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Smarter way to shop Putting apps to the test: finding the best deal • SHOPPING, E1

A sound investment Company buys VocalBooth Mobile Studio BUSINESS, B1

WEATHER TODAY

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Scattered snow showers High 44, Low 22 Page C6

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Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Redmond may create stormwater utility What a Inside

By Patrick Cliff

• Redmond City Council weighs cuts to SDCs, Page C1

REDMOND — To deal with stormwater costs, the city of Redmond may create a new utility fee over the next five years. City staff peg the increasing costs to Redmond’s recent growth, aging infrastructure and regulatory requirements dating back to

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2001. Some of those costs are coming into play because a yearslong permitting process with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality could close in the next year. If the utility fee is approved, Redmond and Bend would be the only Central Oregon cities with separate stormwater utilities. The city’s proposal calls for phased-in increases

over the next five years. Typically, Redmond increases its waste water rates — which currently cover stormwater — 3 percent each year. Under the plan, Redmond would tack on 2 percent for each of the next five years. The money would be used to start up the stormwater utility. See Redmond / A5

Bend girl to show her style to nation

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Representatives of federal agencies with operations in Central Oregon largely declined to speculate on what a possible shutdown of the federal government might mean locally. But if Congress and the president are unable to come to a decision on a continuing budget resolution funding the federal government past Friday, some offices are likely to close, and some services will be unavailable. Decisions on what government functions will be affected are made by individual agencies in consultation with the Office of Management and Budget. Local representatives of agencies, including the Department of Veterans Affairs, the U.S. Forest Service and the Internal Revenue Service, deferred questions to an OMB representative, who was unavailable late Tuesday. But a look at the guidelines ahead of a government shutdown, and at what has happened before during such an event, could provide clues to what happens locally if no agreement is reached. See Shutdown / A4

Design for bedroom leads to guest spot on TV show By Erik Hidle

As leaders spar, what’s ‘essential’ is up for debate

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I

t was a writing assignment at Cascade Middle School that turned 11-year-old Amy Daines’

spring break into a national television debut. Daines and her fellow language arts students were instructed to write a letter to a business and encouraged to mail their work. Daines has an interest in design, which she’s applying to a bedroom in the home her parents are now building. Just before the school’s winter break, she sent ideas for her new room to “The Nate Berkus Show,” a nationally syndicated daytime talk show that focuses on style and design. “I never expected we would see anything back,” said Daines’ mother, Heather. “It seemed like every day, though, that Amy would come home and ask if she had got a letter back. Then all of a sudden we got a phone call, and it was the show asking to speak to Amy.” The show had received her letter after it was forwarded and routed through other studios. Heather Daines said the show later told her they rarely get physical mail, and it was a near-miracle they actually got the letter. But when they read it they loved Amy’s enthusiasm for designing her room and wanted her to come on the show. “They called us on a Thursday, and by Sunday we were on a plane to New York for filming,” Heather Daines said. “It was spring break, so she ended up getting a pretty great opportunity to do all this.” See Design / A5

By Sheryl Gay Stolberg And Robert Pear New York Times News Service

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Amy Daines, a sixth-grader at Cascade Middle School in Bend, sits on her bed while holding plans she made for her new bedroom at her family’s home in Bend on March 20. After writing to “The Nate Berkus Show” to share her ideas and request advice on designing her new bedroom, Amy and her mother flew to New York City to be on the show. The episode in which Amy appears in scheduled to air in Bend on April 13 on ABC. To read Amy’s letter to “The Nate Berkus Show” and see photos from her trip, see Page A5.

“I don’t know exactly what I want to do when I grow up, but I do know I want to do something with design.” — Amy Daines, 11, who appeared on “The Nate Berkus Show” over spring break after writing to the show for a class writing assignment

Estrogen lowers heart, cancer risks By Tara Parker-Pope New York Times News Service

Ron Wurzer / New York Times News Service

Andrea LaCroix, a professor of epidemiology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, was the lead author of the study.

In a finding that challenges the conventional wisdom about the risks of some hormones used in menopause, a major government study has found that years after using estrogen-only therapy, certain women had a markedly reduced risk of breast cancer and heart attack. The research, part of the landmark Women’s Health Initiative study, is likely to surprise women and their doctors, who for years have heard frightening news about the risks of hormone therapy. But most of those fears are related to the use of a

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Vol. 108, No. 96, 36 pages, 6 sections

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combination of two hormones, estrogen and progestin, which are prescribed to relieve hot flashes and other symptoms of menopause, and have been shown to increase a woman’s risk of breast cancer. The new findings, reported Tuesday in The Journal of the American Medical Association, come from 10,739 women in the Women’s Health Initiative study who had previously had a hysterectomy, the surgical removal of the uterus. Nationwide, about one-third of women in their 50s have had a hysterectomy. See Estrogen / A4

Correction

INDEX

We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

shutdown could look like locally

Crossword E5, F2

Obituaries

C5

Business

B1-6

Editorial

C4

Sports

D1-6

Classified

F1-6

Horoscope

E5

Stocks

B4-5

Comics

E4-5

Movies

E3

TV listings

E2

In a story headlined “Public to be excluded from contract negotiations,” which appeared Saturday, April 2, on Page A1, the date of Bend Firefighters Association pay raises was reported incorrectly. Employees received a raise on July 1, 2010. The Bulletin regrets the error.

WASHINGTON — The National Zoo would close, but the lions and tigers will get fed; Yellowstone and other national parks will shut down. The Internal Revenue Service could stop issuing refund checks. Customs and Border Patrol agents training officials in Afghanistan might have to come home. And thousands of government-issued BlackBerries would go silent. This is what a government shutdown might look like. The reality of the first federal government shutdown in more than 15 years drew closer Tuesday as President Barack Obama and congressional leaders failed to make progress after back-to-back meetings at the White House and on Capitol Hill. Obama and Congress remained billions of dollars apart and at odds over where to find savings after an 80-minute West Wing meeting that included House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev. In the meeting, Boehner floated the possibility that he may seek as much as Inside $40 billion in cuts, • How a $7 billion more than shutdown the two sides have would affect been discussing for the past week. various Growing irked by agencies the prolonged neand services, gotiations, Obama Page A4 demanded that the congressional leaders “act like grown-ups.” “If they can’t sort it out, then I want them back here tomorrow. And if that doesn’t work, we’ll invite them again the day after that,” Obama told reporters in the press room, hours after the meeting. With budget talks between Republicans and Democrats far from resolution, official Washington braced Tuesday for a replay of the Great Government Shutdowns of 1995 and 1996. See Essential / A4

TOP NEWS INSIDE JAPAN: Plant operator says it has contained 1 radioactive leak, Page A5


A2 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGA MILLIONS The numbers drawn are:

1 19 20 31 36 9

x2

Nobody won the jackpot Tuesday night in the Mega Millions game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $30 million for Friday’s drawing.

After disaster, disposing of waste creates dilemmas Cleanup of junk ranging from ships to drugs stirs legal, ethical questions By Julie Makinen Los Angeles Times

TOKYO — For days on end, 23-year-old Hiraku Sato and a coworker toiled in their pharmacy in Tagajo City, picking through hundreds of small containers of vitamin drinks, aspirin and other medicines that were flung to the four corners of their shop when ocean waters from nearly a mile away rushed in. A 4-foot-high mound of metal shelves, broken computers and other retail detritus was still massed last week outside the store in the northeastern coastal community. But Sato, wearing a white mask and knee-high rubber boots, beamed with satisfaction at what he had organized inside: blue, green and pink baskets packed with unopened but mudcaked bottles and boxes. “I was really upset when I came here and saw the mess,” he said. But now that he’s been able to salvage a few things, he added, he could see some hope for recovery — never mind that customers might not want the dirty products, or that the street outside still looked like a total wasteland. “I don’t know when, where or how they’ll clean this up,” he sighed. In the best of times, one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. But in the wake of Japan’s March 11 earthquake and tsunami, the nation is facing complex legal, financial, logistical, environmental and ethical questions over just how to deal with at least 80 million tons of debris — from 300-ton ships and smashed cars to waterlogged heirlooms and soiled family photos. The central government said Tuesday that it would foot the bill for the cleanup; normally, it covers half of local governments’ waste disposal costs. The expense is only beginning to be tabulated, but it’s expected to far exceed the $3.2 billion required to dispose of 15 million tons of debris in Kobe after its 1995 earthquake. Still being sorted out are such nitty-gritty questions as: How long will owners of waterlogged autos — who might need their license plates to file insurance claims — be given to claim their vehicles? Can cleanup crews unilaterally bulldoze demolished structures, or do they need approval from property owners? What should be done if sentimental or valuable items are recovered amid the junk? Certain valuables already pose their own challenges. Japan SelfDefense Forces troops working in southern Miyagi prefecture reportedly came across a 45-pound safe beneath a collapsed house.

They couldn’t open it, and there was nothing on the safe to indicate where it came from. Waste management specialists are now debating whether the vast amounts of debris — called gareki in Japanese — can be tested for toxics such as asbestos, dioxins and PCBs. While the debris remains wet, asbestos can’t disperse into the air. But when the dry season arrives, dangerous particles could be inhaled. And then, of course, there are fears of radiation contamination from the quake-crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. For the time being, parks, baseball fields and stadiums are being used as temporary dumps. But longer term, there are serious questions about where in an already space-challenged island nation the trash can be disposed of.

Tabulating property wrecked in cataclysm Kazuyuki Akaishi, a waste and recycling expert at the Japan Research Institute, said estimates of the volume of tsunami and earthquake debris range from 80 million to 200 million tons; in a typical year, the entire country generates about 71 million tons of household waste, and more than 400 million tons of industrial waste, according to the Environment Ministry. Japan’s National Police Agency says 18,000 houses collapsed and that about 140,000 others were partially damaged. In Miyagi prefecture alone, an estimated 146,000 cars were destroyed and more may yet be found as tsunami-inundated areas dry out. The trash problems extend beyond the quake and tsunami zone. In Tokyo, which normally burns trash 24 hours a day, everyday garbage is piling up because post-quake power shortages have forced incinerators to curtail operations by as much as a third. Additional refuse washed out to sea and is expected to reach Hawaii in about two years and Alaska a year later, according to Nikolai Maximenko, an oceanographer at the University of Hawaii who studies ocean currents. In normal times, Japan’s meticulous approach to waste and recycling is the stuff of legend; it’s not just a matter of separating paper from plastic, or glass from aluminum — cities here publish detailed guides for properly disposing of everything from used chopsticks to lipstick. Special bags must be used. Collection schedules are strict. To ignore the rules is to risk being reprimanded by a local volunteer trash monitor, or shunned by neighbors.

But there’s no rule book for problems such as the 500,000 tons of rotting seafood in disabled port refrigeration facilities, said Masato Yamada of the National Institute for Environmental Studies, who is leading a national task force on the trash crisis. “That’s one very urgent problem,” he said last week. His panel has advised collecting the decaying seafood and dumping it at sea.

A muddy issue Recycling is further hindered because of the mud. It’s not just that things are dirty; the slop may contain toxic amounts of heavy metals from refineries, factories and other facilities smashed by the raging water. Designating new landfills may take years, Yamada said. For now, he and his colleagues are simply worried about the trash mountains that survivors are rapidly making; the heaps can ferment and catch fire. Waste collection has been slowed by the loss of garbage-collecting equipment and destruction of government infrastructure. Shinji Suda, 28, a trash collection worker in Tagajo who camped out on the upper floor of a shopping center for two days after the tsunami, said his company’s 15 garbage trucks were picked up by the wave. Only one, he said last week, had been found. Nearby, at the New Japan Compressor Co., Hiroko Yamamoto was crying as she supervised the operation of a crane lifting stray vehicles. Normally, the crane is used to haul the heavy machines the company makes. “We’ve been out rebuilding since the second or third day,” she said. “It’s in our DNA.” The central government has

started to impose some order on the process. Normal fees for scrapping household appliances such as air conditioners have been suspended until at least August. And the Justice Ministry is considering endorsing emergency regulations that would allow authorities to clear debris without first making contact with property owners. “Some property owners may sue the government, accusing it of getting rid of something that was still useful, but, oh well. The recovery effort has to come first,” said an unnamed official on a government advisory committee quoted in the Mainichi newspaper this week. Still, there is a keen sense that, with so many people having lost almost everything, a substantial effort must be made to reunite owners with certain keepsakes. Volunteers are picking through muddy flats, salvaging snapshots, diplomas and other personal effects that might lift the spirits of survivors. The government has said it will establish warehouses for things like photo albums and ihai stones — small mortuary tablets that commemorate deceased relatives and are placed on the Buddhist altar present in most Japanese homes.

We know that the heart of the home is in the kitchen. So, what better place to set up your own green headquarters? Going green at home means creating a healthier environment for your family. One of my most effective ways of getting the whole family involved in recycling is with the mobile recycling center. Since it’s on wheels, I move it from room to room to collect items that might not otherwise make it to the recycling bin. It’s the perfect chore for younger members of the family because it teaches them about all the items that can be recycled into something new. Packing waste-free lunches should be on every mom’s list. Putting lunch items in reusable containers (including reusable juice “boxes”) helps cut down on waste. Paper towels are another single-use item responsible for a lot of waste in most kitchens. Try doing without them for a week and you’ll see how easy it is. Instead of grabbing one on your way to the garbage, keep reusable dishtowels and cloth napkins handy in a drawer. Next up — those toxic cocktails you have sitting under the sink. Things like chemical cleaners, bug killers and air fresheners can actually pollute your home with toxins that are known to cause asthma and other more serious health problems. These days it’s easy to find effective and totally nontoxic products to help you clean or remove any pest or odor from your home. You can also make your own cleaners and air fresheners using two of my favorite staples — baking soda and white vinegar. Of course, we can’t forget the food when considering ways to go green in a kitchen. If you don’t have the room or time for a full-fledged garden, consider planting a small container with your favorite herbs or small veggies. Or you can support a local farm and receive freshly picked produce in exchange by joining a Community Supported Agriculture retailer. It really doesn’t have to take extra time or money to do your part at home. There are many ways you can make an even bigger difference — right from the comfort of your kitchen.

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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 A3

T S U.N.’s actions on Ivory Coast show policy shift, analysts say By Dan Bilefsky New York Times News Service

UNITED NATIONS — The unusual military strikes by the United Nations against military bases of Ivory Coast’s strongman, Laurent Gbagbo, represent a seminal moment in which an organization generally disinclined to intervene forcefully in the affairs of member states is showing a new willingness to take bold action to save lives, diplomats and analysts said. After weeks of the United Nations’ equivocating, Alain Le Roy, head of the organization’s peacekeeping operations, on Monday night framed the decision to intervene both as a moral choice and military and legal imperative: Gbagbo should be stopped from using mortars, rocket-propelled grenades and heavy machine guns against civilians and international peacekeepers. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon also said intervention was necessary to protect lives, even as he sought to emphasize that the United Nations was not a party to the conflict. While both officials stressed the encroaching urgency on the ground, U.N. diplomats and analysts said Tuesday that the organization’s intervention also was part of a fundamental political shift in which military action

Poll: Majority of Americans say action in Libya lacks clear goal By Michael Muskal Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Despite President Barack Obama’s national address on his Libya policy, an increasing percentage of Americans say the military action lacks a clear goal, according to a Pew poll released Tuesday. The national survey, by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press, found that 57 percent of Americans said the U.S. policy lacked a clear goal, up from 50 percent who said the same thing a week earlier, before the president formally addressed the nation but while the administration was making its position known. The latest poll was conducted March 30 to April 3 and involved interviews with 1,507 adults. There is a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points for the full sample. Obama took to the airwaves on March 28 to explain his Libya policy, which includes using U.S. air power as part of an international effort to protect civilians caught between rebels and strongman Moammar Gadhafi. Separate from the military action is the long-term policy of the U.S. of using peaceful means to depose Gadhafi, whom the West argues has lost any legitimacy to rule. The Obama administration has emphasized the distinction between international military policy and U.S. policy based on sanctions and other peaceful tactics. Republicans have attacked Obama, arguing that his goals have not been clear and that he acted too slowly in backing military force to help the Libyan rebels. Despite some questions about the goals, the public’s reaction to the Libyan strikes has remained constant but mixed over the weeks.

Rebecca Blackwell / The Associated Press

Issiaka Diakhite, 26, says he took up arms after his parents were killed by Laurent Gbagbo loyalists in November. Gbagbo was huddled in a bunker at his home and was exploring different options for his surrender, officials said Tuesday. against Libya — backed by two Security Council resolutions and the vocal support of the Obama administration — had provided an important spur. They said Libya had at least temporarily eclipsed some of the divisive debates of the past about whether humanitarian intervention could be viewed as a guise for imperialism. In stressing the U.N.’s supporting role, Ban chose his words carefully for fear of feeding into a claim by Gbagbo that Alassane Ouattara,

the man who beat him in elections last year and is battling to assume the presidency, is a tool of the French. “The action in the Ivory Coast was given a psychological lift by the fact that it is happening against the backdrop of Libya, and supports Mr. Obama’s narrative that intervention is justified in some cases,” said a senior U.N. diplomat close to the discussions on Ivory Coast, who requested anonymity because he is not authorized to speak on the matter.

Debris puts scare into NASA, space station By Scott Powers and Mark K. Matthews The Orlando Sentinel

ORLANDO, Fla. — A small piece of debris from an old satellite hurtling toward the International Space Station sent a scare through NASA and the three astronauts aboard the station, but the debris ultimately sailed harmlessly by. The debris, about 5 inches across, passed by the station at 4:21 p.m. EDT, missing the station by a little more than three miles, according to NASA calculations. For much of the day, as NASA tracked the space junk, the three astronauts were advised to be ready to scramble into the Soyuz capsule that’s attached to the station that could fly them back to Earth.

But the red-level alert was canceled around 3 p.m. EDT, when NASA became confident enough in the track of the debris. The astronauts on the space station are American Catherine Coleman, Italian Paulo Nespoli, and Russian Commander Dmitry Kondratyev. Despite the scare, the incident was considered fairly routine. NASA begins preparing for action any time a piece of space junk appears likely to pass close to the space station, which happens fairly regularly. Usually the alert is dropped as the debris gets close enough for NASA to project an exact path, and determines it’s going to miss. The last time debris got close enough to force an evacuation was in 2009.

Wisconsin election testing GOP’s power is a nail-biter By Nicholas Riccardi Los Angeles Times

A normally humdrum Wisconsin election that became a referendum on Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s battle against public employee unions was too close to call Tuesday night, as Democrats tried to oust a conservative state Supreme Court justice and shift the balance of power in the state. With 97 percent of the precincts reporting, Justice David Prosser and his challenger, Assistant Attorney General JoAnne Kloppenburg, were in a virtual dead heat. The winner was not expected to be known before Wednesday, if then. More than $3 million in outside money poured into the technically nonpartisan con-

test, which became especially contentious after the Legislature passed Walker’s labor bill in March. In a sign of how heated the reelection campaign became for Prosser, who was seeking his second 10-year term, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin weighed in on his behalf and national “tea party” groups ran ads attacking Kloppenburg as anti-business. The last time Prosser ran, he was unopposed. Prosser’s campaign had vowed last year that he would be a “complement” to Walker and the newly elected Republican legislative majority. But that was before Walker proposed curtailing collective bargaining rights for most public workers in Wisconsin.

High court restores death sentence for brain-damaged man By David Savage McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Supreme Court restored a death sentence for a Los Angeles murderer Monday, despite evidence that he suffered severe brain damage as a child. Scott Pinholster stabbed two men to death in a drug robbery gone bad nearly 30 years ago. He was also an epileptic who had suffered blows to the head in

two auto accidents. His mother backed her car into him when he was just 2, and his head slammed into the windshield during another accident a year or two later. By age 10, he was having outbursts at school. At 11, he was sent to a mental institution. This evidence of brain trauma did not figure significantly in Pinholster’s trial in 1984, however. His lawyer did not bring a mental health expert to court to

try to persuade the jury to sentence his client to life in prison rather than death. The lone defense witness was his mother, who described the accidents and his troubles in school. Most of the testimony about his brain damage came nearly 15 years later in a federal court hearing in Los Angeles. That testimony prompted a federal judge and the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse the death sentence.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Odd challenge for Detroit planners: how to shrink a city By Monica Davey New York Times News Service

DETROIT — When Marja M. Winters was studying urban planning, she learned the art and science of helping cities grow. Now Winters, a native of Detroit and the deputy director of the city’s planning and development department, finds herself in an unexpected role: sorting out how to help her hometown shrink, by working through difficult decisions that will determine which neighborhoods can be saved and which cannot. “It was always this notion that

the population of the world continues to grow, and more and more people want to live in cities,” Winters, 33. “The reality is very different. Who knew?” Mayor Dave Bing has made it a top priority to deal with Detroit’s fast-sinking population and crumbling infrastructure by steering those who remain into fewer neighborhoods, rather than leaving them scattered throughout the 139-square-mile city, whose boundaries made more sense when twice as many people lived here 40 years ago. Carrying out such an effort

in a city as vast as Detroit is like solving a complicated set of interwoven puzzles: How to reconfigure roads, bus lines, police districts; how to encourage people — there is no power of eminent domain to force them — to move out of the worst neighborhoods and into better ones? Later this month, a team that includes Winters is expected to present a proposed — and certain to be highly controversial — map to guide investment in each of the city’s neighborhoods. A final plan for a remade city is expected by year’s end.

Essential Continued from A1 For weeks, the Obama administration has been quietly examining the experience of the mid1990s as a kind of shutdown survival guide. Now those preparations have kicked into high gear. The White House Office of Management and Budget directed the heads of federal agencies late Monday to share contingency plans with senior managers. On Capitol Hill, the chairman of the House Committee on Administration warned “nonessential employees” Tuesday to turn off their BlackBerries during a shutdown, or risk punishment for working while on furlough. And at the Smithsonian Institution, employees were preparing for a lot of disappointed tourists. The 1995 and 1996 shutdowns occurred in the dead of winter. Now it is spring break; Linda St. Thomas, a spokeswoman, said the Smithsonian has already sold 23,000 advance tickets for cafeteria meals and Imax movies in April. Her staff was prepared to print “Closed Due to Government Shutdown” signs to tape to glass windows in their museums. “I got a call yesterday from a woman in Cincinnati; she was bringing a big family, two cars, they were going to drive in from Ohio on Friday,” St. Thomas said. “She wanted to know, what should she do? I said, ‘I don’t know.’” In any shutdown, the government does not completely cease functioning, of course. Activities that are essential to national security, like military operations, can continue. Air traffic control and other public safety functions are exempt from shutdowns. Federal prisons still operate; law enforcement and criminal investigations can continue. Employees deemed essential to the functioning of government can come to work. (In ego-driven Washington, a federal shutdown forces high-powered workers to confront their self worth. Many federal officials insisted on showing up in previous shutdowns, apparently unable to come to grips with idea they might not be considered vital.) During the shutdowns of 1995 and 1996, cleanup work on toxic waste sites was halted because contractors could not be paid and Environmental Protection Agency officials could not monitor cleanup work. Work on more than 3,500 bankruptcy cases was suspended, and the government took a break from going after deadbeat dads. Tens of thousands of passport and visa applications went unprocessed. Yet in preparation for a possible shutdown of 2011, officials have discovered that the lessons of more than a decade ago are

Shutdown Continued from A1 Guidelines for a possible shutdown published by the Congressional Research Office identify some employees as “essential” and thus required to report to work during any shutdown. Essential employees include military personnel, federal law enforcement and federal prison employees, and those who provide direct medical care or ensure the continued operation of transportation or power systems. Since 1977, portions of the federal government have been shut down 17 times when Congress and the president have failed to come to agreement on budgetary matters. During the last shutdown — five days in November 1995 and another 21 between mid-December and early January 1996 — various offices were fully or partially closed in Central Oregon. The Social Security and IRS offices in Bend were closed. Tax audits were delayed, and new Social Security applications were not processed, but Social Security checks were mailed on schedule.

J. Scott Applewhite / The Associated Press

Following a meeting with President Barack Obama Tuesday, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and House Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., talk about the budget.

• 368 National Park Service sites closed (loss Parks, museums of 7 million visitors); museums, monuments closed (loss of 2 million visitors)

Visas, passports • About 20,000 foreign visa applications per day not processed • 200,000 U.S. passport applications not processed; U.S. tourism, airlines suffered major losses

When there’s a shutdown

Military veterans • Services curtailed

The federal government could shut down if Congress is unable to reach a compromise to fund the government beyond Friday, April 8. Examples of services affected in 1996 during a 21-day government shutdown:

Federal contractors • About $3.7 billion in Washington, D.C.area contracts affected • Workers furloughed without pay

Law enforcement

Health

• Delays in processing alcohol, tobacco, firearms and explosives applications • Work on 3,500 bankruptcy cases suspended • Recruitment of federal law enforcement officers stopped

• Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stopped disease surveillance • Toxic waste cleanup at 609 sites stopped; 2,400 Superfund workers sent home • No new patients accepted for clinical research at National Institutes of Health Source: Congressional Research Service

© 2011 MCT

Judy Treible, Melina Yingling / McClatchy-Tribune News Service

not always relevant. An entire federal agency, the Department of Homeland Security, has come into existence since then. Most of its employees would continue working at airports, borders and seaports as usual, but many managers at headquarters would be temporarily out of work, a federal official said. The government is much more heavily involved in the mortgage lending market today than in

the mid-1990s, and officials are deeply concerned about the economic fallout should the Federal Housing Administration stop guaranteeing loans. Yet Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, although government-owned, would continue to operate. Officials are also concerned about unemployment benefits, paid jointly by the federal government and states. In 1995, with the jobless rate at 5.6 percent,

Bureau of Land Management offices were largely closed, and grazing and mining claims were not processed. Timber sale administrators with the BLM remained on duty. Crater Lake National Park closed, initially shutting down the visitors center and later barring all visitors. Most employees of the Ochoco and Deschutes National Forests were put on furlough during the shutdown. Wood-cutting permits, including Christmas tree permits, were not available during the closure, but the agency’s law enforcement and forest protection employees remained on the job. At a Forest Service site near Crescent that was unstaffed during the shutdown, employees returning to work in early January discovered more than $40,000 in equipment had disappeared, in-

cluding a pickup, four snowmobiles, two four-wheel ATVs and two snowmobile trailers. Most of the property was later recovered. Essential employees who continued working during the shutdown in late 1995 and early 1996 did so without pay, but were later paid. The U.S. Post Office spokesman Peter Hass said because the Post Office receives no government funding, it is unaffected by government shutdowns. Andrew Whelan, spokesman for Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, said House Republicans are “doing all they can to avoid a shutdown,” and are continuing negotiations with the president and the Democratic-controlled Senate. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

Contact your public officials Find an easily searchable list of contact information for federal, state, legislative, county and city officials at www.bendbulletin.com/officials.

The Bulletin

Detroit is already shrinking on its own, of course. Recent Census figures show the city, once the nation’s fourth largest, lost a quarter of its population in the past decade, leaving it with fewer than 714,000 people. But the losses have been spread around the city rather than cropping up in consolidated chunks on the city edges, leaving a more vibrant core. For their part, city officials say the police and firefighters will always serve all Detroit neighborhoods — even ones where only a few people may be left.

states were able to draw on their trust funds to pay the federal portion. Today, many state funds are borrowing from the federal government. And the growth of the Internet is another big change in the bureaucratic landscape, creating entirely new questions for policymakers to contend with. “We realized that the world was a very different place in 1995 than now,” said one official familiar with the planning, who insisted on anonymity to speak candidly about it. “In 1995, you really didn’t have the question of: Are websites essential? Is email essential? What do you do about people’s BlackBerries? Is a Twitter feed an essential way of communicating? None of that existed. These are all legal questions to figure out.” Much would depend on how long a shutdown lasts. (The longest previous episode ran three weeks.) At the federal courts, officials said they could continue operations for 10 days to two weeks, using money from fees paid by people who have filed civil suits. “After that, who knows?” said Karen Redmond, a spokeswoman for the Administrative Office of the United States Courts. One key question is whether federal employees — the government workforce includes more than 1.9 million civilian workers — would be compensated in the event of a shutdown. Most of those workers are deemed nonessential, but federal officials have not provided an estimate of the number. John Berry, director of the Office of Personnel Management, posted information on the agency’s website Tuesday night saying that “federal agencies do not have the authority to pay their employees during a shutdown.” Congress, he said, would decide whether to pay employees who are furloughed. In the past, Congress often provided such pay, but the political climate now is different, and lawmakers might be less willing to do so. Members of Congress and White House officials have broad discretion about whether to declare their employees essential. In previous shutdowns, most worked with skeleton crews. The chairman of the Committee on House Administration, Rep. Dan Lungren, R.-Calif., sent detailed guidance Tuesday to all House members and offices on what they could and could not do during a government shutdown. A sample letter he provided warned: “Working in any way during a period of furlough, even as a volunteer, is grounds for disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment. To avoid violating this prohibition, we strongly recommend that you turn your BlackBerries off for the duration of the furlough.”

Estrogen Continued from A1 The Women’s Health Initiative was begun in 1991 by the National Institutes of Health as a sweeping investigation of hormone use and other health issues of postmenopausal women. While most women in the hormone study were taking combination hormone therapy, women without a uterus took estrogen alone or a placebo for about six years and were followed for nearly 11 years. The estrogen-only group was not given progestin, which is prescribed only to protect the uterus from the harmful effects of estrogen. Although all the women in the estrogen study stopped using the treatment in 2004, the investigators have continued to monitor their health, as is typical in large clinical trials. The most surprising new finding relates to breast cancer. The women with hysterectomies who used estrogen alone had a 23 percent lower risk for breast cancer compared with those who had taken a placebo. This is in stark contrast to the higher risk of breast cancer shown in the estrogen-progestin part of the trial. “The decreased risk of breast cancer in this group is something we totally didn’t expect when we started the WHI hormone therapy trials,” said Andrea LaCroix, the study’s lead author and a professor of epidemiology at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. “This study differentiates estrogen alone from estrogen and progestin in a very big way. I hope it gets across to women, because we are not reversing ourselves.” Indeed, the investigators emphasized that the results do not change recommendations concerning combination hormone therapy for the two-thirds of menopausal women who still have a uterus. The Women’s Health Initiative data have consistently shown that the combination of estrogen and progestin raises breast cancer risk, and that the treatment should be used only to relieve severe menopause symptoms, using the lowest dose for the shortest possible time. But the data are reassuring for millions of middle-aged women without a uterus who take estrogen to relieve hot flashes and other menopause symptoms. An accompanying editorial in the journal was skeptical about the results, arguing that the design of the Women’s Health Initiative, which is skewed toward older women and stopped all forms of hormone treatment after several years of use, does not match the way doctors typically prescribe treatment to women in their 50s at the onset of menopause. Dr. Graham Colditz, an author of the editorial and professor of surgery at Washington

University School of Medicine in St. Louis, said he thought data collected from observational studies that show a higher risk of breast cancer associated with estrogen use were more reliable than the data gathered from the Women’s Health Initiative clinical trial. “The finding doesn’t reflect how hormones are used in the U.S. at the moment,” Colditz said. The trial has, however, been held up for years as the gold standard for medical research, and its findings linking combination hormones to breast cancer and heart problems led to significant changes in the way doctors around the world treated menopause. A major caveat in interpreting the new estrogen data is that the study used conjugated equine estrogens, which are estrogen compounds derived from the urine of pregnant mares and marketed by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals under the brand Premarin. The brand has fallen out of favor with many women who are choosing treatments that contain estradiol, which is chemically similar to a woman’s natural estrogen. It is not known whether the benefits of estrogen shown in the Women’s Health Initiative would be replicated using a different type of estrogen. Nobody knows why estrogen treatment alone appeared to lower breast cancer risk in the study, but one explanation may be that in menopausal women with low levels of natural estrogen, the effects of estrogen drugs induce cell death in existing tumors. Nobody is suggesting that women start using estrogen to prevent breast cancer, but the finding opens a potentially new avenue of research in the prevention of the disease. “We need to look closely at these findings to see if we can learn more about ways to prevent breast cancer in women,” said Dr. JoAnn Manson, a Women’s Health Initiative investigator and an author of the study. Dr. Rowan Chlebowski, another author of the study and a medical oncologist at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute, said the findings underscored the fact that the risks and benefits of menopause hormones change depending on a woman’s health status, her age and the type of hormone used. Chlebowski previously led research that showed cancer risks associated with combination hormone therapy, but he says the new data on estrogen alone show that in certain women, estrogen use to relieve menopausal symptoms is a “good choice. “When you look at the debate, people are saying hormones are good or not good — it’s been all or nothing. This calls attention to the fact that there are differences,” Chlebowski said. “I hope that separation will become clearer now.”

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 A5

JAPAN’S NUCLEAR CRISIS

Operator says it has contained one leak By Kenji Hall and Julie Makinen Los Angeles Times

Submitted photos

For a writing assignment in her sixth-grade class at Cascade Middle School, Amy Daines, 11, of Bend, wrote a letter to “The Nate Berkus Show” (far left), detailing her plans for designing her new bedroom and asking for advice. Producers asked her to appear on the show. Over spring break, Amy and her mother, Heather, flew to New York City, visited CBS Studios (above) and met Nate Berkus (left). “He was super nice to me,” Amy said.

Design Continued from A1 In her letter, Amy Daines describes how thoroughly she has thought out the design for her room. She knows she wants to appreciate the space not only as an 11-year-old, but also as a 17-year-old. She also knows it will have to be appropriate for guests, as her room is where her

grandparents stay when they visit. “Nate asked me a bunch of questions about what I wanted in my dream room when I went on to talk to him,” Amy Daines said. “It was really fun to be there and to talk to Nate. He was super nice to me.” Amy Daines said she was treated to first-class amenities such as access to the celebrity green room, professional makeup and her choice of food as she

waited to go on the air. She also got to see what television looks like from the other side. “The producers told me when I went on stage I couldn’t look at anything in the crowd or anywhere else,” she said. “I was supposed to just look at Nate. They wanted us to act like we were just having a conversation. It wasn’t scary, though. It was really fun.” The Daines family signed a

contract at the end of the day saying they wouldn’t reveal anything specific about the show, but from their description of events it sounds like Berkus had a surprise of sorts ready for the girl’s appearance. “Let’s just say it was a really good day for Amy,” Heather Daines said. But the ultimate gift might have been a reinforcing of a young girl’s future. “I don’t know exactly what

I want to do when I grow up,” Amy Daines said, “but I do know I want to do something with design.” In Bend, The Nate Berkus Show airs on KOHD at both 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. weekdays. The show in which Amy Daines appears is currently scheduled to air on April 13. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Iceland seeks to become sanctuary for free speech By Henry Chu Los Angeles Times

REYKJAVIK, Iceland — Got a hard-hitting investigative story but can’t get it past government censors at home? Publish it in Iceland instead. What about a website featuring classified, inflammatory or potentially libelous material? Park it on an Internet server here, without fear of legal harassment or official pressure to reveal your sources. Lawmakers here have given the go-ahead to an ambitious plan to turn this unassuming island in the North Atlantic into an international sanctuary for free speech, putting Iceland at the leading edge of media openness but also pushing it into uncharted territory. The goal, supporters say, is to promote transparency not only in Iceland but also across an increasingly interconnected world. “We should try to push the boundaries as far as we can,” said Robert Marshall, a member of the Althingi, the world’s oldest parliament, which is trying to reinvent Iceland after its humiliating economic meltdown 2½ years ago. “We basically want to go as far as we can possibly go to create an environment for journalists to work in and to protect freedom of expression.” It’s an almost utopian vision of the free flow of information, one that in many ways resembles the philosophy of WikiLeaks, the whistle-blowing website. And no

Redmond Continued from A1 Next year, the residential rates would increase from $30.75 to $32.29, with 62 cents being saved for storm water costs. After the fifth year of increases the rates would be divided, with $35.85 going to wastewater and $3.40 to storm water. City staff are aware Redmond residents are probably in no mood for new fees. But the increase is needed, said Public Works Director Chris Doty, who described the plan during a Redmond City Council meeting Tuesday. “Wastewater was never intended to pay for stormwater,” Doty said. “Stormwater has been kind of an addition to that.” With the city’s growth since 2001, Redmond has seen a 118 percent increase in underground injection control devices, or UICs, which include dry wells and drill holes that handle stormwater. Redmond now has 1,689 UICs. In addition, some of the city’s storm water infrastructure is old and needs increased maintenance to address problems like crumbling

wonder: Among those consulted by lawmakers crafting the Icelandic Modern Media Initiative was Julian Assange, WikiLeaks’ controversial founder. But as Assange himself has discovered, even the best of intentions can have unintended, and sometimes unwelcome, consequences. Government lawyers and analysts charged with figuring out how to turn the initiative into law are facing a series of knotty questions, especially those touching on national security. If a Chinese journalist wanted to publish an investigation into corruption among top political leaders, or if Falun Gong, the meditation sect banned by Beijing, decided to base its website in Iceland, might that not expose Reykjavik to China’s displeasure or even provoke cyber-attacks and infiltration by Chinese spies? “The security of Iceland’s national interests could be at risk,” said Jon Vilberg Gudjonsson, director of legal affairs for the Education Ministry, which has been charged with fleshing out the initiative. “Will that change our foreign relations?” Or say that al-Qaida terrorists orchestrate a deadly attack on Los Angeles using emails sent through Icelandic Internet servers. The new initiative demands that Icelandic authorities keep IP addresses and communica-

tion logs secret, as part of its protections of free speech and privacy. How would the U.S., a fellow member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, react to a rebuff to a request for such information? “We can’t just say we are not bound by legal obligations or international law,” said Elfa Yr Gylfadottir, a spokeswoman for the Education Ministry. “It just doesn’t work that way.” Also unclear in Parliament’s resolution, she said, is how — or if — authorities here could hold accountable groups in faraway countries that use Iceland as a long-distance megaphone to spew ideologies of hate and violence. “Who will be responsible under Icelandic law?” Gylfadottir said. “Because rights only come with responsibility, and the responsibility part of the resolution is still to be decided.” In all, 13 existing statutes will have to be amended to turn the media initiative into reality. Gudjonsson said it could take another year for his team to put together a legislative package before lawmakers. The idea of setting up Iceland as a media and free speech sanctuary was born of the island’s spectacular economic crash at the end of 2008, when highly over-leveraged Icelandic banks collapsed during the global financial meltdown and the country nearly went bankrupt.

dry wells. Both the new and old infrastructure fall under the DEQ rules, revised in 2001. Those rules cover several areas, including a UIC’s proximity to drinking water supplies and whether or not it contaminates groundwater. Redmond staff does not have an exact estimate for how much the regulatory issues could cost the city. But depending on a UIC’s location, fixing compliance problems can cost anywhere from $10,000 to $500,000, according to Shannon Taylor, the city’s waste water division manager. Taylor estimates there are about 250 UICs in the city that violate one rule or another. Taylor does not expect the city to have to fix each of those wells, though. If a UIC violates a rule but is deemed safe, it may require only a low-cost fix. “It would be my hope that we would ... be limited in the number of retrofits required,” Taylor said. City Councilor Ed Boero pushed staff to find other ways to fund storm water projects. “You know, I looked at this thing, and it’s about a 30 percent increase from what (people) are

paying today,” Boero said. “That seems like a lot of money. I’m just wondering if there’s another way to get there. That’s a huge increase.” Councilor Camden King also said the new fee comes at a difficult economic time, but argued the city was avoiding a larger onetime impact with its approach. “There’s a need for these (fees),” King said. “I applaud the staff for getting out in front of this and trying to make it as palatable as possible.” Doty agreed the economy makes now a difficult time to launch a new fee. City staff, Doty said, designed the five-year phase-in approach to ease the pain of an increase. The plan is not certain yet and won’t be until the council passes the 2011-12 budget by early summer. The council can remove the increase during budget deliberations this spring, Doty said. “It’s there and it can be simply cleaved if that’s not what we want to do,” he said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

There’s a widespread sense here that journalists bear partial blame for what happened by not questioning their country’s rapid economic expansion or digging for signs of malfeasance. “The basic principle of following the money wasn’t being done,”

said lawmaker Marshall, himself a former journalist. “We had companies that were doing extremely well, we had Icelandic businessmen buying whole streets in London, and nobody was (looking) into ‘How are they doing this? ... It was our downfall.”

TOKYO — The operator of Japan’s stricken nuclear plant reported today that it had apparently contained a leak that had been allowing radiation to seep into the sea. Tokyo Electric Power Co. had said Tuesday that it had found iodine-131 at 7.5 million times the legal limit in a seawater sample taken earlier near the facility, and government officials instituted a health limit for radioactivity in fish. Other samples were found to contain radioactive cesium at 1.1 million times the legal limit. The exact cause of the radiation was not immediately clear, though Tepco has said that highly contaminated water has been leaking from a pit near the No. 2 reactor. The utility had suspected the leak was coming from a crack, but several attempts to seal the crack failed to stop the flow. Then the company said Tuesday the leak instead might be coming from a faulty joint where the pit meets a duct, allowing radioactive water to seep into a layer of gravel underneath. The utility injected “liquid glass” into the gravel, and on Wednesday officials were reporting that the leak had been contained. Meanwhile, Tepco continued releasing what it described as water contaminated with low levels of radiation into the sea to make room in onsite storage tanks for more highly contaminated water. In all, the company said it planned to release 11,500 tons of the water, but by Tuesday morning it had released less than 25 percent of that amount. The government authorized the release of the 11,500 tons and has said that any radiation would be quickly diluted.


N A T ION / WOR L D

A6 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

W  B

Storms wreak havoc on South By Stephen Ceasar Los Angeles Times

Photos offer evidence of abuse by Gadhafi ZAWIYAH, Libya — In the second-floor office of a burnedout police station here, the photographs strewn across the floor spun out the stories of the unlucky prisoners who fell into the custody of the brutal government of Moammar Gadhafi. Some depicted corpses bearing the marks of torture. One showed scars down the back of a man dressed only in his underwear, another a naked man face down under a sheet with his hands bound. The faces of the dead bore expressions of horror. Other pictures showed puddles of blood, a table of jars, bottles and powders and, in one, a long saw. In a labyrinthine basement, workers were clearing out burned books and files. One room contained a two-liter bottle of gin. Gesturing into another room that was kept dark, a worker mimicked a gun with his hands and murmured “Gadhafi,” suggesting it was an execution chamber. Journalists discovered the photographs and records on an official trip to this devastated city, where Gadhafi forces battled rebels for nearly a week to retake control..

Gunfire erupts during new clashes in Yemen SANAA, Yemen — Security forces and armed men in civilian clothes clashed with antigovernment demonstrators in the city of Taiz on Tuesday, opening fire on crowds calling for President Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down, witnesses said. It was the third straight day of violence in Taiz, where more than 10 protesters were killed by gunfire on Monday. Boshra al-Maqtari, one of the protest leaders, said that at least 20 people were wounded by gunfire on Tuesday, but that there had been no deaths. The clashes began in roughly the same area of the city where the protesters were killed on Monday, the deadliest day so far in six weeks of demonstrations demanding the immediate ouster of Saleh. Gunfire also erupted in Sanaa, the capital, near the headquarters of Maj. Gen. Ali Mohsin al-Ahmar, a top military leader who broke with Saleh last month to support the antigovernment demonstrators.

A powerful system of tornadoes, hailstorms and lightning pounded the South, killing at least 8 people in the region and leaving a wake of uprooted trees, downed power lines and damaged homes. The storms swept quickly through northeast Texas and Oklahoma and rolled into the South on Monday and early Tuesday, hitting Georgia and the Carolinas. The system was expected to pass through Florida and into the Atlantic Ocean by Tuesday evening, according to the National Weather Service. At least six people were killed in Georgia, including a 3-year-old child and his father who died after a tree fell into their home in Butts County. In rural Dodge County, a 45year-old man was found dead under rubble after a mobile home was lifted and thrown off its foundation by powerful winds, officials said. In Tennessee, an 87-yearold Memphis man was found dead after he was electrocuted outside of his home by a toppled power line, officials said. In Mississippi, a 20-yearold man was killed when his car struck a tree that had been knocked down across a road.

By Nicole Ostrow Bloomberg News

Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post

Wendi Lehman, of Jacksonville, heads for cover after visiting the Midtown Beach in Palm Beach, Fla., on Tuesday. A strong storm system wreaked havoc on the South Tuesday, killing at least 9 people. The National Weather Service is investigating about two dozen reports of tornadoes throughout the region and received more than 900 reports of wind damage, said Tom Bradshaw, a meteorologist with the agency.

“This is a typical severe spring weather outbreak,” Bradshaw said. “What’s fortunate is that we haven’t had any very strong tornadoes with this particular system.” In Georgia, roads across the

Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Children and teens exposed to secondhand smoke are more likely to develop symptoms for a variety of mental health problems, including major depressive disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and others, according to a study published in Tuesday’s edition of the journal Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

At this point, it should come as no surprise to anyone that exposure to tobacco smoke is unhealthy. Plenty of studies have linked secondhand smoke to respiratory problems, asthma, sudden infant death syndrome, middle ear infections and other physical health problems. But the link between secondhand smoke and mental health has not been examined as closely. The new study is believed to be the first that looks at how

secondhand smoke exposure — as measured by the presence of a nicotine metabolite in the blood — is associated with mental health in a nationally representative sample of American kids and teens. Researchers from the National Institutes of Health, the University of Miami and Legacy, the nonprofit that fights tobacco use, used data on 2,901 youths who were between the ages of 8 and 15 when they were part of the

2 arrested as Britain revives hacking case LONDON — Scotland Yard said Tuesday that two journalists had been arrested, questioned and released on bail in the renewed inquiry into a five-year-old case involving illegal hacking of celebrity voice mail by The News of the World, the gossip-driven tabloid owned by Rupert Murdoch that is one of Britain’s most widely circulated newspapers. The two men were “arrested on suspicion of unlawfully intercepting mobile phone voice-mail messages,” according to a police statement, which did not name the reporters because they had not been charged. A person familiar with the investigation, who spoke on the condition of anonymity as he was not authorized to discuss the matter, identified them as Ian Edmondson, who was fired as the tabloid’s news editor this year, and Neville Thurlbeck, the paper’s chief reporter. The investigation has been under way since 2006, when a Scotland Yard inquiry into complaints by three members of Britain’s royal household, including Prince William and Prince Harry, uncovered a pattern of illegal hacking into the princes’ cellphone messages. Two men were jailed in the case in 2007.

U.S. diplomat expelled over WikiLeaks cable MEDELLIN, Colombia — Ecuador’s government said Tuesday that it was expelling the U.S. ambassador, Heather M. Hodges, over comments made public in a diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks in which Hodges referred to high-level police corruption in Ecuador and possible knowledge of it by the president. The expulsion of Hodges by President Rafael Correa’s government made her the latest diplomatic casualty of WikiLeaks revelations in Latin America. Carlos Pascual, the former U.S. envoy to Mexico who resigned last month, was not technically expelled but was forced out as a result of exposure by WikiLeaks. — From wire reports

state remained closed, blocked by downed power lines and toppled trees. State officials on Tuesday began surveying the aftermath of the storms, with nearly half of Georgia’s counties reporting damage.

Secondhand smoke affects kids’ brains as well as bodies By Karen Kaplan

BEND

RIVER

Working overtime is a heart risk, study finds

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National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2001 to 2004. As part of the study, the kids were asked to provide blood samples; those who were exposed to secondhand smoke had higher levels of the cotinine, which is produced as the body metabolizes nicotine. The kids were also assessed for a variety of mental health disorders as defined by the National Institute of Mental Health’s Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV.

Working overtime may be a killer, according to research that finds long hours on the job is a heart risk along with smoking, bad cholesterol and high blood pressure. Adults who worked 11 hours a day or more had a 67 percent higher risk of developing coronary heart disease than those who worked an eighthour shift, a study Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine found. The researchers found that by adding working hours to a standard heart risk assessment model, they could increase the accuracy of heart disease predictions by 5 percent. Because working long hours is common and on the rise in developed countries, the study may have implications for doctors when it comes to advising patients on their health, lead researcher Mika Kivimaki said. Heart disease is the nation’s leading killer for women and men, according to the National Institutes of Health. “Current evidence on coronary heart disease prevention emphasizes the importance of focusing on the total risk rather than single risk factors,” Kivimaki, a professor at University College London, said Friday in an email. “People who work long hours should be particularly careful in following healthy diets, exercising sufficiently and keeping their blood pressure, cholesterol levels and blood glucose within healthy limits.” If the findings are confirmed in other trials, doctors will have another tool to help them determine who is at greater risk for heart disease, Kivimaki said.


B

At Work Tackling long-term unemployment, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF U.S. Cellular to offer smartphone class U.S. Cellular will offer a free workshop on smartphones and their features Thursday morning at its store on Bend’s north side. Employees will explain various functions of BlackBerry, Android- and Windows-powered devices, according to a news release from U.S. Cellular. Smartphones provide e-mail access, Web browsing and other features. The workshop, one in a series offered monthly at U.S. Cellular stores across the state, will be held from 8:30-10 a.m. at 3197 N. U.S. Highway 97, the news release stated. Participants do not have to be U.S. Cellular customers. Registration is not required, but the company asks participants to contact the store at 541-3850853, according to the release.

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Restaurants, countries tighten approaches to radiation in food Chefs buying devices for testing; agencies add import restrictions

Sous chef Eric Fricker, of La Bernadin restaurant in New York, checks Black Sea bass for radiation before it will be served at the restaurant.

By William Neuman and Florence Fabricant New York Times News Service

Eric Ripert, the chef of Le Bernardin, the high temple of seafood in Manhattan, bought a new kitchen gadget a few days ago: a radiation detector. “I just want to make sure whatever we use is safe,” said Ripert, whose staff is using the device to screen every item of food that enters the restaurant, regardless of its origin. He has also stopped buying fish from Japan, which means no high-quality, farm-raised hamachi and kampachi for raw seafood dishes. “Nobody knows how the currents will carry the contaminated water,” he said. Despite assurances by health officials that radiation from the stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power

B

Librado Romero New York Times News Service

plant in Japan is unlikely to show up in the food supply, worries about contaminated foods are growing among consumers, businesses and governments worldwide. On Tuesday, the Japanese government announced new radiation standards for fish after high levels of radioactive iodine and cesium were found in fish caught halfway between the reactor site and Tokyo. In response, the European Union said it would tighten its own radia-

tion limits for Japanese food imports. India said it would ban all food from Japan for at least three months. In the United States, where about 4 percent of food imports come from Japan, the Food and Drug Administration has restricted some foods from the country. And the agency is working with customs officials to screen incoming fish and other food for traces of radiation. See Radiation / B5

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Only surprise in plane crack was timing, Boeing says By Bob Cox McClatchy-Tribune News Service

FORT WORTH, Texas — Boeing Co. officials say they are concerned and surprised that the aluminum skin of a Southwest Airlines 737 ripped open 34,000 feet above Arizona, but the only thing really surprising about the problem was when it occurred. A senior Boeing engineer told reporters Tuesday that the company expected cracks to develop eventually in latter versions of the 737 “classic” aircraft series — just not until much later in their useful lives. “We are all concerned about this recent development,” said Paul Richter, chief engineer for Boeing aircraft models that are no longer in production, speaking in a conference call. The Federal Aviation Administration, acting on Boeing’s recommendations, issued an emergency order for airlines to almost immediately inspect and test older 737s. The tests require mechanics to run electricity between probes inserted in rivet holes to detect microscopic cracks in the aluminum skin. The invisible subsurface cracks begin inside drilled rivet holes. See Planes / B5

Congress votes to repeal tax rule WASHINGTON — Congress sent the White House its first rollback of last year’s health care law Tuesday, a bipartisan repeal of a burdensome tax reporting requirement that’s widely unpopular with businesses. Even President Barack Obama is eager to see it gone. The Senate voted 87 to 12 to repeal the filing requirement, which would have forced millions of businesses to file tax forms for every vendor selling them more than $600 in goods each year, starting in 2012. The filing requirement is unrelated to health care. However, it would have been used to pay for part of the new health law.

Google may come under FTC scrutiny Google Inc. may become the subject of an additional investigation into its dominance of the online search market, according to a report published Tuesday. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission is considering opening an investigation of Google, according to a Bloomberg News report, though the FTC is waiting to see first whether the Justice Department will challenge the Mountain View, Calif.-based company’s purchase of ITA Software. Depending on the DOJ’s decision, either regulator may seek to lead the broader probe of Google’s search business, according to the report. — From staff and wire reports

Auto sales gaining strength U.S. sales of new cars and trucks rose in March, helped by a brighter jobs outlook and rising sales of fuel-efficient vehicles.

Monthly light vehicles sales March 2011 1.25 million

1.5

1.2

0.9

Germany arrests six in euro fraud ring By Jack Ewing

Illustration courtesy of VocalBooth

New York Times News Service

An example of a VB Mobile Studio, a recording studio on wheels, made by Bend-based VocalBooth. The company recently delivered its first mobile studio.

Recording studios on wheels VocalBooth delivers its first mobile unit, one of several recent changes for company By Tim Doran The Bulletin

V

ocalBooth, the Bend company that made sound booths more portable, recently put the whole recording studio on wheels, delivering its first VB Mobile Studio to a consumer products company. While confidentiality agreements prevent VocalBooth management from naming the company, the customized 30-foot trailer with two complete recording studios will help create a marketing campaign, according to a VocalBooth news release. “It’s exciting,” Jennifer Matthey, vice president of marketing, said Tuesday. “We’ve known that this is a real viable product. We just needed the right client to say yes.” Announced in 2009, the Mobile Studio can be ordered in several sizes, from trailer models pulled by tour

buses up to a 53-foot model housed on an 18-wheel tractor-trailor. They all come with performance space and control rooms, and the big one includes a restroom, minibar and lounge. The Mobile Studio represents one of the recent changes for the company that began making its soundproof, modular recording booths in Bend in 1997. Booths start at 4 feet by 4 feet, with single-wall design, lights, fan and connections, and continue up to 16 feet by 16 feet, with double-walled construction and sub flooring. Employees build them to customer specifications. Prices start around $3,500 and can climb skyward, depending on customization, said Jay Riker, chief operating officer. First-quarter sales in 2011 increased about 25 percent, year over year, Riker said. See VocalBooth / B2

Courtesy of VocalBooth

The interior of a VocalBooth has material to isolate sound and can be outfitted with audio recording equipment or mixing equipment and customized to meet customer requirements.

0.6

FRANKFURT —It was not a glamorous Hollywood-style bank heist. No tunnels. No rappelling from helicopters. Not even a single ski mask. Just an unusually heavy carry-on bag, which a female flight attendant struggled to carry through Frankfurt’s airport after arriving from China. But when curious customs agents took a look, they found evidence that may have helped them crack one of the biggest frauds in history against the Bundesbank, Germany’s august central bank. Authorities say the fraud has cost the bank about 6 million euros, or $8.5 million. Inside the flight attendant’s bag, the authorities say, were thousands of 1-euro and 2-euro coins that had supposedly been scrapped after years of use but had been methodically reconstructed so they could be cashed in. According to prosecutors, in recent years a fraud ring involving flight attendants has toted 30 tons of supposedly scrapped euro coins back into Europe from China. Recyclers in China were supposed to have melted down the old coins, which had been removed from circulation and sold as scrap metal. Instead, officials say, the band and its accomplices painstakingly reassembled the coins, then fooled the Bundesbank into redeeming them for paper currency or money transfers into bank accounts. Last week, German authorities arrested six men in and around Frankfurt in connection with the case. See Fraud / B2

MAMJ J ASOND J FM ’10 ’11

Percent change in total number of vehicles sold in March from the same month last year Chrysler Nissan

26.9

Honda

By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

23.5

Ford GM

State Lottery director defends staff amid suggested cuts

31.4%

16.0 11.0

Toyota -5.7 Source: Autodata Corp. AP

With Oregon legislators looking to slash funding for police, education and other essential services to balance the state budget, Lottery Director Larry Niswender was quick to defend lottery staff from cuts to nonessential spending called for by Bend businessman Greg Farfaglia. On Tuesday, Farfaglia said he’s been

swamped with calls from people throughout the state supporting his recommendation that state officials cut nonessential jobs and expenses such as lottery sales representatives first, and not touch services like police, education and programs that provide essential aid and services to the poor and elderly. Farfaglia, owner of the Southside Pub in Bend and part-owner of the Tumble

Inn Tavern in Redmond, sent an e-mail letter dated March 29 to Niswender, Gov. John Kitzhaber, state Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, and several other state officials urging them to cut all or part of the lottery’s 45 field sales representatives and regional managers and use the savings to backfill funding for teachers, police and other essential services targeted for cuts in the state’s efforts to close a $3.5 billion

budget gap. In that letter, Farfaglia explained that in his 12 years as a tavern owner and lottery gaming retailer, he has never had a lottery sales representative or regional manager provide supplies, sales assistance or service that couldn’t be handled for a fraction of the cost via mail order, phone or the Internet. See Lottery / B5


B2 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

B  B Groupon competitor raises $400 million WASHINGTON — LivingSocial, the website based here that distributes daily deals for restaurants, spas and retail outlets, added $400 million to its coffers last week as investors continued to funnel money into the fastgrowing company. The latest funding round comes as the company continues to vie for market share with industry leader Groupon, based in Chicago, and broadens its deals to include real-time discounts and weekend getaways. Investors said the latest round values LivingSocial at $3 billion, a significant climb from last summer, when the company took on money at a $200 million valuation. Amazon.com and Institutional Investors Fund are among the investors in the latest round.

Merck to buy Inspire for $430 million NEW YORK — Merck & Co., the second-biggest U.S. pharmaceutical company, said Tuesday it agreed to buy specialty drugmaker Inspire Pharmaceuticals Inc. for about $430 million to expand its U.S. sales force to sell eye-disease products. Merck, based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., said it will pay $5 a share, a 26 percent premium to Inspire’s closing share price Monday, the companies said in a statement. The deal has been approved by both boards. Warburg Pincus, which owns about 28 percent of the outstanding shares, has agreed to tender all shares, the companies said.

Icahn tops Dish bid for Blockbuster NEW YORK — Investor Carl Icahn and a group of liquidators made a $310.6 million bid for Blockbuster’s movie rental business, bettering a $307.1 million bid from Dish Network. SK Telecom, based in Seoul, won’t place another bid and said its prior cash bid of $284.5 million is superior to other bids because it takes on more liabilities for movie studios and covers other costs. “Our desire has been to acquire this business as a going concern: to preserve relationships with the studios, preserve stores, and relationships with suppliers,” said David Feldman, a lawyer with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher, who represents SK Telecom. Because SK’s offer would give another $49.5 million to three major motion picture studios — Sony, Universal Studios and Fox — its cash offer shouldn’t be seen as comparable with those of other bidders, Feldman said. SK Telecom would also assume $11.5 million in liabilities to all of Blockbuster’s studio partners.

Wells Fargo to pay $11M to settle charges CHARLOTTE, N.C. — The Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday said Wells Fargo & Co. has agreed to pay more than $11 million in restitution and penalties to settle charges that Wachovia improperly sold complex mortgage-backed securities in late 2006 and early 2007. San Francisco-based Wells Fargo acquired Charlotte’s Wachovia in 2008. Wells Fargo neither admitted nor denied the SEC’s findings. The SEC said Wachovia violated anti-fraud provisions of the securities law regarding two collateralized debt obligations the bank sold to investors as the U.S. housing market was showing signs of stress.

