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Positive attitude during treatment? Maybe not

Shooting for the younger crowd ‘Deshoots’ seeks to get kids interested in sporting clays • SPORTS, D1

HEALTH, F1

WEATHER TODAY

THURSDAY

Mostly cloudy High 51, Low 29 Page C6

• April 14, 2011 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

OBAMA’S DEFICIT PLAN Transcript of remarks at www.bendbulletin.com/speech

Trillions off debt, tempered with taxing the rich

COCC approves 8.5% tuition hike Third straight increase in as many years By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

The Central Oregon Community College board of directors on Wednesday voted unanimously to implement an 8.5 percent tuition hike for

the 2011-12 school year to deal with a continued state funding decrease. Tuition will increase by $6, to $76 per credit for in-district students. Outof-district and border-state students will see a $5 per-credit increase, to

$101 per credit. Out-of-state students will face a $9 per-credit increase to $204 per credit. It’s the third tuition increase in the past three school years. Between 2006 and 2009, the college did not raise tuition. In fall 2009, tuition rose $3 per credit for in-district students and in

Prominent Sunriver man slain in Calif.

Promoting parkway safety

By Mark Landler and Michael D. Shear New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama made the case Wednesday for slowing the rapid growth of the national debt while retaining core Democratic values, proposing a mix of long-term spending cuts, tax increases and changes to social welfare programs as his opening position in a partisan budget battle over the nation’s fiscal challenges. After spending months on the sidelines as Republicans laid out their plans, Obama jumped in to present an alternative and a philosophical rebuttal to the conservative approach that will reach the “If we truly House floor Friday. Republican believe in a leaders were working Wednesday progressive to round up votes for that measure vision of our and one to finance the governsociety, we ment for the rest of the fiscal year. have the Obama said his proposal would obligation to cut federal budget deficits by a cuprove that we mulative $4 trillion over 12 years, can afford our compared with a deficit reduction commitments.” of $4.4 trillion over 10 years in the — President Republican plan. But the president Barack Obama said he would use starkly different means, rejecting the fundamental changes to Medicare and Medicaid proposed by Republicans and relying in part on tax increases on affluent Americans. The president framed his proposal as a balanced alternative to the Republican plan, setting the stage for a debate that will consume Washington in coming weeks, as the administration faces off with Congress over raising the national debt ceiling, and into next year, as the president runs for re-election. See Deficit / A5

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A prominent Sunriver resident was stabbed to death at his second home in Borrego Springs, Calif., Wednesday morning, launching a six-hour search for his assailant that ended with police shooting and killing the suspect. Paramedics and deputies from the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department were dispatched to the home of George George Men- Mendenhall denhall, 72, at around 7 a.m. First responders performed first aid, but Mendenhall died shortly after their arrival. George Mendenhall and his wife, Kate, have had a home in Sunriver for about 30 years, are longtime sponsors of the Sunriver Music Festival, and helped form the now-defunct Sunriver Preparatory School in the early 1980s. See Stabbing / A5

More on the budget fight • Graphic: Comparing competing plans, Page A2 • Details emerge on last week’s budget deal: Cuts are spread across all agencies, Page A2 • How might Republicans vote on the deal today? Outcome may preview the fight ahead, Page A5

By Stephen Ohlemacher The Associated Press

For all the complaining this time of year, most Americans actually think the taxes they pay are fair. Not that they’re cheering. Fewer people expect refunds this year than in previous years, a new survey indicates. But as Monday’s filing deadline approaches, the poll shows that 54 percent believe their tax bills are either somewhat fair or very fair, compared with 46 percent who say they are unfair. Should taxes be raised to eat into huge federal deficits? Among the public, 62 percent say they favor cutting government services to sop up the red ink. Just 29 percent say raise taxes. Jim Martel is not one of those people. The Weymouth, Mass., electrician said his tax bill is already unfair, but he would be willing to pay more if he thought the money would be spent wisely; he’s not optimistic. “That’s what bothers me,” he said. See Taxes / A4

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on Wednesday to show motorists where to stop for the crosswalk at Badger Road, and work with contractors from Tomco Electric Inc., below, to install a signpost

designed to alert drivers to the upcoming crosswalk.

sign

— Bulletin staff report

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97

The Washington Post

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Push buttons on both sides and at median Stop activate here flashing sign beacons

Ladder-style crosswalk

Bike-pedestrian crossing sign

d. BUS 97

Bend Parkway

Powers Rd.

Stop here sign

Bike-pedestrian signs with rapid flashing beacons

Source: Oregon Department of Transportation

CIA losing intel war to private sector By Julie Tate

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Lights on the signpost will flash rapidly when activated by a pedestrian at the crosswalk. ODOT is putting the same system in at Reed Lane, where a bicyclist was killed when a driver hit Bikepedestrian him and his daughter signs with at the crosswalk in rapid October. The agency flashing beacons also is painting more visible, ladder-style Stop crosswalks. here

way

Are taxes fair? These answers may surprise

regon Department of Transportation employees paint a bar on the Bend Parkway

Bend P ark

SNAPSHOT OF TAXPAYERS

fall 2010 it rose again, from $66 per credit to $70 per credit. “When the budget discussion started, our legislators were sort of saying, ‘You should think about a 10 percent tuition increase because you’re not going to get it from us,’” COCC President Jim Middleton said. See COCC / A4

Photos by Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin Map by Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

In the decade since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, private intelligence firms and security consultants have peeled away veterans from the top reaches of the CIA, hiring scores of longtime officers in large part to gain access to the burgeoning world of intelligence contracting. More than 90 of the agency’s upper-level managers have left for the private sector in the past 10 years, according to data compiled by The Washington Post. In addition to three directors, the CIA has lost four of its deputy directors for operations, three directors of its counterterrorism center and all five of the division chiefs who were in place the day of the Sept. 11 attacks and responsible for monitoring terrorism and instability across the world. See CIA / A5

97

MON-SAT

We use recycled newsprint

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An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 108, No. 104, 42 pages, 7 sections

TOP NEWS INSIDE

INDEX

The Bulletin Abby

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TV listings

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EGYPT: Protesters realize a victory as Hosni Mubarak is detained, Page A3


A2 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

The Bulletin

F / The budget debate

How to reach us STOP, START OR MISS YOUR PAPER?

THE PLAN UNVEILED WEDNESDAY $6 trillion

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Judging Obama’s plan against Ryan’s President Barack Obama has outlined sharp differences with House Republicans over how to tackle the rising national debt. On Wednesday, Obama responded to a Republican blueprint proposed recently by House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan that would cut spending by $6 trillion compared with Obama’s 2012 budget, proposed in February, largely by reductions to Medicare and Medicaid. On Wednesday, Obama insisted on the need for a combination of cuts to defense spending, a reduction in Medicare and Medicaid costs and increases in taxes on the rich. An examination of Ryan’s plan and Obama’s 2012 budget proposals:

REVENUE

Obama 5

5

Obama 4

Obama 2012 budget plan

Ryan

4

Ryan 3

3 0

2

DEFICIT Ryan

–$995 –$1,163 2012

1

Obama

In billions

2

–$391

1

–$1,158 2021

0 2012

KEY

SPENDING

$6 trillion

2012

2021

2021

Ryan plan

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SOCIAL SECURITY

INCOME SECURITY

DEFENSE

MEDICARE

HEALTH

$1.4 trillion 1.2 $1.3 trillion 1.0

$871

0.8

$724 billion

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$707

$785 $742 $741

$532 billion

$567

$495 billion

$809 $362 billion

0.4

$501

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$401 $347

0.2

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

4 23 39 49 50 39 Power Play: 3. The estimated jackpot is $27 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

5 10 12 13 39 46 Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $11 million for Saturday’s drawing.

EDUCATION

0 2012

2021

With spending projected to soar as the population ages and baby boomers retire, neither Obama nor Ryan is proposing any changes to the program. In public remarks, Obama has played down the need for reform. Ryan, in contrast, has praised proposals to raise the retirement age and curtail benefits for well-off retirees, while proposing legislation that would force an overhaul as soon as next year.

2012

2021

Obama and Ryan take the same approach to defense spending, seeking savings recommended by the Pentagon but otherwise allowing spending to continue to rise gradually over the next decade. Ryan would also fully fund Obama's request for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

2012

2021

Income security includes things such as food stamps, unemployment insurance and housing assistance. Ryan would cut funding for this category. His plan would overhaul the way the government gives out food stamps, limiting the amount of money each state can receive and making the aid contingent on work or job training.

2012

2021

Obama has proposed no significant changes to the program since signing a health care initiative last year that would sharply restrain spending. Ryan proposes to radically overhaul the program beginning in 2022, replacing traditional Medicare benefits with government support to purchase private insurance.

2012

$117 billion

2021

Ryan proposes a repeal of Obama’s far-reaching initiative to extend coverage to the uninsured, reining in spending on Medicaid and on subsidies, and tax breaks for middle- and lower-income people to buy insurance.

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$100

$81

2012

2021

Obama’s budget seeks a modest boost in education funding for teacher training, research and early-childhood education. Ryan’s plan cuts spending, but restores funding for a voucher program in Washington, D.C., public schools.

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AVERTING THE SHUTDOWN: FRIDAY’S AGREEMENT

Details of deal: Cuts spread the pain The Washington Post The $38 billion in spending cuts that President Barack Obama and congressional leaders agreed to last week are spread over a multitude of domestic programs across virtually the entire federal government. The budget compromise reached Friday that averted a government shutdown includes the biggest spending reductions since World War II. If passed, the bipartisan budget would fund the government through the rest of fiscal 2011, which ends Sept. 30. The scope and reach of the spending cuts became clear Tuesday, when the House Appropriations Committee introduced a 459-page bill that puts the framework of the deal into legislative language. The House is expected to vote on the measure today, with the Senate likely to take it up before lawmakers in both chambers depart Friday for a two-week recess. Although some conservative and liberal lawmakers have objected to the compromise, House and Senate leaders expect the bill to pass. • Veterans Affairs: $400 million could be cut. The Department of Veterans Affairs would lose about $400 million in funding, linked mostly to information-technology contracts and construction projects. But the vast majority of the department’s budget is on a multi-year cycle and would not be affected by this year’s cuts. • Transportation: Department would lose $400 million. The budget measure contains no funding for high-speed rail in 2011 and would rescind $400 million from the $2.4 billion available in 2010 funding. Last week, 24 states, the District of Columbia and Amtrak submitted 98 applications with funding requests totaling more than $10 billion. • Interior: Endangered-species program would lose $25 million. • Agriculture: Funding to help farmers and ranchers develop conservation plans would be cut by more than $300 million. Rehabilitation programs for fragile watershed areas would be reduced by $165 million, and wetlandsprotection programs would lose $176 million.

• Environmental Protection Agency: EPA would lose $1.35 billion. The measure would cut about 15 percent of the Environmental Protection Agency’s budget, greatly diminishing a program that provides money to states to reduce water pollution. • Securities and Exchange Commission: Agency would receive $74 million more. The Securities and Exchange Commission would receive a 7 percent increase under the budget bill. The measure would give the agency $1.19 billion — $74 million more than 2010 levels. • Housing and Urban Development: Community development would lose $942 million. The budget legislation would cut $942 million from the Community Development Fund, which includes block grants designed to help rehabilitate housing and invest in primarily low-income neighborhoods. • Homeland Security: $784 million would be cut. The Department of Homeland Security would escape major cuts, with discretionary funding down 2 percent from the 2010 budget, or $784 million. Officials stressed that all frontline operations — including U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Coast Guard, the Secret Service, and the Transportation Security Administration — would sustain staffing levels. The bill would reduce FEMA first-responder grants by $786 million, eliminate $264 million that was targeted for earmarks and rescind $557 million in balances from prior-year funding. • Labor: $870 million less for jobs programs, workers. The Labor Department would lose $870 million for the rest of the fiscal year from job training and creation programs, community college curriculums for dislocated workers, and a fund that aims to prepare workers for green jobs. • Science and Technology: Science Foundation would lose $53 million. The National Science Foundation would take a $53 million cut from its $6.9 billion budget, meaning it would fund 134 fewer grants to outside researchers than it did in fiscal 2010, said

an agency spokeswoman, a loss of support for 1,500 researchers and support personal. • Energy: $170 million would go toward credit subsidy. Despite widespread anxiety among developers of alternative-energy projects, the budget deal would not make cuts in an Energy Department program that provides loan guarantees to renewable energy, electric power transmission systems and biofuels projects that begin construction by Sept. 30. • State: $8 billion in cuts include Economic Support Fund. The State Department would take an $8 billion hit, much of it in cuts to foreign aid. Other programs facing major reductions include the Peace Corps and those that encourage educational exchanges and reduce the threat from weapons of mass destruction. • Justice: $1 billion in cuts would not have major impact. • Health and Human Services: $17 million less for family-planning aid. The bill would reduce by $17 million, or 5 percent, funding for family-planning services provided by organizations such as Planned Parenthood. But many cuts would affect programs that Obama had already proposed scaling back or ending. Similarly, although the legislation would eliminate $600 million in discretionary funding for community health centers, the effect would be lessened by the $1 billion in mandatory funding automatically directed to such centers through the health care law adopted last year. That increase in spending would push the budget up by $14.9 billion, to $573 billion. The deal would slash $2.2 billion, or one-third, of a $6 billion program in the health care law that subsidizes loans to civic and community groups that form not-for-profit insurance cooperatives. The bill also would cut $3.5 billion set aside to reward states that make an extra effort to enroll eligible low-income children in the Children’s Health Insurance Program. • Education: $1.3 billion less than last year. The budget bill would make modest cuts to several Education Department initia-

tives, leaving overall funding $1.3 billion lower than last year, according to a summary released by a Senate committee. The measure would preserve the Pell Grant program, the largest source of need-based grants to college students, with the maximum grant remaining at $5,550. The measure would provide $700 million for Race to the Top, the administration’s signature initiative to spur

reform in K-12 education. Obama had requested $1.3 billion. • Defense: Pentagon would receive $5 billion more. The Defense Department would be allocated $513 billion, a $5 billion increase from 2010 levels, making the Pentagon one of the few agencies to receive a boost in the budget bill. The legislation also would put an additional $157.8 billion toward overseas contingency operations.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 A3

T S Allies agree on aid for rebels Mubarak, EGYPT

Bulletin wire reports

DOHA, Qatar — NATO, Arab and African ministers agreed Wednesday “to work urgently” with the Libyan rebels to set up a mechanism by which some frozen assets belonging to Moammar Gadhafi might be transferred to the rebel cause. The agreement came at the first meeting between representatives of the NATO-led coalition, regional leaders and the rebels in a closed-door conference here that was billed as the

beginning of a continuing dialogue. The meeting came at a time of growing frictions among the allied countries and with the rebels themselves over how much military force to apply on the Gadhafi regime. But those divisions were set aside — for the moment, at least. “This is the money of the Libyans, not of Colonel Gadhafi,” said the Italian foreign minister, Franco Frattini, who added that the assistance would be aimed “at humanitarian and daily needs.”

Rebel leaders in Benghazi received the news as an indication that the international community was prepared to sell them weapons in their struggle to overthrow Gadhafi.

U.S. airstrikes continue Meanwhile, in Washington, Pentagon officials disclosed Wednesday that U.S. warplanes had continued to strike targets in Libya even after the Obama administration said the

United States was stepping back and letting NATO take the lead. Although U.S. officials had said that no aircraft would fly offensive strike missions, unless officially approved in Washington, 11 warplanes have flown 97 sorties designed to electronically jam or otherwise suppress Libyan air defenses since April 4, when command of the mission was handed over to NATO and the United States publicly said it was stepping back to a supporting role.

TRAGEDY AMID IMMIGRATION TENSIONS IN EUROPE

N 

 B Bloomberg, Clinton unite climate groups New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and former President Bill Clinton, two of the most influential spokesmen for environmental sustainability, will merge their global climate groups under a plan announced Wednesday. The new organization will combine C40, a coalition of international cities run by Bloomberg, and the Clinton Climate Initiative, a project of Clinton’s philanthropic foundation, doubling the groups’ annual budgets and staff. At a time when domestic legislation and international treaties to address global warming have stalled, the merger represents a major bet on the future of populous cities like New York, Seoul and Tokyo as laboratories for experimentation and action.

Gitmo recidivism rate drops, diplomat says U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded that three of the 68 Guantanamo detainees released since Barack Obama became president have engaged in terrorism or insurgency, a senior administration told Congress Wednesday. U.S. Ambassador Dan Fried, the diplomat who arranged many of the releases, revealed the figure during questioning at a House Armed Services Committee hearing. The rate of so-called returnto-battlefield detainees is far less than what the Defense Intelligence Agency determined it was during the Bush administration. In a report released in December, the DIA reported that 79 of 532 detainees released during the Bush administration had engaged in terrorism or insurgency.

Bay of Pigs veterans honored, 50 years on Fifty years ago, a group of Cuban exiles who eagerly volunteered for a clandestine mission to topple Fidel Castro were left largely abandoned in Cuba when U.S. support for the mission evaporated. The Bay of Pigs would go down as one of the United States’ biggest strategic blunders: More than 100 men were killed, and Castro stayed. But the survivors of Brigade 2506 have never lost their resolve. On Wednesday, eight of the estimated 1,100 surviving members basked in a congressional salute: a resolution put into the Senate record and remarks from the floor of the House.

War crime arrests for 2 in Northwest SEATTLE — Two naturalized U.S. citizens, living in Washington state and Oregon, were arrested Wednesday over allegations of war crimes in Bosnia and Herzegovina. That country requested the arrest of Edin Dzeko, 39, of Everett, Wash., and Rasema Handanovic, 39, of Beaverton, according to the U.S. Attorney’s offices in Portland and Seattle. Both are accused of being members of a Bosnian Army unit that attacked a village where 16 civilians were killed. They would have been 18 at the time of the 1993 attack. Extradition hearings will come at a later time — From wire reports

Italian Coast Guard via The Associated Press

Two women drowned while attempting to reach Italy from North Africa on Wednesday after their boat, with 250 aboard, ran aground off the Italian island of Pantelleria. Italy’s coast guard said the boat was likely carrying sub-Saharan Africans. Tensions have risen recently between Italy and its European Union partners over how to handle an influx of African immigrants. Italy had been calling on its fellow EU members to help share the burden of receiving the more than 22,000 immigrants who have arrived in the country since January, the majority of them “economic migrants” from Tunisia seeking work in France and elsewhere in Europe.

JAPAN

Spent fuel rods add to trouble at nuke plant By Mari Yamaguchi and Shino Yuasa The Associated Press

TOKYO — The operator of Japan’s tsunami-flooded nuclear power complex was seeking ways earlier today to pull damaged spent fuel rods out of a storage pool for one of the plant’s reactors, citing surging radiation and elevated temperatures as worrisome signs. The troubling signals at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex come as frustrations grow with Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s handling of the crisis, which has progressed fitfully since a March 11 tsunami swamped the plant, knocking out crucial cooling systems. Restoring them will take months. Frequent aftershocks from the magnitude 9.0 earthquake that triggered the monstrous waves are unwelcome reminders of the disaster and are impeding work on the cooling systems.

Updating the toll Authorities say Japan’s earthquake and tsunami killed 13,439 people and left 14,867 missing. The number of missing has risen in recent days as local police in some devastated communities belatedly reported to higher authorities.

The government earlier this week revised its rating of the severity of the crisis to level 7, the worst possible on an international scale. The only other level 7 was the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, though that explosion released 10 times the radioactivity that has come from Fukushima Dai-ichi so far. TEPCO officials said Wednesday they were discussing ways to eventually remove spent fuel rods from storage pools as the plant is closed down for good.

CDC: Half of adults take vitamins, supplements By Mike Stobbe The Associated Press

About half of U.S. adults take vitamins and other dietary supplements — a level that’s been holding steady for much of the past decade, new government figures show. But the data also show a booming number of older women are taking calcium. Federal officials released figures Wednesday showing that the use of dietary supplements has grown since the early 1990s when it was about 42 percent. The data shows use leveled off in 2003 through 2008, with about half of adults 20 and older taking at least one dietary supplement. The biggest change was for calcium. Two-thirds of women 60 and older take it, up from 28 percent in the early 1990s. Experts

note the ranks of the elderly have been growing, and include many women who have been encouraged for years to take calcium to help protect against osteoporosis. The information comes from national, in-home surveys in 19881994 and 2003-2008. The surveys in the past decade included more than 2,000 people each year. Interviewers not only asked participants what supplements they took, but also asked to see the bottles to verify their answers. Use of multivitamins — the most popular supplement — crept up to nearly 40 percent. Most people who take vitamins and other supplements are educated, have good incomes, eat pretty well and already get the nutrients they need from their diets, the surveys suggests.

detained, may face charges By Lee Keath and Sarah el Deeb The Associated Press

CAIRO — Ousted President Hosni Mubarak and his two sons were detained Wednesday for investigation of corruption, abuse of power and killings of protesters, bringing cheers of victory from activists who hoped it marked a Hosni Mubaturning point in Egypt’s turbulent rak’s house transition to democracy. arrest is a The 82-year-old Mubarak was watershed under detention in a hospital, a moment for step prosecutors depicted as a Egypt’s protest precaution to monitor his health movement. while under questioning. His sons Gamal, once seen as Mubarak’s successor, and Alaa, a wealthy businessman, were jailed in Cairo’s Torah prison, where a string of former top regime figures — including Mubarak’s prime minister, ruling party chief and chief of staff — are already languishing, facing similar investigations. The detention of the man who ruled Egypt unquestioned for 29 years set a new landmark in the already unprecedented wave of upheaval shaking the Middle East. It was arguably the first time an authoritarian leader in the Arab world has been brought to justice by his own people, given that Saddam Hussein was toppled by U.S. troops, who handed him over for trial and execution by Iraq’s new Shiite rulers. Corruption had been rife under Mubarak’s regime. In a country where 40 percent of the population lives on $2 a day or less, many resented the business tycoon-politicians elevated to power by Gamal Mubarak and accused of looting the nation’s coffers to enrich themselves. The detention was a significant victory for Egypt’s protest movement, which has been in an increasingly tense tug-of-war with the country’s new military rulers over the shape of the post-Mubarak future. Protesters have been pushing hard for the apparently reluctant military to prosecute Mubarak.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Suicide bomber strikes Afghan elders

MOM DRIVES VAN INTO HUDSON, KILLING SELF, 3 KIDS

by Sangar Rahimi and Alissa J. Rubin New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — A suicide bomber on foot detonated himself Wednesday as tribal elders left a meeting in a remote mountain village in eastern Afghanistan, killing one of the most senior local figures and 11 other people including five schoolboys. The meeting, which was being held to resolve local disputes in Jaja village in Asmar District of Kunar province, included some of the most powerful local leaders, including Haji Malik Zareen, a commander who was killed in the attack and was renowned for fighting the Russians when they occupied Afghanistan, said Gen. Khalilullah Zaiyee, provincial police chief. The police were investigating the attack and said they did not know who was responsible. The Education Ministry in a statement said that among those killed were five boys under 15 and that two of the five were brothers.

Taliban claims no responsibility In a rare disavowal, a spokesman for the Taliban denied that anyone linked to them had played a role in the attack. In a number of recent suicide attacks, even ones involving civilian deaths, the Taliban have offered explanations about why they carried out the assault. “After our investigation and assessments, we found that Mujahedeen of Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan is not involved in the attack on Commander Haji Malik Zareen and his fellow tribesmen,” said Zabiullah Mujahid, the Taliban’s spokesman for the north and east of the country. “We are not claiming the responsibility for the attack. The area where the attack occurred has leafy green valleys amid towering boulder-strewn mountains crisscrossed by footpaths and lumber trails that lead across the nearby border with Pakistan. While Taliban and even foreign fighters, particularly Pakistanis, are known to travel through the area, much of the activity is criminal and involves fighting between local clans over timber, gem smuggling and land.

The Associated Press

Cynthia Beadle, of Newburgh, N.Y., leaves a stuffed teddy bear in the water where, on Tuesday night, a woman upset with the father of her children packed her four youngsters into her minivan and drove into the frigid Hudson River, killing everyone except her 10-year-old son, who managed to roll down a window of the sinking vehicle and swim to shore. The dead youngsters ranged in age from 11 months to 5 years. A relative had called police Tuesday night to report a dispute at the home of Lashanda Armstrong, 25. Shortly afterward, she drove off a boat ramp several blocks away from her apartment in this struggling city 60 miles north of New York City.

Belarus: Subway bombing solved New York Times News Service MINSK, Belarus — The president of Belarus, Aleksandr Lukashenko, announced Wednesday that the security services had already caught the perpetrators of a subway bombing that killed 12 people and wounded scores here Monday, saying that three suspects had quickly confessed to the crime. “At 5 this morning, the crime

was solved,” Lukashenko said in televised remarks. “The police and security services needed one day to conduct a brilliant operation and detain the perpetrators without any noise, shots or fuss.” He said one suspect was a lathe operator and another was an electrician, without explaining why they would want to bomb a crowded subway platform at rush hour.

Lukashenko said the suspects had also confessed to bombings carried out in 2005 and 2008, cases that have never been solved. Monday’s bombing occurred during the evening rush hour in a subway station in the center of Minsk, the Belarus capital, close to presidential and other government offices. More than 150 people were injured, many seriously.

COCC Continued from A1 “We’re still proud that it’s the lowest in the state, that we’re able to provide the best bang for the buck for our local students,” Middleton said. “But we held it flat for three years and in the current conditions we can’t deliver quality at the same price.” According to Chief Financial Officer Kevin Kimball, COCC’s combined tuition and fees for indistrict students will remain the lowest among Oregon’s community colleges, at $3,618 annually for a student taking a full load of courses. In contrast, the 2011-12 statewide average for tuition and fees is expected to be about $4,076. Other community colleges will also raise tuition and fees in the 2011-12 school year. Several, like Linn-Benton Community College, raised tuition mid-year by as much as $15 per credit. Tuition and fees made up nearly 50 percent of COCC’s revenues this year. By increasing tuition and the technology fee, the college expects to collect an additional $1.5 million, which will be used for staff and services, as well as to help pay for the new Madras and Prineville centers, opening in the fall. COCC will also increase a technology fee, first implemented in 2002. The fee, currently $2 per credit up to 10 credits, will increase in the 2011-12 school year to $3 per credit up to 15 credits each term. This is the technology fee’s first increase in 10 years. The fee is used to support growing technology used in most courses. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

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Taxes Continued from A1 “If I thought people in office had the right thing in mind and they were doing the right thing with the money … I wouldn’t have a problem with it,” Martel said. “But they don’t.” Taxes are sure to be a major issue as Congress takes up budget legislation for next year and the 2012 presidential campaign gets under way in earnest. On Wednesday, President Barack Obama revived his proposal to raise taxes on the wealthiest Americans to help reduce government borrowing. In the Associated Press-GfK poll, Democrats were more likely than Republicans to think their tax bills were fair. Liberals and moderates were more likely to think so than conservatives. Women more likely than men. Most whites thought their tax bills were fair; most non-whites didn’t. The young and the old — adults under 30 and seniors 65 and above — were much more likely to say their taxes were fair than those in their prime earning years. Surprisingly, there was little difference in the perception of fairness across income levels. But just because people say they pay a fair amount doesn’t mean that they think others do. Sandra Jennings, a retired teacher in South Bend, Ind., said her federal taxes are fair, but she thinks rich people get off too easily. Rich people, she said in an interview, “get all these loopholes. The middle class does not have loopholes.” Mari Lemelson of Edison, N.J., said, “I have a big problem with the millionaires, at least what I understand to be the millionaires’ tax breaks.”

Tax revenue Monday is the filing deadline for federal tax returns — three days later than usual because a local holiday is being observed in the nation’s capital Friday, April 15, the traditional deadline. Federal tax receipts are projected to hit their lowest level in 60 years when measured as

a share of the overall economy. Tax receipts dipped during the recession and have stayed low in part because Congress has extended Bush-era tax cuts at every income level, leaving federal rates unchanged for much of the past decade. Residents in many states, however, have faced higher taxes because — unlike the federal government — states, school districts and municipalities must balance their budgets each year.

Refunds Many people who don’t expect refunds could be in for a pleasant surprise. Through March 25, about 87 percent of the individual returns processed by the Internal Revenue Service qualified for refunds. That’s about the same rate through the same period as last year. Ultimately, about 85 percent of individual returns qualified for refunds last year, totaling about $360 billion. The refunds averaged $3,000, about the same amount as so far this year. Economists say tax refunds typically provide a boost to the economy each spring. This year, however, more people say they plan to save, invest or use their refunds to pay down debts. Only 27 percent of the people surveyed said they plan to simply spend their tax refund, down from 38 percent in 2009. Fortyfive percent said they would save or invest their refunds. “A lot of people got caught with too much debt going into this recession and may well take this as an opportunity to reduce their debt level rather than go out and rent that summer house,” said David Wyss, chief economist at Standard & Poor’s in New York. “When they’re scared, they are more likely to save it than if they are happy and feel like the good times will continue forever.” The poll was conducted March 24-28 by GfK Roper Public Affairs and Corporate Communications. It involved landline and cellphone interviews with 1,001 adults nationwide and had a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 4.2 percentage points.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Budget votes may be a bellwether for fiscal fight ahead By Philip Rucker and Paul Kane The Washington Post

House Republican leaders maneuvered Wednesday to round up support in the party for two major spending bills. Both are expected to pass the House, but it’s the size and makeup of the coalitions behind the bills that will help shape Washington’s fiscal debate over the next several months. The first of the two votes is to come today, on whether to affirm the hard-fought budget deal reached last week that averted a government shutdown. The six-month spending bill appears headed for passage with support on both sides of the political aisle. If that happens, it would indicate a bipartisan bloc of lawmakers who might be willing to compromise again later on acrimonious spending issues. The second vote will come Friday over the GOP’s 2012 budget blueprint, crafted by Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., which would lower the nation’s long-term deficit by reining in spending and fundamentally overhauling Medicare and Medicaid. That roll call will be partisan; no Democrat is expected to vote for the Ryan plan. For the more vulnerable freshmen Republicans, the vote could become a defining marker that Democrats hope to

Deficit Continued from A1 Obama named Vice President Joe Biden to lead the negotiations with Congress, which the administration hopes will produce the outlines of a deal by the end of June, although a detailed agreement might have to await the outcome of the 2012 election. Biden played a similar role in talks that averted a government shutdown at the 11th hour, over issues far less thorny than those on the table now.

Obama’s partisan tone In a 44-minute speech to an audience at George Washington University that included Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, the author of the Republican plan, Obama was often combative and partisan, saying the Republican approach would hurt the elderly by driving up the cost of medical care, deprive millions of health insurance and starve the nation of investments in its future. “These are the kind of cuts that tells us we can’t afford the America that I believe in,” he said. “I believe it paints a vision of our future that’s deeply pessimistic. “There’s nothing serious about a plan that claims to reduce the deficit by spending a trillion dollars on tax cuts for millionaires and billionaires,” the president continued, as Ryan sat stonefaced. “There’s nothing courageous about asking for sacrifice from those who can least afford it and don’t have any clout on Capitol Hill.” Yet Obama acknowledged that the rising medical costs and the mounting debt required action. And he warned Democrats that his administration would have to cut cherished programs and strictly limit the growth of Medicare and Medicaid. “If we truly believe in a progressive vision of our society,” he said, “we have the obligation to prove that we can afford our commitments.”

Getting to $4 trillion Obama said he would meet his $4 trillion deficit-reduction target by cutting spending across a range of government programs, from farm subsidies to federal pension insurance. He called for cutting $400 billion more in military spending — twice what his defense secretary, Robert Gates, told Congress was the largest cut he could recommend. In a sign of the tensions the plan may cause within the administration, officials at the Pentagon said Gates was not told of Obama’s proposal until Tuesday. In a statement, a Pentagon spokesman, Geoff Morrell, said that “further significant defense cuts” would reduce the military’s capability. “It is important that any reduction in funding be shaped by strategy and policy choices, and not be a budget math exercise,” Morrell said.

use in reelection campaigns next year. Lawmakers were still digesting the 459-page short-term spending bill Wednesday (details of which appear on Page A2) as GOP leaders labored to win over as many rank-and-file Republicans as possible, to demonstrate unity over the agreement made Friday by House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. The deal, which results in $38 billion in spending cuts over the five months remaining in fiscal 2011, has drawn high-profile detractors in the GOP. Today’s vote will be closely watched as an indicator of fissures between Boehner’s leadership team and the party’s tea party adherents, who had pushed aggressively for deeper spending cuts. Any revolt among the 87 GOP freshmen could be interpreted as a prelude to the coming clash over the debt ceiling, when Congress will have to decide whether to increase the amount of money that the federal government can borrow. Some in the House see the chamber’s March 15 vote approving a stopgap funding bill as a benchmark for today’s vote. In that roll call, 186 Republicans and 85 Democrats voted for the legislation; 54 Republicans rejected the measure.

Republicans criticized the plan, both for the cuts in military spending and for what they said was an overall lack of detail. “Republicans, led by Chairman Ryan, have set the bar with a jobs budget that puts us on a path to paying down the debt and preserves Medicare and Medicaid for the future,” Speaker John Boehner said in a statement. “This afternoon, I didn’t hear a plan to match it from the president.” Boehner repeated a threat to refuse to raise the $14.3 trillion ceiling on the national debt, which the government is likely to breach in early July, unless the administration agrees to rein in spending and deficits. The administration has sought to keep the debt ceiling issue separate from the broader budget debate, and Obama addressed it only indirectly Wednesday. “If our creditors start worrying that we may be unable to pay back our debts,” Obama said, “that could drive up interest rates for everyone.” Still, in what some analysts said was a gesture to Republicans, Obama said his plan would contain a trigger to require across-the-board spending cuts if, by 2014, the federal debt was still projected to be rising as a percentage of the total economy. The trigger would apply not only to spending but also to what the administration calls “tax expenditures” — essentially payments to taxpayers for deductions for charitable donations or home mortgages. The use of the phrase “tax expenditures” allows the administration to lump tax-related issues into the spending category. Obama was more direct in his call for allowing the Bush-era tax cuts for higher-income Americans to expire in 2012. The president agreed to extend the cuts in December.

Medicare, Medicaid and the fight to come While Obama’s plan does not detail specific cuts, analysts said it offered enough detail to set off a substantive debate with Republicans. Some said the proposal for capping the annual cost increase in Medicare and Medicaid to just above the economic growth rate was surprisingly conservative. Others said they were pleased that Obama had called for overhauling Social Security, even if he was vague and said it was not a leading culprit for the deficit. “It looks like Ryan smoked him out, so to speak,” said Rudolph Penner, a senior fellow at the Urban Institute. Penner said Obama’s plan hewed closely to the recommendations of his commission on deficit reduction. Obama did not explicitly endorse those recommendations when the commission submitted its report in December — a decision that fueled criticism from Republicans and some Democrats that he was not facing up to the tough choices in the budget debate.

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 A5

CIA Continued from A1 In many quarters in Washington, government officials decamp for the private sector as a matter of course. Defense consultancies routinely hire generals retiring from the Pentagon; the city’s lobbying firms are stacked with former members of Congress and administration officials. But the wave of departures from the CIA has marked an end to a decades-old culture of discretion and restraint in which retired officers, by and large, stayed out of the intelligence business. It has also raised questions about the impact of the losses incurred by the agency. Veteran officers leave with a wealth of institutional knowledge, extensive personal contacts and an understanding of world affairs afforded only to those working at the nation’s preeminent repository of intelligence. Among the CIA’s losses to the private sector have been top subject matter experts including Stephen Kappes, who served as the agency’s top spy in Moscow and who helped negotiate Libya’s disarmament in 2003; Henry Crumpton, who was one of the CIA’s first officers in Afghanistan after the Sept. 11 attacks; and Cofer Black, the director of the agency’s counterterrorism center on Sept. 11. The exodus into the private sector has been driven by an explosion in intelligence contracting. As part of its Top Secret America investigation, The Washington Post estimated that out of 854,000 people with top-secret clearances, 265,000 are contractors. Thirty percent of the workforce in the intelligence agencies is made up of contractors. Those contractors do everything from assessing security risks to analyzing intelligence to providing “risk mitigation” services in foreign countries. “Since 9/11, the demographics of the agency have been out of whack. A number of people left the agency earlier than you would think, and you had a large influx of younger people,” said Robert Grenier, a 27-year agency veteran who is now chairman of ERG Partners, a boutique investment bank specializing in the intelligence industry. “The average experience of an officer now is much lower than it has been traditionally, and that has its effects on the agency.” For private firms seeking to tap into the lucrative industry of intelligence contracting, the value of having agency officers on the payroll is hard to overstate. And although the agency pays its top managers large sums — the most senior officers make nearly $180,000 annually — private firms are generally able to pay more. This report is based on interviews with more than a dozen current and former CIA of-

Stabbing Continued from A1 In California, investigators identified 52-year-old Craig Petersen as their suspect and broadcast information about Petersen and his vehicle to law enforcement agencies in the surrounding area. Shortly before 1 p.m., deputies located the suspect’s pickup truck parked at a rest stop about 50 miles south of Borrego Springs. Petersen, in the bed of the truck, grabbed an object that appeared to be a firearm as a sergeant approached, and was shot and killed by the sergeant. Jodie Bischof, who along with her husband, Bruce, is a longtime friend of the Mendenhalls, said Petersen has done handyman work at the Mendenhall home in Borrego Springs for several years. Wednesday morning, Petersen arrived at the home and asked to see George

The mysterious “Kryptos” sculpture in the courtyard of CIA headquarters in Washington. From 1990 through 1996, Congress had slashed the intelligence community’s budget every year, and from 1996 through 2000, it effectively left the budget flat. New York Times News Service

“Honestly, it’s painful to see, and it’s not in the national interest. ... The agency would be well served to implement stronger incentives to encourage people to stay.” — A former CIA official ficials. The Post compiled its list of more than 90 upper-level managers by identifying agency personnel who left for the private sector after serving as directors, deputy directors or chiefs of the CIA’s various divisions, as well as other members of the leadership of the Directorate of Operations, now known as the National Clandestine Service. CIA spokesman George Little said that “any suggestion that there isn’t world-class, senior expertise at the CIA is flat wrong.” “Retirement is a fact of professional life,” Little said, “and the CIA has created strong mechanisms to assist our officers as they explore opportunities after retirement and to retain their knowledge before they go.” The bulk of the agency’s losses to the private sector came roughly from 2002 through 2007, as business with intelligence contractors spiked. In fiscal 2010, a senior U.S. official said, attrition rates at the CIA were at an all-time low. Some of the officials quoted for this report spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivities involved in discussing the agency’s inner workings. Few of them cited problems at the agency as their reason for leaving. Rather, they said, the choice was often financially driven.

Intelligence demand Years of intelligence reforms found the CIA unprepared for the events that followed the Sept. 11 attacks. From 1990 through 1996, Congress had slashed the intelligence community’s budget every year, and from 1996 through 2000, it effectively left the budget flat.

Mendenhall, Bischof said. Kate Mendenhall sent Petersen to the garage where her husband was, Bischof said, then went to the garage herself about 10 minutes later to find George Mendenhall wounded. George Mendenhall was still conscious when deputies and paramedics arrived, Bischof said, and was able to identify Petersen as the man who had stabbed him. Neighbor George Nase said it’s difficult for him to imagine George Mendenhall getting into an altercation with anyone. He said the Mendenhalls were friendly, well-respected people and good neighbors, whom he would often see out walking their dog in the neighborhood. “They’re a very fine family, and he’s a very mild person.” Nase said. “This is really a shocker, a real, real shocker.” Pam Beezley, executive director of the Sunriver Music Festival, said she talked to George

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Suddenly, with a demand for better intelligence, the agency needed more bodies. It needed people to deploy to Afghanistan. It needed top-level linguists. It needed interrogators. Insiders and outsiders quickly concluded that the CIA needed contractors. Richard “Hollis” Helms, a longtime overseas officer and former head of the agency’s European division, founded Abraxas Corp. in the days after the attacks. Helms identified the areas in which the agency needed the most help and began aggressively recruiting current and former intelligence professionals. Those professionals included mid-level analysts from the Directorate of Intelligence. But they also included top brass such as Rod Smith, a former chief of the agency’s Special Activities Division, and Fred Turco, one of the original architects of the CIA’s counterterrorism center and the former chief of external operations. Meredith Woodruff, one of the agency’s most senior female operatives, signed on to Abraxas in 2006. “Hollis is brilliant; he realized there was a huge market out there to exploit. He printed money for a while — hired tons of CIA staffers and doubled their salary. He was the first agency guy to figure it all out,” said one former chief of station, the term for the top CIA officer at a U.S. Embassy. “You would see people leave the CIA on a Friday and come back on Monday in the same job but working for Abraxas.” Barry McManus, an agency veteran, was among those who saw the promise of Abraxas. McManus had worked for the CIA his entire career, with the exception of a few years on the D.C. police force. He started out as a bodyguard for CIA Director William Casey, then climbed through the ranks, eventually doing work in more than 130 countries. By 1993, he had become the CIA’s chief operations polygraph examiner and interrogator, responsible for interviewing high-level terrorism suspects and others in the process of interrogation. But when he turned 50 in 2003 and found himself eligible for retirement, McManus said, he realized he wanted to do something else.

Now, as vice president of training and education at Abraxas, he spends much of his time training others in the law enforcement and intelligence world. Among his contracts is one with the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, which hired him to lead a fourday class that covers an introduction to terrorism. According to government contracting documents, in a separate four-day period in 2006, he made nearly $40,000 for leading a seminar for immigration officers in “detecting deception and eliciting responses.” A year later, he secured a $238,000 contract to perform guest lectures. Pretty soon, more contracts began rolling in. McManus said he is well-compensated for his work at Abraxas. One of his first big purchases in post-agency life: a black Maserati GranTurismo, which retails for $160,000.

Mendenhall on Friday. He had just come off the golf course and visited with Beezley for a short time after confirming his plans to continue his sponsorship for this summer’s music festival. “They’re wonderful people, very active, played a lot of golf; I know down in Borrego Springs they did a lot of hiking, members of the health club here in Sunriver, Kate plays tennis, very active,” she said. “Just a wonderful family.” Before moving to Sunriver, the Mendenhalls spent several years living in Hong Kong, Beezley said, running the family-owned produce import and export company. The couple’s children, Tina and Scott, continue to run the company today, she said. Bischof said not knowing what

might have led up to the stabbing makes George Mendenhall’s death particularly hard for family and friends. “I don’t know that we’ll ever know the motive, because the guy is dead now,” she said. “It’s just crazy. George is the nicest guy in the world.”

Slowing the brain drain At the agency, Director Leon Panetta has helped slow the hemorrhaging of talent. But this year he has seen his top three leaders leave the agency. Collectively, they represented more than 75 years of institutional knowledge and operations talent. One former official said the loss of so many insiders has taken a toll on those connected to the agency. “Honestly, it’s painful to see, and it’s not in the national interest to see so many men and women at the peak of their experience walk out of the agency at the age of 52 or 53,” the former official said. “The agency would be well served to implement stronger incentives to encourage people to stay.” Bob Wallace, a 32-year agency veteran who now runs Artemus Consulting Group in McLean, Va., suggested the departures from the agency reflect more than the draw of a big salary outside government. Rather, he said, some veterans who have risen to the management level are leaving for a much more mundane reason: bureaucracy. “People tire of meetings,” Wallace said. “Eventually, they decide they want to jump to the private sector so they can be back on the street again — doing what they love.”

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com EQUAL HOUSING LENDER


A6 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


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Personal Finance Repairing that neglected nest egg, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,761.52 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +16.73 +.61%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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12,270.99 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +7.41 +.06%

1,314.41 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +.25 +.02%

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BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.46 treasury CHANGE -1.14%

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$1454.90 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$2.00

Culver-based Earth2o will begin shipping bottled water on Friday to Japan, where radiation leaking from a tsunamidamaged nuclear power plant has caused shortages, the company said Wednesday. Earth2o expects to send 40,000 cases of bottled water a month to Japan, Steve Emery, president and CEO, said in a conference call with the head of the U.S. Small Business Administration. He expects the shipments to increase business about 15 percent and employment by about five workers. “We will be adding a full-time second shift for Japan,” he said.

Radiation leaks from the damaged nuclear power plant prompted warnings about radioactive iodine in drinking water in the weeks after the March 11 disaster, according to The Associated Press. The warnings led to a run on bottled water, which was still in short supply last week, the news agency reported. Emery credits Earth2o’s recent certification to the highest level of food-safety standards as one of the reasons it’s allowed to distribute in Japan. In March 2010 it became one of 49 plants worldwide to earn Level 3 Safe Quality Food certification from NSF International. The company also continues

to reduce its environmental impact, he said. Earth2o plans to start its own plastics company in Culver to produce nearly all its bottles out of 100-percent recycled plastic. Making the bottles in Culver will eliminate about 10 semitruck shipments a week from Olympia, Wash., Emery said, reducing pollution. The company expects to add about five employees to make bottles, he said. Previously, Earth2o eliminated cardboard in its packaging and replaced older mercury-vapor lights with T5 fluorescents, reducing energy costs about 60 percent. See Water / B6

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

JPMorgan reports big jump in profit

The firm Neal Huston & Associates Architects Inc. will move from Bend’s Mount Bachelor Village office park to an office on Powerhouse Drive in Bend’s Old Mill District. The Old Mill spot is smaller than the current spot and is a better fit for the company, which has streamlined its processes in recent years, said Neal Huston, the owner. The move is likely to be complete by the end of June, he said.

By Eric Dash New York Times News Service

Labor markets improve, Fed says

Jerry Holt / Minneapolis Star Tribune

Scott Hughes, chief operating officer of Visiam, stands outside the company’s office in Blaine, Minn. Visiam supplies processing technology for municipal solid waste management groups. The $75,000 the company received through the angel tax credit program last year helped it save three full-time jobs, hire outside consultants and bring its technology to commercialization.

Angels fear to tread Some states looking to tax credits to encourage angel investors By Wendy Lee Star Tribune (Minneapolis)

MINNEAPOLIS — hey’re risk-takers, putting thousands of their own dollars into unproven ideas for the thrill of turning startups into successful businesses. Called angel investors, these wealthy individuals are the financial saviors who step in after entrepreneurs have raised all the cash they can from friends and family.

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The problem is, there aren’t enough of them. Wealthy individuals who finance startups around the country are cutting back because the deals have gotten less attractive. Several investors said they can make the same or more money without taking nearly so much risk. The number of active U.S. angel investors declined 11 percent to 125,100 people in the first half of 2010, compared with a year earlier, according to the Uni-

versity of New Hampshire’s Center for Venture Research. Those who remain are becoming more cautious, with the lowest percentage of angel investors funding startups at the idea or concept stage in at least 15 years. “If we don’t have the acorns, we’re not going to have the trees,” said Jeffrey Sohl, director for the University of New Hampshire’s Center for Venture Research. See Investors / B5

Borrowing rises Consumers borrowed more in February, taking out loans for new cars and financing purchases on their credit cards. Outstanding consumer debt

Senate report names culprits in financial crisis

Seasonally adjusted

By Gretchen Morgenson and Louise Story

$2.50 trillion

New York Times News Service

2.45

$2.42T

2.40

2.35 FMAMJ J ASOND J F ’10 ’11 Source: Federal Reserve AP

$40.235 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.177

Earth2o’s Steve Emery stands among stacks of recycled plastic water bottles at the company’s Culver location last fall. The company expects to send 40,000 cases of bottled water a month to Japan, which is experiencing shortages due to increased radiation levels from the damaged nuclear power plant.

Architecture firm moving to Old Mill

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that the economy expanded at a “moderate” pace across much of the country in February and March, led by manufacturing, with labor markets showing improvements in most regions. “While many districts described the improvements as only moderate, most districts stated that gains were widespread across sectors,” the Fed said in its Beige Book report in Washington. While higher commodity costs compelled sellers to try to raise prices, pressures to increase wages were “weak or subdued.” The report may reinforce views this month from Chairman Ben Bernanke’s top two lieutenants, Janet Yellen and William Dudley, that the economy is recovering without enough strength to warrant withdrawing record monetary stimulus. The Fed, while keeping the benchmark interest rate close to zero since 2008, is aiming to boost growth by completing $600 billion of Treasury purchases through June. — From staff and wire reports

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Culver company expects to add about 5 employees The Bulletin

The Astro Lounge bar, located on Minnesota Avenue in downtown Bend, will move around the corner to the former Subway location on Bond Street, owner Josh Maquet said. Maquet said he will submit plans to the city of Bend for building permits to construct “an urban patio” behind the new space, which is twice as large as the current one. Maquet also envisions the addition of a small stage for concerts and a 30-foot-long bar at the new space, which will probably be open for lunch, he said. The current Astro Lounge will be vacant at the end of May, and the new site should be open for business in July, Maquet said.

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Earth2o to ship its water to Japan By Tim Doran

Astro Lounge plans move to Bond Street

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A voluminous report on the financial crisis by the U.S. Senate — citing internal documents and private communications of bank executives, regulators, credit ratings agencies and investors — describes business practices that were rife with conflicts during the mortgage mania and reckless activities that were ignored inside the banks and among their federal regulators.

The 650-page report, “Wall Street and the Financial Crisis: Anatomy of a Financial Collapse,” was released Wednesday by the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, whose co-chairmen are Carl Levin, D-Mich., and Tom Coburn, R-Okla. The result of two years’ work, the report focuses on an array of institutions with central roles in the mortgage crisis: Washington Mutual, an aggressive mortgage lender that collapsed in 2008; the Office of Thrift Su-

pervision, a regulator; the credit ratings agencies Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service; and the investment banks Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank. “The report pulls back the curtain on shoddy, risky, deceptive practices on the part of a lot of major financial institutions,” Levin said in an interview. “The overwhelming evidence is that those institutions deceived their clients and deceived the public, and they were aided and abetted by def-

erential regulators and credit ratings agencies who had conflicts of interest.” The bipartisan report includes 19 recommendations for changes to regulatory and industry practices. These include creating strong conflict-of-interest policies at the nation’s banks and requiring that banks hold higher reserves against risky mortgages. The report also asks federal regulators to examine its findings for violations of laws. See Report / B5

Even as JPMorgan Chase reported a 67 percent increase in first-quarter earnings on Wednesday, the problems in its troubled home lending unit kept piling up. Bad mortgages and home equity loans cost the bank $1 billion in the first quarter, bringing total residential real estate losses since the financial crisis began to more than $20 billion. To make matters worse, bank officials said they expected these high loss levels to persist, and acknowledged new mortgage lending had stalled. Mortgage originations fell 29 percent from the fourth quarter, as higher rates deflated the refinancing boom of 2010. Still, strong results from JPMorgan’s investment bank as well as the release of $2 billion that had been set aside earlier to cover credit card losses offset the mortgage mess and contributed to a record $5.6 billion quarterly profit. As the first of the major banks to report their first quarter results, JPMorgan is closely watched as a bellwether for both Wall Street and the broader banking industry. Analysts suggested there was an increasing divergence in performance between Wall Street activities like trading and investment banking and more traditional retail lending. Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citigroup and other big financial institutions face a similar challenge as they report earnings this month. “There just is not enough economic strength to fuel loan growth,” David Trone, a banking analyst at JMP Securities, said. “That traditional part of banking is just very stagnant.” Revenue fell 8 percent to $25.8 billion, underscoring the challenge banks face as they try to expand their underlying businesses amid a still-sluggish economy and new government rules that restrict lucrative sources of income like overdraft fees. See Morgan / B2

“There just is not enough economic strength to fuel loan growth. That traditional part of banking is just very stagnant.” — David Trone, banking analyst, JMP Securities


B2 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T ORY

Hedge fund manager charged in insider case

Morgan Continued from B1 Then there is the cleanup bill for the foreclosure crisis. On Wednesday afternoon, JPMorgan’s mortgage unit, Chase Home Lending, and 13 other servicers took a major step in putting their troubles behind them when they struck a deal with federal regulators to make sweeping changes to their loan servicing operations. Chase Home Lending plans to add 2,000 to 3,000 employees, create a separate unit to handle troubled mortgages and strengthen its internal controls. These moves forced the bank to take a one-time $1.1 billion charge in the first quarter to reflect the higher operating costs resulting from the new mortgage practices. The company also recently announced several prominent management changes at Chase Home Lending. “We are adding a lot of intensive manpower and talent to fix the problems of the past,” Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan’s chairman and chief executive, said on a conference call with reporters. The moves are aimed at addressing the problems flagged by regulators after a public uproar over foreclosure practices last fall. JPMorgan, Bank of America, GMAC, Wells Fargo and other big lenders were forced to review tens of thousands of mortgage files after revelations of paperwork mistakes and other errors. In some cases, those institutions were also forced to temporarily halt foreclosures across the country. The settlement with federal regulators still leaves open the possibility of fines and other legal actions. But it does not end separate settlement talks with state attorneys general, who have been pressing the banks to expand their mortgage modification programs and to pay at least $20 billion in penalties. Nor does Wednesday’s agreement with federal regulators ad-

By Ben Protess New York Times News Service

Jessica Ebelhar / New York Times News Service

JPMorgan Chase reported a 67 percent increase in first-quarter earnings on Wednesday, but bad mortgages and home equity loans also cost the bank $1 billion in the first quarter. dress a flurry of lawsuits from private investors seeking to recover losses on troubled loans and securities the bank sold. Although there has been little progress in the negotiations with either the attorneys general or investors, the bank has been setting aside money for any eventual deals. JPMorgan put aside an additional $650 million in the first quarter to cover these potential legal claims and other foreclosure-related costs, after increasing its litigation reserves by more than $6.7 billion in 2010. The bank also added $420 million a separate reserve to cover

expected losses stemming from the repurchase of faulty loans that it had sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, the government-controlled housing finance companies. Previously, it had set aside more than $5.6 billion for these claims. “I think a good global settlement will be good for everybody,” Dimon said. “Keeping this mess going on is not good for anybody.” The number of mortgage troubles overshadowed an otherwise solid quarter for most of the bank’s other businesses. JPMorgan’s quarterly profit of $5.6 bil-

China’s economic policy will be a main topic at G-20 meeting By Binyamin Appelbaum New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The United States and its allies, frustrated in their efforts to pressure China directly to change its economic policies, are seeking to enlist other developing nations in an international campaign that China may find more palatable. At a meeting of finance ministers from the Group of 20 nations Friday, the United States hopes to advance a set of proposed standards for judging the risks that individual nations pose to the global economy. Those standards could be used by the end of the year to put a spotlight on China for suppressing its currency to keep its exports cheap. Even if the exercise succeeds, the benefits are unlikely to be tangible or clear. The U.S. and China have wrangled for years over the relative value of their currencies. The Chinese have made modest concessions in recent years, but mostly because of internal concerns about inflation and economic dependence on exports. A senior Treasury official said that it was important for countries to establish shared standards, and in particular to highlight that large deficits and large surpluses were two sides of the same issue and merited the same concern. “This hasn’t been on the table in the past, but that’s where the conversation is moving now and that’s helpful,” said Lael Brainard, the Treasury under secretary for international affairs. The purpose of the standards is not lost on China, which has resisted the process. In February, the Chinese fought successfully

to exclude one important measure, reserves of foreign currencies, from the list of proposed standards. China holds more than $2.85 trillion in foreign currency, the world’s largest reserve. It has pursued an aggressive policy of printing renminbi to buy foreign currencies, lifting the value of those currencies and holding down the value of its own. Earlier this week, a senior Chinese official published an article blasting the standards as a “political tool” intended to make developing nations like China pay for the economic recovery of developed nations like the United States. Li Yong, vice minister of finance, wrote that developed nations were responsible for overprinting their own currencies, driving up the price of commodities and creating inflationary pressures in developing countries. Li wrote that the real goal of those countries was to increase demand for their own exports. “The issue of external imbalances is a sensitive topic related to the development rights and growth potential of China and other emerging economies, and is another political tool, after the exchange rate, used by developed nations such as the U.S. to curb China’s economic development,” Li wrote in the article, which was published on the website of the finance ministry. Still, China has shifted slowly in the direction sought by the international community in recent years. China’s policymakers adopted a five-year plan in October that calls for domestic consump-

lion, or $1.28 a share, exceeded analysts’ estimates and was a sharp increase over the $3.3 billion, or 74 cents a share, that the company earned a year earlier. Indeed, JPMorgan’s investment bank posted a $2.4 billion profit, down 4 percent from a year ago, when unusually strong trading results helped fuel a record profit. Investment banking fees were up 23 percent, as JPMorgan benefited from dozens of new deals, including AT&T’s $39 billion planned acquisition of T-Mobile USA. Fixed income trading revenue was up 33 percent from the

prior year, while revenue from its equities group fell 8 percent on lower trading volumes. The corporate bank, which provides loans to mid-size companies, reported earnings of $546 million, up 3 percent from the period a year earlier. Bank officials pointed to a marked improvement in the number of mid-size businesses seeking credit. The credit card division reported a $1.3 billion profit, up 3 percent from the period a year earlier. But much of that gain was a result of the bank’s decision to release about $2 billion it had previously set aside to cover losses.

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tion to replace exports as the driver of economic growth. The country also has allowed its currency to appreciate 4.4 percent against the dollar since last June. American officials describe this as an effective increase of 10 percent because the rate of inflation in China is much higher than in the United States. The United States has embraced an elevated role for the Group of 20 as the primary forum for international economic coordination. The Group of 7, which previously played that role, is composed of nations with economies driven by consumption, and currencies that float freely in response to demand. The new seats at the table, by contrast, are held mostly by nations like China, India and Brazil that manage their currencies to create a competitive advantage for their exports. There is broad agreement that the unbalanced relationship between those two sets of countries — debtors on the one hand, exporters on the other — is a major fault line that threatens global stability. There is much less agreement about the proper allocation of the economic pain associated with potential solutions. The goal of the current process is to break that controversial issue into manageable pieces. France, the current chairman of the group, has spent this year simply trying to create agreement on the rules for analyzing nations that can be completed by the time heads of state meet in Cannes this fall. Those rules would be used to single out nations that posed the greatest risks for further study.

Motorola Solutions settles suits with Chinese company By David Barboza New York Times News Service

SHANGHAI — Motorola Solutions and the Chinese company Huawei Technologies said Wednesday that they had agreed to settle a pair of lawsuits over intellectual property. The agreement is expected to clear the way for Motorola Solutions to complete the sale of its networking division to Nokia Siemens Networks. Analysts say that deal has been delayed partly because of the legal disputes.

Separately, in a filing Wednesday with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Motorola Solutions and Nokia Siemens said they expected to close the sale by April 29, pending approval by Chinese regulators. The companies also said the price Nokia Siemens would pay for Motorola Solutions’ networking unit had been reduced to $975 million from $1.2 billion. The companies did not explain why the price had been reduced. Motorola Solutions and Huawei issued a joint statement late

Wednesday in Beijing. Motorola Solutions said it had agreed to drop a lawsuit filed last year in an Illinois court accusing Huawei of conspiring with several Motorola workers to steal trade secrets. Motorola Solutions split off from Motorola in January. For its part, Huawei said it had agreed to drop its lawsuit trying to block Motorola Solutions from proceeding with the sale of its networking unit because the deal involved some of Huawei’s technology.

NEW YORK — Federal prosecutors have charged a hedge fund manager with insider trading, accusing him of using secret information about a clinical drug trial to place millions of dollars in trades. The portfolio manager, Joseph Skowron, a medical doctor who specialized in health care funds, is the latest person to be ensnared in the government’s vast insider trading investigation. Skowron is also accused of conspiring to hide his role in the trading scheme, which saved his hedge fund, FrontPoint Partners, more than $30 million, according to a complaint unsealed Wednesday by federal prosecutors in New York. FrontPoint, which was recently spun off from Morgan Stanley and is not accused of any wrongdoing, has agreed to return about $33 million to the government. Skowron surrendered to the FBI on Wednesday. His name first surfaced in November, when federal prosecutors accused a French doctor of illegally leaking confidential information about a drug trial to Skowron. He, in turn, gave the source envelopes stuffed with cash, prosecutors said. The source, Yves Benhamou, pleaded guilty this week to securities fraud and conspiracy to obstruct justice, according to court documents.

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P F   Gay parents jump through hoops to ensure family’s financial security By Tara Siegel Bernard New York Times News Service

Chris Richards / New York Times News Service

Faced with the prospect of caring for her 89-year-old mother, Marina Sturm, of Tucson, Ariz., a 55-year-old clarinetist, had to overhaul her retirement finances after a long period of neglect.

Repairing a neglected nest egg By Carmen Wong Ulrich New York Times News Service

From Mozart, who begged patrons to help settle his debts, to the rapper MC Hammer, who declared bankruptcy, musicians have a long history of lacking money skills. So far, Marina Sturm, a 55-year-old clarinetist, has managed to avoid Mozart’s fate. “I don’t like owing people,” she said. And while she’s far from the problems Hammer faced, she has fallen into other money traps like indifference and a lack of confidence. “I’m naive” about money, she said. Combine that with the passage of time and this single, tenured professor at the University of Las Vegas feels as if she has wasted valuable years. “In my 20s, I didn’t think about it. Thirties, maybe. In your 40s you’re more likely to, then 50s you go ‘Whoops!’” At least she’s on notice. In a recent Harris Interactive Poll, 25 percent of baby boomers said that they had no retirement savings at all and 26 percent said they had no cash savings. Sturm is in much better shape, though far from where she should be to meet her retirement goals. After talking with Kimberly Overman, a certified financial planner who is president of the Financial Well, an advisory firm in Tampa, Fla., Sturm discovered that she actually had close to $180,000 saved and invested, much more than the $80,000 she thought she had before looking at her statements.

