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Environmental group organizes garbage fashion show • COMMUNITY LIFE, E1

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• December 7, 2010 50¢

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BIOMASS ENERGY

Labor driving appeal of plant

BUSH-ERA TAX CUTS

Skating under the stars Wyden

supports extension By Keith Chu The Bulletin

WASHINGTON — Compromise was the operative word in Washington, D.C., to start this week, as President Barack Obama announced a deal with Republicans to extend expiring tax cuts and U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden signaled a willingness to accept an extension for wealthy households, in exchange for a promise of wider tax reform in the future. Obama announced the tentative deal Monday evening to extend all of the 2001 and 2003 tax cuts passed under President George W. Bush, which are due to expire at the end of this year. In an interview with The Bulletin earlier Monday, Wyden reiterated comments he made over the weekend that he would support a one-year extension of all of the Bush tax cuts, in exchange for a guarantee that comprehensive tax reform would occur next year. Wyden said simplifying the tax system by eliminating deductions and lowering tax rates was key to growth in the mid-1980s and is needed to jumpstart the sluggish U.S. economy. See Tax cuts / A4

By Scott Hammers The Bulletin

An appeal of a proposed La Pine biomass power plant is apparently being driven by organized labor representatives seeking a labor agreement on the construction of the estimated $75 million project. The plant, proposed by St. Helens-based Biogreen Sustainable Energy Co., would generate 24.9 megawatts of power by burning wood scrap that would otherwise be burned in slash piles on the company’s private forestland southeast of La Pine. The company is facing a fast-approaching deadline to gain local approval for the project — if Biogreen is unable to start work on the plant by the end of the year, it will be unable to qualify for a stimulus-related tax credit that company President Rob Broberg says is critical to its viability. The appeal, filed by John Williams of Portland on Oct. 19, asserts that the Deschutes County Community Development Department was in error when it approved Biogreen’s site plan. The appeal claims the decision failed to consider conflicting evidence about the amount of heavy truck traffic that will be created by fuel deliveries to the site and wrongly concluded that the plant would not have a significant negative visual and noise impact on nearby properties. See Biomass / A4

IN CONGRESS

Obama and GOP agree on tax cuts By David M. Herszenhorn and Jackie Calmes New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama announced a tentative deal with congressional Republicans on Monday to extend the Bush-era tax cuts at all income levels for two years as part of a package that would also keep benefits flowing to the long-term unemployed, cut payroll taxes for all workers for a year and take other steps to bolster the economy. The deal appeared to resolve the first major standoff since the midterm elections between the Barack White House and newly empow- Obama ered Republicans on Capitol Hill. But it also highlighted the strains Obama faces in his own party as he navigates between a desire to get things done and a retreat from his own positions and the principles of many liberals. Congressional Democrats pointedly noted they had yet to agree to any deal, even as many Republicans signaled that they would go along. See Obama / A4

Clarification In a story headlined “St. Charles, workers at odds in union bid,” which appeared Saturday, Dec. 4 on Page A1, the number of housekeepers St. Charles Health System laid off earlier this year was unclear. The health system eliminated 16 positions in April, 12 of which were filled at the time. St. Charles currently employs 65 people in housekeeping positions in Bend.

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

CATHOLIC ABUSE CASES

Accused priests proving hard to monitor in U.S. By Michelle Boorstein and William Wan The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Ten years after the clergy sex abuse scandal exploded in the United States, lawsuits have been settled, reports issued, policies overhauled. But even as the crisis has shifted to Europe and the Vatican prepares to issue new guidelines on how to han-

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Want to learn ice skating and other winter sports?

As the sunlight fades, and holiday lights twinkle behind her, Gwen Newell, 39, of Bend, practices her skating on the rink at Seventh Mountain Resort during open skate Monday afternoon. Newell, who was alone for part of the session on the rink, said: “I think it’s great skating right now. It’s not snowing. It’s just perfect weather.” Hours of operation for public skate today are from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., and from 7 to 9 p.m. For more information about rink hours and lessons, call 877-219-3709.

dle sex abuse cases, something glaring is missing in this country: the accused priests. Although the vast majority were removed from ministry long ago — barred from celebrating Mass in public, administering sacraments, wearing their clerical collars — church officials say they have no way to monitor where the men are now. See Priests / A4

Humboldt’s marijuana growers team up to go legit By Peter Hecht McClatchy -Tribune News Service

EUREKA, Calif. — Joey Burger was 14 when his naturalist parents moved from Santa Cruz to settle in the coastal forest of Humboldt County. Local hippies and homesteaders welcomed the new kid in the woods. They schooled him in the regional art — growing marijuana. “It was never looked upon as a bad thing,” Burger said. Except before the fall harvests, when helicopters full of narcot-

The Bulletin An Independent Newspaper

Vol. 107, No. 341, 42 pages, 7 sections

Follow along in Community Sports on Tuesdays as Bulletin sports reporter Amanda Miles learns how to enjoy winter in Central Oregon. Her first installment in the series, ice skating, appears today on Page D1.

ics officers whipped through the sky. Neighbors rushed “to call their friends to make sure they were OK,” he said.

Adam Hineman grows his pot indoors and sells his “Big Bud Train Wreck” to fellow medical pot patients in California.

A new threat These days, it isn’t just helicopters that frighten Humboldt County’s pot culture. America’s most renowned bastion of illicit marijuana growing is threatened by cavernous, citytaxed cultivation warehouses soon to be licensed in Oakland. See Humboldt / A4

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

INDEX Abby

E2

Business

B1-6

Calendar

E3

Classified

G1-6

Crossword

E5, G2

Comics

E4-5

Editorial

C4

Community

E1-6

Horoscope

E5

Local

C1-6

Sports

D1-6

Movies

E3

Stocks

B4-5

Obituaries

C5

TV listings

E2

TOP NEWS INSIDE WAL-MART: Supreme Court considers largest class-action lawsuit, Page A3


A2 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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Digital gift cards increasing in popularity By Arielle Kass Cox Newspapers

ATLANTA — Gift-givers unsure of the contents of a person’s DVD collection, with little time to shop or simply at a loss for what to get, have long been buying gift cards. Real, plastic, tangible gift cards. But the sales of electronic cards, a digital alternative, have

begun to grow. Atlanta’s First Data has been involved in the digital gift card industry for a decade and now offers a gift card to Cold Stone Creamery that can be bought on Facebook, said Michael Hursta, the company’s vice president of gift cards. Home Depot, the Atlantabased home improvement chain,

has also made strides in its electronic card offerings. A study by Retail Systems Research, sponsored by Home Depot card administrator CashStar, noted that many retailers have opportunities to increase personalization, through pictures or video, to notify senders when gift cards are opened and to connect sales to social media. However,

few do. Beginning Nov. 1, Home Depot will begin offering digital gift cards with video messages that buyers can record on webcams or upload from their home computers. The company started offering physical gift cards that could include an online video component around Father’s Day.

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Oregon Lottery Results As listed by The Associated Press

MEGABUCKS

The numbers drawn are:

5

9 13 17 35 40

Nobody won the jackpot Monday night in the Megabucks game, pushing the estimated jackpot to $8.8 million for Wednesday’s drawing.

