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Yoga for bicyclists

Juniper jaunt at peaceful Horse Ridge

Local classes tuned to their aches and pains • HEALTH, F1

OUTING, E1

WEATHER TODAY

THURSDAY

Partly to mostly cloudy High 43, Low 27 Page C6

• December 23, 2010 50¢

Serving Central Oregon since 1903 www.bendbulletin.com

Deputy DAs’ jobs in limbo at year’s end By Hillary Borrud

Rubber to meet road Hikes in gas tax, service fees will fund state projects By Sheila G. Miller The Bulletin

Time to start picking up pennies. A new 6-cent fuel tax going into effect Jan. 1 will increase the cost of filling up at the pump.

The fuel tax increase is part of the Jobs and Transportation Act passed by the Oregon Legislature in 2009. It’s one of a slew of fee increases to pay for local and state road repair and new highway projects.

In addition to the fuel tax, the state increased fees for various DMV services like the cost of vehicle title, registration and license plates, as well as increasing taxes and registration fees on heavy vehicles. The state hopes the fuel tax,

which applies to both gasoline and diesel fuel, will combine with other fee increases already in place to raise up to $300 million per year. Since 1993, the state’s fuel tax has been 24 cents per gallon. Beginning Jan. 1, the tax will increase to 30 cents per gallon. See Gas tax / A4

The Bulletin

The turmoil over the transition in the Deschutes County district attorney’s office is continuing to play out this week, with the county and the incoming district attorney at odds over whether several prosecutors should report to work on Jan. 3. That is the day District Attorney-elect Patrick Flaherty takes District office. Attorney-elect On Monday, Patrick FlaFlaherty sent herty wants letters to four several deputy of the 18 curDAs out of the rent deputy office by Dec. district attor31, but the neys informcounty says ing them he they should would not apreport to point them work at least when he takes through Jan. 3. office. The short letters do not tell the prosecutors why Flaherty chose not to keep them on. One of those prosecutors, Phil Duong, said he had been told by Flaherty in November that Duong would remain in his job once Flaherty took office. Duong said that until Monday, he had not heard anything more from Flaherty about his job. The other deputy district attorneys who were notified Monday that they would lose their jobs were Mary Anderson, Jody Vaughan and Brentley Foster, according to the letters obtained by The Bulletin. Over the summer, Flaherty also sent a letter to Chief Deputy District Attorney Darryl Nakahira informing him that said he did not plan to employ him in the new year. See DAs / A4

Going for a ride? Today is the last day for sleigh rides as part of Traditions, Sunriver Resort’s monthlong holiday celebration. Rides are from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Tickets, available at the concierge, are $5 for the general public. Below, Chris Bryant drives a sleigh for the Litehiser family, of Sunriver, near the lodge Wednesday.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke The Bulletin

CROOK COUNTY

Pay drop is worst in West By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Crook County’s 12.5 percent decline in compensation paid to employees in all industries from 2008 to 2009 was the biggest drop reported among the 183 counties in the six-state far West region, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis reported Tuesday. The BEA reported drops in 125 of the 183 counties in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon and Washington. The largest increase in industry compensation in the Far West region was 15.8 percent in Lander County, Nev., where two gold mines, Cortez Gold Mining and Newmont Mining Corp., employ about 1,500 of the county’s 5,086 population. Jason Carr, an economic development director for Crook County, said several factors combined to drive down total wages, including the transfer of Les Schwab Tire Centers corporate headquarters and about 300 of the company’s top management from Prineville to Bend. See Crook / A6

Employee compensation Total employee compensation paid to employees in all industries in Crook County peaked and declined earlier than in both Oregon and the U.S.

Crook County In hundreds of millions of dollars 350 $314 300 250

$216 $235

200 ’99

’01

’03

’05

’07

’09

Oregon In billions of dollars 100 80

$92 $88

$62

60 ’99

Full-body scanners: Exposing our privacy, body image

TOP NEWS INSIDE CONGRESS: Obama praises productive lameduck session, Page A3 KOREA TENSION: South launches drills, Page A3

INDEX Abby

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Oregon

Comics

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Outing

E1-6

Crossword E5, G2

Sports

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Editorial

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Stocks

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TV listings

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Weather

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Health

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’05

’07

Special to The Washington Post

We are more naked, as a nation, than we’ve ever been. We are forever baring our souls, revealing the mundane and the sacred. We are naked in our curiosity about the semifamous and the strange, we are naked in our aspirations (to be semi-famous, even for something strange), we are naked online — or, at least, con-

siderably more exposed than we tend to realize. All of which may help explain why most Americans seem unconcerned about those full-body airport scanESS ners, the ones that see under your clothes. In an existential sense, we are used to this sort of thing. “Go on — take a gander,” we seem to be saying. “We have nothing to hide.”

Christmas is approaching, and with it travel and more opportunities for Americans to be asked to pass through what the Transportation SecuriA Y ty Administration calls advanced imaging technology and what critics call the “porno-scanners.” If past — and polls — are prologue, most holiday travelers who come face-to-face with the full-body scanners will simply

step in and raise their hands, as they appeared to do just before Thanksgiving, on what was supposed to be the big protest of National Opt-Out Day. To understand why so many of us opt in when confronted by full-body scanners — 99 percent, according to Sterling Payne, a TSA spokeswoman — first consider why a vocal minority opts out. See Scanners / A6

’09

United States In trillions of dollars 8

$8 $7.8

7

By Libby Copeland

Movies

E3

Obituaries

C5

$5.3 6 5

’99

’01

’03

’05

’07

’09

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Inside • How Crook County residents’ pay compares with others in 6 Western states, Page A6

150 YEARS SINCE SECESSION

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In South Carolina, Civil War still simmers By Manuel Roig-Franzia The Washington Post

We use recycled newsprint The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 357, 42 pages, 7 sections

MON-SAT

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Stacy L. Pearsall / The Associated Press

A crowd protests Monday’s “Secession Ball,” which commemorated South Carolina’s decision 150 years ago to secede from the United States.

CHARLESTON, S.C. — “Dixie,” that emotionally freighted and muchdebated anthem of the old Confederacy, starts soft when it’s done right, barely above a whisper. But each sotto voce syllable of the opening verse, each feather-light scrape of the fiddle strings, could be heard without straining when the ladies in the hoop skirts and the men in the frock coats rose in reverence to celebrate the 150th anniversary of South Carolina’s secession.

“We are very proud of who we are,” said Chip Limehouse, a South Carolina legislator who rented a historically accurate suit and vest for the formal ball celebrating the anniversary. “This is in our DNA.” Great-great-great-granddad fought the Yankees, lost his plantation, was bathed in glory, the men and women at the ball like to say. They’re proud of their ancestors, they declare, and that’s why they paid $100 apiece to take part in an event touted as a “joyous night of music, dancing, food and drink.”

Outside Charleston’s municipal auditorium, on an unseasonably chilly Southern night, some of the men and women in a crowd of about 100 were thinking about their own ancestors: slaves who picked the cotton for the forebears and allies of the men and women inside. “Disgusting,” the Rev. Joseph Darby, vice president of the local NAACP chapter, said of the event. On the street, they lifted protest signs; inside, they lifted drinks with names like “Rebel Yell.” See Secession / A5


A2 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Elite colleges: Worth the price of admission? By Jacques Steinberg New York Times News Service

elite private institution, and some evidence suggests this premium has increased over time.” Grouping colleges by the same tiers of selectivity used in a popular college guidebook, Barron’s, the researchers found that alumni of the most selective colleges earned, on average, 40 percent more a year than those who graduated from the least selective public universities, as calculated 10 years after they graduated from high school. Those same researchers found in a separate paper that “attendance at an elite private college significantly increases the probability of attending graduate school, and more specifically graduate school at a major research university.” One major caveat: These studies, which tracked more than 5,000 college graduates, some for more than a decade, are themselves more than a decade old.

As hundreds of thousands of students rush to fill out college applications to meet end-of-theyear deadlines, it might be worth asking them: Is where you spend the next four years of your life that important? The sluggish economy and rising costs of college have only intensified questions about whether expensive, prestigious colleges make any difference. Do their graduates make more money? Get into better professional programs? Make better connections? And are they more satisfied with their lives, or at least with their work? Many college guidance counselors will say, find your own rainbow. But that can sound like pabulum to even the most laidback parent and student. Answers to such questions cannot be found, typically, in the sort of data churned out annually in the U.S. News & World Report rankings, which tend to focus on Tuition skyrocketing inputs like average SAT scores Over that period, of course, the or college rejection rates. Handi- full sticker price for elite private cappers shy away from collating colleges has far outstripped the such information partly because pace of inflation, to say nothing it can be hard to measure some- of the cost of many of their pubthing like alumni lic school peers satisfaction five (even accounting to 10 years out. “Prestige does pay. for the soaring Moreover, in takof some But prestige costs, prices ing a yardstick to public universisomeone’s suc- too. The question is, ties, especially in cess, or quality is the cost less than California, sufof life, how much fering under state can be attributed the added return?” budget crises). to one’s alma maFor example, ter, versus some- — Scott Thomas, full tuition and one’s aptitude, sociologist and professor fees at Princeton intelligence and of educational studies this year amount at Claremont Graduate doggedness? to more than But econo- University $50,000, while mists and sociolRutgers, the state ogists have tried university just up to tackle these questions. Their the New Jersey Turnpike, costs research, however hedged, does state residents less than half that. suggest that elite schools can The figures are similar for the make a difference in income and private University of Pennsylvagraduate school placement. But nia and the public Pennsylvania happiness in life? That’s a ques- State University. (For the sake of tion for another day. this exercise, set aside those students at elite colleges whose fi‘Significant economic nancial aid packages cover most, all, of their education.) return’ at elite schools if not Despite the lingering gap in Among the most cited research pricing between public and prion the subject — a paper by econ- vate schools, Eric Eide, one of the omists from the RAND Corp. authors of that paper on the earnand Brigham Young and Cornell ings of blue-chip college graduUniversities — found that “strong ates, said he had seen no evidence evidence emerges of a significant that would persuade him to revise economic return to attending an the conclusion he reached in 1998.

“Education is a long-run investment,” said Eide, chairman of the economics department at Brigham Young. “It may be more painful to finance right now. People may be more hesitant to go into debt because of the recession. In my opinion, they should be looking over the long run of their child’s life.” He added, “I don’t think the costs of college are going up faster than the returns on graduating from an elite private college.” Still, one flaw in such research has always been that it can be hard to disentangle the impact of the institution from the inherent abilities and personal qualities of the individual graduate. In other words, if someone had been accepted at an elite college, but chose to go to a more pedestrian one, would his earnings over the long term be the same? In 1999, economists from Princeton and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation looked at some of the same data Eide and his colleagues had used, but crunched them in a different way: They compared students at more selective colleges to others of “seemingly comparable ability,” based on their SAT scores and class rank, who had attended less selective schools, either by choice or because a top college rejected them. The earnings of graduates in the two groups were about the same — perhaps shifting the ledger in favor of the less expensive, less prestigious route. (The one exception was that children from “disadvantaged family backgrounds” appeared to earn more over time if they attended more selective colleges. The authors, Stacy Berg Dale and Alan Krueger, do not speculate why, but conclude, “These students appear to benefit most from attending a more elite college.”)

Finding satisfaction Earnings, of course, and even graduate school attendance, are but two of many measurements of graduates’ success post-college. Earlier this year, two labor and education professors from Penn State, along with a sociologist from Claremont Graduate University in California, sought to examine whether graduates from elite colleges were, in general, more satisfied in their work than those who attended less

Jim Wilson / New York Times News Service

A bust of President Herbert Hoover, a Stanford graduate, is displayed at Stanford University in Palo Alto, Calif. prestigious institutions. Writing in April in the Journal of Labor Research, the three researchers argued that “an exclusive focus on the economic outcomes of college graduation, and from prestigious colleges in particular, neglects a host of other employment features.” Mining a sample of nearly 5,000 recipients of bachelor’s degrees in 1992 and 1993, who were then tracked for nearly a decade, the authors concluded that “job satisfaction decreases slightly as college selectivity moves up.” One hypothesis by the authors was that the expectations of elite college graduates — especially when it came to earnings — might have been higher, and thus more subject to disappointment, than the expectations of those who graduated from less competitive colleges. Still, one of those authors, Scott Thomas, a sociologist who is a professor of educational studies at Claremont, said high school students and their parents should take any attempt to apply broad generalizations to such personal choices with a grain of salt. “Prestige does pay,” Thomas said. “But prestige costs, too. The question is, is the cost less than the added return?” His answer was one he said he knew families would find maddening: “It depends.” For example, someone who knew he needed to earn a reliable salary immediately after graduation, and as a result chose to study something practical like business or engineering, might find the cost-benefit analysis tilted in favor of a state school, he said. “Students from less affluent backgrounds are going to find themselves in situations where college is less about ‘finding themselves,’ and more about skills acquisition and making contacts that will lead straight into the labor market,” Thomas said. For such a student, he said,

a state university, particularly a big one, may also have a large, passionate alumni body. It, in turn, may play a disproportionate role in deciding who gets which jobs in a state in a variety of fields — an old-boy (and, increasingly, old-girl) network that may be less impressed with a job applicant’s Ivy League pedigree. “If you’ve attended a big state school with a tremendous football program,” Thomas said, “there’s tremendous affinity and good will — whether or not you had anything to do with the football program.” In the end, some researchers echo that tried-and-perhapseven-true wisdom of guidance counselors: The extent to which one takes advantage of the educational offerings of an institution may be more important, in the long run, than how prominently and proudly that institution’s name is being displayed on the back windows of cars in the nation’s wealthiest enclaves.

Major strengths In this analysis, one’s major — and how it aligns with the departmental strengths of a university — may be more significant than the place in the academic pecking order awarded to that college by the statisticians at U.S. News. “Everything we know from studying college student experiences and outcomes tells us that there is more variability within schools than between them,” said Alexander McCormick, a former admissions officer at his alma mater, Dartmouth College, and now an associate professor of education at Indiana University at Bloomington. “This is the irony, given the dominance of the rankings mentality of who’s No. 5 or No. 50,” McCormick added. “The quality of that biology major offered at School No. 50? It may exceed that at School No. 5.”

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

POWERBALL

The numbers drawn Wednesday night are:

11 33 44 46 47 12 Power Play: 2. The estimated jackpot is $35 million.

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

5

9 19 25 32 33

Nobody won the jackpot Wednesday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $1.4 million for Saturday’s drawing.

More U.S. students turn to U.K. universities

Cash-strapped L.A. schools may seek corporate sponsors By Jennifer Medina New York Times News Service

By Daniel de Vise The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — When Adelaide Waldrop learned that she had been consigned to the wait list at each of the four universities she wanted most to attend, it was as if all the excitement had drained from her collegiate quest. Then she remembered her wild-card school: the University of St. Andrews, the medieval cobblestone campus in Scotland. Now Waldrop, of Silver Spring, Md., is a St. Andrews sophomore, one of a growing number of American students who enroll at top-ranked British universities, which offer the prestige of elite U.S. schools at a fraction of the cost. The population of U.S. undergraduates at United Kingdom schools has spiked 30 percent in five years, to 3,560 in the 200809 academic year, the most recent figure available from Britain’s Higher Education Statistics Agency. It’s a trend driven by price, prestige and — in the case of St. Andrews — a prince. St. Andrews, founded in 1413, is two centuries older than Harvard. It is the birthplace of golf — and of the romance between Prince William and his fiancee, Kate Middleton.

Michael S. Williamson / Washington Post

In the kitchen at his Potomac, Md., home, Kajetan Malachowski, 17, goes through correspondence with various colleges. He has applied to five schools in Britain. “It’s just so magical walking around St. Andrews, with all of the history,” said Waldrop, 19. “After visiting, I kind of just forgot about my other schools.” Waldrop is paying $19,670 in tuition this year at St. Andrews. Tuition at Swarthmore College, where she was wait-listed, is $39,260. “We are considerably less than the very good privates that you have in the United States,” said Stephen Magee, vice principal of St. Andrews. “And in that sense, we think we’re a very good value.” The small community of collegiate expatriates is populated heavily with students from the New York-Washington corridor and California, British higher education officials say. U.K. universities have emerged as a worthy consolation prize for students rebuffed by Ivy League schools. Much of the interest focuses on Scotland, whose fouryear collegiate model closely resembles the American under-

graduate experience. (English universities, by contrast, graduate students in three years and stress specialization over general education.) “If you just fail to get in at Harvard, we’re happy to have you at St. Andrews,” Magee said, “because it means you’re bloody good.” U.K. universities routinely send recruiters to U.S. high schools. The era of online admissions enables students to apply to schools in St. Louis and Edinburgh with similar ease. Social networking has created a new platform for students overseas to share pictures and stories with friends back home. “I think universities internationally are trying to compete for American students in a way that they never have before,” said Jim Jump, guidance director at St. Christopher’s School in Richmond, Va., and former president of the National Association for College Admission Counseling. His school hosted recruiters from the U.K. this fall.

LOS ANGELES — The football field at a public school here, in the second-largest school district in the country, soon may be brought to students by Nike. Facing another potential round of huge budget cuts, the Los Angeles school board unanimously approved a plan last week to allow the district to seek corporate sponsorships as a way to get money to the schools. The district is not the first to look for private dollars as a way to close public budget gaps — districts in Sheboygan, Wis., and Midland, Texas, for example, have offered up naming rights for their stadiums for years. But the Los Angeles school district is by far the largest to do so, and officials say the plan could generate as much as $18 million for the schools. In the past three years, the Los Angeles Unified School District has cut $1.5 billion from its operating budget, now down to $5.4 billion. As recently as last month, 1,000 more employees lost their jobs in layoffs. And Gov.-elect Jerry Brown suggested at a budget forum that schools could expect more drastic cuts when he presents a new state budget next month. “This is our way to be responsive to that reality; we need to look for other sources of revenue,” said Melissa Infusino, the director of partnerships for the district. “As uncomfortable as it may be for folks, it’s less com-

fortable to get rid of programs or go through more layoffs.” As they discussed the proposal at last week’s meeting, several board members expressed distaste for the idea of opening up schools to business, but concluded that there was no other way. “The implications of us doing this are really disconcerting and really bothers me to my core,” said Steve Zimmer, who said he reluctantly favored the plan. “The reality is public funding is not funding public education.” Continuing the budget cuts “would just be a massacre” for public education in the city, he said. All money generated through the sponsorships will go to the district’s general fund, although they will be earmarked to finance athletic, arts or academic programs at the donor’s request. In a one-page summary pitch to potential sponsors, the district mentions the possibility of arranging school visits to pass out samples of approved food products or placing the donors’ logos in school cafeterias. Or perhaps they might rather have the naming rights for the Academic Decathlon or Drill Team championships. While the district will soon begin enthusiastically pitching the sponsorships to local businesses and major corporations, they are making it clear that they have their limits. No alcohol, tobacco or firearms can be promoted. No companies that promote high-calorie or highfat foods will get play, either.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 A3

TS  Obama hails achievements of ‘most productive’ Congress After passing arms treaty, ‘don’t ask’ repeal, president to push immigration reform

Wyden votes for treaty 2 days after surgery

Bulletin wire reports WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama wrapped up an unexpectedly productive and politically successful lameduck session of Congress on Wednesday with a sweeping assessment of his achievements. He pronounced a new START pact with Russia “the most significant arms control agreement in nearly two decades” and said economists “across the political spectrum” agreed the deal he struck with Republicans to extend Bush-era tax cuts would speed economic growth. All in all, Obama concluded, this was “the most productive post-election period we’ve had in decades” and “the most productive two years that we’ve had in generations.” But even as he trumpeted his accomplishments at a news conference intended to showcase what his aides cast as a political revival, Obama grew most animated about the one that got away: his failure to win enough support to pass the Dream Act, which would have allowed some children of illegal immigrants to gain citizenship. “Maybe my biggest disappointment was this Dream Act vote,” he said. He added later that he intended to seek Republican support and take the case to the public for a broader immigration overhaul. “One thing I hope people have seen during this lame duck — I am persistent,” the president said after a reporter asked whether he would continue to push the immigration measure next year. “If I believe in something strongly, I stay on it. And I believe strongly in this.”

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / The Associated Press

President Barack Obama laughs during a news conference at the White House Wednesday.

Bipartisanship is possible Obama suggested the legislation passed this month demonstrated that bipartisanship is possible in Washington. “We are not doomed to endless gridlock,” he said. Yet his remarks on immigration and other issues — including a vow to continue fighting Republicans, who want to permanently extend tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans — underscored the struggles ahead for him next year when Republicans return with renewed strength in the Senate and a majority in the House. Republicans challenged the idea that Obama had gotten the upper hand. They said the key victories — the START agreement and the repeal of the “don’t ask, don’t tell” ban on gays serving openly in the military — had bipartisan support before the lame-duck session began. The GOP also successfully blocked a major budget bill and won an extension of tax cuts on the highest incomes. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has said his top political goal in the new Congress will be Obama’s defeat in 2012.

Italian students protest planned university changes By Rachel Donadio and Gaia Pianigiani New York Times News Service

ROME — Tens of thousands of students took to the streets Wednesday to protest planned changes in the university system but stayed away from the historic center here, much of which had been cordoned off by the police to avoid a repeat of last week’s violent demonstrations. The protest turned out to be peaceful, allaying widespread fears, as thousands marched from the city’s main university, La Sapienza, steering clear of the historic center but blocking traffic on a main highway. Other protests in Palermo and Milan turned violent, with skirmishes between demonstrators and the police. In Turin, students occupied a landmark building. In Rome, some protesters carried fake Christmas presents labeled with politically minded holiday wishes — “Social welfare for students and temporary workers,” one read — to oppose what they said were cuts to

Italy’s famously dysfunctional universities. In the previous protests, held on same the day that Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi narrowly survived a confidence vote, the police used tear gas on demonstrators who smashed shop windows and burned cars in the worst violence in downtown Rome in years. The center-right government blamed the left for the violence and warned of a return to 1970s-style political violence. While critics said such claims were overblown, there is a palpable and growing sense of frustration among young people in Italy, where youth unemployment averages 25 percent. As they marched in Rome on Wednesday, students shouted, “We don’t want to pay for the crisis,” referring to the financial crisis that has turned Italy’s troubled labor market from bad to worse. “Where do I see my future? Certainly not in this country,” said one protester, Morgana Proietti, 22, expressing a common sentiment.

Wary of industry, administration defends stance on polar bears By Neela Banerjee Tribune Washington Bureau

WASHINGTON — A dispute about how much the government should protect polar bears has turned into a battleground for environmentalists and some of the country’s most powerful business organizations over the larger question of global warming. On Wednesday, the Interior Department filed arguments in federal court defending its decision to classify polar bears as “threatened” rather than “endangered” despite widespread shrinkage of the sea ice that forms the bears’ natural habitat. What makes the issue so sensitive is that, if polar bears received the stricter endangered classification, the Obama administration would be pressured to attack the problem at its source: the petroleum, coal and manufacturing companies that emit the greenhouse gases scientists say are a

major factor in climate change. “There is a pronounced pushback from industry because they rightly see that they will have to modify or mitigate their activities to comply with the laws,” said Andrew Wetzler, director of the Land and Wildlife program at the Natural Resources Defense Council, one of the environmental groups suing to change the polar bear’s status. In early 2009, the Obama administration pledged to revisit several controversial environmental decisions made under George W. Bush — including the polar bear’s status. But months later, Obama’s Interior Department ratified the bears’ “threatened” classification. Although the Obama administration has moved steadily to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, now the White House has been trying not to provoke policy battles with wary businesses.

PORTLAND — Sen. Ron Wyden got out of the hospital following surgery for prostate cancer and walked onto the floor of the U.S. Senate in Washington, D.C., to cast his vote in favor of the new strategic arms-control treaty with Russia. Spokesman Tom Towslee says the Oregon Democrat decided Wednesday that establishing a new arms control treaty with Russia, called START, was, “more important than a little discomfort.” Towslee says the 61-year-old Wyden is doing fine after surgery Monday at Johns Hopkins University Hospital in Baltimore. Wyden went to his home in the District of Columbia, then to the Senate to cast his vote, and then back home again. The treaty passed by a vote of 71-26. — The Associated Press

Congress approves health bill for 9/11 first responders After years of fierce lobbying and debate, Congress approved a bill Wednesday to cover the cost of medical care for rescue workers and others who became sick from toxic fumes, dust and smoke after the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center. The $4.3 billion bill cleared its biggest hurdle Wednesday afternoon when the Senate unexpectedly approved it just 12 days after Republican senators had blocked a more expensive House version from coming to the floor of the Senate for a vote. In recent days, Republican senators had been under fire for their opposition to the legislation.

A month after attack, S. Korea holds huge drills By Foster Klug Associated Press

POCHEON, South Korea — South Korean tanks fired artillery early today as the army and air force held its largest air and ground drills of the year in a show of force a month after North Korea’s deadly shelling of a front-line island. The drills, taking place at training grounds in mountainous Pocheon near the Koreas’ heavily fortified border, signaled South Korea’s determination to demonstrate and hone its military strength at the risk of further escalation with North Korea. Vulcan artillery vehicles fired into a wide valley with numbers carved onto hills below as the army and air force launched the drills at 2:42 p.m. about 20 miles from the North Korean border. They are the armed forces’ largest joint firing exercises this year, and the biggest-ever wintertime air and ground firing exercises, government and army officials said on condition of anonymity, citing department rules. Exactly one month ago, routine South Korean live-fire drills from Yeonpyeong Island in the Yellow Sea triggered a shower of North Korean artillery that killed two marines and two construction workers. It was the first military attack on

a civilian area since the 1950-53 Korean War ended in a truce. North Korea, which claims the waters around the South Korean-held island lying 7 miles from its shores as its territory, accused the South of sparking the exchange by ignoring Pyongyang’s warnings against staging the live-fire drills near their disputed maritime border. Amid international concerns of all-out war on the tense Korean peninsula, South Korea has pushed ahead with military exercises over the past several weeks, including live-fire drills from Yeonpyeong Island and Monday’s land-based exercises. Thursday’s drills will be the largest-scale firing exercise jointly staged by South Korea’s army and air force this year, and the biggest-ever wintertime air and ground firing exercises, government and army officials said on condition of anonymity citing department rules. Forty-seven similar exercises have taken place this year but Thursday’s maneuvers were scheduled in response to the North Korean attack, according to army officials. “We will thoroughly punish the enemy if it provokes us again as with the shelling of Yeonpyeong Island,” Brig. Gen. Ju Eun-sik, chief of the South Korean army’s 1st Armored Brigade, said.

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

A4 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

2 Chicago firefighters die when roof collapses By Joel Hood, Annie Sweeney and Stacy St. Clair Chicago Tribune

CHICAGO — At daybreak Wednesday, Corey Ankum and Edward Stringer were among the Chicago firefighters quelling a blaze in an abandoned building when the roof gave way, trapping them inside. Ankum and Stringer died and more than a dozen firefighters were injured on the 100th anniversary of the city’s most devastating fire. Fire Department spokesman Larry Langford said both firefighters died of trauma. Ankum had been with the department less than two years; Stringer, about 12 years. In all, 19 firefighters suffered injuries, Chicago Fire Commissioner Robert Hoff said Wednesday afternoon at a news conference. He said the injuries of those who survived were not considered

Fossils in Siberia were cousins of Neanderthals By Carl Zimmer New York Times News Service

An international team of scientists has identified a previously shadowy human group known as the Denisovans as cousins to Neanderthals who lived in Asia from roughly 400,000 to 50,000 years ago and interbred with the ancestors of today’s inhabitants of New Guinea. All the Denisovans have left behind are a broken finger bone and a wisdom tooth in a Siberian cave. But the scientists have succeeded in extracting the entire genome of the Denisovans from these scant remains. An analysis of this ancient DNA, published Wednesday in Nature, reveals that the genomes of people from New Guinea contain 4.8 percent Denisovan DNA. An earlier, incomplete analysis of Denisovan DNA had placed the group as more distant from both Neanderthals and humans. On the basis of the new findings, the scientists propose that the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans emerged from Africa half a million years ago. The Neanderthals spread westward, settling in the Near East and Europe. The Denisovans headed east. Some 50,000 years ago, they interbred with humans expanding from Africa along the coast of South Asia, bequeathing some of their DNA to them. The research was led by Dr. Svante Paabo, a geneticist at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany. Paabo and his colleagues have pioneered methods for rescuing fragments of ancient DNA from fossils and stitching them together. In May, for example, they published a complete Neanderthal genome. Analyzing the Neanderthal genome, Paabo and his colleagues concluded that humans and Neanderthals descended from common ancestors that lived 600,000 years ago. But the scientists also found that 2.5 percent of the Neanderthal genome is more similar to the DNA of living Europeans and Asians than to African DNA. From this evidence they concluded that Neanderthals interbred with humans soon after they emerged from Africa roughly 50,000 years ago. Paabo’s success with European Neanderthal fossils inspired him and his colleagues to look farther afield. They began to work with Dr. Anatoli Derevianko of the Russian Academy of Sciences, who explores Siberian caves in search of fossils of hominins, formerly known has hominids, (species more closely related to living humans than to chimpanzees, our closest living relatives). Last year, Derevianko and his colleagues sent Paabo a nondescript fragment of a finger bone from a cave called Denisova. Derevianko thought that the fossil, which is at least 50,000 years old, might have belonged to one of the earliest humans to live in Siberia. Paabo and his colleagues isolated a small bundle of DNA from the bone’s mitochondria, the energy-generating structures within our cells.

life-threatening. Hoff said firefighters were in the building and on the roof, searching for hot spots and whether anyone was inside, when the roof collapsed. The two who died were inside the building, he said. “The search effort was aggressive. Two members were found immediately,” Hoff said. “Every firefighter that was there did the best they could to save their brothers. Hoff said officials decided to search inside the building because “people in this kind of weather seek refuge, and we take no building as being vacant. We do it cautiously, but we go in for people who may try to get out of the cold.” Hoff said there was “no indication to the chief officers and company officers at the scene that (the roof) was in danger of collapse. That’s when we make our decision to go in and do a search.”

Gas tax

RIVER

Continued from A1 Then Tuesday, Deschutes County sent e-mails to the four deputy district attorneys and Nakahira informing them that until formal termination action is taken by the District Attorney, they remain on the payroll and are expected to observe county policy regarding hours of work and reporting time. And on Wednesday, Flaherty sent another letter to the prosecutors, telling them their jobs will end on Dec. 31. The deputy district attorneys should clean out their offices and return any government property issued to them by Dec. 30, because they will no longer have access to the District Attorney’s Office, Flaherty wrote. However, Flaherty does not yet have the authority to terminate the employment of people working in the District Attorney’s Office, according to the county. “I expect that all of them will show up for work on (Jan. 3),” Deschutes County Legal Counsel Mark Pilliod said of the deputy district attorneys.

“Basically they pay the tax and (consumers) pay them back,” Thompson said.

Continued from A1 ODOT Spokesman Dave Thompson said the fuel tax has remained the same for 17 years even as inflation has risen and cars have become more efficient. “So if the gas tax is supposed to be a user fee for damage caused by driving, it is not a very good one right now,” he said. “It has lost its direct connection as cars have become more efficient. That’s great for the environment but it’s not so good for roads. They’re doing a similar amount of damage but paying less for it.” The state taxes the fuel distributors, and stations report the amount of gas received to the state; filling stations will in turn pass the increase in cost along to consumers.

BEND

DAs

Increase at the pump remains to be seen But it’s unclear for now just how much of an increase drivers will see at the pump. “So they will change their prices on Jan. 1, but what they change it to is a darn good question,” Thompson said. AAA Spokeswoman Marie Dodds said some gas stations may increase prices per gallon by 6 cents on Jan. 1. Others may handle the increase differently. “It will kind of depend on how individual stations decide to implement it,” she said. “Some may raise their rate by 6 cents, others will take a bite out of profits instead and raise it more slowly. It really will depend on the operator and where

PROMENADE,

BEND

Flaherty did not return calls for comment. The deputy district attorneys have formed a union, which approved a contract that includes a just cause provision that would dictate how and why they could be disciplined or fired. The union’s interest in the provision arose because of Flaherty’s election and his plans to dismiss some prosecutors. The union pushed for the Deschutes County Commission to vote on whether to ratify the agreement by the end of the year. Last week, the commission voted unanimously to delay that decision until Jan. 12. Now, that decision may also be up in the air, because two county commissioners said Wednesday they might discuss on Monday whether to vote on the contract before January. “We should talk about it,” Commissioner Alan Unger said Wednesday. Unger said he would reflect on what to do over Christmas weekend, because the commission is running out of time to change course before January. Commissioner Dennis Luke said he would be happy to reopen the discussion, if the other two

commissioners want to do so. “From the discussion that I had with the county administrator today, he’s going to give the (County Commission) the opportunity to talk about that in executive session on Monday,” Luke said. Commissioner Tammy Baney could not be reached for comment. She said last week it wouldn’t be right to make a final decision without hearing from Flaherty in his official capacity as district attorney. After the commissioners decided last week to delay the vote, an attorney for two of the deputy district attorneys Flaherty plans to let go sent a letter to the county, asking officials to reconsider. Attorney Andrew Altschul asked the county to “take any and all additional actions necessary to prevent Mr. Flaherty from illegally terminating any County employees.” Altschul also informed the county that it must maintain his clients’ employment records and other documents and communications related to the dispute, in case there is a lawsuit. “While my clients and I remain cautiously optimistic that they will remain properly employed

even after Mr. Flaherty officially assumes his District Attorney role, given the recent actions described above, it seems prudent to make sure no evidence is inadvertently lost while we wait to see how everything plays out,” Altschul wrote. Flaherty and Deschutes County commissioners have acknowledged that the county is likely to face legal action in any situation. Altschul argued in the letter that if the county delayed a vote on the ratification of the contract in order to “help facilitate Mr. Flaherty’s forthcoming illegal terminations,” the county would be liable for those firings. Baney’s recent comments suggest that was a motive, according to Altschul. “I genuinely am sort of baffled by the county’s failure to ratify the collective bargaining agreement, although I still hold out extremely slim hope they’ll do so by the end of the year, because ratifying that makes this all disappear,” Altschul said.

they’re located and how often they take gas deliveries.” Dodds said smaller markets, where gas isn’t delivered very often, may increase their gas prices immediately. Thompson estimated the average driver uses between 525 and 600 gallons of gasoline or diesel fuel each year. That translates to between $31.50 and $36 each year in increased costs at the gas station. He said he knows some Oregonians may be surprised by the increase. “The fact that it was passed one and a half years ago but it’s just taking effect,” he said, “there’s a sticker shock, and it’s completely understandable that people might be upset and curious.” He pointed to the change in cost for services like cable television and movie tickets over the same 17-year period.

“It is one of those things that 6 cents sounds like a lot, but when you do add it up isn’t significant for most people,” Dodds said. “Is it a pain? ... Nobody likes paying more for gas.”

First, it will pay $2 million of the repaving costs for U.S. Highway 97 between the Crooked River Bridge and the Redmond reroute. That project was completed in 2009, but funds raised through the fuel tax and other revenues will help pay for the work. Second, the funds will pay for the second phase of the Redmond reroute, reconstructing Sixth Street between Deschutes and Jackpine avenues. That project is slated for 2012. And third, the funds from the gas tax will pay for $25 million of the projected $45 million cost to extend Murphy Road from Third Street to Brookswood Boulevard and construct a crossing over U.S. Highway 97.

5 41 . 317. 6 0 0 0

Many Central Oregon roads to benefit But Dodds said the state’s roads are a mess and ODOT needs the funds to improve them. “I think the 2009 Legislature recognized that our roads are in a state of terrible disrepair,” she said. “Had we kept up with this better, we might not be in a situation where we see a large increase like this. In the end it’s not a significant amount.” Central Oregon will benefit from several road construction projects with revenues from the tax and fee increases.

Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Sheila G. Miller can be reached at 541-617-7831 or at smiller@bendbulletin.com.


C OV ER S T OR I ES

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 A5

After freeze ends, Israeli settlement-building booms By Ethan Bronner New York Times News Service

JERUSALEM — In the three months since Israel ended its settlement construction freeze in the West Bank, causing the Palestinians to withdraw from peace talks, a settlement-building boom has begun, especially in more remote communities that are least likely to be part of Israel after any two-state peace deal. This means that if negotiations ever get back on track, there will be thousands more Israeli settlers who will have to relocate into Israel, posing new problems

EPA urges testing for hexavalent chromium By Lyndsey Layton The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency is suggesting that water utilities nationwide test their drinking water for hexavalent chromium, a probable carcinogen, after an independent survey released earlier this week found the chemical in tap water drawn from 31 cities, including Bend. A sample drawn last spring from the Avion Water Co. system — which serves approximately 10,820 residential customers in southeast Bend and 1,316 commercial, irrigation and fire protection customers — measured hexavalent chromium at 0.78 parts per billion, 13 times above a proposed California standard for hexavalent chromium in drinking water. But Avion has questioned the findings, saying the water samples submitted for the study may have been compromised The EPA said Wednesday that it is issuing guidance to the utilities explaining how to test for the chemical but is not requiring tests at this time. The agency said it will also give technical help to the 31 cities identified in the survey so they can set up a monitoring and sampling procedure for hexavalent chromium, a chemical made famous by the film “Erin Brockovich.” George Hawkins, the general manager of D.C. Water, said his agency will follow the guidance issued by the EPA. “If additional testing needs to be taken to make sure that what we’re doing is protective of public health, that’s what we’ll do,” he said. Testing for hexavalent chromium, also known as chromium 6, is technically challenging. Many laboratories that handle standard tests for water companies are not equipped to perform the more sophisticated tests. EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson met Tuesday with 10 senators representing some of the 31 communities to discuss the findings of the survey, which was conducted by the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy organization.

Guantanamo closing set back in Congress By Charlie Savage New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — Congress voted Wednesday to impose strict new limits on transferring detainees out of the Guantanamo Bay prison, dealing a major blow to President Barack Obama’s vows to shut down the center and give federal court trials to many of the prisoners. The Guantanamo provisions were contained in a major defense authorization bill, which both chambers passed on the last day of Congress’ lame-duck session. It is considered highly unlikely that Obama will veto the bill because it also authorizes billions in spending for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. Robert M. Chesney, a University of Texas law professor who specializes in national security matters, said the legislation would make it even harder to close the prison, at the U.S. military base in Cuba.

over how to accommodate them while creating a Palestinian state on the land where many of them are living now. In addition to West Bank settlement-building, construction for predominantly Jewish housing in East Jerusalem, where the Palestinians hope to make their future capital, has been rapidly growing after a break of half a year, with hundreds of units approved and thousands more planned. On a tour of West Bank construction sites, Dror Etkes, an anti-settlement advocate who has spent the past nine years

chronicling their growth, said he doubted whether there had been such a burst in settlement construction in at least a decade. Hagit Ofran, a settlement opponent who monitors their growth for Peace Now, said there were 2,000 housing units being built now and a total of 13,000 in the pipeline that did not require additional permits. In each of the past three years, about 3,000 units have been built. While government data on the building will not be published until the new year, settler leaders did not contradict these assessments.

Palestinian leaders have said they will not return to peace talks with Israel as long as settlement construction occurs. Israel has replied that the sooner talks get started, the sooner settlements and other areas of dispute can be solved. The Obama administration is trying to negotiate with each side in hopes of finding common ground. The Palestinians are also planning to submit to the United Nations Security Council a resolution condemning settlement construction. Mark Regev, a spokesman for the Israeli prime minister, Benja-

min Netanyahu, said that since the 10-month building moratorium ended in September, the government had been sticking to building only in existing settlements and had not expropriated more land for settlements. Settlement opponents disagree, saying that the larger the settler population, the more resources — water, roads, security — will be needed for them and the harder it will be to get Israelis to agree to a Palestinian state. Moreover, much of the new building is deep in the West Bank. In the West Bank, most of

Secession Continued from A1 The stubborn inside-outside face-off that throttled this jewel of a Southern city Monday night hints at dramas to come, an unending series of Civil War anniversaries stretching from secession and the firing on Fort Sumter to the laying down of arms at Appomattox. For the next 4½ years — the span of the bloodiest conflict in U.S. history — Americans black and white will have ample opportunities to wrestle with delicate, almost-impossible-to-resolve questions of legacy and history, of what to commemorate and what to condemn. South Carolina was the first state to secede from the Union, but the commemoration will be followed by similar events in other states — parades and balls and speeches and plaques. The anniversaries will press current politicians to tiptoe through minefields of nuance. Charleston Mayor Joe Riley called the Secession Ball “unfortunate” and “the opposite of unifying,” but several bigname lawmakers not only attended, but donned costumes to do so. The emotions of the day were on display at a ceremony dedicating a historical marker about the secession. Someone in the audience yelled “You’re a liar” when Riley told the crowd that South Carolinians were motivated to secede, in part, by a desire to preserve slavery. Riley has invited President Barack Obama to narrate portions of Abraham Lincoln’s greatest speeches in an observance of the firing on Fort Sumter, though it’s unclear whether he will accept. When Lincoln’s name was mentioned at the Secession Ball’s theatrical performance, a re-enactment of South Car-

Michael Givens, commander and chief of The Sons of the Confederate Veterans, stands outside the door to the Ordinance of Secession Gala in Charleston, S.C., on Monday.

Photos by Stacy L. Pearsall / The Associated Press

Dressed in period clothing, Lynn Charles, right, helps direct guests of the Ordinance of Secession Gala find their seats at the Gaillard Auditorium in Charleston, S.C., on Monday. olina’s secession convention that drew from historical documents, the actors hissed. “Impeach,” one of the actors called out. Lincoln and the North were responsible for “vulgar tyranny,” the actors said. A narrator intoned that the 169 South Carolina men who voted unanimously to secede were “compelled by the same sublime courage” as the men who fought against Britain in the Revolutionary War the century before.

Slavery was mentioned, but the main reasons for secession were portrayed as high tariffs and Northern states using Southern tax money to build their own infrastructure. The star of the show, playing the convention president, is one of South Carolina’s most powerful present-day politicians, state Senate President Pro Tempore Glenn McConnell, a Confederate heritage defender who owns a Civil War memorabilia business.

The guests, enthusiasts in tuxedos, flouncy skirts or militia uniforms, sashayed from the cavernous theater into a party room where images of huge Confederate battle flags were projected on the wall. Two black police officers leaned glumly against a wall in the hallway as the predominantly white crowd filed past. Guests picked at ham and biscuits while a string band with a defiant name — Un-Reconstructed — played waltzes and the Virginia reel. Many in the crowd are members of “Secession Camps,” small groups of Civil War history buffs collected under the banner of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. And there were the battle re-enactors. Their intricate uniforms, with brass buttons and braiddraped epaulets, can cost upward of $1,000 each. Chip Limehouse, a parking company owner who represents Berkeley and Charleston counties in the South Carolina House of Representatives, grinned when asked about the protests. “They actually helped ticket sales,” he said of the protestors. “We’d like to thank them. Without them, we wouldn’t have made budget.”

the building in recent years has been in large settlements relatively close to Israel that are widely expected to be annexed by Israel by swapping land elsewhere in a future deal. These include the large settlements of Maale Adumim, the Gush Etzion block, Betar Illit and Modiin Illit. Building in those areas generally requires government tenders, and those have been slower in coming lately. The intense recent growth has been more in private building, mostly in smaller and more remote settlements.

John Hines, a wealthy Texas oilman and cattle rancher, helped, too. He sent a $5,000 sponsorship for the affair because he loves the Old South: “They created a society far and above anything else on Earth.” The central argument both inside and outside the auditorium is the same one that enlivened the Charleston mayor’s news conference earlier in the day: the role of slavery in the decision to secede. A favorite citation of the crowd at the ball comes from Charles Dickens. “He said, ‘The Northern onslaught upon slavery was no more than a piece of specious humbug designed to conceal its desire for economic control of the Southern states,’ ” said John Zebelean, a retired U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonel from Baltimore who attended the ball. “It’s all there! You can look it up.” Darby, the NAACP vice president, spent much of the day talking about documents drafted during the secession commission that mention slavery repeatedly and cite it as a prime motivating factor. But the point, he said, is not merely a matter of historical contention. Celebrating secession, he says, contributes to an atmosphere of inequality in present-day South Carolina, where fights over the quality of education and job opportunities for African Americans still simmer. Reminders of secession are everywhere. In Charleston, there’s a Secessionville Road; in Beaufort, there’s a Secession Golf Club. Darby says that the day before the ball, he ran into a white man whose ancestor was one of the signers of the secession ordinance; the man was “distressed” about the ball and had no plans to attend. They got to talking about their bloodlines, and the man mentioned the name of the signer: Artemus Darby. In those days it was common for slaves to take the names of their masters. “I looked at him and said, ‘Hello, cousin,’ ” Darby said.


A6 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Pay Continued from A1 “This (2009) was the first full year without those (Les Schwab) paychecks,” Carr said. In a county with a 2009 estimated population of 22,566, Carr said the loss of that many management-level positions is bound to significantly reduce the total wages paid countywide. However, Carr said the actual impact on Crook County may be less dramatic than it appears from the decline in compensation numbers because many of the Les Schwab management staff still live in Crook County. So while they’re collecting their paychecks in Deschutes County, their income is still supporting Crook County’s tax base and being spent in businesses in Prineville and the surrounding area. Declines in management compensation numbers reported by BEA also reflect the loss of management jobs. The BEA report shows management compensation in Crook County fell from $6.5 million in 2007 to $5.8 million in 2008 to less than $4.9 million in 2009. Reductions in the construction sector, and in manufacturing of wood products and durable goods, also contributed to the overall decline in compensation, Carr said. According to the BEA report, total compensation paid to workers in all industries in Crook County fell from nearly $269 million in 2008 to $235 million in 2009, which is the lowest level in seven years, when the compensation also totaled $235 million. Over the past decade, total compensation across Crook County rose every year from 1999 through 2006, going from $216 million in 1990 to $314 million in 2006. That was followed by a drop back to $275 million in 2007, according to the BEA report. From 1999 through 2003, construction industry compensation totals fluctuated between $7.3 million and $7.8 million, then peaked at $20.7 million in 2007. In 2008, the construction industry’s total compensation dipped to $18.2 million, then plunged to $9.9 million in 2009, according to

Scanners Continued from A1 “I simply do not trust the TSA to keep those images private,” says Boston area columnist and TV commentator Michele McPhee, who in November chose one of those enhanced pat-downs over a full-body scanner at Logan International Airport. “The last thing I want is my naked image all over the place in Boston.” The fear of being exposed is a theme that comes up constantly in interviews with those suspicious of full-body scanners. That’s not the only thing they talk about, of course; they talk about government intrusion and constitutional rights, about health concerns over scanner radiation, about the ways in which they see airport security as reactive, ineffective. They talk about the building indignities of airplane travel. They talk about control and the sense of having to choose between two unhappy options, the scanner or the pat-down. But most of all they talk about a sense of privacy squandered, a sense of being vulnerable in deeply personal terms. They use the word “humiliating” a lot, and the word “dignity.” Exposure is an elemental fear, after all, as anyone who has sweated through a naked dream can attest. Despite the TSA’s assurances about advanced imaging technology — that the scanned images are blurred by a “privacy algorithm,” that the images can’t be leaked because they’re automatically deleted by the machines after being evaluated remotely, that the officers evaluating them aren’t allowed to bring cameras or cellphones that could reproduce the images - there are still, for some, lurking suspicions about what they call a virtual strip search. It might be that even — or perhaps especially — in a confessional age, there is something alarming about being unclothed in public, even if it’s only in a virtual sense, even if a stranger in a remote room is the only one privy to one’s nakedness. If you go through one of the new scanners you are bargaining, giving up your privacy in exchange for security or expediency or other things. If one doesn’t buy this premise, doesn’t believe full-body scanners are a good bargain, then one is being exposed against one’s will. And to be naked is to be unprepared and unprotected, to be uniquely defenseless against criticism and attack. There is the fear of not being attractive or of being too attractive,

Compensation of employees by county From 2008 to 2009, Crook County posted a 12.5 percent decline in total compensation paid to employees in all industries — the largest decline of any county in the six Western states, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Statistics.

Percentage change, 2008-09 1.6% to 15.8% -0.7% to 1.6% -2.7% to -0.7% Crook County

-5.1% to -2.7% -12.5% to -5.1% U.S. growth rate: -3.2% Far West growth rate: -3.5%

Robb Kerr / The Bulletin ile photo

Ochoco Lumber Managing Partner John Shelk, right, works at the mill in this 2001 photo. “In Central and Eastern Oregon, lack of supply killed the timber industry,” Shelk said in an interview this year, “and there’s no chance of it coming back until the supply issue is resolved.”

Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis

the BEA. While the wood products industry compensation also declined, from $38.7 million in 2008 to $28.4 million in 2009, John Shelk, managing partner at Ochoco Lumber in Prineville, said his company last operated a lumber mill in Crook County in 2001, when lumber and wood products compensation totaled $43.6 million. Because there haven’t been any lumber mills operating in Crook County since 2001, the decline in wood products manufacturing compensation reported for the county from 2008 to 2009 could only be in secondary wood products such as doors and window frames, Shelk said. “By that time (2008-2009) all the primary sawmills were gone. They were shut down,” Shelk said. However, Carolyn Eagan, regional economist with the Oregon Employment Department, said lumber mills’ closure has had a domino effect on wages in Crook County. Eagan said many of the work-

ers who earned $20 to $25 per hour in the mills transitioned into construction, where they made that much or more until the national mortgage lending crisis caused the housing and construction industries to crash in 2008. This time around, there are no good-paying jobs for workers with those skills to move into, so many are no longer collecting paychecks counted in the BEA report, Eagan said. She said the county’s secondary wood products manufacturers have tried hard to keep from laying off workers during the economic downturn by reducing hours, but that also drags down the total compensation number for that industry. “What has happened with this recession, especially in construction and manufacturing, is you have a lot of employees working 30 hours instead of 40. That’s why it is a jobless recovery,” Eagan said. “Companies aren’t going to start hiring again until they get all of those part-time workers back up to full time.” Carr said construction of Face-

book’s data center began this year in Crook County, but that data won’t show up in the compensation report until next year. “Facebook is in the process of hiring employees to work in the data center now, so wages for those jobs will show up next year,” Carr said. He said Facebook’s plans call for hiring 30 to 40 people initially to work in the data center, which will help, but won’t make up for the 300 Les Schwab jobs that moved to Bend, or the decline in construction and wood products manufacturing jobs. Eagan said wood products employment in Crook County, at 570 jobs, is less than half of the 1,500 employed in the industry in 2001. Carr and Eagan said they don’t see any new industries on the horizon to replace the 870 jobs lost between wood products manufacturing and the Les Schwab headquarters move. “Facebook has talked about expanding, but that is dependent on boosting the area’s power supply,” Carr said, referencing data centers’ significant power needs.

Shelk said reviving the wood products industry offers the greatest hope of bringing good-paying jobs back to Crook County. After 30 years of legal battles that shut down most logging on federal lands, he is hopeful that Gov.-elect John Kitzhaber, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., and other political leaders will succeed in their efforts to get environmentalists, timber companies and federal land managers to agree on a sustainable harvest from federal timber lands in Central and Eastern Oregon. Until that happens, he said there won’t be a revival of the region’s timber industry, whether the housing market improves or not. “In Central and Eastern Oregon, lack of supply killed the timber industry, and there’s no chance of it coming back until the supply issue is resolved,” Shelk said. “What gives me hope is the fact that everyone on every side of the issue, except for a few

fringe groups, recognizes that the hands-off polices have created massive forest health problems. “We all recognize that without management, the trees will continue to deteriorate with insect infestations, fuel loading and catastrophic fires,” Shelk said. “Ten years ago, I never thought we’d get to this point where we could agree on anything, but I think we all pretty much agree that active management is needed to keep the forests from burning up, and with the economic situation and budget cuts, people realize the government doesn’t have a bunch of money to go out and hire people to go through the forests and just clear out the brush and little trees under 3 inches in diameter,” Shelk said. “To pay for thinning, there needs to be an element of commercial timber harvest, and I think everyone is beginning to recognize that.”

of being ridiculed or ogled. There is the fear that all the things we do to smooth and minimize ourselves, all of the adornments that contribute to the formation of our public selves, are undone by a fullbody scanner, that we will be seen in all our secret ugliness. As the TSA adds more scanners and more fliers come into contact with them, it seems unlikely the vocal minority that objects to them will disappear. On FlyerTalk’s message boards, frequent fliers compile lists of which terminals at which airports have full-body scanners, the better to avoid them. “The sheep being herded to slaughter,” one frequent poster writes of those who submit to the new technology. Recently, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., introduced legislation that would make it illegal to record or distribute the images taken by the machines. Meanwhile, in a nod to modesty and privacy, the TSA is testing a type of software that would convert all scanner images to what TSA spokeswoman Payne calls “a standard generic figure,” while still highlighting what the agency likes to call “anomalies.” You can see the opt-outers as cranky outliers or as the nation’s conscience, and perhaps the truth is somewhere in between. Because even for the majority of people who don’t agree with them, their protest should be instructive. It tells us a lot about how our culture’s relationship with privacy has changed. The use of technology to intrude on people’s private lives in America isn’t an invention of the 21st century, of course, or even of the 20th. Sarah Igo, a history professor at Vanderbilt University, points to a crystallizing moment in 1890, when one of the first legal arguments was made in a law journal about the right to privacy. The threat? Newspapers and magazines printing paparazzi photos of socialites. Really. Now, we are in an age when technology’s intrusions into privacy erupt in scandals every few months, if not more often. The uproars over Facebook’s privacy protocols bear witness to this, as do the cases of alleged cyber-bullying over MySpace and Facebook, and — in the case of the suicide of Rutgers student Tyler Clementi — webcam and Twitter. Loads of user names and passwords were recently compromised in the hack on Gawker Media. As Tiger Woods discovered, celebrity texts might as well be written on bathroom doors. And the ongoing WikiLeaks dumps of confidential diplomatic cables contribute to the sense that nothing is confidential

anymore. With each scandal there is outrage, to greater or lesser degrees. There are attempts to “draw a line in the sand,” as Igo puts it, as with the Federal Trade Commission’s proposal allowing consumers to opt out of having online advertisers track their browsing habits. Another recent victory for privacy: a federal appeals court ruled the government needs a warrant to gain access to e-mails stored by Internet service providers. But the controversies tend to be the exceptions, the rulings tend to be reactive (and late), and the line tends to move in one direction. We have largely made peace with Facebook collecting information about us, with Amazon saving

our credit card numbers. More broadly, we have made peace with our confessional culture. If we are outwardly ambivalent that moments of deep personal anguish and light mundanity are processed into entertainment without much distinction on reality TV and YouTube, we nevertheless eagerly consume it all. We vote with links clicked and cookies accepted. Even surveillance itself becomes titillation. As Hal Niedzviecki, a cultural commentator in Toronto and author of “The Peep Diaries,” points out, the evening news features surveillance camera footage of bungled convenience store robberies. Dash cam arrest videos show up online.

Niedzviecki calls the current state of things “peep culture.” “Peep culture conditions us to want to use our privacy to achieve things,” says Niedzviecki, who suggests this breeds a kind of passivity, a failure to ask questions. “It’s not, ‘Oh, no, no, you can’t ask me to give this up.’ It’s, ‘Sure, you can have it, but what am I getting back?’” In other words, we often feel we’re exercising control over what we give up. And we tend to focus on what we think we’re getting: security, social mobility, convenience. So, yes, the vast majority of us will continue to go through the full-body scanners. We will do it most of all because we hope the new technology makes us safer,

but also because we’re in a rush, because we don’t want to make a fuss, because we don’t want to find out just how “enhanced” a pat-down can be, because we don’t even know what a full-body scanner is. We will do it because we’ve been inured to giving up things when we go to the airport, and it stinks, sure, but this is the price of flying in a scary age. We will do it because thinkingly or unthinkingly we have concluded this is a good bargain. This is the familiar dance of human being and machine, of old-fashioned privacy and newfangled technology, negotiating terms. Or this is much ado about nothing, depending on where you choose to stand.

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or at emerriman@bendbulletin.com.

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Personal Finance Betting on the weather to score big prizes, see Page B3.

www.bendbulletin.com/business

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

MARKET REPORT

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2,671.48 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +3.87 +.15%

STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF

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11,559.49 DOW JONES CLOSE CHANGE +26.33 +.23%

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1,258.84 S&P 500 CLOSE CHANGE +4.24 +.34%

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By Ed Merriman The Bulletin

Fort Collins, Colo.-based Advanced Energy Industries Inc., parent company of PV Powered in Bend, on Wednesday announced the creation of two focused business units within the company effective Jan. 1: Thin Films and Renewables. The company says the move will enable improved execution and a strategic focus on two distinct markets. The Renewables unit, headquartered in Bend, will be managed by Gregg Patterson in the role of executive vice president and general manager. The Renewables unit will include the PV Powered and Solaron solar inverter products, the latter of which are produced in Fort Collins and whose managers will report to Patterson. The Thin Films business unit will be managed by Yuval Wasserman in addition to his role as the company’s president and chief operating officer, and will be headquartered in Fort Collins. Wasserman and Patterson will report to Hans Betz, CEO of Advanced Energy. “… The Renewables business unit will focus on string, commercial and utility-scale solar projects and installations, selling primarily to distributors (engineering, procurement and construction contractors), developers and utility companies,” Betz said in a news release.

BONDS

Ten-year CLOSE 3.34 treasury CHANGE +.60%

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$1386.80 GOLD CLOSE CHANGE -$1.40

Alliance wants filmmakers to view Central Oregon as picture perfect Group seeks to build up moviemaking infrastructure

Advanced Energy creates 2 units

Central Oregon has terrific scenery for filming movies, television shows, commercials or scenes for video games and websites, and a local group is looking to exploit that by working with state officials to promote a regional film industry. “We know a lot of people who love the

Bend area and would love to come here to make films, but right now we just don’t have the infrastructure,” said Brad Douglas, president of the Central Oregon Film Alliance, formerly known as the Film Oregon Alliance. The COFA executive committee includes Douglas, a film producer based in the Bend area; videographer Greg Oullete, COFA

vice president; and Jeff Dawn, an Academy Award-winning makeup artist who has several Arnold Schwarzenegger movies among his credits. “Think about what a major film production employing hundreds of people could mean to the economy of Central Oregon,” Douglas said. “If we can establish Central Oregon as a filmmaking community, we can build somewhat of a recession-proof economy. At the end of the day, that is our goal.” See Film / B5

Home-stretch buying lifts merchants’ spirits

Home sales rise but fall short of forecast Sales of existing homes rose in November, but analysts said increased employment and better access to credit were needed before the housing market could achieve a sustained recovery. The National Association of Realtors said Wednesday that existing-home sales rose 5.6 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.68 million units in November, up from about 4.43 million in October. Still, the rate was nearly 28 percent below the 6.49 million of November 2009 and below the pace of 4.75 million units that economists surveyed by Bloomberg had expected. “We are underperforming, given the size of the population,” said Walter Molony, a spokesman for the Realtors association. “Homes sales this year are subpar. We should be over 5 million on a sustainable level.” The November figure, a sharp reversal of the 26 percent plunge in existing-home sales in October, reflects completed transactions for existing single-family homes, town homes, condominiums and co-ops. — From staff and wire reports

Ruth Fremson / New York Times News Service

Shoppers fill Herald Square outside of Macy’s in New York on Wednesday. The last-minute holiday surge is marking the return of the American consumer, who is shedding the recession’s thrifty ways and rediscovering the pleasure of shopping all over again.

Consumers are shedding the thriftiness of recent years, setting stage for sales that may rival prerecession levels By Stephanie Clifford New York Times News Service

The last-minute holiday surge is marking the return of the U.S. consumer, who is shedding the recession’s thrifty ways and rediscovering the pleasure of shopping. The malls are jammed, parking lots snarled and sales expected to stay strong in the few remaining days before Christmas. With new figures showing in-store sales up 5.5 percent on the final weekend before Christmas compared with last year, this holiday season is on track to be the healthiest since 2006. Separately, online shopping has been fueling growth in total sales, while spending in stores

on this Thursday alone may rival the levels reached the Friday after Thanksgiving. And Christmas Eve still beckons the procrastinators — of those with the majority of their shopping left to do, about 10 percent plan to be in stores Friday, one survey suggests. From the Pacific Northwest to New Jersey, a few consumers rushing in and out of the mall madness this week gave the sense that a healing economy meant it was fine to splurge a bit. “The air alone makes me want to shop,” said Michaya Pollard, 29, who had accompanied her children’s elementary school to Westlake Center mall in Seattle to see the Christmas decorations. See Sales / B2

6 percent

2.6%

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By Graham Bowley New York Times News Service

0 -2 -4 -6 -8 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 2008 2009 2010 Source: Department of Commerce AP

The number-crunchers on Wall Street are starting to crunch something else: the news. Math-loving traders are using powerful computers to speed-read news reports, editorials, company websites, blog posts and even Twitter messages — and then letting the machines decide what it all means for the markets. The development goes far beyond standard digital fare like most-read

and e-mailed lists. In some cases, the computers are actually parsing writers’ words, sentence structure, even the odd emoticon. A wink and a smile — ;) — for instance, just might mean things are looking up for the markets. Then, often without human intervention, the programs are interpreting that news and trading on it. Given the volatility in the markets and concern that computerized trading exaggerates the ups

$29.367 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE -$0.009

WIND POWER

Chinese subsidies illegal, U.S. says By Sewell Chan New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration accused China on Wednesday of illegally subsidizing the production of wind power equipment and called for discussions at the World Trade Organization, the first step in a trade case sought by U.S. steelworkers. It is the second time in less than four months that the administration has accused China of violating world trade rules. The move escalates the trade tensions between the United States and China over clean energy, a sector that the administration views as a technological frontier in which U.S. companies are struggling to remain competitive. Washington is challenging a special government fund in China that awards grants to makers of wind power equipment. The Americans say the fund provides subsidies that are illegal under WTO rules because the grants appear to be contingent on manufacturers using parts made in China rather than foreign-made components. “Import substitution subsidies are particularly harmful and inherently trade distorting, which is why they are expressly prohibited under WTO rules,” Ron Kirk, the U.S. trade representative, said. See Wind / B5

How rating agencies set stage for community bank failures McClatchy-Tribune News Service

In the final weekend before Christmas, sales were up

5.5% The International Council of Shopping Centers has revised its estimates for November and December upward and now expects chain store sales to rise

3.5% to 4%

Wall Street computers read the news, and trade on it

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By Kevin G. Hall and Greg Gordon

Economy grows Gross domestic product measures the value of all goods and services produced within the United States. GDP quarterly growth Seasonally adjusted at annual rates

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and downs, the notion that Wall Street is engineering news-bots might sound like an investor’s nightmare. But the development, years in the making, is part of the technological revolution that is reshaping Wall Street. In a business where information is the most valuable commodity, traders with the smartest, fastest computers can outfox and outmaneuver rivals. See Trading / B2

New York Times News Service illustration

NEW YORK — Billions of dollars in top-rated bonds backed by community banks have gone bust, debunking the defense offered by credit-rating agencies that wildly inaccurate ratings were limited to risky mortgage bonds that imploded and then triggered the U.S. financial crisis. Government regulators and lawyers across the United States are examining how credit-rating agencies came to bless as “investment grade” the now-toxic bonds made up of special securities issued by community bank holding companies. During the go-go years preceding the December 2007 start of the worst modern recession, more than $50 billion of these special securities were floated by community banks and pooled into complex instruments called collateralized debt obligations, or CDOs. From 2000 to 2008, Moody’s Investors Service rated at least 103 of them, valued at $55 billion, issued by banks, insurance companies and real estate investment trusts. Today, many of these securities are virtually worthless. Questioned by the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission on June 2 in New York, Moody’s Chief Executive Raymond McDaniel insisted that “the poor performance of ratings from the 2006-2007 period in residential mortgage-backed securities and other related securities, housing-related securities, has not at all been replicated elsewhere in the business.” Wrong. See Ratings / B5


B USI N ESS

B2 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M   BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY

SATURDAY

BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

Jan. 8

TUESDAY PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444.

THURSDAY Dec. 30 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Dec. 31 EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541617-8861.

MONDAY Jan. 3 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www. happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Jan. 4 LIVE REAL ESTATE TV SHOW: Learn about purchasing a home with an FHA 203K Renovation Loan. Hosted by Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty. Visit www.ExitRealtyBend. com and follow the show icons; free; 7 p.m.

OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Jan. 11 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 12 HOW TO START A BUSINESS: Learn the basic steps needed to open a business. Registration required; $15; 6-8 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

FRIDAY Jan. 14 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Jan. 17 LEADING AND MOTIVATING IN THE REAL WORLD: Executive education course offered by Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration suitable for professional hoteliers and restaurateurs. Early registration encouraged, class continues through Jan. 19; $1,895; OSUCascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-480-8700 or http://www.osucascades.edu/ cornellexecprogram/home.

TUESDAY Jan. 18

THURSDAY Jan. 6 HOLDING EMPLOYEES AND OTHERS ACCOUNTABLE: Learn to ensure that team members do their jobs well and take responsibility for contributing to a common goal; $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7290 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES: Central Oregon Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a nine-month series designed to give managers and team leaders the skills they need to succeed in their organizations; entire series costs $645, individual seminars are $85; 8 a.m.-noon; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7700 or http://www.cocc.edu/.

FRIDAY Jan. 7 FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: 8:309:30 a.m.; Housing Works, 405 S.W. Sixth St.; 541-323-7405. THE SOCIAL NONPROFIT: Learn about social media strategies for nonprofits. Space is limited. Registration required by Jan. 5; free; 10-11 a.m.; Alpine Internet Solutions, 790 S.W. Industrial Way, Bend; 541312-4704.

BEGINNING QUICKBOOKS PRO: Registration required. Class continues Jan. 20; $59; 6-9 p.m.; Bend Senior Center, 1600 S.E. Reed Market Road; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu. BUILD A PROFESSIONAL WEBSITE FOR YOUR BUSINESS: Learn to use the industry standard, Wordpress, to create a customized website. Registration required; $149; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

THURSDAY Jan. 20 STRATEGIC PRICING FOR HOTELS: Executive education course offered by Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration suitable for professional hoteliers and restaurateurs. Early registration encouraged, class continues through Jan. 22; $1,895; OSUCascades Campus, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-480-8700 or http://www.osucascades.edu/ cornellexecprogram/home. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Preregistration required; $35; 9 a.m.2 p.m.; Round Table Pizza, 1552 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. BEGINNING DREAMWEAVER: Learn to create a website using Dreamweaver. Class continues Jan. 27 and Feb. 3. Registration required; $89; 6-9 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7270 or http://noncredit.cocc.edu.