Tough economy But to save the amount Sturm actually needs to retire at age 67, there’s additional pressure. She earns her living in two professions taking a big hit in this economy — teaching and the arts. Overman, 52 and also single, took to Sturm and her needs immediately. “Most of the issues that are going on in our world are going on in her life.” Overman said that when making a financial plan, assumptions on future income needed to be flexible to take account of the realities of the times. For Sturm, who even with tenure has already been placed on paid furlough and may be forced to take a 5 percent salary cut, “we’re in a position right now that we have to think that that assumption doesn’t really work,” Overman said. And though Sturm does not have children, she is caring for an aging parent. To be able to take in her 89-year-old mother and have other family nearby to help, Sturm recently bought a bright, adobe-style home in Tucson, with a view of the mountains. After not being a property owner for decades, Sturm now has a mortgage and — though her mother is helping with expenses — the strain of a new set of costs is wearing on her budget and her mind. “If something happens with Mom, how much of it will have to be out of our pockets, I don’t know.” With that in mind, Overman’s advice for Sturm started with getting long-term care insurance for herself. “In my opinion it’s essential. You can break a hip and

long-term care will take care of you when medical coverage does not — same with stroke.” Overman said all older people should consider such coverage, even married couples with children. “I have had women tell me, ‘My kids will take care of me.’ Only to have them call me a year and a half later saying that their kids are losing their jobs because they’re taking care of me!” But long-term care insurance can be expensive. Can Sturm, who makes less than $70,000 a year, manage that? And does it make sense? “It is expensive but not having it is also expensive,” Overman said. She estimated such coverage for Sturm would cost about $1,900 a year. “I bet you she’s paying that much in car insurance.” The youngest of three children from a musical family, Sturm has enjoyed her “nomadic” existence, but it has left her finances scattered through four separate retirement accounts. Overman’s advice: consolidate. “She does need to consolidate into a single IRA so she can diversify without having to keep track of 14 different statements which she doesn’t read anyway.”

Investment strategy Overman, who is also president of the Financial Planning Association of Florida, works with clients by initially assessing their tolerance for risk. After answering 25 questions, Sturm’s results showed that she was very conservative — more so than 80 percent of investors. Overman’s strategy to plump up Sturm’s conservative portfolio was to get her to put the maximum contribution into her 403(b) savings plan and put even more each month into a Roth IRA. “If she can bump it up to the 15 percent level and rebalance her portfolio, she has about a 70 percent chance of hitting her retirement goals.” This sunny prognosis is aided by Sturm’s pension, larger than she had thought, but still too small to live on even when combined with Social Security. As a last and vital move, Sturm needed to reduce her expenses by about 35 percent at retirement, Overman said. “If she doesn’t make these changes, her chances are zero. That’s the problem.” Sturm’s expenses needed triage. Her cash balances were too low for Overman. After putting a down payment on the home and lending cash to her sister at 2 percent interest, Sturm needed to find places to cut. After a rather painful realization, she accepted Overman’s suggestion that she create and stick to a budget. “For someone who is creative, dealing with that hunt and peck is painful,” Sturm said. In the past, she never paid attention to grocery prices, but now was learning to pass up costlier items in favor of less expensive ones. So many changes in such a short time left Sturm reeling but energized. “I don’t know how fast it can happen. But that’s the way I run my life: open the door; make the moves. And not just sit there, stunned.”

BEVERLY HILLS, Mich. — Most pregnant women avoid long road trips right before their due date. But Amanda and Kay Shelton, a lesbian couple in Beverly Hills, Mich., contemplated traveling more than 600 miles to New Jersey so Amanda could give birth in a state where their baby could have two “legal” mothers. Michigan, along with several other states, doesn’t allow same-sex couples to perform second-parent adoptions, which allow one partner to adopt the other’s biological or adopted children. They never did make the long trip, which would have allowed Kay to begin adoption proceedings immediately. “It was not terribly practical, so we were kind of in a difficult spot,” said Amanda, 34. The inability to adopt is one of many legal and financial inequalities the Sheltons face because their state and the federal government do not recognize their union, which they affirmed in a ceremony almost 11 years ago. Though Kay, 37, is known as “mama” to their children — Maya is 3, Myles, 8 months — the state government still views her as a legal stranger. So Amanda, who works as a commercial litigator for a law firm in Detroit, must sign a notarized document every six months that gives Kay, who stays home with the children, parental consent. But they have often wondered if there was more they could do to strengthen those legal ties, or to improve their financial situation. So we asked three experts in same-sex issues — a lawyer, a financial planner and an accountant — for advice.

Legal documents The Sheltons say their top priority is their children. If Amanda were unable to care for them, Kay said, “I would not want them missing from me, even for a day.” Michigan recognizes secondparent adoptions performed elsewhere, but that would require establishing residency in a state where Kay could adopt. That can take more than a year. Several documents are available to create as many rights as possible for the couple, according to Mary Kator, chief counsel at the Rainbow Law Center, a firm in Southfield, Mich. Without the documents, Kay, a former auto mechanic, is vulnerable — especially if the couple ever splits up.

Fabrizio Costantini / New York Times News Service

Amanda, right, and Kay Shelton sit with their two children, Maya, 3, and Myles, 8 months, last month in Beverly Hills, Mich. Instead of relying on the renewable parental authority document, she suggested a “power of attorney for parental authority,” which does not expire. It would allow Kay to act on the children’s behalf, whether it was for a trip to the doctor’s office or a visit with a teacher. “It has never been challenged and as a practical matter, it works,” Kator said.

Finances and taxes Since Kay isn’t earning any money, she cannot use any taxadvantaged savings vehicles for retirement — these require earned income. And Amanda can’t contribute to a spousal IRA on her behalf, since they cannot marry. Kay isn’t entitled to receive Social Security benefits on Amanda’s earnings record, either. Normally, lower-earning spouses can receive up to half of their spouse’s benefits, if those are higher than their own. Surviving spouses are also entitled to collect their husband or wife’s higher benefits instead of their own. “I know I need to be saving more for her, but I’m not,” said Amanda, who puts about $6,000 a year in her 401(k). It would be difficult, if not impossible, to divide that up should they split. Married people who divorce can divide retirement plan assets without having to pay taxes or penalties on withdrawals, but the Sheltons wouldn’t have those privileges, said James Tissot, president of Prism Planning in New York. “The biggest issue as you go forward is the disparity be-

tween the two retirement plans and coming up with something that is equitable,” he told the couple. That agreement should be included in a domestic partner agreement. If the Sheltons could file their federal returns jointly, they would save several thousand dollars in taxes. Instead, Amanda files her federal tax return as “head of household,” and claims the children and Kay as dependents. Tax rates are higher for people who file as head of house-

hold compared with couples who file jointly, so they end up paying at least $3,000 more, according to Tina Salandra, an accountant and president of Numerical LLC. But they could do something that would help Kay save for retirement: Amanda could hire Kay as a nanny and pay her $3,649 a year, which she could then put into a Roth IRA. (Kay needs to earn less than $3,650 for Amanda to continue to claim her as a dependent, Salandra said.)

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D 3.84 +.08 1.00 41.12 -.18 18.19 +.14 1.10 23.04 -.08 33.23 +.02 0.92 28.00 +.04 2.24 +.03 0.92 36.13 -.17 0.84 18.12 +.62 0.64 26.85 -.42 1.97 36.87 -.11 36.60 -.23 0.56 8.97 +.02 1.82 100.25 -.01 1.82 82.37 -.59 48.90 -.60 50.71 +.54 0.42 45.40 +.10 4.57 -.18 1.50 46.61 -.11 0.18 19.42 +.27 30.47 -.34 145.69 +4.98 0.60 68.31 +.76 0.28 36.25 +.22 2.10 -.04 37.42 -.16 1.36 61.98 +.15 0.56 12.41 -.19 0.82 20.36 -.04 0.79 12.19 -.17 0.70 11.54 +.01 0.44 15.31 -.36 0.04 13.27 -.20 2.05 25.93 -.63 7.56 -.17 2.46 -.02 1.80 47.24 -.40 1.04 2.19 +.06 2.80 64.40 +.09 0.52 29.63 -.33 2.08 60.15 +.47 0.04 2.39 +.05 51.25 +.14 28.31 +.34 72.86 +1.77 0.35 20.04 +.18 28.43 -.49 55.89 -.65 0.72 100.56 +.06 9.23 +.21 0.32 20.54 -.14 0.48 52.16 -.18 24.76 +1.07 1.24 54.14 -.18 2.40 59.18 +.70 1.89 +.12 22.02 +.16 4.51 +.06 0.10 6.39 0.76 83.00 -.02 1.64 81.87 +.50 54.52 +.46 8.24 +.10 0.96 31.84 -.06 16.60 +.05 0.28 31.84 +.12 80.76 -.92 0.30 48.68 +.13 0.60 30.25 -.14 43.54 +.30 40.30 +.22 2.39 .69 -.01 80.96 +2.77 0.05 6.01 -.07 26.47 +1.46 0.80 18.33 +.03 2.04 +.11 1.75 -.21 7.39 -.18 1.46 32.66 -.28 1.28 9.92 -.03 5.50 194.68 -.10 0.32 4.06 +.01 1.36 10.30 -.06 0.40 18.28 +.18 0.60 17.61 +.30 26.91 +.66 0.80 31.62 -.06 1.68 72.13 -.95 0.40 8.65 +.04 1.26 +.03 0.20 13.25 -.18 72.27 +.21 0.04 6.82 -.11 2.00 94.06 -.38 6.98 -.12 9.02 +.15 0.60 11.74 1.66 29.40 +.25 1.65 20.94 +.12 16.49 +.50 0.44 22.38 +.03 33.41 +1.00 10.61 +.18 1.55 +.02 0.56 23.99 +.24 1.32 27.33 -.11 0.36 38.12 +.02 0.60 22.83 42.09 -.15 1.30 5.83 +.13 9.65 -.04 26.00 -.21 0.52 31.39 -.23 1.24 23.10 +.35 0.56 18.47 -.16 0.34 10.28 -.01 12.07 -.53 0.32 26.37 +.23 0.28 12.40 -.22 1.28 69.40 -.13 19.98 +.03 0.05 24.55 +.40 3.95 61.41 +.12 0.20 25.36 +.64 0.80 43.61 -.26 0.10 91.25 -.05 0.49 38.82 -.68 3.15 -.05 0.92 71.37 -.35 0.16 24.05 +.22 27.81 +.34 0.84 17.12 +.18 0.20 24.45 +.14 28.67 +2.74 0.40 134.09 +.27 1.16 74.37 +.13 0.04 44.25 -.40 39.60 -.52 4.49 +.05 1.00 34.27 -.03 5.60 304.63 +2.96 0.84 18.96 +.03 7.45 -.17 5.91 255.11 +4.18 0.26 13.74 +.59 1.04 76.11 +.74 0.12 10.09 +.44 0.34 9.18 -.21 22.33 +1.24 17.36 +.30 0.50 35.62 -.49 25.19 +.04 0.50 33.72 +.17 0.72 44.80 +.22 48.51 -.51 0.12 51.88 +.94 60.20 +.14 8.57 -.15 9.83 +.18 7.31 +.06 1.14 13.28 +.02 0.60 8.68 -.05 0.63 9.60 16.24 -.56 0.04 6.61 -.13 7.00 +.18 6.66 -.04 16.08 +.04 1.87 +.50 1.96 57.15 +.26 0.40 28.14 -.10 53.57 +.72 1.16 33.69 -.04 0.64 10.66 -.14 1.30 72.96 -.77 0.36 45.27 -.80 1.08 62.69 +.18 10.40 +.12 .51 43.18 +.59 49.05 +.28 0.20 51.53 -.09 21.42 -.21 3.46 -.23 0.04 6.90 -.13 0.30 11.14 -.09 1.52 12.76 +.01 1.82 +.02 0.80 127.74 +.20 1.92 +.09 0.78 41.08 -.11 4.39 -.17 28.34 +.93 22.36 -.64 32.30 +.43 1.00 37.63 -.80 0.72 40.78 +.09 35.55 +.19 29.63 +.39 0.54 39.10 +.11 55.83 -.14 1.76 107.63 +1.06 0.04 16.86 -.22 43.10 +.91 11.99 +.62 0.36 5.77 -.08 .70 +.04 0.20 44.60 +.43 8.08 +.02 10.70 +.06 55.93 +.58 .38 -.01 3.77 31.56 +.36 4.13 +.05 0.43 8.71 +.09 1.19 19.80 +.07 0.80 37.77 +.20 32.29 +.27 0.79 17.32 +.09 1.56 15.39 -.11 10.35 -.08 21.32 +.01 0.01 22.38 +.17 15.10 -3.97 18.23 -.11 2.90 40.22 +.39 75.85 -.49

Nm Cepheid Cerner ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAuto lf ChinaBAK ChinaCEd ChiCeram ChinaEd ChiGengM ChinGerui ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChiMarFd ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaUni ChiValve ChXDPlas Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp Citigp wtB CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy CleanH Clearwire h ClevBioL h CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStInfra Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColonyFncl ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompPrdS CompCrd h CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConsolCm ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts CorOnDm n Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp Crane Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold Cryptologic Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurtisWrt Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE DUSA DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DicksSptg DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrSCBr rs DSOXBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll DirEMBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk

D 28.75 -.28 111.39 +2.48 41.46 +.23 4.37 +.07 49.72 -.13 51.98 +.60 28.75 +.09 16.91 +.05 7.80 +.31 0.30 32.40 +.47 2.88 103.81 -.37 0.05 39.73 +.25 0.20 14.97 +.17 52.88 +.13 0.66 3.89 9.96 +.26 1.66 -.04 5.44 -.02 4.40 +.02 1.27 +.10 3.16 +.11 4.93 -.27 2.39 -.18 1.92 -.06 0.91 57.31 +.21 3.63 -.16 9.84 -.08 1.93 47.04 +.45 5.72 -.02 9.56 -.54 3.25 -.58 1.56 4.02 -.60 6.24 +.21 3.69 -.09 0.23 18.82 +.23 3.92 -.07 4.26 -.10 281.31 +7.01 14.79 -.30 1.56 61.87 +.14 31.00 -.02 1.36 80.02 +.14 6.75 +.23 26.54 +1.14 0.40 107.31 -.67 2.64 -.04 1.60 32.28 -.19 0.84 19.83 +.10 0.49 29.86 -.05 18.00 +.12 0.24 17.25 -.19 4.50 -.05 .18 -.01 .88 +.02 74.81 +1.16 0.80 57.35 -.67 2.33 +.01 16.56 +.58 98.14 -1.74 5.95 -.01 7.94 +.06 0.56 95.27 +1.91 30.95 +.10 2.20 69.42 -.72 21.09 -.22 0.60 53.97 +1.89 14.52 +.34 1.88 67.28 +.38 0.48 27.84 +.22 33.76 -.85 0.40 5.88 +.13 13.46 -.67 0.32 28.51 +.26 80.25 +.33 7.85 -.01 1.44 17.75 -.05 49.12 +.52 2.53 -.04 2.32 81.61 -.93 21.33 -.07 0.60 18.82 -.10 1.28 18.41 -.02 3.51 +.06 0.45 24.20 -.11 0.45 22.81 -.10 0.40 38.39 -.05 0.92 40.49 -.32 0.48 16.20 -.22 16.98 +.13 2.00 26.15 -.03 32.83 +1.35 38.74 +.80 0.41 41.83 +.02 28.14 -.13 4.84 -.10 0.80 48.91 +.19 11.19 +.23 28.86 +.33 1.00 28.59 -.23 0.40 37.45 -.38 0.92 23.60 -.02 98.90 +.05 55.07 +.08 2.39 +.01 2.64 77.66 +.50 0.40 50.45 +1.56 1.55 18.11 -.13 2.40 50.10 +.13 21.62 +.02 0.96 33.03 +.11 66.63 +.90 14.03 +.02 .23 +.01 0.06 72.62 +.12 1.16 66.59 +.43 0.42 24.81 +.07 44.58 +.29 0.38 27.94 1.00 94.97 -.24 17.82 -.01 4.30 -.12 0.56 51.55 -1.03 18.20 +.18 0.20 19.34 +.16 1.65 34.55 -.30 23.79 -.15 11.65 -.09 0.82 76.41 -.04 8.72 +.06 0.18 8.16 -.18 60.86 +.50 0.30 16.68 -.28 31.77 -.26 0.80 52.39 -.09 4.31 +.16 0.92 46.91 +.15 1.95 96.98 -1.52 33.84 -1.10 1.40 44.66 +.03 0.32 3.15 41.16 -1.82 0.74 11.03 +.12 18.59 +.40 1.06 -.02 42.86 +.38 38.47 +.44 1.68 +.17 .14 +.01 44.87 +.24 29.97 +.27 1.80 59.59 -.29 1.05 105.89 +.17 3.80 -.05 0.01 143.89 -.31 0.32 33.08 -.90 1.27 -.03 50.08 -1.37 18.10 +.08 2.40 11.95 +.01 0.50 53.23 -.10 1.52 -.01 7.88 -.21 0.28 5.35 -.04 0.40 4.54 -.01 1.33 27.22 -.08 0.15 11.48 -.18 42.98 +.21 2.24 48.48 +.13 5.73 -.02 17.24 +.14 0.08 52.16 +.56 1.28 46.54 -.32 15.15 -.08 86.70 +.26 0.24 52.45 -.77 9.90 -.18 92.80 +4.94 0.20 7.64 +.05 1.40 93.58 +.13 .42 +.01 8.63 +1.37 15.42 +.72 9.58 -.32 .88 +.01 1.00 26.95 +.03 21.53 +.44 22.39 -.03 38.78 +.21 2.32 +.07 4.01 0.20 35.95 -.17 8.16 -.19 0.93 61.38 +.37 44.31 +.19 7.48 -.03 0.16 13.26 -.01 0.68 87.72 +1.74 4.23 +.18 2.46 77.82 +.73 0.18 60.20 -.43 0.50 75.96 -.12 0.32 10.48 +.07 11.61 -.06 40.73 +.07 2.72 56.78 -.23 36.07 -.25 28.33 -.09 0.16 42.95 +.43 33.25 +.17 46.50 +.02 1.35 45.62 +.87 37.42 -.16 4.30 61.54 -.49 40.70 +.64 36.43 -.11 0.84 41.83 +.90 21.71 -.45 15.05 +.06 15.04 -.22 0.01 53.43 +.45 17.40 -.50 29.71 -.54 43.93 -.90 82.16 +.21 0.16 81.50 +.09 0.05 77.69 +.46 0.24 24.23 +.17 40.27 +.26 35.83 +.17 23.26 -.02

Nm

D

Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DrmWksA DresserR Drew Inds DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

0.40 41.70 +.07 0.24 37.20 +.28 49.87 -.40 13.40 -.28 20.52 -.16 31.73 -.08 68.46 +.51 56.49 +.53 1.97 43.55 -.05 18.03 +.16 1.00 87.27 +.90 0.52 59.18 +.12 1.04 19.25 -.11 1.07 2.86 -.01 0.40 18.78 -.03 1.10 64.45 -.02 0.60 36.70 -.26 1.00 38.55 -.12 27.45 -.03 51.02 +.80 1.50 21.67 -.21 0.52 4.67 +.05 73.36 +.90 3.78 -.06 4.76 -.03 1.64 53.82 +.07 0.48 22.95 +.10 0.98 18.08 +.09 0.68 13.84 +.15 1.44 81.17 +.04 3.51 +.19 3.15 -.12 1.67 -.04 14.83 -.52 2.54 -.02 5.70 +.04 1.08 9.69 -.03

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2.80 85.94 -1.22 9.23 -.09 0.85 6.29 +.08 1.00 26.59 -.36 0.65 22.85 +.27 3.46 +.01 11.92 +.02 8.44 -.01 0.94 7.69 +.03 0.55 6.07 -.02 8.67 -.03 13.70 +1.09 9.60 -.05 0.60 29.54 -.55 3.23 +.01 0.88 70.52 -.02 35.73 -.44 2.00 48.13 +.18 1.80 32.83 +.28 0.20 24.68 -.03 2.05 +.09 47.67 -1.15 3.03 59.76 +.32 6.18 -.18 6.52 -.11 1.00 45.76 +.38 7.99 +.37 0.28 7.62 +.02 3.33 +.17 25.59 -.01 44.33 -.33 0.24 2.33 -.01 0.08 20.89 +.09 3.64 +.02 0.74 61.65 +.54 0.52 17.01 -.10 1.00 50.33 +.15 0.08 7.14 -.15 .58 -.02 0.40 60.86 -.25 27.75 +.05 0.18 40.94 +.18 2.93 39.84 +.40 0.33 54.73 -.01 3.58 57.67 +.45 0.19 49.05 +.82 0.35 34.19 -.14 0.84 29.42 +.13 0.04 7.97 +.03 3.69 +.20 1.60 88.71 +.71 15.65 -.20 0.30 13.43 +.15 0.75 34.28 +.43 0.24 63.25 -.21 19.80 -.55 0.60 269.76 +6.80 13.76 -.04 0.92 25.43 +.11 0.84 24.87 +.21 3.38 1.12 47.57 +.08 23.82 +.24

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D 2.44 76.89 +.23 1.00 39.16 +.17 0.72 78.10 +.50 17.20 +.12 1.04 59.61 +.22 0.16 10.25 +.01 1.00 30.98 -.13 28.95 +.37 10.24 +.24 15.37 -.04 55.07 -.47 0.80 11.45 -.05 15.94 -.23 0.32 34.68 +.24 16.74 +.14 20.56 +.20 67.62 -.13 0.90 40.09 -.18 8.67 +.44 0.48 27.25 -.17 14.20 +.01 0.32 85.34 +2.62 13.71 +.48 1.52 33.47 -.09 1.02 34.91 +.06 5.01 +.24 21.34 +.87 16.08 +.41 15.70 +.48 2.41 35.61 -3.04 5.72 +.06 1.08 -.04 0.62 31.74 +.32 0.74 44.17 -.60 16.75 0.14 12.68 -.44 1.38 37.44 +.35 5.93 -.05 10.62 +.09 51.44 +1.22 21.00 +.06 0.64 25.63 -.01 1.25 -.01 1.98 +.05 6.11 +.34 0.09 24.92 -.17 6.00 97.85 +1.83 2.45 +.07 0.30 26.39 +.15 8.08 +.07 15.48 +.62 4.68 +.09 3.17 +.08 24.00 +.51 20.58 +.05 16.44 +.21 5.18 -.01 59.91 -.25 0.70 24.60 +.18 40.28 +.40 1.12 46.72 +.09 70.09 -.99 15.93 +.34 3.30 -.11 14.23 -.07 0.32 31.89 -.52 1.12 68.15 -1.10 16.80 -.14 0.40 17.69 -.31 0.46 35.57 +.37 0.20 26.79 -.02 8.27 -.31 0.20 76.79 +.12 5.48 -.06 44.18 +.33 23.11 -.15 13.23 +.01 2.07 -.03 0.07 4.06 -.03 1.10 73.40 +.34 23.49 +.01 4.26 +.17 19.92 -.57 18.78 +.13 32.46 +.26 1.80 18.43 -.06 .66 +.02 0.25 11.90 -.21 39.19 +.12 9.24 21.31 -.03 0.48 14.68 +.04 31.54 +.52 1.20 38.26 +.41 29.76 +.34 0.14 26.79 +.01 27.76 -.03 0.29 1.80 +.03 0.80 17.79 -.06 1.38 71.45 +.72 7.04 48.77 +1.02 0.40 31.62 +.32 0.44 75.07 +.43 0.04 7.70 -.16 1.52 25.20 -.20 0.40 24.06 -.07 1.92 42.34 -.12 0.24 5.37 -.02 1.72 20.34 +.48 65.66 -.19 9.52 -.17 1.96 +.01 9.94 -.11 4.02 -.09 8.70 +.04 39.83 +.35 48.58 +.75 52.89 +.95 238.75 +4.83 25.61 +.15 1.72 +.02 29.73 +.62 2.01 +.04 .56 +.04 7.69 -.10 26.07 +.18 6.42 +.18 10.86 +.24 113.79 +.89 1.00 17.11 -.03 9.16 -.11 0.28 14.78 +.07 5.62 +.28 0.20 18.93 +.13 70.70 +.21 0.60 56.32 -.92 6.89 -.16 0.15 17.20 +.09 0.15 18.30 +.24 0.20 23.63 +.08 2.20 54.97 -.15 0.92 18.75 +.02 1.86 52.67 +.23 1.24 79.41 +1.21 20.09 +.13 22.49 -.22 0.98 43.35 +.12 0.72 92.51 +.92 0.55 8.74 +.01 5.00 +.06 1.70 23.41 -.25 0.42 55.40 -.16 0.92 45.95 +.11 1.60 67.83 +.06 6.14 +.13 1.10 33.88 -.19 14.56 -.05 24.39 +.85 1.12 51.63 -.33 2.76 +.03 1.88 61.53 -1.31 0.40 4.90 -.06 0.40 12.20 -.02 1.74 44.46 -.17 12.86 +.04 2.53 55.27 +.01 5.01 -.05 2.39 -.09 6.02 33.91 -.09 1.70 44.14 -.36 0.54 29.99 -.29 26.61 +.02 19.41 +.24 1.45 44.85 -.36 0.70 14.30 +.07 0.47 8.97 -.03 0.72 8.50 -.01 0.76 8.90 +.03 17.76 +.39 9.89 -.04 5.89 -.01 1.50 50.52 +.19 32.77 -.09 55.38 -.67 30.08 +.86

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D 1.84 96.89 -.01 86.02 +.94 .59 -.05 1.01 16.06 +.18 10.79 +.17 10.68 -.03 4.23 -.01 12.69 -.28 2.42 155.01 +.20 73.87 +.50 .44 -.01 34.37 -.32 0.28 10.46 -.32 0.70 12.87 -.11 0.80 24.08 -.11 1.48 23.29 +.20 0.13 30.60 -.14 1.00 48.03 -.04 31.84 +1.27 8.00 +.05 9.63 +.13 2.30 -.16 3.25 +.06 2.08 64.44 +.04 3.75 +.03 1.21 -.03 33.62 +.02 62.28 +1.38 106.98 +.70 2.07 +.05 3.65 -.03 2.40 +.20 12.67 +.20 4.50 18.24 -.07 0.24 33.70 +.30 18.21 -.29 3.41 -.11 2.87 -.05 11.33 -.15 3.60 -.15 0.20 12.49 +.01 10.05 -.32 2.15 +.11 32.68 -.34 2.77 +.56 1.75 28.04 -.44 0.80 32.75 +.05 36.86 +.20 29.45 -.17 0.60 6.12 -.02 0.92 44.62 +.23 1.82 43.86 +.12 20.93 -.25 3.57 +.04 7.22 +.04 2.25 -.11 1.40 62.54 -.59 0.50 14.57 +.09 2.20 92.27 -1.49 1.40 26.79 -.09 2.44 55.15 +.05 27.68 +.36 0.48 50.13 -.18 4.83 -.01 .49 +.03 3.61 -.03 0.80 27.95 +.21 3.64 +.24 2.00 9.24 +.05 0.70 57.03 -.11 0.10 41.09 +.90 0.11 12.06 +.10 123.38 +2.90 33.54 -.04 0.20 2.90 +.05 23.22 +.34 3.39 -.06 26.08 +.45 6.55 +.12 1.28 93.58 +.21 2.20 80.65 -.19 24.06 +.06 0.48 33.18 +.23 0.20 28.04 +.62 1.24 32.35 +.08 0.34 65.18 +.84 0.48 20.58 -.03 0.84 13.62 +.03 37.10 +.36 0.23 14.77 +.13 1.08 26.09 -.05 0.80 37.35 -.42 0.60 13.79 +.03 19.36 -.20 0.80 37.97 -.04 0.62 12.86 +.01 0.12 13.32 +.02 1.08 18.24 +.03 1.92 66.45 -.12 2.50 -.03 24.14 +.19 11.92 -.18 0.28 26.50 -.03 1.38 21.28 +.07 0.28 87.50 +2.10 4.86 150.67 +2.03 24.94 +1.74 1.41 33.30 -.69 1.41 37.20 -1.01 8.28 +.10 0.50 41.70 +.32 0.80 20.46 5.51 -.12 0.60 30.82 +.04 6.29 +.16 98.51 +3.95 2.56 66.11 +.07 1.02 31.04 +.13 0.15 66.13 +.28 2.49 +.01 8.58 +.07 1.16 29.32 -.27 1.26 19.29 +.30 11.37 +.10 7.15 +.17 1.38 19.11 +.44 1.46 13.84 +.07 12.95 -.09 2.10 42.08 13.87 +.32 0.08 97.40 +.21 37.60 -1.25 1.48 24.95 -.04 3.88 63.83 +.54 34.25 +.35 0.20 34.98 +.11 2.20 +.04 0.32 37.41 -.08 32.81 +.27 .61 -.02 1.68 42.00 -.32 3.11 +.16 10.42 +1.02 1.80 91.05 +1.74 0.80 128.39 +4.08 48.46 +1.87 0.16 13.02 -.44 56.12 +.29 .37 -.04 3.10 -.02 1.04 23.47 -.08 0.80 37.89 -.12 0.28 56.68 +.55 2.04 38.54 -.23 7.48 -.31 42.41 -.95 30.93 +.24 33.92 +.19 32.43 +.35 21.50 +.02 0.17 19.81 -.20 10.05 -.01 1.27 18.18 +.02 25.31 +.03 1.38 18.62 +.04 0.97 14.32 1.55 26.55 +.01 0.24 24.13 +.58 0.39 56.85 +.48 4.25 +.17 2.45 -.09 2.00 101.38 +.85 0.12 143.68 -.33 14.20 +.49 1.24 67.08 +.56 514.81 +2.67 42.42 +.24 0.04 23.41 -.05 .37 -.01 0.55 31.25 -.21 0.04 14.19 -.30 41.31 -.04 32.85 -.28 41.53 21.25 -.02 0.32 61.38 +.04 17.96 -.01 88.14 +1.43 51.98 -.87 0.39 52.33 -.03 57.97 +.72 37.66 -.43 25.76 -.47 28.93 -.54 15.97 -.02 28.75 -.17 17.53 +.10 0.43 55.08 -.10 0.05 68.96 -.92 26.15 -.64 18.42 -.06 0.21 56.56 +.34 0.03 52.72 -.25 30.13 -.01 82.41 +1.92 0.01 46.94 +.05 44.43 -.28 16.33 +.02 0.11 77.56 -.13 19.85 -.48 57.24 +1.19 40.64 -.87 258.98 +6.05 16.48 +.03 17.15 +.07 2.10 62.99 +.10 7.23 +.47 2.48 45.61 +.34 29.77 +.28 1.40 21.41 +.03 0.45 15.60 -.03 43.65 -.08 1.21 11.40 -.05 0.56 25.84 -.50 0.54 9.10 +.13 0.44 14.20 -.04 1.15 60.80 -.77 1.37 30.96 +.38 3.20 107.77 -.41 7.69 -.01 1.22 -.12

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D 52.91 +1.47 20.31 +.19 14.74 -.31 0.16 15.74 -.05 26.65 +.29 7.98 -.08 10.14 +.28 3.08 -.02 3.48 -.01 0.56 42.09 +.12 8.88 +.18 23.24 -.05 1.76 74.33 +.50 38.06 0.73 57.41 +.92 45.02 +2.40 96.32 +3.11 24.34 +.24 0.30 51.13 +.23 2.76 -.31 24.53 +.31 2.87 +.01 0.10 13.18 +.24 8.95 1.12 35.14 +.35 3.61 +.13 0.28 29.78 +.19 0.20 49.08 24.48 +.37 1.82 37.58 +.10 1.83 37.09 -.96 0.60 27.58 +.10 0.02 11.75 -.09 38.41 +.39 1.04 26.96 +.09 8.90 +.14 24.05 +.03 20.65 +1.34 4.81 +.01 18.22 +.34 12.60 +.12 1.97 +.16 0.30 19.05 +.01 1.23 38.98 -.23 0.61 33.44 -.03 0.81 30.53 +.02 0.56 39.15 +.13 1.05 76.04 +.31 0.16 16.28 -.12 0.64 37.00 -.11 0.33 25.84 +.16 1.31 31.56 +.08 3.72 +.03 1.64 74.89 +.93 0.40 19.98 +.01 3.26 -.16 0.52 35.81 +.04 0.30 57.04 +.04 1.68 21.55 +.05 0.72 45.58 -.58 1.10 27.81 -.08 0.40 18.15 -.06 0.24 11.19 -.04 .78 +.01 90.69 +.26 0.60 33.66 +.11 0.06 8.98 +.02 0.08 15.34 +.18 49.47 +1.88 0.12 7.95 45.82 -.36 21.22 -.08 32.13 +.91 49.36 +1.65 6.00 -.06 4.00 124.38 -9.56 0.72 59.84 +.15 38.28 +.77 .11 -.01 6.02 +.01 9.99 -.26 3.91 +.22 1.44 30.88 +.01 0.40 43.80 +.12 2.16 -.10 0.60 43.06 +.17 16.44 +.17 16.06 +.21 9.80 +.55 9.48 -.16 9.34 +.11 0.04 29.00 -.60 2.96 -.01 2.66 -.08 38.62 +1.05 0.35 9.08 -.03 5.43 +.27 0.04 9.21 -.22 11.16 +.03 10.13 +.01 39.45 -.01 14.00 -.04 9.28 +.55 19.53 -.36 18.33 +.08 0.20 13.70 +.12 25.66 +.21 31.12 -.63 1.13 67.79 +.61 26.98 +.06 0.04 2.66 -.03 0.24 54.16 -.65 3.24 -.07 1.98 +.04 10.84 -.27 1.04 28.19 -.26 1.80 36.77 +.23 0.72 19.23 -.02 0.20 15.09 -.18 0.20 21.40 -.19 0.64 34.90 +1.20 0.85 18.52 +.01 4.41 +.04 0.96 11.16 +.10 0.71 46.64 +1.37 0.76 51.26 +.20 38.12 -.39 51.37 +1.11 16.89 -.06 19.36 -.15 0.47 12.26 +.03 15.13 +.03 6.16 -.13 27.40 +.12 34.17 +.35 0.25 23.23 +.03 0.80 25.26 -.13 6.29 +.03 2.23 34.29 +.18 24.00 -.40 1.00 50.09 -.35 5.66 -.01 3.81 -.02 0.32 28.06 +1.01 1.75 53.39 +.37 51.23 +.44 0.60 52.89 -1.03 1.27 35.00 +.25 1.24 10.20 -.13 7.72 +.02 18.63 +.08 1.61 24.68 -.48 0.72 7.77 +.11 0.81 15.26 -.11 1.36 58.13 +.02 1.75 26.01 -.18 0.83 18.38 -.02 5.42 -.38 0.08 5.16 +.08 2.10 48.34 0.52 22.02 +.03 58.47 +.65 0.68 49.34 -.02 6.54 -.02 1.00 +.02 40.61 +.62 50.39 +.90 17.02 +.24 33.06 +.06 0.50 33.10 -.17 24.93 +.28 26.25 +1.03 14.02 -.04 0.78 49.67 +.40 0.52 34.34 +.20 0.32 16.05 -.23 0.08 26.60 -.28 26.17 +.59 55.40 -.04 2.25 +.03 12.38 -.18 1.24 39.48 +.23 0.40 29.87 -.53 27.55 +.12 49.80 +.84 2.20 92.86 +.49 1.85 -.09 28.86 +.81 1.00 56.42 -.33 1.00 62.31 +.83 42.86 +1.04 1.92 72.37 +.23 0.94 35.64 +.19 0.72 50.57 +.28 0.02 25.63 -.04 17.87 -.27 8.86 +.33 20.16 -.08 4.66 +.03 0.64 66.59 -.31 7.92 -.73 2.64 86.57 +.77 3.16 60.51 -.27 0.28 18.42 +.15 0.50 23.03 +.05 1.39 +.05 0.30 55.12 +.11 0.58 77.98 +.78 0.28 62.99 +.41 7.22 -.03 1.68 40.95 +.11 0.84 49.61 +.41 3.00 +.04 0.79 78.36 -1.15 4.93 -.06 1.44 59.93 +.24 76.07 +2.57 .72 -.02 8.09 +.19 1.09 +.03 49.41 +.29 29.63 +1.21 0.32 35.50 -.38 11.61 +.35 26.35 +.70 0.92 22.96 -.38 1.20 58.25 +.04 0.66 14.81 +.07 1.00 25.14 -.17 1.52 10.14 +.12 1.00 52.01 -.32

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0.28 10.14 -.01 18.71 +.02 0.74 23.60 -.06 1.00 31.50 -.02 1.73 30.03 +.04 44.19 -.02 8.26 -.19 9.09 +.32 2.20 +.15 4.28 +.02 16.35 +.01 2.51 -.01 49.80 -.71 48.05 +.30 0.47 18.07 +.07 .07 -.01 0.20 11.14 -.22 74.96 +.99 1.12 32.28 +.16 1.12 31.33 +.21 10.60 -.32 1.52 96.90 +.36 31.35 +.21 2.57 +.08 21.37 -.34 0.08 2.76 0.40 6.21 -.01 2.08 72.61 -.62 31.72 +.29 0.50 25.99 -.37 5.95 +.11 10.85 +.13 42.75 +.45 0.20 50.62 +.10 1.92 84.21 +.23 66.43 +.10 0.50 44.33 -.48 2.00 22.58 -.11 1.92 42.50 -1.25 53.46 +1.55 0.20 47.20 +.40 0.37 25.98 -.30 1.59 -.01 2.89 -.02 3.86 +.02 1.91 +.01 31.69 +.13 24.17 -.02 2.52 100.03 +.68 6.90 -.14 49.58 -.06 28.98 -.53 0.90 32.39 -.58 0.90 29.15 -.37 0.38 52.56 -.05 1.50 -.05 0.20 27.99 +.83 1.00 33.91 +.31 0.72 13.64 -.16 0.72 38.86 -.13 5.57 -.11 15.17 -.02 34.03 +.03 7.34 +.08 2.21 80.26 +.03 3.17 80.06 +.15 0.69 63.82 +.24 0.85 77.46 +.16 1.29 68.04 +.04 1.31 56.24 -.13 0.53 60.1


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Investors

the problem is they aren’t getting rewarded enough for the risk in investing in unproven business ideas. In the past, angels would often get more favorable deal terms than later investors. But that has changed, and laterstage investors can often make as much money or more. “They spoiled the party for a lot of people,” angel investor Mark Ravich said. “If you’re entering at a later stage, you’re taking less risk and getting a better deal.” The financial burden on angel investors has also increased. In the past, a promising startup could move on to funding from venture capital firms after it started with raised money from angel investors. However, venture capital firms are shifting toward later-stage companies, requiring angel investors to provide multiple rounds of funding. “If this is the new normal, there is not enough money to fund things to get further enough along to a (venture capital firm),” said Paula Skjefte, president and CEO of Waterford Consulting. “I would like to believe this is cyclical, but something is going to have to change to make the whole entrepreneur side of the equation a more friendly environment.”

Continued from B1 Without the money, entrepreneurs like Joel Ackerman are having a tougher time building their businesses and creating jobs. Ackerman, a former UnitedHealth Group executive, needs $2 million to build his startup, River Systems, which is developing software to help senior citizens communicate with their doctors, families and pastors from home. He’s had more than 20 meetings with angel investors. They say he has a great idea, but they want to wait until there is a product that brings in revenue. “The traditional role of an angel investor is about dead right now,” Ackerman said, who has nearly used up his retirement savings and taken a second mortgage on his house to fund River Systems. “We have the great potential to create jobs. Once we get the ball rolling, it will happen.”

Investor concerns Many angel investors say they would invest more money into startups, if they had it. The problem is, their money is tied up in earlier investments, some of which have been in their portfolios for more than a decade. One way for investors to get their money out of a startup is for it to go public on the stock market. But a weak market has mostly cut off that pathway. “We’re just waiting for some of our investments that we’ve been in for 10 years to come through,” angel investor Steve Wirth said. “We want to see some liquidity events, so that we can plow proceeds back into the community again and again.” Investors are also concerned about medical device companies. Uncertainty about approval processes at the Food and Drug Administration makes investors nervous. Andy LaFrence, who invests in clean tech and life sciences companies, said he’s generally not interested in startups that need more than 18 to 24 months to get products for the market. It’s too risky, he said. “In general, I want to make sure there is a pretty short window to sale,” LaFrence said. Angel investors say part of

Report

their college dorm. The company had nearly leveraged all of its $1 million in assets and without the angel investment, it would have gone out of business, Weber said. Today, W3i employs about 70 people. Weber has registered as an investor under the state’s angel tax credit program and said he believes Minnesota entrepreneurs who have succeeded should give back. Weber said the credit’s incentive recently encouraged him to double his investment in a local startup. “I want to see the community get stronger,” 31-year-old Weber said. “I don’t do it because I expect a good return.” Visiam, which supplies processing technology for municipal solid waste management groups, said the $75,000 it received through the angel tax credit program last year helped the company save three fulltime jobs, hire outside consultants and bring its technology to commercialization. “It allowed a company to stay in business,” said Scott Hughes, chief operating officer. Other plans are in the works to make it easier to find accredited angel investors, whom the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission requires to meet requirements such as a net worth of more than $1 million. The Minnesota Angel Network, a Web portal that will help facilitate discussions between angel investors and entrepreneurs, will launch this summer. Startups will have their business plans critiqued by network’s mentors and must meet certain milestones before entering the portal. St. Paul, Minn.-based Rain Source Capital, which pools angel investors’ money to create angel funds, said it plans to create 121 U.S. angel funds over the next four years. Each fund would be worth at least $1 million. That’s not to say it will be any easier for entrepreneurs to raise money, CEO Steve Mercil said. “What’s changed a lot since the recession is companies have to get to cash flow even quicker. ... They have to show some real growth and critical mass to attract capital,” Mercil said. “Gone are the days ... where you could just generally prove something and people will start throwing money at you.”

Providing incentive State officials are hoping a tax credit will help sweeten the deal. Qualified investors who put at least $10,000 into Minnesota startups will receive a 25 percent tax credit on their investment. The credit started last year, bringing in more than $28 million in investment in startups. “Our program is really helping change the environment here,” said Jeff Nelson, angel tax credit program coordinator. “What our program does, in a sense, is give (investors) a partial exit right away. If you put $1 million in, within months, you’re getting 25 percent of that back.” At Sartell, Minn.-based software and application distributor W3i, angel investment played a key role in making the business successful and profitable, cofounder Rob Weber said. It was 13 years ago when Weber and his identical twin Ryan started what would become W3i out of

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 B5

Continued from B1 The report adds significant new evidence to previously disclosed material showing that a wide swath of the financial industry chose profits over propriety during the mortgage lending spree. It also casts a harsh light on what the report calls regulatory failures, which helped deepen the crisis. Singled out for criticism is the Office of Thrift Supervision, which oversaw some of the nation’s most aggressive lenders, including Countrywide Financial, IndyMac and Washington Mutual, whose chief executive was Kerry Killinger. Noting that the agency’s officials viewed the institutions it regulated as “constituents,” the report said that the office relied on bank executives to correct identified problems and was reluctant to interfere with “even unsound lending and securitization practices” at Washington Mutual.

Warnings ignored The report describes how two risk managers at the bank were marginalized by its executives. One of them told the committee that executives began providing the regulator with outdated loss estimates as the mortgage crisis widened. After the risk manager told regulators that the estimates it had received were dated, Killinger fired him. From 2004 to 2008, for example, the regulatory office identified more than 500 serious deficiencies at Washington Mutual, yet did not force the bank to improve its lending operations, according to the report. And when the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., the bank’s backup regulator, moved to downgrade the bank’s safety and soundness rating in September 2008, John Reich, the director of the Office of Thrift Supervision, wrote an angry e-mail to a colleague. Referring to Sheila Bair, the FDIC chairwoman, he wrote: “I cannot believe the continuing audacity of this woman.” Washington Mutual failed two weeks later. The office was abolished last year, and its operations were folded into the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency. Reich declined to comment. A lawyer for Killinger did not re-

spond to a request for comment. The report was produced by the same Senate committee that conducted an 11-hour hearing last April with Goldman executives and employees of its mortgage unit, who testified about their trading and securities underwriting practices. At the hearing, some lawmakers questioned Goldman’s assertion that it had not bet against the mortgage market as real estate prices collapsed. And on Wednesday, Levin pointed out that his committee had found 3,400 places in Goldman documents where its officials used the phrase “net short,” a reference to negative bets. “Why would Goldman deny what was so obvious, that they were engaged in a huge short in the year 2007?” Levin asked in a press briefing Wednesday morning. “Because they gained at the expense of their clients and they used abusive practices to do it.” The report uncovered a new aspect of Goldman’s mortgage activity during 2007. That year, as Goldman tried to build its bet against housing, the report says, it tried to drive up the price of a mortgage index, a practice known as squeezing the shorts. When the price of the index rose sharply, the cost of betting against the mortgage market fell. Goldman tried to put on the short squeeze, the report noted, so that it could add to its negative bets more cheaply and protect itself against the housing collapse. A Goldman spokesman said in a statement: “While we disagree with many of the conclusions of the report, we take seriously the issues explored by the subcommittee. We recently issued the results of a comprehensive examination of our business standards and practices and committed to making significant changes that will strengthen relationships with clients, improve transparency and disclosure and enhance standards for the review, approval and suitability of complex instruments.”

Shorting the market The report also sheds new light on the bundling and trading

of mortgages at Deutsche Bank, which had also made negative bets in that market. Unlike Goldman, Deutsche Bank has not been accused of wrongdoing by government investigators. But the Senate report focuses on a trader named Greg Lippmann, who has since left the bank to join a hedge fund. Lippmann was vocally negative about housing as early as 2005 and brought his idea of shorting the market to professional investors on Wall Street. He described risky mortgage securities before the crisis as “pigs,” according to the report. When he was asked to buy one such mortgage security, he responded that he “would take it and try to dupe someone,” according to the report. Lippmann persuaded Deutsche to let him build a large short position, reaching $5 billion by 2007, the report says. The bank still lost money on other positive mortgage bets, but Lippmann’s trade helped reduce the company’s overall loss. The report focused on one Deutsche collateralized debt obligation from 2006, called Gemstone VII, and described how Deutsche and other banks made $5 million to $10 million for every deal like Gemstone they created. In 2006 and 2007, banks created about a trillion dollars of CDO deals — the most complex type of mortgage security and the instruments that sent the lending craze to dizzying heights. In emails provided to the committee, Lippmann called the bank’s operation a “CDO machine” and characterized such securities as a “Ponzi scheme.” But when the committee interviewed Lippmann, he backtracked, saying his colorful descriptions were used to defend his negative view of the market. In the Senate interview, Lippmann also said that he thought he was the person who persuaded the American International Group to stop writing insurance on mortgage securities. Lippmann declined to comment on Wednesday.

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.10f .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .80a .82 ... .24 .32 .22 .72 .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 14 20 21 16 ... 24 27 24 88 22 10 ... 10 19 14 12 ... 17 65 6

60.82 -1.62 +7.3 23.04 -.08 +2.3 13.27 -.20 -.5 15.03 -.48 -3.3 72.13 -.95 +10.5 7.59 -.10 -10.2 45.81 +.27 -3.1 60.47 +.10 +.3 76.41 -.04 +5.8 8.84 +.16 +19.6 33.35 +.11 +12.1 41.13 +.05 -2.3 10.97 -.16 -10.6 19.78 +.02 -5.9 8.85 +.08 ... 24.20 +.09 +8.2 5.92 -.02 -2.3 9.05 -.20 -4.3 22.85 +.27 +12.7 14.20 +.01 +18.3 25.63 -.01 -8.2

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1458.00 $1454.90 $40.235

Pvs Day $1452.00 $1452.90 $40.058

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46f .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .20a ... .60f

19 17 16 16 40 ... 34 21 15 16 19 10 26 10 74 15 14 14 89 6

79.41 +1.21 -7.0 45.95 +.11 +8.4 44.46 -.17 -4.3 12.69 -.28 -28.3 50.13 -.18 -12.6 2.45 +.15 +18.4 42.00 -.32 +12.1 143.68 -.33 +3.2 24.05 +.05 +6.9 60.57 -.02 -8.8 83.90 +.02 +.2 45.65 -.39 +1.1 35.81 +.04 +11.4 11.61 +.35 -.7 11.14 -.22 -8.5 25.99 -.37 -3.6 16.59 -.26 -2.0 30.68 -.72 -1.0 3.56 +.08 +26.2 22.43 -.13 +18.5

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm AlcatelLuc SPDR Fncl

3927647 4.50 -.05 1373644 131.46 -.01 1133126 13.27 -.20 765920 6.06 +.42 732400 16.28 -.12

Gainers ($2 or more) Name GrahamPk QntmDSS FMajSilv g AldIrish rs MGM Rsts

Last

Chg %Chg

22.22 +5.51 +33.0 3.10 +.45 +17.0 23.05 +2.52 +12.3 3.66 +.34 +10.2 13.70 +1.09 +8.6

Losers ($2 or more) Name CenPacF rt AIntGr pfA CenPacF s ChinaSecur Raythn wt

Last 6.50 3.24 15.10 4.02 11.40

3.25 3.25 3.25

Vol (00)

CAMAC En RareEle g AvalRare n KodiakO g Rentech

Last Chg

96504 1.87 +.50 70751 15.46 -.28 45957 9.64 +.02 35864 6.20 +.20 33788 1.18 +.06

Gainers ($2 or more)

-33.0 -27.0 -20.8 -13.0 -11.3

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Cisco Level3 PwShs QQQ Dell Inc SiriusXM

1,586 1,424 126 3,136 48 14

Last Chg

589660 17.25 -.19 506746 1.69 +.01 469093 56.85 +.48 447876 15.42 +.72 420859 1.84 +.03

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

TelInstEl ChinaPhH iBio Vicon ChiMetRur

7.93 2.53 2.92 4.77 4.18

+.90 +12.8 +.24 +10.5 +.25 +9.4 +.29 +6.5 +.22 +5.6

GTx Inc EagRkE wt OssenInno n HSW Intl h SifyTech

3.68 +.93 +33.8 5.26 +1.31 +33.2 2.77 +.56 +25.3 4.00 +.80 +25.0 5.41 +.84 +18.4

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

SearchMed ChinNEPet Solitario Tofutti InfuSystem

2.18 3.25 2.76 2.27 2.60

-.39 -15.2 -.58 -15.1 -.31 -10.1 -.23 -9.2 -.17 -6.1

Identive Toreador USecBcCA HookerFu WashFd wt

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg -3.20 -1.20 -3.97 -.60 -1.45

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

3.63 -2.06 -36.2 7.92 -.73 -8.4 3.30 -.28 -7.8 12.29 -1.01 -7.6 6.00 -.49 -7.6

Diary 258 210 34 502 5 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,327 1,243 153 2,723 42 45

12,450.93 5,404.33 422.43 8,545.78 2,453.68 2,840.51 1,344.07 14,276.94 859.08

9,614.32 3,872.64 346.95 6,355.83 1,689.19 2,061.14 1,010.91 15.80 587.66

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,270.99 5,232.38 409.45 8,367.31 2,389.97 2,761.52 1,314.41 13,958.91 823.92

+7.41 -7.10 +1.78 +6.85 +15.87 +16.73 +.25 +13.50 +1.65

YTD %Chg %Chg +.06 -.14 +.44 +.08 +.67 +.61 +.02 +.10 +.20

52-wk %Chg

+5.99 +2.46 +1.10 +5.06 +8.22 +4.10 +4.51 +4.48 +5.14

+10.32 +12.64 +6.63 +8.26 +20.59 +10.25 +8.57 +9.84 +14.05

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

362.76 2,719.18 4,006.23 6,010.44 7,177.97 24,135.03 37,347.69 22,096.96 3,457.63 9,641.18 2,121.92 3,172.08 4,999.60 5,816.06

+.55 s +.90 s +.75 s +.77 s +1.06 s +.66 s +.07 s +.36 s +.18 s +.90 s +1.56 s +1.09 s +.19 s +.47 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0501 1.6274 1.0385 .002118 .1530 1.4441 .1286 .011930 .084903 .0354 .000918 .1597 1.1157 .0344

1.0472 1.6255 1.0399 .002121 .1528 1.4485 .1286 .011940 .084601 .0356 .000917 .1588 1.1148 .0343

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.46 -0.05 +4.9 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.42 -0.05 +4.8 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.43 -0.01 +3.4 GrowthI 27.10 +0.11 +4.9 Ultra 23.75 +0.11 +4.9 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.75 +0.07 +4.9 AMutlA p 26.29 +0.01 +4.4 BalA p 18.54 -0.01 +4.0 BondA p 12.20 +0.01 +1.0 CapIBA p 51.47 +0.18 +4.1 CapWGA p 37.28 +0.21 +4.8 CapWA p 20.74 +0.03 +2.5 EupacA p 43.40 +0.40 +4.9 FdInvA p 38.72 +0.07 +5.8 GovtA p 13.84 +0.02 GwthA p 31.78 +0.11 +4.4 HI TrA p 11.56 +4.5 IncoA p 17.23 +0.02 +5.1 IntBdA p 13.40 +0.01 +0.5 ICAA p 29.08 +0.01 +3.7 NEcoA p 26.60 +0.16 +5.0 N PerA p 29.87 +0.13 +4.4 NwWrldA 55.88 +0.40 +2.4 SmCpA p 40.40 +0.30 +4.0 TxExA p 11.70 +0.1 WshA p 28.53 -0.03 +5.4 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 31.35 +0.29 +4.0 IntEqII I r 12.95 +0.13 +3.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 23.01 +0.25 +6.0 IntlVal r 28.15 +0.21 +3.8 MidCap 35.97 +0.40 +7.0 MidCapVal 22.21 +0.02 +10.6 Baron Funds: Growth 55.07 +0.06 +7.5 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.76 +0.03 +1.4 DivMu 14.21 +0.01 +0.5

TxMgdIntl 16.03 +0.08 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.55 -0.01 GlAlA r 20.12 +0.04 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.75 +0.03 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.59 -0.02 GlbAlloc r 20.22 +0.04 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 56.40 +0.50 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 30.65 +0.17 DivEqInc 10.58 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.67 +0.18 AcornIntZ 41.80 +0.19 ValRestr 52.21 +0.04 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.83 +0.02 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.80 +0.06 USCorEq2 11.64 +0.01 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.90 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.30 +0.01 NYVen C 34.65 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.24 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.65 +0.14 EmMktV 37.01 +0.17 IntSmVa 18.18 +0.12 LargeCo 10.37 USLgVa 21.68 -0.03 US Micro 14.47 +0.01 US Small 22.69 +0.03 US SmVa 27.02 -0.06 IntlSmCo 17.94 +0.11 Fixd 10.34 +0.01 IntVa 19.39 +0.08 Glb5FxInc 10.94 +0.01 2YGlFxd 10.17 Dodge&Cox:

+1.9 +5.9 +3.6 +3.4 +5.9 +3.7 +5.7 +4.8 +5.1 +4.9 +2.2 +3.5 +5.2 +5.1 +6.3 +4.5 +4.6 +4.3 +1.6 +2.2 +2.4 +5.7 +5.1 +8.0 +5.1 +6.3 +5.7 +4.5 +0.3 +5.8 +0.6 +0.2

Balanced 73.08 Income 13.32 +0.02 IntlStk 36.99 +0.12 Stock 113.21 -0.04 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 10.97 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.59 -0.06 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09 GblMacAbR 10.21 +0.02 LgCapVal 18.64 -0.06 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.44 +0.02 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.03 Fairholme 34.22 -0.17 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.71 +0.13 StrInA 12.58 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.92 +0.13 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.08 +0.03 FF2015 11.77 +0.03 FF2020 14.36 +0.04 FF2020K 13.74 +0.03 FF2025 12.04 +0.03 FF2030 14.41 +0.04 FF2030K 14.24 +0.04 FF2035 12.04 +0.03 FF2040 8.42 +0.02 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.99 +0.03 AMgr50 15.90 +0.05 Balanc 18.86 +0.04 BalancedK 18.86 +0.04 BlueChGr 47.51 +0.33 Canada 61.74 +0.15 CapAp 26.22 +0.12 CpInc r 9.80 +0.01 Contra 70.49 +0.44 ContraK 70.48 +0.44 DisEq 24.02 +0.09 DivIntl 31.42 +0.19

+4.6 +1.7 +3.6 +5.4 NA +2.3 +2.6 +0.7 +2.3 +5.3 +4.6 -3.8 +3.9 +3.3 +4.0 +3.6 +3.8 +4.1 +4.2 +4.5 +4.6 +4.7 +5.0 +5.1 +5.1 +3.4 +3.8 +3.8 +4.8 +6.2 +3.5 +5.4 +4.2 +4.2 +6.6 +4.2

DivrsIntK r 31.41 DivGth 29.93 EmrMk 27.11 Eq Inc 46.75 EQII 19.28 Fidel 34.15 FltRateHi r 9.89 GNMA 11.46 GovtInc 10.39 GroCo 89.57 GroInc 19.12 GrowthCoK 89.56 HighInc r 9.20 Indepn 25.56 IntBd 10.58 IntlDisc 34.06 InvGrBd 11.42 InvGB 7.43 LgCapVal 12.18 LatAm 58.54 LevCoStk 30.16 LowP r 40.96 LowPriK r 40.95 Magelln 74.05 MidCap 30.57 MuniInc 12.17 NwMkt r 15.69 OTC 59.50 100Index 9.13 Ovrsea 33.90 Puritn 18.64 SCmdtyStrt 13.17 SrsIntGrw 11.69 SrsIntVal 10.62 SrInvGrdF 11.42 STBF 8.47 SmllCpS r 20.53 StratInc 11.25 StrReRt r 9.89 TotalBd 10.78 USBI 11.31 Value 73.21 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 52.96

+0.19 +0.05 +0.24 -0.02 -0.02 +0.16 +0.01 +0.02 +0.78 +0.01 +0.79 +0.20 +0.02 +0.24 +0.02 +0.01 -0.01 +0.14 +0.15 +0.14 +0.08 +0.12 +0.01 +0.01 +0.62 +0.21 +0.05 +0.01 +0.05 +0.04 +0.02 +0.02 +0.01 +0.02 +0.02 +0.05

+4.3 +5.3 +2.9 +5.9 +5.9 +6.3 +1.8 +0.9 +0.2 +7.7 +4.7 +7.8 +4.6 +5.0 +1.1 +3.1 +1.0 +1.4 +6.2 -0.8 +6.1 +6.7 +6.8 +3.3 +6.0 +0.4 +1.8 +8.3 +4.5 +4.4 +4.4 +4.2 +3.5 +6.8 +1.0 +0.5 +4.7 +3.2 +3.7 +1.6 +0.7 +6.6

-0.13 -0.3

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 40.49 +0.12 500IdxInv 46.55 +0.01 IntlInxInv 36.92 +0.20 TotMktInv 38.36 +0.04 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.55 +0.01 TotMktAd r 38.36 +0.03 First Eagle: GlblA 47.87 +0.13 OverseasA 23.15 +0.12 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.25 +0.01 FoundAl p 11.10 +0.02 HYTFA p 9.51 +0.01 IncomA p 2.25 USGovA p 6.71 +0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p 13.87 +0.06 IncmeAd 2.24 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.27 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.67 +0.03 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.59 +0.04 GlBd A p 13.90 +0.05 GrwthA p 19.20 +0.09 WorldA p 15.81 +0.07 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.93 +0.06 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.12 +0.02 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.89 +0.03 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.51 +0.09 Quality 20.90 +0.03 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.36 +0.07 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.44 +0.01 MidCapV 37.66 +0.07 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.20

+6.1 +5.1 +5.0 +5.3 +5.1 +5.3 +3.3 +2.2 +0.5 +6.1 +0.2 +5.4 +0.6 +3.5 +5.5 +5.2 +5.0 +8.7 +3.4 +7.9 +6.5 +3.3 +4.7 +4.4 +6.2 +4.5 +4.1 +4.2 +4.2 NA

CapApInst 38.24 +0.36 IntlInv t 63.47 +0.29 Intl r 64.12 +0.30 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.30 +0.07 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.33 +0.07 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.14 +0.06 Div&Gr 20.54 -0.06 TotRetBd 11.04 +0.01 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.19 +0.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.37 +0.08 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.05 +0.01 CmstkA 16.60 -0.02 EqIncA 8.92 GrIncA p 20.17 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.85 +0.30 AssetStA p 25.62 +0.31 AssetStrI r 25.85 +0.32 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.47 +0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.46 +0.02 HighYld 8.37 IntmTFBd 10.74 ShtDurBd 10.97 +0.01 USLCCrPls 21.29 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 50.99 +0.21 PrkMCVal T 23.87 +0.03 Twenty T 66.70 +0.30 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.34 LSGrwth 13.38 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.85 +0.03 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.24 +0.04 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.71 +0.19

+4.1 +5.8 +5.9 +1.9 +2.0 +4.2 +5.3 +1.3 -0.8 +3.9 +5.4 +5.9 +4.3 +5.2 +4.7 +5.0 +5.0 +0.9 +1.0 +4.5 +0.6 +0.4 +3.0 +0.7 +5.8 +1.5 NA NA +0.3 +0.2 +8.7

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.74 +0.03 +4.7 StrInc C 15.38 +0.02 +4.6 LSBondR 14.68 +0.03 +4.6 StrIncA 15.31 +0.03 +4.9 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.36 +0.02 +3.2 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.04 -0.02 +4.2 BdDebA p 8.04 +4.7 ShDurIncA p 4.61 +0.01 +1.4 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.64 +0.01 +1.2 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.51 -0.01 +3.5 ValueA 24.04 -0.07 +5.7 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.15 -0.06 +5.8 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.12 +0.04 +5.9 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 23.78 +0.25 +1.5 MergerFd 16.19 +2.6 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.43 +0.01 +1.7 TotRtBdI 10.43 +0.02 +1.9 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 41.10 +0.28 +10.0 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.55 +0.09 +4.7 GlbDiscZ 30.93 +0.08 +4.7 QuestZ 18.47 +0.01 +4.4 SharesZ 21.85 +0.03 +5.1 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 49.62 +0.20 +8.0 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.39 +0.21 +7.9 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.50 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.93 +4.3 Intl I r 20.21 +0.18 +4.1 Oakmark r 43.72 +0.04 +5.9 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.12 +0.03 +5.3

