still in Seattle. “They don’t know that last year we were the eighth seed. And the year before that, we weren’t even thinking about the playoffs. I think every year we’ve gotten better. ...We’ve just got to keep pressing. This is just one stop in the road for us in trying to get to the goal that we want to reach.” The Thunder’s success has made the team a hit in Oklahoma City. It averaged 18,148 fans per game this season, 99.7 percent of capacity, and had 35 sellouts. “It’s great for our fans,” Thunder coach Scott Brooks said. “It’s great for our city to be division champs. It is definitely a step in our process we started four years ago. We want to get to a championship level like all the other teams in this league. But it is a great step for our franchise.”

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 D5

PREP ROUNDUP

Bend High boys tennis tops Mountain View 6-2 Bulletin staff report Jeff Windsor set the tone for a Bend High team which — led by Windsor’s win in straight sets at No. 1 singles — swept Mountain View in singles play en route to a 6-2 Special District 1 boys tennis victory Thursday at Mountain View. The host Cougars did take a win at No. 1 doubles as the duo of Matt Larraneta and Matt VanHemelryck topped Bend’s Jon Simning and Preston Tuttle 6-1, 6-3. James Harper and Brandon Hargous scored a win for the host team at No. 4 doubles, but wins in the two doubles matches were all Mountain View could muster. Bend’s Joel Johnson, Cole Anderson and Josh Woodward all notched wins in singles competition to put the Lava Bears in position for a team victory on a blustery spring day. Both teams return to action Tuesday, with Mountain View

hosting Redmond and Bend hosting Summit. In other prep events Thursday: BOYS TENNIS Summit J.V.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Crook County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Trevor Brown posted a win for Crook County at No. 1 singles, besting Max L’Etoile 6-0, 6-0, but Summit’s junior varsity squad survived to take the team win after posting three wins in doubles play. Harrison Maze and Eric Fields gave the Storm wins in singles competition, but Jerad Anderson kept the dual even with a Cowboys victory at No. 3 singles. Josue Lopez and Leo Nore gave Crook County its sole doubles win, edging out Summit’s Ben Souther and Tosh Harrington 6-3, 6-3. Summit’s varsity squad returns to the court Friday at the Jesuit Tournament in Portland, while Crook County is on the road at Sister Tuesday.

GIRLS TENNIS Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 PRINEVILLE — Barbara Furuie of Crook County beat Summit’s Hannah Shepard 1-6, 6-1, 10-6 in No. 1 singles, and Natalia Wiersh followed with another three-set win for the Cowgirls at No. 2 singles before the Storm took the next two singles matches on their way to the team victory. Haley Younger and Lindsey Brodeck scored a No. 1 doubles win for Summit, which won three of the four doubles matches. Both teams are back in action today at the Bend Invitational. Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Kaylee Tornay notched a win at No. 1 singles, beating Mountain View’s Hayati Wolfenden 6-1, 76, and teammate Cassidy Taylor followed suit with a win at No. 2 doubles before Mountain View overpowered its hosts to take the Special District 1 team dual. Allie

Kercher gave the Cougars their first victory with a win at No. 3 singles and the duo of Betsy Daniel and Jess Cesar posted a No. 2 doubles win for Mountain View to help seal the win. Both Mountain View and Bend are back in action today the Bend Invitational. TRACK AND FIELD Two Bulldogs win a pair of events in Scio SCIO — Culver seniors Preston Quinn and Tyler Funk both won two events in a five-team meet at Scio. Quinn cruised to victory in the 1,500 meters (4 minutes and 38.55 seconds) and the 3,000 (10:32.28) and Funk won both the 110-meter hurdles (16.76 seconds) and the 300 hurdles (42.36). The Bulldogs finished fourth in the team standings, with Scio winning the event. Culver’s girls finished in last place as a team, with Santiam taking first, but Bulldog freshman Ana Badillo finished third in the 800 (1 minute and 12.13 seconds).

A S 

 B  Snowriding • Local skiers and snowboarders shine at national event: Several Central Oregon skiers and snowboarders posted high placings at the USA Snowboard Association National Championships, staged April 2-12 in Copper Mountain, Colo. Bend’s Hunter Hess finished first overall in the boys 10-12 ski division, and Grant Gorham, also of Bend, was second in the halfpipe in the boys 10-12 ski category. Bend’s Carolyn Boyle was fourth overall in the girls 13-15 ski division. In snowboarding, Bend’s Kent Callister won the halfpipe contest in the boys 14-15 division, and finished sixth in slopestyle. Don Richter, of Bend, won the snowboard slalom in the men’s 50-59 category and was second in giant slalom. Bend’s Molly Kern finished third overall in the 7-and-under girls snowboard division, and Zoe Kern was fourth overall in the 10-11 girls snowboard category.

Drue Schnake, of Bend, placed eighth overall in 10-11 girls snowboarding. For complete results of Central Oregon riders, see Adventure Scoreboard, on this page.

Multisport • Pole pedal paddle seminar set for next week: A Pole Pedal Paddle first-timers seminar is scheduled for Thursday, April 21, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at U.S. Bank in downtown Bend. Past winners of the event will answer questions regarding transitions, training, the course, logistics, and how to shave some time during the race. The Pole Pedal Paddle is a multisport event that includes alpine and cross-country skiing, cycling, running and kayaking. Participants compete as teams, pairs, or individuals in numerous age categories. The PPP is scheduled for Saturday, May 21. Those interested in the seminar can RSVP to molly@mbsef. org or 541-388-0002. — Bulletin staff report

ADVENTURE SPORTS SCOREBOARD PREP SCOREBOARD

Continued from D1 Commissioner Bud Selig said Tuesday that he had already studied the integrity of baseball’s records, with help from Jerome Holtzman, the Chicago writer who was baseball’s official historian. “I had enormous affection and respect for him,” Selig said of Holtzman. “I said to him one day — because he thought that was being overblown, about steroids and the way people were reacting — I said: ‘All right, Jerome, why don’t you do this for me? Why don’t you go back to the ’20s and ’30s and show me the things that were aberrational and caused differences in records?’ “He did. It took him six months, and he did it brilliantly; I still have it in my file. And his conclusion is every era has had its problems, whatever it is.” Selig then spoke about the color barrier, not just before Jackie Robinson broke it in 1947 but for many years later, when some teams enforced it on their own. He said he was in Detroit the day Ozzie Virgil integrated the Tigers — 11 years after Robinson’s debut for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Racism clearly affected baseball’s records. So did the rampant use of steroids. But all the records stand, as they should. “That’s a slippery slope,” Selig said. “Once you get involved in that, there’s no fair way to do it. At this moment I have no feeling of doing anything differently than I’m doing.” But while facts are facts, the Hall of Fame is subjective, and the guardians of Cooperstown are not keen on cheaters. That is why Bonds seems very unlikely to be enshrined. The verdict in San Francisco does not help his cause, but it is peripheral to the Hall of Fame debate. Almost everybody believes that Bonds used steroids, and well more than a quarter of Hall of Fame voters believe steroid use disqualifies a player from induction. There may be flaws with such logic, but that is reality.

Bonds will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot in December 2012, five years after his final season. Ten-year members of the Baseball Writers’ Association of America will have 15 years to consider his candidacy, as long as Bonds never falls below 5 percent of the vote. Seventy-five percent is needed for election. (The New York Times does not allow its writers to vote.) If Bonds does not make it on the writers’ ballot, he could someday appear on the veterans committee ballot, which for now consists of eight Hall of Famers, four executives and four members of the media. Again, he would need 75 percent to be elected. Seventy-five percent is an awful lot. Catfish Hunter and Juan Marichal needed three appearances on the ballot to cross the threshold. Andre Dawson needed nine years, Jim Rice the full 15. Voters’ opinions can change over time, but does anyone believe that three-quarters of voters will ignore the sport’s most explosive issue since the Black Sox scandal? No chance. Consider Mark McGwire. You can make a case that McGwire was not a Hall of Famer if you believe he was simply a onedimensional home run hitter (albeit one who reached base almost 40 percent of the time). According to Baseball-Reference. com, McGwire’s closest historical comparable of the pre-steroid era is Harmon Killebrew, who received 59.6 percent of the vote in his first ballot, in 1981. Three years later, he was in. Killebrew hit 573 homers and batted .256. McGwire hit 583 homers and batted .263. Maybe voters’ attitudes would have shifted over the years, but it seems safe to guess that 60 percent of voters think a player like Killebrew should go in right away. In McGwire’s first year on the ballot, in 2007, he received 23.5 percent — which means, unscientifically, that 36.1 percent of voters disqualified him immediately because of steroids. That is easily a strong enough voting bloc

to bar a candidate from Cooperstown. And after McGwire’s admission of steroid use in 2010, his total slipped below 20 percent. Bonds was a much better player than McGwire — a better offensive force, maybe, than anybody else who ever played. He will get some support from voters who believe he would have been a Hall of Famer without using steroids. But there is a one-sentence instruction on every ballot that reads: “Voting shall be based upon the player’s record, playing ability, integrity, sportsmanship, character and contributions to the team(s) on which the player played.” If more than 25 percent of voters disqualify Bonds based on his lack of integrity, sportsmanship and character, he will not get in. Writers were duped into celebrating the achievements of McGwire and Bonds and so many others. Most of us were not aggressive enough in following our suspicions. For many, barring a player from Cooperstown is a chance to belatedly take a stand, with the sportsmanship clause as justification. If the writers reject Bonds for 15 years, he might have a better chance with contemporaries from his era on the veterans committee. But Hall of Famers tend to cherish the exclusivity of their club, and those who did not use steroids might be unlikely to welcome a player who did. Bonds retains respect from his peers for his ability, which was wondrous. However he achieved it, he was a marvel to behold. “You look back at Barry Bonds and all the stuff he’s going through, supposedly what he did, this and that, when you saw that guy hit, it was like no other,” Boston’s Kevin Youkilis said last weekend. “The guy would see 15 pitches, the catcher would hold his hand out, and then he’d get one pitch to hit and it was a home run.” Those home runs, and that reputation, are Bonds’ to keep. The trouble begins when others begin to judge him, and Wednesday was only the start.

LACROSSE Boys Thursday’s Result Bend 13, Redmond 0

High Desert BMX, Bend April 4 Race Results 13 Girls — 1, Margie Beeler. 2, Olivia Armstrong. 3, Shyanne Bighaus. 26-30 Cruiser — 1, Derek Camacho. 2, Mike Albright. 3, Mike Pitts. 41-45 Cruiser — 1, Dolly Beeler. 2, Sunny Harmeson. 3, Kristi Buck. 6 Novice — 1, Carson Rider. 2, Bowie Helzer. 3, Oliver Reilly. 7 Intermediate — 1, Wyatt Pickens. 2, Suddy Helzer. 3, Rowan Heisinger. 8 Expert — 1, Jacob Cook. 2, Reilly Johnson. 3, Zane Strome. 9 Novice — 1, Brandon Lauterio. 2, Casey Yarborough. 3, Peyton Pitts. 13 Intermediate — 1, Conner Buck. 2, Ian Hight. 3, Riley Albright. 14 Expert — 1, Sage Green. 2, Randy Chisolm. 3, Aaron Beaty. ——— April 6 Race Results 26-30 Cruiser — 1, Derek Camacho. 2, Mike Pitts. 3, David Elliott. 14-16 Girls Cruiser — 1, Jaydra Kinsey. 2, Olivia Armstrong. 3, Madison Elliott. 8 Novice — 1, Peyton Pitts. 2, McKenna Kirby. 3, Chamberlin Campbell. 8 Expert — 1, Jacob Cook. 2, Reilly Johnson. 3, Zane Strome. 9 Intermediate — 1, Diesel Vecqueray. 2, Casey Stilwell. 3, Cambridge Campbell. 13 Expert — 1, Taylor Stephens. 2, Andrew Herrera. 3, River Stredwick. ——— April 9 Race Results 26-30 Cruiser — 1, Derek Camacho. 2, Mike Albright. 3, David Elliott. 26-30 Girls Cruiser — 1, Dolly Beeler. 2, Margie Beeler. 3, Sunny Harmeson. 6 Novice — 1, Fynn Dragan. 2, Bowie Helzer. 3, Banyan Howell. 7 Intermediate — 1, Suddy Helzer. 2, Wyatt Pickens. 3, Elliot Henson. 8 Novice — 1, Peyton Pitts. 2, Kameron Zollman. 3, McKenna Kirby. 9 Intermediate — 1, Jacob Cook. 2, Reilly Johnson. 3, Diesel Vecqueray. 13 Expert — 1, Taylor Stephens. 2, River Stredwick. 3, Margie Beeler.

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Bonds

Thursday’s Results At Scio High School Team scores — 1, Santiam 166; 2, Regis 140; 3, Nestucca 123; 4, Scio 80; 5, Culver 51. 100 — 1, Haley Guest, SC, 13.23; 2, Tess Schumacher, R, 13.86; 3, Hannah Green, N, 14.50. 200 — 1, Haley Guest, SC, 13.23; 2, Tess Schumacher, R, 13.86; 3, Hannah Green, N, 14.50. 400 — 1, Shannon Pieren, N, 1:08.49; 2, Grace Smith, SC, 1:08.66; 3, Ana Badillo, C, 1:12.13. 800 — 1, Kelsey Arndt, SA, 2:50.16; 2, Kylie McGregor, SA, 2:57.50; 3, Daniela Martinez, SA, 2:58.53. 1500 — 1, Kelsey Arndt, SA, 5:51.98; 2, Cassidy Tharp, SC,

CYCLING

HW Y 97

Thursday’s Results ——— CLASS 5A Special District 1 BEND 6, MOUNTAIN VIEW 2 At Mountain View Singles — Jeff Windsor, B, def. Alek Mauldin, MV, 6-0, 6-1;

Girls

Thursday’s Results At Scio High School Team scores — 1, Scio 174; 2, Regis 144; 3, Santiam 117; 4, Culver 95; 5, Nestucca 79. 100 — 1, Chris Smith, SA, 12.30; 2, Harley Stephenson, SC, 12.37; 3, Ethan Massari, SC, 12.38. 200 — 1, Brady Smith, SC, 24.31; 2, Justin Guest, SC, 24.71; 3, Micah Massari, SC, 25.24. 400 — 1, AJ Holmberg, SC, 53.89; 2, Micah Massari, SC, 54.55; 3, Jesus Retano, C, 56.66. 800 — 1, Kyle Belanger, C, 2:18.38; 2, Parker Jensen, N, 2:19.95; 3, Lennie Plaetinck, SC, 2:24.96. 1500 — 1, Preston Quinn, C, 4:38.55; 2, Kyle Belanger, C, 4:49.13; 3, Cody Aalsma, N, 4:50.13.

6:16.67; 3, Samara Rufener, C, 6:58.41. 3,000 — 1, Hanna Scrocca, R, 12:17.59; 2, Trishia Hopkins, N, 16:11.49. 100 hurdles — 1, Kayla Dolby, R, 18.84; 2, Brianne Frieden, SA, 19.28; 3, Tracy Sappington, SA, 20.38. 300 hurdles — 1, Brooke Thompson, SA, 57.56; 2, Tracy Sappington, SA, 57.86; 3, Jessica Gunzenhauser, SC, 58.86. 400 relay — 1, Nestucca, 54.28; 2, Regis, 55.99; 3, Santiam, 57.29. 1600 relay — 1, Nestucca, 4:54.64; 2, Santiam, 5:11.57; 3, Regis, 6:03.75. Shot — 1, Haley Guest, SC, 38-04.25; 2, Liz Ayers, R, 3105.00; 3, Kayla Dolby, R, 29-05.00. Discus — 1, Jaclyn Fessler, R, 94-08; 2, Daniela Salinas, SA, 87-02; 3, Kayla Dolby, R, 83-00. Javelin — 1, Liz Ayers, R, 99-08; 2, Lauren Alley, R, 88-02; 3, Rebecca Windle, N, 87-03. High jump — 1, Brittany Hurliman, N, 5-00.00; 2, Kayla Dolby, R, 5-00.00; 3, Shannon Pieren, N, 4-08.00. Pole vault — 1, Natasha Helsing, N, 8-06.00; 2, JJ Halemeier, SA, 7-06.00; 3, Brittney Pratt, C, 7-00.00. Long jump — 1, Zoe Shelton, SC, 14-06.50; 2, Haley Guest, SC, 14-06.00; 3, Hannah Green, N, 13-10.50. Triple jump — 1, Shannon Pieren, N, 31-02.50; 2, JJ Halemeier, SA, 29-08.00; 3, Kristin Mouser, SA, 27-06.00.

BUS INE SS

Boys

TRACK & FIELD Boys

3000 — 1, Preston Quinn, C, 10:32.28; 2, Hector Martinez, R, 11:20.00; 3, Lennie Plaetinck, SC, 13:28.46. 110 hurdles — 1, Tyler Funk, C, 16.76; 2, Daniel Harper, SC, 17.76; 3, Austin Miller, SC, 17.93. 300 hurdles — 1, Tyler Funk, C, 42.36; 2, AJ Holmberg, SC, 44.83; 3, Daniel Harper, SC, 47.47. 400 relay — 1, Scio ‘A,’ 46.08; 2, Scio ‘B,’ 49.01; 3, Santiam, 50.98. 1600 relay — 1, Scio, 3:37.13; 2, Culver, 3:45.24; 3, Nestucca, 4:00.35. Shot — 1, Jonathan Moore, R, 39-05.50; 2, Phil Yoder, SC, 35-10.75; 3, Trevor Dolby, R, 34-11.75. Discus — 1, Jonathan Moore, R, 116-06; 2, Michael Ripp, R, 96-03; 3, Josiah Weinman, SA, 91-03. Javelin — 1, Zach Sherman, R, 142-09; 2, Paul Bentz, R, 13003; 3, Josiah Weinman, SA, 129-07. High jump — 1, Nick Ahn, N, 5-10.00; 2, Austin Sears, N, 5-08.00; 3, Adam Moore, R, 5-06.00. Pole vault — 1, Daniel Thompson, SA, 9-00.00; 2, Ryan Mumey, R, 9-00.00; 3, Nick Ahn, N. 9-00.00. Long jump — 1, Paul Bentz, R, 18-00.50; 2, Nathan Jones, SC, 16-05.00 3, Kris Sims, SA, 15-09.00. Triple jump — 1, Ryan Gescher, R, 36-02.50; 2, Michael Beitel, R, 36-02.00; 3, Adam Moore, R, 35-03.50.

Hatch, Prineville, 39th in halfpipe, 64th in slopestyle. Girls 13-15 — Carolyn Boyle: seventh in halfpipe, sixth in slopestyle, 12th in skiercross, fourth overall.

97

Thursday’s Results ——— CLASS 5A Special District 1 MOUNTAIN VIEW 5, BEND 3 At Bend Singles — Kaylee Tornay, B, def. Hayati WolfendenMV 6-1, 76; Cassidy Taylor, B, def. Crosby Mays, MV, 6-0, 6-1; Allie Kercher, MV, def. Claire Nichols, B, 6-2, 6-1; Courtney Horrell, MV, def. Melissa Watkins, B, 4-6, 6-2, 10-4. Doubles — Oliveira/Palcic, B, def. Deckard/Lind, MV, 7-5, 6-3; Daniel/Cesar, MV, def. Daley/Fowlds, B, 7-5, 6-3; Andersen/Johnson, MV, def. Palcic/Peterson, B, 7-5, 3-6, 10-6; Torrence/Eberle, MV, def. Holliday/Taunton, B, 7-5, 6-0. ——— NONCONFERENCE SUMMIT 5, CROOK COUNTY 3 At Crook County Singles — Barbara Furuie, CC, def. Hannah Shepard, S, 1-6, 6-1, 10-6; Natasha Wiersh, CC, def. Mikaela .Forest, 6-4, 2-6, 10-6; Amy ieber, S, def. Lisa Pham, CC, 6-4, 6-1; Ariel Steele, S, def. Ali Apperson, CC, 6-0, 6-1. Doubles — Younger/Brodeck, S, def. Morgan/Brown, CC, 6-3, 5-7, 10-8; Johnston/Kemper, CC, def. Collis/Sundborg, S, 6-1, 6-3; Caine/Dodson, S, def. Nelson/Bowers, CC, 6-3, 6-2; Evans/Bailey, S, def. Slawter/Goertzen, 6-1, 6-3.

Joel Johnson, B, def. Dylan Wells, MV, 6-1, 6-0; Cole Anderson, B, def. Philip Atkinson, MV, 6-2, 5-7 (10-5); Josh Woodland, B, def. Eric Watson, MV, 6-3, 6-2. Doubles — Matt Larraneta/Matt VanHemelryck, MV, def. Jon Simning/Preston Tuttle, B, 6-1, 6-3; Kristian Raymond/Matheus Friere, B, def. Mason Martel/Nick Nizinski, MV, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5); Tanner Jacobson/Brad Halligan, B, def. Ethan Ouellette/Dillon Warner, MV, 6-3, 6-1; James Harper/Brandon Hargous, MV, def. Matt Woodland/ Stephen Seghal, 7-5, retired. ——— NONCONFERENCE SUMMIT J.V. 5, CROOK COUNTY 3 At Summit Singles — Trevor Brown, CC, def. Max L’Etoile, 6-0, 6-0; Harrison Maze, S, def. Brady Slater, CC, 7-6 (8-6), 6-3; Jerad Anderson, CC, def. Raleigh Audette, S, 6-2, 6-1; Eric Fields, S, def. Gabe Alvarez. CC. 6-4, 6-0. Doubles — Lopez/Nore, CC, def. Souther/Harrington, S, 6-3, 6-3; Callande/Stefferman, S, def. Umbarger/Peterson, CC, 6-2, 75; Dolezal/Zhang, S, def. Woodward/Barney, CC, 6-1, 6-0; Summit wins by forfeit.

USASA NATIONALS At Copper Mountain, Colo. April 2-12 Central Oregon rider results (All from Bend unless otherwise noted) ——— SNOWBOARDING Boys 12-13 — Nathan Jacobson: 16th in halfpipe, 17th in slopestyle; Logan Schaffer: 17th in halfpipe; Brad Smith: 16th in boardercross. Boys 8-9 — Cody Collins: 27th in slalom, 30th in GS, 32nd in halfpipe, 38th in slopestyle. Boys 16-17 — Dimitri Hagen: 36th in slopestyle. Men 50-59 — Don Richter: first in slalom, second in GS. Girls 10-11 — Zoe Kern: ninth in slalom, eighth in GS, 11th in halfpipe, seventh in slopestyle, ninth in boardercross, fourth overall; Drue Schnake: 12th in slalom, 12th in GS. 14th in halfpipe, 14th in slopestyle, 19th in boardercross, eighth overall. Open class women — Devyn Schnake: 11th in slopestyle. Girls 7-under — Molly Kern: fifth in slalom, third in GS, fourth in halfpipe, first in slopestyle, third in boardercross, third overall. Boys 14-15 — Kent Callister: first in halfpipe, sixth in slopestyle. Girls 14-15 — Sage Allen: 13th in slopestyle. ——— SKIING Boys 10-12 — Hunter Hess: fourth in halfpipe, sixth in slopestyle, seventh in skiercross, first overall; Tristan Hatch, Prineville: 35th in halfpipe, 42nd in skiercross; Grant Gorham: second in halfpipe. Girls 10-12 — Anna Gorham: fourth in halfpipe, fifth in slopestyle. Boys 13-15 — Crosby Jones: 69th in slopestyle; Dylan

BEND PARKWAY - HWY

TENNIS Girls

SNOWRIDING


D6 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A D V EN T U R E S P ORT S

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

CLIMBING FREE CLIMBING DAY AT BEND ROCK GYM: Sunday, April 17, noon to 8 p.m.; come check out the newly remodeled floor and climbing terrain at Bend Rock Gym; donations accepted; admission is two canned or non-perishable food items; 541-388-6764; info@bendrockgym. com; www.bendrockgym.com.

CYCLING FREE BIKE RODEO: Saturday, April 16, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the corner of Fort Clatsop Drive and Ordway Drive in Bend’s Northwest Crossing neighborhood; hosted by the Bend Endurance Academy; a bike rodeo is an obstacle course that is open to riders of all ages and abilities; participants must supply their own bike and helmet; contact Brenna Warburton for details: 541-678-3865. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY CYCLING PROGRAMS: Include options in youth development, junior teams, U23/collegiate teams, camps, races and shuttles; age 6 and older; mountain biking, road cycling and cyclocross; info@ bendenduranceacdemy.org; www. bendenduranceacdemy.org. MBSEF CYCLING PROGRAM: Classes in both mountain and road biking are offered starting at the end of April, through August; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; (541) 923-5650; www.trinitybikes.com. WEEKLY ROAD RIDE: Saturdays, noon; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675. GRIT CLINICS: Women-specific mountain bike clinics for beginner and intermediate mountain bikers; designed to increase confidence on the trail by improving bike-handling skills; four clinics offered in Bend: May 14-15, June 11-12, July 30-31, Sept. 10-11; registration is open at Bend’s Pine Mountain Sports; $100 per two-day session; visit www.GritClinics.com, or email info@GritClinics.com.

HIKING HIKING CENTRAL OREGON RIVERS: The field trips will explore the stream sides of the Metolius, Deschutes, McKenzie and Fall rivers; trails will cover five to eight miles in length; one classroom session on April 19 and four field sessions Tuesdays, April 21 through May 12, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; $85; 541-3837270 or noncredit.cocc.edu. HIKING THE CENTRAL OREGON DESERT: The four field trips will visit different trails in the area, and each hike will cover five to eight miles; one classroom session on April 18 and four field sessions Monday, April 20 through May 11, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; $85; 541-3837270 or noncredit.cocc.edu.