NEWS OF RECORD PERMITS City of Bend

Brooks Resources Corp., 2215 N.W. Clearwater Drive, $334,535 Tennbrook Financing LLC, 19129 N.W. Park Commons Drive, $195,923 Schumacher Construction Inc., 19605 S.W. Hollygrape St., $271,207 Schumacher Construction Inc., 61173 S.W. Teton Court, $186,579 Bend Research Inc., 63045 Corporate Place, $250,000

Jeremy M. Kinzer, contractor, 2858 N.W. Lakemont Drive, $348,543 Jennifer Moon, 2188 N.W. Clearwater Drive, $296,446 Bridges at Shadow Glen, 20864 S.E. Tamar Lane, $333,970 Deschutes County

Jill D. Oertley and Mark Swift, 70715 Holmes Road, Sisters, $181,177.78 Daniel C. Fitzpatrick, 56622 Sunstone Loop, Bend, $369,351.92 Bruce and Jessie Kiefer, 67255 Rabbitbrush Drive, Bend, $165,007.90

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

City’s failed pension may be sign of what’s to come By Michael Cooper and Mary Williams Walsh New York Times News Service

PRICHARD, Ala. — This struggling small city on the outskirts of Mobile was warned for years that its pension fund would run out of money by 2009 if it did nothing. Right on schedule, its fund ran dry. Then Prichard did something that pension experts say they have never seen before: It stopped sending monthly pension checks to its 150 retired workers, breaking a state law requiring it to pay its promised retirement benefits in full. Since then, Nettie Banks, 68, a retired Prichard police and fire dispatcher, has filed for bankruptcy. Alfred Arnold, a 66-year-old retired fire captain, has gone back to work as a shopping mall security guard to try to keep his house. Eddie Ragland, 59, a retired police captain, accepted help from colleagues, bake sales and collection jars after he was shot by a robber, leaving him badly wounded and unable to get to his new job as a police officer at the regional airport. Far worse was the retired fire marshal who died in June. Like many of the others, he was too young to collect Social Security.

“Prichard is the future. We’re all on the same conveyor belt. Prichard is just a little further down the road.” — Michael Aguirre, the former San Diego city attorney, who has called for San Diego to declare bankruptcy and restructure its own outsize pension obligations “When they found him, he had no electricity and no running water in his house,” said David Anders, 58, a retired district fire chief. “He was a proud enough man that he wouldn’t accept help.” The situation in Prichard is extremely unusual — the city has sought bankruptcy protection twice — but it proves that the unthinkable can, in fact, sometimes happen. And it stands as a warning to cities like Philadelphia and states like Illinois, whose pension funds are under great strain: If nothing changes, the money eventually does run out, and when that happens, misery and turmoil follow. It is not just the pensioners

who suffer when a pension fund runs dry. If a city tried to follow the law and pay its pensioners with money from its annual operating budget, it would probably have to make large tax increases, or huge service cuts, to come up with the money. Current city workers could find themselves paying into a pension plan that will not be there for their own retirements. In Prichard, some older workers have delayed retiring, since they cannot afford to give up their paychecks if no pension checks will follow. So the declining, little-known city of Prichard is now attracting the attention of bankruptcy lawyers, labor leaders, municipal credit analysts and local officials from across the country. They want to see if Prichard, like the continuing bankruptcy of Vallejo, Calif., ultimately creates a legal precedent on whether distressed cities can legally cut or reduce their pensions, and if so, how. “Prichard is the future,” said Michael Aguirre, the former San Diego city attorney, who has called for San Diego to declare bankruptcy and restructure its own outsize pension obligations. “We’re all on the same conveyor belt. Prichard is just a little further down the road.”

Trading Continued from B1 “It is an arms race,” said Roger Ehrenberg, managing partner at IA Ventures, an investment firm specializing in young companies, speaking of some of the new technologies that help traders identify events first and interpret them. Many of the robo-readers look beyond the numbers and try to analyze market sentiment, that intuitive feeling investors have about the markets. Like the latest economic figures, news and social media buzz — “unstructured data,” as it is known — can shift the mood from exuberance to despondency. Tech-savvy traders have been scraping data out of new reports, press releases and corporate websites for years. But new, linguistics-based software goes well beyond that. News agencies like Bloomberg, Dow Jones and Thomson Reuters have adopted the idea, offering services that supposedly help their Wall Street customers sift through news automatically. Some of these programs hardly seem like rocket science. Working with academics at Columbia University and the University of Notre Dame, Dow Jones compiled a dictionary of about 3,700 words that can signal changes in sentiment. Feelgood words include obvious ones like “ingenuity,” “strength” and “winner.” Feel-bad ones include “litigious,” “colludes” and “risk.” The software typically identifies the subject of a story and then examines the actual words. The programs are written to recognize the meaning of words and phrases in context, like distinguishing between “terribly,” “good” and “terribly good.”

Aggregate effects Vince Fioramonti, a portfolio manager at Alpha Equity Management, a $185 million equities fund in Hartford, Conn., uses Thomson Reuters software to measure sentiment over weeks, rather than minutes or hours, and pumps that information directly into his fund’s trading systems. “It is an aggregate effect,” Fioramonti said. “These things give you the ability to assimilate more information.” Bloomberg monitors news articles and Twitter feeds and alerts its customers if a lot of people are suddenly sending Twitter messages about, say, IBM. Lexalytics, a text analysis company in Amherst, Mass., that works with Thomson Reuters, says it has developed algorithms that make sense out of

Sales Continued from B1 After a particularly good year at the barber shop and salons that she owns, Pollard said she had spent several hours over the weekend buying extra gifts like a Coach bag for her sister. “I didn’t plan on spending more this year,” she said, but “I’m excited about their faces on Christmas Day.” Some women’s apparel items were sold out, bolstering the notion that women were buying for themselves again. A Patagonia whitefleece jacket in medium was only available at a store in tropical Honolulu, while an Anthropologie sweater coat decorated with poppies was out of stock at the company’s online store but available on eBay at a huge markup.

A fresh approach Retailers have begun to change their approach to the holiday season after two years in which they have had to mark down items as Christmas neared. Retailers now manage their inventory better across sectors like women’s apparel, for instance, and avoid the last-minute priceslashing of Christmases past. “Retailers have become much better at playing this game,” Sherif Mityas, a partner in the retail practice of the consulting firm A.T. Kearney, said in an e-mail. Still, promotions were heavy, with Lord & Taylor offering 20 percent off almost the entire store, and Kohl’s giving its Kohl’s cardholders 15 percent to 30 percent off all purchases. Many stores were running low on inventory, which was actually a good thing for the retailers, Mityas said. “Retailers have learned painful lessons around the balance of inventory, versus margin-crushing fire sales the last days before Christmas,” he said. “Getting more consumers to pay higher prices earlier in the holiday season in fear of missing out on certain items at the last minute will serve retailers well in subsequent holiday seasons.” The recession forced stores to regroup after a dismal holiday year in 2008, and one that showed just slight improvement last year.

Perking up

Michael J. Lutch / New York Times News Service

Vince Fioramonti, a portfolio manager at Alpha Equity Management in Hartford, Conn., uses Thomson Reuters software to measure market sentiment. “It is an aggregate effect,” Fioramonti said. “These things give you the ability to assimilate more information.” Twitter messages. That includes emoticons like the happy-face :) and the not-so-happy :\. Skeptics abound, but proponents insist such software will eventually catch on with traders. “This is where the news breaks,” said Jeff Catlin, chief executive of Lexalytics. “You have a leg up if you are a trader.”

High-tech advantages The computer-savvy traders known as quants are paying attention. According to Aite Group, a financial services consulting company, about 35 percent of quantitative trading firms are exploring whether to use unstructured data feeds. Two years ago, about 2 percent of those firms used them. Quants often use these programs to manage their risks by, say, automatically shutting down trading when bad news hits. But industry experts say the programs are also moving the markets. Last May, as Greece’s financial crisis deepened, Wall Street computers seized on a news story with the word “abyss” in the headline and initiated sell orders, according to

industry experts. But some warn of a growing digital divide in the markets. Well-heeled traders who can afford sophisticated technology have an edge over everyone else, these people say. Paul Tetlock, an associate professor at Columbia University who did research that was used to create the news algorithms, worries that technology has skewed the playing field. Regulators, he said, should keep a close eye on these high-speed traders. “People are trading news at very high frequency,” he said. “People worry about that.” But the experts are already talking about the next thing — programs to automatically digest broadcast and closedcaption television. Adam Honore, research director at Aite Group, said the innovations did not end there. He said some traders were using software that monitored public statements by corporate executives and administered the computer equivalent of a liedetector test. “It is the next wave of trading,” Honore said of unstructured data. “It goes hand in hand with more and more of everyday life being digitized.”

According to the International Council of Shopping Centers, which tracks sales at chain stores open at least a year, November and December sales rose 1.1 percent in 2007, then declined 5.6 percent in 2008 and rose 2.3 percent in 2009. This year, the council has already revised its estimates upward and now expects chain store sales to rise 3.5 percent to 4 percent. That would rival prerecession spending levels and be the biggest increase in holiday spending since 2006. ShopperTrak, which estimates total retail sales, said Wednesday that dollars spent this last weekend had risen 5.5 percent, to $18.83 billion, from last year, while traffic increased 3 percent. As for the online shopping, which has outpaced in-store sales this year, the marketing research company comScore indicated that online sales increased 12 percent in the first 49 days of the holiday season, to $28.36 billion, compared with the same period last year. Overall, apparel sales were strong, up 9.8 percent from Oct. 31 to Dec. 11 compared with last year, according to MasterCard Advisors SpendingPulse, which tracks all forms of payment, including cash and check. Michael McNamara, vice president for research and analysis at SpendingPulse, noted that women’s apparel was up about 4.4 percent in the early holiday shopping season. “They’re perking up even since Black Friday a little bit — it’s the most positive season we’ve seen there since 2007,” he said. “Women are starting to buy for themselves again.”


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 B3

P F   Betting on the weather Making a night out at the movies to score cash, big prizes more affordable Deals are win-win for merchants, who rely on insurance to back the gambles

By Gregory Karp Chicago Tribune

By Peter Mucha The Philadelphia Inquirer

PHILADELPHIA — About eight years ago, Roxann Dulce came oh-so-close. Another quarter-inch of snow on Christmas Day, and Anthony Jewelers in Palmyra, N.J., would have refunded the cost of purchases all of its customers made Thanksgiving weekend. This year, the Palmyra financial controller had a hunch that she’ll win — just as she predicted the Giants would beat the undefeated New England Patriots in the 2008 Super Bowl. New York did win, in an alltime crazy nail-biter. So on the Saturday after Turkey Day this year, Dulce walked down the street to Anthony Jewelers and bought a rainbow sapphire bracelet for herself, a couple of ornaments and a gift for a niece. Now she’s dreaming of a White Christmas coating her bank account to the tune of $700. Anthony’s is one of the fate-defying merchants that tempt customers every holiday season with an unusual guarantee: Customers get their money back if a certain amount of snow falls in such-and-such a timeframe, or on some special date. “White Christmas Sale. Free Hot Tub if it snows on Christmas,” a banner on a sample outside West Chester (Pa.) Spas proclaims this month. Shop until Christmas Eve at Corinne Jewelers in Toms River, N.J., and get cash back if an inch falls on New Year’s Eve. If it does, customers will collectively recoup perhaps $1 million, said Ryan Blumenthal, general manager at the

Clem Murray / Philadelphia Inquirer

Larry Granger, president of West Chester Spas, stands beside a spa adorned with a banner describing the “Free if it Snows” deal outside his store in West Chester, Pa. store that bears his grandmother’s name. Around the nation, even some car dealers get in on the action. The merchants aren’t losing sleep because the gamble’s all paid for through insurance. The insurer is the Grinch who prays for clear skies. Picking a policy is a bit of a balancing act. If the promotion’s too easy to win — one flake! — the premiums will be sky-high. If it’s too tough to win, don’t expect an avalanche of customers. “The idea is to make it believable to the public and make it affordable to the retailer,” said Patricia Sleicher, president of Global Weather Insurance Agency Inc., the Long Island, N.Y.-based insurer backing the spa and Corinne Jewelers deals. Her company covers 50 to 100

weather-based promotions a year, with end-of-year snow deals being the most popular. But other special days are targeted, too, and not just winter ones such as Valentine’s Day, President’s Day and Super Bowl Sunday. Wedding rainouts can mean ring refunds. Hot-temperature deals have been tried for July Fourth. “We’ve even done wind in Wyoming,” she said. Such promotions are small potatoes in the weather-underwriting industry, though. “Our main business is insuring concerts, movies, TV commercials for weather,” Sleicher said. Her firm’s biggest payout was about $6 million over the filming of “Cliffhanger,” starring Sylvester Stallone, when production was delayed because “they got blizzard after blizzard” in the Italian

Alps, she said. With store promotions, finetuning often shows up in the fine print. Anthony’s pays off on just an inch of snow from midnight to midnight on Dec. 25. But for a freebie hot tub, 2 inches or more must fall between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. on Dec. 25, as measured at Pottstown (Pa.) Limerick Airport. The odds might seem slim, but very similar conditions paid off last year for patrons of Geis Perry Jewelry in Atlantic, Iowa. “We went for two inches of snow in a six-hour period, and they actually got, like, eight,” Sleicher said. “I felt fantastic about it. I had the happiest customers around,” said Rich Perry, co-owner with his wife, Nedra.

A closer look at Citi’s credit card reboot By Ron Lieber New York Times News Service

It can’t be much fun to be a credit card marketer right now The bosses are desperate for new revenue after a couple of years of writing off bad loans. President Barack Obama signed legislation making it more difficult to raise interest rates and impose fees. Meanwhile, many customers are paying down high-interest debt and have sworn off the companies’ products in favor of debit cards. Oh, and they mostly hate that card companies cut many of their credit limits in a time of need and then reduced perks on some cards as if to rub salt in their wounds. So now a couple of companies want to throw you a small bone. American Express said Friday that it will soon get rid of its dreaded currency conversion fees for transactions that begin outside of the United States, although only for people who have its Platinum or Centurion (aka Black) personal and small-business cards. Two new Citigroup cards will also drop the fees. The new cards are part of an overhaul of much of Citigroup’s credit card operations. The company will discontinue a number of cards, including its PremierPass, Diamond Preferred Rewards, Simplicity Rewards, Home Rebate and Driver’s Edge Options cards. (The popular cards that earn American Airlines miles are not part of the changes.) Starting early next year, Citi will replace these cards with one of four cards: ThankYou, ThankYou Preferred, Premier and Prestige. As part of the overhaul, Citi will take away some perks that many cardholders like and add others that weren’t there before. Many new customers will be paying strikingly higher annual fees than they may have paid for Citi’s discontinued cards (although at least for the moment, current customers won’t be affected). Citi isn’t the only company making changes to its card line-

up; most other issuers have been experimenting with new fees and rules for at least a year in an attempt to test the limits of the new card legislation and stop the bleeding in their card businesses.

Points calculus Citi is a bit late to the game here. Then again, some of its new effort is built on a change it made in 2004. That was when Citi introduced PremierPass cards. Users earned one point in Citi’s proprietary ThankYou program for every dollar they spent. Then, they redeemed those points for merchandise or free plane tickets on multiple airlines. The twist was this: When you bought a plane ticket for yourself or others with the cards, you also earned separate “flight” points for every mile that you or they flew. Those points could add up quickly. So Citi wouldn’t let people redeem the flight points until they had an equal number of “purchase points,” which were all the ThankYou points people earned for every card purchase. Because many people racked up flight points faster than purchase points, the not-yet-redeemable flight points turned into an anchor that kept many cardholders paying annual fees year after year. For some affluent customers, this was such a bonanza that Citi had to repeatedly tweak the redemption rules for plane tickets in its ThankYou program. These changes served to keep the points from being so valuable that the program would become unsustainable. Today, you get a penny per point to spend on airline tickets when you redeem a ThankYou point. And herein lies the challenge in analyzing a card like this, one that most consumers don’t think through. When card companies advertise double points or flight points or triple miles, it is utterly meaningless until you know exactly what those points or miles

will buy. This can be confusing. Really confusing. In fact, it’s confusing for Citi’s own employees, who included some language in the terms and conditions on its new cards that strongly suggested that the company was changing the earning rules for these flight points. In fact, the rules will remain the same. Some of the other point-earning rules are changing, though. Many Citi customers now earn at least two points for every dollar they spend at gas stations and grocery and drug stores. With the new cards, that will fall to 1.2 points per dollar spent for the Premier card and 1.3 points for the Prestige one. That said, customers can earn an unlimited number of points each year, and in most instances they won’t expire. Points on discontinued Citi cards are supposed to transfer to the new ones the company will send out in the first half of 2011. Citi says it has no plans to further restrict redemptions. This is true until it isn’t, and as with any loyalty program, the rules can and will change.

New perks On the Premier and Prestige cards, Citi is also throwing in some new perks. One that appears to be new to the card industry is a 15 percent discount on domestic plane tickets. You have to book through a Citi partner travel agent, and the terms and conditions for this benefit are rife with anxiety-producing bits about the partner determining the airline and routing, limited availability, airline participation (or lack thereof) and the possibility of earning no airline miles. I tested the program for a New York-to-Chicago trip in February 2011 and found that the discount was real and that most airlines on the route participated. But I suspect that this will be much harder to use around Easter and

Thanksgiving. As for the new annual fees, they are aggressive. Two of the new cards have none, but the perksladen Premier card has a $125 annual fee while the Prestige card requires $500. Current PremierPass and other Citi customers who are paying lower annual fees will continue paying the existing fees for now. Despite my best efforts, I could not extract a promise from Terry O’Neil, Citi Cards executive vice president, that he would never raise them. “There is no plan in place to increase annual fees for those customers,” was the best he would offer. The company has also added annual fees for any and all supplemental cards, say for your spouse and children. New customers will pay $50 for each extra Premier card every year; Prestige cardholders will pay $175 for each authorized user. Why? The card and its benefits are worth it, O’Neil said. (Current card holders will not have to pay annual fees for their authorized users’ cards for now.) Maybe they are and maybe they aren’t. Never has the phrase “your mileage may vary” been more appropriate than it is with Citi’s credit card reboot. So much depends on what, where and how you spend and which rules Citi changes in the future (and when). The experts figure that consumers will be skeptical. “I just don’t think that people will have a lot of confidence,” said Dennis Lefebvre, who moderates or co-moderates several credit card forums on FlyerTalk.com, where many of the savviest travelers and credit card users hang out and swap tips. “They have tinkered with the way you earn and redeem ThankYou points so many times over the last half dozen years that I think it’s very difficult for a person to make a decision to accumulate those points towards a spectacular reward that takes years to save for.”

Americans can watch movies at home in high definition on large screens and with surround sound. And they have a growing number of sources for movies, including on-demand from their subscription TV service and various online services. Even so, Americans still love going to a movie theater. Frugal moviegoers, however, don’t always pay full price. Movie ticket prices this year are averaging $7.85, a nearly 5 percent increase over 2009, according to Hollywood.com. That’s due in part to theaters charging more for 3D movies. Still, compared with ticket prices to attend a professional sporting event, live theater or popular music concerts, going to the movies is cheap entertainment. But you can make it cheaper. Besides the obvious advice of going to less-expensive matinee showtimes and skipping outrageously expensive popcorn, candy and soft drinks, here are a few tips to spend less when going to the movie theater. • Check theater websites. You can often find discounts and coupons for tickets or concessions, and special programs for kids. AMC Theatres, for example, recently offered a $10 gift card if you see five new movies from a list of 17 before Jan. 6. Similarly, some theaters offer discounts through such social media as Twitter and Facebook. • Loyalty programs at theaters. Avid moviegoers might benefit from joining a loyalty program, where going frequently earns free tickets and concessions. Examples are the Regal Crown Club and AMC MovieWatcher Rewards. • Entertainment Books. The little, fat coupon books, sometimes sold as fundraisers, usually have coupons for movie theaters. See entertainment.com. It’s also worth thumbing through local newspapers and tourism guides. And if you’re a fan of daily deal sites, such as Groupon.com and Kgbdeals.com, keep an eye out for movie ticket deals. • 3-D scrutiny. Movies in 3D are a hot trend, but they cost more and are not always worth it, said Stacie Hougland, content editor at Movies.com. For example, “Toy Story 3” and “Tangled” worked perfectly well in the traditional two-dimensional format, while “Clash of the Titans” was actually made worse by its clunky, inferior 3-D conversion, according to Movies.com critics Jen Yamato and Dave White. “Before you pony up for

the extra charge, do some reading to find out if 3-D is necessarily a worthwhile addition for the movie,” Hougland said. • Warehouse clubs. If you belong to a warehouse club, check for discount movie theater tickets. Costco, for example, offers discounts on tickets to theaters run by AMC, Regal Entertainment and Cinemark Theatres. • Card-carrying discounts. Identification cards for senior citizens, students and military personnel score you a discount at some theaters. Even your credit card might earn you a discount. A recent Visa Signature promotion offered “buy one, get one free” movie tickets on movie site Fandango.com. • Membership and associations. Some AAA locations offer discount movie tickets, as do local companies and nonprofit organizations, churches and schools and condo and homeowners associations. • Get group discounts. If you’re going to the movies as a group, call ahead to the theater and book a party. You can get deals on tickets, popcorn and soft drinks, Hougland said. • Bulk-buying websites. If you don’t mind jumping through hoops for discounts, try a site like the new MovieBuzzed.com, where you can pay about half price for tickets. The site offers “certificates” for bulk-buying tickets: $25 worth of movie tickets for $12, for example. Certificates can be used to get “codes,” which are used to buy and print movie tickets at Fandango.com. There are many significant restrictions. First, certificates expire after five months. Second, when you redeem your certificates, it takes 10 to 12 days to get your Fandango codes by e-mail. So, these discount tickets are only useful if you’re planning to visit the theater in about two weeks, not if you want tickets for tonight. Third, after you receive your Fandango codes, you’ll have 14 days to use them before those codes expire. So, your window for going to the movies is roughly between 10 and 24 days after you buy certificates at MovieBuzzed.com. Fourth, you must use your entire certificate amount in that period. Moreover, when you initially buy your certificates, there’s a processing fee of $5.50 to $6.75 on a single order, depending on which ticket package you order. So, the smallest package really costs $17.50 for $25 worth of tickets, a 30 percent discount. Finally, make sure Fandango. com offers tickets to theaters you want to go to.

HOLIDAY DEADLINES Wishes you a Safe and Merry Christmas The Bulletin will be closed on Friday, Christmas Eve and Saturday, Christmas Day

Retail & Classified Display Advertising Deadlines PUBLICATION ............................................. DEADLINE Friday 12/24 ..................................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Go! Magazine 12/24 .....................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Saturday 12/25 .............................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Sunday 12/26 ..............................................Tuesday 12/21 4 p.m. Monday 12/27 ......................................... Wednesday 12/22 Noon At Home 12/28........................................ Wednesday 12/22 Noon Scene 1/1 .................................................. Thursday 12/23 8 a.m. Tuesday 12/28 ............................................ Thursday 12/23 Noon

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B USI N ESS

B4 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Consolidated stock listings Nm

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A-B-C-D A-Power AAR ABB Ltd ABM ACE Ltd AES Corp AFLAC AGCO AGIC Cv AGIC Cv2 AGL Res AK Steel AMAG Ph AMB Pr AMN Hlth AMR AOL ARYxTh h ASML Hld AT&T Inc ATP O&G AU Optron AVI Bio AXT Inc Aarons s Aastrom rs AbtLab AberFitc AbdAsPac Abiomed AbitibiB n Abraxas AcaciaTc AcadiaPh h AcadiaRlt Accenture AccoBrds Accuride n Achillion AcmePkt AcordaTh ActivePwr ActivsBliz Actuant Actuate Acuity AcuraPh ADAM AdeonaPh AdobeSy Adtran AdvAuto AdvATech AdvBattery AdvEnId AMD AdvSemi AdvOil&Gs Advntrx rs AecomTch AegeanMP Aegon AerCap Aeropostl s AEterna g Aetna AffilMgrs Affymax Affymetrix AgFeed Agilent Agnico g Agrium g AirProd AirMedia Aircastle Airgas AirTran Aixtron AkamaiT AkeenaS h Akorn AlskAir AlaskCom Albemarle AlbertoC n AlcatelLuc Alcoa Alcon Alere AlexBld AlexREE AlexcoR g Alexion Alexza AlignTech AlimeraS n Alkerm AllgEngy AllegTch Allergan AlliData AlliHlthC AlliancOne AlliBInco AlliBern AlliantEgy AlliantTch AldIrish AlldNevG AllisChE AllosThera AllotComm AllscriptH Allstate AlmadnM g AlnylamP AlphaNRs Alphatec AlpGPPrp AlpTotDiv AlpAlerMLP AlteraCp lf AlterraCap AltraHldgs Altria AlumChina AmBev Amarin Amazon Amdocs Amedisys Ameren Amerigrp AMovilL AmApparel AmAxle AmCampus ACapAgy AmCapLtd AEagleOut AEP AEqInvLf AmExp AFnclGrp AGreet AmIntlGrp AmerMed AmOriBio AmSupr AmTower AmWtrWks Ameriprise AmeriBrgn Ametek s Amgen AmkorT lf Amphenol Amylin AnacorPh n Anadarko Anadigc AnadysPh AnalogDev Ancestry Angiotc gh AnglogldA ABInBev AnnTaylr Annaly Anooraq g Ansys AntaresP Antigenic h Anworth Aon Corp A123 Sys Apache AptInv ApogeeE ApolloGrp ApolloInv Apple Inc ApldIndlT ApldMatl AMCC ApldSig Approach Apricus rs AquaAm Arbitron ArcadiaRs ArcelorMit ArchCap ArchCoal ArchDan ArenaPhm AresCap AriadP Ariba Inc ArkBest ArmHld ArmourRsd ArrayBio Arris ArrowEl ArrwhRsh h ArtTech ArubaNet ArvMerit AshfordHT Ashland AsiaInfoL AspenIns AspenTech AsscdBanc AsdEstat Assurant AssuredG AstoriaF AstraZen Astrotech athenahlth Atheros AtlasEngy Atmel ATMOS AtwoodOcn AudCodes

5.12 -.14 27.82 -.49 0.48 22.24 +.29 0.56 26.70 +.17 1.30 62.14 +.34 12.36 +.24 1.20 57.23 +.63 50.62 +.29 1.08 10.15 +.14 1.02 9.26 +.13 1.76 36.19 +.27 0.20 16.69 +.05 18.09 +.19 1.12 31.56 +.01 6.37 +.06 7.95 -.10 24.58 +.59 .20 -.01 0.27 38.31 +.33 1.72 29.13 +.06 16.15 +.53 10.23 -.01 2.04 -.03 8.93 +.20 0.05 19.97 -.24 2.30 -.02 1.76 47.84 -.16 0.70 56.97 -1.17 0.42 6.68 +.01 9.48 +.06 23.75 -.05 4.14 -.10 25.51 -.68 1.10 +.18 0.72 18.36 -.07 0.90 48.64 -.09 8.60 -.07 15.40 3.62 +.34 54.55 -1.80 25.85 -.07 2.55 -.05 0.15 12.54 +.31 0.04 27.35 -.19 5.92 +.21 0.52 59.53 -.21 3.26 -.49 7.32 +.21 .97 +.03 30.65 -.28 0.36 35.86 +.19 0.24 66.56 -.17 3.99 +.05 3.92 +.03 14.26 +.36 8.11 -.03 0.06 5.49 -.10 6.65 +.18 2.92 -.07 28.17 +.09 0.04 10.04 +.92 6.08 +.03 13.88 +.11 24.39 -.55 1.78 -.04 0.04 30.73 +.54 101.14 -.72 6.75 +.17 5.04 +.04 2.46 +.04 41.06 +.23 0.64 75.17 -1.20 0.11 84.09 -.20 1.96 90.57 +.04 6.38 -.04 0.40 10.67 +.08 1.00 61.44 -1.78 7.38 -.04 0.18 33.11 -.20 48.79 -1.60 .52 +.02 6.19 +.06 58.30 -.76 0.86 11.48 +.05 0.56 56.16 -.57 0.34 36.94 +.04 2.88 -.06 0.12 15.14 +.25 3.95 162.05 -.08 36.03 +.23 1.26 39.90 +.45 1.80 71.97 +1.28 7.16 -.12 81.45 -.26 1.25 +.04 20.37 +.09 11.01 +.02 12.33 -.24 0.60 24.09 +.17 0.72 58.46 -.51 0.20 70.92 +1.03 71.23 -.11 4.05 +.29 4.23 +.04 0.48 7.84 -.03 1.51 23.10 +.60 1.58 37.24 +.48 0.80 73.83 -.08 1.09 -.06 25.86 -1.28 6.34 +.10 4.53 +.04 11.00 -.43 19.37 -.11 0.80 31.97 +.10 4.80 -.08 9.69 -.26 55.59 +.49 2.52 -.03 0.40 7.18 +.10 0.66 5.82 0.25 15.86 +.08 0.24 36.02 +.21 0.48 21.02 +.25 20.92 +.23 1.52 25.26 +.01 23.01 +.09 4.95 151.96 -.94 7.87 +.12 184.76 +.01 26.91 +.23 32.55 -.32 1.54 28.30 +.17 45.70 -.58 1.29 56.86 1.67 +.02 12.85 -.42 1.35 31.10 +.05 5.60 29.79 -.16 8.09 +.10 0.44 14.46 -.31 1.84 35.96 +.16 0.10 12.92 -.03 0.72 42.81 -.42 0.65 32.52 +.05 0.56 22.84 +.84 55.76 +.58 19.35 +.02 2.26 -.03 28.57 -.84 50.79 +.07 0.88 25.20 -.04 0.72 57.96 +.35 0.40 34.14 +.40 0.24 39.30 -.60 56.95 -.44 7.41 -.07 0.06 53.00 +.24 15.21 +.13 5.01 +.01 0.36 67.75 -.36 7.18 -.07 1.10 +.07 0.88 37.58 -.40 30.00 -.16 .22 -.00 0.18 47.57 -.31 0.49 57.48 -.15 27.30 +.20 2.65 18.32 +.02 1.42 53.25 +.31 1.70 +.01 1.02 -.01 0.88 7.18 0.60 45.95 +.22 9.71 +.27 0.60 118.22 +.06 0.40 25.40 +.06 0.33 13.60 +.16 38.96 +.44 1.12 11.31 +.02 325.16 +.96 0.68 32.63 +.19 0.28 14.00 +.09 10.60 -.26 0.50 37.80 +.02 23.46 -.16 3.84 +.41 0.62 22.29 +.04 0.40 42.25 +.21 .31 +.02 0.75 37.89 -.27 88.86 +.45 0.40 34.41 -.46 0.60 30.59 +.44 1.80 -.24 1.40 16.73 -.07 5.21 +.01 23.72 -.24 0.12 27.27 +.23 0.12 20.43 +.65 1.44 7.64 -.05 3.15 -.02 11.06 -.02 34.09 -.01 1.10 +.10 5.98 22.15 -.43 21.56 +.08 9.48 -.13 0.60 53.16 +.02 17.06 +.26 0.60 29.05 +.13 12.85 -.33 0.04 15.35 +.44 0.68 14.76 -.17 0.64 38.50 +.38 0.18 17.89 -.73 0.52 14.15 +.84 2.41 45.80 -.12 1.08 -.03 41.59 +.54 35.94 +.09 43.40 -.05 12.20 +.01 1.36 31.35 +.13 37.50 +.61 6.19 -.24

Nm Augusta g Aurizon g AustAcq n AutoNatn Autodesk Autoliv AutoData Auxilium AvagoTch AvalRare n AvalonBay AvanirPhm AveryD AviatNetw AvisBudg Avnet Avon Axcelis AXIS Cap B&G Foods BB&T Cp BCE g BE Aero BGC Ptrs BHP BillLt BHPBil plc BJs Whls BMC Sft BP PLC BPZ Res BRE BRFBrasil s BSD Med BabckW n Baidu s BakrHu Baldor BallCp BallardPw BallyTech BalticTr n BanColum BcBilVArg BcoBrades BcoSantand BcoSBrasil BcpSouth BkofAm BkAm pfH BkAm wtA BkAm wtB BkAML pfQ BkHawaii BkIrelnd BkMont g BkNYMel BkNova g BankAtl A Banks.com BannerCp BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BarcBk prD BiPNG Barclay Bar iPVix rs Bard BarnesNob Barnes BarrickG BasicEnSv Baxter BeaconPw BeacnRfg BeazerHm BebeStrs BeckCoult BectDck BedBath Belo Bemis Berkley BerkH B s BerkHBcp BerryPet BestBuy BigLots BBarrett BioRef s BioanlySys Biodel BioFuelEn BiogenIdc BioMarin BioMedR BlkRKelso BlackRock BlkBldA n BlkCrAll4 BlkDebtStr BlkEnDiv BlkGlbOp BlkrkHigh BlkIntlG&I BlkMuniyQ3 BlkMuniyld Blackstone BlockHR BlueCoat Boeing Boise Inc BonaFilm n BoozAllen n Borders BorgWarn BostPrv BostProp BostonSci BoydGm Brandyw BrasilTele BreitBurn BrigExp Brightpnt Brigus grs Brinker BrMySq Broadcom BroadrdgF BroadSft n Broadwind BrcdeCm BroncoDrl Brookdale BrkfldAs g BrkfInfra BrkfldPrp BrklneB BrwnBrn BrownShoe BrukerCp Brunswick Bsquare BuckTch Buckle Bucyrus Buenavent BungeLt CA Inc CAI Intl CB REllis CBL Asc CBOE n CBS B CEVA Inc CF Inds CH Robins CIGNA CIT Grp CLECO CME Grp CMS Eng CNA Fn CNO Fincl CNinsure CPI CRH CSX CVB Fncl CVR Engy CVS Care CablvsnNY Cabot CabotO&G CadencePh Cadence CalDive CalaCvHi CalaStrTR Calgon Calix n CallGolf CallonP h Calpine CAMAC En CamdnP Cameco g CameltInf n Cameron CampSp CampCC n CdnNRy g CdnNRs gs CdnSolar CanoPet Canon CapOne CapitlSrce CapitolBcp CapFdF rs CapsteadM CapsThera CpstnTrb h Cardero g Cardica CardnlHlth Cardiom g CardioNet CardiumTh CareFusion CareerEd CarMax Carnival CarpTech Carrizo Carters Caterpillar CathayGen CaviumNet CelSci Celanese CeleraGrp Celestic g Celgene CellTher rsh Cemex Cemig pf CenovusE Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil

D 3.80 -.06 6.97 -.31 9.50 -.05 28.00 +.36 39.62 -.03 1.60 80.95 -.27 1.44 46.91 +.06 22.00 -.10 0.07 28.14 +.26 4.47 -.33 3.57 111.05 -.15 4.20 -.02 0.80 42.47 +.26 5.24 +.08 14.98 -.09 32.56 -.18 0.88 29.11 +.10 3.60 -.08 0.92 36.14 +.54 0.68 13.65 -.16 0.60 26.49 +.31 1.97 35.43 +.87 37.11 +.03 0.48 8.51 -.09 1.74 91.83 +.85 1.74 80.35 +.72 45.20 -.03 47.80 -.41 43.61 +.07 4.45 1.50 42.86 -.05 0.10 16.35 -.01 4.79 +.39 25.27 +.13 100.50 -.75 0.60 56.76 +.04 0.68 63.17 -.12 0.40 69.65 +.36 1.54 +.04 42.01 -.10 0.32 10.65 -.13 1.34 60.37 +.86 0.57 10.36 -.03 0.82 19.82 +.49 0.80 10.79 -.07 0.33 13.20 +.18 0.88 16.11 +1.53 0.04 13.38 +.40 2.05 25.25 +.05 7.36 +.09 2.75 +.07 2.16 25.37 -.04 1.80 47.70 +.44 1.04 2.53 -.07 2.80 57.03 +.23 0.36 30.52 +.73 1.96 55.88 +.68 1.29 +.24 .30 +.02 0.04 2.05 +.25 47.99 +.27 25.38 +.24 2.03 25.15 -.18 7.67 +.12 0.28 16.61 -.06 36.62 -.20 0.72 93.30 -.24 1.00 14.10 -.04 0.32 21.03 +.02 0.48 51.22 -.46 16.91 -.15 1.24 50.64 +.50 .21 -.05 18.00 -.10 5.48 +.06 0.10 6.01 0.76 74.66 -.23 1.64 84.38 +.57 47.67 +.12 7.22 +.01 0.92 33.23 +.05 0.28 27.47 +.13 80.14 -.35 0.64 21.00 -.28 0.30 43.90 -.63 0.60 33.52 +.06 29.91 +.50 39.86 -.34 22.39 +.37 2.05 -.53 1.89 +.09 1.66 -.33 67.70 -.52 28.25 +.03 0.68 18.46 +.23 1.28 11.48 +.09 4.00 190.96 -1.55 1.42 17.34 +.11 0.83 11.95 +.07 0.32 3.80 -.02 0.98 8.75 +.07 2.28 18.23 +.18 0.17 2.07 +.01 1.36 10.05 0.86 12.06 +.03 0.99 12.83 +.10 0.40 14.30 +.22 0.60 12.90 +.06 30.27 +.20 1.68 64.61 +.42 0.40 7.93 +.04 5.92 -.11 19.40 +.09 1.19 +.02 72.28 -.28 0.04 7.02 +.42 2.00 85.56 +.82 7.71 -.14 9.89 +.02 0.60 11.32 +.43 21.11 +.21 1.56 20.13 +.69 27.38 -.32 9.09 +.07 1.88 -.02 0.56 21.27 +.07 1.32 26.34 -.02 0.32 43.92 -.18 0.60 21.40 +.05 26.27 -.13 1.99 5.44 -.05 6.73 -.02 21.44 +.06 0.52 32.49 +.15 1.10 20.86 -.44 0.56 17.45 +.34 0.34 11.19 +.24 0.32 24.20 +.10 0.28 14.77 -.25 17.06 -.09 0.05 18.91 -.37 8.35 +.27 0.16 22.32 -.50 0.80 37.61 -.75 0.10 89.40 -.05 0.46 47.96 -.58 0.92 63.75 +1.51 0.16 24.65 -.08 18.87 +.63 21.28 -.03 0.80 17.83 +.17 0.40 22.10 -.10 0.20 19.59 +.32 20.59 -.49 0.40 128.83 -.35 1.16 79.91 -.12 0.04 36.65 -.35 45.39 +.45 1.00 30.92 -.02 4.60 327.00 +.92 0.84 19.14 -.01 27.27 +.08 6.99 +.12 0.26 16.49 +.04 1.00 20.84 -1.65 0.83 20.58 -.13 1.04 63.98 -.01 0.34 9.03 +.44 14.91 +.24 0.35 34.95 +.47 0.50 34.24 -.39 0.72 38.53 -.19 0.12 36.76 -.22 7.50 +.08 8.42 +.04 5.84 +.02 1.02 12.41 +.02 0.63 9.20 +.06 15.48 +.27 16.86 +.54 0.04 8.26 -.15 5.83 -.22 13.71 +.13 2.07 -.57 1.80 52.73 +.72 0.28 39.64 +.16 24.45 +1.05 50.63 -.15 1.16 34.33 -.23 0.64 13.30 +.23 1.08 66.40 -.31 0.30 43.79 +.65 12.83 -.01 .29 -.01 50.81 +.55 0.20 42.54 +.36 0.04 6.98 +.03 .44 -.01 11.65 -.03 1.51 12.86 +.19 .48 -.00 .96 -.06 1.68 -.04 4.10 0.78 39.11 +.41 5.85 -.15 4.96 -.01 .47 +.02 25.17 -.04 20.26 +.40 32.30 -.87 0.40 46.59 +1.41 0.72 41.90 +.53 32.91 +.51 30.49 -1.01 1.76 94.57 -.06 0.04 16.33 +.11 37.64 -.80 .85 +.01 0.20 40.79 -.36 6.31 -.01 9.75 -.01 59.45 +.34 .37 -.00 0.43 10.73 -.14 1.19 16.35 -.29 0.80 32.42 +.18 26.08 +.01 0.78 15.88 1.56 13.19 -.14

Nm CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CenPacF CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid CeragonN Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh CharterCm ChkPoint Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaBiot ChiCbl rsh ChinaCEd ChinaDigtl ChinaEd ChinaGreen ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChinaMda ChinaMed ChiMYWd n ChinaMble ChinaNGas ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaUni ChiValve ChinaYuch ChinaNet Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityNC ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire ClickSft CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn CocaCE CocaCl Codexis n Coeur CogentC CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStInfra CohStQIR CohStRE Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColBnkg ColumLabs ColSprtw Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyBkSy CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comverge Con-Way ConAgra ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopanoEn Copart Corcept CoreLogic CoreSite n CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd Costamre n Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien Crane CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CrimsnExp Crocs Crossh g rs CrwnCstle CrownHold Cryolife Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubicEngy CubistPh CullenFr CumbldPh Cummins Curis CurEuro CurJpn CurtisWrt Cyclacel CyprsBio h CypSemi CypSharp CytRx Cytokinet Cytomed Cytori DCT Indl DHT Hldgs DNP Selct DPL DR Horton DST Sys DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB AgriDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Diageo DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards Dionex DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrSCBear rs DREBear rs

D 23.40 -.06 20.15 +.22 0.01 19.87 -.12 1.53 +.10 15.93 -.08 2.90 46.46 -.34 5.79 64.46 -.28 23.46 +.21 12.80 +.20 95.62 -.38 2.49 +.01 35.60 +.42 3.59 -.06 38.50 +.28 45.90 +.12 31.53 -.58 7.48 +.03 15.83 +.21 5.47 -.21 0.30 25.41 +.03 2.88 89.92 +.69 32.86 -.34 0.16 11.94 -.11 49.15 -.83 0.69 4.18 -.07 13.84 -.16 1.92 +.07 14.23 -.58 .49 -.02 7.29 +.20 2.00 7.25 -.26 2.34 -.01 9.47 +.34 7.52 -.17 1.54 61.78 +.20 21.89 +.87 15.89 -.04 11.64 -.10 10.57 -.08 1.85 49.78 -.27 5.18 +.03 12.54 +.39 5.49 -.02 1.58 -.01 5.04 -.01 4.23 -.12 0.23 14.91 -.07 10.36 -.74 0.25 31.69 +.57 4.32 +.76 231.78 -2.58 13.83 -.26 0.24 5.75 +.05 1.48 60.23 +.99 1.27 24.75 0.68 70.66 +1.14 4.28 +.04 20.81 -.67 0.32 89.85 +.34 2.38 +.03 1.60 32.22 +.34 0.84 17.83 +.10 0.49 28.30 -.90 16.26 +.04 19.56 +.03 2.13 26.88 +.13 4.73 -.01 .64 +.01 68.45 -1.30 0.40 62.31 +.50 2.02 -.12 14.54 +.03 1.40 21.47 +.39 5.19 +.09 8.04 +.14 0.56 78.63 -1.35 2.20 63.71 +.40 21.49 +.07 0.60 56.21 -1.82 12.19 -.01 0.48 25.00 -.03 1.76 65.59 +.10 10.76 +.13 26.15 -.91 13.49 +.49 72.82 -.03 8.53 +.05 0.96 16.28 +.20 0.72 8.60 +.20 1.20 14.09 +.35 58.46 -1.97 2.90 +.03 2.12 80.92 +1.02 20.40 -.37 0.60 18.02 +.03 0.04 21.58 +.65 2.14 -.03 0.80 61.89 +.53 0.38 22.20 -.05 0.38 20.83 -.08 0.40 42.73 +.04 0.94 39.72 +.12 0.48 16.86 -.68 2.00 25.33 +.55 31.23 0.96 28.58 +.80 37.13 +.20 29.25 -.69 0.36 40.75 -1.03 27.60 -.11 30.48 +.14 0.80 48.87 +.61 11.83 +.10 24.17 +.41 6.75 -.15 0.40 36.42 +.46 0.92 22.49 +.09 88.08 -.35 53.59 -.24 1.61 -.02 2.20 67.03 +.40 0.40 46.16 +.56 2.38 49.56 +.07 31.88 +.73 21.98 0.96 30.75 +1.13 59.08 +.22 13.36 +.08 .34 +.00 0.06 56.93 -.32 1.08 59.34 +.59 0.42 23.59 +.05 2.30 31.70 +.40 37.38 +.06 3.90 -.29 18.66 +.32 0.13 13.78 +.18 4.63 +.13 0.56 47.04 -.06 0.20 19.43 +.19 1.65 34.97 +.92 24.99 -.05 13.21 +.18 13.52 +.15 0.82 72.27 -.05 8.79 +.28 0.17 8.00 +.09 52.04 -.02 1.50 17.34 +.18 26.80 +.11 0.80 46.26 +.88 0.92 40.81 +.56 1.85 40.22 +.47 0.32 2.89 -.01 66.82 +.47 4.04 -.02 18.69 -.67 2.04 +.29 42.61 -.27 33.85 +.08 5.33 -.06 .30 -.00 42.21 +1.25 .95 +.09 21.74 -.03 1.80 62.01 +.90 6.15 -.75 1.05 111.25 +.06 1.92 -.08 0.01 130.47 +.03 118.33 +.25 0.32 33.56 +.12 1.53 -.08 6.46 18.05 -.04 2.40 12.95 -.06 1.03 -.02 2.08 -.05 .47 -.01 5.41 -.48 0.28 5.44 +.06 0.40 4.77 +.02 0.78 9.25 -.12 1.33 26.15 +.22 0.15 12.28 +.37 0.60 45.19 +1.10 2.24 45.39 +.42 17.42 -.23 0.08 47.13 -.24 1.28 47.20 -.34 13.59 +.17 70.05 +.71 0.24 48.10 +.70 8.34 +.15 84.31 -2.71 1.40 83.95 -.51 .30 +.00 0.36 18.76 +.02 10.11 -.70 13.88 +.04 12.43 -.22 .79 1.00 22.85 +.21 19.36 -.09 37.38 -.40 3.29 -.04 3.63 +.08 0.20 34.79 +.16 5.82 -.02 0.93 51.95 -.10 13.61 +.34 8.45 +.03 0.08 13.81 +.11 0.64 76.02 +1.62 2.38 74.66 +.21 0.50 64.91 +.73 0.03 11.62 +.07 12.94 +.05 13.56 -.23 37.50 -.09 1.08 32.33 +.35 2.12 49.54 +.60 34.61 +.44 0.16 38.14 -.40 118.11 -.22 39.66 +.30 6.26 45.68 -.14 5.68 38.80 +.47 15.30 +.01 0.20 18.92 -.39

Nm

D

DrxEBear rs DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxDMBear DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt DrySM Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty DuoyGWat DurectCp DynMatl Dynavax DynaVox n Dynegy rs DynexCap

7.35 3.41 4.77 8.06 5.06 0.08

0.40 0.24

1.83 1.00 1.04 0.40 1.10 0.60 1.00

0.52 0.57

1.64 0.48 0.98 0.68 0.16

1.08

Nm 23.58 -.23 21.71 -.23 9.47 -.33 27.84 +.89 45.37 +.87 54.40 +1.05 8.45 -.05 74.20 -.11 8.79 -.08 71.40 +.63 56.18 +.51 18.20 -.03 42.78 +.07 37.01 -.10 .20 -.00 19.25 +.19 37.95 +.62 37.31 +1.95 66.39 -.40 13.10 +.15 31.09 -.21 56.29 +.05 42.92 -.04 15.99 -.10 78.43 +.58 17.51 +.28 1.26 -.03 16.65 +.30 58.96 +1.52 34.37 +.29 36.31 -.52 8.63 -.20 29.61 +.60 26.27 -.10 43.22 +.37 4.48 +.01 7.48 +.17 78.99 +.16 2.23 +.03 5.93 -.05 49.80 -.17 20.92 17.76 -.01 12.19 +.29 12.21 +.07 3.60 23.25 -.40 3.06 4.73 -.01 5.89 +.04 10.79 +.12

E-F-G-H ECDang n 24.76 +1.05 E-House 0.25 14.83 +.41 ETrade rs 16.03 eBay 28.57 -.08 EDAP TMS 5.90 -.22 eHealth 14.07 -.16 EMC Cp 22.89 -.04 EMCOR 29.83 +.15 ENI 2.51 43.63 +.10 EOG Res 0.62 92.20 +.55 EQT Corp 0.88 44.58 -.40 eResrch 7.72 +.11 EagleBulk 4.92 -.05 EaglRkEn 0.10 8.51 +.17 ErthLink 0.64 8.56 EstWstBcp 0.04 19.94 +.62 EastChm 1.88 82.10 +.20 EKodak 5.92 +.25 Eaton 2.32 102.18 +.02 EatnVan 0.72 31.31 -.17 EV EEq2 1.11 12.16 +.15 EV LtdDur 1.39 15.80 +.04 EVMuniBd 0.92 11.26 +.08 EVRiskMgd 1.28 13.11 EV TxAd 1.29 16.38 +.02 EV TxDiver 1.16 11.05 +.15 EVTxMGlo 1.14 10.24 +.15 EVTxGBW 1.56 12.04 +.01 EVTxBWOp 1.60 12.92 +.19 Ebix Inc s 24.05 +.51 Ecolab 0.70 50.26 +.02 EdisonInt 1.28 38.67 -.17 EducMgmt 15.37 +.98 EducRlty 0.20 7.54 -.03 EdwLfSci s 81.91 -.95 8x8 Inc 2.25 ElPasoCp 0.04 13.60 -.01 ElPasoEl 28.03 -.04 ElPasoPpl 1.64 32.99 +.34 Elan 5.92 -.02 EldorGld g 0.05 17.98 -.25 ElectArts 15.98 +.05 Embraer 0.64 29.27 -.03 Emcore 1.23 -.36 EMS 64.48 +.35 EmersonEl 1.38 58.02 -.25 EmmisCm .79 +.07 EmpireRst 1.05 -.02 Emulex 11.89 +.07 EnbrEPtrs 4.11 61.26 +.58 EnCana g 0.80 28.87 +.19 EndvSilv g 6.75 -.29 EndoPhrm 35.16 +.02 Endologix 7.44 +.23 EndurSpec 1.00 46.48 +.15 Ener1 4.15 +.03 EnerNOC 24.07 -.11 Energen 0.52 48.09 +.82 EngyConv 4.84 +.04 EngyPtrs 14.08 -.03 EngyTEq 2.16 38.06 +.50 EngyTsfr 3.58 49.66 +.51 EgyXXI rs 28.16 -.09 EnergySol 5.58 +.10 Enerpls g 2.16 30.95 +.53 Enersis 0.61 23.53 -.23 ENSCO 1.40 52.53 +.26 Entegris 7.47 -.23 Entergy 3.32 71.57 +1.06 EnteroM rs 3.00 +.08 EntPrPt 2.33 41.14 +.44 EnterPT 2.60 46.25 EntreeGold 3.13 -.08 EntropCom 11.73 -.20 EnzonPhar 12.50 +.29 EpiCpt rsh .82 Equifax 0.64 35.56 -.26 Equinix 80.65 -.78 EqLfPrp 1.20 55.77 +.20 EqtyOne 0.88 17.75 +.29 EqtyRsd 1.47 51.48 +.40 EricsnTel 0.28 11.41 -.18 EssexPT 4.13 114.04 +1.01 EsteeLdr 0.75 79.81 -.27 EtfSilver 29.12 -.08 Eurand 11.80 EvergE rs .54 -.01 EvrgrSlr h .57 +.00 ExactSci h 6.51 +.09 ExcelM 5.72 -.01 ExcoRes 0.16 19.49 +.17 Exelixis 8.67 -.41 Exelon 2.10 41.86 +.56 ExeterR gs 5.89 -.14 ExideTc 9.48 +.20 Expedia 0.28 26.62 -.57 ExpdIntl 0.40 55.53 -.43 Express n 18.42 -.21 ExpScrip s 54.75 +.03 ExterranH 24.23 +.16 ExtraSpce 0.33 17.54 +.09 ExxonMbl 1.76 72.80 +.08 Ezcorp 28.01 -.27 F5 Netwks 136.17 -.47 FBR Cap 3.99 +.15 FLIR Sys 29.69 +.69 FMC Corp 0.50 79.61 -.64 FMC Tech 87.28 -.30 FNBCp PA 0.48 10.16 +.32 FSI Intl 4.65 +.41 FTI Cnslt 35.99 +.13 FXCM n 12.77 +.02 FactsetR 0.92 95.01 +.47 FairchldS 15.33 -.32 FamilyDlr 0.62 49.09 -.09 Fastenal 0.84 59.60 -.27 FedExCp 0.48 93.37 -.32 FedRlty 2.68 77.35 +.21 FedSignl 0.24 6.74 FedInvst 0.96 26.81 -.02 FelCor 7.40 +.14 Ferro 15.06 -.12 FibriaCelu 16.15 +.61 FidlNFin 0.72 13.85 +.02 FidNatInfo 0.20 27.22 +.09 FifthStFin 1.28 12.01 +.02 FifthThird 0.04 14.71 +.41 FinEngin n 19.32 -.08 Finisar 28.98 -.42 FinLine 0.16 17.45 -1.34 FstAFin n 0.24 15.17 +.13 FstBcpPR .40 +.02 FstCwlth 0.04 7.45 +.38 FFnclOH 0.40 19.41 +.62 FstHorizon 0.72 11.75 +.47 FstInRT 8.47 FstMarblhd 2.10 +.06 FMidBc 0.04 11.49 +.42 FstNiagara 0.60 14.01 +.18 FstPotom 0.80 16.66 +.20 FstSecGp h 0.04 .61 +.05 FstSolar 131.66 -1.37 FT Fincl 0.19 14.66 +.10 FT HiLgSh 18.18 +.06 FTrSenFlt 0.72 13.89 +.09 FirstEngy 2.20 36.86 +.23 FstMerit 0.64 19.91 +.26 Fiserv 59.00 -.47 FlagstB rs 1.57 +.02 Flextrn 7.81 -.08 Flotek h 4.33 +.06 FlowrsFds 0.80 26.63 +.24 Flowserve 1.16 119.32 +1.81 Fluor 0.50 66.06 +1.15 FocusMda 22.09 -.55 FEMSA 0.64 55.94 -.01 FootLockr 0.60 19.54 -.27 ForcePro 5.57 -.13 FordM 16.99 FordM wt 8.30 ForestCA 16.31 +.27 ForestLab 32.01 -.43 ForestOil 37.09 -.11 FormFac 8.96 -.04 Fortinet 31.68 -.30 Fortress 5.74 +.31 FortuneBr 0.76 61.05 +.07 Fossil Inc 71.89 -1.14 FosterWhl 34.70 -.30 FranceTel 1.77 21.03 -.06 FrankRes 1.00 109.97 -1.93 FMCG 2.00 116.39 +.19 FresKabi rt .04 -.00 FreshMkt n 43.56 +1.34 Fronteer g 11.33 -.49 FrontierCm 0.75 9.49 +.04 FrontierOil 17.65 +.21 Frontline 1.90 25.68 +.05

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D 2.02 +.12 0.12 10.46 +.51 6.45 5.00 -.04 4.32 +.47 1.12 34.78 -.02 0.20 4.65 +.09 5.48 +.12 23.06 -.06 9.07 +.52 0.84 15.17 +.22 0.68 5.84 +.07 1.68 18.50 0.14 13.82 +.03 1.28 29.49 -.03 21.70 +.06 7.62 -.23 0.16 15.48 +.30 0.40 21.20 +.04 0.20 70.22 -.56 1.50 30.57 -.68 33.43 -.27 .39 +.07 4.25 +.08 36.80 +.13 59.21 +1.11 14.42 -.23 5.24 -.02 35.20 -.16 1.68 70.53 +.34 0.56 18.06 +.30 15.78 -.18 0.04 3.51 +.22 1.12 35.61 +.18 5.54 -.05 34.92 +1.07 2.38 51.78 +1.10 2.75 +.06 3.88 +.14 19.39 -.29 0.18 15.22 +.07 0.44 29.55 -.07 1.64 51.50 +.09 .52 -.02 13.41 +.39 71.52 +.02 24.49 +.06 24.18 -.10 0.32 14.00 +.08 5.09 -.05 0.18 7.09 -.07 1.45 -.01 0.30 28.89 -.49 36.34 -.22 0.52 15.59 +.53 2.00 39.07 -.02 2.70 0.40 8.20 -.05 3.13 +.03 7.04 0.08 45.89 +.69 0.25 25.39 -.32 0.10 19.27 +.08 1.45 +.06 0.15 17.67 -.21 2.07 +.04 0.40 14.69 -.37 0.68 15.40 +.25 0.16 17.38 -.18 0.36 44.69 -.23 4.53 -.29 1.53 23.40 +.16 1.40 169.60 +1.37 1.02 21.45 -.08 1.16 88.56 +.66 17.71 +.21 12.00 +.06 605.49 +2.42 1.64 25.91 -.06 20.15 +.13 2.16 138.01 -.49 2.30 +.03 7.92 -.12 18.86 +.08 0.52 28.30 -.24 2.75 -.21 0.07 7.31 -.02 0.83 19.63 +.25 32.44 -.68 0.40 42.17 +.59 1.27 -.08 15.52 +.33 0.52 26.51 +.25 0.80 47.14 -1.90 7.38 10.10 -.03 30.50 0.58 29.00 +.27 1.86 36.00 +.40 1.70 51.51 +.24 2.00 26.66 +.12 27.49 -.29 0.36 40.41 +.12 .47 -.03 0.96 34.58 -2.46 24.94 -.42 21.42 -.04 1.13 +.04 1.39 +.06 53.98 +.14 17.71 +.15 0.40 35.01 -.17 47.93 -.08 8.61 -.01 0.07 12.09 -.04 1.00 45.82 -.30 11.32 -.14 0.82 28.40 +.34 0.20 27.43 +.32 1.00 49.62 +.35 4.40 29.97 -.41 1.24 22.52 +.24 8.08 -.10 4.92 +.08 2.76 47.21 +.55 0.62 16.01 -.15 9.48 -.04 1.20 21.12 +.24 27.24 +.45 21.42 +.26 26.48 -.11 11.58 +.05 0.08 16.11 -.10 0.04 15.40 -.03 4.80 10.74 -.19 3.40 +.18 1.80 49.73 +.10 12.55 -.08 0.24 48.74 +.18 .49 -.01 62.12 +.14 1.00 69.27 +.58 3.43 -.14 0.80 10.61 +.23 0.20 6.60 +.05 1.28 47.99 +.42 14.37 -.18 0.40 76.18 +.17 0.32 41.48 -.43 18.25 +.11 21.87 +.28 37.65 +.33 19.56 +.57 0.63 7.55 +.06 1.70 31.47 +.31 0.41 41.55 -.45 0.76 20.74 +.23 0.25 2.03 -.01 0.60 39.53 +.28 14.84 +.19 19.00 +.31 0.95 35.18 +.10 42.58 +.25 2.32 55.50 +.46 1.33 53.72 +.19 0.44 17.99 +.03 1.02 51.59 +.13 21.35 +.20 56.72 -.05 1.80 22.20 -.05 0.04 17.76 -.04 0.28 6.49 -.08 4.25 -.11 53.96 -1.18 1.44 60.68 +.23 0.60 12.93 +.23 24.63 +.36 55.85 +1.05 0.48 40.79 +.46 0.04 6.85 +.15 0.40 15.76 -.21 3.69 +.44 45.73 +.87 8.37 -.09 5.00 +.69

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29.97 -.22 0.08 17.72 -.11 0.53 50.49 +.27 .61 +.03 0.88 27.17 -.78 0.50 23.56 +.05 0.26 20.27 -.52 0.54 7.67 -.01 1.20 10.97 +.10 9.67 -.06 0.31 5.75 +.05 8.63 +.11 0.07 1.16 -.03 13.52 -.03 33.78 +.20 0.82 25.09 +.15 2.33 74.59 +.75 0.50 30.34 +.12 0.95 35.14 -.02 0.30 24.04 -.03 0.45 18.98 +.06 0.14 10.76 +.04 0.39 58.80 +.17 0.34 13.93 +.01 0.52 61.55 +.17 0.43 13.30 +.03 1.56 46.32 +.23 2.15 36.98 -.03 0.61 30.68 -.15 0.29 15.01 +.01 0.43 17.23 +.06 0.82 48.59 +.10 1.28 65.24 +1.27 28.57 -.07 1.08 56.92 +.26 1.69 50.05 +.27 2.53 107.42 -.08 0.87 62.88 +.09 0.63 43.15 -.12 1.01 92.05 +.07 2.34 126.88 +.45 3.90 105.52 -.12 0.61 46.66 +.16 5.27 108.34 -.09 0.64 46.39 +.09 5.67 107.24 +.17 1.13 66.05 +.08 1.14 52.80 +.34 1.24 59.86 +.38 3.74 99.27 +.23 3.86 93.12 -.67 3.26 93.70 -.26 0.88 83.95 -.02 1.42 57.75 +.11 0.83 45.04 +.21 0.52 56.98 -.06 1.42 101.99 +.23 0.99 91.39 +.28 7.85 90.09 +.25 58.93 -.26 0.44 55.83 +.06 1.85 65.35 +.49 1.28 64.82 +.43 0.57 101.55 -.04 0.72 57.37 +.05 1.11 69.89 +.25 1.06 71.41 +.23 3.11 104.22 -.15 0.47 88.33 -.27 0.79 78.82 -.02 2.87 38.56 +.02 1.19 75.03 +.26 0.67 23.22 +.01 1.88 55.22 +.39 0.08 13.50 +.22 1.03 65.79 +.10 0.59 57.48 +.65 0.58 69.53 +.02 0.91 76.44 -.07 0.20 62.88 +.32 0.38 73.60 -.24 7.55 +.07 1.00 52.12 -.28 63.87 +1.49 19.93 -.33 0.60 39.99 -.05 3.89 +.23 1.40 +.05 1.36 53.62 +.55 64.00 -.30 25.79 -.52 9.77 +.09 3.68 +.01 20.45 -.43 0.44 39.42 -.24 17.01 +.58 1.54 +.01 3.87 38.90 +.38 .57 +.04 2.82 38.63 +.04 10.42 -.29 45.02 +.06 1.94 +.06 .01 -.00 0.90 74.20 +.16 0.28 47.09 -.05 18.62 -.03 2.99 +.41 0.57 8.68 -.01 1.16 -.01 19.90 +.14 .63 +.03 8.49 +.15 6.70 +.06 8.10 +.01 2.72 49.29 +.13 0.72 20.89 -.21 5.10 -.28 120.45 +.37 0.42 19.62 0.40 42.67 +.52 0.08 16.40 -.34 12.83 -.14 36.30 +2.54 5.84 +.12 2.60 145.95 +.21 7.19 -.16 1.08 55.76 +.15 0.24 17.32 -.08 0.50 26.99 +.19 29.48 -.33 9.66 -.56 72.92 -.49 10.78 -.13 0.48 15.17 +.02 20.03 -.40 35.79 -.03 49.91 -.17 266.01 -.85 0.44 23.75 +.16 3.49 23.02 +.02 1.03 12.19 +.16 0.96 12.29 +.23 0.29 4.68 +.07 16.64 +.24 8.44 +.03 0.75 25.03 +.10 10.51 +.19 0.65 23.54 +.51 53.85 -.38 2.70 -.13 24.07 -.03 17.47 -.74 43.13 -.25 30.64 +.43 6.92 -.09 28.34 -.14 14.36 -.27 0.20 42.16 +1.16 14.57 +.46 1.81 35.74 +.28 2.00 26.99 +.15 0.28 20.11 +.56 0.38 29.49 -.09 21.44 +.18 1.72 -.22 46.32 +2.17 6.81 +.12 2.36 24.85 -.31 0.04 13.11 +.38 0.33 32.07 +.05 19.90 -.07 0.30 26.77 +.10 6.64 -.04 21.84 -.46 45.63 +.16 1.61 -.01 2.16 62.02 -.32 0.64 38.64 -.42 0.20 15.54 -.37 0.20 86.12 +.62 1.13 +.01 41.19 -.26

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D 0.70 86.75 -.84 37.90 +.29 13.91 +.11 0.25 14.21 +.39 0.20 29.51 -.08 16.18 -.15 0.23 14.53 +.04 0.56 9.37 +.16 1.00 39.68 +.05 21.25 +.24 11.90 -.17 5.35 +.07 48.20 -.07 15.41 -.03 1.62 51.30 +.19 13.08 +.33 0.48 38.49 -.03 9.32 +.06 4.75 -.07 13.11 -.18 0.04 8.64 +.15 1.40 35.86 +.49 2.64 63.19 +.16 0.72 17.41 -.02 4.44 70.00 +.30 4.44 65.10 +.10 19.35 +.31 14.05 -.04 1.31 +.07 0.10 18.33 -.02 13.53 +.14 0.24 19.37 -.07 1.70 21.98 +.10 6.67 -.05 53.78 -.33 4.29 -.17 13.35 +.18 23.66 +.27 1.16 31.88 +.04 7.57 -.45 0.42 21.78 +.07 7.47 -.05 10.06 +.03 11.86 +.01 1.60 70.80 +.75 0.46 30.95 -.51 10.45 -.10 1.49 -.13 17.23 -.03 3.92 +.01 22.85 +.03 2.33 -.29 6.09 +.05 7.77 +.16 9.24 .94 -.03 88.82 +.29 3.67 +.08 1.19 -.04 52.71 +.15 39.66 +.35 0.20 40.63 +.61 46.04 -1.35 0.44 26.53 +.39 6.23 -.01 5.84 -.09 9.29 +.02 0.50 39.25 +.11 12.59 +.32 5.78 -.02 99.75 +.20 0.20 12.65 +4.05 0.24 37.18 -.40 1.08 23.10 +.07 0.40 29.66 -.51 0.16 18.96 +.44 0.25 29.52 +.06 .98 +.02 1.59 0.46 7.95 -.02 35.35 -.03 0.29 4.88 +.02 35.06 +.52 33.12 +.38 15.99 -.01 62.24 +2.83 1.90 31.69 +.58 55.46 +.33 41.42 -.47 37.58 +.19 11.08 +.01 1.96 35.20 +.06 6.01 -.21 0.60 31.06 -.67 0.80 27.45 +.14 0.20 28.92 +.17 0.34 62.00 -5.55 0.92 34.72 -.21 2.64 37.11 +.38 3.80 +.03 6.48 +.01 0.20 14.21 +.20 11.77 +.06 11.46 -.01 7.75 +.06 1.45 4.22 +.04 6.74 -.01 3.00 69.35 -.45 3.94 -.04 0.25 39.20 +.22 19.71 +.13 35.70 +.88 2.33 4.50 82.40 +.38 9.97 +.23 0.44 25.67 -.01 1.44 109.88 +.60 0.50 61.81 -1.31 71.70 -1.81 32.95 +.40

