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An east-side icon heads west Pilot Butte plans to open a second location on Century Drive, but it won’t be a drive-in,

LA PINE

City claims nepotism in water, sewer feud By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Tonight’s public hearing in La Pine has to do with a topic most people would run from: annexation of the water and sewer districts. But it has officials of this 5-year-old city butting heads with longtime commission-

BUSINESS, B1

DA’s newest deputy owes back taxes

ers of the two districts. The dispute involves allegations of conflicts of interest and nepotism: A commissioner had her dog buried at district expense. Her two daughters and another commissioner’s son have worked for the district. The wife of another district official earned real estate commissions

on five property sales to an engineer doing business with the districts. The same engineer won two contracts without any bidding done. The commissioners involved don’t deny the allegations and say they’ve done nothing wrong. See La Pine / A4

A soapy start to spring cleaning

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

The Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office has appointed J. Pat Horton as its newest deputy district attorney. The elected district attorney for Lane County between 1973 and 1985, Horton was originally hired by District Attorney Patrick Flaherty in early January as a management analyst, a newly created position that Flaherty said was intended to assist him in studying and reorganizing the workflow of the office. He was an outspoken proponent of marijuana decriminalization during his time as the head of the Lane County office, and prosecuted the high-profile Diane Downs murder case before going into private practice as a defense, civil rights and personal injury attorney. When Horton was first hired by the District Attorney’s Office, HIS law license had been inactive for nearly 11 years, barring him from working as a deputy DA, according to the Oregon State Bar. His license has since been reinstated. The reassignment includes a pay increase for Horton. Originally hired at $36 per hour without benefits, Horton will now be earning full benefits and a monthly salary just shy of $7,400. Since the end of his first legal career, Horton has been an active real estate investor in Central Oregon, one of many who, in his words, “got hurt pretty badly” when the economy turned sour. A 40-acre property owned by Horton in northwest Redmond was recently surrendered to Home Federal Bank, which had sued him for $2.6 million. The transfer of the property to the bank brings the suit to an end, Horton said, and the bank will cover the $73,289 in back property taxes he’d racked up over the last four years. Horton owes another $18,939 in back taxes on a residence in Pronghorn, which he said will be paid. See DA / A4

GITMO: Obama reverses order on trials, Page A3

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seeing through the side windows.

By Nick Budnick The Bulletin

SALEM — Discussions over a voterapproved law that uses lottery money for parks and natural areas have local conservation groups concerned. In November, voters approved Measure 76 by a margin of 69 percent to 31 percent. In Deschutes County, the margin was nearly as resounding, with 68.4 percent in favor. The law essentially extended an earlier measure that allocated 15 percent of lottery funds to

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set a sunset date at which the lottery funding law would expire, as well as let the Legislature divert funds to nonwildlife causes in times of economic emergency. But the new proposed law has sparked controversy and hardball politics. Now that lawmakers have written a bill to implement that agreement, The Nature Conservancy has balked at supporting it, saying it did not realize the implications of the agreement. See Lottery / A5

‘Birthright citizenship’ under attack By Michael Matza The Philadelphia Inquirer

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 108, No. 67, 38 pages, 7 sections We use recycled newsprint

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parks and wildlife habitat. The law has led park officials from other states to look at Oregon’s well-funded system with envy. While parks remain popular in Oregon, the margin of victory last November was due to an agreement struck last summer among interest groups and lawmakers to avoid an opposition campaign. Under the deal, major conservation groups supporting Measure 76 agreed to support a follow-up measure backed by the Oregon Education Association. As discussed, the follow-up measure would

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having fun,” he said while preparing to wash the vehicle, which had been so covered with mud he had trouble

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ryce Shiner washes off his muddy Jeep at M&M Car Wash and Supplies in Bend on Monday. “I was just out

Wildlife groups balk at lottery fund pact Women seize

TOP NEWS INSIDE

Abby

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

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PHILADELPHIA — Twelve years ago, Lizbeth Ramos and her common-law husband, Juan, left their hometown near Puebla, Mexico, and set out on foot for the Arizona border, to slip into new lives as illegal immigrants. He found work in a produce market near Philadelphia, she in a boutique. Now 30, she lies on an examination table in Pennsylvania Hospital, at an obstetrics clinic for immigrant women, no status questions asked. As a doctor slides an ultrasound wand

over her bulging belly, her eyes are transfixed by the monitor. She is carrying twins. The moment they enter the world, they will be what their parents are not: U.S. citizens. Such is their birthright, granted by the 14th Amendment to an estimated 340,000 babies born annually to undocumented immigrants. But in the marathon fight over immigration control, that 143-year-old constitutional guarantee has become the latest target — and the delivery room the new front. The pejorative “anchor babies” already is in the lexicon. See Citizenship / A4

Ed Hille / Philadelphia Inquirer

Dr. Jack Ludmir performs an ultrasound on a illegal immigrant from Nicaragua at Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia.

opportunity in Arab protests By Bill Varner Bloomberg News

UNITED NATIONS — Azza Kamel, a women’s rights advocate in Egypt, says the popular uprisings in her country and its neighbors are Inside creating new • Loyalist forces opportunities gain in Libya, for women. Page A3 “There was no difference between women who were veiled or not veiled,” Kamel said at the United Nations, referring to the protests that ended Hosni Mubarak’s 30-year rule. “The revolution created a land as free for women as for men.” Whether turmoil in the Arab world will yield progress toward full political and economic rights for women is unclear, says Isobel Coleman, author of “Paradise Beneath Her Feet: How Woman Are Transforming the Middle East.” See Women / A4


A2 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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WIRELESS SPEAKERS

Joy of home broadcasting dio systems built since the 1970s. Look behind them, though, and you notice something novel: There’s no place to attach speaker wires even if you wanted to. Instead, each speaker only needs to plug into a wall outlet. Plug each one in, then turn on the transmitter, and the speakers pipe fantastic, rich sound from your home theater. At $500 for two speakers and a transmitter, the Zona is pricey, but it’s the perfect solution for sending sound — without wires — to the back of a large room.

By Farhad Manjoo New York Times News Service

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A few years ago I bought a high-end home theater system that promised to “surround” me in sound when watching Hollywood blockbusters — or, more likely, reruns of “Law & Order.” But when I unpacked the system, I saw that for the best audio, I’d have to surround myself in speaker wires, too. The system included five small speakers (two for the front of the room, two for the back and one for the center) as well as a couchshaking subwoofer. Each speaker and the subwoofer needed to be connected by a cable to the central unit; this meant I’d have to find an inconspicuous way to snake long tangle-prone wires from my television set to every corner of my living room. It took me about a day of carefully rearranging rugs and couches to hide the wires, but even that wasn’t totally successful. Occasionally the clutch of wires would peek out and threaten to trip someone or prompt my Roomba robotic vacuum cleaner to stop short. When I moved to a new home, I didn’t bother to reconnect the system. Surround sound was sensational, but it wasn’t worth the setup. Others think the same. “Seventy percent of people who buy home-theater systems never bother to connect the rear speakers,” said Ed de la Fuente, the marketing manager for Aperion Audio. “Running the wires is just too much of a hassle.”

Until recently, there hasn’t been a better way. Electronics companies have been making wireless speaker systems for years, but many were based on older radio technology that was prone to interference from microwaves, cordless phones and other gadgets. The only way to get amazing audio was ... through a wire. That’s changing. I’ve been testing several wireless audio systems lately that promise to give me perfect (or at least pretty good) sound with much less electronic interference than in the old days. Some of them are meant for the living room, others for the bedroom, and one fantastic system will pipe music to every room in your house. My adventures in wireless audio have left my home littered with speakers, but because they all required little setup, and because many can be tucked out of sight, my home doesn’t look the least bit messy (well, not because of speaker wires, anyway). The most basic wireless audio system I tried was the iA100, a $200 unit by iHome that is ideal for playing tunes at your bedside, office, dorm or in any small room. The iA100 is a snappylooking clock radio that can connect to your iPhone, iPad or another smart phone through the Bluetooth wireless standard. You can listen to music anytime your phone or music player is within a few dozen feet of the iA100. The device isn’t going to win over any audio enthusiasts (its sound was a bit tinny), but considering its size, the audio quality will be perfectly acceptable to most people.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

8 10 23 24 41 44 Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $7.8 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

New York Times News Service

That’s because over a Bluetooth connection, I noticed, the music would occasionally skip. There’s something else amiss with the Zikmu: The only way to connect it to my home theater system was with a wire. If you’re looking for completely wireless speakers for watching movies, these beautiful obelisks won’t work for you.

The Zona wireless speaker system, which sells for $500, plugs into wall outlets.

Best value

I especially liked the system’s companion iPhone app that lets you set the clock-radio alarm through your phone, which is much handier than fiddling with buttons on a traditional alarm clock. There was just one problem with the iA100: It occasionally lost the wireless connection to my iPhone, and the only way to get it back was to go into my phone’s settings page to reconnect it. This was a minor annoyance. At the other end of the price spectrum you’ll find the Zikmu, a $1,600 pair of wireless speakers designed by Philippe Starck and manufactured by the electronics company Parrot. The Zikmu is stunning. Each speaker is a threefoot-tall minimalist plastic slab that stands atop a circular base; my wife said it resembled the obelisk that drives the apes crazy at the start of “2001: A Space Odyssey.” Like the iA100, the Zikmu can play music stored on your phone through a Bluetooth connection, and it can also play tunes on your computer by hooking up to your home Wi-Fi network. For the most part, the Zikmu sounds as good as it looks; music piped through the speakers was deep and full, and the Zikmu is capable of going much louder than your neighbors will appreciate. Still, I wouldn’t recommend them to audiophiles.

But two other speaker systems did supply wireless sound for the home theater. These speakers use a tiny transmitter device that plugs into your TV, DVD player or other audio source; the transmitter beams sound to two speakers, which you can place anywhere in the room. The first system, called Railtones, is made by Tech Lighting, whose main business is high-end home lighting fixtures. This explains the shape of the Railtones speakers: They look like wall lamps. And, indeed, Railtones is meant for people who already have designer lighting systems in their homes. To set it up, you attach each Railtones speaker to a track-lighting rail mounted on your wall or ceiling; the speaker draws its electric power from the track, while pulling the audio from the transmitter you’ve attached to your home theater. A set of two Railtones speakers and a transmitter sells for about $500. I found that they produced respectable sound, but the Railtones’ true advantage was the way they hide themselves in your room. If you want your speakers out of view, there’s no better place to put them than up high, among the light bulbs. By comparison, the Zona system, made by Aperion, looks downright pedestrian — black and rectangular, like the hi-fi speakers on most of the home au-

But why should only two speakers of a home theater system be without wires? Movies these days are programmed to produce separate audio channels for each of five or even seven speakers. Is it possible to get a home-theater sound system with more than two wireless speakers? The short answer: not now, but soon. In June, Aperion will release the Intimus 4T SUMMIT wireless audio system, which will transmit every sound of the latest blockbuster to five different speakers and a subwoofer. De la Fuente, of Aperion, called the new product a harbinger. “I don’t know how long it’s going to be,” he said, “but eventually, we’ll see most speakers ship without wires.” For now, though, the completely wireless home theater may be out of reach for mainstream buyers: the Intimus 4T Summit will sell for $2,499. Excluding the home theater, though, wireless heaven is already here. A company called Sonos has developed a series of interlocking, Internet-connected audio components designed to deliver music across your whole house. A number of different configurations are available, but the most straightforward device is the S5, a $399 speaker and amplifier in one. It’s easy to set up: Install the software on your computer, plug a transmitter device into your wireless router, and then set the S5 anywhere in your house. The device connects to your home wireless network, and can gain access to music on your computer as well as from a number of online services, including Pandora, Rhapsody and Napster. But the real magic begins when you install several S5s throughout your home. I put one in my bedroom, one in the living room and one in the den. You can play the same song across the house, or something different in every room; you can control the volume separately or collectively as well. You can do all this with the company’s dedicated touchscreen remote ($349), but you can also control the beast just by using your PC, Mac, iPhone, iPad or Android phone. The best part is that many people in your house can have a say in the music. So when my wife sat in the living room and used her iPhone to play something contemporary — Kanye West, I think — one afternoon, I vetoed it from the bedroom, and, using my phone, played an ’80s music channel. Does this sound like the start of trouble? Quite the opposite. Music everywhere, without wires. Trust me, it sounds beautiful.

By Jenna Wortham New York Times News Service

The iPad 2, unveiled Wednesday, offers several sleek improvements over its predecessor. But its most attractive feature is perhaps the same one its predecessor had: the price tag. And what makes that feature even more compelling is that so far, Apple’s competitors in tablets cannot beat or even match it. The iPad 2, like the original, starts at $499. Apple says that since it introduced the original last April, it has sold 15 million of the devices, generating $9.5 billion in revenue. The Motorola Xoom and the Samsung Galaxy Tab were introduced last fall, both to generally good reviews but at higher prices. Dozens of hardware manufacturers are scrambling to bring their own variations to market this year: Hewlett-Packard with the TouchPad, HTC with the Flyer, LG with the G-Slate and BlackBerry with the PlayBook. But prices, or even release dates, have not been announced, and industry experts say it is not yet clear whether the devices can be competitive with Apple on price. “There have been nearly a hundred competitive tablets that have been introduced since the iPad,” said Toni Sacconaghi, an analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein. “But it seems that no one has eclipsed or even matched Apple on pricing.” Analysts and industry experts point to a number of reasons. Primarily, they say, Apple’s deep pockets — a staggering $60 billion in cash reserves — have allowed it to form partnerships with other companies to buy large supplies of components. By doing this, the company probably secures a lower price from suppliers, ensuring a lower manufacturing cost. At the same time, they say, Apple has sidestepped high licensing fees for other items it needs, like the A4 and A5 processors in the iPads. Those parts, designed in-house at Apple by a company that Apple bought, are among the costlier components needed to make a tablet computer. Sacconaghi said Apple also could subsidize some of the cost of building iPads with the money it makes through its App Store, which generates more than a billion dollars a year. This means that Apple can take a lower profit margin on the iPad, 25 percent, than it does on, for example, the iPhone, which can yield as much as 50 percent profit. Yet another advantage is Apple’s wide net of its own global retail shops and online stores; for customers, this means they can avoid a markup from a third party like Best Buy. Although other companies have some of these factors in their favor, no one but Apple has all of them.

Those massively muscular mannequins kick sand in men’s faces The Denver Post

As listed by The Associated Press

Illustration by Scott Roberts / New York Times News Service

Wireless to the rescue

By Tucker Shaw

Oregon Lottery Results

More coming soon

IPad’s rivals can’t beat its price tag

Maybe it’s because my doctor raised his eyebrows during the weigh-in portion of my last physical. Maybe it’s because I’m planning a beach vacation. Maybe it’s the profusion of perfect abs that’s co-opted pop culture over the past few years — from music (see LL Cool J) to sports (see David Beckham) to reality television (see “Jersey Shore”) to movies (see any of the “Twilight” flicks). But for whatever reason, I was tuned in a few weeks ago when I walked into Dick’s Sporting Goods, and for the first time I noticed the massively muscular mannequins — I mean, freakishly muscular mannequins — hawking the kinds of clothes that I, a not-freakishly muscular person, had gone there to purchase for my treadmill sessions. Massive arms. Tree-trunk legs.

Tiny waists. Sculpted calves. Glutes big enough to support a steam-table buffet. Shoulders as round and grand as bowling balls. These were not representations of any men that I cross paths with in my daily life, but of the titanic heroes of ancient Greek myths. (Or WWE wrestlers — choose your own image.) Boy, would I love to look like that. Only, I don’t. And won’t. That window closed long ago — actually let’s be honest, it was never really open. I’m a 40-plus beanpole with an age-appropriate paunch, long past the age when I could aspire to a physique like that. I was shopping for workout clothes because I had been told somewhere that I could stave off my exercise ennui with some shiny new gym duds, the kind that “wick away sweat.” (To where is it “wicked”? I’ve often

wondered. Connecticut?) The abs I want were only a few threads of Lycra away. Disclosure: I hate shopping. For one thing, I hate spending money. For another, I’m not a natural browser. I hate the hunt. And I resent all those posters of exactingly tousled, hairless and perfectly toned supermodels in tight jeans and tank tops staring down at you from department-store walls, daring you to spend money to try to look as good as they do. As if. I figured that shopping for gym clothes at a sports shop, I would be safe from all those taunting Abercrombie & Fitch-sters. Wrong. Those mannequins. Those colossal, improbable mannequins. They chased me straight out of the store. I tried Niketown on the 16th Street Mall, only to discover that its floor space was occupied by similarly intimidating goliaths,

posed in the kind of square-shouldered stance I associate with facing down a charging mountain lion (not that I’ve ever had to do that). Sports Authority Elite in Cherry Creek mall? Beautiful store, behemoth mannequins. I get it. I understand the idea behind these plaster muscles. They are meant to be inspiring. Designed to tap into that part of your brain that — when it’s not being overruled by petty nuisances like reality — wants to believe that you, too, can look like that, if only you buy those shorts. It’s a basic rule of 21st-century marketing: You entice people by showing them what they think they want to be, rather than what they actually are. When the clothes don’t change their lives, they’ll salve their disappointment with a return trip to the store. If only, if only, they can find just the right gym shorts.

Of course, we’re all in on the shtick. None of us actually believes that purchasing this season’s workout gear will transform us into champion bodybuilders any more than we believe that a pill purchased off a late-night infomercial will melt away the pounds as we sleep. But, logic aside, consumers are attracted to improbable promises. Even if the shorts don’t turn us into Olympians, we’ll still somehow be part of the club. The lure of transformation, however unreasonable, punches our idbuttons, and we buy. I described the muscled mannequins to a female friend: “Can you believe those things? No one looks like that! They’re unreal! Outrageous!” She showed no sympathy. “Welcome to my world,” she said, holding up the Victoria’s Secret catalog.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 A3

T S Washington’s role in Libya grows complex Obama says trials By David E. Sanger and Thom Shanker New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Nearly three weeks after Libya erupted in what may now turn into a protracted civil war, the politics of military intervention to speed the ouster of Moammar Gadhafi grow more complicated by the day — for both the White House and Republicans. President Barack Obama, appearing Monday morning with Australia’s prime minister, tried to raise the pressure on Gadhafi

further by talking about “a range of potential options, including potential military options” against the embattled Libyan leader. Despite Obama’s statement, interviews with military officials and other administration officials describe a number of risks, some tactical and others political, to U.S. intervention in Libya. Of most concern to the president himself, one high-level aide said, is the perception that the United States would once again be meddling in the Middle East, where it has overturned many a

leader, including Saddam Hussein. Some critics of the United States in the region — as well as some leaders — have already claimed a Western conspiracy is stoking the revolutions that have overtaken the Middle East. “He keeps reminding us that the best revolutions are completely organic,” the senior official said, quoting the president. At the same time, there are a range of persistent voices — in Congress and even inside the administration — arguing that Obama is moving too slowly.

They contend that there is too much concern about perceptions, and that the White House is too squeamish because of Iraq. Furthermore, they say a military caught up in two difficult wars has exaggerated the risks of imposing a no-fly zone over Libya, the tactic discussed most often. The U.S. military is also privately skeptical of humanitarian gestures that put the lives of troops at risk for the cause of the moment, while being of only tenuous national interest.

Forces loyal to Gadhafi press assault in the east and west By Kareem Fahim a nd David D. Kirkpatrick New York Times News Service

RAS LANUF, Libya — Government warplanes taunted rebels with flyovers and repeatedly bombed their positions near this coastal city’s oil refinery Monday, seeking to drive the opposition forces back farther to the east, as Libya continued what appeared to be a slide into civil war. The air attacks, which injured a family of five, added a note of urgency to a growing debate in Western capitals about imposing a no-fly zone over Libya. There were conflicting reports about the casualties after the airstrikes. Witnesses had said a man died when the car was hit, but doctors at a local hospital said the man, along with four relatives, survived. The steady attacks from the air helped further turn the momentum of the conflict in eastern Libya, where opposition fighters had made strong gains recently in their drive to the west, toward Surt, a stronghold of Moammar Gadhafi, and on to Tripoli. But on Sunday, troops loyal to Gadhafi stormed the town of Bin Jawwad, just to the west of Ras Lanuf, backed by fierce air power, and sent the fighters holding it into retreat.

Information scarce In addition, the elite Khamis Brigade continued Monday to batter the opposition-held city of Zawiyah, west of Tripoli, with tanks, artillery and snipers, residents there said. With cell phone and Internet communications cut off, virtually the only source

Anti-Gadhafi rebel runs away as smoke rises following an air strike by Libyan warplanes near a checkpoint of the anti-Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi rebels, in the oil town of Ras Lanouf in eastern Libya on Monday of information on events there was a lone reporter for Sky TV, the British television channel. She said the heavily armed government troops attacked in the morning and inexplicably withdrew after several hours, even though their tanks seemed to have taken control of the city’s central square. Government forces also attacked the rebel-held city of Misurata, Libya’s third largest, which lies about 100 miles east

New York Times News Service

CHICAGO — More than two weeks after Wisconsin lawmakers split over a bill that would vastly curtail collective bargaining for public workers, even negotiations over the negotiations have become matters of division, fury and dueling public critiques. Scott Fitzgerald, the Republican leader in Wisconsin’s Senate, described the progress of talks with 14 Senate Democrats who left the state last month to block a vote on the bill as “negotiating with Jell-O.” Chris Larson, one of the Senate Democrats, accused Fitzgerald and Gov. Scott Walker of misleading the public, trying to shift blame to the Democrats, and of “throwing people who were negotiating in earnest under the bus.” While those on both sides of Wisconsin’s partisan split over collective-bargaining rights say they have in recent days engaged in private discussions over the matter, little progress toward compromise has emerged.

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama on Monday reversed his 2-year-old order halting new military charges against detainees at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, permitting military trials to resume with revamped procedures but implicitly admitting the failure of his pledge to close the prison camp. Obama said in a statement that he remained committed to closing Guantánamo someday and to charging some terrorism suspects in civilian criminal courts. But Congress has blocked the transfer of prisoners from Guantanamo to the United States for trial, frustrating the administration’s plan to hold civilian trials for Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the chief plotter of the Sept. 11 attacks, and others accused of terrorism. Officials declined to say whether Mohammed would be scheduled for a military commission or would await a trial in federal court if Congress lifts its prohibition Separately, for detainees who will not get trials, Obama set out new rules in an executive order Monday requiring a review of their status within a year and every three years after that to determine whether

By Elisabeth Bumiller Hussein Malla / The Associated Press

By Mark Landler

New York Times News Service

By Scott Shane and Mark Landler

they remain a threat, should be scheduled for a military trial or released. The order also requires compliance with the Geneva Conventions and the international treaty that bans torture and inhumane treatment. Obama said in a statement that from the beginning of his administration, “the United States has worked to bring terrorists to justice consistent with our commitment to protect the American people and uphold our values.” He said the new procedures, which had been forecast in news reports, “broaden our ability to bring terrorists to justice, provide oversight for our actions, and ensure the humane treatment of detainees.” Administration officials declined to discuss individual cases, but one senior official said he expected new charges to be brought against detainees within days or weeks. A second official said the administration was committed to bringing “9/11 plotters to justice” but did not explain how that might occur. Among detainees believed most likely to face a military commission soon is Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, a Saudi accused of planning the bombing of the American destroyer Cole in Yemen in 2000. He was waterboarded, which could open the way to assertions by the defense that he was tortured.

U.S. ‘well positioned’ to start exit from Afghanistan, Gates says

of Tripoli. The rebels have rejected any foreign invasion of the country but would welcome a no-fly zone, saying they can handle Gadhafi’s soldiers, tanks and rockets, but not his warplanes and helicopter gunships.

No-fly zone uncertain On Monday, Britain and France said they would seek U.N. authority for a no-fly zone, but

Talks to end Gary Locke named U.S. impasse in ambassador to China Wisconsin flounder By Monica Davey

of detainees at Gitmo can resume

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama plans to nominate Gary Locke, the commerce secretary and one of the highest-ranking Chinese-Americans in the administration, as the next U.S. ambassador to China, administration officials said Monday. Locke, 61, would succeed Jon M. Huntsman Jr., who is stepping down next month to explore a bid for the Republican nomination for president. Locke, a former governor of Washington, was both the first Chinese-American commerce

secretary and the first ChineseAmerican governor, serving for two terms, from 1996 to 2005. He was born in Seattle, the son of immigrants from Hong Kong, and traces his Chinese ancestry to southern Guangdong province. Before going to Washington, Locke built a reputation as an expert on trade relations with China. While governor, he made several trade trips to China on behalf of Washington, which is often referred to as the nation’s most trade-dependent state, as the manufacturing base of Boeing, among other exporters.

Fears of wheat crisis in China recede as epic drought eases By Keith Bradsher New York Times News Service

HONG KONG — Rain and snow during the past two weeks, together with a huge irrigation effort, appear to have saved much of the wheat crop in northern China from drought, Chinese and international agricultural and meteorological experts said Monday. This winter was the driest in perhaps 200 years in parts of China, the world’s largest wheat producer. That prompted alarm

a month ago that China might need to sharply increase its usually modest wheat imports, at a time when world food prices were already surging. Supplies were tight after bad weather in other wheat-producing countries, including Russia and Australia. But days of snow and rain across the heart of China’s wheat belt in northern Henan and western Shandong Provinces have brought moisture to fields so dry that large cracks appeared in the dirt.

Russia, which holds veto power, has already rejected any form of military intervention. In Tripoli, the Libyan foreign minister, Moussa Koussa, held an extraordinary news conference in which he accused the U.S. and Britain of “yearning for the colonial era” and seeking to divide the country. He maintained that a force of about 300 al-Qaida fighters formerly held by the U.S. at Guantánamo Bay was backing rebel forces.

New York Times News Service

KABUL, Afghanistan — Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Monday that the United States was “well positioned” to begin withdrawing some U.S. troops from Afghanistan in July, but he said that a substantial force would remain and that the United States was starting talks with the Afghans about keeping a security presence in the country beyond 2014. At a joint news conference in the Afghan capital with President Hamid Karzai, Gates said that no decisions had been made about the number of troops to go home.

His remarks were tempered with enough caveats, however, to suggest that the July drawdown promised by President Barack Obama could be minor. “As I have said time and again, we are not leaving Afghanistan this summer,” Gates said. Currently about 100,000 American troops are in the country. Gates also used the news conference to offer an extended apology to Karzai for the mistaken killings last week of nine Afghan boys. Karzai accepted the apology. On Sunday Karzai had rejected an apology for the killings from Gen. David H. Petraeus, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

La Pine

DA

If you go

Burgess Rd.

MILES 0

1/2

LA PINE

Area where water and sewer districts want to expand La Pine city limits/UGB

97 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

manager for the La Pine Special Sewer District. Andrew Newton earned $20.74 an hour when he stopped working there in 2006, Zigler wrote. Allen said that employing so many relatives in a small office can cause problems. “In a small group, with that few of employees, it just causes problems when you have that many relatives either serving on the board, or working for the company,” Allen said. “What I found there is just this kind of culture that has grown over time, that hasn’t kept up with all of the normal practices that government entities have to follow. ... No one set out to do it wrong or violate the law. It just happened.” Nelson-Dodson said her daughters performed much-needed duties when Zigler, the operations manager, needed time off. Back in November, Allen questioned sewer and water district commissioners about no-bid contracts they approved with HGE Inc., for engineering on the Cagle subdivision expansion. The contracts could be worth a total of $700,000 to $1.4 million, according to information from HGE President Richard Nored. Last year, Nored purchased five properties in La Pine, using as his real estate agent the wife of the sewer district chairman, Dennis Carter. Carter voted along with other officials in November in favor of the contract with HGE. Nored purchased a total of $459,500 in property, according to deeds recorded in Deschutes County. On each deal, Nored worked with real estate agent Nancy Carter, Dennis Carter and Nored confirmed. Carter and Nored said the real estate deals have no connection to the water and sewer districts’ busi-

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ness, and it was not necessary for Carter to declare any conflict of interest before voting on the two contracts with Nored in November. “I don’t discuss my wife’s work in meetings,” Carter said recently. He did not know how much his wife earned from her transactions with Nored. “No, it wasn’t a conflict of interest at all,” Carter said. Allen said it was bad business practice for the districts to approve no-bid contracts in November with HGE. “The question is, is it good business for a public entity to not competitively bid the largest contracts that the district has, to know where you are out there?” Allen said. “And I think the answer to that is clearly no.” Nored and his firm have done engineering work for the sewer and water districts since the 1990s. “I built the water district,” Nored said. “So I know as much about the water and sewer system in La Pine as anybody.” Yet despite HGE’s lengthy relationship with the La Pine sewer and water districts, the firm did not have a contract formally recognizing it as the districts’ engineer. HGE needed an engineering services contract with each district, “so then the government would approve us as doing the (expansion) work, and it wouldn’t have to have a separate proposal form,” Nored said. The two no-bid contracts that officials at the water and sewer districts approved in November did that, Nored said. It’s common for governments to hire HGE without going through a bidding process or signing contracts that specify how much a project will cost, Nored said. HGE does submit bids on projects, “but we’re in communities where you have a relationship.” HGE has a similar arrangement with the city of Sisters, said City Manager Eileen Stein. “We’ve had a contract with HGE to be the city’s engineer of record since the 1970s,” Stein said. HGE essentially serves as the city’s engineer, since the city does not have an engineer. The HGE contract predates Stein’s tenure, so she did not know whether the city went out to bid for it in the past. Nelson-Dodson is still undecided about whether to cooperate with the city’s plan to annex the districts. “I don’t know what I want,” Nelson-Dodson said.

Continued from A1 Many of Horton’s real estate transactions were made as part of a group that included Tyler Fitzsimons, the head of the defunct Desert Sun Development. Fitzsimons is facing federal charges of bank fraud and money laundering for his activities with Desert Sun, which were not connected with his dealings with Horton. Along with Jayne Heyne, Horton and Fitzsimons in 2003 formed the Deschutes Land & Cattle Co. LLC, which once owned 120 acres on the northwest edge of Redmond, and lobbied successfully to have their properties brought in to the city’s urban growth boundary in 2006. In 2007, Horton sold a 40-acre parcel he had acquired as part of Deschutes Land & Cattle Co. to the Redmond School District for $7.79 million. Monday, the school district completed the final step of that transaction, reaching an agreement to have Horton refund $480,000 of the $500,000 that had been placed in escrow at the time of purchase to fund the extension of water and sewer lines to the school district property. School district Chief Operations Officer Doug Snyder said the original deal allowed Horton to keep the interest earned on the money in escrow for up to five years, by which time it was anticipated he would use the $500,000 to construct the utility lines needed to build a middle school and elementary school on the property. With the five-year deadline about 20 months away and no pressing need for new schools in northwest Redmond, the district opted to take back the funds for other purposes, allowing Horton to keep the $20,000 he would have earned in interest over the next 20 months, Snyder said. Horton said he’s looking forward to trying cases again for the first time in several years. “I welcome getting back to this job in the DA’s Office,” he said. “I’m not doing any real estate development now, because there isn’t any to do. “Rather than sitting around all day wondering when the real estate market is going to turn around, I think it’s fortuitous Mr. Flaherty offered me this opportunity to do something I really enjoyed when I was younger, being a prosecutor.” Horton is the sixth new prosecutor to be named since Flaherty took over the office from Mike Dugan, whom he defeated in the district attorney’s election last May.

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

97

tional advocacy group. But “differentiating citizens on the basis of their parents’ immigration status would inevitably result in discriminatory treatment.” Supporters of birthright citizenship — including the American Civil Liberties Union, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, Migration Policy Institute and the Constitutional Accountability Center — have hit back hard, issuing white papers on the 14th Amendment’s intent, organizing pro-immigrant rallies and running radio ads. According to a 2010 Pew Hispanic Center analysis, undocumented immigrants comprise slightly more than 4 percent of adults in the U.S. But because of their youth and high birthrates, they produce an estimated 8 percent of the approximately 4.3 million babies born annually. What is the real anchoring power of “anchor babies?” Advocates contend it is overblown. U.S.-born children cannot “protect their parents from deportation,” the Immigration Policy Center’s analysis stated. “Every year the U.S. deports thousands of parents of U.S. citizens.” Those children can sponsor their parents for permanent residency, but not before age 21. In most cases, if the petition is granted, the parents would still have to leave the U.S. for at least 10 years — the penalty for having been here illegally in the first place. The center’s report concluded: “Undocumented immigrants do not come to the U.S. to give birth as part of a 31-year plan.” But birthright citizenship does have its benefits. In households with typically low incomes, the infants are immediately eligible for Medicaid and other government benefits — even though their parents are not. In arguing for his legislative agenda, Metcalfe stresses the economic impact. The estimated 140,000 illegal immigrants in Pennsylvania, he said, drain state coffers to the tune of $1.4 billion a year — much of it to cover uncompensated emergency-room services for people “who shouldn’t be on our soil in the first place.”

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‘Not my fight,’ says obstetrician

‘I just want healthy babies’

Women

In 2006, Jack Ludmir, chief of obstetrics at Pennsylvania Hospital, founded a pre-natal clinic for immigrant women, Latina Community Health Services. He sees about 50 women a week, who pay on a sliding scale that averages $5, but nothing at all if they can’t afford it. He writes their names in an oldschool notebook. Not all are Latina; he has had patients from Egypt and Pakistan. Ludmir doesn’t ask their immigration status. But based on their lack of Social Security numbers, he estimates that at least 14 percent of the women who deliver there are undocumented. “I didn’t bring these people here,” he said. “They are here, in my backyard, and they are coming to my hospital.” But, he said, he does not provide hundreds of thousands of dollars of subsidized care purely from the goodness of his heart. It is in Pennsylvania Hospital’s self-interest to provide preventative care against gestational diabetes, high blood pressure and other complications, he said, than to incur astronomical unreimbursed costs when a woman in a life-or-death crisis needs an emergency delivery. Although illegal immigrants are not entitled to publicly funded health benefits, hospitals cannot turn away any woman in labor. “I am not a politician,” Ludmir said. “I am not here to argue that the borders should be tighter. That is not my fight. “But the law is the law, and unless Metcalfe and others change it,” he said, these children “are U.S. citizens.”

As the cornerstone of American civil rights, the 14th Amendment affirms that “all persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States,” regardless of their parents’ citizenship. Ratified in 1868, it was designed to rectify the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1857 Dred Scott decision, which held that no one of African descent, including slaves and free persons, could ever become U.S. citizens. Immigrant advocates say that the amendment’s framers wanted to make sure that race, ethnicity and parentage could never again be used by the government to decide who among the those born in America are worthy of citizenship. Several U.S. Supreme Court cases have essentially upheld that interpretation, but without directly addressing the question of whether children of illegal immigrants are covered by the amendment. Metcalfe and his supporters contend the phrase, “subject to the jurisdiction thereof,” is open to reinterpretation. They say it doesn’t apply to illegal immigrants because they owe their allegiance to a foreign power, and not America. Lofty arguments are not on the mind of Lizbeth Ramos as she awaits the expected arrival of her twins in June, but frets about premature delivery. Asked if it matters whether her children have U.S. citizenship, she falls silent for a moment, then shrugs and smiles. “I really don’t care. I just want healthy babies.”

Continued from A1 “It could go either way,” said Coleman, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York. “In a country like Egypt, where you have powerful Islamist groups and a very influential mainstream that appeals to Islam, women have will have to navigate very carefully. The same is true in Tunisia.” Kamel and other women from the region took part last week in meetings that marked the one-year anniversary of U.N. Women, the United Nations agency to promote women’s rights. They asked U.N. officials to help them solidify gains and seize opportunities to end some of the world’s most repressive laws and practices. The 2009 U.N. Arab Human Development Report said women “find themselves in a subservient position within the family and receive little protection from the legal system against violations inflicted by male family members.” It cited sexual and psychological abuse, genital mutilation, forced child marriage and prostitution, and trafficking.





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“Help us break the cycle of fear,” Nora Rafeh, a graduate student in political science in Egypt, said after coming to New York from Cairo’s Tahrir Square. Former Chilean President Michelle Bachelet, the head of U.N. Women, vowed to use her annual $500 million budget to help Arab women become more involved politically and economically. Bachelet said she wants Arab leaders to learn that every nation loses economically by failing to enhance women’s rights. “It is a great opportunity,” Bachelet said of the protests. “This is a very important moment in which the momentum won’t be lost.” No woman was named to the committee to draft a new Egyptian constitution, Coleman noted, and she cautioned that democracy is likely to bring Islamist groups into Tunisia’s political mix. Laws affecting women in Egypt and Tunisia are some of the most progressive in the region, so there is potential for backsliding. Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

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Continued from A1 “Once a child is born here, the parents make the argument that they should be allowed to stay as that child’s guardian. They are using that child as an anchor (to) play on our heartstrings,” said Pennsylvania state Rep. Daryl Metcalfe, a Butler County Republican who has built a national reputation as a crusader against what he calls “illegal alien invaders.” Immigrant advocates dismiss his contention as myth, and point to a recent study that found that undocumented immigrants generally “come for work and to join family members.” The nonprofit Immigration Policy Center concluded “they do no come specifically to give birth” and game the immigration system. Such assertions have not tempered the efforts of immigrationcontrol proponents to effectively do away with “birthright citizenship” for the offspring of illegal immigrants. On the federal level, two Republican senators, David Vitter of Louisiana and Rand Paul of Kentucky, want to accomplish it by amending the Constitution — allowing automatic citizenship only if a child has at least one parent who already is a citizen, a legal permanent resident or an active-duty soldier. On the state level, Metcalfe, joined by lawmakers from 40 others states, is promoting a package of model legislation under the rubric “National Security Begins At Home.” Among those suggested bills: In lieu of automatic citizenship, states would issue distinctly marked birth certificates for the newborns of illegal immigrants, to distinguish them from U.S. citizens. Pointing out that immigration policy is a federal prerogative, immigrant advocates say that such proposals are beyond the scope of state lawmakers’ authority, not to mention unconstitutional. Metcalfe’s “model (birth certificate) statute claims not to confer any particular benefit or penalty on the basis of the different markings,” said Alison Parker, U.S. program director for Human Rights Watch, an interna-

The water and sewer districts in La Pine, currently separate from the city, want to expand within the city’s urban growth boundary. Meanwhile, the city is trying to annex the districts.

PERENNIALS & ANNUALS  POTTERY  BIRDBATHS  GIFT ITEMS  FREE ESTIMATES

Citizenship

Districts want to expand

Hun ting ton Rd. Pine Dr.

Continued from A1 They are fighting annexation into the city’s government to keep water and sewer rates from going up, and to protect employees. They also cite a federal law that prevents a forcible takeover while a loan is outstanding. They currently have two U.S. Department of Agriculture loans totaling $2.9 million. City officials say putting the water and sewer districts under city control would be cost-effective and make it easier for businesses to move to La Pine. The city councilors and city manager have talked publicly about alleged mismanagement and nepotism at the sewer and water districts. Mayor Ken Mulenex said at a February City Council meeting that those issues came to light after councilors instructed City Manager Rick Allen to research the districts’ operations, to learn more about them before annexing them. “It’s become evident in all this due diligence that sewer and water are pretty sloppy operations,” Mulenex said. “And we have no doubt as a council that the city can run a structured, well-running public works department that would include sewer and water.” One of the issues Mulenex and other city officials have raised is La Pine Water District Commissioner BarbeAnn Nelson-Dodson’s personal use of district equipment. When Nelson-Dodson’s 15-year-old Labrador, Jumpy, died on Christmas 2009, she called a couple of district employees to come bury the dog because the ground was frozen. They buried Jumpy the day after Christmas, but did not bill Nelson-Dodson for the $35 the district charges to rent equipment until recently. “I don’t remember all of it because I was pretty upset about it,” Nelson-Dodson said last week. Nelson-Dodson also has two daughters who have worked for the districts. Rachel Dodson held a $10an-hour job as a temporary office assistant for the districts from January through September 2010, Donna Zigler, the operations manager for the districts, wrote in an e-mail. Ashley Williams, who is also Nelson-Dodson’s daughter, has worked as an administrative assistant for the districts since January 2009 and earns $14.86 an hour, according to Zigler. “It was just a fluke that I said, ‘Let’s send Ashley over there, and she can work for sewer, so she doesn’t work for me,” Nelson-Dodson said. Williams is paid with sewer district funds, and does work for both districts, according to Zigler’s e-mail. Previously, Nelson-Dodson had done a lot of filing and other work for the districts without pay, Nelson-Dodson said. James Newton is a commissioner with both the sewer and water districts, and his son Andrew Newton worked for nearly a decade as the operations

 PLANTERS 


C OV ER S T ORY

— Chester Finn Jr., president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a nonprofit research group focused on improving K-12 education executives from Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates to Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke are lamenting the damage caused by education reductions. “No economy can succeed without a high-quality workforce, particularly in an age of globalization and technical change,” Bernanke said in a speech Wednesday. “Cost-effective K-12 and postsecondary schooling are crucial.” In New York, Bloomberg is pushing the Legislature to pass a law eliminating the “last-in, first-out” policy, saying as many as 4,666, or 6 percent, of the city’s teachers may be fired. In New Jersey, Christie proposed eliminating seniority rules for teachers at a town hall meeting Sept. 28. And in California, a Senate bill was introduced Feb. 15 that would replace seniority with a system based on several factors including student performance. Superintendents argue seniority rules force them to retain incompetent teachers instead of young talent. Changing the system would be a “pretty substantial boost” to student performance, said Chester Finn Jr., who was assistant secretary of education under President Ronald Reagan from 1985 to 1988. He is president of the Thomas B. Fordham Institute, a nonprofit research group focused on improving K-12 education.

“Just as some schools are dropout factories, there are teachers that are ignorance factories,” Finn said in a telephone interview. “You’re going to have to let some people go, so why not get rid of the people who aren’t getting the job done?” While seniority isn’t the “endall and be-all,” mayors and superintendents don’t want any system at all, said Randi Weingarten, president of the Washingtonbased American Federation of Teachers, which has 1.5 million members. “They just want individual principals to make decisions based on who their favorites are,” Weingarten said in a telephone interview March 4. “Instead of trying to figure out who to work with and how to deal with a terrible budget, they’re trying to attack teachers and attack people who made an investment and commitment to this profession before it was cool.” The recession that began in 2008 and the resulting budget crises devastated teacher employment. About 172,000 publiceducation jobs, including those of teachers and clerical workers, have been eliminated since September 2008, according to John See, an American Federation of Teachers spokesman. In the past 12 months, 99,800 have disappeared, he said, citing federal labor statistics.

Sheen fired from CBS’ ‘Two and a Half Men’ By Joe Flint Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — CBS is down to one and a half men. Charlie Sheen, star of the network’s hit show “Two and a Half Men,” was thrown off the show Monday by Warner Bros., the studio that produces the situation comedy. The move to fire Sheen follows several weeks of highly public and vituperative battling by the actor against CBS, Warner Bros. and “Two and a Half Men” cocreator Chuck Lorre. In a letter to Sheen’s lawyer outlining its reasons for his dis-

Lottery Continued from A1 Specifically, the group says the fix-it measure contemplated by lawmakers, called House Joint Resolution 29, doesn’t keep enough money flowing to groups for habitat restoration. Among other things, HJR 29 would let the state keep about $8.5 million to cover the costs of implementing the new law. The position has sparked tough talk in the Willamette Valley. If The Nature Conservancy doesn’t get on board with the agreement, the Oregon Education Association is prepared to pursue a new ballot measure that could divert more lottery funding away from natural areas to schools. “We are concerned that it appears that they are reneging on the promise that they made to voters, to the Legislature, and to those of us who originally had some concerns with the measure,” said Becca Uherbelau, spokeswoman for the OEA. The possibility of Measure 76 exploding politically has groups such as the Deschutes River Conservancy and Upper Deschutes Watershed Council worried. Since 1999, the Deschutes Conservancy has collected more than $10 million in lottery-funded grants from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board for use in Central Oregon, according to the state. That figure is second only to The Nature Conservancy, which collected more than $15 million for projects all over the state. “At this stage, we don’t and won’t get involved in all those backroom negotiations and deal making,” said Tod Heisler, executive director of the Deschutes River Conservancy. Asked about

missal, Warner Bros. charged that the actor’s “erratic behavior” undermined production and said his tabloid lifestyle — which has included brushes with the law, accusations of violence toward women including two of his former wives, and hospital trips — has put him in breach of his contract. Sheen’s “self-destructive conduct resulted in his hospitalization, his inability to work at all for a period and the rapid erosion of the cooperative and creative process necessary to produce the show,” lawyers representing the studio said in its letter to Sheen’s

lawyer, Martin Singer. The letter goes on to say that Sheen’s admitted drug use and “furnishing of cocaine” to others puts him in violation of his contract. “There is ample evidence supporting Warner Bros. reasonable good faith opinion that Mr. Sheen has committed felony offenses involving moral turpitude ... that have interfered with his ability to fully and completely render all material services required” under his contract, noted the letter. Neither Sheen’s manager nor lawyer responded to requests for comment.

the talk that a follow-up measure could take all the parks and wildlife funding, he said. “Of course it concerns me. My hope is that calmer minds will prevail and that the right negotiation will occur that frankly protects the will of the voters on Measure 76.” Heisler said the funds have gone into projects that make a difference for Central Oregonians, including restoration of instream flows to Whychuss Creek and the Deschutes River by piping canals to conserve water. “It’s been incredibly important environmentally and for your irrigators, and municipalities and local jobs,” he said. The Upper Deschutes Watershed Council has worked with Deschutes River Conservancy on a lot of grant projects. The council’s executive director, Ryan Houston, said that if the lottery money disappears, about 60 percent of the project funding the council has received would, too — including money used to help with city parks. But he said his group doesn’t know enough to take a position. “Quite honestly, it’s something we here on this side of the mountains don’t fully understand, all the politics that are going on,” he said. One group, the Oregon League of Conservation Voters, has publicly renounced The Nature Conservancy’s position, saying that as far as OLCV is concerned, the bill being pushed by lawmakers meets the terms agreed upon by OLCV, The Nature Conservancy and lawmakers last summer. Jon Isaacs, OLCV executive director, said he’s disappointed both in The Nature Conservancy’s renouncing of the agreement and in the OEA’s willingness to use the threat of a ballot measure to enforce that same agreement.

“I’ve been in probably four meetings where it’s been put on the table,” he said. “At this point, if they don’t (follow through on their threat), their credibility is on the line in terms of putting it out there as the next steps they’ll take.” He called the disagreement a destructive one. “In my view, this is what the antigovernment forces out there want: They want those of us who believe in government ... to fight among ourselves over limited resources. ... It’s potentially really destructive for the conservation community.” Stephen Anderson, an Oregon spokesman for The Nature Conservancy, declined to comment on whether a recent statement issued to the Willamette Week newspaper meant that his group was backing away from its earlier position opposing HJR 29. “We’ve always indicated that we would have some flexibility, and that’s why we’re talking to the legislative leadership now to work that out.” Rep. Ben Cannon, D-Portland, is one of the sponsors of HJR 29, and is part of small group of lawmakers that continues to negotiate with The Nature Conservancy. He said he hopes that the group returns to staying within “the framework of the agreement,” from last summer, because “I think they have at some points begun to stray outside of it.” Lawmakers will meet to discuss the issue later this week. HJR 29 is expected to lead to a measure on the November ballot that tweaks Measure 76, though its details have not yet been finalized. Nick Budnick can be reached at 503-566-2839 or at nbudnick@bendbulletin.com.

Shrinking sea ice has triggered Arctic phytoplankton blooms an average of 50 days earlier than 14 years ago. Median extent of sea ice

R U S S I A

(Jan. 1979-2000)

A S I A

Sea ice extent January 2011

Bering Sea

K a ra

Alaska

. U.S DA A CAN

Beaufort Sea

Sea

Arctic Ocean FIN. SWE. Greenland

0 500 MILES

Foxe Basin

Baffin(DENMARK) Bay

Source: National Snow and Ice Data Center

the retreat of the ice,” said Kahru, who published the work in the journal Global Change Biology. “A 50-day shift is a big shift,” said plankton researcher Michael Behrenfeld of Oregon State University, who was not involved in the study. “As the planet warms, the threat is that these changes seen closer to land may spread across the entire Arctic.” Ecologists worry that the early blooms could unravel the region’s ecosystem and “lead to crashes of the food web,” said William Sydeman, who studies ocean ecology as president of the nonprofit Farallon Institute in Petaluma, Calif. When phytoplankton explode in population during the blooms, tiny animals called zooplankton — which include krill and other small crustaceans — likewise expand in number as they harvest the phytoplankton. Fish, shellfish and whales feed on the zooplankton, seabirds snatch the fish and shellfish, and polar bears and seals subsist on those species. The timing of this sequential harvest is programmed into the reproductive cycles of many animals, Sydeman said. “It’s all about when food is available.” So the disrupted phytoplankton blooms could “have cascading effects up the food web all the way to marine mammals.” But the Arctic food web is poorly studied, and so any result-

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NEW YORK — Public-school teachers are facing the biggest challenge to their job security in more than half a century as politicians target seniority rules that make the last hired the first fired when jobs are cut. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican, Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, a Democrat, and New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, an independent, are among officials pushing for changes in laws in coming months to let them fire underperforming teachers. As budget cuts threaten the jobs of thousands of school employees, officials are demanding the right to keep the most talented, even if they’re the least experienced. The proposed changes may undercut the power of teachers’ unions. They intensify the debate on how to judge instructor’s effectiveness as U.S. students lag behind international peers. As officials cut education budgets, they should focus on what is best for children, Education Secretary Arne Duncan said. “Layoffs based only on seniority don’t help kids,” Duncan said in a conference call with reporters March 3. “We have to minimize the negative impact on students.” In 14 states, including New York, California and New Jersey, districts can consider only seniority when dismissing teachers, and they are home to 40 percent of public-school instructors, according to a report published last month by The New Teacher Project, a New York organization founded in 1997 by Michelle Rhee, Washington’s former schools chancellor. Even as states cut billions from their budgets, federal officials and

“Just as some schools are dropout factories, there are teachers that are ignorance factories. You’re going to have to let some people go, so why not get rid of the people who aren’t getting the job done?”

Climate researchers have long warned that the Arctic is particularly vulnerable to global warming. The dramatic shrinking of sea ice in areas circling the North Pole highlights those concerns. A new report finds that the disappearing ice has apparently triggered another dramatic event — one that could disrupt the entire ecosystem of fish, shellfish, birds and marine mammals that thrive in the harsh northern climate. Each summer, an explosion of tiny ocean-dwelling plants and algae, called phytoplankton, anchors the Arctic food web. But these vital annual blooms of phytoplankton are now peaking up to 50 days earlier than they did 14 years ago, satellite data show. “The ice is retreating earlier in the Arctic, and the phytoplankton blooms are also starting earlier,” said study leader Mati Kahru, an oceanographer at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego. Drawing on observations from three American and European climate satellites, Kahru and his team studied worldwide phytoplankton blooms from 1997 through 2009. The satellites can spot the blooms by their color, as billions of the tiny organisms turn huge swaths of the ocean green for a week or two. The blooms peaked earlier and earlier in 11 percent of the areas where Kahru’s team was able to collect good data. Kahru said the impacted zones cover roughly 1 million square kilometers, including portions of the Foxe Basin and the Baffin and Kara seas. In the late 1990s, phytoplankton blooms in these areas hit their peak in September, only after a summer’s worth of relative warmth had melted the edges of the polar ice cap. But by 2009 the blooms’ peaks had shifted to early July. “The trend is obvious and significant, and in my mind there is no doubt it is related to

Arctic plankton

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Bloomberg News

The Washington Post

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By Oliver Staley

By Brian Vastag

CI RC

Merit-based layoffs threaten job security

Shrinking ice threatens Arctic ecosystem

IC

TEACHERS UNIONS

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 A5

Mary Kate Cannistra / The Washington Post

ing decline in fish, seabirds and mammals will be difficult to spot. As the Arctic Ocean north becomes less and less icy, commercial fisherman have begun eyeing these vast, untapped waters as an adjunct to the famously rich fishing grounds of the subarctic Bering Sea, west of Alaska. But in 2009, the U.S. body overseeing fishing in the region, the North Pacific Fishery Management Council, banned commercial fishing in the Arctic Ocean, citing a lack of knowledge about how many — or even what kind — of fish live there. “There are no catches authorized because we don’t know enough about the fish populations there to set a quota,” said Julie Speegle, a spokeswoman for the Alaska office of the National Marine Fisheries Service. Last week, that service reported results from the first fish survey in 30 years of the Beaufort Sea, an arm of the Arctic Ocean north of Alaska. The survey found sizeable populations of several commercially valuable species, including pollock, Pacific cod and snow crab. How these populations will respond to the earlier plankton blooms is a big unknown, Sydeman said. But research has shown that northern Atlantic cod populations crash when plankton blooms in that region shift in time.


A6 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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B

YouTube’s big buy Acquisition will give site more original content, see Page B4.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,745.63 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -39.04 -1.40%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

t

12,090.03 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -79.85 -.66%

t

1,310.13 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -11.02 -.83%

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al deal works out. Expansion has always been a goal, said Falconer, who owns the restaurant along with his wife, Tammy. The economy has started to improve, and leasing rates in Bend remain low. “When I bought the place four years ago,” he said, “I kind of had this intention, … and now’s a good time.” Hours for the Pilot Butte Drive-In Westside will likely be 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. at first, Falconer said. He would like to open for breakfast sometime next winter. See Pilot Butte / B3

The Bulletin

State economic index flat in January

Pilot Butte Drive-In, the east-side icon known for its 18-ounce burger, plans to open a second location on Bend’s west side, co-owner Bill Falconer said Monday. Falconer, who bought the restaurant in April 2007, did not want to give a specific location while still negotiating a lease. But he hopes to begin serving up the restaurant’s signature burgers, Cobb salads, shakes and other food at a site on Northwest 14th Street/Southwest Century Drive around Memorial Day weekend, if the rent-

s

$1434.10 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE +$5.90

WASHINGTON — The Securities and Exchange Commission is about 400 employees short of what it needs to manage its current workload, according to a consultant’s four-month internal review mandated by the Dodd-Frank Act. The preliminary findings by Boston Consulting Group reinforce arguments by SEC officials that the agency is underfunded and understaffed as it takes on oversight of derivatives, credit-rating firms and municipal bonds, according to a draft copy of the report obtained by Bloomberg News. “Without sufficient human resources, the agency will be unable to complete the requirements of Dodd-Frank while maintaining its current activities,” the draft said. The study said staffing levels had declined since 2005 and that SEC employees interviewed consistently complained that their departments were understaffed. — From staff and wire reports

Productivity

Andy Tullis The Bulletin

TechXchange hopes to expand used-phone business in Oregon, online The Bulletin

B

elieve it or not, 21-year-old Taylor Hooks, the sole employee of the Bend refurbished cell phone store TechXchange, is not obsessed with her Android smart phone. “This is kind of funny, but I’m not a cell phone person, meaning, like, I don’t really have to have my cell phone by my side,” Hooks said. “I’m not texting 24/7. But I understand cell phones really well. I’m kind of a nerd that way. But … I’m not passionate about my cell phone.” A native of Burien, Wash., she obtained her first cell phone when she was 13. Her professional affiliation with the technology came years later, after her

New York Times News Service

Seasonally adjusted 10 percent 8

2.6%

4 0 -2 2010

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

AP

What: TechXchange LLC Where: 1036 N.E. Third Street, Bend Employees: One Website: http://techxchange.org Phone: 541-633-0848

mother, Lisa Perra, who had been general manager of the Bend GetWireless! store, an authorized T-Mobile dealer, established a separate operation just for used phones inside the shop in late 2007 or early 2008. The GetWireless! store closed soon thereafter, and Perra put the

The next frontier for digital music is not a tablet or a smart phone, but two items that have been part of everyday life for decades: the car and the television set. For years, digital music has been confined mostly to traditional computers and phones. But that limitation is slowly disappearing as the market shifts toward cloud services, which stream content from remote servers, allowing anything with an Internet connection — like smart TVs or Blu-ray players — to become portals for vast libraries of entertainment. One music streaming service, MOG,

is counting on this change to draw new subscribers and help it stand out in a crowded field. Today, the company will announce a string of deals that could introduce it to millions of potential new customers. LG, Samsung and Vizio will incorporate MOG into their Internet-ready televisions and other devices, and the service will become available on Sonos, a wireless system for managing music throughout the house. And in what the company calls the first integration of an on-demand music service into a car, MOG will also become part of BMW’s Mini line. See MOG / B3

TECH FOCUS

2

The basics

Foreclosure deal could be made in 2 months

used-phone business on hold, her daughter said. In 2009, when Hooks was 19, she saw her mother not doing anything with the business. “I really just didn’t want to work for anybody else, and I didn’t want to work in just a folding-clothes type of situation or, you know, working in a restaurant, that kind of thing, so, I said, ‘I have a couple of options,’ ” Hooks said. She remembers telling her mother, “If you’re not going to do anything with it, I’ll take it over.” The mother and daughter started a miniature TechXchange operation out of their Bend garage. See TechXchange / B3

WASHINGTON — A broad agreement could be struck within two months to overhaul how millions of foreclosures are handled by the nation’s biggest banks and to expand the use of home loan modifications, according to Tom Miller, the attorney general of Iowa. All 50 state attorneys general, along with federal regulators, have been stepping up pressure on the mortgage servicers over their foreclosure lapses in recent days and presented them with an outline of a settlement late last week. But Miller’s comments at a press conference here Monday marked the first time officials have said when an agreement might come. “I’m hoping we can wrap it up in a couple of months,” he said. “That’s a hope, but we’re going to move as fast as we can.” There have been reports that a broad settlement with the banks was imminent, but Miller played down that prospect, citing thorny issues like the question of just which homeowners should benefit from the proceeds of any settlement. See Foreclosure / B3

Fears about oil in Mideast and Libya pay off for Russia By Andrew E. Kramer New York Times News Service

MOSCOW — Whatever the eventual outcome of the Muslim world’s social upheaval, there is a clear economic winner so far: Vladimir Putin. Russia, which pumps more oil than Saudi Arabia, is reaping a windfall from the steep rise in global energy prices resulting from instability in oil regions of the Middle East and North Africa. Riding the high oil prices, the Russian ruble has risen faster against the dollar this year than any other currency, which is helpful because it will curb consumer inflation during an election year. Russian stocks are buoyant, too: The Micex index closed last week at 1,781, up nearly 6 percent since the beginning of the year. (Monday was a holiday in Russia.) But the Russians could not step in to offset any potential big drop in global production, because Russia does not have any oil wells standing idle that would allow it to increase production. Right now Russia is pumping oil at its top capacity. See Oil / B4

Streaming music service is betting on cars, TVs By Ben Sisario

Non-farm business productivity, percent change from previous quarter.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin ile photo

Pilot Butte Drive-In hopes to offer its signature burgers at a site on Northwest 14th Street/Southwest Century Drive.

Taylor Hooks decided to take over her mother’s used cell phone business in 2009, eventually expanding it into the TechXchange retail store on Third Street in Bend. Hooks says usedphone businesses are often “pawnshoppy,” but she aims to provide a retail experience on par with that of major cell phone carriers.

By Jordan Novet

$35.855 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.538

New York Times News Service

Giving cell phones a second chance

SEC review finds staffing shortfall

s

By Nelson D. Schwartz

EXECUTIVE FILE

A drop in core manufacturing kept the University of Oregon Economic Index relatively flat for January, according to a report released Monday. The manufacturing decline offset other positive signs, according to the latest University of Oregon Index of Economic Indicators, which reached 90.6 in January. Employment indicators — the number of firsttime claims for jobless benefits and payroll for temporary workers — continued to show steady positive signs, according to the report. The index suggests ongoing improvement in the state’s economic activity, although the recent sharp increase in commodity prices could cause problems if the trend continues.

2009

Ten-year CLOSE 3.49 treasury CHANGE +.29%

Pilot Butte Drive-In plans to flip burgers on west side By Tim Doran

Unemployment rates dropped less than a percentage point each in all three Central Oregon counties in January compared with December’s rates, according to state figures released Monday. In Crook County, the seasonally adjusted jobless rate was 17.6 percent in January, a dip of 0.8 of a percentage point from December. The rate in January 2010 was 16.8 percent, according to the Oregon Employment Department. Deschutes County reported a seasonally adjusted rate of 14 percent in January, compared with 14.6 percent in December. The rate was 14.2 percent in January 2010. In Jefferson County, the unemployment rate in January was 14.1 percent, a dip of 0.4 of a percentage point from December. Jefferson County recorded a 13.9 percent jobless rate in January 2010.