MISCELLANEOUS POLE PEDAL PADDLE FIRSTTIMERS SEMINAR: Thursday, April 21, 5:30 to 7 p.m.; U.S. Bank in downtown Bend; past winners of the event will answer questions regarding transitions, training, the course, logistics and how to shave some time; RSVP to molly@mbsef. org or 541-388-0002; the Pole Pedal Paddle is a multisport event that includes alpine and cross-country skiing, cycling, running and kayaking. BEND OFF ROAD OYSTER RACE: Saturday, June 25, 8 a.m.; at Deschutes Brewery in Bend; a condensed, milder version of an adventure race, the Oyster Off Road challenges teams of two and relays of four to push the limits in some of nature’s pristine playgrounds; entry fee $60; 303-777-6887; oysterracingseries.com. THE URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-9622862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

PADDLING SPRING PADDLE FEST: April 30May 1, at Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe in Bend; kayaking experts will teach free two-hour basic skills kayak clinics all day Saturday behind the store starting at 10 a.m.; Sunday, at River Bend Park, boating representatives from major kayak and canoe companies will bring the latest models for paddlers to demo; contact Tumalo Creek Kayak and Canoe at 541-317-9407 or info@tumalocreek. KAYAKING CLASSES: Sundays, 4-6 p.m.; for all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment

provided to those who preregister, first-come, first served otherwise; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: Sundays, 4:15 to 6 p.m.; at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; Sundays through the end of May; space is limited to 12 boats; registration is available beginning the Monday before each roll session at register. bendparksandrec.org; boats must be clean and paddles padded and taped to prevent damage to the pool; no instruction is provided; $8-$10 per boat.

ROLLER DERBY RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY: Practice with the Renegades Sundays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Bend’s Midtown Ballroom; dropin fee of $7; loaner gear available; contact nmonroe94@gmail.com. PRACTICE WITH THE LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY LEAGUE: 3 to 5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; at Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com or 541-306-7364.

RUNNING LIGHT OF HOPE: Sunday, April 17; at Riverbend Park, Bend; 10-kilometer, five-kilometer and one-kilometer runs/ walks; $10-$35; proceeds benefit CASA of Central Oregon; 541-389-1618; http://www.casaofcentraloregon.org. FOOTZONE HALF-MARATHON TRAINING GROUP: Saturdays through May 28; 9 a.m.; 12-week program; train for the Dirty Half or Happy Girls Half; $90; Johanna Olson; 208-450-9074; sign up online at www.footzonebend. com or in person at FootZone. HAPPY GIRLS HALF MARATHON TRAINING PROGRAM: Eight-week half-marathon training program to prepare for the Happy Girls Half (May 29), Dirty Half (June) or Pacific Crest (June); Saturdays through May 21 at 8:30 a.m.; $75; 541389-1601; training@fleetfeetbend. com; www.fleetfeetbend.com/half. REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays for a 4- to 8-mile run; contact Dan Edwards at rundanorun1985@ gmail.com or 541-419-0889. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. TEAM XTREME’S RUNNING CLUB IN REDMOND: Meets at 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Xtreme Fitness Center, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 2- to 5-mile run; free; 541-923-6662. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park for 6-18 miles; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Distances and locations vary; paces between 7- and 11minute miles can be accommodated; Sundays at 9 a.m.; locations vary, Bend; free; 541-317-3568 or jenny@footzonebend.com.

SCUBA DIVING BASIC BEGINNER SCUBA DIVING CLASSES: Central Oregon Scuba Academy at Cascade Swim Center in Redmond, ongoing; certification for anyone 12 and older; vacation refresher and dive industry career classes for certified divers; cost varies; Rick Conners at 541312-2727 or 541-287-2727.

SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING WESTERN REGION FIS SPRING SERIES DOWNHILL RACE: April 1520 at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. SKI EVALUATION FOR MT. BACHELOR NATIONAL SKI PATROL: Sunday, April 17, at 9 a.m., at Mt. Bachelor “Sprung” (large white tent in the West Village parking lot); candidates should plan to spend most of the day on the mountain; the volunteer NSP is recruiting for all disciplines: alpine patrol, nordic patrol and auxiliary patrol; alpine patrol is open to alpine skiers, snowboarders and alpine touring/telemark skiers; this is the final ski evaluation offered this ski season; contact Rob Weiss at mt.bnsp.training@gmail.com. ANNUAL MAY DAY RACE: April 29-May 1 at Mt. Bachelor; open to ages 7 to 14; race is staged out of the Junior Race Center at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

SNOWSHOEING GUIDED SNOWSHOE TRIPS: Three guided snowshoe trips per week; trips geared towards those ages 55 and older; trips divided into easy, intermediate and advanced in Deschutes, Ochoco and Willamette national forests; $15 per person for first time snowshoers; $20 per person after first trip; registration required two days before each trip; contact 541-3838077; strideon@silverstriders. com; www.silverstriders.com.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Mountain biker Bill Hartrich cruises along singletrack trail at Horse Ridge last week. The area offers mountain bikers challenging rides with sweeping views of the High Desert.

Ho rse Ridge Continued from D1 A map is also available on the Central Oregon Trail Alliance website (www.cotamtb.com), but don’t expect that to end any confusion. To me, Horse Ridge is a new adventure every time — barbedwire fences, random turnoffs and dirt roads always make it so. Am I going the right way? Who knows? There’s nobody out here because, well, it’s snowing. Such was the case last Friday as I mounted my bike at the trailhead and those little pellets of springtime snow started falling. The sun came and went through foreboding gray clouds. From the trailhead, bikers have two main options for singletrack. They can go left and ride a rolling trail along a fence line close to U.S. Highway 20, or go right and begin a challenging climb through a short, shallow canyon. Both options can lead to 10- to 15-mile loops. And both trails lead to a fun ridgeline that offers expansive views of the desert landscape east of Bend. I started out with the pretty tough climb through the canyon, which included a few rocky, twisting switchbacks. The singletrack trail was in incredible shape — wet and tacky, with even some fresh powder snow in spots under the shade of trees. Once past the grind of the initial climb, which served to warm me up quickly on a day when high temperatures would reach only the low 40s, I settled onto the side-hill trail to encounter a sprawling vista of the Badlands Wilderness and beyond. Twisted old juniper trees, no greenery left on their limbs, rose into the sky along the trail. Some of the oldest known Western juniper trees are found on the slopes of Horse Ridge, according to the BLM. On a clear day, bikers can take in views of the Three Sisters, Mount Jefferson, Mount Washington, Three Finger Jack, and even Mount Hood to the distant north. Farther east lie Smith Rock, Powell Buttes and the Ochocos, together serving as a backdrop to the juniper-dotted Badlands that dominate the horizon. Directly across Highway 20 is Dry River Canyon. The trail eventually became extremely technical, filled with lava rocks, as it turned back west. On previous rides, I would just go until I couldn’t take the strain of riding over the rocks, then turn around and double back the way I had come. This time, I was determined to ride some sort of loop. Fences are another issue at Horse Ridge. Depending on where they ride, mountain bikers may have to clear at least two barbed-wire fences, which mark the Horse Ridge Research Natural Area. The 600-acre area was established in 1967 to study Western juniper and big sagebrush plant communities, according to the BLM. After clearing a second fence, I noticed Pine Mountain to the south covered in snow. Sun shined off the dusting that blanketed its peak. Instead of crossing a third fence, which would have led me about 400 feet down to the far southeastern end of the trail system, I took a right and con-

Once past the grind of the initial climb, which served to warm me up quickly on a day when high temperatures would reach only the low 40s, I settled onto the side-hill trail to encounter a sprawling vista of the Badlands Wilderness and beyond. Twisted old juniper trees, no greenery left on their limbs, rose into the sky along the trail. Some of the oldest known Western juniper trees are found on the slopes of Horse Ridge, according to the BLM. tinued along singletrack high atop the ridge. I was just a couple hundred feet lower than the highest point of Horse Ridge, which rises to 5,148 feet. I noticed a turnoff to the right, which would have led me back down to the trailhead, but I wanted to continue along the trail. I eventually came to a dead end, or at least what seemed like a dead end. I started down

the west side of the ridge and encountered a view of the area ravaged by the 1996 Skeleton Fire — a vast swath of barrenness. The ridge seemed to drop 800 feet straight down. I could make out the markings of a primitive trail that appeared to switch back down the drop-off, but I had no plans to follow it. I rode back to the turnoff I had seen earlier, hoping to find

the trailhead. The turnoff led to a ripping downhill singletrack trail straight through a gully. The continuous downhill wore out my brakes as I tore down the side of the ridge. Back at the trailhead, that uneasy feeling of isolation I always get at Horse Ridge was gone. Two other vehicles were parked at the trailhead, two mountain bikers just starting out. More clouds rolled in, the snow started falling again, and I was glad to be done. Horse Ridge may not be the first choice for Central Oregon mountain bikers, but with a huge snowpack this year, choices remain somewhat limited until other more popular areas thaw out. Enjoy the winter riding while it lasts, because soon we’ll be complaining about the dusty trails of midsummer. Ma rk Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

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F

E

HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE ‘Friday Night Lights’

Inside

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

It’s not too late to get into this NBC series, Page E2

FAMILY

www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

INSIDE Dear Abby Bunnies bought for Easter often wind up in shelters, Page E2

Family Calendar Listing of family-friendly events, Page E3

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Juniper Swim & Fitness to host Kid’s Night Out Kid’s Night Out will be held 6:30-9:30 p.m. every Saturday through May 28 at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center. The program for children ages 3-11 is run by lifeguards and trained staff. It includes games, crafts, stories, movies. Swimming is available for children in kindergarten through fifth grade. Pizza, a drink and a healthy snack are also included. The cost is $10 for in-district residents, $14 for out-of-district residents. Preregistration is encouraged and available at http://register .bendparksandrec.org. The fitness center is located at 800 N.E. Sixth St. in Bend. Contact: 541-389-7665.

Becca’s Closet reopens with new look and more Becca’s Closet will be holding a grand reopening celebration at its newly remodeled location in the basement of Bend’s Community Center from 3:30-5:30 p.m. Tuesday. The public is invited to see the new digs, enjoy free food and beverages, and learn about getting involved with the project. The closet, which offers free formalwear to teens throughout Central Oregon, now includes a boys’ section with tuxedos, dress shoes, shirts, jackets and other men’s accessories to lend. The existing girls’ section has more than 1,600 dresses plus shoes and other accessories. Becca’s Closet is a volunteerbased program managed by teens from Central Oregon. There are more opportunities for teens to be involved in helping staff the closet, as well as in publicity, fundraising, Web design, public speaking and much more. Bend’s Community Center is located at 1036 N.E. Fifth St. Contact: beccascloset@bendscommunitycenter.org or Mimi Graves at 541-419-9616. — From staff reports

Disposable or cloth?

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Seems to be no bottom to half-century diaper debate

Esme Rhine is an outstanding student at Bend High with a 4.27 GPA. She was recently accepted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

By Leanne Italie

Bend High student is building her future

The Associated Press

NEW YORK — isposables, cloth. Cloth, disposables. Fifty years after Procter & Gamble introduced affordable throwaway diapers, dubbing them Pampers, the battle over baby’s bottom rages on. The brand brought on a revolution in baby care, obliterating safety pins, soaking pails and diaper delivery trucks. But reusable diapers have been slowly inching back into the mainstream, with the predictable face-off among parents choosing one or the other — though some families use both. In 1958, with other disposables already out, P&G’s version was a “fortunate failure” during a summer test run in Dallas, according to a company history. Consisting of pads and plastic pants, it made babies uncomfortable in the heat. The company tweaked the invention into a one-piece and went calling on parents again in 1961. They played in Peoria, Ill., one of the markets chosen, but customers said the cost of 10 cents each was too high. More tweaks followed and the price went down to 6 cents. By 1979, Pampers was a billion-dollar brand. The disposable diaper industry, now worth more than $25 billion, crushed the cloth market. But wait. After the save-the-planet zeitgeist of two decades ago failed to produce a blockbuster comeback, reusables have become de rigueur in certain circles, and to some parents who lack money for disposables. See Diapers / E6

D

Editor’s Note: Standout Students, which runs every other week in The Bulletin, highlights outstanding teenagers in Central Oregon. To suggest a student for consideration, e-mail Megan Kehoe at mkehoe@bend bulletin.com.

By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Esme Rhine, 17, said she locked herself in her room for a week while she waited for the news. “I didn’t want to be around anyone,” said Esme. “I was so nervous.”

Local diaper event Bambini of Bend will host a cloth diaper-changing event as part of the national Great Cloth Diaper Change at 9 a.m. April 23. The event is an attempt to set a world record for most cloth diapers changed simultaneously and raise awareness of the benefits of cloth diapers. Locally, it will be held at Bambini, 1052 N.W. Newport Ave., in Bend. Contact: 541-385-1806.

STANDOUT STUDENTS Finally, on a day in late March, the e-mail she had been waiting for since January arrived. Esme’s dream of going into the field of engineering was finally coming true. She had been accepted by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “I was just in shock,” said Esme. “And then I was so excited.” See Esme / E6

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN

LIVING WITH CHILDREN

Details, Page E3

Please is not welcome if your intent is authoritative

Bend Spring Festival Celebrate the season with music, art and more in Bend’s NorthWest Crossing neighborhood.

Eat, Play, Love!

By John Rosemond

The High Desert Museum offers dinner, playtime, music and learning activities for families with young children.

Q:

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

bumGenius via The Associated Press

Reusable cloth diapers, like bumGenius, have been inching back into the mainstream.

Cow pie bingo This fundraising event at Bend’s Mountain View High School also includes face painting and a petting zoo.

RIGHT: The “Goodbye Disposable, Hello Cloth” custom 2-in-1 hybrid cloth diaper is a limited edition. Charlie Banana via The Associated Press

When a parent is giving a child an instruction, like “pick up your toys,” should the parent use “please”? My wife says we should model the behavior we want from our kids, but I say it’s unnecessary. I was surprised to discover, searching back over 35 years of weekly newspaper columns (approximately 1,750), that I’ve never answered this important question. I have said on several occasions that children should be taught fundamental manners — including proper use of “please,” “thank you,” and “you’re welcome” — before they are taught their ABCs, but never have I looked at this issue from the flip side of the coin. So it’s time that I did, and THANK YOU for asking. See Please / E3

A:


T EL EV ISION

E2 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Bunnies bought for Easter often wind up in shelters Dear Abby: Could you please reprint a letter you ran a few years ago about the dangers of purchasing a pet rabbit for children at Easter? As a rabbit owner for eight years, I’m all too familiar with the misconceptions and ridiculous theories associated with these delightful creatures. Every point in that letter rang true to me, and I beg anyone considering giving a child a rabbit to reconsider. When I bought my bunny, it was near Easter time. Most pet stores didn’t offer them, and I was told it was because of the large number of rabbits found dead or abandoned on the streets because the selfish, inhumane people who bought them for the holiday disposed of them the next day. These dear little animals deserve owners who will love and respect them. Please don’t waste their lives. — Caitlin In L.A. Dear Caitlin: I’m happy to oblige. The letter you requested carries an important message that can’t be repeated often enough: Dear Abby: Easter is coming. Many families still purchase live rabbits as pets for their children. Parents often think rabbits are good “starter” pets and don’t understand what they are getting into. As a result, many of these poor creatures end up in animal shelters, and children learn that pets are disposable. Before getting rabbits, people should consider: 1. Are they willing to make a seven-to-10-year commitment? That is the average lifespan of a rabbit. 2. What will happen if their child gets bored with the bunny after six months? 3. Is there a place in their house for a rabbit cage? 4. Are they willing to pay to get it spayed/neutered and provide vet care? 5. Do they know that most rabSelf Referrals Welcome

DEAR ABBY bits hate to be held? Will their child accept that? 6. Are they willing to ensure that children younger than 7 won’t pick up the rabbit without supervision? Rabbits are fragile; their legs or spine will break if accidentally dropped. 7. Can they provide three hours of exercise every day in an escape-proof area outside its cage? 8. Do the adults want the rabbit, too? A rabbit should be a family pet. If people have questions about rabbits and their care, please ask them to contact my organization. We are happy to answer questions. Our website is www.rabbit network.org, and our phone number is 781-431-1211. Finally, if a rabbit is right for you and your family, please adopt one from a shelter or rescue group. You’ll enrich your family with a new member and also teach your kids the value of saving a life. Thank you. — Suzanne Trayhan, President, House Rabbit Network Dear Suzanne: The topic of bunnies, baby chicks and ducklings as Easter gifts is one that recurs every year. I hear from people who work in animal shelters deploring the fact that these helpless little creatures are later dumped when they cease to be novelties. I hope readers will take to heart what you have written, particularly the suggestion that if a rabbit is going to be adopted, a shelter or rescue group can be an excellent resource. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

It’s not too late to turn on the ‘Lights’ By Chuck Barney Contra Costa Times

The characters

If there were justice in the complicated realm of pop culture, “Friday Night Lights” would have spent the past five years loading up on Emmy awards and adorning magazine covers. Instead, it has mostly lurked on the primetime sidelines as television’s most understated and underappreciated masterpiece. Perhaps it needed some kind of attention-seizing hook. A small-town drama about high school football and so much more, “Friday Night Lights” contains no raunchy vampire sex or Mafia goons. Its young characters haven’t been juiced-up and Snookified. The driven head coach at the center of the show (Kyle Chandler) has only one wife (Connie Britton), who, believe it or not, does not peddle pot on the side. No, all this show has going for it is some superb writing, exceptional acting and a slew of heartfelt stories about ordinary folk that typically provide at least one lump-in-thethroat moment per episode. Vampire sex, apparently, was never a viable option. “Friday Night Lights” kicks off its fifth and final season on NBC tonight. That means its small but rabid band of supporters has one last chance to break out the pom-poms and lead some passionate cheers for this unique gem. As always, it would be nice to have a few more warm bodies in the booster section. I know what you’re thinking: Here’s another preachy TV critic spewing an eatyour-vegetables kind of sermon. Guess again. I’m urging you to give “Friday Night Lights” a chance not because it’s good for you in the way that say, “The Wire,” is good for you. I’m urging you to watch because this just might

‘Friday Night Lights’

Here’s a look at some primary players in “Friday Night Lights”: his past re-enters his life. ERIC TAYLOR (Kyle Chandler): A high school football coach who won a Texas state championship with the JESS MERRIWEATHER Dillon Panthers. Became a victim of (Jurnee Smollett): East Dillon student, avid football fan and back-room politics and was forced girlfriend of Vince Howard. out of that job. Moved across town This season: Joins the football to coach at East Dillon, a poorly program as a team manager and funded, racially diverse program. considers a future in the sport. This season: He faces off-field uncertainty as budget woes may LUKE CAFFERTY (Matt Lauria): shut down the program. Running back for East Dillon. Attracted unwanted attention when a TAMI TAYLOR (Connie Britton): one-night stand with classmate Becky Strong-willed wife of coach Taylor and mother of two. Former principal Sproles resulted in a pregnancy and, ultimately, an abortion. at Dillon HS, now a student This season: Hopes to forge a counselor at East Dillon. genuine relationship with Becky, This season: She becomes who doesn’t appear interested. frustrated in her new job and eyes an enticing opportunity at a BECKY SPROLES (Madison Philadelphia college. Burge): East Dillon student with an JULIE TAYLOR (Aimee Teegarden): ongoing crush on former Panthers’ star Tim Riggins. After her abortion, College-bound daughter of Eric and moved in with Tim’s brother Billy Tami, and ex-girlfriend of former and his wife, Mindy. Dillon HS quarterback Matt Saracen This season: Tries hard to get over Tim. (Zach Gilford). This season: A budding college TIM RIGGINS (TAYLOR KITSCH): relationship brings complications. Resident wild boy and former VINCE HOWARD (Michael Jordan): football standout who dropped out Talented, but troubled, East Dillon QB of college. Serving time in prison after taking the rap for brother Billy, who took up the sport late in life after who was operating a chop shop. run-ins with the law. This season: Emerges from prison This season: Football stardom with a chip on his shoulder. goes to his head and a figure from

When: 8 tonight Where: NBC

541-706-6900

this show is teeming with characters who worm their way into your heart. Just give them two or three episodes to form a bond and, odds are, you’ll find yourself cheering their triumphs, crying over their disappointments and cringing at their mistakes. Why? Because they feel so incredibly honest and real.

Interior Design & Finishes by

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be the blind date that pays off in the TV love of your life. From town rabble-rouser Tim Riggins (Taylor Kitsch) and troubled but talented quarterback Vince Howard (Michael Jordan), to beauty-queen heartbreaker Becky Sproles (Madison Burge) and headstrong Jess Merriweather (Jurnee Smollett),

And speaking of real, the performances of Chandler and Britton as Eric and Tami Taylor are off-the-charts brilliant. Like any long-wedded couple, their characters frustrate and annoy one another, but at the end of the day they always fall back into each other’s arms. With a pleasing mixture of humor, warmth and playfulness, they personify TV’s most authentic depiction of a modern marriage — and they do it so well that you forget these are actors at work. Adapted from a book and movie of the same name, “Friday Night Lights” debuted in 2006, focusing on a high school football team based in fictional Dillon, Texas, and on its coach and his family. Over the years, the series has deftly examined this small town’s near religious devotion to football and how its dreams of achieving glory through sport often collide with harsh reality. But in “Friday Night Lights,” football is mainly used as a way to tap into a rich tapestry of engaging relationships and to explore an array of personal and social issues. For example, a Season 4 episode in which a player’s estranged father dies in Iraq offered a moving portrait of a young man coming to grips with both his grief and anger. That same season, a student had an abortion — a rarity in prime time — and the show handled the potentially combustible plot line with remarkable nuance.

April 15, 16 & 17

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

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KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Rudy Maxa Steves Europe

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7:00

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

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Shark Tank (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Friday Night Lights Expectations ‘14’ Chaos Love and Rockets (N) ’ ‘PG’ Shark Tank (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Kitchen Nightmares (N) ‘14’ Å News on PDX-TV Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Friday Night Lights Expectations ‘14’ Smallville Kent (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Hometime ‘G’ Around-House Washington W’k BBC Newsnight

9:00

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Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å CSI: NY Out of the Sky ’ ‘14’ Å Primetime: What Would You Do? ’ Fringe (N) ’ (PA) ‘14’ Å Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Lark Rise to Candleford ’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å Supernatural (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Martha-Sewing 1 Stroke Paint Lark Rise to Candleford ’ Å

10:00

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20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å Blue Bloods Little Fish ’ ‘14’ Å 20/20 ’ ‘PG’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Masterpiece Classic ‘PG’ Å Dateline NBC (N) ’ Å House of Payne Meet the Browns Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Masterpiece Classic ‘PG’ Å

11:00

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KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens A Passover Celebration ’ ‘G’ News Jay Leno Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John A Passover Celebration ’ ‘G’