More consumers buying for themselves this holiday Some hope trend is a sign of thawing commerce By Ylan Q. Mui The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — Consumers are adding a very important name back to their holiday shopping lists this year: their own. The percentage of shoppers who say they plan to indulge in a little something extra for themselves has risen four points since last year to more than 57 percent — the biggest jump in at least six years, according to an industry survey. Sales of jewelry, apparel and consumer electronics are up so far this holiday season from last year, and experts attribute part of the boost to what has become known as “self-gifting.” You didn’t think Dad was going to give that 50-inch flat-panel TV to someone else, did you? “The consumer really is sitting there saying, ‘I’m going to take advantage of these deals,’ ” said Marshal Cohen, senior analyst for NPD Group, a consumer research firm. “This consumer is saying that there really is some pent-up demand.” During the nation’s economic downturn, consumers saved money by whittling down their Christmas lists. Spending on gifts for babysitters, co-workers and teachers was slashed, and, in the ultimate act of selfsacrifice, shoppers cut back on themselves. According to the National Retail Federation (NRF), the number of self-gifting shoppers began to fall in 2007 — the year the recession began — after steadily increasing for several holiday seasons. Though the number ticked up in 2008, it plunged last year to under 53 percent of shoppers. The amount they intended to spend last year also fell nearly 5 percent to $101.37. This year, both measures have rebounded along with consumer confidence. And shoppers reported plans to spend an average of $107.50 this Christmas on themselves, the NRF said. “The economy is picking up a little bit,” said Lisa Bennett, as she sipped a Bellini on a recent evening at a cocktail party at Bliss Spa for its top customers. Bennett said the sense that the recovery is on track made her feel a little less guilty about spending $200 online at Ann Taylor for herself while she was scouring the Internet for gifts for her teen cousins. They got Best Buy gift certificates and J. Crew sweaters; she got two new tops and a dress and then booked an oxygen facial for herself at the spa. General manager Michelle Caron said customers are not only booking “maintenance” appointments — the manicures and waxing that some women count as necessities — but also reserving more indulgent services such as facials and massages. This holiday, the spa launched a new service dubbed Shopper’s Delight, a lower leg massage and exfoliating treatment for $70. “We’ve only been getting busier and busier,” Caron said. Industry experts say the return of self-gifting is a telling indicator of consumer health. Over the past two years, as consumers have grappled with high unemployment, falling home prices and a volatile stock market, spending

Mark Gail / The Washington Post

Manicurists work on the hands and nails of customers at the W Hotel’s Bliss Spa in Washington. The percentage of shoppers who say they plan to indulge in a little something extra for themselves has risen four points since last year to more than 57 percent, the biggest jump in at least six years, according to an industry survey. was primarily driven by necessity. Retailers that sold staples such as groceries held up better during the recession than those that stocked discretionary items. But if shoppers are now willing to buy for themselves, that could mean the big freeze on consumer spending is starting to thaw. Cohen said self-gifting helped drive the strong sales and shopper traffic over the post-Thanksgiving weekend. His research showed 35 percent of shoppers bought something for themselves, more than he expected. Self-gifting could also prove lucrative for retailers because it rarely occurs by itself, Cohen said. Shoppers may reward themselves after spending on others or, on the flip side, justify their own purchases by buying a few gifts. “It’s like it becomes a fever,” he said. “For every self-gifted item,

there’s generally another item that gets added to the assortment as well.” Still, New England Consulting Group founder and Chief Executive Gary Stibel said any increase in self-gifting is incremental at best. Shoppers put their kids first and their pets second, he said. Parents and spouses take the back seats, leaving only a tiny portion of discretionary income left over for personal indulgences. “She’s trying to take care of everybody, but she more often than not puts herself last,” Stibel said of the typical female shopper. “She’s too damn conscientious for her own good.” So which actually makes us happier: self-sacrifice or self-indulgence? A study by Harvard Business School associate professor Michael Norton and two

colleagues from the University of British Columbia in 2008 examined whether shoppers derived greater pleasure from spending on themselves or on others. The researchers gave up to $20 to shoppers with instructions to spend it on themselves or on other people — perhaps through a gift for a friend or a donation to a homeless shelter. Though most people expected to enjoy keeping the money, Norton said that at the end of the day, those who bought for someone else reported feeling significantly happier. Norton said his research did not examine whether the drawnout process of holiday gift-giving can overwhelm the joy of giving, but he is clearly no Grinch. “In the moment of giving,” he said, “it’s still nice to have given a gift to someone.”

Technology Consumer Environment Education Science

Tree growers seek federal nod for ad campaign By Michael Doyle McClatchy -Tribune News Service

WASHINGTON — Got Christmas tree? Just in time for the holidays, some domestic Christmas tree producers are hoping to emulate the nation’s dairy, beef and cotton farmers, who tax themselves to pay for common ads. But first, they must rally support for an idea some oppose on principle. On Monday, the Agriculture Department began public consideration of the proposed Christmas tree promotion program. If approved, the program would raise $2 million a year for ads meant to offset the increasingly competitive artificial tree industry. “We think this is a really good idea,” said Paul Battaglia, the owner of the Battaglia Ranch in San Martin, Calif. “We’ve been losing a lot of our market share.” Artificial tree sales nearly doubled to 17.4 million from 2003 to 2007, according to the Agriculture Department. Fresh-tree sales, meanwhile, have declined overall from 37 million in 1991 to 31 million in 2007, according to the Agriculture Department. There’s nothing ho-ho-ho about this competition, as tree farmers dismiss “fake” trees while artificial tree manufacturers retort that their products don’t shed needles and don’t catch fire. Any new ad campaign, though, would probably have to stay positive. The proposed Christmas tree program would be akin to 18 existing promotion orders already overseen by the Agriculture Department and funded by industry assessments. Some are very large, like two dairy industry programs that together collect some $391 million annually. Others are modest, like the $2.7 milliona-year watermelon promotion program. Some of the resulting promotions, including the dairy industry’s long-running “Got Milk?” campaign and the cotton industry’s “Cotton: the fabric of our lives” slogan, have entered the national vocabulary. Overall, farmers and Agriculture Department officials tout the assessment-funded ad programs as successful and worth the price. “These marketing efforts have had a positive and a statistically significant impact on per capita fluid milk consumption,” officials with the dairy industry programs asserted, in their most recent annual report. Skeptics exist, though, and some producers challenge both the efficacy and fairness of mandatory advertising fees. Within California’s San Joaquin Valley, for instance, some tree fruit producers have fought similar assessment programs for many years, with several challenges reaching the U.S. Supreme Court. “Individuals have a First Amendment interest in freedom from compulsion to subsidize speech,” former Justice David Souter argued in a 1997 challenge brought by California peach and nectarine growers. Souter was in the minority, and by a 5-4 vote the court upheld the tree fruit program. The court in 2005 likewise upheld the beef promotion program, but other free-speech challenges keep popping up in state courts. The proposed Christmas tree program would charge producers and importers 15 cents for every fresh-cut tree. A Christmas Tree Promotion Board, appointed by the Agriculture Department, would administer the funds. The new program could be established after the public comment period expires on Feb. 11. An industry-wide referendum would be held within three years to determine whether the program continues.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 A3

TS  Obama urges China to rein in N. Korea Class-action U.S. SUPREME COURT

By Mark Landler

New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — In a sign of mounting tension between the United States and China over North Korea, President Barack Obama telephoned President Hu Jintao and warned that China was emboldening its unruly neighbor by not publicly challenging its behavior, a senior administration official said Monday. In a frank, 30-minute discussion Sunday night, Obama urged China to put the North Korean government on a tighter leash after a series of provocations, most

recently its shelling of a South Korean island, which has stoked fears of a wider military confrontation in the Korean Peninsula.

‘Consequences’ Obama, the official said, told Hu that “it was important for the North Koreans to understand that their actions would have consequences, including in their relations with China.” He reminded the Chinese leader of a tense meeting they had in Toronto in June, after which the president publicly declared that

China was guilty of “turning a blind eye” to North Korea’s military provocations.

China silent Since then, North Korea has lobbed artillery shells at South Korea, killing four people, and disclosed the existence of a clandestine uranium enrichment complex. Still, China, North Korea’s most powerful ally, has not spoken out against the government. Even Obama’s phone call with Hu took several days to set up, although the White House

insisted that it was a scheduling issue, not an attempt by China to duck the president. Hu did not offer any specific assurances to Obama, the official said, but he also did not complain about joint U.S.-South Korean military exercises in the Yellow Sea. Nor did he suggest that the United States was partly to blame for North Korea’s belligerence because of its unwillingness to negotiate with Pyongyang. “The call was meant to be more forward-looking than pointing fingers at the past,” the U.S. official said.

RIOTS IN GREECE MARK ANNIVERSARY OF STUDENT’S DEATH

suit against Wal-Mart goes to high court By Adam Liptak New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday agreed to hear an appeal in the biggest employment discrimination case in the nation’s history, one claiming that Wal-Mart Stores discriminated against hundreds of thousands of women in pay and promotion. The lawsuit seeks back pay that could amount to billions of dollars. The question before the court is not whether there was discrimination but rather whether the claims by the individual employees may be combined as a class action. The court’s decision on that issue will almost certainly affect all sorts of class-action suits, including ones asserting antitrust, securities and product liability, as well as other claims. If nothing else, many pending class actions will slow or stop while litigants and courts await the decision in the case. Arguments in the case are likely to be heard this spring with a decision

expected by the end of June. There has been no ruling yet on the plaintiffs’ claims that they were discriminated against, and the ground rules for how those claims will be heard have not yet been determined. Resolution of the merits of the plaintiffs’ case will now await a decision about whether it may go forward as a class action. In their brief urging the justices to deny review, the plaintiffs had said Wal-Mart’s objection to class-action treatment boiled down to the enormous size of the class. Brad Seligman, the main lawyer for the plaintiffs, said Monday that plaintiffs welcomed the court’s review of the limited issue and were confident justices would rule in their favor. “Wal-Mart has thrown up an extraordinarily broad number of issues, many of which, if the court seriously entertained, could very severely undermine many civil rights class actions,” Seligman said.