6

BONDS

Restaurant expected to open around Memorial Day

Central Oregon jobless rates dip

B

The MOG car app appears on the info screen of a BMW Mini Cooper. MOG is counting on integration with cars and TVs to help it stand out from other music streaming services. Jim Wilson New York Times News Service


B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

D

A-B-C-D A-Power ABB Ltd ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATMI Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AVX Cp AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh Accelrys Accenture AccoBrds AccretvH n Accuray Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity Acxiom AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvPhot AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirTrnsp AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexBld AlexcoR g Alexion AlignTech Alkerm AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish rs AlldNevG AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlonUSA AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria Alumina AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek s Amgen AmicusTh AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry Andrsons AnglogldA ABInBev Anixter AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach Apricus rs AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd ArmstrW s Arris ArrowEl ArtioGInv ArubaNet ArvMerit AsburyA AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS Atrinsic rs AtwoodOcn Augusta g Aurizon g AuthenTec AutoNatn Autobytel AutoChina Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg

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Nm Avista Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods B2B Inet BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMB Munai BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BT Grp BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu BallCp wi BallardPw BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm wtA BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BiPCop BrcIndiaTR BiPNG Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belden Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRef s Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BioTime BlkHillsCp BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkIntlG&I Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BluDolp rs Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BovieMed BoydGm Brandyw BravoBri n BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq BristowGp Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrownFB BrukerCp Brunswick Bsquare BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNOOC CNinsure CRH CSG Sys CSX CTC Media CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet CapGold CapOne CapSenL CapitlSrce CapFdF rs Caplease CapsteadM CpstnTrb h CarboCer Cardero g CardnlHlth CardiumTh Cardtronic CareFusion CareerEd CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CascadeF h Caseys CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid

D 1.10 22.53 -.09 33.35 -.83 0.92 27.27 -.08 2.73 -.18 0.92 35.82 -.45 0.84 17.99 +.21 1.21 -.01 0.60 26.35 -.02 1.97 35.95 -.48 33.96 -1.54 0.56 9.63 +.03 1.82 94.47 -1.29 1.82 79.76 -1.11 49.04 -.40 1.18 +.15 49.42 -.82 0.42 48.15 -.41 6.62 -.03 1.50 45.38 -.35 0.18 17.69 -.11 4.30 +.04 1.04 30.48 +.02 34.56 +.01 120.18 -2.16 0.60 69.46 -.27 0.28 35.68 -.15 2.08 -.10 35.74 -2.54 1.34 59.00 -.10 0.55 11.67 -.16 0.82 19.40 -.49 0.78 11.50 -.14 0.45 12.02 -.09 0.44 15.61 -.11 0.04 14.03 -.09 7.85 +.02 1.04 2.06 -.06 2.80 63.08 -.50 0.36 29.85 -.21 1.96 61.82 +.35 0.04 2.43 -.04 51.06 -.23 28.05 +.02 57.71 -1.85 66.42 -1.44 7.08 +.13 0.35 19.96 -.51 32.49 +.83 58.22 +1.28 0.72 96.10 -1.12 11.79 -.41 0.32 20.85 -.47 0.48 52.99 +.16 20.89 +.01 1.24 53.11 -.69 20.66 -.44 4.48 -.09 0.10 5.71 -.10 0.76 82.91 1.64 79.41 -.80 47.52 -.82 0.20 35.89 -.53 7.40 -.35 0.96 32.44 -.28 18.08 -.46 0.28 29.41 -.16 85.04 -.46 0.30 49.68 -.64 0.60 31.81 -.88 41.09 +.09 37.45 -.20 22.74 +.29 4.01 -.07 1.95 -.06 1.00 +.05 71.24 +.09 23.95 -.34 0.68 17.33 -.03 1.95 -.03 4.27 +.01 7.56 -.28 1.46 30.99 -.27 1.28 12.69 -.06 34.82 -.46 5.50 198.24 -3.65 0.32 4.07 0.98 8.69 +.02 1.36 10.54 -.06 0.40 17.59 -.59 0.60 14.62 +.15 26.93 -.72 7.85 -.57 1.68 70.88 -.92 0.40 9.06 -.25 1.67 -.19 75.63 -2.12 0.04 7.02 -.04 2.00 92.34 -.39 7.47 -.06 2.64 -.06 9.66 -.47 0.60 12.03 -.03 17.13 -.99 18.77 +.57 0.44 20.18 -.09 35.32 -.51 12.13 -.12 1.80 0.56 24.85 +1.03 1.32 26.31 -.12 48.73 -.47 0.36 40.74 -1.30 0.60 22.61 -.31 34.90 -2.67 1.35 -.07 6.17 -.28 9.83 +.17 26.93 +.01 0.52 31.49 -.10 1.24 22.64 -.38 0.56 17.45 -.05 0.34 10.21 -.09 12.80 -.75 0.32 25.26 -.08 0.28 14.31 -.56 1.28 67.46 -.21 19.48 -.39 0.05 22.93 -.21 8.57 -.50 0.20 25.77 -.25 0.80 36.77 -.34 0.10 90.95 0.46 45.77 -.29 0.92 70.68 -1.22 0.16 23.72 -.26 24.71 -.36 6.93 -.02 0.84 17.54 +.16 0.40 28.38 +.45 0.20 23.62 -.34 0.40 128.90 -5.41 1.16 72.22 -.62 0.04 43.00 -.82 42.85 -.51 1.00 32.90 -.02 5.60 303.87 -.93 0.84 19.16 -.01 47.59 -1.47 7.22 -.04 5.28 230.95 +2.52 0.26 15.79 -.28 0.84 22.38 +.01 19.80 +.01 1.04 74.23 -.73 0.61 21.59 -.64 0.34 8.21 +.01 20.01 -.63 0.50 32.83 -.18 26.06 -.45 0.50 35.88 -.46 0.72 43.80 -.50 0.12 45.32 -.98 8.51 -.11 9.44 -.43 7.27 -.07 0.63 9.64 -.04 13.76 -.65 20.41 +.78 0.04 7.35 -.23 7.54 -.34 14.96 -.35 1.47 -.09 1.80 55.29 -.73 0.40 38.88 -1.75 17.75 -1.50 61.95 -.03 1.16 33.41 -.14 0.64 11.51 -.28 1.30 73.94 +.08 0.36 49.48 -1.64 1.08 64.58 -1.68 13.18 -.36 .82 +.20 5.40 -.04 0.20 48.30 -.23 9.26 -.28 0.04 7.39 -.08 0.30 12.48 +.03 0.26 5.37 -.13 1.51 12.98 -.18 1.75 +.09 0.80 125.14 +2.24 2.01 -.11 0.78 41.97 -.56 .39 +.02 19.16 -.35 27.50 -.42 22.30 -.73 34.40 -.75 1.00 39.93 -.43 0.72 40.35 -1.33 36.63 +.28 28.41 +.18 .45 -.08 0.54 40.55 -.55 43.92 -1.93 1.76 102.13 -.91 0.04 17.36 -.34 41.15 -2.71 0.36 5.80 -.15 .61 -.01 0.20 41.35 -.38 6.26 -.10 11.39 -.23 53.70 -.56 .23 -.02 3.59 30.78 -.07 0.43 8.74 -.15 1.19 17.62 -.17 0.80 39.37 -.21 30.66 0.79 15.82 -.06 1.56 14.73 -.07 12.66 -.13 19.55 -.81 0.01 22.15 +.16 16.58 -.12 2.90 40.09 -.31 6.02 +.07 55.30 -.87 27.17 -.26

Nm Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn CheniereE ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaCEd ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChinaEd ChinElMot ChinaFire ChiGengM ChinaInfo ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChiMarFd ChinaMda ChinaMble ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaUni ChiValve ChXDPlas ChiXFash n Chipotle Chiquita Chubb ChungTel n ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys Clarcor ClaudeR g CleanEngy Clearwire CliffsNRs ClinicData Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCola CocaCE Coeur CogdSpen CognizTech CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs CmtyHlt CommVlt CompDivHd CompssMn CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComScore ComstkRs Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ConsEP ContlRes Continucre Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Copel CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts CornstProg CornstTR CornerstStr Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Crane Cray Inc CSVS2xVxS CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold CrwnMedia Crystallx g Ctrip.com CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr Cummins Curis CurEuro CurtisWrt Cyclacel CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCP Mid DCT Indl DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DJSP Ent h DPL DR Horton Drdgold DSW Inc DTE DUSA DanaHldg Danaher s DaqoNEn n Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DealrTrk DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DemMda n DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver DigitalGlb Dillards DineEquity Diodes DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrSCBr rs DirFnBr rs DirLCBr rs DrxEMBll s DrTcBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs

D 102.62 -1.67 2.66 -.24 37.60 -1.03 3.12 -.02 45.00 -.29 48.33 -1.17 28.75 -.22 3.91 -.09 15.30 -.54 9.73 -.14 1.70 19.85 +.09 0.30 33.45 -.12 2.88 103.01 -.74 0.05 35.93 -1.48 0.20 13.43 -.23 43.47 -.68 0.69 4.29 +.05 6.20 -.17 2.00 6.31 -.23 1.42 1.87 -.20 3.86 -.07 7.02 +.76 2.70 +.02 4.97 -.08 6.15 +.33 1.54 57.37 -.30 4.94 +.21 12.99 -.11 1.85 47.60 -.36 12.17 -.73 5.05 +.03 2.79 99.24 -.46 1.63 -.02 4.10 -.10 5.25 +.02 0.23 16.66 -.30 6.54 -.10 6.31 -.61 4.10 -.40 252.56 -2.44 14.38 -.58 1.56 59.17 -.23 29.81 -.27 1.36 76.68 +.30 5.59 +.09 25.98 -2.83 0.40 113.63 -.38 2.51 -.11 1.60 33.01 -.24 0.84 19.40 -.03 0.49 27.76 -.24 23.12 -1.44 18.20 -.20 4.52 -.02 .96 -.00 71.20 -.68 0.42 41.65 -.42 2.67 -.01 13.35 -.30 5.17 -.38 0.56 95.77 -3.35 30.30 -.01 2.20 67.91 -.48 20.74 -.55 0.60 54.62 -.31 15.35 +.40 1.88 65.22 +.01 0.48 25.96 +.13 34.03 -.67 0.40 6.09 -.24 75.91 -.41 0.72 9.80 +.04 44.54 +.16 2.87 -.03 2.32 77.54 +.04 20.48 -.69 0.60 18.83 -.34 3.43 +.11 0.45 25.42 -.13 0.45 24.02 -.06 0.40 37.99 -.37 0.92 40.12 +.05 0.48 15.66 -.61 2.00 26.61 -.16 40.47 -.77 34.93 -1.55 1.36 15.43 -.57 1.80 88.20 -2.25 29.17 +.10 0.80 47.25 -.49 11.25 28.38 -.68 26.33 +.08 0.40 34.63 +.21 0.92 23.05 -.11 13.71 -.40 108.58 -.27 52.47 +.24 2.37 2.64 79.20 -.78 0.40 50.85 -1.63 2.40 49.84 +.13 29.09 -.31 19.68 -.19 0.96 30.40 +.01 2.86 +.07 67.60 -.69 5.19 -.26 13.63 -.34 .36 -.00 0.06 69.33 -.77 1.16 63.31 -1.42 0.42 22.88 -.56 2.30 34.55 -.46 40.77 -.35 0.36 26.27 +.12 1.00 102.99 +.10 17.95 -.05 4.73 -.34 0.56 47.20 -1.44 1.24 8.73 -.42 1.33 9.21 -.63 1.53 10.44 -.44 0.20 22.59 -.33 1.65 34.83 -.34 24.25 -.37 13.42 -.26 0.82 72.19 -.62 8.43 -.06 0.18 8.11 -.11 56.41 -1.21 1.50 16.88 -.17 31.05 -.58 0.80 53.06 +.08 4.02 -.07 0.88 47.97 +.25 0.92 46.97 -.78 6.88 -.42 45.40 +2.44 1.85 43.50 -.64 0.32 3.08 +.01 49.29 -.50 18.50 +.08 1.95 -.22 40.76 -.17 38.87 -.25 2.80 +.09 .16 -.01 38.07 -.97 1.00 +.13 22.00 +.23 1.80 58.04 -.14 1.05 99.70 -2.80 2.90 -.09 0.01 139.18 -.10 0.32 37.35 -.67 1.31 20.40 -.51 2.40 12.50 -.07 .86 -.05 0.50 53.96 -1.22 1.48 -.04 6.45 +.01 2.47 40.35 +.06 0.28 5.22 -.06 33.16 -.73 0.40 4.71 +.04 .15 -.09 1.33 26.26 +.07 0.15 11.33 -.13 0.07 5.05 +.06 39.72 -1.42 2.24 48.09 +.37 4.20 +.25 18.30 -.45 0.08 50.14 -.62 12.14 -.04 1.28 46.36 +.04 14.50 -.29 82.48 -1.28 0.24 53.35 -.62 20.06 -.40 9.84 -.14 87.42 +.24 1.40 90.37 -1.98 .46 -.02 0.36 19.00 +.01 6.68 +.14 15.39 -.21 10.09 +.18 1.13 -.01 1.00 25.53 -.58 23.40 -1.15 23.82 -.30 31.85 -.83 3.64 -.21 4.05 -.07 0.20 37.94 +.23 8.62 -.08 0.93 61.99 -.83 15.38 -.31 43.02 +.24 7.73 -.03 0.16 13.96 0.68 90.53 -.59 4.07 -.16 14.41 -.72 2.46 77.53 -.62 0.18 51.64 +1.08 0.50 76.83 -1.90 0.32 11.21 -.39 12.21 -.25 14.69 -.06 37.67 -.56 1.12 35.58 -.15 2.72 57.09 +.06 32.85 -1.00 30.25 -.63 0.16 39.56 -.29 54.39 -2.89 30.40 -1.35 45.84 -.21 0.51 50.32 -2.18 40.18 +1.96 41.26 +.77 37.65 +.93 0.19 36.69 -1.68 20.64 +.82 15.66 +.34 14.89 +.30

Nm

D

DrxSOXBll DirEMBr rs DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarFn s DollarGen DollarTh DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs Donldson DonlleyRR DoralFncl DotHillSy DblEgl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DunBrad Duoyuan lf DyaxCp Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs DynexCap

0.01 62.04 21.30 30.13 46.92 0.39 62.04 0.11 78.94 1.55 80.63 0.41 83.83 0.08 21.54 41.47 36.47 23.32 0.40 43.02 0.24 35.36 50.00 13.96 21.29 27.90 54.06 50.71 1.97 45.42 17.07 1.00 88.05 0.52 56.63 1.04 18.31 1.24 2.92 10.84 0.40 18.40 1.10 63.82 0.60 37.26 1.00 37.35 7.58 26.56 53.11 0.52 4.75 75.90 1.81 4.90 1.64 53.26 0.48 22.96 0.98 18.14 0.68 13.43 1.44 79.52 2.32 1.59 15.88 2.85 5.80 1.08 10.53

Nm -5.60 +.84 -.59 +.88 -1.42 -4.16 -2.12 -1.73 -.07 -.47 -.64 -.18 -.53 +.22 -1.29 -.43 +.02 -.57 -.42 -1.27 -.12 -.25 -.35 -.18 -.21 -.06 +.10 -.47 +.06 -1.81 -.26 -.06 -.20 -.37 +.06 +.03 -1.93 -.04 -.14 -.61 -.27 +.16 -.11 -.35 -.01 -.08 -.76 -.11 +.20 +.10

E-F-G-H ECDang n E-House ETrade rs eBay EDAP TMS EGShConsu eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp ETF Pall EV Engy EXFO g EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak Eaton s EatnVan EVRiskMgd EV TxAG EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducRlty EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts Embraer Emcore lf Emdeon EMS EmersonEl EmmisCm Emulex EnbrEPtrs Enbridge EnCana g EncoreCap EndvSilv g EndoPhrm Endologix Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EngyPtrs EnrgyRec EngyTsfr EngyXXI EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntropCom EnzonPhar Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EverestRe EvergE rs EvrgrSlr rs ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener Fabrinet n FairchldS FalconStor FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedAgric FedMogul FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferro FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird 51job Finisar FinLine FstAccept FstAFin n FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMajSilv g FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FT Fincl FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowInt FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG s FDelMnt Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FullerHB FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds

26.65 -.75 0.25 12.19 +.21 15.45 -.28 31.50 -.51 4.74 +1.16 0.02 21.96 -.33 13.15 -.71 26.79 -.53 31.74 -.21 2.51 49.22 -.09 0.64 108.58 -.80 0.88 47.05 -.50 78.45 -2.30 3.04 44.57 -.32 12.81 +.04 4.06 -.05 0.40 31.66 -.75 0.60 9.60 -.06 0.20 7.88 -.08 0.04 23.11 -.04 1.88 95.23 -1.13 3.15 -.04 1.36 53.03 -1.32 0.72 31.34 -.53 1.28 12.93 -.04 1.23 14.74 -.11 1.16 11.02 -.03 1.14 10.47 -.04 1.56 12.52 -.02 28.59 -.31 0.70 47.42 -.93 0.97 43.06 -.13 1.28 37.59 +.14 0.20 7.73 -.12 89.83 +.32 2.74 0.04 18.11 -.22 1.76 36.33 -1.41 6.47 -.06 0.10 16.26 -.33 18.45 -.34 0.64 33.36 -.40 3.10 +.07 15.64 -.10 63.34 +.02 1.38 59.08 -.66 1.09 -.06 10.57 -.22 4.11 66.29 -.06 1.96 59.47 -.59 0.80 32.12 -.19 25.25 -.72 10.20 +.86 35.84 -.21 6.19 -.02 3.40 -.10 20.52 -1.09 0.54 60.48 +.06 66.48 -.85 3.38 -.14 15.25 -.26 3.17 -.13 3.58 54.12 -.67 33.80 -.50 6.63 -.04 2.16 32.17 -.28 0.61 20.28 -.12 1.40 55.33 -1.66 8.52 -.37 3.32 72.94 +.69 2.36 42.87 -.23 2.80 46.35 -.06 8.98 -.27 10.35 -.33 0.64 35.67 -.27 83.93 -.39 0.88 18.27 +.02 1.47 52.62 -.70 0.35 12.85 -.10 4.16 116.75 -1.27 0.75 90.89 -1.51 35.91 +.53 1.92 86.58 -.14 3.75 -.04 2.00 +.03 5.43 -.01 4.74 -.11 0.16 20.42 -.09 11.34 -.41 2.10 41.82 +.69 5.65 +.39 11.53 -.06 0.28 21.00 +.22 0.40 47.67 -.83 54.67 -1.48 22.63 -.19 0.56 19.89 +.12 3.74 -.05 1.76 84.72 -.36 108.70 -5.12 33.98 -1.06 0.24 32.17 -.02 0.60 76.56 -1.42 94.50 -1.24 0.48 10.14 +.03 3.76 -.12 35.00 +.20 9.88 -1.37 27.00 -2.00 17.91 -.88 4.55 -.21 0.72 50.59 +.04 1.00 61.26 -.59 0.48 88.26 -.43 0.20 19.71 -.48 24.62 +1.48 2.68 81.71 -.20 0.24 6.05 -.15 0.96 27.00 -.75 7.03 -.21 15.21 -.21 14.38 -.07 0.48 14.06 -.02 0.20 30.86 -.67 1.28 13.41 -.21 0.04 13.60 -.30 57.72 -2.64 40.72 -2.50 0.20 17.27 -.52 1.90 +.03 0.24 15.96 +.03 0.12 6.28 -.02 0.04 11.30 -.13 11.22 -.17 18.08 +.84 0.04 11.81 -.06 0.64 14.16 -.11 142.55 -4.02 0.19 15.18 -.14 0.05 22.09 -.11 2.20 37.27 +.26 0.64 16.80 +.13 60.17 -1.30 1.75 -.04 7.83 -.21 6.30 -.32 4.20 -.08 0.80 25.51 -.24 1.28 126.04 -2.36 0.50 69.39 -1.92 27.39 -.11 0.64 57.10 -.24 0.66 19.75 -.40 4.80 -.15 14.01 -.41 5.64 -.34 18.57 -.25 32.25 -.22 33.71 -.39 9.11 -.29 43.11 -.14 5.90 -.38 0.76 61.23 +.38 83.05 +2.22 34.98 -1.52 1.77 21.74 -.24 1.00 124.35 -1.20 1.00 50.14 -1.57 0.20 25.50 -.50 14.83 -.02 0.75 7.94 0.24 26.16 -1.49 1.85 26.71 -.47 23.55 -.79 1.68 -.02 0.28 20.90 -.42 0.12 11.00 +.06 4.98 4.05 -.11

How to Read the Market in Review He e a e he 2 578 mos ac ve s ocks on he New Yo k S ock Exchange Nasdaq Na ona Ma ke s and Ame can S ock Exchange Mu ua unds a e 415 a ges S ocks n bo d changed 5 pe cen o mo e n p ce Name S ocks a e s ed a phabe ca y by he company s u name no s abb ev a on Company names made up o n a s appea a he beg nn ng o each e e s s D v Cu en annua d v dend a e pa d on s ock based on a es qua e y o sem annua dec a a on un ess o he w se oo no ed Las P ce s ock was ad ng a when exchange c osed o he day Chg Loss o ga n o he day No change nd ca ed by ma k Fund Name Name o mu ua und and am y Se Ne asse va ue o p ce a wh ch und cou d be so d Chg Da y ne change n he NAV YTD % Re Pe cen change n NAV o he yea o da e w h d v dends e nves ed S ock Foo no es – PE g ea e han 99 d – ue ha been a ed o edemp on b ompan d – New 52 wee ow dd – Lo n a 12 mo e – Compan o me ed on he Ame an E hange Eme g ng Compan Ma e p a e g – D dend and ea n ng n Canad an do a h – empo a e mp om Na daq ap a and u p u ng qua a on n – S o wa a new ue n he a ea The 52 wee h gh and ow gu e da e on om he beg nn ng o ad ng p – P e e ed o ue p – P e e en e pp – Ho de owe n a men o pu ha e p e q – C o ed end mu ua und no PE a u a ed – R gh o bu e u a a pe ed p e – S o ha p b a ea 20 pe en w h n he a ea w – T ade w be e ed when he o ued wd – When d bu ed w – Wa an a ow ng a pu ha e o a o u– New 52 wee h gh un – Un n ud ng mo e han one e u – Compan n ban up o e e e hp o be ng eo gan ed unde he ban up aw Appea n on o he name D v dend Foo no es a – E a d dend we e pa d bu a e no n uded b – Annua a e p u o – L qu da ng d dend e – Amoun de a ed o pa d n a 12 mon h – Cu en annua a e wh h wa n ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen – Sum o d dend pa d a e o p no egu a a e – Sum o d dend pa d h ea Mo e en d dend wa om ed o de e ed – De a ed o pa d h ea a umu a e ue w h d dend n a ea m – Cu en annua a e wh h wa de ea ed b mo e en d dend announ emen p – n a d dend annua a e no nown e d no hown – De a ed o pa d n p e ed ng 12 mon h p u o d dend – Pa d n o app o ma e a h a ue on e d bu on da e Mo a e o abo e mu be wo h $1 and ga ne o e $2 Mu ua Fund Foo no es e – E ap a ga n d bu on – P e ou da quo e n – No oad und p – Fund a e u ed o pa d bu on o – Redemp on ee o on ngen de e ed a e oad ma app – S o d dend o p – Bo h p and – E a h d dend

Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm GATX GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB Gensco GenOn En Genpact Gentex GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GeoGloblR GeoMet GeoPetro Geores GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GettyRlty GiantIntac Gildan GileadSci GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobCrsg GlobDefT GloblInd GblX Uran GlbXSilvM GlbSpcMet GluMobile GolLinhas GolarLNG GoldFLtd GoldResrc Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GrCanyEd GraniteC GraphPkg GrayTelev GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPanSilv g GtPlainEn GreenDot n GreenMtC s GreenPlns GreenbCos Greenhill Group1 GrubbEllis GpTelevisa Guess GugCdnEn GugSolar GulfMrkA GulfportE H&E Eq HCC Ins HCP Inc HFF Inc HMS Hld HSBC HSN Inc HainCel Hallibrtn Halozyme HampRB h HancHld Hanesbrds HanmiFncl HansenMed HansenNat HanwhaSol HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HWinstn g Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heinz HelixEn HelmPayne Hemisphrx HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HiSoft n Hitachi HollyCp HlywdMda Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp Honda HonwllIntl HorizLns Hormel s Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls HovnanE HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HutchT Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 1.16 34.27 -.69 0.20 4.73 -.10 5.52 -.01 18.62 -.90 10.40 -.57 0.52 6.17 -.14 1.68 18.99 0.14 12.30 -.29 1.32 30.70 -.22 19.71 -.34 8.94 -.05 0.16 16.05 -.19 0.45 21.26 -.33 0.20 72.25 -2.39 1.50 34.43 -.34 38.00 -.51 .49 -.00 4.72 -.05 34.98 -.84 12.23 -.17 5.18 -.02 43.15 -.95 1.88 75.45 -.87 0.56 20.38 +.01 14.98 -.15 0.04 2.60 -.02 1.12 36.79 +.03 5.17 -.02 31.70 -.69 2.38 48.47 -.99 40.12 -1.47 3.76 -.11 0.18 13.75 -.02 0.48 28.58 -.38 1.80 52.09 -.64 .42 +.00 12.75 -.12 75.87 +.22 24.41 -.26 .80 1.69 -.10 .91 +.16 30.83 -1.39 33.22 +.68 0.32 13.57 -.24 4.97 -.05 1.92 21.94 -.07 0.18 7.80 -.19 0.30 30.80 -.18 41.06 +.35 2.04 38.23 -.25 1.91 -.03 0.40 9.07 +.12 14.46 -.76 24.22 -.03 9.00 +.09 0.40 20.26 -.65 0.25 28.40 +.06 0.15 22.83 -.81 3.90 -.07 0.40 13.06 -.12 0.75 19.34 -.24 0.19 17.49 -.09 0.24 28.17 -.43 0.41 49.99 -.08 2.84 -.10 1.40 159.15 -1.85 1.16 84.55 -1.36 20.45 +.13 13.34 -.34 591.66 -8.96 37.55 -.27 0.84 41.16 -.07 20.51 -.02 2.16 135.77 -.66 4.91 -.28 8.77 -.73 15.99 -.50 0.52 28.00 -.52 5.29 -.02 2.25 -.05 2.62 +.03 0.07 7.88 -.28 4.96 +.41 0.83 19.22 -.01 43.25 -4.15 41.27 -.48 12.14 -.16 24.19 -.59 1.80 67.87 -1.74 0.44 39.80 -1.17 1.03 -.08 23.28 -.41 0.80 44.32 -1.18 0.57 23.48 -.39 0.03 7.86 -.19 46.50 +.63 27.32 -1.20 18.35 -.17 0.58 30.32 -.17 1.92 36.71 -.23 13.58 -.41 79.00 -.13 1.80 53.24 -.21 29.58 -.75 29.11 -.30 0.36 46.44 -.40 6.67 -.07 .96 -.02 0.96 32.72 -.34 25.19 -.41 1.26 -.01 1.97 -.09 55.88 -.31 8.18 -.30 0.40 40.75 +1.00 0.10 48.28 -.45 9.48 -.21 0.07 12.20 +.10 1.00 45.59 -.59 14.16 +1.00 0.82 33.46 -.82 0.40 27.81 -.80 16.52 -.23 1.20 47.00 +.41 4.40 30.15 +.10 1.24 24.47 -.19 6.52 -.16 5.03 -.10 2.76 51.28 -.15 10.12 -.03 1.20 22.92 -.04 30.13 -1.06 24.86 -.38 37.29 -.10 0.08 16.51 -.39 5.76 -.03 9.53 -.59 1.80 48.61 -.52 15.40 -.22 0.24 63.33 -.73 .48 +.03 68.49 -1.07 1.00 75.01 -1.55 5.50 -.43 0.88 11.40 0.20 6.26 -.15 1.38 53.39 +.45 14.81 -.18 0.40 84.36 +.12 0.32 41.98 -.63 17.94 -.37 14.28 -.37 31.01 -.38 1.70 33.94 -.09 0.41 38.66 -.61 20.98 -.17 64.57 +3.33 0.60 54.60 -3.40 1.60 -.06 20.93 -.15 1.00 36.87 -.35 37.86 -1.13 2.48 55.17 -.51 41.60 -1.40 1.33 56.19 -.32 4.11 -.07 0.51 27.13 -.29 28.93 -.74 17.02 -.37 53.32 -.82 1.80 22.39 -.22 0.04 17.46 -.21 3.75 -.12 1.52 67.49 -.27 0.60 9.84 -.04 25.74 +.16 63.04 -1.52 0.52 42.00 -.62 0.04 6.53 -.12 0.40 16.71 -.54 3.10 +.08 10.78 -.27 6.06 -.29

I-J-K-L

Nm IAC Inter IAMGld g ICICI Bk IdexxLabs IHS Inc ING GRE ING GlbDv ING ING 8.5cap INGPrRTr ION Geoph IPG Photon iShGold s iShGSCI iSAstla iSAstria iShBraz iSCan iSFrnce iShGer iSh HK iShItaly iShJapn iSh Kor iSMalas iShMex iShNeth iShSing iSPacxJpn iShSoAfr iSSpain iSSwedn iSTaiwn iSh UK iShTurkey iShSilver iShS&P100 iShDJDv iShBTips iShAsiaexJ iShChina25 iShDJTr iSSP500 iShBAgB iShEMkts iShiBxB iSh ACWI iShEMBd iSSPGth iShSPLatA iSSPVal iShB20 T iShB7-10T iShB1-3T iS Eafe iSRusMCV iSRusMCG iShRsMd iSSPMid iShiBxHYB iShs SOX iShC&SRl iSR1KV iSR1KG iSRus1K iSR2KV iShBarc1-3 iSR2KG iShR2K iShUSPfd iShREst iShDJHm iShFnSc iShUSEngy iShSPSm iShDJMd iShBasM iShDJOG iShEur350 iShSCGrth iStar ITT Corp ITT Ed iBio IconixBr Idacorp IDEX ITW Illumina Imax Corp Immucor ImunoGn Imunmd ImpaxLabs ImpOil gs Incyte IndBkMI rs IndiaFd IndiaGC wt Infinera Informat InfosysT IngerRd IngrmM Inhibitex InlandRE Innodata Innospec InovioPhm InsitTc InspPhar IntgDv ISSI IntegrysE Intel InteractBrk IntcntlEx InterDig Intrface InterMune InterNAP IntlBcsh IBM Intl Coal IntFlav IntlGame IntPap IntlRectif IntTower g InterOil g Interpublic Intersil Intevac IntraLks n IntPotash Intuit IntSurg Invesco InvMtgCap InVKSrInc InvTech InvBncp IridiumCm IronMtn Isis ItauUnibH Itron IvanhoeEn IvanhM g IvaxDiag Ixia j2Global JA Solar JDS Uniph JPMorgCh JPMAlerian Jabil JackHenry JackInBox JacksnHw h JacobsEng Jaguar g Jamba JamesRiv JanusCap Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesSoda JosABnk s JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KBR Inc KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KV PhmA

D 30.86 -.64 0.08 21.97 -.22 0.53 44.83 -.52 76.90 -1.26 88.00 +.97 0.54 7.99 -.03 1.20 10.95 -.03 12.36 -.04 2.13 25.50 +.06 0.28 6.09 +.05 12.47 -.30 56.28 -1.59 14.00 +.04 37.57 -.28 0.82 25.54 -.41 0.25 22.45 -.07 2.53 74.79 -.92 0.50 33.53 -.45 0.66 26.36 -.25 0.29 25.84 -.11 0.45 18.54 -.21 0.33 18.42 -.02 0.14 11.22 -.22 0.44 58.91 -1.21 0.34 14.25 -.07 0.54 60.55 -.85 0.33 22.49 -.20 0.43 13.18 -.06 1.56 46.54 -.56 1.82 69.28 -.54 2.15 41.02 0.55 31.61 +.04 0.29 14.87 -.27 0.43 18.12 -.20 1.28 56.70 -1.54 35.23 +.54 1.08 59.10 -.39 1.70 51.16 -.18 2.78 108.52 -.09 0.97 60.86 -.83 0.63 43.10 -.34 1.06 90.83 -.73 2.36 131.96 -1.00 3.89 105.07 +.05 0.64 46.24 -.66 5.22 107.89 -.27 0.81 48.20 -.51 5.64 105.98 +.25 1.16 68.02 -.64 1.18 52.13 -1.01 1.24 62.82 -.41 3.86 90.23 -.58 3.26 92.57 -.23 0.82 83.83 -.06 1.42 60.64 -.59 0.86 46.95 -.43 0.57 59.39 -.76 1.48 106.31 -1.21 0.97 95.51 -1.30 7.70 92.02 +.02 0.44 60.60 -1.71 1.90 68.60 -.49 1.29 67.82 -.47 0.73 59.90 -.61 1.13 73.05 -.62 1.16 73.28 -1.10 2.91 104.59 -.03 0.58 91.29 -1.50 0.89 81.09 -1.35 2.93 39.32 -.16 1.97 58.43 -.38 0.07 13.00 -.18 0.59 59.04 -.42 0.49 44.49 -.27 0.74 70.84 -1.14 0.08 64.38 -.49 0.87 78.02 -1.41 0.18 71.14 -.52 0.98 41.71 -.34 0.62 75.61 -1.08 9.94 -.37 1.00 56.67 -.65 72.40 -1.27 3.07 -.18 21.25 -.47 1.20 37.33 -.28 0.60 40.70 -.79 1.36 54.77 -.12 67.43 -.88 27.81 -.60 19.84 +.02 9.09 -.13 3.35 -.12 21.99 -.16 0.44 53.73 -.27 13.83 -.20 3.25 -.14 3.87 30.06 -.38 .02 7.97 -.18 46.34 -.18 0.90 66.82 -.85 0.28 45.13 +.26 19.62 -.43 2.48 +.05 0.57 9.39 -.04 2.75 +.03 28.89 +2.54 1.16 -.06 25.44 -.66 3.88 -.12 7.60 -.22 9.79 -.61 2.72 49.90 +.18 0.72 21.21 -.35 1.79 15.66 -.11 134.72 +4.47 0.40 44.14 -2.08 0.08 16.29 -.20 44.24 -.07 6.47 -.21 0.38 18.11 -.48 2.60 159.93 -1.90 10.50 -.04 1.08 57.35 +.25 0.24 16.23 -.46 0.75 26.30 -.48 32.70 -.64 9.25 -.23 70.82 -.16 0.24 12.84 -.19 0.48 12.16 -.34 12.43 -.54 28.69 -1.06 37.04 -1.19 51.93 -.88 329.59 -2.45 0.44 26.19 -.41 3.49 24.01 +.22 0.29 5.00 -.01 18.74 -.25 14.09 -.09 9.30 0.75 25.66 +.45 8.76 -.17 0.67 22.14 -.71 54.91 -1.07 3.47 -.18 1.48 27.22 -1.33 1.33 -.13 17.37 -.40 28.80 -.61 6.77 -.23 25.49 -1.88 0.20 45.19 -.33 1.78 37.88 -.15 0.28 21.33 -.46 0.42 31.97 -.49 22.40 +.23 1.19 -.05 48.14 -1.46 4.96 -.25 2.22 -.03 23.21 +2.96 0.04 12.59 -.50 0.33 33.86 -.21 27.30 +.19 0.30 23.24 -.11 5.54 -.01 23.89 -1.65 60.80 1.04 -.04 2.16 60.40 -.66 0.64 41.02 -.29 0.20 12.67 -.20 1.47 45.34 -.56 0.70 93.82 -2.79 44.32 +.21 0.25 12.86 -.22 0.20 34.32 -1.05 0.52 17.43 -.25 0.60 9.63 -.15 1.00 49.25 -1.96 18.97 -.52 10.01 +.01

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm KandiTech KC Southn KapStone Kellogg Kemet rs Kendle Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KimberR g KimbClk Kimco KindME KindMor n KindredHlt KineticC Kinross g KirbyCp KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohlberg Kohls KongZhg KopinCp KoreaElc KornFer Kraft KratonPP KrispKrm Kroger KronosWd Kulicke L&L Engy L-1 Ident L-3 Com LDK Solar LECG LG Display LHC Grp LJ Intl LKQ Corp LML Pay LSB Inds LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LadThalFn LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH LaSalH pfE Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincEdSv LincNat LinearTch LinnEngy LionsGt g LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM Loews Logitech LogMeIn LongtopFn Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy Lufkin s lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 4.22 +.12 52.84 -1.11 15.87 -.44 1.62 54.17 -.16 14.38 -.54 8.96 -.11 0.48 37.80 -.82 3.84 -.03 15.58 -.03 0.04 9.27 +.01 1.66 -.09 2.80 64.29 -.48 0.72 18.15 -.04 4.52 73.41 +.13 30.90 +.05 24.99 -.35 51.32 -.15 0.10 15.79 +.15 55.21 -.96 12.97 -.27 0.24 18.98 -.15 1.70 25.28 +.21 6.87 -.11 0.68 7.66 -.74 1.00 53.55 -.28 8.38 -.34 4.18 -.11 12.33 -.02 21.73 -.51 1.16 31.33 -.25 36.25 -1.08 6.02 -.21 0.42 23.64 +.04 1.00 53.31 +1.10 9.25 -.46 7.68 +.04 11.92 +.01 1.80 78.43 -.77 12.17 -.40 .15 +.01 15.91 -.21 28.81 +.66 4.17 +.08 23.86 +.06 6.07 +.54 34.93 -1.35 6.18 -.10 9.41 +.02 9.47 -.15 91.13 -1.25 .98 -.04 56.72 -1.55 36.90 -.48 0.20 43.65 -.57 42.19 -1.46 0.44 26.57 -.52 2.00 25.32 6.77 -.27 9.88 -.18 0.50 43.16 -.96 12.01 +.12 4.39 -.05 1.00 103.30 -1.06 0.24 35.00 -.76 1.08 23.29 -.43 0.40 33.75 -.41 0.16 19.41 -.38 0.60 49.21 +.02 0.25 32.23 -.17 1.39 +.06 1.87 -.03 0.46 9.20 -.25 36.33 -.08 0.32 5.11 -.07 43.13 -.53 41.27 -.78 16.04 -.17 73.26 -1.35 1.90 32.62 -.25 52.93 -.35 36.14 -.61 38.38 -.42 11.51 +.12 1.96 34.66 +.06 6.88 -.32 0.80 31.60 -.71 0.80 29.44 -.36 1.00 16.30 -.07 0.20 30.47 -.45 0.96 33.85 -.70 2.64 38.62 +.18 6.13 -.15 10.42 -.41 10.47 -.14 5.41 -.05 3.91 -.09 3.85 -.16 3.00 79.30 -.55 0.25 42.38 -.39 19.97 +.43 34.81 -.46 29.51 +.09 5.20 77.54 -.20 9.75 -.31 0.44 26.00 -.24 1.44 105.18 -2.41 4.95 +.71 0.50 86.69 +1.81 75.18 -2.08 22.76 -.80 39.83 +.19

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDC Pr g MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG MagelPt MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes Majesco MAKO Srg ManTech Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVIndo s MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MecoxL n MedAssets MedcoHlth

2.80 87.08 12.69 11.04 0.85 6.39 1.00 24.79 0.56 18.79 0.65 21.67 2.97 12.53 8.45 0.94 8.49 0.55 6.11 8.25 13.44 11.38 0.60 31.52 3.59 0.88 63.19 34.96 2.00 47.61 1.80 33.69 0.20 23.26 1.85 28.54 3.10 6.46 6.52 1.00 50.00 7.65 1.67 20.05 43.96 0.08 19.34 3.77 0.74 63.33 0.52 18.46 1.00 51.42 .69 0.40 59.95 24.99 0.18 41.49 2.93 39.66 0.33 55.35 3.58 52.04 0.27 27.96 0.19 47.94 0.35 37.95 0.84 29.94 0.04 7.67 1.60 85.15 15.81 0.30 13.41 2.75 30.07 0.24 64.25 19.41 0.60 247.27 0.92 25.37 2.36 0.84 26.74 3.86 1.12 47.69 25.45 2.44 76.29 1.00 37.54 0.72 78.56 17.00 1.04 59.20 1.00 28.58 29.00 10.45 6.22 15.69 62.03

-.93 +.21 +.56 -.45 -.20 +.79 +.08 -.14 -.42 -.23 -.09 -.01 -.09 -.32 -.57 -.53 -.19 -.28 -.29 -.75 -.21 -.10 -.07 +.44 +.27 -.25 -.14 -.81 +.14 +.03 +.08 -.08 -.12 -2.11 -.42 -.24 -.01 -.45 -.20 -.15 -.29 -1.00 -1.06 +.02 -.49 -.05 -.30 -.03 -1.30 -.32 +.10 -.29 -1.08 +.44 -2.48 -.15 -.15 -.77 -.07 -.47 -.19 +.26 -.59 -1.92 -.34 -.08 -.61 -1.31 -.32 -.11 -.16 -1.56

Nm MedProp MediCo Medicis Medifast Medivation Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MercGn Meredith MergeHlth Meritage Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetLf equn MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MidAApt MdwGold g MillerHer MillerPet Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolinaH MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MonPwSys MonroMf s Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS China Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCI Bld rs NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFuGas NatGrid NatInstr s NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NavigCons Navios Navistar NektarTh Nelnet NeoStem NeoPhoto n Neoprobe NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix NtScout NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng NeuStar Nevsun g NDragon NwGold g NY&Co NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NielsenH n NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NoahHld n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordion g Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NwstNG NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NovoNord NSTAR NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OCZ Tech OGE Engy OReillyAu OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer Oclaro rs OcwenFn OdysMar OfficeDpt OfficeMax OilSvHT OilStates

D 0.80 11.37 -.16 16.37 -.63 0.24 30.76 -.48 21.91 -.41 16.64 -.44 66.50 -.56 0.90 38.99 -.27 7.14 -.23 0.48 25.91 -.47 15.81 -.10 0.32 68.55 +1.54 13.68 -.37 1.52 32.83 -.23 2.40 39.65 +.36 1.02 34.39 -.44 4.74 -.17 24.58 -.58 5.90 -.18 1.35 +.01 0.62 29.97 +.20 0.74 45.53 -.04 85.90 14.98 +.07 4.98 -.23 0.14 13.03 -.38 1.38 36.62 -.58 5.37 -.29 11.03 -.61 48.70 -.74 21.94 -.64 0.64 25.72 -.23 1.56 -.03 2.51 60.92 -.83 2.39 +.27 0.09 26.00 -.40 5.41 -.04 6.00 88.89 -.70 2.31 -.10 0.20 26.81 -.82 7.86 -.19 11.32 -.08 3.34 -.04 5.37 -.09 4.06 -.04 20.21 +.47 14.54 -.38 55.25 -1.59 0.70 27.07 -.31 35.89 -.69 1.12 43.54 -.70 47.70 -1.56 14.17 +.14 14.39 -.71 0.32 32.17 -.08 1.12 71.65 -1.41 15.31 -.59 0.40 19.63 -.18 0.46 31.82 +.09 0.20 28.32 -.12 2.44 27.97 +.32 0.20 82.72 -2.78 40.22 +.07 26.95 +.30 14.02 -.12 2.13 -.04 0.07 3.78 -.12 1.10 73.44 -.46 22.53 -.21 19.03 -.49 14.40 +.51 19.00 -.21 31.85 -1.42 1.80 18.38 -.03 .63 +.01 37.97 -1.33 2.62 -.03 7.54 -.02 19.22 -.16 0.48 14.70 +.02 29.16 -1.59 1.20 35.59 -.41 27.58 -.68 0.14 26.16 -.09 17.31 -.94 28.24 +.22 0.29 1.78 -.06 1.38 71.33 -1.35 7.04 46.93 -.24 0.40 31.67 -.08 0.44 79.88 -.86 0.04 7.81 -.04 1.52 25.58 -.06 0.40 15.14 -.37 1.92 40.51 -.08 9.27 -.23 0.24 5.76 +.09 60.86 -.45 8.71 -.18 0.28 20.92 -.39 1.75 +.26 13.77 -1.81 3.81 -.10 40.91 -1.25 51.13 -.92 46.58 -.75 207.40 -3.32 26.98 -.33 1.85 -.04 29.32 -.17 1.91 -.08 25.68 -.36 5.91 .04 -.00 10.73 +.01 5.86 -.13 1.00 17.57 -.18 9.77 -.47 0.28 15.25 -.08 7.08 -.23 0.20 19.04 -.11 72.01 0.60 53.68 -.59 7.58 +.18 0.15 17.21 -.39 0.15 18.12 -.60 0.20 27.02 -.33 2.20 54.62 -.13 0.92 19.09 +.01 1.86 53.02 +.20 27.00 +.45 1.24 88.92 -.96 16.37 +.11 24.67 -.25 13.99 -.05 0.98 44.67 -.17 0.72 93.47 -.23 0.55 8.34 -.15 5.96 -.15 15.21 -.27 1.70 25.03 +.13 12.10 -.05 0.92 43.26 -.82 1.60 64.84 -.46 13.65 -.22 7.08 -.24 1.10 34.12 +.29 17.76 -.45 32.45 -.24 1.12 50.94 -.50 2.81 -.04 1.88 65.79 -.90 0.40 5.26 -.16 0.40 12.19 -.11 1.74 48.24 +.09 9.84 -.55 13.91 -.26 2.53 56.19 -.87 5.64 +.15 2.56 -.05 5.79 -.04 39.77 -1.61 1.82 127.68 -.09 1.70 45.00 +.28 0.54 31.02 -.30 26.64 -.30 17.18 -.62 1.45 46.88 -1.06 0.70 13.55 -.26 0.47 9.05 -.04 0.76 9.00 -.04 0.66 8.15 -.04 20.47 -.29 21.74 -.53 9.12 +1.22 1.50 48.92 +.05 55.38 -1.00 35.25 -.04 1.84 103.53 +.38 82.50 -.49 16.93 -1.07 10.61 +.21 2.65 -.25 5.21 -.14 13.18 -.57 2.40 160.83 -1.61 77.41 +.61

D

Oilsands g .55 -.05 OldDomF s 32.05 -.19 OldNBcp 0.28 10.92 -.14 OldRepub 0.70 12.07 Olin 0.80 19.37 -.35 OmegaHlt 1.48 22.57 -.08 OmegaP 12.03 -.22 Omncre 0.13 29.29 -.20 Omnicom 1.00 48.93 -.62 OmniVisn 33.26 -.23 Omnova 7.05 +.02 OnSmcnd 10.71 -.44 1800Flowrs 2.75 -.10 ONEOK 2.08 64.08 -.45 Onstrm rsh 1.04 -.04 OnyxPh 35.23 -.66 OpenTxt 56.75 -1.88 OpenTable 86.58 -3.41 OpnwvSy 2.14 -.06 OpkoHlth 3.69 -.28 OplinkC 26.22 -1.78 Opnext 3.58 -.18 OptCable 0.04 5.87 -.70 OptimerPh 11.48 +.09 optXprs 4.50 16.06 -.08 Oracle 0.20 32.10 -.67 OrbitalSci 17.58 -.59 Orbitz 3.50 -.10 Orexigen 2.84 -.10 OrientEH 12.01 -.10 OriginAg 8.29 -.34 OrionMar 10.99 -.31 OrmatTc 0.20 23.81 -.49 OshkoshCp 35.39 -.83 OvShip 1.75 32.51 +.14 Overstk 16.12 -.52 OwensM s 0.80 30.80 -.53 OwensCorn 34.91 -.51 OwensIll 29.89 -.26 PC Mall 10.44 +.31 PDF Sol 7.03 +.08 PDL Bio 0.60 5.66 -.01 PF Chng 0.92 46.31 -.41 PG&E Cp 1.82 45.67 +.19 PHH Corp 21.90 -.10 PLX Tch 3.71 -.03 PMC Sra 7.93 -.10 PMI Grp 2.85 -.07 PNC 0.40 60.70 -.25 PNM Res 0.50 14.56 -.09 POSCO 1.43 101.60 -2.72 PPG 2.20 87.52 -1.05 PPL Corp 1.40 26.00 +.44 PacWstBc 0.04 20.20 -.04 Paccar 0.48 48.43 -.77 PacerIntl 5.32 -.14 PacEth h .72 +.03 PacSunwr 4.32 -.14 PackAmer 0.80 28.37 -.30 PaetecHld 3.68 -.04 PainTher 2.00 7.75 +.22 Palatin rs .83 +.01 PallCorp 0.70 54.62 -.65 PanASlv 0.10 38.59 -.96 Panasonic 0.11 13.37 +.07 PaneraBrd 119.17 -1.07 ParPharm 30.64 -1.84 ParagShip 0.20 3.07 -.04 ParamTch 22.74 -.61 ParaG&S 4.42 +.27 Parexel 23.36 ParkDrl 5.29 -.06 ParkerHan 1.28 85.21 -2.12 Parkrvsn h .72 -.09 PrtnrCm 2.13 18.23 -.14 PartnerRe 2.20 77.39 +.11 PatriotCoal 24.59 -.88 Patterson 0.40 32.93 -.31 PattUTI 0.20 27.35 -.11 Paychex 1.24 33.05 -.25 PeabdyE 0.34 68.28 -1.07 Pengrth g 0.84 13.09 -.08 PnnNGm 36.11 -1.11 PennVa 0.23 15.91 +.42 PennWst g 1.08 28.03 -.52 PennantPk 1.08 12.50 -.07 Penney 0.80 34.41 +.30 PenRE 0.60 13.82 -.36 PennyMac 1.68 18.82 +.02 Penske 19.48 -.39 Pentair 0.80 36.04 -.66 PeopUtdF 0.62 12.43 -.24 PepBoy 0.12 12.09 -.46 PepcoHold 1.08 19.02 +.15 PepsiCo 1.92 63.47 +.07 PerfectWld 21.62 +.03 PerkElm 0.28 27.33 -.44 Perrigo 0.28 76.00 -1.60 PetMed 0.50 14.55 -.22 Petrohawk 21.80 +.31 PetrbrsA 1.20 35.95 +.10 Petrobras 1.20 41.57 +.09 PetroDev 47.34 -.09 PtroqstE 8.25 -.03 PetsMart 0.50 41.80 -.10 Pfizer 0.80 19.61 -.05 PhrmAth 3.29 -.01 PharmPdt 0.60 28.15 -.08 Pharmacyc 5.13 +.03 Pharmasset 61.95+12.18 PhilipMor 2.56 63.64 +.14 PhilipsEl 1.02 32.93 -.32 PhlVH 0.15 60.47 -.84 PhnxCos 2.44 -.11 PhotrIn 9.56 -.23 PiedNG 1.12 30.26 +.12 PiedmOfc 1.26 18.70 -.21 Pier 1 9.27 -.57 PilgrimsP 7.06 -.39 PimCpOp 1.38 20.38 +.10 PimcoHiI 1.46 14.14 +.11 PinnclEnt 11.90 -.61 PinWst 2.10 43.43 +.10 PionDrill 12.13 +.16 PioNtrl 0.08 99.28 -.72 PitnyBw 1.48 24.53 -.13 PlainsAA 3.83 65.37 -.20 PlainsEx 35.51 -1.21 Plantron 0.20 35.56 -.20 PlatGpMet 2.41 -.04 PlatUnd 0.32 39.94 -.50 Plexus 29.10 -.35 PlugPwr h .70 +.01 PlumCrk 1.68 40.53 -.36 Polaris 1.80 79.80 +1.15 Polo RL 0.80 124.62 -.67 Polycom 49.31 +.32 PolyMet g 2.29 +.10 PolyOne 0.16 13.93 -.27 Polypore 54.37 -1.00 Popular 3.07 -.04 PortGE 1.04 23.60 +.08 PositvID h .60 +.02 Potash wi 0.28 59.12 -1.97 PwrInteg 0.20 39.17 -.43 Power-One 7.85 -.43 PSCrudeDS 43.35 -.27 PwshDB 30.29 -.14 PS Agri 35.28 -.02 PS Oil 32.13 +.17 PS USDBull 21.96 +.03 PS USDBear 27.94 -.02 PwSClnEn 10.31 -.24 PS OilSv 0.08 25.28 -.21 PSPrivEq 0.37 11.27 -.13 PSFinPf 1.27 18.07 -.05 PwShPfd 0.97 14.30 -.02 PShEMSov 1.56 26.36 +.07 PSIndia 0.24 22.14 -.36 PwShs QQQ 0.36 57.19 -.78 Powrwav 3.49 -.10 Praxair 2.00 96.92 -1.34 PrecCastpt 0.12 136.58 -2.57 PrecDrill 12.20 +.11 PremGlbSv 6.61 -.07 Prestige 11.56 -.25 PriceTR 1.24 65.94 -.80 priceline 466.69 -2.44 PrideIntl 41.75 -.85 PrinFncl 0.55 32.68 -.31 PrisaB n 11.39 +.07 PrivateB 0.04 14.96 -.06 ProShtDow 42.13 +.27 ProShtQQQ 32.82 +.42 ProShtS&P 41.81 +.33 PrUShS&P 21.60 +.35 ProUltDow 0.37 59.66 -.72 PrUlShDow 18.71 +.23 ProUltMC 0.04 70.12 -1.93 ProUltQQQ 89.29 -2.37 PrUShQQQ rs 51.91 +1.32 ProUltSP 0.43 52.17 -.86 PrUShtFn rs 58.28 +.77 ProUShL20 39.14 +.46 PrUSCh25 rs 29.15 +.39 ProUSEM rs 32.95 +.97 ProUSRE rs 16.35 +.25 ProUSOG rs 28.24 +.36 ProUSBM rs 18.49 +.66 ProUltRE rs 0.41 54.67 -.81 ProUFin rs 0.07 69.45 -1.08 PrUPShQQQ 26.18 +1.01 PrUPShR2K 19.74 +.90 ProUltO&G 0.23 59.27 -.67 ProUBasM 0.04 50.88 -1.89 ProShtR2K 30.75 +.50 PrUltPQQQ s 84.34 -3.45 ProUltR2K 0.01 45.66 -1.57 ProSht20Tr 45.30 +.27 ProUSSP500 16.75 +.38 PrUltSP500 s 0.13 76.97 -2.01 ProSUltGold 71.24 +.37 ProUSSlv rs 26.61 -1.14 PrUltCrde rs 56.88 +.42 PrUShCrde rs 42.28 -.27 ProUSGld rs 27.01 -.18 ProSUltSilv 210.27 +6.08 ProUltShYen 16.01 -.01 ProUShEuro 18.41 +.03 ProctGam 1.93 61.71 -.32 PrognicsPh 5.93 +.13 ProgrssEn 2.48 45.99 +.29 ProgrsSft s 27.91 -.61 ProgsvCp 1.40 20.70 -.18 ProLogis 0.45 15.68 -.17 ProUSR2K rs 45.62 +1.46 ProspctCap 1.21 12.20 -.08 Protalix 6.26 -.31 ProtLife 0.56 27.78 -.40 ProvEn g 0.54 8.59 -.03 Prudentl 1.15 63.15 -.72 PSEG 1.37 31.47 -.14 PubStrg 3.20 109.24 +.13 PudaCoal 11.98 -.19 PulteGrp 6.54 -.10 PureBio 1.91 +.13 PPrIT 0.71 6.47 -.04 PyramidOil 7.67 -.73

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n

0.08 38.07 -.33

Nm

D

QIAGEN 20.73 -.11 QiaoXing 2.25 +.06 QlikTech n 23.61 -.35 Qlogic 17.54 Qualcom 0.76 57.58 -.57 QuantaSvc 22.26 -.24 QntmDSS 2.49 -.04 Quepasa 6.99 -.38 QstDiag 0.40 56.21 -.48 QuestSft 26.34 -.65 Questar s 0.61 17.32 -.10 Questcor 12.97 -.09 QksilvRes 14.50 +.17 Quiksilvr 4.13 -.06 QuinStreet 23.48 -.16 QwestCm 0.32 6.62 -.03 RAIT Fin 0.03 3.19 -.14 RF MicD 6.90 -.19 RPC s 0.28 21.13 +.56 RPM 0.84 22.88 +.01 RSC Hldgs 13.19 -.39 RTI IntlM 28.54 -.49 RXi Phrm 1.26 +.01 Rackspace 36.75 -1.03 RadianGrp 0.01 7.05 -.11 RadntSys 17.47 -.29 RadientPh .42 -.15 RadOneD 1.98 -.05 RadioShk 0.25 14.58 -.49 Radware 35.96 -1.46 RailAmer 15.52 -.25 RAM Engy 2.45 +.43 Rambus 20.16 -.16 Randgold 0.17 77.01 -3.47 RangeRs 0.16 50.16 -.42 RareEle g 11.86 +.42 RJamesFn 0.52 37.61 -.10 Rayonier 2.16 60.45 -.25 Raytheon 1.50 51.09 -.63 RealD n 24.05 -.12 RealNwk 3.73 -.13 RltyInco 1.73 34.93 +.05 RedHat 40.35 -.61 RedRobin 23.70 -.18 RedwdTr 1.00 16.12 +.02 RegalBel 0.68 71.34 -1.02 RegalEnt 0.84 13.72 -.22 RgcyCtrs 1.85 43.39 -.10 RegncyEn 1.78 27.46 -.16 Regenrn 38.05 +.05 RegionsFn 0.04 7.41 -.07 Regis Cp 0.24 17.80 -.28 ReinsGrp 0.48 59.76 +.01 RelStlAl 0.48 54.21 -1.65 RenaisRe 1.04 65.75 -.11 ReneSola 8.92 -.34 RentACt 0.24 32.79 -.44 Rentech 1.25 Replgn 3.54 -1.37 ReprosT rs 6.45 +.04 RepubAir 6.02 -.03 RepubSvc 0.80 29.60 -.18 RschMotn 64.86 -1.61 ResMed s 31.79 -.15 ResoluteEn 17.85 -.41 ResrceCap 1.00 7.30 +.01 ResConn 0.16 19.26 -.64 RetailHT 1.95 104.86 -.85 RexEnergy 12.49 +.47 RexahnPh 1.46 -.04 ReynAm s 2.12 34.70 -.15 Richmnt g 6.40 +.24 RightNow 28.63 -.52 RioTinto s 1.08 68.33 -2.20 RitchieBr 0.42 24.60 -.78 RiteAid h 1.20 -.02 Riverbed s 42.40 -2.08 RoadrnTr n 14.46 -.32 RobbMyer 0.18 43.28 -.78 RobtHalf 0.56 32.10 -.70 RockTen 0.80 69.38 -.72 RockvFn s 10.56 -.04 RockwlAut 1.40 86.73 -1.16 RockColl 0.96 63.50 -.87 RockwdH 47.04 -.78 RofinSinar 39.56 -.12 RogCm gs 1.42 34.42 -.54 Roper 0.44 84.87 -1.08 RosettaR 43.45 +.78 RossStrs 0.88 70.67 -1.24 Rovi Corp 55.39 -1.13 Rowan 41.65 -1.25 RoyalBk g 2.00 61.29 -.06 RBScotlnd 14.09 -.25 RBSct prM 17.51 +.02 RylCarb 42.24 -.03 RoyDShllB 3.36 70.99 -.53 RoyDShllA 3.36 71.72 -.49 RoyGld 0.44 50.20 -.38 RoyaleEn 7.17 -.22 Royce 0.72 15.06 -.13 Rubicon g 5.09 -.07 RubiconTc 23.20 +.23 RubyTues 13.09 -.11 Ruddick 0.52 36.63 -.96 Ryanair 2.29 28.99 +.03 Ryder 1.08 47.03 -1.03 RdxSPEW 0.63 49.60 -.49 Ryland 0.12 15.97 -.45 SAIC 16.53 -.05 SAP AG 0.82 61.03 -.42 SBA Com 41.92 -.23 SCANA 1.94 40.29 +.09 SEI Inv 0.20 22.44 -.03 SFN Grp 13.76 -.64 SK Tlcm 18.23 SLGreen 0.40 72.46 -.65 SLM Cp 14.69 -.03 SM Energy 0.10 72.31 -.71 SMF Engy 1.80 -.06 SpdrDJIA 2.96 120.71 -.76 SpdrGold 139.72 +.37 SpdrIntRE 3.39 39.55 -.31 SP Mid 1.51 173.59 -2.47 S&P500ETF 2.37 131.43 -1.04 Spdr Div 1.74 53.49 -.34 SpdrHome 0.33 17.51 -.23 SpdrKbwBk 0.13 25.78 -.20 SpdrKbwCM 0.65 39.59 -.23 SpdrKbwIns 0.67 44.29 -.30 SpdrWilRE 1.79 63.23 -.51 SpdrBarcCv 1.81 41.75 -.24 SpdrLehHY 4.51 40.57 +.08 SpdrNuBST 0.47 23.85 -.05 SpdrKbw RB 0.35 26.27 -.19 SpdrRetl 0.49 48.38 -.73 SpdrOGEx 0.20 60.26 -.76 SpdrMetM 0.38 70.94 -1.64 SPX Cp 1.00 78.22 -1.43 SRA Intl 26.01 -.43 STEC 20.32 +.03 STMicro 0.28 13.13 +.01 STR Hldgs 16.24 -.32 SVB FnGp 53.30 -.79 SXC Hlth s 49.89 -2.06 SabraHlt n 17.15 -.09 Safeway 0.48 21.60 -.23 StJoe 26.24 -1.18 StJude 0.84 49.31 -.08 Saks 11.85 -.05 Salesforce 128.02 -1.95 SalixPhm 31.86 -1.40 SallyBty 12.69 -.33 SamsO&G 4.53 +.45 SanderFm 0.68 41.21 +.12 SanDisk 46.88 -.81 SandRdge 11.26 +.15 SangBio 7.54 -.19 Sanmina 14.97 -.85 Sanofi 1.63 35.31 -.23 Santarus 3.22 Sapient 0.35 11.49 -.16 SaraLee 0.46 16.64 -.19 Satcon h 3.64 -.07 SavientPh 10.11 -.26 Savvis 34.88 +1.65 Schlmbrg 1.00 90.25 -1.15 SchwUSMkt 0.44 31.78 -.27 SchwUSLgC 0.46 31.29 -.25 SchUSSmC 0.33 35.99 -.55 Schwab 0.24 18.56 -.10 SchMau 0.60 52.81 -.79 SciGames 8.89 -.24 Scotts 1.00 55.05 -.69 ScrippsNet 0.30 50.76 -.88 ScrippsEW 9.64 -.20 SeabGld g 34.67 -.47 SeacorHld 15.00 96.78 -1.59 SeadrillLtd 2.74 36.55 -.66 SeagateT 13.56 +1.12 SealAir 0.52 26.43 -.47 SearsHldgs 83.24 -1.52 SeattGen 14.80 -.08 SelCmfrt 12.18 +.09 SemiHTr 0.56 35.40 -1.02 SempraEn 1.92 53.60 -.04 Semtech 23.65 -.51 SenHous 1.48 23.16 -.12 Sensata n 33.27 -.06 Sensient 0.84 32.67 -.31 Sequenom 5.94 -.21 ServiceCp 0.20 10.93 -.06 ShandaGm 6.39 -.24 ShawGrp 39.84 -1.21 Sherwin 1.46 80.00 -.92 ShipFin 1.52 20.92 +.08 Shire 0.39 84.86 -.58 ShoreTel 7.16 -.31 ShufflMstr 8.97 -.35 Shutterfly 40.32 -1.71 SiderNac s 0.58 16.07 -.66 Siemens 3.72 132.10 -1.10 SifyTech 2.72 -.07 SigaTech h 15.20 -.16 SigmaDsg 11.41 -.52 SigmaAld 0.72 62.65 -1.69 SignatBk 54.59 -.06 SignetJwlrs 43.55 -1.06 SilganH s 0.44 36.07 -.33 SilicGrIn 18.48 +.37 SilicnImg 9.16 -.44 SilcnLab 44.00 -.79 SilicnMotn 8.36 -.50 Slcnware 0.41 6.77 -.13 SilvStd g 29.55 -.05 SilvWhtn g 0.12 45.02 +.06 SilvrcpM g 0.08 14.70 +.17 SimonProp 3.20 105.95 -.70 SimpsnM 0.50 27.75 -.65 Sina 82.81 -1.32 Sinclair 0.48 12.51 -.29 SinoCoking 11.16 -.03 SiriusXM 1.74 -.07 SironaDent 51.50 -.46 Skechers 19.72 -.20 SkilldHcre 14.14 -.73 Sky-mobi n 9.44 -.79 SkyWest 0.16 16.40 +.49 SkywksSol 34.41 -.57 SmartBal 4.16 +.04 SmartM 6.56 -.24

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9.31 -.05 4.11 -.12 3.86 -.02 0.56 41.26 -.15 8.35 -.18 22.23 -.19 1.76 69.51 -.30 38.61 -.25 0.73 54.35 -1.79 42.58 +2.39 78.13 -3.68 22.44 +.48 0.30 49.80 -.32 3.18 -.04 22.67 -.64 2.93 +.02 0.10 14.68 -.19 8.82 -.10 1.12 35.93 -.28 3.89 -.13 0.28 35.16 -.79 0.20 48.06 -.97 26.16 -.88 1.82 38.07 +.10 1.83 40.73 -1.32 0.60 28.37 -.31 0.02 11.77 -.03 37.91 +.06 20.16 -.95 7.46 -.37 1.04 26.98 +.02 27.26 -.52 6.76 +.04 25.75 -.22 23.26 +.19 4.48 +.14 16.86 +.46 13.02 +.13 1.85 1.17 38.38 -.67 0.57 32.88 -.26 0.78 29.50 -.08 0.49 38.82 -.39 0.99 77.79 -.55 0.16 16.41 -.11 0.60 36.50 -.34 0.32 26.08 -.34 1.27 32.13 +.13 3.75 -.10 1.64 74.94 -.92 0.36 20.12 -.31 1.86 +.04 0.52 33.60 +.48 0.30 57.74 -1.24 1.68 22.80 +.08 0.04 43.84 +.03 1.02 27.45 -.22 0.30 18.10 -.38 0.16 9.53 -.19 .80 -.12 84.71 -1.19 0.06 8.83 -.08 0.08 14.56 -.37 45.33 +.62 0.12 7.71 -.06 72.98 -.08 24.27 -1.24 29.68 +.04 46.07 -2.04 6.16 -.31 4.00 135.40 -2.97 0.72 63.31 -.36 35.88 -.81 .19 +.01 7.36 -.14 1.44 31.81 -.82 0.40 46.87 -.86 1.93 -.03 0.60 42.16 -.22 15.82 -.60 15.72 -.60 11.55 -.15 10.26 -.18 9.15 -.28 0.04 28.90 -.50 3.71 +.07 2.88 -.01 38.64 -.73 6.02 -.27 0.35 7.81 -.24 5.79 +.09 0.04 9.38 -.17 11.66 -.14 10.12 -.09 41.89 -.71 14.76 +.12 5.98 -.04 18.38 -.29 17.88 +.16 28.16 -.88 1.13 66.24 -.72 27.27 -.42 0.04 2.51 -.02 2.05 +.69 2.35 +.09 1.04 27.59 +.03 0.80 21.29 -.41 0.20 15.86 -.23 0.20 22.45 -.04 0.85 18.09 +.02 10.71 -.05 5.59 -.20 0.71 38.66 -.43 0.60 49.32 -1.26 58.07 -1.35 17.60 -.36 17.97 -.44 0.47 12.20 -.21 15.67 -.38 5.61 -.13 25.72 +.18 32.69 -.69 0.25 24.21 -.75 0.78 26.12 -.29 6.35 -.15 2.19 34.32 -.15 1.00 51.30 -.35 6.08 -.16 4.02 -.04 0.32 25.07 -.76 1.75 53.05 -.35 17.10 -.01 49.44 -.68 0.60 54.03 -1.60 1.27 34.52 -.26 1.24 10.31 -.32 7.81 -.10 4.04 -.15 1.65 15.37 -.40 0.72 7.85 -.07 0.68 15.53 -.15 1.36 58.03 -1.07 1.75 25.28 -.01 0.80 18.01 +.14 0.47 32.56 -.08 7.87 -.58 20.64 -.22 0.08 5.25 -.11 0.52 22.67 -.59 0.54 10.47 -.02 49.04 +.50 0.68 46.63 +.64 7.03 -.15 1.33 +.07 2.84 +.24 39.25 -1.55 49.90 +.11 17.96 -1.02 34.59 -.39 0.50 36.42 -.51 18.96 +.01 24.94 -.01 24.29 -.63 16.57 -.50 22.89 -.22 14.95 -.08 0.78 49.31 -1.01 25.13 -.38 0.52 35.48 -.79 0.32 16.66 -.27 0.08 26.64 -.35 21.99 -.81 56.61 -.41 2.24 -.01 56.22 +.19 12.70 -.43 1.24 39.11 -.24 0.40 31.71 -.82 28.13 -.75 48.33 -2.96 2.20 92.40 +.21 24.10 -1.03 1.00 61.15 -1.27 1.00 62.97 +.38 37.96 -1.22 1.05 -.01 1.92 71.07 -.94 0.94 36.78 -.47 0.72 47.54 -1.45 0.02 23.45 +.15 17.78 -.38 9.06 -.21 21.00 -.09 4.57 +.90 0.64 64.50 -.86 2.64 85.25 -.94 3.16 60.79 -.80 0.28 17.85 -.23 0.50 23.79 -.10 1.30 -.05 4.27 -.18 1.05 89.02 -1.97 0.28 53.61 -.34 1.78 -.10 1.68 39.46 -.21 0.84 50.90 +.01 3.35 -.06 15.03 +.11 83.75 -1.20 1.44 58.96 -.22 43.14 -.76 .64 -.03 8.72 -.44 1.26 -.08 19.59 -.20 49.49 -.88 26.12 -.99 0.32 29.83 -.65 13.74 -.55 22.99 -.41 0.92 22.51 -.30 4.75 -.08 1.20 56.47 -.02 0.66 13.79 -.16 1.00 23.80 -.67 1.52 11.33 +.14 .48 +.04 0.64 36.32 -.46 0.86 45.09 -.17 0.16 18.40 -.02

U-V-W-X-Y-Z

Nm

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U-Store-It UBS AG UDR UFP Tch UGI Corp UIL Hold UQM Tech URS US Airwy US Geoth US Gold USA Tech h USEC USG UTiWrldwd UTStrcm UltaSalon UltimSoft UltraPt g Umpqua UndrArmr UniSrcEn UnilevNV Unilever UnionDrll UnionPac Unisys Unit UtdCBksGa UtdContl UtdMicro UtdNtrlF UtdOnln UPS B UtdRentals US12MoOil US Bancrp US Enr US NGsFd US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdTherap UtdhlthGp Unitrin UnvAmr UnvslCp UnivDisp UnivHlthS UnivTravel UnumGrp Ur-Energy Uranerz UraniumEn UranmRs UrbanOut VCA Ant VF Cp VaalcoE VailRsrt Valassis Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeantPh ValenceT h ValeroE Validus VlyNBcp Valspar ValueClick VanceInfo VangSTBd M G m G M & R D W m

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0.28 10.25 +.03 19.30 -.06 0.74 23.51 -.09 16.05 -.94 1.00 32.79 -.21 1.73 29.52 -.32 3.15 -.05 45.48 -1.11 8.30 +.02 1.04 -.02 8.13 +.07 2.38 -.10 5.50 +.02 16.66 -.17 0.06 19.27 -.36 2.15 -.01 41.27 -.71 56.77 -.19 43.44 -.74 0.20 11.06 -.17 67.86 +.53 1.68 36.58 -.27 1.12 30.40 -.20 1.12 29.72 -.12 9.91 +.21 1.52 94.56 -.80 33.18 -1.49 59.25 +.27 1.30 -.03 23.31 +1.05 0.08 2.86 -.08 43.70 +.25 0.40 5.80 -.10 2.08 71.80 -.64 31.10 -.67 48.05 +.15 0.20 26.90 -.14 6.25 -.13 5.24 +.17 42.37 +.04 0.20 54.38 -1.44 1.70 82.28 -.58 68.73 -.81 0.50 43.56 -.89 0.96 29.29 -.26 2.00 20.54 -.52 1.92 41.78 -.17 40.82 -.98 0.20 46.97 -.69 6.28 -.15 0.37 25.81 -.21 2.56 +.03 4.57 -.25 5.70 -.31 2.77 -.15 37.99 -.51 25.04 -.27 2.52 96.75 +1.06 8.33 +.29 48.00 +.15 28.39 -.74 0.76 33.23 -1.27 0.76 29.27 -.80 0.38 39.39 -.47 1.59 0.20 27.83 -.84 1.00 30.18 -.53 0.72 13.58 +.01 0.72 37.77 -.20 14.66 -.14 29.97 -2.15 2.27 80.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Pilot Butte

people are not going to travel that far on a regular basis.” The restaurant opened in 1983, when San Francisco restaurateurs Jack and Dee Mangin moved to Bend and bought the venue, once home to an A&W, according to The Bulletin’s archives. Over the years, the Pilot Butte Drive-In has received writeups in Reader’s Digest, various guide books and Internet bulletin boards catering to motorcycle riders and fishing enthusiasts. In nearly every survey, Pilot Butte Drive-In ranks at or near the top for hamburgers, trading the No. 1 spot with its older cousin, Dandy’s Drive-In, which opened in 1968 on Northeast Third Street, according to newspaper archives.

