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Redmond OKs urban expansion By Patrick Cliff and Devo’n Williams The Bulletin

REDMOND — The Redmond City Council approved a major expansion of the city’s Downtown Urban Renewal District Tuesday. With the 7-0 vote, the district increases in size from 599 acres to 700 acres and lasts until 2031. The expansion is projected to spur more than $400 million in private investment on projects ranging from a movie theater to a new convention center. The district has already funded major projects in Redmond, including Centennial Park and extensive improvements along Fifth and Sixth streets. Under the new version of the district, the city could help fund projects that include converting Evergreen School into city hall and beautifying the Redmond reroute. Tuesday’s meeting was the final step in a process that has lasted about two years. “The taxpayer understood this could be transformative for Redmond,” said Heather Richards, the principal economic planner for Redmond. “This is not a build-it-and-they-will-come type plan. We’re focusing on private investments.” Urban renewal districts collect a portion of property taxes, reserving that revenue for investments inside a boundary. In the next 20 years, the city projects the district will collect more than $90 million. The district would use that money to help defray infrastructure costs. In doing so, the district should attract more than $400 million in private investment. City leaders have long argued that the district’s expansion was a vital step toward improving downtown. The plan envisions more housing in the city’s core and a medical office district near St. Charles Redmond. City staffers have heavily touted the lack of a tax rate increase. Susan Nobles, a Redmond resident at the meeting, said she has seen public and private partnerships work. “It meshes well.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bend bulletin.com. Devo’n Williams can be reached at 541-617-7818 or at dwilliams@bendbulletin.com.

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Indictment in fatal hit and run By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A grand jury has indicted a Bend man on charges stemming from a fatal hit and run in late January, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office announced Tuesday. Bret Lee Biedscheid, 38, was indicted Tuesday on two charges — criminally negligent homicide and failure to per-

form the duties of a driver when a person is killed — in connection with the accident that killed Anthony “Tony” Martin, of Bend, on Jan. 26. Both charges are felonies, and are punishable by a maximum term of 10 years in prison and five years in prison, respectively. Biedscheid is scheduled to be arraigned in Deschutes County District Court on Thursday morning.

KAPKA BUTTE

New sno-park options to ease overcrowding

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

MON-SAT

Vol. 108, No. 103, 36 pages, 6 sections

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across Third Street near Revere Avenue about 11 p.m. Jan. 26 when he was struck by a southbound vehicle. The vehicle did not stop. Martin died of his injuries at the scene. Bend Police were contacted a few days later by Portland defense attorney Stephen Houze, representing Biedscheid and his wife, Ellyn Biedscheid. See Hit and run / A4

NATO countries split on tactics in Libya conflict By Steven Lee Myers and Eric Schmitt New York Times News Service

By Kate Ramsayer The Bulletin

Options for a new sno-park along the Cascade Lakes Highway include 110 additional parking spaces, more than seven miles of dog-friendly ski trails, moving the Dutchman Flat snow play area and creating short new trails to tie into existing snowmobile and crosscountry ski routes. The different alternatives for the Kapka Sno-park, proposed for the junction of the Cascade Lakes Highway and the Sunriver cutoff, are designed to relieve pressure on the often-overflowing Dutchman Sno-park and provide another place where people can ski with dogs off-leash. “It’s a place where we think we can serve both the motorized and nonmotorized recreation in the area,” said Amy Tinderholt, recreation team leader for the Bend-Fort Inside Rock Ranger • How to make District. comments and see The U.S. Forthe environmental est Service has impact statement, released its Page A6 draft environmental impact statement on the Kapka Butte sno-park plan, including several different alternatives, and will be taking comments on it for 45 days beginning Friday. For years, the Forest Service has been debating what to do about the overcrowding at Dutchman Flat Sno-park, across from Mt. Bachelor. A 1996 proposal to expand Dutchman was never completed. In 2004, the agency held a threeday “Dutchman summit” to discuss what to do about the popular, high-elevation sno-park, which has room for only about 26 vehicles and is consistently filled during weekends and holidays. One of the ideas out of the summit was to build a new sno-park at the Sunriver cutoff. “The Forest Service has spent a lot of time talking with winter users about needs in the area, and the Cascade Lakes Highway is the area with the greatest amount of winter recreation,” Tinderholt said. “One of the things that there was a need for is additional winter parking.” In early 2009, the

USFS sno-park options The Forest Service has released its draft environmental impact statement for a new sno-park at Kapka Butte. Options include new trails for skiing with dogs, connector trails to ski and snowmobile routes, and in two alternatives, moving the Dutchman Flat Snow Play Area. Existing snowmobile trails To Mt. Bachelor

Proposed nordic trails open to dogs

Highway underpass Existing nordic trails

46

Vista Butte Sno-park

Proposed nordic connector Parking

46 To Bend

Proposed snowmobile connector Kapka Butte Proposed snowshoe trail

Proposed sno-park at Kapka Butte

45

WASHINGTON — With the United States limiting itself to a supporting role in the conflict in Libya, fissures opened among NATO allies Tuesday over the scope and intensity of attacks against the forces of Moammar Gadhafi, officials here and in Europe said. On the eve of two important meetings this week, France and Britain openly called on the alliance and its partners to intensify airstrikes on Libyan government troops to protect civilians, prompting an unusual public retort from NATO’s command that it was carrying out the military operation under the terms of the United Nations Security Council resolution that authorized force. “As long as regime forces continue attacking their own people, we will intervene to protect them,” Lt. Gen. Charles Bouchard of Canada, the NATO operational commander, said in Naples, Italy. “NATO’s resolve is in its mandate to protect the civilian population.” Arriving for talks in Luxembourg with other European leaders, the British foreign minister, William Hague, said that the allies had to “maintain and intensify” the military effort, noting that Britain had already deployed extra ground attack planes. See Libya / A4

To Sunriver

Existing snowmobile trails

To Mt. Bachelor 46

Proposed

Existing nordic trails

Snomobile snow play area 16.6 acres Proposed snowmobile trail connector Existing

Snomobile snow play area

Dutchman Flat Snow Play Area proposal

46

To Bend

Source: U.S. Forest Service

16.6 acres Dutchman Flat Sno-park

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

agency released a plan for a new Kapka Butte sno-park, featuring 70 parking spots for trucks and snowmobile trailers, as well as 40 spots for vehicles without trailers. The sno-park would also have new trails, with a network of groomed, dog-friendly trail loops,

a snowshoe trail up Kapka Butte, a short new trail from the parking lot to snowmobile trails that lead to the Dutchman Flat system and a short connector to the ski and snowmobile trails at the Vista Butte Sno-park. See Sno-parks / A6

Chocolate milk stirs controversy in public schools By Kevin Sieff The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — It was once a staple of public school cafeterias that blended the indulgent and the nutritious, satisfying parents and children both. But chocolate milk is uncontroversial no more. Dozens of districts have demanded reformulations. Others have banned it outright. At the center of these battles are complex public health calculations: Is it better to remove sugary chocolate flavorings at the risk that many students will skip milk altogether, missing out on crucial calcium and Vitamin D? Or should schools instead make tweaks — less fat, different sweeteners, fewer calories — that might salvage the benefits while minimizing the downside? However schools answer these questions, protest inevitably follows. When Fairfax County, Va., and District of Columbia schools banned chocolate milk last year from elementary lunch lines, officials heard not just from parents and students. They also received letters and petitions from a slew of nutritionists and influential special interest groups. See Milk / A4

At Fort Sumter, a somber 150th anniversary of Civil War By Bruce Smith

We use recycled newsprint

The District Attorney’s Office had previously identified Biedscheid as a “person of interest” in the case, but has not referred to him as a suspect. Biedscheid, who is director of accounting at Les Schwab Tire Centers, has not been arrested. A message left on Biedscheid’s home phone Tuesday evening was not returned. Martin, 48, was walking his bicycle

The Associated Press

CHARLESTON, S.C. — Booming cannons, plaintive period music and hushed crowds ushered in the 150th anniversary of America’s bloodiest war on Tuesday, a commemoration that continues to underscore a racial divide that had plagued the nation since before the Civil War.

Ciara Lee, 25, watches Fort Sumter during Charleston’s commemoration on Tuesday. C. Aluka Berry / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

The events marked the 150th anniversary of the Confederate bombardment of Union-held Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, an engagement that plunged the nation into four years of war at a cost of more than 600,000 lives. Several hundred people gathered on Charleston’s Battery in the pre-dawn darkness, much as Charleston residents gathered 150 years ago to watch the bombardment on April 12, 1861. About 4 a.m., a single beam of light reached skyward from Fort Sumter. About a half hour later, about the time the first shots were fired, a second

beam glowed, signifying a nation torn in two. Nearby, a brass ensemble played a concert entitled “When Jesus Wept” as hundreds listened. Fifty years ago during the centennial of the Civil War, there was a celebratory mood. But on Tuesday, the 150th anniversary events were muted. Even the applause seemed subdued. At the White House, President Barack Obama captured the somber mood in a proclamation that the date would be the first day of the Civil War Sesquicentennial. See Civil War / A6


A2 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Sea lions’ appetite for salmon has lawmakers out for blood

As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

10 23 39 41 45 15 x2 Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $58 million for Friday’s drawing.

By Adam Weintraub The Associated Press

By Rob Hotakainen McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — The California sea lions were unwelcome visitors from the very beginning, greeted with yells, rubber bullets and firecrackers when they swam up the Columbia River to gobble up thousands of endangered salmon at the Bonneville Dam. When the harassment wouldn’t scare them away, fishery managers turned to deadly force. They used traps and euthanasia, giving lethal injections to 30 sea lions from 2008 to 2010. This spring, the sea lions have found safe harbor at the dam, about 50 miles east of Portland, after an appellate court in San Francisco ruled that states and the National Marine Fisheries Service had to stop the killings. But the reprieve could be short-lived: The issue now has found its way to Capitol Hill, where Congress is being urged to intervene. Seeking to put an end to the invaders’ free lunch once and for all, four members of the House of Representatives — Republican Rep. Greg Walden of Oregon and Democrat Norm Dicks and Republicans Doc Hastings and Jaime Herrera Beutler, all of Washington state — have teamed up on a bill that would give both states and Indian tribes a quicker way to get federal permission to kill the sea lions. “With all other methods exhausted, lethal removal of the most aggressive sea lions is often the only option left,” Hastings said.

Both species protected The issue is an example of the delicate work involved in trying to manage animal populations. In this case, both the salmon and sea lions are protected by the federal government — the salmon by the Endangered Species Act and the sea lions by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. As a result, the federal government goes to great lengths to try to protect both. Under normal conditions, killing a sea lion is a serious crime, punishable by up to a year in prison and a fine of up to $100,000. Guy Norman, regional administrator for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife in Vancouver, said the number of California sea lions has surged from about 30,000 to more than 300,000 in the past 35 years. He said the sea lions have learned that they have “a tremendous opportunity” to prey on the salmon while they’re delayed before passing over the dam. Norman said the number of sea lions, usually 100 or so, peaks at the dam from April through mid-May. “It’s been a management dilemma from Day One in terms of trying to balance the situation with endangered salmon versus a natural predator that’s accessing these endangered fish in an unnatural setting,” he said.

Distinctive characteristics

CANADA

California sea lions, known for their noisy barking, intelligence and playfulness, are often confused with seals.

U.S.

Good listener

California sea lion range

Pacific • Easily trained and adapt well to Ocean man-made environments • Hunt continuously Raised forehead for up to 30 hours; Dog-like face each dive lasts three to five Streamlined minutes

shape

Small external ears

No claws or hair on foreflippers

Source: National Geographic, MCT Photo Service © 2011 MCT

Size compared with person

• Swim with wing-like strokes • May reach speeds of 25 mph (40 kph)

No mane, unlike the other 14 species of sea lions

• Move very well on land • Rear and front flippers rotate forward to scoot Less than 30 years Up to 850 lb. (386 kg)* Mainly squid and fish Colony, rookery

Lifespan Weight Diet Group name

*Females much smaller, at 220 lb. (110 kg) Melina Yingling / McClatchy-Tribune News

Sea lions vs. salmon

Seattle

Pacific Ocean

65 km. 40 miles

Washington

Columbia River

Once-threatened California sea lions have learned to swim up the Columbia River to feast on Portland Bonneville Dam endangered salmon. Government attempts to manage both animal populations: Oregon 1970

Sea lion population totals less than 10,000

1972

Congress passes the Marine Mammal Protection Act

1980s

Sea lion population grows

1990s

Columbia River salmon protected by the Endangered Species Act Amended Marine Mammal Protection Act allows the killing of sea lions if they are eating endangered species

1994 2000

Increased sea lion sightings at Bonneville Dam

2006

Washington, Oregon and Idaho seek a license from Congress to kill more than 80 sea lions a year

2007

Legislation to expedite the request introduced by four Northwest members of Congress goes nowhere

2008-10 Forty sea lions trapped; 30 are euthanized, 10 sent to zoos and other alternative sites 2011

In January, National Marine Fisheries Service says it won’t appeal court ruling to stop sea lion killings; in March, four House members introduce bill that would give states and Indian tribes a quicker way to get federal permission to kill sea lions © 2011 MCT

Source: McClatchy Washington Bureau, ESRI

Fishermen versus animal rights activists Last spring alone, the sea lions killed an estimated 5,000 salmon at Bonneville Dam, situated where the Columbia River passes through the Cascade Mountains and separates Washington and Oregon. “That’s a significant number of salmon — and they’re endangered,” Dicks said. “You’ve got an endangered species, and with these sea lions coming up from California, they’re just hitting them pretty hard,” Dicks said. If the bill is passed, roughly 85 sea lions could get killed this year, under a complicated formula that would change the number each year based on population

Melina Yingling / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

estimates. The issue is pitting fishermen in the Pacific Northwest against animal rights advocates. “Commercial fishermen are not excited about having to kill sea lions,” said Bruce Buckmaster of Astoria, a board member of the group Salmon For All, comprising commercial fishing interests. “There’s no blood thirst here, but we just have way too many. ... Like everything to do with salmon in the Pacific Northwest, it’s complicated. And it’s hard to grasp how one thing makes a difference in the system.” Under federal law, sea lions can only be killed if the National Marine Fisheries Service can prove that they’re having a significant negative impact on salmon.

In November, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco sided with the Humane Society of the United States and the Wild Fish Conservancy in stopping the killing, ruling that the standard hadn’t been met. The court noted that fishermen were taking many more salmon than the sea lions. “The government’s plan to kill sea lions for eating fish, while at the same time authorizing fishermen to take four times as many fish as sea lions, is irrational, and the court has rightly put a stop to it,” said Jonathan Lovvorn, the vice president and chief counsel for animal protection litigation for the Humane Society.

Other factors? Kurt Beardslee, the executive director of Wild Fish Conservancy, said that blaming sea lions for the decline in the salmon population “is nothing but a distraction” and that there could be many other factors, including dams, fisheries and habitat degradation. In January, the National Marine Fisheries Service announced that it wouldn’t appeal the court decision. That disappointed Hastings, who introduced the legislation last month. Hastings said it would be unacceptable to expect residents of Northwest states to “sit by while a few sea lions gorge themselves on thousands of endangered fish.” Similar legislation was introduced in Congress in 2006, but it went nowhere. This year, prospects could be letter. The legislation has been referred to the House Natural Resources Committee, which is headed by Hastings. Backers of the legislation are more optimistic this time. Calling the legislation “well overdue,” Buckmaster, the fishermen’s representative, said the sea lions are eating an estimated 20 percent of the total salmon that are available for commercial fishermen in any given year, costing the industry “a huge amount of money.” “It’s very clear that we have a healthy population of California sea lions and they simply need to be managed,” Buckmaster said. “That’s what we’ve been calling for. ... Why can’t we manage? It’s because a few people — the Humane Society of the United States — say those sea lions are more important than our communities and endangered salmon.” In the past three years, said Norman, the Washington state fish administrator, 10 sea lions were moved to zoos in Chicago and Texas or to other alternative sites, but he said they’re in low demand. The 30 that were killed were given a lethal injection by a qualified veterinarian, he said. “It’s a humane euthanization,” Norman said.

Scientists say Japan Trench now has more seismic stress By Joel Achenbach The Washington Post

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Brown signs California’s new energy mandate

Japan won’t stop shaking. Monday, a month after the horrific March 11 earthquake and tsunami, the island was rattled anew by an aftershock, this one measuring magnitude 6.6. It was hardly a major temblor, but it was strong enough to knock out electricity briefly at the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. Four days earlier, a magnitude 7.1 quake led to four deaths and widespread power outages. With soldiers still looking for the bodies of thousands of people who vanished a month ago, Japan is coping with the painful reality that it is sits in a seismic bull’s eye. Now scientists are warning that the March 11 event not only will lead to years of aftershocks but might also have increased the risk of a major quake on an adjacent fault. A new calculation by American and Japanese scientists

concluded that the March 11 event heightened the strain on a number of faults bracketing the ruptured segment of the Japan Trench. “There’s quite a bit of real estate on which stress has increased, by our calculations,” said U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Ross Stein. “The possibility of getting large, late aftershocks to the north and south of the main shock is real.” Stein and two Japanese colleagues, including lead author Shinji Toda of Kyoto University, have submitted their research to the journal Earth Planets Space. The scientists are not making a formal prediction of another big earthquake. But they believe that the section of the Japan Trench east of Tokyo now has more stress than before March 11. “That section of the subduction zone is clearly loaded,” said Chris Goldfinger, an Oregon State seismologist who was not

part of the new research. The processes that lead to earthquakes are too chaotic to be predictable in any practical sense. Two other scientists said that even if there is an increase in seismic hazard on nearby faults, it is minimal and certainly hard to quantify. Susan Hough, a USGS geologist who has written extensively on the subject of earthquake predictions, sounded a skeptical note when asked about the increased risk of a big quake: “Big earthquakes don’t cascade like dominoes, bang bang bang. At least not commonly. So I think the maps showing bright red bull’s eyes of increased stress may be more alarming than they should be.” Hanging over Japan is the worrisome example of Sumatra. Three months after the Dec. 26, 2004, magnitude 9.1 earthquake that generated a catastrophic tsunami, the adjacent segment

of the same fault broke again, this time in a magnitude 8.7 earthquake. The fault system has since generated several more powerful earthquakes. “It will take probably a decade before this aftershock sequence is over,” Stein said. “The watchword in Tokyo should be long-term vigilance. Nobody should think this should go away in a few weeks or a few months.” Tokyo is in a particularly treacherous location. It sits on the gentle Kanto Plain, adjacent to a large bay that is protected by a peninsula from the battering forces of the Pacific Ocean — tsunamis and typhoons. But there are faults in every direction, and a triplejunction of tectonic plates just offshore where slabs of the earth meet, grind, and sometimes violently lurch past one another.

MILPITAS, Calif. — Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed legislation requiring California utilities to get one-third of their power from renewable sources, giving the state the most aggressive alternative energy mandate in the U.S. California utilities and other electricity providers have until the end of 2020 to draw 33 percent of their power from solar panels, windmills and other renewable sources. “There are people who think we can drill our way to happiness and prosperity,” the Democratic governor told hundreds of workers and other supporters at a solar panel manufacturing plant near San Jose. “Instead of just taking oil from thousands of miles away, we’re taking the sun and converting it.” Previous California law required utilities to get 20 percent of their power from renewable sources. Supporters of the higher standard said it will reassure investors and keep money flowing to develop alternative energy sources. They say that will lead to cleaner air and job growth in the green energy sector. “By the end of the decade, our goal is to make solar cost-competitive with other forms of energy, all other forms of energy,” Energy Secretary Steven Chu told the crowd at the SunPower Corp./Flextronics plant. “This would be a game-changer for us, opening up a world of export opportunities, and California’s innovators and businesses can help us achieve this goal.” Critics of the legislation said sticking with traditional energy sources such as coal and natural gas would be cheaper, keeping costs down for business and residential ratepayers. Business groups point to estimates that the higher standard could drive up electricity costs for California ratepayers by more than 7 percent, despite language in the legislation to limit cost increases. The California Republican Party pointed to one study that suggested the average Californian’s energy bill would go up 19 percent under the new standard.

Gray wolf losing endangered status in West By Matthew Brown The Associated Press

BILLINGS, Mont. — An attachment to a federal budget bill needed to avert a government shutdown would take gray wolves off the endangered species list across most of the Northern Rockies. Wildlife advocates conceded Tuesday the wolf provision was all but certain to remain in the spending bill after efforts to remove it failed. Congress faces a tight deadline on a budget plan already months overdue, and the rider has bipartisan support. It orders the Obama administration to lift protections for wolves within 60 days in five Western states. Protections would remain intact in Wyoming. But wolf hunting would resume this fall in Idaho and Montana, where an estimated 1,250 wolves have been blamed in hundreds of livestock attacks and for declines in some big game herds. Wolves would be returned to state management in Washington, Oregon and Utah. Lawmakers said they inserted the rider to circumvent a federal judge who repeatedly blocked proposals to hunt the predators. The legislation would block further court intervention. “We needed to figure out a way to manage these critters just like we manage other wildlife, and this is the way to do it,” Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., said in an interview with The Associated Press. “If you take a look at impacts wolves have had on domestic livestock, on our big game, it is not deniable that it has been extensive.”


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 A3

T S NASA picks shuttles’ retirement homes By Kenneth Chang New York Times News Service

NASA’s space shuttles, which have been carrying astronauts aloft for 30 years, were assigned to their final destinations on Tuesday: One will head to the nation’s capital, another to Los Angeles, and the third from its current home at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the center’s visitor complex next door. In a ceremony commemorating the shuttle program, Maj. Gen. Charles F. Bolden Jr., the NASA administrator, made the long-awaited announcement of where the soon-to-be museum pieces would end up.

The Discovery, which completed its final flight last month, is headed to the Smithsonian, for display at the spacious Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center near Washington Dulles International Airport. The Endeavour, currently on the launching pad for its final space trip, will go to the California Science Center. The Atlantis, scheduled for its last mission in June, will go to the Kennedy visitor complex. The audience at the Kennedy ceremony erupted into cheering as Bolden announced the Atlantis’ destination. “I guess I got something right today,” the general said with a laugh.

New leader consolidates his control in Ivory Coast By Adam Nossiter and Scott Sayare New York Times News Service

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — For four months, the Golf Hotel served as the headquarters — and effectively the prison — of Alassane Ouattara, the winner of last year’s presidential election, who was blockaded inside by the nation’s strongman, Laurent Gbagbo. Now the tables have turned. On Tuesday, about 40 prisoners taken in the final assault on Gbagbo’s residence a day earlier sat stripped to the waist under the hot sun and the watchful eyes of Ouattara’s forces. The prisoners included several of Gbagbo’s closest bodyguards. Inside the Golf Hotel, Gbagbo’s generals pledged allegiance to Ouattara, a spokesman said. All the top officers were there, the spokesman said, except the three whose loyalty to Gbagbo was “unconditional”: the heads of the Republican Guard and the feared security services, and the naval forces chief. Pickup trucks loaded with Ouattara’s soldiers, bristling with guns and dressed in motley makeshift uniforms, set off from the hotel at regular intervals to cruise this city’s still jumpy streets. There was little other traffic. Occasional gunfire and heavy-

weapons fire could be heard as Ouattara forces flushed out pockets of resistance in die-hard proGbagbo neighborhoods. While French and U.N. officials acknowledge their attacks weakened Gbagbo’s defenses, helping Ouattara’s forces to storm in and grab Gbagbo after a protracted standoff, they have taken pains to say that their actions were motivated by a mandate to protect civilians. Seeking to avoid the accusation that they had used force to replace one African leader with another — a suggestion that could all too easily rekindle associations with France’s long interventionist history in colonial and post-colonial Africa — French officials continued to deny any involvement in Gbagbo’s arrest. But the suspicions have prompted some in the French opposition to demand clarification of France’s role in Ivory Coast, a former colony. After his arrest, Gbagbo was taken to the Golf Hotel, where he remained Tuesday, according to U.N. officials. The U.N. secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, said the organization would continue to help in trying to restore order, and he urged Ouattara to prevent any retaliatory attacks against Gbagbo supporters.

Conspicuous among the unsuccessful hopefuls were the Museum of Flight in Seattle, which had already begun construction of a wing that it hoped would house an orbiter; the National Museum of the United States Air Force in Ohio; and NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Texas, the site of mission control for the 135 shuttle missions. The disappointment in Houston was pronounced. Rep. Pete Olson, a Republican whose district includes the space center, said in a statement, “This oversight smacks of a political gesture in an agency that has always served above politics.”

The Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS — Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty may be running for president, but he’s not ready to be official about it. Pawlenty moved quickly Tuesday to knock down a CNN story that appeared to show him officially entering the race. During an airing of Piers Morgan Tonight, taped earlier in the day, the talk show host remarked on Pawlenty’s low standing in early polls. He asked if Pawlenty would consider being real estate tycoon Donald Trump’s No. 2 on a ticket. The former governor laughed and responded, “I’m running for president.” Later in the interview, Morgan asked Pawlenty to clarify if that

was an official announcement. “I’ve got an exploratory committee up and running and we’ll have a final or full announcement on that in the coming weeks,” said Pawlenty, who formed an exploratory committee last month. “It won’t be too much longer. But everything is headed in that direction.” After the show aired, Pawlenty spokesman Alex Conant took issue with the way in which CNN promoted the interview throughout the afternoon and in Morgan’s online blog. That blog included a video clip of the portion of the interview. It was listed under the headline, “Tim Pawlenty says ‘I’m running for President’ and comments on Trump as possible opponent.”

New York Times News Service NEW YORK — It was a straightforward question, but not one usually answered by the likes of Joseph C. Massino. At least not with such candor. The longtime boss of the Bonanno crime family was asked by a prosecutor, “What powers did you have?” Massino, seated at the witness stand, offered a quick, matter-offact reply. “Murders, responsibility for the family, made captains, break captains,” he said. And so it was that Massino, 68, the only official boss of a New York crime family ever to cooperate with federal authorities, appeared in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn on Tuesday and became the first to testify against a

former confederate. For nearly five hours, Massino cataloged his misdeeds, recounting murders and other acts of varying criminal scope. Massino would tell the jury that the man on trial, Vincent Basciano, the family’s former acting boss, had spoken to him about ordering the 2004 killing of Randolph Pizzolo, a Bonanno associate, a conversation Massino secretly recorded. Basciano is charged with ordering Pizzolo’s murder. But for much of the day, Massino established his credentials and gave the jury his view from the top, his philosophy of mob management and his personal history — all larded with a steady stream of culinary metaphors and references.

missions. A spokesman for Oregon U.S. Rep. David Wu says the orbital maneuvering engine was used for maneuvering in space and re-entering Earth’s atmosphere. The engine awarded to Evergreen flew on several shuttle missions. Evergreen President Tim Wahlberg tells the McMinnville News-Register the museum appreciates that NASA is making the artifacts available. — The Associated Press

Anis Belghoul / The Associated Press

Police officers beat back student protesters in Algiers, Algeria, on Tuesday. Thousands of students were marching in Algeria’s capital to demand the resignation of the education minister in the latest anti-government protests to sweep across the Arab world. The students are defying a longtime ban on protests in Algiers — a measure adopted at the height of Algeria’s Islamic insurgency — and were blocked by police while trying to reach the government’s headquarters.

Japan officials defend delay in revealing severity of radiation By Keith Bradsher, Hiroko Tabuchi and Andrew Pollack TOKYO — Japanese officials struggled through the day Tuesday to explain why it had taken them a month to disclose large-scale releases of radioactive material in mid-March at a crippled nuclear power plant, as the government and an electric utility disagreed on the extent of continuing problems there. The government announced Tuesday morning that it had raised its rating of the severity of the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station to 7, the worst on an international scale, from 5. Officials said the reactor had released one-tenth as much radioactive material as the Chernobyl accident in 1986,

but still qualified as a 7 according to a complex formula devised by the International Atomic Energy Agency. Japan’s new assessment was based largely on computer models showing very heavy emissions of radioactive iodine and cesium March 14-16, just after the earthquake and tsunami rendered the plant’s emergency cooling system inoperative. The nearly monthlong delay in acknowledging the extent of these emissions is a fresh example of confused data and analysis from the Japanese, and put the authorities on the defensive about whether they have delayed or blocked the release of information to avoid alarming the public. Seiji Shiroya, a commissioner of Japan’s Nuclear Safety Commission, an independent government panel that oversees the

Belarus security chief suggests opposition was behind bombing New York Times News Service

Mafia boss breaks code, tells all

McMINNVILLE — An Oregon space museum didn’t snag a full space shuttle but it has been awarded several artifacts of the space shuttle program. NASA said Tuesday that the Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum in McMinnville will receive artifacts that include a shuttle cockpit simulator and an orbital maneuvering system engine. The simulator was used by astronauts to train for shuttle

POLICE CLUB STUDENT PROTESTERS IN ALGIERS

New York Times News Service

Pawlenty says ‘I’m running’; campaign downplays it

Oregon museum snares shuttle artifacts

MINSK, Belarus — The head of Belarus’ security services suggested Tuesday that members of the country’s embattled opposition might have been behind the bombing Monday that killed 12 people and wounded 150 at a subway station close to the office of the country’s authoritarian president, AleksandrLukashenko. Vadim Zaitsev, the head

of the security services — still called the KGB in this former Soviet republic — indicated that the bombers might have had links to the organizers of a large protest against Lukashenko in December. Zaitsev’s remarks seemed to confirm the fears of several opposition leaders that the authorities could use the attack as a pretext to broaden an already extensive crackdown.

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country’s nuclear industry, said the government had delayed issuing data on the extent of the radiation releases because of concern that the margins of error had been large in initial computer models. But he also suggested a public policy reason for having kept quiet. “Some foreigners fled the country even when there appeared to be little risk,” he said. “If we immediately decided to label the situation as Level 7, we could have triggered a panicked reaction.” The Japanese media, which has a reputation for passivity but has become more aggressive in response to public unhappiness about the nuclear accident, questioned government leaders through the day about what the government knew about the accident and when it knew it. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

Republicans scramble to get votes for budget bill By Jennifer Steinhauer New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — House Republicans scurried Tuesday to secure the votes needed for a bill that would keep the government financed for the rest of the fiscal year. The House and Senate are scheduled to vote on the spending plan Thursday, the deadline before the expiration of a very short-term stopgap financing measure worked out late Friday night. Over the roughly two days between the revelation of the details of the plan early Tuesday morning and the vote Thursday, Republicans and Democrats have the chance to voice their skepticism about the bill. Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, who is chairman of the influential House Republican Study Committee, said Tuesday that he would oppose the measure because it did not cut enough in federal spending. “While I respect that some of my Republican colleagues will ultimately support this spending deal, I believe voters are asking us to set our sights higher,” Jordan said in a statement. While only 28 Republicans voted against the bridge plan to keep the money flowing until Thursday’s vote, it is highly likely that some of the Republicans who supported that measure were looking to avoid a government shutdown and will vote nay on the bill to fund the government through the rest of the fiscal year. In a meeting with reporters Tuesday, the House majority leader, Eric Cantor of Virginia, while saying it was his understanding that the bill had “strong Republican support,” conceded that he was not certain the bill would pass without support from Democrats. “Certainly we’ll always ask for them,” he said about Democrats. House Democrats also largely supported the agreement reached Friday night, but it was somewhat unclear where they would stand this week on a bill that hacks away at some of their favorite programs, though the cuts are far less than Republicans sought. On the Senate side, the spending plan faced skepticism from the most conservative members, who do not think it makes enough cuts, and from more liberal members, like Sen. Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., who said Tuesday he would reject the measure because it was “Robin Hood in reverse.” Still, passage in that chamber appeared likely.

April 15, 16 & 17 Co-Presented by The Source and E2 Solar


A4 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Frankly, my dear, ‘Windies’ live for this By Kim Severson New York Times News Service

MARIETTA, Ga. — It doesn’t take much to talk Selina Faye Sorrow into slipping on her replica of the dress Vivien Leigh wore in the barbecue scene from the film “Gone With the Wind.” You don’t know the dress? Then you are clearly not a “Windy,” a fan so ardent that recreating the burning of Atlanta in an airport hotel banquet room is not out of the question. Sorrow, 48, might best be described as Windies’ royalty, one of perhaps 100 people in the country who meet a few times a year to indulge in all things GWTW. And this year, the book’s 75th anniversary, will be as indulgent as it gets. Nearly every room of her tidy house in Powder Springs, Ga., a short drive from the Gone With the Wind Museum in Marietta, drips with the book and film. It started with the Scarlett O’Hara Barbie doll that Sorrow’s husband gave her 18 years ago.

Now, she has more than 500 items worth thousands of dollars. Twin Rhett Butler-Scarlett O’Hara pillows adorn the couple’s king-size bed. She has a replica of Clark Gable’s driver’s license, GWTW wine and water bottles and rare engraved invitations to Margaret Mitchell’s funeral, which were delivered after the novel’s author was killed, at age 48, by a reckless driver in 1949. There are 30 copies of the book in several languages and a movie seat from the Atlanta theater where the movie premiered in 1939. She sews gowns from movie scenes and sells them for $500, taking joy in seeing the expression on a woman’s face when she puts one on. “I love that time, with the struggles and the way they got through it all,” Sorrow said, trying to explain how a slight interest grew into full-blown worship. “It just seems like it would have been a precious time to enjoy being a lady.”

“Gone With the Wind” means a lot in Atlanta. After all, Mitchell, who published her novel in 1936, lived, died and was buried there. Her story of the South before and after the Civil War is one that Atlantans, who like to joke that they only get burned once, hold as one of the city’s great contributions to American culture. For the Windies, however, Atlanta is the promised land. Most are already making plans to head there in June for the anniversary. The celebration — events at three Gone With the Wind museums, the premiere of a documentary, a Champagne toast at Mitchell’s grave — is being billed as “a global pilgrimage to Atlanta.” Connie Sutherland, director of the Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum, is a student of the Windies. She says they are mostly middle-aged straight women and gay men, and usually white. But a new crop of younger, more diverse Windies is popping up at high schools and colleges, she

Filmmaker claims to have found nails used in Jesus’ crucifixion By Alisa Odenheimer Bloomberg News

JERUSALEM — Two ancient nails discovered in a Jerusalem archaeological excavation 20 years ago may have been those used to crucify Jesus, filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici says. The nails, discovered in an excavation of a first century Jewish tomb in 1990, have divided historical opinion. Jacobovici’s view is set out in a documentary that will be aired on television in both the United States and Israel. A number of ossuaries were found in the tomb, which belonged to the Caiaphas family, according to inscriptions on two of the bone boxes, Jacobovici says. Caiaphas was the name of the Jewish High Priest at the time of the crucifixion of Jesus, according to the New Testament. “I’m not standing here today and saying I know, for 100 percent sure, that these are the nails of the crucifixion,” Jacobovici said in Jerusalem. “We have enough evidence to bring this story to the world, that requires us to tell the story.” The nails were not photographed at the time that they were found, and there is no record of what was done with

Libya Continued from A1 “Of course, it would be welcome if other countries also did the same,” Hague said. His remarks, echoed by Foreign Minister Alain Juppe of France, reflected what officials have described as a complex and at times convoluted coalition, with many participating countries refusing to carry out airstrikes against forces on the ground, even as their planes patrol the skies over Libya. Britain and France, for example, are now flying the bulk of the attack missions, with Norway, Denmark and Canada also striking Libyan targets on the ground. But other countries, including the Netherlands, Sweden, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, are taking less aggressive roles, enforcing the no-fly zone over Libya or conducting reconnaissance missions, in a nod to political considerations back home. The differing tactics reflect the different ways in which each country in the coalition views the mission, and how tough it has been to corral all the participants into focused attacks. In Washington, Obama administration officials sought to tamp down a growing sense of concern among some military analysts that the combination of the Americans’ back-seat role, NATO’s inexperience in waging a complicated air campaign against moving targets and botched communications with the ragtag rebel army had thrown the mission into disarray. In the past week, NATO pilots were involved in two friendly-fire incidents that killed more than a dozen rebel fighters. Meantime, as some allies privately hope for the return of the American-led ground-attack missions, other coalition partners have expressed concern that their supplies of precision-guided bombs are running low after more than 800 strike missions.

them, according to the documentary. At around the same time as the excavation, two ancient nails from the Second Temple period were delivered to a Tel Aviv University lab from Jerusalem and remained there since then. These two nails are bent, which may be consistent with their being used for crucifixion, according to the documentary. Jacobovici says that the crucifixion nails were seen as a powerful talisman, that could protect the bearer in this life and the afterlife, and were therefore included in the tomb. For Caiaphas, the crucifixion of Jesus was one of the most important events in his life, and this is another possible reason they were included in his tomb, Jacobovici says. The Israel Antiquities Authority said in response that there is no scientific proof for Jacobovici’s theory. Nails are commonly found in ancient burial caves from this period, and are believed to have been used for chiseling the name of the deceased on the sarcophagus, and there is no indication that they have any other significance, it said. The tomb found in Jerusalem has not been proven to have belonged to the family of the High

“We have every confidence in NATO’s ability to carry out the tasks of enforcing the arms embargo as well as the no-fly zone and the protection of civilians in Libya,” Mark Toner, a State Department spokesman, said Tuesday. “As the president said, the U.S. and other key partners had capabilities that they brought to this operation upfront, and then our role would diminish as NATO stepped up and took command and control of the operation. And that’s what’s happened.” The countries involved in the conflict are to hold separate meetings this week to try to maintain a consensus on forcing Gadhafi to end attacks on cities held by rebel forces. In Doha, Qatar, on Wednesday, representatives of one group of allied countries will discuss the diplomatic initiatives now under way, led by the United Nations special envoy for Libya, Abdel Ilah al-Khatib, and African leaders. Libya’s former foreign minister, Moussa Koussa, who fled to Britain, is also expected to attend. NATO members begin a meeting the next day in Berlin. The American delegation to the meetings in Doha will be led by Under Secretary of State William Burns. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, who met with the Jordanian foreign minister and the emir of Qatar in Washington on Tuesday, will attend the NATO meeting in Berlin. The separate meetings are themselves a sign of the bifurcated political and military leadership of the coalition, whose members remain divided over the means of the operation, if not the end: a political transition in Libya that sees the removal of Gadhafi. “Forming coalitions is complicated enough,” the senior administration official said. “Sustaining them is sometimes equally complicated. It requires a lot of hard work and tending.” A European diplomat expressed concern that the efforts to negotiate a cease-fire — rebuffed so far by the rebels and

Priest of that name, and may have belonged to another family with the same name, the IAA said. “There is no doubt that the talented director Simcha Jacobovici created an interesting film, at the center of which is a genuine archaeological artifact,” the IAA said in an e-mailed statement. “However, the interpretation presented in it has no basis in the find or in archaeological research.” While there is no proof that the nails came from the cave of Caiaphas, or that they were used for crucifixion, or even any textual evidence that Caiaphas kept the nails of the crucifixion, it is a possibility, Gabriel Barkay, a Bar Ilan University professor who appears in the documentary, said at a news conference today. “This is not the way to draw conclusions in science,” Barkay said. “But on the other hand, those are possible things. I think it is a fascinating film. One does not have to accept every detail in it.” The documentary will be aired on the History Channel April 20 and in Israel on Channel 1 on May 15, the first of a series called “Secrets of Christianity.”

government loyalists — could have a potential “demobilization effect” among some of the militaries now involved, because it might entice some countries to slow down the assault. Referring to Gadhafi, the diplomat insisted that “we have to maintain the military pressure on him” in order to end the conflict. Several European and NATO diplomats acknowledged Tuesday that NATO’s initial handling of the air campaign has been plagued with problems and miscommunications. But these officials insisted that with improving weather and lessons learned from a week’s worth of hard knocks, the tempo of operations was steadily improving. A senior NATO diplomat said, for instance, that the alliance decided only at the end of March how many aircraft it would need to maintain the operation that the United States led for about 10 days. After some reluctance, countries were providing the forces to fill the requirements. NATO is now flying just under 200 aircraft, with the United States supplying about 40 refueling, reconnaissance and other specialized planes that few if any other countries have. The United States also has about 40 aircraft in reserve, including tank-killing A-10s and AC-130 gunships. The diplomats said that after a rough start, NATO was getting better at attacking mobile targets by identifying them accurately and quickly and relaying that information to the warplanes. “There is a learning curve, but we are progressing,” a French diplomat said. “The Americans are not indispensable.” In Brussels, Brig. Gen. Mark van Uhm, NATO chief of operations, said Tuesday that allied warplanes flew an average of 62 bombing runs a day last weekend, about on par with what the American-led operation did. “We are having an effect,” van Uhm said. “Gadhafi forces can’t fight how they want to, where they want to or with what weapons they want to.”

and veteran Windies said. “They just didn’t know there are others who feel that way about it, too,” Sutherland said. “It becomes a whole social network.” Throughout the year, you can find Windies gathered at the handful of Gone With the Wind museums around the country, at one another’s homes or at midrange hotels, dressing the part and re-enacting scenes and sharing little-known details about the movie and the book.

Gives people hope New revelations are treated like gold. A news article last month about the final typescript of the last four chapters of the book being at a Southport, Conn., library shot through the Windies’ community — at least a minority of them who are more dedicated to the book than the movie. At some gatherings, actors from the film show up and offer

Milk Continued from A1 Most accused the districts of acting rashly, robbing students of a tasty drink and the vitamins and minerals that fuel bone and muscle growth. “We got 10 to 20 e-mails a day,” said Penny McConnell, director of food and nutrition services for Fairfax. “It was a lot of pressure.” This month — and partly because of that pressure — Fairfax officials announced that they would reintroduce chocolate milk in school cafeterias. The newer, low-fat version includes sucrose, which is made from sugar cane or beets, instead of high-fructose corn syrup, which some critics say is more heavily processed and, as a result, less healthy. Such reformulations have satisfied some of chocolate milk’s critics. But most scientists and nutritionists say that changing sweeteners makes little dietary difference if the total calorie content stays the same. This is a view embraced by the Corn Refiners Associa-

Hit and run Continued from A1 Police obtained a warrant to search the Biedscheids’ home in southwest Bend and a GMC pickup truck with damage to the front passenger side. Both of the Biedscheids submitted DNA samples to investigators, who also took samples of a “substance consistent with blood” found on the truck. Police also seized cellphones, computers, GPS devices and other items from the Biedscheids’ home. In a news release issued late Tuesday afternoon, the District Attorney’s Office said members of the grand jury heard from witnesses and law enforcement officers, and reviewed documents and videotapes during their investigation of the incident. Chief Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson said she was not able to speak to specific details of the case at this point. The news release from the District Attorney’s Office thanked Bend Police for their “expert and thorough” investigation. Friends and family of Mar-

Rich Addicks / New York Times News Service

Selina Faye Sorrow, an aficionado of the film “Gone With the Wind,” wears a handmade replica dress at her home in Powder Spring, Ga. The network of ardent “Gone With the Wind” fans, calling themselves “Windies,” plans to descend on Atlanta this June to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the book’s publication. autographs, sometimes for sale. Of course, most of the notable stars have died, most recently Cammie King Conlon, who as a child played Bonnie Blue Butler. “The theme of survival and overcoming adversity really resonates with a lot of people,”

said Kathleen Marcaccio, 53, of Royal Oak, Mich., who keeps the most comprehensive list of the group’s events and is considered the Windies’ den mother. “It still always gives people that hope,” she said, “no matter what they are dealing with.”

tion, which often finds itself on the losing side of such changes. “Why should school districts pay more for one sweetener when children’s bodies can’t tell the difference?” said Audrae Erickson, the group’s president. The stakes are high because more than 70 percent of the milk distributed in school cafeterias is flavored, according to the Milk Processor Education Program, an industry group. Fairfax alone serves 62,000 gallons of chocolate milk a year. And the formulations used in many cafeterias across the country have more calories, ounce for ounce, than Coke. Such statistics have drawn the attention of those lobbying for healthier school lunches at a time of rising obesity among children. Parents in many districts have been vocal. “If we want to fix childhood obesity, chocolate milk is just one of the things we need to get rid of,” said Jeff Anderson, a parent of three students at Wolftrap Elementary in Vienna, Va., and a member of Real Food for Kids, an advocacy group. “It’s a treat, not something you have every day with lunch.” Nutritionists, meanwhile, have

split between those who think chocolate milk is worth the payoff in nutrients and those who don’t. “Trying to get students to consume calcium by drinking chocolate milk is like getting them to eat apples by serving them apple pie,” said Ann Cooper, a leading advocate for healthy school lunches. The catch is that when schools remove flavored milk, students drink less milk. The milk processors’ group puts the number at 37 percent less milk overall. Based on such statistics, the National Dairy Council has launched its Raise Your Hand for Chocolate Milk campaign. “Chocolate milk is the most popular milk choice in schools,” according to the campaign’s pitch, “and kids will drink less milk and get fewer nutrients if it’s taken away.” Jostled by the new politics of school lunch, Fairfax officials have vacillated over other staples. This year, for example, they removed salt from pretzels, but weeks later they were coaxed into putting it back. “All of a sudden, everyone who eats is a nutritionist,” McConnell said. “It makes our job a lot more difficult.”

tin said they’d been waiting to see what would happen in the case for a long time. “We were getting to the point where we were losing hope,” said Toni Wattenbarger, Martin’s stepdaughter. “But there is a God. We’re so excited. It’s great to hopefully get closure. Lots of smiles.” David Crouse, a friend and former neighbor of Martin, said he was pleased to hear of the indictment, and hoped the time between the crash and the indictment was spent conducting a thorough investigation. “Due to the fact there are highpowered attorneys involved on the defense, they do need to be able to build a strong case,” Crouse said. “I’m glad they’re finally moving forward and the process is coming around now. Justice is blind to the dollar bills

being thrown at it, I’d like to say.” Wattenbarger said she and other members of Martin’s family plan to attend Biedscheid’s arraignment. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

541-388-4418


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 A5


A6 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Newly found papers of Civil War Walt Whitman unveiled By Michael E. Ruane The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The scholar’s eyes glazed over as he turned page after page of the old government ledger books filled with the scribbling of Victorian clerks. On and on they went: Orders, pronouncements, instructions, inked by copyists hunched over desks in the years right after the Civil War, filling the blue-lined pages like those in a child’s penmanship book. Suddenly, the scholar stopped. There were the distinct D’s, the strange X’s, the ornate capital C’s he recognized. And later, in a margin, the tell-tale “W.W.” — for Walt Whitman. Kenneth Price, a Whitman expert from the University of Nebraska, realized he had unearthed a trove of documents in the famous American poet’s handwriting, filed away in the National Archives and virtually forgotten until now. Tuesday, on the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War, the Archives announced that Price had found almost 3,000 pieces in Whitman’s handwriting, a discovery that Archivist of the United States David Ferriero called “astonishing.” The writings are essentially letters authored by various government officials that Whitman copied into record books when he was a clerk in the office of the U.S. Attorney General in the mid- to late-1860s. A journalist, poet and essayist, Whitman is perhaps best known for capturing the haunted pageantry of the Civil War in his work, “Drum Taps,” which contains his masterpiece, “When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom’d,” an elegy to Abraham Lincoln. They are no new poems or oth-

Sno-park plans The draft environmental impact statement for the Kapka Butte Sno-park is available at www.fs.fed. us/r6/centraloregon/projects/units/ bendrock/kapksno-elksnomo/ index.shtml. For more information, call Amy Tinderholt at (541) 3834708.

Sno-parks Continued from A1 “They’re going to have room to park, they’re not going to have to drive all the way up to Dutchman, see if (they) can squeeze in,” Tinderholt said. “They’re going to be able to park at Kapka, be on the trail and five minutes later be at Dutchman Flat.” The agency received about 500 comments on the initial proposal, and came up with additional alternatives. There is not a preferred alternative at this point, Tinderholt said, noting that the Forest Service wanted to get comments on the draft environmental impact statement before making a decision, possibly this summer. Construction, with funds from the Federal Highway Administration, could start in the summer of 2012. The other alternatives include dropping the idea for Kapka and doing nothing, or shrinking the size of the parking lot to 50 large spots and not adding new dog-friendly trails, instead only meeting current space needs. Another option would include moving the snow play area on Dutchman Flat to a different spot on the flat — keeping it the same size, but creating a nonmotorized area closer to Dutchman Sno-park. The agency isn’t considering expanding Dutchman Sno-park, Tinderholt said, because people couldn’t reach a consensus on a good option. The area is already congested, with the sno-park and Mt. Bachelor, so the Forest Service doesn’t want to add more to the mix. “It’s not an area where we want to add more congestion,” she said. The two main needs are to add more parking and a place for skiing with dogs, she said, and Kapka tackles those problems. At 5,900 feet in elevation, the Kapka Butte area was chosen, she said, because it’s higher than the Wanoga Sno-park (5,500 feet) or the Edison Sno-park (5,000 feet), so it will get more snow. Kapka would have adequate snow for about three to four weeks longer than Wanoga, according to the agency’s report. But it will probably still be several weeks behind Dutchman, Tinderholt said.

er literary works in Price’s find, but the discovery illuminates Whitman’s day-to-day life as a Washingtonian and a dedicated federal worker toiling with hundreds of others in the demanding post-war bureaucracy. Whitman lived in Washington for most of the decade from 1863 to 1873 — and is most famous as the national poet of the Civil War, and for his many visits to sick and wounded Union soldiers in Washington hospitals during the war. But he also worked — diligently, Price said Tuesday — in the Army Paymaster’s Office, the Department of the Interior and the Attorney General’s office. Price began unearthing the writings during research in 2008 and 2009. “Although Whitman is not the official author of these documents, in most cases, they definitely passed through his mind and his fingertips,” Ferriero said during the public announcement of the find at the main Archives building in downtown Washington. “They shed light on Whitman’s post-war poetry and his cultural criticism,” he said. Whitman, then 44, a striking, dapper man with a full gray beard and light eyes, came to Washington from Brooklyn, where he lived, in 1862 after his brother, George, was wounded in the Battle of Fredricksburg. George turned to be only slightly injured, and the poet, deeply moved by the plight of the sick and wounded, decided to stay on in the capital to visit the hospitals, work and write. He sat often at the bedside of ill and dying soldiers, comforting them, writing letters home to their families, and dispensing “oranges, stationary, small amounts of cash, candy, bread pudding and love,” Price said.

The comment period starts Friday and runs for 45 days. To comment, write to Shane Jeffries, District Ranger, Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District, 1230 N.E. Third St., Suite A-262, Bend, OR 97701, send a fax to (541) 383-4700, or e-mail comments-pacificnorthwestdeschutes-bend-ftrock@fs.fed.us.

It’s also a spot to add trails for people who ski with their dogs, she said, although the agency still needs to figure out how those trails would be maintained and groomed. A new parking lot would increase the capacity of sno-parks along the Cascade Lakes Highway by about 20 percent, according to the draft report. It probably wouldn’t attract more people to the area, Tinderholt said, but would provide space for people who currently park illegally and also have room to absorb future growth in Central Oregon’s population. The issue of building a new sno-park, instead of expanding Dutchman or looking at other alternatives, is a contentious one, she said, and the Forest Service expects to get many comments. Pieter Van Gelderen, with the Moon Country Snowmobilers, said that while Kapka’s a good concept, he thinks it will lead to more conflict between different groups. The snowmobile trails and the dog-friendly trails overlap, and both funnel through a tight underpass, while the Nordic ski connector and a different snowmobile trail would have to share a culvert under the road as well. “They keep talking about conflict,” Van Gelderen said. “What I’m scared of is they’re setting up a condition where it breeds conflict.” He’s pushing for the “no change” alternative, he said, with the idea instead of expanding the Dutchman Sno-park, which has the best snow and already has a small parking lot on the site. An online petition to do that, he noted, has hundreds of signatures. Linda Frost, president of the Central Oregon Nordic Club, said she’s concerned about a communal tunnel with skiers and snowmobilers as well, but thinks the Kapka proposal can be tweaked to make it work. It would be nice to have another Nordic skiing area in the area, she said, and new parking would be welcome. “We need more parking for the snowmobilers up higher,” she said. “Wanoga is a long ways away.” Kate Ramsayer can be reached at 541-617-7811 or at kramsayer@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from A1 “On this milestone in American history, we remember the great cost of the unity and liberty we now enjoy, causes for which so many have laid down their lives,” the statement released by the White House said. Alluding to the war’s ultimate end in 1865, Obama added: “When the guns fell silent and the fate of our Nation was secured, blue and gray would unite under one flag and the institution of slavery would be forever abolished from our land.” “We are the United States of America — we have been tested, we have repaired our Union, and we have emerged stronger,” his proclamation added. Of about 1,200 people attending two main commemorative events, only a handful were black. One man whose Confederate ancestor is credited with firing the first shot of the war acknowledged his family legacy as a “mixed blessing.” “I think it signifies the mood of the nation. I think we’re much more sensitive to other people and the diversity in this country,” said Linda Marshall, a 58-year-old registered nurse from Charleston as she waited for the second beam of light as dawn creeped up. A little over two hours later, as a red sun rose on James Island across the harbor, Confederate re-enactors fired an authentic 1847 seacoast mortar, signaling about 30 other cannons ringing the harbor. Those cannons quickly thumped and smoke rose in a re-enactment of the Sumter bombardment. In a dispatch to The Associated Press in 1861, an unnamed correspondent observed the fort’s parapets crumbling under the pounding of artillery. He wrote of gun emplacements being “shot away” and shells falling “thick and fast.” “The ball has opened. War

C. Aluka Berry / McClathcy-Tribune News Service

Dale Smith, 60, of Johnsonville, S.C., holds a Confederate flag as he views Fort Sumter from downtown Charleston, waiting for canons to mark the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War on Tuesday. is inaugurated ... Fort Sumter has returned the fire and brisk cannonading has been kept up,” the dispatch said. Sumter fell after a 34-hour bombardment. One of those on hand on James Island was John Hugh Farley of Roswell, Ga. Many historians credit Farley’s ancestor, Lt. Henry Farley, as firing the first shot at Sumter. “It’s a real big honor. We are very proud of our family,” said Farley, who had two other ancestors fight for the South. “It certainly is a mixed blessing because it’s bringing back a memory from way back but it also helps us to look at history and learn from history.” Later in the morning, Danny Lucas, 53 and black, was walking out after visiting Charleston’s Old Slave Mart Museum, where the history of Charleston’s role as an urban slave trading center is recounted. “I have no problem with the Civil War being honored as long as it is inclusive,” said Lucas, a Ridgeland, S.C. resident. “I don’t think whites should be so de-

fensive and I don’t think blacks should feel they are unwelcome to these kinds of things. I think it will fade over time.” Lucas does think last December’s secession ball in Charleston, during which South Carolina’s leaving the Union was commemorated, may have soured some blacks on the 150th events. “The secession ball discouraged them because in their minds, they saw the ball as a celebration,” he said. With other events they may decide “I’m not going to go because there will be a whole lot of rebel yelling and carrying on.” “In this moment of remembrance, let us all do the tough truth telling necessary for our nation to finally heal from the sins of slavery and fratricide,” said Benjamin Todd Jealous, the president and chief executive officer of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in a statement released by the civil rights group. “Commemorative events must neither ignore slavery as the principal cause of the Civil War, nor romanticize those who

fought to keep African Americans in slavery,” he said. “This is a time for the nation to reflect and repent, not ignore - let alone celebrate - the atrocities that tore our country apart.” State Sen. Glenn McConnell, president pro tempore of the South Carolina Senate and a Civil War re-enactor, told the audience of about 700 on James Island that the effects of the war are still being felt. “The War Between the States triggered generations of disputes and controversies between regions, races and cultures,” he said. “Why was the war fought? Was it about slavery or states’ rights? What does the Confederate battle flag stand for? Is it a symbol of bigotry or a memorial to the valor of fallen soldiers,” he asked about 700 people gathered at a ceremony commemorating the first shots of the war. “Many of the emotional issues still rage.” He said the South has moved on and “the time has come to move beyond the petty disputes of the past.”


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At Work Time for spring cleaning at the workplace, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Oregon jobless rate declines in March PORTLAND — The Oregon unemployment rate declined slightly in March to 10 percent, advancing a recent trend and pushing the rate to the lowest level in more than two years. The seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment rate in Oregon has been stuck between 10 percent and 11 percent for more than a year but has been nudging downward. It fell from 10.2 percent in February to the lowest point since hitting 9.9 percent in January 2009. The national rate was 8.8 percent for March. The slight improvement in the overall jobless rate for Oregon was offset by the loss of about 2,500 jobs in March. The state had gained 9,700 jobs in February. “Oregon job growth took a breather in March after five months of solid gains,” state employment economist Nick Beleiciks said Tuesday.

Small-business confidence drops WASHINGTON — Confidence among small companies fell to a five-month low in March, dampened by a deteriorating outlook for sales, profits and the economy, a private survey found. The National Federation of Independent Business’s optimism index decreased to 91.9, the Washington-based group said Tuesday in a statement. February’s reading of 94.5 was the highest since the recession began in December 2007.

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How Central Oregon drivers are coping with costlier gas As prices near $4, many carpooling, consolidating trips, considering hybrids By Jordan Novet The Bulletin

However indirectly, uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa are impacting Bend drivers. The unrest isn’t the only cause of rising gas prices in the United States, but it does seem to be influencing the primary one: speculators’ and traders’ concerns about oil supply, said Larry Kimmel, vice president of Bend Oil. On Tuesday, though, Kimmel pointed out, an analyst with Goldman Sachs said supplies are “adequate.” Even so, gas prices are now close to $4 a gallon around the country, a mark they surpassed in summer 2008. They could cause Americans to spend less

The Bulletin / Pete Erickson

“Two and a half gallons of gas for $10, that’s insane,” said Marls Green, 60 and from east of Bend, after filling up the tank of his Honda motorcycle at the Stop & Go Mini Mart Shell station in east Bend on Tuesday. and thereby slow down a recovery of the American economy, economists have said, according to media reports. At the Stop and Go Mini Mart Shell, at the corner of East 27th

Street and U.S. Highway 20 in Bend on Tuesday, several people filling up their vehicles’ gas tanks shared their ways of trying to save money at the pump. At the station on Tuesday,

regular gas cost $3.89 a gallon. The average price for a gallon of gas in Bend is $3.85 — a few cents more than Tuesday’s national average of $3.79, and almost a dollar more than the national average cost this time last year, $2.86 — according to AAA. A station in Bakersfield, Calif., was asking for $4.49 a gallon on Tuesday, and, according to a “Good Morning America” segment that aired Tuesday on ABC, a gas station in Orlando, Fla., was charging $5.59 a gallon. Not every customer at the Stop and Go Mini Mart Shell in Bend said they were feeling pressure from the rising gas prices. “It could be worse,” said customer Wendy Sutherland of east Bend. “I definitely want to try not to drive as much, but, I mean, if you have to go somewhere, you have to go somewhere.” Other customers made similar comments. See Gas / B5

Some last-minute tax help

The U.S. service sector, which employs about 90 percent of the workforce, decreased in March for the first time in seven months Seasonally adjusted 60 58

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

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end residents Barbara and John Stead, both 66, get help with their taxes Tuesday from AARP volunteer Bill Mergel, 68, of Bend, at the Bend Senior Center, 1600 Southeast Reed Market Road. Mergel said he has been volunteering to help with taxes for the past 15 years. The

deadline for filing taxes was extended by three days this year, to Monday, April 18, because the Emancipation Day holiday in Washington, D.C., falls on April 15. Taxpayers who cannot file their tax returns by the due date may file a form by April 18 for an automatic six-month extension. For

By Kevin G. Hall

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McClatchy-Tribune News Service

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54 52 50 2010

2011

Non-manufacturing index monitors service industries such as construction, retail, banking and travel. A reading below 50 indicates contraction. Source: Institute for Supply Management AP

Work begins on Warm Springs’ new telecom hub By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

The long wait for telephone service for an estimated 62 percent of residents of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation may soon be over. On Tuesday, a crowd of about 80 people showed up to celebrate the groundbreaking for construction of a new tribal communications center that will serve as the hub for a new tribal telecommunications system, including towers and other equipment needed to extend telephone and broadband Internet services to all residences and businesses on the reservation, according to Jeff Anspach, chief executive officer of Warm Springs Teleco. Anspach said many reservations across the country have been left decades behind the rest of rural America by the lack of telephone and Internet service, but with a $5.4 million combination 50 percent grant and 50 percent loan from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs plan to propel their phone and Internet communications systems into the 21st century. He said the tribes began advancing money from their own funds to begin some initial work on outside telecommunications infrastructure after the grant/ loan award was originally announced in August. See telecom / B5

New York Times News Service

As rest of economy builds up momentum, housing still struggling to find its footing

Non-manufacturing index

$40.058 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.546

By Sam Grobart and Evelyn M. Rusli

more information on extensions, visit www.irs.gov/formspubs/article/0,,id=98155,00.html.