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MB Fncl MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MI Devel MIPS Tech MPG OffTr MSCI Inc MYR Grp Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MagelnHl MagelMPtr MagelPt MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes ManTech MgHiYP Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MarinaB rs MktVGold MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktVCoal MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MStewrt MartMM MarvellT Masco Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg Maxygen s McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH

2.80 86.16 +.42 0.04 17.38 +.93 9.90 -.09 0.37 7.25 -.11 1.00 29.88 +.44 0.65 20.19 +.06 3.10 11.02 +.09 8.50 +.12 0.90 8.17 0.57 6.26 -.06 10.47 +.10 14.73 -.16 0.40 27.69 +8.63 14.68 -.38 2.75 +.05 39.93 +1.40 21.00 -.80 2.00 46.31 -.04 1.80 32.51 +.68 0.20 25.49 -.49 .97 -.03 47.92 +.40 2.98 55.41 +.83 2.79 +.10 0.50 7.07 -.07 5.02 -.03 0.72 52.11 -.47 6.26 -.05 41.50 +.65 0.24 2.22 -.03 0.08 13.35 +.14 8.52 +.19 0.74 64.73 -.41 0.52 17.15 +.12 1.00 36.53 +.34 1.38 -.03 0.11 59.84 -.71 0.08 37.65 +.15 40.71 -1.43 0.42 52.01 -.14 0.45 57.60 -.26 0.31 46.38 +.02 0.35 42.20 -.18 0.84 27.31 +.18 0.04 6.82 +.03 31.56 -.11 4.65 +.01 1.60 93.75 -.17 18.88 -.19 0.30 13.00 -.06 2.75 29.70 -.58 0.24 52.30 -.15 14.35 +.18 0.60 217.40 -2.38 0.83 26.23 +.36 3.04 -.09 0.84 23.69 +.03 1.00 3.95 +.03 4.92 -.08 1.12 46.94 -.09 20.50 +.18 2.44 77.01 +.15 0.94 36.29 +.23

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D 0.72 70.97 +1.02 17.29 +.25 46.30 -.08 0.90 61.93 -.06 1.00 25.91 +.15 29.58 +.10 9.60 +.32 20.45 +.45 61.67 -.17 8.47 +.02 0.80 10.31 +.09 0.24 27.76 -.23 24.34 +.05 31.01 -.28 16.31 +.09 67.82 +.13 0.90 36.81 -.11 6.35 +.06 0.36 24.78 -.12 12.20 +.01 69.25 +.26 7.65 +.45 1.52 36.22 +.04 3.71 +.07 23.35 +.66 2.39 46.23 -2.81 5.64 -.02 0.74 44.73 +.19 12.60 -.12 0.14 13.38 +.06 1.38 34.34 -.13 8.03 +.07 8.28 +.14 44.37 -.35 23.01 -.74 0.64 28.19 +.12 1.88 +.14 0.09 25.79 -.20 7.24 93.43 +.73 2.31 +.07 0.20 26.21 -.19 5.77 +.08 10.51 -.20 .01 +.01 .01 +.01 5.28 +.04 3.65 +.03 20.47 +.26 16.11 +.15 60.10 -.41 0.70 22.85 +.11 1.12 50.87 +.17 43.34 -1.09 15.13 -.11 2.91 +.03 16.11 -.06 0.04 14.12 +.02 1.12 66.45 +.15 23.89 -.58 0.46 26.38 +.11 0.20 27.40 +.54 1.20 15.81 -.05 2.47 25.62 +.13 1.01 19.45 -.37 0.20 69.21 +.05 9.09 +.09 38.01 -1.24 29.42 +1.68 20.75 -1.13 2.59 +.03 0.07 4.22 1.10 74.23 +.79 21.41 +.20 23.13 +.03 12.71 +.22 15.31 -.08 34.65 -.72 1.80 17.60 +1.19 .39 -.01 45.31 +.09 2.24 -.04 .25 +.02 11.49 +.03 7.65 -.04 19.10 +.41 0.48 14.28 +.03 20.25 +1.00 1.20 29.85 +.02 22.35 -.02 0.14 32.21 +.06 13.31 -.09 9.37 +.10 24.16 0.29 1.70 -.04 1.38 64.84 +.58 7.04 44.57 +.37 0.44 65.75 +.37 0.04 8.42 +.37 1.52 26.31 +.12 0.40 13.81 +.02 1.88 34.90 -.02 5.29 -.71 1.86 +.04 0.20 4.01 +.07 0.24 5.14 +.02 57.17 -2.00 12.55 +.08 1.44 +.03 31.81 -.25 55.05 -.26 36.07 +.01 185.35 -.89 1.73 -.02 11.98 -.68 1.49 -.03 8.44 +.02 14.95 -.25 6.85 -.34 .05 +.01 9.12 -.21 1.00 18.85 +.50 10.00 +.15 0.28 14.91 +.13 6.92 +.79 0.20 18.32 -.03 73.00 -.04 0.60 59.31 -.73 6.13 -.16 17.17 -.03 0.15 14.95 +.46 0.15 16.62 +.42 0.20 21.98 +.48 2.00 52.07 +.95 0.92 17.52 +.11 1.86 50.20 +.15 6.49 1.24 86.95 -5.35 .60 -.01 15.99 -.06 20.04 +1.04 0.90 34.52 -.15 0.72 85.18 +.21 0.56 10.26 +.07 6.29 +.10 13.94 +.95 1.70 26.43 +.34 0.84 94.11 -.10 0.80 42.85 -.33 1.44 62.67 +.02 11.15 +.81 6.48 +.07 1.03 31.93 +.04 27.26 +.14 1.12 55.73 +.83 2.98 -.08 1.88 65.13 +.63 0.40 4.71 -.03 0.40 11.73 +.13 8.25 +.35 14.05 -.52 1.99 59.17 +.27 10.02 +.28 2.61 +.02 6.01 -.01 32.60 -.04 0.50 30.57 -.23 26.02 +.48 18.27 -.11 1.45 44.50 -.07 0.91 12.60 +.07 0.86 12.84 +.01 1.39 13.35 +.01 0.99 12.80 -.03 0.47 8.93 +.02 0.70 8.62 +.08 0.89 12.96 +.02 0.60 7.26 +.04 0.66 7.76 +.03 15.03 +.16 61.21 -.72 27.89 -1.40 1.52 97.76 +1.13 75.27 +1.11 .93 -.02 0.88 15.00 +.34 12.35 -.15

D

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Q-R-S-T QEP Res n QIAGEN QKL Strs QR Eng n QiaoXing

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RegalBel 0.68 69.54 +.09 RegalEnt 0.84 12.31 -.24 RgcyCtrs 1.85 41.65 +.38 RegncyEn 1.78 26.41 +.35 RegeneRx .23 -.03 Regenrn 33.47 -.18 RegBkHT 0.59 85.79 +1.69 RegionsFn 0.04 6.91 +.46 Regis Cp 0.16 16.38 -.11 ReinsGrp 0.48 54.70 +.88 RelStlAl 0.40 51.73 +.72 RenaisRe 1.00 63.29 +1.01 ReneSola 8.40 -.09 RentACt 0.24 31.88 +.54 Rentech 1.26 -.02 ReprosT rs 1.41 -.12 Repsol 1.20 28.29 -.02 RepubAir 7.42 -.01 RepubSvc 0.80 30.02 +.04 RschMotn 58.69 +.45 ResMed s 35.61 +.50 ResoluteEn 14.66 -.05 ResrceCap 1.00 7.49 +.04 ResConn 0.16 19.14 +.38 RetailHT 1.71 106.61 +.38 RetailOpp 0.24 9.60 -.05 Revlon 9.76 +.40 RexEnergy 13.46 +.17 RexahnPh 1.21 -.03 ReynAm s 1.96 32.86 +.05 RightNow 23.32 -.01 RioTinto s 0.90 70.97 +.25 RitchieBr 0.42 22.00 +.35 RiteAid .90 -.02 Riverbed s 35.16 RobbMyer 0.17 34.91 -.64 RobtHalf 0.52 30.87 +.05 RockwlAut 1.40 72.45 +.05 RockColl 0.96 58.32 +.36 RockwdH 38.61 -.23 RogCm gs 1.28 33.87 +.04 Rollins s 0.24 19.71 -.12 Roper 0.44 77.98 +.12 RosettaR 36.74 -.17 RossStrs 0.64 63.36 +.25 Rovi Corp 58.36 +.60 Rowan 34.28 -.63 RoyalBk g 2.00 51.25 +.41 RBScotlnd 12.59 +.10 RylCarb 46.30 -.33 RoyDShllB 3.36 65.49 +.42 RoyDShllA 3.36 65.44 +.37 Royce 0.12 14.57 +.14 Rubicon g 5.45 -.17 RubiconTc 20.90 +.52 RubyTues 13.62 -.01 Ruddick 0.52 36.38 +.19 Rudolph 7.93 +.06 RuthsHosp 4.95 -.17 Ryanair 2.29 30.23 +.32 Ryder 1.08 51.24 -.10 RdxSPEW 0.62 47.38 +.11 Ryland 0.12 17.80 +.11 S1 Corp 7.21 +.18 SAIC 15.77 +.03 SAP AG 0.67 50.18 +.02 SBA Com 40.27 -.21 SCANA 1.90 40.92 +.12 SEI Inv 0.20 24.07 -.11 SFN Grp 9.99 -.13 SK Tlcm 18.63 -.01 SLGreen 0.40 65.86 +.51 SLM Cp 13.05 +.07 SM Energy 0.10 57.46 +.91 SpdrDJIA 2.43 115.58 +.27 SpdrGold 135.05 -.27 S&PChina 0.83 76.63 -.23 SpdrSPRus 0.18 35.34 +.35 SpdrIntRE 1.31 38.00 +.27 SP Mid 1.51 165.65 +.44 S&P500ETF 2.31 125.78 +.39 Spdr Div 1.68 52.21 +.19 SpdrHome 0.12 17.65 +.09 SpdrKbwBk 0.11 26.07 +.58 SpdrKbwIns 0.43 43.32 +.34 SpdrLehHY 4.13 40.22 -.06 SpdrNuBST 0.43 23.85 +.07 SpdrNuBMu 0.88 21.83 SpdrKbw RB 0.30 26.88 +1.02 SpdrRetl 0.49 48.03 -.03 SpdrOGEx 0.20 52.17 +.09 SpdrMetM 0.38 67.86 -.39 SPX Cp 1.00 71.40 +1.09 STEC 17.14 -.22 STMicro 0.28 10.31 -.04 STR Hldgs 20.02 +.23 SVB FnGp 54.24 +1.40 SWS Grp 0.04 4.60 -.06 SabraHlt n 18.50 +.46 Safeway 0.48 22.24 +.19 StJoe 22.32 +.88 StJude 42.50 +.13 Saks 10.98 -.34 Salesforce 135.53 -3.50 SalixPhm 47.51 -.31 SallyBty 14.43 +.03 SamsO&G 1.10 -.02 SanderFm 0.60 40.50 +.40 SanDisk 51.01 -.63 SandRdge 7.28 +.19 SangBio 6.97 +.09 Sanmina 11.68 -.13 Sanofi 1.63 32.52 +.22 Santarus 3.12 +.03 Sapient 0.35 12.26 +.10 SaraLee 0.46 17.50 -.03 Satcon h 4.74 +.25 SavientPh 11.93 -.20 Savvis 25.55 -.20 Schlmbrg 0.84 82.81 +.37 Scholastc 0.40 27.70 -.17 SchwUSMkt 0.44 30.41 +.10 SchwLCGr 0.21 30.22 +.05 SchwIntEq 0.47 27.40 +.09 Schwab 0.24 17.08 +.13 SchMau 0.60 63.77 -.32 SciClone 4.26 +.16 SciGames 9.91 +.10 Scotts 1.00 50.77 +.77 ScrippsNet 0.30 52.80 +.24 SeaCube n 0.20 14.00 +.04 SeabGld g 29.26 -.88 SeacoastBk 1.30 +.04 SeacorHld 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SironaDent 41.52 -.18 Skechers 19.41 -.19 SkilldHcre 9.00 +.16 SkywksSol 28.10 -.14

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0.72

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6.50 0.20 1.13 0.04 1.04 0.92 0.20 0.20 0.82 0.71 0.60

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0.64 0.20 2.44 0.36 3.13 0.28 0.50 0.30 0.28 1.60 0.84

1.44

0.32

0.26 0.92 0.60 1.20 0.66 1.00 1.48 0.64

Nm 5.62 -.01 9.65 +.04 5.30 -.17 3.77 +.04 39.39 -.16 21.05 +.25 65.64 +.11 25.74 +.03 57.39 +.13 54.06 -.34 34.04 -.74 65.13 -1.37 8.41 -.04 19.40 +.18 3.38 -.07 23.84 +.03 3.21 +.02 3.38 +.38 10.90 +.01 11.21 -.20 33.96 +.16 2.59 -.01 35.48 -.76 45.36 -1.44 24.79 +.31 38.24 -.10 48.56 +.40 24.13 +.10 13.09 -.01 35.93 +.43 36.40 +.10 6.53 -.21 9.01 +.05 25.12 +.18 6.26 -.10 .71 -.06 20.71 +.22 18.65 -.26 4.21 -.10 12.87 -.03 12.06 -.01 46.02 +.38 38.04 -.02 31.67 +.09 29.39 +.13 37.79 +.05 67.22 +.23 15.98 +.18 34.89 +.08 25.22 -.03 31.34 +.14 4.69 +.36 67.17 +.77 22.57 +.29 2.69 -.05 5.22 -.03 1.94 -.01 32.93 +.07 61.84 -.57 21.39 +.14 47.77 +1.09 23.38 +.07 18.29 +.07 10.26 10.01 +.04 1.09 -.02 3.89 +.06 37.12 -.21 10.39 +.33 7.12 +.27 15.85 +.34 44.37 -1.78 6.80 +.18 20.71 -.02 21.80 +.15 16.44 -.61 5.16 +.13 54.38 +.20 3.76 30.50 -.21 .18 -.01 30.23 +.06 37.85 +1.00 .45 +.00 40.01 +.02 8.08 -.38 13.34 -.13 5.63 10.15 +.15 8.12 -.06 28.85 +.99 2.86 +.01 34.63 -.06 8.10 -.39 9.26 +.41 10.11 +.60 10.60 +.05 9.10 +.05 40.09 +.30 12.61 +.50 27.27 -.23 16.71 +.01 13.91 +.24 30.02 +.15 57.81 +.29 30.86 +.02 27.25 +.01 2.65 +.10 1.92 +.02 29.20 -.13 24.06 -.81 14.38 18.94 +.10 17.90 +.10 8.69 +.19 6.17 -.12 33.50 +.54 44.36 +.15 1.10 +.08 52.74 -.61 15.16 -.14 17.44 +.26 12.30 -.09 12.57 +.01 8.48 +.13 23.02 +.23 27.71 -.31 21.84 +.13 50.42 +.07 7.08 +.08 60.03 +.33 5.00 -.04 4.80 -.08 30.64 -.04 49.23 +.33 43.66 +.03 57.44 -.17 33.28 +.23 12.26 +.02 11.72 +.21 4.75 -.11 14.34 -.04 8.25 -.03 12.86 +.05 55.03 -.57 68.69 -.06 15.97 +.16 37.72 +.29 10.40 -.15 20.32 -.26 6.71 -.05 20.99 +.19 10.28 +.15 39.79 -.24 48.90 +.01 6.80 -.03 42.26 -.51 42.10 -.96 14.06 -.15 30.61 +.09 42.28 -.79 12.87 -.11 32.63 +.37 18.57 +.11 22.05 -.04 11.80 -.16 51.20 +.10 22.40 +.69 32.47 +.03 17.32 -.23 23.31 -.18 28.02 -.62 55.54 +.01 3.05 +.41 48.81 +.66 13.40 -.12 37.15 +.44 34.67 +.04 28.69 +.20 86.72 +.19 1.27 +.14 20.24 -.94 52.26 +.49 64.20 -1.24 25.26 -1.16 .88 +.03 65.51 -.32 32.27 +.43 48.63 -.54 19.68 -.08 17.00 -.33 8.70 -.03 19.96 +.53 61.22 +.40 15.81 +.07 63.20 -.42 72.60 +.65 24.12 +.44 53.21 -.02 15.30 +.13 25.82 -.08 1.36 -.02 53.20 +1.35 48.19 +.03 6.63 +.09 37.76 +.20 51.98 +.72 3.37 -.03 15.79 +.59 69.28 -.30 55.85 -.02 41.57 -2.25 52.50 -.07 .49 +.04 1.82 +.08 22.14 +.21 40.28 23.43 +.11 25.68 +.33 11.54 -.05 18.61 -.39 22.93 -.20 6.57 +.24 25.65 +.77 10.40 +.18 5.50 +.11 48.16 +.25 16.77 +.08 21.46 -.07 9.72 +.05 35.43 +.27

D

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C OV ER S T OR I ES

Film

for wardrobes, or flowers, furniture and other items. “We are really concentrating on that directory so that a producer who is interested in filming in Central Oregon can look at it and see everything they need to produce a film, whether it’s a wrecking yard or an old Crown Victoria for a police car. The directory will make Central Oregon a more viable site for filming major motion pictures because producers can arrive knowing they won’t have to spend days searching for people and businesses with the skills and resources they need, Douglas said. “We’re going to invite the entire community to submit information for the directory,” Douglas said. While the new website is being developed, people interested in getting in the directory can do so through the current website at www.filmoregon.org.

Continued from B1 Since other communities courting film-production companies — including Portland, Eugene, Medford and Ashland — all have organizations with names that identify their locations for filmmakers, Douglas said he and other executive committee members changed the name of the local group to better target filmmaking for Central Oregon. “We reorganized and changed the name over the past year. We will have an official announcement and coming-out party sometime in January or February,” Douglas said. In the meantime, he said COFA is developing a new website and beginning work on a new source directory of resources that filmmakers coming to Central Oregon may need to film major motion pictures. The directory will include everyone from camera, sound and lighting crews to painters and set construction crews. It also will include services and accommodations, such as motels and restaurants, and scenic locations, scenic farms and ranches, gas stations or police station locations for movie scenes, antique cars available as props, and stores where filmmakers can purchase clothing

Building awareness Douglas and other COFA members participated last Friday in a statewide video conference annual meeting of the Governor’s Office of Film and Television. Vince Porter, GOFT executive director, said the conference provided information about the Oregon Production Investment

Ratings

it’s clear that even more of these toxic assets may flow to the FDIC, which is unable to find other institutions willing to take them. One of the failed banks, Riverside National Bank of Fort Pierce, Fla., brought a suit against Moody’s and its two competitors, alleging that Moody’s as a result of “undisclosed conflicts of interest fraudulently and/or negligently assigned inflated ‘investment grade’ ratings to the CDOs” that are worthless today. Riverside eventually failed and its toxic assets fell to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., which in an unusual move took over as the plaintiff and continued the suit. Moody’s declined to comment. During several public hearings this year, former analysts at Moody’s, which dominated the business of rating complex bonds, testified that they were pressured by superiors to maximize their

Continued from B1 Of the 324 U.S. banks that have failed since 2008, 136 of them defaulted on a total of $5 billion in trust-preferred securities — called TRuPS in industry parlance — that they had issued to raise capital. These securities were popular because their issuance didn’t dilute an issuer’s share price, unlike preferred stock. And the dividends paid on the securities were tax deductible for the issuer. Through the Freedom of Information Act, McClatchy Newspapers learned that at least 36 failed banks have transferred more than $1 billion in bonds backed by trust-preferred securities to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. And with 860 small banks on the FDIC’s “watch list” as of Sept. 30, indicating risk of failure, Hospice Home Health Hospice House Transitions

Fund and the Greenlight Oregon Labor Rebate film and television projects that resulted in more than $178.5 million in direct spending on filmmaking in Oregon, and nearly $350 million in direct and indirect economic impacts from 2007 through Dec. 1 this year. In 2009, those programs resulted in 471 local hires who worked 204,938 hours, $350,000 spent on hiring locals to be extras or background performers, $1.9 million spent on pension, health and welfare fund contributions, and 417 local vendors who were paid by the shows, Porter said. “Currently, there are 41 states with film incentive programs and Oregon’s ranks in the lower third of those states in terms of money we offer as an incentive. Despite the fact that Oregon has chosen to not go as far as some aggressive states, we are able to pool our other resources to land our share of projects,” Porter said. “We feel that if we can just be in the conversation when a project is looking for a location, we can land the ones who see the many values of our state,” Porter said.

Oregon exposure

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 B5

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” filmed in Salem; “Paint Your Wagon,” filmed in Baker City; “Animal House,” filmed in Eugene; and “The Goonies,” filmed in Astoria, Porter said. More recently, a small-budget movie called “Meek Cutoff,” filmed in the Burns area last year, has gained international attention for its desert scenes and depiction of pioneer life. “The Toronto Film Festival and the Sundance Festival will be screening it early next year,” Porter said. “We are excited. It is going to be out in movie theaters” in 2011. He said another movie, “The Wait,” filmed over the summer in Black Butte and Sisters, also is helping put Central Oregon on the map as a filmmaking location. “Obviously, Central Oregon has some landscapes and vistas that attract filmmakers,” Porter said. “Central Oregon is one of the areas we are looking to increase our efforts to promote filmmaking. Like other regions of the state, the people in Central Oregon have to look in the mirror and identify the advantages they have, and market those advantages.”

Some of the many movies made in Oregon include blockbusters

Ed Merriman can be reached at 541-617-7820 or emerriman@ bendbulletin.com.

revenues, even if it meant providing dubious ratings. It’s why McDaniel’s testimony is so damning in its assertion that ratings problems were limited to mortgage bonds, and brought by outside factors. “This (collapse in trust-preferred CDOs) has nothing to do with mortgages at all, and yet you still have had this massive impact and this massive failure,” said a former Moody’s senior analyst who alleges he was pressured to provide inaccurate ratings. The analyst, who insisted on anonymity for fear of litigation, said there’s a fundamental flaw in the way these securities were rated. Moody’s provided what were called “shadow ratings,” one-time ratings issued about the health of the bank that weren’t continually monitored and instead represented a snapshot in time. Armed with these “shadow ratings,” investment banks then

pooled the securities into different layers of risk, offering investors slices of the pooled securities broken down into differing risk levels. Hedge funds and big pension funds often took the portions rated highest and thus perceived to be of least risk. Less sophisticated buyers took out the riskier portions, which offered the higher returns. “There are small banks who are buying some of the most sophisticated and difficult to analyze securities. Many of our clients didn’t seem to have clear appreciation for the risks they were assuming,” said Gene Phillips, the director of PF2 Securities Evaluations Inc., a New York firm that provides independent valuation of complex financial instruments. “And yes, the only thing they’re relying on is the rating and perhaps the promises made to them by the” investment bank salesperson.

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Wind Continued from B1 “These subsidies effectively operate as a barrier to U.S. exports to China. Opening markets by removing barriers to our exports is a core element of the president’s trade strategy.” The grants available under the Chinese program range from $6.7 million to $22.5 million, and the recipients, and the Chinese makers of wind turbines and associated parts can receive multiple awards as the size of the wind turbine models increases. Grants under the program since 2008 could total several hundred million dollars, Kirk’s office said. The accusation Wednesday is the first step in the WTO dispute settlement process. If China and the United States cannot reach a solution through consultations, the United States may request the establishment of a WTO dispute settlement panel. The action grows out of an investigation Kirk’s office initiated Oct. 15 in response to a complaint by the United Steelworkers over a range of practices in the clean-energy sector, including prohibited subsidies, export restraints, discrimination against foreign companies and imported goods, requirements that foreign companies transfer technology to their domestic counterparts. The filing, known as a Section 301 complaint, has been the subject of several talks between Chinese and U.S. trade officials. Kirk’s office said it “was able to make progress on some of these other areas of concern during the course of the Section 301 investigation through its bilateral engagement with China.”

China agreed to lift one barrier to foreign developers seeking to build wind farms there after two days of meetings last week in Washington, part of an annual forum known as the United States-China Joint Commission on Commerce and Trade. Beijing will allow overseas experience in wind farm development, and not just experience in China, to qualify them for Chinese projects. But several other barriers remain: Foreign developers are barred from offshore projects for national reasons, are not allowed to borrow as much money as domestic developers and are not allowed to sell carbon credits from their wind farms. Kirk said his office would continue to investigate the steelworker complaints that have not already been addressed but was not planning additional formal action under Section 301, which is part of the Trade Act of 1974 and authorized the president to take “all appropriate action,” including retaliation, to remove practices by foreign governments that violate international trade agreements or discriminates against U.S. commerce. “We will continue to work closely with the USW and other stakeholders in the months ahead on the remaining allegations,” Kirk said. referring to the steelworkers union. “If we are able to develop sufficient evidence to support those allegations and they can be effectively addressed through WTO litigation, we will pursue the enforcement of our rights at the WTO independently of Section 301.” The steelworkers union, in a statement, said that resolving the remaining issues would take considerable effort. “The goal is not litigation; it’s to end their practices,” the union said.

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Div

PE

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40 .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64

10 14 20 26 14 ... ... 29 25 53 20 11 ... 11 ... 13 14 ... 16 ... 7

YTD Last Chg %Chg 58.30 22.67 13.38 16.35 64.61 6.90 45.70 61.89 72.27 7.42 29.69 41.48 12.59 20.89 8.64 21.78 5.84 9.97 20.19 12.20 28.19

-.76 -.01 +.40 -.09 +.42 +.26 -.43 +.53 -.05 -.12 +.69 -.43 +.04 -.21 +.15 +.07 -.09 +.23 +.06 +.01 +.12

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

+68.7 +5.0 -11.2 +33.0 +19.4 +1.5 +66.2 +58.5 +22.1 +209.2 -9.3 -19.5 -5.4 +2.4 +55.7 +6.1 +116.3 +42.8 -14.4 +38.2 -7.5

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1386.00 $1386.80 $29.367

Pvs Day $1387.00 $1388.20 $29.376

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24f .80 1.74f ... .48a ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .24f .20 ... .60f

22 17 17 25 62 ... 35 21 ... 28 20 10 27 11 ... 17 16 12 ... ...

86.95 -5.35 +31.6 42.85 -.33 +14.0 46.93 -.02 +4.2 17.99 +.17 +41.8 57.18 +.05 +57.6 2.09 +.04 -25.8 37.01 +.12 -2.0 141.93 +.61 +28.6 22.24 +.19 +4.5 65.83 -.26 +38.0 84.50 +1.21 +37.1 46.02 +.38 +15.0 32.93 +.07 +42.8 11.54 -.05 +92.3 12.13 +.18 -9.5 26.95 +.39 +19.7 16.70 +.60 -13.7 31.31 +.49 +16.0 2.79 +.02 +32.9 18.44 +.03 +16.4

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

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Vol (00)

Last Chg

Citigrp BkofAm SPDR Fncl S&P500ETF JPMorgCh

5044140 2354073 699728 687657 467736

4.73 -.01 13.38 +.40 15.98 +.18 125.78 +.39 42.16 +1.16

Gainers ($2 or more) Name MI Devel OxfordInds Newcastle BcpSouth AegeanMP

Last

Lindsay CPI ProsHldg NikeB Orbitz

27.69 +8.63 +45.3 26.97 +4.80 +21.7 6.92 +.79 +12.9 16.11 +1.53 +10.5 10.04 +.92 +10.1

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name CAMAC En RareEle g GoldStr g Hyperdyn ParaG&S

Last Chg

83960 2.07 -.57 48763 10.17 -.11 47745 4.53 -.29 39595 5.00 +.69 35155 3.36 -.10

52-Week High Low Name

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

SiriusXM Intel HuntBnk Microsoft Cisco

1117163 1.60 +.13 475608 20.89 -.21 432515 6.85 +.15 418581 28.19 +.12 414308 19.56 +.03

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

Crossh g rs Hyperdyn SondeR grs ChinaNutri PacBkrM g

2.04 5.00 3.38 2.90 9.70

+.29 +16.6 +.69 +16.0 +.38 +12.7 +.20 +7.4 +.53 +5.8

LegacyBcp WhitneyH Rdiff.cm ChinaNet SthcstFn

Last

Chg %Chg

12.65 +4.05 +47.1 14.00 +3.13 +28.8 4.92 +1.07 +27.8 4.32 +.76 +21.3 3.26 +.51 +18.5

Losers ($2 or more)

Name

Last

Chg %Chg

Name

-8.2 -7.3 -6.4 -5.8 -5.7

CAMAC En NewConcEn GrtBasG g AvalRare n GoldStr g

2.07 3.38 2.75 4.47 4.53

-.57 -21.6 -.54 -13.8 -.21 -7.1 -.33 -6.9 -.29 -6.0

NaturlAlt CumbldPh GlobusM n Cytori WSB Hldgs

1,870 1,178 111 3,159 214 14

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

280 205 36 521 18 16

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Vol (00)

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

62.00 -5.55 20.84 -1.65 11.06 -.76 86.95 -5.35 6.07 -.37

Nasdaq

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more) Name

Indexes

Last

Diary

Chg %Chg

5.29 -.71 -11.8 6.15 -.75 -10.9 10.05 -1.09 -9.8 5.41 -.48 -8.1 2.30 -.19 -7.6

Diary 1,402 1,254 140 2,796 208 26

11,549.12 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,114.69 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,912.80 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,177.58 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,669.01 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,255.82 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,342.44 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 790.67 580.49 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,559.49 5,098.82 405.40 7,931.76 2,163.71 2,671.48 1,258.84 13,371.96 790.59

+26.33 +3.69 +1.97 +25.66 -.57 +3.87 +4.24 +40.10 +.07

YTD %Chg %Chg +.23 +.07 +.49 +.32 -.03 +.15 +.34 +.30 +.01

52-wk %Chg

+10.85 +24.37 +1.86 +10.39 +18.56 +17.73 +12.89 +15.79 +26.42

+10.44 +21.88 +1.15 +9.90 +19.13 +17.71 +12.34 +15.20 +25.30

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Wednesday.

Key currency exchange rates Wednesday compared with late Tuesday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

356.17 2,631.43 3,919.71 5,983.49 7,067.92 23,045.19 38,172.91 20,733.37 3,322.38 10,346.48 2,038.11 3,144.31 4,869.60 5,892.49

+.01 s +.02 s -.20 t +.53 s -.14 t +.22 s -.15 t -.02 t +.10 s -.23 t +.05 s +.14 s +.15 s +.08 s

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9997 1.5371 .9865 .002132 .1504 1.3089 .1285 .011964 .081126 .0326 .000867 .1457 1.0497 .0334

.9962 1.5465 .9817 .002133 .1501 1.3095 .1286 .011938 .080792 .0325 .000868 .1460 1.0428 .0334

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv x 18.52 -0.10 +14.0 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.27 +0.02 +13.2 GrowthI 25.94 +18.1 Ultra 22.76 +17.1 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.87 +0.06 +14.2 AMutlA px 25.31 -0.11 +12.2 BalA p 17.96 +0.04 +12.6 BondA p 12.14 -0.01 +6.8 CapIBA p 49.64 +0.10 +8.1 CapWGA p 35.61 +0.05 +7.4 CapWA p 20.44 +0.02 +4.6 EupacA p 41.60 +8.5 FdInvA p 36.63 +0.13 +13.8 GovtA p 14.38 +5.3 GwthA p 30.42 +0.08 +12.2 HI TrA p 11.25 +0.01 +14.3 IncoA p 16.75 +0.03 +11.6 IntBdA p 13.41 -0.01 +4.5 ICAA p 28.32 +0.08 +10.8 NEcoA p 25.45 +0.08 +13.2 N PerA p 28.75 +0.02 +12.1 NwWrldA 54.81 +0.07 +16.1 SmCpA p 39.14 +0.12 +24.1 TxExA p 11.83 +2.1 WshA p 27.19 +0.09 +13.3 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.42 +0.02 +7.7 IntlEqA 29.63 +0.02 +7.5 IntEqII I r 12.60 +7.0 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.59 +0.04 +5.4 MidCap 34.06 -0.05 +33.3 MidCapVal 20.12 +0.05 +14.6 Baron Funds: Growth 51.36 -0.09 +24.3 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.69 +8.5 DivMu 14.27 +2.6 TxMgdIntl 15.58 +0.02 +3.7 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 17.48 +0.06 +12.7 GlAlA r 19.25 +0.05 +8.9 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.98 +0.04 +8.0 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.51 +0.06 +13.0 GlbAlloc r 19.32 +0.04 +9.1 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 53.66 +0.05 +20.7 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.35 +0.01 +26.1 DivEqInc 10.08 +0.05 +15.9 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.30 +0.01 +26.5 AcornIntZ 40.10 +0.04 +20.2 ValRestr 49.80 +0.20 +18.0 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 11.11 +0.02 +12.4 USCorEq2 11.00 +0.04 +22.1 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 34.27 +0.15 +11.9 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 34.61 +0.15 +12.1 NYVen C 33.15 +0.15 +11.1 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc pe 9.17 -0.37 +7.2 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.66 +0.06 +20.8 EmMktV 35.31 +0.07 +19.2 IntSmVa 16.79 +0.03 +15.3 LargeCo 9.91 +0.03 +15.1 USLgVa 20.08 +0.14 +19.9 US Small 21.53 +0.01 +31.7 US SmVa 25.71 +0.08 +31.6 IntlSmCo 16.76 +0.01 +20.9 Fixd 10.32 +1.2 IntVa 18.24 +0.03 +9.7 Glb5FxInc 10.86 -0.01 +5.1 2YGlFxd 10.14 +1.6 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 70.33 +0.20 +12.4 Income 13.19 +6.8 IntlStk 35.46 +0.09 +12.9 Stock 108.06 +0.42 +13.8 Eaton Vance A:

LgCpVal 18.24 NatlMunInc 8.95 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.27 LgCapVal 18.29 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.63 FPA Funds: NwInc 10.83 FPACres 26.73 Fairholme 35.21 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.46 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 20.00 StrInA e 12.31 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.19 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.82 FF2015 11.53 FF2020 14.02 FF2020K 13.39 FF2025 11.70 FF2030 13.98 FF2035 11.63 FF2040 8.13 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.67 AMgr50 15.38 Balanc 18.22 BalancedK 18.22 BlueChGr 45.53 Canada 56.94 CapAp 25.41 CpInc r 9.39 Contra 67.88 ContraK 67.85 DisEq 22.59 DivIntl 29.97 DivrsIntK r 29.94 DivGth 28.40 EmrMk 25.87 Eq Inc 44.19 EQII 18.23

+0.11 +9.9 -1.0 +0.01 +4.6 +0.10 +10.1 +0.04 +11.3 +3.0 +0.09 +11.8 +0.25 +23.9 +17.2 -0.01 +16.3 -0.27 +8.8 +16.6 +0.01 +11.2 +0.01 +11.3 +0.02 +12.5 +0.02 +12.6 +0.02 +13.3 +0.03 +13.6 +0.03 +14.0 +0.02 +14.3 +0.05 +16.6 +0.04 +13.2 +0.04 +13.6 +0.04 +13.8 +0.03 +20.1 +0.12 +19.3 -0.02 +18.7 +0.01 +16.3 -0.01 +17.2 +17.4 +0.02 +8.5 +0.06 +8.7 +0.06 +8.9 +0.08 +21.1 +0.10 +16.1 +0.28 +14.9 +0.13 +13.4

Fidel 32.27 FltRateHi r 9.78 GNMA 11.46 GovtInc 10.41 GroCo 83.72 GroInc 18.35 GrowthCoK 83.69 HighInc r 8.91 Indepn 24.46 IntBd 10.53 IntmMu e 10.03 IntlDisc 32.79 InvGrBd 11.37 InvGB 7.37 LgCapVal 11.80 LatAm 57.58 LevCoStk 28.35 LowP r 38.17 LowPriK r 38.14 Magelln 71.64 MidCap 28.92 MuniInc e 12.29 NwMkt r 15.62 OTC 55.39 100Index 8.74 Ovrsea 32.32 Puritn 17.91 SCmdtyStrt 12.35 SrsIntGrw 11.22 SrsIntVal 9.90 StIntMu e 10.61 STBF 8.45 SmllCpS r 19.67 StratInc 11.02 StrReRt r 9.48 TotalBd 10.69 USBI 11.30 Value 68.85 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 51.57 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 38.28 500IdxInv 44.51 IntlInxInv 34.94

+0.15 +15.0 +0.01 +7.6 +6.8 -0.01 +4.9 -0.21 +21.4 +0.08 +14.9 -0.21 +21.6 +13.2 -0.03 +22.8 -0.01 +7.3 -0.05 +2.5 +0.09 +10.0 -0.01 +7.0 +8.1 +0.06 +11.1 +0.15 +13.6 +0.04 +24.2 +0.13 +20.0 +0.12 +20.2 +0.14 +12.4 +0.06 +23.9 +2.6 +0.03 +10.7 +0.01 +21.2 +0.04 +12.4 +0.07 +6.1 +0.03 +14.0 +0.06 +13.3 +0.03 +15.6 +0.02 +3.2 +2.0 +3.6 +0.03 +23.4 +0.01 +9.1 +0.01 +12.7 +8.2 -0.02 +5.9 +0.36 +22.6 -0.44 +31.3 +0.07 +29.0 +0.15 +15.1 +0.04 +6.9

TotMktInv 36.47 +0.12 +17.5 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 44.51 +0.15 +15.1 TotMktAd r 36.47 +0.12 +17.6 First Eagle: GlblA 46.03 +0.01 +16.7 OverseasA 22.37 +0.02 +17.7 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.38 +0.9 FoundAl p 10.68 +0.04 +10.6 HYTFA p 9.67 +3.0 IncomA p 2.17 +0.01 +12.4 USGovA p 6.74 +5.8 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +12.0 IncmeAd 2.16 +0.01 +12.6 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.19 +0.01 +11.7 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.72 +0.08 +11.8 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.93 +0.02 +7.7 GlBd A p 13.48 +0.02 +11.8 GrwthA p 17.78 +0.05 +7.5 WorldA p 14.79 +0.03 +7.6 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.50 +0.01 +11.3 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 40.97 +0.20 +11.2 GMO Trust III: Quality 20.14 +0.02 +5.6 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.35 +0.04 +18.6 Quality 20.14 +0.02 +5.7 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.27 +0.01 +12.8 Harbor Funds: Bond 12.03 +7.3 CapApInst 36.95 -0.08 +12.3 IntlInv t 59.46 +0.17 +10.6 Intl r 60.00 +0.18 +11.0 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 34.54 +0.17 +12.6 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 34.55 +0.17 +12.9

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 42.54 +0.17 +16.3 Div&Gr 19.46 +0.09 +13.0 Advisers 19.27 +0.03 +11.8 TotRetBd 10.85 +7.1 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.35 -0.05 -3.4 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 16.15 +0.03 +8.0 CmstkA 15.72 +0.09 +15.5 EqIncA 8.56 +0.04 +12.0 GrIncA p 19.14 +0.13 +12.2 HYMuA 8.99 +4.3 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.68 +0.02 +8.7 AssetStA p 24.36 +0.02 +9.5 AssetStrI r 24.56 +0.02 +9.8 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.48 -0.01 +6.8 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.47 -0.01 +7.0 HighYld 8.15 +13.9 IntmTFBd 10.79 +1.9 ShtDurBd 10.97 +2.9 USLCCrPls 20.65 +0.10 +14.1 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT rx 50.29 +0.19 +18.5 PrkMCVal T 22.51 +0.10 +14.5 Twenty T x 65.85 +0.04 +7.2 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.14 +0.02 +13.2 LSGrwth 13.15 +0.02 +14.8 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.56 +0.05 +20.1 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 21.89 +0.06 +19.8 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.13 +0.1 Longleaf Partners: Partners 28.49 +0.12 +18.3 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.10 +12.2 StrInc C 14.69 -0.01 +11.3 LSBondR 14.05 +11.9 StrIncA 14.61 +12.1

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.31 -0.01 +10.2 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.56 +0.08 +14.1 BdDebA p 7.78 +12.3 ShDurIncA p 4.60 +6.3 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.63 +5.4 MFS Funds A: TotRA 14.11 +0.04 +9.9 ValueA 22.84 +0.12 +11.6 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.93 +0.11 +11.8 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.54 +0.03 +8.3 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 17.72 +0.03 +17.1 PacTgrInv 22.97 +0.05 +19.8 MergerFd 16.05 -0.01 +3.3 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.36 +11.2 TotRtBdI 10.35 -0.01 +11.3 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 37.61 -0.02 +33.9 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.35 +0.09 +11.7 GlbDiscZ 29.69 +0.09 +12.0 QuestZ 17.74 +0.09 +10.5 SharesZ 20.87 +0.08 +12.2 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 46.20 +0.07 +22.4 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 47.89 +0.08 +22.0 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.26 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.74 +0.07 +9.5 Intl I r 19.42 +0.04 +16.3 Oakmark r 41.41 +0.20 +12.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 7.66 +0.01 +15.4 GlbSMdCap 15.40 +0.02 +23.6 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 43.72 +0.02 +9.5 DvMktA p 35.62 +0.21 +24.0

GlobA p 60.54 +0.05 +16.0 GblStrIncA 4.25 +0.01 +14.7 Gold p 47.92 -0.78 +48.6 IntBdA p 6.50 +0.02 +5.7 MnStFdA 32.47 +0.17 +16.1 RisingDivA 15.54 +0.02 +13.4 S&MdCpVl 32.05 +0.08 +20.6 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 14.11 +0.02 +12.4 S&MdCpVl 27.51 +0.07 +19.7 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 14.06 +0.02 +12.5 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.68 +1.7 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.22 +0.20 +24.4 IntlBdY 6.50 +0.02 +6.0 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 10.79 -0.01 +7.9 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 10.90 NA AllAsset 12.52 +0.01 NA ComodRR 9.26 +0.05 +21.1 HiYld 9.26 +13.6 InvGrCp 10.41 -0.02 +10.8 LowDu 10.35 +4.5 RealRtnI 11.34 -0.02 +7.4 ShortT 9.86 +1.9 TotRt 10.79 -0.01 +8.1 TR II 10.33 -0.01 +7.4 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.35 +4.1 RealRtA p 11.34 -0.02 +6.9 TotRtA 10.79 -0.01 +7.7 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 10.79 -0.01 +6.9 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 10.79 -0.01 +7.8 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 10.79 -0.01 +8.0 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.25 +0.09 +17.9 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 41.03 +0.17 +15.7 Price Funds:

BlChip 38.37 CapApp 20.31 EmMktS 34.74 EqInc 23.65 EqIndex 33.89 Growth 32.31 HlthSci 30.61 HiYield 6.77 IntlBond 9.72 IntlStk 14.07 MidCap 58.83 MCapVal 23.66 N Asia 18.89 New Era 51.47 N Horiz 33.70 N Inc 9.46 R2010 15.29 R2015 11.86 R2020 16.40 R2025 12.02 R2030 17.25 R2040 17.39 ShtBd 4.84 SmCpStk 34.66 SmCapVal 36.35 SpecIn 12.30 Value 23.28 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.53 VoyA p 23.77 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.73 PremierI r 20.48 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.21 S&P Sel 19.58 Scout Funds: Intl 32.10 Selected Funds: AmShD 41.32 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.37 Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 51.29 Thornburg Fds:

+0.01 +17.2 +0.08 +14.1 +0.08 +16.9 +0.13 +15.0 +0.12 +14.8 +0.01 +17.5 +0.04 +17.6 +13.7 +0.03 +2.7 +0.04 +13.2 -0.06 +28.7 +0.10 +16.2 +0.04 +18.5 +0.15 +19.4 +35.5 +6.7 +0.02 +12.3 +0.03 +13.5 +0.04 +14.5 +0.03 +15.2 +0.04 +15.8 +0.05 +16.3 -0.01 +2.9 +0.03 +33.4 +0.08 +26.0 +0.01 +9.0 +0.16 +15.7 +0.08 +14.0 +0.08 +20.9 +24.7 +0.01 +27.3 +0.12 +16.0 +0.07 +15.0 +0.05 +12.2 +0.17 +12.7 +0.03 +5.8 +0.38 +12.8

IntValA p 27.90 IntValue I 28.53 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 24.20 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.72 CpOpAdl 76.94 EMAdmr r 39.00 Energy 120.07 ExtdAdm 41.84 500Adml 116.43 GNMA Ad 10.94 GrwAdm 31.75 HlthCr 51.77 HiYldCp 5.67 InfProAd 25.82 ITBdAdml 11.24 ITsryAdml 11.52 IntGrAdm 60.90 ITAdml 13.28 ITGrAdm 10.07 LtdTrAd 11.00 LTGrAdml 9.21 LT Adml 10.70 MCpAdml 93.57 MuHYAdm 10.11 PrmCap r 68.22 ReitAdm r 78.19 STsyAdml 10.82 STBdAdml 10.58 ShtTrAd 15.87 STFdAd 10.85 STIGrAd 10.76 SmCAdm 35.38 TtlBAdml 10.61 TStkAdm 31.61 WellslAdm 52.32 WelltnAdm 53.93 Windsor 45.67 WdsrIIAd 46.04 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.40 CapOpp 33.31 DivdGro 14.53

+0.11 +13.2 +0.11 +13.6 +0.07 +14.2 +2.7 +0.09 +11.3 +0.09 +16.4 +0.51 +11.9 +0.07 +28.1 +0.41 +15.1 +6.7 +0.02 +17.3 +0.11 +6.5 +11.7 -0.03 +6.0 -0.02 +9.1 -0.02 +7.2 +0.10 +14.6 +2.2 -0.02 +10.1 +2.0 -0.03 +9.1 +1.6 +0.22 +26.1 +2.6 +0.01 +12.9 +0.48 +26.7 -0.01 +2.6 -0.01 +3.9 +0.01 +1.1 -0.01 +3.2 -0.01 +5.1 +0.05 +28.7 -0.02 +6.1 +0.10 +17.4 +10.2 +0.14 +10.7 +0.20 +14.4 +0.27 +10.8 +0.05 +15.3 +0.04 +11.3 +0.02 +11.5

Energy 63.95 EqInc 20.38 Explr 73.43 GNMA 10.94 GlobEq 18.03 HYCorp 5.67 HlthCre 122.68 InflaPro 13.14 IntlGr 19.14 IntlVal 32.49 ITIGrade 10.07 LifeCon 16.46 LifeGro 22.28 LifeMod 19.80 LTIGrade 9.21 Morg 18.19 MuInt 13.28 PrecMtls r 25.99 PrmcpCor 13.91 Prmcp r 65.75 SelValu r 19.05 STAR 19.32 STIGrade 10.76 StratEq 18.69 TgtRetInc 11.36 TgRe2010 22.78 TgtRe2015 12.68 TgRe2020 22.50 TgtRe2025 12.84 TgRe2030 22.03 TgtRe2035 13.34 TgtRe2040 21.86 TgtRe2045 13.80 USGro 18.33 Wellsly 21.60 Welltn 31.22 Wndsr 13.53 WndsII 25.94 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 116.40 EMkt 29.68 Extend 41.79 Growth 31.74 MidCap 20.60

+0.27 +11.8 +0.07 +14.9 -0.06 +28.3 +6.5 +0.05 +15.1 +11.6 +0.26 +6.4 -0.02 +5.9 +0.03 +14.5 +0.07 +6.1 -0.02 +10.0 +0.01 +10.7 +0.05 +14.6 +0.02 +12.8 -0.03 +9.0 -0.01 +19.1 +2.1 -0.08 +33.5 +14.9 +0.01 +12.8 +0.07 +19.4 +0.02 +11.3 -0.01 +5.0 +0.01 +22.3 +9.0 +0.02 +11.0 +0.02 +12.1 +0.03 +12.7 +0.02 +13.4 +0.05 +14.1 +0.04 +14.8 +0.05 +14.8 +0.03 +14.8 +0.04 +12.0 +10.1 +0.08 +10.6 +0.06 +14.3 +0.15 +10.7 +0.41 +15.0 +0.07 +16.3 +0.07 +27.9 +0.03 +17.1 +0.05 +25.9

SmCap

35.32 +0.05 +28.5

SmlCpGth

22.17 -0.05 +31.7

SmlCpVl

16.36 +0.08 +25.3

STBnd

10.58 -0.01 +3.8

TotBnd

10.61 -0.02 +6.0

TotlIntl

15.77 +0.02 +9.4

TotStk

31.60 +0.10 +17.2

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst

10.17 +0.01

ExtIn

41.87 +0.08 +28.1

NS

FTAllWldI r

92.49 +0.16 +10.3

GrwthIst

31.76 +0.03 +17.4

InfProInst

10.52 -0.01 +6.1

InstIdx

115.67 +0.41 +15.1

InsPl

115.68 +0.41 +15.1

InsTStPlus

28.72 +0.09 +17.4

MidCpIst

20.68 +0.04 +26.1

SCInst

35.40 +0.05 +28.7

TBIst

10.61 -0.02 +6.1

TSInst

31.61 +0.10 +17.4

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

96.18 +0.34 +15.1

STBdIdx

10.58 -0.01 +3.9

TotBdSgl

10.61 -0.02 +6.1

TotStkSgl

30.51 +0.10 +17.4

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.77 -0.01

NA


B6 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Thank You To The Following Businesses For Your Support Of The Newspapers In Education Program Central Oregon Community Col. 541-383-7700 www.cocc.edu Red Robin Restaurant 541-382-9234 Quality Business Service 541-475-2250 Brian T. Hemphill, Attorney 541-382-2991 De Leone Corporation 541-504-8311 1st Rate Mortgage, Inc. 541-548-8111 Arco AM PM 541-318-5110 CoEnergy Propane 541-504-9444 The Pony Express 541-549-1538 Bend Pawn & Trading 541-317-5099 Jerry’s Outdoor Power 541-382-8947 9th Street RV Storage 541-389-6740 Ewing Software & Bookkeeping Services 541-389-0357 Bell-Air Motel 541-382-1885 Affordable Auto Repair 541-548-2991 R.V. Outfitters 541-312-9758 Powell’s Sweet Shoppe 541-617-9866 Juniper Paper & Supply 541-312-4070 Bend Garbage & Recycling 541-382-2263 Johnson Benefit Plan 541-382-3571 Madras Sanitary Services 541-475-2071 R & H Construction 541-312-2961 Sunriver Resort 800-801-8765 Caudell Landscapes 541-548-7077 Active Towing LLC 541-416-8003 Mid Oregon Credit Union 541-382-1795 Impact Graphix and Signs 541-548-8544 GFP Enterprises Inc 541-549-8167 Exceptional Real Estate 541-317-8909 Brightwood Corporation 541-475-2234 James E. Hodson, DMD, PC 541-548-8155 Cascade Biosciences 541-588-6209 Avion Water Company Inc 541-382-5342 Coldwell Banker Dick Dodson Realty 541-475-6137 Ascent Capitol Management LLC 541-382-4847 Brokman Revere, LLC 541-389-3288 Coldwell Banker 541-382-4123 A Greener Cleaner 541-318-7153 Action Typesetting & Printing Co. 541-388-1480 Bend Surgery Center 541-318-0858 Butch’s Place LLC 541-923-7677 H.S.W. Builders 541-388-9898 Computer Heroes / Frank Evans 541-312-2300 New House Manufacturing Co Inc 541-548-1055 Severson Plumbing & Mechanical Inc 541-382-3720 Lumbermans Insurance & Financial 541-382-2421 $12.99 Store 541-549-2059 Wagner Mall 541-382-9423 MST Corporation 541-416-9000 Cold Stone Creamery 541-382-5466 Elemental Eyecare 541-323-3937 Dutch Pacific Properties 541-588-9226 Aeries Mini Storage 541-383-3365 Susan Daly Sterns 541-306-6753 Far West Real Estate LLC 541-447-6294 In Tune 541-923-1636 Scenes From the West 541-639-1003 Cunningham Insurance & Financial 541-318-8536 Desert Valley Equine Center 541-504-5299 TK Jacobson Investments, Inc. 541-383-8502 Car Kare Inc. 541-382-4896 Stormwater Services 541-548-4049 Strictly Organic Coffee Company 541-330-6061 A&W Restaurant 541-923-8881 Ryder Graphics 541-382-5934 Sagebrush Supply 541-382-3531 Quality Coat Asphalt Maintenance 541-480-6655 Piloto Ranch 541-504-4602 PGC Building + Design 541-312-4201 Tornay Insurance Agency Inc Allstate 541-388-2136 Cart-Tek Golf Carts 541-330-0405 FivePine Lodge 541-549-5900 Premier Printing Solutions 541-617-9899 Alert Safety Supply 541-548-6155 Century Insurance Group LLC 541-382-4211 Tumalo Therapeutics 541-420-2577 The Law Offices of Bryan W. Gruetter P.C 541-585-1140 Juniper Rock Products 503-463-7177 Maxine Hoggan PsyD 541-526-0969

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MICROSEMI 541-382-8028 www.microsemi.com 625 SW Powerhouse Drive, Bend 161 NE 5th Street, Madras www.hemphill-attorney.com 1258 SW Lake Road, Redmond 735 Southwest 9th Street, Redmond 61122 South Hwy 97, Bend www.coenergy.net 160 S. Oak Street, Sisters 61420 S. Hwy 97, Bend www.jerrysoutdoorbend.com 169 SE 9th Street, Bend 20402 Klahani Drive, Bend 8790 S. Highway 97, Redmond 347 SW 2nd Street, Redmond www.rvoutfitters.net 818 Northwest Wall Street, Bend 1028 SE Paiute Way, Bend www.bendgarbage.com www.johnsonbenefitplanning.com www.madrassanitary.com www.rhconst.com www.sunriver-resort.com 3700 NW Montgomery Ave. Redmond 2675 SW High Desert Dr. # 27, Prineville www.midoregon.com www.impactgraphixandsigns.com www.gfpenterprises.com www.exceptionalbend.com www.brightwood.com 708 W. Antler Avenue, Redmond 69215 Singletree, Sisters 60813 Parrell Road, Bend www.liveinmadras.com 975 SW Colorado Ave # 200, Bend 19479 Bounty Lake Ct, Bend www.bendproperty.com www.a-greenercleaner.com www.actiontype.com www.bendsurgery.com 1515 N. Hwy 97, Redmond www.hswbuilders.com www.comphero.net www.newhouse-mfg.com 220 Southeast Davis Ave, Bend www.lumbins.com 216 West Cascade Avenue, Sisters 1900 NE 3rd Street # 200, Bend www.mstcorp.com www.coldstonecreamery.com www.elementaleyecare.com 414 West Washington Avenue, Sisters 1300 2nd Street, Bend www.stearnstmlaw.com www.farwestrealestatellc.com www.intuneredmond.com www.scenesfromthewest.com 612 NE Savannah Ste. 1, Bend www.desertvalleyequine.com 23451 Butterfield Trail, Bend www.carkareinc.com www.stormwateroregon.com www.strictlyorganic.com 1501 SW Highland Ave., Redmond www.rydergraphics.net 22270 Hwy 20 East, Bend P.O. Box 1574, Bend www.pilotoranch.com www.pgcbuilding.com 560 NE Greenwood Ave. Suite A, Bend 23229 Butterfield Trail, Bend www.fivepinelodge.com www.ppsbend.com www.alertsafetysupply.com www.centuryins.com 64672 Cook Avenue, Bend www.gruetterlaw.com 3717 SE Juniper Canyon Rd., Prineville 258 SW Fifth Ave. #A, Redmond

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C

Inside

OREGON Jury recommends death for bank bombers, see Page C3. OBITUARIES Actress Marcia Lewis was a Tony award nominee, see Page C5.

www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

OLCC staff recommends revocation of market’s liquor license

AMERICAN COMMUNITY SURVEY

Our neighbors More of them are likely to be Hispanic, population data show

But judge sides with Warm Springs-area convenience store

Editor’s note: This is the first in a threepart series examining different components of the American Community Survey in Central Oregon, detailing changes in population, income and education. Today: population.

By Lauren Dake

By Molly Black

The Bulletin

The Bulletin

The Oregon Liquor Control Commission staff laid out 50 serious incidents and 30 more minor events it maintained should cause the Rainbow Market convenience store, located on U.S. Highway 26 southeast of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, to lose its liquor license. From February 2008 through August 2009, the commission staff pointed to a slew of events including fights, sexual assaults and shots being fired on the property that they believe constitute a “history of serious and persistent problems involving disturbances, lewd or unlawful activities.� But an administrative law judge ruled the staff did not prove that the problems were related to the sale of alcohol at the convenience store. The judge’s decision is now pending in front of the OLCC, which is scheduled to hear the case early next year. It is up to the commission to adopt the judge’s ruling entirely, with exceptions or not at all. Timothy Gassner, a Madrasbased attorney, is representing Rainbow Market. He said the OLCC has the burden of proving the incidents were related to the sale of alcohol at the market. The commission staff, he said, was unable to prove the connection and also unable to show that the market had a history of serious and persistent problems. “The lack of incidents relating to the sale of alcohol inside the premises is a testament to the responsible manner in which the licensee operates the store,� Gassner wrote in a legal document. See Market / C5

E

Holiday closures • The Bulletin building will be closed Friday and Saturday in observance of the Christmas holiday. • Many government offices also will be closed and many services unavailable Friday and Saturday. Almost all city, county, state and federal offices are closed Saturday. Almost all state offices will also be closed Friday. • Deschutes and Crook County public libraries will be closed Friday and Saturday. The Jefferson County Public Library will be open Friday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and closed Saturday. • Post offices will have shortened hours Friday, and will be closed Saturday. Mail will not be delivered or picked up Saturday. • Liquor stores: On Friday, Bend North liquor store will be open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Bend East from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Bend West from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Bend South from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., La Pine from 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., Prineville from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Redmond South from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Redmond North from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sisters from 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunriver from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. On Saturday, Bend North liquor store will be open from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the Sunriver liquor store will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. All other liquor stores will be closed Saturday. • Banks will be closed Saturday. • Bend’s Juniper Swim and Fitness will close at 1 p.m. Friday and will be closed Saturday. The Cascade Swim Center in Redmond will close at 1 p.m. Friday and will be closed Saturday.

arlier this month, the Census Bureau released detailed community-based information through the American Community Survey. This survey, unlike the census, is conducted every year to provide information about the social and economic needs of cities nationwide. The census is completed every 10 years to provide an entire count of the U.S. population

to Congress. The information released in the American Community Survey is not an actual count, but it can still show specific estimated data from each community within the nation. As in most of the country, the Hispanic population here is growing rapidly. In Central Oregon, according to the American Community Survey data, there was an 8.4 percent increase in the Hispanic population from 2005 to 2009. Deschutes County, for instance, had an estimated Hispanic population of 9,409 in 2009 out of 151,879 people. The growth of the Hispanic population in Central Oregon can be seen in a number of ways. One is the expansion of the

work of Central Oregon’s Latino Community Association. The association is dedicated to helping the Latino community learn English and better interact with other Central Oregonians. The organization also assists community members with filing taxes and paying bills, and presents Hispanic residents with information about education and other resources in the area. Created in 1994, the association began in response to the evident increase in the Latino population. It initially started as a hot line created by St. Francis Church. “The increase in the Latino community was obvious to them at the time,� said Brad Porterfield, executive director of the Latino Community Association. See Population / C5

Racial makeup of Central Oregon counties compared to the United States $SPPL$PVOUZ

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Black 0.1% American Indian or Alaska Native 1.3% Asian 0.3% Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0% Other 1.3%

White 95.1%

Hispanic or Latino (all races) 7.3%

Black 0.4% American Indian or Alaska Native 1% Asian 1.2% White 93.8% Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander .1% Other 1.4% Hispanic or Latino (all races) 6.2%

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Want to take a closer look at the American Community Survey data? The New York Times has partnered with Google to plot all of the survey data by census tract. Visit http://projects.nytimes.com/census/2010 to explore the data. Source: American Community Survey

SPIRIT OF THE SEASON

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

SE C R E T SA N TA S

DMV may face suit over location change Brookswood Meadow shopping center owner claims breach of contract By Nick Grube The Bulletin

When the DMV told Scott Lovejoy, of Brookswood Meadow LLC, on Dec. 8 that it was no longer planning to move into his shopping center in southwest Bend, he responded by saying he didn’t think it was going to be the last chapter. In a way, he was right. The next one came the following day, and it happened to be penned on the letterhead used by Brookswood Meadow LLC’s attorneys, Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis. That letter, addressed to DMV Administrator Thomas McClellan, stated that the DMV, not Brookswood Meadow, had violated the terms of the lease agreement when it terminated its contract with the company. As a result, the letter states, the DMV’s attempt to get out of its lease should be considered “null and void� and the agency should move into the shopping center as originally planned or face possible litigation. Oregon Department of Transportation spokesman David Thompson said his agency — the umbrella organization for the DMV — still considers the lease with Brookswood Meadow terminated. He also said he could not comment on the letter from Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis since it could lead to litigation. “They’re obviously protesting the fact that we’re canceling the agreement,� Thompson said of Brookswood Meadow LLC. “Our attorneys from the Department of Justice tell us that we can’t comment on any of the details in any of the negotiations to end the agreement.� See DMV / C5

BOBBIE JONES CASE

Sain likely to spend rest of life in prison By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Operation Santa Claus volunteers Brie Freeman, from left, Peggy Foutz, Jenny Long and Maggie Henry wrap presents for families in need at the Boys & Girls Club of Bend on Tuesday. The Rivera Wealth Management Group is working with the Boys & Girls Club by raising funds to help families buy gifts and food for Christmas. This is the first year of Operation Santa Claus, and so far the group has raised $9,000 for needy families, according to one of its founders.

A man charged with killing a Spring River-area mother of two and dumping her body in the forest near Mt. Bachelor in August will likely spend the rest of his life in prison, it was announced We d n e s d ay in Deschutes County Circuit Court. Michael Shawn Sain Sr., 30, reached a plea deal with Michael Sain prosec utors Monday in the death of Roberta “Bobbie� Jones, 28. He was formally sentenced Wednesday. In exchange for the prosecution dropping aggravated murder charges — which could have led to a death penalty sentence — Sain pleaded guilty to one count each of murder, firstdegree abuse of a corpse, and felon in possession of a firearm. Sain will be eligible for parole in 36 years, eight months, but Judge Alta Brady said it’s unlikely a parole board will be sympathetic to any petition for release. See Sain / C6


C2 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

L B  

BAKER CITY

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358.

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Fund established to help Still family A fund for Chuck and Grant Still has been established at the Bank of the Cascades and Selco Credit Union, and donations are being sought to help support the Stills in the wake of their family tragedy, according to a news release. The fund, established by Still’s employer Pepsi-Cola Bend, will help the father and son pay for living expenses, ongoing medical care and future medical and counseling expenses. On Dec. 15, Chuck’s wife, Julie Still, 39, and his daughter, Gracie, 5, were found dead after being shot in their Bend home. Chuck’s son, Grant, 2, also suffered injuries in the incident, and was treated at Oregon Health Sciences University before being released. Those interested in donating can do so at any Bank of the Cascades or Selco Credit Union locations, or money can be mailed to the Pepsi-Cola Company of Bend, at 2440 NE 4th St., Bend, OR 97701.

Creswell School District settles civil rights lawsuit The Associated Press EUGENE — The Creswell School District has paid $10,000 to settle its part of a civil rights lawsuit in which school officials were accused of coercing a student to falsely confess to shooting a neighbor’s dog in 2008. The Eugene Register-Guard reports that the father of Levi Dunn filed the lawsuit in February. The suit alleges that Creswell Middle School principal Shirley Burrus and campus security supervisor Will Davey, along with Lane County sheriff’s deputies, interrogated Dunn until he falsely confessed, then paraded him in front of neighbors at the scene of the shooting. Ballistic tests later cleared him. The lawsuit says Dunn was ostracized and threatened after the false confession. He later moved away from Oregon because of it. Creswell Superintendent Rick Stuber says it agreed to pay the $10,000 but that the settlement does not include an apology or admission that policies were violated.

Bend Police Department

John Collins / Baker City Herald

Kelly Thibodeaux, left, reminds third-grade student Averi Elms of the finger movements before he plays a simple tune, at Brooklyn Primary School in Baker City on Dec. 15. Each student had the chance to play solo, with Thibodeaux accompanying them on the guitar.

‘Swamp rock’ musician helps kids fiddle around By Lisa Britton Baker City Herald

BAKER CITY — Jocelyn Wellman snugs the fiddle under her chin, then starts sawing away with the bow. Back and forth, back and forth — so far, sounds good. Then: squeak! She sticks out her tongue in annoyance as her eyes find instructor Kelly Thibodeaux. “It hurts my ears!� she says with a grin. Then she starts again, joining the cacophony that is warm-up time for the session Rick Rembold’s third-grade class is having with Thibodeaux, the artist-in-residence this week at Brooklyn Primary School. “With the reduction in staffing, we wanted the artist-in-residence to be music,� said Principal Troy Fisher. This year, music teacher Terry LaMont is dividing his time between Brooklyn, including kindergarten, Haines and Keating. Fisher said the students have enjoyed this week of fiddling. “This has been the most reaction to an artist-in-residence we’ve had in the six years I’ve been here,� he said. Fisher said the program was funded by grants from ArtsEast and Crossroads Carnegie Art Center. Also, Rob and Lori Thomas have donated the use of a guest house for Thibodeaux’s lodging.

From the Big Easy Thibodeaux grew up in New Orleans, but not with the fiddle. “I grew up with rock ’n’ roll music, and a family of engineers,� he said.

On the Web To learn more about Thibodeaux and his workshops, visit his Web site: www.etouffee.com.

He was one year shy of earning a degree in electrical engineering then changed his mind, and decided to play the fiddle instead. That was 35 years ago. Now he describes himself as a “working musician� with his band, Etouffee, that plays a style called swamp rock. He now lives in Oakridge, near Eugene. When he’s not playing, he’s teaching youngsters how to make the fiddle sing.