Continued from B1 Pilot Butte Drive-In, on Northeast Greenwood Avenue and Northeast Ninth Street, is open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., he said. A west-side location will not likely be able to capture the same drive-in ambiance of the restaurant on Greenwood, with its carhop stations and message-board sign, complete with neon lettering and analog clock. The west-side location being negotiated is a newer, more modern building, he said. It won’t have drive-up service. Reaction to news of a second Pilot Butte Drive-In across town has been positive, Falconer said. It might prompt some customers to buy a burger more often. “There’s no real quick route from east to west in Bend,” Falconer said, “and the west-side

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

TechXchange A:

No idea when. Not right now. Hoping within the next couple of years.

Continued from B1 In May 2009, Hooks opened a 100-square-foot store near the corner of East Third Street and Greenwood Avenue in Bend. The following year, with more and more sales coming in, she found a bigger spot across the street, a converted house, and she still runs the business there. Used and refurbished cell phones tied to various service providers hang on the wall, as do accessories. Hooks answered several of The Bulletin’s questions about the business.

Q: A:

Do you envision doing this for the rest of your life? I love owning my own business. I don’t necessarily know if I would be in TechXchange for the remainder of my career. What I do love is marketing. And so I’d love to do like marketing/consulting-firm stuff.

Q: A: Q: A:

Have you seen any other cities having this kind of store? A lot of places just do, like, repairs. There are repair places in larger places. I believe there are places that do sell some used cell phones. A lot of times the buildings are not really in nice areas, and they’re kind of pawnshoppy, I guess. This is what I’ve seen. So our goal is just to kind of create, like, another Verizon, except we sell used cell phones.

Q: A:

What goes into running this business? What knowledge do you tap on a daily basis? I do everything, so the knowledge is pretty much multitasking, multitasking, multitasking, and learning how to balance your time.

Q: A:

What providers’ phones do you carry? We just deal with the major carriers — Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile, AT&T, US Cellular. Those are the large ones in our area.

Q: A:

How have you raised the money to expand? It was, like, grass-roots. It’s really just been growing from itself. I mean, we only had a few phones when we were in the garage, so you would buy your own couple of cell phones, and then you’d sell those, and you’d use that money to buy more. And it’s eventually just grown into this.

Q: A:

Are you planning to open other TechXchanges? Yeah, definitely in the future. We’re going to work on opening our online store to sell everywhere online, and then we hope to open physical locations in, like, Eugene, Portland.

Q:

Do you do anything on the side? I do not. This is my full-time gig.

Jordan Novet can be reached at 541-633-2117 or at jnovet@ bendbulletin.com.

Do you have any idea when?

MOG Continued from B1 (On-demand streaming, unlike radio, lets you pick the songs you listen to.) More such deals are on the way, said David Hyman, MOG’s founder. “When you are thinking about buying into a cloud-based music service,” Hyman said, “I imagine you asking yourself, ‘Can I use this on my phone? Can I use it in my car? Will it work in my new TV?’ The value of these services goes up the more places consumers can access you.” MOG, based in Berkeley, Calif., was founded in 2005 as a social networking site. It changed in late 2009 into a subscription streaming service, offering 10 million songs at rates of $5 a month for music on PCs alone, or $10 for additional access through mobile devices. On new TVs and home theater systems, MOG will be a preinstalled feature, and in the Mini it can be activated by plugging in a smart phone. (MOG users paying $5 will get access through their TVs, but the $10 subscription is needed for Sonos and the Mini.)

Untapped living rooms Unlike MP3s, which a customer buys once and then pos-

Foreclosure Continued from B1 The attorneys general and federal government agencies are pressing for a financial settlement that could total over $20 billion. When asked about these estimates, Miller and three other attorneys general declined to comment Monday.

Growing criticism While the attorneys general and the newly created Consumer Financial Protection Bureau support such a fund for homeowner relief, there has been growing criticism of the government’s existing program to modify mortgages, known as the Home Affordable Modification Program. Last week, Republicans in the House pushed to kill the program, which has helped far fewer homeowners than promised. A fund with at least $20 billion would represent a sharp expansion of modification efforts for the more than 4 million Americans facing the loss of their homes. Many more Americans have mortgage loans that exceed the

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 B3

sesses, music accessed through the cloud needs constant contact with the service that provides it, which means the service must be available everywhere its customers spend their time. And if you’re looking for ubiquity, the first places to go are the living room and the car — both of which, analysts say, represent huge untapped markets for digital music. “I don’t think anybody in the music industry quite grasps how much of an important opportunity lies in the living room,” said Mark Mulligan, an analyst at Forrester Research. “And the window for that opportunity is closing ever more as every year goes by.” In many homes, the Internetready television, preloaded with streaming services like Netflix and Pandora, is fast becoming a multipurpose entertainment hub. Sony has recently introduced its Qriocity service, which offers streaming music and movie subscriptions through Sony’s connected devices like televisions and PlayStations. “Home theaters and Blu-ray get a lot of attention when it comes to playing movies or TV shows, but music is a critical feature for those devices too,” said Matthew Durgin, the head of smart TV for LG Electronics in the United States. “In a lot of cases, we put the highest-qual-

ity speakers in the living room.”

value of their homes because of falling housing prices, and critics warn that if an aid program is too generous, it could encourage borrowers to walk away from their homes. Major servicers, including Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo and JPMorgan Chase, all declined to comment last week. However, in recent financial filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, several big banks warned that the continuing regulatory investigations could have a significant effect on their results. As expensive as a settlement could be for the big banks, industry lobbyists in Washington privately say that they are eager to put the issue behind them, especially given the public relations fallout from a protracted fight with the government. And though the banks have said that the number of actual victims of foreclosure abuses is small, it is likely that any settlement will force them to acknowledge broader problems with their procedures. “The servicers themselves acknowledge there have been very serious problems in foreclosure servicing,” said John

Suthers, the attorney general of Colorado. “They know there are problems.”

Crowded field For subscription music services, the competition is intense and the rewards so far have been small. In addition to MOG, the field includes Rhapsody, Rdio and the remade Napster. Spotify, a European service, is expected to enter the U.S. market this year. But relatively few customers have been willing to pay for streaming music. Rhapsody, online since 2001, has 750,000 users; MOG does not report its subscription numbers, but analysts estimate that they are much lower. Apple and Google are also working on cloud-based music services, but they have been mum about their plans. Hyman says he believes the car, where people do much of their listening, could be digital music’s biggest opportunity by far, capable of attracting millions of new subscribers. Pandora, the Internet radio service, is already in many cars, including the Mini, and 20 million subscribers pay for satellite radio from Sirius XM. But so far on-demand music has been unavailable. “The car is the holy grail,” said Hyman. “I look at the satellite-radio market in America, with 20 million subscribers, and I don’t see why we shouldn’t be 20 mil-

Settlement talks Since last fall, the nation’s biggest mortgage servicers have been under investigation by all 50 state attorneys general, after a nationwide furor was set off by revelations that documents in many foreclosure cases were signed with only a cursory review, a practice known as robo-signing. Settlement talks are running on two tracks. The attorneys generals, backed up by a host of federal agencies, last week presented the five biggest mortgage servicers with a 27-page draft settlement proposal that could profoundly change how homeowners in default are treated. The attorneys general, the federal consumer bureau and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. are also pushing for a large monetary settlement from the servicers. Much of that money would be used to modify the loan terms for borrowers who are delinquent or facing foreclosure, perhaps reducing the interest rate or the principal to

lion subscribers.” MOG’s controls on the Mini are integrated into the dashboard’s digital display, and activated by hooking up a smart phone through the car’s Mini Connected system. The program connects to the Internet through the phone, but otherwise it is handled entirely through the standard dashboard controls. Only recently have car manufacturers been able to incorporate such new features, said Rob Passaro, a senior project manager at the BMW Group. “We interact with lots of cool technology companies, and the conversations we’ve always had over the years is: ‘Hey, awesome service, we want to get it into the car. When can it happen?’ ‘Oh, in about five years,’ ” Passaro said. “Now we can move as quickly as the consumer tech industry on these things.” To attract listeners who enjoy the sense of serendipity they get with Pandora, which creates custom music streams based on users’ tastes, MOG has developed a feature that combines ondemand and radiolike service; when a digital slider is moved to one side, a stream of one artist’s music will gradually filter in similar music. “We want to be in all these places where consumers listen to music,” Hyman said.

lower monthly payments. But regulators disagree over how big that settlement should be. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and the Federal Reserve do not favor as large a penalty as the attorneys general and the consumer bureau do. In addition, Miller admitted that it was not always clear who had final say in the negotiations. “Nobody’s driving the bus,” he said. “Nobody really has the lead or is in control of this. It’s a real joint effort.” Under the blueprint presented last week, banks would be prohibited from starting foreclosure proceedings while a borrower was actively trying to lower the interest rate or ease other terms of the home loan. Any borrower who successfully made three payments in a trial loan modification would be given a permanent modification. When a modification was denied, it would be automatically reviewed by an ombudsman or independent review panel. In addition, banks would have to reward their employees for pursuing modifications over foreclosures, while late fees would be curtailed.

Market update Northwest stocks Name AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

... 1.10f .04 .36 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... .24 .32 .22 .72f .04 .42 ... ... .65 ... .64

8 14 21 20 16 ... ... 27 23 60 21 11 ... 11 20 14 14 ... 16 72 7

57.72 -.82 +1.8 22.53 -.09 ... 14.03 -.09 +5.2 14.82 -.25 -4.7 70.88 -.92 +8.6 8.88 +.11 +5.1 47.35 -2.46 +.1 60.96 -.97 +1.1 72.19 -.62 ... 8.43 -.14 +14.1 32.17 -.02 +8.1 41.98 -.63 -.3 10.94 -.01 -10.8 21.21 -.35 +.9 9.27 +.01 +4.7 23.64 +.04 +5.7 6.77 -.27 +11.7 9.75 -.31 +3.1 21.67 +.08 +6.9 15.81 -.10 +31.8 25.72 -.23 -7.8

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1436.00 $1434.10 $35.855

Pvs Day $1430.00 $1428.20 $35.317

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24 .92f 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.46f .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

21 16 18 17 39 ... 32 20 14 19 19 10 25 12 74 17 14 14 84 ...

88.92 -.96 +4.1 43.26 -.82 +2.1 48.24 +.09 +3.8 13.18 -.57 -25.5 48.43 -.77 -15.5 2.66 +.01 +28.5 40.53 -.36 +8.2 136.58 -2.57 -1.9 21.60 -.23 -4.0 63.58 -1.84 -4.2 80.00 -.92 -4.5 45.12 -.29 ... 33.60 +.48 +4.6 13.74 -.55 +17.5 11.06 -.17 -9.2 26.90 -.14 -.3 17.23 -.16 +1.8 31.72 -.19 +2.4 3.37 -.07 +19.5 23.34 -.23 +23.3

Prime rate Time period

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp S&P500ETF BkofAm FordM iShR2K

3535025 1907805 1356571 1044791 799612

Last Chg 4.52 131.43 14.03 14.01 81.09

-.02 -1.04 -.09 -.41 -1.35

Gainers ($2 or more) Name WDigital BarcShtD IFM Inv JohnCn pfZ DSOXBr rs

Last

Chg %Chg

34.68 +4.67 17.65 +2.04 4.70 +.49 207.74 +20.52 56.51 +4.35

+15.6 +13.1 +11.6 +11.0 +8.3

Losers ($2 or more) Name NeoPhoto n ChiXFash n GreenDot n DrxSOXBll CameltInf n

3.25 3.25 3.25

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

LucasEngy GtPanSilv g SamsO&G EndvSilv g NwGold g

Last Chg

204116 4.95 +.71 102430 4.96 +.41 80873 4.53 +.45 75093 10.20 +.86 50994 10.73 +.01

LucasEngy MdwGold g SamsO&G EndvSilv g GtPanSilv g

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

PwShs QQQ SiriusXM Cisco Microsoft Intel

Gainers ($2 or more)

875309 874439 696010 645381 558319

Last Chg 57.19 1.74 18.20 25.72 21.21

-.78 -.07 -.20 -.23 -.35

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

4.95 2.39 4.53 10.20 4.96

+.71 +16.7 +.27 +12.7 +.45 +11.0 +.86 +9.2 +.41 +9.0

Atrinsic rs SynthEngy EDAP TMS Pharmasset TomoThera

Name

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

5.69 +2.71 2.05 +.69 4.74 +1.16 61.95 +12.18 4.57 +.90

+90.6 +50.7 +32.4 +24.5 +24.5

Losers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

13.77 4.10 43.25 62.04 17.75

-1.81 -11.6 -.40 -8.9 -4.15 -8.8 -5.60 -8.3 -1.50 -7.8

Ever-Glory PyramidOil EmersnR h StreamGSv Augusta g

2.05 7.67 2.65 3.00 5.63

-.23 -10.1 -.73 -8.7 -.24 -8.3 -.26 -8.0 -.48 -7.9

Replgn FX Ener Macatawa TastyBak OptCable

3.54 -1.37 -27.9 9.88 -1.37 -12.2 2.60 -.32 -11.0 2.57 -.31 -10.8 5.87 -.70 -10.7

729 2,319 91 3,139 159 22

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

NYSE

Indexes

Diary

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Diary 167 300 41 508 31 3

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

593 2,042 125 2,760 107 38

12,391.29 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,306.65 3,872.64 Dow Jones Transportation 417.22 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 8,520.27 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,420.83 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,840.51 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,344.07 1,010.91 S&P 500 14,276.94 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 838.00 587.66 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

12,090.03 5,018.23 413.22 8,337.02 2,402.07 2,745.63 1,310.13 13,886.07 812.25

-79.85 -42.31 +.66 -76.03 -17.67 -39.04 -11.02 -134.92 -12.74

YTD %Chg %Chg -.66 -.84 +.16 -.90 -.73 -1.40 -.83 -.96 -1.54

52-wk %Chg

+4.43 -1.73 +2.03 +4.68 +8.77 +3.50 +4.17 +3.94 +3.65

+14.57 +19.08 +9.45 +14.32 +25.31 +17.73 +15.08 +16.57 +21.76

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

366.08 2,680.17 3,990.41 5,973.78 7,161.93 23,313.19 36,603.30 22,145.79 3,430.05 10,505.02 1,980.27 3,066.52 4,895.90 5,890.47

-.51 t -.79 t -.74 t -.28 t -.24 t -.41 t -.81 t +.03 s +.35 s -1.76 t -1.22 t +.17 s -1.26 t -.44 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

1.0116 1.6202 1.0278 .002110 .1525 1.3968 .1284 .012153 .083008 .0354 .000893 .1571 1.0797 .0340

1.0132 1.6262 1.0284 .002110 .1522 1.3987 .1284 .012147 .083367 .0355 .000895 .1575 1.0795 .0340

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 20.32 -0.16 +4.2 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 19.30 -0.15 +4.2 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.40 -0.04 +2.6 GrowthI 27.04 -0.29 +4.6 Ultra 23.67 -0.28 +4.5 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.58 -0.18 +4.0 AMutlA p 26.14 -0.15 +3.2 BalA p 18.43 -0.12 +3.3 BondA p 12.17 +0.4 CapIBA p 50.80 -0.19 +1.8 CapWGA p 36.58 -0.25 +2.4 CapWA p 20.62 +1.0 EupacA p 42.43 -0.40 +2.6 FdInvA p 38.41 -0.36 +5.0 GovtA p 13.82 -0.4 GwthA p 31.66 -0.33 +4.0 HI TrA p 11.55 +3.5 IncoA p 17.14 -0.07 +3.6 IntBdA p 13.40 +0.2 ICAA p 28.94 -0.25 +3.2 NEcoA p 26.16 -0.28 +3.3 N PerA p 29.54 -0.27 +3.2 NwWrldA 53.72 -0.38 -1.6 SmCpA p 38.94 -0.33 +0.2 TxExA p 11.77 -0.01 +0.3 WshA p 28.35 -0.19 +4.2 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.49 -0.26 +1.2 IntEqII I r 12.57 -0.11 +0.9 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.24 -0.23 +2.5 IntlVal r 27.94 -0.20 +3.1 MidCap 35.04 -0.40 +4.2 MidCapVal 21.46 -0.22 +6.9 Baron Funds: Growth 54.13 -0.54 +5.7 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.72 -0.01 +0.7 DivMu 14.27 +0.6

TxMgdIntl 16.30 -0.14 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 18.31 -0.12 GlAlA r 19.96 -0.12 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.62 -0.11 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 18.35 -0.12 GlbAlloc r 20.05 -0.12 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 55.50 -0.83 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.97 -0.42 DivEqInc 10.42 -0.08 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.96 -0.44 AcornIntZ 41.23 -0.20 ValRestr 51.44 -0.64 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.75 -0.04 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.83 -0.09 USCorEq2 11.53 -0.13 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 35.32 -0.29 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.70 -0.29 NYVen C 34.12 -0.28 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.23 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.41 -0.14 EmMktV 35.02 -0.15 IntSmVa 18.03 -0.11 LargeCo 10.35 -0.09 USLgVa 21.57 -0.19 US Small 22.31 -0.36 US SmVa 26.83 -0.45 IntlSmCo 17.94 -0.08 Fixd 10.34 +0.01 IntVa 19.47 -0.18 Glb5FxInc 10.89 2YGlFxd 10.16 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 73.25 -0.45

+3.6 +4.5 +2.8 +2.6 +4.6 +2.8 +4.0 +2.5 +3.2 +2.6 +0.8 +1.8 +4.4 +5.1 +5.1 +2.9 +2.9 +2.7 +1.0 -3.4 -3.2 +4.8 +4.5 +7.2 +4.4 +4.9 +4.4 +0.2 +5.9 +0.1 +0.1 +4.3

Income 13.36 IntlStk 36.76 Stock 113.44 DoubleLine Funds: TRBd I 10.98 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.62 Eaton Vance I: FltgRt 9.10 GblMacAbR 10.21 LgCapVal 18.68 FMI Funds: LgCap p 16.16 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.92 FPACres 27.74 Fairholme 35.03 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.41 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.68 StrInA 12.50 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.89 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.95 FF2015 11.66 FF2020 14.22 FF2020K 13.60 FF2025 11.91 FF2030 14.26 FF2030K 14.08 FF2035 11.91 FF2040 8.32 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.94 AMgr50 15.80 Balanc 18.82 BalancedK 18.83 BlueChGr 47.12 Canada 62.10 CapAp 26.30 CpInc r 9.80 Contra 70.37 ContraK 70.35

-0.01 +1.0 -0.31 +2.9 -0.91 +5.3 NA -0.14 +2.2 +2.3 +0.3 -0.14 +2.2 -0.09 +3.5 +0.6 -0.08 +3.5 -0.21 -1.5 -0.08 -1.6 -0.26 +3.8 -0.01 +2.2 -0.25 +3.9 -0.06 -0.04 -0.07 -0.07 -0.07 -0.09 -0.09 -0.08 -0.06

+2.6 +2.8 +3.1 +3.1 +3.4 +3.6 +3.5 +3.8 +3.9

-0.13 -0.09 -0.13 -0.12 -0.66 -1.01 -0.17 -0.02 -0.86 -0.86

+4.7 +2.5 +3.2 +3.3 +3.9 +6.8 +3.8 +4.9 +4.0 +4.0

DisEq DivIntl DivrsIntK r DivGth EmrMk Eq Inc EQII Fidel FltRateHi r GNMA GovtInc GroCo GroInc GrowthCoK HighInc r Indepn IntBd IntlDisc InvGrBd InvGB LgCapVal LatAm LevCoStk LowP r LowPriK r Magelln MagellanK MidCap MuniInc NwMkt r OTC 100Index Ovrsea Puritn SCmdtyStrt SrsIntGrw SrsIntVal SrInvGrdF STBF SmllCpS r StratInc StrReRt r TotalBd USBI

23.51 31.31 31.29 29.77 25.74 46.28 19.11 33.99 9.89 11.46 10.36 87.19 19.02 87.15 9.19 25.25 10.56 33.88 11.39 7.41 12.02 56.93 30.15 40.12 40.11 75.14 75.08 29.81 12.23 15.50 58.92 9.11 33.91 18.56 13.10 11.44 10.62 11.39 8.47 20.48 11.19 9.85 10.75 11.29

-0.24 -0.29 -0.29 -0.34 -0.19 -0.31 -0.13 -0.34

-0.01 -1.00 -0.15 -1.01 -0.31 -0.01 -0.34

-0.05 -0.76 -0.35 -0.27 -0.27 -1.01 -1.02 -0.38 -0.01 -0.71 -0.07 +0.24 -0.12 -0.07 -0.11 -0.10 -0.01 -0.30 -0.01 -0.02 -0.01 -0.01

+4.3 +3.8 +3.9 +4.7 -2.3 +4.6 +4.7 +5.7 +1.5 +0.5 -0.3 +4.9 +3.9 +4.9 +3.9 +3.7 +0.7 +2.5 +0.4 +0.8 +4.8 -3.6 +6.1 +4.5 +4.6 +4.8 +4.9 +3.3 +0.4 +7.3 +4.2 +4.4 +3.6 +3.6 +1.3 +6.8 +0.4 +0.4 +4.5 +2.2 +2.8 +0.9 +0.2

Value 72.19 -0.67 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 51.95 -0.33 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 39.85 -0.54 500IdxInv 46.50 -0.39 IntlInxInv 36.85 -0.32 TotMktInv 38.08 -0.36 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 46.50 -0.39 TotMktAd r 38.08 -0.36 First Eagle: GlblA 47.61 -0.29 OverseasA 23.06 -0.11 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.31 -0.01 FoundAl p 10.97 -0.04 HYTFA p 9.54 -0.01 IncomA p 2.25 USGovA p 6.72 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.24 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.27 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.51 -0.13 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.48 -0.06 GlBd A p 13.62 GrwthA p 18.76 -0.13 WorldA p 15.60 -0.13 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.64 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 42.09 -0.42 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.69 -0.16 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.63 -0.06 Quality 20.70 -0.15 Goldman Sachs A: MdCVA p 37.35 -0.40 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.45

+5.1 -2.2 +4.4 +4.5 +4.8 +4.5 +4.5 +4.5 +2.7 +1.8 +0.6 +4.9 -0.1 +4.8 +0.4 +0.9 +4.9 +4.7 +4.2 +7.2 +1.0 +5.5 +5.1 +0.8 +4.6 +2.9 +0.2 +2.9 +4.0 +3.5

MidCapV 37.64 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.20 CapApInst 38.02 IntlInv t 62.03 Intl r 62.64 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.27 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.29 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 43.88 Div&Gr 20.43 TotRetBd 10.98 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.03 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 17.15 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.94 CmstkA 16.48 EqIncA 8.96 GrIncA p 20.23 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 24.22 AssetStA p 24.95 AssetStrI r 25.17 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.45 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.44 HighYld 8.36 IntmTFBd 10.80 ShtDurBd 10.97 USLCCrPls 21.40 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 51.15 PrkMCVal T 23.44 Twenty T 66.84 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.29 LSGrwth 13.26 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 20.78 Lazard Open:

-0.40 +4.1 +0.8 -0.45 +3.5 -0.44 +3.4 -0.44 +3.5 -0.43 +1.8 -0.43 +1.9 -0.48 +3.6 -0.15 +4.8 +0.8 -0.02 -2.1 -0.10 +2.6 -0.10 -0.13 -0.05 -0.14

+4.8 +4.8 +4.3 +5.3

-0.26 +2.1 -0.27 +2.2 -0.27 +2.3 +0.4 +0.5 +3.7 +0.9 +0.3 -0.18 +3.5 -0.57 +1.0 -0.18 +3.9 -0.86 +1.7 -0.07 +3.0 -0.11 +3.3 -0.19 -4.6

EmgMkO p 21.15 -0.20 Longleaf Partners: Partners 30.49 -0.23 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.51 -0.03 StrInc C 15.13 -0.03 LSBondR 14.46 -0.02 StrIncA 15.05 -0.03 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.22 -0.01 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 12.06 -0.12 BdDebA p 8.02 -0.01 ShDurIncA p 4.61 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.42 -0.07 ValueA 23.81 -0.16 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.92 -0.16 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 9.06 -0.08 Matthews Asian: PacTgrInv 22.25 -0.18 MergerFd 16.02 +0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.41 TotRtBdI 10.41 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 38.55 -0.37 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 30.12 -0.18 GlbDiscZ 30.49 -0.18 QuestZ 18.24 -0.10 SharesZ 21.68 -0.13 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 48.44 -0.44 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 50.18 -0.46 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.49 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 28.60 -0.21 Intl I r 20.32 -0.19 Oakmark r 43.47 -0.35 Old Westbury Fds:

-4.7 +7.9 +2.6 +2.6 +2.5 +2.7 +1.6 +4.1 +3.8 +1.0 +2.6 +4.4 +4.4 +5.2 -5.1 +1.5 +1.1 +1.2 +3.2 +3.2 +3.3 +3.1 +4.3 +5.4 +5.3 +3.9 +3.1 +4.7 +5.3

GlobOpp 7.99 -0.04 GlbSMdCap 15.92 -0.15 Oppenheimer A: DvMktA p 34.99 -0.22 GlobA p 63.63 -0.24 GblStrIncA 4.33 IntBdA p 6.50 MnStFdA 32.98 -0.28 RisingDivA 16.22 -0.12 S&MdCpVl 33.13 -0.35 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.70 -0.11 S&MdCpVl 28.38 -0.31 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.65 -0.11 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.48 -0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.62 -0.22 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.88 -0.01 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.75 -0.01 AllAsset 12.32 -0.02 ComodRR 9.82 -0.05 HiYld 9.50 -0.01 InvGrCp 10.55 -0.01 LowDu 10.42 -0.01 RealRtnI 11.46 ShortT 9.89 TotRt 10.88 -0.01 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.46 TotRtA 10.88 -0.01 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.88 -0.01 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.88 -0.01 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.88 -0.01 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 47.02 -0.12 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 42.12 -0.43 Price Funds:

+3.6 +2.9 -4.1 +5.4 +2.0 -0.2 +1.8 +4.6 +3.4 +4.4 +3.2 +4.4 -1.2 -4.0 +0.9 +1.7 +2.2 +5.7 +3.5 +1.6 +0.8 +1.3 +0.5 +0.9 +1.2 +0.8 +0.7 +0.8 +0.9 +2.6 +2.8

BlChip 40.01 CapApp 21.11 EmMktS 34.23 EqInc 24.73 EqIndex 35.38 Growth 33.47 HlthSci 32.45 HiYield 6.94 IntlBond 10.03 IntlStk 14.50 MidCap 62.19 MCapVal 24.65 N Asia 18.27 New Era 56.14 N Horiz 35.36 N Inc 9.45 R2010 15.77 R2015 12.27 R2020 17.01 R2025 12.49 R2030 17.97 R2035 12.74 R2040 18.14 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 36.07 SmCapVal 37.51 SpecIn 12.48 Value 24.70 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 14.17 VoyA p 24.41 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 12.26 PremierI r 21.62 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 38.88 S&P Sel 20.45 Scout Funds: Intl 33.48 Selected Funds: AmShD 42.57 Sequoia 136.25 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 21.10 Third Avenue Fds:

-0.46 -0.11 -0.28 -0.17 -0.30 -0.38 -0.33 -0.01 -0.01 -0.16 -0.83 -0.23 -0.13 -0.72 -0.46 -0.01 -0.09 -0.07 -0.12 -0.10 -0.15 -0.11 -0.17 -0.45 -0.49 -0.03 -0.20

+4.9 +3.9 -3.0 +4.4 +4.5 +4.1 +7.2 +3.7 +1.3 +1.9 +6.3 +4.0 -4.7 +7.6 +5.6 +0.2 +2.8 +3.2 +3.5 +3.7 +4.0 +4.2 +4.1 +0.4 +4.8 +3.8 +1.7 +5.8

-0.11 +4.7 -0.29 +3.0 -0.17 +5.2 -0.31 +6.2 -0.35 +4.6 -0.17 +4.5 -0.32 +3.4 -0.33 +2.8 -1.43 +5.4 -0.13 +5.2

ValueInst 51.85 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 29.11 IntValue I 29.77 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.22 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.98 CAITAdm 10.74 CpOpAdl 80.03 EMAdmr r 39.10 Energy 136.89 ExtdAdm 43.31 500Adml 121.08 GNMA Ad 10.72 GrwAdm 32.67 HlthCr 54.14 HiYldCp 5.82 InfProAd 25.87 ITBdAdml 11.13 ITsryAdml 11.24 IntGrAdm 62.72 ITAdml 13.30 ITGrAdm 9.91 LtdTrAd 10.99 LTGrAdml 9.16 LT Adml 10.64 MCpAdml 96.93 MuHYAdm 10.03 PrmCap r 70.98 ReitAdm r 81.30 STsyAdml 10.67 STBdAdml 10.53 ShtTrAd 15.86 STIGrAd 10.78 SmCAdm 36.51 TtlBAdml 10.54 TStkAdm 33.01 WellslAdm 53.63 WelltnAdm 55.54 Windsor 47.90 WdsrIIAd 47.90 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 25.27

-0.41 +0.2 -0.25 +3.9 -0.25 +3.9 -0.09 +1.7 -0.12 +2.8 +1.0 -1.03 +4.2 -0.21 -1.9 -0.98 +12.4 -0.61 +4.9 -1.01 +4.5 +0.4 -0.35 +3.4 -0.53 +4.8 +3.4 +1.3 -0.02 -0.01 -0.3 -0.60 +2.0 +0.9 -0.01 +0.8 +0.3 -0.04 -0.9 +0.4 -1.06 +5.2 +0.2 -0.87 +4.0 -0.61 +3.6 +0.1 -0.01 +0.2 +0.3 -0.01 +0.6 -0.54 +5.0 -0.01 -0.31 +4.6 -0.19 +2.0 -0.30 +3.4 -0.48 +5.1 -0.36 +5.1 -0.18 +3.4

CapOpp 34.65 DivdGro 14.88 Energy 72.90 EqInc 21.38 Explr 77.03 GNMA 10.72 GlobEq 18.52 HYCorp 5.82 HlthCre 128.30 InflaPro 13.17 IntlGr 19.71 IntlVal 33.36 ITIGrade 9.91 LifeCon 16.67 LifeGro 22.80 LifeMod 20.07 LTIGrade 9.16 Morg 18.81 MuInt 13.30 PrecMtls r 26.27 PrmcpCor 14.31 Prmcp r 68.41 SelValu r 19.54 STAR 19.60 STIGrade 10.78 StratEq 19.44 TgtRetInc 11.44 TgRe2010 22.78 TgtRe2015 12.72 TgRe2020 22.70 TgtRe2025 13.00 TgRe2030 22.40 TgtRe2035 13.57 TgtRe2040 22.29 TgtRe2045 14.00 USGro 19.20 Wellsly 22.13 Welltn 32.15 Wndsr 14.20 WndsII 26.99 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntAdm r 27.14 TotIntlInst r 108.59 500 121.05

-0.44 +4.2 -0.10 +3.5 -0.52 +12.3 -0.14 +4.9 -1.21 +5.7 +0.4 -0.15 +3.7 +3.4 -1.24 +4.8 +1.3 -0.19 +1.9 -0.29 +3.7 -0.01 +0.8 -0.07 +1.9 -0.17 +3.4 -0.12 +2.6 -0.04 -0.9 -0.26 +4.3 +0.9 -0.12 -1.8 -0.18 +3.9 -0.83 +4.0 -0.19 +4.2 -0.13 +2.7 -0.01 +0.6 -0.26 +6.1 -0.04 +1.4 -0.10 +2.1 -0.07 +2.4 -0.14 +2.7 -0.09 +3.0 -0.17 +3.3 -0.11 +3.7 -0.18 +3.7 -0.11 +3.7 -0.23 +5.2 -0.08 +2.0 -0.18 +3.4 -0.14 +5.1 -0.20 +5.1 -0.22 +3.0 -0.85 +3.0 -1.01 +4.5

Growth

32.66 -0.35 +3.4

MidCap

21.35 -0.24 +5.1

SmCap

36.47 -0.54 +4.9

SmlCpGth

23.27 -0.39 +6.2

SmlCpVl

16.60 -0.21 +3.7

STBnd

10.53 -0.01 +0.2

TotBnd

10.54 -0.01

TotlIntl

16.23 -0.13 +3.0

TotStk

32.99 -0.31 +4.5

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.43 -0.09 +4.5

ExtIn

43.31 -0.60 +4.9

FTAllWldI r

96.68 -0.78 +3.0

GrwthIst

32.67 -0.35 +3.4

InfProInst

10.54

+1.3

InstIdx

120.22 -1.01 +4.5

InsPl

120.23 -1.01 +4.5

InsTStPlus

29.84 -0.28 +4.6

MidCpIst

21.41 -0.24 +5.2

SCInst

36.50 -0.54 +5.0

TBIst

10.54 -0.01

TSInst

33.01 -0.31 +4.6

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

100.01 -0.84 +4.5

STBdIdx

10.53 -0.01 +0.2

TotBdSgl

10.54 -0.01

TotStkSgl

31.86 -0.29 +4.6

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.83

+1.2

Yacktman Funds: Fund p

17.38 -0.11 +5.1


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M 

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY CENTRAL OREGON BREAKFAST SEMINAR, SPRING EMPLOYMENT LAW POTPOURRI: Presentations on managing workplace bullying and sensitive employment records. RSVP before March 1; $15.00; 8-10 a.m.; St. Charles Bend conference center, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321 or kward@barran.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.1 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. PERS UPDATE: David Crosley of PERS will present the latest information about PERS. Hosted by the Financial Planning Association of Mid-Oregon, lunch provided. Registration required; $25; 12:30-2 p.m.; Downtown Athletic Club, 999 Willamette St., Eugene; 541-2849855 or www.fpanet.org/docs/ assets/1073392A-1D09-67A17AC882B335F3AE49/March82011 MeetingNotice.pdf. INTEGRATING COLORS AND TYPOGRAPHY: Registration required; $99; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MARKET ON YOUTUBE FOR PROFIT: Learn how to use the free tools on YouTube to create marketing videos that drive traffic to you or your business. Registration required; $59; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. FINANCIAL PEACE UNIVERSITY: Thirteen-week course taught by Dave Ramsey teaches families and individuals how to manage their money. Dave Ramsey is a personal money management expert, author and host of a national radio program; 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Smith Rock Community Church, 8344 11th St., Terrebonne; 541-526-1788 or www.daveramsey.com.

WEDNESDAY SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING, IT’S NOT JUST A FAD: With Jamie Christman of COTV’s “Talk of the Town” as moderator, this panel discussion, including presenters Matt Hand, Jim Kress and Kelly Walker, will share how businesses can utilize social media marketing tools like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn; free; 7:30-9 a.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541382-3221 or www.bendchamber.org. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. IMPLEMENTING LEAN OFFICE: Five-session online course providing tools, resources and skill development to implement LEAN Office protocols. LEAN Office is a work improvement method focused on eliminating waste, reducing costs and improving efficiency. Register at www.simplicated.com/component/ option,com_dtregister/Itemid,9/. Course dates: Jan. 26, Feb. 9, Feb. 23 and March 9; $199; 9 a.m.; 541788-7001. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library,

601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. ACCESS 2007, BEGINNING: Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Surftides, 2945 N.W. Jetty Ave., Lincoln City; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Registration required; $15; 10 a.m.-noon; Crook County School District, 471 N.E. Ochoco Plaza Drive, Prineville; 541-383-7290 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu. WHY STREETSMART EDGE: Learn how to use StreetSmart Edge’s tools. Registration required; free; noon-1:30 p.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-3181794, luiz.soutomaior@schwab.com or www.schwab.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541-553-3243.

FRIDAY REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & CVB COFFEE CLATTER: Free; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Central Oregon Pediatric Associates, 413 N.W. Larch Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541536-6237 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-504-1389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541388-1133 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www.aarp.org/ taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. NONPROFIT GRANT WRITING: Registration required; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Redmond campus, 2030 S.E. College Loop, Redmond; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. FREE TAX FRIDAY: Tax return reviews. Call to schedule an appointment; free; 3-4 p.m.; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666 or www.facebook.com/Zoomtax.

SATURDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax-preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. Spanish interpreters will be available Feb. 9 and 19 and March 9 and 19; to schedule time with an interpreter, call 541-382-4366. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-504-1389 or visit www.yourmoneyback.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: For individuals and families at or below about $58,000 in gross income, these sessions provide free tax preparation services. Certified tax volunteers will be available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment call 541447-3260 or visit www.yourmoney back.org; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.;

YouTube makes acquisition to boost original content

Prineville COIC Office, 2321 N.E. Third St.; 541-447-3119.

MONDAY FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-536-6237 or visit www .aarp.org/taxaide; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-5041389. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-388-1133 or visit www.aarp. org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-548-6325 or visit www .aarp.org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-5486325. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www .aarp.org/taxaide; free; 1-5 p.m.; Warm Springs Community Center, 2200 Hollywood Blvd.; 541-5533243. OREGON SOLAR INCENTIVE PROGRAM INFORMATION SESSION: Learn about Oregon’s Solar Incentive Program. Registration requested; free; 5:306 p.m.; E2 Solar, 63063 Layton Ave., Bend; 541-388-1151, sales@ e2solarenergy.com or www.e2 solarenergy.com.

TUESDAY March 15 FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541388-1133 or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-388-1133. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541548-6325 or visit www.aarp .org/taxaide; free; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-548-6325. VISIT BEND BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING: RSVP requested to valerie@visitbend. com; free; 9 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave.; 541-382-8048 or valerie@ visitbend.com. FREE TAX-PREPARATION SESSIONS: Free tax-preparation services with certified tax volunteers available for assistance. For more information and to schedule an appointment, call 541-553-3148 or visit www .aarp.org/taxaide; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Madras Senior Center, 860 S.W. Madison; 541-475-6494. BANKRUPTCY CLINIC: Free bankruptcy information session; free; 4-5 p.m.; Rosie Bareis Community Campus, 1010 N.W. 14th St., Bend; 541-385-6950. INTEGRATING COLORS AND TYPOGRAPHY: Registration required; $99; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3837270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. MARKET ON YOUTUBE FOR PROFIT: Learn how to use the free tools on YouTube to create marketing videos that drive traffic to you or your business. Registration required; $59; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Library, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

By Claire Cain Miller New York Times News Service

SAN FRANCISCO — YouTube, the video site owned by Google, formally announced on Monday that it had acquired Next New Networks, a Web video production company, in its biggest effort yet to move beyond short, quirky home videos to professionally produced content. The acquisition of Next New Networks, which produces original programming and helps video creators distribute their films and make money, is YouTube’s biggest leap into creating its own programming. But that will be minimal, the companies

said. Original programming has taken a back seat at Next New Networks, and Google has shied away from producing its own content. “We want to make as clean a line as possible for us to build the platform on YouTube and then let the content production happen with our partners,” said Tom Pickett, director of global content operation at YouTube. Google will pay less than $50 million for the company, according to two people briefed on the terms of the deal, which The New York Times first reported YouTube’s interest in the company in December. The compa-

nies declined to comment on the price. Improving its original programming is crucial for YouTube, which faces competition from Web video services like Hulu, iTunes and Netflix. For its part, Google, which is trying to popularize its Google TV service, needs more Web video that people will watch for hours at a time. “There’s still a lot of YouTube that’s about the single video experience right now,” Pickett said. “We want to think about sets of videos and program experiences. That’s where we’re heading, and we think this team is going to help us get there.”

Oil Continued from B1 But at last week’s closing of $114, the price of each of those barrels of Ural crude, the country’s main export blend, has risen 24 percent since the beginning of the year. Last week, the prime minister, Putin, sat down for a meeting with Russia’s finance minister, Aleksei Kudrin, which was nationally televised on state news channels for the public’s enlightenment as the two discussed, just short of gloating, the benefits to Russia of a global oil panic. “Mr. Kudrin, budget revenues have become considerable,” Putin said matter-of-factly. Kudrin agreed, noting that if prices hold, Russia will be able to resume contributions to its sovereign wealth funds for the first time since the summer of 2008, when the global recession began. One of those sovereign investment vehicles, the Reserve Fund, could reach $50 billion by the end of the year, Kudrin reported. Just a few months ago Russian officials planning the 2011 budget had anticipated the fund would be depleted. “Good,” Putin responded to Kudrin’s account, nodding with satisfaction. “The upheavals taking place in a number of the oil- and gasproducing countries now send a signal to investors to come to Russia,” Total’s chief executive, Christophe de Margerie, said in a meeting with President Dmitry

New York Times News Service ile photo

An oil treatment facility operates at the Priobskoe oilfield in Khanty-Mansi, Russia. Medvedev announcing the deal. Margerie said his company was committing about $4 billion to the venture. “Russia offers a much safer environment for investment,” he said. Oil experts say that because global production capacity for oil is still far larger than world demand, the run-up in prices is being fueled by fear more than by reality. The concern is that the violence in Libya could spread to other member states of the Organization for the Petroleum Exporting Countries, which are primarily Arab nations. Russia is not only outside OPEC, and thus free from the cartel’s production restraints, but also, with its formidable secret police apparatus and a population bulge among the elderly rather than the young, is seen as less vul-

nerable to an outbreak of social unrest. Russia is building a pipeline under the Baltic Sea directly to Germany, called Nord Stream, and has proposed another similar pipeline under the Black Sea to Bulgaria. It says these pipes will reduce the risk of traveling overland through central European countries that are unfriendly to Russia, but some European governments have balked at the high cost and political subtexts of these projects. When Putin visited Brussels last month, he had a new argument for these pipes, which he has championed for years. “I am confident that the real long-term interests of the European economy lie with our resources,” Putin said at a news conference. “Nothing matters more than stability.”

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Gordon L. McComb to Michael Meinhardt and Pat Wang, Squaw Back Woods Addition to Indian Ford Ranch Homes, Lot 40, $240,000 Green Arbor Development Inc. to Lawrence C. and Lea J. Vose, Broken Top, Phase V-C, Lot 481, $325,000 JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. and Washington Mutual Bank to Collin C. and Angela D. Brooks, Sandalwood, Phase 2, Lot 37, $160,000 Craig K. Edwards to TSLM LLC, Township 15, Range 13, Section 16, $665,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Citibank N.A., Township 15, Range 11, Section 28, $349,000 Roger K. and Judith A. Stroup to William K. and Ardis E. Mangels trustees of Mangels Family Trust, Fairway Crest Village, Phase 3, Lot 5, Block 13, $160,000 Gary W. and Gayle Estes to Vergent LLC, NorthWest Crossing, Phase 4, Lot 150, $287,950 Vergent LLC to Gary W. and Gayle L. Estes, Awbrey Butte Homesites,

Phase 32, Lot 7, $399,000 Susan D. and David S. Galloway to Steven E. and Jill S. Ritchie, Fairway Crest Village, Phase 4, Lot 22, Block 17, $370,000 Melissa Tasaki to Sergio A. Lugo, Partition Plat 200527, Parcel 3, $190,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal National Mortgage Association, Deer Pointe Village, Phase 2, Lot 1, Block 3, $209,143 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Township 22, Range 10, Section 05, $170,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc. to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Deschutes River Recreation Homesites, Unit 8, Part 2, Lot 12, Block 101, $210,000 Paterson Communications Inc. to Julius A. Jr. and Lynn H. Bernard, Views at Oaktree, Phases 3, 4 and 5, Lot 34, $249,000 Wells Fargo Bank N.A. to Pablo P. Gomez, Partition Plat 19976, Parcel 2, $175,000 Jan L. Gnass to Carl E. Maass and

Kathleen S. Roche, Boulder Ridge, Phase 1, Lot 5, $155,000 Gary D. and Kimberly A. Roberts to Daniel H. Sallee and Brenda G. Sallee, Skyliner Summit at Broken Top, Phase 10, Lot 232, $450,000 Fannie Mae aka Federal National Mortgage Association to Mark and Karen Hobbs, Champion Ridge, Phase 4, Lot 83, $297,900 Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Samuel P. and Lana L. Fox, Marea 2, Lot 33, $196,000 John P. and Joyce C. Price to Kenneth and Jessica Cooper, Rimrock Estates, Lot 2, $250,000 Sterling Savings Bank to Ochoco Properties LLC and Robert D. and Rebecca S. Williams, American Lane Industrial Park, Phase 1, Lot 1, $490,000 HSBC Bank USA N.A. to Kevin E. and Terri L. Urbansky, Aubrey Heights, Lot 15, Block 12, $240,000 Crook County

Jim Hensley as Sheriff of Crook County to Home Federal Bancorp Inc., Township 14 South, Range 16 East, Section 32, $3,042,798.09

4 *APR – Annual Percentage Rate. Rate is based on credit profile, so your rate may differ. Variable rate is adjusted monthly. Rate is current as of 3/1/11 and is subject to change without notice.


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Inside

OREGON Congressman Wu reaches out to constituency, see Page C3. Grizzly bear’s threatened status challenged in court, see Page C3.

OBITUARIES Stand-up comedian Mike DeStefano, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

HYDROELECTRIC PLANTS

Irrigation district studying area canals for power

Well sh t!

WORKSHOP: RULE OF THIRDS

Last Tuesday we asked readers to submit photos that show the use of the Rule of Thirds. Follow the series at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot Coming up: March 22: Virtual field trip to downtown • April 5: Triptychs • April 19: Virtual field trip to Pilot Butte • May 3: Letters in nature • And more ...

More hydroelectric plants could be in the region’s future, with the Central Oregon Irrigation District studying the feasibility of six sites along its canals. The district already has two plants in the Bend area — one in the city’s Juniper Ridge project and another near Mt. Bachelor Village — and could expand that number with the assistance of a $36,000 Oregon Department of Energy grant. The potential sites are located around Bend and Redmond, with one within the limits of each city, another just south of Redmond, and three east of Bend. The largest proposed plant — a 1.2-megawatt facility northeast of Bend — would likely cost in the neighborhood of $1 million. The district would sell the power to energy companies, which could produce up to $80,000 in annual gross revenues for the district. Each site’s study will provide more specific numbers, according to Steve Johnson, district manager. Revenue from hydroelectric plants helps offset the district’s increasing costs, Johnson said. “It’s not like all of a sudden it’s this awesome gold mine and every patron of the district gets to go on vacation to Hawaii,” Johnson said. “It adds additional revenue that we don’t have to charge patrons as an increase.” Johnson expects each of the studies to be completed in the next month. Once the studies are done, the district may send out a request for proposals calling for private companies to build plants. See Canals / C5

Change to home brew law step closer Supporters hope bill will be passed in time for fairs to schedule beer competitions

By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

C

“Staircase of the lighthouse on Mt. Diablo in California.”

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Submitted by user Sarah Dressler

Submitted by user Carolyn

“Ocracoke Lighthouse”

Submitted by user Lisa Bagwell

“Elephant families — mostly the females — are fiercely protective of their young. It’s beautiful to watch.”

SALEM — Competitive home-brewers are one step closer to pouring a celebratory drink, thanks to a House panel that moved a much-discussed change in the law closer to reality Monday. “The current law was great while we all ignored it,” Ted Hausotter told members of the House IN THE Business LEGISLATURE and Labor Committee. But since the state’s alcohol regulatory agency, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, started enforcing a long-ignored statute last summer, it has been legal to consume homemade brew and craft wine only in the places where they were made. “It is stifling the home-brew community,” said Hausotter, who spoke on behalf of the Oregon Homebrewers Alliance, Good Libations and several other homebrew organizations. “Many are concerned with taking beer or wine out of the house. … Yes, the current law is that restrictive, stopping transportation, social gatherings and education. It is hard to educate how to judge home brew without home brew. Home-brewing is down in our state, and beer competitions are nonexistent.” See Home brew / C5

Area experts to speak with Prineville residents on water issues

La Pine’s ‘Trunkor-Treat’ wins state accolade Submitted by user howardg

By Leon Pantenburg

By Erik Hidle

“Best train ride ever.”

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

LA PINE — The original idea behind the 2010 Halloween Party was to make it easier and safer for La Pine kids to safely trick-or-treat. So a “Trunk-or-Treat” event was organized at the La Pine Events Center on Halloween night. At the event, community members and local businesses set up booths and handed out treats. The gathering was a success, with more than 1,500 kids and parents participating. The event also won the sponsor, the La Pine Park and Recreation District, the state “Best New Event” award from the Oregon Festival and Events Association. The association, which assists communities in planning, organizing and promoting community events and festivals, presented the award March 1. La Pine’s “Trunk-or-Treat” was started as a family-oriented community event, said Justin Cutler, director of the park and recreation district. “There are other, similar events throughout the country,” he said. “They are popular everywhere, urban or rural, since it allows a safe event to be held, and it reduces the danger.” See Award / C5

Two Crook County water experts will talk to residents Wednesday morning about the past, present and future of water resources in the Prineville area as government officials continue to find ways to keep the county hydrated. Mike Kasberger, manager of the Ochoco Irrigation District, and Bob Main, a former Central Oregon Watermaster, will speak at 7 a.m. at Meadow Lakes Restaurant, 300 S.W. Meadowlakes Dr. in Prineville. The Ochoco Irrigation District primarily covers Prineville and serves about 20,000 acres of land in Crook County. “We’re going to talk about how we, the Ochoco Irrigation District, operate,” Kasberger said. “We’re going to talk about how we operate in regards to fish, recreation, farming and habitat conservation and the legislation involved with that.” Kasberger said he plans to update attendees on efforts to reintroduce steelhead populations above the Pelton Dam — a project that has introduced more than 1 million baby fish into the area over the past three years. See Water / C5

Submitted by user Cheryl Chapman

“Getty Garden”

“Sunset 2006”

“Little dog, big shadow”

Submitted by user Jeff

Submitted by user Keith Bagwell

Attention, photographers! These photos were among scores readers posted on www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot. We publish reader photos every other Tuesday, the week after our photographers offer advice.


C2 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 4:40 p.m. March 4, in the 100 block of Northeast Bend River Mall Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 6:09 p.m. March 4, in the 63400 block of North U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported at 7:41 p.m. March 4, in the 1900 block of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:29 p.m. March 4, in the 2600 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. DUII — Michael Wayne Gorremans, 38, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:39 p.m. March 4, in the 1300 block of Northeast Broken Bow Drive. DUII — Ashley Kathreen Hohman, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:15 a.m. March 5, in the 1000 block of Northwest Wall Street. DUII — Brian Swede Peterson, 23, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:39 a.m. March 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Northwest Colorado Avenue. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and items stolen at 7:49 a.m. March 5, in the 100 block of Northwest Greeley Avenue. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen at 10:42 a.m. March 5, in the 100 block of Northwest Broadway Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:27 a.m. March 5, in the 19900 block of Birchwood Drive. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 2:31 p.m. March 5, in the 20700 block of Valentine Street. DUII — Zarian Ipo McManus, 24, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:59 p.m. March 5, in the 700 block of Northeast Ninth Street. DUII — Rieda May Sparks, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:05 a.m. March 6, in the area of Northeast Fourth Street and Northeast Revere Avenue. DUII — Michael Patrick Spisak, 19, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:15 a.m. March 6, in the area of Reed Market Road and the railroad tracks. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 7:10 a.m. March 6, in the 1900 block of Northeast Providence Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 4 p.m. March 6, in the 61500 block

of South U.S. Highway 97. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 7:28 p.m. March 6, in the 900 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:53 a.m. March 7, in the 100 block of Northeast Third Street. Redmond Police Department

DUII — James Leon Clark, 38, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:39 p.m. March 4, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Wickiup Avenue. Theft — A digital camera was reported stolen at 5:30 p.m. March 4, in the 2500 block of Southeast Jesse Butler Circle. Theft — A theft was reported at 4:48 p.m. March 4, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 3:09 p.m. March 4, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 2:28 p.m. March 4, in the 2600 block of Southwest Glacier Place. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:32 a.m. March 4, in the 400 block of Northwest 25th Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 10:25 a.m. March 4, in the 400 block of Northwest 17th Street. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 9:45 a.m. March 4, in the 100 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:20 a.m. March 4, in the 300 block of Northwest Oak Tree Lane. Theft — A theft was reported at 5:06 p.m. March 5, in the 3100 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:52 a.m. March 5, in the 600 block of Southwest Evergreen Avenue. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 11:07 a.m. March 5, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A motorcycle was reported stolen at 9:33 a.m. March 5, in the 1300 block of Northeast 5th Street. Prineville Police Department

Theft — A theft was reported at 9:18 a.m. March 4, in the area of Northwest Ninth Street. DUII — Annette S. Caseri, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:24 a.m. March 4, in the area of Southeast Algonquian Loop. DUII — Dustin Murray, 22, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at midnight March 5, in the area of North Main Street. DUII — Lucas Enneberg, 24,

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was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:06 a.m. March 6, in the area of Bull Boulevard. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:49 p.m. March 6, in the area of Northwest Second Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 1:31 p.m. March 6, in the area of Southeast Third Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:20 p.m. March 4 , in the 60200 block of Pawnee Lane in Bend. Theft — Items were reported stolen from a vehicle at 6:18 p.m. March 4, in the 13000 block of Century Drive in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:05 p.m. March 4, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 11 in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 5:56 p.m. March 4, in the 16000 block of Hawks Lair Road in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:40 p.m. March 4, in the 61400 block of Ward Road in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 5:09 p.m. March 4, in the 2400 block of Northwest 101st Street in Redmond. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 4:57 p.m. March 4, in the 16100 block of Hawks Lair Road in La Pine. Theft — Furniture was reported stolen at 2:29 p.m. March 4, in the 16000 block of Cattle Drive Road in Sisters. DUII — Robert Curtis Arndt, 46, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 10:49 p.m. March 5, in the area of Burgess and Huntington Roads in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:38 a.m. March 5, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Helmholtz Way in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:10 a.m. March 5, in the area of Jacinto Road and Stellar Drive in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:18 a.m. March 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 372 near milepost 8 in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:00 a.m. March 5, in the area of East U.S. Highway 20 and South Buckaroo Trail in Sisters. DUII — Allen Bruce Hammermann, 36, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:29 a.m. March 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 149 in Sunriver. DUII — Richard Patrick Morton, 42, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 6:08 p.m. March 6, in the area of China Hat Road near milepost 2 in Bend. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 11:57

a.m. March 6, in the 100 block of West Adams Avenue in Sisters. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:06 a.m. March 6, in the 54900 block of Huntington Road in La Pine. Theft — A theft was reported at 9:21 a.m. March 6, in the 69600 block of Hinkle Butte Drive in Cloverdale. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:32 a.m. March 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and Powell Butte Highway in Bend. Oregon State Police

DUII — Nicholas John Yannariello, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:58 p.m. March 4, in the area of Northwest Sixth Street and Northwest Dogwood Avenue in Redmond. DUII — Kyran James Murphy, 35, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:30 a.m. March 5, in the South U.S. Highway 97 near Reed Market Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:50 a.m. March 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 148. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:30 p.m. March 5, in the area of West U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 83. DUII — Josiah Russell Cunningham, 31, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:26 a.m. March 6, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 143. DUII — Greggory Thomas LeLachuer, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:43 p.m. March 6, in the area of Northwest Kansas Avenue and Northwest Staats Street in Bend.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Terrier mix — Young female, white and tan; found near Redmond High School. Border collie — Young male, black and white, with collar; found near Holmes Road in Sisters. Corgi mix — Young male, sable and white; found near Northwest 43rd Street and Northwest Chinook Drive in Terrebonne. Domestic long-haired cat — Adult female, gray and white, with red paisley collar; found near Southwest Reindeer Avenue.