Justices hear case of vet who missed filing deadline By Robert Barnes The Washington Post

Alkis Konstantinidis / The Associated Press

A petrol bomb explodes next to riot police during a student protest to mark two years since the fatal police shooting of a teenage boy that sparked Greece’s worst riots in decades, in central Athens on Monday. Police closed roads and deployed several thousand officers around the city, amid an event to commemorate the death of 15-year-old Alexandros Grigoropoulos.

WikiLeaks founder may surrender to police By Sylvia Hui and John Heilprin The Associated Press

LONDON — Julian Assange’s lawyer was arranging to deliver the WikiLeaks founder to British police for questioning in a sex-crimes investigation of the man who has angered Washington by spilling thousands of government secrets on the Internet. Lawyer Mark Stephens told reporters in London that the Metropolitan Police had called him to say they had received an arrest warrant from Sweden for Assange. Assange has been staying at an undisclosed location in Britain. “We are in the process of making arrangements to meet with police by consent,” Stephens said Monday, declining to

say when Assange’s interview with police would take place. Scotland Yard refused to comment. The 39-year-old Australian is wanted on suspicion of rape, sexual molestation and unlawful coercion in Sweden, and the case could lead to his extradition. Interpol placed Assange on its most-wanted list on Nov. 30 after Sweden issued an arrest warrant. Last week, Sweden’s highest court upheld the detention order. Assange has denied the accusations, which Stephens has said stem from a “dispute over consensual but unprotected sex.” The lawyer has said the Swedish investigation has turned into a “political stunt.” The pressure on WikiLeaks

mounted from other quarters Monday: Swiss authorities closed Assange’s bank account, depriving him of a key fundraising tool. And WikiLeaks struggled to stay online despite more hacker attacks and resistance from world governments, receiving help from computer-savvy advocates who have set up hundreds of “mirrors” — or carbon-copy websites — around the world. In one of its most sensitive disclosures yet, WikiLeaks released on Sunday a secret 2009 diplomatic cable listing sites around the world that the U.S. considers critical to its security. The locations include undersea communications lines, mines, food suppliers, manufacturers of weapons components, and

vaccine factories. WikiLeaks has been under intense international scrutiny over its disclosure of a mountain of classified U.S. cables that have embarrassed Washington and other governments. U.S. officials have been putting pressure on WikiLeaks and those who help it, and is investigating whether Assange can be prosecuted under espionage law. For days, WikiLeaks has been forced by governments, hackers and companies to move from one website to another. WikiLeaks is now relying on a Swedish host. But WikiLeaks’ Swedish servers were crippled after coming under suspected attack again Monday, the latest in a series of such assaults.

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court’s sympathies collided with its precedent Monday. The “poor fellow,” in the words of Justice Antonin Scalia, at the center of Monday’s case was the late David Henderson, who came back from the Korean War and was found 100 percent disabled with paranoid schizophrenia. A special court set up to deal with the problems of veterans said it could not hear his appeal of a denial of benefits from the Veterans Administration because he filed 15 days too late. His widow, Doretha Henderson, has taken up his case, and his attorney at the Supreme Court said the problems for which he sought help caused him to miss

the deadline. But to help Henderson, the court might have to abandon a decision it made just three years ago about a less sympathetic character. In 2007, a slim majority said Keith Bowles, a convicted murderer, could not pursue his appeal because he had filed it two days late. In Bowles’ case, he had met a deadline set by the judge in the case, but the judge had misinterpreted the limit set by Congress for such appeals. Even attorneys for the federal government, who opposed reopening Henderson’s appeal, agreed that the veterans court was established by Congress to help veterans making claims. But Assistant Solicitor General Eric Miller said it was not the court’s prerogative to create exceptions to the deadline.

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3 Republicans in race to lead House spending committee By Carl Hulse New York Times News Service

WASHINGTON — The thick binder is dominated by a drawing of a chubby Uncle Sam, with shirt buttons straining against his girth, and a fleshy hand open and outstretched. “Uncle Needs a Diet,” declares the package assembled by Rep. Jerry Lewis, R-Calif., one of three candidates in the race for one of the most powerful, and now paradoxical, jobs in government: leading the House Appropriations Committee in the new Congress as the Republican leadership tries to transform the panel from a fountain of federal spending into ground zero for budget cutting. Selecting a chairman — a party vote is expected today — is the first step in perhaps the most audacious aspect of the plan by Rep. John Boehner, the incoming Republican speaker, to alter the way the House works.

Like Lewis, the two other leading candidates, Rep. Harold Rogers of Kentucky and Rep. Jack Kingston of Georgia, are campaigning to convince their party’s leadership that they can cast aside their own histories as earmarkers and pork-allocators and lead a shift in focus from how to spend to how to save.

Entrenched cultures To make the effort more than a slogan will mean upending one of the most entrenched cultures in Washington, a bipartisan tradition of directing money to favored causes with an eye as much to political gain as to policy outcome. Under both parties, the committee has long been a power unto itself, a secretive realm where subcommittee chairmen hold sway over Cabinet secretaries and generals, and financing can almost magically materialize or disappear for

little-scrutinized local projects even as national priorities are set or dismissed.

Lobbyist complex Leading the committee toward a belt-tightening mandate would also mean taking on an entire industry that has been built up around the federal trough, a complex of lobbyists, consultants and corporations that feeds off the competition for dollars and with some regularity produces scandals — and provides a substantial chunk of the campaign contributions that fuel the U.S. political system. “It has been a favor factory for years, and now it is going to become a slaughterhouse,” said Rep. Jeff Flake, an Arizona Republican and longtime antagonist of the Appropriations Committee who Monday was endorsed by Boehner to be one of several anti-spending conser-

vatives to be seated on the panel. “It is going to get ugly.” All the candidates for chairman have more than 15 years on the committee, and all have hungrily sought earmarks. According to Taxpayers for Common Sense, in the last fiscal year, Lewis won 62 earmarks worth $97.6 million, followed by Rogers with 59 costing $93.4 million and Kingston 40 worth $66.8 million. Lewis was chairman of the committee before Democrats took control of the House in 2006 and would need a special exemption to be chairman again because of party-imposed term limits. In campaigning for the job, he has emphasized his past efforts to push spending cuts. Rogers has promoted his party fundraising and his willingness to confront the executive branch on spending. Kingston has the backing of some outside fiscal watchdogs and promises a new openness on the panel.

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A4 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C OV ER S T OR I ES

Biomass Continued from A1 At a public hearing held by the Deschutes County Commission and the La Pine City Council in August, Williams identified himself as representing “Concerned Citizens for Clean Air.” Williams was the only member of the group to testify at the hearing, which he has also represented while testifying in opposition to a gasification facility in Louisiana, a biorefinery in Mississippi, and filing Freedom of Information Act requests with the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2002, Williams was hired by Oregon State Building Trades, an umbrella group representing several labor unions, to lobby against the proposed Congentrix natural gas power plant that had been proposed southeast of Madras. In 2007, Williams represented Workers for a Livable Oregon, a union group that appealed a proposed PepsiCo plant in Albany that was to be built using out-of-state

Priests McClatchy-Tribune News Service

Lelehnia Du Bois packs up dried marijuana buds in her small indoor grow room in unincorporated Humboldt County, Calif.