PW India fined for botched audits WASHINGTON — PricewaterhouseCoopers affiliates botched audits of an India-based computer company, failing to notice that the company had more than $1 billion of fictitious cash balances, regulators charged Tuesday. Instead of checking with the company’s banks to confirm account balances, the auditors let management of the company, Satyam Computer Services, perform checks for them, regulators alleged. The Indian affiliates of PricewaterhouseCoopers agreed to pay $7.5 million in penalties to the SEC and the oversight board set up in the United States to auditors. Satyam settled SEC fraud charges Tuesday by agreeing to pay a $10 million fine. It neither admitted nor denied wrongdoing. — From wire reports

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Creating a Facebook campus that will be sufficiently social By Fred A. Bernstein New York Times News Service

MENLO PARK, Calif. — Facebook, which started out in a dormitory at Harvard, transferred to a rented house in Silicon Valley and now occupies a cluster of office buildings in Palo Alto, Calif., is about to make its biggest move yet: to a 57-acre campus in this small city about 30 miles south of San Francisco. Construction workers are already swarming over the campus, a series of stucco-covered low-rise buildings occupied by Sun Microsystems until Sun was bought by the Oracle Corp. last year. Facebook plans to move in some employees by July and have most of its 2,000 workers, including its founder, Mark Zuckerberg, on site within 10 months. The campus will resemble an urban streetscape, with cafeterias by Roman and Williams, the New York design firm behind the Ace Hotel and its Breslin and John Dory restaurants. But if the campus will be a microcosm of a city, it’s not clear that the real city around the campus — including the largely Mexican-American neighborhood of Belle Haven — will benefit from Facebook’s presence. For one thing, the Facebook site is surrounded on three sides by water, and separated from the rest of Menlo Park by railroad tracks and a divided highway. The site is so insular that in the two decades it was occupied by Sun Microsystems it was nicknamed Sun Quentin (a reference to San Quentin prison, about 40 miles north). And because Facebook provides its employees with three meals a day in its own cafeterias, there may be little reason for them to venture off the property. At Mi Tierra Linda, a Mexican food store on Willow Road (which dead-ends at the Facebook site), workers said they were not aware that Facebook was heading their way. But one customer, Freddy Bueno, 24, said he knew the company was coming and hoped it would be good for local businesses.

Moving in “Facebook has a huge global presence,” said the city manager of Menlo Park, Glen Rojas, who said he was optimistic that the company would attract other

Fraud Continued from B1 The investigation is continuing, said Doris Moeller-Scheu, a Frankfurt prosecutor, who did not rule out further arrests. No Bundesbank employees are suspected in the fraud, authorities said. But the case is an embarrassment for the central bank, long a symbol of German prudence and monetary stability. Three of the six men arrested were flight attendants who worked for Lufthansa and other airlines with routes between China and Germany. The attendants took advantage of their exemption from baggage weight requirements to carry the coins from China to Frankfurt, prosecutors said. The female flight attendant, who authorities said was not arrested because she had not redeemed any of the money, told investigators that Chinese friends had given her the coins to exchange abroad because domestic banks would not accept them, according to Sing Tao, a Hong Kong newspaper. All six suspects, ages 28 to 45, are being held awaiting trial, and so far none are cooperating

VocalBooth Continued from B1 The company employs 15, which includes part-time workers and consultants. While pop-star clients like Lady GaGa, who received her purple-wrapped interior booth in London, or Mariah Carey, who had hers adorned in Hello Kittypink, get the most mentions, the company’s products appeal to those in an array of industries. Corporations seeking to reduce costs and outsourcing have ordered VocalBooths for inhouse production, Matthey said.

CHINA

Central bank raises interest rates again By David Barboza New York Times News Service

Heidi Schumann / New York Times News Service

Facebook is moving to the former offices of Sun Microsystems in Menlo Park, Calif., by July and bringing most of its 2,000 workers. businesses to the city, which has a population of about 30,000. At the same time, he said, there is concern about how large a presence Facebook will become. Sun had 3,600 employees on site; Facebook, with a workforce that is growing by 50 percent a year, could exceed that number, said John Tenanes, Facebook’s director of global real estate. In fact, because Sun’s engineers had private offices, while most Facebook employees work in unpartitioned spaces, Tenanes said the 1 million-squarefoot campus could handle a much larger population than it was originally designed for. But Rojas said the site could legally accommodate only 3,600 workers, as determined by an environmental impact report. To exceed that number, Facebook will have to negotiate with Menlo Park, which will be looking for civic benefits in exchange, he said. Those could include street improvements, bicycle paths and payments in lieu of taxes. “They can start moving in tomorrow,” he said of Facebook. “But they can’t have more than 3,600 employees until they get City Council approval.” As for what civic improvements Facebook may make, Menlo Park is not relying on the

company for ideas. Soon after Facebook announced plans to move to the Sun site (which it is leasing with an option to buy from Rreef, a unit of Deutsche Bank that bought it from Oracle last year), the city asked the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects to conduct a charrette, a kind of brainstorming session for architects. Such events usually attract 40 or 50 people; this one drew nearly 200, said John Stewart, a local architect who helped organize it. Zuckerberg stopped by to lend his support. The proposals will be presented to the City Council at a meeting on May 3, with Tenanes and other Facebook executives on hand.

Company culture But right now the focus is on getting the campus ready for Facebook employees. Contractors have already replaced rows of small offices in one of the Sun buildings with a loftlike space where desks will be pushed together in groups of four. “We like that you can sit at one end and see all the way to the other,” said Tenanes, showing off a section of building that had been stripped to concrete and ductwork — and will remain that way.

The San Francisco architecture firm Gensler is masterminding the renovation. Scott Dunlap, the Gensler principal running the project, said he was not thinking about making an architectural statement but about “protecting Facebook’s extraordinary company culture.” Currently, about 40 percent of Facebook employees commute to work on foot or bicycle or by bus (including some provided by the company), Tenanes said. For those employees, the remote location of the new site will pose a challenge. But he is already planning bus routes and considering opening a pedestrian tunnel that was dug but never used under the Bayfront Expressway, the highway that separates the campus from the rest of Menlo Park. (In case it outgrows the Sun property, Facebook bought a 22-acre site across the road.) Asked about the cost of the various projects, Tenanes said the privately held company, recently valued at $50 billion, was “not going to share any figures.” But, he said, “we’re going to be very frugal,” even if that means the campus never looks like the sleek headquarters another company might insist on. The Facebook corporate culture, he said, is that “we try to do as much with as little as we can.”

SHANGHAI — China raised interest rates Tuesday for the fourth time in six months, the latest move aimed at reining in inflation and a looming property bubble and slowing an economy that is threatening to overheat. The central bank raised the benchmark one-year bank deposit rate by a quarter of a percentage point, to 3.25 percent, effective Wednesday. The oneyear lending rate rose by the same amount, to 6.31 percent. The latest rate increase was widely expected by analysts, some of whom said they believed it would be followed by another increase in May. Raising interest rates should encourage depositors to hold more money in their accounts and make it slightly more costly for individuals and corporations to borrow from banks, which would help reduce spending and ease upward pressure on prices. In February, consumer prices in China increased 4.9 percent, driven by an 11 percent rise in food prices, while producer prices rose 7.2 percent, the biggest increase since October 2008. Earlier Tuesday, the Reserve Bank of Australia kept that country’s interest rates steady and said that inflation had been held in check by “the high level of the exchange rate, the earlier decline in wages growth and strong competition in some key markets.”

Banks pressure Portugal to accept a bailout By Raphael Minder and Matthew Saltmarsh

The fraud ring, which officials said had been operating since 2007, took advantage of the way the two-piece coins are made. The 2-euro coin has a nickel and brass alloy center, or “pill,” surrounded by a nickel and copper ring. The 1-euro coin has the reverse: a copper and nickel pill surrounded by a nickel and brass ring. When the coins were removed from circulation, a subcontractor separated the rings from the pills before the metal was sold to Chinese recycling companies. The thieves discovered that they could put the pills and rings back together, bring them to Germany and redeem them at the Bundesbank. Prosecutors said they are only just beginning to investigate how the scam worked on the Chinese side. During raids of 10 buildings in and near Frankfurt on March 30, the police seized a machine that they believe was

used to reassemble coins. But Moeller-Scheu, the Frankfurt prosecutor, said it was likely that most of the labor-intensive work of putting coins back together was done in China. “It wouldn’t pay with the hourly wage here,” Moeller-Scheu said. “It had to be a low-wage country.” How does someone inconspicuously redeem tons of reassembled coins? It was not as hard as it might seem, the Bundesbank says. Chinese companies recycle enormous amounts of washing machines, autos, clothing and other wornout goods from Europe, often finding euros, which they then send back for redemption. “It wasn’t so unusual to get coins from China,” said Susanne Kreutzer, a Bundesbank spokeswoman. “That is a business model for some people.” The thieves packed the coins in official looking safebags, which are used to trade coins for cash and are easily available on the Internet, prosecutors said. The band mixed in some genuine coins to fool inspectors, who make spot checks of redeemed coins. The accomplices could turn in the coins at any of the Bundesbank’s 47 branches in Germany, although large amounts would

be accepted only at the branch in Mainz, about 40 kilometers, or 25 miles, west of Frankfurt. Kreutzer said there had been other occasions when the Bundesbank suspected that people were redeeming invalid coins, but before last week authorities were never able to make an arrest. One question raised since the arrests is why the coins were not more thoroughly destroyed when they were taken out of circulation. It is not clear which of Europe’s central banks might have been responsible for the coins involved in the Bundesbank scam. The Bundesbank said it could not have been the source of the coins, because it renders old euro pieces unusable by crimping them with deep ridges. Moeller-Scheu said there was no evidence to support a report in the news magazine Der Spiegel that the coins had come from Italy and Greece. In any case, Bundesbank officials said they did not think the scheme could be carried out in the future. In January, new EU rules took effect placing tighter restrictions on the redemption of coins. “This business model won’t work anymore,” said Kreutzer, the Bundesbank spokeswoman.

Universities have installed them for music, theater and broadcast departments. The company also built a 20-foot-by-30-foot booth with seven projector windows for a film festival. Churches and religious organizations, such as Focus on the Family, use VocalBooths for recording and audio tasks, as do the software industry and others. Ubisoft, creator of the game “Assassin’s Creed,” produces audio using VocalBooths. “Because we have a VocalBooth, we no longer have to outsource for basic needs — these babies pay for themselves pretty

fast,” according to a statement attributed to Levon Louis, Ubisoft’s audio director, on VocalBooth’s website. VocalBooth also has upgraded its branding, launched a new website recently and joined forces with other companies for marketing, Matthey said. It teams up with those whose products are installed in the booths. It also joins forces with local businesses. Last year, it held a contest and gave away a Breedlove guitar and plans a repeat this year. “It was super-successful,” she said. VocalBooth employees will be

featuring the company’s products at the National Association of Broadcasters show, which starts Thursday in Las Vegas. Those from the television, radio, film and entertainment industries will see more than just VocalBooth’s modular recording booths at the show. They also can watch scenic videos of Bend, Matthey said, provided by Visit Bend, the city’s tourismpromotion agency. “We kind of help spread the word about Bend,” she said.

with authorities, Moeller-Scheu said. They face fraud and counterfeiting charges that carry maximum sentences of 10 years in prison. Under German law, the names of suspects are typically not released.

How they did it

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

New York Times News Service

LISBON — Portuguese banks have raised the pressure on the government to seek emergency international financing with a warning that domestic institutions should not be burdened with more sovereign debt. Carlos Santos Ferreira, chief executive of Millennium BCP, the country’s biggest private bank, said during an interview Tuesday that Portuguese banks “are able to buy more debt, but this is for sure not the best way to go. “We have our own ideas about risk,” he said, “and I believe we have already enough Portuguese debt in our balance sheets.” His assessment came as Moody’s Investors Service downgraded its rating on Portuguese debt, the second in less than a month, warning that the country’s next government would have to turn to its European partners for aid “as a matter of urgency.” Santos Ferreira was even more forthright, calling on the caretaker government of Prime Minister Jose Socrates to negotiate a bridge loan to meet Portugal’s immediate financing needs. “The situation is a serious one and it is time for the government to consider asking for some kind of bridge loan,” Santos Ferreira said. “I believe that the next government will for sure need some kind of help from the European Union and the International Monetary Fund, but for the moment this bridge will be necessary.” Portugal has about 9 billion euros ($12.8 billion) of bond redemptions coming due in April and June, and investors are questioning its ability to meet those payments without help from its European partners or the monetary fund. On Friday, however, the country managed to sell 1.65 billion euros of short-term bills in what was seen as a stopgap measure.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 B3

A W Tackling long-term joblessness By Katherine Yung

“A lot of economists believe long-term unemployment can permanently reduce the productive capacity of some people. It’s not in the interest of society to throw away that long-term productive capacity.”

Detroit Free Press

DETROIT — When Tim Zaneske lost his information technology job in June 2009, he never dreamed that he would be unemployed for months and months and months. Today, nearly two years later, the Flushing Township, Mich., resident is still looking for permanent work. His lengthy job search has taken its toll, forcing the father of two young children to file for bankruptcy. Last month, Zaneske finally got some relief: a part-time contract job. “You get job leads, but nine times out of 10, it’s nothing,” the 44-year-old said. “It’s beyond frustrating.” Last year, 36 percent of Michigan’s 590,000 unemployed workers had been searching for a job for a year or longer, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That was the third-highest rate in the country, behind only New Jersey and Georgia. Though the state’s job market is improving, economists expect longterm unemployment to remain a huge problem because it will take years to recoup the millions of jobs that were lost during the recession.

An uphill battle The Great Recession may officially be over, but it has left behind a huge problem: hundreds of thousands of workers who have been unable to find a job for almost two years or longer. Though economists warn the problem isn’t likely to go away anytime soon, policies to help the long-term unemployed — such as additional weeks of jobless benefits or a federal job creation program — face an uphill battle given the current anti-spending mood in Congress. “Long-term unemployment is going to be a persistent problem,” said Heidi Shierholz, a labor market economist at the Economic Policy Institute. She found that there are no jobs available for four out of every five unemployed workers. Experts at the Brookings Institution predict that it could take at least five years for the nation to create the more than 12 million jobs needed to

— Timothy Bartik, senior economist, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research

Kathleen Galligan / Detroit Free Press

Tim Zaneske, 44, replaces the hard drive of a laptop for a client at his home in Flushing Township, Mich. Zaneske, who lost his job in June 2009, now does contract work. return to pre-recession employment levels while absorbing the 125,000 people who enter the labor force each month. The federal government does not keep track of how many people nationwide have exhausted 99 weeks of unemployment benefits. But a December report from the Congressional Research Service estimates that as of last October, there were 1.4 million of these so-called 99ers. Diane Swonk, chief economist at Mesirow Financial, said that with no short-term solution in sight, the situation is likely to create a number of negative effects, such as increased welfare and disability payments as 99ers struggle to survive. “Once you hit 99 weeks, the chances that you are going to re-enter the labor force is pretty slim,” she said.

The long struggle For many people like Zaneske, searching for a job has become an endless, weary struggle. When the domestic auto industry nearly collapsed in 2008, Zaneske lost his engineering support job. A month later, he got a

new position teaching engineers how to use software at a company in Troy, Mich. But 16 months later, in June 2009, he was once again laid off. He sent out résumés, networked with friends, went to job fairs and made sure he was on LinkedIn.com, a social media network popular with employers. Yet months and months passed, with Zaneske getting only two interviews, neither of which led to job offers. The father of two tapped into his 401(k) retirement plan and tried to do as much freelance consulting work as he could get. After more than a year of unemployment, he wound up having to file for bankruptcy. Last month, Zaneske finally landed an information technology contract job in Fenton that he said he hopes will turn into a full-time position. So far, he has been working anywhere from one to four days a week. “This was a curveball, for sure,” Zaneske said of his lengthy job search. “It really isn’t something you can prepare yourself for.” To help people like Zaneske, advocates for the long-term unemployed are pushing for more federal assis-

bendbulletin.com/b boocoo

tance. Last month, a bill that would provide 14 weeks of emergency unemployment benefits to workers that have exhausted all of their jobless benefits was introduced in the U.S. House. The additional benefits could cost up to $16 billion, a tough sell amid the fervor in Washington to cut costs.

Long-term productivity Some labor market experts, including Timothy Bartik, a senior economist at the W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research in Kalamazoo, say they believe that the federal government should establish a temporary job creation program. Bartik said hundreds of thousands of unemployed workers could be put to work performing public service jobs at small nonprofit organizations, doing everything from repairing schools and renovating parks to cleaning up abandoned properties. Long-term joblessness can damage a country’s long-run economic productivity, Bartik warned. And it’s no secret that people who are out of work for long periods usually experience a number of negative effects, including a decline in job skills, reduced self-confidence and mental and physical health problems. “A lot of economists believe longterm unemployment can permanently reduce the productive capacity of some people,” Bartik said. “It’s not in the interest of society to throw away that long-term productive capacity.”

C O M M E N TA RY

Thanks to those who support the job hunters By Diane Stafford McClatchy-Tribune News Service

People in long-term job searches are mostly invisible to those who have been steadily employed throughout the recession and jobless recovery. The idea that someone can’t get a job is inconceivable to some. But the doubters haven’t spent much time at job loss support groups. Somewhere nearly every day, in a church or school meeting room, one of those groups is meeting. Laura Johannesmeyer, who convenes jobfinding support groups in the community career office at Johnson County (Kan.) Community College, maintains an online list of the local groups at www.jccc.edu/jobclubs. Job hunters can find one that fits their time and place priorities. These meetings are attended mostly by middle-age and older professionals who lost their jobs, often through no performance fault of their own but because of mergers, job relocations, downsizing and other reorganizations. Many are emotionally drained. They’re not sure how to sell themselves in today’s job market. Some are nearing financial ruin. I recently spent an evening with Judy Ambler, who, though personally battling significant health issues and unemployment, has for years convened the Career Transition Ministry at Holy Trinity Catholic Church in Lenexa, Kan. One job hunter who came to the meeting quite fairly called her “inspirational.” She and other job club leaders have provided what sometimes is the only ray of hope, the only free guidance to job hunters whose confidence and self-worth are shaken. Another convener, Maureen Reintjes, who leads on-site job club meetings at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Shawnee, Kan., also spends countless hours administering an online KC Metro Networking Job Club at sacredheartjobclub.ning.com. These are just three of many volunteers who do difficult work, giving advice and good ol’ pep talks to job hunters who need it. They deserve not just thanks from job hunters but blessings from all of us.


B USI N ESS

B4 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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Nm 91.24 +1.32 85.15 91.54 +.85 24.60 +.02 40.42 -.06 35.59 -.19 1.86 -.04 24.31 -.16 42.43 -.20 37.85 +.32 47.90 -.09 13.75 -.13 21.77 -.38 32.23 +.63 67.99 +1.39 56.68 +.34 44.77 -.15 18.60 +.16 91.53 +.61 19.18 +.14 19.10 +.09 66.58 -.02 38.66 +.51 37.41 -.33 27.12 -.06 54.57 +.63 4.79 +.03 3.84 4.72 +.02 56.06 +.47 24.20 +.01 18.41 +.03 13.91 -.12 3.21 -.78 1.51 -.04 17.45 +.17 1.85 +.25 2.74 5.61 +.07 9.92 +.10

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21.16 +1.31 0.25 12.77 +.07 15.96 +.11 31.84 +.45 25.93 -.09 2.67 50.27 -.20 0.64 116.92 -1.45 0.88 50.20 -.06 144.74 +2.21 3.04 53.72 +.06 7.89 -.02 3.75 -.05 0.60 10.48 +.07 0.20 7.97 +.05 0.04 22.75 +.23 1.88 100.87 +.22 3.40 +.05 1.36 55.22 -.38 0.72 32.78 +.28 1.25 15.96 +.10 1.28 12.83 +.03 1.23 15.13 +.09 1.16 11.11 +.06 1.14 10.64 +.10 1.21 12.27 23.65 -.38 35.98 -1.64 0.70 52.01 +.35 1.16 42.63 +.37 .43 -.06 1.28 36.93 +.04 22.14 +1.29 82.26 -3.22 2.90 -.02 0.04 17.94 -.05 1.76 36.68 -.10 7.15 +.35 0.10 16.94 +.90 20.03 +.34 0.64 34.14 -.21 2.37 -.06 16.49 +.12 1.38 58.94 +.14 9.28 +.05 10.38 -.02 0.80 34.60 -.30 13.91 +.72 11.16 +.98 40.42 +1.92 1.20 47.99 -.89 2.92 0.54 63.08 -.65 71.69 +.30 2.08 -.13 1.00 -.02 17.74 -.67 3.58 52.39 +.22 35.17 +.49 5.70 +.22 2.16 31.93 +.09 0.61 21.30 -.13 39.00 +.36 1.40 59.33 +.16 8.51 +.15 3.32 66.74 -.60 2.36 43.28 +.08 7.94 -.01 10.98 -.07 12.50 -.06 0.64 39.50 -.31 92.13 -.66 0.88 18.91 +.17 1.47 56.33 +.02 0.35 12.94 +.09 4.16 125.80 +.73 0.75 95.24 -.26 39.07 +.73 18.79 -.25 1.92 92.14 -.31 2.98 1.38 -.02 7.31 -.11 4.26 0.16 20.83 +.08 11.38 +.26 2.10 40.75 -.31 5.47 +.32 10.95 -.03 0.28 22.72 +.29 0.40 50.57 +.24 19.04 -.43 56.89 -.02 23.22 -.44 6.72 +.52 0.56 20.20 -.16 3.37 -.13 1.76 85.42 +.55 32.61 +.64 93.35 -.80 0.24 34.18 +.05 0.60 86.89 49.29 -.32 0.48 10.54 -.14 38.98 -.01 9.13 +.26 0.24 13.50 -.13 21.18 -.04 0.08 31.21 -.20 18.78 +1.12 16.90 0.72 51.94 1.00 66.74 +.62 0.48 94.19 -.93 2.68 81.53 -.32 0.96 26.66 6.26 +.15 17.36 +.50 1.77 -.13 16.78 +.09 0.48 14.79 +.19 0.20 32.98 -.13 1.28 13.26 +.04 0.24 13.89 -.08 24.14 +.73 0.20 20.44 +.66 0.24 16.25 -.01 0.12 6.84 -.01 0.04 11.35 -.02 12.02 +.12 25.61 +2.10 0.04 12.17 +.03 0.64 13.68 -.16 0.80 15.78 -.10 153.01 -3.25 0.10 26.84 +.01 0.04 36.81 +.08 0.09 21.47 +.17 0.19 15.59 -.04 0.35 46.13 +.68 0.09 11.83 -.26 0.05 23.52 +.01 2.20 36.77 -.34 0.64 17.41 +.01 61.63 -1.19 1.45 -.03 7.21 -.07 8.51 -.03 0.80 27.48 -.07 1.28 132.20 -.88 0.50 73.56 +.04 30.53 -.45 0.64 60.76 +.67 0.66 20.40 +.58 4.99 +.05 15.79 +.24 7.15 +.22 18.56 -.05 33.03 +.17 37.26 -.09 10.36 +.22 44.49 +1.00 5.72 -.02 0.76 63.43 +.71 93.62 +.10 38.13 -.16 1.77 22.53 -.05 1.00 125.30 -2.10 0.76 14.06 -.01 1.00 56.61 +.84 15.17 -.01 0.75 8.06 -.04 0.24 31.64 +1.14 1.85 24.28 +.11 3.82 +.37 28.80 -1.05 2.05 -.02 0.28 21.75 +.08 0.16 11.25 -.10 4.66 +.10 8.26 +.65 1.16 39.76 -.10 25.92 +.02 6.25 -.10 17.33 -.27 2.28 +.01 29.22 +.04 10.41 +.01 0.52 6.24 +.02 1.68 19.12 +.25

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Gafisa SA Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoGloblR GeoMet Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GettyRlty GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln GlimchRt GlobalCash GlbGeoph n GloblInd GlobPay GblX Uran GlbXSilvM Globalstar GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcp wt Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Goodyr pfA Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech GrahamPk Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GrWlfRes GreenMtC s GreenbCos Greenhill GrubbEllis GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugCdnEn GugAirline GugChinSC GugMultAs GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE H&E Eq HCA Hld n HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HampRB h HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann Heckmn wt HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighOne n HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc Hitachi Hittite HollyCp Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HotTopic HovnanE HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk HuntIng n Huntsmn Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.14 14.26 +.66 1.32 30.85 -.04 23.58 +1.01 10.12 +.28 0.16 15.53 0.45 23.10 +.57 0.20 80.41 +.25 1.50 33.78 42.02 +.27 .46 -.01 33.69 -.27 10.41 -.24 6.11 -.02 43.87 +.37 1.88 74.60 +1.23 0.56 20.33 -.20 0.40 15.26 -.16 0.04 2.13 +.13 1.12 36.32 -.22 5.79 -.02 32.87 +.48 3.75 -.09 0.18 14.76 +.25 0.48 30.69 +.01 27.71 -.12 1.80 54.10 -.40 .37 -.01 13.20 -.16 76.33 +.02 26.38 +.05 .60 -.02 1.59 -.06 31.34 -.83 36.40 +.40 0.25 12.57 -.04 5.13 -.01 1.92 24.06 +.53 0.18 7.48 +.10 1.32 -.02 0.30 33.24 +.06 41.84 -.97 0.52 14.97 -.05 2.04 39.62 +.32 0.40 9.10 -.04 3.15 -.01 15.76 +.95 10.11 +.38 0.08 52.08 +2.41 0.40 15.42 +.10 0.25 30.00 +1.14 1.33 -.05 0.15 24.38 +.77 4.16 -.12 0.40 13.75 -.11 0.75 28.30 -.23 0.19 18.29 +.69 0.27 28.00 +1.09 5.15 +1.65 0.41 52.16 +2.96 3.08 +.21 1.40 158.91 +.01 1.16 86.84 -.44 22.05 +.02 15.32 +.30 2.94 51.80 +.71 569.09-18.59 39.61 -.17 0.84 44.94 -.06 21.00 +.23 17.07 +.19 2.16 141.52 +.57 4.18 +.10 8.07 +.02 5.58 +.06 2.31 +.04 2.73 +.14 0.07 7.84 +.04 4.12 -.07 0.83 20.41 -.01 2.19 +.04 66.25 -.28 28.79 -.02 1.80 61.17 -1.75 .72 +.01 13.94 +.11 24.71 -.60 0.80 39.96 -.35 0.51 23.37 +.18 0.03 35.38 -.75 0.44 30.01 +.11 1.00 21.43 +.03 0.03 8.72 +.04 5.65 +.05 36.29 +1.37 19.77 -.08 34.02 +.35 0.58 31.88 +.08 1.92 37.73 -.07 1.80 52.71 +.29 32.92 +.42 32.43 -.08 0.36 49.73 +.23 7.03 +.21 .60 -.01 0.96 33.84 -.16 27.68 +.30 1.34 +.01 1.10 45.11 -.12 2.44 +.30 61.01 -.06 7.40 -.05 20.59 +.73 0.40 41.75 -.17 0.10 47.46 +.88 9.74 -.15 0.07 15.28 +.48 1.00 50.63 -.15 17.77 +.86 0.82 36.40 +.26 0.40 27.26 -.31 14.96 -.19 1.20 47.12 -.07 4.20 28.11 -.09 1.24 25.24 +.09 5.84 -.04 6.12 -.05 2.76 52.80 +.39 11.14 -.27 1.20 22.81 +.06 32.59 -1.16 25.23 -.50 39.97 -.13 0.08 17.93 +.04 6.35 -.10 .83 -.06 9.53 +.40 1.80 49.10 +.05 17.46 +.36 0.24 68.69 -.05 .48 +.02 70.16 -.68 1.00 82.70 +1.70 6.44 -.36 0.20 6.01 +.05 1.38 55.32 +.62 16.00 +.09 0.40 86.35 +.47 0.32 40.29 -.05 19.76 +.22 13.15 +.14 36.66 +.97 14.18 -.18 1.70 35.14 -.13 0.41 39.10 +.37 0.76 21.71 -.04 49.60 -1.42 63.44 +.15 0.60 64.95 +1.67 21.88 -.06 1.00 37.60 +.13 42.72 +.38 2.48 59.44 +.03 34.78 -1.06 1.33 59.05 -.18 1.14 +.05 0.51 28.01 -.06 30.07 -.75 17.61 +.74 56.55 +.25 1.80 23.56 +.05 0.08 16.91 -.19 0.28 5.65 +.13 3.30 -.08 38.63 +.38 1.52 71.23 -.61 0.60 9.61 -.14 27.62 -.09 70.38 -.60 0.52 45.42 -.06 0.04 6.73 -.01 40.25 +.10 0.40 17.57 -.13 12.12 +.10 4.69 -.06

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D 31.01 +.04 0.08 22.90 +1.16 0.53 50.01 -.66 78.96 -.45 0.15 19.13 -.01 88.00 -1.38 0.54 8.18 -.04 1.20 11.03 +.09 12.85 -.05 0.31 6.09 +.06 13.50 -.26 56.63 +1.54 0.07 1.49 -.03 14.23 +.23 38.09 -.05 0.82 26.87 -.03 0.25 23.37 -.26 2.53 79.51 -.27 0.50 34.20 +.20 0.29 26.35 -.07 0.45 19.47 +.02 0.33 18.78 -.04 0.14 9.96 -.20 0.44 65.51 +.13 0.34 14.91 -.05 0.54 63.73 -.05 0.43 13.80 -.04 1.56 49.01 +.01 1.82 74.64 +.15 2.15 42.69 -.38 0.29 15.13 -.01 0.43 18.41 +.13 1.57 69.18 -.03 1.28 68.27 +.21 38.34 +.76 1.09 59.55 -.06 1.75 52.47 -.04 2.92 109.15 -.20 0.97 64.86 -.01 0.63 46.00 -.35 1.05 96.75 -.57 2.46 133.65 -.15 3.88 104.91 -.22 0.64 49.77 -.10 5.18 108.59 +.06 0.81 48.91 +.04 1.35 43.43 -.21 5.61 106.52 -.26 0.15 30.02 -.12 1.20 68.86 -.08 0.72 44.97 +.04 0.64 47.41 +.37 1.18 54.94 +.09 1.27 63.75 +.01 0.73 48.82 +.01 3.91 91.92 -.37 3.25 92.70 -.47 0.81 83.68 -.09 1.42 60.58 -.15 0.91 48.50 0.59 61.54 +.21 1.59 109.90 +.16 1.00 99.83 +.35 7.61 91.74 -.10 0.31 59.22 +1.30 0.51 102.43 +1.29 1.90 70.23 +.04 1.25 69.12 -.01 0.36 36.81 +.16 0.60 111.43 +.45 0.76 60.84 +.09 1.18 74.28 +.03 1.24 76.12 +.17 4.41 105.40 -.10 2.85 104.12 -.14 0.53 96.68 +.74 0.89 85.19 +.46 0.10 110.21 -.03 2.94 39.66 +.09 1.25 87.32 +.23 0.72 23.82 -.13 1.98 59.59 +.10 0.07 13.26 0.61 59.61 -.01 0.74 74.35 +.27 0.04 64.86 -.22 0.93 83.57 +.98 8.98 -.01 1.00 60.15 -.64 76.60 +2.75 0.68 45.16 +.52 1.36 54.49 -.26 69.03 -1.34 31.58 -.03 20.00 +.02 9.18 +.04 3.96 +.21 27.20 +.99 9.75 -.08 0.44 53.87 +.66 16.45 +.32 3.87 33.27 -.44 8.33 +.29 8.77 -.03 52.39 +.38 0.90 73.40 +.01 0.28 47.90 -.05 21.30 +.21 4.95 -.05 0.57 9.38 -.06 1.16 +.01 4.97 +.99 20.51 -.24 7.43 +.19 9.22 +.28 2.72 50.61 -.26 0.72 19.71 +.22 1.79 16.01 -.13 119.81 +.91 0.40 48.43 -.68 0.08 19.19 +.37 47.86 -.39 6.91 +.05 2.60 163.99 -.26 11.20 -.03 1.08 64.22 +.40 0.24 16.40 -.09 1.05 30.68 +.61 32.89 +.62 0.16 31.84 +.33 10.38 +.56 74.69 -1.30 7.11 +.50 0.24 12.56 -.07 0.48 13.14 +1.02 26.28 -.77 36.12 +.58 53.49 -.59 351.74 +4.99 0.44 25.75 -.22 3.71 21.60 -.02 0.29 5.07 +.03 8.12 +.08 0.75 32.75 +.31 14.57 +.34 9.12 -.02 11.18 +.18 0.67 24.18 +.01 55.58 -.20 2.87 +.10 1.48 28.44 +.84 14.05 -.05 6.71 +.14 30.96 +.47 19.15 +.07 1.00 46.58 +.24 1.78 38.15 -.04 1.80 25.92 +.05 2.00 26.25 +.04 0.28 20.44 -.03 0.42 33.77 +.15 22.53 -.02 .60 -.02 51.94 +.13 5.55 +.15 2.19 -.04 24.39 -.44 0.04 12.41 -.04 0.08 8.54 -.23 0.35 35.45 +.37 33.52 +1.39 0.30 24.59 -.21 6.15 -.11 25.76 +.39 1.11 -.03 2.16 59.80 -.35 0.64 41.38 -.38 0.20 14.27 +.30 51.27 +.27 0.70 100.82 -1.54 39.38 -.38 8.19 +.02 0.25 11.69 -.51 0.20 38.11 +.25 11.65 -.19 0.52 17.41 +.27

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Nm KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA Kaman KandiTech KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindredHlt KineticC Kinross g KnghtCap KnightTr KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger KronosWd Kulicke L&L Engy L-1 Ident L-3 Com LAN Air LDK Solar LECG h LG Display LJ Intl LKQ Corp LML Pay LSB Inds LSI Corp LTC Prp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LaBarg Laboph gh LabCp LaBrnch LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Layne Lazard LeCroy LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp s LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g Liquidity LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 0.60 9.98 -.03 1.00 46.16 -.27 20.29 -.03 4.60 -.40 0.56 36.56 -.13 2.76 -.04 54.36 -.70 17.63 +.39 1.96 30.50 -1.66 1.62 53.95 -.28 14.64 -.40 0.48 38.67 -.13 5.19 +.17 15.64 +.12 0.04 8.86 -.06 1.40 39.46 +.07 2.80 65.38 -.48 0.72 17.92 -.02 4.52 74.06 -.30 29.44 24.59 +.39 54.53 +.18 0.10 16.23 +.84 13.50 -.04 0.24 19.68 -.16 6.73 -.10 1.00 54.55 +.99 4.68 +.03 12.49 -.07 1.16 31.49 -.02 39.90 +.40 5.33 -.28 0.42 23.79 -.09 1.00 58.90 -.04 9.10 +.15 6.16 -.49 11.76 -.05 1.80 78.91 +.61 0.62 26.20 -.13 11.88 +.20 .15 -.01 16.84 +.38 3.85 -.23 24.24 -.10 3.00 +.06 39.31 -.62 6.66 +.09 1.68 29.30 +.42 9.10 +.03 9.84 +.15 19.26 +.23 .50 -.04 93.65 +.09 4.05 +.03 1.23 +.05 55.03 +.13 34.22 -2.76 0.20 46.96 -.03 44.84 +1.06 0.44 27.05 +.19 6.05 +.12 12.50 +.09 34.98 -.16 0.50 42.52 +.69 11.82 +.44 15.69 +.22 4.23 -.01 0.50 48.36 +.33 0.24 36.34 -.41 1.08 23.67 -.54 0.40 32.29 +.15 0.16 18.32 +.25 0.72 53.63 +.13 0.25 38.27 -.75 1.45 +.03 1.78 +.04 0.46 9.28 -.16 36.02 -.37 0.32 5.29 +.05 42.36 +.65 40.52 +.44 16.64 +.38 74.34 +.46 1.90 33.07 +.10 52.78 -.37 38.25 +1.03 40.80 -.08 8.87 -.02 1.96 35.01 -.02 7.01 +.03 0.80 34.49 +1.16 0.80 29.91 +.33 0.20 30.33 -.35 0.96 33.61 +.53 2.64 39.38 -.03 6.39 +.07 19.65 +.39 10.12 +.18 12.46 -.24 5.57 +.15 3.86 +.01 4.29 -.01 3.00 81.11 +.12 0.25 43.40 -.27 14.46 -.06 46.95 -.27 1.54 -.16 5.20 96.01 +.94 10.34 +.18 0.44 26.78 +.20 1.44 134.03 +.09 3.87 93.49 +2.55 24.35 -.03 41.34 +.69

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MAP Phm MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDC Pr g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes Majesco MAKO Srg ManTech MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel MaximIntg Maxygen s McClatchy McCorm McC&Sch McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn MeadJohn MdbkIns

2.80 88.69 -.63 13.10 +1.39 14.34 +.31 0.04 21.32 -.04 9.92 -.24 0.85 6.61 -.09 1.00 25.70 +.30 0.56 17.42 +.52 0.65 23.38 -.08 3.52 +.08 12.45 8.60 -.12 0.94 8.18 -.04 0.55 6.06 -.03 9.17 13.33 +.07 9.74 -.21 0.60 33.34 +.04 3.42 -.02 0.88 70.50 +.23 37.46 -.76 2.00 48.96 +.48 1.80 33.11 +.04 0.20 24.60 +.67 2.33 27.10 6.77 -.40 7.00 -.04 1.00 48.99 -.69 8.49 -.02 3.57 -.33 25.34 -.06 43.90 +.87 0.24 2.31 0.08 22.79 +.62 3.73 -.01 0.74 63.29 +.26 0.52 17.67 -.30 1.00 53.43 +.34 .68 -.05 0.40 62.71 +2.96 27.37 +.12 0.18 42.60 -.53 2.93 41.66 +2.26 0.33 57.29 -.09 0.19 51.35 -.20 2.60 49.04 +.46 0.35 35.13 -.11 0.84 29.86 -.31 0.04 8.10 +.01 15.85 +.32 0.30 14.16 +.14 2.75 33.12 -.19 0.24 70.06 +.19 21.76 -.07 0.60 262.93 +1.68 0.92 25.45 +.11 0.84 25.57 +.23 1.00 5.15 3.50 +.04 1.12 47.71 -.22 9.66 +.44 25.55 -.04 2.44 76.60 +.21 1.00 39.18 +.04 0.72 79.15 -.16 17.93 -.20 1.04 58.47 +.21 0.16 10.44 -.01

Nm MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MergeHlth Meritage Meritor MeruNetw Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MdwGold g MillerHer Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monotype MonroMf s Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MorgHtl Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NIC Inc NII Hldg NPS Phm NRG Egy NTN Buzz NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstr s NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs NavigCons NaviosAcq Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoPhoto n Neoprobe Net1UEPS NetLogicM NetApp Netease Netflix NetSolTch NetwkEng Neurcrine NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NewEnSys NwGold g NewOriEd NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource NielsenH n NikeB NileTher h 99 Cents NipponTT NiskaGsS n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordion g Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus Novogen h NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvEPOp NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvQPf2 Nvidia O2Micro OCZ Tech OGE Engy OReillyAu OasisPet n OcciPet

D 1.00 31.71 +.51 31.76 -.18 11.19 -.06 15.96 +.54 56.17 -.75 0.80 11.60 +.01 16.31 -.01 0.32 34.09 +.90 15.95 -.63 20.12 +.06 69.68 +1.13 0.90 39.25 -.18 8.34 -.15 25.62 +1.02 0.48 27.52 +.25 14.46 -.15 0.32 85.60 +.26 14.88 +.40 1.52 33.16 -.11 1.02 34.77 +.51 5.23 +.02 24.60 +.05 16.91 +.09 16.05 -2.82 6.24 +.18 1.25 +.12 0.62 31.49 -.48 0.74 44.98 -.75 16.51 +.18 0.14 14.25 +.97 1.38 38.09 +.11 5.28 -.18 11.02 -.18 50.93 +.42 20.84 +.33 0.64 25.78 +.23 1.30 +.02 2.12 +.27 0.09 27.37 +.01 6.00 96.49 -2.33 2.47 +.15 0.30 25.60 -.05 8.31 +.12 13.98 +.59 3.17 +.37 4.51 -.06 3.11 -.05 21.08 -.40 16.52 +.29 5.40 +.19 61.81 -.05 0.70 25.05 +.13 0.70 20.62 +.07 1.12 47.18 -.04 65.49 -.92 15.59 +.19 3.52 +.03 14.48 +.85 14.06 +.29 0.32 33.82 +.48 1.12 73.60 -.45 16.73 +.13 0.40 18.34 +.03 0.46 34.96 +.37 0.20 27.18 +.08 9.26 -.43 0.20 82.56 +.10 44.17 -.13 23.78 +.15 14.48 -.07 2.28 +.01 0.07 4.37 -.10 1.10 75.04 +1.71 23.33 -.04 20.11 +.11 19.01 +.18 31.29 +.81 1.80 18.56 +.24 .69 -.01 0.25 12.45 -.30 42.16 -.31 9.45 -.07 21.12 -.26 .49 -.02 0.48 15.08 +.01 31.99 +.86 1.20 38.98 30.56 +.37 0.14 27.44 17.67 +.04 28.00 +.56 0.29 1.72 -.03 1.38 75.40 7.04 48.28 -.28 0.40 32.76 +.06 0.44 80.48 -.98 0.04 8.08 -.08 1.52 26.05 +.05 0.40 24.06 +9.99 1.92 42.53 +.05 2.16 35.05 -.17 10.06 +.15 0.20 3.85 -.04 0.24 5.84 -.13 69.39 -.11 9.78 +.48 11.36 -.16 4.10 -.04 8.67 +.10 41.90 +.50 46.05 +.35 51.90 +.19 244.23 -.49 1.73 -.09 2.02 +.01 8.02 +.79 25.85 -.06 14.83 +.07 6.29 +.32 4.05 -.35 11.63 +.41 105.07 +1.19 7.00 +.05 1.00 17.43 +.14 9.67 +.15 0.28 14.96 -.11 5.93 -.06 0.20 19.22 +.05 75.65 +.43 0.60 56.98 +2.39 7.87 17.66 -.01 0.15 17.77 -.25 0.15 18.79 -.15 0.20 25.08 -.26 2.20 56.31 +.12 0.92 19.26 -.10 27.41 -.34 1.24 77.93 +.52 .82 -.06 19.76 +.08 22.10 -.35 1.40 21.38 -.46 0.98 46.05 -.05 0.72 97.14 -.07 0.55 8.77 +.05 4.91 -.13 15.92 +.33 1.70 24.31 -.20 11.88 -.17 0.92 45.66 +.49 1.60 68.75 -.83 11.56 -.56 6.74 +.14 1.10 34.76 -.14 15.74 +.39 25.64 +.15 1.12 51.70 -.11 2.74 +.07 1.88 62.21 -.37 0.40 5.15 -.09 0.40 12.37 -.04 13.79 +.91 2.53 54.88 +.31 5.11 -.01 2.57 -.01 5.97 -.01 36.20 +.03 1.79 +.48 1.70 47.06 +.08 0.54 28.76 +.13 25.50 +.52 19.57 -.04 1.45 47.46 +.59 0.70 14.27 +.04 1.26 12.65 -.08 0.47 9.09 0.76 9.03 -.01 0.66 8.23 -.01 17.58 +.03 7.25 +.05 8.92 +.46 1.50 51.34 +.16 58.23 +.56 32.88 +.21 1.84 102.73 -.79

D

Oceaneer 89.42 -2.09 OceanFr rs .64 -.02 Och-Ziff 1.01 16.09 +.12 Oclaro rs 10.89 +.26 OcwenFn 11.05 +.05 OdysMar 3.25 -.04 OfficeDpt 4.36 +.19 OfficeMax 13.50 +.32 OilSvHT 2.42 165.57 +.33 OilStates 79.75 +4.64 Oilsands g .48 -.01 OldNBcp 0.28 10.73 -.11 OldRepub 0.70 13.10 +.10 Olin 0.80 24.78 +1.62 OmegaHlt 1.48 23.17 +.35 Omncre 0.13 30.91 -.07 Omnicell 15.48 +.23 Omnicom 1.00 48.74 -.30 OmniVisn h 33.55 +.05 Omnova 8.11 +.04 OnSmcnd 9.93 +.26 Oncolyt g 5.77 -.03 Oncothyr 3.94 +.03 ONEOK 2.08 67.32 -.23 OnlineRes 3.92 Onstrm rsh 1.81 -.14 OnyxPh 34.19 +.22 OpenTxt 62.46 -1.87 OpenTable 109.63 +.76 OpnwvSy 2.12 -.01 OpkoHlth 3.78 -.03 OpntTch 0.40 38.30 -.68 Opnext 2.26 -.04 optXprs 4.50 18.80 +.15 Oracle 0.24 33.92 -.22 OraSure 8.18 +.32 Orbitz 3.42 -.13 Orexigen 3.09 -.20 OrientEH 12.25 -.10 OriginAg 7.25 -.18 Orthovta 2.13 -.01 OshkoshCp 35.99 -.37 OvShip 1.75 31.60 +.16 OwensMin 0.80 32.97 -.07 OwensCorn 36.41 +.04 OwensIll 30.18 -.10 OxfordInds 0.52 35.25 +1.03 PDL Bio 0.60 6.20 +.14 PF Chng 0.92 46.73 PG&E Cp 1.82 44.48 -.01 PHH Corp 21.91 -.05 Pimc1-5Tip 0.75 53.58 -.04 PimShMat 1.16 101.00 -.01 PMC Sra 7.22 +.09 PMI Grp 2.62 -.01 PNC 0.40 63.01 -.59 PNM Res 0.50 14.74 +.07 POSCO 0.53 116.05 -.78 PPG 2.20 96.35 -.14 PPL Corp 1.40 25.56 -.26 PSS Wrld 27.50 +.16 PacWstBc 0.04 21.95 -.63 Paccar 0.48 52.79 -.30 PacEth h .56 -.04 PacSunwr 3.64 +.01 PackAmer 0.80 28.90 -.43 PaetecHld 3.68 +.06 PainTher 2.00 9.96 +.46 PallCorp 0.70 58.60 +.03 PanASlv 0.10 40.06 +1.42 Panasonic 0.11 12.31 -.23 PaneraBrd 128.69 +.02 Pantry 14.71 -.15 ParPharm 32.15 +.23 ParTech 4.74 +.08 ParagShip 0.20 2.63 -.12 ParamTc h 22.70 -.04 ParaG&S 4.01 +.27 Parexel 25.53 +.27 ParkDrl 7.12 -.01 ParkerHan 1.28 96.20 Prkwy pfD 2.00 24.68 -.09 PrtnrCm 2.15 19.26 -.16 PartnerRe 2.20 81.11 -1.25 PatriotCoal 26.81 -.08 Patterson 0.48 33.06 +.08 PattUTI 0.20 28.96 +.01 Paychex 1.24 31.97 -.10 PeabdyE 0.34 72.23 -.04 Pearson 0.62 18.66 +.05 Pebblebrk 0.48 21.74 +.05 Pengrth g 0.84 14.05 +.09 PnnNGm 38.42 -.20 PennVa 0.23 15.73 -.51 PennVaRs 1.88 27.62 +.07 PennWst g 1.08 27.91 +.06 PennantPk 1.08 11.98 -.02 Penney 0.80 36.95 +1.07 PenRE 0.60 14.14 -.13 Penske 20.63 +.64 Pentair 0.80 39.25 +.75 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.85 +.18 PepBoy 0.12 13.66 +.74 PepcoHold 1.08 18.80 -.04 PepsiCo 1.92 65.58 +.49 PeregrineP 2.66 +.10 PerfectWld 23.86 +1.50 PerkElm 0.28 26.91 +.09 Perrigo 0.28 80.57 +.71 Petrohawk 24.55 +.25 PetrbrsA 1.41 35.81 -.33 Petrobras 1.41 40.73 -.62 PtroqstE 9.28 -.21 PetsMart 0.50 41.66 +.29 Pfizer 0.80 20.45 -.09 PhrmAth 3.16 -.01 PharmPdt 0.60 29.51 +1.08 Pharmasset 94.86+10.35 PhilipMor 2.56 65.55 +.63 PhilipsEl 1.02 31.35 -.36 PhlVH 0.15 66.09 +.66 PhnxCos 2.67 +.02 PhotrIn 8.75 +.03 PiedmOfc 1.26 19.40 +.09 Pier 1 10.42 +.25 PilgrimsP 7.17 -.01 PimCpOp 1.38 19.90 -.02 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.99 PinnclEnt 13.72 -.23 PinWst 2.10 42.90 -.31 PionDrill 13.98 +.20 PioNtrl 0.08 104.03 -.63 PitnyBw 1.48 25.66 +.03 PlainsAA 3.83 63.76 -.21 PlainsEx 37.22 +.14 Plantron 0.20 36.55 +.12 PlatGpMet 2.11 -.03 PlatUnd 0.32 38.03 -.64 PlugPwr h .67 -.01 PlumCrk 1.68 43.97 -.03 PluristemT 2.95 -.01 Polaris 1.80 88.86 +.86 Polo RL 0.80 128.59 +.59 Polycom 48.57 -.55 PolyMet g 2.09 +.07 PolyOne 0.16 14.54 +.30 Polypore 59.00 -.24 Poniard h .43 -.00 Pool Corp 0.52 24.48 -.09 Popular 3.07 +.07 PortGE 1.04 24.12 -.14 PositvID h .42 -.03 PostPrp 0.80 38.95 +.08 Potash s 0.28 61.12 -.32 PwrInteg 0.20 37.10 +.45 Power-One 8.59 +.08 PSCrudeDS 41.70 +.23 PwshDB 31.03 +.03 PwShCurH 24.74 +.14 PS Agri 34.54 +.02 PS Oil 32.71 -.08 PS Gold 51.27 +.84 PS USDBull 21.78 +.01 PwSClnEn 10.67 +.01 PSPrivEq 0.37 11.72 PSFinPf 1.27 18.20 +.04 PSETecLd 0.06 18.86 +.01 PSBldABd 1.48 25.28 -.04 PSHYCpBd 1.38 18.55 -.01 PwShPfd 0.97 14.38 +.03 PShEMSov 1.55 26.51 +.01 PSIndia 0.24 24.52 -.05 PowerSec 7.98 -.35 PwShs QQQ 0.39 57.12 -.15 Powrwav 4.60 +.07 PranaBio 2.51 +.07 Praxair 2.00 103.02 +.63 PrecCastpt 0.12 147.48 -1.29 PrecDrill 14.23 -.06 PriceTR 1.24 67.35 +.04 priceline 516.94 -1.65 PrideIntl 43.69 +.01 PrinctnR .47 +.07 PrinFncl 0.55 31.69 -.30 PrivateB 0.04 14.94 -.21 ProShtDow 40.97 +.04 ProShtQQQ 32.71 +.08 ProShtS&P 40.97 PrUShS&P 20.72 ProUltDow 0.32 62.59 -.04 PrUlShDow 17.66 +.04 ProUltQQQ 88.95 -.55 PrUShQQQ rs 51.58 +.34 ProUltSP 0.39 53.80 -.03 PrUShtFn rs 56.48 +.04 ProSShFn 34.85 -.02 ProUShL20 37.27 +.24 PrUSCh25 rs 25.17 +.29 ProUSEM rs 28.06 +.10 ProUSRE rs 15.31 -.01 ProUSOG rs 26.07 -.21 ProUSBM rs 15.87 -.38 ProUFin rs 0.05 70.93 -.01 PrUPShQQQ 25.79 +.19 PrUPShR2K 16.67 -.26 ProUltO&G 0.21 62.79 +.43 ProUBasM 0.03 58.45 +1.35 ProShtR2K 29.08 -.19 PrUltPQQQ s 83.51 -.96 ProUltR2K 0.01 50.36 +.48 ProUSSP500 15.70 +.01 PrUltSP500 s 0.11 80.86 +.01 ProSUltGold 73.27 +2.25 ProUSSlv rs 21.35 -.91 PrUltCrde rs 58.33 -.44 PrUShCrde rs 40.28 +.25 ProUSGld rs 25.97 -.85 ProSUltSilv 243.98 +9.01 ProUltShYen 16.91 +.31 ProUShEuro 17.73 Procera rs 10.74 +1.41 ProctGam 1.93 61.67 -.59 ProgrssEn 2.48 46.79 -.01 ProgrsSft s 30.06 +.03 ProgsvCp 1.40 21.16 -.15 ProLogis 0.45 16.11 +.02 ProUSR2K rs 40.81 -.40 ProspctCap 1.21 11.72 -.43 ProtLife 0.56 26.80 +.13 ProvEn g 0.54 9.08 -.17 ProvidFS 0.44 14.69 -.16

Nm

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Prudentl PSEG PubStrg PudaCoal PulseElec PulteGrp PPrIT

1.15 63.15 1.37 30.81 3.20 111.19 10.77 0.10 6.14 7.43 0.71 6.55

Nm -.07 -.08 -.54 -.69 +.01 +.10 +.06

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0.28 10.39 +.03 18.02 -.16 0.74 24.42 -.05 1.00 33.17 -.13 46.76 +1.06 8.45 -.29 1.05 -.04 9.52 +.58 2.19 -.18 4.47 +.09 16.27 +.10 2.83 +.05 49.81 +1.53 57.15 -1.35 50.17 +.04 0.47 17.69 +.20 26.84 -1.27 .07 +.00 0.20 11.36 -.08 76.05 +1.50 1.12 31.60 +.16 1.12 30.79 +.20 1.52 97.80 -.81 30.83 -.17 2.33 21.75 -1.00 0.08 2.82 +.03 45.45 -.02 0.40 6.42 +.03 2.08 74.15 -.59 34.09 +.36 0.50 26.51 -.09 11.08 -.14 43.10 -.16 0.20 54.64 +.62 1.70 85.40 +.17 68.47 +.33 0.50 45.09 -.51 60.07 +2.49 0.20 50.88 -.06 3.85 -.16 0.37 26.43 -.09 1.77 -.05 3.18 -.04 3.97 -.03 2.08 -.06 30.68 +.49 7.87 +1.05 25.08 -.17 2.52 99.06 +.43 7.57 +.25 29.06 -.39 0.76 34.27 +.39 0.76 30.33 +.17 0.38 53.96 +.98 1.60 +.04 0.20 30.50 +.43 1.00 33.74 -.51 0.72 13.83 -.18 0.66 109.20 +1.57 0.72 39.83 +.40 5.42 -.18 15.60


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Radiation

water in many states. Tests in Arizona, California and Washington state have found minuscule amounts in milk, leading to concern among dairy farmers. Everything detected has been well below levels considered dangerous, but food companies realize that consumers may still need to be reassured. In California, Will Daniels, senior vice president for food safety at Earthbound Farm, a major producer of organic salad greens, said the company was prepared to test soil and greens for radiation if concerns persisted or fallout from Japan intensified. “The likelihood of contamination on the West Coast is extremely low, so it’s really important that we’re monitoring appropriately and not creating panic,” Daniels said. “But we certainly need to make sure we’re doing the appropriate thing and are ready to respond.”

Continued from B1 So far, that screening has identified seven items that required further testing to see if the radiation detected exceeded normal background levels, according to Siobhan Delancey, an FDA spokeswoman. Those items included tea and flavoring compounds. She said three of the items had been cleared for delivery and four were awaiting test results. Patricia Hansen, a senior scientist at the FDA, acknowledged that the radiation detection methods used to screen food imports were not sensitive enough to detect a single contaminated fish in a large shipment. But she said that small amounts of contamination did not represent a public health hazard. A person would have to consume large amounts of fish in excess of what are known as an “intervention level,” or threshold level, of radiation for an extended period of time before it would be considered dangerous, she said. “One fish that might be at an intervention level in a huge cargo container, we’re not going to pick that up,” she said. “But the important context is, is that one fish at the intervention level a public health concern? No, it is not.” Nicholas Fisher, a professor of marine sciences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, said that, according to some radiation safety guidelines, people could safely eat 35 pounds of fish each year containing the level of cesium 137 detected in the Japanese fish. “You’re not going to die from eating it right away,” he said, “but we’re getting to levels where I would think twice about eating it.” All the talk about radioactive food in Japan, which earlier banned milk and other farm products from areas near the crippled plant, has made some people uneasy, even thousands of miles away. “When radioactive material started going into the ocean, that raised my concern greatly,” Karen Werner, 68, said Tuesday as she shopped for fish at 99 Ranch Market in Richmond, Calif. “Right now, I’m not too worried about it showing up in fish, but I’m keeping my eye on it.”

Seaweed boom Consumer worries about radiation have led to a big boom in sales of one food that often comes from Japan: seaweed. Natural food stores and Asian markets on the West Coast said they had seen a run on seaweed ever since the nuclear reactors in Japan began leaking radiation. Some consumers view seaweed as a natural source of normal iodine, which can help protect the thyroid gland against exposure to radioactive iodine. Timothy Zerkel, a manager at Central Co-op in Seattle, said sales of many types of seaweed were far above normal levels and the store’s distributors had begun rationing shipments because they could not keep up with demand. Scientists cautioned against eating large amounts of seaweed, however, saying that the levels of radioactive iodine reaching this country from Japan were much too low to worry about. And they said that some people could encounter health problems from consuming too much iodine. In addition, scientists said that radioactive iodine could concentrate at high levels in seaweed. As more contaminated water from the Fukushima reactors enters the sea, health concerns could arise about new seaweed imports from Japan.

Lottery Continued from B1 Niswender responded in a March 31 two-page, singlespaced letter that after reviewing Farfaglia’s call for eliminating lottery sales representatives and regional managers, he “has concluded that the existing expense and staffing levels in the Eastern Oregon and Central Oregon service area are justified and necessary.” Niswender wrote that the Oregon Lottery has seven field sales representatives and 11 field service representatives who service taverns and other lottery retailers in 18 counties across Central and Eastern Oregon. He said duties of each sales representative include managing inventory and keeping the state vans they drive stocked with paper slips and other supplies for video poker, keno and other lottery games. In addition, Niswender said sales reps answer questions from retailers, advise retailers on ways to increase lottery sales, help them solve problems and maintain a strong working relationship with retailers within their territories. “Each field sales representative in Eastern and Central Oregon is responsible for about 72 retailers, and every other week each retailer receives various onsite support services (referenced above),” Niswender said in his response to Farfaglia.

Planes Continued from B1 They can eventually spread until a section of the skin is so weak it is blown open by the cabin pressure, as happened with the Southwest flight Friday. The FAA ordered inspections of 737s built between 1993 and 2000. For airplanes with 35,000 or more flight cycles — a cycle is one takeoff and one landing — the inspections must be done within five days. Airlines will be given 20 days to inspect and test planes with 30,000 to 35,000 cycles, and all the 737s must be tested before they reach the 30,000 cycle mark. Boeing said 570 737-300s, 737400s and 737-500s are affected.

THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 B5

However, Farfaglia said his experience and the comments he has heard from other lottery retailers don’t match Niswender’s description of what field sales representatives do for the average salary of $56,200 a year reported by Niswender. “I have never received any sales advice from any lottery employee,” Farfaglia wrote to Niswender. “Whenever I have asked my video poker sales rep for supplies for the traditional side of the lottery, I have been told to call the 1-800 number because he doesn’t carry any of that stuff in the van. “As far as problem-solving, we call the 1-800 number for any poker or traditional issues,” Farfaglia said in an e-mail he sent to Niswender Tuesday in response to Niswender’s March 31 letter. Farfaglia asked Niswender what he had done to verify whether the sales representatives actually provided the services he outlined. If they aren’t doing those things and the lottery is working fine, that should prove the reps aren’t needed, he wrote. He asked whether Niswender had ever taken a surprise ride with a sales rep for a day, ever visited lottery retailers to see what a sales rep does, ever asked the retailers what sales advice they have received from a sales rep, or asked retailers how many times they see their lottery sales representative. Niswender said in his March 31 letter the agency sends out an

annual survey asking retailers to rate their sales reps, but Farfaglia said the survey is more of a popularity rating than a measure of whether retailers could do just as well without them.

The jets, which differ primarily in size and passenger capacity, were the last of Boeing’s 3,000plus second-generation 737 classics. The company’s current, “next-generation” 737 line is similar in many respects but was extensively redesigned. The problem of cracking along the 737’s “lap joints” caused by metal fatigue and, likely in many cases, corrosion is not new. In the best-known case, the skin of an Aloha Airlines 737 weakened by fatigue and corrosion ripped off in flight in 1988. The plane was able to land, but a flight attendant was killed when she was sucked out of the suddenly wide-open cabin. Richter said that through experience, Boeing determined

that inspections should be done every 30,000 cycles in earlier 737s, but design changes starting in 1993 were expected to extend the minimum life to at least 60,000 cycles. Because Boeing had not anticipated the cracking problem until much later in the life of the aircraft, Southwest and other airlines were not inspecting and testing for lap joint cracks. Aviation experts say the metal fatigue and cracking almost inevitably result from the way airplanes are built. Sheets of aluminum skin fourhundredths of an inch thick are fastened to the aircraft frame and overlapped lengthwise. Two rows of closely spaced rivets bind those 50-foot-long “lap joints,” which run parallel along

Seeking details Conger wants to hear more from Niswender about Farfaglia’s suggestions. “The lottery director’s response ... lacked sufficient detail for me to understand whether Mr. Farfaglia’s claims have merit,” Conger said. “If a citizen takes the time to inform an agency of potential waste or other problems, I think the agency should carefully and thoroughly investigate the matter — the state owes the citizen at least that much. “I plan to request a more thoughtful explanation from the lottery director and intend to discuss the situation in a faceto-face meeting with him next week,” Conger said. Niswender said in his letter the lottery takes its mission seriously and is continually looking for ways to be more efficient and to contain administrative costs to maximize profits for state programs, including education. Farfaglia said the response he received from Niswender was about what he expected. He’s still hoping for a serious consideration of his suggestion to cut lottery sales representatives and other nonessential state jobs and wasteful spending.