Service sector growth slows

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Cisco shuts down Flip, its video camera unit

Tyco said to be target of takeover A French conglomerate, Schneider Electric, has begun takeover talks with Tyco International, according to people briefed on the matter, in what could be one of the biggest deals this year. A sale of Tyco would bring a conclusion to a once-sprawling empire with a troubled history, including accounting scandals in the last decade that led to the convictions of its former chief executive, Dennis Kozlowski, and former chief financial officer, Mark Swartz. The deal talks are an outgrowth of Schneider’s having studied potential acquisitions in the United States for several months. But the discussions are in early stages and may still fall apart, these people cautioned, speaking on the condition of anonymity because the talks were intended to be confidential. — From staff and wire reports

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WASHINGTON — Many sectors of the U.S. economy are showing heartening signs of growth: employment, international trade, manufacturing and professional services among them. Then there’s the miserable housing sector. It’s still missing from the list of positives, still a net drag on the U.S. economic recovery. Where’s the bottom? Four years into the housing crisis, specialists still aren’t sure if we’re on our way up or still have further to drop. Mark Zandi, the chief economist for forecaster Moody’s Analytics, expects a bot-

tom in home prices next year and recovery thereafter. “House prices will bottom out by year’s end as the market works through a bulge of distressed sales,” Zandi said. “Sales, construction and prices will be recovering in earnest by this time next year.” That’s too soon for Mark Vitner, a senior economist at Wells Fargo Securities in Charlotte, N.C. He doesn’t see the housing market returning to normal until 2016. Yes, five more years. “If you assume we’re adding 2.8 million people a year (to the U.S. population); 1.35 million new homes a year. Tear down 200,000 a year ... we don’t get to a normal

year until 2016, really,” Vitner said. Even when home prices stop sliding in much of the country, or sales by distressed borrowers level off, there’s a whole other wave of pent-up sellers waiting on the sidelines. “You’ve had a lot of people who’ve held homes off the market because they don’t want to compete with foreclosures. It’s likely to be a buyer’s market for awhile, mainly because there are so many homes on the market and there is still a limited supply of qualified buyers,” Vitner said. “The supply of buyers is being limited by high unemployment and the large number of people with homes they can’t sell.” See Housing / B5

It was one of the great tech startup success stories of the past decade. The Flip video camera, conceived by a few entrepreneurs in an office above Gump’s department store in San Francisco, went on sale in 2007 and quickly dominated the camcorder market. The startup sold 2 million of the pocket-size, easy-to-use cameras in the first two years. Then, in 2009, the founders cashed out and sold to Cisco Systems, the computer networking giant, for $590 million. On Tuesday, Cisco announced it was shutting down its Flip video camera division. Even in the life cycle of the tech world, this is fast. See Flip / B2

Flip video cameras were wildly successful when Cisco Systems bought the startup in 2009. Now, just two years later, Cisco is killing the Flip division. The Associated Press ile photo


B USI N ESS

B2 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Risk of soil erosion is up on farmland Push to plant more, changing weather patterns to blame, scientists say

By Barry Meier New York Times News Service

By William Neuman New York Times News Service

When prices for corn and soybeans surged last fall, Bill Hammitt, a farmer in the fertile hill country of western Iowa, began to see the bulldozers come out, clearing steep hillsides of trees and pastureland to make way for more acres of the state’s staple crops. Now, as spring planting begins, with the chance of drenching rains, Hammitt worries that such steep ground is at high risk for soil erosion — a farmland scourge that feels as distant to most Americans as tales of the Dust Bowl and Woody Guthrie ballads. Long in decline, erosion is once again rearing as a threat because of an aggressive push to plant on more land, changing weather patterns and inadequate enforcement of protections, scientists and environmentalists say. “There’s a lot of land being converted into row crop in this area that never has been farmed before,” said Hammitt, 59, explaining that the bulldozed land was too steep and costly to farm to be profitable in years of ordinary prices. “It brings more highly erodible land into production because they’re out to make more money on every acre.” Now, research by scientists at Iowa State University provides evidence that erosion in some parts of the state is occurring at levels far beyond government estimates. It is being exacerbated, they say, by severe storms, which have occurred more often in recent years, possibly because of broader climate shifts. “The thing that’s really smacking us now are the high-intensity, high-volume rainstorms that we’re getting,” said Richard Cruse, an agronomy professor at Iowa State who directs the Iowa Daily Erosion Project. “In a variety of locations, we’re losing topsoil considerably faster — 10 to as much as 50 times faster — than it’s forming.”

Combating erosion Erosion can do major damage to water quality, silting streams and lakes and dumping fertilizers and pesticides into the water supply. Fertilizer runoff is responsible for a vast “dead zone,” an oxygen-depleted region where little or no sea life can exist, in the Gulf of Mexico. And because it washes away rich topsoil, erosion can threaten crop yields. Significant gains were made in combating erosion in the 1980s and early 1990s, as the federal government began to require that farmers receiving agricultural subsidies carry out individually tailored soil conservation plans. Those plans often included measures such as terracing steep ground or sowing buffer strips with perennial grasses to stabilize areas prone to erosion, such

Flip Continued from B1 From the outset, the acquisition was an odd fit for Cisco, which is known for its enterprise networking services. To some analysts, the decision to shutter Flip was an admission by Cisco that it made a mistake. “Cisco was swayed by the sexiness of selling to the consumer,” said Mo Koyfman, a principal at Spark Capital, a Boston venture capital firm. “They’re not wired to do it themselves, so they do it by acquisition. Flip was one of the most visible targets out there. But it’s really hard to turn an elephant into a horse. Cisco’s an elephant.” But the rapid rise, and now demise, of Flip is also a vivid illustration of the ferocious metabolism of the consumer marketplace and of the smartphone’s power to destroy other gadgets. “It was unusually fast,” said Brent Bracelin, an analyst with Pacific Crest Securities. “It’s a testament to the pace of innovation in consumer electronics and smartphone technology. More and more functionality is being integrated into smartphones.” The rapid innovation of smartphones, he said, is “one of the most disruptive trends we’ve seen.” As newer and faster technologies beget newer and faster tech-

Watchdog: FDA lenient on risky medical devices

Mark Kegans / New York Times News Service

Bill Hammitt, a farmer who is on the board of the Harrison County Soil and Water Conservation District, walks along the top of a berm on his farm near Portsmouth, Iowa. as the edges of fields near streams or borders between crops. Many farmers, such as Hammitt, who is on the board of the Harrison County soil and water conservation district, also do little or no plowing and leave crop residues on harvested fields, techniques that reduce runoff. But environmentalists claim that enforcement of conservation plans by the U.S. Department of Agriculture is not as strict as it should be and that the gains in fighting erosion have stalled or are being undercut. USDA data show that the amount of farmland erosion nationwide from water fell substantially from the early 1980s to the mid-1990s, then largely stagnated. Enforcement is needed more than ever, environmentalists say, because high crop prices provide a strong incentive for farmers to plant as much ground as possible and to take fewer protective measures like grass buffer strips.

Other factors Other factors are also at work. Farmers increasingly rent the land they cultivate, which can mean they are less familiar with areas at risk for erosion or are less invested in caring for the land over the long run. In addition, farmers using modern supersize tractors, built to efficiently cover swaths of land, can find it inconvenient to break up land into smaller sections through buffer areas or terraces. Widely used herbicides can kill the grass in buffer strips, leaving them more vulnerable to erosion. And government biofuels policies that have increased the demand for corn have encouraged farmers to plant more. “You’ve got all these market forces and public policies and biofuel mandates and more severe storms,” said Craig Cox, senior vice president of the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group that will release a report on erosion Wednesday. “It’s all coming together, and we’re asleep at the switch.” Cox said that he flew over parts of

“Cisco was swayed by the sexiness of selling to the consumer. They’re not wired to do it themselves, so they do it by acquisition. … But it’s really hard to turn an elephant into a horse. Cisco’s an elephant.” — Mo Koyfman, a principal at Spark Capital, a Boston venture capital firm. nologies, consumers move on to the next big thing with alacrity. In four years, Flip has gone from startup, to dominant camcorder maker, to defunct. It took IBM about four years just to reach dominance with its PC in the early 1980s. The iPad is only one year old. Just as the Flip was reaching its zenith, the smartphone was gaining traction among consumers. With its versatility in recording video and still images, as well as its ability to perform myriad other functions, the smartphone has since proved to be a far more desirable product than a singlefunction device like the Flip. At the same time, the smartphone has crushed the market for

Iowa in a helicopter last spring after a severe storm and found that deep gullies had formed in unprotected farmland, becoming conduits for soil runoff. Farmers frequently level off such gullies after harvesting in the fall, he said, and then replant the same low-lying areas year after year, leaving them susceptible to further erosion. Thomas Christensen, an Agriculture Department regional conservationist, disagreed, saying, “Conservation compliance is working,” and adding that improvements to its enforcement program were in the works. Last year, however, the agency reviewed fewer than 1 percent of the tracts nationwide that it considered highly erodible to make sure that farmers were following conservation plans. About 1 percent of those reviewed were found to be in violation. But the new federal budget deal cuts 12 percent from the agency’s conservation spending, which could hamper soil efforts. Agency officials said they were still assessing the impact.

is not on the brink of becoming a new Dust Bowl. Many farmers use good conservation practices, and the state’s rich topsoil in many areas is deep enough to last decades with moderate amounts of erosion. But agronomists say that heavy erosion in unprotected areas can significantly diminish crop yields, and, over time, land that is not well cared for can become depleted. That means farmers must use more fertilizer to increase yields. Erosion also does major harm to water quality. More than anything else this year, farmers are making decisions based on how they can best take advantage of corn and soybean prices, which have soared in recent months. Cruse said that creates a paradox. When crop prices are low and farmers are scraping by, many say they cannot afford to take steps to protect their fields from erosion. Now, he said, they say they still cannot afford it because there is too much profit to be made from farming every bit of land.

The Food and Drug Administration is allowing some highrisk devices like artificial hips to be sold without strenuous testing, despite promises that it would address regulatory issues affecting them, a federal watchdog group plans to testify today. The group, the Government Accountability Office, found that the FDA has taken some recent steps to determine if certain high-risk medical devices should undergo more testing before being sold. But in the meantime, it is continuing to approve dozens of such devices annually with scant review, exposing patients to risks. An official with the office is expected to give the testimony Wednesday at a hearing before the Senate Special Committee on Aging. The office will also present its preliminary findings of what it concluded were shortcomings in how the FDA oversees recalls of troubled devices.

U.S. trade deficit narrows, activity softens in February By Greg Robb MarketWatch

WASHINGTON — The trade of goods and services across U.S. borders softened in February, government data showed Tuesday, leading economists to forecast much weaker growth in the first quarter than previously expected. “Overall, these data provide further evidence that the economy has slowed,” said Paul Dales, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics. Imports of goods and services dropped by 1.7 percent to a seasonally adjusted $210.9

Grim picture The information from the Iowa Daily Erosion Project paints a grimmer picture than a recent assessment by federal officials. The USDA’s most recent National Resources Inventory, released last year, estimated that erosion in Iowa averaged 5.2 tons an acre each year. That was slightly higher than the 5 tons per acre that the department estimated was a tolerable annual rate of erosion for most Iowa soils, meaning that it allowed a high level of crop productivity to be maintained indefinitely. Last year, according to Erosion Project data analyzed by the Environmental Working Group, the average estimated rate of erosion exceeded the sustainable level in 133 Iowa townships. In 2009, an estimated 641 townships exceeded the sustainable rate, including nearly 400 that had double or more that rate. Despite the concerns, Iowa

GPS devices, put a serious dent in the point-and-shoot camera industry and threatens the existence of many other everyday devices — the wristwatch, the alarm clock and the portable music player. For technology entrepreneurs, the Flip story may be a cautionary tale of another sort. Many entrepreneurs look at Facebook’s ability to rebuff suitors as an inspiration to stay independent. But Flip’s founders were paid more than half a billion dollars for their invention from one of the most deep-pocketed companies in Silicon Valley, offering an alternate lesson in the fine art of cashing out at the right time. “There are a lot of young entrepreneurs who look at Flip as a huge success, and they should continue to,” said Jonathan Kaplan, a co-founder and former chief executive of the startup that invented the Flip. “The demise of Flip has nothing to do with how great a product it is. Companies have to make decisions that sometimes people like you and I don’t always understand.” Cisco said its decision to shut down the Flip division was part of an overall restructuring plan of its consumer business. “We are making key, targeted moves as we align operations in support of our network-centric platform strategy,” said John Chambers, Cisco’s chief executive, in a statement.

A spokeswoman for the FDA, Karen Riley, said that officials there had not seen the GAO testimony and so could not respond directly to it. She added that FDA officials planned to testify at the hearing. The panel is also expected to hear from patient advocates and industry representatives. Among other issues, the Senate hearing is expected to examine the approval and marketing of a now-recalled artificial hip sold by Johnson & Johnson known as the ASR, or Articular Surface Replacement. An article last December in The New York Times detailed how the medical products giant continued to sell the hip despite repeated reports by physicians abroad that it was faulty. The FDA permitted Johnson & Johnson to sell the artificial hip without conducting clinical trials. A few years after implant, it began disintegrating in patients, shedding metallic debris that has left some patients crippled.

bendbulletin.com/b boocoo

billion during February, while exports declined 1.4 percent to $165.1 billion, the Commerce Department estimated. The trade deficit — that is, the difference between exports and imports — narrowed to $45.8 billion for the month from an upwardly revised $47 billion in January, originally reported as $46.3 billion. The 2.6 percent decline in the deficit was much less than expected. Analysts surveyed by MarketWatch had expected the deficit to narrow to $42.9 billion. The trade deficit had widened by 16.7 percent in January.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 B3

A W Buyout offer? Weigh the ramifications By Sue Stock

Abraham Daye, a consultant, keeps up with his clients by e-mail and phone from his 12th-floor office at N.C. Mutual Life in Durham, N.C. He took a buyout from the firm in June.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

RALEIGH, N.C. — Two years ago, N.C. Mutual Life Insurance offered Abraham Daye an early retirement package. He turned it down. But when the company came back last year and asked again, Daye took the offer. It’s a situation thousands of workers will face as the economy remains shaky. Businesses of all sizes are looking to do more with less and trim their budgets. Early retirement buyouts are popular ways to prune staff. Depending on your situation, this opportunity could be devastating or exhilarating — an unwanted parting of ways or a chance to make a new beginning. But before you go signing an agreement for a buyout or early retirement package, consider more than what you will do with your days off. Workers should evaluate their personal finances, their worklife balance, the implications of such a move on their careers and the legal jargon within the agreement itself. We talked to experts — as well as someone who made the move — about the questions you should ask yourself and your company before you agree to walk out the door.

Money expert Oliver Pursche of Gary Goldberg Financial Services in New York • What’s the alternative? “Our personal experience is that those that have turned down buyouts often end up getting a worseoff deal within a year or two. ... When a company offers a buyout, it’s because they want to reduce the workforce, and if not enough people take it, then the layoffs start.” • How are your finances now?

Harry Lynch Raleigh News & Observer

Look at the sum of your savings and retirement accounts, plus whatever the buyout package will contribute. “If you’re used to living on $75,000 a year and your buyout is $100,000, and that ends up being all of your savings, then after taxes, that means you’ve got less than a year’s worth of expenses in hand.” • How much does it cost you to live? “Most people say, ‘We probably spend $350 on groceries and a couple hundred on cable and telephone,’ but they really don’t know. It’s really looking back and going through and really identifying how much life is costing you.” • What would an emergency do to your finances? “It’s very easy to say, ‘I live on $40,000 a year and I have $100,000 in the bank, so I have at least two years of living expenses,’ ” he said. “But what if you get sick? What if the roof collapses and needs to be replaced?” • How will your budget change? “If you have a long commute, you no longer have it. But the flip side of that is, if you happen to live down the street from your office or just down the road,

you have to think in terms of what happens if my next job is 20 minutes away? What does that do to my budget?” Also, “Itemize all of your expenses, including the things you get for free at the office and maybe take for granted that you won’t be getting for free anymore.”

Legal expert William Joseph Austin Jr., attorney with Ward & Smith of Raleigh • What is your standing in the company? Think about the reasons that you may have been selected for the offer. Think about anything you may have done or any incident that would make your employer want to eliminate you or your position. This doesn’t necessarily mean you’re going to file a lawsuit, but it’s an important question to ask yourself. • What are your rights? Under the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, an employer with more than 100 full-time workers must file a notice with state regulators and give workers 60 days’ notice of a

Sp ring cleaning at the workplace aids productivity, pride, perception By Patricia Kitchen Newsday

MELVILLE, N.Y. — When it came time to deliver the news to his staff about cleaning up their workspace, John Caracciolo decided to get down and dirty: “You’ve got to part with your stuff,” the president and chief executive of JVC Broadcasting Co. told his 45 employees. JVC’s Ronkonkoma, N.Y., office, home of four radio stations, had become a home to stacks of papers, broken equipment, band memorabilia and, Caracciolo said, “Girl Scout cookies from every troop on Long Island.” It was “purge week,” Caracciolo said shortly after he filled his own wastebasket with years’ worth of outdated business cards. “So yes, we are ordering a Dumpster and decluttering our stations.” Two full Dumpsters later, he reported his office being “lean and mean right now.” Indeed, at this time of year that urge to tackle home closets, drawers and dark spaces under the sink can spill over to spring cubicle cleaning, said Lorraine Kimmey, a professional organizer in Blue Point, N.Y. There’s a certain energy at this time of year, she said. “It’s about making a renewal.” For Caracciolo, 46, it’s “the feeling we all get when the first sunny day hits. You want to start new and fresh and get ready for a busy second and third quarter.” While her desk may still be “a work in progress,” Donna KolbLaukaitis, 50, senior account executive, said she spent time over the weekend organizing and clearing the stacks of folders and papers, relocating them to the new file cabinet she’s had since late January. “We’re so busy,” she said. “It’s a good problem.” Certainly, there is a value to digging out — improved productivity, pride in your space, a diminished chance of rodents and worse. The state of your cubicle can also affect how you’re perceived by the boss. A telephone survey last fall of more than 516 human resources professionals found 83 percent

Randee Daddona / Newsday

Tiffany Beatrice, foreground, works at her computer as co-workers Cat Sodano, from left, Natalie Matyka, Morgan Kolb and Jan Miller participate in spring cleaning at the offices of JVC Broadcasting in Long Island, New York. said people’s professional images are greatly or somewhat affected by the state of their desks, according to the research by staffing firm OfficeTeam in Menlo Park, Calif. One factor in the accumulation of office clutter is a lack of downtime in which to sort, evaluate and purge, said Chris Campisi, metro market manager for Long Island with staffing firm Robert Half International, of which OfficeTeam is a division. It’s fine if you

have an administrative assistant to help keep things organized, he said. But most people “don’t have that luxury.” Jim Dreeben, 70, owner of Peconic Paddler in Riverhead, N.Y., said he and a friend started a major cleanup process March 30 as Dreeben shifted focus from his winter snowplowing business to the sale and rental of kayaks, canoes, paddles. In the end, he says, the shop “looks pretty classy.”

plant closure or mass layoff. Older workers may also be protected by the Older Workers Benefit Protection Act, which requires employers to provide a breakdown of the ages of employees being terminated and their jobs. • What does the agreement say? Don’t blindly sign. Make sure you know what will happen with “nickel and dime” issues like your accrued vacation time, any paid holidays you are due, etc. “Anything that has accrued to your benefit that is not subject to written forfeiture should be addressed,” Austin said. • Do you qualify for unemployment benefits? In most cases, employees who take a voluntary separation package can apply for unemployment benefits. However, you will not be able to get benefits until your severance package runs out.

Career expert John O’Connor of Career Pro in Raleigh • What benefits come with the package? In some cases, you may be able to keep your health insur-

ance for a period after you leave the company. If the agreement doesn’t specifically state this, try to negotiate for it. Or, you may be able to pay a certain amount to remain on your company’s plan. If all else fails, find out when you will become eligible for COBRA, which allows you to temporarily continue your health benefits under group rates. • What if you come back? Many companies will rehire former employees or hire them as contractors after a buyout. If you think this is likely, ask about the ramifications of coming back to work for the company. Will you have to pay back part of the buyout package? • Do you have a plan? If you are not retiring and plan to seek a new job, make a proactive plan about what you will do with your time off. It’s all about your attitude, behavior and how productive you can show your employer that you’ve been during that time period.

Work and life expert Sylvia Hackett, vice president of human resources, Rex Healthcare • How will this impact me psychologically? Understand that taking a buyout is more than just cleaning out your desk and walking out the door. “You may be disconnected from people who have been a big part of your life and your career,” she said. “You need to think about what that means emotionally.” • What kind of support can I get? Your employer may offer counseling or assistance for departing employees. If it’s offered, use it. If not, seek counseling. Or you may be able to find a support group for workers in a similar situation. “That’s doubly good because such groups also serve as a resource and a network for future career opportunities,” she said.

• How can I keep upbeat? “If you are healthy, working out regularly, eating well — don’t change that,” she said. “A lot of times your work environment supports those things. It’s important not to put those things aside.”

Time and money For most folks who take these offers, the two top concerns are having enough money and figuring out what they will do with their spare time. Dianne Dunlap took a buyout from Cisco in 2009. The hardest thing for her was figuring out how much she and her husband actually spend each month and keeping spending under control on a more limited income. “After retirement, I had to think about things like, this is how much I have coming in and this is how much cash I can take out of the bank, and how much I can afford to put on my credit card,” said Dunlap, 58, of Raleigh. “I never really thought about what I was spending before.” Abraham Daye’s No. 1 fear — that he would be bored in retirement — turned out to be unwarranted. Shortly after he accepted the early retirement package, N.C. Mutual Life offered him a parttime consulting job. He now works three days a week and spends the rest of his time fishing, doing yardwork and “doing all those things I’ve been wanting to do for the last 30 years.” His best advice to folks trying to make a decision: Take the full amount of time you are given to review your options and think about your decision. “Having 30 days to think about it really helped,” he said. “I was able to weigh all the situations and go through a lot of scenarios. If I’d only have had a week, that would have been really frightening.”


B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd ADA-ES AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh Accenture AccretvH n Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity Acxiom Adecaog n AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAmer AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl AeroViron AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa AlexBld AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliHlthC AlliancOne AllnceRes AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AldIrish rs AlldNevG AlldWldA AllosThera AllscriptH Allstate AllyFn pfB AlmadnM g AlonUSA AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina AmBev s Amarin Amazon AmbasInt rs Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAssets n AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AmIntlGrp AmLorain AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Amrign Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry AnglogldA ABInBev AnikaTh Anixter Ann Inc Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGM n ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldMatl AMCC Approach AquaAm ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet AsburyA AscenaRtl AscentSol AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlPwr g AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Augusta g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autobytel Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay

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D 3.76 -.19 1.00 41.30 -.64 5.13 -.04 18.05 -.04 33.21 -.71 0.92 27.96 -.05 2.21 -.04 0.92 36.30 +.14 0.84 17.50 -.77 1.17 -.02 0.64 27.27 -.02 1.97 36.98 -.11 36.83 -.13 0.56 8.95 -.27 1.82 100.26 -2.42 1.82 82.96 -2.51 49.50 -.60 .93 -.02 50.17 -.55 0.42 45.30 -1.37 8.93 117.79 -4.09 4.75 -.23 1.50 46.72 -.11 0.18 19.15 -.11 30.81 -1.35 140.71 -4.97 0.60 67.55 -1.76 0.28 36.03 -.25 2.14 -.10 37.58 -.99 1.36 61.83 -2.28 0.56 12.60 0.82 20.40 -.25 0.79 12.36 -.02 0.70 11.53 -.04 3.29 89.29 -1.59 0.44 15.67 -.14 0.04 13.47 -.02 7.73 -.04 2.48 -.07 1.80 47.64 +.04 1.04 2.13 +.08 2.80 64.31 -.62 0.52 29.96 -.18 2.08 59.68 -.95 0.04 2.34 +.03 51.11 -.99 27.97 -.91 58.17 -.93 54.17 -1.74 2.03 26.14 -.05 0.35 19.86 -.04 28.92 +.27 56.54 +.57 0.72 100.50 +.14 9.02 -.36 0.32 20.68 -.27 0.48 52.34 -.74 23.69 -1.70 1.24 54.32 +.04 2.40 58.48 -1.49 1.77 +.03 21.86 +.26 4.45 -.05 0.10 6.39 +.06 0.76 83.02 +.01 1.64 81.37 -.13 54.06 +.05 8.14 -.16 0.96 31.90 -.30 16.55 -.66 0.28 31.72 -.14 81.68 -.58 0.30 48.55 -2.45 0.60 30.39 +.03 43.24 -.21 40.08 -1.10 2.39 +.12 .70 -.01 78.19 -.36 0.05 6.08 -.08 25.01 -.17 0.80 18.30 +.03 1.93 -.08 7.57 +.33 1.28 9.95 -.12 5.50 194.78 -1.17 0.32 4.08 0.98 8.76 -.02 1.09 15.09 -.20 0.40 18.10 +.10 0.60 17.31 -.09 26.25 -1.06 2.08 32.17 +.10 1.68 73.08 -.68 0.40 8.61 -.09 1.23 -.08 72.06 -2.25 0.04 6.93 -.08 2.00 94.44 -.33 7.10 -.12 8.87 -.23 0.60 11.74 -.13 1.65 20.82 -.23 15.99 -.46 0.44 22.35 -.25 32.41 -1.41 10.43 -.11 1.53 -.04 0.56 23.75 +.26 1.32 27.44 +.04 3.66 82.00 +.01 0.36 38.10 -1.21 0.60 22.83 -.05 42.24 -.56 1.30 -.03 5.70 -.16 9.69 -.81 26.21 -.26 0.52 31.62 -.44 1.24 22.75 -.15 0.56 18.63 +.09 0.34 10.29 -.06 12.60 -.33 0.32 26.14 -.34 0.28 12.62 -.08 1.28 69.53 +1.76 19.95 -.11 0.05 24.15 -.56 3.95 61.29 -.96 0.20 24.72 -.86 0.80 44.07 -.12 0.10 91.30 -.15 0.49 39.50 -2.27 54.97 +1.05 3.20 -.06 0.92 71.72 -.90 0.16 23.83 -.33 27.47 +.04 0.84 16.94 -.22 0.20 24.31 -.13 25.93 +.25 0.40 133.82 -1.61 34.06 -1.12 1.16 74.24 +.33 0.04 44.65 +.67 40.12 -.13 4.44 -.03 1.00 34.30 -.26 5.60 301.67 -2.33 0.84 18.93 +.03 45.06 -1.34 7.62 -.19 5.91 250.93 -7.58 0.26 13.15 -.26 1.04 75.37 -.84 0.61 23.04 +.13 0.34 9.39 -.08 21.09 -1.03 17.06 -.22 0.50 36.11 +.07 25.15 +.28 0.50 33.55 -.14 0.72 44.58 -.92 0.12 50.94 -1.43 8.72 -.26 9.65 -.11 7.25 -.01 0.60 8.73 -.03 0.63 9.60 -.07 16.80 +.40 19.77 -.14 0.04 6.74 -.13 6.70 -.24 16.04 -.15 1.90 20.70 -.46 1.37 -.13 1.96 56.89 +.42 0.40 28.24 -.71 52.85 -.69 1.16 33.73 +.40 3.48 86.42 -.84 1.30 73.73 -.02 0.36 46.07 -1.52 1.08 62.51 -.32 10.28 -.04 .51 -.02 42.59 +.37 0.20 51.62 +.12 3.69 -.14 0.04 7.03 -.01 0.30 11.23 +.01 0.26 5.30 1.52 12.75 -.12 1.80 -.05 0.80 127.54 -4.58 1.83 -.03 0.78 41.19 -.79 4.56 27.41 -.19 23.00 -.99 31.87 +.04 1.00 38.43 +.58 1.00 40.02 +.98 0.72 40.69 -.29 35.36 -.90 29.24 +.25 0.54 38.99 -.10 55.97 -.03 1.76 106.57 -2.50 0.04 17.08 -.17 42.19 -1.06 11.37 -.14 .66 -.02 0.20 44.17 -1.19 8.06 +.02 10.64 -.21 55.35 -.01 .40 -.01 3.77 31.20 -1.17 0.43 8.62 -.06 1.19 19.73 -.22 0.80 37.57 -1.53 32.02 -.13 0.79 17.23 -.09 1.56 15.50 -.40 10.43 -.47 21.31 -.39 0.01 22.21 -.47 18.33 -1.32 2.90 39.83 -.45

Nm Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChiArmM ChinAuto lf ChinaBiot ChinaCEd ChiCeram ChinaDir ChinaEd ChiGengM ChinGerui ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaLodg ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaSun ChinaTel ChinaUni ChiValve ChXDPlas ChiXFash n ChinaYuch ChiCache n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp Citigp wtB CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy Clearwire h ClevBioL h CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CogdSpen CogentC Cognex CognizTech CohStInfra CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColonyFncl ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompPrdS CompCrd h CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConsolCm ConEd ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Cosi Inc Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CreXus Crocs Crossh g rs CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubicEngy CubistPh Cummins Curis CurEuro CurJpn Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DPL DR Horton DSW Inc DTE DUSA DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s DeerConsu Deere DejourE g Delcath Delek Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DrxSOXBll

D 76.34 -.05 29.03 -.17 108.91 -.60 2.69 -.04 41.23 -.34 4.30 -.09 49.85 -.78 51.38 -.24 28.66 +.06 3.92 -.14 16.86 -.24 7.49 -.52 1.70 17.78 -.45 0.30 31.93 -1.41 2.88 104.18 -3.60 0.05 39.48 -1.30 0.20 14.80 -.19 52.75 +.31 0.66 3.89 -.04 2.00 -.20 9.70 -.98 7.54 -.02 5.46 -.46 4.38 -.49 1.25 -.05 1.17 -.05 3.05 -.15 5.20 2.57 -.10 1.98 -.17 0.91 57.10 -.57 20.90 +.20 1.93 46.59 -.25 5.74 -.21 3.83 -.24 3.16 103.35 -1.31 1.56 -.02 4.62 -.08 6.03 -.19 3.78 -.12 1.09 62.88 -2.78 0.23 18.59 -.12 3.99 -.01 4.36 -.21 4.40 -.05 29.54 -.77 16.11 -.86 274.30 +5.89 15.09 +.01 1.56 61.73 -.50 31.02 -.52 1.36 79.88 +.31 6.52 -.26 25.40 +.09 0.40 107.98 -5.17 2.68 -.07 1.60 32.47 -.53 0.84 19.73 -.24 0.49 29.91 -.13 17.88 -.63 0.24 17.44 -.03 4.55 +.02 .19 .85 73.65 -1.21 0.80 58.02 +.15 2.32 -.08 15.98 -.15 5.96 +.01 7.88 -.04 0.56 93.36 -3.64 30.85 +.30 2.20 70.14 +.20 21.31 -.26 0.60 52.08 +1.15 14.18 -.02 1.88 66.90 -.50 0.48 27.62 34.61 -.97 0.40 5.75 -.01 14.13 -.59 0.32 28.25 -.28 79.92 -.58 1.44 17.80 -.09 0.72 9.59 -.09 48.60 -.50 2.57 -.08 2.32 82.54 +.93 21.40 -.37 0.60 18.92 -.08 1.28 18.43 +.08 3.45 -.08 0.45 24.31 -.24 0.45 22.91 -.23 0.40 38.44 +.25 0.48 16.42 -.06 2.00 26.18 -.01 31.48 +5.59 37.94 -1.11 0.41 41.81 -.72 28.27 -.66 4.94 -1.68 0.80 48.72 -.47 10.96 -.13 28.53 -.95 1.00 28.82 -.29 0.40 37.83 +.17 0.92 23.62 -.21 98.85 -4.23 54.99 -.05 2.38 2.64 77.16 -2.96 0.40 48.89 -1.45 1.55 18.63 -.08 2.40 49.97 -.25 21.60 +.08 0.96 32.92 -.26 65.73 -2.16 14.01 -.03 .22 -.03 0.06 72.50 -.08 1.16 66.16 -.43 0.42 24.74 +.46 2.30 35.56 44.29 -.10 0.46 27.94 -.52 1.00 95.21 -1.68 17.83 -.09 4.42 -.17 0.56 52.58 +1.72 0.20 19.18 -.42 1.65 34.85 +.33 23.94 -.07 11.74 -.26 1.30 +.05 0.82 76.45 +.25 8.66 +.01 0.18 8.34 -.04 60.36 -.24 0.30 16.96 -.30 32.03 +.40 0.80 52.48 -.47 4.15 +.08 0.88 48.62 +1.15 1.95 98.50 -2.42 34.94 +.54 1.40 44.63 -.15 0.32 3.15 +.01 42.98 -.63 0.74 10.91 +.02 18.19 -.41 1.08 -.03 0.32 9.53 -.13 42.48 -.37 38.03 -.01 .13 44.63 -.62 .60 -.03 29.70 -.08 1.05 105.72 -1.70 3.85 -.08 0.01 144.20 +.49 117.93 +1.26 1.30 -.06 51.45 -1.73 18.02 -.69 2.40 11.94 -.10 0.50 53.33 -1.47 1.53 -.02 8.09 +.45 0.28 5.39 -.01 0.40 4.55 -.17 1.33 27.30 -.12 0.15 11.66 -.05 42.77 -.68 2.24 48.35 -.38 5.75 17.10 -.18 0.08 51.60 -.13 1.28 46.86 +.17 15.23 86.44 -.19 0.24 53.22 -.79 10.08 -.19 87.86 -.62 0.20 7.59 +.52 1.40 93.45 -1.54 .42 -.01 7.26 +.08 0.15 13.29 +.07 14.70 +.10 9.90 +.47 .87 -.01 1.00 26.92 -.31 21.09 -1.24 22.42 -.90 38.57 +.09 2.25 -.17 4.01 -.05 0.20 36.12 -.48 8.35 -.23 0.93 61.01 -.39 14.33 -.90 44.12 -.63 7.50 +.11 0.16 13.27 -.11 0.68 85.98 -3.26 4.05 -.09 2.46 77.09 -.88 0.18 60.63 +.54 0.50 76.08 -2.67 0.32 10.41 -.36 11.67 -.12 15.19 -.33 40.66 -.32 1.12 34.56 -.62 2.72 57.01 +.27 36.32 -.18 28.42 +.14 0.16 42.52 -.18 33.08 +.08 46.48 -.05 1.35 44.75 -1.24 37.58 +1.40 40.06 +.49 36.54 +.83 0.84 40.93 -2.40 22.16 +.55 14.99 +.05 15.26 +1.27 0.01 52.98 -3.46

Nm

D

DirEMBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscLab rs DishNetwk Disney DocuSec DolbyLab DoleFood DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad DuoyGWat DurectCp DyaxCp Dycom DyntrCp h Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

0.39 0.16 0.05 0.24

0.40

1.97 1.00 0.52 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 1.44

1.08

Nm 17.90 30.25 44.83 63.03 81.95 81.41 77.23 24.06 40.01 35.66 1.86 23.28 41.63 3.42 50.27 13.68 20.68 31.81 67.95 55.96 43.60 17.87 86.37 59.06 19.36 1.07 2.87 18.81 64.47 36.96 38.67 7.85 27.48 50.22 4.62 72.46 3.84 4.79 53.75 22.85 17.99 13.69 81.13 3.32 3.27 1.71 15.35 1.62 2.56 5.66 9.72

+.94 -.42 -1.43 -.36 -3.23 -1.96 -7.58 -.06 -.21 -.03 -.03 -.19 -.26 -.40 -.48 +.03 +.23 +.18 -.05 -.11 -.38 -.01 +.51 -1.63 -.11 -.04 -.01 -.02 -.53 -.80 +.52 -.22 +.07 -2.13 -.02 -2.69 +.01 -.06 -1.10 -.19 -.17 +.02 +.08 +.21 -.23 +.01 -.62 -.10 -.08 -.26

E-F-G-H ECDang n 19.37 -.59 ETrade rs 15.80 -.09 eBay 30.70 -.49 ECAMTrI n 1.19 28.90 -1.81 EMC Cp 25.85 -.53 EMCOR 29.46 -.74 ENI 2.67 50.18 -.57 EOG Res 0.64 109.23 -3.44 EQT Corp 0.88 46.63 -1.90 ETF Pall 75.52 -1.72 EV Engy 3.04 52.94 -1.70 EagleBulk 3.70 -.07 EaglRkEn 0.60 10.23 -.03 ErthLink 0.20 8.07 +.01 EstWstBcp 0.04 22.35 -.13 EastChm 1.88 96.37 -1.35 EKodak 3.30 Eaton s 1.36 52.50 -1.08 EatnVan 0.72 32.60 -.30 EV LtdDur 1.25 15.74 -.03 EVRiskMgd 1.28 12.61 -.07 EV TxAG 1.23 14.99 -.14 EV TxDiver 1.16 10.97 -.07 EVTxMGlo 1.14 10.54 -.10 EVTxGBW 1.21 12.09 -.07 EVTxBWOp 1.33 12.73 -.09 Ebix Inc 22.19 -.20 EchelonC 8.66 -.23 Ecolab 0.70 50.78 -.52 Ecopetrol 1.16 39.66 -.81 EdisonInt 1.28 37.92 +1.13 EdwLfSci s 83.26 -.09 8x8 Inc 2.91 -.10 ElPasoCp 0.04 16.96 -.39 ElPasoPpl 1.76 36.26 -.32 Elan 7.43 -.19 EldorGld g 0.10 17.36 -.23 ElectArts 19.74 -.11 EFII 16.90 +.35 ElsterGp n 15.22 +.07 eMagin 8.09 -.54 Embraer 0.64 33.05 -.36 Emcore lf 2.20 -.05 EmersonEl 1.38 57.16 -.48 EmpirRst h .61 +.06 Emulex 10.02 -.16 Enbridge 1.96 61.68 -.45 EnCana g 0.80 32.85 -.46 EndvrInt rs 14.06 -.49 EndvSilv g 10.90 -.50 EndoPhrm 39.93 -1.13 Ener1 2.66 -.21 EnerNOC 17.71 -.43 Energen 0.54 59.90 -2.29 Energizer 69.98 -.21 EngyConv 2.04 -.04 EngyFocus .85 -.09 EngyPtrs 16.57 -.68 EnrgyRec 3.25 +.14 EngyTsfr 3.58 52.35 -.29 EngyXXI 33.80 -.90 EnergySol 5.36 -.10 Enerpls g 2.16 30.67 -1.02 Enersis 0.61 20.64 -.23 EnerSys 36.54 -1.17 ENSCO 1.40 56.25 -1.25 Entegris 7.83 -.20 Entergy 3.32 65.36 -.08 EntPrPt 2.36 42.41 -.48 EntropCom 7.41 -.32 EnzonPhar 10.99 -.01 EpicorSft 12.51 -.11 Epocrates n 20.99 -.21 Equifax 0.64 37.46 -.52 Equinix 91.42 -1.30 EqtyOne 0.88 18.37 -.23 EqtyRsd 1.47 55.68 +.13 EricsnTel 0.35 12.83 -.37 EssexPT 4.16 123.81 -1.15 EsteeLdr 0.75 94.50 -.55 EtfSilver 39.87 -.08 Euronet 17.73 -.01 EverestRe 1.92 91.14 -1.09 EvergE rs 2.99 +.02 EvrgrSlr rs 1.35 +.02 ExactSci h 7.05 +.04 ExcelM 4.30 -.10 ExcoRes 0.16 20.77 -.14 Exelixis 11.41 +.36 Exelon 2.10 39.77 -.10 ExeterR gs 5.13 -.10 ExideTc 9.61 -.54 Expedia 0.28 24.21 -.31 ExpdIntl 0.40 50.49 +.17 Express n 20.68 -.19 ExpScrip s 56.05 +.10 ExterranH 21.75 -.50 ExtorreG g 7.08 -.18 ExtraSpce 0.56 19.36 -.14 ExtrmNet 2.89 -.50 ExxonMbl 1.76 83.18 -1.98 Ezcorp 28.98 +.04 F5 Netwks 93.77 -.73 FBR Cap 3.64 +.08 FLIR Sys 0.24 33.24 -.31 FMC Corp 0.60 83.72 -.62 FMC Tch s 45.25 -1.88 FNBCp PA 0.48 10.45 -.08 FSI Intl 4.13 -.06 FTI Cnslt 38.70 -.25 FX Ener 8.14 -.13 FairchldS 19.23 +.23 FamilyDlr 0.72 51.85 -.15 Fastenal 1.04 64.54 -2.96 FedExCp 0.48 94.08 +1.55 FedRlty 2.68 81.36 -.09 FedSignl 0.24 6.24 -.24 FedInvst 0.96 26.21 -.53 FelCor 6.20 -.10 Ferrellgs 2.00 25.83 +.03 Ferro 15.51 -.34 FibriaCelu 15.92 -.22 FidlNFin 0.48 14.76 -.09 FidNatInfo 0.20 33.00 -.03 FifthStFin 1.28 12.95 -.08 FifthThird 0.24 13.66 -.07 Finisar 24.05 -.55 FinLine 0.20 20.24 -.31 FstAFin n 0.24 15.42 -.07 FstCwlth 0.12 6.48 -.10 FstHorizon 0.04 11.39 -.06 FstInRT 11.93 FMajSilv g 20.53 -2.09 FMidBc 0.04 12.15 -.07 FstNiagara 0.64 13.89 +.04 FstSolar 143.65 -.75 FTNDXTc 0.10 26.47 -.26 FT Matls 0.38 24.75 -.32 FT Copper 0.35 44.45 -1.29 FT RNG 0.05 22.05 -.76 FirstEngy 2.20 37.00 +.24 FstMerit 0.64 17.06 -.17 Fiserv 61.97 -.70 FlagstB rs 1.41 -.02 Flagstone 0.16 8.59 -.30 Flextrn 6.96 -.13 Flotek 8.65 -.45 FlowrsFds 0.80 28.21 +.03 Flowserve 1.28 127.12 -4.34 Fluor 0.50 67.92 -2.34 FocusMda 31.25 -.03 FEMSA 0.64 60.18 -1.70 FootLockr 0.66 20.58 +.13 ForcePro 4.62 -.09 FordM 14.91 +.05 FordM wt 6.32 +.03 ForestCA 17.78 -.16 ForestLab 33.90 -.32 ForestOil 34.25 -1.65 FormFac 9.54 -.05 Fortinet 37.88 -1.18 Fortress 5.75 -.18 FortuneBr 0.76 63.00 -.61 Fossil Inc 92.51 -.81 FosterWhl 34.80 -1.04 FranceTel 1.77 22.69 -.21 FrankRes 1.00 124.08 +.08 FMCG s 1.00 53.70 -1.74 FrontierCm 0.75 7.99 -.02 FrontierOil 0.24 27.96 -1.23 Frontline 1.85 23.05 -.53 FuelSysSol 26.88 -.10 FuelCell 1.84 -.07 FullerHB 0.28 20.80 -.66 FultonFncl 0.16 11.13 FurnBrds 4.64 -.16 FushiCopp 7.97 -.05 GATX 1.16 38.87 -.41

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm GFI Grp GMAC CpT GMX Rs GNC n GSE Sy GSI Cmce h GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel GenOn En Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth GeoGrp GeoMet GeoPetro Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobalCash GlobCrsg GloblInd GlobPay GblXChCon GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GolarLNG n GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraniteC GraphPkg GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenbCos Group1 GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugCdnEn GugInsidr GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCr pfI HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtldPay HeartWare Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg HiTchPhm HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HiSoft n Hittite HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HHughes n HubbelB HudsCity HugotnR HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn

D 0.20

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Nm Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 40.16 -.96 11.85 +.48 3.96 -.27

I-J-K-L IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IdexxLabs IESI-BFC g iGateCorp ING GRE ING GlbDv ING INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iPass iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iShBraz iSCan iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShNeth iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShThai iShChile iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSSPGth iSSPGlbEn iShNatRes iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShs SOX iShNsdqBio iShC&SRl iSR1KV iShPolnd n iSMCGth iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iShDJTel iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShBasM iShPeru iShDJOE iShDJOG iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed IconixBr IdenixPh Identive IDEX iGo Inc ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Incyte IndiaGC Inergy Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InnerWkgs InsightEnt InspPhar IntgDv IntegrysE Intel Intellichk InteractBrk interClick IntcntlEx InterDig InterMune InterNAP IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterOil g Intphse Interpublic Intersil IntervestB IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invacare Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech IridiumCm IRIS Int IronMtn Isis IstaPh ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g Ixia JA Solar JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JosABnk s JournalCm JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KAR Auct

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nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm KB Home KBR Inc KIT Digitl KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA KandiTech KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg Kemet rs Kenexa Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimberR g KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindMM KindredHlt KineticC Kinross g KnghtCap KnightTr KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger Kulicke L&L Engy L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LECG h LG Display LKQ Corp LML Pay LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LaBarg LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp s LeeEnt LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

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M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc MV OilTr MYR Grp Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes MaidenH Majesco MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MkVPoland MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVIndo s MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd MatrixSv Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson

2.80 87.16 13.06 9.32 0.85 6.21 1.00 26.95 0.65 22.58 3.45 11.90 8.45 0.94 7.66 0.55 6.09 8.70 12.61 9.65 0.60 30.09 3.22 0.88 70.54 36.17 3.07 41.33 24.34 2.00 47.95 1.80 32.55 0.20 24.71 1.96 28.96 3.03 59.44 6.36 6.63 1.00 45.38 7.62 0.28 7.60 3.16 25.60 0.08 20.80 3.62 0.74 61.11 0.52 17.11 1.00 50.18 .60 0.40 61.11 27.70 0.18 40.76 0.23 30.02 2.93 39.44 0.33 54.74 0.27 29.88 0.19 48.23 2.60 49.08 0.35 34.33 0.84 29.29 0.04 7.94 3.49 1.60 88.00 15.85 0.30 13.28 0.75 33.85 0.24 63.46 20.35 0.60 262.96 13.80 0.92 25.32 2.15 0.84 24.66 3.38 1.12 47.49 23.58 2.44 76.66 1.00 38.99 0.72 77.60

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D

OfficeDpt 4.24 +.05 OfficeMax 12.97 -.01 OilSvHT 2.42 154.81 -4.44 OilStates 73.37 -1.83 Oilsands g .46 -.01 OldNBcp 0.28 10.78 +.05 OldRepub 0.70 12.98 +.07 Olin 0.80 24.19 -.34 OmegaHlt 1.48 23.09 +.24 OmegaP 13.63 -.34 Omncre 0.13 30.74 -.35 Omnicom 1.00 48.07 -.50 OmniVisn h 30.57 -1.26 Omnova 7.95 -.14 OnAssign 8.82 -.55 OnSmcnd 9.50 -.16 OnTrack 2.46 +.12 1800Flowrs 3.19 -.01 ONEOK 2.08 64.40 -.50 OnlineRes 3.72 -.09 Onstrm rsh 1.24 -.29 OnyxPh 33.60 -.15 OpenTxt 60.90 +.21 OpenTable 106.28 -1.56 OpnwvSy 2.02 -.12 OpkoHlth 3.68 -.02 OplinkC 17.87 -.66 Opnext 2.20 -.09 OptimerPh 12.47 -.32 optXprs 4.50 18.31 -.15 Oracle 0.24 33.40 -.39 OrchidCell 2.78 Orexigen 2.92 -.03 OrientEH 11.48 -.12 OrientPap 3.75 -.14 OrientFn 0.20 12.48 -.09 OrionMar 10.37 -.12 Orthovta 2.04 +.01 OshkoshCp 33.02 -.79 OvShip 1.75 28.48 -1.18 Overstk 14.15 -.61 OwensMin 0.80 32.70 -.11 OwensCorn 36.66 -.34 OwensIll 29.62 +.37 PDL Bio 0.60 6.14 -.10 PF Chng 0.92 44.39 -.15 PG&E Cp 1.82 43.74 -.32 PHH Corp 21.18 -.05 PLX Tch 3.53 -.11 PMC Sra 7.18 -.04 PMI Grp 2.36 -.11 PNC 1.40 63.13 -.13 PNM Res 0.50 14.48 -.32 POSCO 0.53 109.51 -.91 PPG 2.20 93.76 -1.18 PPL Corp 1.40 26.88 +1.19 PPL pfU 2.44 55.10 +1.65 PSS Wrld 27.32 -.21 Paccar 0.48 50.31 -.41 PacerIntl 4.84 -.10 PacEth h .46 -.05 PacSunwr 3.64 -.08 PackAmer 0.80 27.74 -.17 PaetecHld 3.40 +.03 PainTher 2.00 9.19 -.04 PallCorp 0.70 57.14 -.84 PanASlv 0.10 40.19 -.76 PaneraBrd 120.48 -.02 ParPharm 33.58 +.25 ParagShip 0.20 2.85 +.01 ParamTc h 22.88 -.49 ParaG&S 3.45 -.10 ParkDrl 6.43 -.34 ParkerHan 1.28 93.37 -1.87 PartnerRe 2.20 80.84 -1.08 PatriotCoal 24.00 -1.07 Patterson 0.48 32.95 -.12 PattUTI 0.20 27.42 -1.27 Paychex 1.24 32.27 -.03 PeabdyE 0.34 64.34 -2.09 Pebblebrk 0.48 20.61 -.41 Pengrth g 0.84 13.59 -.48 PnnNGm 36.74 -.92 PennVa 0.23 14.64 -.93 PennVaRs 1.88 27.15 -.35 PennWst g 1.08 26.14 -1.14 PenPkFR n 13.18 -.18 Penney 0.80 37.77 -.25 PennyMac 1.68 18.07 -.20 Penske 19.56 -.81 Pentair 0.80 38.01 -.63 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.85 -.23 PepBoy 0.12 13.30 -.33 PepcoHold 1.08 18.21 -.10 PepsiCo 1.92 66.57 +.53 PeregrineP 2.53 -.01 PerkElm 0.28 26.53 -.13 Prmian 1.38 21.21 -.93 Perrigo 0.28 85.40 +1.09 PetChina 4.86 148.64 -7.80 Petrohawk 23.20 -.13 PetrbrsA 1.41 33.99 -1.36 Petrobras 1.41 38.21 -1.62 PtroqstE 8.18 -.56 PetsMart 0.50 41.39 -.75 Pfizer 0.80 20.46 -.21 PhmHTr 3.14 67.39 -.22 PharmPdt 0.60 30.78 -.15 Pharmacyc 6.13 +.12 Pharmasset 94.56 -1.60 PhilipMor 2.56 66.04 -.79 PhilipsEl 1.02 30.91 -.45 PhlVH 0.15 65.85 +.85 PhnxCos 2.48 -.10 PhotrIn 8.51 -.09 PiedmOfc 1.26 18.99 +.02 Pier 1 11.27 -.28 PilgrimsP 6.98 +.02 PimCpOp 1.38 18.67 +.40 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.77 -.01 PinnclEnt 13.04 -.43 PinWst 2.10 42.08 -.37 PionDrill 13.55 -.45 PioNtrl 0.08 97.19 -5.14 PiperJaf 38.85 -1.10 PitnyBw 1.48 24.99 -.19 PlainsAA 3.88 63.29 -.29 PlainsEx 33.90 -1.09 Plantron 0.20 34.87 -.45 PlatGpMet 2.16 -.03 PlatUnd 0.32 37.49 +.30 Plexus 32.54 -.66 PlugPwr h .63 -.03 PlumCrk 1.68 42.32 -.38 Polaris 1.80 89.31 -1.57 Polo RL 0.80 124.31 -.17 Polycom 46.59 +.50 PolyMet g 1.93 -.11 PolyOne 0.16 13.46 -.33 Polypore 55.83 -2.04 Poniard h .41 Pool Corp 0.52 25.11 +.30 Popular 3.12 +.02 PortGE 1.04 23.55 -.24 PostPrp 0.80 38.01 -.20 PostRockE 7.28 -.44 Potash s 0.28 56.13 -.93 Power-One 7.79 -.05 PSCrudeDS 43.36 +2.66 PwshDB 30.69 -.64 PS Agri 33.73 -.52 PS Oil 32.08 -1.01 PS BasMet 25.05 -.32 PS USDBull 21.48 -.05 PwSClnEn 10.06 -.19 PwSFoodBv 0.21 19.09 +.05 PS OilSv 0.08 24.50 -.87 PSPrivEq 0.37 11.55 -.14 PSFinPf 1.27 18.16 -.05 PSHYCpBd 1.38 18.58 -.02 PwShPfd 0.97 14.32 -.02 PShEMSov 1.55 26.54 -.02 PSIndia 0.24 23.55 -.15 PowerSec 6.77 -.17 PwShs QQQ 0.39 56.37 -.39 Powrwav 4.08 -.23 PranaBio 2.54 +.04 Praxair 2.00 100.53 -.84 PrecCastpt 0.12 144.01 -1.86 PrecDrill 13.71 -1.25 PriceTR 1.24 66.52 -.78 priceline 512.14 -.31 PrideIntl 42.18 -.59 PrinctnR h .38 -.01 PrinFncl 0.55 31.46 -.44 PrivateB 0.04 14.49 +.01 ProShtDow 41.35 +.41 ProShtQQQ 33.13 +.22 ProShtS&P 41.53 +.32 PrUShS&P 21.27 +.33 ProUltDow 0.32 61.34 -1.20 PrUlShDow 17.97 +.33 ProUltQQQ 86.71 -1.17 PrUShQQQ rs 52.85 +.70 ProUltSP 0.39 52.36 -.83 PrUShtFn rs 57.25 +.42 ProUShL20 38.09 -.84 ProUSL7-10T 42.35 -.54 PrUSCh25 rs 26.23 +.62 ProUSEM rs 29.47 +1.10 ProUSRE rs 15.99 +.07 ProUSOG rs 28.92 +1.59 ProUSBM rs 17.43 +.68 ProUltRE rs 0.43 55.18 -.23 ProUFin rs 0.05 69.88 -.54 PrUPShQQQ 26.79 +.51 PrUPShR2K 18.48 +.68 ProUltO&G 0.21 56.22 -3.53 ProUBasM 0.03 52.97 -2.23 PrUPR2K s 89.62 -3.63 ProShtR2K 30.14 +.35 PrUltPQQQ s 80.49 -1.62 ProUltR2K 0.01 46.89 -1.24 ProSht20Tr 44.71 -.46 ProUSSP500 16.31 +.34 PrUltSP500 s 0.11 77.69 -1.76 ProSUltGold 72.85 -1.10 ProUSSlv rs 20.33 +.12 PrUltCrde rs 56.05 -3.59 PrUShCrde rs 41.51 +2.33 ProVixSTF 62.78 +.59 ProUSGld rs 26.06 +.36 ProSUltSilv 252.93 -1.37 ProUltShYen 16.46 -.36 ProUShEuro 17.08 -.11 ProctGam 2.10 62.89 +.70 PrognicsPh 6.76 +.11 ProgrssEn 2.48 45.27 -.27 ProgsvCp 1.40 21.38 -.14 ProLogis 0.45 15.63 -.09 ProUSR2K rs 43.73 +1.08 ProspctCap 1.21 11.45 -.12 Protalix 7.09 -.05 ProtLife 0.56 26.34 -.18 ProvEn g 0.54 8.97 -.18 Prudentl 1.15 61.57 -1.17 PSEG 1.37 30.58 +.02 PubStrg 3.20 108.18 -.55 PulteGrp 7.70 -.08 PPrIT 0.71 6.59 +.01

Q-R-S-T

Nm QEP Res n QIAGEN QKL Strs QiaoXing Qihoo360 n QlikTech n Qlogic Qualcom QuantaSvc QntmDSS QstDiag QuestSft Questar s Questcor QuickLog QksilvRes Quiksilvr QuinStreet RAIT Fin RBC Bear RBS pfG RC2 RF MicD RPC s RPM RSC Hldgs RTI IntlM RXi Phrm Rackspace RadianGrp RadientPh RadOneD RadioShk Radware Ralcorp RAM Engy Rambus RamcoG Randgold RangeRs RareEle g RJamesFn Rayonier Raytheon RealD n RltyInco RedHat Rdiff.cm RedwdTr RegalBel RegalEnt RgcyCtrs RegncyEn Regenrn RegBkHT RegionsFn Regis Cp RehabCG ReinsGrp RelStlAl RenaisRe ReneSola RentACt Rentech ReprosT rs RepubAir RepubSvc RschMotn ResMed s ResoluteEn Resolute wt ResrceCap RetailHT RevSmCap RevADRFd RexEnergy RexahnPh ReynAm s Richmnt g RightNow RioTinto s RitchieBr RiteAid Riverbed s RobbMyer RobtHalf RockTen RockwlAut RockColl RockwdH RofinSinar RogCm gs Roper RosettaR RosettaStn RossStrs Rovi Corp Rowan RoyalBk g RylCarb RoyDShllB RoyDShllA RoyGld RoyaleEn Rubicon g RubiconTc RubyTues Rudolph Rural/Met Ryder RdxSPEW Ryland SAIC SAP AG SBA Com SCANA SEI Inv SK Tlcm SLGreen SLM Cp SLMCpi18 SM Energy SpdrDJIA SpdrGold SpdrIntRE SP Mid S&P500ETF Spdr Div SpdrHome SpdrKbwBk SpdrKbwIns SpdrBarcCv SpdrLehHY SpdrNuBST SpdrKbw RB SpdrRetl SpdrOGEx SpdrOGEq SpdrMetM SPX Cp SRA Intl STEC STMicro STR Hldgs SVB FnGp SXC Hlth s SafeBulk Safeway StJoe StJude Saks Salesforce SalixPhm SallyBty SamsO&G SJuanB SandRMs n SanderFm SanDisk SandRdge SangBio Sanmina Sanofi Sanofi rt Santarus Sapient SaraLee Sasol Satcon h SavientPh Savvis Schlmbrg Schnitzer Schulmn SchwUSMkt SchwUSLgC Schwab SciClone SciGames Scotts ScrippsNet SeadrillLtd SeagateT SealAir Sealy SearchMed SearsHldgs Seaspan SeattGen SelCmfrt SemGroup SemiHTr SempraEn Semtech SenHous SensataT Sequenom ServiceCp SvcSourc n ShandaGm ShawGrp ShengInno Sherwin ShipFin Shire ShoreTel ShufflMstr Shutterfly SiderurNac Siemens SifyTech SigaTech h SigmaAld SignetJwlrs SilicGrIn SilicnImg SilcnLab SilicnMotn Slcnware SilvStd g SilvWhtn g SilvrcpM g SimonProp Sina Sinclair SinoCoking SinoHub SiriusXM SironaDent Skechers SkilldHcre