Humboldt Continued from A1 It is alarmed by cities from La Puente to Berkeley to Sacramento that approved taxes on dispensaries or endorsed medical marijuana cultivation, sanctioning a weed economy wider and more competitive than ever. So now Humboldt seeks to save itself by going legit. In an area where marijuana growers typically evade attention, Burger is the public voice of the new Humboldt Growers Association. Aligned with a Sacramento lobbyist, it is working for county approval to license and tax outdoor pot plantations of up to 40,000 square feet. The proposal — for local growers who can confirm that they have contracts to supply weed to California medical pot shops — is attracting serious attention. But the plan riles small marijuana farmers, pits indoor vs. outdoor growers, and stirs up fears that Humboldt’s legendary marijuana brand could lose its character to industrialization. Humboldt, which already permits local medical pot patients to grow up to 100 square feet of plants, is expecting to begin work this month on a more liberal cultivation ordinance. “Doing nothing is not an option,” said county Supervisor Bonnie Neely, who supports the Humboldt growers’ plan in concept but is uncertain how large a scale of growing the county should allow. “This is a major part of our economy. I just don’t think we can let Oakland or anyone else just become the leader.” The idea of taxing and regulating marijuana in Humboldt — where pot growing is considered a natural right — isn’t an easy sell. Kim Nelson, a shaggy-haired, mustachioed carpenter who grows weed outside his cabin above Garberville, supports local pot taxes and oversight. But Nelson, secretary of the local Medical Marijuana Advisory Panel, says other growers express “anger and rage over getting a permit to grow marijuana.”

Former timber county Burger fears Humboldt, which long ago saw its timber and fishing industries wither away, will lose out again if it doesn’t take proactive steps to legitimize its pot trade. Now a 28-year-old businessman with early flecks of gray in his hair, Burger runs a gardening supplies showroom and supervises a well-tended outdoor orchard of marijuana that sends its product to medical dispensaries elsewhere in the state. He looks warily at municipalities elsewhere in California levying taxes and capitalizing on medicinal growing. “They are taking market share from people who spent a generation risking their lives and their land,” Burger said. “We want to see people who paid their dues get a chance. We want to come out and compete legally.” Max Del Real, a Sacramento lobbyist working with the Growers Association, said its proposed ordinance could generate $10 million a year in county tax revenues. The plan would impose annual county fees of $20,000 on a quarter-acre out-

door pot garden and $80,000 for an acre. Neely is skeptical of the tax revenue projections. But she considers the plan a reasonable proposal in a county where pot is so entrenched in the culture, economy and politics that supervisors four years ago drafted a letter petitioning Congress to legalize marijuana. In Humboldt, population 138,000, it is more common to ask who doesn’t grow pot than who does. As open-air gardens and greenhouses bloom in the mountains, average citizens supplement their income growing under shimmering lights at home.

‘Big Bud Train Wreck’ Adam Hineman, 31, toiled long hours in the restaurant business until he began growing pot in a modest suburban house. The registered medical marijuana patient provides his “Big Bud Train Wreck” to pot shops in Humboldt and Santa Barbara counties. And he builds on a Humboldt dream — of someday buying property in the country and sustaining his family with marijuana flowering in the open sun.” You couldn’t make it in Humboldt without weed,” he said. Humboldt County District Attorney Paul Gallegos, the only prosecutor in California to publicly endorse Proposition 19, the initiative voters defeated Nov. 2 that would have made recreational pot legal, says it is time that Humboldt legitimizes the trade “that permeates our society.” Gallegos prosecutes more than 1,000 marijuana cases a year — mostly for grows exceeding 99 plants. Authorities also deal with robberies and home invasions at pot sites. In August, a grower was arrested on suspicion of shooting two laborers, killing one. While pot sustains the economy, growers have purchased fire trucks and paid for emergency medical training for local volunteer fire crews. Recently, in the town of Redway, an anxious meeting took place over how to protect the local trade. Robert Sutherland, an environmentalist known as “Man Who Walks in the Woods,” submitted a proposal declaring that the county must “work ... to guard the worldwide reputation of Humboldt County marijuana.” Dennis “Tony” Turner, a former school counselor who runs a dispensary in Arcata, pitched a regional brokerage to market small growers’ weed to pot shops statewide. Another advocate proposed a local “cannabis council” including pot farmers, a human rights advocate and an expert “in weights and measures.” An informal poll taken at the event showed more support for licensing smaller marijuana grows — 2,000 square feet instead of 40,000. But Del Real, the Sacramento lobbyist, ebulliently pitched the Growers Association plan. It could sanction local growers who cultivate for hundreds of medical marijuana users or allow scores of small growers to share cultivation space. “The revolution is starting here,” he said.

Continued from A1 Nor do they keep official data on how many were defrocked, or stripped of their priestly status; how many were imprisoned or placed on sex-offender lists; how many are working; and how many are dead. The priests have largely vanished from public view. Their fates are often a mystery to their victims, their parishioners and even their attorneys. Independently compiling data about what happened to the men is nearly impossible. Reports by the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops show that at least 5,768 priests were accused from 1950 to 2009. Although the church deems most of the allegations credible, the vast majority have never been proved, and many of the priests have never been publicly identified. But a comprehensive list of names does not exist. Victims groups often disagree with church officials on who should be included and maintain their own lists. The Washington Post was able to identify 31 priests accused in the Washington area and locate nine who are alive. All declined to talk about their cases or their lives, but court documents and interviews with those around them offer glimpses. The outcomes vary so much that they defy sweeping generalizations about the way the allegations were handled by the church or the courts. Many of the cases never made it into criminal court because the alleged abuse occurred decades earlier and fell beyond local statutes of limitations or made evidence difficult to gather. Sometimes the accusers did not want to press charges. But at least 11 men were sentenced to prison, and at least five were sued in civil court. Seven are dead, including Monsignor William Reinecke, longtime chancellor of the Arlington Diocese, who shot himself after

Tax cuts Continued from A1 “To me, the extension of the Bush tax cuts has to force tax reform because we have to have the growth,” Wyden said. Most Democrats have opposed an extension of the tax cuts for individuals who earn more than $200,000 or households earning $250,000 a year. For the past several months Wyden had generally deflected questions about his position on extending the Bush tax cuts, saying he was focused on passing the comprehensive tax reform bill he authored with Sen. Judd Gregg, R-N.H. That bill, modeled on the 1986 tax reform effort, reduces the number of tax brackets, lowers tax rates for individuals and businesses and eliminates most tax deductions. On Monday, Wyden said simply extending all of the Bush tax cuts was tantamount to extending a

Obama Continued from A1 Obama said he did not like some elements of the framework, but he had agreed to it to avoid having taxes increase for middleclass Americans at the end of the year. “It’s not perfect, but this compromise is an essential step on the road to recovery,” Obama said.

nonunion labor. In a June 5, 2010, story printed in The Register-Guard of Eugene, Williams is identified as a researcher with the Plumbers and Steamfitters Union Local 290, contesting a proposed expansion to athletic facilities at the University of Oregon along with John Endicott, the union’s business manager. Williams and Endicott did not return calls for comment.

Environmental concerns a ‘tactic’ The environmental concerns raised in Williams’ appeal are a tactic, Broberg said, intended to delay the project in an attempt to get Biogreen to agree to hire union workers to build the plant. “The opposition that we face right now, they’re hiding the true issue, which is organized labor requiring an exclusive labor agreement, and they’re hiding behind environmental concerns that are baseless,” Broberg said. “Biogreen and our opposition are going to con-

tinue to do this dance until one, they decide they’ve had enough and decide to go away, or two, I sign that labor agreement.” Broberg said he has no intention of signing the agreement offered to him. Biogreen is 51 percent owned by Wellons Inc., a Vancouver-based company that builds boilers and other equipment used in wood-fired energy systems — Broberg said Wellons will provide the management and highest-skilled labor needed to build the plant, but the bulk of the 50-plus people needed during construction will be hired locally. The La Pine City Council will be meeting Wednesday to consider Williams’ appeal, a continuation of hearing that began Nov. 16.

Union-exclusive construction contract Vic Russell, a La Pine resident and owner of Vic Russell Construction, said he’s hoping to bid for his company to do some of the site preparation work for the power plant, but if Biogreen

“Our authority over them ends when they’re laicized and no longer priests. Even if they’re not laicized, they have the choice of walking away. They are adults. We’re not a police force. We don’t run prisons. We don’t have mechanisms in a legal sense for controlling them.” — Susan Gibbs, spokeswoman, Washington Archdiocese a former altar boy confronted him after Mass. At least 10 were defrocked by the Vatican. Four of those convicted of crimes wound up on sex-offender registries.

