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Search resumes for Blaylock Members of the Deschutes and Linn county search and rescue units spent Thursday on the North Santiam Lori Blaylock

River, looking for signs of Lori Blaylock, the Bend

woman who disappeared nearly three months ago and is believed to have been killed and dumped in the river.

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Bend mulls changes to city property fees

Prineville’s water woes

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Redeveloping vacant lots and old buildings in Bend could become more expensive if the city moves forward with proposed changes in how it charges fees. The city is currently in the midst of updating the way it allocates and collects system development charges, or SDCs, and has been working with some in the development community to do so. The fees offset costs of things like roads, sewer lines and water mains. But while there has been a lot of agreement on the proposed SDC code, one new provision has some business leaders and even a few city councilors concerned about its potential impact. This new rule would require a property that has never had SDCs paid on it to now pay the fees if it has languished for more than three years and is about to undergo new development or use. For the most part, this would only apply to buildings that were constructed before 1992, when the city’s SDC program was implemented, or to vacant lots that once had structures on them before that same year. It could also include properties that were annexed into the city after SDCs were put in place. See SDCs / A5

Twenty-nine million years ago, Central Oregon had a wetter climate, covered with broadleaf deciduous trees and populated with a variety of early mammals. Centered in what is now Prineville was the Crooked River caldera, a volcanic feature whose eruption would affect life and the water supply in the area today.

Miohippus, a small ancestral horse

To learn about the geological history Illustration by Eric Baker / The Bulletin

City Council approves wetland to ease plight By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

PRINEVILLE — A new system for wastewater treatment in the city of Prineville will keep new building costs down, return water naturally to Inside the ecosystem and • Wyden, Merkley eventually create a back Walden on nature park open for public use. Bowman dam The Prineville City plan, Page C1 Council voted unanimously recently to abandon the idea of purchasing a mechanical system to clean wastewater and accept an alternative. The new plan has the city keeping its current system of lagoon

treatment and implementing an additional step in the process: create a wetland in approximately 280 acres of city-owned fields in the northwest part of town. The current treatment system consists of two large lagoons that clean the water over 90 days through naturally occurring algae blooms. The treated water is considered undrinkable but safe for irrigation purposes and to water the city golf course and 560 acres of field land owned by the city. Under the new plan, the water will continue to irrigate the golf course but a portion of the field land will be converted into wetland that improves wildlife habitat, allows for public access on potential trail systems and

that led to Prineville’s water shortage, see Page A4.

returns water into the Crooked River, which could benefit steelhead. “We will take flat fields and construct deep ponds, shallow ponds, berms and walking trails in the area,” said Eric Klann, a city of Prineville engineer. “There are areas where it will be wet for only a few weeks a year and could develop into a bird habitat, and then other areas that would be wet all year around for other species. “The water will seep in, and as it seeps through the soil, it will be purified and join the shallow groundwater table and rejoin the Crooked River,” Klann said. “We expect it will increase flows in the Crooked River by 2 million gallons per day.” See Prineville / A4

Need to learn? Take a test By Pam Belluck New York Times News Service

As debts mount, bankruptcy quietly pondered for states By Mary Williams Walsh New York Times News Service

Policy makers are working behind the scenes to come up with a way to let states declare bankruptcy and get out from under crushing debts, including the pensions they have promised to retired public workers. Unlike cities, states are barred from seeking protection in fed-

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eral bankruptcy court. Any effort to change that status would have to clear high constitutional hurdles because the states are considered sovereigns. But proponents say some states are so strapped that the only feasible way out may be bankruptcy, giving Illinois, for example, the opportunity to do what General Motors did with

the federal government’s aid. Beyond their short-term budget gaps, some states have deep structural problems, like insolvent pension funds, that are diverting money from essential public services like education and health care. Some members of Congress fear that it is just a matter of time before a state seeks a bailout, say bankruptcy

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lawyers who have been consulted by congressional aides. Bankruptcy could permit a state to alter its contractual promises to retirees, which are often protected by state constitutions, and it could provide an alternative to a no-strings bailout. Along with retirees, however, investors in a state’s bonds could suffer, possibly ending up

at the back of the line as unsecured creditors. “All of a sudden, there’s a whole new risk factor,” said Paul Maco, a partner at the firm Vinson & Elkins who was head of the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Office of Municipal Securities during the Clinton administration. See Bankruptcy / A4

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Taking a test is not just a passive mechanism for assessing how much people know, according to new research. It actually helps people learn, and it works better than a number of other studying techniques. The research, published online Thursday in the journal Science, found that students who read a passage, then took a test asking them to recall what they had read, retained about 50 percent more of the information a week later than students who used two other methods. One of those methods — repeatedly studying the material — is familiar to legions of students who cram before exams. The other — having students draw detailed diagrams documenting what they are learning — is prized by many teachers because it forces students to make connections among facts. See Test / A5

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A2 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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An advisory committee to the Food and Drug Administration recommended unanimously Thursday that the agency approve the first test — a brain scan — that can show the characteristic plaques of Alzheimer’s disease in the brain of a living person. The approval was contingent on radiologists agreeing on what the scans say and doctors being trained in how to read the scans. The FDA usually follows advice from its advisory committees, and Alzheimer’s experts anticipated that the

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Oodles of doodles: On viral videos, ‘mathemusician’ makes math cool “I want people to feel they can do this. People can. It’s mathematics that anyone can do.”

week carving fruit up into polyhedra, and where am I going to get a job doing that?” She did indeed spend a week carving fruit into polyhedrons, posting photographs and instructions on her website, vihart.com.

— Vi Hart, on her viral math doodling videos

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She calls herself a full-time recreational mathemusician, an off-the-beaten-path choice with seemingly limited prospects. And for most of the two years since she graduated from Stony Brook University, life as a recreational mathemusician has indeed been a meager niche pursuit. Then, in November, she posted on YouTube a video about doodling in math class, which married a distaste for the way math is taught in school with an exuberance for actual mathematics. The rapid-fire narration begins, “OK, let’s say you’re me and you’re in math class, you’re supposed to be learning about exponential functions, but you’re having trouble caring about exponential functions because unfortunately your math class is probably not terribly engaging.” The video never shows her face, just her hands doodling in a notebook. She talks about binary trees, Hercules cutting off the heads of a mythical hydra (each severed neck grows two new heads, which is the essence of a binary tree), and a fractal pattern known as Sierpinski’s Triangle. She did another about drawing stars (really about geometry and polygons). Then another about doodling snakes (which segues into graph theory, “a subject too interesting to be included in most grade-school curricula,” she says). And another about prime numbers. (“Remember, we use prime numbers to talk to aliens. I’m not making this up.”) The videos went viral, viewed more than a million times. “You > Chuck Norris,” gushed a fan on her YouTube page. At first glance, Hart’s fascination with math might seem unexpected. She graduated with a degree in music, and she never took a math course in college. At second glance, the intertwining of art and math seems to be the family business. Her father, George Hart, builds sculptures based on geometric forms.

The summer Hart was 13, she tagged along with her father to a computational geometry conference. “And I was hooked, immediately,” she said. “It was so different from school, where you are surrounded by this drudgery and no one is excited about it. Any gathering of passionate people is fun, really no matter what they’re doing. And in this case, it was mathematics.” In college, she continued attending math conferences and collaborated on a number of papers with Erik Demaine, an MIT professor best known for his origami creations. After finishing her music degree — as a senior, she composed and conducted a seven-part musical piece based on the seven Harry Potter books — “I couldn’t focus on one thing or ever see myself fitting into any little slot where I would have some sort of normal job,” Hart said. “If I want to spend a week carving fruit up into polyhedra, I want to spend a

It might be tough for dolphins to remember faces, considering they always look like they’re smiling. But new research indicates they apparently never forget a voice. That’s one finding from a research project by University of Chicago doctoral student Jason Bruck that represents, he says, “a decoding of their whole communication system — at least the start of that.” Bruck, who works with dolphins at Brookfield Zoo and five other facilities, plays

recorded whistles of dolphins that had been in the same tank 20 years earlier but hadn’t seen their tank mates in that time. When that happens, the dolphins swim toward the signal. When he plays the whistles of unfamiliar dolphins, the signal is ignored or, in some cases, imitated. Based on observations of dolphins and multiple underwater microphones, Bruck’s research also suggests that dolphins are able to determine family relationships of other dolphins through whistles, and that mother dolphins “cluck like chickens” to call their calves.

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Mathemusician

Hooked at an early age

Such mathematical musings drew modest amounts of interest. In the fall, she was looking over some of her doodles. She thought of taking photographs of them and writing instructions for those, too, but she decided to try something different. She made her first doodling video. Working by herself, practically embracing a camera on a tripod, she created a video of her doodling seemingly from the point of view of the doodler. “I want a real first-person view,” she said, “because I want people to feel they can do this. People can. It’s mathematics that anyone can do.” The ensuing attention has come with job offers and an income. In one week in December, she earned $300 off the advertising revenue that YouTube shares with video creators. She is also happy that, unlike in her early efforts, which drew an audience typical of mathematics research — older and male, mostly — the biggest demographic for her new videos, at least among registered users, are teenage girls. “I just think that’s really awesome,” she said, “because you’ve got girls in middle school and high school who are suddenly enjoying mathematics and enjoying being a little nerdy and smart, and we need that.”

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His day job until last year was as a computer science professor at Stony Brook; he is now chief of content for the Museum of Mathematics, which is looking to open in Manhattan next year.

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FARMINGDALE, N.Y. — At the aptly named Tiny Thai restaurant here, a small table, about 2½ feet square, was jammed with a teapot, two plates of curry, a bowl of soup, two cups of tea, two glasses of water, a plate with two egg rolls, a plate of salad and an iPhone. For most people, this would have been merely an unwieldy lunch. For Vi Hart, her mind pondered the mathematical implications. “There’s a packing puzzle here,” she said. “This is the kind of thing where if you’re accustomed to thinking about these problems, you see them in everything.” Mathematicians over the centuries have thought long and deep about how tightly things, like piles of oranges, can be packed within a given amount of space. “Here we’ve got even another layer,” Hart said, “where you’re allowed to overhang off the edge of your square. So now you have a new puzzle, where maybe you want the big things near the edge because you can fit more of them off the edge before they fall off.” Hart — her given name is Victoria, but she has long since dropped the last six letters — has an audacious career ambition: She wants to make math cool. She effused, “You’re thinking about it, because it’s awesome.”

Dolphins recognize others’ voices

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Vi Hart holds an icosahedron made from six balloons. In November, Hart’s YouTube video about doodling in math class went viral. She is now receiving job offers to continue her math pursuits.

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scans would be approved. The additional requirement would not be a big hurdle, said Dr. Daniel Skovronsky, chief executive of the company, Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, that applied to market the scans. “We don’t know exactly what FDA will want,” Skovronsky said. “But it should take months to generate this type of data, not years.” The committee vote is “a very positive thing,” said Maria Carrillo, senior director of medical and scientific relations for the Alzheimer’s Association. “This is nothing but a positive for our families.” More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s disease.

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 A3

TS  More than 125 arrested in huge mob crackdown

Hu visits Chicago By Antonio Olivo and Andrew L. Wang

By William K. Rashbaum

Chicago Tribune

New York Times News Service

CHICAGO — Amid cheers from supporters and hectoring from protesters, Chinese President Hu Jintao arrived in Chicago on Thursday for a visit organizers have billed as a chance to strengthen bonds between the Midwest and the world’s most populous nation. “We want to establish a new partnership between Chicago and China that will benefit the future generations for years to come,” Mayor Richard Daley said to Hu before a ballroom full of business and political leaders at the Hilton Chicago on South Michigan Avenue. Chicago, Hu replied, exemplifies “the self-enterprising and pioneering spirit” that has helped make the U.S. a world leader. “Boeing, Motorola, Caterpillar, McDonald’s and many other Midwestern companies have become household names in China.” Chinese officials have said the trip to Chicago — Hu’s first, and the first by a Chinese head of state since 2002 — indicates the importance of pushing beyond the coasts. Chicago authorities say it’s a signal of the city’s prominence and an opportunity to establish it as an economic entry point to America. Today, Hu is scheduled to visit Walter Payton College Preparatory High School, home of the Confucius Institute, which teaches Chinese language and culture. Hu then will visit Woodridge for an exhibit of Chinese companies with a presence in the Midwest. The Chinese president landed at O’Hare International Airport just before 4:30 p.m, fresh from Washington, where he was a guest of President Barack Obama at a state dinner Wednesday and spent Thursday meeting with congressional leaders before having lunch with a group of American executives.

The criminal allegations spanned several states and several decades, encompassing figures from seven mob families, and led to federal charges that were brought against more than 125 people Thursday. There were murders, including a double homicide over a spilled drink in a bar. There were the more runof-the-mill activities associated with organized crime: racketeering, extortion, loansharking, money laundering, gambling and the like. There were even some names from mob lore, including Luigi Manocchio, 83, the former boss of New England’s Patriarca crime family, who was said to have dressed in women’s clothing to avoid cap-

Ahmed al-Husseini / The Associated Press

Men grieve after a bombing in Karbala, 50 miles south of Baghdad, Iraq, on Thursday.

3 explosions kill 50 Shiite pilgrims in Iraq By Ali Qeis and Liz Sly The Washington Post

BAGHDAD — Continuing an upsurge of violence in Iraq, three bombs killed 50 Shiite pilgrims as they poured into the holy city of Karbala on Thursday ahead of a major religious commemoration. At least 150 people were injured when the bombs exploded in separate locations on the packed roads leading into the city, about 60 miles southwest of Baghdad, according to Maj. Alaa al-Ghanemi, Karbala’s police spokesman. Despite initial reports that the bombings were suicide attacks, investigations showed that they were not, Ghanemi said. Two parked cars and a motorcycle had been rigged with explosives and detonated within quick succession in the three locations, he said. The roads into Karbala were jammed at the time with some of the hundreds of thousands of Shiite pilgrims who are converging on the city on foot from across Iraq and beyond for the

UNREST IN TUNISIA

annual Arbaeen commemoration, due to take place Tuesday. The festival marks 40 days after the anniversary of the death of the 7th-century Shiite martyr Hussein. Such pilgrimages have long been favored targets of the Sunni extremists who have declared war on Iraq’s Shiite-led government, and police had been bracing for such attacks this week. There were no assertions of responsibility, but Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki blamed the attacks on “infidel terrorists,” a reference to the Sunni extremist group al-Qaida in Iraq. U.S. military officials have expressed skepticism that the group has the capacity to stage major bombings in the almost wholly Shiite cities of Iraq’s south. In a separate attack Thursday, a suicide bomber drove an explosives-packed car into the main gate of the police headquarters in the city of Baqouba, northeast of Baghdad, killing two people in the third suicide attack this week against Iraq’s security forces.

2 officers, suspect killed in shootout By Suzette Laboy The Associated Press

Thibault Camus / The Associated Press

Tunisian protesters shout slogans in front of the former ruling party’s headquarters in Tunis on Thursday.

Protesters demand a break with the past By David D. Kirkpatrick New York Times News Service

TUNIS, Tunisia — Tunisia’s interim government struggled Thursday to placate protesters demanding the eradication of the country’s former ruling party. The government announced steps toward an amnesty for political exiles, including Islamists. Several Cabinet ministers said they were resigning from the old ruling party. And demonstrators outside the party headquarters were met by soldiers who said the building now belonged to the people and who eventually helped pull down the party’s name from the facade. The soldiers smiled as protesters put flowers in their gun barrels.

The party and the government had been led by Zine elAbidine Ben Ali, who fled into exile in Saudi Arabia last week, ending 23 years of increasingly autocratic rule. State television reported that the party’s once-powerful central committee had been dissolved because many of its members who were in an interim government had quit. The amnesty plan announced Thursday was conceived by the Cabinet, which said it would present a bill on the proposal to the Parliament for approval. Exiles have been eager to return to Tunisia since Ben Ali left. He had crushed most opposition during his rule, driving out many, including the founders of Tunisia’s relatively liberal Islamist party.

MIAMI — A shootout erupted Thursday in a notoriously crimeridden section of Miami as a team of heavily armed law enforcement agents tried to serve a murder warrant, leaving two officers and a suspect dead, authorities said. Miami-Dade Police Director James Loftus said 21-year veteran Roger Castillo had been shot once and died at the scene. Amanda Haworth, a 23-year veteran, was taken to a hospital and later died from several gunshot wounds. Officer Oscar Placencia shot and killed the suspect, 22-year-old Johnny Simms, who had been armed with a handgun, Loftus said. A squad from the warrants division was serving a summons for first-degree murder to Simms in the Miami’s impoverished Liberty City neighborhood. Officers knew Simms, who has a lengthy criminal, was inside the home — a duplex with bars on the windows — and told him to come out, Loftus said. “This unit is very well-trained, very well-armed, and highly protects itself,” said Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Alvarez, a former police chief. “So they know what they’re doing. It was just a tragic incident that we see here too often in Miami-Dade, of a violent suspect who could care less.” Loftus said another officer, Deidree Beecher, was being treated at a hospital for a knee injury. She was not shot.

Return of independents lifts Obama’s standing By Michael A. Memoli McClatchy-Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is enjoying a surge in public approval as he marks the midpoint of his first term, with independent voters who were instrumental to Republican victories in last year’s con-

gressional elections beginning to swing back to the president. The uptick, arriving in time for the second anniversary of Obama’s inauguration, follows a lame-duck congressional session that was seen as successful for the White House and comes after the president’s well-received

speech on the shooting tragedy in Tucson, Ariz. A new NBC News/Wall Street Journal survey released Wednesday night showed Obama’s jobapproval rating at 53 percent, an 8-point jump from mid-December and his highest rating since July 2009.

ture decades ago. He was arrested in Florida, accused of another mob standby: shaking down strip clubs, in Providence, R.I. The charges were contained in 16 indictments handed up in federal courts in four jurisdictions. Taken together, they amounted to what federal officials called the “largest mob roundup in FBI history.” The indictments were announced by Attorney General Eric Holder, who appeared at a news conference Thursday morning in Brooklyn, where the charges against roughly two-thirds of the defendants were lodged. For the attorney general, it was an opportunity to preside over the kind of law enforcement operation that was once the core mission of the Justice Department, but that has been largely overshadowed during his tenure by far more ambiguous issues

inherited from the Bush administration. Holder spoke of the “unprecedented scope and cooperation” in the investigation, but questions were also raised about the diffuse nature of the indictments, which involved a myriad of unrelated criminal activity. The sweep began before dawn, with 800 federal agents and state and local investigators fanning out across the region. The targets, officials said, ran the gamut from what they called small-time bookmakers and shakedown artists to mob middle managers and the entire current leadership of the Colombo crime family, as well as two senior Gambino family figures. Prosecutors said 34 “made” members of New York’s five crime families — Genovese, Gambino, Colombo, Luchese and Bonanno — and crime families in New Jersey and New England were among those arrested.

Giffords’ doctor: ‘Long road ahead of her’ By Jennifer Medina New York Times News Service

TUCSON, Ariz. — In the nearly two weeks since a bullet passed through her brain, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords has continued to make what doctors say is remarkable progress and is now able to distinguish particular colors and bear her own weight on her feet. But as doctors prepared on Thursday to move her to a rehabilitation center in Houston, they continued to caution that she faces months of intensive physical and speech therapy. “I do want to caution everyone that she has a long road ahead of her,” said Dr. G. Michael Lemole, the chief neu-

rosurgeon at University Medical Center, where Giffords has been treated. “It is not uncommon for someone to initially improve and then plateau for a little while and then improve again, so everyone has to gear their expectations for what she’s willing to show for us as opposed to what we want.” Giffords’ husband, Capt. Mark Kelly, said he hoped she would walk through the hospital doors here in a couple of months to thank doctors. Lemole said that while such a feat would be possible, Giffords was likely to be a patient at the rehabilitation center for several months. Kelly said he was confident that his wife was aware of her surroundings. She has reached

for his face, smiled at him and scrolled through his iPad, he said. “I can just look in her eyes and tell,” he said. “She is a fighter like nobody else that I know. I am extremely confident that she is going to be back here and back at work soon.” Kelly said that he chose the Institute for Rehabilitation and Research at Memorial Hermann hospital in Houston because of its reputation and location.

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A4 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

How the caldera was formed Ancient history Gas-rich magma chambers formed below the surface, fracturing the overlying rock as they expanded. Some magma found its way to the surface along these fractures, creating vents on the edge of the caldera dome. About 22 by 15 miles across, the Crooked River caldera was one of the largest in the United States. A smaller caldera, the nearby Wildcat Mountain caldera, had erupted 10 million years earlier.

Vents formed along the edge of the caldera dome to release some of the pressure from the expanding magma chambers below.

Wildcat Mountain caldera Crooked River caldera Redmond

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Several magma chambers may have formed underground, forcing the overlaying rock upward into a dome.

Crooked River caldera eruption, 29.6 million years ago When the Crooked River caldera erupted, it did so in a brief, catastrophic event: 1 Like steam escaping from a pressure cooker, hot ash exploded laterally from the sides of the dome.

Much of the hot ash fell back into the caldera, but some may have fallen as far away as the John Day Fossil Beds.

Thick clouds of hot ash exploded across the landscape as the eruption started.

2 The overlying rock that covered the magma chambers collapsed in upon itself or was flung out with the ash. 3 Much of the ash, lava and rock fell back into the caldera, filling in the collasped magma chambers.

The overlying rock collapsed into the magma chambers and was covered with hot ash, forming into a thick, dense layer of tuff.

Water sources scarce in the caldera basin By Erik Hidle The Bulletin

Water in the city of Prineville is a precious commodity due to minimal water below the city’s surface, but officials are working on plans to improve the hand they were dealt in the dry caldera basin. The main problem for the city is minimal groundwater resources. Wells are either extremely low in flow or dry altogether. City of Prineville Engineer Eric Klann said a resident in Bend or Redmond can drill a well and expect to produce between 2,500 and 3,500 gallons per minute, but a Prineville resident drilling a well should only expect a fraction of that. According to Klann, a well producing 200 gallons per minute is considered a “good well” in the Prineville area. In 2005, the city drilled three wells that ended up being completely dry. Klann said he is working on developing a map of where underground “streams” are located that could be tapped to develop more abundant wells. The idea came when the city found a strong source of water near the airport in a vein of basalt aquifer. Two wells in that area produce a total of 1,000 gallons per minute. But a third well, drilled 2,000 feet from the current wells, came up dry showing that the vein is quite narrow. “What we found is an ancient Crooked River streambed,” Klann said. “Millions of years ago, the Crooked River ran through that area. When we went down in that area, we hit one of those old river channels where the water is still flowing. But the problem is once you move away from that area, you can hit a place where the Crooked River never was.” The reason the city is so interested in developing better

wells is because, as it stands now, the city does not have the capacity to serve its existing residents, Klann said. Klann said the city currently serves 9,020 people, but some 1,250 residents do not have city water service and use wells to draw their own water. On top of that, state law requires the city to plan to serve the entirety of its Urban Growth Boundary with services. Prineville estimates it could see 26,980 new residents if the boundary is filled. Also, the city is restricted in what it can do to solve the water problem as it is included in the Deschutes Groundwater Mitigation Area. The state-mandated boundary dictates water use in the area and requires mitigation credits to be obtained before additional wells can be dug. “The credits are expensive and few and far between,” Klann said. “There are no more surface water rights here. If we pump a gallon of water out of the well, it won’t go to the stream. So, whatever water we take out of the stream we put back into the stream. “We are studying our geology here,” he said. “We are trying to determine how our aquifers are recharged and where the water comes from. We are also trying to identify natural flow water rights so we can convert those into mitigation credits.” Klann also said projects such as the bill proposed by U.S. Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, to release more water from the Bowman Dam could help them obtain mitigation credits. “On top of everything, we are very much working on our conservation efforts,” Klann said. “The less we waste, the more we have.” Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

After the eruption; more volcanics, lava and erosion Volcanic activity continued after the initial eruption, but on a much smaller scale. Powell Buttes, Grizzly Mountain and Gray Butte grew from small vents along the edge of the caldera between 25 and 28 million years ago. Lava flows from nearby volcanos, and from smaller vents inside the caldera, added successive layers of basalt to the caldera. The last layer came from Newberry Volcano, 45 miles to the south, about 400,000 years ago. Lava also flowed into the caldera along the Crooked River channel. Some flows continued along the drainage to accumulate further downstream. Although lava occasionally altered or blocked the river’s path, the Crooked River’s course has remained much the same as it is today. Over time, weathering and erosion have smoothed the features of the caldera.

Lava flows blanketed the caldera, adding successive layers of basalt on top of the tuff. The thickest accumulations can be seen on the canyon walls of the Crooked River south of present-day Prineville, which are over 600 feet high.

The eruption filled the caldera with a dense layer of tuff nearly a thousand feet thick. Smith Rock is a remnant of this tuff.

Gray Smith Butte Rock

Grizzly Mountain

Present-day Prineville

Powell Buttes

Crooked River

Tuff Powell Buttes, Gray Butte and Grizzly Mountain are remnants of rhyolite intrusions, formed when magma oozed up like toothpaste along the margins of the caldera and cooled.

The Crooked River caldera today

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Sources: Jason McClaughry, Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries; Caroline Gordon, Ochoco National Forest; Oregon Geology magazine

Bankruptcy Continued from A1 For now, the fear of destabilizing the municipal bond market with the words “state bankruptcy” has proponents in Congress going about their work on tiptoe. No draft bill is in circulation yet, and no member of Congress has come forward as a sponsor, although Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, asked the Federal Reserve chairman, Ben Bernanke, about the possibility in a hearing this month. House Republicans and senators from both parties have taken an

interest in the issue, with nudging from bankruptcy lawyers and a former House speaker, Newt Gingrich, who could be a Republican presidential candidate. It would be difficult to get a bill through Congress, not only because of the constitutional questions and the complexities of bankruptcy law but also because of fears that even talk of such a law could make the states’ problems worse. Lawmakers might ultimately decide to stop short of a full-blown bankruptcy proposal and establish instead some sort of oversight panel for distressed states, akin to the Municipal Assistance Cor-

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Successive layers of basalt have voids between them and some are more porus than others, giving water a place to collect.

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The tuff that filled the caldera during the eruption created a dense, solid layer, leaving few voids into which water can flow.

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The caldera’s distinct shape can be seen today from atop Grizzly Mountain or the Ochoco Wayside viewpoint. Beneath Prineville, the tuff left behind from the eruption formed a dense layer nearly a thousand feet thick. This layer makes drilling wells for water an unlikely prospect within the Prineville valley.

poration, which helped New York City during its fiscal crisis of 1975. Still, discussions about something as far-reaching as bankruptcy could give governors and others more leverage in bargaining with unionized public workers. “They are readying a massive assault on us,” said Charles Loveless, legislative director of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees. “We’re taking this very seriously.” Loveless said he was meeting with potential allies on the Hill, making the point that certain states might indeed have financial problems, but public employ-

ir rvo se e R

Eric Baker / The Bulletin

ees and their benefits were not the cause. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities released a report Thursday warning against a tendency to confuse the states’ immediate budget gaps with their long-term structural deficits. Discussion of a new bankruptcy venue for the states appears to have taken off in November, after Gingrich gave a speech about the country’s big challenges, including government debt and an uncompetitive labor market. “We just have to be honest and clear about this, and I also hope the House Republicans are going to move a bill in the first month or

Prineville Continued from A1 Klann hopes to see the city begin work on the project in 2012 and complete the development in 2015. He said once the project is complete, it could serve around 36,000 people, or meet the city’s growth needs for the next 30 years. The change of plans also reduces ratepayers’ system development charges — the cost charged for new developments. The mechanical solution to treating the city’s wastewater would have cost $33 million and cost a developer about $9,147 per single dwelling in SDCs. The wetland plan as adopted will cost $6.6 million and bring the SDC cost down to $3,875. Klann said that the difference in upkeep costs between a mechanical system and a wetland system had not been fully calculated, and by his estimate was that the wetland would be “five times cheaper” to operate. “That may be just a few thousand dollars for a single dwelling,” Klann said, “But when you think about large projects such as Facebook that are equal to many, many dwellings, you see a major cost because of many, many SDCs. Reducing that cost is an economic benefit to the community.” Prineville City Manager Steve Forrester said the economic benefits from the plan will be a boon for future development. “This gives us the ability to cut the SDC in half,” Forrester said. “It takes a lot of pressure off what the city is facing in terms of economic development. It puts us in competitive range with other cities.” Prineville Mayor Betty Roppe

so of their tenure to create a venue for state bankruptcy,” he said. Pensions become unsecured debts in municipal bankruptcy and may be reduced. And the law makes it easier for a bankrupt city to tear up its labor contracts than for a bankrupt company, said James Spiotto, head of the bankruptcy practice at Chapman & Cutler in Chicago. The biggest surprise may await the holders of a state’s general obligation bonds. Although widely considered the strongest credit of any government, they can be treated as unsecured credits, subject to reduction, under Chapter 9.

also said the lower costs will benefit ratepayers. “If we built a treatment plant, we would have to pass that cost on to the ratepayers,” Roppe said. “This is a much reduced cost and keeps the rates lower.” Forrester added that the reduced cost also meant the city was less likely to depend on a bond to build the wetlands. And it benefits the community by opening up lands for public use. “The citizens own 280 acres they can’t access at this point,” Forrester said. “But this makes it accessible for bird-watching, jogging and other activities.” Klann also said the system will help to keep the consumptive rate of water in the area lower, which is a number taken into account when the city applies for mitigation credits to utilize wells. “This is going to ensure that our consumptive rate remains as low as possible,” Klann said. “By using the wetland, the water is working its way back into the natural system and not leaving the area. That number is very important when you talk about water rights and water mitigation.” Klann said the idea came from the city of La Grande’s Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area. La Grande Public Works Director Norm Paullus said in an earlier interview that La Grande’s 720-acre wetland project has garnered awards and drawn visitors from as far away as Saudi Arabia. A similar project has also been developed in Salem. Athena and Roseburg have projects under construction. Erik Hidle can be reached at 541-617-7837 or at ehidle@bendbulletin.com.

Spiotto said he thought bankruptcy court was not a good avenue for troubled states, and he has designed an alternative called the Public Pension Funding Authority. It would have mandatory jurisdiction over states that failed to provide sufficient funding to their workers’ pensions or that were diverting money from services. “I’ve talked to some people from Congress, and I’m going to talk to some more,” he said. “I don’t want the states to have to pay higher borrowing costs because of a panic that they might go bankrupt. I don’t think it’s the right thing at all. But it’s the beginning of a dialog.”


C OV ER S T OR I ES

MODESTO, Calif. — After losing her speech more than a decade ago, Brenda Jensen became isolated from friends and was teased for using an electronic device that made her sound like a robot. Today, the 52-year-old has her voice back thanks to a rare transplant surgery at the University of California Medical Center in Sacramento. An international team of surgeons replaced Jensen’s larynx, or voicebox, in an 18-hour operation in October. It was only the second successful larynx transplant documented in medical literature. The first was at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio in 1998. The surgeons could not tell if their delicate work was a success until 13 days after the operation, when they went to Jensen’s hospital bed and asked her to speak. “I want to go home,” she said in a hoarse voice and then broke into a smile. Friends and family members now are amazed when she speaks, including 12-year-old granddaughter Samara Versteegh, who had never heard the sound of Jensen’s voice. “When she called me from the hospital and I talked with her

SDCs Continued from A1 “We’re opposed to it altogether, especially on the existing buildings,” said Andy High, vice president of government affairs with the Central Oregon Builders Association. “I think it’s going to have a bigger impact than what the city is anticipating.” City officials have estimated that this new provision would only apply to about 2 percent of commercial properties that needed permits for new development. Today, if someone redeveloped a building that has been vacant for more than three years and was built before SDCs were in place, that person would get an SDC credit for whatever use was already associated with the property and therefore have to pay a smaller amount of fees, or no fees at all, if the use was less intensive or the same. This would be true for a vacant lot that used to have a building that has since been razed. For example, if someone wanted to turn an office building downtown that was built in 1908 and has been vacant for five years into a brew pub — which would have a greater impact on the city’s streets, water and sewer systems since it serves more people — that individual would get an SDC credit for the previous office use and only pay a difference for the restaurant portion. Under the proposed rules, however, that developer would have to pay the full amount of SDCs, such as if the building was brand new, because it had been idle for more than three years. High said this isn’t fair to the developer because the person who initially constructed the building has likely already paid some sort of fee to the city, whether through property taxes or other charges that existed before SDCs. He said the building’s impact to infrastructure also would

for the first time, I bawled,” said Kathryn Versteegh, Jensen’s daughter. “It was amazing for her to produce sound and actually talk.” Jensen, who returned home from the hospital Nov. 11, reunited with the surgical team at a news conference Thursday morning at the University of California Medical Center. Her speech is still raspy, but she has shown steady improvement. Doctors hope the natural tones of her voice will return in the next several months. Jensen also is enjoying the smell of food again — the operation opened damaged airways in her neck, which had kept her from breathing through her mouth and nose. She has a breathing tube at the base of her neck and puts a finger over it when she speaks. Gregory Farwell, a University of California Davis associate professor of otolaryngology and the lead surgeon, said he is delighted with the results of the operation, which could open the door to transplants for people who have severely damaged vocal cords. The surgeons had to knit together the complex anatomy of the larynx, with its nerves and muscles that work to produce the voice and assist with swallowing and breathing.

have already been accounted for in the city’s SDC program. With the recent recession, he said there are probably some people who had the intention of building on a lot but just couldn’t because of financial restraints. If the city implemented the SDC program, he said such delays could then penalize that developer for waiting on an investment. A building owner also could have had difficulties finding someone to lease his or her property, and therefore would lose their SDC credit. “I don’t see any benefit for changing it,” High said. “At the end of the day, I think it’s a money grab by the city, and it shouldn’t be that way.” On Wednesday, High expressed his concerns to Bend City Councilors, several of whom had similar apprehensions. New Councilor Scott Ramsay said at the meeting and on Thursday that he was worried the new rule, if approved, could prevent investors or developers from revitalizing some of the older parts of town. This, he said, could move development further away from the core of the city, like downtown or between Third Street and the Parkway. “My fear is that a lot of these older buildings that are sitting vacant right now because of the economic downturn would be looked at as kind of the stepchild,” said Ramsay, who owns a business on Division Street. “My hope is that we could help these older buildings to help them redevelop.” He also had some concerns about some of the vacant lots around town that he said are primed for development. A couple examples he gave are the vacant lot next to the Bend Brewing Company downtown that’s along the Deschutes River and another one near the Deschutes Brewery. Ramsay also noted that this new rule could impact the city’s ability to sell the old Bulletin property on the corner of Olney Avenue and Wall Street that has

been a constant drain on Bend’s general fund because of interest payments. City Manager Eric King said the new rule was created as a way to make properties that have long been vacant or empty pay for additional impacts to Bend’s infrastructure, and in a way resets that clock after a certain time. It’s also somewhat of a way of encouraging development versus allowing property to remain barren. “What we’re saying,” King said, “is for those who have never paid SDCs, and they’re just sitting on property that’s never been used, that there’s some sort of timeline.” After Wednesday’s council meeting, he said, city staff are now looking at modifying that provision. Some of the options include giving vacant lots and empty buildings different timelines for when the SDC credit would expire. He said that could mean allowing more time for empty buildings to find a tenant before taking away the credit. King added that developing the perfect system is difficult, and he thinks the city has been “overdependent” on SDCs to pay for future infrastructure. By pushing for more SDCs, he said it puts too much of a burden on developers and makes it difficult to keep up with major infrastructure projects, particularly those in transportation since there aren’t any utility rates associated with roads, as there are with sewer and water. “It’s very complex. This SDC thing is not the easiest way to pay for infrastructure because trying to determine everybody’s proportionate share is not a simple task,” King said. “The simplest method is that everybody that lives in the community has some sort of responsibility to pay for this infrastructure, and there is some sort of tax base for that.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

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Woman can speak again after larynx transplant surgery

Continued from A1 These other methods not only are popular, the researchers reported; they also seem to give students the illusion that they know material better than they do. In the experiments, the students were asked to predict how much they would remember a week after using one of the methods to learn the material. Those who took the test after reading the passage predicted they would remember less than the other students predicted — but the results were just the opposite. Several cognitive scientists and education experts said the results were striking. The researchers engaged 200 college students in two experiments, assigning them to read several paragraphs about a scientific subject — how the digestive system works, for example, or the different types of vertebrate muscle tissue. In the first experiment, the students were divided into four groups. One did nothing more than read the text for five minutes. Another studied the passage in four consecutive five-minute sessions. A third group engaged in “concept mapping,” in which, with the passage in front of them, they arranged information from the passage into a kind of diagram, writing details and ideas in hand-drawn bubbles and linking the bubbles in an organized way. The final group took a “retrieval practice” test. Without the passage in front of them, they wrote what they remembered in a free-form essay for 10 minutes. Then they reread the passage and took another retrieval practice test. A week later all four groups were given a short-answer test that assessed their ability to recall facts and draw logical conclusions based on the facts. The second experiment focused only on concept mapping and retrieval practice testing, with each student doing an exercise using each method. In this initial phase, researchers reported, students who made diagrams while consulting the passage included more detail than students asked to recall what they had just read in an essay. But when they were evaluated a week later, the students in the testing group did much better than the concept mappers. They even did better when they were evaluated not with a short-answer test but with a test requiring them to draw a concept map from memory.

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Jose Luis Magana / The Associated Press

Male Giant Panda Tian Tian eats a fruitsicle at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., on Thursday. Zoo Director Dennis Kelly and Zang Chunlin, the Secretary General of the China Wildlife Conservation Association, signed a new Giant Panda cooperative research and breeding agreement for five more years on Thursday.

Test

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A6 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN


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Healthy Wal-Mart Giant retailer outlines ambitious new plan, see Page B4.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

MARKET REPORT

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2,704.29 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE -21.07 -.77%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B2-3

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF PremierWest reports loss, reverse split Medford-based PremierWest Bancorp, parent company of PremierWest Bank, on Thursday reported a net loss of $0.7 million, or 1 cent per share, in the fourth quarter ended Dec. 31, compared with a net loss of $110.6 million, or $4.46 per share, for the same quarter in 2009. For the year ended Dec. 31, the company reported a net loss of $7.5 million, or 9 cents per share, compared with a net loss of $148.6 million, or $6.01 per share, for 2009. The company also announced that it intends to file an amendment to its articles of incorporation to complete a 1-for-10 reverse stock split effective Feb. 10. Shareholders approved the split at a special meeting on Dec. 16. The intention of the reverse stock split is to bring the company’s stock price above the $1 minimum bid price required for continued listing on the Nasdaq Capital Market. PremierWest has until March 10 to regain compliance, the company said in a news release.

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11,822.80 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE -2.49 -.02%

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1,280.26 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE -1.66 -.13%

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Ten-year CLOSE 3.45 treasury CHANGE +3.60%

Correction In a story headlined “Here they come,” which appeared Wednesday, Jan. 19, on Page B1, the last name of cyclist Chris Horner was misspelled. The Bulletin regrets the error.

Central Oregon fuel prices Prices from the AAA Fuel Price Finder at www .aaaorid.com. Price per gallon for regular unleaded gasoline and diesel, as posted online Thursday.

GASOLINE Station, address Per gallon • Space Age, 20635 Grandview Drive, Bend. . . $3.16 • Ron’s Oil, 62980 N. Highway 97, Bend . . . . . . . $3.19 • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.22 • Quick Way, 690 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend . . . . . .$3.25 • Texaco, 2409 N.E. Butler Market Road, Bend . . . . . .$3.26 • Chevron, 398 N.W. Third St., Prineville. . . . . . . . . . . .$3.26 • Chevron, 2005 S. Highway 97, Redmond . . . . . . . . . . .$3.26 • Chevron, 1001 Railway, Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.26

DIESEL • Gordy’s Truck Stop, 17045 Whitney Road, La Pine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.26 • Chevron, 2005 S. Highway 97, Redmond . . . . . . . . . . .$3.50 Marla Polenz / The Bulletin

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$1346.50 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$23.70

State mortgage program draws interest in Deschutes 890 homeowners apply for 371 slots; Crook, Jefferson have weaker turnout By Tim Doran The Bulletin

More than twice as many Deschutes County homeowners applied to a state program to have their mortgages paid for up to a year than the number of available slots. In Deschutes County, 890 homeowners completed applications, hoping to be selected in a random drawing for the 371 slots allocated to the county, said Michael Kaplan,

administrator of the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative. However, Crook and Jefferson counties had the opposite results. The number of homeowners who applied for the Mortgage Payment Assistance Program from those counties will fill about half the slots each county has available, if they all qualify. The state allocated Crook County 283 slots, and 142 homeowners applied, Kaplan

said. Jefferson County received 244 slots, and 145 applied. Officials have not decided how to handle the potentially extra slots from Crook and Jefferson counties, Kaplan said. With the need in Deschutes County apparently greater than the help available, some of the slots from the other counties could be reallocated, he said. See Mortgage / B3

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$27.459 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$1.333

Google co-founder to reclaim CEO post Page hopes to revive entrepreneurial spirit By Claire Cain Miller and Miguel Helft New York Times News Service

Auto repair isn’t what it used to be Darin Moore, 45, owner of Thompson Import Specialities of Bend, uses a laptop connected to the onboard computer in a Nissan sedan. Based on the repair codes and his training and experience interpreting repair codes emitted by onboard computers, Moore interprets the data and diagnoses the problem prior to initiating repair work.

Rates on 30-year mortgages up slightly Interest rates on 30- and 15year fixed-rate mortgages rose and fell slightly, respectively, this week, according to results of Freddie Mac’s weekly mortgage survey. The 30-year rate averaged 4.74 percent, with an average 0.8 point for the week ending Thursday, up from last week, when it averaged 4.71 percent. Last year at this time, the 30year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 4.99 percent. The 15-year rate this week averaged 4.05 percent, with an average 0.8 point, down from last week, when it averaged 4.08 percent. A year ago at this time, the 15-year rate averaged 4.40 percent. — From staff reports

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Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Years of training required to work on technologically sophisticated vehicles By Ed Merriman The Bulletin 50 In the old days, the kid next 40 door who built the fastest hot rod in town in his backyard and raced it on Saturday nights could land an auto mechanic’s job right out of high school. Times have changed. Today, the road to a profession as an auto mechanic, or automotive technician, requires a minimum of two years of technical automotive training to attain

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the knowledge and skills to operate computerized diagnostic 70 equipment and interpret repair 80 codes emitted by the vehicle’s onboard computers, according to owners of Bend automotive repair shops. “I advise people interested in a career in automotive repair that they have to be strong in computers and electronics,” said Darin Moore, 45, owner of Thompson Import Specialities in north Bend. “I’d say about

AUTO NEWS

70 percent of the things we deal with now is electrical.” Moore said he developed a passion for automotive work when he was growing up in The Dalles, where he built a dune buggy and worked on hot rods and motorcycles when he was in high school. After high school, he honed his autorepair skills at the Universal Technical Institute in Phoenix, and then continued his training under the previous owner prior to purchasing the business in 1987. See Repair / B3

SAN FRANCISCO — Google made the biggest management shake-up Thursday since it went public, handing the reins of the company to one of its co-founders in an effort to get back to its startup roots. As it has grown into the dominant company in Silicon Valley, Google has lost some of its entrepreneurial culture and become a slower-moving bureaucraLarry Page cy, analysts and insiders say, in contrast to Facebook, Inside Twitter and • Google other younger, posts strong nimbler comearnings, petitors. Page B4 To counter this, the company announced that Larry Page, its 38year-old co-founder, would take over as chief executive from Eric Schmidt, a technology industry veteran who was brought in a decade ago to provide adult supervision, as Silicon Valley calls it. Schmidt, 55, will remain executive chairman. “One of the primary goals I have is to get Google to be a big company that has the nimbleness and soul and passion and speed of a startup,” Page said in a telephone interview Thursday. He will start his new role in April. The shake-up comes at a time of major upheaval in Silicon Valley. While Google remains immensely powerful and successful — as demonstrated by the stellar quarterly financial results it reported Thursday — the company faces challenges on several fronts. The sudden rise of Facebook has exposed Google’s failures in areas like social networking and threatens its vast share of the online advertising market. Meanwhile, while Google has had success in new areas like mobile and display advertising, it has struggled to branch out into other businesses like television. See Google / B4 PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Warner Music plan: Buy or be bought By Tim Arrango and Andrew Ross Sorkin New York Times News Service

The Warner Music Group, one of the four major record companies, has hired investment bank Goldman Sachs to seek out potential buyers for the company, a process that will play out while Warner continues to explore buying the beleaguered British music giant EMI. The decision to hire Goldman Sachs came after several suitors, including the buyout firm Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, approached Warner Music’s management in recent months about buying the company, according to an executive briefed on the matter who spoke only anonymously. Instead of negotiating solely with KKR, the company’s management decided to begin a

formal sale process by hiring Goldman, which has recently begun making pitches to financial investors and media companies about buying Warner. One possible outcome of the auction is for Warner to sell not the entire company but only Warner/Chappell, its prized publishing arm, said a person with direct knowledge of the process. Meanwhile, a separate set of bankers within Goldman has been working on a potential acquisition of EMI by Warner. Goldman has reached out to Citigroup, which owns a large amount of EMI’s debt and could soon control the company if it fails to meet its payments, according to executives involved in the process, who would speak of the confidential negotiations only anonymously. See Warner / B3

Airbus tanker accident could complicate Air Force deal New York Times News Service WASHINGTON — A large part of a midair refueling boom broke off of an Airbus plane during a training exercise, the company said Thursday, adding a possible complication to the Air Force’s effort to award a $35 billion contract for new tankers. Airbus executives said the cause of the accident, which occurred Wednesday off the coast of Portugal, was not yet clear. Airbus has asserted that it was ahead of its rival, Boeing, in designing new booms, and its parent, the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Co., plans to use the same model on the plane for the Air Force if it wins the contract.

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B USI N ESS

B2 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMR AOL ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh h AcadiaRlt Accenture AccretvH n Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Acuity AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs AdventSft s Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix Agenus AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliFibO rs AlliancOne AllnceRes AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlphaNRs AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap Altria Alumina AlumChina Alvarion AmBev s Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAssets n AmAxle ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AIG wt AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amtech Amylin Anadarko Anadigc AnalogDev Ancestry Anglgld 13 AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP AntheraP n Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC Approach Apricus rs AquaAm ArQule Arbitron ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArdeaBio ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArmHld ArmourRsd Arris ArrowEl ArubaNet ArvMerit AscenaRtl AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen athenahlth Atheros AtlasAir AtlasEngy AtlasPplH AtlasPpln Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes Aurizon g AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData AutoZone Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AvisBudg Avnet

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Nm Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJsRest BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BP Pru BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallyTech BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BkAtl A h BannerCp Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BarcBk prD BarcBk pr Barclay Bar iPVix rs BarVixMdT Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BaytexE g BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis BenchElec Berkley BerkH B s BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRef s Biocryst Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioLase BioMarin BioMedR BioSante BioScrip BlkRKelso Blkboard BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCpHY VI BlkDebtStr BlkIntlG&I BlMunhNYQ BlMunyNYQ Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat BlueNile BdwlkPpl Boeing Boise Inc Boise wt BonaFilm n Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw Braskem BreitBurn BridgptEd BrigStrat BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrooksAuto BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Bsquare BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BuffaloWW BungeLt CA Inc CB REllis CBIZ Inc CBL Asc CBS B CF Inds CGI g CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CME Grp CMS Eng CNH Gbl CNO Fincl CNinsure CRH CSG Sys CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care Cabelas CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaStrTR Calgon CallGolf Callidus CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CP Rwy g CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapGold n CapOne CapProd CaptlTr CapitlSrce CaptlBcp h CapFdF rs CapsteadM CpstnTrb h Cardero g CardnlHlth CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd Carlisle CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters CatalystH Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CedarSh CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cellcom CelldexTh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBras lf CentEuro CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid

D 0.88 28.88 +.38 3.21 -.11 0.92 35.16 +.55 0.60 27.08 -.21 1.97 35.46 -.11 38.62 -.83 0.48 8.24 -.34 1.74 88.08 -2.51 1.74 76.35 -2.37 35.45 +.17 45.13 +.44 48.27 -.71 47.57 -.63 8.80 122.91 -2.57 4.82 -.08 1.50 42.41 0.10 17.56 -.03 4.88 -.05 28.03 -.07 105.66 -1.65 0.60 58.51 -.23 0.68 63.42 +.03 0.40 69.20 -.44 42.21 -.07 1.34 57.22 -.28 0.55 11.87 +.29 0.82 19.41 -.52 0.78 11.86 +.24 0.45 12.30 -.49 0.88 14.93 -.27 0.04 14.54 +.17 2.05 25.37 -.07 8.01 +.11 2.86 -.02 1.80 47.36 -.66 1.04 2.37 -.03 2.80 59.44 -.23 0.36 31.63 +.15 1.96 56.24 -.44 1.14 0.04 2.03 -.13 3.43 +.11 48.62 -.31 24.69 -.70 2.03 25.35 -.02 1.66 23.45 -.49 0.28 19.30 +.33 31.85 -.33 60.40 -.48 0.72 93.11 +.27 1.00 16.48 -.33 0.32 19.92 -.12 0.48 46.98 -.72 16.81 -.01 1.24 50.55 +.25 2.40 48.34 +.21 .32 +.01 18.34 -.09 5.60 +.02 0.10 5.96 +.02 0.76 71.89 +.14 1.64 83.09 +.09 47.99 -.41 6.64 +.01 0.92 32.27 -.48 18.97 -.47 0.28 27.61 -.04 80.73 -.19 0.30 45.13 -1.20 0.60 35.32 +.42 32.41 +.19 39.48 -.41 23.10 -.37 4.32 -.09 2.38 +.10 1.13 -.15 68.78 +2.54 2.77 +1.10 25.94 -.68 0.68 18.29 +.17 1.92 +.01 4.99 +.03 1.28 11.40 -.10 39.93 -.09 4.00 190.87 -.69 1.42 17.96 +.09 0.99 11.33 -.12 0.32 3.88 +.01 1.36 10.13 -.09 0.95 12.45 -.07 0.85 11.81 +.16 0.40 15.33 +.21 0.60 13.21 +.15 28.41 -1.79 60.05 -2.01 2.06 31.57 -.48 1.68 71.12 -.61 0.40 8.19 -.11 .84 -.13 7.32 +.41 .83 -.02 68.85 -.95 0.04 6.70 -.10 2.00 89.95 +.32 7.27 +.12 11.51 +.13 0.60 11.09 -.09 0.02 24.80 -.15 1.56 21.25 -.40 17.20 +.38 0.44 20.75 -.16 26.97 -1.00 9.05 -.10 1.64 -.10 0.56 21.45 +.44 1.32 25.83 +.22 0.32 45.00 -1.44 0.60 22.82 -.30 25.51 -1.35 1.99 -.09 5.70 +.02 21.22 -.04 0.52 32.89 -.24 0.56 17.47 +.02 0.34 10.77 +.02 11.21 -.16 0.32 24.50 -.11 0.28 13.30 17.08 -.13 0.05 19.60 -.19 9.58 -.45 0.16 20.25 -.57 0.80 37.07 +1.43 0.10 90.35 +.11 0.46 41.60 -1.69 44.61 -.16 0.92 69.48 -1.42 0.16 25.46 -.04 22.07 +.06 6.65 0.80 16.83 -.27 0.20 20.50 +.29 0.40 135.83 -4.34 18.41 -.22 1.16 77.80 +.08 0.04 40.85 +.44 47.29 +.28 4.60 309.21 +2.95 0.84 19.12 +.12 49.68 -1.91 6.55 -.12 0.26 18.97 -1.15 0.83 20.56 +.29 18.57 +.02 1.04 67.74 -.57 0.34 8.57 -.12 15.77 +.07 0.50 35.31 +.81 21.61 +.02 0.50 34.15 +.42 0.72 40.52 -1.20 0.12 38.31 -.07 7.29 -.17 8.56 -.33 6.01 -.09 0.63 9.34 -.01 13.70 +.18 0.04 7.87 +.01 5.91 -.26 6.96 -.04 14.20 -.24 1.80 -.08 1.80 53.98 +.51 0.40 38.25 -1.73 24.87 -.58 50.20 -.06 1.16 35.25 +.40 0.64 12.89 -.20 1.08 67.63 -.44 0.30 42.17 -.28 1.08 66.69 -.15 14.76 -.35 .39 -.02 49.80 -.84 4.78 -.13 0.20 47.25 -.07 0.93 9.56 -.40 2.14 +.29 0.04 7.66 -.06 .40 -.12 11.66 -.08 1.51 12.61 -.01 1.10 1.82 -.02 0.78 40.45 -.38 .40 -.00 25.91 -.12 21.73 +.41 0.68 39.77 -.77 31.90 -.09 1.00 46.03 -.23 0.72 41.93 -1.47 31.91 -1.18 28.61 -.47 43.69 +.69 1.76 93.61 -1.93 0.04 16.22 -.28 39.63 -3.61 0.36 5.94 -.05 .76 -.03 0.20 40.77 -1.95 6.16 +.18 9.43 -.10 56.63 +.31 .37 -.01 3.59 32.42 +.02 3.76 +.12 0.43 10.21 +.12 1.19 16.99 -.44 0.80 31.74 -.20 25.80 -1.17 0.79 15.94 +.12 1.56 13.57 -.19 24.90 -.59 0.01 18.51 -.54 1.92 +.21 14.54 -.47 2.90 42.44 -.91 5.37 -.05 60.38 +.96 23.10 -1.08

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CeragonN 13.18 -1.06 Cerner 96.15 -.01 CerusCp 3.54 +.10 ChRvLab 37.49 +.45 ChrmSh 3.17 +.07 ChartInds 36.95 -.77 ChkPoint 45.82 -.68 Cheesecake 30.24 +.36 ChelseaTh 6.50 +.11 Chemtura n 15.26 -.32 CheniereEn 6.46 -.08 CheniereE 1.70 21.56 -.74 ChesEng 0.30 27.81 -.02 Chevron 2.88 92.71 -.26 ChicB&I 34.16 -.45 Chicos 0.16 10.81 ChildPlace 45.09 +.89 Chimera 0.69 4.14 +.02 ChinAgri s 11.62 -.23 ChinaBAK 1.88 -.04 ChinaBiot 17.67 +.19 ChiCbl rsh .53 -.09 ChinaDir 1.49 -.01 ChiGengM 2.92 -.05 ChinGerui 5.93 +.06 ChinaGreen 7.98 -.06 ChinaIntEn 5.97 -.14 ChinaLife 1.54 60.87 -.83 ChinaMda 19.65 -.53 ChinaMed 12.39 -.16 ChinaMble 1.85 49.93 -.35 ChinaNGas 5.73 -.05 ChNBorun n 12.75 -.32 ChinNEPet 5.84 +.21 ChinaPStl 1.72 -.01 ChinaRE 8.40 -.32 ChinaSecur 4.62 -.07 ChinaShen 6.34 -.27 ChShengP 1.41 -.35 ChinaSky 5.26 -.09 ChinaUni 0.23 15.39 +.30 ChiValve 7.37 -.34 ChXDPlas 6.48 +.11 ChiXFash n 7.60 -.47 ChinaYuch 0.25 28.30 -1.90 Chipotle 223.04 -6.29 Chiquita 15.49 +.19 ChrisBnk 0.24 6.05 +.12 Chubb 1.48 58.05 +.27 CIBER 4.86 +.19 CienaCorp 24.10 -.72 Cimarex 0.32 96.37 +1.06 CinciBell 2.65 -.05 CinnFin 1.60 31.76 +.03 Cinemark 0.84 17.66 -.15 Cintas 0.49 29.29 +.72 Cirrus 17.34 -.55 Cisco 20.77 -.05 Citigp pfN 1.97 27.12 +.11 Citigrp 4.80 +.04 CitzRepB h .66 -.02 CitrixSys 65.36 -2.44 CityNC 0.40 62.12 +.50 ClaudeR g 2.04 -.08 CleanEngy 13.22 -.25 Clearwire 5.58 -.08 ClevBioL h 7.41 +.43 ClickSft 7.53 -.28 CliffsNRs 0.56 84.25 -3.12 ClinicData 14.84 -.76 Clorox 2.20 63.97 +.60 CloudPeak 21.59 -.61 Coach 0.60 53.38 -.26 CobaltIEn 12.67 -.39 CocaCE 0.48 25.05 +.11 CocaCl 1.76 62.93 -.49 Coeur 23.17 -.75 CogentC 14.51 -.39 CognizTech 73.61 -.94 CohStQIR 0.72 9.05 +.09 Coinstar 41.93 -.48 ColdwtrCrk 2.74 -.05 ColgPal 2.12 78.99 -.01 CollctvBrd 20.41 +.61 ColonPT 0.60 18.50 +.15 ColumLabs 2.64 -.03 Comcast 0.38 23.26 +.16 Comc spcl 0.38 21.92 +.31 Comerica 0.40 38.88 +.73 CmcBMO 0.94 41.53 -.55 CmclMtls 0.48 16.21 -.20 CmwReit rs 2.00 25.82 +.09 CmtyHlt 35.86 -.12 CommVlt 29.52 -1.32 CBD-Pao s 0.36 40.44 +.07 Compellent 27.64 -.01 CompPrdS 27.66 +1.17 CompSci 0.80 52.96 -.03 Compuwre 11.78 -.34 ComScore 24.31 -.05 ComstkRs 25.12 -.15 Con-Way 0.40 33.57 -.31 ConAgra 0.92 23.46 +.32 ConchoRes 90.00 -2.45 ConcurTch 52.67 -3.20 Conexant 2.04 -.04 ConocPhil 2.20 67.21 -.56 ConsolEngy 0.40 50.57 +.65 ConsolCm 1.55 17.92 -.10 ConEd 2.38 50.53 +.18 ConstantC 27.93 -1.85 ConstellA 19.14 -.08 ConstellEn 0.96 32.16 +.10 ContlRes 60.50 -1.64 Cnvrgys 14.06 -.15 ConvOrg h .40 -.01 CooperCo 0.06 57.45 +.06 Cooper Ind 1.08 59.20 +.17 CooperTire 0.42 22.57 -.03 CopanoEn 2.30 33.43 -.38 Copart 39.25 -.18 CoreLab s 1.00 86.80 -3.11 CoreLogic 19.72 +.05 CorinthC 5.09 +.14 CornPdts 0.56 48.76 -.22 Corning 0.20 19.38 -.28 CorpOffP 1.65 34.15 -.15 CorrectnCp 24.91 +.28 Cosan Ltd 13.74 -.37 Costco 0.82 72.36 +.29 Cott Cp 8.00 -.21 CousPrp 0.18 8.46 +.03 Covance 54.96 +.55 CovantaH 1.50 16.78 -.15 CoventryH 29.28 -.84 Covidien 0.80 47.77 -.24 CrackerB 0.88 52.94 +.19 Crane 0.92 42.37 -.79 Cray Inc 7.41 -.01 CSCush30 20 0.91 23.56 -.29 CredSuiss 1.85 44.21 -.25 CrSuiHiY 0.32 2.98 +.01 Cree Inc 52.36 -1.27 Crocs 15.58 -.18 Crossh g rs 1.92 -.13 CrwnCstle 42.18 +.61 CrownHold 32.93 -.14 Crystallx g .28 -.01 Ctrip.com s 42.80 -.19 CubistPh 21.20 -.05 CullenFr 1.80 61.51 -.23 Cummins 1.05 108.02 -3.41 Curis 2.83 +.05 CurEuro 0.01 134.21 +.04 CurAstla 3.24 98.99 -1.27 Cyclacel 1.49 +.00 Cymer 46.60 -.29 CypSemi 20.51 -.30 CypSharp 2.40 12.70 -.01 CytRx .86 -.02 Cytec 0.05 49.72 -.82 Cytokinet 1.96 -.09 Cytomed .54 -.02 Cytori 5.36 -.18 DARA rs 3.79 +.04 DCT Indl 0.28 5.56 +.10 DG FastCh 27.17 -.85 DHT Hldgs 0.40 4.90 -.04 DPL 1.33 26.30 +.03 DR Horton 0.15 12.91 +.07 DSW Inc 34.70 +1.64 DTE 2.24 46.75 +.19 Daktronics 0.10 15.10 -.04 DanaHldg 17.37 -.63 Danaher s 0.08 46.26 -.77 Darden 1.28 46.44 +.51 Darling 12.93 +.53 DaVita 70.84 -.29 DeVry 0.24 46.72 +.71 DeanFds 9.86 +.23 DeckOut s 74.91 -2.23 DeerConsu 11.00 -.01 Deere 1.40 89.26 -.14 DejourE g .35 +.01 DelMnte 0.36 18.88 Delcath 9.04 -.08 Dell Inc 13.60 -.18 DeltaAir 11.61 +.16 DeltaPtr h .79 +.01 Deluxe 1.00 23.84 +.15 DemandTc 12.95 -.12 DenburyR 18.85 -.30 Dndreon 35.65 -.46 DenisnM g 3.27 -.14 Dennys 3.70 -.01 Dentsply 0.20 35.95 -.03 Depomed 5.90 +.24 DeutschBk 0.93 58.88 +.73 DB AgriDL 14.87 +.14 DBGoldSh 15.98 +.27 DBGoldDL 38.17 -1.54 DBGoldDS 8.87 +.28 DevelDiv 0.16 13.32 +.09 DevonE 0.64 82.33 -.16 Dex One n 6.50 -.15 DexCom 14.72 -.40 Diageo 2.38 76.71 -1.73 DiaOffs 0.50 74.49 +.55 DiamRk 12.06 -.07 DianaShip 11.92 -.11 DiceHldg 12.77 -.34 DicksSptg 34.98 +.08 Diebold 1.08 31.48 -.32 DigitalRlt 2.12 51.61 -1.19 DigRiver 35.24 -.16 DigitalGlb 30.99 +.22 Dillards 0.16 41.96 +4.42 Diodes 25.09 -.86 DirecTV A 42.30 +.20 DrxTcBll s 0.51 49.94 -1.37 DrxEMBll s 0.19 39.21 -1.34 DrTcBear rs 21.58 +.52 DrSCBear rs 15.75 +.48 DREBear rs 17.90 +.01 DrxEBear rs 20.83 +.44 DrxSOXBr 0.71 13.09 +.44 DrxSOXBll 0.01 58.05 -2.19 DirEMBr rs 20.99 +.64 DirFnBear 8.77 -.07 DrxFBull s 29.49 +.26 Dir30TrBear 47.66 +1.79

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0.62 30.91 -1.20 0.39 56.45 -.07 0.11 70.70 -2.32 8.32 +.07 1.55 75.04 -.48 0.41 62.60 -1.43 0.08 20.34 -.08 39.78 +.29 34.31 +.42 21.41 +.11 0.40 39.17 +.08 0.24 36.79 +.08 60.19 -1.47 14.63 +.11 29.48 +.15 51.73 -.14 1.83 43.37 +.40 16.64 +.18 1.00 78.37 -1.19 1.04 17.78 -.04 1.42 -.10 2.89 +.35 0.40 17.01 +.15 1.10 56.72 -1.48 0.60 34.29 -.88 1.00 35.02 -.36 7.29 -.29 28.58 +.33 43.96 +.15 0.52 4.45 73.66 -2.51 1.98 -.15 5.05 -.07 1.64 48.12 -.76 0.48 20.96 +.09 0.98 18.05 +.05 0.68 13.19 +.08 1.40 84.40 -.08 3.26 -.21 2.03 +.01 15.63 -.09 3.20 +.08 5.60 -.07

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29.96 +1.19 0.25 15.56 -.44 16.05 -.03 30.78 +1.68 12.16 -.07 23.84 -.40 29.70 +.16 4.13 -.10 2.51 46.93 -.04 0.62 101.36 -.08 0.88 45.49 -.78 80.57 -.43 3.03 40.45 -1.54 9.50 -.17 4.73 -.09 0.40 28.18 -.04 0.10 8.71 -.27 0.20 8.75 +.01 0.04 20.62 -.26 1.88 90.58 -1.55 5.25 +.02 2.32 100.21 -4.00 0.72 30.64 -.07 1.03 17.00 +.32 0.92 10.93 +.27 1.28 13.08 +.03 1.16 11.30 +.04 1.14 10.55 1.56 12.20 -.03 1.60 13.01 +.03 24.00 -.96 0.70 49.60 -.12 1.28 37.70 +.08 16.57 +.92 0.20 7.49 +.03 83.51 -.29 2.56 -.06 0.04 14.11 -.02 1.64 33.62 -.49 6.47 -.04 0.10 16.42 -.47 15.76 -.08 7.37 +.32 0.64 33.06 +.05 1.52 +.11 65.95 +.45 22.40 -.86 1.38 57.48 -.43 1.15 +.09 11.75 -.43 4.11 61.25 -.98 1.96 55.32 -.39 0.80 31.98 +.51 2.00 21.34 -.60 5.89 -.28 33.72 -.88 6.16 -.09 4.22 -.14 23.75 -.88 0.52 53.84 -.23 72.82 +.62 4.25 -.17 1.17 -.06 3.65 2.16 37.96 -.63 3.58 51.29 -.96 27.34 +.72 5.44 +.06 2.16 31.65 -.58 0.61 21.11 -.10 1.40 52.44 -.17 7.27 -.09 3.32 73.23 +.67 2.36 42.17 -.82 2.60 44.70 -.30 2.79 -.07 12.51 -.56 11.62 -.01 0.64 36.06 -.48 85.13 -1.37 1.47 51.18 +.28 0.28 11.45 -.09 4.13 110.77 -1.56 0.75 83.62 -.09 27.39 -1.21 11.98 +.10 2.41 +.08 3.02 -.03 5.99 -.20 5.22 -.18 0.16 19.47 -.06 7.46 +.24 2.10 43.35 +.53 5.45 -.14 9.71 -.34 0.28 26.29 -.05 0.40 54.28 -.45 17.70 -.42 58.03 -.37 24.10 -.33 0.40 18.46 +.24 3.28 -.12 1.76 77.75 -.49 31.12 -.69 28.52 +.09 109.15-29.63 3.84 +.02 26.95 +.11 29.27 -.09 0.50 75.76 -1.05 85.51 -1.33 0.48 10.15 +.02 4.07 +.01 37.10 +.32 7.06 -.13 13.76 -.54 16.26 -.47 0.72 44.26 +.55 1.00 59.88 +.12 0.48 93.51 -.83 2.68 77.17 +.40 0.24 7.03 -.17 0.96 26.40 -.04 7.20 -.27 2.00 27.27 -.11 15.14 -.46 16.03 -.11 0.72 13.74 +.34 0.20 29.92 +.09 1.28 12.21 -.09 0.04 14.22 -.39 55.71 -2.14 24.10 +.19 30.49 -.89 0.20 16.07 +.01 0.24 15.38 +.21 5.40 -.64 0.12 6.94 +.19 0.04 11.99 -.01 9.87 -.03 11.56 -1.12 0.04 12.50 -.10 0.60 13.92 -.31 147.39 +3.71 0.10 26.68 -.41 0.04 34.97 -.63 0.17 25.18 -.19 0.05 19.92 -.20 2.20 39.40 +.58 0.64 19.04 -.35 61.90 -.10 1.61 -.04 8.22 -.14 5.99 -.09 0.80 26.40 +.19 1.16 114.15 -.82 0.50 69.90 +.31 23.70 -.36 0.64 55.13 -.56 0.60 18.30 -.04 5.51 -.14 17.78 -.12 8.96 -.11 3.25 53.53 -.33 16.37 +.14 31.99 +.11 37.61 -.62 9.03 -.46 34.95 -.64 5.69 -.01 0.76 61.04 -.10 70.05 +.84 36.68 -1.32 1.77 21.26 +.11 1.00 118.27 +.25 2.00 110.90 -4.26 .04 -.00 0.20 27.11 -.21 9.49 -.58 0.75 9.16 -.05 17.77 -.70 2.00 25.61 -.90 1.78 -.08 0.28 22.27 -.56 0.12 10.52 -.01 5.69 +.62