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A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Criminal Minds ’ ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Machismo ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Haunted ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Reckoner ‘14’ Å Breakout Kings ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds A Real Rain ’ ‘14’ (5:02) ››› “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004, Comedy-Drama) George Clooney, Brad Pitt, Matt Damon. Indebted criminals plan an elabo- ›› “The Recruit” (2003, Suspense) Al Pacino, Colin Farrell, Bridget Moynahan. A CIA rookie must ferret out ›› “The Recruit” (2003, Suspense) Al Pacino. A CIA rookie 102 40 39 rate heist in Europe. Å a mole within the agency. Å must ferret out a mole within the agency. Å Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å Infested! ’ ‘PG’ Å Infested! ’ ‘PG’ Å Killer Outbreaks (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Haunted Bone Crusher (N) ‘PG’ Killer Outbreaks ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Monsters Inside Me ’ ‘PG’ Å The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC ›››› “Milk” (2008) Sean Penn. The life story of activist Harvey Milk. 137 44 The Singing Bee (N) ’ ‘PG’ CMT’s Next Superstar (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Singing Bee ’ ‘PG’ CMT’s Next Superstar ’ ‘PG’ 190 32 42 53 Grumpy Old Men (5:45) ›› “Grumpier Old Men” (1995, Comedy) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau. ’ America’s Next Great Restaurant ’ Mad Money The Celebrity Apprentice Marketing event for sun-care products. ’ ‘PG’ Fat Loss Back Pain Relief 51 36 40 52 The Celebrity Apprentice Marketing event for sun-care products. ’ ‘PG’ Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Chris Rock: Kill the Messenger ’ ‘MA’ Å Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ Journal Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ HS Softball 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Wizards-Place Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie “Lemonade Mouth” (2011) Bridgit Mendler, Adam Hicks. Premiere. ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Pig Bomb ’ ‘PG’ Å Hogs Gone Wild Wild Hog War ‘PG’ American Loggers Rain Delay ‘PG’ American Loggers (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Hogs Gone Wild Wild Hog War ‘PG’ 156 21 16 37 Desert Car Kings Caddy Shock ‘PG’ SportsCenter Special: On the Clock Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 The Association: Boston Celtics (N) NFL Live (N) Boxing Friday Night Fights (N) (Live) Å MMA Live (N) The Association: Boston Celtics (N) SportsNation Å NASCAR Now 2010 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 Football Live Cheap Seats Cheap Seats AWA Wrestling Å AWA Wrestling Å Boxing 1998 Judah vs. Ward Å Boxing: 2001 Augustus vs. Ward 23 25 123 25 College Football: 2007 Sheraton Hawaii Bowl SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos ’ ‘PG’ Å The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Cora vs. Hillson Chopped The chefs cook octopus. Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Outrageous Food Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Deli Unwrapped 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (4:00) › “The Benchwarmers” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Alvin and the Chipmunks” (2007, Comedy) Jason Lee, David Cross. ›› “Alvin and the Chipmunks” (2007, Comedy) Jason Lee, David Cross. 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Disaster DIY ‘G’ Income Property Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration Restoration Restoration 155 42 41 36 Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Intervention Kelly and Mark ‘14’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup Orange County Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: San Quentin Poetry slam. Lockup: San Quentin Lockup: Raw Convict Code 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show RJ Berger When I Was 17 Teen Mom 2 Unseen Moments ‘PG’ America’s Best Dance Crew ››› “Freedom Writers” (2007) Hilary Swank, Patrick Dempsey. ’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob Victorious ’ ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly iOMG ‘G’ Supah Ninjas ‘G’ “Mr. Troop Mom” (2009) George Lopez, Daniela Bobadilla. ’ Å The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show (N) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals From Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. (N) (Live) Gangland Beware the Goose! ‘14’ The Ultimate Fighter ’ ‘14’ Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Coal The Master Mines ’ ‘PG’ Coal A failing power supply. ’ ‘PG’ Coal Down N Out ’ ‘PG’ 132 31 34 46 Gangland Better Off Dead ‘14’ Å › “Ultraviolet” (2006) Milla Jovovich, Cameron Bright, Nick Chinlund. Å WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Sanctuary Pax Romana (N) ’ Å Being Human 133 35 133 45 (3:30) › “Equilibrium” (2002) Å Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord (N) Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Christian Celeb First to Know 205 60 130 Friends ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens ›› “Bedtime Stories” (2008, Comedy) Adam Sandler, Keri Russell. Å ›› “50 First Dates” (2004) Adam Sandler, Drew Barrymore. 16 27 11 28 Friends ‘PG’ ››› “The One That Got Away” (1958, Adventure) Hardy Kruger, Colin Gordon. A Ger- ›› “Daughter of Horror” (1955) Adrienne ›› “The Wooden Horse” (1950, War) Leo Genn, Anthony Steel, David Tomlinson. Brit- ›› “The Colditz Story” (1957, War) John Mills, Eric Portman, Christopher Rhodes. 101 44 101 29 ish POWs tunnel under gym horse, escape from stalag. British officers try escape from escape-proof German castle. man P.O.W. tries to escape from his British captors. Barrett, Ben Roseman. Cake Boss ‘PG’ Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Randy Knows Randy Knows Randy Knows Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Randy Knows Randy Knows 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ Kitchen Boss (N) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Ghosts ’ ‘14’ Bones The X in the File ‘14’ Å Bones The Dentist in the Ditch ‘14’ ››› “The Bourne Supremacy” (2004, Suspense) Matt Damon. Å ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990) Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Ain’t No Love ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Batman: Brave Young Justice Ben 10 Ult. Generator Rex Star Wars: Clone King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures (N) ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (11:41) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Dead and Unburied ‘PG’ Å NCIS Once a Hero ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” (1984) Harrison Ford, Kate Capshaw. Å (10:35) ›› “National Treasure: Book of Secrets” Å 15 30 23 30 House Office Politics ’ ‘14’ Å Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ SNL Remembers Chris Farley ›› “Spaceballs” (1987, Comedy) Mel Brooks, John Candy. Premiere. ’ 191 48 37 54 Best of I Love The... ’ ‘PG’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:15) ›› “John Q” 2002 ‘PG-13’ (6:15) ›› “Uncle Buck” 1989, Comedy John Candy. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 Dylan Walsh. ‘PG-13’ Å (9:45) ››› “The Thing” 1982, Horror Kurt Russell. ’ ‘R’ Å Reign of Fire ’ Fox Legacy ››› “Cleopatra” 1963, Historical Drama Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton, Rex Harrison. An account of the Egyptian queen’s tragic love affair. ‘G’ Å Fox Legacy ››› “Cleopatra” 1963 Elizabeth Taylor. ‘G’ Å Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ UFC Primetime: Shark Fights 13 The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Shark Fights 13 The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, Second Round From San Antonio. Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Champions: Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am, First Round PGA Tour Golf The Waltons The Conflict ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Whatever, You’re Whatever, Martha (4:45) ››› “Avatar” 2009, Science Fiction Sam Worthington, Voice of Zoe Saldana, Sigourney Weaver. A His Way Movie producer Jerry Weintraub discusses his career. The Ricky Gervais Eastbound & Down Real Time With Bill Maher TV host Ed Real Time With Bill Maher TV host Ed HBO 425 501 425 10 former Marine falls in love with a native of a lush alien world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ’ ‘14’ Å Schultz; Michael Steele. ’ ‘MA’ Show ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å Schultz; Michael Steele. ’ ‘MA’ Whitest Kids Whitest Kids Whitest Kids Whitest Kids Onion News Whitest Kids Mr. Show-Bob (8:35) ››› “Evil Dead 2” 1987, Horror Bruce Campbell, Sarah Berry. ‘R’ Onion News Whitest Kids Larry Sanders IFC 105 105 (4:10) ››› “Crazy Heart” 2009, Drama (6:05) ››› “The Ghost and the Darkness” 1996 Michael Douglas. An engineer and a ›› “The Book of Eli” 2010, Action Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman. A lone warrior ›› “S.W.A.T.” 2003, Action Samuel L. Jackson, Colin Farrell. A Los Angeles SWAT MAX 400 508 7 Jeff Bridges. ’ ‘R’ Å hunter stalk man-eating African lions. ’ ‘R’ Å carries hope across a post-apocalyptic wasteland. ’ ‘R’ Å team must protect a criminal. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Hooked Vampire Fish ‘PG’ Hooked Chasing Marlin (N) ‘PG’ Hooked Fishzilla ‘PG’ Hooked Vampire Fish ‘PG’ Hooked Chasing Marlin ‘PG’ Hooked Fishzilla ‘PG’ Dog Whisperer Dueling Pit Bulls ‘G’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai Power Rangers Power Rangers Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai Power Rangers Power Rangers Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Ren & Stimpy ’ Ren & Stimpy ’ NTOON 89 115 189 Zona’s Show Spanish Fly Wanna Fish Alaska Outdoors Pro Team Journal Bassmasters Match Fish. Trevor Gowdy Big Water Adven. Familiar Waters Wanna Fish American Archer Trout Unlimited OUTD 37 307 43 (4:45) “Agora” 2009, Adventure Rachel Weisz, Max Minghella, Oscar Isaac. iTV. A ›› “Twilight” 2008, Romance Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. iTV. A teen is caught ›› “Remember Me” 2010 Robert Pattinson. iTV Premiere. Love begins to heal the The 2011 AVN Awards (iTV) Erotic filmSHO 500 500 slave falls in love with Hypatia of Alexandria. ‘R’ up in an unorthodox romance with a vampire. ’ ‘PG-13’ troubled spirit of a rebellious young man. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å making awards. ‘MA’ SPEED Center NASCAR Hall of Fame Biography (N) NASCAR Racing NASCAR Racing Trackside At... Formula 1 Debrief (N) Mobil 1 The Grid Formula One Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (3:50) Armored (5:25) ›› “The Last Song” 2010, Drama Miley Cyrus. ’ ‘PG’ Å (7:20) ›› “2012” 2009 John Cusack. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. ‘PG-13’ Camelot Lady Of the Lake (N) ‘MA’ Camelot Lady Of the Lake ’ ‘MA’ STARZ 300 408 300 (5:05) “Familiar Strangers” 2008, Comedy-Drama Shawn (6:40) “Enemies Among Us” 2010, Action Eric Roberts, Billy ››› “We Were Soldiers” 2002, War Mel Gibson, Madeleine Stowe, Greg Kinnear. Outnumbered U.S. troops ››› “Internal Affairs” 1990 Richard Gere. A corrupt cop manipuTMC 525 525 Hatosy, D. J. Qualls. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Zane, Robin Givens. ’ ‘R’ Å battle the North Vietnamese. ’ ‘R’ lates colleagues for personal gain. ‘R’ Å (4:30) NHL Hockey New York Rangers at Washington Capitals (N) (Live) NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks (N) (Live) Hockey Central World Extreme Cagefighting VS. 27 58 30 Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Fools Rush In” 1997 ‘PG-13’ WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

P’ G   M 

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine. TODAY BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 4-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www. nwxevents.com. MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “In the Current,” features a parade and art stroll, and a performing arts evening at Bronco Billy’s Ranch Grill and Saloon; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; chili feed is $10 with chili, $5 without chili; 4 p.m. parade, 4:30 p.m. art stroll, 6:30 p.m. performing arts; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival.org or www. sistersfolkfestival.org. EAT, PLAY, LOVE!: Dinner, play and learning activities and live music for families with young children; donations of nonperishable food encouraged; 4:30-7 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-410-1974 or www. deschutescountykids.com. VFW DINNER: A dinner of spaghetti and meatballs; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775.

SATURDAY GOAT JAMBOREE: Featuring classes, shopping and a raffle; $7 or $20 per family; 8 a.m.-3:15 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave.; 541-548-2226 or COGA2010@aol.com. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www. nwxevents.com. COW PIE BINGO: Watch cows wander a grid set on the school’s soccer field, marking squares with droppings; with face painting, a petting zoo and more; proceeds benefit the Bend FFA Alumni; $5 per square; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-318-5778.

SUNDAY LIGHT OF HOPE: Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon hosts a 10K, 5K and 1K run/walk; proceeds benefit CASA; $30 or $20 for the 10K and 5K races, $10 for the 1K; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-1618 or www. casaofcentraloregon.org. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www. nwxevents.com. LUAU FUNDRAISER: A buffet-style meal, with music by Bill Keale and art giveaways; proceeds benefit Feedin’ the People; $25; 5-9 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-420-6278.

Please Continued from E1 Since there is no research on this matter, I must rely solely on personal experience and opinion, both of which lead to me answer “it depends.” Specifically, it depends on the situation. Are you giving an instruction or are you making a request? In many instances, tacking “please” onto the beginning or end of an instruction such as “pick up your toys” may well give the child the impression that the parent is asking the child to consider whether he’d like to pick up his toys or not. In that event, the use of “please” has confused the issue and the child is much less likely to pick up the toys. I generally recommend, and especially with young children, that parents not introduce this potential confusion into their instructions. Authoritative parent speech (I also call it “leadership speech” and “alpha speech”) greatly increases the likelihood of obedience, and all of the good research into parenting outcomes clearly finds that obedience and happiness go hand-in-glove. That’s generally true, by the way,

The Associated Press

From left, Raphael (voiced by George Lopez), Blu (voiced by Jesse Eisenberg) and Jewel (voiced by Anne Hathaway) take flying lessons in “Rio.” See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine.

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘Rio’ Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

Holden Korish, and his sister Ari Korish, lean in to take a look at what Tina Myers paints on the face of Mac Hamlin during Bend Spring Festival last year.

Story times, library youth events for April 15-21 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Monday. • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 12:15 p.m. Saturday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • WEE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Monday and Wednesday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. AND 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St.,; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • TEEN LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Monday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Wednesdays. • TEEN THURSDAYS: Game day, grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES STORY TIME: Ages 18 to 36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday.

SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. • KIDS CREW: Ages 6-11; 3 to 4 p.m. Tuesday. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080: • KIDS CREW: MINUTE TO WIN IT: Ages 6-11; 3 p.m. Tuesday. • PAJAMA PARTY STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 7 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. • TEEN TERRITORY GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 1:30 p.m. Wednesday. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Themed adventures; ages 3-4; 10 to 11 a.m. today; $15, $10 members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 ages 65 and older) • THE OTTER DEN: Ages 2-5; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. today and Monday-Thursday; $5, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 ages 65 and older) • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) BETWEEN THE COVERS: 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-385-4766: • STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY; 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394: • SPRING FAMILY FORAY: Nature walk; ages 2-5; 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Thursday; $3 adults, $2 children, free for members. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

MONDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

SPOKEN WORD SHOWCASE: Students from Pilot Butte Middle School perform poetry, emceed by Jason Graham; free; 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or www.thenatureofwords.org.

MOUNTAINSTAR 10-YEAR CELEBRATION: Featuring facility tours, a bounce house, face painting, food and more; free; 4:30-6 p.m.; MountainStar Family Relief Nursery, 2125 N.E. Daggett Lane, Bend; 541-322-6820 or www. mountainstarfamily.org.

FLAMENCO EN LAS AMERICAS: Savannah Fuentes performs traditional flamenco; $18 in advance, $23 at the door, $10 students, $7 children; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www. towertheatre.org.

TUESDAY

Rating: G What it’s about: A rare blue macaw is sent to Brazil to mate and save his species, only he doesn’t get along with the female macaw, and they’re bird-napped. The kid attractor factor: Animation, funny birds, slapstick, samba music. Good lessons/bad lessons: Exotic birds were never meant to be pets because it drives them to extinction in the wild. Violence: Cartoon slapstick. Language: Disney clean. Sex: Brazilian babes on the beach in Rio. Drugs: Does chloroform count? Parents’ advisory: Far and away the smartest, sweetest and funniest film from the folks who made those “Ice Age” cartoons, suitable for the whole family.

‘Hop’ Rating: PG for some mild rude humor. What it’s about: Guy hits the Easter Bunny with his car and must help him recover and realize his rock ’n’ roll dream. The kid attractor factor: A smart-mouthed, rock-drumming animated bunny, and James Marsden, the goofy prince from “Enchanted.” Good lessons/bad lessons: Sooner or later, you will meet your destiny. Violence: A car accident, mild cartoon peril. Language: Disney clean. Sex: Nary a hint. Drugs: Nary a whiff. Parents’ advisory: Harmless, this blend of animation and live action is aimed at the very youngest filmgoers. Suitable for all ages.

‘Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules’ Rating: PG for some mild rude humor and mischief. What it’s about: The Wimpy Kid makes his way through seventh grade and a rough-and-tumble relationship with his teenage brother. The kid attractor factor: It’s the second movie based on the

popular and funny Jeff Kinney books, with tweens and teens as its stars. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Don’t be good at something you don’t want to do” and other teen slacker credos. Violence: None to speak of. Language: “Holy moly!” is about as rough as it gets. Sex: Teen and tween flirtation, an underwear gag. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: Aimed squarely at the middle-school and younger set, it’s perfectly fine for 6 and older.

‘Mars Needs Moms’ Rating: PG for sci-fi action and peril. What it’s about: A little boy stows away on a spaceship when his mother is abducted by aliens. The kid attractor factor: Animation by the “Polar Express” folks, based on a Berkeley Breathed kids’ book. Good lessons/bad lessons: Words can wound, and there is no limit to a mother’s love. Violence: Alien laser guns and the threat of asphyxiation in the airless vacuum of space. Language: Disney clean. Sex: A little interspecies flirting, and blushing. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: More plotheavy than jokey, this one may be tough on the 6-and-younger set but perfectly engrossing for 7 and older.

‘Red Riding Hood’ Rating: PG-13 for violence and creature terror, and some sensuality. What it’s about: Red Riding Hood’s medieval village is menaced by a big bad WEREwolf. The kid attractor factor: Young people in lust in a fairy tale from the director of “Twilight.” Good lessons/bad lessons: “Our methods of pleasing God are sometimes ... flawed.” Violence: Slashings, stabbings and a hand is bitten off. Language: Fairy-tale friendly. Sex: Interrupted. Drugs: Ale and wine. Parents’ advisory: Aimed at that “Twilight” demographic, this is just as sexual, has a bit more blood plus a little swordplay — OK for 13 and older.

No events listed.

“When giving an instruction to a child, I recommend prefacing it with one of the following: ‘I need you to...,’ ‘I want you to...,’ ‘You’re going to...,’ or ‘It’s time for you to...’ Parents who master that habit invariably report to me that obedience increases dramatically in a relatively short period of time. That’s hardly surprising given that those prefaces make it perfectly clear that the instruction is not being thrown out there for the child to think about and/or do in his or her own sweet time.”

of adults as well as children. The employee who is constantly pushing against the boundaries, constantly questioning the authority of his or her boss, is not a happy camper. When giving an instruction to a child, I recommend prefacing it with one of the following: “I need you to...,” “I want you to...,” “You’re going to...,” or “It’s time for you to...” Parents who master that habit invariably report to me that obedience increases dramatically in a relatively short period of time. That’s hardly surprising given that those prefaces make it perfectly clear that the

instruction is not being thrown out there for the child to think about and/or do in his or her own sweet time. But there are situations that merit exception. For example, I certainly think it’s right and proper, when the family is seated

at the dinner table, for parents to use “please” when asking a child to pass the salt shaker. “It’s time for you to pass the salt shaker” just doesn’t fit the occasion. In that instance, the parent uses good manners (saying “please” and not reaching across the table) in order to teach by example and cause the child to exhibit good manners in return. Good manners is not the issue when giving an instruction such as “pick up your toys.” So, I sorta kinda agree with you, and I sorta kinda agree with your wife. In so doing, I hope that I have contributed in some small way to a long and happy marriage. Family psychologist John Rosemond answers parents’ questions on his website at www.rosemond.com.

Looking to volunteer? Find out what organizations need help with a variety of tasks at www.bendbulletin.com/volunteer.

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E4 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H B Y JACQ U ELINE BI GA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, April 15, 2011 This year, you forge a new path, and happily so. You feel much freer than you have in the past. This can be a banner year for you if you are open to the many opportunities. You will have a tendency to take the comments of others personally. Try not to, as they have more to do with the other party than with you. If you are single, use care, as you are likely to choose someone who might not be emotionally available. If you are attached, the two of you enjoy time away together, which will enhance your bond. LIBRA can be challenging. They have the same issues as you but a different approach. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Your efforts come back in multiples. Don’t take someone’s thoughtless words personally. You can be sure this person is uncomfortable with his or her error. Don’t add to the problem. Tonight: Clear your desk first. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You have a tendency to go overboard right now. You don’t need to prove anything; you simply need to be authentic. You’ll draw the results you want if you follow through. Let your imagination feed a situation. You will enjoy it more! Tonight: Let it happen. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Pressure builds to handle

an issue in a certain way. Rather than have an argument, you could close down. You wonder what would be the most effective approach. Stay centered under pressure. Only make the decision when you are ready. Tonight: Nap, then decide. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Keep reaching out for others. You also might have some last-minute details before you enter the weekend. Could the problem involve taxes? Whatever the case, dig in and get it done. Tonight: Celebrate being free. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Be aware of the costs of letting go and relaxing too soon today. Finish up the workweek in a manner that pleases you, even if it means putting in a long day. The end results will be well worth it. Tonight: Join friends — better late than never. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Attention from a key loved one makes your day. You might be giddy. Be aware of your limitations with finances. Don’t go overboard, if possible. A little discipline might make you happy in the long run. Tonight: If you can think of it, you can do it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Take your time, even if someone is pressuring you. Explore vagueness about an important matter close to your heart. You might need to hold back until you feel more sure of yourself. A family member does a reversal! Tonight: Vanish ... stay mum about why! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Zero in on what is

important. Don’t sell yourself short. Be direct with a friend or loved one who often makes you smile. Clear out an important errand or meeting early on. Tonight: Let the good times happen. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHH Tension builds as you juggle too much. You know where you are supposed to be, but where your mind wanders is another issue. You are more than ready for some free time. Once you clear out key errands or must-dos, you can follow your imagination. Tonight: The later it is, the more fun. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH You might want to try another approach or a different mental slant. Make sure you can center yourself in these new concepts, or you will come off as manipulative. Indulge those in your immediate environment. Tonight: Meet a pal after work. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Continue giving key associates, friends and loved ones all the attention they want. Your ability to make others feel important is key. People want to be around someone who values them as much as you do. Tonight: Be with a favorite person. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHHH Defer to others. You might not be in the mood to make any decisions right now. You will be happiest if you let go and simply enjoy yourself. The less you need to worry about or deal with, the happier you will be. Tonight: Say “yes” to an invitation. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Esme

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Esme Rhine is an outstanding student with an avid interest in engineering. She maintains a 4.27 GPA at Bend High School.

Diapers Continued from E1 The new cloth diapers are hardly a threat to the big guys in throwaways, but in crunchy enclaves like Portland and Northampton, Mass., it’s a rare parent worth his yoga mat who would dare consider disposables, at least out loud. Reusables can be had in bigbox stores and discount houses. Stashes are sometimes passed on to friends. They’re still roughly 5 percent or less of the diaper market, but it was the other way around in 1956 when disposables accounted for about 1 percent. That’s when P&G chemical engineer Vic Mills went in search of a better alternative to cloth for his newborn grandchild. Disposables have been around since at least 1935, primarily as a niche item for trips away from home, but they never broke through to overtake cloth until Pampers hit, tapping into the postwar fervor for all things new, convenient and timesaving — especially among women setting up house in suburbia.

“Empowerment of women was a big piece of what was behind that,” said Jodi Allen, general manager for Pampers. “Offering conveniences, offering more options, was clearly part of the culture at that time.”

Environmental dispute Today, saving the environment — and keeping anything that isn’t “green!” away from baby — is driving interest in reusables. The green question is especially vexing as both sides bandy scientific studies involving so many variables that the Natural Resources Defense Council considers the issue a wash when it comes to disposables in a landfill versus reusables in the laundry. “We don’t recommend one over another,” said Allen Hershkowitz, a senior scientist at the environmental action group and director of its solid waste project. “A compelling argument for getting rid of disposable diapers absolutely does not exist. It’s a personal choice, but it really can’t be made on environmental grounds. There are costs both ways,” he said.

Continued from E1 Esme, along with aspirations to be an engineer, builds birdhouses and works on a goat farm in her spare time. Esme is also a stellar student, taking a rigorous course load of AP math and science classes, along with IB English classes, all while maintaining a GPA of 4.27. The Bend High senior is also involved in her school’s athletics, playing basketball and participating in track and field. In addition, she volunteers at Bend’s Community Center twice a month in the soup kitchen. Esme said her interest in engineering started with her dad, who himself has an engineering background and had always encouraged Esme to take an interest in the field. Esme soon grew to love it, and has independently worked on projects, such as building birdhouses, where she’s been able to apply engineering principles. Last year, Esme applied for MIT’s summer technology program for high school women in-

terested in studying engineering. She spent part of her summer learning about how to measure sound waves using lasers. “The application process was a lot of work, but it was definitely worth it,” Esme said of the program. “It was just the best experience.” Esme and fellow program participants constructed a 5-by7-foot machine that made lemonade from scratch. Despite the impressive feat, Esme said the lemonade the machine produced wasn’t all that tasty. “The proportions were kind of off,” she said, and the mix-

ture ended up being too sour to drink. Originally from Fremont, Calif., Esme moved with her family to Central Oregon when she was 7. Esme has three brothers, one of whom is her twin. Her mother, Martha Rhine, is a former substitute teacher; her dad, Bruce, a former business entrepreneur, is semiretired. Esme says her family has had a huge impact on who she is and where she is going. “I’m really lucky to have such a strong support system,” Esme said. “I didn’t get here on my own. Everyone’s been helping me.” In addition to her avid interest in engineering, Esme enjoys playing sports at Bend High. She says her participation in basketball and track and field has taught her how to be a good team player. Her former English teacher, Sally Pressler, says Esme’s ability to lift up others around her is one of the reasons she is such an outstanding student. “She works to make everyone successful; she is truly a team player,” Pressler said. “Esme is

Cloth advocates are scrappy. They have a public education arm, the Real Diaper Association, which is not to be confused with a trade group, the Real Diaper Industry Association. Reusable diapers come in cotton, hemp, bamboo, wool and less organic forms. The flat cloths of old have been reinvented in prefolded, fitted, pocketed and all-in-one “systems” that offer breathability, expandability, leak control, Velcro, snaps and a three-armed fastener called a Snappi. There’s also a cuteness factor in brightly decorated covers, many from mom-grown businesses fueled by Internet interest. “Even if there really are no indications that future generations of humans will be able to survive our mistakes, I can wash load after load of dirty diapers with some trite optimism,” said clothuser Thomas Chang, the stayat-home dad to year-old Olive in Northampton. Shhhh: He and his wife use disposables at night. In Portland, 20-month-old Alexander’s mom, Kris Vockler, went for disposables all

day long after she worked out a metric carefully weighing the pros and cons — the big pro being she travels a lot and decided they were hassle-free when her son was along for the ride. He’s mostly potty-trained now, but Vockler’s memories are fresh. “We live outside Portland, where, if you know the place, picking disposables and saying so would give us funny looks,” she said. There are a lot of “what abouts” in the cloth-versus-disposable debate. There’s the cotton, pulp, petrol and industrial agricultural complexes to contend with on both sides. And what about the landfills, a subject that comes up a lot. Disposable diapers, Hershkowitz said, make up about 1.5 percent of all municipal waste generated in the United States, and municipal waste makes up about 2 percent of all waste from all sources. As someone who cares, he’s been looking for answers to the diaper dilemma for decades, “and there’s just no clear position to take. I wish it was that easy, but it’s not.” P&G’s Allen, a believer in “giv-

ing babies the best, most comfortable experience,” is no clothbasher. “I certainly don’t want to downplay the cloth diapering options and the fact that parents are looking for options that are also good for the environment,” she said. In his enlightened western Massachusetts town, Chang notes that few day care centers support cloth, though that’s changing. Most states allow child care providers to decide for themselves whether to accept reusable diapers. Generally, day care centers are not terribly receptive, said Heather McNamara, mom of two in San Diego, Calif., and executive director of the Real Diaper Association. The group maintains a searchable database of cloth-friendly day cares and massive amounts of other information at Realdiaperindustry.org. McNamara sees a steady stream of cloth converts there. “There’s a large silent population of cloth-diaper users,” she said. “People come to us almost daily and say, ‘I can’t believe I didn’t know about this before.’ ”

Esme Rhine, 17 School: Bend High School Movies: “Ladder 49” TV Shows: “The Office,” “Modern Family,” “Pretty Little Liars” Books: Harry Potter Series, Bourne Identity series Quote: “You miss 100 percent of the shots you don’t take.” — Wayne Gretzky

very unassuming and wears her intelligence well.” Pressler said that though Esme is brilliant, she still works hard to make her work as high-quality as possible. Esme says working hard is one of the cornerstones of her personality. “I just don’t feel good if I don’t give something my best,” she said. “I always want to give my best effort in anything I’m doing.” Though Esme doesn’t know exactly what she wants to do career-wise, she says she’s looking forward to attending MIT. Part of her enthusiasm comes from programs the school offers, including study-abroad programs where students get to put their knowledge to use by working on projects like water filtration systems or building wheelchairs for local communities. “I’m definitely a little nervous,” Esme said of going off to college. “But I’m excited to take that next step. I’m ready to move on.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Pampers via The Associated Press

A baby wears a Pampers diaper designed by Cynthia Rowley. The diaper battle rages on 50 years after diaper latecomer Procter & Gamble rolled over old-fashioned reusables to mass-market an affordable throwaway for the first time.