“You have an opportunity to do something every Oregonian wants to see — eliminate wasteful spending on government positions and add needed revenue to state coffers,” Farfaglia said. Statewide, the Oregon Lottery employs 45 field sales representatives, according to Mary Loftin, Lottery communications director. “You could save millions of dollars a year for the state and show that Oregon is ready for our new challenges and that this administration is different than those of the past,” Farfaglia wrote Tuesday. Niswender wrote that lottery sales and marketing staff has a significant impact on the lottery’s success and the amount of proceeds it generates for public programs, including education. “While cutting the number of staff might have a brief shortterm effect of increasing available funds, we believe the longterm negative impact would far outweigh any short-term gains,” Niswender wrote. Farfaglia called on business owners and citizens in Central Oregon and across the state to look at the agencies they interact with, identify positions, expenditures and programs that appear nonessential or wasteful, and recommend cuts to lawmakers and agency officials. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

both sides of the fuselage top. The process of manufacturing the aircraft — drilling holes in the aluminum — creates tiny cracks within the rivet holes. Over time, the stress of thousands of takeoffs and landings takes its toll and can expand those cracks. “We did expect there would be a need to inspect this airplane at some point in time,” Richter said, “but all of our analysis and evidence suggested the problem would be much later” in the life of the aircraft.

Other food concerns Other segments of the food industry are also grappling with how to respond to radiation concerns. Sensitive monitoring devices and tests have detected trace amounts of radioactive material from Japan in the air and

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Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

... 1.10f .04 .36 1.68 ... .80f .80a .82 ... .24 .32 .22 .72 .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

9 14 20 22 16 ... 27 26 24 86 22 10 ... 10 19 14 13 ... 17 66 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 62.61 23.41 13.47 16.10 73.23 7.59 51.89 59.49 74.93 8.58 34.18 40.29 11.91 19.71 8.86 23.79 6.05 10.34 23.38 14.46 25.78

+.07 -.04 +.03 +.42 -.72 +.68 +.74 +.64 +.76 +.07 +.05 -.05 -.08 +.22 -.06 -.09 +.12 +.18 -.08 -.15 +.23

Name

+10.4 +4.0 +1.0 +3.5 +12.2 -10.2 +9.8 -1.3 +3.8 +16.1 +14.9 -4.3 -2.9 -6.3 +.1 +6.4 -.2 +9.3 +15.3 +20.5 -7.6

NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1454.00 $1451.80 $39.175

Pvs Day $1434.00 $1432.20 $38.484

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46f .86f .52 ... .20 .50f .24 .20a ... .60f

19 17 17 17 42 ... 35 22 15 17 20 11 27 10 76 15 14 14 88 6

77.93 +.52 -8.8 45.66 +.49 +7.7 45.96 -.30 -1.1 13.50 +.32 -23.7 52.79 -.30 -7.9 2.37 +.06 +14.5 43.97 -.03 +17.4 147.48 -1.29 +5.9 23.94 +.51 +6.4 64.21 -1.81 -3.3 85.19 -.35 +1.7 46.63 -.09 +3.3 36.40 -.33 +13.3 12.05 -.06 +3.1 11.36 -.08 -6.7 26.51 -.09 -1.7 17.38 +.14 +2.7 31.99 +.19 +3.2 3.52 +.05 +24.8 24.64 -.32 +30.2

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp NatSemi S&P500ETF FordM iShEMkts

3854913 1273751 1065395 708036 672162

4.47 +.04 24.06 +9.99 133.24 -.02 15.79 +.24 49.77 -.10

Gainers ($2 or more) Name NatSemi Goldcp wt AberFitc QntmDSS Lubys

Last

Chg %Chg

24.06 +9.99 +71.0 5.15 +1.65 +47.1 65.57 +6.40 +10.8 2.75 +.26 +10.4 5.65 +.52 +10.1

Losers ($2 or more) Name DuoyGWat DirDGldBr BkIrelnd IFM Inv KV PhmA

Last

Chg %Chg

3.21 -.78 -19.5 36.21 -3.86 -9.6 2.31 -.21 -8.3 3.01 -.26 -8.0 4.60 -.40 -8.0

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

VirnetX NovaGld g Rentech GoldStr g NthgtM g

Last Chg

77512 27.50 +4.05 73475 13.79 +.91 63910 1.25 +.01 60277 3.08 +.21 47696 2.74 +.07

Gainers ($2 or more) Name AlmadnM g VirnetX Procera rs MdwGold g MinesMgt

Last

4.85 +.81 +20.1 27.50 +4.05 +17.3 10.74 +1.41 +15.1 2.12 +.27 +14.6 3.17 +.37 +13.2

Name SearchM un CoastD CagleA NewEnSys HallwdGp

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Cisco SiriusXM Microsoft Intel InspPhar

1006882 17.22 +.16 756172 1.78 +.08 697290 25.78 +.23 613554 19.71 +.22 547364 4.97 +.99

Name

Last

InspPhar Questcor CubistPh Zion wt1-12 HansenMed

1,650 1,353 140 3,143 281 14

Chg %Chg

2.56 -.49 -16.1 3.81 -.34 -8.2 6.30 -.55 -8.0 4.05 -.35 -8.0 24.00 -2.00 -7.7

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg

Chg %Chg

4.97 +.99 +24.9 18.00 +3.08 +20.6 29.01 +3.76 +14.9 5.50 +.70 +14.6 2.44 +.30 +14.0

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

SemiLeds n MeruNetw AsiaEntRs WrightM ZST Digtl

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

11.96 16.05 7.04 15.05 4.93

Chg %Chg -2.50 -2.82 -1.06 -2.08 -.63

-17.3 -14.9 -13.1 -12.1 -11.4

Diary 242 232 39 513 24 6

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

1,333 1,270 142 2,745 202 33

12,419.71 5,404.33 422.43 8,520.27 2,438.62 2,840.51 1,344.07 14,276.94 850.73

9,614.32 3,872.64 346.95 6,355.83 1,689.19 2,061.14 1,010.91 15.80 587.66

Dow Jones Industrials Dow Jones Transportation Dow Jones Utilities NYSE Composite Amex Index Nasdaq Composite S&P 500 Wilshire 5000 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,393.90 5,342.92 413.88 8,488.39 2,443.50 2,791.19 1,332.63 14,193.07 853.31

-6.13 -36.04 -1.28 +5.98 +31.22 +2.00 -.24 +9.35 +3.95

YTD %Chg %Chg -.05 -.67 -.31 +.07 +1.29 +.07 -.02 +.07 +.47

52-wk %Chg

+7.05 +4.62 +2.20 +6.58 +10.65 +5.21 +5.96 +6.23 +8.89

+12.98 +20.57 +6.76 +11.62 +24.61 +14.54 +12.04 +13.87 +21.64

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Tuesday.

Key currency exchange rates Tuesday compared with late Monday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

368.96 2,698.21 4,041.74 6,007.06 7,175.31 24,150.58 37,832.96 22,058.98 3,469.38 9,615.55 2,130.43 3,146.75 4,998.60 5,871.62

-.01 t -.34 t -.03 t -.16 t ... +1.47 s -.19 t +.23 s +.29 s -1.06 t +.69 s +.20 s +.28 s +.16 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0337 1.6283 1.0381 .002110 .1528 1.4220 .1286 .011790 .084625 .0354 .000919 .1579 1.0799 .0340

1.0355 1.6125 1.0334 .002103 .1528 1.4216 .1287 .011898 .084328 .0353 .000919 .1581 1.0828 .0342

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.69 +0.04 +6.1 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.65 +0.04 +6.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.48 +4.1 GrowthI 27.46 -0.03 +6.3 Ultra 24.12 +6.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.92 +5.8 AMutlA p 26.54 +5.4 BalA p 18.73 -0.01 +5.0 BondA p 12.17 -0.03 +0.7 CapIBA p 51.38 -0.02 +3.9 CapWGA p 37.22 -0.06 +4.6 CapWA p 20.59 -0.02 +1.7 EupacA p 43.26 -0.08 +4.6 FdInvA p 39.30 -0.02 +7.4 GovtA p 13.82 -0.03 -0.2 GwthA p 32.24 +5.9 HI TrA p 11.54 +0.01 +4.1 IncoA p 17.32 +5.7 IntBdA p 13.37 -0.03 +0.2 ICAA p 29.37 +0.02 +4.8 NEcoA p 26.71 -0.03 +5.4 N PerA p 30.06 +0.02 +5.0 NwWrldA 55.91 -0.05 +2.4 SmCpA p 40.62 +0.12 +4.5 TxExA p 11.71 +0.1 WshA p 28.94 -0.01 +7.0 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 31.30 +3.8 IntEqII I r 12.94 +3.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.87 -0.05 +5.4 IntlVal r 27.95 -0.04 +3.1 MidCap 36.45 +0.01 +8.4 MidCapVal 22.60 +0.29 +12.5 Baron Funds: Growth 56.85 +11.0 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.72 -0.03 +1.0 DivMu 14.20 -0.01 +0.4

TxMgdIntl 15.95 -0.05 +1.4 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.81 +0.02 +7.4 GlAlA r 20.22 +4.1 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.85 +3.9 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.86 +0.02 +7.5 GlbAlloc r 20.32 +4.2 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 57.53 +0.12 +7.8 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 31.28 +0.17 +7.0 DivEqInc 10.75 +6.8 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 32.32 +0.18 +7.1 AcornIntZ 41.95 -0.06 +2.5 ValRestr 53.59 -0.01 +6.3 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.92 +0.02 +6.2 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.79 -0.03 +5.0 USCorEq2 11.91 +0.02 +8.8 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 36.22 +5.5 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 36.62 +0.01 +5.6 NYVen C 34.96 +5.3 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.22 -0.01 +1.3 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 22.80 +0.03 +2.9 EmMktV 37.26 +0.06 +3.0 IntSmVa 18.20 -0.11 +5.8 LargeCo 10.51 +6.5 USLgVa 22.09 -0.02 +10.1 US Micro 15.06 +0.07 +9.4 US Small 23.49 +0.12 +10.0 US SmVa 28.16 +0.11 +10.1 IntlSmCo 17.95 -0.06 +4.6 Fixd 10.33 +0.2 IntVa 19.31 -0.07 +5.4 Glb5FxInc 10.88 -0.03 2YGlFxd 10.16 -0.01 +0.1 Dodge&Cox:

Balanced 73.70 Income 13.28 -0.01 IntlStk 37.05 -0.07 Stock 114.58 +0.02 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 10.98 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.88 +0.01 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.09 GblMacAbR 10.21 LgCapVal 18.93 +0.01 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.48 FPA Funds: FPACres 28.16 -0.02 Fairholme 34.83 +0.09 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.94 +0.02 StrInA 12.54 -0.01 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 21.15 +0.02 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 14.14 FF2015 11.81 FF2020 14.43 FF2020K 13.81 FF2025 12.11 FF2030 14.51 +0.01 FF2030K 14.33 FF2035 12.14 +0.01 FF2040 8.49 +0.01 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 13.20 AMgr50 16.00 -0.01 Balanc 19.08 -0.01 BalancedK 19.08 -0.01 BlueChGr 48.21 +0.11 Canada 63.71 +0.43 CapAp 26.71 -0.03 CpInc r 9.86 +0.02 Contra 71.29 +0.10 ContraK 71.28 +0.10 DisEq 24.28 +0.05 DivIntl 31.47

+5.5 +1.4 +3.8 +6.7 NA +3.9 +2.5 +0.6 +3.9 +5.6 +5.1 -2.1 +5.1 +2.8 +5.2 +4.0 +4.1 +4.6 +4.7 +5.1 +5.4 +5.4 +5.8 +6.0 +6.8 +3.8 +4.7 +4.7 +6.3 +9.6 +5.4 +5.9 +5.4 +5.4 +7.8 +4.4

DivrsIntK r 31.45 DivGth 30.56 EmrMk 27.33 Eq Inc 47.55 EQII 19.60 Fidel 34.67 FltRateHi r 9.89 GNMA 11.42 GovtInc 10.36 GroCo 90.67 GroInc 19.32 GrowthCoK 90.65 HighInc r 9.19 Indepn 26.24 IntBd 10.54 IntlDisc 33.99 InvGrBd 11.39 InvGB 7.41 LgCapVal 12.31 LatAm 60.17 LevCoStk 31.21 LowP r 41.14 LowPriK r 41.13 Magelln 75.71 MidCap 31.26 MuniInc 12.17 NwMkt r 15.70 OTC 60.04 100Index 9.23 Ovrsea 33.88 Puritn 18.87 SCmdtyStrt 13.31 SrsIntGrw 11.72 SrsIntVal 10.59 SrInvGrdF 11.39 STBF 8.46 SmllCpS r 20.93 StratInc 11.23 StrReRt r 9.98 TotalBd 10.75 USBI 11.28 Value 74.72 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 53.96

-0.01 +0.12 +0.08 +0.13 +0.07 +0.04 +0.01 -0.03 -0.03 +0.31 +0.02 +0.31 +0.05 -0.03 -0.07 -0.02 -0.02 +0.21 +0.23 +0.10 +0.10 +0.05 -0.01 -0.11 -0.01 -0.02 +0.03 +0.02 -0.03 -0.03 -0.01 +0.02 +0.01 -0.02 -0.03 +0.38

+4.4 +7.5 +3.7 +7.4 +7.4 +7.8 +1.7 +0.4 -0.1 +9.0 +5.6 +9.1 +4.4 +7.8 +0.7 +2.9 +0.6 +1.0 +7.4 +1.9 +9.8 +7.2 +7.2 +5.6 +8.4 +0.3 +1.8 +9.3 +5.6 +4.3 +5.4 +5.3 +3.8 +6.5 +0.7 +0.4 +6.8 +2.9 +4.2 +1.2 +0.3 +8.8

+2.15 +1.6

Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 41.65 +0.15 500IdxInv 47.36 IntlInxInv 36.66 -0.08 TotMktInv 38.98 +0.02 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 47.36 -0.01 TotMktAd r 38.99 +0.03 First Eagle: GlblA 48.07 +0.01 OverseasA 23.08 -0.06 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.25 FoundAl p 11.14 HYTFA p 9.51 IncomA p 2.26 USGovA p 6.69 -0.01 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p 13.83 +0.04 IncmeAd 2.25 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.28 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.84 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.56 GlBd A p 13.87 +0.05 GrwthA p 19.17 WorldA p 15.85 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.89 +0.04 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.80 -0.04 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.97 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 15.64 +0.02 Quality 20.98 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 38.17 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.43 MidCapV 38.48 +0.01 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.15 -0.02

+9.1 +6.5 +4.2 +7.0 +6.5 +7.0 +3.7 +1.9 +0.5 +6.5 +5.8 +0.3 +3.2 +5.9 +5.6 +5.8 +8.3 +3.2 +7.8 +6.8 +3.0 +6.4 NA +7.1 NA +6.3 +3.9 +6.4 +1.2

CapApInst 38.47 -0.06 IntlInv t 63.40 +0.04 Intl r 64.04 +0.04 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.87 +0.03 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.90 +0.03 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 44.81 +0.03 Div&Gr 20.83 TotRetBd 11.01 -0.02 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 11.98 +0.03 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.32 -0.03 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 17.18 -0.03 CmstkA 16.82 +0.04 EqIncA 9.00 GrIncA p 20.38 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 25.06 +0.08 AssetStA p 25.83 +0.07 AssetStrI r 26.06 +0.08 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.43 -0.02 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.42 -0.02 HighYld 8.34 IntmTFBd 10.73 ShtDurBd 10.95 USLCCrPls 21.61 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 52.08 PrkMCVal T 24.15 +0.04 Twenty T 67.10 -0.06 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.46 LSGrwth 13.56 +0.01 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 22.23 -0.01 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.63 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.80 -0.07

+4.8 +5.7 +5.8 +3.6 +3.6 +5.8 +6.8 +1.0 -2.5 +3.6 +6.2 +7.3 +5.2 +6.3 +5.6 +5.8 +5.9 +0.6 +0.6 +4.1 +0.5 +0.2 +4.5 +2.8 +7.0 +2.1 +4.8 +5.6 +2.1 +2.0 +9.0

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.66 +0.01 +4.1 StrInc C 15.30 +0.02 +4.1 LSBondR 14.61 +0.02 +4.1 StrIncA 15.22 +0.02 +4.3 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.28 -0.01 +2.6 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.29 +6.4 BdDebA p 8.04 +4.5 ShDurIncA p 4.60 +1.1 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.62 -0.01 +0.7 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.61 -0.01 +4.2 ValueA 24.29 +6.8 MFS Funds I: ValueI 24.39 +6.8 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.12 -0.01 +5.9 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 23.65 -0.05 +0.9 MergerFd 16.19 +2.6 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.40 -0.02 +1.3 TotRtBdI 10.40 -0.02 +1.5 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 41.21 +0.09 +10.3 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.56 +0.03 +4.7 GlbDiscZ 30.94 +0.03 +4.8 QuestZ 18.50 -0.03 +4.6 SharesZ 22.02 +0.01 +5.9 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 50.91 +0.08 +10.8 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 52.73 +0.08 +10.7 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.47 +4.2 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 29.27 +0.04 +5.5 Intl I r 20.00 -0.09 +3.0 Oakmark r 43.83 +0.10 +6.1 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.15 +0.01 +5.7

GlbSMdCap 16.41 -0.01 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 37.05 +0.05 GlobA p 64.24 -0.05 GblStrIncA 4.35 IntBdA p 6.57 MnStFdA 33.44 +0.02 RisingDivA 16.41 +0.02 S&MdCpVl 34.49 +0.19 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.89 +0.03 S&MdCpVl 29.52 +0.16 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.83 +0.02 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 36.67 +0.05 IntlBdY 6.57 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.89 -0.02 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.88 +0.01 AllAsset 12.47 +0.01 ComodRR 9.80 +0.02 HiYld 9.48 InvGrCp 10.60 -0.01 LowDu 10.45 RealRtnI 11.55 -0.01 ShortT 9.90 TotRt 10.89 -0.02 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.55 -0.01 TotRtA 10.89 -0.02 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.89 -0.02 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.89 -0.02 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.89 -0.02 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.82 +0.17 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 43.21 +0.02 Price Funds: BlChip 40.38 -0.13 CapApp 21.33 -0.02

+6.1 +1.6 +6.4 +3.0 +1.2 +3.2 +6.1 +7.6 +5.9 +7.4 +5.9 +1.7 +1.2 +1.2 +3.6 +4.0 +8.4 +3.8 +2.5 +1.3 +2.5 +0.7 +1.3 +2.4 +1.1 +0.9 +1.2 +1.2 +4.4 +5.7 +5.9 +5.0

EmMktS 36.42 EqInc 25.15 EqIndex 35.90 Growth 33.92 HlthSci 34.62 HiYield 6.94 IntlBond 10.05 IntlStk 14.74 MidCap 64.34 MCapVal 25.28 N Asia 19.36 New Era 58.14 N Horiz 37.47 N Inc 9.46 R2010 15.99 R2015 12.45 R2020 17.29 R2025 12.71 R2030 18.29 R2035 12.98 R2040 18.48 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 38.05 SmCapVal 39.31 SpecIn 12.53 Value 25.15 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.42 VoyA p 24.68 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.87 PremierI r 22.77 TotRetI r 14.14 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 39.71 S&P Sel 20.83 Scout Funds: Intl 33.80 Selected Funds: AmShD 43.69 Sequoia 145.57 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.47 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 54.29

-0.02 +3.2 +0.02 +6.5 -0.01 +6.4 -0.09 +5.5 +0.13 +14.3 +0.01 +4.3 -0.01 +1.7 -0.01 +3.6 +0.35 +9.9 +0.03 +6.6 +0.9 +0.20 +11.5 +0.19 +11.9 -0.01 +0.6 +4.2 -0.01 +4.7 +5.2 +5.6 -0.01 +5.8 -0.01 +6.1 -0.01 +6.1 -0.01 +0.4 +0.16 +10.5 +0.08 +8.8 +2.5 -0.01 +7.8 +6.7 +0.03 +4.1 +0.06 +10.5 +0.14 +11.9 +0.01 +7.6 +0.01 +6.8 +6.4 -0.03 +4.4 +0.01 +5.5 +0.63 +12.6 +7.1 -0.27 +4.9

Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.65 IntValue I 30.30 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.44 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 22.19 CAITAdm 10.68 CpOpAdl 80.83 EMAdmr r 41.51 Energy 140.85 ExtdAdm 45.30 500Adml 122.77 GNMA Ad 10.70 GrwAdm 33.24 HlthCr 55.05 HiYldCp 5.82 InfProAd 26.00 ITBdAdml 11.08 ITsryAdml 11.22 IntGrAdm 64.64 ITAdml 13.20 ITGrAdm 9.82 LtdTrAd 10.98 LTGrAdml 9.25 LT Adml 10.57 MCpAdml 100.69 MuHYAdm 9.97 PrmCap r 72.01 ReitAdm r 83.02 STsyAdml 10.65 STBdAdml 10.50 ShtTrAd 15.86 STIGrAd 10.72 SmCAdm 38.33 TtlBAdml 10.53 TStkAdm 33.66 WellslAdm 53.73 WelltnAdm 55.94 Windsor 48.84 WdsrIIAd 48.89 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.82 CapOpp 34.99

+0.04 +5.9 +0.04 +6.0 +0.03 +2.6 -0.01 +4.3 +0.7 +5.3 +0.04 +4.1 +0.06 +16.4 +0.17 +9.8 -0.02 +6.5 -0.03 +0.5 -0.01 +5.5 -0.13 +7.4 +0.01 +4.0 -0.04 +2.4 -0.05 +0.2 -0.04 -0.3 -0.02 +5.1 -0.01 +0.5 -0.02 +1.1 +0.4 -0.02 +0.5 +0.1 +0.23 +9.3 -0.22 +0.05 -0.01 -0.02

+5.5 +6.6 -0.1 +0.1 +0.4 -0.02 +0.7 +0.19 +10.2 -0.03 +0.2 +0.02 +7.1 -0.06 +3.1 -0.04 +4.8 +0.01 +7.1 +0.04 +7.3 -0.02 +5.6 +5.3

DivdGro 15.22 Energy 75.01 EqInc 21.74 Explr 80.68 GNMA 10.70 GlobEq 18.91 HYCorp 5.82 HlthCre 130.45 InflaPro 13.24 IntlGr 20.31 IntlVal 33.14 ITIGrade 9.82 LifeCon 16.78 LifeGro 23.22 LifeMod 20.37 LTIGrade 9.25 Morg 19.18 MuInt 13.20 PrecMtls r 27.49 PrmcpCor 14.52 Prmcp r 69.39 SelValu r 20.21 STAR 19.86 STIGrade 10.72 StratEq 20.51 TgtRetInc 11.50 TgRe2010 23.06 TgtRe2015 12.89 TgRe2020 23.03 TgtRe2025 13.21 TgRe2030 22.79 TgtRe2035 13.82 TgtRe2040 22.70 TgtRe2045 14.26 USGro 19.41 Wellsly 22.18 Welltn 32.39 Wndsr 14.47 WndsII 27.54 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.47 TotIntlInst r 109.89 500 122.76 Growth 33.24

+0.01 +5.8 +0.04 +16.4 +0.01 +7.4 +0.43 +10.7 -0.03 +0.5 +5.9 +0.01 +4.0 -0.31 +7.4 -0.02 +2.5 -0.01 +5.0 -0.08 +3.0 -0.02 +1.1 -0.02 +3.0 -0.01 +5.3 -0.02 +4.1 -0.02 +0.5 +0.01 +6.4 -0.01 +0.5 +0.33 +3.0 -0.02 +5.4 -0.21 +5.5 +0.02 +7.7 -0.02 +4.1 -0.02 +0.7 +0.08 +12.0 -0.01 +2.5 -0.02 +3.4 -0.01 +3.8 -0.02 +4.2 +4.7 -0.01 +5.1 +5.6 -0.01 +5.6 +5.6 -0.02 +6.4 -0.02 +3.1 -0.02 +4.8 +7.1 +0.02 +7.3

MidCap

22.18 +0.05 +9.2

SmCap

38.28 +0.18 +10.2

-0.03 -0.14 -0.02 -0.01

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+4.3 +4.2 +6.4 +5.4

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24.59 +0.16 +12.2

SmlCpVl

17.31 +0.06 +8.1

STBnd

10.50 -0.02 +0.1

TotBnd

10.53 -0.03 +0.2

TotlIntl

16.42 -0.02 +4.2

TotStk

33.65 +0.02 +7.0

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.37 -0.03 +3.9

ExtIn

45.29 +0.16 +9.8

FTAllWldI r

98.07 -0.10 +4.5

GrwthIst

33.24 -0.01 +5.5

InfProInst

10.59 -0.02 +2.5

InstIdx

121.91 -0.02 +6.5

InsPl

121.92 -0.02 +6.5

InsTStPlus

30.44 +0.02 +7.1

MidCpIst

22.24 +0.05 +9.2

SCInst

38.33 +0.19 +10.2

TBIst

10.53 -0.03 +0.2

TSInst

33.66 +0.02 +7.1

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

101.41 -0.02 +6.5

STBdIdx

10.50 -0.02 +0.1

TotBdSgl

10.53 -0.03 +0.2

TotStkSgl

32.48 +0.02 +7.0

Western Asset: CorePlus I Fund p

10.84 -0.01 +1.6 17.68 -0.01 +6.9


B USI N ESS

B6 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL GREEN APPRAISER COURSE: Two-day course approved for 14 hours of continued education. Taught by Taylor Watkins of Watkins and Associates; $329 per person; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 503-9687160, cmayou@earthadvantage.org or www.earthadvantage.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-5041389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration is required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY BUSINESS NETWORK INTERNATIONAL

WEEKLY MEETING: The meeting is upstairs and starts promptly at 7 a.m.; free; Deschutes County Title Co., 397 Upper Terrace Drive, Bend; 541-610-9125. CERTIFIED RESIDENTIAL GREEN APPRAISER COURSE: Two-day course approved for 14 hours of continued education. Taught by Taylor Watkins of Watkins and Associates; $329 per person; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 503-9687160, cmayou@earthadvantage.org or www.earthadvantage.org. TEAM BUILDING FOR GREATER PRODUCTIVITY: Registration required; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541-553-3243.

FRIDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-536-6237 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance.

For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325.

SATURDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-5041389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541-4473260 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-447-3119.

MONDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-536-6237 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W.

NEWS OF RECORD Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: SUPER DISCOUNT DAY. Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $15; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-4476384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541-553-3243. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use Wordpress to create a customized website. Monday evening course April 11 through May 16. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

TUESDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. BEGINNING PHOTOSHOP: Two evening class. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

BANKRUPTCIES Chapter 7 Filed March 30

Hal E. Bentley, 2038 S.W. 22nd St., Redmond Dori L. Reed, 52041 Dorrance Meadow Road #9, La Pine Scott S. DeLong, 55708 Snow Goose Road, Bend David M. Graham, 63179 Desert Sage, Bend Ronald L. and Shirlene G. Hillard, 409 N.E. Sixth St., Bend Nancy A. Becker, 19129 Pumice Butte Road, Bend Melissa Gail-Ann Hartman, 2565 N.E. Harvey Lane, Bend Casey R. Snow, 63108 Turret Court, Bend Gary E. Boothe, 981 N.E. Yew St., Prineville Juan and Josefa Gutierrez, 3018 S.W. Pumice Ave., Redmond Aleda O. Verburg, 3436 S.W. Obsidian Ave., Redmond Filed March 31

Michelle C. Riley, 61040 S.W. South Queens Drive #46, Bend Jonnie M. and Julie A. Leach, P.O. Box 860, Prineville Art J. and Vivian H. Gienger, 8140 N.W. Madras Highway, Prineville Kevin R. Newton, 1779 Bobbie Court, Bend Tania C. M. Johnson, P.O. Box 321, La Pine Turner C. IV and Michelle M. Hardesty, 20670 Wild Goose Lane, Bend Kimberly K. and Archie Mooyman, 1122 Barberry Drive, Terrebonne Michael L. and Carrie E. Knighten, P.O. Box 5476, Bend Matthew R. Spruill, 20814 N.E. Sierra Drive #26, Bend Wyndee A. Chesbrough, 14784 S.E. Umpqua Road, Prineville William R. and Tamela J. Berberick, P.O. Box 1991, La Pine Nora E. Moss, 16353 Whitetail Lane, Sunriver Lana M. Clark, 3108 N.E. Yellow Ribbon Drive, Bend Filed April 1

Kathryn D. Abbe, 1854 N.E. Diablo Way, Bend Randy A. Sussmane-Stubbs, 60360 Chickasaw Way, Bend Filed April 2

John M. and Jamie M. Donahue, 55428 Heierman Drive, Bend Sharon G. Schoettler, 900 N.E. Butler Market Road #71, Bend Filed April 4

Caleb M. Jagels, 795 Adams Ave., Metolius Chapter 13 Filed March 31

Ivan R. Smith Jr., 8101 N.E. Mill Creek Road, Prineville Craig A. Ford and Korina L. Chinchen, 1607 N.W. Trenton Ave., Bend Filed April 1

Robert C. Hoyer, 20452 Rae Road, Bend


L

Inside

C LOCAL SCHOOLS Students get sample of Spanish culture, see Page C3. OREGON Leader in kidnapping plot pleads guilty, see Page C6. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

Kitzhaber: Education New program planned at Pilot Butte IB Middle Years approach stresses global view, critical thinking system ‘severely broken’ BEND-LA PINE SCHOOLS

“I want to really enhance the whole culture of Pilot Butte Middle School, and it’s a way to positively impact the entire student body.”

By Lauren Dake

— Michael Hecker, Pilot Butte Middle School principal

By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Bend-La Pine Schools officials plan to start an International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme at Pilot Butte Middle School. The program offers students a challenging global curriculum that emphasizes critical thinking and focuses on improving teacher training and professional de-

velopment. It could take as many as three years to gain formal approval. But administrators say all students will benefit from the implementation, and they hope that will be welcome news to parents who have provided so much negative feedback about the school during the middle school boundary change process. Pilot Butte Principal Michael Hecker met with school staff Tues-

day to discuss implementing the program. He said the staff seemed excited about participating. “I want to really enhance the whole culture of Pilot Butte Middle School, and it’s a way to positively impact the entire student body,” Hecker said. The IB Middle Years program, which is intended for students between ages 11 and 16, focuses on eight main subject groups, includ-

ing technology, arts and a second language. For a school to earn IB World School status, it must undergo an extensive authorization process that requires site visits and teacher training. Only approved world schools can offer IBendorsed programs and classes. Superintendent Ron Wilkinson said the plan to start a signature, choice program at Pilot Butte fell by the wayside in the midst of budget woes over the past few years. See Pilot Butte / C5

The Bulletin

SALEM — For the first time this legislative session, Gov. John Kitzhaber testified in front of lawmakers, urging them to help transform the state’s education system. Kitzhaber told senators on Tuesday afternoon the education system is “severely broken.” “A new approach, a new Gov. John direction is Kitzhaber required to produce better resources for teachers and more value for taxpayers,” Kitzhaber told members of the Senate Education and Workforce Development Committee. “We spend over a billion dollars a biennium on programs for kids zero through 5, and we simply aren’t getting the outcomes we need by the time they get to school,” Kitzhaber said. Kitzhaber has made education reform one of his priorities in this legislative session. “We know that one out of every four high school graduates, only one out of four, is collegeready, and 20 percent of our community college budget is spent on remediation,” he said. “At the same time, we recognize that most of the jobs that will be available for Oregonians in the next decade will require at least a technical certificate or an associate’s degree. So, without fundamentally changing our approach to education funding and governance, it will be impossible, in my estimation, to achieve our long-term objectives of ensuring that every high school graduate is college-ready.” The governor’s goal is to create one entity, known as the Education Investment Board, that would oversee all levels of education. He was advocating on behalf of Senate Bill 909, which would create the “zero to 20” system. Earlier in the day, the governor said the creation of the board is the key to the state’s education reform. The goal of the 13-member board, which would be appointed by the governor, would be to streamline and integrate the state’s education. The board would be in charge of creating a proposed budget for preschool through post-secondary education. It would still be up to lawmakers to approve the budget. Some of the board’s priorities would be to ensure students enter preschool ready to learn and leave first grade with the ability to read. The board would also be charged with establishing performance-based models to fund schools, moving away from funding districts based on enrollment numbers. See Reform / C5

IN THE LEGISLATURE Senate Bill 909 Gov. John Kitzhaber has called this bill, which would create a single board to oversee all levels of education, the centerpiece of the state’s education reform. • Sponsors: This bill is being sponsored by the Committee on Rules, on Kitzhaber’s behalf. • What’s next: Another public hearing or work session has not been scheduled for the bill. A work session must be scheduled by Friday, and the bill must be voted on by April 21.

Catching spring air in the High Desert

Redmond may slash SDCs in half in effort to spur projects By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — As it looks for ways to spur development, the city of Redmond is in the early stages of considering a temporary 50 percent cut in system development charges. City staff presented a rough proposal at a Tuesday city council meeting after the idea was pushed by some area developers. If the city allows the discount, developers and homebuyers could save thousands of dollars. SDCs, which pay for various growth-related projects, vary according to projects’ expected impacts. In Redmond, SDCs are $12,320 for a single-family home and $86,500 for a 10,000-square-foot office building. Redmond projects it will bring in about $500,000 in SDCs next year, so the discount could cost about $250,000. If it spurred development, the city’s SDC income could increase, according to staff.

Over the tipping point A 50 percent discount could push people who are wavering to move on a project soon, according to Jon Start, manager of Redmond Economic Development. “This could be an incentive for them to do something sooner rather than later,” said Stark, who has spoken with city staff about the proposal. “This is a good way to say, ‘Hey, we’re open for business.’ ” Exactly what projects the discounts would apply to remains uncertain, and the idea of an SDC break received a mixed reaction from city councilors. Councilor Shirlee Evans said it is not clear the city needs more buildings. There are plenty of available residential and commercial buildings in Redmond, she said. Evans worries that making incentives available only to new development will do nothing to help people who have already invested in Redmond. “We are ignoring their existence totally and trying to attract new money into town,” Evans said. “These are people who have already made their commitment and have bought into the system. They deserve some consideration.”

Limits to deal possible

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Jamie Goldman, 24 and from Bend, gets some air while making a jump over a hip table on the slalom course at Phil’s Trail on Tuesday afternoon. He and a friend were reaping the rewards of several hours of volunteer work to maintain the course, he said. They were also taking advantage of a window of good weather. The National Weather Service is forecasting snowy, rainy conditions in Central Oregon for the next couple of days. For the area’s forecast, turn to Page C6.

Public Works Director Chris Doty made suggestions to limit the deal, including setting specific time limits on development schedules. For example, a developer who received a 50 percent discount and failed to begin construction within a year could be subject to the full SDC rate. That, Doty said, would discourage developers from buying SDCs at discounted rates for construction projects years down the road. “We want to be sure if they’re pulling that permit, that they’re moving toward construction,” Doty said. Several councilors voiced support for the idea, though no vote was held. See SDCs / C5

Bend to rebuild heavily traveled roundabout By Nick Grube The Bulletin

A busy roundabout at Reed Market Road and Mt. Washington Drive is expected to get a makeover this spring. The city of Bend is planning to repave the roadway in the pothole-riddled roundabout by this summer. It also intends to do some work on the streets leading into the intersection. City officials still aren’t sure exactly how much the project

will cost, but street division manager Hardy Hanson estimates the work on the roundabout and the four street legs will be around $200,000. “It’s one of the worst,” Hanson said. “It’s certainly degrading quickly, so there are some grave concerns about it.” Hanson said the intersection will be closed for about a month, and detours will be set up to allow people to travel around the construction zone.

Those alternate routes, which will allow people to access the Cascade Lakes Highway, could possibly be on Mt. Bachelor Drive, Westridge Road and Chandler Avenue. “If you look at a map, there are ways to get around that roundabout, so we’re kind of lucky in that way,” Hanson said. Hanson added that the city’s intention is to do the work when school is out to avoid heavy traffic on the roads used to access

Cascade Middle School and Seven Peaks School. The city is considering using concrete instead of asphalt. Many Bend roundabouts have an asphalt base, Hanson said, and the life span of that material is shorter than that of concrete. He said concrete can last 30 to 40 years compared with about 15 for asphalt. “We still have some decisions to make, but the sentiment is that we want to go to concrete because

it’s much more durable,” Hanson said. “If this process works, it’s my intention to try and push to do it for all the roundabouts.” The roundabout at Reed Market and Mt. Washington is one of the most highly traveled in the city. Hanson said it has roughly 20,000 vehicle trips on average per day. Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.


C2 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:31 a.m. April 1, in the 1100 block of Northwest Kingston Avenue. DUII — Kristine Michelle Kyner, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:37 a.m. April 1, in the 1300 block of Northwest Wall Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:49 a.m. April 1, in the area of Pilot Butte State Park. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:07 a.m. April 1, in the 600 block of Northwest Compass Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:18 a.m. April 1, in the 20300 block of Klahani Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:07 p.m. April 1, in the 1500 block of Northeast Second Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:19 p.m. April 1, in the 700 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:45 p.m. April 1, in the 2600 block of Northwest College Way. DUII — Kelly Michael Edwards, 26, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 9:22 p.m. April 1, in the area of Northwest Bond Street and Northwest Oregon Avenue. DUII — Benjamin Adam Core, 43, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:18 p.m. April 1, in the area of Northwest Kansas Avenue and Northwest Wall Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:47 a.m. April 2, in the 2000 block of Northeast Full Moon Drive. DUII — Daniel Taylor Hudson Conner, 23, was arrested on suspicion

of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3 a.m. April 2, in the area of Northwest Oregon Avenue and Northwest Wall Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 7:53 a.m. April 2, in the 1000 block of Northwest Bond Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:48 a.m. April 2, in the area of Northwest 14th Street and Northwest Newport Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 12:22 p.m. April 2, in the 21000 block of Carl Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 1:41 p.m. April 2, in the 60900 block of Targee Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:01 p.m. April 2, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:30 p.m. April 2, in the 700 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 4:21 p.m. April 2, in the 61500 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 6:05 p.m. April 2, in the 500 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. DUII — Camille Pedersen, 21, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:13 a.m. April 3, in the area of Bear Creek Road and Northeast McCartney Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported and an arrest made at 7:25 a.m. April 3, in the 100 block of Northwest Minnesota Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 8:04 a.m. April 3, in the 20300 block of Fairway Drive. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:03 a.m. April 3, in the 20500 block of Cooley Road. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:36 a.m. April 3, in the 60700 block of Country Club Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:19 a.m. April 3, in the 900 block of Southeast Zeller Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and an arrest made at 4:27 p.m. April 3, in the 61300

First modern Olympic Games open in 1896 The Associated Press Today is Wednesday, April 6, the 96th day of 2011. There are 269 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On April 6, 1909, American explorers Robert Peary and Matthew Henson and four Inuits became the first men to reach the North Pole. ON THIS DATE In 1830, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was organized by Joseph Smith in Fayette, N.Y. In 1862, the Civil War Battle of Shiloh began in Tennessee as Confederate forces launched a surprise attack against Union troops, who beat back the Confederates the next day. In 1886, the Canadian city of Vancouver, British Columbia, was incorporated. In 1896, the first modern Olympic Games formally opened in Athens, Greece. In 1917, Congress approved a declaration of war against Germany. In 1945, during World War II, the Japanese warship Yamato and nine other vessels sailed on a suicide mission to attack the U.S. fleet off Okinawa; the fleet was intercepted the next day. In 1965, the United States launched the Intelsat I, also known as the “Early Bird� communications satellite, into orbit. In 1971, Russian-born composer Igor Stravinsky, 88, died in New York City. In 1985, William Schroeder became the first artificial heart recipient to be discharged from the hospital as he moved into an apartment in Louisville, Ky. In 1994, the presidents of Rwanda and Burundi were killed in a mysterious plane crash near Rwanda’s capital; widespread violence and killings erupted in Rwanda over claims the plane had been shot down. TEN YEARS AGO Algerian national Ahmed Ressam, accused of bringing explosives into the United States just days before the millennium celebrations, was convicted twice in the same day — first in France for belonging to a group supporting Islamic militants, then in Los Angeles on terror charges. Pacific Gas and Electric Co. filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy pro-

T O D AY I N HISTORY tection in an offshoot of the California energy crisis. (It emerged from bankruptcy in April 2004.) FIVE YEARS AGO At the death penalty trial of al-Qaida conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui, former New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani described his own harrowing experiences in lower Manhattan on Sept. 11, 2001. U.S. Rep. Cynthia McKinney, D-Ga., apologized for an altercation in which she’d entered a Capitol building unrecognized, refused to stop when asked by a police officer and then struck him. ONE YEAR AGO The White House announced a fundamental shift in U.S. nuclear strategy that called the spread of atomic weapons to rogue states or terrorists a worse threat than the nuclear Armageddon feared during the Cold War. Former Soviet diplomat Anatoly Dobrynin, 90, died in Moscow. Actor Corin Redgrave, 70, died in London. Former Chief Wilma Mankiller, the first female leader of the Cherokee Nation, died in Oklahoma at age 64. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Nobel Prize-winning scientist James Watson is 83. Composerconductor Andre Previn is 82. Country singer Merle Haggard is 74. Actor Billy Dee Williams is 74. Actor Roy Thinnes is 73. Movie director Barry Levinson is 69. Actor John Ratzenberger is 64. Actress Marilu Henner is 59. Olympic bronze medal figure skater Janet Lynn is 58. Actor Michael Rooker is 56. Rock musician Warren Haynes is 51. Rock singer-musician Frank Black is 46. Author Vince Flynn is 45. Actress Ari Meyers is 42. Actor Paul Rudd is 42. Actor-producer Jason Hervey is 39. Rock musician Markku Lappalainen is 38. Actor Zach Braff is 36. Actress Candace Cameron Bure is 35. Actor Bret Harrison is 29. Actor Charlie McDermott (TV: “The Middle�) is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “History is the ship carrying living memories to the future.� — Sir Stephen Spender, British poet and critic (1909-1995)

block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:09 p.m. April 3, in the 200 block of Northeast Second Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 8:23 a.m. April 4, in the 2600 block of Northeast Forum Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:33 a.m. April 4, in the 63500 block of Stacy Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 8:34 a.m. April 4, in the 63000 block of Lower Meadow Drive. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 8:51 a.m. April 4, in the 100 block of Southeast Bridgeford Boulevard. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 9:13 a.m. April 4, in the 300 block of Southwest Century Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:19 a.m. April 4, in the 200 block of Southeast Soft Tail Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:59 a.m. April 4, in the 61300 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:41 a.m. April 4, in the 20700 block of Prince John Court. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 12:05 p.m. April 4, in the 1000 block of Southeast Fourth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:41 p.m. April 4, in the 1200 block of Northwest Wall Street. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:06 p.m. April 4, in the 1700 block of Northeast Wells Acres Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:37 p.m. April 4, in the 1700 block of Northeast Wells Acres Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 3:08 p.m. April 4, in the 2500 block of Awbrey Point Circle. DUII — Nicholas C. Saddler, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 7:44 p.m. April 4, in the area of Reed Lane and Southeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:30 p.m. April 4, in the 61100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen

L B   at 9:58 p.m. April 4, in the 2600 block of Northwest College Way. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 8:19 p.m. April 4, in the 800 block of Northwest Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A washer and dryer were reported stolen at 5:02 p.m. April 4, in the 400 block of Northwest 25th Street. Theft — A vehicle was reported stolen at 2:16 p.m. April 4, in the 2400 block of Southwest Timber View Court. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:45 a.m. April 4, in the area of East Antler Avenue and the railroad tracks. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:37 a.m. April 4, in the area of Southwest Airport Way and the railroad tracks. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:14 p.m. April 4, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:26 p.m. April 4, in the area of Northeast Ochoco Avenue. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Theft — A theft was reported at 9:46 a.m. April 4, in the 53800 block of Rock Sand Road in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Monday 14 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www. redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Labrador retriever — Female, black, with a pink collar; found near Fifth Street in Terrebonne. Pug — Male, black; found near Northwest Poplar Avenue.

Mother, her toddler injured in dog attack The Associated Press NEWPORT — A Lincoln County sheriff’s officer says a toddler suffered life-threatening injuries to her head and neck and her mother was injured as well in a dog attack in a home in Otter Rock. Sgt. Mark Meister says little Eden Bailey and her mother, Kari Wallace, had recently moved to the home. The residents were gone Monday when the family’s pet

bulldog attacked the little girl. Meister says no one saw the initial attack but after the mother was able to get her child away, the dog tried to continue the attack. The mother was able to get out of the house with her daughter and close the dog inside. The dog was euthanized at the owners’ request. The little girl turned 2 on Tuesday.

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Grand jury to look at hit-and-run death A grand jury this week will begin looking into the hit-andrun that killed a Bend man in late January, Deschutes County Chief Deputy District Attorney Traci Anderson said Tuesday. Anderson did not say what day the grand jury will begin its investigation. On Jan. 26, a southbound driver struck and killed Anthony “Tony� Martin, 48, as he pushed his bicycle across Third Street. No arrest has been made, but the District Attorney’s Office has confirmed that Bret Biedschied, 38, of Bend, is regarded as a person of interest in the case. Anderson said the grand jury will hear from multiple witnesses, and she could not anticipate how long the process would take. The grand jury will determine if the evidence supports filing charges against anyone in the case.

Middlekauff verdict due Thursday Judge Stephen Tiktin is set to announce his verdict in the murder trial of Darrell Middlekauff on Thursday. Middlekauff, 48, was charged with murder in the death of his wife, Brenda Middlekauff, whose body was discovered in a partially buried steel drum in southern Deschutes County in July 2005. Tiktin heard nearly eight weeks of arguments from prosecutors and Middlekauff’s defense team before the conclusion of the trial last week. If convicted, Middlekauff could face life in prison.

Missing La Pine man located near resort A La Pine man missing overnight was located early Tuesday afternoon. Authorities said Clayton Roy Lichtenhahn, 41, was located walking near Twin Lakes Resort at around 1:20 p.m. and hospitalized. Lichtenhahn was reported missing by his wife, Sandy Lichtenhahn, shortly after 1:30 a.m. Tuesday. She told sheriff’s deputies he left their house north of La Pine at around 4:30 p.m. Monday on his ATV. He did not say where he was going, and did not take his wallet, cell phone or house keys. Sheriff’s Capt. Marc Mills said Lichtenhahn crashed his ATV about four miles from

his home, and may have been disoriented, as he began walking in the wrong direction. Lichtenhahn was approximately 12 miles from his ATV when he was found by an employee of Twin Lakes Resort.

Woman to enter plea in embezzlement case A woman suspected of embezzling thousands from customers of her property management company was arraigned in Deschutes County Circuit Court on Tuesday and is due to enter a plea to the charges against her May 9. Elizabeth J. Rose, 49, faces 54 counts of first-degree theft and two counts of aggravated first degree theft for allegedly transferring money out of customers’ accounts while operating PRG Property Management. An investigation by Bend Police identified 60 potential victims, who are believed to have lost more than $235,000 collectively. In November 2009, Rose was fined $21,314 by the state Real Estate Agency for operating an unlicensed property management company.

Several lane closures scheduled in Bend Several west Bend roads will have reduced lanes today while construction crews work to install sewer monitoring equipment. Between the hours of 7 a.m. and 10 a.m. on Northwest Newport Avenue, the eastbound lane will be reduced to a travel lane between 13th Street and 14th Street. The center of Newport Avenue will also be closed. From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Northwest Newport Avenue between Seventh Street and Eighth Street, the westbound lane will be reduced to a travel lane. At the intersection of Northwest Portland Avenue and First Street, the center of the intersection will be closed, and two travel lanes will be maintained between 8:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. On Fourth Street just north of Penn Avenue, the center of the street will be closed with two travel lanes between 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. On Southwest Columbia Street just north of Commerce Avenue, the shoulder of the northbound lane will be closed, with two travel lanes from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS Veterans Outreach Speaker Thursday, April 7th, 11:30 am Kings Buffet, Wagner Mall, Bend JOIN US TO LEARN MORE!

WWW.LWVDESCHUTES.ORG


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 C3

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A special section featuring news from schools in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties

IN BRIEF Crook Rotary raises scholarship money The Crook County/Prineville Rotary Club raised $10,150 at its “Dollars for Scholars” radiothon on KRCO last week. The broadcast, which ran from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. April 1, will fund scholarships for Crook County High School graduates.

Oregon Connections Academy enrolling Oregon Connections Academy, a virtual, online public school, will host free information sessions around Oregon and online in the coming weeks as it enrolls students for the 2011-12 school year. At the sessions, families can meet Oregon Connections Academy representatives and learn about the enrollment process and curriculum. For more information on the program or to learn more about the information sessions, go to www.connectionsacademy.org or call 800-382-6010.

Scratch-it event will benefit area schools

Photos by Dean Guernsey / The Bulletin

Thomas Yee and Suzanne Mendieta perform a flamenco-inspired dance during a concert at Sage Elementary School in Redmond last week. Under the auspices of the Redmond Community Concert Association, students were treated to an hourlong performance featuring music and dancing from Spain, Argentina and other Spanish-speaking countries.

A morsel of world music Spanish-themed concert inspires Redmond students

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By Megan K ehoe • The Bulletin hough Sage Elementary School students in Redmond had just returned from spring break, they were already being whisked away to foreign lands last week with a concert featuring classical music from Spain,

C O N TAC T U S

Argentina and other Spanish-speaking countries. “Most of these kids have never seen someone playing harp, let alone a live classical concert,” said Geri Gunderson of the Redmond Community Concert Association. “And they’re getting to hear such wonderful music.” The concert featured harpist Anna Maria Mendieta along with a classical music ensemble. Their performance of Spanish and Argentineinfused music treated students to both a musical and cultural experience that Monday morning. Students even watched their principal, Carolyn Espinosa, dance a tango — a sight that had many of them smiling and giggling. The Redmond Community Concert Association has operated an outreach program for 17 years, sending visiting artists and musicians into Redmond schools, Gunderson said. Last week’s concert at Sage was held in the gymnasium, with the entire student body present. The musicians started the concert with a “Buenos Dias.” Many of the students, understanding the Spanish words for “Good morning,” responded by repeating the phrase. Violinist Thomas Yee talked to students about Spanish, asking them which countries use it as their main language. “California!” one student near the front row shouted. Teachers and students laughed at the response. Yee told the student he wasn’t altogether wrong — that while many people in California do speak Spanish, California is not a country. Other responses were Mexico and Spain. Yee added several others to the list, and explained that the music the ensemble would play comes from many of those countries. “I’ve never been to a classical music concert before,” said Brianna Hamilton, 10. “So I think it’ll be interesting.” The concert began with a song by Spanish composer Manuel De Falla. As Mendieta gracefully plucked her harp, Yee cut away furiously at the violin.

SCHOOL BRIEFS: Items and announcements of general interest. Please include details and contact information. Phone: 541-617-7831 E-mail: smiller@bendbulletin.com

Midway through the song, dancer Suzanne Mendieta, Anna’s sister, emerged from behind the stage dressed in a canary-yellow flamenco dress. Yee joined her on the floor, matching her graceful movements while continuing to play the violin. Reactions of “Whoa!” and “Cool!” erupted from the audience. “It’s so much fun to see the kids’ expressions,” said Diana Barker, RCCA president. After receiving a round of applause, performers talked to students about the diversity of the local culture in Redmond, and how the confluence of cultures was comparable in some ways to many Latin American countries, including Argentina. The next song the musicians played was an Ástor Piazzolla tango. Mendieta left her harp midway through the song to dance a tango with another dancer who emerged from behind the stage. “The dancing is awesome,” said Gaby Smith, 10. “I like that if you close your eyes, you can hear a different place.” The performance was topped off with a tango number featuring one of the dancers and a surprised Espinosa, who hadn’t expected to be learning how to tango in front of the student body. “It’s really amazing,” said Eve Williams, 11. “I just love the way the music sounds.” Barker said such concerts can spur an interest in music that students can carry with them for life. “It gives them an exposure to a kind of music that they wouldn’t otherwise see,” Barker said. “Most artists were their age when they were first exposed to music — and it’s that one brief contact that can set them on their way.” Meg an Kehoe can be reached at 541-383-0354 or at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

Seven local schools will participate in a school fundraiser sponsored by Oregon Lottery on Thursday. Representatives from Culver High School, Powell Butte Community Charter School, Cecil Sly Elementary School, Seven Peaks School, Redmond Proficiency Academy and Cascade Middle School will have five minutes to scratch off as many scratchit tickets as they can. All cash prizes from the scratch-it tickets go to the schools. The schools are among 75 statewide that were selected to participate in the program. The event will take place at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Hollinshead Barn at 1235 N.E. Jones Road in Bend. — Bulletin staff reports

TEEN FEATS: The Bulletin wants to recognize high school students’ achievements off the playing fields. Do you know of teens who have been recognized recently for their academic achievements or who have won an award or certificate for their participation in clubs, choirs or volunteer groups? If so, please submit the information and a photo. Phone: 541-383-0358 Mail: P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 E-mail: youth@bendbulletin.com

Local schools For Web links to local schools, preschool through college, visit www.bend bulletin.com /schools.

The Bulletin

Anna Maria Mendieta plays the harp for Sage Elementary School students during a classical music concert at the school in Redmond last week. Students clap to the rhythm of a flamenco song during a performance by a classical music group at Sage Elementary School in Redmond.

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Contact your public officials Find an easily searchable list of contact information for federal, state, county and city officials at www.bendbulletin .com/officials.

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C4 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Halt uncharitable with tougher law

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ome charities operating in Oregon spend only pennies on the dollar on good works. Instead, most of their money goes to raising more money, salaries or other administra-

tive costs. The purpose of the Wishing Well Foundation of Louisiana is to fulfill the fondest wish of terminally ill children. Its average annual expenditures are about $1.3 million. Of that only about 12 percent goes to charitable causes. There are charities that spend even smaller fractions. California’s Shiloh International Ministries helps needy children and the homeless. It has average annual expenditures of $937,315. Less than 4 percent goes to charitable causes. Despite those lopsided numbers, high administrative and fundraising costs do not equal fraud or misuse. Expenditures alone also tell donors nothing about the relative effectiveness of an organization. But Oregon Attorney General John Kroger would like a tool to challenge the tax-exempt status of charities that spend so little on their stated purposes. Senate Bill 40 would allow the attorney general to disqualify charities from receiving contributions that are Oregon-tax-deductible. The cutoff would be spending of at least 30 percent for charitable causes. The organization would have to fail to expend at least 30 percent of total annual functional expenses on program services — averaged over the organization’s last three fiscal years. Disqualified charities would have to tell donors about their status or face fines. The disqualification is not auto-

matic. Charities get to appeal. Mitigating circumstances would be considered, such as fundraising drives. The bill also has exceptions. For instance, charities that have only been in existence for up to four years cannot be disqualified. Oregon did have a law prohibiting charities from soliciting money if they spent too much on administration. The U.S. Supreme Court found provisions like that violated free speech. In 1989, the Legislature repealed Oregon’s law. This law is different in that it allows charities to continue soliciting. It just revokes their Oregon tax exemption. In the two hearings on SB 40, no one testified against it. The Nonprofit Association of Oregon supports the bill. There were still questions raised. Some organizations set up for educational and information purposes frequently send out fliers that are part information and part fundraiser. Figuring out how to classify that expense can be tricky. State Sen. Chris Telfer, R-Bend, an accountant who has worked with many charities, said she has seen some charities count how many words are used for fundraising compared with the words used in the rest of a flier’s content. Telfer supports the bill and the Legislature should, too, to protect consumers and worthy charities.

Don’t buy into the ‘Buy American’ bill P

ublic agencies have two main obligations when it comes to construction work. The first is to get the best job done. The second is to do that at the least possible cost to taxpayers. Oregon House Bill 3349 would toss that second obligation aside and for no good reason. The measure, sponsored by state Rep. Mike Schaufler, D-Happy Valley, would require agencies doing almost any construction, including repaving roads, to use made-in-America products. There are some limits, to be sure. Only iron, steel, wood and manufactured goods would have to be homemade, as would all the equipment used in a project. The requirement would not kick in if the project was a new line to distribute or transmit power. And agencies would get a bye on the requirement if meeting it added 25 percent or more to the cost of a project — a huge increase, if you think about it. They’d also be free to shop elsewhere if they could not find enough

good-quality products at home. What would Oregonians get in return? Well, the business group Associated Oregon Industries points out the higher costs for materials could result in smaller projects, meaning fewer local workers on the job. Oregonians would also likely get to feel good about the American workers busily constructing the escalator going into that new state office building or the Americans creating the countertops. Beyond that, it’s hard to find an advantage. We’re all for shopping local, don’t get us wrong. But when we choose to do that, we’re spending our own money, not that of our neighbors. Moreover, we’re doing so voluntarily, not because someone in Salem decided it was good policy. A measure much like HB 3349 died in the brief legislative session last year for the same reasons this one should die now. It gets the state’s spending priorities wrong, making value a secondary consideration when it shouldn’t be.

My Nickel’s Worth Energy independence

Naturally, we need to be concerned about the environment and other matters as we head in this direction. With proper regulation and advanced technology, we can focus on our energy independence. Terry A. Brown Bend

In America we are presently faced with high oil prices, which translate into higher fuel costs for all Americans. This is caused by our ever-increasing dependency on oil. For whatever good, and whatever time, hopefully sooner than later, we need to be less dependent on oil. When we look at our current budget dilemma, which will undoubtedly burden our future generations, we need to think differently. Over the past several years, we have spent in excess of 1 trillion dollars in our war effort in Iraq and Afghanistan. What have we gotten from this investment? Hopefully, and questionably, we have provided them with a path to democracy. When we leave those countries we can only hope that our efforts were not in vain. What we should have done is provided our military support and aid with the condition that they would pay us back in the form of oil payments and imports. We import much of our oil from the Persian Gulf (Bahrain, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates). Now that we have spent over 1 trillion dollars to aid them in their effort, they owe it to us in payment. We are too naive when it comes to financially supporting certain Middle East countries. We need not look any further than Egypt, Bahrain and Saudi Arabia. We continue to funnel financial aid to these countries that hold us by the purse strings (OPEC). Is that not the reason that we continue to cater to them as friendly trade partners? I say, enough is enough. Let’s focus on what we now have in terms of energy potential — natural gas, oil, mineral resources that lay within our continental borders and our friendly neighbors.