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D 7.85 +.12 9.42 -.46 1.12 32.20 -1.15 0.20 4.76 +.13 1.84 23.50 +.04 5.12 +.08 23.00 +.09 11.21 +.46 0.68 5.86 -.03 1.68 18.24 -.44 0.14 13.65 -.14 1.28 28.84 -.06 21.01 +.55 7.56 -.19 0.16 14.55 +.06 0.40 20.22 +.08 1.50 31.04 -.54 .51 -.04 4.41 -.11 33.72 -.35 60.97 +.51 13.68 -.29 5.12 -.02 35.97 -1.57 1.68 73.45 +.78 0.56 18.43 +.10 14.43 -.07 0.04 3.17 -.11 1.12 37.12 +1.20 5.54 -.27 37.18 -.22 2.38 54.87 -.29 2.43 -.08 37.82 +.07 3.60 -1.25 4.13 0.18 14.77 -.22 0.44 30.67 -1.12 1.64 50.52 -.39 .58 +.01 13.31 -.13 71.85 -.10 22.99 +.14 1.26 -.06 25.80 -1.02 25.86 +.29 0.32 13.88 -.30 4.87 -.07 1.92 27.58 -.11 0.18 6.98 +.01 1.37 -.05 0.30 27.99 -.01 38.17 +.02 0.52 15.18 +.04 2.00 37.05 -.96 2.16 +.02 0.40 8.79 -.08 3.02 +.03 7.00 -.20 0.08 47.03 -.68 0.40 20.39 -.52 0.28 21.73 -.63 0.25 22.29 -1.01 0.10 19.29 -.79 1.37 -.04 0.15 18.20 -.70 2.09 +.03 0.40 15.64 -.34 0.68 16.66 -.22 0.16 16.47 -.09 1.76 +.01 0.18 25.51 -1.15 0.36 40.50 -.23 3.86 +.06 1.53 24.32 +.15 1.40 165.69 -.80 1.16 88.78 -.93 19.08 -.79 11.75 +.08 626.77 -4.98 35.17 -.41 0.84 40.73 -.32 19.91 -.17 15.20 +.23 2.16 135.20 -.88 3.39 +.04 8.23 -.17 18.84 +.72 0.52 26.02 +.35 2.54 -.05 0.83 19.90 +.07 60.92 -.99 34.11 -.42 21.16 +.20 0.40 38.86 +.13 1.21 16.27 -.25 2.55 +.05 24.74 -.50 0.80 42.72 +.60 0.13 23.16 -.36 0.86 45.83 -.49 0.03 8.02 +.03 9.64 -.18 34.25 +.25 0.58 29.64 -.20 1.86 36.13 +.18 0.81 150.51 +.15 1.70 55.55 -.50 2.03 26.74 -.14 2.00 27.61 +.19 28.25 +.47 58.88 +.61 0.36 39.06 -.18 7.14 -.09 0.96 33.63 -.27 25.33 +.76 1.10 -.02 1.52 -.09 55.02 +.76 19.02 -.26 0.40 35.95 -.03 44.78 -.34 7.96 -.09 0.07 11.09 -.19 1.00 47.47 -.41 11.79 +.31 0.82 31.18 -.10 0.20 27.40 -.10 10.91 -.17 1.00 44.66 +.11 4.40 28.24 -.35 1.24 24.65 -.04 7.50 -.01 5.32 +.04 2.76 47.84 +.09 9.25 +.15 1.20 20.50 -.07 28.43 -.30 22.80 -.26 29.71 -.55 10.99 +.51 .55 +.06 0.08 15.99 +.01 4.98 -.05 8.95 -.55 1.80 49.09 +.47 11.60 -.26 0.24 50.62 -.42 .50 -.01 65.38 +.19 1.00 64.12 +.36 3.13 -.16 0.80 10.42 -.05 0.20 6.43 -.08 1.28 49.19 -.01 13.89 -.01 0.40 79.44 -1.06 0.32 46.78 +.46 18.50 -.19 18.58 +.19 1.70 32.31 +.05 0.41 39.57 -.54 0.25 2.54 -.10 0.60 41.48 -.98 16.06 -.57 19.41 +.02 0.95 36.49 +.86 37.25 -1.03 40.35 +.25 1.33 54.58 +.24 0.20 5.16 -.48 1.02 50.70 +.10 21.09 -.36 12.90 -.23 55.65 -.70 1.80 24.68 +.08 0.04 17.98 -.16 0.28 5.75 +.09 4.51 -.15 0.60 11.40 -.64 51.49 +5.06 25.15 -.41 57.80 -.56 0.48 40.95 -.60 0.04 6.85 -.15

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M-N-O-P M&T Bk MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSC Ind MSCI Inc MV OilTr Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MagelMPtr MagelPt MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes Majesco h MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Indo MktV Viet MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson

2.80 85.73 12.33 0.37 6.90 1.00 31.10 0.65 21.32 3.18 11.60 8.26 0.94 7.99 0.56 6.12 9.20 15.33 15.32 26.22 3.45 0.88 59.98 35.12 2.93 37.02 2.00 46.42 1.80 33.75 0.20 23.40 .84 2.98 54.51 2.78 0.50 8.10 5.61 0.72 57.80 7.06 1.12 15.71 0.08 12.93 6.17 0.74 64.58 0.52 17.43 1.00 41.85 1.28 0.40 54.64 23.24 0.18 39.45 2.93 34.57 0.33 54.02 3.58 56.65 0.82 76.88 0.34 26.76 0.19 46.65 2.56 41.63 0.35 40.14 0.84 27.32 0.04 7.12 31.50 4.06 1.60 83.35 20.43 0.30 13.34 2.75 28.52 0.24 53.58 15.32 0.60 235.10 0.83 23.76 2.30 0.84 25.60 5.18 1.12 46.49 19.42 2.44 75.16 1.00 37.62 0.72 73.76

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Nm McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MdbkIns MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedProp Medicis Medifast Medivation MedleyC n Mednax Medtrnic MelcoCrwn MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck Meredith MeridBio Meritage Mesab Metabolix Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicrosSys MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MdwGold g Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine Mohawk Molex MolexA MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MoneyGrm MonPwSys Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys MorgStan MS China MorgSt pfA Mosaic MotrlaSol n MotrlaMo n Motricity n Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NII Hldg NIVS IntT NMT Md h NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatFnPrt NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP NatResPtrs NatusMed Nautilus h Navios NaviosMar Navistar NektarTh Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix NtScout NetSolTch NetSpend n NetSuite NetwkEng NeurMtrx Neurcrine NeuStar Nevsun g NDragon NewEnSys NwGold g NJ Rscs NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordion g Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NuSkin NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvIMO NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvQPf2 Nvidia NxStageMd OCZ Tech OGE Engy OReillyAu OasisPet n OcciPet Oceaneer

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OceanFr rs .88 -.02 Och-Ziff 0.88 15.77 -.16 Oclaro rs 12.83 -.11 OcwenFn 10.28 +.02 OdysMar 3.20 -.14 OfficeDpt 5.91 +.40 OfficeMax 17.57 -.06 OilSvHT 2.40 143.54 -.76 OilStates 64.10 -1.59 Oilsands g .56 -.03 OldNBcp 0.28 11.53 -.08 OldRepub 0.69 13.00 -.02 Olin 0.80 20.06 -.23 OmegaHlt 1.48 21.74 +.03 Omncre 0.13 25.69 +.06 Omnicom 0.80 45.56 +.12 OmniVisn 29.58 -.62 Omnova 7.75 OnSmcnd 11.07 -.15 ONEOK 2.08 58.24 +.68 Onstrm rsh 1.40 +.13 OnyxPh 34.64 -.49 OpenTxt 47.64 -.35 OpenTable 76.12 -1.70 OpnwvSy 2.14 -.06 OpexaTher 2.51 -.03 OpkoHlth 3.64 +.06 Opnext 1.85 -.19 optXprs 4.50 14.39 +.08 Oracle 0.20 32.31 +.71 OraSure 6.86 +.13 OrbitalSci 17.55 -.41 Orexigen 9.04 +.18 OrientEH 12.49 +.01 OrientPap 5.46 +.24 OrientFn 0.20 11.59 +.03 OriginAg 10.14 -.07 Oritani s 0.40 11.87 -.05 OshkoshCp 36.31 -.91 OvShip 1.75 33.91 -.34 OwensCorn 31.96 +.01 OwensIll 31.51 +.07 Oxigene h .20 -.02 PDL Bio 1.00 5.11 +.16 PF Chng 0.63 47.79 +.96 PG&E Cp 1.82 47.00 -.34 PHH Corp 24.57 +.17 PMC Sra 8.78 -.24 PMI Grp 3.20 -.09 PNC 0.40 61.00 -.81 PNM Res 0.50 13.38 -.11 POSCO 1.43 104.83 -.17 PPG 2.20 81.36 -1.43 PPL Corp 1.40 26.00 +.19 PSS Wrld 22.97 +.11 PacWstBc 0.04 21.48 -.71 Paccar 0.48 55.20 -.65 PacerIntl 6.72 -.17 PacEth h .81 -.06 PacSunwr 4.60 +.08 PackAmer 0.60 27.81 -.65 PaetecHld 3.86 -.02 PallCorp 0.70 49.16 -.84 PanASlv 0.10 34.04 -1.56 Panasonic 0.05 13.94 -.11 PaneraBrd 100.15 -.28 PapaJohns 29.11 +.75 ParPharm 34.85 -1.54 ParagShip 0.20 3.19 -.06 ParamTch 24.05 -.25 ParaG&S 3.15 -.26 Parexel 21.24 +1.28 ParkDrl 4.16 -.09 ParkerHan 1.16 85.51 -5.57 Parkwy 0.30 16.46 -.16 PartnerRe 2.20 81.14 +.16 PatriotCoal 23.65 +.57 Patterson 0.40 31.27 -.12 PattUTI 0.20 20.55 +.06 Paychex 1.24 32.43 +.04 PeabdyE 0.34 59.31 -.65 Pearson 0.55 16.76 -.15 Pengrth g 0.84 13.11 -.18 PnnNGm 35.01 +.58 PennVa 0.23 16.56 -.56 PennWst g 1.08 25.63 +.13 Penney 0.80 30.10 +1.02 Penske 16.61 +.03 Pentair 0.80 35.82 -.67 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.69 -.26 PepcoHold 1.08 18.51 +.18 PepsiCo 1.92 65.90 PeregrineP 2.61 -.11 PerfectWld 23.34 +.94 PerkElm 0.28 24.84 -.34 Prmian 1.37 21.28 -1.02 Perrigo 0.28 71.18 +4.93 PetMed 0.50 15.60 -.01 PetChina 3.97 137.12 -1.83 Petrohawk 18.88 -.37 PetrbrsA 1.20 33.05 -.20 Petrobras 1.20 36.50 -.33 PtroqstE 7.12 -.01 PetsMart 0.50 39.94 +.07 Pfizer 0.80 18.24 -.08 PhrmAth 3.12 -.08 PhmHTr 2.42 65.73 +.21 PharmPdt 0.60 29.33 +.90 Pharmacyc 5.36 -.23 Pharmasset 46.43 -.05 Pharmerica 11.65 -.42 PhilipMor 2.56 56.49 -.10 PhilipsEl 0.95 33.19 +.26 PhlVH 0.15 58.10 -.57 PhnxCos 2.51 PhotrIn 6.37 +.03 PiedNG 1.12 28.62 +.14 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.67 +.12 Pier 1 9.85 -.26 PilgrimsP 7.58 +.23 PimcoHiI 1.46 12.80 -.05 PimcoMu2 0.78 9.57 +.13 PinnclEnt 15.03 +.15 PinnaclFn 14.90 +.50 PinWst 2.10 41.55 +.13 PionDrill 8.30 -.07 PioNtrl 0.08 90.44 -1.51 PitnyBw 1.46 23.79 -.15 PlainsAA 3.83 63.17 -.47 PlainsEx 33.26 -.71 PlatGpMet 2.38 -.07 PlaybyB 6.10 -.01 Plexus 29.00 -1.65 PlugPwr h .73 -.08 PlumCrk 1.68 39.93 +.25 PluristemT 2.54 -.37 Polo RL 0.40 105.00 -.69 Polycom 38.18 -2.61 PolyMet g 2.16 -.09 PolyOne 13.14 -.14 Polypore 44.35 -1.94 Poniard h .70 +.08 Popular 3.13 -.04 PortGE 1.04 22.02 +.03 PositvID h .80 -.06 PostPrp 0.80 35.40 +.15 Potash 0.40 161.84 -4.97 Potlatch 2.04 34.36 +.18 PwrInteg 0.20 38.08 -1.25 Power-One 11.02 -.01 PSCrudeDS 57.15 +2.80 PwshDB 27.68 -.28 PS Agri 33.16 +.28 PS Oil 28.07 -.43 PS Gold 47.36 -.98 PS BasMet 23.45 -.71 PS USDBull 22.68 +.07 PwSClnEn 10.63 -.11 PwShNetw 0.11 26.25 -.97 PS OilSv 0.08 21.81 -.12 PwSWtr 0.11 18.87 -.24 PSTechLdr 0.05 23.78 -.30 PSPrivEq 0.37 10.89 -.14 PSFinPf 1.27 17.68 PwShPfd 0.97 14.07 -.01 PShEMSov 1.57 26.37 -.15 PSIndia 0.24 23.11 -.07 PwShs QQQ 0.33 56.11 -.40 Powrwav 3.46 -.25 Praxair 1.80 91.18 -1.10 PrecCastpt 0.12 143.30 -1.92 PrecDrill 9.96 -.13 PrmWBc h .38 -.00 PrepaidLg 61.62 +1.69 PriceTR 1.08 65.63 -.39 priceline 424.22 -7.81 PrideIntl 32.59 -.74 Primedia 0.28 4.96 -.14 PrinFncl 0.55 32.28 +.02 PrisaA n 9.99 -.25 PrivateB 0.04 14.29 -.13 ProShtDow 43.32 -.03 ProShtQQQ 33.63 +.25 ProShtS&P 43.03 +.06 PrUShS&P 22.91 +.07 ProUltDow 0.37 56.84 -.02 PrUlShDow 19.81 +.01 ProUltMC 0.04 64.73 -1.08 PrUShMC 11.62 +.18 ProUltQQQ 86.23 -1.37 PrUShQQQ 10.94 +.16 ProUltSP 0.43 49.75 -.12 ProUShL20 39.51 +.99 ProUSL7-10T 42.86 +.61 PrUSCh25 rs 29.07 +.87 ProUSEM rs 32.48 +.70 ProUSRE rs 17.89 +.01 ProUSOG rs 35.29 +.51 ProUSBM rs 20.17 +.52 ProUltRE rs 0.41 50.93 +.08 ProUShtFn 15.01 -.09 ProUFin rs 0.07 68.62 +.41 PrUPShQQQ 28.39 +.62 PrUPShR2K 23.19 +.69 ProUltO&G 0.23 48.28 -.77 ProUBasM 0.04 47.94 -1.41 ProUShEur 13.71 +.12 ProShtR2K 32.59 +.62 ProUltPQQQ 161.07 -3.70 ProUSR2K 12.64 +.24 ProUltR2K 0.01 42.10 -.94 ProSht20Tr 45.51 +.61 ProUSSP500 18.35 +.07 ProUltSP500 0.38 215.98 -7.21 ProUltCrude 11.72 -.62 ProUSGld rs 30.97 +1.11 ProUSSlv rs 12.13 +.97 ProUShCrude 10.74 +.52 ProSUltSilv 124.62-11.51 ProUltShYen 16.36 +.38 ProUShEuro 19.91 -.02 ProctGam 1.93 65.80 +.45 ProgrssEn 2.48 44.92 +.02 ProgrsSoft 43.15 -.65 ProgsvCp 1.16 19.97 +.65 ProLogis 0.45 14.30 -.03 ProspctCap 1.21 11.21 -.09 ProspBcsh 0.70 39.73 -.50 Protalix 10.00 -.12 ProtLife 0.56 28.09 -.35 ProvEn g 0.54 7.95 -.03

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1.15 60.81 1.37 32.17 3.20 103.96 12.28 0.10 4.76 8.38 0.52 5.79 0.71 6.28

Nm +.52 +.40 +.34 -.36 -.13 +.10 +.03 -.04

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0.08 37.90 +.01 18.83 7.07 -.14 2.45 -.08 24.20 -.96 17.54 -.38 0.76 51.33 -.81 22.24 +.03 3.92 -.07 .47 -.02 1.93 -.04 0.40 54.25 +.67 26.76 -.81 0.56 17.92 +.03 15.17 -.04 5.68 -.03 14.60 -.37 4.57 -.09 21.97 -.33 0.32 6.98 -.15 0.03 2.62 -.04 1.47 13.00 -.15 1.52 13.00 -.15 7.88 -.31 0.19 17.34 -.01 0.84 22.34 -.12 11.90 -.24 26.53 -.01 1.88 -.17 29.78 -3.65 3.62 -.22 0.01 7.89 -.30 17.72 -.19 .88 +.01 1.41 -.04 0.25 17.54 +.28 36.19 -2.25 61.29 -.70 20.75 -.12 5.00 0.17 79.63 -2.61 0.16 45.85 -1.79 12.75 -.12 0.52 35.34 +1.74 2.16 56.49 -.02 1.50 52.37 +1.16 25.55 -.96 3.89 -.05 1.73 33.70 -.26 43.28 -2.29 21.40 -.11 3.36 +.25 8.13 -.68 1.00 15.06 +.04 0.84 12.70 +.12 1.85 41.62 +.16 1.78 26.42 -.55 33.82 +.52 0.59 87.11 +.39 0.04 7.23 +.10 0.16 17.74 +.13 0.48 57.82 -.28 0.40 52.16 -.15 1.00 64.09 -.16 10.45 +.44 0.24 29.97 +1.04 1.24 -.04 5.05 +.26 3.12 +.37 1.20 30.46 +.51 6.07 -.11 0.80 30.38 62.40 -.88 32.08 -.50 17.22 +.04 1.00 6.85 -.12 1.71 107.17 +1.36 12.01 -.35 1.34 +.12 1.96 32.14 +.09 7.14 -.23 26.04 -1.07 0.90 68.25 -1.97 1.01 -.02 35.44 -1.53 0.18 39.99 -.64 0.52 32.82 -.20 1.40 75.60 +1.41 0.96 62.84 -.42 38.43 -1.17 1.28 35.76 +.03 0.24 19.07 -.04 0.44 73.56 -.49 35.07 -1.45 0.64 65.06 +.32 63.82 -2.66 33.51 -.58 2.00 54.22 13.48 +.01 47.48 -1.11 3.36 67.85 -.65 3.36 67.85 -.43 0.44 46.29 -1.26 0.12 14.53 -.13 5.07 -.42 20.84 +.09 13.90 -.03 19.14 +.47 5.04 -.05 2.29 29.50 -1.20 1.08 49.74 -.79 0.63 47.96 -.10 0.12 17.94 -.07 16.46 +.06 0.67 54.41 +.01 39.78 +.50 1.90 41.94 +.15 0.20 24.19 -.14 17.67 -.04 0.40 70.30 +.53 14.13 +.31 0.10 56.81 -1.45 2.77 118.12 -.04 131.20 -2.52 1.51 166.54 -1.26 2.37 128.08 -.17 63.06 -.07 1.74 52.07 -.13 0.33 17.86 -.02 0.13 26.18 -.04 0.67 43.28 +.14 1.79 61.05 1.89 41.39 -.07 4.68 40.15 +.01 0.49 23.49 -.01 1.02 21.19 -.06 0.35 26.65 -.18 0.49 46.96 +.44 0.20 53.37 -.91 0.38 66.73 -.59 1.00 73.86 -1.27 26.07 +.26 20.77 -.06 0.28 11.56 -.27 18.56 -.21 54.32 -1.17 45.07 +.74 2.55 50.52 -1.64 0.48 21.15 +.40 27.52 +.52 42.20 +.15 11.62 +.12 131.79 -9.05 41.00 -.85 12.91 +.25 2.01 -.04 0.60 40.77 +.79 49.95 -1.55 7.37 -.14 7.59 -.27 13.88 -.58 1.63 34.08 -.02 1.70 21.95 +.03 3.29 -.12 0.35 12.50 -.26 0.46 18.27 5.01 -.03 10.54 -.08 27.57 -.55 0.84 85.28 -.98 0.07 62.00 +.14 0.62 21.04 -.01 0.33 34.30 -.39 0.24 18.31 3.91 10.38 -.19 1.00 51.00 -.79 0.30 47.81 +.23 9.49 -.19 28.30 -.54 1.68 -.03 2.41 32.60 -1.02 13.31 -.82 0.52 25.67 -.02 .93 +.02 75.90 +3.72 15.73 -.38 9.64 -.20 0.56 33.87 -.27 19.00 +.19 1.56 52.30 +.36 22.15 -.81 1.48 21.76 +.12 30.10 +.01 6.90 -.18 0.16 8.57 -.03 19.97 -1.72 6.34 -.15 38.67 +.61 1.44 81.89 -1.22 1.62 +.14 1.44 21.47 -.40 0.34 78.94 -.14 10.59 -.30 33.91 -.92 0.58 17.53 +.03 3.72 122.24 -.99 14.50 -.24 2.94 -.18 14.17 -.23 0.64 63.58 -.39 42.50 -.09 10.33 -.65 7.10 -.17 47.73 -.77 0.41 6.74 +.04 23.07 -.99 31.49 -.80 0.08 10.30 -.30 3.20 98.78 +.05 0.40 30.46 -.43

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D 79.93 -1.16 0.43 7.82 -.13 12.18 -.42 8.08 +.03 1.52 -.02 21.39 +.05 10.51 +.18 6.05 +.89 30.03 -1.88 4.11 +.16 5.62 -.16 9.70 -.04 5.16 -.04 3.63 -.01 0.56 38.89 -.27 13.03 -.10 20.44 +.59 1.60 63.45 +.23 26.66 -1.24 0.73 53.26 -1.81 36.78 -1.61 68.51 -1.84 9.05 +.10 19.50 -.47 0.30 52.15 -1.95 22.94 -.57 2.83 -.13 0.10 12.46 +.18 10.27 -.09 14.80 -.33 2.95 -.07 0.14 35.43 -.51 0.20 41.69 -2.53 23.65 -.40 1.82 38.40 -.05 1.68 45.15 -1.57 0.60 26.03 -.28 0.02 12.79 -.04 38.00 -.94 20.29 -.54 0.10 6.07 +.08 1.04 25.31 +.19 6.04 -.13 .54 -.24 23.75 -.16 19.49 -.67 4.27 -.01 12.30 -.55 11.52 -.30 1.17 37.57 -.54 0.57 32.16 +.08 0.78 29.44 +.15 0.49 37.73 +.08 0.99 69.73 -.50 0.16 16.33 +.08 0.60 35.61 -.18 0.32 25.87 -.14 1.27 31.98 +.24 4.59 +.03 1.36 65.91 -.05 0.36 23.25 +.36 1.68 -.09 0.52 33.18 +.17 0.30 61.12 -.86 1.60 21.83 -.15 0.04 47.56 -.44 1.02 23.82 -.29 0.30 17.94 +.27 0.16 10.96 -.01 .98 -.01 78.64 -.38 0.60 35.47 -.31 0.06 9.00 +.18 0.08 15.64 39.89 -.56 62.85 +.56 21.59 -.57 22.01 -.55 2.26 30.74 -1.37 5.24 -.13 4.00 124.50 +1.61 0.72 57.20 -.38 9.57 -.67 30.46 -1.83 .21 -.01 1.44 30.99 -.29 0.40 37.78 -.20 .44 -.01 0.60 40.58 -.98 7.55 -.28 14.57 +.02 14.07 +.02 7.09 -.02 10.09 -.11 9.10 +.18 0.04 27.87 -.51 2.86 -.03 36.00 +.01 8.77 -.21 0.35 7.32 +.06 5.89 -.19 0.04 9.92 +.12 10.93 +.10 9.21 -.09 40.41 -1.31 13.29 -.11 17.81 -.16 0.20 13.09 -.06 32.05 +.75 28.52 -.52 10.38 -.15 1.13 60.87 -1.41 26.35 -.37 0.04 2.89 +.06 2.06 26.66 +.79 5.09 -.44 1.04 29.97 +.01 0.92 24.64 -.26 0.20 15.25 -.64 0.20 20.49 -.46 0.82 18.23 +.07 9.62 -.11 5.59 -.08 0.96 11.52 -.27 0.71 37.49 +1.14 0.60 47.02 +.28 58.43 -1.79 16.69 -.49 17.28 +.03 0.47 13.26 -.27 12.44 -.31 6.19 -.07 23.87 +.27 30.00 -.99 0.25 21.95 -.25 1.55 49.54 -.25 6.35 -.21 29.41 +.54 2.15 33.47 +.86 1.00 55.55 +1.02 5.50 -.32 4.69 -.07 0.32 26.34 +.22 1.75 50.79 -.06 46.65 -.64 0.60 60.49 -2.12 1.27 33.79 -.28 1.28 11.34 -.52 .75 +.12 12.06 -.04 4.32 -.13 1.65 15.92 -.10 0.77 8.59 -.09 0.68 13.82 -.02 5.25 73.25 +.96 0.77 16.78 +.10 8.10 -.23 20.34 -.76 0.08 6.81 -.23 0.44 22.44 -.58 0.54 10.26 -.04 39.40 -1.25 0.68 46.13 -.21 6.75 -.10 .88 +.01 42.41 -1.68 45.43 -.58 13.86 -.31 30.96 -.40 0.50 40.20 -1.64 13.37 -.59 22.62 -1.41 18.06 -.63 21.65 -.29 11.30 +.27 0.75 53.65 -.25 0.52 33.91 -.25 17.77 +.02 0.08 26.05 +.59 22.74 -.30 55.29 -.79 48.24 -.39 14.14 -.50 1.16 38.12 -.36 0.40 35.70 -.47 26.36 -.42 2.10 88.04 +.08 20.94 -.46 1.00 54.71 -.27 1.00 57.76 -.46 27.00 -.11 .93 -.02 1.60 67.09 +.74 0.85 32.37 -.03 0.72 49.21 -1.90 0.02 18.71 -.75 23.53 -.48 18.42 -.17 9.62 -.03 20.70 +.23 0.64 61.09 +.02 16.36 -.62 2.44 76.08 -.28 3.13 57.12 +.17 0.28 17.07 -.15 0.50 26.19 +.04 1.43 -.03 4.10 1.05 83.36 -.64 0.28 47.06 +.09 1.60 37.12 -.24 0.84 51.65 +.05 3.12 +.04 76.52 -.65 14.47 -.14 78.37 -.83 1.44 54.88 +.43 47.18 -3.37 .41 -.02 1.55 -.06 19.12 -1.01 42.00 -2.56 27.96 +.47 0.32 27.26 -.27 13.10 -.59 0.60 9.64 -.21 3.88 -.11 1.20 46.33 -.17 0.66 16.30 -.29 1.48 9.77 -.04 0.64 36.02 -.01

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9.26 +.04 17.34 -.06 0.74 22.87 -.01 1.00 32.36 -.20 1.73 30.10 +.15 2.80 -.19 42.25 +.27 10.25 +.22 1.21 -.02 6.42 -.47 1.52 -.11 5.55 -.04 15.73 -.36 0.06 21.48 -.51 2.10 -.13 36.12 +.40 11.96 -.33 47.06 -.51 5.43 -.56 .10 -.00 0.20 11.99 +.01 54.09 -1.12 1.11 30.49 -.09 1.11 30.11 -.16 1.52 95.05 -2.25 27.08 -.29 48.75 -.77 1.72 -.03 24.18 -.20 0.08 3.29 -.11 0.40 7.04 -.01 1.88 72.66 +.48 24.89 -.56 0.20 26.70 +.18 6.37 +.16 37.57 -.97 0.20 54.11 +1.78 1.70 79.55 -.36 67.39 -1.12 .39 -.02 0.50 40.31 -.25 2.00 20.53 +.15 1.92 38.49 +.30 32.53 -1.91 0.20 43.48 -.19 6.66 +.10 0.37 24.83 +.07 2.74 -.10 4.75 +.21 5.24 -.15 2.95 -.17 35.00 -.04 23.77 -.61 2.52 83.60 +.54 7.35 -.11 30.84 -.31 0.76 35.67 -.71 0.76 31.51 -.59 0.38 35.35 +.35 1.51 -.08 0.20 24.08 -.70 0.88 30.58 -.07 0.72 14.25 -.29 0.72 35.71 -.21 6.23 -.12 14.52 -.41 34.89 -.44 2.31 80.49 -.14 3.23 80.04 -.30 0.67 62.40 -.28 0.89 75.19 -.42 0.85


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Warner

Mortgage

Continued from B1 The unusual two-track process of Warner seeking to buy while also exploring selling out to new investors underscores the desire of Warner’s private equity owners to either make a big strategic move and double down on the music business by buying EMI, or cash out. They acquired the company from Time Warner more than seven years ago — a long time frame for private equity investors, who normally prefer to own a company for three to five years before selling. Late last year, Citigroup won a lawsuit against EMI’s private equity owners, Terra Firma, which had filed a suit that said Citigroup had defrauded Terra Firma during the auction of EMI in August of 2007. That deal, for $6.8 billion, came at the height of the credit boom — and just before credit markets began to freeze — and has been an ill-fated move for Terra Firma and its founder, Guy Hands. KKR’s interest in Warner is related to expanding a joint venture it owns with Bertelsmann to license music rights. KKR had been in talks with Warner Music about engineering a joint bid for EMI, but those discussions then turned toward KKR buying Warner outright, according to one of the executives involved in the process. A Warner Music spokesman declined to comment.

Continued from B1 “We’re going to have to evaluate that,” Kaplan said. The Mortgage Payment Assistance Program is the first of four foreclosure-prevention programs funded by $220 million in federal money. Kaplan expects the other three programs — financial help for homeowners modifying loans, help finding affordable housing for those who have lost homes and ensuring loans remain affordable for homeowners who have found a job or financially recovered — to launch in the spring. Mortgage payment assistance will use $100 million of the funds, which Oregon received from the U.S. Treasury because high unemployment rates designated it one of the 17 “hardest-hit” states. The state began taking applications Dec. 10 for the program, which will pay up to a year’s mortgage or $20,000 — whichever comes first. The

Repair

test flights and possible manufacturing of drones, officially known as Unmanned Aerial System vehicles, to Central Oregon. Worldwide, Strobel said there’s a growing demand for people with the training to build, operate and repair computer-operated equipment of all types, including the newest robotic equipment used in auto manufacturing plants and many other types of manufacturing industries. “In the future, if you are going to work on anything, it is going to involve electronics,” Strobel said.

Continued from B1 “The biggest difference between a good mechanic and a bad mechanic is their ability to properly diagnose electrical problems,” Moore said. Despite good pay, with auto mechanic wages ranging from $14 per hour for an entry-level mechanic to $25 or more for a good, experienced mechanic, Moore said there’s a shortage of mechanics nationwide and locally who are trained to diagnose and repair today’s technologically sophisticated vehicles. “In Central Oregon, auto mechanics generally earn $30,000 to $40,000 a year, depending on experience, but the big-city guys can make well over $100,000,” Moore said. Eric Strobel, Bend manager at Economic Development for Central Oregon, said the applicability of skills and knowledge to operate and repair electronic systems of computer-controlled equipment extends beyond automobiles. “The basic nature of everything is going high-tech,” Strobel said. He said different types of computer-controlled equipment are used in everything from military weapons and monitoring systems, to airplanes, home and business computers, heating and air conditioning systems, hospitals, manufacturing plants and more. He cited a proposal to bring

Training infrastructure One of the programs to assist area businesses, called HiDec (High Desert Enterprise Consortium), focuses on lean production, manufacturing, and business marketing and administration systems. The HiDec program emphasizes incorporating computers and electronic equipment to help businesses do things more efficiently and more effectively, Strobel said. “Lean production is about productivity and process improvement, and waste reduction,” he said. To ensure Central Oregon has a work force skilled in electronics and other technical fields, Strobel said EDCO supports the technical training center Central Oregon Community College plans to build in Redmond. Stephen Newcombe, assistant to the vice president for instruction at COCC, said a commit-

THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 B3 time, “ ... especially in Deschutes, where they had 890 people to see. It’s going to be a few more days or potentially weeks to make sure everyone has had an appointment or chance to have their documentation reviewed.” Among the major requirements to qualify, household income must be below 120 percent of state median income, which is $74,160 for a family of four, according to state information. The homeowner must be unemployed or have experienced a verifiable loss of income of 25 percent or more, and the current, firstlien mortgage must have originated before Jan. 1, 2009, according to the information. Winners will be selected in 36 random drawings, one for each county. While the date has not been set, the drawings should be held in a matter of weeks, Kaplan said Wednesday. The state allocated slots based on a formula designed to steer 80 percent of the funding to the 20 hardesthit counties. Officials factored in each county’s unemployment rate and how it has

On the Web For more information on the Mortgage Payment Assistance Program or other foreclosureprevention programs, visit www.oregonhomeownerhelp.org.

application period ended Jan. 14. Statewide, 15,575 homeowners completed the seven-step online application, Kaplan said. Officials do not yet know how many will ultimately qualify to be included in the random drawings. After completing the application, each homeowner must meet individually with an adviser from one of the agencies assigned to each county, such as NeighborImpact in Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties. But some applicants have not yet met with an adviser, who examines all financial documents to ensure the homeowners qualify, Kaplan said. “We had a lot of applicants who applied in the last couple of weeks,” he said, and those interviews take

tee composed of three deans of instruction and the vice president for instruction submitted a formal proposal to the COCC board Jan. 12 recommending the college proceed with preliminary planning for what has been described as the Redmond Technology Center, including the appointment of a committee of entrepreneurs and business leaders to assist with planning the center and its curriculum. Currently, COCC offers some technology classes in Redmond, but the plan involves constructing a new, larger technology center. A start date for construction hasn’t been set. Ken Mays, who heads up the COCC Automotive Technology Program, said COCC is developing the center because more space is needed to accommodate growing demand for trained technicians and growth in student enrollment in technical programs, including Automotive Technology. For example, Mays said about 150 students completed the Automotive Technology Program in 2009-10, compared with 45 from 2004-05. “A very positive aspect is the growing number of HispanicAmerican students — 25 percent of our current student population,” Mays said, adding the increase in student enrollment includes a mix of young and old. “This program (Automotive Technology) offers students a job that will include mechanical, hydraulic, electrical, electronic, computers, control systems and

fabrication,” Mays said. “Even though the learning platform is a vehicle, the opportunities are far beyond.” He said technicians need to be critical thinkers. “This industry has always required smart people,” Mays said. In addition to the expansion in technology training at COCC, Strobel said he believes technical education also should be a bigger focus in the K-12 educational system. “Educators have got to look at those technical areas where the jobs are going to be,” Strobel said. He said EDCO has appointed volunteers to provide input to COCC officials and local school districts about expanding technical curriculum in area schools. COCC offers a variety of technical training under its Career Pathways course offerings. The classes provide training in computers and electronics, including automotive technology, computer information systems and health information technology.

On the job Sabrina Moore, 32, is among a handful of women to graduate from the COCC Automotive Technology Program, and the only mechanic wearing blue eyeliner at Mark’s Automotive in Bend. “I had been doing construction, but I was having a little trouble finding work. I heard there were lots of jobs for automotive technicians, so I decided,

changed since 2007, its housing prices and their change since 2007, and the rate of foreclosure and mortgage delinquency. That calculation gave Deschutes County the highest number, Crook County the second highest, and Jefferson County ranked fifth. Jackson and Multnomah counties received the third- and fourth-highest numbers, respectively. Those selected will receive fiveyear, forgivable, interest-free loans. The state will defer all payments and forgive 20 percent of the balance each year, according to program information. If participants sell or refinance their homes within five years, they may have to repay some of the money. State officials estimate the program will help 5,000 homeowners statewide, and while the need is much greater, Kaplan said, “we’ll make a significant difference in thousands of people’s lives.” Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

‘Why not?’” she said. While women today work in all kinds of jobs that used to be considered men’s work, Moore said she’s noticed women mechanics are still a small minority. “I am a woman in a man’s world,” Moore said. “I was the only woman in my COCC class, and when I’ve stopped by to visit with Ken Mays, I haven’t noticed any women in the classes.” Mays said women constitute between 6 and 8 percent of students enrolled in the Automotive Technology Program. “Only a few finish to work as technicians. However, we offer an AAS (Associate of Applied Sciences) in Automotive Management that appeals to our women students,” Mays said. Moore said she likes everything about her job as an automotive technician in training. Her goal is to become a certified master automotive technician, which requires two years of on-the-job training in addition to the training she received through the COCC Automotive Technology Program. To be certified, she also has to pass tests in eight different fields of automotive repair, which are taken through the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence, Moore said. She completed the COCC program in June 2009 and has been honing her skills under master mechanic Mike Bowman, who, at age 60, has been working as an auto mechanic since 1973. That’s when most cars still had distributor caps and points that

controlled the timing of spark plug firing, and when properly adjusting the timing was a critical part of a tuneup. Bowman said the internal workings of engines haven’t changed much, but the biggest difference is the computer-controlled electronics and onboard diagnostic systems. “Today, everything is computer-controlled. The onboard computer senses when there is a problem, and the check-engine light comes on. We hook the car up to diagnostic equipment or a laptop computer — the car talks to us,” Bowman said. In a way, he said the job of being an auto mechanic today is similar to a medical doctor, in that the car’s onboard computer system spits out codes that describe the symptoms, and from there it’s up to the mechanic to figure out what’s causing the symptoms and how to treat them. One of the tools mechanics use in assessing the symptoms is a computer database for diagnoses of common repairs. “From the information provided by the onboard computer, we extract a general idea of the problem and the common causes. That allows us to be more efficient,” Bowman said. Classes in the COCC Automotive Technology Program start every quarter. More information is available at http://automotive .cocc.edu/. Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

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YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64

11 14 21 22 15 ... ... 28 24 52 20 12 ... 10 ... 13 13 ... 17 ... 7

61.25 -1.43 +8.0 23.01 +.04 +2.2 14.54 +.17 +9.0 14.07 -.36 -9.5 71.12 -.61 +9.0 9.50 -.35 +12.4 47.44 -.94 +.3 59.97 +.11 -.5 72.36 +.29 +.2 7.26 -.04 -1.8 29.27 -.09 -1.6 46.78 +.46 +11.1 11.52 -.18 -6.1 20.95 -.06 -.4 8.40 -.14 -5.1 21.59 +.08 -3.4 5.63 -.12 -7.0 9.26 -.43 -2.1 21.32 +.38 +5.2 12.21 -.21 +1.8 28.35 -.12 +1.6

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1352.00 $1346.50 $27.459

Pvs Day $1370.00 $1370.20 $28.792

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24f .80 1.74 ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

20 17 16 24 60 ... 37 22 ... 19 19 10 27 13 ... 17 14 14 ... ...

83.07 -.59 -2.8 41.24 +.33 -2.7 45.27 +.10 -2.6 17.57 -.06 -.7 55.20 -.65 -3.7 2.44 +.04 +17.9 39.93 +.25 +6.6 143.30 -1.92 +2.9 21.15 +.40 -6.0 62.00 +.14 -6.6 81.89 -1.22 -2.2 46.93 +.26 +4.0 33.18 +.17 +3.3 13.10 -.59 +12.1 11.99 +.01 -1.6 26.70 +.18 -1.0 17.28 -.11 +2.1 31.89 +.08 +2.9 3.15 +.05 +11.7 21.60 +.29 +14.1

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm S&P500ETF FordM SPDR Fncl

5986771 2351887 1588034 928128 904234

Last Chg 4.80 14.54 128.08 17.78 16.33

+.04 +.17 -.17 -.12 +.08

Gainers ($2 or more) Name CaptlTr MLFact7-12 Dillards ITT Ed ProUSSlv rs

Last

Chg %Chg

2.14 +.29 +15.7 10.16 +1.26 +14.2 41.96 +4.42 +11.8 69.48 +6.74 +10.7 12.13 +.97 +8.7

Losers ($2 or more) Name CapTr12 pf VoltInfo lf CaptlTr pf GCSaba Gerova un

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

2.07 -.45 -17.9 6.36 -1.31 -17.1 2.03 -.35 -14.7 18.21 -2.79 -13.3 4.77 -.60 -11.2

Nasdaq

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

NA Pall g Taseko RareEle g NovaGld g Hyperdyn

Last Chg

63615 7.33 -.30 60178 5.50 -.32 59964 12.75 -.12 56521 13.46 -.34 56406 5.06 -.78

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

PwShs QQQ FifthThird Microsoft Intel Cisco

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last Chg 56.11 14.22 28.35 20.95 20.77

-.40 -.39 -.12 -.06 -.05

Gainers ($2 or more)

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Last

HMG ChiMetRur PernixTh PHC Inc EstnLtCap

6.04 3.91 9.25 2.05 4.50

+.89 +17.3 +.41 +11.7 +.70 +8.2 +.10 +5.1 +.21 +4.9

Sky-mobi n FarmCB Servidyne DotHill h Fuqi Intl lf

6.05 +.89 +17.2 7.02 +1.01 +16.8 2.61 +.34 +15.0 2.89 +.35 +13.8 5.69 +.62 +12.2

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Hyperdyn Barnwell MexcoEn B&HO Dreams

5.06 6.34 8.53 4.28 2.28

-.78 -13.4 -.76 -10.7 -.97 -10.2 -.42 -8.9 -.21 -8.4

MannKd F5 Netwks WashFd wt WestellT HSW Int rs

192 296 23 511 7 8

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Last

Diary 1,138 1,888 105 3,131 44 25

790236 680889 562983 551947 515666

Name

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

52-Week High Low Name

Chg %Chg

6.17 -2.94 109.15 -29.63 5.51 -1.48 2.95 -.65 3.29 -.72

-32.3 -21.4 -21.2 -18.1 -18.0

Diary 739 1,921 92 2,752 37 21

11,861.24 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,256.80 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 8,200.24 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,225.48 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,766.17 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,296.06 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,770.32 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 807.89 580.49 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,822.80 5,080.82 413.71 8,076.72 2,134.80 2,704.29 1,280.26 13,550.42 778.08

-2.49 -48.51 +2.40 -28.20 -29.55 -21.07 -1.66 -42.03 -8.81

YTD %Chg %Chg -.02 -.95 +.58 -.35 -1.37 -.77 -.13 -.31 -1.12

52-wk %Chg

+2.12 -.51 +2.15 +1.42 -3.33 +1.94 +1.80 +1.42 -.71

+13.79 +24.11 +5.19 +12.58 +15.56 +19.36 +14.67 +16.82 +23.83

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Thursday.

Key currency exchange rates Thursday compared with late Wednesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

356.14 2,626.24 3,964.84 5,867.91 7,024.27 24,003.70 37,584.68 21,792.28 3,339.29 10,437.31 2,106.66 3,205.48 4,892.00 5,833.43

-.51 t -.55 t -.30 t -1.82 t -.83 t -1.70 t -.60 t +.37 s -.20 t -1.13 t -.43 t -1.13 t -1.06 t -.81 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9882 1.5910 1.0024 .002023 .1518 1.3469 .1285 .012043 .082981 .0333 .000889 .1501 1.0332 .0342

1.0001 1.5990 1.0040 .002032 .1519 1.3465 .1286 .012187 .082850 .0335 .000897 .1511 1.0471 .0344

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Insti: LgCapInst 19.97 +0.01 +2.4 Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.98 +0.02 +2.4 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.28 +1.0 GrowthI 26.27 -0.15 +1.7 Ultra 23.03 -0.25 +1.7 American Funds A: AmcpA p 19.21 -0.02 +2.0 AMutlA p 25.63 +1.2 BalA p 18.15 -0.05 +1.2 BondA p 12.14 -0.06 -0.2 CapIBA p 49.91 -0.25 CapWGA p 36.03 -0.25 +0.9 CapWA p 20.35 -0.12 -0.3 EupacA p 41.43 -0.50 +0.1 FdInvA p 37.06 -0.17 +1.0 GovtA p 13.82 -0.07 -0.7 GwthA p 30.81 -0.10 +1.2 HI TrA p 11.41 -0.01 +1.5 IncoA p 16.68 -0.02 +0.8 IntBdA p 13.40 -0.04 -0.1 ICAA p 28.61 +0.02 +1.6 NEcoA p 25.94 -0.12 +2.4 N PerA p 28.59 -0.26 -0.1 NwWrldA 53.82 -0.68 -1.4 SmCpA p 38.84 -0.45 -0.1 TxExA p 11.57 +0.01 -1.9 WshA p 27.59 -0.01 +1.4 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 29.75 -0.49 -1.3 IntlEqA 29.03 -0.48 -1.3 IntEqII I r 12.29 -0.21 -1.4 Artisan Funds: Intl 22.03 -0.21 +1.5 MidCap 33.72 -0.49 +0.3 MidCapVal 20.53 -0.01 +2.2 Baron Funds: Growth 50.96 -0.42 -0.5 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.69 -0.06 DivMu 14.15 -0.6

TxMgdIntl 15.87 -0.20 BlackRock A: EqtyDiv 17.69 -0.02 GlAlA r 19.53 -0.11 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 18.24 -0.10 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.72 -0.03 GlbAlloc r 19.62 -0.10 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 53.93 -0.85 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 28.92 -0.40 DivEqInc 10.20 -0.02 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 29.87 -0.40 AcornIntZ 40.62 -0.63 ValRestr 50.41 -0.42 Credit Suisse Comm: ComRet t 9.29 -0.05 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.45 -0.12 USCorEq2 11.10 -0.05 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.71 -0.09 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 35.07 -0.09 NYVen C 33.56 -0.09 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.18 -0.04 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.93 -0.21 EmMktV 35.76 -0.33 IntSmVa 17.42 -0.23 LargeCo 10.09 -0.01 USLgVa 20.56 US Small 21.29 -0.23 US SmVa 25.44 -0.21 IntlSmCo 17.30 -0.24 Fixd 10.33 IntVa 18.99 -0.11 Glb5FxInc 10.87 -0.03 2YGlFxd 10.15 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 71.69 -0.13

+0.9 +1.0 +0.6 +0.6 +1.0 +0.6 +1.0 -1.1 +1.0 -1.1 -0.7 -0.2 -0.5 +1.7 +1.2 +1.1 +1.1 +1.1 -0.1 -1.0 -1.1 +1.3 +1.9 +2.2 -0.3 -0.5 +0.7 +0.1 +3.3 -0.1 +2.1

Income 13.23 IntlStk 35.93 Stock 110.66 Eaton Vance A: LgCpVal 18.41 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.26 LgCapVal 18.46 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.99 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.88 FPACres 27.14 Fairholme 35.71 Federated Instl: KaufmnR 5.50 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.10 StrInA 12.45 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.29 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.68 FF2015 11.42 FF2020 13.90 FF2020K 13.30 FF2025 11.63 FF2030 13.91 FF2030K 13.74 FF2035 11.60 FF2040 8.11 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.89 AMgr50 15.53 Balanc 18.42 BalancedK 18.42 BlueChGr 46.03 Canada 57.54 CapAp 25.44 CpInc r 9.60 Contra 68.21 ContraK 68.18 DisEq 23.03 DivIntl 30.20 DivrsIntK r 30.18

-0.04 -0.46 +0.6 -0.16 +2.7 -0.01 +1.0 -0.02 +0.2 -0.01 +1.0 +0.01 +2.4 +0.3 -0.02 +1.3 +0.24 +0.4 -0.04 -0.22 +0.7 -0.03 +0.8 -0.22 +0.7 -0.08 -0.07 -0.08 -0.08 -0.07 -0.09 -0.09 -0.08 -0.05 -0.05 -0.08 -0.08 -0.08 -0.52 -0.63 -0.13 -0.03 -0.76 -0.77 -0.06 -0.40 -0.40

+0.7 +0.7 +0.8 +0.8 +1.0 +1.0 +1.0 +1.1 +1.2 +1.7 +0.7 +1.0 +1.0 +1.5 -1.0 +0.4 +2.1 +0.7 +0.7 +2.2 +0.2 +0.2

DivGth 28.76 EmrMk 26.12 Eq Inc 45.17 EQII 18.65 Fidel 32.68 FltRateHi r 9.88 GNMA 11.43 GovtInc 10.38 GroCo 84.88 GroInc 18.65 GrowthCoK 84.84 HighInc r 9.08 Indepn 24.46 IntBd 10.54 IntmMu 9.91 IntlDisc 33.01 InvGrBd 11.36 InvGB 7.37 LgCapVal 12.04 LatAm 57.44 LevCoStk 28.68 LowP r 38.69 LowPriK r 38.67 Magelln 72.51 MidCap 28.99 MuniInc 12.00 NwMkt r 15.60 OTC 56.81 100Index 8.93 Ovrsea 32.71 Puritn 18.09 SCmdtyStrt 12.53 SrsIntGrw 11.07 SrsIntVal 10.30 STBF 8.46 SmllCpS r 20.12 StratInc 11.14 StrReRt r 9.59 TotalBd 10.71 USBI 11.29 Value 69.76 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 47.86 Fidelity Spartan:

-0.16 +1.2 -0.42 -0.9 -0.02 +2.1 +2.2 -0.13 +1.6 +1.1 -0.04 -0.2 -0.04 -0.4 -1.14 +2.1 -0.07 +1.9 -1.13 +2.1 +1.9 -0.38 +0.5 -0.03 +0.1 -1.0 -0.53 -0.1 -0.05 -0.2 -0.03 -0.1 -0.02 +1.8 -0.65 -2.7 -0.24 +0.9 -0.27 +0.8 -0.27 +0.8 -0.46 +1.2 -0.36 +0.5 +0.02 -2.0 -0.08 -0.80 +3.4 +2.2 -0.44 +0.7 -0.07 +1.0 -0.07 -0.9 -0.20 -1.9 -0.07 +3.6 -0.01 +0.1 -0.17 +2.7 -0.03 +0.7 -0.04 +0.1 -0.04 +0.1 -0.04 -0.2 -0.22 +1.6 -0.72 -9.9

ExtMkIn 38.29 -0.36 500IdxInv 45.32 -0.06 IntlInxInv 35.69 -0.42 TotMktInv 37.01 -0.10 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 45.32 -0.06 TotMktAd r 37.01 -0.10 First Eagle: GlblA 46.41 -0.42 OverseasA 22.53 -0.31 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.04 +0.01 FoundAl p 10.67 -0.03 HYTFA p 9.36 +0.02 IncomA p 2.21 USGovA p 6.72 -0.02 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p IncmeAd 2.20 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.23 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 21.01 -0.04 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 7.19 -0.09 GlBd A p 13.44 -0.08 GrwthA p 18.20 -0.10 WorldA p 15.19 -0.08 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.46 -0.09 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 41.05 -0.06 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.43 -0.01 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.76 -0.18 Quality 20.44 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.37 -0.01 MidCapV 36.60 -0.19 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.10 -0.05 CapApInst 37.31 -0.40 IntlInv t 60.15 -0.71 Intl r 60.71 -0.72

+0.3 +1.9 +1.5 +1.6 +1.9 +1.6 +0.1 -0.6 -2.5 +2.0 -2.6 +1.9 -0.3 -0.8 +2.0 +1.9 +1.8 +3.0 -0.7 +2.3 +2.4 -0.8 +2.0 +1.6 +1.1 +1.6 +1.3 +1.2 +1.6 +0.2 +0.3

Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 35.39 -0.12 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 35.40 -0.13 Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 43.35 -0.17 Div&Gr 19.92 +0.03 TotRetBd 10.90 -0.05 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.17 +0.05 IVA Funds: Wldwide I r 16.83 -0.06 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.58 +0.05 CmstkA 16.07 +0.05 EqIncA 8.75 GrIncA p 19.70 +0.04 HYMuA 8.67 +0.01 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.70 -0.33 AssetStA p 24.39 -0.34 AssetStrI r 24.60 -0.34 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.46 -0.05 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.46 -0.04 HighYld 8.29 -0.01 IntmTFBd 10.67 ShtDurBd 10.97 -0.02 USLCCrPls 20.98 -0.09 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 52.28 -0.27 PrkMCVal T 22.85 -0.07 Twenty T 67.01 +0.26 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.03 -0.07 LSGrwth 12.98 -0.08 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.27 -0.28 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.66 -0.29 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 14.57 +0.01 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.72 +0.02

+2.2 +2.2 +2.3 +2.2 -1.0 +0.7 +2.5 +2.2 +1.9 +2.5 -3.1 -0.1 -0.1 -0.1 +1.7 -0.8 +1.5 +3.2 +1.2 +1.9 +1.0 +1.1 -2.3 -2.4 -3.3 +1.6

Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.33 -0.07 StrInc C 14.95 -0.06 LSBondR 14.28 -0.06 StrIncA 14.88 -0.06 Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.11 -0.07 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.75 -0.03 BdDebA p 7.89 -0.02 ShDurIncA p 4.60 -0.01 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 -0.01 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.25 -0.01 ValueA 23.29 +0.04 MFS Funds I: ValueI 23.39 +0.04 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.64 -0.09 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.10 -0.12 PacTgrInv 23.10 -0.18 MergerFd 15.86 -0.01 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.38 -0.04 TotRtBdI 10.38 -0.04 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 37.65 -0.55 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.65 -0.10 GlbDiscZ 30.00 -0.10 QuestZ 17.97 -0.03 SharesZ 21.17 -0.04 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 45.86 -0.40 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 47.52 -0.42 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.39 Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.95 -0.06 Intl I r 19.83 -0.23 Oakmark r 42.42 +0.12 Old Westbury Fds:

+0.4 +0.5 +0.4 +0.6 -0.2 +1.5 +1.3 +0.2 +0.2 +1.1 +2.1 +2.1 +0.3 +0.3 -1.5 +0.5 +0.2 +0.3 +0.8 +1.6 +1.6 +1.6 +1.8 -0.2 -0.3 NA +0.8 +2.2 +2.7

GlobOpp 7.80 -0.03 GlbSMdCap 15.48 -0.15 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 43.75 -0.39 DvMktA p 35.34 -0.37 GlobA p 61.34 -0.52 GblStrIncA 4.28 -0.03 Gold p 44.48 -1.07 IntBdA p 6.45 -0.05 MnStFdA 33.01 -0.01 RisingDivA 15.69 -0.02 S&MdCpVl 32.06 -0.23 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.24 -0.01 S&MdCpVl 27.49 -0.20 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.19 -0.01 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.28 +0.01 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 34.96 -0.36 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.82 -0.05 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.52 -0.07 AllAsset 12.06 -0.07 ComodRR 9.23 -0.11 HiYld 9.40 InvGrCp 10.46 -0.06 LowDu 10.42 RealRtnI 11.29 -0.11 ShortT 9.88 TotRt 10.82 -0.05 PIMCO Funds A: RealRtA p 11.29 -0.11 TotRtA 10.82 -0.05 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.82 -0.05 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.82 -0.05 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.82 -0.05 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.02 -0.48 Pioneer Funds A:

+1.2 +0.1 +0.4 -3.1 +1.6 +0.1 -10.8 -1.5 +1.9 +1.2 +0.1 +1.1 +1.1 -5.3 -3.1 -0.1 -0.5 +0.1 -0.6 +1.4 +0.1 +0.4 -0.5 +0.3 -0.1 -0.6 -0.1 -0.2 -0.1 -0.1 -1.7

PionFdA p 41.55 Price Funds: BlChip 38.76 CapApp 20.61 EmMktS 34.74 EqInc 24.15 EqIndex 34.50 Growth 32.59 HlthSci 31.10 HiYield 6.86 IntlBond 9.83 IntlStk 14.19 MidCap 59.37 MCapVal 24.04 N Asia 18.87 New Era 52.09 N Horiz 33.44 N Inc 9.45 R2010 15.46 R2015 12.00 R2020 16.61 R2025 12.18 R2030 17.49 R2035 12.39 R2040 17.64 ShtBd 4.85 SmCpStk 34.35 SmCapVal 35.85 SpecIn 12.38 Value 23.94 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.86 VoyA p 24.34 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.65 PremierI r 20.28 TotRetI r 13.11 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.84 S&P Sel 19.94 Scout Funds: Intl 32.43 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.83 Templeton Instit:

-0.09 +1.4 -0.33 +0.01 -0.39 +0.03 -0.04 -0.27 -0.17 -0.01 -0.06 -0.14 -0.55 -0.01 -0.10 -0.66 -0.42 -0.04 -0.06 -0.05 -0.07 -0.06 -0.09 -0.06 -0.09 -0.31 -0.38 -0.04 +0.05

+1.7 +1.5 -1.5 +1.9 +1.9 +1.4 +2.7 +1.5 -1.1 -0.3 +1.4 +1.4 -1.6 -0.1 -0.1 -0.2 +0.8 +0.9 +1.0 +1.2 +1.2 +1.3 +1.3 +0.1 -0.2 -0.8 +0.4 +2.6

+0.02 +2.4 -0.12 +2.7 -0.09 -0.16 -0.3 -0.07 -0.5 -0.08 +1.8 -0.02 +1.9 -0.34 +0.2 -0.11 +1.0

ForEqS 20.57 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 52.86 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 28.05 IntValue I 28.67 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.91 Vanguard Admiral: BalAdml 21.56 CAITAdm 10.53 CpOpAdl 78.20 EMAdmr r 39.57 Energy 124.45 ExtdAdm 41.46 500Adml 118.01 GNMA Ad 10.70 GrwAdm 32.12 HlthCr 52.44 HiYldCp 5.75 InfProAd 25.40 ITBdAdml 11.16 ITsryAdml 11.28 IntGrAdm 61.24 ITAdml 13.08 ITGrAdm 9.89 LtdTrAd 10.96 LTGrAdml 9.14 LT Adml 10.43 MCpAdml 93.08 MuHYAdm 9.85 PrmCap r 69.70 ReitAdm r 78.47 STsyAdml 10.68 STBdAdml 10.55 ShtTrAd 15.85 STIGrAd 10.77 SmCAdm 34.79 TtlBAdml 10.55 TStkAdm 32.08 WellslAdm 52.61 WelltnAdm 54.45 Windsor 46.54 WdsrIIAd 46.72

-0.18 +2.6 -0.28 +2.1 -0.43 +0.1 -0.44 +0.1 -0.14 +0.4 -0.07 +0.8 -1.5 -0.44 +1.8 -0.43 -0.7 -0.91 +2.2 -0.40 +0.4 -0.15 +1.9 -0.04 -0.2 -0.13 +1.6 +1.5 -0.01 +1.3 -0.25 -0.5 -0.07 -0.2 -0.06 -0.3 -0.84 -0.5 +0.01 -1.2 -0.05 +0.01 -0.2 -0.09 -1.8 +0.01 -2.1 -0.53 +1.0 +0.02 -2.2 -0.21 +2.1 +0.05 -0.01 -0.02 +0.1 +0.01 -0.01 +0.2 -0.37 -0.04 -0.3 -0.09 +1.6 -0.21 +0.1 -0.06 +1.4 -0.05 +2.1 +0.05 +2.5

Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.70 CapOpp 33.86 DivdGro 14.62 Energy 66.28 EqInc 20.62 Explr 73.23 GNMA 10.70 GlobEq 18.13 HYCorp 5.75 HlthCre 124.26 InflaPro 12.93 IntlGr 19.25 IntlVal 32.68 ITIGrade 9.89 LifeCon 16.44 LifeGro 22.28 LifeMod 19.71 LTIGrade 9.14 Morg 18.37 MuInt 13.08 PrecMtls r 24.85 PrmcpCor 13.93 Prmcp r 67.18 SelValu r 18.99 STAR 19.23 STIGrade 10.77 StratEq 18.46 TgtRetInc 11.29 TgRe2010 22.41 TgtRe2015 12.50 TgRe2020 22.27 TgtRe2025 12.73 TgRe2030 21.90 TgtRe2035 13.24 TgtRe2040 21.74 TgtRe2045 13.66 USGro 18.60 Wellsly 21.72 Welltn 31.52 Wndsr 13.79 WndsII 26.32 Vanguard Idx Fds: TotIntlInst r

500 -0.09 -0.19 +0.05 -0.49 -0.03 -0.93 -0.04 -0.12 -0.01

+1.0 +1.9 +1.7 +2.1 +1.2 +0.4 -0.2 +1.5 +1.2 +1.5 -0.13 -0.5 -0.26 -0.5 -0.33 +1.6 -0.05 -0.06 +0.5 -0.11 +1.0 -0.09 +0.7 -0.09 -1.9 -0.17 +1.9 +0.01 -1.2 -0.55 -7.1 -0.05 +1.2 -0.20 +2.1 -0.06 +1.2 -0.10 +0.8 -0.01 +0.2 -0.14 +0.8 -0.06 +0.1 -0.11 +0.4 -0.06 +0.6 -0.10 +0.8 -0.06 +0.9 -0.10 +1.0 -0.06 +1.1 -0.11 +1.1 -0.06 +1.2 -0.12 +1.9 -0.08 +0.1 -0.04 +1.4 -0.02 +2.1 +0.03 +2.5 +0.6

118.00 -0.15 +1.9

Growth

32.12 -0.13 +1.6

MidCap

20.51 -0.11 +1.0

SmCap

34.75 -0.38

SmlCpGth

21.93 -0.31

SmlCpVl

16.00 -0.12 -0.1

STBnd

10.55 -0.02 +0.1

TotBnd

10.55 -0.04 -0.3

TotlIntl

15.84 -0.16 +0.5

TotStk

32.07 -0.09 +1.6

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.11 -0.09 +1.3

ExtIn

41.46 -0.39 +0.5

FTAllWldI r

94.42 -0.90 +0.6

GrwthIst

32.12 -0.13 +1.6

InfProInst

10.35 -0.10 -0.5

InstIdx

117.18 -0.15 +1.9

InsPl

117.18 -0.15 +1.9

InsTStPlus

29.00 -0.08 +1.6

MidCpIst

20.56 -0.12 +1.0

SCInst

34.78 -0.37

TBIst

10.55 -0.04 -0.3

TSInst

32.08 -0.09 +1.6

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

97.48 -0.13 +1.9

STBdIdx

10.55 -0.02 +0.1

TotBdSgl

10.55 -0.04 -0.3

TotStkSgl

30.96 -0.09 +1.6

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.77 -0.04 +0.1


B USI N ESS

B4 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

M   D I SPATC H E S Attorneys Bruce Brothers, Wayne Hawn and Jennifer Coughlin have announced the formation of Brothers, Hawn & Coughlin LLP. The Bend law firm focuses on representing people injured in motor vehicle collisions and through medical malpractice. They also handle sexual abuse, insurance coverage and product-liability issues. The partners have more than 60 years combined legal experience and can be reached at 541-382-5885. Todd Grover and Eric Ward have opened the law firm Ward Grover LLP in Bend, at 233 S.W. Wilson Ave., Suite 204, above the Bank of the Cascades. Graduates

of Lewis & Clark Law School, they have 20 years combined criminal defense legal experience with expertise in federal whitecollar crimes and state and federal drug offenses. To contact Grover or Ward, call 541-312-5150. Advantage Dental of Prineville has partnered with Crook County Health Advocates and opened a new dental clinic at 257 N.E. Second St. for low-income residents and those serviced by the Oregon Health Plan. In addition to treating OHP patients, the clinic also serves commercial insurance patients and feefor-service patients. Advantage Dental owns 20 clinics throughout Oregon. To learn more, visit

www.advantagedental.com. H & R Block has opened a new office in Prineville, at 447 N.W. Third St. A grand opening will be held Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. H & R Block provides inperson and online tax-preparation services. Its Prineville office can be reached at 541-447-5004. The Marilyn Room, a new venue for live local music, has opened at 415 N.E. Third St., in Bend. With a Marilyn Monroe theme, the bar and lounge also offers a banquet hall seating up to 250 people. For more information, contact Ryan Huffman at ryan@thewhitebull .com, 770-354-9075 or via Facebook at www.facebook.com/the marilyn.

BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY HEALTH CARE, IMPACTS TO YOUR BUSINESS IN 2011: This Bend Chamber of Commerce event features Wes Price of Harrigan Price Fronk & Company LLP, Dan Stevens of PacificSource and Kurt Renstrom of Johnson Benefit Planning speaking about health care and how it will impact businesses this year. For more information and to register, visit www.bendchamber.org/calendar/ EmailCommunityAffairsCouncil.htm; $30 for Bend chamber members, $40 at the door; 7:30-9 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by Soroptimist International of Redmond; free for chamber members; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Senior Center, 325 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-306-7062. UNDERSTANDING GOOGLE ANALYTICS: Learn the basics of improving your website with a free tool, Google Analytics. Google Analytics helps you understand who visits your website and how it is used by those visitors. No registration required; free; 11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541-312-4704. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL AWARDS BANQUET: Several awards will be presented, including Redmond’s Citizen of the Year and Business of the Year. Reservations required. 541-9235191 or karen@visitredmondoregon .com; $35; 6 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, Conference Center, 1522 Cline Falls Road.

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. DISCUSSION ON BEND’S WATER OPTIONS: Understand the merits and drawbacks of the city of Bend’s surface water project. Hosted by the natural resources program at Oregon State University-Cascades Campus and COTV’s “Talk of the Town.” RSVP requested at 541-388-5814 or talk@bendbroadband.net. For more information, visit www.osucascades .edu or www.talkofthetownco.com; free; 6 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way; 541-3223100.