Sharing a love of music He brings about 40 fiddles with him for the students to play. Thibodeaux is full of stories, and these fiddles bring another one: he was in Louisiana when Hurricane Katrina hit. After the hurricane, he said the oil companies doubled the price of gasoline, and he didn’t think it was right to capitalize on other’s misfortune. “My only way to protest was to sell my gas-guzzling SUV and buy a Honda,� he said. “Then I bought all these fiddles.� At the beginning of a session, the students take up a fiddle and start rubbing rosin (made of tree sap) on the horsehair bow, which has to be sticky to work on the fiddle strings. “This is the only quiet part of the program, when they rosin up their bows,� he said. Then comes the warmup.

They improve every day, he said, as the sound of 20-some students “sawing� fills the room. “Believe it or not, I can hear that little song being played,� he said. “I’m teaching them a little dance fiddle tune, a little two-step.� After practicing for a few minutes, Thibodeaux takes up his guitar and brings the students up, one by one, to practice a short song. “Okay, short, short, long. Take it away,� he says, strumming the guitar in time with the young fiddler. When the students switch, Thibodeaux shares music tidbits with the class. “You know, a couple hundred years ago they didn’t have itty-bitty fiddles,� he said. “They only had one size, probably their grandpa’s. They’d saw on it till they got big enough to hold it off the ground.� He said a fiddle which is also a violin was made to imitate people. It is shaped like a human (an hourglass shape) with the scroll representing hair, strings the vocal cords, and the bow providing the vibration that creates sound.

Kids get hooked “Fiddles are magical,� he said. And youngsters take right to these instruments, especially when he welcomes them with a catchy dance tune. “With a kid, if you don’t grab their attention right away, you won’t get it,� he said. Most can’t get enough. “The most significant thing is it’s an amazing self-esteem builder,� he said. And then they’re hooked. “After this, they all want fiddles,� he said with a grin.

Theft — A theft was reported at 10:17 a.m. Dec. 21, in the 2700 block of Northeast Laramie Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:18 a.m. Dec. 21, in the 20900 block of Miramar Drive. Theft — A theft was reported at 10:20 a.m. Dec. 21, in the 1100 block of Northwest Newport Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:57 p.m. Dec. 21, in the area of Northeast Neff Road and Northeast Purcell Boulevard. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:26 p.m. Dec. 21, in the 900 block of Southeast Stratford Court. DUII — Dallas William Kittle, 53, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:46 p.m. Dec. 21, in the area of Southwest Century Drive and Southwest Chandler Avenue. Unlawful entry — Vehicles were reported entered at 7:41 a.m. Dec. 22, at 9th Street RV Storage Center. Redmond Police Department

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and wallet stolen at 9:14 p.m. Dec. 21, in the 600 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and purse stolen at 8:32 p.m. Dec. 21, in the 400 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 2:15 p.m. Dec. 21, in the 1600 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 1:33 p.m. Dec. 21, in the 1700 block of Southwest Odem Medo Road. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:07 p.m. Dec. 21, in the 900 block of Southwest Veterans Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:35 a.m. Dec. 21, in the area of Southwest 23rd Street and Southwest Quartz Avenue. DUII — Evan Tyler Smith, 27, was arrested on suspicion of driving

under the influence of intoxicants at 1:04 a.m. Dec. 21, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Obsidian Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:31 p.m. Dec. 21, in the area of Northwest Fourth Street. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:40 p.m. Dec. 21, in the area of 73rd Street and Limestone Avenue in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:52 p.m. Dec. 21, in the area of 73rd Street and Limestone Avenue in Bend. DUII — Aaron P. Hempy, 32, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 3:23 p.m. Dec. 21, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 and State Highway 126 in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:15 p.m. Dec. 21, in the area of Bridge and Serpentine drives in La Pine.

BEND FIRE RUNS Tuesday 4:31 p.m. — Unauthorized burning, 19086 Riverwoods Drive. 8:04 p.m. — Smoke odor reported, 60871 Windsor Drive. 14 — Medical aid calls.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-4477178 — or check the website at www.humanesocietyochocos .com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541-923-0882 — or refer to the website at www .redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Pit bull mix — Adult female, red brindle; found near West Antler Avenue. Australian shepherd — Older female, black, white and gray; found near U.S. Highway 97 and Northwest Davidson Way in Terrebonne.

Sea otter debuts in Newport The Associated Press NEWPORT — A sea otter rescued from Alaska has made its debut in the outdoor exhibit at the Oregon Coast Aquarium in Newport. The Oregonian reports the staff watched closely Tuesday as 8-month old Mojo met a 12-year-old sea otter named Hunter. The staff says Hunter

gave Mojo a gentle bite to establish dominance, then the two splashed and groomed each other before swimming their separate ways.

LEARN GOLF AT HOME! Bend’s Golf Doctor and PGA Life Member Bill Martin will make house calls! Learn your swing before you ever hit a golf ball.

• No weather interference • Privacy while you learn • No ball hypnosis Bill Martin

541-480-3153 to book a lesson at home!

Today is Thursday, Dec. 23, the 357th day of 2010. There are 8 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 23, 1968, 82 crew members of the U.S. intelligence ship Pueblo were released by North Korea, 11 months after they had been captured. ON THIS DATE In 1783, George Washington resigned as commander in chief of the Continental Army and retired to his home at Mount Vernon, Va. In 1788, Maryland passed an act to cede an area “not exceeding 10 miles square� for the seat of the national government; about two-thirds of the area became the District of Columbia. In 1823, the poem “Account of a Visit from St. Nicholas� was published anonymously in the Troy (N.Y.) Sentinel; the verse, more popularly known as “ ’Twas the Night Before Christmas,� was later attributed to Clement C. Moore. In 1893, the Engelbert Hum-

T O D AY IN HISTORY perdinck opera “Haensel und Gretel� was first performed, in Weimar, Germany. In 1928, the National Broadcasting Company set up a permanent, coast-to-coast network. In 1941, during World War II, American forces on Wake Island surrendered to the Japanese. In 1948, former Japanese premier Hideki Tojo and six other Japanese war leaders were executed in Tokyo. In 1967, President Lyndon B. Johnson held an unprecedented meeting with Pope Paul VI at the Vatican. In 1975, Richard Welch, the Central Intelligence Agency station chief in Athens, was shot and killed outside his home by the militant group November 17. In 1980, a state funeral was held in Moscow for former Premier Alexei Kosygin, who had died Dec. 18 at age 76. TEN YEARS AGO Pro-democracy forces claimed a sweeping victory in Serbia’s

parliamentary elections. Death claimed comedian Victor Borge in Greenwich, Conn., at age 91 and actor Billy Barty in Glendale, Calif., at age 76. FIVE YEARS AGO Chad declared itself in a “state of belligerence� with Sudan, accusing its neighbor of aggression. An Azerbaijan Airlines passenger plane carrying 23 people crashed into the Caspian Sea, killing all on board. ONE YEAR AGO Richard and Mayumi Heene, the parents who had pulled the “balloon boy� hoax in hopes of landing a reality TV show, were sentenced by a judge in Fort Collins, Colo., to jail — 90 days for him, 20 days for her. Gary Patterson, who had guided TCU to its best season in 70 years, became the first Associated Press Coach of the Year from outside the six conferences with automatic BCS bids. Yitzhak Ahronovitch, captain of the Exodus during a 1947 attempt to take Holocaust survivors to Palestine, died in northern Israel at age 86.

TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Gerald O’Loughlin is 89. Actor Ronnie Schell is 79. Emperor Akihito of Japan is 77. Pro Football Hall of Famer Paul Hornung is 75. Actor Frederic Forrest is 74. Actor James Stacy is 74. Rock musician Jorma Kaukonen is 70. Rock musician Ron Bushy is 69. Actor-comedian Harry Shearer is 67. Gen. Wesley Clark (ret.) is 66. Actress Susan Lucci is 64. Singer-musician Adrian Belew is 61. Rock musician Dave Murray (Iron Maiden) is 54. Actress Joan Severance is 52. Singer Terry Weeks is 47. Rock singer Eddie Vedder (Pearl Jam) is 46. The first lady of France, Carla Bruni-Sarkozy, is 43. Rock musician Jamie Murphy is 35. Jazz musician Irvin Mayfield is 33. Actress Estella Warren is 32. Actress Anna Maria Perez de Tagle is 20. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “All that is really necessary for survival of the fittest, it seems, is an interest in life, good, bad or peculiar.� — Grace Paley, American writer (1922-2007)

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 C3

O Marine reserves send fish far and wide, study shows

O  B Shots fired in struggle at dog groomer’s SWEET HOME — A man wielding a shotgun was arrested after he allegedly rushed into his girlfriend’s dog-grooming business and fired two shots during a struggle. The Democrat-Herald reported that Barry Boydston was dropped off at the business by his brother, who was arrested later Monday on suspicion of drunken driving. Boydston allegedly pointed a sawed-off shotgun at a store employee as his girlfriend, Cindy Blondin, attempted to restrain him. During the struggle, Boydston fired two shots. One struck a tub where a dog was being bathed — the dog was unscathed — and another hit the ceiling. Boydston surrendered to authorities and was facing assault and weapons charges.

Drug ring leader gets 25-year sentence PORTLAND — A Mexican national has been sentenced to 25 years in federal prison after his conviction on charges that he led a drug ring that supplied methamphetamine to east Portland for five months. U.S. District Court Judge Anna Brown has sentenced 27year-old Rafael Romero-Duarte after his October conviction. The U.S. Attorney’s Office says the investigation involved a five-month wiretap of several telephones and an undercover operation that led to RomeroDuarte’s arrest. He was alleged to have been the leader of an operation of drug runners, stash houses and cash couriers who managed to distribute between two and eight pounds of methamphetamine to Portland between November 2008 and April 2009.

Abusive mom’s father seeks custody of kids EUGENE —The father of a woman who is serving time in prison for abusing her adopted 9year-old boy is seeking custody of four of the boy’s siblings. The Eugene Register-Guard reports that Jesse McCurry, father of Alona Lee Hartwig, is disputing a Department of Human Services ruling that accuses him of neglecting the 9-year-old boy whom his daughter abused. Hartwig is serving 10 years in prison. Her husband is serving five years. McCurry’s attorney, Max Mizejewski, said Tuesday that his client believes the state’s ruling is preventing him from being a foster parent for the children, who are in state custody. The state contends McCurry was negligent about the boy’s abuse. Two of the children are the 9year-old’s biological siblings.

Protected zones help replenish faraway fish populations, OSU researchers find By Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

Rick Bowmer / The Associated Press

Joshua Turnidge is led away in chains Wednesday after a jury at Marion County Circuit Court in Salem decided his fate and that of his father, Bruce Turnidge, right, in the bombing of a Woodburn bank. Jurors recommended the death penalty for the pair, who were convicted Dec. 8 of planting the bomb that exploded inside the bank two years ago, killing two police officers and maiming a third. They will be formally sentenced by a judge Jan. 24.

Bank bombers should be executed, jury says By Jonathan J. Cooper The Associated Press

SALEM — A jury Wednesday recommended that a father and his son be sentenced to death for planting a bomb that exploded inside a Woodburn bank two years ago, killing two police officers and maiming a third. In a trial that spanned three months, prosecutors portrayed Bruce and Joshua Turnidge as bigoted men who hated authorities, were desperate for money and feared that newly elected President Barack Obama would take away their guns.

Automatic appeal Both defendants stood with their lawyers and stared straight forward, showing no emotion as Marion County Circuit Judge Tom Hart read the jury’s decisions. Sheriff’s deputies handcuffed them and led them away to be jailed until Hart formally sentences them Jan. 24. The judge is bound by the jury’s death sentence and

cannot impose a lesser penalty. However, because the case involves capital punishment, it automatically will be appealed to the Oregon Supreme Court.

each pointing the finger at the other for building and planting the bomb, which prosecutors said was part of a plan to rob the bank.

‘No remorse’

Dangerous beliefs?

The same jury convicted the men Dec. 8 on 18 counts each of aggravated murder and other charges in the December 2008 bombing at the West Coast Bank in Woodburn. The homemade bomb killed state police bomb technician William Hakim, who was trying to dismantle it, and Woodburn Police Capt. Tom Tennant, who was helping. “This is a murderer with no remorse,” prosecutor Matt Kemmy said in his closing argument of the penalty phase Tuesday. Both men have maintained their innocence. Father and son turned on each other in trial,

Prosecutors urged jurors to sentence the men to death to prevent them from endangering prison staff or preaching their hatred for authorities to young prisoners who will someday be released. The men were convicted after prosecutors argued that the Turnidges had fantasies of building bombs, robbing banks and starting an anti-government militia. They hatched the bank robbery plan because they needed money to keep their struggling biodiesel company afloat, prosecutors said.

GRANTS PASS — Scientists now have hard evidence for something they have long believed — that establishing no-fishing zones in the ocean will help replenish fish populations far away that have been overharvested. Authors of the study published online Wednesday in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE said it bolsters scientific evidence for establishing marine reserves in coastal waters, which have faced stiff opposition from the fishing industry. Lead author Mark Christie of Oregon State University said they used DNA sampling on 1,073 yellow tang, a popular aquarium fish, off the Kona Coast of Hawaii in 2006 and found their offspring were as far as 114 miles away. Two fish in unprotected areas were genetically linked to parents inside protected areas. The study was funded by Conservation International. Previously, the idea that tiny larvae spawned inside marine reserves would be widely dispersed by ocean currents was based on computer models. Christie said the new study should help locate marine reserves to maximize their effectiveness at reseeding depleted

fishing areas. “Logic dictates that the larvae that come out of marine protected areas have to go somewhere,” said Stephen Palumbi, professor of marine sciences at Stanford University, who did not take part in the study. “What this study has done is provide really the first very direct evidence of this happening over a broader scale..” State and federal governments and conservation groups have been creating reserves to conserve and replenish fish stocks depleted by overfishing. But they have been opposed by the fishing industry, which has demanded scientific evidence for reducing the places they can make their living. California this month created a new series of no-fishing zones from the Mexican border to Santa Barbara, and fishing industry groups have threatened lawsuits. In Oregon, only two reserves have been created during years of wrangling, and they are not yet enforced. Three more have been proposed. Peter Moyle, professor of fisheries at the University of California at Davis, cautioned that the study is for one species of fish and one reef system, and should be replicated, especially for rockfish off the coast of California.

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Woman, dog rescued from muddy riverbank WILSONVILLE — A Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue crew pulled a woman and her dog from the muddy bank of the Willamette River at Wilsonville. The department says Jackie Janopolo called for help Tuesday evening after she waded into the water to save her 150-pound Burmese mountain dog when he became stuck in the mud. Firefighters found Janopolo clinging to a tree at Memorial Park and pulled her and her dog, named Bernie, to safety with a rope. Neither was injured.

Tanning salon photos case won’t go to trial MCMINNVILLE — Yamhill County prosecutors have dropped an invasion-of-privacy charge filed last year against a man accused of using a cell phone to photograph women tanning at the business his parents then owned in Sheridan. The McMinnville News-Register reports that the case was scheduled for trial Wednesday and Thursday, but the prosecutors said in a hearing there was insufficient evidence to go ahead on the misdemeanor charge against 20-year-old Collin Serres. — From wire reports

1865 NE Highway 20, Bend M o n – S a t 9 –7 | S u n 1 0 – 6

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Larvae from yellow tang, left, living in marine reserves off Hawaii grew into adult fish in unprotected areas far away, according to a new study. Oregon State University via The Associated Press


C4 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Sell property, then fix up jail

J

ust months ago, voters clobbered a $44 million bond that would have allowed Deschutes County to remodel and expand its jail. Now, Sheriff Larry Blanton, with the blessing of county

commissioners, has decided to borrow almost $1 million from those very same voters. The money will pay for a handful of projects that would have been funded by the defeated bond, including a significant expansion of the staff lounge area. Blanton certainly knows his business, so we’re happy to accept his assessment of the county jail. Built more than a decade ago, it’s somewhat outdated and ill-equipped to handle — comfortably, anyway — the number of people who now work there. In an ideal world, a bigger staff area would be nice, as would the other improvements under consideration. These include an expansion of the locker room used by male staff and a reconfiguration of the central control room to create office space for on-duty sergeants, says Blanton. But we don’t live in an ideal world. Voters just told the county they didn’t want to pay more to increase jail capacity. Why, then, does it make sense to borrow their money to expand a locker room and quadruple the size of the staff area, which will grow from roughly 300 square feet to about 1,250, including a janitorial closet, according Susan Ross, the county’s property and facilities director? Blanton considers these improvements necessary, but he acknowledges that the jail would not cease to function if the county opted not to make them now. The money — $900,000, to be exact — has been paid by property owners who live in the countywide tax district approved by voters in 2006. The sheriff’s office saved money in much the same way that a homeowner might save to buy a dishwasher, Blanton explained to a Bulletin reporter this week. We suspect many taxpayers might see things a little differently. They might, for instance, have preferred the county to lower their tax rate marginally — effectively returning the money — rather than spending it on

capital improvements just months after they turned down a capital bond. Alternatively, they might have preferred the sheriff’s office to keep the money in reserve for the time being, if for no other reason than to decrease the likelihood of a hike in their tax rates. This summer, Blanton opted to cut the countywide law enforcement tax rate by 3 cents per $1,000 of assessed value, and most taxpayers would surely like the rate to stay there for a while. After all, how many of them have had the money recently to make household renovations that weren’t absolutely necessary? Blanton does make a convincing case that at least one proposed project — an expansion of his office’s evidence storage area — is a necessity. According to Ross, the expansion amounts to roughly 500 square feet. But other expansions — including the staff area and the male locker room — are quality-oflife improvements that jail employees can certainly live without, at least for the time being. Like most taxpayers, no doubt, we believe jail employees should enjoy decent working conditions, and we have no problem with Blanton spending the necessary money when appropriate. When might that be? The county’s own funding mechanism provides a reasonable answer. What commissioners agreed to this week was, in effect, a loan. The sheriff will be free to spend up to $900,000 of tax district funds on the improvements he considers necessary, and the county promises to repay the money from real estate sales — when and if the county manages to sell enough property in a recovered real estate market. Why not leave taxpayers’ money where it is — minus whatever’s needed to expand the evidence storage area — and pay for non-vital remodeling projects with the proceeds from actual land sales?

Eco-group’s plea for press, money T

he Washington, D.C.-based Environmental Working Group (EWG) has certainly made headlines with a recently released report decrying the presence of chromium-6 in tap water collected from 31 cities, including Bend. But, then, grabbing headlines raises the group’s profile, which is a great way to generate contributions. And if there’s a group that could use a few generous donors, it’s EWG. Last year, the group’s expenses (about $5.1 million) exceeded its revenues (about $3.5 million) by over 45 percent, according to EWG’s 2009 annual report. Just the reverse had been true during the group’s previous five years, particularly 2008, when revenues (about $6.6 million) exceeded expenses (about $4.8 million) by about 38 percent. Operating significantly in the red for a year

didn’t put the group under, obviously, but it was surely a significant motivator to scrape up some more contributions. After all, environmental advocacy doesn’t come free, what with the need to provide six-figure incomes to seven employees, according to the group’s 990 tax form for 2009. These include EWG President Kenneth Cook ($211,818), Executive Director Richard Wiles ($180,616) and Communications Director Alexander Formuzis ($125,142). Then again, maybe we’re wrong. Maybe the group is motivated entirely by a desire to provide accurate and credible information. If that’s so, it should have no problem reversing course and divulging who collected Bend’s tap water sample, where it was collected and when. After all, nothing says “shoddy science” like secrecy.

Creche collectors gone wild L

ast Christmas I got a jolt. I learned that my brother Kevin collects creches. They were all over his house, crammed onto every mantle, table, counter, lawn and closet — 17 in all, including the little plastic stable my mom put over the fireplace when we were little. I was perturbed. I knew Kevin, a salesman, was a fanatical guardian of the word Christmas, as opposed to the pagan, generic “holiday,” but I had no idea that he had such a monomaniacal hobby. Maybe I was scarred by reading “The Glass Menagerie” as a teenager. But, books and records aside, collections always struck me as vaguely creepy. I had shuddered for years as my sister accumulated clowns and “Don Quixote” objects. And the porcelain baby collection of an older cousin actually made me feel queasy. I wondered why Kevin was so obsessive about creches. Was it a way to stay close to our late mother? An homage to our old church, Nativity? As a child, he treated St. Joseph, the shepherds and three kings as action figures, staging smackdowns. “The shepherd had an advantage because he was holding the lamb, and he could use it as a weapon,” Kevin recalled fondly. I also remembered that he got very upset one year when St. Joseph was stolen from the outdoor nativity scene at Nativity, and he fretted over why Christ’s stepfather disappeared from the New Testament so abruptly. Could that make him hoard a houseful of St. Josephs — and send his three sons to a college named St. Joseph’s? I was curious enough about the manger mania that when he told me he’d been invited to the Friends of the Creche annual convention in New Haven one weekend in November, I asked if I could go, too. Touring the creche display at the

MAUREEN DOWD Knights of Columbus hall, we met collectors who had 300, 500, even 600 creches, the kind who might put an addition on the house just to display their stables. Kevin began to feel inadequate with a mere 15. (He gave two to his oldest son.) Bonnie Psanenstiel, a 52-year-old nurse from Owensboro, Ky., told me that she has 500 sets packed into her “Nativity meditation room,” even though “I’m not really into religion.” She got her first, which was handcarved out of olive wood, on a high school trip to Morocco and spent four years baby-sitting and cleaning houses to pay it off. She’s most attached to the set given to her by a woman she helped when she was a rape-incest counseling volunteer. “We used to sit by the Mississippi River and just talk,” Bonnie said as she started to cry. “She would slowly gather up some of this Delta clay, and she made me a set.” She believes Nativities represent “renewal.” The Rev. Tim Goldrick, the gregarious pastor of St. Nicholas Church in Fall River, Mass., said his grandfather told him it was a Portuguese-Azorian tradition that the man of the house set up the creche. He begged to put up their Woolworth’s set. For years, the priest kept hundreds of creches in milk crates in his guest room, which precluded actual guests. “There was no room in the inn,” he said wryly. When he transferred from his last parish, he called a mover and explained that he owned no furniture but did have

a lot of Christmas decorations. “It took three men two days to box them up and ship them,” he said. Mike Whalen, 61, of Clinton Township, Mich., the president of the creche society and proud owner of 400, said he doesn’t know of creche fixations causing any marital battles. “There’s a lady from California whose husband is Jewish, and he’s very involved,” Whalen said. “He came up with an Excel system to organize things.” Rita Bocher of Wynnewood, Pa., does the society’s newsletter. In the ’80s, doing market research for the Franklin Mint, she had to research creches. “I thought nobody collects Nativities,” she said. “Turned out, I was totally wrong.” Now she has 700 subscribers around the world. She saw her favorite in a German museum. It was a prequel, showing the Magi getting ready to go on their trip, ordering around servants, gathering gold, frankincense and myrrh. Goldrick explained to Kevin that St. Joseph might have disappeared so abruptly all those years ago from the belief that if you bury a St. Joseph statue in the yard, you can sell your house quicker. (A tradition that has revived with the downturn in the real estate market, according to The Wall Street Journal.) I couldn’t fight the fanatics, so I joined them. At the convention I bought a Cape Cod creche made by Nathaniel Wordell of South Chatham, Mass. Mary’s a mermaid. The baby Jesus is covered with a striped beach towel. The Wise Men are a crab, a crocodile and a sea horse. The “livestock” are a frog, a turtle and starfish. Joseph has a trident. Sadly, it did not draw my brother and me closer. “That is sacrilegious,” Kevin said, staring in horror. “The Virgin Mary does not have a tail.” Maureen Dowd is a columnist for The New York Times.

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We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or OpEd piece every 30 days.

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Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

Unyielding Somali doctor is heroic, female and Muslim W NICHOLAS hat’s the ugliest side of Islam? Maybe it’s the Somali Muslim militias that engage in atrocities like the execution of a 13-year-old girl named Aisha Ibrahim. Three men raped Aisha, and when she reported the crime she was charged with illicit sex, half-buried in the ground before a crowd of 1,000 and then stoned to death. That’s the extremist side of Islam that drives Islamophobia in the United States, including congressional hearings on American Muslims that House Republicans are planning for next year. But there’s another side of Islam as well, represented by an extraordinary Somali Muslim woman, Dr. Hawa Abdi, who has confronted the armed militias. Amazingly, she forced them to back down — and even submit a written apology. Glamour magazine, which named Hawa a “woman of the year,” got it exactly right when it called her “equal parts Mother Teresa

and Rambo.” Hawa, a 63-year-old ob-gyn who earned a law degree on the side, is visiting the United States to raise money for her health work back home. A member of Somalia’s elite, she founded a one-room clinic in 1983, but then the Somalian government collapsed, famine struck, and aid groups fled. So today Hawa is running a 400-bed hospital. Over the years, the hospital became the core of something even grander. Thousands of people displaced by civil war came to shelter on Hawa’s 1,300 acres of farmland around the hospital. Today her home and hospital have been overtaken by a vast camp that she says numbers about 90,000 displaced people. Hawa supplies these 90,000 people with drinking water and struggles to find ways to feed them. She worries that handouts breed dependency (and in any case, United Nations agencies can’t safely

KRISTOF reach her now to distribute food), so she is training formerly nomadic herding families to farm and even to fish in the sea. She’s also pushing education. An American freelance journalist, Eliza Griswold, visited Hawa’s encampment in 2007 and 2008 and was stunned that an unarmed woman had managed to create a secure, functioning oasis surrounded by a chaotic land of hunger and warlords. Griswold helped Hawa start a school for 850 children, mostly girls. In addition, Hawa runs literacy and health classes for women, and programs

to discourage female genital mutilation. And she operates a tiny jail — for men who beat their wives. “We are trying an experiment,” she told me. “We women in Somalia are trying to be leaders in our community.” So Hawa had her hands full already — and then in May a hard-line militia, Hizb al-Islam, or Party of Islam, decided that a woman shouldn’t run anything substantial. The militia ordered her to hand over operations, and she refused — and pointedly added: “I may be a woman, but I’m a doctor. What have you done for society?” The Party of Islam then attacked with 750 soldiers and seized the hospital. The world’s Somalis reacted with outrage, and the militia backed down and ordered Hawa to run the hospital, but under its direction. She refused. For a week there were daily negotiations, but Hawa refused to budge. She demanded that the militia not only withdraw entirely but

also submit a written apology. “I was begging her, ‘Just give in,’ ” recalled Deqo Mohamed, her daughter, a doctor in Atlanta who spoke regularly to her mother by telephone. “She was saying, ‘No! I will die with dignity.’ ” It didn’t come to that. The Party of Islam tired of being denounced by Somalis at home and around the world, so it slinked off and handed over an apology — but also left behind a wrecked hospital. The operating theater still isn’t functional, and that’s why Hawa is here, appealing for money (especially from ethnic Somalis). What a woman! And what a Muslim! It’s because of people like her that sweeping denunciations of Islam, or the “Muslim hearings” planned in Congress, rile me — and seem profoundly misguided. Nicholas Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 C5

O D

N   John Stovall, of Redmond Sept. 29, 1944 - Dec. 21, 2010 Arrangements: Redmond Memorial Chapel, 541-548-3219 Services: No services will be held.

June Velda Stover, of Prineville July 14, 1931 - Dec. 23, 2010 Arrangements: Prineville Funeral Home 541-447-6459 Services: Funeral services will be held on Thursday, December 23, 2010, at Prineville Funeral Home, at 1:00 p.m. Pastor Dusty Flegel will officiate.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

Everett Warren Brock Feb. 8, 1919 - Dec. 15, 2010 Everett Warren Brock passed away at the age of 91, on December 15, 2010. Everett is survived by his children, Deanna, Colleen, Michael, Patrick, Julie, Sheri, Cynthia, John, and Mary; his brother, Frank Brock; 16 grandchildren and 17 great-grandchildren. Everett was predeceased by his beloved wife, Colleen Catherine (McKay) Brock of 67 years, who suffered from Alzheimer's in her final days. Everett was devastated by her affliction and stayed close by her side to the end. The family feels that Everett would be pleased with any memorial contributions made to Alzheimer's Research in care of Herring Grosclose Funeral Home at 315 W. Alder, Walla Walla, Washington, in the name of Everett Brock for his wife, Colleen. Everett's services were in Walla Walla, Washington. He was laid to rest in his family plot next to generations of family members and his wife Colleen. Everett was born February 8, 1919, in Touchet, Washington, where he farmed and entered sales for the first 50 years of his life. He moved to Central Oregon and had his home base there the next 41 years. Everett passed away at the home of his daughter, Sheri (Brock) Wood in Terrebonne, Oregon. Everett will be remembered by those who knew him for his stories, candid sense of humor, energetic interest in life and generosity with his time in support of family, friends and others. It is now his time to rest in peace in the arms of his Savior and Creator.

Announcer Fred Foy best known for work on ‘Lone Ranger’

Marcia Lewis, left, and Bebe Neuwirth perform in “Chicago” at the Richard Rogers Theater in New York on Oct. 23, 1996. Lewis was known for bringing a comic brassiness to the Broadway musicals in which she appeared.

By Dennis McLellan Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — Fred Foy, a radio and television announcer best known for conjuring up “those thrilling days of yesteryear” in the late 1940s and ’50s as the announcernarrator of “The Lone Ranger,” has died. He was 89. Foy died Wednesday of age-related causes at his home in Woburn, Mass., said his daughter, Nancy Foy. This 2003 During a family photo broadcastprovided by ing career Nancy Foy shows her fa- that began ther, Fred Foy, in Detroit in 1940, at the OldFoy spent Time Radio more than convention in 20 years as Newark, N.J. a staff announcer for ABC television and radio before retiring in the mid-1980s. His early career included stints announcing radio’s “The Green Hornet” and “The Challenge of the Yukon,” and he later was the announcer on “The Dick Cavett Show” on ABC in the late ’60s and early ’70s. But for many, Foy remains best remembered for his stentorian delivery of what many consider the most famous opening lines in broadcast history: “A fiery horse with the speed of light, a cloud of dust and a hearty ‘Hi-yo, Silver’ — the Lone Ranger!”

DMV Continued from C1 Neither Lovejoy nor his attorney, John Berge, of Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis, was available for comment Wednesday. The DMV announced in late August that it had signed a lease with Brookswood Meadow LLC for a spot in the company’s Brookswood Meadow Plaza. The plaza is located on the corner of Brookswood Boulevard and Amber Meadow Drive. The move was supposed to get the DMV out of its temporary location on the north side of Bend and put the agency’s offices in a permanent home, which it hasn’t had since its lease ran out at its longtime location on Emkay Drive.

Unhappy neighbors But after the DMV made its plans public, there was community backlash. Some neighbors in the surrounding RiverRim community feared the increased traffic would put their kids’ safety in jeopardy and would inconvenience the neighborhood. Others, including many Bend city councilors, believed the shopping center was in an out-of-the-way location for the rest of the community. Despite these concerns, it appeared inevitable the DMV would move into Brookswood Meadow Plaza, since it had already signed a lease with the shopping center’s owners. Pleas made by concerned citizens to state and local officials went largely unanswered. It wasn’t until the city put a hold on the building permits

New York Times News Service ile photo

Actress/singer Lewis was a Tony nominee By Bruce Weber New York Times News Service

Marcia Lewis, an actress and singer known for bringing a comic brassiness to Broadway revivals of “Grease” and “Chicago,” died on Tuesday in Nashville. She was 72. The cause was lung cancer, said her husband, Fred Bryan. A sturdy woman with a sturdily high-pitched voice that she could muster to comically piercing effect, Lewis came to prominence late in her performing life, when she was already in her 50s. She earned her first Broadway credit in the original production (though not the original cast) of “Hello, Dolly!”

A storied career She subsequently led the respectable career of a character actress for three decades, appearing in TV sitcoms, occasional films and theater productions on and off Broadway. Then, in 1994, she landed a role in a revival of the hit 1972

needed to get the shopping center ready for the DMV that the agency backed out of its lease. Because the city wanted to go through a land-use process to ensure Brookswood Meadow Plaza had enough parking for the DMV, it effectively pushed back the move-in date for the agency and gave it a loophole to get out of its contract.

Accusations But according to the Dec. 9 letter Brookswood Meadow LLC’s attorney sent to the DMV, the delay was for “reasons beyond the control” of the company. The letter states this provides an exemption to the DMV’s reason for termination of the lease, and, in fact, is found in the same section of the contract that the state agency cited in its termination letter to Lovejoy. The Bryant, Lovlien & Jarvis letter also asserts the DMV breached its contract with Brookswood Meadow LLC by notifying the city that it was terminating its lease at the shopping center, and therefore tried to influence city officials who were making decisions on the building permits. “This is clearly an attempt to persuade the City not to issue the requisite building permits, which constitutes a breach by the DMV under the Lease for acting in bad faith and intentional interference with business relations under Oregon law,”

musical “Grease.” The revival, which also starred Rosie O’Donnell, was roundly scorned by critics but lasted four years, and Lewis was nominated for a Tony Award as best featured actress for her performance as Miss Lynch, the crabby old-maid English teacher. In 1996 she was in the opening-night cast of the long-running Broadway hit “Chicago,” which began life as part of the “Encores!” series of musicals in concert. (The original “Chicago” ran on Broadway from 1975 to 1977.) Lewis played Mama Morton, a prison matron who shares the profane show-stopping duet “Class” with the murderess Velma Kelly and belts out an audience favorite of her own, “When You’re Good to Mama.” Again she was nominated for a Tony. “She was so outrageous and so excellent,” said Joel Grey, a friend of Lewis’ who also starred in “Chicago.” “People used to gather in the wings to watch her.”

the letter states. “Further, the DMV’s distribution of the letters and e-mail correspondence with the City of Bend also constitutes a breach … because this is the release of confidential information or otherwise of a sensitive nature.”

City fires back City officials have disputed that they made any decisions regarding the DMV or Brookswood Meadow LLC based on politics. The city also recently affirmed that the shopping center had enough parking spaces for the DMV, and can issue building permits as soon as an appeal period for that decision ends next week. Planning Manager Colin Stephens said if an appeal is received, it will first be heard by a hearings officer in Bend. After that, an appeal of that decision could go to the Oregon Land Use Board of Appeals. “There’s been this discussion about the staff getting political pressure and making this lastminute decision to ram them through this loophole, and that’s not what happened,” Stephens said about the reason to place the initial hold on the building permits. “We were very cautious about how we would go through with this process.” Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

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bendbulletin.com Obituary Dept. 541-617-7825

Passion for performing Marcia Bernice Lewis was born in Melrose, Mass., on Aug. 18, 1938. Her father, an engineer for General Electric, was transferred when Marcia was a girl, and she grew up mostly in Cincinnati. She attended the University of Cincinnati and became a registered nurse, but she also performed in local theater productions and in her early 20s moved to New York City to become a professional actress. Lewis played Miss Hannigan in the original Broadway run of “Annie” and Golde in the 1990 revival of “Fiddler on the Roof.” Other theater credits include the musicals “Rags” and “Rosa” and the 1989 revival of “Orpheus Descending.” On TV, she appeared in “The Bob Newhart Show,” “Baretta,” “Happy Days,” “Kate and Allie,” “Mr. Belvedere,” “Goodtime Girls” and the miniseries “Rich Man, Poor Man.” She was also a cabaret singer and recorded a solo album, “Nowadays,” in 1998.

Population Continued from C1 “The church is where the majority of Latinos practice, so the hot line was started to assist them,” he said. “By 2000, the need began to grow, so it was developed into a nonprofit. It started pretty small, but by 2006, we started to expand and created other branches and other means to help reach the entire community, to get them involved.” Porterfield said it does much more than just bridge the language barrier. “We have English tutors, typically volunteers, that meet with a student or a group of students once a week,” he said. “We also provide basic assistance, giving referrals on any number of things, including medical, legal and educational areas, helping them get in touch with people they need to around the area

Market Continued from C1 “The remaining incidents which are alleged to have occurred outside the premises or in the immediate vicinity thereof have not been proved to have involved patrons of the establishment or to be related to the sale of alcohol.” Alcohol is not sold on the Warm Springs Indian Reservation. If the Rainbow Market were to stop selling alcohol, residents would likely have to drive to Madras for liquor, wine and beer. The OLCC has sanctioned Rainbow Market in the past. In 2006, an employee did not check for identification of a person who looked younger than 26 years old, violating Oregon liquor regulations. In 2007, the market and its owner, Roxanne McInturff, were ticketed for allowing drinking in the parking lot and the market received a 23day suspension. In 2009, the market was in the news when it faced with a 30-day liquor license suspension in connection with the arrest of an off-duty employee outside the store. After the suspension was appealed, the OLCC commission decided the market was not at fault. “No one is denying there are problems at Rainbow Market,” said OLCC spokeswoman Christie Scott. “Legally (the judge) is finding it hard to tie the problems outside the Rainbow Market to the sale and service inside the market. Because they take their drink, walk away and drink it in the next lot.” The commission does not have to accept the administrative law judge’s decision, Scott said. “But whatever decision they do make has to have a legal basis,” she said. Any decision the OLCC makes can be appealed to the Oregon Court of Appeals. Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

for help or information.” The association provides dental clinics for adults and children, partnering with other organizations in the area. On average, the association assists over 125 people a month and is always accepting of more volunteers. “The volunteer program is a huge part of what we do,” said Porterfield. “The English tutor is a popular volunteer position, but we also have volunteers that help in the office, and those usually need to be bilingual. We always need help at the events we put on, and you don’t necessarily have to be bilingual for those. We’re just glad to have the help.” For more information about the Latino Community Association, visit www.latinocommunityassociation.org. Molly Black can be reached at 541-617-7836 or at mblack@bendbulletin.com.

Fumiko Ezawa Mount Fumiko Ezawa Mount died peacefully in the arms of her loving daughter in Bend, Oregon, on December 17th. Fumiko was 85 years old. Fumiko was born in Chiba-ken, Japan. Fumiko and her late husband, Parker, met in Japan where they were married and had a son, Robert, and a daughter, Momi. In 1957, they moved to Oakridge, Oregon where they lived, worked and raised their family. Parker passed away in 1983, and in 1986 Fumiko moved to Bend, Oregon, to live with her daughter’s family. Fumiko was a loving, caring, cheerful presence who left a lasting impression on the many lives she touched. Fumiko enjoyed gardening, shopping, dining out, and playing slot machines. Fumiko loved her family dearly and would do anything for her children, grandchildren and friends. Fumiko is survived by her son, Robert, her daughter, Momi, her grandchildren Gerad, Sonja, Robby and Jennifer, seven great grandchildren and many special friends. A graveside service with the interment of her cremated remains will be held at Forestvale Memorial Park in Oakridge, Oregon, in the spring of 2011.


W E AT H ER

C6 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 23

HIGH Ben Burkel

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

 Warm Springs

Marion Forks

35/34

39/24

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

41/29

34/32

43/27

Oakridge Elk Lake 31/15

Mostly cloudy with a chance of showers in the north today. Central

43/33

Camp Sherman 40/24 Redmond Prineville 43/27 Cascadia 41/28 42/28 Sisters  43/26 Bend Post 40/26

37/35

37/33

31/29

36/26

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

38/24

40/23

35/22

Skies will be mostly cloudy today and tonight.

Vancouver 42/38

Seattle

46/35

38/24

35/22

Crater Lake

Boise



Idaho Falls

Elko

32/22

39/14

Reno

45/26

San Francisco Skies will be mostly 57/48 cloudy today and tonight.



30/24

43/27

41/28





27/12

Bend

51/42

34/26

28/17

Helena

Redding

Silver Lake

34/21



44/35

Christmas Valley

Chemult

Missoula

Eugene

42/25

34/17

City

48/40

Salt Lake City 41/25

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

HIGH

Moon phases Last

New

First

Full

Dec. 27 Jan. 4

Jan. 12

Jan. 19

Thursday Hi/Lo/W

LOW

HIGH

Astoria . . . . . . . . 49/42/0.31 . . . . . 49/45/sh. . . . . . 51/45/sh Baker City . . . . . .36/22/trace . . . . . . 35/19/c. . . . . . 36/23/pc Brookings . . . . . . 50/41/0.45 . . . . . 52/49/sh. . . . . . 55/49/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . . 33/5/0.08 . . . . . . 34/19/c. . . . . . 37/21/pc Eugene . . . . . . . .51/38/trace . . . . . . 46/35/c. . . . . . 48/43/sh Klamath Falls . . . 40/34/0.00 . . . . . . 37/24/c. . . . . . 37/29/rs Lakeview. . . . . . . 37/19/0.02 . . . . . . 37/21/c. . . . . . 38/27/pc La Pine . . . . . . . . 43/32/0.00 . . . . . . 39/23/c. . . . . . 39/28/sn Medford . . . . . . . 47/39/0.17 . . . . . . 46/35/c. . . . . . . 54/39/c Newport . . . . . . . 52/45/0.10 . . . . . 52/43/sh. . . . . . 53/47/sh North Bend . . . . . 52/39/0.24 . . . . . 54/45/sh. . . . . . 56/46/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . . 26/7/0.00 . . . . . 30/21/pc. . . . . . 32/24/pc Pendleton . . . . . . 43/23/0.05 . . . . . . 39/25/c. . . . . . . 57/27/c Portland . . . . . . . 44/38/0.03 . . . . . 42/37/sh. . . . . . . 43/41/r Prineville . . . . . . . 44/36/0.00 . . . . . . 41/28/c. . . . . . 41/34/sn Redmond. . . . . . .46/37/trace . . . . . . 41/28/c. . . . . . 40/29/sn Roseburg. . . . . . . 50/40/0.04 . . . . . 49/39/sh. . . . . . 49/43/sh Salem . . . . . . . . .51/40/trace . . . . . 46/37/sh. . . . . . 48/44/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 47/29/0.00 . . . . . . 43/26/c. . . . . . 35/22/sn The Dalles . . . . . . 39/32/0.05 . . . . . . 36/35/c. . . . . . 35/35/rs

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

1

0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH 6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43/34 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.00” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 in 1935 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.15” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . -17 in 1990 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 1.24” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.87” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 11.19” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 29.78 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 2.15 in 1964 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .6:41 a.m. . . . . . .3:58 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:45 a.m. . . . . . .2:03 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:26 a.m. . . . . . .5:11 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .11:47 a.m. . . . . .11:29 p.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .1:11 a.m. . . . . .12:43 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .11:46 a.m. . . . . .11:36 p.m.

LOW

LOW

38 26

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX Friday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, scattered mixed showers.

41 26

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

Calgary 25/13

Grants Pass

Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:38 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:31 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:38 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:32 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 7:37 p.m. Moonset today . . . . 9:22 a.m.

MONDAY Mostly cloudy, scattered mixed showers.

44 28

BEND ALMANAC Yesterday’s regional extremes • 52° Newport • 5° Burns

SUNDAY

Cloudy, mixed showers developing after LOW sunset.

HIGH

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Eastern

Hampton Fort Rock

LOW

44 28

NORTHWEST

42/37

33/25

Crescent

HIGH

Portland

Burns

La Pine

39/23

Crescent Lake

LOW

Rain and mountain snow will fall to the northwest, but high pressure will keep it dry elsewhere.

35/24

Brothers

Sunriver

Partly to mostly cloudy skies, seasonable.

27

Paulina

39/25

SATURDAY

Tonight: Partly to mostly cloudy skies.

Today: Partly to mostly cloudy skies, seasonable temperatures.

43

Bob Shaw

Government Camp

FRIDAY

V.HIGH 8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . 2-24 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 49 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . 49-84 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . 68-84 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . 69 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . 42-44 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-0 . . . . . . . . 78 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-32 Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 20-48 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mammoth Mtn., California . .6-10 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Squaw Valley, California . . . . . . 4 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico. . . . . . . . . . . 3 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

. . . . . . 39-40 . . . . 128-192 . . . . . . . . 82 . . . . . . . 120 . . . . . . 39-55 . . . . . . 22-27 . . . . . . . . 41

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

S

S

S

Vancouver 42/38

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

Calgary 25/13

Cheyenne 36/24 San Francisco 57/50

• 7.50” Palomar Mtn., Calif.

Salt Lake City Las 41/25 Vegas 56/40

Los Angeles 58/48

Denver 45/24

Albuquerque 44/32 Phoenix 63/46

Tijuana 61/43 Chihuahua 73/31

La Paz 73/46 Anchorage 10/-10

Juneau 25/18

Mazatlan 80/52

S Winnipeg 12/1

S

S

Thunder Bay 26/13

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 30/17

Halifax 34/29 Portland To ronto 38/21 29/17 St. Paul Green Bay Boston 25/13 27/17 39/26 Rapid City Detroit Buffalo New York 26/14 28/19 27/21 41/29 Des Moines Philadelphia Columbus 30/23 Chicago 29/19 39/25 31/24 Omaha W ashington, D. C. 29/23 38/26 Louisville Kansas City 35/26 36/29 St. Louis Charlotte 34/28 49/24 Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 44/34 41/27 45/33 Atlanta 47/31 Birmingham Dallas 49/29 49/43 New Orleans 58/43 Orlando Houston 68/46 61/56 Bismarck 20/12

Boise 41/28

Kingsville, Texas

Honolulu 81/70

Saskatoon 15/6

Billings 31/19

Portland 42/37

• 84° Havre, Mont.

S

Seattle 48/40

(in the 48 contiguous states):

• -18°

S

Miami 74/57 Monterrey 80/53

FRONTS

SEARCHING FOR SOME BREAKFAST IN BEND

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .55/40/0.00 . . .53/40/t . . 48/30/sh Akron . . . . . . . . .29/26/0.00 . .30/18/sn . . 30/20/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .31/25/0.00 . . .34/20/c . . . 32/15/s Albuquerque. . . .55/41/0.00 . .44/32/sh . . . 50/32/s Anchorage . . . . . 14/-4/0.00 . . 10/-10/s . . . . . 8/-5/c Atlanta . . . . . . . .65/47/0.00 . . .47/31/s . . . 52/34/s Atlantic City . . . .41/25/0.01 . 41/27/pc . . 39/31/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .65/54/0.00 . . .61/52/c . . . .62/37/t Baltimore . . . . . .45/32/0.00 . 37/26/pc . . 37/26/pc Billings. . . . . . . . . .25/8/0.00 . . .31/19/c . . 38/23/pc Birmingham . . . .62/47/0.00 . . .49/29/s . . 54/33/pc Bismarck . . . . . . . .13/8/0.00 . .20/12/sn . . . .19/-1/c Boise . . . . . . . . . .41/27/0.00 . 41/28/pc . . 42/25/pc Boston. . . . . . . . .39/32/0.00 . .39/26/sn . . . 36/23/s Bridgeport, CT. . .39/29/0.00 . . .40/25/c . . . 38/23/s Buffalo . . . . . . . .25/23/0.00 . .27/21/sn . . 28/21/sn Burlington, VT. . .29/25/0.17 . . .30/15/c . . . 26/16/s Caribou, ME . . . .36/30/0.02 . .30/16/sn . . 27/10/pc Charleston, SC . .71/53/0.01 . . .52/32/s . . . 53/37/s Charlotte. . . . . . .63/43/0.00 . . .49/24/s . . . 48/31/s Chattanooga. . . .54/37/0.01 . 45/27/pc . . 49/32/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .33/18/0.00 . . .36/24/c . . 37/19/pc Chicago. . . . . . . .35/18/0.00 . 31/24/pc . . . 31/21/c Cincinnati . . . . . .36/25/0.00 . 31/21/pc . . . 30/21/c Cleveland . . . . . .31/28/0.03 . .30/21/sn . . 30/23/sn Colorado Springs 27/19/0.00 . . .44/25/c . . 42/23/pc Columbia, MO . .29/19/0.00 . . .33/28/c . . 31/24/sn Columbia, SC . . .69/46/0.00 . . .52/27/s . . . 52/33/s Columbus, GA. . .70/57/0.00 . . .53/33/s . . 57/33/pc Columbus, OH. . .32/28/0.00 . 29/19/pc . . 28/21/pc Concord, NH . . . .35/28/0.06 . . .37/17/c . . . 32/13/s Corpus Christi. . .77/57/0.00 . . .76/63/c . . . .77/39/t Dallas Ft Worth. .52/42/0.00 . . .49/43/c . . . .49/36/t Dayton . . . . . . . .31/21/0.01 . 30/18/pc . . . 27/19/c Denver. . . . . . . . .42/13/0.00 . . .45/24/c . . 45/24/pc Des Moines. . . . .30/18/0.00 . . .30/23/c . . 28/16/sn Detroit. . . . . . . . .33/25/0.03 . 28/19/pc . . . 30/22/c Duluth . . . . . . . . .27/23/0.00 . 20/10/pc . . . . 22/5/c El Paso. . . . . . . . .71/40/0.00 . 64/34/pc . . . 59/31/s Fairbanks. . . . . -20/-31/0.00 -30/-38/pc . . -27/-36/c Fargo. . . . . . . . . .17/14/0.00 . . . .21/6/c . . . . 16/3/c Flagstaff . . . . . . .46/34/0.09 . . 40/17/rs . . . 48/19/s

Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .36/23/0.05 . . .30/20/c . . 28/16/pc Green Bay. . . . . .32/21/0.07 . 27/17/pc . . .29/15/sf Greensboro. . . . .58/39/0.00 . . .42/25/s . . 45/30/pc Harrisburg. . . . . .39/29/0.00 . 36/23/pc . . . 36/24/s Hartford, CT . . . .40/29/0.00 . . .37/19/c . . . 33/19/s Helena. . . . . . . . . . 8/-4/0.00 . 27/12/pc . . . 30/9/pc Honolulu . . . . . . .80/68/0.00 . .81/70/sh . . 81/70/pc Houston . . . . . . .76/66/0.00 . 61/56/pc . . . .69/44/t Huntsville . . . . . .58/39/0.03 . . .46/27/s . . 49/32/pc Indianapolis . . . .34/19/0.00 . 30/21/pc . . . 29/21/c Jackson, MS . . . .65/50/0.00 . . .53/33/s . . 58/38/pc Madison, WI . . . .34/19/0.00 . 26/16/pc . . . 26/12/c Jacksonville. . . . .75/45/0.00 . . .58/34/s . . . 60/45/s Juneau. . . . . . . . .28/13/0.00 . . .25/18/c . . 27/21/sn Kansas City. . . . .29/16/0.00 . . .36/29/c . . 33/24/sn Lansing . . . . . . . .31/23/0.05 . 28/17/pc . . 26/16/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .55/51/0.04 . 56/40/pc . . . 58/41/s Lexington . . . . . .36/26/0.00 . 32/23/pc . . 31/22/sn Lincoln. . . . . . . . .29/14/0.00 . . .30/23/c . . 28/17/sn Little Rock. . . . . .57/44/0.00 . 45/33/pc . . 44/31/sh Los Angeles. . . . .62/55/1.25 . 58/48/pc . . 61/50/pc Louisville . . . . . . .37/28/0.00 . 35/26/pc . . 36/28/sn Memphis. . . . . . .54/39/0.00 . 43/31/pc . . . 47/30/c Miami . . . . . . . . .76/56/0.00 . 74/57/pc . . 72/58/pc Milwaukee . . . . .36/25/0.01 . 30/20/pc . . . 33/20/c Minneapolis . . . .32/27/0.01 . . .25/13/c . . . 26/10/c Nashville . . . . . . .48/30/0.00 . 41/27/pc . . . 42/33/c New Orleans. . . .76/59/0.00 . . .58/43/s . . 61/53/pc New York . . . . . .38/28/0.00 . . .41/29/c . . . 38/25/s Newark, NJ . . . . .40/28/0.00 . . .40/28/c . . . 37/24/s Norfolk, VA . . . . .43/34/0.00 . . .42/25/s . . . 43/30/s Oklahoma City . .46/30/0.00 . . .44/34/c . . . .41/23/r Omaha . . . . . . . .27/15/0.00 . . .29/23/c . . 28/16/sn Orlando. . . . . . . .76/41/0.00 . . .68/46/s . . . 69/49/s Palm Springs. . . .60/55/2.62 . 63/48/pc . . . 69/46/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .32/19/0.00 . . .29/23/c . . 29/19/sn Philadelphia . . . .41/28/0.00 . 39/25/pc . . 38/25/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .75/56/0.00 . 63/46/pc . . . 67/46/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .30/27/0.00 . .29/20/sn . . 29/21/sn Portland, ME. . . .37/32/0.05 . .38/21/sn . . . 32/14/s Providence . . . . .42/31/0.00 . .39/24/sn . . . 37/21/s Raleigh . . . . . . . .52/41/0.00 . . .44/24/s . . . 46/31/s

The Associated Press

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Sain Continued from C1 Authorities have until now provided limited information on what happened between Aug. 4, when Jones was reported missing, and Aug. 12, when Sain was arrested on suspicion of murder. Prosecutor Kandy Gies provided a narrative to the courtroom audience Wednesday, filling in some of the details. Gies said investigators have determined Jones, Sain, and others were using methamphetamine at a duplex on Northeast Dawson Drive in Bend on the night of Aug. 3. As morning arrived, the others left, including the resident of the duplex, leaving Jones and Sain alone about 6:30 a.m. Aug. 4. Sometime during the next 1½ hours, Sain assaulted Jones, Gies said, knocking out two of her teeth. He shot her four times in the head with a rifle, Gies said, then placed her body in a duffle bag and loaded it into a car. Sain left Jones’ body near a spur road near U.S. Forest Service Road 45, and later ditched the rifle in the forest near Sunriver. Officers recovered Jones’ cell phone and other personal possessions

from the car he had been driving and had abandoned after getting stuck on a Forest Service road. Sain was arrested on unrelated charges Aug. 5 and questioned as a person of interest in Jones’ disappearance. Jones’ body was found by a Mt. Bachelor security guard Aug. 7, and Sain was arrested on suspicion of murder on Aug. 12. Appearing by video from the Deschutes County Jail on Wednesday, Sain was largely motionless while members of Jones’ family read statements to the courtroom. Jones’ mother, Debra Headrick, addressed Sain directly, speaking of how her daughter had often described Sain as her best friend. “How do I convey to you the chaos and devastation you have caused this family?” Headrick said. “For me and her two boys, you ripped the heart right out of us.” Sain provided only a short statement to the courtroom and Jones’ family. “I committed the ultimate act of cowardism, and would like to apologize for that,” he said. After the hearing, Shelly Stanton, Jones’ aunt, said multiple hearings over several months or years would have been hard for Jones’ sons, Jaydon and Alec, so

family members agreed to the plea deal between prosecutors and Sain’s defense team. Stanton said she would have liked to have heard more from Sain about what happened, but there’s little he could have said that would have been comforting for the family. “The past five months have been the worst our family has ever experienced,” Stanton read from a statement. “Losing Bobbie has brought more tears, anger, hate and loneliness than anyone can imagine.” Deschutes County District Attorney Mike Dugan said it’s extremely rare to wrap up a murder case in under five months, and credited prosecutors and Sain’s defense team for their hard work. He said he’s pleased to see the case come to an end before he leaves office in January. “This case started on my watch as D.A., and I’m glad it ended on my watch as D.A.,” Dugan said. “But there’s never satisfaction in sending someone to prison for the rest of their life, there’s never satisfaction in talking to victims — these are very, very sad things.” S cott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin.com.

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .30/27/0.00 . .33/30/sn . . 34/28/sn Athens. . . . . . . . .64/46/0.00 . . .68/49/s . . 70/55/sh Auckland. . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .77/64/s . . 74/60/pc Baghdad . . . . . . .68/46/0.00 . 68/47/pc . . 66/46/pc Bangkok . . . . . . .90/75/0.00 . 88/74/pc . . 89/75/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .45/21/0.00 . . . .26/9/s . . . . 23/7/s Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/57/0.00 . 69/57/pc . . . 67/55/s Berlin. . . . . . . . . .30/19/0.00 . . 37/35/rs . . 35/27/sn Bogota . . . . . . . .63/48/0.00 . .68/48/sh . . 70/49/sh Budapest. . . . . . .37/25/0.00 . . .44/31/c . . 43/35/sh Buenos Aires. . . .97/68/0.00 . . .93/63/s . . . 92/61/s Cabo San Lucas .75/55/0.00 . . .78/56/s . . . 76/56/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .73/54/0.00 . . .75/54/s . . . 76/54/s Calgary . . . . . . . . .25/5/0.00 . 25/13/pc . . . 32/11/s Cancun . . . . . . . 79/NA/0.00 . 79/61/pc . . 77/57/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .30/16/0.62 . . .34/20/s . . . 34/19/s Edinburgh . . . . . .21/10/0.00 . . 28/18/sf . . 31/18/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .43/37/1.21 . . .45/39/r . . .39/27/rs Harare . . . . . . . . .82/59/0.00 . . .81/62/t . . . .83/63/t Hong Kong . . . . .75/64/0.00 . . .77/67/s . . . 76/65/s Istanbul. . . . . . . .66/46/0.00 . 64/47/pc . . 68/52/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .63/53/0.00 . . .64/48/s . . . 64/46/s Johannesburg . . .79/57/0.03 . . .80/63/t . . . .81/64/t Lima . . . . . . . . . .75/66/0.00 . .71/63/sh . . 72/63/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .59/54/0.00 . 50/39/pc . . 52/44/sh London . . . . . . . .36/32/0.16 . 34/25/pc . . 33/22/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .52/46/0.59 . .46/31/sh . . . 43/26/s Manila. . . . . . . . .88/75/0.00 . .87/74/sh . . 86/74/sh

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/72/0.00 . . .88/68/s . . 86/64/pc Mexico City. . . . .73/39/0.00 . . .76/39/s . . . 75/37/s Montreal. . . . . . .32/25/0.05 . 30/16/pc . . 25/13/pc Moscow . . . . . . .23/18/0.00 . . .13/5/pc . . 19/15/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .79/57/0.00 . .80/59/sh . . . .80/60/t Nassau . . . . . . . .82/57/0.00 . 76/63/pc . . 74/63/pc New Delhi. . . . . .55/50/0.00 . . .70/47/s . . . 70/46/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .57/50/0.07 . 55/35/pc . . . 42/29/s Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . . 3/-7/0.01 . . . 6/-1/pc . . . .7/-2/pc Ottawa . . . . . . . .28/21/0.00 . 29/15/pc . . 26/14/pc Paris. . . . . . . . . . .36/32/0.19 . .36/31/sn . . .35/25/sf Rio de Janeiro. . .90/81/0.00 . . .85/76/t . . . .87/76/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .61/57/0.07 . . .61/52/r . . 57/48/sh Santiago . . . . . . .75/55/0.00 . 84/54/pc . . . 86/53/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/66/0.00 . . .82/67/t . . . .84/67/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .30/28/0.00 . . 39/35/rs . . .35/20/sf Seoul . . . . . . . . . .46/27/0.00 . 35/12/pc . . . . 18/4/s Shanghai. . . . . . .61/39/0.00 . . .56/39/s . . 42/34/sh Singapore . . . . . .86/77/0.47 . . .88/76/t . . . .86/76/t Stockholm. . . . . . . 6/-5/0.00 . . .15/1/pc . . .12/-2/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .73/64/0.00 . 82/64/pc . . 77/63/pc Taipei. . . . . . . . . .68/57/0.00 . . .73/59/s . . 70/61/sh Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .72/52/0.00 . . .70/51/s . . . 69/51/s Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .64/50/0.00 . . .58/45/s . . 50/35/pc Toronto . . . . . . . .27/18/0.00 . 29/17/pc . . 27/15/pc Vancouver. . . . . .48/45/0.03 . . .42/38/r . . . .46/43/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .34/28/0.00 . . .43/36/c . . .38/27/rs Warsaw. . . . . . . .34/28/0.00 . . .35/28/c . . .38/33/rs

Hillsides collapse as storm lashes Southern California By Raquel Maria Dillon and Gillian Flaccus

After searching for prey for several minutes, a bald eagle takes flight from a pile of wooden debris along the Deschutes River on Wednesday morning.

Yesterday Thursday Friday Yesterday Thursday Friday City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . . .38/3/0.00 . .26/14/sn . . . 27/12/c Savannah . . . . . .72/53/0.00 . . .55/34/s . . . 56/39/s Reno . . . . . . . . . .43/27/0.00 . . .45/26/c . . 48/28/pc Seattle. . . . . . . . .49/42/0.01 . .48/40/sh . . . .50/41/r Richmond . . . . . .47/33/0.00 . . .41/23/s . . . 43/26/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .24/11/0.00 . .24/18/sn . . . . 22/8/c Rochester, NY . . .27/24/0.00 . . 29/23/sf . . 28/20/sn Spokane . . . . . . 33/24/trace . . .35/25/c . . 37/26/pc Sacramento. . . . .58/50/0.40 . 56/44/pc . . . 56/47/c Springfield, MO. .36/22/0.00 . 40/30/pc . . 33/26/sn St. Louis. . . . . . . .37/25/0.00 . . .34/28/c . . 32/26/sn Tampa . . . . . . . . .71/48/0.00 . . .70/49/s . . . 71/52/s Salt Lake City . . .40/32/0.63 . . .41/25/c . . 39/28/pc Tucson. . . . . . . . .70/50/0.00 . 61/36/pc . . . 65/39/s San Antonio . . . .65/55/0.01 . . .65/57/c . . . .65/42/t Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .45/26/0.00 . . .45/35/c . . . .39/27/i San Diego . . . . . .63/57/1.89 . 58/49/pc . . 62/49/pc Washington, DC .45/34/0.00 . . .38/26/s . . . 38/26/s San Francisco . . .55/52/0.28 . 57/48/pc . . . 58/49/c Wichita . . . . . . . .35/24/0.00 . . .40/31/c . . 35/25/sn San Jose . . . . . . .61/52/0.13 . 59/46/pc . . 61/48/pc Yakima . . . . . . . .35/22/0.25 . . .32/26/c . . 32/26/sn Santa Fe . . . . . . .52/36/0.01 . . .42/25/r . . . 43/26/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .66/57/0.05 . 66/48/pc . . . 67/48/s

LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. — The tail end of a storm that dumped rain on Southern California for nearly a week gave the region one final lashing Wednesday, burying houses and cars in mud, washing hillsides onto highways, flooding urban streets, threatening dozens of canyon homes and spreading filthy water that prompted the closure of 12 miles of Orange County beaches. Inflatable boats and canoes were used to rescue dozens of motorists and homeowners from flooded streets, hotels and hillsides. Others refused to leave their homes, even as dirty water and mud sliced through their neighborhoods. The storm weakened as it

moved eastward, but floods still washed away at least six vacant homes in Arizona and inundated parts of Nevada and Utah. The low-pressure system could be in New Mexico by today and reach the Gulf Coast by Saturday with some rain, but not the deluge that hit Southern California, forecasters said. The storm turned the final days before Christmas into a nightmare, and left some residents fearful that more and bigger mudslides could strike the wildfire-scarred hillsides in suburban Los Angeles even after the skies cleared. Officials on Tuesday ordered the evacuation of 232 homes in La Canada Flintridge and La Crescenta, suburbs of Los Angeles below steep hillsides that burned in 2009 and where mudslides inundated homes and backyards in February.

Travelers in Europe get some relief LONDON — Conditions improved Wednesday at Heathrow Airport, where about 70 percent of the scheduled flights were operating after days of weather-related chaos. Still, no one was allowed to enter the airport without a ticket on a confirmed flight. The Eurostar rail service, which also suffered major disruptions because of the freezing weather, was operating most of its trains Wednesday. Transportation in Western Europe has been virtually paralyzed this week, the busiest travel period of the year. — New York Times News Service

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S

College Football Inside Boise State wraps up season with win over Utah in Las Vegas, see Page D3.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Auburn QB Newton wins Associated Press Player of Year AUBURN, Ala. — Cam Newton lifted Auburn from the back of the Top 25 to No. 1 in the nation. The Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback led the Tigers into the national title game against No. 2 Oregon with a mix of flair and poise. Newton has already raked in Auburn QB the HeisCam Newton man Trophy and Davey O’Brien and Maxwell awards for his spectacular season. He added AP Player of the Year to his collection on Wednesday. An NCAA investigation into Newton’s recruitment, which threw his eligibility into doubt during November, had no effect on how he played down the stretch — or the voting for the AP award. It was about as lopsided as the Heisman vote. Newton received 51 votes from the 60-member AP football poll panel. Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore received three, Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck got two and four ballots went unreturned. — The Associated Press

HUNTING & FISHING

Flu-flu arrows, Frisbees and pheasants in flight I

t’s akin to catching a steelhead on the surface, to making your longest cast to set a fly down light as a feather and see it disappear in the maw of a tarpon. To shoot a pheasant in flight is one of archery’s great thrills. Kuk-kuk-kuk-kuk. The bird claws to the sky, its long tailfeathers stream behind, its wings a blur, a fury of sound and motion. An arrow streaks from the bow. For a moment, the trajectory of the bird and the arc of the feathered shaft appear to intersect, then the ar-

GARY LEWIS

row spirals down and the bird climbs out of reach and away. The night before, as we sat down to beef marsala at the Imperial River Company in Maupin, Mike described his gear. On our hunt in the morning with Sage Canyon Outfitters, Mike would shoot a Hoyt Dorado recurve and a carbon shaft tipped with a G5 small game head and a flu-flu fletch. A flu-flu is a type of arrow designed to fly a short distance, primarily for aerial targets. See Pheasants / D6

PREP GIRLS SOCCER

Nine from C.O. are named first team all-state Summit’s Estopare is 5A player of year; Mountain View’s Mattox is 5A’s top coach

Larry Brown is out as Bobcats coach

Former Charlotte Bobcats coach Larry Brown.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NHL ...........................................D2 College football .........................D3 College basketball .....................D3 NFL ........................................... D4 NBA ...........................................D5 Hunting & Fishing .................... D6

Gary Lewis / For The Bulletin

Mike Huitt, of Sisters, hunted east of Maupin to take a rooster pheasant on the wing with his recurve bow and a feathered shaft.