GlbSMdCap 16.25 +0.12 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 36.75 +0.19 GlobA p 63.99 +0.29 GblStrIncA 4.38 +0.01 IntBdA p 6.63 MnStFdA 33.07 -0.03 RisingDivA 16.23 +0.02 S&MdCpVl 33.86 +0.10 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.71 +0.01 S&MdCpVl 28.98 +0.09 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.66 +0.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.37 +0.18 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.94 +0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.91 +0.03 AllAsset 12.48 +0.02 ComodRR 9.73 +0.02 HiYld 9.49 InvGrCp 10.64 +0.02 LowDu 10.47 RealRtnI 11.59 +0.02 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 10.94 +0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.59 +0.02 TotRtA 10.94 +0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.94 +0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.94 +0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.94 +0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.62 +0.10 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.47 -0.02 Price Funds: BlChip 39.83 +0.26 CapApp 21.22 +0.02 EmMktS 36.22 +0.33

+5.0 +0.8 +6.0 +3.9 +2.2 +2.1 +4.9 +5.7 +4.6 +5.4 +4.6 +0.8 +1.7 +3.9 +4.1 +7.6 +4.1 +3.1 +1.5 +3.0 +0.7 +1.8 +2.8 +1.7 +1.5 +1.7 +1.8 +4.0 +3.9 +4.5 +4.5 +2.7

EqInc 24.79 EqIndex 35.43 Growth 33.54 HlthSci 34.38 HiYield 6.95 IntlBond 10.17 IntlStk 14.77 MidCap 62.97 MCapVal 24.76 N Asia 19.54 New Era 55.39 N Horiz 36.69 N Inc 9.47 R2010 15.90 R2015 12.36 R2020 17.14 R2025 12.58 R2030 18.10 R2035 12.83 R2040 18.27 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 36.93 SmCapVal 37.90 SpecIn 12.53 Value 24.70 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.20 VoyA p 24.24 Royce Funds: LwPrSkSv r 19.36 PennMuI r 12.51 PremierI r 22.20 TotRetI r 13.82 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.13 S&P Sel 20.56 Scout Funds: Intl 33.81 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.34 Sequoia 143.60 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.47 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 53.96

-0.04 +5.0 +0.01 +5.0 +0.25 +4.3 +0.21 +13.5 +0.01 +4.6 +0.01 +2.9 +0.10 +3.8 +0.35 +7.6 +4.4 +0.29 +1.9 +0.09 +6.2 +0.28 +9.6 +0.02 +0.8 +0.03 +3.7 +0.03 +4.0 +0.05 +4.3 +0.03 +4.5 +0.06 +4.7 +0.04 +4.9 +0.06 +4.9 +0.7 +0.08 +7.3 -0.04 +4.9 +0.01 +2.5 -0.03 +5.8 -0.05 +5.1 +0.01 +2.2 +0.05 +0.02 +0.07 +0.02

+6.1 +7.4 +9.1 +5.1

+0.03 +5.2 +0.01 +5.1 +0.17 +4.4 +0.02 +4.7 -0.03 +11.1 +0.11 +7.1 +0.40 +4.3

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.68 IntValue I 30.33 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.48 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.00 CAITAdm 10.69 CpOpAdl 80.00 EMAdmr r 41.07 Energy 134.64 ExtdAdm 43.98 500Adml 121.16 GNMA Ad 10.73 GrwAdm 32.85 HlthCr 55.39 HiYldCp 5.82 InfProAd 26.14 ITBdAdml 11.12 ITsryAdml 11.26 IntGrAdm 64.34 ITAdml 13.21 ITGrAdm 9.85 LtdTrAd 10.99 LTGrAdml 9.25 LT Adml 10.57 MCpAdml 98.53 MuHYAdm 9.97 PrmCap r 71.21 ReitAdm r 81.33 STsyAdml 10.68 STBdAdml 10.53 ShtTrAd 15.86 STIGrAd 10.75 SmCAdm 37.12 TtlBAdml 10.55 TStkAdm 33.12 WellslAdm 53.61 WelltnAdm 55.53 Windsor 47.94 WdsrIIAd 48.29 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.50 CapOpp 34.63

+0.27 +6.0 +0.27 +6.1 +0.13 +2.8 +0.03 +3.5 +0.01 +0.9 +0.31 +4.2 +0.26 +3.0 +0.35 +11.3 +0.13 +6.6 +0.04 +5.1 +0.01 +0.8 +0.12 +4.2 +0.05 +8.1 +4.2 +0.06 +3.0 +0.02 +0.7 +0.02 +0.1 +0.47 +4.6 +0.01 +0.6 +0.01 +1.5 +0.01 +0.6 +0.04 +0.7 +0.2 +0.43 +6.9 +0.01 +0.1 +0.23 +4.3 -0.08 +4.4 +0.01 +0.2 +0.01 +0.5 +0.4 +0.01 +1.0 +0.09 +6.7 +0.01 +0.5 +0.03 +5.3 +0.06 +2.9 -0.03 +4.1 -0.08 +5.2 -0.09 +6.0 +0.02 +4.3 +0.13 +4.2

DivdGro 15.12 Energy 71.70 EqInc 21.51 Explr 78.55 GNMA 10.73 GlobEq 18.82 HYCorp 5.82 HlthCre 131.25 InflaPro 13.31 IntlGr 20.22 IntlVal 33.12 ITIGrade 9.85 LifeCon 16.72 LifeGro 23.00 LifeMod 20.24 LTIGrade 9.25 Morg 18.90 MuInt 13.21 PrecMtls r 27.42 PrmcpCor 14.35 Prmcp r 68.62 SelValu r 19.94 STAR 19.75 STIGrade 10.75 StratEq 20.01 TgtRetInc 11.48 TgRe2010 22.97 TgtRe2015 12.82 TgRe2020 22.88 TgtRe2025 13.11 TgRe2030 22.59 TgtRe2035 13.68 TgtRe2040 22.48 TgtRe2045 14.12 USGro 19.22 Wellsly 22.13 Welltn 32.15 Wndsr 14.20 WndsII 27.20 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.46 TotIntlInst r 109.86 500 121.15 Growth 32.85

-0.02 +5.1 +0.18 +11.3 -0.02 +6.2 +0.50 +7.7 +0.01 +0.8 +0.06 +5.4 +4.2 +0.13 +8.0 +0.03 +3.0 +0.15 +4.6 +0.16 +3.0 +0.01 +1.5 +0.03 +2.6 +0.05 +4.3 +0.04 +3.4 +0.04 +0.6 +0.12 +4.8 +0.01 +0.6 +0.11 +2.7 +0.03 +4.2 +0.22 +4.3 +0.03 +6.3 +0.06 +3.5 +0.01 +1.0 +0.07 +9.2 +0.02 +2.3 +0.05 +3.0 +0.03 +3.2 +0.05 +3.5 +0.03 +3.9 +0.05 +4.2 +0.03 +4.5 +0.05 +4.6 +0.03 +4.6 +0.14 +5.3 +0.03 +2.9 -0.02 +4.0 -0.03 +5.1 -0.05 +6.0 +0.14 +0.56 +0.03 +0.13

+4.2 +4.2 +5.0 +4.2

MidCap

21.70 +0.09 +6.9

SmCap

37.07 +0.09 +6.7

SmlCpGth

23.81 +0.14 +8.6

SmlCpVl

16.76 -0.02 +4.7

STBnd

10.53 +0.01 +0.4

TotBnd

10.55 +0.01 +0.4

TotlIntl

16.42 +0.09 +4.2

TotStk

33.11 +0.03 +5.3

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.44 +0.05 +4.6

ExtIn

43.98 +0.13 +6.6

FTAllWldI r

98.04 +0.48 +4.5

GrwthIst

32.85 +0.13 +4.2

InfProInst

10.65 +0.03 +3.1

InstIdx

120.32 +0.04 +5.1

InsPl

120.32 +0.04 +5.1

InsTStPlus

29.95 +0.03 +5.4

MidCpIst

21.76 +0.09 +6.9

SCInst

37.11 +0.08 +6.7

TBIst

10.55 +0.01 +0.5

TSInst

33.13 +0.04 +5.4

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

100.08 +0.03 +5.1

STBdIdx

10.53 +0.01 +0.5

TotBdSgl

10.55 +0.01 +0.5

TotStkSgl

31.97 +0.04 +5.4

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.86 +0.02 +1.9

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.59 -0.01 +6.3


B USI N ESS

B6 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M  TODAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. CENTRAL OREGON CHRISTIAN BUSINESS ASSOCIATION MONTHLY BREAKFAST MEETING: Bob Schuster, co-founder of Dynamic Coaching, will share what he has learned during his 45 years in business. Breakfast included. RSVP requested; $10; 6:30-7:45 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-788-5301 or info@ cocba.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. HOW TO RAISE BACKYARD CHICKENS: Free; noon; Cowgirl Cash, 924 Brooks St., Bend; 541815-8996. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541553-3243. SOCIAL SECURITY 101: RSVP requested; free; 4-5:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. GENERATING GREAT ADVERTISING CONCEPTS: Registration required; $49; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MICROSOFT CERTIFICATION PREP, EXCEL 2007: Four-session course. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY INSIDE MAY’S GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND: Review the proposed project recommendations for $30 million worth of road improvements with Bend City Manager Eric King, Transportation Engineering Manager Nick Arnis and Better Roads for Bend Co-Chair Amy Tykeson. Reservations encouraged; $30 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members, $40 at the door; 7:15-9 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by American Family Insurance; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-536-6237 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. SOCIAL CULTURE & THE SOCIAL

MEDIA POLICY: Explore ways to promote an internal social culture and create a social media policy that will enhance and support online social activity; free; 11 a.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-7198880, chevypham@gmail.com or http://host5.evanced.info/deschutes/ evanced/eventcalendar.asp. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 6 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-5088681, rcooper@bendhabitat.org or www.bendhabitat.org.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 11 a.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-5088681, rcooper@bendhabitat.org or www.bendhabitat.org.

MONDAY WORD 2007, BEYOND THE BASICS: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON RETIRED EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION MEETING: $8.50 for lunch; 11:30 a.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-382-7044. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4-8 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY MARKETING TO YOUR BEST CUSTOMERS: Cheryl McIntosh of Studio Absolute will discuss ways to reach buyers, build brand loyalty and grow your business. Two threehour classes; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUYER STRATEGIES FOR TODAY’S REAL ESTATE MARKET: Presented by The Oregon and Beyond Real Estate Group of Steve Scott Realtors. Reservations encouraged; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First American Title Insurance Co., 395 S.W. Bluff, Bend; 541-693-2009.

WEDNESDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining .com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NETWORKING SOCIAL: Hosted by At Home Care Group; free; 5:30 p.m.; Home Federal Bank, 8222 N. U.S. Highway 97 #2110; 541-9232679 or www.crrchamber.com. ACCESS 2007, BEGINNING: Two-evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. LAUNCH YOUR BUSINESS: Working with a business adviser and classroom peers, class participants learn how to start a business and develop a working plan. Class combines four one-hour sessions for coaching and three three-hour classes on Wednesday evenings. Registration required; $79; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY April 21 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7:00 a.m; free; Bend

Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. DISCOVER WHAT IS HOLDING YOU BACK FROM SUCCESS: Briam Klemmer, author of “The Compassionate Samurai,” will discuss how to break through old habits and find new ways to address professional and personal challenges; $39 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $49 for others; 7:30-11:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. 18TH ANNUAL OREGONIANS AGAINST DISCRIMINATION BUSINESS LEADERS LUNCHEON: “Summit for a Stronger Oregon” with keynote speaker Gov. John Kitzhaber; $75; noon-1 p.m.; Oregon Convention Center, 777 N.E. Martin Luther King Blvd., Portland; 503222-6151, juan@basicrights.org or https://equalityfederation.salsalabs. com/o/35028/p/salsa/event/ common/public/?event_KEY=592.

FRIDAY April 22 REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Comfort Suites, 2243 S.W. Yew Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmond oregon.com. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Two Friday mornings. Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. PRACTICAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT: Two Friday sessions. Registration required; $349; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

SATURDAY April 23 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY April 25 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY April 26 CORE SELLING SKILLS OVERVIEW: A 90-minute overview by Rich Rudnick of Smart Sales Solutions. Rudnick will discuss building instant rapport, prequalifying leads, presentation development, mastering objections and closing the sale; $25 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members; $45 for others; 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. BEGINNING EXCEL: Two-evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

NEWS OF RECORD

Water

PERMITS City of Bend

Marken Heights Development, 2668 N.W. Nordeen, $232,972 Bruce L. Kemp, 61178 S.W. Teton, $231,288 Brookswood Bend LLC, 19633 Harvard, $270,284 Deschutes County

Bradley J. Carlson, 56917 Dancing Rock Loop, Bend, $404,634.08 William R. St. Clair, 70055 McKenzie Canyon Road, Sisters, $249,926.11 Sanders Nye, 63890 Johnson Road, Bend, $127,058.22

Wells Fargo to tap frequent travelers to test new credit cards Bloomberg News NEW YORK — Wells Fargo, the U.S. bank with the most branches, is testing microchipembedded credit cards with frequent travelers to address complaints of customers who have trouble using their cards abroad. The pilot program marks the first effort by a major U.S. bank to deploy Visa Inc. credit cards with so-called EMV-chip technology, which has become a standard in Europe and much of the rest of the world, according to San Francisco-based Wells Fargo. The lender is preparing to notify 15,000 customers it identified as frequent travelers, including college students and clients of its private bank, that they’ve been invited to participate in the pilot. The cardholders will receive the EMV cards in the middle of the year.

Continued from B1 “It is part of our core beliefs to change the industry,” Emery said. Earth2o’s efforts have earned Emery recognition far beyond Culver. The SBA named him 2010 Oregon Small Business Person of the year, inviting him in May to a White House ceremony, where he had an opportunity to talk to agency officials. He also serves on the Oregon Business Development Commission. Various government programs have helped Earth2o grow over the years, Emery said, such as the Manufacturing Extension Partnership program, which is administered through a U.S. Commerce Department agency. A loan through the SBA helped the company expand a warehouse once owned by Sea-

swirl Boats, which shut down operations in Culver in 2007. Emery and Earth2o serve as an example that small businesses can tap into export markets, Karen Mills, administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration, said Wednesday, and such efforts will help the nation achieve President Obama’s goal of doubling exports by 2015. “Across this country there are export opportunities for all small businesses,” she said. Mills also praised Earth2o’s green practices. Some businesses, she said, believe they will increase costs by adopting more green practices, when in fact, Mills said, they can reduce costs, waste and overhead. “Steve is a great example of doing all of the above,” she said. Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

Japanese government lowers economic outlook By Bettina Wassener New York Times News Service

HONG KONG — In the latest sign of the economic toll wrought by the natural disasters last month in Japan, the government in Tokyo on Wednesday lowered its assessment of the Japanese economy for the first time in six months. The economy is expected to start to recover from the severe earthquake-induced downturn later this year, the cabinet office said in its monthly economic report for April. But for now, exports, private consumption, corporate profits and the job market remain under pressure, further weighing on the economy. Japan had

already been struggling with deflation, persistently anemic growth and a seemingly intractable government debt burden well before the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck on March 11. “Weakness will continue for a while” because of the catastrophes, Japan’s cabinet office said in a statement, which was noticeably bleaker than the assessment it issued soon after the quake in March. The assessment echoed that of the Japanese central bank, which said last week that the economy was “under strong downward pressure” and that there was “high uncertainty” about the possible effects of the disaster on the economy.

CENTRAL OREGON BUILDERS ASSOCIATION

HOME NINETEENTH

&

ANNUAL

GARDEN S H O W PRESENTED BY:

BUSINESS CALENDAR

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

MAY 6, 7 & 8, 2011

WEDNESDAY April 27 NEIGHBORHOOD NIGHT: NorthWest Crossing businesses and restaurants will offer specials, entertainment and giveaways. Held the last Wednesday of each month; free; 5-8 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend.

THURSDAY April 28 BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. CENTRAL OREGON BUSINESS EXPO: Columbia State Bank and the Redmond Chamber of Commerce & CVB present this business-tobusiness networking event. The event includes workshops and the opportunity to exchange information and ideas with fellow exhibiting companies. Keynote speaker luncheon begins at 11:45 a.m. and the expo opens at 1 p.m; free; 1-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-923-5191 or www.cobusiness expo.com.

Reach more than 70,000 Central Oregon readers in the official Home & Garden Show guide.

Official Show Guide Publishes: in The Bulletin Saturday, April 30 Advertising Deadline: Friday, April 15

For show information visit: www.centraloregonshow.com

To Advertise, call your Bulletin Sales Representative at 541-382-1811


L

Inside

OREGON Portland man accused of rape in Denver airport, see Page C3. Power firm may halt wind power during spring runoff, see Page C3.

OBITUARIES Sidney Harman, innovator and Newsweek owner, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE

4th case identified in Central Oregon

C

House sends K-12 bill to governor $5.7 billion funding measure likely will result in further cuts for school districts By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

SALEM — House lawmakers passed the $5.7 billion K-12 budget Wednesday even as many conceded the amount was not enough and would translate into layoffs and shorter school years for districts throughout the state.

“I ask for your support, even when I say we are not providing our children with the same opportunities we had,” said Peter Buckley, D-Ashland, one of the budget writing co-chairs. “We are not doing that, and it is to our disgrace that we’re not doing that.” But lawmakers who voted

IN THE LEGISLATURE in favor of the bill said it would at least be passed early enough to give districts time to plan, avoiding last-minute budget scrambles. Opponents, however, urged lawmakers to dip more into reserves. At least one lawmaker, Rep. Bob Jenson, R-Pendleton,

spoke and said the $5.7 billion figure is too high. The House passed the budget by a 32-28 vote.

Kitzhaber likely to sign On Tuesday, the Senate approved the $5.7 billion budget unanimously. Both chambers agreed to use $100 million from the Education Stability Fund. The budget now heads to the governor, who is expected to sign it.

Among those who would like to rely more heavily on reserve funds is House Democratic Leader Dave Hunt, of Gladstone, who said rainy day funds were created for times like these. “It is raining,” Hunt said. “And it is time to use reserve funds to fill at least some of these critical holes.” Hunt called the balance of the state’s rainy day funds — one of which contains roughly $440 million — “unacceptably high.” See Funding / C5

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A fourth case of meningococcal disease has been identified in Central Oregon, but public health officials say it is unrelated to the three other cases reported in a little more than a month. Tom Kuhn, community health program manager for Deschutes County Health Services, said the victim, a woman in her 30s, is recovering. The newest patient is infected with the Y strain of the disease, Kuhn said, while earlier patients in Crook and Deschutes counties contracted the B and C strains. Vaccines are available for both the Y and C strains, but there is no vaccine for the B strain.

Bend doctor suspended for relations with patient By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

‘A coincidence’ “It seems to be a large number cases in a short period of time in a small geographic area,” Kuhn said. “However, since the most recent case is a Y — of the four cases there have been three different strains — there’s still no cause for alarm that this is an outbreak. It’s still being called a coincidence.” The health department said those in close contact with the woman recently diagnosed have been advised to take antibiotics to lessen the chances of infection and transmission. The first case of meningococcal to be reported in Central Oregon this year came on March 9 when Colbey Cloutier, a 16-yearold Crook County High School student, was hospitalized. Michael Hodnett, 24, of Prineville, was hospitalized with the same strain as Cloutier on March 15. Crook County Health officials said despite the strains being the same there is no greater concern to the public.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

True horse power Event showcases methods, gear for animal-driven agriculture

T

Infant dies March 20

urning the soil over in straight rows, 15-year-old Jacob McIntosh, above, of Redmond, guides

his Belgian Draft horses Dan, 9, and

An unidentified infant from Deschutes County died from a different strain of the disease on March 20. Richard Leman, a public health physician with the state public health division, said while meningococcal infections are rare, the recent spike in Central Oregon isn’t out of the ordinary. Infections are most common between November and March, Leman said. “It is a fairly unusual infection,” Leman said. “Typically we see 30 to 40 cases a year (statewide), so that works out to be a bit less than one in 100,000 people.” Kuhn said how the meningococcal bacteria operates is a mystery. The bacteria is present in the nose and throat of more than 10 percent of the population, he said, and is transmitted by saliva or respiratory secretions, but is harmless to most carriers. For reasons not fully understood, the bacteria will at times move into a carrier’s bloodstream, he said, causing high fever, headaches and a stiff neck. See Disease / C5

Rambo, 12, from left, through their plotted lot as they compete against other farmers in the walking division of the Plowing Match at the Small Farmer’s Journal Horsedrawn Auction & Swap at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds in Madras on Wednesday afternoon. The event, which runs through Saturday, offers a variety of free demonstrations and clinics on animal-powered agriculture and all the various elements that go along with it. At left, attendees browse through a booth offering saddles and other equestrian gear at the fairgrounds.

Fewer entering Deschutes’ juvenile justice system County re-evaluating cost-effectiveness of services beyond those required by state law By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

The number of kids entering Deschutes County’s juvenile justice system is on the decline, prompting the county to re-evaluate its menu of juvenile services.

From 2009 through 2010, the number of kids under county supervision on an average day decreased by about 17 percent, falling from 471 to 390, according to Community Justice Director Ken Hales. Recently, Hales appeared before the county commission to present a report on the cost-effectiveness of certain county juvenile services. Many of the juvenile services the county provides, such as reporting to school administrators and taking charge of kids before

and after court hearings, are mandated by state law, County Administrator Dave Kanner wrote in a staff report. So Hales looked at additional juvenile services the county chooses to provide. Hales concluded in his report that the county cannot save any more money at the juvenile detention center unless it closes another cell unit. The county closed one of the facility’s three cells, known as “pods,” last year, laying off five employees. Commission-

ers at that time asked Hales to produce a report on juvenile services. Hales concluded that closing another unit “may result in insufficient capacity to serve current and near future demand.” Though the county might have to lay off juvenile probation officers in the future, Hales does not want to do so in the coming budget year. Instead, he wants to see whether juvenile crime trends change. Meanwhile, Hales has in-

structed his staff to move kids under supervision for “violations” through the system more quickly. Violations are acts that would not be crimes if the offenders were adults. “For the most part, we’re talking about minor in possession” violations, Hales said. County juvenile employees might, for example, monitor these kids’ compliance with conditions of a diversion program, such as community service and drug and alcohol evaluations. See Juveniles / C5

A Bend gynecologist has been reprimanded and placed on one month’s suspension after the Oregon Medical Board found he had violated state law with dishonorable conduct and repeated acts of negligence. Dr. David Redwine, who operates his own gynecology clinic in Bend, received the stipulated order from the board because he was involved in a sexual relationship with a patient and improperly prescribed drugs to her and members of her family. In an e-mailed statement, Redwine said he will begin performing surgery again in May when his suspension is up. “The most important outcome of this action is that I will be able to continue to practice medicine, for which I am grateful to the Board,” he wrote. “I self-reported to the Board, cooperated fully with their very thorough investigation, and I am satisfied with the result.”

Professional boundaries In the April 8 order, the medical board states that Redwine prescribed a variety of medications for the complaining patient, including an oral steroid, patches for nausea, an antibiotic, fenfluramine for weight loss, Valtrex for herpes, and others. According to the order, Redwine also performed a breast exam on the patient in “an informal social setting that was witnessed by a family member and a friend,” developed a sexual relationship with the patient in the mid-2000s and loaned the patient about $935,000 to invest in the real estate market. Redwine’s order went into effect on April 8. He was fined $5,000 and his medical license is suspended for 30 days. In the meantime, he must take a class on professional boundaries and appropriate prescribing and have weekly psychotherapy meetings for at least a year. The board began its investigation in October when it notified Redwine that it had found evidence to support allegations he violated state law and that it planned to take disciplinary action against him.

Malpractice lawsuit Much of the information in the board’s complaint was similar to that included in a malpractice lawsuit filed in August 2009 by a Jane Doe in Clackamas County. That lawsuit alleged negligence and intentional infliction of emotional distress; asked for past and future medical expenses associated with a surgery and economic and noneconomic damages associated with emotional distress. It was transferred to Deschutes County and has not moved forward. Documents related to that case confirm Jane Doe is Tami Sawyer, a former Bend real estate broker who was indicted in November on federal charges of bank fraud, wire fraud, money laundering, false statement to a financial institution and conspiracy to commit wire fraud. See Suspended / C5


C2 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Redmond Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 5:08 a.m. April 12, in the 2100 block of Southwest Canyon Drive. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:29 a.m. April 11, in the 1300 block of Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:50 a.m. April 11, in the 61300 block of Big Eddy Circle. Theft — A theft was reported at 9 a.m. April 11, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:20 a.m. April 11, in the 300 block of Northeast Burnside Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:42 p.m. April 11, in the 100 block of Northwest Cascade Place. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 1:53 p.m. April 11, in the 3000 block of Northeast Charleston Court. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 2:36 p.m. April 11, in the 61500 block of 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 5:13 p.m. April 11, in the 1800 block of Northeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:47 p.m. April 11, in the 300 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at

7:10 p.m. April 11, in the 1600 block of Northeast Watson Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:23 p.m. April 11, in the 1100 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. DUII — Amanda Marie Brinegar, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:58 p.m. April 11, in the area of Murphy and Parrell roads. DUII — Pavel Tkachenko, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:09 p.m. April 11, in the 1100 block of Southeast U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:56 a.m. April 12, in the 3000 block of Northeast Charleston Court. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:43 a.m. April 12, in the 100 block of Southeast Ninth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:09 a.m. April 12, in the 700 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:19 a.m. April 12, in the 2700 block of Northeast 27th Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:59 a.m. April 12, in the 2100 block of Northwest High Lakes Loop. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:06 a.m. April 12, in the 20200 block of Mountain High Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 10:30 a.m. April 12, in the 500 block of Northwest Sean Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 12:03 p.m. April 12, in the 1600 block of Northwest Fresno Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:38 p.m. April 12, in the 3300 block of Northwest Panorama Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:55 p.m. April 12, in the 61600 block of Southeast 27th Street.

L B  

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 3:46 p.m. April 12, in the 1400 block of Northeast Tucson Way. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 6:21 p.m. April 12, in the 65100 block of 97th Street in Bend. Theft — A truck radiator was reported stolen at 12:25 p.m. April 12, in the 53800 block of Rock Sand Road in La Pine. DUII — Michael Joel Kelly, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:31 a.m. April 12, in the area of 61st Street and North U.S. Highway 97 in Redmond. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:25 p.m. April 6, in the area of Highway 126 near milepost 8. DUII — Patrick Dillin Boni, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:41 p.m. April 12, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 115 in Terrebonne.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Dachshund — Young female, red wirehair; found near West Antler Avenue and Northwest 35th Street. Hound mix — Female puppy, brown and white; found near Terrebonne.

FREE BEEF DAY AT WASHINGTON’S CAPITOL

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Deschutes advances permit extensions The Deschutes County Commission moved ahead Wednesday with plans to approve an additional two-year extension for those who currently hold development approvals from the county. The next step is a public hearing, which is currently unscheduled, where the commissioners will hear public testimony and ultimately vote on the extension. County staff will recommend that all development projects approved prior to the day the ordinance passes get the benefits, said Nick Lelack Deschutes County planning director. For developers and builders, this proposed extension would make it seven years that they’ve been allowed to sit on their development approvals. The county already allows two years from the date they’re approved to start building and three one-year extensions after that.

Deschutes jail work to begin in May A remodeling project at the Deschutes County jail will come in approximately $200,000 dollars under budget, officials announced Wednesday. Contractor HSW Builders is expected to start next month on a remodel that will expand the male staff’s locker rooms as well as kitchen storage and the lunchroom, the Sheriff’s Office said. Jail staff are not allowed to leave for meal breaks during their shifts. The remodel will also expand the inmates’ program area and the evidence storage area. The county is paying for the project with internal loans, which are supposed to be repaid in the future with proceeds from real estate sales. The project will not result in a tax increase, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

southbound lane on Northeast Division Street between Seward Avenue and Revere Avenue will be closed. From 12:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., both lanes of Northeast Fourth Street between Addison Avenue to Underwood Avenue will be closed. On Northeast Olney Avenue between Fifth Street and Sixth Street, the eastbound lane will be closed between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. On Northeast Neff Road between Cliff Drive and Northeast 12th Street, the westbound lane will be closed between 3 p.m. and 4 p.m. Flaggers, signs and traffic cones will be in place to facilitate traffic during the lane closures.

Deschutes Land Trust gets $30,000 grant The Deschutes Land Trust has been awarded a $30,000 grant from the Conservation Alliance to support its campaign to buy the Skyline Forest. The Land Trust has been working since 2005 to buy the 33,000acre property, a former tree farm that stretches from Bend to Sisters. It will use the grant funds to offer bike rides, walks and other activities designed to raise awareness about the forest, which is still at risk, said Brad Chalfant, the trust’s executive director. “The landowner can still decide to develop or sell the property,� he said.

Rep. Walden accepting entries for art contest Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., announced Wednesday that his office is accepting submissions for a national art competition whose winners will have their work displayed in the U.S. Capitol. The 2011 Congressional Art Competition, An Artistic Discovery, is open to high school students. Those in Walden’s district, which includes Central Oregon,

Bend lane closures scheduled for Friday

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

Rod Wesselman, in front, of Moses Lake, Wash., and the regional manager of the American Angus Association, cooks tri-tip beef with Jack Field, of Ellensburg, Wash., and the executive vice president of the Washington Cattlemen’s Association on Wednesday at the state Capitol in Olympia, Wash. The WCA served nearly 500 pounds of free beef to lawmakers and visitors as part of its annual “Beef Day.�

Titanic hits iceberg, sinks in 1912 The Associated Press Today is Thursday, April 14, the 104th day of 2011. There are 261 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was shot and mortally wounded by John Wilkes Booth during a performance of “Our American Cousin� at Ford’s Theater in Washington; the president died nine hours later. ON THIS DATE In 1775, the first American society for the abolition of slavery was formed in Philadelphia. In 1828, the first edition of Noah Webster’s “American Dictionary of the English Language� was published. In 1910, President William Howard Taft became the first U.S. chief executive to throw the ceremonial first pitch at a baseball game as the Washington Senators beat the Philadelphia Athletics 3-0. In 1912, the British liner RMS Titanic collided with an iceberg in the North Atlantic and began sinking. In 1931, King Alfonso XIII of Spain went into exile, and the Second Spanish Republic was proclaimed. In 1949, at the conclusion of the so-called “Wilhelmstrasse Trial,� 19 former Nazi Foreign Office officials were sentenced by an American tribunal in Nuremberg to prison terms ranging from four to 25 years. In 1956, Ampex Corp. demonstrated the first successful videotape recorder at the National Association of Radio and Televi-

T O D AY IN HISTORY sion Broadcasters Convention in Chicago. In 1960, the musical “Bye Bye Birdie� opened on Broadway. In 1981, the first test flight of America’s first operational space shuttle, the Columbia, ended successfully with a landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California. In 1986, Americans got word of a U.S. air raid on Libya (because of the time difference, it was the early morning of April 15 where the attack occurred.) French feminist author Simone de Beauvoir died in Paris at age 78. TEN YEARS AGO The 24 crew members of the U.S. spy plane who’d been held in China for 11 days landed at their home base, Whidbey Island Naval Air Station in Washington, where they were greeted by thousands of friends, family members and other well-wishers. FIVE YEARS AGO President George W. Bush rebuffed recommendations from a growing number of retired generals that he replace Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, saying, “He has my full support.� Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant broke the team’s single-season scoring record, getting 50 points to eclipse Elgin Baylor’s long-standing total of 2,719 points in a 110-99 victory over the Portland Trail Blazers.

ONE YEAR AGO A magnitude-7 earthquake in a remote Tibetan region of China killed some 2,700 people and injured more than 10,000. The Eyjafjallajokul volcano in Iceland erupted, sending out an ash plume that led most northern European countries to close their airspace between April 15 and 20, grounding about 10 million travelers worldwide. Ultra marathoner and amputee Amy PalmieroWinters won the Sullivan Award as America’s top amateur athlete. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Bradford Dillman is 81. Actor Jay Robinson is 81. Country singer Loretta Lynn is 76. Actress Julie Christie is 71. Retired MLB All-Star Pete Rose is 70. Rock musician Ritchie Blackmore is 66. Actor John Shea is 62. Actor-race car driver Brian Forster is 51. Actor Brad Garrett is 51. Actor Robert Carlyle is 50. Rock singer-musician John Bell (Widespread Panic) is 49. Actor Robert Clendenin is 47. Actress Catherine Dent is 46. Actor Lloyd Owen is 45.Retired MLB All-Star Greg Maddux is 45. Rock musician Barrett Martin is 44. Actor Anthony Michael Hall is 43. Actor Adrien Brody is 38. Classical singer David Miller is 38. Rapper DaBrat is 37.Actor Antwon Tanner is 36. Actress Sarah Michelle Gellar is 34. Actor-producer Rob McElhenney is 34. Actress Vivien Cardone is 18. Actress Abigail Breslin is 15. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Change your life today. Don’t gamble on the future, act now, without delay.� — Simone de Beauvoir (1 9 0 8 -1 9 8 6 )

Scheduled tree trimming efforts will cause short-term lane closures around Bend on Friday from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. From 8 to 10 a.m., the northbound lane on Jamison Street between Poe Sholes Drive and a dead end will be closed. The southbound lane on Vogt Road from Mary Way to Raymond Court will be closed from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. From 10 a.m. to noon, the

should submit no more than two photographs of their work to Walden’s office by May 2. A panel of judges will choose the winner from Walden’s district, and that work will become part of a student art exhibit in the Capitol. Four district runners-up will have their work displayed in Walden’s offices in Washington, D.C., Medford, Bend and La Grande. All artwork will be displayed for one year then returned. Entry forms and other information can be found on Walden’s website, http://walden.house .gov/ArtCompetition.

Bend Police chief to address AAUW Bend Police Chief Sandi Baxter will speak at Saturday’s breakfast meeting of the American Association of University Women about challenges of leading the police force. Baxter, born and raised in Bend, began her law enforcement career in 1977 as a reserve officer with the Bend Police Department and was hired as its first female patrol officer in 1979. She’s held many positions, including K-9 handler and detective. She was appointed chief in 2009 and will retire soon. The meeting, from 9:30 a.m. to noon at Touchmark, 19800 S.W. Touchmark Way, is open to the public. Reservations are required for the buffet breakfast and the cost is $13. RSVP to bendaauw@ officeliveusers.com by April 13. The American Association of University Women advances equity for women and girls. For more information, visit http://bend branchaauw.club.officelive.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 C3

O Portland man, 26, accused of raping woman at airport

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BPA may curb excess wind power

By Sheila V Kumar The Associated Press

DENVER — A man appeared in court Wednesday after his arrest on suspicion of raping a woman who was waiting for a flight at Denver International Airport, and her family has raised questions about whether some employees witnessed the attack but didn’t intervene. The suspect, Noel Alexander Bertrand, 26, of Portland, was being held in lieu of $50,000 bond. Authorities said he didn’t yet have an attorney. Authorities said the alleged attack occurred at about 12:30 a.m. Tuesday in the nearly deserted Concourse A. Family members said the woman had missed a connecting flight Monday evening and had to spend the night at the airport. Family members said the woman told them three people she believed to be airport employees walked by without helping. Police spokesman Sonny Jackson said two workers pulled a man off a woman shortly before police officers and airport security personnel arrived, and others saw the incident and telephoned for help but didn’t intervene.

The Associated Press

Scobel Wiggins / Corvallis Gazette-Times

Makayla Karnowski, 11, gets support from Ethan Eccles, 10, and Demetrie Nogle, 10, as she learns to ride a unicycle Wednesday in the “circus acts” physical education unit at Wilson Elementary School in Corvallis. In addition to riding unicycles, students are learning how to use Chinese yo-yos and to juggle. Teachers hope the unit will introduce students to other ways of getting exercise and keep them interested in staying fit.

O  B

Jeld-Wen will pay for lumber yard cleanup KLAMATH FALLS — JeldWen will pay the federal government $700,000 after reaching a settlement on the cleanup of a Klamath Falls lumber site the Oregon window and door manufacturing company owned in the early 1970s. The Herald and News in Klamath Falls reports the Environmental Protection Agency

Man hides inside mall, steals jewelry MEDFORD — Police in Medford are looking for a man who hid inside a store at the Rogue Valley Mall and then stole $10,000 worth of jewelry before smashing two glass doors to escape. The Mail Tribune reported that police suspect the same man may have broken into a car wash minutes later, based on surveillance video at both businesses. Medford police responded to the mall break-in at about 11 p.m. Monday and found a jewelry counter at a J.C. Penney Co. store smashed, along with two glass doors. The man was described as white, about 5-feet-10 to 6 feet tall, with short dark hair and a muscular build. He was wearing a white T-shirt with “American Rag” on the front. — From wire reports

Lake of the Woods Resort to get $3.5M face-lift By Lee Juillerat Herald and News

LAKE OF THE WOODS — Modern, but still rustic. While owners of the Lake of the Woods Resort are investing more than $3.5 million to upgrade the lodge and resort, owners John Doherty and George Gregory emphasize they’re taking steps to ensure the historic lodge retains its classic, rustic look. “We’re trying to make it a glo-

rious place and keep that historic flavor,” Gregory said. “It will look like it was built in 1922, but it will have all the amenities,” Doherty said. Crews are hustling to get the resort, including the lodge, its restaurant and bar, along with the marina, cabins and RV park, ready to reopen May 1 after being closed for the month of April. Resort visitors will notice major changes at the lodge, including a new bar, new restrooms,

new windows and new kitchen. Because of the limited construction season, other improvements will be seen in coming years. In 2012, the restaurant capacity will be doubled with a 3,000-squarefoot addition. By 2013, the lodge’s second floor, reached by a new grand stairway and a new elevator, will include a 625-square-foot bar, conference room and large windows that provide lake views. Also planned is a 34-foot gazebo at the water’s edge.

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THE DALLES — A black bear stranded on The Dalles Dam across the Columbia River was shot after wildlife officials decided it could not be rescued. Army Corps of Engineers workers at the dam called the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife after spotting the bear Monday. But wildlife officials decided it was too risky for a person to try to reach the bear. The biologists also thought if they tranquilized the bear, it might tumble 75 feet down the downstream wall. Wildlife spokesman Rick Hargrave said an Oregon State Police trooper shot the bear and it fell into the water on the upstream side of the spillway. Hargrave says after a while they lost sight of the bear in the water. Army Corps officials think the bear may have fallen in the river while fishing and been carried to the dam.

spent five months cleaning up the Circle DE Lumber site, removing a tank used to treat lumber and 500 tons of contaminated soil. Jeld-Wen and federal officials negotiated for about three years on the site cleanup before the government filed a lawsuit in April 2010. But an EPA attorney said it was unlikely the case would have gone to court. Jeld-Wen said many companies had used the site for lumber operations for about 75 years, but Jeld-Wen owned it just briefly, from 1971 to 1973.

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SEATTLE — The Bonneville Power Administration wants to shut down Northwest wind farms this spring when hydroelectric dams are generating plenty of electricity as a huge mountain snowpack melts. The Portland-based BPA may have to limit production from wind farms to free space in the regional power grid, The Seattle Times reported Wednesday. “We’re looking at doing everything we can to avoid the shutdowns, but you have to be able to do something when your back is against the wall,” said Doug Johnson, a BPA spokesman. Before shutting down wind farms, BPA would reduce coal, natural gas and nuclear power plant production as low as possible, he said. The wind-power producers are fighting the proposal that could cost them millions in lost revenue. “There has been a strong united (wind industry) voice saying ‘This is not reasonable,’” says Roby Roberts, a vice president of Horizon Wind Energy, which has built wind farms in Oregon and Washington. Wind farms have been sprouting in Washington and Oregon thanks to tax credits and requirements that utilities use more renewable energy. The Northwest farms are capable of producing up to 3,500 megawatts of power — more than triple the energy of the Northwest’s sole nuclearpower plant. And that capacity could double by 2015. A wind power shutdown would be a last resort, the BPA said, but it has to be ready to balance the flow of energy it markets in the Northwest as well as meeting commitments to ratepayers, helping salmon and selling power outside the region. The industry says if there are shutdowns it should be compensated for lost revenue. Such payments would raise operating costs and could push up rates for the BPA’s major customers — Northwest public utilities, including Seattle City Light, which have endorsed the agency plan. “Bonneville is doing the best they can to try to make this work for all parties, and we support this effort,” said Steve Kern, of Seattle City Light. For many wind power producers, a big part of the payback is collecting tax credits. Those credits couldn’t be collected during shutdowns. They are pressing for alternatives to ship their power to other areas of the U.S. and Canada, and more flexibility to substitute wind power for fossil fuelgenerated electricity outside the region, according to Robert Kahn, who represents many of the region’s major wind-farm operators. In a March 31 letter to the BPA, Sen. Jeff Merkley and Rep. Earl Blumenauer, both of Oregon, wrote that the agency proposal could result in “significant economic harm” to wind-power projects and threaten future development. The pressure appears to have slowed down BPA. The final plan was supposed to be released by April 1 but has now been delayed. In the years ahead, the BPA will try to develop new options for balancing the system, such as diverting surplus river water inland to help recharge aquifers.

Jackson described those who called as “good witnesses” and said calling authorities is what police advise for anyone witnessing a crime. He said the two people who intervened were airline employees. He declined to identify the airline. Airport officials believe airport workers, including employees of outside contractors, “responded appropriately,” spokeswoman Jenny Schiavone said. One of the woman’s family members said she gave this account: A man introduced himself and struck up a conversation with her in a restaurant. She left, and the man followed her, sat down beside her and tried to kiss her. When she objected, the man threw her to the floor and assaulted her. The family members said the woman was flying from her home in Oregon to a convent in Peoria, Ill., to look into a yearlong service program through the Catholic Church. She doesn’t plan to join the convent but is looking for a service activity while she waits to get into a dental hygienist school, they said.

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C4 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Do not restrict public disclosure

R

epublican Jim Huffman believes public disclosure of individual campaign contributions hurts democracy. He wrote in The Wall Street Journal this week about his

failed 2010 attempt to defeat Democratic Sen. Ron Wyden. “The disclosure requirement makes the mountain to be climbed by most challengers even steeper,” he said. His argument for eliminating some disclosure, though, is an argument for a less informed electorate — less confident in the system’s integrity. When Huffman was running against Wyden, he faced a problematic contest. A law professor at Lewis & Clark law school, Huffman was not a household name before he ran. Although there are plenty of independent-minded Oregonians, there were and are more registered Democrats than Republicans. The policy differences between the candidates were pretty much what you might expect, the candidates articulate. In the end, Wyden raised $5.7 million in contributions, Huffman about $2.3 million. Wyden won with 866,507 votes to Huffman’s 566,199. During the campaign, potential individual donors told Huffman they agreed with him, but they didn’t want to get crosswise with Wyden. Some had a matter pending before a federal agency, were working on legislation or were hoping for a federal grant. Disclosure makes “threats possible and fear of retribution plausible,” Huffman wrote. Or it could be that disclosure gives contributors an excuse. Huffman found the benefits of disclosure scant, essentially only promoting the re-election of incumbents.

The cap of individual contributions at $2,400 provides voters with little information, he wrote. He concluded that reporting should still be mandated for tracking contribution limits — without public disclosure. Huffman’s experiences trace the issues of the Buckley v. Valeo case. The U.S. Supreme Court decided it in 1976 in favor of public disclosure. And we can’t argue with his experience. Contribution disclosure does infringe on privacy. Disclosure can make raising money more difficult. But it does not invidiously disadvantage challengers. Challengers do win. As Huffman wrote on his election website after he lost, the story of the 2010 election was how challengers won. The Oregon House and Senate were rebalanced to a nearly 50/50 split between Democrats and Republicans. Congress was also reshaped. It’s vital that voters make informed decisions. Disclosure is one of the least restrictive means of subduing the harms of voter ignorance and money in politics. It’s also hard to make the case that voters do not already know that the mountain to be climbed by challengers is steeper. Disclosure is an imperfect instrument of democracy. Without it, voters become less participants and more spectators.

Staffing fix not simple

W

hile an audit found Deschutes County’s 911 emergency service district might be spending more than necessary on staffing, changing the situation could be difficult to accomplish. There are no quick solutions to the problem, if in fact one exists. The district’s overtime costs are high, no doubt about it. Last year it spent $300,000 on overtime, in no small part because 911 dispatchers work four, 12-hour shifts per week. The quick answer, then, might be to hire enough people to eliminate at least that part of the district’s overtime bill. But Rob Poirier, the district’s new head, says it isn’t as easy as that. For one thing, the district has had trouble recruiting and keeping people in the dispatcher job. It’s a particularly high-stress occupation, and dispatchers apparently are hard to find and, equally important, keep. The current long-day work system was put in place years ago, Poirier said, when that sort of schedule was popular. Too, he said, at the time officials believed the federal Fair Labor Standards Act exemption for police and firefighters from overtime requirements when working a four-day 10-hour week applied also to emer-

gency dispatchers, making the current long-day week cheaper than hiring more dispatchers. Poirier hopes a new, less expensive system can be put in place in a way that works for both the county and for his employees. Then there’s the question raised in the audit of how much service to member agencies is too much. The 911 office is home to the police records of its member agencies, and the county’s audit found it does more record searches and the like than some other mid-size 911 offices. Shifting those records and the care of them back to the individual agencies might save the 911 district money, but as both County Administrator Dave Kanner and Poirier point out, doing so merely shifts the expense associated with them to local police agencies. It is, arguably, cheaper in the long run to keep them centralized at 911. Kanner says the 911 chief has been working on the district’s staffing issues almost from the moment Poirier arrived on the job in mid October. They know the district has staffing, and therefore spending, problems. What is less clear is just what can be done to fix them.

My Nickel’s Worth Don’t cut parks

increases? Is it the private sector who gets services? I’ll let you draw your own conclusion. I can only conclude that not only is folly involved but that the continuing under-reporting of labor expense is most certainly longterm purposeful deceit. Dave Kyle Bend

While I understand the need for cutting certain budgets, I believe that with things as financially difficult as they are for some people, me included, the wilderness, especially the national parks, is one of the only affordable options for a vacation — or a place just “to get away.” I worry that with the National Parks Service already facing a $600 million budget shortfall, even more cuts could be devastating. Ryan Mickelson Bend

Withdraw HB 3347 Rep. Gene Whisnant introduced HB 3347 into the Legislature without any local public input. He made an executive decision for his constituents, without consulting them first. HB 3347 basically gives Sunriver Resort, Lowe Corporation and Sunriver Environmental LLC the freedom to build a dense subdivision containing 925 homes, and they will not have to follow current state and county land use laws and goals. Gene stated at the La Pine Town Hall meeting that the roads were too bad this winter to come over the mountains to consult with his constituents first. Yet I remember several weekends when the roads were indeed good. In any case, a south county bill of this magnitude could have waited for better roads. Had he presented HB 3347 to his constituents before introducing it into the Legislature, he would have found overwhelming opposition. And that is exactly why he moved forward with this “stealth” bill. But since HB 3347 has already been introduced, a legislative committee hearing will be scheduled soon, and many Deschutes County citizens must now travel over the mountains to testify in Salem. It will be their only opportunity to have public input, at much hardship and expense to them. If he’s serious about representing

True accounting I used to think the folly of government overspending was largely the result of a political culture that rewards spending versus sound financial management. Now I understand that Oregon is a prime example of how it happens. It is the accepted practice for government to under-report expenses, especially the cost of labor benefits. We have an experienced governor who portrays the state budget shortfall as $3.5 billion but excludes the $12 billion of unfunded public retiree benefits that are owed but have not been expensed or paid. This means the budget deficit is closer to $16 billion. I guess it is legal because the state has under-reported and underfunded labor expenses for decades. I know that for private companies, the same practice is not legal. How can we solve our current financial problems or prevent future ones if we do not report the actual cost of labor that represents around 60 percent of the total budget? Who benefits the most? Is it the politician who keeps getting elected? Is it public employees who keep getting pay

all his constituents instead of just corporate interests, Gene should immediately withdraw HB 3347. Tina Lyons La Pine

Aliens, not immigrants Joe Stevens’ letter (March 30) about immigrants in Deschutes County doesn’t pass the smell test. First, the people in the examples he cited are illegal aliens. They are not immigrants. That’s like calling an intruder in your home an uninvited house guest. Second, the prevalence of $5-perday pick-and-shovel jobs in Mexico is heartbreaking, but it does not justify illegal behavior here. Mr. Stevens should know that everyone who desires to come to the U.S. has no inherent right to do so. We simply do not have the resources to take in all would-be immigrants. That’s why we have immigration laws. We are a sovereign nation and have a legal obligation to pick and choose the number and quality of those we allow in. Finally, Mr. Stevens’ assertion that almost two-thirds of those detained by ICE from Deschutes County have had no criminal records is laughable. All people here illegally by definition are criminals. Criminal behavior has consequences. Deportation is a consequence of illegal entry. I fully support legal immigration, so I say this to potential immigrants: If you want to come here, knock at the front door and ask permission to enter. You have absolutely no right to sneak in the back door under cover of darkness and then expect a warm welcome and a place at the table. Greg Franklin Bend

Letters policy

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Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Biomass energy helps manage forests, lowers dependence By John Shelk Bulletin guest columnist

I

n the discussion prompted by the Seattle Times’ story printed April 4 in The Bulletin (“New studies sully reputation of biomass as clean and green …”) I’d ask three questions: How does biomass fit Oregon and the nation’s energy strategy? Does biomass further Oregon’s competitive advantage with respect to renewable energy? And, just as important, can it help Oregon as it struggles to restore its sickly east-side forests? As a nation, we’ve struggled to find an energy strategy other than to use more of it. To the extent there is a consensus, it’s this: Reduce dependence on foreign sources of energy. Encourage and reward conservation. Decrease carbon dioxide emissions. Accelerate the use of renewables. Acknowledge there are trade-offs with all energy production but, with all forms, produce energy as

cleanly as possible. None is perfect. Does forest biomass further that strategy? The answer has to be yes. Foremost, woody material is a renewable resource. It is not a fossil fuel and it is not foreign. The prevailing view is that because tree growth captures atmospheric carbon, biomass is carbon neutral in the long term. Is biomass as clean as other renewables? While combusting biomass does generate carbon dioxide and certain particulate emissions, it does so with pollution controls that make it much cleaner than if the biomass is burnt in the woods either through controlled burns or uncontrolled forest fires. It is a net improvement, and as Oregon begins to address the problems with its unhealthy forests, it could be a potent tool. No energy source is perfect. One challenge with wind and solar is that they don’t produce around the clock and must be “firmed up” with other energy

IN MY VIEW sources. Northwest wind projects have been fortunate to utilize the Columbia River hydro system for firming to date, but that system may be reaching its capacity for firming and the most likely future source will be natural gas. Biomass can produce 24/7, and as such can be part of the solution to the challenges of other renewable energy sources and can help displace the use of fossil fuels. Oregon has a diversity of renewable energy generation options, and that gives us a competitive advantage. The Oregon Business Plan states that Oregon’s east-side forests badly need thinning to avoid catastrophic fires and ecological disaster. With 100 years of fire suppression and little active management, many federally managed east-side and interior southwest Oregon forests have high levels of fuel buildup in dead and small live

trees, putting them at moderate to severe risk of unusually intense fire. A woody biomass sector focused on restoration of our forests is a tremendous opportunity to promote healthier forests while providing rural Oregon with economic opportunity. We should use this material for biomass energy to help create and sustain jobs in Oregon’s rural communities, where we need them most. The Oregon Forest Resources Institute estimates that between logging slash and restoration thinning statewide, Oregon can sustainably produce upwards of five million tons of woody biomass each year, which would create an estimated 4,500 new jobs. Healthy demand for woody biomass also would strengthen the financial incentive for private landowners to maintain their lands as forest, slowing the pace of forestland conversion for development and sustaining private forest contributions to habitat, water

and air quality, recreation and carbon sequestration. Oregonians should embrace the opportunity to manage our forests in a way that fully integrates conservation and economic objectives and contributes to the desire for renewable energy. The benefits to all Oregonians and to the nation could be profound. To be sure, there are trade-offs. Using biomass to generate energy is not a silver bullet, nor is any renewable energy resource. However, it can play an important role, along with other sources of renewable energy generation, to accomplish long-term reductions of carbon dioxide, combat climate change, and stimulate new jobs and economic opportunity. John Shelk is the managing director of Ochoco Lumber Company. Ochoco Lumber began production of a biomass pellet mill in John Day earlier this year.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 C5

O    D N Bernard "Bernie" Vincent Chiaravalle, of Bend July 20, 1933 - April 11, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A private memorial service will be held on Saturday, April 16, 2011. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Cenone Benson, of Prineville May 5, 1938 - April 8, 2011 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 NE 4th Street, Prineville, Oregon. 541-416-9733. Services: In keeping with her wishes, no service will be held. Contributions may be made to:

Charity of ones choice.

Daisy Marie Davis, of Bend Mar. 13, 1921 - April 10, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds, 541.382.2471. www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No service will be held at this time.

Dwight "Bud" Gregory Knox, of Redmond Oct. 29, 1927 - April 12, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 sign our guest book at redmondmemorial.com Services: Graveside Tuesday April 19, 2011 at 2:00 pm Juniper Haven Cemetery, Prineville, OR.

George Baldini, of Bend Jan. 6, 1931 - Mar. 24, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Memorial Service will be held sometime this Spring.

Richard Carl Ferini, of Bend Aug. 3, 1925 - April 10, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No service will be held at this time.

Gladys Leora Barger, of Madras Sept. 11, 1923 - April 9, 2011 Arrangements: Bel-Air Funeral Home, 541-475-2241 Services: Funeral Services will be held on Friday, April 15, 2011 at 11:00 AM at the First Baptist Church in Madras Burial will follow at Mount Jefferson Memorial Park. Contributions may be made to:

First Baptist Church of Madras.

Patsy Petrie, of La Pine Oct. 27, 1924 - April 9, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel in La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Memorial Service on Thursday, April 14 at 3 p.m. Baird Memorial Chapel, 16468 Finley Butte Rd., La Pine, OR.

Ruth Caroline Pinckney, of Bend Nov. 26, 1919 - April 11, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: No formal memorial service will be held at Ruth’s request. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., #1, Bend, Oregon 97701 or the Oregon Commission for the Blind, 535 SE 12th Avenue, Portland Oregon 97214.

Thomas O’Donnell Connolly, of Bend Jan. 5, 1929 - April 11, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Memorial Mass at Santa Maria Church, Orinda, California on Tuesday, April 19, 2011 at 11:00 a.m.

William "Bill" D. Lyche, of Bend Dec. 5, 1935 - April 11, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com Services: A Celebration of Life will be held at 3:33 p.m. on Monday, April 18, 2011 at Eagle Crest Resort.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 FAX: 541-322-7254 MAIL: Obituaries E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708

Funding Continued from C1 Lawmakers did say that more money could be diverted from reserve accounts if the May forecast shows the state is doing better. Two local lawmakers voted against the bill, Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, and Rep. Gene Whisnant, R-Sunriver. But Rep. Mike McLane, R-Powell Butte, voted in favor. Conger voted against the bill in part, he said, because lawmakers could have done more to help districts drive costs down. He pointed to reforming the Public Employee Retirement System. He also said lawmakers should have passed more bills that would give districts flexibility to be more efficient. “We’ve probably increased mandates and further limited

“It gives us something to work with, but I dare say the word stability is too optimistic.” — Ivan Hernandez, Crook County School District superintendent flexibility for teachers to teach, and as a result we have probably increased the cost,” Conger said. Bend-La Pine Superintendent Ron Wilkinson agreed with Conger’s sentiments, saying he was hoping there would be changes to the PERS system. With the $5.7 billion budget, Wilkinson said, his district faces a $15 million budget gap, $5.6 million of which is attributable to PERS rate increases. “Only the Legislature can help

Dixie Lee Benson

Linda Rose Sturza

April 8, 1943 - April 12, 2011

April 13, 1946 - April 8, 2011

Dixie Lee Benson was born to Ivan and Leta Vanhook on April 8, 1943, in Klamath Falls, Oregon. Dixie grew up in the Klamath Falls area and graduated from Klamath Union High School and continued to live in the area until moving to Central Oregon in 1975. Married to husband, Dixie Benson Duane Benson, at Culver Christian Church on April 5, 1997, and worked as Controller for Round Butte Seed Growers since April of 1999. Dixie very much enjoyed gardening, family times and events, and spending time with her grandchildren. She had a life-long passion for sewing and was a skilled quilter. Dixie passed away peacefully at home on April 12, 2011, at 68 years of age. Survivors left to carry on her legacy include husband, Duane of Culver; son, John Spradley and wife, Sydney, Klamath Falls; daughter, Teresa Verling and husband, George, Klamath Falls; daughter, Susan Franich and husband, Paul, Beaverton; son, Cary Benson, Metolius; grandchildren, Leta Spradley, Timothy Verling, Ryan Verling, McKenzie Verling, Tyler Franich, Kelsey Franich. Preceded in death by her parents, and sister, Lois. Her memorial service will be held at 10:30 a.m., on Saturday, April 16, 2011, at Culver Christian Church with Pastor Bob Campbell officiating. At Dixie's request, in lieu of flowers please contribute to the American Cancer Society or the local Hospice provider of your choosing.

Linda Rose Sturza died April 8, 2011, at her home in Redmond. She was born April 13, 1946, in Prineville, OR, to Morris and Hetra (Hamilton) Eeds. Linda graduated high school in Sparks, Nevada, and moved to Redmond in 1968. She married Evan Sturza on Nov. 1, Linda Rose 1969, in Sturza Reno, Nevada. Evan preceded her in death in 2004. Linda worked as a hostess at Mrs. Beasley's Restaurant, also as a seamstress in her spare time. She enjoyed bowling and was a member of Women's Bowling Association. She also enjoyed crafts, spending time with family and friends, going to the coast, helping others and she especially enjoyed spending time with her grandkids. Linda is survived by a daughter, Bobbie Sturza, son, Robert "Rick" Sturza, step daughters, Carmen Parker, Rita McFarlane, Corine Polly, brother, Jackie Eeds, 11 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by a stepson, Ed Sturza. A graveside service will be held at Redmond Memorial Cemetery on April 15, 2011, at 1:00 p.m.. A Celebration of Life will follow at Redmond VFW Hall at 2:00 p.m. Please sign our guest book at redmondmemorial.com

Barbara Joan Day October 3, 1937 - April 9, 2011 Barbara J. Day, died at her residence on Saturday, April 9, in Bend. She was born in Chico, CA. on October 3, 1937. Most of her life with her husband James Day, Jr., they made La Pine their home, where they raised their family. In addition to being at home, she delighted in being with her grandBarbara Day children, reading and music. She was a long-time member of Friends Conservative Baptist Church in La Pine. Her husband preceded her in death in 1985, and surviving are her four sons, Mike, Richard, Jim, and David Day; one daughter, Jenny Hasbun; a brother, Patrick Caldwell and her two sisters, Rhonda Beeman and Melissa Hegge; eight grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Funeral services will be Saturday, April 16, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at Deschutes Memorial Mausoleum Chapel, 63875 N. Hwy 97, Bend, interment will follow. Contributions may be made to Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, OR 97701. Please leave online condolences at deschutesmemorialchapel.com

us with (the PERS rate increases), and right now it doesn’t appear that will come,” Wilkinson said. “But the session isn’t over, so we’ll keep fighting.” Wilkinson said it does help to have the budget set early, especially as his district begins the bargaining process with employees. And as Crook County School District also faces more cuts, and the prospects of closing two elementary schools and cutting as many as 17 positions, Superintendent Ivan Hernandez said the early budget is nice but “stability” isn’t the right word. “It gives us something to work with, but I dare say the word stability is too optimistic,” he said. “We’re in unstable times.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Dwight ‘Bud’ Gregory Knox October 29, 1927 - April 12, 2011 Dwight ‘Bud’ Knox died April 12, 2011, at his home in Redmond. He was born October 29, 1927, in Gresham, Oregon, to Roscoe and Emma (Gregson) Knox. Bud graduated from Crook County High School. He served in the Bud Knox US Navy during WWII. He married Margie Ditmore on July 4, 1982, in Redmond, Oregon. Bud was a long-time resident of Central Oregon, as his family was a pioneer family in this area. He was a logger and a rancher. He also enjoyed golfing and hunting in his spare time. Bud is survived by his wife, Margie Knox; daughter, Terisa Clark; three grandsons; and many step-grandchildren and step-great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a son, Buck Knox, three sisters, and one brother. A graveside service will be held at 2 p.m., on Tuesday, April 19, 2011, at Juniper Haven Cemetery in Prineville, Oregon. Contributions may be made to Redmond/Sisters Hospice. Please sign the online guestbook at www.redmondmemorial.com.