TUESDAY MID-OREGON CONSTRUCTION SAFETY SUMMIT: Designed for residential and commercial construction workers, attendees may choose from several classes such as fall protection and managing risk, advanced electrical safety and work zone flagging; $50, or $60 after Jan 20. There is an additional $15 fee for the flagging certification; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 503-947-7428 or www.orosha.org/conferences. OREGON NATIONAL CAREER READINESS CERTIFICATE LAUNCH: Gov. John Kitzhaber announces the statewide availability of Oregon’s National Career Readiness Certificate and how it will help develop, certify and identify work-ready Oregonians. The NCRC is a tool that verifies workplace readiness and helps connect job applicants with employers. To RSVP, contact Laura Wieking at 503-5047676 or laurawieking@comcast.net; free; 9-10 a.m.; NW Natural, Fourth Floor Hospitality Suite, 220 N.W. Second Ave., Portland; 503-947-1303. KNOW INTERNET SEARCHING: Sign up online, at the reference desk or call 541-617-7080; free; 10:30 a.m.-noon; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. COMBINE THE BEST OF TWO WORLDS: Learn the differences and similarities between profit and nonprofit businesses and how best to manage nonprofit organizations. Register by Jan. 24; $25 for Bend chamber members and $45 for the general public; 11 a.m.; Bend Golf and Country Club, 61045 Country Club Drive; 541-382-7437.

KNOW WORD III: Sign up online, at the reference desk or call 541-6177080; free; 2-3:30 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121037. FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER CLASS: Find out about the latest government programs and grants for first-time homebuyers and those who have not owned for the past three years. Enjoy a free dinner while learning about buying a home. Please call for reservations; 6-8 p.m.; Evergreen Home Loans, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. #200, Bend; 541-318-5500. MARKETING TO YOUR BEST CUSTOMERS: Part of the Online Marketing Series. Class continues Feb. 1. Registration required; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http:// noncredit.cocc.edu.

WEDNESDAY GREEN PROFESSIONALS CONFERENCE: The one-day event will host three speaker tracks on energy efficiency, renewable technologies and sustainability. There also will be an exhibit hall of companies, organizations and educational institutions offering career opportunities and ways to get involved in the green business community; $195; discounts available to nonprofits and students; 7:30 a.m.6:30 p.m.; Oregon Convention Center, 777 N.E. Martin Luther King Blvd., Portland. DEVELOPING YOUR ANNUAL FUNDRAISING PLAN: Explore the elements of a fundraising plan and strategies for implementation. For more information and to register, visit www.nonprofitoregon.org/training_ convening/workshops; $135 for nonprofit association members and $150 for nonmembers; 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-382-4321. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY CENTRAL OREGON ECONOMIC FORECAST: Produced by the Center for Economic Research and Forecasting, the program will feature an economic forecast for the U.S., the state and Central Oregon in particular, including comments on the political landscape. Tickets available at clucerf.org. For additional information or to purchase a table, contact Lawnae Hunter, 541-389-7910; 7:30-11:30 a.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend. HOW TO GET 5 MILLION PEOPLE TO VISIT YOUR WEBSITE: Offered by the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon, this AdBite is a presentation by “The Oatmeal,” aka Matthew Inman, about his journey and how social media played a role in his past business success and now his current blogging success with his website www.theoatmeal.com. Register at adfedco.org by noon Jan. 25; $15 for members; $35 for nonmembers; 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-385-1992. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: An overview on how to research investments and place online orders. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior. Register by Jan. 25; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. FIRST-TIME HOMEBUYER: Learn the financial advantages of buying versus renting and how to prepare financially for a home purchase. To register, call 541-382-1795; 6 p.m.; Mid Oregon Credit Union, 202 N.E. Olney Ave., Bend. LIVE CONTRACTOR EDUCATION: Taught by Central Oregon Contractor Training, this live course is approved by the Oregon Construction Contractors Board and satisfies the educational requirement to take the test to become a licensed contractor in Oregon. Registration fee includes the Oregon Contractor’s Reference Manual. Prepayment is required. To

register, go to http://noncredit.cocc .edu or call 541-383-7290. Class continues Jan. 28 and 29; $275; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7700. WEB DESIGN SERIES: Three Hours to a Better Website, Jan. 27; Make Money with a Web Affiliate, Feb. 3; Photoshop for the Web, Feb. 10. Sign up for individual classes or the series. Registration required at http:// noncredit.cocc.edu; $55 per class or $145 for the series; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270.

FRIDAY Jan. 28 REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by Dana Signs; free for chamber members; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Dana Signs, 615 S.W. Umatilla Ave.; 541-548-7226. CONVERSATIONS FOR SUCCESS: Greg Ferrera will share thoughts and ideas on the changing real estate industry and how to be successful. RSVP by Jan. 25 to katella@ katellab.com; $15 for Women’s Council of Realtors members; $20 for nonmembers; 9-10:30 a.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-977-4861. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

SATURDAY Jan. 29 CENTRAL OREGON FORAGE SEMINAR: RSVP to OSU Crook County Extension Service at 541447-6228; free; 8:30 a.m.; 4-H Clover Club Building, 502 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. CROOKED RIVER RANCHTERREBONNE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GALA/ANNUAL MEETING: A social evening with dinner and a silent auction at the Sandbagger Saloon in Crooked River Ranch. RSVP required to 541-9232679. Must be a chamber member to attend; $25; 6 p.m.

SUNDAY Jan. 30 FINANCIAL PEACE UNIVERSITY: This 13-week course taught by Dave Ramsey teaches families and individuals how to manage their money. Ramsey is a personal money management expert, author and host of a national radio program. Contact Briauna Widmer at 541-389-8241 for more information and to register; 6 p.m.; Christian Life Center, 21720 E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-389-8241.

MONDAY Jan. 31 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Feb. 1 FROM HERE TO NET ZERO: Discover strategies for building highly efficient homes and powering them through renewable energy. Learn about incentives and tax credits available to those who build to high efficiency standards. Register at www.earth advantage.org; free; 5:30-7 p.m.; Earth Advantage Institute, 345 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; 541-306-3814.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Marla Polenz at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Wal-Mart to make its food more healthful, affordable By Andrea Chang Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the nation’s largest retailer and grocer, said Thursday that it would launch an aggressive initiative to make its food products more healthful and affordable, and would build new stores in underserved areas. Appearing with first lady Michelle Obama at a news conference in Washington, WalMart executives outlined the ambitious plan, which includes reformulating thousands of packaged food items by 2015 to reduce sodium by 25 percent, lower added sugars by 10 percent and remove all industrially produced trans fats. The discount giant said it would also work with its distributors and farmers to lower prices on fresh fruits and vegetables, estimating that the move would save customers $1 billion a year. Wal-Mart is also developing criteria for a front-of-package seal on some products that would help consumers identify healthier food options such as whole-grain cereal, whole-wheat pasta and unsweetened canned fruit. “We don’t think any American should have to choose between what’s affordable and what’s healthy,” said Andrea

Google Continued from B1 The management move alters an unusual experiment in which Google was run jointly by a troika that included Schmidt, Page as president of products and Sergey Brin, 37, the company’s other cofounder as its president of technology. The relationship between the founders and Schmidt was rocky during its early years, as the founders frequently undercut Schmidt. But by most accounts, the three worked well together for the past several years. Brin and Schmidt joined Page in the interview, in which the three said they have jointly made all major decisions, and met privately before the weekly staff meeting to make sure they were on the same page. But after recent discussions, they decided Page should be the top decision-maker because of “the pace of decision-making and the scale of the company,” Page

Cliff Owen / The Associated Press

Wal-Mart President and CEO Bill Simon looks on as first lady Michelle Obama takes part in Wal-Mart’s announcement on Thursday in Washington of a comprehensive effort to provide healthier and more affordable food choices to their customers. Thomas, senior vice president of sustainability at Wal-Mart. Obama, whose Let’s Move campaign aims to combat childhood obesity and encourage kids to be more active, lauded Wal-Mart’s plan, which could have a ripple-down effect on other mass-market retailers and grocery stores. “Efforts like this show us that yes, we can improve how we make and sell food in this country. We can do that. And we can feed our kids better,” Obama said. “They’re actually chang-

E-commerce gives Google a boost Google’s strong fourthquarter earnings proved that it is now firmly ensconced in e-commerce, and also showed that, with its Android operating system and related apps, it is smoothly transitioning to the mobile world. Google reported Thursday that net income in the quarter ended Dec. 31 was $2.54 billion, or $7.81 a share, up from $1.97 billion, or $6.13 a share, in the year-ago quarter. Excluding the cost of stock options and the related tax benefits, Google’s fourthquarter profit was $8.75 a share, up from $6.79. — New York Times News Service said. Brin added that the threeway process was confusing employees. “We wanted to make it clear

ing how the entire food industry does business.” The ongoing process is not expected to negatively affect earnings, Wal-Mart said. The Bentonville, Ark., company said it would try to make sure the flavors of reformulated foods — which will include items such as salad dressings, lunch meats and frozen entrees — would not be altered. Wal-Mart also said it would build new stores in “food deserts” in urban and rural areas that lack healthful food choices.

to all the executives and the managers who report to us where they should send an email,” he said. Page and Schmidt said the decision was mutual and had nothing to do with Schmidt’s performance. “I don’t think there’s another person in the universe that could have done as good a job as Eric has done in the company,” Page said. When Page becomes chief executive, Schmidt will focus on external business partnerships and government outreach, including fighting regulators’ concerns about Google’s growing power, and Brin will concentrate on several new products, which he declined to name. Page led the company in its early days but gave up that role in 2001, when it was still private. In tapping him to return to the post, Google becomes one of the few major companies in the Valley to be put under the control of a founder after being run for so long by a professional manager.


L

Inside

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

Merkley, Wyden support changes at dam By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Two more federal lawmakers have joined the effort to ensure the decidedly manmade Arthur Bowman Dam is no longer protected by the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. Currently, the Crooked River Wild and Scenic River boundary is drawn down the middle of the dam, effectively blocking efforts to add a small hydro plant at the dam’s base. U.S. Sens. Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, both Oregon Democrats, are drafting the Senate version of a proposal by Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, to move that boundary downstream of the dam. Wyden is working with Merkley on a Senate bill to solve the Bowman problem, Deputy Press Secretary Tom Caiazza said this week.

IN CONGRESS

“Senators Wyden and Merkley and staff from both offices have been working with stakeholders ... to reach an agreement on moving the wild and scenic river boundary as well as to seek a consensus on a more comprehensive solution for the area.” — Tom Caiazza, deputy press secretary, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

“Senators Wyden and Merkley and staff from both offices have been working with stakeholders — the irrigation district, the City of Prineville, environmental groups, and hydroelectric developers — to reach an agreement on moving the wild and scenic river boundary as well as to seek a consensus on a more comprehensive solution for the area,” Caiazza said, in an e-mail.

Similar Senate bill Merkley said he’s still working out the details of a Senate bill, but said Walden’s proposal is close

C

CALIFORNIA Governor defends divisive budget, see Page C2. OREGON Republican lawmakers call for pause on regulations, see Page C3. WASHINGTON FBI investigating Spokane bomb plot, see Page C6.

to the mark. “I think that his bill moves in the right direction,” Merkley said, in an interview last week. “We’re expecting to be able to put together a bill (in the Senate).”

Other options While Walden has said his bill will be narrowly focused on moving the boundary, Crook County and Prineville officials are asking the senators to consider other options, including providing water for the city and ensuring the reservoir stays full enough for boating and other recreation.

“It may look a little bit different from Walden’s,” Merkley said. The 245-foot-tall earthen dam sits about 20 miles south of Prineville, plugging the western end of the Prineville Reservoir. A spokeswoman for Portland General Electric said earlier this week that the utility is proposing to build a $13 million power station at the dam’s base. Any hydro plant proposal would still have to satisfy environmental review, and demonstrate that it wouldn’t damage the Wild and Scenic portion of the stream, Ochoco Irrigation District General Manager Mike Kasberger said. But first the line has to be moved off of the dam. “The existing boundary right now precludes hydro altogether,” Kasberger said. “The boundary has to be moved so they can put a plant in at all.” By all accounts, the line was drawn on Bowman by mistake, as BLM Oregon State Director Ed Shepard wrote in a 2007 letter to Walden. See Bowman / C5

MISSING BEND WOMAN

Officials resume search for body Search and rescue units patrol North Santiam for what they believe are remains of Lori Blaylock By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

A lesson in

jamming Railslide structure assembled for competition at COCC

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Workers assemble scaffolding Thursday afternoon at Central Oregon Community College in Bend for the second “Jam on the Hill” railslide competition scheduled today from 4 to 8 p.m. For more information, contact Brianna Metzler at 541-285-7854.

Members of the Deschutes and Linn county search and rescue units spent Thursday moving up and down the banks of the North Santiam River, in an unsuccessful search for a body that may be that of a Bend woman who disappeared late last year. Lori “Woody” Blaylock, 48, was reported missing Nov. 2, after she failed to show up for work at St. Charles Bend. Her husband, 46-yearold Steven Blaylock, told police she wandered away from their northeast Bend home a few days earlier, but he had not filed a missing persons report because he expected her to return. Steven Blaylock was arrested Lori Blaylock Nov. 10 after police searched the couple’s home, and he has since been indicted on one count of murder. In early December, kayakers spotted a body in the North Santiam River near where investigators had discovered clothing believed to be Lori Blaylock’s. Water conditions proved too treacherous for divers to recover the body, and by the time river levels subsided, the body had dislodged from the underwater debris where it had been spotted. See Blaylock / C5

Redmond changing the way it handles its city history By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

Jon Montana, 26, secures carpet to the face of a scaffolding structure Thursday afternoon at COCC. The structure will be covered with snow this morning for the second “Jam on the Hill” railslide competition.

REDMOND

Search still on for farmers market manager By Patrick Cliff The Bulletin

REDMOND — Centennial Park in Redmond hosted a farmers market last year, and the city hopes someone will run one again this summer. That is not certain, though. A request-for-proposal process that just closed failed to attract a single qualified manager. The city put out the RFP earlier in the winter hoping to find someone new to manage the market and use some of the revenues to promote the market. Though Redmond received some initial interest, only one person applied and that application was incomplete. Now the city has launched a sec-

ond RFP process, simplifying some of the documents required. The new deadline to respond is Jan. 26. Community Development Director Heather Richards said the city believes a market in Centennial Park could help draw heavy pedestrian traffic downtown. “We want to see what we can do to help grow a market as a whole,” Richards said. “We just want to be able to support that type of activity in the city.” The farmers market the city wants in Centennial Park would lean toward produce and local crafts. At least 30 percent of the booths, according to the original RFP, should

sell local produce. The remaining booths would stock crafts and food made locally by non-chain restaurants. The RFP also prohibits vendors from selling services like satellite TV or cell phone plans. Redmond is looking for a new market manager because the previous one moved out of the region. The RFP spells out how revenues from the market will be allocated. Revenues, such as vendor fees, will be split, with 70 percent going to the manager and 20 percent reserved to promote the market. The remaining 10 percent will be held aside by the city for possible mar-

ket manager bonuses. Redmond also plans to contribute $2,000 toward the market’s initial marketing budget. Richards said she was surprised more people did not respond the first time around, but that staff began the RFP process early enough to allow for some setbacks. Time is running short to plan and open a farmers market by summer, she said. “I still think we have enough time,” Richards said. “Obviously, it’s easier to do more up front.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bend bulletin.com.

REDMOND — How Redmond handles its history is on the verge of changing, with the creation of a new landmark commission and dissolution of the city’s historical commission. A few steps remain, but the Greater Redmond Historical Society, a new nonprofit, will take over the historical commission’s responsibilities, including gathering “It just opens a local artifacts and op- lot more doors erating the Redmond Museum. Most of the and windows. commissioners already One of the best have moved over to the things about society’s board. The move is being being a society made, in large part, to allow volunteers to is everyone can fundraise for the muse- belong and have um and other historical a voice in the functions. By being an independent nonprofit, process.” the society expects both to be able to raise — Kathleen Clark, more money and gath- president, Greater er more volunteers. Redmond Historical Society organizers be- Society lieve that people are less willing to support a museum financially if they believe it has access to the city’s tax dollars. Kathleen Clark, the commission’s chairwoman and the society’s president, hopes that by breaking up the seven-member commission, local residents will feel more involved in the museum. “It just opens a lot more doors and windows. One of the best things about being a society is everyone can belong and have a voice in the process,” Clark said. “It’s not just seven people sitting around a table making decisions. This is a lot bigger than all of us.” See Redmond / C5


C2 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Many 1st-term lawmakers rejecting legislative car perk By Jim Sanders McClatchy -Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Move over, Gov. Jerry Brown, because more than half of California’s freshmen lawmakers are joining you in turning down a government perk. Elected by angry taxpayers in a year of a massive state defi-

cit, 18 of 31 first-year legislators have decided not to order a new car bankrolled largely by public funds. The penny pinching, mostly symbolic in closing a $26.4 billion budget gap, echoes the tone set by Brown in turning in his state-issued cell phone and vowing to reduce the state’s vehicle

fleet for workers. The cumulative total of 29 legislators driving personal cars for work — nearly evenly split between Democrats and Republicans — is unprecedented in recent memory. By comparison, nine California lawmakers rejected state cars in 2006, and 17 turned

thumbs down in 2009, records show. Freshmen legislators are rejecting state cars at rates far exceeding veteran colleagues: 58 percent of first-year lawmakers are driving their family cars at work, for example, compared with just 13 percent of incumbents.

L B   Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Bend’s water issue heats up at debate

Spaghetti feed raises funds for veterans

Close to 100 people attended a City Club of Central Oregon debate at St. Charles Bend on Monday that explored the city of Bend’s future water needs and the options it has to meet those demands. The debate, between local attorney Bill Buchanan and City Engineer Tom Hickmann, focused on Bend’s Bridge Creek water system upgrade that could cost up to $73 million and increase water rates up to 45 percent. Much of the discussion swirled around whether the city made the right choice to reinvest in this system, which provides about half of the city’s annual water supply, or if it missed an opportunity to switch to all groundwater, which makes up the other half of the supply. Monday’s debate is a precursor to another forum scheduled for 7 p.m. on Monday at the Oregon State University-Cascades campus that will have the same topic. Talk of the Town recorded Monday’s event, and will rebroadcast it on COTV Channel 11 at 7 p.m. Thursday.

The Bend Band of Brothers and Jake’s Diner will hold an all-you-can-eat spaghetti feed at Jake’s Diner on Sunday, Feb. 20, from 4 to 6 p.m. Money raised will enable World War II veterans to travel to Washington, D.C., to visit the war memorial. A $10 donation is requested. Jake’s Diner is located at 2210 N.E. Highway 20, in Bend.

Park renovations to begin Monday Renovations to improve Columbia Park in Bend will begin Monday, according to a news release. Due to the construction, several park pathways and trails may be rerouted during the project. In addition, several areas of the park may be closed temporarily during construction. Visitors to the park are asked to stay out of the closed areas, and follow the rerouted paths. Construction will include the addition of new paths, sidewalks and a playground. The park’s turf field will also be reconditioned, and a new picnic shelter

Rich Pedroncelli / The Associated Press

and plaza will be added during the construction. The renovation project is expected to be completed in the fall.

Call for talent show submissions Those interested in entering Central Oregon’s Got Talent show are encouraged to submit audition tapes by Jan. 31, according to a news release. The talent show, which is organized by the Bend Park & Recreation District, will take place March 12 at the Tower Theatre in Bend. Those who want to submit audition tapes can post a link online, and send the link to saraht@ bendparksandrec.org, or send a hard copy tape to Sarah Thorsen, BPRD, 799 S.W. Columbia St., Bend 97702. Cash prizes will be awarded to winners of the March event, with first place receiving $500, second place receiving $300 and third place receiving $200.

Housing Works creates fourplex for homeless The regional housing authority, Housing Works, recently

purchased a property in Bend that it will turn into housing for homeless families, according to a news release. The organization purchased a fourplex with money awarded through the Neighborhood Stabilization Program. Once the property is renovated, Housing Works will move four homeless families into the units, and will offer them on-site support services.

Riverhouse gala raises $103,000 for charity The 19th annual Gala at the Riverhouse event that took place in Bend on Monday evening raised more than $103,000, according to a news release. The money raised from the event will go toward Sparrow Clubs, a nonprofit organization that helps match terminally ill children and their families with neighborhood organizations that can help them emotionally and financially. The gala was hosted by The Riverhouse Hotel and the Central Oregon Visitors Association. Since the Riverhouse’s first gala, the organization has raised more than $1.4 million for Central

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 10:27 a.m. Jan. 19, in the 800 block of Southeast Centennial Street. Redmond Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:25 p.m. Jan. 19, in the 600 block of Southwest 15th Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:27 p.m. Jan. 19, in the area of Southwest Sixth Street and Southwest Glacier Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 12:43 p.m. Jan. 19, in the 1000 block of Southeast Lake Road. Theft — Gasoline was reported stolen

at 11:20 a.m. Jan. 19, in the 1100 block of Southwest Lake Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:37 a.m. Jan. 19, in the 1200 block of Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Burglary — Guns were reported stolen at 8:04 a.m. Jan. 19, in the 2700 block of Northwest Eighth Street. Prineville Police Department

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:19 a.m. Jan. 19, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:27 p.m. Jan. 19, in the area of North Main Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:29 p.m. Jan. 19, in the area of Hamby Road and U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:55 p.m. Jan. 19, in the area of 93rd Street and Old BendRedmond Highway in Redmond.

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported and an arrest made at 2:02 p.m. Jan. 19, in the 63300 block of Britta Street in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:34 p.m. Jan. 19, in the 16100 block of Burgess Road in La Pine. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:58 a.m. Jan. 19, in the 55800 block of Wood Duck Drive in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:09 a.m. Jan. 19, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 154 in Sunriver. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:05 a.m. Jan. 19, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 148.

BEND FIRE RUNS

5:17 p.m. — Chimney or flue fire, 23145 Alfalfa Market Road. 18 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www .humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane .org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org.

Today is Friday, Jan. 21, the 21st day of 2011. There are 344 days left in the year.

Tuesday 1:15 p.m. — Building fire, 60419 Lakeview Drive.

TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Jan. 21, 1861, Jefferson Davis of Mississippi and four other Southerners whose states had seceded from the Union resigned from the U.S. Senate. ON THIS DATE In 1793, during the French Revolution, King Louis XVI, condemned for treason, was executed on the guillotine. In 1910, the Great Paris Flood began as the rain-swollen Seine River burst its banks, sending water into the French capital. In 1911, Sen. Robert La Follette of Wisconsin announced creation of the National Progressive Republican League with the goal of promoting “popular government and progressive legislation.� In 1915, the first Kiwanis Club was founded, in Detroit. In 1924, Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin died at age 53. In 1950, former State Department official Alger Hiss, accused of being part of a Communist spy ring, was found guilty in New York of lying to a grand jury. (Hiss, who proclaimed his innocence, served less than four years in prison.) George Orwell (Eric Blair), author of “1984� died in London at age 46. In 1954, the first atomic submarine, the USS Nautilus, was launched at Groton, Conn. (How-

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y ever, the Nautilus did not make its first nuclear-powered run until nearly a year later.) In 1968, the Battle of Khe Sanh began during the Vietnam War as North Vietnamese forces attacked a U.S. Marine base; the Americans were able to hold their position until the siege was lifted 21⠄2 months later. In Greenland, an American B-52 bomber carrying four hydrogen bombs crashed, killing one crew member and scattering radioactive material. In 1970, the Boeing 747 went on its first commercial flight as Pan Am passengers traveled from New York to London. In 1976, the supersonic Concorde jet was put into service by Britain and France. TEN YEARS AGO Pope John Paul II elevated archbishops of New York and Washington and 35 other church leaders to the College of Cardinals. The Roman epic “Gladiator� claimed best dramatic movie and the 1970s rock-and-roll story “Almost Famous� won best comedy at the Golden Globes Awards. Byron De La Beckwith, a white supremacist convicted of assassinating civil rights leader Medgar Evers, died in Jackson, Miss., at age 80. FIVE YEARS AGO Rescuers in West Virginia found the bodies of two min-

Gov. Brown calls education funding ‘a civil rights issue’ districts are not as good as the wealthier districts, so I don’t want to take more money from schools. I’d like to put more money into schools. So that’s just where we are. And where do we get the money? Well, that’s the rub. And this proposal I have is to basically restore what was before, where the local property taxes go for local functions, whether it’s fire or police or schools or whatever the cities and the counties are doing.� Brown at that event invited city leaders who disagreed with him to stop by his office to talk. “I invited 400 people to come over,� he said Thursday morning. “Only about 20 came, so I handled it.� Brown said the political landscape has become more polarized than when he was last governor, from 1975 to 1983. He also continued to remind audiences that the state’s budget deficit is inherited. “Boy, things went downhill after I left,� Brown said. “We started building prisons and stopped building colleges.�

By David Siders McClatchy-Tribune News Service

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Gov. Jerry Brown on Thursday morning called education funding a civil rights issue, defending his proposal to eliminate redevelopment agencies to reduce California’s yawning budget deficit, and to push more tax revenue to schools and public safety. “We take from redevelopment and we put $1 billion into schools, that’s a good thing, because we’ve got to make sure whatever we do, we give a chance to those who are coming along in the next generation,� Brown said at a breakfast hosted by the California Legislative Black Caucus to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. “And that is a civil rights issue.� Brown made a similar, if less explicit, assertion in remarks to city officials the previous day, suggesting a developing line of argument. “We know Latino and African-American kids are way behind other kids,� Brown said at a conference hosted by the League of California Cities, which opposes Brown’s redevelopment proposal. “We know the poor

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First Kiwanis Club founded in Detroit in 1915 The Associated Press

Gov. Jerry Brown, center, visits with people attending the California Legislative Black Caucus to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Sacramento, Calif., on Thursday.

ers who had disappeared after a conveyor belt caught fire deep inside a coal mine. A Red Cross-chartered helicopter that had been used for earthquake relief in Pakistan went missing (the wreckage of the copter and the bodies of the seven people on board were found in June 2006). ONE YEAR AGO A bitterly divided U.S. Supreme Court, in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, vastly increased the power of big business and labor unions to influence government decisions by freeing them to spend their millions directly to sway elections for president and Congress. Former Democratic presidential candidate John Edwards finally admitted fathering a child during an affair before his second White House bid. Toyota recalled 2.3 million U.S. vehicles to fix accelerator pedals. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actress Ann Wedgeworth is 77. World Golf Hall of Famer Jack Nicklaus is 71. Opera singer Placido Domingo is 70. Singer Richie Havens is 70. Singer Mac Davis is 69. Actress Jill Eikenberry is 64. Country musician Jim Ibbotson (The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band) is 64. Singer-songwriter Billy Ocean is 61. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke is 61. Attorney General Eric Holder is 60. Microsoft co-founder

Paul Allen is 58. Actor-director Robby Benson is 55. Actress Geena Davis is 55. Basketball Hall of Famer Hakeem Olajuwon is 48. Actress Charlotte Ross is 43. Actor John Ducey is 42. Actress Karina Lombard is 42. Rapper Levirt (B-Rock and the Bizz) is 41. Rock musician Mark Trojanowski (Sister Hazel) is 41. Rock singer-songwriter Cat Power is 39. Rock DJ Chris Kilmore (Incubus) is 38. Actor Vincent Laresca is 37. Singer Emma Bunton (Spice Girls) is 35. Country singer Phil Stacey is 33. Rhythm-and-blues singer Nokio (Dru Hill) is 32. Actress Izabella Miko is 30. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “The road to ruin is always kept in good repair.� — Anonymous

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THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 C3

O Affidavit: Barista feared for life, shot robber

ACADEMICS SERVING THEIR COMMUNITIES

‘His one chance to survive’

The Associated Press

Jesse Skoubo / The Associated Press

Oregon State University’s James Cassidy shows a class of Geosciences 300 students the qualities of clay and soil at the OSU Organic Grower’s Club farm in Corvallis. The 13 students taking part in Cassidy’s hands-on lesson were completing their community service for Geosciences 300. The course requires students to work in groups of six on one of a variety of projects in the community, from removing English ivy at parks around Corvallis to creating a public service announcement for OSU’s KBVR-FM.

O  B Shooting justified, grand jury rules PORTLAND — A Multnomah County grand jury has ruled that the Jan. 2 use of deadly force by two Portland police officers at an abandoned car wash was justified. Portland police have said that Officers Jason Lile and Larry Wingfield responded to reports that a security guard had been threatened by a man. Investigators say the officers tried to use a stun gun

to subdue the knife-wielding man, but he wouldn’t drop the weapon. The 67-year-old homeless man died from gunshot wounds. The grand jury made its decision Thursday.

State food stamp use reaches record level SALEM — The number of Oregonians receiving food stamps has reached a record level of nearly 750,000 people.

The Statesman Journal reports the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, increased by about 7,500 people in December alone — up about 13 percent compared to December 2009. Gene Evans, a spokesman for the Oregon Department of Human Services, says the 750,000 people now in the SNAP program means that about one of every five people in Oregon is now receiving food stamp benefits. — From wire reports

As the barista turned, he noticed Combs looking down, which gave the Dutch Bros. employee the opportunity to draw his gun, the affidavit states. He “realized this was his one chance to survive,” Braziel wrote. After shooting Combs, the barista said he encountered a second robber, who raised a handgun toward him, Braziel said. The barista fired twice toward the accomplice, who returned fire and then ran away, the affidavit states. Braziel filed the document in Lane County Circuit Court to support criminal charges against Brandon Lee Plunk, 27, the man accused of accompanying Combs, also 27, to the coffee stand and exchanging gunfire with the barista before fleeing. Plunk was being held at the Lane County jail on charges that include attempted aggravated murder and robbery. Plunk denied involvement when Braziel interviewed him following his arrest, the affidavit states. The document details how, nearly two months after the robbery, police managed to track down Plunk at his Eugene home. Braziel wrote that he obtained key information in the case from a Lane County jail inmate who helped police contact a witness to the crime. The Register-Guard did not identify the Dutch Bros. employee because he is a crime victim. Police previously said he is in his 20s.

Bikini barista says she chased thief onto bus The Associated Press PORTLAND — A Portland bikini barista says she followed a man who stole her tips onto a bus and demanded that he give the money back. Molly Karvinen tells KATUTV that the man first offered her “a couple of bucks” but she demanded the rest as stunned bus passengers watched. The bus driver told her to take the dispute elsewhere. She says the man finally gave her back about $20 before she got off the bus. She estimates he took about $50. Police are looking for the man.

gains and a stiff regulatory environment put the state at a comPORTLAND — Oregon Sen- petitive disadvantage with Seattle ate Republicans have called for and Silicon Valley in attracting a two-year suspension of all new employers. rules by state agencies because “We need to stop at this point, they say excessive regulation and once we’ve stopped, reevaluhurts job growth. ate the next step,” Thompson Republicans point to more said. stringent clean water standards Democrats say they have and an expansion of worked while in power one part of the workers’ to streamline rules, and compensation premium say the proposed moraas signs the regulations torium is unnecessary, go too far in constrainunrealistic and could ing business growth. backfire. “It’s just death by a “This Senate RepubIN THE thousand cuts,” said Jonlican proposal is very LEGISLATURE much a ready-shoot-aim athan Thompson, Senate Republican caucus approach,” said House administrator. “We’re Democratic Leader Dave hearing from business leaders Hunt. “I cannot imagine any legand small-business owners that islators voting for a proposal that it’s regulation and regulation and would be this bad for both busiregulation.” ness and the public.” Thompson said he thinks ReHunt said that by suspending all publican senators would be agree- new rules, Republicans are proable to a potential compromise, posing to cut the rules that have but had not yet heard a counter- helped businesses cut through proposal from Democrats. red tape. “And that’s before you The proposal by the Senate Re- even get onto things like protectpublicans is part of their effort in ing kids or protecting safe workthis year’s governor’s race to paint places,” he said. Oregon as unfriendly to business The moratorium could be while Democrats have held pow- passed by the Legislature or creer, and their pledge to improve the ated by an executive order by the climate for private enterprise. governor. A collection of business owners A spokesman for Gov. John told former Republican candidate Kitzhaber said Kitzhaber hadn’t Chris Dudley in July that Ore- yet reviewed the proposed gon’s high income tax on capital legislation.

By Nigel Duara

The Associated Press EUGENE — An Oregon coffee stand barista says he shot and killed an armed robber when the man briefly looked away while holding him at gunpoint, according to a newly released court document. The Dutch Bros. barista told Eugene police he feared for his life in the Nov. 24 holdup, the document says. The barista said he pulled a Glock .40-caliber handgun from his waistband and fired several shots at the robber, who returned gunfire with at least two shots, The (Eugene) Register-Guard reported. Sirus Combs collapsed and died in the coffee stand’s doorway while clutching a wad of stolen cash in one hand and a pistol in the other, Eugene police Detective Dan Braziel wrote in the probable-cause affidavit filed after investigators arrested Combs’ alleged accomplice Jan. 14. After the barista allowed Combs to take cash from the till, Combs ordered him to turn around, the affidavit said. The worker “thought Combs was having him turn around so he could execute him,” Braziel wrote.

Republicans call for pause on regulation

BEND

RIVER

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5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0


C4 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

BETC bonanza

S

tate leaders keep telling us there’s a budget problem. Things are so dire, some lawmakers insist, that they’ve had to target the modest “kicker” Oregon businesses are on track to

collect at the end of the biennium. This is unfortunate, to be sure, especially after the 2009 Legislature — and later voters — hiked taxes substantially on many of these same companies. But serious problems sometimes require undesirable measures, you know. This is quite a sob story. But before buying the Legislature’s line on the kicker, consider the good fortune of SoloPower Inc., a California solar panel company that state officials are preparing to give millions of dollars. Your dollars. According to The Oregonian, SoloPower wants to build a $55 million manufacturing plant in Wilsonville. That normally would be great news, but in this case SoloPower hopes to collect $42 million worth of loans and tax breaks. That amounts to nearly $130,000 for each of the 170 jobs the company says its project will create. Wilsonville and Clackamas County would provide some of these subsidies, which is fine by us. If taxpayers in those communities want to grease the skids for SoloPower, that’s entirely their concern. Unfortunately, taxpayers throughout Oregon will be on the hook, too. In addition to local subsidies, SoloPower is in line to receive a $20 million state loan and another $20 million in tax credits through the state’s notorious Business Energy Tax Credit (BETC) program. Jody Wiser of Tax Fairness Oregon told The Oregonian that “it’s outrageous that we’re taking on 70-some percent of the risk for a company that will have no reason to stay here if they can find a better place to go.” She’s right, as taxpayers in Massachusetts can attest. Just a few years after the Bay State shoveled $43 million in subsidies in its direction, Evergreen Solar decided to lay off 800 people and bolt for China, where the cost of doing business is quite a bit lower. Companies respond to costs and incentives, which is why it’s neither sur-

prising — nor outrageous — for SoloPower to ask for tax credits, nor for Evergreen Solar to follow its bottom line to China. What is outrageous, on the other hand, is the foolishness with which public officials hand out public money. The tax credits with which Oregon wooed SoloPower effectively swipe future revenue from the state’s general fund, which supports public schools, among other things. Spending Oregon’s general fund on solar panels rather than schools would be questionable even during good times, but isn’t Oregon facing a multibilliondollar general fund shortfall? Under Gov. Ted Kulongoski, state government was gripped by a green energy mania, pouring BETCs and other subsidies into the construction of ethanol plants and wind farms even as lawmakers forced Oregonians to buy the costly fuel and electricity they produced. The spending spree was so indiscriminate that even a New Mexico-based trucking company managed to stick Oregon’s general fund — and, thus, its public schools — with a bill for millions of dollars in efficiency upgrades. What did Oregonians get in return for this spending? A smaller general fund, higher energy costs and plenty of evidence that state leaders had absolutely no idea what they were doing. We’re beginning to suspect that nothing’s changed. How else do you explain the determination of lawmakers to grab “kicker” funds that would be returned to viable businesses, while handing a similar amount to a company that probably couldn’t exist without heavy taxpayer subsidies? If this is what passes for economic development in Oregon, we’re in big trouble.

Wu’s bizarre behavior

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ep. David Wu’s district, confined to the state’s northwest corner, is a long way from Central Oregon. Still, he represents 20 percent of Oregon’s clout in the House of Representatives. That means his conduct matters to all Oregonians, not merely those in the first congressional district. What a pity. Following his re-election in November, Wu was abandoned by six staff members and the leadership of his campaign team, according to The Oregonian. Such a mass exodus is apparently quite a rarity, though in Wu’s case not particularly surprising. The congressman has developed a reputation for occasionally bizarre behavior, including a 2007 floor speech in which he warned of “faux Klingons” in the White House (“Don’t let faux Klingons send real Americans to war”). Wu’s Klingon reference was a tortured anal-

ogy that made better sense in context ... but not much better. Wu’s strange behavior continued during last year’s campaign. He made only two public appearances before the election, according to The Oregonian. In one, he delivered a speech so loud, shrill and hostile that even a county precinct leader from his own party wrote a letter of complaint. And in the other, which took place at Portland International Airport, he browbeat TSA personnel into giving him inappropriate access to a secured gate, where he urged arriving passengers to vote for him. And now, of course, his staffers are fleeing like Klingons before the starship Enterprise. For the sake of all Oregonians, the folks in the state’s first congressional district should find themselves a strong candidate of either party and prepare to beam David Wu into retirement.

Angry speech contributed to tragedy By Lynette Sheffield

IN MY VIEW

Bulletin guest columnist

W

hat are you going to do? Idleness is no longer an option. This is not a game of freeze tag. If you breathe in, you must breathe out. On Jan. 8, in Tucson, Ariz., our nation inhaled. Are we going to exhale? You can pretend it didn’t involve you personally, but you’re wrong. Our republic was attacked that day just as it was in New York, Washington, D.C., and Pennsylvania on Sept. 11, 2001; at the Murrah Building in Oklahoma City on April 19, 1995; at Kent State University on May 4, 1970; on a hotel balcony in Memphis on April 4, 1968; in a car in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963; at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941; in Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865; and many other times, when our nation was assaulted by those who thought violence could override the will of the people. We, the people. The ones who still seek to form a more perfect union. It would be easy to say the carnage of Jan. 8 was simply the result of a single deranged mind expressing his madness through the use of a firearm, but nothing happens in a vacuum. As much as we were all horrified and saddened as we watched the details unfold in real time through various forms of media, no one can truthfully say they ever felt a single moment of surprise. We knew this was coming. While we the people did not actually wield the gun that killed our fellow citizens, we all consented, in one way or another, to allow the toxic atmosphere to develop in which it was used. We wrote off the hate speech as so much

hot air, we passed off the gun-wavers as a bunch of kooks, we watched the boiling-over town hall meetings on television with a smirk and blithely changed the channel. But today we have to ask ourselves: Now what? The preamble to our Constitution reads: “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.” I don’t know about you, but when I see a 9-year-old girl shot dead along with five more of my fellow Americans, the last thing I am feeling is domestic tranquility. My general welfare has not been promoted, and my liberty has not been blessed. And I am heartbroken. And very, very angry. All those who have a platform have the burden of truth. They must report facts that have been verified and separate opinion and slant as such. Errors must be corrected promptly and with the same passion with which the inaccuracies were first reported. There are those irresponsible few who have vomited out their vitriol that denigrates our elected officials, glorified violence through their calls for “targeting and reloading” and “Second Amendment remedies,” and who urged their listeners to “take our country back!” Well, guess what? You can’t have it. It’s ours. Because we’re Americans.

We’re real Americans, and we live on both coasts and in between. We’re real Americans, and we live in cities and rural areas. We’re real Americans, and we’ve been here for generations, and we are newly sworn in. We’re real Americans, and while we may not all pray, we all hope. We’re real Americans, and we have accents. We speak many languages and use different slang, but we all understand a smile. We’re real Americans of all ages, including a little girl who was born on Sept. 11, 2001, a shining ray of beauty on an ugly day, whose life was snuffed out in a snap on Jan. 8, 2011, in Tucson. We must change. But at the very least, for now, can we all agree to the following? We, the people of the United States, want to live in a country where our leaders are elected through a free and fair balloting system, and are allowed to serve out their terms without fear of bodily harm. We, the people of the United States, want to live in a country where, when we disagree with our elected leaders, we have the right to peaceably assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances as is our constitutional right. We, the people, the ordinary everyday people of the United States of America, want to live in a country where we have the freedom to go to a supermarket or meet with our elected official on a Saturday morning without the risk of being shot. We, the people, want every 9-year-old to also enjoy their 10th birthday. C’mon, people. Exhale. Lynette Sheffield lives in Bend.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

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How Bend can use Juniper Ridge to attract new businesses By Scott Nunns Bulletin guest columnist

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et’s create some jobs. The city of Bend is looking for growth, economic stability and business revenue sufficient to form a financial base somewhat immune to business cycles, and providing supportive infrastructure revenue. Revenue is essential to fund new development as well as maintain and replace worn existing capital equipment essential to incremental additions: roads, intersections, sewers and treatment plants, water mains, etc. The city needs a broader manufacturing and financial base to cushion declines in construction, agriculture, wood products and tourism. If we look around, the key value-added features of Bend are its location, topography and desirability from the standpoint of potential emigrants: individual, industry and business. When we list attributes generally descriptive of Bend and surrounding communities, we come up with (in no graded order): climate, outdoor activities, lifestyle, superior region-

al airport, rail service, pipelines, health services, culture, culinary identity, senses of community, and available land for economic growth and development. With the exception of land, few currently owned assets available to the city are capable of driving economic multipliers. A second is the growing highereducation infrastructure on the cusp of full bloom. Juniper Ridge is the primary asset owned by the city that has a zero raw product cost. While some may argue this statement isn’t true due to the city’s philosophical encumbrance of the property with development expenditures, it should treat this expense as water under the bridge, wiping the slate clean for more imaginative and better conceived development strategy. Surely, trying to double down and make the expenses back (or disappear) is an exercise in futility. If one looks at resources available and seeks to maximize their value in terms of future growth and stability, free land residing within Juniper Ridge is of inestimable value. It’s the lever for future

IN MY VIEW growth in the Central Oregon community and Bend. It will become more valuable only if leaders commit to a development strategy that realizes a good sustainable crop comes from field development, soil enrichment, maintenance and good cultural practices over time. Up to this point it seems the strategy was to get rich on land sales, use the windfall to cover expanding city expenditures, and if any remained apply them to older infrastructure projects. The problem is this strategy depends on a waiting cue of willing buyers. The current downturn demonstrates this is not so and will not likely occur for some time, if ever. So the question becomes: How does a community attract manufacturing and technical industry, a complex productive population, and a business/higher-education community without first creating the emotion and drive to make it happen and knit together? Bend is in the enviable position of hav-

ing an asset few others possess. Free land in a desirable place. We have seen city after city bargain away their security by giving up future tax revenues and income streams to bribe industry and business for what often is but an effort by them to harvest tax and expense credits. Here in Bend, free land can become a tangible asset for the business immediately activating itself on tax roles at current appraised value and current tax rates with only one condition, a reversion restriction. The restriction would terminate five (or 10?) years after business commencement and successful performance over the period, or immediately activate upon closure of the facility, bankruptcy or failure to keep property and business tax payments current prior to completion of the performance period. In default, ownership of the land and improvements would revert to the city by title and foreclosure. While the property is free to the business, it is tendered with the understanding that the city is serious about entertaining well-funded applicants. The city’s

economic development department can wrap this up with other statewide and national economic benefits. However, care must be taken to ensure that property taxes, SDCs, utility fees and all other revenue come to the city on a timely basis. Actively promoted, this strategy provides a sound and intelligent method by which development of Juniper Ridge may be accomplished, although it doesn’t provide windfall profits. Improving property tax revenues, utility fees and permit fees judiciously sequestered and managed will provide for incremental development of required transportation and access structures. Additionally, transportation bond measures may be appropriate. New manufacturing and industrial jobs will demand goods and services from surrounding established businesses. Higher education will furnish skilled labor. As each level of increase occurs, there will be a compounding of economic activity propelling the local and regional economy forward. Scott Nunns lives in Bend.


THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 C5

O Esther Andrich

D

N   Esther Andrich, of Bend Feb. 27 - Jan. 19, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home, 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: 1:00 PM, Saturday, January 22, 2011 at St. Francis Of Assisi Historic Catholic Church, corner of Franklin and Lava, Bend. Contributions may be made to:

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, 6931 Arlington Road, 2nd floor, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

Harry "Mike" Fredenhagen, of Bend April 4, 1915 - Jan. 18, 2011 Arrangements: Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home 541-382-2471 www.niswonger-reynolds.com

Services: Graveside services Monday, January 24, 2011 at 1:00PM at Pilot Butte Cemetery Bend, OR.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Redmond Continued from C1 The society has yet to officially take over the commission activities, but there are already about 40 members, according to Clark. Society memberships will be a key way the nonprofit raises money, charging $25 for a single membership or $40 for a family. Local historical societies tend to be independent, even if supported by the local government, according to Kelly Cannon-Miller, executive director of the Des Chutes Historical Society. There are several models for funding those societies, though, including dedicated tax levies — as in Crook County — or fundraising. The Redmond society’s decision to split from the city makes sense to Cannon-Miller. “By starting a nonprofit historical society, that opens up all kinds of other fundraising opportunities for them they wouldn’t otherwise have,” Cannon-Miller said. The Redmond City Council must still approve breaking up the historical commission, but Redmond City Manager David Brandt expects that to happen sometime in the next month. The city is waiting for the nonprofit’s organization to be finalized before holding a council vote. One way the city will continue

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Feb. 27, 1934 Jan. 19, 2011 Esther was born in Bismarck, North Dakota, to Albert and Celestine Brunmeier and spent her early years in Flasher, North Dakota. In 1943, her family moved to Astoria, Oregon, where she attended Star of the Sea School from 3rd grade through high school, graduating in 1952. Esther Andrich While at Star of the Sea School, Esther met the love of her life, Dale Andrich. They started dating their sophomore year of high school. They married on August 21, 1954, and were blessed with three boys, Dave of Bend, Peter of Lynnwood, Washington and Tom of Portland. The young family moved to Bend in 1966, where they became members of St. Francis of Assisi Church and Esther began a 20-year career as a teacher's aide at Juniper Elementary School. Esther enjoyed reading, sewing, decorating, cooking, going to movies and cheering on her boys at their many athletic events. She loved being with family and friends and trips to the coast. A proud grandmother, Esther was well loved by her five grandchildren, Adrian, Sophie, Isabel, Dane and Sloane. Esther is also survived by her siblings, Bob Brunmeier, Margaret Engstrom, Ron Brunmeier and Mike Brunmeier; and her three daughters-in-law, Norma, Sarah and Diann. She was preceded in death by her sister, Marianne Griffin. A celebration of Esther's life will be held at 1:00 p.m., Saturday, January 22, at St. Francis of Assisi Historical Church, at the corner of Franklin and Lava, in downtown Bend. A reception will follow the service at the Phoenix Inn, downtown Bend. In lieu of flowers, please make remembrances in Esther's name to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. Please sign our guest book at www.niswonger-reynolds.com.

to support the society is by leasing the museum space for little or no cost, Brandt said. That would make the arrangement similar to the one the Des Chutes Historical Museum has with Deschutes County, which lets the society use the Reed School building for no charge. “It’ll be a dollar a year kind of thing,” Brandt said. Brandt said the city is not giving up all control. The historical artifacts that belong to the city will be loaned to the society, which will care for and display the items. If the society ever dis-

Negro Leagues, majors player Crowe dead at 89 The Associated Press WHITELAND, Ind. — Former Negro Leagues and major league baseball player George Crowe has died. He was 89. Adrienne Crowe tells the Daily Journal of Franklin, Ind., that her father died Tuesday night in Rancho Cordova, Calif. The exact cause of death wasn’t immediately known. Crowe had been in an assisted living home since 2008 after a series of strokes. Crowe was born in 1921 in

Whiteland, Ind., and attended Franklin High School. He was selected Indiana’s first Mr. Basketball in 1939. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He played in the Negro National League’s Black Yankees and the Harlem Renaissance of the black professional basketball league. His nine-year major league career included stints with the Boston and Milwaukee Braves, Cincinnati Reds and St. Louis Cardinals.

Blaylock Continued from C1 Bruce Riley, undersheriff of Linn County, said water and weather conditions on Thursday presented a good opportunity for searchers to return to the river. “We’re just making one more effort,” Riley said. “We don’t have any new information. There’s been no new sighting or anything. We’re just making one more concentrated effort to see what we can find.” Deputy Joe Larson of Linn County said 36 people joined the search. Back in Bend, Steven Blaylock was scheduled to enter a plea to the murder charge in Deschutes County Circuit Court on Thursday, but his

Bowman Continued from C1 “The BLM does not believe that it was the intent of Congress to place the wild and scenic river boundary on the center of the dam or to even include the dam, but rather just below the dam and spillway structures,” Shepard’s letter said. Local officials said they’d like to resolve other issues surrounding Prineville Reservoir as part of a bill moving the Wild and Scenic River boundary, if possible. Tourists boating in the Prineville Reservoir provide a nice boost for the local economy, said Crook County Commissioner Mike McCabe, so pre-

solved, the property would return to the city, Brandt said. Once the council votes on breaking up the historical commission, it will also vote on creating a new historical landmark commission, according to Brandt. Redmond’s landmark commission would take on several roles, including helping the city identify historically important buildings and promoting those buildings for redevelopment. According to a city staff report, the commission would help promote economic development in part because developers of historic properties

Detroit Idanha N

22

Detroit Lake

orth Sant iam R iver

Search for missing woman resumes Detroit Bend

O R E G O N

22 Greg Cross / The Bulletin

plea date was pushed back to Feb. 3. Appearing by video from the Deschutes County jail, Steven Blaylock conversed briefly with his attorneys, who requested the additional time to give them an opportunity to meet with him. Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or at shammers@bendbulletin.com.

serving water for those users is important. “That’s big for our community,” McCabe said. “It generates a lot of dollars.” Prineville Mayor Betty Roppe said the city would like to put a small portion of the reservoir’s unallocated water back into the Crooked River. The city would then apply for permission to pump more water from its wells, to account for possible growth, Roppe said. “We do have 500 homes in the city limits that are not on city water or city sewer at this time, and we could potentially have to put them on city water at any minute,” Roppe said. Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

can be eligible for tax breaks. The new Redmond commission would take over local landmark duties from Deschutes County Landmarks Commission, Brandt said. The landmark commission will be open to volunteers, and Brandt believes there is enough local interest. “There are local resources,” Brandt said of Redmond landmarks. “We have the resources to handle it locally.” Patrick Cliff can be reached at 541-633-2161 or at pcliff@bendbulletin.com.

Dorthea Hughitt December 27, 1918 - January 15, 2011 Our beloved mother and grandmother, Dorthea Hughitt, passed away January 15, 2011, in Medford, OR in the presence of family. Her passing came at the age of 92 after spending her last five years in the loving arms of the wonderful caregivers at KC Adult Foster Care. Dorthea was born December 27, 1918 in Culver, OR to Burson and Hazel Cate. She spent her early years on the ranch in Culver before moving to southern California for a few years, eventually returning to Redmond while in high school. After graduating she attended Oregon State University for a couple of years prior to settling down in Redmond. One of her first jobs was with Bend Hardware at their Redmond store and it was there that she met her husband, Bill, whom she married in August 1943, and shared her life for 63 years. After the hardware store closed she went to work for the Redmond Spokesman, where she worked as a linotype operator for several years. She left the Spokesman to spend full time raising her two boys and over the years worked at several local clothing stores in Redmond. Dorthea was a very loving and devoted wife, mother and grandmother and most enjoyed spending time with family and her many friends. She enjoyed cooking, baking and entertaining, especially when it came to family. Her “special cookie drawer” and yummy strawberry jam were always a hit with the grandkids. She and Bill developed a love for the game of golf and enjoyed playing for many years, playing together in many tournaments around the state. She also enjoyed traveling, participating in local community service events and playing cards. She was an active member of Community Presbyterian Church in Redmond for many years and was involved in O.D.O. and P.E.O. during her life in Redmond. In 2003, Dorthea and Bill moved to Medford, OR to be closer to family. She was preceded in death by her husband, Bill, in 2007. Dorthea is survived by her two sons, Bill and daughter-in-law Kathy Hughitt of Medford, Larry and daughter-in-law, Helene Hughitt of Eugene; grandchildren, Jason Hughitt of Grants Pass, Toby Koch and wife, Stacey of Prineville, Danielle Hughitt of Portland, Jill Reed and husband, Jason Reed of Lincoln, CA, Jessica Hughitt and husband, Jeroen Bastiaens of Spain; great-grandchildren Kayla and Isabella Hughitt of Grants Pass, Brandt Reed of Lincoln, CA, and Kaden and Kindal Shivers of Prineville. The family would like to say a special thank you to Asante Hospice for their kind and gentle care. Graveside services will be held Saturday, January 22, 2011 at 11:00 a.m. at the Redmond Cemetery with a memorial gathering to be held at Community Presbyterian Church immediately following the service.


W E AT H ER

C6 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2011.

TODAY, JANUARY 21

SATURDAY

Today: Mostly cloudy, chance of rain showers.

Ben Burkel

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

LOW

53

30

STATE Western

52/32



Mitchell

Madras

56/29

54/32

Camp Sherman 48/24 Redmond Prineville 53/27 Cascadia 55/28 52/38 Sisters 51/26 Bend Post 53/30

Oakridge Elk Lake 50/36

41/15

50/24

50/23

51/25

44/17

Hampton 48/24

Fort Rock

Vancouver

34/23

Seattle

40/29

Boise

53/30

46/29



69/44



Idaho Falls Elko

25/22

48/26



Reno



Rain, with snow above 5,000’ today. Rain and snow showers tonight.



46/25

Bend

52/26

50/22

Crater Lake

Helena

50/34

Redding

Silver Lake

49/21

34/32

Grants Pass

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula

Eugene

52/25



City

49/42

47/37

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:33 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 5:00 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:32 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 5:02 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:50 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 8:23 a.m.

57/30

San Francisco

Salt Lake City

63/49

39/30



LOW

HIGH

Moon phases Last

New

First

Full

Jan. 26

Feb. 2

Feb. 10

Feb. 18

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Friday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 42/28/0.06 . . . . . . 50/42/r. . . . . . 50/41/pc Baker City . . . . . . . 27/5/0.00 . . . . . .40/26/rs. . . . . . 38/22/pc Brookings . . . . . . 64/42/0.00 . . . . . . 61/45/c. . . . . . 62/43/pc Burns. . . . . . . . . . . 30/5/0.00 . . . . . .43/24/rs. . . . . . 39/22/pc Eugene . . . . . . . . 44/37/0.00 . . . . . . 47/37/r. . . . . . 53/38/pc Klamath Falls . . . 47/22/0.00 . . . . . . 50/24/c. . . . . . 42/19/pc Lakeview. . . . . . . 46/19/0.00 . . . . . . 51/20/c. . . . . . 42/14/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 49/12/0.00 . . . . . .51/23/rs. . . . . . 46/20/pc Medford . . . . . . . 48/30/0.00 . . . . . . 56/35/f. . . . . . 51/28/pc Newport . . . . . . . 52/34/0.00 . . . . . . 52/45/r. . . . . . 53/45/pc North Bend . . . . . 55/32/0.00 . . . . . . 53/40/r. . . . . . 55/36/pc Ontario . . . . . . . . 34/18/0.00 . . . . . .39/26/rs. . . . . . 38/22/pc Pendleton . . . . . .45/28/trace . . . . . . 52/36/r. . . . . . 47/28/pc Portland . . . . . . .40/33/trace . . . . . . 48/39/r. . . . . . 50/40/pc Prineville . . . . . . . 43/21/0.01 . . . . . . 55/28/r. . . . . . 47/20/pc Redmond. . . . . . . 47/19/0.00 . . . . . . 53/27/r. . . . . . 50/20/pc Roseburg. . . . . . . 46/40/0.00 . . . . . 55/39/sh. . . . . . 52/32/pc Salem . . . . . . . . . 42/31/0.00 . . . . . . 49/38/r. . . . . . 52/38/pc Sisters . . . . . . . . . 42/18/0.08 . . . . . .51/26/rs. . . . . . 45/23/pc The Dalles . . . . . . 50/35/0.00 . . . . . . 50/37/r. . . . . . 51/29/pc

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46/23 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.01” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .64 in 1994 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.44” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -20 in 1930 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.20” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.44” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . . 1.20” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.27 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 1.03 in 1964 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:24 a.m. . . . . . .3:17 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .4:16 a.m. . . . . . .1:42 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .7:49 a.m. . . . . . .5:11 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .10:01 a.m. . . . . . .9:58 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . .11:18 p.m. . . . . .10:51 a.m. Uranus . . . . . . .9:54 a.m. . . . . . .9:46 p.m.

0

LOW

49 25

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Saturday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly sunny.

53 26

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary

45/41

Portland

Burns

51/23

49/22

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 64° Brookings • 5° Meacham

Mostly sunny.

52 25

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

48/39

La Pine

HIGH

NORTHWEST

51/24

Periods of rain today. Rain and snow showers tonight. Eastern

LOW

46 22



Brothers

Sunriver

HIGH

TUESDAY

Mostly sunny.

A cold front will move through the region with rain likely and some higher elevation snow.

Paulina

51/25

Crescent

Crescent Lake

Rain, with snow above 7,000’ today. Showers and mountain snow tonight. Central

55/33

56/34

49/34



Willowdale

Warm Springs

48/34

46/31



37/28

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

MONDAY

Mostly sunny.

Tonight: Partly cloudy, chance of rain showers.

HIGH

SUNDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 36-48 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 41 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-81 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 76-93 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 78 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 38-43 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 99 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Mammoth Mtn., California . . . 0.0 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . .6-0 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . 0.0 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . .0-0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

. . . . . . 39-40 . . . . 120-220 . . . . . . . . 83 . . . . . . . 116 . . . . . . 45-62 . . . . . . 36-40 . . . . . . 45-65

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

Vancouver 45/41 Seattle 49/42

S

S Calgary 34/23

S

S

Saskatoon 14/-8

S Winnipeg -4/-18

S

S

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 11/-4

Thunder Bay -2/-11

Halifax 32/25 P ortland Billings To ronto (in the 48 Portland 27/10 40/25 16/1 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): 48/39 Boston 3/-2 5/-3 Boise 29/13 Buffalo Rapid City Detroit 46/29 18/3 38/19 New York • 85° 14/8 34/14 Des Moines West Palm Beach, Fla. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 15/3 Chicago 42/25 17/6 34/13 9/6 • -26° San Francisco Omaha Salt Lake Washington, D. C. 63/49 Fosston, Minn. 24/8 City 32/15 Las Denver Louisville • 0.49” Vegas 39/30 Kansas City 49/25 19/12 St. Louis 28/14 62/43 Olney, Ill. Charlotte 18/17 Nashville 46/21 Albuquerque Los Angeles 30/21 Oklahoma City Little Rock 52/28 73/50 44/23 35/25 Phoenix Atlanta 71/44 Honolulu 44/26 Birmingham Dallas 81/68 Tijuana 41/23 45/29 73/45 Bismarck 23/3

Houston 51/35

Chihuahua 68/29

La Paz 75/48 Anchorage 27/24

Juneau 39/36

Mazatlan 77/50

Orlando 71/46

New Orleans 52/32

Miami 81/63

Monterrey 68/42

FRONTS

SUNDANCE KICKS OFF IN UTAH

Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .56/26/0.00 . 53/25/pc . . . 58/36/s Akron . . . . . . . . .25/16/0.11 . . .17/4/sn . . . 18/8/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .24/12/0.00 . . .29/7/sn . . . .18/-2/c Albuquerque. . . .48/33/0.00 . . .52/28/s . . 52/28/pc Anchorage . . . . .18/12/0.22 . .27/24/sn . . . 29/27/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . . .44/26/s . . . 47/28/s Atlantic City . . . .42/30/0.04 . .35/14/sn . . . 27/18/c Austin . . . . . . . . .60/39/0.00 . . .51/25/s . . . 59/32/s Baltimore . . . . . .43/29/0.00 . 31/14/pc . . . 25/15/c Billings. . . . . . . . .30/15/0.00 . 40/25/pc . . 37/22/sn Birmingham . . . .48/37/0.00 . . .41/23/s . . . 48/25/s Bismarck . . . . . . . 16/-8/0.01 . . . 23/3/sf . . . .12/-2/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .39/24/0.00 . . 46/29/rs . . 43/26/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .32/27/0.00 . .29/13/sn . . . . 20/7/c Bridgeport, CT. . .34/25/0.00 . .32/13/sn . . . . 22/9/c Buffalo . . . . . . . .21/14/0.01 . . .18/3/sn . . . 13/9/sn Burlington, VT. . .24/15/0.00 . . 21/-1/sn . . .10/-10/c Caribou, ME . . . . .12/1/0.00 . . .15/0/sn . . .9/-17/pc Charleston, SC . .65/35/0.00 . . .56/32/s . . 48/30/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .50/30/0.00 . . .46/21/s . . 42/23/pc Chattanooga. . . .44/28/0.00 . 38/24/pc . . 45/25/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .31/13/0.00 . 42/25/pc . . .40/18/rs Chicago. . . . . . . .19/14/0.00 . . . .9/6/pc . . 20/11/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .32/24/0.04 . . .16/9/pc . . 24/14/sn Cleveland . . . . . .26/19/0.12 . . .17/6/sn . . 17/10/sn Colorado Springs 27/10/0.00 . 46/23/pc . . 51/19/pc Columbia, MO . .24/14/0.46 . . 21/15/sf . . 28/17/pc Columbia, SC . . .60/30/0.00 . . .51/25/s . . 46/21/pc Columbus, GA. . .50/32/0.00 . . .49/26/s . . . 52/28/s Columbus, OH. . .29/24/0.40 . . . .17/6/c . . . 22/13/c Concord, NH . . . .28/17/0.00 . . .26/3/sn . . . .21/-3/c Corpus Christi. . .69/49/0.01 . . .53/34/s . . . 61/47/s Dallas Ft Worth. .52/30/0.03 . 45/29/pc . . . 55/37/s Dayton . . . . . . . .27/19/0.33 . . .13/6/pc . . . 21/11/c Denver. . . . . . . . . .37/6/0.00 . 49/25/pc . . 48/19/pc Des Moines. . . . . .20/6/0.00 . . .15/3/sn . . . 16/5/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .25/18/0.05 . . . .14/8/c . . 18/12/sn Duluth . . . . . . . . . . 0/-9/0.01 . . . 0/-5/sn . . . .7/-9/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .62/42/0.00 . . .61/33/s . . . 63/36/s Fairbanks. . . . . -27/-40/0.00 . -25/-35/c . . -12/-21/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . 13/-15/0.00 . . . 3/-9/sn . . . .4/-9/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .38/24/0.00 . . .51/18/s . . . 50/19/s

Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday Yesterday Friday Saturday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .25/18/0.01 . . .15/2/sn . . . 17/6/sn Rapid City . . . . . . .18/1/0.00 . . .38/19/c . . 33/15/sn Savannah . . . . . .65/35/0.00 . . .58/30/s . . 51/30/pc Green Bay. . . . . .11/-9/trace . . . 5/-3/pc . . . .12/-1/c Reno . . . . . . . . . .50/24/0.00 . 57/30/pc . . . 50/26/s Seattle. . . . . . . . .42/33/0.01 . . .49/42/r . . 46/40/pc Greensboro. . . . .47/27/0.00 . . .36/16/s . . 31/17/pc Richmond . . . . . .45/27/0.00 . . .39/18/s . . . 31/22/c Sioux Falls. . . . . . . 7/-6/0.00 . . .16/0/sn . . . . 16/0/c Harrisburg. . . . . .35/28/0.00 . . .27/8/sn . . . 20/7/pc Rochester, NY . . .22/11/0.00 . . .19/7/sn . . . . 15/7/c Spokane . . . . . . .33/20/0.01 . . 39/29/rs . . 39/28/pc Hartford, CT . . . .31/23/0.00 . . .29/7/sn . . . . 16/4/c Sacramento. . . . .60/35/0.00 . . .63/45/s . . . 59/41/s Springfield, MO. .28/15/0.08 . 29/19/pc . . 33/21/pc Helena. . . . . . . . .35/21/0.00 . 40/29/pc . . . 38/22/c St. Louis. . . . . . . .25/18/0.38 . . .18/17/c . . . 27/16/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .76/51/0.00 . .67/49/sh . . 61/40/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .83/67/0.00 . . .81/68/s . . . 80/67/s Salt Lake City . . .36/22/0.00 . . 39/30/rs . . 37/21/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .71/45/0.00 . . .71/40/s . . . 70/39/s Houston . . . . . . .64/41/0.00 . . .51/35/s . . . 59/42/s San Antonio . . . .63/41/0.00 . . .54/31/s . . . 61/40/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .29/16/0.31 . . .37/21/c . . 43/28/pc Huntsville . . . . . .41/34/0.02 . . .36/21/s . . . 41/23/s San Diego . . . . . .72/54/0.00 . . .69/50/s . . . 65/51/s Washington, DC .44/35/0.00 . 32/15/pc . . . 27/17/c Indianapolis . . . .26/18/0.26 . . .13/8/pc . . 25/14/sn San Francisco . . .63/45/0.00 . . .61/47/s . . . 61/46/s Wichita . . . . . . . .34/12/0.00 . . .36/17/c . . 41/24/pc Jackson, MS . . . .56/39/0.09 . 45/25/pc . . . 51/27/s San Jose . . . . . . .66/45/0.00 . . .67/46/s . . . 66/44/s Yakima . . . . . . . .42/24/0.00 . . .44/31/r . . 46/24/pc Madison, WI . . . . .17/2/0.00 . . . . .4/4/c . . . 15/2/pc Santa Fe . . . . . . .40/25/0.00 . 46/19/pc . . 45/20/pc Yuma. . . . . . . . . .71/57/0.00 . . .74/45/s . . . 75/46/s Jacksonville. . . . .71/36/0.00 . 57/35/pc . . 56/29/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .37/27/0.27 . . .39/36/r . . . .39/31/r Kansas City. . . . . .23/9/0.02 . .28/14/sn . . . 30/19/c Amsterdam. . . . .41/28/0.00 . 40/33/pc . . 40/34/sh Mecca . . . . . . . . .84/57/0.00 . . .83/63/s . . . 87/65/s Lansing . . . . . . . .23/16/0.00 . . . .14/2/c . . . 17/5/sn Athens. . . . . . . . .62/37/0.00 . .55/45/sh . . 58/46/sh Mexico City. . . . .79/46/0.00 . . .76/41/s . . . 76/40/s Las Vegas . . . . . .57/43/0.00 . . .62/43/s . . . 66/40/s Auckland. . . . . . .75/61/0.00 . .73/64/sh . . 72/62/sh Montreal. . . . . . .14/10/0.00 . . 13/-2/sf . . . .3/-12/c Lexington . . . . . .34/25/0.23 . . .18/7/pc . . . 27/17/c Baghdad . . . . . . .59/36/0.00 . . .58/41/s . . . 60/40/s Moscow . . . . . . . .14/7/0.14 . . .16/11/c . . . 14/8/sn Lincoln. . . . . . . . . 19/-4/0.00 . .27/10/sn . . 30/12/sn Bangkok . . . . . . .88/70/0.00 . 88/69/pc . . 89/70/pc Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . .80/60/sh . . 82/59/pc Little Rock. . . . . .37/28/0.20 . 35/25/pc . . . 45/27/s Beijing. . . . . . . . . .32/9/0.00 . 34/14/pc . . 29/10/pc Nassau . . . . . . . .84/70/0.00 . . .80/66/t . . . .75/61/t Los Angeles. . . . .77/51/0.00 . . .73/50/s . . . 67/50/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . .66/55/s . . 65/56/pc New Delhi. . . . . .48/46/0.00 . 71/48/pc . . 73/50/pc Louisville . . . . . . .32/25/0.27 . 19/12/pc . . .29/17/sf Berlin. . . . . . . . . .36/32/0.00 . 33/27/pc . . . 34/31/c Osaka . . . . . . . . .46/27/0.00 . 45/32/pc . . . 44/31/s Memphis. . . . . . .38/28/0.14 . 33/24/pc . . . 43/25/s Bogota . . . . . . . .70/43/0.00 . .70/45/sh . . 72/45/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . .25/12/0.00 . . .28/21/c . . . 32/23/c Miami . . . . . . . . .82/63/0.21 . . .81/63/t . . 76/52/pc Budapest. . . . . . .37/32/0.28 . 32/25/pc . . 33/25/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . . .10/1/0.00 . . 13/-1/sf . . . .5/-10/c Milwaukee . . . . . 20/9/trace . . . .6/4/pc . . 18/10/pc Buenos Aires. . . .82/55/0.00 . . .82/65/s . . . 86/67/s Paris. . . . . . . . . . .41/34/0.00 . 40/33/pc . . 39/34/sh Minneapolis . . . . . 9/-3/0.01 . . . 3/-2/sn . . . .12/-6/s Cabo San Lucas .79/61/0.00 . . .74/54/s . . . 73/53/s Rio de Janeiro. . .95/81/0.00 . 95/75/pc . . . .91/75/t Nashville . . . . . . .34/27/0.07 . 30/21/pc . . 38/24/pc Cairo . . . . . . . . . .68/50/0.00 . . .64/51/s . . . 66/52/s Rome. . . . . . . . . .55/43/0.57 . .49/41/sh . . 45/39/sh New Orleans. . . .62/43/0.00 . 52/32/pc . . . 56/37/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .37/5/0.00 . 34/23/pc . . 34/22/pc Santiago . . . . . . .88/57/0.00 . . .86/56/s . . . 90/60/s New York . . . . . .34/30/0.00 . .34/14/sn . . . 22/10/c Cancun . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . . .81/66/t . . . .78/64/t Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/70/0.00 . . .81/69/t . . . .83/70/t Newark, NJ . . . . .36/32/0.00 . .34/14/sn . . . . 23/9/c Dublin . . . . . . . . .43/21/0.00 . . .45/32/s . . 45/34/pc Sapporo. . . . . . . .25/19/0.00 . 30/22/pc . . 27/20/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .44/38/0.00 . . .43/20/s . . . 32/23/c Edinburgh . . . . . .36/25/0.00 . 43/32/pc . . . 43/34/c Seoul . . . . . . . . . .23/12/0.00 . . .29/10/s . . . . 27/9/s Oklahoma City . .32/18/0.02 . . .44/23/c . . 48/30/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .37/27/0.00 . 35/25/pc . . 33/26/pc Shanghai. . . . . . .36/32/0.09 . 43/35/pc . . 44/35/pc Omaha . . . . . . . . .18/1/0.00 . . .24/8/sn . . . . 21/9/sf Harare . . . . . . . . .77/63/0.15 . . .78/65/t . . . .82/65/t Singapore . . . . . .88/75/0.07 . 87/73/pc . . 86/74/pc Orlando. . . . . . . .81/50/0.00 . .71/46/sh . . 65/39/pc Hong Kong . . . . .63/54/0.00 . . .66/55/s . . 64/54/pc Stockholm. . . . . .30/23/0.00 . 26/21/pc . . 25/22/pc Palm Springs. . . .74/56/0.00 . . .75/50/s . . . 78/50/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .50/36/0.00 . .46/38/sh . . 44/37/sh Sydney. . . . . . . . .81/72/0.00 . 80/68/pc . . . .77/66/t Peoria . . . . . . . . .21/14/0.05 . . . 11/8/sf . . 20/10/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .59/33/0.00 . . .58/38/s . . 59/42/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .66/61/0.00 . .65/59/sh . . 65/55/pc Philadelphia . . . .38/32/0.00 . .34/13/sn . . . 26/11/c Johannesburg . . .79/64/0.00 . . .79/64/t . . . .80/65/t Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . . .65/48/s . . 65/50/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .72/48/0.00 . . .71/44/s . . . 70/44/s Lima . . . . . . . . . .77/68/0.00 . 80/67/pc . . 81/66/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .46/36/0.00 . . .46/35/s . . . 49/37/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .26/20/0.14 . . .22/3/sn . . . . 18/9/c Lisbon . . . . . . . . .61/48/0.00 . 61/47/pc . . . 55/41/s Toronto . . . . . . . . .21/9/0.00 . . . 16/1/sf . . . . 10/1/c Portland, ME. . . .28/19/0.00 . .27/10/sn . . .23/-1/pc London . . . . . . . .41/36/0.00 . 41/33/pc . . . 42/36/c Vancouver. . . . . .37/34/0.29 . .45/41/sh . . 44/37/pc Providence . . . . .33/27/0.00 . .28/11/sn . . . . 23/7/c Madrid . . . . . . . .54/37/0.00 . . .46/25/s . . . 44/25/s Vienna. . . . . . . . .39/30/0.00 . 34/26/pc . . 32/24/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .51/28/0.00 . . .43/18/s . . 32/19/pc Manila. . . . . . . . .88/75/0.04 . . .84/76/t . . . .85/76/t Warsaw. . . . . . . .34/30/0.22 . . 31/25/sf . . .30/25/sf

INTERNATIONAL

Schwarzenegger sued over commutation By Jack Dolan Los Angeles Times

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The parents of Luis Santos, the 22-year-old college student killed in a confrontation that involved the son of former California state Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez, sued former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger in Sacramento on Thursday, claiming he violated their constitutional rights under the state’s

Victims’ Bill of Rights. During his last hours in office, Schwarzenegger cut Esteban Nunez’s 16-year sentence for voluntary manslaughter to seven years, without notifying the Santos family. Schwarzenegger noted in a statement that Nunez, although involved in the fight that ended in Santos’ death, did not inflict the fatal knife wound. Under the California Constitution, family members have

a right to be heard “upon request” in any proceeding involving a “post-conviction release decision.” The suit asks the court to reinstate Nunez’s original 16-year sentence, which he agreed to through a plea bargain. Days after releasing the commutation order, Schwarzenegger sent the Santos family a letter apologizing for not informing them of his decision.