PREP BOYS BASKETBALL

NBA

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — After a miserable start to the season in which he took shots at his players and himself, Larry Brown is out as coach of the Charlotte Bobcats in another messy exit in his welltraveled career. Former Charlotte Hornets coach Paul Silas, who has been out of the league since 2005, will direct the team for the rest of the season on an interim basis. Owner Michael Jordan announced Brown’s departure in a news release, a day after the Bobcats were outscored 31-12 in the fourth quarter in their fourth straight loss. “I met with Coach Brown two weeks ago about the team’s performance and what we could do to improve it,” Jordan said. “We met again this morning after practice. The team has clearly not lived up to either of our expectations and we both agreed that a change was necessary.” The 70-year-old Brown, a Hall of Fame coach who was in the third season of his 13th professional and college head coaching job, had been upset with the makeup and effort of his team for weeks. The Bobcats (9-19) had lost three games by 31 or more points in 10 days before Tuesday’s fourth-quarter meltdown against Oklahoma City. — The Associated Press

D

Bulletin staff report

Inside

Central Oregon’s reputation as a high school soccer hotbed continues to grow. Six girls soccer players from Bend schools have been named to the Class 5A all-state first team, including Summit junior defender Hayley Estopare, who was selected as the 5A player of the year. Estopare’s teammates, senior forward Eve Hess and junior forward Kristen Parr both received all-state first-team honors after helping the Storm to their first girls soccer state championship this fall. Mountain View’s Torie Morris, a junior defender, and Amy Clason-Messina, a senior goalkeeper, also were named to the 5A all-state first team following the Cougars’ run to the state championship game. Mountain View coach Grant Mattox was

• All-state teams for Class 6A, 5A, and 4A, Page D2 selected as the 5A coach of the year. Bend High’s junior midfielder Maryn Beutler also received 5A all-state first-team honors. In Class 4A, Sisters High placed three players on the all-state first team. Senior forward Marin Allen and juniors Jodie Reoch (midfielder) and Sara Small (goalkeeper) all were named to 4A’s all-state first team after leading the Outlaws to the 2010 4A state title game. The girls soccer all-state teams are voted on by coaches from around the state and compiled by The Oregonian newspaper.

WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL C O M M E N TA RY

UConn’s record stands on its own, not on the shoulders of UCLA By Bill Plaschke Los Angeles Times

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Sawyer Gerdes (5) is fouled by Sprague’s Devvon Gage (11) as he drives to the basket during the first quarter of Wednesday night’s game in Redmond.

Panthers rally for OT victory Redmond beats Sprague in its own tourney, 53-50, for its fourth straight win Bulletin staff report REDMOND — Brad Carter scored a gamehigh 26 points to lead Redmond to a 53-50 double-overtime victory over Sprague on Wednesday in the Panthers’ own boys basketball invitational. A 6-foot-7-inch senior forward, Carter record-

ed eight points in the two extra periods to help Redmond win its fourth consecutive game. “The bottom line is he’s going up strong and being aggressive,” Redmond coach Dusty Porter said about Carter. “He’s expecting to finish.” Sprague, which entered the game on a threegame winning streak, lead 20-10 after the first quarter, in large part because of eight Panther turnovers. Redmond buckled down defensively before the half, though, and held the Olympians to just two points in the second period. “The kids woke up,” said Porter, whose team trailed 22-18 at halftime. “They stayed with it and played hard.” See Panthers / D5

I

t was yet another empowering landmark reached by an amazing group of athletes, yet it felt hollow and forced. Because, once again, a triumph by women was measured against something achieved by men. Everyone is chortling about the University of Connecticut women’s basketball team breaking the UCLA men’s record 88game winning streak Tuesday, except, well, they didn’t. Different game. Different league. Dif-

ferent records. Everyone is yakking about how Connecticut Coach Gino Auriemma is the new John Wooden except, well, he’s not. Different game. Different league. Different coaches. After his Huskies shredded Florida State, 93-62, Auriemma said the right thing in referring to the Bruins’ 1971-74 streak, telling an interviewer, “I’m not John Wooden and this isn’t UCLA. This is Connecticut and for us, this is good enough.” See UConn / D5

Jessica Hill / The Associated Press

Connecticut forward Maya Moore celebrates near the end of Tuesday’s game against Florida State in Hartford, Conn. Connecticut beat Florida State 93-62 to set an NCAA Division I basketball record for consecutive wins at 89.


D2 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

FOOTBALL

Today Girls basketball: Culver at Ione, 4 p.m. Boys basketball: Culver at Ione, 5:30 p.m.

5 p.m. — College, Poinsettia Bowl, Navy vs. San Diego State, ESPN. 5:20 p.m. — NFL, Carolina Panthers at Pittsburgh Steelers, NFL Network.

BASKETBALL

Meineke Car Care Bowl 4.5 5.5 South Florida Sun Bowl Miami (Fla.) 2.5 3 Notre Dame Liberty Bowl Georgia 7 6.5 Central Florida Chick-Fil-A Bowl South Carolina 3 3 Florida St

IN THE BLEACHERS

Clemson

Monday, Dec. 27 Girls basketball: Nike Interstate Tournament at Lake Oswego: Redmond vs. Silverton, 6:30 p.m.; Mountain View vs. West Salem, 1 p.m. Boys basketball: Madras vs. Barlow at Barlow Invitational, 7 p.m.

Texas Tech

5 p.m. — Men’s college, Georgetown at Memphis, ESPN2. 5 p.m. — NBA, San Antonio Spurs at Orlando Magic, TNT. 7 p.m. — Men’s college, Diamond Head Classic, second semifinal, teams TBD, ESPN2. 7:30 p.m. — NBA, Miami Heat at Phoenix Suns, TNT.

FRIDAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Cancun Governor’s Cup, consolation game, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Cancun Governor’s Cup, final, ESPN2.

FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Hawaii Bowl, Hawaii vs. Tulsa, ESPN.

RADIO TODAY FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Poinsettia Bowl, Navy vs. San Diego State, KICEAM 940.

FRIDAY FOOTBALL 5 p.m. — College, Hawaii Bowl, Hawaii vs. Tulsa, KICE-AM 940. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

NHL ROUNDUP

Penguins win, Crosby extends scoring streak to 22 games The Associated Press PITTSBURGH — Sidney Crosby and the Pittsburgh Penguins did enough work early on that they could afford to coast and look ahead to a showdown with rival Washington. Crosby matched the second-longest NHL scoring streak in 18 years at 22 games with his first-period goal and the Penguins beat the Florida Panthers 5-2 on Wednesday night. Crosby scored for the 28th time this season and 22nd time during the streak 7:44 into the game, giving the Penguins a 2-1 lead they wouldn’t relinquish. “The last few games we have done a pretty good job of starting well and creating a lot of pressure and generating a lot of shots early,” said Crosby, who scored on a slap shot that beat Florida goalie Tomas Vokoun to the far side. Crosby leads the NHL in scoring with 58 points (28 goals, 30 assists). “But the last couple periods of this one weren’t our greatest. We had the lead but we probably could have done a better job— I think partly mainly because we’re thinking about tomorrow,” Crosby said. The Penguins came out strong early Wednesday with the game Thursday at Washington — a preview of the Winter Classic to be played at Pittsburgh’s Heinz Field on Jan. 1 — looming. The teams are linked by superstars Crosby and Alex Ovechkin and the fact HBO is filming a reality series about them this month. Pittsburgh took a 3-1 lead by taking 14 shots over the game’s first 11 minutes, chasing Vokoun. The Penguins took a 4-1 lead on Ben Lovejoy’s first career goal 6:19 into the second but were outshot 29-17 over the final two periods. “We made it a lot closer than we needed it to be,” Crosby said. “Partly because, I think, knowing that we play tomorrow night. I’m sure guys might have been secretly trying to save a little bit.” Mark Letestu, Matt Cooke and Pascal Dupuis also scored for Pittsburgh, which has won 14 of its past 16, recovering from a two-game losing streak last week with consecutive convincing victories. Stephen Weiss and Bryan McCabe scored for Florida, which had won five of its previous seven. “To spot a team three goals — any team — before you kind of get your game going, it’s tough, let alone against these guys,” said Scott Clemmensen, who replaced Vokoun in Florida’s net. “It just became too much for us to climb out of.” In other games on Wednesday night: Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Canucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 DETROIT — Henrik Zetterberg’s second goal of the game at 2:59 of overtime gave Detroit a win over Vancouver in a matchup of Western Conference division leaders. Zetterberg also had an assist on Nicklas Lidstrom’s power-play goal that tied it at 4 late in the third period. Blackhawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 CHICAGO — Jack Skille scored two goals, rookie Corey Crawford made 24 saves and Chicago defeated Nashville for its third straight win. Dave Bolland and Bryan Bickell also scored for the Blackhawks, who allowed just two Nashville power plays. Islanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Lightning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 UNIONDALE, N.Y. — John Tavares scored 3:23 into overtime and New York snapped Tampa Bay’s fourgame winning streak. Tavares got to a loose puck near the left post and swept a shot past goalie Dan Ellis to give the Islanders their first win of the season when they didn’t score first.

January 1 Dallas Ticket City Bowl 9.5 9.5 Northwestern Outback Bowl 7 7.5 Penn State Capital One Bowl 11 10 Michigan State Gator Bowl 5.5 5.5 Michigan Rose Bowl 2.5 2.5 Wisconsin Fiesta Bowl 17 17 Connecticut

Florida

PREP SPORTS Girls soccer

Alabama Miss. State

2010 ALL-STATE TEAMS ——— Class 6A Player of the year — Tasha Wilkins, Jesuit. Coach of the year — Tim Copeland, Grant First team — Tasha Wilkins, sr., forward, Jesuit; Anna-Marie Popma, jr., forward, Tualatin; Lauren Pyrch, sr., forward, West Linn; Alex Hairston, sr., forward, Grant; Whitney Pitalo, jr., forward, South Salem; Lily Archer, sr., midfielder, Grant; Sarah Chambers, jr., forward, North Medford; Kaija Perkiomaki, sr., defender, Lincoln; Kelsey Henningsen, sr., defender, Westview; Emily Maletis, sr., midfielder, Jesuit; Angela Haluska, sr., goalkeeper, Clackamas. Honorable mention — JoEllen DeLeon, sr., midfielder, Centennial; Kyleigh Jandro, so., forward, Gresham; Taylor Boyer, jr., midfielder, Thurston; Erika Oliva, sr., defender, West Salem; Meli Cortez, jr., forward, South Salem; Jill Farley, fr., midfielder, Tualatin; Natalie Meiggs, sr., midfielder, Clackamas; Kallina Haase, jr., goalkeeper, Westview. ——— Class 5A Player of the year — Hayley Estopare, Summit Coach of the year — Grant Mattox, Mountain View First team — Hayley Estopare, sr., forward, Summit; Jaclyn Silsby, sr., forward, West Albany; Sierra Duarte, sr., forward, Wilson; Tayler Ficek, sr., forward, North Eugene; Courtney King, sr., defender, Liberty; Tori Morris, jr., defender, Mountain View; Kristen Parr, jr., forward, Summit; Maryn Beutler, jr., midfielder, Bend; Nikki McCall, sr., forward, The Dalles-Wahtonka; Daniel Solis, sr., forward, Sherwood; Amy Clason-Messina, sr., goalkeeper, Mountain View. Honorable mention — Iris Anderson, sr., midfielder, North Eugene; Emily Ing, sr., forward, Hood River Valley; McKayla Madison, jr., midfielder, Mountain View; Monica McEntee, sr., defender, Summit; Katie Noonan, sr., forward, Marist; Victoria Fulton, so., goalkeeper, Sandy. ——— Class 4A Co-players of the year — Kaitlin Crowell, Mazama and Sierra Grunwald, Philomath. Co-coaches of the year — Angela Durant, Mazama, and Mark Swanburg, Hidden Valley. First team — Sierra Grunwald, sr., midfielder/forward, Philomath; Kaitlin Crowell, fr., forward/midfielder, Mazama; Ariel Viera, so., forward, Scappoose; Marin Allen, sr., forward/midfielder, Sisters; Amber Jensen, so., forward, Gladstone; Dana Powell, sr., forward, Hidden Valley; Belen Betancourt, sr., midfielder/forward, McLoughlin; Kira Jany, sr., defender, North Bend; Jodie Reoch, jr., midfielder, Sisters; Anna Russell, sr., midfielder, Molalla; Sara Small, jr., goalkeeper, Sisters. Honorable mention — Maria Dominguez, jr., midfielder, Mazama; Kylie Durant, so., forward/midfielder, Mazama; Tegan Grunwald, jr., forward, Philomath; Alyssa Bonds, sr., forward, Cottage Grove; Rachelle Flick, sr., forward, Hidden Valley; Abby Hendricks, sr., defender, Stayton; Ellie Mullen, jr., defender, Scappoose; Kellie Skofstad, sr., defender, Gladstone; Edith Pelayo, sr., goalkeeper, Stayton.

Boys basketball Wednesday’s result ——— REDMOND TOURNAMENT ——— SPRAGUE (50) — Treamore, McNally 16, Gage, Foot 2, A.J. Lapray 17, Bratton 2, Ellis 13. Totals 16 6-20 50. REDMOND (53) — Matt Dahlen 6, Lau, Mitch Dahlen 8, Gerdes 1, Genz 7, Pies, Tavita 5, Larkin, Brad Carter 26. Totals 19 12-27 53. Sprague 20 2 6 10 NA NA — 50 Redmond 10 8 11 9 NA NA — 53 Three-point goals —Sprague: Lapray 2; Redmond: Matt Dahlen, Tavita, Genz.

FOOTBALL NFL NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE All Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF x-New England 12 2 0 .857 446 N.Y. Jets 10 4 0 .714 295 Miami 7 7 0 .500 239 Buffalo 4 10 0 .286 273 South W L T Pct PF Indianapolis 8 6 0 .571 381 Jacksonville 8 6 0 .571 319 Tennessee 6 8 0 .429 322 Houston 5 9 0 .357 333 North W L T Pct PF x-Pittsburgh 10 4 0 .714 307 Baltimore 10 4 0 .714 324 Cleveland 5 9 0 .357 252 Cincinnati 3 11 0 .214 281 West W L T Pct PF Kansas City 9 5 0 .643 322 San Diego 8 6 0 .571 388 Oakland 7 7 0 .500 353 Denver 3 11 0 .214 292 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF Philadelphia 10 4 0 .714 412 N.Y. Giants 9 5 0 .643 360 Washington 5 9 0 .357 268 Dallas 5 9 0 .357 354 South W L T Pct PF x-Atlanta 12 2 0 .857 369 New Orleans 10 4 0 .714 354 Tampa Bay 8 6 0 .571 280 Carolina 2 12 0 .143 183 North W L T Pct PF Chicago 10 4 0 .714 293 Green Bay 8 6 0 .571 333 Minnesota 5 9 0 .357 244 Detroit 4 10 0 .286 308 West W L T Pct PF St. Louis 6 8 0 .429 258 Seattle 6 8 0 .429 279 San Francisco 5 9 0 .357 250 Arizona 4 10 0 .286 255 x-clinched playoff spot ——— Today’s Game Carolina at Pittsburgh, 5:20 p.m. Saturday’s Game Dallas at Arizona, 4:30 p.m. Sunday’s Games Tennessee at Kansas City, 10 a.m. San Francisco at St. Louis, 10 a.m. N.Y. Jets at Chicago, 10 a.m. Baltimore at Cleveland, 10 a.m. New England at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Detroit at Miami, 10 a.m. Washington at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Indianapolis at Oakland, 1:05 p.m. Houston at Denver, 1:05 p.m. San Diego at Cincinnati, 1:05 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Green Bay, 1:15 p.m. Seattle at Tampa Bay, 1:15 p.m. Minnesota at Philadelphia, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 27 New Orleans at Atlanta, 5:30 p.m. NFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS Week 15 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds Vick, PHL 329 208 2755 Rodgers, GBY 410 268 3289 Romo, DAL 213 148 1605 Brees, NOR 571 391 4122 Kitna, DAL 298 197 2250 M. Ryan, ATL 510 320 3321 Cutler, CHI 368 227 2891 Freeman, TAM 422 249 2959 E. Manning, NYG 477 305 3458 Ale. Smith, SNF 298 179 1974

M. Turner, ATL

Rushers Att Yds 300 1256

Avg 4.19

TD 20 23 11 31 15 25 20 18 28 12

PA 303 259 261 353 PA 342 365 282 386 PA 220 253 271 362 PA 281 260 330 415 PA 339 288 343 396 PA 261 270 290 350 PA 242 220 314 329 PA 295 363 314 370

Tcu Oklahoma

Bradshaw, NYG A. Peterson, MIN S. Jackson, STL L. McCoy, PHL Forte, CHI Gore, SNF Blount, TAM Jacobs, NYG Hightower, ARI

249 247 295 194 203 203 164 126 135

1182 1149 1148 1036 865 853 777 727 683

4.75 4.65 3.89 5.34 4.26 4.20 4.74 5.77 5.06

48t 80t 42t 62 68t 64 48 73 80t

Avg 12.1 12.2 11.1 12.1 12.6 12.8 8.4 7.4 14.6 11.2

LG TD 46 8 43 7 33 7 56 6 41 5 46t 10 36 3 40 2 87t 12 35 3

McBriar, DAL Morstead, NOR A. Lee, SNF Donn. Jones, STL Dodge, NYG N. Harris, DET Rocca, PHL Masthay, GBY J. Baker, CAR Be. Graham, ARI

Punters No 52 47 78 78 61 80 61 58 80 80

Yds 2491 2188 3614 3583 2762 3562 2713 2558 3481 3469

LG 65 64 61 63 69 66 63 62 57 65

Avg 47.9 46.6 46.3 45.9 45.3 44.5 44.5 44.1 43.5 43.4

Akers, PHL M. Bryant, ATL Jo. Brown, STL Buehler, DAL Crosby, GBY Gould, CHI Feely, ARI Mare, SEA Gano, WAS Tynes, NYG

Kicking PAT 44-44 38-38 24-25 38-39 39-39 30-30 25-25 29-29 24-24 39-39

FG 30-35 27-30 28-34 22-29 20-26 23-27 22-24 22-27 22-32 17-20

LG 50 51 53 53 56 54 55 51 49 53

Pts 134 119 108 104 99 99 97 95 90 90

TD 31 29 24 23 22 14 28 22 20 23

Int 4 11 5 8 13 5 15 11 9 12

Receivers No Yds R. White, ATL 106 1284 Colston, NOR 82 1001 Witten, DAL 82 911 S. Moss, WAS 79 956 Fitzgerald, ARI 78 986 H. Nicks, NYG 75 959 Amendola, STL 75 627 L. McCoy, PHL 74 551 Ca. Johnson, DET 73 1068 Cooley, WAS 67 748

AFC INDIVIDUAL LEADERS Week 15 Quarterbacks Att Com Yds Brady, NWE 449 299 3561 P. Rivers, SND 464 309 4141 Cassel, KAN 383 227 2687 Flacco, BAL 451 280 3395 Garrard, JAC 328 214 2435 Roethlisberger, PIT 335 203 2600 P. Manning, IND 608 407 4257 Schaub, HOU 519 324 3807 Orton, DEN 498 293 3653 Fitzpatrick, BUF 404 237 2749

8 11 5 7 5 3 6 8 5

Rushers Att Yds A. Foster, HOU 277 1345 Jones-Drew, JAC 299 1324 Charles, KAN 203 1303 Chr. Johnson, TEN 282 1267 Mendenhall, PIT 292 1173 Hillis, CLE 252 1129 D. McFadden, OAK 212 1112 R. Rice, BAL 262 1051 Benson, CIN 276 1006 Tomlinson, NYJ 206 886

Avg 4.86 4.43 6.42 4.49 4.02 4.48 5.25 4.01 3.64 4.30

LG 74t 37 80 76t 50t 48 57t 50 26 31

Receivers No Yds Wayne, IND 99 1247 And. Johnson, HOU 86 1216 Welker, NWE 83 829 T. Owens, CIN 72 983 Ste. Johnson, BUF 72 943 B. Marshall, MIA 71 815 Bess, MIA 71 751 B. Lloyd, DEN 67 1264 Ochocinco, CIN 67 831 R. Rice, BAL 62 556

Avg 12.6 14.1 10.0 13.7 13.1 11.5 10.6 18.9 12.4 9.0

LG TD 50 5 60 8 35 7 78t 9 45 10 46 3 29 3 71 10 42 4 34 1

Scifres, SND Lechler, OAK B. Fields, MIA Sepulveda, PIT D. Colquitt, KAN B. Colquitt, DEN Hodges, CLE Podlesh, JAC Mesko, NWE Koch, BAL

Punters No 44 66 63 56 77 77 72 46 51 71

Yds 2123 3103 2916 2550 3450 3404 3177 2001 2203 3058

LG 67 68 69 62 72 63 59 63 65 60

Avg 48.3 47.0 46.3 45.5 44.8 44.2 44.1 43.5 43.2 43.1

Janikowski, OAK Vinatieri, IND Folk, NYJ D. Carpenter, MIA Rackers, HOU Cundiff, BAL Bironas, TEN Scobee, JAC P. Dawson, CLE Succop, KAN

Kicking PAT 37-37 45-45 28-28 21-21 37-37 36-36 34-34 37-37 27-27 37-37

FG 28-35 22-24 27-36 28-38 22-25 22-25 22-23 20-24 21-26 17-22

LG 54 48 56 60 53 49 55 59 48 53

Pts 121 111 109 105 103 102 100 97 90 88

TD 13 5 4 11 10 11 7 4 7 5

College NCAA FOOTBALL CHAMPIONSHIP SUBDIVISION All Times PST ——— Championship Friday, Jan. 7 At Pizza Hut Park Frisco, Texas Eastern Washington (12-2) vs. Delaware (12-2), 4 p.m.

Int 5 10 7 19 10 9 13 6 20 10

LG TD 55 11

BOWLS Subject to Change All Times PST ——— Wednesday, Dec. 22 MAACO Bowl: Boise State 26, Utah 3 Today, Dec. 23 Poinsettia Bowl: San Diego State (8-4) vs. Navy (8-3), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl: Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl: Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida International (6-6), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Monday, Dec. 27

Independence Bowl: Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 28 Champs Sports Bowl: North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West Virginia (9-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Insight Bowl: Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 29 Military Bowl: East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4), 11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Texas Bowl: Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl: Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl: SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Pinstripe Bowl: Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Music City Bowl: North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl: Nebraska (10-3) vs. Washington (6-6), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 31 Meineke Bowl: Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sun Bowl: Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 11 a.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl: Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl: South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State (9-4), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 1 TicketCity Bowl: Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech (75), 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Capital One Bowl: Michigan State (11-1) vs. Alabama (9-3), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl: Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl: Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (8-4), 10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Rose Bowl: TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Fiesta Bowl: Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (11-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 3 Orange Bowl: Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (11-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox) Saturday, Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl: Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl: Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-1), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 10 BCS National Championship: Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Today STEELERS 13.5 14 Panthers Saturday Cowboys 6 6.5 CARDINALS Sunday DOLPHINS 3.5 3.5 Lions EAGLES 14 14.5 Vikings JAGUARS 6.5 7 Redskins RAMS 2.5 2.5 49ers BUCCANEERS 6.5 6 Seahawks Patriots 8 8 BILLS BEARS 1 1 Jets Ravens 3 3.5 BROWNS CHIEFS 5 5 Titans Colts 3 3 RAIDERS Texans 2.5 NL BRONCOS PACKERS 3 3 Giants Chargers 7.5 7.5 BENGALS Monday FALCONS 2.5 2.5 Saints Favorite

San Diego St

College Today Poinsettia Bowl 1.5 3

Navy

Hawaii

Friday Hawaii Bowl 12.5 10.5

Tulsa

Toledo

Air Force

West Virginia Missouri

Maryland Baylor Oklahoma St

Sunday Little Caesars Pizza Bowl 2 1.5 Florida Int’l Monday Independence Bowl 1.5 3 Georgia Tech December 28 Champ Sports Bowl 1.5 2.5 Insight Bowl PK 2.5

NC State Iowa

December 29 Eagle Bank Bowl 8 7 East Carolina Texas Bowl 2 1.5 Illinois Alamo Bowl 5.5 5.5 Arizona

December 30 Armed Forces Bowl 7 7 Army Pinstripe Bowl Kansas St 3 PK Syracuse Music City Bowl North Carolina 1 2 Tennessee Holiday Bowl Nebraska 13.5 14 Washington Smu

December 31

Stanford

January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

Miami (Ohio)

January 6 GMAC Bowl 1.5 1

Mid. Tenn. St.

Lsu

January 7 Cotton Bowl PK 1

Texas A&M

Pitt

January 8 BBVA Compass Bowl 2.5 3.5

Kentucky

Nevada

January 9 Fight Hunger Bowl 9 8 Boston College

Auburn

January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 3 Oregon

BASKETBALL Men’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Akron 72, Stetson 56 Arizona 82, Robert Morris 56 Ark.-Little Rock 52, Oral Roberts 49 CS Bakersfield 89, UC Riverside 80 Gonzaga 64, Xavier 54 Kansas 78, California 63 Miami 73, Rice 67 Montana 71, Cal St.-Fullerton 57 N. Arizona 74, Air Force 63 N. Iowa 67, Indiana 61 New Mexico 89, Colorado 76 Oregon St. 74, Ill.-Chicago 54 Portland 88, Boise St. 79 SIU-Edwardsville 78, Longwood 71 San Diego St. 56, IUPUI 54 San Jose St. 95, Puget Sound 62 Santa Clara 99, CS Northridge 79 Utah St. 78, W. Michigan 57 Washington 90, Nevada 60 Wis.-Green Bay 68, Wyoming 62 SOUTHWEST Arkansas 67, Texas Southern 59 Canisius 78, Lamar 72 Loyola of Chicago 84, Texas-Pan American 76 SMU 49, Alabama St. 38 Texas Tech 73, Texas-Arlington 56 MIDWEST Bowling Green 70, Manhattan 57 Bradley 73, Detroit 65 Cent. Michigan 63, Cornerstone 60 Cleveland St. 69, South Florida 62 Creighton 58, Samford 40 DePaul 71, Florida Atlantic 62 Missouri 75, Illinois 64 Missouri St. 77, Arkansas St. 70 Notre Dame 93, UMBC 53 S. Illinois 61, N. Illinois 49 South Dakota 82, Loyola Marymount 70 Temple 76, Ohio 65 Texas 67, Michigan St. 55 EAST Albany, N.Y. 63, Colgate 61 Boston College 84, Bucknell 80 Cent. Connecticut St. 71, New Hampshire 50 Connecticut 81, Harvard 52 Dayton 69, Seton Hall 65 Elon 73, Navy 58 Fordham 80, Kennesaw St. 63 George Mason 85, Duquesne 79, 2OT George Washington 82, East Carolina 80 Hofstra 71, Holy Cross 56 Penn 78, Delaware 68 Pittsburgh 61, American U. 46 Princeton 75, Towson 65 Quinnipiac 88, Niagara 63 Rhode Island 73, Lafayette 65 Rider 77, La Salle 68 Siena 62, Georgia Tech 57 Syracuse 93, Drexel 65 UCF 64, Massachusetts 59 Vermont 84, Iona 79 Villanova 76, Monmouth, N.J. 36 TOURNAMENT Cancun Governor’s Cup First Round Colorado St. 82, Appalachian St. 79 Saint Louis 71, Northeastern 49 Southern Miss. 64, ETSU 60 Hawaiian Airlines Diamond Head Classic First Round Baylor 83, San Diego 50 Butler 74, Utah 62 Washington St. 83, Mississippi St. 57 Wednesday’s summary

Oregon St. 74, Ill.-Chicago 54 ILL.-CHICAGO (5-8) Pau. Carter 6-16 4-4 19, Williams 0-2 0-0 0, Par. Carter 2-3 0-0 4, Kreps 7-14 2-2 21, Neely 1-7 0-0 2, Gray 0-2 1-2 1, Harding 0-0 0-0 0, Singh 1-2 0-0 3, Denard 0-1 0-0 0, King 0-3 0-0 0, Birton 0-1 0-0 0, Robbins 0-3 0-0 0, Tyler 2-3 0-0 4. Totals 19-57 7-8 54. OREGON ST. (5-6) Johnson 1-6 0-0 2, Collier 4-5 2-2 10, Brandt 3-6 0-2 6, Cunningham 7-11 7-7 22, Haynes 1-2 0-2 3, McShane 0-1 0-0 0, Starks 4-10 0-0 12, Brown 0-0 0-0 0, Burton 0-4 1-2 1, Deane 0-0 0-0 0, Wallace 1-5 2-2 4, Jones 0-0 0-0 0, Nelson 6-8 1-2 14. Totals 27-58 13-19 74. Halftime—Oregon St. 39-19. 3-Point Goals—Ill.Chicago 9-23 (Kreps 5-9, Pau. Carter 3-7, Singh 1-2, King 0-1, Gray 0-1, Tyler 0-1, Neely 0-1, Birton 0-1), Oregon St. 7-18 (Starks 4-7, Haynes 1-1, Cunningham 12, Nelson 1-2, Burton 0-1, Johnson 0-1, Brandt 0-1, Wallace 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Ill.-Chicago 37 (Pau. Carter, Kreps, Tyler 7), Oregon St. 35 (Collier, Johnson 7). Assists—Ill.-Chicago 9 (Neely 4), Oregon St. 14 (Burton 4). Total Fouls—Ill.-Chicago 16, Oregon St. 10. A—3,881.

Women’s college Wednesday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Dayton 98, CS Bakersfield 78 Denver 72, UTEP 63 Montana St. 107, Pacific 58 Stanford 100, San Francisco 45 Utah 72, New Mexico St. 62 SOUTHWEST Georgia 60, TCU 57 Oklahoma St. 77, Oral Roberts 48 MIDWEST Cent. Michigan 98, Wichita St. 73 Drake 77, Air Force 61 Indiana St. 86, SIU-Edwardsville 68 Iowa 75, N. Iowa 64 Kansas 64, Creighton 58 Loyola of Chicago 64, W. Illinois 59 Michigan 68, Boston College 55 Minnesota 82, N. Arizona 74 Northwestern 70, Toledo 60 Saint Louis 55, Evansville 53 Wright St. 73, UCF 65 SOUTH Charlotte 74, Md.-Eastern Shore 36 Florida A&M 52, Savannah St. 48 George Mason 73, Longwood 45 Memphis 71, Fla. International 65 Purdue 59, Gardner-Webb 58 South Alabama 69, Lipscomb 41 Syracuse 77, Clemson 58 Tenn.-Martin 89, Murray St. 78 Tennessee 102, ETSU 53 UNC Asheville 76, Mercer 73 Wake Forest 84, Furman 35

EAST American U. 83, Troy 49 Delaware St. 62, St. Francis, NY 42 Duquesne 84, St. Francis, Pa. 69 Fairfield 55, Albany, N.Y. 26 Fairleigh Dickinson 51, Cent. Connecticut St. 46 Georgetown 73, Coppin St. 52 Hofstra 65, Hartford 51 Iona 47, Fordham 44 N.J. Tech 60, Howard 57 New Hampshire 75, Quinnipiac 63 Providence 50, Oakland, Mich. 49 Richmond 66, Towson 50 Sacred Heart 69, Harvard 60 Saint Joseph’s 50, Delaware 45 Seton Hall 65, La Salle 62 UC Santa Barbara 71, Siena 49

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Philadelphia 35 22 8 5 49 117 87 Pittsburgh 35 23 10 2 48 115 81 N.Y. Rangers 35 20 14 1 41 105 91 N.Y. Islanders 31 7 18 6 20 67 105 New Jersey 33 9 22 2 20 59 103 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 34 19 13 2 40 89 77 Boston 32 17 11 4 38 89 68 Buffalo 34 14 16 4 32 89 97 Ottawa 35 14 17 4 32 81 106 Toronto 33 12 17 4 28 75 102 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 36 20 12 4 44 109 100 Tampa Bay 34 19 10 5 43 105 111 Atlanta 36 19 12 5 43 117 104 Carolina 32 15 13 4 34 90 99 Florida 32 15 17 0 30 87 83 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 33 21 8 4 46 110 92 Chicago 36 19 14 3 41 115 104 Nashville 33 17 10 6 40 84 83 Columbus 33 17 13 3 37 85 91 St. Louis 33 16 12 5 37 86 93 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 32 19 8 5 43 105 83 Colorado 34 19 11 4 42 121 110 Minnesota 32 15 13 4 34 79 91 Calgary 35 14 18 3 31 92 103 Edmonton 32 12 15 5 29 85 110 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 34 21 10 3 45 100 92 San Jose 34 18 11 5 41 102 95 Anaheim 38 18 16 4 40 98 111 Los Angeles 32 19 12 1 39 95 75 Phoenix 32 15 10 7 37 89 93 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Wednesday’s Games N.Y. Islanders 2, Tampa Bay 1, OT Pittsburgh 5, Florida 2 Detroit 5, Vancouver 4, OT Chicago 4, Nashville 1 Today’s Games Atlanta at Boston, 4 p.m. Florida at Buffalo, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Washington, 4 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 4 p.m. Vancouver at Columbus, 4 p.m. Detroit at St. Louis, 5 p.m. Ottawa at Nashville, 5 p.m. Calgary at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Minnesota at Colorado, 6 p.m. Edmonton at Los Angeles, 7:30 p.m. Phoenix at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX—Named Arnie Beyeler manager of Pawtucket (IL), Kevin Boles manager of Portland (EL), Bruce Crabbe manager, Kevin Walker pitching coach and Alex Ochoa hitting coach for Salem (Carolina), Dick Such pitching coach at Greenville (SAL), Carlos Febles manager and Paul Abbott pitching coach for Lowell (N.Y.-Penn), George Lombard manager and dave Tomlin pitching coach for Gulf Coast Red Sox. KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Assigned INF Joaquin Arias and INF Lance Zawadzki outright to Omaha (AAA). TAMPA BAY RAYS—Named Dave Eiland as a special assistant. National League HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with LHP Gustavo Chacin on a minor-league contract. MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with RHP Sean Green and INF Craig Counsell on one-year contracts. PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Designated RHP Joe Martinez for assignment. Named Dean Treanor manager of Indianapolis (IL), P.J. Forbes manager of Altoona (EL), Carlos Garcia of Bradenton (FSL), Gary Robinson manager of West Virginia (SAL), Dave Turgeon manager and Justin Meccage pitching coach for State College (NYPenn), Brad Fischer advisor-player development, Frank Kremblas coordinator of instruction, Jeff Livesey hitting coordinator, Gary Green infield coordinator, Luis Dorante, Latin America field coordinator and Scott Mitchell assistant pitching coordinator. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Named John Abbamondi vice president of strategy and business analysis. WASHINGTON NATIONALS—Assigned LHP Matt Chico outright to Syracuse (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHARLOTTE BOBCATS—Announced the resignation of coach Larry Brown. LOS ANGELES CLIPPERS—Signed F Ike Diogu. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Placed WR Early Doucet on injured reserve. Signed LB Curtis Gatewood from the practice squad. BUFFALO BILLS—Signed DB Brett Johnson to the practice squad. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Signed FB Rashawn Jackson from the practice squad. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Claimed TE Garrett Mills off waivers from Philadelphia. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Placed TE Evan Moore on injured reserve. DENVER BRONCOS—Placed FB Spencer Larsen on injured reserve. Signed G Stanley Daniels. GREEN BAY PACKERS—Signed G Adrian Battles and S Michael Greco to practice squad. Placed WR Terrance Smith on practice squad-injured reserve. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Placed WR Austin Collie on injured reserve. MINNESOTA VIKINGS—Signed QB Rhett Bomar from the New York Giants practice squad. Waived QB R.J. Archer. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Signed DL Landon Cohen. Released DL Louis Leonard. SEATTLE SEHAWKS—Signed LB Michael Johnson from the Kansas City the practice squad. Signed LB Vuna Tuihalamaka to the practice squad. Placed DE Derek Walker on practice squad-injured reserve. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Promoted LB Curtis Johnson from the practice squad. Signed WR Joe West to practice squad. WASHINGTON REDSKINS—Placed DL Ma’ake Kemoeatu and DL Phillip Daniels on injured reserve. Signed LB Rob Jackson from the practice squad. Signed DL Darrion Scott. Signed DL Rashaad Duncan and OT Xavier Fulton to the practice squad. Released OT Jacob Bender from the practice squad. HOCKEY National Hockey League ANAHEIM DUCKS—Reassigned LW Josh Green to Syracuse (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Recalled F Josh Bailey from Bridgeport (AHL). NEW YORK RANGERS—Recalled F Mats Zuccarello from Connecticut (AHL). PHOENIX COYOTES—Recalled LW Mikkel Boedker from San Antonio (AHL). Placed LW Taylor Pyatt on injured reserve. SOCCER Major League Soccer D.C. UNITED—Signed MF Andy Najar to a multiyear contract. PHILADELPHIA UNION—Signed MF Zach Pfeffer. COLLEGE SKYLINE CONFERENCE—Named Linda Bruno commissioner. JACKSONVILLE STATE—Named Chris Boone defensive coordinator. MIAMI—Named Brennan Carroll tight ends coach and national recruiting coordinator.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 D3

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

S  B

Football • Ohio State looks into tattoo allegations: Ohio State is investigating allegations that several football players traded autographs for tattoos, according to multiple reports. WBNS-TV and The Columbus Dispatch, both citing unidentified sources, reported on their websites Wednesday night that the school was looking into the possible NCAA violations just two weeks before the Buckeyes face Arkansas in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 4. Quarterback Terrelle Pryor, not mentioned in either report, quickly responded on Twitter. “I paid for my tattoos. GoBucks” he posted. • Rodgers returns to Packers practice: Aaron Rodgers returned to practice for the Green Bay Packers on Wednesday. With the playoffs still a realistic possibility, he’s expected to start Sunday’s game against the New York Giants. And while Rodgers acknowledges he’ll be careful about sliding instead of taking a direct hit when he scrambles in the future, he says coming back from his second concussion this season won’t fundamentally change the way he plays. Rodgers sat out practices and team meetings last week and didn’t play in Sunday night’s loss at New England. • Colts WR Collie out for season: Peyton Manning has lost another of his top targets for the season. Indianapolis Colts receiver Austin Collie suffered a concussion Sunday against Jacksonville, and the team placed him on injured reserve Wednesday. Though Collie is in his second year, Manning feels like he’s losing a veteran. Despite missing five games and more than a half in three others, Collie leads all Indy receivers with eight touchdown catches, is second in receptions (58) and third in yards (649). “He’s fast, he’s got a good feel for zones, he understands defenses,” Manning said. “He has his physical talents, but also, his experience has helped him play at such a high level at such a young point in his career.” • Concussion has Favre in limbo: As the Minnesota Vikings have been reminded this season, ruling Brett Favre out is never easy. He managed to make it in Monday night’s game after the final injury report declared him out, let alone all the other weeks just this year when his status was unclear until the final hours. That’s why Vikings interim coach Leslie Frazier is still holding a spot in the starting lineup for the 41-yearold, soon-to-be-retired quarterback in case he recovers quickly from the concussion that knocked him out of the game against the Bears. “It will just be a day-to-day situation,” Frazier said. “If he gets cleared by our doctors then things will change, but until he’s cleared there isn’t much that can be done other than whatever the doctors recommend.” • Jets’ Ryan: Foot-fetish report ‘a personal matter’: New York Jets coach Rex Ryan says it’s a “personal matter” and declined to talk about a “foot-fetish” report posted by the sports website Deadspin that show four videos of a woman who bears a close resemblance to Ryan’s wife, Michelle. The videos show a woman displaying her toes to an off-screen cameraman who, in one video, sounds a lot like the coach. The two are having an intimate chat about her feet. During his news conference Wednesday, Ryan declined several times to discuss the situation. “I understand I’m going to get asked this question frontways, sideways, backways, and all this, but it is a personal matter,” he said. • Metrodome roof nearly clear of snow and ice: Workers are finally close to clearing the Metrodome roof of snow and ice so that more substantial repair work can begin on the home of the Minnesota Vikings in Minneapolis. The executive director of the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission said crews hoped to have the roof clear on Wednesday. He says it’s still not clear how long total repairs will take, whether it will involve replacing damaged panels or replacing the roof entirely, and how much it will all cost. • Brady passes Vick to top

final fan Pro Bowl voting: Tom Brady has overtaken Michael Vick to lead all players in the final fan voting for the Pro Bowl. The New England Patriots quarterback had nearly 1.9 million votes when balloting ended Monday. The NFL said Wednesday that Vick topped the NFC with more than 1.5 million. Almost 100 million votes were cast online and via mobile phones. Fans account for one-third of the selection process. Players and coaches vote Wednesday and today. The 43-man rosters will be announced Tuesday. Players leading their position voting include Houston Texans running back Arian Foster and wide receiver Andre Johnson, Pittsburgh Steelers strong safety Troy Polamalu and Indianapolis Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney. The Pro Bowl is Jan. 30 in Honolulu.

Horse racing • Racing deal keeps Preakness in Maryland: The Maryland Racing Commission has approved an agreement that will keep the Preakness Stakes, a state tradition and the second jewel in racing’s Triple Crown, in Baltimore. The commission voted Wednesday to support an agreement reached by horse racing representatives and Gov. Martin O’Malley’s administration earlier in the day in Annapolis. It calls for 146 days of live racing at the state’s horse racing tracks. The deal would redirect $3.5 million to $4 million in state slot machine revenue from capital improvements at racetracks to help defray operating costs.

Basketball • Ratings up for NBA: More viewers are tuning into the NBA — and it’s not just the fascination with the Miami Heat. Television ratings for games on ESPN and TNT are up more than 30 percent so far this season compared to last year. Sure, the Heat are drawing big audiences after a summer of free-agent intrigue concluded with LeBron James and Chris Bosh joining Dwyane Wade in Miami. Ratings for Heat games on ESPN have increased 69 percent from last season. But take out the five matchups involving Miami, and the network’s NBA coverage is still up 23 percent from a year ago.

Beavs win last game before start of Pac-10 The Associated Press

Eric Jamison / The Associated Press

Boise State running back Doug Martin is brought down by Utah’s Chaz Walker (32) and Matt Martinez (52) during the first half of the Maaco Bowl on Wednesday night in Las Vegas.

Boise caps season with bowl victory By Tim Dahlberg The Associated Press

LAS VEGAS — It wasn’t the bowl Boise State wanted to be in, and for the better part of the first half Wednesday night, the Broncos played as if they were thinking about the one that got away. Then Doug Martin raced 84 yards up the middle, and suddenly the MAACO Bowl didn’t look so bad after all. Martin shook Boise State out of its brief postseason funk with his long touchdown run midway through the second quarter, and the 10th-ranked Broncos dominated the rest of the way to beat No. 20 Utah 26-3 in a game that wasn’t as close as the final score indicated. “It was a startup for our team,” Martin said. “A momentum changer.” The victory was small consolation for Boise State, which missed out on a possible Rose Bowl appearance on two missed field goals last month at Nevada. But the dominating win against a team that was at one time ranked No. 6 in the country was a reminder why the Broncos rode high in the polls before suffering their only loss in two years. It may also be a reminder for next year’s poll voters not to write off a team that won every game over the last two years except the one that really mattered. The loss to Nevada not only cost the school millions of dollars in a BCS bowl bid, but some of the

Tennis • Nadal beats Federer: Rafael Nadal beat Roger Federer 7-6 (3), 4-6, 6-1 Wednesday to square a twomatch exhibition series for charity between the world’s top-ranked tennis players in Madrid. Nadal sealed the win with a powerfully angled forehand crosscourt shot in front of a capacity crowd at Caja Magica sports arena that included many of Spain’s leading dignitaries. Federer beat Nadal 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 Tuesday in the opening match in Zurich, Switzerland.

Baseball • Man who killed Angel pitcher gets 51 years to life: A construction worker who was on probation for felony drunken driving when he ran a red light and killed rookie Los Angeles Angels pitcher Nick Adenhart and two other people was sentenced Wednesday to 51 years to life in prison. A judge sentenced Andrew Gallo, 24, amid sobbing from the victims’ family and friends who earlier heard him apologize for the 2009 crash. Prosecutors said Gallo’s blood-alcohol level was nearly three times the legal limit when he blew through a red light at an Orange County intersection on April 9, 2009, and T-boned the car carrying Adenhart and three friends. — From wire reports

grudging respect others had finally given Boise State. Count Utah coach Kyle Whittingham among the believers. “This is a team that was the top-ranked team that was setting itself up for a run at the national championship,” Whittingham said. “If they beat Reno (Nevada) and if Auburn or Oregon stumble, they’re in that game.” Neither of those things happened, of course, forcing Boise State to go begging for a decent bowl bid despite its gaudy record. The Broncos landed in this gambling city, where the bookies quickly established them as 17-point favorites to beat a Utah team that also had its BCS dream dashed late in the season. But Boise State (12-1) came out flat and seemed disinterested. Kellen Moore fumbled on the third play of the game and the Broncos turned the ball over three times to help Utah (10-3) to a 3-0 lead. Martin then scampered up the middle and headed down the left sideline on the first play from scrimmage following a Utes punt. Moore, who also threw an interception in the first quarter, rebounded with a 25-yard touchdown pass to Tyler Shoemaker in the closing seconds of the first half to give Boise State a 16-3 lead. He added another 18yard TD pass to Austin Pettis in the third quarter.

C O M M E N TA RY

Hockey • Man charged with throwing waffles at Leafs’ game: A frustrated Toronto Maple Leafs fan who threw waffles on the ice at the Air Canada Centre will have to admire his team from afar. Joseph Robb was charged with criminal mischief and barred from the arena for throwing waffles on the ice at a Maple Leafs game to protest the team’s performance this season. The 12-17-4 Leafs were 28th out of the NHL’s 30 teams entering Wednesday’s games.

MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Does college football really need Cuban’s cash to fix postseason? By Tim Cowlishaw The Dallas Morning News

M

ark Cuban’s not so different from you and me. This is evident from the fact that he has considerable trouble getting people to take his money. I run into this problem all the time. Just this weekend I had store clerks handing back my credit card and saying, “Sorry, we can’t take this.” In Cuban’s case, he couldn’t get the Chicago Cubs to take his $500 million a couple years ago. He failed to get the Rangers to take his giant check this summer. So last week, the Mavericks owner announced he would spend his money to save college football from the evil BCS and produce the playoff that he says everyone wants. Cuban’s announcement surprised me for a number of reasons. I will list three of them here. Number one is that he went to Indiana University. So I wasn’t even aware that he knew what college football was. Number two is that he thought the problem could be fixed by throwing money at it. I think the big conference commissioners know that a lot of money could be generated by a playoff system (although I think they exaggerate the number). Most of them are on the record as having said so, in some cases, even to Congress. Number three is simply that this doesn’t strike me as a Cuban-type cause. Athletic directors, coaches and players all have said that they favor the bowls (or, like me, an improved version of the current system) over a playoff. There are two groups of people that favor a playoff. One is the media. I can’t remember the last time Cuban thought the media were in touch with any cause worth leading. The other group is, allegedly, the fans. Now you can find polls that say fans want it. But after the first year of a playoff, I promise you there will be polls saying that fans don’t like the playoff system that was installed to replace the bowls. That aside, fans profess to love the NCAA men’s basketball tournament, and I have no doubt they do. They also stay away from watching college basketball until March in alarming numbers. No one knows — certainly I don’t profess to know — exactly what impact a 16-team

college football playoff in December would have on September ratings. My guess is that over time they would slide. It might be a small amount, it might be significant. I don’t know. But as far as causes go, this battle hardly seems a worthwhile use of the $500 million Cuban said he would raise to throw at colleges to support a playoff. In Cuban’s words, “There is quite a lot of satisfaction in taking on Goliath.” That might be a fair characterization of the powers of the BCS, but I don’t know anyone who sees Cuban as a David figure. Certainly no one in the Fort Worth courtroom who watched as he tried to pull off a last-minute purchase of the Rangers viewed him in that light. Having heard from the critics, Cuban has decided it’s more about throwing money at college presidents and administrators in a manner in which they could enhance their schools’ ability to provide education. With a daughter in college and a son not far behind, I’m in favor of anything that either broadens that experience or, heaven forbid, reduces educational costs. Using those as tools to provide a college football playoff? I’m at a loss to see how the current system — beyond being bloated with too many bowls and in need of changing the automatic qualifiers on an annual basis — is broken. Regular-season ratings remain strong. The major bowls get good numbers. The national championship will be the highest rated show on television that week, despite the fact that Auburn and Oregon hardly represent schools with Notre Dame or Texaslike fan bases. The complaints about the college bowl system remind me a lot of all those callers and e-mailers who insist that they and everyone they know have given up on Jerry Jones and the Cowboys. I hear it all the time, and I’m hardly alone. But I was also hardly alone Sunday at Cowboys Stadium where more than 86,000 fans watched an NFC East consolation bracket game between Dallas and Washington. When people turn off those sets and dismiss the college bowl system, I’ll start wondering if there’s a place for Mark Cuban or perhaps someone with a better handle on the game’s problems to come in and fix it.

CORVALLIS — Jared Cunningham scored 22 points and Roberto Nelson added 14 to lead Oregon State to a 74-54 win against IllinoisChicago on Wednesday night. In their final tuneup before Pac-10 Conference play, the Beavers (5-6) led by 20 at halftime, and Illinois-Chicago got no closer than 17 afterward. Robo Kreps had 21 points and seven rebounds, and Paul Carter scored 19 points for the Flames (5-8), who defeated then-12th ranked Illinois four days earlier. Nelson, a redshirt freshman guard, had the best of his four games as a collegian. He played 16 minutes and was six of eight from the floor, including a 3-pointer. “The guys just got me open shots,” Nelson said. “The guys were penetrating, and I was just hitting open shots.” After 18 months in eligibility limbo, the highly-touted recruit from Santa Barbara, Calif., was finally cleared by the NCAA earlier this month. “It sure is great having somebody who can come off the bench and just hit shots,” Oregon State coach Craig Robinson said. The Beavers, who lost four of their previous five games, used a 7-0 run during in the first six minutes of the second half to build a 51-26 advantage. Cunningham added the exclamation point late with a dunk off a long outlet pass from Devon Collier, giving the Beavers a 69-45 lead with 3:54 remaining. In other games on Wednesday night: No. 3 Kansas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Cal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 BERKELEY, Calif. — Markieff Morris had 21 points and 10 rebounds and No. 3 Kansas overcame the ejection of his twin brother to beat California in a testy game Wednesday night. Freshman Josh Selby scored 18 points in his second game since an NCAA suspension and the Jayhawks (11-0) remained unbeaten and handed the Golden Bears (6-5) their third loss in four games. No. 4 Connecticut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Harvard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 HARTFORD, Conn. — Kebab Walker’s 20 points and a suffocating defense helped Connecticut record to 10-0. UConn’s man-to-man defense blanketed the Crimson (7-3), holding them to 30 percent shooting, including four of 31 from 3-point range. No. 5 Syracuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Drexel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 SYRACUSE, N.Y. — Kris Joseph had a career-high 25 points, Scoop Jardine added 21 and Rick Jackson had his ninth double-double of the season as Syracuse (13-0) remained unbeaten with a victory over Drexel. No. 6 Pittsburgh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 American . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 PITTSBURGH — Brad Wanamaker scored 19 points and Pittsburgh (12-1) held American to a lone basket for 10 minutes in the first half. No. 7 San Diego State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 IUPUI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 LAS VEGAS — D.J. Gay scored 18 points and Malcolm Thomas fell just shy of a doubledouble as San Diego State won its school-record 14th straight game. No. 8 Villanova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Monmouth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 WEST LONG BRANCH, N.J. — Corey Fisher had 20 points and Corey Stokes added 19 to lead Villanova (10-1) over Monmouth. No. 9 Missouri. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 No. 21 Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 ST. LOUIS — Laurence Bowers made a fourpoint play with a layup and two free throws after an intentional foul with 40 seconds to go, fueling a huge final minute for Missouri (11-1). No. 18 Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 No. 12 Michigan State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 EAST LANSING, Mich. — Jordan Hamilton scored 21 points and Tristan Thompson had 17 points and 15 rebounds for Texas (10-2). No. 13 Kentucky . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Winthrop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 LEXINGTON, Ky. — Doron Lamb’s 32 points set a Kentucky record for a freshman as the Wildcats (9-2) rolled. No. 15 Baylor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 San Diego . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 HONOLULU — Quincy Acy and Anthony Jones each scored 14 points, and LaceDarius Dunn added 13 for Baylor (8-1) in the opening round of the Diamond Head Classic. No. 20 Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Radford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Erving Walker scored 20 points and Kenny Boynton added 11 for Florida (9-3). No. 24 Central Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Massachusetts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 AMHERST, Mass. — Isaac Sosa scored 14 points in his first start of the season and Central Florida (11-0) won in its debut as a nationally ranked team. Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Robert Morris. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 TUCSON, Ariz. — Derrick Williams had 17 points and nine rebounds as Arizona (11-2) blew open a tight game with a 19-4 run spanning halftime. Washington State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Mississippi State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 HONOLULU — Klay Thompson scored 28 points and Mountain View High grad Abe Lodwick added a season-high nine points to lead Washington State (9-1) in the opening round of the Diamond Head Classic. Washington . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Nevada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 SEATTLE — Isaiah Thomas scored a season-high 24 points, and Washington (8-3) looked sharp in a blowout.


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D4 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Despite losing records, NFC West teams are setting sights on playoffs

Tiny Eagles WR Jackson has a knack for big plays By Rob Maaddi The Associated Press

Marcio Jose Sanchez / The Associated Press

Jeff Roberson / The Associated Press

Ted S. Warren / The Associated Press

San Francisco and tight end Vernon Davis have a 5-9 record, but they can still win the NFC West with tiebreakers over St. Louis and San Francisco.

St. Louis quarterback Sam Bradford has the Rams on the verge of the playoffs as a rookie, although he has struggled of late.

Seattle and receiver Mike Williams will know more about their playoff chances after St. Louis and San Francisco play on Sunday.

49ers are staying in division race despite inconsistencies

Rams QB Bradford insists he hasn’t hit rookie wall

Seahawks’ trip to Tampa Bay could be meaningless

By Janie McCauley

By R.B. Fallstrom

By Tim Booth

The Asso ciated Press

The Associated Press

The Associated Press

SANTA CLARA, Calif. — The San Francisco 49ers are an NFL enigma. So bad one week, so good the next — and it’s hard to explain exactly why. Other than inconsistency, of course. They have no real identity on offense in large part because of injuries, and the only reason they’re alive in the playoff chase with a lowly 5-9 record: The Niners play in the dreadful NFC West. “To still be in it, it’s amazing,” tight end Vernon Davis said. No team has made the playoffs with a losing record in a non-strike season — so, this could be a historymaking first for the West champion. Cleveland and Detroit advanced in the 1982 strike season with 4-5 records when the playoffs were expanded to include eight teams per conference. “It’s unusual, but let’s not get it twisted. We didn’t make the rules,” San Francisco linebacker Takeo Spikes said defensively. “We live in a society where the rules are made and we’re going to play in them. So we get the opportunity to do that, which we will with these next two games. Hopefully we’ll take care of business and we’ll set ourselves up with the playoffs. “I don’t worry about what this person may say, what that person may say. If they had the opportunity to be in our shoes right now they would love to. But they can’t. That’s why they’re sitting behind a desk, holding microphones and making opinions. One day I’ll be that person but until that day I’m going to take advantage of my business here.” Even coach Mike Singletary has been perplexed by this season, by this team he truly thought would be so much better in his second full year in charge. He lists certain players who have had productive years, and points to a pair of rookie offensive linemen who have hung tough through their introduction to the rigors of the pro game. Yet many have greatly underachieved. There have been quarterback switches and the 49ers have made a lot of the same mistakes that hurt them a year ago in an 8-8 season. That after Singletary and his players thought things were fixed and they were destined to end a seven-year postseason drought. “It’s never over ’til it’s over,” center David Baas said. “We’ve got a chance to do something awesome.” But it could be over as soon as Sunday, when San Francisco plays at St. Louis. A loss and the 49ers are officially done, leaving the Rams and Seahawks to fight for the top spot in the league’s worst division. San Francisco would have been eliminated last weekend if either Seattle or St. Louis had won, yet neither did. Having won four of seven, San Francisco actually has been the division’s hottest team of late. “I never thought we were totally out of it,” rookie running back Anthony Dixon said. “Because until they told us we were out of it, we were in it.” The hands-down favorite to win the West, San Francisco went unbeaten in the preseason and then started 0-5. Team president Jed York declared his club would still rebound to win the division and make the playoffs, even though no team in NFL history has bounced back from an 0-5 start to advance to the postseason.

ST. LOUIS — Sam Bradford is in a slump, throwing no touchdown passes and five interceptions in the last three games. The St. Louis Rams’ rookie quarterback insisted Wednesday he hasn’t hit the wall mentally or physically. He’s fired up about leading a team that could secure its first playoff berth since 2004 with victories over the 49ers at home and at Seattle to finish the season. Even after last week’s loss to the Chiefs, who sacked him three times, intercepted two passes and hit him with regularity, Bradford said he feels better than he did at this point of the year in any of his college seasons at Oklahoma. He credits extra weight added during offseason conditioning. Bradford insists his eyes never, ever glaze over during late-night video sessions. “I’m up to the challenge every week,” Bradford said. “I haven’t hit the point where I’m watching film at night and I’m like, ‘OK, what defense, who are we playing again?’ “Everything very clear, so I think that’s a good sign.” His teammates see no letup. “Nah, no way,” wide receiver Danny Amendola said. “I don’t believe it. He’s a great player and he’s going to continue to play great.” The No. 1 pick is having one of the top statistical seasons for a rookie quarterback in NFL history, last week becoming the third to pass for 3,000 yards. He’s also third on the list in attempts and completions, and beyond the rookie numbers he’s one of only six quarterbacks in the NFL to take every snap this season. That last fact is a point of pride for Bradford, who long ago quieted concerns that his surgically repaired throwing shoulder wouldn’t hold up in the NFL. His statistics the last three games, however, have dropped off. Bradford enjoyed his first career 300yard game with three touchdowns at Denver in Week 11, but since then he’s 57 for 104 for 599 yards against Arizona, New Orleans and Kansas City. Before the slump, the last two games representing a step up in competition, Bradford threw at least one touchdown pass in 10 of the first 11 games. No question, he’s not happy with his recent work. He said it has nothing to do with different strategies defenses have cooked up. “Obviously, the past couple of weeks I haven’t played as well as I would have liked to,” Bradford said. “It’s frustrating at times, but you can’t get caught up in the past. “It’s me not being as clean in my reads as I need to be.” Of course, it’s not all on Bradford that the Rams (68) have scored one touchdown per game the last three weeks. The line has had protection issues, giving up eight sacks in that span and leaving Bradford on the run much of the time. Coach Steve Spagnuolo said the team’s no-name crew of pass catchers has had trouble getting open fast enough. “It all kind of ties together,” Spagnuolo said. “We all love it when it’s protected perfectly and the ball gets out perfectly on time.”

RENTON, Wash. — The Seattle Seahawks will fly nearly 3,000 miles one-way this weekend to play a game that potentially has no relevance. Amazing that the Seahawks, with just six wins heading into Week 16, could consider resting players on Sunday at Tampa Bay in a move to improve their chances of reaching the playoffs depending on what happens earlier in the day. Not that Pete Carroll would consider pulling back. He was annoyed by the idea when it was brought up on Wednesday. “That’s not going to be any factor, it’s not going to be in the mindset,” Carroll said. “We’re going to go play the game to win the football game. We can’t afford to do anything but that right now.” But the reality is that by the time Seattle finally kicks off in Tampa Bay, the Seahawks will know whether their game has any meaning. A win by St. Louis over San Francisco on Sunday morning makes the Seahawks result insignificant. The Seahawks could win by 30 or lose by 30 and it would make no difference to who wins the NFC West title. In that scenario, the season finale between Seattle and St. Louis at Qwest Field would decide the division champ. But if San Francisco wins, the Seahawks likely need wins in their last two games to reach the playoffs. It didn’t need to be this way for Seattle. Had the Seahawks won at San Francisco two weeks ago, the 49ers would already be eliminated from playoff contention and the Seahawks would have an opportunity to wrap up the division this weekend. “We’ve had a lot of mulligans this year. I don’t even want to think about it,” Seattle linebacker Lofa Tatupu said. “I just want to get out there and play ball.” The struggling Seahawks, having dropped six of eight games, could use at least the slightest bit of consistent play. Offensively, Matt Hasselbeck was yanked from last week’s loss to Atlanta after committing three turnovers in the third quarter that led to 17 Falcons points in their 34-18 win over the Seahawks. Defensively, Seattle has given up at least 30 points in its last six losses. So playing well and beating the Buccaneers is certainly still in the front of their minds this week, even if the final outcome Sunday has no bearing on Seattle’s playoff hopes. “You can’t think about that,” Tatupu said. “You want to get better and keep excelling toward the end of the season. That’s our main focus and that’s our priority. We definitely want to make the playoffs. Don’t get that misconstrued, but whatever happens, happens. We’re going to play as well as we can and continue to hit our stride at the end of the season.” Carroll said he’ll be aware of what is going on in St. Louis, but he’ll be trying to block his players from letting whatever is happening in the Midwest affect their approach. “It doesn’t have anything to do with what we’re doing. It really doesn’t. And it shouldn’t. We’ve never turned to those kind of scenarios — back-against-thewall scenario or underdog or favorite or any of that — that’s not the stuff we deal with,” Carroll said.

NFL playoff scenarios

For Week 16

AFC

NFC

CLINCHED: New England (playoff spot) and Pittsburgh (playoff spot) ELIMINATED: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Denver, Cleveland, Houston, Miami.

CLINCHED: Chicago (NFC North) and Atlanta (playoff spot) ELIMINATED: Carolina, Detroit, Washington, Dallas, Minnesota, Arizona.

NEW ENGLAND • Clinches AFC East and homefield advantage with: 1) Win or tie OR 2) N.Y. Jets loss or tie

ATLANTA • Clinches NFC South and homefield advantage with: 1) Win or tie

CHICAGO • Clinches a first-round bye with: 1) Win and Philadelphia loss and N.Y. Giants loss or tie

PHILADELPHIA • Clinches NFC East with: 1) Win OR 2) Tie and N.Y. Giants loss or tie OR 3) N.Y. Giants loss • Clinches a playoff spot with: 1) Tie OR 2) Tampa Bay loss or tie

NEW ORLEANS • Clinches a playoff spot with: 1) Win or tie OR 2) Tampa Bay loss or tie

PITTSBURGH • Clinches AFC North and a first-round bye with: 1) Win and Baltimore loss KANSAS CITY • Clinches AFC West with: 1) Win and San Diego loss or tie OR 2) Tie and San Diego loss

BALTIMORE • Clinches a playoff spot with: 1) Win or tie OR 2) Kansas City loss and Jacksonville loss or tie OR 3) Kansas City loss and Indianapolis loss or tie OR 4) San Diego loss or tie and Jacksonville loss or tie OR 5) San Diego loss or tie and Indianapolis loss or tie N.Y. JETS • Clinch a playoff spot with: 1) Win or tie OR 2) Jacksonville loss or tie OR 3) Indianapolis loss or tie

N.Y. GIANTS • Clinch a playoff spot with: 1) Win

PHILADELPHIA — He’s built more like a ballboy than a football player, and his end zone antics drive his coach and some of his teammates crazy. If he keeps making big plays, though, DeSean Jackson can do whatever he wants when he scores. The diminutive Jackson — he’s generously listed at 5-foot-10 and 175 pounds — is one of the most exciting players to watch in any sport. When he gets the ball, he’s a threat to take it the distance from anywhere on the field. Just ask the New York Giants. Jackson’s 65-yard punt return on the final play capped an incredible rally last Sunday and gave the Philadelphia Eagles a 3831 win over the Giants in a battle for the NFC East lead. Of course, Jackson didn’t take the easy route into the end zone. He stuck the ball in the air and began his celebration around the 5. When he reached the 1, he ran across the field before finally crossing the goal line. This time, however, Jackson wasn’t showboating. He wanted to make sure there would be no time left on the clock when he scored. “I did that on purpose,” Jackson told The Associated Press on Wednesday. “Trying to be a smart player.” Jackson doesn’t always make wise decisions on the field. The speedy wide receiver drew an unsportsmanlike conduct penalty in a 30-27 win over Dallas two weeks ago after a career-best 91yard TD catch because he stopped at the 1, turned his back to the end zone, held the ball out and flopped backward. In his second game as a rookie in 2008, Jackson committed one of the all-time bonehead plays. He turned a 61-yard TD catch into a 60-yard reception and fumble because he was so eager to dance that he flipped the ball backward at the 1. That play also was in Dallas and it was in front of a national audience on a Monday night. The Cowboys didn’t pick up the ball, so the Eagles kept possession. In 2005, Jackson made a similar mental blunder in the U.S. AllAmerican Bowl for high school players. On his way into the end zone after a long catch, he dove from the 5 and landed at the 1. Perhaps he’s learned from his mistakes because he actually scored against the Giants before throwing the ball into the stands. Eagles coach Andy Reid and quarterback Michael Vick both made critical comments after Jackson’s backward flop against the Cowboys cost the Eagles 15 yards on the kickoff. Jackson didn’t care for the criticism. “People dive into the end zone all day — it shouldn’t have been a penalty,” Jackson said. “I turned around backwards, so that is probably why, but I am going to continue to do what I do and to entertain.” Jackson is one of the top receivers in the NFL, and he’s arguably the most dangerous kick returner along with Chicago’s Devin Hester. Last season, Jackson was the first player ever selected to the Pro Bowl at two positions. Coming off a 210-yard receiving performance against the Cowboys, Jackson was shut down most of the game by New York. He had three catches for 52 yards. But Jackson can make a difference on special teams, so Reid called on him to return a punt after the Eagles rallied from a 21point deficit with 7:18 left to tie it. Giants rookie Matt Dodge was supposed to kick the ball away from Jackson, but he failed. Jackson made him pay, taking it all the way for his fourth career TD on a punt return. “I suppose what you’re looking for in a returner is obviously speed, agility and all that, but there are some returners that have an extra quality, they’re able to make something out of nothing, and that’s Devin Hester and DeSean Jackson,” Eagles punter Sav Rocca said. “It’s the ones that can make something out of nothing that you’re a little bit afraid of. Even if you do your job correctly, it can still fall to pieces at times.” Jackson has scored a rushing, receiving and punt-return touchdown in each of his first three seasons, becoming only the second player in NFL history to do so. He has 45 catches this season for 1,024 yards and six TDs. He’s also run for 104 yards and a score.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 D5

NBA ROUNDUP

NBA SCOREBOARD

NBA-best Spurs beat Nuggets, without Anthony

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division Boston New York Philadelphia Toronto New Jersey

W 23 17 11 10 9

L 4 12 18 19 21

Miami Atlanta Orlando Charlotte Washington

W 21 19 16 9 7

L 9 12 12 19 20

Chicago Indiana Milwaukee Detroit Cleveland

W 18 13 11 10 8

L 9 14 16 19 21

Pct .852 .586 .379 .345 .300

GB — 7 13 14 15½

L10 10-0 7-3 6-4 2-8 3-7

Str W-14 W-1 L-2 L-2 L-1

Home 13-1 7-7 8-6 7-9 6-8

Away 10-3 10-5 3-12 3-10 3-13

Conf 19-2 10-7 8-14 8-12 5-14

Away 9-5 8-7 7-7 3-12 0-13

Conf 15-4 15-8 12-6 5-13 4-16

Away 7-6 5-8 4-10 3-12 3-13

Conf 7-4 8-8 7-5 6-9 7-14

Southeast Division Pct .700 .613 .571 .321 .259

GB — 2½ 4 11 12½

L10 9-1 6-4 2-8 3-7 2-8

Str L-1 W-2 L-4 L-4 L-1

Home 12-4 11-5 9-5 6-7 7-7

Central Division

The Associated Press SAN ANTONIO — Manu Ginobili finished off the Denver Nuggets for the second time in a week. There was no doubt about it this time. Ginobili scored 22 points and buried the go-ahead 3-pointer late in the fourth, and the San Antonio Spurs beat Denver — playing without All-Star Carmelo Anthony following the death of his sister — 109-103 on Wednesday night for their 10th victory in a row. The Nuggets said Anthony will return after Christmas. Their next game is Saturday at Oklahoma City. The victory for the Spurs came six days after Ginobili assured a victory in Denver by drawing a charge with 0.3 seconds left on Anthony, who had thought he scored the winning shot on a hard drive to the basket. Gary Neal also had 22 points for the Spurs, who outscored the Nuggets 29-14 in the fourth quarter as Denver made just two field goals in the final 5¼ minutes. “It was a huge fourth quarter,” Ginobili said. “I’m still kind of in shock by the way we won it.” The Spurs reached their second double-digit winning streak already this season and improved their NBA-best record to 25-3. It ranks among the 11 best starts to a season in NBA history. Ty Lawson and J.R. Smith led the Nuggets with 22 points apiece, and Kenyon Martin played 17 minutes in his season debut after missing the first 26 games while recovering from knee surgery. The Nuggets were slow to adjust to San Antonio’s zone defense in the fourth, which coach Gregg Popovich implemented after Denver took an 89-90 lead at the end of the third, mostly thanks to five Denver 3-pointers in the quarter. Smith, making his first start in three seasons in place of Anthony, was four of five from beyond the arc in the third quarter alone and scored 16 points in the quarter. “I feel bad because I couldn’t help my team as much as I should against the zone situation,” Nuggets coach George Karl said. “I think if we had made some shots early they would have gone away from it. We didn’t have a lot of cohesiveness against their zone attack.” Anthony’s sister, Michelle Anthony, died of a pre-existing medical condition Tuesday in Baltimore. She had four children. Anthony traveled with the Nuggets to San Antonio but left early Thursday after receiving word about the death of a family member. “It brings us down to earth,” Karl said before the game. “Basketball isn’t the most important thing.” In other games on Wednesday night: Celtics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 76ers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 BOSTON — Ray Allen scored 22 points, and Paul Pierce recovered after missing his first seven shots to score 11 in the second half and lead Boston to its 14th straight victory.Elton Brand had 16 points and 12 rebounds for Philadelphia. Jazz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Timberwolves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .107 MINNEAPOLIS — Al Jefferson had 23 points, nine rebounds and seven blocks against his former team and Utah coach Jerry Sloan moved into sole possession of third place on the career victories list with 1,211. Kevin Love had 25 points and 19 rebounds for Minnesota. Bulls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .87 Wizards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80 WASHINGTON — Carlos Boozer scored 30 points and Derrick Rose added 25 to help Chicago beat Washington for its ninth victory in 10 games. Boozer also had 10 rebounds and a season-high seven assists, and the Bulls are 9-3 since Boozer returned after missing the first 15 games with a broken hand. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112 Thunder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 NEW YORK — Amare Stoudemire scored 23 points, Wilson Chandler added 21, and New York ran past Oklahoma City to snap a three-game losing streak. In a game featuring the NBA’s top two scorers, Stoudemire nearly matched league leader Kevin Durant, who finished with 26. Pistons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .115 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .93 TORONTO — Richard Hamilton scored a season-high 35 points, Rodney Stuckey had 21 and Detroit beat Toronto to snap a five-game losing streak against the Raptors. The Pistons fell one point shy of matching a season high and ended an eight-game road skid. Hawks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98 Cavaliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 ATLANTA — Joe Johnson scored 23 points in his best game since his return from elbow surgery to lead Atlanta past Antawn Jamison and Cleveland. Jamison had 23 points but Atlanta was stronger with its balanced attack. Al Horford had 18 points, Marvin Williams added 17 and Josh Smith had 16 points and 11 rebounds for the Hawks. Hornets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .105 Nets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91 NEW ORLEANS — Emeka Okafor had 21 points and 10 rebounds, Chris Paul added 12 points and 14 assists, and New Orleans. shot 53.9 percent and made eight of 16 3-point attempts. Devin Harris had 21 points and eight assists for New Jersey. Rockets. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Clippers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 LOS ANGELES — Kevin Martin scored 28 points, including four free throws in the final 16 seconds, and Houston nearly blew an 18-point lead in the second half before holding on for its fourth straight victory. Luis Scola added 22 points for the Rockets. Rookie Blake Griffin led Los Angeles with 24 points and tied a season high with 18 rebounds.