Support helmet law change Please support state Rep. Andy Olson’s and Rep. Tim Freeman’s sponsorship of House Bill 3141, which would allow adults to make a personal decision about wearing helmets or not when they ride motorcycles. Too many personal freedoms and liberties are being taken away from us in the guise of government mandates. Just imagine the wonder, the scents, the sights and the just plain down-to-earth good feeling you would get, wandering around the vistas here in Central Oregon. I am a member of BikePac and ABATE, which also support this bill. No one is asking people to not wear helmets; we just request that we be allowed to choose. If you are using the support of a “burden on society” rebuttal due to incapacitating head injuries, I can cite many more costly burdens that the taxpayers have to pay and support — head injuries due to skiing or snowboarding falls, automobile collisions and construction accidents; mandatory auto insurance against uninsured motorists (for those that carry insurance); increased medical premiums due to the severely obese, smokers, etc.; and rescuing the mountain climbers who get stranded or lost in our scenic mountains. There is no limit to what we already support as American citizens and taxpayers. Wake up! Think logically and objectively when deciding your views

of this bill. Do not react to manipulated statistics and raw emotions. Monika Niebuhr-Sims Albany

At-will employment risky As a victim of this economy, I have experienced firsthand just what “at will employment” means. The employer can and will lay you off, fire you, dismiss you, let you go or terminate you at any time without notice or reason. It is completely within their rights, but as an employee you are expected to give reason and at least two weeks’ notice — and preferably find your own replacement, to avoid leaving your employer in an uncomfortable position. Out of curiosity, I decided to research why in such a progressive society we are so far behind in our human rights. What I have discovered is pretty appalling. “At-will employment” has its genesis rule in Horace Gray Wood’s 1877 treaties on master-servant relations. U.S. at-will employment rule allows discharge for no reason. All U.S. states adopted this rule. Since 1959 there have been few exceptions. Burden of proof remains on the discharged employee. Unless an employee enters into a contract with the employer, the employee is at the total whim of the employer. God forbid if your boss comes to work in a bad mood. You could be out on the street and scrambling to find another job. In which case, once again you are at the mercy of the employer. It is the way it really is and, yes, people are people. Good, bad and very ugly. It needs to change. We cannot still be in a master-servant relationship, and yet we are. Desera Nelson La Pine

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Follow other states’ lead, support school choice in Oregon By Jeff W. Reed Bulletin guest columnist

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n states across the country, Democrats and Republicans have been united trailblazers in expanding educational opportunities for disadvantaged students. Indeed, two schoolchoice proposals, currently before the evenly split Oregon House of Representatives, are advancing in other states in bipartisan fashion. Oregon could follow their pioneering lead. Tax-credit scholarships and scholarships for students with special needs — bills introduced in the Oregon House — allow families to take all or a portion of the tax dollars “attached” to their children to schools of choice, including private options. Currently, there are 22 such programs in place across the country, and they are growing both in size and popularity. Take Florida’s tax-credit scholarship program, which provides scholarships or vouchers, to 30,000 low-income students dissatisfied with their public schools. To-

day that program is supported by a majority of Republican lawmakers, almost half of the Democrats, all but two members of the Hispanic Legislative Caucus, and two-thirds of the Legislative Black Caucus. Ten years ago, just one Florida Democratic lawmaker was supportive. Oklahoma became the newest member of the school-choice family last year when it created scholarships for students with special needs. Again, this was passed in a bipartisan manner with party-line Republican support in Oklahoma’s Senate, bipartisan support in its House, and approval by then-Gov. Brad Henry, a Democrat. Recently, a taxcredit scholarship proposal — similar to Oregon’s — passed the Oklahoma Senate with bipartisan approval. Also in 2010, Louisiana created its third school-choice program, for students with special needs, with bipartisan support in both legislative chambers. School choice almost came to Illinois in 2010 when Democrat Sen. James Meeks, co-chair of Illinois’ Legislative

IN MY VIEW Black Caucus and former spiritual adviser to President Barack Obama, introduced a voucher measure for students in Chicago’s failing and overcrowded public schools. The proposal, endorsed by the Chicago Tribune, gained Republican and Democratic support but ultimately fell a few votes short. This year, Pennsylvania’s legislative effort to expand its tax-credit scholarship program, currently serving 38,000 low-income families, and to create a voucher option for low-income students in failing public schools, is expected to become law. The measure, co-sponsored by Republican Sen. Jeff Piccola and Democratic Sen. Anthony Williams, passed Pennsylvania’s Senate Education Committee last week. Also last week, Maryland’s Democratic Gov. Martin O’Malley encouraged his state’s House Ways and Means Committee to pass a tax-credit scholar-

ship proposal “to stem the tide of private school closures” and “save public schools [sic] systems from added costs that are far in excess of the public revenues needed to fund the tax credit.” School choice is gaining champions among both Democrats and Republicans because of its ability to save taxpayers’ money, help public education, and provide a safety net for families. Of the 10 “gold standard” random-assignment studies conducted on voucher programs, nine found that some or all participants benefited academically from vouchers. Just one found no difference. Moreover, of the 19 empirical studies examining vouchers’ impact on public schools, 18 concluded vouchers improve public schools and one found no visible impact. As Pennsylvania state Sen. Anthony Williams, a Democrat, recently wrote, “School choice is not an alternative to public education. It is a vital part of an innovative and productive public education system.” He’s right. As evidenced by today’s

22 voucher programs nationwide, most voucher-eligible families elect to stay in public schools. Still, school choice can provide all parents greater comfort and reassurance that their children are educated appropriately. Think about it: The “threat” of families leaving encourages public and private schools to do better in meeting their needs. And for students who do leave, they are more satisfied; their former public school classrooms are smaller, with more resources; and their previous teachers are relieved of students who didn’t even want to be there in the first place. Oregon could join Pennsylvania, Louisiana, Oklahoma, Florida and others in transcending politics to do what is right for kids, families and schools: provide choices to high-quality learning environments and give schools and students a path to succeed. Jeff W. Reed is a state programs director with the Foundation for Educational Choice.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 C5

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N   Ardis "Ardy" Arlene Heglar, of Bend, Oregon (Formerly of Salina, Kansas) Sept. 27, 1921 - April 4, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services will be held per Ardis' request. Contributions may be made to:

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Bonita “Bonnie” J. Nistler (Butzman), of Prineville Nov. 11, 1919 - April 2, 2011 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home, 541-447-6459 Services: A funeral service will be held Saturday, April 9, 2011 at 10:00 am at St. Joseph’s Catholic in Prineville with a graveside service to follow at Juniper Haven Cemetery. A luncheon will follow at the Parish Hall. A rosary will be held Friday, April 8, 2011 at Prineville Funeral Home at 6:00 pm.

David Clyde Kelly, of Redmond Sept. 24, 1927 - April 4, 2011 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 www.redmondmemorial.com Services: A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, April 9, 2011 at Butler Aircraft Company, 1050 SE Sisters Ave., Redmond, Oregon.

Fred William Boehlke, of La Pine Sept. 26, 1927 - April 4, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: No services will be held per Fred's request. Contributions may be made to:

Leona Marguerite (Creson) Moe

Pilot Butte

April 22, 1917 - March 31, 2011

Continued from C1 “Frankly, it got detoured for a while, but what we’re doing now is actually just getting back on track and moving forward,” he said. While the district continues to face budget problems, Wilkinson said the cost of starting the program lies mostly in initial teacher training. “We still will have a roughly $115 million budget or so, and within that we can prioritize some of the existing resources,” he said. “In spite of the fact that we have tremendous budget challenges, we are still moving forward with the goal of offering a world-class education to all students.” Offering a middle-years program costs $8,400 annually, and startup costs for the IB program at Bend High ran about $200,000. Hecker said Pilot Butte officials have been researching program changes at the school for several years. During that time, they’ve considered a number of possibilities, ranging from the IB Middle Years program to advanced tech-

Leona passed from this world on March 31, 2011; she was 93 years young. Leona was the loving wife of Leland Moe (deceased), and is survived by her daughter, Janet White (Portland), and was a wonderful grandmother of Lea White Bring (Redmond), Yvonne White Porter (Redmond), Leland White (Deer Park, WA), and Greg White (Portland). Leona was also blessed with nine great-grandchildren and one great-great grandson. Leona was born in a homestead located amongst the orchards of Odell, OR. She had spent the past 35 years in Terrebonne and Redmond. She was a passionate defender of the earth and was very pleased when “earth day” was celebrated on her birthday each year. She was a meticulous homemaker and loved gardening, cooking, sewing, and playing cards with family on Sunday nights. She had been known to cheat at cards on occasion, although it was never clear whether it was done on purpose. One of Leona’s favorite memories was climbing to the top of Misery Ridge at Smith Rock when she was in her 80s. She loved having guests, although not too often or too many. Leona will be deeply missed by her family and friends.

Sylvia I. Booth Sept. 30, 1943 - March 20, 2011 Sylvia, 67, died March 20, in Silverton. She was born in Bend and lived there all of her life, graduating from Bend High School. Sylvia enjoyed camping and socializing with her friends. She married Zelbert Booth on June 1, 1962, in Bend. Sylvia is survived by her husband, Zelbert of Bend; children, Charles Booth of Hawaii and Tracy Jessiman of Silverton; brothers, Jim Hunter of Hillsboro and Bob Hunter of Bend; four grandchildren and two great-grandsons. Graveside service will be held Saturday, April 9, 2011, at noon, at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, in Bend. Arrangements by North Santiam Funeral Service, in Stayton, Oregon.

Partners in Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701 www.partnersbend.org

Jeanette Carver, of Bend May 15, 1928 - April 2, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Memorial Service Monday, April 25, 2011, 11:00 AM at Grace First Lutheran Church, 2265 NW Shevlin Park Road, Bend, Oregon.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

SDCs Continued from C1 Councilor Ed Boero, for instance, suggested the deal be tied to jobs created. That approach is taken in enterprise zones, which offer tax breaks when a company builds something that will create new jobs. Councilor Margie Dawson suggested the price cut could benefit the city in limited instances. But Redmond already has an overabundance of vacant

Reform Continued from C1 “We need to invest in a system that is designed for the 21st century, not designed for the past,” Kitzhaber said. “(Currently) the budgets of early childhood, K-12, community colleges and higher education are viewed not as part of a common interdependent continuum, but as fragmented, separate, competing entities that move by themselves through the legislative budgeting process, where, as you know, funding is based largely on enrollment.” Eventually, the new board would replace the board of education and the board of higher education. Sen. Larry George, R-Sherwood, said he was concerned about the consolidation of power the investment board would create. “I need some encouragement that this is a coordinating council that is basically going to try and find ways we can find innovations in our schools,” he said, “and not necessarily become a top-down structure that basically crushes innovation.” Nori Juba, a Bend-La Pine School Board member and

homes, she argued, so giving incentives to a home builder might not make sense. Dawson said she might support the cut if it is aimed at developers building commercial or industrial properties. “I think it would not benefit us for someone who wants to do a subdivision of single-family homes (to get a discount),” Dawson said. Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Cookbook author Bernard Clayton Jr. By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Bernard Clayton Jr., a newspaper reporter whose love for fresh bread inspired him to master the art of baking and write several classic cookbooks on bread and pastry, died March 28 in Bloomington, Ind. He was 94. His death was confirmed by his wife, Marjorie. Clayton experienced a breadbaking epiphany while bicycling across Europe with his wife in 1965. The quality of the breads, gratifying to appetites sharpened by a hard day’s ride, impressed him. Although he had never baked so much as a muffin in his life, he embarked on a quest to explore bread and pastry making. His hobby developed into an obsession, then a career. Over the next decade, he traveled around the world and logged countless hours in his home kitchen, newly outfitted with a professional oven,

mastering the techniques and the recipes that he presented in “The Complete Book of Breads.” First published in 1973, it became a twin to James Beard’s “Beard on Bread” on the shelves of American home cooks. It was most recently updated in 2003, under the title “Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads.” A 7,000-mile research trip that took him to bakeries all over France led to “The Breads of France” (1978), a comprehensive cookbook that guided the reader through French bread in all forms, from the leaf-shaped fougasse of Provence to the bagels served at Goldenberg’s deli in the Marais neighborhood of Paris. “The Complete Book of Pastry,” published in 1981, dealt with its subject on a truly global scale, with recipes for strudel, South American empanadas, Italian pizzas and calzones, Greek baklava and Russian piroshki.

nology, expanded talented-andgifted or dual-immersion Spanish and English programs. “I’ve honestly thought about IB for years now. I haven’t talked much about it publicly, but I’ve been looking at it and researching it prior to being here at Pilot Butte and prior to being in Bend,” Hecker said. “There has been lots of talk about just changing Pilot Butte and putting in some kind of program, and I’ve frequently said this, and I want to reiterate it: We’re not broken, we don’t need fixing. We’re just looking at quality programs that have the ability to impact a lot of students.”

Teacher training There are only six schools in Oregon participating in the Middle Years program. In Redmond, both Obsidian Middle School and Redmond High School offer the program, as do Cedar Park Middle School and the International School of Beaverton in the Beaverton School District, the Portland French School, and Gilkey International Middle School in Portland. Teachers may begin training as early as this summer, and

school officials will begin site visits to other area schools, including one this month. Even if it takes the school several years to be authorized to offer IB Middle Years program classes, Hecker said students will reap the benefits well before that as teachers begin implementing what they learn in the IB training.

Central location, low enrollment Wilkinson said the district wants the program at Pilot Butte because of its central location in Bend, as well as its low enrollment and the fact that beginning next year the school will send students to all three high schools in town. “I think I would be lying if I said that hasn’t entered into (the plans),” Wilkinson said. “Yes, we have listened to people saying that there’s nothing special about Pilot Butte, and it is a way of really providing that opportunity. But I guess I would continue to emphasize that this was part of a discussion three years ago. … It’s time to get it back on track.” Because it will pursue the IB program at Pilot Butte, Wilkin-

“It allows for innovation, but it holds all the schools accountable. So I think those two things are possible. … We can have a system that is working together but at the same time comes up with its own solutions.” — Nori Juba, Bend-La Pine School Board member

Central Oregon business owner, responded to George’s concerns. Juba was named part of Kitzhaber’s statewide education team in February. The governor created the team to start working on ideas and a framework for the education investment board. He used the Bend-La Pine School District as an example, saying the district has set some high standards and accountability metrics for all the district’s schools. But all the schools, he said, have approached teaching and learning in different ways. “It allows for innovation, but it holds all the schools accountable,” he said. “So I think those two things are possible. … We can have a system that is working together but at the same time comes up with its own solutions.” Sen. Suzanne Bonamici, D-

Portland, is concerned about the performance-based model for funding, and used test scores as an example that would worry her. “What have you envisioned that these outcomes will be and how will they be measured?” Bonamici said. The governor’s education adviser, Nancy Golden, answered, using the goal of having all students

son said the school will not move the district’s self-contained talented-and-gifted program from Cascade Middle School. “We’ll have this new program at Pilot Butte, and we’ll continue to serve TAG students at Pilot Butte and simply enhance what we do with all of our talented students,” he said. Unlike at Bend High, where students can choose to take certain IB classes or enroll in the diploma program, all students at the middle school will likely participate in the Middle Years program, and Hecker hopes all teachers will be trained to teach according to the IB philosophy. Some schools, he said, operate a program within the school, but Hecker wants all students to take IB curriculum classes, whether they’re remedial or advanced or somewhere in between. “Our wish is to make it the entire school where there’s not necessarily anything called an IB class but all students are getting the IB experience,” Hecker said. “It will not be a schoolwithin-a-school model.” Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.

reading at the end of first grade. “The hope is they are ready to read, but then what we need to do is have a system in place that quickly decides if the child is already at grade level and can be stretched beyond,” Golden said. “Is the child on track? Do they need strategic intervention or intensive intervention? And we have to create systems in our school districts that allow us to apply the interventions quickly, immediately, so we can get all the children back on track. … It’s very focused on students’ individual levels, but what it does say is that we’re all accountable to the outcomes.” Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

Celebration of Life for

Wilma Pauline Todd Wilma’s family would like to extend an invitation for all that knew her to please join them in celebrating her life. Wilma was born on April 11, 1936, and passed away on November 28, 2010, after losing her battle with cancer. A celebration of life will be held on April 9, 2011, at the Terrebonne Grange Hall located at the corner of Smith Rock Way and 11th Street between the hours of 11am to 1pm. The family will be providing food and beverages.

Nov. 11, 2010 - March 20, 2011

er l my life had I ev best! Never in al e th ith d w an ed ct ess I was bl on how perfe ople compliment seen heard so many pe by they had ever ba ul tif au be t os m e w th s d alway ill how you were my baby son, an u, yo is at Th es. in their liv u be. precious soul! Yo e years to get your inable ag im le ib ed cr We tried for thre the most in in r, ve re fo e lif y s changed m the fact that it’ e to reality with the way! I can’t com me day you were sa e think that th to ur life. le yo ab r fo in ag ht im fig un en, you had to be er ev ve ha is u cause there no happiest yo ned my heart be ke ac bl s ha u yo Losing ck. way to get you ba nimaginable U is g Our sufferin u back ds can’t bring yo A thousand wor I tried and I know because illion tears, m a Neither can cried. I e us ca I know be or rs will Unknown Auth for you. The tea cry for you, I pray you ve lo I t. ar he I hurt for you, I n my face or w do g in m I ea ay str w love in a never stop You taught me to ! elf e our its er e w lif u an Yo th e! more ew was ther kn r no , re fo be d yo uld spoil u! I have never love ted, just so we co an w er my ev e w ly out you! You are one and on going to live with I’m nd w ou ho ar ow ed lv kn don’t life revo orld, my life. Our ER everything, my w ver. I will NEV re fo t ar he y you in m how oh n, so by Ba you! I will hold er. th time we had toge meday forget this short at you. I know so ok lo to t an w st ju d YOU! an VE u yo LO I iss y Im want to sa st ju I t bu , ay pl e pain runs thru we will get to rd to breathe, th ha s it’ et , lp gu to It’s hard ess. I’ll never forg words could expr t no ar d, sm sa so so e ar I’m u s. vein ’ and ‘Da.’ Yo um ‘M y sa ss ld ki ou d the way you w and hold you an I could hug you ver and strong, I wish h! I love you, ne ug la ur beautiful yo to ten lis d an you forget it! Love, Mommy d never let go, your children an g hu n, re ild ch Love your are gonna go. know when they r ve ne u yo e us beca

ge Brown, n, Theodore Gad My handsome so March 20th, on I, my wife and was taken from eningitis. No eria bacterial m 2011, from neiss and sorrow n how much pain words can explai can ever g in th ugh, and no we are going thro there is any If . al he t my hear make this hole in g over me, you are watchin way possible that ow that your kn I want you to n, so is, th g in ad re than life itself dy love you more Mommy & Dad . We will hold ever change that and nothing will forget the ve rever, and ne r fo ts ar he r ou in you You were our t to be with you. short time we go rever. I just anged our lives fo world and you ch goes home is, ne who reads th hope that everyo realize that d an ds sses their ki and holds and ki what they take for granted life is too short to n it could he u never know w have. Because yo I can’t wait d an E ANDSOM H u yo ve lo I d. en en I will be you again. ’Til th until I get to see y heart. holding you in m Love, Daddy

Theodore is survived by his parents, Geoff and Tammy Brown; and Debbie Brown and Theodore Greg Brown, Debbie Gibson, Chris Gibson, and J.C. Guzek. A Celebration of Life Ceremony will be held Thursday, April 7, 2011 at 1:11 p.m. at Old Back Nine Golf Course, 60650 China Hat Road, Bend Oregon. Memorial contributions may be made at PremierWest Bank at an account set up in the name of Theodore Gadge Brown.


WE

C6 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

AT HE R

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, APRIL 6 Today: Mostly cloudy, scattered snow showers, very chilly, breezy.

HIGH Ben Burkel

44

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

43/29

41/25

50/28

32/18



Willowdale

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

46/29

40/19

Mitchell

Madras

42/24

45/27

Camp Sherman 39/19 Redmond Prineville 44/22 Cascadia 41/23 43/23 Sisters 42/21 Bend Post 44/22

Oakridge Elk Lake 41/21

32/10

41/18

43/20

40/18

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Burns

38/17

39/19

Fort Rock

Chemult 38/16

Vancouver 45/36

Seattle

City

47/37

Missoula 43/27





Eugene 49/34

Bend

46/28

Boise

44/22

53/31

49/34

 Idaho Falls

Redding



49/30

Elko

61/38

57/29

Reno

44/21

Helena

63/31

39/21

Cloudy skies with a mix of rain and snow today and tonight.

Crater Lake 27/19

San Francisco



62/47

Salt Lake City 55/39



Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

Moon phases First

HIGH

LOW

Full

Last

New

April 11 April 17 April 24 May 2

Wednesday Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 50/41/0.41 . . . . . 47/37/sh. . . . . . 50/35/sh Baker City . . . . . . 49/38/0.13 . . . . . .44/25/rs. . . . . . 39/24/sn Brookings . . . . . . 53/42/0.50 . . . . . 50/40/sh. . . . . . 49/38/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 49/38/0.03 . . . . . 44/26/sn. . . . . . 38/22/sn Eugene . . . . . . . . 55/39/0.16 . . . . . 49/34/sh. . . . . . 49/33/sh Klamath Falls . . . 51/39/0.04 . . . . . 43/24/sh. . . . . . 37/21/sn Lakeview. . . . . . . 55/37/0.00 . . . . . 43/24/sn. . . . . . 36/21/sn La Pine . . . . . . . . 45/33/0.04 . . . . . 40/18/sn. . . . . . 36/23/sn Medford . . . . . . . 59/46/0.21 . . . . . 49/34/sh. . . . . . 45/29/sh Newport . . . . . . . 50/45/0.34 . . . . . 48/37/sh. . . . . . 50/37/sh North Bend . . . . . 52/43/0.59 . . . . . 49/39/sh. . . . . . 48/36/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 56/44/0.06 . . . . . 52/33/sh. . . . . . . 45/31/c Pendleton . . . . . . 51/40/0.21 . . . . . 50/31/sh. . . . . . 49/33/sh Portland . . . . . . . 53/41/0.28 . . . . . 49/37/sh. . . . . . 50/37/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 45/34/0.01 . . . . . 41/23/sn. . . . . . 42/26/sn Redmond. . . . . . . 48/35/0.02 . . . . . .42/23/rs. . . . . . 40/24/sn Roseburg. . . . . . . 54/44/0.49 . . . . . 48/36/sh. . . . . . 47/31/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 54/37/0.23 . . . . . 48/35/sh. . . . . . 50/34/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 43/35/0.02 . . . . . 42/21/sn. . . . . . 38/23/sn The Dalles . . . . . . 57/43/0.17 . . . . . 48/31/sh. . . . . . 50/31/sh

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

2

MEDIUM 4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45/32 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.03” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 in 1960 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.10” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 in 1997 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.13” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.86” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.94” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.03 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.16 in 1938 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:31 a.m. . . . . . .7:59 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .5:31 a.m. . . . . . .4:39 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .6:14 a.m. . . . . . .6:27 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .6:42 a.m. . . . . . .7:30 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .7:03 p.m. . . . . . .6:50 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:07 a.m. . . . . . .6:11 p.m.

2

LOW

52 29

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Thursday Hi/Lo/W

Mainly cloudy with scattered rain showers. HIGH

50 30

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 41/23

Grants Pass

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:38 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 7:38 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:36 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 7:39 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:48 a.m. Moonset today . . . 11:14 p.m.

SUNDAY Partly cloudy and slightly warmer.

47 23

BEND ALMANAC

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 59° Medford • 32° Meacham

SATURDAY Partly cloudy and cool.

NORTHWEST

43/20

35/12

Mostly cloudy, chance of snow showers, LOW very chilly, breezy.

Showers will be likely across the region today, with snow likely in the mountains.

49/37

Cloudy skies with a mix of rain and snow today and tonight. Eastern

FRIDAY

43 17

Portland

Brothers 

39/19

HIGH

22

36/19

40/20

Sunriver

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, isolated snow showers, colder.

LOW

Paulina

La Pine



Showers, with snow above 1,500 feet today and tonight. Central

46/28

THURSDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-80 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 38-96 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 106-164 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . 153-177 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . . 141 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 74-86 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12-12 . . . . . . . 183 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 55-120

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

. . . . . . 71-72 . . . . 185-290 . . . . . . . 119 . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . 46-86 . . . no report . . . . . . 77-82

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 45/36

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Calgary 41/23

Saskatoon 44/23

Cheyenne 47/34

Plant City, Fla.

Winnipeg 41/26

Salt Lake City Las 55/39 Vegas 74/54

Tijuana 64/52

Denver 58/41

Omaha 60/46 Kansas City 69/49

Phoenix Albuquerque 83/62 72/46

Chihuahua 88/54

Anchorage 33/26

La Paz 85/55 Juneau 46/28

Mazatlan 86/59

S

S

St. Louis 71/50

S

S S

Quebec 38/27

To ronto 48/38

Green Bay 49/31

Des Moines 64/43

Los Angeles 62/50 Honolulu 83/68

S

Thunder Bay 40/25

Rapid City 55/35

Hollywood, Fla. San Francisco 62/47

S

St. Paul 56/36

Boise 53/31

• 3°

S

Bismarck 51/35

Billings 56/32

Portland 49/37

• 92°

• 1.79”

S

Seattle 47/37

(in the 48 contiguous states):

Dillon, Colo.

S

Detroit 51/35 Chicago 52/38

Buffalo

44/38

Columbus 62/46

Louisville 71/50

Halifax 44/27 Portland 50/29 Boston 52/38 New York 55/41 Philadelphia 59/44 Washington, D. C. 62/47

Charlotte 68/44

Nashville 71/49

Little Rock 73/55 Atlanta Oklahoma City 84/62 68/49 Birmingham 72/48 Dallas 81/63 New Orleans 75/63 Houston 79/64

Orlando 77/59 Miami 81/71

Monterrey 93/65

FRONTS

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .80/38/0.00 . . .90/61/s . . . 90/56/s Akron . . . . . . . . .42/35/0.05 . .53/40/sh . . . .62/52/t Albany. . . . . . . . .55/38/0.36 . 50/31/pc . . 53/34/pc Albuquerque. . . .75/41/0.00 . 72/46/pc . . 67/42/pc Anchorage . . . . .38/30/0.20 . 33/26/pc . . . .43/30/r Atlanta . . . . . . . .83/43/1.04 . . .68/49/s . . 75/59/pc Atlantic City . . . .61/46/0.10 . 55/40/pc . . . 59/42/c Austin . . . . . . . . .76/38/0.00 . . .82/63/s . . 86/69/pc Baltimore . . . . . .72/43/0.25 . 60/45/pc . . . 68/47/c Billings. . . . . . . . .54/40/0.06 . . .56/32/c . . .44/29/rs Birmingham . . . .61/41/0.00 . . .72/48/s . . 82/63/pc Bismarck . . . . . . .50/25/0.00 . . .51/35/c . . 53/34/sh Boise . . . . . . . . . .54/43/0.08 . .53/31/sh . . . 44/30/c Boston. . . . . . . . .64/42/0.07 . 52/38/pc . . 47/36/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .54/43/0.08 . 52/39/pc . . 49/40/sh Buffalo . . . . . . . .36/33/0.02 . . .44/38/c . . . 48/36/c Burlington, VT. . .52/37/0.55 . 43/27/pc . . . 48/26/s Caribou, ME . . . .43/33/0.20 . 35/19/pc . . . 40/13/s Charleston, SC . .70/55/0.23 . . .66/50/s . . . 74/61/s Charlotte. . . . . . .72/50/0.49 . . .68/44/s . . . 76/53/s Chattanooga. . . .58/43/0.00 . 70/43/pc . . 76/57/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .65/39/0.00 . . .47/34/c . . 55/29/sh Chicago. . . . . . . .53/33/0.00 . .52/38/sh . . 51/43/sh Cincinnati . . . . . .52/39/0.04 . 66/47/pc . . . .73/61/t Cleveland . . . . . .44/36/0.00 . .48/44/sh . . 62/49/sh Colorado Springs 75/30/0.00 . 64/38/pc . . 61/36/sh Columbia, MO . .65/30/0.00 . 70/48/pc . . . .71/58/t Columbia, SC . . .75/52/0.59 . . .70/45/s . . . 78/55/s Columbus, GA. . .86/47/1.19 . . .73/49/s . . . 78/60/s Columbus, OH. . .45/38/0.01 . . .62/46/c . . . 72/56/c Concord, NH . . . .46/36/0.09 . 50/27/pc . . . 49/27/s Corpus Christi. . .74/53/0.00 . . .80/67/s . . 85/73/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .72/38/0.00 . . .81/63/s . . 83/67/pc Dayton . . . . . . . .46/36/0.00 . 62/46/pc . . . 71/58/c Denver. . . . . . . . .75/45/0.00 . . .58/41/c . . 63/36/sh Des Moines. . . . .68/29/0.00 . . .64/43/c . . 57/45/sh Detroit. . . . . . . . .47/35/0.00 . .51/35/sh . . 48/40/pc Duluth . . . . . . . . .45/25/0.00 . . .43/28/c . . 43/33/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .86/42/0.00 . 86/55/pc . . . 79/52/s Fairbanks. . . . . . .38/24/0.00 . . .27/3/sn . . . 37/17/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .46/29/0.00 . . .48/32/c . . 52/37/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .65/23/0.00 . .55/33/sh . . 51/32/sh

Yesterday WednesdayThursday Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .46/33/0.00 . .53/35/sh . . 54/40/sh Rapid City . . . . . .68/27/0.00 . 55/35/pc . . 56/33/sh Green Bay. . . . . .47/30/0.00 . . .49/31/c . . 52/37/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .65/49/0.00 . 63/31/pc . . 40/26/sh Greensboro. . . . .70/46/0.16 . . .65/45/s . . 73/52/pc Richmond . . . . . .72/51/0.15 . 67/47/pc . . 76/51/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .66/41/0.41 . .57/45/sh . . 63/43/sh Rochester, NY . . .44/37/0.07 . . .46/37/c . . 49/36/pc Hartford, CT . . . .59/41/0.21 . 50/36/pc . . 49/36/sh Sacramento. . . . .71/51/0.00 . 68/46/pc . . 58/38/sh Helena. . . . . . . . .51/37/0.00 . 46/28/pc . . 40/28/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .66/35/0.00 . 71/50/pc . . . .70/59/t Honolulu . . . . . . .83/69/0.01 . . .83/68/t . . 83/71/sh Salt Lake City . . .65/42/0.00 . .55/39/sh . . 44/31/sh Houston . . . . . . .72/41/0.00 . . .79/64/s . . 81/71/pc San Antonio . . . .76/41/0.00 . . .82/66/s . . 90/70/pc Huntsville . . . . . .58/41/0.00 . . .71/47/s . . 75/58/pc San Diego . . . . . .70/59/0.00 . . .63/54/c . . 61/50/sh Indianapolis . . . .52/37/0.00 . 64/47/pc . . . .67/58/t San Francisco . . .61/50/0.00 . 61/47/pc . . 55/43/sh Jackson, MS . . . .65/44/0.00 . . .75/55/s . . 80/65/pc San Jose . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . 64/46/pc . . 57/39/sh Madison, WI . . . .52/31/0.00 . .55/36/sh . . 55/40/sh Santa Fe . . . . . . .74/31/0.00 . 69/36/pc . . 62/34/pc Jacksonville. . . . .73/55/0.70 . . .71/52/s . . . 78/61/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .43/28/0.01 . . .46/28/c . . . 46/33/c Kansas City. . . . .71/30/0.00 . 69/49/pc . . . .70/53/t Amsterdam. . . . .52/45/0.02 . . .67/54/c . . 61/45/pc Lansing . . . . . . . .45/31/0.00 . .52/34/sh . . 53/40/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .64/44/0.00 . .63/52/sh . . 64/48/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .84/52/0.00 . . .74/54/c . . 71/49/pc Auckland. . . . . . .64/54/0.00 . .65/52/sh . . 66/55/sh Lexington . . . . . .53/38/0.02 . 68/48/pc . . 70/58/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .81/63/0.00 . 81/61/pc . . 85/59/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . .74/30/0.00 . . .61/47/c . . 59/44/sh Bangkok . . . . . . .90/75/1.77 . . .87/76/t . . . .86/76/t Little Rock. . . . . .68/37/0.00 . . .73/55/s . . 76/62/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .64/37/0.00 . 69/44/pc . . 66/42/pc Los Angeles. . . . .65/57/0.00 . . .62/50/c . . 61/49/sh Beirut. . . . . . . . . .66/57/1.63 . .67/59/sh . . 68/58/sh Louisville . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . 71/50/pc . . . 73/63/c Berlin. . . . . . . . . .59/41/0.00 . . .64/53/c . . 62/41/pc Memphis. . . . . . .61/40/0.00 . . .73/56/s . . 79/67/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .68/54/0.94 . .67/52/sh . . 66/52/sh Miami . . . . . . . . .92/70/0.34 . . .81/71/s . . 84/78/pc Budapest. . . . . . .61/45/0.03 . . .64/48/c . . . 70/51/c Milwaukee . . . . .52/34/0.00 . .48/36/sh . . 45/39/sh Buenos Aires. . . .77/45/0.00 . . .78/54/s . . . .79/51/t Minneapolis . . . .56/30/0.00 . . .56/36/c . . 57/42/pc Cabo San Lucas .86/64/0.00 . . .83/61/s . . . 80/60/s Nashville . . . . . . .58/40/0.00 . 71/49/pc . . 76/60/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . . .75/56/s . . 79/60/sh New Orleans. . . .66/53/0.00 . . .75/63/s . . 79/70/pc Calgary . . . . . . . .43/32/0.00 . .41/23/sh . . . 37/20/c New York . . . . . .67/43/0.16 . 55/41/pc . . 53/40/sh Cancun . . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . . .84/74/t . . 83/74/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .70/46/0.10 . 57/42/pc . . 54/40/sh Dublin . . . . . . . . .64/52/0.26 . 65/46/pc . . 62/46/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .72/47/0.14 . 63/46/pc . . 72/52/pc Edinburgh . . . . . .61/52/0.00 . .60/47/sh . . . 52/41/c Oklahoma City . .76/33/0.00 . . .84/62/s . . 83/60/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .63/36/0.00 . 72/50/pc . . . 74/48/s Omaha . . . . . . . .73/31/0.00 . . .60/46/c . . 57/45/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .76/58/t . . . .76/59/t Orlando. . . . . . . .78/65/0.44 . . .77/59/s . . . 84/65/s Hong Kong . . . . .72/64/0.00 . 70/63/pc . . 74/65/pc Palm Springs. . . .89/56/0.00 . . .79/55/c . . 74/46/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .52/43/0.00 . . .55/45/c . . 58/40/pc Peoria . . . . . . . . .57/32/0.00 . 65/45/pc . . . .61/54/t Jerusalem . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . .59/47/sh . . 66/49/pc Philadelphia . . . .69/45/0.15 . 59/44/pc . . 60/44/sh Johannesburg . . .64/55/0.60 . .63/54/sh . . 67/53/sh Phoenix. . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . .83/62/c . . . 81/56/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . 75/62/pc . . 76/64/pc Pittsburgh . . . . . .45/35/0.22 . .55/42/sh . . 61/48/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . 76/57/pc . . 78/59/pc Portland, ME. . . .49/36/0.17 . 50/29/pc . . . 49/28/s London . . . . . . . .55/48/0.07 . 67/48/pc . . 63/45/pc Providence . . . . .60/41/0.05 . 53/37/pc . . 49/37/sh Madrid . . . . . . . .77/48/0.00 . 76/54/pc . . . 78/50/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .71/48/0.50 . . .67/45/s . . . 75/53/s Manila. . . . . . . . .86/77/0.00 . .87/76/sh . . 88/75/pc

Yesterday WednesdayThursday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Savannah . . . . . .86/64/0.59 . . .69/49/s . . . 76/61/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .45/41/0.11 . .47/37/sh . . 50/38/pc Sioux Falls. . . . . .61/25/0.00 . 57/38/pc . . . .55/39/r Spokane . . . . . . .51/36/0.00 . .43/28/sh . . 45/29/pc Springfield, MO. .64/26/0.00 . . .71/50/s . . . .73/59/t Tampa . . . . . . . . .76/65/0.63 . . .80/60/s . . . 84/66/s Tucson. . . . . . . . .91/50/0.00 . . .81/54/c . . . 79/53/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .74/36/0.00 . . .78/58/s . . 79/64/pc Washington, DC .71/44/0.42 . 62/47/pc . . 70/48/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .73/29/0.00 . 72/52/pc . . 78/53/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .57/37/0.00 . .49/28/sh . . 48/30/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .88/59/0.00 . . .85/56/c . . . 81/56/s

INTERNATIONAL Mecca . . . . . . . . .90/72/0.00 . . .92/70/s . . . 91/68/s Mexico City. . . . .82/55/0.00 . 82/54/pc . . 84/54/pc Montreal. . . . . . .50/37/0.37 . . 40/28/sf . . 44/29/pc Moscow . . . . . . .46/36/0.00 . 49/36/pc . . 50/39/sh Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/63/0.00 . . .79/59/t . . . .80/61/t Nassau . . . . . . . .86/75/0.00 . 84/73/pc . . 84/74/pc New Delhi. . . . . .93/64/0.00 . . .91/65/s . . 93/68/pc Osaka . . . . . . . . .63/36/0.00 . . .64/42/s . . 64/45/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .41/36/0.16 . . .53/44/c . . 46/31/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .45/36/0.47 . . 41/28/sf . . 44/30/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .66/39/0.00 . 73/53/pc . . . 73/48/s Rio de Janeiro. . .86/77/0.00 . . .81/70/s . . . 82/70/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .68/52/0.00 . . .70/50/s . . 74/52/pc Santiago . . . . . . .90/50/0.00 . . .82/51/s . . . 79/47/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . . .72/62/s . . . 74/61/s Sapporo. . . . . . . .54/30/0.00 . . .57/35/s . . 59/39/pc Seoul . . . . . . . . . .63/34/0.00 . . .61/41/s . . 54/44/sh Shanghai. . . . . . .61/45/0.00 . 65/53/pc . . 60/53/sh Singapore . . . . . .90/75/2.44 . . .88/77/t . . . .90/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .48/37/0.00 . .50/45/sh . . 46/36/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .68/59/0.00 . 70/61/pc . . 72/61/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . 75/61/pc . . 79/63/pc Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .64/54/0.19 . .65/51/sh . . 68/51/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .57/41/0.00 . . .64/45/s . . . 66/47/s Toronto . . . . . . . .41/36/0.04 . 48/38/pc . . 46/34/sh Vancouver. . . . . .50/39/0.41 . 45/36/pc . . . 48/37/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .59/46/0.22 . . .65/54/c . . 73/49/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .59/43/0.30 . .58/47/sh . . 57/47/sh

THE CAPITOL IN BLOOM Daffodils are shown in full bloom at the Capitol Mall in Salem on Tuesday. In the background is the Capitol rotunda topped by the golden pioneer statue.

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The Associated Press

The Associated Press

OREGON CITY — The man who police say organized a failed plot to kidnap Columbia Sportswear Chairwoman Gert Boyle pleaded guilty Tuesday, two days before his trial was set to begin. Nestor Caballero Gutierrez pleaded guilty to burglary, robbery, kidnapping and assault counts in Clackamas County Circuit Court. The 40-year-old man faces 141⁄2 years in prison when he is sentenced April 14. A second defendant, Jose Luis Arevalo, 47, pleaded guilty last month to kidnapping, robbery, burglary and criminal conspiracy. Chief Deputy District Attorney Greg Horner told The Oregonian that negotiations continue with the third defendant, Ramon Alberto Midence, 40. Boyle, then 86, foiled the Nov. 10 abduction attempt by telling Caballero Gutierrez she had to disable her home security alarm, then tripping a silent alarm that called police to her home in the Portland suburb of West Linn. Her “Tough Mother” image

became the cornerstone of Columbia Sportswear’s marketing efforts, but in a victim’s impact statement filed in court last month, Boyle described the fear, humiliation and pain she suffered. When she returned home in the early evening of Nov. 10, Caballero Gutierrez approached her with a gift basket and asked her to autograph a book, prosecutors said. He then pulled out a handgun and forced her inside. Boyle said the man threatened to shoot her and repeatedly shoved her into the wall and onto the ground. She had recently undergone her second hip-replacement surgery and feared she would not be able to get up. “He told me he had people waiting outside to help him,” Boyle said. “I thought they were going to kill me.” She told the court she no longer feels safe living alone and returned to her home only to gather belongings. She has cut back on her role at Columbia Sportswear, a company she helped build into an international brand.

MOLALLA— Police have found the van that struck and fatally injured a 67-year-old Oregon bicyclist on a rural road last month outside Portland but are still looking for the driver. Thomas Mossman was struck on Highway 211 just west of Molalla on March 22 as he was cycling to a friend’s house. The driver sped off, leaving Mossman bleeding in a ditch with a head injury, more than a dozen fractured ribs and other broken bones. Mossman was hospitalized after neighbors found him, but he died on March 31. An anonymous tip led detectives to a gray Dodge Caravan on Sunday at a rural Clackamas County home. But the vehicle’s owner is not the man accused of the hit-and-run death, police said. Lt. Gregg Hastings, an Oregon State Police spokesman, declined to identify the suspect or provide other details Tuesday but said the search was continuing. The van has been seized as part of the investigation, he said.

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D MLB Inside Royals take record to 4-1 after beating White Sox in 12 innings, see Page D3. www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

COLLEGE BASEBALL

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: NCAA TOURNAMENT

TEE TO GREEN

Beavers take 11-1 victory over Pilots in midweek battle PORTLAND — Parker Berberet homered and tallied four runs driven in to pace the 19th-ranked Oregon State baseball team to an 11-1 win over Portland in a nonconference game Tuesday afternoon at Joe Etzel Field. “We played well today and chalked up a good victory,” Oregon State head coach Pat Casey said. “We got a great outing from James (Nygren) and we did what we needed to do for a midweek win.” Nygren made his fourth start of the season and was the recipient of the run support. He improved to 4-1 after going 7 2⁄3 innings Tuesday, allowing five hits and one run while striking out three. He tallied his third quality start this season in the process. Offensively, the Beavers finished with just seven hits, but drew 10 walks and were hit by a pitch three times. Jared Norris and Kavin Keyes both tallied two hits to lead the Beavers, who improved to 21-7 this season, forcing Portland to drop to 10-15. Berberet’s four RBIs led the team, giving him his eighth multiple-RBI game of the season. Madras High graduate Turner Gill went zero for four for UP hitting in the Pilots’ No. 3 spot. Oregon State will now set its sights on No. 5 Arizona State, which visits Corvallis starting Friday for a threegame series. First pitch Friday night is scheduled for 5:35 p.m. PDT. — From wire reports

INSIDE NBA

Texas A&M takes its first NCAA title By Doug Feinberg The Associated Press

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

A golfer chips to the 18th green Friday at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. The member-owned club has hired David McLay Kidd, a world-renowned golf architecht and Bend resident, looks to make improvements to the golf facility.

A plan forward Awbrey Glen hires David McLay Kidd to draw up master plan By Zack Hall The Bulletin

After nearly 20 years, the management and membership of Awbrey Glen Golf Club think a face-lift might be in order. The northwest Bend facility, a member-owned private golf club that opened in 1993, did not have to look far to find a world-class golf architect willing to help. Awbrey Glen has hired David McLay Kidd’s Bend-based design firm, DMK Golf Design, to create a long-term master plan aimed at making incremental improvements to the golf facility that could take perhaps as long as 20 years to complete.

Awbrey Glen will not be turned into a links course on par with Kidd’s most famous creation: the original course at Bandon Dunes Golf Resort on the southern Oregon Coast. Rather, the idea is to make the parkland-style course more playable using the path that Gene “Bunny” Mason, the longtime Central Oregon golf pro who designed Awbrey Glen, mapped out nearly two decades ago. “We’re not going to start over,” says Mark Amberson, Awbrey Glen’s general manager, who has been with the club since its inception. “We are going to make some tweaks.” See Forward / D6

Nicklaus’ win in ’86 endures The Golden Bear won his 18th major at The Masters 25 years ago

Portland Trail Blazers’ Andre Miller (24) drives as Golden State Warriors’ Stephen Curry falls back in the first quarter of Tuesday’s game in Portland.

By Larry Dorman New York Times News Service

Blazers headed to playoffs despite loss Portland falls to Golden State 108-87, see Page D4

NHL

Chris O’Meara / The Associated Press

Jack Nicklaus speaks during a news conference before the start of the Masters golf tournament, Tuesday in Augusta, Ga.

Next up • The Masters • When: Thursday-Sunday • TV: ESPN, Thursday- Friday (noon); CBS, Saturday (12:30 p.m.) Sunday, (11 a.m.)

AUGUSTA, Ga. — The larger-thanlife bronze sculpture of Jack Nicklaus that stands in the rotunda of the Augusta Museum of History is frozen in a transcendent moment in golf history, one that will reverberate at Augusta National Golf Club this week as Nicklaus’ epic Masters victory from 25 years ago is remembered. The piece could have been modeled from any of several photographs capturing what happened at the 17th hole late on the Sunday afternoon of April

Canadiens clinch playoff berth Montreal beats Chicago 2-1 in overtime, see Page D2

Paxton Deuel, a junior at Summit High School, will be honing his skills on the court this season. Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Summit takes on tougher schedule to prepare for state High and Medford, as well as a home invitational in which district-rival HermSummit boys tennis coach Josh iston and 6A power Sprague will be in • A listing Cordell does not care about his team’s attendance. of all boys record. “I’m not worried about our record,” tennis teams Cordell says. “I want to be really pre“We’re playing our toughest schedin Central ule ever,” says Cordell, who guided pared for district and state. I’ve been Oregon the Storm to a fourth-place finish at the coach for 10 years (at Summit) and the Class 5A state tournament last I’ve always said let’s play the best teams competing season. that are willing to play us.” in 2011, In an effort to prepare for the level The demanding schedule seems to be Page D5 of play the Storm will face in the postpaying early dividends. The Storm gave season, Summit will juggle a busy and Jesuit a run for its money in March, loscompetitive schedule throughout April. Stops ing 5-3 to a Crusader squad that lost only three for last season’s Intermountain Conference run- of 70 matches last season. ners-up include tournaments at Portland’s Jesuit See Summit / D5

The Bulletin

Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 Major League Baseball ..............D3 Prep sports .......................... D4, 5 NBA .......................................... D4 Tee to Green......................... D5, 6

Michael Conroy / The Associated Press

Texas A&M’s Danielle Adams celebrates after Texas A&M’s 76-70 win over Notre Dame in the women’s college basketball championship game in Indianapolis, Tuesday.

2011 PREP BOYS TENNIS PREVIEW

By James Williams

INDEX

13, 1986, a split second before Nicklaus — then 46 — first took the lead in what became his sixth and last Masters victory, his record 18th major championship and his 73rd tour win. It was then that Nicklaus knew his odds of winning had moved from possible to highly probable. The photographs show the change on his face as his last birdie putt of a remarkable final round approached the hole. With soft light from the setting sun streaming onto his face as it broke into a wide grin, Nicklaus bent his knees into a powerful, athletic crouch and raised the putter in his left hand aloft, like a scepter or Excalibur, as he stalked the putt. This is the recollection Tiger Woods, who was 10 at the time, has said is his most vivid, “the way Jack was walking the putt into the hole.” See Nicklaus / D5

INDIANAPOLIS — Scoring at will, grabbing boards and making a key steal, Danielle Adams saved her best game for the biggest stage and gave Texas A&M its first national championship. Adams scored 22 of her 30 points in a dominating second half and answered the Fighting Irish basket for basket Tuesday night to help the Aggies bring a title to the former all-male military academy with a thrilling 7670 victory over Notre Dame. “I knew they couldn’t stop me inside so that’s what I did, I took it inside,” said Adams, who became the school’s first All-American just a week ago. No one was happier than Gary Blair, the outspoken A&M coach who hadn’t been in the Final Four since 1998 when he was with Arkansas. Blair bluntly said it was a good thing that top powers like Connecticut, Tennessee and Stanford weren’t in the title game. “We don’t give up,” Blair said. “We might not play the prettiest game in the world but it’s good for women’s basketball to see a Texas A&M and a Notre Dame in this game.” And then his Aggies went out and proved him right in front of a pro-Irish crowd. Tyra White added 18 points for A&M, including a huge threepointer as the shot clock buzzer sounded to put the Aggies up 73-68 with 1:07 left. She and her teammates then staved off a final, frantic push by the Fighting Irish and their sensational young star guard, Skylar Diggins. The Aggies are a national championship newcomer and bullied their way through the tournament to get to the top. Like Notre Dame, they vanquished their conference rival on the way, beating Baylor in the Dallas regional final after losing to the Lady Bears three times during the season.

Inside


D2 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

BASEBALL

Today Track: Bend at Redmond, 3:30 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, TBA; Gilchrist at Summit JV, 3:30 p.m. Baseball: Crook County at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; Summit at Redmond (DH), 2 p.m. Boys tennis: Madras at Blanchett, 4 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Summit at Sisters, 5 p.m.

10:30 a.m. — MLB, Pittsburgh Pirates at St. Louis Cardinals, MLB Network. 11 a.m. — MLB, Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers, Root Sports. 4 p.m. — MLB, Minnesota Twins at New York Yankees, ESPN2.

GOLF Noon — 2011 Masters Par 3 Contest, ESPN.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Milwaukee Bucks at Miami Heat, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Lakers at Golden State Warriors, ESPN.

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, St. Louis Blues at Chicago Blackhawks, VS. network.

THURSDAY TENNIS 10 a.m. — Women’s Tennis Association, Family Circle Cup, round of 16, ESPN2.

BASEBALL Noon — MLB, Boston Red Sox at Cleveland Indians or Houston Astros at Cincinnati Reds, MLB Network.

GOLF Noon, 5 p.m. — 2011 Masters Tournament, first round, ESPN.

HOCKEY 2 p.m. — Men’s NCAA Tournament, first semifinal, Minnesota-Duluth vs. Notre Dame, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — NHL, Atlanta Thrashers at New York Rangers, VS. network. 5:30 p.m. — Men’s NCAA Tournament, second semifinal, Michigan vs. North Dakota, ESPN2.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, Boston Celtics at Chicago Bulls, TNT. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Utah Jazz, TNT.

RADIO THURSDAY BASKETBALL 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Utah Jazz, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Baseball • Fan beaten at Dodger game may have brain damage: A San Francisco Giants fan who was beaten at Dodger Stadium after last week’s opening game shows signs of brain damage and remains in critical condition, a doctor said Tuesday. Meanwhile, detectives were looking into unconfirmed reports that the same suspects struck other Giants fans minutes before the attack that left Bryan Stow in a coma. Stow, a 42-year-old paramedic and father of two from Santa Cruz, remained in critical but guarded condition at Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center. He suffered a severe skull fracture and bad bruising to his brain’s frontal lobes, said Dr. Gabriel Zada, a neurosurgeon. • Bonds: Feds rest after losing bid on secret tape: Prosecutors rested their case against Barry Bonds on Tuesday as the judge turned down their late bid to get a newly discovered audio tape of two key witnesses heard by the jury. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston refused to let the panel listen to a tape recording of a conversation between Bonds’ orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Arthur Ting, and his former business partner, Steve Hoskins. Prosecutors had hoped to use the recording to win back some of the momentum they lost last week when Ting directly contradicted Hoskins, who was a star witness and claimed the pair had repeatedly discussed the home run king and steroids. Illston, however, said much of the tape was inaudible, and what could be heard was irrelevant and inadmissible. Prosecutors finished presenting their evidence by having court staff read a transcript of Bonds’ December 2003 grand jury testimony.

Thursday Track: La Pine at Sweet Home, 4 p.m.; Culver at Regis, 4 p.m. Baseball: Culver at Horizon Christian, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 5 p.m. Softball: Elmira at Summit, 4:30 p.m.; Madras at La Salle, 4:30 p.m. Boys golf: Summit, Redmond at Quail Valley Golf Course in Banks, 10 a.m. Boys tennis: Bend at Redmond, 4 p.m.; Mountain View at Crook County, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Redmond at Bend, 4 p.m.; Crook County at Mountain View, 4 p.m.; Blanchett at Madras, 4 p.m. Friday Track: Mountain View at McKenzie Invitational in Blue River, 2 p.m. Baseball: Crook County at Bend, 4:30 p.m.; La Pine at Sisters, 4:30 p.m. Softball: Bend at Redmond (DH), 3 p.m.; Crook County at Mountain View (DH), 3 p.m.; Eddyville/Siletz at Culver, 4:30 p.m.; Hood River Valley at Madras (DH), 2:30 p.m.; Sisters at La Pine, 4:30 p.m. Girls golf: Redmond hosts Bend, Summit, Crook County, Madras at Eagle Crest, 1:30 p.m. Boys golf: Madras and Sisters at Aspen Lakes, TBA Boys tennis: Bend, Mountain View at Summit Tournament, TBA; Burns, Nyssa at Crook County, 2 p.m.; Canyonville at Sisters, 4 p.m. Girls tennis: Crook County at Burns, 2 p.m. Boys lacrosse: Sisters at Mountain View, 5 p.m.; Riverdale at Bend, 5:30 p.m. Saturday Track: Redmond at Sandy Invitational, 10:30 a.m.; Summit at Roseburg Invitational, 11:30 a.m.; Madras, Culver at Burns Invitational, noon Baseball: Central Linn at Culver (DH), noon.; Mountain View at Redmond (DH), noon.; Crook County at Roosevelt, 1 p.m.; Crook County at Marshall, 3 p.m.; La Pine at Burns (DH), noon. Softball: Central Linn at Culver (DH), noon; Crook County at Roosevelt, 1 p.m.; Crook County at Marshall, 3 p.m.; La Pine at Burns (DH), noon Boys tennis: Bend, Mountain View at Summit Tournament, TBA; Redmond, Sisters at Madras, 10 a.m.; Crook County vs. La Grande and Baker at Baker, TBA Girls tennis: Crook County vs. La Grand and Baker at Baker, TBA Boys lacrosse: Roseburg at Bend, 5 p.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college POLL USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, final records, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Connecticut (30) 32-9 773 8 2. Butler 28-10 704 NR 3. Kentucky 29-9 676 10 4. Kansas 35-3 659 2 5. Ohio State (1) 34-3 630 1 6. Virginia Commonwealth 28-12 555 NR 7. Duke 32-5 554 3 8. North Carolina 29-8 532 7 9. Arizona 30-8 531 18 10. Florida 29-8 503 13 11. San Diego State 34-3 479 5 12. Pittsburgh 28-6 448 4 13. Brigham Young 32-5 376 12 14. Notre Dame 27-7 336 6 15. Wisconsin 25-9 311 16 16. Texas 28-8 290 9 17. Purdue 26-8 276 15 18. Syracuse 27-8 250 14 19. Florida State 23-11 197 NR 20. Marquette 22-15 159 NR 21. Richmond 29-8 152 NR 22. Louisville 25-10 147 11 23. Washington 24-11 108 23 24. Kansas State 23-11 73 24 25. Utah State 30-4 51 17 Others receiving votes: Temple 41; West Virginia 34; St. John’s 33; Texas A&M 31; Xavier 31; UCLA 25; Cincinnati 24; Vanderbilt 24; Wichita State 20; George Mason 9; Michigan 9; Old Dominion 9; Gonzaga 7; Georgetown 5; Missouri 2; Illinois 1.

Women’s college NCAA WOMEN’S TOURNAMENT ——— National Championship Tuesday’s Game Texas A&M 76, Notre Dame 70 Tuesday’s Result

Texas A&M 76, Notre Dame 70 NOTRE DAME (31-8)

Diggins 7-19 8-9 23, Achonwa 0-1 0-0 0, Miller 0-1 0-1 0, Peters 8-10 5-8 21, Turner 0-1 2-2 2, Novosel 5-10 4-4 14, Mallory 1-6 1-2 4, Bruszewski 3-4 0-0 6. Totals 24-52 20-26 70. TEXAS A&M (33-5) Snow 0-0 0-0 0, Carter 2-6 0-0 5, Windham 0-0 0-0 0, Grant 0-0 0-0 0, Baker 1-2 0-0 2, White 7-9 3-5 18, Elonu 4-10 1-3 9, Adams 13-22 4-7 30, Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Pratcher 0-0 0-0 0, Gilbert 0-0 2-2 2, Assarian 0-0 0-0 0, Colson 2-4 6-6 10. Totals 29-53 16-23 76. Halftime—Notre Dame 35-33. 3-Point Goals—Notre Dame 2-10 (Mallory 1-4, Diggins 1-5, Novosel 0-1), Texas A&M 2-7 (White 1-1, Carter 1-2, Adams 0-2, Colson 0-2). Fouled Out—Achonwa, Carter. Rebounds—Notre Dame 29 (Peters 11), Texas A&M 32 (Adams 9). Assists—Notre Dame 10 (Diggins, Mallory 3), Texas A&M 14 (Colson 5). Total Fouls—Notre Dame 19, Texas A&M 21. A—17,473.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF x-Philadelphia 80 46 23 11 103 249 x-Pittsburgh 80 47 25 8 102 229 N.Y. Rangers 80 43 32 5 91 228 New Jersey 79 36 38 5 77 165 N.Y. Islanders 79 30 37 12 72 220 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF y-Boston 79 44 24 11 99 238 x-Montreal 80 43 30 7 93 210 Buffalo 80 41 29 10 92 236 Toronto 80 37 32 11 85 215 Ottawa 80 31 39 10 72 188 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF y-Washington 80 47 22 11 105 219 x-Tampa Bay 80 44 25 11 99 237 Carolina 79 38 30 11 87 225 Atlanta 79 33 34 12 78 217 Florida 79 29 38 12 70 190 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF y-Detroit 79 46 23 10 102 255 Nashville 80 43 26 11 97 215 Chicago 79 42 28 9 93 247 St. Louis 80 37 33 10 84 235 Columbus 80 34 33 13 81 210 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF z-Vancouver 80 52 19 9 113 254 Calgary 80 40 29 11 91 242 Minnesota 79 37 34 8 82 198 Colorado 79 29 42 8 66 219 Edmonton 79 25 43 11 61 188 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF y-San Jose 79 47 23 9 103 240 Phoenix 79 42 25 12 96 224 Los Angeles 79 45 28 6 96 214 Anaheim 79 44 30 5 93 228 Dallas 79 40 28 11 91 217

Basketball • North Carolina State turns to Gottfried as next coach: Former Alabama coach Mark Gottfried is the new men’s basketball coach at North Carolina State. In a statement from the school Tuesday, Gottfried said he was “extremely excited about the opportunity and challenge” of taking over a program that hasn’t been to the NCAA tournament since 2006. Athletic director Debbie Yow said Gottfried will receive a five-year contract with a guarantee of $1.2 million annually, a deal that includes an automatic two-year extension if he leads N.C. State back to the NCAA tournament in either of the next two seasons. —From wire reports

GA 215 194 193 200 250 GA 189 205 222 243 245 GA 194 236 232 258 220 GA 231 191 216 230 249 GA 183 233 224 278 256 GA 202 217 191 231 224

NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division z-clinched conference Tuesday’s Games Washington 3, Toronto 2, SO Buffalo 4, Tampa Bay 2 Pittsburgh 4, New Jersey 2 Montreal 2, Chicago 1, OT Ottawa 5, Philadelphia 2 St. Louis 3, Colorado 1 Nashville 6, Atlanta 3 Dallas 3, Columbus 0 Edmonton 2, Vancouver 0 Today’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Boston, 4 p.m. Toronto at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Florida at Washington, 4 p.m. Detroit at Carolina, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago, 5 p.m. Edmonton at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. San Jose at Anaheim, 7 p.m. Phoenix at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Atlanta at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 4 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

SOCCER MLS MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER All Times PDT ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Philadelphia 2 1 0 6 2 New England 1 0 2 5 4 New York 1 0 2 5 2 Chicago 1 0 1 4 4 Sporting Kansas City 1 1 1 4 8 Toronto FC 1 1 1 4 5 Columbus 1 1 1 4 3 D.C. 1 2 0 3 5 Houston 0 1 2 2 2 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF Colorado 3 0 0 9 8 Los Angeles 2 1 1 7 4 Real Salt Lake 2 0 0 6 5 Vancouver 1 1 1 4 7 San Jose 1 1 1 4 4 Seattle 0 2 2 2 3 Chivas USA 0 2 1 1 3 Portland 0 2 1 1 2 FC Dallas 0 2 1 1 1 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. ——— Today’s Game New England at Vancouver, 7 p.m. Friday’s Game Colorado at FC Dallas, 6 p.m. Saturday’s Games Chicago at Seattle FC, 1 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at D.C. United, 4:30 p.m. Real Salt Lake at New England, 4:30 p.m. Columbus at Chivas USA, 7:30 p.m.