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$ Chris Pizzello / The Associated Press

A pedestrian looks at posters promoting documentary films premiering at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, on Thursday.

WASHINGTON

FBI investigates bomb attempt at MLK parade By Jerry Markon The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The FBI is investigating whether racial bias could have played a role in the apparent attempted bombing of a Martin Luther King Day parade route in Spokane, Wash., officials said Wednesday. Three city employees spotted an unattended black backpack on a bench about an hour before the parade honoring the slain civil rights leader was to start on Monday. When they looked inside and saw wires, they alerted Spokane police, who disarmed a potentially lethal explosive device, officials said. No one was injured in the incident, which came amid growing concern nationally over what authorities call a wave of homegrown terrorism. But if the bomb had gone off, it could have caused multiple deaths or injuries, officials said.

“The device appeared to be operational, it appeared to be deadly, and it was intended to inflict multiple casualties,” said Special Agent Frederick Gutt, a spokesman for the FBI’s Seattle field office.

Remote detonator Law enforcement sources familiar with the device, which is being analyzed at the FBI lab in suburban Quantico, Va., said it had a remote detonator and was positioned so that any blast would have been directed at the crowd of several hundred marchers. “Someone obviously took some time with it,” said one source, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation is unfolding. But several officials played down initial reports that the bomb was one of the most potentially destructive in U.S. history.

“That’s a stretch,” said one law enforcement official. “Undoubtedly, it was viable, but in relation to other devices uncovered over time across the country, it will fall within that spectrum.” The FBI-led Joint Terrorism Task Force is investigating, and Frank Harrill, the supervisory senior resident FBI agent in Spokane, said the timing of the nearmiss on Martin Luther King Day “is a matter of grave concern.” “The confluence of the march, the route, the timing is inescapable,” Harrill said. Federal officials noted that there is a history of white supremacist and militia activity in the Northwest region but said it is too soon to tell whether that played a role in the incident. “We don’t know the motive,” Gutt said. “But obviously, with its placement at a Martin Luther King Day event, the obvious suggestion is it would be related to that.”

Bend Info: 541-280-5653 Redmond Info: 541-923-6265

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NBA Inside Blazers shake off slow start to beat Clippers, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

NFL

ADVENTURE SPORTS

Bears-Packers tickets up to $1K on resale market The National Football League’s oldest rivalry is producing record prices on the ticket-resale market for the two teams’ first postseason meeting in 70 years. Seats for Sunday’s conference championship game between the Chicago Bears and Green Bay Packers at Soldier Field in Chicago are being resold at an average price of $1,018, according to FanSnap. com, an Internet search engine that finds available seats on about 50 ticket- reselling Websites. The cost is more than double the $469 average price for the American Football Conference title game in Pittsburgh between the Steelers and New York Jets. Face value ranges between $134 and $586 for each game. “It’s kind of like the Super Bowl has come to Chicago,” Mark Tuchscherer, manager at ticket brokerage Ticket Chest, said. “It’s been nuts. We have a lot of people looking to go because of the matchup. I haven’t seen a game like this in a long time.” The NFC championship marks just the second time in a 182-game rivalry dating to 1921 that Chicago and Green Bay will meet in the NFL playoffs. — Bloomberg News

AUTO RACING

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Bend Rock Gym climbers, from left, Walker Davis, Lukas Strauss-Wise, Tristan Helmich and Abby Black are heading to the bouldering national championships next month in Colorado.

Early ascents

NASCAR drivers in favor of simpler points system DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Jimmie Johnson understands that speculation over a new points system is often viewed as NASCAR’s attempt to end his five-year championship reign. But Johnson said he’ll Jimmie be ready Johnson to race — and win — under any format. “I don’t care what races are in the Chase, the format to win the championship, I could care less,” Johnson said, “because I feel confident that my team will be able to win championships under any set of circumstances.” Johnson’s record five titles have all come in the Chase system, which debuted in 2004 and already has been tweaked once before. The Associated Press reported earlier this week NASCAR is considering dumping the points system used since 1975 in favor of a simpler method that awards points based directly on the finishing position in the 43-car field. NASCAR’s brief offseason ended Thursday when drivers reported to Daytona International Speedway for three days of testing in preparation for next month’s season-opener. Although drivers were pleased with the smooth surface on the newly paved track, much of the talk centered on NASCAR’s upcoming changes. The drivers do seem interested in the proposed 43-to-1 system because it’s simpler to fans, and the drivers themselves. “If I am running 12th or something, I don’t even know how many points that is worth and I have been doing this long enough that I should know,” Carl Edwards said. — The Associated Press

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 Tennis ........................................D2 Basketball ..................................D3 Hockey .......................................D3 Prep sports ................................D3 Golf ........................................... D4 Adventure Sports.......................D3

Young Bend climbers are headed to the bouldering national championships

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er back parallel to the ground, Abby Black crawls on the overhanging wall like an oversized spider. A thick blue mat is her only protection some 15 feet below at the Bend Rock Gym. She lunges for the next hold, then PLOP! The 14-year-old lands hard on the mat — but on her feet — then gets back up and tries it again. Kids and climbing seem to go hand in hand — my 2-year-old son makes a beeline for the rock wall every time I take him to the park in our Bend neighborhood. “It seems like they’re naturally drawn toward it,” says Mike Rougeux, coach of the Bend Climbing Team. “Kids are just natural at climbing and want to climb things.” Four youngsters from the team will represent Central Oregon at the American Bouldering Series (ABS) National Championships, Feb. 18-20 in Boulder, Colo. Bouldering is a style of rock climbing limited to

MARK MORICAL short climbs without the use of a rope. The sport is typically practiced outdoors on large boulders, or indoors on an overhanging wall with man-made handholds and footholds. Bend’s Tristan Helmich, 13; Walker Davis, 12; Lukas Strauss-Wise, 11; and Black plan to make the trip to Boulder next month. They qualified for the nationals based on their performances at the ABS Regional Championships in Tacoma, Wash., this past weekend. In ABS events, competitors climb pre-established routes in rock gyms and earn points for

each hold that they reach. “I like the way you have to figure out the problem and how to get through the route,” Black says. “There’s a lot of mentally preparing for competitions. There’s a huge mental side of it, with whether you can actually hang on to the hold or not when you’re at the point of exhaustion.” Rougeux, who works for Timberline Mountain Guides in Bend, has coached the Bend Climbing Team for five years. He says that the proliferation of indoor climbing gyms throughout the country has exposed an increasing number of youths to rock climbing. “Before climbing gyms were such a staple, there was almost a need to have parents who climbed,” Rougeux explains. The Bend Climbing Team is made up of 13 climbers who have worked their way through other climbing programs at the Bend Rock Gym in southeast Bend. See Ascents / D4

PREP WRESTLING

C Y C L I N G C O M M E N TA RY

Armstrong on Summit defeats Bend High with pin in night’s final match wonder drug?

Seems unlikely

Storm earn first dual meet victory over Lava Bears in program history

By John Leicester The Associated Press

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By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

In less than a minute, Kaden Olson helped Summit High make history. Wrestling the final match of the night at Bend High, Olson pinned the Lava Bears’ Shane Buck in 53 seconds Thursday in the crosstown rivals’ 215-pound match, handing the Storm a 39-33 victory. Olson’s late heroics gave Summit its first dual meet win over Bend High in the Storm’s 10-year wrestling history. “It’s a huge stepping stone for us,” said Olson, whose pin also gave Summit three dual meet victories for the first time in school history. “I knew it was going to come down to the two of us. We’d been giving each other looks (across the gym) all night.” Olson, who was pinned by Buck earlier in the season, caught the Lava Bear junior in a head-and-arm move, and posted an early takedown. With

PARIS — he notion that Lance Armstrong won the Tour de France seven times because he was on some kind of secret wonder-drug somehow unavailable to other riders has long floated around the froth-osphere where sports fans trade rumor, fiction and the occasional fact. Now, Sports Illustrated gives a possible name for such a potion — HemAssist. The magazine reports “the FDA has information that Armstrong gained access” in the late 1990s to the experimental drug that was never commercialized. A doctor who oversaw the clinical studies spoke enthusiastically to SI about how HemAssist, theoretically at least, could help riders scale French mountain passes by delivering oxygen to tired muscles. “Better than EPO” — long a performance-enhancer of choice in cycling — but without its potential nasty side-effects like making blood gooey, Robert Przybelski was quoted as saying. Mmmmmm. Really? If Armstrong doped, which he has always vociferously insisted was not the case, then it’s difficult to believe that a drug like HemAssist would have been his magic bullet, or that he had a magic bullet at all. See Armstrong / D4

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Summit’s Gabe Thompson rolls Bend’s Evan Chinadle in the 125-pound match Thursday night at Bend High. the Summit crowd on its feet, Olson worked Buck for almost 30 seconds before earning the pin. “He actually beat me with the

same move earlier in the year,” said Olson, also a junior. “Me and that kid have some history.” See Wrestling / D3


D2 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

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SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY TENNIS Midnight — Australian Open, day 5, ESPN2. Noon — Australian Open, day 5, ESPN2 (taped). 6 p.m. — Australian Open, day 6, ESPN2.

GOLF 6:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Abu Dhabi Golf Championship, second round, Golf Channel. Noon — PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic, third round, Golf Channel. 3:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, first round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 5 p.m. — NBA, New York Knicks at San Antonio Spurs, ESPN. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Los Angeles Lakers at Denver Nuggets, ESPN.

SATURDAY TENNIS Midnight — Australian Open, day 6, ESPN2. 7 a.m. — Australian Open, day 6 (taped), ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Australian Open, round of 16, ESPN2.

SOCCER 4:30 a.m. — English Premier League, Wolverhampton Wanderers vs. Liverpool, ESPN2.

GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Abu Dhabi Golf Championship, third round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic, fourth round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, second round, Golf Channel.

BASKETBALL 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Ohio State at Illinois, CBS. 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Villanova at Syracuse, ESPN. 9 a.m. — Women’s college, Texas A&M at Iowa State, FSNW. 9 a.m. — Men’s college, Arkansas-Little Rock at Florida Atlantic, ESPN2. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, regional coverage, Stanford at UCLA, CBS. 11 a.m. — Men’s college, Kansas State at Texas A&M, ESPN. 11 a.m. — Women’s college, Nebraska at Kansas State, FSNW. Noon — Men’s college, Temple at Xavier, ESPN2. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Texas at Kansas, CBS. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Duke at Wake Forest, ESPN. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, Arizona State at Washington, FSNW. 1 p.m. — Men’s college, New Mexico at UNLV, VS. network. 2 p.m. — Men’s college, Creighton at Missouri State, ESPN2. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Kentucky at South Carolina, ESPN. 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at Oregon State, FSNW. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Memphis at Alabama-Birmingham, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — Men’s college, Gonzaga at San Francisco, FSNW. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Michigan State at Purdue, ESPN. 7 p.m. — NBA, Indiana Pacers at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest. 7:30 p.m. — Men’s college, Arizona at Washington State, FSNW. 8 p.m. — NBA D-League, Austin Toros at Utah Flash, VS. network (taped).

BOWLING 11:30 a.m. — PBA Tournament of Champions, ABC.

SUNDAY TENNIS Midnight — Australian Open, round of 16, ESPN2. 10 a.m. — Australian Open, round of 16, ESPN2 (taped). 4 p.m. — Australian Open, round of 16, ESPN2.

BOXING 2 a.m. — Marcos Jimenez vs. Diego Magdaleno, FSNW (taped).

GOLF 5:30 a.m. — PGA European Tour, Abu Dhabi Golf Championship, final round, Golf Channel. 1 p.m. — PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic, final round, Golf Channel. 4:30 p.m. — Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, final round, Golf Channel.

HOCKEY 9:30 a.m. — NHL, Philadelphia Flyers at Chicago Blackhawks, NBC.

WINTER SPORTS 10 a.m. — Deer Valley Celebrity Skifest, CBS (taped).

BASKETBALL 10 a.m. — Women’s college, Oklahoma at Kansas, FSNW.

ON DECK Today Girls basketball: Junction City at La Pine, 7:15 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 7:15 p.m.; Paisley at Gilchrist, 2 p.m.; Estacada at Madras, 7 p.m.; Crook County at Bend, 7 p.m.; Lincoln at Redmond, 5:30 p.m.; Culver at Western Mennonite, 5 p.m. Boys basketball: Junction City at La Pine, 5:45 p.m.; Sisters at Cottage Grove, 5;45 p.m.; Madras at Estacada, 7 p.m.; Bend at Crook County, 7 p.m.; Lincoln at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Culver at Western Mennonite, 6:30 p.m.; Paisley at Gilchrist, 3:30 p.m. Wrestling: Culver at Crater Duals, 6 p.m.

Paul Goydos Kevin Stadler Scott McCarron Jason Dufner William McGirt Zack Miller Brandt Snedeker Chez Reavie Charley Hoffman Marc Turnesa Lee Janzen Bo Van Pelt Matt McQuillan Roland Thatcher Chad Campbell Nate Smith Joe Ogilvie Ben Martin

IN THE BLEACHERS

Saturday Girls basketball: Redmond at Mountain View, 12:45 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 5 p.m.; Gilchrist at North Lake, 1:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Mountain View at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Western Mennonite at Culver, 6:30 p.m.; Gilchrist at North Lake, 2:30 p.m. Wrestling: Summit, Sisters at La Pine Frostbite Invitational, 10 a.m.; Bend at Eagle Point Invitational, TBA; Culver at Crater Duals, TBA; Gilchirst at all-Class 1A tournament in Lowell, 10 a.m. Swimming: Summit, Mountain View at Madras Invitational, 8 a.m.; Bend at Hood River Invite, TBA; Sisters at South Albany, TBA Nordic skiing: OISRA classic race at Hoodoo, 11:30 a.m. Alpine skiing: OISRA SL race (4 runs) on Cliff Hanger at Mt. Bachelor, 10 a.m

TENNIS Australian Open

BASKETBALL Men’s college Thursday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Cal Poly 65, UC Riverside 60 Denver 74, Arkansas St. 36 E. Washington 72, N. Arizona 59 Montana 75, Idaho St. 65 N. Colorado 77, Sacramento St. 72 Nevada 90, New Mexico St. 71 Portland St. 71, Weber St. 69 S. Utah 69, W. Illinois 48 San Francisco 81, Portland 74 Santa Clara 85, Gonzaga 71 Southern Cal 65, Stanford 42 UCLA 86, California 84 Utah St. 74, Louisiana Tech 57 Washington 85, Arizona 68 Washington St. 78, Arizona St. 61 MIDWEST Cent. Michigan 66, N. Illinois 64 Cleveland St. 81, Detroit 69 IPFW 84, N. Dakota St. 80 Northwestern 98, SIU-Edwardsville 55 Oakland, Mich. 97, S. Dakota St. 88 UMKC 85, IUPUI 77, 2OT Utah Valley 107, North Dakota 96, 4OT Wisconsin 69, Indiana 60 Wright St. 66, Youngstown St. 62 SOUTH Ark.-Little Rock 78, Fla. International 70 Coastal Carolina 80, UNC Asheville 59 Coll. of Charleston 93, W. Carolina 64 E. Illinois 61, Murray St. 60 Elon 77, Davidson 70 Florida 45, Auburn 40 Florida Gulf Coast 68, Campbell 66 Furman 74, Samford 55 Gardner-Webb 58, Charleston Southern 50 High Point 64, Presbyterian 60, OT Liberty 100, VMI 82 Mercer 70, Jacksonville 68, OT Middle Tennessee 63, Troy 51 North Florida 71, Kennesaw St. 56 North Texas 79, Louisiana-Monroe 62 Tenn.-Martin 79, SE Missouri 69 Tennessee St. 68, Jacksonville St. 63 Tennessee Tech 71, Austin Peay 68 The Citadel 81, Appalachian St. 63 UNC Greensboro 87, Georgia Southern 75 Virginia Tech 74, Maryland 57 W. Kentucky 84, South Alabama 75 Winthrop 74, Radford 58 Wofford 88, Chattanooga 56 EAST Albany, N.Y. 76, Binghamton 37 Boston U. 67, Stony Brook 62 Bryant 74, Fairleigh Dickinson 71 Cent. Connecticut St. 66, Monmouth, N.J. 47 Long Island U. 83, Robert Morris 67 Loyola, Md. 62, Manhattan 50 Mount St. Mary’s, Md. 61, Sacred Heart 45 Rider 80, Marist 66 Rutgers 71, South Florida 62 St. Francis, Pa. 75, St. Francis, NY 56 UMBC 74, Hartford 70, 2OT Vermont 61, New Hampshire 53 Wagner 90, Quinnipiac 80 PAC-10 STANDINGS All Times PST ——— Conference All Games W L PCT W L PCT Washington 6 1 .857 14 4 .778 Arizona 4 2 .667 15 4 .789 UCLA 4 2 .667 12 6 .667 Washington St. 4 3 .571 14 5 .737 Stanford 3 3 .500 10 7 .588 Southern Cal 3 3 .500 11 8 .579 Oregon St. 3 3 .500 8 9 .471 California 2 4 .333 9 9 .500 Arizona St. 1 5 .167 9 9 .500 Oregon 1 5 .167 8 10 .444 Thursday’s Games Washington St. 78, Arizona St. 61 UCLA 86, California 84 Southern Cal 65, Stanford 42 Washington 85, Arizona 68 Saturday’s Games Stanford at UCLA, 11 a.m. Arizona State at Washington, 4 p.m. Oregon at Oregon State, 3 p.m. Arizona at Washington State, 7:30 p.m. California at USC, 8 p.m.

Women’s college Thursday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Arizona 61, Washington 58 California 82, Southern Cal 71 E. Washington 60, N. Arizona 53 Gonzaga 89, Santa Clara 53 Montana 61, Idaho St. 54 N. Colorado 91, Sacramento St. 59 Portland 74, San Francisco 57 San Jose St. 63, Idaho 61 Stanford 64, UCLA 38 Washington St. 70, Arizona St. 65 Weber St. 65, Portland St. 62 SOUTHWEST UTEP 79, Rice 57 MIDWEST Butler 64, Loyola of Chicago 60 Cleveland St. 61, Detroit 51 DePaul 90, N.J. Tech 43 Ill.-Chicago 63, Valparaiso 42 Illinois St. 70, Creighton 57 Indiana St. 77, Drake 74, OT

68l-72s—140 72s-68l—140 70s-70l—140 68s-72l—140 70n-70p—140 74l-66s—140 70p-70n—140 73l-67s—140 68s-72l—140 70l-71s—141 68n-73p—141 69s-72l—141 65p-76n—141 70l-71s—141 69n-72p—141 72p-69n—141 67s-74l—141 69p-72n—141

Michigan 76, Northwestern 67 Michigan St. 69, Indiana 55 North Dakota 69, Utah Valley 52 Ohio St. 71, Illinois 62 Purdue 79, Penn St. 69 Wisconsin 71, Minnesota 63 Wright St. 64, Youngstown St. 61 SOUTH Auburn 45, Mississippi St. 41 Dillard 78, New Orleans 39 Florida St. 83, Clemson 73 George Mason 49, Drexel 47 Georgia 60, Alabama 51 Houston 74, UAB 65 Jacksonville St. 77, Tennessee St. 73 James Madison 72, William & Mary 59 Kentucky 59, Florida 58 LSU 78, Mississippi 43 Louisiana Tech 91, Utah St. 74 Louisiana-Monroe 76, North Texas 65 Memphis 74, UCF 53 Murray St. 71, E. Illinois 64 North Carolina 71, Wake Forest 56 Northeastern 72, Georgia St. 48 Southern Miss. 86, Tulane 81, OT Stetson 70, Florida Gulf Coast 52 Tennessee 71, South Carolina 56 Tennessee Tech 69, Austin Peay 65 UNC Wilmington 66, Delaware 48 Va. Commonwealth 63, Old Dominion 60 Vanderbilt 65, Arkansas 54 Winston-Salem 68, Saint Paul’s 54 EAST Binghamton 50, Albany, N.Y. 44 Boston College 77, N.C. State 67 Boston U. 82, Stony Brook 65 Hofstra 81, Towson 74 UMBC 67, Hartford 60, 2OT Vermont 57, Maine 48

San Jose 48 24 19 5 53 133 132 Los Angeles 47 24 22 1 49 134 119 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay 3, Atlanta 2, SO San Jose 2, Vancouver 1, SO Buffalo 4, Boston 2 Toronto 5, Anaheim 2 New Jersey 2, Pittsburgh 0 Washington 2, N.Y. Islanders 1 Philadelphia 6, Ottawa 2 Carolina 4, N.Y. Rangers 1 Detroit 4, St. Louis 3, OT Nashville 5, Colorado 1 Dallas 4, Edmonton 2 Phoenix 2, Los Angeles 0 Today’s Games N.Y. Islanders at Buffalo, 4:30 p.m. Montreal at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Dallas at Calgary, 6 p.m.

GOLF PGA Tour

FOOTBALL NFL playoffs All Times PST Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 23 Green Bay at Chicago, noon (Fox) N.Y. Jets at Pittsburgh, 3:30 p.m. (CBS)

Betting Line NFL PLAYOFFS (Home teams in CAPS) Sunday’s Games Opening Current Underdog 3 3.5 BEARS 3.5 3.5 Jets

Favorite Packers STEELERS

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF Philadelphia 47 31 11 5 67 164 Pittsburgh 48 29 15 4 62 150 N.Y. Rangers 49 27 19 3 57 140 N.Y. Islanders 45 14 24 7 35 109 New Jersey 46 14 29 3 31 92 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Boston 47 26 14 7 59 144 Montreal 47 26 17 4 56 118 Buffalo 46 21 20 5 47 127 Toronto 46 19 22 5 43 119 Ottawa 48 17 24 7 41 105 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF Tampa Bay 48 28 15 5 61 143 Washington 48 26 14 8 60 135 Atlanta 49 23 18 8 54 148 Carolina 47 23 18 6 52 141 Florida 45 21 20 4 46 123 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF Detroit 47 29 12 6 64 162 Nashville 47 26 15 6 58 129 Chicago 47 25 18 4 54 150 St. Louis 46 22 17 7 51 124 Columbus 47 22 20 5 49 123 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF Vancouver 47 29 10 8 66 153 Colorado 47 24 17 6 54 153 Minnesota 47 24 18 5 53 123 Calgary 47 20 21 6 46 126 Edmonton 46 14 25 7 35 115 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF Dallas 47 29 13 5 63 139 Phoenix 48 24 15 9 57 138 Anaheim 50 26 20 4 56 133

GA 124 112 119 150 140 GA 107 113 134 141 150 GA 152 125 156 146 119 GA 138 112 130 133 147 GA 115 151 128 143 159 GA 122 135 141

BOB HOPE CLASSIC Thursday At p-PGA West, Arnold Palmer Private Course (6,950 yards) At n-PGA West, Jack Nicklaus Private Course (6,924 yards) At l-La Quinta Country Club (7,060 yards) At s-SilverRock Resort, Palmer Course (7,403 yards) La Quinta, Calif. Purse: $5 million Second Round Leading scores Jhonattan Vegas 64p-67n—131 Boo Weekley 65p-66n—131 Charles Howell III 66n-66p—132 Chris Couch 67l-65s—132 Keegan Bradley 66n-67p—133 Brian Davis 67p-66n—133 Cameron Tringale 67p-67n—134 John Senden 66s-68l—134 Jeff Overton 69n-65p—134 Greg Chalmers 67n-67p—134 Peter Tomasulo 66s-68l—134 Gary Woodland 65s-69l—134 Ricky Barnes 65s-70l—135 Daniel Summerhays 69s-66l—135 David Duval 68s-67l—135 Jerry Kelly 67l-68s—135 Fredrik Jacobson 65n-70p—135 Kevin Na 69l-67s—136 Tim Petrovic 67p-69n—136 Martin Laird 68l-68s—136 Kevin Streelman 69n-67p—136 Harrison Frazar 68s-68l—136 Derek Lamely 63p-73n—136 Matt Kuchar 66s-70l—136 Kyle Stanley 65l-71s—136 Alex Cejka 69p-67n—136 Kenny Perry 67p-69n—136 Rory Sabbatini 70n-66p—136 Hunter Haas 67n-69p—136 Webb Simpson 68s-69l—137 Steve Flesch 68p-69n—137 Brandt Jobe 68s-69l—137 Steve Elkington 68p-69n—137 Bill Haas 69s-68l—137 Bubba Watson 66s-71l—137 Kevin Chappell 68s-69l—137 Kris Blanks 66l-71s—137 Ryuji Imada 66p-71n—137 Michael Bradley 68p-69n—137 Michael Putnam 69n-68p—137 D.A. Points 67n-70p—137 Dean Wilson 69l-68s—137 Kevin Sutherland 68n-69p—137 Vaughn Taylor 71n-66p—137 Stephen Ames 69p-68n—137 Jeff Klauk 69p-68n—137 Chris Kirk 69l-68s—137 Jason Gore 70n-68p—138 Chad Collins 66p-72n—138 Matt Jones 67p-71n—138 Jeff Maggert 67l-71s—138 Bobby Gates 69n-69p—138 J.J. Henry 64n-74p—138 Pat Perez 69s-69l—138 Brian Gay 69l-69s—138 Brendan Steele 67l-71s—138 Shaun Micheel 66s-72l—138 Chris Stroud 70l-68s—138 Bill Lunde 74p-64n—138 Mark Calcavecchia 69s-69l—138 Ryan Palmer 67l-71s—138 Blake Adams 70l-69s—139 Scott Stallings 71n-68p—139 Paul Stankowski 69s-70l—139 D.J. Trahan 71l-68s—139 Chris Baryla 69p-70n—139 Brendon de Jonge 68s-71l—139 Steve Marino 68l-71s—139 David Mathis 70p-70n—140 Justin Leonard 69s-71l—140

Today At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $24.7 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles Men Third Round Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Viktor Troicki (29), Serbia, 6-2, retired. Nicolas Almagro (14), Spain, def. Ivan Ljubicic (17), Croatia, 6-4, 7-6 (8), 6-3. Andy Roddick (8), United States, def. Robin Haase, Netherlands, 2-6, 7-6 (2), 6-2, 6-2. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, def. Richard Gasquet (28), France, 6-2, 7-6 (3), 6-2. Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Xavier Malisse, Belgium, 6-3, 6-3, 6-1. Tommy Robredo, Spain, def. Sergiy Stakhovsky, Ukraine, 5-7, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. Thursday’s late results David Ferrer (7), Spain, def. Michael Russell, United States, 6-0, 6-1, 7-5. Jurgen Melzer (11), Austria, def. Pere Riba, Spain, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. John Isner (20), United States, def. Radek Stepanek, Czech Republic, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1. Jan Hernych, Czech Republic, def. Thomaz Bellucci (30), Brazil, 6-2, 6-7 (11), 6-4, 6-7 (3), 8-6. Richard Berankis, Lithuania, def. David Nalbandian (27), Argentina, 6-1, 6-0, 2-0, retired. Robin Soderling (4), Sweden, def. Gilles Muller, Luxembourg, 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-1. Andy Murray (5), Britain, def. Illya Marchenko, Ukraine, 6-1, 6-3, 6-3. Marcos Baghdatis (21), Cyprus, def. Juan Martin del Potro, Argentina, 6-1, 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. Women Today Third Round Anastasija Sevastova, Latvia, def. Vesna Manasieva, Russia, 6-1, 6-3. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Dominika Cibulkova (29), Slovakia, 6-4, 6-3. Francesca Schiavone (6), Italy, def. Monica Niculescu, Romania, 6-0, 7-6 (2). Li Na (9), China, def. Barbora Zahlavova Strycova, Czech Republic, 6-2, 6-1. Victoria Azarenka (8), Belarus, def. Chanelle Scheepers, South Africa, 6-3, 6-3. Svetlana Kuznetsova (23), Russia, def. Justine Henin (11), Belgium, 6-4, 7-6 (8). Thursday’s late results Ekaterina Makarova, Russia, def. Lesya Tsurenko, Ukraine, 7-6 (6), 6-1. Vera Zvonareva (2), Russia, def. Bojana Jovanovski, Serbia, 2-6, 6-3, 6-1. Lucie Safarova (31), Czech Republic, def. Klara Zakopalova, Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-7 (2), 7-5. Sam Stosur (5), Australia, def. Vera Dushevina, Russia, 6-3, 6-2.

DEALS Transactions Thursday’s Sports Transactions BASEBALL Major League Baseball MLB—Suspended Oakland minor league RHP Joselito Adames (Arizona) and Philadelphia minor league RHP San Lazaro Solano (Dominican Summer League) each 50 games for testing positive for a performanceenhancing substances. American League KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Agreed to terms with LHP Bruce Chen on a one-year contract. Designated LHP Dusty Hughes for assignment. Added LHP Jeff Francis to the 40-man roster. SEATTLE MARINERS—Agreed to terms with OF Jody Gerut and LHP Nate Robertson on minor league contracts. National League LOS ANGELES DODGERS—Agreed to terms with OF Marcus Thames on a one-year contract. NEW YORK METS—Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Young and OF Scott Hairston on one-year contracts. Designated RHP Tobi Stoner and OF Jason Pridie for assignment. SAN FRANCISCO GIANTS—Agreed to terms with LHP Javier Lopez on a one-year contract. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association TORONTO RAPTORS—Bought out the contract of F Peja Stojakovic, making him a free agent. FOOTBALL National Football League KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Promoted Mark Donovan to president. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Named Craig Johnson quarterbacks coach and Jeff Davidson offensive line coach. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Named John Morton wide receivers coach. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Named Darrell Bevell offensive coordinator. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Recalled D Nick Leddy from Rockford (AHL). COLORADO AVALANCHE—Sent F T.J. Galiardi to Lake Erie (AHL). Recalled F Ryan Stoa from Lake Erie. LOS ANGELES KINGS—Placed LW Marco Sturm on injured reserve. Recalled LW Andrei Loktionov from Manchester (AHL). MONTREAL CANADIENS—Recalled C Ryan White from Hamilton (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS—Recalled F Brodie Dupont from Connecticut (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Placed G Antero Niittymaki on injured reserve. Signed G Jordan White to a one-game amateur tryout. ST. LOUIS BLUES—Assigned F Chris Porter to Peoria (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING—Assigned G Mike Smith to Norfolk (AHL). WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Recalled D Brian Fahey from Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE MICHIGAN—Junior QB Tate Forcier is leaving the school. SOUTHERN CAL—Announced freshman G Bryce Jones will leave the men’s basketball team and transfer to another school.

Noon — Women’s college, Oregon State at Oregon, FSNW. 2 p.m. — Women’s college, North Carolina at Maryland, ESPN2. 2 p.m. — Women’s college, Duke at North Carolina State, FSNW.

FOOTBALL Noon — NFC Championship, Green Bay Packers at Chicago Bears, Fox. 3:30 p.m. — AFC Championship, New York Jets at Pittsburgh Steelers, CBS.

RADIO BASKETBALL 3 p.m. — Men’s college, Oregon at Oregon State, KICE-AM 940, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. 7 p.m. — NBA, Indiana Pacers at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690.

Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

Federer, Wozniacki advance; Henin out The Associated Press MELBOURNE, Australia — Justine Henin’s run at the Australian Open finished in the third round today when she lost 6-4, 7-6 (8) to Svetlana Kuznetsova, just a year after reaching the final in her comeback to Grand Slam tennis. It was Henin’s first loss in a major to Kuznetsova, the former French and U.S. Open champion, and her worst run at a Grand Slam event since Wimbledon in 2005. Henin was only weeks into a comeback from a career break when she lost the final last year to Serena Williams, the third time in four appearances that she’d reached the championship match at Melbourne. Her comeback season was derailed when

AUSTRALIAN OPEN she injured her right elbow at Wimbledon and didn’t play again in 2010. Kuznetsova will meet French Open champion Francesca Schiavone in the fourth round. Caroline Wozniacki, playing her first major with the No. 1-ranking, advanced in routine fashion. Also advancing were No. 8 Victoria Azarenka and No. 9 Li Na, a semifinalist last year. Defending champion Roger Federer beat Xavier Malisse 6-3, 6-3, 6-1 to earn his 57th career win at the Australian Open, surpassing Stefan Edberg’s Open Era record. “It’s very nice, but he still stays my

idol,” said Federer, a 16-time Grand Slam winner. He will next play Tommy Robredo, who beat Ukraine’s Sergiy Stakhovsky 5-7, 6-2, 6-4, 6-2. No. 3 Novak Djokovic’s third-round match lasted only one set — the 2008 champion was leading 6-2 when his Davis Cup-winning teammate Viktor Troicki retired with a stomach muscle strain. Djokovic will play No. 14 Nicolas Almagro, who beat No. 17 Ivan Ljubicic 6-4, 7-6 (8), 6-3. Andy Roddick was having trouble countering Robin Haase in the first set before his powerful serve kicked in. He finished with 32 aces in a 26, 7-6 (2), 6-2, 6-2 win. No. 6 Tomas Berdych beat Richard Gasquet 6-2, 7-6 (3), 6-2.

Golf • Love III picked as U.S. Ryder Cup captain: Davis Love III had to share his big day with Chicago’s beloved Bears. If he leads the Americans to the Ryder Cup in the fall of 2012, he’ll have the whole town to himself. An emotional and enthusiastic Love was introduced Thursday as the next U.S. captain of the Ryder Cup, then spent the next few hours being feted across Chicago. He was made an honorary member at Medinah Country Club, where the 2012 matches will be played, got a miniature replica of the Stanley Cup, and hobnobbed with Chicago’s sports royalty: Scottie Pippen, Dan Hampton and Ernie Banks. Europe, which won the gold trophy in Wales last October, appointed two-time Masters champion Jose Maria Olazabal as its captain Tuesday.

Football • Chiefs QB Cassel picked for Pro Bowl: Once again, Matt Cassel is coming off the bench to replace his injured buddy Tom Brady. The first time it happened, Cassel went from anonymous backup in New England to starting quarterback in Kansas City with a $60 million contract. This time, it means he is headed to his first Pro Bowl. Cassel was picked for the Jan. 30 game in Honolulu because Brady will reportedly have foot surgery to repair a stress fracture. The two are close friends and Brady was one of the first people to call. “We had a great conversation,” said Cassel, who threw a career-high 27 touchdown passes this season and led the Chiefs to their first AFC West title since 2003. “I would have loved to see him go and play because he had an outstanding year.” • Metrodome roof replacement could take five to six months: The new head of the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission said Thursday that replacing the snow-damaged roof of the Metrodome in Minneapolis would likely take five to six months, raising the possibility of affecting next season’s schedule for the Minnesota Vikings. Ted Mondale took the oath as chairman Thursday, less than a week after Gov. Mark Dayton made the former state senator his administration’s point man on the push for a new Vikings stadium. However, the Vikings have another season in the dome, which was damaged by a December blizzard.

Tennis • Agassi picked for tennis Hall of Fame: The sport that has given Andre Agassi everything is giving him something more. The baseliner known for his aggressive returns and career Grand Slam announced Thursday that he will be inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame, telling hundreds of students at a prep school he runs in Las Vegas that tennis has given him much more than eight major titles. “Tennis has given me everything in my life,” Agassi said. “It’s given me my wife — it’s given me my life’s work by allowing me the resources to build this school for you.” Agassi is married to Steffi Graf, who was inducted into the hall in Newport, R.I., in 2004. He will be inducted on July 9.

Skiing • Austrian has brain operation after crash: Austrian skier Hans Grugger underwent brain surgery Thursday after crashing during a training run for the World Cup downhill on the demanding Streif course. The Austrian ski federation said Thursday that Grugger was having neurosurgery but declined to reveal more detail until after the operation. Grugger was brought to a hospital by helicopter in nearby Innsbruck with a brain contusion and a chest injury and was “not responsive,” according to federation spokesman Markus Aigner. Grugger fell after losing balance at the so-called Mausefalle, a long jump shortly after a sharp right turn, and was motionless on the slope.

Cycling • U-23 champ wins third stage of Tour Down Under: Matthew Goss took a tumble, this time from a tire puncture, and watched Michael Matthews race on without him. It didn’t matter much to the Australian cycling star, because he figured nobody was going to keep up anyway. Matthews cruised to victory in the third stage of the Tour Down Under on Thursday, while Goss recovered from the flat tire to reclaim the leader’s overall jersey. “No one was going to beat Matthews today, he was just too quick,” Goss said. Matthews, the under-23 world champion from Netherlandsbased Rabobank, outsprinted Goss and defending champion Andre Greipel in an uphill finish to the 80-mile stage from suburban Unley in Adelaide to Stirling in the hills that fringe the city. Overnight tour leader Robbie McEwen also punctured late in the stage and watched the overall lead change hands for the third time in as many stages. Seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong rode strongly in temperatures that reached 98 degrees, controlling the tempo of the peleton before finishing in 84th place, more than 3 minutes behind the stage winner. — From wire reports


THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 D3

NHL ROUNDUP

Brodeur, Devils shut down Pens The Associated Press NEWARK, N.J. — For the first time all season, Martin Brodeur and the New Jersey Devils are playing like the team that was a perennial Stanley Cup contender. Although the Devils still have the NHL’s worst record, they’re scoring goals, playing defense and most of all, they’re finally winning. Brodeur and the suddenly revived Devils took advantage of the absence of Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin to shut out the Pittsburgh Penguins 2-0 on Thursday night. “It has been a hard season,” said Brodeur, who stopped 23 shots in his record 114th regular-season shutout. “Hopefully, we’ve turned the page and we’re moving on. I know I need to continue to work on the right things in my game to be able to play like that every night.” Brodeur had a relatively easy night in posting his fourth shutout of the season and giving New Jersey points in a season-high five straight games (4-0-1). Brian Rolston and rookie Nick Palmieri scored for the Devils (14-29-3), who are still more than 20 points out of a playoff spot. The Devils’ current streak started when Brodeur took back the starting job from Johan Hedberg. During that span he has allowed 10 goals and the offense has responded with 20. Also on Thursday: Flyers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Senators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 PHILADELPHIA — Mike Richards scored twice, Chris Pronger had an assist in his return from a broken foot and Philadelphia beat Ottawa in a fight-filled game. Capitals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Islanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — Alex Ovechkin assisted on goals by Jason Chimera and Nicklas Backstrom, and rookie Braden Holtby made 24 saves in his return from the minors to lift Washington. Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Ducks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 TORONTO — Jean-Sebastien Giguere made 26 saves against his former Anaheim teammates and Mikhail Grabovski scored twice for Toronto. Sabres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Bruins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 BOSTON — Ryan Miller stopped 38 shots and Thomas Vanek had a goal and an assist for Buffalo. Hurricanes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Rangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 RALEIGH, N.C. — Cam Ward made 39 saves and Chad LaRose, Jussi Jokinen, Brandon Sutter and Jeff Skinner scored in Carolina’s victory over New York. Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ATLANTA — NHL goals leader Steven Stamkos scored twice and Dominic Moore added the shootout winner, leading Tampa Bay to its 10th straight win over Atlanta. Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Blues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ST. LOUIS — Darren Helm scored at 1:51 of overtime for Detroit and Jimmy Howard stopped 26 shots in his return after missing two games. Stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Oilers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 EDMONTON, Alberta — Jamie Benn had a goal and an assist and Kari Lehtonen made 30 saves for Dallas. Sharks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 VANCOUVER, British Columbia — Joe Pavelski scored the only shootout goal and San Jose’s Antti Niemi stopped all three Vancouver shooters. Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Avalanche. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 DENVER — Pekka Rinne stopped 32 shots for Nashville against a Colorado squad that learned hours earlier that left wing Tomas Fleischmann would miss the rest of the season because of blood clots in his lungs. Coyotes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 LOS ANGELES — Martin Hanzal opened the scoring with a disputed power-play goal in the second period, Ilya Bryzgalov made 35 saves for his third shutout of the season and 19th overall and Phoenix beat fading Los Angeles for its fourth straight road victory.

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

PREP ROUNDUP

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

Bulls 82, Mavericks 77 DALLAS (77) Pavlovic 0-3 3-3 3, Nowitzki 6-16 7-8 19, Chandler 5-9 2-2 12, Kidd 3-7 0-0 8, Stevenson 4-10 0-0 12, Marion 2-7 2-4 6, Terry 5-14 1-1 12, Haywood 1-3 1-2 3, Barea 0-4 2-2 2. Totals 26-73 18-22 77. CHICAGO (82) Deng 3-13 1-1 7, Gibson 2-7 0-0 4, Thomas 4-5 1-1 9, Rose 9-28 6-6 26, Bogans 2-3 0-0 6, Asik 1-5 3-6 5, Korver 3-5 2-2 9, Brewer 4-11 0-0 8, Watson 3-7 0-0 8. Totals 31-84 13-16 82. Dallas 20 15 25 17 — 77 Chicago 19 25 12 26 — 82 3-Point Goals—Dallas 7-22 (Stevenson 410, Kidd 2-4, Terry 1-5, Pavlovic 0-1, Nowitzki 02), Chicago 7-16 (Watson 2-2, Bogans 2-3, Rose 2-5, Korver 1-2, Brewer 0-1, Deng 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Dallas 49 (Chandler 12), Chicago 58 (Deng 12). Assists—Dallas 16 (Terry, Nowitzki 4), Chicago 15 (Rose 9). Total Fouls—Dallas 17, Chicago 22. A—21,397 (20,917).

Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 32 22 17 13 11

L 9 19 25 29 31

Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington

W 30 28 27 17 12

L 13 15 15 24 28

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 29 16 15 15 8

L 14 23 24 27 33

Pct .780 .537 .405 .310 .262

GB — 10 15½ 19½ 21½

L10 8-2 4-6 4-6 2-8 2-8

Str W-4 L-4 L-2 L-5 W-1

Home 20-3 10-9 12-7 8-12 8-10

Away 12-6 12-10 5-18 5-17 3-21

Conf 25-5 12-9 12-18 9-18 6-18

Away 15-8 14-9 11-10 5-14 0-20

Conf 19-6 19-8 18-7 11-16 7-20

Away 10-10 6-13 6-15 4-18 3-20

Conf 16-9 10-13 9-11 9-13 7-18

Southeast Division Pct .698 .651 .643 .415 .300

GB — 2 2½ 12 16½

L10 6-4 8-2 7-3 6-4 4-6

Str L-4 W-2 W-1 W-2 L-1

Home 15-5 14-6 16-5 12-10 12-8

Central Division Pct .674 .410 .385 .357 .195

GB — 11 12 13½ 20

L10 6-4 3-7 3-7 4-6 0-10

Str W-1 L-3 W-1 L-1 L-14

Home 19-4 10-10 9-9 11-9 5-13

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Bobcats 100, 76ers 97 PHILADELPHIA (97) Iguodala 7-11 5-9 19, Brand 6-13 0-0 12, Hawes 3-7 0-0 6, Holiday 6-17 0-0 13, Meeks 2-5 0-0 5, Williams 4-9 3-4 11, Turner 2-5 2-2 7, Young 9-14 3-3 21, Speights 0-4 3-4 3, Kapono 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 39-85 16-22 97. CHARLOTTE (100) Wallace 2-7 2-2 6, Diaw 3-5 2-4 9, K.Brown 2-4 2-2 6, Augustin 11-17 6-6 31, Jackson 5-16 4-5 14, Henderson 5-8 1-2 11, McGuire 1-3 0-0 2, Mohammed 7-12 1-3 15, Livingston 2-6 2-2 6, Carroll 0-1 0-0 0, Najera 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 38-79 20-26 100. Philadelphia 27 23 18 29 — 97 Charlotte 30 26 18 26 — 100 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 3-14 (Turner 1-2, Meeks 1-3, Holiday 1-3, Iguodala 0-2, Williams 0-4), Charlotte 4-11 (Augustin 3-5, Diaw 1-2, Wallace 0-1, Jackson 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 53 (Brand 10), Charlotte 46 (K.Brown 9). Assists—Philadelphia 22 (Holiday 7), Charlotte 21 (Augustin 8). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 21, Charlotte 17. Technicals—Charlotte defensive three second. A—14,326 (19,077).

Blazers 108, Clippers 93 L.A. CLIPPERS (93) Gomes 1-5 0-0 2, Griffin 6-17 8-13 20, Jordan 2-3 2-2 6, Davis 7-14 1-1 16, Gordon 13-26 2-3 35, Bledsoe 0-3 0-0 0, Diogu 1-2 0-0 2, Foye 2-7 0-0 5, Aminu 3-4 1-2 7. Totals 3581 14-21 93. PORTLAND (108) Batum 4-8 0-0 10, Aldridge 13-20 2-3 28, Przybilla 1-2 0-0 2, Miller 6-15 3-5 15, Matthews 10-18 4-4 28, Cunningham 1-1 1-2 3, Fernandez 7-10 2-3 17, Mills 1-3 1-2 3, Marks 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 44-78 13-19 108. L.A. Clippers 27 23 21 22 — 93 Portland 23 32 29 24 — 108 3-Point Goals—L.A. Clippers 9-26 (Gordon 7-11, Foye 1-4, Davis 1-6, Bledsoe 0-1, Aminu 0-1, Gomes 0-3), Portland 7-16 (Matthews 4-8, Batum 2-4, Fernandez 1-2, Mills 0-1, Aldridge 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—L.A. Clippers 52 (Griffin 18), Portland 41 (Aldridge, Miller 8). Assists—L.A. Clippers 18 (Davis 6), Portland 21 (Miller 7). Total Fouls—L.A. Clippers 17, Portland 20. Technicals—Jordan, Portland defensive three second. A—20,630 (19,980).

Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Houston Memphis

W 36 27 27 20 19

L 6 15 16 23 23

Oklahoma City Utah Denver Portland Minnesota

W 27 27 24 24 10

L 15 15 17 20 33

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 31 19 18 16 9

L 13 21 23 26 31

Pct .857 .643 .628 .465 .452

GB — 9 9½ 16½ 17

L10 8-2 3-7 8-2 4-6 5-5

Str W-7 L-1 W-6 W-3 L-2

Home 23-2 15-8 17-5 12-9 12-7

Away 13-4 12-7 10-11 8-14 7-16

Conf 24-3 17-7 13-11 10-15 13-14

Away 12-9 12-8 5-13 9-15 2-21

Conf 15-11 13-11 16-11 17-13 3-23

Away 14-8 8-12 6-16 3-13 3-15

Conf 16-9 11-14 10-15 12-19 4-18

Northwest Division Pct .643 .643 .585 .545 .233

GB — — 2½ 4 17½

L10 6-4 5-5 6-4 6-4 2-8

Str L-2 L-2 W-1 W-4 L-3

Home 15-6 15-7 19-4 15-5 8-12

La Pine wrestling earns Sky-Em victory Bulletin staff report ELMIRA — La Pine earned its first Sky-Em League wrestling win of the season by topping Elmira 40-36 on the road Thursday evening. The Hawks (1-3 Sky-Em League) edged out their hosts thanks to pins from Chris Love (112 pounds), Zack Knabe (119), Cameron Byrd (125), Deion Mock (135) and Tyler Markland-Pope (145). Garrett Searcy tallied a lopsided win for the Hawks, defeating Manny Beller 11-1 in the 189-pound match. La Pine returns to action Saturday, hosting the La Pine Frostbite Invitational. In other wrestling matches Thursday: Estacada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Madras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 MADRAS — Giving up forfeits in four weight classes, the White Buffaloes fell to 1-1 in Tri-Valley Conference duals. Miguel

Vasquez posted a 4-1 win at 130 pounds and Brandon Hawes recorded a 5-3 victory at 140 pounds to lead Madras. Only seven matches were actually wrestled between the two teams. The Buffs are off until next Thursday, when they host Molalla. Crook County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .62 Mountain View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 PRINEVILLE — Crook County won every match save for one — the 215-pound contest. Jared George (140 pounds), Braden Woodbury (145), Trevor Wilson (152), Trevor Ough (171), Bryson Martin (189) and Alex Pierce (285) all recorded wins by fall for the Cowboys. Mountain View’s victory came when Trevor Roberts pinned Crook County’s Jordan Noyes in 5 minutes, 47 seconds. The Cougars are at Summit on Wednesday, while Crook County is off until the Reser’s Tournament of Champions in Hillsboro on Jan. 28 and 29.

Paciic Division Pct .705 .475 .439 .381 .225

GB — 10 11½ 14 20

L10 Str 8-2 L-1 6-4 W-4 6-4 W-3 6-4 L-1 3-7 L-3 ——— Wednesday’s Games

Phoenix 106, Cleveland 98 Orlando 99, Philadelphia 98, OT Milwaukee 100, Washington 87 Houston 104, New York 89 Denver 112, Oklahoma City 107 Portland 94, Sacramento 90, OT L.A. Clippers 126, Minnesota 111

Home 17-5 11-9 12-7 13-13 6-16

New Jersey 103, Utah 95 Boston 86, Detroit 82 New Orleans 103, Memphis 102, OT San Antonio 104, Toronto 95 Dallas 109, L.A. Lakers 100 Golden State 110, Indiana 108 Thursday’s Games

Charlotte 100, Philadelphia 97 Portland 108, L.A. Clippers 93

Chicago 82, Dallas 77 Today’s Games

Detroit at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Washington, 4 p.m. Utah at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Houston at Memphis, 5 p.m. Sacramento at Golden State, 7:30 p.m.

Toronto at Orlando, 4 p.m. New Orleans at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Cleveland, 4:30 p.m. New York at San Antonio, 5 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Denver, 7:30 p.m. Saturday’s Games

Atlanta at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Boston at Washington, 4 p.m. Toronto at Miami, 4:30 p.m. Cleveland at Chicago, 5 p.m. New York at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m. Memphis at Milwaukee, 5:30 p.m. Indiana at Portland, 7 p.m.

Dallas at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Phoenix at Detroit, 4:30 p.m. Utah at Philadelphia, 4:30 p.m. San Antonio at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Orlando at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Golden State at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m. All Times PST Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

NBA ROUNDUP

Blazers beat Clippers, win fourth straight The Associated Press PORTLAND — LaMarcus Aldridge is running his All-Star campaign on the court. In the locker room, he is playing it cool. Aldridge had 28 points and eight rebounds to bolster his case for a berth on the Western Conference squad in the Portland Trail Blazers’ 108-93 win over the Los Angeles Clippers Thursday night. That he was facing fellow power forward and All-Star candidate Blake Griffin didn’t mean much to him, Aldridge said. “It really doesn’t matter,” he said. “I am not getting caught up in that. I think people want me to get caught up in it but I am not. I am about trying to win, and I didn’t do anything extra tonight.” Wesley Matthews added 28 for the Blazers (24-20), who shot 56 percent from the field and finished the game on an 18-6 run to tie a season-best with their fourth straight win. Rudy Fernandez had 17 points and Andre Miller added 15 for the Blazers, who are 11-2 in their last 13 games at home. Eric Gordon had 35 points for Los Angeles (16-26) despite playing with an injured tendon on the ring finger of his shooting hand. Griffin was just six of 17 from the field but managed to stay productive with 20 points and 18 rebounds. “I definitely respect his game,” Aldridge said of Griffin. “He plays the whole game from start to finish. He’s a great talent — athletic, physical and he goes to the basket strong.” Both power forwards have a strong case for the All-Star team. Griffin is averaging 22.6 points and 12.8 rebounds a game. On Monday, he scored 47 points against Indiana, and he had a 27-game stretch of double-doubles come to an end Wednesday against Minnesota. Aldridge averages 21.3 points and 8.8 rebounds. He has emerged as the team’s most productive player since three-time All-Star Brandon Roy went out in mid-December. The Clippers had a three-game winning streak snapped. Portland took the lead just before halftime and kept it for the rest of the game. Gordon made two 3-pointers and Griffin knocked down a 20-footer to get the Clippers within 90-87.

The Blazers went up 96-89 with 3:12 left when Aldridge backed up Griffin and hit a jump hook. Matthews made his fourth 3-pointer and then hit two free throws to put Portland up 101-91. Fernandez scored five straight points to put the Clippers away. “I thought the Blazers executed much better than we did, in the second half especially,” Clippers coach Vinny Del Negro said. “Our defense was not good enough or tough enough.” Both teams were playing for the second straight night. The Blazers beat the Kings in overtime Wednesday despite playing without Marcus Camby, whose 11.3 rebounds per game are fifth in the NBA. Camby had arthroscopic surgery on his right knee and will be sidelined about three weeks. Camby said via Twitter that the surgery Thursday to repair a meniscus tear was successful. The Clippers, who started off the season 1-13, have been a different team since the middle of December, and they won for the 11th time in 15 games against the Timberwolves Wednesday night. The Clippers started the game by sprinting to a 16-2 lead, but the Blazers went on a 21-5 run, with Matthews hitting two 3s to tie the game at 23. Randy Foye made a pull-up jumper and a 3 to put the Clippers up 40-35, but Matthews made his third 3 in the half to put Portland up 47-45. Portland led 84-71 in the third after Nicolas Batum made back-toback 3-pointers. Miller scored on an alley-oop and then a breakaway layup to extend the lead to 90-79 with 9:02 left in the game. Also on Thursday: Bobcats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 76ers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 CHARLOTTE, N.C. — D.J. Augustin scored a career-high 31 points, including four free throws in the final 11 seconds, in Charlotte’s win. Bulls. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Mavericks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .77 CHICAGO — Derrick Rose scored 26 points to lead Chicago. Rose shot nine for 28 from the field, shouldering a larger-than-usual share of the offensive load in the absence of injured forward Carlos Boozer.

Bend’s Greg Prescott controls Summit’s Brandon Katter during Thursday night’s 130pound match at Bend High.

Wrestling Continued from D1 Olson’s victory capped a roller coaster night for the Storm, who led 33-9 early in the contest before the Lava Bears rallied to tie the dual, 33-33. Jason Vinton (145 pounds), Dre Golden (152), Gavin Gerdes (171) and Kenny Dailey (189) recorded consecutive wins for Bend, seemingly giving the Bears the momentum heading into the final match of the dual before Olson took down Buck. “We knew that’s how it would line up,” Bend coach Luke Larwin said about Summit’s strength in the lighter weights and the Lava Bears’ advantage in the middle weights. “The dual went about how we thought, except for that last match.” Summit put itself in a position for the vic-

tory by recording three pins in the first four matches of the night. James Zachow (285), Erik Nazario (112) and Brian Pecham (119) all won by fall to give the Storm an early 18-6 lead. “Zachow started us off and then Nazario gets a pin, Pecham gets a pin,” Summit coach Tom Nelson said, recalling the match. “They all just wrestled their butts off. Brandon Katter (at 130 pounds) didn’t win, but stayed off his back and didn’t get pinned. That was big.” “It’s been our team goal all season to be the best team in the city,” added Nelson, whose squad takes on Mountain View next week. “This is just a great group of kids. They’ve put in the time and the work and are starting to be competitive. It’s fun.” Beau Eastes can be reached at 5 4 1 -3 8 3 0 3 0 5 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

PREP SCOREBOARD WRESTLING Thursday’s results ——— SUMMIT 39, BEND 33 at Bend High 103 — Bend wins by forfeit. 112 — Erik Nazario, S, pins Sam Prescott, B, 1:28. 119 — Brian Pecham, S, pins Nico Spring, B, 3:29. 125 — Gabe Thompson, S, def. Evan Chinadle, B, 10-5. 130 — Greg Prescott, B, def. Brandon Katter, S, 10-7. 135 — Ryan Leiphart, S, pins Diego Rincon, B, 3:31. 140 —Eric Thompson, S, pins Izaak Simar, B, 2:47. 145 — Jason Vinton, B, def. Conner Rueth, S, 6-3. 152 — Dre Golden, B, pins Jacob Fritz, S, 5:36. 160 — Willy Abt, B, def. Sean Seefeldt, S, 5-4. 171 — Gavin Gerdes, B, pins Josh Brandt, S, 4:46. 189 — Kenny Dailey, B, pins Max Burbidge, S, 1:46. 215 — Kaden Olson, S, pins Shane Buck, B, :53. 285 — James Zachow, S, pins D.J. Thompson, B, 1:56. ——— CROOK COUNTY 62, MOUNTAIN VIEW 6 At Madras High 103 — Erik Martin, CC, def. Wyatt Slaght, MV, 20-7. 112 — Grayson Munn, CC, def. Jake McDonald, MV, 5-4. 119 — McKennan Buckner, CC, def. Keelin Crew, MV, 15-2. 125 — Cole McCarty, CC, def. Chris Kirkpatrick, MV, 19-3. 130 — Andy Katzenberger, CC, def. Tanner Combs, MV, 16-4. 135 — Dawson Barber, CC, def. Kyler Ayers, MV, 4-2. 140 — Jared George, CC, pins Justin Weltman, MV, :22. 145 — Braden Woodbury, CC, pins Mack Amodeo, MV, 3:25. 152 — Trevor Wilson, CC, wins by forfeit. 160 — Jake Zeigler, CC, def. Wyatt Bloom, MV, 10-4. 171 — Trevor Ough, CC, pins Brandon Hosea, MV, 1:23.

189 — Bryson Martin, CC, pins Connor Wiese, MV, :23. 215 — Trevor Roberts, MV, pins, Jordan Noyes, CC, 5:47. 285 — Alex Pierce, CC, pins Dylan Johnson, MV, :40. ——— LA PINE 40, ELMIRA 36 At Elmira High 103 — Thorin Wilson, LP wins by forfeit. 112 — Chris Love, LP, pins Jace Bedoin, E, 3:15. 119 — Zack Knabe, LP, pins Austin Lammre, E, 2:09. 125 — Cameron Byrd, LP, pins, Tarrance Chang, E, 3:02. 130 — Robbie Hoades, E, pins Riley Aamodt, LP, 1:21. 135 — Deion Mock, LP, pins Dakota Utter, 3:09. 140 — Eli Russo, E, pins Joseph Swayze, LP, time unavailable. 145 — Tyler Markland-Pope, LP, pins Hunter Weast, E, 3:43. 152 — Andy Brown, E, def. Levi Penter, LP, 5-3. 160 — Ryan Zimmerman, E, pins Kyle Contreras, LP, 3:53. 171 — Cameron Robertson, E, def. Dylan Johnson, LP, 5-0. 189 — Garrett Searcy, LP, def. Manny Beller, E, 11-1. 215 — Andrew Piper, E, pins Chad Van Cleave, LP, time unavailable. 285 — Kyle Smith, E, pins Darrin Dulley, LP, :25. TRI-VALLEY CONFERENCE ——— ESTACADA 47, MADRAS 24 at Madras 103 — Madras wins by forfeit. 112 — Wheeler, E, def. Fine, M, 5-3. 119 — Pinto, E, tech falls Ozuna, M, 22-6. 125 — Licari, E, pins L. McDonald, M, 1:15. 130 — Vasquez def. Bradford, E, 4-1. 135 — Davidson, E, def. Boise, M, 4-2 OT. 140 — Hawes, M, def. Pitcher, E, 5-3. 145 — Hicks, E, pins Morningowl, M, 1:16. 152 — Estacada wins by forfeit. 160 — Estacada wins by forfeit. 171 —Estacada wins by forfeit. 189 — Estacada wins by forfeit. 215 — Madras wins by forfeit. 285 — Madras wins by forfeit

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Thomas leads No. 20 Huskies past Arizona The Associated Press SEATTLE — Isaiah Thomas did a little of everything again, scoring 22 points, handing out 10 assists and grabbing six rebounds, and No. 20 Washington took sole possession of first place in the Pac-10 with a 85-68 win over Arizona on Thursday night. Coming off perhaps the best game of his career at California where Thomas scored 27 points and had 13 assists, the Huskies diminutive guard was at it again. He made seven of 12 shots and posted his sixth straight game with at least seven assists. Justin Holiday also scored 22 points for the Huskies (14-4, 6-1), including a 3-pointer in the closing seconds for Thomas’ 10th assist. Derrick Williams led Arizona (15-4, 4-2) with 22 points and 11 rebounds, but was saddled with foul trouble for most of the final 10 minutes. Williams didn’t score the final 6:42. Matthew Bryan-Amaning scored 14 of his 18 in the second half, 10 of those coming in the first 5:08 of the half. Bryan-Amaning also grabbed seven rebounds as the Huskies held a 41-35 advantage on the boards.