Pct .667 .481 .407 .345 .276

GB — 5 7 9 11

Darren Abate / The Associated Press

Str W-2 W-1 W-1 W-2 L-2

Home 11-3 8-6 7-6 7-7 5-8

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Houston Memphis

W 25 23 17 14 12

L 3 5 12 15 17

Utah Oklahoma City Denver Portland Minnesota

W 21 20 16 15 6

L 9 10 11 14 24

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 21 13 10 8 5

L 8 14 18 22 21

Pct .893 .821 .586 .483 .414

GB — 2 8½ 11½ 13½

L10 10-0 9-1 4-6 7-3 4-6

Str W-10 W-4 W-1 W-4 L-3

Home 16-2 13-4 12-3 8-4 8-6

Away 9-1 10-1 5-9 6-11 4-11

Conf 17-3 14-3 10-7 10-9 9-10

Away 10-4 10-5 4-9 5-11 1-17

Conf 10-8 11-6 10-6 9-9 2-17

Away 11-5 6-9 4-12 2-11 2-9

Conf 11-5 10-10 7-13 6-16 1-15

Northwest Division Pct .700 .667 .593 .517 .200

GB — 1 3½ 5½ 15

L10 6-4 7-3 5-5 7-3 1-9

Str W-3 L-1 L-1 W-3 L-7

Home 11-5 10-5 12-2 10-3 5-7

Paciic Division Pct .724 .481 .357 .267 .192

GB — 7 10½ 13½ 14½

L10 Str 8-2 L-1 5-5 L-1 2-8 W-1 4-6 L-1 1-9 L-6 ——— Wednesday’s Games

Atlanta 98, Cleveland 84 Chicago 87, Washington 80 New York 112, Oklahoma City 98 New Orleans 105, New Jersey 91 Houston 97, L.A. Clippers 92

Home 10-3 7-5 6-6 6-11 3-12

Detroit 115, Toronto 93 Boston 84, Philadelphia 80 Utah 112, Minnesota 107 San Antonio 109, Denver 103 Today’s Games

San Antonio at Orlando, 5 p.m. Miami at Phoenix, 7:30 p.m.

Milwaukee at Sacramento, 7 p.m. All Times PST

SUMMARIES Wednesday’s Games

Spurs 109, Nuggets 103 DENVER (103) Smith 8-18 2-2 22, Martin 4-5 0-0 8, Nene 4-7 5-8 13, Billups 4-11 12-12 20, Afflalo 4-11 2-2 12, Lawson 8-12 4-5 22, Harrington 1-6 0-0 2, Andersen 2-6 0-0 4, Forbes 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 35-78 25-29 103. SAN ANTONIO (109) Jefferson 7-12 0-0 16, Duncan 3-7 3-4 9, Blair 1-2 0-0 2, Parker 5-13 1-4 11, Ginobili 6-15 6-8 22, Splitter 6-7 0-0 12, Neal 7-12 3-3 22, Bonner 4-5 2-5 13, Udoka 0-1 0-0 0, Quinn 1-2 0-0 2, McDyess 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 40-76 15-24 109. Denver 27 29 33 14 — 103 San Antonio 26 33 21 29 — 109 3-Point Goals—Denver 8-25 (Smith 4-10, Lawson 2-3, Afflalo 2-5, Forbes 0-1, Harrington 0-2, Billups 0-4), San Antonio 14-28 (Neal 5-7, Ginobili 4-9, Bonner 3-4, Jefferson 2-4, Udoka 0-1, Quinn 0-1, Parker 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Denver 47 (Afflalo 10), San Antonio 45 (Splitter, Duncan 9). Assists—Denver 22 (Billups 7), San Antonio 26 (Parker 9). Total Fouls— Denver 18, San Antonio 19. Technicals—Denver Bench. A—18,581 (18,797).

Jazz 112, T’wolves 107 UTAH (112) Kirilenko 4-7 7-8 16, Millsap 10-16 3-4 23, Jefferson 10-17 3-7 23, Williams 6-19 13-14 25, Bell 1-4 4-4 6, Miles 3-9 2-2 8, Elson 0-0 0-0 0, Watson 2-2 0-0 4, Price 0-0 0-0 0, Fesenko 0-0 2-2 2, G.Hayward 1-1 3-3 5. Totals 37-75 37-44 112. MINNESOTA (107) Beasley 9-16 6-8 24, Love 7-20 9-10 25, Milicic 3-10 0-2 6, Ridnour 7-12 1-1 16, Johnson 5-8 0-0 14, Flynn 2-5 0-0 5, Brewer 0-3 1-2 1, Koufos 0-3 0-0 0, Ellington 0-1 0-0 0, Webster 4-9 6-6 16. Totals 37-87 23-29 107. Utah 20 25 26 41 — 112 Minnesota 29 27 27 24 — 107 3-Point Goals—Utah 1-10 (Kirilenko 1-3, Bell 0-1, Williams 0-3, Miles 0-3), Minnesota 10-20 (Johnson 4-6, Love 2-3, Webster 2-5, Flynn 1-2, Ridnour 1-3, Ellington 0-1). Fouled Out—Milicic. Rebounds—Utah 50 (Millsap 11), Minnesota 51 (Love 19). Assists—Utah 25 (Williams 7), Minnesota 19 (Ridnour 5). Total Fouls—Utah 24, Minnesota 30. A—15,809 (19,356).

Hornets 105, Nets 91 NEW JERSEY (91) Outlaw 3-11 3-4 9, Humphries 4-5 0-0 8, Lopez 6-16 4-4 16, Harris 9-14 1-1 21, Graham 3-5 3-3 9, Favors 5-9 0-0 10, Vujacic 4-8 2-2 12, Farmar 2-8 0-0 4, Murphy 1-4 0-0 2, Petro 0-1 00 0, Uzoh 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 37-81 13-14 91. NEW ORLEANS (105) Ariza 3-11 2-2 8, West 7-12 3-4 18, Okafor 8-13 5-9 21, Paul 6-8 0-0 12, Belinelli 6-8 0-0 14, Thornton 7-10 0-0 18, Pondexter 0-1 0-0 0, Jack 2-6 2-2 7, Mbenga 0-2 2-2 2, Smith 2-5 1-2 5. Totals 41-76 15-21 105. New Jersey 29 21 13 28 — 91 New Orleans 32 25 26 22 — 105 3-Point Goals—New Jersey 4-15 (Vujacic 2-3, Harris 2-4, Farmar 0-4, Outlaw 0-4), New Orleans 8-16 (Thornton 4-5, Belinelli 2-3, West 1-1, Jack 1-2, Paul 0-1, Pondexter 0-1, Ariza 03). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—New Jersey 32 (Murphy 7), New Orleans 54 (Okafor 10). Assists—New Jersey 21 (Harris 8), New Orleans 27 (Paul 14). Total Fouls—New Jersey 19, New Orleans 14. A—15,423 (17,188).

Celtics 84, 76ers 80 PHILADELPHIA (80) Iguodala 2-11 5-6 9, Brand 5-8 6-8 16, Hawes 3-8 0-0 6, Holiday 6-13 2-3 15, Meeks 0-2 3-4 3, Battie 5-8 0-1 10, Nocioni 1-4 0-0 3, Young 1-3 4-6 6, Williams 5-8 2-3 12. Totals 28-65 22-31 80. BOSTON (84) Pierce 4-15 2-2 11, Garnett 4-10 4-4 12, S.O’Neal 5-8 3-7 13, Robinson 3-6 0-0 9, Allen 8-17 5-6 22, Davis 2-9 2-2 6, Daniels 2-7 0-0 4, Bradley 1-2 0-0 2, Erden 0-1 0-0 0, Wafer 2-5 0-0 5. Totals 31-80 16-21 84. Philadelphia 17 27 17 19 — 80 Boston 23 15 26 20 — 84 3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 2-10 (Holiday 1-1, Nocioni 1-3, Meeks 0-1, Williams 0-2, Iguodala 0-3), Boston 6-20 (Robinson 3-5, Pierce 1-4, Wafer 1-4, Allen 1-5, Daniels 0-2). Fouled Out—Brand. Rebounds—Philadelphia 45 (Brand 12), Boston 55 (S.O’Neal 9). Assists— Philadelphia 14 (Holiday 5), Boston 19 (Allen 6). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 18, Boston 23. Technicals—Garnett, Pierce. A—18,624 (18,624).

Knicks 112, Thunder 98

San Antonio Spurs’ DeJuan Blair (45), left, shoots around Denver Nuggets’ Chris Andersen, right, during the first half of Wednesday night’s game in San Antonio.

L10 9-1 4-6 5-5 4-6 1-9

OKLAHOMA CITY (98) Durant 9-18 7-8 26, Green 6-19 1-1 14, Ibaka 0-6 0-0 0, Westbrook 10-24 2-3 23, Sefolosha 35 0-0 6, Harden 3-8 7-8 13, Collison 0-1 2-2 2, Maynor 2-5 0-1 4, Ivey 1-3 0-0 2, White 2-4 0-2 4, Mullens 1-2 0-0 2, Aldrich 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 38-97 19-25 98. NEW YORK (112) Gallinari 4-8 3-3 13, Chandler 9-15 0-0 21, Stoudemire 7-16 9-10 23, Felton 5-14 1-1 12, Fields 5-8 2-2 14, Williams 3-7 0-0 7, Douglas 4-8 0-0 9, Turiaf 4-5 3-5 11, Mozgov 1-3 0-0 2, Randolph 0-1 0-0 0, Walker 0-1 0-0 0, Mason

0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-86 18-21 112. Oklahoma City 28 27 23 20 — 98 New York 27 36 27 22 — 112 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 3-17 (Westbrook 1-1, Durant 1-4, Green 1-6, Sefolosha 0-2, Harden 0-4), New York 10-21 (Chandler 3-4, Fields 2-3, Gallinari 2-4, Williams 1-2, Felton 1-4, Douglas 1-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 61 (Ibaka, Sefolosha 8), New York 51 (Fields 10). Assists—Oklahoma City 15 (Westbrook 5), New York 30 (Felton 10). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 17, New York 22. Technicals—Oklahoma City defensive three second. A—19,763 (19,763).

Bulls 87, Wizards 80 CHICAGO (87) Deng 5-13 2-2 14, Boozer 11-18 8-11 30, Thomas 2-4 0-0 4, Rose 9-21 7-10 25, Bogans 0-3 2-2 2, Brewer 3-5 0-0 6, Korver 0-5 2-2 2, Watson 1-4 0-0 2, Asik 0-0 2-2 2, Gibson 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 31-73 23-29 87. WASHINGTON (80) Thornton 4-10 3-3 11, Blatche 3-14 1-2 7, McGee 0-3 0-0 0, Hinrich 6-14 7-8 19, Young 919 1-1 22, Howard 4-8 4-5 13, Lewis 4-10 0-0 8, Armstrong 0-0 0-0 0, Booker 0-0 0-0 0, Hudson 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 30-79 16-19 80. Chicago 29 17 27 14 — 87 Washington 33 17 20 10 — 80 3-Point Goals—Chicago 2-16 (Deng 2-6, Korver 0-1, Watson 0-1, Bogans 0-2, Rose 06), Washington 4-14 (Young 3-6, Howard 1-1, Hudson 0-1, Hinrich 0-1, Lewis 0-5). Fouled Out—Thomas. Rebounds—Chicago 56 (Boozer 10), Washington 44 (McGee 10). Assists—Chicago 18 (Boozer 7), Washington 17 (Hinrich 9). Total Fouls—Chicago 23, Washington 24. Technicals—Blatche, McGee, Washington Coach Saunders, Washington defensive three second. A—18,011 (20,173).

Pistons 115, Raptors 93 DETROIT (115) Prince 3-9 0-0 6, Villanueva 8-15 2-2 18, Wallace 1-2 2-4 4, Stuckey 9-15 3-3 21, Gordon 1-7 2-2 4, Monroe 2-3 3-3 7, McGrady 8-12 0-0 17, Hamilton 13-20 3-5 35, Maxiell 0-2 0-0 0, Bynum 1-1 0-0 3, Daye 0-4 0-0 0, Wilcox 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 46-90 15-19 115. TORONTO (93) Kleiza 7-11 4-4 19, Johnson 1-2 0-0 2, Bargnani 6-17 4-7 16, Calderon 1-6 2-2 5, DeRozan 4-7 2-2 10, Davis 4-5 2-3 10, Barbosa 7-12 4-5 21, Wright 3-4 0-0 6, Dorsey 2-2 0-0 4, Alabi 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-67 18-23 93. Detroit 24 38 24 29 — 115 Toronto 23 21 24 25 — 93 3-Point Goals—Detroit 8-23 (Hamilton 6-10, Bynum 1-1, McGrady 1-2, Prince 0-1, Villanueva 0-2, Daye 0-2, Gordon 0-2, Stuckey 0-3), Toronto 5-14 (Barbosa 3-6, Kleiza 1-3, Calderon 1-4, Bargnani 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Detroit 44 (McGrady 7), Toronto 41 (Wright 6). Assists—Detroit 27 (McGrady 7), Toronto 26 (Calderon 13). Total Fouls—Detroit 18, Toronto 15. Technicals—Toronto defensive three second 2. A—15,303 (19,800).

Hawks 98, Cavaliers 84 CLEVELAND (84) Parker 3-10 0-0 8, Jamison 10-16 2-3 23, Varejao 1-4 2-2 4, M. Williams 8-20 2-2 18, Gibson 4-12 2-2 12, Hickson 2-5 0-0 4, Sessions 2-5 3-4 7, J.Williams 1-6 0-0 2, Moon 0-0 0-0 0, Hollins 3-3 0-0 6. Totals 34-81 11-13 84. ATLANTA (98) Ma.Williams 7-11 0-1 17, Smith 8-14 0-1 16, Horford 8-13 2-2 18, Bibby 2-7 0-0 6, Johnson 9-17 2-2 23, Pachulia 1-5 0-0 2, Teague 3-8 1-2 7, Evans 4-8 0-0 8, Collins 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 42-83 6-10 98. Cleveland 22 24 23 15 — 84 Atlanta 17 32 28 21 — 98 3-Point Goals—Cleveland 5-22 (Parker 2-6, Gibson 2-7, Jamison 1-4, J.Williams 0-2, M. Williams 0-3), Atlanta 8-22 (Johnson 3-6, Ma.Williams 3-6, Bibby 2-6, Smith 0-2, Evans 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Cleveland 44 (Varejao 13), Atlanta 50 (Smith 11). Assists—Cleveland 22 (M. Williams 11), Atlanta 29 (Johnson 7). Total Fouls—Cleveland 11, Atlanta 14. Technicals—Cleveland defensive three second. A—12,610 (18,729).

Rockets 97, Clippers 92 HOUSTON (97) Battier 4-6 2-2 13, Scola 10-21 2-2 22, Hayes 3-3 1-2 7, Lowry 2-7 1-3 5, Martin 8-19 9-11 28, Hill 0-0 0-0 0, Budinger 2-9 2-2 7, Miller 1-3 0-0 2, Brooks 2-6 1-1 7, Lee 2-7 0-0 4, Patterson 1-1 0-0 2. Totals 35-82 18-23 97. L.A. CLIPPERS (92) Gomes 3-9 0-0 7, Griffin 8-20 7-10 24, Jordan 5-7 4-6 14, Davis 2-9 1-1 5, Gordon 7-14 3-3 18, Butler 2-6 0-0 5, Foye 1-6 0-0 2, Bledsoe 2-6 0-0 4, Diogu 4-7 0-2 8, Collins 0-0 0-0 0, Aminu 1-3 3-4 5. Totals 35-87 18-26 92. Houston 32 24 18 23 — 97 L.A. Clippers 28 15 19 30 — 92 3-Point Goals—Houston 9-29 (Battier 3-5, Martin 3-9, Brooks 2-4, Budinger 1-4, Miller 0-1, Lowry 0-3, Lee 0-3), L.A. Clippers 4-15 (Griffin 1-2, Gordon 1-2, Gomes 1-3, Butler 1-3, Davis 0-2, Bledsoe 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Houston 57 (Battier 10), L.A. Clippers 55 (Griffin 18). Assists—Houston 28 (Battier 7), L.A. Clippers 22 (Gordon 6). Total Fouls—Houston 24, L.A. Clippers 19. Technicals—Miller, Griffin, L.A. Clippers defensive three second. A—17,470 (19,060).

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Redmond’s Brad Carter attempts a three-point shot over a Sprague defender during the first quarter of Wednesday night’s game at Redmond High School.

Panthers Continued from D5 The Panthers (4-2) outscored Sprague, their former Central Valley Conference rival, 20-16 in the second half, and regulation ended with the two teams tied 38-38. Redmond, which has held its last four opponents under 45 points in regulation, pulled out the victory after outscoring the Olympians 15-12 in the two overtimes. “It’s a good Christmas present for us,” said Porter, whose squad opened the season with two losses before starting its four-game win

streak. Mitch Dahlen added eight points and Trevor Genz contributed seven. The key, though, was Carter, who has become the Panthers’ main offensive threat as junior Tanner Manselle recovers from a back injury. “Last year he had the shots, but he didn’t finish,” Porter said about Carter. “The biggest difference this year is he’s going up with two hands, ready to finish. He’s not taking off-balanced one-handed jump shots.” Redmond is off until Tuesday, when the Panthers play South Eugene in the first round of Medford’s Abby’s Holiday Tournament.

Seniors lead Cowboy wrestling Bulletin staff report PASCO, Wash. — Three Crook County wrestlers placed at the 33-team Best of the West tournament, which concluded Wednesday, helping the Cowboys take fifth place as a team. Seniors Andy Katzenberger (135 pounds), Trevor Wilson (152) and Trevor Ough (171) all placed third in their respective 32-man brackets.

UConn Continued from D1 But earlier, his team and its fans didn’t act like it. It was less of a game than a celebration, fans waving, “89” signs in the stands, players wearing “89” T-shirts afterward, Auriemma even leaving his star Maya Moore in the game in the final two minutes with his team leading by 32. At the final buzzer, the ESPN announcer summed up the atmosphere by claiming, “UConn has one-upped UCLA!” It has not. It cannot. Why would it even want to? “By saying those sort of things, people not only take credit away from UCLA, but they take credit away from Connecticut,” said Nan Muehlhausen, John Wooden’s daughter, in a phone interview. “If Daddy was alive, he would be very happy for them, he loved women’s basketball. But why can’t they celebrate for what they are?” A more enduring question, perhaps, is why do we keep doing this to women’s sports? Why do we keep judging their achievements by those of their male counterparts? Why can’t we just celebrate great female athletes for being, you know, great female athletes? It’s a waste of precious time, attention and the ideals of gender equity. It’s not equal if you act as if the men’s game is so much more important, you celebrate breaking a men’s record as if you just won a championship. It’s sort of like the excitement over a women dunking. Why? Who cares if a woman can dunk? That is not why fans love women’s basketball. That’s not what the sport is about. You never hear a female soccer player trying to compare herself to Beckham, do you? That’s because women’s soccer, especially in our World-Cup winning country, doesn’t need to be anything else. The female Huskies indeed broke an incredible record Tuesday night — they broke their own record of 88 consecutive wins. Auriemma is indeed a great coach who should be compared to other great coaches — such as Tennessee’s Pat Summitt and Stanford’s Tara VanDerveer. This should have been yet another night to embrace the fundamental beauty of the

The Best of the West was a two-day event with teams from Washington, Oregon and Idaho. On Tuesday, teams competed in a dual-meet format — Crook County went 31 in four duals — and on Wednesday wrestlers competed in 32-man, single-elimination brackets. The Cowboys are off until Wednesday, when they compete at the one-day Free Berry Invitational in Pendleton.

women’s game and the incredible consistency of Connecticut in owning it. Instead, TV viewers were treated to cutaway shots of Bill Walton’s hooks and Jamaal Wilkes’ jumpers. It felt like watching a baseball team attempting to break a record set by football players. It felt like Sept. 3, 1977. Do you remember that day? Of course not. But judging by Tuesday’s parameters, it was one of the biggest days in sports, the day that Japanese league star Sadaharu Oh hit his 756th career homer, breaking Hank Aaron’s career record. The achievement was nice, but the comparison a little silly, Oh and Aaron playing the same sport but in vastly different lands. We slapped a few paragraphs about it in our newspapers and forgot about it a day later. It should have been the same thing Tuesday. Instead of all the references to UCLA, folks should have focused on Wayland Baptist, a women’s team that won 131 consecutive games from 1953 to 1958. But no, folks say, that team played a completely different game in a vastly different era, so the comparison doesn’t work. But tying the Connecticut women to the UCLA men does work? Give credit to the Wooden family for acting as classy as always, with grandson Greg Wooden flying to Hartford and sitting courtside at the game. When asked about his grandfather and Connecticut, Greg told an interviewer, “He would have been thrilled for them. Absolutely thrilled. It’s obvious the Wooden family is very supportive of Connecticut breaking the record. It’s history. It’s a neat place to be.” But Nan is right. Why can’t Connecticut be there without giving the impression that it is standing on UCLA’s shoulders? Nan didn’t watch the Connecticut game Tuesday. She was busy driving to the UCLA men’s game against Montana State. As much as her father loved women’s basketball, if he were alive, he would have probably been headed to the same game. “It’s still a great streak, but it’s just different,” Nan said. Different isn’t always worse. Sometimes different is just different. Can’t Connecticut win without UCLA losing? The Huskies have the best college women’s basketball program in history, and shame on all of us if they need to play against the specter of a men’s team to prove it.


H U N T I NG & F ISH I NG

D6 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E C 

FLY-TYING CORNER By Gary Lewis

Please e-mail sports event information to sports@ bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

For The Bulletin

If you’re hoping to sneak out of the house over the holidays to ply the waters of the Crooked, the Fall River or the Metolius, here’s a fly tied in the spirit of the season. Tied with wire, its peacock thorax reinforced by biots and other elements, it is a pattern that will keep giving long after Christmas. Its wire body lends weight and the rubber legs add action and bugginess. Fish this fly under an indicator and consider pairing it with a Scud or a Pheasant Tail. In faster currents, set the indicator at two times the depth. Tie this pattern with black thread on a No. 14-16 nymph hook. Slide a brass bead up against the eye of the hook. For the tail, use brown goose

Pheasants Continued from D1 Mike, who owns Top Pin Archery in Sisters, fletched his own arrows with 12-inch white turkey feathers. To prepare for the hunt, Mike practiced on thrown Frisbees. “I got so I could hit the Frisbee once out of three tries,” he said. We had the wind in our faces, the sun at our backs. Before us, the Bakeoven Road stretched out toward Mount Hood. We’d picked the only clear day in weeks. His head up, his nose in the air, Poncho, the German shorthair, coursed back and forth in the tall grass. Mike was intent. Between us, Bob Krein watched his dog. Out there on the point of our wedge, the pointer had dropped his head and his tail had begun to wag. Body rigid, his muscles quivered with the scent of the bird. He turned and locked, his eyes on the prize in the grass. Mike walked up alongside the dog, an arrow nocked. On his left, I stepped into place and the bird came up, cleared the grass and as it towered above the dog, Mike let fly. My brain registered the bird and the arrow in separate planes and I swung my CZ side-by-side up to take it at 25 yards. Poncho brought the rooster

N. Belknap St. Contact: 447-5029. THE REDMOND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Redmond VFW Hall.

SHOOTING FISHING

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Christmas Prince, courtesy Fly and Field Outfitters. biots. Build up the underbody with thread then wrap it with green and red copper wire. For the legs, use fine rubber. Tie

back, while I reloaded and Mike retrieved his arrow. Only then did it occur to me what a great idea it had been to bring a bowhunter on a bird hunt. So it went. We hunted out the flat toward the mountain then worked a canyon along a creek, in the junipers and the wild rose. Poncho pointed, we walked in, the bird flushed, Mike shot and I backed him up. The game bag grew heavy, but the archer had yet to connect on a bird. Worse, he wanted it too bad. He was rattled. We stopped for lunch when the sun was high in the sky and threw clay pigeons by hand for Mike. The practice seemed to settle our bowhunter down. Now, with the sun in the west, we gave Mike the opportunity to trade his archery tackle for the 12-gauge. He would not have it, except to let me try my hand at three birds. My first try fell short, but my second arrow went beneath the wing. As close as it gets. My third shot fell short again. Out on a long flat we hunted where once pioneer wagon wheels had bumped a rutted two-track, where Pony Express riders had pounded the dirt to dust and after them the stagecoach. Not far from where we hunted, a German baker, headed to the gold mines in 1862, had

the thorax with peacock. Finish with goose biots tied flat over the thorax and a throat of brown saddle hackle.

been attacked by Indians and liberated of his livestock. Set afoot, he built an oven to sell bread to travelers. “I don’t think I’ve ever wanted something as bad as I want this,” Mike said. Minutes later, a pheasant flushed out of the grass. Mike missed it and I missed it, an easy shot that I should have made with the 20-gauge. I watched the bird alight 300 yards away at the base of a transmission tower. There were other birds to chase. But an hour later, we walked back past the tower and Poncho went on point. Last chance, I thought. In a moment, the bird was in the air. Mike’s arrow and the arc of the bird intersected in time and space. The arrow bounced off and the bird regained its strength. We watched it fly. Mike picked up a few feathers and held them to the sky. The only one who didn’t give up was the shorthair. Another 300 yards out, we saw Poncho stop, point and then turn back toward us. Mike’s hardearned bird was in his mouth. Gary Lewis is the host of “High Desert Outdoorsman” and author of “John Nosler — Going Ballistic,” “Black Bear Hunting,” “Hunting Oregon” and other titles. Contact Lewis at www.GaryLewisOutdoors.com.

DESCHUTES CHAPTER OF TROUT UNLIMITED: Meets on the first Monday of each month at the Environmental Center in Bend; meeting starts at 6:45 p.m. for members to meet and greet, and discuss what the Chapter is up to; 541-306-4509; communications@ deschutestu.org; www.deschutestu.org. BEND CASTING CLUB: The Bend Casting Club is a group of local fly anglers from around Central Oregon who are trying to improve their casting technique; club meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month, from 6 to 8 p.m., at the Orvis Casting Course in Bend’s Old Mill District; 541-306-4509 or bendcastingclub@gmail.com. THE SUNRIVER ANGLERS CLUB: Meets on the third Thursday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Sunriver Fire Station. Contact: www.sunriveranglers.org.

HUNTING THE BEND CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the King Buffet at the north end of the Wagner Mall, across from Robberson Ford in Bend. Contact: Bendchapter_oha@yahoo.com. THE OCHOCO CHAPTER OF THE OREGON HUNTERS ASSOCIATION: Meets the first Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the Prineville Fire Hall, 405

BEND TRAP CLUB: Five-stand and skeet shooting Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m; trap shooting on Thursdays and Sundays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; located east of Bend, at Milepost 30 off U.S. Highway 20; contact Marc Rich at 541-388-1737 or visit www.bendtrapclub.com. CENTRAL OREGON SPORTING CLAYS AND HUNTING PRESERVE: 13-station, 100-target course and 5-Stand open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to dusk, and Sunday from 9 a.m. to dusk; located at 9020 South Highway 97, Redmond; www.birdandclay.com or 541-383-0001. REDMOND ROD & GUN CLUB: Rifle and Pistol are Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.; skeet is Tuesdays and Sundays beginning at 10 a.m.; trap is Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. to closing, and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.; 2011 Family Memberships now available for $50; non-members are welcome; www.rrandgc.com. PINE MOUNTAIN POSSE: Cowboy action shooting club that shoots at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; second Sunday of each month; 541318-8199 or www.pinemountainposse.com. HORSE RIDGE PISTOLEROS: Cowboy action shooting with pistols, rifles and shotguns at the Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association range on U.S. Highway 20 at Milepost 24; first and third Sunday of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-408-7027 or www.hrp-sass.com.

FISHING REPORT

Anglers having success with steelhead in lower Hood River Here is the weekly fishing report for selected areas in and around Central Oregon, provided by fisheries biologists for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife:

CENTRAL ZONE ANTELOPE FLAT RESERVOIR: Angler reports indicate a high growth rate and excellent catch rates. The reservoir has been stocked twice with catchable rainbow trout and was stocked again in October. CROOKED RIVER BELOW BOWMAN DAM: Fishing is good using both dry flies and midges. According to recent angler reports to ODFW fishing reports, the trout seem to be larger this year than in recent past years. Flows are currently around 95 cfs. Please exercise caution as winter temperatures continue to decline. DESCHUTES RIVER (Mouth to the Northern Boundary of the Warm Springs Reservation): The Deschutes River is open to angling for steelhead and trout from the mouth upstream to Pelton Dam (river mile 100). Summer steelhead are spread out in good numbers from the Columbia upstream to Warm Springs, but the majority of fish are between Maupin and

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Warm Springs. Anglers had been doing well for steelhead between Warm Springs and Trout Creek. HOOD RIVER: Anglers are reporting a few bright winter Steelhead in the lower river. Steelhead anglers should expect fish numbers to increase in January and February, with a peak in March and April. METOLIUS RIVER: Trout fishing has been good. Insect hatches should offer opportunities for good dry-fly fishing. The river upstream of Allingham Bridge is closed to fishing on Nov. 1. OCHOCO CREEK UPSTREAM TO OCHOCO DAM: Anglers should be aware that beginning in 2010 new fishing regulations went into effect that permanently restrict fishing to artificial flies and lures only; two trout per day and 8-inch minimum length. PRINEVILLE RESERVOIR: Anglers continue to report good fishing and have reported catching larger trout than in recent years. Anglers should consult the 2010 Sport Fishing Regulations (page 63) for maximum length requirements and bag limits for both largemouth and smallmouth bass. PRINEVILLE YOUTH FISHING POND: Young anglers are catching rainbow trout and an occasional largemouth bass. SHEVLIN YOUTH FISHING POND: The pond is open to children 17 years old and younger with a bag limit of two fish.

WIN A 7-NIGHT MEXICAN RIVIERA CRUISE

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Enjoy a spectacular vacation, courtesy of Carnival Cruise Lines, Getaways Travel, and The Bulletin. Trip for two includes seven days onboard the Carnival Splendor® roundtrip from Los Angeles. Visit the ports of Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan and Cabo San Lucas. Room, dining, and ship entertainment included.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SUBSCRIBE CALL THE BULLETIN AT 541-385-5800 FOR COMPLETE RULES AND REGULATIONS Visit www.bendbulletin.com/vacationrules or stop by The Bulletin at 1777 SW Chandler Ave., Bend, OR. Additional entry forms are available in newspapers for sale across Central Oregon and in the lobby of The Bulletin. Winner will be drawn January 28, 2011.

OFFICIAL BULLETIN | GETAWAYS TRAVEL VACATION GETAWAY SWEEPSTAKES ENTRY FORM Sign me up to win The Bulletin’s Fourth Annual Subscriber Vacation Getaway Sweepstakes! Official entry form only. No other reproductions are accepted. Prizes are non-transferable to any other party and cannot be substituted for cash or any other value. Winner is responsible for all taxes. Must be 21 years of age or older.

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GETAWAYS TRAVEL 563 SW 13th St., Bend, OR 97702 • 541-317-1274 • www.getawaystravel.net

RULES: All vacations are approved on a promotional basis and are subject to availability. Blackout dates apply. Trip is valid through Jan. 31, 2012. Travel dates are final and will not be extended. Travel is not permitted during holiday periods, including both 5 days prior and after. Trips are NON-TRANSFERABLE and cannot be exchanged for cash. Trips are valid for 2 adults ONLY per room and do not include any special promotions. NO room upgrades. Winner must be at least 21 years old. Employees of participating companies and its properties, sponsors, vendors and their immediate families are not eligible to win. The Bulletin reserves the right to deem entries ineligible. One coupon per edition.


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ADVENTURES IN THE CENTRAL OREGON OUTDOORS

OUTING

Inside

Ride to Nowhere Biking at Big Bend Ranch State Park truly wild, Page E6

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/outing

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

No need to dream — trails will be white this Christmas By Heidi Hagemeier The Bulletin

It is definitely going to be a white Christmas. Even the lowest-elevation summer trails in the Deschutes National Forest are now under at least a few inches of snow, according to Chris Sabo, the forest’s trails specialist. And weather forecasters are calling for a chance of snow every day into the holiday weekend. That means people need to use common sense: While it’s relatively safe now to ski, snowshoe and snowmobile in the forest, hazards may still be concealed by thin snow cover, particularly at lower elevations. Snow depth is up to 8 feet in some higher elevations in the forest. Sabo expects heavy traffic at sno-parks throughout the holiday weekend. He urged users to be patient and practice good trail etiquette, or perhaps even have second- or third-choice destinations. Parking at popular sno-parks like Dutchman Flat, Virginia Meissner, Wanoga, Ten Mile and Upper Three Creek will likely fill up early. With heavy use and variable weather, Sabo also noted that the likelihood of accidents increases. He encouraged snow enthusiasts to be prepared when they venture out with proper gear and clothing for the activity. Recreationists approaching Elk Lake or the Crescent Lake Ranger District should also be on the lookout for potential hazards from logging. The road to Elk Lake from the south has residual effects from plowing, although the logging project is now finished due to the early snow. Winter logging operations will impact snowmobile trails in the Crescent Ranger District. For more information, call the district office at 541-433-3200.

TRAIL UPDATE

Photos by Ben Salmon / The Bulletin

The trails at Horse Ridge Recreation Area are open to nonmotorized uses such as hikers, cyclists and people on horseback.

Horse Ridge, near and far Head east for an easygoing desert walk among the junipers By Ben Salmon

If you go

The Bulletin

W

hen the snow starts to fly in town, I like to head east. Don’t get me wrong; I like snow. I’m an avid downhill skier, a snowboard dabbler and an occasional snowshoer. I have no problem with the cold, or the white stuff it brings. But in my mind, fall and early winter are the time to hit the desert east of Bend, to get one last glimpse of actual trails made of earth, not buried in snow. Of course, when the snow flies the way it has over the past couple of weeks, even the desert turns into a winter wonderland. That was the case Tuesday morning at Horse Ridge Recreation Area about 15 miles southeast of town. I decided to delay my workday by taking a quick hike around the flats north of Horse Ridge, and checking out the newly improved Horse Ridge Trailhead, as touted by the Prineville District of the Bureau of Land Management in an e-mail I received Monday. Between my house on Bend’s western edge and my destination, however, were two stops: day care for my daughter, and some processed-egg McProtein for me. So it was midmorning by the time I finally pointed my car east and sped down U.S. Highway 20 with some of my favorite music of the year blaring. (Shameless plug: If you’d like to hear what I was listening to, go download 36 of the best songs of 2010 for free at www.bendbulletin.com/nearfar. It’s good stuff, so do it!) See Outing / E6

New picnic tables are among the improvements made at Horse Ridge Trailhead. LEFT: Twisted juniper trees dot the landscape at Horse Ridge Recreation Area southeast of Bend. BELOW: The natural ridges of the Horse Ridge Recreation Area ring the flat, scrubby area that’s accessible through the newly improved Horse Ridge Trailhead.

What: Horse Ridge Trailhead at Horse Ridge Recreation Area Where: From U.S. Highway 20 and 27th Street in Bend, drive east about 15 miles to the “Oregon Badlands Wilderness” sign and turn right on Old Highway 20. Drive 0.7 miles to Horse Ridge Trailhead. Cost: Free Contact: www.blm. gov/ or/resources/ recreation/ site_info.php or 541-416-6700.

Heidi Hagemeier can be reached at 541-617-7828 or at hhagemeier@bendbulletin.com.

SPOTLIGHT Whole Foods to accept recyclables, donations If you’re stuck with post-holiday trash or other items you don’t want, head down to Whole Foods Market, 2610 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, in Bend. The store will offer an ecofriendly opportunity to dispose of holiday items, with particular focus on plastics, electronics, Styrofoam, and donations such as clothing or household items. Materials and donations will be accepted from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Jan. 8. Contact: 541-389-0151.

Nicotine support group launches in Madras The Madras Nicotine Anonymous group is now meeting and is welcoming new members. The group will gather from 6 to 7 p.m. Tuesdays at Rodriguez Annex, Jefferson County Library, at 241 S.E. Seventh St., in Madras. The group uses a 12-step program that is modeled after that of Alcoholics Anonymous. Men and women will gather to solve the problems associated with nicotine use and to help each other quit or use less nicotine. Contact: 541-993-0609. — From staff reports


T EL EV ISION

E2 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Vegetarians and vegans Got yule overload? Enjoy nonholiday TV weigh in on meaty issues By Diane Werts Newsday

Dear Abby: I am writing about the letter from “Turkey Eater in Texas” (Nov. 12), who resented having a vegan Thanksgiving to accommodate two family members. I think your answer missed what being a gracious host is about. The entire meal shouldn’t have to consist of vegan items. However, it wouldn’t be a big deal to serve a vegan main dish and have those individuals also bring their favorite items. Making them bring a complete meal excludes them from a family gathering, and what fun is that? After your column ran, my father called to tell me that holiday dinners would no longer accommodate my daughter’s celiac disease. She’s 9 and struggles with being “different.” When she ingests gluten, she has cramps and vomiting, loses weight and risks significant long-term consequences. Next year, we will host the holiday dinners. Our extended family can join us — or not. The bottom line is that if you exclude family (for being vegan or having celiac disease), you’ve done the opposite of what holidays are about. — Kaye in Alabama Dear Kaye: That’s true. What bothered me about the letter from “Turkey Eater” was the idea that his brother expected him to cater the entire Thanksgiving dinner to his nieces’ preference to eat vegan. If the writer had said he had been asked to ensure there were dishes that would not inflame (literally) his nieces’ serious medical condition, I would have answered differently. What has surprised me about the comments I have received from readers about that letter has been the amount of prejudice and anger expressed against vegetarians by more than a few. But read on for some responses from vegans:

DEAR ABBY “I encourage people to please get over the stigma of vegan/ vegetarian and sample something new once in a while.” — Rachel in Seattle Dear Abby: I am a vegan in a meat-and-potatoes family. For 15 years I have spent every holiday and family gathering listening to them degrade my food choices and try to “convert” me back to my “senses.” I have never expected them to cook for me. I always pack my own foods since they are unwilling to branch out and try new foods. When I have brought a dish, they all loved it, as long as they didn’t know it was vegan and that I had prepared it. I find many people are resentful if we host a dinner party with only vegan food. They expect us to accommodate them by cooking meat, but feel we should fend for ourselves at a function they hold. I encourage people to please get over the stigma of vegan/vegetarian and sample something new once in a while. If I can endure every family gathering taking place at a steakhouse, I don’t think it’s unreasonable to have one night when they experience how tasty food without meat in it can be. — Rachel in Seattle Dear Abby: I am 31 and have been a vegetarian my entire life. I come from a meat-loving family and have never insisted they change an entire meal to accommodate my eating habits. Instead, I take food I know I will eat and share it with everyone else. “Turkey Eater’s” vegan relatives

It still isn’t Christmas, but plenty of people have had ho-hoho enough already. Lucky for them, nonholiday viewing will run almost as rampant as seasonal excess in the next few days. Channels have lined up marathons of drama, comedy, movies, documentaries and reality TV to provide respite from yule overload.

should realize they’re in the minority. If they each brought a vegan-friendly dish or two, they’d have three to six things to choose from — and that’s plenty. — Eating Well in New Mexico Dear Abby: I chose veganism for many reasons, none of which is to be a pain in the keister — either by lecturing/ scolding others, or by having high-maintenance expectations. I feel it’s important to be flexible, especially at gettogethers. What I value most about holidays is sharing a meal with people I love. If I want a completely vegan Thanksgiving, it should be one that I host and prepare. To expect that of nonvegetarians is not only unreasonable, but also difficult, since many people are inexperienced in how to cook vegan. My family Thanksgiving has an array of omnivores, vegetarians and vegans. Dad loves to cook and makes sure there’s something for everyone. I help bake pies, others bring a vegan dish and everyone is content. Sometimes the vegetarian dishes are so delicious, the omnivores salivate. Mutual respect is of utmost importance. Being militant or demanding can bring a negative perspective to vegetarianism. If we want others to empathize with us, we need to do the same. — Thankful Vegan in Kansas City

Movies ‘STAR WARS’ The first three chapters start with “Phantom Menace” (Friday 9 a.m., 12:07 p.m., 3:20 p.m.; repeated 6:30 p.m., 9:37 p.m., 12:50 a.m., Spike). Then comes “Star Wars” and its two middle sequels (Saturday 9 a.m., 12:07 p.m., 3:15 p.m.; repeated 6:30 p.m., 9:37 p.m., 12:45 a.m., Spike). BIG ’80S WEEKEND Another Encore festival saluting Gen X’s favorite decade (Friday 8 p.m.-Sunday night 2 a.m., Encore) features films like “The Karate Kid,” “Fast Times at Ridgemont High,” “The Breakfast Club.” Full lineup at starz. com/promotions/big80s. SHIRLEY TEMPLE Hollywood’s ’30s child superstar gets a new profile, “The Shirley Temple Story” (Saturday at 6 a.m., repeats at 1 p.m., Fox Movie Channel), and a daylong marathon of cuteness (Saturday 6:30 a.m.-8 p.m., FMC). ‘ROCKY’ All the ones with numbers, from II to V, unreel in a first set (II-IV: Saturday 6, 8:30 and 10:30 p.m., Versus) and second set (III-V: Sunday 5, 7 and 9 p.m., Versus).

Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Discovery Channel

Mike Rowe’s “Dirty Jobs” airs Friday on the Discovery Channel. ‘FREAKS AND GEEKS’ (Saturday 6 a.m.-Sunday 6 p.m., IFC) — Judd Apatow flashes back to 1980 teens with stars-to-be including Seth Rogen, Linda Cardellini and James Franco. AGATHA CHRISTIE DETECTIVES (Saturday 6 a.m.-Sunday 6 a.m., WLIW/21) — It’s a double dose of Miss Marple (Saturday 6 a.m.-noon, and 9 p.m.-3 a.m.) and Hercule Poirot (Saturday noon-9 p.m., and 3- 5:30 a.m.).

Documentary ‘PLANET EARTH’ (Friday noon-Saturday 6 a.m., Animal Planet) — Acclaimed series explores water, forests, mountains, jungles and other parts of nature. ‘NATURE’S MOST AMAZING EVENTS’ (Friday 11 a.m.-2 a.m., Planet

Green) — Huge occurrences include Kalahari flood and more.

Real world LOVE/HATE “Celebrity Rehab 4” (Friday noon-6 p.m., VH1), “The Real Housewives of New Jersey” (Saturday 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Bravo), “Girls Who Like Boys Who Like Boys” (Saturday 2-9 p.m., Sundance). OUTDOORS/WORKING “Dirty Jobs” (Friday 7 p.m.10 a.m., Discovery), “Fish Warrior”/”Hooked” (Saturday 9 a.m.-3 a.m., NatGeo). MUSIC “Mariah Carey Takeover” (Friday 10 a.m.-Saturday 6 a.m., fuse), “That Metal Show” (Friday 2-6:30 p.m., Sunday 6 p.m.-2:30 a.m., VH1 Classic), “Behind the Music Remastered” (Saturday 10 a.m.-4 a.m., VH1 Classic).

Series “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” (Saturday 6 a.m.-Sunday 6 a.m., Chiller) — Sarah Michelle Gellar stars.

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5:00

5:30

KATU News at 5 ABC World News News Nightly News KOIN Local 6 at 5 News The Nate Berkus Show ‘PG’ Å America’s Funniest Home Videos Old Christine Old Christine Electric Comp. Fetch! Ruff News Nightly News House of Payne House of Payne Sara’s Meals Primal Grill Travels-Edge Steves Europe

6:00

6:30

KATU News at 6 (N) ’ Å NewsChannel 21 at 6 (N) Å KOIN Local 6 at 6 Evening News News (N) ABC World News Two/Half Men Two/Half Men The Office ‘PG’ The Office ‘PG’ Wolf: Travels Nightly Business News News Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Steves Europe Burt Wolf Wolf: Travels Nightly Business

7:00

7:30

Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Jeopardy! (N) ‘G’ Wheel of Fortune Old Christine Scrubs ‘14’ Å Entertainment The Insider ‘PG’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ The Simpsons ’ PBS NewsHour (N) ’ Å Live at 7 (N) Inside Edition (N) That ’70s Show That ’70s Show Victory Garden Yankee Shop PBS NewsHour ’ Å

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30

10:00

10:30

Dr. Seuss’ Grinch ›› “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey. ’ Å Community ‘PG’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Outsourced ‘PG’ The Office Classy Christmas ’ ‘PG’ Big Bang Theory $..! My Dad Says CSI: Crime Scene Investigation ‘14’ The Mentalist ’ ‘14’ Å Dr. Seuss’ Grinch ›› “Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (2000, Fantasy) Jim Carrey. ’ Å Million Dollar Money Drop Competing for up to $1 million. (N) ‘PG’ Å News Channel 21 TMZ (N) ’ ‘PG’ News on PDX-TV Without a Trace Revelations ’ ‘PG’ Without a Trace The Bus ‘PG’ Å Oregon Art Beat Field Guide Frontline From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians ‘PG’ Å Community ‘PG’ 30 Rock ’ ‘14’ The Office ‘PG’ Outsourced ‘PG’ The Office Classy Christmas ’ ‘PG’ The Vampire Diaries ’ ‘14’ Å Nikita The Recruit ’ ‘14’ Å Married... With King of Queens Woodsmith Shop Glass-Vicki Art Workshop Joy/Painting Gourmet’s Adven Jacques Pepin Oregon Art Beat Field Guide Frontline From Jesus to Christ: The First Christians ‘PG’ Å

11:00

11:30

KATU News at 11 (11:35) Nightline News Jay Leno News Letterman News (N) (11:35) Nightline Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘14’ King of Queens King of Queens Priests at Armagh Cathedral News Jay Leno South Park ‘MA’ South Park ‘14’ Sara’s Meals Primal Grill Priests at Armagh Cathedral

BASIC CABLE CHANNELS

A&E AMC ANPL BRAVO CMT CNBC CNN COM COTV CSPAN DIS DISC ESPN ESPN2 ESPNC ESPNN FAM FNC FOOD FSNW FX HGTV HIST LIFE MSNBC MTV NICK SPIKE SYFY TBN TBS TCM TLC TNT TOON TRAV TVLND USA VH1

The First 48 ‘14’ Å The First 48 Straight Menace ‘14’ The First 48 A teenager is murdered. The First 48 ‘14’ Å Peacemaker Peacemaker Peacemaker Peacemaker 130 28 18 32 The First 48 ‘14’ Å ›› “Hidalgo” (2004, Adventure) Viggo Mortensen, Omar Sharif, Louise Lombard. A Westerner races a horse across the Arabian ››› “The Princess Bride” (1987, Adventure) Cary Elwes, Robin Wright. A stableboy ›› “Nanny McPhee” (2005, Comedy) Emma Thompson, Colin Firth. A woman uses 102 40 39 desert. in disguise sets out to rescue his beloved. Å magic to control a widower’s unruly children. Å Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions Raging Bulls ‘PG’ Fatal Attractions My Pet Python ‘PG’ Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions ’ ‘PG’ Å Fatal Attractions My Pet Python ‘PG’ 68 50 26 38 Fatal Attractions Big Cats ‘14’ Å Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Real Housewives/Beverly Shep & Tiffany Real Housewives 137 44 The Dukes of Hazzard ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ ››› “October Sky” (1999) Jake Gyllenhaal, Chris Cooper. ’ Cribs ’ Cribs ’ 190 32 42 53 Extreme Makeover: Home Edition The team revisits one family. ‘PG’ Å Biography on CNBC J.W. Marriott American Greed Mad Money Cruise Inc.: Big Money/High Seas Biography on CNBC J.W. Marriott Sexier-90 Days! Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Cruise Inc.: Big Money/High Seas Larry King Live ‘PG’ Å Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live ‘PG’ Anderson Cooper 360 Anderson Cooper 360 52 38 35 48 Parker Spitzer (N) (5:27) Tosh.0 ‘14’ (5:57) Scrubs ‘14’ (6:27) Scrubs ‘14’ Daily Show Colbert Report Jeff Dunham Christmas Special Jeff Dunham: Arguing With Myself Jeff Dunham Christmas Special Daily Show Colbert Report 135 53 135 47 (3:25) Duplex Bend La Pine U of O Today PM Edition Cooking City Club of Central Oregon The Buzz Epic Conditions Outside Presents Paid Program Visions of NW Ride Guide ‘14’ The Element 11 Capital News Today Today in Washington 58 20 12 11 Tonight From Washington Phineas and Ferb Shake it Up! ‘G’ Good-Charlie Good-Charlie Good-Charlie › “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2006) Suite/Deck Fish Hooks ‘G’ Fish Hooks ‘G’ Suite/Deck Suite/Deck 87 43 14 39 Wizards-Place Oddities ’ ‘PG’ Oddities ’ ‘PG’ Oddities ’ ‘PG’ Oddities ’ ‘PG’ Auction Kings ’ Christmas Unwrapped (N) ‘G’ Å American Chopper: Sr. vs. Jr. Auction Kings ’ Oddities (N) ‘PG’ Christmas Unwrapped ’ ‘G’ Å 156 21 16 37 Oddities ’ ‘PG’ SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å SportsCenter (Live) Å 21 23 22 23 College Football San Diego County Credit Union Poinsettia Bowl -- Navy vs. San Diego State From San Diego. (Live) College Basketball NFL Live Å MMA Live (N) 2010 World Series of Poker Å 2010 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Georgetown at Memphis (Live) World Cup Soccer From June 23, 2010. Å AWA Wrestling Å NBA Eastern Conference Final Game 4, from May 24, 2010. (N) 23 25 123 25 World Cup Soccer From June 18, 2010. Å SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 ››› “The Santa Clause” (1994) Tim Allen, Judge Reinhold. Å ›› “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” (1992, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. Å The 700 Club (N) ‘G’ Å 67 29 19 41 (4:30) ››› “The Polar Express” (2004, Fantasy) Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Ultimate Recipe Showdown ‘G’ Iron Chef America ‘G’ Iron Chef America Paula Deen. Ace of Cakes Ace of Cakes Chopped Holiday-themed dishes. 177 62 98 44 B’foot Contessa Huskies Football Preview Profiles Beavers Cougars Access Tennis Outback Champions Series - Cayman Huskies Football Preview The Final Score Huskies The Final Score 20 45 28* 26 Mark Few Show (4:00) ›› “Dr. Dolittle 2” (2001) Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men Two/Half Men ›› “Night at the Museum” (2006, Comedy) Ben Stiller, Carla Gugino, Dick Van Dyke. ›› “Night at the Museum” (2006) Ben Stiller. 131 Bang, Your Buck Income Property Designed to Sell Hunters Int’l House Hunters My First Place My First Place Property Virgins Property Virgins House Hunters Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l House Hunters 176 49 33 43 Bang, Buck Ancient Aliens Closer Encounters Alien encounters throughout history. ‘PG’ Ancient Aliens Angels and Aliens Ancient Aliens Alien Devastations Brad Meltzer’s Decoded (N) Å Declassified ‘PG’ Å 155 42 41 36 Surviving the Holidays American Pickers ‘PG’ Å Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ Pawn Stars ‘PG’ ›› “The Break-Up” (2006) Vince Vaughn, Jennifer Aniston. Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘PG’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann (5:21) 16 and Pregnant Ashley hopes for adoption. ‘14’ (6:56) The Challenge: Cutthroat ‘14’ (7:58) Pranked ’ (8:28) Pranked ’ (8:59) Pranked ’ Pranked Hol. Pranked (N) ‘14’ Bully Beatdown Megadrive (N) ’ Fantasy Factory 192 22 38 57 That ’70s Show SpongeBob iCarly ‘G’ Å iCarly ‘G’ Å The Penguins Adven./Jimmy Big Time Rush ’ ‘G’ Å My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids George Lopez ’ Glenn Martin, DDS Camp (N) ’ ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob ›› “Rambo” (2008, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Julie Benz. ’ TNA Wrestling (N) ’ ‘14’ Å TNA ReACTION (N) ’ ‘14’ 132 31 34 46 ›› “Rambo: First Blood Part II” (1985, Action) Sylvester Stallone. ’ ›› “The Golden Compass” (2007, Fantasy) Nicole Kidman, Dakota Blue Richards. Å ››› “The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian” (2008, Fantasy) Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes. Å ›› “The Golden Compass” (2007) 133 35 133 45 Dinotopia Å Behind Scenes David Jeremiah Win.-Wisdom This Is Your Day The True Story of the Nativity Live-Holy Land “Christmas Child” (2003, Drama) William R. Moses. Changing-World Annie Moses Christmas Program 205 60 130 Love-Raymond King of Queens King of Queens Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ Seinfeld ’ ‘PG’ ›› “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby” (2006) Will Ferrell. Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ Conan (N) ‘14’ 16 27 11 28 Love-Raymond ››› “Boys Town” (1938, Drama) Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney, Henry Hull. A new ››› “Men of Boys Town” (1941) Spencer ››› “The Human Comedy” (1943, Comedy-Drama) Mickey Rooney, Frank Morgan, (7:15) ››› “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” (1939) Mickey Rooney. Mark 101 44 101 29 James Craig. A boy comes of age in WWII California. Å Twain’s boy hero rafts the Mississippi. Å (DVS) arrival disrupts a home for wayward boys. Å (DVS) Tracy, Mickey Rooney. Å Police Women of Dallas ‘14’ Å Police Women of Dallas ‘14’ Å Police Women of Dallas ‘14’ Å Police Women of Dallas (N) ’ ‘14’ Cellblock 6: Female Lock Up ‘PG’ Police Women of Dallas ‘14’ Å 178 34 32 34 Police Women of Dallas ‘14’ Å NBA Basketball Miami Heat at Phoenix Suns From US Airways Center in Phoenix. (Live) Å Inside the NBA (Live) Å Bones The Man in the Outhouse ‘14’ 17 26 15 27 NBA Basketball San Antonio Spurs at Orlando Magic From Amway Arena in Orlando, Fla. ›› “Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties” (2006) Voices of Bill Murray. Scooby-Doo Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Total Drama Scooby-Doo Adventure Time Regular Show King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘14’ Family Guy ‘PG’ 84 Million Dollar Yachts ‘PG’ Å Amazing Waterfront Homes ‘G’ David Blaine: Discover Magic ‘PG’ Carnivore Carnivore Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Ribs Paradise ‘G’ Å 179 51 45 42 Forbes Luxe 11 Mega Toys ‘G’ All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Love-Raymond Roseanne ‘PG’ (11:31) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons ›› “Bad Boys II” (2003) Martin Lawrence. Two detectives battle a drug kingpin in Miami. ›› “Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008) Harrison Ford. Å (10:40) ››› “The Bourne Ultimatum” (2007) Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order Mario Lopez Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew ‘14’ Don’t Forget Don’t Forget Saturday Night Live The Best of Mike Myers ‘14’ Å Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Larry the Cable Guy’s Christmas 191 48 37 54 Brandy & Ray J PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:10) ››› “Parenthood” 1989 ’ (6:15) ›› “K-9” 1989, Comedy James Belushi. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ›› “G-Force” 2009, Action Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å ››› “Sleepless in Seattle” 1993 Tom Hanks, Meg Ryan. ’ ‘PG’ Å Underworld ›› “A Life Less Ordinary” 1997 Ewan McGregor, Holly Hunter. ‘R’ Å ››› “Raising Arizona” 1987 Nicolas Cage. ‘PG-13’ After Film School Night-Heaven ››› “Broadcast News” 1987, Romance-Comedy William Hurt, Albert Brooks. ‘R’ Å MX Awards 2010 Motocross of Nations (N) The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Romaniacs The Daily Habit Bubba’s World Dirt Demons Bondi Rescue The Daily Habit Big Break Big Break Sandals Resorts Big Break Sandals Resorts Big Break Sandals Resorts Golf Central Big Break Sandals Resorts Big Break Sandals Resorts Big Break Sandals Resorts (4:00) “Moonlight and Mistletoe” ›› “Call Me Claus” (2001) Whoopi Goldberg, Nigel Hawthorne. ‘PG’ Å “Three Wise Women” (2010, Drama) Fionnula Flanagan. ‘PG’ Å “The Night Before the Night Before Christmas” (2010) Jennifer Beals. ‘PG’ 24/7 Penguins/Capitals: Road to the (6:15) ››› “Drag Me to Hell” 2009, Horror Alison Lohman. A young woman must ››› “I Love You, Man” 2009 Paul Rudd. A man’s new friend- Gulliver’s Travels Ricky Gervais: Out of England 2 - The (11:15) Real Sex Down and Dirty A man HBO 425 501 425 10 NHL Winter Classic ’ Å Stand-Up Special ‘MA’ Å shatter a powerful curse placed upon her. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å ship threatens his upcoming wedding. ’ ‘R’ wears mascot costumes. ‘MA’ ›› “Naked in New York” 1993, Comedy Eric Stoltz, Ralph Macchio. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Arrested Dev. ›› “The Center of the World” 2001, Drama Peter Sarsgaard. ‘NR’ ›› “Havoc” 2005, Drama Anne Hathaway. ‘R’ Naked in NY IFC 105 105 ›› “The Wolfman” 2010 Benicio Del Toro. A nobleman becomes (11:45) Life on Top (3:20) ››› “The Last Samurai” 2003 Tom ›› “Stargate” 1994, Science Fiction Kurt Russell, James Spader. An artifact found in › “Mirrors” 2008, Horror Kiefer Sutherland, Paula Patton, Amy Smart. An evil force MAX 400 508 7 Cruise. ’ ‘R’ Å ‘MA’ Å Egypt is the doorway to another world. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å uses mirrors to gain entrance to this world. ’ ‘R’ Å the embodiment of a terrible curse. ’ ‘R’ Hitler’s Hidden Holocaust ‘14’ Blowing Up History Naked Science ‘PG’ Hitler’s Hidden Holocaust ‘14’ Blowing Up History Naked Science ‘PG’ Inside Polygamy: Life in Bountiful NGC 157 157 Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar: Airbender Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Dragon Ball Z Kai Dragon Ball Z Kai (10:05) The Troop Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ CatDog ‘Y’ Å NTOON 89 115 189 Beyond the Hunt In Pursuit, Miller Monster Bucks American Hunter Bow Madness Ult. Adventures Jimmy Big Time Steve’s Outdoor Jackie Bushman Beyond, Lodge Legends of Fall Bone Collector Outdoorsman Drop Zone OUTD 37 307 43 (5:05) ›› “New York, I Love You” 2009, Drama Shia LaBeouf, Blake Lively. iTV. Sev- ›› “Tyler Perry’s the Family That Preys” 2008, Drama Kathy Bates. iTV. Greed and ›› “Extraordinary Measures” 2010, Drama Brendan Fraser, Harrison Ford. iTV. Two Next Stop for Char- I Can’t Believe I’m SHO 500 500 eral love stories take place throughout the city. ’ ‘R’ Å scandal test the mettle of two family matriarchs. ’ ‘PG-13’ men join forces to develop a life-saving drug. ‘PG’ lie (N) ‘MA’ Still Single Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars Pinks - All Out ‘PG’ Dangerous Drives ‘PG’ Battle-Supercars Battle-Supercars MotoGP Racing Laguna Seca SPEED 35 303 125 (3:50) Dear John (5:45) ›› “Planet 51” 2009 Voices of Dwayne Johnson. ’ ‘PG’ Å (7:20) ›› “Daddy Day Care” 2003 Eddie Murphy. ‘PG’ ›› “Paul Blart: Mall Cop” 2009 Kevin James. ’ ‘PG’ (10:35) ›› “Dear John” 2010 Channing Tatum. Å STARZ 300 408 300 (4:30) ››› “Adventureland” 2009, Comedy-Drama Jesse Eisen- (6:20) ›› “Finding Amanda” 2008 Matthew Broderick. A man “Give ’Em Hell Malone” 2009 Thomas Jane. A gunman must The King’s Speech › “The Collector” 2009, Horror Josh Stewart. A thief picks a bad ›› “The Killer Inside TMC 525 525 berg, Kristen Stewart. ’ ‘R’ Å tries to bring his niece to rehab. ’ ‘R’ Å protect a valuable briefcase from a gangster. ‘R’ night to break into a mansion. ’ ‘R’ Å Me” 2010 (4:00) WEC Best of 2010 (N) ›› “Rocky IV” (1985, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burt Young. NHL Overtime (Live) ›› “Rocky IV” (1985, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Burt Young. NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer Bad Blood ’ ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer Holiday Spirit ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer Slam ‘PG’ Å Ghost Whisperer ’ ‘PG’ Å Secret Lives of Women ‘14’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 103 33


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 E3

CALENDAR MAGIC SHOW: Mr. Magic presents an evening of humor, interaction and magic; $5, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Lodge, North Pole, 17728 Abbot Drive; 800-486-8591 or www. sunriver-resort.com/traditions.

High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. REVEREND HORTON HEAT: The Dallas-based rockabilly band performs, with Hillstomp; $20 plus fees in advance, $25 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-7882989 or www.randompresents.com.

FRIDAY

THURSDAY

TODAY

COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE: With food, carols, a choir performance and a performance by Annie Bethancourt; reservations recommended; free; 4, 5:30 and 7 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-317-0700 or www .towertheatre.org. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eaglecrest.com. ’TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS: Featuring holiday trivia, caroling and a live reading of the holiday poem; free admission; 7-8 p.m.; Sunriver Resort, Homestead Room, 57081 Meadow Road; 800-486-8591 or www .sunriver-resort.com/traditions.