U.S. combat troops arrive in Vietnam in ’65 The Associated Press Today is Shrove Tuesday, March 8, the 67th day of 2011. There are 298 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On March 8, 1862, during the Civil War, the ironclad CSS Virginia rammed and sank the USS Cumberland and heavily damaged the USS Congress, both frigates, off Newport News, Va. ON THIS DATE In 1782, the Gnadenhutten massacre took place as more than 90 Native Americans were slain by militiamen in Ohio in retaliation for raids carried out by other American Indians. In 1874, the 13th president of the United States, Millard Fillmore, died in Buffalo, N.Y., at age 74. In 1917, Russia’s “February Revolution� (so called because of the Old Style calendar used by Russians at the time) began with rioting and strikes in Petrograd. The U.S. Senate voted to limit filibusters by adopting the cloture rule. In 1930, the 27th president of the United States, William Howard Taft, died in Washington at age 72. In 1944, two days after an initial strike, U.S. heavy bombers resumed raiding Berlin during World War II. In 1960, Democrat John F. Ken-

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y nedy and Republican Richard M. Nixon won the New Hampshire presidential primary. In 1965, the United States landed its first combat troops in South Vietnam as 3,500 Marines were brought in to defend the U.S. airbase at Da Nang. In 1971, Joe Frazier defeated Muhammad Ali by decision in what was billed as “The Fight of the Century� at Madison Square Garden in New York. In 1988, 17 soldiers were killed when two Army helicopters from Fort Campbell, Ky., collided in midflight. TEN YEARS AGO The Republican-controlled House voted for an across-theboard tax cut of nearly $1 trillion over the next decade, handing President George W. Bush a major victory only 48 days into his term. FIVE YEARS AGO Iran threatened the United States with “harm and pain� if the U.S. tried to use the U.N. Security Council to punish Tehran for its suspect nuclear program. Six months after Hurricane Katrina, President George W. Bush got a close-up look at the remaining mountains of debris, abandoned homes and boarded-up businesses in New Orleans. The Hornets played their first game

at The New Orleans Arena since Katrina; they lost to the Los Angeles Lakers, 113-107. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Sue Ane Langdon is 75. Actor-director Micky Dolenz is 66. Singer-musician Randy Meisner is 65. Pop singer Peggy March is 63. Baseball Hall-of-Famer Jim Rice is 58. Singer Gary Numan is 53. NBC News anchor Lester Holt is 52. Actor Aidan Quinn is 52. Country musician Jimmy Dormire is 51. Actress Camryn Manheim is 50. Actor Leon is 48. Rock singer Shawn Mullins (The Thorns) is 43. Actress Andrea

Parker is 41. Actor Boris Kodjoe is 38. Actor Freddie Prinze Jr. is 35. Actor James Van Der Beek is 34. Rhythm-and-blues singer Kameelah Williams (702) is 33. Rock singer Tom Chaplin (Keane) is 32. Rock musician Andy Ross (OK Go) is 32. Rhythm-and-blues singer Kristinia DeBarge is 21. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “If there is any principle of the Constitution that more imperatively calls for attachment than any other it is the principle of free thought — not free thought for those who agree with us but freedom for the thought that we hate.� — Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., Supreme Court Justice (born this date in 1841, died 1935)

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Bulletin staff report

Prescribed field burns to begin Several prescribed burns will take place today and Thursday near Mitchell and Clarno. An estimated 40 acres are to be burned. The first burn is scheduled to take place today along Bridge Creek west of Mitchell. The second round of burns will take place Thursday five miles

north of Clarno. The burns are designed to provide an area of green-up to serve as feed for elk and deer. Smoke is expected to be visible from Highway 26, but it is not expected to impact any main roads. Motorists are encouraged to slow down and turn on their headlights in case smoke does drift onto rural roadways. All burns are dependent on weather conditions.

OSU researchers helping develop mini-chopper to count, sort plant life By Sarah Eddington The Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — A team of researchers is developing a way to save nursery producers across the globe the hassle of manually counting millions of plants over vast acres of land, and the solution is in the sky. Researchers from the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture, Oregon State University and the University of Florida are tackling the issue with a remote-controlled helicopter equipped with a digital camera and software that can count the plants and sort them by size and grade. “As with any business, having an accurate and real-time inventory is critical,� said Jim Robbins, extension horticulture specialist for the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture. “The key is that we could provide them with a more accurate, cost-effective way to collect inventory data.� Robbins said the idea originated in 2008 when he was visiting a nursery producer in Oregon who casually mentioned the challenges and limitations of current inventory methods. Robbins said traditionally, inventory is done by manual counts in the field. “It’s not humanly possible for them to use human beings to count all of these plants, so what they do is count a subsample and use that to estimate the total crop,� he said. “Our goal is to give them a cost-effective way to obtain real-time information that can far exceed what a human can do.� The multi-rotor helicopter consists of a platform 3 feet in diameter attached to four to eight separate propeller blades and supports an off-the-shelf digital camera. The entire device weighs about 2 pounds. It is expected to range in cost from $3,000 to $5,000. In September, the research

Jim Robbins / University of Arkansas via The Associated Press

A prototype remote control, multi-rotor helicopter flies by a tree farm near Portland in September 2010. team hosted a demonstration in Oregon for top leaders in the nursery industry. Robbins said researchers are still in the early stages of the design process, but they have already received ample interest from the leading nursery producers in the country. The team also has received funding from the Oregon Association of Nurseries and the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Gary McAninch, nursery and Christmas tree program manager for the Oregon Department of Agriculture, said this project was one of nine to receive funding from the agency in January, and that members of the industry are excited to see it in action. “This was a very highly ranked project,� McAninch said. “It’s fairly labor-intensive to do inventory counts on your plants. We thought this project would be very helpful to the nursery industry.�


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 C3

O Threatened status of grizzly bears appealed

“I am very capable of taking care of my constituents here in Oregon, very capable of discharging the obligations that you have entrusted me with in the last election.” — U.S. Rep. David Wu, D-Portland

Pendleton man killed by train identified PENDLETON — Police in Pendleton have identified a man who witnesses said made no attempt to get out of the way of a freight train. The East Oregonian reported that 57-year-old Robert W. Crawford Sr. of Pendleton died Sunday after an eastbound train struck him about 8 p.m. while he was sitting on the tracks. Police said witnesses reported Crawford did not try to avoid the approaching train, which repeatedly blew its horn while approaching the crossing. Police said it was unknown if drugs or alcohol played a role, pending the results of toxicology tests. It was the second death by a train in Pendleton in less than a year.

By Nigel Duara The Associated Press

PORTLAND — Dueling attorneys for a conservation group and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offered starkly different opinions Monday about the future of the grizzly bear population in and around Yellowstone National Park, if the bear is taken off the threatened species list. Three 9th Circuit Court of Appeals justices heard arguments and rebuttals from each side more than a year after U.S. District Judge Donald Molloy put the grizzlies back on the list. The federal government is bullish on the bear’s prospects, and state wildlife agencies from Montana and Wyoming have argued in briefs that officials are confident the bears won’t go extinct if states are left to manage them. Environmental groups say the bear’s future is murky, and lifting protections now poses too great a risk to their survival.

Declining food source Molloy’s ruling, which resolved a lawsuit brought by the Montana-based Greater Yellowstone Coalition, highlighted the deaths of hundreds of thousands of whitebark pine trees over the past two decades. The pine trees produce nuts that some grizzlies rely upon as a mainstay, and the number of trees has been falling. The reasons range from climate change to the presence of a destructive species of beetle, but the shrinking food source has pushed grizzlies to look for food in areas that increasingly bring them into contact with humans. Allen Brabender, a U.S. Justice Department attorney, argued Monday that the bear’s population has been growing from between 4 percent and 7 percent a year, and the bears will find a way to adapt without the whitebark pine seeds. Appellate court judge Susan Graber said she saw a disconnect in the government’s argument. “You say they’ll find other things to eat, so they won’t starve,” Graber said. Brabender responded that the government didn’t have to prove that the bears would find a replacement food source. “Even in years without the whitebark pine being available, Yellowstone grizzly populations were still up,” he said.

Problem bears Tensions have been rising in the northern Rockies as the bear population increases and the animals spread into parts of Idaho, Wyoming and Montana, where they prey on livestock, damage property and periodically attack humans. The government agencies in favor of removing the bear from the threatened species list argue that an appellate court judge shouldn’t act as a scientist in determining the whitebark pine seed issue, according to a brief filed by the state of Wyoming. Longtime conservationist attorney Doug Honnold said the Yellowstone area is the “shining example” of bear conservation, but areas around Yellowstone concern conservationists. “At what point,” asked judge Sidney R. Thomas, “does the grizzly get to where it could be delisted?” Honnold declined to give a specific number but said the U.S. Forest Service number of 500 was too low.

Don Ryan / The Associated Press

Oregon Democratic Congressman David Wu answers questions in Hillsboro on Monday. Wu is reaching out to key constituents in his district as he tries to position himself for re-election after questions about his mental health led to the resignations of several staff members.

Wu reaching out after odd episodes Congressman seeks to reassure constituents he can do job properly By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

HILLSBORO — U.S. Rep. David Wu tried Monday to reassure constituents following reports about his odd behavior on the campaign trail and concerns about his mental health. Wu spoke briefly at the Washington County Public Affairs Forum in Hillsboro, telling about 50 people at the weekly luncheon that he’s capable of doing his job. Wu, D-Portland, repeated an argument he has used since questions arose publicly about his health more than two weeks ago. The seventh-term congressman said he takes full responsibility for his inappropriate behavior, which included angry speeches and sending pictures to staff members of himself wearing a tiger costume. “I am very capable of taking care of my constituents here in Oregon, very capable of discharging the obligations that you have entrusted me with in the last election,” Wu said at the forum. Wu has said he will run for re-election, and the reports about his mental health have forced him to get an unusually early start on his bid. He spent the weekend crisscrossing his district in northwestern Oregon, which

includes a number of high-tech firms and some of the largest employers in Oregon, including Intel and Nike. He previewed a campaign message Monday, declaring himself “the education guy” and a leader in science and technology policy. Seven of Wu’s staff members resigned last year after some of them tried to persuade Wu to seek psychiatric treatment because of his bizarre behavior. The congressman repeated Monday that he’s being treated and is in “a good place.” He told The Associated Press last month that his behavior during the campaign was the culmination of a two-year period of mental health challenges that began in 2008 as marital discord led toward his separation from his wife. “To me perhaps the most disturbing thing about what’s happened in the last few weeks is I’ve let the story become about me,” Wu said Monday. “The story should never be about me. ... It should be about you and the challenges that you face every single day.” Wu spoke for about 15 minutes and took three questions from the audience. Only one touched on his mental health. Forrest Soth, 91, of Beaverton wanted to know if Wu could handle the stress of trying to avert a government shutdown if Republicans and Democrats can’t pass a new federal budget or at least a stopgap measure. Wu said it’s critical that Congress avoid a government shutdown to ensure services continue and paychecks go out.

Kitzhaber pledges support for labor unions The Associated Press SALEM — Hundreds of union members who rallied at noon at the state Capitol in Salem got a pledge from Gov. John Kitzhaber that he’s on their side. The Oregonian reported the

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Democratic governor said the state will not solve its budget crisis or fix other problems by attacking the labor movement or making scapegoats out of public employees. The event was organized as a

statement to Oregon lawmakers drafting the two-year state budget and a show of solidarity with embattled public employees in Wisconsin, where a Republican governor is trying to eliminate collective bargaining rights.

Obama names judge to grant board SALEM — President Barack Obama has nominated Chief Judge David Brewer of the Oregon Court of Appeals for the board of the State Justice Institute. The institute is not a federal agency, but its 11 board members are named by the president and confirmed by the U.S. Senate. It was created in 1984 to award grants for improvements in state courts. The Statesman Journal reported that Brewer has been on the Oregon appeals court, one of the nation’s busiest intermediate-level courts, since 1999. He has been its chief judge since November 2004.

Worker unhurt as car rams gas station

a car came crashing through a wall and into the cashier stand inside the station in Springfield. KEZI-TV reported the unidentified worker was sweeping the floor when an entire wall suddenly came down on top of him early Saturday. The manager of the AM PM Mini Market, Casey Wilson, told the television station that just another foot, and the worker could have been hurt. The worker was treated at a hospital and released. In a video of the crash, the worker climbs out of all the debris and hurdles over the counter to get to safety. Wilson said the driver was circling the parking lot and having an argument with his female companion when the crash occurred.

Autistic boy can bring service dog to school HILLSBORO — The Hillsboro School District has agreed to allow a fourth-grader with autism to use his service dog at school, a decision that follows three years of lobbying from the boy’s family. The Oregonian reported the district announced last week it would let 10-year-old Jordan Givens bring his trained dog with him to school on a trial basis. This came after a January meeting between Superintendent Mike Scott, the boy’s family and U.S. Attorney Dwight Holton. The district had refused to let Jordan bring his German shepherd to school, saying the boy was adequately meeting his education plan goals. His mother says the dog helps Jordan remain calm. The boy wears a belt attached to a harness on the animal. The Department of Justice spent a year investigating the matter. — From wire reports

SPRINGFIELD — An Oregon gas station worker escaped serious injury when

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C4 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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Whitsett’s idea makes sense

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f Oregon Sen. Doug Whitsett, R-Klamath Falls, has his way, at least one state law will make more sense at the end of this legislative session than it does today. Whitsett is proposing

changes to the law that requires solar power, and only solar power, be incorporated in certain public buildings around the state. The law, enacted by the 2007 Legislature, requires that public agencies building new facilities or spending at least $1 million remodeling old ones use at least 1.5 percent of what they spend on solar energy. The gain, according to those who supported the bill at the time, is twofold. Oregon’s public agencies move to the front of the green energy race, while Oregon’s then-infant solar energy industry gets a boost, as well. That might be good for the solar energy industry, but several other so-called green energy options deserve the chance for equal time, and Whitsett’s amendments to the 2007 act would give it to them. He does not propose removing the requirement for public use of green energy, the option that would be most cost-effective but least politically correct. Rather, Whitsett proposes to change the law so that energy from small hydro projects, biomass and on-site wind and geothermal projects would qualify to meet the green-energy requirement. At least as important, conservation measures that cut

energy usage by 20 percent or more also would qualify. The change, if it is approved, would be good news in Central and Eastern Oregon. To the south, Oregon Institute of Technology has taken advantage of the Klamath Falls area’s geothermal resource for more than 40 years. The idea that it would be required to add solar panels to any future project is simply silly. Closer to home, Central Oregon Community College will put up several new buildings in the region over the next few years, some of which are better suited for other forms of green energy or conservation than for solar. Giving the school the option to choose among them makes both environmental and financial sense. If Oregon’s public agencies are going to be pushed to go green, they shouldn’t be barred from doing so in the way that best suits them. It’s fine, we suppose, to support the solar industry in this state, but if we’re going to do that, we should at the same time support all green energy industries with equal fervor. Whitsett’s Senate Bill 586 meets both goals nicely.

Disagreement can’t be put off forever G ov. John Kitzhaber told a Portland audience last week that he had asked leaders of the Oregon House of Representatives to delay discussion of a measure that would change one portion of state tax law. His reason? The proposed change promised to create a split in the evenly divided House, and the governor worried that a split will make it difficult for him to accomplish all he has set out to do. His agenda is nothing if not aggressive. He wants to revamp the state’s education system from kindergarten through college, even as he is overhauling its health care system simultaneously. He hopes to shift emphasis and dollars to Oregon’s youngest residents on the theory that money spent on the very young delivers a bigger bang for the buck than money spent elsewhere. And, there’s that $3 billion-plus budget gap to close. Accomplishing all this will take some doing. Supporters of higher education, as one example, are sure to squawk loudly if funds for the state’s university system are cut and not replaced with new freedom for the system to raise and spend money on its own. They will point out, correctly, that while money spent on 5-year-olds is fine, it does little good if those same

children grow up to a higher education system that has been beggared beyond recognition. If he is to have even an outside shot at doing all he hopes to do, Kitzhaber has to move fast. He is best served if party disagreements have not yet reached a critical level and lawmakers, particularly those in the evenly divided House, are still operating in the glow of goodwill that begins most legislative sessions. He may well have run out of much of his needed time Monday. The House of Representatives considered a Democratic proposal to delay a vote on SB 301 for a few days, as the governor had wanted. They were outmaneuvered by their Republican counterparts, however, and two members of the former group joined the Republicans to force a vote on the measure Monday. The measure to reconnect was approved by a 41-19 margin. As Kitzhaber had feared, the discussions before the votes were fairly contentious. Whether that disagreement will have an impact on Kitzhaber’s plans remains to be seen. In reality, however, he could not seriously have expected lawmakers to put controversy on the back burner while he works to persuade them to accept his plan. People simply don’t work that way, not even lawmakers.

My Nickel’s Worth Alert travelers to dangers The Bulletin tells us that another two people died due to icy roadways over the Feb. 19 weekend: one at the Santiam Junction and one near Lava Butte. Both were due to drivers losing control and their vehicles sliding into the opposite lane. The Lava Butte driver was from California driving north. Again, it seems that speed and being unaccustomed to winter driving precautions have claimed two more lives and caused several serious injuries. How many more of us will be victims due to other drivers’ lack of caution? It’s one thing for locals to know how to drive safely in winter, like slowing down and not using cruise control, but quite another to convey that to a tired out-of-state driver in a hurry and used to a high speed limit. It’s bad enough the driver at fault is killed, but, in addition, the driver not at fault, driving the opposite direction, also dies. We have to install some kind of alert/control that activates when ice forms on the highways — an electric sign, ODOT/highway patrolmen, roadside inspections, etc. Concrete lane separators spanning the higher-elevation highway sections would also save lives. Money is tight these days, but how much is it worth to stay alive while you drive on the ice? Please e-mail our representative, Jason Conger, with your thoughts at rep.jasonconger@state .or.us or phone 503-986-1454. Gary Will La Pine

Obama’s broken vow Every president of the United States of America has been sworn into office in accordance with Article II Section 1 of the Constitution, and so doing has sworn to “… preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”

On Feb. 24, The Bulletin reported (correctly), “President Obama has declared the Defense of Marriage Act unconstitutional and directed the Department of Justice to stop defending the law in court.” By so doing, Obama has usurped the powers granted to the Supreme Court and openly broken the oath of office vow he took upon being inaugurated. The Defense of Marriage Act was legally created. No president has the right or power to declare a law unconstitutional. In the writer’s opinion, Obama has violated the oath of office and should be impeached and removed from office before he can do further damage. John Howells Redmond

Peace and quiet first As a semiannual visitor to Crater Lake, I am appalled at the suggestion of helicopters for hire there. It seems like one of the last places on earth you can go for some peace and quiet. This sort of beauty will not be enhanced by the sight and sound of a man-made vehicle in the sky. A couple of more reasons to oppose this? Helicopters are nowhere close to being fuel-efficient, and their safety record is not stellar. Let wealthy tourists fly their playthings away from our national treasure. Ben Buckley Sisters

Restrict travel, save money One of the justifications for the reclassifying of high schools and the reassignment of many leagues throughout the state was to save money on travel expenses. I’m sure this goal was at least partially met, but how do you justify the expense of the Marshfield High girls’ bas-

ketball team traveling six hours to Bend (and back) after a 2-22 season? Closer to home, Summit will travel to Corvallis as a “reward” for its less-than-stellar 7-16 season. Why don’t we just lay off a few teachers and eliminate all music programs so all the teams can make the playoffs? Peter Stoefen Bend

No new roundabouts I support the views of Jim Carmichael (Feb. 18) and John Speckmann (Feb. 26) about the road plan put forth by the Bend City Council. The city needs to put its money into improving the existing system instead of building new roundabouts. I do support the ideas about roundabouts, but in this poor economy, the city needs to look at the existing roads and not grandiose future roads. Brent Lake Bend

No free ride to job security Seniority should not be a free ride to employment in the Redmond School District. When facing a $10 million budget shortfall, why would a school district’s youngest and arguably brightest workers be subject to layoff? All teachers need to stay up to date on the latest and best teaching practices and principles. If a teacher has stayed current in his or her academic knowledge by attending seminars and taking classes, then seniority should be the deciding factor in the layoff process. Public sector employees have been fairly immune to the layoff process. This practice has to end when it comes to the education of our children. Brent D. Yonkovich Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Despite an expert’s claim, cancer still reigns as top killer By Archie Bleyer Bulletin guest columnist

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n Feb. 20, The Bulletin published David Ropeik’s special editorial to The Washington Post titled “Fears vs. facts: Should the public’s horror of cancer be a factor when EPA weighs new regulations?” Ropeik is an instructor in the Harvard Extension Program, a consultant on risk perception and risk management, and author of “How Risky Is It, Really? Why Our Fears Don’t Always Match the Facts.” More than most anyone, he should therefore have his facts straight. Unfortunately, he didn’t do his homework for the editorial he wrote. In it, he criticizes the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for considering cancerrelated deaths to have a higher potential impact on our economy than those caused by heart disease. Apparently, the

EPA is now required to conduct a costbenefit analysis for all regulations which impact the economy by $100 million or more. Ropeik takes issue with the EPA’s intent, claiming that more people in the U.S. die of heart disease than of cancer and that heart disease “kills across a broader range of demographics.” In his editorial, Ropeik states that death by heart disease is “far more likely” than death by cancer. He used data from 2007, when heart disease killed about 616,000 in the U.S., and cancer 563,000. The data he cites do not take into account the relative mortality trends of cancer and heart disease that now have more Americans dying of cancer than any other disease. Deaths due to heart disease have been declining nationally at a rate between 16,000 and 24,000 fewer deaths per year, depending on the how the rate is calculated.

IN MY VIEW Cancer deaths, on the other hand, have been increasing since at least 1960, and at a constant increment between 2000 and 2007 of 1,300 additional deaths per year. This year as many as 30,000 more Americans are expected to die of cancer than of heart disease. Ropeik is more than just out of date. As to the range of demographics, cancer has killed more children, adolescents and young adults (less than 40 years of age) than heart disease since at least 1969, when national mortality statistics first became available. The same is true for middle-aged adults 40 to 60 years old since 1982 and older adults 60 to 75 years of age since 1990. No race, ethnicity, gender or age subgroup is spared from cancer or death from cancer. We

know of no one who is immune from getting cancer. Ropeik is correct in describing cancer as the disease Americans fear most, and he rightfully cautions us (and the EPA) to regard facts more than fear, per se. Americans not only fear the consequences and suffering associated with cancer, but also are now justified in fearing its foremost incidence and prevalence. In the case of the two most frequent killers of Americans however — together heart disease and cancer cause more deaths than the next six causes of death combined — the fear can be minimized because both are substantively avoidable vis-à-vis physical fitness, proper nutrition and other lifestyle choices. Having been a pediatric oncologist since 1969, when national mortality data first became available, I have endeavored to get the facts right for more

than four decades. Having seen more children die of cancer than any other disease throughout my life, and knowing that more young adults and children continue to die of cancer than of any other disease, I am compelled to recognize the magnitude of the problem. Having graduated from the same school where Ropeik taught Knight Science Journalism Fellowship courses (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), I share his dedication to science, to explaining risk in practical and understandable terms, and to guiding emotion with accurate information. We both want to set records straight. This time, however, the expert on risk took too much of a risk with static data and ignored trends, misappropriated breadth, and underestimated the source of fear. Archie Bleyer, M.D., lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 C5

O Walter Zacharius, 87, Mike DeStefano, stand-up D

N   comedian, dies in his 40s leading publisher Sept. 17, 1943 - March 2, 2011 Arrangements: Baird Memorial Chapel of La Pine, 541-536-5104 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: Services are pending, will be announced at a later date. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Ct., Bend, OR 97701; www.partnersbend.org

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Home brew Continued from C1 SB 444, which has already cleared the Senate, now goes to the House floor for a vote. Those behind the bill say the goal is to have the legislation passed in time for county fairs to put out their schedules, which they usually do at the end of March or early in April. Many homemade beer and wine competitions, popular at county fairs, were canceled last summer. John McCulley spoke on behalf of the Oregon Fairs Association. He told lawmakers there are usually more than 1,000 homemade beer and wine entries in county fairs across the state.

By Dennis Hevesi NEW YORK — Mike DeStefano, a burly, tattooed comedian who turned his recovery from heroin addiction into brutally honest, profanity-laced routines, died on Sunday in the Bronx. He was in his 40s, but his lawyer, Josh Sandler, who confirmed the death, could not provide a birth date or a cause. One of DeStefano’s lines was, “I hate hypocrites,” followed by an expletive-laden assessment of “anyone who says he doesn’t curse.” A milder one was, “Don’t do drugs, because if you do, you’ll end up with a ‘Comedy Central Presents’ special.” He did. Besides being a regular at clubs in New York and around the country, DeStefano appeared on television on Comedy Central’s “Live at Gotham,” “Late Night With Conan O’Brien” and Showtime; on radio on “The Opie & Anthony Show”; and at popular comedy festivals in Montreal and Aspen, Colo. Last year he finished among the top five finalists on the NBC show “Last Comic Standing.” (One judge on that show, Greg Giraldo, died last year.) “I am a stand-up comic,” DeStefano said on his website, mikedestefano.com, in a statement taken from his comedy act. “Before that, I was a drug counselor. Before that, I was a drug addict. Before that, I was 12.” DeStefano got his first gig almost unintentionally. Born in the Bronx, he was 15 when he got hooked on heroin. At 31, after years in rehab, he became a drug counselor in Florida. Bored with the standard substance-abuse lecture, he began punctuating his talks with personal asides and off-color language. At a Narcotics Anonymous convention in Atlanta, after the pool party was rained out and

“It’s important to note homebrewers and home wine makers take as much pride as pie makers,” he told committee members.

Bill brings clarity Sen. Floyd Prozanski, DEugene, is a home-brewer and sponsor of the bill. He said the new legislation would give craft beer makers and wine makers the clarity they need. Rep. Jason Conger, R-Bend, who sits on the House Business and Labor Committee, said he believes the bill will soon become law. “Given that Oregon has a rather proud history of making good beer, (this) is a common-

of romance novels

Comedian Mike DeStefano, who finished among the top five finalists last season on NBC’s “Last Comic Standing,” died Sunday in New York. DeStefano’s lawyer said he was in his 40s.

New York Times News Service

“I am a stand-up comic. Before that, I was a drug counselor. Before that, I was a drug addict. Before that, I was 12.” — Excerpt from DeStefano’s comedy act everybody was crammed into a tent, DeStefano stepped before the microphone. “I went up in front of all these people and started ranting about drugs,” he said in an interview for the website ComedyBeat. “It was bizarre how they loved it.” He would go on to perform at

sense solution,” Conger said. Aaron Hofferber, president of the Central Oregon Homebrewers Organization, said in an earlier interview he was glad to hear the bill was moving so swiftly through the Legislature. He’s so optimistic it will pass that he’s planned a home brew competition, called Spring Fling, for April. Rep. Mike Schaufler, D-Happy Valley, told committee members he would like to carry the bill to the House for a vote as soon as possible. “Benjamin Franklin is quoted as (saying), ‘Beer is proof that God loves us,’ ” Schaufler said.

U.S. Zebra Books, the company’s sole imprint until the late 1980s, became known for its embossed covers, with a lurid “sunset” palette of purples, pinks and oranges and a bold use of foil. Zacharius pushed the taste boundary even further in 1989, when he began putting holograms on his covers. Although the company occasionally published name writers, including Joyce Carol Oates, Isaac Asimov and Jerzy Kosinski, its economic well-being and its reputation lay with many writers largely unknown to The New York Review of Books — best-sellers like Fern Michaels, Lisa Jackson and Beverly Barton. “We’re not impressed with what’s selling on Fifth Avenue or Rodeo Drive,” Zacharius told The New York Times in 1982. “Our readers patronize suburban shopping malls.” Walter Zacharius was born on Oct. 16, 1923, in New York, and attended public schools. He enlisted in the Army soon after leaving high school and took part in the Normandy invasion and the liberation of Paris. After returning to the U.S., he found a job with Macfadden Publications, working on magazines like True Confessions and True Story before teaming up with Aaron Wyn at Ace, where he helped create Ace Double Novels, a paperback line that offered two books in one volume. With Irwin Stein, he founded Lancer Books in 1961 to publish genre fiction, primarily science fiction and fantasy, notably the “Conan the Barbarian” stories of Robert E. Howard. The company also turned out erotic crime and spy novels.

By William Grimes New York Times News Service

Walter Zacharius, who rode the passion-swollen wave of romance fiction in the early 1980s to build the Kensington Publishing Corp. into a leading purveyor of bodice-rippers and other romance genres, died Wednesday at his home in New York. He was 87. The cause was pancreatic cancer, his son, Steven, said. Zacharius emerged from the world of true-confession magazines and paperback genre fiction to found Kensington in 1974 with Roberta Grossman. Beating the bushes for overlooked writers and eager first-timers willing to start out cheap, the partners developed the careers of prolific and profit-generating authors like Janelle Taylor and Katherine Stone. As it expanded the romance genre to embrace paranormal romance, adult Western romance and romance titles aimed at Hispanic, black and gay readers, Kensington branched out into new forms of distribution. Zacharius signed deals with Wal-Mart, sold his books on the shopping network QVC and saw the potential of ebooks early on. Through its Zebra, Dafina, Brava, Encanto and other imprints, Kensington publishes about 450 fiction and nonfiction books a year in a wide variety of genres. Although about 60 percent of its list is devoted to titles like “A Little Bit Sinful” and “A Storm of Pleasure,” it has also published “I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell” by Tucker Max. With sales of $70 million, the company is the largest independent publisher of mass-market titles in the

Mike Carano Cringe Humor Entertainment via The Associated Press

more than 100 substance-recovery events around the world. He liked to tell those audiences, in vivid language, that they had probably joined a 12-step program just so they could meet people. DeStefano’s wife, Fran, who had also been an addict and who contracted AIDS, died several years ago. Information about his survivors was not available. Several weeks ago, as he was working to draw fans to what turned out to be one of his last performances in Manhattan, DeStefano wrote wryly, if eerily, on his website: “I might die tomorrow and you won’t get a chance to see my show, ‘Drugs, Disease and Death: A Comedy by Mike DeStefano.’ Then you’ll feel bad. Let’s avoid all that and buy tickets.”

Proposed hydroelectric projects

Culver

The Central Oregon Irrigation District is reviewing six sites for hydroelectric plants along its canals in Deschutes County. The proposed plants range in power production from 400 kilowatts to 1.2 megawatts.

River Canal

97 CROOK COUNTY

26

JEFFERSON COUNTY DESCHUTES COUNTY

126

370

940kW 242

Sisters

Central Oregon I.D.

126

ch Why

Young Ave. Drop 20

Crooked R ive r

Terrebonne

Yew Ave.

20

us Cre ek

Larry Lee Tergesen, of Bend

Prineville 126

Redmond

400kW

Shumway

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

1.2mW

Tumalo

380

Powell Butte 27

NC-2 Falls 400kW

Central Alfalfa Oregon I.D.

Bend

Award Continued from C1 In La Pine, along with many rural areas with widely dispersed homes, Cutler said, a lot of time and parental driving are needed for kids to get much candy. There is also the danger of hordes of excited kids who might ignore street-crossing danger and common sense in their pursuit of Halloween treats. “Trick-or-treating can be dangerous, particularly if the area

Underground map Klann said he is developing a map of where underground “streams” are located that could be tapped to develop more abundant wells. Klann also said a new lagoon and wetland system for wastewater disposal adopted by the City Council in January will

is dark and the kids are wearing dark costumes and walking by the side of the road,” he said. “By having a centrally located event like Trunk-or-Treat, it can be well-lighted and supervised. The kids go trunk-to-truck as opposed to house-to-house.” Trunk-Or-Treat ended up “being like a carnival,” Cutler said, with decorated trucks and car trunks, booths and costumes. “It was an open-house style party with cars set up in a circle around our field by the event center and a booth inside

help to keep the consumptive rate of water in the area low. Also in the works to help the area is legislation from U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River. According to a spokesman, Walden continues to work on introducing a bill to move a misplaced environmental boundary on Bowman Dam that would allow for the release of more water from the dam and could help improve the city’s access to water. U.S. Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, both Oregon Democrats, have also voiced support of such a plan. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

the building,” he said. “We had a jump house, and Crescent Creek Church set up a cardboard maze.” The event will be repeated next year, Cutler said. “Everybody who participated was really positive, and I heard several people say how they couldn’t wait to decorate their trucks or cars and hand out candy next year,” Cutler said. Leon Pantenburg can be reached at 541-382-1811 or at lpantenburg@bendbulletin.com.

Ri v

Continued from C1 Also, he plans on giving a “Crooked River 101” talk that will explain some of the challenges the area is facing. Main said he will speak on the history of water in the area, saying the story is “very interesting and filled with heroes and villains.” “Most people think of water as just being there,” Main said. “You turn on your tap and it appears. But it didn’t always. “The history is interesting because we need to be aware of where we came from so we know how to get where we are going.”

Water issues are not new to the area. City of Prineville Engineer Eric Klann explained in an interview with The Bulletin in January that the main problem the city is facing is minimal groundwater resources, meaning wells are either extremely low in flow or completely dry.

Des chu tes

Water

ek Tumalo Cre

Ten Barr Chute

er

Burt’s Chute

650kW

500kW 20 97 MILES

Note: Irrigation district boundaries and canals are approximated; not all canals may be shown.

0

Sources: Irrigation districts, Oregon Water Resources Department, Deschutes Basin Board of Control

Canals Continued from C1 Several factors could influence how much a plant costs, including who builds the infrastructure, Johnson said. State and federal tax incentive programs help make projects like these more affordable, according to Kevin Crew, president of Tumalo-based Black Rock Consulting. The region is ripe for more hydroelectric projects along canals, said Crew, who is working with the district on the feasibility studies. For instance, a roughly 700foot elevation drop between Bend and Redmond means the canal water could be used both for farming and to produce energy. Because the plants often involve piping, the canals can become more efficient and lose less water to seepage, Crew said. “I’m really positive about this resource we have,” Crew said.

10 Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

“If (the water) is kept instream, that’s great. If it’s spread to other lands, there’s not really an environmental benefit to that.” — John Devoe, WaterWatch Oregon executive director

“There’s multiple uses for this water.” If hydroelectric projects make the canals more efficient, a question remains about what happens to unused water. By piping their canals, irrigation districts are able to serve the needs of their members without diverting as much from rivers. They may continue to divert the same amount and use the excess to irrigate more land. Alternatively, they can leave the extra water in stream, according WaterWatch Oregon Executive

Director John DeVoe. The more public funding that goes to a project, the more water must be left in a stream or river. DeVoe’s group hopes that hydroelectric projects along canals will boost in-stream flows. “If (the water) is kept instream, that’s great,” DeVoe said. “If it’s spread to other lands, there’s not really an environmental benefit to that.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Every Friday In


W E AT H ER

C6 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LP ©2011.

TODAY, MARCH 8

HIGH Ben Burkel

53

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

49/34

47/33

55/34

37/27

Warm Springs

Marion Forks

54/40

49/30

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

51/35

53/38

Camp Sherman 49/30 Redmond Prineville 53/33 Cascadia 51/34 52/34 Sisters  52/32  Bend Post 53/33

Oakridge Elk Lake 50/32

41/21

Partly to mostly cloudy with a chance of showers.

55/39



50/29

45/28

Fort Rock

48/30

Vancouver 43/39

48/41

Chemult 45/27



Eugene 54/40

Grants Pass

Bend

Boise

53/33

46/34

Idaho Falls Redding

Elko

61/42

44/29

35/22

Mostly cloudy skies with a chance of showers.

Crater Lake 37/28

San Francisco 62/48



44/26

Reno

49/27

40/24

41/28

55/38

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

Helena Missoula



City



55/31





 Salt Lake City 44/36



Moon phases First

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

LOW

HIGH

Full

Last

New

Mar. 12 Mar. 19 Mar. 26 April 3

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . .NA/29/0.00 . . . . . 50/42/sh. . . . . . 53/43/sh Baker City . . . . . . 41/26/0.01 . . . . . 43/27/sh. . . . . . 48/31/pc Brookings . . . . . . 48/38/0.15 . . . . . 53/44/sh. . . . . . 56/46/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 38/27/0.00 . . . . . .45/28/rs. . . . . . 48/30/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 50/33/0.04 . . . . . 54/40/sh. . . . . . 56/41/sh Klamath Falls . . . 40/27/0.08 . . . . . 48/27/sh. . . . . . 56/33/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 37/21/0.16 . . . . . 44/30/sn. . . . . . 51/31/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 42/25/0.00 . . . . . .50/29/rs. . . . . . 52/29/sh Medford . . . . . . . 49/38/0.07 . . . . . 57/39/sh. . . . . . 63/41/pc Newport . . . . . . .48/32/trace . . . . . 51/44/sh. . . . . . 53/45/sh North Bend . . . . . 50/37/0.20 . . . . . 53/46/sh. . . . . . 56/43/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 49/34/0.18 . . . . . .48/31/rs. . . . . . 52/33/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 46/33/0.00 . . . . . 52/36/sh. . . . . . 58/40/sh Portland . . . . . . . 49/31/0.00 . . . . . 52/42/sh. . . . . . 55/42/sh Prineville . . . . . . . 41/29/0.00 . . . . . .51/34/rs. . . . . . 56/34/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 45/26/0.00 . . . . . 51/29/sh. . . . . . 57/35/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 50/39/0.03 . . . . . 57/42/sh. . . . . . 61/42/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 51/34/0.01 . . . . . 53/42/sh. . . . . . 55/41/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 42/29/0.00 . . . . . .52/32/rs. . . . . . 55/30/rs The Dalles . . . . . . 53/33/0.00 . . . . . 49/34/sh. . . . . . 57/38/sh

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43/25 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .70 in 1941 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.43” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 in 1951 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.21” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.90” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 3.10” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.84 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 0.39 in 1962 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:56 a.m. . . . . . .7:02 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:51 a.m. . . . . . .2:35 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .6:20 a.m. . . . . . .5:22 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . . .7:21 a.m. . . . . . .7:48 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .8:08 p.m. . . . . . .7:48 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .6:58 a.m. . . . . . .6:57 p.m.

1

LOW

50 28

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, scattered rain showers.

51 27

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

30/17

Seattle Portland

Sunrise today . . . . . . 6:30 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 6:02 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 6:29 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 6:04 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:42 a.m. Moonset today . . . 10:19 p.m.

SATURDAY Mostly cloudy.

49 26

BEND ALMANAC

52/31

44/23

HIGH

59 35

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 53° The Dalles • 21° Lakeview

FRIDAY Mostly cloudy, widespread rain showers, breezy.

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Central

Cloudy skies over a chance of showers.

Mostly cloudy, very slight chance of rain, much LOW warmer.

NORTHWEST

Eastern

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

HIGH

33

Calgary

42/26

50/29

LOW

52/42

Burns

La Pine

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, not as cold.

THURSDAY

Moist Pacific air will continue to provide cloudy skies with a chance of showers across the region.

45/30

Brothers

49/30

Today: Morning mixed showers, isolated afternoon rain showers, breezy.

Paulina

49/31

Sunriver

WEDNESDAY

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-72 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-84 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . 80-126 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . 124-143 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . 118 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 78-89 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 150 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . 47-100 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mammoth Mtn., California . .8-12 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 11 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

. . . . . . 56-57 . . . . 150-235 . . . . . . . 114 . . . . . . . 175 . . . . . . 43-60 . . . . . . 51-58 . . . . . . 68-71

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 43/39

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Calgary 30/17

S

Saskatoon 14/-1

Seattle 48/41

S Winnipeg 17/9

S

S

Thunder Bay 28/18

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 25/6

Halifax 32/16 Portland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 32/14 32/21 34/25 52/42 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Boston 35/28 39/30 Boise 40/26 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 46/34 38/25 New York 18/9 • 87° 37/29 48/30 Des Moines Laredo, Texas Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 42/34 Chicago 31/26 53/41 50/32 48/40 • -22° Omaha San Francisco Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 38/30 62/48 Williston, N.D. City 54/35 Las Denver Louisville 44/36 Kansas City Vegas • 2.10” 35/24 60/47 49/34 St. Louis 64/46 Charlotte Portland, Maine 55/48 61/38 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 56/29 66/51 67/35 62/51 62/48 Phoenix Atlanta 73/48 Honolulu 60/50 Birmingham 82/71 Dallas Tijuana 65/52 80/44 66/47 New Orleans 71/64 Orlando Houston 80/57 Chihuahua 74/63 80/40 Miami 81/70 Monterrey La Paz 93/65 82/51 Mazatlan Anchorage 78/49 28/11 Juneau 33/21 Bismarck 20/9

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .79/47/0.00 . . .82/36/s . . . 65/35/s Akron . . . . . . . . .39/18/0.00 . . .45/30/c . . . .45/33/t Albany. . . . . . . . .30/23/0.72 . 36/17/pc . . 38/30/pc Albuquerque. . . .62/48/0.00 . 56/29/pc . . . 63/32/s Anchorage . . . . .30/16/0.00 . 28/11/pc . . . . 27/6/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .55/35/0.00 . 60/50/pc . . . .60/43/t Atlantic City . . . .52/35/0.01 . . .45/35/s . . . 45/40/c Austin . . . . . . . . .77/45/0.00 . 81/46/pc . . . 74/38/s Baltimore . . . . . .49/34/0.01 . 53/32/pc . . . 48/42/c Billings. . . . . . . . . .21/3/0.00 . . .32/21/c . . 45/26/pc Birmingham . . . .55/37/0.00 . . .65/52/c . . . .67/39/t Bismarck . . . . . . . . 6/-6/0.00 . . .20/9/sn . . 27/10/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .43/33/0.25 . .46/34/sh . . . 52/35/c Boston. . . . . . . . .57/30/0.43 . 40/26/pc . . . 37/32/s Bridgeport, CT. . .52/33/0.28 . 41/28/pc . . 41/36/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .25/17/0.00 . . .38/25/c . . . .43/40/r Burlington, VT. . .23/17/1.41 . . .26/3/pc . . 36/27/pc Caribou, ME . . . .27/19/3.37 21/-10/pc . . . . 24/8/s Charleston, SC . .60/41/0.00 . . .66/49/s . . 69/57/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .56/33/0.00 . 61/38/pc . . . .55/50/r Chattanooga. . . .51/37/0.00 . . .62/47/c . . . .60/45/r Cheyenne . . . . . .21/10/0.00 . .31/26/sn . . . 38/22/c Chicago. . . . . . . .34/24/0.00 . 48/40/pc . . .46/30/rs Cincinnati . . . . . .44/28/0.00 . . .56/45/c . . 55/39/sh Cleveland . . . . . .33/17/0.00 . . .43/31/c . . . .47/33/t Colorado Springs 33/26/0.02 . .35/23/sn . . 42/22/pc Columbia, MO . .45/30/0.00 . . .51/43/r . . 44/30/sh Columbia, SC . . .60/38/0.00 . . .65/45/s . . . 64/51/c Columbus, GA. . .56/37/0.00 . . .65/55/c . . . .68/47/t Columbus, OH. . .39/24/0.00 . . .53/41/c . . 50/40/sh Concord, NH . . . .37/24/1.54 . . .36/9/pc . . . 34/21/s Corpus Christi. . .75/48/0.00 . 81/61/pc . . . 76/47/s Dallas Ft Worth. .66/47/0.00 . 80/44/pc . . . 63/39/s Dayton . . . . . . . .39/26/0.00 . . .53/40/c . . 53/37/sh Denver. . . . . . . . .30/18/0.00 . .35/24/sn . . 49/28/pc Des Moines. . . . .38/30/0.01 . . 42/34/rs . . 36/23/sn Detroit. . . . . . . . .36/16/0.00 . 37/29/pc . . . .40/40/r Duluth . . . . . . . . .26/15/0.03 . . .30/24/c . . 33/20/sn El Paso. . . . . . . . .79/49/0.00 . . .71/39/s . . . 69/37/s Fairbanks. . . . . . 19/-15/0.00 16/-15/pc . .13/-23/pc Fargo. . . . . . . . . . .14/3/0.00 . . .22/15/c . . 27/11/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .39/31/0.12 . 44/17/pc . . . 54/20/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .35/15/0.00 . 40/31/pc . . . .42/32/t Green Bay. . . . . .34/16/0.00 . . .39/30/c . . . .40/28/i Greensboro. . . . .53/28/0.00 . 60/36/pc . . 51/49/sh Harrisburg. . . . . .44/32/0.01 . 44/27/pc . . . .46/37/r Hartford, CT . . . .37/28/0.79 . 41/23/pc . . 40/34/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .36/12/0.02 . . .40/24/c . . 48/31/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .83/72/0.00 . 82/71/pc . . . 82/70/s Houston . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . . .74/63/t . . . 70/49/s Huntsville . . . . . .52/38/0.00 . . .63/53/c . . . .64/41/t Indianapolis . . . .41/30/0.00 . . .56/45/c . . . .56/33/r Jackson, MS . . . .59/35/0.00 . . .63/58/t . . . .70/45/t Madison, WI . . . .34/23/0.00 . . .43/35/c . . .40/27/rs Jacksonville. . . . .59/43/0.00 . 72/51/pc . . 76/57/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .35/10/0.00 . 33/21/pc . . 29/15/pc Kansas City. . . . .44/35/0.00 . . .49/34/r . . 41/28/sh Lansing . . . . . . . . .35/7/0.00 . 40/30/pc . . . .42/33/t Las Vegas . . . . . .69/53/0.00 . 64/46/pc . . 70/51/pc Lexington . . . . . .45/30/0.00 . 59/44/pc . . . .55/39/t Lincoln. . . . . . . . .37/28/0.18 . . 36/29/rs . . 37/24/pc Little Rock. . . . . .49/36/0.00 . . .62/48/t . . 60/37/pc Los Angeles. . . . .64/54/0.00 . 66/51/pc . . . 74/53/s Louisville . . . . . . .47/34/0.00 . . .60/47/c . . . .59/36/t Memphis. . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . . .61/58/t . . . .63/39/t Miami . . . . . . . . .81/61/0.00 . . .81/70/s . . . 81/68/s Milwaukee . . . . .35/20/0.00 . 39/36/pc . . .42/30/rs Minneapolis . . . .29/24/0.03 . . .35/28/c . . 32/21/sn Nashville . . . . . . .49/37/0.00 . . .62/51/c . . . .62/38/t New Orleans. . . .64/46/0.00 . . .71/64/t . . . .75/51/t New York . . . . . .53/34/0.09 . 48/30/pc . . . 43/39/c Newark, NJ . . . . .54/35/0.09 . 46/30/pc . . 44/38/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .51/39/0.00 . . .54/38/s . . . 58/51/c Oklahoma City . .59/45/0.00 . . .67/35/t . . . 58/34/s Omaha . . . . . . . .45/29/0.02 . .38/30/sn . . . 35/25/c Orlando. . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . 80/57/pc . . 82/60/sh Palm Springs. . . .75/57/0.00 . . .71/43/s . . . 78/49/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .39/32/0.00 . . .52/45/r . . .48/30/rs Philadelphia . . . .49/34/0.04 . 50/32/pc . . . 49/40/c Phoenix. . . . . . . .75/60/0.00 . . .73/48/s . . . 81/54/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .41/20/0.00 . 52/35/pc . . . .47/39/r Portland, ME. . . .42/27/2.10 . 32/14/pc . . . 34/24/s Providence . . . . .53/33/0.54 . 46/27/pc . . 41/34/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .54/34/0.00 . 60/34/pc . . . 55/53/c

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . . 8/-2/0.04 . . .18/9/sn . . 35/16/pc Savannah . . . . . .62/38/0.00 . 67/52/pc . . 71/57/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .46/32/0.12 . . .55/31/c . . 60/34/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .48/34/0.00 . .48/41/sh . . 52/42/sh Richmond . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . 59/33/pc . . . 56/50/c Sioux Falls. . . . . .23/17/0.04 . .32/26/sn . . 30/14/sn Rochester, NY . . .32/21/0.00 . . .35/22/c . . . .41/40/r Spokane . . . . . . .41/28/0.00 . .41/31/sh . . 45/35/sh Sacramento. . . . .61/44/0.30 . 64/45/pc . . 67/46/pc Springfield, MO. .46/33/0.00 . . .55/38/t . . 45/29/pc St. Louis. . . . . . . .47/34/0.00 . . .55/48/r . . 48/35/sh Tampa . . . . . . . . .70/55/0.00 . . .80/59/s . . . 79/61/s Salt Lake City . . .43/32/0.34 . .44/36/sn . . . 51/38/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .73/59/0.00 . . .69/40/s . . . 78/45/s San Antonio . . . .78/45/0.00 . 83/49/pc . . . 75/43/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .52/42/0.00 . . .64/37/t . . . 56/34/s San Diego . . . . . .62/56/0.14 . . .63/50/s . . . 72/51/s Washington, DC .48/33/0.02 . 54/35/pc . . 49/43/sh San Francisco . . .56/49/0.00 . 61/48/pc . . 64/49/pc Wichita . . . . . . . .51/43/0.00 . . .53/30/t . . 46/27/pc San Jose . . . . . . .58/48/0.00 . 62/47/pc . . 69/47/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .53/25/0.00 . .46/28/sh . . .54/35/rs Santa Fe . . . . . . .51/38/0.00 . 49/23/pc . . 57/23/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .76/62/0.00 . . .77/52/s . . . 82/54/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .46/27/0.00 . . .50/35/s . . 45/37/sh Athens. . . . . . . . .50/39/0.25 . . 41/33/rs . . 44/29/pc Auckland. . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .69/58/s . . 70/59/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .75/52/0.00 . .74/54/sh . . 76/51/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .95/79/0.00 . . .91/78/t . . . .89/77/t Beijing. . . . . . . . .52/28/0.00 . . .45/26/s . . . 46/28/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .68/59/0.11 . .61/53/sh . . . .58/50/r Berlin. . . . . . . . . .41/19/0.00 . . .46/29/s . . 50/33/pc Bogota . . . . . . . .66/48/0.01 . .64/51/sh . . 61/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . .39/19/0.00 . . .36/19/s . . . 38/22/s Buenos Aires. . . .82/72/0.00 . . .85/68/t . . . .85/69/t Cabo San Lucas .82/54/0.00 . . .82/59/s . . . 80/59/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .72/57/0.00 . 74/56/pc . . 68/51/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . 10/-8/0.00 . . .30/17/s . . . 39/23/s Cancun . . . . . . . .84/63/4.05 . 82/69/pc . . 82/68/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .50/28/0.00 . 46/33/pc . . 44/34/sh Edinburgh . . . . . .48/30/0.00 . .45/35/sh . . .40/33/rs Geneva . . . . . . . .43/30/0.00 . 51/34/pc . . 55/39/pc Harare . . . . . . . . .79/61/0.00 . . .81/60/t . . . .82/59/t Hong Kong . . . . .72/59/0.01 . . .63/60/c . . 65/61/sh Istanbul. . . . . . . .46/37/0.04 . .33/24/sn . . 33/23/sn Jerusalem . . . . . .62/50/0.00 . .57/45/sh . . 54/42/sh Johannesburg . . .79/55/0.00 . . .81/55/s . . . 83/58/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .81/66/0.00 . .81/67/sh . . 80/66/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .58/48/sh . . 58/46/sh London . . . . . . . .50/32/0.00 . . .50/35/s . . 45/35/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .63/39/0.00 . . .55/40/c . . 54/38/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .93/75/0.70 . . .88/76/t . . . .88/75/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .95/75/0.00 . . .92/72/s . . . 91/70/s Mexico City. . . . .77/52/0.07 . . .78/47/s . . . 79/47/s Montreal. . . . . . .27/18/0.53 . . .25/8/pc . . . 34/30/c Moscow . . . . . . .25/10/0.00 . . .31/18/s . . 35/22/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .84/64/0.00 . . .86/59/s . . . 84/58/s Nassau . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . 80/68/pc . . . 82/69/s New Delhi. . . . . .81/55/0.00 . . .78/54/s . . . 75/51/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .54/41/0.90 . 49/38/pc . . 46/34/pc Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .36/23/0.00 . 35/28/pc . . .33/21/sf Ottawa . . . . . . . .25/12/0.00 . 26/10/pc . . . 35/32/c Paris. . . . . . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . . .54/38/s . . 53/36/pc Rio de Janeiro. . .79/73/0.00 . .81/72/sh . . . .83/73/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .55/34/0.00 . . .51/32/s . . . 54/35/s Santiago . . . . . . .82/54/0.00 . . .83/54/s . . . 84/54/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .70/64/0.00 . .79/65/sh . . . .78/64/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .32/32/0.00 . .33/24/sn . . .28/21/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . .45/28/0.00 . . .43/28/s . . 38/22/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .52/39/0.00 . 54/43/pc . . 50/38/pc Singapore . . . . . .90/77/0.55 . . .90/76/t . . . .88/75/t Stockholm. . . . . .37/18/0.00 . 38/27/pc . . .36/25/rs Sydney. . . . . . . . .75/63/0.00 . . .79/65/s . . . 80/67/c Taipei. . . . . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . 66/53/pc . . 67/58/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . .62/53/sh . . 58/49/sh Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .48/36/0.00 . .48/36/sh . . 50/36/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .28/10/0.00 . 34/25/pc . . 37/35/sh Vancouver. . . . . .45/32/0.00 . . .43/39/r . . . .45/41/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .39/23/0.00 . . .41/25/s . . 51/35/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .36/21/0.00 . 39/25/pc . . . 44/26/s


S

NHL Inside Stars score quickly in overtime for win over Kings, see Page D2.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

COMMUNITY SPORTS

COLLEGE BASKETBALL

COLLEGE BASKETBALL: NCAA TOURNEY

Arizona player and coach honored with top Pac-10 awards WALNUT CREEK, Calif. — Pac-10 champion Arizona has won two of the conference’s biggest awards with forward Derrick Williams being picked as the league’s top player and Sean Miller winDerrick ning coach Williams of the year. In other awards announced Monday, California guard Allen Crabbe was picked as top Sean Miller freshman, USC guard Marcus Simmons won top defensive player and Washington forward Matthew Bryan-Amaning was the most improved player. UCLA had a league-high three players on the 10-man all-conference team in forwards Tyler Honeycutt and Reeves Nelson, and guard Malcolm Lee. Williams was second in the league in scoring at 18.8 points per game and shot a league-best 61 percent in leading the Wildcats to a 14-4 conference record. He is the sixth Arizona player to win player of the year. — The Associated Press

INSIDE NBA

Selection committee sequestered in luxury bunker By Rusty Miller The Associated Press

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Coach Gabe Mason steals the ball from Trevor Rieger, 19, during a dribbling drill at practice for the Special Olympics Redmond Mountain Lions basketball team at Highland Baptist Church last week.

Taking their best shot — together Special Olympics basketball receives a little coaching from smokejumpers By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

They form a curious and seemingly unlikely combination, a group of smokejumpers and a set of athletes with cognitive disabilities. And yet, members of those two demographics have joined forces in Central Oregon in recent years, and the outcome is a swelling Special Olympics basketball program based in Redmond. “I do it a lot for myself just as much as I do it for the athletes,” Gabe Mason said, after a recent Tuesday practice, about coaching. “I get as much mental benefit out of it as they do.” Mason, 35, is head coach of the Mountain Lions and one of about a half-dozen locally based smokejumpers who serve as coaches for the

Portland Trail Blazers’ Wesley Matthews gets around Orlando Magic’s Gilbert Arenas to score a basket during the second half of Monday’s game in Orlando, Fla. Portland won 89-85.

Blazers hold off Magic rally for win

D

Retired Prineville ‘Hotshot’ superintendant Lance Honda get the players to work on their defense during practice for the Special Olympics Redmond basketball team last week. Mountain Lions, members of Special Olympics Oregon’s High Desert chapter, which comprises Deschutes and Crook counties. A part-time resident of Prineville — where he lives when he

isn’t parachuting out of planes to fight wildland fires in Alaska — Mason has been a coach with the Redmond program for six years. See Together / D4

COLUMBUS, Ohio — From Wednesday morning through Sunday night, nine men and one woman, along with assorted helpers and facilitators, will be sequestered on the 15th floor of The Westin hotel in Indianapolis. Ensconced in a luxury bunker, they won’t come out for good until they’ve decided the 68 NCAA men’s tournament teams, seeded them and placed them in the brackets. “There’s nobody up there but us. And the security guard at the elevator,” said Gene Smith, Ohio State’s athletic director and the chairman of the 10-person NCAA Division I selection committee. “We’re sequestered and everybody’s focused on the work. Wednesday morning, we’ll have a little time to ourselves to study. Then we get started at noon and start talking about teams. Our initial ballots are due that afternoon. We’ll spend the next few days doing the selection and eventually moving on to seeding and the brackets on Inside Sunday.” • Results from And undoubtMonday’s edly making some tournament coaches, players games, and fans’ dreams Page D3 come true — while making others extremely angry. Maybe no one will be happier when the meetings are over than Sheila Smith, Gene’s wife. “She can’t wait,” her husband said with a laugh. Smith is in his fifth and final year of his cycle on the committee, and his first as chair. He has devoted thousands of hours to watching games — the NCAA provides satellite dishes and premium viewing packages for all the committee members — not to mention this long, stressful week of final meetings and debate. Sheila, a former basketball player and coach, often watches games with her husband. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t get old. Still, it’s not all torture for every family member. “My kids think it’s one of the coolest things of all time,” said Mike Bobinski, the AD at Xavier and in his third year as a member of the committee. “It’s pretty neat. I would second that.” There are other perks to a coffee-fueled five days in Indiana. The committee is assigned a person who delivers all their food — almost anything they want. See Selection / D3

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Morneau, Beckett show no two concussions alike By Pat Borzi New York Times News Service

LaMarcus Aldridge scores 24 points to lead Portland over Orlando, see Page D3 Blazers .........89 Magic...........85

Bulls.............85 Hornets ........77

Rockets ......123 Kings .........101

Mavericks ..108 T’wolves ....105

Clippers .......92 Bobcats .......87

Grizzlies ..... 107 Thunder .....101

Knicks ........ 131 Jazz............109

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 NBA ...........................................D3 College basketball .....................D3 Community Sports ................... D4

Meng Outzen / The Associated Press

Boston Red Sox pitcher Josh Beckett holds his head as he is led from the field after being hit by a ball during batting practice prior to the Red Sox’s spring training baseball game against the Minnesota Twins in Fort Myers, Fla., last week.

FORT MYERS, Fla. — Eight months after suffering a season-ending concussion while breaking up a double play, the Minnesota Twins’ Justin Morneau has yet to play in another baseball game. He is participating in spring training but still has lingering symptoms, like occasional fogginess, and does not yet have medical clearance to return to the lineup. Just miles away, in the Boston Red Sox’s camp, pitcher Josh Beckett is preparing to pitch Tuesday, a little more than a week after he was accidentally hit in the head with a batted ball during a team practice. He felt symptoms of a concussion the next day, but they subsided quickly, and Beckett was soon making jokes about the experience. The contrasting experiences of the two players, both of them American League stars, underlines the fact that no two concussions are alike, and that recovery times are dependent on whether a player has a concussion history and on other individual factors. That contrast is playing out day by day in Fort Myers. Walking up the dugout steps at Hammond Stadium on a sunny morning last week, Morneau greeted Eunice Ellis, a security guard, and offered a hearty “Good morning.” Ellis, who has worked at the stadium for five years, smiled back and said: “Good morning. Are you good today?” For Morneau, that, of course, is a relative question. He takes batting practice and works out with his teammates, but he still feels concussion-like symptoms once or twice a week, just as he did when he reported to camp Feb. 21. “I’m not quite there yet,” Morneau said. “But it’s getting

Charles Krupa / The Associated Press

Minnesota Twins first baseman Justin Morneau watches a spring training baseball game against the Baltimore Orioles on Sunday. Morneau, who suffered a season-ending concussion in July 2010, has been sidelined since the injury. close.” In January, Twins general manager Bill Smith said Morneau might miss the first week to 10 days of exhibition games. Now it could be longer; the Twins will not put him in the lineup until he is symptom-free. See Concussions / D3


D2 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

BASKETBALL

Wednesday Boys basketball: Class 5A state tournament at Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene — Bend High vs. Crescent Valley, 1:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. Benson, 3:15 p.m. Girls basketball: Class 4A state tournament at Gill Coliseum in Corvallis — Crook County vs. Henley, 3:15 p.m.; Madras vs. Banks, 6:30 p.m.

9 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, first round, Connecticut vs. DePaul, ESPN2. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, first round, Seton Hall vs. Rutgers, ESPN2. 4 p.m. — Women’s college, Big East Tournament, final, Villanova vs. South Florida, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Sun Belt Conference Tournament, final, ESPN2. 4:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Miami Heat, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Horizon League Tournament, final, Butler vs. Wisconsin-Milwaukee, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Summit League Tournament, final, ESPN2.

SOCCER 11:55 a.m. — English Premier League, teams TBA, FSNW. 9:30 p.m. — UEFA Champions League, teams TBA, FSNW (same-day tape).

BASEBALL Noon — MLB Spring Training, Arizona Diamondbacks at Cleveland Indians, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB Spring Training, New York Yankees at Washington Nationals, MLB Network. (same-day tape). 8 p.m. — MLB Spring Training, Texas Rangers at Los Angeles Angels, MLB Network (same-day tape).

HOCKEY 5 p.m. — NHL, Colorado Avalanche at Minnesota Wild, VS. network. 7 p.m. — Western Hockey League, Tri-City Americans at Kamloops Blazers, FSNW.

WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, ESPN. 9 a.m. — Women’s college, Big 12 Tournament, first quarterfinal, FSNW. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, ESPN. 11:30 a.m. — Women’s college, Big 12 Tournament, second quarterfinal, FSNW. 3 p.m. — Women’s college, Big 12 Tournament, third quarterfinal, FSNW. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Northeast Conference Tournament, final, ESPN2. 5:30 p.m. — Women’s college, Big 12 Tournament, fourth quarterfinal, FSNW. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Big East Tournament, second round, ESPN. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Big Sky Tournament, final, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Pac-10 Tournament, first round, Oregon State vs. Stanford, FSNW. 8:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Pac-10 Tournament, first round, Oregon vs. Arizona State, FSNW.

BASEBALL Noon — MLB Spring Training, Seattle Mariners at Los Angeles Dodgers, MLB Network. 4 p.m. — MLB Spring Training, Baltimore Orioles at Boston Red Sox, MLB Network. 8 p.m. — MLB Spring Training, Houston Astros at New York Mets, MLB Network (same-day tape).

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Chicago Blackhawks at Tampa Bay Lightning, VS. network.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 4:30 p.m. — NBA, Portland Trail Blazers at Miami Heat, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

BASEBALL 5:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690.

WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Pac-10 Tournament, first round, Oregon State vs. Stanford, KICE-AM 940, KRCO-AM 690. 8:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Pac-10 Tournament, first round, Oregon vs. Arizona State, KBND-AM 1110. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • NFL, players union done for the day: The NFL and the players union negotiated for four hours Monday before calling it a day. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith and members of the two negotiating teams are expected to reconvene before a federal mediator today.