Hummingbird

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w w w. w b u . c o m / b e n d


THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 F1

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Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

FREE adult companion cats to seniors. Friendly, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will always take back for any reason. Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by appt, call 541-647-2181 to schedule. 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Photos, map, more at www.craftcats.org. Free Cats (2): Beautiful, need loving home, brothers, please call 541-788-3416.

FREE rescued barn/shop cats, fixed, shots. Some tame. We Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage will deliver. 541-389-8420. costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy German Shepherd Pups, AKC. by the Estate, Honest Artist. Health guarantee. $850 Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 509-406-3717 Wanted: Used Rug, 9x12, Kittens & cats thru local rescue shades of red color, please group. 65480 78th, Bend. call 541-385-9289. Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by appt, 541-647-2181. Altered, 205 shots, ID chip, more. Small kittens also, 541-815-7278. Items for Free Info: 541-389-8420; Photos, map at www.craftcats.org Chair, Very clean, dark maroon, back reclines - no foot stool, Lab, black female, 4-5 months free, you haul, 541-408-3353 old, $75. Call 503-310-2514 or 541-576-3701 208

Pets and Supplies Aussies, AKC Mini's, Toy's parents on site family raised shots/wormed must see 541-598-6264/788-7799 Border Collie/New Zealand Huntaway puppies, 8 wks, working parents, wonderful dogs, $300. 541-546-6171

Border Collie Puppies (10), 10 wks, 1st shots, well socialized, $50 ea. 541-477-3327 Border Collies, black/white, tri, smooth coat, shots/wormed, 7 weeks $250. 541-948-7997

Lab Puppies, AKC, 2 males left, 8 weeks, 1st shots & dewormed. 541-771-7511 Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Labrador Pups, AKC, Chocolates & Yellows, $500; Blacks, $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & wormed. Call 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

Boston Terrier Male AKC, 3 year old, not neutered. Plays well with others. Needs lots of attention. Very cute and loved $250 (541)279-4016 Boxer Mix, 1 male, 1 female brindle color, 12 wks. Asking $75 each. 541-410-9928

1 7 7 7

Lhasa Apso/Pug Spring Pups. Lhasa Apso mother, dad is reg. brinde Pug. Adorable variety colors. Must see. You Boxers AKC Reg, fawns, whites, will fall in love. $400. Taking & brindles, 1st shots, very so$75 dep. now. Call for info. cial.$500-$650. 541-325-3376 541-548-0747,541-279-3588 Check out the Malti-Poos: phone correcclassiieds online tion made. 2 females, born www.bendbulletin.com 9/9/10. All puppy & rabies shots, dewormed & health Updated daily checked, $375, no shipping. Dachshund, AKC 2-yr old male, 541-350-5106, no AM calls. $375. DNA, pedigree, red & MINIATURE SCHNAUZERS white piebald. 541-420-6044 two males, 8 weeks old, $300 each. 541-416-3677 Dachshund AKC miniature male puppy, 8 weeks, 1st shots, Mini-Dachshunds, 2 young $325. 541-420-6044 females, 1 black/tan, 1 pieDog Crate & Carrier, small, like bald, $200 ea, 541-604-4333. new, $50 OBO for both, Parti Pomeranian Male puppy Redmond 541-526-0897. ready for a new home! No English Bulldogs: adult, spayed papers. First 2 sets of shots female $500; 4month, intact done. $350. Call Jamie at male, $1200. 541-588-6490 541-416-0175 541-390-6053

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C h a n d l e r 246

248

262

267

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Health and Beauty Items

Commercial / Ofice Equipment &Fixtures

Fuel and Wood

Office Partition, portable, like new, 6’x5’. $50, call 541-382-7241.

& Equipment

Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

12g Winchester 1200 shotgun, wood stock, pump, 28” barrel, $200. 541-647-8931

Loveseat with sofa, new, light blue and beige, $400. 20g New England youth single shot shotgun, wood stock, 541-549-8626. Ltd Ed. $150. 541-647-8931 NEED TO CANCEL 22LR Remington 597 semi-auto YOUR AD? rifle, synthetic stock, $200. The Bulletin Classifieds 541-647-8931 has an "After Hours" Line Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. 22 Rifle, Winchester, model to cancel your ad! 190, $145; .38, 2” barrel, $275, 541-771-5648. Queen size Flexsteel hideabed, dark taupe, lightly used, $95. .38, 6” barrel, $225; 12 ga., 541-419-0613 Remington 870 Wingmaster, Second Hand 28”, $275, 541-771-5648.

Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643.

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates!

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store.

In the Forum Center

541-330-0420

9mm Interarms semi-auto pistol, blued, 80% condition, $200. 541-647-8931

BE PREPARED! Oregon’s Largest 3 Day GUN & KNIFE SHOW April 15-16-17 Portland Expo Center Featuring Preparedness and Survival Products I-5 exit #306B Admission $9 Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4 1-800-659-3440 www.collectorswest.com

Browning BAR(2), Belgium made, 300 Win Mag, $575, .308, $525, 541-948-6633.

Need To Sell: Baby Trend ExpeCASH!! dition Jogging Stroller with infant car seat that clicks into For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900. stroller and base for the car. Pit Bull - purebred blue nose All included $200 obo call Colt MK-III Trooper, 4” .357 male, 3 yrs, not neutered, Lindsay 541-706-1078. looking for good home, $200. mag., $500; Mars Pneumatic We also have a puppy of his, Spear Guns, various sizes, 212 11 week old female, black in 2x18”, 1x24”, $150 each. Antiques & color, $200. 541-771-3165 541-549-6625. Collectibles Pomeranian Puppies CKC Reg, 2 fem’s, 3 males; 2 rare gray, DO YOU HAVE 2 fancy red sables, 1 black. Alaska Candles, handcrafted, SOMETHING TO SELL wildlife series, w/Alaskan $500-600. 541-598-4443 FOR $500 OR LESS? Crude oil, $75, 541-318-5732 Non-commercial POODLE Pups, AKC Toy advertisers may Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Beautiful gaming/dining table; place an ad with our overstuffed loveseat (new); Call 541-475-3889 lamp table w/ball &claw feet; "QUICK CASH mannequin; primitive cabiSPECIAL" nets; contemporary metal Professional Training for Obedi1 week 3 lines chandelier. 541-389-5408 ence, Upland & Waterfowl for $12 or all breeds. Labrador & Pu- Castles of Europe (Danbury 2 weeks $18! delpointer pups & started dogs mint 1994), 7 porcelain, mint Ad must as well, 541-680-0009. cond. if purchased as group include price of single item price neg. 541-848-8230 of $500 or less, or mulPueblan Milk Snake $75, tiple items whose total Golden Gecko & cage $40, Montgomery Ward Radio/ does not exceed $500. Anole & cage $25, Long Tail Phonograph combo, antique, Grass Lizard & cage $25. Call $99, call 541-318-5732. Call Classifieds at Leslie at 541-923-8555 Pedal Cars: Jeep w/matching 541-385-5809 Queensland Heelers Boat. Also Trunks & vintage www.bendbulletin.com Standards & mini,$150 & up. Suitcases. 541-389-5408 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ The Bulletin reserves the right GUNS to publish all ads from The Buy, Sell, Trade RAT TERRIER Trained! Great on Bulletin newspaper onto The 541-728-1036. hikes, people, dogs, love. Bulletin Internet website. Pretty & VERY sweet! 2yrs, H & H FIREARMS 14 lbs,neutered. Right home Buy, Sell, Trade, Consign $100. He's lonely for his new Across From forever buddy! 541-233-6727 Pilot Butte Drive-In Tower of London Castle, (Lenox 541-382-9352 Saint Bernard Rescue porcelain 1995) mint cond. Now Adopting! 541-848-8230. MUZZLE LOADER KIT, 50 cal. saintrescue.org/oregon.htm Hawken rifle kit, #5113 Males & Females. Large breed Wizard Of Oz, set of 6 dolls, manufactured by Thompexper. req’d. Foster homes 50th Anniversary Collector’s son Arms, kit still in orig. desperately needed, too! set, $175, 541-318-5732. box, collectors item, $350 Call Jeff: 541-390-1353 obo. 541- 416-1007 240 Shih Tzu Yorkie mix (2). Will be Crafts and Hobbies OR + UTAH CCW: Required 1 yr in June. Great dogs for class Oregon and Utah Conkids. White w/brown markcealed License. Saturday ings. Up to date shots. Both Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ April 16 9:30 a.m. at Madras blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein male. $100 ea 541-728-6969 Range. $100 includes Photo $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 required by Utah, Call Paul Yorkie Puppy, no papers, Quilting Frame, $200, please Sumner (541)475-7277 for parents on site, $300. call 541-961-3776 for more preregistration and info 541-550-0249, Redmond info. RG 22LR 8-shot German made 242 cowboy-style revolver, hol210 sater, $200. 541-647-8931 Exercise Equipment

Furniture & Appliances

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Full size bed frame & dresser w/mirror, solid maple, from 1950s. $500. 541-382-0890 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. KENMORE White 30” freestanding gas range, new $1,699. Asking $450. 541-549-8626.

O r e g o n

210

211

A-1 Washers & Dryers

B e n d

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A v e . ,

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

TREADMILL - older model Precor in excellent cond., $350 obo. 541-416-1007

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

245

247

Golf Equipment

Sporting Goods - Misc.

EZ-Go Electric Golf Cart, fully equipped, exc. cond., $1200, 541-419-4890.

246

Backpack, Dana Design, Big Sky, nearly new, $75, 541-318-5732

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Backpack, Lowe, Sirocco Backpack, great cond., $125, 541-318-5732

12g Winchester 1100 semiauto, 28” barrel, wood stock, $200. 541-647-8931

Sleeping Bag, North Face , sub-zero, like new, $200,541-318-5732

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Pellets, Pack Saddle, 23 bags, $3/bag, $69 Cash, Bend, Air Conditioner, Soleus, pur541-330-1972. chased at Home Depot for $500, due to moving to west269 ern Oregon will sell for $350 Gardening Supplies OBO, 541-382-0763

263

Tools 2-ton Floor Jack, new, $20. Handyman Jack, 48” $25. 541-480-1337

265

Building Materials

866-700-1414

(24 hr recorded message)

Alpaca Manure - FREE - Great for your garden. You load & haul. 541-977-8013

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

Craftsman gas mower, 6.5hp, with rear catcher, good condition, $95. 541-419-5693

253

TV, Stereo and Video

TC audio speakers (2), solid oak, on pedestals, $150 & Audio Super Bass, on rollers, in solid oak cabinet, $150. 541-419-0613.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

260

Misc. Items

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. GENERATE SOME EXCITEMENT IN YOUR NEIGBORHOOD. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. Kettle Grill, $20. Big Turkey pot with metal burner, $40. 541-480-1337

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K. St. 541 475-9722 Open to the public. Prineville Habitat ReStore Building Supply Resale 1427 NW Murphy Ct. 541 447-6934 Open to the public.

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Water Tank, 250 Gallon Fiberglass Tank slip-on for type 6 wildland fire engine, used 2 seasons, has all hookups, $400, 541-961-3776.

AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

316

Irrigation Equipment IRRIGATION WATER RIGHTS - Tumalo TID, $5500, consider selling 1-5 acres, reduced rate on 1+ acre. 541-815-9974.

325

Custom No-till Seeding Have Gravel Will Travel! Cinders, topsoil, fill material, etc. Excavation & septic systems. Call Abbas Construction CCB#78840, 541-548-6812.

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

Hummingbirds Are Back!

Grass, Alfalfa & Grain Crops All of Central Oregon.

Call 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

341

Horses and Equipment AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795 WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

345

Livestock & Equipment

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Hay, Grain and Feed

Black Packasport, System 90, excellent condition, $450. 808-635-8980 (local)

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

300

The Bulletin

Big decorative wall clock, $10. 541-480-1337

BOXES - Great for moving or storage, $25 (cash). Call 541-454-0056

Farm Market

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Sony under-cabinet Radio & CD Player, like new, $50. 541-548-7137 Stereo set in solid Oak cabinet, CD, amplifier, dual cassette, $225. 541-419-0613

9 7 7 0 2

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Camera parts, misc jewelry found here at Redmond Airport Terminal Building. Call to identify: 541-504-3499 Found Dog: Sheltie, Beautiful, Baker Rd. in DRW, 4/9, call 541-383-3709.

Fuel and Wood

Found LADDER that attaches to horse trailer? Apr. 4, Smith Rock Way. 541-548-4674

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

FOUND Motorola Bluetooth in little bag 3 blks S of McMenamins 4/1. 541-390-9087

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

FOUND Toyota keys + 3 additional, on Brookswood 4/6. Call to identify 541-389-1629

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

L O S T Mini-Pinscher R e ward “Paris” female chocolate & tan, brown collar, 4/10, near 6th & Olney, scared but comes to food, 503-422-2320

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

Feeder Steers or Heifers, healthy, locally grown & raised, delivery available, Culver, Call 541-546-8747 or 541-460-0841. Tame Miniature Goats, bottle babies & yearling. Nigerian, Pygmy & mixes, $65 ea., 2 / $100. Alfalfa, 541-388-8725

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

541-385-5809


F2 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 454

476

Looking for Employment

Employment Opportunities

Position and housing wanted Former heavy equip. operator & landscaper seeking small woodworking shop and rental in Bend area. Can pay or exchange for yard upkeep or improvement, fencing, rock work, etc. 760-525-5773

Schools and Training Seeking a Ranch Job, full or Advertise in 30 Daily newspapers! $525/25-words, 3days. Reach 3 million classified readers in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Washington & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. (PNDC) AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified - Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-804-5293. (PNDC)

part time, 15 years exp. at Willows Ranch. Call Miguel 541-390-5033. For references, call Judy 541-549-1248

470

Domestic & In-Home Positions Part-time day Caregiver for elderly, bedridden woman. Sun. 7:30-4:30, Mon. Tues. 7:30-11:30. 541-419-3405

476

Employment Opportunities

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC)

Advertise and Reach over 3 million readers in the Pacific Northwest! 30 daily newspapers, six states. 25-word classified $525 for a 3-day ad. Call (916) 288-6010; (916) 288-6019 or visit www.pnna.com/advertising_ pndc.cfm for the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection. Oregon Medical Training PCS (PNDC) Phlebotomy classes begin May 2nd. Registration now open: www.oregonmedicaltraining.com Barber or Beautician wanted, for established salon, lots of 541-343-3100 walk-ins, lease only. TRUCK SCHOOL 541-280-4376. www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Need Help? Student Loans/Job Waiting We Can Help! Toll Free 1-888-438-2235 REACH THOUSANDS OF 454 POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES Looking for Employment EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department I provide housekeeping & carefor more information: giving svcs, & have 20+ yrs 541-385-5809 experience. 541-508-6403

280

Estate Sales Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains! Call Classifieds: 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 284

Sales Southwest Bend Garage Sale: Woodworking & Mechanic tools, toolboxes, vices, antiques, furniture, household, women’s & kids clothes, much more! Fri.-Sat. 7-5, 19644 Clear Night Dr. No early sales. Multi-Family Yard Sale: DRW, Remodeling tools, materials, clothing, new air conditioner, new carpet & pad, too much to list, Sat. 8-5, Sun. 10-4, 18880 Choctaw Rd.

286

Computer - IT and Network Administrator

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

476

476

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Environmental Services/Housekeeping

Food Service

Medical Billing/ Collection Professional

DON'T MISS OUT on the unique opportunity to work at Central Oregon's finest resort. The Ranch has summer positions available in our food service division as well as our Welcome Center & Spa. Do you enjoy working with people, and have a "customer first" attitude? We are looking for enthusiastic, customer service oriented individuals to join Team BBR. There are just a few openings left in the following areas:

Responsible for the company’s networks, servers, network security, telephone and email (40/hr. per week - Mon.systems. Responsibilities will Fri.) - Full Time - 5 X 8/hr. include: Windows servers, shifts per week - (4pm network servers, firewall, PC 12:30am), yet flexible setup, IT security and supbased on patient census port for over 45 internal usand job demands. Prior ers and budgeting and fore•Restaurant/Banquet Servers experience in sterile envicasting of IT needs. Monitor •Restaurant Bussers ronment and infection and maintain the company’s •Bartenders control preferred. Must be web site, online sales, and •Line Cook able to stoop, bend, and lift social networks. Provide sup•Restaurant Supervisor 25lbs be able to prioritize port at six locations in north •Snack Shop Attendants workload, and be efficient Central Oregon. Knowledge •Beverage Cart Attendants in duties. of IBM iSeries a plus. Skills •Guest Service Supervisor should include hands-on •Guest Service Agent Email resume to knowledge of installation, re•Vacation Sales Agent jobs@bendsurgery.com pair and modification of IT •Spa receptionist/ Sales hardware including wireless, Associate Deadline: open until filled. and software. Working knowledge of Microsoft Benefits include golf privileges Server and related products. and 30% discount on food Working knowledge of com- FIRE CHIEF JOB OPENING! In and merchandise. beautiful Big Sky, Montana. ponents and the ability to Apply on line at Applications accepted configure new systems. www.blackbutteranch.com . through 4/30/11 from expeCompetitive wage, plus exBBR is a drug free work rienced EMS/Fire professioncellent benefit package, DOE. place. EOE. als to lead combination deCall 541-989-8221 for applipartment. Visit Hairstylist - Fully licensed cation, or mail resume to www.BigSkyFire.org for defor hair, nails & waxing. MCGG Box 367, Lexington, tails. (PNDC) Recent relevant experience OR 97839. necessary. Hourly/commisDental Surgical Assistant: sion. Teresa, 541-382-8449 Central Oregon Perio, looking for part time surgical assisImmediate openings for feller tant to work 2 days per week. buncher, delimber, loader Please Fax resume to operator and log truck. work 541-317-0355 or contact in CA. Some relocation reimJulie at 541-317-0255. bursement. 530-816-0656.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-385-5809

(Private Party ads only)

286

Sales Northeast Bend Sales Northeast Bend ESTATE/LIQUIDATION: All Items must go, furniture, sofa, chairs, end tables, dining room set, nice bedroom set, Wurlizter organ, Franciscan and Syracuse china, kitchenware, baking supplies, sewing supplies, hand knitted afghans, blankets, sheet sets, costume jewelry, misc. Grandma Goodies. CASH SALE, all items sold ‘as is’, and all sales are final. Small House, limited access to 15 buyers at a time. Thursday 2-6 p.m., Friday 8-4 pm., 2074 NE Chanel Court, near Savannah & Purcell.

476

Employment Opportunities

288

Garage Sale! 1 Day Sat. 4/16 8-4. 21126 Charity Ln, Bend. Tools, Women Shoes (7-8), Clothes & Misc. Don’t Miss!

290

Sales Redmond Area Double Moving Sale: Everything from A-Z, tools antiques, collectibles, Fri.-Sat, 8-4, 1407 NW Canyon Dr.

Garage Sale - Kids stuff, miscellaneous and knickknacks, Saturday only, 9-3, 2165 NW Canyon Drive, Redmond.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds GARAGE SALE Sat & Sun, 8am-5pm. 5305 NW 83rd, Redmond. (Take 101st off Hwy 126) Post-hole digger w/2 bits; deep well pump, hay elevator, Craftsman radial arm saw, golf clubs, Skill cordless set, Makita chop saw, small garden tools for garden tractor, hard-bound books, clothes, toys saddle, much more! 541-504-4282 or 408-710-7952

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today! Mig Welder for Manufacturing in Minot, North Dakota. Year round, full-time inside work, wage DOE. Contact Butch at 701-838-6346. OR Nurse

Full-time, 4 - 10 hr. shifts. Monday - Friday. Applicant must have scrub and circulation experience. Benefits. Interested persons should email their resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Deadline: open until filled.

Pharmacist

position. Need friendly, organized, motivated pharmacist to take care of our patients. Independent central Oregon community pharmacy, full or part-time, no Sundays, no nights. Competitive wage and benefits. Call Leah 541-419-4688.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Education

Sales Other Areas

Concordia University (CU) MBA program in Bend seeks an adjunct business faculty member to teach a graduate level e-Commerce course in Bend starting in mid-July, 2011. Class meeting times are once per month on Friday evening and all day Saturday. This two-month long course uses case-based methodology and Harvard Business School materials. MBA or masters in a related field required. Significant experience in e-Commerce required. Proven success in college-level teaching strongly desired. Single course contract basis. The faculty employment application form can be downloaded via the CU website: http://www.cu-portland.edu/aboutcu/employment.cfm A complete application packet must include the CU Application Form, letter of interest, vita, and 3 references. Send application packet to Tom Daniels, MBA Program Director, Bend, at tdaniels@cu-portland.edu or by mail at 2611 NW Gill Ct, Bend, OR 97701. For information about Concordia’s MBA program in Bend, contact Tom Daniels at (541) 350-3553. Concordia University does not discriminate in the employment of individuals on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, disability, sex, or age. However, Concordia University is an institution of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, and, to the extent allowed by law, Concordia University reserves the right to give preference in employment based upon religion.

CRAFT SALE -

Independent Contractor

290

Sales Redmond Area

Moving Sale: Sat. 8-3, tram- Grandma’s Moving Sale! Fri-Sat, 9-4. 10466 NW 27th, poline, furniture, bikes, toys, Terrebonne. Sofa, bed, TV, household items, more, 63089 Marsh Orchid Dr. W/D, crocks, tools, dishes, antiques, knickknacks, MORE!

Sales Southeast Bend

Lot Attendant Full-time, Monday - Friday, some weekends, benefits included. Must work in the outdoor environment. Background and drug test required. Please see Beth at Carrera Motors, 1045 SE 3rd. St., Bend. No phone calls please.

Responsible for receptionist/office duties. Position is full-time; $10/hr plus bonuses. Must have experience in medical field and hold current certification in coding and billing. Email cover letter outlining qualifications/accomplishments. to drmacdonell@ bendbroadband.com

Huge Moving Sale: Some Antiques + ‘48 Chevy, Fri & Sat. 9-4, 3515 NW Ice, Terrebonne.

292

ORIGINAL CRAFTS SALE INCLUDING HANDMADE JEWELRY, WALLETS, HOME DECOR AND MUCH MORE! 18285 Snow Creek Lane, Sisters, Sat, Apr. 16, 12-4 Flea Market -The Best Bargains in Madras! 3rd & B Street Open every Fri-Sat-Sun, 9-5. Only $10 to rent a table - 2nd table 1/2-off! 541-604-4106

Move Sale - Rain or shine. 20939 Gift Road, 8-5 Sat 4/16 & Sun 4/17. You think it, we could have it! Tan Bed, Dog Kennel; Refrigerator; fishing boat on new trailer; womens professional clothes sizes 8-14; sewing stuff; books; old jars; building supplies, nails; doors, windows, some childrens, questions, phone 541-647-0647 NO EARLY SALES- driveway is circular

BUNDLE

HAULER

500

SOCIAL SERVICES

RN Case Manager

TANF Case Manager

Partners In Care has two openings for full-time RN Case Managers to provide care to our home health and hospice patients. Applicants MUST have a current Oregon RN license. Qualified candidates are asked to submit a resume to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend OR 97701 Attn: HR, or via email to HR@partnersbend.org

CAUTION

Finance & Business

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

$28,282 - $40,398 Full Benefits Non-Management, Regular, Full-Time This position is located in Chiloquin. For more information contact: The Klamath Tribes PO Box 436 Chiloquin, OR 97624 jobs@klamathtribes.com 541-783-2219 x 113 Technical Operations Manager Highly technical position responsible for developing, implementing and supporting the technical projects and activities within the Payroll Department. Responsibilities will include date migration, report, analysis, data security and various systems issues. Degree in MIS or related field, 4+ yrs of related computer systems work exp. Position is located in Klamath Falls, OR. Visit www.jeld-wen.com for more info. Send resume to jobs@jeld-wen.com EOE.

Tele-Marketing: Small company seeking individuals to fundraise for well-known non-profit organizations. Great for seniors, homemakers, students & others, Permanent part-time, 19 hours weekly, MonThur. 5-9 p.m & Fri. 4-7 p.m. $8.50 per hour plus bonuses. Some experience helpful, but will train those with great work ethic & ability to obtain contributions. 541-385-5371 The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

541-382-3402 573

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC)

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor

A bundle hauler is needed to distribute The Central Oregon Nickel Ads publication.

Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

This independent contractor position requires a dependable vehicle capable of distributing approximately 75 Nickel bundles to various drop locations located in and around Deschutes County.

& Call Today &

Valid driver’s license and proof of insurance is required. This position drops bundles to locations every Thursday from approximately 9 a.m. till 3:30 p.m. and then also restocks the route on Saturdays. This position is not an employee position and profit is determined based upon the number of drops involved. If you meet the above qualifications, please submit your information to: circulation@bendbulletin.com or drop off your contact information to: The Bulletin Circulation Department 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702. No phone calls please.

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

Rentals

600

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

636

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

!! Spring On In !!

A small studio, $385 + dep. No pets/smoking. Applications at 38 #2 NW Irving Ave., 3 blocks from downtown Bend. Call 541-389-4902

$150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Fox Hollow Apts.

630

Rooms for Rent No smoking, male preferred, $270/mo. +$50 dep. Kitchen facilities. 541-420-6625. Room w/private bath, kitchen privileges, laundry facilities. In Tumalo on acreage. Dog or horse???. $500+utils in winter months.541-389-8142 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $575.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, no pets, $675/mo., utils incl., call Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $675/mo. 541-480-3666

Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2342 NE Mary Rose Pl., #2 $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

WEST SIDE STUDIO. Private fenced yard, 2 decks, laundry, newly remodeled, includes utilities. $650 month. 541-317-1879.