D 0.08 38.03 -1.15 19.78 -.35 2.27 -.23 2.18 +.06 24.10 -.70 27.01 +.28 17.42 +.08 0.86 52.25 -1.15 21.98 -.60 2.65 -.11 0.40 57.92 +.14 24.10 -.17 0.61 16.66 -.55 19.17 +.16 4.05 +.05 13.17 -.35 4.20 -.04 19.52 -.41 0.03 2.20 -.08 36.82 -.35 1.52 15.97 +.03 27.84 -.01 5.93 -.17 0.28 21.99 -.76 0.84 23.12 -.29 13.33 -.46 29.71 -.56 1.30 -.04 41.04 -1.58 0.01 6.37 -.13 .37 -.02 2.04 -.06 0.25 16.29 +.27 33.24 -1.01 68.71 +.33 1.92 -.12 19.36 -.16 0.65 12.28 -.12 85.07 -.78 0.16 54.03 -2.33 15.74 +.63 0.52 37.58 -.20 2.16 60.75 -.75 1.72 50.14 -.58 29.60 -.20 1.73 34.66 +.07 44.59 -.45 7.91 +.56 1.00 15.30 -.17 0.68 71.99 -1.73 0.84 13.80 -.04 1.85 41.90 -.59 1.78 27.82 -.11 42.85 -1.06 0.70 87.19 +.05 0.04 7.27 +.01 0.24 17.93 -.34 36.76 -.23 0.48 60.51 -.23 0.48 55.37 -1.11 1.04 70.77 -1.34 9.17 -.32 0.24 34.64 -.28 1.12 -.03 4.66 -.27 5.77 0.80 30.07 +.22 53.72 -.93 31.75 +.34 17.52 -.22 4.60 -.19 1.00 6.17 -.18 2.04 108.57 +.30 0.14 34.01 -.47 0.87 40.35 -.59 10.98 -.62 1.19 -.03 2.12 35.99 -.08 7.37 -.41 33.01 -.15 1.08 72.13 -1.69 0.42 27.50 1.06 +.03 30.92 -2.15 0.18 38.94 -1.06 0.56 29.94 -.15 0.80 67.42 +.33 1.40 91.74 -.67 0.96 63.49 -.63 47.19 -1.30 35.02 -1.67 1.42 36.38 +.20 0.44 84.60 -.60 43.26 -2.28 13.68 +.02 0.88 71.22 -.03 49.71 -1.18 40.63 -.62 2.00 62.06 -.92 40.11 +.41 3.36 72.24 -2.17 3.36 72.53 -1.95 0.44 52.35 -.76 5.24 +.07 5.27 -.12 25.17 -.83 10.77 +.11 10.30 -.04 17.02 -.02 1.08 50.60 +.63 0.70 50.02 -.33 0.12 16.03 -.25 17.32 -.12 0.82 62.92 -.95 38.55 -.21 1.94 38.62 -.32 0.20 23.17 -.21 18.24 -.14 0.40 75.92 +.38 14.74 -.36 0.90 22.94 +.04 0.10 68.77 -3.02 2.98 122.46 -1.18 141.61 -1.03 3.41 38.97 -.31 1.55 176.28 -1.70 2.34 131.47 -.99 1.74 53.62 -.43 0.31 18.33 -.11 0.15 25.99 -.04 0.71 43.99 -.43 1.81 41.85 -.09 4.44 40.34 -.12 0.47 23.93 +.02 0.36 26.56 -.15 0.50 51.66 -.30 0.49 59.92 -2.22 0.30 40.96 -1.38 0.41 71.77 -1.60 1.00 78.97 -1.58 30.94 -.06 18.02 -.69 0.40 11.94 -.39 16.36 -.81 56.99 -.38 52.97 -1.09 0.60 8.30 -.96 0.48 24.00 +.18 25.78 -.95 0.84 52.12 -.42 11.73 +.06 132.82 -1.80 35.96 -.33 14.02 -.23 3.45 -.26 1.68 25.13 -1.09 24.95 -.68 0.68 44.29 +.57 46.01 -.42 11.64 -.58 7.64 +.18 10.77 -.26 1.63 37.05 -.07 2.35 -.05 3.11 -.09 12.01 -.04 0.46 18.38 -.07 1.53 55.69 -2.39 3.06 -.17 10.46 -.02 34.54 -1.27 1.00 86.24 -2.56 0.07 60.59 -.76 0.62 24.68 -.25 0.46 31.83 -.26 0.49 31.34 -.24 0.24 18.25 -.10 4.51 -.14 8.58 -.37 1.00 58.08 -.69 0.30 49.39 -.76 2.74 34.74 -.33 0.72 16.10 +.36 0.52 25.87 -.15 2.45 +.03 2.57 +.45 78.94 +.67 0.50 18.30 -.87 15.84 -.02 12.09 -.38 26.21 -.58 0.55 33.95 -.68 1.92 52.57 -.43 25.43 -.54 1.48 23.38 33.82 -.58 6.75 -.10 0.20 11.28 -.12 12.43 -.12 6.55 +.01 34.26 -.71 3.01 +.05 1.46 83.88 -.78 1.52 19.95 -.24 0.39 89.66 -.79 8.79 -.21 10.69 -.37 51.01 -.37 0.58 16.27 -.29 3.72 134.89 -2.55 4.57 +.05 12.93 -.13 0.72 63.85 -.51 44.39 -1.21 18.38 -1.85 7.00 -.58 42.10 -.99 9.24 -.57 0.41 6.05 -.17 33.42 -.59 0.12 42.37 -1.74 0.08 14.14 -.78 3.20 104.76 -.99 111.27 -5.00 0.48 10.84 -.42 5.60 -.19 1.60 -.04 1.81 +.03 51.44 -.36 20.12 -.10 15.05 +1.03

Nm Sky-mobi n SkyWest SkystarBio SkywksSol SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithWes SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SmurfStn n SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm SolarWinds Solera Solitario Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy Spansion n SpectraEn SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGold SprottRL g StageStrs SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StarwdPT StateStr Statoil ASA StlDynam Steelcse StemCells Stereotaxis Stericycle Steris SterlBcsh Sterlite StewEnt StifelFn s StillwtrM StoneEngy Stratasys StratHotels Stryker SturmRug SuccessF SulphCo SumitMitsu SummitH n SunBcpNJ SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP rs SunLink Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunriseSen SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SupcndTch SuperGen SupEnrgy Supvalu support.cm SusqBnc SwEGrain23 SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng SwiftTrns n SwisherH n Symantec Synaptics Synchron Syneron Syngenta Synnex Synopsys Synovus Syntel SynthEngy Syntroleum Sysco TAL Intl TAM SA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TE Connect TECO THQ TICC Cap TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisBio Taleo A TalismE g Tanger s TanzRy g TargaRsLP Target Taseko TASER TastyBak TataMotors Taubmn TeamHlth TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekLNG TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TelcmNZ TelItalia TelefEsp s TelMexL TeleNav n TelData60 Telestone TeleTech Tellabs TempleInld TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tengsco Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium TeslaMot n Tesoro TetraTech TeucrCorn TevaPhrm TxCapBsh TexInst TexRdhse Textron ThermoFis ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3D Sys 3M Co ThrshdPhm TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany THorton g Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMach TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros TomoThera Trchmrk Toreador TorDBk g Total SA TotalSys TowerGrp TowerSemi Toyota TractSup s TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPet TransDigm TransGlb Transocn TranSwtch Travelers Travelzoo TreeHse n TriValley TriangPet TridentM h TrimbleN TrinaSolar Trinity

D 0.16

1.76 0.73

0.30

0.10 1.12 0.28 0.20 1.82 1.83 0.60 0.02 1.04

0.30 1.23 0.61 0.81 0.56 1.05 0.16 0.64 0.33 1.31 1.64 0.40 0.20 0.52 0.30 1.68 0.72 1.10 0.40 0.24

0.60 0.06 0.08 0.12

0.72 0.32

1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04

0.35 0.04

1.13 0.04 0.24 1.04 1.80 0.72 0.20 0.20 0.64 0.85 0.96 0.71 0.76

0.47

0.25 0.80 2.23 1.00 0.20 0.32 1.75 0.60 1.27 2.52 1.24

0.72 0.81 1.75 0.83 1.75 0.08 0.52 0.68

0.50

0.78 0.52 0.32 0.08 1.24 0.40 2.20 1.00 1.00 0.68 1.92 0.94 0.72 0.02

0.64 2.64 3.16 0.28 0.50 0.58 0.28 1.68 0.84

0.79 1.44

0.32

Nm 12.49 -.06 15.79 -.11 5.16 -.32 26.36 -.77 8.06 -.12 9.86 +.45 3.10 -.08 3.49 -.02 8.70 -.27 23.29 -.05 73.83 +.80 38.06 +.23 56.49 -1.68 42.62 +1.47 93.21 -1.53 24.10 -.10 50.90 +.02 3.07 -.02 24.22 -.43 2.86 +.01 12.94 -.29 8.95 -.01 34.79 -.33 3.48 -.04 29.59 -.65 49.08 -.72 24.11 -.86 37.48 -.30 38.05 -.73 27.48 -.43 11.84 +.06 38.02 -1.58 17.59 -.14 26.87 -.32 8.76 +.09 24.02 -.16 19.31 -1.04 4.80 +.09 17.88 -.17 12.48 -.15 1.81 +.07 19.04 -.26 39.21 -.54 33.47 -.04 30.51 +.10 39.02 -.05 75.73 -2.42 16.40 -.06 37.11 -.28 25.68 -.21 31.48 -.08 3.69 -.01 73.96 -.88 19.97 -.28 2.30 -.06 3.42 +.01 35.77 +.28 57.00 +.58 21.50 -.06 46.16 -.03 27.89 -.97 18.21 -.21 11.23 -.26 .77 -.01 3.85 -.11 90.43 +.08 33.55 -.34 8.96 +.02 15.16 -.03 7.95 +.02 46.18 -.88 21.30 -1.19 31.22 -1.67 47.71 -.60 6.06 -.12 59.69 -.31 21.28 -1.33 37.51 -.32 .12 -.01 6.01 +.04 10.25 +.03 3.69 +.06 30.87 -.64 43.68 -1.85 2.26 -.03 2.59 +.50 42.89 -1.26 7.39 -.34 16.27 -.12 15.85 -.17 9.25 -.27 9.64 -.05 9.23 -.04 29.60 +.09 2.97 -.17 2.74 -.05 37.57 -1.29 9.11 -.09 5.16 -.18 9.43 +.02 7.55 -.25 11.14 -.29 10.12 -.23 39.46 -1.57 14.04 -.25 8.73 +.38 18.25 -.17 25.45 -.46 31.75 -.95 13.60 -.32 67.18 +.01 31.70 -.56 26.92 -.40 2.69 -.04 54.81 -1.49 3.31 1.94 -.06 28.45 +.06 36.54 -.01 19.25 -.43 15.27 +.10 21.59 -.02 33.70 +.01 18.51 -.18 4.37 -.17 11.06 -.03 45.27 -.72 51.06 -.03 50.26 -1.28 16.94 -.35 19.51 -.27 12.23 -.28 15.10 -.36 6.29 -.20 27.28 -.12 33.82 -.55 23.20 -.90 25.39 +.34 6.26 -.12 34.11 -.08 50.44 +1.18 5.67 -.15 3.83 -.07 4.00 +.03 27.05 -.11 53.02 -.13 19.50 +.38 50.79 -1.11 53.92 -2.42 35.07 -.90 37.58 -.39 10.33 -.09 7.70 -.18 4.15 -.07 18.55 -.16 7.66 -.04 15.37 -.11 26.19 -.03 18.40 -.22 10.90 -.92 24.83 +.13 5.80 -.02 20.39 -.13 5.08 -.03 21.99 -.22 57.82 +1.59 49.36 -1.14 6.56 +.12 .98 -.04 39.99 +.33 49.49 -.70 16.78 -.89 33.00 -1.05 33.27 -1.30 24.65 -.62 25.22 -.43 14.06 -.44 45.02 -1.42 49.27 +.29 25.33 -.17 34.14 -.79 16.28 +.04 26.88 -.30 55.44 -.54 12.56 -.30 39.25 -.47 30.40 -1.38 27.43 +.18 48.96 -2.03 92.37 -1.43 1.94 -.01 28.05 +1.06 56.75 -.94 61.48 -.57 46.60 +.82 41.82 -.20 .99 -.01 72.14 -.66 35.45 +.30 50.29 -.25 25.67 -.37 26.77 +.14 18.14 -.32 8.53 +.11 20.24 -.17 4.63 -.03 66.90 -.18 8.65 -.55 85.80 -2.47 60.78 -1.06 18.27 -.15 22.98 -.05 1.34 -.01 77.20 +.70 62.58 -.42 40.84 -.40 49.20 -.66 2.96 -.07 79.43 -.80 14.27 -.78 79.51 -1.25 4.99 -.51 59.69 -.73 73.50 +.02 58.28 -.21 .74 +.02 7.90 -.51 1.06 -.05 49.12 -.60 28.42 -.01 35.96 -.23

D

TriQuint TrueRelig Tsakos TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini TwoHrbInv TycoIntl Tyson

11.26 -.70 25.65 -1.01 0.60 10.32 -.27 4.84 -.22 1.20 58.21 -.56 0.66 14.74 -.27 1.00 25.31 -.12 1.52 10.02 -.16 1.00 52.33 +3.61 0.16 19.50 +.32

U-V-W-X-Y-Z U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UGI Corp UIL Hold UQM Tech URS US Airwy US Gold USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltraPt g Ultrapar s Uluru Umpqua UndrArmr UnilevNV Unilever UnionDrll UnionPac Unisys Unit UtdCBksGa UtdContl UtdMicro UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US Bancrp US Enr US NGs rs US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp UnivDisp UnivHlthS UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UranmRs UrbanOut VF Cp VaalcoE VailRsrt Valassis ValeCap12P Vale SA Vale SA pf

N

G M m M R D W m N R D M m D

m m m M m

G

Mw

OG M W& O WM W H W W O W R W M W W W W W W M W R W WR W W M W W W W W W m W MD W WW W R W W W W W W W W W WD W R W U W m W W W W W W H W W Wm Wm Wm W G Wm W m W D W W W W W mD W D W W W W w W W W W W M W m W G OM

R M R Ww m G m

mm m

m w

0.28 10.15 +.08 18.69 +.03 0.74 23.66 -.03 1.00 31.52 -.62 1.73 29.99 -.13 2.61 -.16 44.21 -1.22 8.45 +.21 8.77 -.29 2.05 -.07 4.26 -.03 16.34 +.22 0.06 20.23 -.18 2.52 -.12 50.51 -.61 47.75 -1.30 0.47 18.00 -.12 .07 +.00 0.20 11.36 +.06 73.97 +.68 1.12 32.12 -.01 1.12 31.12 -.20 10.92 -.10 1.52 96.54 +1.19 31.14 +.49 57.68 -2.32 2.49 +.10 21.71 +1.19 0.08 2.76 -.02 0.40 6.22 -.09 2.08 73.23 +.02 31.43 -.45 0.50 26.36 +.27 5.84 -.43 10.72 -.06 42.30 -1.34 0.20 50.52 -1.20 1.70 83.98 -1.00 66.33 +.23 0.50 44.81 +.49 51.91 -4.74 0.20 46.80 -.19 0.37 26.28 -.12 1.60 -.08 2.91 -.16 3.84 -.24 1.90 -.16 31.56 +.26 2.52 99.35 +.06 7.04 49.64 +.45 29.51 -.26 3.38 95.67 -1.47 0.90 32.97 -.99 0


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Housing

In California

Continued from B1

Grim indicators Here’s one grim indication of where housing stands. Before the housing bubble burst, residential investment accounted for about 6.3 percent of the nation’s economic activity. Today, that number has fallen to around 2.4 percent, according to Michael Mussa, a former International Monetary Fund chief economist now with the Peterson Institute for International Economics, a research group. Another measure: In February, the last full month for which data is available, distress sales accounted for almost four in every 10 homes sold nationally, according to the National Association of Realtors. In March 2008, distress sales accounted for 18 percent of total sales. This number peaked at 49 percent in March 2009, and fell to the low 30-percent range for most of last year as many states imposed foreclosure moratoriums. The number climbed back to 39 percent in February as these bans were lifted. “The uptick in distressed sales in recent months results from tight credit and smaller shares of traditional buyers,” said Walter Molony, a spokesman for the National Association of Realtors. “As a consequence, all-cash sales and investors have been a larger share, with a focus on the discounted pricing of distressed property.” Tight credit is a polite way of saying banks aren’t lending. After the easy-money days of the housing boom, banks hit reverse and are reluctant to lend for refinancing an existing home or purchasing a new one. There’s logic to the banks’ reluctance. If prices are going to keep falling, then homes could quickly be underwater — worth less than the mortgages that financed their purchase. An estimated 25 percent of homeowners in the U.S. currently are underwater, unable to build equity as they make monthly payments. “I think what makes the cycle particularly unique, painful, just difficult, is that ... one in four homeowners nationwide are underwater,” said Leslie Appleton-Young, the chief economist for the California Association of Realtors. “In California, I believe the number is 31 percent. It’s a whole different decision to trade up or down when you don’t have any equity in the mix.”

Gas

in the last two and a half years while sales continue to rise. International buyers in particular, who represent 60 to 90 percent of total sales depending on the neighborhood or building, are attracted to Miami’s multicultural character ... and enviable weather,” Jack Levine, the chairman of the Miami Association of Realtors, told McClatchy Newspapers. “An improving job market for local and domestic buyers will only enhance the market’s positive direction.” The Mortgage Bankers Association finds reason for optimism too. Its most recent data show across-the-board decreases in mortgage-delinquency rates, especially those payments that are late by three payments or fewer. “We are still pretty much in the same place we were six months ago,” said Jay Brinkmann, the chief economist for the group, adding that last year’s end of homebuyer tax credits created a predictable dip in sales. “I am still thinking that between some of the better jobs numbers and interest rates being low on a historical basis, that we may end up with a pretty robust spring in terms of purchases.”

California, the nation’s most populous state, has a unique dynamic in its housing recovery. Parts of the state, especially around the state capital of Sacramento, had a huge run-up in home prices and tremendous overbuilding. These areas have seen prices drop as much as 70 percent. The state’s median home price, the midpoint, hit bottom two years ago; sales have picked up by about 20 percent since then, said Appleton-Young. “We are running on a cycle where we dropped harder faster than the nation. We came back pretty strong,” she said, noting that the number of homes available for sale on the low end of prices is down to about six months’ inventory. That suggests the worst may almost be over on the low end of the nation’s largest housing market. For high-end homes in California, there’s roughly 10 to 12 months of inventory, meaning only steep price cuts will reduce this number. Data provided by California real-estate agents show that 56 percent of all homes sold in the state in February were distress sales. That’s up slightly from 55 percent in February 2010. In Sacramento County, 71 percent of all home sales in February were distress sales, up from 68 percent in February 2010.

California and other highcost states may also see an uptick of sales for an odd reason: Mortgage finance titans Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, in government hands since 2008, may lose their authority to buy higher-priced mortgages — as much as $729,750 for single-family homes — after September. Republicans, who now control the House of Representatives, may let the higher loan limit expire, reducing Fannie’s and Freddie’s role in the housing market. “It may provide a spark in spring sales. After that, financing loans of that size will be more extensive,” said AppletonYoung, adding: “It’s going to be a couple more years” before normalcy returns to real estate markets. Michelle Meyer, a housing economist with Bank of America Merrill Lynch, is more blunt about prospects for the national housing market. “The bottom line is that housing conditions vary significantly by region, zip code and even street,” she wrote in March 25 research report. “For those in the market — either buyers or sellers — do not expect a normal experience, because it does not exist.”

The story is much the same in Florida. For the Orlando region, which saw both a population and housing boom, foreclosures and short sales — an agreement in which a home is sold at a loss with the lender’s blessing — accounted for almost 69 percent of all sales last year, according to the Orlando Regional Realtor Association. This February, they accounted for more than 73 percent of sales. A decade ago, this figure was less than 3 percent. Farther south, distressed property sales of single-family homes represented just under 70 percent of sales in MiamiDade County in February, and 58 percent of sales in Broward County, home to Fort Lauderdale. Almost 59 percent of condos and townhouse sales in Broward were distress sales in February, almost 73 percent in Miami-Dade County. If that sounds dismal, South Florida real-estate agents see a glass half full. “Miami’s unique real estate market has seen housing inventory drop nearly 55 percent

On the Web

Continued from B1 But several customers said they have been making changes to their usual driving routines — starting to carpool, consolidating trips or considering buying hybrids. Loraine Hudson and Melanie Barlow both live near Rickard Road in southeast Bend and work together as customer service representatives at Bend Memorial Clinic. So, a few weeks ago, as gas prices kept rising, they agreed to commute to and from work in Hudson’s vehicle, they said. Bend resident Kristen Standly said she and her husband plan to buy a more fuel-efficient vehicle than the ones they currently have, such as a Chevrolet Equinox, in the next few weeks. Standly said the couple are planning to drive to San Diego for vacation in June. “The gas is just going to be way too much in either of our trucks,” she said. “In summer,” she added, “I’m going to bike to work.” Jewel Kaupp said she commutes to Bend from her home in La Pine every day. “I get 32 to 35 (mpg), but I need better than that,” she said. Since February, she said, she has been planning to buy a new Toyota Prius hybrid in June or July. “(Gas) prices go up and up and up,” Kaupp said. The most popular fuel-saving method customers at the Stop and Go Mini Mart Shell promot-

Many variables

In Florida

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 B5

Telecom Continued from B1 In addition to the 62 percent of tribal residents who currently don’t have access to telephone service, Anspach said the project will make wireless Internet service available to 30 percent of the tribes’ residences and businesses where wireless services are not currently available. “This is a huge upgrade for us,” Anspach said. “The project will quadruple the bandwidth we have now.” He said the tribes were notified last week that the grant award had been approved for disbursement for construction of the communications center, and the architectural firm Steele Associates of Bend has completed the building plans, so construction is set to begin next week. “The communications center is the heart and soul of this project. It is where all of the computers, racks and telecommunications

AAA offers several tips for saving money on gas in a file available online at http://www .aaaorid.com/news/Gas_ Watchers_Guide_2007.pdf

ed was the consolidation of trips. That means thinking ahead before driving and making many stops in one general area or route, rather than taking several separate trips to the same area. “To fill my tank, it’s getting close to $80,” said Bend resident Glenda Hart, who drives a Nissan Maxima. She said she can stretch a fill-up over a month or more. She said she makes a list of places she needs to visit on a trip before she departs from her home. Her husband just had a kidney transplant, she said. “We don’t have a choice but to save money at this stage of the game,” Hart said. Some gas buyers said they were frustrated the price of gas is getting closer to what it was almost three years ago. So did Kent Couch, the owner of the station, because as prices rise, he, too, has to pay more for the same amount of product. In Oregon, gas station customers are prohibited from pumping their own gas. That cuts into profit margins for Couch and other gas station operators in the state. “I’m all for the labor part,” Couch said. “It’s helping the

“This is a huge upgrade for us. The project will quadruple the bandwidth we have now.” — Jeff Anspach, chief executive officer of Warm Springs Teleco switches will be housed,” Anspach said. With tribal funds advanced in anticipation of the ARRA grant/ loan funds coming through, work installing towers, cables and other equipment began earlier this year, including all of the equipment needed to expand high-speed Internet to the KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, Anspach said. “The telecommunications project is part of a broader effort to modernize and prepare for economic development on the Warm Springs (reservation),”

economy.” He was referring to the 16 attendants he said he employs. Of the 18 cents a gallon in profit the station keeps, Couch said, 8 cents pay for labor, 8 cents cover credit card fees and parts of the 2 cents that are left go toward electric bills and other overhead costs, such as “drive-offs” — when customers don’t pay for their gas. What’s left is 1 to 2 cents a gallon, if everything goes right, Couch said. “First I’ve got to pay all the bills, and if there’s any left, then I get to keep it,” he said. Couch and other owners of convenience stores, which sell 80 percent of the gas sold in the U.S., can make more money from products inside, such as coffee, said Jeff Lenard, spokesman for the National Association of Convenience Stores, based in Alexandria, Va. Couch said he would like to see customers come up with new ways to save money on gas. “They need to figure out how to stretch their gas dollars,” he said. Edward Alonzo, who has been an attendant at the station for about two years, said he takes the bus most days he works. If city buses could run late into the night, and also start operating on Sundays, he said, “a lot of people wouldn’t need a car. That would be awesome.” Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

Anspach said. “The biggest hole in our economic development was the lack of phone and Internet service. Now, when we are recruiting businesses, we can tell them we have the telephone and broadband services they need to conduct business.” He said all of the work on the new tribal communications center, towers, microwave stations, cables and other equipment is expected to be completed by sometime in October. “We put Kah-Nee-Ta on a fast track — so that part of the work is expected to be done in the next few weeks, in time for the upcoming tourist season,” Anspach said. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

Find It All Online bendbulletin.com

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.10f .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .80a .82 ... .24 .32 .22 .72 .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 14 20 21 16 ... 24 27 24 87 22 10 ... 10 19 14 12 ... 17 65 6

62.44 +2.43 +10.1 23.12 -.13 +2.7 13.47 -.02 +1.0 15.51 -.23 -.3 73.08 -.68 +12.0 7.69 ... -9.0 45.54 -.63 -3.7 60.37 -.33 +.1 76.45 +.25 +5.9 8.68 +.12 +17.5 33.24 -.31 +11.7 41.08 +.03 -2.4 11.13 -.01 -9.3 19.76 -.36 -6.0 8.77 -.06 -.9 24.11 -.12 +7.8 5.94 -.09 -2.0 9.25 -.14 -2.2 22.58 -.52 +11.4 14.19 -.11 +18.3 25.64 -.34 -8.1

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1452.00 $1452.90 $40.058

Pvs Day $1464.00 $1467.40 $40.604

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46f .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .20a ... .60f

19 17 16 16 40 ... 34 21 15 16 19 10 26 10 76 15 14 14 87 6

78.20 +.07 -8.5 45.84 -.12 +8.2 44.63 -.55 -4.0 12.97 -.01 -26.7 50.31 -.41 -12.3 2.30 +.05 +11.1 42.32 -.38 +13.0 144.01 -1.86 +3.4 24.00 +.18 +6.7 60.59 -.76 -8.7 83.88 -.78 +.2 46.04 -.58 +2.0 35.77 +.28 +11.3 11.26 -.70 -3.7 11.36 +.06 -6.7 26.36 +.27 -2.3 16.85 +.04 -.4 31.40 ... +1.3 3.48 -.02 +23.4 22.56 -.54 +19.2

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm FordM PPL Corp

4381816 1502368 975483 811985 801466

4.55 +.02 131.47 -.99 13.47 -.02 14.91 +.05 26.88 +1.19

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CmtyHlt DBCmdDS DrxEBear rs BarcShtD ChinaSoAir

Last

Chg %Chg

31.48 28.38 15.26 17.14 22.70

+5.59 +21.6 +3.22 +12.8 +1.27 +9.1 +1.38 +8.8 +1.58 +7.5

Losers ($2 or more) Name WMS CSVSVixMT SafeBulk NeoPhoto n FMajSilv g

Last

Chg %Chg

30.01 77.98 8.30 10.05 20.53

-6.21 -17.1 -9.28 -10.6 -.96 -10.4 -1.04 -9.4 -2.09 -9.2

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

AvalRare n RareEle g KodiakO g VirnetX NwGold g

Last Chg

65595 9.62 -.03 64491 15.74 +.63 60560 6.00 -.21 46979 21.71 -3.81 46717 10.62 -.47

SunLink SearchMed Tofutti BioTime RareEle g

Vol (00)

Level3 Cisco Intel PwShs QQQ MicronT

783 2,235 116 3,134 27 20

Last Chg 1.67 17.44 19.76 56.37 10.53

-.03 -.03 -.36 -.39 -.21

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

2.59 2.57 2.50 7.57 15.74

+.50 +23.9 +.45 +21.2 +.19 +8.2 +.33 +4.6 +.63 +4.2

Identive IdenixPh IntervestB TibetPhm n AnikaTh

5.69 +3.03 +113.9 3.84 +.65 +20.4 2.80 +.38 +15.7 4.01 +.42 +11.7 9.75 +.87 +9.8

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

21.71 -3.81 -14.9 2.05 -.24 -10.5 3.42 -.40 -10.5 2.54 -.29 -10.2 2.00 -.20 -9.1

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

CompCrd h GenFin un ExtrmNet SuffolkBc ChiCeram

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

720877 627585 511708 467450 419188

Last

Losers ($2 or more) VirnetX AmLorain DocuSec Innovaro ChiArmM

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Gainers ($2 or more) Name

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Chg %Chg

4.94 -1.68 -25.4 2.80 -.70 -20.0 2.89 -.50 -14.7 18.50 -2.19 -10.6 4.38 -.49 -10.1

Diary 136 338 35 509 4 7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

639 1,987 115 2,741 25 48

12,450.93 5,404.33 422.43 8,545.78 2,453.68 2,840.51 1,344.07 14,276.94 859.08

9,614.32 3,872.64 346.95 6,355.83 1,689.19 2,061.14 1,010.91 15.80 587.66

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,263.58 5,239.48 407.67 8,360.46 2,374.10 2,744.79 1,314.16 13,945.41 822.27

-117.53 +16.21 -.84 -85.31 -28.41 -26.72 -10.30 -118.55 -11.59

YTD %Chg %Chg -.95 +.31 -.21 -1.01 -1.18 -.96 -.78 -.84 -1.39

52-wk %Chg

+5.93 +2.60 +.66 +4.98 +7.50 +3.46 +4.49 +4.38 +4.93

+11.29 +15.49 +6.07 +9.45 +20.27 +11.31 +9.76 +11.08 +16.30

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

360.77 2,694.84 3,976.60 5,964.47 7,102.91 23,976.37 37,321.80 22,018.55 3,451.34 9,555.26 2,089.40 3,138.00 4,990.20 5,788.92

-1.56 t -.97 t -1.54 t -1.47 t -1.41 t -1.34 t -.72 t -1.55 t -.29 t -1.69 t -1.55 t -.71 t -1.47 t -1.45 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0472 1.6255 1.0399 .002121 .1528 1.4485 .1286 .011940 .084601 .0356 .000917 .1588 1.1148 .0343

1.0500 1.6345 1.0452 .002123 .1529 1.4429 .1287 .011800 .085161 .0356 .000919 .1599 1.1030 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.51 -0.15 +5.2 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.47 -0.15 +5.1 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.44 -0.04 +3.6 GrowthI 26.99 -0.26 +4.5 Ultra 23.64 -0.22 +4.4 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.68 -0.15 +4.5 AMutlA p 26.28 -0.18 +4.4 BalA p 18.55 -0.09 +4.0 BondA p 12.19 +0.03 +0.9 CapIBA p 51.29 -0.32 +3.7 CapWGA p 37.07 -0.37 +4.2 CapWA p 20.71 +0.04 +2.3 EupacA p 43.00 -0.45 +3.9 FdInvA p 38.65 -0.44 +5.6 GovtA p 13.82 +0.05 -0.1 GwthA p 31.67 -0.33 +4.0 HI TrA p 11.56 -0.01 +4.5 IncoA p 17.21 -0.10 +5.0 IntBdA p 13.39 +0.03 +0.4 ICAA p 29.07 -0.26 +3.7 NEcoA p 26.44 -0.21 +4.4 N PerA p 29.74 -0.29 +3.9 NwWrldA 55.48 -0.58 +1.6 SmCpA p 40.10 -0.44 +3.2 TxExA p 11.70 +0.01 +0.1 WshA p 28.56 -0.26 +5.5 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 31.06 -0.50 +3.1 IntEqII I r 12.82 -0.22 +2.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.76 -0.25 +4.9 IntlVal r 27.94 -0.19 +3.1 MidCap 35.57 -0.27 +5.8 MidCapVal 22.19 -0.25 +10.5 Baron Funds: Growth 55.01 -0.34 +7.4 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.73 +0.04 +1.1 DivMu 14.20 +0.01 +0.5

TxMgdIntl 15.95 -0.13 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.56 -0.19 GlAlA r 20.08 -0.14 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.72 -0.13 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.61 -0.18 GlbAlloc r 20.18 -0.14 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 55.90 -0.84 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 30.48 -0.39 DivEqInc 10.58 -0.11 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 31.49 -0.41 AcornIntZ 41.61 -0.40 ValRestr 52.17 -0.72 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.81 -0.21 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.74 -0.13 USCorEq2 11.63 -0.12 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.90 -0.31 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.29 -0.32 NYVen C 34.65 -0.30 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.23 +0.01 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.51 -0.35 EmMktV 36.84 -0.58 IntSmVa 18.06 -0.24 LargeCo 10.37 -0.08 USLgVa 21.71 -0.18 US Micro 14.46 -0.23 US Small 22.66 -0.33 US SmVa 27.08 -0.40 IntlSmCo 17.83 -0.20 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 19.31 -0.18 Glb5FxInc 10.93 +0.05 2YGlFxd 10.17 +0.01 Dodge&Cox:

+1.4 +5.9 +3.4 +3.2 +6.0 +3.5 +4.7 +4.2 +5.1 +4.3 +1.7 +3.5 +5.0 +4.5 +6.2 +4.5 +4.6 +4.3 +1.5 +1.6 +1.9 +5.0 +5.1 +8.2 +5.1 +6.2 +5.9 +3.9 +0.2 +5.4 +0.5 +0.2

Balanced 73.08 -0.31 Income 13.30 +0.02 IntlStk 36.87 -0.42 Stock 113.25 -0.69 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 10.95 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.65 -0.14 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09 -0.01 GblMacAbR 10.19 -0.02 LgCapVal 18.70 -0.14 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.42 -0.02 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.03 -0.17 Fairholme 34.39 -0.15 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.58 -0.20 StrInA 12.57 +0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.79 -0.20 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.05 -0.07 FF2015 11.74 -0.06 FF2020 14.32 -0.09 FF2020K 13.71 -0.08 FF2025 12.01 -0.08 FF2030 14.37 -0.12 FF2030K 14.20 -0.11 FF2035 12.01 -0.11 FF2040 8.40 -0.07 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.96 -0.12 AMgr50 15.85 -0.07 Balanc 18.82 -0.08 BalancedK 18.82 -0.08 BlueChGr 47.18 -0.48 Canada 61.59 -1.22 CapAp 26.10 -0.15 CpInc r 9.79 -0.04 Contra 70.05 -0.68 ContraK 70.04 -0.68 DisEq 23.93 -0.23 DivIntl 31.23 -0.43

+4.6 +1.6 +3.2 +5.5 NA +2.6 +2.6 +0.5 +2.7 +5.2 +4.6 -3.3 +3.3 +3.2 +3.4 +3.4 +3.5 +3.8 +3.9 +4.3 +4.4 +4.4 +4.7 +4.9 +4.8 +3.1 +3.6 +3.6 +4.0 +5.9 +3.0 +5.3 +3.6 +3.6 +6.2 +3.6

DivrsIntK r 31.22 DivGth 29.88 EmrMk 26.87 Eq Inc 46.77 EQII 19.30 Fidel 33.99 FltRateHi r 9.89 GNMA 11.45 GovtInc 10.37 GroCo 88.79 GroInc 19.11 GrowthCoK 88.77 HighInc r 9.20 Indepn 25.36 IntBd 10.56 IntlDisc 33.82 InvGrBd 11.40 InvGB 7.42 LgCapVal 12.19 LatAm 58.54 LevCoStk 30.02 LowP r 40.81 LowPriK r 40.81 Magelln 73.97 MidCap 30.45 MuniInc 12.16 NwMkt r 15.68 OTC 58.88 100Index 9.13 Ovrsea 33.69 Puritn 18.59 SCmdtyStrt 13.16 SrsIntGrw 11.64 SrsIntVal 10.58 SrInvGrdF 11.40 STBF 8.47 SmllCpS r 20.51 StratInc 11.25 StrReRt r 9.88 TotalBd 10.76 USBI 11.29 Value 73.16 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 53.09

-0.42 -0.34 -0.53 -0.39 -0.15 -0.40 -0.01 +0.04 +0.03 -0.88 -0.13 -0.88 -0.01 -0.37 +0.03 -0.40 +0.04 +0.02 -0.07 -1.19 -0.39 -0.26 -0.25 -0.90 -0.38 +0.01 -0.03 -0.64 -0.08 -0.46 -0.10 -0.25 -0.16 -0.11 +0.04 +0.01 -0.16 +0.01 -0.05 +0.03 +0.04 -0.73 -0.99

+3.7 +5.1 +2.0 +6.0 +6.0 +5.8 +1.8 +0.8 +6.8 +4.7 +6.8 +4.6 +4.1 +0.9 +2.4 +0.8 +1.2 +6.3 -0.8 +5.6 +6.3 +6.4 +3.2 +5.5 +0.3 +1.7 +7.2 +4.5 +3.7 +4.2 +4.1 +3.1 +6.4 +0.8 +0.5 +4.6 +3.2 +3.6 +1.4 +0.5 +6.5

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 40.37 -0.47 500IdxInv 46.54 -0.36 IntlInxInv 36.72 -0.38 TotMktInv 38.32 -0.33 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.54 -0.36 TotMktAd r 38.33 -0.33 First Eagle: GlblA 47.74 -0.37 OverseasA 23.03 -0.15 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.24 +0.02 FoundAl p 11.08 -0.05 HYTFA p 9.50 +0.01 IncomA p 2.25 -0.01 USGovA p 6.70 +0.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p 13.81 -0.07 IncmeAd 2.24 -0.01 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.27 -0.01 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.64 -0.07 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.55 -0.09 GlBd A p 13.85 -0.07 GrwthA p 19.11 -0.16 WorldA p 15.74 -0.14 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.87 -0.07 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.10 -0.34 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.86 -0.10 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.42 -0.27 Quality 20.87 -0.09 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.29 -0.32 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.43 -0.02 MidCapV 37.59 -0.33 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.18

+5.8 +5.0 +4.4 +5.2 +5.1 +5.2 +3.0 +1.6 +0.4 +5.9 +0.1 +5.4 +0.4 +3.0 +5.5 +5.2 +4.8 +8.2 +3.1 +7.4 +6.1 +2.9 +4.6 +4.3 +5.6 +4.3 +3.9 +4.0 +4.0 NA

CapApInst 37.88 -0.33 IntlInv t 63.18 -0.73 Intl r 63.82 -0.74 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.23 -0.31 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.26 -0.31 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.08 -0.39 Div&Gr 20.60 -0.17 TotRetBd 11.03 +0.03 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.14 +0.09 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.29 -0.09 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.04 -0.10 CmstkA 16.62 -0.11 EqIncA 8.92 -0.04 GrIncA p 20.17 -0.13 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.55 -0.32 AssetStA p 25.31 -0.33 AssetStrI r 25.53 -0.34 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.45 +0.03 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.44 +0.03 HighYld 8.37 -0.01 IntmTFBd 10.74 +0.01 ShtDurBd 10.96 +0.01 USLCCrPls 21.29 -0.19 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 50.78 -0.46 PrkMCVal T 23.84 -0.18 Twenty T 66.40 -0.40 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.34 -0.08 LSGrwth 13.38 -0.11 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.82 -0.40 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.20 -0.41 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.52 -0.25

+3.2 +5.3 +5.4 +1.7 +1.8 +4.1 +5.6 +1.2 -1.2 +3.4 +5.4 +6.0 +4.3 +5.2 +3.5 +3.7 +3.7 +0.7 +0.8 +4.5 +0.6 +0.3 +3.0 +0.3 +5.6 +1.0 +3.8 +4.2 +0.2

+8.0

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.71 StrInc C 15.36 LSBondR 14.65 StrIncA 15.28 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.34 +0.03 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.06 -0.11 BdDebA p 8.04 ShDurIncA p 4.60 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 MFS Funds A: TotRA x 14.52 -0.06 ValueA 24.11 -0.17 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.21 -0.18 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.08 -0.06 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 23.53 -0.28 MergerFd 16.19 -0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.42 +0.03 TotRtBdI 10.41 +0.02 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 40.82 -0.27 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.46 -0.19 GlbDiscZ 30.85 -0.18 QuestZ 18.46 -0.07 SharesZ 21.82 -0.06 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 49.42 -0.66 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 51.18 -0.68 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.50 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.93 -0.21 Intl I r 20.03 -0.20 Oakmark r 43.68 -0.15 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.09 -0.06

+4.5 +4.5 +4.3 +4.7 +3.1 +4.4 +4.7 +1.2 +1.0 +3.7 +6.0 +6.0 +5.5 +0.4 +2.6 +1.6 +1.7 +9.3 +4.4 +4.5 +4.4 +5.0 +7.5 +7.4 NA +4.3 +3.2 +5.8 +4.9

GlbSMdCap 16.13 -0.20 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 36.56 -0.63 GlobA p 63.70 -0.63 GblStrIncA 4.37 -0.01 IntBdA p 6.63 +0.01 MnStFdA 33.10 -0.17 RisingDivA 16.21 -0.15 S&MdCpVl 33.76 -0.28 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.70 -0.13 S&MdCpVl 28.89 -0.25 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.64 -0.14 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.19 -0.62 IntlBdY 6.63 +0.01 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.93 +0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.88 -0.03 AllAsset 12.46 -0.04 ComodRR 9.71 -0.19 HiYld 9.49 -0.01 InvGrCp 10.62 +0.02 LowDu 10.47 +0.01 RealRtnI 11.57 +0.04 ShortT 9.91 +0.01 TotRt 10.93 +0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.57 +0.04 TotRtA 10.93 +0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.93 +0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.93 +0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.93 +0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.52 -0.24 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.49 -0.39 Price Funds: BlChip 39.57 -0.40 CapApp 21.20 -0.07

+4.3 +0.2 +5.5 +3.6 +2.2 +2.2 +4.8 +5.4 +4.5 +5.1 +4.5 +0.3 +2.2 +1.6 +3.6 +3.9 +7.4 +4.1 +2.8 +1.5 +2.8 +0.8 +1.7 +2.6 +1.6 +1.4 +1.6 +1.7 +3.7 +3.9 +3.8 +4.4

EmMktS 35.89 EqInc 24.83 EqIndex 35.42 Growth 33.29 HlthSci 34.17 HiYield 6.94 IntlBond 10.16 IntlStk 14.67 MidCap 62.62 MCapVal 24.76 N Asia 19.25 New Era 55.30 N Horiz 36.41 N Inc 9.45 R2010 15.87 R2015 12.33 R2020 17.09 R2025 12.55 R2030 18.04 R2035 12.79 R2040 18.21 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 36.85 SmCapVal 37.94 SpecIn 12.52 Value 24.73 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.25 VoyA p 24.23 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.49 PremierI r 22.13 TotRetI r 13.80 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.10 S&P Sel 20.55 Scout Funds: Intl 33.64 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.32 Sequoia 143.63 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.36 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 53.56

-0.59 +1.7 -0.18 +5.2 -0.28 +5.0 -0.33 +3.5 -0.03 +12.8 -0.01 +4.4 +0.04 +2.8 -0.19 +3.1 -0.59 +7.0 -0.20 +4.4 -0.21 +0.4 -1.45 +6.0 -0.37 +8.7 +0.02 +0.5 -0.07 +3.5 -0.08 +3.7 -0.12 +4.0 -0.09 +4.2 -0.15 +4.4 -0.11 +4.6 -0.17 +4.5 +0.01 +0.7 -0.43 +7.0 -0.56 +5.0 +2.4 -0.21 +6.0 -0.10 +5.5 -0.17 +2.2 -0.17 +7.2 -0.26 +8.7 -0.15 +5.0 -0.31 +5.2 -0.16 +5.0 -0.33 +3.9 -0.39 +4.6 -1.13 +11.1 -0.27 +6.5 -0.74 +3.5

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.41 IntValue I 30.06 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.35 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.97 CAITAdm 10.68 CpOpAdl 79.69 EMAdmr r 40.81 Energy 134.29 ExtdAdm 43.85 500Adml 121.12 GNMA Ad 10.72 GrwAdm 32.73 HlthCr 55.34 HiYldCp 5.82 InfProAd 26.08 ITBdAdml 11.10 ITsryAdml 11.24 IntGrAdm 63.87 ITAdml 13.20 ITGrAdm 9.84 LtdTrAd 10.98 LTGrAdml 9.21 LT Adml 10.57 MCpAdml 98.10 MuHYAdm 9.96 PrmCap r 70.98 ReitAdm r 81.41 STsyAdml 10.67 STBdAdml 10.52 ShtTrAd 15.86 STIGrAd 10.74 SmCAdm 37.03 TtlBAdml 10.54 TStkAdm 33.09 WellslAdm 53.55 WelltnAdm 55.56 Windsor 48.02 WdsrIIAd 48.38 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.48 CapOpp 34.50

-0.34 +5.0 -0.34 +5.1 -0.19 +2.2 -0.08 +3.3 +0.01 +0.8 -0.41 +3.8 -0.70 +2.4 -3.94 +11.0 -0.51 +6.3 -0.95 +5.0 +0.03 +0.7 -0.23 +3.9 +0.01 +8.0 -0.01 +4.2 +0.12 +2.8 +0.06 +0.5 +0.05 -0.1 -0.89 +3.8 +0.01 +0.6 +0.04 +1.4 +0.5 +0.07 +0.2 +0.02 +0.2 -0.94 +6.4 +0.01 -0.1 -0.55 +4.0 -0.16 +4.5 +0.02 +0.1 +0.02 +0.4 +0.4 +0.01 +0.9 -0.47 +6.5 +0.04 +0.4 -0.28 +5.3 -0.08 +2.8 -0.27 +4.1 -0.43 +5.3 -0.40 +6.2 -0.17 +4.2 -0.17 +3.8

DivdGro 15.14 Energy 71.52 EqInc 21.53 Explr 78.05 GNMA 10.72 GlobEq 18.76 HYCorp 5.82 HlthCre 131.12 InflaPro 13.28 IntlGr 20.07 IntlVal 32.96 ITIGrade 9.84 LifeCon 16.69 LifeGro 22.95 LifeMod 20.20 LTIGrade 9.21 Morg 18.78 MuInt 13.20 PrecMtls r 27.31 PrmcpCor 14.32 Prmcp r 68.40 SelValu r 19.91 STAR 19.69 STIGrade 10.74 StratEq 19.94 TgtRetInc 11.46 TgRe2010 22.92 TgtRe2015 12.79 TgRe2020 22.83 TgtRe2025 13.08 TgRe2030 22.54 TgtRe2035 13.65 TgtRe2040 22.43 TgtRe2045 14.09 USGro 19.08 Wellsly 22.10 Welltn 32.17 Wndsr 14.23 WndsII 27.25 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.32 TotIntlInst r 109.30 500 121.12 Growth 32.72

-0.09 +5.3 -2.09 +11.0 -0.19 +6.3 -0.92 +7.0 +0.03 +0.7 -0.19 +5.0 -0.01 +4.2 +7.9 +0.06 +2.8 -0.28 +3.8 -0.38 +2.5 +0.04 +1.4 -0.05 +2.4 -0.18 +4.0 -0.10 +3.2 +0.07 +0.2 -0.19 +4.2 +0.01 +0.5 -0.77 +2.3 -0.11 +4.0 -0.53 +4.0 -0.14 +6.1 -0.10 +3.2 +0.01 +0.9 -0.19 +8.8 -0.01 +2.1 -0.07 +2.7 -0.06 +3.0 -0.12 +3.3 -0.08 +3.6 -0.16 +4.0 -0.11 +4.3 -0.19 +4.3 -0.11 +4.4 -0.17 +4.5 -0.03 +2.7 -0.16 +4.1 -0.13 +5.3 -0.23 +6.2

MidCap

21.61 -0.20 +6.4

SmCap

36.98 -0.48 +6.4

-0.33 -1.31 -0.94 -0.24

Yacktman Funds:

+3.7 +3.7 +5.0 +3.8

SmlCpGth

23.67 -0.33 +8.0

SmlCpVl

16.78 -0.19 +4.8

STBnd

10.52 +0.02 +0.3

TotBnd

10.54 +0.04 +0.3

TotlIntl

16.33 -0.20 +3.6

TotStk

33.08 -0.28 +5.2

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.39 -0.10 +4.1

ExtIn

43.85 -0.51 +6.3

FTAllWldI r

97.56 -1.15 +4.0

GrwthIst

32.72 -0.24 +3.8

InfProInst

10.62 +0.05 +2.8

InstIdx

120.28 -0.94 +5.0

InsPl

120.28 -0.95 +5.1

InsTStPlus

29.92 -0.26 +5.3

MidCpIst

21.67 -0.21 +6.4

SCInst

37.03 -0.47 +6.5

TBIst

10.54 +0.04 +0.4

TSInst

33.09 -0.28 +5.3

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

100.05 -0.78 +5.0

STBdIdx

10.52 +0.02 +0.4

TotBdSgl

10.54 +0.04 +0.4

TotStkSgl

31.93 -0.28 +5.2

Western Asset: CorePlus I Fund p

10.85 +0.03 +1.8 17.60 -0.05 +6.4


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY BUSINESS PLANNING BEST PRACTICES, DON’T LEAVE SUCCESS TO CHANCE: Presented by Jim Wilcox with Central Oregon Community College. Learn about developing a business plan and continually maintaining it. Register by April 12; free; 7:30 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. DEATH OF A BORROWER OR GUARANTOR: Presented by attorney Christopher Hatfield and hosted by the Risk Management Association East Cascades Chapter. Lunch included. RSVP requested; $30 for RMA members, $35 for others; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-3229233 or bbritt@columbiabank.com. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE YOUNG PROFESSIONALS NETWORK: Free; 6 p.m.; Red Dog Depot, 3716 S.W. 21st Place; 541-923-5191 or www.redmondchamber.org.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting starts promptly at 7:00 a.m.; free; Bend Masonic Center, 1036 N.E. Eighth St.; 541-610-9125. CENTRAL OREGON CHRISTIAN BUSINESS ASSOCIATION MONTHLY BREAKFAST MEETING: Bob Schuster, co-founder of Dynamic Coaching, will share what he has learned during his 45 years in business. Breakfast included. RSVP requested; $10; 6:307:45 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, 2210 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-788-5301 or info@cocba.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend

Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. HOW TO RAISE BACKYARD CHICKENS: Free; noon; Cowgirl Cash, 924 Brooks St., Bend; 541-815-8996. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541-553-3243. SOCIAL SECURITY 101: RSVP requested; free; 4-5:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. GENERATING GREAT ADVERTISING CONCEPTS: Registration required; $49; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MICROSOFT CERTIFICATION PREP, EXCEL 2007: Four-session course. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY INSIDE MAY’S GENERAL OBLIGATION BOND: Review the proposed project recommendations for $30 million worth of road improvements with Bend City Manager Eric King, Transportation Engineering Manager Nick Arnis and Better Roads for Bend Co-Chair Amy Tykeson. Reservations encouraged; $30 for Bend Chamber of Commerce members, $40 at the door; 7:15-9 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3823221 or www.bendchamber.org. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Hosted by American Family Insurance; free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541536-6237 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information

NEWS OF RECORD BANKRUPTCIES

Donna Fuller, P.O. Box 1879, La Pine Filed April 8

Chapter 7 Filed April 6

Jason R. Ceccanti, 2077 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond Karen M. Parker, 2077 S.W. Canyon Drive, Redmond Fawn L. Curry, P.O. Box 2270, Redmond Brenen Mansfield, P.O. Box 1178, Redmond Tammy Blakemore, 14501 S.W. Bills Place, Terrebonne Tyler N. Moss, 939 N.E. Locksley Drive, Bend Kenneth and Amy Paulson, 67405 Harrington Loop, Bend Thale E. Brown, P.O. Box 9415, Bend Filed April 7

Randy W. Mooney and Ashley A. Glidewell, 65290 U.S. Highway 20, Bend Tommy L. Fosdick, 19920 S.W. Granite Drive #207, Bend Mark W. and Lisa L. Crnich, 1133 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond Srdjan Cvetanovic, 19587 Simpson Ave., Bend Kerry K. Knouse, 61665 Woodriver Drive, Bend Paul R. Fletcher, 654 E. Antler, Redmond Cynthia Jo Davis, 8892 S. Shad Road, Terrebonne Patricia S. Muffley, 63447 Stacy Lane, Bend Matthew S. Emery, 19860 Fourth St., Bend

Steven M. and Katherine A. George, 2508 S.W. 35th Court, Redmond Wade N. and Linda E. Foss, 3115 S.W. Salmon Ave., Redmond Mark C. Keith, 611 N.E. Bellevue Lane #305, Bend Douglas P. and Connie G. Wright, 21495 Hyde Lane, Bend Filed April 9

Betty A. Berger, 828 N.E. Quimby Ave., Bend Filed April 11

Paul D. Wilson, 595 S.E. Fifth St., Prineville James N. Meeks, 1124 N.W. Baltimore Ave., Bend Patricia A. Bender, P.O. Box 266, Madras Debby L. Davidson, 19574 Riverwoods Drive, Bend Elizabeth R. McGlauflin, 1900 N.E. Third St. Suite 106, Box #194, Bend William J. and Marla M. Railey, 1263 S.E. Eighth St., Prineville Leah M. Mansfield, 185 N.W. Harwood Ave. #12, Prineville Andrea C. Belding, 727 S.W. Seventh St., Redmond Advanced Surgical Care LLC, 2084 N.E. Professional Court, Bend Sue A. Parrish, 3455 S.W. Salmon, Redmond Chapter 13 Filed April 12

Joseph W. and Shawn J. Anzaldo, 2366 N.W. Torsway, Bend

and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. WORK ZONE FLAGGER CLASS: Covers the fundamental principles of traffic safety and meets the requirements of the Oregon Department of Transportation’s construction specifications. Registration required; $79; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. SOCIAL CULTURE & THE SOCIAL MEDIA POLICY: Part three of The Social Nonprofit workshop nine-part series. Explore ways to promote an internal social culture and create a social media policy that will enhance and support online social activity; free; 11 a.m.; Deschutes Library Administration Building, 507 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-7198880, chevypham@gmail.com or http://host5.evanced.info/deschutes/ evanced/eventcalendar.asp. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 6 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-5088681, rcooper@bendhabitat.org or www.bendhabitat.org.

SATURDAY BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. BEND AREA HABITAT FOR HUMANITY AFFORDABLE HOUSING

ORIENTATION: An orientation for families interested in home ownership; free; 11 a.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-5088681, rcooper@bendhabitat.org or www.bendhabitat.org.

U.S. still lagging in use of technology, study says By John Markoff New York Times News Service

MONDAY WORD 2007, BEYOND THE BASICS: Registration required; $59; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. CENTRAL OREGON RETIRED EDUCATORS ASSOCIATION MEETING: $8.50 for lunch; 11:30 a.m.; Zion Lutheran Church, 1113 S.W. Black Butte Blvd., Redmond; 541-382-7044. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 4-8 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining. com.

TUESDAY MARKETING TO YOUR BEST CUSTOMERS: Cheryl McIntosh of Studio Absolute will discuss ways to reach buyers, build brand loyalty and grow your business. Two threehour classes; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUYER STRATEGIES FOR TODAY’S REAL ESTATE MARKET: Presented by The Oregon and Beyond Real Estate Group of Steve Scott Realtors. Reservations encouraged; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; First American Title Insurance Co., 395 S.W. Bluff, Bend; 541-693-2009.

WEDNESDAY April 20 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

The United States continues to lag other nations in its use of computing and communications technology, according to an annual study issued Tuesday by the World Economic Forum. For the second consecutive year, the U.S. finished fifth in the study’s comparison of 138 countries that make up 98.8 percent of the world’s total gross domestic product. Sweden was first, followed by Singapore, Finland and Switzerland. These rankings, for 2010, are based on an index of 71 economic and social indicators, as diverse as new patents, mobile phone subscriptions and availability of venture capital. The annual reports began in 2001, after the collapse of the Internet bubble. The World Economic Forum, based in Davos, Switzerland, holds that technological progress is the principal driver of innovation, productivity and efficiency. “What we are trying to address,” said a co-author of the study, Soumitra Dutta, a profes-

sor of Information Systems at the INSEAD business school, “is what is the capability and what is the level of success of a nation to benefit from the network economy?” The study showed the rapid progress of the so-called Asian Tigers, whose governments have invested heavily in technology. Besides Singapore, Taiwan was ranked sixth, South Korea 10th and Hong Kong 12th. Japan was 19th. China ranked 36th and India 48th, falling five places from 2009. Rounding out the large developing BRIC countries — Brazil, Russia, India and China — Brazil was 56th and Russia 77th. The country making the most progress in 2010 was Indonesia, which jumped 14 places to 53rd — in part because of high educational standards and in part because of the importance the government has placed on information and communications technology. Among Western nations, Canada was eighth, Norway ninth, Germany 13th, Britain 15th and France 20th.

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LOCAL SCHOOLS Students re-create relics from ancient Egypt, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Kam Kuwata, leading California political strategist, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2011

BEND-LA PINE

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Parents, students protest planned high school schedule change

WASHINGTON

Found: Fort Stevens State Park

ia River

Portland Salem

Newport

Eugene

Bend

OREGON

Remains of ex-Bend man found 400 miles from where he was swept off

Coos Bay

By Scott Hammers

MILES

Disadvantages of 7 periods stressed

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The Bulletin 100

Medford

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

About 50 students and several parents showed up at the Bend-La Pine Schools board meeting Tuesday to question the district’s plan to change high school schedules to seven-period days. They expressed concerns about how the schedule would affect students’ ability to complete all the classes they wanted or needed to take, as well as why the decision to change the schedule hadn’t been discussed with parents and teachers before being handed down. Lonnie Van Duzer, parent of a Mountain View High School student, said she wanted answers Inside about the schedule change. • Senate OKs “There hasn’t been really a lot education of explanation about how it’s gofunding bill, ing to change and specifically why,” she told the board. “We Page C3 know that it’s money. Of course. Because it’s always about the money and lack thereof.” Van Duzer’s daughter, under the block system, could earn eight credits in a year. Van Duzer worries that under the seven-period schedule her daughter can earn only seven credits. Instead of taking two credits’ worth of Spanish in the same year, it will take a full year to earn one credit. “The kids are getting less. And we are asking these kids to do more with less,” Van Duzer said. “Is this what’s really best for these kids?”

Body of tsunami victim discovered near Astoria

Crescent City C

Eureka

CALIFORNIA

Missing: Mouth of Klamath River Greg Cross / The Bulletin

The remains of a former Bend resident swept out to sea by the March 11 West Coast tsunami have been located. Dustin Weber’s body was found April 2 roughly 400 miles north of the sandbar at the mouth of the Klamath River from which he disappeared. Weber, 25, was an indirect victim of

the 9.0 magnitude earthquake off the northeast coast of Japan. More than 13,000 Japanese citizens were killed in the earthquake and reDustin Weber sulting tsunami. The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office said Tuesday the remains found on a beach at Fort Stevens State Park, just south of Astoria, had been positively identified as Weber’s through dental records. Born and raised in Bend, Weber had moved to California just three weeks

before he died, said his father, Jon Weber. His grandmother, a member of the Yurok tribe, had given him an old house on the reservation south of Crescent City, Calif., Jon Weber said, and he’d been fixing up the house, hiking and making new friends. After years of often struggling in Bend, Weber was thriving in his new home, Jon Weber said. “He’d only been down there for three weeks, but the three weeks that he had, I’ve never seen him happier than he was,” he said. “Couldn’t have been a better situation for him to go at that time, just because he was so happy.” See Tsunami / C2

Irrigation season begins

$15 million budget gap Even though the Oregon Legislature on Tuesday moved closer to approving a $5.7 billion budget for the 2011-13 biennium, which is higher than Gov. John Kitzhaber’s proposed budget, Bend-La Pine Schools still will face a $15 million budget gap for the 2011-12 school year. Superintendent Ron Wilkinson last week announced he would switch to the new schedule and cut at least 20 to 22 high school teaching positions. That would allow teachers to oversee more classes, holding class sizes at about 35 students. Several people at the meeting suggested in lieu of eliminating teaching positions, the district eliminate some administrator positions. For many students in the district, the new schedule will be their third in three years. See Schedule / C2

Deschutes may give developers additional time to start projects By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Deschutes County gives developers five years to start their projects after they obtain land-use approval. It’s one of the most generous planning approval periods in Oregon, says Planning Director Nick Lelack. Yet with the real estate market still in the doldrums, the Central Oregon Builders Association says some of its members could have their land-use approvals expire while they wait for the economy to recover. The county commissioners will discuss at 1:30 p.m. today whether to grant an extension for those approvals. Andy High, vice president of government affairs for the Central Oregon Builders Association, and Lelack do not know how many developers are approaching the expiration of their land-use permits. However, Lelack pointed to county data that show requests have increased significantly since 2008 for land-use permit extensions already available. In general, county land use approvals remain active for two years. After that, developers can request up to three, one-year extensions, Lelack said. The fee for each extension is $310. The development permits have expiration dates to ensure that projects comply with current land use rules. See Extensions / C2

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

SURVEYING THE FLOW Central Oregon Irrigation District water master Cary Penhollow, of Redmond, checks the flow of water after opening the Pilot Butte Canal main head gates at the Division Street dam area of the Deschutes River in Bend on Tuesday morning.