Some retire Some of the accused priests have been able to retire with church pensions and benefits; others were cut off. Yet many have never stopped seeing themselves as priests, even when the pope has forbidden them to wear their collars or to act as clergy. Robert Petrella has been accused by at least 25 men of molesting them when they were boys, church officials said. He has been convicted twice of abuse charges in Prince George’s County, Md., — in 1997 and 2002. Yet his name does not appear on any sex-offender registry: He was prosecuted under the Maryland laws in effect at the time his crimes were committed, long before such registries existed, said Prince George’s Assistant State’s Attorney Renee Battle-Brooks. The Washington Archdiocese, which removed Petrella from the ministry in 1989 after two decades and seven parishes, defrocked him in 2002. Susan Gibbs, a spokeswoman for the archdiocese, said she isn’t sure where Petrella is, and his attorney, William Brennan, declined to comment. The person who has tracked the former priest most closely in recent years is David Fortwengler, who was an 11-year-old altar boy at St. Columba when Petrella molested him in 1968.

“I got that sick feeling in my stomach again,” Fortwengler said of learning that Petrella’s probation was coming to an end. Petrella, who did not respond to phone calls and letters, had gone unmonitored for long stretches before. For several years after he was removed from the ministry, he eked out a living on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, crabbing and selling groceries, according to court documents.

Psychiatric treatment Petrella, whom the archdiocese sent for psychiatric treatment at least three times in the 1970s and ’80s after abuse allegations, didn’t face criminal charges until 1997. After being convicted of battery, he served one week in jail before persuading a Prince George’s judge to release him so he could care for his ill mother. His release required him to be in a home-detention program in Pennsylvania under supervised probation for three years. Yet it came out in court documents years later that probation authorities there were never supervising him; Petrella was sending his own monthly reports to officials in Maryland. In 2002, after Fortwengler and two more victims came forward with allegations, Petrella was arrested again and pleaded guilty to three counts of unnatural or perverted sex practices. This time, he served nine months and was released on the probation that ended three years ago. Haunted by the idea of Pe-

Extension’s impact on Oregonians Both Republicans and Democrats want to extend the Bush tax cuts for individuals earning less than $200,000 and families making $250,000 or less. Most Democrats want taxes on higher earners to increase. How many Oregonians would take a hit if taxes for wealthier families went up? The most recent U.S. Internal Revenue Service data shows 5,464 individuals and 35,398 joint filers earned more than $200,000 in 2008, amounting to about 2.3 percent of the state’s taxpayers. The data don’t specify how many of those joint fliers earned more than $250,000. Citizens for Tax Justice, a liberal think tank, estimated that 1.7 percent of Oregon taxpayers would see taxes increase under the Democratic proposal.

“broken policy,” but a temporary extension would be acceptable if it came with wider-ranging reform. “It doesn’t produce jobs; it is contributing to the problems we’re having getting jobs in America,” said Wyden, adding that he’s had frequent meetings with White House officials over the past 10 days. “I am willing to accept an extension for some period of time if it forces a new policy”

A White House official said there was no official estimate of the proposal’s cost, but estimated the payroll tax cut at $120 billion and the tab for extending unemployment benefits at $56 billion. The office of U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore., was still studying the proposal Monday night. Earlier in the day, his spokeswoman, Julie Edwards, said Merkley would oppose any extension of tax cuts for families earning more than $250,000.

The package would cost about $900 billion over the next two years. It would reduce the 6.2 percent Social Security payroll tax on all wage earners by 2 percentage points for one year. For a family earning $50,000 a year, it would amount to a savings of $1,000. In addition, the agreement provides for a 13-month extension of jobless aid for the long-term unemployed. Obama also agreed to a deal

on the federal estate tax that infuriated many members of his party. The deal would ultimately set an exemption of $5 million per person and a maximum rate of 35 percent — a higher exemption and far lower rate than many Democrats wanted. Obama said he was insisting on a temporary deal on the tax rates for high earners and wealthy estates on the belief that he would ultimately prevail.

signs a union-exclusive contract, he’ll be out of luck. “They aren’t interested in the air quality, they aren’t interested in the water quality, they don’t care about a damn thing but a union contract,” Russell said. Roger Lee, executive director of Economic Development for Central Oregon, said he recalls encountering Williams during the fight over the Congentrix, and witnessed a similar unionbacked challenge to a cement plant project in eastern Oregon in the late 1990s. Lee said he’s unaware of an instance in which unions have secured a contract by appealing a project, but assumes the tactic must pay off occasionally. “It’s a dubious strategy, for sure,” Lee said. “I’m just wondering why it’s continuing to be employed.” Scott Hammers can be reached at 541-383-0387 or shammers@bendbulletin. com.

trella going unnoticed, Fortwengler located him in 2008 in the North Arlington, N.J., home where the former priest had grown up. He was living there with his mother, neighbors said. He sometimes took walks carrying a Bible and wore a clerical collar when he appeared for a neighborhood condolence call, they said. “In order to protect your children, the whereabouts of dangerous predators like Petrella must be disclosed,” read the flier Fortwengler took door to door. “Our authority over them ends when they’re laicized and no longer priests,” Gibbs said. “Even if they’re not laicized, they have the choice of walking away. They are adults. We’re not a police force. We don’t run prisons. We don’t have mechanisms in a legal sense for controlling them.” The legal system is much better positioned to offer ongoing scrutiny, she said. “That’s why it’s best if someone reports abuse immediately and that it’s brought to authorities, because then there’s a legal path to follow for investigating, proving and monitoring.” David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire, said he thinks the church has a greater responsibility to track offenders than do public school systems, youth sports leagues or other organizations that work with children. The church has a systemic history of “betraying” its duty to protect children, said Finkelhor, who has been cited by the U.S. bishops as an expert on child abuse. The church is a global organization with resources that a typical public school system doesn’t have. And priests have an authority “far greater than teachers and coaches,” he said.

“Senator Merkley supports continuing the middle-class tax cuts,” Edwards said. “He does not support a bonus round of tax cuts for the very wealthiest Americans.” Rep. Greg Walden, R-Hood River, was also examining the deal Monday. Spokesman Andrew Whelan said Walden believes preventing any tax increases is necessary for an economic recovery. “Obviously, Representative Walden is looking forward to getting into the details of the deal but preventing a job-killing tax increase is a priority for House Republicans,” Whelan said. “Increasing taxes during a recession is not going to help put people back to work in long-term and sustainable jobs, which is the most important priority right now.” Keith Chu can be reached at 202-662-7456 or at kchu@bendbulletin.com.

“I’m confident,” Obama said, “that as we make tough choices about bringing our deficit down, as I engage in a conversation with the American people about the hard choices we’re going to have to make to secure our future and our children’s future and our grandchildren’s future, it will become apparent that we cannot afford to extend those tax cuts any longer.”


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A6 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N A T ION

Owing their lives and friendship to chance Pearl Harbor vets recall meeting and deadly attack By Corina Knoll Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — They were barely men at the time, unaware of each other but baptized by the same fire. Paul Perrault was 21, a naval officer aboard the USS Phoenix, anchored in Pearl Harbor’s East Loch. He had just risen from his bunk when cannon-like blasts tore through the morning calm. Scrambling to his post in the gunnery, he saw a sky mottled with Japanese planes. Across the harbor on Ford Island was seaman 2nd Class Anthony “George” Mark, 18, who narrowly escaped a round of gunfire as bombs plunged into nearby hangars. Twenty years later, two fathers met on a Monrovia, Calif., cul-de-sac. One lived in a tan-colored home with his wife and two children. The other was moving his family of five into the house next door. After a month of small talk, the men learned of their shared past. Chance had saved their lives. Chance made them neighbors. A bond formed naturally between two men who shied away from recognition. “I wasn’t impressed that George was at Pearl Harbor and George wasn’t impressed that I was,” Perrault said. Instead they talked football, went to Dodgers games, tailgated at UCLA. Once, an acquaintance gave them tickets to the Super Bowl, held that year in Pasadena. Their excitement at sitting on the 50-yard line would become a running joke after their view was obstructed by players standing on the sideline. On quiet Parkrose Avenue in Monrovia, they were separated by a carport, a lemon tree and the breezes that swept inbetween. Mark and his wife, Dorothy, arrived in 1960 with their son and two daughters. By then, Perrault had lived there 10 years with his wife, Orla, and their two children. Mark beat a regular path to Perrault’s stoop, and they grew comfortable in each other’s backyards. They went on a trip to Las Vegas, where they casino-hopped and took in a couple of glitzy shows. They watched

Photos by Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times

Paul Perrault, 91, of Monrovia, Calif., holds a photograph of his veteran days when he served aboard the USS Phoenix.