Call for Specials!

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Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend SE Duplex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage, small fenced yard, W/D hookup, kitchen appl., $725/ mo., 541-990-0426 or 541-258-5973.

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Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental 1015 Roanoke Ave. - $590/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, rate! If you have a home or 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, apt. to rent, call a Bulletin view of town, no smoking or Classified Rep. to get the pets. Norb, 541-420-9848. new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Call us at 541-382-3678 or Heart of Jesus. Visit us at www.sonberg.biz j.d.

personals

2 BDRM., 1 BATH flat near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $600/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townhouse apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great location, starting at $565. 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 F3 642

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Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Houses for Rent La Pine

SPRING BLAST! Studios $375 1 Bdrm $400 Free Move-in Rent! • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond Close to schools, shopping, and parks! 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

ONE MONTH FREE with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

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Houses for Rent General 2 Bdrm 2 bath Spotless, custom stick-built ranch at CRR. New floors, views, double garage, no smoking. $695/mo. 541-548-4225

Where buyers meet sellers. Whether you’re looking for a hat or a place to hang it, your future is just a page away.

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PUBLISHER'S 18839 Tuscarora Lane 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, gas appls & NOTICE fireplace. Crescent Creek $850 - Custom home in DesAll real estate advertising in subdivision, w/Fitness Ctr. chutes River Woods. 3 Bdrm, this newspaper is subject to No smoking; pets neg. $675/ 2 bath on large pvt lot; large the Fair Housing Act which mo.$775/dep. 541-815-5494 fenced yard & 2-car garage. makes it illegal to advertise The best of country living! "any preference, limitation or Small pets considered 671 730 discrimination based on race, ABOVE & BEYOND PROP Mobile/Mfd. New Listings color, religion, sex, handicap, MGMT - 541-389-8558 for Rent familial status, marital status www.aboveandbeyondmanagement.com Sunny, Warm So. Oregon! or national origin, or an in- 2 Bdrm 2 bath, in Westridge Trade your Bend area home On 10 acres, between Sisters & tention to make any such Subdivision. Newly remodfor my 7-yr 4 Bdrm 2.5 Bath Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 preference, limitation or diseled, on ½ acre, near Ath. Central Point home, in sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ crimination." Familial status Club of Bend. No smoking. planned development, with wood stove, all new carpet & includes children under the $1195. Call 541-388-8198 nice views. 541-941-6915 paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, age of 18 living with parents fenced for horses, $1095. or legal custodians, pregnant 658 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 women, and people securing 744 Houses for Rent custody of children under 18. Open Houses This newspaper will not 675 Redmond knowingly accept any adver4 Bdrm 3.5 bath in StoneRV Parking tising for real estate which is 3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, haven, built 2006. Open Sat in violation of the law. Our new carpet & paint, nice big Hookup for RV in quiet Tumalo 11-3, Sun 11-2, 20418 Murreaders are hereby informed yard, dbl. garage w/opener, phy Rd, Bend. By owner, area. Dog or cat ok. Beautiful that all dwellings advertised quiet cul-de-sac. $995 $209,900. 541-979-1920 view. $550/mo. Electricity in this newspaper are avail541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 extra in winter. able on an equal opportunity 541-389-8142 745 basis. To complain of dis- 3 Bdrm+offc, 1 bath, 1800+/sq ft ranch style in Redmond. crimination call HUD toll-free Homes for Sale 676 Gas heat + AC; near Sr. at 1-800-877-0246. The toll Heating the Oustide? Center & hospital, fenced free telephone number for Mobile/Mfd. Space yard, new paint & carpet, Trade in a heat bill for ours! the hearing impaired is $900/mo, pets considered. RV/Trailer Space in NE $75/mo. average per month, 1-800-927-9275. 541-408-2000; 541-480-4248 541-548-5511 Redmond, near Crooked Rented your property? www.JandMHomes.com River Dinner Train, addiThe Bulletin Classifieds tional 17x20 finished bldg. Look at: Bendhomes.com has an "After Hours" Line w/deck, fenced area, incl. NOTICE: for Complete Listings of Call 541-383-2371 24 hrs. W/S, $400/mo, Call All real estate advertised Area Real Estate for Sale to cancel your ad! 541-419-1917. here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which The Bulletin is now offering a 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family 687 makes it illegal to advertise LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE room with woodstove, new any preference, limitation or Commercial for Rental rate! If you have a carpet, pad & paint, single discrimination based on race, home to rent, call a Bulletin Rent/Lease garage w/opener. $895/mo. color, religion, sex, handicap, Classified Rep. to get the 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 familial status or national new rates and get your ad Office / Warehouse origin, or intention to make started ASAP! 541-385-5809 $695/mo, 3 bdrm 2 bath. New 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. any such preferences, limitapaint inside/outside, new spaces, 827 Business Way, tions or discrimination. We Why Rent? carpet and vinyl. Dbl garage Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + will not knowingly accept any When you Can own! w/ opener. Nice neighbor$300 dep. 541-678-1404 advertising for real estate For as low as $1295 Down. hood. 541-388-8503 which is in violation of this 541- 548-5511 Office/Warehouse Space, law. All persons are hereby A nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1008 www.JandMHomes.com 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, informed that all dwellings sq.ft., vaulted ceiling, fenced on Boyd Acres Rd, advertised are available on yard, coverd deck, RV park650 541-382-8998. an equal opportunity basis. ing, dbl garage w/ opener. The Bulletin Classified Houses for Rent $795. 480-3393 or 610-7803. RV-Boat Storage, etc. Shop NE Bend 36’x42’ with 2 roll-up doors, Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, between Redmond, & Terre14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. 3 Bdrm, 1800 sq ft. Very clean! bonne. $350/mo. No smoking; pets negotiable. New bathroom, lrg fam rm, Call 541-419-1917 $900/mo. + deposits. Call sprinklers, attch garage. No We Service All Vacs! 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 smkg; pets poss. 1150 NE 6th The Bulletin offers a LOWER, Free Estimates! St. Avail now! $950/mo, $600 Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 MORE AFFORDABLE Rental refundable. 541-389-4985 rate! If you have a home to bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., rent, call a Bulletin Classified $695/mo. 1st, last. No inWhen buying a home, 83% of Rep. to get the new rates and side pets. Mtn. views. Bend’s Only Central Oregonians turn to get your ad started ASAP! 503-829-7252, 679-4495 Authorized 541-385-5809 Oreck Store. Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple call Classified 385-5809 to net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. place your Real Estate ad 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541 In the Forum Center Looking for your next 541-330-0420 693 employee? Ofice/Retail Space Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and 746 for Rent reach over 60,000 Northwest Bend Homes readers each week. 455 Sq.ft. Office Space, Your classified ad will high visibility on Highland BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 also appear on Ave in Redmond, $400 per Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., bendbulletin.com which mo. incl. W/S/G, Please Call new slab granite countercurrently receives over 541-419-1917. tops, hrdwd floors, gas fire1.5 million page views place, only $424,900. Randy every month at An Office with bath, various Schoning, principal Broker, no extra cost. sizes and locations from John L. Scott. 541-480-3393 Bulletin Classifieds $200 per month, including Get Results! utilities. 541-317-8717 750 Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at Redmond Homes bendbulletin.com 5

Houses for Rent SE Bend

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

762

Homes with Acreage 10 acres bordering BLM - 2520 sq ft 3 Bdrm, 2½ Bath. Large horse barn, extra large detached garage, all well-built. Extensive landscaping; 5 miles west of Redmond. $355,000. Call 541-923-7261

763

Recreational Homes and Property

Cabin for sale on the Metolius River Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. Go to: Lakehouse.com for specs. Ad#230071 or check under Oregon listings.

771

Lots Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $89,999, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

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Acreages 20 Acres, Christmas Valley, off Oil Dry (paved road), power at road, $15,000 or trade for ??? 541-728-1036.

9.18 Buildable acres: $147,000, Great Location; only 1 mile from Eagle Crest Resort! 503-260-7750 wtaaffe@comcast.net ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes Brand New 3 Bdrm. 2 bath, delivered & Set Up, starting at $39,999, financing available, Call 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

Mountain Views 654

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

Real Estate For Sale

NEW 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1731 sq.ft., bonus room, fenced yard, 20269 SE Knights Bridge Pl. $1095/mo. 1 yr lease, no pets. 541-350-2206

Acres, Eagle Crest area, very private, gated, 3+ bdrm., 2.75 bath, 3 car garage plus 1600 sq.ft. finished shop, in-ground pool, $795,000. 541-948-5832.

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

Electrical Services

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Quality Builders Electric

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

• Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

J. L. SCOTT

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466

Computer/Cabling Install

Same Day Response

QB Digital Living

Landscape Management

•Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Clean Up/Yard Debris, Hauling. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

5 4 1 -3 8 5 -5 8 0 9

• Evaluating Seasonal Needs • Pruning Trees and Shrubs • Thinning Overgrown Areas • Removing Undesired Plants • Hauling Debris • Renovation • Fertilizer Programs • Organic Options EXPERIENCED Senior Discounts

541-390-3436

Get 1 FREE Maintenance Service or Aeration ($40+ value) when you sign up for a full season of maintenance!

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

“Pihl Bilt” Since 1981 S.E. Pihl Construction Remodeling specialist, addons, kitchen & bath, faux wall finishes, tile & stone, Energy Trust of Oregon Trade Ally, Window & door upgrades, no job to small. Call for Spring Specials, Call Scott, 541-815-1990, CCB#110370

We offer: • Residential & Commercial • Organic Products (kid and pet safe!) • Aerations & Thatching • Mulch, Hedging, Pruning • Irrigation Management • Spring & Fall Clean-ups • Fertilization • Weed Control

Licensed / Bonded / Insured FREE Estimates! Call today: (541) 617.TURF [8873] www.turflandscapes.com

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years! FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883 NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

SAVE THIS AD!! Rototilling Backyard Gardens $25/hour • Min. 1 hour Call Jim, 541-633-7941 8am-6pm for appt; leave msg

Bend Landscaping & Maint. Thatching, aerating, spring cleanup, sprinkler turn-ons, weekly mows.

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990 Mary’s Lawn Care is seeking New Customers for •Lawn Maint. • Spring clean-up • Aerating • Thatching 541-350-1097 541-410-2953 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

V Spring Clean Up! V Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 CURTIS SESLAR’S

TOTAL LAWN CARE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Serving Redmond since 1980. FREE THATCHING WITH AERATING SERVICE Mowing , Edging, Fertilizing, Hauling. Senior Discounts. Don’t delay, call today for Free estimate 541-279-1821 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

1 per day

$

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or 541-385-5809


F4 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

in the manner prescribed by law; and (4) Applying the proceeds received first toward the costs of sale, then toward satisfaction of plaintiff's General Judgment; and any surplus to defendants or to any party who may establish any right to any surplus; and (5) Ordering that defendants and each of them and those claiming under defendants are foreclosed forever of all interest or claim in the Property except any statutory right of redemption that defendants may have in the Property. This summons is published pursuant to an order dated the 14th day of March, 2011 of the Circuit Court Judge of the above-entitled court, directing that this summons be published once each week for four weeks, making four publications in all, in a newspaper published and of general circulation in Deschutes County, Oregon. NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! You must 'appear' in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a 'motion' or 'answer. The 'motion' or 'answer' must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein, along with the required filing fee. It must in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney, or if plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. If you have questions you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Legal Referal Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636.

KATHLEEN ST. CLAIR, TRUSTEE OF THE NORMAN and KATHLEEN ST. CLAIR, Plaintiff, TRUST DATED NOVEMBER 5, 1991, v. SUMMONS KENNETH B. CLARKE and MICHAEL ANN CLARKE Defendants Case No. 10 CV 1295 ST To:MICHAEL ANN CLARKE, Defendant You are hereby required to appear and defend the Complaint filed against you in the above entitled action within thirty (30) days from the date of first publication of this summons, and in case of your failure to do so, for want thereof, plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the complaint. SUMMARY STATEMENT: The object of the complaint underlying the summons published herein is summarized as follows: Judicial Foreclosure of plaintiff's deed of trust lien on real property in Deschutes County, Oregon, commonly known as 52430 Railroad Street, LaPine OR 97739 and having the following legal description (the "Property"): A tract of land lying partly in the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter (SE ¼ SW¼ ) and partly in the Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter (SW ¼ SE ¼ ) of Section 36, Township 21 South, Range 10 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being described as follows: Commencing at the South Quarter corner of said Section 36; thence South 89º33'55" West 132.71 feet; thence North 01º32'33" West 261.86 feet to the true point of beginning of this description; thence North 01º32'33" West 73.31 feet; thence due North 238.22 feet; thence South 89º38'20" East 388.34 feet to a point on the West line of the Burlington-Northern Railroad right-of-way; thence south 10º26'10"west along said right-of-way line 316.31 feet; thence leaving said right-of-way line North 89º38'52" West 329.07 feet to the point of beginning and there terminating. Based on the foregoing, plaintiff prays a General Judgment (1) To plaintiff against defendants Kenneth B. Clark and Michael Ann Clarke, and each of them, in the amount of $160,000.00, plus interest at the rate of 7% per annum from July 1, 2010, to date of payment; $600 as the cost of a title report and litigation guaranty; plus $1,144.26 in delinquent and unpaid property taxes and interest through December 15, 2010, plus interest at the rate of 16% per annum thereafter; plus additional property taxes that become due prior to sale of the property, and plaintiff's costs and disbursements herein, plaintiff's reasonable attorney fees (not to exceed $2,500 if this matter is uncontested); and (2) Declaring that the lien of the Deed of Trust being foreclosed is a valid lien against the Property described in herein and declaring this lien to be superior to any interest, lien, right, title, or claim of the defendants or any of them in the Property; and (3) Foreclosing plaintiff's Deed of Trust lien and ordering the sale of the Property described herein, by the Sheriff of Deschutes County

Plaintiff's attorney is: Ken Brinich, OSB # 82484, Hendrix Brinich & Bertalan LLP; 716 NW Harriman St, Bend, OR 97701 541.382.4980 Date of first publication: March 25, 2011. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell personal property from unit(s) listed below to enforce a lien imposed on said property under the Oregon Self Storage Facilities Act (ORS 87.685) The undersigned will sell at public sale by competitive bidding on the 23rd day of April at 11:00 a.m., on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Bend Sentry Storage, 1291 SE Wilson, Bend, Sate of Oregon, the following: #120 Jesse Lucero #55 Michael Marsh #442 Judah Chalet #535 Ryan Jespersen #521 Ryan Jespersen LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10734 T-10734 filed by THE DANIELS GROUP, LLC, 1111 MAIN ST. SUITE 700, VANCOUVER WA 98660 proposes a change in points of diversion and place of use under Certificate 83850. The right allows the use of 2.16 CUBIC FEET PER SECOND (priority date APRIL 8, 1914) from the CROOKED RIVER AND PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR in Sec. 23 and 29, T 14 S, R 14 E, W.M. for SUPPLEMENTAL IRRIGATION in Sec. 20, 28, and 29. The applicant proposes to move the points of diversion to one point of diversion approximately 3 miles upstream to Sec. 22, T 14 S, R 14 E, W.M.) and to change the place of use to Sec. 15 and 22, T 14S, R 14 E, W.M. The Water Resources Depart-

ment has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is April 29, 2011. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10732 T-10732 filed by THE DANIELS GROUP, 1111 MAIN ST., SUITE 700, VANCOUVER WA 98660 proposes an additional point of diversion under Certificate 86137. The right allows the use of 0.43 CUBIC FOOT PER SECOND (priority date 1903) from the CROOKED RIVER in Sec. 20, T 14 S, R 14 E, W.M. for IRRIGATION in Sec. 28. The applicant proposes an additional point of diversion approximately 3.5 miles upstream in Sec. 23, T 14 S, R 14 E, W.M. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is April 29, 2011. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10730 / Mitigation Project MP-124 T-10730 filed by GRASS BUTTE, LLC (1111 MAIN STREET, SUITE 700, VANCOUVER WA, 98660) and by PREMIER WEST BANK (875 RIMROCK WAY, SUITE 100, REDMOND OR, 97756) proposes a change in place of use and character of use under Certificates 83857, 83651, and 83732. The first right allows the use of 0.84 CUBIC FEET PER SECOND (CFS) (priority dates 1898, 1904/1910, and 1892) from the CROOKED RIVER in Sec.8, T15S, R16E, and Secs. 20, 24, and 29, T14S, R14E, W.M. for IRRIGATION in Secs. 20, 21, and 29. The second right allows the use of 0.56 CFS (priority date 1903) from the CROOKED RIVER in Sec. 24, T 14S, R 14E, W.M. for IRRIGATION in Sec. 28. The third right allows the use of 0.137 CFS (priority date 1892) from the CROOKED RIVER in Sec. 20, T14S, R14E, W.M. for IRRIGATION in Sec. 20. The applicant proposes to create an instream use in the Crooked River (from each point of diversion to Lake Billy Chinook) at a maximum of 1.536 CFS, and to establish mitigation credits in the Crooked River and General Zones of Impact. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FAA-100745 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MARTA J. RICHARDS, A MARRIED WOMAN, HER SOLE AND SEPARATE ESTATE, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, SOUTH BRANCH, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR NATIONWIDE MORTGAGE, INC., as beneficiary, dated 12/18/2006, recorded 12/27/2006, under Instrument No. 200683765, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TEN (10) OF FERGUSON COURT, PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61082 FERGUSON COURT BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 17, 2011 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2009 16 payments at $1,634.46 each $26,151.36 5 payments at $1,859.95 each $9,299.75 (07-01-09 through 03-17-11) Late Charges: $1,284.48 Beneficiary Advances: $4,016.94 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $40,752.53 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $429,799.25, PLUS interest thereon at 1.125% per annum from 06/01/10 to 11/1/2010, 1.125% per annum from 11/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 20, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/17/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3946163 04/01/2011, 04/08/2011, 04/15/2011, 04/22/2011

690-380-5000. The Department has also concluded that the proposed transfer appears to result in mitigation credits pursuant to OAR 690-521-0300 & OAR 690-521-0400. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is April 29, 2011. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Preliminary Determination for Water Right Transfer T-10733 T-10733 filed by DANIELS GROUP, LLC, 1111 MAIN ST. SUITE 700, VANCOUVER WA 98660 proposes a change in points of diversion and place of use under Certificate 83850. The right allows the use of 1.2 CUBIC FEET PER SECOND (priority date APRIL 8, 1914) from the CROOKED RIVER in Sec. 29, T 14 S, R 14 E, W.M. for IRRIGATION in Sec. 20 and 29. The applicant proposes to move the points of diversion approximately 0.75 miles downstream and approximately 3.5 miles upstream in Sec. 20, T 14 S, R 14 E, W.M. and in Sec. 23, T 14 S, R 14 E, W.M., and to change the place of use to Sec. 28 and 29, T14 S, R 14 E W.M.. The Water Resources Department has concluded that the proposed transfer appears to be consistent with the requirements of ORS Chapter 540 and OAR 690-380-5000. Any person may file, jointly or severally, with the Department a protest or standing statement within 30 days after the date of final publication of notice in the Department's weekly notice or of this newspaper notice, whichever is later. A protest form and additional information on filing protests may be obtained by calling (503) 986-0883. The last date of newspaper publication is April 29, 2011. If no protests are filed, the Department will issue a final order consistent with the preliminary determination. LEGAL NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 819 Notice is hereby given that the following vehicle will be sold, for cash to the highest bidder, on 4/27/2011. The sale will be held at 10:00am by: DAVIS TOWING INC. 188 W. SISTERS PRK. DR. SISTERS, OR 2001 ISUZU RODEO UT VIN = 4S2DM58W114320325 Amount due on lien $3030.00 Reputed owner(s): MARGARITO BARRERA-DIAZ RELIANT FINANCIAL CORP. LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain deed of trust ("Trust Deed") made, executed and delivered by Nelmstar, L.L.C., an Idaho Limited Liability Company, as grantor, to Wetstern Title & Escrow, as trustee, in favor of Textron Financial Corporation, a Delaware corporation, as beneficiary, dated December 6, 2007, and recorded on December 10, 2007, as Recording No. 2007-63232, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The Trust Deed covers the fol-

lowing described real property ("Property") situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 1, TERRY PARK, City of La Pine, Deschutes County, Oregon. There are defaults by the grantor or other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, with respect to provisions therein which authorize sale in the event of default of such provision; the defaults for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Arrearage in the sum of $161,507.83 as of December 31, 2010, plus additional payments, property expenditures, taxes, liens, assessments, insurance, late fees, attorney's and trustee's fees and costs, and interest due at the time of reinstatement or sale. The full amount of the Note balance became due and payable on December 6, 2010. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: Payoff in the sum of $161,507.83 as of December 31, 2010, plus taxes, liens, assessments, property expenditures, insurance, accruing interest, late fees, attorney's and trustee's fees and costs incurred by beneficiary or its assigns. The full amount of the Note balance became due and payable on December 6, 2010. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: West Front Entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, Bend, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the above-described Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, attached hereto as Exhibit A, is incorporated herein by reference. [Exhibit A, NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS, is not published pursuant to

86.750(2)(b).] DATED: January 24, 2011. Marisol Ricoy McAllister, Successor Trustee Farleigh Wada Witt 121 SW Morrison, Suite 600 Portland, OR 97204 Phone: 503-228-6044; fax: 503-228-1741 LEGAL NOTICE Symbiotics LLC, on behalf of Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC (PO Box 535, Rigby, ID 83442), submitted a Final License Application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the Wickiup Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 12965) on March 25, 2011. The project would add a 7.15-MW run-of-river generation facility to the existing Wickiup Dam in Deschutes County, Oregon. A copy of the Final License Application is available for public viewing at the La Pine Public Library. The document can also be downloaded at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp by searching for the project number. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx7427 T.S. No.: 1203690-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Paul Deluca and Robin Deluca, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin Financial Corp., Subsidiary of National Citybank Of Indiana, as Beneficiary, dated October 28, 2004, recorded November 02, 2004, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2004-65823 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: All of lot thirteen and that portion of lot twelve, block four, Woodside Ranch Phase I, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: beginning at the southwest corner of said lot 12; thence north 31°19'21" west, 579.53 feet;thence south 83°00'59" east, 50.00 feet; thence south 27°13'52" east, 549.94 feet to the point of beginning Commonly known as: 20606 Coventry Circle Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due December 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $6,976.89 Monthly Late Charge $348.84. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $620,532.01 together with interest thereon at 6.990% per annum from November 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 08, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Des-

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L521670 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018321/MILLER Investor No: 4003395761 AP #1: 177306 Title #: 100788585 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by RONALD H. MILLER, DEBRA L. MILLER as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated July 21, 2003, Recorded July 28, 2003 as Instr. No. 2003-50233 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 6, BLOCK 8, TAMARACK PARK EAST PHASE VII, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 4 PYMTS FROM 09/01/10 TO 12/01/10 @ 917.73 $3,670.92 4 L/C FROM 09/16/10 TO 12/16/10 @ 35.50 $142.00 1 PYMT DUE 01/01/11 @ 917.49 $917.49 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $.50 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $27.00 $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$4,757.91 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1971 NE MONROE LANE, BEND, OR 97701-6555 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $114,808.39, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 08/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/07/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931936 PUB: 04/01/11, 04/08/11, 04/15/11, 04/22/11

chutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender

includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 07, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-373070 04/01/11, 04/08, 04/15, 04/22 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031310329 T.S. No.: 11-01680-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of August 9, 2006 made by, JUSTIN PETERSEN, KIMBERLY D. PETERSEN , was the original Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, was the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, was the original beneficiary, recorded on August 15, 2006, as Instrument No. 200655943 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of

Trust") to wit: APN: 207938 PARCEL ONE OF PARTITION PLAT 2002-68, RECORDED OCTOBER 8, 2002 IN BOOK 2002, PAGE 55449, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING A PORTION OF PARCEL ONE OF PARTITION PLAT 1992-51 AND THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 62015 BYRAM ROAD, BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-5, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-5 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $45,132.30 as of March 29, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L521675 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017608/HILLMAN AP #1: 241911 Title #: 100787410 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MATTHEW B. HILLMAN, REBECCA A. HILLMAN as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated April 1, 2008, Recorded April 7, 2008 as Instr. No. 2008-15235 in Book --Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 309, RIVERRIM PUD, PHASE 4, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 10 PYMTS FROM 04/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 2,508.06 $25,080.60 9 L/C FROM 04/16/10 TO 12/16/10 @ 109.75 $987.75 MISCELLANEOUS FEES $79.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$26,147.85 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 60805 TARALON PLACE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $381,456.51, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 17, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales TAC# 931934 PUB: 04/01/11, 04/08/11, 04/15/11, 04/22/11 DATED: 01/07/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L521391 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017565/TOLLEFSON Investor No: 4004612156 AP #1: 201808 Title #: 100775306 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by ALFRED L. TOLLEFSON, TRINNA L. TOLLEFSON as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated October 17, 2005, Recorded October 21, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-71987 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A!LEGAL DESCRIPTION That portion of Lots One (1) and Two (2), RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 15, Deschutes County, Oregon, described as follows: Beginning at the initial point, a 5/8 inch rebar with yellow plastic cap marked "W&H PACIFIC" monumenting the Northwest corner of Lot 1, "RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 15" as recorded in the Deschutes County Surveyor's Records as Cs 14196 on the Easterly right of way of Cinnamon Teal Drive which bears South 36°38'58" West, 1004.57 feet from the Northeast corner of Section Twenty-two (22), Township Fifteen (15) South, Range Twelve (12), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon; thence leaving said right of way along said boundary South 78°12'52" East, 79.56 feet; thence South 38°47'59" East, 26.07 feet; thence leaving said boundary South 51°04'38" West, 92.47 feet to said right of way; thence along the arc of a non-tangent 625.00 foot radius curve to the left, through a central angle of 08°55'29" an arc distance of 97.35 feet (the chord of which bears North 13°14'44" West, 97.26 feet) to the initial point. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 3 PYMTS FROM 06/01/10 TO 08/01/10 @ 1,867.43 $5,602.29 5 PYMTS FROM 09/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 2,622.47 $13,112.35 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $373.48 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $52.50 $52.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$19,140.62 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1930 CINNAMON TEAL DRIVE, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $299,465.43, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 05/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931948W PUB: 04/01/11, 04/08/11, 04/15/11, 04/22/11 DATED: 01/04/11