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When to expect water

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Irrigation water has started trickling through local canals. Irrigation district

Partial water delivery start

1 Arnold

Monday

2 Central Oregon

Began April 12 for Central Oregon Canal, April 14 for Pilot Butte Canal

3 North Unit

April 15

4 Ochoco

April 20

5 Three Sisters

Expected to begin by end of April

6 Swalley

Began April 1

7 Tumalo

Monday

Source: Irrigation districts

JEFFERSON COUNTY

Madras

3

26

CROOK COUNTY 4

5

Prineville Redmond

Sisters

126 97

20 7

2

6

27

Bend

1 DESCHUTES COUNTY

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Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

EN ROUTE TO FARMLANDS Central Oregon Irrigation District patrolman Lynn Shores, of Bend, walks over fish filters as water flows toward the Pilot Butte Canal main head gates Tuesday morning.

OPENING PUSH Clarification In a story headlined, “Deschutes may ease rules on wind turbines,” which appeared Tuesday, April 12, on Page C1, the cost of a county building permit for a wind turbine was reported incorrectly, due to incorrect information supplied to The Bulletin. A typical building permit for a wind turbine would cost approximately $200.

Penhollow presses an “open” button on the Pilot Butte Canal main head gates at the Division Street dam in Bend, allowing irrigation water from the Deschutes River to flow in large quantities to farmland.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

C2 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Tsunami

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:50 a.m. April 7, in the 1100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:50 a.m. April 7, in the 61600 block of Summer Shade Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 1:05 p.m. April 7, in the 61400 block of Southeast 27th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:34 p.m. April 7, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:36 p.m. April 7, in the 20600 block of Foxborough Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:51 p.m. April 7, in the 19900 block of Powers Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 7:24 p.m. April 7, in the 1200 block of Northwest Hartford Avenue. DUII — Steven Michael Creed, 48, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:31 p.m. April 7, in the 61300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Brandon Levi Jackson, 33, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:10 p.m. April 7, in the 700 block of Northwest Wall Street. DUII — Carmella Marie Thomas, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:10 p.m. April 7, in the 700 block of Northeast Savannah Drive. DUII — Ashley Marie Sol, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:55 p.m. April 7, in the area of Northeast Fourth Street and Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:33 a.m. April 8, in the 61400 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:49 a.m. April 8, in the 400 block of Northeast Quimby Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 1:01 p.m. April 8, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97.

Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 1:02 p.m. April 8, in the 600 block of Northeast Third Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:55 p.m. April 8, in the 19800 block of Touchmark Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:24 p.m. April 8, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. DUII — Taylor Murrhee Alexy, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:31 p.m. April 8, in the 1000 block of Southeast Third Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:16 p.m. April 8, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. DUII — Tyler Jay Lewis Dolman, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:12 a.m. April 9, in the area of Northwest Awbrey Road and Northwest Newport Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:35 a.m. April 9, in the 61100 block of Snowbrush Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:49 a.m. April 9, in the 200 block of Northwest Lafayette Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:45 a.m. April 9, in the 1400 block of Northeast Tucson Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:43 a.m. April 9, in the 1100 block of Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:18 a.m. April 9, in the 100 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. DUII — Jacob William Heller, 28, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:57 p.m. April 9, in the area of North Alderwood Circle and Cedarwood Road. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2 p.m. April 9, in the 61100 block of Parrell Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 2:41 p.m. April 9, in the 1000 block of Northeast Locksley Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 2:44 p.m. April 9, in the 61200 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:46 p.m. April 9, in the 3100 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 3:58 p.m. April 9, in the 20200 block of Knightsbridge Place.

Medford man gets 3 years in fraud scheme The Associated Press MEDFORD — A Southern Oregon man has been sentenced to nearly three years in prison for bilking friends and family members out of retirement savings in an illegal scheme to develop land belonging to American Indian tribes in Montana. Gilbert Birdinground Pugliano of Medford planned to buy and develop tribal land in Montana and return the profits to his investors, but he later found out his plan was illegal, the Mail Tribune reported. Instead of returning the money he collected from clients, he used it to buy expensive cars and vacations.

Medford police said Pugliano, 32, has roots in an American Indian community in Montana, and that may have helped him convince victims that what he was doing was legitimate. Pugliano was indicted last fall on various counts of racketeering, aggravated theft, securities fraud and selling unlicensed securities. He apologized during his sentencing Monday in Jackson County Circuit Court in Medford, saying, “I got caught up in a cycle of immense greed and bad decisions.� But some victims in the courtroom called out “liar� as Pugliano spoke.

Theft — A theft was reported at 4:14 p.m. April 9, in the 2600 block of Northwest College Way. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:13 p.m. April 9, in the 3200 block of Northeast Spring Creek Place. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:26 p.m. April 9, in the 2600 block of Northeast Forum Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 6:33 p.m. April 9, in the area of Daniel and Keyte roads. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:15 p.m. April 9, in the 100 block of Northwest Oregon Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:25 p.m. April 9, in the 61000 block of Country Club Drive. DUII — Ronald Allen Faught, 51, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:16 a.m. April 10, in the area of Southwest Bond Street and Southwest Industrial Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:05 a.m. April 10, in the 61200 block of Fairfield Drive. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 11:26 a.m. April 10, in the 2500 block of U.S. Highway 20. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 1:12 p.m. April 10, in the 700 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Richard William Sander, 40, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:28 p.m. April 10, in the area of Southeast Third Street and Southeast Reed Market Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:46 p.m. April 10, in the 1300 block of Northeast Elk Court. DUII — David James Kaiser, 56, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:47 p.m. April 10, in the 600 block of Northeast Third Street. DUII — Richard William Sander, 40, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:49 p.m. April 10, in the area of Southeast Fifth Street and Southeast Roosevelt Avenue. DUII — Kjell Erik Risdall, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:49 p.m. April 10, in the 100 block of Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive. DUII — Skylar Buckley Thornton, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:28 a.m. April 11, in the 1300 block of Northwest Galveston Avenue.

Redmond Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:15 a.m. April 11, in the 200 block of Northwest Fifth Street. Theft — Batteries were reported stolen at 1:34 a.m. April 11, in the 200 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

DUII — Ryan Edwin Coryell, 40, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:55 p.m. April 11, in the 61000 block of Brosterhous Road in Bend. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 9:43 a.m. April 11, in the 51300 block of U.S. Highway 97 in La Pine. Theft — A yard decoration was reported stolen at 8:55 a.m. April 11, in the 53100 block of Woodstock Drive in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Friday 5:41 p.m. — Confined cooking fire, 2500 N.W. High Lakes Loop. 15 — Medical aid calls. Saturday 8:15 a.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 1324 N.E. Dempsey Drive. 17 — Medical aid calls. Sunday 3:49 p.m. — Authorized controlled burning, 60445 Billadeau Road. 7:03 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 19431 Apache Road. 16 — Medical aid calls. Monday 15 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Chihuahua and Cavalier King Charles Spaniel mix — Adult male, red gold; found near South U.S. Highway 97. Pug — Adult female, black; found near Southwest 17th Street and Southwest Obsidian Avenue.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Signals to shut down on Butler Market

Ex-senator to address OSU-Cascades grads

Signals will be shut down at several intersections on Butler Market Road on Thursday while crews install new water valve boxes. Between 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., the signals at the intersection of Brinson Boulevard and Butler Market Road will be shut down. From 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., the signals at the intersection of Purcell Boulevard and Butler Market Road will be shut down. Flaggers will be present.

Former state Sen. Neil Bryant will present the key address at Oregon State UniversityCascades’ 10th commencement June 12. Bryant served as senator from 1993 to 2001 and is a longtime resident of Central Oregon. He is a shareholder in the Bend firm of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis and has supported higher education in Central Oregon through his involvement with several organizations since 1993. The commencement will take place in Drake Park.

FDR dedicates Jefferson Memorial in 1943 The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, April 13, the 103rd day of 2011. There are 262 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 13, 1861, Fort Sumter in South Carolina fell as the Union commander, Maj. Robert Anderson, agreed to surrender in the face of the Confederates’ relentless bombardment. ON THIS DATE In 1598, King Henry IV of France endorsed the Edict of Nantes, which granted rights to the Protestant Huguenots. (The edict was abrogated in 1685 by King Louis XIV, who declared France entirely Catholic again.) In 1742, Handel’s “Messiah� was first performed publicly, in Dublin, Ireland. In 1743, the third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson, was born in Shadwell in the Virginia Colony. In 1860, the Pony Express completed its inaugural run from St. Joseph, Mo. to Sacramento, Calif., in 10 days. In 1943, President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the Jefferson Memorial. In 1958, Van Cliburn of the United States won the first In-

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y ternational Tchaikovsky Competition for piano in Moscow; Russian Valery Klimov won the violin competition. In 1960, the U.S. Navy’s Transit 1B navigational satellite was successfully launched into orbit. In 1970, Apollo 13, four-fifths of the way to the moon, was crippled when a tank containing liquid oxygen burst. (The astronauts managed to return safely.) In 1981, Washington Post reporter Janet Cooke received a Pulitzer Prize for her feature about an 8-year-old heroin addict named “Jimmy�; however, Cooke relinquished the prize two days later, admitting she’d fabricated the story. In 1986, Pope John Paul II visited the Great Synagogue of Rome in the first recorded papal visit of its kind to a Jewish house of worship. TEN YEARS AGO With the crew of a U.S. spy plane safely back in the United States, American officials gave their detailed version of what happened when the plane collided with a Chinese fighter on April 1; the U.S. said its plane was struck by the jet. (China

maintained that the U.S. plane rammed the fighter.) FIVE YEARS AGO Confessed al-Qaida conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui expressed no remorse for his role in the 9/11 attacks as he took the stand for the second time in his death-penalty trial in Alexandria, Va. British author Dame Muriel Spark died in Florence, Italy, at age 88. ONE YEAR AGO World leaders concluded a 47nation nuclear security conference in Washington, endorsing President Barack Obama’s call for securing all of the globe’s vulnerable nuclear materials within four years, but offering few specifics for achieving that goal. First lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden made a surprise visit to Haiti, the scene of a devastating earthquake three months earlier. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Movie director Stanley Donen is 87. Former Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell, R-Colo., is 78. Actor Lyle Waggoner is 76. Actor Edward Fox is 74. Actor Paul Sorvino is 72. Poet Seamus Heaney is 72. Movie-TV composer Bill Conti

is 69. Rock musician Jack Casady is 67. Actor Tony Dow is 66. Singer Al Green is 65. Author-journalist Christopher Hitchens is 62. Actor Ron Perlman is 61. Actor William Sadler is 61. Singer Peabo Bryson is 60. Bandleader/rock musician Max Weinberg is 60. Bluegrass singer-musician Sam Bush is 59. Rock musician Jimmy Destri is 57. Singer-musician Louis Johnson (The Brothers Johnson) is 56. Comedian Gary Kroeger is 54. Actress Saundra Santiago is 54. Sen. Bob Casey Jr., D-Pa., is 51. Rock musician Joey Mazzola (Sponge) is 50. Chess grandmaster Garry Kasparov is 48. Actress Page Hannah is 47. Actress-comedian Caroline Rhea is 47. Rock musician Lisa Umbarger is 46. Rock musician Marc Ford is 45. Reggae singer Capleton is 44. Actor Ricky Schroder is 41. Rock singer Aaron Lewis (Staind) is 39. Actor Bokeem Woodbine is 38. Singer Lou Bega is 36. Actor-producer Glenn Howerton is 35. Actress Courtney Peldon is 30. Pop singer Nellie McKay is 29. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Happiness is not the absence of problems but the ability to deal with them.� — Charles Louis de Montesquieu, French philosopher (1689-1755)

Continued from C1 On the morning of the tsunami, Weber and two friends went down to the beach to watch the waves come in and take photos. The first wave came in about 7:30 a.m. and sent a five-foot surge up the Klamath River, Jon Weber said. He and his son called each other after the first wave, but neither man answered his phone. About 9:15 a.m., a larger wave came sweeping along the coast, moving from north to south. Weber, who’d been distracted by banging on rocks with a stick, had his back turned to the water and was knocked down and dragged out to sea. Jon Weber said he’s been touched by the community’s support his family, particular-

Schedule Continued from C1 Bend, Mountain View and Summit high schools all operated on a block schedule in 2009-10, in which students met every day in four subjects for 90 minutes, earning one credit in each of those subjects at the end of the semester. This fall, the high schools each made changes to those block schedules, adding intervention and enrichment periods and shifting how often blocks meet.

Class effectiveness Now those schools will switch to a seven-period semester schedule with all classes meeting daily but for a shorter period of time. La Pine High, which currently uses a trimester schedule, will also make the adjustment. Marshall High School’s schedule will not change. But that schedule, students said, wasn’t ideal. Summit High School student Jackson Ward said by changing from long blocks to a seven-period day, some classes, like physical education classes, would no longer be as useful. “Already that time flies by quickly,� he said. “If you drastically cut the time of our P.E. classes, this could mean kids have a lot less time to get their physical activity during the day.� Other classes, like Modern Sports, where students go to the skate park every other day to go skateboarding, would no longer be possible. “If you substantially reduce (class length), that means these classes will not be able to function because kids can’t get across town,� he said. He said science labs also could suffer from shorter

Extensions Continued from C1 “Deschutes County already has one of the longest development approval periods in Oregon, if you include all the maximum extensions possible today,� Lelack said. “That’s probably why it’s taken a little bit longer for these requests to come to Deschutes County, is because we have little bit longer window to begin with.� If county commissioners want to extend the permits, Lelack said he will recommend doing so for two years and requiring developers to apply for more time, just as they do now for their first three extensions. Other Central Oregon governments that have extended development approvals include the cities of Bend,

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646

ly the 600 people who turned out for his son’s memorial service in late March. “It’s been very, very tough. I’ve got pictures all over the house. I get up each morning, I cry a few tears, and pull up my head up and keep going,� Jon Weber said. “I’ve got other family members — his sister’s here, she’s 17. I’ve got to keep going.� Weber’s remains will be cremated, his father said. He’s hoping to scatter some of his son’s ashes near the hot springs at Newberry Crater and near Paisley, two places they often went to get away from town and spend time together. Weber is the first person in the U.S. to be killed by a tsunami since 1964 when an earthquake in Alaska triggered waves that hit Crescent City, killing 11 people. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

class times, and said many students currently use free blocks to participate in internships. “We will not gain valuable life experience for the future,â€? Ward said. “This is a pivotal time to be able to do these things and get real-world experience.â€? Board member Nori Juba told the crowd that no final decisions had been made. “We’re trying to make decisions based on sound research and at the same time take community input,â€? he said. “In defense of what’s been happening, our superintendent has been in Salem every week trying to get more money out of the state ‌ So when you ask why all of a sudden is this happening, guess what? We’re not getting any more help from the state. Something’s going to have to be done to look at how to fill the gap.â€?

‘Draconian’ change But parents cautioned making rash decisions. Claudia Hinz told the board that the number of students in the room spoke for itself. “Make a visual tour of the room here and just briefly acknowledge the ages among us,â€? she said. “There’s an awful lot of high school students here ‌ because they feel so strongly, they’re here of their own initiative about these detrimental changes.â€? Hinz called the change to a seven-period day a “Draconian measure.â€? “I would ask you to go back to the drawing board,â€? she said. “And I would ask that before you return to the numbers, to consult with the teachers, to bring the students into the process, bring the parents into the process. ‌ This is not the right decision for our students or teachers or the community here in Bend.â€? Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

Redmond and Sisters, and Crook County, according to a county staff report. Typically, they have given developers two more years to start projects. Bend officials have approved two rounds of special extensions. In March, the Bend City Council decided to allow the community development director to grant two-year extensions on active planning approvals to help builders and developers in a down economy. Councilors approved a similar extension in February 2009. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 C3

L S IN BRIEF Redmond charter enrolling students

A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

Bringing history back to life

Redmond Proficiency Academy, the Redmond School District’s public charter high school, is offering open enrollment for all grades for 2011-12. Enrollment for the school, which allows students to move at their own pace and is designed for students interested in a self-designed or accelerated course of study, is open through Friday. For more information or to register, go to www .rpacademy.org or call 541-526-0882.

Sky View sixth-graders reproduce relics for project on ancient Egypt By Megan Kehoe The Bulletin

Redmond to host kindergarten event Redmond School District will host its kindergarten roundup for incoming students next week. The program will allow the district to determine how many students will enroll in the classes. Staff will register kindergartners and give parents information on open houses, bus and boundary information, and other services. Children who will turn age 5 on or before Sept. 1 are eligible to start kindergarten. To register your kindergartner, bring a birth certificate or document proving the child’s birth date; the child’s immunization records; and a proof of residency, like a piece of mail with a parent’s name and current address. Roundup times are as follows: • 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., April 18 to April 22, at Tumalo Community School, 19835 Second St., for kids attending Tumalo School. • 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., April 19, at Terrebonne Community School, 1199 B St., for kids attending Terrebonne School. The school will also enroll students the entire week during school hours. • 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., April 20, at Lynch Elementary, 1314 S.W. Kalama Ave., for kids attending John Tuck, Lynch, Sage, Tom McCall or Vern Patrick elementaries.

Photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Hannah Wiley, 11, lifts up a pyramid during the sixth-grade Ancient Egypt Day in the media center at Sky View Middle School in Bend on a recent Monday morning. Sky View Middle School sixth-graders Cristian Rivera, 12, left, watches as Allison Cox, 12, touches a mummy made by Holden Kingrey, 12, who is standing behind Allison. Holden made the mummy for the annual class event.

Bend students win science expo awards Several area students working with the Bend Science Station won honors at the Northwest Science Exposition in Portland on April 1. The fair was sponsored by Intel and featured more than 500 students from Oregon and Washington. Irene Peaks, a homeschooled sophomore, earned second place in the Animal Sciences category. Irene is eligible to present her project at the International Science Fair in Los Angeles in May. Quincy Hayden, a Redmond Proficiency Academy junior, earned third place in the Energy and Transportation category. Michael DeKock, a homeschooled seventh-grader, earned an honorable mention in the Animal Science and Microbiology category. He also earned $50 from the American Statistical Association and an award from the U.S. Metric Association. Matthew Finney-Jordet, a seventh-grader at Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School, earned an honorable mention in the Medicine and Health Sciences category. — From wire reports

T E E N F E AT S Billy Murphy recently attained the rank of Eagle Scout from Boy Scouts of America. Murphy is a member of Troop 21 in Bend and attends Summit High School. For his community service project, Murphy and his volunteers spent approximately 310 hours improving the water runoff near the footbridge of Shevlin Park. Murphy is also a musician and will travel with the Summit High School Wind Ensemble to perform at Carnegie Hall in New York this month. He is the son of Richard and Bissy Murphy.

Senate approves $5.7B in education funding The Associated Press SALEM— Oregon senators gritted their teeth Tuesday and unanimously passed two education spending bills that could force teacher layoffs, shorter school years and larger classes. The Senate repudiated calls from education groups, unions and some Democrats in the House to dig deeper into savings for schools. Senators authorized $5.7 billion that will leave schools far short of what they say they need to continue business as usual for the next two years. “I don’t like it,” Sen. Chris Edwards, D-Eugene, told senators. “But colleagues, you know what? This recession sucks. All these decisions suck, and this budget sucks. But we don’t have a choice. We have to do this.” Lawmakers said that since they

IN THE LEGISLATURE can’t give schools more money, they opted instead to give them certainty and stability. Sen. Rod Monroe, D-Portland, said the $5.7 billion in funding is “sacrosanct,” even if tax collections continue to decline when the latest revenue projections are released in May. “I can assure you, that number is firm,” said Monroe, co-chair of the budget subcommittee that handles education. “It is not going to change.” The education bills, HB5552 and HB 5553, draw on $123 million from two savings accounts, the Education Stability Fund and the Common School Fund.

C O N TAC T U S SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: smiller@bendbulletin.com TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have

been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

Sky View Middle School’s library was transformed into an ancient Egyptian museum on a recent Monday morning. Though, with full-costumed pharaohs walking around and chatting with visitors, perhaps it was a little livelier than your average, dust-gathering hall of history. “I’m just your regular pharaoh,” said Tyler Nelson, 12, pointing to his elaborate costume. “We get extra credit if we dress up.” Tyler, along with the rest of the sixth-graders at Sky View, spent the morning showcasing the projects they had been working on for the past month as part of a lesson on ancient Egypt. The library was the center of the museum, with student projects lined up around walls and populating the tops of bookshelves. Ancient Egypt Day has become an annual event at Sky View, said sixth-grade teacher Dawn Roberts. “It’s always their favorite part of the lesson,” Roberts said. “Kids remember a lot more if they get hands-on learning — it really sticks with them.” Students stood by their projects while parents, teachers and other students made their way around the room. Tyler’s project was a topographical map of the Nile River Valley made out of clay. His costume — a gold-trimmed tunic, striped headdress and stylized sandals, — was worthy of Egyptian royalty. “My mom and aunt made it,” Tyler said. “I think it’s pretty cool to be a pharaoh.” Tyler said that during the lesson on Egypt, students learned about King Tutankhamen and other pharaohs throughout Egyptian history. Students also learned that not all Egyptians lived as lavishly as the royalty. “I learned that it took 20 years to build a pyramid,” said Karissa Thompson, 11. “And a lot of the people died building it.” For her project, Karissa constructed a large-scale pyramid out of cardboard, glue and sand with a drawbridge-style door that opened to reveal an inner chamber. Other students took the Egyptian theme to the max with life-size replicas. Holden Kingrey, 12, stood by his life-size mummy project, which attracted

“It’s always their favorite part of the lesson. Kids remember a lot more if they get hands-on learning — it really sticks with them.” — Dawn Roberts, Sky View Middle School sixth-grade teacher

many of the museum visitors even though it was located in a corner of the library. Holden said he made the mummy by stuffing old clothes with newspaper and wrapping the figure with fabric strips. For the head, he used a balloon, and for the sarcophagus, he used cardboard, tape and gold spray paint. “The main thing I learned was how to mummify someone,” Holden said. “I learned you have to take their organs out.” Holden also learned a thing or two about practical jokes. Earlier in the day, he and some of his friends had used the life-size sarcophagus to hide in and scare their teacher when she lifted the cardboard lid. “It’s been a really fun project,” Holden said. Other students created replicas of Egyptian jewelry, the Rosetta Stone — the inscribed tablet that enabled scholars to decipher Egyptian hieroglyphics — and canopic jars — jars in which the viscera of the deceased was stored alongside a mummy. One project featured clay canopic jars along with Play-Doh replicas of a liver, heart, intestines and lungs, neatly placed in plastic bags in front of the jars. Roberts said the project allows students to exercise and showcase their creativity. “A lot of these kids really put their hearts into these projects,” Roberts said. “And you can tell that they’re really proud of what they’ve done.” Megan Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

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C4 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA RICHARD COE

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Don’t place ban on ‘independent’

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hat legislators feel they have a right to do is not the same as what’s right to do. But when it comes to Democrats and Republicans protecting their major

party status, legislators grow a convenient blind spot. Today, House Bill 2442 is scheduled for a hearing in the House Rules Committee. The bill would allow the Democrats and Republicans in the Legislature to change the name of another political party. No party in Oregon could have the word “independent” in it. This bill targets only one party — the Independent Party of Oregon. It’s an upstart in state politics. It formed in 2007. It’s small compared to the number of Oregon Democrats with 860,000 members or Oregon Republicans with 663,000. But it’s already the state’s third-largest political party with about 65,000 members. The bill says the word independent “causes widespread voter confusion and threatens the integrity and administration of elections laws.” It’s more like the Independent Party of Oregon threatens Democrats and Republicans. Sure, there are some voters who think of themselves as independent who get confused when they are registering or reregistering to vote. They see “Independent party” and check that rather than “not a member of a party.” Voter confusion is not a reason that legislators should be picking what’s an appropriate name for political parties. Political advertising from Democrats and Republicans causes plenty of voter confusion, and we’re not banning that. The two major parties in Oregon have a history of meddling with threats to their status. Democrats got spooked in 2004

Political advertising from Democrats and Republicans causes plenty of voter confusion, and we’re not banning that. when Ralph Nader tried to get on the Oregon ballot for president with petition signatures. In 2005, Democrats and Republicans banded together to prevent that from ever happening again. They created a law that said if a voter takes part in a partisan primary and signs a petition for an independent candidate, the signature doesn’t count. It made it hard for independent candidates to qualify. It greatly complicated matters for then-state Sen. Ben Westlund of Tumalo when he made a run for governor as an independent in 2006. It also discouraged Gov. John Kitzhaber from running as an independent that year. Fortunately, enough pressure was put on the Legislature and the law was overturned in 2009. With House Bill 2442, the parties are back at it again. The language of House Bill 2442 also declares it “an emergency being necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety.” That’s so it can take effect immediately upon passage. The only urgency here is that of the major parties to try again to crush any upstarts.

Move mileage bill O

regonians buying used cars generally can assume that the mileage they’re told a vehicle has is accurate. The state Driver and Motor Vehicle Services Division tracks the mileage of cars sold when they’re less than 10 years old, and that information is available to purchasers. A problem arises when older vehicles change hands, however, though that could change if House Bill 2042 becomes law. The measure, sponsored by Rep. Phil Barnhart, D-Eugene, does not require sellers to record their mileage on older cars; it simply allows them to do so. It does require DMV to store all mileage statements thus gathered, a change from current practice. For now the agency collects information only on newer used cars, and sellers of older cars are never even asked to record their mileage. The Oregon Vehicle Dealers Association asked for the measure as a way of cutting down fraud on the used car lot. The group estimates there are at least 5,000 cases of odometer fraud

in the state each year, and it costs car buyers money. In fact, OVDA says, the average overpayment in such cases is about $2,500. Those seeking to cheat buyers can use a computer to roll back the exterior odometer on a vehicle or simply replace it with one from another vehicle. This is the sort of pro-consumer legislation that can be a winner for everyone but those determined to cheat on odometer readings. Honest sellers should have no problem recording their mileage, a task that is both quick and simple. Buyers clearly win, for they’ll know whether DMV has the records on file. And DMV wins, as well. The measure costs the agency next to nothing — it has said complying with the change requires only a small tweak of office computers, and $60,000 should do the job. The Oregon Automobile Dealers Association, meanwhile, has not taken a position on the bill. A public hearing on HB 2042 is scheduled for Friday. The bill should be allowed to move forward.

My Nickel’s Worth Tuition bill not equitable

and farmlands. Anglers, birds, beavers, cows, campers and homesteaders thrive along the river corridor and share this unique place. Over the past several years, a strong collaborative effort has been building to guide a balanced vision for managing this shared river system, working to retain a strong agricultural heritage and protecting Prineville and landowners from floods, while preserving a healthy river to support our quality of life. Sadly, it seems the spirit of collaboration has been lost as legislation to change the dam and water management has broken down from shared solutions into fractured demands. We must come back to the table and regain the spirit of collaboration for the Crooked River today and for all the years in our future. We have the right people and information to implement a shared vision. Darek Staab Bend

The “logic” used by those Oregon senators who support granting in-state tuition to illegal aliens is absurd. Sen. Frank Morse and other proponents of the so-called “tuition equity bill” tell us Oregonians are unfairly holding students accountable for their parents’ actions when we require children brought here illegally to pay outof-state tuition. But if that’s the case, then aren’t we also unfairly holding students from out-of-state, who are U.S. citizens, accountable for their parents’ actions in choosing not to live in Oregon? In both cases, the students are required to pay out-of-state tuition because of the actions of their parents. But Morse and others want to eliminate that perceived unfairness only in the case of illegal immigrants while continuing to require U.S. citizens from out of state to pay tuition at the higher rate. It seems to me if one is really concerned about not penalizing students for their parents’ actions through differing tuition charges, the logical method would be to eliminate out-ofstate tuition entirely, not to give a tuition break to illegal immigrants while denying it to U.S. citizens. Brian Ellis Bend

Setting the record straight Craig Knight, in his March 26 letter, omitted a few facts about the Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993. Every Republican in the House as well as 41 Democrats (true bipartisan opposition?) opposed it because, among other things, it retroactively raised taxes on the estates of people who’d died even as far back as the George H.W. Bush administration. There was even Democratic opposition in the Democratically controlled Senate (tie broken by Vice President Al Gore). Congress approves all spending. Only the Republican-controlled Congress reduced spending after 1994 created surpluses. If one remembers, when the Republicans just wanted to reduce

Managing Crooked River The Crooked River is an amazing river system. As it carves its way through canyons, farms, forests and towns, it picks up and shows off a unique character with rich diversity. The silt and nutrients carried by the flowing river feed willow, cottonwoods, wetlands

the projected rate of increase (say 2 percent from 3 percent), most Democrats were calling these cuts. Just because under President George W. Bush the Republicans abandoned their principles doesn’t justify giving credit where it doesn’t belong. Jeff Bender Redmond

Freedom from bikers’ bills I, too, believe in personal freedom, and after reading the In My View column on motorcycle helmets, I want mine. I want freedom from caring for a body with serious brain injuries after not wearing a helmet in a “human error” event. The reality is, young riders with brain injuries often live a long time in a coma, semicoma or adult care facility. The cost can run into the millions of dollars. I want freedom from my taxes going to pay for that kind of “human error.” Fine, you want to ride without a helmet? Then be required to carry a $2 million major medical insurance policy. Don’t carry it? Lose your motorcycle and your privilege to ride. It is one thing to pay for injuries that result in permanent disability from riding judiciously. It is another entirely to pay for the same when no precautions are taken. Having worked in an intensive care unit and a neurology/neurosurgical unit, I have seen the impact of permanent brain injury. And it is not only devastating to family and friends, it is very costly to taxpayers. It is a serious mistake to loosen the helmet law without including a requirement to carry a major medical long-term care policy. I want freedom from the impact of your human error. Nancy Petersen Madras

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

State money managers did not make intelligent decisions By William Valentine Bulletin guest columnist

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n the April 3 editorial, “Money is right for managing billions,” the Bulletin justified the relatively high compensation given to the state’s investment officers as consistent with those offered at competing private and public institutions managing billions of dollars. I was in agreement. But there’s a saying in sales: “When you’ve made the sale, stop selling.” The Bulletin went on to extol the virtues of the investment-performancebased bonus system at Oregon Public Employees Retirement System (PERS), concluding with the suggestion that the current investment officers were especially justified in their income — which is to say doing a great job — because the PERS fund has a better 10-year return than the S&P 500 index. Au contraire! The Bulletin entirely ignored the concept of risk, and failed to acknowledged how the officers’ risk-taking has manifested in the weakened state of the fund

today and the damage it’s doing to municipal budgets statewide. In investing, returns achieved are commensurate with risk taken. Equally important to your average long-run return is how you got there — the volatility period to period. Down-side volatility for a state pension fund creates a short-term problem in that it requires member employers to make up for investment losses though larger contributions to the fund. In the long term, down-side impairment creates an actuarial imbalance (too few assets to support the liabilities) that can put the fund’s solvency in question — a burden the state must bear. Because of risks taken over the past decade, the PERS fund is in worse condition today than it was when it required an overhaul to ensure continued solvency. The issue isn’t that markets fell in recent years, it’s the degree to which this fund was impacted. Back in 2002, the fund was 92 percent funded (assets vs. future liabilities). As the state looked ahead, it realized then that it was staring into an abyss because

IN MY VIEW of unrealistically high promised investment returns and mushrooming benefit costs. The state restructured the entire PERS program. The investment staff did its part by upping the aggressiveness of the investment portfolio at several levels, most notably via an increase to the Real Estate and Private Equity allocations, bringing them to a combined weight of nearly 30 percent of the fund. This is a very large allocation compared with other funds of similar size and nature. And for a while, it worked. The outsized return from 2003-2006, due largely to private equity and real estate, put the fund in solid standing — it went from 92 percent funded to 110 percent, bringing accolades to the investment team and bonuses to its staff. While I was not privy to the investment decision-making at that point, I can only assume a mix of hubris, the compensation incentive and an inability to see the

real risk borne by private equity and real estate, prevented the investment officers from making a really smart decision: to reduce the risk through a more conservative allocation going forward. They didn’t, and this was their critical mistake. The fund got absolutely hammered in the financial crisis. In 2008 alone, the PERS asset account fell by 27 percent, three times more than the worst prior year in its history and among the worst of its peers. Today, the funded ratio is about 88 percent — lower than in 2002. The outsized losses have put a crushing demand on its member employers, which have to make up for investment losses though larger contributions to the fund. This couldn’t come at a worse time for the already strained budgets of school districts, cities and counties. To this point, little has been done to reduce the large allocation to private equity and real estate. According to investment staff, it’s because they can’t not stay risky — they’re once again betting the black chips to shore up the shortfall, relying on

continued recovery of markets. That and the fact that there are fewer asset classes less liquid than private equity and real estate … well, they’re stuck. Maybe we get continued recovery. I hope so. But what if we don’t? At a minimum, it means employers will again have to make up for future investment losses through increased contributions, unnecessarily amplified because of the high risk level. The worst case — another profound market decline — is that the entire fund could become effectively insolvent. Instead of congratulating the state’s officers, we need to take a hard look at how PERS rewards risk-taking, the sensibility of the current officers’ investment decisions and just how good a job their overseers — the Oregon Investment Council — are really doing. To do so otherwise just may be the fund’s, and the state’s, financial undoing. William Valentine is the president of Valentine Ventures, an investment firm in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 C5

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N   Barbara Joan Day, of Bend Oct. 3, 1937 - April 9, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: 11:00AM, Saturday, April 16, 2011; Deschutes Memorial Mausoleum Chapel, Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, 97701.

Harriet "Pat" P. (Russell) Watson, of Bend May 4, 1925 - April 9, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A memorial service will be held at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701, www.partnersbend.org

Marjory Frances Eusebio, of Bend Oct. 2, 1947 - April 7, 2011 Arrangements: Deschutes Memorial Chapel, (541)382-5592; www.deschutesmemorialchapel.com

Services: Memorial Service Saturday April 16, 2011 at 2:00PM Trinity Lutheran Church, 2550 NE Butler Market Rd., Bend, OR. Contributions may be made to:

Trinity Lutheran School Scholarship Fund, 2550 NE Butler Market Rd., Bend, OR 97701.

Ronald Neil Winkle, of Culver Jan. 30, 1945 - April 7, 2011 Arrangements: Autumn Funerals, 541-318-0842, www.autumnfunerals.net Services: A memorial service will be held Saturday, April 16, 2011 at 11:00 AM at the Redmond Grange Hall.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Wayne Clarence Tautfest

Donald Everett Smith

Jan. 7, 1939 - April 7, 2011

Jan. 21, 1927 - April 10, 2011

Wayne Clarence Tautfest was born the son of Melvin, and V. Margaret (Erickson) Tautfest on Saturday, January 7, 1939, in Newberg, Oregon. Wayne graduated from Newberg High School in 1957. He then enlisted in the Marine Corp. He later returned to Newberg and married Doreen Delores Billeter on May 9, 1959. The couple moved to Newark, California and lived there until moving back to Newberg in 1963. They made Newberg their home until retiring to La Pine, Oregon in 2003. While in La Pine, Wayne taught art classes at the La Pine Senior Center. He was an avid rock hound, enjoying camping, hunting and fishing as well. Active with American Legion, Wayne often helped with their projects by driving and making deliveries. He was always willing to help anyone in need. Baking and sharing his coffee and baked goods was a regular activity for Wayne. Knitting hats for the Fire Department was an enjoyable pastime for him and he was well known for his welding craftsmanship. On Thursday, April 7, 2011, Wayne Tautfest died at his residence when he was seventy-two years, three months and zero days of age. Surviving and left to honor his life are two sons, Donald Tautfest of Tigard, and Casey Tautfest and his wife, Karen of Dundee; his sister, Terri Hopes of Gresham; two brothers, Warner Tautfest of Arizona, and Carl Tautfest of Newberg; his sister, Phyllis Mills of McMinnville; five grandchildren, and those who have come to know and appreciate him where he has lived and worked. He was preceded in death by his wife, Doreen, and his parents. His Memorial Service will be Thursday, April 14, 2011, at 2:00 p.m., in Attrell's Newberg Funeral Chapel, a Golden Rule Funeral Home, with Pastor David Case officiating. Online condolences may be made at www.attrells.com Memorial contributions may be made to the American Legion c/o Attrell's Newberg Funeral Chapel, 207 Villa Road, Newberg, Oregon 97132.

Donald Everett Smith, 83, beloved husband to his late wife Billie, lived a wonderful life January 21, 1927 - April 10, 2011. He took his last breath peacefully in the home of his daughter, Cynthia Claridge. Surviving him are his Donald Everett daughters, Cynthia, JaSmith nine Smith, Deanna Smith; his son, Brad Smith; his seven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Don grew up in Oakland, CA, entered the Navy at 17, and met his late wife Billie while serving in Spokane, WA. Together they raised their family, initially in Spokane and eventually in Portland, OR. Don enjoyed a long career in advertising and marketing where he made many friends. Upon retiring Don & Billie spent some years traveling the world and moved to Redmond, living together until her death in 1998. For the past 10 years, Don resided with his long time friend, Marilyn Greene, in Bend. He is a man who will be truly missed here on Earth, but in his wake are many who feel gratitude for the opportunity to have known and loved him. We cherish his memory and rejoice in his newly found freedom and peace. Contributions can be made in the name of Don & Billie to the Redmond branch of the Deschutes County Library, Partners In Care Hospice, or the Oregon Nature Conservancy. Funeral services will be held in Spokane later this spring. Please sign our guestbook at redmondmemorial.com.

Daniel Catan, composer of operas in Spanish, 62 New York Times News Service

Salvador Assael, magnate of cultured pearls New York Times News Service Salvador Assael, a titan of the cultured pearl business whose wares were prized for their size, hue and luminosity, died on April 1 in Manhattan. He was 88. The death, after a short illness, was confirmed by Madeleine Stancescu, a spokeswoman for his company, Assael International. Assael had a home in Manhattan. Assael was known in particular for creating the modern market for black pearls, which had traditionally languished in the shadow of their brilliant white cousins. The company’s pearls have been carried by the world’s bestknown jewelers.

Daniel Catan, a Mexican composer known for bringing Spanish-language operas into the international repertory, including an adaptation of the film “Il Postino,” died last weekend in Austin, Texas. He was 62 and lived in South Pasadena, Calif. Catan is believed to have died in his sleep, his wife, Andrea Puente, said Monday; the precise date of death had not yet been determined. At his death, Catan was on the faculty of College of the Canyons, a community college in Santa Clarita, Calif. He was in residence this semester at the University of Texas at Austin, where he was working on an opera based on the Frank Capra film “Meet John Doe,” commissioned by the university’s Butler School of Music. Catan, who had four operas produced in the United States, was most closely associated here with the opera companies of Houston, San Diego and Seattle.

Hedda Sterne, artist of many styles New York Times News Service Hedda Sterne, an artist whose association with the Abstract Expressionists became fixed forever when she appeared prominently in a now-famous 1951 Life magazine photograph of the movement’s leading lights, died Friday at her home in Manhattan. She was 100. Her death was announced by Clara Diament Sujo, the director of CDS Gallery in Manhattan. Sterne, who was the last surviving artist from the Life photograph, shared few of the stylistic or philosophical concerns of the Abstract Expressionists, nor

did she cast herself in the heroic mold favored by many artists in the movement. She did, however, join with 17 prominent Abstract Expressionists and other avant-gardists in signing a notorious open letter to the director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in 1950 accusing it of hostility to “advanced art.” The letter, with signatures from the likes of Barnett Newman, Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, caused a stir. The artists were dubbed the Irascible 18 by Emily Genauer, the chief art critic of The New York Herald Tribune,

and 15 of them were gathered by Life magazine for a group portrait by the photographer Nina Leen. Sterne, who arrived late, was positioned on a table in the back row, where, she later said, she stood out “like a feather on top.” Although the photograph achieved mythic status, and some of its subjects scaled the heights of fame, Sterne retreated to the margins of art history. She spent the next half-century working steadily at her art and exhibiting frequently, but she never developed a marketable artistic signature.

George Wilhelm / Los Angeles Times

Kam Kuwata, sits in his Sherman Oaks, Calif., office in August 2002. Kuwata, a longtime adviser to California Sen. Dianne Feinstein known for his political savvy and sly wit, was found dead Monday at his home in Los Angeles. He was 57.

Kam Kuwata, leading political strategist, 57 By Mark Z. Barabak Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Kam Kuwata, one of California’s leading Democratic political strategists and a droll wit whose colorful quotes and keen analyses enlivened many campaigns, was found dead in his Los Angeles condominium Monday. He was 57. Police were called to investigate when family and friends grew concerned after not hearing from Kuwata for several days. The cause of death was not known, but a Los Angeles Police Department spokesman, Sgt. Ron Pickering, said there was no evidence of foul play. Kuwata’s death brought an outpouring of shock and fond remembrance from strategists for both major parties, as well as reporters who knew him as both a source and occasional verbal sparring partner. “He was a great, smart, savvy political mind,” said Bill Carrick, a Los Angeles-based Democratic strategist and Kuwata’s longtime friend and campaign partner. “Even more important, he was one of the nicest people that ever worked in politics. Generous beyond compare.” Don Sipple, a GOP strategist in Santa Barbara, said he “worked with Kam and against Kam, and he was always a true professional and a gentleman.” Kam Toyo Kuwata was born Oct. 1, 1953, in the San Francisco Bay Area and raised in the Los Angeles suburb of Sierra Madre by a single mother.

He showed his puckish humor — and partisan bent — early on. At age 6, he was handed a “Democrats for Nixon” bumper sticker and promptly scratched off a few letters so that it read “Rats for Nixon.” More seriously, he had a deep interest in civil rights; during World War II, his mother’s family had been forced to live in a Japanese-American internment camp. Kuwata attended Pasadena High, where he pushed for greater integration of the public schools, and went on to the University of Southern California, where he earned a degree in political science and spent free time volunteering for Democratic candidates and causes. His mother wanted him to go to law school, but instead Kuwata moved to Washington, D.C., where he joined Democratic Sen. Alan Cranston’s staff as a mail clerk. He rose through the ranks to become a spokesman for Cranston’s unsuccessful 1984 presidential campaign. Two years later, Kuwata emerged as one California’s highest-profile campaign strategists — and most quotable political sources — as the voluble spokesman for Cranston’s reelection effort, one of the closest and hardest-fought California contests in decades. With a barbed sense of humor, Kuwata relished campaign combat, delighting in a wellturned phrase and the ability to get under the skin of political opponents. By the end of that contest, Republican nominee Ed

Zschau was in a running debate with Kuwata, responding to his quotes in the morning newspapers while the senator floated above the fray. Cranston, an underdog, won the race by fewer than 105,000 votes out of more than 7 million cast. In 1992, Kuwata joined Carrick as a top strategist for Dianne Feinstein, helping her claim the U.S. Senate seat she still holds. Kuwata helped Feinstein win re-election several times and, up until his death, was talking up her prospects for another run in 2012. “California has lost a sharp political mind, and I’ve lost a loyal and dear friend of more than 20 years,” Feinstein said in a written statement. “He was respected by people in politics and journalism, something I always thought spoke volumes about the kind of person he was. ... There will never be another like Kam.” Other clients included Hawaii Sen. Daniel Akaka, former Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn and former Rep. Jane Harman, D-Los Angeles. In 2008, he helped then-Sen. Barack Obama’s campaign team manage the Democratic National Convention in Denver. Although relentless in his advocacy and quick to pounce on any perceived error, Kuwata counted many reporters and rival strategists as friends, sealing those relationships over good food, expensive bourbon, cigars or a round of golf. Kuwata is survived by his mother and a brother.

Charles Laufer, 87, teacher who founded Tiger Beat magazine By Douglas Martin New York Times News Service

Charles Laufer, who as a high school teacher in 1955 despaired that his students had nothing entertaining to read and responded with magazines aimed at teenage girls desperate to know much, much more about the lives of their favorite cute stars, died April 5 in Northridge, Calif. He was 87. The cause was heart failure, his brother, Ira, said. Laufer’s best-known magazine was Tiger Beat, published monthly. With its spinoff publications and its competitors, of which the most popular was 16 Magazine, Tiger Beat had it all covered — or at least what mattered most to girls from about 8 to 14. The Beach Boys’ loves! Jan and Dean’s comeback! The private lives of the Beatles! Exclamation points, sometimes as many as 50 a page, added emphasis. Pix, as pictures were known, were glossy, glamorous and frequently poster-size. Fax, as facts were known, often included “101 things you never knew about (fill in star’s name)”: He uses a blue toothbrush!

Titles were catchy, oddly innocent by later standards: “Shaun: A Junk Food Junkie?,” “Leif’s Sad Childhood,” “Bobby’s Favorite Type of Girls” and “Marie: Fighting With Donny?” Lauder told The Los Angeles Times in 1974 that the newsstand price of Tiger Beat, then 75 cents, was the same as the price of a hot-fudge sundae, and that the magazine probably provided the same dollop of entertainment. He was even clearer in describing his mission in a 1979 interview with Parade magazine: “Let’s face it, we’re in the little girl business.” Charles Harry Laufer was born on Sept. 13, 1923, in Newark, where his father, Isadore, owned a taxi company and was a state assemblyman. Charles was a star basketball player in high school before moving to Los Angeles, where he graduated from the University of Southern California. He taught English, journalism and history at two high schools. To tempt his students to read more, Laufer in 1955 started a magazine called Coaster, which later became Teen, and which

he sold in 1957. In 1965 he published a one-shot magazine crammed with Beatles photos. It sold 750,000 copies in two days. Later in 1965 he started Tiger Beat. Its mainstay, copied by socalled teenzines to this day, was “guys in their 20s singing La La songs to 13-year-old girls,” Laufer said in an interview with The Seattle Times in 1992. His brother put up half the initial capital for Tiger Beat, but Charles ran it as publisher. His strategy to compete with 16 Magazine was to build promotional relationships with production and record companies. But it was often Laufer’s own perspicacity that yielded the advantage. At a screening of new television shows in 1965 he saw the Monkees for the first time, and recognized Davy Jones from his performance in “Oliver!” on Broadway. Recognizing the Monkees’ potential, he put them on the cover of Tiger Beat. That put the still-struggling publication in the black, and he signed an exclusive deal for special Monkee magazines, Monkee picture books and Monkee love beads, which added to the bonanza.


W E AT H ER

C6 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, APRIL 13 Today: Mostly cloudy, mixed showers, cooler, breezy.

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

Western

51/31

 Willowdale

Cloudy with rain likely.

50/30

Camp Sherman 43/21 Redmond Prineville 48/24 Cascadia 45/25 47/25 Sisters 45/23 Bend Post Oakridge Elk Lake 45/23

36/12

Brothers

Sunriver 43/21

45/20

Portland

Burns

50/39

54/32

Boise

48/24

53/32



49/38

Eastern

43/21

Bend



Idaho Falls Redding

Elko

58/42

57/30

51/26

48/23

Silver Lake

41/18

57/32

Helena

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula

Eugene

Cloudy with a good chance of showers.

47/22

39/14



53/40

Hampton Fort Rock

City

52/39

46/22

Crescent 41/19

Seattle

40/21

Reno

42/27

Partly to mostly cloudy, good chance of showers.

Crater Lake 29/23

52/31

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

57/47

58/32



S

S

Portland 53/40

• 2.34” Lexington, Ky.

San Francisco 57/47 Las Vegas 74/50 Los Angeles 62/51

Honolulu 85/69

Calgary 47/31

Boise 53/32

Laredo, Texas Dillon, Colo.

S

Tijuana 64/51

Anchorage 41/22

S

Saskatoon 45/25

Seattle 52/39

• 92° • 14°

S

Vancouver 50/41

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes (in the 48 contiguous states):

S

Billings 59/35

S Winnipeg 43/25

S

S

S

S

St. Paul 53/36

Green Bay 62/36

S S

Quebec 48/37

Thunder Bay 49/25

Bismarck 51/27

S

To ronto 57/38

Halifax 50/40 Portland 44/37 Boston 46/39

Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 49/36 New York 52/30 60/43 Cheyenne 57/44 Des Moines 46/31 Columbus Philadelphia 73/50 Omaha Chicago 64/42 59/45 69/46 64/43 Salt Lake Washington, D. C. Denver St. Louis City 63/46 53/33 75/52 58/32 Louisville Kansas City 73/48 78/55 Charlotte 71/44 Albuquerque Nashville Little Rock 74/41 71/45 77/53 Oklahoma City Phoenix Atlanta 82/56 83/56 72/50 Birmingham Dallas 76/47 82/64 New Orleans 80/61 Orlando Houston 84/57 Chihuahua 82/68 92/54 Miami 85/70 Monterrey La Paz 94/67 91/61 Mazatlan 85/56

Juneau 49/31

FRONTS

Last

New

April 17 April 24 May 2

First

May 10



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

TEMPERATURE

Astoria . . . . . . . . 52/34/0.00 . . . . . . 48/39/r. . . . . . 49/40/sh Baker City . . . . . .54/22/trace . . . . . 49/28/sh. . . . . . 46/31/sh Brookings . . . . . . 49/32/0.00 . . . . . 49/42/sh. . . . . . 52/47/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 53/26/0.00 . . . . . .46/27/rs. . . . . . 48/33/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 57/32/0.00 . . . . . 50/39/sh. . . . . . 53/43/sh Klamath Falls . . . 53/22/0.00 . . . . . 41/28/sh. . . . . . 45/31/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 52/23/0.00 . . . . . 43/25/sn. . . . . . 46/28/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 54/15/0.00 . . . . . .44/20/rs. . . . . . 41/27/rs Medford . . . . . . . 61/31/0.00 . . . . . 51/35/sh. . . . . . 53/41/sh Newport . . . . . . . 48/32/0.00 . . . . . . 49/40/r. . . . . . 49/44/sh North Bend . . . . . 50/34/0.00 . . . . . . 49/39/r. . . . . . 50/44/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 60/33/0.00 . . . . . 54/36/sh. . . . . . 52/37/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 55/27/0.00 . . . . . 57/35/sh. . . . . . 55/35/pc Portland . . . . . . . 57/35/0.01 . . . . . 53/40/sh. . . . . . 51/42/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 52/20/0.00 . . . . . 45/25/sh. . . . . . 48/31/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 56/16/0.00 . . . . . 46/26/sh. . . . . . 45/29/pc Roseburg. . . . . . .59/32/trace . . . . . 50/38/sh. . . . . . 53/41/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 56/31/0.01 . . . . . 51/38/sh. . . . . . 52/40/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 52/19/0.00 . . . . . 45/23/sn. . . . . . 42/29/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 60/31/0.00 . . . . . 55/36/sh. . . . . . 52/35/pc

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

2

54 23

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55/19 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 in 1940 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.17” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 in 1968 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.27” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.93” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 4.08” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.90 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.37 in 1956 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:01 a.m. . . . . . .7:01 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:23 a.m. . . . . . .4:56 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .5:58 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:18 a.m. . . . . . .7:11 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .6:33 p.m. . . . . . .6:21 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .5:40 a.m. . . . . . .5:46 p.m.

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

HIGH

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . 38-107 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 103-166 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . 152-174 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . 144 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 82-98 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6-0 . . . . . . . 192 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 50-132 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . no report . . . . 175-270 . . . . . . . 123 . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . 46-86 . . . no report . . . . . . . . 78

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

Moon phases Full

57 24

Partly to mostly cloudy, slight chance of LOW rain showers, mild.

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS S

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:26 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:47 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:24 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:48 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 2:45 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 3:42 a.m.

HIGH

SUNDAY

Partly to mostly cloudy, slight chance of LOW rain showers, mild.

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 47/31

44/20

Crescent Lake

Vancouver

Paulina

La Pine



BEND ALMANAC

50/41



56 34

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 61° Medford • 16° Redmond

SATURDAY

Mostly cloudy, widespread rain showers, warmLOW er, breezy.

HIGH

NORTHWEST

Central

44/22

Mostly cloudy, slight chance of mixed LOW showers, breezy.

52 31

46/26

50/29

48/24

HIGH

FRIDAY

Cloudy skies and widespread showers today. Look for heaviest rain near the coast.

Mitchell

Madras



51/32

45/28

57/33

44/21

Ruggs

Condon

37/21

Warm Springs

LOW

24

STATE

Maupin

Marion Forks

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, isolated snow showers.