GA 1 3 1 3 8 5 3 7 3 GA 2 5 1 6 3 5 5 6 5

TENNIS ATP Tour

DEALS Transactions

ASSOCIATION OF TENNIS PROFESSIONALS ——— Grand Prix Hassan II Tuesday Casablanca, Morocco Singles First Round Filippo Volandri, Italy, def. Julien Benneteau, France, 7-5, 6-3. Potito Starace (5), Italy, def. Daniel Brands, Germany, 7-5, 6-2. Michael Berrer, Germany, def. Nicolas Devilder, France, 6-3, 6-3. Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo, Spain, def. Rui Machado, Portugal, 7-5, 6-1. Blaz Kavcic, Slovenia, def. Reda Al Amrani, Morocco, 3-4, retired. Frederico Gil, Portugal, def. Simone Bolelli, Italy, 6-3, 6-1. Andrey Kuznetsov, Russia, def. Sergio Gutierrez-Ferrol, Spain, 6-1, 7-6 (5). Fabio Fognini (7), Italy, def. Gerard Granollers-Pujol, Spain, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3.

BASEBALL American Association AMARILLO SOX—Signed OF Lee Cruz. KANSAS CITY T-BONES—Signed OF Brian Joynt. LINCOLN SALTDOGS—Signed RHP Garrett Sherrill, LHP Lindsay Gulin and OF Jon Nelson. SIOUX FALLS PHEASANTS—Signed INF Cam Cameron. Can-Am League BROCKTON ROX—Released RHP Mike Wlodarczyk, RHP Wayne Lundgren, RHP Francisco Ortiz and OF Mike Conroy. NEW JERSEY JACKALS—Signed C Chris Anderson. PITTSFIELD COLONIALS—Signed INF Matt Nandin. QUEBEC CAPITALES—Signed RHP Bryan Rembisz. WORCESTER TORNADOES—Signed LHP Nick Serino. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NEW ORLEANS HORNETS—Signed F Patrick Ewing Jr. for the remainder of the season. PHILADELPHIA 76ERS—Signed G Antonio Daniels. FOOTBALL Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS—Signed WR Marcus Henry. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS—Signed D Zach Redmond and assigned him to Chicago (AHL). Reassigned LW Michael Forney and G Chris Carrozzi from Gwinnett (ECHL) to Chicago. NEW YORK RANGERS—Assigned F Kris Newbury to Connecticut (AHL). OTTAWA SENATORS—Recalled D Andre Benoit, D Patrick Wiercioch and F Roman Wick from Binghamton (AHL). PHILADELPHIA FLYERS—Placed G Michael Leighton on re-entry waivers. American Hockey League AHL—Suspended Hershey RW Andrew Gordon one game as a result of his actions in an April 1 game at Norfolk. CHICAGO WOLVES—Recalled LW Patrick Galivan from Gwinnett (ECHL). MANITOBA MOOSE—Released D Kyle Bushee. Signed D Adam Polasek. MILWAUKEE ADMIRALS—Signed F Taylor Beck and C Mike Latta. PEORIA RIVERMEN—Signed G Beau Erickson. PROVIDENCE BRUINS—Assigned D Ryan Donald and D Alain Goulet to Reading (ECHL). ECHL ELMIRA JACKALS—Announced D R.J. Anderson was returned to the team by Binghamton (AHL) and F Eric Lampe was assigned to the team by Syracuse (AHL). READING ROYALS—Signed G Dan Dunn. Announced F Matt Caruana was assigned to the team by Toronto (AHL) and F forward Rob Slaney was recalled by Toronto. Central Hockey League BLOOMINGTON PRAIRIETHUNDER—Announced F Garrett Klotz was recalled by Adirondack (AHL). TEXAS BRAHMAS—Signed F Shawn Skelly COLLEGE GEORGIA—Announced junior F Trey Thompkins will enter the NBA draft and junior F Travis Leslie has declared for the NBA draft. HOLY CROSS—Named Erin Walker volleyball coach. ILLINOIS—Announced freshman F Jereme Richmond has declared for the NBA draft. IOWA—Announced junior basketball G Cully Payne has been granted a release from his scholarship at his request. KENNESAW STATE—Named Vaughn Williams athletic director. LAMAR—Named Pat Knight men’s basketball coach. MIDWESTERN STATE—Names Nelson Haggerty men’s basketball coach. MISSOURI—Named Frank Haith men’s basketball coach. NORTH CAROLINA STATE—Named Mark Gottfried men’s basketball coach. OKLAHOMA CITY—Named Dionne Phelps men’s basketball coach. SAMFORD—Named Andy Stoots women’s assistant soccer coach.

U.S. Men’s Clay Court Championships Tuesday Houston Singles First Round Albert Ramos, Spain, def. Brian Dabul, Argentina, 6-4, 7-5. Somdev Devvarman, India, def. Robert Kendrick, United States, 6-2, 6-1. Igor Kunitsyn, Russia, def. Mischa Zverev, Germany, 7-6 (1), 6-2. Ryan Sweeting, United States, def. Tim Smyczek, United States, 6-2, 6-2. Ivo Karlovic, Croatia, def. Benjamin Becker (5), Germany, 7-6 (5), 6-4. Kei Nishikori (6), Japan, def. Franco Skugor, Croatia, 6-3, 6-2. Teymuraz Gabashvili, Russia, def. Paul Capdeville, Chile, 6-4, 7-6 (4). Horacio Zeballos, Argentina, def. Ryan Harrison, United States, 6-4, 6-3. James Blake, United States, def. Carlos Berloca, Argentina, 6-7 (7), 6-3, 6-4.

WTA Tour WOMEN’S TENNIS ASSOCIATION ——— Andalucia Tennis Experience Tuesday Marbella, Spain Singles First Round Tsvetana Pironkova (5), Bulgaria, def. Maria-Teresa Torro-Flor, Spain, 6-2, 6-2. Kristina Barrois, Germany, def. Kirsten Flipkens, Belgium, 6-3, 7-5. Estrella Cabeza Candela, Spain, def. Aravane Rezai (3), France, 6-3, 6-0. Lara Arruabarrena-Vecino, Spain, def. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 7-5, 6-4. Irina-Camelia Begu, Romania, def. Alberta Brianti, Italy, 6-4, 6-1. Dinara Safina, Russia, def. Arantxa Rus, Netherlands, 3-6, 6-2, 6-4. Lourdes Dominguez Lino, Spain, def. Angelique Kerber, Germany, 6-4, 3-6, 6-3. Agnes Szavay, Hungary, def. Johanna Larsson, Sweden, 6-1, 6-1. Svetlana Kuznetsova (2), Russia, def. Mona Barthel, Germany, 4-6, 7-6 (4), 6-4. Family Circle Cup Tuesday Charleston, S.C. Singles First Round Sabine Lisicki, Germany, def. Renata Voracova, Czech Republic, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2. Edina Gallovits-Hall, Romania, def. Jamie Hampton, United States, 7-6 (1), 7-5. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova (15), Czech Republic, def. Andrea Hlavackova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 2-6, 7-6 (6). Anna Tatishvili, Georgia, def. Jelena Dokic, Australia, 7-5, 2-6, 6-4. Daniela Hantuchova (10), Slovakia, def. Alla Kudryavtseva, Russia, 6-1, 7-6 (3). Maria Kirilenko (9), Russia, def. Varvara Lepchenko, United States, 6-4, 6-0. Tamira Paszek, Austria, def. Melanie Oudin, United States, 6-1, 7-5. Patricia Mayr-Achleitner, Germany, def. Zhang Shuai, China, 6-1, 6-4. Second Round Christina McHale, United States, def. Alisa Kleybanova (8), Russia, 6-1, 6-0. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, def. Jill Craybas, United States, 6-3, 6-2. Julia Goerges (12), Germany, def. Eva Birnerova, Czech Republic, 1-6, 7-5, 2-0, retired. Yanina Wickmayer (6), Belgium, def. Zheng Jie, China, 6-4, 6-0. Peng Shuai (11), China, def. Ayumi Morita, Japan, 6-2, 6-1. Sania Mirza, India, def. Vania King, United States, 6-7

FISH COUNT Fish Report Upstream daily movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams on Tuesday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 14 0 73 47 The Dalles 11 0 94 60 John Day 12 0 191 123 McNary 9 0 169 89 Upstream year-to-date movement of adult chinook, jack chinook, steelhead, and wild steelhead at selected Columbia River dams last updated on Monday. Chnk Jchnk Stlhd Wstlhd Bonneville 295 1 2,665 1,159 The Dalles 37 0 385 211 John Day 39 0 780 464 McNary 24 1 603 348

NHL ROUNDUP

Football • NFL awards $1 million to players’ charities as lockout heads to court: The NFL awarded $1 million in grants to the charities of nearly 90 current and former players. The league said Tuesday that star quarterbacks Peyton Manning, Drew Brees, Ben Roethlisberger and Philip Rivers were among those receiving money for their foundations. NFL Charities has given more than $17 million to player foundations over two decades, and that didn’t change with the lockout this year. With the lockout at three weeks, attorneys for the NFL and its locked-out players will go before a federal judge today in the first round of their fight over the future of the $9 billion business — including the 2011 season. The players are asking for an immediate end to the lockout on the basis of “irreparable harm” to their careers. The injunction request accompanies the antitrust lawsuit filed against the league after labor talks broke down on March 11. • Group files FEC complaint against Fiesta Bowl: A watchdog group wants the Federal Election Commission to launch an investigation into the Fiesta Bowl for reimbursing its employees for campaign donations. In its complaint filed Tuesday, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington urged the FEC to declare that the Arizonabased college football game violated federal election laws and to impose sanctions. The complaint is based on an internal report released by the bowl last week, which found that the Fiesta Bowl reimbursed at least $46,539 in political donations to its employees — an apparent violation of elections laws. The CREW complaint is focused on the federal campaign donations, which it says total $28,500. It also says the bowl violated federal election laws by using its facilities to host fundraisers for candidates for federal office. An FEC spokeswoman said the agency can’t comment on specific complaints it receives, and had no response to Sloan’s comments.

(6), 6-4, 6-2. Shahar Peer (5), Israel, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 6-1, 6-3.

Toronto FC at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Sunday’s Game Vancouver at Houston, 4 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Canadiens beat Blackhawks, clinch playoff spot The Associated Press MONTREAL — The Chicago Blackhawks’ quest just to qualify to defend their Stanley Cup title drew tighter as the Montreal Canadiens booked their return to the playoffs. P.K. Subban scored a powerplay goal at 1:19 of overtime and Montreal clinched its fourth straight playoff trip with a 2-1 win over Chicago on Tuesday night. “I was just happy to be able to score there,” Subban said. “I took some penalties so I just tried to make up for it. It was a great team effort.” Carey Price made 42 saves for the Canadiens, who went on a four-on-three advantage 37 seconds into the extra period when Blackhawks captain Jonathan Toews was called for tripping Subban in Montreal’s end. “We worked so hard out there and we pushed ourselves and killed some penalties and had some great chances on the power play,” Toews said. “All you’re trying to do is lift the guy’s stick and you could argue that there are a lot of stick penalties out there late in the game and you feel like it’s that type of thing that’s going to be let go both ways, and it ends up deciding the game.” Subban drove a slap shot past Corey Crawford after Montreal coach Jacques Martin used his timeout going into the power play. The rookie Canadiens defenseman turned and skated toward Price, who checked Subban to the ice as the Canadiens gathered around their teammates to celebrate their

Graham Hughes / The Associated Press

Montreal Canadiens’ goaltender Carey Price makes a save against the Chicago Blackhawks during the second period of Tuesday’s game in Montreal. return to the postseason. “We just looked at each other, we were skating as hard as we can at each other and we were both really excited, and I buried him,” Price said. Patrick Kane scored his 27th goal for Chicago, which moved into a tie with Anaheim for seventh in the West with 93 points. Dallas and Calgary are two points back in ninth. The Ducks, Blackhawks and Stars all have three games left, while Calgary has two. “Any time you get to that situation one point never feels like it’s good enough,” Toews said. “We worked so hard for 60 minutes and we came back, especially in the second and the third, we played

great hockey. It’s no reason why we shouldn’t come up with two points. It’s frustrating when you’re the goat, when you’re the guy that takes a penalty like that.” Also on Tuesday: Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Thrashers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Jordin Tootoo and Sergei Kostitsyn each had two goals and an assist, and Nashville moved closer to clinching a playoff berth by beating Atlanta. Senators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 OTTAWA — Jason Spezza had a goal and three assists to lead Ottawa to victory over slumping Philadelphia. Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

PITTSBURGH — Pascal Dupuis had two goals and Pittsburgh moved closer to clinching homeice advantage in the first round of the playoffs with a win over New Jersey. Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 TORONTO — Mike Knuble scored in the fourth round of the shootout to lift Washington to victory over Toronto after the Maple Leafs were eliminated from playoff contention. Sabres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 BUFFALO, N.Y. — Thomas Vanek scored three times to lead Buffalo to a win over Tampa Bay, inching the Sabres within a point of clinching a playoff berth. Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Avalanche . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ST. LOUIS — Kevin Shattenkirk had a goal and an assist against his former team, Andy McDonald added a goal and two assists, and St. Louis beat Colorado. Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 EDMONTON, Alberta — Devan Dubnyk made 26 saves and lastplace Edmonton beat first-place Vancouver for the second consecutive game. Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 DALLAS — Kari Lehtonen made 23 saves for his 17th career shutout, Steve Ott scored his second goal in 25 games on the power play, and Dallas pulled closer to the final Western Conference playoff spot with a victory over short-handed Columbus.


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 D3

M AJ O R L E AGUE BA SE BA L L AL BOXSCORES Indians 3, Red Sox 1 Boston Ellsbury cf Crawford lf Pedroia 2b Ad.Gonzalez 1b Youkilis 3b Ortiz dh J.Drew rf Saltalamacchia c a-Lowrie ph-ss Scutaro ss Varitek c Totals

AB 4 4 4 4 2 3 3 1 1 3 0 29

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 1 4

SO 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3

Avg. .188 .133 .333 .294 .182 .267 .167 .091 .167 .000 ---

Cleveland AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Brantley cf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .333 A.Cabrera ss 3 1 1 0 1 2 .250 Choo rf 4 0 0 0 0 2 .063 C.Santana c 2 0 0 1 1 1 .400 Hafner dh 3 1 1 0 1 1 .375 O.Cabrera 2b 4 1 1 1 0 0 .375 Kearns lf 3 0 0 0 1 2 .000 LaPorta 1b 3 0 0 0 1 2 .167 Hannahan 3b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .357 Totals 28 3 5 3 6 12 Boston 010 000 000 — 1 4 1 Cleveland 000 210 00x — 3 5 1 a-fouled out for Saltalamacchia in the 8th. E—Saltalamacchia (1), Tomlin (1). LOB—Boston 5, Cleveland 8. 2B—J.Drew (1), Brantley (2), A.Cabrera (2), Hafner (1). RBIs—Saltalamacchia (1), C.Santana (4), O.Cabrera (5), Hannahan (4). SB—Brantley (1), A.Cabrera (1), LaPorta (1). SF—C.Santana. Runners left in scoring position—Boston 1 (Ortiz) Cleveland 5 (C.Santana, Choo 2, Brantley 2). Runners moved up—Choo 2. GIDP—Ad.Gonzalez, Scutaro. DP—Cleveland 2 (A.Cabrera, Hannahan, LaPorta), (A.Cabrera, O.Cabrera, LaPorta). Boston IP H R ER Beckett L, 0-1 5 5 3 3 Albers 1 0 0 0 Jenks 1 0 0 0 Bard 1 0 0 0 Cleveland IP H R ER Tomlin W, 1-0 7 3 1 1 Sipp H, 2 1 0 0 0 C.Perez S, 1-1 1 1 0 0 T—2:48. A—9,025 (43,441).

BB 4 1 1 0 BB 3 0 1

SO 4 3 3 2 SO 3 0 0

NP ERA 106 5.40 22 0.00 16 0.00 16 21.60 NP ERA 91 1.29 7 0.00 27 0.00

Angels 5, Rays 3 Los Angeles M.Izturis ss H.Kendrick 2b Abreu dh Tor.Hunter rf V.Wells lf Callaspo 3b Trumbo 1b Conger c Bourjos cf Totals

AB 5 2 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 34

R 0 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 5

H BI BB 1 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 9 5 3

SO 1 0 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 6

Avg. .318 .429 .400 .261 .136 .438 .176 .250 .263

Tampa Bay AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jaso c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-F.Lopez ph-3b 2 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Damon lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .091 Shoppach c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Zobrist 2b 3 1 0 0 1 1 .231 M.Ramirez dh 4 0 0 0 0 3 .063 D.Johnson 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .067 B.Upton cf 4 1 1 2 0 1 .333 Joyce rf 4 0 1 0 0 0 .091 S.Rodriguez 3b-lf 3 1 1 1 1 0 .286 Brignac ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .000 a-E.Johnson ph-ss 1 0 0 0 1 0 .167 Totals 32 3 5 3 5 7 Los Angeles 310 010 000 — 5 9 0 Tampa Bay 001 000 020 — 3 5 0 a-walked for Brignac in the 7th. b-singled for Jaso in the 7th. LOB—Los Angeles 5, Tampa Bay 7. 2B—Joyce (1). 3B—H.Kendrick (1). HR—Conger (1), off Niemann S.Rodriguez (1), off Weaver; B.Upton (1), off Kohn. RBIs—Tor.Hunter 2 (4), Callaspo 2 (4), Conger (1), B.Upton 2 (2), S.Rodriguez (1). SB—M.Izturis (2), Abreu (1), Tor.Hunter (1), Bourjos (1), Damon (1). Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 2 (Tor. Hunter 2); Tampa Bay 5 (M.Ramirez, Jaso, D.Johnson, Damon 2). Runners moved up—Zobrist. GIDP—Tor.Hunter. DP—Tampa Bay 1 (S.Rodriguez, Zobrist, D.Johnson). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Weaver W, 2-0 6 2-3 3 1 1 3 6 112 0.69 Takahashi 1-3 1 1 1 2 0 18 10.13 Kohn 1 1 1 1 0 0 18 9.00 Walden S, 1-1 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Tampa Bay IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Niemann L, 0-1 6 9 5 5 1 4 90 7.50 J.Cruz 1 0 0 0 2 0 14 0.00 Farnsworth 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Jo.Peralta 1 0 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Niemann pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Takahashi pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. Inherited runners-scored—Takahashi 1-0, Kohn 1-1, J.Cruz 1-0. IBB—off J.Cruz (Abreu). WP—Weaver. T—2:46. A—13,173 (34,078).

Twins 5, Yankees 4 (10 innings) Minnesota Span cf Nishioka 2b Mauer c D.Young lf Cuddyer 1b-rf Kubel dh Valencia 3b Repko rf a-Morneau ph-1b A.Casilla ss b-Thome ph 1-Tolbert pr-ss Totals

AB 4 5 3 5 4 5 3 2 2 2 0 1 36

R 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 5

H BI BB SO 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 1 2 2 1 1 3 0 2 0 0 1 2 2 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 7 5 6 10

Avg. .316 .250 .143 .143 .133 .353 .125 .000 .188 .200 .143 .200

New York AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Jeter ss 4 1 1 0 1 1 .167 Swisher rf 4 1 2 0 0 1 .333 Teixeira 1b 4 1 1 3 0 0 .333 Al.Rodriguez 3b 4 0 1 0 0 1 .333 Cano 2b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .238 Posada dh 4 0 0 0 0 2 .222 Martin c 3 0 0 0 1 1 .353 An.Jones lf 3 1 1 1 0 1 .333 Gardner lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .125 Granderson cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .176 Totals 35 4 6 4 2 8 Minnesota 000 000 040 1 — 5 7 0 New York 310 000 000 0 — 4 6 0 a-lined out for Repko in the 8th. b-walked for A.Casilla in the 8th. 1-ran for Thome in the 8th. LOB—Minnesota 7, New York 3. 2B—D.Young (1). HR—Teixeira (4), off Duensing; An.Jones (1), off Duensing. RBIs—Mauer 2 (2), D.Young 3 (3), Teixeira 3 (10), An.Jones (1). Runners left in scoring position—Minnesota 3 (A.Casilla, Cuddyer, Kubel). GIDP—D.Young, Posada. DP—Minnesota 1 (Valencia, Nishioka, Cuddyer) New York 1 (Al.Rodriguez, Cano, Teixeira). Minnesota IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Duensing 7 6 4 4 2 7 103 5.14 Capps W, 1-0 2 0 0 0 0 0 16 2.25 Nathan S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 17 4.50 New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Sabathia 7 2 0 0 1 6 104 1.38 R.Soriano 2-3 1 4 4 3 1 32 13.50 Rbertsn BS, 1-1 1-3 1 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 M.Rivera 1 1 0 0 0 2 13 0.00 Logan L, 0-1 0 2 1 1 1 0 12 13.50 Ayala 1 0 0 0 1 0 13 6.00 Logan pitched to 3 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Robertson 3-3, Ayala 2-0. T—3:17. A—40,267 (50,291).

Blue Jays 7, Athletics 6 (10 innings) Oakland Crisp cf Barton 1b C.Jackson lf Willingham dh M.Ellis 2b DeJesus rf K.Suzuki c Kouzmanoff 3b An.LaRoche ss Pennington ss Totals

AB 5 4 4 4 5 4 4 5 3 2 40

R H 0 1 0 0 1 2 2 2 0 1 0 2 0 1 1 2 2 2 0 0 6 13

Toronto R.Davis cf Y.Escobar ss

AB R 5 2 5 3

BI 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 1 0 6

BB 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3

SO 1 2 0 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 12

Avg. .353 .200 .400 .333 .267 .188 .231 .267 .667 .111

H BI BB SO Avg. 2 0 0 0 .300 3 2 0 1 .375

Lind 1b 3 0 2 1 0 0 .353 A.Hill 2b 4 1 1 2 0 0 .200 J.Rivera rf 3 1 0 0 1 0 .091 Encarnacion dh 4 0 1 1 0 0 .188 Snider lf 4 0 0 1 0 1 .250 J.Nix 3b 4 0 1 0 0 0 .333 J.Molina c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Totals 36 7 10 7 1 4 Oakland 003 200 000 1 — 6 13 2 Toronto 000 104 000 2 — 7 10 0 No outs when winning run scored. E—McCarthy (1), Kouzmanoff (3). LOB—Oakland 9, Toronto 4. 2B—Crisp (2), C.Jackson (1), M.Ellis (1), K.Suzuki (2), Kouzmanoff (1), An.LaRoche (1), R.Davis (1), Encarnacion (1). HR—Willingham (2), off Frasor Y.Escobar (1), off Balfour. RBIs—C.Jackson (1), Willingham 2 (5), M.Ellis (4), DeJesus (2), An.LaRoche (1), Y.Escobar 2 (3), Lind (4), A.Hill 2 (4), Encarnacion (3), Snider (3). SB—A.Hill (1). SF—Willingham, Lind. Runners left in scoring position—Oakland 5 (Kouzmanoff, K.Suzuki, M.Ellis, C.Jackson, Pennington); Toronto 2 (J.Rivera, J.Nix). Runners moved up—Crisp, Snider. GIDP—K.Suzuki, Kouzmanoff, Encarnacion. DP—Oakland 1 (Kouzmanoff, M.Ellis, Barton); Toronto 2 (Y.Escobar, A.Hill, Lind), (Y.Escobar, A.Hill, Lind).

J.Upton rf Montero c C.Young cf Miranda 1b R.Roberts 3b G.Parra lf b-Mora ph Enright p a-Branyan ph Demel p Paterson p J.Gutierrez p D.Hernandez p c-Nady ph Totals

MELKY SMOOTH

Oakland IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McCarthy 8 8 5 4 1 2 89 4.50 Blevins 1 0 0 0 0 2 11 2.45 Balfour L, 0-1 0 2 2 2 0 0 6 10.80 Toronto IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Jo-.Reyes 3 1-3 9 5 5 1 3 75 13.50 Villanueva 2 2-3 0 0 0 2 3 34 0.00 Purcey 1 0 0 0 0 2 19 0.00 Camp 1 1 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 Rauch 1 1 0 0 0 0 14 4.50 Frasor W, 1-0 1 2 1 1 0 3 31 3.00 Balfour pitched to 2 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Villanueva 2-1. HBP—by Frasor (K.Suzuki). T—2:54. A—11,077 (49,260).

Rangers 3, Mariners 2 Seattle I.Suzuki rf Figgins 3b Bradley lf Cust dh Smoak 1b Olivo c A.Kennedy 2b J.Wilson ss M.Saunders cf Totals

AB 4 4 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 34

R 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2

H BI BB 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 6 2 2

SO 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 2 5

Avg. .286 .143 .350 .125 .294 .353 .333 .353 .167

Texas AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Kinsler 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .294 Andrus ss 3 0 0 0 0 0 .313 Hamilton lf 4 1 1 1 0 2 .263 A.Beltre 3b 3 0 0 0 0 1 .100 Mi.Young 1b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .286 N.Cruz dh 2 1 0 0 1 0 .375 Moreland rf 3 0 2 1 0 0 .300 Torrealba c 3 0 0 0 0 0 .200 Borbon cf 3 0 0 0 0 0 .273 Totals 28 3 5 3 1 5 Seattle 000 000 200 — 2 6 0 Texas 010 002 00x — 3 5 1 E—Kinsler (1). LOB—Seattle 7, Texas 3. 2B— A.Kennedy (1), Hamilton (3), Mi.Young (3), Moreland (1). 3B—Moreland (1). RBIs—J.Wilson (1), M.Saunders (2), Hamilton (4), Mi.Young (2), Moreland (1). S—Andrus. Runners left in scoring position—Seattle 3 (M.Saunders, Bradley 2); Texas 3 (Torrealba, Borbon, N.Cruz). Runners moved up—J.Wilson. Seattle IP H R ER BB SO Pineda L, 0-1 6 5 3 3 1 4 J.Wright 2 0 0 0 0 1 Texas IP H R ER BB SO Ogando W, 1-0 6 2 0 0 2 4 M.Lowe H, 2 1-3 3 2 2 0 0 Oliver H, 2 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 0 Feliz S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 Inherited runners-scored—Oliver 2-1. T—2:36. A—30,953 (49,170).

NP ERA 85 4.50 25 0.00 NP ERA 90 0.00 17 27.00 22 2.45 13 0.00

Ed Zurga / The Associated Press

Kansas City Royals’ Melky Cabrera watches his single that drove in Chris Getz for the game-winning run in the 12th inning of Tuesday’s game against the Chicago White Sox. The Royals won 7-6.

STANDINGS, SCORES AND SCHEDULES AMERICAN LEAGUE East Division Baltimore Toronto New York Boston Tampa Bay Central Division Kansas City Chicago Cleveland Minnesota Detroit West Division Texas Los Angeles Seattle Oakland

W 4 3 3 0 0 W 4 2 2 2 1 W 5 2 2 1

L Pct GB WCGB 0 1.000 — — 1 .750 1 — 2 .600 1½ ½ 4 .000 4 3 4 .000 4 3 L Pct GB WCGB 1 .800 — — 2 .500 1½ 1 2 .500 1½ 1 3 .400 2 1½ 3 .250 2½ 2 L Pct GB WCGB 0 1.000 — — 3 .400 3 1½ 3 .400 3 1½ 3 .250 3½ 2

Tuesday’s Games L.A. Angels 5, Tampa Bay 3 Cleveland 3, Boston 1 Minnesota 5, N.Y. Yankees 4, 10 innings Toronto 7, Oakland 6, 10 innings Texas 3, Seattle 2 Kansas City 7, Chicago White Sox 6, 12 innings

Royals 7, White Sox 6 (12 innings) Chicago AB Pierre lf 6 Beckham 2b 6 A.Dunn dh 4 1-Lillibridge pr-dh 0 Konerko 1b 5 Rios cf 6 Quentin rf 5 Pierzynski c 5 Al.Ramirez ss 4 Morel 3b 5 Totals 46

R H 1 1 1 3 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 1 6 11

BI 0 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 5

BB 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 3

SO 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 4

Avg. .235 .471 .286 .000 .313 .111 .438 .333 .176 .286

Kansas City AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Aviles 3b 5 0 0 0 0 2 .158 Me.Cabrera cf 6 1 3 3 0 0 .280 Gordon lf 5 2 3 2 0 1 .375 Butler dh 4 1 2 2 1 0 .316 Ka’aihue 1b 4 0 0 0 1 3 .176 Francoeur rf 5 0 2 0 0 0 .318 A.Escobar ss 5 1 1 0 0 0 .182 Treanor c 4 1 0 0 1 2 .250 Getz 2b 5 1 2 0 0 0 .357 Totals 43 7 13 7 3 8 Chicago 400 002 000 000 — 6 11 0 Kansas City 220 000 020 001 — 7 13 1 One out when winning run scored. 1-ran for A.Dunn in the 12th. E—Aviles (3). LOB—Chicago 8, Kansas City 6. 2B—Gordon 2 (4). 3B—Pierre (1), Al.Ramirez (1). HR—Konerko (1), off Hochevar; Gordon (1), off Floyd; Butler (2), off Sale. RBIs—Beckham (3), Konerko 3 (6), Al.Ramirez (3), Me.Cabrera 3 (4), Gordon 2 (3), Butler 2 (3). SB—Pierre (1), Francoeur (2), A.Escobar (2), Treanor (1). CS—Lillibridge (1), Morel (1). S—Aviles. Runners left in scoring position—Chicago 3 (Al. Ramirez, Konerko, Beckham); Kansas City 3 (Gordon, A.Escobar, Ka’aihue). Runners moved up—Quentin. GIDP—A.Escobar. DP—Chicago 2 (Al.Ramirez, Beckham, Konerko), (Al. Ramirez, Konerko). Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Floyd 7 7 4 4 2 5 104 5.14 Sale BS, 1-1 2-3 2 2 2 0 1 18 7.71 Crain 1 1-3 1 0 0 0 0 19 3.86 Santos 2 1 0 0 1 2 28 0.00 T.Pena L, 0-1 1-3 2 1 1 0 0 8 20.25 Kansas City IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hochevar 6 7 6 5 2 1 101 6.17 Crow 2 2 0 0 0 2 24 0.00 Soria 1 0 0 0 0 1 15 0.00 Tejeda 1 0 0 0 0 0 8 3.00 Texeira 1 1-3 2 0 0 1 0 23 0.00 Jeffress W, 1-0 2-3 0 0 0 0 0 5 5.40 Inherited runners-scored—Jeffress 2-0. IBB—off Santos (Butler). HBP—by Hochevar (A.Dunn). T—3:32. A—12,641 (37,903).

NL BOXSCORES Reds 8, Astros 2 Houston AB R Bourn cf 4 1 Ang.Sanchez ss 3 0 Pence rf 4 0 Ca.Lee lf 4 0 Hall 2b 3 0 W.Lopez p 0 0 Fulchino p 0 0 c-Michaels ph 1 0 Lyon p 0 0 Wallace 1b 4 0 C.Johnson 3b 3 1 Quintero c 3 0 Happ p 0 0 a-Inglett ph 1 0 An.Rodriguez p 0 0 M.Downs 2b 1 0 Totals 31 2

H BI BB 2 0 0 1 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 2 2

SO 0 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 7

Avg. .188 .333 .375 .267 .067 ----.000 --.133 .214 .091 --.000 --.000

Cincinnati AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Stubbs cf 5 1 2 0 0 0 .438 Phillips 2b 2 3 2 0 1 0 .375 b-Cairo ph-2b 1 0 0 1 0 0 .333 Votto 1b 4 2 2 1 1 0 .357 Rolen 3b 5 1 1 1 0 1 .188 Gomes lf 2 0 0 1 2 1 .200 Heisey rf 2 0 1 3 1 0 .500 R.Hernandez c 4 0 0 1 0 1 .444 Janish ss 4 0 1 0 0 1 .385 Leake p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Jor.Smith p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Maloney p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 33 8 10 8 5 5 Houston 000 020 000 — 2 5 0 Cincinnati 320 210 00x — 8 10 0 a-flied out for Happ in the 5th. b-hit a sacrifice fly for Phillips in the 5th. c-struck out for Fulchino in the 8th. LOB—Houston 6, Cincinnati 8. 2B—Bourn (1), Votto (1). RBIs—Ang.Sanchez 2 (3), Cairo (2), Votto (3), Rolen (4), Gomes (3), Heisey 3 (3), R.Hernandez (4).

NATIONAL LEAGUE L10 4-0 3-1 3-2 0-4 0-4 L10 4-1 2-2 2-2 2-3 1-3 L10 5-0 2-3 2-3 1-3

Str Home Away W-4 1-0 3-0 W-1 3-1 0-0 L-1 3-2 0-0 L-4 0-0 0-4 L-4 0-4 0-0 Str Home Away W-4 4-1 0-0 L-2 0-0 2-2 W-2 2-2 0-0 W-1 0-0 2-3 L-1 0-0 1-3 Str Home Away W-5 5-0 0-0 W-1 0-0 2-3 L-3 0-0 2-3 L-1 1-2 0-1

East Division New York Philadelphia Atlanta Florida Washington Central Division Cincinnati Chicago Pittsburgh St. Louis Milwaukee Houston West Division San Diego Colorado Los Angeles Arizona San Francisco

Today’s Games L.A. Angels (Haren 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Hellickson 0-0), 10:10 a.m. Seattle (F.Hernandez 1-0) at Texas (C.Wilson 0-0), 11:05 a.m. Chicago White Sox (Buehrle 1-0) at Kansas City (Francis 0-0), 11:10 a.m. Boston (Matsuzaka 0-0) at Cleveland (Talbot 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Detroit (Verlander 0-0) at Baltimore (Bergesen 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Minnesota (Pavano 0-1) at N.Y. Yankees (Garcia 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Oakland (Braden 0-0) at Toronto (Litsch 0-0), 4:07 p.m.

W 3 3 3 2 1 W 4 3 3 2 1 0 W 3 2 3 1 1

L Pct GB WCGB 1 .750 — — 1 .750 — — 2 .600 ½ ½ 2 .500 1 1 3 .250 2 2 L Pct GB WCGB 0 1.000 — — 2 .600 1½ ½ 2 .600 1½ ½ 3 .400 2½ 1½ 4 .200 3½ 2½ 4 .000 4 3 L Pct GB WCGB 1 .750 — — 1 .667 ½ ½ 2 .600 ½ ½ 3 .250 2 2 4 .200 2½ 2½

Tuesday’s Games Chicago Cubs 6, Arizona 5 San Diego 3, San Francisco 1 N.Y. Mets 7, Philadelphia 1 Cincinnati 8, Houston 2 Florida 3, Washington 2, 10 innings Milwaukee 1, Atlanta 0 St. Louis 3, Pittsburgh 2 Colorado 3, L.A. Dodgers 0

L10 3-1 3-1 3-2 2-2 1-3 L10 4-0 3-2 3-2 2-3 1-4 0-4 L10 3-1 2-1 3-2 1-3 1-4

Str Home Away W-3 0-0 3-1 L-1 3-1 0-0 L-1 0-0 3-2 W-1 2-2 0-0 L-2 1-2 0-1 Str Home Away W-4 4-0 0-0 W-2 3-2 0-0 L-1 0-0 3-2 W-1 2-3 0-0 W-1 1-1 0-3 L-4 0-0 0-4 Str Home Away W-1 1-0 2-1 W-2 2-1 0-0 L-1 3-1 0-1 L-3 0-0 1-3 L-2 0-0 1-4

Today’s Games Pittsburgh (Correia 1-0) at St. Louis (Carpenter 0-0), 10:45 a.m. Arizona (Galarraga 0-0) at Chicago Cubs (Dempster 0-1), 11:20 a.m. L.A. Dodgers (Billingsley 1-0) at Colorado (Hammel 0-0), 12:10 p.m. San Francisco (Lincecum 0-1) at San Diego (Stauffer 0-0), 3:35 p.m. N.Y. Mets (Pelfrey 0-1) at Philadelphia (Blanton 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Houston (Figueroa 0-0) at Cincinnati (Volquez 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Washington (L.Hernandez 0-1) at Florida (Volstad 0-0), 4:10 p.m. Atlanta (Minor 0-0) at Milwaukee (Estrada 0-0), 5:10 p.m.

American League roundup

National League roundup

• Royals 7, White Sox 6: KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Melky Cabrera’s RBI single scored Chris Getz from second in the 12th inning, lifting Kansas City past Chicago. Chris Getz singled leading off and was sacrificed to second and then Cabrera connected off Tony Pena (0-1) for his third hit of the game. • Indians 3, Red Sox 1: CLEVELAND — Josh Tomlin outpitched Boston’s Josh Beckett, Cleveland came up with just enough timely hits and the Indians kept the Red Sox winless so far this season with a victory over the team many predicted would win it all. • Angels 5, Rays 3: ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Jered Weaver won his second consecutive start, Torii Hunter and Alberto Callaspo both had two RBIs and the Los Angeles Angels beat winless Tampa Bay. The defending AL East champion Rays fell to 0-4. Manny Ramirez was hitless in four atbats with three strikeouts and is one for 16 overall, while Johnny Damon returned after missing a game with a sore right calf and singled, making him one for 11 this year. • Twins 5, Yankees 4: NEW YORK — Joe Mauer hit a go-ahead single in the 10th inning and Minnesota broke through in the Bronx, rallying past the New York Yankees to overcome a dominant outing by CC Sabathia. Delmon Young blooped a three-run double in the eighth to tie it and Minnesota took advantage of five walks by Yankees relievers in the last three innings. • Blue Jays 7, Athletics 6: TORONTO — Yunel Escobar hit a two-run homer in the 10th inning, lifting Toronto to victory over Oakland. Josh Willingham hit a leadoff homer in the top of the 10th to give Oakland a 6-5 lead. But Rajai Davis led off the bottom half with a single against Grant Balfour (0-1) and Escobar followed with a first-pitch homer that landed in the right field bullpen, his first of the season. • Rangers 3, Mariners 2: ARLINGTON, Texas — Alexi Ogando pitched six scoreless innings in his first major league start and Josh Hamilton hit an RBI double as Texas remained undefeated with a victory over Seattle. The defending American League champion Rangers are the first team to five wins.

• Mets 7, Phillies 1: PHILADELPHIA — Chris Young pitched effectively into the sixth inning and had two of his career-high three hits during a six-run third, helping the New York Mets beat Philadelphia. The four-time NL East champion Phillies tried to start 4-0 for the first time since 1915. • Reds 8, Astros 2: CINCINNATI — Chris Heisey drove in three runs and Cincinnati took a patient approach at the plate in improving to 4-0 for the first time since its 1990 World Series championship season, beating Houston. Heisey walked with the bases loaded, was hit by a pitch with the bases loaded, and singled home a run off J.A. Happ (0-1), who helped the league’s top offense immensely. • Padres 3, Giants 1: SAN DIEGO — Aaron Harang pitched six strong innings in his debut with his hometown Padres, who won their home opener against skidding San Francisco. The defending World Series champion Giants have lost four of five. • Cubs 6, Diamondbacks 5: CHICAGO — Marlon Byrd had three hits, doubling in a key run in the seventh inning, and Chicago held on for a victory over Arizona. Byrd, who also scored a run, drove in pinch-hitter Jeff Baker with a one-out double to left off Sam Demel (1-1), giving Chicago a 5-4 lead after blowing a three-run advantage in the top of the seventh. • Cardinals 3, Pirates 2: ST. LOUIS — Albert Pujols had the tying and go-ahead RBIs and Kyle McClellan rebounded from a shaky beginning to pitch well in his first career start as St. Louis beat Pittsburgh. • Brewers 1, Braves 0: MILWAUKEE — Yovani Gallardo threw a two-hitter and Milwaukee snapped a four-game losing streak to begin the season. Gallardo (1-0) walked two and struck out two for the third shutout of his career. • Rockies 3, Dodgers 0: DENVER — Jhoulys Chacin scattered five hits over seven sharp innings and Troy Tulowitzki broke out of a hitting funk with a solo homer, helping Colorado to a win over the Los Angeles Dodgers. • Marlins 3, Nationals 2: MIAMI — Florida overcame a night of poor clutch hitting when Donnie Murphy delivered a bases-loaded, two-out single in the 10th inning to beat Washington.

SB—Stubbs (2), Phillips (1). S—Happ. SF—Cairo. Runners left in scoring position—Houston 2 (Pence, Michaels); Cincinnati 4 (Janish, R.Hernandez 2, Votto). Runners moved up—Gomes. Houston IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Happ L, 0-1 4 7 7 7 5 2 91 15.75 An.Rodriguez 1 2 1 1 0 0 18 15.43 W.Lopez 1 0 0 0 0 1 11 0.00 Fulchino 1 1 0 0 0 1 13 3.00 Lyon 1 0 0 0 0 1 16 20.25 Cincinnati IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Leake W, 1-0 6 3 2 2 2 4 94 3.00 Jor.Smith 2 2 0 0 0 3 27 3.38 Maloney 1 0 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 HBP—by Happ (Heisey), by Leake (C.Johnson). T—2:38. A—11,821 (42,319).

Padres 3, Giants 1 San Francisco Torres cf F.Sanchez 2b Huff rf Posey c P.Sandoval 3b Burrell lf Belt 1b

AB 4 4 3 4 3 4 4

R 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

SO 1 1 1 1 1 1 0

Avg. .278 .368 .211 .250 .333 .167 .118

Tejada ss Bumgarner p Mota p b-Rowand ph R.Ramirez p Totals

4 1 1 1 0 33

0 0 0 0 0 1

1 1 0 1 0 8

0 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 0 0 0 2

0 0 1 0 0 7

.238 1.000 .000 .571 ---

San Diego AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Bartlett ss 3 1 0 0 1 1 .176 O.Hudson 2b 4 1 1 0 0 2 .154 Cantu 1b 3 0 0 1 0 0 .143 Ludwick lf 3 0 0 0 1 0 .154 Headley 3b 2 0 0 1 2 0 .214 Denorfia rf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .222 Maybin cf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .188 Hundley c 4 1 3 0 0 0 .533 Harang p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 a-C.Hunter ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 1.000 Gregerson p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Adams p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bell p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 29 3 7 3 4 5 San Francisco 100 000 000 — 1 8 0 San Diego 003 000 00x — 3 7 0 a-singled for Harang in the 6th. b-singled for Mota in the 7th. LOB—San Francisco 7, San Diego 8. 2B—Tejada (2), Hundley (2). RBIs—Huff (4), Cantu (1), Headley (5), De-

norfia (1). SB—Torres (1), Bartlett (1). CS—P.Sandoval (1), C.Hunter (1). S—Harang. SF—Cantu. Runners left in scoring position—San Francisco 4 (Posey 2, Burrell, F.Sanchez); San Diego 4 (Maybin 2, Cantu 2). Runners moved up—F.Sanchez, Huff. GIDP—Belt. DP—San Francisco 1 (Posey, Posey, P.Sandoval); San Diego 1 (O.Hudson, Bartlett, Cantu). San Francisco IP H R ER BB ERA Bmgrner L, 0-1 3 5 3 3 3 2 Mota 3 2 0 0 1 3 R.Ramirez 2 0 0 0 0 0 San Diego IP H R ER BB SO Harang W, 1-0 6 6 1 1 2 6 Gregerson H, 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 Adams H, 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 Bell S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 0 Bumgarner pitched to 1 batter in the 4th. Inherited runners-scored—Mota 1-0. T—2:36. A—43,146 (42,691).

SO NP 73 40 20 NP 94 17 17 9

9.00 0.00 0.00 ERA 1.50 3.00 4.50 0.00

Cubs 6, Diamondbacks 5 Arizona Bloomquist ss K.Johnson 2b

AB R 4 0 4 0

H BI BB SO Avg. 1 2 1 1 .333 0 0 0 1 .167

4 3 4 3 3 3 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 1 33

0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5

1 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 7

0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 5

0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

1 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 7

.222 .467 .176 .375 .300 .214 .167 .000 .400 --------.000

Overbay 1b Alvarez 3b Diaz rf a-G.Jones ph-rf Jaramillo c Cedeno ss c-Doumit ph 1-J.Rodriguez pr Ja.McDonald p Karstens p b-Bowker ph Olson p Resop p d-Pearce ph Totals

3 4 2 2 3 3 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 32

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

2 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8

2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 11

.278 .190 .111 .250 .286 .250 .250 --.000 --.000 ----.000

Chicago AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fukudome rf 3 0 1 0 2 1 .273 Marshall p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --S.Castro ss 5 1 2 1 0 0 .476 Byrd cf 4 1 3 1 0 1 .273 Ar.Ramirez 3b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .333 Colvin 1b 3 1 1 3 1 1 .182 A.Soriano lf 3 0 1 0 1 1 .278 Barney 2b 3 1 1 0 0 0 .333 J.Russell p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Re.Johnson rf 0 0 0 0 0 0 .000 K.Hill c 3 1 0 0 1 0 .000 Cashner p 1 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Samardzija p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Mateo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Je.Baker 2b 2 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Totals 31 6 10 5 6 6 Arizona 001 000 301 — 5 7 1 Chicago 022 000 20x — 6 10 0 a-struck out for Enright in the 7th. b-singled for G.Parra in the 9th. c-grounded out for D.Hernandez in the 9th. E—Montero (2). LOB—Arizona 5, Chicago 8. 2B— S.Castro (2), Byrd (1). HR—R.Roberts (1), off Cashner Colvin (1), off Enright. RBIs—Bloomquist 2 (3), R.Roberts (2), G.Parra (2), Nady (1), S.Castro (2), Byrd (1), Colvin 3 (3). SB—Bloomquist (4). S—Cashner. Runners left in scoring position—Arizona 3 (J.Upton, K.Johnson, Bloomquist); Chicago 3 (Colvin, J.Russell 2). Runners moved up—Nady. GIDP—Montero, Barney. DP—Arizona 1 (K.Johnson, Bloomquist, Miranda); Chicago 1 (Colvin, S.Castro, J.Russell).

St. Louis AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Theriot ss 2 2 1 0 2 0 .211 Rasmus cf 3 0 2 0 1 0 .400 Pujols 1b 2 0 1 2 1 0 .167 Berkman rf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .313 Craig lf 4 0 2 1 0 0 .364 Miller p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Y.Molina c 0 0 0 0 0 0 .133 Freese 3b 2 0 0 0 1 1 .133 Batista p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Jay lf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .286 Schumaker 2b 3 0 0 0 1 0 .278 Laird c 4 0 0 0 0 2 .000 Franklin p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --McClellan p 2 0 0 0 0 1 .000 Descalso 3b 1 0 0 0 0 1 .167 Totals 28 3 7 3 6 6 Pittsburgh 200 000 000 — 2 8 0 St. Louis 000 110 10x — 3 7 0 a-flied out for Diaz in the 7th. b-flied out for Karstens in the 7th. c-singled for Cedeno in the 9th. d-struck out for Resop in the 9th. 1-ran for Doumit in the 9th. LOB—Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 8. 2B—Tabata (1), Berkman (1). HR—Overbay (1), off McClellan. RBIs— Overbay 2 (3), Pujols 2 (3), Craig (4). SB—Jaramillo (1). CS—McCutchen (1). S—Ja.McDonald. SF—Pujols. Runners left in scoring position—Pittsburgh 4 (Tabata, Alvarez 2, Bowker); St. Louis 3 (Craig 2, Laird). GIDP—Alvarez, Schumaker, Laird. DP—Pittsburgh 2 (Walker, Cedeno, Overbay), (Alvarez, Overbay); St. Louis 1 (Schumaker, Theriot, Pujols).

Arizona IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Enright 6 7 4 4 3 3 100 6.00 Demel L, 1-1 1-3 3 2 2 1 1 20 9.00 Paterson 0 0 0 0 1 0 4 0.00 J.Gutierrez 2-3 0 0 0 0 1 10 0.00 D.Hernandez 1 0 0 0 1 1 15 0.00 Chicago IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Cashner 5 1-3 2 1 1 1 2 72 1.69 Samardzija H, 1 1 0 2 2 2 2 27 9.00 Mateo 0 1 1 1 1 0 8 27.00 J.Russell W, 1-0 1 2-3 2 0 0 0 2 28 0.00 Marshall S, 1-1 1 2 1 1 0 1 18 3.86 Mateo pitched to 2 batters in the 7th. Paterson pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. Inherited runners-scored—Paterson 3-1, J.Gutierrez 3-0, Samardzija 1-0, Mateo 2-1, J.Russell 3-2. IBB—off Demel (Ar.Ramirez). T—3:17. A—27,039 (41,159).

Pittsburgh IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ja.McDonald 4 2-3 4 2 2 4 4 87 3.86 Karstens 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 0 14 0.00 Olson L, 0-1 1-3 1 1 1 1 1 13 13.50 Resop 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 24 0.00 St. Louis IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA McClellan 6 6 2 2 1 7 95 3.00 Batista W, 1-0 1 2-3 1 0 0 1 1 30 0.00 Miller H, 1 1-3 0 0 0 1 1 11 0.00 Franklin S, 1-2 1 1 0 0 0 2 16 4.50 Inherited runners-scored—Karstens 1-0, Resop 2-1, Miller 1-0. WP—Karstens. T—2:51. A—33,666 (43,975).

Mets 7, Phillies 1 New York Jos.Reyes ss Pagan cf D.Wright 3b Beltran rf Hairston lf I.Davis 1b Emaus 2b D.Carrasco p Byrdak p c-Dan.Murphy ph Parnell p Nickeas c C.Young p Hu 2b Totals

AB 5 3 5 4 4 4 4 0 0 1 0 5 3 1 39

R H 1 2 1 0 2 4 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 1 7 13

BI 0 0 2 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6

BB 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4

SO 0 1 1 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 7

Avg. .250 .143 .412 .143 .143 .333 .200 ----.200 --.000 1.000 .200

Philadelphia AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Victorino cf 5 0 0 0 0 3 .154 Polanco 3b 3 0 1 1 1 0 .400 Rollins ss 3 0 1 0 1 0 .467 Howard 1b 4 0 0 0 0 3 .412 Ibanez lf 4 0 2 0 0 1 .267 B.Francisco rf 4 0 0 0 0 1 .353 Ruiz c 3 0 0 0 1 0 .154 Valdez 2b 4 1 1 0 0 1 .333 Hamels p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --K.Kendrick p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 a-M.Martinez ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .250 Herndon p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --J.Romero p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --b-Orr ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .500 Baez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Bastardo p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --d-Gload ph 1 0 1 0 0 0 .500 Totals 33 1 7 1 4 9 New York 006 001 000 — 7 13 0 Philadelphia 000 010 000 — 1 7 0 a-walked for K.Kendrick in the 5th. b-singled for J.Romero in the 7th. c-grounded out for Byrdak in the 9th. d-singled for Bastardo in the 9th. LOB—New York 10, Philadelphia 9. 2B—D.Wright (1), Polanco (3). RBIs—D.Wright 2 (4), Hairston (2), I.Davis (4), Emaus (1), C.Young (1), Polanco (1). SB—Jos.Reyes (1), Pagan (2), D.Wright (1), Rollins (2), Valdez (1). Runners left in scoring position—New York 5 (Hairston 2, Jos.Reyes, I.Davis, Emaus); Philadelphia 5 (Howard 3, B.Francisco, Valdez). GIDP—Beltran, Valdez. DP—New York 1 (Jos.Reyes, I.Davis); Philadelphia 1 (Howard, Rollins, Howard). New York IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA C.Young W, 1-0 5 1-3 5 1 1 4 7 103 1.69 D.Carrasco 1 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 23 0.00 Byrdak 1 0 0 0 0 1 13 0.00 Parnell 1 1 0 0 0 0 11 0.00 Philadelphia IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Hamels L, 0-1 2 2-3 7 6 6 2 3 68 20.25 K.Kendrick 2 1-3 2 0 0 1 1 42 2.70 Herndon 1 2 1 1 1 1 25 6.75 J.Romero 1 1 0 0 0 1 16 9.00 Baez 1 1 0 0 0 0 10 0.00 Bastardo 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 0.00 Inherited runners-scored—D.Carrasco 2-0, K.Kendrick 2-0. HBP—by Hamels (Pagan). PB—Ruiz. T—2:56. A—45,365 (43,651).

Brewers 1, Braves 0 Atlanta AB R Prado lf 3 0 McLouth cf 3 0 C.Jones 3b 3 0 McCann c 3 0 Uggla 2b 3 0 Heyward rf 2 0 Ale.Gonzalez ss 3 0 Hinske 1b 3 0 D.Lowe p 2 0 O’Flaherty p 0 0 Linebrink p 0 0 a-Freeman ph 1 0 Totals 26 0

H BI BB 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2

SO 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2

Avg. .238 .211 .300 .333 .200 .286 .235 .000 .000 ----.133

Milwaukee AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Weeks 2b 4 0 0 0 0 2 .286 Morgan cf-rf 4 0 3 0 0 0 .500 Braun lf 2 0 2 1 2 0 .412 Fielder 1b 4 0 0 0 0 0 .176 McGehee 3b 4 0 1 0 0 2 .263 Kotsay rf 2 0 0 0 1 0 .000 1-Gomez pr-cf 1 0 0 0 0 0 .118 Counsell ss 2 0 0 0 1 1 .000 Kottaras c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .143 Gallardo p 3 1 1 0 0 1 .167 Totals 29 1 7 1 4 7 Atlanta 000 000 000 — 0 2 0 Milwaukee 001 000 00x — 1 7 0 a-grounded out for Linebrink in the 9th. 1-ran for Kotsay in the 6th. LOB—Atlanta 1, Milwaukee 8. 3B—Morgan (1). RBIs—Braun (3). SB—Counsell (1). CS—Uggla (1). Runners left in scoring position—Milwaukee 5 (Fielder 2, Kottaras, Gomez 2). GIDP—McLouth, C.Jones, Counsell. DP—Atlanta 1 (Uggla, Hinske); Milwaukee 2 (Counsell, Fielder), (Fielder, Counsell, Fielder). Atlanta IP H R ER BB D.Lowe L, 1-1 6 5 1 1 3 O’Flaherty 1 1-3 1 0 0 1 Linebrink 2-3 1 0 0 0 Milwaukee IP H R ER BB Gallardo W, 1-0 9 2 0 0 2 Inherited runners-scored—Linebrink O’Flaherty (Braun). T—2:21. A—24,117 (41,900).

SO NP ERA 7 108 0.77 0 25 0.00 0 3 3.38 SO NP ERA 2 111 1.20 2-0. IBB—off

Cardinals 3, Pirates 2 Pittsburgh Tabata lf Walker 2b McCutchen cf

AB 4 4 3

R 1 0 0

H BI BB 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 1

SO 0 3 1

Avg. .389 .333 .357

Rockies 3, Dodgers 0 Los Angeles Furcal ss Gwynn lf Ethier rf Kemp cf Loney 1b Uribe 3b Barajas c Carroll 2b Kershaw p a-Miles ph MacDougal p Hawksworth p Totals

AB 4 4 2 4 4 4 3 3 1 1 0 0 30

R 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

H BI BB 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 0 2

SO 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 7

Avg. .250 .200 .353 .313 .158 .182 .267 .308 .000 .200 -----

Colorado AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Fowler cf 4 1 1 0 0 1 .250 Spilborghs rf 4 0 0 0 0 3 .000 C.Gonzalez lf 3 0 0 0 1 1 .333 Tulowitzki ss 3 1 1 1 1 0 .091 Jo.Lopez 2b 3 0 1 1 0 1 .364 Helton 1b 3 0 1 0 0 1 .273 Wigginton 3b 3 0 1 0 0 0 .250 R.Betancourt p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Street p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Iannetta c 3 1 1 1 0 1 .444 Chacin p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 b-Stewart ph-3b 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 Totals 28 3 6 3 2 8 Los Angeles 000 000 000 — 0 5 0 Colorado 000 111 00x — 3 6 0 a-lined out for Kershaw in the 7th. b-flied out for Chacin in the 7th. LOB—Los Angeles 6, Colorado 4. 2B—Gwynn (1), Fowler (2). HR—Tulowitzki (1), off Kershaw; Iannetta (1), off Kershaw. RBIs—Tulowitzki (1), Jo.Lopez (3), Iannetta (2). S—Kershaw, Chacin. Runners left in scoring position—Los Angeles 3 (Kemp, Gwynn, Uribe); Colorado 2 (Fowler, Helton). Runners moved up—Furcal, Loney, C.Gonzalez. GIDP—Uribe. DP—Colorado 1 (Wigginton, Jo.Lopez, Helton). Los Angeles IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Kershaw L, 1-1 6 6 3 3 1 8 89 2.08 MacDougal 1 0 0 0 0 0 9 0.00 Hawksworth 1 0 0 0 1 0 16 0.00 Colorado IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Chacin W, 1-0 7 5 0 0 2 4 97 0.00 R.Betncrt H, 2 1 0 0 0 0 2 9 0.00 Street S, 2-2 1 0 0 0 0 1 10 3.00 IBB—off Kershaw (Tulowitzki), off Chacin (Ethier). T—2:19. A—24,693 (50,490).

Marlins 3, Nationals 2 (10 innings) Washington Hairston Jr. 2b-lf Werth rf Zimmerman 3b Ad.LaRoche 1b Morse lf Clippard p b-Stairs ph Storen p Desmond ss Ankiel cf W.Ramos c Cora ss S.Burnett p Marquis p Espinosa 2b Totals

AB 4 5 2 4 4 0 1 0 0 3 5 5 0 2 1 36

R 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

H BI BB SO 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 2 1 1 3 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 2 7 11

Avg. .000 .333 .364 .188 .154 --.000 --.000 .083 .500 .200 --.500 .400

Florida AB R H BI BB SO Avg. Coghlan cf 5 0 1 0 0 0 .118 Infante 2b 3 1 0 0 1 0 .200 H.Ramirez ss 4 0 0 0 1 1 .167 G.Sanchez 1b 5 0 2 0 0 1 .444 Morrison lf 4 1 2 1 1 1 .286 J.Buck c 5 0 0 0 0 1 .222 Do.Murphy 3b 5 1 2 1 0 0 .250 Bonifacio rf 3 0 1 0 0 0 .455 Ani.Sanchez p 1 0 0 0 0 0 .000 R.Webb p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --M.Dunn p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --a-Dobbs ph 0 0 0 1 0 0 .500 Hensley p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --L.Nunez p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --c-Stanton ph 0 0 0 0 1 0 .500 1-Cousins pr 0 0 0 0 0 0 .167 Mujica p 0 0 0 0 0 0 --Totals 35 3 8 3 4 4 Washington 101 000 000 0 — 2 8 2 Florida 010 000 100 1 — 3 8 0 Two outs when winning run scored. a-hit a sacrifice fly for M.Dunn in the 7th. b-grounded out for Clippard in the 9th. c-walked for L.Nunez in the 9th. 1-ran for Stanton in the 9th. E—Werth (1), Zimmerman (1). LOB—Washington 12, Florida 11. 2B—Werth (3), Coghlan (1), G.Sanchez (4), Morrison (1), Do.Murphy (1). HR—Zimmerman (1), off Ani.Sanchez; Morrison (2), off Marquis. RBIs—Zimmerman (2), Morse (2), Morrison (4), Do.Murphy (1), Dobbs (2). SB—Ankiel (1). S—Marquis, Infante, Bonifacio, Ani.Sanchez. SF—Dobbs. Runners left in scoring position—Washington 7 (Ankiel, Werth 2, W.Ramos 3, Hairston Jr.); Florida 5 (G.Sanchez, Do.Murphy, Infante, J.Buck 2). Runners moved up—H.Ramirez. Washington IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Marquis 6 1-3 6 2 2 0 2 78 2.84 Clippard 1 2-3 0 0 0 2 1 31 0.00 Storen L, 0-1 1 1 1 0 2 0 35 3.38 S.Burnett 2-3 1 0 0 0 1 8 0.00 Florida IP H R ER BB SO NP ERA Ani.Sanchez 5 2-3 7 2 2 3 7 105 3.18 R.Webb 2-3 0 0 0 1 0 10 16.20 M.Dunn 2-3 0 0 0 2 1 20 0.00 Hensley 1 1 0 0 1 1 16 0.00 L.Nunez 1 0 0 0 0 0 13 3.00 Mujica W, 1-0 1 0 0 0 0 2 15 0.00 Storen pitched to 3 batters in the 10th. Inherited runners-scored—Clippard 1-1, S.Burnett 3-1, R.Webb 2-0, M.Dunn 1-0. IBB—off Clippard (Morrison), off Storen (H.Ramirez). WP—Storen. T—3:30. A—10,482 (38,560).