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 F5

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obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $707,941.24 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000% per annum from September 1, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 15, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 8, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3965108 04/15/2011, 04/22/2011, 04/29/2011, 05/06/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx7286 T.S. No.: 1311573-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert Hopper and Debra F. Hopper, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc, as Beneficiary, dated March 09, 2007, recorded March 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at

page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-15553 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Unit 31, Greyhawk Condominiums, Deschutes County, Oregon, described in and subject to that certain declaration of condominium ownership for Greyhawk Condominiums recorded February 1, 2007 in volume 2007, page 06945, Deschutes County Official Records, together with the limited and general common elements set forth therein appertaining to said unit Commonly known as: 1525 Northwest Juniper Street #31 Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $515.69 Monthly Late Charge $25.78. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $75,544.72 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from August 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 15, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their re-

spective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 09, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-373769 04/08, 04/15, 04/22, 04/29 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0142820273 T.S. No.: 10-11873-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 14, 2005 made by, JAMES A.BOEDDEKER AND DEBORAH A. BOEDDEKER was the original Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO, was the original trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA, was the original beneficiary, recorded on March 22, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-16832 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 185883 PARCEL ONE (1)OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 1994-21 BEING A PORTION OF LOT ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-SIX (126) IN RIVER BEND ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19595 BUCK CANYON ROAD, BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: HSBC Sank USA, National Association, not in its individual capacity, but solely as Trustee on behalf of GSAA Home Equity Trust 2005-12. Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligation:; secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amount:; total: $29,537.52 as of March 8, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $364,364.43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00000% per annum from March 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on July 18, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal a;; would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L521392 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000019343/WALCH Investor No: 4004947303 AP #1: 199444 Title #: 100775330 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by GARY LOUIS WALCH as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated July 21, 2006, Recorded July 26, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-51085 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE (135) OF NI-LAH-SHA-PHASES 2 AND 3, RECORDED OCTOBER 21, 1999, CABINET E, PAGE 342, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 3 PYMTS FROM 07/01/10 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,042.74 $3,128.22 4 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,033.05 $4,132.20 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $165.76 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $39.00 $39.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$7,465.18 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 731 NE SHOSHONE DRIVE, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $97,713.19, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/04/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931946 PUB: 04/01/11, 04/08/11, 04/15/11, 04/22/11

costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and ‘Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated; March 25, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signer ASAP# 3953303 04/01/2011, 04/08/2011, 04/15/2011, 04/22/2011

entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-2524900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 25, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3953340 04/01/2011, 04/08/2011, 04/15/2011, 04/22/2011

2010 of principal and inter18697 covering the follow11/1/2010 until paid; plus occurred), together with the est and subsequent installing described real property all accrued late charges costs, trustee's and attorney's ments due thereafter; plus situated in said County and thereon; and all trustee's fees and curing any other late charges; together with State, to wit: Lot 9, LARCH fees, foreclosure costs and default complained of in the all subsequent sums adMEADOWS, City of Redmond, any sums advanced by the Notice of Default by tendervanced by beneficiary pursuDeschutes County, Oregon beneficiary pursuant to the ing the performance reant to the terms and condiCommonly known as: 1355 terms of said deed of trust. quired under the obligation tions of said deed of trust. NW 16th Court, Redmond, Whereof, notice hereby is or trust deed, at any time Monthly payment $530.07 OR 97756 Both the benefigiven that the undersigned prior to five days before the Monthly Late Charge $22.99. ciary and the trustee have trustee will on 8/12/2011 at date last set for the sale. In By this reason of said default elected to sell the said real the hour of 11:00 AM, Stanconstruing this, the mascuthe beneficiary has declared property to satisfy the oblidard of Time, as established line gender includes the all obligations secured by gations secured by said trust by Section 187.110, Oregon feminine and the successor said Deed of Trust immedideed and notice has been reRevised Statutes, at the front in interest to the grantor as ately due and payable, said corded pursuant to Section entrance of the Courthouse, well as any other person sums being the following, 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised 1164 N.W. Bond Street, City owing obligation, the perto-wit; The sum of Statutes: the default for of Bend, County of Desformance of which is se$69,197.52 together with which the foreclosure is chutes, State of Oregon, sell cured by said trust deed; the interest thereon at 6.125% made is the grantor's failure at public auction to the highwords "trustee" and "benefiper annum from September to: Make the monthly payest bidder for cash the interciary" include their respec01, 2010 until paid; plus all ments of $811.72 each, est in the said described real tive successors in interest, if accrued late charges commencing with the payproperty which the grantor any. Dated: 4/8/2011 FIRST thereon; and all trustee's ment due on 12/1/2010 and had or had power to convey AMERICAN TITLE INSURfees, foreclosure costs and continuing each month until at the time of the execution ANCE COMPANY, Trustee any sums advance by the this trust deed is reinstated by him of the said trust deed, C/O The Mortgage Law Firm, beneficiary pursuant to the or goes to trustee's sale; plus together with any interest PLC 43180 Business Park terms and conditions of the a late charge of $40.59 on which the grantor or his sucDrive, Suite 202 Temecula, said deed of trust. Whereof, each installment not paid cessors in interest acquired CA 92590 (619)465-8200 notice hereby is given that, within fifteen days following after the execution of said DENNIS CANLAS ASAP# Cal-Western Reconveyance the payment due date; trust deed, to satisfy the 3964769 04/15/2011, Corporation the undersigned trustee's fees and other costs foregoing obligations thereby 04/22/2011, 04/29/2011, trustee will on July 22, 2011 and expenses associated with secured (and the costs and 05/06/2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Stanthis foreclosure and any furexpenses of sale, including a dard of Time, as established ther breach of any term or reasonable charge by the by Section 187.110, Oregon condition contained in subtrustee). Notice is further Revised Statutes, At the Bond ject note and deed of trust. given that any person named Street entrance to DesBy the reason of said default in Section 86.753 of Oregon chutes County Courthouse the beneficiary has declared Revised Statutes; has the 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, all obligations secured by right to have the foreclosure County of Deschutes, State said deed of trust immediproceeding dismissed and of Oregon, sell at public aucately due and payable, said the trust deed reinstated by tion to the highest bidder for sums being the following, to payment to the beneficiary of cash the interest in the said wit: The principal sum of the entire amount then due LEGAL NOTICE described real property $99,130.22 together with the (other than such portion of TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE which the grantor had or had interest thereon at the rate said principal as would not Loan No: 0031089766 T.S. power to convey at the time 4.375% per annum from then be due had no default No.: 11-00719-6 Reference is of the execution by him of made to that certain Deed of the said trust deed, together 1000 1000 1000 Trust dated as of April 3, with any interest which the 2006 made by, MICHAEL T. Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices grantor or his successors in FIELDS, LAUREL J. FIELDS interest acquired after the was the original Grantor to execution of said trust deed, LEGAL NOTICE WESTERN TITLE AND ESto satisfy the foregoing obli- TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's CROW COMPANY, was the gations thereby secured and Sale No. 09-FMB-101499 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERoriginal trustee, in favor of the costs and expense of SIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE MERS AS NOMINEE FOR sale, including a reasonable USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JUNE M. AMERICAN BROKERS CONcharge by the trustee. NoCHRISTIANSEN AND RICHARD W. CHRISTIANSEN, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as grantor, to FIRST DUIT, was the original bentice is further given that any AMERICAN TITLE INS. CO., as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSeficiary, recorded on April 10, person named in Section TEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR SIERRA PACIFIC MORTGAGE COMPANY, INC., as beneficiary, 2006, as Instrument No. 86.753 of Oregon Revised dated 11/4/2005, recorded 11/14/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-78154, records of DES2006-24339 of Official Statutes has the right to have CHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations seRecords in the office of the the foreclosure proceeding cured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE Recorder of Deschutes dismissed and the trust deed OF THE INDYMAC INDX MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERCounty, Oregon (the "Deed of reinstated by payment to the TIFICATES, SERIES 2006-AR2 UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED FEBTrust") to wit: APN: 243921 beneficiary of the entire RUARY 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said LOT 17, DESERT SKIES, amount then due (other than county and state, to-wit: LOT 3 IN BLOCK 2 OF PONDEROSA CASCADE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, ORPHASES 1 AND 2, DESsuch portion of said principal EGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described CHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. as would not then be due had above is purported to be: 66590 WEST CASCADE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disCommonly known as: 21135 no default occurred), toclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designaCLAIRAWAY AVENUE, BEND, gether with the costs, tion. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the OR The current beneficiary is: trustee's and attorney's fees obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to OrDeutsche Bank National Trust and curing any other default egon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure Company, as Trustee for GSR complained of in the Notice to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of October 21, 2010 Delinquent Payments Mortgage Loan Trust of Default by tendering the from June 01, 2010 5 payments at $2,344.60 each $11,723.00 (06-01-10 through 10-21-10) Late 2006-0A1, Mortgage performance required under Charges: $494.50 Beneficiary Advances: $33.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL $12,250.50 ALSO, Pass-Through Certificates, the obligation or trust deed, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other seSeries 2006-0A1 Both the LEGAL NOTICE at any time prior to five days nior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist Beneficiary and the trustee TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE before the date last set for that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as have elected to sell the said Loan No: xxxxx8984 T.S. No.: sale. In construing this noa condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid ail sereal property to satisfy the 1315547-09. Reference is tice, the masculine gender nior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements obligations secured by the made to that certain deed includes the feminine and the for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said Deed of Trust and notice has made by Edward J. Staat, neuter, the singular includes default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed been recorded pursuant to and Elizabeth D. Staat, Husplural, the word "grantor" inimmediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF Section 86.735(3) of Oregon band And Wife, as Grantor to cludes any successor in in$606,058.35, PLUS interest thereon at 3.625% per annum from 5/1/2010, until paid, together Revised Statutes: the Northwest Trustee Services, terest to the grantor as well with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the prodefaults' for which the foreas Trustee, in favor of Union as any other persons owing tection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice closure is made is that the Federal Bank of Indianapolis, an obligation, the perforhereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on February 23, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, grantor(s): failed to pay as Beneficiary, dated July 23, mance of which is secured by in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE payments which became due; 2004, recorded July 28, said trust deed, the words DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, together with late charges 2004, in official records of "trustee" and "beneficiary" inState of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said dedue, and which defaulted Deschutes, Oregon in cludes their respective sucscribed property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution amounts total:$22,087.29 as book/reel/volume No. xx at cessors in interest, if any. by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in of March 10, 2011. By this page No. xx, fee/file/InDated: March 16, 2011. interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations reason of said default the strument/microfilm/recepCal-Western Reconveyance thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Beneficiary has declared all tion No. 2004-44828 coverCorporation 525 East Main Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to obligations secured by said ing the following described Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cafive days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and deed of trust immediately real property situated in said jon CA 92022-9004 the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than due and payable, said sums County and State, to-wit: Cal-Western Reconveyance such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred} and by curing any being the following, to wit: Unit 12 of Kitty Hawk Phase Corporation Signature/By: other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance The sum of $418,342.65 toI, Deschutes County, Oregon, Tammy Laird R-375254 required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the gether with interest thereon as set forth in declaration of 04/15, 04/22, 04/29, 05/06 performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in at the rate of 3.17100% per unit ownership recorded July enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding annum from February 1, 31, 1978 in book 279 at page LEGAL NOTICE the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender in2010 until paid; plus all ac338 of deed records. ComTRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE cludes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes crued late charges thereon; monly known as: 56922 TS No.: 111705 APN: 249216 any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the perand all trustee's fees, forecloMeadow Road Unit 12 Now Reference is made to that formance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include sure costs and any sums adKnown As 17658 Pinnacle Ln. certain deed made by Duane their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any vanced by the Beneficiary #12 Sunriver OR 97707. A. Haugen, An Unmarried grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they pursuant to the terms of said Both the beneficiary and the Man as Grantor to First bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 10/21/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORdeed of trust. Whereof, notrustee have elected to sell American Title Company, as PORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, tice hereby is given that FIthe said real property to satTrustee, in favor of MortWA 98104 Phone: {206)340-2550 Safe Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3943499 DELITY NATIONAL TITLE isfy the obligations secured gage Electronic Registration 03/25/2011, 04/01/2011, 04/08/2011, 04/15/2011 INSURANCE COMPANY, as by said trust deed and notice Systems, Inc. as Beneficiary, the duly appointed trustee has been recorded pursuant dated 4/29/2009, recorded 1000 1000 1000 under the Deed of Trust will to Section 86.735(3) of Or5/5/2009, in the official Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices on July 22, 2011 at the hour egon Revised Statutes: the records of Deschutes County, of 11:00 AM, Standard of default for which the forecloOregon in book/reel/volume LEGAL NOTICE Time, as established by secsure is made is the grantor's: No. - at page No. -, OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L520631 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: tion 187.110, Oregon ReFailure to pay the monthly fee/file/instrument/micro1000017536/HERVEY Investor No: 4004189161 AP #1: 132324 Title #: 100744648 Refervised Statues, at the front payment due October 1, film/reception No. 2009ence is made to that certain Trust Deed made by SHARON M. HERVEY as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON - REDMOND as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CAS1000 1000 1000 CADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated October 6, 2004, Recorded October 13, 2004 as Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices Instr. No. 2004-61425 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT Exhibit "A" Real property in the County of LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L521470 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: Deschutes, State of Oregon, described as follows: A tract of land located in the Northeast Quarter 1000018240/TONEY Investor No: 4003232344 AP #1: 154822 Title #: 100782796 Referof the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NE¼ SE NW¼) of Section Thirty-five (35), TOWNSHIP SIXTEEN (16) SOUTH, RANGE ELEVEN (11), EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, ence is made to that certain Trust Deed made by MICHAEL J. TONEY as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Deschutes County, Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at a point whence the Center North One-Sixteenth corner of said Section 35 bears South 89° 40' 05" East, 657.11 Beneficiary. Dated June 10, 2003, Recorded June 16, 2003 as Instr. No. 2003-40156 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON feet, said point also being the Northwest corner of said Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarcovering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 9 ter of the Northwest Quarter (NE¼ SE¼ NW¼); thence along the North line of said Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (NE¼ SE¼ NW¼) South 89° 40' 05' IN BLOCK 33, MOUNTAIN VILLAGE EAST V, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE FOLLOWING: BEGINNING AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 9, BLOCK 33, East 505.94 feet, more or less, to a point on the centerline of the Columbia Southern Canal; MOUNTAIN VILLAGE EAST 5, THENCE NORTH 89ø44'19" EAST ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF SAID thence along the centerline of said canal South 49° 11' 07" West, 666.70 feet, more or less, to a LOT 9, A DISTANCE OF 8.21 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTH LINE NORTH 17.57 FEET; point on the West line of said Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter of the Northwest QuarTHENCE NORTH 25ø57'21" WEST 36.55 FEET TO THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID LOT 9; THENCE ter (NE¼ SE¼ NW thence along the West line of said Northeast Quarter of the Southeast Quarter SOUTH 08ø41'08" EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE 51.78 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINof the Northwest Quarter (NE SE NW¼) North 00° 10' 35 West, 438.70 feet, more or less, to the point of beginning. Tax Parcel Number: 132324 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected NING. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 21 failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 09/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,317.27 $6,586.35 4 L/C FROM 09/16/10 TO 12/16/10 @ 65.86 $263.44 RECOVERABLE BALPYMTS FROM 05/01/09 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,454.23 $30,538.83 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $764.68 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $3,667.06 $3,667.06 Sub-Total of Amounts in ArANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $13.50 $13.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$6,863.29 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have rears:$34,970.57 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condibeneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written tion to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 57318 SEQUOIA LANE, SUNRIVER, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any described above is purported to be : 18955 PINEHURST ROAD, BEND, OR 97701 The incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $205,679.20, the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 08/01/10, and following, to wit: Principal $106,903.10, together with interest as provided in the note or other such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are instrument secured from 04/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given May 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the exbid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone pected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/04/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931942 PUB: 04/01/11, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931950W PUB: 04/01/11, 04/08/11, 04/15/11, 04/08/11, 04/15/11, 04/22/11 04/22/11 DATED: 01/04/11


F6 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0156846024 T.S. No.: 11-00854-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of November 22, 2006 made by, ROBERT M. HUGHES AND STACY K. HUGHES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY was the original Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, was the original trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA, was the original beneficiary, recorded on November 29, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-78326 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 240452 LOT FIVE (5), RIDGEWATER II, P.U.D., CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20920 SAGE CREEK DRIVE, BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, (SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION) AS TRUSTEE FOR LEHMAN XS TRUST SERIES 2007-9 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $19,076.63 as of March 1, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $396,902.98 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.62500% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on July 11, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other

default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 19, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3947967 03/25/2011, 04/01/2011, 04/08/2011, 04/15/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0031044720 T.S. No.; 11-00919-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of March 13, 2006 made by, RONALD S. BOYD, LORI R. BOYD was the original Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, was the original trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN BROKERS CONDUIT, was the original beneficiary, recorded on March 22, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-19885 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 174193 LOT FOUR (4), BLOCK TWO (2), WYNDEMERE, RECORDED SEPTEMBER 27, 1988, IN CABINET C, PAGE 273, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 908 NW GLENBROOKS PLACE, BEND, OR The current beneficiary is: Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for American Home Mortgage Assets Trust 2006-1, Mortgage-Backed Pass-Through Certificates Series 2006-1 Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $36,916.56 as of March 11, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $606,552.02 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.04100% per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on July 25, 2011 at the hour of 11:00

AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 25, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3953352 04/01/2011, 04/08/2011, 04/15/2011, 04/22/2011 PUBLIC NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS CHAPTER 87 Notice is hereby given that the following vehicle will be sold, for cash to the highest bidder, on 4/25/2011. The sale will be held at 10:00 a.m. by SAS AUTO 6700 SW 67TH REDMOND, OR 2000 GMC Denali VIN = 1GKEK13R3YR158053

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Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

Polaris Indy Trail 1989, $500; 1998 RMK 500, $1200; 2000 RMK 700 $1500, all exc. cond., 541-419-4890.

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L521657 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017596/COOK AP #1: 175140 Title #: 100787412 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by PAUL W. COOK, TERRIE K. COOK as Grantor, to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated April 21, 2003, Recorded May 2, 2003 as Instr. No. 2003-29252 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "A" A portion of Lot 4, block 1, RAINTREE, Deschutes County, Oregon. more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the most Northerly point of said Lot 4; thence Southeasterly along a curve with a radius of 50.00 feet, a delta angle of 56° 09' 58" a distance of 49.01 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 02°28 31" West a distance of 159.56 feet to a 5/8" iron rod; thence South 89° 59' 13" West 187.59 feet; thence North 00° 26' 40" East 90.00 feet; thence North 58° 38' 29" East 179.46 feet to the point of beginning. EXCEPTING THEREFROM a portion of Lot 4 Block 1 of RAINTREE SUBDIVISION, beginning at the Southwest corner of said Lot 4, Block 1; thence North 89° 59' 13" East 104.00 feet; thence North 12° 57' 50" West 21.55 feet; thence North 43° 59' 38" West 112.88 feet; thence South 58° 38' 29" West 23.57 feet; thence South 00° 26' 40" West 90 feet to the point of beginning. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 6 PYMTS FROM 07/01/10 TO 12/01/10 @ 845.37 $5,072.22 1 PYMT DUE 01/01/11 @ 840.66 $840.66 TOTAL LATE CHARGES $33.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$5,946.38 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 20945 MISTY LANE, BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $101,343.15, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 06/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931940W PUB: 04/01/11, 04/08/11, 04/15/11, 04/22/11 DATED: 01/04/11

880

Motorhomes

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., see to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd in La Pine. $8000. OBO 541-876-5106.

Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

870

Boats & Accessories 12’ Aluminum Sea Nymph, $110; Evinrude 8HP good cond, $320, 541-593-9771. 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 541-385-5809

18’ Hewes 180 Sportsman 2007 Yamaha 115 & 8hp kicker, downriggers Excel cond, low hrs, $22,900. 541-815-3383

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $15,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

20' Calabria 1998 tournament ski boat / 237 hours. 350ci/ 300hp F.I. GM engine. Nice, too many extras to list. $13,500. Call 541-736-3067 Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $350 OBO, 541-548-3711.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Harley Ultra Classic 2001, Best of everything. Garage kept. Madras. $9000 call 541-475-7459.

Legal Notices

865

ATVs

17.5’ Bayliner, 2005, 3.0 Merc, like new, low hrs, $7500 obo. Will consider partial trades. 541-279-1862 after 5 pm.

860

Amount due on lien $4954.00 Reputed owner(s) Brandon Lamb Brandon Lamb & Carin Moore Rogue Federal Credit Union

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Boat Trailer, 25’ Pacific, dual axle, $300, call 541-961-3776.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

JAYCO SENECA 2008 36MS, fully loaded, 2 slides, gen., diesel, 8k miles, like new cond., $114,900 obo. Call for details 1-541-556-8224.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. New Price!!!!! $19,500. 541-788-4844.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

LEATHER RIDING VESTS, size M & XXXL, $15 ea, or both $25 (cash). 541-454-0056

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Honda Gold Wing GL 1100, 1980. 2300 miles, full dress plus helmets, $3500 or best offer. Call 541-389-8410

Used out-drive parts Mercury OMC rebuilt marine motors: 151 $1595; 3.0 $1895; 4.3 (1993), $1995. 541-389-0435

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $84,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

Honda XR400 2001, $1900; Yamaha TT90 $650, Honda XR50, $400, 541-419-4890.

Watercraft

GAS

SAVER!

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 Motorcycle Carrier, up to 400 lbs., fits into trailer jack, $50, 541-815-2042.

865

ATVs Honda 200 4 wheeler, good cond., $600, call 541-419-4890.

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

881

Travel Trailers

875

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Dancers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Wilderness 2-person Kayak w/ paddles, like new. $650 new; sell $375. 541-383-8528

880

Motorhomes

A-Liner pop-up 15-ft 2010, 2-burner stove, frig, freshwater tank, furnace, fantastic fan, $9950. 541-923-3021 JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps 6, slide-out, Arizona room, range w/oven, micro, toilet & shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt batteries, outside shower, twin propane tanks, BBQ. $10,500. 541-312-9312 Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Beaver Lexington 1994, Anniversary model, Cummins Diesel, 38’, nice, full factory paint, $35,900,541-617-1249

Rebates up to $1000 Plus 3.99% APR Financing on select models ATV's can be hazardous to operate. All riders under 16 should ride only with adult supervision. Always wear a helmet and be sure to take a safety training course. Financing on approval of credit. See dealer for details.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

882

Fifth Wheels

One owner, low miles, generator, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 backup camera, awnings, non slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. smoker, no pets, Motivated cond. for Snowbirds, solid seller. Just reduced and oak cabs day & night shades, priced to sell at $10,950, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Bounder 34’ 1994.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 882

Autos & Transportation

Fifth Wheels Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

900

THE BULLETIN • Friday, April 15, 2011 F7

932

932

933

933

935

935

935

Antique and Classic Autos

Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

GMC 3/4-Ton 1992, 4WD, with canopy, $1500 OBO, 541-382-5309.

Buick Rendezvous 2004, clean & low mileage, $11,000 OBO. 541-410-7829;541-389-4506

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Smolich Auto Mall Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

916

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob. Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Chevy

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories (1) Brand new Radial all terrain T/A 31x10 50R15 + 5-hole rim, $100. 541-480-1337

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com 2

Falken Uro M&S 195/60R15, 70%, $140. 541-480-5950.

We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Antique and Classic Autos When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Asking $3,999 or make offer. 541-389-5355

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Paying Top Dollar For Your Vehicle! We will pay CASH for your vehicle. Buying vehicles NOW!

541-322-7253

Great fuel economy. 60K Miles, comes with warranty! VIN #507847

Smolich Auto Mall

Now Only $11,998

99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348. Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Sale Price $19,999

Over 150 used to choose from!

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

366

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Dodge Nitro AWD 2008 Great Fuel Miser! 4X4, Low miles! A Must See! Warranty! VIN #258369

Now Only $16,877 Hwy 20 in Bend smolichmotors.com People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, tow pkg., 5.4L V-8, 4WD, bedliner, CD, air, winter & summer tires, great cond., 2ND REDUCTION, now $11,900 541-554-5212, 702-501-0600.

Over 150 used to choose from!

933 ***

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

Big wheel and tire pkg., leather, low miles! Warranty! Vin #108600

Chevy HHR 2006

Smolich Auto Mall

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Tire Chains for 50R15 tires, NEW, $25. 541-480-1337 extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $7900 541-815-1523.

New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Pickups

Ford 2 Door 1949,

Winter Master M&S, P185/70R13, 100%, $80. 541-480-5950.

Hummer H2 Supercharge 2003

The Bulletin Classifieds

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

The Bulletin

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

WILLYS JEEP 1956

931

Over 150 used to choose from!

Chevy El Camino 1979,

925

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031.

541-389-5016 evenings.