48

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

THURSDAY

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .81/42/0.00 . . .87/64/s . . . 90/47/s Akron . . . . . . . . .49/42/0.00 . . .59/36/c . . 64/44/pc Albany. . . . . . . . .62/49/0.00 . .51/38/sh . . 61/37/pc Albuquerque. . . .73/44/0.00 . 74/41/pc . . . 70/39/s Anchorage . . . . .45/27/0.00 . 41/22/pc . . . .42/24/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .82/55/0.19 . . .72/50/s . . . 77/53/s Atlantic City . . . .70/50/0.09 . .61/43/sh . . . 61/43/s Austin . . . . . . . . .85/42/0.00 . . .85/68/s . . 87/63/pc Baltimore . . . . . .71/54/0.33 . .60/43/sh . . . 66/48/s Billings. . . . . . . . .52/40/0.00 . 59/35/pc . . 45/32/sh Birmingham . . . .73/55/0.68 . . .76/47/s . . . 81/58/s Bismarck . . . . . . .60/37/0.00 . . .51/27/s . . 43/29/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .59/33/0.00 . . .53/32/t . . . 51/37/c Boston. . . . . . . . .66/48/0.00 . . .46/39/r . . 57/43/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .67/48/0.15 . . .48/40/r . . 57/43/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .54/40/0.00 . .49/36/sh . . . 56/36/c Burlington, VT. . .57/42/0.00 . .49/38/sh . . 57/30/pc Caribou, ME . . . .52/41/0.00 . . .41/36/r . . 48/27/sh Charleston, SC . .76/61/0.05 . . .74/52/s . . . 74/56/s Charlotte. . . . . . .72/59/0.01 . . .71/44/s . . . 74/54/s Chattanooga. . . .70/55/0.17 . . .72/43/s . . . 77/52/s Cheyenne . . . . . .59/31/0.00 . . .46/31/c . . 46/28/sh Chicago. . . . . . . .58/40/0.00 . 64/43/pc . . 51/41/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .57/45/0.30 . . .66/43/s . . . 72/52/s Cleveland . . . . . .46/39/0.00 . . .58/39/c . . 59/39/pc Colorado Springs 67/32/0.00 . 51/35/pc . . 57/32/sh Columbia, MO . .69/42/0.00 . 75/52/pc . . . .74/48/t Columbia, SC . . .74/63/0.02 . . .74/47/s . . . 76/55/s Columbus, GA. . .86/60/0.21 . . .79/50/s . . . 81/56/s Columbus, OH. . .55/42/0.57 . . .64/42/s . . 69/49/pc Concord, NH . . . .65/53/0.00 . . .47/36/r . . 63/36/pc Corpus Christi. . .81/61/0.00 . 82/70/pc . . 86/70/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .78/49/0.00 . . .82/64/s . . 86/55/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .56/42/0.15 . . .65/44/s . . 68/50/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .66/36/0.00 . 53/33/pc . . 50/31/sh Des Moines. . . . .70/41/0.00 . 73/50/pc . . 58/43/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .60/39/0.00 . . .60/43/s . . 56/37/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .65/36/0.00 . 51/30/pc . . 42/24/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .86/48/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . . 82/50/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .28/14/0.00 . . .30/7/pc . . . 31/8/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . .62/42/0.00 . 48/26/pc . . 46/28/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .57/25/0.00 . 55/25/pc . . . 52/23/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .61/37/0.00 . 62/40/pc . . 58/36/sh Rapid City . . . . . .58/41/0.00 . . .52/30/c . . 38/30/sn Green Bay. . . . . .58/33/0.00 . 62/36/pc . . . 43/33/c Reno . . . . . . . . . .63/33/0.00 . 52/31/pc . . 58/39/pc Greensboro. . . . .72/55/0.09 . 69/45/pc . . . 72/50/s Richmond . . . . . .79/63/0.47 . . .69/46/c . . . 72/49/s Harrisburg. . . . . .65/51/0.43 . .54/40/sh . . 65/47/pc Rochester, NY . . .51/41/0.00 . .50/36/sh . . . 59/35/c Hartford, CT . . . .65/51/0.04 . . .49/39/r . . 63/39/pc Sacramento. . . . .66/43/0.00 . .63/42/sh . . 66/49/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . 54/32/pc . . 46/30/sh St. Louis. . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . 75/52/pc . . . 74/50/c Honolulu . . . . . . .83/71/0.01 . 85/69/pc . . . .83/69/r Salt Lake City . . .57/43/0.01 . . .58/32/t . . 46/36/sh Houston . . . . . . .83/54/0.00 . . .82/68/s . . 85/72/pc San Antonio . . . .84/49/0.00 . 85/69/pc . . 89/66/pc Huntsville . . . . . .72/52/0.11 . . .73/45/s . . . 79/55/s San Diego . . . . . .65/57/0.00 . . .63/51/s . . . 67/55/s Indianapolis . . . .62/44/0.00 . . .67/47/s . . . 71/53/c San Francisco . . .56/47/0.00 . .58/46/sh . . . 60/48/c Jackson, MS . . . .77/50/0.00 . . .79/54/s . . 81/63/pc San Jose . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . .61/45/sh . . . 64/46/c Madison, WI . . . .62/32/0.00 . 65/40/pc . . 45/37/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .67/34/0.00 . 68/34/pc . . 59/28/pc Jacksonville. . . . .78/64/0.00 . . .80/53/s . . . 80/56/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .46/35/0.00 . . .49/31/r . . 48/30/sh Kansas City. . . . .71/41/0.00 . 78/55/pc . . . .73/44/t Amsterdam. . . . .52/41/0.14 . .50/40/sh . . . 53/42/c Lansing . . . . . . . .56/35/0.00 . . .61/40/s . . 57/36/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .64/42/0.00 . . .69/51/s . . . 64/48/s Las Vegas . . . . . .80/53/0.00 . . .74/50/s . . . 71/51/s Auckland. . . . . . .68/54/0.00 . . .68/54/s . . 68/57/sh Lexington . . . . . .58/43/2.34 . . .68/44/s . . 73/52/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . .75/54/s . . . 79/55/s Lincoln. . . . . . . . .75/29/0.00 . .69/46/sh . . 57/39/sh Bangkok . . . . . . .91/79/0.00 . . .91/77/t . . . .92/78/t Little Rock. . . . . .76/47/0.00 . . .77/53/s . . 78/57/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .79/39/0.00 . . .81/48/s . . 83/52/pc Los Angeles. . . . .65/53/0.00 . . .62/51/s . . . 66/53/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .64/57/0.02 . 66/53/pc . . . 69/55/s Louisville . . . . . . .64/50/1.31 . . .73/48/s . . 75/52/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .54/43/0.00 . .48/39/sh . . 52/39/sh Memphis. . . . . . .70/53/0.00 . . .77/53/s . . 79/61/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .61/54/0.86 . .65/51/sh . . 65/52/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . .85/70/s . . . 84/71/s Budapest. . . . . . .68/45/0.01 . 56/36/pc . . 52/37/sh Milwaukee . . . . .53/39/0.00 . 59/38/pc . . 42/34/sh Buenos Aires. . . .82/63/0.00 . . .79/55/s . . 72/46/pc Minneapolis . . . .68/42/0.00 . .53/36/sh . . . 49/35/c Cabo San Lucas .82/57/0.00 . . .88/64/s . . . 90/64/s Nashville . . . . . . .69/52/0.06 . . .71/45/s . . 77/53/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .73/57/0.00 . . .78/59/s . . . 83/62/s New Orleans. . . .79/65/0.00 . . .80/61/s . . 82/68/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .43/32/0.00 . .47/31/sh . . .39/29/rs New York . . . . . .71/48/0.57 . . .57/44/r . . 64/48/pc Cancun . . . . . . . .86/72/0.00 . . .86/73/s . . . 86/72/s Newark, NJ . . . . .71/51/0.51 . .54/43/sh . . 64/47/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . .54/48/sh . . 58/48/sh Norfolk, VA . . . . .85/67/0.00 . . .66/50/c . . . 68/50/s Edinburgh . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . .48/44/sh . . . 54/44/c Oklahoma City . .80/41/0.00 . . .82/56/s . . 77/42/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .59/43/0.00 . . .60/37/s . . 56/41/sh Omaha . . . . . . . .74/37/0.00 . .69/46/sh . . 56/40/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .77/52/0.00 . 79/55/pc . . 79/54/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .90/68/0.00 . . .84/57/s . . . 86/62/s Hong Kong . . . . .81/70/0.00 . 77/66/pc . . . 80/69/s Palm Springs. . . .87/55/0.00 . . .70/51/s . . . 81/63/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . 65/45/pc . . 51/38/sh Peoria . . . . . . . . .64/44/0.00 . 69/49/pc . . . .63/49/t Jerusalem . . . . . .64/46/0.02 . . .63/44/s . . . 68/46/s Philadelphia . . . .72/51/0.39 . .59/45/sh . . . 65/45/s Johannesburg . . .72/50/0.00 . . .74/55/t . . . .75/57/t Phoenix. . . . . . . .85/58/0.00 . . .83/56/s . . . 84/59/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . 77/64/pc . . 78/63/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .54/46/0.82 . . .58/37/c . . . 67/45/c Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.00 . . .81/58/s . . . 77/56/s Portland, ME. . . .65/53/0.00 . . .44/37/r . . 59/41/pc London . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . .53/45/sh . . . 56/45/c Providence . . . . .60/51/0.04 . . .51/42/r . . 59/42/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . . .76/47/s . . . 78/48/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .73/62/0.00 . 68/44/pc . . . 74/49/s Manila. . . . . . . . .91/75/0.00 . . .90/74/s . . . 92/74/s

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . 90/67/trace . . .76/49/s . . . 77/58/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .54/35/0.00 . .52/39/sh . . 51/39/sh Sioux Falls. . . . . .75/32/0.00 . .48/35/sh . . 44/32/sh Spokane . . . . . . .48/28/0.00 . .51/31/sh . . .48/32/rs Springfield, MO. .69/39/0.00 . 75/52/pc . . . .74/44/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .84/72/0.00 . . .82/61/s . . . 84/65/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . . .82/49/s . . . 82/51/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .78/42/0.00 . . .81/57/s . . . .82/48/t Washington, DC .71/54/0.19 . .63/46/sh . . . 68/50/s Wichita . . . . . . . .76/38/0.00 . 79/52/pc . . . .67/43/t Yakima . . . . . . . .56/21/0.00 . .58/31/sh . . 52/32/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .85/53/0.00 . . .84/55/s . . . 86/59/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .99/75/0.00 . . .98/75/s . . 99/75/pc Mexico City. . . . .81/55/0.00 . 88/57/pc . . 89/57/pc Montreal. . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . .49/39/sh . . . 54/35/s Moscow . . . . . . .36/30/0.21 . . 43/33/rs . . 45/32/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . 81/59/pc . . . .78/58/t Nassau . . . . . . . .86/73/0.00 . . .83/70/t . . 84/71/pc New Delhi. . . . . .91/72/0.00 . 93/72/pc . . . 95/73/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . . .66/45/s . . . 68/45/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .45/36/0.87 . .46/38/sh . . 51/36/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .57/32/0.00 . .50/39/sh . . . 53/34/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .57/39/0.00 . .58/43/sh . . 57/43/sh Rio de Janeiro. . .93/77/0.00 . 89/76/pc . . 90/76/pc Rome. . . . . . . . . .64/43/0.00 . 65/48/pc . . 64/48/sh Santiago . . . . . . .64/48/0.00 . .66/49/sh . . 65/47/sh Sao Paulo . . . . . .84/66/0.00 . . .82/66/t . . . .82/68/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .52/34/0.00 . 51/36/pc . . . 53/35/s Seoul . . . . . . . . . .59/32/0.00 . . .65/41/s . . . 66/43/s Shanghai. . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . .69/53/sh . . . 75/56/s Singapore . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .88/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .46/37/0.00 . . .44/35/c . . 48/35/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . 71/57/pc . . 73/57/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .72/63/0.00 . 79/67/pc . . 84/68/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .64/57/0.10 . . .66/51/s . . . 71/53/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .61/46/0.00 . . .66/46/s . . . 69/49/s Toronto . . . . . . . .55/39/0.00 . 57/38/pc . . 56/35/pc Vancouver. . . . . .50/36/0.00 . .50/41/sh . . . .47/37/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .66/45/0.17 . .48/41/sh . . 53/38/sh Warsaw. . . . . . . .61/43/0.64 . .48/38/sh . . 50/37/sh


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NBA Inside Blazers win, clinch No. 6 seed in West, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2011

BASEBALL

In disaster’s shadow, baseball returns to Japan on opening day By Ken Belson New York Times News Service

CHIBA, Japan — The parking lots around QVC Marine Field were closed because the land underneath them liquefied in the March 11 earthquake. Some scoreboards were turned off to save electricity, and a new inning can no longer begin after a game is 3 1⁄2

hours old for the same reason. Flags at the stadium were flown at half staff, and players on one of the teams, the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles, wore patches on their uniforms that in effect urged their fans to “stick with it.” A strong aftershock in the morning delayed some trains heading to the

stadium, which is about 45 minutes outside Tokyo, and another aftershock in the fourth inning forced the home plate umpire to call time. But in the face of it all, they played ball here Tuesday. In the first six innings, each team spotted the other team a run. See Japan / D5

Keith Bedford / The New York Times

Fans hold signs and cheer for the Chiba Lotte Marines during the game against the Rakuten Golden Eagles in Chiba, Japan, on Tuesday.

Texas’ Josh Hamilton reacts after being tagged out at home plate on Tuesday.

TEE TO GREEN

Hamilton may be out for two months with broken arm DETROIT— Texas slugger Josh Hamilton is expected to miss six to eight weeks after breaking his upper right arm on a headfirst dive into home plate Tuesday, a daring dash the AL MVP later called “stupid.” Hamilton tried to score from third on a foul popup near the Detroit dugout in the first inning. Third baseman Brandon Inge and catcher Victor Martinez both chased the ball, leaving the plate unprotected. Inge made the catch, then tossed the ball to Martinez, who scampered back in time to tag Hamilton. “It was a stupid play,” Hamilton said. “The whole time the ball was in the air, the coach was yelling, ‘Go, there’s no one at home,’ and I was thinking, ‘I don’t want to do this, something is going to happen.’ The AL champion Rangers, off to a 9-2 start, said Hamilton has a non-displaced fracture of the humerus bone at the top of his arm, just below the shoulder. He isn’t expected to swing a bat for a month. The fracture was small enough that it wasn’t detected on an X-ray, but Daniels held a conference call about two hours after the game with results from an MRI exam. — The Associated Press

FOOTBALL NFL releases preseason schedule despite lockout NEW YORK— The NFL is preparing for preseason games even though the owners and players remain at odds over a new contract. The league released its preseason schedule Tuesday as lawyers for locked-out players were meeting with a judge in Minneapolis prior to court-ordered mediation with the league later this week. The first preseason game will match the Chicago Bears against the St. Louis Rams in the Pro Football Hall of Fame game at Canton, Ohio on Aug. 7. The preseason schedule, of course, is contingent on the players and NFL owners reaching a new collective bargaining agreement, replacing the one that expired March 11 after talks with a federal mediator in Washington broke off. Because teams will need at least two weeks of training camp to get ready, that means the NFL would need to have its labor stalemate solved about July 25 at the very latest, even if starters are only going to play for a series or two in the exhibition opener. With the NFL entering its second month of its shutdown, the only business going on is the April 28-30 draft. The preseason schedule includes 65 games through Sept. 2. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NBA ...........................................D2 MLB ...........................................D3 Prep sports ............................... D4 Tee to Green.............................. D6

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Andy Stoughton, of Portland, works on his game on the driving range at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend Sunday afternoon.

Swinging in spring Bend-area pros offer advice on playing better golf early in the season

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omething about seeing the azaleas in bloom and the sun shining at Augusta National makes golfers everywhere want to slap on their golf shoes. Of course, in Central Oregon as with most of the Pacific Northwest, the weather rarely cooperates. For many golfers in our region, the post-Masters round is their first of the season. And that first round — whether played on a chilly day in April or a gorgeous day in June — typically will be a struggle after the long winter layoff. It’s part of the peril of living in a place with four seasons. (Or does Central Oregon have only

for advice on how to better prepare for the early season, and they all offer some valuable tips . The idea is you want to be “off and running when the weather gets good … in August,” quips Tam Bronkey, director of instruction at Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. And here are some ways to do it:

ZACK HALL two: cold and hot?) But a long layoff does not mean you necessarily have to sacrifice your early-season rounds in the name of tuning up. I talked to three area golf instructors recently

Getting ready By now I’m sure you’ve done all the proper offseason weight training and stretching that make for a stronger, more fit golfer. OK, so maybe not. See Spring / D5

Summit posts two wins at Pronghorn Bulletin staff report Redmond’s Jared Lambert captured medalist honors, but Summit teams stole the show Tuesday at the High Desert Classic high school golf tournament. Lambert fired a 1-under-par 71 for the low individual score of the day on the Nicklaus Course at Pronghorn Club northeast of Bend, where boys and girls teams from Redmond, Summit, Bend High and Crook County took part in the 18-hole event.

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PREP GOLF The Summit boys posted a winning team score of 310. Dylan Cramer (72), T.K. Wasserman (74) and Ryan Blackwell (76) all shot under 80 for the Storm, who bested runner-up Redmond (322) by 12 strokes in what was easily the best golfing weather so far this spring for area teams. See Summit / D4

Redmond High School golfer Jared Lambert putts on No. 5 of the Nicklaus Course at Pronghorn Club while competing in the High Desert Classic Tuesday morning. Lambert shot the low score of the day, a 71. Redmond finished runner-up behind Summit in the team competition.

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D2 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

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BASEBALL

Today Track: Crook County at Bend, TBA; Mountain View at Summit 4 p.m. Baseball: Bend at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Redmond at Mountain View (DH), 1 p.m. Softball: Mountain View at Summit (DH), 3 p.m.; Redmond at Crook County (DH), 3 p.m. Boys tennis: Madras at North Marion, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Madras at North Marion, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Summit at Mountain View, 5 p.m.; Bend at Sisters, 5 p.m.

10 a.m. — MLB, Kansas City Royals at Minnesota Twins or Texas Rangers at Detroit Tigers, MLB Network. 12:30 p.m. — MLB, Toronto Blue Jays at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Washington Nationals, ESPN2.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Phoenix Coyotes at Detroit Red Wings, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks, VS. network.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, New Orleans Hornets at Dallas Mavericks, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Clippers, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

THURSDAY GOLF 6 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Malaysian Open, first round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Texas Open, first round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — Nationwide Tour, Fresh Express Classic, first round, Golf Channel.

BASEBALL 4 p.m. — MLB, Philadelphia Phillies at Washington Nationals or Florida Marlins at Atlanta Braves, MLB Network. 5 p.m. — MLB, Toronto Blue Jays at Seattle Mariners, Root Sports.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Montreal Canadiens at Boston Bruins, VS. network. 7 p.m. — NHL, conference quarterfinals, Los Angeles Kings at San Jose Sharks, VS. network.

SOCCER 8 p.m. — Major League Soccer, Chicago Fire at Portland Timbers, ESPN2.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Golden State Warriors, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball • Nationals put 3B Zimmerman on DL: The Washington Nationals have put third baseman Ryan Zimmerman on the 15-day disabled list. This is Zimmerman’s second trip to the DL since arriving in the majors in 2005. Zimmerman is hitting .357 with a triple, homer and four RBIs in eight games.

Basketball • UConn’s Walker heading to NBA: Connecticut’s Kemba Walker announced Tuesday he will enter the June NBA draft. He said he has not hired an agent, but has been talking to them. The 6-foot-1 junior guard led the Huskies to a 32-9 record, including an 11-0 postseason run that ended with a national championship. Walker is expected to be a first-round pick, and perhaps the second guard chosen, behind Duke’s Kyrie Irving. Walker averaged 23.5 points, 5.4 rebounds and 4.5 assists during his junior season. • UCLA’s Lee leaving for draft: UCLA guard Malcolm Lee is leaving school to enter the NBA draft and he plans to hire an agent, ensuring he won’t be eligible to return for his senior season. Lee said Tuesday that he is immediately withdrawing from school. He averaged 13.1 points, second-best on the team, along with 3.1 rebounds this season. He was voted first-team All-Pac-10 and to the league’s All-Defensive team. • Hornets’ West has knee surgery: The New Orleans Hornets’ team doctor says star forward David West has had successful surgery to repair a torn ligament in his left knee and is expected to recover fully. West has been out since tearing his left anterior cruciate ligament during the Hornets’ victory at Utah on March 24 and is not expected to return to the court until next season.

Cycling • Italian leader issues doping ultimatum: Italian Olympic Committee president Giovanni Petrucci said Tuesday doping has become so rampant that his country’s cycling federation needs to tell teams and riders “to stop because nobody believes you anymore.” The ultimatum came a day after CONI said it would open an inquiry into about 30 high-profile cyclists, team officials and physicians allegedly involved in an extensive doping operation based in Mantova. Former world champion Alessandro Ballan, disgraced former Tour de France leader Michael Rasmussen, 2004 Giro d’Italia winner Damiano Cunego and several other past and current members of the Lampre team are allegedly involved in the Mantova case.

Hockey • Stars fire coach: The Dallas Stars have fired coach Marc Crawford after missing the playoffs in each of his two seasons. Stars general manager Joe Nieuwendyk made the announcement Tuesday, two days after Dallas failed to break a three-season playoff drought. Crawford won the 1996 Stanley Cup with Colorado, and later coached in Vancouver and Los Angeles.

Golf • South Africa tour announces $10 million WGC event: The Sunshine Tour will make leading golfers choose between the world’s richest tournament in South Africa and Tiger Woods’ charity event in California from next year. A new $10 million World Golf Championships event to be hosted by the tour was heralded by Sunshine commissioner Gareth Tindall on Tuesday as the launch of “a world tour.” The date and venue for the new WGC event — just the second outside the U.S. after Shanghai’s HSBC Champions — had not been finalized, Tindall said, but organizers are looking at the first week of December. That would put the tournament with the world’s biggest purse on a collision course with Woods’ Chevron Challenge, cosponsored by the U.S. PGA Tour, and the Sunshine Tour’s Nedbank Challenge at Sun City. — From wire reports

Monday, April 18: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD x-Monday, April 25: Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, TBD WESTERN CONFERENCE Vancouver vs. Chicago Wednesday, April 13: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Friday, April 15: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Thursday, April 21: Chicago at Vancouver, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Vancouver at Chicago, 5 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Chicago at Vancouver, TBD San Jose vs. Los Angeles Thursday, April 14: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 19: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: San Jose at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Los Angeles at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. x-Monday, April 25: San Jose at Los Angeles, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Los Angeles at San Jose, TBD Detroit vs. Phoenix Wednesday, April 13: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Phoenix at Detroit, 10 a.m. Monday, April 18: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Detroit at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Phoenix at Detroit, 4 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Detroit at Phoenix, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Phoenix at Detroit, TBD Anaheim vs. Nashville Wednesday, April 13: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 15: Nashville at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD Wednesday, April 20: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Friday, April 22: Nashville at Anaheim, 7 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Anaheim at Nashville, TBD x-Tuesday, April 26: Nashville at Anaheim, TBD

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Track: Culver at Scio, 4 p.m. Boys tennis: Bend at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Summit, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View at Bend, 4 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Redmond at Bend, 5 p.m. Friday Baseball: Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Crook County, 4:30 p.m.; Gladstone at Madras, 5 p.m.; Sisters at Elmira, 4:30 p.m.; Sweet Home at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Madras at Gladstone, 4:30 p.m. Regis at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Crook County at Bend (DH), 3 p.m.; Summit at Redmond (DH), 3 p.m.; Elimra at Sisters, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sweet Home, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Redmond hosts Bend, Crook County, Madras at Eagle Crest, Ridge Course, 9 a.m. Girls golf: Summit hosts Bend, Mountain View, Redmond at Broken Top, noon Boys tennis: Summit at Jesuit, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Mountain View, Redmond, Summit, Crook County at Bend Invitational, TBA Girls lacrosse: Bend United at Crescent Valley, TBA; Bend United at West Salem, TBA Boys lacrosse: Hermiston at Summit, 8 p.m.

TENNIS ATP Tour

BASKETBALL NBA NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct z-Chicago 61 20 .753 y-Miami 57 24 .704 y-Boston 55 26 .679 x-Orlando 51 30 .630 x-Atlanta 44 37 .543 x-New York 42 39 .519 x-Philadelphia 41 40 .506 x-Indiana 37 44 .457 Milwaukee 34 47 .420 Charlotte 33 48 .407 Detroit 29 52 .358 New Jersey 24 57 .296 Washington 23 58 .284 Toronto 22 59 .272 Cleveland 18 63 .222 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct z-San Antonio 61 20 .753 y-L.A. Lakers 56 25 .691 x-Dallas 56 25 .691 y-Oklahoma City 55 26 .679 x-Denver 50 31 .617 x-Portland 48 33 .593 x-New Orleans 46 35 .568 x-Memphis 46 35 .568 Houston 42 39 .519 Phoenix 39 42 .481 Utah 38 43 .469 Golden State 35 46 .432 L.A. Clippers 31 50 .383 Sacramento 24 57 .296 Minnesota 17 64 .210 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference ——— Tuesday’s Games Chicago 103, New York 90 Portland 102, Memphis 89 L.A. Lakers 102, San Antonio 93 Today’s Games Denver at Utah, 5 p.m. New Jersey at Chicago, 5 p.m. New Orleans at Dallas, 5 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. New York at Boston, 5 p.m. Atlanta at Charlotte, 5 p.m. Washington at Cleveland, 5 p.m. Indiana at Orlando, 5 p.m. Detroit at Philadelphia, 5 p.m. Miami at Toronto, 5 p.m. Portland at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Memphis at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. San Antonio at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Sacramento, 7:30 p.m.

Tuesday’s Summaries GB — 4 6 10 17 19 20 24 27 28 32 37 38 39 43 GB — 5 5 6 11 13 15 15 19 22 23 26 30 37 44

Blazers 102, Grizzlies 89 MEMPHIS (89) Young 5-9 2-3 13, Arthur 3-7 0-0 6, Gasol 4-9 3-4 11, Conley 8-13 0-0 17, Mayo 5-13 1-1 13, Battier 4-6 2-2 12, Vasquez 0-4 0-0 0, Smith 3-6 0-0 6, Haddadi 4-8 1-2 9, Powe 0-4 2-6 2. Totals 36-79 11-18 89. PORTLAND (102) Wallace 5-11 3-3 14, Aldridge 10-16 2-2 22, Camby 2-7 0-0 4, Miller 2-3 5-5 9, Matthews 5-16 0-0 13, Batum 4-14 7-8 16, Fernandez 5-6 4-5 18, Roy 1-4 0-0 2, Mills 1-2 0-0 2, C.Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, A.Johnson 0-0 0-0 0, Barron 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 36-80 21-23 102. Memphis 25 20 21 23 — 89 Portland 27 18 29 28 — 102 3-Point Goals—Memphis 6-12 (Battier 2-2, Mayo 2-4, Young 1-1, Conley 1-3, Vasquez 0-2), Portland 9-18 (Fernandez 4-5, Matthews 3-4, Wallace 1-3, Batum 1-5, Roy 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Memphis 53 (Gasol, Haddadi 10), Portland 43 (Camby, Aldridge 11). Assists—Memphis 16 (Mayo 3), Portland 23 (Miller 8). Total Fouls—Memphis 23, Portland 15. Technicals— Memphis defensive three second 2, Portland defensive three second. A—20,662 (19,980).

Bulls 103, Knicks 90 CHICAGO (103) Boozer 5-19 4-5 14, Deng 9-16 3-4 23, Noah 3-4 7-7 13, Rose 10-19 4-5 26, Bogans 3-6 0-0 8, Brewer 0-1 0-0 0, Watson 4-6 0-0 9, Gibson 1-4 2-2 4, Asik 1-2 0-0 2, Korver 0-6 4-4 4. Totals 36-83 24-27 103. NEW YORK (90) Anthony 8-19 4-4 21, Sha.Williams 4-11 0-0 10, Turiaf 2-2 2-4 6, Fields 4-9 0-0 8, Billups 4-10 1-1 10, Jeffries 1-1 0-1 2, Douglas 4-15 4-4 13, Walker 6-12 3-3 18, Carter 1-4 0-0 2, Brown 0-0 0-0 0, She.Williams 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 34-83 14-17 90. Chicago 24 28 32 19 — 103 New York 27 28 18 17 — 90 3-Point Goals—Chicago 7-20 (Deng 2-4, Bogans 2-5, Rose 2-6, Watson 1-2, Korver 0-3), New York 8-31 (Walker 3-7, Sha.Williams 2-7, Billups 1-2, Anthony 1-6, Douglas 1-7, Fields 0-1, Carter 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Chicago 59 (Boozer 22), New York 43 (Anthony, Douglas 5). Assists—Chicago 20 (Deng, Boozer 4), New York 19 (Billups 8). Total Fouls—Chicago 18, New York 20. Technicals—Sha.Williams. A—19,763 (19,763).

Lakers 102, Spurs 93 SAN ANTONIO (93) Jefferson 2-9 5-6 10, Splitter 3-10 2-3 8, Blair 5-10 2-2 12, Hill 2-9 7-7 11, Neal 6-13 2-2 16, Bonner 4-5 2-2

13, Anderson 2-9 0-0 5, Green 3-10 0-0 6, Quinn 1-7 0-0 2, Novak 3-6 2-2 10. Totals 31-88 22-24 93. L.A. LAKERS (102) Artest 1-2 5-6 7, Gasol 7-12 3-4 17, Bynum 2-3 0-0 4, Fisher 4-10 4-4 13, Bryant 8-21 9-9 27, Odom 9-18 45 23, Brown 4-11 0-0 9, Walton 1-2 0-0 2, Smith 0-0 0-0 0, Ratliff 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 36-79 25-28 102. San Antonio 15 30 19 29 — 93 L.A. Lakers 24 21 25 32 — 102 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 9-25 (Bonner 3-3, Novak 2-3, Neal 2-4, Jefferson 1-3, Anderson 1-4, Quinn 0-1, Hill 0-2, Green 0-5), L.A. Lakers 5-19 (Bryant 2-6, Fisher 1-2, Brown 1-3, Odom 1-6, Walton 0-1, Artest 01). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—San Antonio 50 (Blair 11), L.A. Lakers 55 (Gasol 17). Assists—San Antonio 18 (Quinn 9), L.A. Lakers 24 (Gasol 5). Total Fouls—San Antonio 23, L.A. Lakers 23. Technicals—Blair, Bryant. A—18,997 (18,997).

HOCKEY NHL NHL PLAYOFFS All Times PDT ——— FIRST ROUND (Best-of-7) (x-if necessary) EASTERN CONFERENCE Washington vs. New York Rangers Wednesday, April 13: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 15: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 17: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, noon Wednesday, April 20: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, noon x-Monday, April 25: Washington at N.Y. Rangers, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: N.Y. Rangers at Washington, TBD Philadelphia vs. Buffalo Thursday, April 14: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 2 p.m. Monday, April 18: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20: Philadelphia at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. x-Friday, April 22: Buffalo at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. x-Sunday, April 24: Philadelphia at Buffalo, noon x-Tuesday, April 26: Buffalo at Philadelphia, TBD Boston vs. Montreal Thursday, April 14: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. Monday, April 18: Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21: Boston at Montreal, 4 p.m. x-Saturday, April 23: Montreal at Boston, 4 p.m. x-Tuesday, April 26: Boston at Montreal, TBD x-Wednesday, April 27: Montreal at Boston TBD Pittsburgh vs. Tampa Bay Wednesday, April 13: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Friday, April 15: Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m.

ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters Tuesday Monte Carlo, Monaco Singles First Round Gilles Simon (16), France, def. Thomaz Bellucci, Brazil, 6-3, 6-2. Feliciano Lopez, Spain, def. Janko Tipsarevic, Serbia, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (4). Maximo Gonzalez, Argentina, def. Victor Hanescu, Romania, 3-6, 7-5, 6-1. Fabio Fognini, Italy, def. Kevin Anderson, South Africa, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2. Guillermo Garcia-Lopez, Spain, def. Vincent Millot, France, 6-2, 6-4. Albert Montanes, Spain, def. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-4, 6-2. Pere Riba, Spain, def. Potito Starace, Italy, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3. Second Round Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Philipp Kohlschreiber, Germany, 6-2, 6-1. Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (12), France, 7-6 (2), 6-4. Milos Raonic, Canada, def. Ernests Gulbis, Latvia, 6-4, 7-5. Tomas Berdych (5), Czech Republic, def. Olivier Rochus, Belgium, 6-2, 6-3.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 3 1 0 9 3 New England 1 1 3 6 5 Houston 1 1 2 5 5 New York 1 1 2 5 2 Toronto FC 1 1 2 5 6 Columbus 1 1 2 5 3 Chicago 1 1 1 4 5 Sporting Kansas City 1 1 1 4 8 D.C. 1 2 1 4 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Real Salt Lake 3 0 0 9 7 Colorado 3 1 0 9 8 Los Angeles 2 1 2 8 5 Vancouver 1 2 2 5 9 San Jose 1 1 2 5 5 Seattle 1 2 2 5 5 FC Dallas 1 2 1 4 4 Chivas USA 0 2 2 2 3 Portland 0 2 1 1 2 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Games Los Angeles at Toronto FC, 5 p.m.

GA 1 6 4 2 6 3 5 8 8 GA 1 5 6 10 4 6 5 5 6

Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 6 p.m. Thursday’s Game Chicago at Portland, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Games Seattle FC at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. D.C. United at Toronto FC, 4 p.m. Chivas USA at Vancouver, 4 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 4:30 p.m. San Jose at New York, 4:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Chicago, 1 p.m. FC Dallas at Portland, 3 p.m. New England at Houston, 4 p.m.

BASEBALL College Pacific-10 Conference ——— Tuesday’s Games x-USC 5, Pepperdine 5, suspended, darkness x-Stanford 3, Pacific 1 x-Washington State 3, Gonzaga 1 x-UCLA 6, Long Beach State 4 x-Washington 11, Seattle 0 Today’s Game x-Oregon at Portland, 3 p.m. x=nonleague

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Suspended Houston RHP Aneury Rodriguez three games, pending appeal, and manager Brad Mills one game and fined both undisclosed amounts for their ejections during Sunday’s game against the Marlins. American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Recalled OF Reggie Willits. Optioned OF Chris Pettit to Salt Lake City (PCL). NEW YORK YANKEES—Placed RHP Luis Ayala on the 15-day DL. TEXAS RANGERS—Agreed to terms on a contract extension with assistant general manager Thad Levine through the 2015 season. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Designated LHP David Purcey for assignment. Recalled RHP Casey Janssen and LHP Brad Mills from Las Vegas (PCL). National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Placed SS Rafael Furcal on the 15-day DL. Recalled INF Ivan De Jesus from Albuquerque (PCL). WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Placed 3B Ryan Zimmerman on the 15-day DL, retroactive to April 10. Recalled C Jesus Flores from Syracuse (IL). HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES—Agreed to terms with D Justin Krueger on a one-year contract. DALLAS STARS—Fired coach Marc Crawford. MINNESOTA WILD—Signed D Chay Genoway. NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Promoted interim coach Jack Capuano to coach. PHOENIX COYOTES—Recalled D Oliver Ekman-Larsson and D Nolan Yonkman from San Antonio (AHL). TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS—Assigned G Ben Scrivens from Toronto (AHL) to Reading (ECHL). SOCCER Major League Soccer RED BULL NEW YORK—Signed D Teddy Schneider. COLLEGE BUTLER—Announced junior G Shelvin Mack has declared for the NBA draft. CONNECTICUT—Announced junior G Kemba Walker will enter the NBA draft. FLORIDA—Named John Pelphrey and Norm Roberts men’s assistant basketball coaches. HIGH POINT—Named Jennifer Hoover women’s basketball coach. MIAMI—Named Shawn Eichorst athletic director. WINTHROP—Named Marlene Stollings women’s basketball coach.

FISH COUNT Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 50 0 22 11 The Dalles 7 0 20 10 John Day 2 0 67 43 McNary 2 0 91 49 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 709 1 2976 1271 The Dalles 115 0 786 464 John Day 84 0 633 1029 McNary 56 1 1502 901

NBA ROUNDUP

Blazers lock up sixth seed with win The Associated Press PORTLAND — The Trail Blazers were relieved to finally lock up the sixth seed in the Western Conference. “Whenever you can get through everything we’ve been through this year — the injuries and the guys out of the lineup — and still be the sixth seed feels good,” said LaMarcus Aldridge, who had 22 points and 11 rebounds Tuesday night in a 102-89 victory over the Memphis Grizzlies. While the Blazers secured their spot in the standings, they’ll have to wait until after the league wraps up the regular season tonight to find out their opponent in the first-round of the playoffs. Portland finishes on the road against Golden State, which was long ago eliminated. “To get the sixth spot, I think is a great accomplishment for this team and all they had to go through this year, different guys having to fill in and make adjustments,” coach Nate McMillan said. “Guys stepped in and played good basketball, and gave us an opportunity to play in the postseason.” Portland got hit this season with several key knee injuries: Center Greg Oden had another season-ending surgery. Three-time All-Star Brandon Roy struggled with his knees earlier in the season, and eventually had arthroscopic surgery on both of them. Center Marcus Camby also had surgery in January. Guard Andre Miller said clinching the sixth seed was an important hurdle. “Especially for the mental part of it,” he said. “Knowing what we’ve been through this season with the guys getting injured and sitting out — six sounds better than eight, you know?” Memphis, which played without starters Zach Randolph and Tony Allen, was still wrestling with New Orleans for the final two spots. The Grizzlies visit the Clippers while the Hornets are at Dallas tonight. Grizzlies coach Lionel Hollins decided to rest Randolph and Allen, who were not in the starting lineup against the Blazers but were in uniform — albeit under sweats — on the bench. There was speculation that the move was tactical to set up a favorable playoff matchup. Hollins maintained after the game that both had nagging injuries that needed rest.

Blazers sign C Earl Barron PORTLAND — The Portland Trail Blazers have signed center Earl Barron for the rest of the season. Barron has played parts of five seasons with Miami, New York, Phoenix and Milwaukee. He has averaged 5.2 points and 3.6 rebounds, appearing in 108 games, including 27 starts. This season the 7-foot, 250-pound center has played for both the Suns and the Bucks. Barron brings the Blazers’ roster to 15 players.

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers’ Marcus Camby (23) and Memphis Grizzlies’ Marc Gasol (33) work for position under the boards in the first half of Tuesday’s game. “I didn’t want to play Zach these last two games because I want to get him rested and fresh. He hurt his elbow and he has the bad knee and I just didn’t want to have him out there banging for two more games when we have the playoffs going.” Allen, Hollins said, had swelling in his knee and ankle. Randolph, who once played for the Blazers, is averaging a team-high 20.1 points and 12.2 rebounds this season. Allen is averaging 6.9 points and 2.7 rebounds. Their absence didn’t stop the Grizzlies from going ahead by as many as six points in the opening quarter, although Portland tied it at 25 on Rudy Fernandez’s three-pointer. Portland went up 43-35 on Wesley Matthews’ reverse layup before the Grizzlies rallied to tie it at 43 on Marc Gasol’s jumper before pulling in front on Mike Conley’s bank shot. Andre Miller hit a pair of free throws to tie it at 45 at the break. Aldridge went to the bench with four fouls in

the third quarter, but the Blazers went up 66-59 on Gerald Wallace’s fast-break layup. Aldridge’s 15-foot jumper in the final quarter put Portland up 88-75. But the Grizzlies quickly narrowed it to 88-80 on Shane Battier’s threepointer with 5:45. The Blazers held off the Grizzlies the rest of the way. Fernandez finished with 18 points. Conley led the Grizzlies with 17 points. Gasol had 11 points and 10 rebounds. “I think our mindset is that teams will fall where they may, and we’re just going to have to deal with whoever we play and be focused for that team,” Conley said. “Any way you cut it, you’re going to play a good team.” The Blazers saw the return of center Marcus Camby, who missed two games with a strained neck. Camby banged his head on the floor in a collision with David Lee in a loss to the Warriors last week. Camby had four points and 11 rebounds. Also on Tuesday: Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 NEW YORK — Derrick Rose scored 26 points and Chicago stayed in the race for the NBA’s best record, overwhelming New York for its eighth straight victory. Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 LOS ANGELES — Kobe Bryant scored 27 points and Los Angeles snapped its five-game losing streak at a potentially high cost, losing center Andrew Bynum to a hyperextended right knee in a victory over San Antonio.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 D3

M A JOR LEAGUE BASEBALL AL BOXSCORES Tigers 5, Rangers 4 Texas AB R H Andrus ss 3 1 1 Mi.Young 2b 3 2 3 Hamilton dh 1 0 1 a-Kinsler ph-dh 3 0 0 A.Beltre 3b 3 0 1 N.Cruz rf 3 0 1 Dav.Murphy lf 4 0 0 Torrealba c 4 0 1 Moreland 1b 4 1 2 Borbon cf 3 0 0 Totals 31 4 10

BI 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 4

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 3

Avg. .200 .341 .333 .231 .205 .278 .313 .242 .333 .167

Detroit AB R H BI BB SO Avg. A.Jackson cf 3 1 1 0 1 0 .214 Santiago 2b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .214 Raburn lf 4 2 2 1 1 1 .296 Mi.Cabrera 1b 5 0 2 1 0 0 .385 V.Martinez c 1 0 0 1 2 0 .220 1-Kelly pr-rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .182 Boesch dh 4 0 1 1 0 2 .273 Jh.Peralta ss 2 0 0 0 2 1 .324 Inge 3b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .243 C.Wells rf 3 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Avila c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Totals 31 5 9 5 6 7 Texas 101 001 010 — 4 10 0 Detroit 100 102 001 — 5 9 0 Two outs when winning run scored. 1-ran for V.Martinez in the 8th. LOB—Texas 5, Detroit 9. 2B—A.Beltre (2), Moreland (4), Raburn (4), Mi.Cabrera (3), C.Wells (1). 3B—Hamilton (1), A.Jackson (1). RBIs—Mi.Young (4), Hamilton (7), A.Beltre (9), N.Cruz (11), Santiago (2), Raburn (4), Mi.Cabrera (10), V.Martinez (8), Boesch (6). SB—Andrus 2 (3), Mi.Young (1), Kelly (1), Boesch (1). S—Borbon, A.Jackson, Avila. SF—Mi.Young, V.Martinez. Runners left in scoring position—Texas 3 (Kinsler, Dav.Murphy 2); Detroit 4 (Boesch, Inge, Raburn, Jh.Peralta). Runners moved up—A.Beltre, Santiago, Mi.Cabrera. GIDP—Borbon, Jh.Peralta. DP—Texas 1 (Andrus, Mi.Young, Moreland); Detroit 2 (Inge, Inge, V.Martinez), (Mi.Cabrera, Jh.Peralta, Mi.Cabrera). Texas IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Wilson 6 2-3 7 4 4 3 4 106 3.72 Strop 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 2 24 0.00 O’Day L, 0-1 2-3 2 1 1 2 1 22 2.08 Detroit IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Penny 6 2-3 7 3 3 1 2 89 8.27 Villarreal H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3.86 Benoit BS, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 35 1.80 Valverde W, 1-0 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Strop 1-0, Villarreal 1-0. HBP—by Penny (Andrus), by Benoit (A.Beltre). WP— Penny, Benoit. T—3:20. A—20,609 (41,255).

Rays 3, Red Sox 2 Tampa Bay AB Fuld lf 4 Damon dh 4 B.Upton cf 4 F.Lopez 3b 3 Brignac ss 0 S.Rodriguez 2b-3b 4 Zobrist rf 3 Shoppach c 4 D.Johnson 1b 3 Kotchman 1b 0 E.Johnson ss-2b 3 Totals 32

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 3

H BI BB 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 8 3 2

SO 0 2 2 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 1 9

Avg. .313 .220 .308 .278 .227 .190 .190 .211 .122 .167 .286

Boston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Crawford lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .152 Pedroia 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .366 Ad.Gonzalez 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .268 Youkilis dh 3 0 1 0 0 1 .182 Lowrie 3b 4 0 2 1 0 0 .438 Cameron cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .091 a-Ellsbury ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .189 Varitek c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .100 b-J.Drew ph 1 0 0 0 0 1 .296 D.McDonald rf 3 1 1 1 0 0 .125 c-Ortiz ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .275 Scutaro ss 2 0 0 0 1 0 .172 Totals 31 2 5 2 2 5 Tampa Bay 000 030 000 — 3 8 0 Boston 001 001 000 — 2 5 0 a-struck out for Cameron in the 9th. b-struck out for Varitek in the 9th. c-flied out for D.McDonald in the 9th. LOB—Tampa Bay 4, Boston 6. 2B—Pedroia (4), Lowrie 2 (2). HR—D.McDonald (1), off Price. RBIs—Fuld (4), Damon 2 (7), Lowrie (1), D.McDonald (1). SB—Fuld (6), Damon (3), Zobrist (1). CS—F.Lopez (1), Crawford (1). Runners left in scoring position—Tampa Bay 4 (Shoppach, Damon, B.Upton, F.Lopez); Boston 3 (Varitek, Cameron, Lowrie). Runners moved up—B.Upton, Ad.Gonzalez 2. GIDP—B.Upton, S.Rodriguez, E.Johnson. DP—Boston 3 (Lowrie, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez), (Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez), (Scutaro, Pedroia, Ad.Gonzalez). Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Price W, 1-2 7 2-3 5 2 2 2 3 117 3.92 Jo.Peralta H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 3.38 Frnswrth S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.08 Boston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lester L, 0-1 7 7 3 3 2 8 109 3.72 Bard 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 9.64 Jenks 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—Jo.Peralta 2-0. HBP—by Price (Crawford, Youkilis). T—2:54. A—37,015 (37,493).

Twins 4, Royals 3 (10 innings) Kansas City Getz 2b Me.Cabrera cf Gordon lf Butler 1b Francoeur rf Betemit 3b Aviles dh B.Pena c A.Escobar ss Totals

AB 4 5 5 4 5 4 2 4 4 37

R 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 3

H BI BB 1 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 8 3 2

SO 0 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 5

Avg. .333 .275 .340 .351 .273 .400 .107 .316 .205

Minnesota AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Span cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .275 Mauer c 4 0 1 1 0 1 .235 Morneau 1b 5 0 0 0 0 1 .222 D.Young lf 5 0 1 0 0 2 .189 2-Repko pr 0 1 0 0 0 0 .000 Cuddyer rf 4 1 4 0 1 0 .219 Kubel dh 5 1 2 0 0 1 .314 Valencia 3b 3 0 1 1 2 0 .206 L.Hughes 2b 4 0 2 2 0 2 .273 A.Casilla ss 3 1 0 0 0 0 .143 a-Thome ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .211 1-Tolbert pr-ss 0 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Totals 39 4 13 4 3 7 Kansas City 000 200 100 0 — 3 8 0 Minnesota 001 200 000 1 — 4 13 1 One out when winning run scored. a-singled for A.Casilla in the 9th. 1-ran for Thome in the 9th. 2-ran for D.Young in the 10th. E—Duensing (1). LOB—Kansas City 8, Minnesota 11. 2B—Francoeur (2), Kubel (3). RBIs—Me.Cabrera (6), Betemit (5), Aviles (3), Mauer (4), Valencia (3), L.Hughes 2 (2). SB—A.Casilla (2). S—Getz. SF—Aviles, Mauer. Runners left in scoring position—Kansas City 2 (A.Escobar, Francoeur); Minnesota 4 (Morneau, Span, L.Hughes, Mauer). Runners moved up—Span, Kubel, Valencia. DP—Kansas City 1 (Francoeur, Butler). Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Francis 7 8 3 3 1 5 100 2.61 Crow 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 1 23 0.00 Collins 1 1 0 0 0 1 18 0.00 Tejeda L, 0-1 0 3 1 1 1 0 18 5.06 Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duensing 6 8 3 2 2 2 101 4.15 Mijares 1-3 0 0 0 0 1 4 0.00 Capps 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 19 1.35 Nathan 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 2.25 D.Hghs W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 0 12 5.79 Duensing pitched to 3 batters in the 7th. Tejeda pitched to 4 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Collins 1-0, Mijares 2-0, Capps 2-0. T—3:17. A—38,154 (39,500).

White Sox 6, Athletics 5 (10 innings) Oakland AB Crisp cf 5 c-Willingham ph-lf 1 Barton 1b 5 DeJesus rf-cf 5 Matsui dh 5 K.Suzuki c 5 Sweeney lf 0 a-C.Jackson ph-lf-rf3

R 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0

SO 2 1 1 2 0 2 0 0

Avg. .233 .237 .275 .216 .237 .194 .200 .188

M.Ellis 2b Kouzmanoff 3b An.LaRoche ss Totals

5 5 4 43

1 2 1 1 0 1 5 12

1 2 0 5

0 0 .211 0 1 .184 1 1 .375 3 10

Paterson H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 0 16 0.00 D.Hernandez 2 2 0 0 0 3 28 0.00 Putz 1 1 0 0 0 0 12 2.25 Inherited runners-scored—Paterson 2-0. IBB—off Carpenter (R.Roberts), off Augenstein (Montero). HBP— by Carpenter (K.Johnson). WP—Carpenter. T—3:18. A—16,645 (48,633).

PL AY AT THE PL ATE

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Pierre lf 4 1 1 1 1 0 .265 Vizquel 2b-3b 5 0 3 0 0 0 .455 A.Dunn dh 4 0 1 0 1 2 .278 Konerko 1b 4 0 0 1 1 1 .381 Quentin rf 5 0 0 0 0 1 .310 Rios cf 5 1 1 0 0 1 .208 Pierzynski c 5 1 1 0 0 0 .256 Al.Ramirez ss 4 3 2 4 1 1 .275 Teahen 3b 2 0 0 0 1 0 .375 b-Beckham ph-2b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .295 Totals 39 6 9 6 5 6 Oakland 011 012 000 0 — 5 12 1 Chicago 040 001 000 1 — 6 9 2 Two outs when winning run scored. a-grounded into a fielder’s choice for Sweeney in the 5th. b-lined out for Teahen in the 8th. c-struck out for Crisp in the 10th. E—An.LaRoche (1), Rios (1), Al.Ramirez (3). LOB— Oakland 11, Chicago 9. 2B—Barton (5), Matsui (3), M.Ellis (3). HR—Kouzmanoff (1), off T.Pena; Al.Ramirez (2), off Cahill; Al.Ramirez (3), off Cramer. RBIs—Matsui 2 (6), M.Ellis (5), Kouzmanoff 2 (4), Pierre (6), Konerko (12), Al.Ramirez 4 (8). Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 8 (K.Suzuki 4, Crisp, An.LaRoche, C.Jackson 2); Chicago 4 (Quentin 2, Pierzynski, Konerko). Runners moved up—DeJesus, Matsui, M.Ellis, Teahen. GIDP—DeJesus. DP—Chicago 1 (Vizquel, Al.Ramirez, Konerko).

Reds 8, Padres 2 (11 innings) Cincinnati Stubbs cf Phillips 2b Votto 1b Rolen 3b Gomes lf Cordero p Hanigan c Bruce rf Janish ss Ondrusek p e-Heisey ph-lf LeCure p a-Cairo ph Chapman p Masset p Bray p Renteria ss Totals

Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cahill 4 2-3 6 4 4 3 3 97 3.12 Breslow 1 2 1 1 1 0 25 18.00 Ziegler 1 0 0 0 0 1 12 0.00 Blevins 2 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 30 2.84 Cramer L, 0-1 2-3 1 1 1 0 1 18 3.86 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA E.Jackson 4 2-3 7 3 3 2 4 100 2.89 Ohman 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 3 11.57 T.Pena BS, 1-1 1 4 2 2 0 1 31 13.50 Santos 2 0 0 0 0 3 24 0.00 Sale W, 2-0 2 1 0 0 1 2 34 3.68 Inherited runners-scored—Breslow 2-0, Ziegler 2-0, Ohman 2-0. WP—Cahill 2. PB—Pierzynski. T—3:32. A—18,020 (40,615).

Angels 2, Indians 0 Cleveland Brantley cf A.Cabrera ss Choo rf C.Santana c Hafner dh O.Cabrera 2b T.Buck lf LaPorta 1b Hannahan 3b Totals

AB 4 4 4 2 3 3 3 3 2 28

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 8

Avg. .275 .289 .190 .225 .324 .333 .136 .219 .235

Los Angeles AB R H BI BB SO Avg. M.Izturis ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .318 H.Kendrick 2b 4 0 0 0 0 1 .341 Abreu dh 1 0 0 0 3 0 .368 Tor.Hunter rf 4 0 0 0 0 0 .265 Callaspo 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .324 Trumbo 1b 3 1 1 1 0 1 .282 Willits lf 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Mathis c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .192 Bourjos cf 3 1 2 1 0 1 .250 Totals 28 2 4 2 3 6 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 1 0 Los Angeles 001 000 10x — 2 4 1 E—Callaspo (2). LOB—Cleveland 3, Los Angeles 5. 2B—Bourjos (2). HR—Bourjos (1), off Carmona; Trumbo (1), off Carmona. RBIs—Trumbo (3), Bourjos (5). CS—O.Cabrera (1). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Callaspo 2, Tor.Hunter). Runners moved up—M.Izturis, H.Kendrick, Tor. Hunter. Cleveland IP H R ER BB SO Carmona L, 0-2 7 2-3 4 2 2 3 6 Herrmann 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO Haren W, 3-0 9 1 0 0 2 8 Inherited runners-scored—Herrmann 2-0. T—2:15. A—43,529 (45,389).

NP 118 5 NP 125

ERA 6.11 8.31 ERA 0.73

SO 0 0 1 1 1 3 1 0 1 8

Avg. .407 .444 .379 .250 .170 .333 .135 .270 .292

Mariners 3, Blue Jays 2 Toronto AB R Y.Escobar ss 3 1 C.Patterson cf 4 0 Bautista rf 4 0 Lind 1b 4 0 A.Hill 2b 4 0 Arencibia c 3 0 Snider lf 3 0 Encarnacion dh 3 1 J.Nix 3b 3 0 Totals 31 2

H BI BB 0 0 1 2 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 2

Seattle AB R H BI BB SO Avg. I.Suzuki rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .273 J.Wilson 2b 4 1 0 0 0 1 .231 Bradley dh 3 0 1 1 1 1 .282 Olivo c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .182 Smoak 1b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .270 L.Rodriguez 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .133 M.Saunders lf 3 0 0 0 0 2 .227 Ryan ss 3 1 1 0 0 0 .185 Langerhans cf 2 1 1 2 1 1 .200 Totals 29 3 5 3 2 8 Toronto 000 000 020 — 2 5 1 Seattle 003 000 00x — 3 5 1 E—J.Nix (1), Smoak (2). LOB—Toronto 4, Seattle 4. 2B—I.Suzuki (2). HR—Langerhans (3), off R.Romero. RBIs—C.Patterson 2 (4), Bradley (4), Langerhans 2 (5). SB—C.Patterson (1), J.Wilson (4). Runners left in scoring position—Toronto 1 (Arencibia); Seattle 1 (Smoak). Runners moved up—Olivo. DP—Toronto 1 (Bautista, Bautista, Arencibia); Seattle 1 (Smoak, Smoak, Olivo). Toronto IP H R ER BB SO R.Rmero L, 1-1 8 5 3 2 2 8 Seattle IP H R ER BB SO Pineda W, 1-1 7 1-3 5 2 1 2 7 Ray H, 1 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 League S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Ray 1-0. R.Romero (Bradley). PB—Olivo. T—2:19. A—15,500 (47,878).

NP ERA 113 1.66 NP ERA 103 2.70 2 6.75 8 0.00 IBB—off

NL BOXSCORES Nationals 7, Phillies 4 Philadelphia Victorino cf Polanco 3b Rollins ss Howard 1b B.Francisco rf Ibanez lf Ruiz c Valdez 2b Blanton p a-Mayberry ph Herndon p Bastardo p Baez p c-M.Martinez ph Totals

AB 5 5 5 3 3 4 4 4 2 1 0 0 0 1 37

R H 0 0 0 2 1 2 2 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 10

BI 0 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

BB 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

SO 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .366 .349 .333 .359 .308 .256 .333 .355 .333 .500 ------.222

Washington AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Desmond ss 5 0 0 0 0 1 .209 Ankiel cf 5 1 1 0 0 2 .211 Werth rf 3 2 2 1 1 0 .237 Stairs 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .000 b-Morse ph-1b 0 0 0 0 1 0 .148 W.Ramos c 3 2 2 2 1 0 .450 S.Burnett p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --L.Nix lf 4 1 2 0 0 0 .267 Espinosa 2b 1 1 0 1 2 0 .269 Hairston Jr. 3b 3 0 1 1 0 0 .071 Clippard p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --I.Rodriguez c 1 0 0 0 0 0 .167 L.Hernandez p 1 0 0 1 0 0 .000 Cora 3b 2 0 1 1 0 0 .200 Totals 31 7 9 7 5 5 Philadelphia 010 000 021 — 4 10 0 Washington 010 310 11x — 7 9 0 a-struck out for Blanton in the 7th. b-walked for Stairs in the 7th. c-grounded out for Baez in the 9th. LOB—Philadelphia 8, Washington 7. 2B—Werth (4), W.Ramos (2). HR—Howard (3), off L.Hernandez; Werth (2), off Blanton. RBIs—Polanco (9), Howard (12), Ibanez (7), Werth (2), W.Ramos 2 (2), Espinosa (6), Hairston Jr. (2), L.Hernandez (1), Cora (1). SB—Ankiel (2), Werth (1). S—L.Hernandez. SF—Espinosa. Runners left in scoring position—Philadelphia 4 (Ibanez, Victorino 2, Ruiz); Washington 5 (Desmond 2, L.Nix 2, Ankiel). Runners moved up—M.Martinez, Desmond, Stairs,

Eric Risberg / The Associated Press

Los Angeles Dodgers’ James Loney, left, is tagged out at home plate by San Francisco Giants catcher Buster Posey during the fourth inning of Tuesday’s game in San Francisco.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Baltimore New York Toronto Tampa Bay Boston Central Division Cleveland Chicago Kansas City Minnesota Detroit West Division Texas Los Angeles Oakland Seattle

W 6 5 5 3 2 W 8 7 6 4 4 W 9 6 5 4

L 3 4 6 8 9 L 3 4 4 6 7 L 2 5 6 7

Pct .667 .556 .455 .273 .182 Pct .727 .636 .600 .400 .364 Pct .818 .545 .455 .364

NATIONAL LEAGUE GB WCGB — — 1 1 2 2 4 4 5 5 GB WCGB — — 1 — 1½ ½ 3½ 2½ 4 3 GB WCGB — — 3 1 4 2 5 3

Tuesday’s Games Detroit 5, Texas 4 Baltimore at New York, ppd., rain Tampa Bay 3, Boston 2 Minnesota 4, Kansas City 3, 10 innings Chicago White Sox 6, Oakland 5, 10 innings L.A. Angels 2, Cleveland 0 Seattle 3, Toronto 2

L10 6-3 5-4 4-6 3-7 2-8 L10 8-2 6-4 6-4 4-6 4-6 L10 8-2 5-5 5-5 3-7

Str Home Away L-2 3-3 3-0 L-1 4-2 1-2 L-4 4-2 1-4 W-2 0-5 3-3 L-2 2-3 0-6 Str Home Away L-1 4-2 4-1 W-1 4-2 3-2 L-1 4-2 2-2 W-1 2-2 2-4 W-1 2-3 2-4 Str Home Away L-1 6-0 3-2 W-1 3-2 3-3 L-1 1-2 4-4 W-2 2-3 2-4

East Division Philadelphia Florida Washington Atlanta New York Central Division Cincinnati Milwaukee Pittsburgh Chicago St. Louis Houston West Division Colorado Los Angeles Arizona San Francisco San Diego

Today’s Games Texas (Bush 0-0) at Detroit (Scherzer 20), 10:05 a.m. Kansas City (Davies 0-1) at Minnesota (Liriano 0-2), 10:10 a.m. Oakland (Anderson 0-1) at Chicago White Sox (Danks 0-1), 11:10 a.m. Toronto (Drabek 1-0) at Seattle (Vargas 0-1), 12:40 p.m. Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at N.Y. Yankees (A.J.Burnett 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Cleveland (C.Carrasco 1-1) at L.A. Angels (E.Santana 0-1), 4:05 p.m. Tampa Bay (Shields 0-1) at Boston (Lackey 1-1), 4:10 p.m.

W 7 5 5 5 4 W 8 5 5 5 4 3 W 7 6 5 5 4

L 3 5 5 6 6 L 3 5 5 6 7 8 L 2 5 5 6 6

Pct .700 .500 .500 .455 .400 Pct .727 .500 .500 .455 .364 .273 Pct .778 .545 .500 .455 .400

Tuesday’s Games Washington 7, Philadelphia 4 Milwaukee at Pittsburgh, ppd., rain Atlanta 5, Florida 0 Colorado at New York, ppd., rain Houston 11, Chicago Cubs 2 Arizona 13, St. Louis 8 Cincinnati 8, San Diego 2, 11 innings San Francisco 5, L.A. Dodgers 4

GB WCGB — — 2 ½ 2 ½ 2½ 1 3 1½ GB WCGB — — 2½ ½ 2½ ½ 3 1 4 2 5 3 GB WCGB — — 2 — 2½ ½ 3 1 3½ 1½

L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6 4-6 L10 7-3 5-5 5-5 5-5 4-6 3-7 L10 7-2 5-5 5-5 5-5 4-6

Str Home Away L-1 5-1 2-2 L-2 3-3 2-2 W-2 2-2 3-3 W-1 2-2 3-4 L-2 1-3 3-3 Str Home Away W-2 5-1 3-2 W-2 5-2 0-3 L-2 1-3 4-2 L-1 3-3 2-3 L-1 2-4 2-3 W-1 2-3 1-5 Str Home Away W-3 3-1 4-1 L-1 3-1 3-4 W-1 3-2 2-3 W-1 3-2 2-4 L-2 2-5 2-1

Today’s Games Cincinnati (T.Wood 1-1) at San Diego (Stauffer 0-1), 3:35 p.m. Milwaukee (Marcum 1-1) at Pittsburgh (Correia 2-0), 4:05 p.m. Philadelphia (Halladay 1-0) at Washington (Lannan 1-0), 4:05 p.m. Colorado (Rogers 1-0) at N.Y. Mets (Niese 0-1), 4:10 p.m. Florida (Jo.Johnson 1-0) at Atlanta (T.Hudson 2-0), 4:10 p.m. Chicago Cubs (Zambrano 1-0) at Houston (W.Rodriguez 0-1), 5:05 p.m. St. Louis (Westbrook 0-1) at Arizona (I.Kennedy 1-0), 6:40 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Lilly 0-1) at San Francisco (J.Sanchez 0-1), 7:15 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Mariners 3, Blue Jays 2: SEATTLE — Rookie Michael Pineda dazzled in the first home start of his career, taking a shutout into the eighth inning for his first professional win, and Seattle beat Toronto. The 22-year-old was clocked as high as 99 mph on the stadium radar gun. • Tigers 5, Rangers 4: DETROIT — Miguel Cabrera’s bases-loaded single in the bottom of the ninth gave Detroit a win over Texas. Detroit led 4-3 before Texas tied it in the eighth with a run off reliever Joaquin Benoit. • Rays 3, Red Sox 2: BOSTON — David Price outpitched Jon Lester and Tampa Bay broke a tie with Boston for the worst record in the American League with a victory over the Red Sox. The Rays and Red Sox began the game even at 2-8. Price (1-2) allowed five hits in 7 2⁄3 innings. • Twins 4, Royals 3: MINNEAPOLIS — Danny Valencia hit a bases-loaded single with one out in the 10th inning to lift Minnesota to victory over Kansas City. While the Twins’ bullpen pitched four perfect innings, including the 10th by Dusty Hughes (1-0), reliever Robinson Tejeda (0-1) failed the Royals, giving up a one-out single to Delmon Young and walking Michael Cuddyer. • White Sox 6, Athletics 5: CHICAGO — Alexei Ramirez hit his second homer of the game with two outs in the 10th inning to lift the Chicago White Sox to victory over Oakland. Ramirez also hit a three-run shot in the second inning and scored a run after drawing a walk in the sixth. • Angels 2, Indians 0: ANAHEIM, Calif. — Dan Haren pitched a one-hitter, allowing only Shin-Soo Choo’s clean single in the fourth inning, and the Los Angeles Angels beat Cleveland to snap the Indians’ eight-game winning streak. Haren (3-0) struck out eight and walked two in his third major league shutout.

• Nationals 7, Phillies 4: WASHINGTON — Jayson Werth homered and doubled to lead Washington to victory in his first appearance against Philadelphia since leaving the Phillies as a free agent. Werth doubled leading off the fourth inning and scored, starting a three-run inning that gave the Nationals the lead for good. • Giants 5, Dodgers 4: SAN FRANCISCO — Aaron Rowand tripled leading off the seventh and scored the go-ahead run moments later on a wild pitch, and San Francisco beat the Los Angeles Dodgers. • Braves 5, Marlins 0: ATLANTA — Tommy Hanson pitched four-hit ball over seven innings for his first victory, Jason Heyward and Brian McCann homered, and Chipper Jones drove in two runs to lead Atlanta past Florida. Hanson (1-2) finally got a few runs to work with and the Braves turned in several nifty defensive plays, two of them diving stops by shortstop Alex Gonzalez. • Astros 11, Cubs 2: HOUSTON — Brett Myers kept up his dominance against the Chicago Cubs and Angel Sanchez tied a career high with four hits to lead Houston to victory. Myers (1-0) allowed eight hits and one run in seven innings to improve his career record against Chicago to 11-3. • Diamondbacks 13, Cardinals 8: PHOENIX — Justin Upton and Juan Miranda each hit a threerun homer to lead Arizona to a win over St. Louis. Chris Young added a two-run homer for Arizona, which scored seven of its runs with two outs. • Reds 8, Padres 2: SAN DIEGO — Ryan Hanigan hit a go-ahead double and Drew Stubbs launched a three-run homer that capped a six-run burst in the 11th inning and led Cincinnati over San Diego.