Winter sports • Lance Mackey leading Iditarod out of Rohn: Defending four-time champion Lance Mackey is leading the start of the 1,150-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race from Anchorage to Nome. Mackey left the Rohn checkpoint just after 6 p.m. Monday, followed by Hugh Neff and Sebastian Schnuelle. Rohn is 272 miles from Anchorage. The 62 teams held a ceremonial start Saturday in Anchorage and began the racing Sunday at Willow.

Baseball • Judge allows steroids testimony of former players: Longtime San Francisco Giants clubhouse manager Mike Murphy will testify about Barry Bonds’ hat size, a Nike employee will discuss the slugger’s feet and prosecutors will show the jury photographs of Bonds’ growing physique during his career, court papers filed Monday showed. In a witness list filed Monday, prosecutors outlined their planned evidence, most of which has been made public since a grand jury started meeting more than seven years ago.

Basketball • Texas Tech fires Pat Knight as coach: Texas Tech fired Pat Knight on Monday, ending a disappointing threeyear run for a coach who failed to lead the Red Raiders to the NCAA tournament after taking over for his famous father. Knight will coach the Red Raiders at this week’s Big 12 Tournament and then step down. • Michigan school wins first game after star player dies: A west Michigan high school basketball team has won its first game since a star player collapsed after scoring the winning basket to give his team a perfect regular-season record. Nearly 3,500 fans observed a moment of silence before the tipoff of Monday night’s state tournament game between the teams from Fennville and Lawrence high schools. — From wire reports

Baltimore (ss) 0, N.Y. Yankees (ss) 0, tie Kansas City (ss) 11, San Diego 3 San Francisco 4, Texas 1 Today’s Games Baltimore vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Florida vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Yankees vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Pittsburgh vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Toronto vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Boston (ss) vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Houston (ss) vs. Boston (ss) at Fort Myers, Fla., 10:05 a.m. N.Y. Mets (ss) vs. Houston (ss) at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Washington vs. N.Y. Mets (ss) at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 a.m. Colorado (ss) vs. Chicago White Sox at Glendale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. San Diego vs. Oakland at Phoenix, 12:05 p.m. Texas vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. San Francisco vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. Kansas City at Surprise, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Arizona vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 12:05 p.m. Chicago Cubs vs. Colorado (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz., 12:10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Minnesota vs. Baltimore (ss) at Sarasota, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Toronto vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Philadelphia vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 10:05 a.m. St. Louis vs. Atlanta at Kissimmee, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Washington vs. Florida at Jupiter, Fla., 10:05 a.m. Houston vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie, Fla., 10:10 a.m. Chicago White Sox vs. San Francisco at Scottsdale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Cincinnati vs. San Diego (ss) at Peoria, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Seattle vs. L.A. Dodgers at Glendale, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. San Diego (ss) vs. Cleveland at Goodyear, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Oakland vs. Texas at Surprise, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Colorado vs. L.A. Angels at Tempe, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Kansas City vs. Chicago Cubs at Mesa, Ariz., 12:05 p.m. Milwaukee vs. Arizona at Scottsdale, Ariz., 12:10 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 4:05 p.m. Baltimore (ss) vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 4:05 p.m.

IN THE BLEACHERS

Thursday Girls basketball: Class 5A state tournament at Matthew Knight Arean in Eugene — Mountain View vs. West Albany, 8:15 p.m.; Class 4A state semifinals in Corvallis Friday Boys basketball: Class 5A state semifinals in Eugene Girls basketball: Class 5A state semifinals in Eugene; Class 4A state final in Corvallis Saturday Boys basketball: Class 5A state final in Eugene Girls basketball: Class 5A state final in Eugene

BASKETBALL High School PREP GIRLS OSAA State Championships Class 6A March 10-12 at Rose Garden Arena, Portland Thursday’s Games Quarterfinals Jesuit vs. South Medford, 1:30 p.m. Oregon City vs. Tigard, 3:15 p.m. South Eugene vs. Beaverton, 6:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Acadamy vs. Clackamas, 8:15 p.m. Class 5A March 10-12 at Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene Thursday’s Games Quarterfinals Springfield vs. Sherwood, 1:30 p.m. Wilsonville vs. Crescent Valley, 3:15 p.m. Hermiston vs. Willamette, 6:30 p.m. Mountain View vs. West Albany, 8:15 p.m. Class 4A March 9-11 at Gill Coliseum, Corvallis Wednesday’s Games Quarterfinals La Salle Prep vs. Mazama, 1:30 p.m. Henley vs. Crook County, 3:15 p.m. Madras vs. Banks, 6:30 p.m. Brookings-Harbor vs. Cascade, 8:15 p.m. PREP BOYS OSAA State Championships Class 6A March 9-12 at Rose Garden Arena, Portland Wednesday’s Games Quarterfinals Jesuit vs. Roseburg, 1:30 p.m. Central Catholic vs. Lincoln, 3:15 p.m. North Medford vs. West Linn, 6:30 p.m. Westview vs. South Medford, 8:15 p.m. Class 5A March 9-12 at Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene Wednesday’s Games Quarterfinals Bend vs. Crescent Valley, 1:30 p.m. Benson vs. Mountain View, 3:15 p.m. Wilsonville vs. Milwaukie, 6:30 p.m. Woodburn vs. Corvallis, 8:15 p.m. Class 4A March 8-11 at Gill Coliseum, Corvallis Today’s Games Quarterfinals Mazama vs. Banks, 1:30 p.m. Tillamook vs. Cottage Grove, 3:15 p.m. North Bend vs. Roosevelt, 6:30 p.m. Central vs. Phoenix, 8:15 p.m.

Men’s college Monday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENT Colonial Athletic Association Championship Old Dominion 70, Va. Commonwealth 65 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Championship St. Peter’s 62, Iona 57 Southern Conference Championship Wofford 77, Coll. of Charleston 67 Summit League Semifinals Oakland, Mich. 110, S. Dakota St. 90 Oral Roberts 83, IUPUI 77 Sun Belt Conference Semifinals Ark.-Little Rock 65, Middle Tennessee 56 North Texas 81, W. Kentucky 62 West Coast Conference Championship Gonzaga 75, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 63 POLLS AP Top Twenty Five The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 6, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Ohio St. (52) 29-2 1,612 1 2. Kansas (13) 29-2 1,569 2 3. Pittsburgh 27-4 1,493 4 4. Notre Dame 25-5 1,416 8 5. Duke 27-4 1,265 4 6. North Carolina 24-6 1,209 13 7. San Diego St. 29-2 1,197 9 8. BYU 28-3 1,187 3 9. Purdue 25-6 1,108 6 10. Texas 25-6 1,081 7 11. Syracuse 25-6 984 12 12. Florida 24-6 931 14 13. Wisconsin 23-7 870 10 14. Louisville 23-8 794 11 15. Kentucky 22-8 639 20 16. Arizona 25-6 562 18 17. St. John’s 20-10 462 15 18. Xavier 24-6 437 23 19. Kansas St. 22-9 345 — 20. West Virginia 20-10 294 — 21. Connecticut 21-9 281 16 22. Georgetown 21-9 244 17

23. Utah St. 28-3 234 25 24. Temple 24-6 209 — 25. Cincinnati 24-7 202 — Others receiving votes: Texas A&M 177, Vanderbilt 101, Villanova 64, UCLA 40, UNLV 29, Missouri 22, George Mason 12, Old Dominion 11, Alabama 10, Belmont 9, Butler 9, Gonzaga 6, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 4, Va. Commonwealth 3, UAB 2, Harvard 1. USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 6, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Ohio State (17) 29-2 767 1 2. Kansas (14) 29-2 748 2 3. Pittsburgh 27-4 702 5 4. Notre Dame 25-5 678 7 5. Duke 27-4 595 4 6. San Diego State 29-2 592 9 7. North Carolina 24-6 560 13 8. Brigham Young 28-3 546 3 9. Purdue 25-6 537 6 10. Texas 25-6 518 8 11. Syracuse 25-6 492 12 12. Florida 24-6 456 14 13. Wisconsin 23-7 396 10 14. Louisville 23-8 364 11 15. Arizona 25-6 285 18 16. Kentucky 22-8 274 23 17. Utah State 28-3 237 21 18. St. John’s 20-10 230 15 19. Connecticut 21-9 165 16 20. Xavier 24-6 150 NR 21. Texas A&M 23-7 146 22 22. Georgetown 21-9 117 17 23. Kansas State 22-9 113 NR 24. Vanderbilt 21-9 80 20 25. Temple 24-6 77 NR Others receiving votes: West Virginia (20-10) 64; Villanova (21-10) 43; UCLA (22-9) 36; Cincinnati (24-7) 31; Missouri (22-9) 23; UNLV (23-7) 16; George Mason (26-6) 14; Saint Mary’s (24-7) 11; Alabama-Birmingham (22-7) 4; Boston College (19-11) 3; Florida State (21-9) 2; Alabama (20-10) 1; Harvard (23-5) 1; Washington (20-10) 1.

Women’s college Monday’s Games ——— TOURNAMENT Atlantic 10 Conference Championship Xavier 67, Dayton 60 Big East Conference Semifinals Connecticut 75, Rutgers 51 Notre Dame 71, DePaul 67 Horizon League First Round Detroit 57, Valparaiso 50 Loyola of Chicago 49, Youngstown St. 47 Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference Championship Marist 63, Loyola, Md. 45 Southern Conference Championship Samford 57, Appalachian St. 54 Summit League Semifinals Oakland, Mich. 96, Oral Roberts 62 S. Dakota St. 70, IPFW 67 Sun Belt Conference Semifinals Ark.-Little Rock 47, Fla. International 37 W. Kentucky 55, Arkansas St. 47 West Coast Conference Championship Gonzaga 72, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 46 POLL AP Women’s Top Twenty Five The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through March 6, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs

1. Connecticut (37) 30-1 973 1 2. Stanford (2) 27-2 929 2 3. Baylor 28-2 887 3 4. Tennessee 31-2 875 4 5. Xavier 27-2 809 6 6. Duke 29-3 774 8 7. UCLA 26-3 716 9 8. Texas A&M 26-4 715 5 9. DePaul 27-5 651 12 10. Notre Dame 25-6 644 7 11. Miami 27-4 552 10 12. Michigan St. 26-5 503 11 13. Wis.-Green Bay 29-1 465 15 14. North Carolina 25-8 449 19 15. Florida St. 23-7 412 14 16. Maryland 23-6 390 13 17. Kentucky 24-8 335 16 18. Ohio St. 22-9 262 — 19. Marist 28-2 250 21 20. Gonzaga 27-4 197 22 21. Oklahoma 20-10 154 18 22. Houston 25-4 128 25 23. Georgetown 22-10 114 17 24. Georgia Tech 23-10 102 — 25. Marquette 23-8 78 20 Others receiving votes: Iowa 53, Louisiana Tech 41, Iowa St. 40, Penn St. 40, West Virginia 33, Texas Tech 31, BYU 13, Kansas St. 13, Rutgers 11, Georgia 10, Temple 7, Tulane 7, N. Iowa 4, Princeton 4, Bowling Green 3, Louisville 1.

BASEBALL MLB MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL Spring Training All Times PST ——— AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pct Kansas City 7 3 .700 Detroit 8 4 .667 Minnesota 6 3 .667 Texas 6 4 .600 Baltimore 4 3 .571 Los Angeles 5 5 .500 Seattle 4 4 .500 Boston 4 5 .444 Cleveland 4 5 .444 New York 4 5 .444 Toronto 4 5 .444 Oakland 4 6 .400 Chicago 2 6 .250 Tampa Bay 2 7 .222 NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pct San Francisco 9 3 .750 Atlanta 7 3 .700 St. Louis 6 3 .667 Washington 5 3 .625 Cincinnati 6 4 .600 Milwaukee 6 4 .600 Colorado 5 4 .556 Florida 4 4 .500 San Diego 4 4 .500 Philadelphia 5 6 .455 Pittsburgh 5 6 .455 New York 4 5 .444 Chicago 4 6 .400 Los Angeles 4 7 .364 Arizona 4 9 .308 Houston 2 8 .200 NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings;games against non-major league teams do not. ——— Monday’s Games St. Louis 10, Minnesota 4 Tampa Bay 4, Pittsburgh 2 Washington 14, Houston 9 Boston 6, Baltimore (ss) 5 Florida 4, Atlanta 3, 10 innings N.Y. Yankees (ss) 7, Philadelphia 1 Detroit 2, N.Y. Mets 1 Chicago White Sox (ss) 16, Cleveland 16, tie Seattle 6, Oakland 3 Milwaukee 15, Cincinnati 2 Chicago Cubs 14, L.A. Angels 13 Chicago White Sox (ss) 12, Arizona (ss) 1 Arizona (ss) 8, Kansas City (ss) 6 L.A. Dodgers 7, Colorado 1

College POLLS Collegiate Baseball Poll TUCSON, Ariz. — The Collegiate Baseball poll with records through March 6, points and previous rank. Voting is done by coaches, sports writers and sports information directors: Record Pts Pvs 1. Florida 10-1 496 1 2. Oklahoma 14-0 495 2 3. Vanderbilt 11-1 493 3 4. Clemson 7-2 488 4 5. Florida St. 10-1 486 5 6. South Carolina 8-1 483 6 7. Louisiana St. 11-1 481 7 8. Cal. St. Fullerton 8-3 479 13 9. Texas Christian 7-4 477 10 10. Virginia 12-1 475 15 11. Texas 7-4 474 12 12. UCLA 7-4 472 8 13. Arizona St. 9-2 470 11 14. Texas A&M 9-3 467 9 15. Arizona 9-2 465 16 16. North Carolina 11-1 464 17 17. Stanford 6-5 463 14 18. Arkansas 10-1 460 20 19. Wichita St. 9-2 455 19 20. Fresno St. 8-1 453 21 21. U.C. Irvine 8-1 451 22 22. Louisville 8-2 449 25 23. Rice 8-5 447 23 24. Georgia Tech. 8-4 443 26 25. Auburn 9-3 439 27 26. Stetson 9-1 436 — 27. James Madison 11-1 434 — 28. Tulane 9-3 430 — 29. Nebraska 8-4 427 — 30. Cal St. Bakersfield 11-2 425 — Baseball America Top 25 DURHAM, N.C. — The top 25 teams in the Baseball America poll with records through March 6 and previous ranking (voting by the staff of Baseball America): Record Pv 1. Florida 10-1 1 2. Vanderbilt 11-1 2 3. Oklahoma 14-0 3 4. South Carolina 8-1 4 5. Texas 7-4 6 6. Cal State Fullerton 8-3 7 7. TCU 7-4 8 8. Florida State 10-1 11 9. Arizona State 9-2 10 10. Clemson 7-2 12 11. Virginia 12-1 13 12. Stanford 6-5 9 13. UCLA 7-4 5 14. Arizona 9-2 17 15. North Carolina 11-1 23 16. Louisiana State 11-1 19 17. Baylor 6-5 16 18. Rice 8-5 21 19. Connecticut 4-4 22 20. California 6-4 14 21. Coll. of Charleston 10-2 18 22. Texas A&M 9-3 20 23. Fresno State 8-1 24 24. Tulane 9-3 NR 25. Georgia Tech 8-4 NR

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts Philadelphia 65 40 19 6 86 Pittsburgh 67 38 21 8 84 N.Y. Rangers 68 35 29 4 74 New Jersey 65 30 31 4 64 N.Y. Islanders 67 25 32 10 60 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts Boston 65 38 19 8 84 Montreal 66 36 23 7 79 Buffalo 65 32 25 8 72 Toronto 66 29 28 9 67

GF 208 193 193 139 184

GA 174 166 164 168 213

GF 199 176 189 173

GA 152 167 187 202

Ottawa

65 22 34 9 53 147 206 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 67 37 20 10 84 178 167 Tampa Bay 66 37 21 8 82 196 200 Carolina 66 31 26 9 71 191 201 Atlanta 66 27 28 11 65 184 214 Florida 66 26 31 9 61 165 184 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 66 39 19 8 86 219 193 Chicago 66 37 23 6 80 218 182 Nashville 66 33 24 9 75 167 156 Columbus 65 31 26 8 70 180 196 St. Louis 66 29 28 9 67 182 198 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 67 42 16 9 93 216 155 Calgary 68 35 24 9 79 207 193 Minnesota 66 34 25 7 75 171 174 Colorado 65 26 31 8 60 185 224 Edmonton 66 23 35 8 54 169 215 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA San Jose 66 38 22 6 82 185 167 Dallas 66 36 23 7 79 184 186 Phoenix 67 34 23 10 78 191 194 Los Angeles 66 36 25 5 77 183 163 Anaheim 66 35 26 5 75 182 193 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Games Washington 2, Tampa Bay 1, SO St. Louis 5, Columbus 4, SO Dallas 4, Los Angeles 3, OT Tuesday’s Games Ottawa at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Toronto at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Edmonton at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Pittsburgh, 4 p.m. Boston at Montreal, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Vancouver at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Nashville at San Jose, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday’s Games Edmonton at Washington, 4 p.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 4 p.m. St. Louis at Columbus, 4 p.m. Los Angeles at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Chicago at Tampa Bay, 4:30 p.m. Calgary at Dallas, 6 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Anaheim, 7:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Fired vice president of umpiring Mike Port, vice president of operations and administration Ed Burns and senior specialist of on-field operations Darryl Hamilton. American League CLEVELAND INDIANS—Agreed to terms with INF Nick Johnson on a minor league contract and OF Michael Brantley, C Lou Marson, RHP Carlos Carrasco, RHP Frank Herrmann, RHP Josh Judy, RHP Corey Kluber, RHP Justin Masterson, RHP Zach McAllister, RHP Vinnie Pestano, RHP Hector Rondon, RHP Mitch Talbot, RHP Jess Todd, LHP Kelvin De La Cruz, LHP Nick Hagadone, LHP David Huff LHP Tony Sipp, INF Jason Donald, INF Jared Goedert, INF Matt LaPorta, INF Jayson Nix, INF Luis Valbuena, OF Ezequiel Carrera, OF Trevor Crowe, OF Shelley Duncan and OF Nick Weglarz on one-year contracts. National League SAN DIEGO PADRES—Announced the retirement of C Gregg Zaun. Reassigned RHP Brad Brach, RHP Alexis Lara, RHP Craig Italiano, RHP Matt Lollis and LHP Juan Oramas to their minor league camp. American Association AMARILLO SOX—Signed RHP Ryan Mitchell. Atlantic League LONG ISLAND DUCKS—Signed C Tom Pennino, RHP Joselo Diaz and OF Lew Ford. Frontier League JOLIET SLAMMERS—Signed 2B Hector Pellot. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS MINERS—Released OF Lenell McGee. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE BOBCATS—Signed G Garrett Temple to a 10-day contract. NBA Developmen League RIO GRANDE VALLEY VIPERS—Signed F forward Marquis Gilstrap. Waived G-F Matt Janning. FOOTBALL National Football League OAKLAND RAIDERS—Promoted assistant coach Chuck Bresnahan to defensive coordinator. PITTSBURGH STEELERS—Named Carnell Lake defensive backs coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League ATLANTA THRASHERS—Loaned LW Andrew Kozek from Chicago (AHL) to Hershey (AHL). ST. LOUIS BLUES—Recalled F T.J. Hensick from Peoria (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Signed C Tyler Johnson to a three-year contract. VANCOUVER CANUCKS—Called up RW Victor Oreskovich from Manitoba (AHL). American Hockey League CHICAGO WOLVES—Announced D Josh Godfrey was loaned to the team by Washington (NHL). PEORIA RIVERMEN—Announced F Akim Aliu was reassigned to the team from Gwinnett (ECHL). Central Hockey League ARIZONA SUNDOGS—Waived F Samuel Grenache. SOCCER Major League Soccer FC DALLAS—Acquired F Fabian Castillo from Deportivo Cali. PORTLAND TIMBERS—Signed F Jorge Perlaza. COLLEGE BROWN—Named Jill Reeve women’s field hockey coach. EASTERN WASHINGTON—Fired men’s basketball coach Kirk Earlywine. TEXAS A&M-CORPUS CHRISTI—Fried men’s basketball coach Perry Clark. TEXAS STATE—Promoted Laurie Hindson assistant athletic director for academic services and director of the athletic academic center. TEXAS TECH—Fired men’s basketball coach Pat Knight. TOWSON—Announced the resignation of men’s basketball coach Pat Kennedy.

Stars snatch win over Kings in overtime The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — Brenden Morrow was unsure whether Mike Ribeiro passed the puck to him, or whether he simply stole it from his Dallas teammate. Morrow’s winning goal after that exchange left absolutely no doubt the Stars are resilient enough to contend with the best of the West. Morrow scored 38 seconds into overtime, and the Stars rallied from a late deficit for a 4-3 victory over the Los Angeles Kings on Monday night. The Dallas captain collected what appeared to be a back pass from Ribeiro and eluded three Kings to score his 26th goal of the season for the Stars, who have won five of their past six and haven’t lost in regulation since Feb. 22. “It showed huge character for us to come out and get that two points,” Morrow said of the Stars’ three rallies from one-goal deficits. “This group has been good about that all year. Last year and in years past, it was something we wouldn’t be mentally tough enough to overcome. But now we just wipe those things away and try to steal the momentum on the next shift.” Ribeiro had a goal and two assists, and Kari Lehtonen made 20 saves as the Stars put a strong finish on their third California road game in four nights. Trevor Daley and Jamie Benn scored tying goals for Dallas in the third period, with Benn getting a short-handed breakaway goal with 14:40 to play. With leading scorer Brad Richards sidelined by an apparent concussion, the Stars had lost

NHL ROUNDUP five straight and were on the verge of irrelevancy before their current surge, which has put them right back into a tie for fifth place in the muddled Western Conference standings. Los Angeles never trailed in regulation, and Dallas twice gave up goals less than a minute after tying the score. None of it stopped the Stars from sticking with it in the final stop of a four-game trip against every other team in the Pacific Division. “It took a lot of grit,” Dallas coach Marc Crawford said. “It’s funny, because you usually don’t get many opportunities against the Kings because they play solidly defensively. That’s been our secret lately, too. We haven’t given up many opportunities, but there were a few mistakes made tonight on both sides, and when you made the mistakes, they ended up being on the sticks of guys that had something going.” Willie Mitchell, Justin Williams and Kyle Clifford scored for the Kings, who lost three of four to wrap up a six-game homestand. While the Stars seized an unlikely victory, the Kings felt they gave it away. “We’re a team that if we’re going to make the playoffs, we’re going to need to lock games like these down,” said Williams, who earned his 400th career point with an assist. “We missed an opportunity to jump ahead of these guys in the standings. On the other side, we’re going to

make sure that that point isn’t going to stop us from making the playoffs. We have a big road trip coming up, so we’re going to have to have a big push.” Jonathan Bernier made 18 saves and Anze Kopitar had two assists for the Kings, still stuck in eighth place in the West. Up next is a fourgame road trip, their final significant stretch away from Staples Center during the chase for their second straight playoff berth. “The one-goal lead going into the third gave us a good position over a team in our division,” Los Angeles coach Terry Murray said. “We should be able to shut that game down. We didn’t manage the puck. We made mistakes and turned the puck over. That’s something we need to clean up right away.” Also on Monday: Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TAMPA, Fla. — Alex Ovechkin assisted on Washington’s only goal in regulation, then scored in the opening round of the shootout to give the first-place Capitals a victory over slumping Tampa Bay. Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Blue Jackets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ST. LOUIS — Andy McDonald scored two goals and added another in a shootout, leading St. Louis to victory over Columbus.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 D3

NBA ROUNDUP

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Orlando loses its Magic, Gonzaga wins WCC tournament suffers loss to Blazers The Associated Press

The Associated Press ORLANDO, Fla. — The Orlando Magic pulled off one of the most amazing feats of the NBA season when it rallied from 24 points down to beat Miami last week. But Monday night, winning without their biggest star proved to be little too much opposite a team that’s fighting for its playoff life down the stretch. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 24 points, Andre Miller added 15 and the Portland Trail Blazers held on to beat the Magic, who were without the suspended Dwight Howard, 89-85 on Monday night. Portland won its third straight, and 10th in 13 games. The Blazers also swept the two-game season series with Orlando. Marcus Camby was held scoreless, but had 10 rebounds to help the Blazers fend off a late rally by the Magic. Orlando lost its second consecutive game and dropped to 1-2 this season without Howard, who sat out while serving a one-game suspension after picking up his 16th technical foul Friday. “It’s tough because we didn’t know who they were going to start,” said Aldridge, whose team moved within a half-game in the win column of idle Denver for the fifth spot in the Western Conference. “We had to wait for game time to find out. ...They’re better with him, but they’re still good without him. They have a bunch of shooters. ... It wasn’t no easy game at all.” Jason Richardson led Orlando with 22 points, followed by 13 apiece from Ryan Anderson and Hedo Turkoglu. The Magic hit 11 of 22 three-pointers on the night, but were done in by 19 turnovers that led to several easy baskets throughout the game. Richardson’s three tied it at 74-all with 9:34 to play in the game. A three by Anderson two possessions later then gave the Magic their first lead since the opening minutes, 77-76. The pace quickened from there and, following a pair of ties and lead changes, the Blazers regained the lead 81-79 on a tip-in by Gerald Wallace with 6:26 left. The Magic kept it within a basket before Portland’s Wesley Matthews drained a three-pointer from the corner to push to 88-83. Orlando then lost a basket by Anderson after an official review during a timeout waved it off because of a shot-clock violation. That made the deficit 88-81 with just 2:47 remaining. Turkoglu hit another from beyond the arc to cut it 89-85 at the 1:21 mark and Portland turned it over on a shot-clock violation of its own with 56.3 seconds to play. “We played really hard, gave it our all, but it just didn’t come up at the end,” Richardson said. Also on Monday: Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 MEMPHIS, Tenn. — Mike Conley and Tony Allen each scored 20 points and Marc Gasol added 18 as Memphis withstood a second-half rally and defeated Oklahoma City.

John Raoux / The Associated Press

Portland Trail Blazers’ Andre Miller (24) gets off a shot around Orlando Magic’s Hedo Turkoglu (15) during the first half of Monday’s game. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Hornets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 CHICAGO — Derrick Rose scored 24 points, and Chicago beat New Orleans with Hornets star Chris Paul sidelined by a concussion. Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 MINNEAPOLIS — Dirk Nowitzki overcame foul trouble to score 25 points in 27 minutes, helping Dallas outlast Minnesota. Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Bobcats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Blake Griffin had 17 points and 15 rebounds and Los Angeles had more offensive options than Charlotte in a victory that matched teams missing their leading scorers. Knicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 NEW YORK — Carmelo Anthony scored 34 points, Amare Stoudemire added 31 and New York showed how dangerous they can be when their superstars are rolling, beating Utah. Rockets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Kings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Chad Budinger scored 20 points and Kyle Lowry had 19 points, eight assists and seven rebounds for Houston, which defeated Sacramento to give coach Rick Adelman his 935th win as an NBA coach.

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES Monday’s Games

Blazers 89, Magic 85 PORTLAND (89) Batum 4-8 0-0 9, Aldridge 10-18 3-7 24, Camby 0-4 0-0 0, Miller 6-11 2-3 15, Matthews 4-8 3-3 13, Wallace 4-11 1-2 9, Fernandez 1-6 2-2 5, Roy 4-8 0-0 9, Mills 2-7 0-0 5. Totals 35-81 11-17 89. ORLANDO (85) Turkoglu 5-12 1-2 13, Anderson 4-9 2-2 13, Bass 4-9 1-1 9, Nelson 1-7 0-0 2, J.Richardson 8-13 2-2 22, Clark 4-6 1-1 9, Arenas 4-9 0-0 9, Redick 3-5 1-1 8, Q.Richardson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 33-71 8-9 85. Portland 24 23 23 19 — 89 Orlando 19 24 23 19 — 85 3-Point Goals—Portland 8-25 (Matthews 2-4, Aldridge 1-1, Miller 1-2, Roy 1-3, Fernandez 1-4, Mills 1-4, Batum 1-5, Wallace 0-2), Orlando 1122 (J.Richardson 4-5, Anderson 3-6, Turkoglu 2-4, Redick 1-1, Arenas 1-3, Q.Richardson 0-1, Nelson 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Portland 47 (Wallace, Camby 10), Orlando 44 (Clark 9). Assists—Portland 21 (Miller 7), Orlando 14 (Nelson 4). Total Fouls—Portland 14, Orlando 17. Technicals—Portland defensive three second, Orlando defensive three second. A—19,001 (18,500).

Grizzlies 107, Thunder 101 OKLAHOMA CITY (101) Durant 8-20 3-5 23, Ibaka 7-10 0-2 14, Mohammed 2-4 0-0 4, Westbrook 11-21 4-5 27, Sefolosha 1-2 1-2 3, Collison 2-4 1-2 5, Harden 7-11 2-2 16, Maynor 1-2 0-0 2, Aldrich 1-1 0-0 2, Cook 2-6 0-0 5. Totals 42-81 11-18 101. MEMPHIS (107) Young 5-9 2-3 12, Randolph 6-9 5-6 17, Gasol 9-13 0-0 18, Conley 9-20 2-2 20, Allen 7-12 5-7 20, Battier 3-6 1-2 7, Mayo 2-6 2-4 7, Arthur 3-9 0-0 6, Williams 0-1 0-0 0, Smith 0-0 0-2 0. Totals 44-85 17-26 107. Oklahoma City 24 22 27 28 — 101 Memphis 25 33 21 28 — 107 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 6-18 (Durant 4-10, Westbrook 1-2, Cook 1-5, Harden 0-1), Memphis 2-12 (Allen 1-2, Mayo 1-2, Randolph 0-1, Battier 0-2, Conley 0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 47 (Harden, Ibaka, Durant 6), Memphis 49 (Battier, Mayo 7). Assists—Oklahoma City 21 (Westbrook 7), Memphis 22 (Conley 9). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 23, Memphis 19. A—13,903 (18,119).

Bulls 85, Hornets 77 NEW ORLEANS (77) Pondexter 1-4 0-0 2, West 4-17 3-3 11, Okafor 3-7 2-4 8, Jack 8-19 6-7 23, Belinelli 6-12 2-2 17, Green 3-13 0-0 6, Landry 4-8 2-2 10, Gray 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-80 15-18 77. CHICAGO (85) Deng 2-12 5-5 10, Boozer 8-14 3-3 19, Noah 3-7 0-1 6, Rose 8-21 6-7 24, Bogans 2-4 0-0 5, Brewer 5-7 0-0 10, Gibson 1-3 0-0 2, Asik 0-2 12 1, Watson 0-3 2-2 2, Korver 2-8 2-2 6. Totals 31-81 19-22 85. New Orleans 23 20 17 17 — 77 Chicago 26 17 23 19 — 85 3-Point Goals—New Orleans 4-13 (Belinelli 36, Jack 1-2, Pondexter 0-1, West 0-2, Green 0-2), Chicago 4-20 (Rose 2-6, Bogans 1-2, Deng 1-5, Brewer 0-1, Watson 0-2, Korver 0-4). Fouled Out— None. Rebounds—New Orleans 53 (West 11), Chicago 54 (Noah 13). Assists—New Orleans 10 (Jack, West 3), Chicago 24 (Rose 9). Total Fouls— New Orleans 16, Chicago 17. Technicals—Chicago defensive three second. A—21,997 (20,917).

Mavs 108, T’wolves 105 DALLAS (108)

Assists—Dallas 29 (Kidd 9), Minnesota 23 (Love 5). Total Fouls—Dallas 19, Minnesota 21. Technicals—Dallas defensive three second, Beasley. A—13,288 (19,356).

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division x-Boston New York Philadelphia New Jersey Toronto

W 46 33 32 19 17

Miami Orlando Atlanta Charlotte Washington

W 43 40 37 26 16

L 15 29 30 43 46

Pct .754 .532 .516 .306 .270

GB — 13½ 14½ 27½ 30

L10 8-2 7-3 8-2 4-6 3-7

Str W-5 W-2 W-2 W-2 L-2

Home 27-5 18-13 21-10 13-16 12-20

Away 19-10 15-16 11-20 4-27 5-24

Conf 30-7 21-14 19-20 11-25 10-29

Away 21-12 16-13 19-15 10-22 1-29

Conf 29-12 27-12 25-13 15-22 10-29

Southeast Division L 20 24 26 37 46

Pct .683 .625 .587 .413 .258

GB — 3½ 6 17 26½

L10 4-6 6-4 4-6 4-6 2-8

Str L-4 L-2 L-2 L-5 L-1

Home 22-8 24-11 18-11 16-15 15-17

Central Division W 44 27 23 23 12

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

L 18 35 38 41 50

Pct .710 .435 .377 .359 .194

GB — 17 20½ 22 32

L10 8-2 3-7 3-7 3-7 4-6

Str W-3 L-3 L-2 W-1 L-1

Home 27-4 17-14 15-16 16-17 8-23

Away 17-14 10-21 8-22 7-24 4-27

Conf 26-11 18-18 15-18 15-22 9-28

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 51 46 37 36 33

L 12 17 29 29 32

Oklahoma City Denver Portland Utah Minnesota

W 39 37 36 33 15

L 23 27 27 31 50

W L.A. Lakers 45 Phoenix 32 Golden State 27 L.A. Clippers 24 Sacramento 15 x-clinched playoff spot

L 19 29 35 40 46

Pct .810 .730 .561 .554 .508

GB — 5 15½ 16 19

L10 7-3 9-1 4-6 7-3 8-2

Str L-1 W-1 L-1 W-2 W-2

Home 29-3 23-9 21-9 22-9 17-13

Away 22-9 23-8 16-20 14-20 16-19

Conf 31-7 25-9 19-19 22-19 19-22

Away 17-14 11-20 15-17 15-16 5-27

Conf 23-17 21-19 22-17 17-21 6-34

Away 23-11 15-16 8-22 6-25 7-22

Conf 26-11 16-18 16-21 16-25 9-29

Northwest Division Pct .629 .578 .571 .516 .231

GB — 3 3½ 7 25½

L10 5-5 6-4 7-3 2-8 2-8

Str L-1 L-1 W-3 L-1 L-3

Home 22-9 26-7 21-10 18-15 10-23

Paciic Division Pct .703 .525 .435 .375 .246

GB — 11½ 17 21 28½

L10 7-3 6-4 4-6 4-6 2-8

Str W-7 L-1 L-2 W-3 L-3

Home 22-8 17-13 19-13 18-15 8-24

——— Monday’s Games L.A. Clippers 92, Charlotte 87 New York 131, Utah 109 Memphis 107, Oklahoma City 101 Houston 123, Sacramento 101

Portland 89, Orlando 85 Chicago 85, New Orleans 77 Dallas 108, Minnesota 105 olden State at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Milwaukee at Washington, 4 p.m. Houston at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Wednesday’s Games

Chicago at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Oklahoma City at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Dallas at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Orlando at Sacramento, 7 p.m.

Golden State at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Utah at Toronto, 4 p.m. New York at Memphis, 5 p.m. Indiana at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Detroit at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. All Times PST

Stojakovic 4-9 0-0 9, Nowitzki 7-12 10-10 25, Haywood 3-4 2-3 8, Kidd 4-8 3-3 13, Beaubois 4-10 0-0 9, Terry 3-11 4-4 11, Brewer 1-1 0-0 2, Marion 4-11 1-2 9, Mahinmi 1-3 0-0 2, Barea 3-7 0-0 8, Cardinal 4-8 0-0 12. Totals 38-84 20-22 108. MINNESOTA (105) Beasley 8-22 4-9 20, Love 7-14 5-6 23, Milicic 3-5 0-0 6, Ridnour 3-10 1-1 9, Johnson 2-5 0-0 5, Pekovic 2-4 2-4 6, Flynn 5-8 0-0 11, Webster 1-5 1-1 3, Tolliver 2-5 3-3 8, Ellington

UTAH (109) Kirilenko 2-2 0-0 4, Millsap 2-6 0-0 4, Jefferson 17-26 2-3 36, Harris 0-7 4-4 4, Bell 2-7 4-4 9, Favors 6-11 4-4 16, Miles 3-14 4-4 12, Watson 3-9 3-6 9, Hayward 4-5 1-1 11, Evans 2-4 0-0 4. Totals 41-91 22-26 109. NEW YORK (131) Anthony 12-16 6-6 34, Jeffries 0-2 0-0 0, Stoudemire 12-15 7-7 31, Douglas 6-9 3-4 20, Fields 2-6 2-2 6, Mason 3-6 1-2 9, Sha.Williams 2-5 0-0 5, She.Williams 3-8 7-8 13, Carter 1-7 00 2, Brown 3-3 0-0 6, Balkman 1-3 0-0 3, Rautins 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 46-82 26-29 131. Utah 24 24 26 35 — 109 New York 40 26 36 29 — 131 3-Point Goals—Utah 5-19 (Hayward 2-3, Miles 2-8, Bell 1-4, Watson 0-1, Harris 0-3), New York 13-26 (Douglas 5-7, Anthony 4-5, Mason 2-4, Balkman 1-2, Sha.Williams 1-3, Rautins 0-1, Fields 0-1, Carter 0-3). Fouled Out—Favors. Rebounds—Utah 52 (Jefferson 12), New York 41 (Jeffries 6). Assists—Utah 27 (Watson 8), New York 32 (She.Williams, Douglas 6). Total Fouls—Utah 22, New York 23. A—19,763 (19,763).

Clippers 92, Bobcats 87 L.A. CLIPPERS (92) Gomes 3-7 0-0 8, Griffin 5-11 7-8 17, Jordan 0-0 0-2 0, Williams 5-15 6-8 17, Foye 3-11 2-2 10, Kaman 6-13 4-4 16, Aminu 1-4 0-0 2, Bledsoe 5-8 1-2 13, Moon 1-1 0-0 2, Smith 2-4 3-3 7. Totals 31-74 23-29 92. CHARLOTTE (87) McGuire 1-4 0-2 2, Diaw 8-13 1-2 19, Brown 3-6 1-4 7, Augustin 4-16 3-4 13, Henderson 1018 0-0 20, White 3-9 3-4 9, Przybilla 0-1 0-0 0, Livingston 6-11 5-6 17, Carroll 0-0 0-0 0, Najera 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 35-78 13-22 87. L.A. Clippers 27 22 22 21 — 92 Charlotte 26 21 20 20 — 87 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 7-18 (Bledsoe 2-2, Gomes 2-5, Foye 2-5, Williams 1-3, Aminu 0-3), Charlotte 4-9 (Diaw 2-2, Augustin 2-7). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 54 (Griffin 15), Charlotte 47 (Diaw 8). Assists—L.A. Clippers 18 (Williams 7), Charlotte 22 (Diaw 8). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 19, Charlotte 18. Technicals—Gomes, Jordan. A—16,438 (19,077).

Rockets 123, Kings 101

Today’s Games L.A. Lakers at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Philadelphia at Indiana, 4 p.m. Portland at Miami, 4:30 p.m.

Knicks 131, Jazz 109

5-7 0-0 12, Randolph 1-3 0-2 2. Totals 39-88 16-26 105. Dallas 22 26 25 35 — 108 Minnesota 30 20 30 25 — 105 3-Point Goals—Dallas 12-35 (Cardinal 4-8, Barea 2-5, Kidd 2-6, Nowitzki 1-2, Stojakovic 1-4, Beaubois 1-4, Terry 1-6), Minnesota 11-23 (Love 4-6, Ridnour 2-3, Ellington 2-3, Tolliver 11, Johnson 1-3, Flynn 1-4, Beasley 0-1, Webster 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Dallas 52 (Marion, Haywood 10), Minnesota 55 (Love 17).

HOUSTON (123) Budinger 6-10 4-4 20, Scola 5-7 0-0 10, Hayes 4-5 0-0 8, Lowry 7-12 1-1 19, Martin 3-12 8-8 15, Lee 7-13 5-5 19, Miller 2-4 3-3 7, Dragic 3-6 4-4 10, Patterson 4-8 0-0 8, Hill 1-4 0-1 2, Williams 2-2 1-1 5. Totals 44-83 26-27 123. SACRAMENTO (101) Garcia 5-9 1-2 11, Cousins 10-20 0-0 20, Dalembert 4-12 0-0 8, Udrih 6-8 3-3 15, Thornton 6-17 2-2 16, Casspi 5-11 0-0 10, Thompson 3-5 1-2 7, Taylor 5-8 0-0 10, Jackson 0-1 2-2 2, Jeter 1-4 0-0 2. Totals 45-95 9-11 101. Houston 29 36 30 28 — 123 Sacramento 30 28 16 27 — 101 3-Point Goals—Houston 9-23 (Budinger 4-6, Lowry 4-8, Martin 1-5, Lee 0-1, Miller 01, Dragic 0-2), Sacramento 2-6 (Thornton 2-3, Garcia 0-1, Taylor 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 45 (Lowry 7), Sacramento 47 (Dalembert 12). Assists—Houston 23 (Lowry 8), Sacramento 21 (Udrih, Thornton 4). Total Fouls—Houston 17, Sacramento 16. Technicals—Sacramento defensive three second. A—12,561 (17,317).

LAS VEGAS — Robert Sacre scored 12 points, including a dunk and six late free throws and Gonzaga beat Saint Mary’s 75-63 Monday night to win the West Coast Conference tournament for the second time in three years. Gonzaga (24-9) received an automatic bid into the NCAA tournament for its 13th straight appearance. Saint Mary’s (24-8) will have to hope for an at-large berth. Steven Gray led Gonzaga with 15 points and Dower had 10. Sacre had four blocks and eight rebounds. Mickey McConnell led Saint Mary’s with 24 points and Matthew Dellavedova added 21. The game was tied at 53 when Gonzaga reserve Sam Dower started an 8-0 run with a pick-and-roll layup. Freshman guard David Stockton, with Hall of Fame father John Stockton in the stands, hit a three-pointer to put Gonzaga ahead 58-53. Saint Mary’s made it 61-58 on a 3-pointer by Clint Steindl, but Elias Harris countered with a tip-in, and Sacre made two more free throws and a powerful dunk off a pass from Stockton to put it out of reach. Rob Jones and Mitchell Young

both fouled out with more than five minutes remaining. The teams split the regularseason series. Saint Mary’s won 73-71 on Jan. 27 and Gonzaga took the rematch 89-85 in overtime on Feb. 24. This one was just as close despite the final margin. The teams met in the WCC title game four times previously. Gonzaga won in 2004, 2005 and 2009, and the Gaels took last year’s title. Gonzaga won the women’s title earlier Monday with a 72-46 victory over Saint Mary’s. Also on Monday: Oakland, Michigan . . . . . . . . .110 S. Dakota State . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Drew Valentine recorded a doubledouble and Oakland, Mich., scored a season high in a victory over South Dakota State in the Summit League tournament semifinals. North Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81 W. Kentucky. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 HOT SPRINGS, Ark. — Tristan Thompson scored 28 points to lead North Texas to a win over Western Kentucky in the Sun Belt tournament semifinals. St. Peter’s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Iona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 BRIDGEPORT, Conn. — Jeron Belin scored 17 points and

Selection Continued from D1 “That’s when you hope you don’t gain 10 pounds,” Smith said. So big has become the NCAA’s Selection Sunday that it’s the modern-day equivalent of electing a pope — the only thing lacking is a puff of smoke from the chimney atop the downtown hotel — when the brackets are finally announced on national television. By then, Smith, Bobinski and the other members of the committee — the ADs at Utah State, Connecticut, Texas-San Antonio, Cal-Riverside, Southern Methodist and Wake Forest and the commissioners of the Big 12 and Big Sky conferences — have parsed the teams, their schedules and a season of some 5,000 games. A common misconception is that favoritism is shown to the schools who have representatives on the committee. That is hotly denied by every member. “If somebody gets ready to say something about Ohio State, I’m kicked out,” Smith joked. “I’m kicked out to another room and I just pray they come and get me when it’s all said and done.” The Buckeyes are currently ranked No. 1 in the nation, so getting into the field isn’t a question. Neither is a No. 1 seed. Like the ADs at the other schools, Smith must rescue himself from any deliberation about his team. Xavier just won the regular-season title in the Atlantic 10 and is a lock to make the tournament. But Bobinski won’t be around for any of the talk about the Musketeers. “We all understand the way the process works. So when someone says, ‘Hey, let’s put Xavier up on the board, I want to talk about them’ — from either a selection or seeding standpoint — I get up and go,” Bobinski said. “And they don’t speak

Concussions Continued from D1 “We’re not going to rush him out there,” Smith said. Across town, at City of Palms Park, Beckett appears good to go eight days after Ino Guerrero, Boston’s batting practice pitcher, accidentally struck Beckett with a ball after hitting it with a fungo bat. Unlike Morneau, who discussed his recovery reluctantly and grimly, Beckett spent most of a seven-minute interview last week making jokes and giving Guerrero a hard time. “I don’t know if I feel lucky, but I’m glad it wasn’t worse than it was,” Beckett said. “But it was just Ino hitting. I mean, if it was Ortiz or Youkilis or a real athlete hitting, I would have been hurt a lot more.” He was referring to power-hitting teammates David Ortiz and Kevin Youkilis. Why Beckett was able to return so quickly, while Morneau’s absence continues, illustrates the difficulty of treating concussions and postconcussion syndrome. Even the Mets’ Jason Bay, who suffered a concussion about two weeks after Morneau did last season and did not play after July 25, is playing again in exhibition games. Morneau had one other documented concussion, in April 2005, when he missed 10 days after a beaning by Seattle’s Ron Villone. Morneau has told the Twins he also had several head injuries in youth hockey and basketball before signing with Minnesota as a third-round pick in 1999.

St. Peter’s beat Iona to secure the school’s first NCAA tournament berth in 16 years and win the MAAC championship. Old Dominion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Virginia Commonwealth . . . . 65 RICHMOND, Va. — Frank Hassell scored 22 points and grabbed nine rebounds and Old Dominion withstood a furious second-half rally by Virginia Commonwealth and defended its Colonial Athletic Association tournament title. Wofford. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 College of Charleston . . . . . . 67 CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. — Cameron Rundles scored 21 points, sending Wofford to a second straight NCAA tournament berth with a victory over College of Charleston in the Southern Conference tournament championship. Ark.-Little Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Middle Tennessee. . . . . . . . . . 56 HOT SPRINGS, Ark. — Solomon Bozeman scored 23 points and Arkansas-Little Rock advanced to the Sun Belt tournament championship game with a win over Middle Tennessee. Oral Roberts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 IUPUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 SIOUX FALLS, S.D. — Dominique Morrison scored 26 points to lead Oral Roberts past IUPUI in the Summit League tournament semifinals.

about it until I’m gone.” There are discussions about teams, games, travel, injuries — almost everything is put on the conference-room table. The group votes, re-votes, then votes several more times. Every fine point is analyzed. “We don’t just sit there and look at a bunch of numbers and then say, ‘OK, by the numbers, this is the best team in America,’ ” Bobinski said. “There is obviously more to it than that. We all watch a lot of games, we all have our own way of analyzing teams, looking at teams and bringing some qualitative steps to the conversation. If it was just a numbers exercise, they wouldn’t need a committee. You’d just spit it out with a computer.” Of course, there are always surprises. Three years ago, a horrific tornado ripped through Atlanta, slamming into the Georgia Dome during the Southeastern Conference tournament. Overlooked Georgia, just 13-16 coming in, reeled off four wins in three days to win the title and the automatic NCAA berth that comes with most conference tournament titles. The committee has contingency plans to cover almost any occurrence, including teams grabbing an automatic spot on the bracket with a losing record. By late Sunday, all the conference tournaments will be over. All that remains is the much anticipated announcement of the brackets. Then the second-guessing begins. For the 10 people who cast the deciding votes on the teams, a weight has been lifted. “We understand when we get (to the hotel) that millions of eyeballs and opinions will be offered up about what we’re ultimately going to produce here on Sunday,” Bobinski said. “There’s no question that we get that and it kind of hangs over the room all week long.” He added, “I would have to tell you when we’re done, it’s good to be done.”

As for Beckett, this is believed to be his second concussion. The first happened in high school, he said, a result of a fistfight. This time, Beckett said he felt fine until going out to lunch the next day, when he said he began shaking and felt sleepy. Beckett’s symptoms subsided after a good night’s sleep. “I’ve been fine since that lunch deal,” he said. Beckett passed balance and cognitive assessment tests administered by the club’s medical staff before manager Terry Francona allowed him to throw a simulated game Friday, four days after the beaning. “We wanted to make sure he passed every test before we let him do anything,” Francona said. “They’ve made so many advances medically that they didn’t have 20 years ago, we’d be kind of crazy not to.” Someone who incurs another brain injury while experiencing symptoms of an initial one is at higher risk of a protracted recovery, said Dr. Robert Cantu, co-director of Boston University’s Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy and a leading specialist in the area of sports-related concussions. That is why athletes must be symptom free before returning to play. Morneau tried taking batting practice in August and again in October before backing off. “If there wasn’t anything, I’d be playing already,” Morneau said. “There is still some stuff that pops up every once in a while, but it’s not as often now. I take a nap, and usually when I wake up, everything’s good. I’ve had more good days than bad

days. It’s really encouraging.” Last week, Morneau left camp for what he termed a routine checkup with a specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s sports concussion program. Smith said Morneau had done nothing to worsen his symptoms or set back his recovery. “We followed the protocol established by the doctors to the letter,” Smith said. Though Smith remains hopeful that Morneau will be ready by opening day, Morneau said the club never pressured him to return. “They’ve said all the right things and done all the right things: ‘We want him back as a human being first of all, and leading a normal life, and baseball is secondary,’ ” Morneau said. “That’s helped an awful lot. They haven’t said, he’s got to be ready by opening day, or anything like that. Whenever it’s ready, it’s ready. That’s helped a lot. “One of the biggest things that can hinder getting over a concussion is stress and pressure and all that type stuff. They’ve been great with that, and that’s helped me recover.” For now, Morneau pushes himself. He arrives at the Twins’ complex at 6:30 a.m., earlier than almost everyone except catcher Joe Mauer, who pulls in at 6. Morneau works out in the weight room before hitting in the indoor batting cage. Then it is on to the field for stretching, batting practice and fielding ground balls. And Morneau is easy to spot; he is the only Twin wearing a batting helmet in the cage.


C OM M U N I T Y S P ORT S

D4 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Together

C  S  C

Continued from D1 At that recent Tuesday practice, held at Highland Baptist Church in west Redmond, about 20 team members turned out in preparation for the Mountain Lions’ upcoming Winter Regional Indoor Games basketball tournament, which will be held this Saturday in Turner, just south of Salem. A second basketball team from Central Oregon, one based in Bend, is also scheduled to participate. During practice, the Redmond Special Olympians worked on their skills just as any other players would, dribbling basketballs off the church gym’s carpeted floor, performing drills and scrimmaging against one another — and against the coaches on hand, who also included the father and sister of one of the Mountain Lion players. (Being a smokejumper is not a requirement to coach.) At Saturday’s tournament, players will be divided into smaller teams based on ability level and understanding of the game. They will take part in fullcourt five-on-five games, halfcourt three-on-three games or individual skills competitions. Mason began working with disabled populations while attending Oregon State University. When he started coaching in the Redmond program the team had dwindled to just five players. But now, about 30 Special Olympians from Redmond, Prineville and Powell Butte fill out the Mountain Lions’ roster. Becoming involved created an immediate impression. One of Mason’s favorite memories took place at a tournament during his first year of coaching in Redmond, with an athlete who no longer plays for the Mountain Lions. “This guy loved basketball so much that he once showed up with his shoes on the wrong feet, and he didn’t even slow down to take them off,� Mason recalled. “He loved basketball.� That Special Olympian also tended to be a bit of a ball hog, as Mason put it. In one game at the tournament, at both the end of regulation play and the end of the first overtime, the player would not give up the ball and took two ill-regarded shots that missed. During a timeout at the end

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BASEBALL

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Coach Gabe Mason, a smokejumper by profession, gets the team lined up for a drill during practice for the Special Olympics Redmond basketball team at Highland Baptist Church last week. of the second overtime, Mason looked directly at the player and instructed him to pass the ball. So, the player proceeded to hoist another shot. “It was so beautiful,� Mason said. “It went around the rim several times and went in. And the crowd was — it was like the Celtics won. It was so electric, and I remember it so clearly. We talked about it for years. But that’s what sold me on basketball.� Mason believes the team’s numbers have continued to increase since that year thanks to consistency in the coaching staff and a group of guardians who network well and agree with the coaches’ philosophy. “If we can have fun and if we’re burning calories — that’s the two things that we shoot for,� Mason explained. A few seasons ago, as the team grew in size, Mason looked for additional coaches to keep pace. He recruited a neighbor, Marcel Potvin, whom he knew from working together at one point on a local “Hotshots� crew — a team of firefighters that attacks wildland fires from the ground level. Mason said Potvin was instrumental in persuading some of his smokejumper co-workers at the Redmond base to volunteer, which they are still doing today. One of the smokejumpers Potvin recruited, Geoff Schultz, 33, is in his first season coaching with the Mountain Lions. He said he plans to travel with the team to Saturday’s tournament. “It sounded like they were needing some coaches, and I was around for the winter,� Schultz

explained of his reasoning to start coaching. “Why not?� The experience has proved to be an enjoyable one. “It’s been good,� Schultz said. “It’s really rewarding. All the athletes are great people to be around. I really enjoy participating.� Cruz Brigham, 18, is one of the players who has benefited from the coaches’ influence. The Redmond resident is in his second year with the Mountain Lions. Brigham, who went to Redmond High School and now attends Central Oregon Community College, had prior basketball experience but, he said, he did not shoot the ball well when he joined the team. The coaches worked with him individually to improve his shooting, and also instructed him in ballhandling and defense. “Those guys really showed me how to play, and play like a team,� Brigham said. And on Saturday, Brigham and his Mountain Lion teammates will get the chance to implement in competition what they have learned from those coaches. “We all want to play hard and just have fun,� Brigham explained. “That’s what basketball is all about. It’s not about winning — well, it kind of is — it’s not really about winning. It’s about, win or lose, just go out there, have fun, work as a team, meet new people. “That’s what basketball’s all about.� Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

I B Baseball

Martial Arts

• Youth camp scheduled in Bend: The Bend Fieldhouse is set to play host to a youth baseball camp this week. The camp, for players ages 8 to 14, will take place from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday at the Fieldhouse, located on Southeast Roosevelt Avenue. Campers will receive coaching on baseball fundamentals such as hitting, fielding and catching by instructors from NW Diamond Sports, a baseball academy based in Wilsonville. Cost is $50. For more information or to register, contact Denny Carter at 541-420-4868.

• Central Oregon martial artists perform well at competition: Three tae kwon do students from the High Desert Martial Arts studio in Bend recorded top finishes Saturday at the U.S. National Open Taekwondo Championships. The event was held at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland. Joni Ransom, 10 years old and a black belt, took first place in forms and finished second in sparring. Reece King, 8 and a brown belt, also took first in forms and second in sparring. Anela Lucas, 9 and a blue belt, finished second in forms and third in sparring.

Hockey

Softball

• Adult tournament slated for this weekend in Sunriver: A three-on-three ice hockey tournament for adults is scheduled to take place Saturday on the ice rink at the Village at Sunriver. Four local teams will square off in a round-robin tournament format for the inaugural Wally Wallace Cup. Games are to start at 8:30 a.m. The championship game is set to begin at 12:15 p.m. Admission is free for spectators.

• Meetings for Bend adult leagues on tap: The Bend Park & Recreation District will be conducting a series of meetings next week for its 2011 adult softball leagues. All meetings will be held Thursday evening, March 17, at the park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St. Teams interested in joining the leagues — which are open to adults age 18 and older, as well as to high school graduates — must send a representative to the appropriate time slot. Squads

that do not send a representative to the meetings might not be allowed to participate, as space in the leagues is limited. The meeting for Senior Metro will take place at 5:45, followed by Women’s Metro at 6:30, Coed Metro at 7:15, and Men’s Metro at 8 p.m. Team fees of $730 and rosters are due by Friday, April 1. For more information, contact the park district office at 541389-7275. • Park district in need of coach: The Bend Park & Recreation District is seeking a volunteer coach for one of its girls fast-pitch softball teams in the 12-14 age group. The coach can expect to volunteer for four to five hours per week during the 10-week season, which starts March 28 and ends June 3. Most games and practices will take place on weekdays. Orientation meetings and clinics will be held prior to the start of the season. Coaching experience is preferred. Applications are available at the park district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St., and online at www.bendparksandrec.org. A criminal background check will be performed. For more information, contact the park district office at 541389-7275. — Bulletin staff reports

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT Adult Basketball League Playoff Scores Men’s A Division Furnish 90, Country Catering 69; Riverside Market 93, Olson Heating 92 (OT). Men’s B Division Antioch 72, Court Vision 45; Cojs Knightryderz 81, Uniballers 59. Men’s Over 35 Division Southwest Hoodies 82, Widgi Creek 75.

BOWLING LEAGUE STANDINGS AND HIGH SCORES Lava Lanes, Bend Feb. 20-25 Casino Fun — Craftsman Carpet; Mikey Moldenhauer, 241/594; Teresa McDonald, 198/482. Win, Lose, or Draw — The Mispins; Jerry Jakeway, 199/516; JoAnne Merris, 182/480. Sundae Jubilee — Did not bowl. His and Hers — Square Pegs; Terry Lussier, 268/716; Patti Sundita, 214/584. Jack and Jill — Shari’s Team; Tim Moyer, 189/541; Pennie Olson, 214/577. Guys and Gals — More Wine Please; Josiah Ohlde, 227/630; Michelle Smith, 232/581.

Early Risers — Bowlie Rollers; Edie Roebuck, 182/505. Rejects — The Wild Bunch; Kenneth Fleming, 214/608; Sue Snedden, 207/539. Lava Lanes Classic — Leprechans; Geoff Higlin, 247/658; Bev Sunderlin, 180/505. Wednesday Inc. — Eye of The Needle; Al Darcy Jr., 300/786; Jason Gregory, 250/698. Tea Timers — Pick-Up-Gals; Chris Gray, 226/609. Afternoon Delight — The Whatevers; Gary DeBernardi, 234/591; Amanda Baessler, 256/563. Latecomers — CO Trophies; Tami Smith, 204/561. Progressive — Helen’s Ho’s; Matt Ayres, 249/708. Free Breathers — He’s and She; John Scott, 248/668; Sue Snedden, 190/523. T.G.I.F. — The Incredibowls; Derek Kelley, 265/732; Monique McCleary, 235/607.

SWIMMING BEND SWIM CLUB Oregon Senior Championships Friday through Sunday At Gresham BSC results Women Brooke Miller: 100 fly, 1:02.65 (15th); 400 IM, 4:54.20 (10th); 200 fly, 2:21.62 (7th). Madi Brewer: 500 free, 5:05.22 (1st); 200 IM, 2:10.63 (1st); 100 back, 58.15 (3rd); 200 free, 1:53.50 (1st); 200 back, 2:03.73

(1st); 100 free, 53.94 (3rd). Brooke Collins: 500 free, 5:15.45 (3rd); 200 IM, 2:12.84 (2nd); 50 free, 25.50 (10th); 200 free, 1:58.76 (5th); 100 free, 54.36 (4th). Team: Fourth place. Men John Murphy: 100 fly, 55.73 (12th); 200 IM, 2:04.55 (11th); 100 breast, 1:05.59 (15th); 100 free, 50.91 (11th); 200 fly, 2:05.65 (6th). Combined team: Seventh place.

VOLLEYBALL REDMOND VOLLEYBALL ASSOCIATION Standings as of Friday (Wins-Losses-Ties) Women’s 1, Hit List, 20-4-0. 2, Lady Slammers, 20-4-2. 3, Just Lucky, 19-4-1. 3, S.W.A.T., 19-4-1. 5, Pink Panthers, 9-12-3. 6, Dinkin & Divin, 9-13-2. 7, G.N.O., 9-17-0. 8, Volley Girls, 8-15-1. 9, Orphans, 3-21-0. 10, Victorious Secret, 1-23-0. Tuesday Coed 1, Benz Electric, 53-10-1. 2, Penguins, 49-13-2. 3, Marks Auto Body, 47-17-0. 4, Trybz, 45-18-1. 5, Super Awesomes, 28-35-1. 6, Storm Water Services, 19-44-1. 7, All Stars, 15-48-1. 8, Go Easy, 15-49-0. 9, Dysfunctionals, 13-50-1. Thursday Coed 1, @1st We Tried, 48-8-0. 2, Net Results, 47-9-0. 3, Peak Performance, 45-10-1. 4, Number One, 30-25-1. 5, LMFAO, 2630-0. 6, C O Sound & Security, 10-45-1. 7, Ducks, 9-47-0. 8, All Stars, 7-48-1.

YOUTH CAMP: Saturday, 9 a.m.-noon; for players ages 8-14; skill work in hitting, catching and fielding; with NW Diamond Sports, a Wilsonville-based baseball academy; Bend Fieldhouse, 401 S.E. Roosevelt; $50; 541-420-4686. TINY TOTS BASEBALL: Through the Bend Park & Recreation District; for boys and girls ages 4-6; noncompetitive program, and focus is on motor skill development and skills such as listening and following directions; April 6-27 on Wednesday afternoons: $36 for district residents, $49 otherwise; Greg Brady, 541-7066124; Greg@bendparksandrec.org.

BASKETBALL PEE WEE HOOPS: For children 3-5; learn to catch, pass, dribble and shoot a basketball; Mondays, March 14 and 28: 11-11:30 a.m.; $15; at the RAPRD Activity Center; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. HIGH MOUNTAIN HOOPS TRYOUTS: Sunday, at Summit High School, Bend: for boys and girls travel teams in grades five through eight; boys 2-3:30 p.m.; girls 4-5:30 p.m.; $325 for season; www.highmountainhoops.com.

BIKING MOUNTAIN AND ROAD BIKE RIDES: Join Trinity Bikes in Redmond Mondays or Wednesdays for evening rides; road bike ride from shop on Mondays and mountain bike ride at Peterson Ridge in Sisters or Phil’s Trail complex in Bend on Wednesdays; all riding levels welcome; bring own bike or rent from the shop; Trinity Bikes; 541-923-5650; www.trinitybikes.com.