Disease Continued from C1 Because the symptoms are not significantly different than other illnesses, Kuhn said, it’s difficult to pinpoint. “That’s a really hard thing, what to describe to people when they have symptoms like that,” he said, “We just advise if you start feeling very ill, if it’s gone beyond the threshold

Suspended Continued from C1 Redwine invested more than $800,000 in Sawyer’s company, Starboard LLC, and in 2009 Sawyer signed a judgment on behalf of the company conceding it owed him that money plus interest. Since then Redwine and his wife, Laurie Redwine, have

Sidney Harman, 92, innovator and Newsweek owner By Robert D. Mcfadden New York Times News Service

Sidney Harman, an audio pioneer who built the first highfidelity stereo receiver, dabbled in education and government, and made a late-in-life splash by acquiring an antiquated Newsweek magazine and wedding it with a sassy young website, The Daily Beast, died Tuesday night in Washington. He was 92. The cause was complications of acute myeloid leukemia, according to a statement by the family that appeared on The Daily Beast. Family members said they learned of his illness only about a month ago. For most of his life, Harman was known as the scientistbusinessman who co-founded Harman/Kardon in 1953 and made high-quality audio equipment for homes and businesses, and later navigational and other devices for cars. He made a fortune, estimated by Forbes at $500 million in 2010, and gave millions to education, the performing and fine arts and other philanthropies.

Married to former California lawmaker But Harman, who was married to former Rep. Jane Harman, a nine-term California Democrat who lost a 1998 California gubernatorial primary race largely financed by him, was also a golfing, tennisplaying health enthusiast who leaped out of bed every morning to do calisthenics, a scholar of boundless energy and utopian ideas, and something of a Renaissance man. He studied physics, engineering and social psychology; was a classical music fan and jazz aficionado; recited Shakespeare by heart; was a civil rights and antiwar activist; created programs to humanize the workplace; was the president of a Quaker college on Long Island; served as President Jimmy Carter’s deputy secretary of commerce; published a memoir at 85; and was still active in business in his 90s. In August 2010, two days before he turned 92, Harman, who had virtually no media experience, bought Newsweek from the Washington Post Co. for a token $1 and some $47 million in liabilities. The Post had sought a deep-pocketed savior who might preserve Newsweek’s staff and standards. Founded in 1933 and acquired by the Post Co. in 1961, Newsweek had long trailed Time magazine in circulation and revenue but was known for serious print journalism. But bled by an exodus of staff members, readers and advertisers and under pressures of recession and Internet competition, the magazine had gone into a financial freefall, losing $30 million in 2009, and seemed rudderless and moribund. After a shaky courtship, Harman and Barry Diller, The

of just feeling miserable, you should contact your physician or healthcare provider.” Health authorities recommend children, people with certain immune disorders, and persons living in close quarters like college dormitories and military housing receive a meningococcal vaccine. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

tried to get that money, but have thus far been unsuccessful in their quest. The Sawyers refused to answer questions at debtor exams and were eventually held in contempt of court. Redwine filed another lawsuit against the pair and their companies in June. Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Lawrence K. Ho / Los Angeles Times

Sidney Harman, shown in Santa Monica, Calif., in November 2010, a philanthropist, polymath and pioneer in high-fidelity sound for homes and cars who tried to resuscitate Newsweek magazine, died Tuesday. He was 92. Daily Beast’s owner, agreed to a merger, with Harman as executive chairman and Tina Brown of The Beast — and of The New Yorker and Vanity Fair before that — as its editor. The two-year-old website was also losing millions. Critics called it a noble but impractical venture. Harman regarded it as the capstone challenge of his diversified career. His stamp can be seen in the magazine’s pages, where a weekly column called “Connecting the Dots” was added at his suggestion, the name reflecting his view of a weekly news magazine’s role.

Magazine still hurting But its attempt to regain readers and advertisers has been a struggle. Figures released last week by the Publishers Information Bureau showed that the number of advertising pages in Newsweek fell 31 percent compared with the same three months last year. Diller said Harman’s estate would assume control of his stake in the magazine. “Three weeks ago, when he told me of his illness, he said he and his family wanted to continue as partners in Newsweek/ Beast in all events,” Diller said. “We will carry on, though we will greatly miss his passionate enthusiasm and belief in the venture.” Sidney Harman was born in Montreal on Aug. 4, 1918, and grew up in New York City, where his father worked at a hearing-aid company. The boy had a paper route and sold discarded magazines. In 1939 he graduated from a branch of City College that became Baruch College, earning a degree in physics. He found an engineering job with the David Bogen Co., a New York maker of loudspeakers. After Army service in 1944-45, he returned to the company and by the early 1950s was general manager.

Juveniles Continued from C1 Violation supervision is the only county juvenile program that has not been proven by research to reduce recidivism, according to the report. Neither does it promote victim or community benefits. Research has shown it is more cost-effective to concentrate supervision efforts on high-risk juvenile offenders, and supervision of low-risk offenders does not improve recidivism rates, Hales said. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, APRIL 14

HIGH Ben Burkel

51

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Today: Mostly cloudy, slight chance of mixed showers, afternoon breezes.

STATE Western

56/34

Warm Springs 54/36

47/26

 Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

49/31

Camp Sherman 46/26 Redmond Prineville 51/29 Cascadia 48/30 50/30 Sisters  49/28 Bend Post 51/29

48/28

39/17

Brothers

Sunriver 46/26

48/25

Burns 48/27

Hampton

Crescent 45/24

Fort Rock

Vancouver 48/39

38/26

Seattle

Chemult 45/23

City

50/38

Missoula 46/31

46/26

54/43

Bend

55/42

53/37





 Idaho Falls

Redding

Elko

64/46

45/30

50/28

49/28

Silver Lake

45/33

Boise

51/29

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley



Helena

Eugene

Reno

45/32

Partly to mostly cloudy today. A few rain and snow showers tonight.

Crater Lake 32/27

58/38

San Francisco 60/48





Salt Lake City 46/32

Moon phases Full

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

LOW

Last

New

April 17 April 24 May 2

First

May 10

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 50/42/0.17 . . . . . . 49/43/r. . . . . . 53/43/sh Baker City . . . . . . 49/33/0.07 . . . . . . 46/30/c. . . . . . 49/35/sh Brookings . . . . . . 51/39/0.32 . . . . . 51/47/sh. . . . . . 51/46/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 45/33/0.11 . . . . . 47/32/sh. . . . . . 53/35/sh Eugene . . . . . . . . 53/41/0.24 . . . . . . 54/43/r. . . . . . 54/45/sh Klamath Falls . . .44/31/trace . . . . . 48/32/pc. . . . . . 53/36/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 43/34/0.02 . . . . . 45/32/pc. . . . . . 49/33/sh La Pine . . . . . . . . 46/28/0.00 . . . . . 47/25/sn. . . . . . 51/31/sh Medford . . . . . . . 54/41/0.01 . . . . . . 56/41/c. . . . . . 59/46/sh Newport . . . . . . . 50/41/0.19 . . . . . . 49/44/r. . . . . . 53/45/sh North Bend . . . . . 54/43/0.19 . . . . . . 52/45/r. . . . . . 53/48/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 58/38/0.04 . . . . . 54/38/pc. . . . . . 54/42/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 52/36/0.09 . . . . . . 56/38/c. . . . . . 61/42/sh Portland . . . . . . . 52/44/0.07 . . . . . . 50/44/r. . . . . . 55/45/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 43/34/0.02 . . . . . . 48/30/c. . . . . . 59/36/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 49/33/0.01 . . . . . . 50/33/c. . . . . . 56/35/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 53/41/0.10 . . . . . 54/43/sh. . . . . . 57/46/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 54/42/0.12 . . . . . . 52/43/r. . . . . . 55/44/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 42/29/0.00 . . . . . . 49/28/r. . . . . . 53/31/sh The Dalles . . . . . .55/44/trace . . . . . . 56/39/c. . . . . . 60/42/sh

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . . . . . . . No restrictions Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 in 1947 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.17” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 in 1968 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.29” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.93” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.10” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.96 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.50 in 1937 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .5:57 a.m. . . . . . .6:54 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:21 a.m. . . . . . .4:58 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .5:55 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:14 a.m. . . . . . .7:08 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:29 p.m. . . . . . .6:17 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:37 a.m. . . . . . .5:42 p.m.

1

LOW

56 24

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Partly to mostly cloudy and cool. HIGH

54 24

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

Portland

Partly to mostly cloudy today. A few rain and snow showers tonight. Eastern

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:24 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:48 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:22 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:49 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 4:01 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 4:11 a.m.

MONDAY Partly to mostly cloudy and cool.

55 23

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 58° Ontario • 27° Meacham

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of rain showLOW ers, breezy.

HIGH

54 32

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

50/27

42/19

HIGH

29

50/44



La Pine

LOW

Mainly cloudy, widespread rain showers, slightly LOW warmer, breezy.

NORTHWEST

43/26

47/27

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, slight chance of snow showers, cool.

SATURDAY

An approaching storm system will bring rain and mountain snow to western locations.

Paulina

47/25

Crescent Lake

Rain with snow above 5,000 feet today. Rain and snow showers tonight. Central

53/35 52/34

Oakridge Elk Lake

53/34

50/32

38/26

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

FRIDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 38-107 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 103-166 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . 151-174 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 142 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 82-98 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 189 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 50-132 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . no report . . . . 175-270 . . . . . . . 122 . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . 46-86 . . . no report . . . . . . . . 76

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

S

Vancouver 48/39 Calgary 38/26 Seattle 50/38

S

S

Saskatoon 42/28

S Winnipeg 46/26

S

S

S

S

S Quebec 49/29

Thunder Bay 42/23

S S Halifax 53/37

Portland 58/33 Boston 59/43 Boise New York Rapid City Detroit Buffalo 53/37 63/44 • 96° 35/29 54/32 56/37 Laredo, Texas Des Moines Philadelphia Cheyenne Columbus 63/47 Chicago 66/45 43/28 • 10° 69/46 Omaha 52/40 San Francisco 64/43 Salt Lake W ashington, D. C. Yellowstone National 60/48 City Kansas City 68/50 Las Park, Wyo. Denver Louisville 46/32 73/52 Vegas 50/32 75/55 • 4.12” St. Louis 72/53 Charlotte 73/53 76/49 Martha’s Vineyard, Mass. Albuquerque Los Angeles Nashville 64/35 Oklahoma City 68/53 76/56 Little Rock Phoenix 84/46 Atlanta 79/60 83/58 Honolulu 77/56 Birmingham 85/70 Tijuana 82/57 Dallas 68/51 82/57 New Orleans 81/69 Orlando Houston 85/62 Chihuahua 84/70 91/52 Miami 86/72 Monterrey La Paz 97/67 92/59 Mazatlan Anchorage 87/59 44/25 Juneau 49/31 (in the 48 contiguous states):

Portland 50/44

Billings 46/30

FRONTS

Bismarck 40/30

St. Paul Green Bay 43/33 51/34

To ronto 55/35

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .86/60/0.00 . 92/47/pc . . . 78/43/s Akron . . . . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . 64/42/pc . . 62/46/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .50/44/0.32 . 63/32/pc . . . 58/32/s Albuquerque. . . .74/41/0.00 . . .64/35/s . . . 67/43/s Anchorage . . . . .41/26/0.00 . .44/25/sh . . 44/28/pc Atlanta . . . . . . . .75/47/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . . .76/58/t Atlantic City . . . .65/48/0.03 . 62/42/pc . . . 56/44/s Austin . . . . . . . . .86/41/0.00 . 87/62/pc . . . 82/46/s Baltimore . . . . . .56/48/0.13 . 68/47/pc . . . 63/50/s Billings. . . . . . . . .61/34/0.00 . .46/30/sh . . 55/33/sh Birmingham . . . .77/45/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . . .81/54/t Bismarck . . . . . . .50/27/0.00 . . 40/30/rs . . 35/24/sn Boise . . . . . . . . . .57/42/0.00 . 53/37/pc . . . 55/41/c Boston. . . . . . . . .49/43/1.32 . 59/43/pc . . . 49/40/s Bridgeport, CT. . .50/44/0.43 . 62/40/pc . . . 54/39/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .47/41/0.65 . 54/32/pc . . . 55/38/s Burlington, VT. . .53/42/0.18 . 53/28/pc . . . 48/30/s Caribou, ME . . . .47/25/0.11 . 47/23/pc . . . 39/18/s Charleston, SC . .78/50/0.00 . . .76/55/s . . . 75/62/s Charlotte. . . . . . .75/42/0.00 . . .76/49/s . . 73/58/pc Chattanooga. . . .75/44/0.00 . . .77/53/s . . . .73/56/t Cheyenne . . . . . .46/34/0.00 . . 43/28/rs . . . 49/33/s Chicago. . . . . . . .68/36/0.00 . . .52/40/c . . 52/43/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .67/36/0.00 . 71/50/pc . . . .66/50/t Cleveland . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . . .55/39/c . . . 56/45/c Colorado Springs 58/40/0.00 . .50/27/sh . . . 56/32/s Columbia, MO . .75/49/0.00 . 74/53/pc . . . .62/41/t Columbia, SC . . .77/46/0.00 . . .76/52/s . . 76/60/pc Columbus, GA. . .81/49/0.00 . . .81/56/s . . . .82/60/t Columbus, OH. . .64/37/0.00 . 69/46/pc . . . .67/49/t Concord, NH . . . .53/41/0.63 . 63/32/pc . . . 53/28/s Corpus Christi. . .82/56/0.00 . 85/70/pc . . 89/60/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .80/54/0.00 . 82/57/pc . . . 75/47/s Dayton . . . . . . . .64/35/0.02 . 68/47/pc . . . .64/48/t Denver. . . . . . . . .55/34/0.00 . .50/32/sh . . . 54/36/s Des Moines. . . . .75/51/0.00 . .63/47/sh . . 50/36/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .66/35/0.00 . . .56/37/c . . . 51/42/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .53/41/0.03 . . .39/28/s . . .41/29/rs El Paso. . . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . . .82/50/s . . . 82/54/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .30/13/0.00 . . .33/8/pc . . . 42/12/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . .47/33/0.00 . 46/28/pc . . .43/29/rs Flagstaff . . . . . . .56/27/0.00 . . .54/24/s . . . 59/25/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .66/32/0.00 . . .57/33/c . . 54/42/sh Green Bay. . . . . .66/37/0.00 . . .43/33/c . . .41/35/rs Greensboro. . . . .70/43/0.00 . . .72/48/s . . 72/60/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .52/45/0.32 . 66/43/pc . . 61/45/pc Hartford, CT . . . .49/45/0.67 . 62/39/pc . . . 55/36/s Helena. . . . . . . . .55/32/0.00 . .45/33/sh . . . 52/34/c Honolulu . . . . . . .81/67/0.00 . 85/70/pc . . 83/70/pc Houston . . . . . . .83/50/0.00 . 84/70/pc . . 85/54/pc Huntsville . . . . . .74/44/0.00 . . .79/55/s . . . .74/50/t Indianapolis . . . .67/38/0.00 . 70/50/pc . . . .64/47/t Jackson, MS . . . .79/44/0.00 . 83/63/pc . . . .78/51/t Madison, WI . . . .72/36/0.00 . .47/37/sh . . 45/37/sh Jacksonville. . . . .83/50/0.00 . . .82/57/s . . 81/61/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .52/35/0.03 . .49/31/sh . . 48/29/sh Kansas City. . . . .78/50/0.00 . . .73/52/t . . 54/37/sh Lansing . . . . . . . .65/29/0.00 . . .54/32/c . . 50/42/sh Las Vegas . . . . . .74/59/0.00 . . .72/53/s . . . 79/61/s Lexington . . . . . .63/35/0.00 . . .72/52/s . . . .68/50/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .77/53/0.00 . . .66/43/t . . 44/30/sh Little Rock. . . . . .78/48/0.00 . 79/60/pc . . . .75/43/t Los Angeles. . . . .62/55/0.00 . . .68/53/s . . . 74/58/s Louisville . . . . . . .70/44/0.00 . 75/55/pc . . . .68/48/t Memphis. . . . . . .78/50/0.00 . 81/63/pc . . . .75/48/t Miami . . . . . . . . .88/71/0.00 . . .86/72/s . . 85/74/pc Milwaukee . . . . .66/35/0.00 . . .43/34/c . . 43/39/sh Minneapolis . . . .62/49/0.00 . 51/34/pc . . 44/30/sh Nashville . . . . . . .72/42/0.00 . 76/56/pc . . . .73/51/t New Orleans. . . .81/57/0.00 . 81/69/pc . . . .81/60/t New York . . . . . .49/43/0.41 . 63/44/pc . . . 56/42/s Newark, NJ . . . . .52/45/0.30 . 66/44/pc . . 57/42/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .69/55/0.00 . . .69/48/s . . . 67/57/s Oklahoma City . .86/50/0.00 . 84/46/pc . . 65/38/pc Omaha . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . . .64/43/t . . 45/30/sh Orlando. . . . . . . .85/62/0.00 . . .85/62/s . . 85/67/pc Palm Springs. . . .81/55/0.00 . . .85/55/s . . . 92/65/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .70/42/0.00 . . .68/48/c . . . .55/43/t Philadelphia . . . .54/46/0.08 . 66/45/pc . . . 62/46/s Phoenix. . . . . . . .86/58/0.00 . . .83/58/s . . . 88/63/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .57/42/0.13 . 65/44/pc . . 64/47/pc Portland, ME. . . .50/41/1.44 . 58/33/pc . . . 48/27/s Providence . . . . .50/44/1.91 . 60/42/pc . . . 53/39/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .72/47/0.00 . . .73/47/s . . 72/60/pc

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .52/36/0.13 . .35/29/sn . . 40/26/pc Savannah . . . . . .79/48/0.00 . . .79/56/s . . . 77/63/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .49/37/0.00 . 58/38/pc . . . 68/42/c Seattle. . . . . . . . .48/42/0.11 . . .50/38/r . . 52/39/sh Richmond . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . .72/47/s . . . 71/54/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .53/40/0.03 . .48/36/sh . . .38/29/rs Rochester, NY . . .46/42/0.88 . 54/30/pc . . . 53/38/s Spokane . . . . . . .47/36/0.00 . . .47/32/c . . 52/35/sh Sacramento. . . . 63/45/trace . 67/47/pc . . 72/51/pc Springfield, MO. .75/45/0.00 . . .76/47/t . . 57/35/sh St. Louis. . . . . . . .74/47/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . . .69/44/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/63/0.00 . . .84/67/s . . 84/69/pc Salt Lake City . . .64/40/0.00 . 46/32/pc . . . 57/43/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .82/51/0.00 . . .80/49/s . . . 86/53/s San Antonio . . . .84/53/0.00 . 88/64/pc . . . 87/50/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .84/49/0.00 . . .83/48/t . . . 64/39/c San Diego . . . . . .64/57/0.00 . . .67/52/s . . . 73/59/s Washington, DC .59/48/0.31 . 68/50/pc . . . 63/52/s San Francisco . . .58/46/0.15 . 60/47/pc . . 65/50/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .84/50/0.00 . . .74/43/t . . 55/34/sh San Jose . . . . . . .60/43/0.05 . 65/46/pc . . 72/49/pc Yakima . . . . . . . 57/39/trace . . .51/36/c . . 61/41/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .69/29/0.00 . 59/25/pc . . 62/31/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .84/58/0.00 . . .84/56/s . . . 90/62/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .54/39/0.00 . . .52/42/c . . 58/42/pc Athens. . . . . . . . .68/56/0.00 . . .64/48/s . . 63/49/pc Auckland. . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . 68/56/pc . . 68/58/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . . .79/59/s . . . 85/58/s Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/0.03 . 93/78/pc . . 94/78/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .75/50/0.00 . 85/52/pc . . 75/45/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . .69/55/s . . . 72/55/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .43/41/0.00 . .51/39/sh . . . 55/36/s Bogota . . . . . . . .66/52/0.62 . .65/51/sh . . 63/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .54/41/0.07 . .52/40/sh . . 55/39/sh Buenos Aires. . . .84/63/0.00 . 73/50/pc . . 71/51/pc Cabo San Lucas .82/61/0.00 . . .89/62/s . . . 91/61/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .84/64/s . . . 89/65/s Calgary . . . . . . . .43/23/0.00 . .38/26/sn . . 38/23/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . .85/72/s . . . 85/73/s Dublin . . . . . . . . .55/41/0.21 . .58/41/sh . . 57/45/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . . .55/41/c . . . 56/45/c Geneva . . . . . . . .55/37/0.00 . .55/40/sh . . 58/39/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 79/53/pc . . 80/55/pc Hong Kong . . . . .81/70/0.00 . . .82/70/s . . . 84/72/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . .50/40/sh . . . 55/40/c Jerusalem . . . . . .62/46/0.00 . . .69/47/s . . . 76/50/s Johannesburg . . .66/55/0.00 . . .74/55/t . . . .73/56/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.00 . 77/63/pc . . 76/64/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .84/61/0.00 . . .79/58/s . . 79/59/pc London . . . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . . .56/44/c . . 58/45/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .79/49/s . . 76/49/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .91/77/0.00 . . .93/75/s . . . 93/76/s

Mecca . . . . . . . . .99/77/0.00 . 97/74/pc . . 96/73/pc Mexico City. . . . .86/52/0.00 . 89/57/pc . . 87/56/pc Montreal. . . . . . .48/39/0.06 . . .49/30/s . . . 47/29/s Moscow . . . . . . .37/30/0.09 . .47/34/sh . . 48/33/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/61/0.00 . . .79/59/t . . . .78/58/t Nassau . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . 84/72/pc . . 84/73/pc New Delhi. . . . . .91/68/0.00 . . .93/73/s . . . 96/73/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .68/41/0.00 . . .68/45/s . . 68/49/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .50/30/0.24 . 54/38/pc . . 55/37/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .50/41/0.00 . . .49/30/s . . . 48/30/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .55/36/0.00 . 59/43/pc . . 62/43/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .91/77/0.00 . 91/76/pc . . 90/76/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .66/43/0.00 . .64/51/sh . . 62/49/sh Santiago . . . . . . .64/54/0.03 . 69/46/pc . . . 65/39/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .77/64/0.00 . . .83/66/t . . . .81/65/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .48/39/0.00 . 57/43/pc . . 62/45/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .61/36/0.00 . 67/43/pc . . 64/44/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . . .77/56/s . . . .78/59/t Singapore . . . . . .90/77/0.00 . . .88/77/t . . . .87/77/t Stockholm. . . . . .45/36/0.00 . . .50/35/s . . . 53/37/s Sydney. . . . . . . . .75/57/0.00 . 73/57/pc . . 70/58/sh Taipei. . . . . . . . . .81/64/0.00 . 83/68/pc . . 86/70/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .70/54/s . . . 76/56/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . .69/50/s . . . 71/52/s Toronto . . . . . . . .52/41/0.00 . 55/35/pc . . . 52/35/s Vancouver. . . . . .52/45/0.01 . . .48/39/r . . 48/38/sh Vienna. . . . . . . . .48/41/0.05 . .53/39/sh . . 57/38/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .46/41/0.25 . .50/36/sh . . 53/35/pc


S

NHL Inside Playoffs start; Caps top Rangers in overtime, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

NBA Kobe Bryant fined $100K for gay slur LOS ANGELES — The NBA fined Kobe Bryant $100,000 on Wednesday for using a derogatory gay term in frustration over a referee’s call. NBA Commissioner David Stern issued a swift disciplinary ruling after the Los Angeles Lakers’ five-time NBA champion guard cursed and used the homophobic slur when referee Bennie Adams called a technical foul on him Tuesday night in the third quarter of a victory over the San Antonio Spurs. “Kobe Bryant’s comment during last night’s game was offensive and inexcusable,” Stern said. “While I’m fully aware that basketball is an emotional game, such a distasteful term should never be tolerated. ... Kobe and everyone associated with the NBA know that insensitive or derogatory comments are not acceptable and have no place in our game or society.” Stern’s action drew praise from gay-rights organizations that had demanded a fuller apology from Bryant and condemnation of his words by the Lakers. Bryant, the sixthleading scorer in NBA history, issued a statement earlier Wednesday saying his words came strictly out of anger and shouldn’t be taken literally. Bryant’s words and actions were captured by TNT’s cameras during the network’s national broadcast of the Lakers’ regular-season home finale. — The Associated Press

PREP TRACK & FIELD

Summit takes pair of wins against Mountain View Bulletin staff report Led by Laney Hayes’ win and new school record in the high jump, the Summit girls bested crosstown rival Mountain View 90-55 on Wednesday in a two-team meet at Summit High. The Storm boys also defeated the Cougars, winning the dual meet 77-66. Hayes, one of four Storm jumpers to clear 5 feet, 2 inches or better on Wednesday, went 5-04 1⁄4, breaking teammate Lucinda Howard’s school record of 5-04, which she set on Saturday in Roseburg.

Inside • More prep coverage, Page D5

“Best day for high jumpers I’ve ever seen at Summit,” Storm coach Dave Turnbull said. “Maybe the best I’ve seen in 20 years of coaching.” Howard finished second in the high jump (5-2) and Danielle Taylor placed third (5-2). See Track / D5

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Summit high jumper Lucinda Howard clears 5 feet, 2 inches on her way to second place in the high jump during a dual meet with Mountain View at Summit High School. Her teammate, Laney Hayes, won the event with a school record jump of 5-04 1⁄4.

HUNTING & FISHING

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER

Timbers ready for their home opener By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

BASEBALL Bonds found guilty of obstruction SAN FRANCISCO — A federal jury convicted Barry Bonds of a single charge of obstruction of justice Wednesday but failed to reach a verdict on the three counts at the heart of allegations that he knowingly used steroids and human growth hormone and lied to a grand jury about it. Following a 12-day trial and almost four full days of deliberation, the jury of eight women and four men could reach a unanimous verdict on only one of the four counts against Bonds. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston declared a mistrial on the others, a messy end to a case that put the slugger — and baseball itself — under a cloud of suspicion for more than three years. Bonds sat stone-faced through the verdict, displaying no emotion. His legal team immediately asked that the guilty verdict be thrown out and Illston did not rule on the request. She set May 20 for a hearing in the case. The case also represented the culmination of the federal investigation into the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative steroids ring. Federal prosecutors and the Justice Department will have to decide whether to retry Bonds on the unresolved counts. — The Associated Press

D

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Bend’s Bailey O’Grady, 13, shoots at clays while practicing at the Central Oregon Sporting Clays site near Redmond on Tuesday. O’Grady plans to participate in the Deshoots Youth Sports program this summer.

Deshoots Youth Sports What: A sporting clays program for kids 18 and younger Where: Central Oregon Sporting Clays and Hunting Preserve, 9020 U.S. Highway 97, Redmond, Oregon 97756 When: Starting in June, specific dates and times to be announced; those interested in the program are welcome to visit Central Oregon Sporting Clays this spring Contact: Hap Blackmer at 541-420-4332 or deshootsyouth@gmail. com; Central Oregon Sporting Clays at www.birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001

Aiming for youth A new sporting clays program in Central Oregon is seeking to get youngsters involved in the sport By Mark Morical The Bulletin

When discussing sporting clays, Hap Blackmer calls kids “the lifeblood of the sport.” But in the same breath, he admits that relatively few youngsters have been introduced to the target-shooting pastime. Blackmer, of Bend, hopes to change that with a new program called Deshoots Youth Sports. The nonprofit organization is designed to give dozens of kids age 18 and younger the chance to try sporting clays this summer at the Central Oregon Sporting Clays and Hunting Preserve, located be-

tween Bend and Redmond. Sporting clay targets, which simulate birds, are clay discs launched from electric traps at varying speeds and trajectories. The sport uses the same clay targets as trap and skeet shooting. “It seems like trap and skeet shooting are kind of going down, and sporting clays is kind of growing,” Blackmer says. “It’s more exciting. With kids, you’ve got computers and video games — a lot of action. Sporting clays is a little more action-oriented. We’re not standing in one spot. It’s a lot more interesting.” See Aiming / D5

PORTLAND — The Portland Timbers finally get to play in front of their hometown fans as a Major League Soccer team tonight when they host the Chicago Fire. While they’re obviously excited about the gala opener at their newly refurbished stadium, the expansion Timbers are also anxious to get that first victory. Three games into the season, a win has elud- Next up ed Portland, • Chicago Fire which is 0-2-1 at Portland with losses at Timbers Colorado and Toronto, and When: Today, a 1-all draw at 8 p.m. New England. “At the end TV: ESPN2 of the day, the fans can’t kick the ball into the net for us,” said team captain Jack Jewsbury. “We know we’ve got to get it done.” This week the Timbers practiced for the first time at renovated Jeld-Wen Field. At the same time construction workers buzzed about adding finishing touches, like painting upper level bleacher seats. The stadium, until recently called PGE Park, underwent $31 million in changes and improvements for the Timbers’ leap to MLS this season. A new grandstand rises along the stadium’s east side, once the outfield when the facility was home for the Triple-A Portland Beavers. The field is covered with brand new turf, and a new video scoreboard looms over the south end. “There’s a lot of emotions coming to a head in a great way,” Timbers owner Merritt Paulson said as he surveyed the field. See Timbers / D5

NBA

Blazers lose finale, will face Mavs Barry Bonds leaves court after a verdict was reached in his trial on Wednesday in San Francisco.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 NBA .......................................... D4 Prep sports ................................D5 Adventure Sports...................... D6

The Associated Press OAKLAND, Calif. — LaMarcus Aldridge and the Portland Trail Blazers are headed to Dallas for the first round of the NBA playoffs. The Texas native isn’t sure whether to celebrate or not. On one hand, Aldridge is going home to where he was born and attended college. On the other, the Trail Blazers will face a Mavericks team that finished with 57 wins. “It means the family, my mom, can come to the game,” said Aldridge. who didn’t play in Portland’s 110-86 loss to the Golden State Warriors in the regular-season finale Wednesday. See Blazers / D4

Playoff matchups A look at the first-round matchups for the NBA playoffs:

EAST • No. 1 Chicago vs. No. 8 Indiana • No. 2 Miami vs. No. 7 Philadelphia • No. 3 Boston vs. No. 6 New York • No. 4 Orlando vs. No. 5 Atlanta

WEST • No. 1 San Antonio vs. No. 8 Memphis • No. 2 L.A. Lakers vs. No. 7 New Orleans • No. 3 Dallas vs. No. 6 Portland • No. 4 Oklahoma City vs. No. 5 Denver

Ben Margot / The Associated Press

Portland’s Armon Johnson, right, drives the ball against Golden State’s Stephen Curry during the first half of Wednesday night’s game in Oakland, Calif.


D2 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A TELEVISION TODAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, first round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 9 a.m. — MLB, Colorado Rockies at New York Mets, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Washington Nationals or Florida Marlins at Atlanta Braves, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks, VS. network.

9:30 a.m. — Champions Tour, Outback Steakhouse Open, first round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, second round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, second round, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Texas Rangers at New York Yankees or Florida Marlins at Philadelphia Phillies, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, New York Rangers at Washington Capitals, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks, VS. network.

BOXING 6 p.m. — Friday Night Fights, junior welterweights, Ivan Popoca vs. Ruslan Provodnikov, ESPN2.

RADIO

SOCCER 8 p.m. — Major League Soccer, Chicago Fire at Portland Timbers, ESPN2.

SCOREBOARD

FRIDAY BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — College, Oregon State at Stanford, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

FRIDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, second round, Golf Channel.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball

nitely with the chicken pox

• Ducks top Pilots: Oregon recovered from an early two-run deficit to record a 6-4 victory over Portland on Wednesday afternoon in Portland. With the game knotted at 4-4 after seven innings, the Ducks (16-14) capitalized on a Portland error to take a two-run lead in the top of the eighth that stood up. Paul Esheleman was two for four and plated the game-winning run. Stefan Sabol was two for three with an RBI, run scored and double.

Football

Prep sports • Local equestrian teams ready for final district meet: With an eye on next month’s state competition, high school riders from around the region will take part this weekend in the third meet of the 2011 season for the Central District of Oregon High School Equestrian Teams (OHSET). The meet, the final district competition of the season, is scheduled for Friday through Sunday at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond. Events are scheduled for all three days in the Hooker Creek Event Center. Competition is expected to get under way at approximately 8:30 a.m. each day. The teams making up the OHSET Central District represent Redmond, Bend, Mountain View, Summit, Madras, Crook County, La Pine, Sisters, Hood River Valley, The Dalles Wahtonka, Pendleton, Dufur and Lakeview high schools. Riders this weekend are competing to qualify for the 2011 state meet, scheduled for May 19-22 at the Deschutes fairgrounds. Events scheduled for Friday include equitation over fences, dressage, hunt seat equitation, saddle seat equitation, in-hand obstacle relay, working pairs and drill. Saturday’s scheduled events are stock seat equitation, working rancher, showmanship, trail, in-hand trail, driving, reining, breakaway roping, steer daubing and team penning. On Sunday, scheduled events include bi-rangle, Canadian team flags, barrels, poles, keyhole, individual flags and figure eight. The district event is free to spectators, and vendors will be on site.

Basketball • Williams leaving Arizona: Arizona forward Derrick Williams is heading to the NBA after two program-rebuilding seasons in the desert. The Pac-10’s player of the year announced Wednesday that he will sign with an agent and won’t return for his junior season. Williams averaged 19.5 points and 8.3 rebounds while shooting 59 percent as a sophomore this past season, leading the Wildcats to the West Regional final after missing the NCAA tournament the year before. Williams has been projected as a lottery pick because of his athleticism and versatility. • NBA suspends Villanueva: Charlie Villanueva of the Detroit Pistons has been suspended for five games without pay for initiating an on-court altercation with Cleveland’s Ryan Hollins. NBA vice president Stu Jackson announced the suspension Wednesday. He says Villanueva also tried to “escalate the altercation by entering the Cavaliers’ locker room on two occasions following his ejection.” • Bynum’s knee injury not serious for Lakers: Andrew Bynum’s latest knee injury probably won’t keep the Los Angeles Lakers’ shot-blocking center out of their playoff opener. The Lakers breathed a collective sigh of relief after Bynum’s MRI on Wednesday showed only a bone bruise. The oft-injured 7-footer hyperextended his troublesome right knee during Los Angeles’ win over San Antonio on Tuesday night. Bynum was hurt during the second quarter against the Spurs when he fell awkwardly to the court after stepping on DeJuan Blair’s foot while getting back on defense. The Lakers have at least one ailment they can’t shake: Backup guard Steve Blake is out indefi-

• NFL meets judge; Goodell expected at mediation: One month and two days after the NFL and its players cut off negotiations on a new collective bargaining agreement and put the 2011 season in peril, the two sides will return to the table for court-ordered mediation today with a key legal ruling on the lockout still pending. NFL executives met with U.S. Magistrate Judge Arthur Boylan on Wednesday for five hours the day before the first talks between the league and the players since the middle of March. Executive vice president Jeff Pash, the NFL’s lead negotiator, was at the federal courthouse along with other officials and outside counsel. Lawyers for the players met with Boylan for about four hours on Tuesday. Larger contingents are expected when mediation begins in Boylan’s chambers, including commissioner Roger Goodell himself. League spokesman Greg Aiello said Goodell will attend along with some of the owners. • NFL’s rookie pitch: Divert $300 million from first rounders: The NFL’s proposal to the players for a rookie compensation system would divert about $300 million a year from first-round draft picks’ contracts to veterans and player benefits. According to documents obtained by The Associated Press, the league’s offer would free more than $1.2 billion by 2016 and slow the growth rate of guaranteed payments to first-rounders, which the documents show increased by 233 percent since 2000. All contracts for first-round picks would become fixed at five years. • Big 12, Fox Sports reach TV agreement: The Big 12 Conference and Fox Sports announced a 13-year cable TV deal Wednesday that officials say will ensure the long-term stability of the league. Financial terms were not disclosed. Sports Business Journal has reported that the contract, which starts with the 2012 football season, will pay the conference $90 million a year. The Big 12 also has a deal with ABC-ESPN running through 2015-16 that would raise the conference’s total TV rights revenue to a reported $130 million annually. • ABC to televise LSU-Oregon game: LSU’s season-opener against Oregon in the Cowboys Classic on Sept. 3 in Arlington, Texas will be televised nationally by ABC. Kickoff between the Tigers and the Ducks is set for 7 p.m. local time (5 p.m. Pacific) from Cowboys Stadium. Oregon posted a 12-1 mark a year ago with its only loss coming to Auburn, 22-19, in the BCS National Championship Game. LSU is coming off an 11-2 overall mark in 2010, capped with a 41-24 win over Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl.

Soccer • Spain leads FIFA rankings: World Cup winner Spain has stayed on top of the FIFA rankings, while Brazil and Italy moved into the top 10. Spain leads longtime No. 2 the Netherlands, with Brazil improving two places to No. 3. Italy ends a seven-month exile from the top 10, rising two places to ninth. The United States leads CONCACAF teams at No. 22 despite falling for the second straight month. Germany and Argentina are fourth and fifth as each fell one spot.

Cycling • Ventoso wins first stage of Castilla: Spaniard Fran Ventoso won the first stage of the Vuelta de Castilla and Leon in Spain on Wednesday, while Alberto Contador placed 15th in his final Giro d’Italia tuneup. Ventoso won a sprint to finish the 108.3-mile leg in 4 hours, 12 minutes, 57 seconds, ahead of Manuel Belletti of Colnago-CSF Inox and Marco Kump of Geox-TMC. — From wire reports

ON DECK Today Track: Culver at Scio, 4 p.m. Boys tennis: Bend at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View at Bend, 4 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Redmond at Bend, 5 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

BASEBALL College Pacific-10 Conference ——— Wednesday’s Game x-Oregon 6, Portland 4 Friday’s Games Oregon State at Stanford, 5:30 p.m. Arizona at UCLA, 6 p.m. California at Washington, 6 p.m. Oregon at USC, 6 p.m. Washington State at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games Oregon State at Stanford, 1 p.m. Arizona at UCLA, 2 p.m. California at Washington, 2 p.m. Oregon at USC, 2 p.m. Washington State at Arizona State, 6:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Oregon at USC, noon Washington State at Arizona State, 12:30 p.m. Arizona at UCLA, 1 p.m. California at Washington, 1 p.m. Oregon State at Stanford, 1 p.m. x=nonleague

Friday Baseball: Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Madras at Gladstone, 4:30 p.m. Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Bend (DH), 3 p.m.; Summit at Redmond (DH), 3 p.m.; Elimra at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond hosts Bend, Crook County, Madras at Eagle Crest, Ridge Course, 9 a.m. Girls golf: Summit hosts Bend, Mountain View, Redmond at Broken Top, noon Boys tennis: Summit at Jesuit, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA Girls lacrosse: Bend United at Crescent Valley, TBA; Bend United at West Salem, TBA Boys lacrosse: Hermiston at Summit, 8 p.m. Saturday Track: Redmond, Summit, Madras, Culver, Gilchrist at La Pine Invitational, 11 a.m.; Bend, Mountain View, Summit at Crater Classic in Central Point, 10:45 a.m.; Crook County at Lower Columbia Invitational in St. Helens, Wash., 12:30 p.m.; Culver at Meet of Champions in Salem, TBA Baseball: Culver at Burns (DH), 1 p.m.; Marshall at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond hosts at Eagle Crest Challenge Course, TBA Softball: Marshall at Crook County (DH), 1 p.m. Boys tennis: Summit at Jesuit, 10 a.m.; Sisters at Central, noon Girls tennis: Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA; Sisters at Madras, 8:30 p.m. Girls lacrosse: Bend United at Marist, TBA; Bend United at Corvallis, TBA Boys lacrosse: Hermiston at Bend, 1 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL NHL PLAYOFFS All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington 1, New York Rangers 0 Wednesday, April 13: Washington 2, N.Y. Rangers 1, OT Friday, April 15: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, noon Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, noon x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia vs. Buffalo Thursday, April 14: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, noon x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Boston vs. Montreal Thursday, April 14: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh 1, Tampa Bay 0 Wednesday, April 13: Pittsburgh 3, Tampa Bay 0 Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver 1, Chicago 0 Wednesday, April 13: Vancouver 2, Chicago 0 Friday, April 15: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m.

DEALS Transactions

x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose vs. Los Angeles Thursday, April 14: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit 1, Phoenix 0 Wednesday, April 13: Detroit 4, Phoenix 2 Saturday, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Nashville 1, Anaheim 0 Wednesday, April 13: Nashville 4, Anaheim 1 Friday, April 15: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBD

TENNIS ATP Tour ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters Wednesday Monte Carlo, Monaco Singles Second Round David Ferrer (4), Spain, def. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, 6-2, 6-0. Richard Gasquet (13), France, def. Guillermo GarciaLopez, Spain, 6-2, 6-1. Viktor Troicki (11), Serbia, def. Fabio Fognini, Italy, 6-3, 4-6, 6-4. Frederico Gil, Portugal, def. Florian Mayer, Germany, 7-5, 6-1. Gilles Simon (16), France, def. Albert Montanes, Spain, 6-3, 6-4. Gael Monfils (8), France, def. Daniel Gimeno-Traver, Spain, 7-5, 6-2. Marin Cilic (15), Croatia, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 5-2, retired. Nicolas Almagro (9), Spain, def. Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, 6-7 (6), 7-5, 7-6 (10). Tommy Robredo, Spain, def. Fernando Verdasco (6),

Spain, 6-4, 6-3. Rafael Nadal (1), Spain, def. Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, 6-2, 6-2. Jurgen Melzer (7), Austria, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2. Andy Murray (3), Britain, def. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 6-1, 6-4.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 3 1 0 9 3 Toronto FC 1 1 3 6 6 New England 1 1 3 6 5 Houston 1 1 2 5 5 New York 1 1 2 5 2 Columbus 1 1 2 5 3 Chicago 1 1 1 4 5 Sporting Kansas City 1 1 1 4 8 D.C. 1 2 1 4 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 4 0 0 12 8 Colorado 3 2 0 9 8 Los Angeles 2 1 3 9 5 Seattle 1 2 2 5 5 San Jose 1 1 2 5 5 Vancouver 1 2 2 5 9 FC Dallas 1 2 1 4 4 Chivas USA 0 2 2 2 3 Portland 0 2 1 1 2 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Wednesday’s Games Toronto FC 0, Los Angeles 0, tie Real Salt Lake 1, Colorado 0 Today’s Game Chicago at Portland, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Seattle FC at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Chivas USA at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at New York, 4:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Chicago, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Portland, 3 p.m. New England at Houston, 4 p.m.

GA 1 6 6 4 2 3 5 8 8 GA 1 6 6 6 4 10 5 5 6

BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL — Named Chuck Meriwether and Ed Montague umpire supervisors. 1B Carlos Delgado announced his retirement. American League TEXAS RANGERS — Placed OF Josh Hamilton on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Chris Davis from Round Rock (PCL). National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Recalled RHP Esmerling Vasquez from Reno (PCL). Optioned RHP Kam Mickolio to Reno. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Suspended Detroit F Charlie Villanueva five games for initiating an on-court altercation with Cleveland F Ryan Hollins and attempting to escalate the altercation by entering the Cavaliers’ locker room on two occasions following his ejection during Monday’s game. Fined L.A. Lakers G Kobe Bryant $100,000 for using a derogatory term at an official during Tuesday’s game against San Antonio. LOS ANGELES LAKERS — Signed G Trey Johnson. Recalled F Derrick Caracter from Bakersfield (NBADL). HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Recalled G Igor Bobkov, D Mat Clark, LW Nicolas Deschamps, LW Josh Green, D Nate Guenin, C Peter Holland, LW Patrick Maroon and RW Kyle Palmieri from Syracuse (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES — Recalled F Mathieu Beaudoin, F Dane Byers, F Bracken Kearns, F Alexandre Picard, F Viktor Tikhonov, D Maxim Goncharov, D Brandon Gormley, D Garrett Stafford, D Chris Summers and G Matt Climie from San Antonio (AHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer COLUMBUS CREW — Agreed to terms with president and general manager Mark McCullers on a four-year contract extension. PORTLAND TIMBERS — Signed M Diego Chara as a designated player. COLLEGE CHARLOTTE — Announced F Gokhan Sirin is leaving the men’s basketball program. FLORIDA STATE — Announced junior F Chris Singleton has declared for the NBA draft. MISSOURI — Named Ernie Nestor men’s assistant basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 79 0 44 25 The Dalles 17 0 26 13 John Day 3 0 75 57 McNary 6 0 105 64 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 788 1 3020 1296 The Dalles 132 0 812 477 John Day 87 0 1737 1086 McNary 62 1 1607 965

NHL ROUNDUP

Capitals beat Rangers in playoff opener thanks to overtime goal The Associated Press WASHINGTON — Alexander Semin had gone 14 playoff games without a goal, a troubling trend for a Washington Capitals team that has endured too many postseason disappointments in recent years. It took almost 80 minutes of hockey in game No. 15 to finally end the drought. Semin scored 18:24 into overtime Wednesday night to give the Capitals a 2-1 win over the eighth-seeded New York Rangers in Game 1 of their first-round series, a welcome bit of relief to the No. 1 seed in the Eastern Conference. “We’re not getting anywhere without Alex Semin scoring,” Washington coach Bruce Boudreau said. “We need him to go and create that other offensive threat.” Semin scored 28 times in the regular season and has been Washington’s best offensive threat after Alex Ovechkin for several years, but he was blanked in seven-game series losses to Pittsburgh two years ago and Montreal last year. His last playoff goal also came against the Rangers in the seventh game of a first-round series in 2009. He came close in the first period Wednesday, hitting the crossbar with five minutes to play in the first period, about a half-minute before Jason Arnott also clanged one off the net frame. Arnott and Semin teamed up for the winning goal, when Arnott intercepted a clearing pass from defenseman Marc Staal and found Semin between the circles for a one-timer past Henrik Lundqvist. Semin is notoriously averse to speaking to reporters and didn’t have much to say about his big moment, but his teammates knew its significance. “Last year he was little bit upset he didn’t score a goal,” Ovechkin said. “And right now it’s very important for him to score a goal, step up and show

Alex Brandon / The Associated Press

Washington Capitals’ Alexander Semin (28) and Alex Ovechkin (8) celebrate Ovechkin’s goal in the third period of Game 1 of a first-round NHL hockey playoff series with the New York Rangers, Wednesday. his leadership.” Ovechkin tied the game late in regulation during an intense pokeat-the-puck scramble, matching Matt Gilroy’s third-period goal in a game that took a while to get going. Michal Neuvirth made 24 saves to win his NHL playoff debut. Lundqvist stopped 31 shots for the Rangers. In other playoff games on Wednesday: Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ANAHEIM, Calif. — Mike Fisher had two goals and an assist, Pekka Rinne made 27 saves, and Nashville clamped down defensively in the series opener. Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 PITTSBURGH — Alex Kovalev and

Arron Asham scored third-period goals 18 seconds apart and Marc-Andre Fleury stopped 32 shots to lead Pittsburgh to victory over Tampa Bay in the first-round playoff opener. Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Coyotes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 DETROIT — Pavel Datsyuk and Johan Franzen scored midway through the second period to put Detroit ahead, and the Red Wings went on to beat Phoenix in Game 1 of the Western Conference first-round playoff series. Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Chris Higgins and Jannik Hansen scored in the first period, Roberto Luongo made 32 saves, and Vancouver beat Chicago in the first-round playoff opener.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL AL BOXSCORES Blue Jays 8, Mariners 3 Toronto Y.Escobar ss C.Patterson cf Bautista rf J.Rivera lf a-Snider ph-lf J.Nix 3b Arencibia dh Encarnacion 1b Jo.McDonald 2b J.Molina c Totals

AB 5 5 5 3 2 5 4 4 4 4 41

R H 1 3 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 3 8 14

BI 1 0 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 3

SO 1 1 2 0 0 2 1 0 2 1 10

Avg. .438 .429 .353 .121 .154 .310 .323 .268 .353 .353

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 5 1 0 0 0 1 .245 A.Kennedy 2b 4 0 2 0 1 0 .333 Bradley lf 5 0 1 1 0 2 .273 Cust dh 5 0 1 0 0 2 .175 Smoak 1b 3 1 1 1 1 1 .275 Langerhans cf 2 1 0 0 2 1 .182 L.Rodriguez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 0 .111 Ryan ss 3 0 1 1 1 0 .200 C.Gimenez c 3 0 1 0 1 1 .333 Totals 33 3 7 3 6 8 Toronto 001 000 061 — 8 14 1 Seattle 001 001 010 — 3 7 0 a-fouled out for J.Rivera in the 8th. E—J.Nix (2). LOB—Toronto 9, Seattle 10. 2B— Y.Escobar (1), J.Nix (2), Encarnacion (3), J.Molina 2 (3), Bradley (4). HR—Bautista (3), off Ray; Smoak (1), off Drabek. RBIs—Y.Escobar (6), Bautista 3 (5), Arencibia (6), Encarnacion (4), J.Molina 2 (3), Bradley (5), Smoak (5), Ryan (3). SB—Snider (3), J.Nix (2). S—L.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 4 (Bautista 2, C.Patterson, Jo.McDonald); Seattle 3 (Smoak 2, I.Suzuki). Runners moved up—L.Rodriguez. Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Drabek 5 2-3 6 2 2 4 5 114 1.93 Rzpnski W, 1-0 2 0 1 1 1 2 25 1.17 Rauch 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 20 3.18 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Vargas 6 2-3 5 1 1 1 7 105 4.86 J.Wright H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 5 0.00 Ray L, 1-1 2-3 5 5 5 0 0 21 15.43 Lueke 1-3 2 1 1 1 1 17 11.25 Wilhelmsen 1 2 1 1 1 1 24 9.64 Inherited runners-scored—Rzepczynski 2-0, Rauch 1-1, Lueke 1-1. WP—Drabek. T—3:23. A—12,407 (47,878).

Athletics 7, White Sox 4 (10 innings) Oakland DeJesus cf M.Ellis 2b C.Jackson rf-3b Willingham lf Matsui dh 1-Crisp pr-dh Kouzmanoff 3b a-Barton ph-1b K.Suzuki c An.LaRoche 1b b-Sweeney ph-rf Pennington ss Totals

AB 4 5 4 3 4 1 3 1 4 3 2 3 37

R H 0 0 0 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 7 11

BI 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 0 2 7

BB 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 6

SO 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 1 10

Avg. .195 .209 .250 .244 .262 .250 .171 .293 .175 .368 .143 .214

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 4 1 3 0 1 0 .302 Beckham 2b 5 0 1 1 0 2 .286 A.Dunn dh 4 0 0 0 1 2 .227 Konerko 1b 5 0 1 0 0 1 .362 Quentin rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .326 Rios cf 4 2 1 0 1 1 .212 Al.Ramirez ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 R.Castro c 5 0 0 1 0 1 .143 Morel 3b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .244 Totals 38 4 9 3 3 8 Oakland 000 100 003 3 — 7 11 2 Chicago 000 012 010 0 — 4 9 1 a-walked for Kouzmanoff in the 9th. b-struck out for An.LaRoche in the 9th. 1-ran for Matsui in the 9th. E—Kouzmanoff (4), Anderson (1), Pierre (3). LOB— Oakland 7, Chicago 10. 2B—C.Jackson (2), Beckham (4), Rios (4). HR—Matsui (2), off Danks. RBIs—Willingham (7), Matsui (7), Crisp (2), Barton 2 (3), Pennington 2 (3), Beckham (7), R.Castro (2), Morel (7). SB—M.Ellis (1), C.Jackson (1), Crisp (5), Rios (2). CS—Pierre 2 (4). S—DeJesus, Al.Ramirez, Morel. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 4 (Matsui 2, C.Jackson, DeJesus); Chicago 6 (Rios 2, R.Castro, Konerko, Beckham 2). Runners moved up—A.Dunn. GIDP—DeJesus, Matsui, An.LaRoche. DP—Chicago 3 (Morel, Al.Ramirez, Konerko), (Al. Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko), (Beckham, Al.Ramirez, Konerko). Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Anderson 5 2-3 9 3 2 1 3 105 2.29 Breslow 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 16 10.80 Ziegler 1 0 1 0 2 1 32 0.00 Balfour W, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 4.15 Fuentes S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 18 2.70 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Danks 8 5 1 1 3 7 108 3.15 Sale 0 3 3 3 0 0 10 7.36 Crain H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 13 2.84 Thrntn L, 0-2 1 3 3 3 2 1 33 7.71 T.Pena 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 11.25 Sale pitched to 3 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Breslow 2-0, Crain 2-0, Thornton 3-2, T.Pena 1-0. HBP—by Anderson (Quentin). T—3:23. A—16,523 (40,615).

Tigers 3, Rangers 2 Texas Kinsler 2b Andrus ss Mi.Young dh A.Beltre 3b N.Cruz rf Dav.Murphy lf Napoli c Moreland 1b Borbon cf Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 35

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 1 8 2 2

SO 0 1 0 2 2 1 1 2 0 9

Avg. .209 .179 .333 .208 .300 .300 .333 .323 .222

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .200 Rhymes 2b 4 0 2 0 0 0 .216 Raburn lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .300 Mi.Cabrera 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .349 V.Martinez dh 4 1 1 0 0 1 .222 Boesch rf 4 1 2 1 0 0 .297 Jh.Peralta ss 4 0 0 0 0 1 .289 Avila c 3 0 1 0 1 0 .258 Inge 3b 2 1 1 2 1 0 .256 Totals 31 3 8 3 4 3 Texas 000 002 000 — 2 8 0 Detroit 000 002 001 — 3 8 1 One out when winning run scored. E—Inge (3). LOB—Texas 9, Detroit 8. 2B—Mi.Young (5), V.Martinez (3), Boesch (3). HR—Inge (1), off Oliver. RBIs—N.Cruz (12), Dav.Murphy (4), Boesch (7), Inge 2 (3). SB—Mi.Young (2), Dav.Murphy 2 (4), Boesch (2). CS—Dav.Murphy (2). SF—Inge. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 6 (N.Cruz 3, Kinsler, Napoli, Andrus); Detroit 3 (V.Martinez, Rhymes 2). Runners moved up—Kinsler, Mi.Young, Mi.Cabrera, Jh.Peralta. DP—Texas 1 (Andrus). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Bush 3 3 0 0 3 0 71 0.00 Tobin 2 1 0 0 1 0 26 3.60 M.Lowe BS, 1-1 1 3 2 2 0 1 26 13.50 Rhodes 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 2.25 Oliver L, 1-1 1 1-3 1 1 1 0 1 20 2.57 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Scherzer 6 6 2 2 2 7 113 4.76 Villarreal 2 1 0 0 0 2 23 2.70 Valverde W, 2-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 0.00 HBP—by Scherzer (Kinsler). WP—Scherzer 2, Villarreal. Balk—Valverde. T—3:12. A—20,526 (41,255).

Royals 10, Twins 5 Kansas City Getz 2b Me.Cabrera cf Gordon lf Butler 1b Francoeur rf Betemit dh Aviles 3b Treanor c A.Escobar ss Totals

AB 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 39

R 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 0 1 10

H 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 0 2 14

BI 1 0 2 1 2 0 3 0 1 10

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2

SO 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 5

Avg. .342 .286 .346 .341 .292 .379 .156 .174 .229

Minnesota Span cf Tolbert ss Kubel rf

AB 5 5 5

R 2 1 1

H BI BB 4 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 0

SO 0 0 0

Avg. .333 .300 .325

Morneau 1b 5 1 1 1 0 3 .220 D.Young lf 4 0 2 2 0 0 .220 Thome dh 3 0 0 0 1 2 .182 Cuddyer 2b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .222 Valencia 3b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .184 Butera c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .125 Totals 39 5 12 4 1 7 Kansas City 000 601 003 — 10 14 1 Minnesota 100 040 000 — 5 12 2 E—Me.Cabrera (1), D.Young (1), Tolbert (1). LOB— Kansas City 5, Minnesota 8. 2B—Gordon (6), Aviles 2 (3), Tolbert (1), Morneau (4), D.Young (2). RBIs—Getz (5), Gordon 2 (7), Butler (6), Francoeur 2 (8), Aviles 3 (6), A.Escobar (5), Kubel (2), Morneau (3), D.Young 2 (5). CS—A.Escobar (1). SF—Francoeur. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 4 (Butler, Getz, Betemit 2); Minnesota 5 (Cuddyer 2, Valencia 2, Morneau). Runners moved up—Gordon, A.Escobar. DP—Minnesota 1 (Morneau). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Davies W, 1-1 5 10 5 5 1 4 89 9.00 Texeira H, 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 2.08 Collins H, 2 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 16 0.00 Jeffress S, 1-1 2 1 0 0 0 1 29 1.93 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Liriano L, 0-3 5 8 7 7 1 4 78 9.42 Perkins 2 1 0 0 0 0 25 0.00 Al.Burnett 1 1-3 2 1 1 0 1 21 3.86 D.Hughes 0 3 2 2 1 0 13 9.64 Manship 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 9.00 Liriano pitched to 1 batter in the 6th. D.Hughes pitched to 4 batters in the 9th. Inherited runners-scored—Collins 1-0, Perkins 1-1, D.Hughes 1-1, Manship 3-1. IBB—off D.Hughes (Butler). T—2:46. A—36,286 (39,500).

Yankees 7, Orioles 4 Baltimore B.Roberts 2b Markakis rf D.Lee 1b Guerrero dh Scott lf Ad.Jones cf Mar.Reynolds 3b Wieters c Andino ss Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 4 4 4 3 3 35

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 4

H BI BB 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 2 1 0 0 1 8 4 2

SO 2 2 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 8

Avg. .214 .222 .194 .268 .188 .189 .273 .241 .000

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Gardner lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .171 Jeter ss 4 2 2 1 0 0 .237 Teixeira 1b 3 2 2 0 1 1 .222 Al.Rodriguez 3b 3 1 2 3 1 0 .355 Cano 2b 4 0 1 2 0 1 .317 Swisher rf 3 0 1 0 1 0 .229 Posada dh 4 1 2 1 0 0 .182 1-E.Nunez pr-dh 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Granderson cf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .156 Martin c 4 1 1 0 0 1 .294 Totals 33 7 12 7 4 5 Baltimore 000 000 400 — 4 8 0 New York 330 010 00x — 7 12 0 1-ran for Posada in the 8th. LOB—Baltimore 6, New York 6. 2B—Mar.Reynolds 2 (5), Wieters (2), Cano (5), Martin (2). HR—Wieters (1), off A.J.Burnett; B.Roberts (3), off A.J.Burnett; Al.Rodriguez (4), off Tillman; Posada (4), off Jakubauskas. RBIs— B.Roberts 2 (10), Wieters 2 (4), Jeter (3), Al.Rodriguez 3 (8), Cano 2 (7), Posada (7). CS—Gardner (1). Runners left in scoring position—Baltimore 3 (Guerrero, Andino, B.Roberts); New York 4 (Posada 2, Cano, Gardner). Runners moved up—Markakis, Gardner. GIDP— Cano, Martin. DP—Baltimore 2 (B.Roberts, Andino, D.Lee), (Andino, B.Roberts, D.Lee). Baltimore IP H R ER BB SO NP Tillman L, 0-1 1 2-3 9 6 6 1 2 57 Jakubauskas 3 1-3 2 1 1 2 1 49 Bergesen 2 0 0 0 0 2 24 Accardo 1 1 0 0 1 0 15 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP A.J.Brntt W, 3-0 6 1-3 7 4 4 2 5 112 Robertson H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 R.Soriano H, 4 1 1 0 0 0 1 11 M.Rivera S, 5-5 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 Inherited runners-scored—Jakubauskas WP—A.J.Burnett 3. T—2:51. A—42,171 (50,291).

ERA 7.30 8.53 3.18 2.45 ERA 4.67 0.00 7.71 0.00 2-0.

Angels 4, Indians 3 (12 innings) Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf C.Santana c Hafner dh O.Cabrera 2b Kearns lf LaPorta 1b Everett 3b Totals

AB 5 4 3 4 5 5 4 5 5 40

R 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3

H BI BB 3 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 7 3 4

SO 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 2 0 7

Avg. .311 .286 .200 .205 .282 .295 .143 .189 .375

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourjos cf 5 0 0 0 0 4 .220 H.Kendrick 2b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .327 Abreu dh 4 1 1 0 1 0 .357 Tor.Hunter rf 5 1 1 2 0 2 .259 V.Wells lf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .102 Callaspo 3b 4 0 1 0 1 1 .317 Trumbo 1b 4 0 0 0 1 0 .256 Conger c 2 0 1 0 2 0 .286 1-Willits pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mathis c 0 0 0 1 0 0 .192 B.Wood ss 1 0 0 0 0 0 .111 a-M.Izturis ph-ss 2 0 0 0 0 0 .304 Totals 37 4 6 3 5 9 Cleveland 100 010 010 000 — 3 7 1 LA 000 300 000 001 — 4 6 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-flied out for B.Wood in the 8th. 1-ran for Conger in the 10th. E—A.Cabrera (1). LOB—Cleveland 6, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Brantley (4), H.Kendrick (2). 3B—A.Cabrera (1). HR—Tor.Hunter (3), off C.Carrasco. RBIs—Brantley (6), Choo 2 (4), Tor.Hunter 2 (9), Mathis (3). SB—Choo 2 (2). S—B.Wood. SF—Choo, Mathis. Runners left in scoring position—Cleveland 3 (O.Cabrera, A.Cabrera, C.Santana); Los Angeles 1 (H.Kendrick). Runners moved up—Choo, C.Santana. GIDP— O.Cabrera, Tor.Hunter, B.Wood. DP—Cleveland 2 (Everett, O.Cabrera, LaPorta), (A.Cabrera, O.Cabrera, LaPorta); Los Angeles 2 (E.Santana, H.Kendrick, B.Wood, Trumbo), (Conger, Conger, Callaspo). Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Carrasco 7 5 3 3 2 5 90 5.03 Pestano 1 0 0 0 0 2 12 0.00 Sipp 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 2 27 0.00 C.Perez 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Durbin L, 0-1 2-3 1 1 1 2 0 19 10.13 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Santana 7 6 3 3 2 3 105 3.74 S.Downs 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Rodney 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 20 3.18 Walden 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Tkahshi W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 0 1 22 5.06 E.Santana pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—C.Perez 1-0, S.Downs 11, Rodney 1-0. IBB—off Durbin (Trumbo). WP—Durbin, E.Santana, S.Downs. T—3:16. A—31,049 (45,389).