I.Rodriguez. Philadelphia IP H R ER BB Blanton L, 0-1 6 7 5 5 1 Herndon 2-3 1 1 1 1 Bastardo 1-3 0 0 0 2 Baez 1 1 1 1 1 Washington IP H R ER BB L.Hrndz W, 1-16 2-3 7 1 1 0 Clippard H, 3 2-3 1 2 2 2 S.Burnett S, 3-3 1 2-3 2 1 1 0 Inherited runners-scored—Bastardo 3-0, S.Burnett 3-2. WP—S.Burnett. T—2:42. A—13,413 (41,506).

SO NP ERA 4 86 10.45 1 18 5.40 0 12 0.00 0 15 1.50 SO NP ERA 6 98 3.50 1 21 1.93 0 28 1.35 2-1, Clippard

Braves 5, Marlins 0 Florida Coghlan cf Infante 2b H.Ramirez ss Stanton rf G.Sanchez 1b Morrison lf J.Buck c Dobbs 3b

AB 4 4 4 4 2 4 4 1

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

SO 2 0 1 1 1 0 1 0

Avg. .227 .244 .182 .286 .324 .324 .231 .500

a-Helms ph-3b Volstad p Sanches p b-Bonifacio ph Mujica p Totals

1 2 0 0 0 30

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 5

0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 1 0 4

0 1 0 0 0 7

.308 .000 1.000 .261 ---

Atlanta AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Prado lf 4 2 2 0 0 1 .298 McLouth cf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .237 C.Jones 3b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .308 McCann c 4 1 1 1 0 1 .350 Uggla 2b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .167 Heyward rf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .273 Ale.Gonzalez ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .250 Freeman 1b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .194 Hanson p 3 0 0 0 0 1 .000 O’Flaherty p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Moylan p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Linebrink p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 31 5 9 5 2 5 Florida 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Atlanta 002 120 00x — 5 9 0 a-grounded out for Dobbs in the 8th. b-walked for Sanches in the 8th. LOB—Florida 7, Atlanta 6. 2B—Stanton (3), Morrison (4), Prado (5), McLouth (3), Uggla (1). HR—Heyward (3),

off Volstad; McCann (1), off Volstad. RBIs—McLouth (3), C.Jones 2 (8), McCann (6), Heyward (6). S—McLouth. SF—C.Jones. Runners left in scoring position—Florida 4 (J.Buck 2, Coghlan, H.Ramirez); Atlanta 1 (Ale.Gonzalez). Runners moved up—Morrison 2. GIDP—G.Sanchez, J.Buck. DP—Atlanta 2 (Uggla, Ale.Gonzalez, Freeman), (C.Jones, Uggla, Freeman). Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Volstad L, 0-1 4 2-3 8 5 5 2 3 82 5.59 Sanches 2 1-3 0 0 0 0 2 22 0.00 Mujica 1 1 0 0 0 0 16 5.79 Atlanta IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hanson W, 1-2 7 4 0 0 2 5 98 3.38 O’Flaherty 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 19 0.00 Moylan 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 7 4.91 Linebrink 1 0 0 0 1 2 20 5.40 Inherited runners-scored—Sanches 2-0, Moylan 2-0. IBB—off Volstad (Heyward). T—2:33. A—13,865 (49,586).

Astros 11, Cubs 2 Chicago

AB R

H BI BB SO Avg.

S.Castro ss Barney 2b Mateo p Grabow p c-K.Hill ph Byrd cf Re.Johnson cf Ar.Ramirez 3b DeWitt 3b C.Pena 1b A.Soriano lf Soto c Colvin rf J.Russell p Samardzija p Stevens p a-Je.Baker ph-2b Totals

5 4 0 0 0 3 2 3 1 4 4 4 4 0 2 0 2 38

0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 11

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 2 0 0 8

.367 .320 ----.000 .391 .111 .293 .125 .185 .250 .189 .167 .000 .000 --.381

Houston AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bourn cf 5 4 2 1 0 1 .268 Ang.Sanchez ss 5 2 4 2 0 0 .395 Pence rf 5 1 3 4 0 0 .326 Ca.Lee 1b 5 0 0 1 0 1 .200 Wallace 1b 0 0 0 0 0 0 .250 Michaels lf 5 0 1 0 0 1 .100 Hall 2b 5 0 1 1 0 2 .231 C.Johnson 3b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .189 Quintero c 3 2 3 0 1 0 .292 Myers p 3 1 1 0 0 0 .429 Fulchino p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Bourgeois ph 1 1 1 1 0 0 .400 An.Rodriguez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 41 11 16 10 1 7 Chicago 000 000 101 — 2 11 3 Houston 320 200 04x — 11 16 1 a-flied out for Stevens in the 7th. b-singled for Fulchino in the 8th. c-walked for Grabow in the 9th. E—A.Soriano (2), DeWitt (2), Barney (1), C.Johnson (4). LOB—Chicago 10, Houston 8. 2B—Byrd (6), Re.Johnson (1), Colvin (2), Bourn (6), Ang.Sanchez (2), Pence (4), Quintero (3). 3B—Quintero (1). HR—Colvin (2), off Myers. RBIs—S.Castro (3), Colvin (6), Bourn (3), Ang.Sanchez 2 (8), Pence 4 (9), Ca.Lee (6), Hall (3), Bourgeois (1). SB—Bourn 2 (4). Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 6 (C.Pena, Soto 3, A.Soriano, Re.Johnson); Houston 4 (C.Johnson 2, Myers, Ca.Lee). Runners moved up—S.Castro, C.Pena, Pence, Ca.Lee. Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA J.Russell L, 1-1 1 2-3 7 5 4 0 1 55 9.82 Samardzija 3 3 2 2 1 2 54 7.50 Stevens 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 23 0.00 Mateo 1 0 0 0 0 3 15 2.08 Grabow 1 5 4 3 0 0 20 8.31 Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Myers W, 1-0 7 8 1 1 0 5 100 1.77 Fulchino 1 1 0 0 0 2 24 3.00 An.Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 1 1 21 13.50 Inherited runners-scored—Samardzija 1-0, Stevens 2-0. HBP—by Samardzija (C.Johnson). T—3:04. A—23,523 (40,963).

Diamondbacks 13, Cardinals 8 St. Louis Theriot ss Rasmus cf Pujols 1b Holliday lf Berkman rf Freese 3b Schumaker 2b Y.Molina c Carpenter p Tallet p b-Jay ph Augenstein p Motte p e-Descalso ph Totals

AB 6 6 5 5 5 4 3 5 2 0 0 1 0 1 43

R H 2 3 2 2 1 3 0 1 1 3 1 2 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 8 16

BI 0 2 0 1 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

BB 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 4

SO 0 1 1 3 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

Avg. .286 .357 .200 .375 .289 .313 .275 .152 .000 --.333 1.000 --.188

Arizona AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bloomquist lf 5 1 1 0 0 0 .349 K.Johnson 2b 3 1 0 0 1 2 .190 J.Upton rf 3 2 1 3 2 1 .300 S.Drew ss 5 2 2 1 0 1 .381 C.Young cf 4 2 3 3 1 0 .302 Branyan 1b 4 1 2 0 1 1 .400 Montero c 4 2 2 0 1 2 .455 R.Roberts 3b 4 1 2 1 1 0 .316 Galarraga p 2 0 0 1 0 1 .000 a-Mora ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .238 Mickolio p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Paterson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Miranda ph 1 1 1 3 0 0 .238 D.Hernandez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-G.Parra ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .292 Putz p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 36 13 14 13 7 8 St. Louis 021 023 000 — 8 16 0 Arizona 231 214 00x — 13 14 0 a-hit a sacrifice fly for Galarraga in the 5th. b-walked for Tallet in the 6th. c-homered for Paterson in the 6th. d-grounded out for D.Hernandez in the 8th. e-flied out for Motte in the 9th. LOB—St. Louis 12, Arizona 8. 2B—Theriot (1), Schumaker (4), Bloomquist (3), S.Drew (3), Branyan (2), Montero (4), R.Roberts (1). HR—Berkman (3), off Galarraga; Freese (2), off Galarraga; Rasmus (2), off Galarraga; J.Upton (3), off Carpenter; C.Young (3), off Carpenter; Miranda (1), off Augenstein. RBIs—Rasmus 2 (3), Holliday (4), Berkman 2 (6), Freese 2 (5), Schumaker (4), J.Upton 3 (8), S.Drew (6), C.Young 3 (10), R.Roberts (6), Galarraga (1), Mora (4), Miranda 3 (3). SF—Mora. Runners left in scoring position—St. Louis 6 (Theriot, Y.Molina 4, Holliday); Arizona 5 (Montero, Bloomquist 2, S.Drew 2). Runners moved up—Bloomquist, Galarraga. GIDP—R.Roberts. DP—St. Louis 1 (Schumaker, Theriot, Pujols). St. Louis Crpentr L, 0-2 Tallet Augenstein Motte Arizona Glrraga W, 2-0 Mickolio

IP 4 1 1 2-3 1 1-3 IP 5 2-3

H 8 2 3 1 H 9 4

R 8 1 4 0 R 5 3

ER 8 1 4 0 ER 5 3

BB 3 2 1 1 BB 2 1

SO 4 0 3 1 SO 3 2

NP 83 22 30 19 NP 99 37

ERA 5.82 2.08 9.53 3.00 ERA 6.75 9.00

AB 6 5 5 5 4 0 5 3 4 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 2 42

R H 1 2 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 0 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 8 10

BI 4 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 8

BB 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 6

Avg. .250 .386 .415 .231 .267 --.318 .220 .353 --.313 .000 .250 ------.583

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Venable rf 3 0 0 0 2 1 .161 O.Hudson 2b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .324 Headley 3b 5 0 0 0 0 3 .212 Ludwick lf 4 0 0 0 1 0 .094 Luebke p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Hawpe 1b 3 0 0 0 0 2 .138 c-Cantu ph-1b 2 0 0 0 0 1 .190 Hundley c 3 2 1 0 2 1 .387 Maybin cf 4 0 1 0 1 2 .257 Alb.Gonzalez ss 5 0 2 1 0 2 .333 Richard p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-E.Patterson ph 1 0 0 1 0 0 .250 Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Adams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Denorfia ph-lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Totals 38 2 6 2 6 14 Cincinnati 100 010 000 06 — 8 10 0 San Diego 010 000 010 00 — 2 6 1 a-popped out for LeCure in the 7th. b-grounded out for Gregerson in the 8th. c-struck out for Hawpe in the 9th. d-grounded out for Adams in the 10th. e-singled for Ondrusek in the 11th. E—Richard (2). LOB—Cincinnati 6, San Diego 9. 2B—Gomes (2), Hanigan (1), O.Hudson (3), Maybin (2). 3B—Alb.Gonzalez (1). HR—Stubbs (2), off Luebke. RBIs—Stubbs 4 (8), Gomes (10), Hanigan (6), Heisey (8), Renteria (4), Alb.Gonzalez (2), E.Patterson (1). S—LeCure. Runners left in scoring position—Cincinnati 3 (Hanigan 2, Phillips); San Diego 6 (Ludwick 3, Venable, Maybin 2). Runners moved up—Stubbs, O.Hudson, E.Patterson, Denorfia. GIDP—Votto. DP—San Diego 1 (O.Hudson, Alb.Gonzalez, Hawpe). Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA LeCure 6 1 1 1 2 8 87 2.25 Chapman H, 3 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 0.00 Masset BS, 2-2 1 2 1 1 0 1 16 10.80 Bray 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 9 0.00 Ondrusk W, 2-0 1 2-3 2 0 0 2 2 30 0.00 Cordero 1 0 0 0 1 1 14 1.80 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Richard 7 2-3 5 2 1 2 4 107 2.45 Gregerson 1-3 0 0 0 0 0 1 1.69 Bell 1 0 0 0 1 1 17 0.00 Adams 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 1.80 Luebke L, 0-1 1 5 6 6 1 0 33 11.37 Inherited runners-scored—Ondrusek 2-0, Gregerson 1-0. IBB—off Bray (Ludwick), off Ondrusek (Venable). T—3:21. A—17,379 (42,691).

Giants 5, Dodgers 4 Los Angeles Gwynn lf Carroll ss Ethier rf Kemp cf Loney 1b Uribe 3b Barajas c Miles 2b Billingsley p Jansen p b-Thames ph Hawksworth p d-Paul ph Totals

AB 5 5 4 2 4 3 4 4 2 0 1 0 1 35

R 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 4

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 2 1 2 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 2

SO 1 2 1 0 0 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 9

Avg. .269 .364 .381 .472 .163 .147 .206 .150 .000 --.200 --.333

San Francisco AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Rowand cf 4 2 2 1 0 1 .346 F.Sanchez 2b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .286 Huff rf-lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .233 Posey c 4 1 3 2 0 0 .300 P.Sandoval 3b 4 0 1 1 0 1 .368 Burrell lf 2 0 0 0 1 2 .207 Affeldt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Romo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Fontenot ph 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Br.Wilson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Tejada ss 4 0 1 0 0 0 .268 Belt 1b 3 1 1 0 1 1 .158 Lincecum p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Mota p 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-Schierholtz ph-rf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .235 Totals 30 5 9 4 4 7 Los Angeles 000 300 100 — 4 8 0 San Francisco 000 220 10x — 5 9 1 a-grounded out for Mota in the 6th. b-homered for Jansen in the 7th. c-grounded out for Romo in the 8th. d-struck out for Hawksworth in the 9th. E—Belt (1). LOB—Los Angeles 7, San Francisco 6. 2B—Ethier (1), Kemp (5), Uribe (2), F.Sanchez (3), P.Sandoval (1). 3B—Rowand (1). HR—Thames (1), off Affeldt. RBIs—Kemp (6), Loney (5), Uribe (2), Thames (2), Rowand (3), Posey 2 (7), P.Sandoval (5). SB—Belt (2). CS—Kemp (1), Tejada (1). S—Lincecum. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 4 (Miles 3, Loney); San Francisco 4 (Tejada, P.Sandoval 2, Schierholtz). Runners moved up—Loney. GIDP—Huff. DP—Los Angeles 2 (Barajas, Barajas, Carroll), (Loney, Carroll, Hawksworth). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Billingsley 5 7 4 4 2 6 99 7.71 Jansen 1 0 0 0 1 1 23 7.11 Hwkwrth L, 1-1 2 2 1 1 1 0 23 3.86 San Fran. IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Lincecum 5 1-3 6 3 3 1 4 115 1.86 Mota H, 2 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 6 2.25 Affldt W, 1-0 1 2 1 1 1 0 17 4.50 Romo H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Br.Wilson S, 1-2 1 0 0 0 0 3 14 19.29 Inherited runners-scored—Mota 3-0. IBB—off Affeldt (Kemp). HBP—by Lincecum (Uribe). WP—Billingsley, Hawksworth. T—3:00. A—41,960 (41,915).

LEADERS AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—YEscobar, Toronto, .407; MiCabrera, Detroit, .385; Konerko, Chicago, .381; Bautista, Toronto, .379; Abreu, Los Angeles, .368; Pedroia, Boston, .366; Butler, Kansas City, .351. RUNS—Beckham, Chicago, 10; AlRamirez, Chicago, 10; MiCabrera, Detroit, 9; Gordon, Kansas City, 9; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 9; Kinsler, Texas, 9; AlRodriguez, New York, 9. RBI—Konerko, Chicago, 12; NCruz, Texas, 11; ACabrera, Cleveland, 10; MiCabrera, Detroit, 10; Quentin, Chicago, 10; Teixeira, New York, 10; Beltre, Texas, 9. HITS—Gordon, Kansas City, 16; Konerko, Chicago, 16; MiCabrera, Detroit, 15; HKendrick, Los Angeles, 15; Pedroia, Boston, 15; MiYoung, Texas, 15; Abreu, Los Angeles, 14; MeCabrera, Kansas City, 14; MIzturis, Los Angeles, 14. DOUBLES—Quentin, Chicago, 7; Barton, Oakland, 5; Gordon, Kansas City, 5; Smoak, Seattle, 5; 8 tied at 4. NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—Kemp, Los Angeles, .472; Montero, Arizona, .455; Votto, Cincinnati, .444; Phillips, Cincinnati, .410; Fielder, Milwaukee, .400; Janish, Cincinnati, .400; AngSanchez, Houston, .395. RUNS—Phillips, Cincinnati, 12; Votto, Cincinnati, 12; Tabata, Pittsburgh, 11; Bourn, Houston, 10; Braun, Milwaukee, 10; SCastro, Chicago, 10; Fowler, Colorado, 10; AngSanchez, Houston, 10; CYoung, Arizona, 10. RBI—Howard, Philadelphia, 12; IDavis, New York, 11; Fielder, Milwaukee, 11; Rolen, Cincinnati, 10; CYoung, Arizona, 10; Gomes, Cincinnati, 9; Pence, Houston, 9; Polanco, Philadelphia, 9; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 9; Walker, Pittsburgh, 9. HITS—Byrd, Chicago, 18; SCastro, Chicago, 18; Kemp, Los Angeles, 17; AngSanchez, Houston, 17; Ethier, Los Angeles, 16; Phillips, Cincinnati, 16; JosReyes, New York, 16; Votto, Cincinnati, 16. DOUBLES—Bourn, Houston, 6; Byrd, Chicago, 6; Coghlan, Florida, 5; Kemp, Los Angeles.


D4 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Summit

NHL

Ovechkin is scoring less, but Capitals are winning more

Continued from D1 The Summit girls also recorded a team victory Tuesday, winning with a score of 358. “We took a big step forward today,” Summit boys coach Mark Tichenor said. “Before, we thought we were a year away from making any serious noise at the state tournament. After the showing by the two freshmen (Wasserman and Blackwell), though, I think we’re going to be very strong.” Wasserman putted only 26 times Tuesday, and Blackwell, who won an intrasquad qualifying round over the weekend to earn the Storm’s fifth varsity spot for the High Desert Classic, hit 11 of 18 fairways. Cole Ortega posted Summit’s fourth and final counting score, an 88. For the Redmond boys, in addition to Lambert’s 71 — the Panther senior recorded six birdies Tuesday — Tim Messner carded an 80, Mason Rodby finished with an 85, and Riley Cron added an 86. Playing in a foursome with the Storm’s Cramer, Lambert trailed the Summit junior by two strokes at the turn. Lambert posted a 1-under 35 on the back nine, though, compared with Cramer’s 2-over 38. Bend High placed third in the boys team scoring with a 339. Ryan Crownover paced the Lava Bears with a 79, and Rob-

By Jeff Z. Klein New York Times News Service

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Crook County High School golfer Jared George, left, tees off on No. 5 of the Nicklaus Course, as (from left) Summit High’s Dylan Cramer, Bend High’s Ryan Crownover and Redmond High’s Jared Lambert watch, during the High Desert Classic at Pronghorn Club Tuesday morning. bie Wilkins carded an 81. “It’s neat to see the kids play well when you know they have the talent,” Bend coach Rusty Clemons said about his team and the boys field in general. “It was a good day for scores. … It’s tough to swing a club when you’re all bundled up like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man.” Crook County rounded out the boys team scoring with a 354. Jared George turned in an 82 and Dillon Russell shot an 83 to lead the Cowboys.

While the boys medalist honors came down to the final hole, Summit sophomore Madi Mansberger blew out the girls field, posting an 8-over-par 80 to finish first in the individual standings. Mansberger tore up the front nine, posting a 1-over 37, before cooling off on the back with a 43. Bend High’s Kayla Good placed second with an 87, and her Lava Bear teammate Heidi Froelich took third with an 88. Behind Good and Froelich,

Bend claimed runner-up team honors behind Summit with a 373. “I don’t know if this is the year we make a run at Summit,” Lava Bear coach Lowell Norby said. “But we’re closing the gap a little bit.” Crook County placed third (427) and Redmond finished fourth (438) in the girls tournament. Kirsti Kelso led the Cowgirls with a 96, and Cayla Lussier posted a team-low 106 for the Panthers.

Outlaws stay unbeaten in Sky-Em Bulletin staff report

PREP ROUNDUP

COTTAGE GROVE — Erik Carlson slugged a double, a home run and batted six runs in to lead Sisters to a 12-1 Sky-Em League baseball victory over Cottage Grove on Tuesday. The Outlaws (5-0 Sky-Em, 111 overall) banged out 12 hits in five innings against the Lions for their fifth consecutive win. Sisters’ Shane Groth struck out six and walked three in four innings of work to earn the victory. The Outlaws never trailed in the game, scoring two runs in their opening at-bat. Sisters added four runs in the second inning and four in the fourth before tacking on two more in the fifth. Cottage Grove (3-2 Sky-Em, 5-7 overall) only managed five hits against the visiting Outlaws. Hunter Hamilton took the loss for the Lions after being removed from the mound in the second inning. Sisters is at Elmira on Friday. In other prep events Tuesday: SOFTBALL Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Cottage Grove. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 SISTERS — The Outlaws shut out Cottage Grove to earn their second Sky-Em League win of the season, this time in five innings due to the 10-run rule. Sisters (2-4 overall) hosts Elmira Friday. Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 ELMIRA — The Falcons nohit the Hawks and ended the Sky-Em League contest after five innings because of the 10run mercy rule. Jocelyen Gerdau took the loss for La Pine. The Hawks (1-4 Sky-Em, 2-11 overall) are at Sweet Home on Friday.

Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 - 19 Burns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 - 2 CULVER — The Bulldogs routed the visiting Hilanders in a nonleague doubleheader, outhitting Burns 27-3 in the two games. Megan McKinney recorded the win in both games, striking out eight while allowing just one hit in the opener. Culver posted 10 extra-base hits in the two games. Kymber Wofford ended the day with a double and two triples and Sam Donnelly recorded two doubles, both of which came in the first game. The Bulldogs (103 overall) host Regis on Friday. BASEBALL Elmira . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 LA PINE — Elmira piled on four runs in the opening inning and La Pine never got its bats going in the Sky-Em League matchup. Starting pitcher Jon Ebner lasted three innings and posted a triple at the plate for the Hawks (0-4 Sky-Em League, 110 overall). La Pine hosts Sweet Home Friday. Culver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Santiam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 CULVER — The Bulldogs exploded for eight runs in the sixth inning to defeat the Wolverines in Class 2A/1A Special District 2 play. Clay Gibson, Luke Fisher and Kyle Bender all had a pair of runs batted in during Culver’s big inning. Gerson Gonzalez went the distance on the mound for the Bulldogs to pick up the win. Culver hosts Regis on Friday. GIRLS TENNIS Redmond. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 REDMOND — The Panthers

won three of four singles matches to defeat the Cowgirls at home. Redmond’s Genna Miller defeated Crook County’s Lisa Pham 6-3, 6-1 in No. 2 singles to lead the Panther attack. Kayla Morgan and Katie Brown posted a 6-4, 7-6 (7-4) victory over Redmond’s Karli Christensen and Emmalee Cron in No. 1 doubles play. Redmond is at the Bend Invitational on Friday and Saturday. Crook County hosts Summit on Thursday. Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Mountain View. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Hailey Younger of Summit bested Mountain View’s Hayati Wolfenden 6-1, 6-0 to take the No. 1 singles match at Mountain View. The Cougars’ Crosby Mays outlasted Ariel Steele 6-3, 3-6 (10-8) in the No. 2 singles match, but the Storm won three of the four doubles matches to clinch the team win. Summit travels to Crook County on Thursday, while Mountain View returns to action Friday at the Bend Invitational. North Bend. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 ——— Junction City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 JUNCTION CITY — Megan Minke was a double winner for Sisters, besting North Bend’s Zenora Cuzort 6-4, 3-6, 7-5 and Anna Edwards of Junction City 6-2, 4-6, 6-3. The Outlaws’ doubles duo Paige Tosello and Shelbi Thompson also earned two wins on the day in matches played at Junction City. Sisters is on the road at Madras on Saturday.

BOYS TENNIS Summit. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Brothers Bo and Liam Hall posted a 6-0, 6-0 victory against Colby Chance and Eric Watson in the No. 1 doubles match to lead the Storm to victory at Summit High. The host team won three of four doubles matches as well as three of the four singles matches. Matt Larraneta paced the Cougars with a win at No. 1 singles, defeating Parker Nichols 6-2, 6-4. The Storm host Crook County on Thursday, while Mountain View entertains Bend the same day. TRACK & FIELD Hawks post a pair of wins SISTERS — La Pine’s Deion Mock won the boys pole vault and Ashley Agenbroad took first in the girls discus for the Hawks at the four-team Sky-Em League track meet at Sisters High. Complete results were not available. Travis Harrison added a runner-up finish in the discus and a third-place effort in the shot put, while Brittany Glenn finished second in the girls 300 hurdles. The Hawks host the La Pine Invitational on Saturday. GIRLS GOLF Buffs first on the coast GEARHART — Lauren Simmons placed third with a 101 and Savannah Patterson finished fifth with a 104 as Madras won the eight-team tournament at Gearhart Golf Links. The White Buffaloes shot 426 as a team, defeating runner-up Central Catholic (451) by 25 strokes. Kecia Florendo (109), Rachel Simmons (112) and Rachel Mendanzona (123) also contributed scores for Madras at the par-72 course. Seaside’s Katy Kawafoe took medalist honors with a 97.

ARLINGTON, Va. — It seems an odd thing to ask whether Alex Ovechkin is mentally ready for the playoffs, but that question was put to Washington coach Bruce Boudreau on Tuesday on the eve of the Capitals-New York Rangers first-round series. “He’s playing hungrier,” Boudreau told reporters at the Capitals’ practice rink. “He’s got that look in his eyes. When he’s got that look, it’s good for us.” Ovechkin is ready, and chances are he will still sometimes dazzle in that runaway-locomotive way of his, as he has since joining the Capitals from Dynamo Moscow in 2005. And perhaps he will pull the kind of pranks he did in the playoff series against the Rangers two years ago, when he sat in full gear on the Capitals’ bench at Madison Square Garden to watch their morning skate. (He was asked to leave, he said jokingly, because the Rangers “are afraid of me.”) But dazzling people and joking around are no longer what Ovechkin is about, and that has given rise to the questions about his reduced production. But Ovechkin is a changed player. He has learned through experience that championships are won with defense. “Yeah, you see the stats,” Ovechkin said Tuesday. “Regular year and playoffs are two different seasons, so right now it is a new season started.” Ovechkin has put up the lowest scoring totals of his NHL career: 32 goals and 53 assists in 79 games. That was still good enough to make him No. 7 in the league in total points, but it was also a far cry from the numbers that won him a point-scoring trophy, two goal-scoring trophies and three consecutive Most Valuable Player awards. In a year in which Sidney Crosby, his friendly rival for the title of hockey’s biggest star, missed half the season with a concussion, Ovechkin did not ramp up his scoring to claim the crown. Instead, through slumps and frustrations, he stuck to Boudreau’s plan of transforming the Capitals into a better defensive team. “If it is good for the team I will do it,” Ovechkin said. “If Bruce tells me to do this, I’m going to do it.” The Capitals — who since 1999 have won only one of seven playoff series — and Ovechkin persevered. They finished with 107 points, down from 121 last season, but still wound up No. 1 in the Eastern Conference. Their goal production dropped from last season’s league-leading 3.82 to 2.67 a game, 19th in the league. But they improved their goalsagainst average to 2.33 (4th) from 2.77 (16th). Ovechkin’s numbers reflected that shift to more responsible

defense. “Every player in the world likes to score goals, but we’ve gone through that,” Boudreau said Tuesday, adding that the Capitals’ “best players have won all kind of awards and accolades and everything else; the one thing they haven’t won is the big one.” Mike Knuble, at 38 the oldest Capital, was with Detroit in the 1990s when Steve Yzerman completed his transformation from a scoring machine into a two-way leader who won Stanley Cups. He says he sees a similar change in Ovechkin. “I’ve been around a while, and I can see Alex is older and wiser,” Knuble said. “I think when you get all the other hardware, you want to go for the piece that’s missing.” Ovechkin is not saying much about the Rangers series. In 2009, he spoke with his shot totals: 49 in seven games, almost a quarter of the shots the Capitals took on Henrik Lundqvist, as Washington rallied from a 3-1 deficit to advance to the second round. In 2011, will he and the Capitals let their defense do the talking? “It has been hard for us, but I think everybody’s ready and everybody can’t wait,” Ovechkin said. “We want to keep going.” A moment later, he cut off questions and strode away. Alex Ovechkin had to get back to business.

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PREP SCOREBOARD GOLF Girls Tuesday’s results ——— HIGH DESERT CLASSIC Pronghorn Golf Club Par 72 Team scores — Summit 358, Bend 373, Crook County 427, Redmond 438. Medalist — Madi Mansberger, Summit, 80. SUMMIT (358) — Madi Mansberger, 37-43—80; Rebecca Kerry, 41-50—91; Kristen Parr, 45-47—92; Anna Schwab, 4352—95; Megan Mitchell, 50-47—97. BEND (373) — Kayla Good, 43-44—87; Heidi Froelich, 4246—88; Maddy Rice, 45-50—95; Lili Bornio, 51-52—103; Danae Walker, 54-58—112. CROOK COUNTY (427) — Kristi Kelso, 50-46—96; Kalie Solomon, 52-49—101; Jaci McKenzie, 49-54—103; Sierra Morgan, 61-66—127; Hannah Seely, 62-72—134. REDMOND (438) — Cayla Lussier, 51-55—106; Emily Roundtree, 50-58—108; Rachel Westendorf, 56-54—110; Rheannan Toney, 56-58—114; Chelsea Driggers, 59-61—120.

Boys Tuesday’s results ——— HIGH DESERT CLASSIC Pronghorn Golf Club Par 72 Team scores — Summit 310, Redmond 322, Bend 339, Crook County 354. Medalist — Jared Lambert, Redmond, 71. SUMMIT (310) — Dylan Cramer, 34-38—72; T.K. Wasserman, 38-36—74; Ryan Blackwell, 37-39—76; Cole Ortega, 4345—88; Kyle Wells, 47-44—91. REDMOND (322) — Jared Lambert, 36-35—71; Tim Messner, 41-39—80; Mason Rodby, 44-41—85; Riley Cron, 49-37—86; Ben Moore, 44-48—92. BEND (339) — Ryan Crownover, 40-39—79; Robbie Wilkins, 39-42—81; Chapin Pedersen, 43-46—89; Jaired Rodmaker, 5139—90; Carter McGowan, 45-46—91. CROOK COUNTY (354) — Jared George, 41-41—82; Dillon Russell, 43-40—83; Ben McLane, 46-44—90; Mitch Scofield, 4653—99; Kurt Russell, 51-54—105.

At Redmond Singles — Barbara Furuie, CC, def. Monica Johnson, R, 6-4, 6-4; Genna Miller, R, def. Lisa Pham, CC, 6-3, 6-1; Chloe Woodward, R, def. Ali Apperson, CC, 6-3, 6-0; Ashlee Lemos, R, def. Natalia Wiersh, CC, 6-1, 6-1. Doubles — Morgan/Brown, CC, def. Christensen/Cron, R, 6-4, 7-6 (7-4); Johnston/Kemper, CC, def. Wright/Dollarhide, R, 7-5, 7-6 (7-4); Hartford/Bentlage, R, def. Bowers/Nelson, CC, 6-2, 6-0; McCall/Marshall, R, def. Goertzen/Slawter, CC, 6-1, 6-0. ——— SUMMIT 5, MOUNTAIN VIEW 3 At Mountain View Singles — Hailey Younger, S, def. Hayati Wolfenden, MV, 61, 6-0; Crosby Mays, MV, def. Ariel Steeve, S, 6-3, 3-6, 10-8; Ally Kercher, MV, def. Morgan DeMeyer, S, 7-5, 6-3; Amanda Fefferman, S, def. Courtney Horrell, MV, 6-1, 6-4. Doubles — Brodeck/Shephard, S, def. Deckard/Lind, MV, 6-1, 6-0; Cesar/Daniel, MV, def. Forest/Sundborg, S, 6-2, 6-2; Caine/ Dodson, S, def. Anderson/Johnson, MV, 6-4, 6-3; Bailey/Evans, S, def. Eberle/Torrence, MV, 6-4, 7-6(4).

Second game (Five innings) Burns 000 20 — 2 2 4 Culver 973 0X — 19 16 1 Bodine and Hodge; McKinney, Dougherty (4) and Donnelly. W— McKinney. L— Bodine. 2B — Culver: McKinney, Hill. 3B — Culver: Wofford.

Boys

BASEBALL

Tuesday’s results ——— REDMOND 7, CROOK COUNTY 1 At Prineville Singles — Alex Bruno, R, def. Jared Anderson, CC, 6-1, 6-2; Carlo Gangan, R, def. Gabe Alvarez, CC, 6-0, 6-0; Miguel Hidalgo, R, def. Oliver Peterson, CC, 6-1, 6-1; Chris Wilcox, R, won by forfeit. Doubles — Brown/Slater, CC, def. Jackson/Chriss, R, 6-3, 6-3; Maxwell/Powell, R, def. Lopez/Nore, CC, 6-4, 6-1; Wilson/Hamilton, R, def. Umbarger/Woodward, CC, 6-3, 6-3; Jorgensen/Huff, R, won by forfeit. ——— SUMMIT 6, MOUNTAIN VIEW 2 At Summit Singles — Matt Larraneta, MV, def. Parker Nichols, S, 6-2, 6-4; Dylan Lowes, S, def. Matt VanHemelryck, MV, 6-3, 6-0; Alec Virk, S, def. Philip Atkinson, MV, 6-0, 6-0; Wes Franco, S, def. James Harper, MV, 6-1, 4-6 (10-8). Doubles — B. Hall/L. Hall, S, def. Chance/Watson, MV, 6-0, 6-0.; Dillingham/Parr, S, def. Martel/King, MV, 7-5, 6-7(1), 10-6; Rowden/Dalquist, S, def. Mauldin/Onellete, MV, 7-5, 6-3. King/Hargows, MV, def. L’Etoile/Souther, S, 6-3, 6-3.

Tuesday’s results ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— Sisters 240 42 — 12 12 1 Cottage Grove 100 000 — 1 5 4 Groth, Lahey and Morgan, Calarco; Hamilton, Bloom (2), Denny (4), Jordan (5) and Dunn. W — Groth. L— Hamilton. 2B — Sisters: Carlson, Groth. HR — Sisters: Carlson. ——— Elmira 410 113 0 — 10 12 3 La Pine 100 000 1 — 2 4 7 Engham and Keagal; Ebner, Allen (4), Siauw (7) and Manley. W—Engham. L—Ebner. 2B—Elmira: Bogg, Engham, Fay. 3B—La Pine: Ebner. HR—Elmira: Rodriguez. ——— CLASS 2A/1A SPECIAL DISTRICT 2 Santiam 110 010 4 — 7 10 3 Culver 100 028 x — 11 8 2 Nicote, White (5), Cooper (6) and Sexton; Gonzalez and Barany. W — Gonzalez. L — White. 2B — Santiam: McConnel; Culver: Saldana. 3B — Santiam: Nicote.

SOFTBALL

TENNIS Girls Tuesday’s results ——— REDMOND 5, CROOK COUNTY 3

La Pine Elmira

Tuesday’s results ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— 000 00 — 223 3x —

LACROSSE Boys 0 0 8 10 7 2

Redmond

Gerdau, K. Parrish (4) and Maxfield, Miller (4); Boytz and Thoms. W — Boytz. L — Gerdau. 2B — Elmira: Boytz. ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— First game (Five innings) Burns 000 00 — 0 1 1 Culver 303 4X — 10 11 0 Bodine and Hodge; McKinney and Donnelly. W — McKinney. L — Bodine. 2B —Culver: Dougherty 2, Donnelly, McKinney, Wofford, VanAlstyne. 3B — Culver: Wofford

Tuesday’s result ——— Harney County 17, Redmond 0

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 D5

Japan Continued from D1 Then in a bit of storybook drama for the Eagles, who are from Sendai, a city not far from the epicenter of the giant quake last month, their spiritual leader, Motohiro Shima, hit a three-run home run into the team’s cheering section in left field, and Tohoku beat the Chiba Lotte Marines, 6-4. “This is a victory for all of us, including the people trying their best in Tohoku,” said Hisashi Iwakuma, the Eagles’ starting pitcher. And so it was on opening day, Japan style. There were staples of custom and optimism — fried soba noodles on the griddle, cheerleaders in pink satin outfits dancing in the early spring sun, long lines of fans eager to enter the stadium for the first time since last fall, when the hometown Lotte Marines won the Japan Series. But the return of baseball has been infused with more poignant meaning this year as the country struggles to right itself after a catastrophic earthquake and tsunami leveled northeastern Japan. For weeks, owners, players and fans debated whether to start the season on time when so many Japanese are still suffering. A very public discussion turned into a proxy for how the nation wanted

Keith Bedford / The New York Times

The Rakuten Golden Eagles celebrate their victory over the Chiba Lotte Marines in Chiba, Japan, on Tuesday. With the deadly earthquake, tsunami and continued radiation leaks looming in the background, the Eagles beat the defending champion Marines 6-4 on opening day. to get back on its feet. Ultimately, opening day was delayed nearly three weeks, enough time for stadiums to be patched up, players to move out of damaged homes and fans to find it in

themselves to seek solace at the ballpark. This has been particularly true for the team from Tohoku. With their own stadium damaged, the Golden Eagles will play six home

Spring Continued from D1 Most recreational golfers don’t have the time or desire for such things in the winter. But quicker ways to work on the fundamentals of golf are available — all without setting foot on the course. Bronkey suggests using a mirror to work on the proper grip, posture, alignment, ball position and swing plane. “Check your fundamentals,” Bronkey says. “When it’s a down time, it’s a good time to do that.” Once you venture out to the course for some practice, be sure to warm up, says Bob Garza, director of instruction at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend. And don’t hit too many balls first thing out of winter, Garza adds. “(Be) careful as you come out of the winter that you don’t overdo it, because you are not in golfing shape,” Garza says. “There are people that come out that probably are not as flexible as they were when the golf season ended, and they are trying to overdo it.” Scott Cravens, who owns Crave Golf Learning Center in Redmond, likes to work on finding a consistent, correct finishing position for a golfer’s swing. Finding a strong finish will help find a consistent, repeatable swing, he says. The finish of a good golf swing ends in balance, with, for right-handers, your weight on your left side and your right toe touching the turf, Cravens says. Cravens practices finishing the same way with each swing, holding the finishing position until the ball falls to the earth. “If you are going to practice, go practice that,” Cravens says. Bronkey also suggests that if you have been thinking of changing your swing, now is the time do it. And both Garza and Bronkey agree that golfers can get a lot out of spring lessons. “As a golf instructor, I hate it when somebody comes (for their first lesson) in August or September,” Bronkey says. “By the end (of the season), you are pretty much stuck with how you played all summer. You want to prevent the damage early.”

Short game Garza says golfers should pay particular attention to their short games in spring. Why? “Their full swings and full shots aren’t that bad,” Garza says of many of his students. “It is the short game and putting that just suffer miserably (from the layoff).” Spend extra time in the shortgame area, even if the Central Oregon weather doesn’t always cooperate, Garza says. Cravens agrees, adding that working on shorter pitch shots is helpful to full golf swings, too. “Eighty percent of my practicing I do from 100 yards in,” Cravens says. “That tempo, timing, rhythm, balance (from pitch shots), that all carries over to your full swing.”

Grips How can your golf equipment suffer during the offseason if all it has done is sit in a garage?

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Chuck Stoughton, of Bend, chips onto a practice green at Widgi Creek Golf Club in Bend Sunday afternoon. Well, air can do strange things to rubber grips. “Our clubs have been sitting around all winter, maybe in the garage somewhere, and the grips can start to wear,” Bronkey says. “You don’t want to be playing with split grips starting out the season.” Garza suggests before ever heading to the course inspecting grips for slickness or for indentations visible on the grip around where the forefinger or thumb would make contact with the club. “When you start seeing that, it’s time for new grips,” Garza says. If you are not ready to pay for new grips — a new set of which can cost anywhere from $75 to $130 — Garza says you can extend the life of your old grips with sandpaper. He suggests using sandpaper to rough up slick grips. “I’ve got some sandpaper, and I just rub it on my grips before I play,” Garza says, adding that he carries sandpaper in his golf bag.

Once on the course You might want to play the course a bit differently in the spring from how you would play it on a warm July day, when your game is in tune and the golf course is in peak condition. It’s only natural to change your strategy with changing conditions. Even professionals do it. “I definitely take one more club,” Garza says of his spring rounds, during which, for example, he might opt to hit 6-iron instead of a 7-iron. Take an extra club into the greens early on in the season for two reasons: First, you likely won’t be making the same sweet contact with the ball that you were making at midseason last year. And second, golf balls do not compress as easily in cooler weather, which shaves some distance, Garza observes. Also, play conservatively, and use the safest landing area, Cravens advises. “It’s not hitting the perfect shot, it’s picking the perfect club, so you don’t invite bogey,” Cravens says.

games in the Osaka area this month. But in their loss they have become the sympathetic favorite of the league and a beacon to their beleaguered fans. “During the last month a lot of

people have had it tough, but I’m hoping the team will give us some energy,” said Ryo Shishido, 33, a construction worker who drove eight hours from Fukushima City to see his team play Tuesday. “Usually, I’m so busy I can’t get to opening day, but there was no way I was going to miss it this year.” After the final out, some of the Eagles players ran to the left field stands to salute their fans, many of whom took off work so they could cheer the team on behalf of those back home who could not be here themselves. “Winning will give us strength,” said Yu Yoshida, 30, an office worker from Tokyo whose family in Ishinomaki is living in a refugee center. The players should play hard, he said, to inspire the people of Tohoku, a sentiment heard around Japan. Ryozo Kato, the commissioner of Nippon Professional Baseball and a former ambassador to the United States, saw an even greater, broader message. “My strong feeling is that baseball will give a signal to the world that Japan is OK,” Kato said just moments before his assistant’s cellphone started beeping to indicate an impending earthquake. Opening day, of course, is just

one game in a long season for the fans and players. For the owners, much work remains. The Marines are looking to bring in diesel generators to power the lights when night games resume later this spring, said Akio Shigemitsu, the chairman of the Lotte group. In the meantime, attendance and advertising rates will suffer because of all the day games the team has to play, he said. His problems pale next to those facing the Eagles. At their stadium in Sendai, walls and walkways were cracked, lounges and suites were flooded, and the ceilings in the team offices fell. Many of the team’s fans are out of work, living in refugee centers or worse. The nuclear crisis in neighboring Fukushima prefecture has heightened fears. Given all of the obstacles, if the Eagles are in contention for the pennant in September, they are likely to become an inspiration not just for their fans but to a nation looking for encouragement. “People in Tohoku are mentally a little bit tired and need something to get energized about,” said Hiroshi Mikitani, the chairman of Rakuten, which owns the Eagles. “If our team performs well, it’s going to be a great story.”

Once on the green, be aware that most course superintendents keep putting surfaces mowed longer and slower during the spring months. Because of this, Garza says, golfers should be more firm in hitting their putts. “For some people that’s difficult to do, to have a bit of a firmer stroke and hit it harder,” Garza says. “They’re not used to doing that, so they are constantly coming up short.” But most of all, lower your expectations early in the season, Bronkey says. Golfers should not expect to be playing their best golf early on. “You have to be patient with yourself, too,” Bronkey says. “You’ve ridden the bike before, but it doesn’t feel the same. You have to reorient yourself to the game.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

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T EE

D6 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

TO

G R EEN

Redmond pro aces way to win B y Zack Hall The Bulletin

Redmond golf pro Scott Cravens knows how to finish a golf tournament. Cravens aced the first playoff hole from 144 yards away to win the 15th Oregon Senior Master’s Invitational this past Friday at KahNee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. “It really was (the rarest of circumstances),” Cravens, 52, said of his clutch hole-in-one. “It was pretty special.” Cravens started the final round of the 36hole tournament, an annual Oregon PGA senior pro-am, in third place. But the longtime Redmond pro played well Friday, needing a birdie on his final hole — the par-3 first hole — to break 70 and force a playoff with Ted Westling, a pro at Stone Creek Golf Club in Oregon City. Cravens’ playing partner sailed long with a 9-iron on the 18th hole of the day, so Cravens chose a pitching wedge for his shot. He landed the shot hole high, Cravens recounted, and ended up about six feet away from the cup. He rolled in the putt for birdie. But just as important, his tee shot locked Cravens in on the correct distance for what just minutes later would become the first hole of a playoff.

“I had a pretty good feeling about that hole to begin with,” recalled Cravens, who has twice competed in the Champions Tour’s National Qualifying School and last year nearly qualified for the 50-and-over circuit’s Boeing Classic in Seattle. In Friday’s playoff at Kah-Nee-Ta, Cravens teed off first using that same wedge, and the ball took flight for the cup. “When I hit it,” Cravens said, “it was right at it.” He bent over to pick up his tee when Cruz Bocanegra, an assistant pro at Kah-Nee-Ta who was among those following the playoff, yelled “It went in!” said Cravens, adding that about a dozen or so other golfers were watching and cheering as the ball went in. Westling missed his tee shot long, giving Cravens the tournament win. Cravens’ third career hole-in-one was good for the $300 first prize and a Masters-like green jacket that Kah-Nee-Ta awards to the tournament champion. “That was pretty cool,” said Cravens, who owns Crave Golf Learning Center in Redmond. “That’s the only green jacket I am ever going to win.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@bendbulletin.com.

G W TEXAS OPEN Site: San Antonio. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: TPC San Antonio, Oaks Course (7,435 yards, par 72). Purse: $6.2 million. Winner’s share: $1,116,000. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday-Friday, noon-3 p.m.; Saturday-Sunday, 10-11:30 a.m.) and CBS (SaturdaySunday, noon-3 p.m.). Last year: Adam Scott won his seventh PGA Tour title and first since the 2008 Byron Nelson, shooting 66-67 in a 36-hole Sunday finale to beat Fredrik Jacobson by a stroke. Submitted photo

Scott Cravens, left, poses with Ryan Davis, head professional at Kah-Nee-Ta, after Cravens hit a hole-in-one to win Kah-NeeTa’s Master’s Invitational.

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results AWBREY GLEN Masters Moving Day Tournament, April 9-10 Member’s Saturday Net plus Tour Player’s Sunday Gross Ladies — 1 (tie), Barb LaBissoniere & Tiger Woods, 141; Rosie Cook & Tiger Woods, 141. Men — Green/Gold Flight: 1, James Chrisman & Phil Mickelson, 146. White/Gold Flight: 1, Dave Morton & Luke Donald, 138. 2 (tie), Ed Hagstrom & Tiger Woods, 139. Bert Larson & Tiger Woods, 139. BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Bend Masters, April 9 Two Net Best Ball 1, Brett Evert/Jerry Mattioda/Ron Weaver/Gary Pinkard, 119. 2, Franz Miller/Pete Nielsen/Mike Kammerich/Rich Morehead, 127. 3 (tie), Rod Wigle/Craig Smith/Joe Miller/Don Christensen, 129; Mike Groat/Dick Graber/Roger Demaris/Terry Mero, 129. 5 (tie), Mark Swearingen/Barry Cole/Bob Brubaker/Russ Mitchell, 130; Tom Dunderdale/Ed Amarillas/Ron Tokuyama/Tom Baty, 130. Stroke Play White Dogwood Flight (0-10 handicap) — Gross: 1, Chuck Wehrle, 76. 2, Franz Miller, 78. 3, Charlie Rice, 79. 4, Mark Swearingen, 80. Net: 1, Manco Snapp, 69. 2 (tie), Jerry Mattioda, 72; Tom Dunderdale, 72. 4, Brad Patrick, 73. Golden Bell Flight (11-15) — Gross: 1, Pete Nielsen, 80. 2, Jim Rodgers, 81. 3, Bob Thye, 87. Net: 1, Russ Mitchell, 69. 2, Ron Weaver, 71. 3, Bill Boos, 74. Azalea Flight (16 and up) — Gross: 1, Terry Mero, 84. 2, Bob Brubaker, 91. 3 (tie), Ron Tokuyama, 94; John Casey, 94. Net: 1, Don Christensen, 70. 2, Sid Smith, 73. 3 (tie), Paul Lumpkin, 77; Gary Pinkard, 77. Stroke Plus Tour Pro’s First Round at Masters White Dogwood Flight — Gross: 1, Chuck Wehrle/Luke Donald, 145. 2, Franz Miller/Luke Donald, 147. Net: 1, Ed Amarillas/Hideiki Matsuyama, 143. 2 (tie), Tom Dunderdale/Jason Day, 144; Manco Snapp/Alex Cejka, 144. Golden Bell Flight — Gross: 1, Pete Nielsen/Tiger Woods, 154. 2, Jim Rodgers/Alex Cejka, 156. Net: 1, Russ Mitchell/Y.E. Yang, 142. 2, Ron Weaver/Fred Couples, 143. Azalea Flight — Gross: 1, Terry Mero/Ryan Palmer, 153. 2, Ron Tokuyama/Bo Van Pelt, 162. Net: 1, Don Christensen/Miguel Angel Jimenez, 140. 2, Sid Smith/Martin Laird, 142. KPs — Jim Rodgers, No. 3; Rod Wigle, No. 11. Long Putts — Ron Weaver, No. 9; Ed Amarillas, No. 18. BRASADA Central Oregon Winter Series, April 8 Shamble Gross: 1, Dan Ostrin/Harry Paik, 60. 2 (tie), Lance Kuykendall/Burke Morgan, 64; Mike Reuther/Verl Steppe, 64. 4 (tie), Dwight Hietala/Pat Woerner, 65; Brandon Kearney/Ed Carson, 65. 6, Martin Chuck/Curtis Tucker, 66. 7, Tony Blasius/Brian Holmes, 67. Net: 1 (tie), Bob Stirling/Jeff Keller, 57; Kory Callantine/Dave Ratzlaff, 57. 3 (tie), Roger Palmer/Mark Scott, 58; Tom Wimberly/Jerry Harris, 58; Scott Herrmann/Earl Byers, 58; Bob Holloway/Guy Crapper, 58. 7 (tie), Fran Ostlund/Casey Jones, 59; Tom McCleery/Bob McCleery, 59; Joe Perry/Steve Peccia, 59; Tom Strange/Steve Spangler, 59. Skins — Austin Maki/Rabe Clements, No. 1; Dan Ostrin/Harry Paik, No. 5. KPs — 0-12 handicap: Rosie Cook, No. 4; 13 & up: Bob Holloway, 13 and up. CROOKED RIVER RANCH Men’s Golf Club, April 5 Two-man Best Ball A Flight (0-19 handicap) — Gross: 1, Scott Herrmann/Earl Byers, 72. 2, Jim Martin/Paul Nemitz, 76. 3, Dennis Glender/Herb Parker, 76. Net: 1, Terry Papen/Ron Fitzpatrick, 60. 2, Joe Griffin/ Bill Rhoads, 63. 3, Fred Johnson/Jim Platz, 64. B Flight (19.5-32) — Gross: 1, Ron Aker/A.K. Majors, 83. 2, Ted Carlin/Bob Bengtson, 88. 3, Dale Monroe/Billy Romaine, 89. Net: 1, Russell Hague/Ron Meisner, 62. 2, Carl Dewing/Herb Koth, 65. 3, Maury Fitzgerald/John Frey, 66. EAGLE CREST Women’s Golf Group, April 5 at Ridge Course Net Three Blind Mice Flight A — 1, Linda Hill, 51. 2, Patty Scott, 53. 3 (tie), Debbie Hehn, 57; Marilee Axling, 57; Linda Thurlow, 57. Flight B — 1, Elaine Blyler, 51. 2, Janet Owens, 54. 3, Betty Stearns, 58. Flight C — 1, Adirenne Nickel, 46. 2, Nancy Dolby, 49. 3, Charlene Kenny, 52. Flight D — 1, Sharon Loberg, 47. 2, Nancy Peccia, 51. 3, Charleen Hurst, 53. KAH-NEE-TA Senior Masters Invitational, April 7-8 Stroke Play Professionals — Gross: 1, Scott Cravens (Crave Sports), 143 (won in playoff). 2, Ted Westling (Stone Creek GC), 143. 3, Gordon Tolbert (Stone Creek GC), 145. 4, Fred Haney (The Reserve), 146. Net: 1, John Bowen (Heron Lakes), 139. 2, Hank Childs (Rose City GC), 141. 3, Tom Hinton (Rose City GC), 147. Amateurs — Gross: 1, Steve Belt (Crave Sports), 141. 2, Byron Patton (Broadmoor GC), 142. 3, Joe Vaughan (Stone Creek GC), 148. 4, Bruce Neelands (Prineville), 153. Net: 1, George Carlson (Rose City GC), 140. 2, Brad Skreen (Stone Creek), 143. 3, Les Mombert (Lost Tracks), 144. 4, Jim Madden (Creekside), 146. Team — Gross: 1, John Bowen-Byron Patton (Heron Lakes), 127. 2, Scott Cravens-Steve Belt (Crave Sports), 133. 3, Ted Westlng-Brad Skreen (Stone Creek), 135. Net: 1, Bob Garza-Les Mombert (Lost Tracks), 128. 2, Tom Hinton-George Carlson (Rose City GC), 131. 3, Bob Sproule-Dave Link (The Dalles), 130. 4, Chuck Solomon-Steve Chamberlain (Ronn Grove Golf Schools), 133. Round 1 Skins — Les Mombert (Lost Tracks), No. 6; Bruce

Neelands (Prineville), No. 9; Bryon Patton (Broadmoor GC), No. 10; John Bowen (Heron Lakes), Nos. 14, 18; Jim Madden (Creekside), No. 15. Round 2 Skins — Brad Skreen (Stone Creek GC), No. 12. MEADOW LAKES Men’s Association, April 6 Two-Man Best Ball Gross: 1, Jeff Storm/Caleb Henry, 36. Net: 1 (tie), J.W. Miller/ Britton Coffer, 34; Mark Payne/Jon Wilber, 34. KPs — Mark Payne, No. 13; Britton Coffer, No. 17. Men’s Association Spring Swing, April 9 Best Ball Gross: 1, Zach Lampert/Jeff Storm, 69. 2, Jeff Roundtree/Todd Goodew, 75. Net: 1, Dave Barnhouse/Dave Ego, 61. 2 (tie), Fred Bushong/George Lienkaemper, 63; Steve Spangler/John Mitchell, 63. KPs — Jeff Storm, No. 4; Dewey Springer, No. 8; Jeff Roundtree, No. 13. RIVER’S EDGE Men’s Club, April 5 Stroke play Gross: 1, Dieter Haussler, 82. 2, Hi Becker, 85. 3, Dave Fiedler, 87. 4 (tie), Roger Bean, 92; Mike Reuter, 92. 6 (tie), Randy Olson, 93; Jerry Egge, 93; Cick Carroll, 93. 9, Stan Brock, 94. 10, Taylor Story, 95. 11, Bob Drake, 96. 12 (tie), Wayne Johnson, 97; Gary Mack, 97. 14 (tie), Mike Brasher, 98; Maury Pruitt, 98. 16 (tie), Roy Fullerton, 99; Chuck Mackdanz, 99. 18 (tie), J.J. Somer, 100; Keith Wood, 100. 20, Jim Buck, 102. 21, Lloyd Vordenberg, 106. 22, Larry Hartman, 108. 23 (tie), Connie Munsey, 109; Chris Tilton, 109. 25 (tie), Jerry Bockmeyer, 115; Dave Welker, 115. 27, Al Derenzis, 120. Net: 1, Brock, 65. 2 (tie), Fiedler, 67; Wood, 67. 4 (tie), Haussler, 73; Olson, 73. 6, Story, 74. 7, Carroll, 75. 8 (tie), Egge, 76; Reuter, 76. 10 (tie), Bean, 78; Pruitt, 78. 12, Becker, 79. 13 (tie), Fullerton, 80; Mackdanz, 80; Somer, 80. 16 (tie), Drake, 81; Mack, 81; Tilton, 81. 19, Derenzis, 82. 20 (tie), Buck, 84; Johnson, 84; Vordenberg, 84. 23 (tie), Brasher, 85; Hartman, 85; Welker, 85. 26 (tie), Brockmeyer, Munsey. KPs — Larry Hartman, No. 4; Dave Fiedler, No. 14.

Hole-In-One Report April 1 ASPEN LAKES John Christa, Sisters No. 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-iron April 3 BEND GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB Sarah Heinly, Bend No. 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .94 yards . . . . . . . . . . pitching wedge April 9 GREENS AT REDMOND Andy Rhine, Bend No. 9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron April 9 KAH-NEE-TA Scott Cravens, Redmond No. 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 yards. . . . . . . . . . pitching wedge April 11 GREENS AT REDMOND Harold Norris, Redmond No. 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-iron

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— LEAGUES April 16 — The Central Oregon chapter of the Executive Women’s Golf Association is hosting its 2011 kickoff event at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Meeting is open to EWGA members, prospective members and guests. The EWGA will unveil the 2011 event schedule, and include speakers, a fashion show and raffle. Begins with a 9:30 a.m. check in and includes a free breakfast buffet. Optional round of par-3 golf or a lesson after the meeting for $20. RSVP by April 10. For more information or to register, call Vicky Thomas at 541-389-1513 or e-mail at ewgaco@gmail.com. May 5 — Meadow Lakes Ladies Golf Association in Prineville meeting is open to the public. Registration from 7:30-8:30 a.m. followed by welcome and short meeting. Informal round of golf begins at 9 a.m. Cost to join is $65 ($30 dues and $35 for entire season’s days play). For more information, call president Linda Richards at 503-577-5083. Tuesdays — The Men’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course in Bend play weekly tournaments. Members of the men’s club and others interested River’s Edge Golf Club men with an established USGA handicap are invited to participate. Interested golfers should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — The Women’s Club at River’s Edge Golf Course play weekly in tournaments that tee off at 9:30 a.m. Members are welcome and should sign up by the preceding Saturday for the tournaments. For more information, or to register, call River’s Edge at 541-389-2828. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. Cost is $35 plus $30 handicapping fee. Nightly greens fee is $7. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Juniper Ladies Golf Club plays weekly between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information visit www.juniperladies.com. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. Wednesdays — Ladies Club at Desert Peaks in Madras. Times vary each week. Cost is $20 to join and weekly games are held. For more information, call Desert Peaks at 541-475-6368. Thursdays — Ladies League at Meadow Lakes Golf Course

Martin Kaymer, Louis Oosthuizen and Italian teen star Matteo Manassero. Kaymer missed the cut in the Masters. ... American Anthony Kang won in 2009 at Saujana. ... The tournament is in its 50th year. ... The European Tour will remain in Asia the next two weeks for the China Open and Ballantine’s Championship in South Korea.