MISCELLANEOUS LULUMON BOOT CAMP: Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m.; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; focuses on sport-specific drills, cardiovascular training and core strength exercises; for all ability levels; free; bring water bottle and sweat towel; Megan Hill; 541-480-5039 or Salt Fit on Facebook. SPRING FENCING: For fitness and competition; for youths 10 and older, and adults; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 5:30-7 p.m.; at High Desert Fencing in Bend; Randall, 541-389-4547; Jeff, 541-419-7087. TUMBLING/BEGINNING GYMNASTICS: Ages 5-11; Mondays and Wednesdays through March 31; 6:45-7:30 p.m.; basic exercises such as rolls, cartwheels, handstands, and low balance beam; wear comfortable clothes and hair pulled back; RAPRD Activity Center; $35; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. PARENT AND ME TUMBLING: Ages 2-4; Thursdays through March 31 (no class March 24); introduction to fundamental tumbling skills with parental assistance; 11-11:30 a.m.; $22; at the RAPRD Activity Center in Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ARCHERY FOR YOUTH: Ages 8-13; includes proper safety, bow handling, archery etiquette; Thursdays through March 31 (no class March 24); 5:30-7 p.m.; equipment provided; at CentWise, 533 S.W. Fifth St., Redmond; $25; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ACROVISION TAE KWON DO: For ages 6 and up; Tuesdays and Thursdays through March 31 (no class during spring break); 7-8 p.m. at the RARD Activity Center in Redmond; students will train in a complete martial arts system; uniforms are required and will be available for purchase; $69; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. DIANE’S RIDING CENTER: For ages 7-14; learn proper skills and care for horse, and how to ride; Saturdays, April 2-23, 1-2 p.m. at Diane’s Riding Center in Tumalo; $100; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes newcomers and former fencers; Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m.; free first session; Randall at 541-3894547 or Jeff at 541-419-7087. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play every Monday; 6-9 p.m. (set-up half an hour before); Giant Round Robin Tournament on Saturday, March 19; beginner classes available; cost for beginner classes $96; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; drop-in fee, $5; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267614-6477; bendtabletennis@yahoo. com; www.bendtabletennis.com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nine-ball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eightball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@comcast. net or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541647-1363; www.foxsbilliards.com. YOGA FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 7-8 p.m.; Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; vinyasa yoga tailored for athletes to enhance their performance; $5; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com. KAYAKING: For all ages; weekly classes and open pool; equipment provided to those who preregister, first come, first served otherwise; Sundays, 4-6 p.m., Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $3; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: At Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; Sundays through the end of May; indoor pool available Sundays, 4:15–6 p.m.; space is limited to 12 boats; registration is available beginning the Monday before each roll session at https://register.bendparksandrec. org; boats must be clean and

paddles padded and taped to prevent damage to the pool; no instruction is provided; $8-$10 per boat.

RUNNING GRIN & BEAR IT RUN: Saturday at 10 a.m.; 5K, 10K and mile family fun run; Old Mill District, Bend; $10-$30 (add $10 after Saturday); register at www.time2race.com. ST. PATRICK’S DAY DASH: Sunday at 10:05 a.m.; 5K run; starts at Deschutes Brewery & Public House in downtown Bend; $15-$35; www.bendstpatsdash.com. ST. PATTY’S DAY HASH RUN: Thursday, March 17; 5:30 p.m.; starts at Troy Field in downtown Bend; put on by Bend Hash House Harriers; $7; wear green; participants must be at least 21; www.bendhash.com. ST. PATTIE’S SHAMROCK RUN: Friday, March 18; 6 p.m.; Sisters; 10K and 5K trail runs; $23-$28; www.sistersmultisport.com. HORSE BUTTE 10 MILE TRAIL RUN: Sunday, April 3; 9 a.m.; Bend; $25$30; long-sleeved technical T-shirt, $15; 541-314-3568; superdave@ superfitproductions.com; http://www. superfitproductions.com/?page_id=60. LIFE SKILLS SCURRY: Sunday, April 10; 10 a.m.; 5K and mile races; at High Desert Middle School, Bend; $10; benefit for Bend High’s life skills department; day-of-race registration begins at 8:45 a.m., forms available at FootZone and Fleet Feet Bend; jmail@ bendbroadband.com; 541-678-3405. PETERSON RIDGE RUMBLE: Sunday, April 10; 20-mile and 40-mile trail runs; Sisters; fundraiser for the Sisters High cross-country team: $35-$55; www.gobroncobilly.com/rumble. LIGHT OF HOPE: Sunday, April 17; at Riverbend Park, Bend; 10K, 5K and 1K runs/walks; $10-$35; proceeds benefit CASA of Central Oregon; 541-389-1618; http://www. casaofcentraloregon.org. FOOTZONE HALF-MARATHON TRAINING GROUP: Saturdays through May 28; 9 a.m.; 12-week program; train for the Dirty Half or Happy Girls Half; $90; Johanna Olson; 208-450-9074; sign up online at www.footzonebend. com or in person at FootZone. LEARN TO RUN 5K PROGRAM: Starts Saturday, March 26; six-week program held on Saturdays and geared toward the Solaire Salmon Run 5K on May 7; class provides a nurturing, noncompetitive environment for those wanting to begin a fitness program; sign up at FootZone, 845 N.W. Wall St., Bend; $55 ($5 discount if registered before March 18; 541-317-3568; www.footzonebend.com; Connie Austin; conzaustin@gmail.com. REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB: Four-to-eight-mile weekly run starting at 8 a.m.; runners of all ages and abilities welcome; follow “Redmond Oregon Running Klub� on Facebook for weekly meeting place or e-mail Dan Edwards; dedwards@bendbroadband.com.

FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Sundays at 9 a.m.; distances and locations vary; paces between seven and 11 minutes per mile; free; no registration necessary; Jenny; 541314-3568; jenny@footzonebend.com. GOOD FORM CLINIC: Tuesdays at 7 p.m., and Saturdays at 8:30 a.m.; learn the basics of good running form and what it can do to improve efficiency, reduce injury and make you faster; at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; limited to 12 spots, sign up at FootZone; free; 541317-3568; Teague@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com. LEARN TO RUN WORKSHOP: First Monday of each month, 6 p.m.; instruction on how to choose the correct running gear, proper running/walking form, goal setting and creating your own training plan; $45; FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; 541-317-3568; conzaustin@ gmail.com; www.footzonebend.com. STRENGTH TRAINING FOR ATHLETES: 6:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 Galveston Ave.; Cynthia Ratzman from Accelerated Fitness leads workout; $5; 541-389-1601.

SNOW SPORTS BEND SKI CLUB MONTHLY MEETING: Wednesday at 7 p.m.; doors open at 6:30; at the Phoenix Inn Suites in downtown Bend; final meeting of the season; introduction of next season’s officers, raffle, pizza and cookies; free. CASCADE CREST NORDIC SKI RACE: Saturday, March 19; at Mt. Bachelor; 10 a.m.; 15K and 25K freestyle distances; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. GREAT NORDEEN NORDIC SKI RACE: Saturday, April 2; at Mt. Bachelor; 9:30 a.m.; 15K and 30K freestyle distances; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

OVERNIGHT SNOWSHOE TRIPS: March 16-17 and March 23-24; overnight stay in yurts near Sisters in the Deschutes National Forest; $234 per person, cost includes snowmobile transportation, yurt rental, all food except two lunches and guide fee; trips geared toward those 55 and older; registration required by Sunday for first trip and by March 21 for second trip; 541383-8077; strideon@silverstriders. com; www.silverstriders.com. YOUTH ICE HOCKEY: Sundays through April; 5:30-7 p.m.; Sunriver Village Ice Rink; all youth players ages 6-14 are welcome for skating, drills, and scrimmaging; bring own equipment; Scott Wallace; 541-480-6721. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SPRING BREAK CAMP: March 19-22; 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE SPRING BREAK CAMP: March 22-25; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

SOCCER MEN’S SOCCER LEAGUE: Registration now available for Cascade Area Soccer Association men’s competitive outdoor league; season lasts from mid-April until early October; Joe Oberto; 541322-9686; joberto@bendcable.com. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Ages 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $5; Friday nights; coed 7-9 p.m., men 9-11 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com.

SOFTBALL BEND SENIOR SOFTBALL REGISTRATION: ; Season runs April 18-July 21; games played weekday evenings at Skyline Sports Complex; open practices from noon-2 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at Hal Puddy Field, beginning on March 2; $60 or free for players 75 and older; registration due by Friday; contact Brian Crosby; 541-318-0426; briancrosby@bendcable.com. CASCADE ALLIANCE SOFTBALL: Forming teams at the 12 and under, 14 and under, and 16 and under levels for tournaments in the spring and summer of 2011; skills clinic Friday at Bend High, 2-6 p.m.; tryouts will be held Sunday, time and location to be determined; all girls living in the Bend-La Pine Schools boundaries are eligible; visit website for information on open gyms and clinics; www.cascadealliance.org.

SWIMMING WATERBABIES: Basic water skills for infants and toddlers; ages 6 months through 3 years; games and challenges; through March 31 (no class during spring break); Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6-6:30 p.m.; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541548-7275; www.raprd.org. AQUA KIDS SWIM LESSONS: Ages 3-11; variety of days and times; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. ADULT SWIM LESSONS: For ages 18 and older; Mondays and Wednesdays, through April 6 (no class during spring break); 6-6:30 p.m.; at Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $28.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. COSMIC SWIM: For middle school students only (student ID required); March 19 and April 2, 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; $2.50; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:25 to 8:25 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone under age 18; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; RAPRD, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

WALKING WALK MS CENTRAL OREGON WALK 2011: Saturday, April 16; 10 a.m.; Riverbend Park, Bend; 5K; no entry fee, but minimum of $100 in fundraising suggested; http:// walkorc.nationalmssociety.org/ site/TR/Walk/ORCWalkEvents?fr_ id=16551&pg=entry. GET IN MOTION: Walking program for beginners; Tuesdays, today-April 5; 5:30 p.m.; emphasis on lifestyle change in terms of fitness and nutrition; will include weekly group walks, discussions about nutrition and strength training; $50; 541-3891601; training@fleetfeetbend.com; www.fleetfeetbend.com/getinmotion.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS

SPOTLIGHT Amnesty, peace groups will hold fundraiser

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Aspen Hadley, 10, and her Big Sister, Christine Brousseau, 36, share a laugh while enjoying milkshakes at Pilot Butte Drive-In in Bend. Brousseau is the state’s 2011 nominee for the annual Big Sister of the Year award. The winner will be announced in April.

Big role model Bend woman named Oregon nominee for national Big Sister of the Year award

a

By David Jasper The Bulletin

O Christine Brousseau and Aspen Hadley look over a journal they have periodically filled out since Brousseau became Big Sister to Hadley four years ago.

ver the four years they’ve known each other, Christine Brousseau and Aspen Hadley have forged a tradition. French fries and milkshakes on their birthdays. While the two aren’t biologically related, they consider themselves sisters nonetheless. Brousseau volunteers as a Big Sister with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon; she has been matched with Aspen for four years. On Thursday afternoon, the two shared a booth at Pilot Butte DriveIn in Bend, where they celebrated Brousseau’s 36th birthday. The two may want to save room for another special occasion: Brous-

seau was recently named the state nominee in the national Big Sister of the Year competition. The winner, to be announced in early April, will go to Big Brothers Big Sisters’ national conference June 14-16 in Dallas, says Melanie Price, match support specialist for Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon. There are four Big Brothers Big Sisters agencies in Oregon, including BBBS of Central Oregon, which works with 190 pairs of “Littles” and “Bigs” in Deschutes, Jefferson and Crook counties. From among its 190 Bigs, the agency selected three Big Sisters and three Big Brothers to compete alongside nominees from other state BBBS agencies, and Brousseau’s name came out on top as Oregon’s nominee in the national Big Sister of the Year competition. See Sisters / E6

Amnesty International 610 and Central Oregon Peace Network are hosting a Dine and Sign fundraiser Sunday to provide information about the Amnesty International organization in its 50th anniversary year. Amnesty International “works worldwide to dismantle the systems of injustice, stop violence against women and respond to global human rights emergencies,” according to a press release. Attendees can eat “World Bowls,” which is a bowl of brown rice, black beans and salsa “that represents how most of the world eats,” according to a press release. The bowls are $7.50, plus $2.50 to add chicken or pork. Attendees can also sign correspondence precomposed to the embassy in Washington, D.C., and government officials who handle cases of prisoners of conscience. “We’ve been effective in getting 44,000 prisoners of conscience freed from prison,” said Philip Randall, coordinator of Amnesty International 610 and outreach coordinator for Central Oregon Peace Network, who will also give a talk on the history of the two organizations. The event will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Common Table restaurant, 150 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend. Contact: 541-388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us.

Raffle to benefit nonprofits for families Buy raffle tickets now for a chance to win a trip to Mexico and support several regional nonprofit organizations. Only 500 tickets will be sold for the raffle, which is supporting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon, Saving Grace, the KIDS Center and SMART. Tickets cost $10 each. The trip is a seven-night stay in Cancun at the Royal Mayan Resort from Nov. 26 to Dec. 2. Tickets are on sale through Thursday. The winner will be drawn Friday at the Cowboys 4 Kids fundraiser, which is focused on supporting the charities’ efforts in Crook County. The event, to be held at the Powell Butte Community Center, will include a chili dinner, live music and a silent auction. Tickets to the event are $15. The event will begin at 5:30 p.m. Tickets for both the raffle and fundraiser are for sale at the nonprofits’ Crook County offices as well as Lil’ Buckaroo Schoolhouse, Square Dot Saddlery, the Prineville Chamber of Commerce, the Powell Butte Country Store and the Web address below. Contact: http://Cowboys4Kids .kintera.org/CrookCounty, agow@ bbbsco@org or 541-312-6047.

Growing vegetables in Central Oregon

The challenge of interpreting pop concerts for the deaf By Monica Hesse The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The first question that interpreters get asked is, “But why would a deaf person go to a concert?” They think it’s a silly question, but everyone asks it. Going to a concert is partly about hearing the songs. It is equally about the costumes, the spectacle, the pulsing, the convulsing — the sticky, claustrophobic mass of humanity. When you consider this, it makes perfect sense that deaf people go to concerts. But someone still needs to interpret the words. In the upstairs computer room of her house in Riverdale, Md., Traci Ison ponders the metaphorical question that freaky teens and worried parents have been asking for two years, but this

time in a very literal way. How do you interpret Lady Gaga? Here is the lyric: “Come on now, this beat is sick/ I wanna take a ride on your disco stick.” If the sentence is translated word-for-word from English to its corresponding signs, the resulting phrase could come across as something like, “I want to ride on the twig of John Travolta’s dance moves.” Lady Gaga’s “Love Game” is metaphorical, but exactly how metaphorical is it? Is the tone callous? Flirty? Dirty? There is the added complication that Lady Gaga sometimes makes her own gesture when she performs “Love Game,” and as it happens, that gesture does have a sign language translation. See Signers / E6

Traci Randolph works on interpreting Bon Jovi songs at her home in Germantown, Md. “I’m qualified to interpret Bon Jovi,” said Randolph, who has been a fan of the group for two decades. “I wouldn’t be qualified for Linkin Park.” Marvin Joseph The Washington Post

Oregon State University Extension Service is sponsoring a free vegetable gardening in Central Oregon class that will address plant care and selection, site preparation and tips for extending the season in the High Desert. The class will be held Wednesday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Cascades Hall at Oregon State University-Cascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend. Contact: http://extension .oregonstate.edu/deschutes.

Bend Senior Center to host dinner dance “Way Out West,” a candlelight dinner dance, will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. March 18 at Bend Senior Center. The event will feature a gourmet buffet and dancing to live music by the Old Time Fiddlers. Tickets are $10 per person and are available in advance at the center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road Contact: 541-388-1133. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Rough play causes painful injury to loving family pet Dear Abby: My 9-year-old son’s friend “Isaac” was over for a visit. He was captivated by our Labrador retriever, “Layla,” who is very loving. Isaac doesn’t have a dog, so he wanted to play with Layla. At one point, I overheard him say to my son, “Look, I’m riding your dog!” I immediately intervened, but I was too late. A day or so later, Layla was unable to descend our stairway and was clearly in pain. She has been on pain medication for three weeks and is growing progressively worse. The next step is to get X-rays and/or an MRI to see if she has a spinal injury, and then determine her treatment. It’s possible the damage is irreversible. My wife and I are extremely upset about this, but we’re afraid to tell our son or Isaac and his parents for fear it will place undue guilt on a 9-year-old boy. On the flip side, I wouldn’t want him to do this to anyone else’s beloved pet. How do you recommend we proceed? — Heartbroken in New York Dear Heartbroken: Children are not mind-readers. If you don’t tell them when they make a mistake, they won’t realize they have made one. Contact Isaac’s parents and explain what happened. If your dog needs treatment, they should be responsible for whatever damage their son did. Dear Abby: The other day I was with a friend who is a bit overweight. We were trying on clothes in one of the stores. She grabbed a shirt she was sure she could fit into, but when she tried it on, it ripped. She had to pay for it. On the ride home my friend asked me, “Am I fat?” I was at a loss, so I told her no. What should I have done? I feel horrible for lying, but I didn’t know what else to do. — Lost for Words Dear Lost for Words: You could have replied, “What size was the shirt?” And when she answered, you should have said, “I guess you’re a size or two larger.” It would have been more tactful

DEAR ABBY than saying she was fat, and gotten the point across. Dear Abby: My wife and I recently attended the funeral of a friend’s father. During the sermon I noticed tears in our friend’s eyes and offered her my handkerchief. On the way home, this sparked a conversation about the obligation of a person who receives a handkerchief. Should it be returned after the event, or should it first be laundered? Or is it considered a gift, not to be returned at all? Later that evening at a movie, I noticed a woman hand someone her handkerchief saying, “It’s monogrammed. It was my mother’s.” No mention was made of a request that it be returned. I’m sure most people wouldn’t mind letting go of a standard handkerchief, but one with sentimental value would be different, wouldn’t it? What do you suggest? — Real Men Carry Handkerchiefs Dear Real Man: You were chivalrous to offer your handkerchief to the grieving daughter. Had it merely been used to dab away a tear, it could have been returned to you at the end of the service. If, however, there was makeup on it — or the dab was followed by a swipe of her nose — the woman should have held onto it, laundered it and returned it to you in the presumably pristine condition it was in when you gave it to her. As to the monogrammed (heirloom) hanky you saw lent in the theater, when the woman explained its significance to her friend, that was the tip-off that she expected it to be returned. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Foster shares source of passion

Relive historic Billy Joel concert

By Rick Bentley McClatchy-Tribune News Service

PASADENA, Calif. — David Foster’s returns to public television with a sequel to his popular special “David Foster & Friends.” In “Great Performances: Hitman Returns: David Foster & Friends,” the producer, singer and songwriter was joined by Chaka Khan, All-4One, Michael Bolton, Natalie Cole, Kenny Loggins, Martina McBride, Ne-Yo, Seal, Donna Summer and Earth, Wind and Fire at a concert filmed in Las Vegas. The 15-time Grammy winner talks about his long musical career:

Q:

You’ve been in the music business for 40 years. Do you still have the same passion for writing and performing? Every single day that I wake up, I try to do my very best. I give 100 percent and absolutely 100 percent love what I do every single day. I can’t wait to get into the studio tomorrow. I’m working with that little 10-year-old Jackie Evancho. We’re making a record. I’m obsessed with what I do, and I just love it.

A:

Q: A:

What attracted you to the piano? The great thing about the piano is it’s the whole orchestra at your fingertips. It’s the only instrument that provides the range of the entire orchestra, and maybe that’s what turned me on. My father taught me. He was an amateur piano player, but he was quite good.

Q: A:

What’s your biggest talent as a music producer? I think I can identify great singers. People have said about me that I have a Midas touch, and I think I

By Glenn Gamboa Newsday

Reason to watch: A chance to relive the historic “Last Play at Shea” concerts on July 16 and 18, 2008 — the final concerts at the stadium before it was torn down. What’s in it: These are the performances that also formed the center of the documentary “Last Play at Shea,” only they are shown in their entirety instead of the edited versions that appeared in the film. While the documentary includes the deep tracks that Joel used for his career-spanning set list, the “Great Performances” set is almost all hits and includes special guests: the great Tony Bennett on “New York State of Mind,” Garth Brooks on “Shameless” and, of course, Paul McCartney. Don’t miss: When McCartney sits down at Joel’s piano to sing “Let It Be” as the final song ever at Shea Stadium, it’s a rare moment of closure in music history. McCartney and The Beatles ushered in the era of stadium rock when they played Shea in 1965 and proved to the world that rock ’n’ roll was neither a niche nor a fad. Joel’s decision to let McCartney close Shea Stadium, which, according to the documentary, happened on the fly backstage, will go down as one of rock’s most selfless acts.

The Associated Press ile photo

David Foster performs on “The Hitman Returns: David Foster & Friends” at the Mandalay Bay Events Center in Las Vegas. PBS’ “Great Performances” will feature Foster Wednesday night. do in terms of singers. I honestly believe that I can get a better vocal out of a singer than any other producer on the planet. That’s my mandate when I go in.

‘Great Performances’

Q:

When: 9:30 p.m. Wednesday Where: OPB

A:

‘HARRY CONNICK JR. IN CONCERT ON BROADWAY’

You’ve worked with everyone from Barbra Streisand to Michael Jackson. Anyone still on your musical wish list? Stevie Wonder has always been on my list, and I’ve said it probably in 100 interviews. Strangely enough, on Christmas Day he called me. I pressed him again. I want to get the London Philharmonic Orchestra and I want to take his 12 greatest songs and just do them the way they were intended to be done, just with the London very unplugged. So that might happen.

Q: A:

Does being happy or sad affect how you write love songs? When I sit at the piano, I immerse myself. I’m not feeling any pain in my life right now. I’m very, very happy, but if you describe to me some kind of setting in a movie of some horrible thing that’s just happened with a young child or an older person that just died, I would just sink myself into the piano and I

Self Referrals Welcome

‘DAVID FOSTER & FRIENDS’

When: 10 p.m. Thursday Where: OPB

‘BILLY JOEL LIVE AT SHEA STADIUM’ When: 8 p.m. Saturday Where: OPB

can just get lost without having to be unhappy.

Q: A:

If you could give advice to your younger self, what would it be? I would probably tell him, “Don’t do anything different.” Because every little thing that happens to you, good and bad, becomes a little piece of the puzzle of who you become.

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BD-Bend/Redmond/Sisters/Black Butte (Digital); PM-Prineville/Madras; SR-Sunriver; L-La Pine; * Sports programming may vary

TUESDAY PRIME TIME 3/8/11 BROADCAST/CABLE CHANNELS

BD PM SR L ^ KATU KTVZ % % % % KBNZ & KOHD ) ) ) ) KFXO * ` ` ` , , KPDX KOAB _ # _ # ( KGW # KTVZDT2 , CREATE 3-2 3-2 173 3-2 OPB HD 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1

5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Hidden China Avec Eric ’ ‘G’ Travels-Edge Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ This Old House Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Globe Trekker Mongolia ‘G’ Å This Old House Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Woodwright PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

No Ordinary Family ’ ‘PG’ Å V Devil in a Blue Dress (N) ’ ‘14’ The Biggest Loser Teams compete in a mud-pit challenge. (N) ‘PG’ Å NCIS Enemies Foreign ‘14’ Å NCIS: Los Angeles Black Widow ‘14’ No Ordinary Family ’ ‘PG’ Å V Devil in a Blue Dress (N) ’ ‘14’ Glee Sexy (N) ’ ‘14’ Å Raising Hope ‘14’ Traffic Light ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Are You Smarter? Are You Smarter? Suze Orman’s Money Class ’ ‘G’ Å The Biggest Loser Teams compete in a mud-pit challenge. (N) ‘PG’ Å One Tree Hill ’ ‘PG’ Å Hellcats Papa, Oh Papa ‘PG’ Å Woodsmith Shop The Winemakers Watercolor Quest Joy/Painting Suze Orman’s Money Class ’ ‘G’ Å

10:00

10:30

11:00

(10:01) Detroit 1-8-7 Stone Cold ‘14’ KATU News at 11 Parenthood ’ ‘PG’ Å News The Good Wife Double Jeopardy ‘14’ News (10:01) Detroit 1-8-7 Stone Cold ‘14’ News (N) News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Don’t Forget Don’t Forget King of Queens Cirque du Soleil -- Flowers in the Desert ’ ‘PG’ Å Parenthood ’ ‘PG’ Å News Married... With Married... With King of Queens Food Trip-Todd Julia-Jacques Hidden China Cirque du Soleil -- Flowers in the Desert ’ ‘PG’ Å

11:30 (11:35) Nightline Jay Leno Letterman (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens Jay Leno King of Queens Avec Eric ’ ‘G’

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Bounty Hunter The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Twist of Fate ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 ‘14’ Å Breakout Kings Pilot ‘14’ Å 130 28 18 32 Bounty Hunter ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta, Joe Pesci. An Irish-Italian hood joins the 1950s New York (3:00) › “Money ››› “Training Day” (2001, Crime Drama) Denzel Washington, Ethan Hawke, Scott Glenn. A rookie cop 102 40 39 Train” (1995) meets a corrupt Los Angeles narcotics officer. Å Mafia. Å K-9 Cops Hidden cocaine. ‘14’ Å Human Prey ’ ‘14’ Å Fatal Attractions Reptiles ‘14’ Å Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å 68 50 26 38 K-9 Cops Gangs ’ ‘14’ Å The Real Housewives of Miami ‘14’ The Real Housewives of Miami ‘14’ Bethenny Ever After Housewives/OC Million Dollar Listing (N) ‘14’ Å The Real Housewives of Miami ‘14’ 137 44 Blue Collar Comedy The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ‘G’ Å ›› “Grumpier Old Men” (1995) Jack Lemmon, Walter Matthau. ’ Å 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ›› “Grumpier Old Men” ’ 60 Minutes on CNBC The Inventors 60 Minutes on CNBC (N) Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC The Inventors 60 Minutes on CNBC 51 36 40 52 The Facebook Obsession Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 In the Arena (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report SportsDome Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Daniel Tosh: Happy Thoughts ‘14’ Tosh.0 (N) Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å 135 53 135 47 South Park ‘14’ COTV Blazer Profiles PM Edition Get Outdoors Redmond City Council (Live) Epic Conditions Word Travels ’ COTV Blazer Profiles 11 Capital News Today 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Shake It Up! ‘G’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Suite/Deck Phineas and Ferb Fish Hooks ‘G’ Suite/Deck Wizards-Place Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Shake It Up! ‘G’ Cash Cab ‘PG’ Cash-Chicago Pitchmen (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Dirty Jobs Termite researcher. ‘PG’ Dirty Jobs Mike takes a look back. American Treas Auction Kings ’ 156 21 16 37 MythBusters Viewer Special ’ ‘PG’ College Basketball Horizon League Tournament, Final: Teams TBA (Live) SportsCenter (Live) Å NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 Women’s College Basketball College Basketball Summit League Tournament, Final: Teams TBA (Live) Basketball Final Baseball Tonight SportsNation SportsNation NASCAR Now 2010 Poker 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Who’s Number 1? Å Can’t Blame Can’t Blame AWA Wrestling Å College Basketball Å 23 25 123 25 MLB Baseball From July 28, 1991. Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls The Perfect Dress ‘PG’ Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Paula’s Best 30-Minute Meals Iron Chef America Cora vs. Falkner Cupcake Wars Cupcake Wars Ice House (N) Chopped Dream’n of Redeem’n! 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa WHL Hockey Tri-City Americans at Kamloops Blazers (Live) UEFA Champions League Soccer Barcelona vs. Arsenal 20 45 28* 26 High School Basketball Live Free-Die Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ››› “Hellboy II: The Golden Army” (2008, Action) Ron Perlman, Selma Blair, Doug Jones. Lights Out Inflight (N) ‘MA’ 131 Dear Genevieve Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters House Hunters My First Place My First Place Selling New York House Hunters Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Dear Genevieve Modern Marvels Whiskey ‘PG’ Å Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Larry the Cable Larry the Cable Guy Top Shot Quickfire Face-Off (N) ‘PG’ 155 42 41 36 Modern Marvels The Potato ‘PG’ Intervention Corrine ‘14’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ American Pickers ‘PG’ Å American Pickers ‘PG’ Å One Born Every Minute ‘PG’ Å 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Ed Show (N) The Last Word The Rachel Maddow Show The Ed Show 56 59 128 51 The Last Word That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library ’ Silent Library ’ True Life I’m Looking for My Child Teen Mom 2 Pushing The Limit ‘PG’ Teen Mom 2 (N) ’ ‘PG’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ True Jackson, VP iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å SpongeBob SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ 82 46 24 40 T.U.F.F. Puppy (5:50) ›› “The Punisher” (2004, Action) Thomas Jane, John Travolta, Will Patton. ’ (8:40) ›› “Swordfish” (2001) John Travolta. An ex-con computer hacker is pulled into a high-tech heist. ’ 132 31 34 46 (3:00) ›› “Lucky Number Slevin” › “The Hitcher” (2007, Suspense) Sean Bean, Sophia Bush. Å ›› “The Devil’s Advocate” (1997) Keanu Reeves. An attorney goes to work at a law firm run by Satan. Å 133 35 133 45 Star Trek: The Next Generation ‘PG’ Behind Scenes Joyce Meyer John Hagee Hillsong ‘G’ Å Praise the Lord Å World Government Forming Now Full Flame Å Changing-World 205 60 130 Friends ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ King of Queens King of Queens The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘14’ The Office ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Friends ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Red Headed Woman” (1932) Jean Harlow. A gold-digging ››› “Three Wise Girls” (1932) Jean Har- (7:45) ›› “Riffraff” (1935, Comedy) Spencer Tracy, Jean Harlow, Mickey Rooney. A ›› “Suzy” (1936, Drama) Jean Harlow. A dancer flees after be101 44 101 29 secretary tries to seduce her married boss. low, Mae Clark. fisherman clashes with a woman working in a tuna factory. ing framed for her husband’s death. Å Kitchen Boss (N) Ultimate Cake Off ’ ‘PG’ Å 19 Kids-Count 19 Kids-Count What Not to Wear Leia ‘PG’ Å What Not to Wear Teresa S. (N) ‘PG’ Tiny: Kenadie’s Next Chapter 178 34 32 34 Cake Boss ‘PG’ Law & Order Anchors Away ’ ‘14’ Bones The Killer in the Concrete ‘14’ ›› “Con Air” (1997) Nicolas Cage. Vicious convicts hijack their flight. Southland Graduation Day (N) ‘MA’ 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Kid Pro Quo ’ ‘14’ Garfield Show Codename: Kid Codename: Kid Total Drama Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Scooby-Doo Hole in the Wall Adventure Time King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Bizarre Foods/Zimmern 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family All in the Family Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit White Collar Under the Radar ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’ Basketball Wives Finale ’ ‘14’ RuPaul’s Drag Race Ru Ha Ha ‘14’ Charlie Sheen: Losing It 191 48 37 54 Basketball Wives ’ ‘14’

The First 48 ‘14’ Å ›››› “GoodFellas” (1990) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta. Å Fatal Attractions Reptiles ‘14’ Å What Happens Real Housewives Comedy Central Comedy Club ‘14’ Take It Off! Lose Weight Anderson Cooper 360 Daily Show Colbert Report Ride Guide ‘14’ Outside Presents Today in Washington Sonny-Chance Sonny-Chance Dirty Jobs Termite researcher. ‘PG’ SportsCenter (Live) Å 2010 World Series of Poker Å Highlight Express Highlight Express The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å Glenn Beck Challenge Lights Out Inflight ‘MA’ Property Virgins Property Virgins High Impact: M-16 ‘PG’ Å One Born Every Minute ‘PG’ Å Hardball With Chris Matthews Å My Life as Liz (N) Teen Mom 2 ‘PG’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Ways to Die The Event ’ ‘14’ Å Spring Praise-A-Thon Conan (N) ‘14’ (11:15) ›››› “City Lights” (1931) Charlie Chaplin, Harry Myers. What Not to Wear Leia ‘PG’ Å Memphis Beat Eaglets ‘PG’ Å Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ When Vacations Attack ‘PG’ Å Retired at 35 Hot in Cleveland Character Approved: Trailblazers Basketball Wives Finale ’ ‘14’

PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:05) ›› “Mr. Jones” 1993 ’ ‘R’ ››› “Steel Magnolias” 1989, Comedy-Drama Sally Field. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “G-Force” 2009, Action Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Blue Crush” 2002 Kate Bosworth. ‘PG-13’ Å (11:15) ›› “Dumb & Dumber” Å ››› “Strange Days” 1995, Suspense Ralph Fiennes, Angela Bassett. ‘R’ Å › “Only the Strong” 1993, Drama Mark Dacascos. ‘PG-13’ Å ›› Suspiria ‘R’ ›› “A Life Less Ordinary” 1997 Ewan McGregor, Holly Hunter. ‘R’ Å Snowboard Snowboard Snowboard The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Ski & Snowbrd Bondi Rescue (N) The Daily Habit College Exp. The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Ski & Snowbrd Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Haney Project Pipe Dream Pipe Dream Pipe Dream (N) School of Golf Pipe Dream Golf Central Inside PGA Tour Pipe Dream Pipe Dream School of Golf Pipe Dream Golf Central Inside PGA Tour Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘G’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘PG’ Å Touched by an Angel ’ ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:30) ››› “Coraline” 2009 Voices of (6:15) What to ›› “The Ring” 2002, Horror Naomi Watts, Martin Henderson. A videotape holds ›› “Robin Hood” 2010, Adventure Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett, William Hurt. Robin and his men battle Big Love A firestorm surrounds Bill and HBO 425 501 425 10 Dakota Fanning. ‘PG’ Å Watch ’ Å deadly consequences for its viewers. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å the Sheriff of Nottingham. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Margene. ’ ‘14’ Å (3:45) ›› “Anamorph” 2007 ‘R’ Onion News Portlandia ‘14’ Freaks and Geeks The Diary ‘PG’ Larry Sanders ›› “The Big Empty” 2003, Comedy Jon Favreau, Bud Cort. ‘R’ Å Freaks and Geeks The Diary ‘PG’ Undeclared ‘14’ IFC 105 105 (4:35) “Deadly Impact” 2009 Sean Patrick (6:10) ››› “Twelve Monkeys” 1995, Science Fiction Bruce Willis, Brad Pitt. A prisoner (8:15) ›› “Wayne’s World” 1992, Comedy Mike Myers, Dana Carvey. A producer tries ›› “Wayne’s World 2” 1993 Mike Myers. A dead rock star tells (11:40) Life on Top MAX 400 508 7 Flanery. ’ ‘NR’ Å goes back in time to avert a deadly plague. ’ ‘R’ Å to restructure a cable access show. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Wayne to organize a big concert. ‘PG-13’ ‘MA’ Å Hunt for the Somali Pirates ‘PG’ Hard Time Prison Gangs ‘PG’ Hard Time Back on the Streets ‘14’ Hunt for the Somali Pirates ‘PG’ Hard Time Prison Gangs ‘PG’ Hard Time Back on the Streets ‘14’ Drugged: High on Cocaine ‘14’ NGC 157 157 Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai OddParents OddParents Fanboy-Chum The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Driven TV Ted Nugent Hunting, Country Truth Hunting Western Extreme Dream Season Hunting TV Adv. Abroad Truth Hunting Hunting, Country Bone Collector Steve’s Outdoor Friends of NRA Game Chasers OUTD 37 307 43 “Adam Resurrected” 2008, Drama Jeff Goldblum, Willem Dafoe. iTV Premiere. A Californication ’ Californication ’ Shameless Frank needs his ex-wife’s (4:00) “King of Cali- (5:45) ››› “Sling Blade” 1996, Drama Billy Bob Thornton, Dwight Yoakam, J.T. Walsh. iTV. A mentally SHO 500 500 former performer becomes the ringleader in an asylum. ‘R’ fornia” 2007 impaired man with a violent past befriends a boy. ’ ‘R’ ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å signature. ’ ‘MA’ Å American Trucker Ticket to Ride (N) Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Bubba’s World Bubba’s World American Trucker Ticket to Ride Barrett-Jackson Special Edition ‘G’ Bubba’s World Bubba’s World NASCAR Race Hub SPEED 35 303 125 (4:25) ›› “The Stepfather” 2009 (6:10) ›› “Open Season 2” 2008 ’ ‘PG’ Å › “Old Dogs” 2009 John Travolta. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Sweet Home Alabama” 2002 Reese Witherspoon. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (10:50) ››› “The Last Station” STARZ 300 408 300 (4:15) “School of Life” 2005 David Paymer. A teacher and his (6:20) ›› “Finding Amanda” 2008 Matthew Broderick. A man “Good Time Max” 2007 James Franco. Premiere. Two genius ››› “Innocents” 2000, Drama Tim Pigott-Smith. Children have ››› “Life During Wartime” 2009 Shirley TMC 525 525 counterpart compete for an award. ’ ‘PG’ Å tries to bring his niece to rehab. ’ ‘R’ Å brothers lead very different lives. ’ ‘NR’ Å a high mortality-rate at a hospital. ’ ‘NR’ Henderson. ’ ‘R’ Å NHL Hockey Colorado Avalanche at Minnesota Wild (Live) Hockey Central NHL Overtime Boxing World Series: Memphis at Los Angeles NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Joan & Melissa: Joan Knows Best? Ghost Whisperer The Crossing ‘PG’ Plat. Weddings Plat. Weddings WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 E3

CALENDAR TODAY SHROVE TUESDAY COMMUNITY PANCAKE SUPPER: Featuring pancakes, ham, eggs, applesauce and drinks; proceeds benefit the St. Andrew’s Discretionary Fund for community outreach; donations accepted; 5-7 p.m.; St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 807 E. First St., Prineville; 541-447-5813. SHROVE TUESDAY PANCAKE SUPPER: Featuring pancakes, sausage, applesauce and drinks; $4, $2 ages 4-12, free ages 3 and younger, $10 families; 5-7 p.m.; Episcopal Church of the Transfiguration, 68825 N. Brooks Camp Road, Sisters; 541-549-7087. KNOW DIRT: Gail Wells talks about allegiance to place and how it affects opinions about land use; free; 6:30 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/ calendar. “THE WORLD ACCORDING TO MONSANTO”: A screening of the documentary about food production, genetically modified foods and more; $2 suggested donation; 7 p.m., 6:30 p.m. social; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-389-0785. WEINLAND: Portland-based indie folk-rock band performs, with Laurel Brauns; $10 suggested donation; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; The Barn in Sisters, 68467 Three Creeks Road; 541-408-7794.

WEDNESDAY KING PERKOFF BAND: The jazz and blues act performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. MOONALICE: The Bay Area-based jam band performs; ages 21 and older; $10; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.randompresents.com.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMEN’S SHOW: Featuring vendors and a variety of resources for outdoor recreation, with a head and horns competition, a kids trout pond and cooking demonstrations; $10, $5 ages 6-16, free ages 5 and younger, $18 for a two-day pass; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 503-552-5003 or www.otshows.com. GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “A Confederacy of Dunces” by John Kennedy Toole; bring a lunch; free; noon; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1055 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. PROPOSALS FOR CHANGE: College students present ideas for involvement in local and global issues; free; 1-5 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Boyle Education Center, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; smkline@cocc.edu. “THE CRISIS OF GEOGRAPHICAL IGNORANCE”: Alexander Murphy discusses why knowing geography is important, particularly in addressing geopolitical and environmental issues; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663 or http:// osher.uoregon.edu. BREATHE EZ BENEFIT: Featuring performances by Mosley Wotta,

Sara Jackson-Holman, Elliot, Chris Beland and Erin Cole-Baker; proceeds benefit Erin Zurflu, who is battling lung cancer; $10 suggested donation; 6 p.m.; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-8482044 or ecolebaker@gmail.com. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: R. Gregory Nokes talks about his book “Massacred for Gold: The Chinese in Hells Canyon”; RSVP requested; $3, free for museum members; 6:30 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-3824754, ext. 241 or www.highdesert museum.org. THE UNDERSCORE ORKESTRA: The Portland-based gypsyjazz band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS: The Chinese troupe performs rigorous acrobatics with music, costumes and choreography; $27 or $32; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES: The Boise, Idaho-based indie rock band performs, with Josh Hart; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www. silvermoonbrewing.com.

FRIDAY CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMEN’S SHOW: Featuring vendors and a variety of resources for outdoor recreation, with a head and horns competition, a kids trout pond and cooking demonstrations; $10, $5 ages 6-16, free ages 5 and younger, $18 for a two-day pass; noon-8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 503-552-5003 or www.otshows.com. AN IRISHMAN’S OREGON: Brian Doyle provides an afternoon of storytelling; free; 4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541312-1034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. COWBOYS 4 KIDS: Featuring dinner and live music by Abigail Nyman, Jon Bowerman and the Quincy Street Band; with a silent auction; proceeds benefit Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Oregon, KIDS Center, Saving Grace and SMART; $15; 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m.; Powell Butte Community Center, 8404 S.W. Reif Road; 541-312-6047. FIGHT CANCER WITH BIG DAVE: With live music, a Texas hold ’em and blackjack tournament, a silent auction, dinner and more; proceeds benefit Dave Wiersema, who is battling cancer, and his family; $20 for dinner and event, $50 includes tournament; 6 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-385-8606, ext. 118 or http://bigdave.eventbrite.com. TEAM TRIVIA SHOWDOWN: Answer general trivia questions in teams of up to six people; with live and silent auctions and a raffle; proceeds benefit Together for Children; $40; 6-9 p.m.; Mt. Bachelor Village Resort Conference Center, 19717 Mount Bachelor Drive, Bend; 541-389-9317 or www.together-for-children.org. CHORALE WORKS CONCERT: The Cascade Chorale performs works by American choral composers, under the direction of James Knox; $10; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-383-7512.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

“AIDA”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a musical about an enslaved princess of Nubia and the love of an Egyptian prince; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. “THE FRENCH LIEUTENANT’S WOMAN”: A screening of the 1981 R-rated film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541475-3351 or www.jcld.org. GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS: The Chinese troupe performs rigorous acrobatics with music, costumes and choreography; $27 or $32; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. SUNNY LEDFURD: The North Carolina-based acoustic country act performs; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

SATURDAY CENTRAL OREGON SPORTSMEN’S SHOW: Featuring vendors and a variety of resources for outdoor recreation, with a head and horns competition, a kids trout pond and cooking demonstrations; $10, $5 ages 6-16, free ages 5 and younger, $18 for a two-day pass; 10 a.m.8 p.m.; Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 503-552-5003 or www.otshows.com. GRIN AND BEAR IT RUN: 5K, 10K and 1-mile run/walks to benefit Healthy Beginnings; races begin and end at the amphitheater; costs vary, see website for details; free for spectators; 10 a.m.; Les Schwab Amphitheater, 344 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-383-6357 or www.myhb.org. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY OPEN HOUSE: See exhibits, meet birds of prey and more; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www.sunrivernaturecenter.org. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Sarahlee Lawrence talks about her book “River House”; free; 2 p.m.; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; 541-312-1032 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Ellen Waterston talks about her book “Where the Crooked River Rises”; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 2 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www .highdesertmuseum.org. HAPPY JACK EVENT: Meet Happy Jack the border collie, with crafts, prizes and more; free; 3 p.m.; Crook County Library, 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. FURRY FRIENDS GALA DINNER: A buffet dinner, with live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; $60; 5 p.m.; Chloe at North Redmond Station, 1857 N.W. Sixth St.; 541923-0882. VFW DINNER: A dinner of fish and chips, with coleslaw; proceeds benefit disabled veterans; $7; 5-7 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. CENTRAL OREGON’S GOT TALENT: A talent show contest with local participants; proceeds benefit special recreation programs; $10, $7 ages 11 and younger; 6 p.m., doors open 5 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

THE NOVELISTS: The Reno, Nev.based indie rock group performs, with Shane Simonsen; free; 6 p.m.; Green Plow Coffee Roasters, 436 S.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-516-1128. “EAT, DRINK AND BE DEADLY!”: Buckboard Murder Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery theater event; proceeds benefit Soroptimist of Redmond; $40, $70 per couple; 7 p.m.; High Desert Activity Center, Deschutes County Fair & Expo Center, 3800 S.W. Airport Way, Redmond; 541410-2610 or www.siredmond.com. “VIOLIN MASTERS — TWO GENTLEMEN OF CREMONA”: A screening of the documentary about violin makers Antonio Stradivari and Giuseppe Guarneri del Gesu; $15, $10 students; 7 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-306-3988 or www. highdesertchambermusic.com. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring music by the Tune Dawgs; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE SHOWCASE: Terpsichorean Dance Studio’s Performing Company presents a dance showcase, featuring performances by Bali Ram and 20 local dance studios; $12 in advance, $15 at the door; 7 p.m.; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-389-5351. CHORALE WORKS CONCERT: The Cascade Chorale performs works by American choral composers, under the direction of James Knox; $10; 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541383-7512. JAZZ AT JOE’S VOLUME 29: The Jazz at Joe’s series presents Tony Pacini and the Chuck Redd Quartet; tickets should be purchased in advance; $25; 7-9 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-977-5637, joe@ justjoesmusic.com or www. justjoesmusic.com/jazzatjoes/ events.htm. SISTERS ACT: With family-friendly music, comedy sketches, dance and more; proceeds benefit the Nambirizi School in Uganda; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger; 7 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-1149. WORDS ON TAP: Author Brian Doyle and The Hanz Araki Band explore the musical and literary traditions of the Irish; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “AIDA”: The Mountain View High School drama department presents a musical about an enslaved princess of Nubia and the love of an Egyptian prince; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-383-6402. “THE RAINMAKER”: A romantic comedy about a stranger who changes the lives of a family struggling to keep their ranch during the Dust Bowl; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.2ndstreettheater.com. MOUNTAIN COUNTRY IDOL: Central Oregon musicians compete in finalist round to see who is the best country artist; ages 21 and older; proceeds benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; $5; 8 p.m.; Coyote Ranch, 1368 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-548-7700 or www.mountain997.com. JERRY JOSEPH & THE JACKMORMONS: The Portlandbased rock musicians perform; $12 plus fees in advance, $15 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

M T For Tuesday, March 8

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend, 541-382-6347

BARNEY’S VERSION (R) 2:30, 6:55 BLACK SWAN (R) 2:15, 4:35, 7:15 CASINO JACK (R) 2:25, 4:45, 7:10 THE COMPANY MEN (R) 2:20, 4:40, 7:20 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 2, 4:30, 7:05 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 2:10, 4:50, 7:25

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend, 541-382-6347

THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG13) 1:25, 4:50, 7:50, 10:15 BEASTLY (PG-13) 12:25, 3:20, 7:40, 9:50 DRIVE ANGRY 3-D (R) 1:10, 3:50, 6:35, 9:20 THE EAGLE (PG-13) 1:35, 4:10, 6:55, 9:30

THE FIGHTER (R) 1:40, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45 GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 12:20, 3:05, 6:30 GNOMEO & JULIET 3-D (G) 12:50, 3:40 HALL PASS (R) 12:45, 3:30, 6:40, 9:25 I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 1:45, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40 JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13) Noon, 3:10, 7:15, 10:10 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER 3-D (G) 12:10, 7:30 JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER — THE DIRECTOR’S FAN CUT 3-D (G) 4:20, 9:55 RANGO (DP — PG) 1:05, 4, 7:35, 10:05 RANGO (PG) 12:05, 3, 6:50 SANCTUM 3-D (R) 7:55 TAKE ME HOME TONIGHT (R) 12:40, 4:55, 8:05 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 12:55, 5, 8 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 12:35, 4:35, 7:20, 10 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie times in bold

are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend, 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) 127 HOURS (R) 9:15 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 6

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

GNOMEO & JULIET (G) 4:30, 6:30

I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13) 3:45, 6:15 RANGO (PG) 4:15, 6:45 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 4, 6:30

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters, 541-549-8800

ANOTHER YEAR (PG-13) 6:15 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) 6:30 RANGO (PG) 6:30 UNKNOWN (PG-13) 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

JUST GO WITH IT (UPSTAIRS — PG-13) 5 RANGO (PG) 4, 7 EDITOR’S NOTE: Pine Theater’s upstairs screening room has limited accessibility.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

SXSW 2011

More events and venues, — even more Interactive By Patrick Beach Cox Newspapers

AUSTIN, Texas — After the South by Southwest festivals in 2010, and probably after a nap, managing director Roland Swenson sent his staffers a customary survey to suss out what they needed to do a better job next time. The overwhelming answer was, essentially, “Get us out of here.” Over almost a quarter-century, the wee regional music festival had snowballed into the Thing That Ate March, spawning companion film and interactive festivals and becoming a 10-day cultural event for which Austin is known around the world. During that period, its offices had spread from two buildings on 40th Street just east of Interstate 35 to four other rented properties. The decentralized structure meant people didn’t talk to one another or even know one another. So Swenson went office-shopping and, in December, moved his staff of about 95 into the former offices of architectural firm Graeber Simmons & Cowan at 400 Bowie St., just down the street from the Tiniest Bar in Texas and near where the old Electric Lounge once stood. “It’s a real office building,” Swenson said. “There’s no getting around it.” Swenson said he’s noticed a smoother operation already, which is important for an eversprawling festival whose economic impact on the city last year was $113 million, up from $98.9 million in 2009, according to an executive summary by Greyhill Partners.

The big draw Festival executives put total attendance at more than 175,000, including 36,700 conference registrants, 13,000 music wristband holders (primarily local people), and free public events at Auditorium Shores, the Flatstock poster show and the Austin Record Convention. The move to a centralized headquarters is just one of the changes for the people who, along with 2,000 volunteers, make it all happen. The big story remains Interactive. Last year, SXSW Interactive’s paid registration eclipsed SXSW Music for the first time. The official count was 14,251, including gold (good for Film and Interactive) and platinum (all three conferences) badge holders. That growth, which could be repeated in 2011, was in the 30 to 40 percent range. Early registration numbers in December and January led to serious discussions about capping registration, but then it eased up on its own, mostly because of a lack of available hotel rooms (for the first time, SXSW’s lodging staff has booked 50,000 hotel room nights). “We’ve talked a lot” about setting a cutoff, Interactive Festival director Hugh Forrest said. “There are a lot of pros and cons to the idea of capping it. Had we continued to see the amount of growth in February we were see-

ing in December and January, we probably would have taken some steps in that direction.” The festival might decide to cap attendance next year if growth becomes unmanageable. Raising walk-up registration to $750 (from $550 last year) probably won’t have much effect on curbing growth, Forrest said. What attracts so many people to Interactive? The explosion of social media services such as Twitter and Facebook, the suddenly-it-exists multibillion-dollar market for mobile app developers and the increasing interest in digital living (cue your smart phone’s ringtone) dovetail nicely with what the fest has always been about. But the same people who embrace the digital takeover of America still worry that Interactive is becoming too mainstream — and too big. The festival was taken to task by tech blogger Robert Scoble in December. Scoble complained that when a fest grows to the proportions of SXSW Interactive, it loses its intimate vibe. Forrest said that this year’s plethora of meet-ups (about 65 to 70 daytime events) and increase in campuses (10 this year) are meant to make the fest feel more targeted and to help attendees find their peers. Ten shuttle buses will be employed to locations including the AT&T Conference Center and the Hyatt to manage Interactive’s sprawl. Another big change is that keynotes will be live-streamed, not just to satellite campuses, but to the general public. It will be part of a block of sxsw.com live video that will run from 12:30 to 3 p.m. during the fest. “We’re traditionally very protective of our content in that regard, but we’ve come to realize that this is something that attendees or virtual attendees expect, and live streaming probably doesn’t weaken attendance to the event,” Forrest said. “In fact, it generates more buzz for future years.” Those who can’t get enough of Interactive can attend the new SXSW Technology Summit, which will take place as soon as Interactive ends: March 16-17, on the sixth floor of the Hilton downtown. The summit is open to all badge holders. Change and crowd control are not limited to Interactive. On the film side, organizers have expanded screening venues to include the State Theatre on Congress Avenue and the Rollins Theatre at the Long Center after issues related to crowding last year. The festival is also increasing the number of seats at Austin Convention Center screenings to 650. SXSW Film producer Janet Pierson said the festival plans to screen some selections at two satellite theaters, the Regal Arbor in North Austin and Regal Westgate in South Austin. Those screenings will highlight what’s being shown downtown and make SXSW accessible for people who don’t want to deal with downtown, she said. So whether you’re eager for it, braced for it or leaving town to get away from it, here comes SXSW 2011.


E4 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, March 8, 2011: Your words often create illusions for others. The ability to inspire people is a double-edged sword. You also could discover that your communication style creates confusion for some. You cannot confirm plans enough. At times, you might want to check what you think you are hearing. If you are single, often a rosy-colored haze surrounds your relationships. Make sure that at some point you break through and see reality. Wearing rose-colored glasses might be fun, but ultimately destructive. If you are attached, the two of you could finally react and meet a long-term aspiration. TAURUS zeros in on what you want. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHHH Reach out for others. Their feedback could be instrumental. Financial stability could be the end result if you think things through. If your inner voice makes a suggestion, verify and question. Take a walk if you’re feeling unsure or confused. Tonight: Pay bills. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Knowing that you have the energy to meet the demands, you get ahead of a situation. Use your imagination when focusing in a meeting. What comes up could be a little humorous, and you might decide you don’t want to share. Tonight: Zero in on everything. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHH Touch base with your

sixth sense more often than usual, especially if you’re dealing with authority figures. You might be surprised by what happens if you hit the right note. Visualize great success. Tonight: Up until the wee hours. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHHH Zero in on what you want. You’ll gain greater insight into what is happening in your immediate circle by listening to what isn’t being said. Feel free to find an expert or to explore different ideas. Another person’s insight could be enlightening. Tonight: Join a friend. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Stay on top of your responsibilities. In order to get someone else involved, you need to relate on a one-on-one level. Also, create a greater sense of direction through conversations. Be clear when dealing with someone in charge or someone you have to deal with. Tonight: Burning the midnight oil. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHHH Visualize and share more with someone you often brainstorm with. How you handle this matter and the choices you make could be quite dynamic after this conversation. Be willing to take a leap intellectually and a risk emotionally. Tonight: Say “yes.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHHH Focus on each task at hand. You might need to check in with another person for feedback or direction. Your perspective changes radically with a conversation. How you relate on a one-on-one level could determine the success or failure of a situation. Tonight: A discussion gets to the bottom of the matter.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Others rise to the occasion, and you might need to back off. Others also need the chance to strut their stuff. Do write down what you are thinking. Soon enough, others will be asking for your feedback and ideas. Tonight: Make merry. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH You might want to rethink a personal matter that involves your day-to-day life. One person might be more involved than others. How you handle the matter, the trust you exhibit and your decisions all allow for greater give-andtake. Tonight: Put your feet up. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHHH Your ability to move back and forth on a problem allows for the flex you need. Count on the fact that someone cares much more than you realize. Discussions help demonstrate this person’s support and resourcefulness. Tonight: Where you enjoy yourself. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH Investigate an option when it appears. Give extra attention to a home-security matter. You might want to question the alternatives before you make a decision. Discussions might illuminate cost-effective alternatives. Tonight: Happy at home. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Your ability to say “no” to someone could determine how your long-term relationship flows. If you become too high-voltage and lose your confidence, the long-term damages might be greater than anticipated. Tonight: Living it up! © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Signers

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Christine Brousseau and Aspen Hadley look over the journal they’ve kept for four years. They had a laugh over a 2008 entry by Aspen, clearly showing the improvement she has made in her handwriting skills. “There is something so important about handwriting,” Brousseau said.

Sisters Continued from E1 Aspen, 10, says that when she learned Brousseau had gotten the nomination, “I was so happy. I was like, ‘Yay!’ ” Says Price, who wrote Brousseau’s official nomination letter for the competition, “She’s all about kids and all about community. It’s just really in her heart.” Brousseau and her husband, John, moved to Bend from Portland in 2006. At the time, she was an events coordinator and recruitment specialist with BBBS of Central Oregon. Her job included processing applications for Big Brothers and Big Sisters; three months after she arrived, she found her match in Aspen. “She was the age that I wanted, because I wanted to work with a 6-year-old, or at least a younger age, so that I would have all that time to grow with (her),” says Brousseau, who brightens visibly when she talks about Aspen. “She’s the kindest soul I’ve met. Every fiber of her being is so positive and happy and kind. I learn more from her, I think, than she’s supposed to be learning from me.” Aspen, like Brousseau, suffers from severe asthma. “I felt like there was a connection there that I could help with, because I’ve learned to cope and deal and manage with my asthma, so it was something I wanted to share. I just felt connected to her before I even met her,” Brousseau says. Aspen “knows life can be tough, but she’s a fighter. She doesn’t let it get her down.” Regardless of whether Brousseau wins the national Big Sister of the Year award, it’s clear Aspen has already deemed her the winner. She recalls being 6 and meeting her Big Sister for the first time. “I got all dressed up and my mom put my hair in pigtails and I had elephant ears! At first I was shy and I was avoiding Christine, like, ‘Who is this scary person?’ By the end I was already in her lap, hugging her and not letting go.” Over the past four years, Brousseau and Aspen have spent six to 12 hours a month together, standard for the BBBS program. They share meals, try new activities such as ice skating, take in the theater, hit thrift stores and just plain giggle a lot. Aspen now calls Brousseau “Sissy.” Says Brousseau, “We tell people we’re sisters, and then there’s a bunch of people who really think we are sisters. And then sometimes something will come up, like, ‘Well, how are you older than her mom?’ We’re not blood sisters, but we’re sisters. We’re family. There’s just that bond and connection.” She adds with a laugh, “It’s fun making people wonder and question, with the age difference.” Brousseau left Big Brothers

Big Sisters in 2008 to become executive director of Camp Fire USA Central Oregon, a nonprofit youth-development organization. Three years ago, she started a Camp Fire Club at Ensworth Elementary School, where Aspen is in fourth grade. “I have a full-time job, and my job isn’t just a 9-to-5. I wear many hats here,” Brousseau says of her Camp Fire work. “It carries over into my weekends and evenings. I’m busy, and I have a home life as well. But there’s always time to be a friend, or a mentor, whether in a group situation or in a one-on-one situation like BBBS.” Through the years, she and Aspen have continued to bond, seeing each other at least once a week at weekly meetings for Camp Fire. At last week’s Camp Fire meeting, Brousseau reminded Aspen of the plan to meet a reporter at Pilot Butte Drive-In over fries and shakes. “Her friend Coral said, ‘You guys are the luckiest people in the world. I have got to get myself a Big Sister already,’ Brousseau says, giving a pitch-perfect imitation of a tween. “ ‘Gosh, I need a Big Sister!’ ” As a single mom, Michelle Smith, 31, knows the need to have positive role models in the lives of her daughter, Aspen, and son, John, 13. Smith says she lost her small cleaning business three and a half years ago, after becoming ill with fibromyalgia and enteropathy, an intestinal pathology. “I’ve had to have three major surgeries, so I’m not able to get out and about as much as I used to, as far as camping, hiking. I’m so thankful that their Bigs are able to help out with that, because my kids would really miss it,” Smith says. Son John had a Big Brother from the age of 8, and Aspen began clamoring for a Big of her own at age 5, but the youngest one can begin the program is at age 6. If she were healthier, she’d be a Big Sister herself, Smith says. She “absolutely” believes Brousseau deserves to win Big Sister of the Year, knowing firsthand the role Brousseau has played in Aspen’s life. “They’re soul sisters,” she says. “You see them together, and they’re sisters. Even spending an hour at Goodwill together, just looking at junk stuff together, is precious time to my daughter. “I figure the more people that are in my children’s life to support them and to love them, the better. You know, why not?” D avid Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@bendbulletin.com.

Continued from E1 “Lady Gaga’s gesture means masturbation,” Ison says matter-of-factly. Ison has blonde hair, big eyes, a wide smile. She is a CODA — a Child of a Deaf Adult — and she is the interpreter who has been assigned to work Lady Gaga’s Monster Ball Tour at Verizon Center. She has asked her interpreter friends how they would handle what shall now be referred to as the Disco Stick Problem. “One suggested I do this,” Ison said — mimicking an aggressive hip thrust. But that solution seemed more vulgar than the playful lyrics implied. All of this would be easier if she knew more about her audience — how well they spoke American Sign Language, how well they spoke Gaga — but interpreters at performing arts gigs rarely know their audiences until they arrive at the show. Ison rewinds the song on her iPod and listens again. Over in Germantown, Md., Jon Bon Jovi is presenting similar problems for Traci Randolph. “ ‘The pictures in the shadows,’ ” she said. “Do you think that’s literal?” She is sitting at her dining room table, Skyping with her interpreting partner, Liz Leitch, who lives in Richmond, Va. Leitch will drive up to Washington for the Bon Jovi show a few days later. In front of Randolph: a pile of printouts containing the lyrics for everything the singer has been performing on his latest tour. After each stop, Randolph Googles his latest set list to see what he’s switched up. For weeks, she has been breathing Bon Jovi. When she is not working her day job, she is Livin’ on a Prayer. These puns invade her e-mails. She can’t help it. “So,” Randolph said, “ ‘There’s only pictures hung in the shadows left there to look at you.’ Is that literal? Am I literally picturing someone in a den?” surrounded by portraits? “They could be memories,” Leitch said. Randolph experimentally tries out signs for “memories.” Would these be good memories? Bad ones? The song is, after all, called “Runaway.” “Sometimes I’ll do words on the mouth,” said Randolph, to provide the literal translation, but the signs paired with it will be more conceptual. She is a fan of Bon Jovi. Has been listening to him for 20 years. The job of an interpreter, however, requires a whole other level of attention to detail — an intricate dissection of every single word, with the knowledge that the interpreter’s understandings of the song are going to inform or define other people’s understandings of the song. In late 2009, Randolph and Leitch, along with business partner Kevin Dyels, founded First Chair Interpreted Productions, an agency that focuses solely on interpreting for concerts and performing arts. They do about 50 events a year, including all the work for Verizon Center. First Chair booked Ison and another interpreter, Danielle Hunt, for the Gaga concert. When it comes to concerts, Dyels says, the company looks for interpreters who have credentials but are devoted fans, too. “I’m qualified to interpret Bon Jovi,” Randolph said. “I wouldn’t be qualified for Linkin Park.”

An imprecise art “David Bowie, Led Zeppelin ...” Suzy Rosen Singleton, waiting for the Lady Gaga show, is rattling off her favorite concerts. “Madonna,” added her friend, Charmaine Hlibok. “AC/DC.” Rosen Singleton and Hlibok, who are deaf, communicate by signing or reading lips. Before the Americans With Disabilities Act in 1992 began requiring performing arts venues to provide interpreters on request, “I would make up my own words,” said Rosen Singleton, who works as Gallaudet University’s ombudsman. Interpreters, she says, “are now critical to my enjoyment.” But not every interpreter is cut out for concert work. It’s exhausting, both mentally and physically, which is why interpreters are usually assigned to events in pairs. It’s taxing to provide meaning, convey emotion, and keep the beat at the same time. Also, Hlibok said, “they have to be invisible to us.” This is a paradoxical requirement. What she means is the interpreter has to tread the fine line between acting as a conduit for the song and mistakenly believing they are the entertainment. The less successful ones, she said, “think they’re the character. They get carried away.” What most non-signers don’t realize is that sign language is

A rise in registry of interpreters for the deaf

Tracy A. Woodward / The Washington Post

Danielle Hunt, left, and Traci Ison, sign language interpreters for the Lady Gaga concert last month in Washington, practice before the show outside the Verizon Center. not an exact science, a one-plusone-equals. The same sentence, given to three different interpreters, might result in three different interpretations. What most non-signers further don’t realize is that “sign language” is an imprecise descriptor, and whatever any one interpreter is doing at any given moment might be a blend of multiple approaches. American Sign Language is, as it sounds, its own language, with its own grammatical structure and particular nuances. Its roots are actually not in English, but in French; the language originated when Thomas Gallaudet traveled to Europe in 1815 seeking methods for teaching deaf children. Signed English is, as it sounds, a more literal translation of spoken English, mimicking word order and grammar. Some people think ASL works better for songs. It’s faster, more expressive. It conveys emotions and tonal inflections that wouldn’t be readily apparent to a non-hearing audience member. When Lady Gaga goes “Rah rah rah ah ah, ro ma, ro ma ma,” a proponent of ASL might decide that the important thing to convey would be the raw, flirtatious tone rather than the literal words, which, after all, make no sense. A strict follower of Signed English, on the other hand, might decide to spell out every R, O, M and A, deciding that Lady Gaga should be equal-opportunity nonsensical. The line is between being visible and invisible, but it’s also about figuring what it truly means to interpret something.