D4 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

PREP ROUNDUP

PREP SCOREBOARD

Buffs roll in Tri-Valley opener Bulletin staff report MADRAS — Maycee Abendschein made a big splash in her Tri-Valley Conference debut, pitching a five-inning one-hitter while going three for three at the plate with a double, triple, home run and four runs batted in to lead Madras to a 13-0 blowout victory over La Salle. The White Buffaloes, who are competing in the Tri-Valley this season after playing in the Intermountain Conference the past four years, scored 10 runs in the first inning of the game that was originally scheduled to be at La Salle’s campus in Milwaukie, but was moved to Madras because of rain in the Willamette Valley. Madras was never threatened by the Falcons, whose lone hit was a single. Alex Holcomb added a double and an RBI and Jamie Moe went two for two with a double and an RBI in the route. The White Buffaloes (1-0 TriValley, 6-3 overall) are at La Salle on Thursday. In other prep events Tuesday: BASEBALL Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Sweet Home. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SWEET HOME — Shane Groth allowed two runs and one hit over five innings to earn the Sky-Em League victory for the Outlaws, who improved to 3-0 in league play with the win. Sisters, which pounded out eight hits in the game, led 7-0 after two innings. Jordan Hodges recorded the save, retiring all six batters he faced in the sixth

and seventh innings. Sisters (8-1 overall) hosts La Pine on Friday. Junction City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 LA PINE — Eli Allen posted a double and Christian Wallace added a triple, but the Hawks managed only one other hit in their Sky-Em League loss to the Tigers. Junction City pitcher Tanner Errecart went the distance for the victory. La Pine pitcher Jeremy Friton gave up four runs over four innings and took the loss. The Hawks (0-3 Sky-Em, 1-6 overall) are at Sisters on Friday. La Salle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 MADRAS — The White Buffaloes committed seven errors and wasted a complete game by Madras pitcher Austin Moe that his coach Adam Randall called “fantastic.” Kyle Palmer led the White Buffaloes at the plate with a triple. Madras (0-1 Tri-Valley, 1-9 overall) will play at La Salle on Thursday. SOFTBALL Junction City . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 JUNCTION CITY — La Pine fell behind 6-2 after two innings and never recovered from the early deficit. Becca Parish logged the Hawks’ only extrabase hit, a third-inning double which was one of nine La Pine hits. Junction City took advantage of six Hawk errors to stay ahead for the remainder of the Sky-Em League game. La Pine (1-2 Sky-Em League) continues league play Friday with a home

game against Sisters. BOYS LACROSSE Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Harney County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Three minutes into a suddendeath overtime at Bend High, Colton Raichl scored the gamewinning shot from 10 yards out, boosting the Lava Bears to a win in their first High Desert League game of the season. The senior attackman tallied seven goals and two assists in the victory. Tyler Simpson, Knut Renton and Austin Miller all posted one goal apiece for the Lava Bears, who host Riverdale on Friday. GIRLS TENNIS Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 The Panthers took all four doubles matches and won twice in singles play at Summit High, besting a strong Storm team. Playing at the top two singles spots for Summit were freshmen Lindsey Brodeck and Haley Younger, who posted the Storms’ only wins. Redmond’s No. 1 doubles duo of Karli Christensen and Emmalee Cron bested the Storm’s Hannah Shephard Mackenzie Sundborg, 6-3, 7-6 (9-7) in the nonleague contest. Bend High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 PRINEVILLE — The Cowgirls’ Erin Crofcheck recorded a win at No. 1 singles, but the Lava Bears won six of the seven remaining matches to post the nonleague win. Cassidy Taylor, Alli Calande and Claire Nichols all claimed singles victories for

SOFTBALL Tuesday’s results ——— CLASS 4A TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE (Five innings) ——— La Salle 000 00 — 0 3 1 Madras (10)01 2x — 13 12 1 Melton, Dulwick (3), Melton (5) and Leone; Abendschein and Smith. W — Abendschein. L — Metlon. 2B — Madras: Abendschein, Holcomb, Moe. 3B — Madras: Abendschein; HR — Madras: Abendschein. ——— SKY-EM LEAGUE La Pine 021 000 1 — 4 9 6 Junction City 151 030 x — 10 6 2 Owen, Gerdau (3), Parish (5) and Miller, Maxfield (4); Bevarak and Osburn. W—Bevarak. L—Owen. 2B—La Pine: Parish; Junction City: Amber.

TENNIS Boys Tuesday’s Results ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— SUMMIT 4, REDMOND 4 (Summit wins 11-8 in sets) At Sam Johnson Park, Redmond Singles — Parker Nichols, Summit, def. Brent Massey, Redmond, 6-0, 6-1; Sterling Dillingham, Summit, def. Luke Maxwell, Redmond, 6-2, 6-2; Zack Powell, Redmond, def. Andrew Rowden, Summit, 6-4, 6-2; Ian Eland, Summit, def. Miguel Hidalgo, Redmond, 6-3, 6-0. Doubles — Brunot/Gangan, Redmond, def. Hall/Hall, Summit, 3-6, 6-1, 10-8; Jackson/Chriss. Redmond, def. Parr/Virk, Summit, 6-4, 3-6, 10-5; Jackson/Hamilton, Redmond, def. Dalquist/Peters, Summit, 1-6, 6-4, 10-4; Franco/L’Etoile, Summit, def. Wilcox/Jordinson, Redmond 7-5, 6-4. ——— BEND 7, CROOK COUNTY 1

At Bend High School Singles — Trevor Brown, Crook County, def. Jeff Windsor, Bend, 5-7, 6-1 (10-4); Joel Johnson, Bend, def. Brady Slater, Crook County, 6-3, 2-6 (10-8); Cole Anderson, Bend, def. Jared Anderson, Crook County, 6-4, 6-2; Tanner Jacobson, Bend, def. Gabe Alvarez, Crook County, 6-2, 6-1. Doubles — Jon Simning/Preston Tuttle, Bend, def. Josue Lopez/Leo Nole, Crook County, 6-1, 6-1; Kristian Raymond/Matheus Friere, Bend, def. Dakota Umbarger/Oliver Peterson, Crook County, 6-1, 6-1; Josh Woodland/Brad Halligan, Bend, def. Brick Woodward/Cody Barnes, Crook County, 6-0, 6-0; Matt Woodland/Cameron Tulare, Bend, default. ——— SISTERS 7, CASCADE 0 At Sisters Singles — Ben Fullhart, S, def. Dennis Reutor, C, 8-1; Austin Williams, S, def. Truman Clark, 8-5; Devon Calvin, S, def. Jonah Netland, 8-6, J.T. Harris, S, def. Matthias Hawkin, 8-5. Doubles — Gilmore/P. Fullhart, S, def. Lippold/Ali, C, 8-2; Quinn/Richards, S, def. Welty/Wood, C, 8-4; Cristiano/Standen, S, def. Schaeffer/Usselman, C, 8-6. ——— SISTERS 6, CANYONVILLE 2 At Sisters Singles — Tim Chen, Canyonville, def. Ben Fullhart, Sisters, 6-1, 6-0; Austin Williams, Sisters, def. Jason Ma, Canyonville, 6-1, 6-0; Devon Calvin, Sisters, def. Samanth Stalford, Canyonville, 6-1, 6-0; Mike Hsieh, Canyonville, default. Doubles — Gilmore/Fullhart, Sisters, def. Lin/Huang, Canyonville, 6-1, 6-0; Quinn/Richards, Sisters, def. Bates/Liu, Canyonville, 6-1, 6-3; Cristiano/Standen, Sisters, def. Koryeskova/Celie, Canyonville. 5-7, 6-3 (10-6); Harris/Gilmore, Sisters, def. DeVries/Zhu, Canyonville, 6-4, 6-3. ———

Girls ——— NONCONFERENCE ——— REDMOND 6, SUMMIT 2 At Summit Singles — Lindsey BroDeck, S, def. Monica Johnson, R, 6-2, 6-2; Haley Younger, S, def. Genna Miller, R, 6-1, 6-2; Chloe Woodward, R, def. Ariel Steele, S, 7-5, 6-1; Ashlee Lemos, R, def. Karlyn Evans, S, 6-2, 6-1. Doubles — Karli Christensen/Emmalee Cron, R, def. Hannah Shephard, S,. 6-3, 7-6, 9-7; Jane Wright/Mandy Dollardhide, R, def. Mikaela Forest/Amy Gieber, S, 6-1, 6-1; Haley Hartford/Benita Bentlage, R, def. Hailey Dodson/Lisa Caine, S, 6-2, 6-2; Hannah Ronhaar/Kendall Marshall, R, def. Amanda Fefferman/Morgan DeMeyer, 6-4, 6-4. ——— BEND 6, CROOK COUNTY 2 At Crook County Singles — Erin Crofcheck, CC, def. Kaylee Tornay, B, 7-6 985), 4-6, (12-10); Cassidy Taylor, B, def. Lisa Pham, CC, 6-0, 6-1; Alli Calande, B, def. Alli Apperson, CC, 6-4, 6-3; Claire Nichols, B, def. Natasha Wiersch, CC, 7-5, 6-2. Doubles — Oliveira/Palcic, B, def. Johnston/Kemper, CC, 6-3, 6-3; Morgan/Brown, CC, def. Fowlds/Dailey, B, 7-5, 6-3; Peterson/ Taunton, B, def. Slawter/Gortzern, CC, 6-4, 6-0; Watkins/Zachem, B, def. Bowers/Nelson, CC.

BOYS LACROSSE Tuesday’s Results HIGH DESERT LEAGUE ——— Bend 10, Harney County 9 (OT)

NBA SCOREBOARD

Blazers grab playoff spot despite loss to Warriors The Associated Press

SUMMARIES Warriors 108, Blazers 87 GOLDEN STATE (108) Wright 2-11 0-0 4, Lee 13-17 3-3 29, Udoh 23 0-0 4, Curry 10-21 5-6 28, Ellis 11-19 4-4 30, Amundson 1-3 7-9 9, Thornton 1-5 0-0 2, Radmanovic 0-0 0-0 0, R.Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Lin 0-0 0-0 0, Adrien 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 41-82 19-22 108. PORTLAND (87) Wallace 4-9 2-2 10, Aldridge 7-15 3-3 17, Camby 0-0 0-0 0, Miller 4-7 4-4 12, Matthews 6-11 4-5 17, Batum 7-14 0-0 15, Roy 2-11 1-2 5, Fernandez 1-9 0-0 2, C.Johnson 0-0 2-2 2, Mills 1-3 0-0 3, Babbitt 1-3 0-0 2, A.Johnson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 34-83 16-18 87. Golden State 19 28 37 24 — 108 Portland 19 28 21 19 — 87 3-Point Goals—Golden State 7-16 (Ellis 4-6, Curry 3-5, R.Williams 0-1, Wright 0-4), Portland 3-21 (Mills 1-2, Matthews 1-5, Batum 1-6, Wallace 0-1, Roy 0-1, Fernandez 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Golden State 52 (Lee 20), Portland 43 (Aldridge 12). Assists—Golden State 16 (Ellis 5), Portland 19 (Aldridge 4). Total Fouls—Golden State 19, Portland 16. Technicals—Fernandez. A—20,551 (19,980).

DETROIT (105) Prince 7-16 0-0 14, Wilcox 5-11 0-0 10, Monroe 7-13 8-10 22, Bynum 4-12 5-6 14, Hamilton 1-11 0-0 2, McGrady 7-11 0-1 14, Wallace 0-1 0-0 0, Gordon 3-6 1-1 9, Daye 6-10 0-1 14, Maxiell 3-6 0-1 6, Summers 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 43-98 14-20 105. WASHINGTON (107) Evans 9-13 0-1 20, Blatche 8-18 10-12 26, McGee 4-5 0-2 8, Wall 6-15 14-16 26, Crawford 6-17 4-4 17, Jeffers 2-2 0-0 4, Seraphin 1-1 0-0 2, Yi 2-5 0-0 4, Shakur 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 38-77 28-35 107. Detroit 22 32 27 24 — 105 Washington 31 21 26 29 — 107 3-Point Goals—Detroit 5-17 (Gordon 2-3, Daye 2-4, Bynum 1-5, Hamilton 0-1, Summers 0-1, McGrady 0-1, Prince 0-2), Washington 3-10 (Evans 2-6, Crawford 1-3, Wall 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Detroit 57 (Monroe 14), Washington 50 (Blatche 10). Assists—Detroit 18 (McGrady 6), Washington 21 (Wall 12). Total Fouls—Detroit 22, Washington 17. Technicals—Wall. A—18,131 (20,173).

Nets 107, T’wolves 105

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Golden State Warriors’ Dorell Wright (1) goes to the basket as Portland Trail Blazers’ Marcus Camby, left, defends while teammate Gerald Wallace, right, looks on during Tuesday’s game. winning streak. Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 Raptors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118 NEW YORK — Toney Douglas scored 28 points, Carmelo Anthony and Amare Stoudemire each added 23, and New York closed within a half-game of sixth place in the Eastern Conference by routing Toronto. Celtics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 BOSTON — Rajon Rondo scored 16 points with 13 assists and Boston moved into a tie for the No. 2 seed in the Eastern Conference by beating Philadelphia. Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 Nuggets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 DENVER — Kevin Durant scored 32 points and Oklahoma City beat Denver in a possible first-round playoff preview. Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Lakers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 LOS ANGELES — Rookie Gordon Hayward scored a career-high 22 points and hit the go-ahead free throw with 6 seconds to play, and Utah snapped an eight-game losing streak with a victory over Los Angeles.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Tuesday’s Games

Wizards 107, Pistons 105

Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 WASHINGTON — John Wall scored 16 of his 26 points in the fourth quarter, and Washington has its first three-game winning streak since 2008, with a victory over Detroit. Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101 HOUSTON — Marcus Thornton and Samuel Dalembert scored 21 points apiece, Dalembert and DeMarcus Cousins each grabbed 15 rebounds and Sacramento hurt Houston’s playoff hopes. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Suns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 CHICAGO — Derrick Rose finished with 19 points, Luol Deng scored 18 and Chicago continued to close in on the top seed in the Eastern Conference, hanging on to beat Phoenix. Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Mo Williams scored 16 points and keyed a fourth-quarter rally and the Los Angeles Clippers snapped Memphis’ four-game

Tuesday’s results ——— CLASS 4A SKY-EM LEAGUE ——— Junction City 012 110 0 — 5 6 1 La Pine 000 101 0 — 2 3 3 Errecart and Anderson; Friton, Allen (5) and Manley. W — Errecart. L — Friton. 2B — Junction City: Hise; La Pine: Allen. 3B — La Pine: Wallace. ——— Sisters 250 011 1 — 10 8 2 Sweet Home 002 000 0 — 2 1 1 Groth, Hodges (6) and Morgan; Scott, Hanks (3), Not available (7) and catcher not available. W — Groth. L — Scott. 2B — Sisters: Erlandson. TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— La Salle 002 013 2 — 8 7 4 Madras 010 010 4 — 6 9 7 Regan, Ehli (5), Davis (7) and Line; Moe and Brown. W—Regan. L—Moe. 2B—La Salle: Farnes, Savage, Huynk (2). 3B—Madras: Palmer.

Bend. Crook County is back on the court Thursday at Mountain View. The Lava Bears host Redmond the same day. BOYS TENNIS Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Crook County’s Trevor Brown beat Jeff Windsor 5-7, 6-1 (10-4) in the top singles match of the dual at Bend High, but that was the only victory for the Cowboys in a dominant team victory for the Lava Bears. Joel Johnson, Cole Anderson and Tanner Jacobson all won their singles matches for Bend. The Lava Bears cruised to straight set wins in three doubles matches and dropped just four games all day. Summit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Redmond . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 REDMOND — The Panthers’ doubles teams won three of four matches to pull even with the Storm in a tennis meet at Sam Johnson Park. After both teams claimed four wins, Summit was then declared the victor with an 11-8 edge in sets. Parker Nichols, Sterling Dillingham and Ian Eland all won their singles matches for the Storm. Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Cascade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 ——— Sisters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Canyonville . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 SISTERS — The Outlaws won 13 of 15 matches against a pair of nonleague opponents. Austin Williams posted two victories at No. 2 singles, and Colby Gilmore and Paul Fullhart won twice at No. 1 doubles.

NBA ROUNDUP

PORTLAND — There were no smiles of accomplishment in the Trail Blazers’ locker room on Tuesday night. Yes, the Blazers clinched a playoff spot. But they also got thumped 108-87 by the Golden State Warriors — and at home of all places. “We didn’t play well at all,” guard Brandon Roy said succinctly. Portland secured a postseason berth just before the half when the Houston Rockets lost 104-101 to Sacramento. Even with the loss to Golden State, the Blazers still sit in the sixth spot in the Western Conference. But they’re only a halfgame ahead of New Orleans and only a game in front of Memphis. It will be Portland’s third straight trip to the postseason. Last year the Blazers were eliminated in the first round by the Phoenix Suns, and the year before they were bumped in the opening round by the Rockets. “It’s good to clinch, but that’s something that probably won’t sink in until tomorrow,” Roy said. David Lee had 29 points and a season-high 20 rebounds for the Warriors, who led by as many as 26 points in the second half. Monta Ellis had 30 points and Stephen Curry finished with 28. Also on Tuesday: Spurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 ATLANTA — Tony Parker scored 26 points and San Antonio moved closer to home-court advantage in the playoffs by ending a four-game road losing streak with a win over Atlanta. Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 CLEVELAND — Ramon Sessions scored 18 points to pace seven players in double figures, leading Cleveland to victory over injury-depleted Charlotte, a loss that hurt the Bobcats’ playoff chances. Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 ORLANDO, Fla. — Dwight Howard had 18 points and 17 rebounds, Jameer Nelson scored 17 and Orlando beat Milwaukee. Nets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 NEWARK, N.J. — Deron Williams capped a career-tying 21-assists performance by hitting a game-winning jumper with 1.7 seconds to play to lead New Jersey to victory over Minnesota.

BASEBALL

MINNESOTA (105) Johnson 3-4 0-0 8, Beasley 7-17 5-6 20, Pekovic 5-7 2-2 12, Ridnour 5-9 0-1 11, Ellington 2-7 0-0 4, Randolph 8-16 4-7 20, Tolliver 4-8 5-5 14, Webster 5-7 3-4 16, Flynn 0-4 0-2 0. Totals 39-79 19-27 105. NEW JERSEY (107) Vujacic 6-12 1-2 17, Outlaw 5-15 3-3 13, Lopez 13-23 4-5 30, Williams 6-15 4-7 18, West 1-3 1-2 3, Wright 2-7 1-1 5, Graham 2-3 0-0 5, Gadzuric 00 0-0 0, Farmar 5-7 0-0 12, Petro 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 42-89 14-20 107. Minnesota 23 27 25 30 — 105 New Jersey 29 32 24 22 — 107 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 8-15 (Webster 3-3, Johnson 2-2, Ridnour 1-2, Tolliver 1-2, Beasley 13, Flynn 0-1, Ellington 0-2), New Jersey 9-20 (Vujacic 4-6, Farmar 2-4, Williams 2-6, Graham 1-2, Outlaw 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Minnesota 57 (Beasley 11), New Jersey 44 (Lopez 12). Assists—Minnesota 23 (Ridnour 9), New Jersey 31 (Williams 21). Total Fouls—Minnesota 19, New Jersey 20. Technicals—Minnesota defensive three second, Williams. A—13,461 (18,500).

Magic 78, Bucks 72 MILWAUKEE (72) Delfino 3-11 0-0 7, Mbah a Moute 1-6 0-0 2, Bogut 1-4 0-2 2, Jennings 3-15 1-1 8, Salmons 3-9 1-2 9, Gooden 7-12 4-5 18, Dooling 3-4 2-2 10, Maggette 3-5 2-2 8, Boykins 1-1 0-0 2, Sanders 0-1 1-2 1, Redd 1-4 0-0 2, Douglas-Roberts 1-3 1-1 3. Totals 27-75 12-17 72. ORLANDO (78) Turkoglu 5-12 1-2 12, Bass 3-3 7-10 13, Howard 5-10 8-13 18, Nelson 7-16 2-2 17, J.Richardson 4-14 0-0 8, Arenas 1-3 4-5 6, Anderson 1-4 1-2 3, Q.Richardson 0-2 1-2 1, Duhon 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 26-67 24-36 78. Milwaukee 14 19 22 17 — 72 Orlando 26 16 15 21 — 78 3-Point Goals—Milwaukee 6-20 (Dooling 2-3, Salmons 2-3, Delfino 1-5, Jennings 1-7, Douglas-Roberts 0-1, Redd 0-1), Orlando 2-21 (Nelson 1-4, Turkoglu 1-5, Duhon 0-1, Anderson 0-2, Q.Richardson 0-2, Arenas 0-2, J.Richardson 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Milwaukee 41 (Salmons 8), Orlando 65 (Howard 17). Assists—Milwaukee 14 (Gooden 4), Orlando 12 (Turkoglu, Nelson 3). Total Fouls—Milwaukee 27, Orlando 15. Technicals—Orlando Coach Van Gundy. A—18,996 (18,500).

Spurs 97, Hawks 90

y-Chicago y-Boston y-Miami x-Orlando x-Atlanta x-Philadelphia x-New York Indiana Charlotte Milwaukee Detroit New Jersey Washington Toronto Cleveland

W 57 54 54 49 44 40 39 35 32 31 26 24 21 21 16

L 20 23 23 29 34 38 38 43 45 46 51 53 56 56 61

Pct .740 .701 .701 .628 .564 .513 .506 .449 .416 .403 .338 .312 .273 .273 .208

GB — 3 3 8½ 13½ 17½ 18 22½ 25 26 31 33 36 36 41

L10 8-2 6-4 8-2 7-3 5-5 5-5 4-6 6-4 4-6 5-5 3-7 2-8 5-5 3-7 3-7

Str W-4 W-2 W-3 W-1 L-2 L-2 W-4 L-1 L-3 L-1 L-4 W-1 W-3 L-1 W-1

Home 34-5 31-8 28-10 28-11 24-16 25-12 23-17 22-16 20-18 20-19 19-19 17-20 18-21 15-23 11-28

Away 23-15 23-15 26-13 21-18 20-18 15-26 16-21 13-27 12-27 11-27 7-32 5-33 3-35 6-31 5-33

Conf 34-13 35-12 34-13 33-15 31-17 24-24 25-22 26-22 20-27 23-25 18-29 13-34 14-33 13-34 12-35

WESTERN CONFERENCE W y-San Antonio 59 y-L.A. Lakers 55 x-Dallas 53 x-Oklahoma City 51 x-Denver 47 x-Portland 45 New Orleans 44 Memphis 44 Houston 41 Phoenix 37 Utah 37 Golden State 34 L.A. Clippers 31 Sacramento 23 Minnesota 17 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division

L 19 22 24 26 30 33 33 34 37 40 41 44 47 54 61

Pct .756 .714 .688 .662 .610 .577 .571 .564 .526 .481 .474 .436 .397 .299 .218

GB — 3½ 5½ 7½ 11½ 14 14½ 15 18 21½ 22 25 28 35½ 42

L10 4-6 8-2 6-4 7-3 7-3 6-4 6-4 7-3 7-3 3-7 2-8 4-6 5-5 7-3 0-10

Str W-2 L-2 L-3 W-1 L-1 L-1 W-1 L-1 L-1 L-2 W-1 W-2 W-2 W-2 L-11

Home 34-5 29-10 26-11 28-10 31-8 28-11 26-12 28-11 24-15 21-18 20-19 24-14 22-18 11-28 12-27

Away 25-14 26-12 27-13 23-16 16-22 17-22 18-21 16-23 17-22 16-22 17-22 10-30 9-29 12-26 5-34

Conf 36-12 34-13 31-16 29-19 27-20 27-21 25-22 28-20 23-25 20-27 19-29 19-29 18-30 14-33 7-41

——— Tuesday’s Games San Antonio 97, Atlanta 90 New Jersey 107, Minnesota 105 Washington 107, Detroit 105 New York 131, Toronto 118 L.A. Clippers 82, Memphis 81 Oklahoma City 101, Denver 94 Utah 86, L.A. Lakers 85 Today’s Games Washington at Indiana, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Toronto, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Minnesota, 5 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Sacramento at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. All Times PDT SAN ANTONIO (97) Jefferson 2-6 1-2 5, Duncan 6-8 5-6 17, McDyess 4-7 1-2 9, Parker 10-16 6-6 26, Ginobili 6-12 6-6 18, Hill 5-9 2-2 13, Bonner 1-8 0-0 2, Neal 0-2 0-0 0, Blair 3-6 1-2 7. Totals 37-74 22-26 97. ATLANTA (90) Williams 4-7 0-0 8, Horford 6-15 0-0 12, Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Hinrich 4-7 5-5 13, Johnson 9-23 3-4 21, Crawford 8-13 1-1 20, Pachulia 1-1 1-2 3, Teague 2-5 4-4 8, Wilkins 1-1 1-2 3, Armstrong 0-0 0-0 0, Thomas 0-0 2-2 2. Totals 35-72 1720 90. San Antonio 16 27 23 31 — 97 Atlanta 21 25 19 25 — 90 3-Point Goals—San Antonio 1-8 (Hill 1-2, Parker 0-1, Bonner 0-1, Ginobili 0-2, Jefferson 0-2), Atlanta 3-13 (Crawford 3-5, Hinrich 0-1, Teague 0-2, Johnson 0-5). Fouled Out—Hinrich. Rebounds—San Antonio 50 (Duncan, McDyess, Bonner 6), Atlanta 31 (Horford 9). Assists—San Antonio 14 (Parker, Ginobili 4), Atlanta 17 (Horford 5). Total Fouls—San Antonio 16, Atlanta 23. Technicals—San Antonio defensive three second. Flagrant Fouls—Hinrich. A—17,277 (18,729).

Cavaliers 99, Bobcats 89 CHARLOTTE (89) Cunningham 5-14 0-0 10, Diaw 1-5 1-2 3, Brown 4-7 2-4 10, Augustin 7-20 6-7 22, Henderson 6-15 2-2 15, White 1-7 4-4 6, Carroll 4-5 5-6 13, Temple 2-5 1-2 6, McGuire 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 32-82 21-27 89. CLEVELAND (99) Gee 5-8 1-2 13, Hickson 7-18 2-3 16, Hollins 7-7 2-2 16, Davis 3-10 3-4 11, Parker 0-8 0-0 0, Sessions 5-7 8-8 18, Harangody 5-9 0-0 11, Gibson 3-8 1-1 10, Eyenga 2-4 0-0 4, Graham 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 37-82 17-20 99. Charlotte 16 22 28 23 — 89 Cleveland 34 21 19 25 — 99 3-Point Goals—Charlotte 4-15 (Augustin 2-6, Henderson 1-2, Temple 1-4, Cunningham 0-1, Diaw 0-2), Cleveland 8-24 (Gibson 3-6, Gee 2-3, Davis 2-5, Harangody 1-4, Eyenga 0-1, Parker 05). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Charlotte 53 (Cunningham, Diaw 11), Cleveland 51 (Hickson 19). Assists—Charlotte 22 (Augustin 8), Cleveland 24 (Parker, Davis, Gibson 5). Total Fouls—Charlotte 15, Cleveland 21. Technicals—Charlotte defensive three second. A—19,835 (20,562).

Celtics 99, 76ers 82 PHILADELPHIA (82) Iguodala 3-8 4-7 10, Brand 5-11 2-2 12, Hawes 3-14 0-0 6, Holiday 4-12 2-2 11, Meeks 4-8 0-0 10, Turner 9-14 2-4 21, Young 4-10 0-0 8, Nocioni 0-3 0-0 0, Daniels 1-2 2-2 4, Speights 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 33-84 12-17 82.

Clippers 82, Grizzlies 81 L.A. CLIPPERS (82) Moon 4-7 0-0 8, Griffin 6-15 3-6 15, Kaman 7-12 0-0 14, M.Williams 6-13 1-1 16, Gordon 5-13 1-2 11, Aminu 1-4 1-1 3, Jordan 0-2 3-6 3, Bledsoe 0-0 3-4 3, Foye 3-11 2-2 9, C.Smith 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 32-78 14-22 82. MEMPHIS (81) Young 5-6 3-5 13, Randolph 6-15 2-4 14, Gasol 6-11 2-4 14, Conley 8-16 4-4 20, Allen 4-13 0-0 8, Battier 2-5 0-0 4, Mayo 1-9 1-1 3, Arthur 0-7 0-0 0, I.Smith 0-2 0-0 0, Haddadi 1-1 0-0 2, Powe 0-0 0-0 0, Vasquez 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 34-86 12-18 81. L.A. Clippers 18 21 20 23 — 82 Memphis 23 20 25 13 — 81 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 4-14 (M.Williams 3-6, Foye 1-3, Aminu 0-1, Gordon 0-1, Moon 0-3), Memphis 1-9 (Vasquez 1-1, Allen 0-1, Battier 0-2, Mayo 0-2, Conley 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 59 (Griffin 14), Memphis 53 (Gasol 15). Assists—L.A. Clippers 14 (Foye 4), Memphis 11 (Conley 4). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 19, Memphis 19. Technicals—Kaman, L.A. Clippers defensive three second. A—15,433 (18,119).

Knicks 131, Raptors 118 Cleveland 99, Charlotte 89 Orlando 78, Milwaukee 72 Boston 99, Philadelphia 82 Chicago 97, Phoenix 94 Sacramento 104, Houston 101 Golden State 108, Portland 87

Orlando at Charlotte, 4 p.m. New York at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. New Jersey at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Houston at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Milwaukee at Miami, 5 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.

Frye 3-8, Dudley 2-3, Hill 0-1, Warrick 0-1, Brooks 0-2, Nash 0-2), Chicago 8-19 (Watson 2-4, Deng 2-5, Korver 1-1, Brewer 1-1, Bogans 1-3, Rose 1-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Phoenix 54 (Gortat 13), Chicago 47 (Gibson, Boozer 9). Assists—Phoenix 27 (Nash 16), Chicago 28 (Boozer 7). Total Fouls—Phoenix 20, Chicago 15. Technicals—Phoenix defensive three second. A—21,873 (20,917).

BOSTON (99) Pierce 6-11 3-3 18, Garnett 6-10 2-2 14, J.O’Neal 4-6 1-2 9, Rondo 6-14 4-4 16, Allen 5-7 2-4 13, Davis 3-9 1-2 7, Krstic 4-5 0-0 8, Green 3-9 2-2 8, West 3-4 0-0 6, Pavlovic 0-0 0-0 0, Murphy 0-0 0-0 0, Arroyo 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 4076 15-19 99. Philadelphia 26 24 15 17 — 82 Boston 24 30 21 24 — 99 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 4-10 (Meeks 2-4, Turner 1-1, Holiday 1-3, Hawes 0-1, Iguodala 0-1), Boston 4-10 (Pierce 3-4, Allen 1-1, Rondo 0-2, Green 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 44 (Hawes 8), Boston 52 (Pierce, Green 7). Assists—Philadelphia 17 (Turner 5), Boston 29 (Rondo 13). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 15, Boston 16. Technicals—Philadelphia defensive three second 2. A—18,624 (18,624).

Kings 104, Rockets 101 SACRAMENTO (104) Garcia 1-8 0-0 3, Cousins 6-8 3-4 15, Dalembert 8-12 5-6 21, Evans 7-16 4-4 18, Thornton 9-16 3-4 21, Udrih 5-8 0-0 10, Greene 1-5 0-0 2, Thompson 7-10 0-0 14. Totals 44-83 15-18 104. HOUSTON (101) Budinger 2-8 1-2 6, Scola 9-16 0-0 18, Hayes 3-6 2-2 8, Lowry 4-15 5-6 15, Martin 12-25 4-8 30, Lee 4-13 2-2 12, Patterson 3-5 0-0 6, Hill 3-5 0-1 6, Dragic 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 40-94 14-21 101. Sacramento 24 28 24 28 — 104 Houston 28 18 28 27 — 101 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 1-11 (Garcia 1-4, Udrih 0-1, Thornton 0-1, Greene 0-2, Evans 0-3), Houston 7-25 (Lee 2-6, Lowry 2-7, Martin 2-7, Budinger 1-4, Dragic 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Sacramento 52 (Dalembert, Cousins 15), Houston 51 (Hayes, Scola 10). Assists—Sacramento 18 (Evans 5), Houston 24 (Lowry 9). Total Fouls—Sacramento 18, Houston 15. Technicals— Sacramento defensive three second. A—15,523 (18,043).

Bulls 97, Suns 94 PHOENIX (94) Hill 6-10 1-1 13, Frye 5-15 0-0 13, Gortat 4-9 2-2 10, Nash 3-8 0-0 6, Dudley 5-9 0-0 12, Carter 9-22 2-3 23, Warrick 3-5 3-4 9, Childress 2-5 0-0 4, Brooks 1-4 2-2 4, Lopez 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 3888 10-12 94. CHICAGO (97) Deng 7-16 2-2 18, Boozer 5-13 2-3 12, Noah 6-7 0-0 12, Rose 6-15 6-6 19, Bogans 1-3 0-0 3, Brewer 3-7 3-4 10, Gibson 4-7 2-5 10, Thomas 0-1 0-0 0, Asik 0-0 1-2 1, Watson 2-5 0-0 6, Korver 2-4 1-2 6. Totals 36-78 17-24 97. Phoenix 24 16 30 24 — 94 Chicago 25 28 28 16 — 97 3-Point Goals—Phoenix 8-23 (Carter 3-6,

TORONTO (118) J.Johnson 3-8 3-4 10, A.Johnson 2-3 0-0 4, Bargnani 0-4 0-0 0, Bayless 6-15 6-7 19, DeRozan 13-27 9-12 36, Davis 10-14 2-4 22, Weems 6-11 2-2 14, Evans 0-2 1-2 1, Wright 2-4 0-0 4, Ajinca 3-4 2-2 8. Totals 45-92 25-33 118. NEW YORK (131) Anthony 9-15 0-0 23, Jeffries 1-2 0-0 2, Stoudemire 7-13 9-11 23, Billups 3-8 6-6 13, Fields 3-5 3-4 10, Douglas 10-15 2-5 28, She.Williams 2-2 2-2 6, Sha.Williams 3-5 0-0 7, Walker 3-8 1-1 8, Carter 2-3 0-0 4, Turiaf 0-0 0-0 0, Brown 2-2 3-5 7. Totals 45-78 26-34 131. Toronto 26 28 28 36 — 118 New York 39 39 21 32 — 131 3-Point Goals—Toronto 3-7 (Bayless 1-1, J.Johnson 1-2, DeRozan 1-3, Weems 0-1), New York 15-27 (Douglas 6-9, Anthony 5-7, Fields 1-1, Sha.Williams 1-3, Billups 1-3, Walker 1-4). Fouled Out—Bayless. Rebounds—Toronto 53 (Davis 13), New York 43 (Anthony 9). Assists—Toronto 11 (Bayless 5), New York 31 (Billups 9). Total Fouls— Toronto 24, New York 20. A—19,763 (19,763).

Thunder 101, Nuggets 94 OKLAHOMA CITY (101) Durant 10-21 11-12 32, Ibaka 4-8 1-2 9, Perkins 2-3 0-0 4, Westbrook 5-17 8-10 18, Sefolosha 2-4 0-0 4, Collison 2-2 1-1 5, Harden 4-12 3-6 13, Mohammed 2-3 0-0 4, Maynor 4-8 1-2 10, Cook 0-1 2-2 2. Totals 35-79 27-35 101. DENVER (94) Gallinari 5-9 4-5 17, Martin 6-9 2-2 14, Nene 3-10 1-4 7, Lawson 10-18 8-9 28, Chandler 2-9 1-1 5, Mozgov 0-0 0-0 0, Smith 3-7 0-0 6, Felton 5-13 1-5 11, Harrington 2-5 0-0 6, Koufos 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 36-82 17-26 94. Oklahoma City 27 21 21 32 — 101 Denver 16 31 20 27 — 94 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 4-18 (Harden 2-7, Maynor 1-2, Durant 1-5, Cook 0-1, Westbrook 0-1, Sefolosha 0-2), Denver 5-12 (Gallinari 3-4, Harrington 2-3, Smith 0-1, Chandler 0-2, Felton 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 57 (Perkins 14), Denver 50 (Nene 8). Assists—Oklahoma City 16 (Westbrook 6), Denver 17 (Lawson 5). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 26, Denver 26. Technicals—Durant, Perkins, Oklahoma City defensive three second, Gallinari, Nene. A—18,203 (19,155).

Jazz 86, Lakers 85 UTAH (86) Millsap 7-18 8-8 22, Favors 6-9 2-8 14, Jefferson 5-18 1-2 11, Watson 4-8 0-0 11, Miles 2-8 0-0 4, Elson 0-1 0-0 0, Evans 1-4 0-0 2, Hayward 9-14 2-5 22, Weaver 0-5 0-0 0. Totals 34-85 13-23 86. L.A. LAKERS (85) Artest 3-8 2-2 9, Gasol 5-10 9-11 19, Bynum 5-13 2-2 12, Fisher 3-7 0-3 6, Bryant 6-18 6-6 20, Odom 5-12 0-1 11, Barnes 2-4 0-0 4, Blake 0-0 0-0 0, Brown 2-6 0-0 4, Walton 0-4 0-0 0. Totals 31-82 19-25 85. Utah 20 14 23 29 — 86 L.A. Lakers 24 16 17 28 — 85 3-Point Goals—Utah 5-13 (Watson 3-6, Hayward 2-4, Evans 0-1, Weaver 0-1, Miles 0-1), L.A. Lakers 4-20 (Bryant 2-6, Odom 1-4, Artest 1-5, Walton 0-1, Barnes 0-2, Fisher 0-2). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—Utah 60 (Jefferson, Favors 11), L.A. Lakers 58 (Bynum 23). Assists—Utah 20 (Watson 6), L.A. Lakers 19 (Bryant, Blake 5). Total Fouls—Utah 21, L.A. Lakers 22. A—18,997 (18,997).


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 D5

Summit Continued from D1 In three duals this season, 15 different Summit players have recorded wins, reflecting the Storm’s depth in 2011. Leading the way for Summit is junior Paxton Deuel, who in 2010 finished fourth in singles at the 5A state championships. Three of the four players who finished ahead of Deuel have graduated and Glencoe’s Stuart Tierney, who beat Deuel in last year’s third-place match, is competing in Class 6A this season. “There’s no one in 5A at his level,” Cordell says about Deuel, who won a state title in doubles as a freshman in 2009. “He’s one of the best players in all of the Pacific Northwest.” Senior Sterling Dillingham is also back for the Storm. Last year, along with doubles partner Conor Hegewald, who has since graduated, Dillingham qualified for the 5A state tournament. Cordell says Dillingham will likely play in singles matches for the Storm during the regular season, but Cordell expects the senior to shift to doubles for the district tournament. “Our goal every year is to win state,” Cordell says. “Everything else along the way is just a sub-goal.” While Summit is the unanimous favorite among area coaches at every level, Class 6A Redmond is off to a promising 3-0 start and returns experienced players whose eyes are fixed on qualifying for the state championships. Senior Alex Brunot and junior Carlo Gangan swap duties at No. 1 and No. 2 singles and the two doubles teams of Zach Johnson and Aaron Chriss and Kyle Jackson and Riley Hamilton

help provide the Panthers with some firepower outside of singles play. “Our whole lineup is much deeper (this season),” Redmond coach Jim Ferguson says. The Panthers will need every ounce of muscle they can muster to upset Central Valley Conference favorite Sprague. Leading Bend High’s eight seniors is 2010 state qualifier Jeff Windsor, who finished second at last year’s IMC championship. Windsor has competed at the state championships in all three of his varsity seasons and hopes to return this year. “He’s the second best to Deuel in the district, maybe in the state,” Bend High coach Grant Ludwick says about Windsor. Despite their numerous seniors, the Lava Bears will be working with a raw team and hope to beat out Hermiston for second place in the IMC. “Summit is still the top team in the district and could be a pretty strong favorite for state,” Ludwick says. “Our goal is to qualify as many people as possible for state.” At Mountain View, Matt Larraneta, who last season qualified for the state tournament in doubles play, is currently filling the Cougars’ No. 1 singles slot, but may shift back to doubles for the district meet, says coach Alex Bick. Crook County returns junior Trevor Brown, who got a taste of 5A state tournament play last year. Brown looks to again return to state this season, but at the Class 4A state championships, as the Cowboys are playing down a classification with their declining enrollment.

Nicklaus Continued from D1 It is what Nick Price remembers best from ’86, what he saw from the 15th fairway as he and the man who had been the leader, Greg Norman, were walking toward their tee shots. “We saw the putter go up and we knew it was going in,” Price said. “And it was the loudest roar I have ever heard on a golf course right then and there. Incredible atmosphere and just, I don’t know how to say it, even when I won my majors, it didn’t feel anything like that, that atmosphere.” Very few of the spine-tingling recollections have faded from that Sunday, the most dramatic final round in the history of Augusta National. There, in front of an ecstatic gallery and what is perennially the largest television audience of the year for a golf tournament, Nicklaus — already written off as washed-up — went ahead and won the Masters. The bare facts speak loudly. Starting in a tie for ninth place, four strokes behind, having gone two years without a victory and five since his last major championship, Nicklaus shot a seven-under-par 65 to win. The round included a 30 on the back nine — with a bogey at the 12th. In the 25 years since, no one has closed with an incoming 30 to win. Golf World magazine called it the “greatest final round in major championship history.” Few among those who saw it live or on the CBS broadcast would argue. In one of his many reminiscences of ’86 this year, Nicklaus recently recalled the stirring, high-wire act that was played out across the back nine, stopping just short of calling it the greatest victory of his career. “You can’t really rank them,” he said, “but I think it’s obvious that that one stands out, simply because most of the other ones were during the bulk or the basic part of my career, and I expected to win. “I guess nobody really expected me to be in contention at that point in my career, particularly even me. I had not really prepared all that great for it that spring. But once I got myself in contention, muscle memory and knowing how to play golf came back.” In addition to the sublime shots that were

James Williams can be reached at jwilliams@ bendbulletin.com.

2011 Central Oregon boys tennis outlook CLASS 6A Redmond Panthers Head coach: Jim Ferguson (fourth season) 2010 finish: Fourth at Central Valley Conference district tournament Top players: Carol Gangan, jr.; Alex Brunot, sr. CVC championships: May 11 and 13 in Salem

CLASS 5A Bend Lava Bears Head coach: Grant Ludwick (fourth season) 2010 finish: Third at Intermountain Conference district tournament Returning state qualifier: Jeff Windsor, sr. Special District 1 championships: May 9-10 at Mountain View Mountain View Cougars Head coach: Alex Bick (fifth season) 2010 finish: Fourth at Intermountain Conference district tournament Returning state qualifier: Matt Larraneta, jr. Special District 1 championships: May 9-10 at Mountain View Summit Storm Head coach: Josh Cordell (10th season) 2010 finish: Second at Intermountain Conference district tournament; fourth at Class 5A state tournament Returning state qualifiers: Paxton Deuel, jr.; Sterling Dillingham, sr. Special District 1 championships: May 9-10 at Mountain View

CLASS 4A-3A-2A-1A Crook County Cowboys Head coach: Dan Brown (third season) 2010 finish: Did not place at Intermountain Conference district tournament Returning state qualifier: Trevor Brown, sr. Special District 5 championships: May 12-13 in Ontario Madras White Buffaloes Head coach: Margaret Kinkaid (fifth season) 2010 finish: Did not place at Intermountain Conference district tournament Top players: Alexsis Penaloza, so.; Caleb Freshour, so. Special District 2 championships: May 11-12 in Portland Sisters Outlaws Head coach: Garth Tosello (second season) 2010 finish: Sixth at the Class 4A-3A-2A-1A Special District 3 tournament Returning state qualifier: Ben Fullhart, sr. Special District 3 championships: TBA

Joe Benton / AP ile

Jack Nicklaus, seen here on April 13, 1986, watches his shot go for a birdie, giving him the lead and the title, on the 17th hole at the Masters golf tournament in Augusta, Ga. played — Nicklaus’ soaring 4-iron into the 15th green to 12 feet for eagle, a 5-iron tight to the flagstick at No. 16 — there also were emotional notes that resonated. Curtis Strange, hardly known for his soft side, found himself moved by the sight of Nicklaus, with the second of his four sons, Jackie, on the bag, walking through a dream round. “I guess the one last impression that I have in my mind is Jackie and Jack walking off the last green together arm in arm,” said Strange, who finished in a tie for 21st that year. “I think as a father, we all can relate to that.” Still, the obstacles between Nicklaus and his sixth green jacket were many. Adding to them had been an atmosphere fraught with dramatic tension, sparked by the brash pre-

diction made by Seve Ballesteros of Spain after his third-round 72 put him in a tie for second going into Sunday. “This tournament is mine,” Ballesteros, who won in 1980 and ’83, told The Augusta Chronicle. Then there was the mounting of another effort by Tom Kite to gain his first Masters win after blowing the tournament two years earlier, and the sheer macho swagger that accompanied Norman’s first leading-man appearance, swirling around the top of the boards as the freshly minted Great White Shark. Norman led the tournament at 6-under par 210 after 54 holes, the first of his four 54-hole leads in that year of the Saturday Slam. One by one, every challenger came unraveled. Ballesteros’ hopes all but ended when, after hearing a roar from the 16th green to celebrate Nicklaus’ birdie there, he hit his 4iron into the pond fronting the 15th green. Kite’s chance to end Nicklaus’ dream fizzled when his 10-footer for birdie at the 18th took a dive to the left at the hole. Norman’s opportunity to catch Nicklaus also dissolved at the final hole, where he blew his 4-iron shot into the gallery, well to the right, and failed to get up and down for par after a mediocre pitch. At 46 years, two months and 23 days, Nicklaus became the third-oldest player to win a major, one-and-a-half months younger than Old Tom Morris was when he won the British Open 119 years earlier. In another timeless display in 1998, Nicklaus shook up the youngsters at the Masters again when, at 58, he tied for sixth, shooting a final-round 68. Though still sprightly at 71, he will not mount any more threats to roll back the hands of time. What he did 25 years ago will have to stand. In his recent book, “The 1986 Masters: How Jack Nicklaus Roared Back to Win,” John Boyette, the sports editor of The Augusta Chronicle, quoted Nicklaus saying as much. “I think what it did was put an exclamation point on my career,” Nicklaus told Boyette. “I think I obviously had a pretty good career prior to that, and then to turn around at 46 and be able to finish a golf tournament, people said, ‘Hey, he can still play golf.’ ”

GOLF SCOREBOARD LOCAL The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf results listings and events calendar. Clearly legible items should be faxed to the sports department, 541-385-0831, e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com, or mailed to P.O. Box 6020; Bend, OR 97708.

Club Results CROOKED RIVER RANCH Golf Channel Am Tour, April 2 18-Hole Stroke Play Hogan Flight — 1, Zach Mode, 74. Championship Flight — 1, Craig Falco, 75. Palmer Flight — 1, Casey Jones, 81. Sarazen Fight — 1, Brent Moschetti, 85. Jones Flight — 1, John Cosgrave, 93. DESERT PEAKS Thursday Men’s Club, March 31 Net Blind Draw 1, Don Henderson/Wes Graves, 140. 2, Jordan Say/Dick Pliska, 147. 3, Sam Brown/Al Dupont, 150. KP — Val Paterson. LD — Jordan Say. Friday Night Couples, April 1 Net Chapman 1, Bruce/Jeanette Houck, 31. 2, Carl/Teresa Lindgren, 33.1. 3, Scott Ditmore/Vicki Moore, 34. Sunday Group Play, April 2 Stroke Play Gross: 1, Ed McDaniel, 72. 2 (tie), Francisco Morales, 77; Lowell Patterson, 77. Net: 1 (tie) , Denny Story, 67; Fred Blackman, 67; Sid Benjamin, 67. EAGLE CREST Men’s Club, March 30 Net Alternate Shot at Challenge Course A Flight — 1, Peter O’Reilly/Ray Schadt, 56. 2, Ray Braun/Ron Louthan, 61. 3, Bob Mowlds/Reed Sloss, 62. 4 (tie), Hank Cavender/ Roger Palmer, 63; Frank Nickel/Jim Hawkes, 63; Austin Morris/Nate Wilhite, 63. B Flight — 1, Bill Greeley/Bill Houck, 56. 2, Bill Carey/Paul Pertner, 59. 3 (tie), Lee Roehlke/Rich Sackerson, 61; Matt Conner/ Terry Black, 61; Brooks Gunsel/Sam Puri, 61. JUNIPER Men’s Club, March 31 Stableford 1, Roger Aikin/Scott Hakala/Jim Goad/Hank Weldon, 166. 2, Bob Kennedy/Elton Gregory/Bill Nelson/Cob Cooper, 139. 3, Chuck Swenson/Alan Stewart/Don Garney/Blind draw, 137. KPs — Johnny McDaniel, No. 3; Jim Foad, No. 8; Dave King, No. 13; Don Garney, No. 16. LOST TRACKS Central Oregon Winter Series, April 1 Triple Six Gross: 1, Scott Cravens/Curtis Tucke, 63. 2, Ryan Whitcomb/Bob Selige, 66. 3, Brandon Kearney/Charlie Rice, 68. 4 (tie), Dan Wendt/ Chuck Griffin, 69; Barry Greig/Dave Greig, 69; Chris Points/Nick Fanche, 69. Net: 1, Kory Callantine/Dave Ratzlaff, 60.63. 2, Todd Goodew/Chris Hardy, 62.5. 3, Dan McCleery/Tom McCleery, 63.25. 4, Frank Earls/Jerry Harris, 63.5. 5, Robert Holley/Dan Polis, 63.63. Skins — Les Bryan/Dave Barnhouse, No. 13. KPs — 0-12 handicap: Mark Payne, No. 8; 13 & up: Kim Kellenberg, No. 16. PRONGHORN

Central Oregon Golf Tour, March 31 18-Hole Stroke Play Gross: 0-6 handicap: 1, Mike Reuther, 72. 7-12 handicap: 1, Cheryl Steppe, 80. 13 and up: 1, John Wilson, 77. More scores: Pat Woerner, 75. Jeff Ward, 76. Dwight Hietala, 77. Barry Greig, 79. Net: 1, Bill Burley, 73. 2 (tie), Bob Stirling, 74; Jeremy Buller, 74. 4, Jack Tebbs, 75. 5 (tie), Chris O’Conner, 76; Kory Callantine, 76. Giant Skins — Gross: Gib Stephens, No. 3; Rosie Cook, No. 6; Jim Tebbs, No. 11; Cheryl Steppe, No. 13. Net: Butch Palmer, No. 1; John Wilson, No. 4; Mike Morris, No. 9; Verl Steppe, No. 10; Jim Tebbs, No. 11; David Ratzlaff, No. 13; Chris O’Connor, No. 17.

Hole-In-One Report April 1 ASPEN LAKES John Christa, Sisters No. 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-iron April 1 THE GREENS AT REDMOND Ian Oxford, Redmond No. 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-iron April 3 BRASADA Dillon Russell, Powell Butte No. 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 yards. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-iron

Calendar The Bulletin welcomes contributions to its weekly local golf events calendar. Items should be mailed to P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708; faxed to the sports department at 541-385-0831; or e-mailed to sports@bendbulletin.com. ——— LEAGUES April 16 — The Central Oregon chapter of the Executive Women’s Golf Association is hosting its 2011 kickoff event at Awbrey Glen Golf Club in Bend. Meeting is open to EWGA members, prosepective members and guests. The EWGA will unveil the 2011 event schedule, and include speakers, a fashion show and raffle. Begins with a 9:30 a.m. check in and includes a free breakfast buffet. Optional round of par-3 golf or a lesson after the meeting for $20. RSVP by April 10. For more information or to register, call Vicky Thomas at 541-389-1513 or e-mail at ewgaco@gmail.com. May 5 — Meadow Lakes Ladies Golf Association in Prineville meeting is open to the public. Registration from 7:30-8:30 a.m. followed by welcome and short meeting. Informal round of golf begins at 9 a.m. Cost to join is $65 ($30 dues and $35 for entire season’s days play). For more information, call president Linda Richards at 503-577-5083. Wednesdays — Men’s Golf Association at Meadow Lakes Golf Course plays weekly at 5 or 5:30 p.m. All men are welcome. Cost is $35 plus $30 handicapping fee. Nightly greens fee is $7. For more information, call Zach Lampert at 541-447-7113. ——— CLINICS OR CLASSES April 29 — Oregon Golf Association’s free public rules night at Bend Golf and Country Club. Classes are open to any golfer, and will feature a three-hour presentation designed to cover basic definitions and rules and will include free light appetizers, a no-host bar and a complimentary copy of the current Rules of Golf. Session will be held from 5-9 p.m. Reservations are required, and can be completed at www.eventbrite.com/org/809328921?s=2838377. May 2-4 — Women-only lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes on-course instruction, and a maximum student/ teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those stu-

dents without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-389-7275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. May 16-18 — Adult co-ed golf lessons at Lost Tracks Golf Club in Bend offered by the Bend Park & Recreation District. Sessions are 5:30 to 7 p.m. and are taught by PGA professional Bob Garza. Each session includes on-course instruction, and a maximum student/teacher ratio of 8-to-1. Equipment will be provided for those students without their own. Cost is $55 for residents of the Bend Park & Recreation District, $74 for others. To register, call 541-3897275 or visit www.bendparksandrec.org. June 20-24 — Junior half-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend is open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 7-13. Camp runs 9 a.m.-noon daily, and campers will work on golf fundamentals including stance, swing evaluation, and grip, with emphasis on rules and etiquette. Cost is $295. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. June 27-July 1 — Junior full-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend is open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 9-16. Camp runs 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily, and campers will work on putting, chipping, bunker play and the full swing. Nine holes of golf accompanied by instructors each day also included. Cost is $595 and includes all golf activities, lunch daily and amenity package. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps. com or call 877-611-1911. July 11-15 — Junior half-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend is open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 7-13. Camp runs 9 a.m.-noon daily, and campers will work on golf fundamentals including stance, swing evaluation, and grip, with emphasis on rules and etiquette. Cost is $295. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. July 18-22 — Junior full-day camps at the PGA Tour Academy at Pronghorn Club near Bend is open to boys and girls of all skill levels, ages 9-16. Camp runs 9 a.m.-4 p.m. daily, and campers will work on putting, chipping, bunker play and the full swing. Nine holes of golf accompanied by instructors each day also included. Cost is $595 and includes all golf activities, lunch daily and amenity package. For more information, visit www.pgatourcamps.com or call 877-611-1911. ——— TOURNAMENTS April 7 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Juniper Golf Course in Redmond. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. April 7-8 — Senior Master’s Invitational at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation is presented by the Oregon Chapter of the PGA. 36-hole tournament features a team best ball format and individual 36-hole stroke play competition for professionals and amateurs. Golfers must at least turn 50 years old in 2011. For more information, call 541-553-4971 or visit www.orpga.com. April 8 — Central Oregon Winter Series tournament at the Club at Brasada Ranch on Powell Butte. Tournament is a two-person shamble. No more than one professional allowed per team. Cost is $25 for professionals, $45 for amateurs. Cart and optional gross skins competition cost extra. All players must sign up by noon on the Thursday before the event. To register or for more information, call Pat Huffer, head pro at Crooked River Ranch, at 541-923-6343 or

e-mail him at crrpat@crookedriverranch.com. April 14 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www. centraloregongolftour.com. April 16-17 — The Iceberg Open at Crooked River Ranch is a two-person scramble on Saturday and two-person best ball on Sunday. Gross and net divisions along with closest-to-the-pin and longdrive contests. 9 a.m. shotgun both days. Practice round Friday for $32, including cart. Entry fee is $260 per team and includes greens fees, lunch, cart, range balls and raffle prizes. For more information, call the Crooked River Ranch pro shop at 541-923-6343. April 16-17 — Three-person All-In tournament at Prineville Golf Club. Two-day gross and net payoffs, with optional side games. Friday practice round also available. For more information or to register, call Prineville GC at 541-447-1354. April 23 — Crook County High School benefit tournament at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. Event tees off with a noon shotgun start. For more information or to register, call the Meadow Lakes pro shop at 541-447-7113. April 25 — Central Oregon Seniors Golf Organization event at Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino near Warm Springs. The format is individual gross and net best ball, as well as team best ball. Cash prizes awarded at each event. Tournament series is open to men’s club members at host sites, and participants must have an Oregon Golf Association handicap. Cost is $110 for the season plus a $5 per-event fee. For more information, call Ron Meisner at 541-548-3307. April 28 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Sunriver Resort’s Crosswater Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com. April 28-May 1 — The Central Oregon Shootout is a two-person team event held at Aspen Lakes Golf Course in Sisters, Black Butte Ranch and Eagle Crest Resort in Redmond. The tournament will feature scramble, best ball and Chapman formats. Cost is $550 per team and includes greens fees, carts, range balls, tee gift, continental breakfast, and lunch. Deadline to register is April 20. For more information or to request an entry form, call 541-549-4653, 541-595-1294 or 541-923-4653. April 30 — Golf Channel Am Tour event at Meadow Lakes Golf Course in Prineville. The Am Tour’s Central Oregon chapter is a competitive golf series held at different Central Oregon golf courses. Flighted tournaments open to all amateur golfers of all abilities and prize pool awarded to both gross and net winners. Membership information: 541-389-7676 or www.thegolfchannel.com/amateurtour. May 2-3 — Tetherow Fourball Championship is a two-person best-ball, match-play tournament. Each team will have one professional and one amateur, playing to scratch. Winning professional takes home $7,500. For more information, call Tetherow at 541-3882582, May 3 — Central Oregon Golf Tour event at Prineville Golf Club. The Central Oregon Golf Tour is a competitive golf series held at golf courses throughout Central Oregon. Gross and net competitions open to all amateur golfers of all abilities. Prize pool awarded weekly, and membership not required. For more information or to register: 541-633-7652, 541-318-5155, or www.centraloregongolftour.com.


D6 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Awbrey Glen Golf Club’s signature par3 13th hole feels wider this year after some limbing happened along the hole’s right side.

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Tournaments • Amateur Bend woman beats field of mostly male golfers: LA QUINTA, Calif. — Bend amateur golfer Kareen Queen defeated a mostly male field of 29 golfers over the weekend in her flight of a national tournament on the Golf Channel Am Tour. Queen, a member of Central Oregon’s newly founded chapter of the Golf Channel tour, outlasted Yuri Pikover, a male golfer from Malibu, Calif., in a playoff after she fired a 14-over-par 86 in the second and final round of the Western Masters at PGA West’s Nicklaus Tournament Course. Queen, 50, finished the 36-hole tournament at 35over par, becoming the first female golfer to win a flight in a national tournament on the 6-year-old tour. For more information about the Golf Channel Am Tour, visit www.gcamtour.com. • Pro from Madras cashes another mini-tour check: SANTEE, Calif. — Brian Miller shot a 5-under-par 67 last week to finish second in an 18-hole Golden State Tour golf event. Miller, a 31-year-old from Madras now living in La Quinta, Calif., earned $1,100 for the finish at Carlton Oaks Golf Course near San Diego. Miller has placed in the top 15 in the past five consecutive mini-tour tournaments in which he has played, a streak that started in early March.