SATURDAY STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

SUNDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. CHARITY BINGO: Event includes a canned food drive and baked-goods sale; proceeds benefit the St. Vincent de Paul food bank; $7; 2 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, 235 N.E. Fourth St., Prineville; 541-447-7659. STARFEST: Explore the festive holiday light display; through Jan. 2; free; 5:50-9:30 p.m.; Eagle Crest Resort, 1522 Cline Falls Road, Redmond; www.eagle-crest.com.

MONDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754.

TUESDAY OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. CLASSICS BOOK CLUB: Read and discuss short stories by Henry James; free; 6-8 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7087, kevinb@dpls.us or www.dpls.us/calendar.

WEDNESDAY CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT: Birdwatchers of all levels walk with naturalist or independently for the annual bird survey; free; 8 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541-593-4394 or www.sunrivernaturecenter.org. OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.;

Dec. 30 OWL LEGENDS: Meet the largest owl in the world, along with other owls, and hear talks from a raptor biologist; $7, $5 museum members, plus admission; 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.; High Desert Museum, 59800 S. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-382-4754. EAGLES: Celebrate the eagle, with tall tales, entertainment and food; reservations requested; $20; 7-9 p.m.; Sunriver Nature Center & Observatory, 57245 River Road; 541593-4394 or www. sunrivernature center.org. MAGIC SHOW: Mr. Magic presents an evening of humor, interaction and magic; $5, free ages 12 and younger with an adult; 7 p.m.; Sunriver Lodge, North Pole, 17728 Abbot Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriverresort.com/traditions.

FRIDAY Dec. 31 NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: With skiing, followed by fireworks, sledding and live music; $22; skiing until 9 p.m., party continues through midnight; Hoodoo Mountain Resort, summit of Santiam Pass on U.S. Highway 20, west of Sisters; 541822-3799 or www.hoodoo.com/ events.htm. BEND’S FIRST 1,000 LIGHTS COMMUNITY WALK: Event includes a family festival, a magic show, live music and an illuminated walk; proceeds benefit the La Pine Community Kitchen; $18, $25 for families, free ages 13 and younger; all participants are asked to donate three cans of food, warm clothing or pet food; 4 p.m., walk begins 6 p.m.; Juniper Elementary School, 1300 N.E. Norton St.; www .bendsfirst1000lightswalk.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the Armadillos and dinner; $12; 5-9 p.m.; La Pine Senior Activity Center, 16450 Victory Way; 541-536-6237. NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event, with “The Mafioso Murders,” casino games and more; $59, $110 per couple; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. ROCKIN’ NEW YEAR’S EVE: Featuring costumes, cardboard instruments, games, crafts and more; reservations requested; $65, $55 resort guests; 6:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; Fort Funnigan, 17600 Center Drive, Sunriver; 541-593-4609 or www.sunriver-resort. com/traditions. RISE UP NEW YEAR’S EVE BASH: With performances by Larry and His Flask, Barefoot Surrender, McDougall and Ether Circus; ages 21 and older; $7; 8 p.m.; Old Mill Music Lounge, 360 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, #210, Bend; www.bendticket.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: Featuring a performance by the M80’s; $10; 8:30 p.m.; Kah-Nee-Ta High Desert Resort & Casino, 100 Main St., Warm Springs; 541-553-1112 or http://kahneeta.com. ROCK THE OX: A New Year’s Eve party with a DJ, dancing, champagne and more; ages 21 and older; $35 plus fees; 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.; The Oxford Hotel, 10 N.W. Minnesota Ave., Bend; 541-382-8436 or www .bendticket.com.

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

NEW YEAR’S AT THE MOON: Featuring performances by The Prairie Rockets and the River Pigs; $10; 9 p.m.; Silver Moon Brewing & Taproom, 24 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-388-8331 or www .silvermoonbrewing.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE BONFIRE ON THE SNOW: Wanderlust Tours leads a short snowshoe hike to a bonfire and hand-carved snow amphitheater in the forest; a naturalist shares facts about the forest, animals and the night sky; reservations required; adults only; trips depart from Sunriver and Bend; $85 includes guide, snowshoes, transportation, food and drink; 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m.; 541-389-8359 or www. wanderlusttours.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CELEBRATION: Featuring a performance by the Moon Mountain Ramblers and Jukebot; free, $10 for Moon Mountain Ramblers; 9 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-3825174 or www.mcmenamins.com. NEW YEAR’S EVE CONCERT: With a performance by Sagebrush Rock; free; 9 p.m.-1 a.m.; The Original Kayo’s Dinner House and Lounge, 415 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-323-2520. NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY: With performances by Shade 13, and DJs Harlo, Rada, Ells and Defekt; free; 9 p.m.; MadHappy Lounge, 850 N.W. Brooks St., Bend; 541-388-6868. MESSAGES THROUGH MUSIC: A Slipmat Science party featuring Eternal, Roommate, Mindscape, Defekt, Ells, Kleverkill and more; ages 18 and older; $10 before 10 p.m., $15 after; 10 p.m.; Midtown complex, The Annex, Midtown Ballroom and Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend.

SATURDAY Jan. 1 POLAR BEAR PLUNGE: Take an icy plunge into the Lodge Village’s outdoor pool; hot chocolate served; free; 10 a.m.; Sunriver Resort, 17600 Center Drive; 800-486-8591 or www.sunriver-resort.com/traditions.

SUNDAY Jan. 2 FIDDLERS JAM: Listen or dance at the Oregon Old Time Fiddlers Jam; donations accepted; 1-3 p.m.; Pine Forest Grange, 63214 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-447-5451.

MONDAY Jan. 3 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “Finding Nouf” by Zoe Ferraris; free; noon; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-617-7085 or www .deschuteslibrary.org/calendar.

TUESDAY Jan. 4 GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “I AM BECAUSE WE ARE,” which explores Madonna’s journey to Malawi to see how AIDS and poverty affect children; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY Jan. 5 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in an encore presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted in high

definition; $18; 6:30 p.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com.

THURSDAY Jan. 6 GOOD CHAIR, GREAT BOOKS: Read and discuss “The Zookeeper’s Wife” by Diane Ackerman; bring a lunch; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1081 or www.deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. “BOOMERS, XERS, AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-3121034 or www.deschuteslibrary. org/calendar. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: Preview night for the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $10; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

FRIDAY Jan. 7 “BOOMERS, XERS, AND MILLENNIALS — CAN WE ALL GET ALONG?”: Explore characteristics, communications styles and more about different generations; free; 1 p.m.; Sisters Public Library, 110 N. Cedar St.; 541-312-1034 or www. deschuteslibrary.org/calendar. FIRST FRIDAY GALLERY WALK: Event includes art exhibit openings, artist talks, live music, wine and food in downtown Bend, the Old Mill District and NorthWest Crossing; free; 5-9 p.m., and until 8 p.m. in NorthWest Crossing; throughout Bend. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE”: Nine actors present a live-radio version of the classic holiday tale about George Bailey and his guardian angel; $5, free ages 5 and younger; 7 p.m.; Madras High School, 390 S.E. 10th St.; 541-475-7265 or dhayes@509J.net. PAGAN JUG BAND: The Portlandbased classic country band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “LOVE, LAUGHTER AND LUCCI”: A presentation of the comedy by Cricket Daniel about three generations of an Italian Catholic family living together; $20, $18 students and seniors; 8 p.m.; 2nd Street Theater, 220 N.E. Lafayette Ave., Bend; 541-312-9626 or www.beattickets.org.

SATURDAY Jan. 8 “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, LA FANCIULLA DEL WEST”: Starring Deborah Voigt, Marcello Giordani and Lucio Gallo in a presentation of Puccini’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 10 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347.

M T For Thursday, Dec. 23

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BLACK SWAN (R) 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:40, 7:10 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:20 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) 11:25 a.m., 2:35, 7:05 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:40 a.m., 2:45, 7 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:25 TAMARA DREWE (R) 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:50, 7:15

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:45

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3-D (PG) 12:30, 3:55, 6:30, 9:15 DUE DATE (R) 7:50, 10:25 THE FIGHTER (R) 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8:05, 10:40 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 11:20 a.m., 2:30, 6:25, 9:35 HOW DO YOU KNOW (PG-13) 11:10 a.m., 1:50, 4:30, 7:45, 10:30 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 11:45 a.m., 12:15, 2:05, 2:35, 4:20, 4:50, 6:45, 7:20, 9:20, 10 TANGLED (PG) 11:15 a.m., 1:40, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25 THE TOURIST (PG-13) Noon, 2:45, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05 TRON: LEGACY 3-D (PG) 11:35 a.m., 12:05, 2:20, 4:05, 5:15, 7, 8, 9:55, 10:45 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 11 a.m., 1:45, 4:35, 7:25, 10:20 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 11:05 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1:35, 2:15, 4:25, 5, 7:05, 7:35, 9:45, 10:10 YOGI BEAR (PG) 11:50 a.m.,

1:55, 4, 6:40, 9:10 YOGI BEAR 3-D (PG) 12:25, 2:40, 4:55, 7:15, 9:40 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes. EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies.

(PG-13) 10 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:15, 9 TANGLED (PG) 10:30 a.m., 1, 4, 6:15, 8:30 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 10:15 a.m., 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 YOGI BEAR (PG) 10 a.m., 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7, 9:15

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE

700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) HEREAFTER (PG-13) 6:30 THE POLAR EXPRESS (PG) 12:30 RED (PG-13) 9:30 SECRETARIAT (PG) 3

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER (PG) 4:30 LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 5, 7:30 THE TOURIST (PG-13) 7:15 TRON: LEGACY (PG) 4:15, 7 TRUE GRIT (PG-13) 4:45, 7:15

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

LITTLE FOCKERS (PG-13) 4, 7

N   N  Mariah Carey’s hubby announces twins

Spacey’s impressions highlight ‘Casino Jack’

NEW YORK — Mariah Carey is going to be a mom twice over. Nick Cannon announced on his radio show recently that his wife is expecting twins. Said Cannon on New York’s 92.3 station: “I haven’t even told my wife I doing this, Mariah Carey so I’m probably gonna get yelled at for not getting permission. ... We are having twins!” Carey, 40, and Cannon, 30, have been the subject of a baby watch since they got married two years ago.

WASHINGTON — Kevin Spacey not only transforms into disgraced lobbyist Jack Abramoff in “Casino Jack,” he gets to imitate former Presidents Clinton and Reagan, Al Pacino and many others. In an interview, Spacey says Abramoff was a movie buff who was always doing impressions. Spacey is a talented impressionist, too, so he made sure several impersonations were added to the script. Spacey is up for a Golden Globe for his performance.

Court: Rapper DMX sentenced to prison PHOENIX — Court officials in Arizona say the rapper known as DMX has had his probation revoked and is heading to prison for one year. The Maricopa County Superior Court issued the ruling Thursday against the rapper, whose real name is Earl Simmons. Simmons was arrested last month for violating probation. He told KSAZ-TV in Phoenix he was kicked out of a drug treatment program because he had a drink at a Scottsdale club during a performance. Court documents allege Simmons failed to submit to drug testing and drove on a suspended license.

Gibson’s ‘The Beaver’ due out in March LOS ANGELES — Mel Gibson’s next movie finally has a release date. Distributor Summit Ente r t a i n m e n t announced recently that Gibson’s comic drama “The Beaver” will open in limited release Mel Gibson next March 23 and expand to more theaters April 8. The film has been in limbo amid Gibson’s custody battle with ex-girlfriend Oksana Grigorieva, who claims he physically abused her. “The Beaver” is directed by Jodie Foster and stars Gibson as a troubled family man trying to cope with help from an unusual friend — a beaver puppet he wears on his hand.

Blaze erupts on Kings of Leon tour buses LONDON — Sixty firefighters have tackled a blaze that engulfed two tour buses belonging to the band Kings of Leon at London’s O2 Arena. London Fire Brigade said 12 engines were called Friday to battle the fire in a loading bay. No one was injured in the fire. Seating areas of the arena were unaffected.

Deputies investigating Lohan for battery LOS ANGELES — Authorities say Lindsay Lohan is being i nves t igated for an alleged misdemeanor battery against a female staffer at a rehab facility where the actress is receiving Lindsay Lohan treatment. Riverside County Sheriff’s Deputy Herlinda Valenzuela says officers responded to a Betty Ford Center facility early Dec. 12 for an incident involving Lohan. Valenzuela says a female staffer reported having a dispute with the Lohan and that she wanted to pursue charges. No arrests were made. Valenzuela says detectives continue to look into the case.

Palace: Zara Phillips to be married LONDON — Prince William and Kate Middleton will soon have company on the royal wedding calendar. Buckingham Palace announced Tuesday that Zara Phillips, Queen Elizabeth II’s eldest granddaughter, is engaged. Phillips, an accomplished Zara Phillips equestrian, said she was shocked but “very happy” that her rugbyplaying boyfriend Mike Tindall had proposed. No date has been set yet. Phillips is close friends with her cousin, Prince William, who plans to marry Middleton at Westminster Abbey on April 29. Their engagement was announced last month. Phillips, 29, is 12th in line to the throne. The 32-year-old Tindall has played 66 times for England and was in the team that won the 2003 World Cup. It was during the tournament that he first met Phillips in a Sydney bar. Tindall plays for club side Gloucester and is still a regular in the national side. The palace said in a statement that the couple got engaged Monday evening at their home in western England. — From wire reports

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


E4 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Thursday, Dec. 23, 2010: This year, open up to different ideas. You are processing and changing right in front of others. Some friends might not notice for a while, while others are amazed. As a result of these profound changes, those closely connected to you grow in new ways, making for stronger ties. Stress results from change. Take better care of your health. If you are single, the person you choose today might not be the person you would choose in a year. Try not to make any major life commitments this year. Simply get to know a special or new person better. If you are attached, the two of you will be breaking new ground, thus adding vigor and excitement to the relationship. LEO zeros in on what is important. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Open your eyes to a kid’s mind-set. You will breeze through work and play with more spontaneity and happiness. Should someone toss a snafu in your path, it won’t have an impact. Tonight: Get into the spirit. Go caroling, help decorate a tree or sip eggnog. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHH You might opt to finish up holiday details. At the last minute, you could take on a new project or rush out the door. Did you forget someone? Or is this dash the result of forgetting a work-related matter? Tonight: Close to home. GEMINI (May 21-June 20)

HHHHH Finally, you have the right words and others can hear you. Or do they? Someone quite close could act as if he or she hasn’t heard you, but you can be sure that you hit the bull’s-eye. You don’t need to hammer in an opinion. Tonight: Start a round of gift-giving. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Those impulses that encourage you to go out and spend might attack again. Be sure this is what you really want to do. Pressure from a loved one or family member might be dealt with in another manner. Be creative. Tonight: Your treat. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHHH Note a new sense of direction when you wake. Follow your instincts. Naturally, you seem to make an adjustment in problem situations, eliminating issues. Your personality and intellect meld. Others respond to your magnetism. Tonight: All smiles. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHH Be willing to observe. If you feel out of sorts or hurt by another person’s comments, consider that you could be unusually sensitive. How much are you playing out an old wound? A child or loved one seeks you out. Tonight: Surround yourself with music. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Once more, pressure mounts. How much of this feeling is coming from your own judgments of what you need to do? No one else is pressuring you but you. In that context, you can make another choice. Friends help you let go. Tonight: And the party goes on.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHH Be aware of an older relative and his or her expectations. Communication affects your plans. Understanding evolves between you and others. Remember, you are going through a similar experience. Tonight: A must appearance. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHHH Stop. Take five minutes to reflect on what must be done before Christmas, both personally and perhaps professionally. Don’t forget someone who is often in your thoughts but not present. Tonight: Use your imagination. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH A partner’s or dear friend’s approach touches you. Let this person know how much you appreciate his or her support and caring. It is a good time to stop and share on a deep level. Tonight: Be as open as you can be. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HHHHH You give friendship to those you care about. They in return express loyalty and deep caring. Don’t fight this open exchange between you and others. You discover the true purpose of this situation. Tonight: In the whirlwind of living. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH Listen to what is being shared between you and those who are part of your day-to-day life. Take time today to express your authentic feelings. That might be more important than the Christmas-present ritual. Tonight: Join a co-worker or friend for some holiday cheer. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T ORY

E6 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C D  

ORGANIZATIONS TODAY BINGO: 6 p.m.; Elks Lodge, Bend; 541-382-1371. CENTRAL OREGON RESOURCES FOR INDEPENDENT LIVING: 10:30 a.m.; 20436 S.E. Clay Pigeon Court, Bend; 541-388-8103. COMMUNICATORS PLUS TOASTMASTERS: 6:30 p.m.; IHOP Restaurant, Bend; 541-480-1871. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. HARMONEERS MEN’S CHORUS: 7 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, Bend; 541-382-3392 or www.harmoneers.net. KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Meadow Lakes Restaurant, Prineville; 541-416-2191. REDMOND DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-923-3221. ROTARY CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon; Juniper Golf Course, Redmond; 541-419-1889 or www .redmondoregonrotary.com. SOROPTIMIST INTERNATIONAL OF BEND: Noon; Black Bear Diner, Bend; 541-815-4173. SPANISH CONVERSATION: 3:30-5 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-749-2010.

WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TOPS NO. OR 607: Take Off Pounds Sensibly; 8:30 a.m.; Redmond Seventh-day Adventist Church; 541-546-3478 or www.TOPS.org.

FRIDAY

SUNDAY

BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING PLAY GROUP: 10 a.m.-noon; www.bendap.org or 541-504-6929. BEND KNIT UP: 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; Barnes & Noble Booksellers, Bend; http://groups.yahoo.com/ group/bendknitup. BINGO: 5:45 p.m.; Redmond VFW; 541-526-0812. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107. CENTRAL OREGON REAL ESTATE INVESTORS CLUB: noon-1:30 p.m.; Sunset Mortgage, Bend; fayephil@ bendbroadband.com or 541-306-4171. GAME NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. NORTH MOPS: 9-11:30 a.m.; Church of the Nazarene, Bend; 541-383-3464. PEACE VIGIL: 4-5:30 p.m.; Brandis Square, Bend; 541-388-1793. PINOCHLE: The Vintage of Bend; 541-388-4286.

99ER BRIDGE: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-815-0069. A COURSE IN MIRACLES: 10 a.m. study group; 1012 N.W. Wall St., Suite 210, Bend; 541-390-5373. BEND DRUM CIRCLE: 3 p.m.; Tulen Center, Bend; 541-389-1419. BINGO: 1-4 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-388-1133.

MONDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Coffee and crafting; 10 a.m.; Romaine Village Recreation Hall, Bend; 541-389-7292. BEND GO CLUB: 6-9 p.m.; Whole Foods Market, Bend; 541-385-9198 or www.usgo.org. BEND KIWANIS CLUB: Noon; King Buffet, Bend; 541-389-3678. BEND ZEN: 7-9 p.m.; Old Stone Church, Bend; 541-382-6122. BIRDING FOR PRESCHOOLERS: 10-11 a.m.; Drake Park, Bend; yanalcanlin@yahoo.com. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-617-9107.

CENTRAL OREGON SWEET ADELINES: 6:30-9 p.m.; Redmond Senior Center; 541-322-0265. INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS: 6 p.m.; Bend VFW Hall; 541-382-5376. LIONS INTERNATIONAL OF PRINEVILLE: Noon; The Apple Peddler, Prineville; 541-447-6926. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCE: 7-9 p.m.; Sons of Norway Hall, Bend; 541-549-7511 or 541-410-5784. WHISPERING WINDS CHESS CLUB: 1:15-3:30 p.m.; Whispering Winds Retirement Home, Bend; 541-312-1507.

TUESDAY ACTIVE SENIOR FRIENDS: Walk; 9 a.m.; Farewell Bend Park; 541-610-4164. BEND ELKS LODGE #1371: 7:30 p.m.; 63120 N.E. Boyd Acres Road, Bend; 541-389-7438 or 541-382-1371. BEND HIGHNOONERS TOASTMASTER CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; New Hope Church, Classroom D, Bend; 541-350-6980. BINGO: 6 p.m.; Eagles Lodge & Club, Prineville; 541-447-7659. CASCADE HORIZON SENIOR BAND: 3:45-6 p.m.; High Desert Middle School band room, Bend; 541-382-2712. CENTRAL OREGON CHESS CLUB: 6:30 p.m.; Aspen Ridge Retirement Home, Bend; www.bendchess.com.

By Pamela LeBlanc

le at its other side, which says “The Other Side of Nowhere.” After hitching a ride back down the mountain, we pick up our bikes, grind up a pass and ride a few more hours back to our tents. The hush that blankets the mesas and canyons is exquisite.

Cox Newspapers

BIG BEND RANCH STATE PARK, Texas — Blood oozes from my cactus-shredded calves and I slam into rocks with such force I’m sure my bike will self-destruct, but I can’t contain a whoop of glee as I bomb down a desert trail. I’ve come to remote Big Bend Ranch State Park, just west of the better-known Big Bend National Park, for a four-day bike trek. We’re pedaling and camping our way through the land of tarantulas, sand and star-splashed night skies on what has been dubbed “The Ride to the Other Side of Nowhere.” The timing is perfect. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is pushing this sprawling West Texas landscape as a mountain bikers’ mecca, and the International Mountain Bicycling Association just named the Fresno-Sauceda Loop Trail through the park, which we overlap, one of only two “epic” mountain bike rides in the Southwest. It’s easy to see why. “It’s not just the quality of riding, from great singletrack to creeks to old Jeep roads, but it also has this incredible geology,” said Jeff Renfrow, president of the Big Bend Trails Alliance, a nonprofit trail advocacy group. The park offers diversity that few mountain biking destinations can match. “You’re looking across into another country, the archeology, the more modern ranching history. ... It’s just all there.” It’s a trip that requires meticulous planning, but it’s a magical excursion through a more than 300,000-acre lunar landscape bristling with prickly plants, strewn with brick- and bowling ball-sized rocks and dotted with abandoned mines and crumbling ranch homes. And each night comes with the best reward — the satisfaction of miles hard-earned, meals cooked over a campfire and the biggest sky in the Wild West.

Day 1 22 miles from West Contrabando Trailhead to Pila Montoya III campsite We start our odyssey just west of Lajitas, at the West Contrabando Trailhead, named for smugglers who once sneaked candelilla wax across the border

Day 3

Pam LeBlanc / Cox Newspapers

Chris LeBlanc pushes his bike up a steep hill at Big Bend Ranch State Park, Texas. near here. Yipping like coyotes, we sprint down the first mile of trail, then reassess. We need to conserve our strength — and preserve our bodies — as we crunch along these rugged trails. “Start slow, then taper off after lunch,” said Dan Sholly, deputy director of parks for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. In addition to Sholly, our crew includes Barrett Durst, the new superintendent of the park; my husband, Chris; and my friend Marcy Stellfox. David Riskind, director of natural resources for the department, is driving a support vehicle and filling us in on the cultural history of the place. He’ll meet us at camp at night, saving us from having to haul all our gear. We’re wearing hydration packs on our backs and carrying snacks. We’ve also got spare tires and tubes, and basic tools in case of mechanical problems. Our bikes are outfitted with selfhealing Slime tubes. Although much of the cactus has been removed from the trails, there are still plenty of skin-snagging plants around to turn the prettiest leg into a bloody mess. But I’m in heaven as I chug along. I love the feeling of using my bike (and body) as it was intended to be used. Soon, we meet what we quickly dub the “soul-sucking sand.” Trying to pedal through it is like trying to swim through quicksand. We stop at the ruins of a rock house built in 1897, the abandoned Whit-Roy Mine, a rock overhang decorated with hand-

prints thousands of years ago, and a spring-fed creek that cuts a startling line through a sunbaked backdrop. At about 5 p.m., we roll into camp. It’s one of 55 new sites scattered throughout the park, so isolated that it would take hours to reach the nearest medical clinic. Tents pitched, we work together to prep veggies and grill pork loin.

Day 2 29 miles from Pila Montoya III to the Solitario and back The day starts with a slow climb, but the road is relatively smooth at first. In a few hours we’re at the Solitario, a collapsed and eroded structural dome that stretches 10 miles. After lunch, we plunge into some of the most intense terrain we’ll face all week. The hillsides around our trail close in. We twist over old ranch roads and up and down steep grades. Then it gets really tough. After lunch we’re back to manageable terrain. I spin past a fistsized tarantula trucking across the road. At a spur, we ditch our bikes and pile into Riskind’s fourwheel-drive support vehicle for the white-knuckle ride up to what park staffers call Nowhere. The road follows the shoulder of the hillside, then stops cold. A century ago, crews drilled a test mine here but didn’t find anything. They left the road for us. We hop out, admire a sign that says “Nowhere” and then chuck-

25 miles from Pila Montoya III to Mexicano II campsite The highlight of today’s ride is the roughly five-mile stretch of mostly downhill singletrack leading to the Sauceda Ranger Station. It dips and soars, unraveling like a spool of ribbon in front of us. Most of the miles in this park don’t come easy, but this morning they do, and it’s bliss. The afternoon turns into a protracted uphill clamber, but it’s beautiful. We watch buzzards circle hopefully overhead and then spot a rangy coyote trotting into the distance. I’m finally in the groove. The cacti are taking their toll, though. My legs look like someone rubbed them on a cheese grater.

Day 4 25 miles from Mexicano II to Lajitas It’s mainly downhill, with a few slogs through the dreaded soul-sucking sand. We crest a pass and break for lunch, admiring one of the prettiest vistas of the trek. We can see for miles. Then it’s onward down a bouncing, bike-jostling screamer of a trail. At one point, I launch myself off my bike, landing elbow-first in a cactus. Just a few hours from the finish, we take a quick detour to test a singletrack loop. It’s a roller coaster blast up and down stair-steppy ledges and banked turns. Back on the main road, we chew up the last few miles of the home stretch, admiring the hazy outline of the Chisos Mountains in the distance. This place is unforgiving and harsh, but in the fading light it’s soft and gentle, too. And best seen by bike.

CENTRAL OREGON GOAT PRODUCERS: 7 p.m.; Redmond Public Library; 541-322-6992 or 541-420-3294. CIVIL AIR PATROL: The High Desert Squadron senior members and youth aerospace education cadet meetings; 7 p.m.; Marshall High School, Bend; 541-923-3499. CLASSICS BOOK CLUB OF BEND: 6 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room; 541-312-1046 or kevinb@deschuteslibrary.org. CRIBBAGE CLUB: 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-317-9022. HIGH DESERT RUG HOOKERS: 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541 382-5337. LA PINE LIONS CLUB: Noon; John C. Johnson Center, La Pine; 541-536-9235. PINOCHLE NIGHT: 7 p.m.; DRRH Community Center, Sunriver; 541-598-7502. TUESDAY KNITTERS: 1-3 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-399-1133. VIETNAM VETERANS OF AMERICA: 6 p.m.; VFW Post 1643, Bend; 541-388-1512.

WEDNESDAY BEND CHAMBER TOASTMASTERS CLUB: Noon-1 p.m.; Environmental

Outing Continued from E1 A word to the wise: Don’t misread directions that say “from Highway 20 and Third Street” and start counting your mileage at 27th Street, as I did, because you’ll miss your turnoff, where an “Oregon Badlands Wilderness” stands at the intersection of Old Highway 20. Thanks in part to a long downhill grade and “Digging For Something,” an amazing, upbeat song by the pop-rock band Superchunk, I was moving a bit too fast when that sign flew by. A quick U-turn put me back on course, and before I knew it, I’d arrived at the trailhead, with its expansive new parking area and three picnic tables, including one that is accessible to people with disabilities. For now, those tables are shelves for snow. In a few months, though, they’ll be a great place to hang and have a bite to eat before tackling Horse Ridge’s system of trails. Horse Ridge Recreation Area is a 40-square-mile patch of lava and juniper that is managed for nonmotorized use; hikers, joggers, cyclists and horses are allowed, but cars and ATVs are not, except on a few designated corridors. On a cold Tuesday morning, the place was pretty desolate, besides the occasional roar of a gravel track barreling down the road. I followed two sets of tracks — one human, one more adventurous canine — that headed down an eastbound path, acutely aware of the sound of the snow crunching beneath my feet. With Horse Ridge’s namesake ridges rising to my right, I tromped around for a while, winding my way through a sea of twisted juniper trees. Some of them, with their gnarled branches and wavy, million-shades-ofgray bark, actually looked kind of pretty to me. “I must really be becoming an Central Oregonian,” I thought. Or maybe I said it aloud, to no one in particular. The tracks led me down into a little gully at the foot of the north-

Center, Bend; 541-420-4517. BEND KNITUP: 5:30-8 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-728-0050. BEND/SUNRISE LIONS CLUB: 7-8 a.m.; Jake’s Diner, Bend; 541-389-8678. BINGO: 5:45 p.m.; Redmond VFW; 541-526-0812. CASCADE DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB: 12:30 and 7 p.m.; Bend Senior Center; 541-788-7077. EASTERN CASCADES MODEL RAILROAD CLUB: 7 p.m.; 21520 S.E. Modoc Lane, Bend; 541-317-1545. THE GOLDEN AGE CLUB: Pinochle; 12:45-4 p.m.; 40 S.E. Fifth St., Bend; 541-389-1752. KIWANIS CLUB OF REDMOND: Noon1 p.m.; Izzy’s, Redmond; 541-5485935 or www.redmondkiwanis.org. PRIME TIME TOASTMASTERS: 12:051:05 p.m.; 175 S.W. Meadow Lakes Drive, Prineville; 541-416-6549. REDMOND AREA TOASTMASTER CLUB: 11:50 a.m.-1 p.m.; City Center Church, Redmond; 541383-0396 or 541-410-1758. RICE ITALIAN CONVERSATION GROUP: 6:30-8:30 p.m.; Dudley’s Bookshop Cafe, Bend; 541-447-0732.

20

To Bend

Horse Ridge Trailhead

0 y2 wa igh dH Ol

Biking at Big Bend truly wild

Datebook is a weekly calendar of regularly scheduled nonprofit events and meetings. Listings are free, but must be updated monthly to continue to publish. Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Horse Ridge

20

5,148 ft.

2015

2015 DESCHUTES N ATION A L FOREST

Millican Valley Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

ernmost ridge, which looked as if it had been filled to the brim with a pitcher full of scrubby shrubs. Eventually, I ran up against the Horse Ridge Research Natural Area, an ungrazed 600-acre “research and study plot for Western juniper big sagebrush plant communities,” according to the BLM. The area provides important habitat for elk, mule deer, pronghorn, golden eagles and more, though I saw no wildlife, really. Which was fine with me, as I spent the last little bit of my walk wondering how I would evade a man-eating predator with ice blocks for feet. The big, looping path never went uphill much, and it never went downhill much; it was pretty much an easygoing, solitary walk in the High Desert. Eventually, it took me past a cool, old, rusted oil drum and back toward my car, which looked just as lonely and cold as I felt. Together, we zoomed back up the highway, back toward Bend, a driveway that needs shoveling and other snowy tasks. Relaxed and refreshed, I headed back to the office to work and thaw out. And the next time I want to escape the snow, I’m going to let momentum and the sounds of Superchunk carry me all the way to Boise or something. Ben Salmon can be reached at 541-383-0377 or bsalmon@bendbulletin.com.

Get A Taste For Food, Home & Garden Every Tuesday In AT HOME


H

F

IMPROVING YOUR HEALTH AND WELL-BEING Money Long-term-care insurance can be a pricey mix of options, Page F4

HEALTH

www.bendbulletin.com/health

THE BULLETIN • THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2010

FITNESS MEDICINE

Mountain View Hospital in Madras is trying to wipe out hospital-acquired infections by going right to the source — the patients’ rooms.

Cyclists may find comfort in BikeYoga By Betsy Q. Cliff The Bulletin

BEDSIDE TABLE TELEPHONE HANDRAIL DOOR HANDLE BED SURFACE TRAY TABLE

Hidden in plain sight When a patient vacates a room at Mountain View Hospital in Madras, there are certain areas that the cleaning crews are required to disinfect — some obvious, and some not so obvious.

The dozen or so people gathered to see Uma Kleppinger a few weeks ago at an event at Sunnyside Sports in Bend had various complaints. Most of them were cyclists, and Kleppinger had heard most of their complaints before. They said they had sore hips, tight shoulders and aching backs. They were stiff, they said, and their legs felt tight or heavy. Kleppinger, who began cycling as a bike messenger in New York City more than two decades ago, teaches BikeYoga, yoga poses and stretching uniquely tailored for cyclists. “Anybody that’s spending a lot of time in the saddle will have those problems,” she said. A specifically tailored yoga program, she said, can help cyclists feel better and ride better, too. Athletes who train hard in one sport can be prone to injuries related to their sport. Runners can be sidelined with bad knees; swimmers face a risk of shoulder problems. Bikers face their own set of issues. Hunched over handlebars for hours on end, sitting in the same position, repeating the same motion, cyclists can end up with stiff bodies. See BikeYoga / F6

“Just noticing the places where we’re weak, tight or unbalanced, sometimes that’s enough.” — Uma Kleppinger, trainer

Rob Kerr The Bulletin ile photo

NUTRITION Photo illustration by Althea Borck, photos by Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

The

battle against germs By Markian Hawryluk • The Bulletin

T

his summer, a call that a patient was being discharged from Mountain View Hospital in Madras would get Cathy Luther running. The hospital infection prevention nurse wanted to get there quickly, before staff arrived to clean and prepare the room for the next patient. Luther would secretly mark several key areas of the room with an invisible GloGerm gel, designed to spread the way real germs do. After the room was cleaned, she would go back with a black light and see if the cleaning was adequate. “The results weren’t optimal,” Luther said. Although the hospital was cited earlier this year as having one of the lowest rates of hospital-acquired infections in the state, every spot of gel glowing under the black light represented one more chance of a patient picking up an

infection in the hospital. She wasn’t going to be happy until each room came through spotless. The hospital had its environmental services manager draw up very detailed instructions on how to clean a room, the sink, the toilet, every article in the room. The cleaning staff was trained on the protocol and then tested and retested to see if they’d retained it. And then Luther went back and GloGerm-tested the rooms again. The results were better but still not perfect. They’d go back to training the staff again until it was. It’s all part of an ambitious goal taken on by Mountain View, to have not a single surgical-site infection over a one year period through June 2011. But as the gel testing showed, it will take nearly every single staff member in the hospital — and even the patients themselves — to pull it off. See Infections / F5

Questions (and answers) on new vitamin D advice By Melissa Healy Los Angeles Times

A recent vitamin D report from the Institute of Medicine forced a lot of people to reconsider the essential nutrient. Here’s a look at what the expert panel said, and why it reached its controversial conclusions. How much vitamin D did the experts say is necessary? For most children, teens and adults, a daily dose of 400 international units (IUs) of the vitamin is sufficient, and 600 IUs are recommended. Seniors older than 70 should ideally receive 800 IUs of vitamin D a day, the panel determined. For babies younger than 1, the panel considered 400 IUs of vitamin D enough. Those levels are somewhat higher than the ones set in 1997, the last time a government panel examined vitamin D intake.

But they are far below what many doctors and supplement advocates had been urging. Why weren’t they higher? The idea that people could benefit from daily doses as high as 2,000 IUs is based on the belief that vitamin D can reduce the risk of many chronic diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, metabolic disturbances, depression and certain cancers. A slew of recent studies has linked low levels of vitamin D to an increased incidence of these health problems. But the expert panel concluded that the studies were not convincing — many, in fact, showed no such connection — so it based its recommendations only on the amount of vitamin D needed to maintain bone health and prevent fractures. See Vitamin D / F3

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F2 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H D SUPPORT GROUPS AIDS EDUCATION FOR PREVENTION, TREATMENT, COMMUNITY RESOURCES AND SUPPORT (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7402. AIDS HOT LINE: 800-342-AIDS. AL-ANON: 541-728-3707 or www.centraloregonal-anon.org. AL-ANON PRINEVILLE: 541-416-0604. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS (AA): 541-548-0440 or www.coigaa.org. ALS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-977-7502. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION: 541-548-7074. ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-948-7214. AUTISM RESOURCE GROUP OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-788-0339. BEND ATTACHMENT PARENTING: 541-385-1787. BEND S-ANON FAMILY GROUP: 888-285-3742. BEND ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-382-6122 or 541-382-6651. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-382-5882. BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP/ADULTS AND CHILDREN: 541-383-3910. BRAIN TUMOR SUPPORT GROUP: 541-350-7243 BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7743. BREAST-FEEDING SUPPORT GROUP: 541-385-1787. CANCER INFORMATION LINE: 541-706-7743. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. CELEBRATE RECOVERY: New Hope Church, Bend, 541-480-5276; Faith Christian Center, Bend, 541382-8274; Redmond Assembly of God Church, 541-548-4555; Westside Church, Bend, 541-3827504, ext. 201; Metolius Friends Community Church, 541-546-4974. CENTRAL OREGON ALZHEIMER’S/ DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-504-0571 CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM ASPERGER’S SUPPORT TEAM: 541-633-8293. CENTRAL OREGON AUTISM SPECTRUM RESOURCE AND FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-279-9040. CENTRAL OREGON COALITION FOR ACCESS (WORKING TO CREATE ACCESSIBLE COMMUNITIES): 541-385-3320. CENTRAL OREGON DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY GROUP: 541-420-2759 CENTRAL OREGON DOWN SYNDROME NETWORK: 541548-8559 or www.codsn.org. CENTRAL OREGON FAMILIES WITH MULTIPLES: 541-3305832 or 541-388-2220. CENTRAL OREGON LEAGUE OF AMPUTEES SUPPORT GROUP (COLA): 541-480-7420 or www.ourcola.org. CENTRAL OREGON RIGHT TO LIFE: 541-383-1593. CHILD CAR SEAT CLINIC (PROPER INSTALLATION INFORMATION FOR SEAT AND CHILD): 541-504-5016. CHILDREN’S VISION FOUNDATION: 541-330-3907. CHRONIC PAIN SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-7730. CLARE BRIDGE OF BEND (ALZHEIMER’S SUPPORT GROUP): 541-385-4717 or rnorton1@ brookdaleliving.com. COMPASSIONATE FRIENDS (FOR THOSE GRIEVING THE LOSS OF A CHILD): 541-3300301 or 541-388-1146. CREATIVITY & WELLNESS — MOOD GROUP: 541-647-0865. CROOKED RIVER RANCH ADULT GRIEF SUPPORT: 541-548-7483. DEFEATCANCER: 541-706-7743. DESCHUTES COUNTY MENTAL HEALTH 24-HOUR CRISIS LINE: 541-322-7500. DEPRESSION AND BIPOLAR SUPPORT ALLIANCE: 541-5499622 or 541-771-1620. DEPRESSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-617-0543. DIABETIC SUPPORT GROUP: 541-598-4483. DISABILITY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-8103. DIVORCE CARE: 541-410-4201. DOUBLE TROUBLE RECOVERY: 541-317-0050. DYSTONIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-388-2577. EATING DISORDER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-322-2755. ENCOPRESIS (SOILING): 541-5482814 or encopresis@gmail.com. EVENING BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-460-4030 FAMILY PLANNING SERVICES (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER: 541-389-5468. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS: Redmond 541-280-7249, Bend 541-390-4365. GAMBLING HOT LINE: 800-233-8479. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE GROUP (CELIAC): 541-389-1731. GRANDMA’S HOUSE: 541-383-3515. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541306-6633, 541-318-0384 or

Submitted photo

Suzie Harris leads a yoga class at Namaspa. See the Classes listing for Namaspa’s contact information. mullinski@bendbroadband.com. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7483. GRIEF SUPPORT GROUPS: 541-771-3247. GRIEFSHARE (FAITH-BASED) RECOVERY CLASS: 541-389-8780. HEALING ENCOURAGEMENT FOR ABORTION-RELATED TRAUMA (H.E.A.R.T.): 541-318-1949. HEALTHY BEGINNINGS: 541-383-6357. HEALTHY FAMILIES OF THE HIGH DESERT (FORMERLY READY SET GO): 541-749-2133 HEARING LOSS ASSOCIATION: 541-848-2806 or hlaco2@gmx.com. IMPROVE YOUR STRESS LIFE: 541-706-2904. JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. LA LECHE LEAGUE OF BEND: 541-317-5912. LIVING WELL (CHRONIC CONDITIONS): 541-322-7430. LIVING WELL WITH CANCER FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. LIVING WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES SUPPORT GROUP: 541-536-7399. LUPUS & FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-526-1375. MADRAS NICOTINE ANONYMOUS GROUP: 541-993-0609. MAN-TO-MAN PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. MATERNAL/CHILD HEALTH PROGRAM (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. MEN’S CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-5864. MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. NARCONON: 800-468-6933. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA): 541-416-2146. NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS OF CENTRAL OREGON (NAMI): 541-408-7779 or 541-504-1431. NEWBERRY HOSPICE OF LA PINE: 541-536-7399. OREGON COMMISSION FOR THE BLIND: 541-447-4915. OREGON CURE: 541-475-2164. OREGON LYME DISEASE NETWORK: 541-312-3081 or www.oregonlyme.org. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS: 541-306-6844. PARENTS OF MURDERED CHILDREN (POMC) SUPPORT GROUP: 541-410-7395. PARISH NURSES AND HEALTH MINISTRIES: 541-383-6861. PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP: 541-706-6802. PARTNERS IN CARE: Home health and hospice services; 541-382-5882. PFLAG CENTRAL OREGON: For parents, families and friends of lesbians and gays; 541-317-2334 or www.pflagcentraloregon.org. PLAN LOVING ADOPTIONS NOW (PLAN): 541-389-9239. PLANNED PARENTHOOD: 888-875-7820. PMS ACCESS LINE: 800-222-4767. PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTERS: Bend, 541-385-5334; Madras, 541-475-5338; Prineville, 541-4472420; Redmond, 541-504-8919. PULMONARY HYPERTENSION SUPPORT GROUP: 541-548-7489. RECOVERING COUPLES ANONYMOUS (RCA): 541-389-0969 or www.recovering-couples.org. SAVING GRACE SUPPORT GROUPS: Bend, 541-382-4420; Redmond, 541-504-2550, ext. 1; Madras, 541-475-1880. SCLERODERMA SUPPORT GROUP: 541-480-1958. SELF-ESTEEM GROUP FOR WOMEN: 541-389-7960. SEXAHOLICS ANONYMOUS: 541-595-8780. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE TESTING (DESCHUTES COUNTY HEALTH DEPARTMENT): 541-322-7400. SOUP AND SUPPORT: For mourners; 541-548-7483. SUPPORT GROUP FOR FAMILIES WITH DIABETIC CHILDREN: 541-526-6690. TOBACCO FREE ALLIANCE: 541322-7481. TOPS OR: Bend, 541388-5634; Culver, 541-546-4012; Redmond, 541-923-0878. VETERANS HOTLINE: 541-408-5594 or 818-634-0735. VISION NW: Peer support group;

541-330-0715. VOLUNTEERS IN MEDICINE: 541-330-9001. WINTER BEREAVEMENT SUPPORT GROUP: 541-475-3882, ext. 4030, or www.mvhd.org. WOMEN’S RESOURCE CENTER OF CENTRAL OREGON: 541-385-0747 WOMEN’S SELF-ESTEEM GROUP: 541-389-7960. WOMEN’S SUPPORT GROUP FOR ANGER, ANXIETY, OR DEPRESSION: 541-389-7960. WOMEN SURVIVING WITH CANCER SUPPORT GROUP: 541-693-5864. ZEN MEDITATION GROUP: 541-388-3179.

CLASSES FOOD AND FELLOWSHIP: An allday potluck, with meetings and fellowship for anyone who wants to stop drinking alcohol; free; 7 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday; Trinity Episcipal Church, 469 N.W. Wall St., Bend; www.coigaa.org or 541-548-0440. • ACTIVE LIFE FITNESS: Tai Chi; 541-389-7536 or 541-788-7537. • ADVENTURE BOOT CAMP: Bend Boot Camp, www.bendbootcamp. com; 541-350-5343. • AFTERNOON FIT KIDS: Ages 5-12; 541-389-7665. • ANITA ELSEY: Feldenkrais; 541-408-3731. • ARTICULATION THERAPY CLASSES: 541-550-9424 or www.ashtangayogabend.com. • ASMI YOGA: 541-385-1140 or www.asmiyoga.com. • BABY BOOMERS & BEYOND: Yoga instruction; 541-948-9770. • BABY BOOT CAMP: 541-617-6142 or www.babybootcamp.com. • BAKESTARR: 541-598-4483 or www.bakestarr.com. • BALANCE YOGA CLASSES & RETREATS: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • BEND FELDENKRAIS CENTER: 541-788-9232. • BEND SENIOR CENTER: 541-388-1133. • BEND YOGA: 503-998-8902. • BIKRAM’S YOGA COLLEGE OF INDIA: 541-389-8599 or www.bikramyogabend.com. • THE BODHI TREE, YOGA &

HEALING ARTS: 541-390-2827. • BOOT CAMP FITNESS FOR WOMEN: 541-815-3783. • BOOST FAMILY FITNESS: 541-3905286 or www.boostfam.com. • BREEMA’S NINE PRINCIPLES OF HARMONY: 541-593-8812. • BRINGING THE BUDDHIST 8 FOLD PATH TO MINDFUL DAILY PRACTICE: Hilloah Rohr, 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • CENTRAL OREGON COMMUNITY COLLEGE: 541383-7290 or www.cocc.edu. • CENTRAL OREGON GYMNASTICS ACADEMY: 541-385-1163 or www.cogymnastics.com. • CHICKS RIDE SKI CONDITIONING CLINICS: Elizabeth Goodheart at elizabethgoodheart2@gmail .com or 541-593-1095. • CHRONIC PAIN CLASSES: 541-3187041 or www.healingbridge.com. • CLASSIC HATHA YOGA/ANANDA INSPIRED: Lorette Simonet; 541-3859465 or www.wellnessbend.com. • COMPASSIONATE COMMUNICATION CLASSES: Peace Center, www. pcoco.org or 541-325-3174. • CORE: Yoga; 541-389-6595 or www.coreconditioning.info. • FIT FOR THE KING EXERCISE MINISTRY: 541-923-3925 or www.fitfortheking.info. • FITNESS GUIDE SERVICE: 541-388-1685 or www.fitness guideservice.com. • FOCUS PHYSICAL THERAPY: 541385-3344 or www.focusphysio.com. • FUNCTIONAL FITNESS TRAINING: PEAK Training Studio, 541-647-1346. • GOLF FITNESS AND PERFORMANCE: Chris Cooper, 541-350-1631 or ccooper@taiweb.com. • GOLF FITNESS CLASSES: 541-419-9699. • HEALING BRIDGE PHYSICAL THERAPY: 541-318-7041 or www.healingbridge.com. • HEALTHY HAPPENINGS: 541-706-6390 or www. stcharleshealthcare.org. • HULA HOOP CLASSES: www.hoop dazzle.com or 541-312-6910. • IMAGINE HEALTH NOW: 541-318-4630, maggie@

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our Web site at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

imaginehealthnow.com or www .imaginehealthnow.com. • INNERGYSTICS: 541-388-7395. • IYENGAR YOGA OF BEND: Nadine Sims; 541-318-1186 or www.yogaofbend.com. • IYENGAR YOGA CLASSES: 541-948-9770 or robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com. • JAZZERCISE: www.jazzercise.com or 541-280-5653. • JUNIPER SWIM & FITNESS CENTER: 541-389-7665. • KIDS YOGA: 541-385-5437. • LAUGHTER YOGA: 541-420-2204. • LAUGHTER YOGA CLUB: 541389-0831 or www.pcoco.org. • LIVING FITNESS: 541-382-2332. • MOVEMENT THAT MATTERS: 541-548-6067. • NAMASPA: Baptiste Power Vinyasa Yoga; Suzie Harris; 541-550-8550 or www.namaspa.com. • NORTHWEST CROSSING: Yoga; 541-330-6621 or www.hilloah.com. • PILATES CENTER OF BEND: 541-389-2900 or www.pilatescenter ofbend.com. • PILATES CONNECTION: 541-420-2927 or www. bendpilatesconnection.com. • PILATES FOR CANCER RECOVERY: 541-647-1900 or www.shelleybpilates.com. • PILATES MAT AND EQUIPMENT INSTRUCTION: FreshAirSports.com/ pilates or 541-318-7388. • QIGONG CLASSES: Michelle Wood, 541-330-8894. • REBOUND PILATES: 541-585-1500 or www.reboundpilates.com. • REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT: 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org. • REDMOND RUNNING GROUP: dedwards@bendbroadband.com. • SALLY’S HATHA YOGA: 541-390-

0927 or www.sallyshathayoga.com. • SILVER STRIDERS: 541-3838077 or www.silverstriders.com. • SPIRIT OF PILATES INC.: 541-3301373 or www.spiritofpilates.com. • STROLLER STRIDES: 541-5985231 or www.strollerstrides.com. • SUNDANCE FOOTCARE LLC: 541-815-8131 or canyonwren2646@yahoo.com. • TERPSICHOREAN DANCE STUDIO: Yoga; 541-388-8497. • THERAPEUTIC YOGA PROGRAM: 541-350-1617. • TUESDAY PERFORMANCE GROUP: 541-317-3568. • TULEN CENTER FOR MARTIAL ARTS AND WELLNESS: 541-550-8550. • WILLRACE PERFORMANCE TRAINING STUDIO: 541-350-3938 or runkdwrun@msn.com. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: 541-350-0064. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: 541-419-9699. • WOMEN’S BOOT CAMP: WRP Training Studio; 541-788-5743. • YOGA FOR 55 +: 541-948-9770. • YOGA FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE: 541-322-9642 or info@ bend-yoga.com. • YOGA HEART OF REDMOND: 541633-0530 or www.ericamason.net. • YOGA JOURNEY: 541-419-6778. • YOGA TO GO: robyncastano@ bendbroadband.com or 541-948-9770. • ZUMBA: 541-383-1994. • ZUMBA FITNESS: 541-678-2707.

Laser Resurfacing | Fraxel | Restylane Precision Liposuction | Botox

Call 541.330.6160 www.aesthetics-md.com

Kevin Rueter, MD BEND - DOWNTOWN 18 NW OREGON AVENUE

541.389.7741 BEND - EAST SIDE 1247 NE MEDICAL CENTER DRIVE

541.318.4249 SISTERS 354 W ADAMS STREET

541.549.9609 www.highlakeshealthcare.com

Dr. Kevin Rueter is a board-certified family physician who attended medical school at Oregon Health and Sciences University in Portland and completed his residency at Southern Illinois University. Dr. Rueter’s professional interests encompass the complete scope of Family Medicine from care of the newborn to Geriatric medicine. Dr. Rueter practices at our Bend Eastside Clinic. Dr. Rueter enjoys spending time with his wife, Kathleen, and daughter, Aerilynn. He also enjoys traveling, skiing, and golf. High Lakes Health Care is a preferred provider for most major insurance plans. New patients are now being accepted at all locations. We are now open to new Medicare patients.


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 F3

N TAKE YOUR VITAMINS: A regular look at the sources and benefits of vitamins and minerals.

Potassium Potassium is an essential dietary mineral and electrolyte found in leafy greens, vine-grown fruits, root vegetables and citrus fruits. The body needs to tightly regulate potassium concentrations both inside and outside of cells to function normally. A low blood level of potassium is referred to as hypokalemia and is usually caused by an excessive loss of potassium, such as with prolonged vomiting, use of diuretics, kidney disease or metabolic problems. It can lead to fatigue, muscle weakness and cramps, and intestinal paralysis. Severe hypokalemia can cause abnormal heart rhythms that can be fatal. In rare cases, eating large amounts of black licorice has resulted in hypokalemia. Licorice contains a compound that increases urinary excretion of potassium. Low dietary intake of potassium is generally not enough to cause hypokalemia but can increase the risk of several chronic diseases. Several large epidemiological studies have suggested that increased potassium intake is associated with decreased risk of stroke, kidney stones, osteoporosis and high blood pressure. Such studies can find associations but can’t prove a causal link. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin Banana (1 medium): 422 mg Orange juice (6 fluid ounces): 372 mg Source: Linus Pauling Institute, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

GOOD SOURCES OF POTASSIUM Potato (baked with skin, 1 medium): 926 mg Prunes (½ cup): 637 mg Prune juice (6 fluid ounces): 528 mg Thinkstock

Heard the one about the potato? McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Heard the one about the head of the Washington State Potato Commission, who shed 20 pounds in two months by eating nothing but potatoes in all their forms? Sure, it was a publicity stunt and, if extended longterm, might lead to some health issues. But the guy did lower his total cholesterol level and raise awareness for his product. So where’s the harm? Well, any nutritionist will tell you that eating too much of any one food can lead to unintended consequences, which are detailed in our quiz.

1.

Which of these is not a potential negative side effect of eating vast amounts of potatoes? a) Constipation b) Abdominal bloating c) Acne

d) Gout Speaking of gout, which of these is said to cause the arthritic disease of the joint? a) Pork b) Organ meat (e.g., liver) c) Beer d) All of the above

2.

3.

Which food, eaten in great quantities, can lead to photosensitivity? a) Peaches b) Celery c) Chard d) Broccoli

4.

Strawberries are among the healthiest fruits to consume. However, if eaten to excess, they can lead to what consequence? a) High cholesterol b) Kidney stones c) Enlarged prostate d) Gastric distress

ANSWERS: 1: d; 2: d; 3: b; 4: b Source: www.healthassist.net; Thinkstock photo

sure and kidney stones, can increase levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream.

Continued from F1 Does that mean I should give up my vitamin D supplements? Maintaining a healthy level of vitamin D through diet alone has become much easier since manufacturers began fortifying foods with the nutrient. Fortified foods — including virtually all milk, many brands of orange juice, and some cheeses, yogurts, margarines and breakfast cereals — are now some of the richest dietary sources of vitamin D. High levels exist naturally in fatty fish such as tuna, salmon and mackerel, and it’s also present in egg yolks and beef liver. But there are a lot of people who may still need to add a vitamin D pill to their daily diet. For instance, people who follow a vegan diet need to look hard for supplemental sources of vitamin D, as do those with milk allergies, lactose intolerance, and people who rarely eat fish. “We didn’t actually say in the report that supplementation is verboten,” said Dr. Glenville Jones, an endocrinologist at the University of Queensland in Canada who was on the expert panel. So I should keep on buying foods fortified with vitamin D? Definitely, says Katherine Tallmadge, a registered nutritionist and spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association, which endorsed the panel’s report. In fact, the fortification of foods probably contributed significantly to the panel’s finding that most North Americans get enough of the nutrient, even as they raised the recommended daily levels.

Bananas are well known for their high levels of potassium.

By Sam McManis

Fact or fiction? Ginseng boosts brain power.

Vitamin D

VITAMINS

DAILY ADEQUATE INTAKE FOR POTASSIUM Infants (0-6 months): 400 mg Infants (7-12 months): 700 mg Children (1-3 years): 3,000 mg Children (4-8 years): 3,800 mg Children (9-13 years): 4,500 mg Adolescents (14-18 years): 4,700 mg Adults (19 years and older): 4,700 mg Pregnant women: 4,700 mg Breast-feeding women: 5,100 mg

Next week

Can’t I get some of the vitamin D I need from the sun? Indeed, the sun is a free, plentiful source of vitamin D. When the sun shines on human skin for at least five to 15 minutes, the body produces the nutrient. But with people spending more time indoors and using sunscreen to prevent skin cancer, this source has fallen on hard times. In fact, the panel didn’t even factor in vitamin D from sun exposure when it made its recommendations. Does that mean I should lay off the sunscreen? The sun can be a powerful manufacturer of the nutrient: In 15 minutes, a light-skinned person wearing a bathing suit outside in early July will produce 15,000 to 20,000 IUs of vitamin D. The body stores excess vitamin D in fat, and some research suggests that it is released as needed. But there’s debate about how well that happens, so the panel members suggest that daily dosing of vitamin D is a better bet. Besides, even 15 minutes without sunscreen won’t fly with dermatologists. They warn that prolonged exposure to ultraviolet light — either from the sun or in a tanning booth — elevates a person’s risk of developing melanoma,

Tony Cenicola / New York Times News Service

Many foods are fortified with vitamin D, including milk. the deadliest form of skin cancer. So, by all means, slather on that sunscreen. Are there any groups of people for whom the need for vitamin D supplementation is likely to be higher? Though the institute’s report assumed away the sun as a source of Vitamin D, it acknowledged that “incidental exposure” plays a role in propping up everybody’s levels of the nutrient. For the elderly, that added buffer is largely lost. So among healthy people, those older than 70 need to take in more vitamin D. Breast milk is not a source of vitamin D, so breastfed babies — particularly those who are dark-skinned — should be considered candidates for supplementation from the first week of life. Formula is typically fortified with vitamin D. Some prescription medications, including the anti-seizure drugs Phenobarbital, Dilantin and Tegretol, appear to depress levels of circulating vitamin D, suggesting that some people with epilepsy should consider supplementation. Diuretics called thiazides, which are used to treat high blood pres-

I was told I was deficient in vitamin D. Is it true? Vitamin D deficiency has been defined and tested in widely varying ways. Lab tests for the nutrient have different standards, different methods and sometimes test for different indicators of vitamin D deficiency. So the first things to ask are: Who said you were deficient, and what measure did they use? Physicians and dietitians reading the IOM report’s specialized appendices may be reconsidering what constitutes sufficiency in the coming months. Is there such a thing as too much vitamin D? The expert panel’s compre-

hensive report is unlikely to lay this question to rest, although its advice was clear: Taking more than 4,000 IUs of vitamin D a day is risky. Too much Vitamin D can cause kidney stones and hypercalcemia, which in turn can lead to headaches, anxiety, depression, fatigue, stomach pain, cardiac arrhythmia, muscle weakness, aches, pains and fractures. Daily doses above 10,000 IUs a day are known to cause tissue and kidney damage, the panel said. In thinking about the safe upper limit that the panel proposed, keep in mind that the experts were looking for the amount needed by healthy people to maintain their bones. The panel wasn’t convinced that higher levels of vitamin D could prevent or treat other diseases, so it had little tolerance for the risks associated with mega-doses.

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M Insurance for long-term care can become a pricey puzzle linson, senior vice president for long-term care at Avalere Health. For many people, that’s going to mean patching together a safety net that consists of savings, caregiver help from friends and family, support from local community services and perhaps long-termcare insurance. Care isn’t cheap. In 2009, the average cost for a home health aide was $21 an hour, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. A private room in a nursing home cost $219 daily on average, though there are wide variations depending on location. A one-bedroom unit in an assisted living facility was $3,131 per month, on average.

By Michelle Andrews Special to The Washington Post

People don’t like to think about what will happen if they become too ill or infirm to manage on their own. Experts say that partly explains why sales of long-termcare insurance policies are so anemic; only about 10 percent of seniors have such coverage. Given the complexity of these policies, experts agree it’s tough to decide whether they’re right for you. The policies have many moving parts: After a waiting period, they generally pay a set daily benefit for a certain number of years. They typically cover care in a nursing home, an assisted living facility or at home. They also tend to have high premiums. A 60-year-old might pay $200 a month for a policy that pays $150 a day for a maximum of three years, according to a 2009 study by Avalere Health, a research and consulting firm, and the Kaiser Family Foundation. Purchasing at a younger age can help trim premium costs. But since people typically don’t make a claim until they’re 80 years old or so, that can be a long lead time, especially when you’ve got college tuitions to pay or may be worried about losing your job. Recent turmoil in the longterm-care insurance market adds further uncertainty. MetLife, one of the largest carriers, announced it will no longer sell the policies starting next year, and John Hancock, another major issuer, has asked regulators for premium increases averaging 40 percent for 850,000 policyholders.

Possible solutions In the future, people may be able to take advantage of the Community Living Assistance Services and Support Act, or CLASS Act. This is a program created under the new health care law to help people with functional or cognitive impairments pay for

Thinkstock

In 2009, the average cost for a home health aide was $21 an hour, while a nursing home room averaged $219 a day. nonmedical services to help them stay in their homes. The money can also be used to cover nursing home care. Premiums and benefits have yet to be set, but one estimate, by the Congressional Budget Office, suggested a cash benefit averaging $75 a day. Enrollment won’t begin until 2012 at the earliest, however, and people will have to pay premiums for at least five years before they’re eligible to receive benefits. What’s a consumer to do in the meantime? Unfortunately, existing government programs aren’t much help to middle-income people. Medicare provides only limited nursing home and home health care coverage. Medicaid, the health insurance program for low-income people, pays for about 70 percent of nursing home patients. But in order to qualify, people must generally have no more than a few thousand dollars in assets. “People need to think about it very holistically,” says Anne Tum-

Cost considerations Two years ago, when her mother was in the last stages of Alzheimer’s disease, LuMarie Polivka-West’s parents sold their home and moved to an assisted living facility in Tallahassee. After her mother’s death last year, PolivkaWest and her two brothers moved their father, now 96, to another assisted living facility a bit closer to LuMarie’s home. LuMarie and her two brothers help supplement their dad’s $1,600 monthly Social Security check and the money left from the sale of his home to cover his living expenses, including the $3,400 monthly charge at the assisted living facility. As a nurse practitioner, her younger brother is able to manage their father’s medications, saving him the $600 a month that the assisted living facility would charge for this service. The family discussed buying long-term-care insurance at one time but decided against it, partly because of the cost. “My parents planned well, but they lived longer than expected,” says LuMarie. Her father’s assets will run out in two to three years. “We’ll help maintain Dad in the assisted living facility as long as

possible,” she says. About 10 years ago, Charline Hines and her husband also discussed buying a long-term-care policy. But they made the opposite decision: They bought one. Hines says the policy was useful when her husband was dying of Parkinson’s disease a few years ago and had to go into a nursing home near their home in Grand Prairie, Texas. But Hines, 78, just received a notice that her premium was going up in January, from $2,772 a year to $3,132. Now she’s seriously considering dropping the policy. “I feel it’s time to just let it go,” she says. For people who are considering buying a policy, call a few local facilities to get an idea of costs in the area. Since the average stay in a nursing home is about 2.5 years, many experts advise buying a policy that will provide benefits for about that long. Inflation protection is also key, to keep pace with rising costs. A policy with 5 percent compound inflation protection is the gold standard. Look for a company with strong financial ratings and a history of stable rates. New York Life and Northwestern Mutual, for example, have never raised premiums on existing policies. Those companies are the exception, however. If you buy a long-term-care policy, expect that premiums will go up. “I’m telling people now that they need to build a 50 percent rate increase into their planning,” says Bonnie Burns, a specialist with California Health Advocates, an advocacy organization. This column is produced through a collaboration between The Post and Kaiser Health News. KHN, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care-policy organization that is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

PEOPLE Please send information about people involved in health issues to communitylife@bendbulletin.com. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Advantage Dental in Redmond has several new hires. Derek Sandlin, Sheri Hamon, Karen Hedges, Ashley Ballard and Kerry Story are new customer service representatives. Helen Maldonado is a new human resources assistant. Michelle Lauerman is a new Central/Eastern Oregon dental services adviser. Juniper Mountain Counseling and Wellness has opened at 334 N.E. Irving Ave., Suite 102, Bend. The Laura Cooper center will offer mental health therapy, nutrition counseling, acupuncture, herbal medicine and massage therapy. Laura Cooper, a physical therapist at Therapeutic Associates at The Athletic Club of Bend, has attended a class on breathing evaluation and management. The course covered the chemistry and mechanics of respiration, treatments, and techniques to restore optimal respiration. Dr. Robert Pinnick was recently certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine as a specialist in undersea and hyperbaric medicine. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy utilizes pure oxygen in a pressurized chamber to help patients recover from illnesses and to treat wounds. Pinnick works at Bend Memorial Clinic.

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I am Dr. David Herrin, DC. I run the only Non-Surgical Decompression Center of its kind in Central Oregon. I see people reduce pain medications, avoid surgery, and get their life back -- every day... and all that without surgery. Yes, you heard me right. I specialize in disc degeneration, herniated discs, bulging discs, spinal stenosis, and sciatica. Discover What The Pro Athletes Are Using To Get Out Of Pain -- Without Surgery If you haven’t heard of non-surgical decompression yet, it’s a shame. People all over the country are embracing this therapy. There are PGA pros, professional football players, and people just like you getting back to their old self -- Fast! Here is the “conventional” procedure for back pain patients. “Take these drugs and get some rest. Let’s see what happens in a month.” When that doesn’t work there’s always the option of getting a needle filled with steroids placed directly into your back. Down the road when it’s finally bad enough you may need surgery. This might seem like a good plan for some. I work with those who want to get their old life back without going under the knife. If you have fallen for that trap and are in desperate need of relief of back pain, you should read on. Forgive Me For Expressing My Opinion About Surgery -- I Hated

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THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 F5

M

Next week Bend man learns new way to live as he recovers from viral encephalitis.

We’re living longer but we’re sick longer, too

Infections Continued from F1

Challenging task Infection control is one of the biggest challenges in health care today. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, patients in the U.S. acquire 1.7 million hospital-associated infections each year, contributing to 99,000 deaths. And the average cost per hospital stay is $32,000 higher when a patient contracts an infection in the hospital. In June, Mountain View was selected by the Oregon Patient Safety Commission to be one of 10 hospitals in the newly formed Oregon Healthcare Associated Infection Prevention Collaborative, which aims to eliminate all such preventable infections. The 25bed hospital in Madras is among three such small hospitals participating in the project — which also includes three hospitals with more than 375 beds — and will first focus on eliminating surgical-site infections. Each week, the hospitals talk on a conference call about how to improve their infection-control practices, sharing successes and failures, tips and pitfalls. Controlling surgical infections goes far beyond what happens during the actual surgery itself. Surgical-site infections are those that occur after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place. Any infection that occurs within 30 days after the surgery counts as a hospital-acquired infection. If the surgery involved an implant such as a mesh in a hernia surgery or a joint replacement, the time frame extends to a full year past surgery. From July 2009 to June 2010, Mountain View had only three surgical-site infections, two in April and one in June, for an overall infection rate of 0.4 percent of surgeries. It’s a rate many larger hospitals would envy, but Luther said it’s worth striving for zero. “Somebody said, ‘Maybe we just want to get 95 percent?’ Well, do you want to be that 5 percent that got the infection? I don’t think so,” she said. “I always think, ‘What if that was my mother or my child?’” As close as the hospital is now, getting to zero will still be a challenge. So many things can cause infections and not all of them are under the hospital’s control. Two of the three infections in the past year were caused by conditions that occurred before the patients came to the hospital. One patient came in with a ruptured appendix and another with a colon issue. Both problems expose the body to bacteria. “But we still have to count them,” Luther said. The third infection occurred 29 days after surgery, well after the patient had gone home. “So it’s questionable. Was it something she did when she got home? Was it something that she really did get here?” Luther said. “We hate to call that (a hospitalacquired) infection after they’ve left the hospital. But maybe we didn’t do our teaching.”