Call Mike Springer 541-749-4025

Plymouth Barracuda 1966, original car! 300 hp, 360 V8, centerlines, (Original 273 eng & wheels incl.) 541-593-2597

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Monte Carlo 1970, all original, many extras. MUST SELL due to death. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

AUCTIONS - Check our website for upcoming auctions April 30 & May 14. www.dennisturmon.com 541-923-6261 or 480-0795

KEYSTONE COUGAR 26’ 2004 5th wheel, slide, extras, like new $15,000, 541-389-9444

Canopies and Campers

Now Only $7,788

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Utility Trailers

885

Don’t bother calling - hurry! Come on down! VIN #B90195

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

Truck with Snow Plow!

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Over 150 used to choose from!

$19,450!

Smolich Auto Mall

Ford Expedition XLT AWD 2003

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Over 150 used to choose from!

Smolich Auto Mall

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649 Chevrolet Scottsdale 20, 1987. 4WD, 3/4-ton, A/C, Reese 15,000-lb Fifth wheel pin hitch, tilt wheel, deer guard, excellent 10-ply tires, hubs. $3000. For more details & equip, call John Keseley 541-932-4338

Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, International Travel All 1967, electric windows/door locks, exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, dually, fifth wheel hitch, reshocks, interior seat cover, ceiver hitch, 90% rubber, sueverything works, 121K orig. per maint. w/all records, new mi.,original operators manual trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. and line setting ticket incl. $6500, Back on the market. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401 541-923-0411

Ford F150 SuperCREW 2005 4X4, Loaded, Lariat Pkg. Warranty. Vin #B15268

2011 HYUNDAI ELANTRA

Only $22,250 NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

2011 HYUNDAI SONATA

40

35

MPG

MPG

366

CHECK OUT THE GAS MILEAGE!

Ford F250 4x4 1993. 5.8L engine, Auto, AC, shell, new brakes, tow package, 127K miles, $2800. 541-408-8330 Ford F-250 XLT Super Duty 2008, 4WD, 6.4 Diesel, supercab, long bed, 24K mi., many extras, like new $35,000, 541-923-5754. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

BLUETOOTH, POWER WINDOWS & LOCKS

36 MONTH L E A S E

MSRP $18,530, Cap Cost $18,530, Residual $12,229.80, Due at signing $1,999. 12,000 Mile/year, 36 mo. Acq. fee $595. On approved Credit.

CLASS LEADING INTERIOR ROOM

2011 HYUNDAI ACCENT GS AUTO, A/C, AM/FM/CD

36 MONTH L E A S E

VIN: 175568, MSRP $21,230. Initial Cap Cost $20,950. Due at Signing $2,987, includes title and fees. Aqc. Fee $595. Residual $12,052.65. 36 mo. 12,000 Miles per Year. On approved credit.

2011 HYUNDAI TUCSON GLS AWD

34

33

MPG

MPG

VIN: 192899

Sale Price

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

CHECK OUT THE GAS MILEAGE!

MSRP .....................$14,510 Smolich Discount .....$1,015 Rebate ........................$500

MSRP .....................$24,695 Smolich Discount ........$700

VIN: 212745

$12,995

Sale Price

+ DMV

Finance with HRFC to take off an additional $1,000

$23,995

541.749.4025

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Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


F8 Friday, April 15, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

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Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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(photo for illustration use only)

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Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

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Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium FIND IT! & Climate pkgs. Warranty & BUY IT! Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP S E L L I T ! $33,540. Asking $31,900. The Bulletin Classiieds 541-350-5437

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Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

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Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Nissan Quest 2006 Mercedes-Benz S550 2007 This is a beautiful car w/only 40K mi. Pristine in & out. Leather interior looks showroom new. $42,000, 541-388-7944.

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Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

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Nissan Pathfinder 1989, 3 L V-6, exc. cond., runs great. $1500. 541-480-5950.

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

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Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Mercedes GL450, 2007 Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

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VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

BUICKS ! LeSabres 1998 and 2004 $1900-$4900.

Ford E350 12-pass., 1993, 5L V8, 166K, runs/drives great. $2300 OBO. 541-410-4757 Ford Econoline 150 1988, fuel injected, 4.9 L 6, great work van. $1000. 480-5950

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Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

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All vehicles subject to prior sale, tax, title, license & registration fees. All financing, subject to credit approval. Pictures for illustration purposes only. Offers expire Sunday, April 17, 2011 at close of business.

2011 DODGE GR. CARAVAN Stunning new interior! 25 MPG HWY!

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$

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541-389-1177 • 1865 NE Hwy 20 • Bend, Oregon CHRYSLER • DODGE • JEEP

All sale prices after dealer discounts, factory rebates and applicable incentives. Terms vary. See dealer for details. Limited stock on hand. Manufacturer rebates and incentives subject to change. Art for illustration purposes only. Subject to prior sale. Not responsible for typos. Expires 4/17/2011.


EVERY FRIDAY IN THE BULLETIN APRIL 15, 2011

R E S TAU R A N T S : A review of Pho Viet & Cafe, PAGE 20

PAGE 10


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

inside

REPORTERS Heidi Hagemeier, 541-617-7828 hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com Jenny Wasson, 541-383-0350 jwasson@bendbulletin.com

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING

MUSIC • 3 • G. Love plays in Bend • Feedback celebrates local radio, Record Store Day • PoetHouse hosts Gregory Alan Isakov • Don’t miss this Paleface show • Swingle Singers bring a cappella sounds to Tower • Andre Nickatina back in town • Sapient plays MadHappy Lounge • Tone Red plays Silver Moon • Boxcar Stringband has raucous show planned

Cover illustration by Althea Borck / The Bulletin

COVER STORY • 10

RESTAURANTS • 20

• Bend Spring Festival returns

• A review of Pho Viet & Cafe

FINE ARTS • 12

OUT OF TOWN • 22

• Clyde Keller, photographer • Craig Richards benefit • Sunriver Music Festival member tickets • My Own Two Hands in Sisters • Redmond plans youth art walk • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

• Brewfest in Silverton • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 25 • Review of “Tiger Woods PGA Tour 12: The Masters” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 26

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

541-382-1811

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8

CALENDAR • 16

• Guide to area clubs

• A week full of Central Oregon events

MUSIC RELEASES • 9

PLANNING AHEAD • 18

• Take a look at recent releases

• Make your plans for later on • Talks and classes listing

• “Rio,” “Jane Eyre,” “Scream 4,” “Win Win” and “Of Gods and Men” open in Central Oregon • “Country Strong” and “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

PAGE 3

music

a new

groove

Courtesy Noah Abrams

G. Love, aka Garrett Dutton, got a little help from his friends Seth and Scott Avett on his new album “Fixin’ to Die.”

G. Love returns to his coffee-shop roots on new album By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

Y

ou can hear the voice of Garrett Dutton — better known as G. Love, and coming to Bend Thursday (see “If you go”) — course with excitement when he talks about the recording session that birthed his new solo album “Fixin’ to Die.” He uses words like “inspired” and “special” and “unique” and “refreshing” and, a couple times, “awesome.” Guided by producers Seth and Scott Avett (of the white-hot roots band The Avett Brothers), Dutton spent nine days at Echo Mountain Recording, a studio in a convert-

ed church in Asheville, N.C., banging out foot-stompin’ front porch jams that take the whole G. Love thing right back to where it started. The goal, Dutton said in a telephone interview earlier this week, was to keep G. Love fans engaged by veering away from the urban blues meets hip-hop groove sound that has defined his career, and especially his past three albums, 2004’s “The Hustle,” 2006’s “Lemonade” and 2008’s “Superhero Brother,” all released on Jack Johnson’s Brushfire Records label. “We thought of those last three records as a triumvirate,” he said. “With the econo-

my and the state of the record business and everything like that — it being harder and harder to sell records — it was just like, you know what, we gotta do something really different. So we decided we were gonna go back to my roots as a coffee-shop singer and a Delta bluesman and really … go all the way with that.” Enter the Avetts, a couple of North Carolina boys whose new-school old-time string band is at the forefront of the current rootsmusic revival. Once the G. Love camp decided on the direction of the new record, they set their sights on the ideal producers. Continued Page 5

If you go What: G. Love & Special Sauce, with The Belle Brigade When: 9 p.m. Thursday, doors open 8 p.m. Where: Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door. Advance ticket outlets listed at the website below. Contact: www.random presents.com


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

music

Support your local music scene ... by pledging to KPOV and celebrating Record Store Day

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BEND EAST: 541-382-6248 • 820 N.E. 3RD ST. BEND WEST: 541-382-9253 • 725 N.W. COLUMBIA ST. REDMOND: 541-548-8200 • 341 SW 6TH ST.

build to full power. It was one of the first low-power stations to receive such a permit. Since then, KPOV has been raising funds for its expansion, which would move the station’s transmitter from its current location on Awbrey Butte to another high-altitude point near town that has not yet been finalized, said Jill Mahler, the station’s office manager. The new transmitter location and other upgrades would increase KPOV’s power 400 times, from 2 watts to 800 watts, improving KPOV’s signal strength in Bend and beyond. But the permit expires in June, and if it expires, KPOV loses the chance to expand for the foreseeable future (and maybe forever). So the station’s regular spring pledge drive, held every year to raise money for operating costs, is doubling as a final push to raise $26,689 for expansion, too. The pledge drive runs through April 23, and KPOV has scheduled special programming and other goodies to entice listeners. To support the drive or for more info, visit www.kpov.org or send checks to KPOV at 501 N.W. Bond St., Bend, OR 97701. Now before I tell you why you should send KPOV money, let’s turn our attention to another cornerstone of Bend’s music scene, Ranch Records on Wall Street. It’s no secret that CD sales

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin ile photo

Friends Cathy Kiggins, left, and Zack Frey look through the CDs at Ranch Records in 2010. The Bend store will celebrate Record Store Day on Saturday with a show by Empty Space Orchestra. have been declining rapidly over the past several years, thanks in large part to legal and illegal downloading on the Internet. As a result, hundreds of small, independently owned record stores across the country (and a few large chains) have closed their doors for good. In response, national Record Store Day was founded in 2007 to establish “a celebration of the unique culture” that surrounds the more than 700 independent record stores in the United States. In four years, Record Store Day has grown into a big event among music nerds,

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Feedback BY BEN SALMON

9th Street

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n the final day of 2010, I used this space to make a wish list for the local music scene, and the final item on that list was this: “(Here are) a few evergreens, things I think are always important to a thriving local music scene: Support your local independent record store, Ranch Records. Support your local community radio station, KPOV. And support the venues that are out there providing live music …” Today, I bring you two very simple ways to accomplish those first two things. First up is KPOV’s Spring Power Drive, happening now way over on the right side of your radio dial at 106.7 FM. A little history: In late 2007, KPOV applied to the Federal Communication Commission for a permit to build a full-power, non-commercial radio station at 88.9 FM to serve Bend and other Central Oregon communities. In mid-2008, the FCC granted the station a three-year permit to

SE Wilson Ave

Call for pick-up and delivery 541-306-3200 380 Bridgeford Blvd., Bend, OR 97701 (Suite C / off Wilson or 9th Street)

On the blog Visit www.bendbulletin.com/ frequency to stream a song from Empty Space Orchestra’s Record Store Day release!

who flock to their local dealer to pick up limited vinyl pressings, exclusive releases, special editions, and whatever else they can get their grubby little paws on. (Guilty as charged!) And glory, glory, hallelujah: This Saturday is Record Store Day! Over at Ranch — the only Central Oregon business listed as a participant at www.recordstoreday.com — they’re celebrating with a bunch of official RSD releases (from artists like Nirvana, the Grateful Dead, Mumford & Sons, Pink Floyd and Phish) and “free swag” according to co-owner John Schroeder. Plus, Empty Space Orchestra will perform behind the store on Brooks Street at 1 p.m. Also cool: Empty Space is producing 50 copies of a twosong release for the event, featuring hand-drawn cover art

and unreleased songs “It’s Hard to Play Basketball in the Dark” and “Reincarnation of the Sad Panda.” They’ll cost $5. Now, if you’ve read this far, Ranch’s Record Store Day extravaganza just might be for you, so head down there, reintroduce yourself to the wonders of shopping for actual, physical music, hang out with like-minded folks and support your local, independent record store. Why? Why support Ranch? Why support KPOV? It’s simple: You live in or near Bend (probably), and so do I. And local, independent voices of culture need our support right now. Because it’s those voices that most eagerly and regularly bring new sounds into our town. You can tune your radio to just about any station and hear a song that someone somewhere has already deemed a hit. And you can travel a few miles to a big-box store that sells CDs and find a limited selection of product that someone somewhere has decided is worth stocking because it’s most saleable to the general public. Continued next page


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

PAGE 5

music

Bob Schumacher 541.280.9147 www.schumacherconstructioninc.com

BUSY BUSY BUSY ON THE BULLETIN’S MUSIC BLOG, FREQUENCY! LET’S GET TO IT:

WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM/FREQUENCY

G. Love From Page 3 “They do things in such an honest way,” Dutton said. “We felt like (we should) go back to making records how I used to make ’em: real stripped down, live performances, no frills. Just good, old-fashioned, honest music.” With the Avetts on board, Dutton put his trust in their vision of roots music, and the brothers “guided us to a really unique place,” he said. “They were such a breath of fresh air. It was the kind of session where you do one song and you’d be like, ‘Man, that was awesome. I don’t know how it can get any better,’” Dutton said. “And then you do the next song and it’s even better. And I would just go home every night and I would

Feedback From previous page But only KPOV broadcasts more than 40 locally produced programs that feature music and talk you’re not likely to hear on commercial or even public radio. And only Ranch carries excellent albums by bands that may not appear on the Billboard charts (or even NPR), but are still terrific. Also, both support local artists; Ranch has boxes and boxes of local releases available for purchase. You won’t find Larry and His Flask or Mosley Wotta (much less, say, Problem Stick) at Best Buy. And you support supporting local arts, right? Of course you do! You see, places like KPOV and Ranch are vital to the uniqueness

be so buzzin’ from the music. I … just (wanted to) go straight home and go to bed and not, like, get hit by a car … or anything that could f--- up the vibe we had going. I felt like there was something so precious going on.” The result is indeed inspired. “Fixin’ to Die” is a collection of rustic, heartfelt tunes that feature plenty of string pickin’, slide guitar, hand claps and only a little of the smirking, marble-mouthed raps that marked much of Dutton’s previous work. There are also covers of the Velvet Underground, Paul Simon and a couple of old blues numbers — including the Bukka White-penned title track — sprinkled among its 13 songs. Reviews have been generally positive; more than one has called “Fixin’” the best album of Dutton’s career. Which was ex-

of a town like Bend. With them in place, interesting, different and/ or obscure music can infiltrate our town and our ears, thanks to DJs and record store clerks who are as passionate about good music as you are. Each is as important a piece of the local music scene as a punk club, a jam session or an exciting new rock band. And without them, our funky little town would be a lot less funky, and a lot more boring. Funky is good. Boring is bad. The existence of KPOV and Ranch are good things, and their existence depends on your support. So don’t miss your chance to support them. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

actly the reaction he was hoping for. “We always have to give people a reason to come out,” Dutton said. “We have to put on great shows every night and put out great records so that … we can keep our people that have been with us for a while captivated and we can turn on some new people. “I’m just happy on this record to come out and flip the script a little bit and show people another side of me,” he continued. “Maybe it’s a side that they don’t know about me and they’re gonna find out, or maybe it’s a side of me that they know about and they’ve been waiting for.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

Call 541-389-9690

Improv Comedy with Triage

• Details on three new Les Schwab Amphitheater shows, including where you can get tickets and how much they’ll cost • Video and a review of The Baseball Project at Silver Moon, plus video of Christabel & the Jons at McMenamins • The new video from local MC Mindscape, featuring lots of familiar faces and places in Bend • Free streaming music from Subpop Records and Empty Space Orchestra And more! Click on over to …

70 Years of Hearing Excellence

Saturdays April 16, 2011 & June 4, 2011 ALL AGES WELCOME 7:30pm 5/door

$

Adam, Angela, Rhonda, Judi, Carolyn, Mike, and Lisa with musical guest: Jumpin’ Joyce Respess

www.bendimprov.com Also catch us on the Comedy Stage at NW Crossing’s Springfest!

CTC Greenwood Playhouse 148 NW Greenwood, Bend, OR. 97701

(541) 389-0803

BEND’S Intimate, Affordable, Local

THEATRE MAY 25 WINNIE THE POOH

2nd Street Theater Join Christopher, Kanga & Piglet in Hundred Acre Wood

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5 8 14 17 28

Brandi Carlile Sold Out! Eugene Opera Mumbo Gumbo Crown City Quartet Tribute to the Grateful Dead

Tickets & Info: TowerTheatre.org | Ticket Mill 541.317.0700


PAGE 6 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

music Gregory Alan Isakov plays the PoetHouse As singer-songwriter albums go, you won’t find many better over the past few years than Gregory Alan Isakov’s “This Empty Northern Hemisphere.” Isakov — a South Africa native now based in Boulder, Colo. — may be too young to call a master craftsman of songs, but then again he may be too preternaturally talented not to. “Hemisphere” is an amazing collection of celestial, orchestral folk songs that hold their own in the context of Isakov’s influences (Leonard Cohen, Bruce Springsteen, Nick Drake) and his contemporaries (Josh Ritter, Alexi Murdoch, Iron & Wine). High praise? Indeed. But also deserving. Isakov has a gift for penning beautiful tunes that are both melancholy and melodic, and then draping them with a haze of lush instrumentation. The end result is deeply engaging. Learn more at www.gregory alanisakov.com, and then catch him Saturday in a perfect venue: the dark, intimate PoetHouse in downtown Bend. The mysterious Fairchildren and local act Lo, and Behold will open the show. Gregory Alan Isakov, with Fairchildren and Lo, and Behold; 9 p.m. Saturday; $10 plus fees in advance, available at www .bendticket.com, $12 at the door. Proceeds benefit PoetHouse Art;

PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www.poethouse art.com or 541-728-0756.

Paleface brings anti-folk to Bend You like The Avett Brothers, right? You think Mumford & Sons are the bee’s knees? There’s a real indie/roots/folk movement happening right now, and at least one of its pipelines can be traced to Ramseur Records, the independent label based in North Carolina that birthed not only the Avetts, but The Everybodyfields, Samantha Crain, Frontier Ruckus and the next big thing, Paleface. Paleface is a raucous neo-folk duo, but Paleface is also one dude known as Paleface, a music-industry veteran with a couple of major-label albums, big-time tours and appearances on Avett albums under his belt. Now, he’s playing with drummer Monica “Mo” Samalot, and their most recent work, 2010’s “One Big Party,” is a wonderfully ragged collection of wobbly, boot-stompin’, psychedelic folk music that sounds tight as a drum, but feels constantly on the verge of teetering off the tracks. Find several ways to sample it at www.palefaceonline.com. Sharp-minded locals will remember that The Avett Brothers came to town a few years ago and played a free show at McMenamins. Now they’re doing big-ticket shows at regional am-

The Swingle Singers Submitted photo

phitheaters, and those of us that skipped those early shows (me included) are kicking ourselves. Keep that in mind Wednesday when Paleface comes to Bend. Paleface; 7 p.m. Wednesday; free; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; www.mcmenamins.com or 541-382-5174.

Like ‘Glee’? You’ll love Swingle Singers! A cappella music is riding a wave of newfound popularity thanks, of course, to the hit television program “Glee.” And a rising

tide, they say, lifts all boats. Take, for example, The Swingle Singers, an a cappella octet of virtuosic performers whose sound has been featured all over the aforementioned TV show. The Grammy-winning group was formed by an American in France in 1963 and has been wowing audiences internationally ever since. With “Glee” on their side, the Singers — made up of eight goodlooking young people these days — are as popular as ever; they’ll gig in Hong Kong and Paris before making a rare appearance in the Pacific Northwest. If you hit the Bend show at the Tower Theatre on Monday, expect dynamic, soaring vocals, a choreographed stage show and a setlist that covers classical, jazz, pop, rock and world music. From Bach to Brazilian to the Beatles, as it were. Find ’em at www.swingle singers.com. The Swingle Singers; 7:30 p.m. Monday; $30 and $35 available through the venue; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www.towertheatre.org or 541-317-0700.

Hip-hop happenings: Nickatina, Sapient Two West Coast MCs and regular Bend visitors are back this weekend. Details: • Bay Area gangsta rapper Andre Nickatina isn’t a household name across the country, but in places like Bend, he’s a hero. Why? Perseverance and familiarity play a large part in why local rap fans turn out in large numbers to see Nickatina do his gritty, streetwise thing in person. The guy’s been nothing if not prolific over the past 15 years, cranking out piles of CDs and DVDs and tirelessly working the regional circuit. He returns to the Domino Room (51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend) Saturday, with doors opening

Gregory Alan Isakov Submitted photo

at 8 p.m. and showtime at 9 p.m. Also on the bill: Mumbls, Endr Won, Maintain and Logy B. Tickets are $23 plus fees in advance and $28 at the door. Visit www .randompresents.com for more info and ticket outlets. • Speaking of hustling, Portland-based MC (and Sandpeople member) Sapient is always coming through with a new track, record, tour or video, it seems. The multi-talented MC/producer is a rising star in the Northwest, quick with a freshly futuristic beat and/ or throught-provoking rhyme, and always looking to take a giant leap over hip-hop’s horizon. Hit up www.sapientkills.com to check out all the music there, and if you only have time for one, track down my personal favorite, a woozy, off-kilter banger called “Universal Diorama.” Sapient returns to MadHappy Lounge (850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend) on Sunday evening. The show is free, starts at 9 p.m., and also features performances by IAMe, Northern Lights, Cast Iron and DJ Nykon.

Local roots weekend at the Silver Moon As far as local roots-oriented bands go, Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom (24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend) has you covered this weekend. Check it out: Continued next page


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

music From previous page • Tonight, the Moon hosts the soulful sounds of Tone Red, an ever-evolving human factory of smooth acoustic goodness headed by the bewitching vocals of Crystal Pizzola. Backing her are Joe Schulte (of Moon Mountain Ramblers) and a airtight rhythm section known as Tyler Mason and Jared Forqueran. Plus, these folks have lots of friends, so you never know who might sit in for some good-times pickin’. Find ’em at www.reverbnation.com/tonered. 9 p.m. $5. • On Saturday night, things will get a little more cacophonous as the B ox car Stringband boys set up shop in the Moon’s cozy corner. Boxcar is Joseph Balsamo on the guitar/harmonica/howls and Casey Cathcart on the upright bass/more howls, plus maybe a drummer now. (I heard they added one. Who knows?) Anyway, the result is a grimy, guttural mix of genuine country-blues and rollicking rockabilly that sounds shipped in from the early 20th century. Find ’em at www.reverbnation .com/boxcarstringband. Opening will be Portland’s Left Coast Country. 9 p.m. $5. — Ben Salmon

Up coming Concerts April 23 — David JacobsStrain (blues), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www. silvermoonbrewing.com or 541-388-8331. April 29 — The Staxx Brothers (funk rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www.silvermoonbrewing. com or 541-388-8331. April 29 — Super Adventure Club (experimental pop), MadHappy Lounge, Bend, 541-388-8178. April 29 — Floater (rock), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. April 30 — The Acorn Project (jam-rock), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, www.silvermoonbrewing. com or 541-388-8331. May 4 — The Northstar Session (rock), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174. May 5 — Cash’d Out (Tribute in Black), Domino Room, Bend, www.randompresents.com. May 5 — Ozomatli (Latin fusion), Wall Street, Bend, www.c3events.com. May 5 — Brandi Carlile (folkrock), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.randompresents.com. May 8 — The Devil Makes Three (punk-folk), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 20565 Brinson Blvd., 541-382-4270

The Blacksmith Restaurant 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

OpenFate, 10 pm r/p Blacksmith After Dark, 9 pm dj

Bond Street Grill 1051 N.W. Bond St., 541-318-4833

Bo Restobar 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

Crossings Lounge 3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810

A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm The Reputations, 9 pm r/p

Domino Room 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave.

Fox’s Billiards 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-647-1363

642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar 1012 S.E. Cleveland, 541-389-5625 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

The Marilyn 415 N.E. Third St.

dj f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

Old Mill Brew Werks 384 S.W. Upper Terrace Drive

Parrilla Grill 635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600

Aries party w/ Harlo, Prajekt, 9 pm dj Jason Schweitzer, 7:30 pm r/p

Out of the Blue, 8:30 pm r/p

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

Blues jam, 8 pm sign-ups 7:30 pm

KC Flynn, 9 pm r/p Karaoke w/ Rockin’ Robin, 8 pm DJs Smoke, Basssghost, 9 pm dj Richard Taelour & True Blue, 7:30 pm r/p

Sapient and more, 9 pm h (P. 6)

The Preservation, 9 pm r/p

b

Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

portello winecafe 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777

19570 Amber Meadow Drive, 541-728-0095 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

Strictly Organic Coffee Co. 6 S.W. Bond St., 541-383-1570

The Summit Saloon & Stage 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub 913 N.E. Third Street, 541-383-1694

Timbers East 2570 N.E. Twin Knolls Drive, 541-383-3502

Velvet 805 N.W. Wall Street

THURSDAY

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

DJ Caput, 9 pm dj

Karaoke w/ DJ MC Squared, 7 pm The Envelope Peasant, 9 pm f

Out of the Blue, 8:30 pm r/p

VIBE w/ DJ Prajekt, 9 pm dj

Open mic, 7 pm

Arridium, 9 pm r/p

55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., 541-728-0756

Silver Moon Brewing Co.