Pearl Harbor veterans Paul Perrault, 91, left, and Anthony Mark, 87, pictured on Dec. 2, have lived next door to each other for 50 years in Monrovia, Calif. each other marry off children, grow gray, lose family members and battle illness. Perrault was the introverted one, a history buff with a gentle demeanor who was likely to be found gardening or reading. “I used to send the girls over to his house,” Mark said. “They’d ask me something about school. I’d say, ‘Go next door and talk to Paul.’ He’s sharp.” Mark preferred fishing and camping. He was animated around strangers and had a hearty laugh. An electrician, he would install Perrault’s appliances and fix wiring for free.

Relationship not about attack Tucked in their houses were medals, certificates, black-andwhite photos. But they hardly spoke of the history they shared, seeing little need to compare notes outside of their mutual disdain for the mass internment of Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. The anniversary of the attack was rarely acknowledged, although Mark would sometimes wish Perrault a happy Pearl Harbor day. Neither joined a veteran’s association until they were honored by one. They graciously accepted, but never went to a meeting. Mark, now 87, has returned to Oahu three times, finding more

excitement in driving around the island than in attending dinners or dances where he would be among honored guests. Perrault, 90, has never been back. The two belong to a dwindling fraternity. An estimated 4,000 Pearl Harbor survivors are still alive. “It was just luck — where you happened to be and how the Japanese planned to bomb,” Perrault said. “People say, ‘God was with you,’ but I think, ‘How about the 3,000 that died?’ How come God wasn’t with them?” There is little to be proud of when it comes to surviving a war, Mark said. “We got out and we’re out, period.” Mark grew up in L.A.’s El Sereno and Lincoln Heights neighborhoods, the son of Russian immigrants who ran a small grocery store. A teenager during the Great Depression, he sold newspapers, washed dishes and cleaned a butcher shop where he was paid in pork chops and lunchmeat. He volunteered for the Navy at 17 and was trained to repair bomb sights. His squadron arrived at Pearl Harbor in 1941, the day after Halloween. Perrault had been in Hawaii since the summer. Raised in Monticello, Minn., a town that was all of six square miles, he joined the Navy after two years of college and found himself aboard a light

Gay and lesbian teens are punished more at school, by police, study says By Donna St. George The Washington Post

Gay and lesbian teens in the United States are about 40 percent more likely than their straight peers to be punished by schools, police and the courts, according to a study published Monday, which finds that girls are especially at risk for unequal treatment. The research, described as the first national look at sexual orientation and teen punishment, comes as a spate of high-profile bullying and suicide cases across the country have focused attention on the sometimes hidden cruelties of teen life. The study, from Yale University, adds another layer, finding substantial disparities between gay and straight teens in school expulsions, arrests, convictions and police stops. The harsher approach is not explained by differences in misconduct, the study says. “The most striking difference

“The most striking difference was for lesbian and bisexual girls, and they were two to three times as likely as girls with similar behavior to be punished.” — Kathryn Himmelstein, lead author of the Yale study was for lesbian and bisexual girls, and they were two to three times as likely as girls with similar behavior to be punished,” said Kathryn Himmelstein, lead author of the study, published in the journal Pediatrics. Why the punishment gap exists is less clear. It could be that lesbian, gay and bisexual teens who got in trouble

didn’t get the same breaks as other teens — say, for youthful age or self-defense, Himmelstein said. Or it could be that girls in particular were punished more often because of discomfort with or bias toward some who don’t fit stereotypes of femininity. Using data from more than 15,000 middle school and high school students who were followed into early adulthood as part of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, researchers compared categories of misconduct against six punishments. Nearly 1,500 of the participants in the study identified themselves as lesbian, gay or bisexual, but more than 2,300 reported having felt a same-sex attraction at some point in their lives. More than 800 were in a same-sex relationship. The results showed that, for similar misconduct, gay adolescents were roughly 1.25 to 3 times more likely to be sanctioned than their straight peers.

Study: Aspirin helps reduce cancer deaths By Roni Caryn Rabin New York Times News Service

Many Americans take aspirin to lower their risk of heart disease, but a new study suggests a remarkable added benefit, reporting patients who took aspirin regularly for a period of several years were 21 percent less likely decades later to die of solid tumor cancers, including cancers of the stomach, esophagus and lung. As part of the new study, published online Monday in the journal Lancet, researchers examined the cancer death rates of 25,570 patients who had participated in eight different random-

ized controlled trials of aspirin that ended up to 20 years earlier. Participants who had been assigned to the aspirin arms of the studies were 20 percent less likely after 20 years to have died of solid tumor cancers than those who had been in the comparison group taking dummy pills during the clinical trials, and their risk of gastrointestinal cancer death was 35 percent lower. The risk of lung cancer death was 30 percent lower, the risk of colorectal cancer death was 40 percent lower and the risk of esophageal cancer death was 60 percent lower, the study reported.

The specific dose of aspirin taken did not seem to matter — most trials gave out low doses of 75 to 100 milligrams — but the participants in the longest lasting trials had the most drastic reductions in cancer death years later. But even as some experts hailed the new study as a breakthrough, others urged caution, warning people not to start a regimen of aspirin without first consulting a doctor about the potential risks, including gastrointestinal bleeding and bleeding in the brain (hemorrhagic strokes).

cruiser with 900 men. “Now that I look back on it, it was quite a shock,” Perrault said. “I thought I was kind of a big shot in town and when I got out, why, I was going to do big things. But nobody really knew me or cared.”

Serving on Oahu Oahu offered white sand, brilliant sunsets and a sense of safety. Days were spent patrolling peaceful waters, checking equipment, and undergoing training. Perrault was at sea, in charge of the starboard aircraft gun. On land, Mark repaired and maintained bomb sights and instructed others in their use. Off-duty officers swam in the beach alongside Waikiki, played volleyball and went sightseeing. At night, the harbor twinkled with the deck lights of dozens of ships. On Dec. 6, 1941, Perrault attended a shipboard screening of the Bette Davis film “The Little Foxes.” He was eager to sleep in the next day. The first boom came just before 8 a.m. Running outside the hangar, Mark was greeted by a

fighter plane emblazoned with scarlet circles — the unmistakable emblem of Imperial Japan, Land of the Rising Sun. His heart hammered as he dodged gunfire and dashed back inside. Wave after wave of Japanese planes dropped torpedoes into suddenly roiling waters. When dive bombers attacked the USS Nevada, Mark watched bodies hurtle through the air. A detonation at a nearby dock threw him into lockers. “Oh my God, we’re at war,” he said. He joined a group of mechanics pushing planes out of burning hangars, then climbed into a loft to fling canisters of gas masks to the ground. About a mile away, Perrault sat high in the USS Phoenix, sickened by the panorama of fire and destruction. A voice on the loudspeaker instructed the crew to man their battle stations. “This is not a drill,” someone barked. Because his gun required coordinates and altitudes to operate and was not designed to target divebombers, Perrault could do little but watch ships sink and smoke rise. Below him, the ocean was littered with death. After three relentless hours, Self Referrals Welcome

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the enemy disappeared. Ford Island kicked into gear as officers cleaned and assembled machine guns, preparing for a rematch that would never materialize. Over the next few days, equipment was salvaged, ashes were swept, bodies were gathered, losses were counted. Perrault and Mark would later call it an incomprehensible experience, too chaotic to be terrifying. A half-century has passed since their paths converged in Monrovia. Perrault was working in sales for a Pasadena laundry service. Mark was on the verge of starting his own electrical business in Los Angeles. Now, they spend most days at home, slowed by age and congestive heart failure. Perrault is legally blind, has a pacemaker and wears two hearing aids. Mark suffered a heart attack three years ago. They speak of the war only when asked and are quick to quash any allusions to bravery or heroism. They are survivors, they say, nothing more. It was a matter of chance — the same force that would lead them to modest homes that sit side by side on a quiet street.


B

Tech Focus The Wii has some new competition, see Page B3.