PGA TOUR

plays weekly at 9 a.m. All women players welcome. For more information, call Linda Richards at 503-577-5983. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES April 16 — Swing into Spring free golf clinic at Meadow Lakes Golf Club in Prineville. Meadow Lakes head pro Lee Roberts offers a review of golf fundamentals from 9-10:30 a.m. Cost is free and everyone is welcome. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes golf shop at 541-447-7113. April 19 — Dr. Tim Bollom, an orthopedic surgeon at The Center in Bend, and Chris Cooper, a physical therapist at Therapeutic Associates in Bend a Titleist Performance Institute-certified instructor, will be holding a free golf performance lecture at Tetherow Golf Club. The free lecture will cover common shoulder injuries for golfers, the benefits of warming up, shoulder anatomy and injury prevention. For more information or to register, call 541-322-2375. April 29 — Oregon Golf Association’s free public rules night at Bend Golf and Country Club. Classes are open to any golfer, and will feature a three-hour presentation designed to cover basic definitions and rules and will include free light appetizers, a no-host bar and a complimentary copy of the current Rules of Golf. Session will be held from 5-9 p.m. Reservations are required, and can be completed at www.eventbrite.com/org/809328921?s=2838377. May 2-4 — Women-only lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes on-course instruction, and a maximum student/ teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. May 16-18 — Adult co-ed golf lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes on-course instruction, and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-3897275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. ——— TOURNAMENTS April 14 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. April 16-17 — The Iceberg Open at Crooked River Ranch is a two-person scramble on Saturday and two-person best ball on Sunday. Gross and net divisions along with closest-to-the-pin and longdrive contests. 9 a.m. shotgun both days. Practice round Friday for $32, including cart. Entry fee is $260 per team and includes greens fees, lunch, cart, range balls and raffle prizes. For more information, call the Crooked River Ranch pro shop at 541-923-6343. April 16-17 — Three-person All-In tournament at Prineville Golf Club. Two-day gross and net payoffs, with optional side games. Friday practice round also available. For more information or to register, call Prineville GC at 541-447-1354. April 23 — Crook County High School benefit tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Event tees off with a noon shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. April 25 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. April 28 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. April 28-May 1 — The Central Oregon Shootout is a two-person team event held at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters, Black Butte Ranch and Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. The tournament will feature scramble, best ball and Chapman formats. Cost is $550 per team and includes greens fees, carts, range balls, tee gift, continental breakfast, and lunch. Deadline to register is April 20. For more information or to request an entry form, call 541-549-4653, 541-595-1294 or 541-923-4653. April 30 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel.com/amateurtour. May 2-3 — Tetherow Fourball Championship is a two-person best-ball, match-play tournament. Each team will have one professional and one amateur, playing to scratch. Winning professional takes home $7,500. For more information, call Tetherow at 541388-2582,

May 3 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Prineville Golf Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. May 5 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at the Club at Brasada Ranch in Powell Butte. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. May 7-8 — 40th annual Tee Pee Chapman at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. 36-hole couples Chapman begins each day with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $200 per couple, and includes golf, range balls, dinner banquet and buffet. Special room rates are also available. For more information or to register, visit www.kahneeta.com or call 541-553-4971. May 7-8 — Two-man best ball tournament at Prineville Golf Club. Two-day gross and net payoffs, with optional side games. Friday practice round also available. For more information or to register, call Prineville GC at 541-447-1354. May 9 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Crooked River Ranch. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. May 10-12 — Central Oregon Senior Spring Tour Pro-Am is for teams and individuals through the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. Golfers must be 50 years old or more. This three-day event is held at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond, Crooked River Ranch, and Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond, and Crooked River Ranch. Golfers will compete in a net Stableford, gross and net stroke play and one gross and two net formats. Contact: Amy Kerle, 800-574-0503 or www.orpga.com. May 12 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. May 14 — The Jim Noteboom Memorial Golf Tournament is a four-person team scramble, hosted by Chief Delvis Heath, at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino golf course to benefit The Museum at Warm Springs. Tournament begins with 9 a.m. shotgun. Cost is $300 per team, and includes lunch, contests and prizes. For more information or to register, e-mail Jefferson Greene at jgreene@ museumatwarmsprings.org. May 14 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel.com/amateurtour. May 14-15 — 27th edition of the Juniper Chapman at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Open to any two male golfers with a maximum 28 handicap per contestant, and maximum handicap differential of eight strokes between partners. Two-day, 36-hole tournament with gross and net divisions includes a practice round. To register, call the Juniper pro shop at 541-548-3121 or download entry form at www.playjuniper.com. May 15 — Oregon Golf Association Tour event at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend is a two-person team event. Tee times begin at 1 p.m. OGA Tour events are open to any golfer with a USGA handicap. Cost for this event is $69 for OGA members and $99 for nonmembers. Deadline to enter is May 8. For more information or to register, visit www.oga.org or call the OGA at 503-981-4653. May 16 — Oregon Golf Association Tour event at Black Butte Ranch’s Big Meadow course is a two-person team event. Tee times begin at 9:30 a.m. OGA Tour events are open to any golfer with a USGA handicap. Cost for this event is $69 for OGA members and $99 for nonmembers. Deadline to enter is May 9. For more information or to register, visit www.oga.org or call the OGA at 503-981-4653. May 18 — Men’s qualifier for the 102nd Oregon Amateur Championship at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. Top golfers from the 18-hole qualifier advance to the Oregon Amateur, which is scheduled for June 20-25 at Waverley Country Club in Portland. Golfers must have a USGA handicap of index of five or less to be eligible. In addition, every golfer must be a member of an Oregon Golf Association club and be at least 13 years old as of June 20. Cost is $100. For more information or to register, visit www.oga.org or call the OGA at 503-981-4653. May 19 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Crooked River Ranch. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. May 21 — Men’s League Invite at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville is a three-person scramble tournament. Event tees off with a 9 a.m. shotgun start. Cost is $35 plus greens fee. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541447-7113.

Last week: Charl Schwartzel won the Masters, becoming the first champion in the tournament’s 75-year history to birdie the final four holes. The South African shot a 66 to finish at 14 under, two strokes ahead of Scott and Jason Day. Tiger Woods tied for fourth. Rory McIlroy matched the greatest collapse in Masters history, closing with an 80 after taking a four-stroke lead into the final round. Notes: No. 17 Scott, No. 23 Martin Laird and No. 29 Geoff Ogilvy are the only players ranked in the top 30 in the world in the field. Ogilvy tied for fourth in the Masters. ... The tournament, played in San Antonio since 1922, is in its second season at the Greg Norman-designed Oaks after 15 years at La Cantera. Sergio Garcia served as a design consult. The layout has three par 5s of more than 600 yards. ... Tommy Armour III broke the PGA Tour’s 72-hole scoring record in 2003, finishing at 26under 254. He shot 64-62-63-66. The Heritage is next week in Hilton Head Island, S.C., followed by the Zurich Classic in Avondale, La.

CHAMPIONS TOUR OUTBACK STEAKHOUSE OPEN Site: Lutz, Fla. Schedule: Friday-Sunday. Course: TPC Tampa Bay (6,828 yards, par 71). Purse: $1.7 million. Winner’s share: $255,000. Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 9:3011:30 a.m.) and NBC (Saturday, 1-3 p.m., Sunday, 10 a.m.-noon). Last year: Bernhard Langer won the rain-shortened tournament for the second of his five 2010 titles. Langer shot 67-66 for a one-stroke victory. Last event: Tom Lehman won the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic on April 3 for his second victory of the season. Jeff Sluman, Nick Price and David Frost tied for second, four strokes back. Notes: Langer is sidelined by a left thumb injury. ... Nick Price won the 2009 tournament for his first Champions Tour title. ... Tom Watson won in 2007 and 2008.

NATIONWIDE FRESH EXPRESS CLASSIC Site: Hayward, Calif. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: TPC Stonebrae (7,100 yards, par 70). Purse: $600,000. Winner’s share: $108,000.

PGA EUROPE MALAYSIAN OPEN

Television: Golf Channel (ThursdaySaturday, 3:30-5:30 p.m.; Sunday, 4-6:30 p.m.).

Site: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Kuala Lumpur Golf and Country Club, West Course (6,967 yards, par 72). Purse: $2.5 million. Winner’s share: $416,660. Television: Golf Channel (Thursday, 6-10 a.m.; Friday-Sunday, 6-9:30 a.m.).

Last year: Kevin Chappell birdied two of the last four holes for a one-stroke victory over David Hearn. Last event: PGA Tour winner Brett Wetterich won the Louisiana Open on March 27, beating University of Florida senior Andres Echavarria by a stroke. Notes: Former 49ers star Jerry Rice, the tournament host, received a sponsor’s exemption for the second time. Last year, he missed the cut with rounds of 83 and 76.

Last year: South Korea’s Noh Seungyul beat countryman K.J. Choi by a stroke. Notes: Schwartzel and McIlroy are in the field along with top-ranked

All Times PDT

I B Clinics • Free clinic on Tuesday: Dr. Tim Bollom, an orthopedic surgeon at The Center in Bend, and Chris Cooper, a physical therapist at Therapeutic Associates in Bend and a Titleist Performance Institute-certified instructor, will be holding a free golf-performance lecture at Tetherow Golf Club. The free lecture, which will be Tuesday from 6 to 7 p.m., will cover common shoulder injuries for golfers, the benefits of warming up, shoulder anatomy and injury prevention. For more information or to register, call 541-322-2375.

Locally • The Bulletin seeks tournament info: The Bulletin’s sports department is seeking 2011 golf tournament information to be

published May 1 in our annual Tee to Green Central Oregon Golf Preview. The submission deadline is Friday, April 22. The tournament calendar is for golf events to be held in Central Oregon during 2011. To submit a golf calendar item, send details to Zack Hall by e-mail at zhall@bendbulletin. com or by fax at 541-385-0831. For more information, call 541617-7868. • Take the Central Oregon golf survey: The Bulletin would like to know what golfers think about golfing in Central Oregon. Go to www.bendbulletin.com, search for “golf survey” and take a few minutes to complete our annual survey. Results will be published in our annual Central Oregon Golf Preview on May 1. —Bulletin staff reports

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S

‘Happy Endings’

SAVVY SHOPPER

Inside

Elisha Cuthbert takes a sharp turn to comedy, Page E2

Rewire a lamp, within limits

INSIDE Dear Abby Openly gay man isn’t happy being his partner’s secret, Page E2

SHOPPING IN BRIEF Donate old shoes, get a discount on new ones Donate a pair of gently used shoes and earn a 15 percent discount on a new pair at Acadia Footwear in Bend’s Old Mill District. The shop has launched a shoe drive with the nonprofit organization Soles4Souls, which donates new and used shoes to those in need in more than 70 countries, including the U.S. The shoe drive is going on now through April 30. Acadia Footwear carries brands such as Cole Haan, Teva and Clarks for men, women and children. It is located at 330 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 110. It’s open Mondays through Saturdays 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sundays 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Contact: www.acadiacomfort footwear.com or 541-389-8900.

By Bob Tedeschi New York Times News Service

Somehow, everything I fix ends up far uglier than it was when I started. It’s my zero-sum approach to handyman projects: What you gain in functionality, you lose in beauty. But recently I thought, what if I start with ugly? There would be nothing but upside, right? I tested this theory last week with my first task in the realm of electrical repair, the rewiring of an old lamp. My local secondhand store had some beautiful old lamps that, with some new wiring, might not burn down my house. But I spared them and chose something that, no matter what damage I inflicted, couldn’t possibly be uglier. At the checkout counter, I presented the lamp to the clerk. Her reaction was telling. See Lamp / E6

Fast Forward fashion show Thursday night

Get wired

Check out the season’s latest swimwear, lingerie and other feminine items during Tres Chic’s Fast Forward Spring Fashion Show on Thursday night. The event starts at 8 p.m. at the Mad Happy Lounge, 850 Brooks St., in downtown Bend. Attendees must be 21 and older. Models will present the latest collection from Tres Chic, a lingerie and apparel shop at 206 N.W. Oregon Ave., downstairs in Suite 1. There will also be a DJ spinning, drink specials and a giveaway raffle. Tres Chic shares space with The Frugal Boutique consignment store in downtown Bend. It also carries jewelry, shoes, corsets, stockings and other items. It’s open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 11:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Contact: 541-480-5740.

The updated edition of The Green Spot, a directory of environmentally friendly businesses, hits the streets today. The Green Spot is put together by the Central Oregon Environmental Center, a nonprofit organization devoted to sustainability issues. The services listed range from carpet cleaning to pest control to Earth-friendly gifts. The organization vets each of the businesses and attaches a symbol to them based on which sustainable criteria they meet. The directory also contains a section called the Resource Guide, which lists government organizations and nonprofit agencies that relate to sustainability services. The publication is free and available at the Central Oregon Environmental Center in Bend and at public libraries throughout Deschutes County. It’s also available in Bend at Central Oregon Community College inside Wille Hall, on racks in front of McMenamins Old St. Francis School and Deschutes Brewery & Public House, and in the Wagner Mall, Whole Foods and Strictly Organic Coffee Co. It’s available in Redmond at Cornucopia Natural Foods and Ray’s Food Place. The Green Spot is online at the address below, as well. Contact: http://envirocenter.org/ the-green-spot or 541-385-6908, ext. 11. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

Submitted photo

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 2011

The Green Spot directory now out

E

HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

Rewiring old lamps is a simple home electrical project and there are kits available to supply most of the needed parts. Tony Cenicola New York Times News Service

Photos by Mark Veltman / New York Times News Service

FROM LEFT: A Marc Jacobs silk gauze dress with a floral belt ($2,700), a Marc Jacobs knit dress ($995), a model in a Joie silk maxidress ($358).

Great lengths Longer hemlines are sweeping the pavement this spring By Ruth La Ferla New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — ashion happens by degrees. No banner headlines announce its arrival. (Make way for the mini! Salute the trapeze!) It appears by stealth, like the wisp of cloud that heralds summer showers. So it was with longer hemlines. You scarcely saw them coming, then, all at once, they were descending on spring runways, breezing into cool boutiques and alighting on Manhattan streets well in advance of the season. First embraced a couple of years ago by fashion’s early adopters — young urbanites who flaunted maxidresses and flip-flops as an airy alternative to leggings and jeans — long skirts are now gaining traction as the most plainly discernible trend of spring. A year ago, a movement toward sweeping skirts was in its “incubation phase,” said Holli Rogers, the buying director of Net-a-Porter, the online fashion retailer. “But by the time we were planning what to carry for spring, long was definitely a full-on trend.” And one the retailer was quick to exploit, its website displaying willowy

F

skirts and dresses by the likes of Etro, M Missoni and T by Alexander Wang. Stephanie Solomon, the fashion director of Bloomingdale’s, chimed in: “Below the knee, midcalf, anywhere hovering around the ankles — all of these lengths are trending at the moment. Only now have they started to register with consumers in a big way.” Such fluid looks seem to have trickled upward from vintage shops and downtown streets. Over several seasons, the hems mutated from slinky calf-length and ankle-length tanks and tubular skirts to voluminous, unabashedly romantic pavement sweepers, looks that Nevena Borissova, a partner in Curve, a vanguard boutique in SoHo, describes as “floaty, let’s-go-gethigh-at-Coachella stuff.” Those early styles soon spawned successors that conjure Cathy on the moors and a slew of Willa Cather frontier heroines. There are Saint Laurent-inspired rich gypsy and peasant shapes, interpreted for spring by Jacobs, Karl Lagerfeld at Fendi and Ferragamo, to name but a few. And there are dance-inflected looks, some that were lent impetus by the flurry of calf-length ballerina skirts on the spring runways. See Skirts / E6

$1,659 ride for lil’ ones By Deborah Netburn Los Angeles Times

Bugaboo, the brand that introduced the $800 stroller to America, has put a new model on the market that can retail for as much as $1,659. It is called the Donkey and no, it doesn’t walk your baby by itself, or work by remote control, or carry enough water to last three days in the desert. It doesn’t even claim to be safer than other strollers. What it does do is convert from a very fancy single stroller into a sideby-side double and back again. And despite the price, people are lining up to buy it. “It’s expensive, but the price point was what we expected to pay for the quality and the durability,” said Billy Kobayashi, a father of one with another on the way, while picking up his family’s Donkey at the Bugaboo store in El Segundo, Calif. See Stroller / E3

Ride the Donkey Bugaboo’s latest offering, the Donkey, is the first mono-duo-mono convertible stroller for kids and goods. Pictured is the single with a storage basket ($1,200). Los Angeles Times

A model in a Lanvin silk crepe dress with a brass chain halter neckline ($2,990).


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Openly gay man not happy being his partner’s secret Dear Abby: I am a 25-year-old gay man who has been in a relationship for two years with a guy who just turned 30. My problem is he has not yet told his family about me. He has been around my family, and they view him as part of the family. I want the same with his parents and sibling. I think he should have told them by now. Is it OK to give him an ultimatum to either tell his family or I’ll leave? I don’t want to be a secret anymore, and I don’t know how to handle this. — Out and Proud in Baltimore Dear Out and Proud: It appears your boyfriend has not yet come out to his family — or if he did, it didn’t go well. Although your family accepts him and the fact that you are a couple, the same may not be possible with his. Your boyfriend may need counseling in order to gain the strength to level with his parents and sibling. Because you are no longer willing to be kept under wraps, you do need to make that clear to him. But do not give him an ultimatum unless you are prepared to follow through. Dear Abby: My unmarried sister passed away unexpectedly two years ago. My brother, other sister and I had a difficult time locating her personal accounts and bills because she did everything online. This prompted me to begin writing down all my passwords for my computer and storing the list in a secure location. I have asked my husband of 29 years to do the same, but he refuses. My husband has given me the information on our joint financial accounts, but insists that his e-mail account is private. I told him he doesn’t have to give me the password. I just want him to write it down in the event something happens. I told him I have nothing to hide, but does he? He got angry, and we are barely speaking now.

DEAR ABBY

‘HAPPY ENDINGS’

Cuthbert takes a sharp turn to comedy By Rick Bentley

Five years ago, I found out he was trading questionable e-mails with a divorced cocktail waitress, and now I’m concerned. He frequents bars after work, and I can’t help but worry. Should I drop it or ask him what he’s hiding? — Nothing to Hide in Ohio Dear Nothing to Hide: Folks who are secretive usually have something to hide. Your husband’s past behavior coupled with his refusal to let you have the password to his e-mail account indicates that he’s not proud of what you would find. If you’re willing to accept the status quo, drop the subject. However, if you assert yourself and pursue this, the first person you should talk to is your lawyer because you may need one. Dear Abby: My mother was recently invited to a shower and was given specific instructions NOT to put her name on the gift. The reason? The honoree plans to issue one general thank-you to everyone because she “doesn’t have the time” to send individual thank-you notes. Abby, if someone takes the time and spends the money to buy a gift, shouldn’t the recipient be gracious enough to write a personal note? — Thought I’d Heard it All in Ohio Dear Thought: Of course she should! If the honoree is so busy that she plans to forgo thanking her guests for their generosity, she should save everyone’s time, money and effort and forgo the shower. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

LOS ANGELES — Elisha Cuthbert was a little nervous before starting work on her new ABC series “Happy Endings.” “I had some anxiety because most of my work on television had been with ‘24,’ and I was used to that element,” Cuthbert says. “Once I got on the set, I felt like this was a good place for me. I felt comfortable.” “Happy Endings” is a modern romantic comedy that looks at what happens to six close friends when Cuthbert’s character calls off a wedding to another member of their group. This totally disrupts the friendship dynamic. The series also stars Eliza Coupe, Zachary Knighton, Adam Pally, Damon Wayans Jr. and Casey Wilson. Cuthbert, who mostly has worked on TV dramas, was willing to take the plunge into TV comedy because she liked the flawed character so much. It was a chance to play someone who wasn’t perfect, who didn’t have all the answers. She describes her role as an “honest take on a girl in her late 20s, early 30s going through life at that time.” Cuthbert been working since she was 7 — most notably as Kim Bauer on several seasons of “24.” Nothing that happens with “Happy Endings” can be as testing as her days on “24.”

‘Happy Endings’ Wh e n :9:30 p.m. Wednesday Where:ABC

The writers didn’t quite know what to do with her character after the first season and often created story lines that took idiotic turns. In the first three seasons, Kim was kidnapped five times, came face-to-face with a mountain lion and was wooed by a weird survivalist. Cuthbert never said a word. “I didn’t complain about it because I thought this is where they see the character going. I kind of went with it and tried to think of the best way to play the scene,” Cuthbert says. Because she wasn’t in every episode, she had time to pursue other work. She made mainstream films like “Love, Actually” and “The Girl Next Door” but had no problem starring in smaller, independent movies like “Captivity” and “He Was a Quiet Man.” It’s all been part of what Cuthbert calls “a weird career path.” If “Happy Endings” is a hit, Cuthbert won’t have much time to make movies. She’s OK with that. “I look forward to doing more movies in the future,” she says. “But TV’s such a great place to be, especially now. I can reach an audience that’s much bigger with television than going off to do these independent films. But I like doing all sorts of things. I get bored really easily.”

ABC via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

ABC’s “Happy Endings” stars Elisha Cuthbert as Alex.

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The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Happy Endings Happy Endings Modern Family Minute to Win It Second Chances ’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Survivor: Redemption Island (N) ’ Criminal Minds The Stranger (N) ‘14’ Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior The Middle ‘PG’ Better With You Modern Family Happy Endings Happy Endings Modern Family American Idol Eight Finalists Compete (N) ‘PG’ Å Breaking In ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Burn Notice Kidnapping ring. ’ ‘PG’ Burn Notice False Flag ‘PG’ Å Secrets of the Dead ’ ‘PG’ Nova The Old Testament and how the concept of one God emerged. ‘PG’ Minute to Win It Second Chances ’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit America’s Next Top Model (N) Å Shedding for the Wedding (N) Å House of Payne Meet the Browns For Your Home Katie Brown Lap Quilting ‘G’ Grand View ‘G’ Cook’s Country Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Secrets of the Dead ’ ‘PG’ Nova The Old Testament and how the concept of one God emerged. ‘PG’

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Mysteries of the Jesus Prayer ‘G’ News Jay Leno Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Roseanne ’ ‘G’ Cooking Class Scandinavian Mysteries of the Jesus Prayer ‘G’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK ROOT SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars (N) Dog the Bounty Hunter ‘PG’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ››› “Batman Begins” (2005, Action) Christian Bale, Michael Caine, Liam Neeson. Bruce Wayne becomes Gotham City’s Dark ›› “Constantine” (2005, Fantasy) Keanu (4:00) ››› “The Abyss” (1989, Science Fiction) Ed Harris, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, Michael Biehn. An oil-rig crew must 102 40 39 search for a sunken nuclear sub. Å Knight. Å Reeves, Rachel Weisz. Å I’m Alive Battlegrounds ‘PG’ Å I’m Alive Last Man Standing ’ ‘14’ River Monsters: The Deadliest ‘PG’ River Monsters The Mutilator ‘PG’ I’m Alive Guardians (N) ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters The Mutilator ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 I’m Alive A bull shark. ’ ‘PG’ Å Top Chef Puerto Rico ‘14’ Å Top Chef Finale ‘14’ Å Housewives/NYC Housewives/OC Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Å Top Chef Masters (N) ‘14’ Å Top Chef Masters ‘14’ Å 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å ››› “A Few Good Men” (1992) Tom Cruise. A Navy lawyer defends two Marines in a comrade’s death. Å Trick My Truck Trick My Truck 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition American Greed American Greed Marc Dreier (N) Mad Money American Greed American Greed Marc Dreier Million $ Spinning 51 36 40 52 American Greed Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ’ ‘PG’ Daily Show Colbert Report Sports Show Chappelle Show South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘MA’ Workaholics ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘MA’ Bend La Pine U of O Today Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Shake It Up! ‘G’ Suite/Deck Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie “Another Cinderella Story” (2008) Selena Gomez. Shake it Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash-Chicago MythBusters Myth Evolution ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Blue Ice (N) ‘PG’ Å MythBusters Alcohol Myths ’ ‘PG’ MythBusters ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Desert Car Kings ’ ‘PG’ Å NBA Basketball Memphis Grizzlies at Los Angeles Clippers (N) (Live) SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball New Orleans Hornets at Dallas Mavericks (N) (Live) Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight (N) NASCAR Now MLB Baseball: Phillies at Nationals 22 24 21 24 (4:00) MLB Baseball Philadelphia Phillies at Washington Nationals (N) Å SportsCentury 1986 Masters Film Yes Sir: Jack Nicklaus/’86 Masters AWA Wrestling Å College Football 2005 USC at Oregon From Sept. 24, 2005. (N) 23 25 123 25 Yes Sir: Jack Nicklaus/’86 Masters SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ ››› “Freaky Friday” (2003, Comedy) Jamie Lee Curtis, Lindsay Lohan. ›› “Beverly Hills Chihuahua” (2008) Piper Perabo, Jamie Lee Curtis. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Flay vs. Cardoz Bobby Flay Bobby Flay Challenge Restaurant: Impossible Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (3:00) Déjà Vu Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Slumdog Millionaire” (2008, Comedy-Drama) Dev Patel, Freida Pinto. Premiere. Justified Debts and Accounts ‘MA’ (11:01) Justified ‘MA’ 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Disaster DIY ‘G’ Income Property Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Income Property House Hunters House Hunters Hunters Int’l Income Property Income Property 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Modern Marvels Breaking Point ‘PG’ Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å Ancient Aliens ‘PG’ Å Countdown to Zero ‘PG’ Å Mega Disasters Volcanic Winter ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Mega Movers Giant Structures ‘PG’ Intervention Renee and Peter ‘14’ Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Glamour Belles Glamour Belles Army Wives Walking Wounded ‘PG’ 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library (N) Silent Library ’ Teen Mom 2 Unseen Moments ‘PG’ The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Real World The Real World 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Bensinger Beavers The Game 365 MLB Baseball Toronto Blue Jays at Seattle Mariners From Safeco Field in Seattle. The Dan Patrick Show The Great Ride 20 45 28* 26 Mariners UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Ultimate Fighter (N) ’ Coal Down N Out (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Ultimate Fighter ’ 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Star Trek: Enterprise Judgment ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters Widow’s Watch ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters (N) ’ Å Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files (N) Ghost Hunters ’ Å 133 35 133 45 (4:00) “Ginger Snaps: Unleashed” Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Secrets of Bible Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord (N) Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Meet the Browns Meet the Browns We There Yet? We There Yet? House of Payne House of Payne Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ›› “A Southern Yankee” (1948, Comedy) Red Skelton, Brian Donlevy, Arlene Dahl. A ››› “The Littlest Rebel” (1935) Shirley Temple. A Virginia girl ››› “Advance to the Rear” (1964, Western) Glenn Ford, Stella (10:15) ›› “Golden Girl” (1951, Musical) Mitzi Gaynor, Dale Robertson, Dennis Day. 101 44 101 29 lowly bellhop is recruited by Union forces as a spy. Å asks President Lincoln to spare her father. Stevens, Melvyn Douglas. A Civil War-era entertainer falls for a Confederate spy. Cake Boss ‘PG’ Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Hoarding: Buried Alive (N) ’ ‘PG’ Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ’ ‘G’ Kitchen Boss (N) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Good Faith ’ ‘14’ Bones The Dwarf in the Dirt ’ ‘14’ Bones The Goop on the Girl ’ ‘14’ Bones The Feet on the Beach ‘14’ Bones The Gamer in the Grease ‘14’ CSI: NY Drowning victim. ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order ’ ‘14’ Å (DVS) MAD ‘PG’ Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Hole in the Wall Hole in the Wall King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man-Breakfast Man-Dessert Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Border Patrol (N) Border Patrol (N) 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Hiatus ‘14’ Å NCIS Hiatus ‘14’ Å NCIS Love & War ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Deliverance ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Jack Knife ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Bloodbath ’ ‘14’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Bloodbath ’ ‘14’ Å ›› “ATL” (2006) Tip Harris, Lauren London. Four Atlanta teens face challenges. ’ Love & Hip Hop Beverly Hills 40 Greatest Pranks 3 Practical jokes from television and the Internet. ‘PG’ 191 48 37 54 Behind the Music Behind the Music T.I. T.I. ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:30) ››› “The Big Chill” 1983 William Hurt. ’ ‘R’ (6:20) › “Caddyshack II” 1988 Jackie Mason. ’ ‘PG’ ››› “Hellboy” 2004, Fantasy Ron Perlman, John Hurt. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:05) ›› “Surrogates” 2009 Bruce Willis. ‘PG-13’ (11:35) › Cobra › “Porky’s II: The Next Day” 1983 Dan Monahan. ‘R’ (8:45) › “Porky’s Revenge” 1985, Comedy Dan Monahan. ‘R’ Å After Film School ›› “Zardoz” 1974 Sean Connery. ›› “Gimme an ‘F’” 1984, Comedy Stephen Shellen, Mark Keyloun. ‘R’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Firsthand ‘PG’ Props ‘PG’ Insane Cinema Insane Cinema The Daily Habit The Daily Habit Check 1, 2 ‘PG’ Stupidface ‘MA’ Stupidface ‘MA’ The Daily Habit GolfNow World of Golf Golf Digest Equipment Special (N) Top 10 (N) 19th Hole Golf Central Quest-Card Golf Digest Equipment Special Top 10 19th Hole Quest-Card 19th Hole The Waltons The Fulfillment ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:00) ›› “Mission: Impossible” 1996 Tom ›› “Just Wright” 2010 Queen Latifah. A physical therapist falls Water for Elephants The Pee-wee Herman Show on Broadway The comic brings Gun Fight Activists and advocates debate gun ownership in Real Time With Bill Maher Journalist HBO 425 501 425 10 Cruise. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å in love with her patient. ’ ‘PG’ Å “Pee-wee’s Playhouse” to life. ’ ‘PG’ Å America. (N) ’ ‘MA’ Å Katty Kay. ’ ‘MA’ Å (4:45) › “The Devil’s Rejects” 2005, Horror Sid Haig, Bill Moseley. ‘R’ Undeclared ‘PG’ Ben Stiller Whitest Kids (8:35) ››› “Ginger Snaps” 2000, Horror Emily Perkins, Katharine Isabelle, Kris Lemche. ››› “11:14” 2003 Henry Thomas. IFC 105 105 ››› “Running Scared” 1986, Comedy-Drama Gregory Hines. Two detectives are › “Repo Men” 2010, Science Fiction Jude Law, Forest Whitaker. Agents repossess (4:50) ›› “Judge Dredd” 1995 Sylvester Stallone. A futuristic ›› “Four Christmases” 2008 Vince Vaughn. A couple must MAX 400 508 7 lawman battles a fiendishly clever criminal. somehow fit in four holiday visits with family. Å given 30 days to nab a cocaine smuggler. ’ ‘R’ Å transplanted organs for nonpayment. ’ ‘R’ Å Border Wars Storm Surge ‘PG’ Border Wars ‘14’ Witness: Disaster in Japan (N) Border Wars Storm Surge ‘PG’ Border Wars ‘14’ Witness: Disaster in Japan Border Wars Hidden Narcotics ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Rugrats ‘Y’ Å Rugrats ‘Y’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Shooting USA Sighting Cowboys Amer. Guardian Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Best Defense Shooting Gallery Shooting USA Sighting Amer. Rifleman Amer. Guardian Impossible Shots Cowboys OUTD 37 307 43 The Franchise: The Borgias The Moor Rodrigo seeks (4:00) ›› “Flawless” 2007 Michael Caine. (5:50) ››› “The Ghost Writer” 2010, Drama Pierce Brosnan. iTV. A ghostwriter’s lat- United States of Nurse Jackie Play Inside NASCAR The Franchise: Inside NASCAR SHO 500 500 (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Giants funds. ’ ‘MA’ Å iTV. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å est project lands him in jeopardy. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Tara ‘MA’ Å Me ’ ‘MA’ Giants (iTV) ‘PG’ The 10 (N) ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ Car Warriors ’76 Corvette (N) Car Science (N) Car Science The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ Car Warriors ’76 Corvette Car Science Car Science NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (3:05) ›› XXX (5:20) ›› “The Crazies” 2010 Timothy Olyphant. ‘R’ (7:12) ››› “Gangs of New York” 2002, Historical Drama Leonardo DiCaprio, Daniel Day-Lewis. ’ ‘R’ Å Camelot Guinevere ’ ‘MA’ Å ›› “Blade II” 2002 Wesley Snipes. STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ›› “Get Over It” 2001 Kirsten ››› “The Sum of All Fears” 2002, Suspense Ben Affleck, Morgan Freeman. Terrorists (8:05) ›› “What Just Happened?” 2008, Comedy-Drama Robert De Niro. A movie “The Amateurs” 2005, Comedy Jeff Bridges. Small-town citizens “The Girlfriend ExpeTMC 525 525 rience” ‘R’ Dunst, Ben Foster. ’ ‘PG-13’ plan to detonate a nuclear bomb in the U.S. ’ ‘PG-13’ producer picks his way through the Hollywood jungle. ’ ‘R’ Å make an amateur porn film. ’ ‘R’ NHL Hockey Phoenix Coyotes at Detroit Red Wings (N) NHL Hockey NHL Hockey Chicago Blackhawks at Vancouver Canucks (N) (Live) Hockey Central Sports Jobs Sports Jobs WEC WrekCage Å VS. 27 58 30 Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å Sinbad It’s Just Family ‘PG’ Å Braxton Family Values ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Secret Lives ›› “Where the Heart Is” 2000, Comedy-Drama Natalie Portman, Ashley Judd. ‘PG-13’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY DINNER & A MOVIE: Featuring a nutrient-dense meal, followed by a film selected by attendees; registration requested; $17, $8 children; 5:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546 or www.central oregonlocavore.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick reads from her book “The Daughter’s Walk”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “The Real Dirt on Farmer John,” with a soup potluck; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND: The newgrass band performs; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www .randompresents.com.

THURSDAY RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FAMOUS/INFAMOUS TRIALS — LIZZIE BORDEN: Carolyn Hill talks about the facts of the Lizzie Borden murders, the investigation and its outcome; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663, wwick@uoregon.edu or http://osher.uoregon.edu. STEP INTO SPRING FASHION SHOW: A fashion show, with live and silent auctions and food; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Bend Area Habitat for Humanity’s women’s build; $30 in advance, $35 at the door; 5:30 p.m. auction, 6:30 p.m. show; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541948-0447, pmageau@remax.net or www.centraloregonwcr.org. MANY BORDERS TO CROSS: Elaine Replogle provides historical perspective for immigration admissions and rights; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121037 or www .deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. THE B FOUNDATION: The Los Angeles-based reggaerock band performs, with Katastro; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silver moonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY MY OWN TWO HANDS: Art event, themed “In the Current,” features a parade and art stroll, and a performing arts evening at Bronco Billy’s Ranch Grill and Saloon; proceeds benefit the Sisters Americana Project; chili feed is $10 with chili, $5 without chili; 4 p.m. parade, 4:30 p.m. art stroll, 6:30 p.m. performing arts; downtown Sisters; 541-549-4979, info@ sistersfolkfestival.org or www.sisters folkfestival.org. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. ISLAM 101: Rick Colby talks about basic beliefs and practices common to Muslims, and discusses the role of Islam in “Kapitoil”; free; 2 p.m.;

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 4-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. EAT, PLAY, LOVE!: Dinner, play and learning activities and live music for families with young children; donations of nonperishable food encouraged; 4:30-7 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-410-1974 or www.deschutescountykids.com. VFW DINNER: A dinner of spaghetti and meatballs; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. WALK THE ART BEAT YOUTH SHOW: A spring showcase of local youth art and music at participating businesses; free; 5-8 p.m.; downtown Redmond; 541-923-2411. “CRASH”: A screening of the 2004 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org.

70s; proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society and Bend Relay for Life; $35 or $40; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. COMEDYCORE UNDERGROUND: Central Oregon comedians perform; ages 21 and older; $10; 7:30 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; ryan@thewhitebull.com or www .bendticket.com or www.comedy core.org. TRIAGE: Local improvisational comedy group performs, with musical guest Jumpin’ Joyce Respess; $5; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3890803 or www.bendimprov.com. ANDRE NICKATINA: The San Francisco-based hip-hop artist performs, with Mumbls, Endr Won, Maintain and Logy B; $23 plus fees in advance, $28 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com. GREGORY ALAN ISAKOV: The Colorado-based folk musician performs; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit PoetHouse Art; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; PoetHouse Art, 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; www.bendticket.com.

SATURDAY

LIGHT OF HOPE: Court Appointed Special Advocates of Central Oregon hosts a 10K, 5K and 1K run/walk; proceeds benefit CASA; $30 or $20 for the 10K and 5K races, $10 for the 1K; 9 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Southwest Columbia Street and Southwest Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-389-1618 or www .casaofcentraloregon.org. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-3222184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@brooksresources. com or www.nwxevents.com. ECONOMIC MORALITY AND “KAPITOIL”: Timothy Duy talks about economic morality in “Kapitoil,” by Teddy Wayne, using the works of Adam Smith; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. REDMOND COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION PERFORMANCE: Il Voce performs a vocal popera concert; $50 season ticket, $105 family ticket; 2 and 6:30 p.m.; Redmond High School, 675 S.W. Rimrock Way; 541-350-7222 or http://redmondcca.org. LUAU FUNDRAISER: A buffet-style meal, with music by Bill Keale and art giveaways; proceeds benefit Feedin’ the People; $25; 5-9 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-420-6278. SAPIENT: The Northwest-based hip-hop artist performs, with IAMe and Northern Lights; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

GOAT JAMBOREE: Featuring classes, shopping and a raffle; $5 or $15 per family before April 11, $7 or $20 per family after April 11; 8 a.m.3:15 p.m.; Wind Ridge Farms, 60535 Bobcat Road, Bend; 541-548-2226 or COGA2010@aol.com. EARTH DAY CELEBRATION AND GARDEN WORK PARTY: Help prepare the Common Table Community Garden, located behind the church; bring a dish to share and a shovel; free; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Nativity Lutheran Church, 60850 S.E. Brosterhous Road, Bend; 541-598-6029. GARAGE SALE FUNDRAISER: Proceeds benefit Bend Waves Water Polo Club; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; 1861 S.E. Autumnwood Court, Bend; 541-815-7927. RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. BEND SPRING FESTIVAL: A celebration of the new season with art, live music and food and drinks; free; 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives; valerie@ brooksresources.com or www.nwxevents.com. COW PIE BINGO: Watch cows wander a grid set on the school’s soccer field, marking squares with droppings; with face painting, a petting zoo and more; proceeds benefit the Bend FFA Alumni; $5 per square; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-318-5778. OREGON OLD TIME FIDDLERS: Listen to fiddle music; a portion of proceeds benefits the community center; $5 suggested donation; 1-3 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-312-2069. ISLAM 101: Rick Colby talks about basic beliefs and practices common to Muslims, and discusses the role of Islam in “Kapitoil”; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7040 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. DINNER FUNDRAISER: Spaghetti dinner, with an auction; followed by dancing and live music; registration recommended; proceeds benefit the Ladies Auxiliary fund for Cancer Aid & Research; $8 dinner, $6 or $4 for members for dance; 5:30 p.m., 7 p.m. dance; VFW Hall, 1836 S.W. Veterans Way, Redmond; 541-548-4108. “HOT FLASHES”: A presentation of the musical comedy about a five-woman band in their 40s to

SUNDAY

MONDAY SPOKEN WORD SHOWCASE: Students from Pilot Butte Middle School perform poetry, emceed by Jason Graham; free; 7 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-647-2233 or www.thenatureofwords.org. THE SWINGLE SINGERS: The pop a cappella group performs; $30 or $35; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. THE PRESERVATION: The Austin, Texas-based roots-rock act

performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

TUESDAY “HATCH, MATCH & DISPATCH — A CLOSER LOOK AT VITAL RECORDS RESEARCH”: Bend Genealogical Society presents a program by Nancy Noble; free; 10 a.m.; Rock Arbor Villa, Williamson Hall, 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541317-8978,541-317-9553 or www. orgenweb.org/deschutes/bend-gs. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: River Jordan talks about her book “Praying for Strangers”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134.

WEDNESDAY April 20 MOUNTAINSTAR 10-YEAR CELEBRATION: Featuring facility tours, a bounce house, face painting, food and more; free; 4:30-6 p.m.; MountainStar Family Relief Nursery, 2125 N.E. Daggett Lane, Bend; 541322-6820 or www.mountainstar family.org. VOLUNTEER CONNECT BOARD FAIR: Learn about board service opportunities with nonprofit organizations; free; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-385-8977 or betsy@ volunteerconnectnow.org. FOX CENTRAL OREGON IDOL: Semi-final round for the singing competition; free; 6:30 p.m.; The Old Stone, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-383-2121. PALEFACE: The acoustic anti-folk act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins .com. “THE GRATEFUL DEAD MOVIE EVENT”: A screening of the documentary featuring legendary Grateful Dead concerts from 1974; $12.50; 7:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. THE ENVELOPE PEASANT: The indie folk act performs; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868.

THURSDAY April 21 BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; noon; La Pine Public Library, 16425 First St.; 541-536-0515 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. HOME AND BELONGING: Reshmi Dutt-Ballerstad talks about identity and belonging, and how migration affects immigrants’ relationships with former homes; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FLAMENCO EN LAS AMERICAS: Savannah Fuentes performs traditional flamenco; $18 in advance, $23 at the door, $10 students, $7 children; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE: The Philadelphia-based hip-hop band performs, with Belle Brigade; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY April 22 “TWO FACES OF THE ALPS — FRENCH AND ITALIAN”: Hilloah Rohr talks about two different areas of the Alps, with photos; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491.

M T For Wednesday, April 13

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) 2:25, 5, 7:35 ARTHUR (PG-13) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25 I AM (no MPAA rating) 2:30, 5:05, 7:40 THE KING’S SPEECH (PG13) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 2, 4:35, 7:10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 2:40, 5:10, 7:50

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG13) 1:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:15 ARTHUR (PG-13) 1:25, 4:25, 7:25, 10:05 BATTLE: LOS ANGELES

(PG-13) 12:25, 6:55 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (DP — PG) 1:40, 4:40, 7:15, 9:35 HANNA (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 6:25, 9:25 HOP (DP — PG) 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 9:50 HOP (PG) Noon, 3, 6, 9 INSIDIOUS (PG-13) 1:15, 4:15, 7:35, 10 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 12:45, 3:45, 6:45, 9:15 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (DP — R) 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:55 PAUL (DP — R) 1:55, 4:55, 7:50, 10:25 RANGO (PG) 12:35, 3:35, 6:35, 9:05 RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) 3:25, 9:40 SOUL SURFER (PG) 12:10, 3:10, 6:10, 9:10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 2, 5, 8, 10:20 SUCKER PUNCH (PG-13) 12:05, 3:05, 6:05, 9:30 YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 1:35, 4:35, 7:55, 10:30

EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (PG) 4:45 HOP (PG) 3:45, 6:15

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BLACK SWAN (R) 9:15 GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 3 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 6

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

ARTHUR (PG-13) 5, 7:15

Los Angeles Times

Stroller Continued from E1 The price of strollers has been on an upward climb since the mid-’90s. It is still possible to buy a low-end umbrella stroller at Target for $45. But even now, despite the struggling economy, a stroller by the midpriced Graco brand can set a parent back $100 to $200, depending on whether it comes with a baby tray, a cup holder for Mom, how far the seat reclines, how cleverly it folds up and how easy it is to push. Still, nothing on the market touches the price of the Donkey, which comes in three configurations: a single with a storage basket ($1,200), a double with one bassinet and one stroller seat ($1,499), and two bassinets ($1,659). The only other stroller on the market that breaks $1,000 is the Stokke Xplory, an unusuallooking single stroller that can also function as a portable high chair, which can cost as much as $1,229. In the double stroller market, the previous highest price was the iCandy Pear Tandem, which retails for $700. “The Donkey is really in a class of its own,” said Lauren Logan, owner of the Juvenile Shop in Sherman Oaks, Calif. “It’s up there all by itself,” said Alan Fields, co-author of “Baby Bargains,” a book that serves as a kind of Consumer Reports for all things baby. Logan has been selling baby products since 1979, and Fields has been writing about them since 1994. Both remember when Bugaboo arrived in the U.S. in 2003. “Nobody had ever seen a stroller in that price point that looked that way, that pushed that way,” Logan said. “Back when we started writ-

ing this book, there wasn’t a lot of stroller envy,” Fields said. “Strollers were more of a utilitarian concept. That changed in the earlier part of last decade.” The outrageously priced stroller might have made sense in the first few years of the millennium, when America was on a spending spree. But what about now, when buyers have generally cut back on all spending, and on luxury spending most of all? Who is going to buy the most expensive stroller on the market now? Stacy DeBroff, chief executive of Mom Central Consulting, a social media agency that markets to mothers, identified two types of people who might buy a Donkey. The first, people for whom the price is beyond what they can reasonably afford, might consider the Donkey like a designer handbag or an astronomically expensive watch. “People go premium on items like that because they think, ‘This is my life, this is going to be THE ONE. I’m going to run it into the ground, but every day it is going to define me,’” DeBroff said. The second type is the older gen-Xer or tail-end baby boomer parent who still has plenty of disposable income. “These are buyers who are past the starter program,” said DeBroff. “They are living an upscale life and this is just another upscale purchase for them.” I recently took an informal survey of moms about their thoughts on the previous Bugaboo strollers on the market. Almost everyone who had one loved it. They talked about its “amazing push,” how the seats go into full recline, making it easier for some children to sleep, how much storage the stroller has, and how much they like the way it looks. Several also mentioned that, like a luxury car, it has great resale value.

YOUR HIGHNESS (R) 4, 6:30

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HANNA (PG-13) 6:45 HOP (PG) 6:30 LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

ARTHUR (PG-13) 4, 7

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RANGO (PG) 7

ARTHUR (PG-13) 6:45 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

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HOP (UPSTAIRS — PG) 5 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


E4 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, April 13, 2011: This year, you push past seemingly insurmountable obstacles. You have the energy, ideas and creativity to manifest your desires. You are more upbeat and direct than you have been in years. You have entered a positive luck cycle. Your finances will improve, but you also might spend more. If you are single, how can you not attract admirers? You will have to make some hard choices — make it your pleasure! If you are attached, the two of you enjoy more positive interactions. VIRGO can drive a hard bargain. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHH Stop multitasking; focus on one project at a time. Diversifying might seem inefficient, but it’s not. You’ll land on your feet. Be willing to extend your hand to someone who really needs your support. Tonight: Working late. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH If you must, relax as if you were at home in order to work well. Communication comes from out of left field. Note a tendency to know who is going to call before he or she actually does. Maintain a low profile. Tonight: Be a couch potato if you want to. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHHH Keep the conversations moving. Avoid getting hung up on any details or trivial matters. You can now effectively clear out what you haven’t been able

to for days. Finally, you have a receptive audience. A meeting gives you additional support. Tonight: Make it early. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Stay on top of your budget. A boss or someone you respect within the community talks a good game, but will this person come through for you? Use your instincts with an investment. You cannot be too careful. Tonight: Go with a second wind. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHHH Your enthusiasm is based on your experiences. You know when you hit solid ground. Finally, you receive a response from a key person at a distance. You know what you want. Let the other party figure out what he or she wants without your influence. Tonight: Be the gregarious Lion. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Maintain a low profile for one more day. A partner seems unusually grounded and lucky. Let this person take the lead. You’ll gain understanding. You also need to see the situation from a detached mental stance. Tonight: Do what you want. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Zero in on what you want. Don’t sell yourself short. Knowing what is desirable is important. All you need to be is authentic, and you’ll see results. Note a new person in your circle. He or she could be of interest for a lot of reasons. Tonight: Make it early. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Take the lead in a situation. Honor what you want, but also

think of the group. Your ability to coordinate plans and inspire others merge. Listen to what is being said discreetly. Tonight: Join a friend as soon as you can. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You cannot help but be spontaneous. That quality marks everything you do. Some people who don’t really understand could raise their eyebrows, but the majority will smile at your unusual get-up-and-go. Tonight: You could go till the wee hours. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH Work directly with a partner or key friend. This person understands you well and often is able to pitch in and help make that difference. Above all, between you exists the gift of trust. You come from a space where you are just plain lucky. Tonight: Togetherness works. A discussion is inevitable. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Defer to others. Someone else might have more humor and drama than you. Let this person champion the cause for a while. Several conversations with different people emphasize the wisdom of your ways. Tonight: Dinner for two. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Focus on success. You might be a little too willing to pitch in — be it energy, time or money. Pull back and take a complete look at what is going on. You don’t need to make a commitment of the size you were considering. Tonight: Join friends for a late snack.

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


E6 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Lamp Continued from E1 “Oh,” she said. “You’re buying that!” The light was a vision of white, bubble-glass hideousness that looked like a best-in-show toy poodle that had been trotted around the ring a thousand times too many. The hardware was corroded, the cord was cracked, and the socket was, as a local hardware store employee named Job put it, “illegal.” For the record, it cost $12. Because I know better than to improvise an electrical repair, I first sought counsel from three experts: Michael Barnes, an owner of Antique Lamp Supply, of McMinnville, Tenn.; Jodie Carter, the author of “Black & Decker Wiring 101”; and Dawn Ladd, the owner of Aurora Lampworks, a lighting restoration company in Brooklyn, N.Y. One of their most important tips: Know your lamp-repair limits. “If it’s your first time, look for a single-socket lamp with straight lines,” Ladd said. “Each socket has its own set of wires, and some of the cool lamps from the ’50s have arms that swivel and come out in different directions. Those are tricky to rewire.” That’s why, when I first laid eyes on my ugly lamp, I fell for its beautiful bone structure: a solitary socket 8 inches or so directly above a broad, open base. You need only a few tools for lamp repair. Barnes suggested a multifunction screwdriver (Master Mechanic’s 4-in-1, about $7), an adjustable wrench (the Crescent 8-incher, around $14) and, in case you nick a wire, electrical tape (Duck’s 60-foot, 3/4-inchwide spool, about $1). To strip and split the wires, some people use a pocketknife — “It makes you feel like a surgeon,” Barnes said — but he cautioned that it’s safer to use specialized tools like a wire-splitter (Gardner Bender Cable Ripper, about $2) and a wire-stripper (Klein Tools 1011, about $12). Finally, pick up some san-

What you need

Low hems, high sales Tumbling hemlines have helped drive sales of dresses and skirts, which in 2010 were ahead of the 2009 pace by 12 and 15 percent, respectively, and they promise to do well throughout the spring, according to NPD Group, which tracks consumer spending. “Sales have really taken off,” said Marshal Cohen, the chief retail analyst, “and length has a lot to do with it.” “It comes down to dramatic change, which we haven’t seen in a while,” Cohen said — a change that signals to the consumer that her wardrobe could use a radical update. He went on to predict, “We are seeing the beginning of what could be a three- or even four-year trend.” Falling hems are giving a boost to companion looks, as well. “Silhouette changes require so many adjustments,” Solomon said. “When your hemline drops,

Job) looked over my lamp quickly, pointed to a kit and said that it would work fine. A co-worker agreed. That was great news. I sped home, ready to ugly up my little white pooch. But before I did, I called Carter, who stressed the importance of replacing the existing socket with a perfect match — in particular, finding one with the same switch mechanism — to protect the lamp’s value. I discovered another reason when I glanced at the kit, which had a socket with a push-switch. My lamp had an old-fashioned key switch, and the surrounding hardware would not accommodate a push-switch. So I headed out to another hardware store and found a generous selection of sockets, cords and plugs. How to choose? Ladd suggested looking for

parts bearing the “UL” stamp, which means they were manufactured in accordance with the standards of Underwriters Laboratory. Some specialty stores may offer components like cloth-covered electrical cords that do not meet UL standards; such products may be safe, but, generally speaking, UL approval is a good sign of solid and safe construction. At this store, the one where Job worked, I bought a keyswitch socket as well as a cord and a plug, which came in a package but are also sold separately (a Cooper polarized plug is about $2; an AWG 18-gauge cord runs between 10 and 60 cents a foot). Before you begin your repair, Rule No. 1: Unplug any lamp before fixing. And Rule No. 2: Never plug in a lamp if you lack confidence in its electrical components.

Now you are ready to go. The first job, before you disassemble the old lamp, is to photograph the wiring in the socket and the placement of the hardware. Don’t expect to remember. If you’re cutting the electrical cord to a specific length, measure the distance from the nearest outlet to your lamp’s likely location, then add the height of the lamp, plus a few extra inches. But don’t remove the old cord just yet. If there are bends in the route between the socket and the bottom of the lamp, cut the plug off the old cord and attach it to the leading edge of your new cord. Do this by stripping the insulation from both cords and twisting the ends together tightly. If you are ambitious enough to solder them together, do so.

Now you need to pull the length of cord through the top of the lamp. Sometimes the old cord will break when you’re pulling. This may lead to the demise of the lamp — not from your failed attempt to finesse the cord through its passageways for two hours, but from your more successful attempt to smash your $12 piece of junk on the floor. Before this happens, grab your sanity insurance — the beaded chain. Secure it to your new wire, turn the lamp upside down and let gravity run the chain through the passageways, then pull the cord through. When pulling the new cord through the lamp, move gently. Older lamps especially can have sharp edges that will gash your cord if you yank it. Next is the socket. They come in all shapes and run from $2 to $4, but they basically have three parts: a threaded cap that attaches to the lamp, the interior electrical component and the shell that covers the electrical component and locks into the cap. Run the wire through the cap. Attach the wires to the correct terminal on the socket. Electrical cords are covered on one side by a ribbed sheath, and on the other by a smooth sheath. Split the cord a few inches, then strip the sheaths from each branch to expose about a quarter-inch of wire. Grab the wire with the smooth coating, twist the wire threads together, and turn them clockwise around the post with the gold screw, then tighten the screw. Using the same clockwise approach, wrap the other wire around the silver screw, and tighten that screw. Push that electrical component into the cap and then slide the shell over the component and into the cap until it locks into place. It should snap audibly. Next, reassemble the lamp, referring to your photos if needed. I had to fuss a bit to get everything in place, but it was worth the effort. I eased a new bulb into place, plugged in the lamp and turned the switch. It was a thing of beauty.

ent chiffon. “I never picked up on them until I started to see sheer versions,” she said, referring to diaphanous varieties that appeared on spring runways at Jil Sander, Chloe, Marc Jacobs and Lanvin, among others. Shopping in SoHo last week, Julia McFarlane pondered adding a longer skirt to her wardrobe. McFarlane, who is over 60, is drawn to lengths that “cover the gap between the shoes and the hem,” she said, making long skirts a practical alternative to pants. Does the growing acceptance of longer looks herald a sea change that will impel shoppers to cast off their minis, leggings and jeans? Not likely. “Fashion doesn’t work that way anymore,” Buccini said, arguing that longer skirts represent nothing more than the shift in sensibility that often accompanies fashion fatigue. Kristin Knox, who writes the Clothes Whisperer fashion blog, finds transparent skirts provocative in just the right degree. Wear them, she said, “and all of a sudden you’re going from mumsy to sexy.” So attached was she to her filmy skirts that, as she recalled, “it got to the point where my boyfriend was saying, ‘You can’t step out of the house in that!’” Knox resolved the modesty issue by slipping gossamer bloomers under her skirts. And she has sidestepped the specter of frumpiness — calling to mind college girls in Birkenstocks and genteel matrons with lifetime subscriptions to The New Yorker — by wearing ankle boots on cool days and wedged platforms on others. “Wedges keep the look younger and edgier,” she said. Colleen Sherin, the fashion director of Saks Fifth Avenue, favors platform soles, as well, which look best, she said, with midcalf or ankle-length dresses. For warmer days she suggested ballet shoes or flat sandals. Still, she had a word of caution: “You’re not wearing a pump with this new longer length.” When it comes to proportion, almost anything goes, Sherin maintained. On blustery days, a long skirt can be layered under tunics, moderately cropped or hip-length jackets or chunky cardigans. A dress, she added, may be easier to wear. “You don’t have to think of the components that go with it.” And shorter women needn’t shy away, she said. Like flared trousers, a slender skirt can be elongating. In the city, long, flyaway hemlines can be tricky, of course. But

enterprising fans are buying inexpensive versions at stores like Topshop and American Apparel and taking shears to the hems or

sides to free up their stride. For them, such small sacrifices are worth the trouble. “When you walk down the

street, and your skirt billows out behind you, that adds a touch of glamour,” Knox declared. “There’s really nothing like it.”

From left: lamp sockets, wire strippers, a pull chain, the project lamp, a wrench, a multiuse screwdriver, lamp kits, cords and plugs, a wire splitter and electrical tape. Rewiring old lamps is a simple home electrical project and there are kits available to supply most of the needed parts.

Tony Cenicola / New York Times News Service

ity insurance, in the form of a beaded pull-chain (Pass & Seymour, about $3 for a 3-foot brass length). Buy a strand long enough to span the full height of the lamp. (More on its magical uses later.) For lamp parts, our experts said, you could opt for an all-inone kit (Westinghouse Make-aLamp Kits cost about $12). Typically, kits include a socket and a corded plug, plus hardware for attaching the shade and for adjusting the socket to fit different lamps. The kits usually prevent repeated trips to the store — by “usually,” I mean for people other than me — but they offer limited choices of socket types and cord colors. Of course, aesthetics weren’t an issue for me, so I went straight to a nearby hardware store where a clerk (not the one named

Skirts Continued from E1 Today the merchants who banked on these styles are feeling pretty foxy. “In terms of skirts, longer looks are all that’s selling,” said Borissova, whose shop has outposts in Los Angeles and Miami. Even the “Big Love” looks that were shunned a year ago have made strides, she said. “People are growing into them because the silhouette is more flow-y, the fabrics — organza and chiffon — lighter.” Yet their surge in popularity took some retailers by surprise. “It’s not a sexy look, for sure,” said Beth Buccini, a partner in the SoHo boutique Kirna Zabete. “But I have to say, it’s kind of growing on me.” The store now carries slender floor-length dresses by Thakoon and billowing frocks by Verlaine. Even once-skittish department stores seem determined to, well, go with the flow. “Last year on the streets we saw a lot more longer skirts than we offered in our store,” Solomon, of Bloomingdale’s, said. “We felt we might have missed an opportunity.” This year the store is upbeat enough to have paraded midcalf and ankle-length skirts in a fashion show in SoHo last month. Just over a week ago, Saks Fifth Avenue filled its 49th Street windows with labels including Gryphon, Milly and Diane Von Furstenberg, showing skirts that dipped below the knees and others that pooled at the ankles, with suggestions for how to accessorize the looks.

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Mark Veltman / New York Times News Service

A model in a Joie silk maxidress ($378). you suddenly realize your coat is too short, so you need a new coat; your heels are too high, so you look for a flat or a wedge.” Longer hemlines,” she added emphatically, “give fashion overall a push.”

Fashion sea change? True, long skirts and dresses are an acquired taste, one that may be cultivated over time by poring over fashion magazines and scanning the Web for street shots of style-setters like the model Abbey Lee Kershaw, whose filmy ensembles are being emulated by legions of the would-be hip. After a while, as Solomon noted, your eye adjusts, and suddenly the miniskirt looks passe. “It takes a while to see yourself in long skirts,” said Kendra Thompson, a communications student in Toronto, who was spotted in Chelsea swathed from the waist to ankles in transpar-

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 F1

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Pets and Supplies

Dachshund AKC miniature male puppy, 8 weeks, 1st shots, $325. 541-420-6044

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com Labrador Pups, AKC, Chocolates & Yellows, $500; Blacks, $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & wormed. Call 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com

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Want to Buy or Rent Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage costume Jewelry. Top dollar paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Elizabeth, 541-633-7006

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Items for Free Sofa, exc. cond., very comfortable, 6’, FREE, you haul, call 541-419-7972.

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Pets and Supplies 125 Gallon Saltwater aquarium w/oak stand, skimmer, power compact lighting, live rock, large fish, much more. $1000 obo. (541) 548-7947. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussies, AKC Mini's, Toy's parents on site family raised shots/wormed must see 541-598-6264/788-7799

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com English Mastiff puppies. Males & females, Fawns & 1 Brindle. Shots, health guarantee, ready to go. $1000ea; $1500 for the Brindle. 541-279-1437 FREE adult companion cats to seniors. Friendly, fixed, ID chip, shots, more. Will always take back for any reason. Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by appt, call 541-647-2181 to schedule. 65480 78th, Bend, 541-389-8420. Photos, map, more at www.craftcats.org.

Lab Puppies, AKC, 2 males left, 8 weeks, 1st shots & dewormed. 541-771-7511

S . W .

Lhasa Apso/Pug Spring Pups. Lhasa Apso mother, dad is reg. brinde Pug. Adorable variety colors. Must see. You will fall in love. $400. Taking $75 dep. now. Call for info. 541-548-0747,541-279-3588 Malti-Poos: phone correction made. 2 females, born 9/9/10. All puppy & rabies shots, dewormed & health checked, $375, no shipping. 541-350-5106, no AM calls.

MINIATURE SCHNAUZERS two males, 8 weeks old, $300 each. 541-416-3677 Parti Pomeranian Male puppy ready for a new home! No papers. First 2 sets of shots done. $350. Call Jamie at 541-416-0175 541-390-6053 Pomeranian Puppies CKC Reg, 2 fem’s, 3 males; 2 rare gray, 2 fancy red sables, 1 black. $500-600. 541-598-4443 POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Call 541-475-3889

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Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

A-1 Washers & Dryers $125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

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Golf Equipment

TV, Stereo and Video

Heating and Stoves

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

EZ-Go Electric Golf Cart, fully equipped, exc. cond., $1200, 541-419-4890.