NL BOXSCORES Padres 3, Reds 2 Cincinnati Stubbs cf Phillips 2b Cairo 2b Votto 1b Gomes lf J.Francisco 3b Heisey rf R.Hernandez c Masset p Janish ss T.Wood p Jor.Smith p Chapman p Hanigan c Totals

AB 5 4 0 4 3 3 4 3 0 4 3 0 0 1 34

R 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 3

SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 7

Avg. .265 .354 .250 .444 .273 .143 .300 .231 --.316 .000 .000 --.304

San Diego AB R Maybin cf 2 0 c-Venable ph-rf 1 0 Bartlett ss 4 0 O.Hudson 2b 4 1 Cantu 1b 4 0 Ludwick lf 3 0 Headley 3b 4 1 Denorfia rf-cf 4 0 Ro.Johnson c 2 0 Adams p 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0

SO 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0

Avg. .243 .156 .129 .317 .160 .114 .243 .158 .286 ---

Halladay p Totals

HALLADAY HELPS HIMSELF

Manuel Balce Ceneta / The Associated Press

Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Roy Halladay catches a pop-up hit by the Washington Nationals’ Danny Espinosa during the seventh inning of Wednesday’s game. Philadelphia beat Washington 3-2.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Baltimore New York Toronto Tampa Bay Boston Central Division Cleveland Kansas City Chicago Detroit Minnesota West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 6 6 6 3 2 W 8 7 7 5 4 W 9 7 6 4

L 4 4 6 8 9 L 4 4 5 7 7 L 3 5 6 8

Pct .600 .600 .500 .273 .182 Pct .667 .636 .583 .417 .364 Pct .750 .583 .500 .333

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB — — 1 3½ 4½ GB — ½ 1 3 3½ GB — 2 3 5

Wednesday’s Games Detroit 3, Texas 2 Kansas City 10, Minnesota 5 Oakland 7, Chicago White Sox 4, 10 innings Toronto 8, Seattle 3 N.Y. Yankees 7, Baltimore 4 L.A. Angels 4, Cleveland 3, 12 innings Tampa Bay at Boston, ppd., rain

WCGB ½ ½ 1½ 4 5 WCGB — — ½ 2½ 3 WCGB — ½ 1½ 3½

L10 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7 2-8 L10 8-2 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6 L10 7-3 6-4 6-4 2-8

Str L-3 W-1 W-1 W-2 L-2 Str L-2 W-1 L-1 W-2 L-1 Str L-2 W-2 W-1 L-1

Home Away 3-3 3-1 5-2 1-2 4-2 2-4 0-5 3-3 2-3 0-6 Home Away 4-2 4-2 4-2 3-2 4-3 3-2 3-3 2-4 2-3 2-4 Home Away 6-0 3-3 4-2 3-3 1-2 5-4 2-4 2-4

East Division Philadelphia Florida Washington Atlanta New York Central Division Cincinnati Milwaukee Chicago Pittsburgh St. Louis Houston West Division Colorado Los Angeles San Francisco Arizona San Diego

Today’s Games Minnesota (Pavano 1-1) at Tampa Bay (Shields 0-1), 3:40 p.m. Baltimore (Arrieta 1-1) at N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Seattle (Fister 0-2) at Kansas City (Chen 1-0), 5:10 p.m. Detroit (Coke 0-2) at Oakland (G.Gonzalez 2-0), 7:05 p.m.

W 8 6 5 5 4 W 8 6 6 5 5 3 W 8 6 6 5 5

L 3 5 6 7 7 L 4 5 6 6 7 9 L 2 6 6 6 6

Pct .727 .545 .455 .417 .364 Pct .667 .545 .500 .455 .417 .250 Pct .800 .500 .500 .455 .455

GB — 2 3 3½ 4 GB — 1½ 2 2½ 3 5 GB — 3 3 3½ 3½

Wednesday’s Games San Diego 3, Cincinnati 2 Milwaukee 6, Pittsburgh 0 Philadelphia 3, Washington 2 Colorado 5, N.Y. Mets 4 Florida 5, Atlanta 1 Chicago Cubs 9, Houston 5 St. Louis 15, Arizona 5 San Francisco 4, L.A. Dodgers 3

WCGB — — 1 1½ 2 WCGB — — ½ 1 1½ 3½ WCGB — ½ ½ 1 1

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 6-4 6-4 5-5 4-6 5-5 3-7 L10 8-2 4-6 6-4 4-6 4-6

Str W-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-3 Str L-1 W-3 W-1 L-3 W-1 L-1 Str W-4 L-2 W-2 L-1 W-1

Home Away 5-1 3-2 3-3 3-2 2-3 3-3 2-3 3-4 1-4 3-3 Home Away 5-1 3-3 5-2 1-3 3-3 3-3 1-4 4-2 2-4 3-3 2-4 1-5 Home Away 3-1 5-1 3-1 3-5 4-2 2-4 3-3 2-3 3-5 2-1

Today’s Games Colorado (G.Reynolds 0-0) at N.Y. Mets (Dickey 1-1), 9:10 a.m., 1st game Colorado (De La Rosa 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (Capuano 1-0), 12:40 p.m., 2nd game Milwaukee (Wolf 0-2) at Pittsburgh (Maholm 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 1-1) at Washington (Zimmermann 1-1), 4:05 p.m. Florida (Nolasco 1-0) at Atlanta (Beachy 0-1), 4:10 p.m. San Diego (Moseley 0-2) at Houston (Norris 0-1), 5:05 p.m. St. Louis (J.Garcia 1-0) at L.A. Dodgers (Kuroda 2-0), 7:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Blue Jays 8, Mariners 3: SEATTLE — Jose Bautista hit a three-run homer off Seattle reliever Chris Ray, part of Toronto’s six-run eighth inning, and the Blue Jays avoided a three-game sweep by rallying for a win over the Mariners. Much to the delight of the many Blue Jays fans that made the drive down from British Columbia, Bautista unloaded on a 2-1 breaking ball that Ray (1-1) left in the middle of the plate, hitting it into the Toronto bullpen in left field — where reliever Jon Rauch caught the homer as he was warming up. • Athletics 7, White Sox 4: CHICAGO — Oakland scored three times in the ninth inning, then Coco Crisp hit a go-ahead single in a three-run 10th as the Athletics feasted on Chicago’s shaky bullpen for a startling win. Crisp entered the game in the ninth as a pinch-runner and was in a 3-for-22 slump before singling off Matt Thornton (0-2). • Tigers 3, Rangers 2: DETROIT — Brandon Inge hit a solo home run in the bottom of the ninth inning and Detroit beat Texas in its last at-bat for the second straight day. With one out, Inge hit the first pitch from Darren Oliver (1-1) over the left-field wall. Jose Valverde (2-0) pitched a scoreless top of the ninth for the Tigers. • Royals 10, Twins 5: MINNEAPOLIS — Slumping Mike Aviles doubled twice and drove in three runs as Kansas City became the latest team to tag Francisco Liriano, roughing up Minnesota. Aviles ended his zero-for-18 rut and Alex Gordon added two hits and drove in two runs. The Royals scored six times in the fourth inning to break open the game. • Yankees 7, Orioles 5: NEW YORK — A.J. Burnett remained undefeated in April with the Yankees by pitching effectively into the seventh inning, Alex Rodriguez hit a three-run homer and New York beat Baltimore. Robinson Cano added a two-run double. Mark Teixeira had two hits and Jorge Posada homered as they ended slumps and helped New York move into a tie atop the AL East with the Orioles. • Angels 4, Indians 3: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Jeff Mathis hit a bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the 12th inning that scored Vernon Wells and the Los Angeles Angels beat Cleveland. Wells singled sharply into the hole off the glove of shortstop Asdrubal Cabrera with one out in the 12th, only his fifth hit in 49 at-bats this season.

• Phillies 3, Nationals 2: WASHINGTON — At his dominant best until a shaky ninth inning, Roy Halladay held on to throw his first complete game of 2011, leading Philadelphia past Washington. Through eight shutout innings, Halladay (2-0) allowed only a pair of singles by Adam LaRoche. • Brewers 6, Pirates 0: PITTSBURGH — Shaun Marcum pitched seven shutout innings, Prince Fielder homered for the third time in four games and Milwaukee won its sixth in seven games, over Pittsburgh. Marcum (2-1) was perfect through four and kept the Pirates off-balance with his changeup, allowing only four singles with four strikeouts and a walk. • Marlins 5, Braves 1: ATLANTA — Josh Johnson took a no-hit bid into the eighth inning before rookie Freddie Freeman doubled with one out, and Florida beat Atlanta. Johnson (2-0) dominated the Braves for 7 1⁄3 innings, striking out nine and walking three. • Padres 3, Reds 2: SAN DIEGO — Orlando Hudson hit a bases-loaded, opposite-field single with two outs in the ninth inning and San Diego beat Cincinnati to avoid a three-game sweep. Hudson hit the first pitch he saw from Nick Masset (0-3) over third baseman Juan Francisco’s head and into left field. • Rockies 5, Mets 4: NEW YORK — Troy Tulowitzki hit a go-ahead homer through the thick fog and Colorado, off to the best start in club history, beat the New York Mets. Ryan Spilborghs also connected and Esmil Rogers (2-0) won his second straight outing to begin the season as Colorado earned its fourth consecutive victory — all on the road. • Cubs 9, Astros 5: HOUSTON — Pitcher Carlos Zambrano extended a franchise record with his 22nd career homer and ran his winning streak to 10 games, leading the Chicago Cubs to victory and a series win over Houston. • Cardinals 15, Diamondbacks 5: PHOENIX — Lance Berkman hit a grand slam and drove in five runs, and St. Louis routed Arizona. Skip Schumaker also homered. • Giants 4, Dodgers 3: SAN FRANCISCO — Pablo Sandoval hit a tying solo home run in the sixth inning and last-minute fill-in Mike Fontenot connected two batters later, leading San Francisco past the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Hawpe ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .138 Stauffer p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Qualls p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-E.Patterson ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Frieri p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Hundley ph-c 1 1 1 1 0 0 .406 Totals 31 3 7 3 7 5 Cincinnati 000 110 000 — 2 8 2 San Diego 000 000 111 — 3 7 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Qualls in the 5th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Frieri in the 7th. c-flied out for Maybin in the 7th. d-walked for Bell in the 9th. E—Hanigan (1), Chapman (1). LOB—Cincinnati 8, San Diego 10. 2B—Votto (4), Heisey (1), R.Hernandez (1). RBIs—Votto (7), J.Francisco (1), O.Hudson (3), Cantu (3), Hundley (8). SB—Votto (2), O.Hudson (5). SF—Hundley. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 4 (T.Wood 3, J.Francisco); San Diego 2 (Maybin, Venable). Runners moved up—Phillips, Janish, Cantu. GIDP— J.Francisco, Denorfia. DP—Cincinnati 1 (Janish, Phillips, Votto); San Diego 1 (Qualls, Bartlett, Cantu). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA T.Wood 6 2-3 5 1 1 3 5 98 3.86 Jor.Smith H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 4 1.35 Chapman H, 4 1-3 0 1 0 1 0 10 0.00 Masset L, 0-3 1 1-3 2 1 1 3 0 34 9.95 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Stauffer 4 1-3 6 2 2 2 4 99 4.80 Qualls 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 8 0.00 Frieri 2 2 0 0 0 1 27 2.57 Adams 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 1.50 Bell W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Jor.Smith 2-0, Masset

1-1, Qualls 1-0. IBB—off Masset (Venable), off Stauffer (R.Hernandez). T—2:57. A—17,057 (42,691).

Marlins 5, Braves 1 Florida AB Coghlan cf 4 Infante 2b 4 H.Ramirez ss 3 Stanton rf 4 Cousins rf 0 Morrison lf 4 G.Sanchez 1b 4 Dobbs 3b 2 c-Do.Murphy ph-3b1 J.Buck c 3 Jo.Johnson p 3 R.Webb p 0 Choate p 0 Totals 32

R 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 5

Atlanta AB R Prado lf 4 0 McLouth cf 3 0 C.Jones 3b 3 1 McCann c 3 0 Uggla 2b 4 0 Heyward rf 3 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 Freeman 1b 3 0 T.Hudson p 1 0 a-Ma.Young ph 1 0 C.Martinez p 0 0 b-Hinske ph 1 0 Sherrill p 0 0 Totals 29 1 Florida 131 000

H BI BB 3 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 3

SO 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

Avg. .271 .222 .194 .222 .125 .317 .317 .500 .148 .214 .125 -----

H BI BB SO Avg. 0 0 0 1 .275 0 0 1 2 .220 1 1 1 1 .310 0 0 1 2 .326 0 0 0 1 .152 0 0 0 1 .250 0 0 0 1 .233 1 0 0 1 .205 0 0 0 1 .000 0 0 0 0 .125 0 0 0 0 --0 0 0 1 .000 0 0 0 0 --2 1 3 12 000 — 5 8 0

Atlanta 000 000 001 — 1 2 0 a-grounded out for T.Hudson in the 6th. b-struck out for C.Martinez in the 8th. c-fouled out for Dobbs in the 9th. LOB—Florida 3, Atlanta 4. 2B—Coghlan (6), Freeman (2). HR—Morrison (3), off T.Hudson; C.Jones (1), off Choate. RBIs—Coghlan 2 (5), H.Ramirez (3), Morrison (7), Jo.Johnson (1), C.Jones (9). Runners left in scoring position—Florida 1 (H.Ramirez); Atlanta 1 (Prado). Runners moved up—Infante. GIDP—Stanton, Morrison. DP—Atlanta 2 (Ale.Gonzalez, Uggla, Freeman), (Uggla, Ale.Gonzalez, Freeman). Florida IP H R ER BB Jo.Jnsn W, 2-0 7 1-3 1 0 0 3 R.Webb 2-3 0 0 0 0 Choate 1 1 1 1 0 Atlanta IP H R ER BB T.Hudson L, 2-1 6 7 5 5 2 C.Martinez 2 1 0 0 1 Sherrill 1 0 0 0 0 Inherited runners-scored—R.Webb T.Hudson (J.Buck). WP—T.Hudson. T—2:20. A—14,351 (49,586).

SO NP ERA 9 109 1.35 1 7 4.05 2 20 3.38 SO NP ERA 2 82 3.48 1 21 2.57 0 12 6.75 1-0. IBB—off

Phillies 3, Nationals 2 Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Rollins ss Howard 1b B.Francisco rf Ibanez lf Ruiz c Valdez 2b

AB 3 3 4 3 4 4 3 3

R 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 1 0 1 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 1

SO 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0

Avg. .364 .370 .326 .333 .279 .233 .333 .353

3 1 30 3

0 6

0 3

0 4

1 .167 5

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Desmond ss 3 0 0 0 1 0 .196 Ankiel cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .220 Werth rf 4 1 1 0 0 2 .238 Ad.LaRoche 1b 4 0 2 0 0 1 .229 L.Nix lf 3 0 1 1 0 0 .278 Espinosa 2b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .276 Hairston Jr. 3b 3 0 0 0 0 3 .059 b-Stairs ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 I.Rodriguez c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .136 Lannan p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Gaudin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Slaten p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Cora ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Broderick p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 2 6 2 2 9 Philadelphia 000 120 000 — 3 6 0 Washington 000 000 002 — 2 6 2 a-grounded out for Slaten in the 8th. b-struck out for Hairston Jr. in the 9th. E—Desmond 2 (3). LOB—Philadelphia 6, Washington 6. 2B—Victorino (3), Ankiel (1). RBIs—Polanco (10), Howard (13), B.Francisco (8), L.Nix (4), Espinosa (7). SB—Desmond (4). S—Halladay, Espinosa. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 4 (Howard, Polanco, B.Francisco 2); Washington 3 (Hairston Jr., Werth, I.Rodriguez). Runners moved up—Victorino, Howard, B.Francisco, L.Nix. GIDP—Polanco, Rollins, Valdez, Espinosa. DP—Philadelphia 1 (Valdez, Howard); Washington 3 (Hairston Jr., Espinosa, Ad.LaRoche), (Espinosa, Desmond, Ad.LaRoche), (Espinosa, Desmond, Ad.LaRoche). Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Halladay W, 2-0 9 6 2 2 2 9 123 1.23 Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lannan L, 1-1 6 6 3 2 3 3 100 3.38 Gaudin 1 0 0 0 1 1 21 6.75 Slaten 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Broderick 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 16.20 HBP—by Halladay (L.Nix), by Lannan (Howard). T—2:30. A—16,914 (41,506).

Brewers 6, Pirates 0 Milwaukee Weeks 2b Gomez cf Braun lf Fielder 1b McGehee 3b Loe p Stetter p Kotsay rf 1-Morgan pr-rf Y.Betancourt ss Lucroy c Marcum p Braddock p Counsell 3b Totals

AB 3 3 4 4 3 0 0 3 1 4 4 3 0 0 32

R 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 6

H BI BB 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 6 2

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .273 .194 .342 .385 .211 ----.200 .450 .216 .250 .143 --.000

Pittsburgh AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Tabata lf 2 0 0 0 2 1 .325 Walker 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .273 A.McCutchen cf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .231 Overbay 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .238 Diaz rf 4 0 2 0 0 0 .263 Alvarez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .200 Doumit c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .241 Cedeno ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .167 Correia p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Crotta p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Resop p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Pearce ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Meek p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 30 0 4 0 3 5 Milwaukee 000 004 200 — 6 6 0 Pittsburgh 000 000 000 — 0 4 1 a-grounded out for Resop in the 8th. 1-ran for Kotsay in the 7th. E—Alvarez (3). LOB—Milwaukee 2, Pittsburgh 6. 2B—Y.Betancourt (3), Lucroy (1). HR—Fielder (3), off Correia. RBIs—Gomez (2), Fielder 3 (14), Y.Betancourt (2), Marcum (1). CS—McGehee (1). SF—Gomez. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 3 (Cedeno, Doumit, A.McCutchen). Runners moved up—Marcum. GIDP—Doumit. DP—Milwaukee 1 (Fielder, Y.Betancourt, Marcum). Milwaukee IP H R ER BB SO NP Marcum W, 2-1 7 4 0 0 1 4 94 Braddock 1-3 0 0 0 2 0 18 Loe 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 15 Stetter 1 0 0 0 0 0 16 Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP Correia L, 2-1 6 5 6 4 2 1 78 Crotta 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 Resop 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 Meek 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 Correia pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Loe 2-0, Crotta WP—Braddock. T—2:38. A—8,755 (38,362).

ERA 2.55 2.45 1.35 3.86 ERA 2.70 1.93 2.70 9.82 1-1.

Rockies 5, Mets 4 Colorado AB R S.Smith rf 4 1 Herrera 2b 4 1 C.Gonzalez lf 5 0 Tulowitzki ss 4 2 Jo.Lopez 3b 5 0 Helton 1b 4 0 Spilborghs cf 4 1 Lindstrom p 0 0 Street p 0 0 Iannetta c 1 0 Rogers p 2 0 Mat.Reynolds p 0 0 F.Paulino p 0 0 b-Fowler ph-cf 1 0 Totals 34 5

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 2 3 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 5 6 10

Avg. .324 .474 .268 .306 .206 .304 .200 --.000 .192 .167 ----.250

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jos.Reyes ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .327 Dan.Murphy 2b 4 1 1 1 1 0 .227 D.Wright 3b 5 1 1 0 0 1 .311 Beltran rf 4 0 2 1 1 0 .265 I.Davis 1b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .341 Pagan cf 2 1 2 1 1 0 .220 Harris lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .267 Thole c 4 0 0 0 0 1 .242 Niese p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Emaus ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .200 T.Buchholz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Beato p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Hairston ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .063 D.Carrasco p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 34 4 9 3 4 3 Colorado 000 131 000 — 5 8 0 New York 110 100 100 — 4 9 0 a-singled for Niese in the 6th. b-grounded into a fielder’s choice for F.Paulino in the 8th. c-flied out for Beato in the 8th. LOB—Colorado 9, New York 9. 2B—Herrera (3), Tulowitzki (3), Helton (1), Jos.Reyes (4), Dan.Murphy (2), Beltran (4). 3B—Pagan (1). HR—Tulowitzki (5), off Niese; Spilborghs (1), off Niese. RBIs—Tulowitzki 3 (12), Helton (5), Spilborghs (2), Dan.Murphy (4), Beltran (6), Pagan (5). SB—Herrera 2 (4). S—Rogers, Niese. SF—Pagan. Runners left in scoring position—Colorado 5 (Rogers 2, S.Smith, Jo.Lopez 2); New York 7 (I.Davis, Jos.Reyes, Harris 3, D.Wright, Dan.Murphy). Runners moved up—C.Gonzalez, Jo.Lopez, Jos. Reyes. Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Rogers W, 2-0 5 2-3 7 3 3 4 2 106 2.77 Mat.Rnlds H, 3 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 2 5.40 F.Paulino H, 2 1 2 1 1 0 1 18 1.93 Lindstrom H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 1.80 Street S, 6-6 1 0 0 0 0 0 14 0.90 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niese L, 0-2 6 7 5 5 3 5 101 6.88 T.Buchholz 1 0 0 0 1 2 15 1.35 Beato 1 0 0 0 1 2 16 0.00 D.Carrasco 1 1 0 0 1 1 19 4.05 Inherited runners-scored—Mat.Reynolds 1-0. IBB— off D.Carrasco (Tulowitzki). WP—Rogers 2. T—2:52. A—25,878 (41,800).

Cubs 9, Astros 5 Chicago S.Castro ss Barney 2b Byrd cf Ar.Ramirez 3b Je.Baker 1b Marmol p Soto c A.Soriano lf Colvin rf K.Wood p C.Pena 1b Zambrano p Mateo p Marshall p Re.Johnson rf Totals

AB 5 4 5 5 5 0 4 4 4 0 0 3 0 0 1 40

R H 1 3 1 2 2 0 1 3 1 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 14

Houston

AB R

BI 0 1 0 1 2 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 8

BB 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 1 0 0 0 7

Avg. .389 .345 .353 .326 .385 --.220 .250 .147 --.185 .375 ----.100

H BI BB SO Avg.

Bourn cf 4 1 0 0 1 1 .244 Ang.Sanchez ss 4 1 1 0 0 1 .383 Pence rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .300 Ca.Lee lf 4 1 1 1 0 0 .204 Wallace 1b 3 0 1 1 1 1 .256 Hall 2b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .233 M.Downs 3b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .417 Towles c 3 0 1 0 1 2 .368 W.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Inglett ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Abad p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Michaels ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .091 Del Rosario p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Melancon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --W.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --An.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Bourgeois ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .364 Totals 32 5 7 5 4 7 Chicago 500 001 003 — 9 14 0 Houston 000 005 000 — 5 7 1 a-flied out for W.Rodriguez in the 5th. b-fouled out for Abad in the 6th. c-popped out for An.Rodriguez in the 9th. E—W.Lopez (1). LOB—Chicago 6, Houston 5. 2B— Barney (1), Je.Baker (2), M.Downs (3). HR—A.Soriano (4), off W.Rodriguez; Zambrano (1), off Abad; M.Downs (1), off Zambrano. RBIs—Barney (4), Ar.Ramirez (6), Je.Baker 2 (6), A.Soriano 3 (10), Zambrano (1), Ca.Lee (7), Wallace (6), Hall (4), M.Downs 2 (5). SB—S.Castro (2). S—W.Rodriguez. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 2 (Colvin 2); Houston 1 (Ang.Sanchez). Runners moved up—Pence. GIDP—A.Soriano. DP—Houston 2 (M.Downs, Towles, Wallace), (Ca. Lee, Ang.Sanchez, Hall). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Zmbrno W, 2-0 5 2-3 7 5 5 3 4 99 6.11 Mateo H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.93 Marshall H, 5 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1.50 K.Wood H, 4 1 0 0 0 0 1 14 3.00 Marmol 1 0 0 0 1 1 22 2.84 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA W.Rdrigz L, 0-2 5 9 5 5 2 4 86 7.31 Abad 1 2 1 1 0 0 14 5.06 Del Rosario 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 2.70 Melancon 1 0 0 0 0 2 18 0.00 W.Lopez 1-3 3 3 2 0 0 26 7.71 An.Rodriguez 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 8 11.25 Inherited runners-scored—Mateo 1-0, An.Rodriguez 1-0. T—2:54. A—20,987 (40,963).

Cardinals 15, D’backs 5 St. Louis AB Theriot ss 4 E.Sanchez p 1 Rasmus cf 6 Pujols 1b 3 c-Descalso ph-3b 2 Holliday lf 2 Jay lf 2 Berkman rf 3 Craig rf 1 Freese 3b-1b 5 Schumaker 2b 5 Laird c 5 Westbrook p 4 Batista p 0 e-Greene ph-ss 1 Totals 44

R 2 0 3 3 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 15

H 2 0 3 2 2 0 0 1 0 2 1 3 1 0 0 17

BI 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 5 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 14

BB 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

SO 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 8

Avg. .304 .000 .375 .229 .278 .333 .286 .293 .222 .324 .267 .214 .250 --.250

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. K.Johnson 2b 4 0 0 0 1 1 .174 S.Drew ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .360 J.Gutierrez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Paterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --f-Miranda ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .227 J.Upton rf 4 2 1 0 1 1 .295 Branyan 1b 4 2 2 2 1 1 .421 C.Young cf 5 1 1 1 0 2 .292 Montero c 3 0 1 1 0 0 .444 d-H.Blanco ph-c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mora 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .280 G.Parra lf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .286 I.Kennedy p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Nady ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .300 Heilman p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Vasquez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-R.Roberts ph-ss 2 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Totals 38 5 10 5 3 8 St. Louis 261 330 000 — 15 17 2 Arizona 000 230 000 — 5 10 1 a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for I.Kennedy in the 3rd. b-singled for Vasquez in the 6th. c-doubled for Pujols in the 7th. d-popped out for Montero in the 7th. e-struck out for Batista in the 8th. f-struck out for Paterson in the 9th. E—Pujols (3), Theriot (4), J.Upton (1). LOB—St. Louis 7, Arizona 9. 2B—Theriot (2), Rasmus 2 (2), Pujols (1), Descalso (2), Laird 2 (2), Westbrook (1), J.Upton (3), Montero (5). HR—Berkman (4), off I.Kennedy; Schumaker (1), off Heilman; Branyan (1), off Westbrook. RBIs—Rasmus 2 (5), Pujols 2 (6), Berkman 5 (11), Freese (6), Schumaker 3 (7), Westbrook (1), Branyan 2 (2), C.Young (11), Montero (5), Mora (5). Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 5 (Freese 2, Rasmus 2, Westbrook); Arizona 3 (Heilman, G.Parra, C.Young). Runners moved up—Jay, Berkman 2. GIDP— J.Upton. DP—St. Louis 1 (Freese, Pujols). St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Westbrk W, 1-1 5 1-3 9 5 2 2 3 102 7.63 Batista 1 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 18 0.00 E.Sanchez 2 1 0 0 0 5 30 0.00 Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA I.Knedy L, 1-1 3 7 9 9 2 1 69 6.88 Heilman 1 2-3 7 6 6 1 2 53 12.15 Vasquez 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 18 0.00 J.Gutierrez 2 1 0 0 0 3 20 9.53 Paterson 1 1 0 0 0 2 25 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Batista 2-0, Vasquez 1-0. HBP—by I.Kennedy (Theriot, Holliday). WP—E.Sanchez, I.Kennedy. T—3:02. A—17,660 (48,633).

Giants 4, Dodgers 3 Los Angeles Carroll ss Blake 1b-lf Ethier rf Kemp cf Uribe 3b Thames lf Gwynn lf Guerrier p Barajas c Miles 2b Lilly p MacDougal p Kuo p Loney 1b Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 3 2 1 0 4 4 3 0 0 1 35

R 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 3

H BI BB SO 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 2 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 3 2 12

Avg. .342 .333 .370 .425 .135 .235 .296 --.211 .250 .000 ----.159

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rowand cf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .367 Tejada ss 4 0 0 0 0 0 .244 Huff rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .261 Schierholtz rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Posey c 2 0 0 0 0 1 .286 Burrell lf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .182 P.Sandoval 3b 4 1 1 1 0 1 .357 Belt 1b 3 1 2 0 1 0 .195 Fontenot 2b 3 1 2 2 1 0 .167 J.Sanchez p 2 0 0 0 0 0 .167 a-Bumgarner ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .500 R.Ramirez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Ja.Lopez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-F.Sanchez ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .279 Br.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 4 9 4 2 4 Los Angeles 000 201 000 — 3 9 0 San Francisco 110 002 00x — 4 9 0 a-grounded out for J.Sanchez in the 6th. b-fouled out for Affeldt in the 8th. LOB—Los Angeles 7, San Francisco 8. 2B—Gwynn (3), Miles (1), Rowand (2), Fontenot (1). HR—Barajas (3), off J.Sanchez; P.Sandoval (2), off Lilly; Fontenot (1), off Lilly. RBIs—Barajas 2 (4), Miles (2), Huff (8), P.Sandoval (6), Fontenot 2 (2). SB—Posey (1). CS—Rowand (1). SF—Huff. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (Ethier, Lilly); San Francisco 3 (Rowand, Burrell, F.Sanchez). Runners moved up—Tejada. Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lilly L, 0-2 6 7 4 4 0 2 79 6.00 MacDougal 1 2 0 0 0 0 15 2.25 Kuo 2-3 0 0 0 2 2 22 3.38 Guerrier 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 0.00 San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sanchez W, 1-1 6 7 3 3 2 9 109 3.24 R.Ramirez H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 1.23 Ja.Lopez 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0.00 Romo H, 3 1 1 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Affeldt H, 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 4.15 Br.Wilson S, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 13.50 Ja.Lopez pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Guerrier 2-0, Romo 1-0, Affeldt 1-0. HBP—by Lilly (Posey, Posey). T—2:56. A—42,060 (41,915).


D4 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Blazers

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Wednesday’s Games

Warriors 110, Blazers 86 PORTLAND (86) Matthews 5-9 4-4 18, Barron 2-10 1-2 5, C.Johnson 1-8 6-8 8, Miller 2-3 0-0 4, Fernandez 2-8 0-0 5, A.Johnson 5-12 2-3 12, Babbitt 4-17 1-2 11, Mills 7-16 5-6 23. Totals 28-83 19-25 86. GOLDEN STATE (110) Wright 8-21 1-2 20, Lee 6-13 1-3 13, Udoh 15 1-2 3, Curry 7-11 2-2 18, R.Williams 12-18 0-0 28, Lin 5-8 1-2 12, Amundson 2-5 0-0 4, Radmanovic 0-2 0-0 0, Thornton 2-2 2-2 6, Adrien 2-3 2-2 6. Totals 45-88 10-15 110. Portland 28 17 24 17 — 86 Golden State 30 21 34 25 — 110 3-Point Goals—Portland 11-26 (Mills 47, Matthews 4-7, Babbitt 2-5, Fernandez 1-5, Miller 0-1, A.Johnson 0-1), Golden State 10-23 (R.Williams 4-8, Wright 3-9, Curry 2-4, Lin 12). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 57 (Barron, C.Johnson 13), Golden State 52 (Udoh 8). Assists—Portland 18 (Fernandez 5), Golden State 33 (Curry 9). Total Fouls—Portland 15, Golden State 21. A—19,596 (19,596).

Bucks 110, Thunder 106 MILWAUKEE (110) Delfino 4-9 0-0 10, Mbah a Moute 2-6 2-4 6, Gooden 4-13 2-2 10, Jennings 4-11 7-8 16, Salmons 6-10 3-4 15, Ilyasova 5-8 3-3 14, Redd 5-10 0-0 11, Dooling 0-3 0-0 0, Sanders 5-9 00 10, Maggette 3-5 6-6 12, Boykins 2-4 0-0 6. Totals 40-88 23-27 110. OKLAHOMA CITY (106) Durant 6-14 1-1 14, Ibaka 3-4 0-0 6, Perkins 1-3 0-0 2, Westbrook 7-9 6-6 20, Sefolosha 3-4 0-0 7, Mohammed 5-11 2-4 12, Harden 5-12 1-1 12, Maynor 1-3 0-0 2, Mullens 4-9 2-4 10, Cook 4-6 0-0 11, Robinson 2-11 2-2 7, Ivey 1-2 0-0 3. Totals 42-88 14-18 106. Milwaukee 16 30 18 32 14 — 110 Okla City 21 22 31 22 10 — 106 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 7-18 (Boykins 22, Delfino 2-5, Ilyasova 1-2, Redd 1-3, Jennings 1-3, Salmons 0-1, Dooling 0-1, Gooden 0-1), Oklahoma City 8-20 (Cook 3-4, Sefolosha 1-1, Ivey 1-2, Harden 1-3, Durant 1-3, Robinson 1-5, Maynor 0-1, Westbrook 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Milwaukee 39 (Ilyasova 9), Oklahoma City 63 (Mohammed 10). Assists—Milwaukee 22 (Jennings 7), Oklahoma City 26 (Westbrook, Harden 5). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 15, Oklahoma City 20. A—18,203 (18,203).

Jazz 107, Nuggets 103 DENVER (103) Chandler 10-20 6-7 27, Harrington 4-14 6-6 15, Koufos 7-11 0-0 14, Lawson 3-5 0-0 6, Forbes 7-11 3-3 17, Smith 5-12 3-4 14, Andersen 1-1 2-2 4, Ely 2-3 2-4 6. Totals 39-77 22-26 103. UTAH (107) Millsap 4-9 3-4 12, Favors 5-10 2-3 12, Jefferson 8-15 1-2 17, Harris 6-17 7-8 21, Hayward 12-17 5-5 34, Elson 1-2 0-0 2, Watson 0-4 2-2 2, Evans 3-3 1-2 7. Totals 39-77 21-26 107. Denver 31 27 20 25 — 103 Utah 29 32 21 25 — 107 3-Point Goals—Denver 3-14 (Chandler 1-3, Smith 1-4, Harrington 1-6, Forbes 0-1), Utah 815 (Hayward 5-6, Harris 2-7, Millsap 1-1, Watson 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 44 (Andersen 10), Utah 41 (Jefferson 10). Assists—Denver 15 (Harrington, Forbes, Lawson, Chandler, Smith 3), Utah 25 (Harris 6). Total Fouls—Denver 18, Utah 20. Technicals—Denver defensive three second, Utah Coach Corbin. A—19,051 (19,911).

Pistons 104, 76ers 100 DETROIT (104) Prince 6-9 0-0 14, Wilcox 3-3 0-0 6, Monroe 3-10 4-6 10, Stuckey 9-15 10-11 29, Hamilton 2-5 5-6 9, Gordon 4-8 0-0 10, Daye 2-10 2-2 6, Summers 4-9 1-2 10, Maxiell 4-7 2-4 10. Totals 37-76 24-31 104. PHILADELPHIA (100) Nocioni 6-12 4-4 18, Brand 4-13 0-0 8, Hawes 3-9 0-0 6, Holiday 7-11 4-4 21, Meeks 29 2-2 6, Speights 3-8 2-4 8, Turner 7-13 2-2 18, Young 6-11 0-0 13, Daniels 0-1 0-0 0, Kapono 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 39-91 14-16 100. Detroit 29 23 31 21 — 104 Philadelphia 24 32 21 23 — 100 3-Point Goals—Detroit 6-17 (Gordon 2-4, Prince 2-4, Stuckey 1-3, Summers 1-3, Daye 0-3), Philadelphia 8-24 (Holiday 3-7, Turner 2-2, Nocioni 2-5, Young 1-1, Daniels 0-1, Kapono 03, Meeks 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Detroit 51 (Monroe 13), Philadelphia 49 (Brand 8). Assists—Detroit 26 (Stuckey 8), Philadelphia 27 (Turner, Holiday 7). Total Fouls—Detroit 17, Philadelphia 22. A—13,760 (20,318).

z-Chicago y-Miami y-Boston x-Orlando x-Atlanta x-New York x-Philadelphia x-Indiana Milwaukee Charlotte Detroit New Jersey Washington Toronto Cleveland

W 62 58 56 52 44 42 41 37 35 34 30 24 23 22 19

L 20 24 26 30 38 40 41 45 47 48 52 58 59 60 63

Pct .756 .707 .683 .634 .537 .512 .500 .451 .427 .415 .366 .293 .280 .268 .232

GB — 4 6 10 18 20 21 25 27 28 32 38 39 40 43

L10 9-1 8-2 5-5 6-4 4-6 7-3 4-6 5-5 6-4 4-6 5-5 1-9 6-4 2-8 5-5

Str W-9 W-4 W-1 W-2 L-6 L-2 L-2 L-2 W-3 W-2 W-1 L-5 L-1 L-2 W-2

Home 36-5 30-11 33-8 29-12 24-17 23-18 26-15 24-17 22-19 21-20 21-20 17-22 20-21 16-25 12-29

Away 26-15 28-13 23-18 23-18 20-21 19-22 15-26 13-28 13-28 13-28 9-32 5-36 3-38 6-33 7-34

Conf 39-13 38-14 37-15 36-16 31-21 28-24 25-27 28-24 26-26 22-30 22-30 13-39 16-36 14-38 15-37

WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB L10 Str z-San Antonio 61 21 .744 — 4-6 L-2 y-L.A. Lakers 57 25 .695 4 5-5 W-2 x-Dallas 57 25 .695 4 6-4 W-4 y-Oklahoma City 55 27 .671 6 7-3 L-1 x-Denver 50 32 .610 11 7-3 L-1 x-Portland 48 34 .585 13 6-4 L-1 x-New Orleans 46 36 .561 15 5-5 L-3 x-Memphis 46 36 .561 15 7-3 L-2 Houston 43 39 .524 18 5-5 W-1 Phoenix 40 42 .488 21 4-6 W-2 Utah 39 43 .476 22 3-7 W-2 Golden State 36 46 .439 25 6-4 W-1 L.A. Clippers 32 50 .390 29 4-6 W-1 Sacramento 24 58 .293 37 4-6 L-2 Minnesota 17 65 .207 44 0-10 L-15 x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division; z-clinched conference ——— Wednesday’s Games Utah 107, Denver 103 Dallas 121, New Orleans 89 Milwaukee 110, Oklahoma City 106, OT Charlotte 96, Atlanta 85 Orlando 92, Indiana 74 Miami 97, Toronto 79 L.A. Clippers 110, Memphis 103 L.A. Lakers 116, Sacramento 108, OT End of Regular Season

Home 36-5 30-11 29-12 30-11 33-8 30-11 28-13 30-11 25-16 23-18 21-20 26-15 23-18 11-30 12-29

Away 25-16 27-14 28-13 25-16 17-24 18-23 18-23 16-25 18-23 17-24 18-23 10-31 9-32 13-28 5-36

Conf 38-14 36-16 35-17 33-19 30-22 30-22 27-25 30-22 25-27 23-29 21-31 21-31 19-33 15-37 7-45

Chicago 97, New Jersey 92 Houston 121, Minnesota 102 Boston 112, New York 102 Cleveland 100, Washington 93 Detroit 104, Philadelphia 100 Golden State 110, Portland 86 Phoenix 106, San Antonio 103

1-8 (Ajinca 1-3, J.Johnson 0-1, Bayless 0-2, DeRozan 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Miami 51 (Magloire 19), Toronto 45 (Davis 8). Assists—Miami 20 (Chalmers 13), Toronto 16 (J.Johnson 6). Total Fouls—Miami 18, Toronto 15. Technicals—Miami defensive three second 2. A—20,108 (19,800).

0-1, Miller 0-3), Minnesota 4-13 (Beasley 2-6, Ridnour 1-2, Hayward 1-2, Tolliver 0-1, Webster 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 56 (Dragic 11), Minnesota 49 (Tolliver 13). Assists—Houston 32 (Dragic 11), Minnesota 20 (Ridnour 11). Total Fouls—Houston 18, Minnesota 22. A—17,101 (19,356).

Celtics 112, Knicks 102

Bobcats 96, Hawks 85

NEW YORK (102) Walker 3-6 5-6 12, Stoudemire 6-15 2-3 14, Turiaf 4-5 0-0 8, Douglas 3-8 1-1 8, Fields 6-12 2-3 16, Carter 3-4 2-2 9, Jeffries 2-5 1-2 5, Mason 3-9 1-1 8, Sha.Williams 4-10 1-1 9, Brown 3-7 0-0 7, She.Williams 2-4 2-2 6. Totals 39-85 17-21 102. BOSTON (112) Green 6-13 2-2 14, Davis 8-14 1-2 17, Krstic 5-8 3-4 13, Arroyo 2-5 1-2 6, Wafer 6-13 0-0 14, Murphy 4-6 0-0 9, Bradley 10-16 0-0 20, Pavlovic 7-10 1-3 19. Totals 48-85 8-13 112. New York 28 29 27 18 — 102 Boston 27 34 25 26 — 112 3-Point Goals—New York 7-23 (Fields 2-5, Carter 1-2, Brown 1-2, Walker 1-3, Douglas 14, Mason 1-5, Sha.Williams 0-2), Boston 8-17 (Pavlovic 4-5, Wafer 2-6, Arroyo 1-1, Murphy 1-2, Green 0-1, Bradley 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New York 43 (Fields, Brown 7), Boston 49 (Davis, Green 8). Assists—New York 22 (Carter 6), Boston 19 (Wafer 5). Total Fouls— New York 16, Boston 21. Technicals—Pavlovic. Flagrant Fouls—Walker. A—18,624 (18,624).

ATLANTA (85) Smith 2-3 0-0 4, Horford 1-4 0-0 2, Pachulia 1-3 0-0 2, Hinrich 5-10 0-0 10, Johnson 1-6 0-0 2, Williams 1-6 1-2 3, Crawford 6-10 2-3 14, Powell 5-10 6-7 16, Wilkins 5-10 4-4 14, E.Thomas 3-6 2-2 8, Teague 4-10 1-2 10, Sy 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 34-79 16-20 85. CHARLOTTE (96) Diaw 3-10 0-0 7, Cunningham 7-11 0-0 14, Brown 4-5 3-6 11, Augustin 6-13 4-4 17, Henderson 9-17 2-2 20, McGuire 2-5 4-4 8, White 6-10 0-0 12, Temple 1-4 0-0 3, Carroll 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 40-80 13-16 96. Atlanta 18 25 23 19 — 85 Charlotte 29 32 13 22 — 96 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 1-8 (Teague 1-2, Hinrich 0-1, Sy 0-1, Crawford 0-2, Johnson 0-2), Charlotte 3-10 (Temple 1-1, Diaw 1-3, Augustin 1-4, Henderson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 46 (Pachulia 10), Charlotte 46 (Brown 8). Assists—Atlanta 16 (Crawford, Hinrich, Williams, Pachulia, Powell, Sy 2), Charlotte 27 (Diaw 9). Total Fouls—Atlanta 15, Charlotte 16. Technicals—Charlotte defensive three second 2. A—16,138 (19,077).

Cavs 100, Wizards 93 WASHINGTON (93) Evans 6-7 0-0 15, Blatche 7-13 6-9 20, McGee 5-7 0-0 10, Wall 4-6 2-2 10, Crawford 2-14 0-0 4, Seraphin 3-5 0-0 6, Yi 4-10 2-2 10, Jeffers 3-9 1-2 7, N’diaye 0-0 0-0 0, Shakur 4-13 0-0 8, Owens 1-6 0-0 3. Totals 39-90 11-15 93. CLEVELAND (100) Gee 3-9 0-0 6, Hickson 7-12 1-3 15, Hollins 2-3 8-8 12, Sessions 8-13 11-12 27, Parker 2-7 0-0 5, Harangody 3-8 0-0 9, Harris 1-7 2-2 4, Gibson 4-16 2-2 10, Eyenga 2-4 1-2 6, Graham 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 35-83 25-29 100. Washington 35 15 24 19 — 93 Cleveland 23 24 24 29 — 100 3-Point Goals—Washington 4-12 (Evans 33, Owens 1-3, Wall 0-1, Blatche 0-1, Shakur 0-1, Crawford 0-3), Cleveland 5-21 (Harangody 3-5, Eyenga 1-2, Parker 1-4, Sessions 0-1, Gee 0-2, Gibson 0-7). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Washington 56 (Yi 12), Cleveland 51 (Hickson 13). Assists—Washington 24 (Crawford 6), Cleveland 23 (Harris 5). Total Fouls—Washington 25, Cleveland 13. A—20,562 (20,562).

Heat 97, Raptors 79

Rockets 121, Timberwolves 102

MIAMI (97) Jones 4-11 0-0 12, Anthony 0-4 1-2 1, Ilgauskas 3-7 3-4 9, Bibby 3-8 0-0 7, House 14-27 0-0 35, Chalmers 2-6 0-0 5, Howard 7-12 4-4 18, Magloire 3-4 2-4 8, Pittman 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 37-81 10-14 97. TORONTO (79) J.Johnson 4-10 4-7 12, Dorsey 3-4 1-4 7, Davis 3-7 1-2 7, Bayless 6-13 9-10 21, DeRozan 8-20 2-5 18, Ajinca 1-3 5-6 8, Alabi 0-2 0-0 0, Wright 3-5 0-0 6. Totals 28-64 22-34 79. Miami 29 21 20 27 — 97 Toronto 20 31 18 10 — 79 3-Point Goals—Miami 13-26 (House 7-13, Jones 4-6, Bibby 1-3, Chalmers 1-4), Toronto

HOUSTON (121) Budinger 12-21 7-7 35, Patterson 7-13 0-2 14, Hayes 1-4 0-2 2, Dragic 4-8 0-2 11, Martin 614 12-13 25, Miller 4-8 2-2 10, Lee 7-15 4-4 22, Hill 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 42-84 25-32 121. MINNESOTA (102) Beasley 13-27 6-6 34, Tolliver 3-7 0-0 6, Pekovic 3-7 4-5 10, Ridnour 3-11 0-0 7, Johnson 4-7 0-0 8, Webster 3-10 5-7 11, Randolph 11-17 1-1 23, Hayward 1-4 0-2 3, Ellington 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 41-92 16-21 102. Houston 32 37 21 31 — 121 Minnesota 30 22 37 13 — 102 3-Point Goals—Houston 12-31 (Lee 4-7, Budinger 4-8, Dragic 3-6, Martin 1-6, Hayes

Magic 92, Pacers 74 INDIANA (74) D.Jones 3-8 1-2 7, Hansbrough 4-10 1-1 9, Hibbert 0-4 0-0 0, Collison 2-5 0-0 4, George 1-5 0-0 2, Rush 5-16 1-2 16, Dunleavy 5-10 4-5 16, S.Jones 0-6 1-2 1, McRoberts 3-4 1-1 7, Posey 1-8 0-1 3, Price 2-6 2-2 7, Ford 1-6 0-0 2. Totals 27-88 11-16 74. ORLANDO (92) Turkoglu 5-9 2-2 13, Bass 5-8 2-3 12, Howard 3-7 7-9 13, Nelson 1-6 3-4 6, J.Richardson 3-9 0-0 8, Anderson 4-8 3-3 14, Q.Richardson 39 0-0 7, Duhon 2-6 2-2 6, Allen 3-6 0-0 6, Clark 3-5 1-2 7. Totals 32-73 20-25 92. Indiana 14 15 26 19 — 74 Orlando 28 25 18 21 — 92 3-Point Goals—Indiana 9-25 (Rush 5-9, Dunleavy 2-3, Price 1-4, Posey 1-7, George 0-1, Ford 0-1), Orlando 8-26 (Anderson 3-5, J.Richardson 2-6, Turkoglu 1-3, Nelson 1-4, Q.Richardson 1-4, Duhon 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Indiana 47 (Hansbrough, S.Jones 6), Orlando 65 (Howard 13). Assists—Indiana 16 (Price 7), Orlando 17 (Duhon 5). Total Fouls—Indiana 23, Orlando 18. Technicals—, Orlando defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—S.Jones, Posey. A—19,169 (18,500).

Bulls 97, Nets 92 NEW JERSEY (92) Graham 5-9 0-0 11, Gadzuric 2-4 1-1 5, Lopez 8-17 1-1 17, Farmar 7-15 5-6 21, Vujacic 4-11 0-0 10, Petro 4-7 5-6 13, Uzoh 1-3 0-0 2, Outlaw 4-11 0-0 9, Wright 1-3 2-2 4. Totals 3680 14-16 92. CHICAGO (97) Deng 4-11 2-2 11, Boozer 3-11 2-2 8, Noah 4-11 2-2 10, Rose 5-13 5-8 15, Bogans 1-3 0-0 3, Korver 7-13 3-3 19, Watson 2-5 3-4 8, Gibson 2-4 5-6 9, Thomas 1-2 0-0 2, Butler 4-5 0-0 10, Asik 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 34-79 22-27 97.

New Jersey 20 23 25 24 — 92 Chicago 26 24 18 29 — 97 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 6-15 (Vujacic 2-5, Farmar 2-6, Graham 1-1, Outlaw 1-2, Uzoh 0-1), Chicago 7-21 (Butler 2-3, Korver 2-7, Watson 1-2, Deng 1-3, Bogans 1-3, Rose 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 42 (Petro 8), Chicago 54 (Noah 10). Assists—New Jersey 21 (Farmar 12), Chicago 23 (Watson 6). Total Fouls—New Jersey 19, Chicago 20. Technicals—Graham. A—22,420 (20,917).

Mavs 121, Hornets 89 NEW ORLEANS (89) Ariza 2-7 2-2 6, Landry 4-8 2-2 10, Okafor 2-3 2-2 6, Paul 2-9 3-3 7, Belinelli 5-11 0-0 14, Gray 0-3 0-0 0, Green 3-7 0-0 6, Pondexter 47 1-2 10, Smith 3-4 0-0 6, Jack 8-15 5-6 22, Mbenga 1-3 0-0 2, Ewing Jr. 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 34-79 15-17 89. DALLAS (121) Marion 4-9 2-4 10, Nowitzki 10-21 11-12 32, Chandler 2-2 2-3 6, Kidd 4-6 0-0 12, Stevenson 2-3 0-0 6, Terry 4-11 3-4 13, Cardinal 1-1 0-0 3, Haywood 5-5 0-0 10, Barea 3-6 7-7 14, Brewer 3-4 3-4 11, Beaubois 1-4 0-0 2, Mahinmi 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 40-73 28-34 121. New Orleans 27 34 13 15 — 89 Dallas 28 30 28 35 — 121 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 6-14 (Belinelli 4-8, Jack 1-1, Pondexter 1-2, Ewing Jr. 0-1, Green 0-1, Paul 0-1), Dallas 13-28 (Kidd 4-6, Stevenson 2-3, Brewer 2-3, Terry 2-8, Cardinal 1-1, Barea 1-2, Nowitzki 1-3, Beaubois 0-1, Marion 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— New Orleans 38 (Gray 10), Dallas 48 (Marion 8). Assists—New Orleans 23 (Paul 8), Dallas 32 (Barea, Kidd 8). Total Fouls—New Orleans 28, Dallas 17. Technicals—Paul, Pondexter, New Orleans defensive three second 2. A—20,366 (19,200).

Suns 106, Spurs 103 SAN ANTONIO (103) Jefferson 2-8 2-2 7, Duncan 7-14 3-7 17, McDyess 4-6 0-0 8, Parker 4-12 4-6 12, Ginobili 0-1 0-0 0, Neal 5-11 3-4 14, Bonner 1-6 7-8 9, Blair 2-3 4-4 8, Ge.Hill 4-10 5-6 13, Green 59 0-0 13, Splitter 1-1 0-0 2, Novak 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-82 28-37 103. PHOENIX (106) Gr.Hill 5-10 3-3 14, Frye 6-17 2-2 17, Gortat 10-16 1-3 21, Nash 3-10 2-2 8, Dudley 4-13 6-7 17, Carter 3-8 1-2 8, Childress 1-2 0-0 2, Warrick 1-4 2-2 4, Brooks 0-7 4-4 4, Lopez 4-5 3-4 11. Totals 37-92 24-29 106. San Antonio 27 26 21 29 — 103 Phoenix 43 18 24 21 — 106 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 5-21 (Green 36, Jefferson 1-4, Neal 1-4, Parker 0-1, Novak 0-1, Ge.Hill 0-2, Bonner 0-3), Phoenix 8-19 (Dudley 3-6, Frye 3-10, Gr.Hill 1-1, Carter 1-1, Brooks 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 60 (Duncan 12), Phoenix 56 (Gortat 13). Assists—San Antonio 19 (Parker 7), Phoenix 23 (Nash 10). Total Fouls—San Antonio 25, Phoenix 28. A—18,195 (18,422).

Clippers 110, Grizzlies 103 MEMPHIS (103) Young 8-22 4-4 22, Arthur 2-10 3-4 7, Gasol 5-11 0-0 10, Vasquez 7-11 1-1 17, Mayo 4-11 2-2 12, Haddadi 3-5 4-5 10, Battier 4-8 4-5 13, Powe 0-3 4-4 4, I.Smith 3-3 2-3 8. Totals 3684 24-28 103. L.A. CLIPPERS (110) Moon 2-6 2-2 7, Griffin 13-21 5-7 31, Jordan 5-5 4-8 14, M.Williams 0-5 1-1 1, Gordon 1021 2-2 24, C.Smith 2-4 0-0 4, Aminu 3-3 0-0 6, Bledsoe 6-9 1-1 13, Diogu 3-3 2-3 8, Foye 0-4 2-3 2. Totals 44-81 19-27 110. Memphis 20 17 37 29 — 103 L.A. Clippers 34 32 26 18 — 110 3-Point Goals—Memphis 7-15 (Vasquez 22, Young 2-3, Mayo 2-6, Battier 1-4), L.A. Clippers 3-15 (Gordon 2-5, Moon 1-2, Griffin 0-1, M.Williams 0-3, Foye 0-4). Fouled Out—Arthur. Rebounds—Memphis 52 (Arthur 9), L.A. Clippers 45 (Griffin, Jordan 10). Assists—Memphis 25 (Vasquez, Mayo, Young 4), L.A. Clippers 36 (Griffin 10). Total Fouls—Memphis 24, L.A. Clippers 26. Technicals—Powe 2, Memphis Bench, Griffin, C.Smith 2, L.A. Clippers defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—C.Smith. Ejected—Powe, C.Smith. A—19,060 (19,060).

Lakers 116, Kings 108 L.A. LAKERS (116) Artest 2-11 3-4 8, Odom 9-16 3-3 22, Gasol 8-16 2-2 18, Fisher 5-9 0-0 11, Bryant 13-24 9-10 36, Brown 6-11 1-1 15, Walton 0-0 0-0 0, Johnson 2-3 2-2 6, Caracter 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 45-91 20-22 116. SACRAMENTO (108) Garcia 2-6 0-0 5, Cousins 3-6 0-0 6, Dalembert 8-13 0-2 16, Evans 6-22 6-8 19, Thornton 14-26 1-3 33, Thompson 7-11 2-4 16, Udrih 49 2-2 11, Greene 1-4 0-0 2, Casspi 0-1 0-0 0, Jackson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 45-99 11-19 108. L.A. 31 25 32 11 17 — 116 Sac. 26 22 22 29 9 — 108 3-Point Goals—L.A. Lakers 6-16 (Brown 2-3, Bryant 1-2, Fisher 1-2, Odom 1-4, Artest 1-5), Sacramento 7-24 (Thornton 4-9, Udrih 1-1, Garcia 1-4, Evans 1-5, Casspi 0-1, Jackson 0-1, Thompson 0-1, Greene 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Lakers 49 (Gasol 13), Sacramento 61 (Dalembert 18). Assists—L.A. Lakers 30 (Odom 7), Sacramento 24 (Evans 7). Total Fouls—L.A. Lakers 17, Sacramento 20. Technicals—Gasol, Cousins 2, Sacramento defensive three second 2. Ejected— Cousins. A—17,641 (17,317).

WESTERN CONFERENCE San Antonio vs. Memphis Sunday, April 17: Memphis at San Antonio, 10 a.m. Wednesday, April 20: Memphis at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: San Antonio at Memphis, 4:30 p.m. Monday, April 25: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD x-Friday, April 29: San Antonio at Memphis, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Memphis at San Antonio, TBD

Miami vs. Philadelphia Saturday, April 16: Philadelphia at Miami, 12:30 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Miami, 4 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD Sunday, April 24: Miami at Philadelphia, 10 a.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Miami at Philadelphia, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Philadelphia at Miami, TBD

L.A. Lakers vs. New Orleans Sunday, April 17: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 22: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. Sunday, April 24: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 6:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: New Orleans at L.A. Lakers, TBD

Boston vs. New York Sunday, April 17: New York at Boston, 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: New York at Boston, 4 p.m. Friday, April 22: Boston at New York, TBD Sunday, April 24: Boston at New York, 12:30 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: New York at Boston, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Boston at New York, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: New York at Boston, TBD

Dallas vs. Portland Saturday, April 16: Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Portland at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Dallas at Portland, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Dallas at Portland, 2 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: Portland at Dallas, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Dallas at Portland, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Portland at Dallas, TBD

Orlando vs. Atlanta Saturday, April 16: Atlanta at Orlando, 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Atlanta at Orlando, 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 22: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD Sunday, April 24: Orlando at Atlanta, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Orlando at Atlanta, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Atlanta at Orlando, TBD

Oklahoma City vs. Denver Sunday, April 17: Denver at Oklahoma City, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Denver at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Saturday, April 23: Oklahoma City at Denver, 7 p.m. Monday, April 25: Oklahoma City at Denver, 7:30 p.m. x-Wednesday, April 27: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD x-Friday, April 29: Oklahoma City at Denver, TBD x-Sunday, May 1: Denver at Oklahoma City, TBD

16th time in 17 seasons and Smart’s future is uncertain under new owners Joe Lacob and Peter Guber. “This is my home, so I’m here no matter what,” Smart said. “My family already told me I can go anywhere I want but they’re staying. My focus is on the team, moving forward with the idea that I’m directing this team. That’s how I’m going to play it out.” Dorell Wright had 20 points to cap a breakout season for the veteran forward and David Lee added 13 points for the Warriors. Even without leading scorer Monta Ellis, who sat out his second consecutive game with a concussion, the Warriors had it easy while winning their third straight against Portland this season. Golden State even made a little history along the way. Wright, who signed a threeyear deal with the Warriors last July after five years with Miami, finished the season with 1,344 points, 10 more than the total he had in his previous six seasons combined. In doing so, Wright — the league’s leading three-point shooter going into the night — became the first player in NBA history to accomplish that feat, according to the Elias Sports Bureau. “It’s been great,” Wright

said. “All the records are pretty sweet, but you know my teammates, if it wasn’t for those guys, I wouldn’t be in the position I’m in now.” Patty Mills had a careerhigh 23 points and Wesley Matthews added 18 points for Portland. The Warriors jumped out to a 12-point lead in the first quarter, led by as much as 24 in the second half then held on to snap Portland’s three-game winning streak. The Blazers lost for just the third time in their past nine games, a stretch that included victories over playoff-bound San Antonio, Oklahoma City, Dallas and the Lakers. Luke Babbitt had a doubledouble with 11 points and 11 rebounds for Portland, which shot just 33.7 percent from the floor and committed 21 turnovers. NOTES: The game was a sellout, Golden State’s 13th of the season. ... Curry set a franchise record for free-throw percentage (92.6), breaking Hall of Famer Rick Barry’s mark of 92.4 percent set in 1977-78. ... Oakland Raiders head coach Hue Jackson and former safety Eddie Anderson sat courtside. ... Ellis dressed for the game and sat on the bench in the first half but did not come out after halftime.