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THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010

MARKET REPORT

2,594.92 NASDAQ CLOSE CHANGE +3.46 +.13%

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STOC K S R E P O R T For a complete listing of stocks, including mutual funds, see Pages B4-5

B U S I N E SS IN BRIEF Restaurants share street, but not name The restaurant formerly known as The Decoy Bar and Grill, located at 1051 N.W. Bond St. in downtown Bend, will open under a new name, the Bond Street Grill, at 11 a.m. today, said General Manager Chris Nardella. The new restaurant, under new management, will offer many of the old Decoy menu items with a new spin on them, as well as signature dishes and different happy-hour specials, Nardella said. Meanwhile, at 932 N.W. Bond St. — one block away and across the street — workers were preparing Monday to open a new restaurant as soon as Thursday under the name Caldera Grille, not Bond Street Bar & Grill, as was planned after Giuseppe’s restaurant closed in that location Nov. 30, said bar manager Stacy Caito. An attorney filed articles of incorporation for the Bond Street Grill on Sept. 23, according to the Oregon Secretary of State business registry. A different attorney filed an application for the Bond Street Bar & Grill’s registration Nov. 5. But Monday, that attorney, who could not be reached, filed an application for Caldera Grille’s registration.

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Mortgage aid program set to begin this week State aims to help at least 5,000 homeowners make payments for up to a year By Tim Doran The Bulletin

Beginning Friday, the state will start taking applications to help qualified homeowners pay their mortgages for up to a year, or $20,000, whichever comes first, state officials announced Monday. Representatives from the Oregon Housing and Community Services Department expect the Mortgage Payment Assistance Program to help at least 5,000 Oregon homeowners, who should apply through the website, www.oregon homeownerhelp.org. The mortgage payment effort is the first of

four programs funded by $220 million in federal money to prevent foreclosures. The Oregon Housing and Community Services Department created the Oregon Homeownership Stabilization Initiative to administer the programs. Mortgage payment assistance will use $100 million of the funds, which Oregon received because high unemployment rates designated it one of the 17 “hardest-hit” states. “When Oregon was identified as hardest-hit, it was a dubious distinction,” said Victor Merced, director of Housing and Community Services, at a press conference Monday. See Mortgage / B5

Corrections In a story headlined “Market hits zoning snag,” which appeared Friday, Dec. 3, on Page B1, Stephan White’s age was incorrect. He is 73. Also, the ownership of the property and business were reported incorrectly. White owns both. The Bulletin regrets the errors.

Pump prices U.S. weekly Since last week average retail price for one Up gallon of regular 10¢ unleaded gasoline:

Two-year trend

Week ending Dec. 6, 2010

$2.96

$2 $1 2009

2010

© 2010 MCT Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration MCT

U.S. selling last of stake in Citigroup Taxpayers expected to reap about $12B

For more information about the Mortgage Payment Assistance Program or other foreclosure prevention programs, visit www .oregonhomeownerhelp.org. Additional information may also be found through NeighborImpact at www .homeownershipcenter.org or by calling 541-318-7506.

Citigroup is finally wriggling free of Uncle Sam. Two years after the financial giant was bailed out by the federal government, the U.S. Treasury is selling its remaining shares in the company. The move, announced late Monday, largely ends the remarkable federal rescue of Citigroup, whose downfall came to symbolize all that was wrong with Wall Street. It also represents another milestone in the post-bailout era. While the government would retain a vestigial interest in Citigroup after the offering, the sale would effectively free the giant company from modest federal pay restrictions and lift a cloud that has hung over its chief executive, Vikram Pandit. “We are very appreciative of the support provided by the UST during the financial crisis,” the company said in a statement, referring to the U.S. Treasury. Emboldened by strong investor interest and recent initial public offering of General Motors, another bailed-out giant, the Treasury announced Monday evening that it would start selling 2.4 billion shares of Citigroup common stock. See Citigroup / B2

A personal history at a Bend institution

New York Times News Service

“We really think it’s important that the book business have this open diversity of retail points, just like it does in print.” — Tom Turvey, director for strategic partnerships, Google

Andy Tullis / The Bulletin

Justine Bender Bennett, who along with her mother, Chris Bender, became a co-owner of the Pine Tavern in October, sits in the restaurant’s redesigned lounge area Monday, with a bacon cheeseburger and fries.

Pine Tavern co-owner has been involved in since childhood By Tim Doran The Bulletin

P

ine Tavern, Bend’s oldest restaurant, has new owners. But at least one of them, Justine Bender Bennett, spent so much time in the restaurant as a child, the kitchen staff once labeled a container with her name and filled it with leftover bread, which Bender Bennett fed to the ducks on Mirror Pond. Duck feeding was allowed 25-or-so years ago, when she spent summers living in an apartment above the Pine Tavern when her father, Bert Bender, one of the restaurant’s owners, came to Bend.

The basics What: Pine Tavern Where: 967 N.W. Brooks St. Employees: 49 Phone: 541-382-5581 Web site: http://pinetavern.com

“I spent almost every summer here with my dad, hunting crawdads and feeding bread ends to the ducks,” she said. It was around the same time she lost

her appetite for the Pine Tavern’s famous sourdough scones, the recipe for which her father brought from Idaho. Bender Bennett “OD’d” on the pastry after eating a whole order. “I have not touched a scone, except for quality-control purposes, since I was 8,” she said Monday. Bender Bennett and her mother, Chris Bender, bought out the remaining owners, including Brad Hollenbeck, a longtime manager who had acquired an ownership interest. They officially took over the landmark Bend eatery in October, said Bender Bennett, 36. See Pine Tavern / B5

A coffee clash between Kraft and Starbucks New York Times News Service

$3

$29.705 SILVER CLOSE CHANGE +$0.464

By Eric Dash

EXECUTIVE FILE

By William Neuman

$4

s

Foreclosure help

Airbus favored to win Pentagon contract SEATTLE — Following an inadvertent peek at Defense Department data, Boeing executives believe the Air Force is likely to award the long-awaited tanker contract to Airbus parent company EADS, according to a leading defense analyst with close ties to Boeing. That view of the feeling inside Boeing is confirmed by two congressional sources familiar with the $40 billion tanker competition. Citing conversations with several unnamed senior Boeing officials, Loren Thompson of the Lexington Institute said Monday the company’s hopes faded when Air Force analyses of the two contending airplanes were accidentally leaked to both sides earlier this month. Those analyses confirmed Boeing’s worst fears, Thompson said. They showed the Airbus A330 tanker scoring well ahead of the Boeing 767 tanker in a mission-effectiveness rating. — From staff and wire reports

B

A billion-dollar brouhaha between Starbucks and Kraft over supermarket coffee sales is turning into the venti latte of corporate divorces — with a double shot of espresso and extra foam. On Monday, Kraft took the fight to court, asking a federal judge in Manhattan to stop Starbucks from breaking the 12-year partnership under which Kraft

New York Times News Service

distributes Starbucks’ packaged coffees, including whole beans and ground coffee, to grocery stores and other retailers.

The war of words has been escalating for days, as the two sides traded charges and countercharges. Kraft claims

that Starbucks unilaterally decided to end their agreement, and Starbucks says that Kraft failed to aggressively promote its brands, which include Seattle’s Best Coffee, in stores. The bitterness has also spilled into the fast-growing market for single-serve coffee machines, with Kraft accusing Starbucks of undermining sales of its Tassimo coffee system ahead of the peak holiday season. See Coffee / B5

Google calls just-launched e-bookstore an ‘open ecosystem’ By Julie Bosman New York Times News Service

The Google e-bookstore is finally open. After years of planning and months of delays, the search giant Google started its e-book venture Monday, creating a potentially robust competitor in the digital book market to Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Apple. Google executives described the e-bookstore as an “open ecosystem” that will offer more than 3 million books, including hundreds of thousands for sale and millions free. More than 4,000 publishers, including large trade book companies like Random House, Simon & Schuster and Macmillan, have made books available for sale through Google, many at prices that are identical to those of other e-bookstores. “We really think it’s important that the book business have this open diversity of retail points, just like it does in print,” Tom Turvey, the director for strategic partnerships at Google, said in an interview. “We want to make sure we maintain that and support that.” Customers can set up an account for buying books, store them in a central online, password-protected library and read them on personal computers, tablets, smart phones and e-readers. See Google / B2


B USI N ESS

B2 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

M   BUSINESS CALENDAR TODAY PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 4-8:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. HOME ENERGY I.Q. WORKSHOP: Hosted by Energy Trust of Oregon and Cascade Natural Gas, the workshop covers practical ideas that homeowners and renters can try right away along with bigger energysavings strategies. Admission is open to all area Cascade Natural Gas customers. Registration required by visiting www.regonline.com/ energyiq or calling 866-368-7878; free; 6-8:30 p.m.; The Environmental Center, 16 N.W. Kansas Ave., Bend.