Also on Thursday: No. 18 Wisconsin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Indiana . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 MADISON, Wis. — Jordan Taylor scored a career-high 28 points to lead Wisconsin (14-4, 4-2 Big Ten) past Indiana. Southern Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Stanford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 LOS ANGELES — Nikola Vucevic had 20 points and nine rebounds as Southern Cal (11-8, 3-3 Pac-10) held Stanford to a seasonlow in points. Washington State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Arizona State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 PULLMAN, Wash. — DeAngelo Casto scored 25 points and Klay Thompson added 22 as Washington State (14-5, 4-3 Pac-10) won. UCLA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 LOS ANGELES — Reeves Nelson scored a career-high 24 points, tipping in the winning basket at the buzzer, and UCLA (12-6, 4-2 Pac-10) beat California for its third straight win.


D4 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

A S   B  Snowriding

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Abby Black and Walker Davis scale the wall at the Bend Rock Gym on Wednesday.

Ascents Continued from D1 While climbing is an individual sport, the youngsters get the extra benefit of training and practicing as a team. Rougeux recognizes that these young climbers probably will not be lifelong competitors — but more likely lifelong rock climbers. Most of them enjoy climbing at Smith Rock State Park near Terrebonne, and some have even taken their parents rock climbing. “Outdoors is way better (for climbing),� Helmich admits. “I like outdoor bouldering better than indoor, but I can’t get outside all the time,� StraussWise says. “I can do it (indoors) when it’s cold and snowing.� In helping the kids make the transition from the controlled environment of an indoor rock gym to the great outdoors of Smith Rock, Rougeux must teach them risk management. “The desire is there, and I’ve been working with them to make sure they have a solid foundation so they can (climb outside),�

Armstrong Continued from D1 There are plenty of other products and methods out there, unlike drugs in HemAssist’s family, that are known to truly give the boost that cheats seek. Horrific but now depressingly mundane practices like transfusing blood. Cocktails of growth hormone, steroids, EPO, testosterone. The list of things riders took to try to beat Armstrong runs on and on. Either Armstrong was monk-like in resisting the temptations so many others succumbed to or he’s lying. SI’s claims add to the pile of allegations against Armstrong that has grown too large and too explosive to easily dismiss. Instead, let investigation Jeff Novitzky get to the bottom of it. The taxpayer dollars that Armstrong’s lawyers grumble are being wasted on the federal investigator’s hunt of Armstrong will have been money well spent if he unmasks the Tour’s biggest champion as a cheat or, alternatively, determines that there’s really nothing or not much there. The current limbo of allegation vs. denial, of mounting anecdotal evidence but no smoking-gun proof that Armstrong doped, is good for nobody, with the exception of journalists to whom this offers a rich vein of stories. Bad for Armstrong and the can-

Rougeux says. But bouldering indoors is where many of climbing’s current biggest names got their start, including Chris Sharma, Tommy Caldwell and Daniel Woods. “All the climbers in the magazines, they all started as youth competitors through ABS,� Rougeux says. “They’re kind of that first generation that has grown up with climbing gyms being a mainstay in metropolitan areas. Now it’s just getting bigger and bigger.� Rougeux sees a wealth of potential in Helmich, who is seeking sponsorship and would like to perhaps make a career out of climbing — and maybe become one of those climbers who appears in popular climbing magazines. “I think I can be,� Helmich says. “I just have to keep climbing and working hard.� At nationals, according to Rougeux, a spotlight is trained on the competing climber as hundreds of spectators look on. Route-setters create the moves for each climb before the competitions. The higher a climber

cer survivors he fills with hope. Bad for cycling, which combats doping more convincingly now than during Armstrong’s winning era. And bad for all of us who want to believe in champions and be inspired by the human body’s capacity to achieve incredible things. Now back to SI’s HemAssist claim. Just the idea that a sports star could use his wealth, clout and connections to access experimental drugs meant to be strictly controlled is alarming. It is way beyond the sports world’s remit or powers to probe such organized fraud alone. More reason to think that snooping by gumshoes like Novitzky is entirely valid. Still, the HemAssist allegation doesn’t appear to make much scientific sense. Scientists from Europe and Australia tried out another HemAssist-like drug a few years back on sports students in the southern French city of Montpellier, infusing them with Hemopure and having them pedal exercise bikes. They were surprised to discover that, contrary to their expectations, the drug did not seem to boost athletic performance or endurance. Those findings make them doubt that HemAssist would have done huge good for Armstrong if, indeed, he was cynical enough to have used it. Armstrong spokesman Mark

gets, the more points he or she receives. In case of a tie, the winner is the climber with the fewest falls. Rougeux says bouldering is a powerful, intense form of rock climbing. “They’re either getting it in three attempts or they’re not getting it at all,� he says of climbers. “It’s pretty impressive how tired they get after two moves.� Mastering the mental challenges of the sport is what separates the best climbers, Rougeux explains. “Instead of letting go when it gets hard, just keep pushing,� he says. At the Bend Rock Gym, Black attempts a particularly challenging bouldering route. She pushes up from one handhold, flying up and backward into the air. Her hands slip off the next hold, and SMACK! She is back on the blue mat, a wry smile across her face. There is nothing left to do but get up and try it again. Mark Morical can be reached at 541-383-0318 or at mmorical@ bendbulletin.com.

Fabiani says the cyclist never took HemAssist. He also says that because its developer, Baxter International, abandoned trials of the drug in 1998, it was “impossible� that Armstrong could have gotten hold of it. “It would have been a big story, ‘Now we know why Armstrong was so strong — because he took HemAssist,’� says one of the researchers who took part in the study of Hemopure, Yorck Olaf Schumacher of Freiburg University in Germany. “But, pffff, I think that would be oversimplifying things.� Of this type of drug, called hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers or HBOCs, Schumacher adds: “There’s nothing up to now that shows or proves that it improves performance.� “I’m very skeptical,� says another of the scientists, Michel Audran at the University of Montpellier. The drug they tested, Hemopure, was “better than HemAssist and it didn’t improve performance, so it would surprise me that he (Armstrong) took this for nothing.� He adds that a side-effect of Hemopure was that it gave the students stomach gas. “Either you burp or break wind. It’s very uncomfortable. I tried it out on people and I can guarantee that they were all ill,� he says. Hardly ideal for an elite cyclist. But some of them still gave this stuff a whirl, risking their health.

• Freestyle series set for this weekend: The USA Snowboarding Association Enter the Dragon snowboard and freestyle ski series will return to Mt. Bachelor this weekend. The event brings together amateur riders of all ages and abilities to compete in slopestyle, halfpipe and snowboardcross or skicross. This Saturday and Sunday will include slopestyle competitions. Registration will be held in the West Village Lodge Caldera from 8 to 9:30 a.m. Parents must sign for minor participants and helmets are required. Awards are held on Sunday after each event weekend. The weekend of Feb. 5-6 will include slopestyle on Saturday and halfpipe on Sunday. More halfpipe competitions are scheduled for Feb. 19-20, followed by snowboardcross and skicross on March 5-6.

Athletes can accumulate points to qualify for the USA Snowboarding Association Nationals at Copper Mountain, Colo., in April. For more information, e-mail Michele Schnake at michele@ usasa.org. • Free Flow Tour set for Bachelor Jan. 29-30: The Gatorade Free Flow Tour, an amateur series that holds contests throughout the country in January, is coming to Mt. Bachelor Jan. 29-30. The halfpipe competition is slated for Saturday, and slopestyle on Sunday. The winner in each contest will earn a trip to the Gatorade Free Flow Tour Finals, staged in conjunction with the Dew Tour’s Toyota Championships, Feb. 10-13, at Utah’s Snowbasin Resort. The two overall snowboard halfpipe and slopestyle champions and the overall freeski halfpipe and slopestyle champions earn a spot to compete against the pros at the first stop

of the 2011-12 Winter Dew Tour the following season. The Gatorade Free Flow Tour is open to all amateur snowboarders and freeskiers age 21 and under. Entry fee is $20 for one competition, and $30 for two. For more information, visit www.gatoradefreeflowtour.com.

Cross-country skiing • Nordic race slated for Saturday at Bachelor: The seventh annual Nancy P’s Classic is scheduled for this Saturday at 10 a.m. at the Mt. Bachelor Nordic Center. The mass-start classic crosscountry ski race includes distances of five, 10 or 20 kilometers. The race is staged on a long loop through the woods. Entry fees range from $13 to $20. For more information, or to register, visit www.mbsef.org or call 541-388-0002. — Bulletin staff reports

A S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

SKIING AND SNOWBOARDING MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MBSEF ALPINE MASTERS WINTER SKIING: At Mt. Bachelor, enrollment is open for ages 21 and up, running now through March; 541-388-0002, mbsef@mbsef.org, www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002;

Spanish rider Jesus Manzano keeled over at the 2003 Tour after, he says, he was injected with an HBOC used to treat anemic dogs. Audran believes Manzano’s experience scared off other riders. “Some of them used it, a few of them,� he says. “But after the Manzano story ... they abandoned it.� An anti-doping blood test for HBOCs has been in force since 2004 but, as far as the World Anti-Doping Agency knows, no athlete has yet tested positive. Armstrong’s seven consecutive Tour wins ran through to 2005. Przybelski, who oversaw HemAssist’s early development for Baxter, maintained in a subsequent phone interview with The Associated Press that the drug could have improved sports performance, although he added that no direct studies were done to prove that theory. “I could not imagine a cyclist using HemAssist or any HBOC day after day ... I would imagine that such a product would be used selectively for a most difficult mountain stage,� Przybelski wrote in a follow-up e-mail to the AP. “But of course,� he added, “I don’t believe these products were ever used.�

mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org.

NORDIC SKIING BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options through Feb. 23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION

FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. SENIOR XC-SKI AND SNOWSHOE WEEK AT DIAMOND LAKE: Feb. 7-10; lessons available; offerings range from flat two-mile ski tours on wide roads to challenging eight-mile off-track ski tours in the backcountry; www. diamondlake.net, 800-733-7593.

SNOWMOBILING MOON COUNTRY SNO-MOBILERS: Monthly meeting for the local snowmobile club is on Wednesday, Jan. 26, at Jake’s Diner in Bend; dinner is at 6 p.m. and meeting starts at 7 p.m.; contact Van Gelderen at 541-318-8012.

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LA QUINTA, Calif. — Jhonattan Vegas isn’t exactly sure how his Venezuelan parents came up with the unusual spelling of his first name. If the 26-year-old rookie manages to keep up his swift start at the Bob Hope Classic, the golf world will have to memorize it quickly. Vegas shot a 5-under 67 in windy conditions Thursday for a share of the second-round lead with Boo Weekley. Weekley had a 66 to match Vegas at 13-under 131 in the 90hole tournament on four Palm Springs-area courses. Charles Howell III (66) and Chris Couch (65) were a stroke back. Although Vegas bogeyed his final hole on the Nicklaus Private course, he leads the field

with 17 birdies. With power and accuracy off the tee, Vegas used an improved short game to get on top early in just his fifth PGA Tour event. “It’s good to be hitting the ball well and putting well, especially on a course like these ones where you’ve always got a lot of birdie opportunities,� said Vegas, who played at the University of Texas before excelling on the Nationwide Tour last year. Although many pros still don’t know him — Weekley had never met Vegas before they shook hands in the media tent after the second round — others already call him “Jhonny Vegas.� Vegas moved to the United States in 2002, spending nearly two years improving his English enough to attend college.

He became the first Venezuelan to earn a PGA Tour card last year. Weekley birdied his final two Nicklaus holes, wrapping up a sharp round on perhaps the tournament’s easiest course. The veteran changed putters after finishing in a 27th-place tie at the Sony Open in Hawaii last week, and the switch already has produced remarkable results. “To 12 feet, 15 feet, I feel like I can make it,� Weekley said. “I would say for about the last year, I ain’t felt that in a while. I was hoping that this would happen.� Howell shot his second 66 of the tournament, while Couch made three birdies on his final four holes. Keegan Bradley and Brian Davis are two strokes off

the lead at 133, while 29 players — including David Duval and Matt Kuchar — were within five strokes of the lead. Also on Thursday: Schwartzel leads in Abu Dhabi ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — Charl Schwartzel shot an 8-under 64 to take a onestroke lead over Padraig Harrington after the first round of the Abu Dhabi Championship. The Joburg Open winner last week, Schwartzel had nine birdies — eight on his first 12 holes. U.S. Open champion Graeme McDowell birdied his last five holes to join Alexander Noren and Niclas Fasth at 65. Defending champion Martin Kaymer had a 67, top-ranked Lee Westwood opened with a 69 and Masters champion Phil Mickelson had a 71.

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GETAWAYS TRAVEL 563 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 www.getawaystravel.net RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.

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HELPING CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES THRIVE Inside

• Television • Comics • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

FAMILY

www.bendbulletin.com/family

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21,

F A M I LY IN BRIEF Cascades Academy hosts series Lauren Kessler, author of “My Teenage Werewolf: A Mother, A Daughter, A Journey Through the Thicket of Adolescence,” will share her story during a special event at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Cascades Academy in Bend. Kessler will share information about how parents can try to handle the sometimes rocky teen-parent relationship. The school is located at 2150 N.E. Studio Road, No. 2. For more information or to reserve a seat, contact info@cascadesacademy.org or 541-382-0699. The event is free and open to the public. The event is part of an educational series from Cascades Academy that includes a screening of the documentary, “Race to Nowhere,” about highstakes testing and student stress, at the Tower Theatre in downtown Bend on March 14. Also, Michael Thompson, author of “Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys,” will give a presentation during an event at the Tower Theatre on April 25.

Kim Clowers works in her home office earlier this month, while her daughter’s toys sit outside in the snow.

Local parents share benefits, challenges of working from home while raising a family

Immunization deadline coming fast Deschutes County Health officials are reminding parents that children won’t be able to attend school or certified child care facilities after Feb. 16 unless they have received all the required immunizations or have an appropriate medical or religious exemption. Parents of children who have incomplete immunizations will receive a letter in the coming weeks. Oregon law requires vaccination of students in all public and private schools, preschools, Head Start and certified child care facilities. Rotary Club of Bend will hold four more Shots for Tots and Teens clinics before the deadline: Jan. 22 at Sisters Elementary School, Jan. 29 at Hugh Hartman Campus in Redmond, Feb. 5 at Pilot Butte Middle School in Bend, and Feb. 12 at La Pine Middle School. The clinics are open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. to Deschutes County residents on a walk-in basis. Insurance will be billed for those who are insured, but shots are free for uninsured children. Parents should bring a copy of their children’s immunization records to the clinics. Contact: www.deschutes.org/ immunizations or 541-322-7400. — From staff reports

Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Four-year-old Jaden Clowers draws on a chalkboard in her mother Kim Clowers’ home office. Clowers helps run the family business from home while also caring for her daughter. At times it can be a difficult juggle, especially since Jaden has stopped napping.

Work-at-home Jaden Clowers, right, and her mom enjoy a snack break at their home in Bend.

B E ST B E T S FOR FAMILY FUN

By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

Details, Page E3

Free Family Saturday If you haven’t visited the High Desert Museum or just haven’t been in awhile, Saturday is your chance to check out everything the museum has to offer — from historical exhibits to furry critters — all for free! Families may want to take advantage of the free shuttle service as well.

Singalong Saturday From “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” to “If I Only Had a Brain,” the classic the “Wizard of Oz” is packed with great songs. Kids and adults alike can sing along to these awesome tunes while watching the film on the big screen at Bend’s Tower Theatre on Saturday.

end mom Kim Clowers has worked from home ever since her daughter, Jaden, was born four years ago. On her second day home after the birth, Clowers was already finding time to squeeze in a bit of work, writing paychecks for subcontractors for the family’s building and finish carpentry business. Clowers, 46, jokes that while her husband drives the truck (and does much of the physical work), she “drives

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parents the desk” and does pretty much all the paperwork for the business. In the months that followed Jaden’s arrival, Clowers figured out how to build a workday around naps and feedings. When Jaden would snooze, Clowers would work. Working from home has given Clowers the ability to spend special time with her daughter, snuggling together and reading books, going to play dates, and visiting local playgrounds. “The benefit is she has access to me and I have access to her,” said Clowers.

But juggling work with caring for her daughter can be tricky. Jaden doesn’t take naps anymore, so sometimes Clowers has to stay up until midnight to finish work. Every once in a while she has to park her daughter in front of the TV in order to complete an important project. Clowers considers herself a working mom, even if the work is done from home, often with her daughter nearby. For Clowers, this is the only arrangement that makes sense. See Work / E6

Mountain View senior speaks language of support Editor’s note: Standout Students, which runs every other week in The Bulletin, highlights outstanding teenagers in Central Oregon. To suggest a student for consideration, e-mail Megan Kehoe at mkehoe@bendbulletin.com.

By Alandra Johnson The Bulletin

Marie Miller has a knack for helping people. The Mountain View High School senior plans to become a nurse. She has helped organize blood drives at her high school and has gone on mission trips to Mexico. Marie has found some of her most rewarding moments of the past year have come when she is lending a hand, whether serving as a translator or helping tutor students.

STANDOUT STUDENTS Spanish Marie loves speaking Spanish and puts those skills to use to help others. She started learning to speak Spanish during her freshman year at Mountain View, and since then she says the language has really woven its way into her life. Marie recently walked into the school office to find a Spanish-speaking mother trying to communicate with one of the school counselors. See Miller / E6

Mountain view High School senior Marie Miller, 18, stands in the hallway of St. Charles Bend Tuesday during a job shadowing program. Marie plans to become a nurse. Andy Tullis The Bulletin


T EL EV IS IO N

E2 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Grieving mom gets no respite from well-meaning friends Dear Abby: My adult son passed away nine months ago. I am mostly numb. My home has always been welcoming, and I have had friends and family here constantly — but now they won’t leave! They don’t seem to “get” the fact that I need some time to be alone. I love these people, but my heart is broken. The only person I want to see and spend time with is my surviving son. I have lost my enthusiasm for almost everything. I work full time and no longer want to be the “hostess.” I am TIRED. My sons and I were close, and I raised them by myself. How do I tell my friends and family members that I need to be alone without offending them? — Heartbroken In Corpus Christi, Texas Dear Heartbroken: Please accept my deepest sympathy for your loss. I’m sure your friends and family care deeply about you and are only trying to be there for you. However, you need to heal as best as you can in your own way from the death of your son. Thank them for their constant support, and explain that you need some time to be alone and cope with this without a crowd around. They will understand. Working your way through the grieving process can be exhausting. But if your “tiredness” persists, I’m advising you to discuss it with your doctor because it can be a symptom of chronic depression, which is a medical condition. Dear Abby: I’m a friendly, outgoing cashier at a grocery store. I enjoy chatting with customers. I particularly like some of them and look forward to them coming in. The problem is what I should do when they ask me for personal information, like my phone number or Facebook information. In the last month, two customers asked to be my friends on Facebook and one asked for my phone number. I don’t feel comfortable sharing this information with them. What is a polite way to let them know I don’t want to give

DEAR ABBY out that information? — Facebook-Unfriendly In Loveland, Colo. Dear Facebook-unfriendly: Smile at the customer and, in your usual upbeat, friendly way, say: “You know, I think you are very nice — but I keep my work life and personal life separate. I never mix the two. But thanks for asking.” Period. Dear Abby: My 12-year-old daughter, “Sophia,” repeatedly shirks her basic responsibilities. She routinely receives detention for not completing homework assignments and for failing to bring required materials to class. Despite my concern, Sophia continues with her usual shortcomings. This is causing a great deal of stress between us, and our relationship is now very poor. Should I keep pushing her or should I just allow her to fail? — Disappointed Mom In Louisiana Dear Disappointed Mom: Of course you shouldn’t allow your daughter to fail. All mothers have to “push” sometimes. It goes with the territory. However, rather than letting it drive you and your daughter apart, talk with her teacher and see if she or he can give you some insight as to what’s going on. If that doesn’t help, then consult Sophia’s pediatrician. The girl may have a neurological problem that’s causing her behavior. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

T   B 

‘Gods of the Arena’ premieres tonight Reason to watch: Follow-up to Starz’s big-and-only hit. What it’s about: The first season — “Spartacus: Blood and Sand” — starred Australian actor Andy Whitfield as the leader of the slave revolt in ancient Rome. But Whitfield was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma last March, and the role has since been recast. So “Gods of the Arena” is not, technically, the second season but a prequel to the first; Spartacus doesn’t even appear, although Whitfield does a brief cameo later. Batiatus (John Hannah) — the slaveholding noble — and his better half, Lucretia (Lucy Lawless) — have a particularly brutal and effective warrior named Gannicus (Dustin Clare) in servitude. He is so good, in fact, that others want to buy him. Batiatus gets an offer he may not be able to refuse. My say: Let’s get down to what fans of this sword-andsandal blood porn nonsense really want to know: How many naked women? I counted about 25, but may have missed one or two (I wasn’t looking that closely. Really, I wasn’t.) There is one lesbian love scene, but you’ll have to wait to just before the closing credits for that. Meanwhile, the body count: Still high but not obscenely high. Can’t kill off too many extras just yet. What “Sparty” seems to have done a bit more effectively in the prequel is offer variations on the carnage; true fans will especially ap-

Laugh along with ‘Portlandia’ tonight Reason to watch: Terrific new sketch series on IFC starring Fred Armisen. What it’s about: Based on the Web series “ThunderAnt,” “Portlandia” stars “Saturday Night Live’s” Armisen and Carrie Brownstein (a founding member of Portland riot grrrl band Sleater-Kinney) as various residents of Oregon’s largest city. They include a pair of hostile lesbian owners of a bookstore, Women and Women First; another couple who insist on visiting the organic farm where the chicken they are about to order at a restaurant was born and raised (next week’s episode); and two friends commissioned by Portland’s mayor (played by Kyle MacLachlan) to write a song celebrating the city, “but not Seattle.” With cameos next week from Steve Buscemi; and Jason Sudeikis, leader of a polygamy cult that’s a front for that aforementioned organic chicken farm. Lorne Michaels is executive producer. My say: By this point you’ve correctly deduced that “Portlandia” is a satire of the city’s subcultures: animal and biker rights activists, feminists, ’90sera hipsters, folkies, transgenders, anarchists, bisexuals, radical vegans, greens and all others who harbor a seething bias

against Seattle for being a bigger and somewhat cooler city. (Portlandia, by the way, is the name of large statue in the city, but Seattle has the Space Needle, so there you have it.) Bottom line: Hilarious send-up of Portland, but Corvallis, Salem and Eugene may well see themselves in this rip as well.

Break from real news with ‘Onion’ on IFC Reason to watch: From the folks who brought you the satirical website, The Onion, “America’s Finest News Source.” Tune in tonight on IFC. What it’s about: The Onion News Network is the world’s largest TV news network, hosted by Brooke Alvarez (played by Suzanne Sena, a former local TV news anchor, and reporter for E! and “Extra”). She’s a rapidfire anchormonster who clicks around the set in her stilettos, while introducing news stories, or throwing to a reporter in the field for a remote, or debriefing in-studio experts. ONN stories include Kim Jong Il’s efforts to play Batman in the next Warner Bros. epic (Christian Bale will become temporary ruler of North Korea while he’s on leave);

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and pesky time travelers from the future who keep trying to kidnap Suri Cruise. My say: Someone (somewhere) in America flipping through channels late on a Friday night will come across ONN’s fake newscast, and stop in abject wonderment. “Hey, Mabel — get in here! Someone named Zorla in New Mexico just gave birth to 350 babies.” ONN’s fake news is not the TV version of (say) Orson Welles’ “War of the Worlds” radio broadcast, but it is so convincing, self-righteous, bellicose and perfectly deadpan that I was ready to buy a couple of these stories, too — except for the one about the “Thetan trans temporal mercenary” hired by the Cruises to protect Suri. (Interesting piece, though.) Bottom line: ONN expertly mimics a certain type of breathless, vacuous, bubbleheaded news delivery. That delivery, however, comes so fast that just as you’ve begun to absorb one punch line, another comes flying right by and then another and another. Information tumbles off the screen and often flat onto the floor. Too bad, because much of what’s here is very funny, if occasionally cruel. — From wire reports

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5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News Storm Stories Scrubs ‘14’ Å The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! With Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Rudy Maxa Steves’ Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Equitrekking ‘G’ Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves’ Europe OpenRoad ’ ‘G’ Equitrekking ‘G’ Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Garden Home This Old House PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

Supernanny Colombo Family (N) ‘PG’ Minute to Win It ’ ‘PG’ Å Medium Me Without You (N) ’ ‘14’ Supernanny Colombo Family (N) ‘PG’ Kitchen Nightmares (N) ‘14’ Å News on PDX-TV Washington W’k BBC Newsnight Minute to Win It ’ ‘PG’ Å Smallville Icarus ’ ‘14’ Å Rough Cut-Mac Crafting-Spot Washington W’k BBC Newsnight

9:00

9:30

Primetime: What Would You Do? (N) Dateline NBC ’ ‘PG’ Å CSI: NY The 34th Floor ’ ‘14’ Å Primetime: What Would You Do? (N) Fringe The Firefly (N) ‘14’ Å Monk ’ ‘PG’ Å Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å Dateline NBC ’ ‘PG’ Å Supernatural ’ ‘14’ Å Martha-Sewing Dewberry Shw Lark Rise to Candleford ‘PG’ Å

10:00

10:30

(10:03) 20/20 (N) ’ Å CSI: NY Unfriendly Chat ‘14’ Å (10:03) 20/20 (N) ’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ Monk Record producer’s death. ‘PG’ Need to Know (N) ’ Å Married... With Married... With Simply Ming ‘G’ Lidia’s Italy ‘G’ Need to Know (N) ’ Å

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Austin City Limits (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å News Jay Leno King of Queens King of Queens Ciao Italia ’ ‘G’ Caprial-John Austin City Limits (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

Criminal Minds ’ ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Poison ‘PG’ Å Criminal Minds Cold Comfort ’ ‘14’ Criminal Minds Zoe’s Reprise ‘14’ Criminal Minds ’ ‘14’ Å Criminal Minds Demonology ’ ‘14’ 130 28 18 32 Criminal Minds Blood Hungry ’ ‘14’ “Once Upon a Time ›› “Demolition Man” (1993, Science Fiction) Sylvester Stallone, Wesley Snipes, Sandra Bullock. A frozen ›› “Swordfish” (2001, Suspense) John Travolta, Hugh Jackman, Halle Berry. An ex- ›› “The Specialist” (1994, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Sharon Stone. A woman asks a 102 40 39 in Mexico” cop is thawed out to capture an old nemesis. Å con computer hacker is pulled into a high-tech heist. bomb expert to eliminate three gangsters. Å Miami Animal Police ’ ‘PG’ Å The Haunted The Door ‘PG’ Å Infested! ’ ‘PG’ Å Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘PG’ Confessions: Animal Hoarding ‘14’ 68 50 26 38 Miami Animal Police ’ ‘PG’ Å Housewives/Atl. The Real Housewives of Atlanta ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly (7:45) The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills ‘14’ ›› “The Pacifier” (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel, Lauren Graham. Premiere. ›› “The Pacifier” (2005, Comedy) 137 44 (6:45) › “Son-in-Law” (1993, Comedy) Pauly Shore, Carla Gugino, Lane Smith. Red. Wedding Redneck Wed Red. Wedding Redneck Wed Redneck Wed Redneck Wed 190 32 42 53 (4:30) ›› “In the Army Now” (1994) Pauly Shore. Marijuana USA Mexico’s Drug War (N) Mad Money 60 Minutes on CNBC Mexico’s Drug War Wealth-Risk Paid Program 51 36 40 52 60 Minutes on CNBC Piers Morgan Tonight (N) Anderson Cooper 360 Å Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Scrubs ‘14’ Å Daily Show Colbert Report Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Tosh.0 ‘14’ Å Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central Comedy Central 135 53 135 47 Go to Prison Outdoorsman Joy of Fishing PM Edition Visions of NW The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Film Festival Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 (3:30) Tonight From Washington Shake it Up! ‘G’ Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Wizards-Place Fish Hooks ‘G’ Phineas and Ferb Shake It Up! ‘G’ Shake It Up! ‘G’ Shake it Up! ‘G’ Shake it Up! ‘G’ Wizards-Place 87 43 14 39 Shake it Up! ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å Flying Wild Alaska (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Gold Rush: Alaska Gold Fever ‘PG’ Gold Rush: Alaska ’ ‘PG’ Å 156 21 16 37 Cash Cab ’ ‘G’ NBA Basketball Los Angeles Lakers at Denver Nuggets From the Pepsi Center in Denver. SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 NBA Basketball New York Knicks at San Antonio Spurs (Live) Tennis Australian Open, Day 6 From Melbourne, Australia. (Live) Å 22 24 21 24 Tim Tebow - Everything in Between Boxing Boxing From July 23, 2010. (N) Cheap Seats Cheap Seats AWA Wrestling Å AWA Wrestling Å Boxing Boxing: 1994 Holyfield vs. Moorer Boxing 23 25 123 25 Boxing (N) SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Still Standing ’ Still Standing ’ America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos The 700 Club A Brand New Life ‘G’ 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Best Dishes 30-Minute Meals Bobby Flay Best Thing Ate Chopped Prove It On the Plate Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Outrageous Food Best Thing Ate Unwrapped Unwrapped 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Huskies Beavers Cougars Access Huskies Seahawks Boxing Mauricio Pastrana vs. Gary Russell Jr. Seahawks The Final Score Rumble on the Ridge XVI (N) 20 45 28* 26 Mark Few Show “There’s Something About Mary” Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men › “What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher. › “What Happens in Vegas” (2008) Cameron Diaz, Ashton Kutcher. 131 Get It Sold ‘G’ Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters Property Virgins Property Virgins Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 176 49 33 43 Get It Sold ‘G’ Modern Marvels Bombs ‘G’ Å Modern Marvels B-2 Bomber ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Super Ships ‘PG’ Modern Marvels Grease (N) ‘PG’ Restoration Restoration Modern Marvels ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 (4:00) The Real Robin Hood ‘PG’ Old Christine Old Christine How I Met How I Met Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba ‘PG’ Å Reba As Is ‘PG’ Reba ‘PG’ Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) Lockup: San Quentin Poetry slam. Lockup: Raw Convict Code Lockup: Raw Hell in a Cell Lockup Inside Pendleton Juvenile Lockup Return to Corcoran 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Silent Library ’ Silent Library ’ Jersey Shore ’ ‘14’ Å Jersey Shore Free Snooki ‘14’ Å ››› “American Pie” (1999) Jason Biggs, Shannon Elizabeth. ’ 192 22 38 57 The Seven ‘PG’ Fanboy-Chum SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å House of Anubis iCarly ‘G’ Å Victorious ’ ‘G’ Victorious ’ ‘G’ Supah Ninjas ‘G’ George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Entourage ‘MA’ Entourage ‘MA’ 132 31 34 46 CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ › “The Hitcher” (2007, Suspense) Sean Bean, Sophia Bush. WWE Friday Night SmackDown! (N) ’ Å Merlin Goblin’s Gold (N) ’ Å Being Human (Part 1 of 2) 133 35 133 45 Stargate SG-1 Seth ’ ‘PG’ Behind Scenes Hal Lindsey Joel Osteen ‘PG’ Frederick Price Praise the Lord (Live) Å Life Focus ’ ‘G’ Joseph Prince Kim Clement Changing-World Christian Celeb First to Know 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Mamma Mia!” (2008) Meryl Streep, Pierce Brosnan. Premiere. (10:15) The Office (10:45) Glory Daze ‘14’ (11:45) Step Up 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond (9:45) ››› “The Mayor of Hell” (1933, Crime Drama) James (11:15) › “Bloody Birthday” (1981) Susan ›› “City Streets” (1931) Gary Cooper. Mobster’s daughter leads ››› “Scarface” (1932) Paul Muni, Ann Dvorak. The early his- (8:15) ››› “Little Caesar” (1930, Crime Drama) Edward G. 101 44 101 29 circus boyfriend into bootlegging. tory of crime in Chicago is highlighted. Å Robinson, Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Å (DVS) Cagney, Madge Evans, Allen Jenkins. Å Strasberg, Jose Ferrer. Say Yes, Dress Cake Boss ‘PG’ Cake Boss ‘PG’ Four Weddings ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress Four Weddings (N) ’ ‘PG’ Å Say Yes, Dress Say Yes, Dress 178 34 32 34 Say Yes, Dress Law & Order Second Opinion ’ ‘14’ Bones Charred human remains. ‘14’ ››› “Kill Bill: Vol. 1” (2003, Action) Uma Thurman, Lucy Liu. Å (10:15) ››› “Kill Bill: Vol. 2” (2004, Action) Uma Thurman. Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Purple Heart ’ ‘PG’ Grim Adventures Johnny Test ‘Y7’ 6TEEN ‘G’ Total Drama Young Justice (N) Ben 10: Alien Force ‘Y7’ Star Wars: Clone King of the Hill King of the Hill American Dad ’ American Dad ’ Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Terr Places Terr Places Ghost Adventures Goldfield, NV ‘PG’ Ghost Adventures (N) ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘14’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations (5:44) All in the Family ‘PG’ All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 65 47 29 35 Retired at 35 NCIS Dead and Unburied ‘PG’ Å NCIS Witch Hunt ’ ‘PG’ Å CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘PG’ 15 30 23 30 House Office Politics ’ ‘14’ Å 100 Most Shocking Music Moments 100 Most Shocking Music Moments The X Life ‘14’ The X Life ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ You’re Cut Off ’ ‘14’ MTV World Stage Celebrity Rehab 191 48 37 54 100 Most Shocking Music Moments PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:35) › “Sorority Boys” 2002 ‘R’ (6:15) ›› “She-Devil” 1989, Comedy Meryl Streep. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “Happy Gilmore” 1996 Adam Sandler. ’ ‘PG-13’ “Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking” (11:10) ››› “Mad Max” 1979 ‘R’ Fox Legacy (5:16) ›››› “All About Eve” 1950, Drama Bette Davis. ‘NR’ Å Fox Legacy Fox Legacy (8:16) ›››› “All About Eve” 1950, Drama Bette Davis. ‘NR’ Å Fox Legacy Fox Legacy All About Eve Surf Model Swimsuit Issue Surf Model The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ SLAM! ‘14’ Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Cubed (N) The Daily Habit Thrillbillies ‘14’ SLAM! ‘14’ Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit PGA Tour Golf PGA Tour Golf Bob Hope Classic, Third Round From La Quinta, Calif. Golf Central PGA Tour Golf Champions: Mitsubishi Electric Championship, First Round From Kona, Hawaii. Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Who’s the Boss? Little House on the Prairie ‘PG’ “Always and Forever” (2009) Dean McDermott. ‘PG’ The Golden Girls The Golden Girls The Golden Girls (4:30) ›› “Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning (6:45) ››› “Spider-Man 2” 2004, Action Tobey Maguire, Kirsten Dunst, James Franco. Peter Parker fights a The Ricky Gervais Eastbound & Down Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Å Real Time With Bill Maher ’ ‘MA’ Å HBO 425 501 425 10 Thief” 2010 Logan Lerman. ’ ‘PG’ Å man who has mechanical tentacles. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Show ‘MA’ ‘MA’ Å (4:45) ›› “Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back” 2001 Ben Affleck. ‘R’ Onion News Portlandia Farm Mr. Show-Bob (8:35) ›› “Beyond Re-Animator” 2003, Horror Jeffrey Combs. ‘R’ Onion News (11:05) Portlandia Larry Sanders IFC 105 105 (5:05) ›› “Watchmen” 2009, Action Billy Crudup, Malin Akerman, Jackie Earle Haley. A masked vigilante probes the murder of a (8:15) › “Half Past Dead” 2002, Action Steven Seagal, Ja Rule. An undercover agent ›› “She’s Out of My League” 2010 Jay Baruchel. An average (11:45) Life on Top MAX 400 508 7 fellow superhero. ’ ‘R’ Å battles gold-hungry invaders in prison. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å Joe lands a gorgeous girlfriend. ’ ‘R’ Å (N) ’ ‘MA’ Dog Whisperer (N) ‘G’ Wild Justice Pig Stalkers ‘14’ Wild Justice Outlaw Hunters ‘14’ Dog Whisperer ‘G’ Wild Justice Pig Stalkers ‘14’ Wild Justice Outlaw Hunters ‘14’ Border Wars Fog of War ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Zevo-3 ’ Å Zevo-3 ’ Å OddParents Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Zevo-3 ’ Å Zevo-3 ’ Å Zevo-3 ’ Å OddParents OddParents The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Speed Racer Speed Racer NTOON 89 115 189 Zona’s Show Spanish Fly Salt Water Series Alaska Outdoors Pro Team Journal Trevor Gowdy Match Fish. Fish Fishburne Familiar Waters Big Water Adven. Buccaneers American Archer Alaska Outdoors Alaskan OUTD 37 307 43 (4:00) “Nobel Son” 2007, Suspense Alan Inside the NFL (iTV) NFL news and high- ›› “Extraordinary Measures” 2010, Drama Brendan Fraser, Harrison Ford. iTV. Two ››› “The Hurt Locker” 2008, War Jeremy Renner, Brian Geraghty. iTV. Members of (11:15) ››› “The Rock” 1996, Action SHO 500 500 lights. ’ ‘PG’ Å Rickman. iTV. ’ ‘R’ men join forces to develop a life-saving drug. ’ ‘PG’ Å an elite bomb squad pull hazardous duty in Iraq. ’ ‘R’ Å Sean Connery. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction (Live) Barrett-Jackson Automobile Auction (Live) Mustang Boss 302 ‘PG’ Race in 60 Race in 60 SPEED 35 303 125 (5:05) ›› “The International” 2009, Suspense Clive Owen. ‘R’ Å Starz Studios (7:20) ›› “2012” 2009 John Cusack. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out humanity. ‘PG-13’ Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ‘MA’ Spartacus: Gods of the Arena ‘MA’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:40) ›› “Flawless” 2007, Crime Drama Michael Caine, Demi ›› “Crush” 2009 Christopher Egan. A seductress becomes “The Other Side of ›› “Outlander” 2008, Action James Caviezel, Ron Perlman, Sophia Myles. An alien “Dragon Fighter” 2002, Action Dean Cain. A genetically engiTMC 525 525 Moore, Lambert Wilson. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å obsessed with a college student. ’ ‘R’ Å joins forces with Vikings to hunt his enemy. ’ ‘R’ Å neered dragon goes on a rampage. ’ ‘R’ Å the Tracks” Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever Elk Fever VS. 27 58 30 ››› “The First Wives Club” 1996, Comedy Goldie Hawn. ‘PG’ Å The Golden Girls The Golden Girls Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å John Edward Cross Country ‘PG’ ››› “The First Wives Club” 1996 Goldie Hawn. Premiere. ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 E3

FAMILY CALENDAR

A weekly compilation of family-friendly events throughout Central Oregon

P  ’ G  M 

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351. The Family Movie Guide should be used along with the Motion Picture Association of America rating system for selecting movies suitable for children. Only films rated G, PG or PG-13 are included in this weekly listing, along with occasional R-rated films that may have entertainment value or educational value for older children with parental guidance.

Full events calendar and movie times are in today’s GO! Magazine.

FRIDAY Jan. 21 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Camouflage is Cool�; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www. highdesertmuseum.org. JAM ON THE HILL: Riders compete in a series of snowboard heats with vendors; event takes place in the parking lot by Oregon State University-Cascades Campus; free; 4-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; www.wix.com/ jamonthehill/2011.

Courtesy EPK.TV

The fugitive group contemplates how best to avoid being noticed by the farmworkers in “The Way Back.� See the full review in today’s GO! Magazine.

By Roger Moore The Orlando Sentinel

‘The Way Back’

SATURDAY Jan. 22

Warner Bros via The Associated Press

REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; proceeds benefit the Redmond High School wind ensemble; $5, $3 ages 11 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495. FREE FAMILY SATURDAY: The High Desert Museum offers complimentary admission for the whole family; overflow parking and shuttle service available at Morning Star Christian School; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by Central Oregon Symphony musicians; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. WINTER EXTRAVAGANZA: Ballet students and performers from “Oliver� provide an afternoon of dance, drama and refreshments; donations accepted; 2-4 p.m.; Academie de Ballet Classique, 162 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-382-4055. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by Central Oregon Symphony musicians; free; 4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony .com. SPAGHETTI DINNER: Meal includes spaghetti, salad and garlic bread; proceeds benefit a relief fund for area veterans; $6; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring a caller and live music; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. SINGALONG SATURDAY: Watch the G-rated 1939 film “The Wizard of Oz� and sing along with the characters; $10; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org.

SUNDAY Jan. 23 KEEP IT LOCAL — VOLUNTEER EXPO: Community organizations will be on hand to answer questions about volunteering options; free; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7093 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. CHILI COOK-OFF AND RAIL JAM: Eat chili and watch competitors compete for the best recipe; with a rail jam; proceeds benefit The Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools;

Families and fans of the “Wizard of Oz� can sing along while watching the movie at the Tower Theatre in downtown Bend on Saturday night.

$10, $5 ages 6-11, free ages 5 and younger; 2-6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-480-0612 or simplysales@ q.com.

MONDAY Jan. 24 No Family event listings.

TUESDAY Jan. 25 HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC CROWN CITY STRING QUARTET: String musicians play selections from Mozart, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky; $35, $10 children and students with ID; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700, info@ highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchamber music.com.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 26 VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian soup with a list of its ingredients and watch the short video “The Blue Zones�; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017.

THURSDAY Jan. 27 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Snow!�; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. ADVENTURE AROUND AMERICA: Carolyn and Jim Hammond present stories and images from their RV trip through the United States; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-617-4663.

Story times, library youth events for Jan. 21-27 BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7097: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 11 a.m. Wednesday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday and 11 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SATURDAY STORIES: Ages 3-5; 10:15 a.m. Saturday. CROOK COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-4477978: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3 and older; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and 11 a.m. Thursday. • WE READ: Ages 0-3; 10 a.m. Wednesday and 6:30 p.m. Monday. JEFFERSON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY; 241 S.W. Seventh St., Madras; 541-475-3351: • PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Ages 3-5; 10:30 a.m. AND 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. • SPANISH STORY TIME: All ages; 1 p.m. Wednesday. • TODDLERS STORY TIME: Ages 0-2; 10:10 a.m. Tuesday. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY; 16425 First St., La Pine; 541-312-1090: • FAMILY STORY TIME: All ages; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday. • TEEN LAPTOP LAB: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Monday. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1054: • BABY STEPS: Ages 0-18 months; 10:30 a.m. Thursday. • TODDLIN’ TALES: Ages 18-36 months; 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Tuesday. • PRESCHOOL PARADE: Ages 3-5;

10:15 and 11:15 a.m. Wednesday. • TEEN THURSDAYS: Grades 6-12; 3 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY; 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 a.m. Wednesday. • TEEN TUESDAYS: Grades 6-12; 3:30 to 5 p.m. Tuesday. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080: • FAMILY FUN STORY TIME: Ages 0-5; 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. Thursday. • TEEN TERRITORY GAME DAY: Grades 6-12; 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS; 2690 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-318-7242: • ONCE UPON A STORY TIME: All ages; 11 a.m. Friday. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM; 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754: • TOTALLY TOUCHABLE TALES: Ages 2-5; 10:30 a.m. Tuesday; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) • WILD WEDNESDAYS: Treasure hunt for ages 6-12; included with admission ($10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger) CAMALLI BOOK COMPANY: 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134: • STORY TIME: Ages 2-6; 2 p.m. Tuesday. BETWEEN THE COVERS: 645 N.W. Delaware Ave., Bend; 541-3854766: • STORY TIME: 2 p.m. Thursday. * Story times are free unless otherwise noted

F DVD  W

Make ‘Romona and Beezus’ timeless in your movie collection By Rick Bentley McClatchy-Tribune News Service

In “Ramona and Beezus,� Beatrice “Beezus� Quimby must deal with an imaginative younger sister, played by Selena Gomez. Joey King is the perfect pick as Ramona Quimby in the new family-friendly film based on Beverly Cleary’s books. Someone should hurry up and invent a time-freezing machine so Joey can stay this age for future projects. The screenplay by Laurie Craig and Nick Pustay throws out a host of emotional challenges for Joey, from major family disasters to one of the worst school picture days in history.

Bridget Moynahan, John Corbett and Selena Gomez are shown in a scene from, “Ramona and Beezus.� 20th Century Fox via The Associated Press

Rating: PG-13 for violent content, depiction of physical hardships, a nude image and brief strong language. What it’s about: Prisoners make a break from a Soviet gulag during World War II, braving cold, wilderness and other hardships to walk thousands of miles to freedom. The kid attractor factor: It’s a real-life “Man vs. Wild,� based on a real-life Bear Grylls. Good lessons/bad lessons: How to navigate, using a stick in the sand and the sun, and other survival skills. Violence: Yes. Knives are involved. Language: Some profanity Sex: None, with one non-titillating nude image. Drugs: None Parents’ advisory: A newfangled old-fashioned adventure epic, this is a bit too violent for the very young — OK for 10 and older.

‘The Dilemma’ Rating: PG-13 for mature thematic elements involving sexual content What it’s about: A guy tries to find a way to tell his best friend his wife is cheating on him. The kid attractor factor: Vince Vaughn, Kevin James, slap fights Good lessons/bad lessons: “Cheating� is always a lot more complicated than it looks. Violence: Punches are thrown, fish are endangered. Language: Some profanity, not over the top. Sex: Sexual content, from the cheating to the massage parlor, is on modest display. Drugs: Beer and wine are consumed in a bar. Parents’ advisory: Despite the subject matter, mild-mannered enough to be suitable for kids 12 and older.

‘The Green Hornet’ Rating: PG-13 for sequences of violent action, language, sensuality and drug content What it’s about: A hard-partying heir to a newspaper fortune, on a goof, decides to become a crime fighter and enlists his martial-arts and gadget-whiz chauffeur as a sidekick. The kid attractor factor: Seth

Rogen and lots of explosions, shootouts and car chases Good lessons/bad lessons: “Trying doesn’t matter when you always fail.� Violence: Shootings, crushings, dismemberments, etc. Language: Lots of profanity, including almost everything but the F-bomb. Sex: Nubile females are ogled. Drugs: Drunk scenes, meth labs. Parents’ advisory: This rude and crude fanboy-oriented, maskedhero movie is a pretty severe test of the limits of PG-13, suitable for 13 and older, but barely.

‘Gulliver’s Travels’ Rating: PG for brief rude humor, mild language and action. What it’s about: A loser and would-be travel writer is sucked into a world of tiny people where he can be heroic, successful and admired. The kid attractor factor: Jack Black and lots of teeny-tiny people in 3-D, with the odd buttcrack joke. Good lessons/bad lessons: “Put yourself out there.� But don’t plagiarize. Violence: Slapstick, shots to the groin, etc. Language: A brief dissertation on the “A� word, attached to the prefix “lame.� Sex: None, though a lengthy peeto-put-out-a-fire bit should count. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: More family-friendly than your typical Jack Black farce, with the effects and humor aimed very young. OK for 8 and older.

‘Yogi Bear’ Rating: PG for some mild rude humor. What it’s about: Hanging out with a smarter-than-the-average bear in Jellystone Park. The kid attractor factor: The character has been around forever, but this time he’s in 3-D. And Boo Boo is voiced by Justin Timberlake. Good lessons/bad lessons: “You can never fail if you never stop trying.� Violence: Mild slapstick. Language: Disney clean, with the odd butt joke. Sex: Flirtation. Drugs: None. Parents’ advisory: A harmless VERY small-child friendly boymeets-girl and bear-steals-pic-anic-basket comedy, suitable for 8 and younger.

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly


E4 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUE LIN E BI GA R

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Friday, Jan. 21, 2011: This year, you are able to assert yourself without others being offended. People close to you actually might be relieved to see a stronger yet diplomatic you. Learn to communicate with precision, knowing what your message is. If single, you might not really be sure if someone cares. Try to be more aware, and listen to observant friends! If attached, do not take your sweetie for granted. Caring comes back in multiples. VIRGO knows how to key into you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Confusion could mark an accomplishment. Make it a habit to confirm a statement, a meeting location or whatever is needed. You might feel a bit awkward in the presence of others. Just note what is going on inside. Tonight: Play it easy and relaxing. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You might have difficulty moving from one idea to another, mainly because conversations with others could be disjointed. Should you want to clear out a problem, use your communication skills. A friend might not be relating the whole story. Tonight: Let go. You need more fun. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH You ask a question in order to get a clearer perspective, only to discover that the answer opens the door to more confusion. Be skillful in listening, and

reflect what you are hearing. Later in the day, you get a better perspective. Tonight: Head home. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHH Do not allow another person to mow you down over an issue. You do know when someone is being unreasonable. For you, the issue might be more how to say “No, thank you” in an appropriate manner. You do not want to burn any bridges. Tonight: Join some friends. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Clear the haze off several issues. Zero in on the bottom line, knowing when you have had enough. Your ability to open up conversations comes through. People feel more at ease with you. Tonight: Treat a loved one. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH You could be out of sync with daytime events. Don’t worry, your time is coming. In fact, as the sun sets, you feel revitalized, just in time for the weekend! You might need to make last-minute plans, as a delay could slow you down. Tonight: Feeling great, doing your thing. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHHH Zero in on the basics. Knowing what you want helps others follow along. You cut through confusion with your ability to lead. Meetings could be more important than you realize. Supporters appear after a discussion that could be uncomfortable. Tonight: Add a little mystery to your allure. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Pressure builds, as others look up to you and need to follow your example or directions. Avoid taking a personal matter out

into the world. The issue might melt away, given time. The other party feels it when you are not thinking of him or her. Tonight: Where the party begins. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH You seem to know what needs to be done, while others seem to be working their way through a maze. You could be happiest close to home, or in a situation that has a homey atmosphere. You seem to have an unusual sense of grace, which others respond to. Tonight: Know when to call it an early night. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHH Stay sensitive to your well-being. What another party proposes sounds excellent. The reality could be quite different. Avoid signing an agreement without legal representation. Risks could be a bad idea. Tonight: Take off ASAP. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHH Try to be as clear as possible. Also, clarify what you are hearing, as a prevalent theme of misunderstandings could run through the day. Be careful with funds and any other major decisions. A good idea is to say “yes” to a long lunch. Enjoy. Tonight: Where you want to be, but not alone. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHH Clear out as much as you can. You could be unusually tired or withdrawn. Test out your ideas rather than declaring them as givens. You easily could see a problem and make an adjustment. Tighten up a plan. Tonight: Where people are!

© 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

Miller

Marie Miller

Continued from E1 Marie offered to translate because no one in the office was able to understand the woman. The experience struck a chord for Marie, as she got to see firsthand how important her language skills could be to communicate essential information. “It was mentally exhausting, but really, really powerful,” said Marie. Marie has also spent this school year helping tutor Spanish-speaking students to improve their English. For instance, there was a girl who moved from Mexico to Bend at the end of September speaking no English. The girl worked with a teacher in an Englishlearning lab and then Marie worked with her to help polish her skills. The pair ended up swapping languages back and forth, and Marie was impressed with how much she was able to pick up. The girl, a freshman, moved before winter break, but the pair still keep in contact. Marie considers her to be like a little sister in some ways. “I underestimated how rewarding it was going to be,” said Marie. She was impressed with how brave the girl was to be able to go to school each day, not

Work Continued from E1 “I enjoy both. I need stimulation from adults, but I also want to see the world through her eyes.”

Time with kids The reasons parents work from home are plentiful. It can be a financial decision, so a stayat-home parent can help contribute to the family’s finances. It can be a logistical decision, to better allow a parent to pursue a specific kind of job. Working from home can also be a child care decision. People who telecommute are more satisfied with their jobs than those who spend most of their time in the office, according to a recent study from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. The primary benefit telecommuters reported was a decrease in work-life conflict. For Bend mom Amy James, 35, working from home offers the chance to spend time with her kids while also fulfilling her desire to teach. She stopped working as an elementary teacher after her son Casey, now 7, was born. It was important to her to care for her son herself. For the first year or so, that is what she did. But then she began to feel an itch to do something else. After learning DevelopMusic, a local music education program for kids, was for sale, she purchased it. Ever since, James has been teaching music to children while also taking care of her own kids, Casey and Katey, 3. Cathi Brese Doebler, New York

Age: 18 School: Mountain View High School senior Activities: Member of the Red Cross Club, alto in the Jazz Choir and Concert Choir, member of the New Hope Church’s youth group, tutor for Spanish-speaking students Future plans: To study nursing at one of several universities to which she has been accepted Favorite movies: “Inception” and almost any romantic comedy

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

St. Charles Biomed Tech Mike Weber, left, gets help from Mountain View High School senior Marie Miller while wheeling a machine into the neonatal intensive care unit at St. Charles Bend.

her nursing profession at some point or to travel to a Spanishspeaking country. “It’s something God has put on my heart,” said Marie.

Activities knowing any of the language. Marie is now working with another Spanish-speaking student. “I’ve seen him grow as a person and become more confident,” said Marie.

Future plans Marie has known for a long time that she wants to become a nurse. She is currently job shad-

author of “Ditch the Joneses: Discover Your Family,” stopped working full time after her son was born. She started her own consulting and training business when he was about 6 months old. Doebler wrote a book about her experiences in order to help other families follow the same path. She talks about the importance of having regular nap times and teaching children to be quiet when they see Mom or Dad on the phone. Doebler hopes people may be able to explore working from home as a way to spend more time with their children. She thinks many people feel trapped in their current work positions and unsure of how to figure out whether they could work from home. Doebler says many people may not realize how little income they bring home once they account for day care, gas, mileage, dry-cleaning, clothing, eating out and so on. She created a chart for families to track these costs associated with working outside the home. The numbers can be “eye-opening.” Her book also offers information about how to budget and save money to make it work.

Logistics Bend dad David Uri, 41, has been working from home as a financial consultant for the past four years while helping raise his daughters, ages 10, 7 and 4. Working from home requires a great deal of multitasking, something that Uri says he thought he was good at, but has started to question. Lately he feels as if he is better at focusing on one thing and then moving on to the next, which can make juggling work

owing members of the medical staff at St. Charles Bend. She likes working with children and is thinking about working in pediatrics, neonatal or family birthing. Marie has been accepted at several universities in the Northwest, including George Fox University, the University of Portland, Gonzaga University and Seattle Pacific University. She

plans to visit the schools in the coming months to help her decide. She says her parents, Jack and Colleen, have been very encouraging. Her father is a local dentist and is excited that she also wants to go into the health field. She is very close with her family, including her three younger siblings. Marie hopes to be able to use her Spanish-speaking skills in

Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Kim Clowers gives her daughter Jaden a squeeze before getting back to work. Finding a way to balance work and family life is a challenge, but Clowers enjoys the time she gets to spend with her daughter. and kids tricky. He had to install a lock on his office door to prevent interruptions, though sometimes that doesn’t work. The girls slip notes under the door or knock. Uri was on a conference call with 20 people early one morning before anyone else was supposed to be awake. That’s when one of his daughters walked in and asked when he was going to make pancakes. Everyone on the call heard her request. Uri says everyone understood, but it’s the kind of challenging situation that comes up when work and family life overlap. Particularly since her daughter stopped napping, Clowers has learned to be creative about how and when she gets work done. Jaden is in preschool eight hours a week, which helps. Clowers also tries to get out of bed earlier than her daughter to get started on work. Clowers has learned that she

needs blocks of time to get things done, in at least 10-minute increments. Otherwise, if she is interrupted too much, she can make mistakes. Jaden has learned to adjust. She can play quietly on her own and has also learned her mom’s hand signals about how to be quiet while she is on the phone. Sometimes Clowers asks a friend to watch Jaden for a day. On those days, yes, Clowers gets a lot of work done, but she ends up wondering, “What did I miss?” Sometimes, too, deadlines are missed. Early on, Clowers made the decision to make her family her priority above her career. Knowing this conscious priority can help when she has to choose between them. “There have been times when my daughter’s needed me and I’ve been on a serious deadline with work.” She responded to her daughter first, then to work.

Marie, who has a 3.95 grade point average, is a member of her school’s Red Cross Club and she has helped organize several blood drives at the school. Marie also loves music and is a member of the school’s jazz choir and concert choir. “Music is a huge passion of mine.” The alto has auditions with the choirs at several colleges she is considering. While she doesn’t think

James takes Katey to all of the classes she teaches. This arrangement means James never has to use any outside child care (apart from a few hours from her parents on occasion). But the business has required more attention in recent years, and James says the balance can be hard. “There are times where I’m home, but I’m just not present.” She can find it tough to set strict office hours, because she could work 24 hours a day. “There are days when I think about packing it in,” said James. Sometimes she wonders how she would feel to give up her job. She likes getting validation outside of being a mom, plus she loves teaching and music. James also recognizes that these thoughts are a luxury. “For many families, two incomes are not a nicety, they are a necessity.”

Challenges Uri sometimes wonders about the message working from home sends his daughters. When his wife, a local doctor, goes to work, she is out of sight, out of mind. When his wife comes home, she is focused on home. Uri’s office, meanwhile, is in the middle of a high-traffic area in the house and sometimes he has to work instead of focus time on his girls. He’s not sure they can understand that choice, when he would rather play with them but has to work. A few months ago, Uri decided to rent an office away from home where he could dedicate time on work. He still works from home a great deal, but can escape to the official office as needed. Still, Uri values working from home.

about pursuing singing professionally, she wants to continue to perform. “I just can’t imagine not singing,” said Marie. “It’s kind of like my escape from studying.” Marie likes all kinds of music, but especially loves jazz. She also likes writing her own songs, mostly ballads. Marie also plays the violin. Although she is no longer a member of the orchestra, she still practices regularly on her own. In years past, Marie has been involved in musical productions as well as volleyball and track, although she is taking time off from those activities this year. Marie is also an active member of her church’s youth group and has been since about fourth grade. She considers the members of the youth group to be like a second family. They have movie nights or play capture the flag in Drake Park. She is trying to enjoy her last few months at home before heading off to college. “I’ve been forcing myself to not overload and not do too much,” said Marie about her senior year. “I want everything I do to be worthwhile.” Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.

It has meant that whenever he has downtime, he can spend it with his kids instead of, say, surfing the Internet. He likes getting to share as much time with his daughters as he can. Working from home is almost never a 9-to-5 job. James thinks she works about 30 to 40 hours a week. She isn’t paid by the hour, so she doesn’t keep track of how much time she spends on work. For Uri, the hours vary depending on the project he’s working on. Some weeks he puts in about 10 hours, other weeks he works more than 60. Clowers says it’s hard to keep track of the hours she spends working on business and those she spends working on household duties, like paying personal bills, because there is so much commingling. Many parents who work from home also find themselves letting work bleed into night and weekend hours. Clowers expects to spend some time working nights and weekends, even though she likes to save that time for the family. To get all of her work done, it is necessary. Plus, if she’s working at 10 p.m., she doesn’t have to worry about being interrupted by her daughter. For parents who are considering working from home, James offers advice. She encourages them to think about how it will impact family dynamics. For instance, working from home may mean Mom is no longer able to get dinner ready every night or do as much around the house. “Go into it knowing no situation is perfect and allow yourself that flexibility.” Alandra Johnson can be reached at 541-617-7860 or at ajohnson@bendbulletin.com.



Goody’s advertised in The Bulletin and received 170 coupons in just one day. We’re The Bulletin, your local source for news, entertainment, information and savings. Each day 70,000 readers turn to the pages of our print edition for saving opportunities from local businesses. Plus we deliver grocery and shopping inserts every week with additional ways to stretch your dollars — locally. The Bulletin ... there when you need it most.

Goody’s was interested in reaching new customers. So they decided to do something cool. They decided to run a one-day-only coupon in The Bulletin. The response was absolutely SWEET! And here’s the scoop: They received 170 coupons in just one day — a MONDAY! You could say it was one tasty little promotion that a number of Bulletin readers just couldn’t resist.

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To Advertise call 541-382-1811


THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 F1

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Want to Buy or Rent Need firewood - will trade fly pole, fender acoustic guitar, older electric guitar (BC Rich), shop heater, much more. 503-933-0814 (Bend) Wanted: Small Metal building. Will remove from property or pay cash. 541-233-8944.

205

Items for Free FREE American Standard Toilet, and Microwave oven, both work! 541-382-0242. FREE to good home: female long-haired black & tan mini Dachshund, shots & tags up to date. 541-815-6780.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

263 - Tools 264 - Snow Removal Equipment 265 - Building Materials 266 - Heating and Stoves 267 - Fuel and Wood 268 - Trees, Plants & Flowers 269 - Gardening Supplies & Equipment 270 - Lost and Found 275 - Auction Sales GARAGE SALES 280 - Garage/Estate Sales 281 - Fundraiser Sales 282 - Sales Northwest Bend 284 - Sales Southwest Bend 286 - Sales Northeast Bend 288 - Sales Southeast Bend 290 - Sales Redmond Area 292 - Sales Other Areas FARM MARKET 308 - Farm Equipment and Machinery 316 - Irrigation Equipment 325 - Hay, Grain and Feed 333 - Poultry, Rabbits and Supplies 341 - Horses and Equipment 345 - Livestock and Equipment 347 - Llamas/Exotic Animals 350 - Horseshoeing/Farriers 358 - Farmer’s Column 375 - Meat and Animal Processing 383 - Produce and Food 208

208

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Pets and Supplies

Canaries - Color Bred

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537

Singers (males) $75; Hens $45. Yellow variegated, white variegated. 541-410-5105

Kittens & cats for adoption! Thurs, Sat & Sun 1-4, other days by appt. Foster home also has small kittens, 541-815-7278 to visit. Altered, shots, ID chip, more. Support your local no-kill, all-volunteer rescue group. 65480 78th St, Bend, 541-389-8420 541-598-5488 visit www.craftcats.org

Aussie Mini AKC Red Tri pup born 11/21/10, over the top personality, very friendly, 1st shots and wormed, family raised. 598-5314/788-7799 Aussie Mini Litter, (4), shots, tails done, in-home raised, dbl reg. Ready now! $500. 541-409-0253, Redmond AUSSIE PUPPIES, mini and toy, $250, 1 male/1 female left. 1st shots, tails docked. Ready to go! 541-420-9694. Australian Cattle Dogs / Heelers Great temperament, herding instinct. 541-279-4133 Barn/shop cats avail. Free. Fixed, shots, most are semifriendly, will help with rodent control in exchange for safe shelter, food & water. We deliver. 541-389-8420.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

POODLE Pups, AKC Toy Black/white, chocolate & other colors, so loveing, 541-475-3889

Poodle, Toy, Male, 10 mo., parti colored, black & white, $300, 541-480-8372. Pug puppies, 2 males 1 female $350/ea. Parents on site, ready 1/16. 541-948-6511. Pug puppies, Two males one female $35 each. Parents on site, ready to go 1/16. Call 541-948-6511.

263

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Fuel and Wood

The Bulletin reserves the right to publish all ads from The Bulletin newspaper onto The Bulletin Internet website.

Savage model 24B-DL single shot .22/20 ga., $175. Stevens model 67 12 ga. pump shotgun, $125. Both fair cond. 541-548-8920.

CRAFTSMAN 3500 watt generator, $300. 541-317-9864 Paint sprayer - Graco 695, new seals, good unit, $800. KNAACK job-site tool box 48x30, 32" deep $150. Call 541-480-3110 PORTABLE CEMENT MIXER $125. 541-317-9864

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2. Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

300

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

308

240

Crafts and Hobbies Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Taurus revolver, model number M850-2 BL, .38 special, $320 OBO. 541-325-1692 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Winchester Model 12, 12 ga, 30” full, great condition, $325. 541-771-5648

SEARS Craftsman 10” table saw, 3 HP, saw with legs, cast iron table extensions, extra blades, $485 OBO. 541-383-7150.

255

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Computers

Building Materials

THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

SEASONED LODGEPOLE PINE Split, $130/cord Small, but good dry wood. Fuel costs may apply. 541-410-6792; 541-382-6099

Huge inventory reduction sale 30-70% Off Hardwood Flooring, Mouldings and Paneling 145 SE 9th St. Bend 10-3pm Sat, Sun, Mon-Fri 541-610-2206

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

242

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Misc. Items

Pro-From 755 Crosstrainer Treadmill, excellent condition. Used maybe 10X. Folds up and packs away. $175 CASH, you pick up. Awbrey Butte area. Call 541-633-7307. Pro-From Cardio Cross-Trainer $150. 541-317-9864

245

Golf Equipment Like new Adams Speedline driver, 10.5 R shaft, $90. Ping tall putter, $40. New Leupold range finder, GX3, $175. 541-420-6613.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing 12 Ga. Over/Under, Baikal, 1 year old, $375, please call 541-317-0116. .22 LR bolt-action, wood stock, nice beginner rifle, ammo included. $150. 541-647-8931 .380 ACP Pistol, with box, 6 mags, original belt holster, new leather shoulder holster, $325. 541-771-5648 A

Collector Pays Ca$h, hand guns, rifles, etc., 541-475-4275,503-781-8812

CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

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Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389 - 6 6 5 5 BUYING Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS? Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. NEED TO CANCEL OR PLACE YOUR AD? The Bulletin Classifieds has an "After Hours" Line Call 383-2371 24 hrs. to cancel or place your ad!

GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. Juniper Rim Game Preserve - Brothers, OR Pheasants (both roosters/hens) & Chukars, all on special! 541-419-3923; 541-419-8963

Rossi M677, .357 mag, snubnose, holster & ammo, $275. Tristar “Colt copy” 45 LC revolver, $350. 541-647-8931 Ruger 10/22 22LR stainless bull barrel, syn. Hogue stock, 6x24 scope, 6 mags, case & ammo. $375. 541-647-8931 Ruger Ranch Rifle Mini-14. Hogue stock. Tasco red/ green dot scope. Sling. 3 mags. 2 boxes ammo. $625. 541-317-0730 Ruger SP101 357 grey SS, $375 S&W 329 lightweight 44, $700 Kimber 45 Classic SS, $525. 541-604-0380 Savage 110 Rifle - 25-06, good shape w/ Bushnell 3 x 9 $350 OBO - (541) 610-8518

DRY JUNIPER FIREWOOD $175 per cord, split. Immediate delivery available. Call 541-408-6193

The Bulletin Offers Free Private Party Ads • 3 lines - 3 days • Private Party Only • Total of items advertised must equal $200 or Less • Limit one ad per month • 3-ad limit for same item advertised within 3 months 541-385-5809 • Fax 541-385-5802

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves. PELLET STOVE: Heats 1200 Sq Ft. Good Condition, Ind.controls. $300. 541 480 4185

WINTER SPECIAL - Dry Seasoned Lodgepole Pine, guaranteed cords. Split delivered, stacked. Prompt delivery! $175/cord. 541-350-3393

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663 SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Found Gerber knife & Playstation DVD near Bearcreek rndabout, 1/14. 541-389-7955

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you.

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD... To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP

CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

WARM CLOTHING d

Rain Gear, Boots Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE 5th St., Bend (312-2069) For special pick-ups, call Ken Boyer 389-3296 or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

John Deere 10’ seed drill, grass and grain and fertilizer boxes, 7” spacing, exc. cond., $3,450 OBO; 2006 Challenger 16x18 in-line baler, low bale count, exc. cond. $13,500 OBO. 541-419-2713.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Volume discounts; delivery available. Please call 541-480-8648 for more info. FEEDER HAY $80 per ton Will grapple-load for our customers. 541-382-5626; 541-480-3059 Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

267

The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d

WILL BUY FIREWOOD By the cord or by the load. Call 541-771-8534

Fuel and Wood

Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

d

TAMARACK FIREWOOD Split, you haul. $165/cord. Call 541-546-2421

Found Ipod: Off Revere, 1/11/11, Call to identify, 541-389-9210. LOST: Jack Russell puppy. Black & white 4 month old male. Last seen Saturday Jan 15th morning, off SW McKinley Ave. Very loved & very missed. REWARD!! If you have info, please call 541-420-7378 Lost orange tabby, yellow eyes, W. Hills area Jan 11. Answers to Libby. 541-389-7736 REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

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Farm Market

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Dry Seasoned Red Fir $185 per cord, split and delivered, Please Call 541-977-2040.

Exercise Equipment

Dryer, Whirlpool, 6 yrs., only used 3yrs., like new, $100 OBO, 541-419-4198

Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

O r e g o n

Tools

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

OLD BANKER’S DESK $55 541-977-6206

B e n d

246

A-1 Washers & Dryers

LOVESEAT, blue fabric, great shape, only $50. 541-419-5060

A v e . ,

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Furniture & Appliances

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

C h a n d l e r

212

!Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips & elbows. 541-771-2330 www.royalflushretrievers.com

Maremma Guard Dog pups, purebred, great dogs, $300 each, 541-546-6171.

S . W . Antiques & Collectibles

http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Rat Terriers, UKC reg., 2 males, 13 weeks, pedigree, $250 ea, 541-504-5495, leave msg. Chihuahua/Poodle Pups, 9 SHIH-POOs 2 adorable males, family raised, don’t miss your weeks, 1st shot, $120 Cash, chance to own one of the Call 541-678-7599. best! Price Reduced to $200 Chihuahua Pups, Apple without shots. 541-744-1804 Head, well bred, small, $200 Shih Tzu pups, gold & white, & up. 541-420-4825. gold w/ black mask, & black, $385-$750, 541-788-0090 Cockatiel, grey in color, $40, please call 541-382-8814 for Siamese Kittens (4) puremore info. bred, M/F, Seal Point, $125 each. 541-318-3396. English Bulldogs AKC, 2 males left! Home raised, excellent Siberian Husky pups, exhealth, $1300. 541-290-0026 ceptional markings & temperaments, 541-330-8627 or English Mastiff Puppies, 3 stones-siberians@live.com female, brindle, 9 weeks old, $600 ea., 541-232-2174. Sphynx hairless cat, adult Fem, free to quiet, adult-only Female Lab/Pitbull, 10 weeks home. 360-936-9226 old, ready for a good home. Toy/Mini Aussie pups, $450 Call 541-848-0110. +. High quality. Shots, vet, Foster Kitten, 3 1/2 mo. old, tails, etc. Call 541-475-1166 spayed female, gray and Yorkie Pups, 7 wks, 2 fewhite. $40. 541-548-5516. males, 1 male, vet check, will deliver to Central OR, $600, Golden Retriever Purebred 541-792-0375, Mt. Vernon Puppies ready on Valentines Day. $600. Please call Kristi 210 at 541-280-3278.

Lab Pups A K C , 6 Chocolate, 1 yellow, $650; written guarantee hips & eyes. Tidewater Retrievers, 541-266-9894

AKC Yellow Labradors 3 Males For more info please visit us at www.coldcreekfarms.com 541-942-1059

1 7 7 7

Monday - Friday 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

Llamas/Exotic Animals

Sydney, 10 yr male Umbrella Cockatoo, needs new home, all equip included. Nice bird, talks. $499.99 to approved non-smoking home only . Call Stephanie at 541-383-2084.

358

Farmers Column 10X20 STORAGE BUILDINGS for protecting hay, firewood, livestock etc. $1461 Installed. 541-617-1133. CCB #173684. kfjbuilders@ykwc.net

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.10/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523. Butcher Lambs, Suffolk, 6-8 mos., $1.12 per pound, live weight, please call 541-934-2056.

383

Produce and Food L o c al N a t u r al Corn-Finished Beef Buy healthy, grass fed beef directly from the farm. Sold by the pound - no halves or quarters required. CentralOregonBeef.com 541-923-5076


F2 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday.

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

Employment

400

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities 476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Account coordinator Temporary Circulation Account Coordinator Temporary full-time position open in the Circulation department for a Circulation Account coordinator. Main 421 responsibilities include data Schools and Training entry of new credit card or bank draft information on Advertise and Reach over 3 subscribers accounts. Promillion readers in the Pacific cesses all subscriber Auto Northwest! 30 daily newspaRenew payments and mainpers, six states. 25-word tains accurate spreadsheets classified $525 for a 3-day fro business office. Responad. Call (916) 288-6010; sible for tracking and order(916) 288-6019 or visit ing Circulation office supwww.pnna.com/advertising_ plies. Performs monthly pndc.cfm for the Pacific billing steps for several of Northwest Daily Connection. our newspapers and acts as (PNDC) back up to the Customer Service reo and billing staff. Assists with data entry of daily TURN THE PAGE draw projections and returns For More Ads and printing associated reports. The Bulletin Applicants must have excellent interpersonal skills and AIRLINES ARE HIRING - Train strong attention to detail. for high paying Aviation Must be able to work with to Maintenance Career. FAA apwork with others in a supproved program. Financial portive team setting. Ideal aid if qualified - Housing candidate will have comavailable. Call Aviation Inputer experience, basic acstitute of Maintenance. counting knowledge, profi1-877-804-5293. (PNDC) cient in data entry and strong communication and organiATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE zational skills. from Home. *Medical, *BusiPlease submit resumes to: ness, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708 or by e-mail: placement assistance. Comahusted@bendbulletin.com puter available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 866-688-7078 www.CenturaOnline.com (PNDC) Advertise in 30 Daily newspaTRUCK SCHOOL pers! $525/25-words, 3www.IITR.net days. Reach 3 million classiRedmond Campus fied readers in Alaska, Idaho, Student Loans/Job Waiting Oregon, Montana, WashingToll Free 1-888-438-2235 ton & Utah. (916) 288-6019 email: elizabeth@cnpa.com for the Pacific Northwest 454 Daily Connection. (PNDC)

Looking for Employment

Caregiver/Housekeeper position wanted, 15 yrs. exp.,exc. skills & refs, 541-977-2450

CONTROLLER opportunity available. Requires accounting degree & minimum of 8 years accounting or tax experience. Responsible for reporting financial results of operations, budgets & forecasts and information system management. Must have strong computer, interpersonal & team building skills. Audit & CPA desired. Salary $56,000 - $84,000 DOE. with full benefits & bonus opportunity. EOE/pre-employment drug screen. Submit resume to Brooks Resources Corp. 409 NW Franklin Ave., Bend 97701. CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

476

476

476

476

634

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend

DRUG AND ALCOHOL COUNSELOR. Part/Full-time. Certified and experienced, for Bend and Madras, bi-lingual and Masters Level a plus. Salary DOE. Send resumes to Box 16312739 c/o The Bulletin, PO Box 6020, Bend Or 97708

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Front Desk - position for WorldMark/Eagle Crest. Part-time. Strong hospitality exp. desired. Must be flexible, a GO GETTER, and must be willing to work weekends and evenings. Drug Free Workplace. Please apply at Eagle Crest, 1522 Cline Falls Rd. Redmond (3rd floor of Hotel)

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

HAIRSTYLIST for Redmond salon, full or part-time, lease station. Call Coleen at RedDENTAL ASSISTANT mond International Hairport, Are you the team member 541-548-7195. who we are looking for? Our state-of-the-art Redmond Logging practice is seeking an EFDA Experienced Timberline de-limDental Assistant. Do you ber operator needed. Must have a positive attitude? Are have working knowledge of you fun, coachable and a machine and be able to serself-starter? Do you want to vice and perform minor rebe part of a team that is pairs. Steady work in Hood making a difference in River area. 509-949-3772. people’s lives? If this is you, please send your resume to: Marketing Communications jloslc@yahoo.com Manager: Ruff Wear is seeking a marketing professional who will support Ruff DRIVER - Motivated, self-diWear’s mission of building rected Independent Operaperformance products to entor wanted for non-emerhance and inspire outdoor gency medical transportation adventure for dogs and their (wheelchair & ambulatory). human companions. The Contracted position, hours MCM will be responsible for vary, $600-$900/week. Alstyle and content of all interready approved drivers preFIND IT! nal and external communicaferred. Please send resume BUY IT! tions. For details visit: to wapatoshores@gmail.com SELL IT! www.ruffwear.com/careers or 1-866-486-6258. The Bulletin Classiieds

Pharmacy Technician, must be certified. No nights or Sundays. Competitive wage DOE. Resume and references required. Call 541-536-1111.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site. Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

541-383-0386

Sales - Automotive We are seeking honest, confident communicators with a desire to succeed. Focus will be on no pressure used vehicle sales. No exp. is necessary. We will train the right candidate. Monthly income potential up to $5,000 with commissions, bonuses and incentives. Requires an excellent driving record. Benefits include 401K, medical, dental, vision and paid vacations. Own-a-Car is a subsidiary of Gresham Toyota, a 10-Time President’s Award Winning dealer. We are located on Hwy 97, Redmond. Apply at greshamtoyota.com click on CONTACT US then JOIN OUR TEAM. Apply for “Used Vehicle Sales - Auto Sales - Redmond, Oregon”

Sales

Daytime Inside Sales Will hire two sales people to work from the Bend Bulletin newspaper office for the Newspaper in Education sales campaign. This is soft, relaxed business to business sales. We offer a short paid training program. The average salesperson earns $400 to $700 per week, for a 27 hour work week. The dress code is very relaxed and casual. We prefer a background in "business to business" selling. This is not ad or subscription sales, however if you have previous experience in advertising sales, I will give you priority consideration. I'm looking for motivated, energetic, articulate people, with excellent communication skills. Call Melanie at 541-383-0399. Independent Contractor Sales Telephone prospecting position for important professional services. Income potential $50,000. (average income 30k-35k) opportunity for advancement. Base & Commission, Health and Dental Benefits. Will train the right person. Fax resume to: 541-848-6403 or call Mr. Green 541-330-0640.

TELEVISION

On-Air Technician at a local TV station See www.ktvz.com for details. Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

280

High-End, Indoor ESTATE SALE! Antiques, Collectibles, Art, Holiday & Western Decor, Table & Chairs, Thule, Bowflex, 3hp Boat Motor, much more. 66590 W. Cascade, Bend. Fri-Sat., Jan 21-22, 9am-4pm. NO EARLY SALES!

284 Sale Sat 8-noon. HP LaserJet 1020 B/W printer w/spare toner; HP DeskJet 5650 B/W-color printer, glass top computer desk, office chair, wood 4-drawer teacher’s desk, 2 shelf bookcase, all good or better cond. Also 10 old fine whiskey bottles and house & garage stuff. 20067 Mt. Hope Lane, 4 streets S of Powers Rd off Blakely Rd.

286

Sales Northeast Bend

541-322-7253

Look What I Found!

You'll find a little bit of everything in The Bulletin's daily garage and yard sale section. From clothes to collectibles, from housewares to hardware, classified is always the first stop for cost-conscious consumers. And if you're planning your own garage or yard sale, look to the classifieds to bring in the buyers. You won't find a better place for bargains!

Call Classifieds: 385-5809 or Fax 385-5802

288

Sales Southwest Bend Sales Southeast Bend

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE! KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Operate Your Own Business FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

Sunriver Sale Fri-Sat 8-3, 55125 Lazy River Dr., (1 mile south of Thousand Trails) 12’ utility trailer, stainless steel 20.8 cf Kitchen Aid refrig, 16 cf White Westinghouse freezer, hvy duty Whirlpool washer/dryer, 30” HD widescreen JVC TV, sewing cupboards, old wood desk, dressers, furniture & misc.

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Prineville H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

Business Opportunities A BEST-KEPT SECRET! Reach over 3 million Pacific Northwest readers with a $525/25-word classified ad in 30 daily newspapers for 3-days. Call (916) 288-6019 regarding the Pacific Northwest Daily Connection or email elizabeth@cnpa.com (PNDC) Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

$300 off Upstairs Apts. 2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495 Carports & Heat Pumps Lease Options Available Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

604

Fox Hollow Apts. Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

(541) 383-3152

Secure 10x20 Storage, in $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. access, $95/month, Call W/D hookups, patios or decks, Rob, 541-410-4255.

Mature roommate wanted, Cascade View Estates, Redmond. Master suite avail, pvt bath/ entry, walk-in closet, garage. All utils incl, $600/mo, $300 dep. No pets. 541-410-5197

Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

Lovely 2 bdrm, private patio, small, quiet complex, W/S/G paid, no smoking, $525+ dep, 1000 NE Butler Mkt. Rd. Call 541-633-7533.

627

636

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

Steens Mountain Home Lodgings See Bend Craigslist for more info, 541-589-1982.

630

Rooms for Rent Budget Inn, 1300 S. Hwy 97, Royal 541-389-1448; & Gateway Motel, 475 SE 3rd St., 541-382-5631, Furnished Rooms: 5 days/$150+tax

STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens. New owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885 Tumalo - Country Setting Granny unit. 2 rooms + bath, partial kitchen, $395/mo. Call 541-389-6720, or cell, 541-550-0216.

631

Condo / Townhomes For Rent Broken Top Townhouse, 3 bdrm, 3.5 bath, $1,300/mo. (541) 550-8635 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

River Views! 2 bdrm., 1½ bath, W/D hook-up. W/S/G paid, $650/mo. $600 dep. small pets allowed. 930 NW Carlon, 541-280-7188.

Small 1 bdrm., $415/mo., 1st/ last + $200 security dep. 362 NW Riverside, Close to Drake park, downtown & Old Mill District. 541-382-7972.

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 2 bedroom, 2 bath next to park, Appliances avail. including big screen TV! 3 units available. $695-$750 month. 541-280-7781. ASK ABOUT OUR New Year Special! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, non-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $415 to $575 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735 Managed by

GSL Properties

Apt./Multiplex General Like New Duplex. Nice neighDuplex; Newer East side, garage, fireplace. Nice. $750/mo. (541) 550-8635 FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $765/mo. + $915/sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

573

!! Snowball of a Deal !!

Storage Rentals

Roommate Wanted

H Supplement Your Income H

CLOSING BUSINESS SALE: tools, compressor, office furn., piano, many items. RESCHEDULED for 1/28-29, 918 SE Zeller.

600 605

Independent Contractor

Estate Sales

Rentals

West side 2 bedroom, new carpet and paint, 2 car garage. $750/mo. (541) 550-8635

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Across from St. Charles 2 Bedroom duplex, garage, huge fenced yard, RV parking, Pets. $725/mo. 541-480-9200. Avail. Now 2-story townhouse 1407 sq. ft., 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath, garage, all appliances, washer/dryer, WSG paid. No pets/smoking. $750 mo + deposits. 541-389-7734.

Beautiful 2 bdrm., 2.5 bath util., garage, gas fireplace, no smoking or pets. $675 1st+last+sec. Please Call 541-382-5570,541-420-0579

borhood. 2 Bdrm 2 bath, 1-car garage, fenced, central heat & AC. Fully landscaped, $700+dep. 541-545-1825.

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

646

Apt./Multiplex Furnished Furnished West side Triplex, 2 bedroom, 2 car garage, patio. Nice. Short term OK. $1,200/mo. (541) 550-8635

648

Houses for Rent General The Bulletin is now offering a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend 3 Bdrm, 2 Bath 2000 sq ft single story home. Dbl garage w/opener, air cond, fireplace. No smoking/pets. 541-388-2250; 541-815-7099


THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 F3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Real Estate For Sale RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land

650

654

659

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Houses for Rent Sunriver

4 Bdrm 2.5 bath, 1700 sq ft. appls, fenced yd, on culdesac. No smoking. Pets? 2400 NE Jeni Jo Ct., near hospital. $1050. 503-680-9590 Newer 3 Bdrm, 2 bath home for rent in NE Bend. Fireplace, 2 car garage. No smoking, no pets. $790 per month. Lv msg at 541-441-8254

4 Bdrm., 2 masters, 1 on main, A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 3 full bath, 3005 sq.ft., dbl. sq.ft., living room, family garage, gas fireplace, stainroom, new paint, private .5 less appl., spa, large loft, acre lot near Sunriver, $895. $1700/mo., 541-306-4171. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

656

Nice and Clean 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 10x10 storage bldg., 1/2 acre, Houses for Rent 2 decks, drive by only, 20569 SW Bend Raymond Ct., $895 mo., $900 dep., appt. call 408-374-0604. 2 bedroom, 2 bath manufactured home in quiet park, handicap ramp, carport, NOTICE: w/s/g paid., $600/mo. $250 All real estate advertised deposit. 541-382-8244. here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, cul-de-sac, dbl. garage, no smoking, any preference, limitation or avail. 2/15, 19800 SW Wetdiscrimination based on race, land Ct., $850, color, religion, sex, handicap, 541-389-3594. familial status or national origin, or intention to make 658 any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We Houses for Rent will not knowingly accept any Redmond advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby 3/2 1385 sq. ft., family room, new carpet & paint, nice big informed that all dwellings yard, dbl. garage w/opener, advertised are available on quiet cul-de-sac. $995 an equal opportunity basis. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803 The Bulletin Classified 3 Bdrm, 2 bath, 1031 sq.ft., When buying a home, 83% of fenced yard, dbl. garage, Central Oregonians turn to $850/mo., $700 dep., pets neg., drive by first at 1526 NE 4th St., call 541-280-6235 call Classified 385-5809 to place your Real Estate ad Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

654

Houses for Rent SE Bend 3 bdrm, 1 bath house with double and single garage. 20431 Clay Pigeon Ct., $900 mo. 1st/last, $450 refundable deposit. 541-388-2307.

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room with woodstove, new carpet, pad & paint, single garage w/opener. $895/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Adorable duplex in Canyon Rim Village, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath. all appl., includes gardener. Reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877.

671

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft. mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq. ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1195. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

676

Mobile/Mfd. Space RV/Trailer Space in NE Redmond, near Crooked River Dinner Train, additional 17x20 finished bldg. w/deck, fenced area, incl. W/S, $450/mo, Call 541-419-1917.

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 36’x42’ Shop w/2 roll-up doors, Between Redmond & Terrebonne, $400 per mo., taking applications, Please Call 541-419-1917. 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404 The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

693

Find Your Future Home Here!

personals

Thousands of ads daily in print and online.

Thank you St. Jude & Sacred Heart of Jesus. j.d.

To place your ad, visit www.bendbulletin.com or call 541-385-5809

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent 455 Sq.ft. Office Space, high visibility on Highland Ave in Redmond, $400 per mo. incl. W/S/G, Please Call 541-419-1917.

700 705

Handyman

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

* Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

713

Real Estate Wanted Cash For West Side Homes: Fast Closings Call Pat Kelley, Kelley Realty 541-382-3099

745

Homes for Sale

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 • Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling • Decks • Window/Door Re placement • Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179 Philip L. Chavez Contracting Services Specializing in Tile, Remodels & Home Repair, Flooring & Finish Work. CCB#168910 Phil, 541-279-0846 I DO THAT! Remodeling, Home Repairs, Professional & Honest Work. Commercial & Rental Repairs. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

JUNK BE GONE l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

•Pruning Trees And Shrubs •Thinning Over Grown Areas •Removing Unwanted Shrubs •Hauling Debris Piles •Evaluate Seasonal Needs

385-5809 The Bulletin Classified *** Real Estate Auction Nominal Opening Bids Start at $1,000 17471 Curlew Drive, Bend 3BR 2BA 1,200sf+/15911 Green Forest Road, La Pine 2BR 1.5BA 1,216sf+/1632 NE Lotus Drive, Bend 4BR 2.5BA 2,056sf+/10217 SW Geneva View Rd, Terrebonne 3BR 2BA 1,716sf+/mobile/mnftd home. 814 SE Kierra Pl, Madras 3BR 2BA 1,266sf+/townhome. All properties sell: 8:00AM Wed., Jan. 26 at 1632 NE Lotus Drive, Bend williamsauction.com 800-801-8003 Many properties now available for online bidding! A Buyer’s Premium may apply. Williams & Williams OR RE LIC#200507303 GLEN VANNOY BROKER

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874. 388-7605, 410-6945

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

Painting, Wall Covering

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC

Drywall Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CAB# 177336

Landscape Management

541-388-2993

Snow Removal Home Improvement Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

Investor Alert! 2449 SW 34th St., Redmond 4 Bed, 2 Bath, 1599 Sq Ft home, Built in 2001. Currently rented for $1,000 per month. $104,900 Call Peter at 541-419-5391 for more info. www.GorillaCapital.com Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Boats & RV’s

800 850

d SNOW REMOVAL! d

d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

Snowmobiles Polaris Sportsman 2008, 800 CC, AWD,

Cargo Plus Snowmobile/ ATV Trailer 1996, Single axel w/ spare $850 firm, more info Dave 541-593-2247, 8-5, leave msg

860

Motorcycles And Accessories CRAMPED FOR CASH? Use classified to sell those items you no longer need. Call 385-5809

4-wheeler, black in color, custom SS wheels/tires, accessories, exc. cond., 240 miles, $5500, 541-680-8975, leave msg. YAMAHA 1998 230CC motor, 4WD, used as utility vehicle. excellent running condition. $2000 OBO. 541-923-4161 541-788-3896

Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Manufactured/ Mobile Homes $15,999, 3 Bdrm, 2 bath. Will finance, payment $435,will own in 4 yrs; 2 bdrm, 2 bath, price less, terms same,253-241-4152

Yamaha 350 Big Bear

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005, 103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Motorcycle Trailer Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024

870

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

875

Boats & Accessories

Watercraft

17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077 Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, ga-

775

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Snow Removal

880

Motorhomes

***

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof Tops • De-Icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

870

Boats & Accessories

PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in The Bulletin this newspaper is subject to To Subscribe call the Fair Housing Act which 541-385-5800 or go to makes it illegal to advertise www.bendbulletin.com "any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, NEW & USED familial status, marital status HOMES: or national origin, or an intention to make any such Lot Models preference, limitation or disDelivered & Set Up crimination." Familial status Start at includes children under the $29,900, age of 18 living with parents www.JandMHomes.com or legal custodians, pregnant 541-350-1782 women, and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not Suntree, 3 bdrm,2 bath, w/car knowingly accept any adver- port & shed.$19,900. Suntree, tising for real estate which is 4 bdrm, 2 bath,w/carport & in violation of the law. Our shed, $25,750, 541-350-1782 readers are hereby informed www.JAndMHomes.com that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are availYour Credit Is able on an equal opportunity Approved basis. To complain of disFor Bank Foreclosures! crimination call HUD toll-free www.JAndMHomes.com at 1-800-877-0246. The toll 541-350-1782 free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

865

ATVs

Real Estate Services

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Barns

750

Redmond Homes

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

rage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38x10, triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prineville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Motorhomes 1998 Winnebago Itasca Sundancer 31 ft. 42,500 miles. Excellent Condition! Price: $25,000 541.325.1971

Get your business GRO W

ING

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabinets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

With an ad in The Bulletin's

"Call A Service Professional" Directory

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.


F4 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 881

882

882

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Fifth Wheels

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

People Look for Information About Products and Services Every Day through

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

The Bulletin Classifieds

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

882

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

KOMFORT 27’ 2000 5th wheel trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide. In excellent condition, has been stored inside. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916. Kwik Slide 5th whl hitch bought to fit Tundra 6½’ box. mat incl. $700 obo. 541-416-1810

908

Aircraft, Parts and Service

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com Redmond executive hangar, 70 x 70, 20’ Hydroswing door. Office & bath rm. 541-948-2126

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

TERRY 27’ 1995 5th wheel with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great rig in great cond. $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885 Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

541-385-5809

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

4 studded tires mounted Jeep wheels, 16x225R, low miles, paid $850; will take $350. 541-771-0759 Bench seat split-back, out of a ‘92 Ford F-250, gray, $400 OBO. 541-419-5060

932

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non smoker, $8900 541-815-1523.

Garage Sales Find them in The Bulletin Classifieds!

Smolich Auto Mall

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $10,000,541-280-5677

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Dodge 1500 XLT 4x4, 2007 w/ new hydraulic snow plow $6K new; 9,980 miles, many options, $19,900. 541-815-5000

Super Nice, 78K Miles! VIN #642750

Now Only $13,465

Smolich Auto Mall

Dodge Dakota 1989, 4x4, 5spd trans, 189K, new tires, straight body, 8' long bed. $1500 OBO. 541-815-9758

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Special Offer

Dodge Nitro 4WD 2007

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Special Offer

smolichmotors.com

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Chevy

Wagon

1957, VW Super Beetle 1974 Dodge Ram 2001, short

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453. Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Ford Ranger Super Cab 4x4 2003

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

67K Miles! Vin #B22460

Smolich Auto Mall

Only $11,250

Special Offer

933

HYUNDAI

Pickups

smolichmotors.com 541-749-4025 • DLR

When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Antique and Classic Autos C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

366

*** CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are mis understood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us: 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classified ***

Chevrolet Silverado 2004, LS 4x4 ext cab, 6' Rhino bed, 5.3L V8, tow pkg, 20 mpg, 44K miles, HD tires, non smoker, exc cond, $15995, 541-318-5666

Dodge RAM 2500 Diesel 2005

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

63K Miles! Vin #770003

Only $16,277

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FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

FORD EXPLORER 1992 READY FOR SNOW! All Wheel Drive! 5 spd, loaded with all power equipment, sound system. All weather tires. Runs and drives good, Only $1800. 909-570-7067.

Smolich Auto Mall

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily Toyota T100 1996 $3800. Well maintained no mechanical problems, 5-speed, 4wd, 206000 miles. Some dents and scratches. Call Dave at 541 788 8753.

935

Sport Utility Vehicles

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Ford Explorer 4X4 2010 Like NEW but cost effective! 13K Miles! Vin #A28369

Only $23,988

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new, selling for $19. Call for tire size. 541-504-0707

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

Garage Sales

FORD Pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Canopies and Campers Tire Chains, Les Schwab, $50

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Garage Sales

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Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944

933

Pickups

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Utility Trailers Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, reduced to $34,000 OBO 541-610-4472; 541-689-1351

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Antique and Classic Autos

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JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

932

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Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8395 541-598-5111.

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,500 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

366

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Ford F250 X-cab 1995, low-mi, 4X4, 4-spd, new tires, good shape, $3100 obo 410-2449.

Dodge Journey 2009 36K Miles. VIN #195855

Price Reduced Now Only $13,989 Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Honda Pilot 2010 *Nearly New* Under 11k miles on this SUV that performs exceptionally well in all conditions. Seating for 7. Blue Book Value of $30,680 - Asking $29,500. 541.350.3502

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To receive this special offer, call 541-385-5809 Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Friday, January 21, 2011 F5

935

975

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Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

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Smolich Auto Mall

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Special Offer

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Saab 9-3 SE 1999 convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Honda Ridgeline 4X4 2008 29K Miles!! VIN #531969

Price Reduced Now Only $21,877

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custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999. Buick Regal LS 2003 sedan. V-6. Leather. CD. Alloys. 85K. Silver. Compare at $4999. 541-480-3265. DLR 8308. VIN-139644

Honda Civic Hybrid 2008

Mazda 5 Sport 2009

17K Miles! Vin #015479

37K Miles! Vin #346039

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Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $12,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

Only $13,988

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

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Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

***

CHECK YOUR AD Please check your ad on the first day it runs to make sure it is correct. Sometimes instructions over the phone are misunderstood and an error can occur in your ad. If this happens to your ad, please contact us the first day your ad appears and we will be happy to fix it as soon as we can. Deadlines are: Weekdays 12:00 noon for next day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for Sunday; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. If we can assist you, please call us:

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

Hummer H2 2005 Loaded! 54K Miles! VIN #110071

Honda Civic LX 2006,

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

4-door, 53K miles, automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $11,680. Please call 541-419-4018.

NEED TO SELL A CAR? Call The Bulletin and place an ad today! Ask about our "Wheel Deal"! for private party advertisers 385-5809

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smolichmotors.com 541-389-1177 • DLR#366

Jeep CJ7 1986 6-cyl, 4x4, 5-spd., exc. cond., consider trade, $7950, please call 541-593-4437.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

The Bulletin

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Honda CR-V 2003 Only $9,495

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984 Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

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Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Special Offer

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Smolich Auto Mall

Like buying a new car! 503-351-3976.

Special Offer

Smolich Auto Mall Special Offer

40K Miles! Vin #567013

55K Miles! Vin #631269

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smolichmotors.com 541-389-1178 • DLR

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Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

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Mercedes S 430 - 4Matic, 2003, All wheel drive, silver, loaded & pampered. Exc in snow! $14,800. 541-390-3596

speed, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Smolich Auto Mall

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Moonroof

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that CHRISTINA LEE HAMMOND has been appointed personal representative. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned personal representative c/o the law office of Carl W. Hopp, Jr., 168 NW Greenwood Avenue, Bend, OR 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the lawyers for the personal representative, Carl W. Hopp, Jr., Attorney at Law, LLC.

Carl W. Hopp, Jr., Attorney for Personal Representative LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF ELECTION OF DISTRICT BOARD MEMBERS Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #1 Notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, May 17, 2011, an election will be held for the purpose of electing two board members to fill the following positions and terms, including any vacancy which may exist on the board of Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #1. One Director, Position No. 3, 4-year term. One Director, Position No. 4, 4-year term. The election will be conducted by mail. Each candidate for an office listed above must file a declaration of candidacy or petition for nomination for office with the County Clerk of Deschutes County, Oregon, not later than the 61st day before the date of the regular district election. The filing deadline is 5 pm on March 17, 2011. Filing forms are available at the Deschutes County Clerk's office, 1300 NW Wall Street, Suite 202, Bend, Oregon 97701 and online at www.deschutes.org/clerk. Nancy Blankenship Deschutes County Clerk

SEIZING AGENCY: Oregon State Police CASE #: 10-479537 Address: 255 Capitol St. NE, 4th floor, Salem, OR 97310 Phone: 503-378-3720 NOTICE OF REASON FOR SEIZURE FOR FORFEITURE: The property described in this notice was seized for forfeiture because it: (1) Constitutes the proceeds of the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate, the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution, or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475); and/or (2) Was used or intended for use in committing or facilitating the violation of, solicitation to violate, attempt to violate, or conspiracy to violate the criminal laws of the State of Oregon regarding the manufacture, distribution or possession of controlled substances (ORS Chapter 475). PROPERTY SEIZED FOR FORFEITURE: U.S. Currency $8,760.00

$

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18,188 VIN: AH515391

VIN: B3235637

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19,788

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Model BJD-11 MSRP $21,358 VIN: B4509459

New 2011 Subaru Forester 2.5X base HURRY! 2 AT THIS PRICE Auto

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19,598

Model BFB-21 MSRP $23,335

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$

23,499

Automatic

Model BDB-01 MSRP $25,498

VIN: B3381268

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

2010 SUBARU 2.5X 2010 SUBARU 2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2010 SUBARU FORESTER 2010 SUBARU FORESTER OUTBACK PREMIUM FORESTER 2.5X BASE 2.5X PREMIUM 2.5X PREMIUM 2.5X PREMIUM

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Only 1670 Miles, Manual

VIN:A3357749

$

23,999

Moonroof, Heated Seats, Automatic

VIN:AG783956

$

19,399

Moonroof, Heated Seats, Automatic

VIN:AH714447

$

21,898

Moonroof, Heated Seats, Automatic

VIN:AH721838

$

21,788

VIN:AH721172

$

21,988

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

AT THE OLD DODGE LOT UNDER THE BIG AMERICAN FLAG Thank you for reading. All photos are for illustration purposes – not actual vehicles. All prices do not include dealer installed options, documentation, registration or title. All vehicles subject to prior sale. All lease payments based on 10,000 miles/year. Prices good through January 23, 2011.

On December 6, 2010, at SR 299 West of East Fork Road, Trinity County, California, California Highway Patrol officers seized property for forfeiture in connection with alleged controlled substance violations: Health and Safety Code Section 11359. The estimated/appraised value of the property is $2,850.00. The seized property is described as follows: $2,850.00 U. S. Currency Pursuant to Health and Safety Code Section 11488.4(j), the District Attorney of Trinity County has initiated proceedings to forfeit the property listed above. If you claim an interest in this property, you must, within thirty (30) days of the first publication of this Notice, file a verified claim with Court Services, Superior Court, Courthouse, 11 Court Street, Weaverville, California. In this claim, you must specify your interest in the seized property and the basis or origin of each such specific interest. You must also provide a copy of the claim filed to the Trinity County District Attorney, P.O. Box 310, 11 Court Street, Weaverville, California. If your claim is not timely filed, the District Attorney's Office will declare the property listed above to be forfeited to the State of California and will dispose of it as provided in Health and Safety Code Section 11489. Control No. F-089-175-10 has been assigned to this case. Use this number in any correspondence with the Court and the Trinity County District Attorney's Office.

LEGAL NOTICE The Circuit Court of the State of Oregon for the County of Deschutes has appointed the undersigned personal representative of the Estate of Bruno De Block, deceased. All persons having claims against said estate are required to present the same, with proper vouchers to the personal representative at: 19624 Apache Road Bend, OR 97702 within four months from the date of first publication of this notice as stated below, or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by this proceeding may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the personal representative, or the attorney for the personal representative. Dated and first published: January 21, 2011. Personal Representative: Laura De Block 19624 Apache Rd. Bend, OR 97702 Attorneys for Petitioner: Bryan W. Gruetter, OSB # 861985 Joseph S. Walsh, OSB # 065427 300 SW Columbia St. Ste. 203 Bend, OR 97702 541-585-1140

22,149 Model BAD-02 MSRP $24,054

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Oregon State Police Drug Enforcement Section, Asset Forfeiture Unit 255 Capitol St. NE, 4th Floor; Salem, OR 97310 Phone: (503) 934-0161

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541-389-1178 • DLR

FORFEITURE COUNSEL: Asset Forfeiture Counsel, Oregon Department of Justice 610 Hawthorne Avenue, S.E., Suite 210, Salem, OR 97301 Phone: (503) 378-6347

PERSON FROM WHOM PROPERTY SEIZED: Norman John Hull and Rhiannon Joy Hull

Model AJD-11 MSRP $20,844

Dodge Avenger RT 2010

Automatic

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $8900. 541-420-9478

Case No. 10PB0147BH NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS

If you have any interest in the seized property described in this notice, you must claim that interest or you will automatically lose that interest. If you do not file a claim for the property, the property may be forfeited even if you are not convicted of any crime. To claim an interest, you must file a written claim with the forfeiture counsel named below. The written claim must be signed by you, sworn to under penalty of perjury before a notary public, and state: (a) Your true name; (b) The address at which you will accept future mailings from the court and forfeiture counsel; and (3) A statement that you have an interest in the seized property. Your deadline for filing the claim document with the forfeiture counsel named below is 21 days from the last publication date of this notice. This notice will be published on four successive weeks, beginning January 14, 2011 and ending February 4,2011 . If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately.

DATE PROPERTY SEIZED: 12/12/10

Automobiles

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

In the Matter of the Estate of HAROLD RAY “OLE” ANKER, Deceased.

New 2010 Subaru Impreza 2.5i Premium

Special Offer

2 Dr.,Very Cool - Auto. Vin #120635

975

LEGAL NOTICE PUBLISHED NOTICE OF SEIZURE AND NON-JUDICIAL FORFEITURE

For further information concerning the seizure and forfeiture of the property described in this notice contact:

Ford Escort ZX2 1998 VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF SEIZURE FOR FORFEITURE Notice to Potential Claimant Read Carefully ! !

366

Smolich Auto Mall Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

LEGAL NOTICE CIRCUIT COURT, STATE OF OREGON, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

smolichmotors.com

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

366

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

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NISSAN

541-389-1178 • DLR NISSAN

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

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541-389-1178 • DLR Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Nissan Xterra 4X4 2004

Pontiac Grand Prix GTP 2005 97K Miles! Vin #160909

MERCEDES C300 2008 New body style, 30,000 miles, heated seats, luxury sedan, CD, full factory warranty. $23,950.

Chrysler PT Cruiser Touring Pkg 2009

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Smolich Auto Mall

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

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Dated and first published on January 7, 2011.

Vin #049531

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing instrument shall constitute notice, pursuant to ORS 86.740, that the Grantor of the Trust Deed described below has defaulted on its obligations to beneficiary, and that the Beneficiary and Successor Trustee under the Trust Deed have elected to sell the property secured by the Trust Deed: TRUST DEED AND PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: This instrument makes reference to that certain Trust Deed, Security Agreement, and Assignment of Leases and Rents dated October 4, 2007, and recorded on October 4, 2007, as instrument number 2007-53577, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon, wherein ARROWOOD TETHEROW, LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Grantor and WEST COAST TITLE COMPANY is the Trustee, and WESTON INVESTMENT CO. LLC, an Oregon limited liability company, is the Beneficiary, as amended by an Amendment to Trust Deed dated February 16, 2010 and recorded on May 14, 2010, as instrument number 2010-18974, in the Official Records of Deschutes County, State of Oregon (the "Trust Deed"). The aforementioned Trust Deed covers property (the "Property") described as: Tract AC, TETHEROW PHASE 1, filed September 24, 2007, Plat Cabinet H, Page 470, Deschutes County, Oregon. The tax parcel number is: 260624. The undersigned hereby certifies that she has no knowledge of any assignments of the Trust Deed by the Trustee or by the Beneficiary or any appointments of a Successor Trustee other than the appointment of DENISE J. LUKINS, Esq., as Successor Trustee as recorded in the property records of the county in which the Property described above is situated. Further, the undersigned certifies that no action has been instituted to recover the debt, or any part thereof, now remaining secured by the Trust Deed. Or, if such action has been instituted, it has been dismissed except as permitted by ORS 86.735(4). The name and address of Successor Trustee are as follows: Denise J. Lukins, Esq., Successor Trustee, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th Street, Suite 130, Vancouver, WA 98685. The Trust Deed is not a "Residential Trust Deed", as defined in ORS 86.705(3), thus the requirements of Chapter 19, Section 20, Oregon Laws 2008, and Chapter 864 [S.B. 628], Oregon Laws 2009, do not apply. DEFAULT BY BORROWER: There are continuing and uncured defaults by Arrowood Tetherow, LLC (the "Borrower") that, based on the provisions of the Trust Deed, authorize the foreclosure of the Trust Deed and the sale of the Property described above, which uncured and continuing defaults include but are not necessarily limited to the following: 1. Borrower's failure to pay to Beneficiary, when and in the full amounts due, payments as set forth on the Agreement for Letter of Credit dated and effective October 5, 2007, as amended by Amendment to Agreement for Letter of Credit dated December 15, 2009, secured by said Trust Deed. Borrower has failed to pay Beneficiary payments totaling $2,475,316.81 as of October 19, 2010. The full $2,475,316.81 is now due and payable along with all costs and fees associated with this foreclosure. Letter of Credit fees continue to accrue at $2,856.99 per diem. 2. As to the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed, you must cure each such default. Listed below are the defaults which do not involve payment of money to the Beneficiary of the Trust Deed. Opposite each such listed default is a brief description of the action necessary to cure the default and a description of the documentation necessary to show that the default has been cured. The list does not exhaust all possible other defaults; any and all defaults identified by Beneficiary or the Successor Trustee that are not listed below must also be cured. OTHER DEFAULT/ Description of Action Required to Cure and Documentation Necessary to Show Cure: Non-Payment of Taxes and/or Assessments. Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all taxes and assessments against the Real Property are paid current. Permitting liens and encumbrances to attach to the Property, including a deed of trust by Schwabe, Williamson & Wyatt, P.C.; a deed of trust by First American Title Insurance Company; and a judgment by Hotel Financial Strategies. Deliver to Successor Trustee written proof that all liens and encumbrances against the Real Property have been satisfied and released from the public record. ELECTION TO SELL: Notice is hereby given that the Beneficiary, by reason of the uncured and continuing defaults described above, has elected and does hereby elect to foreclose said Trust Deed by advertisement and sale pursuant to ORS 86.735 et seq., and to cause to be sold at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the Grantor's interest in the subject Property, which the Grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time the Grantor executed the Trust Deed in favor of the Beneficiary, along with any interest the Grantor or the Grantor's successors in interest acquired after the execution of the Trust Deed, to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed as well as the expenses of the sale, including compensation of the Trustee as provided by law, and the reasonable fees of Trustee's attorneys. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the sale will be held at the hour of 10:00 a.m., in accordance with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, on Friday, March 18, 2011, on the front steps of the main entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon 97701. RIGHT OF REINSTATEMENT: Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five (5) days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed satisfied by (A) payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, together with the costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the terms of the obligation, as well as Successor Trustee and attorney fees as prescribed by ORS 86.753); and (B) by curing all such other continuing and uncured defaults as noted in this Notice. DATED: October 20, 2010. By: Denise J. Lukins, Esq., OSB 95339, Successor Trustee, Salmon Creek Law Offices, 1412 NE 134th St Ste 130, Vancouver WA 98685. Telephone: (360) 576-5322. Facsimile: (360) 576-5342. Email: dlukins@salmoncreeklawoffices.com.


F6 Friday, January 21, 2011 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1218081178 T.S. No.: 10-10564-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, PETER M. BAUGHMAN AND MONICA BAUGHMAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE, AND TODD LIKENS as Grantor to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on December 22, 2005, as Instrument No, 2005-88100 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 158751 UNIT SIX (6), OF HAWTHORNE TOWNHOMES PHASE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, TOGETHER WITH AN UNDIVIDED INTEREST IN AND TO THE COMMON ELEMENTS APPERTAINING TO SAID UNIT AS SET FORTH IN DECLARATION OF UNIT OWNERSHIP, RECORDED APRIL 13, 1979, IN BOOK 296, PAGE 944, DEED RECORDS Commonly known as: 111 NW HAWTHORNE AVE #6, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86,735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$11,785.58 By this reason of sard default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $234,654.05 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.62500% per annum from May 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 29, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due {other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 29, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Javier Vasquez, Jr., Authorized Signature ASAP# 3870263 01/07/2011, 01/14/2011, 01/21/2011, 01/28/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx5311 T.S. No.: 1311107-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Robert Hopper and Debra F. Hopper, Husband And Wife, as Grantor to Western Title and Escrow Company, as Trustee, in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. As Nominee For Greater Northwest Mortgage, Inc., as Beneficiary, dated March 09, 2007, recorded March 15, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-15538 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: Unit 11, Greyhawk Condominiums, Deschutes County, Oregon, described in and subject to that certain declaration of condominium ownership for Greyhawk Condominiums recorded February 1, 2007 in volume 2007, page 06945, Deschutes County Official Records, together with the limited and general common elements set forth therein appertaining to said unit Commonly known as: 1445 Northwest Juniper Street #11 Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary

and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due September 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $515.69 Monthly Late Charge $25.78. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $75,544.72 together with interest thereon at 6.875% per annum from August 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 28, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 23, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-361526 01/21, 01/28, 02/04, 02/11 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: MICHAEL J. HENDERSON. Trustee: WESTERN TITLE. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: OREGON HOUSING AND COMMUNITY SERVICES DEPARTMENT, STATE OF OREGON, as assignee of, BANK OF THE CASCADES MORTGAGE CENTER. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot Thirty-Seven (37), OBSIDIAN ESTATES, City of Redmond, recorded August 25, 1992, in Cabinet C, Page 675, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: November 1, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-57882 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $1,497.00 each, due the first of each month, for the months of June 2010 through October 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $208,812.07; plus interest at the rate of 5.6250% per annum from May 1, 2010; plus late charges of $1,015.98; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: March 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to

have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #07754.30319). DATED: October 27, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0111166534 T.S. No.: 10-12121-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, DAVID P. MCNIFF AND JUNE MCNIFF, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO., as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on November 5, 2009, as Instrument No. 2009-46870 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 144159 LOT SEVENTEEN (17), BLOCK EIGHTEEN (18), SECOND ADDITION TO WHISPERING PINES ESTATES, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 65528 93RD ST., BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $10,829.03 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $305,695.50 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.62500% per annum from July 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee wilt on April 18, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Dated: December 29, 2010 Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3868801 01/07/2011, 01/14/2011, 01/21/2011, 01/28/2011

541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 1218035567 T.S. No.: 10-10669-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, WILLIAM J. WALTON III, AND JULI A. WALTON, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, as trustee, in favor of UNION FEDERAL BANK OF INDIANAPOLIS, as Beneficiary, recorded on February 1, 2005. as Instrument No. 2005-06457 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 192128 LOT SIX (6), TANGLEWOOD PHASE VI. DESCHUTES COUNTY. OREGON. Commonly known as: 834 SE SHADOWOOD DRIVE, BEND. OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3} of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$13,829.65 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $359,600.00 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.75000% per annum from June 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 29, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any

other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 29, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3868705 01/07/2011, 01/14/2011, 01/21/2011, 01/28/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0081340325 T.S. No.: 10-12427-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ROBERT E. KAVANAUGH AND SHERRY L. KAVANAUGH as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on December 14, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-63904 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 250887 LOT TWENTY-ONE (21), WESTBROOK VILLAGE, PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61650 VEGA STREET, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total:$10,216.35 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $261,965.71 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.00000% per annum from July 1,2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 27, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby ' secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE

COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and 'Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 29, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3868786 01/07/2011, 01/14/2011, 01/21/2011, 01/28/2011 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The Trustee under the terms of the Trust Deed described herein, at the direction of the Beneficiary, hereby elects to sell the property described in the Trust Deed to satisfy the obligations secured thereby. Pursuant to ORS 86.745, the following information is provided: 1. PARTIES: Grantor: ROGER L. PHILLIPS AND SUSAN M. PHILLIPS. Trustee: FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON. Successor Trustee: NANCY K. CARY. Beneficiary: WORLD SAVINGS BANK, FSB. 2. DESCRIPTION OF PROPERTY: The real property is described as follows: Lot One (1), RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 36, recorded February 4, 2002, in Cabinet F, Page 23, Deschutes County, Oregon. 3. RECORDING. The Trust Deed was recorded as follows: Date Recorded: December 27, 2007. Recording No.: 2007-65883 Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 4. DEFAULT. The Grantor or any other person obligated on the Trust Deed and Promissory Note secured thereby is in default and the Beneficiary seeks to foreclose the Trust Deed for failure to pay: Monthly payments in the amount of $2,307.21 each, due the fifteenth of each month, for the months of January 2010 through October 2010; plus late charges and advances; plus any unpaid real property taxes or liens, plus interest. 5. AMOUNT DUE. The amount due on the Note which is secured by the Trust Deed referred to herein is: Principal balance in the amount of $416,546.46; plus interest at an adjustable rate pursuant to the terms of the Promissory Note from December 15, 2009; plus late charges of $777.87; plus advances and foreclosure attorney fees and costs. 6. SALE OF PROPERTY. The Trustee hereby states that the property will be sold to satisfy the obligations secured by the Trust Deed. A Trustee's Notice of Default and Election to Sell Under Terms of Trust Deed has been recorded in the Official Records of Deschutes County, Oregon. 7. TIME OF SALE. Date: March 17, 2011. Time: 11:00 a.m. Place: Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond Street, Bend, Oregon. 8. RIGHT TO REINSTATE. Any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time that is not later than five days before the Trustee conducts the sale, to have this foreclosure dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire amount then due, other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred, by curing any other default that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Trust Deed and by paying all costs and

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FAA-102093 NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ALWYN E. LYNCH AND MARGARET I. LYNCH, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST FRANKLIN FINANCIAL CORP., AN OP. SUB. OF MLB&T CO., FSB, as beneficiary, dated 5/23/2007, recorded 5/29/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-30269, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Residential Credit Solutions, Inc.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT FORTY (40), VILLAGE POINTE, PHASE 2 AND 3, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2987 SOUTHWEST DESCHUTES AVENUE REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of January 5, 2011 Delinquent Payments from March 01, 2010 11 payments at $ 1,928.74 each $ 21,216.14 (03-01-10 through 01-05-11) Late Charges: $ 771.45 Beneficiary Advances: $ 1,178.50 Suspense Credit: $ 0.00 TOTAL: $ 23,166.09 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $246,485.64, PLUS interest thereon at 8.45% per annum from 02/01/10 to 8/1/2010, 8.45% per annum from 8/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on May 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 1/5/2011 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3875264 01/21/2011, 01/28/2011, 02/04/2011, 02/11/2011

expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with the trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amount provided in ORS 86.753. You may reach the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at 503-684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at 800-452-7636 or you may visit its website at: www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.o rg. Any questions regarding this matter should be directed to Lisa Summers, Paralegal, (541) 686-0344 (TS #17368.30831). DATED: November 1, 2010. /s/ Nancy K. Cary. Nancy K. Cary, Successor Trustee, Hershner Hunter, LLP, P.O. Box 1475, Eugene, OR 97440. LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0150587897 T.S. No.: 10-12634-6 Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CARL WALLACE AND MARY WALLACE, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on March 3, 2006, as Instrument No. 2006-14891 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to wit: APN: 202702 PARCEL 2 OF PARTITION PLAT 2001-21, LOCATED IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 1, TOWNSHIP 18 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 21825 BEAR CREEK ROAD, BEND, OR Both the Beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust and notice has been re-

corded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is that the grantor(s): failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; defaulted amounts total: $15,972.66 By this reason of said default the Beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: The sum of $489,372.62 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.50000% per annum from July 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on May 13, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution of the said Deed of Trust, together with any interest which the grantor or his successor(s) in interest acquired after the execution of said Deed of Trust, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the Beneficiary of the entire

amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or Deed of Trust, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.lpsasap.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-730 - 2727 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Deed of Trust, the words "trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: January 8, 2011 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, Trustee Juan Enriquez, Authorized Signature ASAP# 3879191 01/14/2011, 01/21/2011, 01/28/2011, 02/04/2011

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only)

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE The trust deed to be foreclosed pursuant to Oregon law is referred to as follows (the "Trust Deed"): Grantor: Francine A. Yunker and Laverna M. Merritt. Trustee: Deschutes County Title Company. Beneficiary: Advantis Credit Union. Date: December 7, 2006. Recording Date: December 13, 2006. Recording Reference: 2006-81406. County of Recording: Deschutes County. The Trustee is now Miles D. Monson and the mailing address of the Trustee is: Miles D. Monson, "TRUSTEE", Anderson & Monson, P.C., 10700 SW Beaverton Hillsdale Hwy., Suite 460, Beaverton, OR 97005. The Trust Deed covers the following described real property in the County of Deschutes and State of Oregon, ("the Property"): See Exhibit "A" attached hereto: EXHIBIT “A”: THAT PORTION OF THE NORTH HALF OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE WILLAMETTE MERIDIAN, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, LYING SOUTH AND EAST OF THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF FRANK'S ROAD AND NORTH AND EAST OF THE NORTHERLY LINE OF JACKPINE AVENUE AS DESCRIBED IN QUITCLAIM DEED TO DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, RECORDED AUGUST 23, 1977 IN BOOK 256, PAGE 789, DEED RECORDS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THE EASTERLY 474.97 FEET. The default for which foreclosure is made is: The Grantor's failure to pay when due the following sums: Monthly installments of $2,332.25 beginning August 1, 2009 through the installment due January 1, 2010. The sum owing on the obligation that the Trust Deed secures (the "Obligation") is: $375,935.39 together with interest of $20,915.85 through June 7, 2010, plus interest on the principal sum of $375,935.39 at the rate of 6.00 percent per annum from June 8, 2010, together with Trustee's fees, attorney's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the Beneficiary pursuant to the Trust Deed. The Property will be sold to satisfy the Obligation. The date, time and place of the sale is: Date: NOVEMBER 30, 2010 *. Time: 1:00 P.M. Place:DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, FRONT WEST ENTRANCE, 1164 NW BOND, CITY OF BEND, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES AND STATE OF OREGON. *NOTE: THIS FORECLOSURE SALE WAS POSTPONED ON NOVEMBER 30, 2010 AT 1:00 P.M. AT THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, FRONT WEST ENTRANCE, 1164 NW BOND, CITY OF BEND, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES AND STATE OF OREGON AND THE NEW SALE DATE IS MARCH 29, 2011 at 1:00 P.M. AT THE SAME LOCATION. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS: The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for NOVEMBER 30, 2010. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED: IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL DECEMBER 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS: IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER DECEMBER 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE." You must mail or deliver your proof not later than October 31, 2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent you paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT: Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENANCY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE: The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT YOU MADE OR PREPAID RENT YOU PAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR YOUR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer and are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. There are government agencies and nonprofit organizations that can give you information about foreclosure and help you decide what to do. For the name and phone number of an organization near you, please call the statewide phone contact number at 1-800-SAFENET (1-800-723-3638). You may also wish to talk to a lawyer. If you need help finding a lawyer, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636 or you may visit its Website at: http://www.osbar.org. Legal assistance may be available if you have a low income and meet federal poverty guidelines. For more information and a directory of legal aid programs that provide legal help to individuals at no charge, go to http://www.oregonlawhelp.org and to http://www.osbar.org/public/ris/lowcostlegalhelp/legalaid.html RIGHT TO CURE: The right exists under ORS 86.753 to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by doing all of the following at any time that is not later than five days before the date last set for the sale: (1) Paying to the Beneficiary the entire amount then due (other than such portion as would not then be due, had no default occurred); (2) Curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the Trust Deed; and (3) Paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the Obligation and Trust Deed, together with Trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "Grantor" includes any successor in interest to the Grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by the Trust Deed, and the words "Trustee" and "Beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used to collect the debt. Cashier's checks for the foreclosure sale must be made payable to Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee. DATED: July 12, 2010. /s/ Miles D. Monson. Miles D. Monson, Trustee, 10700 SW Beaverton-Hillsdale Hwy. #460, Beaverton, Oregon 97005, (503) 646-9230. STATE OF OREGON ss. County of Washington: I, Miles D. Monson, certify that I am the Trustee and that the foregoing is a complete and exact copy of the original Trustee's Notice of Sale. /s/ Miles D. Monson, Successor Trustee.


FINE ARTS: Caldera kicks off Open Studio events, PAGE 12 MOVIES: ‘No Strings Attached’ and ‘The Way Back’ open, PAGE 25

MICKEY AVALON AT THE DOMINO ROOM, PAGE 3


PAGE 2 • GO! MAGAZINE C O N TAC T U S EDITOR Julie Johnson, 541-383-0308 jjohnson@bendbulletin.com

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

inside

REPORTERS

FINE ARTS • 12

Jenny Harada, 541-383-0350 jharada@bendbulletin.com Breanna Hostbjor, 541-383-0351 bhostbjor@bendbulletin.com David Jasper, 541-383-0349 djasper@bendbulletin.com Alandra Johnson, 541-617-7860 ajohnson@bendbulletin.com Ben Salmon, 541-383-0377 bsalmon@bendbulletin.com

• Caldera hosts open studio • Music in Public Places plans two shows • Crown City String Quartet is back • Sunriver Art Faire seeks artists • “Love, Laughter and Lucci” adds performances • Art Exhibits lists current exhibits

DESIGNER Althea Borck, 541-383-0331 aborck@bendbulletin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT GO! MAGAZINE is published each Friday in The Bulletin. Please submit information at least 10 days before the edition in which it is printed, including the event name, brief description, date, time, location, cost, contact number and a website, if appropriate. E-mail to: events@bendbulletin.com Fax to: 541-385-5804, Attn: Community Life U.S. Mail or hand delivery: Community Life, The Bulletin 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

ADVERTISING

Cover photo submitted

MUSIC • 3 • COVER STORY: Mickey Avalon swaggers into town • Elizabeth Cook at McMenamins • Dance party with Pimps of Joytime • Dawes plays Tuesday show • Dela Project plans fundraiser • HarmonyHouse hosts LJ Booth • Cicada Omega at the Moon • Kites & Crows visits from Ashland • MadHappy rap show • Melodramatics bring reggae to Bend

AREA 97 CLUBS • 8 • Guide to area clubs

• Learn something new

OUT OF TOWN • 20 • Dailey & Vincent bring bluegrass to Medford • A guide to out of town events

GAMING • 24 • Review of “Lost in Shadow” • What’s hot on the gaming scene

MOVIES • 25

OUTDOORS • 15 • Great ways to enjoy the outdoors

541-382-1811

TALKS, CLASSES, MUSEUMS & LIBRARIES • 19

CALENDAR • 16

• “No Strings Attached” and “The Way Back” open in Central Oregon • “Animal Kingdom,” “Buried,” “Stone” and “Takers” are out on Blu-ray and DVD • Brief reviews of movies showing in Central Oregon

• A week full of Central Oregon events

MUSIC RELEASES • 9 • Take a look at recent releases

PLANNING AHEAD • 18 • Make your plans for later on

RESTAURANTS • 10 • A review of Cheerleaders Grill

COMING NEXT WEEK

We’ll tell you about some of the best after-skiing deals at restaurants in Central Oregon.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 3

music

OH MICKEY ... Submitted photo

Mickey Avalon’s raunchy songs and seductive swagger have made him a hit in the Hollywood club scene and beyond.

Hollywood glam-rapper Mickey Avalon comes to Bend By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

M

ickey Avalon’s story is nothing if not interesting. He’s a Hollywood kid who grew up in a more substance- and alcohol-saturated environment than, say, your typical American household. By the time he was 16, he was selling drugs, living on his own and running with a well-known graffiti crew, according to an extensive profile that ran in the L.A. Weekly newspaper in 2006. His grandparents survived the Holocaust, but the same cannot be said about the rest of their family. In his late teens, Avalon lived life

as a devout Orthodox Jew. “Looking back, I was a zealot,” he told L.A. Weekly. His burgeoning rap career started thanks to an acquaintance named Simon Rex, a former MTV VJ who raps under the name Dirt Nasty. Rex encouraged Avalon to record his first songs, and then passed out CDs of the music at trendy Hollywood clubs. By the time Avalon played his first show in the mid-2000s — one he famously started with his back to the audience out of nervousness — the place was packed with people who already knew all the words. He’s also a man who has experienced incredible familial pain; his father was hit and

killed by a drunk driver, and his sister died near the end of a year in which they lived together and stayed sober together under their mom’s roof. Mickey Avalon’s biggest hits are raunchy tales that teem with lyrics about his own experience with prostitution, drug use and life on the streets. Some have titles you can’t print in a family newspaper. Others include “Mr. Right,” “Jane Fonda” and “So Rich, So Pretty.” All are powered by heavy beats and engrossing, synthesized melodies, and are delivered in Avalon’s lackadaisical, almost effeminate flow. Continued Page 5

If you go What: Mickey Avalon, with Top Shelf, Space Boyz, Offset and DJ Chi-Duly When: 9 tonight, doors open 8 p.m. Where: Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $25 at the door Contact: endustryent@gmail.com or 541-602-2628


PAGE 4 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

music

GOOD. FREE. MUSIC.

Each week, Bend’s McMenamins Old St. Francis School hosts free concerts for folks of all ages. Next week brings a particularly strong and diverse slate of artists.

ELIZABETH COOK Submitted photo

By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

T

THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME Submitted photo

By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

A

word of advice for all those who plan to ever see a live performance by The Pimps of Joytime: Pack a towel. I know, I know … it’s not very cool to pull a towel out of your purse/pocket and wipe your brow in the middle of a concert. But which would you rather be, cool or prepared? “Cool” is probably the right answer, but know this: A towel is the only way you’ll stay dry if you catch the Pimps on Thursday in Bend (see “If you go”). Of all the bands that roll through town touting their fusion of cosmopolitan, ultra-danceable styles, few do it better than this band that makes its home in New York City’s melting pot of global grooves and trendy tastemaking. The Pimps of Joytime’s sound is at once both splendidly modern and convincingly vintage; their cross-generational influences — from Fela Kuti and Shuggie Otis to the Rebirth Brass Band to A Tribe Called Quest — shine through their vibrant gumbo of funk, soul, hip-hop and rock, plus sizable doses of Latin and African music. Not content with using an over-hyphenated mishmash of genres to describe their sound, the

If you go What: The Pimps of Joytime When: 7 p.m. Thursday Where: McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.mcmenamins.com or 541-382-5174

Pimps have coined a new word for what they do, as reflected in the name of their forthcoming album, “Janxta Funk.” According to frontman Brian J, “janxta” is “part gangsta, part janky.” Of course, you won’t find the words “gangsta” or “janky” in a standard dictionary, either, so to really soak up The Pimps of Joytime, you must see them live. Just remember, you might at least consider taking a towel. As the band’s Facebook says, these Pimps have exactly one interest: “Making People Sweat.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

he great singer-songwriter Robbie Fulks once decried the kind of people who claim to like “any kind of music but country.” It’s a phrase that’s all too common among modern music fans, thanks in large part to the sugary amalgam of synthesized fiddles and pop-rock pushed on the masses by Nashville’s Music Row. As always, though, there are lots of artists making great country music just outside the glow of the industry’s spotlight. Take, for example, Elizabeth Cook, who’ll play in Bend on Wednesday with her guitarslinging husband, Tim Carroll (see “If you go”). Cook is a Florida native, possessor of an adorable sweet-tea Southern accent, veteran of the NashVegas sausage factory and the creative force behind one of 2010’s best country albums, “Welder.” For years, Cook was known for her authentic take on traditional twang, a la Dolly Parton and Loretta Lynn. But “Welder” finds her branching out into mischievous talking blues (“El Camino”), starkly haunting folk (“Heroin Addict

If you go What: Elizabeth Cook and Tim Carroll When: 7 p.m. Wednesday Where: McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.mcmenamins .com or 541-382-5174

Sister”), playful barstool-pop (“Yes to Booty”) and the scorching guitar tones on “Rock N Roll Man,” provided by Carroll, who’s also the song’s subject. Don’t worry, though, “Welder” also features its fair share of torchy throwback country songs, plus production by Don Was and guest appearances by fringe-country heros Buddy Miller, Rodney Crowell and Dwight Yoakum. The result is an album the No Depression website calls “real, honest and complex” and Paste Magazine calls “irreverent, hilarious and gritty as Appalachian soil.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 5

music

Local Service. Local Knowledge. 541-848-4444 1000 SW Disk Dr. • Bend • www.highdesertbank.com

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541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

EQUAL HOUSING LENDER

NEWS, NEWS, NEWS ON THE BULLETIN’S MUSIC BLOG! VISIT NOW TO FIND OUT: • The scoop about a new venue in town, The Marilyn, which will host live music on weekends and will focus on local artists. • Who’ll be handling Les Schwab Amphitheater’s ticketing this summer (hint: not Ticketmaster) and what it means for your wallet. • When and where hip-hoppers Ice Cube, Del the Funky Homosapien and Busdriver are playing in Bend over the next two months.

IT’S ALL AT ...

WWW.BENDBULLETIN.COM/FREQUENCY

From Page 3 The man has swagger and style for miles, and that’s the biggest attraction to his fast-growing fan base. But in interviews, he comes off as sweet and almost shy, 180 degrees from the guy you see rapping on stage. That gap between his professional persona and his personal life isn’t always easy to navigate, Avalon, 35, said in a telephone interview last week. “Sometimes it’s hard after a show,” he said. “For example, in Cincinnati, we had to leave in a few hours to get out of town, and everyone wanted to come back to my hotel room and party and get crazy, and there’s just only so much I can do, especially if we’re getting on a plane in a few hours. I guess maybe if I had enough money to hire someone to be the mean guy, maybe that would work, but sometimes it’s hard for me to tell people (no).” He continues: “When I’m on stage, I’m performing. I’m doing the thing,” he said. “I mean, I understand when people go, ‘Oh my God, I can’t believe how nice you are.’ It’s like, do they want me to be mean?” Avalon grew up listening to the music his father played: blues, country, rockabilly, Tex-Mex, Cajun. But the first music he discovered on his own was rap, via big stars like the Beastie Boys and Run DMC. (“If I would’ve been a little bit older, it probably would’ve been punk rock,” he says.) And while he understands the difference between the music he makes and the music his dad loved, he believes the link between the two is stronger than it may appear. “Rap’s kind of like the modernday folk music,” Avalon said. “It’s all just people telling their story. So, say my story isn’t the same as 50 Cent’s story. It’s still my story.” Speaking of stories, Avalon

says he has “tons” of songs waiting to be unleashed on the world, but it’s been more than four years since the release of his debut selftitled album. The reason for the delay? Typical music industry politics, he says, though not in so many words. “There’s just so much bulls--t to deal with,” he said. Recently, however, he has cleared at least one obstacle to releasing his new album, which he’s been saying is “coming soon” in interviews for a couple of years now. “I got off my record label, and stuff should be happening pretty soon,” Avalon said. “Like now, I can make music and actually put it out. Before I couldn’t put it out, I just had to wait. And now that I’m off that label, I can put it out.” When asked to confirm that he has split with Interscope Records, he replies: “Yeah. Thank God.” For the next couple months, Avalon will be looking for a new label to release his upcoming sophomore album, and if he doesn’t find a deal that suits him, he says he’ll leak the tracks himself. “Everything’s gonna get out.