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Augustin added 17 points and seven assists and Charlotte sent Atlanta to the playoffs on a sixgame losing streak. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 PHILADELPHIA — Rodney Stuckey scored 29 points, and Tayshaun Prince had 14 to help Detroit hand playoff-bound Philadelphia its fifth loss in six games. Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 CLEVELAND — Ramon Sessions scored 27 points, J.J. Hickson added 15 and Cleveland closed out one of the worst seasons in franchise history. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 MINNEAPOLIS — Chase Budinger scored a career-high 35 points and Kevin Martin added 25 for Houston. Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 LOS ANGELES — Blake Griffin had 31 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists and the Los Angeles Clippers beat playoff-bound Memphis. Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 PHOENIX — Marcin Gortat had 21 points and 13 rebounds, and Phoenix denied San Antonio a chance for home-court advantage throughout the playoffs.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Chicago vs. Indiana Saturday, April 16: Indiana at Chicago, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Indiana at Chicago, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Indiana, TBD Saturday, April 23: Chicago at Indiana, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Indiana at Chicago, TBD x-Thursday, April 28: Chicago at Indiana, TBD x-Saturday, April 30: Indiana at Chicago, TBD

HW Y 97

BOSTON — Avery Bradley scored a career-high 20 points to help Boston’s “B” team beat New York’s second string in a regularseason finale both teams used to rest their starters. Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Pacers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 ORLANDO, Fla. — Ryan Anderson scored 14 points, and Dwight Howard had 13 points and 13 rebounds in a short night in Orlando’s victory over Indiana. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 DALLAS — Dirk Nowitzki scored 12 of his 32 points in the decisive third quarter, leading Dallas past New Orleans. Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 OKLAHOMA CITY — Brandon Jennings scored 16 points and Milwaukee sent Michael Redd into free agency with an overtime victory over Oklahoma City. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 SALT LAKE CITY — Rookie Gordon Hayward scored a career-high 34 points and hit five three-pointers to lift Utah past playoff-bound Denver. Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Gerald Henderson scored 20 points, D.J.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Kobe Bryant’s tying three-pointer with 4.8 seconds left in regulation forced overtime, and the Los Angeles Lakers regrouped to hand Sacramento a 116-108 loss Wednesday night in what might have been the Kings’ last game ever in Sacramento. Marcus Thornton had 33 points to help the Kings outscore the Lakers 29-11 in the fourth quarter. They went ahead by three until the final seconds, when Bryant crushed Sacramento’s hopes yet again. The Lakers then pulled away in overtime to clinch the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference playoffs. They will play the New Orleans Hornets in the first round. Also on Wednesday: Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 CHICAGO — Kyle Korver scored 19 points, Derrick Rose added 15 and Chicago closed the regular season with its ninth straight victory. Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Raptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 TORONTO — Eddie House scored a career-high 35 points, Juwan Howard added 18 and Miami beat Toronto. Celtics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

All times Pacific, subject to change; best of seven (x-if necessary):

BUS INE SS

The Associated Press

Continued from D1 “It means a lot sentimentalwise. But it’s not like, ‘Oh thank you, we’ve got Dallas.’ It’s going to be a tough task.” The Blazers secured the No. 6 seed in the Western Conference on Tuesday night with a victory over Memphis. That gave coach Nate McMillan a chance to rest Aldridge and fellow starters Marcus Camby, Nicholas Batum and Gerald Wallace before opening the postseason at Dallas. Earl Barron, signed as a free agent Tuesday, started at center in Portland’s makeshift lineup that also included reserves Rudy Fernandez and Chris Johnson. The outcome wasn’t all that surprising for a Portland team with nothing on the line. “We were able to sit some guys out that have injuries or soreness,” McMillan said. “Now we can get prepared for who we are going to face this weekend. The important thing tonight was for (the reserves) to go out and play hard and get some time out on the floor.” With the bench logging most of the minutes, the Blazers fell behind early and couldn’t recover. Afterward, Aldridge joined his teammates in the locker room to watch the final minutes of the Lakers’ overtime win against Sacramento. A Los Angeles loss would have sent Portland to Southern California to open the playoffs instead of to Dallas. The Blazers and Mavs split their season series 2-2 this year. “It’s going to be tough,” Aldridge said. “They’ve been to the finals before, a few years back, but they have a really, really good team. They were one of the hottest teams in the NBA this year so it’s going to be a really tough task to go in there and beat them.” Reggie Williams scored 28 points and Stephen Curry had 18 points and nine assists for Golden State in what could be first-year coach Keith Smart’s final game. Smart, who replaced Don Nelson before the season, led Golden State to a 36-46 record. That was a 10-game turnaround from 2010 but the team still missed the playoffs for the

97

Lakers clinch No. 2 seed with win

NBA playoff glance: First round

BEND PARKWAY - HWY

NBA ROUNDUP


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 D5

Aiming

PREP SCOREBOARD TRACK & FIELD

TENNIS Boys

Wednesday’s results ———

Boys CLASS 5A At Summit Team scores — Summit 77, Mountain View 66. 400-meter relay — 1, Summit A, 43.97; 2, Summit B 45.76; 3, Mountain View A, 46.61. 1,500 — 1, Riley Anheluk, MV, 4:31.18; 2, Chase Nachtmann, MV, 4:32.50; 3, Jake McDonald, MV, 4:41.12.. 3,000 — 1, Eric Alldritt, S, 9:25.41; 2, Jake Hill, S, 11:12.03; 3, Logan Myers, MV, 11:45.18. 100 — 1, T.J. Peay, S, 11.40; 2, Jesse Sanderson, S, 11.61; 3, Joel Skotte, MV, 11.77. 400 — 1, Alexander Needham, S, 52.87; 2, Matt Murphy, MV, 54.54; 3, Josh Smith, MV, 55.10. 110 hurdles — 1, Devon Welch, MV, 17.77; 2, Gage Jeffries, S, 17.90. 800 — 1, Travis Neuman, S, 1:59.33; 2, Luke Hinz, S, 2:03.52; 3, Jesse Sanderson, S, 2:05.07. 200 — 1, Alexander Needham, S, 23.55; 2, Dimitri Dillard, MV, 23.77; 3, Joel Skotte, MV, 23.80. 300 hurdles — 1, Michael Wilson, S, 42.27; 2, Nathan Guyer, S, 44.26. 1,600 relay — 1, Summit 3:40.91; 2, Mountain View A, 3:43.89; 3, Mountain View B, 4:09.62. High jump — 1, Blake Bosch, MV, 6-2; 2, Garrett Hardie, S, 6-00; 3, Michael Menefee, S, 6-0. Discus — 1, Hayden Czmowski, MV, 132-11; 2, Justin Warren, MV, 122-6; 3, Dylan Johnson, MV, 121-6. Pole vault — 1, Erik Jorgensen, 13-7; 2, Stephen Schloesser, MV, 11-6; 3, Nick Clark, S, 9-6. Shot — 1, Hayden Czmowski, MV, 41-4.5; 2, Kaden Olson, S, 41-1.75; 3, Jesse Facey, MV, 40-7.75. Javelin — 1, Hayden Czmowski, MV, 146-5; 2, Jesse Facey, MV, 144-10; 3, Justin Warren, MV, 135-2. Triple jump — 1 (tie) Blake Bosch, MV, 36-5.5; 2, Ben Ritchey, S, 36-5.5; 3, William Murphy, S, 34-3. Long jump — 1, Mitch Modin, MV, 20-1.50; 2, Ben Ritchey, S, 18-8; 3, Blake Bosch, MV, 18-2.

Girls CLASS 5A Mountain View vs. Summit At Summit Team scores — 1, Summit 90; 2, Mountain View 55. 100 — 1, Brianna Rosen, MV, 12.96; 2, Sarah Frazier, S, 13.09; 3, Ayla Rosen, MV, 13.16. 200 — 1, Emily Ritchey, S, 27.76; 2, Kiegan Sheridan, MV, 28.71; 3, Malia Powers, S, 28.85. 400 — 1, Brianna Rosen, MV, 61.21; 2, Meg Meagher, S, 65.18; 3, Alexa Thomas, S, 66.59. 800 — 1, Megan Fristoe, S, 2:22.28; 2, Tess Nelson, S, 2:34.12; 3, Krysta Kroeger, MV, 2:39.09. 1500 — 1, Mikhaila Thornton, MV, 5:15.00; 2, Jessica Wolfe, MV, 5:23.00; 3, Mary Hadley Schoderbek, S, 5:26.00. 3000 — 1, Ashley Maton, S, 10:59.72; 2, Mckenzie Goeman, S, 11:40.97; 3, Micaela Martin, S, 13:11.94. 100 hurdles — 1, Laney Hayes, S, 16.63; 2, Josie Kinney, S, 17.52; 3, Tarasina Audia, S, 17.98. 300 hurdles — 1, Josie Kinney, S, 52.84; 2, Ashley Needham, S, 54.26; 3, Maddy Cuniff, S, 55.47. 400 relay — 1, Summit ‘A,’ 49.76; 2, Mountain View, 50.56; 3, Summit ‘B,’ 53.56. 1600 relay — 1, Summit ‘A,’ 4:26.61; 2, Summit ‘B,’ 4:30.56; 3, Summit ‘C,’ 4:32.00. Shot — 1, Anna Roshak, MV, 35-11.50; 2, Courtney Shearer, MV, 31-01.00; 3, Iris Lindner, S, 29-07.00. Discus — 1, Hopper Cashman, MV, 110-11; 2, Taylor Pierce, S, 97-10; 3, Sara Andre, MV, 97-09. Javelin — 1, Courtney Shearer, MV, 120-03; 2, Janelle Noga, MV, 112-09; 3, Taylor Pierce, S, 102-10. High jump — 1, Laney Hayes, S, 5-04.25; 2, Lucinda Howard, S, 5-02.00; 3, Danielle Taylor, S, 5-02.00. Pole vault — 1, Dana Muensterman, S, 8-06.00; 2, Anna Young, S, 8-06.00; 3, Ashley Needham, S, 8-00.00. Long jump — 1, Torrie Morris, MV, 16-03.50; 2, Laney Hayes, S, 15-10.50; 3, Emily Ritchey, S, 15-08.00. Triple jump — 1, Shaina Zollman, MV, 34-01.00; 2, Laney Hayes, S, 33-05.00; 3, Sarah Frazier, S, 33-04.00.

Wednesday’s results ——— Class 4A SPECIAL DISTRICT 2 NORTH MARION 5, MADRAS 3 At Madras Singles — Peter Thwing, NM, def. Ryan Hutchins, M, 6-0, 6-2; Ryan Fine, M, def. David Ovchinnikov, NM, 2-6, 6-1, 6-1; Carlos Garcia, M, def. Jared Meeuwsen, NM, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2; Michael Grigorieff, NM, def. Colby Jack-Parks, M, 6-2, 6-2. Doubles — Carroll/Dady, NM, def. Penaloza/Freshour, M, 6-4, 4-6, 7-5; Caballero/Summers, NM, def. Garcia/Gemelas, M, 6-4, 6-4; Barrow/Kauffman, NM, def. Hernandez/Van Pelt, M, 6-4, 6-3; Vasquez/Giron, M, def. Jackson/Costello, NM, 6-4, 6-1.

BASEBALL Wednesday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID First game Redmond 000 010 0 — 1 3 0 Mountain View 003 010 x — 4 7 2 Smith and Branham; Peters, Robinett (7) and Ayers. W — Peters. L — Smith. S — Robinett. 2B — Mountain View: Ayers, Baker. HR —Mountain View: Peters ——— Second game Redmond 010 000 2 — 3 6 4 Mountain View 100 104 x — 6 4 3 Vernon, Thomas (6) and Branham; J. Hollister, Miller (6) and Ayers. W — J. Hollister. L — Vernon. 2B — Redmond: Buhrle, Vernon, Lau; Mountain View: Miller, Jo Carroll. 3B — Redmond: Vernon. ——— Bend 025 211 (12) — 23 18 2 Summit 022 212 3 — 12 13 10 Martorano, Koski (7) and Newton; Bellandi, Schneider (3), Reddick (3), Rooks (7), Sweet (7) and Mingus. W — Martorano. L — Schneider. 2B — Bend: Hirko, Koski, Bailey; Summit: Reddick 2, Wilson 2. 3B — Bend: Koski, Degaetano. HR — Bend: Zelmer; Summit: Wilson.

SOFTBALL Wednesday’s results ——— INTERMOUNTAIN HYBRID First game Redmond 041 105 — 11 12 0 Crook County 100 000 — 1 4 2 Pesek and McCarthy; Smith and Walker. W—Pesek. L—Smith. 2B—Redmond: Heiberger 2, Nitschelm. 3B— Redmond: Baker; Crook County: Smith. HR—Redmond: Knowles. ——— Second game Redmond 612 12 — 12 11 0 Crook County 000 00 — 0 4 2 Edwards and McCarthy; Smith, Christiansen and Walker. W—Edwards. L—Smith. 2B—Redmond: McCarthy 2, Friend, Baker, Callen; Crook County: Smith. ——— First game Mountain View (10)04 02 — 16 8 2 Summit 000 00 — 0 2 2 Wells and Noel; Amodeo and Birch. W—Wells. L— Amodeo. 2B—Mountain View: Durre, Noel. 3B—Mountain View: Robles ——— Second game Mountain View 200 020 0 — 4 4 5 Summit 301 220 x — 8 8 2 Bateman, Wells (4) and Noel; Defoe and Berge. W—Defoe. L—Bateman. 2B—Mountain View: Wells.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Summit’s Laney Hayes advances past a hurdle en route to winning the 100-meter hurdles race Wednesday.

Track Continued from D1 Summit’s Sarah Taylor was the fourth Storm jumper to go 5-2, clearing the mark in the junior varsity meet. Hayes, Howard, Taylor and Taylor have the first, second and fourth best high jump marks in Class 5A up to this point in the season. Hayes was all over the track Wednesday, winning the 100-meter hurdles in addition to taking second in the long jump and triple jump. Brianna Rosen paced the Mountain View girls, recording wins in

the 100 and 400. In the boys competition, Travis Neuman, Luke Hinz and Jesse Sanderson finished first, second and third, respectively, in the 800. Neuman won the event with a time of 1 minute, 59.33 seconds, the fourth-best 5A time so far this season. Hayden Czmowski and Blake Bosch led the Cougars boys. Czmowski pulled off a hat trick in the three throwing events, winning the shot put, discus and javelin, while Bosch posted victories in the high jump and triple jump. Both teams are back on the track Saturday at the Crater Classic in Central Point.

Mountain View sweeps Redmond in doubleheader Bulletin staff report Mountain View limited Redmond to nine hits in two games Wednesday as the Cougars defeated the Panthers 4-1 and 6-3 to improve to 7-1 in Intermountain Hybrid baseball play. Sam Peters earned the win for Mountain View in the opener, pitching six innings before Alex Robinett closed out the game with a scoreless seventh. Peters struck out three and scattered three hits against six walks. The Cougars (11-4 overall) scored three runs in the third inning, sparked in part by Peters’ solo home run. In the second game, Jacob Hollister picked up the victory, throwing 5 2⁄3 innings to lead Mountain View to a 6-3 win. Ahead 2-1 after five innings, the Cougars broke the game open with a four-run sixth that was fueled by RBI doubles by Matt Miller and Jo Carroll. Mountain View, which has won 10 of its past 11 games, is at Bend High on Friday. In other prep events Wednesday: SOFTBALL Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 - 12 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 - 0 PRINEVILLE — Ashley Pesek went the distance for Redmond and tossed a four-hitter with 10 strikeouts and no walks in the first game of the Intermountain Hybrid doubleheader. The Panthers (6-0 Intermountain Hybrid, 11-1 overall) benefitted from timely hits and a pair of home runs by Brandy Knowles, who swatted a solo shot in the fourth and two-run

Timbers Continued from D1 Paulson, the son of former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, bought the Timbers and the Beavers in 2007 and soon thereafter began a campaign to lure an MLS franchise to Portland. While he won over MLS, he was unable to persuade area leaders to build a new ballpark for the Beavers, the minor league affiliate of the San Diego Padres. The Beavers were sold last year to Jeff Moorad, an owner of the Padres, and moved to Tucson, Ariz. Major League Soccer at the outset appears to be a good fit for Portland, which has been home to the Timbers in one incarnation or another since 1975. The Tim-

PREP ROUNDUP knock in the sixth and final inning. In the second game, Redmond’s Courtney McCarthy tallied two doubles and Cheyenne Friend, Baileigh Baker and Justine Callen all added doubles for the Panthers, who posted 11 hits in the five-inning shutout. Redmond hosts Summit Friday while Crook County travels to meet Bend the same day. Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . 16 - 4 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 - 8 In the opener at Summit High, Cougar senior Danika Noel knocked a bases-loaded double, bringing home three runs to give the Cougars (2-2 Intermountain Hybrid, 4-5 overall) a 10-0 lead after the first inning. Mountain View’s Shelbee Wells tossed a two-hitter shutout in the road win. In the second game, Storm pitcher Mariah Defoe kept the Cougar batters off balance, recording 10 strikeouts to help boost Summit (1-1 Intermountain Hybrid, 2-4 overall) to an 8-4 win. Summit held a 4-0 advantage after three innings and added two more runs in the fourth and fifth innings to keep the home team ahead. Summit is at Redmond on Friday while Mountain View hosts Redmond on Wednesday. BASEBALL Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 The Lava Bears scored 12 runs in the top of the seventh inning at Summit High to blow up what until then was a close game. Bend led 11-9 after six

innings before sealing the Intermountain Hybrid contest in its final at-bat. Sophomore Anthony Martorano earned the win for the Bears (3-3 Intermountain Hybrid, 11-3 overall), giving up nine runs over six innings. Chris Zelmer went three for five with a home run and three runs batted in to lead Bend at the plate. Jonah Koski added three hits and scored five times for the Lava Bears, who recorded 18 hits in the game. Summit (2-4 Intermountain Hybrid, 4-9 overall) kept pace offensively with Bend, posting 13 hits in the defeat. D.J. Wilson went three for four with two doubles, a home run, an RBI and one run scored to lead the Storm. Additionally, Konner Reddick ended the day four for five with two doubles, two RBIs and three runs scored. Summit struggled in the field all game, though, committing 10 errors, three of which came in the top of the seventh. Bend High hosts Mountain View on Friday and Summit is at Crook County the same day. BOYS TENNIS North Marion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MADRAS — Ryan Fine and Carlos Garcia both scored wins for Madras in singles play but North Marion won three of the four doubles matches en route to the Special District 2 win. The White Buffaloes duo of Jesus Vasquez and Michael Giron notched the only Madras doubles win on the day.

bers were born that year as part of the North American Soccer League and they were successful at the start, advancing to the league’s championship game. Because of the excitement surrounding that team, Portland was dubbed “Soccer City, USA.” The moniker has seen a revival with the arrival of MLS. The Timbers sold out their season tickets earlier this year and now there’s a waiting list. The single game tickets are mostly gone, too. The Oregon House of Representatives jumped on the bandwagon on Wednesday by declaring today “Timbers Day” in Oregon. “The excitement and hype around this game is unbelievable,” said goalkeeper Jake Gleeson. “It certainly has surpassed

my expectations.” Gleeson, a 20-year-old from New Zealand, will have to wait to see whether he will start in goal for the Timbers against the Fire. He started in Portland’s past two games, a U.S. Open Cup victory and a regular-season game at New England, because veteran Troy Perkins and backup Adin Brown have both been nursing injuries. Perkins is close to a return, but coach John Spencer said he won’t decide between his two options until game time. Spencer said it is important that his team keep perspective amid all the hoopla on tonight. “For me, you step on the field — it’s a beautiful arena to play in,” the coach said. “But ultimately that’s not what matters — it’s how the team performs.”

TRACK AND FIELD Lava Bears beat Crook County in relays Bend won 55-15 at home against Crook County in a coed relays event. The Cowboys Jordan Reeher was a double winner, taking part in a victorious relay in addition to claiming first place in the long jump. Crook County swept the shot put events, with Cody Smith winning the boys’ competition and Cowgirl Marcy Johnson setting a personal best to finish first in the girls event. BOYS LACROSSE Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 The Storm opened High Desert League play with a victory and are now 4-2 overall. Willy Ross scored a team-high four goals and Quinn Burkett contributed four assists in the win. Dylan Smith added three goals for the Storm, who host Hermiston on Friday. Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 SISTERS — Colton Raichl had a hand in six of his team’s eight goals, scoring three times himself and assisting on three others in the Lava Bears’ nonleague victory over the Outlaws. Tyler Simpson also scored three goals for Bend. Bend hosts Redmond today while Sisters is at Roseburg on Saturday.

Continued from D1 But go to a shooting range and “you don’t see any kids,” laments Jim O’Grady, of Bend. O’Grady’s 13-year-old son, Bailey, is an avid sporting clays shooter and plans to take part in Deshoots Youth Sports. “This is a great opportunity to get the kids introduced,” Jim O’Grady says. “They need to be introduced in some way. In Central Oregon, there’s definitely a need for it.” Blackmer, 54, is a certified sporting clays instructor who started shooting at a young age with his father’s guidance. He knows the gear-intensive sport can be expensive, so he wanted to offer a way to make it more affordable for Central Oregon youth. Blackmer will rely mostly on private donations to run the program, which he plans to conduct over a 12-week period this summer. Specific dates and times for the shooting sessions are yet to be announced. The program will be offered for a one-time fee of $15 to $20. Sporting clays is scored by how many targets a shooter hits out of a specified number of attempts (usually 25 or 50). The typical setup is known as five-stand, which features five stations with a different arrangement of targets at each station. The disc can fly across a shooter’s line of sight, or out and away from the shooter. Central Oregon Sporting Clays — located on a ranch about halfway between Bend and Redmond, about threequarters of a mile east of U.S. Highway 97 — includes a 13station walk-through course, where shooters walk from station to station. A long-range goal for Blackmer is to get youngsters involved in the Scholastic Clay Targets Program (SCTP), a national organization for youth shooters in the sports of trap, skeet and sporting clays. “If they (young shooters) want to take it to the next level, we can get them into that more competition-oriented (direction),” Blackmer says. “We eventually want to get a core group together and travel around and compete at different venues — sort of a competitive traveling team.” But the main focus of Deshoots Youth Sports, Blackmer insists, is safety. “That’s No. 1,” he says. “That’s the first thing we teach. We tell them that they are responsible for everyone else’s safety.” Brad Carroll, a 17-year-old junior at Bend’s Summit High School, got started in sporting clays about a year ago and is now involved in the SCTP. He plans to participate in the Deshoots Youth Sports program. “I think it’s a great opportunity for us,” Carroll says. “It’s cool we have a place that’s local where we can go shoot, have fun, and get better. (Sporting clays) is fun and it teaches you a bunch of stuff — discipline and working hard and getting better at something.” Deshoots Youth Sports will welcome beginners as well as those with experience. Blackmer says he typically will start off with easy targets to build confidence in the young shooters. “We can usually take a kid that has never handled a gun and within an hour have (him or her) break at least a couple

targets,” he says. “Most kids, if they show any interest in it at all, they love it.” Central Oregon Sporting Clays hosted a fundraiser for Deshoots Youth Sports earlier this month, gaining donations through a raffle and a silent auction. Blackmer is seeking additional donations as well as gear, including shotguns, pouches, safety glasses, ear protection and shotgun shells. Blackmer hopes to get parents involved, too. “It’s not super rigid, other than the safety,” he says. “So there’s the opportunity for a lot of outdoor fun.” Mark Morical can be reached at 5 4 1- 383- 0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

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H U N T I N G & F ISH I N G

D6 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E C 

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

FISHING

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Jennifer Lewis boated this 6-pound hatchery winter-run steelhead fishing the Clackamas last week.

Steelhead fishing is worth the woes Rough terrain, weather no deterrent to angling these spectacular fish

“I

have lived,” Rudyard Kipling wrote in 1889. “The American Continent may now sink under the sea, for I have taken the best that it yields, and the best was neither dollars, love, nor real estate.” Addressed to the “gentlemen of the Punjab Fishing Club,” the story recounts Kipling’s passage from The Dalles to Portland, thence along the Willamette and 15 miles overland in a horsedrawn carriage. “All the land was dotted with small townships, and the roads were full of farmers in their town wagons, bunches of tow-haired, boggle-eyed urchins sitting in the hay behind. The men generally looked like loafers, but their women were all well dressed.” Away from the towns, the road struck into the woods. “It wound in and out among fire-blackened stumps under pine-trees, along the corners of log fences, through hollows, which must be hopeless marsh in the winter, and up absurd gradients.” This is what people endure for steelhead. For this is what Kipling spoke of. Better than dollars, better than love, better than real estate: steelhead. It’s a rite of passage in our family. My first — 9 pounds of North Fork Lewis chrome — came when I was 14, after three years of trying and 10 great fish battled and lost. Merrilee caught hers on our first fishing date, a 6-pounder high in the Sandy River watershed. Our firstborn, Tiffany, caught her sea-run rainbows on the Snake River on a January day when the riverbanks were crusted with ice. Our daughter Jennifer was well dressed in a borrowed ski-jacket and her grandpa’s rain pants when we plumbed the depths of the Clackamas — where Kipling and company waded 122 years before, where Kipling hooked his first on an 8-

GARY LEWIS ounce bamboo rod. “The next cast — ah, the pride of it, the regal splendor of it! The thrill that ran down from fingertip to toe! Then the water boiled. He broke for the fly and got it. There remained enough sense in me to give him all he wanted when he jumped not once, but 20 times, before the up-stream flight that ran my line out to the last half-dozen turns, and I saw the nickeled reel-bar glitter under the thinning green coils. My thumb was burned deep when I strove to stopper the line.” We fished a couple of slots up high, then drifted around a corner into a long run. On the left bank, two anglers stood, shiny in wet green slickers. On river right, the best water was occupied by a jet sled and a pontoon boat. My friend Rob Crandall, owner of Watertime Outfitters, dropped anchor upstream from the bank anglers. “I don’t want to crowd those guys. They’re fishing too far out, casting right over the good water in front of them, but they don’t know it. We’ll fish here.” We occupied the middle of the river to drift our jigs into the “buckets” that Crandall knew from experience held the most fish. Way downstream, Jen’s float plunged. Her rod arced when the fish wallowed at the tailout. She put the backbone to it to keep the fish from running the rapids. And then the guy on the bank cast over her line. His float, jig and weights tangled on Jennifer’s rig, he gave the line slack. Jennifer stole line bit by bit and the fish took it back, then

Jen gained again — the current, the line and the graphite on her side. Crandall dipped the net and 6 pounds of ocean-fueled rainbow fury was ours. Crandall clipped Jennifer’s line in a couple of places and freed the other angler’s rig. We basked in the glow of Jen’s first steelhead success. Rob hooked up next. Bright as a new-minted nickel, the fish broke water downstream and turned a back flip above the surface. A big, wild summer-run, we brought him to shore and turned him back. The rain never stopped. By 2 o’clock, water soaked through my hat and ran down the sides of my face. The last drift was a long run. When the float had almost reached the tailout, it disappeared. The fish charged toward our boat and allowed me to gain a prodigious amount of line before it battled 20 feet off the rod tip. I saw it then, a slab of silver in the green water. At the bank, we guided the 12-pound wild hen into the net and then back out again to seed the mighty river with her offspring. I was exultant. Each steelhead is as good as the first. Kipling would have agreed. “My hands were cut and bleeding,” he wrote. “I was dripping with sweat, spangled like a harlequin with scales, water from my waist down, nose peeled by the sun, but utterly, supremely, and consummately happy.” Today, that 15-mile drive from Portland past the loafers and well-dressed women is paved the whole way to the Clack. Generations upon generations of steelhead have passed through the jaws of the great river. By undeserved grace there are still wild steelhead — fish that transcend time and our own generations when we test each other on the water. Gary Lewis is the host of “Adventure Journal” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www. GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

FISHING REPORT

Anglers report kokanee success at Haystack Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Fishing is expected to be good as soon as the lake is accessible. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Make sure you have a supply of blue-winged olives for April. However, high flows can limit success and anglers are encouraged to monitor flows before venturing out (river flows near Prineville). FALL RIVER: The Fall River is a popular winter fishery. Anglers are encouraged to note the special regulations in the 2010 Sport Fishing Regulations; the angling season downstream from the Fall River falls ended on Sept. 30. HAYSTACK RESERVOIR: Anglers have reported good kokanee fishing and occasional large fish. Please send a report to ODFW Fishing Reports if you have fished Haystack recently. LAKE BILLY CHINOOK: The Metolius arm is open and anglers have been catching several bull trout less than 24 inches and occasional keepers. Anglers must obtain a tribal angling permit to fish in this zone; please reference the 2011 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations.

METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. The river upstream of Allingham Bridge is closed to fishing until May 28. OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: Hatches are common in Ochoco Creek between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. this time of year. Angling is restricted to artificial flies and lures only; two trout per day and 8-inch minimum length. OCHOCO RESERVOIR: Although there are no recent reports, anglers are reporting improved fishing over past years. Opportunities for 12- to 20-inch rainbow trout should improve with the warmer weather. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Anglers have reported catching larger trout than in recent years. Anglers should consult the 2011 Sport Fishing Regulations for maximum length requirements and bag limits for both largemouth and smallmouth bass. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is open to children 17 years old and younger with a bag limit of two fish. WALTON LAKE: Anglers are now allowed to access Walton Lake by the Round Mountain Trail, approximately a quarter mile up from the Walton Lake gate. Do not venture onto thin ice, and vehicles should not obstruct traffic when parking; parking may be available at the Walton Sno-park. The lake is stocked with catchable rainbow trout, and our traditional stocking schedule will resume in May. Please contact Ochoco National Forest at 541-416-6500 for more information on access.

ANGLER EDUCATION TRAINING: The ODFW and the Oregon 4-H program will hold an Angler and Aquatic Education Instructor training on Saturday, April 23, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center in Redmond; cost is $25 per person; open to anyone 18 years or older interested in becoming a volunteer angling instructor; preregistration is required by April 20; visit oregon.4h.oregonstate. edu/sport-fishing-projects or call 541-548-6088 ext. 7953. TIGHT LINES BARBECUE DINNER AND AUCTION: Friday, May 6, 5:30 to 9:30 p.m.; Aspen Hall in Bend’s Shevlin Park; $50 per person and $500 per table of eight (prices include dinner and drinks); Deschutes River Conservancy’s fifth annual event; bid on fishing trips throughout the western United States and beyond; all proceeds support the DRC’s mission to restore stream flow and improve water quality in the Deschutes Basin; 541-3824077; debbie@deschutesriver. org; www.deschutesriver.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central

Oregon who are trying to improve their casting techniques; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS CLUB: Meets on the third Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; contact: www.coflyfishers.org.

HUNTING THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405 N. Belknap St.; contact: 541-447-5029.

SHOOTING YOUTH ARCHERY LEAGUE: At Top Pin Archery in Sisters; Thursdays at 3:30 p.m. through May 26; league fee is $45; 541-588-6339; www.toppinarcheryproshop.com; toppinarchery@bendbroadband.com. BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.;

located east of Bend, at milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: Thirteen-station, 100-target course and five-stand open Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 11 a.m. to dusk (closed Wednesday); located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www. birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB BOWLING PIN MATCH: Sunday, April 17, at 12:30 p.m.; match for the inexperienced and experienced alike; 2555 East Highway 126, just a couple of miles outside Redmond on the north side of the road; contact Gary George at 541-504-1513. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and Pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2011 family memberships now available for $50; nonmembers are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-4087027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

FLY-TYING CORNER By Gary Lewis For The Bulletin

When most anglers try to match caddis hatches in late spring and early summer, another hatch might be in the offing. Called the early orange stonefly, western yellow stonefly and yellow sally, the nymph is mottled tan/brown/light yellow in color and when it hatches, it is bright yellow to light brown with tan or yellow wings. Look for this little yellow stonefly when the nymphs migrate to slower water, then crawl to shore in late spring and summer. Fish the dry close to the bank and prospect in the back-eddies. Tie this low-riding fly with a bushier hackle for riffled water and sparse for quiet water. Construct the Yellow Sally with yellow thread on a No. 8-14 long dry-fly hook. Tie a tag of red floss then build the body with light yellow Antron, ribbed with fine gold wire. Tie in two strands of Krystal Flash for the underwing, then tie the wing with deer hair gauged to the

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Yellow Sally, courtesy The Patient Angler. bend of the hook. For the hackle, use tan or light yellow and finish with a long yellow head.

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O

ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS Inside

‘Tough Enough’ “Stone Cold” Steve Austin is back in the wrestling ring, Page E2

OUTING

E

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

Photos by David Jasper / The Bulletin

The icy blue waters of the Metolius River rush downstream near Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery.

Nevermind the

Metolius Monster Metolius River Lake Billy Chinook

Warm Springs Indian Reservation

By David Jasper The Bulletin

DESCHUTES NATIONAL FOREST

Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery Camp Sherman Metolius Springs (headwaters)

14

Black Butte 20

Take in the tranquility of this easy-going spring-fed river

11

To Sisters Greg Cross / The Bulletin

ou know why it’s named the Metolius, don’t you?” I asked my kids. “Why?” one of them said. I love it when they take the bait. “Because of … the Metolius Monster!” I said, using my scariest voice, which, granted, is probably a little high-pitched to frighten effectively. When one of them asked where I got my “not funny” material, I said I made it up, and gave a brief biography for the Metolius Monster: “The Metolius Monster was supposedly destroyed by the wizard of Wizard Falls, but is rumored to fly in on weekends and mess with fishermen.” Throughout the hike along the beautiful Metolius River on Sunday, I used the fictional beast as an excuse to leap out from behind random ponderosas and incense cedars lining the western edge of the river, which flows north into Lake Billy Chinook. While we (read: I) could stand accused of disturbing the hushed, tranquil environs of the blissfully easy Metolius River Trail that morning, here’s the thing about April: There aren’t a lot of people around (yet), which means that you can have your cakewalk and eat it too loudly.

“Y

Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery produces approximately 7 million trout, 5 million steelhead and 33 million salmon annually. We drove the 45 miles from Bend to Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery with one stop, to see where the Metolius Springs form the river’s headwaters. A short, paved path leads you directly to the scenic viewpoint, where the waters gush from the ground. On either side of the path are small signs warning to keep off private property, so you’ll want to stay on the pavement. See Outing / E6

Variable conditions on trails this week By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

Check the weather first before heading to the trails this coming week, as anything from sunshine to snowstorms might greet you. The forecast calls for a few inches to up to a foot of new snow in the mountains. Yet by Saturday, rain is expected from Bend all the way to roughly 6,300 feet, the approximate elevation of the Dutchman Flat Sno-park. This means people should be prepared, even as there is plenty of winter recreation left to be had, said Chris Sabo, trails specialist for the Deschutes National Forest. “Choose wisely, have some winter gear with you and have some fun,” Sabo said. With varying conditions, the snow may be hard one day, and soft and heavy the next. Plows continue to work their way north on the Cascade Lakes Highway. Sabo recommends that snowmobilers leaving from the Mount Bachelor area don’t go any farther south than Devils

TRAIL UPDATE Lake. Elk Lake Resort is now closed. Workers suspended plowing on Road 21 to Newberry Crater this past week to wait for a thick layer of ice on the road to soften. Thus, for the time being, the area remains accessible to snowmobiles. There is still roughly six feet of snow atop McKenzie Pass as well, Sabo said. For those hoping to escape snow, Sabo said trails are beginning to firm up at lower elevations. The Phil’s Trail complex is ready for running and biking for roughly the first five to seven miles from the trailhead. The Deschutes River Trails are clear from Meadow Camp to about Benham Falls, which is more than eight miles upstream. The Peterson Ridge complex south of Sisters is also in good shape, although Sabo has heard reports of mud along

Metolius River trails. Snow on the road to Tumalo Falls is beginning to melt, but there is still plenty of the white stuff starting about a mile in. Sabo doesn’t expect the road to be clear for at least three weeks. Whether at high elevations or lower portions of the Deschutes forest, expect to see trees and other obstructions on the trails, Sabo said, especially because this was a particularly windy winter. Only limited trail maintenance has occurred thus far, and more downed trees will be exposed as the snow melts. To truly find dry conditions, Sabo said, head east. Smith Rock, the Badlands, Horse Butte and other areas are prime for spring running, horseback riding and hiking. Biking is allowed outside of wilderness areas. And besides, a cool spring has its upside. “The good news is the mosquitoes aren’t out yet,” Sabo said. Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

SPOTLIGHT Volunteers needed for Smith Rock project Volunteers are needed for a Smith Rock Restoration Project from 9 a.m. to noon Saturday. The project will include planting grasses near a pedestrian bridge at the park and is sponsored by SOLV, an Oregon nonprofit organization focused on environmental stewardship. There is no cost to attend, but SOLV asks that people preregister so they know how many to expect. Interested volunteers can register at www.solv.org (click on “Find a volunteer opportunity”) or by calling Brett Lyon at 800-333-7658, ext. 332.

Play cow pie bingo at FFA fundraiser The Bend FFA alumni will host a cow pie bingo fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Mountain View High

Bald eagles are among the wildlife you may see on a visit to the Metolius River.

School’s soccer field in Bend. The event will include cow pie bingo, where cows wander around a grid and mark squares with their droppings; a petting zoo; face painting; a stick rodeo for little ones and more. Bingo prizes are $750 for the first winner, $500 for the second and $250 for the third. Tickets are $5 per square and can be purchased in advance by calling 541318-5778. There will also be a limited number of tickets available at the event. Entry is free. Mountain View High School is located at 2755 N.E. 27th St.

Bulletin wants to know about your Easter activities The Bulletin is compiling a list of Easter egg hunts and related activities that are open to the public. Please e-mail details about your event, including date, time, a description and contact names and phone numbers to communitylife@ bendbulletin.com. You can also submit through our website at bendbulletin .com/submitinfo. The deadline to submit information is Monday, and publication is planned in GO! Magazine on April 22. Contact: 541-383-0351. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISIO N

E2 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Quarrelsome couple take hostility to new heights Dear Abby: We have been friends with “The Bickersons” for quite some time. They never have a kind word to say to each other. Mr. B. now has a terminal illness, and you would think they’d be kinder to each other at a time like this. On the contrary, their fights are more groundless and vicious than ever. It is becoming increasingly difficult to be around them. This is when they need friends more than ever, but they’re driving everyone away! What can we do? — Love Is All We Need Dear Love: While you might imagine that when a spouse has a terminal illness it would bring the couple closer together, that is not always the case. Mr. B. may be frightened, angry, in pain and taking it out on his wife. Mrs. B. may be furious at her husband for being sick and dependent, and requiring her to have gone from being a wife to a caregiver. Also, they both may be settling old scores. Because it’s painful to watch what’s going on but you want to be supportive, consider socializing with them separately. They may appreciate the time they get to spend away from each other. Dear Abby: When does dieting become rude? I have always enjoyed inviting friends and family over for dinner. But lately it seems everyone is on some kind of diet and “can’t eat that.” I fix healthy meals — free of fats, sugars and salt. If someone has a dietary restriction or wants to pass on dessert, I am fine with that, of course. I don’t like it, though, when my carefully prepared meals turn into leftovers or get thrown away off someone’s plate. Why would anyone accept a dinner invitation and then turn into a picky guest? Would eating an average serving of a good meal once a week blow someone’s diet? — Lost The Joy Of Cooking

DEAR ABBY Dear Lost The Joy: I’ll answer your questions in reverse order. Eating an “average serving of a good meal” once a week COULD blow someone’s diet, depending on the kind of diet the person is on. And the reason someone who is on a severely restricted diet would accept a dinner invitation on a weekly basis might be because he or she wants to see you, wants to see some of the other guests or doesn’t want to be left out. But for a conclusive answer, you need to query the dieter. Dear Abby: My mother and I are very close, and I love her very much, but I have a problem. Mom goes on every single field trip with my class. There have even been times when she was the only parent in attendance. The teachers are grateful for her, but it’s becoming embarrassing. I’m a freshman in a private high school, and I want to start doing things more independently. What’s the best way to tell Mom before my next trip that I prefer she not go without hurting her feelings? — I’m A Big Girl Now Dear Big Girl: Talk to your mother at a time when you are both calm. She needs to understand that her hovering is making you self-conscious when you need some independence. However, keep in mind that she may be the only parent who is volunteering and has the time to assist in the field trips — which is why the teachers are grateful. What I’m trying to convey is how important it is for you and your mother to communicate honestly with each other.

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘Stone Cold ’ wants to know if you’re ‘Tough Enough’ By Luaine Lee

As host and drill sergeant for the new USA series “WWE Tough Enough,” “Stone Cold” Steve Austin tests WWE hopefuls in the ring.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

PASADENA, Calif. — Though he doesn’t admit it, “Stone Cold” Steve Austin, the Hall of Fame wrestler from World Wrestling Entertainment, is warming up. He gave up wrestling eight years ago after a mishap in the ring left him with two crushed vertebrae in his neck that had to be fused. But looking at him today you’d never know he quit. Tall, muscular, with a shaved head and blondish mustache and goatee, Austin is back in the game. As host and drill sergeant for the new USA series “WWE Tough Enough,” Austin imposes the same rigorous standards he once used on himself. The show pits young WWE hopefuls against each other in the ring, both men and women. “Those first few weeks you’re really judged on your in-ring performance because you’re going to have to weed through those who really don’t belong,” he said. “And then things start to get tougher. And that’s truly based on performance — some people just don’t have it.” When he was 7, he happened to catch wrestling on TV. It was love at first sight. “We call it ‘sports entertainment’ these days, but that’s what I know and love. So I can watch somebody get in that ring and within five or 10 minutes tell you whether they belong or don’t belong, whether they have a chance to make it or hit the road and good luck in your future endeavor.” Austin never wrestled in high school, but was an allaround athlete. “I was a pretty shy kid growing up; I was a regular-size kid. In Edna (Texas), the first year you can play football is the seventh grade ... Because Edna is a

USA Network via McClatchyTribune News Service

little town with not much going on, the coaches would let me work out as a seventh grader,” he said. “My whole career from fifth grade on until I was a senior in high school, I didn’t drink, didn’t party — I played athletics. I had a weight bench outside on our cement slab. And when the high school gym wasn’t open, I would be at home on Friday and Saturday nights working on my concrete slab ... I played football, ran track and played baseball.” He earned three football scholarships, chose one to junior college, another to the University of North Texas. “I blew my knee out and rehabbed and played 11 games the next year as weak side defensive end, then I got into the professional wrestling business,” he said. “Over the course of the next 15 years I screwed up some more ligaments in my knees. But my neck is where I ultimately got out of the business.” Austin was so eager to try wrestling that he dropped out of college with just 17 hours left to finish his degree in physical education. Avidly he’d watch the

‘WWE Tough Enough’ Wh e n : 8 p.m. Mondays Where: USA matches Friday nights and the workouts the next morning. “One of the guys, Gentleman Chris Adams, was having a seminar after the show. I knew I was going to that seminar. I paid my $45, all dressed up in black Gibo pants and a purple shirt, had long blond hair and didn’t have any facial hair. I was a pretty good lookin’ kid back then before all this happened.” He was already working on the freight dock earning $12 an hour and had no idea what a fledgling wrestler earned. “I was making $15 and $20 a night,” he said. “Because I didn’t have any money for food, I went to the

store and bought 10 cans of tuna fish, a bag of potatoes and some disposable razors. I would shave using soap. “For breakfast, lunch and dinner I’d have a can of tuna fish and a potato. I didn’t have anything to cook with, so I peeled the potatoes with my pocketknife. After three or four days of that my tuna fish ran out and I hadn’t got paid yet. So for three and a half days — until my paycheck came in — I’d peel a potato for breakfast, lunch and dinner. That went on for several months. But I was having the time of my life and learning every time I went to the ring.” The 46-year-old admits he took steroids while he was wrestling and that with WWE matches the outcome is predetermined. “If people think you really don’t like each other, it’s going to be a heck of a match. But there’s cooperation going on out there. Now you’re going to be snug and make things look real good, but two guys fighting out there is ugly. It’s not what the fans are there to see. They want to be entertained, they want to see the story unfold, what psychology you’re going to use, how they can get involved. It’s a lesson in psychology which separates the best from the also-rans.” The laws of gravity and physics still apply, he says. “And you can’t fake that. When you get a 250-pound guy slamming you, it hurts. Now you’re hoping that he slams you down flat because that’s the best landing, but bad things happen.” Married to wife No. 4 and the father of two girls, 18 and 14, Austin lives on a 2,100-acre ranch south of San Antonio. “The name is Broken Skull Ranch because I had to break my skull to get it.”

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THURSDAY PRIME TIME 4/14/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News King of Queens King of Queens Hidden China Hubert Keller Travels-Edge Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ’ ‘14’ Burt Wolf Nightly Business News News That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Richard Bangs’ Adventures Burt Wolf Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition ‘G’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Community ‘14’ Paul Reiser Big Bang Theory Engagement Wipeout (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å American Idol ’ ‘PG’ Å News on PDX-TV Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide Community ‘14’ Paul Reiser The Vampire Diaries (N) ‘14’ Å Woodsmith Shop The Winemakers Oregon Art Beat Ore. Field Guide

9:00

9:30

Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Grey’s Anatomy ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Truth in the Myth (N) ‘14’ Without a Trace Endgame ‘14’ Å Live at OPB: The Decemberists ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Parks/Recreat Nikita Into the Dark (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Watercolor Quest Joy/Painting Live at OPB: The Decemberists ‘PG’

10:00

10:30

(10:01) Private Practice ‘14’ Å 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ Outsourced ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Å (10:01) Private Practice ‘14’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Without a Trace Showdown ’ ‘14’ The Greenest Building ’ ‘G’ Å 30 Rock (N) ‘14’ Outsourced ‘14’ House of Payne Meet the Browns Food Trip-Todd Julia-Jacques The Greenest Building ’ ‘G’ Å

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Planet Forward: Energy Innovations News Jay Leno Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Hidden China Hubert Keller Planet Forward: Energy Innovations

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘PG’ Å The First 48 (N) Å Manhunters Manhunters Manhunters Manhunters 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ››› “The Manchurian Candidate” (2004, Suspense) Denzel Washington, Meryl Streep, Liev Schreiber. A Gulf War vet is suspi- ›› “Eraser” (1996, Action) Arnold Schwarzenegger, James Caan, Vanessa Williams. A government agent The Killing El Diablo Sarah tracks down a (11:32) ›› “Eraser” 102 40 39 cious of a political candidate. protects a witness from gunrunners. Å potential witness. ‘14’ Å (1996) Fatal Attractions ’ Å Life Reptiles and amphibians. ‘PG’ Planet Earth Fresh Water ‘G’ Å The Bear Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å The Bear Whisperer (N) ’ ‘PG’ Planet Earth Fresh Water ‘G’ Å 68 50 26 38 Fatal Attractions Chimps ’ Å Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC Housewives/NYC What Happens Housewives/NYC 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å › “Billy Madison” (1995) Adam Sandler, Darren McGavin. ’ Å › “Billy Madison” (1995) Adam Sandler, Darren McGavin. ’ Å 190 32 42 53 (4:00) CMT’s Next Superstar ’ ‘PG’ The American Tax Cheat (N) The American Tax Cheat Mad Money The American Tax Cheat The American Tax Cheat Wealth-Risk Ninja Kitchen 51 36 40 52 New Age of Wal-Mart Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ’ ‘PG’ Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘PG’ Futurama ’ ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ South Park ‘MA’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ COTV Blazer Profiles PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon The Buzz Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ COTV Blazer Profiles Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie “The Suite Life Movie” (2011) Dylan Sprouse. ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Suite/Deck Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch New Blood Fresh blood join the crab fleet. ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch ’ ‘14’ Å Deadliest Catch New Blood ’ ‘14’ 156 21 16 37 Desert Car Kings ’ ‘PG’ Å SportsCenter Special: On the Clock (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NFL Live (N) Association Association Association Association MLS Soccer Chicago Fire at Portland Timbers (Live) NASCAR Now SportsNation Å Draft Special 22 24 21 24 Basketball Harlem Globetrotters Russo & Steele Car Auctions 30 for 30 Å AWA Wrestling Å College Football (N) 23 25 123 25 College Football 2004 Oklahoma at Oklahoma State From Oct. 30, 2004. SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos ››› “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl” (2003, Action) Johnny Depp, Geoffrey Rush. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Iron Chef America Good Eats: Eat This Rock Ice Brigade (N) Unwrapped Chopped Chefs are nervous. 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa The Departed ››› “Slumdog Millionaire” (2008, Comedy-Drama) Dev Patel, Freida Pinto, Madhur Mittal. Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Archer (N) ‘MA’ (10:31) Archer (11:01) Archer Don’t Say a Word 131 Yard Crashers Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Selling New York Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Bang, Your Buck Bang, Your Buck Curb/Block MonsterQuest Hillbilly Beast ‘PG’ Swamp People Gator Gauntlet ‘PG’ Swamp People ‘PG’ Å Swamp People Shooting Wild ‘PG’ Mounted in Al. Mounted in Al. MonsterQuest Legendary beast. ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 MonsterQuest Cattle Killers ‘PG’ Intervention Tina ‘14’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library (N) Silent Library ’ The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å America’s Best Dance Crew America’s Best Dance Crew America’s Best Dance Crew 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Mariners Post. The Dan Patrick Show (N) MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals 20 45 28* 26 MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Kansas City Royals From Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Mo. (N) (Live) UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ TNA Wrestling Rob Van Dam receives an offer from Hulk Hogan. (N) ‘14’ UFC Primetime Coal ’ ‘PG’ 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles Sarah Connor Chronicles Chrono Crusade Chrono Crusade 133 35 133 45 V: The Final Battle (Part 3 of 3) ‘PG’ Å Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day Praise the Lord (N) Å Live-Holy Land Jim Grant Jeffrey Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens ›› “Transporter 3” (2008, Action) Jason Statham, Natalya Rudakova. Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ‘PG’ (6:45) ›››› “The Guardsman” (1931) Alfred Lunt. A jealous (8:15) ››› “Stage Door Canteen” (1943, Musical) Cheryl Walker, William Terry, Marjorie Riordan. Soldiers ››› “The Pirate” (1948) Judy Garland. Actor woos islander by ››› “The Glass Key” (1942) Brian Donlevy. A political boss’s 101 44 101 29 assistant gets him out of a bum murder rap. actor tests his actress wife’s fidelity. and stars mingle at New York’s WWII watering hole. posing as pirate of her dreams. Å Police Women of Dallas ‘14’ Å Unleashed: K9 Unleashed: K9 Police Women of Broward County Police Women of Broward County Unleashed: K9 Unleashed: K9 Police Women of Broward County 178 34 32 34 Police Women of Dallas ‘14’ Å Law & Order Melting Pot ’ ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Proof in the Pudding ‘14’ ›› “The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift” (2006) Lucas Black. Å CSI: NY Like Water for Murder ‘PG’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Cry Wolf ’ ‘14’ Regular Show Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Adventure Time Regular Show MAD ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Triple Rush (N) ‘PG’ Å Border Patrol (N) Border Patrol (N) 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son (6:45) Sanford & Son ‘PG’ Å All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Political assassination. ’ ‘14’ NCIS Petty officer is murdered. ‘PG’ NCIS Reopened investigation. ‘PG’ NCIS An agent is gunned down. ‘14’ NCIS Knockout ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Political assassination. ’ ‘14’ 15 30 23 30 House ’ ‘14’ Å 100 Greatest Artists of All Time ‘PG’ 40 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the ’90s ’ ‘PG’ Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å 191 48 37 54 100 Greatest Artists of All Time ‘PG’ PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(3:35) RoboCop (5:20) ›› “Fallen” 1998, Suspense Denzel Washington. ’ ‘R’ Å In the House ›› “Planet 51” 2009 Voices of Dwayne Johnson. ‘PG’ (9:35) ›› “Conspiracy Theory” 1997, Suspense Mel Gibson, Julia Roberts. ’ ‘R’ Å After Film School ››› “Strange Days” 1995, Suspense Ralph Fiennes, Angela Bassett. ‘R’ Å ›› “Predator 2” 1990, Science Fiction Danny Glover. ‘R’ Å ››› “Strange Days” 1995, Suspense Ralph Fiennes. ‘R’ Å Bubba’s World Bubba’s World Bubba’s World Bubba’s World Moto: In Out Stealth Rider ‘14’ The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit College Exp. Moto: In Out Stealth Rider ‘14’ The Daily Habit College Exp. PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Valero Texas Open, First Round From San Antonio. Golf Central (N) PGA Tour Golf Nationwide: Fresh Express Classic, First Round GolfNow Top 10 The Waltons The Five-Foot Shelf ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Cathouse: Cat Call Katie Morgan’s Sex (4:30) ›› “Fast & Furious” 2009, Action (6:15) › “Leap Year” 2010, Romance-Comedy Amy Adams, Adam Scott. A woman Mildred Pierce Mildred expands her Glendale eatery; Mildred and Veda have an emotional argument. ’ Making Game of HBO 425 501 425 10 Vin Diesel. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ‘MA’ Å travels to Ireland to propose to her boyfriend. ’ ‘PG’ Å (Part 3 of 3) ‘MA’ Å Thrones ’ ‘14’ Quiz ’ ‘MA’ ›› “Boondock Saints” 1999, Crime Drama Willem Dafoe. ‘R’ (7:15) › “London” 2005, Drama Chris Evans, Jessica Biel. ‘R’ (9:15) ›› “Spanking the Monkey” 1994, Comedy Jeremy Davies, Alberta Watson. ‘NR’ Boondock Saints IFC 105 105 (4:50) ››› “The First Wives Club” 1996, Comedy Goldie Hawn, (6:35) ››› “First Blood” 1982 Sylvester Stallone. A Vietnam vet (8:15) ››› “Splice” 2009, Science Fiction Adrien Brody, Sarah Polley. Scientists use › “Half Baked” 1998 Dave Chappelle. New York potheads at- “The Right to Bare MAX 400 508 7 Bette Midler, Diane Keaton. ’ ‘PG’ Å is hounded by a brutal small-town sheriff. human DNA to create a new hybrid. ’ ‘R’ Å tempt to get their friend out of jail. ’ ‘R’ Å All” 2009 Hubble’s Amazing Universe ‘G’ Journey to the Edge of the Universe ‘G’ Hubble’s Amazing Universe ‘G’ Journey to the Edge of the Universe ‘G’ Border Wars Weed Warehouse ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Hero Factory ‘Y7’ Speed Racer Power Rangers Avatar-Last Air Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Hero Factory ‘Y7’ Speed Racer Power Rangers Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Adven./Jimmy Adven./Jimmy NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt Whitetail Nation Magnum TV Wardens Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Whitetail Pro Ted Nugent Lethal Beyond the Hunt Wild Outdoors Outdoors Trophy Hunt Adv. Abroad OUTD 37 307 43 (3:45) › “Play the (5:35) › “Up Close & Personal” 1996, Romance Robert Redford. iTV. A TV newsman (7:45) “Triage” 2009, Drama Colin Farrell, Christopher Lee, Paz Vega. iTV. A photog- The Franchise: Secret Diary of a Nurse Jackie Play Secret Diary of a Gigolos (N) ’ SHO 500 500 rapher’s girlfriend investigates his partner. ’ ‘R’ Å Game” 2008 grooms a new reporter for stardom. ’ ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ Å Call Girl (N) ‘MA’ Giants Me ’ ‘MA’ Call Girl ’ ‘MA’ Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ Speedmakers (N) ‘G’ American Trucker American Trucker Speedmakers Electric Vehicles ‘G’ Speedmakers ‘G’ American Trucker American Trucker Formula One Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (4:30) ›› “Radio” 2003 Cuba Gooding Jr. ‘PG’ Å (6:35) ›› “Eat Pray Love” 2010, Drama Julia Roberts, James Franco. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ››› “District 9” 2009, Science Fiction Sharlto Copley. ’ ‘R’ Å › “The Bounty Hunter” 2010 Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:35) › “Taking Chances” 2009 Justin Long. A history buff tries “Black and Blue: Legends of the Hip-Hop Cop” 2005, Docu“B-Girl” 2009, Drama Julie Urich. A young woman competes in “Hurricane Season” 2009, Drama Forest Whitaker. Displaced (11:15) “Blue” 2009, Drama John Bryant TMC 525 525 to save a battlefield from development. ‘R’ mentary ’ ‘R’ Å underground break-dancing. ’ ‘PG-13’ Davila. ’ ‘NR’ Å students form a basketball team. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å NHL Hockey Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins (N) NHL Hockey NHL Hockey Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks (N) (Live) Hockey Central World Extreme Cagefighting VS. 27 58 30 Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å My Fair Wedding With David Tutera My Fair Wedding With David Tutera Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Plat. Weddings Plat. Weddings WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FAMOUS/INFAMOUS TRIALS — LIZZIE BORDEN: Carolyn Hill talks about the facts of the Lizzie Borden murders, the investigation and its outcome; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-6174663, wwick@ uoregon.edu or http:// osher.uoregon.edu. STEP INTO SPRING FASHION SHOW: A fashion show, with live and silent auctions and food; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Bend Area Habitat for Humanity’s women’s build; $30 in advance, $35 at the door; 5:30 p.m. auction, 6:30 p.m. show; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-948-0447, pmageau@remax.net or www.centraloregonwcr.org. MANY BORDERS TO CROSS: Elaine Replogle provides historical perspective for immigration admissions and rights; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. THE B FOUNDATION: The Los Angeles-based reggae-rock band performs, with Katastro; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “In the Current,” features a parade and art stroll, and a performing arts evening at Bronco Billy’s Ranch Grill and Saloon; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; chili feed is $10 with chili, $5 without chili; 4 p.m. parade, 4:30 p.m. art stroll, 6:30 p.m. performing arts; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. ISLAM 101: Rick Colby talks about basic beliefs and practices common to Muslims, and discusses the role of Islam in “Kapitoil”; free; 2 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 4-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. EAT, PLAY, LOVE!: Dinner, play and learning activities and live music for families with young children; donations of nonperishable food encouraged; 4:30-7 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-410-1974 or www.deschutescountykids.com. VFW DINNER: A dinner of spaghetti and meatballs; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. WALK THE ART BEAT YOUTH SHOW: A spring showcase of local youth art and music at participating

businesses; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-2411. “CRASH”: A screening of the 2004 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

SATURDAY GOAT JAMBOREE: Featuring classes, shopping and a raffle; $5 or $15 per family before April 11, $7 or $20 per family after April 11; 8 a.m.-3:15 p.m.; Humane Society of Redmond, 1355 N.E. Hemlock Ave.; 541-548-2226 or COGA2010@aol.com. YARD SALE FUNDRAISER: With a silent auction; proceeds benefit band, choir, drama and orchestra programs at the school; donations accepted; 8 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6360. EARTH DAY CELEBRATION AND GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help prepare the Common Table Community Garden, located behind the church; bring a dish to share and a shovel; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-598-6029. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Waves Water Polo Club; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 1861 S.E. Autumnwood Court, Bend; 541-815-7927. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. COW PIE BINGO: Watch cows wander a grid set on the school’s soccer field, marking squares with droppings; with face painting, a petting zoo and more; proceeds benefit the Bend FFA Alumni; $5 per square; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-318-5778. OREGON OLD TIME FIDDLERS: Listen to fiddle music; a portion of proceeds benefits the community center; $5 suggested donation; 1-3 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. ISLAM 101: Rick Colby talks about basic beliefs and practices common to Muslims, and discusses the role of Islam in “Kapitoil”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-6177040 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. DINNER FUNDRAISER: Spaghetti dinner, with an auction; followed by dancing and live music; registration recommended; proceeds benefit the Ladies Auxiliary fund for Cancer Aid & Research; $8 dinner, $6 or $4 for members for dance; 5:30 p.m., 7 p.m. dance; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. “HOT FLASHES”: A presentation of the musical comedy about a five-woman band in their 40s to 70s; proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society and Bend Relay for Life; $35 or $40; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. COMEDYCORE UNDERGROUND: Central Oregon comedians perform; ages 21 and older; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; ryan@thewhitebull.com or www.bendticket.com or www .comedycore.org. TRIAGE: Local improvisational comedy group performs, with musical guest Jumpin’ Joyce

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Respess; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.bendimprov.com. BENEFIT CONCERT: Featuring performances by Five Pint Mary and Dahl and Roach, with a raffle; proceeds benefit Craig Richards, who has throat cancer, and his family; $10 suggested donation; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or asugirl1040@hotmail.com. ANDRE NICKATINA: The San Francisco-based hip-hop artist performs, with Mumbls, Endr Won, Maintain and Logy B; $23 plus fees in advance, $28 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV: The Colorado-based folk musician performs, with Fairchildren and Lo, and Behold; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit PoetHouse Art; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www.bendticket.com.

SUNDAY LIGHT OF HOPE: Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon hosts a 10K, 5K and 1K run/walk; proceeds benefit CASA; $30 or $20 for the 10K and 5K races, $10 for the 1K; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-1618 or www.casaofcentraloregon.org. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www.nwx events.com. ECONOMIC MORALITY AND “KAPITOIL”: Timothy Duy talks about economic morality in “Kapitoil,” by Teddy Wayne, using the works of Adam Smith; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: Il Voce performs a vocal popera concert; $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541350-7222 or http:// redmondcca.org. LUAU FUNDRAISER: A buffet-style meal, with music by Bill Keale and art giveaways; proceeds benefit Feedin’ the People; $25; 5-9 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-420-6278. SAPIENT: The Northwest-based hip-hop artist performs, with IAMe, Northern Lights, Cast Iron and DJ Nykon; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

RESEARCH”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Nancy Noble; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-8978,541-317-9553 or www .orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: River Jordan talks about her book “Praying for Strangers”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134.

WEDNESDAY MOUNTAINSTAR 10-YEAR CELEBRATION: Featuring facility tours, a bounce house, face painting, food and more; free; 4:30-6 p.m.; MountainStar Family Relief Nursery, 2125 N.E. Daggett Lane, Bend; 541-322-6820 or www .mountainstarfamily.org. VOLUNTEER CONNECT BOARD FAIR: Learn about board service opportunities with nonprofit organizations; free; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-385-8977 or betsy@ volunteerconnectnow.org. FOX CENTRAL OREGON IDOL: Semi-final round for the singing competition; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-2121. PALEFACE: The acoustic anti-folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE GRATEFUL DEAD MOVIE EVENT”: A screening of the documentary featuring legendary Grateful Dead concerts from 1974; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. THE ENVELOPE PEASANT: The indie folk act performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

THURSDAY April 21 BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. HOME AND BELONGING: Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad talks about identity and belonging, and how migration affects immigrants’ relationships with former homes; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-3121050 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. FLAMENCO EN LAS AMERICAS: Savannah Fuentes performs traditional flamenco; $18 in advance, $23 at the door, $10 students, $7 children; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: The Philadelphia-based hip-hop band performs, with The Belle Brigade; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com.