It’s about human perception and human fallibility, about the difference between aiding someone and patronizing them. “For my very first show, I spent weeks creating this perfect, beautiful ASL interpretation,” said Hunt, who, as one of Gallaudet’s few hearing students, is pursuing her Ph.D. in interpreting. “Then I got there and the client said, ‘I really just want to know the words.’ ” She paused. “It totally changed my approach.” This is what Ison has decided it looks like, to take a ride on a disco stick: It looks like a left index finger rising slightly toward the sky, and right index and middle fingers coming down to curve around it and jounce up and down. It’s a sign that can’t be translated into English, but if you watch her do it, you get the gist that whatever she is doing with her hands is a wee bit naughty. She has decided to mouth Lady Gaga’s words along with the signs, allowing deaf fans to follow along in more than one way. A few days after the concert, Ison shares a link to a video she made of herself at the concert to help her review her own performance. “Love Game” is a fast-paced song, with lyrics spoken in a relentless monotone, leaving little room to catch breath or pause fingers. When Ison signs it, her hands flutter in front of her face and chest, the song ending with a triumphant “Game!” Then, off-screen on the stage, Gaga produces a giant phallic torch. “I don’t know if you heard,” she purred, “but I have a pretty

WASHINGTON — Washington is kind of like a “mecca” for the deaf population, Janet Bailey says. “Because once they come to Gallaudet from Kansas, they’re probably not going back to Kansas.” Gallaudet University was the world’s first school for the advanced education of the deaf and hard of hearing, and is still the only college in which all programs and services are designed to accommodate the deaf. Bailey is the former president of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf, an Alexandria, Va.-based professional organization, and she now works as the group’s government affairs representative. She also, back in 1982, founded the first interpreting agency and began approaching theaters about interpreting their shows. Now, RID’s data say that there are about 120 interpreters in Washington. It doesn’t sound like a lot, but, when you compare it with the general population, it’s proportionally more than double New York state’s or California’s. Last year, more than 1,100 would-be interpreters registered for their knowledge-based certification exams nationwide, up from about 650 in 2006. (Interpreters have to pass the knowledge-based exams before the practical ones — and have up to five years to complete both — so numbers for the performance-based exams haven’t caught up.) —Monica Hesse, The Washington Post

tremendous ‘expletive.’ ” In the video, Ison does a double take, making sure she has heard correctly, before signing the lewd man-parts term. Then she shrugs and fingerspells the word, just to be on the safe side. Given that nobody will ever really understand Lady Gaga, Ison has done the best she can.

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HOME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTRA L ORE GON Still growing? Your eyes aren’t playing tricks on you, Martha Stewart says — cut tulip stems will lengthen in the vase, Page F6

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

FOOD

Soup for supper — what could be more super?

HOME

Tired sofa?

By Alison Highberger For The Bulletin

The perfect meal on a cold evening might just be a bowl of delicious, homemade soup. That’s Marla Jo Hardy’s definition of a super supper. “We like soup because we can put everything in it; you can have a complete meal with veggies and protein. It’s just a big bowl of comfort and satisfaction,” she said. Hardy, 58, is a longtime Bend resident and a certified personal trainer at Living Fitness who specializes in strength training. Her husband, Jason, also is a personal trainer. They make soup together about three times a month, freezing some, and also recommend soup to their fitness clients who seek advice about healthy food ideas. “We tell them the big thing is to be prepared. Have your food ready, or, we’re all human, we’ll be heading out for pizza for dinner. Soup is so satisfying, especially when it’s a day old; all those flavors meld. It’s so nice, coming home to soup. We just pop it in the microwave,” Hardy said. One of her favorite soups is Chicken Pot Pie Chowder (see recipe, Page F2). She created it after being inspired by a soup her mother makes with potatoes and cream. Hardy wanted a healthier, lower-carb version. See Soup / F2

Submitted photo

Maryana Vollstedt’s “Big Book of Soups & Stews” contains a litany of tips and recipes.

GARDEN

Growing trends in the garden world By Liz Douville For The Bulletin

Last year, according to the Garden Writers Association’s Garden Trends Research Report, half of those surveyed by the association said they have gardens in their backyards, while more than one-quarter have gardens in their front yards. The yearly research project conducted by Susan McCoy, president of Garden Media Group, reinforces the fact that gardeners are forging ahead. In 2010, vegetable gardening was up by 20 percent and community gardens were up 60 percent over 2009 numbers. I find the 60 percent increase in community gardens interesting. Is the increase due to community gardens being used as a social connection to the neighborhood? Families staying closer to home during the summer may look to the garden as an opportunity to share and learn. Is the reason as simple as the need to economize? See Trends / F5

Greg Cross / The Bulletin

Give it the slip By Alison Highberger • For The Bulletin

S

lipcovers are versatile and kind of magical. They can transform the look of an old sofa or chair, protect new furniture from kids and pets, or unify the look of a room. Slipcovers can also be an economical alternative to buying new furniture. Even though such covers are not a hot trend in home design right now, Bend interior designer and home staging spe-

T O DAY ’ S RECIPES

F

• ASPARAGUS SOUP WITH HERBED GOAT CHEESE, F2 • CHICKEN POT PIE CHOWDER, F2

cialist Jacquie Sebulsky said the slipcovered look — fitted covers for furniture — never goes out of style. “Slipcovers were really trendy 10 years ago, and then design went to a cleaner, sleeker, more modern look and didn’t incorporate slipcovers so much, but I think slipcovers are really classic,” Sebulsky said. Keep in mind, though, that slipcovers

• THAI GINGER CHICKEN SOUP, F2 • SPAGHETTI SOUP, F2 • REUNION SOUP, F2

always create a relaxed and casual look. “If you don’t like it, if you like things tailored, you’re going to have a hard time falling in love with slipcovers,” Sebulsky said. She noted that slipcovers originated in the United States on the East Coast, places such as the Hamptons of Long Island, N.Y., and the late 19th-century mansions of Providence, R.I. See Slipcovers / F4

• FRESH FRUIT GRATIN, F3 • SAUSAGE AND KALE GRATIN, F3 • BABY ARTICHOKE GRATIN, F3

• PERFECT POPCORN, F6 • CARAMEL CORN, F6 • RIVEL SOUP, F6


F2 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

F Soup Continued from F1 “I had a roasted cauliflower soup recipe I love, and you know how steamed cauliflower can make faux mashed potatoes? I used that idea and added evaporated nonfat milk and chicken broth instead of cream. The herbs I use remind me of mom’s recipe because we love sage and cumin. My soup tastes like dressing and chicken and dumplings. Just yummy,” Hardy said. Maryana Vollstedt is another soup lover. The Oregon native and author of more than 25 cookbooks, many of them bestsellers (www.maryanavollstedt .com), said she makes soup at least once a week for her husband, Reed, and herself. “It’s easy to do, and you have your whole meal in one pot. I think soups can be just as good as a regular, full-course meal: fresh ingredients and a whole lot less sodium in homemade soups,” Vollstedt said in a phone interview from her home in Eugene. Her cookbook, “The Big Book of Soups & Stews,” is subtitled “262 Recipes for Serious Comfort Food.” Three of her recipes are included here (see right): Spaghetti Soup, Thai Ginger Chicken Soup and Reunion Soup, a vegetable soup with a seasoned white sauce whisked in at the end. Vollstedt, 85, wishes more people would make the effort to cook at home, especially soup, since many recipes are simple to make and require only a few minutes of chopping. Her “Big Book of Soups & Stews” has recipes for homemade chicken, turkey, beef, fish and vegetable stock, but she said that’s not necessary. “You don’t have to make your own stock; canned is acceptable. Buy the ones with less sodium and 100 percent fat-free, and if you want it vegetarian, go with vegetable broth,” she said. To jazz up homemade soup, Vollstedt recommends garnishes. Her rule of thumb is, the more complex the soup, the simpler the garnish should be. “They add extra flavor and eye appeal. They dress your soup up a little bit,” she said. “A small amount of an ingredient that suggests the soup’s flavor, such as a few sliced mushrooms for a cream of mushroom soup, are sprinkled on top. Thin soups can be garnished with small herb sprigs or a sprinkling of fresh-snipped herbs that float on top. Light cream soups improve in appearance when sprinkled with finely chopped parsley or chives or a dash of paprika,” Vollstedt writes in her cookbook. Supper can be simple and sublime when it’s soup. “It’s well known for being comfort food, and always has been. All that’s needed is a green salad and crusty bread,” Vollstedt added. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac .com.

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— Maryana Vollstedt, author, “The Big Book of Soups & Stews”

Marla Jo Hardy says that roasting and cutting the corn from the cob is an essential part of her Chicken Pot Pie Chowder.

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Chicken Pot Pie Chowder prepared by Marla Jo Hardy.

ASPARAGUS SOUP WITH HERBED GOAT CHEESE Makes 4-6 servings. GOAT CHEESE: ½ C (4 oz) goat cheese, at room temperature 2 TBS chopped fresh basil leaves Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper Vegetable oil cooking spray SOUP: 2 TBS unsalted butter, at room temperature 1 lb leeks (white and light green part only), thinly sliced 4 C low-sodium chicken broth 2 lbs med asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces ½ C chopped fresh basil leaves Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper For the goat cheese: Line a small baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside. Using a fork, in a small bowl, combine the goat cheese and basil until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Using a ½-oz cookie scoop or a round tablespoon measure sprayed with vegetable cooking spray, scoop the goat cheese into balls and arrange on the prepared baking sheet. Refrigerate for 30 minutes. For the soup: In a Dutch oven or large saucepan, heat the butter over medium heat. Add the leeks and cook, stirring constantly until softened, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the broth, asparagus and basil. Season with salt and pepper, to taste. Increase the heat to high and bring the soup to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until the asparagus is tender, about 15 minutes. Using an immersion blender, blend the soup until smooth. (Or puree in a food processor or blender in batches). Season with salt and pepper, to taste. To serve, ladle the soup into shallow bowls and garnish with the herbed goat cheese. — Adapted from www.food network.com

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Try these dishes for a hearty take on pie.

“It’s easy to do, and you have your whole meal in one pot. I think soups can be just as good as a regular, full-course meal: fresh ingredients and a whole lot less sodium in homemade soups.”

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EK! LAST WE

Next week: Savory pies

856 NW Bond • Downtown Bend • 541-330-5999 www.havenhomestyle.com

MARLA JO HARDY’S CHICKEN POT PIE CHOWDER Makes 8-10 servings. 1-2 TBS olive oil 2 TBS chopped garlic (fresh or from the jar) 1 med white onion, chopped 2 C celery, sliced or chopped 2 C carrots, sliced or chopped 1 lg head cauliflower, ½ chopped and ½ in large florets 1 tsp cumin 1 tsp sage 1 tsp thyme

1 tsp black pepper 2 qts (8 C) chicken broth 1 can evaporated milk (non-fat or regular) 2 ears of corn, grilled or oven-roasted until tender (if grilling, watch closely, it burns easily) 10-12 chicken tenders or 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, browned in frying pan 12 oz pkg of frozen petite peas

Put 1-2 tablespoons olive oil in a large soup pot and sauté the garlic, onion, celery, carrots and the chopped cauliflower with the cumin, sage, thyme and black pepper until the onions are soft. Add the chicken broth and cauliflower florets and bring soup to a boil. When the florets are soft, remove them and put them in a blender or food processor with the evapo-

rated milk. Blend them for a few seconds and then add them back to the soup. Reduce heat to low. Cut corn off the cob and slice the chicken into bite-size pieces. Add the corn, chicken and frozen peas to the soup. Adjust seasonings and serve immediately, or cooked down for about an hour on low heat before serving. — Courtesy Mary Jo Hardy

THAI GINGER CHICKEN SOUP Makes 4 servings. Tender slices of chicken breast and ginger are simmered in coconut milk with green onions and spices. This recipe can easily be doubled. — Maryana Vollstedt 3 C canned unsweetened coconut milk 2 C water 2 boned, skinned chicken breast halves (about 1 lb), cut into ½-inch strips 1-inch section fresh ginger, peeled and grated 1 to 3 TBS Asian fish sauce (nam pla)

¼ C fresh lime juice 1 TBS grated lime zest 2 TBS sliced green onions, including some tender green tops 1 TBS chopped cilantro 2 red chili peppers, seeded and slivered for garnish Fresh cilantro sprigs for garnish

In a soup pot over medium heat, bring coconut milk and water to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add chicken and cook, uncovered, for 3 minutes. Stir in ginger, fish sauce, lime juice and zest and cook, uncovered, for 3 minutes. Stir

in green onions and cilantro and mix well. Ladle into bowls and garnish with slivered chilies and cilantro sprigs. — From “The Big Book of Soups & Stews” by Maryana Vollstedt, Chronicle Books, 2001

SPAGHETTI SOUP Makes 6 servings. On a cold winter day, this hearty soup of meat, tomatoes and spaghetti is a meal in itself. Kids love it, and you will too! — Maryana Vollstedt ½ lb lean ground beef ½ lb bulk sausage 1 C chopped yellow onion 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 can (28 oz) Italian-style tomatoes with basil, coarsely chopped, with juice 2 C beef stock or broth 1 C tomato juice 1 tsp salt

¼ tsp dried oregano ¼ tsp dried basil 1 bay leaf Freshly ground black pepper to taste ¼ C chopped parsley 1 C broken spaghetti (1-inch pieces) ½ C sliced black olives (optional) Freshly grated Parmesan or asiago cheese for topping

In a large soup pot over medium-high heat, cook beef, sausage, onion and garlic, stirring and breaking up meat with a spoon. Cook until meat is no longer pink and vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Pour off any excess grease from pan. Reduce heat to medium-low and add tomatoes, stock, tomato juice, salt, oregano, basil, bay leaf, pepper, pars-

ley and spaghetti. Cook and simmer until flavors are blended, about 30 minutes. Add olives, if desired, and cook, uncovered, 10 minutes longer or until ready to serve. Remove bay leaf and discard. Ladle into bowls and sprinkle with cheese. — From “The Big Book of Soups & Stews” by Maryana Vollstedt, Chronicle Books, 2001

“The herbs I use remind me of mom’s recipe because we love sage and cumin. My soup tastes like dressing and chicken and dumplings,” Hardy says of her chowder.

REUNION SOUP Makes 8 servings. I was served this fantastic soup at an equally fantastic reunion. It is a medley of vegetables simmered in a flavorful stock for a long time and seasoned with a white sauce added at the end. Use the food processor for quick chopping. — Maryana Vollstedt ½ lb bacon, diced 1 C chopped yellow onion 1 C chopped cabbage 1 C chopped celery 1 C chopped carrot 1 lg russet potato (about ¾ lb), peeled and chopped 1 zucchini, sliced lengthwise and then cut into ¼-inch slices 2 cloves garlic, minced ¼ tsp dried chervil ½ tsp salt Freshly ground pepper to taste 1 can (28 oz) whole tomatoes, coarsely chopped, with juice 4 C beef stock or broth ¼ C uncooked barley, thoroughly rinsed 2 TBS brown or white long-grain rice Seasoned White Sauce (recipe follows) 1 TBS cider vinegar SEASONED WHITE SAUCE: 2 TBS butter or margarine 2 tsp all-purpose flour 1 C milk 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce ½ tsp dried thyme ¼ tsp garlic powder ½ tsp salt In a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat, cook bacon until crisp. Drain off drippings, leaving 1 tablespoon in Dutch oven. Add onion, cabbage, celery, carrot, potato, zucchini and garlic and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Add remaining ingredients except white sauce and vinegar. Bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer, covered, until vegetables are very tender, about 90 minutes, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, make white sauce: In a saucepan over medium heat, melt butter. Add flour and stir until bubbly. Whisk in remaining ingredients and stir until thickened, 1 to 2 minutes. Sauce will become thick if it stands; do not thin. After soup has cooked for 90 minutes, whisk in sauce and vinegar. Cook until flavors are blended, about 10 minutes longer. — From “The Big Book of Soups & Stews” by Maryana Vollstedt, Chronicle Books, 2001


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 F3

F Artichokes and sausage, sure, but fruit? You bet — the gratin doesn’t judge

BABY ARTICHOKE GRATIN Makes 8 to 10 servings.

By Noelle Carter Los Angeles Times

Aromatic vegetables suspended in a rich sauce, maybe a little melted cheese, all of it hidden under a crisp golden brown crust. Behold the glory that is the gratin. One of the oldest dishes in the comfort food playbook, the gratin is a celebration of lush creaminess and crisp crust that is often based on the simplest of ingredients. Its poster child, the gratin dauphinois, is made from nothing more than potatoes and cream. Sliced potatoes are layered with cream or milk in a shallow baking dish and baked until the filling is thickened and bubbly and the top of the dish is toasted to a rich brown. That may be classic, but gratin isn’t a restrictive dish. Such goodness should never be limited. Almost any food can be gratineed. Focus the gratin on one ingredient (say, asparagus or crab) for a simple side or appetizer dish, or pair ingredients, constructing the gratin to make a perfect one-dish meal. You could even build the gratin around pasta. (Baked macaroni and cheese, anyone?) Take your inspiration from what you might find in the market, or whatever leftovers might be in the fridge. • Egg-thickened gratin: Not all gratins need an extended baking time before they’re ready. Sometimes a quick trip under the broiler is all that’s necessary. When based on a sauce thickened with eggs, gratins take on a lighter overall texture, much more free-form in structure. A minute or two under the broiler is all these sauces need for color and a delicate crust — any more than that and the sauce could break. • Flour-thickened gratin: A potato gratin owes its creaminess to the natural starch from the potatoes. Absent a main ingredient with a lot of starch, flour is a great choice as a thickener. Start with a roux, then build the sauce with cream, broth or another liquid. The only trick with a flour-based sauce is that it will need time to cook so the raw flavor of the flour dissipates. This can be done on the stove or in the gratin dish. • Fresh-cheese gratin: Perhaps the simplest gratin of all is made with little more than a dollop of fresh cheese or ricotta, or a fermented cream in the form of mascarpone, creme franche, sour cream and even yogurt. As with the egg-based sauces, cheese and cream-based fillings will brown quickly under the broiler, taking no more than a minute or two. Watch carefully that the cheese does not overcook and separate.

4 lbs baby artichokes 1 lemon, divided, plus lemon wedges for garnish Salt 2 egg yolks

Photos by Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times

Creamy gratins topped with a golden, crunchy crust can be made from nearly any ingredient, such as these fresh fruit versions.

FRESH FRUIT GRATIN Makes 4 servings. Note: Amaretti are Italian almond macaroon-like cookies and can be found in well-stocked markets and specialty cooking stores. Cream cheese, creme franche, Greek yogurt or sour cream can be substituted for the mascarpone. 8 amaretti cookies, finely crumbled 4 generous C diced fresh fruit, cut into bite-size pieces (small berries can be left whole) 1 (8-oz) container

mascarpone cheese, at room temperature 2 TBS honey 1 tsp amaretto or citrus liqueur 2 tsp cornstarch

Heat the broiler and set a rack about 4 inches beneath the heating element. Divide the crumbled amaretti among 4 individual gratin dishes or shallow ramekins. Divide the fruit evenly over the top, gently pressing the top of the fruit into an even layer. In a large bowl, whisk together the mascarpone, honey, liqueur and cornstarch until evenly combined. Dollop the cheese mixture into the gratins, and spread with the back of a spoon or a spatula to spread the cheese and flatten it in an even layer over the fruit. Place the gratin dishes under the broiler and cook just until the top of the gratins start to brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat and cool on a rack for 5 minutes before serving. Nutrition information per serving: 404 calories; 6 grams protein; 36 grams carbohydrates; 4 grams fiber; 28 grams fat; 14 grams saturated fat; 71 mg cholesterol; 30 grams sugar; 36 mg sodium.

ITALIAN SAUSAGE AND KALE GRATIN Makes 6 to 8 servings. 3 TBS olive oil 1 lb fresh mild Italian sausage, casings removed and crumbled 1 ⁄3 C dry white wine 2 bunches (about 1 lb) kale, stemmed and torn into

large pieces ½ C (1 stick) butter 1 ⁄3 C flour 2 C milk 8 oz fresh goat cheese 1 C freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

Heat the oven to 350 degrees. In a large, heavy-bottom sauté pan, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Stir in the sausage and cook until browned on all sides and cooked through, about 5 minutes. Add the wine and cook, scraping the flavoring from the bottom of the pan. Continue to cook until the wine reduces and is mostly evaporated, 1 to 2 minutes. Decrease the heat to medium. Stir in the kale, one handful at a time. Cook the kale, stirring it in with the sausage, until it begins to wilt and turn a bright green. Continue adding kale by the handful until it is all added to the sauté pan and is just wilted. Do not overcook the kale. Remove from heat and set the pan aside. In a large saucepan, melt one-half cup (1 stick) butter over medium heat. Whisk in the flour to form a roux. Slowly add the milk, whisking constantly to get rid of any lumps. Bring the mixture to a simmer, whisking frequently. Reduce the heat to a gentle simmer and cook for 10 minutes. Crumble the goat cheese to the sauce and whisk until the cheese is melted and the sauce is smooth, then stir in the sausage and kale. Remove from heat. Spoon the mixture into a shallow, 2-quart gratin dish. In a medium bowl, combine the ParmigianoReggiano, bread crumbs and minced fresh herbs. Pour over the 3 tablespoons melted butter and

1 C fresh bread crumbs 3 TBS melted butter 1 TBS minced fresh herbs (such as a combination of parsley, oregano and basil)

Other gratins are baked, such as this Italian sausage version. stir until the butter is evenly distributed to form the topping. Sprinkle the topping evenly over the sausage and kale mixture. Bake the gratin until the topping is goldenbrown and the filling is bubbly, about 30 minutes. Cool slightly before serving. Nutrition information for each of 8 servings: 494 calories; 14 grams protein; 15 grams carbohydrates; 1 gram fiber; 40 grams fat; 21 grams saturated fat; 85 mg cholesterol; 4 grams sugar; 600 mg sodium.

White pepper 1 TBS water 2 garlic cloves, minced ½ C canola oil ½ C olive oil

1 C heavy cream, whipped ¾ C finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

pressed against the bottom of Trim the artichokes: Fill a bowl the container. Keep pulsing unwith a couple of quarts of cold til most of the mayonnaise is water, and squeeze in the juice emulsified, less than 1 minute, of one-half of a lemon . Trim the then slowly plunge the blender artichokes one at a time, first a bit to mix thoroughly. Taste snapping off the thick outside the aioli and adjust the seasonleaves, until you reach the tening and flavoring with additional der, pale inner leaves. Trim the salt, pepper and lemon juice as tip of the stem, but leave most desired. This makes about 1 of it attached to the base of the cup aioli. artichoke. With a sharp paring Alternatively, to make the knife or vegetable peeler, shave aioli using a whisk: In a large off the dark skin of the stem, bowl whisk together the yolks, exposing the tender core. Peel a pinch each of salt and white around the base of the artichoke pepper, the water, the remaintoo, removing the dark-green ing tablespoon lemon juice spots where the tough leaves and the minced garlic cloves. were attached. Cut across the Whisking continuously, add the leaf tips, removing the top third oils in a very, very slow stream of the artichoke. Slice the enuntil the aioli thickens and all tire artichoke in half lengthwise, Once assembled, all this gratin splitting the bulb and stem and needs is a stint under the broiler. of the oil is incorporated. Taste the aioli and adjust the seasondrop the pieces into the aciduing and flavoring with additional lated water. Bring a medium pot of water to a simmer. salt, pepper and lemon juice as desired. Whip the cream: Beat the cream in a large, While the water is heating, season it well with a few tablespoons of salt. Juice the remaining chilled bowl using a whisk, or in the bowl of a half of the lemon. Set aside 1 tablespoon of the food processor, until whipped to firm peaks. This juice, and pour the remaining juice into the pot makes a generous cup of whipped cream. In a large bowl using a spatula, gently fold the of water. Drain the artichokes, and place them in the sim- aioli into the whipped cream to make a moussemering water. Simmer the artichokes until tender, line sauce. Gently fold in the grated ParmigianoReggiano. Taste the mousseline sauce and ad6 to 9 minutes. Drain well. Heat the broiler. Make a garlic aioli: Using an immersion blend- just the flavorings and seasonings as desired. er, combine the egg yolks, a pinch each of salt Arrange the drained artichokes in a 1½-quart and white pepper, the water, the remaining table- shallow gratin dish and gently spoon over the spoon lemon juice and minced garlic cloves in a mousseline. Place the gratin under the broiler just 2-cup measuring cup or in the tall beaker used for long enough to lightly brown the top of the sauce, immersion blenders. Stand the immersion blend- 1 to 3 minutes depending on the broiler. er in the measuring cup, then slowly pour in the Remove from heat and serve. oils so they settle on top of the other ingredients. Nutrition information for each of 10 servWith the blender held against the bottom of the ings: 348 calories; 3 grams protein; 9 grams carglass, pulse until the mixture begins to emulsify, bohydrates; 6 grams fiber; 34 grams fat; 9 grams which will happen almost immediately. Continue saturated fat; 80 mg cholesterol; 1 gram sugar; 91 to pulse, turning the blender a bit, but keeping it mg sodium.


F4 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: At Home With … Mountain View High School drama coach Deb DeGrosse.

Slipcovers

If you have a sofa you like, but it’s out of style or wearing out, check with the manufacturer to see if slipcovers are available. “Most companies keep a pattern on file even if the sofa has been discontinued. You can pick new fabric and they’ll make a slipcover for you. It’ll typically cost about $600 to $1,000, or half of what a new sofa would cost,” said Sebulsky.

Continued from F1 “Those fantastic old houses would always have slipcovers to protect furniture from weather and light, and they didn’t want the kids to ruin the furniture. It was that white cotton duck cloth. Those great old houses still use that look as a classic design element, and that filters to other parts of the country,” Sebulsky said. You may want to consider slipcovers the next time you notice your furniture needs to be freshened up. It can be a cost-effective way to get a whole new look.

Styles, fabrics, colors

Ready-made or custom Slipcovers can be purchased ready-made from a variety of sources: big-box home and department stores, furniture stores and online companies, to name a few. Ready-made is the most inexpensive option, often costing less than $100 for a couch slipcover, with standard sizes (small, medium and large), and a limited choice of fabrics and colors. The downside of ready-made slipcovers, said Sebulsky, is they need to be adjusted often since they have a loose fit. Some have ties that need to be re-tied frequently, and they have to be

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

This sofa was designed to include a washable slipcover to protect the furniture from wear and dirt. tucked in repeatedly. “You’ll always be fussing with them. They’ll look like a shirt that’s not quite tucked in if you use your sofa heavily,” she said. Upholsterers and seamstresses can create a perfectly fitted custom slipcover for a couch, love seat, recliner, dining chair or ottoman. The skill and time in-

volved are reflected in the price. Karen Johnson of KJ’s Upholstery in Bend estimated the cost of a custom slipcover for a sofa, including fabric, would run about $700, depending on the style and details. Johnson said that sometimes slipcovers are a great option, other times not.

“If it’s an older piece of furniture, you have padding that’s been compressed over the years. If you reupholster instead, I can put in a new layer of padding and give the piece more comfort. I try to make sure that someone who wants a slipcover understands the pros and cons,” Johnson said.

Slipcovers come in a multitude of styles, from country to modern. Some are draped and tucked, others have piping or ruffles, some have tailored pleats. Sebulsky suggested browsing the Internet to see which styles appeal to you. She said that Cottage Living and Southern Living magazines often show the slipcovered look in their home design articles. As for fabrics and colors, Sebulsky said the trend now is for more natural and organic textures and hues, so if you want a modern look, lean toward neutral colors and cotton and linen fabrics, not synthetics. One of the big pluses of slipcovers is the majority of them are machine washable. “That’s a big deal. If you invest in a good piece of furniture, you can protect it for a long time,” said Sebulsky. A laundromat washing ma-

chine works best for a large slipcover that has many yards of fabric. After washing, Sebulsky recommends fluffing it in a dryer set on low heat or no heat for a short amount of time to release some of the wrinkles, and then putting it back on the sofa while it’s still damp. If washing caused a bit of shrinkage, the fabric will stretch a bit when it’s damp, and, as it dries, you’ll get a tighter fit. You can steam it later with an iron or steamer if wrinkles bother you. Besides changing a look and protecting furniture from dirt, slipcovers can unify a room full of mismatched furniture. For an inexpensive fix, buy matching ready-made neutral slipcovers for a sofa and chair that clash, and use pillows to add interest and color. For a higher-end look, Sebulsky suggested checking out fabric stores for relatively inexpensive designer fabric remnants. Such fabrics can make great looking custom slipcovers crafted by an upholsterer or sewing pro. If your furniture looks tired but still has a lot of function left, the slipcover is an old concept that can make a room look fresh and new. Alison Highberger can be reached at ahighberger@mac. com.

Designs to update the kitchen add a little spice combination in the same room. Counter-depth refrigerators are easier to fit into a kitchen because they don’t jut out into the room. But even though they’re often taller, they typically have less storage space, Nairn said. So some designers are dealing with that space shortage by incorporating drawer refrigerators or freezers into the cabinets to hold additional food. Shababy said that kind of arrangement makes sense only when the drawer holds foods that are used mostly in a particular part of the kitchen — for example, a drawer for vegetables next to the sink where they’re cleaned and prepared.

By Mary Beth Breckenridge Akron Beacon Journal

What’s cooking in kitchens? Simpler styling, hidden appliances and a bit of color to make life interesting, to name just a few things. Here are the trends we found when we visited a few kitchen showrooms:

Clean lines Fancy is fading. Kitchens are moving away from ornate looks such as Tuscan and French country in favor of more transitional design, a trend Betty Nairn of Cabinet-STop in Granger Township, Ohio, calls “simplistic luxury.” The move toward clean lines and less ornamentation is due at least in part to homeowners thinking ahead, said Debra Shababy of Studio 76 Kitchens and Baths in Twinsburg, Ohio. Many are looking toward selling their homes as the economy improves, and they want their kitchens to appeal to a broad range of buyers, she said. Contemporary design is gaining interest, too — even in the Midwest, a region long tied to the traditional. Barbara Dillick of Kitchen Design Group in Bath Township, Ohio, figures people have become more comfortable with the spare, sleek look because they’ve been exposed to it through shelter magazines, TV shows and upscale hotels.

Built-in dining Eat-in kitchens are still in demand, but where we do that eating has changed. The bar-style counter is still popular, but it’s giving way in many new kitchens to an extension of the counter that looks more like a table.

Bars

Photos by Karen Schiely / Akron Beacon Journal

A lower table incorporated into the island countertop is featured in the showroom of Studio 76 Kitchen and Baths in Twinsburg, Ohio. The deep base under the island portion provides storage space. Sometimes the extension is counter height; sometimes it’s higher or lower. What sets it apart from bar seating is that it’s designed so the diners sit around the edge and face one another, rather than sitting in a line. The idea of trading a table for a counter extension makes some homeowners nervous initially, Kitchen Design Group’s Deanna Carleton said. But the setup has advantages: It saves space, the extension can do double duty as an extra buffet surface and the deep base that holds the countertop provides a good amount of storage.

Safety, sustainability More than ever, consumers are paying attention to the materials that go into their kitchens, Shababy said.

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She said many respond positively when she suggests cabinet finishes with low levels of volatile organic compounds, vapors that contribute to indoor air pollution. They also like cabinets that are joined with dowels instead of glues containing formaldehyde. Safety features are popular, such as lockouts that prevent stove burners from being turned on accidentally and mechanisms that keep drawers and cabinet doors from slamming on little fingers, Shababy said. And people are leaning toward energy-saving features such as LED lights, as well as natural products such as wood floors and stone countertops, she said. Granite is still the top choice for countertops, especially since common types have become affordable for most people, the designers agreed. But quartz — stone chips mixed with binders and colorants — is coming on strong, they said.

Lighting Kitchen lighting isn’t just a matter of function anymore. It’s also an expression of personality, Carleton said. Hand-blown glass shades on pendant lights, contemporary drum shades and elegant chandeliers are all ways homeown-

A designer pushes a button to open the microwave drawer in the showroom of Studio 76 Kitchen and Baths. ers can infuse their style into a kitchen without making a big commitment. After all, it’s easier and cheaper to change lighting fixtures than it is cabinets or countertops, she noted. Layers of light continue to be common in kitchen design — for example, a ceiling fixture combined with under-counter task lighting and ambient lights behind a glass-front door. But gimmicky lighting schemes such as lighted toe kicks aren’t so popular, Dillick said. LEDs are finding their way into the kitchen, mainly in under-counter lighting but also in

recessed ceiling lights. They’re available in both cool and warm lights to fit different decors and preferences. Nairn has also seen a big preference for natural lighting via windows, skylights or reflective light tubes.

Refrigerator options The depth of the typical refrigerator poses a design challenge, particularly in smaller kitchens. Manufacturers have responded with shallower appliances and drawer models, which are often used in

Bars are coming out of the great room and into the kitchen. Dillick said many of her company’s clients are requesting bar areas in the kitchen where they can store both the booze and the barware in one convenient spot. Often, they’re taking out kitchen desks to free the space. Bar cabinets that look like pantries are popular, she said. Often they’re outfitted with a wine or beverage refrigerator; storage space for glassware, knives and a cutting board; and sometimes a sink.

Color Most homeowners still tend toward the safe and neutral in their kitchen’s more permanent items — cupboards, countertops and flooring. But that doesn’t mean kitchens can’t be colorful. Walls are sporting bold hues such as persimmon or pomegranate, Dillick said. Accessories and appliances bring spots of color, such as a Wolf range with red knobs and a cobalt oven interior that “people fall in love with,” she said. It’s also popular to work a colorful painted cabinet or two in among white or natural wood cabinets to add a bit of interest. Dillick has also seen the comeback of window seats, which provide the opportunity to add color in the form of fabric. Upholstered seats, pillows and window valances all add a bit of color and softness, which are often lacking in a room filled mostly with hard surfaces, she said.

Individualism All of the kitchen designers were hesitant to talk in terms of trends, because they believe a kitchen’s design should suit the individual. Kitchens are places where we spend a lot of time, so it’s more important to have what you like, not what’s popular, they said. “Really, it’s up to you,” Shababy said. “It’s whatever makes you happy being in your kitchen.”


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 F5

G Scottish landscapes to help inspire us all By Adrian Higgins The Washington Post

At a moment in the year when people are looking to spring and thinking about their gardens, landscape photographer Allan Pollok-Morris is rethinking the whole idea of the garden. Is it a place of swooning beauty? No. On an old city campus, plumes of pampas grass brighten a forlorn space but cannot quite transform it. A place of flowers? Not in a contemporary town garden, where the landscape is a study in lawn panels and other rectilinear planes. Of permanence? No. Look at an artist named Jim Buchanan, who etches a labyrinth in the sand to be erased by the tide. You can assess Pollok-Morris’ eclectic take on the garden in his book “Close: Landscape Design and Land Art in Scotland” (Northfield Editions, 2010) and in an exhibit at the U.S. Botanic Garden near the Capitol in Washington. Close, as in near, is an old Scottish term for a landscape that is so inspirational, “it’s as if the heavens are closer to Earth,” Pollok-Morris said in an interview. Through his lens, a garden is many things, but not amorphous. Indeed, he has captured the work of some of the most focused minds in the landscape world today, and yet you come away from the show realizing that the old barriers between flower gardens, landscape gardening and land art are as artificial as gardenmaking itself. Pollok-Morris said he is open to various interpretations of his chosen terrains. In each, he says, he strives “to convey a sense or an experience of the place.” Some of the landscapes are distinctly of their region. Others offer universal inspiration. From a purely horticultural perspective, Scotland is an engaging place to garden. The west coast is wet, the east coast is not (so much), the days extend into the night in the growing season, and the amazing temperance of the Gulf Stream is countered by the effects of the coastal winds. It is a land of the north, and even after six years on the project, the 38-year-old photographer is still amazed that a country sharing latitudes with Alaska can support such lushness.

Stone sentinels A few of the featured landscapes really grab me, in different ways. Andy Goldsworthy has elevated the high craft of dry stonewalling into an art form. (His exhibit “Roof” was installed in the National Gallery of Art’s East Building in 2005.) Near the village of Penpont, Goldsworthy assembled an egglike sentinel recalling the ancient Celtic stone piles or cairns. It is another installation of his that I find mesmerizing: a brownstone arch emanating from the opening of a stone barn. The arch seems to provide a symbolic link between the stone of the barn and the soil whence it came. The muscular arch itself is vernacular in form and material, and yet its use here is strange. The resulting tension is incredibly effective. Pollok-Morris said he was most inspired by Little Sparta, the art garden near Edinburgh devised by the late Ian Hamilton Finlay and known for its gardens, sculptures and monuments inscribed in “concrete poetry”: poetic quotations carved in stone and wood and given heightened meaning by their placement in the environment. The photographer also likes the way the designer Douglas Coltart forms peaceful landscapes that observe the cardinal rule of gardenmaking in scenic territory: Don’t compete with it. I have a handful of favorites, from afar, Little Sparta being one of them. I am drawn to an estate garden and the dramatic siting of the big turreted Dunbeath Castle on the seaside cliffs of northeast Scotland.

Next week: Going up Vertical gardens are rising in popularity.

Trends Continued from F1 A packet of seeds for less than $2 is a small investment for weeks of good, fresh eating. McCoy states, “We had trouble wrapping our heads around saving the rain forests, but we clearly can wrap our arms around saving our own backyards.” Putting conservation on the level of our own backyard makes sense and is a challenge we can meet. Gardening with a purpose heads the list of emerging garden trends for 2011. Other trends include healthy soils being built with additions of organic composts and soil amendments, gardeners using more eco-friendly products, and moving further away from the toxic chemical weed killers and pest repellents. Keep reading for more garden trends.

Eco-scaping Photos by Allan Pollok-Morris / The Washington Post

Charles Jencks, an architectural theorist and landscape architect, designed the Garden of Cosmic Speculation at Portrack House in Dumfries, Scotland, where he lives, as “a landscape conceived as a place to explore certain fundamental aspects of the universe.”

The landscape at the Maggie’s Cancer Caring Center in Dundee, Scotland, was crafted by the garden designer Arabella Lennox-Boyd. The building is by Frank Gehry.

The term “sustainable gardening” has been around for more than a decade, but what does it mean? According to the handbook used in Oregon State University Master Gardener training, sustainable gardening uses “gardening practices that allow plants to thrive with minimal inputs of labor, water, fertilizer and pesticides.” In many cities the planting of the parking strip — that area between the sidewalk and the road — has become popular. Usually drought-tolerant plants are used rather than turf grass or trees that require high water usage. I checked with the Bend Public Works Department, and there is no restriction in planting that strip. However, remember that it is public right of way and the department may need to work in it at some point. So keep that in mind if you are inclined to use eco-scaping in that space. Eco-scaping promotes the planting of native plants. There is an increased interest locally, and nurseries are responding with a wider selection of native plants.

Edible ornamentals Small fruit-bearing shrubs like berries and smaller trees are gaining interest. Is there anything more delightful than raspberries or strawberries from your own garden? Blueberries are gaining in popularity as more varieties suitable to our climate are offered.

The Bulletin ile photo

Raspberries, shown here in a Bend backyard, are among the fruitbearing shrubs and trees that are trendy for 2011.

Growing up with vertical gardening Vertical gardens go beyond your typical redwood trellis. Vertical gardens require a sturdy, free-standing, heavy-duty framework. The plants grow in a series of horizontal growing spaces or pockets. Horticulturist Allan Armitage suggests they can be used to provide privacy, screen eyesores and draw the eye upward to create the illusion of space.

Urban farming and CSAs Farmers markets and community supported agriculture are a growing trend. We have seen that increase in our own area. CSA farms provide fresh produce to subscribers throughout the growing season. The general policy is that you receive a weekly allotment of vegetables that have been harvested that week. The upside is you try veggies that are new to you; the downside is

you may get somewhat the same selection a few weeks in a row. It’s the perfect opportunity to explore some new recipes.

New urbanism According to the Garden Media Group, the definition of this trend is, “Sustainable urban communities offering convenient and enjoyable places to enjoy an urban lifestyle.” I think Central Oregon is ahead of the curve on this trend. Planting water-wise plants, collecting rainwater, walkable streets, diversity of shops, homes and apartments with less turf and more plants encourages better stewardship of our earth and reconnects us as fellow stewards of our resources and our communities, according to the Garden Media Group. What a great common goal for all of us to work toward. Liz Douville can be reached at douville@bendbroadband.com.

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Sustainable containers Peter Cool, gardener at Jura House garden, has taken advantage of the mild climate of the Isle of Jura to grow tender exotic plants in the old vegetable garden.

Annual flower sales are down almost 20 percent from previous years. Annuals are being replaced with longer-blooming perennials. Growing food in containers is becoming a trend, especially as more vegetables that are smaller in size are developed for container growing. Add a trellis to the container for cucumber vines, sprinkle in some dill seed plus a mixture of lettuce seeds and you have the start of a summer salad. The increased interest in herb growing leads one to think about containers that can be planted for the purpose of windowsill growing during the winter.

Succulents At Cambo House, in Fife, Scotland, gardener Elliott Forsyth has repurposed an old walled garden for a 21st-century take on the Scottish garden. Here, landscape designer Xa Tollemache has reworked old walled gardens with tough, bigboned but decorative shrubs, and perennials that are both pliant and defiant in the galeforce winds. I would like to spend an afternoon with the pop artist and sculptor Gerald Laing in his castle garden, not least to observe the pontoon-bicycle boat in action on his pond. Pollok-Morris’ work also records, perhaps not consciously, how the British garden has changed in the past 20 years. The eye-catching, color-driven floral border, dripping in rambling roses and tender wall shrubs, held out a false archetype. Today, the sizzle in the garden is with herbaceous plants - perennials, grasses,

bulbs, even annuals - and the knack is to assemble them in a bold and coherent way that avoids a visual jumble. This is not just a British idea; indeed, it is more Dutch, German and, yes, American. At Cambo House, a country estate in Fife, gardener Elliott Forsyth has pulled this off with striking blocks of summer perennials and grasses in shades of purple, white and green. In another image, we see a foreground of echinops veiling bands of verbena, grasses, plume poppies, buddleias and what look like red blanket flowers. This is exciting, vital gardening, but in the broader survey of “Close,” this horticultural emphasis seems positively traditional.

Succulents are already popular in many Central Oregon gardens. They fit so well with our desire to garden with less water. Succulents make attractive additions to rockeries where soil mass is limited. They can also satisfy our desire to have an attractive indoor plant. Think of the pleasure a blooming Christmas cactus or a jade plant in bloom can bring.

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Indoor gardening For those who can’t or don’t want to garden outdoors, join those who bring the outdoors in with houseplants. Orchids are becoming increasingly popular for their ability to help clean indoor air from volatile compounds and provide oxygen. Phalaenopsis (moth) orchids as well as other varieties are perfect choices for easy growing. Indoor ferns are also becoming more popular. My favorite houseplant is a rabbit’s foot fern. I love how the fury rhizomes resembling a rabbit foot spill over the edge of the container.

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F6 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Are those cut tulips still growing? MARTHA STEWART

Q: A:

Why does it look as if my tulips are growing in the

vase? You’re not seeing things. Tulip stems do continue to lengthen once they’re snipped. That’s because the cells in their stems are particularly responsive to the plant hormone auxin, which causes them to elongate. Auxin also influences phototropism — the tendency of plants to grow toward light. Once these flowers are placed in a vase, it is not unusual for them to extend an inch or more per day, always

reaching for the brightest spot in the room. Most of the growth occurs along the stem above the topmost leaf. Since the arrangement can change on its own, don’t expect it to remain the way you position it. Even if you line up the flowers like soldiers, the stems could swoop and bend by the next day. To keep the blooms fresh, retrim the stem ends (to open the water-uptake channels) and replace the water every few days. Snapdragons, delphiniums and gerbera daisies also grow once cut, but much more slowly than tulips, so you’re not likely to notice the change.

Q: A:

What is white balsamic vinegar? A relatively new addition to the roster of vinegars,

white balsamic vinegar — which has a golden hue — tastes notably milder than the original. Traditional balsamic vinegar comes from the Modena region of Italy, where it is made from grapes — often Trebbiano, a mainstay for the area’s winemakers. A concentrated grape juice (called must) is cooked in open vats and then aged in a series of wooden barrels for five to more than 50 years. The resulting vinegar is deep brown and exceptionally sweet and syrupy. If kept in casks for 12 or more years, it can cost $60 an ounce. (Check the label if you’re looking to buy good-quality balsamic vinegar; the cheapest versions are simply white-wine vinegar with sugar and caramel color.) White balsamic vinegar is

cooked under pressure to prevent caramelization and aged for just a year. The result is much lighter in color, with a less sweet flavor. It’s ideal for sauces, dressings and dishes that traditional balsamic vinegar would discolor. You can also use it in any recipe that calls for a more mild vinegar, such as a marinade or a vinaigrette; its fresh taste is a perfect fit for salads and cooked vegetables.

Q: A:

Do dishes come out cleaner when you don’t overfill your dishwasher? As long as you allow for space between each item, the number of dishes you load should not affect how well the machine cleans the dishes. However, if your china is stacked too tightly, the water will not reach

the soiled parts of the dishes. Organization is the key. Read through the loading manual that comes with your dishwasher for tips. And for more tips on how to load a dishwasher, visit www.marthastewart .com/load-dishwasher. Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 W. 26th St., 9th floor, New York, NY 10001. Questions may also be sent by e-mail to: mslletters@marthastewart. com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.

Tulip stems continue to lengthen once they’re snipped. Tony Cenicola New York Times News Service

Classic Amish comfort food By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Arnetta Paulin from Schuylkill Haven, Pa., was looking for a recipe for what she called rivel soup. She said her mother made this soup often when she was growing up in Pennsylvania Dutch country near Hershey, Pa. This simple but hearty soup, also sometimes called dough ball soup, was and still is a popular Amish comfort food. The recipe sent in by Bette Considine from Timonium, Md., comes from a Pennsylvania Dutch cookbook published in 1966. The word “rivel” means “lump,” and this soup is full of lumps that look like rice when cooked. The rivels are formed when the dough mixture is dropped into the hot broth. If you are pressed for time, and don’t want to make homemade stock, a good quality store-

bought broth will work just fine. However, I would recommend adding some cooked and shredded chicken to the soup to fill it out a bit. RECIPE REQUEST: Dave Coakley from Baltimore is looking for a recipe for oyster stew. He said the one served at the Peppermill Restaurant in Towson, Md., is the best he’s tasted and he would love to have that recipe.

RECIPE FINDER

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. If you send more than one recipe, please put each on a separate piece of paper with your name, address and daytime phone number. Please list the ingredients in order of use and note the number of servings each recipe makes.

RIVEL SOUP Thinkstock

Ditch the microwaved stuff. From start to finish, popping corn on the stovetop takes three to five minutes.

Power to the popcorn – hey, it’s a whole grain

Makes 6 servings. 1 qt chicken broth 1 C flour

½ tsp salt 1 egg, beaten

Bring broth to a boil. Combine the flour and salt in a bowl. Add egg and with fingers work together until mixture is crumbly. Rub mixture between your fingers over the broth, dropping in small

1 cup whole corn kernels, crushed pieces about the size of a pea. These are called rivels. They should not be big; that is a dumpling. Add the corn and simmer about 10 minutes. The rivels will look like boiled rice when cooked.

By Lee Svitak Dean (Minneapolis) Star Tribune

I come from a family of serious popcorn makers. My memories of childhood are tied to the rattle of corn kernels hitting the pan. The ping-ping-ping of them bursting. The alluring fragrance of popped corn wafting into the room. The deliciously greasy fingers that had to be licked. On Saturday nights, my mother would pull out the 3-quart Revere Ware pot — the one with a few vestiges of burnt kernels — and pop up our treat while we, freshly scrubbed and smelling sweetly of Lux soap and Prell shampoo, watched “My Three Sons” and “Hogan’s Heroes.” We took our popping seriously, my mother comparing notes with her sisters on the best technique: lots of oil or little, salt before or after, shaking the pan or not, white, yellow or any of the gourmet versions of popcorn. (“Can you believe it?” my mother would exclaim when she saw the newfangled oddities. “Popcorn comes in colors these days.”) By the mid-1980s, when microwave popcorn appeared on the shelf, we had packed up the old pan. The sheer novelty of almostinstant popcorn had us transfixed in front of the microwave as the small bag expanded in front of our eyes, even though we heeded the urban rumor to “stand clear of the microwave.” Never mind that the bags often burned. It was magic. I’m back to the real thing these days, kernels popped in a heavy pan with just a thin coating of oil. I top it with a modest dose of melted butter and salt. It’s the perfect snack (and in some cases, dinner) in the winter and fall, which not surprisingly is when most popcorn kernels are sold. Not only is popcorn cheap to make at home, but it’s also fast — almost the same amount of time to make popcorn from scratch as to make it in the microwave. From start to finish, 3 to 5 minutes. (So much for our early excitement over the speed of microwave popcorn.) These days, the corn offers a big advantage we never considered earlier: Popcorn is a whole grain and, yes, it can be used to meet dietary recommendations for whole grains (3 cups of popcorn is considered to be one serving of grain). It is fiber, after all.

A simple how-to I’ve included a recipe here, though you don’t really need one. The key is to match the amount of popcorn kernels to the pan you are using. First lightly coat the bottom of a deep pan with a neutral oil that has a high smoking point, such as canola. (The oil gets very hot, so you want one that won’t burn. And, if the oil has a flavor, the popcorn will pick up the same.) Use only as many kernels as make up one layer on the bottom of the pan. Too many and you will end up with unpopped kernels, or what we used to call “old maids.” Cover the pan and place it over medium-high heat. Years ago we shook and rattled the pan till our

arms were numb, but in retrospect it wasn’t necessary. The kernels are moving as they pop, and are just fine if you leave the pan on the burner while they are exploding. Listen as the kernels pop and when they slow to two seconds in between bursts, take the pan off the burner and carefully pour the popcorn into a bowl (do this pointing away from your eyes, in case an unexpected last-minute kernel pops). If you’re using butter, now’s the time to melt it (cool the pan a bit if you’re using the same one because it will be hot enough to burn the butter) and add whatever flavorings you prefer. That’s it. A treat for the times: cheap and fast. And tasty.

PERFECT POPCORN Makes 5 cups. 2 TBS vegetable oil ½ C popcorn kernels

Melted butter, optional Salt, optional

Directions: Cover bottom of 3-quart pan with thin coat of oil. Place over medium-high heat. Add kernels to cover the bottom of pan in one layer. Cover. You do not need to shake the pan as the popping keeps the kernels moving. The popping will take 3 to 5 minutes. When the popping slows to 2 seconds between kernels (instead of the early rapid-fire), remove pan from heat. Transfer popcorn to a large bowl. Add melted butter and salt, as desired, and toss well. Serve immediately. Curried variation: Combine 2 teaspoons curry powder, ½ teaspoon kosher salt and ½ teaspoon sugar. Toss with 8 cups buttered popcorn. Ranch chili variation: Combine 1 tablespoon dry ranch salad dressing mix, ¼ teaspoon ground chipotle chili pepper or chili powder and 1⁄8 teaspoon garlic salt. Toss with 8 cups buttered popcorn.

Premium PLUS Carpet Care TOP OF THE LINE CARPET CARE! Premium PLUS Carpet Care Includes: • Teflon Stain & Soil Protector • Pre-Vacuuming & Deep Carpet Cleaning • Moving Furniture • Spot & Stain Treatment • All work performed by IICRC trained & Certified technicians to exceed Industry Standards S-100 • Speed Drying

CARAMEL CORN Makes 5 quarts. Note: You will need a candy thermometer for this recipe. 1 C butter or margarine 2 C brown sugar, packed ½ C light or dark corn syrup 1 tsp salt

½ tsp baking soda 1 tsp vanilla extract 5 qts (20 cups) popped corn

Preheat oven to 250 degrees. Melt butter in saucepan. Stir in brown sugar, syrup and salt. Bring to boil, stirring constantly. Boil without stirring 5 minutes or until candy thermometer reaches 248 degrees. Remove from heat. Stir in baking soda and vanilla extract. Gradually pour over popped corn, mixing well. Turn into 2 large shallow baking pans. Bake for 45 to 60 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. Remove from oven. Cool completely. Break apart. Store in airtight container.

541-382-9498 www.cleaningclinicinc.com Licensed • Bonded • Insured • CCB# 72129


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 G1

CLASSIFIEDS

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T h e

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General Merchandise

200 202

Want to Buy or Rent WANTED LODGEPOLE PINE, extra lumpy, unusual shaped or burls for woodcarving. Call Bob at 541-866-2604.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie puppies: Black tri mini $450; Red Merle toy $500. Little cuties! 541-475-1166

1 7 7 7

S . W .

208

210

246

265

269

Furniture & Appliances

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Building Materials

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Golden Retriever Puppies, AKC, 6 weeks, wormed twice, 1st shots, parents OFA, $595 ea. 541-593-5549.

Kittens/cats, adopt thru local rescue group. 65480 78th St., Bend, Sat/Sun 1-4, other days by appt, 541-647-2181. Some kittens in foster care, 541-815-7278 Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Fees reduced for March. www.craftcats.org for photos, map, etc. Call 541 389- 8420 for more info.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

212

Antiques & Collectibles

Petmate Dog Carrier, used 2 months, 26’’x17’’x25”, $50 Call 541-647-2961.

Collection of Many Franklin Mint & Danbury Mint Collectable Cars & Harley Davidson Bikes, 25 English Pewter Cars, collectable planes, many misc. items, Call for details, 541-382-3322.

POMERANIAN AKC female 2 months, silver tip blue, $500. 541-389-5264. POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Lovable, happy tail-waggers! Call 541-475-3889

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.wordpress.com/

Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Weatherby Vanguard 7mm Mag., Leupold 3.5x10 scope, like new, $850; Ruger M77 300 Mag, Nikon 4.5x14 scope, stainless, $850; HK USP 45 auto, $700; Ruger MKII 22 pistol, auto, stainless, $300, Marlin 22 auto, SOLD; 14 gun Gun safe, still on shipping pallet, SOLD; All are like new, 541-815-5618.

247

Norwich Terriers, AKC,Rare, del. avail,$2500,541-487-4511. sharonm@peak.org

Furniture

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

PHILCO RADIO Super Heterodyne 7, $75. Victrola Victor Red Border Collie puppies, born talking machine, $150. 1-17, have 1st shots. $200. 541-280-5202. From working parents, Fossil, OR 541-763-4052 The Bulletin reserves the right kingcreek@centurytel.net to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Sporting Goods - Misc.

BOXER-MIX puppies, beautiful! Born Jan. 24. Call Taylor at 541-788-4036. lve msg.

$50, or

Shih Tzu puppies &young adults Redmond, OR 541-788-0090 www.shihtzushowdogs.com

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

260

ChiPom puppy, sweet 4 mo male free to good home. Will be small. 541-316-0638 Chocolate & Black Labs AKC. 2 Female $150-$300 Contact Stephanie@ 541-281-8297

Dutch Hounds, $350, please call 541-536-5037 for moreinfo. English Bulldog AKC, exc quality. 1 big, beautiful male left! $1500 obo. 541-290-0026 Free adult cats as companions for seniors. Fixed, shots, ID chip, more. Will always take back for any reason if things change. Visit Sat/Sun 1-4, other days by appt, 541-647 2181. 65480 78th St., Bend, 389-8420. www.craftcats.org for cat photos, map, etc. Free barn/shop cats, fixed, shots, some friendly. Natural rodent control in exchange for safe shelter, food, water. We deliver! 541-389-8420, lv msg

Small puppies,

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks!

210

Furniture & Appliances 42” drop-leaf blonde table, solid, 3 solid chairs, $95. Prineville 541-362-5016

Cammo Romanian AK-47, extras, $650; Glock 10mm, model 29, 350 rounds, 4 clips, $600, 541-771-3222.

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

Curios & Shooters: 1873 Springfield, S&W’s pre-1900, Daisy Liberator! 2 S&W 19-4s, more. 541-678-1963

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Glock 17, glow & lazer sights + extras, $750 obo. Mini 14 stainless, extras, $750 obo. Both near new. 541-815-8744

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

GERMAN SHEPHERD/CATTLE DOG, male 5 years, neutered, with shots, $100. 541576-3701, 541-536-4440.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643.

263

Tools

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036.

Table Saw, Craftsman, 10”, stand, blades, new motor, $115, 541-504-8316.

HANDGUN SAFETY CLASS for concealed license. NRA, Police Firearms Instructor, Lt. Gary DeKorte Wed. March 16, 6:30-10:30 pm. Call Kevin, Centwise, for reservations $40. 541-548-4422

265

SOFA, microfiber, solid rust Remington 700 Classic 221 Fireball, $475. Win Model 97 brown color, reclines both cowboy-action ready, $575. ends, like new $350. Blue Win Model 97 original, $650. swivel ROCKER, great in 541-410-9244. shape, $50. 541-312-2845

541-322-0496

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased. • Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers.

All Year Dependable Firewood: Split lodgepole, $90 for 1/2 cord; $160 for 1; or $300 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Half cords available, too! Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193 SEASONED JUNIPER: $150/cord rounds, $170 per cord split. Delivered in Central Oregon. Since 1970, Call eves. 541-420-4379 msg.

B e n d

O r e g o n

Forum Center, Bend 541-617-8840 www.wbu.com/bend 270

Lost and Found FOUND BIBLE - Boyd Acres Rd, last week of Feb. Call to identify: 541-420-0517 FOUND trailer hitch with ball near Post Office in Bend. 541-389-9503.

Find It in

308

421

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Schools and Training

John Deere 10’ seed drill, grass & grain and fertilizer boxes, double disk, excellent cond., $3250 OBO. 541-419-2713.

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

John Deere Tractor Model 770 1990, with canopy; JD model 70 loader; JD 513 rotary cutter; Rankin box scraper & 1000-lb forks, excellent condition, 800 hrs, $9000 all. 541-318-6161

Employment Opportunities

476

325

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Hay, Grain and Feed

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com WANTED: Horse or utility trailers for consignment or purchase. KMR Trailer Sales, 541-389-7857 www.kigers.com

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809 DENTAL ASSISTANT Seeking person w/great personality & work ethic.Must be X-Ray certified. Benefits. Please call 541-504-0880 between 10-3 pm. or eves. at 541-977-3249 until 8 p.m. DIETARY MANAGER 65 bed assisted living and 42 bed nursing facility seeking a Dietary Manager. CDM and ServSafe Cert. preferred, should have previous management and culinary experience. Excellent supervisory, organizational, and communication skills required. Apply in person at: 127 SE Wilson Ave., Bend (Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-4:40pm)

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

286

358

Sales Northeast Bend

Farmers Column

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

454

Looking for Employment I provide housekeeping & caregiving svcs, & have 20+ yrs experience. 541-508-6403

LOST Mickey Mouse Silver Anniversary watch, Feb. 21?? Please call 541-617-8710

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

The Bulletin

LOST CAT, March 2nd. Female multi-colored cat, 1 notched ear, Hwy 20 East & Frederick Butte Rd. $50 reward offered. Call 541-419-2074

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

Employment

300 400

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Irish Beer Stein, Tumalo Road, Sunday 2/27, around 12 pm, Call to ID, 541-389-7373

9 7 7 0 2 476

Farm Market

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Barley Straw; Compost; 541-546-6171.

266

• Receipts should include,

CCB #72129 www.cleaningclinicinc.com

A-1 Washers & Dryers

• Laminate from .79¢ sq.ft. • Hardwood from $2.99 sq.ft.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Your Backyard Birdfeeding Specialists!

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery and inspection.

Call Now! 541-382-9498

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

Wood Floor Super Store

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809

Over 40 Years Experience in Carpet Upholstery & Rug Cleaning

Riding Garden Tractor, Scott’s (made by John Deere), 20hp, 48” cut, $900/best offer. Call 541-604-1808

Hardwood Outlet

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Brand new in box Remington 700-SPS, 300 Ultra mag, $600 new, $500 firm. 541-447-1595.

TEDDI BEAR PUPPIES (ZUCHONS), 4 Males, CKC Reg., non-shedding, hypoallergenic, dewclaws rem., 1st BROWNING O/U Cynergy shots/wormed, ready 3/3. Sporting Edition, 30” barrel, $350. 541-460-1277 12 ga. like new cond. $1700 obo. 541-420-2741.

541-647-8261

Ad must include price of item

Beretta A-302 12 Ga., auto special trap, 30” barrell, exc. cond., $1100, 541-410-2819.

Liquidating Appliances, new & reconditioned, guaranteed. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418

Golden Doodle Puppies, Mini’s, $900. Ready May 1st! Gina, 541-390-1015

Schwinn SRB 1800 Recumbant Excercise Bike, like new $275, 541-389-9268.

both male and female, Poodle 1911 Para-Ord, black & blue, cross, Shih-Malts, mini $750. Glock 45ACP, $550. mutts, different prices. DelivBoth like new. 541-647-8931 ery part way. 541-874-2901 AR15 Bushmaster 223, scope, charley2901@gmail.com case, Harrison bi-pod, 6 mags $875 firm. 541-604-4200

GERMAN SHEPHERD 4½ mo. old male, papered, current on shots, $700. 541-306-8164.

German Shepherd pups 1 male, 1 female, affection & protection! $250. 541-390-8875

BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191.

246

Dachshund AKC Mini longhaired, DOB 1/5, $500 & up. 541-598-7417. susanspacas@yahoo.com

Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, females, $375, males, $325,info: 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Bicycles and Accessories

242

Most jobs completed in 5 days or less. Best Pricing in the Industry.

The

541-389-6655

Exercise Equipment

Cabinet Refacing & Refinishing. Save Thousands!

255

241

2008 18” Trek Mtn. Bike, new off road tires, water bottle holder, exc cond, $250. 541-480-2652

classified@bendbulletin.com For newspaper delivery questions, call Circulation Dept. 541-385-5800

Carpet, indoor/outdoor, self stick backing, green/grey, 1000 sq.ft avail, $.50/sq.ft., great for RV’s, 541-388-0871

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

Shelti Mix, male, 541-576-3701 503-310-2514.

To place an ad, call 541-385-5809 or email

Columbia 2-person tent, “Lost Lake,” never used, extra stakes/poles, $90. Portable sling hammock, $45. Call 541-771-9551

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Black Lab/Hound mix, active neutered 4½-yr male, free to good home. 541-848-7525

Boston Terriers, 4 females, 1 male, 1st shots, wormed, ready, $500, 541-536-5141.