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

MEN’S GOLF MASTERS TOURNAMENT Site: Augusta, Ga. Schedule: Thursday-Sunday. Course: Augusta National Golf Club (7,435 yards, par 72). Purse: TBA ($7.5 million in 2010). Winner’s share: TBA ($1.35 million in 2010). Television: ESPN (Thursday-Friday, noon-4:30 p.m., 5-8 p.m.) and CBS (Saturday, 12:30-4 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.). Last year: Phil Mickelson won the major championship for the third time in seven years, closing with a 5-under 67 for a three-stroke victory over Lee Westwood. Mickelson finished at 16-under 272. Last week: Mickelson won the Houston Open to move to No. 3 in the world. He had weekend rounds of 63 and 65 at Redstone to finish at 20-under 268, three strokes ahead of Chris Kirk and Scott Verplank. ... England’s David Horsey won a playoff in the Trophee Hassan II in Morocco. Notes: Woods won his fourth Masters title in 2005, beating Chris DiMarco on the first hole of a playoff. Woods set the tournament record of 18-under 270 in 1997, and also won in 2001 and 2002. He won the last of his 71 PGA Tour titles in September 2009. ... Angel Cabrera won in 2009, beating Kenny Perry on the second hole of a playoff. ... Jose Maria Olazabal was the last European to win the Masters, holding off Greg Norman in the final round in 1999. ... The Texas Open is next week at TPC San Antonio. Online: www.masters.org PGA Tour site: www.pgatour.com PGA European Tour site: www.europeantour.com

LPGA TOUR Next event: Avnet LPGA Classic, April 28-May 1, Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail, Magnolia Grove, The Crossings, Mobile, Ala. Last week: Stacy Lewis held off 2010 champion Yani Tseng to win the Kraft Nabisco Championship by three strokes. Lewis earned her first LPGA Tour title in the year’s first major. Online: www.lpga.com

CHAMPIONS Next event: Outback Steakhouse Open, April 15-17, TPC Tampa Bay, Lutz, Fla. Last week: Tom Lehman won the Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic by four strokes for his second Champions Tour victory of the season. He won the Allianz Championship in February. Online: www.pgatour.com ——— All Times PDT

Forward Continued from D1 In addition to Bandon Dunes, Kidd’s acclaimed portfolio includes Bend’s Tetherow Golf Club and The Castle Course, which in 2008 was the first public championship course to open at venerable St. Andrews in Scotland in nearly 100 years. But Kidd will be charged with something different at Awbrey Glen, where his job is to design a master plan, not a golf course. “I don’t want to stamp my design signature on Awbrey Glen,” says Kidd, who speaks with a strong accent from his native Scotland. “Bunny Mason did a good job and the members love it, otherwise they wouldn’t be members here. “What we’re doing is giving a 20-year face-lift, and we’re respecting what is already here. We’re not trying to build Tetherow’s evil cousin.” In other words, don’t expect Kidd to carpet Awbrey Glen in fescue or turn its greens diabolical with mounds that look like waves of turf. Instead, Kidd’s task will be to “set the goal posts” for future improvements, Amberson says. The goals are to improve playability, increase strategy for better golfers, identify technical issues on the course, improve environmental standards and reduce maintenance costs, Amberson says. Once the blueprint is in place, DMK and Awbrey Glen will then slowly implement the master plan, which Kidd estimates will be ready for members to review in late May. The changes should start subtly and at a relatively small cost, Kidd says.

First on the list: removal of some of the ponderosa pines and juniper trees that have become overgrown. Those trees have caused some playability and shaping issues on the course, Amberson and Kidd agree. And although taking out trees is sure to upset environmentalists, Kidd says the removal is necessary. “The real key point is the trees,” Kidd says. “For us as golf course designers who are not members of the club, it seem fairly obvious. They (the trees) were half this size years ago when Bunny Mason laid the course out and it was built. Those trees are tightly packed and very tall. “This is a golf course, not an arboretum.” In the short term, DMK will devise a plan that should make the course more challenging for low handicappers and more playable for lesser players. That plan is also expected to make the golf course less expensive to maintain by removing out-ofplay turf and replacing it with native high desert landscaping, says Nick Schaan, a senior associate architect with DMK. “There are a lot of places out there where they are growing, irrigating and mowing turf that hasn’t seen a golf ball in 20 years,” says Schaan. Once the minor changes have been made, more significant changes should follow, Kidd says. The key will be to implement the changes in a way that makes sense, he adds. “For instance, if you are going to upgrade the irrigation system, you maybe don’t do a bunch of other things first that then ruin that change,” Kidd says. “It’s

making sure that all of these changes are sequential and all make sense, all aiming toward an endgame that is out there.” For the golf club, the master plan represents an investment that, while still undetermined, will no doubt be significant. For instance, according to Amberson, installing a new bunker costs about $5,000; rebuilding a putting green costs about $50,000. But until the master plan is completed and a strategy to complete the work is put forth, Amberson notes that just how much the face-lift will cost is impossible to determine. In the end, the investment should be worth the cost, says Larry Hinkle, Awbrey Glen’s club president. A new road map should help the golf course stay on one path, and continuity is not always easy to find at a member-owned club, Hinkle says. “I’d change this hole, another member would change that hole,” Hinkle says of the club’s future without a master plan. “We would end up with a messed-up golf course. We want to make sure that when we make changes, we make them for a reason that gets us the biggest bang for

our buck.” Kidd and Awbrey Glen have already developed a good rapport. Last week, Kidd was presented an honorary membership to Awbrey Glen by the course’s membership. “A real honor,” Kidd says. And not a bad way to start a working relationship. Plus, Kidd thinks the master plan will be exactly what Awbrey Glen needs to strengthen itself in the future. “I see it as an incredibly positive step that many clubs don’t take,” says Kidd, adding that a golf course typically becomes outdated in about 20 years. “They just sit there and each incoming (membership) president plants a new tree, and takes out a bunker he didn’t like, and adds a bunker he does like. “And then the next guy … he adds his own, and before you know it another dozen years have passed and nothing changed. In fact, the bits that should’ve been addressed weren’t, and the bits that didn’t need fixing were changed.” Zack Hall can be reached at 541-617-7868 or at zhall@ bendbulletin.com.

Survey • Take the Central Oregon golf survey: The Bulletin would like to know what golfers think about golfing in Central Oregon. Go to bendbulletin.com and take a few minutes to complete our annual golf survey. Results will be published in our annual Central Oregon Golf Preview on Sunday, May 1. — Bulletin staff reports

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S

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HELPING YOU MAKE GOOD BUYING DECISIONS

SAVVY SHOPPER

Inside

‘Addicted to Food’ New show on OWN focuses on eating disorders, Page E2

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/savvyshopper

THE BULLETIN • WEDNESDAY, APRIL 6, 2011

INSIDE

Affording nuptial fashion

Dear Abby Wandering eye stops man short of the altar, Page E2

‘Top Chef Masters’ Leaner format serves show well, Page E3

Brides have more options, prices for wedding gowns

SHOPPING IN BRIEF

By Suzanne S. Brown The Denver Post

Get a free cup of coffee Get a jolt of joe for free now through April 17, as McDonald’s restaurants throughout Central Oregon are giving away small cups of coffee. McDonald’s is interested in exposing consumers to its premium roast, made from beans harvested in South and Central America as well as Indonesia. No purchases are required to get a cup. Customers can pick one up at drive-thrus or in restaurants at all locations in Bend, Redmond, Sisters, La Pine, Prineville and Madras. The limit is one cup per customer per visit. Contact: 503-708-9400.

Equine consignment coming to Bend Gently used equestrian equipment will soon be available to the community when a new consignment store opens in Bend on Saturday. A Bit Less Equine Consignment tack store is opening at 425 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive. It carries English and Western tack at a variety of price points. This includes saddles, bridles, equestrian clothing and country home furnishings. The store is also now accepting goods to be sold. The store will be open Wednesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Contact: 541-323-3262.

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Bar code-scanning applications allow consumers to compare prices of merchandise on a store’s shelf to competing stores in the area just by taking pictures with their smartphone’s camera.

Do smartphones make

smarter

shoppers?

Test-driving applications in Central Oregon By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

REI members’ annual used-gear sale Sunday Outdoor goods galore will be available at lower prices Sunday during REI’s annual used gear sale. The sale is an REI memberonly event, although you can join on the spot. Merchandise with beige tags will be marked down. It will take place from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Stores on Sunday throughout the Old Mill District will be putting on a one-day sidewalk sale in conjunction with the REI event. Weather permitting, racks will be outside with goods discounted up to 75 percent off. The racks will be inside if the weather is stormy. REI is located at 380 S.W. Powerhouse Drive in Bend’s Old Mill District. Contact: www.rei.com/ stores/96 or 541-385-0594.

Produce stand returns The Produce Patch closed its retail location in January, but it’s coming back for summer. The business selling local produce and flowers will return as a stand in the parking lot of The Bend Factory Stores starting May 2. It has also changed its name to Cary’s Produce Patch. Cary’s Produce Patch will also begin offering 12-inch, live flower baskets before Mother’s Day. The stand will be open Monday through Saturday 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Bend Factory Stores are located at 61334 S. Highway 97. It anticipates being open through October. The store went indoors in 2007, offering a variety of products including natural beef, artisan cheese, bakery goods and other items in addition to fresh fruits and vegetables. The ailing economy led to shuttering the store. Contact: www.theproduce patch.com. — Heidi Hagemeier, The Bulletin

M

y fellow shoppers were giving me as wide a berth as possible in a Safeway aisle. Even I felt like a loon. Holding a smartphone 6 inches from my lips, my voice had risen from reasonable to that teetering-on-timeout tone reserved for children. “Annie’s ... Asian ... dressing!” Fourth try, and nothing. I couldn’t bully this phone into telling me where to buy salad dressing. My grocery store frustration was part of a quest last week to test smartphone shopping applications that promise to reveal the best deals in town. Just use the phone’s camera to scan a product’s bar code or speak into the phone, and the apps, their websites say, work their comparisonshopping magic. It feels strange, but expect to see people waving smartphones around in stores more and more. Even now, said Matt Geiss, general manager of Best Buy in Bend, it’s an everyday occurrence. “I don’t see anything wrong with it,” Geiss said. “In fact, if someone scans a TV, I’ll ask him, ‘How much is it at the other stores?’” My initial thought on such apps was, “Sure, they work in a big metro area. But how useful are they here in Central Oregon?” So I set out on my own little survey with three different smartphones, each downloaded with four free shopping apps: Google Shopper, Scandit, ShopSavvy and TheFind. I planned to go to several different stores and try the programs on different types of products. While I experienced a few strikeouts, I also logged enough hits to recommend that anyone shopping for certain types of merchandise give it a try. My first stop was Target, where I settled on the Keurig Mini Plus singleserve coffee machine, priced at $99.99. The Mini Plus, no doubt, is found in stores all over Central Oregon. The first challenge of using shopping apps is getting at the bar code. To find the Keurig’s code, I got on my knees, dragged a box out from deep on the bottom shelf and flipped it up. Some stores have plastic signs in front of goods with a strip that looks

A different kind of code Have you seen a funny, digital-looking box in stores? If not, you will soon. They are called quick response codes, or QR codes. They are twodimensional bar codes that can be scanned by a smartphone camera. When scanned, the QR code directs the smartphone to a Web address. So at Best Buy, for instance, QR codes are now on all the signs in the store. Scanning the code takes you directly to that product on the Best Buy website.

About the apps There are myriad smartphone shopping applications out there. We picked four that seemed to have received a lot of press and Web buzz. But it’s worth playing with different apps to see if another works best for you. Here are some of the main functions these apps perform.

G O O G LE SHOPPER • Scans a bar code to find other Web and local prices • For merchandise like books or DVDs, scans and identifies cover art to find other Web and local prices • Does voice search for goods • Allows you to visit other local stores’ websites, call local stores and see a map for directions • Shows merchandise reviews • Saves favorites • Links to Gmail, Facebook, Twitter and instant messaging

SCANDIT • Scans a bar code to find other Web and local prices • Shows merchandise reviews • Saves favorites • Links to e-mail, Facebook and Twitter

SHOPSAVVY*

Courtesy Newport Avenue Market

like a bar code, but they don’t work. You need to find it on the actual box. For all the apps, it’s as if you’re taking a picture of the bar code. Either a screen pops up with a frame or, in the case of Google Shopper, a line trolls the screen. You then fit the bar code into the frame and the apps lock on it. All the apps’ websites say the light must be bright enough to get a lock. If your smartphone has a camera flash you can try it to help. The apps will then recognize the product to make sure it’s finding the right item. Next comes the information designed to make you a better consumer: results for prices on the Web and at local stores, as well as links to product reviews. It’s worth playing with shopping apps at home before taking them on the road. You don’t need to be in a store to get them to work, so scan the bar code on a household product ahead of time to figure out how they function. See Apps / E6

We already know the cake will contain fruit and that a century-old carriage will be used to transport Prince William and Kate Middleton on their wedding day in London on April 29. But her gown? It continues to be a big secret. Middleton is like many brides in her quest to keep details of her dress under wraps Inside until the big day, says Millie • Movies, Martini Bratten, editor in chief television of Brides magazine. influence “Every bride wants that big retro look at reveal. There’s a magic moweddings, ment when you first see her Page E6 dressed in her wedding gown that makes you gasp.” What has some brides and their parents gasping is a gown’s price tag, given the toll the economy has taken on budgets, and the fact that the average national cost for a wedding with 140 guests is $26,984. On average, a bride spends $1,099 on her wedding dress, according to a 2010 survey of 19,000 couples by theknot.com and weddingchannel.com. But the gown’s cost can range from as little as $100 for a rental gown to more than $10,000 for a high-end custom design. See Gowns / E6

• Scans a bar code to find other Web and local prices • Allows you to visit other local store’s websites, call local stores and see a map for directions • Shows price-matching policy of a retailer when available • Shows merchandise reviews • Saves favorites • Links to e-mail, Facebook and Twitter * ShopSavvy also produces ShopSavvy Premium for 99 cents for the iPhone. For our comparison we opted to use only free apps. The majority of the functions between the free and paid apps are the same.

THEFIND • Scans a bar code to find other Web and local prices • Allows you to visit other stores’ websites • Saves favorites • Links to TheFind’s shopping website and Facebook

Cyrus McCrimmon / The Denver Post

Wedding dress fashion on display at the Four Seasons Hotel in Denver. Romona Keveza silk shantung taffeta gown, $3,999, at Felicé. The Ivanka Trump white agate earrings and Penny Preville stacked bangle bracelets are from Hyde Park Jewelers.

Concierge explains how to get your wish in the service world By Ross Werland Chicago Tribune

In the fun book “Concierge Confidential,” superstar Manhattan concierge Michael Fazio explains how to pry what you want out of the service world. In the process, he provides some intriguing insight into the inner human brat that service people often face. For that, you’ll have to buy the book. But here are a handful of his tips for navigating this rusty old world in more princely fashion: • No reservation at the restaurant? No problem. Check in with the host, be engaging (not smarmy) and acknowledge that you’re an idiot. Say, “Look, I know I’m a loser. I didn’t make a reservation. I’m going to go hang out at the bar. I’d love to come here. It looks so great. ... I’m in your hands.” Fazio swears by it. • Waiters have more clout than you know and can reward good customers. Tip no less than 20 percent. See Service / E6


T EL EV ISION

E2 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Wandering eye stops man short of the altar Dear Abby: I have been dating a wonderful woman I’ll call “Shannon” for a year and a half. She has most things that I want in a partner, and I often feel she’s better than I deserve. We’re in our early 30s, and Shannon is saying she will soon need some kind of idea where we are going in the future. I’m having trouble with the notion of committing to her forever because I’m still attracted to other women. (I haven’t been involved with anyone else since starting to date her.) More worrisome, I’m afraid I’ll meet someone I’m more attracted to in a few years. How can I be sure that Shannon will make me happier than anyone else I might meet in the future? — Conflicted in Washington State Dear Conflicted: You say Shannon has “most” things you want in a partner. Yet I sense that you’re not as physically attracted to her as you think you should be. If this woman does not appeal to you, then face it — she’s not for you. Regardless of how attractive one’s partner is, there are no guarantees that anyone won’t meet someone who is different and appealing at some point in the future. But those who are mature and committed usually realize they have enough invested emotionally in their marriage and children that they can resist temptation. It’s called being an adult. Dear Abby: At least once a week my boss and I drive together from our office to meetings throughout town. She always insists on driving. My problem is, she drives erratically and I often feel in danger with her behind the wheel. Not only does she swerve in and out of lanes without signaling, she is often talking on her cellphone (which is not illegal in our state). I’d be happy to drive. I have a comfortable, reliable car and a safe driving history. I have of-

D E A R ABBY fered, “I’d be glad to drive so you’ll be free to give your full attention to important phone calls.” None of my efforts has worked. I don’t want to be rude or insulting — and certainly don’t want to create an awkward situation with my boss — but I don’t want to keep putting myself at risk with her terrible driving. I’d be grateful for some advice. — Riding Shotgun in Miami Dear Riding Shotgun: It’s time for another — more direct — chat with your boss. You should not have to worry every time you get into a car with her that you might not arrive in one piece. Tell her: “When you talk on the phone while you drive, it makes me very nervous. I’m concerned about my safety as well as the safety of others when you do it. If you don’t want me to drive so you can make your calls, I will meet you at our destination.” Dear Abby: After her second mammogram in 10 years, my mother-in-law now needs a double mastectomy. An annual mammogram would have caught it early enough to prevent its spread. Since I have trouble remembering when it has been a year since my last exam, I decided to schedule my annual exam on my birthday. Now I will always remember when it’s time for my annual gift to myself — preventive health care. — Annual Alison in California Dear Annual Alison: That’s an excellent suggestion. Associating annual medical exams with a holiday — like Valentine’s Day — would be another. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

‘Addicted to Food’ tells stories of winning, losing By Robert Philpot Tennie McCarty — whose Abilene, Texas-area Shades of Hope Treatment Center is featured in a new Oprah Winfrey Network show, “Addicted to Food” — had never heard the word bulimia until she learned one day in the 1980s that she was dying from it. She’d been an alcohol- and drug-addiction counselor in Abilene for years, but she had struggled with her own weight. She’d lost 100 to 150 pounds five different times, but had always gained it back. After a major weight loss, she began taking laxatives — as many as 125 a day — to keep the weight off. She was seeing a doctor for liver problems, but she didn’t tell the doctor about the laxative habit. Then she hired a young man from California to work at Serenity House, the Abilene rehabilitation center where she was program director. He proved to be a good counselor for the patients — and for McCarty herself. “He said, ‘I think you’re a bulimic,’ ” she says. “And I didn’t know what he was talking about. I said, ‘What do you mean?’ ” He began pointing out the liver spots on her face, the way her hair was falling out, the cracks at the corners of her mouth. He said, “You’ll be doing great, but then you’ll get your feelings hurt or get upset and you’ll call for a break. And all the guys go out for a smoke, and you hit the candy machine and you go lock yourself in the bathroom, and you usually take at least three candy bars in there, lock yourself up, and when you come out, you’re calmed down.” He gave her a book called “Fat is a Family Affair” by Judi Hollis, and urged her to call a therapist he knew who was an expert in eating

Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

‘Addicted to Food’

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

When: 10 p.m. Tuesdays Where: OWN

C o u rtesy of OWN

A scene from OWN network’s “Addicted to Food.” disorders. “The denial of this disease is so strong,” McCarty says, “(that) I said, ‘Oh, you mean you think we need to treat eating-disorder clients?’ I couldn’t get in my head that he was saying, ‘You need treatment.’ ” McCarty eventually did get treatment, and in 1987, she founded Shades of Hope, which is in the small town of Buffalo Gap, roughly 15 miles southwest of Abilene. “Addicted to Food” shows how McCarty and her staff (which includes her daughters Kimberly, a therapist, and Kristi, the chief financial officer) work with clients, including eight people who agreed to be filmed for the show. Not that being filmed in this situation was easy. “In the very beginning, it was really tough” to have cameras present, says Amy Callahan, one of the clients featured on the show. “But we had an amazing group of people there, and it was almost like a family there when we had to leave. But the cameras being there was really tough, because the (center’s staff members) strip you of all your rights and control. And you feel so vulnerable.” Callahan says she’s a compulsive overeater — but “Addicted

to Food” isn’t just a weight-loss show. It features some thin people with eating disorders. But McCarty believes anorexia, bulimia and compulsive overeating are all part of the same disease. “Not everyone in the field agrees, but I don’t care,” McCarty said. “I’ve treated so many people that if you don’t get to those underlying causes and conditions — you know, an anorexic can gain weight and get within a normal weight range, but if you’re not treating those core issues, they can continue to gain and get all the way over on the other side. We’ve had compulsive overeaters get so obsessed with losing weight that they go to the other side.” Shades of Hope uses a grouptherapy approach, which is featured prominently in “Addicted to Food.” Callahan, who is a compulsive eater, says she learned things from fellow clients who have bulimia or anorexia. “I knew anorexia and bulimia were eating problems,” Callahan says. “I didn’t realize they were

the same as what I did, but they just got rid of (food), and I didn’t. It’s all the same addiction. I’ve always said I wish I was addicted to cigarettes ... because I can just throw the cigarettes out and never have to buy them again. But food — it’s there every day, and you have to have it to live. It’s not like you can throw it out and never bring it back in. So I can understand (anorexics and bulimics’) struggles.” McCarty says that after producers approached her for “Addicted to Food,” she spent a lot of time soul-searching and praying to see what her motives were for wanting to do the show. But she says that when she finished her own treatment 25 years ago, she made a commitment to spend the rest of her life educating people about eating disorders and helping them recover. And she agreed to do the show because she wants to educate people who have eating disorders, but don’t know what to do about them. “There are people who overeat, and there are people who are overweight, who don’t have diagnosed eating disorders,” McCarty said. “A simple guideline is, on certain foods, if you can take it or leave it. Like one day, you go to work, there’s doughnuts, you can eat a couple and you walk away. Maybe there’s 12 left, but you’ve had your doughnuts. That interaction is complete. A food addict, they’re thinking about the donuts left in the box. ... They might even leave work and go buy a dozen and eat them before they get home.”

BendSpineandPain.com (541) 647-1646 856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

April 15, 16 & 17

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BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

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7:00

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Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 Å Inside Edition (N) Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Garden Smart ‘G’ This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

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The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Mr. Sunshine (N) Off the Map (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Minute to Win It Twin Cities (N) ‘PG’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Survivor: Redemption Island (N) ’ Criminal Minds Hanley Waters ‘14’ Criminal Minds: Suspect Behavior The Middle ‘PG’ The Middle ‘PG’ Modern Family Mr. Sunshine (N) Off the Map (N) ’ ‘14’ Å American Idol The contestants perform; Jeff Beck. ‘PG’ Breaking In ‘14’ News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Burn Notice Broken Rules ’ ‘PG’ Burn Notice Wanted Man ‘PG’ Å Nova A Walk to Beautiful ’ ‘PG’ The Civil War A contrast of Grant and Lee. ’ ‘PG’ Å Minute to Win It Twin Cities (N) ‘PG’ Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit America’s Next Top Model (N) ‘14’ Shedding for the Wedding (N) Å House of Payne Meet the Browns For Your Home Katie Brown Lap Quilting ‘G’ Grand View ‘G’ Cook’s Country Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Nova A Walk to Beautiful ’ ‘PG’ The Civil War A contrast of Grant and Lee. ’ ‘PG’ Å

11:00 KATU News at 11 News News News (N) Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens News Roseanne ’ ‘14’ Cooking Class

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Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Bounty Hunter Bounty Hunter Dog the Bounty Hunter (N) Å Storage Wars Storage Wars (N) Storage Wars Storage Wars 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. ›› “Deep Blue Sea” (1999, Science Fiction) Thomas Jane, Saffron Burrows. Smart ››› “Terminator 2: Judgment Day” (1991, Science Fiction) Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Edward Furlong. Cyborgs 102 40 39 battle over a youth who holds the key to the future. Å Ex-Green Beret goes on Vietnam mission. Å sharks turn a research lab’s staff into fish food. Å Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘G’ Å In Search of the Giant Anaconda ‘G’ When Fish Attack ’ ‘MA’ Å River Monsters: Unhooked Jeremy searches for the goonch. ’ ‘PG’ Å River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Untamed and Uncut ’ ‘G’ Å Top Chef Restaurant Wars ‘14’ Top Chef ‘14’ Å Housewives/OC Bethenny Ever After Top Chef Finale ‘14’ Å Top Chef Reunion Special (N) Å Top Chef Masters (N) ‘14’ Å 137 44 Cribs ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ‘PG’ Å ›› “Young Guns” (1988, Western) Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland. ’ ›› “Young Guns II” (1990) Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland. ’ 190 32 42 53 Cribs ‘PG’ Å American Greed Art Williams Jr. American Greed (N) Mad Money American Greed Art Williams Jr. American Greed Paid Program Recession Profits 51 36 40 52 American Greed Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Å Anderson Cooper 360 Å 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Chappelle Show Chappelle Show South Park The boys cross into a new dimension. ‘MA’ Workaholics ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ Bend La Pine U of O Today Bend City Council Work Session Bend City Council (N) (Live) Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ HS Baseball 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Shake It Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie ›› “Legally Blonde” (2001) Reese Witherspoon. Suite/Deck Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Sons of Guns ’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash-Chicago Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å MythBusters (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Beach Classics Beach Classics Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Sons of Guns ’ NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Golden State Warriors (Live) ‘14’ SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball Milwaukee Bucks at Miami Heat From the AmericanAirlines Arena in Miami. Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å SportsCenter (N) (Live) Å Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) Å NBA Tonight (N) NFL Live (N) MLB Baseball: Twins at Yankees 22 24 21 24 (4:00) MLB Baseball Minnesota Twins at New York Yankees (N) Å 1990 Masters (6:13) Golf Å (7:05) 1992 Masters Film Å (7:57) 1993 Masters Film Å 1994 Masters (9:40) 1995 Masters Film Å (10:32) Golf Å 1997 Masters 23 25 123 25 (4:30) Golf Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ ››› “Meet the Parents” (2000, Comedy) Robert De Niro, Ben Stiller, Blythe Danner. ›› “Along Came Polly” (2004) Ben Stiller, Jennifer Aniston. The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls French Twist ’ ‘PG’ Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Å Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å 5 Ingredient Fix Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Chopped All-Stars Challenge Restaurant: Impossible Meglio’s Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa (3:30) Max Payne Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “The International” (2009, Suspense) Clive Owen, Naomi Watts. Premiere. Justified Brother’s Keeper (N) ‘MA’ (11:03) Justified ‘MA’ 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Disaster DIY ‘G’ Income Property Hunters Int’l House Hunters Income Property: Reno to Riches (N) Income Property House Hunters Hunters Int’l Holmes Inspect Income Property: Reno to Riches 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Modern Marvels Packaging ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Mad Electricity ‘PG’ Brad Meltzer’s Decoded ‘PG’ Å Weird Warfare (N) ‘PG’ Å Weird Weapons The Axis ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Clash of the Gods Hades ‘PG’ Å Intervention A mother of four. ‘14’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Amer. Justice: Death Row Justice: Polly Klaas Glamour Belles Glamour Belles How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show Hardball With Chris Matthews Å 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library (N) Silent Library ’ True Life I’m on Vacation ’ The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Real World ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Beavers Mariners MLB Baseball Seattle Mariners at Texas Rangers From Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, Texas. The Dan Patrick Show Ball Up Streetball 20 45 28* 26 World Poker Tour: Season 9 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Å UFC Unleashed (N) ’ ‘14’ Å The Ultimate Fighter (N) ’ ‘14’ Coal A failing power supply. (N) ‘PG’ Coal A failing power supply. ’ ‘PG’ 132 31 34 46 UFC Unleashed ’ ‘14’ Star Trek: Enterprise Canamar ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters ‘PG’ Å Ghost Hunters Star Island ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Hunters Residual Haunts (N) Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files (N) Ghost Hunters Residual Haunts ’ 133 35 133 45 (4:00) “Volcano: Nature Unleashed” Behind Scenes Grant Jeffrey Secrets of Bible Jack Van Impe Praise the Lord Å Easter Exper. Jesse Duplantis Thru History Changing-World Praise the Lord Å 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘14’ Seinfeld ’ ‘G’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens Meet the Browns Meet the Browns We There Yet? We There Yet? House of Payne House of Payne Conan (N) 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘14’ ›››› “Friendly Persuasion” (1956, Drama) Gary Cooper, Dorothy McGuire, Anthony Perkins. Indiana Quak- ›› “Band of Angels” (1957, Adventure) Clark Gable, Yvonne De Carlo, Sidney Poitier. (9:45) ››› “Of Human Hearts” (1938, Drama) Walter Huston, James Stewart. A dedi- (11:45) ›› “Little 101 44 101 29 ers’ son wants to join Civil War. Å A landowner saves a racially mixed slave from auction. cated preacher has difficulty relating to his son. Å Women” Kitchen Boss (N) Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Hoarding: Buried Alive ‘PG’ Å Extreme Couponing ’ ‘PG’ Å Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon Hoarding: Buried Alive (N) ’ ‘PG’ Extreme Coupon Extreme Coupon 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Dog-fighting ring. ‘14’ Bones Heart failure. ’ ‘14’ Å Bones The Plain in the Prodigy ‘14’ Bones The Devil in the Details ‘14’ Bones ’ ‘14’ Å CSI: NY Buzzkill ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Lucky Stiff ’ ‘14’ MAD ‘PG’ Codename: Kids Codename: Kids Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Hole in the Wall Would Happen Destroy Build King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Ribs Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Hot in Cleveland Hot in Cleveland Roseanne ‘PG’ Roseanne ‘PG’ 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons NCIS Deception ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Light Sleeper ’ ‘PG’ Å NCIS Death of a petty officer. ‘PG’ NCIS Women’s prison riot. ‘14’ Å NCIS Code of Conduct ’ ‘14’ Å NCIS Murdered model. ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 NCIS Murdered model. ‘PG’ Å Love & Hip Hop Behind the Music Jennifer Lopez Jennifer Lopez. ‘PG’ Saturday Night Live Skits featuring Will Ferrell. ’ ‘14’ 40 Greatest One Hit Wonders of the ’90s ’ ‘PG’ Beverly Hills New Jack City 191 48 37 54 Love & Hip Hop PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:20) ›› “Reign of Fire” 2002 ’ (6:10) ››› “Father of the Bride” 1991 Steve Martin. ’ ‘PG’ Å › “Old Dogs” 2009 John Travolta. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Absolute Power” 1997, Suspense Clint Eastwood. ’ ‘R’ Å (11:35) Fallen ‘R’ ›› “Predator 2” 1990, Science Fiction Danny Glover. ‘R’ Å ››› “Naked Lunch” 1991, Science Fiction Peter Weller. ‘R’ Å ›› “Marked for Death” 1990 ‘R’ › “Only the Strong” 1993, Drama Mark Dacascos. ‘PG-13’ Å Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Thrillbillies ‘14’ Ellismania (N) Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ Ellismania Thrillbillies ‘14’ The Daily Habit Cubed ‘14’ 19th Hole (Live) Live From the Masters Live From the Masters 19th Hole Live From the Masters The Waltons The Chicken Thief ‘G’ Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Frasier ‘G’ Å Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ Frasier ’ ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Ricky Gervais Real Time With Bill Maher Author Randy (4:15) ››› “Avatar” 2009, Science Fiction Sam Worthington. A former Marine falls in REAL Sports With Bryant Gumbel ’ ›› “The Wolfman” 2010 Benicio Del Toro. A nobleman becomes Water for Elephants Making Game of HBO 425 501 425 10 love with a native of a lush alien world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Thrones (N) ‘14’ Show ‘MA’ Cohen. ’ ‘MA’ Å ‘PG’ Å the embodiment of a terrible curse. ’ ‘R’ (4:45) ››› “The Usual Suspects” 1995, Suspense Stephen Baldwin. ‘R’ Undeclared ‘PG’ Ben Stiller Whitest Kids ›› “Flannel Pajamas” 2006, Romance Justin Kirk, Julianne Nicholson, Rebecca Schull. ‘R’ (11:15) “The Usual Suspects” 1995 IFC 105 105 (4:15) ›› “Red Heat” 1988, Action Arnold ›› “The Book of Eli” 2010, Action Denzel Washington, Gary Oldman. A lone warrior ››› “Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story” 1993, Biography Jason Scott Lee. Based on the ››› “Splice” 2009, Science Fiction Adrien Brody, Sarah Polley. Scientists use human MAX 400 508 7 Schwarzenegger. ’ ‘R’ Å carries hope across a post-apocalyptic wasteland. ’ ‘R’ Å life and career of the martial arts star. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å DNA to create a new hybrid. ’ ‘R’ Å Gladiators: Back From the Dead Return of the Ghost Ship (N) Ben Franklin’s Pirate Fleet (N) ‘G’ Gladiators: Back From the Dead Return of the Ghost Ship Ben Franklin’s Pirate Fleet ‘G’ Egypt’s Lost Rival ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Power Rangers OddParents OddParents Avatar-Last Air Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Power Rangers OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Rugrats ‘Y’ Å Rugrats ‘Y’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Shooting USA Sighting Cowboys Amer. Guardian Amer. Rifleman Impossible Shots Best Defense Shooting Gallery Shooting USA Sighting Amer. Rifleman Amer. Guardian Impossible Shots Cowboys OUTD 37 307 43 The Borgias The Poisoned Chalice; The Assassin Rodrigo Bor- The King’s Speech (4:30) “The Other Side of the Tracks” (6:15) “Triage” 2009, Drama Colin Farrell, Christopher Lee, Paz Vega. iTV. A photog- United States of Nurse Jackie ’ Inside NASCAR Penn & Teller: SHO 500 500 gia becomes pope. ’ ‘MA’ Å 2008 Brendan Fehr. ‘PG-13’ rapher’s girlfriend investigates his partner. ’ ‘R’ Å ‘MA’ Å (iTV) (N) ‘PG’ Tara ‘MA’ Å Bulls...! ’ ‘MA’ The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ Car Warriors ’69 VW Bugs Car Science (N) Car Science ‘14’ The 10 ‘PG’ The 10 ‘PG’ Car Warriors ’69 VW Bugs Car Science Car Science ‘14’ NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:50) ›› “Armored” 2009 Matt Dillon. ‘PG-13’ Å › “Grown Ups” 2010, Comedy Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (8:23) ›› “Austin Powers in Goldmember” 2002 Å Camelot ’ ‘MA’ Å (11:45) Dragonfly STARZ 300 408 300 (4:45) ››› “How About You” 2007 Hayley (6:15) “Double Identity” 2010, Suspense Val Kilmer, Izabella Miko. A doctor plays cat- ››› “The Deal” 2008, Comedy William H. Macy, Meg Ryan, LL Cool J. A movie is on “Extreme Movie” 2008 Michael Cera. Stories about teens and › “Push” 2009 Chris TMC 525 525 Atwell. ’ ‘NR’ Å and-mouse games with an international criminal. ’ ‘R’ Å hold until its star can be rescued. ’ ‘R’ Evans. Å sex involve a geek and a chat room. ’ ‘R’ NHL Hockey St. Louis Blues at Chicago Blackhawks From the United Center in Chicago. (Live) Hockey Central NHL Overtime FullTiltPoker.net FullTiltPoker.net Aussie Millions NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 › “Hope Floats” 1998, Romance Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ‘PG’ Å 20/20 on WE Danger Next Door ‘14’ › “Hope Floats” 1998, Romance Sandra Bullock. ‘PG-13’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY “IT’S IN THE BAG” LECTURE SERIES: Jay Casbon presents the lecture “Failure is Not an Option: College Bound Teenagers and Stress,” which explores research behind the stresses faced by highperforming teens; free; noon-1 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3100 or www.osucascades .edu/lunchtime-lectures. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR”: Starring Natalie Dessay, Joseph Calleja and Ludovic Tézier in an encore presentation of Donizetti’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. CHRISTABEL AND THE JONS: The Knoxville, Tenn.-based swing band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. LINNEA GOOD: The Canadian singer-songwriter performs Christian music; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; First United Methodist Church, 680 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-1672. THE DANGEROUS SUMMER: The rock-pop band performs, with Sparks the Rescue, The Graduate, The Scenic and Capture the Flag; $10; 7 p.m.; Pilot Butte Event Center, 1034 N.E. 11th St., Bend; 541-6177877 or redlightartistagency@gmail .com. LINDA PURL WITH LEE LESSACK: The vocalists perform stories and songs from timeless classics; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. ICE CUBE: The legendary hip-hop artist performs, with Mosley Wotta; $27.50 plus fees in advance, $30 at the door; 8:30 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541788-2989 or www.random presents.com.

THURSDAY BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FILMMAKER TALK: Loren Irving discusses the film “Finding Fremont in Oregon: 1843”; $3, free for museum members; 6 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. CARNEGIE PROGRAM: The Summit Wind Ensemble performs their Carnegie Hall program in advance of their trip to New York; free; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-3223294 or dan.judd@bend.k12.or.us. EVERYDAY PROPHETS: The Portland-based reggae-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. JASON & THE PUNKNECKS: The Nashville, Tenn.-based country punk band performs; donations accepted; 9 p.m.; D&D Bar &Grill, 927 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-4592 or www.reverbnation.com/ jasonandthepunknecks. THE BASEBALL PROJECT: A baseball-themed rock band including R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck, with opening acts The Minus 5 and Steve Wynn; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing .com.

FRIDAY GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088.

AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jill Charlotte Stanford talks about her book “Wild Women and Tricky Ladies”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0866. “INCEPTION”: A screening of the 2010 PG-13-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld .org.

SATURDAY FUNDRAISING BREAKFAST: A meal of pancakes, eggs, biscuits and gravy, ham and more; with a raffle; proceeds benefit Bear Creek Elementary School; $5 or $2.50 children in advance, $10 or $5 children at the door; 8-11:30 a.m.; Bend’s Community Center, 1036 N.E. Fifth St.; 541-647-4907. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LE COMTE ORY”: Starring Juan Diego Florez, Joyce DiDonato and Diana Damrau in a presentation of Rossini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541382-6347. “VOLCANO COUNTRY” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features volcanoes, how they impact the region, how they function and more; exhibit runs through June 19; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesert museum.org. ARBOR DAY CELEBRATION: With family-friendly activities, nature walks and live-animal talks; $3, $2 ages 2-12, free nature center members; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-5934394. GEMSTONE BEAD SHOW: Featuring a variety of semiprecious beads and pearls at wholesale prices; free admission; 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, 3105 O.B. Riley Road, Bend; 503-309-4088. REVOLUTION OF HOPE: Family event features live music, entertainment, games and more; free; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Centennial Park, Seventh Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-771-6548, office@desertsong. org or http://desertsong.org. ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER FESTIVAL: With karate demonstrations, performances by the OSU Asian and Pacific Cultural Center, food, crafts and more; free; 1-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Campus Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7592. NOVEL IDEA KICKOFF: An overview of events in the 2011 “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; with a presentation on Jackson Pollock, a group splatter project and Middle-Eastern food; free; 1 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. EXPRESS YOURSELF: Lynn Santelmann talks about what it means to know a language, and the joys and pitfalls of learning a new one; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121037 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. VFW DINNER: A dinner of barbecue spare ribs; proceeds benefit local veterans; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-3890775. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jill Charlotte Stanford talks about her book “Wild Women and Tricky Ladies”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. MY FAVORITE SACRED SONGS: An evening of sacred works, featuring vocalist Cullie Treichler; proceeds benefit Common Table; $10; 6:30

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-923-2025 or cullie@bendbroadband.com. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Silas Maynard and music by the High Country Dance Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. EACH STEP IN BETWEEN: Velocity Dance Theatre, Jazz Dance Collective and Terpsichorean Dance Co. present an evening of dance; proceeds benefit Bend Dance Project; $12, $10 students; 7 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-728-1063 or www.dancevelocity .com. JONATHAN BYRD AND CHRIS KOKESH: The folk musicians perform; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541-5482209. HEAD FOR THE HILLS: The Fort Collins, Colo.-based bluegrass band performs; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silver moonbrewing.com. KEVIN KINSELLA: The New York-based acoustic dub musician performs, with Franchot Tone; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.bend ticket.com.

kroth1@cocc.edu. SIERRA CLUB HIKE PREVIEW: A preview of scenic hikes offered by the club, with slides; donations accepted; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. social; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. ROLLER RUMBLE RACE SERIES: Competitors race 400 meters on bikes attached to fork-mounted rollers; $5 to race, $3 spectators; 7:30 p.m., 6:30 p.m. sign-up; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-610-7460 or www.silver moonbrewing.com.

WEDNESDAY April 13 DINNER & A MOVIE: Featuring a nutrient-dense meal, followed by a film selected by attendees; registration requested; $17, $8 children; 5:30 p.m.; Common Table, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-639-5546 or www.central oregonlocavore.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Jane Kirkpatrick reads from her book “The Daughter’s Walk”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Paulina Springs Books, 422 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-526-1491. MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “The Real Dirt on Farmer John,” with a soup potluck; free; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. YONDER MOUNTAIN STRING BAND: The newgrass band performs; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-383-0800 or www.randompresents.com.

LIFE SKILLS SCURRY: 5K and onemile run/walks benefit the life skills department at Bend High School; registration required; $10; 8:45 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. race; High Desert Middle School, 61111 S.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-678-3405 or jmail@ bendbroadband.com. CHARITY BINGO: Proceeds benefit Crook County High School senior scholarships; $5; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. EXPRESS YOURSELF: Lynn Santelmann talks about what it means to know a language, and the joys and pitfalls of learning a new one; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 2 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1070 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. SECOND SUNDAY: Jawad Khan talks about the poetic nature of the Quran and its influence on literature; followed by an open mic; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschutes library.org/calendar.

MONDAY BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 1 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. BOOK DISCUSSION: Discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; part of “A Novel Idea ... Read Together”; free; 6:30 p.m.; Sunriver Books & Music, Sunriver Village Building 25C; 541593-2525 or www.deschuteslibrary .org/calendar. OK SWEETHEART: The throwback pop-rock band performs; free; 8 p.m.; Bo Restobar, 550 N.W. Franklin Ave, No. 118, Bend; 541-617-8880.

TUESDAY “SISSY”: A screening of the film about a girl who faces abuse from a family friend; followed by a discussion of the film; free; 6 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Hitchcock Auditorium, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7412 or

THURSDAY RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Kapitoil” by Teddy Wayne; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1050 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FAMOUS/INFAMOUS TRIALS — LIZZIE BORDEN: Carolyn Hill talks about the facts of the Lizzie Borden murders, the investigation and its outcome; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663, wwick@uoregon.edu or http://osher.uoregon.edu. STEP INTO SPRING FASHION SHOW: A fashion show, with live and silent auctions and food; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit the Bend Area Habitat for Humanity’s women’s build; $30 in advance, $35 at the door; 5:30 p.m. auction, 6:30 p.m. show; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-948-0447, pmageau@remax.net or www. centraloregonwcr.org. MANY BORDERS TO CROSS: Elaine Replogle provides historical perspective for immigration admissions and rights; free; 6:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. THE B FOUNDATION: The Los Angeles-based reggae-rock band performs, with Katastro; $10 plus fees in advance, $12 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY April 15 RV, BOAT SHOW AND ATV SALE: See new floor plans and technology advances for 2011; free; 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541-322-2184.

M T For Wednesday, April 6

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) 2:25, 5, 7:35 THE COMPANY MEN (R) 2:20, 4:55, 7:30 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2:10, 4:45, 7:20 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 2, 4:35, 7:10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 2:35, 5:10, 7:45 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 2:15, 4:50, 7:25

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG13) 1:50, 5:10, 8:10, 10:35

BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG13) 12:40, 3:35, 6:35, 9:55 BEASTLY (PG-13) 6:25, 9:25 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (PG) 12:10, 1:30, 3:20, 4:30, 6:50, 9:30 GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 1:55, 4:10 HOP (PG) Noon, 1, 3:15, 4:20, 6:15, 7:10, 9:15, 9:45 INSIDIOUS (PG-13) 2, 5:05, 8:05, 10:30 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) 12:30, 3:40 LIMITLESS (PG-13) 1:35, 4:50, 7:50, 10:20 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 1:15, 4, 7:30, 10:15 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR ENCORE (no MPAA rating) 6:30 PAUL (R) 12:50, 3:25, 6:40, 10 SOURCE CODE (PG-13) 1:40, 4:40, 7, 9:40 RANGO (PG) 1:25, 4:55, 7:55, 10:25

RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13) 12:20, 5:15, 8:15, 10:35 SUCKER PUNCH (PG-13) 1:10, 3:50, 6:20, 7:20, 9:20, 10:10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) BLACK SWAN (R) 9:15 TANGLED (PG) 3 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (PG) 4:45, 7

‘Masters’ dodge the ax in a leaner format By Mike Hale

April 14

SUNDAY

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

HOP (PG) 3:45, 6:15 RANGO (PG) 4:15, 6:45 SUCKER PUNCH (PG-13) 4, 6:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13) 6:30 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (PG) 6:15 HOP (PG) 6:15 THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R) 6:30

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: RODRICK RULES (UPSTAIRS — PG) 5 HOP (PG) 4, 7 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

New York Times News Service

NEW YORK — In the restaurant world, change usually means expansion: more dishes, more tables, more dining rooms, more spinoffs. The restaurantthemed contest series “Top Chef Masters” has gone in the opposite direction, downsizing for its third season, which begins Wednesday night on Bravo. Gone are the 24- and 22-chef fields of the first two seasons, along with the small-group preliminary rounds they necessitated. Season 3 begins with 12 chefs, and one will be told to pack his or her knives and head home each week. Also slimmer is the judges’ panel, which now includes two regular members, James Oseland and the newcomer Ruth Reichl, a past restaurant critic for The New York Times and the final editor-in-chief of Gourmet magazine. And there’s been a reduction, if only a slight one, in star power: While the 12 chefs include highpowered restaurateurs like Floyd Cardoz (the recently closed Tabla in New York) and Traci Des Jardins (Jardiniere in San Francisco), none have public profiles to match those of the previous winners, Rick Bayless and Marcus Samuelsson. About the only place the show has grown is in the host’s chair, where the reality-show veteran Curtis Stone has replaced the

‘Top Chef Masters’ When: 11 tonight Where: Bravo

rail-thin Kelly Choi. While not as decorative as Choi or the “Top Chef” host Padma Lakshmi, Stone maintains a tradition of exoticism (he’s Australian) and has the advantage of being a chef himself. The changes are part of an overhaul that makes “Masters” more like the franchise’s flagship, “Top Chef.” In the most significant switch, the one-tofive-star cumulative scoring system has been dropped. The celebrity chefs of “Masters” will now be summarily eliminated by the judges the way their lesserknown colleagues have been all along on “Top Chef.” With its prizes directed to charity and its chefs highly mindful of their images, “Masters” has had a more collegial, less confrontational vibe than the original show. It seems a safe bet that this was the problem the makeover was intended to fix, and in the season premiere there’s no lack of backbiting and second-guessing. It’s hard to say for sure after watching only one episode, but a more confrontational and high-adrenaline “Top Chef Masters” may bump up ratings at the cost of making the show less distinctive.

New show, good omens for veteran of canceled series By David Hiltbrand The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — Bret Harrison is shoving right off again. Belying his age, the genial actor already has been on so many series that were canceled, he’s like an old salt whose ships keep capsizing beneath him. Harrison leaves port on a new vessel Wednesday night at 9:30 when “Breaking In” launches on Fox. This time the auguries for the young actor are encouraging: He has the mighty “American Idol” for a lead-in and Christian Slater as a co-star. But there are no guarantees in prime time. And in the days leading up to the inaugural episode, the tension ratchets up. “It’s stressful,” Harrison admits during a hectic promotional stop in Philadelphia. “But if I wasn’t scared, I don’t think I’d be having fun.” On “Breaking In,” he plays a computer hijacker and perennial undergraduate, dug in like a tick in his dorm room. “I’m just your average college student with 12 majors, living the dream,” his character crows. Then he is enlisted/shanghaied to work for a shady security firm owned by a very arch Slater. The pilot for this sharp caper comedy was shot a year ago. Rather than roll it out in September, Fox elected to hold it for spring.

‘Breaking In’ When: 9:30 tonight Where: Fox

“You don’t want to convince yourself that a pilot is going to be successful, but I did,” Harrison says, shaking his head. “I thought, ‘There’s no way this isn’t going to get picked up immediately for 22 episodes.’ ” When production started up again after that long hiatus, there were continuity concerns. “You have to make sure that everybody looks the same,” the actor says. This presented a problem for Michael Rosenbaum, who plays Harrison’s turbocharged romantic rival, Dutch. Rosenbaum was called back to Vancouver to reprise his role as the bald villain Lex Luthor for the finale of “Smallville,” a part he always shaved his head for. “He wore a bald cap (on ‘Smallville’) for the first time,” says Harrison, “because he’s really committed to our show.” “The Loop” gave him his first leading role as a young airline executive in way over his head. “More than anything, (‘The Loop’) taught me how to be a leading man,” he says. “You have to relax and tell yourself that even though it’s a lot of work, everything is going to be fine.”


E4 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQ U ELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Wednesday, April 6, 2011: This year, you are more forthright and direct. Others respond well to your actions, thoughts and personality. Remain confident. You are entering a very lucky year and an 11-year life cycle. If you need to, clarify your desires and long-term goals. You are likely to achieve at least one of your goals. If you are single, you attract many people’s attention. Think before leaping. Ask yourself if this is the type of person who can give you what you desire. If you are attached, make it a point to spend more quality time with your loved ones. TAURUS tries hard but can be as hardheaded as you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH You notice just how lucky you are right now. Put your best foot forward, and watch everything — well, nearly everything — tumble as you would like, if not better. Taking a risk today is OK. Going to extremes could backfire. Tonight: Indulge in a favorite pastime. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHH Take a hint from Aries. Recognize just how far you push others. Step back and know that you can undo any of the damages — and that is exactly what you should do. Be kind to someone who serves as a benefactor or a very caring individual in general. Tonight: Just wish upon a star. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Recognize what is

happening around you. Continue to watch and observe while clearing your mind of as many judgments as you can. You could be taken aback by how much comes up for you. Tonight: You might try airing out some of your thoughts with a trusted friend or respected individual. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH You definitely know where you are going and how to handle a key situation. Take charge, as others sense your savvy in this area. A meeting could prove to be instrumental. A friend — most likely male — wants special time or attention. Tonight: Where the gang is. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH You will come out on top if (1) you decide to assume the lead and (2) if you explain how you perceive an event or situation. You see what others don’t. Your high level of charisma speaks for itself. Tonight: Could be a late one. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH Start combining your mind and emotions more often, especially when dealing with partners. As odd as it seems, soon you will need to be a mind reader in order to figure out what another person wants. Let others think they dominate. Tonight: The only answer is “yes.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Your knowledge helps others achieve more of what they want. Realize everyone has limits, but at this point a key associate doesn’t appear to be restricted in any way, shape or form. Enjoy being a follower. Tonight: Take the lead. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)

HHHH Others simply demand to run with the ball. That is the only way they will accept what is happening. Your ability to clear out a problem right now needs to take a backseat. You understand a lot more than what is obvious. Stay mum. Tonight: Don’t push your luck. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Whether dealing with a risk or a loved one, you must be carrying a magic wand, as everything somehow works out beautifully for you and everyone else concerned. Wherever you are, at work or off, makes no difference. Tonight: Love the moment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Remain upbeat. You seem to have an unusual resilience right now, which does make a difference in various situations. You might want to rethink an offer that involves an investment. Tonight: Light up the moment. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH You have such a convincing manner that someone who decided earlier to give you a “no” in response to a request will say “yes.” Make sure this person won’t change his or her mind later, or keep it in mind that this is a possibility. Tonight: Head home — all smiles. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You could be mixing apples and oranges, despite the fact that you are sure you aren’t. Remain optimistic, but do a better job of listening to associates. If everyone is saying the same thing, but not what you think, look again. Tonight: Hanging out is fun. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Apps Continued from E1 You may need to register, as with TheFind. It’s nice to get that out of the way. Turn on the smartphone’s GPS function when shopping, as well. It may drain the battery faster, but is essential to get the best results. Now that I had my Keurig box ready, adequate light and three bars of reception, I was ready to scan. It felt odd, skulking around a store with a smartphone. A few clerks stopped at the head of the aisle in Target to ask if I was finding everything, but none seemed fazed that I was obviously checking out whether I could get a better deal at other stores. Each app provided a plethora of Web links on all the products scanned, except for a three-pack of Hanes men’s T-shirts at Fred Meyer in Bend. To make sure Fred Meyer itself wasn’t the problem, I scanned the Apples to Apples Party Box at $22.99 in the store and received both Web and local results.

Major retailers Sometimes, I later learned, stores have their own bar codes that don’t bring up results for shopping apps. The Hanes package had a sticker on the back for its bar code. Scandit provided Web results, including for major retailers in our area, but nothing local throughout my shopping trips. A Scandit spokesman said the app provides the most results on the local level for big box stores and will be adding more to its database as time goes on. Google Shopper usually scanned items the quickest. Yet it typically returned fewer local results than TheFind or ShopSavvy. For the Keurig coffee machine, for example, it offered only Best Buy and Lowe’s in Bend and Redmond. Google Shopper was also the only app I tried with voice recognition. It worked fine at times, easily finding Apples to Apples at Fred Meyer. But there was the Annie’s salad dressing incident. And the complex-sounding brand Keurig returned “Quail Egg Mini Plus.” Google was contacted about the app but didn’t comment. TheFind brought back more local results. For the Keurig machine, for instance, it listed six

Service Continued from E1 • Hotels track your complaints. If you are a nice guest, that will go on your digital record. You may be rewarded even at other hotels. And if you’re a jerk, you may be rewarded for that too. • If you have a legitimate reason to send food back, be very gracious no matter how you feel. You might be surprised at how well you’ll be treated.

About the smartphones We used three different smartphones with three different service providers. We didn’t find evidence that the phone or provider changed the results. As long as we had sufficient cell service and the GPS function was turned on, the apps worked. • HTC T-Mobile G2 with T-Mobile service • Samsung Mesmerize Galaxy S with U.S. Cellular service • Apple iPhone 3GS with AT&T service

local options, including one at Sears for $10 less than the Target price. Then I tried ShopSavvy. The app consistently returned the most local results. ShopSavvy also didn’t respond to an inquiry for comment. Ten local options popped up when I tried ShopSavvy for the Keurig coffee machine, including one listing it at $20 cheaper at Ace Hardware in Bend than at Target. For that, I would drive across town. So I did. And that’s when I learned more about how to best use shopping apps. The apps’ local results include handy information like the address of the other store, the distance to that destination, a map showing how to get there and the phone number. But very rarely will they tell you if the item is in stock.

Calling ahead pays

call,” he said. At least in Central Oregon, drop the expectation as well that you’re going to find results for every store in town that carries the product. I found the Keurig Mini Plus at Fred Meyer last week, but it never came up on my app results. And I only got returns for nationally known chain names. Another tip for local results is to consider using the information to negotiate a price. ShopSavvy, for instance, has a link with results that will tell you about a store’s pricematching policy. One retailer said he will match the price if a customer shows him local results on a smartphone, although he will not match Web prices.

Big-ticket utility In my limited experience, the strength of shopping apps isn’t in the little stuff. Scanning a bag of Planters trail mix at Best Buy brought back results from Walmart in Bend and Walgreens in Redmond, but frankly I’d rather pay the extra dollar if I’m that hungry. But shopping apps can be very useful in shopping for biggerticket merchandise, particularly appliances and electronics. Geiss, general manager of Bend’s Best Buy, noted he often sees shoppers scanning electronics and then reading the online reviews. It’s an easy way if you’re impressed by merchandise in person to stop right there and do some online research. The apps also remember what you scanned, so you can do more research later. Some even let you load product information you find online beforehand. Lieberman said while shopping apps make some retailers nervous, others are coming up with ways to try to keep consumers. Down the line, he said, when you scan a DVD player, expect to see offers for a free DVD or free cables included in a purchase. Geiss last week scanned a 32-inch Samsung television. Results popped up: $499 Best Buy, $529 Sears. These days, I bet I’m not alone in saying I could use the extra $30.

I learned — by traveling to Ace Hardware — that calling ahead of time is best. The store carries numerous drip coffee machines but no single-serve machines, let alone the model I found on a smartphone. Usher Lieberman, communications director for TheFind, said some stores don’t make their typical inventory available to add to databases for shopping apps, let alone their actual inventory at that moment. Shopping apps like TheFind instead use their data to return results that, for instance, there is an Ace Hardware nearby and Ace typically offers the Keurig Mini Plus for $79.99. Thus, it’s worth calling Ace to see whether it’s available. “And that’s what we’re trying to do, is let you know it might be available down the street and to

Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin. com.

• “Don’t make plans when you’re drunk. Trust me.” • “You’re not going to get good service from somebody who’s afraid of you. It’s the same reason people don’t keep porcupines as pets.” • When trolling for celebrities at restaurants, sit up front, not in the back. In front, you’ll see the “whole parade.” • In selecting a service person, do you want to see a cute face or get help? “I always look for the oldest, least glamorous person. They might not be nice, but they

rule the roost — and they don’t usually get any validation, so you’ll get a lot more mileage.” • Forget Starbucks if you want a place to camp with friends. Plant yourself in the lobby of a nice hotel instead. “The seats are much better than at a Starbucks, the ambience more appealing, and there won’t be people hovering over you to finish your coffee so they can take your chair.” Above all, treat service people as if you’re on their team, and they will deliver.

Dapper, retro looks reveal media influence By Suzanne S. Brown The Denver Post

Popular television shows and movies, celebrity weddings and red-carpet appearances, runway trends and vintage design are all influences on bridal fashion this year, say wedding experts. “Retro looks are ‘Mad Men’inspired,” says Millie Martini Bratten, editor in chief of Brides magazine. Full skirts, nipped waists and tea lengths are enjoying their moment. Another influence is HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire,” set in the 1920s and ’30s. Dusty nude tones and romantic laces in gowns owe their inspiration to the show, says Heather Levine, fashion editor for theknot.com. And for the guys, “we’re seeing a more dapper look, complete with wingtip shoes, cufflinks and bow ties. We’re used to

Gowns Continued from E1 “It speaks to an interest in fashion at every level and customer demand that it be accessible,” says Bratten. The editor, who has seen wedding trends come and go in her more than three decades at Brides, attributes the variety in styles, prices and places to shop to the fact that wedding attire has come to be viewed less as a ceremonial ensemble and more as a fashion commodity than it used to be. A wedding gown is often the most expensive dress a woman will ever buy, but given that they’re made to order from costly and voluminous fabrics and trims, the fourfigure price tags are easier to justify. Fashion designers started trickling into the wedding business in the late 1980s, but Vera Wang entered with a flourish in 1990. She introduced modern fabrics like stretch tulle and fresh silhouettes that took the industry in a more contemporary, albeit still romantic, direction. Designers at all levels have jumped into the game. Wang has created a new line of dresses selling for $600 to $1,400 at selected stores this spring. Retailers are on board too. J. Crew, Ann Taylor, The Limited and White House Black Market sell dresses for brides and bridesmaids on their websites. Brides who are looking for something different and want to save money have options as well. Bridal shops have always sold samples. Boutiques are now sometimes offering to re-sell a customer’s dress, or renting styles. Andrea Silva-Molina, who runs Eco-Bridal Gowns in Denver, says she created the kind of bridal store she was

tuxedos, but guys are dressing to the nines,” she says. When it comes to necklines, “strapless seems to be here to stay,” says Michael Emmitt, a gown specialist at Anna Bé in Denver. “It is just so much more flattering on many brides.” Styles that are fitted through the body and have a fluted or trumpet skirt are popular silhouettes, Emmitt says. Fabrics with texture — multiple layers of a fabric like organza, draping and tiered designs are strong. What is less popular are flat finishes or high-sheen satin materials, Emmitt says. Dresses have a lot of texture for spring, in fabrics like floral organza, and with fan pleating, tiers and layers. Long, yet soft, trains are back. And lace is important, used in bold motifs or as trim.

looking for when searching for her own wedding gown. “I wanted a designer dress, but didn’t want to pay that much for it,” she said. “Then I thought maybe I’ll rent, but there wasn’t any place to do that either.” So about a year ago she opened her store offering rental dresses, “gently used” consignment gowns, samples and new dresses from bridal companies La Sposa and Forever Yours. The economy is “forcing brides to be smart about what they choose,” Molina says. “They don’t want to sacrifice the experience, but they also don’t want to blow their whole budget on one facet of the wedding.” Such a bride might be planning a more lavish reception or honeymoon, so she’ll cut back a little on the dress. “For some women, the priority is the food or the liquor,” says Heather Levine, fashion editor of theknot.com. “The important message is that you can find a dress at any price; there are thousands of options.”

Tying the knot • $26,984: average wedding cost • 140: average number of guests • 13.7: average number of months couples are engaged • 29: the bride’s average age • 31: the groom’s average age • 41 percent of couples marry in summer; 30 percent choose fall • $1,099: average cost of gown • $5,392: average cost of the engagement ring Source: theknot.com and weddingchannel.com.