MONDAY SPOKEN WORD SHOWCASE: Students from Pilot Butte Middle School perform poetry, emceed by Jason Graham; free; 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or www.thenatureofwords.org. THE SWINGLE SINGERS: The pop a cappella group performs; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE PRESERVATION: The Austin, Texas-based roots-rock act performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

TUESDAY “HATCH, MATCH & DISPATCH — A CLOSER LOOK AT VITAL RECORDS

FRIDAY April 22 HOME AND BELONGING: Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad talks about identity and belonging, and how migration affects immigrants’ relationships with former homes; free; noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar. “TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. “RED”: A screening of the 2010 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

M T For Thursday, April 14

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) 2:25, 5, 7:35 ARTHUR (PG-13) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25 I AM (no MPAA rating) 2:30, 5:05, 7:40 THE KING’S SPEECH (PG13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 2, 4:35, 7:10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 2:40, 5:10, 7:50

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG13) 1:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:15 ARTHUR (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 7:25, 10:05

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13) 12:25, 6:55 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (DP — PG) 1:40, 4:40, 7:15, 9:35 HANNA (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 6:25, 9:25 HOP (DP — PG) 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 9:50 HOP (PG) Noon, 3, 6, 9 INSIDIOUS (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:35, 10 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:15 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (DP — R) 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:55 PAUL (DP — R) 1:55, 4:55, 7:50, 10:25 RANGO (PG) 12:35, 3:35, 6:35, 9:05 RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) 3:25, 9:40 SOUL SURFER (PG) 12:10, 3:10, 6:10, 9:10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 2, 5, 8, 10:20 SUCKER PUNCH (PG-13) 12:05, 3:05, 6:05, 9:30

YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 1:35, 4:35, 7:55, 10:30 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

ARTHUR (PG-13) 5, 7:15 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (PG) 4:45 HOP (PG) 3:45, 6:15 RANGO (PG) 7 YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 4, 6:30

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

ARTHUR (PG-13) 6:45 HANNA (PG-13) 6:45 HOP (PG) 6:30 LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 6:30

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BLACK SWAN (R) 9:15 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ARTHUR (PG-13) 4, 7 HOP (UPSTAIRS — PG) 5 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

NBC via The Associated Press

Larry David, right, makes a cameo appearance in “The Paul Reiser Show,” starring Paul Rieser, left. The show follows the same format as David’s HBO series “Curb Your Enthusiasm.”

‘Paul Reiser Show’ proves you can’t copy the inimitable By Alessandra Stanley New York Times News Service

Margarine and Jayne Mansfield were lesser substitutes that nonetheless filled a void — during World War II butter was rationed and by the late 1950s and early ’60s Marilyn Monroe was often unavailable. “The Paul Reiser Show,” which begins on NBC tonight, is a pale imitation of Larry David’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” and that makes no sense. By the way, HBO will bring back that original for an eighth season in July. Reiser’s new series mostly proves what everybody already knows: “Curb Your Enthusiasm” really is inimitable. So it’s almost baffling to see Reiser, a talented comedian who was a producer and star of the hit 1990s sitcom “Mad About You,” return to television in a comedy wrapped around his real-life persona as a former Hollywood star with time on his hands to meddle with his friends’ lives and get into silly scrapes. (Success in Hollywood sometimes looks like failure with money.) The debt is so obvious that Reiser makes a joke of it, having David appear on the premiere episode as his cantankerous fictional self, irritated at being summoned all the way to the San Fernando Valley for a conversation they could have had on the phone. (Reiser made a cameo appearance as himself on “Curb Your Enthusiasm.”) And one of the funnier moments in the first episode is the one in which Larry goads Paul into doing a version of his show. “In life I’m nice; on TV I’m mean — you’re the opposite,” Larry splutters. “You should be doing your version of ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ because you are so much worse than I am.’” That’s pretend advice, but it’s still very bad. Paul isn’t nearly as rude as the fictional Larry, and that’s less fun. In this iteration he is a well-meaning, idle and forgetful husband and father of two who goes into swivets over nothing with his posse of pals, the fathers of his sons’ friends. Some of these buddies are amusing, particularly Omid

‘The Paul Reiser Show’ When: 8:30 tonight Where: NBC Djalili as a distressed-warehouse operator named Habib, who sells everything from Russian glue to Lacoste-like polo shirts with an upside-down crocodile emblem. “The stuff I sell is damaged, not dangerous,” Habib explains. The series is better when it strays from David’s format, but mostly it follows it too closely. This show is scripted, whereas “Curb Your Enthusiasm” is largely improvised, and the music isn’t exactly the same — “Curb Your Enthusiasm” favors Italian circus music whereas “The Paul Reiser Show” went for a kind of French jazz tango. Even Reiser’s pretend wife, Claire (Amy Landecker), has the same toothy smile and plaintive tone as Larry’s estranged wife, Cheryl (Cheryl Hines). Worse, both shows have the same premise. Reiser says in one of the brief monologues that precede each episode that he has everything anyone could want in life, except a second act. And that is a problem that many of his peers have had to face. David managed to find a new comic incarnation for himself after “Seinfeld,” the show he wrote and co-created with Jerry Seinfeld. Seinfeld hasn’t found as good a niche: His attempt at producing a reality show, “The Marriage Ref,” was renewed by NBC for a second season, but it is not a cult favorite, let alone a hit. Sometimes it takes a third try. After “Friends” ended, Matt LeBlanc tried a spinoff, “Joey,” that didn’t do well. But he is now very funny playing a slightly fictionalized version of himself as a spoiled Hollywood star on “Episodes,” a comedy that Showtime co-produced with the BBC. Reiser has some amusing moments, but his comedy would be better if it didn’t try so hard to copy the inimitable.


E4 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, April 14, 2011: This year, focus on your health and your day-to-day life, work or commitments. You can break patterns and open up to new possibilities, making this period very exciting. You also need to curb a sweet tooth and a tendency to go overboard. A little self-discipline goes a long way. If you are single, you could meet someone in your normal daily routine. This person might not be “the one,” but it could be a significant relationship. If you are attached, the two of you become more of a team. VIRGO keeps you grounded. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH An even approach works wonders. Your instincts guide you past a problem. Be ready to flex with someone’s request. You really have no choice, no matter how you look at the matter. Relax with a boss or elder. Tonight: Could go till the wee hours. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH You might feel like you cannot get a perspective no matter how hard you try. Be adaptable, and tap into your creativity. A meeting provides food for thought. Gain a different perspective by talking to some experts. Tonight: Start your weekend early. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH If you can work from home,

by all means, do. You could be overly tired and drawn from the recent pace. Deal with a partner or associate directly. You could find a key person inspiring yet confusing. Tonight: Your home is your castle. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Follow your instincts, as you will tumble onto a problem otherwise. If you think a friend is being deceitful or hiding something, he or she probably is. Know that you might not understand why. Revamp your plans and adjust accordingly. Tonight: Hang out with friends. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Be aware of how much you bring to different situations. You often might feel as if you push beyond what you should. Giving 100 percent is different from being motivated by insecurity. Stop and ask yourself what your motivation in a situation is. Tonight: Treat yourself on the way home. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Someone close seems nearly perfect! You need to be aware that perhaps you are wearing rose-colored glasses. Stop and take another look. Allow greater creativity and flow with others. You don’t need to worry about giving too much away. Tonight: As you like it. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH You might want to slow down. You’ll gain new information by not being as active of a player in a situation. You might need to revamp your approach, stand and/or attitude as your perspective transforms. Tonight: Vanish happily! SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHHH Zoom in on what you

want. You could be surrounded by people nearly all day as you go from meeting to meeting. You gain support for a new or seemingly foreign idea. Approach the topic in a novel way, much like the idea. Tonight: Where the action is! SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Take the lead on a project. Yes, you could be distracted at first. A personal matter knocks on your door. Others want to hear more of your opinions. Also consider the personal ramifications of a situation. Tonight: A force to behold. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Reach out for others, especially if you want another perspective. The more views and opinions you gather, the stronger your decision and plan will be. You might need to revamp your thinking as a result, turning some heads. Tonight: Let your imagination be the lead player. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Deal with others on a oneon-one level. Your time and attention mean more than you imagine. You draw a strong response. You learn a lot more of what others expect and what they think they offer. Tonight: Dinner for two! PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You have the unique ability to draw in others. Though you might not always see eye to eye with certain people, you appreciate their feedback. Don’t push so hard to make an impression. You don’t need to! Tonight: Think “weekend plans.” © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS

Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TODAY AMERICAN LEGION POST 44: Membership meeting; 7 p.m.; American Legion Post 44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat.org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-9453. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course; 541-419-1889 or www.redmondoregonrotary.com. SECOND CHILDHOOD DOLL CLUB: 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; call for location; 541-923-8557 or 541-548-4269. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering

FRIDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat.org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www.bend ap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNITUP: $1; 10 a.m.-noon; Deschutes Children’s Foundation, Bend; 541-728-0050. BINGO: 6 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NATIONAL ACTIVE AND RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES ASSOCIATION, CENTRAL OREGON CHAPTER: 10 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-2228. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793.

SATURDAY ALFALFA DRUM CIRCLE: 68 p.m.; 25175 Lava Lane, Bend; 541-420-2204. BACHELOR BEAUTS SQUARE DANCE: 7 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, Bend; 541-382-7939. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; see website for location; www.bendhabitat. org, 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or

rcooper@bendhabitat.org. REDMOND CHESS CLUB: 10 a.m.; Brookside Manor, Redmond; 541-410-6363. SONS OF NORWAY: Social; 6 p.m. children’s club, 6:30 dinner; Fjeldheim Lodge Hall, Bend; 541-382-4333.

SUNDAY BINGO: 12:30 p.m.; American Legion Post #44, Redmond; 541-548-5688. DANCE HOUR: 2-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. CASCADE CAMERA CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-389-0663. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON RETIRED EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION: $8.50 lunch; 11:30 a.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, Redmond; 541-382-7044. CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. MT. BACHELOR KENNEL CLUB: 7:30 p.m.; Bend; www.mbkc.org. ORDER OF THE EASTERN STAR:

7:30 p.m.; Masonic Lodge, Redmond; 541-526-0991. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7311 or 541-848-7523. VFW DEXTER FINCHER POST 1412: 6:30 p.m.; Veterans Hall, Prineville; 541-447-7438. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND COIN CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; High Desert Community Grange, Bend; bendcoinclub@hotmail.com or 541-693-3438. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. BIRDING BY EAR: 7:30 a.m.; Sawyer Park, Bend; www.ecaudubon.org or 541-318-8998. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com.

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

CENTRAL OREGON MILITARY OFFICERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA: 3 p.m.; Bend National Guard Armory. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. HIGH DESERT SOCIETY OF THE ARTS: Art connections; 6:30 p.m.; Summer Creek Club House, Redmond; jwoltering@ live.com or 541-923-9974. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. MODERN QUILT GUILD INTEREST GROUP: 5-8 p.m.; QuiltWorks, Bend; kayla.traver@vandals.uidaho.edu. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF REDMOND: Noon; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-306-7062. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133.

WEDNESDAY BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY: 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; 63144 Lancaster St., Bend; 541-385-5387, ext. 229 or rcooper@bendhabitat.org. BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: $3; 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 6-8 p.m.; Timbers East, Bend; 541-383-3502. BOOK-A-LUNCH: Noon-1 p.m.; La Pine Public Library; 541-312-1090. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE

CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. CENTRAL OREGON FLYFISHERS: 6:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-3175843 or www.coflyfishers.org. EAGLES AUXILIARY: 7 p.m.; Eagles Lodge, Prineville; 541-447-7659. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon-1 p.m.; Izzy’s Pizza, Redmond; 541-548-5935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. LATINA WOMEN’S GROUP: 10:30 a.m.noon; Sam Johnson Park, Redmond; 541-504-4204 or 541-504-1397. NEWCOMERS CLUB OF BEND: Hospitality coffee; RSVP required; 5:30-7:30 p.m.; www.newcomersclubofbend. com or 541-388-0865. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:051:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541383-0396 or 541-410-1758. VEGETARIAN CONNECTION: 6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, Bend; 541-948-2596. WEDNESDAY MORNING BIRDERS: 8 a.m.; Nancy P’s Baking Co., Bend; 541-383-4039.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

David Jasper / The Bulletin

Though the Metolius is located near Black Butte, geologists believe the Cascades to be the source of the river, which springs from dry ground and flows into Lake Billy Chinook.

Outing Continued from E1 Like others, I mistakenly believed that the headwaters came from beneath nearby Black Butte, but a sign there explains that geologists actually believe the cold springs originate from the Cascades, to the west. Either way, it’s always a rush to see the water pouring out, seemingly from nowhere, along with the sight of moss-covered rocks and a full-fledged river. The spot also affords a lovely downstream view of the winding river. Much to the chagrin of the kids and our dog, we climbed back in the van and drove a few miles downstream to the hatchery, named after the colorful blue falls that tumble under the one-lane bridge leading to the hatchery. The hatchery is open daily from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., and dogs are allowed, albeit on leash. The hatchery raises rainbow and brook trout, along with kokanee, chinook and Atlantic salmon. According to signs at the hatchery, it annually raises 7 million trout, 5 million steelhead and 33 million salmon.

If you go What: Metolius River and Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery Getting there: From Sisters, drive north on U.S. Highway 20 for 9.6 miles to Forest Road 14. Turn right and follow signs to the Metolius and Wizard Falls Fish Hatchery. Difficulty: Easy Contact: 541-383-5300 or 541-595-6611 (fish hatchery) We dug out fistfuls of quarters to buy fish food. Why it’s so fun to feed fish is one of those great mysteries, but there’s just something satisfying about watching the fish zip to the surface and gulp it down. According to Deschutes National Forest’s website, those who visit the area may spot a “Barrow’s goldeneye, hooded merganser, common merganser, osprey, bald eagle, spotted sandpiper, ruffed grouse and Hammond’s flycatcher.” Truth be told, I wouldn’t know most of those bird species if they pecked me on the cheek, but there was no mistaking the bald eagle that descended and

perched upon a tall snag next to the large settling pond at the facility. I got as close as I could, and took multiple photos of the bird, wishing the dead tree branches obscuring it had a little more respect for our nation’s majestic symbol. From the edge of the pond, it’s a short walk to the river trail. We headed north about a mile, taking in the gorgeous views, climbing on logs and passing the occasional cluster of friendly fly fishermen. “Why do grown-ups always, like, nod or go, ‘How you doin’?’” my daughter Lucy wanted to know. “Uh, because we’re all out enjoying nature?” I guessed. In the case of my daughters, enjoying nature meant alternately singing “This Land is Your Land” and the irreverent version I taught them, “This Land is My Land.” On the way home, we drove through Camp Sherman, already starting to bustle with visitors milling about the roads, getting an early start on the season. The Metolius Monster was not seen among them. David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

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F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

H

Money Electronic communication gives patients and caregivers an easy link to doctors, Page F3

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, APRIL 14, 2011

NUTRITION MEDICAL

After age 60, fewer calories are required

Putting on a

happy face

By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

As people’s bodies age, their nutritional needs evolve. And for biological as well as socioeconomical reasons, seniors are frequently at risk for poor nutrition, which can lead to problems such as anemia, bone fractures, osteoporosis or constipation. But first, it’s important to clarify that the turning point in a senior’s nutritional health is not defined by a particular age. “We used to call ‘seniors’ Inside 65,” said Car• What’s the ol Schrader, nutritional a registered advice for dietitian at your age St. Charles group? Bend. “But now, ‘seniors’ Page F5 are like 80.” Clearly, not all seniors are alike. Some 65year-olds are inactive, frail and malnourished. Some 80-year-olds work out with personal trainers, chug water and eat ravenously. Regardless of the specific year, at some point aging bodies lose muscle and bone strength. Digestion and nutrient absorption slows down. Teeth and taste buds weaken. When these things happen largely depends on genetics and on a lifetime of health, nutrition and fitness habits. But even in the best of situations, Schrader said, somewhere around age 60 bodies start burning fewer calories, so people need to decrease their caloric intake 15 to 20 percent to avoid gaining weight. Those coming into their senior years carrying too much fat are more likely to have health problems including cancer, diabetes, hypertension and coronary artery disease, Schrader said. See Aging / F5

Evidence suggests a positive attitude doesn’t help treatment

By Markian Hawryluk The Bulletin

I

t’s an almost universally accepted ideal — the patient who’s beating cancer because of a positive attitude. In media reports, caregiver instructions and advice from loved ones and support groups, cancer patients are repeatedly reminded that being optimistic and upbeat is critical in the battle against cancer. Unless a patient chooses to be a fighter, a warrior or any number of other militaristic metaphors, there is little hope of survival. But as often as the notion is repeated, there is scant evidence to suggest attitude has any impact on a patient’s outcome. And many cancer experts are concerned for patients facing debilitating treatment and their own mortality are being pressured to paint smiles on their faces and adopt a cheery disposition regardless of their true feelings. That pressure has been dubbed the “tyranny of positive thinking” by one cancer doctor, and there’s growing concern over its unintended consequences. “Many people come to see me or other therapists for help with depressed feelings precisely because they don’t fit today’s popular model for coping with cancer,” Dr. Jimmie Holland, a noted oncologist at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, wrote in her book “The Human Side of Cancer.” “So they come to see me in the hope of getting fixed up and altered into a ‘healthy, normal’ coper.” See Attitude / F6

INSIDE

MONEY Vital stats

Illustration by Jennifer Montgomery / The Bulletin

Health care may not be cheap in Bend, study shows, Page F3

FITNESS

Kids learn to love cycling thanks to local workshops By Anne Aurand The Bulletin

Biking is one lifelong activity that can keep people fit and healthy from preschool through retirement. A couple of organizations in Bend aim to instill a lifelong love of cycling in Central Oregon’s youth by mentoring young riders and teaching them a broad range of cycling skills with a heavy emphasis on fun. Although cycling can be a family affair, some parents say their kids learn better from professional coaches and are more likely to acquire a passion for cycling from their peers. Bill Warburton, cycling director and coach at the Bend Endurance Academy, said his youth cycling programs take groups of kids riding in places such as Shevlin Park and various Forest Service roads and trails. With the youngest and newest riders, they spend time exploring creeks and breaking for snacks, so it’s an all-around fun, outdoor adventure. “We’re tricking them into riding their bikes,” he said. “It’s not about drills and making them do long

FITNESS

“We’re trying to give kids love of it so their parents can enjoy riding their bikes with them, rather than teach.”

Exercise tips Try this stretch to help stabilize the rotator cuff, Page F4

— Bill Warburton, cycling director and coach at Bend Endurance Academy amazing rides.” For families that want to get the youngest kids rolling this summer, Bend Endurance Academy (www.bendenduranceacademy.org) offers a Mini Bikes camp for ages 6 to 8 and Mighty Bikes camp for ages 8 to 12. The academy offers a series of progressive camps for older and more experienced kids who are ready to tackle challenging obstacles or train for racing. See Cycling / F4

MEDICINE Celebrity medicine

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Cameron Beard, 12, rides his cyclocross bike through a wooded area behind his home recently.

Multiple myeloma is a type of cancer found in bone marrow, Page F6


F2 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H D

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

CLASSES

Dancers move to the beat at a Zumba benefit last year. See the Classes listing for details on an upcoming Zumba Against Cancer event.

A LONG HEALTHY BACK: Use gentle movement explorations to develop a strong back; $59; noon Thursdays, April 21-May 26; Focus Physical Therapy, 901 N.W. Carlon Ave., Suite 3, Bend; http://noncredit.cocc. edu or 541-383-7270 to register. GOLF PERFORMANCE LECTURE: Learn about common shoulder injuries, injury prevention, warmup benefits and more; free; 6 p.m. Tuesday; Tetherow Golf Club, 61240 Skyline Ranch Road, Bend; 541-322-2375 to register. PARENTING NOW: Parents of children ages 0-6 learn to handle challenging behaviors and situations, set limits, solve problems and more; $25 per family; 6-8 p.m. Wednesdays, April 20-June 1; Kiddoz Inc. Indoor Play Center, 222 S.E. Reed Market Road, #100, Bend; www. frconline.org or 541-389-5468. ZUMBA AGAINST CANCER: A Latininspired dance workout; arrive early to register; proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society Relay for Life; $10; 6:30 p.m. Saturday; Redmond Athletic Club, 1717 N.E. Second St.; 541-923-6662. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: Strollerfitness program; 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: Support for type 1 diabetics ages 18-24; 541-5984483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEGINNING LINE DANCE FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: danceforhealth. dance@gmail.com or 541-639-6068. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: Dance, Tai Chi, Feldenkrais Awareness Movement, Middle Eastern Belly Dance and more; 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA & HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: Yoga, feldenkrais; 541-385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346.

Andy Tullis The Bulletin ile photo

• GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: WillRace Performance Training Studio, 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: Feldenkrais, back classes, screenings, 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HABITS YOGA STUDIO OF REDMOND: www.facebook. com/healthyhabitsredmond or 541-526-1097. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: St. Charles Health Systems; smoking cessation, parenting preparation; 541-706-6390 or www.stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: QiGong classes; 541-318-4630, maggie@ imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: Yoga, cardio, weight lifting and meditation; 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA: 541-420-2204. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: Personal training; 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: Redmond Senior Center; 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: Mat, chair and equipment classes; 541-420-2927 or www.bendpilates connection.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • PLAY OUTDOORS: Kids yoga; 541-678-5398. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-585-1500 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: dedwards@bendbroadband.com. • SALLY’S HATHA YOGA: 541-3900927 or www.sallyshathayoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-4205730 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STROLLER STRIDES: Stroller-

fitness; 541-598-5231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: Marguerite Saslow conducts nail clinics; 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Dynamic Group Fitness: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: Seven Peaks Elementary School; 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: Dance-based fitness classes; Davon Cabraloff; 541-383-1994.

SUPPORT GROUPS ADHD ADULT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-420-3023. AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243 BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREAST-FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP:

541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY GROUP: 541-420-2759 CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201.

DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: Addiction and mental illness group; 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030 FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: Support for pregnant teens and teen moms; 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: For the bereaved; 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: Free screenings ages 0-5; 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): Home visits for families with newborns; 541-749-2133 HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MADRAS NICOTINE ANONYMOUS GROUP: 541-993-0609. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MEN WITH HIDDEN DISABILITIES SUPPORT GROUP: 541388-8103, ext. 203. MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933.

NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXAHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 541-595-8780. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541-388-5634; Culver, 541-5464012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group; 541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747 WOMEN’S SELF-ESTEEM GROUP: 541-389-7960. WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR ANGER, ANXIETY, OR DEPRESSION: 541-389-7960. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. WOMEN WITH HIDDEN DISABILITIES PEER GROUP: 541-388-8103, ext. 207. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

Colin Soares, PA-C BEND - DOWNTOWN 18 NW OREGON AVENUE

541.389.7741 BEND - EAST SIDE 1247 NE MEDICAL CENTER DRIVE

541.318.4249 SISTERS 354 W ADAMS STREET

541.549.9609 www.highlakeshealthcare.com

Colin Soares, PA-C has joined our family of health care providers. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Biology from Boise State University in 1999 and 2002, respectively. Two weeks after getting married, he went to PA school at Idaho State University. He obtained the Master of Physician Assistant Studies degree in 2004. He is board certified through the NCCPA. Colin enjoys all aspects of family medicine and urgent care with an affinity for pediatrics and orthopedics. He has practiced for over 6 years in family medicine in Boise before moving to Bend. Colin is located at our Eastside clinic and is available 5 days a week to care for our patients. “When I am not in the clinic or hanging out with my wife, Leslie, and two dogs, Wrigley and Kona, look no further than riding or running mountain trails in beautiful Central Oregon. However, this is only possible if I’m not at a high mountain lake or in a river fly-fishing.” High Lakes Health Care is a preferred provider for most major insurance plans. New patients are now being accepted at all locations. We are now open to new Medicare patients.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 F3

M Community health centers draw funds and patients

Next week Hospitals focus on reducing readmissions.

THE DOCTOR IS ALWAYS IN

Physicians more accessible thanks to e-communication By Cassandra Spratling

By Michelle Andrews

Detroit Free Press

Special to The Washington Post

DETROIT — Almost a year ago, Kristen Cullen’s husband broke out in hives from head to toe. She suspected he was having an adverse reaction to medication. But she wasn’t sure what to do. It was late on a Sunday evening. Not typical doctor hours. But Cullen didn’t panic. She turned to one of the trusted tools she has come to rely on since Niall Cullen was diagnosed with colon cancer: her cellphone. She called his oncologist, Dr. Philip A. Philip of the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute. Philip immediately arranged for Niall Cullen to be admitted to the Karmanos wing at Harper Hospital in Detroit. Once there, the attending physician used his cellphone to e-mail a photo of Niall to Philip and other physicians handling his case. Increasingly, caregivers like Cullen and patients are texting, e-mailing, even using Skype to reach health care providers. Many doctors and patients find that newer technologies help strengthen their communication. “Certainly the explosion in the use of smartphones will mean more and more patients will be communicating with their health care providers using either e-mail or text messaging,” says Philip. “I feel that with improved communication options for patients and families, better care can be provided, and patient or family concerns addressed in a more timely fashion or in real time.” In Niall Cullen’s case, doctors quickly developed a treatment plan that eliminated the hives and got him back to work as a software salesman within a couple of days. “I fear what could have happened had I not been able to get hold of Dr. Philip,” says Kristen Cullen, 40. “They told me that on a scale of 1 to 10 for adverse reactions; he was at Level 9. It was life-threatening if he hadn’t been seen and treated as quickly as he was. “My phone is my lifeline to his doctors,” Cullen says.

Community health centers serve 20 million people every year, and that number is expected to double by 2015, thanks to an $11 billion infusion from the health care overhaul and $2 billion in federal stimulus funds. If you’re a middle-income worker with health insurance through your job, chances are these centers have been under your radar, since their target clients are lowincome and uninsured people. But as the number of uninsured has risen to 50 million, more people than ever are struggling to get and pay for health care, and community health centers are an affordable option. As they expand, they’re adding new services and new locations nationwide. Although their mission is to provide a primary-care safety net for people in underserved areas, no one is ever turned away from a community health center. People with incomes up to 200 percent of the federal poverty level ($44,700 for a family of four in 2011) pay on a sliding scale; uninsured people with higher incomes pay the full cost of care, which is generally comparable to costs in the private sector. The centers accept Medicaid and Medicare in addition to many private insurance plans. The new health care law is full of incentives to encourage doctors to provide “medical homes” for their patients, with coordinated care and close patient monitoring to stay on top of necessary preventive services. But community health centers have always taken this approach, say experts. “It’s necessity on their part,” says Laurie Felland, a senior health researcher at the Center for Studying Health System Change. “Because of the difficulty low-income people face in getting services … community health centers over time have tried to add them.” In addition to primary care, many community health centers have behavioral health providers, pharmacies, and preventive and restorative dental services on site. Some have pediatric centers, reflecting the fact that more than a third of their patients are children. At the William F. Ryan Community Health Center on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, the new women and children’s center is decorated in slate gray with bright primary color accents. The building has banks of windows looking down on the street and is so expansive that staff members carry around tablet computers to keep tabs on patients, says Jessica Sessions, director of pediatrics. “Patients are happier here,” she says. A Commonwealth Fund survey of 800 community health centers last year found that 29 percent of them had all five of the medical-home indicators it measured, among them usually providing same- or next-day appointments, offering off-hours clinical advice, tracking test results and referring patients to specialists. An additional 55 percent of centers had three or four indicators. Still, arranging for specialty care can be tough, the survey found. Ninety-one percent of centers said they had trouble getting their uninsured patients in to see a specialist, while 71 percent said that was the case for Medicaid patients, and 49 percent reported difficulty scheduling their Medicare patients with specialists. Wait times are another problem at many centers. In part because they don’t turn anyone away, getting an initial appointment can take months. Once someone becomes a patient at a center, wait times for appointments aren’t generally as long, but they still exist. Continued federal funding for community health centers faces some obstacles. House Republicans have suggested they may trim the government’s contributions as part of the party’s effort to cut federal spending.

The electronic push While many patients find such technology extremely useful, some doctors remain reluctant to use it even though the demand is pushing more and more doctors to communicate electronically. A national poll of 1,612 parents showed that more than half of them would find electronic communication with their children’s health care providers very helpful, but fewer than 15 percent of those parents were actually able to communicate electronically with their child’s pediatrician or other health care providers. “The study found a big gap between what parents can currently do and what parents feel would be helpful,” said Dr. Matthew Davis, director of the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health at the University of Michigan. Davis, a pediatrician, says he is comfortable with electronic communication. “My e-mail address is on my card,” he says. But Davis said he recognizes that some doctors are concerned about medical liability, privacy and compensation. While there are no universal guidelines for electronic communication between physicians and patients, most doctors use it only with patients with whom they have already established a relationship. “We need to see electronic messaging as a replacement for a phone call,” Davis says, “not as a substitution for a visit.” Davis and others expect electronic communication to

VITAL STATS How How expensive expensive is is Bend? Bend? Bend has long been an example of low-cost, high-quality health care. But new data from an Institute of Medicine report suggest that it may be just that our population is healthier. While Bend comes in at the low end in actual cost, when you factor in the cost of living and health of the population, the costs grow. In the risk-adjusted model, Bend is the most expensive area for Medicare in the state. Riskadjusted Actual per capita per capita Medicare Medicare costs costs

National

$9,103

$7,500

Bend

$6,911

$7,107

Eugene

$6,551

$6,164

Medford

$6,538 $6,058

Portland

$7,142 $6,339

Salem

$6,414

$6,182

Source: Institute of Medicine Greg Cross / The Bulletin Photos by Andre J. Jackson / Detroit Free Press

Kristen Cullen sits with her husband Niall, who has been diagnosed with colon cancer, at the Karmanos Cancer Center in Detroit. “My phone is my lifeline to his doctors,” Kristen said.

Kristen Cullen, of West Bloomfield, Mich., uses her laptop and smartphone to stay in communication with her husband Niall’s doctors at the Karmanos Cancer Center in Detroit. increase due to demand. “I think it’s inevitable that physicians will move more toward it, if only because society expects and insists on it as the progressively dominant form of communication today,” Davis said. Last October, Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Mich., began using consultation centers in its cardiovascular center. They are outfitted with a system called WebEx that allows video chats for doctors to communicate with patients and/or caregivers who cannot be present at the facility. An access code and password allows people out of town, or even out of the country, to talk with people in the room. Dr. Marc Sakwa, chief of cardiovascular surgery, says he has found the system especially helpful for talking with the adult children of elderly patients when those children live out of town. “Very often, especially in metro Detroit, you have kids who have moved away to New York or California or wherever, and the kids want to know what’s going on. The patient tells their children what’s going

on, but a lot of things get lost in the translation,” Sakwa says. “Now, we can set the room up in advance. Everybody’s together and everybody understands what’s going on. I think it’s the wave of the future. “I think it makes the patient and the family more comfortable,” he says. “Say the mother is going to have a surgery. The daughter can’t be there for all the pre operative consultation. But the mother doesn’t understand all the nuances of what’s going on or she forgets to ask a question that the daughter asked. If we’re all there in the same room, it relieves a lot of stress for everyone.”

Updates and questions Dr. Philip of Karmanos expects e-communication to increase and agrees it’s a good thing. He e-mails patients regularly. He has also put out-of-town relatives on speaker phone during consultations with patients. “In addition to offering an additional communication option e-mails are easier to handle because unlike a telephone page that needs immediate attention

Get Back to Your Life

I can reply to the e-mail without having to interrupt something that I am doing,” the doctor said. “I can also reply to e-mail even if I am out of state or the country.” Philip says technology also allows some exams to take place without an office visit. “Patients who start on a new treatment that is expected to cause some major side effects can have their condition monitored in real time using the Internet, including the uploading of digital photographs,” he says. Dr. Tsveti Markova, a family medicine physician with the Wayne State University Physicians Group, says the health system’s movement toward becoming more patientcentered demands e-communication and in some ways it’s easier for doctors. “Most of us would rather intervene sooner than later,” Markova says. “E-mailing and texting is fine as long as the communication is secure.” Kristen Cullen believes technology saved her husband’s life. She keeps her phone with her constantly, and sometimes has her laptop at her side. When there’s a new development, she e-mails his doctors with an update. Doctors usually respond shortly thereafter with a text, an e-mail or phone call. Niall Cullen used his smartphone only once to communicate with his doctors. On Father’s Day a couple of years ago, he e-mailed a photo he took of one of his sons at a Little League championship game in Cooperstown, N.Y. “Thanks for giving me another Father’s Day,” his message read.

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Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin .com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

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F4 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F EXERCISE TIPS STRETCHING PART 3

Rotator cuff

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Matt Kirchoff, a physical therapist with Therapeutic Associates in Bend, offers stretching tips for people to do at home to address common muscle imbalances. Different stretches will be featured each week in The Bulletin for six weeks. Kirchoff said stretches should be held at least 30 seconds, and should be done gently, without straining or bouncing. Stretches can be done more than once a day. What: Rotator cuff, the muscles that stabilize the shoulders. Who: For anyone who throws, such as baseball and football players,

or people who play tennis or other shoulder-intensive activities. How: Lie on your right side. Put the right elbow out in front of you, straight ahead of your shoulder. Elbow should be bent, and the palm facing down toward the floor. Use the left hand to gently push the right hand toward the floor. Hold at least 30 seconds and repeat on other side. Tips: The goal is not to touch the right hand to the floor. Gently pressing the hand toward the floor will stretch the shoulder. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin

NO MATTER THE WEATHER

Next week Exercise-induced asthma can affect anyone, anytime.

Cycling Continued from F1 Similar biking programs are offered by the Mt. Bachelor Sports Education Foundation, which aims to help student athletes achieve their athletic goals, according to its website (www. mbsef.org). It emphasizes sportsmanship, self-discipline, goalsetting, and a lifetime of healthy activities. Its road cycling, mountain biking and cyclocross programs are for children between ages 8 and 18. Warburton said kids seem motivated and inspired by riding with other kids, their friends. “They see it’s not just ‘my parents want me to do this,’ but other people enjoy it,” he said. And if kids learn from coaches, it might be more fun for the parent, too. “We’re trying to give kids love of it so their parents can enjoy riding their bikes with them, rather than teach,” he said. “It’s a different dynamic, when the parent is teaching versus just enjoying it with their kids.” Jill Ballantyne’s 10-year-old son, Jett, started the Mighty Bikes program last year, where he spent a couple of hours a day for most of the summer. Ballantyne has been a serious cyclist and racer since the 1980s. When she took her son riding on the Swampy Lakes trail system, she was amazed by his technical skills and abilities. She taught him to ride first, but since she’s a single mom and Jett has an older sister, she really wanted to expose him to riding with other boys. Boys push him in a different way than she could, and it’s as much about socialization as skill building, she said. She figured it was better for Jett to learn “without mom constantly telling him what to do.” In addition to handling a bike, coaches and mentors teach students how to repair their bikes. They require kids to carry water, pumps and tubes, to be prepared for mishaps and be self-suffi-

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Cameron Beard, 12, rides his road bike up a small hill in his neighborhood recently. “My skills have improved from a lover of cycling, who doesn’t know a thing, to a knowledgeable racer,” he said.

Some youth cycling opportunities • www.bendenduranceacademy.org • www.mbsef.org • www.cogwild.com/Bend-• Cycling-Club • www.athleticclubofbend.com, (Cascade Bike Camp, July 18 to 22) cient, Ballantyne said. These ideas instill an ownership of cycling in the youngster, she said. Jett competed well in a cyclocross race, Ballantyne said. But, “I don’t know that he has super far-reaching goals. I think he loves it and that’s probably our goal. That’s my goal, to have

him have fun with it. … I see him staying with it because when your family does it, it helps.” Another local young rider, Cameron Beard, is a 12-year-old at Cascade Middle School who attended a series of progressive cycling camps through the academy when he was 11. He is “cur-

rently doing the full-on competition team,” he wrote in an e-mail. He’s racing in cyclocross and road biking. “My skills have improved from a lover of cycling, who doesn’t know a thing, to a knowledgeable racer,” he wrote. “The thing that I love about the Academy is that the coaches are racers and have been their whole life. They know what they’re doing. They show us good race and training strategies,” he said in the e-mail. “Bill (Warburton, coach) has especially helped me make the switch from fan to racer. I feel more comfortable on the bike and a lot faster. Cycling is no doubt my favorite hobby, because it is fun and helps you get exercise.” Cameron’s mother, Cindy Beard, said she and her husband taught him basic riding skills before she put him in camps. But she wanted him to ride with other kids at his level, and she wanted someone else to teach him safety skills. Beard admits that the whole idea of her son road biking and racing makes her nervous because it can be dangerous. Her husband has been hit twice by a car when biking on city roads. But the coaches at the academy, she said, practice specific drills to address myriad risks, such as what to do when you’re road biking and you see something in your way. Riders have to make a judgment call about hitting it or swerving into the car lane. “My husband and I ride, but as far as teaching him specific skills, I wanted that in the hands of professionals,” she said. “I think kids sometimes listen to coaches more than they would their parents. “He always did like to ride, but now that he’s riding with his peers and he’s racing, there’s more of a passion that I don’t think we could have given him,” she said. Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@ bendbulletin.com.

J.B. Forbes / St. Louis Post-Dispatch

Distance runner Les Myers runs along the path through Forest Park in St. Louis. Myers says he’s not comfortable on a treadmill.

Distance runners can find a groove training indoors By Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Icy roads and sub-zero weather, torrential spring rains and gusty wind — none of them can force distance runner Les Myers onto a treadmill. He’ll pile on layers of clothing and drive from his home in Ladue to Webster Groves, Mo., where he knows the streets will be plowed and salted, to get his miles in. Or, he’ll just stay home. “I’m not comfortable on treadmills. It’s hard to get a good workout on them,” said Myers, 55, of Ladue, Mo. He won the Third Olympiad Memorial Marathon in St. Louis in 1983, before treadmills were commonplace. Bad weather can make running and cycling outdoors uncomfortable and even risky this time of year — just as a lot of people are training for spring races. Some gut it out and train outside anyway. Others find themselves chugging away on a treadmill, stationary bike or, in the case of Dennis Lilly, skating in circles at the Rock-O-Rena in Arnold, Mo. “That gets pretty doggone boring going the same way round and round,” said Lilly, 55, of St. Louis, who skates competitively with Gateway Inline Speed Team. “Plus there’s nothing like being outside with the air in your face.” Runners and cyclists will tell you that hitting the weights and the elliptical trainer are fine. But the only way to excel at their sports is to do it and to do it year round. That can mean spending mind-numbing hours sweating it out indoors, watching fractions of miles tick by on a digital readout. We talked to several runners, cyclists and an athletic trainer who’s also an avid cyclist to find out what they like and dislike

about running and cycling indoors, and what they do to mentally get through the boredom. Wear a heart rate monitor: This is a favorite training tool of Mark Reinking, chairman of the department of physical therapy and athletic training at St. Louis University. He also is an avid cyclist. “I know what my heart rate does outside on my bike so if I use the heart rate monitor inside, I can better simulate the intensity of my outdoor training,” he says. Do interval training: Jill Texier, 34, St. Louis, ran the GO! St. Louis half-marathon in 1:27 last year, placing 10th among women finishers. She mixes things up on the treadmill by sprinting ¼ mile, then jogging to recover for another ¼ mile. She repeats this several times during a workout once a week or every other week. Split up your mileage: Texier and her husband, Matt Texier, ran the New Orleans half marathon last month. They divided a 12-mile training run on a treadmill beforehand into two sixmile runs. They stopped for less than a minute in between but it was enough of a break to provide a mental marker. Adjust the incline and resistance: On medium-range runs, Texier would alternate running for one minute on zero grade followed by a minute at 3.5 grade then back to grade zero and so on. The same can be done by changing resistance on a stationary bike. Focus on form: Reinking uses riding on his indoor trainer as an opportunity to work on his form. “I can work on my technique better inside than out,” he says. “Outside, I have to pay attention to traffic and road surface, but inside I can concentrate on form.”

Exercise helps seniors fight fear of falling By Cynthia Billhartz Gregorian St. Louis Post-Dispatch

ST. LOUIS — Rolf Krojanker was at The Monday Club in Webster Groves, Mo., on a Tuesday evening wearing two hearing aids and a T’ai Chi Ch’uan T-shirt. Those two details might seem unrelated, but they’re not. The American Geriatric Society recently added T’ai Chi as a form of exercise to its list of recommendations for older people who run a high risk of falling. Checking for hearing loss has been on that list for awhile now. In its recent updates, the society recommends that physicians review medications that their elderly patients take, and reduce the use of those that increase the risk of falling, such as antidepressants and sleeping aids. Previously, it suggested reviewing medications if a patient was taking four or more meds. The recommendations are for patients age 65 and older, which is considered geriatric, who run a high risk of falling. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of injury deaths among older adults in the United States, and the rate of those deaths has risen by more than 50 percent over the past decade. In 2002, more than 12,800 people over age 65 died and 1.6 million were treated in emergen-

cy departments because of falls. In 2007, more than 18,000 people died after falls; in 2009, more than 2.2 million older people visited emergency departments for nonfatal falls. The CDC estimates that one out of 10 falls among older people results in serious injuries that require hospitalization and that many people spend a year or more recovering in long-term care facilities. Some never go home. Those numbers are expected to continue growing dramatically as baby boomers age. Dr. Dulce Cruz-Oliver, assistant professor of the department of internal medicine and geriatrics at St. Louis University, said older people who have fallen in the past run a particularly high risk of falling again. “There are many factors that contribute to the increased risk, including changes in posture and gait, medical conditions such as dementia, Parkinson’s disease and stroke, poor eyesight and hearing,” Cruz-Oliver said. Your risk of falling increases when the number of these biological and environmental factors increase, she said. Family doctors can determine whether you’re at risk. Cruz-Oliver said the best way to maintain a keen sense of balance is to exercise, and to start it in your 50s before you begin

losing it. T’ai Chi has been proved to decrease falls in the elderly. Gait-training, physical therapy and dancing help as well, though fewer studies exist on their effectiveness. “You need to do it one to three times a week for more than 12 weeks to really have an impact on decreasing falls,” she said. Krojanker, 88, has been taking T’ai Chi for 10 years. When asked if he’s ever fallen, he said: “Well, of course. When I took Jiu Jitsu.” Mike David, one of the T’ai Chi instructors, has noticed the number of older people coming to class increase significantly during the past decade. “A fear of falling changes not just the way you move but the way you live,” he said. “Then you gain more weight by being docile and there’s more stress every time you have to move and it multiplies from there.”

Reducing falls Recommendations by The American Geriatric Society and The British Geriatric Society to help reduce the risk of falling: Exercise: Take part in programs that help improve balance, gait and strength training, such as Tai Chi or physical therapy. Environment: Make changes to reduce your fall risk factors in the home and in daily activities, such as keeping high traffic areas clear of furniture or clutter. Vision: Undergo cataract surgery when needed, though not as an individual approach. Blood pressure: Raise low blood pressure and manage heart rate and rhythm abnormalities. Consuming more salt and water and wearing compression stockings can raise low blood pressure.

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 F5

N

Next week New smartphone app estimates calories in a meal just by snapping a picture.

New tactic may help treat kids’ milk allergies By Shari Roan Los Angeles Times

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Seniors dine at the Touchmark dining room in Bend recently. One of the nutritional risks some seniors face is alienation; they might not consume as much as they need if they are eating alone. Assisted living centers or senior centers can help provide the social aspect to dining.

Aging Continued from F1 Obesity, she said, is more prevalent than undernutrition because older people often become less active. So the trick is to get more of some nutrients — to stave off the aforementioned health concerns — in fewer overall calories. Seniors need to consume more calcium, Schrader said. Osteoporosis is a common problem for older men and women as they lose calcium in their bones. They should boost calcium intake by about 200 milligrams a day at about age 50, she said. That’s easily achieved through additional dairy products, canned salmon, leafy green vegetables or fortified foods, she said. An additional, low-fat dairy product, such as cheese, yogurt or milk, can also assist with common problem number two: protein shortages. People over 60 should increase protein intake by about 10 grams a day, Schrader said. Muscle loss can be partly attributed to inadequate protein. With muscle loss comes balance problems that lead to scary falls. Older people often get in the habit of snacking lightly on things like apple sauce or crackers rather than consuming a solid meal, and that might curtail protein consumption, Schrader said. She recommends eggs for breakfast, additional dairy products or beans at lunch, maybe a lean meat for dinner. She also recommends some strength training. A new study published in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association suggested that inadequate nutrition is linked to a greater risk of anemia in postmenopausal women. Women with anemia consumed less protein, folate, vitamin B12, iron, vitamin C and red meat than did women without anemia, the study found. The study’s lead investigator, Cynthia Thomson, an associate professor of nutritional sciences at the University of Arizona, said in an e-mail that although many people avoid red meat because of its saturated fat and connection to heart disease, red meats are a significant source of iron. She suggested that women consider consuming some lean cuts such as flank steak or extra lean ground beef, or elk or bison, especially as they enter the menopausal years. She also recommended fortified cereals and dark greens such as spinach and kale, which are rich in B vitamins and iron. But part of the problem is just that many seniors lose their appetite, so they eat less and shortchange intake of vitamins such as B, D and C. To add to that problem, medications can reduce the absorption of some nutrients and vitamins that they eat. Medications can in some cases also impede digestion, setting the stage for constipation. So many seniors take laxatives, which is fine in small occasional doses, said Schrader. However, abuse of laxatives can further reduce vita-

Daily nutritional recommendations that increase with age Under 50 years old

Calcium

Over 50 years old

1,000 milligrams 1,200 milligrams 1,300 milligrams daily is recommended for growing children.

Sodium

2,300 milligrams 1,500 milligrams

Vitamin D

Under 50 50-70 400 International 600 IUs Units (IUs) a day

In the form of D3 Cholecalciferol

Protein

Notes

It's common for most people to take 1,000-2,000 IUs daily.

Under 60

Over 60

•125-pound person: 45-50 grams

•125-pound person: 55-60 grams

•160-pound person: 55-60 grams

•160-pound person: 70-75 grams

Source: Carol Schrader, registered dietitian, St. Charles Bend, based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Greg Cross / The Bulletin

min absorption, she said. Eating lots of fiber-rich foods, such as fruits and vegetables, which also contain healthy phytochemicals, can aid digestion.

Staying social The social side of the equation is powerful when it comes to nutrition for seniors. It’s not uncommon for people to grow isolated in their older years. Many are limited financially, too, said Schrader, who frequently works with the elderly through St. Charles. Being alone or not having money to spend can influence a senior’s eating habits. Those factors can also add up to a bit of depression, which can further diminish an appetite, she said. But even in an assisted living center, where meals are provided in a group setting, it’s still tricky to get everyone to eat enough, said Derrell Henrichs, the chef at Bend’s Touchmark assisted living and independent living facility. Knowing that seniors’ sense of smell and taste is diminished, and keeping in mind low-sodium dietary requirements, Henrichs incorporates different spices and seasonings to make “upscale comfort food” that will tempt his customers to eat up. Henrichs said the last taste to fade out is the sweet taste, so he cooks with a lot of anise, coriander, all spice, cloves. He uses fresh basil and dill, which are on the sweeter side. For seniors who live at home but might not be cooking much, the Meals on Wheels program through the Central Oregon Council on Aging leans on registered dietitians and national dietary guidelines to cook wellbalanced meals that are delivered by volunteers to seniors. The goal, according to Central Oregon Council on Aging Excutive Officer Pamela Norr, is to keep seniors living independently in their homes. If they don’t eat well, their health will be jeopardized and they might no longer be able to live independently. Signs to watch for, which

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could indicate a person may not be getting appropriate nutrition, include unintended weight loss, failing memory, increased alcohol intake, swallowing problems or poor teeth, according to Shelly Schwartz, a nutrition consultant who works in regional hospitals, long-term care centers, assisted living facilities and senior centers. She said that seniors have a reduced ability to fight infections and malignancies. She recommended vitamin E and zinc from whole grains, nuts, lean animal meat or fish. “Let’s face it, the pancreas, heart and kidneys do not function like they did in your twenties, so give them a break,” Schwartz said. “That means eating at least three times a day, eating a diet that is full of colorful produce for a goal of five fruits and vegetables per day, going easy on the sweet goodies and avoiding highly processed and salted foods most of the time.” And if eating all that good food is just impossible, Schrader and Schwartz say a multivitamin or supplement can be recommended by dietitians or physicians. Anne Aurand can be reached at 541-383-0304 or at aaurand@ bendbulletin.com.

Milk allergy is common and stubborn. Children who do not outgrow their milk problems will probably have a lifelong allergy, experts say. But new tactics are emerging to help children become desensitized to milk, including one reported Monday at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in San Francisco. Desensitization involves giving someone tiny amounts of the substance he or she is allergic to over a period of time so that the body adapts to it without provoking an allergic response. This approach can be successful, studies show, but it does take a long time and a lot of patience. Researchers at Stanford University and Children’s Hospital Boston created a new, expedited approach in which children were exposed to small amounts of milk powder along with the allergy drug omalizumab. This medication, known by the brand name Xolair, is an anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) medication. IgE is a class of antibody that is produced in an allergic response. “IgE is the match that lights the fire behind reactions to foods or dog- or catallergies,” said a co-author of the study, Dr. Kari Nadeau, director of food allergy research at Stanford and an assistant professor of pediatrics. “Anti-IgE is a way to protect the person from having reactions while they are increasing their exposure to the food.” In the study, 11 children with milk allergies were given omalizumab for nine weeks before being given a dose of two grams of milk protein, Nadeau said. “That was a lot of milk for the people to tolerate,” she said. In other desensitization protocols, “it takes about six months to get to a small dose that could be tolerable. We wanted to know: Could we go faster and safer?” On the first day of exposure to milk powder, four of the 11 children had allergic reactions, while the rest tolerated the milk without any problems. As the study continued, the children were able to tolerate more milk powder. But more research is needed to identify which children are more likely to benefit from the therapy, Nadeau said. “It offers hope to people with food allergies in general,” she said. Researchers are continuing to look at other medications that may assist with desensitization.

HEAL T HY C HOIC E S Cartoon characters on cereal boxes may be influencing kids, new study finds Kids like the taste of cereal better if it comes in a box decorated with a popular cartoon character, according to a study published last month in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. Researchers asked 80 children, whose mean age was 5.6 years old, to rate a cereal’s taste on a five-point smiley-face scale. One smile meant “I do not like” and five smiles meant “I really like.” Children who saw a popular media character on the box said they liked the cereal more than those who viewed a box with no character on it, according to the abstract of the article. Children who were told the cereal was named “Healthy Bits” liked the

taste more than children who were told it was named “Sugar Bits.” The study concluded that using known media characters influences a child’s subjective taste. It also said that messages about health do resonate with young children, but the presence of the characters on the box can override a child’s concern with nutritional health. — Anne Aurand, The Bulletin Source: http://archpedi.ama-assn.org

Cheesecake isn’t all bad — or is it? By Sam McManis We’re not above going for the cheesecake factor. There’s nothing we love more than cheesecake in all its forms. Take our caloric quiz.

a) stimulates the digestive tract b) stimulates the production and activity of white blood cells c) helps prevent heart disease

1.

4.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

According to the USDA, one slice (80 grams) of commercially prepared cheesecake will set you back how many calories? a) 176 b) 257 c) 399

2.

The biggest problem with cheesecake? It’s high in saturated fat. What percentage of the daily value of saturated fat lurks in that cheesecake sliver? a) 25 percent b) 40 percent c) 62 percent

It’s no surprise that the chain restaurant the Cheesecake Factory gives a larger portion size to its slice of cheesecake than what the USDA recommends. How many calories are in a slice of the “original” cheesecake? a) 577 b) 707 c) 1,077

ANSWERS: 1: b; 2: b; 3: b; 4: b Sources: www.hsph.harvard.edu; nutritiondata.self.com; www.usda.gov

3.

OK, there’s got to be something healthful about cheesecake, right? Wait, here’s something: It’s reasonably high in vitamin A. Which benefit does vitamin A provide?

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F6 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M CELEBRITY M EDICINE Multiple myeloma usually causes bone or back pain and paralysis Geraldine Ferraro, the first female vice presidential candidate for a major U.S. political party, died last month from a blood cancer known as multiple myeloma. According to the National Library of Medicine, multiple myeloma is cancer of the plasma cells in bone marrow. Plasma cells help the body’s Geraldine immune system fight Ferraro disease by producing antibodies. In multiple myeloma, those plasma cells grow out of control in the bone marrow and form tumors in the areas of solid bone. These tumors impede the bone marrow from making red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. As the cancer cells grow in the bone marrow, they can cause pain and destruction of the bones. If the bones in the spine are affected, it can also put pressure on the nerves resulting in numbness or paralysis. Symptoms include bleeding problems, bone or back pain, unexplained fever or fractures, vulnerability to infections and feelings of fatigue. People who have a milder form of the disease may simply be monitored for any change in progress. More aggressive forms might be treated with medication or radiation, but chemotherapy or transplants rarely lead to a permanent cure. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin Source: National Library of Medicine

How to prevent infections from surgery By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Before surgery, you can prepare your body for healthy healing — and cut the odds of a surgical site infection that requires hospital care. Here are tips from Dr. Calin Moucha, associate chief of joint replacement surgery at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City: Quit smoking. Smokers have a much higher risk of complications because nicotine interferes with wound healing. “Smoking is the single most important modifiable risk factor for postoperative complication,” Moucha said. Even quitting for a month before elective surgery helps. Don’t go on a big diet. Many people try to lose weight if they are obese — itself a risk factor for complications — or are afraid of gaining weight after surgery. But dieting usually isn’t smart due to the threat of malnourishment, which again can slow the healing process. Take care of your teeth. Heavy plaque build-up and infections in the teeth or gums can release bacteria into your bloodstream. If you have an obvious problem, see a dentist before an operation. Control your blood sugar. If you are diabetic or have an elevated blood sugar reading, work to normalize levels both before and after an operation. Check on your medications. Some drugs for chronic illnesses, including many anti-inflammatory pills for arthritis, may increase the risk of infection. Ask about pre-surgical testing. Some doctors will check for potentially dangerous bacteria that can live in the nose, as well as for existing infections in patients having a repeat surgery.

Attitude Continued from F1 Now that prevailing notion of the right way to cope may be starting to fade. Patients and their caregivers are beginning to rebel against the external pressure to don a sunny disposition and are advocating to allow each patient to choose his or her own way of dealing emotionally with cancer. But the tyranny of positive thinking may be so ingrained in our popular culture that it could take years before attitudes change.

Myth of optimism Barbara Ehrenreich, a journalist and author of the book “Bright-sided: How Positive Thinking is Undermining America,” was diagnosed with breast cancer more than 10 years ago, and soon after learned what attitude was expected of her. Even among other cancer patients, nobody seemed to share her outrage at the burdens of her disease and the prescribed treatment. One day she ventured onto a cancer message board and under the subject line “Angry,” ranted about the debilitating effects of chemotherapy, the fights with her insurance company, carcinogens in the environment and, most daringly, the “sappy pink ribbons.” The rebuke from her fellow patients was swift and powerful. Her attitude, she was told, would do her in and she needed to “run, not walk” to counseling. The experience led Ehrenreich to examine the evidence that a positive attitude improved a patient’s odds of surviving cancer. She found there was little conclusive research to support the claim. The concept that attitude can conquer cancer may be traced back to several wellpublicized studies in the 1990s. One concluded that mental attitude was a better predictor of survival than the size of a patient’s tumor, the severity of their cancer or the patient’s age. Another found that breast cancer patients who expressed helplessness after their diagnosis were more likely to die or more likely to have a recurrence after treatment. Patients welcomed the new findings, giving them at least some sense of control over what is generally an unpredictable process. By 2001, 64 percent of U.S. and Canadian survivors of ovarian cancer in one survey said that stress had in some way caused their cancer and four out of five credited their positive attitude for warding off a recurrence. “I think there was certainly a time when a lot of support programs in the community depended on the suggestion that not only were they providing support, but they were extending patient lives,” said Dr. James Coyne, an oncologist with the University of Pennsylvania. “And I think they’re backing off of that now.”

Paucity of evidence Coyne has been a vocal critic of the trend toward forcing optimism on cancer patients and has conducted research and analyses that dispel the notion that attitude and outcomes are somehow linked. In a large, nine-year study published in 2007, Coyne and his colleagues asked more than 1,000 cancer patients participating in a clinical trial to fill out quality-of-life questionnaires. Over the course of the study, about 60 percent of the patients died, but researchers could not find any link between emotional wellbeing and cancer progression or death. Coyne also led a 2007 review of the evidence behind the link between positive attitudes and outcomes. The analysis found the studies claiming a link were methodologically flawed, often relying on anecdotal reports, or were of such small size that they carried no statistical significance. Many of the studies were plagued by confounding factors. For example, patients with higher income and better social support were more

likely to report positive attitudes, but those same resources may lead to better health outcomes. Similarly, patients with better initial health may have more positive attitudes, and better initial health predicts better cancer outcomes. The evidence, Coyne said, was underwhelming to say the least.

For the sake of others Although the tendency to promote a positive attitude may cross over into other health conditions — the nation took solace earlier this year that Rep. Gabrielle Giffords was described repeatedly as “a fighter” as she underwent treatment following the Tucson, Ariz., shooting — it seems to be most prevalent in the cancer world. “Cancer is scary in ways that more life-threatening conditions are not,” Coyne said. “For instance, a woman being diagnosed with congestive heart failure has a much more negative prognosis, and she has a much rougher time ahead, in what little bit of life she has left, yet no one talks about a fighting spirit in heart failure.” Coyne believes the pressure may come from family and friends who find cancer so frightening they create this myth that the patient can somehow control his or her own fate. It’s a natural defense mechanism. When someone gets lung cancer, others distance themselves from the same risk by attributing it to smoking. Or when someone has a heart attack, acquaintances attack the diet and lifestyle as if to say, “That won’t happen to us.” So when cancers that seemingly appear or reappear for no apparent reason, there may be a tendency to blame the person and their attitude. It’s somehow comforting to us to think we wouldn’t succumb to cancer ourselves because our attitude is better. “You almost burden the cancer person who’s diagnosed with it to protect us from being frightened,” he said. “But I find that often patients recognize that a positive attitude is so discrepant with the experience they’re having, that it’s a front that they feel a need to put on. It’s a way of managing the distress in the people around them.” And Coyne said even doctors and other caregivers have used this to their advantage. “I think that a hopeful cancer patient is a lot easier to manage than one who’s upset,” he said. “Sometimes (oncologists) don’t want the burden to deal with distraught patients and negativity. I certainly know of situations where they’ll pass out antidepressants like candy. It won’t be in the way of a formal diagnosis of depression, but as a way of ending an encounter with a patient who is crying or upset.” Bend resident Nina Behrens, 71, was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma in January and is currently undergoing treatment. While she says she’s had wonderful support from her family and friends, she admits she doesn’t always give everybody the real story. “People don’t like to hear constant sick stories,” she said. “And so if anybody asks me how I’m doing, I say, ‘I’m doing really great,’ and try to keep a positive spin on it, and gradually get off the subject. Because I don’t want to talk about it, or it becomes, ‘Oh, here she comes again.’ That type of thing.” Behrens said she does believe a positive attitude is helping her cope with the process, but cancer patients must decide for themselves how they will approach their situation. “I think when people are given this diagnosis, it affects you in such a profound way,” she said. “All of a sudden you think, ‘How am I going to live the rest of my life? Am I going to be like a curmudgeon or depressed, how am I going to do this? Is that the way to live? I don’t want to live like that.’”

A feeling of control A 2001 survey of U.S. and Canadian women who had survived ovarian cancer found that many attributed their diagnosis to stress and their outcome to a positive attitude. The 200 women surveyed had been in remission for an average of 7.2 years.

To what do you attribute your cancer? Stress 64% Diet 39% Genes 37% Environment 37% Hormones 30% Sex life 11% Smoking 10%

To what do you attribute being cancer free? Positive attitude 83% Close medical follow-up 82% Healthy lifestyle 69% Prayer 68% Stress reduction 67% Diet 63% Exercise 59% Source: Medscape General Medicine Greg Cross / The Bulletin

when the family member is not there, They’re more apt to admit, ‘I actually am having some pain, I’m having trouble tolerating this pain, but I didn’t want to burden my family with it.’” Patients quickly learn that most people don’t want to hear the horror stories and feel uncomfortable. “We do that in our lives anyway, and it’s just magnified in the situation of cancer,” West said. “When people ask you, ‘How are you doing?’, they’re not looking for, ‘I’m having marital problems and my sister just lost a baby.’ They don’t want hear that. They want to hear, ‘Oh yeah, things are fine. Let’s get margaritas later.’” But while most people can deal with the social convention of ignoring the negative, for cancer patients, the expectation to be positive can have tremendous consequences. “I see that particularly in this whole notion of a ‘fighter’ attitude,” West said. “There’s a huge difficulty for patients with stage IV breast cancer when they decide they don’t want to fight anymore. A lot of them feel like they lose their whole sort of support system from other patients because other patients are so into this fight mentality.” Instead, patients are pressured to adhere to the unspoken rule that they cannot be negative, that they must fight to the end, and cannot quit. “Which is not necessarily exactly what’s going on,” West said. “It’s a realistic idea of what you want to obtain from treatment

and sometimes the treatment is worse than the disease.” Coyne agreed. “It’s seen all the time in palliative care. In the very last weeks where there’s a real push from family members for aggressive treatment, to really put the patient through unnecessary pain and distress and destruction of the remaining quality of life,” he said. “And often, ultimately the family members resent that they got caught up and feel guilty that they got caught up in this.”

Removing barriers Many ardent supporters of the positive attitude hypothesis maintain they don’t believe that willpower alone can stop cancer in its tracks or prevent recurrence, but that it can be a valuable adjunct to medical therapy. The right attitude, they claim, can maximize the odds that the medical treatment will work, removing impediments, not the least of which is patient adherence to treatment protocols. Patients who feel depressed or fatalistic about their condition might not see the need to meet all of their appointments, take all their medications or take other steps for which there is good evidence of a positive impact. In one study, people who described themselves as optimists were less likely to have diabetes, hypertension, high cholesterol or depression. They were less likely to smoke, to be sedentary or overweight. Others contend there’s a continuum of attitudes that can help cancer patients cope. On one end, there’s a warrior approach to fighting cancer, a modern-day St. George battling the dragon, that’s taken root in the public psyche. On the other, there’s a growing contingent of patients who won’t be told how to feel, who assert their right to be angry, sad, even irreverent about their condition. Researchers maintain that for people who fit the warrior mentality, it’s a positive coping strategy that allows patients to have a feeling of control over their fate. Some oncologists urge patients to visualize the battle between cancer cells and the immune system or their chemotherapy agents, or even illustrate the battle scenes on paper. Sandy Henderson, 43, an event promoter in Bend, used visualization when she went through her chemotherapy in 2003. “What I likened it to was the old Pac-Man game. I would sit there and watch them put the needles into my veins and the chemotherapy is super cold. You can really feel it going through your arms. I just sat there visualizing PacMan, that Pac-Man was coming into my body, and chomping up the cancer and killing the cancer, and that’s how I did it every single time,” she recalled. “I would literally sit there, going ‘chomp, chomp, chomp, chomp, chomp.’ Some people thought I was crazy. I don’t really care, because the thing is, it worked.” Henderson describes herself as the type of person who likes to take control of her life and that while every cancer patient needs to find his or her own road, she wanted nothing to do with negativity. “I think people respond to positive energy, if the sun is shining

and it’s a happy day, then you’re happy. If it’s gloomy, you’re more down,” she said. “If you have someone near who’s being negative about it, you choose not to engage with that person.”