Stereo set in solid Oak cabinet, CD, amplifier, dual cassette, $225. 541-419-0613

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KENMORE White 30” freestanding gas range, new $1,699. Asking $450. 541-549-8626.

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

TC audio speakers (2), solid oak, on pedestals, $150 & Audio Super Bass, on rollers, in solid oak cabinet, $150. 541-419-0613.

12g Remington Express 870 Magnum, wood stock, pump shotgun, $200 541-647-8931

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NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Loveseat with sofa, new, light blue and beige, $400. 541-549-8626. Off-white leather couch, 82” excellent condition, $100. Call 541-548-7137 Queen size Flexsteel hideabed, dark taupe, lightly used, $95. 541-419-0613

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

212

Antiques & Collectibles

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Beautiful gaming/dining table; overstuffed loveseat (new); lamp table w/ball &claw feet; mannequin; primitive cabinets; contemporary metal chandelier. 541-389-5408 Montgomery Ward Radio/ Phonograph combo, antique, $99, call 541-318-5732. Pedal Cars: Jeep w/matching Boat. Also Trunks & vintage Suitcases. 541-389-5408 The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

20g Winchester 1200 shotgun, wood stock, pump, 28” barrel, $200. 541-647-8931 22Mag Rohn RG63 8-shot DA/SA revolver, leather holster, $200. 541-647-8931

BE PREPARED! Oregon’s Largest 3 Day GUN & KNIFE SHOW April 15-16-17 Portland Expo Center Featuring Preparedness and Survival Products I-5 exit #306B Admission $9 Fri. 12-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 10-4 1-800-659-3440 w w w . c o ll e c t o r s w e s t . c o m CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

H&R 20g youth single shot shotgun, wood stock, Ltd Edition. $175. 541-647-8931 MUZZLE LOADER KIT, 50 cal. Hawken rifle kit, #5113 manufactured by Thompson Arms, kit still in orig. box, collectors item, $350 obo. 541- 416-1007

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Crypt-Lawn, dbl depth for 2 full caskets at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Bend, Meadow Pond Garden. Lot 2C, space 2, Deed #3664. $1300. 541-848-7600; 541-848-7599 Metal shelving in great shape, 20-30 units @ $30 each (assembled). 541-408-7358 Towable BBQ, restaurant grade, made in Texas, cost $12,000, sell $1500, 541-419-0613. Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Exercise Equipment TREADMILL - older model Precor in excellent cond., $350 obo. 541-416-1007

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Winchesters, Model 1876,1886, 1894, 1892, 64, & more sights & guns, 541-815-4901

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend

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Hay, Grain and Feed

Custom No-till Seeding

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Fuel and Wood

Found Dog: Sheltie, Beautiful, Baker Rd. in DRW, 4/9, call 541-383-3709.

Horses and Equipment

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Found LADDER that attaches to horse trailer? Apr. 4, Smith Rock Way. 541-548-4674

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T o a v o i d fr B u ll e t i n r e c p a y m e nt for o n ly u p o n a n d in s p e

a u d, T h e o m m e n d s F ir e w o o d d e li v e r y c ti o n .

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

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Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

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Water Tanks, 1500 gallon capacity and less, 4 tanks in all, $400. 541-408-7358

Camera parts, misc jewelry found here at Redmond Airport Terminal Building. Call to identify: 541-504-3499

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Building Materials

308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Call 541-419-2713

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

1979 IBM Selectric II, with correcting feature, perfect condition, $225. 541-617-6103

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Lost and Found

Water Tank, 250 Gallon Fiberglass Tank slip-on for type 6 wildland fire engine, used 2 seasons, has all hookups, $400, 541-961-3776.

Commercial / Ofice Equipment &Fixtures

Farm Market

Grass, Alfalfa & Grain Crops All of Central Oregon.

260 BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

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Misc. Items

OR + UTAH CCW: Required class Oregon and Utah Concealed License. Saturday Tower of London Castle, (Lenox April 16 9:30 a.m. at Madras porcelain 1995) mint cond. Range. $100 includes Photo 541-848-8230. required by Utah, Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for Wizard Of Oz, set of 6 dolls, preregistration and info 50th Anniversary Collector’s set, $175, 541-318-5732. SIG 226 9MM NIB, $595. Remington 7600 pump 240 30-06, $385, 541-815-4901.

Professional Training for Obedi- Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein ence, Upland & Waterfowl for $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 all breeds. Labrador & Pudelpointer pups & started dogs Large older Challenger Kiln, as well, 541-680-0009. $60 or best offer. Please call 541-385-6012 Pueblan Milk Snake $75, Golden Gecko & cage $40, Quilting Frame, $200, please Anole & cage $25, Long Tail call 541-961-3776 for more Grass Lizard & cage $25. Call info. Leslie at 541-923-8555

Saint Bernard Rescue Now Adopting! saintrescue.org/oregon.htm Males & Females. Large breed exper. req’d. Foster homes desperately needed, too! Call Jeff: 541-390-1353

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Crafts and Hobbies

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/

C h a n d l e r

Furniture & Appliances

Alaska Candles, handcrafted, wildlife series, w/Alaskan Crude oil, $75, 541-318-5732

DACHSHUND MINI Longhaired puppies AKC. $500+ up. 30% off if you spay or neuter. 541-598-7417

Free Cats (2): Beautiful, need loving home, brothers, please call 541-788-3416. Border Collie/New Zealand Huntaway puppies, 8 wks, FREE rescued barn/shop cats, working parents, wonderful fixed, shots. Some tame. We dogs, $300. 541-546-6171 will deliver. 541-389-8420. Border Collie Puppies (10), 10 German Shepherd Pups, AKC. wks, 1st shots, well socialHealth guarantee. $850 ized, $50 ea. 541-477-3327 509-406-3717 Border Collies, black/white, tri, Golden Retriever Pups exc. smooth coat, shots/wormed, quality, parents OFA, good 7 weeks $250. 541-948-7997 hips, $650. 541-318-3396. Boston Terrier Male AKC, 3 year old, not neutered. Plays well Kelpie/Red Heeler Mix, neutered with shots, $100, with others. Needs lots of 541-576-3701,503-310-2514 attention. Very cute and loved $250 (541)279-4016 Kittens & cats thru local rescue group. 65480 78th, Bend. Boxer Mix, 1 male, 1 female Sat/Sun 1-5. Other days by brindle color, 12 wks. Asking appt, 541-647-2181. Altered, $75 each. 541-410-9928 shots, ID chip, more. Small kittens also, 541-815-7278. Boxers AKC Reg, fawns, whites, Info: 541-389-8420; Photos, & brindles, 1st shots, very somap at www.craftcats.org cial.$500-$650. 541-325-3376 Dachshund, AKC 2-yr old male, $375. DNA, pedigree, red & white piebald. 541-420-6044

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Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

FOUND Motorola Bluetooth in little bag 3 blks S of McMenamins 4/1. 541-390-9087

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WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

FOUND Toyota keys + 3 additional, on Brookswood 4/6. Call to identify 541-389-1629

Farmers Column

Lost: Heirloom Ring, large oval black Onyx, sterling silver, 3/28 or 29?, Tumalo State park or area near Costco? REWARD, 503-829-6208.

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

LOST Mini-Pinscher, Reward “Paris” female chocolate & tan, brown collar, 4/10, near 6th&Olney, scared but comes to food, 503-422-2320

Maglite, found in Terrebonne area. Call to identify. 541-548-0175 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

BarkTurfSoil.com Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

541-389-9663

For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

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A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

541-647-8261

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Health and Beauty Items GOT THYROID PROBLEMS? Discover why 90% of women on thyroid replacement hormones are guaranteed to continue suffering with thyroid symptoms.....and what you can do to finally end suffering once and for all!

Call For Free DVD: Thyroid Secrets: What to do when the medication doesn’t work.

866-700-1414 (24 hr recorded message)

MADRAS Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 84 SW K. St. 541 475-9722 Open to the public.

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

1 per day

$

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496


F2 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400 421

Schools and Training Oregon Medical Training PCS

Phlebotomy classes begin May 2nd. Registration now open: www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403 Position and housing wanted Former heavy equip. operator & landscaper seeking small woodworking shop and rental in Bend area. Can pay or exchange for yard upkeep or improvement, fencing, rock work, etc. 760-525-5773 Seeking a Ranch Job, full or part time, 15 years exp. at Willows Ranch. Call Miguel 541-390-5033. For references, call Judy 541-549-1248

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476

Employment Opportunities

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Kevin O’Connell Classified Department Manager The Bulletin

Computer - IT and Network Administrator

Domestic & In-Home Positions

Barber or Beautician wanted, for established salon, lots of walk-ins, lease only. 541-280-4376.

Part-time day Caregiver for elderly, bedridden woman. Sun. 7:30-4:30, Mon. Tues. 7:30-11:30. 541-419-3405

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

476

Employment Opportunities

(40/hr. per week - Mon.Fri.) - Full Time - 5 X 8/hr. shifts per week - (4pm 12:30am), yet flexible based on patient census and job demands. Prior experience in sterile environment and infection control preferred. Must be able to stoop, bend, and lift 25lbs - be able to prioritize workload, and be efficient in duties.

Responsible for the company’s networks, servers, network security, telephone and email Email resume to systems. Responsibilities will jobs@bendsurgery.com include: Windows servers, network servers, firewall, PC Deadline: open until filled. setup, IT security and support for over 45 internal users and budgeting and fore- Hairstylist - Fully licensed casting of IT needs. Monitor for hair, nails & waxing. and maintain the company’s Recent relevant experience web site, online sales, and necessary. Hourly/commissocial networks. Provide supsion. Teresa, 541-382-8449 port at six locations in north Central Oregon. Knowledge Immediate openings for feller buncher, delimber, loader of IBM iSeries a plus. Skills operator and log truck. work should include hands-on in CA. Some relocation reimknowledge of installation, rebursement. 530-816-0656. pair and modification of IT hardware including wireless, and software. Working Medical Billing/ knowledge of Microsoft Server and related products. Collection Working knowledge of comProfessional ponents and the ability to Responsible for recepconfigure new systems. tionist/office duties. Competitive wage, plus excellent benefit package, DOE. Position is full-time; Call 541-989-8221 for appli$10/hr plus bonuses. cation, or mail resume to Must have experience in MCGG Box 367, Lexington, medical field and hold OR 97839.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 541-383-0398

476

Employment Opportunities

Environmental Services/Housekeeping

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

476

Employment Opportunities

current certification in coding and billing. Email cover letter outlining qualifications/accomplishments. to drmacdonell@ bendbroadband.com

Mig Welder for Manufacturing in Minot, North Dakota. Year round, full-time inside work, wage DOE. Contact Butch at 701-838-6346.

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Sales - Jewelry We are looking for a bright, The Oregonian energetic and motivated perIndependent Dealer son to join our team as a part to full time Sales Associate. As an independent dealer you If you are dependable and would be responsible for have a good work attitude, promotion, delivery and cusplease leave your resume at tomer service of The OrSaxon’s in the Old Mill Disegonian for the Sisters, trict, Bend. Redmond, Madras, and Prineville area. Prior newspaper experience is helpful, Tele-Marketing: Small but not a requirement. If incompany seeking inditerested, please call viduals to fundraise for 1-888-569-7006.

NEWSPAPER

Pharmacist

position. Need friendly, organized, motivated pharmacist to take care of our patients. Independent central Oregon community pharmacy, full or part-time, no Sundays, no nights. Competitive wage and benefits. Call Leah 541-419-4688.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

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290

Sales Southwest Bend

Sales Redmond Area

Garage Sale: Woodworking & Mechanic tools, toolboxes, vices, antiques, furniture, household, women’s & kids clothes, much more! Fri.-Sat. 7-5, 19644 Clear Night Dr. No early sales.

Double Moving Sale: Everything from A-Z, tools antiques, collectibles, Fri.-Sat, 8-4, 1407 NW Canyon Dr.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Moving Sale: Sat. 8-3, trampoline, furniture, bikes, toys, household items, more, 63089 Marsh Orchid Dr.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

GARAGE SALE Sat & Sun, 8am-5pm. 5305 NW 83rd, Redmond. (Take 101st off Hwy 126) Post-hole digger w/2 bits; deep well pump, hay elevator, Craftsman radial arm saw, golf clubs, Skill cordless set, Makita chop saw, small garden tools for garden tractor, hard-bound books, clothes, toys saddle, much more! 541-504-4282 or 408-710-7952 Grandma’s Moving Sale! Fri-Sat, 9-4. 10466 NW 27th, Terrebonne. Sofa, bed, TV, W/D, crocks, tools, dishes, antiques, knickknacks, MORE!

292

Sales Other Areas 400 GARAGE SALES! Portland’s LARGEST Garage Sale. Sat., April 16, 8 to 5 at Portland Expo Center. www.portlandgsale.com

Move Sale - Rain or shine. 20939 Gift Road, 8-5 Sat 4/16 & Sun 4/17. You think it, we could have it! Tan Bed, Dog Kennel; Refrigerator; fishing boat on new trailer; womens professional clothes sizes 8-14; sewing stuff; books; old jars; building supplies, nails; doors, windows, some childrens, questions, phone 541-647-0647 NO EARLY SALES- driveway is circular

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

well-known non-profit organizations. Great for seniors, homemakers, students & others, Permanent part-time, 19 hours weekly, MonThur. 5-9 p.m & Fri. 4-7 p.m. $8.50 per hour plus bonuses. Some experience helpful, but will train those with great work ethic & ability to obtain contributions. 541-385-5371

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

634

Finance & Business

Rentals

500 600 528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

630

Rooms for Rent No smoking, male preferred, $270/mo. +$50 dep. Kitchen facilities. 541-420-6625. Room w/private bath, kitchen privileges, laundry facilities. In Tumalo on acreage. Dog or horse???. $500+utils in winter months.541-389-8142 STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent 2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

541-382-3402 573

Business Opportunities

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! Spring On In !!

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

$150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $575.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Great Location, by BMC & Costco, 2 bdrm., 2 bath duplex, 55+, 2342 NE Mary Rose Pl., #2 $795+dep, no pets/smoking, 541-390-7649

Call for Specials! Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

636

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 1015 Roanoke Ave. - $590/ mo, $500 dep. W/S/G paid, 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath townhouse, view of town, no smoking or pets. Norb, 541-420-9848.

1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, $675/mo., utils incl., call Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

Fully furnished loft apt. on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt. SHEVLIN APARTMENTS Near COCC! Newer 2 Bdrm 1 Bath, granite, wood floors, underground parking/storage area, laundry on site, $675/mo. 541-480-3666 Studio above garage, dishwasher, W/D, nice. $610 incl. gas fireplace, heater, hot water, W/S/G; renter pays elec, 1 small pet OK. 541-382-4868

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend SE Duplex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage, small fenced yard, W/D hookup, kitchen appl., $725/ mo., 541-990-0426 or 541-258-5973.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 F3 658

Houses for Rent Redmond

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

640

648

650

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent NE Bend

2 BDRM., 1 BATH flat near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $600/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

Deluxe 2 Bdrm 1½ Bath Townhouse apt. W/D hookup, fenced yd. NO PETS. Great location, starting at $565. 179 SW Hayes (past Mike’s Fence Center) Please call 541-382-0162; 541-420-0133

541-322-7253

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

ONE MONTH FREE with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

PUBLISHER'S Looking for your next NOTICE employee? All real estate advertising in Place a Bulletin help this newspaper is subject to wanted ad today and the Fair Housing Act which reach over 60,000 makes it illegal to advertise readers each week. "any preference, limitation or Your classified ad will discrimination based on race, also appear on color, religion, sex, handicap, bendbulletin.com which familial status, marital status currently receives over or national origin, or an in1.5 million page views tention to make any such every month at preference, limitation or disno extra cost. crimination." Familial status Bulletin Classifieds includes children under the Get Results! age of 18 living with parents Call 385-5809 or place or legal custodians, pregnant your ad on-line at women, and people securing bendbulletin.com custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any adver652 tising for real estate which is Houses for Rent in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed NW Bend that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are avail- Prestigious, fully furnished, able on an equal opportunity 6 bdrm., 3 bath, NW Skyliner, basis. To complain of dis6 mo. minimum, incl. some crimination call HUD toll-free utils., $2600/mo, please call at 1-800-877-0246. The toll 541-951-3058. free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 654 1-800-927-9275. Crooked River Ranch - 1350 sq ft custom built ranch, 2 bdrm 2 bath, double garage. Patio, Mtn views, no smoking. $750. 541-548-4225

The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

Houses for Rent SE Bend

NEW 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1731 sq.ft., bonus room, fenced yard, 20269 SE Knights Bridge Pl. $1095/mo. 1 yr lease, no pets. 541-350-2206 Non-smoking 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1800 sq ft home with gas heat & large yard. $925 + deposits. 541-382-8900

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

656

Houses for Rent SW Bend

3 Bdrm, 1800 sq ft. Very clean! 2 Bdrm 2 bath, in Westridge New bathroom, lrg fam rm, Subdivision. Newly remodsprinklers, attch garage. No eled, on ½ acre, near Ath. smkg; pets poss. 1150 NE 6th Club of Bend. No smoking. St. Avail now! $950/mo, $600 $1195. Call 541-388-8198 refundable. 541-389-4985

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

personals

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

Real Estate For Sale

$695/mo, 3 bdrm 2 bath. New paint inside/outside, new carpet and vinyl. Dbl garage w/ opener. Nice neighborhood. 541-388-8503

700

A nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1008 sq.ft., vaulted ceiling, fenced yard, coverd deck, RV parking, dbl garage w/ opener. $795. 480-3393 or 610-7803.

New Listings

730

Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 Crooked River Ranch, 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1000 sq. ft., $695/mo. 1st, last. No inside pets. Mtn. views. 503-829-7252, 679-4495

660

Houses for Rent La Pine 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, gas appls & fireplace. Crescent Creek subdivision, w/Fitness Ctr. No smoking; pets neg. $675/ mo.$775/dep. 541-815-5494

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

750

865

880

Redmond Homes

ATVs

Motorhomes

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN

Beaver Lexington 1994, Anniversary model, Cummins Diesel, 38’, nice, full factory paint, $35,900,541-617-1249

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

762

Homes with Acreage Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

10 acres bordering BLM - 2520 sq ft 3 Bdrm, 2½ Bath. Large horse barn, extra large detached garage, all well-built. Extensive landscaping; 5 miles west of Redmond. $355,000. Call 541-923-7261

763 Sunny, Warm So. Oregon! Trade your Bend area home for my 7-yr 4 Bdrm 2.5 Bath Central Point home, in planned development, with nice views. 541-941-6915

Recreational Homes and Property

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

Cabin for sale on the Metolius River Arm of Lake Billy Chinook. Go to: Lakehouse.com for specs. Ad#230071 or check under Oregon listings.

675

771

RV Parking

Lots

Hookup for RV in quiet Tumalo area. Dog or cat ok. Beautiful view. $550/mo. Electricity extra in winter. 541-389-8142

Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $89,999, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse 1792 sq.ft. & 1680 sq.ft. spaces, 827 Business Way, Bend. 30¢/sq.ft.; 1st mo. + $300 dep. 541-678-1404 Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809 Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Sell an Item

FAST! If it's under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classifieds for

$10 - 3 lines, 7 days $16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

745

Homes for Sale

Boats & RV’s

800 850

Snowmobiles

Last Chance Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997 Now only $895! Sled plus trailer package $1650. Won’t Last Long! 541-548-3443.

Polaris Indy Trail 1989, $500; 1998 RMK 500, $1200; 2000 RMK 700 $1500, all exc. cond., 541-419-4890.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010 Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $15,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

746

Northwest Bend Homes BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

Where buyers meet sellers.

Your Future Is Here. Whether you’re looking for a home or need a service, your future is in these pages.

Thousands of ads daily in print and online. To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 385-5809

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

773

Acreages 20 Acres, Christmas Valley, off Oil Dry (paved

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

road), power at road, $15,000 or trade for ??? 541-728-1036.

Domestic Services

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

I Do Professional Housecleaning: 25 yrs. exp., licenced, exc refs., Senior discounts! 541-420-0366

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications. Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Concrete Construction JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

Computer/Cabling Install

$147,000, Great Location; only 1 mile from Eagle Crest Resort! 503-260-7750 wtaaffe@comcast.net ***

CHECK YOUR AD

Quality Builders Electric • Remodels • Home Improvement • Lighting Upgrades • Hot Tub Hook-ups 541-389-0621 www.qbelectric.net CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

QB Digital Living

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co. Clean Up/Yard Debris, Hauling. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492 CCB#180420

“Pihl Bilt” Since 1981 S.E. Pihl Construction Remodeling specialist, addons, kitchen & bath, faux wall finishes, tile & stone, Energy Trust of Oregon Trade Ally, Window & door upgrades, no job to small. Call for Spring Specials, Call Scott, 541-815-1990, CCB#110370 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Landscaping, Yard Care

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

Spring Clean Up •Leaves •Cones and Needles •Broken Branches •Debris Hauling •Defensible Space •Aeration/Dethatching •Compost Top Dressing Weed free bark & flower beds ORGANIC

PROGRAMS

Landscape Maintenance Full or Partial Service •Mowing •Edging •Pruning •Weeding •Sprinkler Adjustments

Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that • Evaluating Seasonal Needs advertise to perform Land • Pruning Trees and Shrubs scape Construction which in • Thinning Overgrown Areas cludes: planting, decks, • Removing Undesired Plants fences, arbors, water-fea • Hauling Debris tures, and installation, repair • Renovation of irrigation systems to be li • Fertilizer Programs censed with the Landscape • Organic Options Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in EXPERIENCED cluded in all advertisements Senior Discounts which indicate the business 541-390-3436 has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Get 1 FREE Persons doing landscape Maintenance Service or maintenance do not require a LCB license. Aeration ($40+ value) when you sign up for a full season of maintenance! Nelson Landscape

Fertilizer included with monthly program

Weekly, monthly or one time service. EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

We offer: • Residential & Commercial • Organic Products (kid and pet safe!) • Aerations & Thatching • Mulch, Hedging, Pruning • Irrigation Management • Spring & Fall Clean-ups • Fertilization • Weed Control

Licensed / Bonded / Insured FREE Estimates! Call today: (541) 617.TURF [8873] www.turflandscapes.com

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration

FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

541-382-3883

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

20' Calabria 1998 tournament ski boat / 237 hours. 350ci/ 300hp F.I. GM engine. Nice, too many extras to list. $13,500. Call 541-736-3067 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Boat Loader, electric, for pickup, with extras, $350 OBO, 541-548-3711.

Honda XR400 2001, $1900; Yamaha TT90 $650, Honda XR50, $400, 541-419-4890.

Boat Trailer, 25’ Pacific, dual axle, $300, call 541-961-3776.

Bend Landscaping & Maint. Thatching, aerating, spring cleanup, sprinkler turn-ons, weekly mows.

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990 Mary’s Lawn Care is seeking New Customers for •Lawn Maint. • Spring clean-up • Aerating • Thatching 541-350-1097 541-410-2953 Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012 Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Rebates up to $1000 Plus 3.99% APR Financing on select models ATV's can be hazardous to operate. All riders under 16 should ride only with adult supervision. Always wear a helmet and be sure to take a safety training course. Financing on approval of credit. See dealer for details.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. New Price!!!!! $19,500. 541-788-4844.

TOTAL LAWN CARE LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Serving Redmond since 1980. FREE THATCHING WITH AERATING SERVICE Mowing , Edging, Fertilizing, Hauling. Senior Discounts. Don’t delay, call today for Free estimate 541-279-1821

SAVE THIS AD!! Rototilling Backyard Gardens $25/hour • Min. 1 hour Call Jim, 541-633-7941 8am-6pm for appt; leave msg

One owner, low miles, generator, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, Motivated seller. Just reduced and priced to sell at $10,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., see to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd in La Pine. $8000. OBO 541-876-5106.

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Winnebago Sightseer 30B Class A 2008 $84,500 OBO Top of the line! cell 805-368-1575

881

The Bulletin

2009 T@da (Tada)

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Travel Trailer Excellent condition! 2 refrigerators, Cool Cat AC/Heat Pump, 15" LCD TV/DVD. Too many extras to list. $19,500 OBO Call 541-548-8770

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

Wilderness 2-person Kayak w/ paddles, like new. $650 new; sell $375. 541-383-8528

Painting, Wall Covering WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Tile, Ceramic

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Travel Trailers

Thatch, Aerate, weeding, raking & monthly maint. 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 www.bblandscape.com

Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

V Spring Clean Up! V

RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Winnebago Access 31J 2008, Class C, Near Low Retail Price! One owner, nonsmoker, garaged, 7,400 miles, auto leveling jacks, (2) slides, upgraded queen bed, bunk beds, microwave, 3-burner range/oven, (3) TVs, and sleeps 10! Lots of storage, maintained, and very clean! Only $76,995! Extended warranty available! Call (541) 388-7179.

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Remodeling, Carpentry

Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

Bounder 34’ 1994.

875

Watercraft

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Maintenance

Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years!

17.5’ Bayliner, 2005, 3.0 Merc, like new, low hrs, $7500 obo. Will consider partial trades. 541-279-1862 after 5 pm. 18’ Hewes 180 Sportsman 2007 Yamaha 115 & 8hp kicker, downriggers Excel cond, low hrs, $22,900. 541-815-3383

Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

CURTIS SESLAR’S

J. L. SCOTT

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

Harley Ultra Classic 2001, Best of everything. Garage kept. Madras. $9000 call 541-475-7459.

Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street happy to fix it as soon as we legal, hvy duty receiver hitch can. R..E Deadlines are: basket. $4500. 541-385-4975 Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for 865 Sunday and Monday. ATVs 541-385-5809 Thank you! Honda 200 4 wheeler, good The Bulletin Classified cond., $600, call *** 541-419-4890. Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684. POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new Look at: Bendhomes.com rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, for Complete Listings of 541-932-4919. Area Real Estate for Sale

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Landscape Management

Electrical Services

•Computer Networking •Phone/Data/TV Jacks •Whole House Audio •Flat Screen TV & Installation 541-280-6771 www.qbdigitalliving.com CCB#127370 Elect Lic#9-206C

Debris Removal

Home Improvement

870

Boats & Accessories

9.18 Buildable acres:

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website) Barns

Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

Call 541-385-5809

A-Liner pop-up 15-ft 2010, 2-burner stove, frig, freshwater tank, furnace, fantastic fan, $9950. 541-923-3021


F4 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 881

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Autos & Transportation

Travel Trailers JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

900 908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504 Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps 6, slide-out, Arizona room, range w/oven, micro, toilet & shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt batteries, outside shower, twin propane tanks, BBQ. $10,500. 541-312-9312

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

882

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

925

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

KEYSTONE COUGAR 26’ 2004 5th wheel, slide, extras, like new $15,000, 541-389-9444

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

885

Canopies and Campers

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $7900 541-815-1523.

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

Ford F250 4x4 1993. 5.8L eng, auto, AC, CC, shell, 2nd gas tank, trlr hitch w/conn. 127K, $2800. 541-408-8330

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

The Bulletin Classifieds Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Chevy

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Ford F-250 XLT Super Duty 2008, 4WD, 6.4 Diesel, supercab, long bed, 24K mi., many extras, like new $35,000, 541-923-5754.

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480. Toyota 2009 Double Cab Prerunner. 26,500 miles SR5-TRD package---tow SHARP - AND RED!! #081331

$26,995

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

BUICKS ! LeSabres 1998 and 2004 $1900-$4900. 90 and 115k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

DLR# 0225

West of Hwy 97 & Empire, Bend FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

935

Sport Utility Vehicles Buick Rendezvous 2004, clean & low mileage, $11,000 OBO. 541-410-7829;541-389-4506

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Ford 2 Door 1949, 99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories Winter Master M&S, P185/70R13, 100%, $80. 541-480-5950.

Falken Uro M&S 195/60R15, 70%, $140. 541-480-5950. Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

$19,450! Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

541-598-3750 DLR# 0225

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Monte Carlo 1970, all original, many extras. MUST SELL due to death. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072 OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

West of Hwy 97 & Empire, Bend

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Mercedes-Benz S550 2007 This is a beautiful car w/only 40K mi. Pristine in & out. Leather interior looks showroom new. $42,000, 541-388-7944.

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007 All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $38,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677 Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

350 auto, new studs, located in Sisters, $3000 OBO, 907-723-9086,907-723-9085

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

WILLYS JEEP 1956 New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Asking $3,999 or make offer. 541-389-5355

933

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649 Chevrolet Scottsdale 20, 1987. 4WD, 3/4-ton, A/C, Reese 15,000-lb Fifth wheel pin hitch, tilt wheel, deer guard, excellent 10-ply tires, hubs. $3000. For more details & equip, call John Keseley 541-932-4338 Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 940

Vans Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford E350 12-pass., 1993, 5L V8, 166K, runs/drives great. $2300 OBO. 541-410-4757 35,000 miles, 3 door, 3 seats, white, $4900 for an almost new van! 541-318-9999.

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE Amended Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) BETTY J. REED, Petitioner, v. DONALD B. HOUGE, Respondent. Case No.: 06DS0779MS Notice is hereby given that I will on May 19, 2011, at 11:10 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 65235 85th Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, to wit, Lot sixteen (16) in Block nine (9) of First Addition to Whispering Pines Estate, Deschutes County, Oregon. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution of Foreclosure (Real Property) issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated February 25, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Donald B. Houge as respondent, recovered General Judgment and Money Award on June 24th, 2009 and Supplemental Judgment and Money Award on September 23, 2009, against Betty J. Reed as petitioner/debtor. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property.

Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive Publications: April 13, 2011, April 20, 2011, April 27, 2011 Date of Last Publication May 5, 2011

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Antique and Classic Autos

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By Lisa Griggs, Civil Technician

(Private Party ads only)

Infiniti EX35 2010 Immaculate, only 4000 miles. 297-hp, V6 engine. Journey edition, premium pkg, AWD. Nav system, Blue tooth, Bose stereo w/USB port. Silver International Travel All 1967, exterior, black leather inteexc. cond., 4WD, new tires, rior. $38,500. 541-306-6564. shocks, interior seat cover, everything works, 121K orig. Jeep Grand Cherokee mi.,original operators manual Laredo 2007 4x4 and line setting ticket incl. 19,280 miles, stability control $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401 absolutely like new condition #688914. $19,977

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LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff

541-389-5016 evenings.

Ford Windstar GL1998.

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

541-598-3750

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Chevy El Camino 1979, MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, tow pkg., 5.4L V-8, 4WD, bedliner, CD, air, winter & summer tires, great cond., 2ND REDUCTION, now $11,900 541-554-5212, 702-501-0600.

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

Wheels, 2-Sets Mini Cooper, 8x18” Custom “Star”, 1 set $300 no tires, 1 set $550 w/tires, 541-382-8762. Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Utility Trailers

2 TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

940

Vans

975

Truck with Snow Plow!

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

933

Pickups

Automobiles

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Fifth Wheels

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

Volvo C70-T5, 2010 Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437 Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Attorney: L. Thomas Clark, OSB #700258 L. Thomas Clark, P.C. Attorney-At-Law 521 NW Harriman St. Bend, OR 97701 (541)388-4053 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE AMENDED TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE (After Release From Stay) Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Stephanie Bain and Seth T. Bain, wife and husband, as grantor, to First American Title, as trustee, in favor of American Express Bank, FSB, as beneficiary, dated July 19, 2005, recorded July 19, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, , in Book 2005, at Page 46253, beneficial interest now held by Bank of America, National Association, as successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association. as Trustee for Luminent Mortgage Trust 2005-1, covering the described real property in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 5, Block 10, East of Eastwood, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly Known as: 1690 N.E. Northview, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,315.25 from September 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: $227,525.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.5% per annum from August 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. The Notice of Default and original Notice of Sale given pursuant thereto stated that the property would be sold on April 29, 2011, at 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon; however, subsequent to the recording of said Notice of Default the original sale proceedings were stayed by order of the court or by proceedings under the National Bankruptcy Act or for other lawful reason. The beneficiary did not participate in obtaining such stay. Said stay was terminated on March 31, 2011. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 18, 2011, at 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS

187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, (which is the new date, time and place set for sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder foreclose the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstate by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then to be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 04-06-2011 KELLY D. SUTHERLAND, Successor Trustee, SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC, 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N, Vancouver, WA 98662, Phone: (360) 260-2253, Fax: (360) 260-2285, Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647, www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa LEGAL NOTICE CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL # 1368-11 Networked Digital Copiers/Multi-functional Devices-Leasing Central Oregon Community College requests sealed proposals from qualified vendors for the provision of Networked Digital Copiers/ Multi-functional Devices for Central Oregon Community College as described in the proposal documents on file at the Central Oregon Community College Purchasing Office, Metolius Hall, Room 212C, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701.

There will be a MANDATORY pre-bid meeting on Wednesday, April 20th, at 10am at the Max Merrill Room in the Library, 2600 NW College Way, Bend, Oregon. Proposers may obtain one complete proposal set from Central Oregon Community College by contacting Julie Mosier, Purchasing Coordinator, by email at jmosier@cocc.edu or by calling 541-383-7779. Sealed offers will be received by Julie Mosier in the Purchasing Office, Metolius Hall, Room 212C, located at 2600 NW College Way, Bend, OR 97701, until 4:00pm May 4, 2011. Offers received after this date and time will not be accepted. Submit offers, with the forms specified in the proposal documents, in a sealed opaque container that is plainly marked RFP #1368-11, "Networked Digital Copiers/Multi-functional Devices", acknowledging receipt of all addenda. Proposal response form must be signed in ink by an authorized representative of the Offeror. The College will reject any proposal not in compliance with all public bidding procedures and requirements and may reject for good cause any and all bids/proposals when determined that it is in the best interest of the public to do so. As set forth in the Proposal response form, no Offer will be considered without a statement by the Offeror as a part of its proposal that the Offeror is a "resident bidder" as defined by ORS 279A.120. No Offeror may withdraw its Offer within forty-five (45) days after the hour set for closing. The RFP Administrator is the sole point of contact for this procurement. All communication between the Offeror and the College regarding this solicitation shall be in writing, submitted by email, to the RFP Administrator at the email listed above. Email inquiries shall be indentified in the subject lines as "Networked Digital Copiers/ Multi-functional Devices". Proposers are to rely on written statements issued exclusively by the RFP Administrator. Any other communication will be considered unofficial and non-binding. Communications directed to other then the RFP Administrator will have no legal bearing on this RFP or the resulting contract(s).

in care of Helen Rives Pruitt, 621 SW Morrison Street, Suite 1300, Portland, OR 97205 within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyer for the personal representative, Helen Rives Pruitt of Wyse Kadish LLP. Dated and first published on April 6, 2011. /s/ Jeffrey L. Borne Personal Representative Personal Representative Jeffrey L. Borne 2733 NW Nordic Avenue Bend, OR 97701 Telephone: 541.322.5964 Attorney for Personal Representative Helen Rives Pruitt, OSB No. 80358 Email: hrp@wysekadish.com Wyse Kadish LLP 621 SW Morrison Street, Suite 1300 Portland, OR 97205 Telephone: 503.228.8448 Facsimile: 503.273.9135 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Martin G. Gyorgyfalvy has been appointed as Personal Representative of the estate of George Gyorgyfalvy, deceased, Deschutes County Circuit Court Case No. 11PB0045MA. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same within four months from the first date of publication of this notice at 1011 Harlow Road, Suite 300, Springfield, Lane County, Oregon 97477, or they may be barred. Any person whose rights may be affected by these proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the above-entitled Court or from the Personal Representative or from the Personal Representative's attorneys, Thorp, Purdy, Jewett, Urness & Wilkinson, P.C. DATED and first published: April 13, 2011. /s/ Martin G. Gyorgyfalvy, Personal Representative

Published this day Wednesday April 13th, 2011 Bend Bulletin, Bend, OR Daily Journal of Commerce, Portland, OR LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PHYLLIS G. BORNE, Deceased. Case No. 11PB0035ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jeffrey L. Borne has been appointed personal representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the personal representative,

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain Line of Credit Instrument/Line of Deed of Trust dated March 26, 2007 and recorded on April 2, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-18930, in the real property records of Deschutes County, Oregon, wherein Luke P. McClain is the Grantor, and Western Title & Escrow Company is the original Trustee, and Bank of the Cascades, an Oregon state-chartered commercial bank, is the Beneficiary (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Lot 98, Shevlin Ridge Phase 5, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Also commonly described as: 3151 NW Shevlin Meadow Drive, Bend, OR 97701. The tax parcel number is: 256816. The undersigned hereby certifies that he has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of David W. Criswell, as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: David W. Criswell, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY BORROWER: There are continuing and uncured defaults by Luke P. McClain (the "Borrower") that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed and the written documents for Loan No. 50130708, including the adjustable rate promissory note dated and effective as of April 26, 2010 (the "Note"), authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. The Loan secured by the Trust Deed matured on October 5, 2010, at which time the entire principal balance owed together with all accrued interest plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and expenses was immediately due and payable by Borrower to Lender. Borrower has failed to pay to Lender a total of not less than $205,280.84 (the "Indebtedness") which total amount is comprised of an unpaid principal balance of $199,376.00 together with accrued and unpaid interest through and including January 4, 2011 of $3,998.44 plus Beneficiary's unpaid fees, costs, and collection expenses of not less than $1,906.40. Interest on account of the unpaid principal portion of the Indebtedness continues to accrue from and after January 4, 2011, at a rate that is currently 4.0% percent per annum or $21.84942 per diem. ALL AMOUNTS are now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed, the Borrower must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure. NONE. TOTAL UNCURED MONETARY (PAYMENT) DEFAULT: By reason of said uncured and continuing defaults, the Beneficiary has accelerated and declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed and the Property immediately due and payable. The sums due and payable being the following: Unpaid principal amount owing pursuant to the Obligations, as of January 4, 2011: $199,376.00. Unpaid interest owing pursuant to the Obligations as of January 4, 2011: $3,998.44. Accrued and unpaid fees, costs and collection expenses, including attorneys fees and costs to January 4, 2011: $1,906.40. TOTAL DUE: $205,280.84. Accordingly, the sum owing on the obligation secured by the Trust Deed is $205,280.84, as of January 4, 2011, together with interest accruing on the principal portion of that amount, plus additional costs and expenses incurred by Beneficiary and/or the Successor Trustee (including their respective attorney's fees, costs, and expenses). ELECTION TO SELL: Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on May 25, 2011, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, at 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701 in Deschutes County, Oregon. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED: January 5 2011. By: David W. Criswell, OSB 925930, Successor Trustee, Ball Janik LLP, 101 SW Main Street, Suite 1100, Portland, Oregon 97204-3219. Telephone: (503) 228-2525. Facsimile: (503) 295-1058. Email: dcriswell@balljanik.com.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 13, 2011 F5

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LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Publications: April 13, 2011; April 20, 2011; April 27, 2011 Date of Last Publication May 4, 2011

Pursuant to ORS 477.250, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held to receive from any interested persons suggestions, advice, objections or remonstrance's to the proposed budget for the Central Oregon Forest Protection District. A hearing will be held on Tuesday, April 26, 2011, at 1:30 P.M., at the Prineville Unit, 3501 E 3rd Street, Prineville, OR. Copies of the tentative budget may be inspected during normal working hours. To ensure the broadest range of services to individuals with disabilities, persons with disabilities requiring special arrangements should contact 541-447-5658 at least two working days in advance. OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY DOUG DECKER, STATE FORESTER

LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Sheriff's Sale Execution in Foreclosure (Real Property) STERLING BANK, a Texas State Banking Corporation, Plaintiff, v. ROBERTO ANAYA GALVAN; HERRADURA INC., an Oregon corporation, dba EL CAPORAL, SISTERS; COSTA DE JALISCO, INC., an Oregon corporation; EL JIMADOR, INC., an Oregon corporation; UNITED STATES SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., a national banking association; and WEST COAST BANCORP, an Oregon State Banking Corporation, Defendants. Case No.: 10CV0686AB Notice is hereby given that I will on May 19, 2011, at 11:00 a.m. at the front, west, entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon, sell, at public oral auction to the highest bidder, for cash, the following real property, known as 473 E. Hood Avenue, Sisters, Oregon 97759, to wit, Lots 1, 2, & 3, Block 15, DAVIDSON ADDITION TO SISTERS, Deschutes County, Oregon. Said sale is made under a Writ of Execution on Foreclosure issued out of the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes, dated February 25, 2011, to me directed in the above-entitled action wherein Sterling Bank as plaintiff, recovered General Judgment on February 15, 2011, against Roberto Anaya Galvan; Herradura, Inc.; Costa De Jalisco, Inc.; El Jimador, Inc. as defendants. BEFORE BIDDING AT THE SALE, A PROSPECTIVE BIDDER SHOULD INDEPENDENTLY INVESTIGATE: (a)The priority of the lien or interest of the judgment creditor; (b)Land use laws and regulations applicable to the property; (c)Approved uses for the property; (d)Limits on farming or forest practices on the property; (e)Rights of neighboring property owners; and (f)Environmental laws and regulations that affect the property. LARRY BLANTON Deschutes County Sheriff By Jinnie L. Willard, Civil Technician Published in Bend Bulletin Date of First and Successive

Attorney: Susan S. Ford, OSB #842203 Sussman Shank LLP 1000 SW Broadway, Ste. 1400 Portland, OR 97205 (503) 227-1111 Conditions of Sale: Only U.S. currency and/or cashier's checks made payable to Deschutes County Sheriff's Office will be accepted. Payment must be made in full immediately upon the close of the sale. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS JEFFREY M. BISHOP has been appointed Personal Representative of the ESTATE OF JACK LEROY BISHOP, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under Case Number 11PB0030AB. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP at 716 NW Harriman Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, ATTN.: Lisa N. Bertalan, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the Personal Representative or the following-named attorney for the Personal Representative. Date of first publication: April 6, 2011. HENDRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP 716 NW HARRIMAN BEND, OR 97701 541-382-4980 LEGAL NOTICE Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Christopher J. Golden and Teresa L. Golden, Grantor(s), to Glenn H. Prohaska trustee, in favor of Conseco Finance Servicing, Corp., as beneficiary, recorded 7/20/2000, in the Records of Deschutes County, Oregon as Instrument No. Vol. 2000 Page 28808, and Katrina E. Glogowski being the successor trustee, covering the following described real property situated in the above-mentioned county and state, to wit: APN: 125538; Lot 1, Block 49, OREGON WATER WONDERLAND UNIT 2, Deschutes County, Oregon together with a 1/1045th undivided interest as tenants in common in the following described parcels: Parcels E, F, G, H and I; Commonly known as 56284 Black Duck, Bend, OR 97707. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to section 86.753(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes. The default for which foreclosure is made is grantor’s failure to pay when due the following sums: monthly payments of $636.71 beginning on Sept, 2010; plus late charges of $5.00; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/ premiums, if applicable. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $96364.77 together with interest thereon at the rate of 10.86% per annum from Sept, 2010 until paid; plus advances of $0.00; together with title expenses, costs, trustee’s fees and attorneys’ fees incurred herein by reason of said default; any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein; and prepayment penalties/premiums, if appli-

cable. Whereof, notice is hereby given that Katrina E. Glogowski, the undersigned trustee will on 06/17/2011 at the hour of 11:00 am standard time, as established by ORS 187.110, at the at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s and attorney’s fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. Notice is hereby given that reinstatement or payoff quotes requested pursuant to ORS 86.757 and 86.759 must comply with that statute. Due to potential conflicts with federal law, persons having no record legal or equitable interest in the subject property will only receive information concerning the sale status and the opening bid. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word “grantor” includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words “trustee” and “beneficiary” include their respective successors in interest, if any. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Dated: February 8, 2011 by: /s/ Katrina E. Glogowski, successor trustee, 2505 Third Ave., Ste. 100, Seattle, WA 98121 (206) 903-9966. LEGAL NOTICE Symbiotics LLC, on behalf of Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC (PO Box 535, Rigby, ID 83442), submitted a Final License Application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the Wickiup Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 12965) on March 25, 2011. The project would add a 7.15-MW run-of-river generation facility to the existing Wickiup Dam in Deschutes County, Oregon. A copy of the Final License Application is available for public viewing at the La Pine Public Library. The document can also be downloaded at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp by searching for the project number.

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541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26442-5r Loan No.: 0206344814 Title No.: 4522825 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Shawnee J. Ray, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co of OR, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 08/14/2007, recorded on 08/17/2007 as Document No. 2007-45453, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 13 in Block 40 of Oregon Water Waterland Unit No. 2, Descutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 125736 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 17460 Gull Drive, Bend, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,006.60 beginning 06/01/2010, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $124,189.22 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum from 05/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 05/25/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 1-10-11 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 81 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 100, Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 204868)(03/30/11, 04/06/11, 04/13/11, 04/20/11)

LEGAL NOTICE The undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the estate of RUTH ANN SCHULTZ, Deceased, by the Deschutes County Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, probate number 11PB0047AB. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same with proper vouchers within four (4) months after the date of first publication to the undersigned or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned or the attorney. Date first published: April 6, 2011 LINDA D. SATTERLY Personal Representative c/o Ronald L. Bryant Attorney at Law Bryant Emerson & Fitch, LLP PO Box 457 Redmond OR 97756 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Shelly A. Duhn and R. Eric Duhn, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated May 25, 2007, recorded May 31, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 30745, beneficial interest having been assigned to Bank of America, National Association, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank, N.A., as trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates Series 2007-OA6 Trust, as covering the following described real property: Lot 9, CANAL CROSSINGS, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20898 Imwalle Avenue nka 20898 Imwalle Court, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,546.48, from May 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,637.46, from July 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $311,903.27, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.216% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given

hat the undersigned trustee will on July 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt.

Dated: 03/03/11 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105761 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Gary R. Henin and Kathy J. Henin, as grantor to Western Title & Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated August 26, 2004, recorded September 29, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 58542, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank, by operation of law as covering the following described real property: LOT 188, ESTATES AT PRONGHORN, PHASE 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: Lot 188, Estates at Pronghorn Phase 2 Deschutes County, Oregon, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $4,101.73, from August 1, 2009, monthly payments in the sum of $4,228.18, from February 1, 2010, and monthly payments in the sum of $4,134.39, from February 1, 2011, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $394,268.76, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.375% per annum from July 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $604,902.80. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL-BE-MAILED- TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Donna Sue Freeborn, as grantor, to Western Title & Escrow Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registrations Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Sierra Pacific Mortgage Company, Inc. and its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated September 1, 2005, recorded September 9, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2005-60688, said Deed of Trust was assigned on August 2, 2010 to US Bank NA as trustee relating to the Chevy Chase Funding LLC Mortgage Backed Certificates, Series 2005-4 under Recording No. 2010-30045, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: See Exhibit A for Legal Description. Exhibit “A” - PARCEL I: In Township 17 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Section 33: Commencing at a point whence the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW1/4 NW1/4) of said Section 33 bears South 00 degrees 00’48” West, 387.95 feet; thence South 89 degrees 49’51” East, 30.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 49’51” East, 825.38 feet; thence South 01 degrees 44’31” East, 388.17 feet; thence North 89 degrees 49’51” West, 837.28 feet; thence North 00 degrees 00’48” East, 387.95 feet to the true point of beginning and the terminus of this description. TOGETHER WITH that portion conveyed in the deed recorded June 23, 1995 in Book 376 Page 2948, Official Records, described as follows: A parcel of land located in the Northwest quarter (NW1/4) Section Thirty-three (33), described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Section 33; thence South 00 degrees 03’41” West, 1321.25 feet along the West line of said Section 33 tot he North 1/16 corner between Sections 32 and 33, a 5/8 inch iron rod, the true point of beginning, thence South 89 degrees 19’06” East along the South line of the NW 1/4 NW 1/4, 207.94 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod; thence leaving said line South 06 degrees 54’40” East, 2.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence South 89 degrees 51’04” West, 208.19 deet to a 5/8 inch iron rod on the West line of said Section 33; thence North 00 degrees 17’01” East along said West line, 5.00 feet to the point of beginning and terminus thereof. PARCEL II: A tract of land located in the South west One-quarter of the Northwest One-quarter (SW1/4 NW 1/4) of Section Thirty-three (33), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of the said Southwest One-quarter of the Northwest One-quarter (SW1/4 NW1/4) of Section 33; thence along the Northerly line of said SW1/4 NW1/4 South 89 degrees 48’24” East, 208.28 feet tot he true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 48’24” East, 355.00 feet; thence leaving said Northerly line South 00 degrees 01’27” East, 2.42 feet to a point on the existing fence; thence along said existing fence North 89 degrees 33’37” West, 354.90 feet; thence North 07 degrees 02’47” West, 0.90 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. And commencing at the Northwest corner of the said SW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 33; thence along the Northerly line of said SW1/4 NW 1/4 South 89 degrees 24’24” East, 563.28 feet tot he true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 48’24” East, 304.00 feet; thence leaving said Northerly line South 01 degrees 41138” East, 3.73 feet to a point on the existing fence; thence along said existing fence North 89 degrees 33’37” West, 304.12 feet; thence North 00 degrees 01’27” West, 2.42 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay the following sums: 1. Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 4/1/2010 through 1/1/2011: 7 payment(s) at $2335.62, 3 payment(s) at $2603.17; Total Payments:$23,158.85; Late Charges: 7 late charge(s) at $116.78, 3 late charge(s) at $130.16 for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date Total Late Charges $1207.94; Recoverable Balance $591.64; THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED:$25,958.43. 2. Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $602,402.80 as of January 27, 2011. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on June 8, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: February 2, 2011. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527.

described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the ben-

eficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 02-24-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-104224 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Scott S. Walker and Debra L. Walker, as tenants by the entirety, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Wilmington Finance, a division of AIG Federal Savings Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 10, 2003, recorded December 16, 2003, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2003, at Page 85405, beneficial interest having been assigned to MorEquity, Inc., as covering the following described real property: Lot Twenty-Five (25), Woodcrest, Phases 1 & 2, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 3125 N.E. Saber Drive, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee

have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,185.43, from June 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $172,984.98, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75% per annum from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on July 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc25926-5r Loan No.: 0205065022 Title No.: 4457147 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by Gerald Lentz, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 02/20/2007, recorded on 02/28/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-12075, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: A parcel of land located in Section 18, Township 18 South, Range 13 East of the Willamette, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: The South half of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter (S1/2 NW1/4 SE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 18. Account No.: 112571 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61050 Sum View Drive, Bend, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $2,426.86 beginning 12/01/2009, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $376,371.38 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 11/01/2009, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 05/25/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 1-10-11 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 81 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 100, Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP#204867)(03/30/11, 04/06/11, 04/13/11, 04/20/11)

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F522127 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999562259/ELLIS Investor No: 175922284 AP #1: 144618 Title #: 110003679 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JAMES T. ELLIS as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated February 22, 2008, Recorded March 24, 2008 as Instr. No. 2008-12871 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 14, JUNIPINE ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 10 PYMTS FROM 04/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,101.02 $11,010.20 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$11,010.20 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 16586 WREN LN, SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $141,782.39, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/05/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931649 PUB: 03/30/11, 04/06/11, 04/13/11, 04/20/11


F6 Wednesday, April 13, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 03/03/11 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106066 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9822 T.S. No.: 1302037-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Randall L. Mahaney, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 28, 2007, recorded April 03, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-19419 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LOT 4 IN BLOCK 4 OF WOODRIVER VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH, A PORTION OF THE COMMON PROPERTY LOCATED IN THE PLAT OF WOODRIVER VILLAGE, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE SOUTH 86° 06' 23" EAST 24.07 FEET TO THE ONE-SIX-TENTH CORNER BETWEEN SECTIONS S AND 6, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; THENCE SOUTH 89° 49' 11" EAST ALONG THE NORTH UNE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER SECTION 5, A DISTANCE OF 181.88 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID LINE DUE SOUTH (SOUTH 00° 00' 00" WEST) 41.79 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY UNE OF BIRCH WOOD DRIVE; THENCE SOUTH 73° 21' 55" WEST 185.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE NORTH 160 38' 05' WEST ALONG THE EAST UNE OF SAID LOT A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND THERE TERMINATING. EXCEPT THAT PORTION DEED TO THE CITY OF BEND IN WARRANTY DEED RECORDED MARCH 14, 2002 IN INSTRUMENT NO. 2002-14310. Commonly known as: 19996 Birchwood Dr. Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due

thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $3,085.04 Monthly Late Charge $154.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $448,768.92 together with interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 29, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 21, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371107 03/23/11, 03/30, 04/06, 04/13 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3826 T.S. No.: 1286309-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Jeremy J. Koehler and Charity Koehler, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company Of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., ("mers") As Nominee For Sierra Pacific Mortgage Company, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated July 17, 2008, recorded July 23, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-30971 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 1 of partition plat no. 2004-67, filed July 30, 2004, and being a partition of parcel 1 of partition plat no. 2001-37, located in a portion of the southeast 1/4 of section 20, township 14 south, range 13 east of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 6775 NW 19th Street Terrebonne OR 97760. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,772.49 Monthly Late Charge $126.40. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $375,469.96 together with interest thereon at 7.000%

per annum from October 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 29, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 21, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371103 03/23/11, 03/30, 04/06, 04/13 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2093 T.S. No.: 1318210-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lois Macadam Lindstedt, A Single Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated June 11, 2008, recorded June 13, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-25535 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 20, copper canyon phase 2, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 19944 Brass Dr. Bend OR 97702-3089. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,564.49 Monthly Late Charge $102.15. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $307,114.46 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from September 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 13, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property

which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 07, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-373306 04/06/11, 04/13, 04/20, 04/27 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Richard Venable, as grantor to Western Title & Escrow, as Trustee, in favor of American General Financial Services (DE), Inc., as Beneficiary, dated September 23, 2005, recorded September 27, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2005, at Page 65226, as covering the following described real property: Lot 137 Ponderosa Pines First Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 14715 S. Sugar Pine Way, La Pine, OR 97739 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to sat-

isfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $994.47, from July 15, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $115,149.24, together with interest thereon at the rate of 7% per annum from June 15, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will on June 28, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually

incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 02-23-2011 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 11-106067 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Elois Arden Jewell, as grantor to First American Title Ins Co. of Oregon, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, as Beneficiary, dated November 1, 2004, recorded November 9, 2004, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2004, at Page 67245, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 15 of Negus Villas, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN

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LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION TO BID MADRAS MUNICIPAL AIRPORT HEAVY AIRCRAFT TAXIWAY AND RUNWAY RESTRIPING/NAVAID IMPROVEMENTS Sealed bids for the Madras Municipal Airport - Heavy Aircraft Taxiway and Runway Restriping/Navaid Improvements, A.I.P. Project No. 3-41-0035-007/CO-III Project No. 26910 will be received by the City of Madras (the City) at the City Hall located at 71 SE D Street, Madras, Oregon, 97741, until the bid closing time of 2:00 p.m, on the 26th day of April 2011, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. Bidders shall submit the required first-tier subcontractor disclosure form within two working hours of the bid closing time. Bidders whose bids and/or disclosure statements are received after the stated times will be considered non-responsive and their bids will not be considered. The scope of work being considered is: 1.Construction of new taxiways for use by heavy aircraft. 2.Expansion to the Apron adjacent to the FBO Building. 3.Pavement Marking for new taxiways and apron. 4.Restriping of Runway 16-34 for non-precision instrument approaches. 5.Misc. Drainage Improvements 6.Installation of Runway End Indicator Light (REIL) system for Runway 34 7.Construction of a new Medium Intensity Taxiway Lighting (MITL) system for the parallel taxi way. 8.Lighting improvements for the expanded apron. 9.Installation of an Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) The Contract Documents for the above project may be examined at the Airport FBO Office on working days, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Copies of said documents may be obtained at a cost of $60.00 per set from The City of Madras, 71 SE D Street, Madras, Oregon, 97741, telephone (541) 475-2344. Technical questions shall be directed to Bill Brackett, Century West Engineering Corporation, (541) 322-8962. Documents will promptly sent upon receipt of $60.00 per set to cover the document fee and postage/handling (The document costs also apply to Plan Centers). The cost of the documents is non-refundable, and the documents need not be returned. Contractors must be qualified in accordance with the applicable parts of ORS 279C in order to enter into a contract with the City. The City will only consider contractors who are able to demonstrate prior experience with similar work. The City may investigate to determine the qualifications of the bidders as part of the evaluation of the bids. Bidders must submit qualification statements in accordance with the terms of Subsection 20-02 of the specifications with their Proposal. Proposals submitted without qualification statements will not be accepted. The proposed contract is under and subject to Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, and to the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Federal Labor Provisions. All labor on the project shall be paid no less than the minimum wage rates established by the U.S. Secretary of Labor or The State of Oregon BOLI, whichever is greater. Each Bidder must supply all information required by the bid documents and specifications. The EEO requirements, labor provisions, and wage rates are included in the specifications and bid documents. Each Bidder must complete, sign and furnish with his bid a "Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities" and a statement entitled "Bidders Statement on Previous Contracts Subject to EEO Clause," as contained in the Bid Proposal. A contractor having 50 or more employees and his subcontractors having 50 or more employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the specifications. To be eligible for award each Bidder must comply with the affirmative action requirements which are contained in the specifications. Disadvantaged Business Enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award of any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement. This contract will be funded in part by a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration. In accordance with federal requirements, the City has determined that this contract has subcontracting possibilities and encourages the participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises as prime contractors and subcontractors. No DBE contract goal has been established for this project. The overall DBE project goal is 3.9% of the total amount bid. Based on the 9th Circuit Court Decision in Western States Paving Company v. Washington State Department of Transportation, the City has determined that it is appropriate to use a race/gender neutral goal. The City encourages all bidders to take active race/gender neutral steps to include DBE's in this contract. Race/gender neutral steps include: unbundling large contracts, subcontracting work the prime contractor may self-perform, providing bonding or financing assistance, providing technical assistance, etc. This contract can be awarded without the lowest responsive bidder meeting the goal or demonstrating good faith effort to meet the goal. Each prospective bidder is requested to attend a voluntary pre-bid meeting to be held at 2:00 p.m., local time on the 12th day of April 2011, at the airport. At this meeting, questions concerning the Contract Documents and the proposed work will be discussed. Answers and clarifications will be in the form of written addenda to the contract and will be mailed or faxed to all plan holders. Contractor licensing under ORS 468A.720 for asbestos abatement is not a requirement of this project. No bid shall be considered unless the bidder is registered with the Oregon Construction Contractors Board or licensed by the State Landscape Contractors Board as required by ORS 671.530. Proposals must be submitted on the prescribed forms and must be accompanied by certified check, cashier's check, or bid bond executed in favor of the City in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the amount bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and payment bond, each in the full amount of the contract price. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any irregularities, and to accept the bid deemed in the best interest of the City. The City may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding by the City that it is in the public interest to do so. CITY OF MADRAS

AS: 508 N.E. Negus Loop, Redmond, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $2,101.73, from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $281,271.50, together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.353% per annum from March 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee will appear on July 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continue the trustee's sale to July 15, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time

established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceed-

ing the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 03/17/11 By: /s/:Kelly D. Sutherland KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105555

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-10-410803-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TERESA MAURICE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of ASSOCIATES HOME EQUITY SERVICES, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 8/4/1998, recorded 8/10/1998, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 506-2789,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133017 LOT 45, BLOCK 8, FIRST ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21070 ROBIN AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 6/10/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $859.82 Monthly Late Charge $42.99 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $88,983.21 together with interest thereon at the rate of 9.6500 per annum from 5/10/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/29/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 7/29/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 6/29/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 03/22/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3950146 04/06/2011, 04/13/2011, 04/20/2011, 04/27/2011

Bulletin Daily Paper 04/13/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Wednesday April 13, 2011

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