A v e . ,

Pets and Supplies

Misc. Items Bernese Mtn. Dog Female 6 mo. Imported. 4 Generations Champ Sires. Vaccinated, Spay Contract Req. $1300 roguebernese@hotmail.com (541)604-4858

C h a n d l e r

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Hairstylist - Fully licensed for hair, nails & waxing. Recent relevant experience necessary. Hourly/commission. Teresa, 541-382-8449 Heavy Equipment Local Heavy Equipment dealer seeks Heavy equipment field mechanic with a minimum 5 years experience. Must be proficient in all phases of diagnostics and repair. Must have a CDL license and a clean driving record. Hourly position requiring overtime and possible weekend work. Send resume to Box 16338070, c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708.

Employment Opportunities Medical Receptionist/ MA: Respected Internal Medicine Practice in Bend has part-time opening, 20+ hrs/week. Successful candidate must have experience in medical office setting & EMR skill set. Preferred candidate will additionally be able to take vital signs, and do basic back office tasks. Strong multi-tasking & organizational skills are a must. Competitive salary. Fax resume Attn: Nita, 541-389-2662.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Nursing Exp. Nurse Manager to share duties in Critical Access Hospital. Work in RN Management team to ensure professional, top quality care. Shared call duties with ability to provide hands on nursing care when necessary. Require strong EMR skills, great communication and supervisory techniques. Must have a min. of 4 years nursing experience, preferably in hospital setting, at least 3 years of supervisory exp. Bachelors degree in nursing or in active pursuit of degree. Prefer experience in a rural environment. Apply to drose@harneydh.com or use online form at www.harneydh.com. For questions call Denise Rose 541-573-5184

OFFICE

MANAGER

Experienced office manager needed for established local business that is a leader in their industry. Responsibilities include oversight of financial activities including sales transaction records, accounts receivable, accounts payable, income statement and balance sheet. Knowledge of Human Resource policy, practices, record keeping and compliance important. Work with multifunctional staff of 5. Strong computer skills important including familiarity with server and network systems. Experienced with a companymanaged website and intranet support systems is also a plus. Must be customer-focused and have strong interpersonal skills required to work with diverse and dynamic 50-person sales organization. Immediate opening with base salary range starting at 45K. Exciting and challenging opportunity. All inquiries handled with complete confidence. Respond to Sam@midoregonpersonnel.com Office Manager PT/FT, busy office, must have clean appearance, computer, bookkeeping, Excel and Customer Service exp. a must. Apply in person only at 1735 NE Hwy 20, Bend.

Delivery

NOW TAKING BIDS

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

375 292

Sales Other Areas

Building Materials BarkTurfSoil.com

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

BERBER CARPET, 15x14.9, new, tan. $145. Installation available. 541-388-0871.

FREE HORSE MANURE, WE LOAD, YOU HAUL. HAVE LOTS! 541-390-1725.

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain-fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included. Please call 541-383-2523. Holstein Steer, 1500 Lb., grain fed 120 days, 2 yrs old., $1/lb live weight. 541-480-3900.

for Contract Haulers, delivering bundles of newspapers from Bend to LaGrande, Oregon. There is a possibility of more runs in the future. Must have own vehicle with license and insurance and the capability to haul up to 8000 lbs. Candidates must also be able to lift up to 50 lbs. physically. Selected candidates will be independently contracted. For more info contact James Baisinger at jbaisinger@bendbulletin.com


G2 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Shipping & Receiving Clerk: Responsibilities include pulling & packaging orders, shipping in courier software, data entry for incoming & outgoing materials, proper warehousing of materials, and delivering materials to their appropriate destinations. Must possess previous experience with shipping & receiving, basic computer skills, ability to lift at least 50 lbs., high degree of accuracy, and a positive attitude. Salary DOE. Send Resume to Precise Flight, Inc., PO Box 7168, Bend, OR 97708 or via e-mail to tracy.mcchesney@preciseflight.com .

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Finance & Business

500 600 507

Want To Rent

LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

3 or 2 Bdrm, 1 or 2 Bath, rural setting preferred. Can give refs; non-smoking adults, well-behaved pets. Need by April 1st. Call 505-455-7917 Retired Marine Corps veteran on good pension wants to share house, rent 1 room + garage or carport for my car. $500 + utilities available. Call Richard, 541-312-5781

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

FREE BANKRUPTCY EVALUATION visit our website at www.oregonfreshstart.com

Sales

Independent Contractor Sales SEEKING DYNAMIC INDIVIDUALS DOES THIS SOUND LIKE YOU? OUTGOING & COMPETITIVE PERSONABLE & ENTHUSIASTIC CONSISTENT & MOTIVATED

541-382-3402

*Solid Income Opportunity* *Complete Training Program* *No Selling Door to Door * *No Telemarketing Involved* *Great Advancement Opportunity* * Full and Part Time Hours * FOR THE CHANCE OF A LIFETIME CALL BRUCE KINCANNON (760) 622-9892 TODAY!

Private party would like to borrow $80,000 @ 8% on local property. 541-383-0449

OFFER:

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

642

658

Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Bend's Finest 1, 2 & 3 Bdrm

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments

Houses for Rent Redmond

Real Estate For Sale

1 Bdrm., 1 bath, charming cottage, large yard, quiet neighborhood, 4 minutes to airport, 2881 SW 32nd St., $650/mo, 541-350-8338.

700

3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big yard, dbl. garage w/opener, quiet cul-de-sac. $995 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

705

Specials on select apts W/D in each apt. Paid W/S/G 2 Sparkling Pools, A/C, Covered Parking, Billiards, Free DVD Rentals 2 Recreation Ctrs 24 hr fitness, computer labs with internet & more! Call STONEBRIAR APTS.

541-330-5020 Stone.briar.apts@gmail.com Managed by Norris & Stevens

!! Snowball of a Deal !! $300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

$99 MOVES YOU IN !!!

630

Rooms for Rent

Limited numbers available 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Awbrey Heights, furn., no smoking/drugs/pets. $350 +$100 dep. (541) 388-2710. Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & 636 Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Apt./Multiplex NW Bend Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax A small 1 Bdrm/1 bath duplex, STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES W/S/G paid, $420 + deposFurnished room, TV w/ cable, its. No smoking/pets, applimicro. & fridge. Util. & linens. cations at: 38 #2 NW Irving New owners, $145-$165/wk. or call 541-389-4902. 541-382-1885

Fully furnished loft apt.

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

632

642

(Private Party ads only)

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Redmond & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend $99 MOVE-IN SPECIAL! 1 & 2 bdrm apts. avail. starting at $575.

Call about our $99 Special! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575. • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Beautiful 2 Bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting. No pets/smoking. Near St. Charles.W/S/G pd; both w/d hkup + laundry facil. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm., 3 bath, plus office, new flooring, large lot, 62024 Dean Swift Road. 3 Blocks south of Costco. Pet OK, $850/mo. 541-408-7368

ONE MONTH FREE with 6 month lease! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. 541-923-1907 OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS www.redmondrents.com

LUCKY YOU SPECIAL! 1/ 2 OFF SOME MOVE-IN RENTS w/ Lease Agreements

KOZAK PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053

Large luxury family home 3/2.5 3200 sq. ft., W/D, fridge, daylight basement, large lot, views, no pets. $1350. 503-720-7268.

Terrebonne 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath in private, treed setting. Has deck, detached garage and storage, $725/month. Call 541-419-8370; 541-548-4727

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, new paint, private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

661

Houses for Rent Prineville 4Bdrm/3bath, 2700 sq ft newer construction. Pet friendly on approval; in rec area with pool, $1000/mo + $1000 dep. Avail 4/1. 541-306-6411

CO.

Houses for Rent 63150 Peale St., Yardley Estates. Available 3/6. 3200 sq Sisters ft, 4 Bdrm, 3 baths, 2 car garage, fenced backyard. $1600 Enchanting Log Home on /mo. Call Tina, 541-330-6972 secluded 4 acres, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 5 mi. to Sisters, Luxury Home: 2490 Sq.ft., 3 $950/mo, 1st, last, dep., bdrm, 2.5 bath, office/den, 3 avail. now, 541-993-4102. car garage, fenced, builders 671 own home, loaded w/upgrades, full mtn. views, 2641 Mobile/Mfd. NE Jill Ct., $1500/mo., avail. for Rent now, 541-420-3557.

NOTICE: All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

• Near old Mill District - Spacious 2 bdrm, 1 bath. Lower end unit. Coin-op Laundry just outside front door. $525 WST • Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath apartment. Off-street parking. On-site laundry. Near hospital. Just $525 WST. • Charming, cozy 2 Bdrm/1 Bath cottage in central location. New carpet. Fenced backyard. $595 per month. • Newly Refurbished SE Unit - 2 Bdrm/1Bath. Private fenced patio. Coin-op laundry. Detached carport. Huge common yard. Ask about Pets. $595 WST • Small House Near Downtown 2 Bdrm/1 Bath. Laundry room. Fenced yard. Cute kitchen w/extra work space. Pets? 541-322-7253 $625 WST. • Wonderfully Charming Home Close In - 2 Bdrm, 1 Bath, Lots of fun touches. Washer & dryer included. Large partially fenced yard. Pet considered. Fireplace, GFA. $775. • NW TOWNHOME - lovely 2 Bdrm/2.5 Bath with Laundry room. Single garage. Vaulted ceilings. Great location. GFA. Fireplaces. $775 WS 652 •Beautiful 1990 sq. ft. NE Home Upscale Subdivision. 3 bedHouses for Rent room, 2 bath. Master bdrm separation. Single level. Triple gaNW Bend rage. Extra RV parking $1,000 per mo. • Newer 4 Bdrm/2.5 Bath Home in SE - 1962 sq. ft. GFA. Prestigious, fully furnished, Cute den or library with gas fireplace off private patio. Double 6 bdrm., 3 bath, NW Skyliner, garage. W/D included. Only $1,150. 6 mo. minimum, incl. some utils., $2600/mo, please call ***** FOR ADDITIONAL PROPERTIES ***** 541-944-8638. CALL 541-382-0053

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com Warehouse/Office space, 1235 sq ft, large roll-up door. 20685 Carmen Lp. No triple net; $600/mo, 1st + dep. 541-480-7546; 541-480-7541 Warehouse with Offices in Redmond,6400 sq.ft., zoned M2, overhead crane, plenty of parking, 919 SE Lake Rd., $0.40/sq.ft., 541-420-1772.

693

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $200 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

745

Homes for Sale Realtors: $5000 to the selling agent upon an acceptable offer of MLS# 201100372. Call 541-410-1500.

746

Real Estate Services

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family * Home Inspectors * room with woodstove, new Etc. carpet, pad & paint, single The Real Estate Services classigarage w/opener. $895/mo. fication is the perfect place to 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 reach prospective B U Y E R S SELLERS of real esClean 4 Bdrm + den, 2 bath, AND 14920 SW Maverick Rd, CRR. tate in Central Oregon. To No smoking. $900/mo. + place an ad call 385-5809 deposits. Call 541-504-8545 or 541-350-1660.

662

2-story duplex, later model, very nice 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 1400 sq ft, all appls, small backyd & patio, W/S/G paid, $695/mo. 541-420-5927

Alpine Meadows

2 Bdrm 1 bath DUPLEX, w/d hookup, dishwasher, micro, range, fridge. Attach. garage w/opener. W/S/landscaping pd. $675/mo, lease. 1317 NE Noe. 503-507-9182

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

Apt./Multiplex General Apt./Multiplex Redmond

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

WE

616

Real Estate Contracts

Web Developer needed for Company in Eugene, go to www.wantingtowork.com/it to see details and submit resume.

WINNING TEAM OF SALES/PROMOTION PROFESSIONALS ARE MAKING AN AVERAGE OF $400 - $800 PER WEEK DOING SPECIAL EVENT, TRADE SHOW, RETAIL & GROCERY STORE PROMOTIONS WHILE REPRESENTING THE BULLETIN NEWSPAPER as an independent contractor

Rentals

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

745

Northwest Bend Homes 4 Bdrms 2½ baths - Great NW Bend family home. Call me for details! Barb Hartnett, Broker, Prudential NW Properties, 541-420-0915

BROKEN TOP bargain priced. 3 Bdrm, 3 bath, 2403 sq.ft., new slab granite countertops, hrdwd floors, gas fireplace, only $424,900. Randy Schoning, principal Broker, John L. Scott. 541-480-3393

750

Redmond Homes

Homes for Sale PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-877-0246. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275. ***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

771

Lots Bargain priced Pronghorn lot, $99,900, also incl. $115,000 golf membership & partially framed 6000 sq. ft. home, too! Randy Schoning, Princ. Broker, John L. Scott RE. 541-480-3393, 541-389-3354

773

Acreages 10 Acres,7 mi. E. of Costco, quiet, secluded, at end of road, power at property line, water near by, $250,000 OWC 541-617-0613

775

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes FULLY REFURBED 5 Bdrm, 3 bath, delivered & set-up to your site, $49,900. 541-548-5511 www.JAndMHomes.com Your land paid off? $500 down only. Pick your new home! Several to choose. 541-548-5511 www.JandMHomes.com


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Boats & RV’s

800 805

Misc. Items

865

880

881

ATVs

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

BROUGHAM 23½’ 1981 motorhome, 2-tone brown, perfect cond, 6 brand new tires. engine perfect, runs great, inside perfect shape. See to appreciate at 15847 WoodChip Lane off Day Rd in La Pine. Asking $8000. 541-876-5106.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

You’ve Taken Care of Your Car’s Body...What about Your Body?

Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Get Your FREE Insider’s Report & Discover...

Yamaha Grizzly 2008 660 - WARN

•How hidden car accident injuries can lead to arthritis. •How even low impact collisions can lead to long term injuries. •Why pain medications may make you worse. •What test should you have to document your injuries so you get the settlement you deserve. Call For Your Free Report.

888--599-1717

(24 hr recorded message)

850

Snowmobiles

Yamaha 600 Mtn. Max 1997, too many extras to list, call for info., $1195, trailer also avail., 541-548-3443.

Winch, Fender Protectors, new winch rope, recent 150/160 hr service, Hunter Green $5,495 541-549-6996 (Sisters).

870

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Yamaha Snowmobiles & Trailer, 1997 700 Triple, 1996 600, Tilt Trailer, front off-load, covers for snowmobiles, clean & exc. cond., package price, $3800, 541-420-1772.

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010

Black on black, detachable windshield, backrest, and luggage rack. 2200 miles. $13,900. Please call Jack, 541-549-4949, or 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

880

Motorhomes

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $39,900, please call 541-330-9149.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

ALPENLITE 1984. A Beauty! Extras, 5th wheel hitch, A/C, microwave, tires are good, large fridge, radio, propane tanks have been certified. Spare tire & wheels. $3000. 923-4174.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

Everest 32’ 2004, 3

slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

REDMOND 5. Local writer seeks info from anyone connected to R5 case. 541-480-2571

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $16,900, 541-390-2504

The Bulletin Classifieds

MERCEDES C300 2008

New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $10,500. 541-589-0767, in Burns.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

"POLE BARNS" Built Right! Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates . See Facebook Business page, search under M. Lewis Construction, LLC CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Truck with Snow Plow!

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Chevy Bonanza 1978, runs good. $4800 OBO. Call 541-390-1466.

Ford 2 Door 1949,

14’x6’ flat trailer, $950 OBO. Please call Jimmy, 541-771-0789

99% Complete, $12,000, please call 541-408-7348.

1989 W-W Trailer, 6x12 enclosed, 2 axle, steel. Needs paint, $1150. 541-420-3906

Ford Mustang 1970 302 Auto snow tires included, $2000 call 541-280-2465.

Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Cargo Trailer HaulMark 26’ 5th wheel, tandem 7000 lb. axle, ¾ plywood interior, ramp and double doors, 12 volt, roof vent, stone guard, silver with chrome corners, exc. cond., $7200. 541-639-1031.

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

CHEVROLET 1970, V-8 automatic 4X4 3/4 ton. Very good condition, lots of new parts and maintenance records. New tires, underdash air, electronic ignition and much more. Original paint, truck used very little. $5700, 541-575-3649 We Buy Scrap Auto & Truck Batteries, $10 each Also buying junk cars & trucks, (up to $500), & scrap metal! Call 541-912-1467

932

Antique and Classic Autos Pickup

FREEDOM CLEANING Got a mess? Call the best! Special Rates Available Now! Call Ellen today! Licensed. 541-420-7525

Dodge Ram 1500, 2001, 4x4 Extra Cab, all power, 90K miles, $8900. 503-329-8154

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

Electrical Services BAXTER ELECTRIC Remodels / Design / Rentals All Small Jobs•Home Improve. All Work by Owner - Call Tom 541-318-1255 CCB 162723

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

Chevy When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Wagon

Ford crew cab 1993, 7.3 Diesel, auto, PS, Rollalong package, deluxe interior & exterior, electric windows/door locks, dually, fifth wheel hitch, receiver hitch, 90% rubber, super maint. w/all records, new trans. rebuilt, 116K miles. $6500, Back on the market. 541-923-0411

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

2004,

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $18,900. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809 Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!!

Toyota Sequoia Limited 2001, auto, leather, sunroof, 6-CD, new tires, 107K miles, $11,500 firm. 541-420-8107

940

HHR

2006,

53K miles, exc. cond., set up for Road Master tow bar, 1 owner, very well maint., $8950, 541-480-0168.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

541-322-7253

Vans Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. C a ll T h e G u r u : 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subject to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-1110138

• 4WD, 68,000 miles. • Great Shape. • Original Owner.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DAVID M. VANASEN AND THERESA L. VAN AS EN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 4/24/2008, recorded 4/30/2008, under Instrument No. 2008-18905, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real properly situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 1 IN BLOCK 15 OF VANDERCERT ACRES SOUTH 1981, PARKV MANUFACTRED HOME, 027A367PVGR10076B (VIN) WHICH IS PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE REAL PROPERTY The street address or other common designation, if any, of the rea! property described above is purported to be: 17874 GRIMM ROAD BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 11, 2011 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 10 payments at $1,691.35 each $16,913.50 (05-01-10 through 02-11-11) Late Charges: $1,076.62 Foreclosure Fees and Costs $1,818.00 TOTAL: $19,808.12 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $220,597.83, PLUS interest thereon at 6.000% per annum from 4/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 14, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/11/2011 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC Trustee By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc. as agent for the Trustee By Angela Barsamyan Foreclosure Assistant 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: (877)237-7878

541-389-5016 evenings.

ASAP# 3912555 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

LeSabre

white, 115k, cloth interior, 80% tires, all factory conveniences okay, luxury ride, 30 mpg hwy, 3.8 litre V6 motor, used but not abused. Very dependable. and excellent buy at $5,400. Call Bob 541-318-9999 or Sam at 541-815-3639.

The Bulletin Classiieds

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2000. 541-322-6261

Rooing Home Improvement

Toyota Landcruiser, 2003, champagne in color, 90K miles, excellent cond, all options + GPS & Sirius radio, $20,000. 541-595-5363

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

All wheel drive, 1 owner, navigation, heated seats, DVD, 2 moonroofs. Immaculate and never abused. $27,950. Call 503-351-3976

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007, 10K miles, running boards, many options, tow package, $18,500 OBO. 541-815-5000

Landscaping, Yard Care

Affordable Roof Repair by licensed, bonded and insured specialist. 36 years’ experience. CCB #94309 Call Cary at 541-948-0865

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $14,500. 541-408-2111

Subaru Forester XS 2003, leathr, auto clim control, htd seats, prem audio, extra whls, 108K, all rec’s, $9500. 541-516-1165

931

Stock Heads off of a 1988 Chevy, $75. Please call 541-771-0789

(Private Party ads only)

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

Buick

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Mercedes GL450, 2007

975

Automobiles

Chevy

Pace Utility Boxed Trailer, 6’x 10’, white, extra metal tiedowns, $1900. 541-647-2961

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $7500 obo. 541-330-0616

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Domestic Services

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Jeep Cherokee Limited, 2003, like new, low miles. Divorce forces sale, $10,500. Call 541-923-0718

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, Contractors Law (ORS 671) ultimate living comfort, requires all businesses that X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, Home & Commercial Repairs, quality built, large kitchen, advertise to perform Land auto, reduced to $12,900 obo Carpentry-Painting, fully loaded, well insulated, scape Construction which in 541-554-5212,702-501-0600 Pressure-washing, Honey hydraulic jacks and so much cludes: planting, decks, Do's. Small or large jobs. more.$54,000! 541-317-9185 fences, arbors, water-fea On-time promise. tures, and installation, repair Senior Discount. of irrigation systems to be li All work guaranteed. censed with the Landscape 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Contractors Board. This Bonded & Insured 4-digit number is to be in CCB#181595 Ford F150 4X4 1996 Eddie cluded in all advertisements Building/Contracting Chevy Corvette 1980, Bauer pkg., auto. 5.8L, Super which indicate the business Philip L. Chavez yellow, glass removable top, Cab, green, power everyhas a bond, insurance and NOTICE: Oregon state law Contracting Services 8 cyl., auto trans, radio, thing, 156k mi. Fair cond. workers compensation for requires anyone who Specializing in Tile, Remodels & heat, A/C, new factory inte$3500 OBO. 541-408-7807. their employees. For your contracts for construction Home Repair, Flooring & rior, black, 48K., exc. tires, protection call 503-378-5909 work to be licensed with the Finish Work. CCB#168910 factory aluminum wheels, or use our website: Construction Contractors Phil, 541-279-0846 asking $12,000, will conwww.lcb.state.or.us to check Board (CCB). An active sider fair offer & possible license status before con license means the contractor FIND IT! trade, 541-385-9350. tracting with the business. is bonded and insured. BUY IT! Persons doing landscape Verify the contractor’s CCB SELL IT! maintenance do not require a license through the Chevy Corvette 1984, all 885 The Bulletin Classiieds Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. LCB license. CCB Consumer Website original, new rubber, runs Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, Canopies and Campers www.hirealicensedcontractor.com great, needs battery, $5000 Margo Construction LLC wheels, brakes. Very nice. or call 503-378-4621. The firm. Call Mike 541-706-1705 Masonry Since 1992 • Pavers Just $12,900. 541-601-6350 Aluminum Canopy Bulletin recommends •Carpentry •Remodeling Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Red, older, $75. checking with the CCB prior Chad L. Elliott Construction • Decks • Window/Door Please call 541-771-0789 to contracting with anyone. MASONRY Replacement • Int/Ext Paint Some other trades also FORD Pickup 1977, Brick * Block * Stone CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 require additional licenses step side, 351 Windsor, Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome and certifications. 115,000 miles, L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945 I DO THAT! MUST SEE! Home Repairs, Remodeling, Chevy El Camino 1979, $4500. Painting, Wall Covering Professional & Honest Work. Child Care Services 350 auto, new studs, located 541-350-1686 Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 in Sisters, $3000 OBO, Dennis 541-317-9768 Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999, MARTIN JAMES In-Home Child Care, 1 infant 907-723-9086,907-723-9085 European Professional Painter extended overhead cab, stereo, opening in very small group, Ford Ranger 2004 Super Repaint Specialist self-contained,outdoor shower, $425/mo. flat,541-388-7555. Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, Oregon License #186147 LLC TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non A/C bed liner, tow pkg, smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. 541-815-2888 120K Like New! KBB Retail: Debris Removal $10,000 OBO Chevy Suburban Remodeling, Carpentry 360-990-3223 1969, classic 3-door, very JUNK BE GONE clean, all original good RGK Contracting & l Haul Away FREE Lance 1071 Camper 2004, condition, $5500, call Consulting 30+Yrs. Exp. For Salvage. loaded, slide out, genera541-536-2792. •Additions/Remodels/Garages Also Cleanups & Cleanouts tor. a/c, very well maint. •Replacement windows/doors Mel 541-389-8107 always garage, $14,999 remodelcentraloregon.com OBO. 541-433-5892 or 541-480-8296 CCB189290 541-771-6400.

M. Lewis Construction, LLC

Honda Pilot 2010 Like new, under 11K, goes great in all conditions. Blue Bk $30,680; asking $27,680. 541-350-3502

GMC Ventura 3500 1986, refrigerated, w/6’x6’x12’ box, has 2 sets tires w/rims., 1250 lb. lift gate, new engine, $5500, 541-389-6588, ask for Bob.

C-10

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Handyman

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Barns

975

Automobiles

933

personals Happy Birthday “Sweet 16” (for the 4th time) to the world-famous Nurse Marty! Love, Michael

940

Vans

Pickups

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

916

541-385-5809

875

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

881

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Fifth Wheels

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

925

Travel Trailers Watercraft

882

932

Antique and Classic Autos

900

Utility Trailers

Hurricane 2007 35.5’ like new, 3 slides, generator, dark cabinets, Ford V10, 4,650 mi $79,900 OBO. 541-923-3510

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

541-385-5809

Autos & Transportation

935

Sport Utility Vehicles CHEVY SUBURBAN LT 2005

$19,450!


G4 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES PROBATE DEPARTMENT Estate of PHILIP J. WEIGAND, Deceased. Case No. 11PB0028MS NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS PURSUANT TO ORS 113.155 AND In the Matter of PHILIP J. WEIGAND, Trustor of the Philip J. Weigand Revocable Living Trust U/T/A dated August 30, 1993, as amended and restated on December 22, 2010, Deceased. Case No. 11PB0029BH NOTICE PURSUANT TO ORS 130.370, INFORMATION TO OTHER PARTIES ENTITLED TO NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed Personal Representative in the above first-captioned Case No. 11PB0028MS (the “Estate”), and is also the sole Trustee of the PHILIP J. WEIGAND, Trustor of the Philip J. Weigand Revocable Living Trust U/T/A dated August 30, 1993, as amended and restated on December 22, 2010, (the “Trust”), in the second-captioned Case No. 11PB0029BH. All persons having claims against the Estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative and/or Trustee at Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, OR 97701-1957, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative and/or Trustee, or the attorneys for the Personal Representative and Trustee, who are Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300, Bend, Oregon 97701-1957. DATED and first published March 8, 2011. Josephine A. Weigand Personal Representative and Trustee PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND TRUSTEE: Josephine A. Weigand 3772 SW Zero Place Redmond, OR 97756 TEL: (541) 548-4358 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND TRUSTEE: KARNOPP PETERSEN LLP Thomas J. Sayeg, OSB #873805 tjs@karnopp.com 1201 NW Wall Street, Suite 300 Bend, Oregon 97701-1957 TEL: (541) 382-3011 FAX: (541) 388-5410 Of Attorneys for Personal Representative and Trustee LEGAL NOTICE Peter J. Salmon, ESQ. #9382 Moss Pite & Duncan, LLP 525 E. Main Street P.O. Box 12289 El Cajon, CA 92022-2289 Telephone: (619) 590-1300 Facsimile: (619) 590-1385 Attorneys for Plaintiff FANNE MAE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF' THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES OMAC MORTGAGE, LLC, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, Plaintiff, V. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AND ASSIGNS OF REX T, HISCOCKS; THE UNKNOWN DEVISEES OP REX T. HISCOCKS; CASEY HISCOCKS; GABRIEL TOWN; AND ALL PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN TUE REAL PROPERTY COMMONLY KNOWN AS 52472 ANTLER LANE, LA PINE, OREGON 97739, Defendants. To defendants the unknown heirs and assigns of Rex T. Hiscocks; the unknown devisees of Rex T. Hiscocks; Casey Hiscocks; Gabriel Town; and All parties claiming an interest in the real property commonly known as 52472 Antler Lane, La Pine, Oregon 97739: IN THE NAME OF TI IF STATE OF OREGON: You are hereby required to appear and defend the action filed against you in the above-entitled cause within 30 days from the date of service of this Summons upon you; and if you fail to appear and defend, for want thereof the Plaintiff will apply to the court for the relief demanded therein. Dated: 12/16/10 By: Rochelle L. Stanford, OSB #06244 Rstanford@piteduncan.com David J. Boulanger, OSB #092943 Trial Attorney 503-222-2256 Dboulanger@pitedunacn.co m 210 SW Morrison St., STE. 600 Portland, OR 97204 Of attorneys for plaintiff GMAC Mortgage, LLC. NOTICE TO DEFENDANT/DEFENDANTS READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer". The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 (Days along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the plaintiffs attorney or, if the plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the plaintiff. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, YOU SHOULD SEE AN ATTORNEY IMMEDIATELY. IF YOU NEED HELP IN FINDING AN ATTORNEY, YOU MAY CALL THE OREGON STATE BAR'S LAWYER REFERRAL SERVICE AT (503) 684-3763 OR TOLL-FREE IN OREGON AT (800) 452-7636. 02/22, 03/01, 03/08, 03/15 R-370179

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxx1834 T.S. No.: 1210667-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Scott J. Sargent, as Grantor to First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee, in favor of Bank of America, N.a., as Beneficiary, dated April 07, 2003, recorded April 16, 2003, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2003-24884 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A tract of land lying in the Southeast Quarter (53 1/4) of section 14, Township 17 South, Range 11 East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County Oregon, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Section corner common to sections 13, 14, 23 and 24; thence North 690511 West along the South line of said section 14, 1330.53 feet to the Southwest corner of the Southeast Quarter of the Southeast quarter (SE 1/4 SE 1/4) of said Section 14; thence North 00°01'33" West along the West line of the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter (SE 1/4 SE 1/4) of said Section 14, 1724,08 feet; thence East 656.95 feet to the true point of beginning; thence North, 612.82 feet to a point on the Southwesterly right of way line of a 60.00 foot road right of way; thence South 58°01 East along said road right of way line, 200.0 feet to the P.C. of a 494.87 foot radius curve right; thence along the arc of said curve along the Southwesterly right of way line of said road, 94.00 feet through a central angle of 100.53 (the long chord of which bears South 52°34'30" East); thence South 47°08" East along the Southwesterly right of way line of said road, 366.55 feet to the P.C. of a 608.91 foot radius curve right; thence along the arc of said curve along the Southwesterly right of way line of said road, 95.11 feet through a central angle of 8°56'58" (the long chord of which bears south 42°39'3l" East); thence South 38°11'02" East along the Southwesterly right of way line of said road, 39.48 feet; thence South 14.04 feet; thence West, 601.77 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 19175 Buck Drive Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due June 1, 2008 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,893.30 Monthly Late Charge $94.67. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $244,891.61 together with interest thereon at 5.750% per annum from May 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 31, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 20, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-365827 02/22, 03/01, 03/08, 03/15 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Stephen L. Barnette, as grantor to Western Title Company, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated April 5, 2007, recorded April 13, 2007, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2007, at Page 21250, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot 15, Block 42, Center Addition to Bend, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 616 N.E. Franklin Ave, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,279.79, from May 1, 2009, and monthly payments in the sum of $1,264.98, from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $218,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.1% per annum from April 1, 2009, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee appeared on February 03, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS187.110, on the front steps between the doors of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continued the trustee's sale to April 04, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, on the front steps between the doors of the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: 2/28/2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Successor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105228ASAP# 3922445 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011, 03/22/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030454193 T.S. No.: 11-00406-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ALAN M. ROUSSEAU as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on April 5, 2005, as Instrument No, 2005-20391 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 201454 PARCEL ONE (1) OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2000-43, RECORDED AUGUST 30, 2000 IN PARTITION CABINET 2-91, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 23585 E HIGHWAY 20, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$14,662.61 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $612,044.94 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.12000% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon, and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 1, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 714-508Â5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 in construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 1, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY. Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3930658 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011, 03/22/2011, 03/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-CK-105338 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DAN I ELLA GARRETT, UNMARRIED, as grantor, to CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE COMP OF OREGON, AN OREGON CORP, as Trustee, in favor of METLIFE HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF METLIFE BANK, N.A., as beneficiary, dated 10/26/2009, recorded 3/24/2010, under Instrument No. 2010-12105, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The ben-

eficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by METLIFE HOME LOANS, A DIVISION OF METLIFE BANK, N.A.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (N1/2 NE1/4 NE1/4 SW1/4) OF SECTION 17, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 13 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 60985 GOSNEY ROAD BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 3, 2011 Total Amount Due $ 230,901.81 Accrued Late Charges $ 0.00 Beneficiary Advances: $ 0.00 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 230,901.81 By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: FAILURE TO PAY THE PRINCIPAL BALANCE WHICH BECAME DUE ON 1/8/2010, DUE TO THE CONDITIONS ON THE NOTE REFERENCED AS PARAGRAPH 6 (A)(i), TOGETHER WITH ACCRUED AND ACCRUING INTEREST, CHARGES, FEES AND COSTS AS SET FORTH. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 7, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. Notwithstanding the use of the term "reinstatement" or "reinstated", this obligation is fully mature and the entire principal balance is due and payable, together with interest, costs, fees and advances as set forth above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/3/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3903600 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEES NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030769764 T.S. No.: 11-00299-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JAMES S. MILLIMAN, MARGARET J. MILLIMAN, AS JOINT TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC, as Beneficiary, recorded on September 30, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-66628 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 195311 LOT FORTY-ONE (41), HAYDEN VIEW PHASE ONE, RECORDED MARCH 17, 1998, IN CABINET D, PAGE 592, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3261 SW NEWBERRY AVENUE, REDMOND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $5,986.91 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $179,261 59 together with interest thereon at the rate of 3.12000% per annum from September 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 5, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend. County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 714-508Â5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular include; plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 1, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3930698 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011, 03/22/2011, 03/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-AGF-1110126 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DANIEL G. REED, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC., as beneficiary, dated 8/9/2007, recorded 8/14/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-4742, records of DESCHUTES County, OR-

EGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by AMERICAN GENERAL FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 24 IN BLOCK 13 OF OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT 2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 55738 SNOW GOOSE RD BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 3, 2011 Delinquent Payments from October 15, 2010 4 payments at $841.41 each $3,365.64 (10-15-10 through 02-03-11) Late Charges: $12.07 Foreclosure Fees and Costs: $1,521.00 TOTAL: $4,898.71 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances; property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $120,948.86, PLUS interest thereon at 10.000% per annum from 9/15/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 9, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of

herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/3/2011 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC Trustee By: Asset Foreclosure Services, inc. as agent for the Trustee Kelli J. Espinoza Sr. VP Default Operations 5900 Canoga Avenue, 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: (877)237-7878 ASAP# 3904264 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-BVS-1110162 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JOSEPH D. COYNER, as grantor, to DAVID A. KUBAT, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 2/23/2006, recorded 3/1/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-14209, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: THE SOUTH 50 FEET OF LOTS 11 AND 12, IN BLOCK 17, OF DESCHUTES, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON; EXCEPT THE WESTERLY 18 FEET. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 329 NORTHWEST BOND STREET BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 4, 2011 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2009 16 payments at $ 1,350.73 each $ 21,612.64 (11-01-09 through 02-04-11) Late Charges: $ 818.30 Foreclosure fees and costs: $ 1,439.00 TOTAL: $ 23,869.94 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order

to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $146,162.89, PLUS interest thereon at 8.790% per annum from 10/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 9, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/4/2011 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC Trustee By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc. as agent for the Trustee By: Kelli J. Espinoza, St. VP Default Operations 5900 Canoga Avenue, Suite 220, Woodland Hills, CA 91367 Phone: (877) 237-7878 ASAP# 3905263 02/15/2011, 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-106283 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JANET FIERAR AND GEORGE FIERAR JR, WIFE AND HUSBAND, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE - BEND, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR DHI MORTGAGE COMPANY LTD, LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, as beneficiary, dated 8/9/2005, recorded 8/11/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-53016, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 172 OF RIVER CANYON ESTATES, NO. 2, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19531 ASTER LANE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of February 11, 2011 Delinquent Payments from November 01, 2010 2 payments at $2,114.42 each $4,228.84 2 payments at $2,131.21 each $4,262.42 (11-01-10 through 02-11-11) Late Charges: $268.86 Beneficiary Advances: $36.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $8,796.12 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $271,346.07, PLUS interest thereon at 6.25% per annum from 10/01/10 to 1/1/2011, 6.25% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on June 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 2/11/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500 Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3912534 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, March 8, 2011 G5

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

cessor Trustee SHAPIRO & SUTHERLAND, LLC 5501 N.E. 109th Court, Suite N Vancouver, WA 98662 www.shapiroattorneys.com/wa Telephone: (360) 260-2253 Toll-free: 1-800-970-5647 S&S 10-105192 ASAP# 3909437 02/22/2011, 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0030778948 T.S. No.: 11-00765-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, TIMOTHY J. BOOHER as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of MERS AS NOMINEE FOR AMERICAN HOME MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on October 7, 2005, as Instrument No. 2005-68498 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 200378 LOT TWENTY-TWO {22), WOODCREST, PHASES 3 AND 5, RECORDED MARCH 9, 2000, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2293 NE LYNDA LANE, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$4,326.78 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $218,427.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 2.00000% per annum from October 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on July 5, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy

the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 714-5085100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730-2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: March 1, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3930667 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011, 03/22/2011, 03/29/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0101706156 T.S, No.: 11-00553-6 Reference Is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, THOMAS M. YOUNG AND ILENE A. YOUNG, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as trustee, in Favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on July 21, 2009, as Instrument No. 2003-31016 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County. OR to wit: APN: 140767 LOT FIVE (5), BLOCK FIVE (5), OF FOREST VIEW, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON Commonly known as: 52732 WAYSIDE LOOP, LA PINE, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected TO sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86 735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s):

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxx9082 T.S. No.: 1197694-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Michael Battin, A Single Person, as Grantor to Deschutes County Title, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated September 14, 2006, recorded September 22, 2006, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2006-64467 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A TRACT OF LAND LOCATED IN THE NORTH HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (N12 NE1/4) OF SECTION 16, TOWNSHIP 17 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EASTOFTHE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SECTION 16; THENCE ALONG THE NORTHERLY LINE OF SAID SECTION 16, SOUTH 890S619U WEST, 1691.15 FEET; ThENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERN LINE SOUTH 22°48'26" EAST, 302.52 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 23°00'32" EAST, 50.00 FEET; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS CURVE LEFT, 2936 FEET; THE CHORD OF WHICH BEARS SOUTH 50°10'07" EAST, 28.94 FEET; THENCE NORTH 86°28'35" EAST, 233.84 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 86°28'35" EAST, 60.99 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF BOYD ACRES ROAD; THENCE ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, SOUTH 41°56'00" EAST, 256.34 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY LINE, SOUTH 48°3'51" WEST. 214.14 FEET; THENCE NORTH 41°56'05" WEST, 163.81 FEET; THENCE NORTH 09°58'03" EAST, 211.38 FEET TO THE POINTOF BEGINNING AND TERMINUS OF THIS DESCRIPTION. Commonly known as: 63545 Boyd Acres Rd Bend Or 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due November 1, 2008 of principal, interest and impounds and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $1,774.38 Monthly Late Charge $88.72.

By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $247,500.00 together with interest thereon at 8.500% per annum from October 01, 2008 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on May 31, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 20, 2011. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-365808 02/22/11, 03/01, 03/08, 03/15

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE 10-105192 A default has occurred under the terms of a trust deed made by Christine Hudson, as grantor to AmeriTitle, as Trustee, in favor of Washington Mutual Bank, FA, as Beneficiary, dated January 13, 2006, recorded February 1, 2006, in the mortgage records of Deschutes County, Oregon, in Book 2006, at Page 07554, beneficial interest now held by JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, successor in interest to Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Washington Mutual Bank as covering the following described real property: Lot Six (6), Northpointe Phase 1, Deschutes County, Oregon. COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 20648 Beaumont Drive, Bend, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly payments in the sum of $1,030.08, from May 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. By reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation that the trust deed secures immediately due and payable, said sum being the following, to-wit: $208,000.00, together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.775% per annum from April 1, 2010, together with all costs, disbursements, and/or fees incurred or paid by the beneficiary and/or trustee, their employees, agents or assigns. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee appeared on January 27, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, and continued the trustee's sale to March 28, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon; the undersigned trustee will appear on March 28, 2011 and continue the trustee's sale to March 30, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM PT, in accord with the standard time established by ORS 187.110, at the main entrance of the Deschutes

County Courthouse, located at 1164 N.W. Bond Street, in the City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, at which time the undersigned trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor has or had power to convey at the time of the execution of said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given to any person named in ORS 86.753 that the right exists, at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by paying to the beneficiary of the entire amount due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligations or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's fees and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Also, please be advised that pursuant to the terms stated on the Deed of Trust and Note, the beneficiary is allowed to conduct property inspections while property is in default. This shall serve as notice that the beneficiary shall be conducting property inspections on the said referenced property. The Fair Debt Collection Practice Act requires that we state the following: This is an attempt to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. If a discharge has been obtained by any party through bankruptcy proceedings: This shall not be construed to be an attempt to collect the outstanding indebtedness or hold you personally liable for the debt. Dated: February 9, 2011 By: KELLY D. SUTHERLAND Suc-

failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total $3,929.16 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligation secured by said deed of trust Immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit The sum of $110,556 80 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.50000% per annum from September 1, 2010 unfit paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon: and ail trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on June 27, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W Bond Street. Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust together with any interest which the grantor or his successors) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and We costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named In Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have The foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee’s or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 1920 Main Street, Suite 1120, Irvine, CA 92614 714-508Â5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular Includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor In interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words

"trustee" and 'Beneficiary" Include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated February 22, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3923474 03/01/2011, 03/08/2011, 03/15/2011, 03/22/2011 LEGAL NOTICE USDA - Forest Service Deschutes National Forest Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District Notice of Decision Flank Vegetation and Fuels Management Project On January 28, 2011, Forest Supervisor John Allen made a decision to implement Alternative 3 of the Flank Vegetation and Fuels Management Environmental Assessment. This notice replaces the notice of the decision that was published in The Bulletin on February 9, 2011. The project area is located on the northeast flank of Newberry Volcano on the Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District. The legal location is Township (T) 20 South (S) Range (R) 13 East (E) sections 12, 13, 14, 15, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 34, 35, and 36 as well as Township (T) 20 South (S) Range (R) 14 East (E) sections 19, 29, 30, 31, and 32, Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon. The Decision Notice and Environmental Assessment are available at the Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District office or an electronic version can be accessed on the Deschutes National Forest website at: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/cen traloregon/projects/units/be ndrock/index.shtml. The Decision Notice authorizes vegetation management and fuels reduction on approximately 5,616 acres. Specifically this decision includes: commercial thinning on 5,268 acres; overstory removal on 251 acres; precommercial thinning on 2,440 acres; ladder fuel reduction on 149 acres; lop and scattering of fuels on 1,131 acres; mowing on 289 acres; hand piling fuels on 5 acres; machine piling fuels on 1,272 acres; and underburning 4,705 acres. Connected actions include: construction of 10.7 miles of temporary road; closure and decommissioning of 10 miles of road; reconstruction of 24.6 miles of road; and subsoiling 19 to 39 acres of compacted skid trails, temp roads, and landings. This decision also includes a non-significant site specific forest plan amendment. The objective for big game thermal cover is amended to allow thinning when the area is below the 30% objective level of thermal cover. This project will address the need for more resilience in the forest to large-scale disturbance events such as

insect, disease, and wildfire and will also move the watershed toward more historic conditions by reducing forest vegetation density and addressing tree species composition. About 14.2 million board feet of timber will be produced. This decision is subject to appeal pursuant to 36 CFR 215. Any written notice of appeal of the decision must be fully consistent with 36 CFR 215.14, "Appeal Content." The notice of appeal must be filed hard copy with the Appeal Deciding Officer, ATTN: 1570 APPEALS, 333 S.W. First Avenue, P.O. Box 3623, Portland, Oregon, 97208-3623, faxed to (503) 808-2339, sent electronically to appeals-pacificnorthwestregional-office@fs.fed.us, or hand delivered to the above address between 7:45AM and 4:30PM, Monday through Friday except legal holidays. The appeal must be postmarked or delivered within 45 days of the date the legal notice for this decision appears in The Bulletin (Bend, Oregon). The publication date of the legal notice in The Bulletin is the exclusive means for calculating the time to file an appeal and those wishing to appeal should not rely on dates or timeframes provided by any other source. Electronic appeals must be submitted as part of the actual e-mail message or as an attachment in Microsoft Word (.doc), rich text format (.rtf), or portable document format (.pdf) only. E-mails submitted to e-mail addresses other than the one listed above, in other formats than those listed, or containing viruses will be rejected. Only individuals or organizations who submitted substantive comments during the comment period may appeal. This project may be implemented 50 days after this legal notice if no appeal is received. If an appeal is received this project may not be implemented for 15 days after the appeal decision. Individuals or organizations who submitted substantive comments during the comment period specified at 215.6 may appeal this decision. The notice of appeal must meet the appeal content requirements at 36 CFR 215.14.


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GEAR UP FOR SPRING BREAK!!!

CATERING: www.bendpizza.com

Chem-Dry of Bend

Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA

“Chicks are coming ... Be Ready!”

BUY 1 PACKAGE, GET 100 FREE MINUTES

See coupon below.

963 SW Simpson Avenue - Suite 100 - Bend OR 97702

CHICK DAY

Purina Feeds Showtime Feeds Wildlife Feeds Pet Food Full Line Equine: Purina, LMF, Supplements

Madras!

HOT NEW BUY 400 MINUTES IN THE REG. BEDS OR BULBS! 250 MINUTES IN THE HIGH PERFORMANCE BED, Any Bo tt GET A FREE LOTION AND MOISTURIZER! $57 VALUE! of Lotio le n OR 2

Fast, accurate filing at an affordable price

www.myzoomtax.com

Now Open in

NEW OWNERSHIP !

Value up to

541.385.9666

March 26th is

Bend’s Best Kept Secret!

$25 CREDIT - TAX PREPARATION BY CPA’s

Call or click online for an appointment: 541-385-ZOOM

OR MORE

Off 2010 tax preparation fee from any Central Oregon Franchise Tax Office/ CPA Firm with this ad.

BREATHe Better AIR!

BRAKE SERVICE

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

PLUS Order 10 Window Coverings or More & Get An Additional 10% Off

7 Days A Week 9:30am - 9pm

25% OFF Select Signature Series ® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds ®

5%

10%

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc. and a home franchise Concept Brand. Offer valid through 4/30/11.

Party of 2

Party of 4 or More

Call today for your complimentary in-home consultation

With purchase of beverage

With purchase of beverage

OFF

OFF

Must present coupon. Not to be combined with any other offer. Expires 3-31-11

541-788-8444 Find us online at www.BudgetBlinds.com At participating franchises only. Valid on select Signature Series ® Window Treatments only. Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Offer not valid with any other offers. Some restrictions may apply. Offer available for a limited time only. ©2010 Budget Blinds, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise is independently owned & operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc.


Tuesday, March 8, 2011

THE BULLETIN

C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! Bend’s Best Kept Secret!

FREE

Value up to $

6400*

Cement Lap Siding

See coupon below.

Brown Bag Deli

the

Upgrade with ANY plan ordered before March 15, 2011.

COUPON

FREE

CEMENT LAP SIDING

Call Now!

(VALUED UP TO $6400)

1289 NE 2nd St. Bend 541-948-6440

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

25% Off Select Signature Series® Window Treatments

“WHAT A GREAT STORE!” BEND 63353 Nels Anderson, Bend, OR (541) 385-7001 PRINEVILLE 1225 NW Gardner Rd., Prineville, OR Be Our Friend On Facebook (541) 447-5609

5

$ 00

CULVER 603 1st St., Culver, OR (541) 546-6603

PLUS Order 10 Window Coverings or More & Get An Additional 10% Off

6.00

CATERING: www.bendpizza.com Expires 3/31/11

Fast, accurate filing at an affordable price

Select Signature Series ® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds ®

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc. and a home franchise Concept Brand. Offer valid through 4/30/11.

ANY PURCHASE OF $30 OR MORE!

Call or click online for an appointment: 541-385-ZOOM

Call today for your complimentary in-home consultation

541-788-8444

www.myzoomtax.com

Find us online at www.BudgetBlinds.com At participating franchises only. Valid on select Signature Series ® Window Treatments only. Offer valid at time of initial estimate only. Offer not valid with any other offers. Some restrictions may apply. Offer available for a limited time only. ©2010 Budget Blinds, Inc. All rights reserved. Each franchise is independently owned & operated. Budget Blinds is a registered trademark of Budget Blinds, Inc.

541.385.9666

963 SW Simpson Avenue - Suite 100 - Bend OR 97702 Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA

3 Rooms Cleaned

Spring ! l Specia

$

99

7 Days A Week 9:30am - 9pm

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 4/30/11

of Central Oregon

BW0311

2 Rooms Cleaned

541-593-1799

$

74

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 4/30/11

$ ® ®

The World’s Greenest Carpet Cleaner

144

Up to 5 Rooms Cleaned

20%

61419 S. Hwy. 97 Suite G • Bend, Oregon 97702

Lunch Special FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open ’til 3:00 pm daily

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

entree

free One per customer

With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Coupon Required | Expires 4-11-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers.

Only

$ 00

5

Chicken or Tofu Pad Thai or Chicken or Tofu Thai Fried Rice All DayDine In or Take Out Coupon Required | Expires 4-11-11 | Cannot be combined with other offers. One per coupon.

• Replace front or rear brake pads • Add brake fluid (as needed) • Inspect front & rear discs & calipers (or rear drums & wheel cylinders), brake likes, hoses, & master cylinder • Rotor turning or replacement extra *Price per axle. *Some models may be higher

At the Corner of Empire and Lower Meadow 63056 Lower Meadow Drive • 541-388-1580 • Fax 541-388-1597 Expires 4/11/11. Limit 4 per customer per coupon. Good only at above location. Not valid with any other offer or coupon.

$

15995

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 3/31/11.

Save UP TO $50 on Air Duct (541) 389-8715 Cleaning!

SET OF SNOW TIRES

• Keep both hands on the wheel for safety • Uses your car’s audio system • Connects you to the world with a touch of a button

Tire Size: Bridgestone Blizzak Studless 215/60R16

$

FOR A TOTAL SAVINGS OF $45.00! (See reverse side of coupon)

DID YOU KNOW? Poor Indoor Air Quality can: Result in Illness • Including Nausea Eye & Skin Irritation • Headaches • Allergic Reactions • Respiratory Problems

*Video Inspection Available 541-389-8715 | LICENSED • BONDED • INSURED | www.masterstouchblend.com

3457 SW HIGHWAY 97 • Madras, OR 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 3/31/11.

541-389-3031 • www.SubaruofBend.com • 2060 NE Hwy 20

NEW OWNERSHIP !

Call today for your FREE ESTIMATE!

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY

59995* Installed

Not valid with any other offer. Bring this coupon with you. Good through 3/31/11.

DRYER VENT CLEANING – AND –

*Mounted & Balanced

$

35900

Save $20 On

SAVE AN ADDITIONAL $5 OFF WHEN YOU HAVE A CHIMNEY & A DRYER VENT CLEANED AT THE SAME TIME

SERVICING ALL MAKES & MODELS, DOMESTIC & FOREIGN WITH ASE CERTIFIED MECHANICS

Blue Tooth Hands Free Car Kit

BREATHe Better AIR!

295 per month Space is limited, so call 541-382-1811 and reserve your full color coupon position today!

With purchase of beverage

BRAKE SERVICE

Place your coupon offer here and reach 130,000 readers for as little as

$

With purchase of beverage

OFF

Guaranteed Everyday Lowest Prices!

EXPIRES April 30, 2011

541-389-1343 • Fax 541-388-5618 • notaxman@qwestoffice.net

By Osathanon’s Family

Party of 4 or More

LONGER LIFE THROUGH REGULAR MAINTENANCE

OR MORE

(Discount deducted from 2009 tax prep. fee)

Tel. 541.548.4883

Party of 2

BW0311

Off 2010 tax preparation fee from any Central Oregon Franchise Tax Office/ CPA Firm with this ad.

Buy Two THAI O get entrees Third

10%

Must present coupon. Not to be combined with any other offer. Expires 3-31-11

With Coupon. Room is Considered 250 Sq. Ft. One Coupon per Customer. No Hidden Fees Expires 4/30/11

5% OFF

BW0311

Whole House Special

RESTAURANT

Expires 3/31/11

$25 CREDIT - TAX PREPARATION BY CPA’s

25% OFF

OFF

Excluding fuel, gas and diesel. Expires on 3/21/11. Not good with any other offer.

Fridays Only $ 8.00

541-389-6714

*Value varies based on floor plan chosen. Offer valid with home order placed by March 15, 2011. Free upgrade on any plan. Coupon not valid with any other offer or promotion. Prices subject to change without notice. CCB#181069

$

March 26th is

Now Open in

CHICK DAY

Purina Feeds Showtime Feeds Wildlife Feeds Pet Food Full Line Equine: Purina, LMF, Supplements

“Chicks are coming ... Be Ready!”

Don’t forget to ask about 4-H & FFA cash back and discounts.

HOT NEW BUY 400 MINUTES IN THE REG. BEDS OR BULBS! 250 MINUTES IN THE HIGH PERFORMANCE BED, Any Bo tt GET A FREE LOTION AND MOISTURIZER! $57 VALUE! of Lotio le n OR 2 BUY 1 PACKAGE, GET 100 FREE MINUTES

GEAR UP FOR SPRING BREAK!!!

5% OFF !

Coupon Expires 4/30/11

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

Madras!

3457 SW Hwy 97 541-460-5100

Chem-Dry of Bend Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties Independently Owned & Operated

20% OFF While they’re outside playing in the snow ... let us give your carpets that nice clean glow.

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 541-388-7374 Bend 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Not including RVs & stairs. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: 3-31-2011


C

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!! 1st Annual

Chick Days At Round Butte Seed locations

of Central Oregon

April 1st & 2nd

Get your orders in early!

541-593-1799

ROUND BUTTE SEED

• 541-388-1580

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541) 385-7001

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

IICRC Certiied Technician

Visit us on face book • www.rbseed.com

THAI O THAI O THAI O

Excellence In Taxes, Inc.

RESTAURANT

Is looking for a few good clients

RESTAURANT

Michael A. Addington, EA, LTC (EA License #62542, LTC License #5093C)

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

22 years experience specializing in individual and small business taxes

541-389-1343 Fax 541-388-5618 notaxman@qwestoffice.net

By Osathanon’s Family

Tel. 541.548.4883

• Form 1040, Schedule A and Oregon starting at $160.00 • S-Corporation & Partnership returns starting at $300.00 • 1099-Misc and 1096 Forms prepared for $10.00 each • Referral Sweepstakes with a $300.00 Grand Prize Drawing • No cost initial consultation & tax preparation cost estimate (1/2 hour) • Free 2009 Tax Return Review

RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883

541.548.4883

(fred meyer shopping center)

(fred meyer shopping center)

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Coupon Required | Expires 4-11-11 Cannot be combined with other offers.

Coupon Required | Expires 4-11-11 Cannot be combined with other offers. With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

61419 S. Hwy. 97 Suite G • Bend, Oregon 97702

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY 3457 SW HIGHWAY 97 • MADRAS, OR

541-460-5100 1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

PURINA DEER PELLETS

PACIFIC STOVE PELLETS

50#

TON

11

Reg. $15.99

195

WITH COUPON Expires 3/21/11

WITH COUPON Expires 3/21/11

$

$20 Off

100s of Items Now on Sale $5 or Less!!!

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

$89!

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

Bonus Discount Special

Save $$$ Save now on any Parts or Service!

Brown Bag Deli 1289 NE 2nd St. Bend 541-948-6440

$

Fridays Only $ 8.00

6.00

If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly.

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/11

• Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/ drums, calipers & wheel cylinders • Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

Recommended Regular Maintenance Service 30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash *Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

FREE Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/11

10% Off Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/11

Expires 3/31/11

CATERING: www.bendpizza.com Expires 3/31/11

$25 CREDIT - TAX PREPARATION BY CPA’s

Call for FREE Information Package

(800) 970-0153

541.548.4883

(See reverse side for Dryer Vent Special)

2011

541-389-6714

the

Gear up for Spring Break!!!

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

Any Chimney or Vent Cleaning

Expires April 30,

Bend’s Best Kept Secret!

Clothing, Shoes, Jackets, Handbags, Swimwear, Formal Gowns

Open ’til 3:00 pm daily

Standard Rate $109 Per Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only

.

541-548-5195

Brand Name Clothes at Affordable Prices

Lunch Special

FREE SOUP Dine-in only.

(fred meyer shopping center)

99 $

NEW OWNERSHIP!

By Osathanon’s Family

Tel. 541.548.4883

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Fast, accurate filing at an affordable price

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Plan #1491

Plan #1491 ✓ Guaranteed Build Time ✓ Price Lock Guarantee ✓ Customizable Floor Plans

Only

$

75,900 5 14

W 4N

Rim ple Ma

Ct .

Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

Call or click online for an appointment: 541-385-ZOOM

www.myzoomtax.com

Chem-Dry of Bend 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

541.385.9666

963 SW Simpson Avenue - Suite 100 - Bend OR 97702 Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

25% OFF Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

25% OFF

a style for every point of view® We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

We bring you the best brands including:

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 4/30/11

® by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 4/30/11

Reach 130,000 readers for as little as $295 per month! This unique section publishes twice each month in The Bulletin and in Central Oregon Marketplace, wrapping the front of a section for amazing and never-before-offered visibility! Only 18 coupon positions are available! Space is limited, so call 541-382-1811 and reserve your full color coupon position today!


C

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

Bend’s Best Kept Secret!

Call for FREE Information Package

Brown Bag Deli

the

1289 NE 2nd St. Bend 541-948-6440

.

$

6.00

Fridays Only $ 8.00

Plan #1491

Plan #1491 ✓ Guaranteed Build Time ✓ Price Lock Guarantee ✓ Customizable Floor Plans

Expires 3/31/11

Only

$

75,900 NW 54 14

CATERING: www.bendpizza.com

Fast, accurate filing at an affordable price

25% OFF Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

Rim

Ct.

We fit your style and your budget! Shop-at-home convenience Personal Style Consultants Thousands of window coverings Professional measuring & installation

541.385.9666

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION

963 SW Simpson Avenue - Suite 100 - Bend OR 97702

Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 4/30/11

a style for every point of view®

Giancarlo Pozzi, CPA

1st Annual

25% OFF

a style for every point of view®

Selected Signature Series® Window Treatments by Budget Blinds®

Chick Days At Round Butte Seed locations Get your orders in early!

April 1st & 2nd

ROUND BUTTE SEED

We bring you the best brands including:

www.myzoomtax.com

p le Ma

541-389-6714

Expires 3/31/11

$25 CREDIT - TAX PREPARATION BY CPA’s

Call or click online for an appointment: 541-385-ZOOM

(800) 970-0153

® by Budget Blinds ®

Call 1-541-788-8444 or visit us online at www.budgetblinds.com

a style for every point of view®

PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION Offer not valid with any other offers. Offer good at time of initial estimate only. Offer good at participating franchises only. Each franchise independently owned and operated. Offer valid through 4/30/11

BEND

PRINEVILLE

CULVER

63353 Nels Anderson Bend, OR 97701

1225 NW Gardner Rd. Prineville, OR 97754

603 1st St. Culver, OR 97734

(541) 385-7001

(541) 447-5609

(541) 546-6603

Visit us on face book • www.rbseed.com

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

Bonus Discount Special

Save $$$ Save now on any Parts or Service! If you spend: $50 - $100 $101 - $200 $201 - $300 $301 - $400 $401 - $500 $501 - $700 $701 - $900 $901 or more

You Save: $10 Off $20 Off $30 Off $40 Off $50 Off $70 Off $90 Off $110 Of

Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/11

FREE BRAKE INSPECTION Good brakes save lives! Take advantage of this FREE brake inspection to ensure your brakes are working properly. • Inspect brake pads &/or shoes, rotors/ drums, calipers & wheel cylinders • Add brake fluid as needed • Road test

FREE

IICRC Certiied Technician

Recommended Regular Maintenance Service

Excellence In Taxes, Inc.

30,000/60,000/90,000/120,000 To promote a long life and eliminate unexpected repairs. We will perform the services as described in your Warranty & Maintenance booklet or per dealer recommendation. • Includes a multi-point vehicle inspection • Includes complimentary car wash

Is looking for a few good clients Michael A. Addington, EA, LTC (EA License #62542, LTC License #5093C)

22 years experience specializing in individual and small business taxes

*Additional charges for Timing Belt replacement or platinum spark plugs may apply.

Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/11

10% Off Must present coupon. Expires 3/31/11

541-389-1343 Fax 541-388-5618 notaxman@qwestoffice.net

• 541-388-1580

$20 Off

NEW OWNERSHIP! Brand Name Clothes at Affordable Prices Clothing, Shoes, Jackets, Handbags, Swimwear, Formal Gowns

100s of Items Now on Sale $5 or Less!!!

$89!

2011

Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

Standard Clean Includes: Single Story House • Wood Stove • Fireplace Insert • Natural Gas • Dryer & Dryer Vent Cleaning

Expires April 30,

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer!

(See reverse side for Dryer Vent Special)

Standard Rate $109 Per Chimney Coupon Discount Rate Only

Gear up for Spring Break!!!

142 E. Main • Sisters • 541-549-6900 • Mon. - Sat. 9am - 7pm

Any Chimney or Vent Cleaning

CENTRAL OREGON RANCH SUPPLY

Chem-Dry of Bend

3457 SW HIGHWAY 97 • MADRAS, OR

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

1726 SOUTH HIGHWAY 97 • REDMOND, OR

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

541-548-5195

541-460-5100

• Form 1040, Schedule A and Oregon starting at $160.00 • S-Corporation & Partnership returns starting at $300.00 • 1099-Misc and 1096 Forms prepared for $10.00 each • Referral Sweepstakes with a $300.00 Grand Prize Drawing • No cost initial consultation & tax preparation cost estimate (1/2 hour) • Free 2009 Tax Return Review

61419 S. Hwy. 97 Suite G • Bend, Oregon 97702

THAI O THAI O THAI O RESTAURANT

RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

RESTAURANT Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

Tel. 541.548.4883

By Osathanon’s Family

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883

541.548.4883

(fred meyer shopping center)

(fred meyer shopping center)

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Now Featuring Dish TV While you Eat

Coupon Required | Expires 4-11-11 Cannot be combined with other offers.

Coupon Required | Expires 4-11-11 Cannot be combined with other offers. With purchase of any menu item of equal or greater value.

Lunch Special

FREE SOUP Dine-in only. Open ’til 3:00 pm daily

974 veterans way #1 redmond, OR 97756

541.548.4883 (fred meyer shopping center)

PURINA DEER PELLETS

PACIFIC STOVE PELLETS

50#

TON

11

Reg. $15.99

195

WITH COUPON Expires 3/21/11

WITH COUPON Expires 3/21/11

$

99 $

Reach 130,000 readers for as little as $295 per month! This unique section publishes twice each month in The Bulletin and in Central Oregon Marketplace, wrapping the front of a section for amazing and never-before-offered visibility! Only 18 coupon positions are available! Space is limited, so call 541-382-1811 and reserve your full color coupon position today!


Bulletin Daily Paper 03/08/11