Paid Advertisement

Bead Dealer Brings Goods to Bend Vickie Hrehocik, owner of Little Indulgences Beads in Portland, will bring 1000s of strands of semi-precious beads, pearls, and cubic zirconia to Bend for a sale this weekend. She is a direct importer of beads from various factories in China and India and brings low prices and great quality directly to you. The public is welcome and there are no requirements to buying at wholesale prices. Many varieties of goods will be available including black onyx, smoky quartz, freshwater pearls, garnets, amethyst, peridot, tiger eye, hematite, howlite, cubic zirconia, and carnelian and more. The strands are priced from about $4 to $40. This is a great sale for jewelry designers and hobbyists alike. The sale dates are Friday, April 8th and Saturday, April 9th from 10 am to 5 pm. The sale location is the Shilo Inn Hotel, 3105 OB Riley Road, Bend. Contact: 503-309-4088.

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Dutch Bros. Coffee advertised in The Bulletin and received 300 coupons in just one day. We’re The Bulletin, your local source for news, entertainment, information and savings. Each day 70,000 readers turn to the pages of our print edition for saving opportunities from local businesses. Plus we deliver grocery and shopping inserts every week with additional ways to stretch your dollars – locally. The Bulletin ... there when you need it most.

Dutch Bros. Coffee was interested in reaching new customers. So they decided to spice things up and run a one-day-only coupon in The Bulletin. The response was HOT! They received 300 coupons and found a line of customers going out their drive-thru. It was one promotion that left a good taste in everyone’s mouth.

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Australian Shepherd mini, gorgeous black tri neutered male, 14 inches, 5 yrs old, looking for perfect home. $150. 360-609-3639 (local)

Beautiful Female cat needs a forever home. Kira is a 1.5-yr-old domestic shorthair, spayed, comes with food, cat box, litter, dishes and toys. She is an indoor cat and loves attention. Please call Nicole @ 541-728-4202. Border Collie/New Zealand Huntaway puppies, 8 wks, working parents, wonderful dogs, $300. 541-546-6171

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FREE adult companion cats to Liquidating Appliances, new & seniors. Friendly, fixed, ID reconditioned, guaranteed. chip, shots, more. Will alLance & Sandy’s Maytag, ways take back for any rea541-385-5418 son. Open Sat/Sun 1-5, & other days by appt., call Off-white leather couch, 82” excellent condition, $250. 541-647-2181 to schedule. Call 541-548-7137 65480 78th St, Bend, 541-389-8420. Photos, map, Second Hand more at www.craftcats.org. Mattresses, sets &

Free Shih Tsus (2), older, to good home, must stay together, 1 female, 1 male-has been neutered, 541-604-6111 German Shepherd pup, female, parents on site, $225. 541-390-8875 German Shorthair Male Pup AKC-Hunter/Pet. Pick of Litter! $450. 541-330-0277 Golden Retriever Pups exc. quality, parents OFA, good hips, $650. 541-318-3396. Green Cheek Conure, almost 1 yr. old, w/ cage, $150, 541-382-3101.

Kittens & cats thru local rescue group. 65480 78th St, Bend, Sat/Sun 1-5, other days by appt, 541-647-2181. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Fees reduced for April only! 541-389-8420; Photos, map, more info: www.craftcats.org

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KITTEN SEASON IS UPON US!! Take advantage of our “Mom & kitten special.” We will alter mama kitty and 4 kittens for $45. Each additional Kitten $5. Call us today to make an appt. Bend Spay & Neuter Project 541-617-1010.

Private collector buying postage stamp albums & collections, world-wide and U.S. 573-286-4343 (local, cell #)

Lab Puppies, 5 yellow, 1 black, 1 chocolate, $150$200, Call 541-647-3137.

Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

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Boxers, AKC Reg. 5 brindle, 4 fawn, 3 white, Ready after 3/29. Taking deposits, $500-$650. 541-325-3376

Pomeranian, 1.5 yr female, very sweet, current shots, great with all ages and all animals! approved home only. $500 firm. Londa @ 541-420-4498

Dachshund, AKC 2-yr old male, $375. DNA, pedigree, red & white piebald. 541-420-6044

DACHSHUND MINI Longhaired puppies AKC. $500+ up. 30% off if you spay or neuter. 541-598-7417

Dachshund Puppies, miniature, 3 females, 1 male, asking $200. 541-536-5037 DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com English Mastiff puppies. Males & females, Fawns & 1 Brindle. Shots, health guarantee, ready to go. $1000ea; $1500 for the Brindle. 541-279-1437

A v e . ,

Furniture & Appliances

Labrador Pups, AKC, Choco- TREADMILL - older model Prelates & Yellows, $500; Blacks, cor in excellent cond., $350 $450. Dew claws, 1st shots & obo. 541-416-1007 wormed. Call 541-536-5385 www.welcomelabs.com 245

Chihuahua Pup, rare, blue long haired male, $200 cash, 541-678-7599

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Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

Chihuahua / Pomeranian/ Papillon mix pup, 11 wk female, $190, 541-639-7279.

S . W .

Pets and Supplies

Wanted: $Cash paid for vintage Free Foster Cats, vaccinated & altered, to good homes, Call costume Jewelry. Top dollar Sherry, 541-548-5516. paid for Gold & Silver. I buy by the Estate, Honest Artist. Free Guinea Pig, with cage, to Elizabeth, 541-633-7006 good home, please call 541-848-7192.

Pets and Supplies

1 7 7 7

POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Call 541-475-3889

Golf Equipment 2003 Club Car, full curtains, 2 yr-old batteries, very good cond. $3800. 541-382-3275

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Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Professional Training for Obedi- 1957 Marlin lever action 336 SC, 35 REM, mint cond. ence, Upland & Waterfowl for $450. 541-480-5950 all breeds. Labrador & Pudelpointer pups & started dogs Browning A - Bolt 300 WSM as well, 541-680-0009. with Nikon Buckmaster Scope $550.00. 541-390-1608 Protect your family from deadly hantavirus spread by rodents! Carry concealed in 33 states. FREE rescued barn/shop Sat. April 9th 8 a.m, Red cats, fixed, shots. Natural romond Comfort Suites. Qualify dent control in exchange for For Your Concealed Hand safe shelter, food, water. Will gun Permit. Oregon & Utah deliver locally. 541-389-8420 permit classes, $50 for Or egon, $60 for Utah, $100 for Purebred Chihuahua male both. www.PistolCraft.com. pup, 5 months. $100 Call Lanny at 541-281-GUNS sagetreeacres82@yahoo.com (4867) to Pre-Register. 541-977-4454 Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/ Shih-Tzu Puppies for sale. 3 boys/2 girls/9 wks. $450 ea. Contact Mike 541-420-1409 Toy Fox Terrier; male; 2-1/2 years old; not neutered; housebroken; good manners; gets along well with other dogs and cats; $100.00 obo; 541-350-3701

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Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers may place an ad with our "QUICK CASH SPECIAL" 1 week 3 lines $12 or 2 weeks $18! Ad must include price of single item of $500 or less, or multiple items whose total does not exceed $500. Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin Classiieds

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Thur. April 14, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. BUYING SILVER COINS, 1964 and earlier, paying 15x face. 541-416-1403.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Building Materials

MUZZLE LOADER KIT, 50 cal. Hawken rifle kit, #5113 manufactured by Thompson Arms, kit still in orig. box, collectors item, $350 obo. 541- 416-1007 OR + UTAH CCW: Required class Oregon and Utah Concealed License. Saturday April 16 9:30 a.m. at Madras Range. $100 includes Photo required by Utah, Call Paul Sumner (541)475-7277 for preregistration and info Remington 700 VTR Varmit 223, green synthetic,Leupold VX-1, 4-12 matte, as new, dies, $690, 541-389-0984

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include,

Alpaca Manure - FREE - Great for your garden. You load & haul. 541-977-8013

541-389-9663

541-647-8261 La Pine Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 52684 Hwy 97 541-536-3234 Open to the public .

Decorative Cube block stones, black, approx. 14”x14”x6”, “Good Looking Stuff” paid $500, moving Sale, will sell for $300, you haul, 541-382-8814. For newspaper delivery , call the Circulation Dept. at 541-385-5800 To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email classified@bendbulletin.com

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Winchester 1873 & 1894; M1 Grand; USM1 Carbine; Luger; Walter P38; Kimbers; many more, cash only 541-350-4224

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Health and Beauty Items GOT THYROID PROBLEMS? Discover why 90% of women on thyroid replacement hormones are guaranteed to continue suffering with thyroid symptoms.....and what you can do to finally end suffering once and for all!

Call For Free DVD: Thyroid Secrets: What to do when the medication doesn’t work.

866-700-1414

The Hardwood Outlet Wood Floor Super Store

Stereo set in solid Oak cabinet, CD, amplifier, dual cassette, $250. 541-419-0613

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Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Schools and Training Oregon Medical Training PCS

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

Custom No-till Seeding Grass, Alfalfa & Grain Crops All of Central Oregon.

Call 541-419-2713 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

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Phlebotomy classes begin May 2nd. Registration now open: www.oregonmedicaltraining.com 541-343-3100 TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

Responsible for the company’s networks, servers, network security, telephone and email systems. Responsibilities will include: Windows servers, network servers, firewall, PC setup, IT security and support for over 45 internal users and budgeting and forecasting of IT needs. Monitor and maintain the company’s web site, online sales, and social networks. Provide support at six locations in north Central Oregon. Knowledge of IBM iSeries a plus. Skills should include hands-on knowledge of installation, repair and modification of IT hardware including wireless, and software. Working knowledge of Microsoft Server and related products. Working knowledge of components and the ability to configure new systems. Competitive wage, plus excellent benefit package, DOE. Call 541-989-8221 for application, or mail resume to MCGG Box 367, Lexington, OR 97839.

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Free Hay, 20 Acres in Tumalo, 2 wheel lines, we pay for water & power, you irrigate & cut, call Jim at 541-390-6776. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Advertising Account Executive

The Bulletin is looking for a professional sales and marketing person to help our local customers grow their businesses with an expanding list of broad-reach and targeted products. This full time position requires a demonstrable background in consultative sales, territory management and aggressive prospecting. 2-4 years of outside advertising sales experience is preferable however we will train the right candidate. The position offers a competitive compensation package including benefits, and rewards an aggressive, customer focused salesperson with unlimited earning potential. Please send your resume, cover letter and salary history to: Sean L. Tate Advertising Manager state@bendbulletin.com You may also drop off your resume in person or mail it to: The Bulletin, Attn: Sean Tate, 1777 SW Chandler, Bend, OR 97701. No phone inquiries please. EOE / Drug Free Workplace

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF • Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft. 541-322-0496 266

TV, Stereo and Video

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308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Computer - IT and Network Administrator

Operate Your Own Business

(24 hr recorded message)

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300 400 325

269

Employment Opportunities

Employment

Hay, Grain and Feed

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

9 7 7 0 2 476

Farm Market

All Year Dependable Firewood: Split/dry lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484 SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

Wholesale Peat Moss Sales

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

O r e g o n

Twin Star Double Basket Rake, elec. over hydraulic controls, field ready, $12,500; 1991 Case 580K backhoe, 4x4, cab, heat, 2nd owner, extend- a-hoe, nice, $24,500, 541-419-2713

Instant Landscaping Co. BULK GARDEN MATERIALS

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

B e n d

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

BarkTurfSoil.com

Lyman .50 cal Plains Pistol w/ black powder supplies. Pics: http://jalbum.net/a/941951 $300/offer 541-410-8029

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neighborhood! Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 541-385-5809.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Crypt-Lawn, dbl depth for 2 full caskets at Deschutes Memorial Gardens, Bend, Meadow FIND IT! Pond Garden. Lot 2C, space BUY IT! 2, Deed #3664. $1300. SELL IT! 541-848-7600; 541-848-7599

A-1 Washers & Dryers

Dining Room set, solid fruitwood, 6 ladderback chairs, $275. 541-419-0613

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove may be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend 270

Lost and Found Found Diamond Ring, Ashley Parkling Lot, Wagner Mall, Redmond, around 3/21, call to ID, 541-420-7166. FOUND iPOD. Send email with description to juiceplus@bendbroadband.com Found: Video camera/case, am of 3/30 Mt. Washington near NW Crossing, 541-317-9000 Lost 2 Gold bangle bracelets, 1 Hawaiian Heirloom, 1 rope, 3/21, NE Bend? Great sentimental value. 541-420-2037 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal, don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 541-382-3537 Redmond, 541-923-0882 Prineville, 541-447-7178; OR Craft Cats, 541-389-8420.

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com


F2 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

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Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Houses for Rent General

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Delivery Driver CDL required, willing to work in yard and sales. Do light mechanical, operate boom truck and Bobcat. Pick up application from 8am-2pm at 63265 Jamison Rd., Bend.

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449

DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before 11 a.m. and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

541-322-7253

541-385-5809 Sales

Independent Contractor Sales

SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED WINNING TEAM OF SALES/ PROMOTION PROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

WE

OFFER:

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours *

FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

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Sales Northwest Bend Sales Southeast Bend Neighborhood Garage Sale: A lot of different home decor, some antiques, nice clothes, outside things & guy stuff. Come buy! Sat. 8-4, Terry Dr. off Stemkamp.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Multi Family Garage Sale Furniture, household, tools, tires, & more! Thur & Fri, 8am-6pm 964 SE Centennial Sale - Fri. 8AM to 5PM and Sat. 8AM to Noon. 1118 SE Palmwood Ct. Furniture, Antiques, Books, Misc. Household Items 208-284-6090

Finance & Business

Sales Other Areas Flea Market -The Best Bargains in Madras! 3rd & B Street Open every Fri-Sat-Sun, 9-5. Only $10 to rent a table - 2nd table 1/2-off! 541-604-4106

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

630

Beautiful updated, cozy, 1 bdrm, 2 bath Condo, A/C, 2 blocks from downtown, along banks of Deschutes, amenities incl., 1 parking spot, indoor pool, hot tub & sauna, serious renters only, credit & refs., check, minimum 1 yr. lease, $675/mo., utils incl., call Kerrie, 541-480-0325.

Visit us at www.sonberg.biz

Rooms for Rent Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) 631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

www.oregonfreshstart.com

638

Apt./Multiplex SE Bend

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend

632

Apt./Multiplex General The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

640 2 BDRM., 1 BATH flat near Old Mill, laundry, parking, $600/month. Victoria L. Manahan Real Estate, 541-280-7240.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

ONE MONTH FREE with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend !! Spring On In !! $150 off Upstairs Apts. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee! 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

1, 2 and 3 bdrm apts. available starting at $575. 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

visit our website at

Studio above garage, dishwasher, W/D, nice. $610 incl. gas fireplace, heater, hot water, W/S/G; renter pays elec, 1 small pet OK. 541-382-4868

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Alpine Meadows Townhomes

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

SE Duplex, 3 bdrm., 1 bath, garage, small fenced yard, W/D hookup, kitchen appl., $725/ mo., 541-990-0426 or 541-258-5973.

528 WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

Fully furnished loft apt.

2 Bdrm townhouse, 2.5 bath, office, fenced yard w/deck, garage. 1244 “B” NE Dawson. $750 dep. $775/mo., W/S/G paid, pets possible. 541-617-8643,541-598-4932

Loans and Mortgages

Sales Redmond Area

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1 Month Rent Free 1550 NW Milwaukee W/D hookup. $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Gas heat. W/S/G Pd. No Pets. Call us at 541-382-3678 or

500

290 GARAGE SALE - Loveseat, keyboard with stand, patio tent, furniture, all like-new condition, books, cat perch & supplies, much more. Sat. only, 4/9, 8 - 3pm, 2607 NE 5th.

Rentals

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. Crooked River Ranch - 1350 sq ft custom built ranch, 2 bdrm 2 bath, double garage. Patio, Mtn views, no smoking. $750. 541-548-4225

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Houses for Rent NE Bend Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Prestigious, fully furnished, 6 bdrm., 3 bath, NW Skyliner, 6 mo. minimum, incl. some utils., $2600/mo, please call 541-951-3058.

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend Non-smoking 3 bdrm 2 bath, 1800 sq ft home with gas heat & large yard. $925 + deposits. 541-382-8900 Spotless Light & Bright! 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath, Gas, Air, All Appliances, New Paint, 2 Car Garage, RV Parking! $995/mo. Ph: 541-480-7653

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

1/2 acre Lot near McCall Idaho in golf course community. Close to Brundage Ski Area. paid $115K. Want to trade for a lot in Bend OR. 541-480-8656 or email lgoodmarkland@yahoo.com

3 Bdrm, 2 bath, in Terrebonne, on 1/2 acre, fenced, 2 car garage, shop, $700/mo., 1st last & $500 dep., call 541-322-6261.

Clean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. No smoking; pets negotiable. $900/mo. + deposits. Call 541-504-8545; 541-350-1660 Redmond Cottage, $475. Mostly self-contained, gas heat, Murphy bed, incl all utils, alley entrance, 2105 NW 12th St. 541-923-6946

662

Houses for Rent Sisters 3 bdrm, 2 bath manufactured home, all appliances. Free cable. No garage; no dogs/ smoking. $695 month, $650 deposit. 541-815-1523.

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

656

Call for Specials!

Houses for Rent SW Bend 2 Bdrm 2 bath, in Westridge Subdivision. Newly remodeled, on ½ acre, near Ath. Club of Bend. No smoking. $1195. Call 541-388-8198

Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $15,500 OBO. 541-944-9753

A nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath, 1008 sq.ft., vaulted ceiling, fenced yard, coverd deck, RV parking, dbl garage w/ opener. $795. 480-3393 or 610-7803. Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning Call Now! 541-382-9498 CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

745

Homes for Sale

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $9800 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

746

Northwest Bend Homes BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1095. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

$300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

730

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010

New Listings

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

Fox Hollow Apts.

541-382-3402

719

652

Houses for Rent NW Bend

700 800

Real Estate Trades

660

!! Snowball of a Deal !!

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

658

Boats & RV’s

Houses for Rent Redmond

The Bulletin is now offering a Houses for Rent LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a La Pine home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath, gas appls & new rates and get your ad fireplace. Crescent Creek started ASAP! 541-385-5809 subdivision, w/Fitness Ctr. No smoking; pets neg. $675/ mo.$775/dep. 541-815-5494 650

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $595$625/mo. 541-385-6928.

(541) 383-3152

2 Bedroom, 1 bath manufactured home in quiet park, W/S/G paid. $575/month, $250 deposit. Please call 541-382-8244.

Real Estate For Sale

Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

771

Lots Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $89,999, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

773

Acreages

Harley Ultra Classic 2001, Best of everything. Garage kept. Madras. $9000 call 541-475-7459.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

865

ATVs

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

20 Acres, Christmas Valley, off Oil Dry (paved road), power at road, $15,000 or trade for ??? 541-728-1036. ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. R..E Deadlines are: Weekdays 11:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday and Monday. 541-385-5809 Thank you! The Bulletin Classified *** Powell Butte: 6 acres, 360° views in farm fields, septic approved, power, OWC, 10223 Houston Lake Rd., $114,900, 541-350-4684.

Rebates up to $1000 Plus 3.99% APR Financing on select models ATV's can be hazardous to operate. All riders under 16 should ride only with adult supervision. Always wear a helmet and be sure to take a safety training course. Financing on approval of credit. See dealer for details.

Midstate Power Products 541-548-6744

Redmond


THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 F3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 865

875

881

882

ATVs

Watercraft

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Autos & Transportation

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

870

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $2450 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

A-Liner pop-up 15-ft 2010, 2-burner stove, frig, freshwater tank, furnace, fantastic fan, $9950. 541-923-3021

The Bulletin Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, excellent condition, $16,900, 541-390-2504

20' Calabria 1998 tournament ski boat / 237 hours. 350ci/ 300hp F.I. GM engine. Nice, too many extras to list. $13,500. Call 541-736-3067 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077 One owner, low miles, generator, 2 roof airs, clean in and out, rear walk-round queen bed, 2 TV’s, leveling hydraulic jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, Motivated seller. Just reduced and priced to sell at $10,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Bounder 34’ 1994.

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981, 2tone brown,perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. eng. perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape, great for hunting, fishing, etc., see to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Ln off Day Rd in La Pine. $8000. OBO 541-876-5106.

Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days. Hitchhiker II 1998, 32’, 2 slides, great cond., $10,500; also avail. 2008 F-250 Super Duty, 4WD Diesel, supercab, 23K mi., like new, $44,000 for both, A Must see, 541-923-5754.

Ford F-150 2006 LOOKS BRAND NEW! Supercab Lariat 5.4L V8 eng.,approx. 20K mi! 4 spd auto, rear wheel drive. Black w/lots of extras: Trailer tow pkg, Custom bedliner, Pickup bed extender, Tan leather trimmed captain chairs, only $18,000. 541-318-7395

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Truck with Snow Plow!

Wagon

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

925

Utility Trailers

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Concrete Construction

Electrical Services

Home Improvement

JJ&B Construction - Quality Concrete work, over 30 yrs experience. Sidewalks, RV Pads, Driveways.... Call Josh 541-279-3330 • CCB190612

BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Barns M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

DMH & Co.

Clean Up/Yard Debris, Hauling. Wild Fire Fuel Reduction. Licensed & Insured 541-419-6593, 541-419-6552

Building/Contracting

Domestic Services

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website

I Do Professional Housecleaning: 25 yrs. exp., licenced, exc refs., Senior discounts! 541-420-0366

www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Drywall ALL PHASES of Drywall. Small patches to remodels and garages. No Job Too Small. 25 yrs. exp. CCB#117379 Dave 541-330-0894 Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

Handyman ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

I DO THAT! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Professional & Honest Work. Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 541-317-9768

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

541-385-5809

CCB#180420

“Pihl Bilt” Since 1981 S.E. Pihl Construction Remodeling specialist, addons, kitchen & bath, faux wall finishes, tile & stone, Energy Trust of Oregon Trade Ally, Window & door upgrades, no job to small. Call for Spring Specials, Call Scott, 541-815-1990, CCB#110370

Pickups CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649 Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Cargo

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 4

Uro M&S 185/70R13, 100%, on four hole rims, $170. 541-480-5950

We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

C-10

Pickup

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-CD, new tires, 107K miles, $11,500 firm. 541-420-8107

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Ford Windstar GL1998.

Ford F250 4x4 1993. 5.8L eng, auto, AC, CC, shell, 2nd gas tank, trlr hitch w/conn. 127K, $2800. 541-408-8330

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

35,000 miles, 3 door, 3 seats, white, $4900 for an almost new van! 541-318-9999.

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $3800. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $1950. 541-419-5480.

Mazda X-Cab

B2300 SE 2003, Great

cond. exc. mpg of 28-30 hwy - has all options 88K $7000 OBO 541-350-5715

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005 • 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

MERCEDES C300 2008

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Honda Pilot EX-L 2008, 17500 miles, dark Cherry, locally owned/maintained, 4WD, exc. cond., 4WD, new tires, Leather, Moonroof, Wholeshocks, interior seat cover, sale $25225, KBB Private everything works, 121K orig. party $26,900, Sell for mi.,original operators manual $25,850. 541-389-2952 and line setting ticket incl. $5000 OBO, 503-559-4401 Infiniti EX35 2010 Immaculate, only 4000 miles. 297-hp, V6 engine. Journey edition, premium pkg, AWD. Nav system, Blue tooth, Bose Mercury Monterrey 1965, stereo w/USB port. Silver Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, exterior, black leather intein storage last 15 yrs., 390 rior. $38,500. 541-306-6564. High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $2850, 541-410-3425.

Monte Carlo 1970, all original, many extras. MUST SELL due to death. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

975

Automobiles Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

BUICKS ! LeSabres 1998 and 2004 $3900-$5900.

90 and 115k miles, silver and white colors, full size 4-door sedans, 30 mpg hwy, luxury cars, trouble-free, too! ask anyone that owns one! 541-318-9999

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $18,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!! Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Chevy Corvette 1988 for sale or Trade for Harley, 4-speed, nice car, $9500, 541-419-0251.

Volvo C70-T5, 2010

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

$19,450!

International Travel All 1967,

Plymouth 4-dr sedan, 1948, all orig., new tires, exlnt driver, all gauges work, 63,520 miles, $8500. 541-504-2878

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mercedes GL450, 2007

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT- Perfect, garaged, factory super charged, just 1623 miles $20,000. 541-923-3567

Porsche Cayenne 2004, 86k mi. Immac,, Loaded, Dlr. maintained, $23k. 503-459-1580

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Mazda 3 I-sport 2008, 4-cyl, 2L, 4-door, 43k, $10,000, went back to college, MUST SELL! 541-280-8693.

940

541-389-5016 evenings.

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

Vans

935

Sport,

12x6, side door, 2 back doors, shelves, exc. cond., $2750, call 541-815-1523.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, tow pkg., V-8, bedliner CD, air, 8 tires, $12,900 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Sport Utility Vehicles Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Convertible Hardtop. 10,800mi. Celestial Blue w/Calcite Cream leather int. Premium & Climate pkgs. Warranty & Service to 10/2014. KBB SRP $33,540. Asking $31,900. 541-350-5437 Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

(This special package is not available on our website)

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

J. L. SCOTT Get 1 FREE Maintenance Service or Aeration ($40+ value) when you sign up for a full season of maintenance!

Licensed / Bonded / Insured FREE Estimates! Call today: (541) 617.TURF [8873] www.turflandscapes.com All types remodeling/handyman Decks, Painting, Carpentry Randy Salveson, 541-306-7492

933

99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

We offer: • Residential & Commercial • Organic Products (kid and pet safe!) • Aerations & Thatching • Mulch, Hedging, Pruning • Irrigation Management • Spring & Fall Clean-ups • Fertilization • Weed Control

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Replacement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

541-389-5355

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 Automotive Service

Asking $3,999 or make offer.

Ford 2 Door 1949,

541-322-7253

Become Oregon Auto Dealer: Mandatory DMV Class Friday April 8th 8:304:30, Bend, OR, Register at 800-447-0302.

1957,

New rebuilt motor, no miles, Power Take-off winch. Exc. tires.

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

932

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Chevy

The Bulletin Classifieds

Wells

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Antique and Classic Autos

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

Chevy Corvette 1980, yellow, glass removable top, 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, heat, A/C, new factory interior, black, 48K., exc. tires, factory aluminum wheels, asking $7500, will consider fair offer & possible trade, 541-385-9350.

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

extended overhead cab, stereo, Wheels, 2-Sets Mini Cooper, self-contained,outdoor shower, 8x18” Custom “Star”, 1 set TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non $300 no tires, 1 set $550 smoker, $7900 541-815-1523. w/tires, 541-382-8762.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $104,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Pettibone Mercury fork lift, 8000 lb., 2-stage, propane, hard rubber tires. $4000 or Make offer. 541-389-5355.

MONTANA 3585 2008, exc. cond., 3 slides, king bed, lrg LR, Arctic insulation, all options $39,500. 541-420-3250

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $9000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Canopies and Campers

WILLYS JEEP 1956

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

885

975

Automobiles

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel, fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, quality built, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more.$59,500. 541-317-9185

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

931

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. New Price!!!!! $19,500. 541-788-4844.

Aircraft, Parts and Service

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

(Private Party ads only)

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

Canopy mount electric boat loader, in good shape $600 OBO. 541-548-3459

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Everest 32’ 2004, 3

Starcraft 2008 Centennial 3612 tent trailer, like new, sleeps 6, slide-out, Arizona room, range w/oven, micro, toilet & shower, stereo system, heated mattresses, roof rack, new 6-ply tires, twin 6-volt batteries, outside shower, twin propane tanks, BBQ. $10,500. 541-312-9312

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Motorhomes Beaver Lexington 1994, Anniversary model, Cummins Diesel, 38’, nice, full factory paint, $35,900,541-617-1249

541-322-7253

Travel Trailer Excellent condition! 2 refrigerators, Cool Cat AC/Heat Pump, 15" LCD TV/DVD. Too many extras to list. $19,500 OBO Call 541-548-8770

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

17.5’ Bayliner, 2005, 3.0 Merc, like new, low hrs, $7500 obo. Will consider partial trades. 541-279-1862 after 5 pm. 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

2009 T@da (Tada)

900

932

Antique and Classic Autos

LAWN & LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Does your lawn have snow mold problems? We can help! SPECIAL 20% OFF Thatching & Aeration Weekly Maintenance • Thatching • Aeration • Lawn Over-seeding Bark • Clean-ups Commercial / Residential Senior Discounts

Providing full service maintenance for over 20 years! FREE AERATION & FERTILIZATION with new seasonal Mowing Service!

“Because weekends WERE NOT made for yard work!”

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

541-382-3883 Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

• Sprinkler activation & repair • Thatch & Aerate • Spring Clean up • Weekly Mowing & Edging •Bi-Monthly & monthly maint. •Flower bed clean up •Bark, Rock, etc. •Senior Discounts

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

CURTIS SESLAR’S

TOTAL LAWN CARE

LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE Serving Redmond since 1980. FREE THATCHING WITH AERATING SERVICE Mowing , Edging, Fertilizing, Hauling. Senior Discounts. Don’t delay, call today for Free estimate 541-279-1821

Collins Lawn Maintenance Weekly Services Available Aeration, One-time Jobs Bonded & Insured Free Estimate. 541-480-9714

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Painting, Wall Covering Landscape Design Installation & Maintenance. Specializing in Pavers. Up to 4 maintenance visits free. Call 541-385-0326

Bend Landscaping & Maint. Thatching, aerating, spring cleanup, sprinkler turn-ons, weekly mows.

541-382-1655 LCB# 7990 Mary’s Lawn Care

is seeking New Customers! • Spring Clean-up • Aerating • Thatching 541-350-1097 541-410-2953 Spring Clean Up! Aerating, thatching, lawn restoration, Vacation Care. Full Season Openings. Senior discounts. Call Mike Miller, 541-408-3364

Call The Yard Doctor for yard maint., thatching, sod, hydroseeding, sprinkler sys, water features, walls, more! Allen 541-536-1294 LCB 5012

WESTERN PAINTING CO. Richard Hayman, a semi-retired painting contractor of 45 years. Small Jobs Welcome. Interior & Exterior. Wallpapering & Woodwork. Restoration a Specialty. Ph. 541-388-6910. CCB#5184

Remodeling, Carpentry RGK Contracting & Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. •Additions/Remodels/Garages •Replacement windows/doors remodelcentraloregon.com 541-480-8296 CCB189290

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678


F4 Wednesday, April 6, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF PHYLLIS G. BORNE, Deceased. Case No. 11PB0035ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Jeffrey L. Borne has been appointed personal representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the personal representative, in care of Helen Rives Pruitt, 621 SW Morrison Street, Suite 1300, Portland, OR 97205 within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyer for the personal representative, Helen Rives Pruitt of Wyse Kadish LLP. Dated and first published on April 6, 2011. /s/ Jeffrey L. Borne Personal Representative Personal Representative Jeffrey L. Borne 2733 NW Nordic Avenue Bend, OR 97701 Telephone: 541.322.5964 Attorney for Personal Representative Helen Rives Pruitt, OSB No. 80358 Email: hrp@wysekadish.com Wyse Kadish LLP 621 SW Morrison Street, Suite 1300 Portland, OR 97205 Telephone: 503.228.8448 Facsimile: 503.273.9135 LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to ORS 477.250, notice is hereby given that a public hearing will be held to receive from any interested persons suggestions, advice, objections or remonstrance's to the proposed budget for the Central Oregon Forest Protection District. A hearing will be held on Tuesday, April 26, 2011, at 1:30 P.M., at the Prineville Unit, 3501 E 3rd Street, Prineville, OR. Copies of the tentative budget may be inspected during normal working hours. To ensure the broadest range of services to individuals with disabilities, persons with disabilities requiring special arrangements should contact 541-447-5658 at least two working days in advance. OREGON DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY DOUG DECKER, STATE FORESTER

JEFFREY M. BISHOP has been appointed Personal Representative of the ESTATE OF JACK LEROY BISHOP, Deceased, by the Circuit Court, State of Oregon, Deschutes County, under Case Number 11PB0030AB. All persons having a claim against the estate must present the claim within four months of the first publication date of this notice to Hendrix, Brinich & Bertalan, LLP at 716 NW Harriman Street, Bend, Oregon 97701, ATTN.: Lisa N. Bertalan, or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the Personal Representative or the following-named attorney for the Personal Representative. Date of first publication: April 6, 2011. HENDRIX BRINICH & BERTALAN, LLP 716 NW HARRIMAN BEND, OR 97701 541-382-4980 LEGAL NOTICE Symbiotics LLC, on behalf of Wickiup Hydro Group, LLC (PO Box 535, Rigby, ID 83442), submitted a Final License Application with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission for the Wickiup Dam Hydroelectric Project (FERC No. 12965) on March 25, 2011. The project would add a 7.15-MW run-of-river generation facility to the existing Wickiup Dam in Deschutes County, Oregon. A copy of the Final License Application is available for public viewing at the La Pine Public Library. The document can also be downloaded at http://www.ferc.gov/docs-fil ing/elibrary.asp by searching for the project number. LEGAL NOTICE The undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the estate of RUTH ANN SCHULTZ, Deceased, by the Deschutes County Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, probate number 11PB0047AB. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present the same with proper vouchers within four (4) months after the date of first publication to the undersigned or they may be barred. Additional information may be obtained from the court records, the undersigned or the attorney. Date first published: April 6, 2011 LINDA D. SATTERLY Personal Representative c/o Ronald L. Bryant Attorney at Law Bryant Emerson & Fitch, LLP PO Box 457 Redmond OR 97756 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx2093 T.S. No.: 1318210-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Lois Macadam Lindstedt, A Single Woman, as Grantor to First American Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., As Nominee For Citimortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated June 11, 2008, recorded June 13, 2008, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2008-25535 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 20, copper canyon phase 2, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 19944 Brass Dr. Bend OR 97702-3089. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's:

Failure to pay the monthly payment due October 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,564.49 Monthly Late Charge $102.15. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $307,114.46 together with interest thereon at 6.750% per annum from September 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on July 13, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 07, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-373306 04/06/11, 04/13, 04/20, 04/27

PLACE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86,735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 01/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE, Monthly Payment $760.90 Monthly Late Charge $38.04 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $169,874.89 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.375% per annum from 12-01-2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 06-14-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W, BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale including a reasonable charge by the trustee, Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in in-

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S, No.: T10-60927-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MARY CATHERINE KOZUSKO as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary-, dated 09-14-2005, recorded 09-22-2005, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-64024 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: VPN: 247690 LOT FIFTY-FOUR (54), CASCADE VISTA P.U.D., CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, Commonly known as: 20085 MOUNT FAITH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE AMOUNT OF YOUR INDEBTEDNESS TO THE BENEFICIARY, THEIR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST AND/OR ASSIGNEES AS RECITED BELOW, AS OF THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER, IS $604,902.80. INTEREST FEES AND COSTS WILL CONTINUE TO ACCRUE AFTER THE DATE OF THIS NOTICE/LETTER UNLESS YOU DISPUTE THE VALIDITY OF THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF WITHIN 30 DAYS AFTER RECEIVING NOTICE OF THIS DOCUMENT, THIS OFFICE WILL ASSUME THE DEBT TO BE VALID. IF YOU NOTIFY THIS OFFICE IN WRITING WITHIN THE 30-DAY PERIOD THAT THE DEBT OR ANY PORTION THEREOF IS DISPUTED, VERIFICATION OF THE DEBT WILL BE OBTAINED AND WILL-BE-MAILED- TO YOU. UPON WRITTEN REQUEST WITHIN 30 DAYS, THE NAME AND ADDRESS OF THE ORIGINAL CREDITOR, IF DIFFERENT FROM THE CURRENT CREDITOR, WILL BE PROVIDED. NOTICE: WE ARE A DEBT COLLECTOR. THIS COMMUNICATION IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR PURPOSES OF DEBT COLLECTION. Reference is made to that certain trust deed made by Donna Sue Freeborn, as grantor, to Western Title & Escrow Company, as trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registrations Systems, Inc. is a separate corporation that is acting solely as a nominee for Sierra Pacific Mortgage Company, Inc. and its successors and assigns, as beneficiary, dated September 1, 2005, recorded September 9, 2005, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, as Recording Number 2005-60688, said Deed of Trust was assigned on August 2, 2010 to US Bank NA as trustee relating to the Chevy Chase Funding LLC Mortgage Backed Certificates, Series 2005-4 under Recording No. 2010-30045, covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: See Exhibit A for Legal Description. Exhibit “A” - PARCEL I: In Township 17 South, Range 13, East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. Section 33: Commencing at a point whence the Northwest corner of the Southwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter (SW1/4 NW1/4) of said Section 33 bears South 00 degrees 00’48” West, 387.95 feet; thence South 89 degrees 49’51” East, 30.00 feet to the true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 49’51” East, 825.38 feet; thence South 01 degrees 44’31” East, 388.17 feet; thence North 89 degrees 49’51” West, 837.28 feet; thence North 00 degrees 00’48” East, 387.95 feet to the true point of beginning and the terminus of this description. TOGETHER WITH that portion conveyed in the deed recorded June 23, 1995 in Book 376 Page 2948, Official Records, described as follows: A parcel of land located in the Northwest quarter (NW1/4) Section Thirty-three (33), described as follows: Beginning at the Northwest corner of said Section 33; thence South 00 degrees 03’41” West, 1321.25 feet along the West line of said Section 33 tot he North 1/16 corner between Sections 32 and 33, a 5/8 inch iron rod, the true point of beginning, thence South 89 degrees 19’06” East along the South line of the NW 1/4 NW 1/4, 207.94 feet to a 1/2 inch iron rod; thence leaving said line South 06 degrees 54’40” East, 2.00 feet to a 5/8 inch iron rod; thence South 89 degrees 51’04” West, 208.19 deet to a 5/8 inch iron rod on the West line of said Section 33; thence North 00 degrees 17’01” East along said West line, 5.00 feet to the point of beginning and terminus thereof. PARCEL II: A tract of land located in the South west One-quarter of the Northwest One-quarter (SW1/4 NW 1/4) of Section Thirty-three (33), Township Seventeen (17) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the Northeast corner of the said Southwest One-quarter of the Northwest One-quarter (SW1/4 NW1/4) of Section 33; thence along the Northerly line of said SW1/4 NW1/4 South 89 degrees 48’24” East, 208.28 feet tot he true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 48’24” East, 355.00 feet; thence leaving said Northerly line South 00 degrees 01’27” East, 2.42 feet to a point on the existing fence; thence along said existing fence North 89 degrees 33’37” West, 354.90 feet; thence North 07 degrees 02’47” West, 0.90 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. And commencing at the Northwest corner of the said SW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 33; thence along the Northerly line of said SW1/4 NW 1/4 South 89 degrees 24’24” East, 563.28 feet tot he true point of beginning; thence South 89 degrees 48’24” East, 304.00 feet; thence leaving said Northerly line South 01 degrees 41138” East, 3.73 feet to a point on the existing fence; thence along said existing fence North 89 degrees 33’37” West, 304.12 feet; thence North 00 degrees 01’27” West, 2.42 feet to the point of beginning and terminus of this description. Both the beneficiary and the trustee, David A. Weibel, will sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statues 86.753(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay the following sums: 1. Monthly Payments: Delinquent Monthly Payments Due from 4/1/2010 through 1/1/2011: 7 payment(s) at $2335.62, 3 payment(s) at $2603.17; Total Payments:$23,158.85; Late Charges: 7 late charge(s) at $116.78, 3 late charge(s) at $130.16 for each monthly payment not made within 15 days of its due date Total Late Charges $1207.94; Recoverable Balance $591.64; THE SUM OWING ON THE OBLIGATION SECURED BY THE TRUST DEED:$25,958.43. 2. Delinquent Real Property Taxes, if any. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Unpaid balance is $602,402.80 as of January 27, 2011. In addition there are attorney's fees and foreclosure costs which as of the date of this notice are estimated to be $2,500.00. Interest, late charges and advances for the protection and preservation of the property may accrue after the date of this notice. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, David A. Weibel, on June 8, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 am, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at the front entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond, in the City of Bend, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by grantor of the said trust deed together with any interest which the grantor or grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), paying all advances authorized under the trust deed, including all costs and expenses incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, and by curing any other default complained of therein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. DATED: February 2, 2011. David A. Weibel, Trustee. For Information Call: Bishop, White, Marshall & Weibel, P.S., 720 Olive Way, Suite 1301, Seattle, WA 98101, (206) 622-7527.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee No.: fc26815-5r Loan No.: 0203596564 Title No.: 4706907 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by David P. Baillargeon, as Grantor, to Deschutes County Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for lender, as Beneficiary, dated 05/22/2006, recorded on 05/25/2006 as Document No. 2006-36144, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot thirteen of Cessna Addition, City of Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 249998 The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 270 SE Tee Court, Bend, OR 97702. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,980.44 beginning 02/01/2009, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $279,889.25 with interest thereon at the rate of 7.250% per annum from 01/01/2009, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. FKA ForeclosureLink, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 05/11/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 12-22-10 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. FKA ForeclosureLink, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. FKA ForeclosureLink, Inc., 4401 Hazel Avenue, Suite 225, Fair Oaks, CA 95628 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. May be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 204812, 03/16/11, 03/23/11, 03/30/11, 04/06/11 )

terest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: February 03, 2011 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC, P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 JAMES M, DAVIS, ASST SEC ASAP# 3920524 03/16/2011, 03/23/2011, 03/30/2011, 04/06/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx4221 T.S. No.: 1247505-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott A. Hancock and Jenny M. Hancock, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Amerititle, as Trustee, in favor of First Franklin A Division of Nat. City Bank Of In, as Beneficiary, dated February 11, 2005, recorded February 25, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-11276 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 85 of Hayden View Phase Two, City of Redmond, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 3151 S.W. Metolius Avenue Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; failure to pay other/misc fees when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; failure to pay fc expenses when due, said sums having been advanced by the beneficiary; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $892.17 Monthly Late Charge $35.29. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $123,193.13 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from August 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the

terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 23, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 12, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-370054 03/16, 03/23, 03/30, 04/06

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3799 T.S. No.: 1248063-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Gerald L. Snow and Penni L. Snow Tenants By The Entirety, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated May 10, 2007, recorded May 21, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-28757 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 4 in block 6 of Indian Ford Meadows, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 69363 Camp Polk Rd. Sisters OR 97759. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due July 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $4,053.84 Monthly Late Charge $202.69. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed

of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $1,496,800.00 together with interest thereon at 3.250% per annum from June 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 22, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not

then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 12, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-370055 03/16, 03/23, 03/30, 04/06

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. #: OR-10-410803-NH Reference is made to that certain deed made by, TERESA MAURICE as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE & ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of ASSOCIATES HOME EQUITY SERVICES, INC. , as Beneficiary, dated 8/4/1998, recorded 8/10/1998, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/ reel/ volume number xxx at page number xxx fee/ file/ instrument/ microfile/ reception number 506-2789,, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 133017 LOT 45, BLOCK 8, FIRST ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21070 ROBIN AVENUE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: The installments of principal and interest which became due on 6/10/2010, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustee's fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising from or associated with the beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $859.82 Monthly Late Charge $42.99 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $88,983.21 together with interest thereon at the rate of 9.6500 per annum from 5/10/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 7/29/2011 at the hour of 11:00:00 AM , Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-730-2727 or Login to: www.fidelityasap.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 7/29/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31,2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 6/29/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 03/22/2011 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Brooke Frank, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information: Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right's against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. ASAP# 3950146 04/06/2011, 04/13/2011, 04/20/2011, 04/27/2011


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THE BULLETIN • Wednesday, April 6, 2011 F5

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1158057397 T.S. No.: 10-11457-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MATTHEW C. ERNST as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on July 11, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006Â47336 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 123120 LOT NINETEEN (19) OF RAILWAY ADDITION, TO THE CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 347 SE JACKSON STREET, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $9,632.02 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $169,794.84 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.50000% per annum from July 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 5, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252Â-4900 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obli-

gation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 9, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3939056 03/16/2011, 03/23/2011, 03/30/2011, 04/06/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx9822 T.S. No.: 1302037-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Randall L. Mahaney, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated March 28, 2007, recorded April 03, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-19419 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: LOT 4 IN BLOCK 4 OF WOODRIVER VILLAGE, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. TOGETHER WITH, A PORTION OF THE COMMON PROPERTY LOCATED IN THE PLAT OF WOODRIVER VILLAGE, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE SOUTH 86° 06' 23" EAST 24.07 FEET TO THE ONE-SIX-TENTH CORNER BETWEEN SECTIONS S AND 6, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; THENCE SOUTH 89° 49' 11" EAST ALONG THE NORTH UNE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER SECTION 5, A DISTANCE OF 181.88 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID LINE DUE SOUTH (SOUTH 00° 00' 00" WEST) 41.79 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTH RIGHT OF WAY UNE OF BIRCH WOOD DRIVE; THENCE SOUTH 73° 21' 55" WEST 185.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 4; THENCE NORTH 160 38' 05' WEST ALONG THE EAST UNE OF SAID LOT A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND THERE TERMINATING. EXCEPT THAT PORTION DEED TO THE CITY OF BEND IN WARRANTY DEED RECORDED MARCH 14, 2002 IN INSTRUMENT NO. 2002-14310. Commonly known as: 19996 Birchwood Dr. Bend Or 97702. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due August 1, 2009 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $3,085.04 Monthly Late Charge $154.20. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $448,768.92 together with interest thereon at 7.125% per annum from July 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will

on June 29, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 21, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-371107 03/23/11, 03/30, 04/06, 04/13

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx2313 T.S. No.: 1214625-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Marcos Rodriguez, A Married Man As His Sole & Separate Property, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For First Franklin A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated September 05, 2006, recorded September 08, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-61476 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Lot 10 in block 3 of East Villa Second Addition, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 62920 Clyde Ln. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due February 1, 2009 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent in-

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Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F522127 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999562259/ELLIS Investor No: 175922284 AP #1: 144618 Title #: 110003679 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JAMES T. ELLIS as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated February 22, 2008, Recorded March 24, 2008 as Instr. No. 2008-12871 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 14, JUNIPINE ACRES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 10 PYMTS FROM 04/01/10 TO 01/01/11 @ 1,101.02 $11,010.20 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$11,010.20 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 16586 WREN LN, SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $141,782.39, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 03/01/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on May 16, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 01/05/11 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 931649 PUB: 03/30/11, 04/06/11, 04/13/11, 04/20/11

stallments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,078.96 Monthly Late Charge $75.31. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $203,945.74 together with interest thereon at 8.500% per annum from January 01, 2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on June 22, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation,

the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: February 12, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-370032 03/16/11, 03/23, 03/30, 04/06

interest thereon at 7.000% LEGAL NOTICE per annum from October 01, TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. Trustee 2009 until paid; plus all acNo.: fc26442-5r Loan No.: 0206344814 Title No.: 4522825 Reference is made to that certain Trust crued late charges thereon; Deed made by Shawnee J. Ray, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co of OR, as Trustee, and all trustee's fees, forecloin favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for Lender, as Bensure costs and any sums adeficiary, dated 08/14/2007, recorded on 08/17/2007 as Document No. 2007-45453, in the mortvance by the beneficiary purgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the suant to the terms and obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, Inc. Said Trust Deed enconditions of the said deed of cumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: Lot 13 in trust. Whereof, notice hereby Block 40 of Oregon Water Waterland Unit No. 2, Descutes County, Oregon. Account No.: 125736 is given that, Cal-Western The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is Reconveyance Corporation purported to be: 17460 Gull Drive, Bend, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liabilthe undersigned trustee will ity for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the benon June 29, 2011 at the hour eficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations seof 1:00pm, Standard of Time, cured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised as established by Section Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when LEGAL NOTICE 187.110, Oregon Revised due, the following sums: monthly payments of $1,006.60 beginning 06/01/2010, together with TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Statutes, At the Bond Street title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, Loan No: xxxxxx3826 T.S. entrance to Deschutes and any further sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real No.: 1286309-09. Reference County Courthouse 1164 NW property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide inis made to that certain deed Bond, City of Bend, County of surance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and made by Jeremy J. Koehler Deschutes, State of Oregon, Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good and Charity Koehler, as sell at public auction to the standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable Grantor to First American highest bidder for cash the written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard Title Insurance Company Of interest in the said described insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting Oregon, as Trustee, in favor real property which the the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on of Mortgage Electronic Reggrantor had or had power to the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the folistration Systems, Inc., convey at the time of the exlowing: Principal balance of $124,189.22 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.875% per annum ("mers") As Nominee For Siecution by him of the said from 05/01/2010, together with any late charge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, imerra Pacific Mortgage Comtrust deed, together with any pounds and advances; senior liens and encumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent pany, Inc., as Beneficiary, interest which the grantor or together with title expense, costs, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any dated July 17, 2008, rehis successors in interest acfurther sums advanced by the beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property corded July 23, 2008, in offiquired after the execution of and its interest therein. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance cial records of Deschutes, said trust deed, to satisfy the Company c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 05/25/2011, at Oregon in book/reel/volume foregoing obligations thereby the hour of 11:00AM in accord with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the No. xx at page No. xx, secured and the costs and front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the fee/file/Instrument/microexpense of sale, including a highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or film/reception No. reasonable charge by the had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any 2008-30971 covering the trustee. Notice is further interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust following described real given that any person named Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, inproperty situated in said in Section 86.753 of Oregon cluding reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. County and State, to-wit: Lot Revised Statutes has the 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have 1 of partition plat no. right to have the foreclosure this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the benefi2004-67, filed July 30, 2004, proceeding dismissed and ciary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be and being a partition of parthe trust deed reinstated by due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is cacel 1 of partition plat no. payment to the beneficiary of pable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or to cure the 2001-37, located in a porthe entire amount then due default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust tion of the southeast 1/4 of (other than such portion of Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender section 20, township 14 said principal as would not includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any south, range 13 east of the then be due had no default successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the perforWillamette Meridian, Desoccurred), together with the mance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include chutes County, Oregon. costs, trustee's and attorney's their respective successors in interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) Commonly known as: 6775 fees and curing any other 603-7342. Dated: 1-10-11 First American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender NW 19th Street Terrebonne default complained of in the Services, Inc., Agent Lauren Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust MortOR 97760. Both the benefiNotice of Default by tendergage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., 81 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 100, Folsom, CA ciary and the trustee have ing the performance re95630 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage Lender Services, Inc. may be a debt collector attempting to colelected to sell the said real quired under the obligation lect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP# 204868)(03/30/11, property to satisfy the oblior trust deed, at any time 04/06/11, 04/13/11, 04/20/11) gations secured by said trust prior to five days before the deed and notice has been redate last set for sale. In con1000 1000 1000 corded pursuant to Section struing this notice, the mas86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices culine gender includes the Statutes: the default for feminine and the neuter, the LEGAL NOTICE which the foreclosure is singular includes plural, the TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705, et seq. and O.R.S. 79-5010, et seq. made is the grantor's: Failword "grantor" includes any Trustee No.: fc25926-5r Loan No.: 0205065022 Title No.: 4457147 Reference is made to that ure to pay the monthly paysuccessor in interest to the certain Trust Deed made by Gerald Lentz, as Grantor, to First American Title Insurance Co. of OR, ment due November 1, 2009 grantor as well as any other as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., solely as nominee for of principal and interest and persons owing an obligation, Lender, as Beneficiary, dated 02/20/2007, recorded on 02/28/2007 as Instrument No. subsequent installments due the performance of which is 2007-12075, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon. The beneficial interest under thereafter; plus late charges; secured by said trust deed, said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by SunTrust Mortgage, together with all subsequent the words "trustee" and "benInc. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and sums advanced by benefieficiary" includes their restate, to-wit: A parcel of land located in Section 18, Township 18 South, Range 13 East of the ciary pursuant to the terms spective successors in interWillamette, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: The South and conditions of said deed est, if any. Dated: February half of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of the Northeast quarter (S1/2 NW1/4 of trust. Monthly payment 21, 2011. Cal-Western ReSE1/4 NE1/4) of Section 18. Account No.: 112571 The street address or other common designa$2,772.49 Monthly Late conveyance Corporation 525 tion, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 61050 Sum View Drive, Bend, Charge $126.40. By this reaEast Main Street P.O. Box OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street son of said default the ben22004 El Cajon CA address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell eficiary has declared all obli92022-9004 Cal-Western Rethe said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Degations secured by said Deed conveyance Corporation fault has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735 (3); the default for which the of Trust immediately due and Signature/By: Tammy Laird foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: monthly payments of payable, said sums being the R-371103 03/23/11, 03/30, $2,426.86 beginning 12/01/2009, together with title expenses, costs, trustee's fees and following, to-wit; The sum of 04/06, 04/13 attorney's fees incurred herein by reason of said default, and any further sums advanced by the $375,469.96 together with beneficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other se1000 1000 1000 nior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Deed of Trust, the beneficiary may insist Legal Notices Legal Notices Legal Notices that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all seLEGAL NOTICE nior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements INVITATION TO BID for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said MADRAS MUNICIPAL AIRPORT default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed HEAVY AIRCRAFT TAXIWAY AND RUNWAY RESTRIPING/NAVAID IMPROVEMENTS immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: Principal balance of $376,371.38 with interest thereon at the rate of 6.375% per annum from 11/01/2009, together with any late Sealed bids for the Madras Municipal Airport - Heavy Aircraft Taxiway and Runway Restriping/Nacharge(s), delinquent taxes, insurance premiums, impounds and advances; senior liens and envaid Improvements, A.I.P. Project No. 3-41-0035-007/CO-III Project No. 26910 will be received cumbrances which are delinquent or become delinquent together with title expense, costs, by the City of Madras (the City) at the City Hall located at 71 SE D Street, Madras, Oregon, 97741, trustee's fees and any attorney's' fees and court costs, and any further sums advanced by the benuntil the bid closing time of 2:00 p.m, on the 26th day of April 2011, at which time the bids will be eficiary for the protection of the above described real property and its interest therein. WHEREpublicly opened and read. Bidders shall submit the required first-tier subcontractor disclosure FORE, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company c/o Mortgage Lender form within two working hours of the bid closing time. Bidders whose bids and/or disclosure Services, Inc., the undersigned trustee will, on 05/25/2011, at the hour of 11:00AM in accord statements are received after the stated times will be considered non-responsive and their bids with the standard of time established by O.R.S. 187.110, At the front entrance of the Courthouse, will not be considered. 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor has or had power to convey at the time The scope of work being considered is: of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obliga1.Construction of new taxiways for use by heavy aircraft. tions thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including reasonable charge by the 2.Expansion to the Apron adjacent to the FBO Building. trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S. 86.753 has the right, at any time 3.Pavement Marking for new taxiways and apron. prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dis4.Restriping of Runway 16-34 for non-precision instrument approaches. missed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then 5.Misc. Drainage Improvements due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) 6.Installation of Runway End Indicator Light (REIL) system for Runway 34 and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering 7.Construction of a new Medium Intensity Taxiway Lighting (MITL) system for the parallel taxi the performance required under the obligation or to cure the default, by paying all costs and exway. penses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and 8.Lighting improvements for the expanded apron. attorney's fees. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the 9.Installation of an Automated Weather Observation System (AWOS) neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by The Contract Documents for the above project may be examined at the Airport FBO Office on said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in working days, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Copies of said documents may be interest, if any. For Trustee Sale Information please call (925) 603-7342. Dated: 1-10-11 First obtained at a cost of $60.00 per set from The City of Madras, 71 SE D Street, Madras, Oregon, American Title Insurance Company, Trustee By: Mortgage Lender Services, Inc., Agent Lauren 97741, telephone (541) 475-2344. Technical questions shall be directed to Bill Brackett, Century Meyer, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer Direct Inquiries To: SunTrust Mortgage, Inc., c/o Mortgage Lender West Engineering Corporation, (541) 322-8962. Documents will promptly sent upon receipt of Services, Inc., 81 Blue Ravine Road, Suite 100, Folsom, CA 95630 (916) 962-3453 Mortgage $60.00 per set to cover the document fee and postage/handling (The document costs also apply Lender Services, Inc., may be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obto Plan Centers). The cost of the documents is non-refundable, and the documents need not be tained will be used for that purpose. (RSVP#204867)(03/30/11, 04/06/11, 04/13/11, returned. 04/20/11) Contractors must be qualified in accordance with the applicable parts of ORS 279C in order to enter into a contract with the City. The City will only consider contractors who are able to demonstrate prior experience with similar work. The City may investigate to determine the qualifications of the bidders as part of the evaluation of the bids. Bidders must submit qualification statements in accordance with the terms of Subsection 20-02 of the specifications with their Proposal. Proposals submitted without qualification statements will not be accepted. The proposed contract is under and subject to Executive Order 11246 of September 24, 1965, and to the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) and Federal Labor Provisions. All labor on the project shall be paid no less than the minimum wage rates established by the U.S. Secretary of Labor or The State of Oregon BOLI, whichever is greater. Each Bidder must supply all information required by the bid documents and specifications. The EEO requirements, labor provisions, and wage rates are included in the specifications and bid documents. Each Bidder must complete, sign and furnish with his bid a "Certification of Nonsegregated Facilities" and a statement entitled "Bidders Statement on Previous Contracts Subject to EEO Clause," as contained in the Bid Proposal. A contractor having 50 or more employees and his subcontractors having 50 or more employees and who may be awarded a subcontract of $50,000 or more will be required to maintain an affirmative action program, the standards for which are contained in the specifications. To be eligible for award each Bidder must comply with the affirmative action requirements which are contained in the specifications. Disadvantaged Business Enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, or national origin in consideration for an award of any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement. This contract will be funded in part by a grant from the Federal Aviation Administration. In accordance with federal requirements, the City has determined that this contract has subcontracting possibilities and encourages the participation of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises as prime contractors and subcontractors. No DBE contract goal has been established for this project. The overall DBE project goal is 3.9% of the total amount bid. Based on the 9th Circuit Court Decision in Western States Paving Company v. Washington State Department of Transportation, the City has determined that it is appropriate to use a race/gender neutral goal. The City encourages all bidders to take active race/gender neutral steps to include DBE's in this contract. Race/gender neutral steps include: unbundling large contracts, subcontracting work the prime contractor may self-perform, providing bonding or financing assistance, providing technical assistance, etc. This contract can be awarded without the lowest responsive bidder meeting the goal or demonstrating good faith effort to meet the goal. Each prospective bidder is requested to attend a voluntary pre-bid meeting to be held at 2:00 p.m., local time on the 12th day of April 2011, at the airport. At this meeting, questions concerning the Contract Documents and the proposed work will be discussed. Answers and clarifications will be in the form of written addenda to the contract and will be mailed or faxed to all plan holders. Contractor licensing under ORS 468A.720 for asbestos abatement is not a requirement of this project. No bid shall be considered unless the bidder is registered with the Oregon Construction Contractors Board or licensed by the State Landscape Contractors Board as required by ORS 671.530. Proposals must be submitted on the prescribed forms and must be accompanied by certified check, cashier's check, or bid bond executed in favor of the City in an amount equal to ten percent (10%) of the amount bid. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a performance bond and payment bond, each in the full amount of the contract price. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive any irregularities, and to accept the bid deemed in the best interest of the City. The City may reject any bid not in compliance with all prescribed public bidding procedures and requirements, and may reject for good cause any or all bids upon a finding by the City that it is in the public interest to do so. CITY OF MADRAS

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: L520642 OR Unit Code: L Loan No: 1000017581/PALMER Investor No: 4005327912 AP #1: 195068 Title #: 100746233 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by JEANETTE H. PALMER as Grantor, to AMERITITLE as Trustee, in favor of BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER as Beneficiary. Dated April 20, 2007, Recorded April 26, 2007 as Instr. No. 2007-24006 in Book --- Page --of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT TWENTY-FOUR (24), EAGLENEST, PHASE 11, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 14 PYMTS FROM 08/01/09 TO 09/01/10 @ 1,616.04 $22,624.56 14 L/C FROM 08/16/09 TO 09/16/10 @ 70.45 $986.30 3 PYMTS FROM 10/01/10 TO 12/01/10 @ 1,620.81 $4,862.43 3 L/C FROM 10/16/10 TO 12/16/10 @ 70.45 $211.35 ACCRUED LATE CHARGES $70.45 RECOVERABLE BALANCE IN THE AMOUNT OF $79.50 $79.50 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$28,834.59 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 2774 NE HOPE DRIVE, BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $228,331.23, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 07/01/09, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on April 29, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 12/20/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 930629 PUB: 03/16/11, 03/23/11, 03/30/11, 04/06/11


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Bulletin Daily Paper 04/06/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Wednesday April 6, 2011