Closing the gaps Reducing surgical-site infections starts well before the patient enters the operating room and continues well after the surgical staff members take off their masks and gowns. Mountain View has changed its pre-operative patient education to limit the germs patients may bring in with them. Patients now get a bottle of chlorhexidine gluconate antiseptic to clean the surgical site before they come to the hospital and are told to take a shower the night before the surgery, to use clean towels and clean bed linen. Patients are told not to shave their surgical site with a razor to avoid microabrasions that can allow germs to enter the body. The hospital also revised its discharge instructions, telling patients to wash their hands before touching the incision area and to have clean clothes protecting the area. Inside the operating room, the surgical team will take steps proven to reduce the risk of infection, such as keeping patients warm throughout the surgery or giving antibiotics shortly before the first incision. Many of the infection-control measures have been built into safe-surgery checklists used by surgical staff to ensure none of the vital steps are missed. Mountain

By Shari Roan Los Angeles Times

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Cathy Luther, an infection prevention nurse, uses a black light and GloGerm Gel to check for cleanliness in a hospital room bathroom sink at Mountain View Hospital in Madras. View uses a version of the World and it’s not clean from the last paHealth Organization’s checklist tient, we can wash our hands all that came out in January 2009. day,” Luther said, and it won’t be They started with paper copies in enough. National studies have shown August 2009, but now have a big laminated poster on the wall of that hospital rooms aren’t cleaned well enough, and that patients adthe operating room. “The surgeon can look at the mitted to rooms previously occuposter on the wall, read them and pied by patients with a particular infection are at an increased risk say yes or no,” Luther said. The use of surgical checklists of acquiring that same infection. Researchers looking at how has gained a lot of momentum over the past year with the release of hospital rooms are cleaned have the surgical checklists developed identified numerous areas that by the World Health Organization. are more frequently touched. The checklists were tested in eight Ideally all surfaces in a hospital hospitals around the world, result- room should be cleaned after each ing in a decrease in the rate of ma- patient, but research shows that jor complications from 11 percent fewer than 50 percent of surfaces to 7 percent of surgeries. Inpatient in a hospital room are cleaned afdeaths after major operations fell ter a patient is discharged. Focusby more than 40 percent in those ing on the high-touch areas prohospitals, from 1.5 percent of sur- vides a greater bang for the buck in reducing infecgeries to 0.8 percent, tions. Yet, in one saving hundreds of From July 2 0 0 9 study of hospital lives. room cleanliness, Now 54 of the 56 to June 2 0 1 0 , only 47 percent of hospitals in Oregon high-touch areas have implemented Mountain View were cleaned by the the safe surgery had only three housekeeping staff. checklists, and the Luther uses the Gloremaining two — St. surgical-site Germ gel primarily Charles Bend and infections, two on those high-touch Redmond — are putareas. She also tries ting them in place in April and to express to the for 2011. one in June, cleaning staff how Patient safety exfor an overall important they are perts maintain that to patient care. checklists, although infection rate of “If you want to a wonderful tool, 0.4 percent of look at a hierarchy, won’t improve payou would see maytient care unless doc- surgeries. be the housekeeptors, nurses and staff ers not as high,” buy in. And Luther said the surgeons at Mountain she said. “That’s not true in health View have taken to them enthu- care because there’s not one persiastically. The hospital has about son in this building that’s any less 20 to 25 doctors who practice and important than any other. We all operate at the hospital, as well have a job and our job is to care physicians from the Indian Health for patients and to protect ourService who rotate through to selves as well in the process.” The task ahead of the hospital serve patients from the Warm is daunting. A study published last Springs Indian Reservation. When the hospital implement- month in the New England Joured a “secret shopper” program nal of Medicine found that despite for hand hygiene, where staff quality improvement efforts at members observe who is cleaning 10 North Carolina hospitals over hands before and after interact- the past six years, there was no ing with patients, doctors scored a decline in medical errors or other 98 percent compliance rate in the preventable adverse events, including hospital-acquired infecmonth of August. “In most places you’re not going tions, surgical mistakes and medto get 50 percent compliance from ication dosage errors. The Madras hospital has limdoctors,” Luther said. The hospital had previously ited resources for large projects, worked on an initiative to improve but over the years has aggreshand hygiene, measuring the vol- sively pursued patient safety iniume of hand gel used. Although tiatives. The current effort, which gel containers were placed on is being supported through a the inside and outside of hospital grant from PacificSource Health rooms, they could never get a big Plans, will build on the previous hand-hygiene project, and an increase in gel use. Under the compliance moni- effort to combat Methicillin-retoring program, compliance im- sistant Staphylococcus aureus, proved from 88 percent in the first a bacteria commonly known as quarter of 2010 to 94.2 percent in MRSA. But Luther hopes that Mountain View’s size might be an the second quarter. advantage. “That’s one of the things about Cleaning rooms being small, we don’t have to go But as Luther tells the cleaning through all the bureaucracy to staff, hand hygiene can only go so change,” she said. “We see ourfar if the rooms themselves still selves as a small nimble hospital.” harbor bacteria or viruses. “We always focus on hand hyMarkian Hawryluk can be giene, but if the patient’s handrail reached at 541-617-7814 or is not clean or their (bed) control, mhawryluk@bendbulletin.com.

Life expectancy soared over the last part of the 20th century as treatments for major diseases improved and infectious diseases were quelled by vaccines and better treatment. The most recent data, however, hint that life expectancy is no longer growing. And, according to a new study, we may spend more years sick than we did even a decade ago. In a fascinating paper published in the Journal of Gerontology, noted gerontologist Eileen Crimmins and her colleague Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, both of the University of Southern California, suggest that the goal of a long life marked by mostly healthy years may not be possible. According to the analysis, the average age of morbidity — which is defined as the period of life spent with serious illness and lack of functional mobility — has increased in the last two decades. For example, a 20year-old man in 1998 could be expected to live an additional 45 years without at least one of these diseases: heart disease, cancer or diabetes. But that number fell to 43.8 in 2006. For women, the expected years of life without a major, serious disease fell from 49.2 years to 48 years over the last decade. “There is substantial evidence that we have done little to date to eliminate or delay disease or the physiological changes that are linked to age,” the authors wrote.

F A C T

VS. FICTION

T H E CLAIM:

Flu mostly kills the elderly. THE REALITY: This one is true in most years, said Dr. Richard Fawcett, an infectious disease specialist and health officer at the Deschutes County Health Department. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 24,000 people die annually from flu and about 90 percent of those are people ages 65 or older. The elderly are “certainly a population that gets hit fairly hard relative to other age groups,” said Fawcett. The exception, Fawcett said, occurred last year with the H1N1 flu. Older people, curiously, appeared to be better protected.

They were both less likely to catch the flu and less likely to become severely ill because of it. That, experts thought, could be because the strain was somewhat like a virus that circulated in the 1930s. Those alive during that time may have had residual immunity to the H1N1 virus that felled younger people. — Betsy Q. Cliff, The Bulletin

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F6 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F

Next week Rotating Supermans: The next in our exercise series.

This holiday season, keep your eyes on your heart By Alison Johnson Daily Press (Newport News, Va.)

Photos by Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Yoga instructor Uma Kleppinger leads a group of cyclists and others earlier this month at Sunnyside Sports in Bend in a yoga routine geared specifically toward those who spend a lot of time riding their bikes. Kleppinger said that a short, regular yoga practice can boost a cyclist’s performance.

BikeYoga Continued from F1 One man who had come to Kleppinger’s class was hoping to do yoga in lieu of visiting the chiropractor. To counter the effects of biking, Kleppinger created a program that combines several different types of yoga. She created it, she said, to help the people she biked with. “It doesn’t take a huge amount to feel more comfortable and at ease in your body. And if you’re more comfortable, you’ll ride more. And if you ride more, you’ll be better.” The program includes some of what you’d imagine — stretches for the legs, hips and back — but also aspects that are less obvious. “If you’re already cycling, you don’t need another workout,” she said. To that end, her routine does not include some of the cardiovascular exertion that is often included in a yoga practice. She also said she understands cyclists typically spend many hours a week training and don’t have the time or desire to devote to exercise. Often, Kleppinger said, cyclists go to yoga once a week or less. That infrequent stretching, she said, does little to increase overall flexibility and comfort on the bike. To that end, Kleppinger’s program is much shorter than a traditional yoga class. “My mission is to get people to do a few minutes a day,” she said. Cyclists only need 15 to 20 minutes of yoga, she said, as

“It doesn’t take a huge amount to feel more comfortable and at ease in your body,” said yoga instructor Uma Kleppinger at Sunnyside Sports. “And if you’re more comfortable, you’ll ride more. And if you ride more, you’ll be better.” long as they’re doing the right thing. Kleppinger recently led a series of classes in Bend corresponding to the USA Cycling Cyclo-cross National Championships. At the class at Sunnyside Sports, she began with breathing exercises. Breathing, she said, separates yoga from just stretching and helps people become more aware of their bodies. “Just noticing the places where we’re weak, tight or unbalanced, sometimes that’s enough.” She then moved on to stretch-

ing exercises. Regular yogis would recognize some of the poses, such as the familiar cat/ cow sequence, done on all fours, alternating arching and rounding the back. Kleppinger showed the class poses that stretched out the hamstring, chronically tight in cyclists. She concentrated on poses that did more than one thing. A leg stretch, for example, also put weight on the wrists and arms. This kind of weightbearing exercise, she said, was to help counter some of the bone loss that can come with cycling. Studies have found that cyclists are sometimes at higher risk for osteopenia, a precursor to osteoporosis, than the general population. Her philosophy is laid out in a book she wrote, “BikeYoga: A Simple Practice to Tune Up Your Mind, Body and Spirit” or on her website, www.bikeyoga.com. Kleppinger also plans to move to Bend from Portland soon, so Central Oregonians will be able to get her training in person. She’s not sure where she will be working yet. She hopes to show people, she said, that it is easy to help yourself feel better and that people can do it by themselves in just a few minutes a day. “My main goal is to demystify yoga and to have people not think of it as something only yoga people do,” she said. “I’m kind of driving myself into obsolescence.” Betsy Q. Cliff can be reached at 541-383-0375 or bcliff@ bendbulletin.com.

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Dangerous heart conditions strike more frequently during the holiday season, including a high number of fatal heart attacks on Christmas and New Year’s Day. “There is nothing worse than going out to tell a family their loved one is dead on a holiday,” said Dr. Gary Kavit, chairman of emergency and trauma services at Riverside Regional Medical Center in Newport News, Va. Here are ways to protect your heart: Watch portion sizes. Large, fatty meals will draw blood to the intestines for digestion — and away from the heart. That’s potentially deadly for people who already have blockages or other damage to their coronary arteries. Limit alcohol intake. Too much alcohol can irritate the upper chambers of the heart and trigger abnormal rhythms. Don’t ignore symptoms. Chest pain that extends to the shoulder, arm, back or jaw is the classic sign of a heart attack, but others include abdominal pain, shortness of breath, sweating, dizziness, vomiting and fatigue. Don’t write it all off to indigestion or worry about disrupting holiday gatherings — get help. Reduce stress. Don’t pack your schedule too full, walk away from unpleasant social situations and build relaxing activities into each day. Exercise — but carefully. Regular exercise is a great stress-buster, but don’t overdo it — especially out in cold weather.

IN MOTION Light exercise every day can help prevent respiratory infections Some fitness enthusiasts can take an almost obsessive approach to exercising every day, while others look for any excuse to skip their workout. It’s no wonder that the question of whether a cold is an excuse to skip exercise comes up often. Although recent research has shown that exercise can help prevent the common cold, experts warn that doesn’t mean exercise is a cure-all. According to Dr. David Nieman, a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, moderate exercise of 30 minutes a day most days of the week actually lowers the risk for respiratory infections. Prolonged intense exercise, on the other hand, can weaken the immune system and allow viruses to spread. “The good news for the majority of fitness enthusiasts who put

in 30 to 60 minutes of exercise most days of the week, is that the number of sick days they’ll take during the common cold season is reduced by at least 40 percent,” he said. Nieman said people can safely exercise while sick if cold symptoms are confined to their head, such as a runny nose or a sore throat. He recommends taking a break from exercise if the illness is more systemic, with respiratory infection, fever, swollen glands or extreme body aches. Once symptoms pass, people may need to ease back into their workout routines. Nieman also encourages people to work out moderately before getting a flu shot. That helps to improve the body’s response to the vaccine. — Markian Hawryluk, The Bulletin

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208

Pets and Supplies

Pets and Supplies

Boston Terrier Beautiful Girls! Will be ready for Christmas. Champion bred for beauty and brains. Excellent family additions. AKC Reg. $950. 541-493-2772

German Shepherds, 10 wks, Gorgeous sable, 3M, 1F, 1st shots, $375. 1- 503-753-1132 German Shorthair Pointer A K C , champ lines, 1 male, 1 female, $300, 541-550-9992.

Kittens & great cats avail. for adoption! Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team, the area's only no-kill, all volunWanted: Adjustable Swivel Piteer cat rescue, will be at ano Stool, please call Petco on Sat. 12/18. Foster Boxer Puppies, AKC, 9 wks. 3 541-382-4573 kittens avail. @ Tom-Tom adorable females left at $500 Motel (next to Sonic) all Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for each. Call 541-408-5230 week, 541-815-7278. Sancold vintage costume, scrap, tuary open for adoptions on silver & gold Jewelry. Top Canaries. Assorted Thurs/Sat/Sun 1-4 PM, other dollar paid, Estate incl. Honcolors including red, bronze, days by appt. Will hold your est Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 yellow, green. Excellent singnew pet up to 2 wks. Closed ers. 5@$40-$75 each. Christmas Day except for 205 (541) 548-7947. those picking up their new Items for Free pet. Open Sun., Dec. 26. Gift CHIHUAHUA, 12-week-old sucertificates avail. so someper sweet black female. Per7’ artificial Christmas tree with one can pick their pet, call fect gift. $225. Madras all trimmings, free to a fam for details! Altered, shots, ID 541-475-2039 after 10 a.m. ily w/kids, who can’t afford chip, more. Low adoption to buy a tree. 541-382-3487. fees; we still have a lot due to Redmond shelter refusing Free bicycle, girls style, good all. 541-389-8420; 647-2181; cond. needs tires. Call 598-5488; www.craftcats.org 541-389-0808 Lab Pups AKC - 2 blacks, 6 Free Olympic weight set with chocolates, dew claws, 1st weights and bench. Call Chihuahua pups, Registered shots & wormed. Hunters. 541-389-0808 males, Long coats, apple $450-$500. 541-536-5385 heads. $300. 541-977-4454 Check out the www.welcomelabs.com sagetreeacres@yahoo.com classiieds online LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, www.bendbulletin.com FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is Updated daily grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips Ottoman, Fabric covered, used, & elbows. 541-771-2330 free, you haul, please call www.royalflushretrievers.com 541-312-3004. Labradoodles, Australian Chihuahuas, 2 purebred fem.,9 208 Imports - 541-504-2662 wks old, great Christmas gift! www.alpen-ridge.com $200/obo. 541-815-9728 Pets and Supplies DACHSHUNDS, AKC MINI Labrador pups AKC, chocolate, yellow, hips guaranteed, LONGHAIRED, Reds, Black & The Bulletin recommends $150-$450. 1-541-954-1727 tans, Creams. $300-$600. extra caution when 541-548-7514 Labrador purebred puppies, purchasing products or black, very cute, ready 12/26. services from out of the Dachshunds, AKC, mini’s, (5) fe$300-$400. 503-740-5312 area. Sending cash, checks, males,chocolate dapple, $375, or credit information may 541-420-6044, 541-447-3060 Maremma Guard Dog pups, be subjected to fraud. For purebred, great dogs, $300 English Springer Spaniels, AKC more information about an each, 541-546-6171. Reg, black/white, housebroke, advertiser, you may call the ready to go! 541-408-6322 PIT/LAB PUPPIES (5), ready to Oregon State Attorney www.kennykennels.com go now, 3 girls, 2 boys $50 General’s Office Consumer each. 541-848-0110. Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392. Pomeranian Puppies - Don’t wait, only a few left! Call 541-475-3496 and also visit: www.pom-a-rama.com

202

Want to Buy or Rent

AKC Bullmastiff puppies born 11-23-10. 916 856-9992 or kcarey@sacsheriff.com Aussies - Toys & Minis, will hold for Christmas, prices start $500, 541-548-6672 or www.cattlecalltoyaussies.com

Australian Cattle Dogs / Heelers Great temperament, herding instinct. 541-279-4133 Australian Shepherds, 2 litters, toy/mini, family raised, $450-$600. 541-475-1166

Border Collie 10-week pups (4) 2 females left, 1st shots, and wormed, $100 ea. 541-852-5753, Prineville.

French bulldog/pug mix puppies. 3 only; taking deposits. Great coat & markings. Loving personalities. Pick yours now for Christmas! $700. 541-548-0747; 541-279-3250 Frenchie Faux puppies, excellent! $750. Ready at 6 weeks on 12/31. 541-447-0210 German Shepherd Pups, A K C , White, absolutely gorgeous, born October 1st. $650 or best offer. Please call 541-536-6167.

German Shepherd pups ready by Christmas. $350 to $450. 541-410-7388

Pomeranian Puppies ready for Christmas! 11 wks, 1st shots, dew claws, Black female $300, Chocolate male $250. Call 541-749-8591 POODLES AKC Toy. Also Pom-a-Poos or Chi-Poos. B&W, colors. 541-325-6212

Poodles for Christmas (3) home raised, $150. (541) 408-7370 www.ludwiglanepoodles.com

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PUG PUPPIES, 6 weeks old, fawn, 2 males, $300 ea., 1 female, $350. 541-610-5133 or 541-416-0814.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

Electronic Adjustable Bed, twin size, wireless remote adjusts foot & head for max comfort. 3 yrs old with minimum use. $495. 541-504-0975

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

Queensland Heelers Standards & mini,$150 & up. 541-280-1537 http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com

Siamese Kittens (4) purebred, M/F, Seal & Lilac point, $125 ea. 541-318-3396

SIBERIAN HUSKY/Wolf pups, 6 wks. wormed & shots, $400 each. 541-610-3431.

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Special needs/senior cats seeking new homes! 3 'wobbly' cats, born w/neurological imbalance issues, otherwise healthy, social, okay w/litter box, etc., inside only & no stairs. Sweet 212 middle-aged cat w/limited vision in one eye, declawed, Antiques & inside only. Two nice deCollectibles clawed cats, inside only. Shy but sweet cat with no teeth, okay w/canned or small Antique Clocks: Refurbished for Sale. Come pick one out kibble dry food. Two senior for the Holidays. cats, very loving. Very nice 1627 NE 3rd, #5, Bend. cat who needs $15/mo. 541-678-8923. worth of asthma meds. Affectionate three legged cat, inside only. Gorgeous & sweet cat that has to have daily heart meds. Two young cats w/limited vision in one eye. Six shy older kittens that need a quiet home & socialCOWGIRL RESALE izing. See many of them at Gently Used Western Wear www.craftcats.org. Most Turquoise, Old Pawn would not be accepted or Squash Blossoms, Cuffs kept for long at a traditional 541-549-6950 shelter, but they are safe at CRAFT even if they stay for The Bulletin reserves the right the rest of their natural lives. to publish all ads from The We'd love to see them all Bulletin newspaper onto The have great new homes, Bulletin Internet website. though. Adoption fee reduced or waived for right home. If you have room in your heart & home for a very 215 special cat that has seen some hard times, please visit Coins & Stamps Cat Rescue, Adoption & Foster Team's sanctuary or call WANTED TO BUY 541-389-8420; 541-598-5488 US & Foreign Coin & Currency Also have many other cats & collections, accum. Pre-1964 kittens that just need loving silver coins, bars, rounds, forever homes. Open house/ sterling flatware. Gold coins, adoptions Thurs/Sat/Sun 1-4 bars, jewelry, scrap & dental PM, other days by appt. If gold. Diamonds, Rolex & you cannot adopt, please vintage watches. No collecsupport our work. We are all tion too large or small. Bedvolunteer & receive no gov’t rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 funds, so must rely on kind people to help us care for the 240 cats that have no one else Crafts and Hobbies looking out for them. CRAFT, P O Box 6441, Bend 97708. Alpaca Yarn, various colors/ Have a safe & warm holiday! blends/sparkle. 175yds/skein $7.50-8.50 ea. 541-385-4989 VIZSLA AKC Pups, ready 1/10. M/$600 F/$750. Deposits. 242 541-430-9335 (Roseburg)

210

Exercise Equipment

Furniture & Appliances !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty!

Nordic Trak elliptical with I-Fit adapt, used little, mint cond., $250 cash/you haul. Pro-Form treadmill, EKG/grip pulse, like new, $150 cash you haul. Buy both $350. Appliances, new & recondi541-306-6511 tioned, guaranteed. Over-

A-1 Washers & Dryers

$125 each. Full Warranty. Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s dead or alive. 541-280-7355.

stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s Maytag, 541-385-5418 Coffee Table,oak,w/3 matching end tables & lamps, exc. cond, $300, 541-504-7483

Couch, blue floral, contemporary style, 80” long, $200. 541-410-3959 Fridge, Kenmore, White, 26 cu. ft., side by side, ice/water indoor, 6 yrs. old, exc. cond., $400 OBO, 541-788-5516 Furniture

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809. Mattress Set, full size, clean, good condition, $100. 503-933-0814 (local call). Queen Mattress/Box Spring, exc. cond, used in guest room, $180, local, 503-933-0814

245

Golf Equipment Ladies newer beginner golf clubs and shoes size 8, $100. 541-617-5787.

246

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

Browning A-Bolt .338 Win Mag w/Boss & Nikon 3-9x40 scope, $780 cash. 541-306-6511

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

Bushmaster XM-15 Predator BUYING semi-auto .223 on bipod Lionel/American Flyer trains, w/Swift scope 6-18x44, 4 accessories. 541-408-2191. clips 30, 20, 10 & 5. $1000. 541-948-7280 Chainsaws, like new! Run excellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! CASH!! MS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Husqavarna 395XP, $595! Supplies. 541-408-6900. 281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, GUNS $295! 541-280-5006 Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. DO YOU HAVE M-1 Garand, $750. Remington SOMETHING TO SELL Model 725, .30-06, $700. Call FOR $500 OR LESS? 541-610-3732 Remington 1100 12 ga. Shotgun. Includes 2 stocks-wood and synthetic, 2 barrels, screw in chokes, case, great shape, $500. 541.390.5866 Rossi 12 gauge 3 inch magnum double barrel stagecoach gun. 20 inch barrels w/hammers. $275. 541-548-0675 Ruger Blackhawk, .357 Magnum. In perfect condition, just like new. Has alternate cylinder that allows you to shoot 9mm as well. Comes with leather holster & any .357 ammo I have. $399 obo. 541-420-0801 Smith & Wesson 14-2 .38 special revolver, 6” barrel $425. 541-647-8931 Smith & Wesson 9mm full metal, sub-compact semiauto, $425. 541-647-8931 Taurus Model 85, 38 special Revolver, blue, 2” barrel, exc cond, now $275. 541-389-9836 Wanted: Collector seeks high quality fishing items. Call 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 Winchester model 1906, 98% original cond., $600; Ruger P89--9mm as new in box, 2 clips holster shells $425, 541-447-8629, 541-419-4221

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TV, Stereo and Video Samsung 52” box big screen, 2006 excellent cond. Must sell, $400. 541-480-2652.

255

Computers THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

257

Musical Instruments Fender Acoustic, DG7, American made,hardshell case, exc cond, $175, 503-933-0814.

258

Travel/Tickets Disneyland (4) 6-day Park Hoppers. Regular $216 each; sell $195 each. 541-419-2753

260

Misc. Items

30-06 rifle, 30-32 rifle; also quality horse tack for sale; Cash only. 541-420-0021.

BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage Berretta 9mm 92F, $575. Glock watches, dental gold. Bill M-29 10mm $575. Mossberg Fleming, 541-382-9419. 12 ga, $300. 541-647-8931

BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, living in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can. The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter:

d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots * 50 TURKEYS & 80 pounds of HAM desperately needed for the annual Christmas Day Dinner, Saturday, Dec. 25.* Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069) Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Non-commercial advertisers can place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Dress, Semi-formal, size 12, Baby blue, satin lace, sequin jacket, $50, 541-382-7241. Ladies new designer leather boots, calf and knee length, $50 ea. 541-617-5787. Ladies newer leather coats, motorcycle red & black Med. Lg., $100 ea. 541-617-5787 Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808

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Snow Removal Equipment Snowblower 21” MTD, single stage electric start, works well. $100. 541-330-2342 SNOWBLOWER - Troy-bilt 24” self-propelled, never used, $500. 541-385-1217, lv msg.

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

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Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’ • Receipts should include, name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

Firewood ads MUST include species and cost per cord to better serve our customers. Thank you. All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

266

Heating and Stoves NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

Lodgepole CASH price: Rounds $119/cord; 2 cords/more $115 ea. Split, $149/cord; 2 cords/more, $145 ea. (Visa/ MC: $129/cord or Split $159 ea) Deliv avail. 541-771-8534

SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

HOLIDAY DEADLINES Wishes you a Safe and Merry Christmas The Bulletin will be closed on Friday, Christmas Eve and Saturday, Christmas Day

Retail & Classified Display Advertising Deadlines PUBLICATION ............................................. DEADLINE Friday 12/24 ..................................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Go! Magazine 12/24 .....................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Saturday 12/25 .............................................Tuesday 12/21 Noon Sunday 12/26 ..............................................Tuesday 12/21 4 p.m. Monday 12/27 ......................................... Wednesday 12/22 Noon At Home 12/28........................................ Wednesday 12/22 Noon Scene 1/1 .................................................. Thursday 12/23 8 a.m. Tuesday 12/28 ............................................ Thursday 12/23 Noon

CLASSIFIED LINE AD DEADLINES Friday 12/24 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/23 Saturday 12/25 - Deadline is Noon Thursday 12/23 Sunday 12/26 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/23 Monday 12/27 - Deadline is 2 p.m. Thursday 12/23

Classifieds • 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Circulation Telephone Service (at 541-385-5800) will be open 12/25 from 6:30 am to 10:30 am to help with your delivery needs.


G2 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

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PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 269

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Farm Market

300 400 308

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Lost and Found FOUND Camera on Awbrey Rd, 12/17. Call to identify. 541-385-8538. FOUND ½” hammer drill, intersection Hwy 20 & 126, Sisters, 12/17. 541-526-1462 FOUND remote control, Sirius satellite sys, Forum Shopping Center, 12/20. 541-480-2510 FOUND RING Call 541-420-7322 with exact description & area it was lost.

Employment

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

325

Hay, Grain and Feed Barn stored Alfalfa $9 per bale. 541-480-8185

Schools and Training TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

454

Looking for Employment Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

541-322-7253

Lost Dog: Male Border Collie mix, black, red collar, between Bend/Redmond on Hwy 97, 12/18, 541-604-4221

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

Wheat Straw: Certified & Bedding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

282

Sales Northwest Bend

NOTICE Remember to remove your Garage Sale signs (nails, staples, etc.) after your Sale event is over! THANKS! From The Bulletin and your local Utility Companies

www.bendbulletin.com

341

Horses and Equipment 200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

Prices Reduced: Quarterhorses, females $300, males & geldings $500, 541-382-7995

286

Sales Northeast Bend

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

TURN THE PAGE For More Ads

The Bulletin 292

Sales Other Areas DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

358

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

375

Meat & Animal Processing Angus Beef, 1/2 or whole, grain fed, no hormones $3.44/lb., hanging weight, cut & wrap included, please call 541-383-2523.

Finance and Sales Manager

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809.

ATTENTION: Recruiters and Businesses -

Toyota-Scion of Bend looking for capable and qualified applicants. must have auto experience. Application and resumes accepted in person only. Must pass drug test, good driving record, and be insurable. Apply in person @ Toyota of Bend, (Ask for Casey Cooper) 2225 NE Hwy. 20, Bend.

VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

Glazier -- Residential: Must have 5 years experience & clean driving record, Shower doors & mirrors a plus. Pay DOE. Call 541-382-2500.

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

Independent Contractor

Employment Opportunities CAUTION

Operate Your Own B usiness

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni Classified Dept. The Bulletin

Call Today &

&

For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

CAUTION

476

541-383-0386 SUTERRA is hiring! Chemical Systems Operators for new facility. $17/hour w/ built in OT, 38K first year. To apply go to http://www.suterra.com or fax resume to 310-966-8310

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Finance & Business

500 507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

528

Loans and Mortgages Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

The Bulletin is your Employment Marketplace Call

541-385-5809 to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200. Earn 8-10% interest on well-secured first trust deeds. Private party. 541-815-2986

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

541-617-7825

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Farmers Column

476

Employment Opportunities

H Supplement Your Income H

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

476

Employment Opportunities

421

LOST Bifocals w/gold chain, Cascade Village Shopping Ctr, 12/14? 541-317-1942

Lost: Full set of keys,w/car fob, Bi-Mart tag, Subaru key, near Costco, 12/13, 541-388-2408 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. VolLost Kodak camera on Dec. ume discounts; delivery 14th at Cascade Middle available. 541-480-8648. School gym. 541-480-3122.

476

Employment Opportunities

Check out OCANs online at classifieds.oregon.com!

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

Oregon Classified Advertising Network

YOUR AD WILL RECEIVE CLOSE TO 2,000,000 EXPOSURES FOR ONLY $250! Oregon Classified Advertising Network is a service of the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association.

Week of December 20, 2010

Employment DRIVER - SINGLE source dispatch. Lots of freight. Daily or weekly pay. Flexible schedules. Newer equipment. Van and refrigerated. CDL-A, 6 months recent experience. 800-414-9569. www.driveknight.com DRIVERS NEEDED western US! We pay for experience. Out 7-10 days max. HazMat and one-year OTR required! 888-459-3008. www.andrustrans.com Manufactured Homes BRAND NEW Marlette triple-wide. 3 Bedroom/2 Bath. Lots of Windows. Gorgeous Home. $64,900 Including Set-up. Only One At This Price!! Won’t Last-Call Today. 541-9281471. jandmhomes.com

541-385-5809


THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 G3

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 650

Real Estate For Sale

Houses for Rent NE Bend

700

NOTICE:

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

Rentals

600

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend ** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495

Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. 604

Storage Rentals Secure 10x20 Storage, in SE Bend, insulated, 24-hr access, $95/month, Call Rob, 541-410-4255.

(541) 383-3152 Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

605

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

Roommate Wanted

541-385-5809

Share House in DRW, $400/mo incl. utils, $200 dep., 541-420-5546.

636

627

Vacation Rentals and Exchanges Costa Rica Home Swap Former Oregonian’s son will be married in Bend 7/29/11. 2 bdrm 2 full bath home in Atenas. “El Mejor Clima del Mundo.” Please email: wagspuravida@yahoo.com

Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General FIRST MONTH HALF-OFF! 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT THROUGHOUT! W/D included. No smoking. No Pets. 1yr. lease. $795/mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth. 541-382-3813 The Bulletin is now offering a MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home or apt. to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

634

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 & 2 bdrms Available starting at $575. Reserve Now! Limited Availability.

Alpine Meadows 541-330-0719

Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet complex, park-like setting, covered parking, w/d hookups, near St. Charles. $550$595/mo. 541-385-6928.

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit Chaparral & Rimrock Apartments Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY Chaparral, 541-923-5008 www.redmondrents.com

Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 bath, fully furnished Condo, $695, $400 dep, near downtown & college, completely renovated, 2 Verandas, no pets/smoking, avail. now, all amenities and W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable incl., 541-279-0590 or cheritowery@yahoo.com

managed by

Fully furnished loft apt. DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm

River & Mountain Views! 930 NW Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. 541-280-7188.

640

2 bath, garage w/opener. 1300 sq ft, w/d hkup, fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. $700 mo + dep. 541-604-0338

648

Houses for Rent General

Bulletin is now offering a Apt./Multiplex SW Bend The LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133 541-420-0133

642

Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

650

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Apt./Multiplex Redmond 3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appl., incl. gardener, reduced to $749/mo. 541-408-0877. ASK ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com

$1000 Mo. Newer immaculate 3/2.5, 1560 sq.ft., dbl. garage 1st & last, pet neg. 19827 Powers Road. 503-363-9264,503-569-3518

658

Houses for Rent Redmond 1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 135 NW 10th St., $650, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM.

97, fresh interior paint, new Pergo, fully fenced. 1st & dep., $850. 503-997-7870.

4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family room, w/woodstove, new carpet/paint, single garage w/opener. $795/mo. 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Spacious 3 bdrm., 2 bath + bonus, single story, large fenced yard, dbl. garage, $950/mo. + $500 dep. 2120 NW 11th St. 541-771-6599

659

Houses for Rent Sunriver A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803.

671

GSL Properties

on Wall Street in Bend. All utilities paid and parking. Call 541-389-2389 for appt.

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

Call about Our Specials! Studios to 3 bedroom units from $395 to $550 • Lots of amenities. • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid THE BLUFFS APTS. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond 541-548-8735

Condo / Townhomes For Rent

656

Bdrm., 2 bath, dbl. garage, Apt./Multiplex Redmond 3 Summerfield location, near

Apt./Multiplex NW Bend

631

A Westside Condo at Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G paid. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803

642

All real estate advertised here in is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of this law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. The Bulletin Classified

bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $975/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330.

Clean 3 Bdrm 2 Bath, new paint/carpet, 1262 sq ft, $900/mo. Near hosp; must see! No pets/smoking. 3023 NE Byers Ct. 541-410-0794 Large 2 bdrm, 1 bath, large fenced backyard in nice neighborhood, $650 mo. + deposit. Call Heidi at 541-480-6679.

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

687

Commercial for Rent/Lease 4628 SW 21st St., Redmond - 2250 sq ft office & warehouse. 15¢/sq ft for 1st 6 mos., + $300 cleaning dep. Avail Jan 15. 541-480-9041

Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locations, office w/bath from $400/mo. 541-317-8717

Office / Warehouse space • 1792 sq ft

705

Real Estate Services * Real Estate Agents * * Appraisers * * Home Inspectors * Etc. The Real Estate Services classification is the perfect place to reach prospective B U Y E R S AND SELLERS of real estate in Central Oregon. To place an ad call 385-5809

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting

The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental rate! If you have a home to rent, call a Bulletin Classified Rep. to get the new rates and get your ad started ASAP! 541-385-5809

NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Snow Removal

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Holiday Lighting Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery

Find It in

EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential

The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Debris Removal l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Excavating

Home Improvement

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Kelly Kerfoot Construction: 28 years exp. in Central OR, Quality & Honesty, from carpentry & handyman jobs, to quality wall covering installations & removal. Senior discounts, licenced, bonded, insured, CCB#47120 Call 541-389-1413 or 541-410-2422

860

rear end, new tires, runs excellent, $1800 OBO, 541-932-4919.

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012. Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

875

Watercraft

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930. Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

To place your Bulletin ad with a photo, visit www.bendbulletin.com, click on “Place an ad” and follow these easy steps:

Masonry

1.

Pick a category (for example - pets or transportation) and choose your ad package.

2.

Write your ad and upload your digital photo.

3.

Create your account with any major credit card.

MASONRY

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/410-6945

MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

(Private Party ads only)

Homes with Acreage

POLARIS PHOENIX 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new

Now you can add a full-color photo to your Bulletin classified ad starting at only $15.00 per week, when you order your ad online.

Chad L. Elliott Construction

541-390-1466

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days

762

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

Downtown Redmond Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. $650/mo + utils; $650 security deposit. 425 SW Sixth St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Painting, Wall Covering

Same Day Response

865

ATVs

An Office with bath, various sizes and locations from $250 per month, including utilities. 541-317-8717

Free Estimates Senior Discounts

JUNK BE GONE

850

Snowmobiles

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

693

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license.

More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

800

Motorcycle Trailer

Kendon stand-up motorcycle trailer, torsion bar suspension, easy load and unload, used seldom and only locally. $1700 OBO. Call 541-306-3010.

Ofice/Retail Space for Rent

I DO THAT!

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595

Boats & RV’s

Show Your Stuff.

Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep Paula, 541-678-1404

Handyman Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. Help w/pre-holiday projects. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

870

Boats & Accessories

541-385-5809

All ads appear in both print and online. Please allow 24 hours for photo processing before your ad appears in print and online.

Snow Removal d SNOW REMOVAL! d d LARGE OR SMALL, d WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

S0305 5X10 kk

Barns

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Motorcycles And Accessories YAMAHA 1998 230CC moBeautiful Prineville home, wood tor, 4WD, used as utility and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, 745 vehicle. excellent running 2.5 bath, master on main HARLEY Davidson Homes for Sale condition. $2000 OBO. level, bonus room, office, Fat Boy LO 2010, 541-923-4161 6.87 acres, conveniently loPUBLISHER'S Health forces sale, 1900 541-788-3896 cated between town & lake, NOTICE mi., 1K mi. service done, $415,000. 541-771-3093 All real estate advertising in black on black, detachable Call The Bulletin At this newspaper is subject to windshield, back rest & lugFind exactly what the Fair Housing Act which 541-385-5809. gage rack, $13,900, Mario, makes it illegal to advertise you are looking for in the 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707 Place Your Ad Or E-Mail "any preference, limitation or At: www.bendbulletin.com CLASSIFIEDS discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, marital status Sisters, turnkey horse setup, 4 acres, great barn, 3 pastures, or national origin, or an inupdated house, 2 bdrm, 2 bath, tention to make any such pond,irrigation, RV pad w/hook Yamaha 350 Big Bear preference, limitation or disHarley Davidson Heritage Soft ups, $575,000, 541-549-9945. 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks crimination." Familial status Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras includes children under the front & rear, strong machine, 764 incl. pipes, lowering kit, age of 18 living with parents excellent condition. $2,200 chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. or legal custodians, pregnant Farms and Ranches 541-382-4115,541-280-7024 541-944-9753 women, and people securing custody of children under 18. 35 Acre irrigated, hay & cattle This newspaper will not farm, close to Prineville, 76 knowingly accept any adveryear old widower will sacritising for real estate which is fice for $395,000, Harley Davidson Police Bike in violation of the law. Our 541-410-3425 2001, low mi., custom bike readers are hereby informed very nice.Stage 1, new tires Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very 771 that all dwellings advertised & brakes, too much to list! low hrs., exc. cond., reduced in this newspaper are availLots A Must See Bike $10,500 to $3000, also boots, helmet, able on an equal opportunity OBO. 541-383-1782 tires, avail., 541-410-0429 basis. To complain of dis$139,000 crimination call HUD toll-free 2 acres 870 at 1-800-877-0246. The toll MLS#201006299 Harley Davidson free telephone number for D & D REALTY GROUP, LLC Boats & Accessories Screamin’ Eagle the hearing impaired is Redmond 541-923-8664 Electric-Glide 2005, 1-800-927-9275. Madras 541-475-3030 103” motor, 2-tone, candy 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 *** teal, 18,000 miles, exc. Christmas Valley! Relaxing, XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, CHECK YOUR AD cond. $19,999 OBO, please tranquil, affordable getaway. mint condition, includes ski Please check your ad on the call 541-480-8080. Away from the hustle & tower w/2 racks - everyfirst day it runs to make sure bustle of city life. Located thing we have, ski jackets it is correct. Sometimes inclose to town, yet far enough adult and kids several, wastructions over the phone are to enjoy the starry skies. Enter skis, wakeboard, gloves, misunderstood and an error joy 1 acre of 360° views in an ropes and many other can occur in your ad. If this area of great hunting, duck boating items. $11,300 Harley Davidson Ultra happens to your ad, please hunting, fishing, golfing, rock OBO . 541-417-0829 Classic 2008, clean, lots contact us the first day your hounding, camping, bird of upgrades, custom exhaust, ad appears and we will be watching or riding quads on Need help ixing stuff dual control heated gloves & happy to fix it as soon as we the sand dunes. Great proparound the house? vest, luggage access. 15K, can. Deadlines are: Weekerty for weekend RVing or Call A Service Professional $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975. days 12:00 noon for next build your getaway! $6,000. and ind the help you need. day, Sat. 11:00 a.m. for SunMLS#2902491 www.bendbulletin.com day; Sat. 12:00 for Monday. Nancy Popp, If we can assist you, please Principal Broker 19’ Blue Water Execucall us: 541-815-8000 tive Overnighter 1988, Crooked River Realty 385-5809 very low hours, been in dry The Bulletin Classified Premier Crooked River Ranch storage for 12 years, new *** Honda Shadow Deluxe rim property. Sit on the camper top, 185HP I/O American Classic Edition. porch swing as you take-in Merc engine, all new tires 2002, black, perfect, gaawesome view from Smith on trailer, $7995 OBO, raged, 5,200 mi. $3495. Rock, down the Crooked 541-447-8664. 541-610-5799. River Canyon, in both directions, ending at a picturepThe Bulletin erfect portrait of Mt. Hood Have an item to To Subscribe call and Mt. Jefferson. Across the sell quick? If it’s 541-385-5800 or go to canyon view miles of Culver Ag lands. This 1.69 acre www.bendbulletin.com under $500 you property boasts a newer home of modest size with can place it in OWNER TERMS lots of room to add accesShort sale or foreclosure does sory bldgs. The perfect vacaThe Bulletin not need to keep you from tion home, comes fully furClassii eds for owning your own home. nished $199,900. Easy terms on this 3 Bdrm MLS#201009485 $ 10 3 lines, 7 days 2.5 bath home. Drive by at Nancy Popp, KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like 3626 SW Volcano, Redmond Principal Broker new cond, low miles, street $16 - 3 lines, 14 days and then call to see: 541-815-8000 legal, hvy duty receiver hitch (Private Party ads only) 541-815-2986 Crooked River Realty basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

750

Redmond Homes

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G4 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 Autos & Transportation

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent 880

881

882

Motorhomes

Travel Trailers

Fifth Wheels

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

MONTANA 2000 36’ 3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

885

real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd., 1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718 Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $40,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126.

Chevy Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Wagon

1957,

4-dr., complete, $15,000 OBO, trades, please call 541-420-5453.

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962 FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $2950. 541-548-3628

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227.

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The Bulletin

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833

Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425.

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

Audi will make your first payment on select models. Exceptional values are yours for a limited time during the Season of Audi.

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

485*/Mo.

$

2011 Audi A4 quattro 2.0T Sedan

36-Month Lease

ZERO due at lease inception. Excludes taxes, title, other options and dealer charges.

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories

nets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue,

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

Canopies and Campers

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabi-

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2

932

Antique and Classic Autos

90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277 Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and so much more. Priced to sell at $59,500! 541-317-9185

Fifth Wheels

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417.

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP,

882 Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Aircraft, Parts and Service

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Grumman AA-5 Traveler, 1/4 interest, beautiful, clean plane, $9500, 619-822-8036 www.carymathis.blogspot.com

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188. Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

908

932

Antique and Classic Autos

and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437. Dodge Brougham Motorhome, 1977, Needs TLC, $1995, Pilgrim Camper 1981, Self contained, Cab-over, needs TLC, $595, 541-382-2335 or 503-585-3240.

900

932

Antique and Classic Autos

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

Fleetwood Elkhorn 9.5’ 1999,

1.9%* APR

4 Michelin Studless ice & snow, used 1 season, 225/60/R16, $175 cash. 541-318-8668

extended overhead cab, stereo, self-contained,outdoor shower, Ford F-150/Expedition 2wd TV, 2nd owner, exc. cond., non 96-03, Four-16" OEM steel smoker, $8900 541-815-1523. wheels, $120. (541)383-2429

932

Antique and Classic Autos When ONLY the BEST will do! 2003 Lance 1030 Deluxe Model Camper, loaded, phenomenal condition. $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

Financing as low as

C-10

Pickup

1969,

152K mi. on chassis, 4 spd. transmission, 250 6 cyl. engine w/60K, new brakes & master cylinder, $2500. Please call 503-551-7406 or 541-367-0800.

2011 Audi Q5 Models

Carrera Audi 1045 SE Third Street Bend, OR 97702 541-382-1711 carreraaudi.com

Audi will make the first months payment up to $1,000 Must be financed thru Audi Financial Services. Offer ends Jan 5th, 2010. Lease and premier purchases are not eligible for this offer.

†Audi of America, Inc. defines the A4 competitive class as automatic transmission versions of the 2010 Audi A4 2.0T, and the 2010 BMW 328i, Mercedes-Benz C300 and Lexus IS 250. “Fuel-efficiency” and “best in class highway mpg” based on EPA highway fuel economy estimates for each model; 30 highway mpg for A4 2.0T automatic. Your mileage may vary. *Rate based on MSRP $36,940 of 2011 A4 and destination charge. Monthly payments total $17,469.36. Purchase option at lease end for $21,055.80. 36-month closed-end lease offered to qualified customers in [state(s) or market(s) here] by Audi Financial Services through participating dealers. Must take delivery by 12/31/2010. Lessee responsible for $0.25/mile over 10,000 miles per year, insurance, a disposition fee of $350 and other financial liabilities at lease end. Advertised offer requires dealer contribution. Model shown: . Higher MSRP will affect lease price. Prices exclude taxes, title, other options and dealer charges. ©2010 Audi of America, Inc. See your dealer, visit audiusa.com or call 1-800-FOR-AUDI for more details. †Audi of America, Inc. defines the A4 competitive class as automatic transmission versions of the 2010 Audi A4 2.0T, and the 2010 BMW 328i, Mercedes-Benz C300 and Lexus IS 250. “Fuel-efficiency” and “best in class highway mpg” based on EPA highway fuel economy estimates for each model; 30 highway mpg for A4 2.0T automatic. Your mileage may vary. *1.9% APR financing available on select new 2011 Audi A4 models through Audi Financial Services to qualified buyers through Dec. 31, 2010. Model shown: A4. Prices exclude taxes, title, other options and dealer charges. ©2010 Audi of America, Inc. See your dealer, visit audiusa.com or call 1-800-FOR-AUDI for more details.

Free Classified Ads! No Charge For Any Item Under

$

00

200

1 Item*/ 3 Lines*/ 3 Days* - FREE! and your ad appears in PRINT and ON-LINE at bendbulletin.com

CALL 541-385-5809 FOR YOUR FREE CLASSIFIED AD *Excludes all service, hay, wood, pets/animals, plants, tickets, weapons, rentals and employment advertising, and all commercial accounts. Must be an individual item under $200.00 and price of individual item must be included in the ad. Ask your Bulletin Sales Representative about special pricing, longer run schedules and additional features. Limit 1 ad per item per 30 days.

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Or visit The Bulletin office at: 1777 SW Chandler Ave.


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

THE BULLETIN • Thursday, December 23, 2010 G5

932

935

975

975

975

975

Antique and Classic Autos

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow package, Good condition, $1200 OBO, 541-815-9939.

garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

Infinity QX4 1998, luxury SUV 4WD, loaded, leather, 80K miles, $7500. CORRECTED PHONE # = 541-815-4052 Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3750 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4000 OBO, 541-548-7396 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $17,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $14,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081. Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Mazda 3, 2005 5-door, dark bronze, 47,500 mi, fully loaded, very good cond, $11,950. Kent, 541-923-6723

Call 541-385-5809 The Bulletin Classifieds

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

975

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $13,995 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150.

Mercedes S430-4Matic, 2003 AWD, silver, loaded & pampered. Excellent in snow! $16,395. 541-390-3596

Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

The Bulletin To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

Pontiac Firebird 1998, exc cond, no wrecks. T-top, V6, loaded, 22/29 mpg (reg gas). $4995. 541-475-3984

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

$3,495

541-923-8627

PORSCHE CARRERA 4S 2003 - Wide body, 6 Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles,

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD

speed, 63,000 miles, all wheel drive, no adverse history, new tires. Seal gray with light gray leather interior. $32,950. 503-351-3976

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

Any 2011 VW starts with a pen.

Ford Diesel 2003 16 Passenger Bus, with wheelchair lift. $4,000 Call Linda at Grant Co. Transportation, John Day 541-575-2370

Automobiles

2011 Tiguan

All-new 2011 Jetta

$

0down 0 $

(excluding title, taxes, options and dealer fees) Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

940

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS

Dodge Ram 2001, short

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Vans 1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

convertible, 2 door, Navy with black soft top, tan interior, very good condition. $5200 firm. 541-317-2929.

SUBARUS!!!

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Pickups

Saab 9-3 SE 1999

Call Classifieds! 541-385-5809. www.bendbulletin.com

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

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Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

If you have a service to offer, we have a special advertising rate for you. CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

VW Super Beetle 1974

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

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Example: 2011 Tiguan for $327 per month/36 month lease.

GMC Sierra Crew Cab SLT 2005, loaded, detailed & in great cond. Matching shell & sprayed bed liner& mat, just over 100k. Asking $15,800, 541-280-7068

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

Audi A4 Avant Quattro 2003 3.0L., 92K mi, garaged, serviced, silver, fully loaded, $9300. 541-420-9478

2011 Tiguan S-Model lease for $327 per mon./36 mos. ZERO due at signing. Offer ends 12/31/2010

BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

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Sport Utility Vehicles CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838.

Chrysler 2005 Pacifica AWD, leather, video sys, 3.5 liter V6, loaded, 21,500 mi, $13,950. 541-382-3666

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Buick LeSabre 2004, custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $6000; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Buick LeSabre Cstm 1996. Go Red, like new, only 68k, seats anywhere in snow, great gas 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 mi. 44K on eng. Comfortable, Look: www.SeeThisRig.com reliable! $1599. 916-690-1529

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LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES

LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department

SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF MONTY K. FISHER; MARILYN K. PAUSTIAN; MATTHEW K. FISHER; OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES; and Occupants of the Premises, Defendants.

In the Matter of the Estate of: LOUISE A. GERLACH, Deceased.

1. TO THE DEFENDANTS: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF MONTY K. FISHER; MARILYN K. PAUSTIAN; MATTHEW K. FISHER; AND OCCUPANTS OF THE PREMISES: 2. In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is December 2, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, Plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the Plaintiff requests that the Plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: LOT 4 IN BLOCK 10 OF OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT I, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 16738 Casper Dr., Bend, Oregon 97707. 3. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by Suntrust Mortgage, Inc., its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. 4. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. 5. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. 6. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By /s/Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th St., Ste. 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com

Case No. 10-PB-0130-ST NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, Gerald L. Gerlach, has been appointed as Personal Representative of the estate of Louise A. Gerlach. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the Personal Representative in care of Stephen D. Dixon at Merrill, O'Sullivan, LLP, 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5, Bend, OR 97702, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or they may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the attorney for the Personal Representative at the address shown below. Dated and first published December 16, 2010. Gerald L. Gerlach Personal Representative PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Gerald L. Gerlach 5188 P Street Washougal, WA 98671 Phone: (503) 318-1201 ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: Stephen D. Dixon, OSB #73078 Merrill O’Sullivan, LLP 805 SW Industrial Way, Suite 5 Bend, OR 97702 Phone: (541) 389-1770 Fax: (541) 389-1777 Email: steve@merrill-osullivan.com LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE’S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0191345289 T.S. No.: 10-10486-6 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, MOLLY J. KERCHER AND ARAM R. BOYD, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE OF OREGON. INC., AN OREGON CORPORATION, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, recorded on September 3, 2003, as Instrument No. 2003-60769 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 183656 LOT THIRTY-SIX (36) OF TIMBERLINE. CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3057 NORTHEAST LARAMIE WAY, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; together with other fees and expenses incurred by the Beneficiary; Monthly Payment $1,110.67 Monthly Late Charge $44.43 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 134,046.81 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.50000 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges

thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 24, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 22, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enriquez ASAP# 3825776 12/02/2010, 12/09/2010, 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705etseq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, etseq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-103586

Audi A4 3.0L 2002, Sport Pkg., Quattro, front & side air bags, leather, 92K, Reduced! $11,700. 541-350-1565

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227

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due at signing

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686 Ford Ranger 2004 Super Cab, XLT, 4X4, V6, 5-spd, A/C bed liner, tow pkg, 120K Like New! KBB Retail: $10,000 OBO 360-990-3223

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1045 SE Third Street Bend carreravw.com 541.382.1711

For all lease offers: Lessee responsible for damage, excess wear and insurance. Exclude taxes, title, options and dealer fees. On approved credit through primary lender. Supplies limited. Photos for illustration only. 2011 VW Tiguan with automatic transmission, MSRP $27,360. Monthly payments total $11,78244. Dealer contribution of $500. Purchase option at lease end $16,142.40. $.25/mile over 10,000 miles. Lessee responsible for a disposition fee of $350. © Volkswagen of American, Inc.

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, MICHAEL M. LINDNER AND JANICE M. LINDNER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INS, CO, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR U.S. FINANCIAL FUNDING INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/22/2007. recorded 7/16/2007, under Instrument No. 2007-38986, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the IndyMac INDX Mortgage Trust 2007-FLX6, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2007-FLX6 under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated July 1, 2007. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 3 OF RIVER CANYON ESTATES, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19696 HOLLYGRAPE STREET BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from September 01, 2009 16 payments at $ 1,642.94 each $ 26,287.04 (09-01-09 through 12-02-10) Late Charges: $ 985.80 Beneficiary Advances: $ 5,189.20 Suspense Credit: $ -1,114.12 TOTAL: $ 31,347.92 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $459,113.10, PLUS interest thereon at 7.375% per annum from 8/1/2009, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET. BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com ASAP# 3836080 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011


G6 Thursday, December 23, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx3348 T.S. No.: 1307566-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Donna Sue Freeborn, as Grantor to Western Title & Escrow Co., as Trustee, in favor of Accubanc Mortgage A Division of National City Bank Of Indiana A National Banking Association, as Beneficiary, dated October 21, 2005, recorded October 26, 2005, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2005-73187 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: A tract of land located in the Southeast One-quarter (SE1/4) of Section Twenty-seven (27), Township Fourteen (14) South, Range Thirteen (13), East of the Willamette Meridian, Deschutes County, Oregon, being more particularly described as follows: Commencing at the South One-quarter corner or said Section 27; thence North 00°05'34" East 47,00 feet; thence South 89°53'53" East 301.91 feet to the true point of beginning for said tract; thence North 24°32'21" West 143.55 feet; thence along an arc of a 175.00 foot radius curve to the right 132.27 feet, the chord of which bears North 22°51'15" West,. 129.14 feet; thence North 18°45'56 East 172,07 feet; thence along an arc of a 100.00 foot radius curve to the left 24.25 feet, the chord of which bears North 11°49'01" East, 24.20 feet; thence North 04°52'07 East 82.30 feet; thence East 388.46 feet; thence South 07°53'30" East 534.14 feet; thence North 89°53'53" West 462.93 feet to the true point of beginning. Commonly known as: 1085 NE Oneil Way Redmond OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed nd notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the monthly payment due April 1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $2,428.16 Monthly Late Charge $121.36. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $363,193.98 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from March 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or

his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 22, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/By: Tammy Laird R-357314 12/23/10, 12/30, 01/06, 01/13 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: xxxxxx8397 T.S. No.: 1306040-09. Reference is made to that certain deed made by Paul B. Heatherman and Patricia Heatherman Husband And Wife, as Grantor to First American Title, as Trustee, in favor of National City Mortgage A Division of National City Bank, as Beneficiary, dated December 14, 2007, recorded December 19, 2007, in official records of Deschutes, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. xx at page No. xx, fee/file/Instrument/microfilm/reception No. 2007-64833 covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: UNIT 15 IN RUSTY HILLS CONDOMINIUMS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, AS DESCRIBED IN THAT CERTAIN DECLARATION OF UNIT OWNERSHIP RECORDED JULY 01, 1980 IN BOOK 324, PAGE 39, DEED RECORDS AND RERECORDED JULY 23, 1981 IN HOOK 344, PAGE 845, DEED RECORDS, APPERTAINING TO A TRACT OF LAND SITUATED IN LOTS 6-11, BLOCK 7, REPLAT OF BLOCKS 6 AND 7, RIVERSIDE ADDITION AS DESCRIBED IN DECLARATION WHICH DECLARATION IS INCORPORATED HEREIN BY REFERENCE AND MADE A PART HEREOF AS IF FULLY SLIT FORTH HEREIN, TOGETHER WITH A PERCENTAGE OF THE COMMON ELEMENTS AS SET FORTH IN SAID DECLARATION APPERTAINING TO SAID UNIT, AND ALSO TOGETHER WITH THE COMMON AREAS AS SET FORTH ON THE PLAT OF Rusty HILLS CONDOMINIUMS. Commonly known as: 2163 NW Hill St. Bend OR 97701. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Failure to pay the onthly payment due august

1, 2010 of principal and interest and subsequent installments due thereafter; plus late charges; together with all subsequent sums advanced by beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of said deed of trust. Monthly payment $975.34 Monthly Late Charge $38.43. By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said Deed of Trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit; The sum of $117,390.10 together with interest thereon at 6.500% per annum from July 01, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advance by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms and conditions of the said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation the undersigned trustee will on April 04, 2011 at the hour of 1:00pm, Standard of Time, as established by Section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statutes, At the Bond Street entrance to Deschutes County Courthouse 1164 NW Bond, City of Bend, County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expense of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" includes their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 22, 2010. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation 525 East Main Street P.O. Box 22004 El Cajon CA 92022-9004 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation Signature/ By: Tammy Laird R-357320 12/23/10, 12/30, 01/06, 01/13

which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 200883 LOT FORTY-NINE, VILLAGE, PHASE III, CITY OF REND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1254 NORTHEAST DAWSON DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 07/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BECOME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $1,906.53 Monthly Late Charge $60.02 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately clue and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $233,394.92 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 06-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 03-21-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest m the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale. including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs,

trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated; November 09, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Sophia Ochoa, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3821732 12/02/2010, 12/09/2010, 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0174641274 T.S. No.: 10-11729-6 Reference is made to that certain deed made by, KIMBERLY A. WILLIAMS as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on February 20, 2008, as Instrument No. 2008-07629 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 254517 LOT TWENTY, CARLY MEADOWS, PHASE 1, CITY OF REDMOND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON, Commonly known as: 3179 SW PERIDOT AVENUE, REDMOND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735{3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,257.50 Monthly Late Charge $50.97 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 174,156.36 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.50000 % per annum from April 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the

beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on April 1, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, OR. County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: December 2, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enriquez ASAP# 3837657 12/09/2010, 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: T10-69921-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, ROB J. ALDRIDGE as Grantor to PACIFIC NORTHWEST TITLE, AN OREGON CORPORATION, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 01-10-2006, recorded 01-18-2006, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-03412 (indicated

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S.No.:T10-69902-OR Reference is made to that certain deed made by, JOHN P. HORTON AND CAROLYN L. HORTON, AS TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY as Grantor to DESCHUTES COUNTY TITLE COMPANY, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" IS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as Beneficiary, dated 03-23-2007, recorded 04-02-2007, in official records of DESCHUTES County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/rruerofile/reeeption No. 2007-19192 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 200856 LOT EIGHT, RIDGE AT EAGLE CREST 33, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 1612 EAGLE SPRINGS COURT REDMOND, OR 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: INSTALLMENT OF PRINCIPAL AND INTEREST PLUS IMPOUNDS AND / OR ADVANCES WHICH BECAME DUE ON 02/01/2010 PLUS LATE CHARGES, AND ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, BALLOON PAYMENTS, PLUS IMPOUNDS AND/OR ADVANCES AND LATE CHARGES THAT BE-

COME PAYABLE. Monthly Payment $3,898.94 Monthly Late Charge $194.94 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $719,804.80 together with interest thereon at she rate of 6.5% per annum from 01-01-2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on 03-21-2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at FRONT ENTRANCE OF THE COURTHOUSE, 1164 N.W. BOND STREET, BEND, OR 97701 County of DESCHUTES, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the

foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. For sales information, please contact AGENCY SALES AND POSTING at WWW.FIDELITYASAP.COM or 714-730-2727 Dated: November 09, 2010 FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY AS TRUSTEE C/O CR TITLE SERVICES INC. P.O. Box 16128 Tucson, AZ 85732-6128 PHONE NUMBER 866-702-9658 ? REINSTATEMENT LINE 866-272-4749 Sophia Ochoa, Asst. Sec. ASAP# 3821722 12/02/2010, 12/09/2010, 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

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LEGAL NOTICE OREGON TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No: F516907 OR Unit Code: F Loan No: 0999432032/HANSON Investor No: 174357078 AP #1: 151002 D0 01000 Title #: 100572519 Reference is made to that certain Trust Deed made by THURLOW E. HANSON, LENA V. KOUZNETSOVA as Grantor, to WELLS FARGO FINANCIAL NATIONAL BANK as Trustee, in favor of WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. as Beneficiary. Dated December 20, 2005, Recorded January 18, 2006 as Instr. No. 2006-03335 in Book --- Page --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of DESCHUTES County; OREGON covering the following described real property situated in said county and state, to wit: LOT 2 OF BLOCK 2 IN BITTERBRUSH SUBDIVISION, CITY OF SISTERS, COUNTY OF DESCHUTES, IN THE STATE OF OR. AS RECORDED IN MB168 PG436 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said Trust Deed and a Notice of Default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is Grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: 8 PYMTS FROM 02/15/10 TO 09/15/10 @ 373.14 $2,985.12 Sub-Total of Amounts in Arrears:$2,985.12 Together with any default in the payment of recurring obligations as they become due. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and Trust Deed, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. The street or other common designation if any, of the real property described above is purported to be : 16639 BITTERBRUSH LN, SISTERS, OR 97759 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street or other common designation. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said Trust Deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to wit: Principal $103,618.81, together with interest as provided in the note or other instrument secured from 01/15/10, and such other costs and fees are due under the note or other instrument secured, and as are provided by statute. WHEREFORE, notice is hereby given that the undersigned trustee will, on January 31, 2011, at the hour of 10:00 A.M. in accord with the Standard Time, as established by ORS 187.110, INSIDE THE MAIN LOBBY OF THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND, BEND , County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, (which is the new date, time and place set for said sale) sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the Grantor had or had power to convey at the time of execution by him of the said Trust Deed, together with any interest which the Grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said Trust Deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in O.R.S.86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the Trust Deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation of the Trust Deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and Trust Deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. It will be necessary for you to contact the undersigned prior to the time you tender reinstatement or payoff so that you may be advised of the exact amount, including trustee's costs and fees, that you will be required to pay. Payment must be in the full amount in the form of cashier's or certified check. The effect of the sale will be to deprive you and all those who hold by, through and under you of all interest in the property described above. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said Trust Deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. We are assisting the Beneficiary to collect a debt and any information we obtain will be used for that purpose whether received orally or in writing. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If available, the expected opening bid and/or postponement information may be obtained by calling the following telephone number(s) on the day before the sale: (714) 480-5690 or you may access sales information at www.tacforeclosures.com/sales DATED: 09/22/10 CHRISTOPHER C. DORR,LLC, OSBA # 992526 By CHRISTOPHER C. DORR, ATTORNEY AT LAW DIRECT INQUIRIES TO: T.D. SERVICE COMPANY FORECLOSURE DEPARTMENT 1820 E. FIRST ST., SUITE 210 P.O. BOX 11988 SANTA ANA, CA 92711-1988 (800) 843-0260 TAC# 922349 PUB: 12/16/10, 12/23/10, 12/30/10, 01/06/11

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LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-1 03590

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-OC-102412

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-FMB-103292

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, RICHARD MURCHIE, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR USA DIRECT FUNDING, as beneficiary, dated 2/7/2008, recorded 2/15/2008, under Instrument No. 2008- 06927, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by OneWest Bank, FSB. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT TWELVE (12), CLIFFS, RECORDED AUGUST 28, 2003, IN CABINET G, PAGE 29, DESCHUTES COUNTY RECORDS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1735 NORTHWEST CLIFFSIDE WAY REDMOND, OR 97756 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from October 01, 2009 3 payments at $2,054.60 each $6,163.80 12 payments at $2,166.88 each $26,002.56 (10-01-09 through 12-02-10) Late Charges: $1,140.44 Beneficiary Advances: $3,681.40 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $36,988.20 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $296,651.73, PLUS interest thereon at 5% per annum from 09/01/09 to 1/1/2010,5% per annum from 01/01/10 to 01/01/11, 5% per annum from 1/1/2011, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, ERIC V. ARBAK AND JODI D. ARBAK, TENANTS BY THE ENTIRETY, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE, as Trustee, in favor of SAXON MORTGAGE, INC. D/B/A SAXON HOME MORTGAGE, as beneficiary, dated 8/9/2006, recorded 8/16/2006, under Instrument No. 2006-56191, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS as Indenture Trustee for the registered holders of SAXON ASSET SECURITIES TRUST 2006-3 MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET BACKED NOTES, SERIES 2006-3. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 47 IN BLOCK 19 OF OREGON WATER WONDERLAND, UNIT NO.2, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 55853 SNOW GOOSE ROAD BEND, OR 97707 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 2, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 5 payments at $ 1,768.59 each $ 8,842.95 (08-01-10 through 12-02-10) Late Charges: $ 891.60 Beneficiary Advances: $ 965.50 Suspense Credit: $ -857.22 TOTAL: $ 9,842.83 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $203,239.48, PLUS interest thereon at 7.550% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 6, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 12/2/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, BRIAN E MITCHELL, as grantor, to AMERITITLE, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR MORTGAGEIT, INC., as beneficiary, dated 5/17/2006, recorded 5/24/2006, under Instrument No. 200635974, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee of the Residential Asset Securitization Trust 2006-A10, Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-J under the Pooling and Servicing Agreement dated July 1, 2006. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT ONE HUNDRED NINETEEN (119), RIVER'S EDGE VILLAGE, PHASE X, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 3316 NORTHWEST FAIRWAY HEIGHTS DRIVE BEND, OR 97701 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of December 8, 2010 Delinquent Payments from August 01, 2010 5 payments at $2,683.33 each $13,416.65 (08-01-10 through 12-08-10) Late Charges: $805.02 Beneficiary Advances: $44.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $14,265.67 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $460,000.00, PLUS interest thereon at 7.000% per annum from 7/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on April 12, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same.DATED: 12/8/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By KAREN JAMES AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206)340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

ASAP# 3836091 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011

ASAP# 3836075 12/16/2010, 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011

ASAP# 3843944 12/23/2010, 12/30/2010, 01/06/2011, 01/13/2011


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/23/10