Unintended consequences Still, many patients struggle with the warrior mentality, and despite going through the same treatment and experiencing the same successes as more natural fighters, they wind up feeling they are somehow losing the battle. Nancy Stohrdahl, a freelance writer from Wisconsin who is blogging about her cancer at nancyspoint.com, cringes when she hears reports of celebrities or other cancer patients whose prognosis is linked to a positive attitude. “People don’t know what else to say and they mean well by saying it, but I think it puts pressure on the cancer person because they feel guilty if they don’t maintain a positive attitude,” she said. “If they don’t survive, it’s like, ‘Well it must be their fault.’ If all it took was a positive attitude to survive cancer, everybody would be walking around with a smile.” Katie Hennessy, a licensed clinical social worker at the OHSU Knight Cancer Center in Portland, counsels patients at all stages of cancer treatment and with varied approaches. “Cancer treatment is very hard, and so in some ways, to have a little bit of spirit or feel the push — sometimes I’ve used that word — there’s a push that sometimes can be helpful in walking through the door in the morning here,” she said. “But there are clearly people who are kind of warriors around this, and then there are other people for whom that doesn’t fit.” So when the people supporting a patient push for a positive attitude or a change in nutrition or whatever they think the magic bullet is going to be, it puts tremendous pressure on a patient already struggling with their treatment. “Here this poor person is sick but they’re also getting all this pressure from the people they love to either put on a happy face, pull themselves up by their bootstraps or whatever it is, because they’re going to be sick if they don’t, and they’re going to feel like they’re failing,” she said. But Hennessy thinks the tide may be turning. “I think we are in a little bit of a shift that we haven’t named yet, about authenticity, or at least it feels that way to me,” she said. “There’s been a lot of dominant messages about attitude and positive thinking, but I think it is receding a bit.” Coyne advocates allowing patients to experience their cancer diagnosis and treatment however they want. “Often there’s a whole range of emotions that patients go through, and often they rapidly shift back to forth,” he said. “Just allow them that, rather than hold them responsible for preserving a positive outlook or even a harshly realistic one. I think patients should be able to say all kinds of things.” Markian Hawryluk can be reached at 541-617-7814 or mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

Put Life Back in Your Life Living Well with Ongoing Health Issues Workshops begin April 21. If you have conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, high blood pressure, heart disease, chronic pain and anxiety, the Living Well with ongoing health issues program can help you take charge of your life. The six-week workshop and

Interfering with care

the book “Living a Healthy Life with

Dr. Heather West, an oncologist with Bend Memorial Clinic, said she definitely sees the impact of external pressures for positivity on patients. “There is often a big difference in how patients act when they come in themselves, versus when they come in with a family member,” she said. “A lot of times they feel like they need to be positive for their family members, and say everything is going fine. And then

Chronic Conditions” costs only $10.

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April 21–May 26, 2pm–4:30pm (Thursdays) www.livingwellco.org

(541) 322-7430


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 G1

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Pets and Supplies

Dachshund, AKC 2-yr old male, $375. DNA, pedigree, red & white piebald. 541-420-6044

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Dachshund AKC miniature male puppy, 8 weeks, 1st shots, $325. 541-420-6044

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Want to Buy or Rent CASH for old pens, watches, sunglasses and motorcycle helmets. Call 541-706-0891

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Items for Free Chair, Very clean, dark maroon, back reclines - no foot stool, free, you haul, 541-408-3353

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Pets and Supplies 125 Gallon Saltwater aquarium w/oak stand, skimmer, power compact lighting, live rock, large fish, much more. $1000 obo. (541) 548-7947. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussies, AKC Mini's, Toy's parents on site family raised shots/wormed must see 541-598-6264/788-7799 Border Collie/New Zealand Huntaway puppies, 8 wks, working parents, wonderful dogs, $300. 541-546-6171

Border Collie Puppies (10), 10 wks, 1st shots, well socialized, $50 ea. 541-477-3327 Border Collies, black/white, tri, smooth coat, shots/wormed, 7 weeks $250. 541-948-7997 Boston Terrier Male AKC, 3 year old, not neutered. Plays well with others. Needs lots of attention. Very cute and loved $250 (541)279-4016

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com FREE adult companion cats to seniors. Friendly, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will always take back for any reason. Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by appt, call 541-647-2181 to schedule. 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Photos, map, more at www.craftcats.org. Free Cats (2): Beautiful, need loving home, brothers, please call 541-788-3416. FREE rescued barn/shop cats, fixed, shots. Some tame. We will deliver. 541-389-8420. German Shepherd Pups, AKC. Health guarantee. $850 509-406-3717 Golden Retriever Pups exc. quality, parents OFA, good hips, $650. 541-318-3396.

Kelpie/Red Heeler Mix, neutered with shots, $100, 541-576-3701,503-310-2514

Kittens & cats thru local rescue group. 65480 78th, Bend. Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by appt, 541-647-2181. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Small Boxer Mix, 1 male, 1 female kittens also, 541-815-7278. brindle color, 12 wks. Asking Info: 541-389-8420; Photos, $75 each. 541-410-9928 map at www.craftcats.org Boxers AKC Reg, fawns, whites, & brindles, 1st shots, very social.$500-$650. 541-325-3376

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Full size bed frame & dresser w/mirror, solid maple, from 1950s. $500. 541-382-0890 Furniture

Alaska Candles, handcrafted, wildlife series, w/Alaskan Crude oil, $75, 541-318-5732 Beautiful gaming/dining table; overstuffed loveseat (new); lamp table w/ball &claw feet; mannequin; primitive cabinets; contemporary metal chandelier. 541-389-5408 Castles of Europe (Danbury mint 1994), 7 porcelain, mint cond. if purchased as group price neg. 541-848-8230

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809. KENMORE White 30” freestanding gas range, new $1,699. Asking $450. 541-549-8626.

Montgomery Ward Radio/ Phonograph combo, antique, $99, call 541-318-5732. Pedal Cars: Jeep w/matching Boat. Also Trunks & vintage Suitcases. 541-389-5408 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Loveseat with sofa, new, light blue and beige, $400. 541-549-8626.

Crafts and Hobbies

Lab Puppies, AKC, 2 males left, 8 weeks, 1st shots & dewormed. 541-771-7511

Malti-Poos: phone correction made. 2 females, born 9/9/10. All puppy & rabies shots, dewormed & health checked, $375, no shipping. 541-350-5106, no AM calls.

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates!

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store.

Mini-Dachshunds, 2 young females, 1 black/tan, 1 piebald, $200 ea, 541-604-4333.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Pomeranian Puppies CKC Reg, 2 fem’s, 3 males; 2 rare gray, 2 fancy red sables, 1 black. $500-600. 541-598-4443 POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Call 541-475-3889

Professional Training for Obedience, Upland & Waterfowl for all breeds. Labrador & Pudelpointer pups & started dogs as well, 541-680-0009. Pueblan Milk Snake $75, Golden Gecko & cage $40, Anole & cage $25, Long Tail Grass Lizard & cage $25. Call Leslie at 541-923-8555 Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Saint Bernard Rescue Now Adopting! saintrescue.org/oregon.htm Males & Females. Large breed exper. req’d. Foster homes desperately needed, too! Call Jeff: 541-390-1353 Shih Tzu Yorkie mix (2). Will be 1 yr in June. Great dogs for kids. White w/brown markings. Up to date shots. Both male. $100 ea 541-728-6969

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com Towable BBQ, restaurant grade, made in Texas, cost $12,000, sell $1500, 541-419-0613.

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BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

240 Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 Quilting Frame, $200, please call 541-961-3776 for more info.

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Exercise Equipment TREADMILL - older model Precor in excellent cond., $350 obo. 541-416-1007

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Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

MUZZLE LOADER KIT, 50 cal. Hawken rifle kit, #5113 manufactured by Thompson Arms, kit still in orig. box, collectors item, $350 obo. 541- 416-1007

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

OR + UTAH CCW: Required class Oregon and Utah Concealed License. Saturday April 16 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $100 includes Photo required by Utah, Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for preregistration and info

EZ-Go Electric Golf Cart, fully equipped, exc. cond., $1200, 541-419-4890.

541-389-6655

(Private Party ads only) BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

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Crypt-Lawn, dbl depth for 2 full caskets at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Bend, Meadow Pond Garden. Lot 2C, space 2, Deed #3664. $1300. 541-848-7600; 541-848-7599

Guns & Hunting and Fishing 12g Remington Express 870 Magnum, wood stock, pump shotgun, $200 541-647-8931

In the Forum Center

541-330-0420

TC audio speakers (2), solid oak, on pedestals, $150 & Audio Super Bass, on rollers, in solid oak cabinet, $150. 541-419-0613.

Misc. Items

SIG 226 9MM NIB, $595. Remington 7600 pump 30-06, $385, 541-815-4901.

Metal shelving in great shape, 20-30 units @ $30 each (assembled). 541-408-7358

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Winchesters, Model 1876,1886, 1894, 1892, 64, & more sights & guns, 541-815-4901 20g H&R youth single shot shotgun, wood stock, Ltd Edition. $165. 541-647-8931 22LR Remington 597 semi-auto rifle, synthetic stock, $200. 541-647-8931 22Mag RG 63 8-shot DA revolver, leather holster included, $185. 541-647-8931

BE PREPARED! Oregon’s Largest 3 Day GUN & KNIFE SHOW

April 15-16-17 Portland Expo Center Featuring Preparedness and Survival Products I-5 exit #306B Admission $9 Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4 1-800-659-3440 www.collectorswest.com

Browning BAR(2), Belgium made, 300 Win Mag, $575, .308, $525, 541-948-6633. CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Colt MK-III Trooper, 4” .357 mag., $500; Mars Pneumatic Spear Guns, various sizes, 2x18”, 1x24”, $150 each. 541-549-6625.

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Sporting Goods - Misc. Backpack, Dana Design, Big Sky, nearly new, $75, 541-318-5732 Backpack, Lowe, Sirocco Backpack, great cond., $125, 541-318-5732 Sleeping Bag, North Face , sub-zero, like new, $200,541-318-5732

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Health and Beauty Items GOT THYROID PROBLEMS? Discover why 90% of women on thyroid replacement hormones are guaranteed to continue suffering with thyroid symptoms.....and what you can do to finally end suffering once and for all!

Call For Free DVD: Thyroid Secrets: What to do when the medication doesn’t work.

866-700-1414

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Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands! Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261 REDMOND Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 1242 S. Hwy 97 541-548-1406 Open to the public .

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

Water Tank, 250 Gallon Fiberglass Tank slip-on for type 6 wildland fire engine, used 2 seasons, has all hookups, $400, 541-961-3776.

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496

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Commercial / Ofice Equipment &Fixtures 1979 IBM Selectric II, with correcting feature, perfect condition, $225. 541-617-6103 Air Conditioner, Soleus, purchased at Home Depot for $500, due to moving to western Oregon will sell for $350 OBO, 541-382-0763

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Tools 2-ton Floor Jack, new, $20. Handyman Jack, 48” $25. 541-480-1337

Kettle Grill, $20. Big Turkey pot with metal burner, $40. 541-480-1337

12g Winchester 1200 shotgun, wood stock, pump, 28” barrel, $200. 541-647-8931

MINIATURE SCHNAUZERS two males, 8 weeks old, $300 each. 541-416-3677

Parti Pomeranian Male puppy ready for a new home! No papers. First 2 sets of shots done. $350. Call Jamie at 541-416-0175 541-390-6053

Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

Tower of London Castle, (Lenox porcelain 1995) mint cond. 541-848-8230. Wizard Of Oz, set of 6 dolls, 50th Anniversary Collector’s set, $175, 541-318-5732.

Off-white leather couch, 82” excellent condition, $100. Call 541-548-7137

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500.

Stereo set in solid Oak cabinet, CD, amplifier, dual cassette, $225. 541-419-0613

Big decorative wall clock, $10. 541-480-1337

Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Queen size Flexsteel hideabed, dark taupe, lightly used, $95. Labrador Pups, AKC, Choco541-419-0613 lates & Yellows, $500; Blacks, $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & Second Hand wormed. Call 541-536-5385 Mattresses, sets & w w w.w elc o m ela b s.c o m singles, call

Lhasa Apso/Pug Spring Pups. Lhasa Apso mother, dad is reg. brinde Pug. Adorable variety colors. Must see. You will fall in love. $400. Taking $75 dep. now. Call for info. 541-548-0747,541-279-3588

9 7 7 0 2

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Golf Equipment

Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Dog Crate & Carrier, small, like Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 new, $35 OBO or both, Redmond 541-526-0897.

O r e g o n

Antiques & Collectibles

541-598-4643. DACHSHUND MINI Longhaired puppies AKC. $500+ up. 30% off if you spay or neuter. 541-598-7417

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Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

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Week of April 11, 2011

Legal Services DIVORCE $135. Complete preparation. Includes children, custody, support, property and bills division. No court appearances.Divorced in 1-5 weeks possible.503-772-5295, www.paralegalalternatives.com,divorce@usa.com.

Help Wanted DRIVERS/COMPANY-Lease: work for us or let us work for you! Unbeatable Career Opportunities. *Trainee *Company Driver *Lease Operator earn up to $51k. *Lease Trainers earn up to $80k. (877) 369-7104, www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com. DRIVER: NEW trucks + flexible days off + paid daily. Looking for drivers who are looking for miles + full benefits. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience required. 800414-9569. www.driveknight.com. NOW ACCEPTING appllications for Wind Technicians, electrical troubleshootinng experience required. For details and application go to www.employmenttrends.com and search.


G2 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 267

269

Fuel and Wood

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

• Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

270

Lost and Found Camera parts, misc jewelry found here at Redmond Airport Terminal Building. Call to identify: 541-504-3499 Found Dog: Sheltie, Beautiful, Baker Rd. in DRW, 4/9, call 541-383-3709. Found LADDER that attaches to horse trailer? Apr. 4, Smith Rock Way. 541-548-4674 FOUND Motorola Bluetooth in little bag 3 blks S of McMenamins 4/1. 541-390-9087

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

325

476

Hay, Grain and Feed

Employment Opportunities

Custom No-till Seeding Grass, Alfalfa & Grain Crops All of Central Oregon.

Call 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Special Low

Phlebotomy classes begin May 2nd. Registration now open: www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100

Free Pygmie Goat, please call 541-420-7075 for more, information.

New Kubota BX 2360 With Loader, 4X4, 23.5 HP, R-4 Industrial Tires, Power Steering.

Farmers Column

MIDSTATE POWER PRODUCTS 541-548-6744 Redmond Water Tanks, 1500 gallon capacity and less, 4 tanks in all, $400. 541-408-7358

316

Irrigation Equipment

L O S T Mini-Pinscher R e ward “Paris” female chocolate & tan, brown collar, 4/10, near 6th & Olney, scared but comes to food, 503-422-2320

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin is your

Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise. www.bendbulletin.com

290

292

Sales Southwest Bend Sales Northeast Bend

284

Sales Redmond Area

Sales Other Areas

Garage Sale: Woodworking & Mechanic tools, toolboxes, vices, antiques, furniture, household, women’s & kids clothes, much more! Fri.-Sat. 7-5, 19644 Clear Night Dr. No early sales.

Double Moving Sale: Everything from A-Z, tools antiques, collectibles, Fri.-Sat, 8-4, 1407 NW Canyon Dr.

Multi-Family Yard Sale: DRW, Remodeling tools, materials, clothing, new air conditioner, new carpet & pad, too much to list, Sat. 8-5, Sun. 10-4, 18880 Choctaw Rd.

286

Sales Northeast Bend ESTATE/LIQUIDATION: All Items must go, furniture, sofa, chairs, end tables, dining room set, nice bedroom set, Wurlizter organ, Franciscan and Syracuse china, kitchenware, baking supplies, sewing supplies, hand knitted afghans, blankets, sheet sets, costume jewelry, misc. Grandma Goodies. CASH SALE, all items sold ‘as is’, and all sales are final. Small House, limited access to 15 buyers at a time. Thursday 2-6 p.m., Friday 8-4 pm., 2074 NE Chanel Court, near Savannah & Purcell.

286

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Garage Sale - Kids stuff, miscellaneous and knickknacks, Saturday only, 9-3, 2165 NW Canyon Drive, Redmond. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

GARAGE SALE Sat & Sun, 8am-5pm. 5305 NW 83rd, Redmond. (Take 101st off Hwy 126) Post-hole digger w/2 bits; deep well pump, PICK UP YOUR hay elevator, Craftsman raGARAGE SALE KIT AT: dial arm saw, golf clubs, Skill 1777 SW Chandler Ave. cordless set, Makita chop Bend, OR 97702 saw, small garden tools for garden tractor, hard-bound books, clothes, toys saddle, much more! 541-504-4282 or 408-710-7952 Moving Sale: Sat. 8-3, tram- Grandma’s Moving Sale! poline, furniture, bikes, toys, Fri-Sat, 9-4. 10466 NW 27th, household items, more, Terrebonne. Sofa, bed, TV, 63089 Marsh Orchid Dr. W/D, crocks, tools, dishes, antiques, knickknacks, MORE! Check out the Huge Moving Sale: Some classiieds online Antiques + ‘48 Chevy, Fri & www.bendbulletin.com Sat. 9-4, 3515 NW Ice, Updated daily Terrebonne.

Move Sale - Rain or shine. 20939 Gift Road, 8-5 Sat 4/16 & Sun 4/17. You think it, we could have it! Tan Bed, Dog Kennel; Refrigerator; fishing boat on new trailer; womens professional clothes sizes 8-14; sewing stuff; books; old jars; building supplies, nails; doors, windows, some childrens, questions, phone 541-647-0647 NO EARLY SALES- driveway is circular

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Environmental Services/Housekeeping

421

Schools and Training

Livestock & Equipment

358

Financing on approved credit.

400 Oregon Medical Training PCS

0% APR Financing

Sale Price $11,999

Employment

345 Feeder Steers or Heifers, healthy, locally grown & raised, delivery available, Culver, Call 541-546-8747 or 541-460-0841.

IRRIGATION WATER RIGHTS - Tumalo TID, $5500, consider selling 1-5 acres, reduced rate on 1+ acre. 541-815-9974.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

300

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

Have Gravel Will Travel! Cinders, topsoil, fill material, etc. Excavation & septic systems. FOUND Toyota keys + 3 additional, on Brookswood 4/6. Call Abbas Construction Call to identify 541-389-1629 CCB#78840, 541-548-6812.

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

Farm Market

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

(40/hr. per week - Mon.Fri.) - Full Time - 5 X 8/hr. shifts per week - (4pm 12:30am), yet flexible based on patient census and job demands. Prior experience in sterile environment and infection control preferred. Must be able to stoop, bend, and lift 25lbs - be able to prioritize workload, and be efficient in duties. Email resume to jobs@bendsurgery.com Deadline: open until filled.

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Position and housing wanted Recent relevant experience Former heavy equip. operanecessary. Hourly/commistor & landscaper seeking sion. Teresa, 541-382-8449 small woodworking shop and rental in Bend area. Can pay Immediate openings for feller or exchange for yard upkeep buncher, delimber, loader or improvement, fencing, operator and log truck. work rock work, etc. 760-525-5773 in CA. Some relocation reimbursement. 530-816-0656. Seeking a Ranch Job, full or part time, 15 years exp. at Need Help? Willows Ranch. Call Miguel 541-390-5033. For referWe Can Help! ences, call Judy 541-549-1248 REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES 470 EVERY DAY! Domestic & Call the Classified Department In-Home Positions for more information: 541-385-5809 Part-time day Caregiver for elderly, bedridden woman. Sun. 7:30-4:30, Mon. Tues. Medical Billing/ 7:30-11:30. 541-419-3405

476

Employment Opportunities Barber or Beautician wanted, for established salon, lots of walk-ins, lease only. 541-280-4376.

Computer - IT and Network Administrator

Collection Professional Responsible for receptionist/office duties. Position is full-time; $10/hr plus bonuses. Must have experience in medical field and hold current certification in coding and billing. Email cover letter outlining qualifications/accomplishments. to drmacdonell@ bendbroadband.com

Responsible for the company’s networks, servers, network security, telephone and email systems. Responsibilities will include: Windows servers, network servers, firewall, PC setup, IT security and support for over 45 internal us- Mig Welder for Manufacturing in Minot, North Dakota. ers and budgeting and foreYear round, full-time inside casting of IT needs. Monitor work, wage DOE. Contact and maintain the company’s Butch at 701-838-6346. web site, online sales, and social networks. Provide sup- NEWSPAPER port at six locations in north The Oregonian Central Oregon. Knowledge Independent Dealer of IBM iSeries a plus. Skills should include hands-on As an independent dealer you knowledge of installation, rewould be responsible for pair and modification of IT promotion, delivery and cushardware including wireless, tomer service of The Orand software. Working egonian for the Sisters, knowledge of Microsoft Redmond, Madras, and Server and related products. Prineville area. Prior newsWorking knowledge of compaper experience is helpful, ponents and the ability to but not a requirement. If inconfigure new systems. terested, please call Competitive wage, plus ex1-888-569-7006. cellent benefit package, DOE. Call 541-989-8221 for application, or mail resume to Pharmacist position. Need friendly, organized, MCGG Box 367, Lexington, motivated pharmacist to take OR 97839. care of our patients. IndeDental Surgical Assistant: pendent central Oregon Central Oregon Perio, looking community pharmacy, full or for part time surgical assispart-time, no Sundays, no tant to work 2 days per week. nights. Competitive wage Please Fax resume to and benefits. Call Leah 541-317-0355 or contact 541-419-4688. Julie at 541-317-0255. Remember.... Add your web address to DO YOU NEED A your ad and readers on GREAT EMPLOYEE The Bulletin's web site will RIGHT NOW? be able to click through auCall The Bulletin before 11 tomatically to your site. a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! RN Case Manager 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: Partners In Care has two www.bendbulletin.com openings for full-time RN Case Managers to provide care to our home health and hospice patients. Applicants MUST have a current Oregon RN license. The Bulletin Qualified candidates are is your asked to submit a resume Employment Marketplace to 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Call Bend OR 97701 Attn: HR, or via email to HR@partners541-385-5809 bend.org

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Finance & Business

Technical Operations Manager Highly technical position responsible for developing, implementing and supporting the technical projects and activities within the Payroll Department. Responsibilities will include date migration, report, analysis, data security and various systems issues. Degree in MIS or related field, 4+ yrs of related computer systems work exp. Position is located in Klamath Falls, OR. Visit www.jeld-wen.com for more info. Send resume to jobs@jeld-wen.com EOE.

500

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Tele-Marketing: Small company seeking individuals to fundraise for well-known non-profit organizations. Great for seniors, homemakers, students & others, Permanent part-time, 19 hours weekly, MonThur. 5-9 p.m & Fri. 4-7 p.m. $8.50 per hour plus bonuses. Some experience helpful, but will train those with great work ethic & ability to obtain contributions. 541-385-5371

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

541-383-0386 Sales - Jewelry We are looking for a bright, energetic and motivated person to join our team as a part to full time Sales Associate. If you are dependable and have a good work attitude, please leave your resume at Saxon’s in the Old Mill District, Bend.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

541-382-3402

541-322-7253

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

640

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Rentals

600

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $575.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

630

Rooms for Rent No smoking, male preferred, $270/mo. +$50 dep. Kitchen facilities. 541-420-6625. Room w/private bath, kitchen privileges, laundry facilities. In Tumalo on acreage. Dog or horse???. $500+utils in winter months.541-389-8142 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755. Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928. Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2342 NE Mary Rose Pl., #2 $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

632 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! Spring On In !! $150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave. - $590/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

ONE MONTH FREE with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & Visit us at www.sonberg.biz deposit A small studio, $385 + dep. No Chaparral & pets/smoking. Applications at 38 #2 NW Irving Ave., 3 Rimrock Apartments Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, $675/mo., utils incl., call Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $675/mo. 541-480-3666

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

personals

Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townhouse apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great location, starting at $565. 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133

636

blocks from downtown Bend. Call 541-389-4902

Apt./Multiplex General

2 BDRM., 1 BATH flat near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $600/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

SE Duplex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage, small fenced yard, W/D hookup, kitchen appl., $725/ mo., 541-990-0426 or 541-258-5973.

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Sell an Item

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 G3 648

658

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent Redmond

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Crooked River Ranch - 1350 sq ft custom built ranch, 2 bdrm 2 bath, double garage. Patio, Mtn views, no smoking. $750. 541-548-4225

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Why Rent? When you Can own! For as low as $1295 Down. 541- 548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

650

$695/mo, 3 bdrm 2 bath. New paint inside/outside, new carpet and vinyl. Dbl garage w/ opener. Nice neighborhood. 541-388-8503 A nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1008 sq.ft., vaulted ceiling, fenced yard, coverd deck, RV parking, dbl garage w/ opener. $795. 480-3393 or 610-7803. People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, gas appls & fireplace. Crescent Creek subdivision, w/Fitness Ctr. No smoking; pets neg. $675/ mo.$775/dep. 541-815-5494

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend NEW 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1731 sq.ft., bonus room, fenced yard, 20269 SE Knights Bridge Pl. $1095/mo. 1 yr lease, no pets. 541-350-2206 Non-smoking 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1800 sq ft home with gas heat & large yard. $925 + deposits. 541-382-8900

700 730

New Listings Sunny, Warm So. Oregon! Trade your Bend area home for my 7-yr 4 Bdrm 2.5 Bath Central Point home, in planned development, with nice views. 541-941-6915

RV Parking

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Homes for Sale Heating the Oustide? Trade in a heat bill for ours! $75/mo. average per month, 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Bend’s Only Authorized Oreck Store.

658

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

10 acres bordering BLM - 2520 sq ft 3 Bdrm, 2½ Bath. Large horse barn, extra large detached garage, all well-built. Extensive landscaping; 5 miles west of Redmond. $355,000. Call 541-923-7261

763

Recreational Homes and Property

Cabin for sale on the Metolius River Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. Go to: Lakehouse.com for specs. Ad#230071 or check under Oregon listings. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

771

Lots Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $89,999, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

773

Acreages

In the Forum Center

541-330-0420 746

Northwest Bend Homes BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

Boats & RV’s

800 Snowmobiles

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. New Price!!!!! $19,500. 541-788-4844.

Last Chance

Watercraft

850

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

Polaris Indy Trail 1989, $500; 1998 RMK 500, $1200; 2000 RMK 700 $1500, all exc. cond., 541-419-4890.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010 Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $15,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

9.18 Buildable acres: $147,000, Great Location; only 1 mile from Eagle Crest Resort! 503-260-7750 wtaaffe@comcast.net

Redmond Homes NE Redmond, corner lot, 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1562 sq. ft., vaulted, great rm floorplan, gas fireplace, hickory cabinets, near park. $99,000. Pam Lester, Principal Broker, Century 21 Gold Country Realty, Inc. 541-504-1338

Where buyers meet sellers.

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure Harley Ultra Classic 2001, Best it is correct. Sometimes inof everything. Garage kept. structions over the phone are Madras. $9000 call misunderstood and an error 541-475-7459. can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please Honda XR400 2001, $1900; contact us the first day your Yamaha TT90 $650, Honda ad appears and we will be XR50, $400, 541-419-4890. happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like The Bulletin Classified new cond, low miles, street *** legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, sep865 tic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., ATVs $114,900, 541-350-4684. Honda 200 4 wheeler, good 775 cond., $600, call 541-419-4890. Manufactured/

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Computer/Cabling Install

Handyman

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

QB Digital Living

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

•Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Building/Contracting

JUNK BE GONE

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea Get 1 FREE tures, and installation, repair Maintenance Service or of irrigation systems to be li Aeration ($40+ value) censed with the Landscape when you sign up for a Contractors Board. This full season of maintenance! 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements We offer: which indicate the business • Residential & Commercial has a bond, insurance and • Organic Products (kid and workers compensation for pet safe!) their employees. For your • Aerations & Thatching protection call 503-378-5909 • Mulch, Hedging, Pruning or use our website: • Irrigation Management www.lcb.state.or.us to check • Spring & Fall Clean-ups license status before con • Fertilization tracting with the business. • Weed Control Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a Licensed / Bonded / Insured LCB license. FREE Estimates! Call today: (541) 617.TURF [8873] Nelson Landscape www.turflandscapes.com

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

Debris Removal l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Clean Up/Yard Debris, Hauling. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

Drywall

Get your business

ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894

GRO W

ING

With an ad in The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional" Directory

Electrical Services Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

“Pihl Bilt” Since 1981 S.E. Pihl Construction Remodeling specialist, addons, kitchen & bath, faux wall finishes, tile & stone, Energy Trust of Oregon Trade Ally, Window & door upgrades, no job to small. Call for Spring Specials, Call Scott, 541-815-1990, CCB#110370

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Maintenance

J. L. SCOTT LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years!

The Bulletin

FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

Landscape Management • Evaluating Seasonal Needs • Pruning Trees and Shrubs • Thinning Overgrown Areas • Removing Undesired Plants • Hauling Debris • Renovation • Fertilizer Programs • Organic Options EXPERIENCED Senior Discounts

541-390-3436

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial • Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759 CURTIS SESLAR’S

TOTAL LAWN CARE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Serving Redmond since 1980. FREE THATCHING WITH AERATING SERVICE Mowing , Edging, Fertilizing, Hauling. Senior Discounts. Don’t delay, call today for Free estimate 541-279-1821

541-382-3883 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

ers, 17’, fiberglass boats, all equip incl., paddles, personal flotation devices, dry bags, spray skirts, roof rack w/towers & cradles -- Just add water, $1850/boat Firm. 541-504-8557.

Wilderness 2-person Kayak w/ paddles, like new. $650 new; sell $375. 541-383-8528

880 Beaver Lexington 1994, Anniversary model, Cummins Diesel, 38’, nice, full factory paint, $35,900,541-617-1249

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Bounder 34’ 1994.

One owner, low miles, generator, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, Motivated seller. Just reduced and priced to sell at $10,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., see to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd in La Pine. $8000. OBO 541-876-5106.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

870

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Sea Kayaks - His & Hers, Eddyline Wind Danc-

Mobile Homes Brand New 3 Bdrm. 2 bath, delivered & Set Up, starting at $39,999, financing available, Call 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com

Boats & Accessories

Barns

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Motorhomes

20 Acres, Christmas Valley, off Oil Dry (paved road), power at road, $15,000 or trade for ??? 541-728-1036.

875

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

***

750

656

Houses for Rent Redmond

762

Homes with Acreage

We Service All Vacs! Free Estimates!

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm 2 bath, in Westridge Subdivision. Newly remodeled, on ½ acre, near Ath. Club of Bend. No smoking. $1195. Call 541-388-8198

870

Boats & Accessories

745

Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

750

Redmond Homes Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

675

Hookup for RV in quiet Tumalo Houses for Rent area. Dog or cat ok. Beautiful NE Bend view. $550/mo. Electricity extra in winter. 3 Bdrm, 1800 sq ft. Very clean! 541-389-8142 New bathroom, lrg fam rm, sprinklers, attch garage. No 687 smkg; pets poss. 1150 NE 6th Commercial for St. Avail now! $950/mo, $600 Rent/Lease refundable. 541-389-4985 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Real Estate For Sale

SAVE THIS AD!! Rototilling Backyard Gardens $25/hour • Min. 1 hour Call Jim, 541-633-7941 8am-6pm for appt; leave msg

Bend Landscaping & Maint. Thatching, aerating, spring cleanup, sprinkler turn-ons, weekly mows.

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990 Mary’s Lawn Care is seeking New Customers for •Lawn Maint. • Spring clean-up • Aerating • Thatching 541-350-1097 541-410-2953 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

V Spring Clean Up! V Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

17.5’ Bayliner, 2005, 3.0 Merc, like new, low hrs, $7500 obo. Will consider partial trades. 541-279-1862 after 5 pm. 18’ Hewes 180 Sportsman 2007 Yamaha 115 & 8hp kicker, downriggers Excel cond, low hrs, $22,900. 541-815-3383 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121 Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $84,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

881

Travel Trailers 20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

2009 T@da (Tada)

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Painting, Wall Covering

Tile, Ceramic Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

20' Calabria 1998 tournament ski boat / 237 hours. 350ci/ 300hp F.I. GM engine. Nice, too many extras to list. $13,500. Call 541-736-3067 Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $350 OBO, 541-548-3711.

Boat Trailer, 25’ Pacific, dual axle, $300, call 541-961-3776.

Travel Trailer Excellent condition! 2 refrigerators, Cool Cat AC/Heat Pump, 15" LCD TV/DVD. Too many extras to list. $19,500 OBO Call 541-548-8770

A-Liner pop-up 15-ft 2010, 2-burner stove, frig, freshwater tank, furnace, fantastic fan, $9950. 541-923-3021


G4 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 881

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Autos & Transportation

Travel Trailers JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

882 Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KEYSTONE COUGAR 26’ 2004 5th wheel, slide, extras, like new $15,000, 541-389-9444

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, tow pkg., 5.4L V-8, 4WD, bedliner, CD, air, winter & summer tires, great cond., 2ND REDUCTION, now $11,900 541-554-5212, 702-501-0600.

Dodge Nitro AWD 2008

Smolich Auto Mall

Great Fuel Miser! 4X4, Low miles! A Must See! Warranty! VIN #258369

Over 150 used to choose from!

Now Only $16,877

smolichmotors.com

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Ford F150 SuperCREW 2005

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Only $22,250

Over 150 used to choose from!

4X4, Loaded, Lariat Pkg. Warranty. Vin #B15268

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford 2 Door 1949,

Ford F-250 XLT Super Duty 2008, 4WD, 6.4 Diesel, supercab, long bed, 24K mi., many extras, like new $35,000, 541-923-5754.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686

99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. mi.,original operators manual and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401

Monte Carlo 1970, all original, many extras. MUST SELL due to death. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072 OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

2

Winter Master M&S, P185/70R13, 100%, $80. 541-480-5950.

Tire Chains for 50R15 tires, NEW, $25. 541-480-1337 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649

1969,

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

$26,995 541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Smolich Auto Mall Over 150 used to choose from!

Hyundai VeraCruz AWD 2008

Like new, fresh trade, fully loaded, 3rd seat. 20K Miles! Warranty! Vin #076124

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo 2007 4x4 19,280 miles, stability control absolutely like new condition #688914. $19,977

We will pay CASH for your vehicle. Buying vehicles NOW! Call Mike Springer 541-749-4025

Chevrolet Scottsdale 20, 1987. 4WD, 3/4-ton, A/C, Reese 15,000-lb Fifth wheel pin hitch, tilt wheel, deer guard, excellent 10-ply tires, hubs. $3000. For more details & equip, call John Keseley 541-932-4338

Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K dually, fifth wheel hitch, remi., glass t-top, runs & looks ceiver hitch, 90% rubber, sugreat, $10,000,541-280-5677 per maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. Chevy Corvette 1980, $6500, Back on the market. yellow, glass removable top, 541-923-0411 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, Smolich factory aluminum wheels, Auto Mall asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, Over 150 used to 541-385-9350. choose from!

Chevy El Camino 1979, 350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Now Only $7,788

90 and 115k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

Smolich Auto Mall

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $7900 541-815-1523.

Over 150 used to choose from!

smolichmotors.com

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 Model Camper, loaded, pheengine, auto. trans, ps, air, nomenal condition. $17,500. frame on rebuild, repainted 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins original blue, original blue Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, interior, original hub caps, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as exc. chrome, asking $9000 or unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160 make offer. 541-385-9350.

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

Nissan Altima 2005

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Only $10,250

(Photo for illustration use only)

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Jeep Grand Cherokee LIMITED 2008

Every Option, LOADED, Diesel! Low miles & Warranty! Vin #192631

541-389-1178 • DLR

Smolich Auto Mall

Warranty! Vin #112719

Sale Price $11,150

Over 150 used to choose from!

HYUNDAI NISSAN

541-749-4025 • DLR 366

Ford Focus SES 2007 Beat the gas war! 38K Miles, Warranty! VIN #168467

935

Over 150 used to choose from!

366

Now Only $12,250

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

Sport Utility Vehicles

Jeep Liberty Diesel AWD 2006

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY!

4 Cylinder auto, Warranty! Vin #274528 (photo for illustration use only)

SUBARUS!!! Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

HYUNDAI

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366

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Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

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Volvo C70-T5, 2010

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS OF WILDA JUNE MOORE DECEASED, LIN G. MOORE, and SUMMER CREEK HOMEOWNER'S ASSOCIATION Defendants

TO THE DEFENDANT: Unknown Heirs of Wilda June Moore, deceased

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Sale Price $17,997

smolichmotors.com

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

Case No. 11CV0253AB SUMMONS

Buick Rendezvous 2004, clean & low mileage, $11,000 OBO. 541-410-7829;541-389-4506

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

By /S/ Robert C. Dougherty Robert C. Dougherty, OSB #87207 Attorney for Plaintiff LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Administrative School District No. 1, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012, will be held at the Education Center, 520 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon. The meeting will take place on the 26th day of April, 2011 at 5:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 26, 2011, at 520 NW Wall Street, Bend, Oregon between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee. LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Budget Committee Meeting Deschutes County Rural Fire District No. 1 A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Deschutes County Rural Fire District No. 1, Deschutes County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012, will be held at the Redmond Main Fire Station located at 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave., Redmond Oregon on April 27, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The committee will reconvene if necessary on April 28, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after Wednesday, April 20, 2011 at the Redmond Main Fire Station located at 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave., Redmond Oregon, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND ELECTION TO SELL AND OF SALE

Nissan Quest 2006

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Smolich Auto Mall

Great fuel economy. 60K Miles, comes with warranty! VIN #507847

DATED this 30th day of March 2011

Publish: The Bulletin April 14, 2011 & April 21, 2011

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Hwy 20 in Bend smolichmotors.com

Chevy HHR 2006

This Summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7.

This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

Over 150 used to choose from!

smolichmotors.com

Over 150 used to choose from!

should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636.

NISSAN

541-389-1178 • DLR

Smolich Auto Mall

READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! Within 30 DAYS of the date of first publication specified herein you MUST do ONE of the following things in connection with the claim filed against you regarding the failure to pay homeowner assessments and other charges owing to plaintiff in the amount of $2,528.36 and relating to your period of ownership of Lot 206 of Caldera Springs: •Pay the claim plus filing and service expenses paid by the plaintiff; OR •Demand a hearing; OR •Demand a jury trial. If you fail to do one of the foregoing things within 30 DAYS of the date of first publication specified herein, then upon written request from the plaintiff, the clerk of the court will enter a judgment against you for the amount claimed plus filing fees and service expenses paid by the plaintiff, plus a prevailing party fee. The demand for a hearing or demand for a jury trial must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. Defendant filing fees are as follows: •To Demand a Hearing if the amount claimed is $1500.00 or less . . . . . . . . . $N/A •To Demand a Hearing if the amount claimed is over $1500.00. . . . . . . . . $143.50 •To Demand a Jury Trial (only if the amount claimed is over $750.00) . . . $287.00 If you have any questions about the small claims court filing procedures after this notice, you may contact the clerk of the court; however, the clerk cannot give you legal advice on this claim. THIS SERVICE BY PUBLICATION OF SMALL CLAIMS NOTICE is made pursuant to an order of the court allowing service upon defendant by publication. Date of first publication: April 14, 2011; Date of last publication: May 5, 2011. Submitted by: Caldera Springs Owners' Association, Inc., P.O. Box 3609, Sunriver, OR 97707, (541) 593-4842, plaintiff.

smolichmotors.com

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111 Nissan Pathfinder 1989, 3 L V-6, exc. cond., runs great. $1500. 541-480-5950.

Honda CR-V AWD 2007

Loaded, Leather, Nav., low mi. Warranty! Vin #046676

Sale Price $24,495

HYUNDAI

smolichmotors.com Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

541-749-4025 • DLR

366

Smolich Auto Mall

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

940 Chevy

Smolich Auto Mall

Sale Price $11,745

Over 150 used to choose from!

541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $38,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Moonroof, alloys, leather, stunning in Black! Warranty! Vin #905248

Convertible! 56K Miles, Warranty! Vin #518414

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Mercedes GL450, 2007

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Over 150 used to choose from!

Chrysler PT Cruiser 2005

Over 150 used to choose from!

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

BUICKS ! LeSabres 1998 and 2004 $1900-$4900.

West of Hwy 97 & Empire, Bend

Smolich Auto Mall

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

DLR# 0225

Ford Expedition XLT AWD 2003

Don’t bother calling - hurry! Come on down! VIN #B90195

Mercedes-Benz S550 2007 This is a beautiful car w/only 40K mi. Pristine in & out. Leather interior looks showroom new. $42,000, 541-388-7944.

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

541-389-5016 evenings.

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

541-598-3750

West of Hwy 97 & Empire, Bend Toyota Tundra 2003, 4WD, SR5 access cab, bedliner & cover, exc. cond., 31,400 mi, $16,500 OBO, 541-383-0854.

$19,450!

885

975

933

Antique and Classic Autos Pickup

Toyota 2009 Double Cab Prerunner. 26,500 miles SR5-TRD package---tow SHARP - AND RED!! #081331

541-389-5355

Pickups

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Automobiles

Paying Top Dollar For Your Vehicle!

932

C-10

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

HYUNDAI

Only $24,995

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories (1) Brand new Radial all terrain T/A 31x10 50R15 + 5-hole rim, $100. 541-480-1337

GMC 3/4-Ton 1992, 4WD, with canopy, $1500 OBO, 541-382-5309.

Ford Windstar GL1998.

The Bulletin Classiieds

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR DESCHUTES COUNTY SMALL CLAIMS DIVISION CASE NO. SC101560 CALDERA SPRINGS OWNERS' ASSOCIATION, INC., an Oregon nonprofit corporation, plaintiff, v. BEVERLY J. SHERRER, an individual, defendant.

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT BEVERLY J. SHERRER:

Sale Price $19,999

smolichmotors.com

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SERVICE BY PUBLICATION OF SMALL CLAIMS NOTICE

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

541-749-4025 • DLR

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

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Ford Econoline 150 1988, fuel injected, 4.9 L 6, great work van. $1000. 480-5950

Big wheel and tire pkg., leather, low miles! Warranty! Vin #108600

International Travel All 1967,

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031.

Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

Ford E350 12-pass., 1993, 5L V8, 166K, runs/drives great. $2300 OBO. 541-410-4757

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

MERCEDES C300 2008

Hummer H2 Supercharge 2003

Ford F250 4x4 1993. 5.8L engine, Auto, AC, shell, new brakes, tow package, 127K miles, $2800. 541-408-8330

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

35,000 miles, 3 door, 3 seats, white, $4900 for an almost new van! 541-318-9999.

Smolich Auto Mall

366

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Over 150 used to choose from!

932

925

Utility Trailers

Falken Uro M&S 195/60R15, 70%, $140. 541-480-5950.

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

975

Automobiles

smolichmotors.com

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

940

Vans

541-389-1178 • DLR

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

NISSAN

Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps 6, slide-out, Arizona room, range w/oven, micro, toilet & shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt batteries, outside shower, twin propane tanks, BBQ. $10,500. 541-312-9312

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

933

Pickups

Antique and Classic Autos

900 908

Fifth Wheels

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Vans

Hyundai Sonata LIMITED 2009 Loaded, Leather, Navigation and more. 21K Miles, Warranty! Vin #421376

Only $18,545 Chevrolet 1-ton Express Cargo Van 1999, with tow package, good condition, $4800. Call 541-419-5693

NISSAN

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

366

Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled Court by PHH Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claim is stated in the written Complaint, a copy of which is served upon you with this Summons. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiff's attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. The object of the complaint is to foreclose a deed of trust dated April 21, 2005 and recorded as Instrument #2005-24111 given by Wilda June Moore on property commonly known as 3672 SW 30th St., Redmond, OR 97756 and legally described as: Lot Fifty (50), SUMMER CREEK PHASE 2, recorded June 11, 2004, in Cabinet G, Page 305, Deschutes County, Oregon. The complaint seeks to foreclose and terminate all interest of Wilda June Moore, deceased as of the date of the deed of trust or subsequently acquired and all other interests in the property. The "motion" or "answer" (or "reply") must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. The date of first publication of the summons is April 14, 2011. If you have questions, you

WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to a certain trust deed ("Trust Deed") made, as follows: Lavender Thrift & Gift, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, Grantor; AmeriTitle, Trustee; and South Valley Bank & Trust, Beneficiary, recorded in Official/Microfilm Records, Volume 2006, Page 52953, Deschutes County, Oregon, covering the following-described real property in Deschutes County, Oregon, commonly known as 724 SW 14th Street, Redmond, OR 97756 ("Property"): PARCEL 1: Lots Seven (7), Eight (8), Nine (9) and Ten (10) in Block Seventeen (17) of MOUNTAIN VIEW ADDITION TO REDMOND, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM that portion conveyed to the State of Oregon, by and through its Department of Transportation, recorded July 8, 2004 in Volume 2004, Page 40447, Deschutes County Records. PARCEL 2: Lot Eleven (11) in Block Seventeen (17) of MOUNTAIN VIEW ADDITION TO REDMOND, Deschutes County, Oregon. EXCEPTING THEREFROM the North Twenty-three (23) feet of Lot 11 in Block 17 of MOUNTAIN VIEW ADDITION TO REDMOND, Deschutes County, Oregon The defaults for which foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Failed to pay the monthly payment due September 10, 2010 and monthly payments thereafter; failed to pay 2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, and 2010-2011 Deschutes County Real Property Taxes in the total amount of $28,059.13, plus interest if any. By reason of said defaults, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligations secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: Principal in the amount of $281,048.37 plus interest thereon at the rate of 5.03% from February 2, 2011 until paid; delinquent interest in the amount of $6,819.67, late charges in the amount of $120, and 2007-2008, 2008-2009, 2009-2010, and 2010-2011Deschutes County Real Property Taxes in the total amount of $28,059.13, plus interest if any, plus trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by beneficiary


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, April 14, 2011 G5

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pursuant to the terms of said trust deed. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will, on June 30, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 a.m. o'clock a.m., in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the following place: the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the abovedescribed Property, which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sum or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes each and every grantor, any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deeds of Trust, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 14, 2011. TRUSTEE /s/ Andrew C. Brandsness, Successor Trustee 411 Pine Street Klamath Falls, OR 97601 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR CIVIL FORFEITURE TO ALL POTENTIAL CLAIMANTS AND TO ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS READ THIS CAREFULLY If you have any interest in the seized property described below, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below, The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last day of publication of this notice. Where to file a claim and for more information: Diana Vitolins, Crook County District Attorney Office, 300 NE Third Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Notice of reasons for Forfeiture: The property described below was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violates, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). IN THE MATTER OF: U.S. Currency in the amount of $3,010.00, Case #10-03-07975 seized 12/02/10 from Nicholas Scott LEGAL NOTICE Symbiotics LLC, on behalf of Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC (PO Box 535, Rigby, ID 83442), submitted a Final License Application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the Wickiup Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 12965) on March 25, 2011. The project would add a 7.15-MW run-of-river generation facility to the existing Wickiup Dam in Deschutes County, Oregon. A copy of the Final License Application is available for public viewing at the La Pine Public Library. The document can also be downloaded at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp by searching for the project number.

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0088260112 T.S. No.: 11-01117-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of June 24, 2008 made by, RICHARD BEEBE, A SINGLE PERSON, was the original Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, was the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, was the original beneficiary, recorded on June 30, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-27944 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 140927 LOT TEN (10), ANDERSON ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 52654 CENTER DRIVE, LAPINE, OR The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $7,143.99 as of March 29, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $185,341.35 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4.50000% per annum from October 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 12, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187-110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 7, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3964295 04/14/2011, 04/21/2011, 04/28/2011, 05/05/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0713912474 T.S. No.: OR-275294-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHAWN O. HOLM AND MICHELLE B. HOLM, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 9/22/2005, recorded 9/30/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-66685 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 198596/18 11 12AA 05300 LOT THIRTY-FIVE (35), OF PARKS AT BROKEN TOP, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19361 BLUE LAKE LOOP BEND, Oregon 97702-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $379,500.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 11/1/2010 plus late

charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,720.95 Monthly Late Charge $92.46 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $379,500.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.25% per annum from 10/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/27/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/3/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3904508 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011, 04/21/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5057 T.S. No.: 1318099-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Bradford C. Jarvis and Patricia A Jarvis, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of World Savings Bank, Fsb, Its Successors and/or Assignees, as Beneficiary, dated December 13, 2007, recorded December 26, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-65771 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot nine (9), Anderson Acres Second Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 16221 North Dr. La Pine OR 97739-9523. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 15, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $759.99 Monthly Late Charge $38.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $167,097.74 together with interest thereon at 7.600% per annum from July 15, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 30, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and

expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 22, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371689 03/24, 03/31, 04/07, 04/14 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0470751199 T.S. No.: OR-275050-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JULIAN URANGA AND KAREN URANGA, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW CO, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 9/15/2006, recorded 9/25/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-64771 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 185523 LOT FIFTEEN (15) PARK PLACE ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3027 SOUTHWEST VOLCANO CIRCLE REDMOND, Oregon 97756-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $115,764.29; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,214.86 Monthly Late Charge $30.75 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $115,764.29 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 9/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/17/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of

said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/27/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3897281 03/24/2011, 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx1698 T.S. No.: 1272865-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by James C. Nore, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For American Brokers Conduit, as Beneficiary, dated July 19, 2005, recorded July 27, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-48249 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot six (6), block seven (7), Tillicum Village Second Addition Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 61225 Nisika Court Bend OR 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,750.13 Monthly Late Charge $.00. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $220,175.52 together with interest thereon at 5.250% per annum from September 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 21, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any

successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 15, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-374340 04/14, 04/21, 04/28, 05/05

persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/1/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Marina Marin Signature By Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3901536 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011, 04/21/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 7428605554 T.S. No.: OR-260090-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SHELBY J. CENIGA AND FRANK L. CENIGA, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE CO, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 4/27/2006, recorded 4/28/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-29469 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 129764 IN TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; SECTION 10; THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE1/4 NW1/4 NE1/4). EXCEPTING THE WESTERLY 30 FEET THEREOF HERETOFORE DEEDED TO THE PUBLIC FOR ROAD PURPOSES. Commonly known as: 1490 NORTHEAST 11TH STREET REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $637,500.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 7/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $4,399.40 Monthly Late Charge $202.53 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $637,500.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.625% per annum from 6/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/21/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FFF-104578 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DENNIS K. RICHARDS, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of FINANCIAL FREEDOM SENIOR FUNDING CORPORATION, as beneficiary, dated 4/1/2009, recorded 4/7/2009, under Instrument No. 2009-14281, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by FINANCIAL FREEDOM ACQUISITION LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT NINETY-SIX (96), PONDEROSA PINES, RECORDED JULY 3, 1970, IN CABINET A, PAGE 401, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 14924 SOUTH SUGAR PINE WAY LA PINE, OR 97739 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of March 10, 2011 Total Amount due $118,614.31 Accrued Late Charges $0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $0.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $118,614.31 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: FAILURE TO PAY THE PRINCIPAL BALANCE WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/11/2009, DUE TO THE CONDITIONS ON THE NOTE REFERENCED AS PARAGRAPH 7 (A), TOGETHER WITH ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST, CHARGES, FEES AND COSTS AS SET FORTH. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on July 12, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any

person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 3/10/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3940185 03/24/2011, 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0088903695 T.S. No.: 11-01120-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust dated as of October 15. 2008 made by. RICK D. MANES AND PAULA S. MANES, HUSBAND AND WIFE , was the original Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, was the original trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, was the original beneficiary, recorded on October 28, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-43598 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, Oregon (the "Deed of Trust") to wit: APN: 141975 LOT THREE (3). IN BLOCK TWO (2), OF TIMBER HAVEN, SECOND ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 15790 PAULINA AVENUE, LAPINE, OR The current beneficiary is: Wells Fargo Bank, NA Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by the Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default(s) for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; and which defaulted amounts total: $8,700.31 as of March 29, 2011. By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit; The sum of $185,900.41 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.37500% per annum from October 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said

deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as the duly appointed trustee under the Deed of Trust will on August 12, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of the Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: April 7, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3964301 04/14/2011, 04/21/2011, 04/28/2011, 05/05/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0428426555 T.S. No.: OR-275053-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JUAN GUTIERREZ ORTEGA AND JOSEFA GUTIERREZ, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 6/2/2006, recorded 6/6/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-39235 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 189351 LOT SIXTY-FOUR (64), OBSIDIAN ESTATES NO. 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3018 SOUTHWEST PUMICE AVENUE REDMOND, Oregon 97756-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc25925-5r Loan No.: 0207309238 Title No.: 4457146 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Tammy R. Lake, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 11/15/2007, recorded on 11/26/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-61195, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 50 of Pines at Pilot Butte Phase 5, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 207856 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1649 NE Lotus Drive #1 & #2, Bend, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,844.52 beginning 02/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $219,402.48 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.125% per annum from 01/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 06/07/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 1-21-11 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 81 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 100, Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., may be attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 204978, 04/14/11, 04/21/11, 04/28/11, 05/05/11)


G6 Thursday, April 14, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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$181,716.06; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $981.62 Monthly Late Charge $38.86 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $181,716.06 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.25% per annum from 9/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/17/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/27/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3897338 03/24/2011, 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0472339340 T.S. No.: OR-275074-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SCOTT B. JONES AND AVA R. JONES, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 1/17/2007, recorded 1/31/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-06657 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 117393 LOT EIGHT (8), BLOCK FIFTY-EIGHT (58) DESCHUTES RIVER RECREATION HOMESITES, UNIT 9, PART 1 & 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 56151 SOLAR DRIVE BEND, Oregon 97707-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $190,679.61; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,631.97 Monthly Late Charge $60.76 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $190,679.61 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per annum from 9/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/17/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Des-

chutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/27/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3897472 03/24/2011, 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx5243 T.S. No.: 1276447-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jessica M. Erickson and Jason C. Erickson, Wife And Husband, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated September 19, 2005, recorded September 22, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-63985 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 12 of Black Hawk Phase 2, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 2824 S.W. Metolius Avenue Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due January 1, 2010 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $974.41 Monthly Late Charge $39.81. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $141,540.75 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from December 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 30, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the

performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 22, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371671 03/24, 03/31, 04/07, 04/14 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.:T11-75380-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ARDEN E. SPAIN as Grantor to DAVID FENNELL, ATTORNEY, as trustee, in favor of UNION FEDERAL BANK OF INDIANAPOLIS, as Beneficiary, dated 0807-2003, recorded 08-14-2003, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2003-55789 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 158735 LOT 9 IN BLOCK 2 OF CHUKAR RIDGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING A REPLAT OF TRACTS 14 AND 15 OF DESCHUTES PARK ADDITION TO BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 206 SW HAYES AVENUE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $836.98 Monthly Late Charge $32,41 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $97,655.01 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.875% per annum from 11-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 08-01-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N,W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: March 31, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASST SEC ASAP# 3958323 04/14/2011, 04/21/2011, 04/28/2011, 05/05/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0359421544 T.S. No.: OR-274961-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, STEPHEN R. PFEIFER AND ELLEN WYMAN PFEIFER, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GREENPOINT MORTGAGE FUNDING, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 9/12/2006, recorded 9/15/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-62750 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 242959 LOT 43 OF RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 39, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1454 TRAIL CREEK CT REDMOND, Oregon 97756-0000 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $727,746.43; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 9/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,903.67 Monthly Late Charge $145.18 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $727,746.43 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.625% per annum from 8/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed,

the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/24/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3893580 03/24/2011, 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0427140165 T.S. No.: OR-276379-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, FRED A. BARBER and MELISSA R. BARBER, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC. A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 4/10/2006, recorded 4/17/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-25989 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 140377 LOT THREE (3), BLOCK TWENTY-FIVE (25), TALL PINES, FIFTH ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 15935 WOODCHIP LANE LA PINE, Oregon 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $182,500.00; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 2/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,188.20 Monthly Late Charge $49.42 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $182,500.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.5% per annum from 1/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/21/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the

costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 2/2/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3902396 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011, 04/21/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602537186 T.S. No.: OR-275515-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CAROLE E DICKSON, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Grantor to NATIONAL TITLE NETWORK, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MOUNTAIN STATES MORTGAGE CENTERS INC., as Beneficiary, dated 12/14/2009, recorded 1/7/2010, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2010-00984 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 254767 LOT FORTY-FOUR(44), NORTHCREST SUBDIVISION, RECORDED NOVEMBER 14, 2006, IN CABINET H, PAGE 123, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 63384 NE LAMOINE LANE BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $178,638.77; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,265.24 Monthly Late Charge $39.82 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $178,638.77 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 9/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/14/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26183-5r Loan No.: 0254696362 Title No.: 4488780 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Jerry Beaver and Melissa A. Beaver, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR., as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 04/01/2008, recorded on 04/04/2008 as Instrument No. 2008-15046, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 2 in Block 1 of Janela Court, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 120409 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61388 Franke Lane, Bend, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,070.27 beginning 04/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $178,495.95 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.250% per annum from 03/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 06/02/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 1-20-11 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 81 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 100, Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., may be attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 204933, 04/07/11, 04/14/11, 04/21/11, 04/28/11)

after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/24/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3893589 03/24/2011, 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0476312921 T.S. No.: OR-275044-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TROY SCHAFFNER as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 1/4/2008, recorded 1/9/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XX at page No. XX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-01156 LOAN MODIFICATION RECORDED 9-18-2009 #2009-39945 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 161909 LOT NINE (9) IN BLOCK ONE (1) OF HALL, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2747 SOUTHWEST 24TH REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $213,286.91; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 10/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,398.45 Monthly Late Charge $59.99 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $213,286.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.125% per an-

num from 9/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 6/17/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 1/27/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Marina Marin Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3897227 03/24/2011, 03/31/2011, 04/07/2011, 04/14/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S, No.: T11-75364-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOSE L. GONZALEZ, VICKI L. GONZALEZ as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 05-11-2006, recorded 05-24-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-35828 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN; 112579 PARCEL 1 PARTITION PLAT 1991-46, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 60972 BILLADEAU ROAD BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for

which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 12/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $ 1,695.17 Monthly Late Charge $62.20 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $398,344.87 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2% per annum from 11-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 08-01-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86,753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: March 31, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M. DAVIS, ASST SEC ASAP# 3958328 04/14/2011, 04/21/2011, 04/28/2011, 05/05/2011

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

1000

1000

1000

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L522302 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000018675/STRATTON Investor No: 4004511766 AP #1: 244282 Title #: 110013172 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JASON M. STRATTON, JENNIFER C. STRATTON as Grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON - REDMOND as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MRTG. CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated July 29, 2005, Recorded August 9, 2005 as Instr. No. 2005-52189 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON ASSUMPTION AGREEMENT DATED 07/02/2007 covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 62 OF HAYDEN RANCH ESTATES, PHASES 2 AND 3, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 5 PYMTS FROM 09/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,055.29 $5,276.45 5 L/C FROM 09/16/10 TO 01/16/11 @ 43.06 $215.30 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $27.00 $27.00 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$5,518.75 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 1236 NE 4TH STREET, REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $138,389.44, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 08/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 31, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/21/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 933019 PUB: 04/14/11, 04/21/11, 04/28/11, 05/05/11


Thursday, April 14, 2011

THE BULLETIN

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY

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Zimecterin $ 5.49 Wormer Safe-Guard Equine Paste $ 7.99 25 gm (treat 1100 lbs body wt.) Panacur Paste

$

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Purina Equine Sr ............ 16 Strategy GX ..................... $1399 Purina Omolene 200 ....... $1499 Purina Ultium ................. $2199 Honor Finisher Touch ..... $1399 Honor FTRS Edge ........... $1499 Honor Show Pig T100 ..... $1999 Honor Lamb Grower ....... $1699 $

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63.50

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PURINA WILD LIFE BLOCKS

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$

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WILD BIRD FEED 50# FROM NOON, APRIL 22 THROUGH 5:00 PM APRIL 23 FREE BEEF BBQ 12:00 - 1:00 PM ON BOTH DAYS - REDMOND STORE ONLY Reps from Intervet/Schearing Plough, Merial, Horseguard, LMF Feed, Purina & Ritchie Waters! All Product in Stock, On Promo, On Display

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$

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18.99 ea.

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PRYANTEL PASTE APPLE FLAVOR

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FROM NOON APRIL 22 THROUGH 5:00 PM APRIL 23

CATTLE WORMER

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Ivomec Pour-On 25 ml ............... $3005 1 liter .............. $8675 5 liter ........... $22500

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Trifecta 10 lbs. Horse Guard $ 3199 Trifecta 40 lbs. Horse Guard $ 10799

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Safeguard Blk worm 16 calves easy Reg. $3999

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PANACUR PASTE

6.99

$

Sale Price $145 Jewelry, Purses & Wallets

Reg. $28099

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Step-In Post Reg. $2

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DURA FORK

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Bulletin Daily Paper 04/14/11