That’s not even a question,” he said. “I didn’t work that much and make that many songs for no one to hear ‘em.” Avalon’s ultimate goal, though, is not for people to simply hear his music. His ultimate goal is to have a huge hit that will propel him to a place where he can make music until the day he dies, regardless of circumstance. “The only reason I even tried to get so big in the first place instead of staying in the underground is because in the underground, there is a short shelf life,” he said. “Like look at the Rolling Stones. I knew if I get that big, then I can do this for the rest of my life. If I don’t, then it will die out. “The Rolling Stones ain’t had a hit in forever, but they’re the Rolling Stones, so they’re gonna play until they’re 100 years old and it’s all good,” Avalon said. “If you don’t make it and you’re trying to play till you’re 100 years old, you just look like an old desperate weirdo.” Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

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Feb. 15 • Ky-Mani Marley Feb. 17 • Marty Stuart Feb. 20 • Peter & the Wolf Feb. 27 • Academy Awards Party

Tickets & Info: TowerTheatre.org Ticket Mill | 541.317.0700


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

music Dela Project holds album fundraiser For a while now, Redmond’s Billy Mickelson has been one of the Central Oregon music scene’s foremost shapeshifters, bouncing back and forth from sludgy prog-rock (Mr. Potato) to ambient soundscapes (Mysle, Strange Attractor) to uplifting Americana (Trail Ninety), and curating it all (along with friends’ projects) via his nonprofit Third Seven record label. Most recently, Mickelson has dedicated his time to the Dela Project, the folk band he shares with Casey Prather. The duo spent the past two years touring all over the country and, in between, playing local shows to a growing number of fans who dig their dusty, heartfelt sound. As if they weren’t busy enough playing live, Mickelson and Prather have been working on their newest album for more than a year, and it’s almost done, Mickelson said in an e-mail. “We wanted all our closest friends on the album,” he said. “So it is now in the finishing stages and there are close to about 80 people on the record.” Of course, the finishing stages are often the hardest part, and that’s why Dela Project is playing a fundraising show Saturday night at MadHappy Lounge. They’ll take the money raised there, pay to have CDs made, and hold a big release show some time in the spring, probably. You can find tons more info and music at www.thirdseven .com. Dela Project, with special surprise guests; 8 p.m. Saturday;

Upcoming Concerts

Tanya Morgan Courtesy jcasasphotography.com

free; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; www .thirdseven.com or tsrbilly@ yahoo.com.

Roots roundup: Kites, Crows, Cicadas & LJ There are a number of solid options in the area this week for folks who love their music rootsy and folksy. To the bullets! • The wonderful HarmonyHouse concert series continues this weekend with the arrival of Wisconsin-based singer-songwriter LJ Booth, whose easygoing songs follow a path similar to David Wilcox. In a folk-friendly town like Sisters, Booth is sure

to please. He’ll play Saturday at the HarmonyHouse (17505 Kent Road, Sisters), where you’re welcome to bring your own beer and munchies if you’d like. 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m. $15 suggested donation. Call 541-548-2209 for more info. • Cicada Omega calls Portland home, but they come from the dark, twisted backroads of western Kentucky, where these guys met in college. Their sound is a wicked cauldron of trance blues, punk rock, polyrhythms, Southern soul, revival stomp and homemade instruments, whipped into a clatter by a wildeyed guy known as the Reverend B.D. Winfield. Feel their power Saturday night at Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom (24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend). 9 p.m. $5. • Mark my words, the Ashland-based indie-folk band Kites & Crows has the potential to do big things. The trio met at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, where they all worked before realizing their musical inclinations wove together quite nicely. The result is textured, melodic folk music driven by the aching sounds of the cello, banjo and accordion and colored with charming harmonies. The group will perform Saturday at portello winecafe (2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend). 7 p.m. Free.

MadHappy Lounge hosts rappers, reggae

8 3 6 N W W a ll S tr e e t 5 4 1 - 3 8 9 - 4 6 8 8 | Across from the Tower Theatre in Bend

A couple things worth noting over at the MadHappy Lounge (850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend) this week. For more info, call 541388-6868, e-mail madhappylounge@gmail.com or find Mad-

Happy Musik on Facebook. • Central Oregon’s hip-hop heads should be dizzy with all the good stuff coming their way. Visit www.bendbulletin.com/ frequency to find out when Ice Cube, Del the Funky Homosapien and Busdriver are heading to Bend. But first, hit up MadHappy on Sunday evening for The Value Menu Tour, featuring indie hip-hoppers Tanya Morgan, Big Pooh, Young Americans and Cloaked Characters. Tanya Morgan isn’t a woman, but two dudes from Cincy/Brooklyn who’ve collaborated with no less than new-school hip-hop superstar Drake, while Pooh is half of the beloved underground rap group Little Brother. His “The Purple Tape” release, set to tracks by Detroit beat-making king Black Milk, is at rapperbigpooh.bandcamp.com, and it’s a must-hear. 8 p.m. Free. • Who doesn’t love to get the weekend started early? I know you reggae buffs do! OK, so here’s your plan, reggae buffs: On Thursday night, The Melodramatics return to town for a free show at MadHappy. These four fellas are from Northern California, where they’ve gathered up buckets of punk, ska, rock and, yes, reggae influence, run it all through a few amps and cords and stuff, and turned out a bouncy soundtrack for your next dance party. The band is currently prepping its debut full-length studio album for release, but first they’re traveling up the West Coast, bringing us some Sublime audio sunshine in the dead of winter. The L.A.based funk band Soul Scratch will also perform. 10 p.m. Free. — Ben Salmon

Jan. 29 — Beth Wood (folk), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www. silvermoonbrewing.com or 541-388-8331. Jan. 29 — ‘80s Video Dance Attack with VJ Kittrox (nostalgia), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Feb. 3 — Emma Hill and Her Gentlemen Callers (folk), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174. Feb. 4 — Tom Russell (Americana), Sisters High School, www. sistersfolkfestival.com or 541-549-4979. Feb. 4-5 — Hillstomp (junkyard blues), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www.silvermoonbrewing. com or 541-388-8331. Feb. 9 — Sonny Hess Band (blues), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174. Feb. 10 — Dead Winter Carpenters (Americana), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174. Feb. 12 — Del the Funky Homosapien (hip-hop), Domino Room, Bend, www. randompresents.com. Feb. 12 — Dusu Mali Band (African), Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, Bend, www.silvermoonbrewing. com or 541-388-8331. Feb. 13 — Busdriver (hip-hop), MadHappy Lounge, Bend, madhappylounge@gmail. com or 541-388-6868. Feb. 15 — Ky-Mani Marley (reggae), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre. org or 541-317-0700. Feb. 16 — Y La Bamba (art-folk), McMenamins Old St. Francis School, Bend, www.mcmenamins. com or 541-382-5174. Feb. 17 — Marty Stuart (country), Tower Theatre, Bend, www.towertheatre. org or 541-317-0700. Feb. 18 — The Aggrolites at Bend WinterFest (dirty reggae), Old Mill District, Bend, www. bendwinterfest.com. Feb. 18-20 — Patrick Lamb (jazz), The Oxford Hotel, Bend, www.oxfordhotelbend. com or 541-382-8436. Feb. 19 — Lyrics Born at Bend WinterFest (hip-hop), Old Mill District, Bend, www. bendwinterfest.com. Feb. 19 — Johnsmith (folk), Harmony House concerts, Sisters, 541-548-2209.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

music Self Referrals Welcome

541-706-6900

THE SECRETS OUT: Thanks to a recent cover feature in Asian Restaurant News, a trade publication distributed to more than 21,000 restaurant owners nationwide, Red Dragon Chinese Restaurant & Lounge is no longer what one reviewer once called “the best kept secret in Bend.”

Dawes Submitted photo

Downsizing Dawes moves from opening at the Schwab to headlining Silver Moon By Ben Salmon The Bulletin

F

olks who showed up early for last summer’s Band of Horses show at Les Schwab Amphitheater might’ve caught the sweet strains of Dawes, the Los Angeles-based Americana band that kicked off the evening. Fighting the daylight, the cold weather, and the wandering attention of a few hundred earlybirds, the band put on a great set of sun-kissed rock ’n’ roll with oodles of melody and more than a hint of twang. Dawes’ music isn’t ideal for that kind of environment, but it’s perfect for somewhere like Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, which works out quite nicely, since the band will play there Tuesday night (see “If you go”). Led by brothers Taylor and Griffin Goldsmith, Dawes’ musical ancestors come from the sunny, serene country-rock scene that took over Southern California (and beyond) in the ’60s and ’70s. We’re talking the Laurel Canyon sound, Gram Parsons, The Band, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Jackson Browne and so on. Those relatively ancient influences belie Dawes’ collective

If you go What: Dawes, with Jonny Corndawg When: 9 p.m. Tuesday Where: Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend Cost: $7 Contact: www.silvermoon brewing.com or 541-388-8331

Despite featuring a number of tried-and-true signature dishes such as Walnut Shrimp, Singapore Chow Mein, General Tso’s Chicken and Hot Sesame Beef, Chan is always evolving and improving, says the article.

Featuring owner Casey Chan and his transformation from U.S. immigrant to owner of one of Central Oregon’s most celebrated Chinese restaurants, the article sited personal drive, delicious food, attentive service and a customer-first attitude as keys to his success.

“Not one to rest on his laurels, Mr. Chan is always looking for ways to better his restaurant, hoping to infuse new elements that will help take it to the next level.”

The Phoenix Lounge youth; the quartet’s average age would barely get them into a bar. But they synthesize those sounds will the skill of men twice their age, as evidenced by their debut album “North Hills,” a warm, intimate collection of songs that are “authentically vintage” (per Rolling Stone magazine) and incredibly easy on the ear. The record’s best song, “When My Time Comes,” soars like an epic gospel number freed of its spiritual burden. Seek it out on YouTube sooner rather than later, and find more about Dawes at www.dawestheband.com. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@ bendbulletin.com.

Full Service Bar • Big Screen TVs • Bar Menu • Drink Specials

EVERY THURSDAY 6PM–CLOSE!

Dine In, Take Out 541-389-9888 61247 S. Hwy 97 • Bend • Next to Bend Wal Mart www.reddragonchineserestaurant.com

PAGE 7


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

area clubs BEND

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

821 N.W. Wall St., 541-323-2328 211 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-318-0588

Bo Restobar 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-617-8880

Blacksmith After Dark, 9 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 8 pm

Dudley’s BookShop Cafe 135 N.W. Minnesota Ave., 541-749-2010

c

Blues Country

dj f

a

DJ Folk

TUESDAY

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

Grover’s Pub 939 S.E. Second St., 541-382-5119

JC’s 642 N.W. Franklin Ave., 541-383-3000

The Quons, 6-8 pm r/p The Autonomics, 9 pm r/p

Kelly D’s Irish Sports Bar 1012 S.E. Cleveland, 541-389-5625

KC Flynn, 9 pm r/p Karaoke w/ DJ Rockin’ Robin, 8 pm

The Marilyn 415 N.E. Third St.

Mr. Wu and Ells, 9 pm dj JZ Band w/ Anastacia, 7:30 pm r/p

Dela Project, 8 pm f (P. 6) Franchot Tone, 7:30 pm r/p

Tanya Morgan, Big Pooh, 8 pm h (P. 6)

Parrilla Grill 635 N.W. 14th St., 541-617-9600

Players Bar & Grill 25 S.W. Century Drive, 541-389-2558

Bobby Lindstrom Band, 9 pm r/p

The Melodramatics, 10 pm r/p (P. 6)

Bobby Lindstrom Band, 9 pm r/p

Jazz Sundays, 2 and 5:30 pm

j

Heleos, 9 pm r/p

Ladies night w/Sarah Spice, 10 pm dj Kites & Crows, 7 pm f (P. 6)

Little Fish, 6:30 pm a

Open mic, 6-8 pm Karaoke, 8 pm

Sidelines Sports Bar & Grill 1020 N.W. Wall St., 541-385-8898

Silver Moon Brewing Co. 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-8331

Strictly Organic Coffee Co. 6 S.W. Bond St., 541-383-1570

The Summit Saloon & Stage 125 N.W. Oregon Ave., 541-749-2440

Taj Palace 917 N.W. Wall St., 541-330-0774

Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub 913 N.E. Third St., 541-383-1694

Third Street Pub 314 S.E. Third St., 541-306-3017

Tumalo Feed Co. 64619 W. U.S. Highway 20, 541-382-2202

Velvet 805 N.W. Wall Street

Elizabeth Cook, Tim Carroll, 7 pm c (P. 4) Open mic, 9 pm

Tone Red, 7 pm a

2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, 541-385-1777 19570 Amber Meadow Drive, 541-728-0095

THURSDAY

Hold ‘em free roll, 6:30 pm

The Pimps of Joytime, 7 pm r/p (P. 4)

portello winecafe River Rim Coffeehouse

w

Americana Rock/Pop World

r/p

MadHappy Mondays, 9 pm

700 N.W. Bond St., 541-382-5174 62860 Boyd Acres Road, 541-383-0889

r/p

Brian Hinderberger, 8 pm r/p

McMenamins Old St. Francis Northside Pub

Metal Punk

Karaoke w/ DJ MC Squared, 7 pm

102 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-389-1410 850 N.W. Brooks St., 541-388-6868

p

Texas hold ‘em, 6:30 pm

M&J Tavern MadHappy Lounge

m

WEDNESDAY

The JZ Band Unplugged, 5:30 pm

375 S.W. Powerhouse Dr., 541-728-0600

Jackson’s Corner

j

Hip-hop Jazz

Mickey Avalon, 9 pm, $25 h (P. 3) Celtic jam, 6-9 pm w

Flatbread Community Oven

845 N.W. Delaware Ave., 541-647-2198

h

Betty Berger Big Band, 6 pm, $7 j

3075 N. U.S. Highway 97, 541-389-8810 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., 541-388-1106

b

Blacksmith After Dark, 9 pm dj A Fine Note Karaoke, 8 pm

Crossings Lounge Domino Room

MONDAY

MUSIC TYPE:

Bill Keale, 6 pm f

5 Fusion & Sushi Bar The Blacksmith Restaurant

Get listed At least 10 days prior to publication, e-mail events@bendbulletin.com. Please include date, venue, time and cost.

Empty Space Orch., BEDM, 9 pm, $5-7 r/p

Cicada Omega, 9 pm, $5 b (P. 6)

Canaan Canaan, 5-7 pm f DJ Steele, 9 pm dj Gypsy Fire bellydance, 6:45 pm Two/Thirds Trio, 6 pm j Jones Road, 9 pm r/p Pat Thomas, 7 pm c Gary Fulkerson, 7:30 pm f

Mike Chubick, 3-5 pm b DJ Steele, 9 pm dj

Dawes, J. Corndawg, 9 pm, $7 a (P. 7) Open mic, 6-8 pm Open mic, 7 pm

Pat Thomas, 7 pm c The Mowbray Collective, 7:30 pm r/p

REDMOND Avery’s Wine Bar & Bistro 427 S.W. Eighth St., 541-504-7111

Bellavia, 6 pm j HDH, Alley Brewed, Hollowbodys, 9 pm

The Boss’s Office 1421 N. Sixth St., 541-548-5900

Checkers Pub 614 N.W. Cedar Ave., 541-504-6006

Millennium Cafe 445 S.W. Sixth St., 541-350-0441

p

DJ Chris, 7:30 pm dj Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 5 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 5 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 12 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 5 pm

Live Texas Hold ‘em or Omaha, 5 pm

SISTERS Three Creeks Brewing Co. 721 Desperado Court, 541-549-1963

Tone Red, 8 pm, $5 a

Mark Ransom, 7 pm, $5 r/p


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PAGE 9

music releases Diddy-Dirty Money

Ghostface Killah

LAST TRAIN TO PARIS Interscope Records Welcome to the new new money, faster than the old new money. “Last Train to Paris” pulses with the sound of indifference, of above-it-all-ness. Diddy is a spectral presence on this album, the first and, most likely, only release by the cumbersomely named concoction Diddy-Dirty Money, which consists of him paired with two female R&B singers, Dawn Richard and Kalenna Harper. He dives into songs, drops a few lines, shares a feeling or two, then disappears, having left barely a footprint. Given this album’s famously long incubation period — it has been teased for about two years — it’s notable that Diddy didn’t feel the need to impose himself overly on the final product. Maybe he senses that the moment has passed: This album was delayed long enough that the once lunatic idea of a Diddy-helmed dance record now feels like an anachronism. In that time period R&B went to the nightclub, speeding

APOLLO KIDS Def Jam Recordings Whether accidental or intentional comedy, the iTunes tags that accompany Ghostface Killah’s ninth album classify “Apollo Kids” as country music. Of course, Dennis Coles isn’t pulling a Nelly and enlisting Tim McGraw to croon the hook on “Handcuffing Them Ho’s,” but in its rigorous devotion to genre standards, it resembles a triumph from a veteran Nashville musician. With impeccably selected guest spots (the Game, Joell Ortiz, Busta Rhymes, Black Thought and his Wu-Tang

Kandi KANDI KOATED Asylum Records Flamboyantly organic singing stokes “Kandi Koated,” which is only Kandi Burruss’ second album. She made her solo debut in 2000 with “Hey Kandi,” but her career dates back further, to an era when vocal groups — hers was the four-woman Xscape, which had million-selling albums in the 1990s — required actual vocal ability. Kandi (as she bills herself) can coo and implore, float and bite. She can glide through high melismas and hurl accusations; she flirts, she growls and she preaches. On “Kandi Koated” she applies her voice to songs about love and its consequenc-

up its tempos and digitizing its lotharios, from direction-changing veterans like Usher to upstarts like Jason Derulo and Taio Cruz. Even the basic idea of a hip-hopR&B-dance hybrid feels outmoded now; the Black Eyed Peas beat Diddy to the punch there. The songs with the most impact here are those that recall the first Diddy heyday, when he was still Puffy. “Someone to Love Me” has a spare, mid-1990s hip-hop framework, and “Last Night Part 2,” produced by the Bad Boy stalwart Mario Winans, could have been made anytime in the past 15 years. — Jon Caramanica, The New York Times

es, singing fervently about romances, betrayals and single parenthood. Kandi didn’t disappear during the gap between solo albums. After Xscape disbanded she became a hit-making songwriter, collaborating on independentwoman manifestos like “No Scrubs” with TLC, “Bills, Bills, Bills” with Destiny’s Child and “Jane Doe” with Alicia Keys. Last year she became a reality television star on “The Real Housewives of Atlanta.” She has a clothing store, an Internet talk show and a blog. But her voice deserved a showcase like “Kandi Koated.” The music is accomplished neo-soul, with programmed drumbeats and electronic keyboards filled out by string orchestrations and Kandi’s overdubbed vocal harmonies. It makes room for her to build narratives like an oldschool soul singer. Writing with various collaborators — including Ne-Yo on “Me and U,” a duet vowing fidelity that puts its melodic emphasis on the “and” — Kandi places herself in first-person situations. She writes the lyrics, and they tell their stories succinctly. — Jon Pareles, The New York Times

brethren), the Staten Island kid hews closely to the bloodynostril boom-bap the Wu-Tang Clan pioneered a decade ago. Lyrically, Ghostface eschews the surreal bent of his secondcareer zenith “Fishscale” for straightforward boasts about fast cars, fast women and faster blades. Though “Apollo Kids” is light on the sweat-dripping narratives that Ghostface staked his reputation on, “Drama” finds Ghostface in “Masterpiece Theatre” mode, sketching crime scenes of guns and grams surrounded by “big jars of haze, Cheech & Chong bongs, Tropicana strawberries and diced bananas.” “Apollo Kids” shows that one

of rap’s company drivers is still on the speedway — zooming slightly slower than before but with better pacing and control of the wheel. — Jeff Weiss, Los Angeles Times

lady, and then a string of ballads designed to romance said lady, ending with “Rejoice,” on which Foxx croons, “Unwrap my body like I’m your birthday gift.” The up-tempo “All Said and Done” wraps things up, presumably signaling that

we’re going to start the cycle all over again. It’s all a neat bit of sequencing, though it’s often Foxx’s collaborators that bring out his best, as if he needs someone to pace him. Justin Timberlake and T.I. help make “Winner” work. Rick Ross and, more important, a sample of The Notorious B.I.G. from “Big Poppa” are the actual stars of “Living Better Now.” And “Yep Dat’s Me” finds Foxx slipping into the cadences of Soulja Boy, who is on the track with Ludacris. Apparently, using the ittakes-a-village approach works, because “Best Night of My Life” is Foxx’s best album so far. — Glenn Gamboa, Newsday

her fiance, Daniel Gibson of the Cleveland Cavaliers. “Calling All Hearts” has standard R&B ingredients in place: guest singers and rappers, and an assortment of producers, including Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, and J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League. But after an initial bit of competitive posturing — “I Ain’t Thru,” with Nicki Minaj rapping about, among other things, dental insurance — the songs slip into the background. Cole sings elegantly complex vocal harmonies, but the central melody lines are shapeless. Most tempos are determinedly slow; Timbaland’s huffing, puffing production for “Last Hangover” is as upbeat as the album gets. And too many tracks rely on the kind of repeating piano chords Blige

definitively claimed in “No More Drama.” Collaborators make Cole perk up. She and the huskyvoiced soul man Tank trade vows to be unselfish in “Tired of Doing Me,” pushing each other beyond the prosaic lyrics. — Jon Pareles, The New York Times

Jamie Foxx BEST NIGHT OF MY LIFE J Records Jamie Foxx makes everything look easy. The Oscar-winner can switch between actor, singer, stand-up comic and impersonator so effortlessly that it’s almost hard to believe. That’s a great skill to have in all those careers, except R&B singer, where slick doesn’t play well, but struggling does. On “Best Night of My Life,” Foxx gets a little closer to letting folks see him sweat, but not too much. The album is set up like a night on the town. There’s a short warm-up in the title track, a bunch of club bangers about finding a special

Keyshia Cole CALLING ALL HEARTS Geffen Records Keyshia Cole tries for a slow burn but rarely ignites on her fourth album, “Calling All Hearts.” One of the many R&B singers following through on Mary J Blige’s streetwise hiphop soul, Cole arrived as a fighter, confronting men who let her down, on her 2005 album, “The Way It Is,” and her 2007 “Just Like You,” both million-sellers. She switched to playing a lover with the slow-motion, sultry come-ons of “A Different Me” in 2008. Along the way, she also starred in a reality show about her career and family, “The Way It Is,” on BET from 2006 to 2008, and in March she had a son with


PAGE 10 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

restaurants

Three cheers for Cheerleaders Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Terry Coon serves a beverage to a customer while working at Cheerleaders Grill in Bend.

Family-friendly grill near The Riverhouse mixes good food, great service with sports memorabilia By John Gottberg Anderson For The Bulletin

B

rett Favre’s autographed Green Bay Packers football jersey hangs from one wall at Cheerleaders Grill. Nearby, a banner commemorates the six basketball championships won by the Michael Jordan-era Chicago Bulls. There is a framed baseballcard collection from the ’70s and ’80s. Softball trophies stand in niches beside hockey and cycling jerseys and photos of local youth sports teams. But don’t expect a sports bar atmosphere. And don’t look for

servers dressed like the Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders. That’s not what Cheerleaders Grill is about. This family-friendly establishment succeeds because it doesn’t try to do too much. Owners Al and Linda Larson serve simple but solid diner-style breakfasts and lunches to a regular clientele that has followed them from a former location to a new one. The Larsons are glad to have found a niche, even now that Cheerleaders has moved next to The Riverhouse. “Ninety percent of our clientele is repeat,” said Al Larson,

taking a break from his duty as head chef. And he pointed out that Cheerleaders’ service team, headed by Linda, knows much of that clientele by name. “We’re like a big family,” Al said.

Breakfast all day When the Larsons bought Cheerleaders in 2001, the restaurant was located on Third Street just south of Greenwood Avenue, in a building now occupied by Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub. A previous owner had dressed his servers in striped referees’ shirts with miniskirts, Al Larson said,

Cheerleaders Grill Location: 3081 N. U.S. Highway 97 (at The Riverhouse), Bend. Hours: 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. every day Price range: Breakfast $3.50 to $12.50, lunch $4 to $10 Credit cards: MasterCard, Visa Kids’ menu: Meals $4.50 and $5 include a drink Vegetarian menu: Limited choices include salads and a veggie omelet Alcoholic beverages: Bottled beer and wine Outdoor seating: Seasonal patio Reservations: Welcomed for larger but that was not his style. Within a few years, despite having a full liquor license and substantial bar seating, Cheerleaders had begun closing af-

groups Contact: 541-330-0631

Scorecard OVERALL: AFood: A-. Simply prepared but solid diner-style breakfasts and lunches. Service: A. Patrons are warmly greeted; orders are quickly taken and delivered. Atmosphere: B. Nothing fancy, but sports memorabilia collection adds interest. Value: A. Reasonable prices for food and service provided.

ter the lunch hour. That left the Larsons’ evenings free for passions like bowling and softball leagues. Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 11

restaurants From previous page The restaurant’s move last June to a new, smaller location on North U.S. Highway 97 enabled it to refocus on food and service without any suggestion of a bar scene. Today bottled beer and wine are available on request, but patrons are more likely to enjoy a good cup of coffee or a “double slam” milk shake. Breakfast is available any hour Cheerleaders is open, daily from 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. The morning menu ranges from biscuits and gravy to Amaretto French toast, with eggs Benedict and Mexicanstyle huevos rancheros tossed in for good measure. I thoroughly enjoyed my Philly steak omelet. Thin, tender slices of beef were wrapped into the omelet with grilled onions, mushrooms and green bell pepper. Swiss cheese was melted inside and outside the eggs, which were served with hash browns and buttered whole-wheat bread.

Filling lunches I returned twice for separate lunches, and each time — never having identified myself — I felt that I was becoming more a part of the Larsons’ “big family.” The servers remembered my face, greeted me warmly, and were prompt in taking my orders and delivering my meals. The lunch menu is one of soups, salads and sandwiches. There’s no fancier meal than homemade meatloaf with mashed potatoes and gravy. And Al Larson is especially proud of his chili, which he’ll serve in a bowl or on top of a burger. But I went with some different directions in my orders, and I wasn’t disappointed. On my first visit, I had a grilled-chicken club sandwich. Layered between three slices of white toast was an ample meal. The bottom level was a BLT — a classic bacon, lettuce and tomato sandwich — with processed American cheese and slices of yellow onion. The upper layer had a tender grilled chicken breast with a leaf of romaine lettuce. In lieu of french fries, I chose to complement the sandwich with cole slaw. Thanks to the addition of a touch of horseradish in the light mayonnaise blend with white cabbage and carrots, it was one of the best slaws I’ve had in Bend. When I again returned for lunch, I opted for a hot pastrami sandwich. There was no shortage of peppery meat in this meal: 10 slices stacked upon dark marbled rye, grilled with two pieces of Swiss cheese and served with sliced dill pickles. And the ac-

Ave., Bend; 541-389-2024. Kristin Yurdin, executive chef and co-owner of Terrebonne Depot Food+Drink, will host a five-course dinner at the Smith Rock-area restaurant Jan. 29. Walla Walla winemaker Thomas Glase will pair innovative Balboa Winery vintages with each course. Reservations are essential for the 6 p.m. meal; cost is $70 with pairings or $50 without. 400 N.W. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-815-4900, www .terrebonnedepot.com.

RECENT REVIEWS R y an Brennecke / The Bulletin

One of the more popular breakfast meals served at Cheerleaders Grill is bacon, eggs, hash browns and toast. companying fries, served with ranch dressing for dipping, were excellent.

The sports collection Al Larson confessed that most of his restaurant’s sports memorabilia collection is not his own. He purchased some of it, he said, along with the business 10 years ago. The softball trophies and youth team photos are his own, symbolic of his own amateurleague success and of the ongoing support that Cheerleaders has lent as an organizational sponsor through the years. But most of the collection belongs to patrons who are glad to share their prized possessions — such as the Favre jersey and the Bulls banner — in easy view of an audience of sports lovers. “If someone has something to display, I’m glad to do it,” Lar-

son said. “It will always belong to them, whenever they want it back.” It’s a family attitude. That’s just how Cheerleaders rolls. John Gottberg Anderson can be reached at janderson@ bendbulletin.com.

SMALL BITES

Cindy’s Chinese Garden (B): Mu shu dishes and other recipes are equal to many Chinese restaurants in Central Oregon, and service is particularly friendly and efficient. But sloppy housekeeping diverts attention from the elegant etched-glass decor 1362 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; www.cindyschinesegarden.com or 541-923-9928. Taylor’s Sausage Deli & Pub (B): A five-generation family business, Taylor’s opened a Bend deli and pub in September. A wide choice of sausages and

Next week: Ariana Visit www. bendbulletin.com /restaurants for readers’ ratings of more than 150 Central Oregon restaurants.

other meats highlights the menu at the folksy restaurant, which offers some of the least expensive meals in Central Oregon. Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday to Saturday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sunday. 913 N.E. Third St., Bend; www.taylorsausage.com or 541-383-1694. Level 2 (B+): Specializing in a tapas-style fusion of world cuisines, this is the newest incarnation of the second-story Fuel Building space in the Shops at the Old Mill District. Pork dishes are particularly good, but preparation of some other plates is heavy-handed. Service is reliable, atmosphere pleasant if understated. Open 3 p.m. to close every day. 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 210, Bend; www .bendlevel2com or 541-323-5382.

Gatsby’s Brasserie Bar opened Wednesday in the downtown Bend space that previously was home to Marz Planetary Bistro. The restaurant has been renovated with lush red-velvet booths and brass tabletops. The moderately priced menu features such classic American dishes as chicken Tetrazzini and daily blue-plate specials. Open 5 p.m. to close Tuesday to Saturday. 163 N.W. Minnesota

Baby & Pet Safe! Our Hot Carbonating Truck Mount Extraction cleans deep! We use one-fifth the amount of water compared to steam cleaners so carpet dries in 1 to 2 hours. Our cleaner, The Natural®, is green certified, non-toxic, so it’s safe for your family and pets who are allergy sensitive! Leaves no sticky residue! Using Chem-Dry resists re-soiling so your carpet fibers stay cleaner, longer! Don’t forget your area rugs & upholstery too!

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PAGE 12 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

fine arts

ARTISTS LESLIE MUTCHLER, ARTIST

JASON URBAN, ARTIST

TADZIO KOELB, NOVELIST

IN RESIDENCE BEN DARWISH, COMPOSER

JAMES CREWS, POET

VAL BRITTON, ARTIST Photos by Rob Kerr / The Bulletin

Caldera Arts Center gives public glimpse of artists’ work during Open Studio event By David Jasper The Bulletin

M

any readers may already know of Caldera Arts Center, a cluster of gorgeous, high-ceilinged buildings, art studios and A-frame cabins nestled between Suttle Lake and Blue Lake west of Sisters. Founded in 1996 by Dan Wieden (of Wieden+Kennedy ad agency) and wife Bonnie Wieden, the summer

camp’s intention was, and remains, fostering creativity in young people from Portland and Central Oregon. Rather than let such a facility and idyllic setting sit unused in the off-season, Caldera began its Artist in Residence program in 2001, treating visual artists, poets, dancers, composers, you name it, to four-week stints each January through March. Caldera supplies the space, the

artists supply the creativity. Want a window on this world? Each month during the winter residency, Caldera hosts Open Studios, two-hour events during which the public can visit and see how the artists have been using their time in Central Oregon. The next event is Saturday from 1 to 3 p.m. (see “If you go”). The January crop of artists comprises three visual artists, two writers and a musician. James Crews, 30, has been writing poetry since he was a third-grader growing up in St. Louis. A graduate of the Master of Fine Arts program at the University of

Wisconsin, Crews recently worked for the service program AmeriCorps VISTA in Portland, where he’s lived for three years. Crews is using his time at Caldera to work on the manuscript for his second poetry collection. His first, “The Book of What Stays,” will be published this summer. Visitors to Caldera can expect Crews to read some of his in-progress new work, which “explores memory and the instability of memory,” said Crews, adding that he’s interested in writing poetry that doesn’t scare off readers, “poetry that is somewhat understandable.” Continued next page


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 13

fine arts

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin ile photo

The cast of “Love, Laughter and Lucci” is, from left, Rachel Deegan, Ali Kinkade, Liam O’Sruitheain and Anne Givans.

Music in Public Places set at two locations Central Oregon Symphony musicians Lorell Girard and Gayle Hoagland (clarinet), Kathy Gault and Jean Shrader (piano), Nick Loeffler (flute) and Kiara Saito-Beckman (violin) will perform two free Music in Public Places chamber music concerts Saturday. The one-hour shows will feature works by Brahms (“Hungarian Dances”), Mendelssohn (Concert Piece No. 2 in D minor) and others. The first performance will be at 1 p.m. at Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; the second performance will be at 4 p.m. at St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road. Contact: www.cosymphony. com or 541-317-3941.

Crown City String Quartet to perform High Desert Chamber Music presents a concert by the Crown City String Quartet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend. According to High Desert Chamber Music’s website, Isabelle Senger founded the organization in 2008 “to provide world-class chamber music performances year-round in Central Oregon.” To that end, the quartet — consisting of Senger (violin), Julian Hallmark (violin), Dane Little (cello) and Carrie Little (viola) — will perform works by Mozart (String Quartet No. 4), Beethoven (String Quartet Op. 18 No. 2) and Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky (String Quartet No. 1, Op. 11). Tickets are $35 for adults

and seniors, $10 for children and students and are available online at www.tower theatre.org.

Sunriver Art Faire accepting applications Applications are now being accepted for Sunriver Art Faire, to be held Aug. 12 and 13 in the Sunriver Village. Acceptable fine art and fine crafts include ceramics, drawing, glass, gourd art, jewelry, metalwork, mixed media, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, textiles and woodwork. The outdoor event is limited to 60 exhibitors, selling their work amid a variety of entertainment including an artist demonstration area and art workshop center for children. Application deadline is March 11. All net proceeds will help support nonprofits in Central Oregon. To apply, visit www .zapplication.org.

‘Lucci’ play held over at 2nd Street Theater “Love, Laughter and Lucci,” a comedy by Bend playwright Cricket Daniel, has been held over at 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend. Five more shows have been added to the play’s run, which was set to close Saturday. New performances include a 2 p.m. matinee Sunday and four evening shows, at 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, Jan. 29. Tickets are $20, $18 for students and seniors. Contact: www.beattickets .org or 541-312-9626. — David Jasper

From previous page Fellow writer Tadzio Koelb, 39, is working on the manuscript for a new novel. His first manuscript is called “Bad of Country,” a literal translation of the French term for homesickness, and is about expatriates, “people who live outside the normal structures that would define them, and how they decide who they are.” They say write what you know, and Koelb has lived in many places, among them, Spain, Rwanda, Madagascar, France, Belgium and England, where he attended the University of East Anglia, earning a Master of Arts in creative writing, which carries a similar cultural currency in England as the Iowa Writers Workshop does in the States. He currently hangs his hat in Brooklyn, where he lived as a child until age 12, and works as a reviewer for such British publications as The Guardian and Times Literary Supplement. He’s starting on a new project at Caldera. “Going back to the beginning of the process is like going back to dating after you’ve been married for a long time. It’s very tentative and uncertain, and you’re not sure if it’s going to turn into anything.” Pianist and composer Ben Darwish, 26, is a graduate of University of Oregon and, like Crews, a resident of Portland. He earns his living giving music lessons and as a professional musician wearing many hats: writing jazz compositions for his Ben Darwish Trio and leading an eight-piece Afrobeat band called Commotion. He’s using his residency to work on jazz compositions and a folk concept album. At the moment, it has a loose story line about a farmer who needs to go underground to find water, “so it’s part fantasy,” he said. “I’m a really social person, but I’m fine with the solitude of this,” Darwish said of Caldera. The artists dine together once a week, and he likes the company. “I hang out with a lot of musicians, but I don’t hang out with a lot of othermedium artists. I’m the only musician here, so it’s cool to hang out with the writers, it’s cool to hang out with the visual artists.”

CUSTOM PICTURE FRAMING & GALLERY Where our quality and customer service is number one. 834 NW Brooks Street Behind the Tower Theatre

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If you go What: Open Studio When: Saturday 1 to 3 p.m.; talks begin at 1:20 p.m.; additional Open Studio events on Feb. 19 and March 19 Where: Caldera Arts Center, 31500 Blue Lake Drive, at the west end of Suttle Lake, off U.S. Highway 20, west of Black Butte Ranch Cost: Free Contact: www.calderaarts.org or 541-595-0956

Collage artist Val Britton, 33, of San Francisco, echoes those feelings, saying that there’s a “similarity in these different disciplines, like the process of writing and being a composer.” Britton creates unique landmass shapes and map-like lines on paper, inspired partly by the death of her truck-driver father when she was still a teenager. Before she left for grad school at California College of the Arts in 2004, her family gave her a road atlas, which became a sort of compass in her creative process as well. “I was sort of looking for a way to connect to his story, which was sort of mysterious to me, (and) his travels,” she explained. “I started using the atlas, projecting sections onto these bigger sheets of paper, just as a formal device to start new drawings.” For her, maps represent more than just physical places, but “psychological places and emotional places as well. Life is a journey, and the telling of your life as a journey is very significant for me.”

Next door, husband and wife artists Jason Urban, 35, and Leslie Mutchler, 30, are sharing space. Judging from her artist’s statement, in which Mutchler said her “research is a theoretical and practical investigation of order and chaos filtered through my own desire and drive for order,” that pursuit of order seems to be winning the day. The studio is tidy to say the least. The two met when Mutchler was enrolled in grad school at Temple University’s Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, where fellow printmaker Urban was teaching at the time. Now they live and teach in Austin, Texas. Print-media artist Urban’s work at Caldera involves turning images into 3-D objects using his original photos, cutting and reshaping them to add dimension. “I’m interested in op-art and optical experience,” he said. Without a press, “I had to find a way to work with my ideas. That’s the thing about Caldera. It’s a chance to do something you wouldn’t normally do.” When he and Mutchler do residencies together, they work side by side, feeding off of each other’s ideas on their respective projects. Mutchler and Urban “feel very lucky to be a part of this,” Mutchler said. “The experience of being at Caldera the last couple of weeks has been freeing … It’s nice being able to come to a place like Caldera and get a month of peace and quiet.” David Jasper can be reached at 541-383-0349 or djasper@ bendbulletin.com.


PAGE 14 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

fine arts ART EXHIBITS AMBIANCE ART CO-OP: Featuring works by Susan Adams from Adams Ranch Pottery; through January; 435 S.W. Evergreen Ave., Redmond; 541-548-8115. ART BY KNIGHT: Featuring oil paintings by Laurel Knight and bronze sculpture by Steven L. Knight; 236 N.W. Newport Ave., Bend; 541633-7488 or www.ArtbyKnight.com. ARTS CENTRAL: Featuring “Remembering Celilo Falls”; through March; 875 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-317-9324. ATELIER 6000: Featuring “Just Desserts,” sweet prints and food landscapes in a variety of media; through Jan. 28, celebration for “Vaquero Buckaroo” from 5:308:30 tonight; 389 S.W. Scalehouse Court, Suite 120, Bend; 541-3308759 or www.atelier6000.com. AZURA STUDIO: Featuring acrylic paintings by Charles H. Chamberlain; through Feb. 1; 856 N.W. Bond St., Unit 3, Bend; 541-385-1846. BEND FURNITURE AND DESIGN: Featuring pottery by Annie Dyer; 2797 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Suite 500, Bend; 541-633-7250. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring “Art of Photography”; through January; 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-312-1037. CAFE SINTRA: Featuring “3 Points of View,” a continually changing exhibit of photographs by Diane Reed, Ric Ergenbright, and John Vito; 1024 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-8004. CALDERA ARTS CENTER: Featuring an open studio of works from professional artists; 1-3 p.m. Saturday; 31500 Blue Lake Drive, off of U.S. Highway 20, west of Black Butte Ranch; 541-595-2561. CANYON CREEK POTTERY: Featuring

Courtesy R. Metheny

A Native American fisherman works on netting in this photo from “Remembering Celilo Falls,” on display through March at Arts Central. pottery by Kenneth Merrill; 310 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-549-0366 or www.canyoncreekpotteryllc.com. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: Featuring more than 200 artists; 222 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. DOUGLAS FINE JEWELRY DESIGN: Featuring works by Steven Douglas; 920 N.W. Bond St., Suite 106, Bend; 541-389-2901. FRANKLIN CROSSING: Featuring “Art in the Atrium,” photography by Vern Bartley and works by gallery artists; through Jan. 30; 550 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-382-9398. FURNISH.: Featuring works by

Valentine’s at Pronghorn $199 /couple

Includes Dinner in Chanterelle, Luxury Lodging & Breakfast for 2 Available February 11th, 12th & 13th For Details and Reservations PronghornClub.com / 541-693-5300

Marjorie Wood Hamlin; 761 N.W. Arizona Ave., Bend; 541-617-8911. THE GALLERY AT THE PINCKNEY CENTER: Featuring the Scholastic Art Exhibit; through Feb. 4, exhibit opens Monday; reception at 1 p.m. Saturday; Pinckney Center for the Arts, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7510. GHIGLIERI GALLERY: Featuring original Western-themed and African-inspired paintings and sculptures by Lorenzo Ghiglieri; 200 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5498683 or www.art-lorenzo.com. THE GOLDSMITH: Featuring pastel art by Nancy Bushaw; 1016 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-647-2676. HIGH DESERT FRAMEWORKS!: Featuring greeting cards and prints by several artists; through January; 61 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-549-6250 or www. highdesertframeworks.com. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF BEND: Featuring “Walk with Me,” works by Gabriel Kulka; through Feb. 16; 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-8964. HIGH DESERT GALLERY OF SISTERS: Featuring works by Grace Bishko, Paul Alan Bennett and Kathy Deggendorfer; through January; 281 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-5496250 or www.highdesertgallery.com. THE HUB HEALING ARTS CENTER: Featuring mixed-media collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; Dawson Station, 219 N.W. Sixth St., Redmond; 541-548-6575. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY: Featuring

Food, Home & Garden In AT HOME Every Tuesday

paintings by Jennifer Lake; 220 W. Cascade Ave., Sisters; 541-549-7200 or www.jenniferlakegallery.com. JILL’S WILD (TASTEFUL) WOMEN WAREHOUSE: Featuring works by Jill Haney-Neal; 20512 Nels Anderson Place, Building 3, Bend; 541-6176078 or www.jillnealgallery.com. KAREN BANDY STUDIO: Featuring “Of the Earth”; through February; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Suite 5, Bend; 541-388-0155. LAHAINA GALLERIES: Featuring paintings and sculptures by Frederick Hart, Robert Bissell, Alexi Butirskiy, Aldo Luongo, Dario Campanile, Hisashi Otsuka, David Lee, Mollie Jurgenson, Katherine Taylor, Donna Young and more; 425 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 307, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-388-4404 or www.lahainagalleries.com. LUBBESMEYER FIBER STUDIO: Featuring fiber art by Lori and Lisa Lubbesmeyer; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 423, Old Mill District, Bend; 541-330-0840 or www.lubbesmeyerstudio.com. MARCELLO’S ITALIAN CUISINE AND PIZZERIA: Featuring several local artists; 4 Ponderosa Road, Sunriver; 541-593-8300. MOCKINGBIRD GALLERY: Featuring “Body & Soul,” works by Vidan; through January; 869 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-388-2107 or www. mockingbird-gallery.com. MOSAIC MEDICAL: Featuring mixedmedia collage paintings by Rosalyn Kliot; 910 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 101, Madras; 541-475-7800. PATAGONIA @ BEND: Featuring photography by Mike Putnam; 920 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-6694. LESTER NEWELL’S PERSPECTIVES FINE ART GALLERY: Featuring works by more than 20 local artists; 130 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-306-3752.

POETHOUSE ART: Featuring resident artists; 55 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-728-0756. RED CHAIR GALLERY: Featuring “Fuse, Paint, Fire,” works by the gallery’s partners; through Feb. 4; 103 N.W. Oregon Ave., Bend; 541-306-3176. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring the Winter 2011 Photography Exhibit; through March 5; 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1064. RIVER BEND FINE ART: Featuring “Feathers, Fins & Fur”; through Feb. 4; 844 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-728-0553 or www. riverbendfineartgallery.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: Featuring works by the Prime Time Friday Artists; through Jan. 28; 117 S.W. Roosevelt Ave., Bend; 541-617-0900. SAGE CUSTOM FRAMING AND GALLERY: Featuring “Travels with Carol,” landscape oil paintings by Carol Jacquet; through Jan. 29; 834 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-382-5884. SISTERS ART WORKS: Featuring “Out on a Limb,” quilts by Journeys Art Quilt Group; through February; 204 W. Adams St., Sisters; 541-420-9695. SISTERS GALLERY & FRAME SHOP: Featuring landscape photography by Gary Albertson; 252 W. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-9552 or www.garyalbertson.com. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring the Annual Art Exhibit; through Feb. 24; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar Ave., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SODA CREEK GALLERY: Featuring originals and prints of Western, wildlife and landscape paintings; 183 E. Hood Ave., Sisters; 541-549-0600. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: Featuring works by Cameron Kaseberg and Chandra vanEijnsbergen; through January; 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080. SUNRIVER LODGE BETTY GRAY GALLERY: Featuring landscape paintings by gallery artists; through March 13, exhibit opens Saturday; 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-382-9398. TETHEROW AT THE FRANKLIN CROSSING BUILDING: Featuring paintings of the High Desert by local artist David Wachs; corner of Franklin Avenue and Bond Street, Bend; www.wordsideas.blogspot.com. THUMP COFFEE: Featuring “Sent from my iPhone,” photography by Carlos Perez, and a preview of “Push” skateboard decks; through January; 25 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-388-0226. TOWNSHEND’S BEND TEAHOUSE: Featuring “Ask the Moon,” works by Megan McGuinness; through January; 835 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-312-2001 or www.townshendstea.com. TUMALO ART CO.: Featuring “Small Works,” works in a variety of media; through January; 450 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 407, Bend; 541-385-9144 or www.tumaloartco.com.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 15

outdoors Outing shorts are trimmed versions of stories published in The Bulletin in the past several weeks. For the complete stories, plus more photos, visit www.bendbulletin.com/outing.

Santiam Junction sno-parks

Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory

T

hree sno-parks west of Santiam Junction offer Central Oregonians some fun, relatively seclud-

ed options for cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Often less crowded than sno-parks on Cascade Lakes Highway, these parks offer a good option for local snow hounds. — Bulletin staff

If you go

The Bulletin ile photo

Lilly Jasper, left, walks with her father, reporter David Jasper, down the Sam Osgood Nature Trail, a short, easy loop next to Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory.

tination is a good

place for an easy but educational

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41

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Sunriver Resort Area of detail

Sunriver Village Mall Abbot Dr.

Lava Lake

20

126

South Century Dr.

So. Century Dr.

Santiam Junction To Sisters, Bend

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To Corvallis

observatory, normally

126

To Eugene

Nature Trail

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Greg Cross / The Bulletin

River

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will be open from 8 to

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Spring River Rd.

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For more information, contact the Detroit Ranger District at 503854-3366, or log on to www .fs.usda.gov/ willamette.

Parking

10 p.m. Feb. 12 and 13. SUNRIVER

Nature Center Greg Cross / The Bulletin

If you go Getting there: From Bend, take U.S. Highway 97 south to Sunriver; exit at South Century Drive and proceed west to roundabout 1, then to 2 and 3. From 3, follow to the nature center

Cost: $3 for adults, $2 for children ages 2-12 Difficulty: Easy Contact: www.sunrivernaturecenter.org or 541-5934394

s Turf, Inc.

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— Bulletin staff

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TURF • TREES SHRUBS • FERTILIZER

541-546-9081 2019 SW Park Lane • Culver


PAGE 16 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY THE 21, BULLETIN 2011 • FRID

this w JAM ON THE HILL

FREE FAMILY SATURDAY

TODAY

SATURDAY What: The High Desert Museum offers complimentary admission for the whole family; overflow parking and shuttle service available at Morning Star Christian School. An otter frolics at the museum.

When: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Where: High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend Cost: Free Contact: 541-382-4754

SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & J What: Riders compete in a series of snowboard heats with vendors; event takes place in the parking lot by Oregon State University-Cascades Campus. A contestant slides down the rail at last year’s event. When: 4-8 p.m.

TODAY BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Camouflage is Cool”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. JAM ON THE HILL: Riders compete in a series of snowboard heats with vendors; event takes place in the parking lot by Oregon State University-Cascades Campus; free; 4-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; www.wix. com/jamonthehill/2011. UNWIND: A night of knitting and crocheting, with music and wine; $18; 6-10 p.m.; Stuart’s of Bend, 50 S.E. Scott St.; 541-390-5145. “AFGHAN STAR”: A screening of the unrated 2009 film; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351 or www.jcld.org. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A

Where: Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend Cost: Free Contact: www.wix.com/ jamonthehill/2011

AREA 97 CLUBS See what’s playing at local night spots on Page 8.

SATURDAY What: Local comics perform, with special musical guests. Jim Mortenson, pictured here at The Old Stone in November, will perform at the event. When: 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.

Space Orchestra; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com.

SATURDAY presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www. beattickets.org. (Story, Page 13) JUSTIN SHANDOR: The Elvis impersonator performs; $5-$15; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-5531112 or http://kahneeta.com. MICKEY AVALON: The hip-hop act performs, with Top Shelf, Space Boyz, Offset and DJ Chi-Duly; $25 at the door; 9 p.m., doors open 8 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; endustryent@gmail.com or www. bendticket.com. (Story, Page 3) WINTER RESIDENCY: Portlandbased fusion act Boy Eats Drum Machine performs, with Empty

Jan. 22 REDMOND GRANGE BREAKFAST: Featuring sourdough pancakes, eggs, ham, coffee and more; proceeds benefit the Redmond High School wind ensemble; $5, $3 ages 11 and younger; 7-10:30 a.m.; Redmond Grange, 707 S.W. Kalama Ave.; 541-480-4495. FREE FAMILY SATURDAY: The High Desert Museum offers complimentary admission for the whole family; overflow parking and shuttle service available at Morning Star Christian School; free; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring a performance by Central Oregon Symphony musicians; free; 1 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-317-3941 or www. cosymphony.com. (Story, Page 13) MUSIC IN PUBLIC PLACES: Featuring

a performance by Central Oregon Symphony musicians; free; 4 p.m.; St. Charles Bend, 2500 N.E. Neff Road; 541-317-3941 or www.cosymphony.com. SPAGHETTI DINNER: Meal includes spaghetti, salad and garlic bread; proceeds benefit a relief fund for area veterans; $6; 5 p.m.; VFW Hall, 1503 N.E. Fourth St., Bend; 541-389-0775. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring a caller and live music; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. KITES & CROWS: The Ashlandbased indie folk trio performs; free; 7 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-385-1777. (Story, Page 6) SINGALONG SATURDAY: Watch the G-rated 1939 film “The Wizard of Oz” and sing along with the characters; $10; 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8

p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org. JUSTIN SHANDOR: The Elvis impersonator performs; $5-$15; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Kah-NeeTa High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. LJ BOOTH: The Scandinavia, Wis.based folk act performs; $15 suggested donation; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; HarmonyHouse, 17505 Kent Road, Sisters; 541548-2209. (Story, Page 6) SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with special musical guests; $5; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. CICADA OMEGA: The Portland-based trance-blues band performs; $5; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. (Story, Page 6) THE DARK SIDE OF OZ: A screening of “The Wizard of Oz,” set to the music of Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon”; free; 10 p.m., doors


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Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC — CROWN CITY STRING QUARTET

LADIES NIGHT OF INDULGENCE

THURSDAY

TUESDAY

What: A night of fun, shopping and pampering for women; proceeds benefit Grandma’s House. Attendees at last year’s event enjoy massages. When: 4:30-9 p.m. Where: The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River

Court, Bend Cost: Donations of nonperishable food requested Contact: www.ladiesnightbenefit. com, ladiesnight2010@gmail.com or 541-389-3111

JAMS

Where: Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St. Cost: $5 Contact: 541-977-5677

open 9:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700.

SUNDAY Jan. 23 KEEP IT LOCAL — VOLUNTEER EXPO: Community organizations will be on hand to answer questions about volunteering options; free; 1-4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7093 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 2 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org. CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit the Prineville sixth-grade camp; $7; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. CHILI COOK-OFF AND RAIL JAM: Eat chili and watch competitors compete for the best recipe; with a rail jam; proceeds benefit The Education Foundation for Bend-La Pine Schools;

What: String musicians, pictured, play selections from Mozart, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky. When: 7:30 p.m. Where: Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend

$10, $5 ages 6-11, free ages 5 and younger; 2-6 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541480-0612 or simplysales@q.com. THE VALUE MENU TOUR: Featuring indie hip-hop acts Tanya Morgan, Big Pooh, Young Americans and Cloaked Characters; free; 8 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@ gmail.com. (Story, Page 6)

MONDAY Jan. 24 TALK OF THE TOWN: COTV and Oregon State University-Cascades Campus host a forum to discuss the city of Bend’s surface water project; reservations required; free; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-3885814, talk@bendbroadband.com or www.talkofthetownco.com.

TUESDAY Jan. 25 HIGH DESERT CHAMBER MUSIC — CROWN CITY STRING QUARTET: String musicians play selections from

Cost: $35, $10 children and students with ID Contact: www.highdesert chambermusic.com, info@ highdesertchambermusic.com or 541-317-0700

Mozart, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky; $35, $10 children and students with ID; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700, info@highdesertchambermusic.com or www.highdesertchambermusic. com. (Story, Page 13) DAWES: The Los Angeles-based country-rock band performs, with Jonny Corndawg; $7; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing. com. (Story, Page 7)

WEDNESDAY Jan. 26 VEGETARIAN POTLUCK: Bring a vegetarian soup with a list of its ingredients and watch the short video “The Blue Zones”; free; 6 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-480-3017. “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in an encore presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive,

Bend; 541-382-6347. (Story, Page 27) LIVE READ: Sit in comfy chairs and listen to short fiction read aloud by library staff; free; 6:30-7:30 p.m.; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. ELIZABETH COOK: The alternative country musician performs, with Tim Carroll; part of the Great Northwest Music Tour; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 4) “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org.

THURSDAY Jan. 27 BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Snow!”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.;

High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. LADIES NIGHT OF INDULGENCE: A night of fun, shopping and pampering for women; proceeds benefit Grandma’s House; donations of nonperishable food requested; 4:30-9 p.m.; The Riverhouse Convention Center, 2850 N.W. Rippling River Court, Bend; 541389-3111, ladiesnight2010@gmail. com or www.ladiesnightbenefit.com. THE PIMPS OF JOYTIME: The funk band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www. mcmenamins.com. (Story, Page 4) “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-3129626 or www.beattickets.org. THE MELODRAMATICS: The Northern California-based reggae-rock band performs; free; 10 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868 or madhappylounge@ gmail.com. (Story, Page 6)


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planning ahead Right Around the Corner JAN. 28-29 — STUDENT-DIRECTED ONE-ACT PLAYS: The Crook County High School drama department presents three student-directed plays; $3; 7 p.m.; Crook County High School, Eugene Southwell Auditorium, 1100 S.E. Lynn Blvd., Prineville; 541-416-6900, ext 3132 or anita. hoffman@crookcounty.k12.or.us. JAN. 28 — BACKPACK EXPLORERS: Parents and children ages 3 and 4 explore nature and participate in activities; themed “Snow!”; $15, $10 museum members, plus accompanying adult admission ($10, $9 seniors); 10 a.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. JAN. 28 — “DESPICABLE ME”: A screening of the 2010 PG-rated film; with pizza and refreshments; free; 6-9 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351. JAN. 28 — WINTER RESIDENCY: The Seattle-based eccentric rock band X-Ray Press performs, with Empty Space Orchestra; $5 plus fees in advance, $7 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.bendticket.com. JAN. 29 — “YEAR OF THE RIVER” EXHIBIT OPENS: New exhibit features the geology and hydrology of the Deschutes River; exhibit runs through April 10; included in the price of admission; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754 or www.highdesertmuseum.org. JAN. 29 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Lauren Kessler reads from her work “My Teenage Werewolf: A Mother, A Daughter, A Journey Through the Thicket of Adolescence”; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. JAN. 29 — CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org. JAN. 29 — DISCOMANIA: Featuring dinner, dancing and a silent auction; proceeds benefit the Crooked River Ranch-Terrebonne Chamber of Commerce; $25; 6 p.m.; Sandbagger Dinner House, 5165 Clubhouse Drive, Crooked River Ranch; 541-923-2679. JAN. 29 — FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER: Featuring live music, food and live and silent auctions; proceeds benefit the Bend Surgery Center Foundation; $40; 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-3170700 or www.towertheatre.org. JAN. 29 — ROBERT BURNS EVENING

AND DINNER: A tribute to the Scottish poet, with live music, dancing, poetry recitations and dinner; $45; 6:50 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-350-5652 or highdesertcelts@gmail.com. JAN. 29 — SATURDAY NIGHT JOKERS & JAMS: Local comics perform, with special musical guests; $5; 8 p.m., doors open 7:30 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-977-5677. JAN. 29 — 80s VIDEO DANCE ATTACK: The 80s dance act performs, with VJ Kittyrox; $5; 9 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com. JAN. 29 — BETH WOOD: The Eugenebased singer-songwriter performs, with Shireen Amini; $8 plus fees in advance, $10 at the door; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. JAN. 30 — CASCADE HORIZON BAND: The senior band performs a concert featuring works by Aaron Copeland, marches, patriotic songs and more, under the direction of Sue Steiger; proceeds benefit the Summit High School wind ensemble; donations accepted; 2 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-389-5121, cascadehorizonband@yahoo.com or http://cascadehorizonband.org. FEB. 1 — AUTHOR PRESENTATION: Suzanne Schlosberg talks about her book “The Good Neighbor Cookbook”; 6:30 p.m.; Camalli Book Co., 1288 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite C, Bend; 541-323-6134. FEB. 1 — GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “GASLAND: Can You Light Your Water on Fire?” a documentary about natural-gas drilling technology; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504. FEB. 2 — DAY OF ZINN: Commemorate the life and works of Howard Zinn, with readings from his works, film clips, a dinner and more; registration required for dinner portion of event; free; noon, 6 p.m. dinner and film; OSU-Cascades Campus, Cascades Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-322-3140 or ndollar@osucascades.edu. FEB. 3 — GRADUATION AUCTION: Silent auction to benefit Summit High School’s graduation party; free admission; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Athletic Club of Bend, 61615 Athletic Club Drive; 541-610-9913 or cindymckee@mac.com. FEB. 3 — GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Oryx and Crake” by Margaret Atwood; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FEB. 3 — “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prizewinning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m.; Bend High School,

Submitted photo

Empty Space Orchestra, pictured, will perform with X-Ray Press on Jan. 28 at Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom. 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. FEB. 3 — EMMA HILL AND HER GENTLEMEN CALLERS: The Portlandbased folk singer performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

Farther Down the Road FEB. 4-5, 9-10 — “TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD”: The Bend High School drama department presents a dramatization of Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning tale; $7, $5 students and seniors; 7 p.m. all days, and 2 p.m. Feb. 5; Bend High School, 230 N.E. Sixth St.; 541-383-6290. FEB. 4-5 — HILLSTOMP: Portlandbased junkyard blues duo performs; ticket prices to be announced; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-3888331 or www.silvermoonbrewing.com. FEB. 4 — SISTERS FOLK FESTIVAL WINTER CONCERT SERIES: Featuring a performance by Tom Russell; $15, $10 students in advance, $20, $12 students

at the door; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Sisters High School, 1700 W. McKinney Butte Road; 541-549-4979 or www.sistersfolkfestival.org. FEB. 5 — CRAB FEED FUNDRAISER: Meal features crab, bread, an assortment of beverages and more; ages 21 and older only; proceeds benefit the student technology program at St. Thomas Academy of Redmond; $20; 4-8 p.m.; St. Thomas Parish Hall, 12th Street and Evergreen Avenue, Redmond; 541-548-3785 or www.redmondacademy.com. FEB. 5 — RHINESTONE COWBOY AUCTION: With a dinner, live and silent auctions and live music by Reno and Cindy Holler; reservations requested; proceeds benefit college scholarships for Sisters High School graduates; $50; 6-10 p.m.; FivePine Lodge & Conference Center, 1021 Desperado Trail, Sisters; 503-5599788 or www.sistersgro.com. FEB. 9 — “9500 LIBERTY”: A screening of the documentary about an explosive immigration-policy battle in Virginia; free; 6:30 p.m.; Becky Johnson Center, 412 S.W. Eighth

St., Redmond; 541-383-7412 or http://multicultural.cocc.edu/events. FEB. 9 — IGNITE BEND: A series of five-minute presentations on a range of topics, each chosen by the presenter; $5 suggested donation; 7 p.m., doors open 6:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St.; 541480-6492 or www.ignitebend.com. FEB. 10 — BUDDY WAKEFIELD: The slam poet performs; free; 7 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-312-1032 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FEB. 10 — “FOREVER PLAID”: A musical about high school crooners who return from the afterlife for one last shot at glory; $37 or $42; 7:30 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541317-0700 or www.towertheatre.org. FEB. 10 — “OLIVER!”: Preview night of Cascades Theatrical Company’s presentation of Lionel Bart’s musical about a lovable orphan who asks for more; $10; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org.


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talks, classes, museums & libraries Education SELF-DEFENSE CLASS: Women ages 15 and older learn self-defense tips; registration required; $15; 12:30-3:30 p.m. Saturday; Sortor Karate, 63056 Lower Meadow Drive, Bend; www.cooath.org. EAGLES IN CENTRAL OREGON: Learn about Sunriver’s eagles, with a slide show; $4, $3 ages 2-12, free nature center members; 2-3 p.m. Saturday; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4442. THE LOVE GENERATION: Steven Bidlake talks about flower children and hippies in the ’60s; free; 2 p.m. Saturday; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar or 541-312-1032. EMBRACING NONVIOLENT LIVING: Learn about violent realities and nonviolent responses; registration recommended; $10 requested donation; 2-4:30 p.m. Sunday and Jan. 30; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; www.pcoco.org. HUMAN TRAFFICKING 101: An overview of human trafficking and lessons on how to recognize it; free; 6:30 p.m. Monday; Highland Baptist Church, 3100 S.W. Highland Ave., Redmond; www.cooath.org. CITY OF BEND’S SURFACE WATER PLAN: A panel discussion of the pros and cons of the city’s plan; free; 7 p.m. Monday; Cascades Hall, Oregon State University-Cascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; www. osucascades.edu or 541-322-3100. WRITING PRESENTATION: Ellen Waterston talks about finding home in fact and fiction; free; 6:30-9 p.m. Thursday; Redmond Public Library, 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave.; www.centraloregonwritersguild. com, 541-923-0896 or elsiemariewrites@gmail.com. CIVILIAN DIPLOMACY IN IRAN: Philip Randall talks about traveling as part of a peace delegation to Iran; free; 7 p.m. Thursday; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; 541-388-1793 or phil@tiedyed.us. MAKE CHOCOLATE TRUFFLES FOR VALENTINE’S DAY: Make confections and learn about chocolate properties and uses; $69; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Jan. 29; Central Oregon Community College, Grandview Kitchen, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit.cocc. edu or 541-383-7290 to register. AARP DRIVER SAFETY PROGRAM: 541-317-0610. AEROSPACE CADET EDUCATION: 541-598-7479. CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE COMMUNITY CLASSES: www.cocc.edu or 541-383-7270. COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION: www.katyelliottmft.com or 541-633-5704. COMPUTER CLASSES: 541383-7270 or www.cocc.edu; Deschutes Public Library System, www.dpls.us or 541-312-1020. KINDERMUSIK: www.kidsmovewith music.com or 541-325-6995. KINDERMUSIK: www.developmusic

Submitted photo

Katheri n e Taylor, pictured, will lead an oil painting class at Central Oregon Community College. See the Arts & Crafts section for details. .com or 541-389-6690. LATINO COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION: 541-382-4366 or www.latca.org. METAPHYSICAL STUDY GROUP: 541-549-4004. MOTORCYCLE SAFETY: http://teamoregon.orst.edu. NEIL KELLY CO. REMODELING SEMINARS: 541-382-7580. PARTNERS IN CARE PRESENTATIONS: loriew@partnersbend.org or 541-382-5882. PEACE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: Compassionate communication, Enneagram, yoga and more; www.pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. SPIRITUAL AWARENESS COMMUNITY OF THE CASCADES: www.spiritual awarenesscommunity.com or 541-388-3179. THE STOREFRONT PROJECT: Creative writing workshops for middle- and high-school students; 541-330-4381 or www.thenatureofwords.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER CLASSES: www.wrcco. org or 541-385-0750. WRITERS GUILD: 541-923-0896.

Parks & Recreation BEND PARK & RECREATION DISTRICT: www.bendparksandrec.org or 541-389-7275. BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. CAMP TUMALO: www.camptumalo. com or 541-389-5151. REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: www.raprd.org or 541-548-7275. SISTERS ORGANIZATION FOR ACTIVITIES AND RECREATION: www.sistersrecreation.com or 541-549-2091.

Outdoor Recreation CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING BASICS: Peggy O’Neil talks about the differences between backcountry, telemark and touring ski styles; registration required; free; 6 p.m. Tuesday; REI, 380 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-385-0594 or www.rei.com/stores/events/96.

WINTER NATURE NIGHT: Learn to identify mammals by their movements with the three Ps of tracking; free; 6:30 p.m. Tuesday; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend; www.deschuteslandtrust. org or 541-330-0017. DESCHUTES LAND TRUST: www.deschuteslandtrust.org or 541-330-0017. THE ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER: www .envirocenter.org or 541-322-4856. OREGON PALEO LANDS INSTITUTE OUTDOOR EXCURSIONS: www .paleolands.org or 541-763-4480. OUTDOORS SKILLS WORKSHOPS: 800-720-6339, ext. 76018. PINE MOUNTAIN OBSERVATORY: pmo-sun.uoregon.edu. REI: www.rei.com/stores/96 or 541-385-0594. SILVER STRIDERS: strideon@silver striders.com or 541-383-8077. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: www.sunrivernature center.org or 541-593-4442. TRADITIONAL MOUNTAINEERING MAP, COMPASS AND GPS SKILLS: Offering outdoor and indoor classes; 541-385-0445. WANDERLUST TOURS: www.wanderlusttours. com or 541-389-8359.