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

Josh Hart Project, 7 pm b

PoetHouse Art

River Rim Coffeehouse

WEDNESDAY

r/p

Brother Jim, 6 pm f

25 S.W. Century Drive, 541-389-2558

2650 N.E. Division St., 541-550-7771

p

Metal Punk

Paleface, 7 pm a (P. 6)

Players Bar & Grill

Rivals Sports Bar & Grill

m

Emerald City, 8 pm r/p G. Love & Special Sauce, Belle Brigade, 9 pm, $20-25 r/p (P. 3)

700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

j

Hip-hop Jazz

Open mic/acoustic jam, 7 pm

McMenamins Old St. Francis Northside Pub

h

Hilst & Coffey, 6 pm f

JC’s

MadHappy Lounge

c

Blues Country

Blacksmith After Dark, 9 pm dj Bobby Lindstrom, 7 pm r/p A Fine Note Karaoke, 9 pm The Reputations, 9 pm r/p Andre Nickatina, Mumbls, Endr Won, 9 pm, $23-28 h (P. 6)

High Desert Hooligans, Shovelbelt, OpenFate, 8 pm r/p

939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

Jackson’s Corner

MONDAY

b

DSkiles Trio, 8 pm b

Grover’s Pub

845 N.W. Delaware Ave., 541-647-2198

SUNDAY

MUSIC TYPE:

Two/Thirds Trio, 6 pm j

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar Black Horse Saloon

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 6 pm The Prairie Rockets, 6:30 pm a Tone Red, 9 pm, $5 a (P. 7) Canaan Canaan, 5-7 pm f DJ Steele, 9 pm dj Arridium, 6 pm r/p Jones Road, 9 pm r/p Jared Delaney, 7:30 pm r/p

Gregory Alan Isakov, 9 pm, $10-12 f (P. 6) Laurel Brauns, 7 pm r/p Hold ‘em tour, 1 pm and 6 pm

Hold ‘em tour, 1 pm; Bounty, 6 pm

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 4 pm

Open mic/jam with Arridium, 8 pm

Ladies night w/ Sarah Spice, 10 pm dj

Hold ‘em, Bounty 6 pm

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 6 pm

Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 6 pm

Boxcar Stringband, 9 pm, $5 b (P. 7) Open mic, 6-8 pm DJ Steele, 9 pm dj

Exit Strategy, 9 pm r/p Open mic, 4 pm

REDMOND Avery’s Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Bellavia, 6 pm j Lindy Gravelle, 5:30 pm c

Brassie’s Bar Eagle Crest Resort, 541-548-4220

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 3 pm

Live poker, 12 pm; Bunco, 6 pm, $10

The Out of Hand Band, 9 pm r/p

The Out of Hand Band, 9 pm r/p

SISTERS Hardtails Bar & Grill 175 Larch St.

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 12 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 3 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 3 pm


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

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PAGE 9

music releases The Strokes ANGLES RCA Records The Strokes’ fourth album, “Angles,” could have been a return to breakthrough “Is This It” form. It could have been the longawaited next step in their evolution, following the ambitious, underappreciated “First Impressions of Earth.” Unfortunately, it’s neither. Instead, “Angles” is an exercise in band dynamics, an example of how compromise doesn’t always work and why true rock-band democracies are few and far between. That becomes all the more maddening after such a promising start. The dueling guitar styles of Albert Hammond Jr. and Nick Va-

lensi on “Machu Picchu” — part Afro-pop, part British invasion — successfully suggest the more ambitious route. The shuffling minimalist rock groove and Julian Casablancas’ enticing ache in “Under Cover of Darkness,” the first single, plops us right back in 2001, when The Strokes led a bumper crop of “the” bands and a new fascination with the Lower East Side. And “Two Kinds of Happiness” offers something else entirely, moving from loping new wave a la The Cars’ “Tonight She Comes” to a frenzied guitar battle. It starts to unravel from there, though. Soon, we get only fragments of good ideas, flashes of brilliance surrounded by the halfheartedness that comes from try-

Raekwon

ing to keep everyone happy. “Angles” shows how hard it is to keep five talented, opinionated guys moving in the same direction, but it also shows how great The Strokes can be when they do. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

SHAOLIN VS. WU-TANG EMI Records As evidenced by 2009’s decadein-the-making “Only Built 4 Cuban Linx … Pt. II,” the new Raekwon is the old Raekwon. We’re not complaining. Striking while the iron is hot, the Wu-Tang torch bearer returns with “Shaolin vs. Wu-Tang,” his second album in less than two years and fifth solo effort overall. While not as hypnotic as Cuban or as urgent as Ghostface’s recent “Apollo Kids,” “Shaolin vs. Wu-Tang” creates a world unto itself, one in which cinematic drug dealers watch kung fu flicks and move to the sound of Ennio Mor-

June

Gucci Mane THE RETURN OF MR. ZONE 6 Warner Bros. Records Gucci Mane’s toughest follow-up may not be the sequel to his last full-length “The Appeal: Georgia’s Most Wanted,” but what to do after getting a giant ice cream cone tattooed across his face. His off-the-mike antics have become so inscrutable that even the notoriously loopy rapper had some folks worried (and his protege Wacka Flocks Flame took some of his interim thunder). So it comes as a great reassurance that his new for-

Josh Kelley GEORGIA CLAY MCA Nashville Josh Kelley has made his name as a soft-rock troubadour, the kind of guy whose songs turn up on the adult pop songs chart, and on VH1. “Georgia Clay,” his first album for MCA Nashville, represents a lane shift into mainstream country, along with a savvy bit of brand renewal: the title track, released last year, scored Kelley a Top 20 country single on the strength of some teenage nostalgia, some breezy twang and a chorus about as blithely pop-oriented as anything from Kelley’s previous career. As it happens, he wrote the song with his brother, Charles Kelley of Lady Antebellum — an unstoppable tide of countrified soft-rock, and one of last year’s

mal mix tape “The Return of Mr. Zone 6” finds him in his best setting — spinning daffy yarns atop spooky trunk-ready minimalism.

best-selling acts in any genre. Which raises a related point: the tone of present-day Nashville couldn’t be more hospitable, really, to the gifts of someone like Kelley. He sings with an easy, un-self-conscious twang, and his songs, often written with collaborators, address the issues you’d expect: family, courtship and selfdoubt, with a faint flicker of vice. In one sense Mr. Kelley invites a mention of Brad Paisley, another clean-cut figure whose best work radiates chivalry rather than debauchery. In a very different sense he calls to mind Keith Urban, another singer to have won Nashville over from the outside, with a very public private life. Not that either comparison does him any favors. For the record, Kelley is married to the actress Katherine Heigl, with whom he has an adopted

For a rapper with such a singular voice, Gucci’s success often hinges on the quality of his beats. “The Appeal” sometimes got lost in overly lush slow jams, but “Zone 6” is a fine sweet spot: “Reckless” is essentially a fussy snare trill; the minimal “I Don’t Love Her” features just a horror show organ and church chime. His notoriously screwball wordplay takes a back seat to a more sedate menace, but Gucci’s inimitable rasp is where it should be — as prominent as, well, a frozen snack tattoo on your cheekbone. — August Brown, Los Angeles Times

30 Friday

ricone. Drum snaps become swollen with horns and strings, and a two-minute track (“Crane Style,” “The Scroll”) can make every second count. — Michael Pollock, The Philadelphia Inquirer

Event calendar

Find out what’s going on in Central Oregon at www.bendbulletin.com/events. Easily searchable by date, city or keyword.

The Bulletin

Sandi Landolt Welcomes Tavia Enoch as her new business partner!

Custom picture framing and design, retail art sales, corporate and commercial art and framing, Art on the Move Rotation program, delivery and install.

We accept ALL framing coupons from other businesses! “We Make Walls Talk and People Talk About Our Walls” daughter. He brings some of those details into his songs: “Naleigh Moon” is a touching ballad for his daughter, while “Baby Blue Eyes” less charmingly concerns his wife. Perhaps it’s his access to celebrity that has him approaching his new task with such humility, hat in hand. — Nate Chinen, The New York Times

1645 NE Lytle #2 • 541.382.6293 • www.artonthegobend.com


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

cover story

Spring into spring ! NorthWest Crossing welcomes the season with annual street festival By David Jasper The Bulletin

T

he Bend Spring Festival returns starting today for a weekend of art, music, food, fashion, beer, wine and maybe

even spring-like weather, should Mother Nature smile upon Bend this weekend. The annual, free event kicks off at 4 p.m. today in NorthWest Crossing and continues through Sunday (see “If you go”). Continued next page

If you go What: Bend Spring Festival When: 4 to 10 p.m. today; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday; 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday Where: NorthWest Crossing at Mt. Washington and N.W. Crossing drives Cost: Free Contact: www.nwxevents.com or valerie@brooksresources.com


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PAGE 11

cover story

Bend Spring Festival

schedule Bend Spring Festival

SATURDAY

Noon — Five Pint Mary (good-time Irish music) 1:30 p.m. — Hilst & Coffey (acoustic Americana) 3 p.m. — Blackstrap (bluegrass)

Outdoor Comedy Stage Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Ann DiSalvo, a professional chalk artist, works on adding texture to a flower petal while working on “Iris With the Sisters” chalk drawing at the 2010 Bend Spring Festival. From previous page The Cascade Community School of Music Art & Wine Bop will feature live music from 6 to 9 tonight. Musicians and faculty from the nonprofit music school will perform during the event, which includes art by festival artists and fine wine samples. During the bop, performers will include Trio Brazil at Tate & Tate Catering, Irene Goodnight at Sage Cafe, Becky Smith at Sara Bella, Aisea Taimani at portello winecafe, Bare Roots at Umpqua Bank and Cooper Brothers at BendFilm. Also during the bop, licensed care providers will hold a “Drop and Bop” club, free child care and arts and crafts activities to the first 80 kids who get dropped off at 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive. The rest of the festival offers an array of live entertainment including music, comedy and kid’s performers (see schedules). New for this year is the Gypsy Den, an assembly of tents erected between La Rosa Authentic Mexican Restaurant and Umpqua Bank. A press release says the Gypsy Den, offering belly dancing, fortune-telling, exotic teas and plum cocktails, is “a virtual labyrinth of mystique, mischief and Middle-Eastern culture.”

No street festival would be complete without art vendors hawking their works, and Bend Spring Festival will feature more than 25 artists selected by a panel of professional artists, gallery owners and art educators. The Spring into Fun Children’s Area will offer stilt walking, art and crafts workshops, face painting, giant puppets, a rock climbing wall and more. Last year’s Street Chalk Art Competition drew more than 100 participants, and this year’s contest Saturday will feature four exhibition artists from across the state, each of whom has been a featured chalk artist at the Art on the Rogue chalk art festival. The chalk is free, as is the space in which to draw. Categories are Adult (18 and older), Student (8-17); School Spirit Competition (middle- and high-school teams of four) and Chalk Box (kids 7 and younger). You can sign up for the competition at the festival, but organizers at C3 Events recommend reserving a space by e-mailing sarah@c3events.com. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

SATURDAY 2 p.m. — Jim Mortenson (emcee and winner of 2010 Bend’s Last Comic Standing) 3 p.m. — Rev. Jacob Woodmansee 4 p.m. — Randall Knight 5 p.m. — Triage (comedy improv)

SUNDAY Noon — Jim Mortenson

NORTHWEST CROSSING, BEND

Restrooms Bike Family fun area rodeo Beer area Kid’s stage Food Main Artist booths booths stage Information Northwest Crossing Dr.

La Rosa

Streets closed from 11 tonight to 2 a.m. Monday

Comedy stage

Umpqua Bank

Deschutes Brewery Gypsy Den

Artist booths Chalk art competition

John Fremont St.

SUNDAY

Ordway Ave. Mt. Washington Dr.

11 a.m. — A mericanistan (tribal sounds) 1 p.m. — Shireen Amini (soul acoustic) 2:30 p.m. — Diana Gameros and Makru (indie-world-Latin-folk) 4:30 p.m. — Brothers of Baladi (Middle Eastern fusion) 6:30 p.m. — Larry and His Flask (acoustic punk) 8:30 p.m. — Mosley Wotta (hiphop/spoken word groove)

Fort Clatsop St.

Main Stage

Fort Clatsop St. Greg Cross / The Bulletin

1 p.m. — Rev. Jacob Woodmansee 2 p.m. — Randall Knight

3:30 p.m. — Cascade School of Music, School of Rock and Children’s Chorus

SUNDAY

Kid’s Stage SATURDAY 11 a.m. — Westside Village Drummers with Shireen Amini 12:30 p.m. — Terpsichorean ballet and hip-hop 2 p.m. — Rasha belly dance workshop and performance

11 a.m. — Terpsichorean ballet and hip-hop 12:30 p.m. — Rasha belly dance workshop and performance 2 p.m. — Cascade School of Music, School of Rock and Children’s Chorus 3:30 p.m. — Gotta Dance with Michelle Mejaski

Easter Brunch Buffet Sunday, April 24, 10am - 3pm Traditional and Northwest Offerings Dainty and Hearty Adults $30 Kids 6 -12 $10 Kids under 6 eat Free Unofficial Egg Hunt Make your reservation by April 22 and receive a special Easter Basket for your table Reservations Recommended 541-382-5581

967 n w b r o o k s s t r e e t , b e n d o r • w w w. p i n e t a v e r n . c o m


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

fine arts

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Photographer Clyde Keller stands beside a group of his pictures hanging in his show at Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe in Bend. The photo to the left of Keller includes Ken Kesey and Bill Murray.

His point of view Local photographer’s prints show a different side of famous people By David Jasper T he B ullet in

I

n the 1960s and 1970s, Bend photographer Clyde Keller, 63, had a Forrest Gump-like knack for being in the right place at the right time, as evidenced in “Another Country,” a show of his prints on display now at Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe in Bend (see “If you go”). Unlike the silver screen’s Gump, Keller possesses a sharp intellect, has a knack for remembering the exact dates, times and locations his photos were taken, and can wax deep and technical on all

kinds of topics, from rare cameras and digital photo formats to obscure authors and the latest research on the differing gray matter of liberals and conservatives. Several times during an interview Monday at Dudley’s, Keller politely cut himself off, concerned he was “boring” the listener. The 19 prints on display in his show, mostly black-and-white, offer a fascinating look at several 20th-century personalities who continue to loom large in the national psyche. Among them: assassinated pres-

idential contender Robert F. Kennedy, “Naked Lunch” author William S. Burroughs, Eugene-based author Ken Kesey, and actor Bill Murray in 1976, before he joined the cast of “Saturday Night Live.” Keller’s also included important women from history, including Shirley Chisholm, the first female presidential candidate, and politically active professor Frances Fox Piven, whose name may be familiar to some who watch Fox News. “Glenn Beck was after Frances Fox Piven for the last two years,” explained Keller. “(She’s) been de-

monized by him as trying to quoteunquote ‘crash the system.’ She’s a mainstream Democrat, and here she is working with Hubert Humphrey in 1977 to get something that was called the HumphreyHawkins bill passed.” The photo of a pre-fame Murray working as a sound man with Kesey and a KVAL TV news crew was taken June 9, 1976, at Kesey’s farm during the Ken Kesey Poetic Hoo-Haw Arts Festival, according to Keller’s website, www.clyde keller.com. Continued next page

If you go What: “Another Country,” works by Clyde Keller When: Through April 30 Where: Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend Cost: Free; prints range from $100-$300 Contact: http://dudleys bookshopcafe .blogspot.com or 541749-2010


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PAGE 13

fine arts From previous page The mic Murray wields was not some ironic prop: He was really there working as a sound man with the TV crew, according to Keller. “I actually egged these guys on,” Keller said of the laughing faces in the photo. “Back then, the whole idea of a ‘media event’ was a new concept … this is actually a satiric comment on the media event, where I egged these guys on and we created the media event — (the) meaning (is) lost in time because that’s what everybody does (now).” Keller was born in 1947 in Portland, where he was raised. He studied art at Portland State University, and also studied with W. Eugene Smith, the World War II photojournalist many credit with originating the photo essay. At the age of 20, Keller scored the opportunity to be the official campaign photographer for the Robert F. Kennedy campaign in Oregon. He spent a month and a half with the campaign. “It was only for specific gigs, so we would go to the coast, or go some place like Eugene, or go to a mock convention at Sunset High School.” At that time, “I had a motorized Nikon that was one of only 300 ever made in the world,” he said. “It was the first modern motor Nikon. Instead of having to wear a battery pack, it was a self-contained unit designed by Marty Vocher in New York. I’m probably boring you. “So I was their guy. I’d submitted some pictures to Washington, D.C., some pictures of him I’d taken in Portland.” His tone becomes somber when he talks about Kennedy. Asked what he was like, Keller replies, “Serious.” “There was an air of tragedy from his brother’s death that you could just feel. There was a commitment to social issues and to ending the war in Vietnam that were pressing,” Keller said. “He would just pleadingly change from moment to moment as he thought of different things. I think that made for some amazing portrait opportunities … I can now (connect) photographs to issues, and they make sense.” In 1968, Keller was on assignment for Kennedy in Portland when actor Warren Beatty showed up. “The next day, outside the Benson Hotel, I nabbed him for a portrait and got him to do all these crazy things,” Keller said. A few years ago, after he posted on his website one shot of Beatty wearing sunglasses, Keller heard from the art department at Simon & Schuster; the portrait is now being used as the cover im-

At the age of 20, while still a student at Portland State University, Clyde Keller served as Robert F. Kennedy’s official Oregon campaign photographer. Here, Kennedy walks along the shore with his dog, Freckles. Andy Tullis The Bulletin

age of Peter Biskind’s biography “Star: The Life & Wild Times of Warren Beatty.” Keller is the third Clyde Keller to display artistic talents. His grandfather, Clyde Leon Keller, wrote hit songs in the 1890s before becoming a well-known pioneer impressionist painter, Keller said. His own father, also Clyde Keller, was a fly-fisherman and watercolorist who lived in Bend. In fact, the youngest Keller moved to Bend in 2003 to care for his father after he was diagnosed with cancer. He’s kept up photography for 40 years. In the 1980s and 1990s he made his living through freelance photography, video production and work on documentaries. He met his wife, Sonja Reiter, also a photographer, in 1987 while he was working for the Seattle Post-Intelligencer newspaper. The two lived together there for a few years before moving to Portland. They lived there until 2003. The couple is childless, and Keller says he’s the last of the line of artistic Clyde Kellers. “I was running around way too much to settle down,” he said. The other side of his family is more technical and into electronics, hence his interest in the details of film and digital photography, as well as printers and Photoshop. “Another Country” includes several giclée prints, including one of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. “I think it’s important for people to be able to see Assange in the context of the fight against

corruption,” Keller said. “My photographs, historically, have always dealt with themes and pictures that tell a story.” Keller emphasized that he’s not retired: “I’m selling on the Internet,” he said. What you see in his show, you can purchase — along with a lot more of his work — from his website, which gets about 250,000 visitors a year. Prints range from $100 to $300. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.

2nd Street to host benefit for local actor Bend actor Craig Richards, who has appeared in such productions as “The Full Monty,” “The Taffetas,” and “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” is battling throat cancer. On Saturday at 8 p.m., 2nd Street Theater will host a benefit for Richards, with performances by the bands Dahl and Roach and Five Pint Mary. According to a press release for the event, “Craig was diagnosed with stage-four throat cancer months ago and has been battling the disease with strength and courage. Please help by attending the event, buying raffle tickets or by making a donation.” Raffle items include haircuts, spa visits, an iPod Shuffle, a Deschutes Brewery gift card and two tickets to 2nd Street Theater’s production of The Who’s “Tommy” in January, among other things. To buy raffle tickets in advance, call 541-280-5263. The suggested donation at the door is $10. 2nd Street Theater is located at 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., in Bend. Contact: 541-312-9626.

Sunriver Music fest sets concert lineup Members can buy tickets now for the Sunriver Music Festival’s summer season. The festival has announced musical guests and featured soloists led by Maestro Lawrence Leighton Smith. The season will start Aug. 7

May 14th, 7:30pm Tickets $26/$22

541-317-0700 www.towertheatre.org

Tower Theatre 835 NW Wall St., Bend, OR 97701

with a dinner and auction in the Great Hall, followed by a pops concert, two classical concerts at the Tower Theatre in Bend and three concerts in the historic Great Hall through Aug. 17. Thomas Lauderdale of Pink Martini and the Sunriver Music Festival Orchestra will present pops classics at the Bend High School auditorium Aug. 9. Soprano Courtney Huffman and mezzo-soprano Sarah Mattox will present “Night at the Opera” on Aug. 12 at the Tower Theatre in Bend; the same program was a sell-out in 2008, according to a press release announcing the festival and ticket sales. Pianist Haochen Zhang will perform a solo recital on Aug. 15, and with the Sunriver Music Festival Orchestra on Aug. 17 during an all-Mozart concert. Tickets range from $10 for youth tickets to $60 for box seats and are on sale now to festival members. Public sales begin June 1. Contact: www.sunrivermusic .org, tickets@sunrivermusic.org or 541-593-9310.

More fun stuff to do in Redmond, Sisters Here are a few other things going on this weekend: • My Own Two Hands Art Stroll, 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. tonight at participating shops and galleries in Sisters. Contact: www.sisters folkfestival.org. • Walk the Art Beat Youth Show, a showcase of art by local youth, from 5 to 8 p.m. tonight at participating businesses in downtown Redmond. Contact: 541-923-2411. —David Jasper


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring gallery artists; demonstration of scratch board techniques by Sean Ferraro, followed by a reception, at 5 p.m. Saturday; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541-6337488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTISTS’ GALLERY SUNRIVER: Featuring works by gallery artists; through April; 57100 Beaver Drive, Building 19, Sunriver; 541-593 4382. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring “Image After Image,” works by members of Atelier 6000; through April; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Mindscape,” works by the Cascade Camera Club; through April 29; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-3308759 or www.atelier6000.com. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “The Painterly Tradition”; through May 1; also featuring the Blue Ribbon Art Tour; through today; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-

“On the John Day,” by Jean Schwa l b e, will be on display through May 14 at Sunriver Lodge Betty Gray Gallery.

Submitted photo

1299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. DUDLEY’S BOOKSHOP CAFE: Featuring “Another Country,” photographs by Clyde Keller; through April; 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-749-2010. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” fiber art by Wendy Hill, Lisa and Lori Lubbesmeyer, and Linda Spring with Alice Van Leunen; through April; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring brush painting by Jeb Barton; through April 29; Pinckney Center for the Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-

NO

W Over 100 Local OPEN!! Vendors Art Crafts Jewelry & More!

Fine Handcrafts & Natural + Organic Goods from the Pacific Northwest

8683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF BEND: Featuring “High Beams,” works by Paul Alan Bennett; through May 3; also featuring ”Wahoo!,” works by Kim Murton; through June 15; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964. HOME FEDERAL BANK: Featuring “Travels with Carol,” works by Carol Jacquet; through May, reception from 2-4 p.m. today; 821 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-548-9977. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING & GALLERY Open Daily 10-5 740 NE 3rd St. OPEN EVERY DAY!

1900 NE Division St, Suite 111 541-633-7986 Tues-Sat • 10-4 www.indiansummerhome.com

Where our quality and customer service is number one. 834 NW Brooks Street Behind the Tower Theatre

541-382-5884

Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring photography by Clayton Musgrove; through April 22; also featuring the Blue Ribbon Art Tour; Saturday through April; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090. LESTER NEWELL’S PERSPECTIVES FINE ART GALLERY: Featuring works by Debra Fisher and Katie O’Neil; through April; 130 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www. perspectivesfineartgallery. com or 541-306-3752. LODGE AT BLACK BUTTE RANCH: Featuring works by Natasha Bacca; through April; 12930 Hawks Beard, Black Butte Ranch; 541-595-1510. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “A Deeper Clarity,” with works by Edwin Koch; through April; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www.mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. QUILTWORKS: Featuring quilts inspired by the novel “Kapitoil”; through April, reception from 5-7 p.m. Thursday; 926 N.E. Greenwood Ave., Suite B, Bend; 541-728-0527. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “Splash, Snap and Sparkle,” works by Dorothy Eberhardt and Jacqueline Newbold; through April; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring high school art; through today;

and featuring “A Bird’s Eye View,” works by Vivian Olsen; exhibit opens Tuesday, through May; also featuring the Blue Ribbon Art Tour; Saturday through April; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064. RIVER BEND FINE ART: Featuring “Painting in the Open,” works by Mitch Baird; through May 5; 844 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0553 or www.riverbendfineartgallery.com. ROTUNDA GALLERY: Featuring “Beneath the Surface,” works by members of ALT; through May 6; Robert L. Barber Library, Central Oregon Community College; 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7564. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring a retrospective of works by Norb Volny; through April 29; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring “Views of Central Oregon and Beyond,” photographs by Paul Carew; through April; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE: Featuring fiber art by Rosalyn Kliot; 291 E. Main Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0251. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SOTHEBY’S INTERNATIONAL REALTY: Featuring works by the High Desert Art League; through April; 821 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-318-8803. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring wood carvings by Ray Dodge, and drawings and paintings by Mike Beeson; through April 29; also featuring the Blue Ribbon Art Tour; through today; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring paintings by Jean Schwalbe and Ann Bullwinkel; through May 14; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TBD LOFT: Featuring “Community Portrait: We Need,” an evolving exhibit by various artists; through December; 856 N.W. Bond St., Suite 2, Bend; 541-388-7558. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www.wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring photography by Caitlin Ducsik; through April; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TOWNSHEND’S BEND TEAHOUSE: Featuring works by Kaycee Anseth; through April; 835 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-312-2001 or www.townshendstea.com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Animal Dreams,” works by more than 20 artists; through May 3; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, APRIL 15, 2011

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Hole-in-the-Ground

Henline Mountain

A

worthwhile

one-

hour

from

drive

Bend, the geographic fea-

Bend Sunriver

20

ture known as Hole-inthe-Ground formed about 15,000 years ago when

97

DESCHUTES COUNTY DESCHUTES N ATION A L FOREST

La Pine

rising magma encountered groundwater on the way to the surface. Today, there’s an easy hiking trail into the center of the

CROOK COUNTY

18

Hole-inthe-Ground K L A M AT H COUNT Y

Fort Rock State Park 31

LAKE COUNTY

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

one-mile-across crater. — Bulletin staff

Markian Hawryluk / The Bulletin ile photo

The route up Henline Mountain winds thr