Arts & Crafts OIL PAINTING JUMP-START WORKSHOP: Learn fundamental painting skills with an emphasis on painting from life; previous drawing experience helpful; $69; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Jan. 29-30; Central Oregon Community College, Ponderosa Hall, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; http://noncredit. cocc.edu or 541-383-7290 to register. ABRACADABRA ARTS & CRAFTS: www.abracadabracrafts.com. ART IN THE MOUNTAINS: www.artinthemountains. com or 541-923-2648. ART STATION: Art camps, classes and workshops; www.artscentraloregon. org or 541-617-1317. ATELIER 6000: Printmaking, book arts and more; www.atelier6000.

com or 541-330-8759. CREATIVITY RESOURCE FOUNDATION: 541-549-2091. DON TERRA ARTWORKS: 541-5491299 or www.donterra.com. JENNIFER LAKE GALLERY ART ACADEMY: 541-549-7200. KEN ROTH STUDIO: Painting workshops; www.kenrothstudio. com or 541-317-1727. KINKER ART STUDIO: 541-306-6341. PAINT ITALY, BEND OR SEATTLE WITH CINDY BRIGGS: 541-420-9463, www.cindybriggs.com or www .MakeEveryDayAPainting.com. SAGEBRUSHERS ART SOCIETY: http://sagebrushersartofbend. com or 541-617-0900.

Performing Arts ACADEMIE DE BALLET CLASSIQUE: 541-382-4055. ACTOR’S REALM: 541-410-7894 or volcanictheatre@bendbroadband.com. ADULT MODERN DANCE: Taught by Fish Hawk Wing Modern Dance troupe; 541-788-0725. AN DAIRE ACADEMY OF IRISH DANCE: www.irishdancecentraloregon.com. BARBERSHOP HARMONY: www. showcasechorus.org or 541447-4756 or 541-526-5006. BEND EXPERIMENTAL ART THEATRE: www.beatonline.org or 541-419-5558. CASCADE COMMUNITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC: www.ccschoolofmusic. org or 541-382-6866. CENTRAL OREGON DANCE COMPANY: www.centraloregondance.com or 541-419-8998 or 541-388-9884. CENTRAL OREGON SCHOOL OF BALLET: www. centraloregonschoolofballet. com or 541-389-9306. CHILDREN’S MUSIC THEATRE GROUP: www.cmtg.org or 541-385-6718. THE CLOG HOUSE: 541-548-2062. CUBAN STYLE DRUMMING CLASSES: 541-550-8381. GOTTA DANCE STUDIO: 541-322-0807. GYPSY FIRE BELLYDANCE: 541-420-5416. HAND DRUMMING: 541-350-9572. INDONESIAN ORCHESTRA: 541-408-1249. JAZZ DANCE COLLECTIVE: www.jazzdancecollective. org or 541-408-7522. LINE DANCE CLASSES: 562-508-1337 or danceforhealth@ymail.com. MODERN SQUARE DANCE CLASSES: 541-385-8074. REDMOND SCHOOL OF DANCE: 541-548-6957 or www. redmondschoolofdance.com. SCENE STUDY WORKSHOP: 541-9775677 or brad@innovationtw.org. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING: 541-549-7311. SQUARE DANCING: 541-548-5743. TANGO DANCE: 541-330-4071. TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: 541-389-5351.

WEST AFRICAN DRUM: 541-760-3204.

Museums A.R. BOWMAN MEMORIAL MUSEUM: Exhibits about Crook County, the City of Prineville Railroad and the local timber industry; free; 246 N. Main St., Prineville; www. bowmanmuseum.org or 541-447-3715. DES CHUTES HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Explores the history, culture and heritage of Deschutes County; $5 adults, $2 ages 13-17, children ages 12 and younger free with adult; 129 N.W. Idaho Ave., Bend; www. deschuteshistory.org or 541-389-1813. HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: Featuring “Gum San — Land of the Golden Mountain,” through April 24; $10 adults, $9 ages 65 and older, $6 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and younger and members. Open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily through April 30; (closed Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s days); 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; www.highdesertmuseum. org or 541-382-4754. THE MUSEUM AT WARM SPRINGS: Cultural, traditional and artistic heritage of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs $7 adults, $6 seniors, $3.50 ages 5-12, $4.50 students; 2189 U.S. Highway 26, Warm Springs; www.museumatwarmsprings. org or 541-553-3331. REDMOND MUSEUM: Featuring displays highlighting 100 years of Redmond history; $2; 529 S.W. Seventh St.; 541-504-3038. SUNRIVER NATURE CENTER & OBSERVATORY: Featuring live birds of prey, hands-on exhibits, nature trail, telescopes, night sky viewing and more; $3 adults, $2 ages 12 and younger; 57245 River Road, Sunriver; www.sunrivernaturecenter. org or 541-593-4394.

Libraries BEND GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY LIBRARY: Williamson Hall at Rock Arbor Villa (behind Jake’s Diner), 2200 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend; 541-317-9553 or www.orgenweb. org/deschutes/bend-gs. BEND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 601 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-617-7040. CROOK COUNTY LIBRARY: 175 N.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-447-7978. FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY: 1260 N.E. Thompson Drive, Bend; 541-382-9947. LA PINE PUBLIC LIBRARY: 1642 51st St., La Pine; 541-312-1091. JEFFERSON COUNTY LIBRARY: 241 S.E. 7th St., Madras; 541-475-3351. REDMOND PUBLIC LIBRARY: 827 S.W. Deschutes Ave., Redmond; 541-312-1050. ROBERT L. BARBER LIBRARY: 2600 N.W. College Way (COCC), Bend; 541-383-7560. SISTERS PUBLIC LIBRARY: 110 N. Cedar St., Sisters; 541-312-1070. SUNRIVER AREA PUBLIC LIBRARY: 56855 Venture Lane, Sunriver; 541-312-1080.


PAGE 20 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

out of town The following is a list of other events “Out of Town.”

Concerts

HARMONIC

DUO Submitted photo

Bluegrass veterans Jamie Dailey, left, and Darrin Vincent formed an award-winning duo in 2008. Featuring tight harmonies and fast picking, their group, Dailey & Vincent, will perform Feb. 9 at the Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater in Medford.

Medford theater welcomes bluegrass veterans By Jenny Harada The Bulletin

S

ince forming in 2008, musical duo Dailey & Vincent have taken the bluegrass world by storm. Exhibiting tight vocal harmonies and fast picking, Jamie Dailey and Darrin Vincent have already received numerous awards, including the International Bluegrass Music Awards’ Emerging Artist of the Year (2008), Vocal Group of the Year (2008-2010) and Entertainer of the Year (2008-2010). The group will perform Feb. 9 at the Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater in Medford. Although relatively new as a duo, Dailey and Vincent are each veterans in the bluegrass circle. Dailey (guitar, bass, lead and harmony vocals) spent nine years touring with Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver. Vincent (mandolin, bass, guitar and lead and harmony vocals) toured with Ricky Skaggs and Kentucky Thunder for 10 years. Vincent is also the younger brother of blue-

grass superstar Rhonda Vincent. According to their website, Dailey and Vincent first collaborated in 2003 on a compilation Christmas album, with the song “Beautiful Star of Bethlehem.” Liking how perfectly their voices blended, they knew they wanted to start a project together in the future. They released their first album (self-titled) in 2008, followed by “Brothers From Different Mothers” (2009), “Singing From the Heart” (2009) and “Dailey & Vincent Sing the Statler Brothers” (2010). Ticket prices range from $22 to $28 for adults and $15 to $21 for youth (ages 18 and younger), depending on seat location. To purchase tickets, visit www.craterian.org or contact 541-779-3000. For more information on Dailey & Vincent, visit http://daileyvincent.music citynetworks.com. Jenny Harada can be reached at 541-3830350 or jharada@bendbulletin.com.

Through Jan. 23 — Winter Folk Festival: Featuring Weavermania, Chad & Jeremy and The Trail Band; Florence Events Center, Florence; www.winterfolkfestival. org or 541-997-1994 Jan. 21 — Amos Lee, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Jan. 21 — Anthony B, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 21 — Bob Brozman, Unitarian Fellowship, Ashland; www. stclairevents.com or 541-535-3562. Jan. 21-23 — “Evynne Hollens: New World, New Directions,” The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Jan. 22 — Amos Lee, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 22 — Dan Reed Band/ Stephanie Schneiderman, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 22 — moe, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Jan. 23 — Anthony B, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 24 — Loudon Wainwright III, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 25 — Old 97s, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Jan. 25 — Ra Ra Riot, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall. org or 541-687-2746. Jan. 26 — The Pimps of Joytime, WOW Hall, Eugene; www. wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. Jan. 26 — Ween, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Jan. 27 — Asylum Street Spankers, WOW Hall, Eugene; www. wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. Jan. 28 — The Bill Charlap Trio, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Jan. 28 — Grace Potter & The Nocturnals, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Jan. 29 — Interpol, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Jan. 29 — TobyMac’s Winter Wonder Slam Tour, Theater of the Clouds, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Jan. 29 — The Wood Brothers, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Jan. 30 — Elizabeth Cook, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Jan. 30 — The Wood Brothers, WOW Hall, Eugene; www. wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 1 — Underoath, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 2 — David Garrett, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 2 — Sarah McLachlan, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

Feb. 3 — Daniel Lanois’ Black Dub, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 3 — Jackie Greene, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall. org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 3 — “Take the ‘A’ Train: The Music of Billy Strayhorn”: Presented by Carl Woideck; The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 4 — Bassnectar, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 4 — Jackie Greene, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 4 — Michael Rose, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall. org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 5 — Motorhead, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 5 — Winterfolk XXIII, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 7 — Led Zeppelin 2, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 8-9 — Social Distortion, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 8 — Trombone Shorty & Orleans Ave, Dante’s, Portland; TW* Feb. 9 — Dailey & Vincent, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.com or 541-779-3000. Feb. 9 — Rodney Crowell, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 9 — Social Distortion, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 9 — STS9, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 10 — Ethan Bortnick, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 10 — Sebadoh, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 10, 13 — “Night and Day”: Presented by The Emerald City Jazz Kings; Jaqua Concert Hall, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 11 — Solas, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 11 — STS9, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Feb. 12 — Chromeo, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 12 — David Wilcox, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 13 — Avenged Sevenfold, Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene; www.matthewknightarena. com or 800-932-3668. Feb. 13 — CAKE, Roseland Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TW* Feb. 15 — Ke$ha, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Feb. 15 — Murder by Death, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 15 — Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses, WOW Hall, Eugene; www. wowhall.org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 16 — Voice of the Wetlands All-Stars: Featuring Tab Benoit, Anders Osborne, Big Chief Monk Boudreaux, Cyril Neville, Johnny Sansome and Whalen Thibodeaux;


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PAGE 21

out of town Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 17 — Elton John, Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene; SOLD OUT; www.matthewknightarena. com or 800-932-3668. Feb. 17 — Gang of Four, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 17 — Jonathan Coulton, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 17 — Waddie Mitchell, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 18 — Godspeed You! Black Emperor, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Feb. 18 — House of Floyd — Pink Floyd Tribute, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 18 — Tommy Emmanuel, Aladdin Theater, Portland; SOLD OUT; TM* Feb. 18 — Jessie Marquez, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7000. Feb. 18 — Yo La Tengo, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 18-19 — Marty Stuart, Chinook Winds Casino Resort, Lincoln City; www.chinookwindscasino. com or 888-624-6228. Feb. 18-27 — Portland Jazz Festival: Featuring Regina Carter, Joshua Redman, Maceo Parker and the SFJAZZ Collective; Portland; www. pdxjazz.com or 503-228-5299. Feb. 19 — The Decemberists, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Feb. 19 — House of Floyd, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 19 — Ryan Bingham & The Dead Horses, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 20 — Yo La Tengo, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall. org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 23 — Al Di Meola, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 23 — Josh Ritter, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 24-27 — Wintergrass: Featuring The Blind Boys of Alabama, Darrell Scott, The Sam Bush Band, Crooked Still and Laurie Lewis & The Right Hands; Hyatt Regency, Bellevue, Wash.; www. acousticsound.org or 253-428-8056. Feb. 25 — Balkan Beat Box, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 25 — Pancho Sanchez, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 25 — Too Slim & the Taildraggers/John Hammond, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 26 — 3 Cohens & AfroSemitic, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 26 — The Four Freshmen, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; www.rrtheater.org or 541-884-0651. Feb. 26 — Gary Myrick & The Figures, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Feb. 26 — Regina Carter, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 26 — SOJA, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Feb. 27 — Maceo Parker, McMenamins Crystal

*Tickets • TM — Ticketmaster, www.ticketmaster.com, 800-745-3000 • TW — TicketsWest, www.ticketswest.com, 800-992-8499 Ballroom, Portland; TM* Feb. 27 — Swans, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* Feb. 28 — Eric Clapton, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. March 1 — Imagination Movers, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* March 3 — Cold War Kids, McMenamins Crystal Ballroom, Portland; TM* March 3 — DeVotchKa, Roseland Theater, Portland; TW* March 3 — Steven Page, Wonder Ballroom, Portland; TM* March 4 — Cold War Kids, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall. org or 541-687-2746.

Lectures & Comedy Jan. 21 —”Afghanistan and Beyond: The Future of American Security”: Lecture by General Stanley McChrystal; part of the World Affairs Council of Oregon’s International Speaker Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. worldoregon.org or 503-306-5252. Jan. 21 — Jim Jefferies, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 25 — Elizabeth Strout: Part of the Portland Arts & Lectures series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.literaryarts.org or 503-227-2583. Jan. 27-28 — Craft Conversation with Garth Johnson, Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Jan. 28 — Brian Regan, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Jan. 28 — Jeff Dunham, Matthew Knight Arena, Eugene; www.matthewknightarena. com or 800-932-3668. Jan. 28 — “Quilt Fusion: Unique Techniques”: Lecture by Terry Grant; The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www. oregongarden.org or 503-874-8100. Jan. 29 — Paula Poundstone, Aladdin Theater, Portland; TM* Jan. 29 — “Waste of Timelessness: Craft in the Present Tense”: Lecture by Garth Johnson; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Feb. 12 — Michel Lauziére, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Feb. 16 — Brian Posehn, WOW Hall, Eugene; www.wowhall. org or 541-687-2746. Feb. 17 — The Moth, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM*

Feb. 19 — The Best of the San Francisco Comedy Competition, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian. org or 541-779-3000. Feb. 23 — “Soil Not Oil: Climate Change, Peak Oil, and Food Justice”: Lecture by Vandana Shiva; part of the World Affairs Council of Oregon’s International Speaker Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.worldoregon. org or 503-306-5252. Feb. 26 — “Madagascar: The Real Treasure Island”: Lecture by Paul Freed; The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www.oregongarden. org or 503-874-8100. March 3 — Tracy Kidder: Part of the Portland Arts & Lectures series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.literaryarts.org or 503-227-2583.

Symphony & Opera Jan. 22-23 — “Three Broadway Divas”: Featuring Debbie Gravitte, Jan Horvath and Christiane Noll; presented by the Oregon

Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Jan. 24 — “Three Broadway Divas”: Featuring Debbie Gravitte, Jan Horvath and Christiane Noll; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Smith Auditorium, Salem; www.absolutelytix. com or 800-874-7012. Jan. 26-27, 30 — Ernest Bloch Music Concerts: Presented by Third Angle Ensemble; associated with the exhibit “Ernest Bloch — Framing a Vision of the World”; Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; www. ojm.org or 503-226-3600. Jan. 29 — “A Gala Evening with Itzhak Perlman”: Featuring music by Beethoven, Strauss and Mendelssohn; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter. org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 29, 31 — “Percussion Spectacular”: Featuring percussionist Colin Currie; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony.

org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 4, 6, 10, 12 — “Turandot”: Opera by Giacomo Puccini; American premiere of Christopher Alden’s production; presented by Portland Opera; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* Feb. 5-7 — “Yuja Wang Plays Rachmaninoff”: Featuring music by Brahms, Nielsen and Rachmaninoff; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 14 — “Valentine’s Day with Johnny Mathis”: Presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 17 — “Scheherazade”: Featuring music by Dvorák, Poulenc and Rimsky-Korsokav; presented by the Eugene Symphony; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter. org or 541-682-5000. Feb. 20 — Cirque de la Symphonie, Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000.

Continued next page


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

out of town

ENTER AS MANY TIMES AS YOU LIKE

!

Enter And Win The Bulletin’s WIN A 7-NIGHT MEXICAN RIVIERA CRUISE

4T H ANNUAL VACAT ION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES!

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FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBSCRIBE CALL THE BULLETIN AT 541-385-5800 FOR COMPLETE RULES AND REGULATIONS Visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules or stop by The Bulletin at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. Additional entry forms are available in newspapers for sale across Central Oregon and in the lobby of The Bulletin. Winner will be drawn January 28, 2011.

OFFICIAL BULLETIN | GETAWAYS TRAVEL

VACATION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FORM

Sign me up to win The Bulletin’s Subscriber Vacation Getaway Sweepstakes! Official entry form only. No other reproductions are accepted. Prizes are non-transferable to any other party and cannot be substituted for cash or any other value. Winner is responsible for all taxes. Must be 21 years of age or older.

NAME: ______________________________________ _____________________________________________ PHONE: ______________________________________ ADDRESS: ___________________________________ _____________________________________________ E-MAIL (required): ___________________________ _____________________________________________ BULLETIN SUBSCRIBER: ___YES ___ NO Official entry forms must be received by 3 p.m. on January 27, 2011. Entry forms may be mailed to: P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708, or dropped off at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR 97702

GETAWAYS TRAVEL 563 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 www.getawaystravel.net RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.

From previous page Feb. 20-21 — “Gregory Vajda’s Dvorák”: Featuring music by Barber, Bartok and Dvorák; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. Feb. 26-28 — “Thomas Lauderdale Plays Grieg”: Featuring music by Stravinsky, Schubert, Grieg and Marquez; presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. March 4 — Storm Large: Presented by the Oregon Symphony; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www.orsymphony. org or 800-228-7343. March 5 — “Springtime Serenade”: Featuring music by Mozart and Tchaikovsky; presented by the Oregon Mozart Players; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. March 6 — “Gotta Dance!”: Presented by the Oregon Symphony and Dance West; part of the Pink Lemonade Kids Series Concert; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; www. orsymphony.org or 800-228-7343. March 11-13 — “The Mikado”: Featuring Tony Award-nominee Christiane Noll as Yum-Yum; presented by the Eugene Opera; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000.

Theater & Dance Through Jan. 22 — Oslund + Co/Dance: Featuring choreography by Mary Oslund; part of the White Bird Uncaged series; Lincoln Hall, Portland State University, Portland; www.whitebird.org or 503-725-3307. Through Jan. 29 — “Circle Mirror Transformation”: New comedy by Annie Baker; presented by the Lord Leebrick Theatre Company; Lord Leebrick Theatre, Eugene; www. lordleebrick.com or 541-465-1506. Through Feb. 6 — “The Imaginary Invalid”: 17th century comedy by Molière; adaptation by Constance Congdon; presented by Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www. pcs.org or 503-446-5700. Through Feb. 6 — “Superior Donuts”: Comedy-drama by Tracy Letts; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Morrison Stage, Portland; www.artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278. Jan. 21 — Ailey II, Ross Ragland Theater, Klamath Falls; www. rrtheater.org or 541-884-0651. Jan. 22 — Ailey II: A showcase for rising young dancers and choreographers; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.com or 541-779-3000. Jan. 22-24 — “The Book of Murder”: Play by Ron Cowen; presented by Zero Clearance Theater Company; Westridge School, Westfir; 541-782-5701. Jan. 25 — “‘S Wonderful — The New Gershwin Musical”: Musical revue featuring music and lyrics by George and Ira Gershwin; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.com or 541-779-3000. Jan. 25 — “Spring Awakening”:

The musical is a fusion of morality, sexuality and rock & roll; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Jan. 27-29 — BodyVox-2, The BodyVox Dance Center, Portland; www.bodyvox.com or 503-229-0627. Jan. 28 — Bellydance Superstars, McDonald Theatre, Eugene; TW* Jan. 29-30 — “Bossa Brasil”: Presented by Ballet Fantastique; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Feb. 1-March 27 — “Futura”: New play by Jordan Harrison; presented by Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-446-5700. Feb. 2 — “Monty Python’s Spamalot”: A tuneful spoof of the King Arthur legend, based on the cult classic film, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail”; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.com or 541-779-3000. Feb. 4 — “Legally Blonde the Musical”: Based on the hit movie of the same name starring Reese Witherspoon; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.com or 541-779-3000. Feb. 5 — “Legally Blonde the Musical”: Based on the hit movie of the same name starring Reese Witherspoon; Hult Center, Eugene; www.hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Feb. 5 — “Rumbles’ Time Machine!”: Presented by the Magical Moombah; The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7004. Feb. 8-March 13 — “The Lieutenant of Inishmore”: Comedy by Martin McDonagh; presented by Artists Repertory Theatre; Alder Stage, Portland; www. artistsrep.org or 503-241-1278. Feb. 9 — Grupo Corpo: Brazil-based company mixes classical ballet and Afro-Brazilian movement; part of the White Bird Dance Series; Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland; TM* Feb. 12-13 — “Alice in Wonderland”: Ballet features Lewis Carroll’s poems set to music by English composers; presented by the Eugene Ballet Company; Hult Center, Eugene; www. hultcenter.org or 541-682-5000. Feb. 14 — “McManus in Love”: Comedy written by Patrick McManus; starring Tim Behrans; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Feb. 16-Nov. 6 — “Measure for Measure”: Tragicomedy by William Shakespeare; directed by Bill Rauch; presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival; Angus Bowmer Theatre, Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Feb. 17 — “A Chorus Line”: 17 dancers audition for a new Broadway musical; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.org or 541-779-3000. Feb. 18-March 12 — “My Name is Rachel Corrie”: Taken from the writings of Rachel Corrie; edited by Alan Rickman and Katharine Viner; presented by the Lord Leebrick Theatre Company; Lord Leebrick Theatre, Eugene; www. lordleebrick.com or 541-465-1506. Feb. 19-July 3 — “To Kill a

Mockingbird”: Based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Harper Lee; adapted by Christopher Sergel; presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival; Angus Bowmer Theatre, Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Feb. 20-Nov. 6 — “The Imaginary Invalid”: Molière’s 17th century comedy gets an injection of 1960s French pop culture; adapted by Oded Gross and Tracy Young; presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival; Angus Bowmer Theatre, Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Feb. 22-March 20 — “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”: Play by Dale Wasserman; based on the novel by Ken Kesey; presented by Portland Center Stage; Gerding Theater at the Armory, Portland; www.pcs.org or 503-446-5700. Feb. 24-June 18 — “The Language Archive”: Julia Cho’s prize-winning tale explores the force and failings of words; presented by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival; New Theatre, Ashland; www. osfashland.org or 800-219-8161. Feb. 26-March 5 — “The Stravinsky Project”: Featuring Igor Stravinsky’s “Firebird,” “The Rite of Spring” and a world-premiere collaboration; presented by the Oregon Ballet Theatre; Keller Auditorium, Portland; TM* March 3-5 — “Hello Dolly!”: Presented by the Teen Musical Theater of Oregon; Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www. craterian.org or 541-779-3000. March 5 — “Mr. Bubble, Cowhand!”: Presented by the Magical Moombah; Jaqua Concert Hall, The Shedd Institute, Eugene; www. theshedd.org or 541-434-7004. March 8 — Tango Inferno, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian.org or 541-779-3000. March 10 — The Aluminum Show, Craterian Ginger Rogers Theater, Medford; www.craterian. org or 541-779-3000.

Exhibits Through Jan. 23 — “Tinkertoy: Build Your Imagination”: Featuring giant replicas of the classic Tinkertoy construction set; Portland Children’s Museum, Portland; www. portlandcm.org or 503-223-6500. Through Jan. 29 — “New Views”: Featuring Gala Bent, Marcus Gannuscio, Grant Hottle, Rachel Peddersen, Megan Scheminske and Liz Tran; The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; www.laurarusso. com or 503-226-2754. Through Jan. 29 — Newport Visual Arts Center: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Brine and Surf” (through Jan. 29) and “From the Collection of ... 2011” (through Jan. 30); Newport; www. coastarts.org or 541-265-6540. Through Jan. 30 — “Daughters of Earth: In Our Hands”: Featuring works by Cathy Stever, Janet Essley, Peny Wallace, Julia Zweerts Brownfoot and Judi Kane; Columbia Art Gallery, Hood River; www. columbiaarts.org or 541-387-8877.


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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 23

out of town Through Feb. 6 — Oregon Museum of Science and Industry: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Identity: An Exhibition of You” (through Feb. 6) and “Design Zone: Behind the Scenes” (through May 30); Portland; www. omsi.edu or 503-797-4000. Through Feb. 6 — Portland Art Museum: The following exhibits are currently on display: “Catherine Opie” (through Feb. 6); Portland; www.portlandartmuseum. org or 503-226-2811. Through Feb. 11 — “David Wojnarowicz: A Fire in My Belly”: Censored film by the late David Wojnarowicz; Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, Portland; www.pica.org or 503-242-1419. Through Feb. 26 — “Object Focus: The Book”: Featuring selections of work from Reed College’s Artists’ Book Collection; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Through May 8 — “Ernest Bloch: Framing a Vision of the World”: Exhibit features photographs taken by composer Ernest Bloch; Oregon Jewish Museum, Portland; www. ojm.org or 503-226-3600. Through June — Museum of Natural and Cultural History: The following exhibits are currently on display: “We are Still Here — Stephanie Wood on Baskets and Biography” (through June); University of Oregon, Eugene; natural-history. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3024. Through July 31 — “Excessive Obsession”: Featuring art influenced by abstract and minimal expressions; Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University of Oregon, Eugene; jsma. uoregon.edu or 541-346-3027. Jan. 15 — Cheetah Cubs Baby Shower, Wildlife Safari, Winston; www. wildlifesafari.net or 541-679-6761. Jan. 17-March 26 — “Between my head and my hand, there is always the face of death”: Featuring work by international artists Amy Bessone, Grant Barnhart, Kaye Donachie, Merlin James, Tala Madani, Elena Pankova and Norbert Schwontkowski; Philip Feldman Gallery+Project Space, Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland; www.pnca.edu or 503-226-4391. Jan. 19-May 8 — “Toys: The Inside Story”: Featuring 12 different hands-on stations illustrating the simple mechanisms commonly found in toys; The Science Factory, Eugene; www.sciencefactory. org or 541-682-7888. Jan. 27-June 4 — “Era Messages: Selections by Garth Johnson”: Featuring works from the 1960s to 1980s that exemplify particular moments in the history of craft; Museum of Contemporary Craft, Portland; www.museumofcontemporarycraft. org or 503-223-2654. Jan. 28-29 — “Stitches in Bloom Quilt Show,” The Oregon Garden, Silverton; www.oregongarden. org or 503-874-8100. Jan. 28-Feb. 20 — “Katsura Imperial Villa: The Photographs of Ishimoto Yasuhiro,” Portland

100 Artists Show benefiting the Craft Emergency Relief Fund; Mary Lou Zeek Gallery, Salem; www. zeekgallery.com or 503-581-3229. Feb. 3-26 — Whitney Nye and René Rickabaugh, The Laura Russo Gallery, Portland; www. laurarusso.com or 503-226-2754. Feb. 5-May 22 — “Riches of a City: Portland Collects”: Featuring more than 100 works of art from the city’s private collections; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www.portlandartmuseum. org or 503-226-2811.

Miscellany Courtesy Owen Carey

The Professor (Lori Larsen) must decide between saving herself and saving the last written literature in existence in “Futura.” Written by Jordan Harrison, the play runs Feb. 1 through March 27 at the Gerding Theater at the Armory in Portland. Japanese Garden, Portland; www.japanesegarden. com or 503-223-1321. Jan. 29-30 — Sagebrush Rendezvous: Featuring an art exhibit and wine tasting; Running Y Ranch Convention Center, Klamath Falls; www.klamath.org/events/ sagebrushart or 541-891-8618.

Jan. 29-May 1 — “Lost Egypt: Ancient Secrets, Modern Science”: Exhibit examines real human and animal mummies, tomb art, facial forensic reconstructions, CT-scans and funerary artifacts; Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland; www.omsi.edu or 503-797-4000. Feb. 1-26 — “Plate it Up”: An annual

Through Jan. 23 — Brides Against Breast Cancer Gown Sale, Doubletree Hotel, Portland; www. bridesagainstbreastcancer. org or 503-491-8091. Through Jan. 23 — ChocolateFest, Oregon Convention Center, Portland; www.worldforestry. org or 503-228-1367. Through Jan. 23 — Good Earth Home, Garden & Living Show, Lane County Convention Center, Eugene; www.eugenehomeshow. com or 541-484-9247. Through Jan. 27 — “My Dog Tulip”: A hand-drawn animated feature film; presented by the Northwest Film Center; Portland Art Museum, Portland; www.

H I G H

nwfilm.org or 503-221-1156. Jan. 21 — Disney Live! Mickey’s Magic Show, Rose Garden, Portland; www.rosequarter. com or 877-789-7673. Jan. 28-30 — OpenLens Festival: Featuring new Oregon-made films; DIVA Center, Eugene; www.openlens. proscenia.net or 541-344-3482. Feb. 4-5 — Professional Bull Riders, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Feb. 19 — Harlem Globetrotters, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. Feb. 25-27 — Fisher Poets Gathering, Astoria; www.clatsopcc. edu/community/fisher-poetsgathring or 503-325-4972. Feb. 25-27 — Newport Seafood & Wine Festival, Newport; www.newportchamber. org or 800-262-7844. Feb. 26 — Smucker’s Stars on Ice, Rose Garden, Portland; www. rosequarter.com or 877-789-7673. March 1-3 — Winemaker Dinners: 50 winemakers will pair celebrated wines with gourmet cuisine at 29 restaurants; various locations in Portland; www. classicwinesauction.com. March 5 — Classic Wines Auction, Oregon Convention Center, Portland; www.classicwinesauction. com or 503-219-8622.

D E S E R T

Healthy Living in Central Oregon A SLICK STOCK MAGAZINE CREATED TO HELP PROMOTE, ENCOURAGE, AND MAINTAIN AN ACTIVE, HEALTHY LIFESTYLE.

Central Oregon Business Owners: Reach Central Oregon with information about your health related retail products and services! Distributed quarterly in more than 33,000 copies of The Bulletin and at distribution points throughout the market area, this new glossy magazine will speak directly to the consumer focused on health and healthy living – and help you grow your business and market share. For more information, please contact Kristin Morris, Bulletin Health/Medical Account Executive at 541-617-7855, e-mail at kmorris@bendbulletin.com, or contact your assigned Bulletin Advertising Executive at 541-382-1811.

LOOK FOR THE NEXT ISSUE COMING FEB. 14 • 541-382-1811


PAGE 24 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

gaming ‘Shadow’ loses depth

TOP 10 XBOX 360 The editors of Game Informer Magazine rank the top 10 Xbox 360 games for January: 1. “Dead Space 2,” Electronic Arts 2. “Pac-Man Championship Edition DX,” Namco Bandai 3. “ilomilo,” Microsoft Game Studios 4. “Battlefield: Bad Company 2 Vietnam,” Electronic Arts 5. “Assassin’s Creed: Bloodlines,” Ubisoft 6. “Call of Duty: Black Ops,” Activision 7. “Need For Speed: Hot Pursuit,” Electronic Arts 8. “Super Meat Boy,” Team Meat 9. “Dance Central,” MTV Games 10. “Fable III,” Microsoft Game Studios McClatchy-Tribune News Service

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

“Lost In Shadow” has fairly tricky puzzles and combat that may frustrate the younger gamer.

Weekly download

Clever puzzles are undermined by poor controls in new Wii game By Jeff Marchiafava Game Informer Magazine

T

hanks to Nintendo’s stable of time-tested mascots, there is no shortage of excellent platformers on the Wii. With “Lost In Shadow,” Hudson Entertainment aims to deliver a more mature adventure to gamers, trading in kid-friendly humor for an introspective story line and action-heavy platforming for challenging puzzles. “Lost In Shadow” delivers on the latter, but even with some clever, continually evolving game mechanics, the entertainment is dragged down by painfully unresponsive controls. Like the main protagonist, “Lost In Shadow’s” story line doesn’t have a lot of weight. You play as the shadow of a boy that has been separated from his

body and cast off of a giant tower. In order to reunite with your body, you must make your way back up the structure one level at a time, solving puzzles and collecting gems to unlock each new floor. The only other story elements are delivered in the form of signposts that contain short musings on your predicament, but they don’t really go anywhere. Instead, the game focuses on your long climb back to the top. “Lost In Shadow” starts out slow, and the lethargic gameplay will likely scare off many players before the game gets good. Your character controls similarly to the prince from the old 2D “Prince of Persia” titles, with a hefty delay every time you change directions, jump or climb ladders. The combat

E RE V I

W

New game releases The following titles were scheduled for release the week of Jan. 16: • “Midnight Pool 3-D” (Mobile) • “The Mysterious Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.

‘LOST IN SHADOW’ 7.5 (out of 10) Wii Hudson Entertainment ESRB rating: E10+ is more affected by these poor controls than the platforming is, as you move too slowly to effectively dodge the attacks of your enemies. This becomes less of a problem as your health bar increases (via reading the aforementioned messages), but only in the sense that it allows you to absorb more cheap shots. The biggest issue, however, is the lack of save points. Dying on a floor requires you to completely restart it, which can easily negate 15-30 minutes of gameplay. You can force a save by returning down a level, but the amount of backtracking required makes it more trouble than it’s worth. Luckily, “Lost In Shadow’s” puzzles largely overcome these considerable flaws. The game

Hyde” (DS) • “Touch ’N’ Play Collection” (DS) • “LittleBigPlanet 2” (PS3) • “Plants vs. Zombies” (DS) • “Mass Effect 2” (PS3)

throws a number of mechanics at you, such as shifting light sources, rotating viewpoints, and moving foreground objects, all of which transform the shadow landscape you traverse. A new mechanic is introduced halfway through the game that introduces some light three-dimensional gameplay and creates more compelling puzzles. As I closed in on the final floors of the tower, I had a hard time putting down the controller. A late twist introduces a bit of unnecessary backtracking, and some floors feel excessively labyrinthine, but neither of these issues drag the overall gameplay too far down. Ultimately I can’t recommend “Lost In Shadow” to everyone. The puzzles and combat are too difficult for children (even on easy mode), and platforming fans will be put off by the unresponsive controls. “Lost In Shadow” can’t compete with Nintendo’s first-party offerings, but if you can accept its flaws, the mindbending puzzles will keep you entertained to the end.

• “Mindjack” (PS3, X360) • “Venetica” (PC) • “Doc Clock: The Toasted Sandwich of Time” (Wii) • “Glory Days — Tactical Defense” (DS) • “Monday Night Combat” (PC) — Gamespot.com

‘ILOMILO’ For: Xbox 360 (via Xbox Live Arcade) From: SouthEnd Interactive/ Microsoft ESRB Rating: E for Everyone Price: $10 “Ilomilo” didn’t need to be charming to an almost illegal degree in order to be a good game, but it certainly doesn’t hurt. The object of each of “ilomilo’s” 49 levels is to reunite best friends ilo and milo, who have been separated by a labyrinth constructed entirely of plush cubes. Reuniting them involves teamwork, with players controlling both characters either alternately by themselves or simultaneously with a friend via local co-op. But things really get interesting when the game introduces advanced tactics — from creating bridges and elevators out of portable cubes to rotating the entire level and defying gravity — and produces level designs that ask players to use the tricks in tandem in order to reunite the friends and find the other secrets hidden within. On the difficulty scale, “ilomilo” hits the sweet spot: The harder levels are cerebrally exhausting, but the game lets you take as much time as you want to figure them out, penalizing slow players only on the completely ignorable Xbox Live leaderboards. The relaxed pace provides a perfect complement to all that aforementioned charm. — Billy O’Keefe, McClatchy-Tribune News Service


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 25

movies

Submitted photo

Ashton Kutcher and Natalie Portman star as best friends in the comedy “No Strings Attached.”

Strange film with few laughs ‘N

o Strings Attached” poses the question: Is it possible to regularly have sex with someone and not run a risk of falling in love? The answer is yes. Now that we have that settled, consider the case of Emma (Natalie Portman) and Adam (Ashton Kutcher), who met when they were 6 and now meet when they’re maybe 26. Busy people. He’s a low-rent TV producer and she’s a medical student. She doesn’t have time for romance, and he’s dating the sexy Vanessa (played by the well-named Ophelia Lovibond). Still, one must do something about sex, lest the pipes run rusty, as my friend Henry Togna Sr., the London hotelier, instruct-

ROGER EBERT

“No Strings Attached” 106 minutes R, for sexual content, language and some drug material ed me when he was well into his 70s. Adam and Emma see each other at a party, remember each other after all those years, yet do

not realize they’re having a Meet Cute. Then Adam discovers Vanessa has dumped him and moved in with his father (Kevin Kline). In response, he begins to drink, which is what the Jack Lemmon character always does in these situations, and what with one thing and another he wakes up naked in Emma’s apartment while she and three roommates reassure him they’re all interns and it’s deja vu when it comes to viewing the male netherlands on display. Is there something a little, I dunno, DATED about a comedy where a guy clutches a towel to his privates while girls giggle at him? And when he asks if he slept with anyone last night, why

does that remind me of Doris Day in “Where Were You When the Lights Went Out?” Here is a titillating sex romp in 2011, when the very words “titillating” and “romp” have outlasted their shelf lives. The movie is rated R, but it’s the most watery R I’ve seen. It’s more of a PG-13 playing dress-up. Anyway, finding out he hasn’t slept with Emma, Adam engages in sitcom badinage that quickly leads to the old rumpy-pumpy, and they find the pipes running marvelously clear. What a discovery! They can have sex and remain just friends! This is a great convenience. They proceed to frolic like two bunnies in clover, using their cell phones and

texting skills to arrange emergency trysts in roughly anything except a bed. All of this is fun while it lasts. Then the wheels of Hollywood morality begin to grind. There was a time when the very premise of this film would have been banned, but times change, and now characters can do pretty much anything as long as they don’t get away with it. Although “No Strings Attached” might have been more fun if Adam and Emma had investigated the longterm possibilities of casual sex, it is required that the specter of Romantic Love raise its ominous head. Are they … becoming too fond? Continued next page


PAGE 26 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

movies

‘Way Back’ is sheer beauty But the travelers’ story is lacking in drama, truth

N

ot every incredible story makes a compelling movie. “The Way Back” is inspired by a 4,000-mile foot journey that began with an escape from a Siberian prison camp in the dead of winter and continued across Mongolia and the Gobi Desert, ending finally months later in free India. At every moment this is astonishing. Mongolia itself was said to be a prison because no one was thought able to walk out of it. Starvation is a daily possibility. So are injuries, disease, death by exposure, or capture by locals eager to collect a reward. Thirst and sun are nearly fatal in the desert. The travelers have only the clothes on their backs. We know some of them reached India, because the saga opens with that news. But how did they possibly do that? Just as we’re told: by walking. Walking and walking. And there lies the weakness of Peter Weir’s film, which is nobly staged and has breathtaking cinematography, but frankly, not enough of a story in the vulgar populist sense. Desperation and exhaustion make it difficult for the trekkers to work up much in the way of characters or conflicts, and while that no doubt spares us many cliches, we are left, during their long walk, with too much of a muchness. The group is often so bearded and weathered that members seem interchangeable. Two who stand out are Ed Harris, an American who claims his name is only “Mr. Smith,” and Colin Farrell as Valka, a Russian. Has Harris ever given a bad performance? The group is led by Jim Sturgess as Janusz, who had the idea for the escape. Along the way they meet

From previous page Emma suggests they try sleeping with others so, you know, they won’t get too hung up on each other. If you’ve ever seen a romantic comedy, you know how that works. Experience shows that NOT sleeping with others is the foolproof way of not getting too hung up, etc. This is a strange film. Its prem-

Courtesy EPK.TV

The fugitive group contemplate how best to avoid being noticed by the farmworkers in “The Way Back.”

Irena (Saoirse Ronan), a young Polish woman. Her presence does not inspire romantic rivalries among the men. It’s that kind of film. Peter Weir is a master film-

maker (“Picnic at Hanging Rock,” “The Year of Living Dangerously,” “Master and Commander”). His cinematographer, Russell Boyd, works both in tight quarters and with astonishing vistas at the roof of the world. The film is a visual feast. I am far from sorry I saw it. But there is one area in which it seems to be lacking: details of survival. How exactly did they survive death by exposure in subzero Mongolia? Why didn’t some of their meat spoil? Where did they find water in the desert? How did their footwear hold up — and why, as prisoners, did they have boots? The answer, I fear, is that although “The Way Back” is described on its poster as “inspired by real events,” it is fiction. The saga was first told in a best-selling

book by Slavomir Rawicz, which was a European best-seller. But IMDb reports: “In 2006 the BBC unearthed records (including some written by Rawicz himself) that showed he had been released by the USSR in 1942.” There is an irony here. The film exhibits an admirable determination to do justice to a real story, but the story’s not real. There’s quite an op-ed debate going on right now between those (Neal Gabler) who say the cultural elite is finally being shouted down by populists and vulgarians, and others (A.O. Scott) who say such categories

are meaningless. You like movies according to your own tastes. Some people have bad taste and others have taste more like mine. Yet my taste is large. It contains multitudes. There is room for vulgarity, if it’s well done. It’s a shame to say so, but perhaps it would have helped “The Way Back” if Peter Weir had relaxed his standards slightly, slipped in some dramatic conflict and made better use of that pretty Polish girl.

ise is so much more transgressive than its execution. It’s as if the 1970s never happened, let alone subsequent decades. Emma and Adam aren’t modern characters. They’re sitcom characters allowed to go all the way like grown-ups. As the wheels of the plot creak and groan, we’re like kids in the back seat, asking, “Are we there yet?” Some diversion is

supplied by the subplot involving Adam’s dad, Alvin (Kline), an aging TV star trapped forever in his own misspent youth. Alvin is a dedicated hedonist, which Vanessa finds to her liking because hedonists are always happy to pay, one way or another, for their hedonism, and Vanessa is happy to be paid, one way or another. Natalie Portman is perhaps

about to win an Academy Award for “Black Swan.” Why she helped produce this I cannot say. Ambitious actors usually do dreck like this in order to afford to produce a movie like “Black Swan.” All the same, she does what she can; she has an edge, aggressive timing, and impressive enthusiasm for sex romping. Of Ashton Kutcher I have less to say. He seems to be a

very nice guy, a little too large for agile romping and still too young for a Brendan Fraser role. When I saw him in “The Butterfly Effect” (2004), I registered that he could act, but in this material he’s essentially just the Male Unit. There is no character there.

ROGER EBERT

“The Way Back” 133 minutes PG-13, for violent content, depiction of physical hardships, a nude image and brief strong language

The film is a visual feast. I am far from sorry I saw it. But there is one area in which it seems to be lacking: details of survival.

Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.

Roger Ebert is a film critic for The Chicago Sun-Times.


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 27

movies ON LOCAL SCREENS Here’s what’s showing on Central Oregon movie screens. For showtimes, see listings on Page 30.

HEADS UP “The Dark Side of Oz” — Adapted from L. Frank Baum’s timeless children’s tale about a Kansas girl’s journey over the rainbow, “The Wizard of Oz” premiered on Aug. 15, 1939. Starring Judy Garland, Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr and Jack Haley, the classic film received five Academy Award nominations and captured two Oscars for Best Song and Best Original Score. “The Dark Side of Oz” features audio from Pink Floyd’s 1973 “Dark Side of the Moon” synchronized to visuals from “The Wizard of Oz.” The film screens at 10 p.m. Saturday at the Tower Theatre in Bend (doors open at 9:30 p.m.). This event is free to the public. 101 minutes. (G) “The Metropolitan Opera: La Fanciulla del West” — Giacomo Puccini’s wild-west opera had its world premiere in 1910 at The Metropolitan Opera. Now, on the occasion of its centennial, all-American diva Deborah Voigt sings the title role of the “girl of the golden west,” starring opposite Marcello Giordani. Nicola Luisotti conducts. “The Metropolitan Opera: Live in High-Definition” series features 12 opera performances transmitted live in high definition to movie theaters around the world. The encore screening starts at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Regal Old Mill Stadium 16 in Bend. Tickets are $18. 230 minutes. (no MPAA rating)

— Synopsis from The Metropolitan Opera “The Wizard of Oz” Singalong — Adapted from L. Frank Baum’s timeless children’s tale about a Kansas girl’s journey over the rainbow, “The Wizard of Oz” premiered on Aug. 15, 1939. Starring Judy Garland, Ray Bolger, Bert Lahr and Jack Haley, the classic film received five Academy Award nominations and captured two Oscars for Best Song and Best Original Score. There will be a costume contest hosted by radio personality Donna James before the singalong. The film screens at 7 p.m. Saturday at Tower Theatre in Bend. Cost is $10. 101 minutes. (G)

WHAT’S NEW “No Strings Attached” — Emma (Natalie Portman) and Adam (Ashton Kutcher), who met when they were 6, now meet when they’re maybe 26. They’re not looking for love, but after they sleep together they decide to be sex buddies as a matter of convenience. Good enough while it lasts, but then romance threatens, and the movie handles it with dreary sitcom predictability. Rating: Two stars. 106 minutes. (R) “The Way Back” — The incredible story of how a group of prisoners

The Associated Press

Gulliver (Jack Black) finds himself in the land of Lilliput in “Gulliver’s Travels.” escaped from a prison camp in the Siberian gulag and began a 4,000-mile trek on foot to freedom in India. The long walk upstages the characters, who are not always sharply defined. Russell Boyd’s cinematography of mountains, snowscapes and the desert is breathtaking. An honorable film by Peter Weir (“Master and Commander”), but a long slog in more ways than one. Rating: Two and a half stars. 133 minutes. (PG-13)

STILL SHOWING “Black Swan” — Natalie Portman in a bravura performance as a driven perfectionist, a young ballerina up for a starring role at Lincoln Center. Her life is shadowed by a smothering mother (Barbara Hershey), an autocratic director (Vincent Cassel), a venomous rival (Mila Kunis) and her deposed predecessor (Winona Ryder). A full-bore melodrama, told with passionate intensity, gloriously and darkly absurd. Directed by Darren Aronofsky. Rating: Three and a half stars. 108 minutes. (R) “The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader” — Edmund, Lucy and their nuisance of a cousin Eustace are drawn into a seafaring painting on the wall and find themselves on board the Dawn Treader and involved in a quest to save Narnia. Their challenge, finding the missing magical swords of the Lords of Telmar, involves a risky sea voyage that finally leads to the ominous Dark Island. The arbitrary plot is just one damn thing after another, but there are thrilling sequences involving a sea monster and a flying dragon, and it’s jolly fun for younger viewers. Rating: Three stars. 115 minutes. (PG) “Country Strong” — One of the best movies of 1957, and I mean that sincerely as a compliment. “Country Strong” is a pure, heartfelt exercise in ’50s social melodrama, using such stock elements as a

depressed heroine, her manipulating husband, an ambivalent Other Man, and a young Eve Harrington impatiently waiting in the wings. Gwenyth Paltrow stars as a troubled country singer, Tim McGraw is her husband/manager and Garrett Hedlund is the Other Man. I eat this stuff up. Rating: Two and a half stars. 116 minutes. (PG-13) “The Dilemma” — Ron Howard’s “The Dilemma” presents the viewer with one. Is it OK to laugh at what was plainly intended as a relationship comedy? Because the best scenes in this Vince Vaughn/Kevin James buddy picture where one buddy’s wife is cheating on him and the other buddy finds out give us more to chew on than laugh about. And that uncertainty — “Wait, is that supposed to be funny?” — makes the movie an unsatisfying if often surprising experience, a less warm and fuzzy “Parenthood” from a director long removed from his warm and fuzzy years. Rating: Two stars. 117 minutes. (PG-13)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel

“Due Date” — Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis star as a mismatched odd couple who find themselves sharing a rental car on a drive from Atlanta to Los Angeles. In a comedy that’s as near as makes no difference to a down-market retread of “Planes, Trains and Automobiles,” they create big laughs and have some funny stops along the way, but the Galifianakis character is so obnoxious in such a passive aggressive way that we don’t much want to see the journey continue. Passable entertainment, but a missed opportunity. Directed by Todd (“The Hangover”) Phillips. Rating: Two and a half stars. 95 minutes. (R) “The Fighter” — Colorful supporting performances help, but a vaguely defined lead diminishes the power you’d expect in this story based on a real fighter. Mark Wahlberg plays Micky Ward, Christian Bale is his goofy crackhead half-brother, Melissa Leo is his possessive mom, and Amy Adams is the barmaid who knows he’ll never get anywhere until he frees himself of his family. The hero comes

across as such a victim of lifelong domination that even when he wins, he feels like a loser. Directed by David O. Russell. Rating: Two and a half stars. 115 minutes. (R) “The Green Hornet” — An almost unendurable demonstration of a movie with nothing to be about. Pointless dialogue scenes go nowhere much too slowly, and then pointless action scenes go everywhere much too quickly. Seth Rogen deserves much of the blame. He co-wrote and stars as Britt Reid, a spoiled little rich brat who grows up the same way; Jay Chou is Kato, the role Bruce Lee played on TV. Together, they devise a damn fool plan to fight crime by impersonating criminals. With Christoph Waltz (“Inglourious Basterds”) as the local crime lord and Cameron Diaz as young Reid’s would-be secretary with nothing to do. Rating: One star. 108 minutes. (PG-13) “Gulliver’s Travels” — Not your average Jack Black movie. More of an innocent family adventure, filmed in a traditional style. Black, as a lowly mail clerk for a newspaper, finds himself in the land of Lilliput — where he is first a captive, then a friendly giant, and finally a hero. With Emily Blunt as a princess, King Billy Connolly and Gen. Chris O’Dowd both rivals for her affection, and Amanda Peet as Black’s editor. Innocent fun. Rating: Three stars. 85 minutes. (PG) “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1” — Harry, Hermione and Ron have grown up and the horrors they met at Hogwarts are but nostalgic memories. They are cast out now into the vastness of the world, on their own, and Voldemort and his Death Eaters draw ever closer. Also drawing near is an equally unsettling phenomenon, sexual maturity. A handsome and sometimes harrowing film that will be completely unintelligible for anyone coming to the series for the first time. Rating: Three stars. 146 minutes. (PG-13)

Continued nex t page

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

movies From previous page “I Love You Phillip Morris” — Jim Carrey in the true life story of outrageous con man Steven Russell, who impersonated doctors, lawyers, FBI agents and corporate executives. He convinced prison officials he had died of AIDS, successfully faked a heart attack, and escaped from jail four times (hint: always on Friday the 13th). Ewan McGregor plays his cellmate Phillip Morris, whom Steven falls in love with. Thereafter his life consists of trying to get Steven out of jail, or trying to escape to be with him. Audacious. Jim Carrey’s mercurial personality was almost necessary to even make this movie. Rating: Three and a half stars. 98 minutes. (R) “The King’s Speech” — After the death of George V and the abdication of his brother Edward, Prince Albert (Colin Firth) becomes George VI, charged with leading Britain into World War II. He is afflicted with a torturous stammer, and his wife (Helena Bonham Carter) seeks out an unorthodox speech therapist (Geoffrey Rush) to treat him. Civilized and fascinating, this is the story of their unlikely relationship. (The R rating, for language, is absurd; this is an ideal film for teenagers.) Rating: Four stars. 118 minutes. (R) “Little Fockers” — “Little Fockers” is possibly the last and certainly the least among the trio of comedies about the power struggle between a nebbishy male nurse and his menacing, control-freak father-inlaw. It’s a desultory, patchwork affair — competently made, comfortably played, but lacking the heart and wit that characterized, in varying degrees, in “Meet the Parents” and “Meet the Fockers.” Rating: One and a half stars. 97 minutes. (PG-13)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel “Made in Dagenham” — Delightful serious comedy about the historic 1968 in Ford’s British plant that ended its unequal pay for women and began a global movement. Sally Hawkins

The Associated Press

Daniel Radcliffe, left, and Emma Watson return to their starring roles in “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1.” plays Rita O’Grady, who caught the public fancy as a strike leader. Bob Hoskins is a sympathetic union organizer, and Miranda Richardson plays Barbara Castle, the minister of labor who unexpectedly sided with the striking women. Rating: Three and a half stars. 113 minutes. (R) “Megamind” — Bright and amusing 3-D animation as two aliens (voiced by Will Ferrell and Brad Pitt) battle for control of Metro City. Tina Fey voices a local TV reporter, David Cross is a piranha-like sidekick for Megamind, and Jonah Hill is a put-upon TV cameraman who finds himself transformed into a third super being. The 3-D isn’t really necessary, but is well-handled. Rating: Three stars. 95 minutes. (PG) “Season of the Witch” — I lost track of the sieges and battles. Nicolas Cage and Ron Perlman are two hero Crusaders who after about a dozen years of rape and pillage hit the road and happen across a

town somewhere in the vastness. They are quickly assigned to convey a local witch (Claire Foy) to a distant monastery where resides the only known incantation that can exorcise her and bring an end to the Black Plague. Rating: Two stars. 95 minutes. (PG-13) “The Social Network” — The life and times of Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg), who created Facebook, became a billionaire in his early 20s, and now has 500 million members on the site he created. A fascinating portrait of a brilliant social misfit who intuited a way to involve humankind in the Kevin Bacon game. Everybody likes Facebook — it’s the site that’s all about YOU. With Justin Timberlake as Sean Parker, the Napster founder who introduced Zuckerberg to the Silicon Valley fast lane, Andrew Garfield as the best friend who gets dumped, and Armie Hammer as the Winklevoss twins, who sued Zuckerberg for stealing their idea. One of the year’s best films. Rating: Four stars. 120 minutes. (PG-13) “Tangled” — Rapunzel, the girl locked in a tower with only her long, golden locks for company, gets a sassy, spirited screen treatment from Disney with “Tangled,” an animated fairytale musical from the Not Pixar corner of the company. Like most of Disney’s in-house cartoons, “Tangled” suffers most when compared to the best of Pixar. Animated musicals are only as good as their songs, and this one isn’t on a par with “Beauty and the Beast” or even “The Princess and the Frog.” But the laughs make the tunes pass by quickly, the emotional moments pay off and this version of Rapunzel lets down its hair just enough to deserve a place of honor with all the other glorious Disney “princess” tales. Rating: Three stars. 93 minutes. (PG)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel Continued next page

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

Courtesy Suzanne Tenner

Chris Brown, left, and Michael Ealy star in the action thriller “Takers.”

NEW DVD & B L U - R AY RELEASES The following movies were released Jan. 18.

“Animal Kingdom” — This dark Australian drama wastes no time shocking its audience with the breezy way it handles bleak material. A woman, overdosed on heroin, sits crumpled on a couch as paramedics try to revive her. But her teenage son can’t seem to peel himself away from the television. When his mother dies, J (James Frecheville) moves in with his estranged grandmother (Jacki Weaver) and meets the rest of his fearsome relatives: four uncles, who demonstrate varying degrees of depravity. J finds the group in crisis, as vigilante police officers have begun murdering suspected criminals. The dirty cops have his new family in their sights. The story emphasizing on banal, everyday life. In one scene, for example, Uncle Baz (Joel Edgerton) teaches his nephew the proper technique for washing his hands after a bathroom visit. DVD and Blu-ray extras: Q-and-A segment with director and cast, audio commentary and featurette. This film was not given a star rating. 112 minutes. (R)

— The Washington Post “Buried” — Paul Conroy (Ryan Reynolds) is a truck driver working for a private contractor in Iraq. He comes to consciousness in blackness. He feels around and finds a lighter. In its flame his worst fears are realized. He has been kidnapped, buried alive and is a hostage. Taking place entirely within the coffin, this is a superior suspense picture that’s ingenious in devising plausible events inside the limited space. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: A behind-thescenes featurette. Rating: Three

and a half stars. 93 minutes. (R)

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago Sun-Times “Stone” — Robert De Niro and Edward Norton playing against type and at the top of their forms in a psychological duel between a parole officer and a tricky prisoner who has his number. Milla Jovovich plays the prisoner’s wife, who attempts to help her man by playing a mind game with De Niro. Holes in the plot but not in the performances. DVD and Blu-ray Extras: A behindthe-scenes featurette. Rating: Three stars. 105 minutes. (R)

— Roger Ebert, The Chicago Sun-Times “Takers” —“Takers” assembles a group of dysfunctional criminals who join forces to make a big killing. It begins with one crime — a bank robbery — and builds up to another — the seizing of an armored car carrying $30 million. In between, the movie puts its cops and robbers in parallel motion toward a cataclysmic collision. Everybody has personal problems. Gang leader Gordon Crosier (the supremely charismatic Idris Elba) has to choreograph the big score while trying to keep his sister in rehab. Ghost (rapper T.I.), a former member of the gang, served six years in prison and is now back, carrying an outsize chip on his shoulder. Detective Jack Welles (Matt Dillon) neglects his daughter while trying to piece together a mosaic of clues that don’t quite seem to connect. DVD Extras: Audio commentary and music video; Blu-ray Extras: Two additional featurettes and movieIQ and BD-Live. This film was not given a star rating. 107 minutes. (PG-13)

— The Washington Post COMING UP: Movies scheduled for national release Jan. 25 include “RED,” “The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest,” “Nowhere Boy” and “Secretariat.” Check with local video stores for availability.

— (“DVD and Blu-ray Extras” from wire and online sources)


GO! MAGAZINE •

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

PAGE 29

movies From previous page “The Tourist” — A romantic comedy crossed with a crime thriller, shot in Paris and Venice, involving a glamorous mystery woman (Angelina Jolie) and a math teacher (Johnny Depp) from Wisconsin. Preposterous, of course, but it could have worked as a farce, with witty flirtation and droll Cary Grantian understatement. Jolie rises to the occasion, but Depp plays the math teacher as a man waiting for the school bell to ring so he can go bowling. Rating: Two stars. 104 minutes. (PG-13) “Tron: Legacy” — Twenty years after he leaves his son at bedtime and steps out for a spin on his motorcycle, Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges) summons him mysteriously to a portal into the software program he invented — and now inhabits. Young Sam Flynn

(Garrett Hedlund) is needed to help his dad and the beautiful Quorra (Olivia Wilde) to ward off an evil cabal that wants to conquer the Internet and/or the world. The plot is impenetrable, but Jeff Bridges is solid in three roles (younger, older and digital), and the visuals are a sensational soundand-light show, cutting-edge in the tradition of the 1982 film. Rating: Three stars. 125 minutes. (PG-13) “True Grit” — An entertaining remake of the 1969 film, and more, by Joel and Ethan Coen. Jeff Bridges as Rooster Cogburn easily fills John Wayne’s boots, and Hailee Steinfeld is very special as young Mattie Ross, who hires the old marshal to help her hunt down the varmint that killed her old man. Not a “Coen brothers film,” but a flawlessly executed Western in the grand tradition. Strong support

from Matt Damon, Josh Brolin and Barry Pepper. Rating: Three and a half stars. 110 minutes. (PG-13) “Yogi Bear” — Yogi always was “smarter than the average bear.” But parents and grandparents dragging tykes along to the 3-D big screen “Yogi Bear” will probably remember him as funnier than the average bear, too. Or funnier than this. A computer-animated Yogi (voiced by Dan Aykroyd) and Boo Boo (voiced by Justin Timberlake) inhabit a real-world Jellystone Park, with the unfunny Tom Cavanagh as Ranger Smith and nothing-funny-to-play Anna Faris as the ranger’s love interest. Rating: One star. 75 minutes. (PG)

— Roger Moore, The Orlando Sentinel — Roger Ebert, The Chicago SunTimes (unless otherwise noted)

Courtesy Phil Bray via Warner Bros. Pictures

Tom Cavanagh stars as Ranger Smith in “Yogi Bear,” a movie based on the Hanna-Barbera cartoon.

YOUR AWARD-WINNING HOME & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE A locally written magazine devoted to the latest trends and techniques in interior design, home building, remodeling, and landscaping ... especially those that relect the best of Central Oregon’s creative lifestyle.

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THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

movies

MISSED THE MOVIE? NEVER AGAIN!

M O V I E T I M E S • For the week of Jan. 21

EDITOR’S NOTES: • Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. • There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

Coming to Video on Demand

JANUARY

THE SOCIAL NETWORK (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 9

Takers REDMOND CINEMAS

– Jan. 18

1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

Saw The Final Chapter – Jan. 25 Courtesy Warner Bros. Pictures

Peter Highman (Robert Downey Jr., left) and Ethan Tremblay (Zach Galifianakis) go on a series of misadventures in the road trip comedy “Due Date.”

Red – Jan. 25

Secretariat – Jan. 25

Resident Evil: Afterlife – Jan. 27

The only movie schedule that matters is yours! Catch these movies and hundreds more - including thousands of FREE titles - on VOD from BendBroadband.

Call 541-382-5551

w w w. b e n d b r o a d b a n d . c o m

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) Fri-Sat: 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5, 7:45, 10:15 Sun: 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:25 Mon-Thu: 2:20, 4:50, 7:15 THE FIGHTER (R) Fri-Sat: 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:25, 10 Sun: 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 7:10 Mon-Thu: 2:05, 4:35, 7:05 I LOVE YOU PHILLIP MORRIS (R) Fri-Sat: Noon, 2:40, 5:05, 7:55, 10:20 Sun: Noon, 2:30, 5, 7:20 Mon-Thu: 2:15, 4:30, 7:30 THE KING’S SPEECH (R) Fri-Sat: 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10 Sun: 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30 Mon-Thu: 2, 4:40, 7:20 MADE IN DAGENHAM (R) Fri-Sat: 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05

Sun: 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15 Mon-Thu: 2:10, 4:45, 7:10 THE WAY BACK (PG-13) Fri-Sat: 11:30 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 8 Sun: 11:45 a.m., 2:40, 7 Mon-Thu: 2:30, 7

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THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) Fri-Thu: 1, 3:50, 7:15, 9:50 COUNTRY STRONG (PG-13) Fri: 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:45 Sat: 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:45 Sun-Mon: 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:45 Tue-Thu: 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:45 THE DILEMMA (PG-13) Fri-Mon: 12:55, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 Tue, Thu: 12:55, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 Wed: 12:55, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20 THE FIGHTER (R) Fri-Thu: 1:45, 5, 8, 10:35

THE GREEN HORNET 3-D (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:20, 1:25, 3:40, 4:45, 6:35, 7:40, 9:30, 10:30 THE GREEN HORNET (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:45, 4:10, 7:10, 10 GULLIVER’S TRAVELS 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 9:25 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:05, 3:25, 6:55 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 12:40, 3:20, 6:20, 9:20 THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST (no MPAA rating) Wed: 6:30 NO STRINGS ATTACHED (R) Fri-Thu: 1:30, 4:25, 7:30, 10:05 SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 10:15 TANGLED (PG) Fri-Thu: 1:15, 4, 6:45, 9:35 THE TOURIST (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 1:50, 4:50, 7:55, 10:25 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: Noon, 3:15, 6:15, 9:10 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) Fri-Tue, Thu: 12:30, 1:40, 3:30, 4:35, 6:25, 7:25, 9:15, 10:10 Wed: 12:30, 3:30, 6:25, 9:15 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) Fri-Thu: 12:15, 4:20, 6:40

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and older only. Younger than 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) DUE DATE (R) Fri-Thu: 6 MEGAMIND (PG) Sat-Sun: Noon, 3 Wed: 3

THE DILEMMA (PG-13) Fri: 4, 6:30, 9 Sat-Sun: 10 a.m., 1:30, 4, 6:30, 9 Mon-Thu: 4, 6:30 THE FIGHTER (R) Fri-Thu: 6:45 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) Fri: 3:30, 6, 8:30 Sat-Sun: 10:30 a.m., 1, 3:30, 6, 8:30 Mon-Thu: 3:30, 6 SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) Fri: 4:30, 9:15 Sat-Sun: 9:45 a.m., noon, 2:15, 4:30, 9:15 Mon-Thu: 4:30 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) Fri: 3:45, 6:15, 9 Sat-Sun: 10:45 a.m., 1:15, 3:45, 6:15, 9 Mon-Thu: 3:45, 6:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

BLACK SWAN (R) Fri: 5:45, 8 Sat: 3:15, 5:45, 8 Sun: 2:15, 4:45, 7 Mon-Thu: 4:45, 7 THE FIGHTER (R) Fri: 7:45 Sat: 5:15, 7:45 Sun-Thu: 4:15, 6:45 GREEN HORNET (PG-13) Fri: 5:30, 8 Sat: 3, 5:30, 8 Sun: 2, 4:30, 7 Mon-Thu: 4:30, 7 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) Fri: 5:15, 7:45 Sat: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45 Sun: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45 Mon-Thu: 4:15, 6:45 YOGI BEAR (PG) Fri: 5:45 Sat: 3:15 Sun: 2:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

GULLIVER’S TRAVELS (PG) Fri, Mon-Thu: 7 Sat-Sun: 1, 7 SEASON OF THE WITCH (PG-13) Fri-Thu: 4


THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

GO! MAGAZINE •

PAGE 31


PAGE 32 • GO! MAGAZINE

THE BULLETIN • FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 2011

www.LesSchwab.com

SUPERMARKET

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155/80TR-13 165/80TR-13 175/70TR-13 185/70TR-13 175/70TR-14 185/70TR-14 195/70TR-14 175/65HR-14 185/65HR-14 195/65HR-14 185/65HR-15

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205/60HR-15 80.23 215/60HR-15 87.68 195/60VR-15 86.28 205/60VR-15 91.68 225/60VR-15 103.16 215/60VR-16 93.08 225/60VR-16 95.53 235/60VR-16 111.91 205/55VR-16 80.65 215/55VR-16 108.09

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LT215/85R-16 LT235/85R-16 P235/75SR-15 P235/75R-15XL P265/75TR-16 LT235/75R-15 LT225/75R-16

TREAD DESIGN MAY VARY

MOUNTING • AIR CHECKS ROAD HAZARD FLAT REPAIR • ROTATIONS

E 131.48 LT245/75R-16 E 147.26 LT265/75R-16 100.19 P215/70TR-16 100.19 P235/70SR-16 141.64 P245/70SR-16 C 125.38 P255/70SR-16 E 131.24

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E 148.56 P265/70SR-16 E 178.93 P245/70SR-17 105.27 P265/70SR-17 121.97 LT265/70R-17 129.11 P245/65SR17 139.07 31/10.50R-15

143.55 143.59 163.29 E 184.25 138.10 C 127.35

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MILANNI 461 STEALTH

RACELINE 197

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MILANNI 452 STELLAR

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541-382-3551 541-385-4702 541-548-4011 541-447-5686 541-475-3834 541-536-3009 541-549-1560 541-318-0281

Bulletin Daily Paper 01/21/11  

The Bulletin Daily print edition for Friday January 21, 2011

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