WEDNESDAY PRIVATE PESTICIDE APPLICATOR WORKSHOP: Oregon State University Extension will conduct a pesticide pre-license workshop to assist pesticide users in preparing for the private applicator exam; $20 for the workshop, manuals available for $22.50; 8:30 a.m.noon; Jefferson County Fair Complex, 430 S.W. Fairgrounds Road, Madras; 541-475-7107 or http://oregonstate.edu/dept/coarc. TWO-DAY LEADERSHIP SUMMIT: Human resource professionals may learn to lead successfully and accomplish more in less time. Program is facilitated by Dana Barz and designed for those with an interest in leadership development. Registration required at info@ danamics.net or 541-550-0272; $365; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 N.W. Wall St., Suite 300, Bend. LIVE REAL ESTATE TV SHOW: “Make it your home with a 203K Renovation Loan,” Hosted by Jim Mazziotti of Exit Realty. Learn to use this loan product to purchase a home and perform repairs. Live at www.ExitRealtyBend.com, follow the show icons; free; 7-8 p.m.

Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Dec. 14 PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444. REDMOND CHAMBER BUSINESS AFTER HOURS: 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Heating & Cooling, 2516 S.W. Glacier Place; 541-2336336.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 15 INTERACTIVE WORKSHOP TO ASSIST SMALL BUSINESSES : The city of Redmond, partnering with the Oregon MicroEnterprise Network, will provide free market research services to Redmond small businesses through a program called MarketLink. Learn how qualifying business owners can apply to receive free and confidential customized research through the MarketLink program; free; 8-9 a.m.; Redmond Fire & Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-7761.

THURSDAY Dec. 16 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $20 “Discount Day”; 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhour training.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY Dec. 17

THURSDAY TWO-DAY LEADERSHIP SUMMIT: Human resource professionals may learn to lead successfully and accomplish more in less time. Program is facilitated by Dana Barz and designed for those with an interest in leadership development. Registration required at info@ danamics.net or 541-550-0272; $365; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; Karnopp Petersen LLP, 1201 N.W. Wall St., Suite 300, Bend. OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com. GETTING THE MOST OUT OF SCHWAB.COM: Learn to research investments, place online trade orders for stocks, bonds and mutual funds, and manage your finances with account features. Presented by Luiz Soutomaior, CFP, CFS. Registration required by Dec. 7; free; noon-1 p.m.; Charles Schwab & Co., 777 N.W. Wall St., Suite 201, Bend; 541-318-1794. 7TH ANNUAL BUSINESS HOP: Hosted by the Redmond Chamber of Commerce & CVB, chamber businesses will display their products and services. Open to the public; free; 5-7 p.m.; Historic Redmond Church, 641 S.W. Cascade Ave.; 541-923-5191 or www.visitredmondoregon.com. BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

FRIDAY FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave., Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. REDMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE COFFEE CLATTER: Sponsored by All About You, a Division of Central Oregon Engraving; 8:30-9:30 a.m.; Redmond Fire and Rescue, 341 N.W. Dogwood Ave.; 541-923-1525. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861.

FREE TAX RETURN REVIEWS: If you think you paid too much or missed a deduction, Zoom Tax can help. Call or stop by for an appointment; free; Zoom Tax, 963 S.W. Simpson Ave. , Suite 100, Bend; 541-385-9666. EDWARD JONES COFFEE CLUB: Current market and economic update including current rates; free; 9 a.m.; Sisters Coffee Co., 61292 S. U.S. Highway 97, Suite 105, Bend; 541-617-8861.

SATURDAY Dec. 18 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

MONDAY Dec. 20 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.1:30 p.m.; Pizza Hut, 2139 N.E. Third St., Bend; 541-447-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

TUESDAY Dec. 21 PORTFOLIO REVIEW AND CURRENT MARKET UPDATE: Hosted by Matthew Leeden, financial adviser; free; 2-6 p.m.; Paulson Investment Co. Inc., 1444 N.W. College Way, Suite 7, Bend; 541-385-0444.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 22 OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission to obtain the alcohol server permit. Registration required; $35; 9 a.m.-1 p.m.; Abby’s Pizza, 1938 S. U.S. Highway 97, Redmond; 541-330-6384 or www.happyhourtraining.com.

THURSDAY Dec. 23

MONDAY OREGON ALCOHOL SERVER PERMIT TRAINING: Meets the minimum requirements by the

BEND TOASTMASTERS MEETING: Come and learn how Toastmasters may benefit you; free; 6:30 p.m.; IHOP, 30 N.E. Bend River Mall Drive; 541-480-1871.

If you have Marketplace events you would like to submit, please contact Collene Funk at 541-617-7815, e-mail business@bendbulletin.com, or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at www.bendbulletin.com. Please allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication.

Investor says he would finance Borders’ bid for Barnes & Noble By Mae Anderson The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Buying out Barnes & Noble would give its much smaller rival, Borders Group, a bigger and firmer stake in the digital world, but some analysts said combining the two largest companies in the shrinking realm of traditional book selling could hurt both — perhaps irreparably. Activist investor William Ackman and his investment firm announced in a regulatory filing Monday that they had offered

Google Continued from B1 A Web connection will not be necessary to read a book. However users can use a dedicated app that can be downloaded to an iPad, iPhone or Android phone. A typical user could begin reading an e-book on an iPad at home, continue reading the same book on an Android phone on the subway and then pick it up again on a Web browser at the office, with the book opening each time to the place where the user left off.

An opportunity for independents The Google eBookstore could be a significant benefit to independent bookstores like Powell’s Books in Portland that have signed on to sell Google e-books on their websites through Google — the first significant entry for independents into the e-book business. “This levels the playing field,” said Oren Teicher, the chief executive of the American Booksellers Association. “If you want to buy e-books, you don’t just have to buy them from the big national outlets.” It is also an opportunity for independents to learn from past missteps. They were slow to build websites to sell books during the initial expansion of online retailing in the 1990s, a mistake that led their customers to turn to Amazon and its deeply discounted selection. “They were so overwhelmed with the competition that Amazon presented, they just didn’t know what they could do to be competitive in the digital arena,” said Peter Osnos, the founder and editor at large of PublicAffairs, an independent publisher. “Google’s giving them a real shot at doing that.”

Healthy competition Publishers said they were elated Amazon would have another serious e-book retailing force to contend with. Only last year, Amazon nearly had the e-book market to itself, leading publishers to worry that they were headed toward an Amazon monopoly. Since then, a vastly more diver-

to finance a $963 million bid by Borders for Barnes & Noble Inc. Under the deal, Pershing Square Capital Management would sponsor a bid by Borders of $16 per share for more than 60 million outstanding Barnes & Noble shares. The news sent Barnes & Noble’s shares up 10.6 percent, or $1.41, on Monday to close at $14.69. Both booksellers face increasingly tough competition from much bigger merchants online and in stores, including Amazon.

sified marketplace has emerged. Last fall, Barnes & Noble introduced an e-reader, the Nook, and more recently, an updated color version, the Nook Color. In April, Apple unveiled the iPad, which the company said in October had sold 7.5 million units. A crop of e-readers introduced this year has given consumers more choices, at prices that are competitive, even less than $100. Google e-books will be readable on any open-format e-readers, including the Nook, a development publishers said would give consumers greater freedom. “Consumers have been in a position where they had to claim some kind of loyalty,” said Maja Thomas, the senior vice president for Hachette Digital, part of the Hachette Book Group, which publishes authors including Stacy Schiff and James Patterson. “Now they can buy books from their local bookstores online, or from Powell’s, or from Google.” E-books bought through Google are not currently readable on Amazon’s Kindle, a Google spokeswoman said, although Kindle users will be able to read free e-books obtained through Google.

New territory Google executives said the five large trade publishers using the agency model would operate under that model with Google, while many other publishers would use a traditional wholesale model. In addition to the dedicated Google site and independent bookstores’ sites, Alibris, an online retailer for new and used books, movies and music, will sell e-books. Google has also set up an affiliate program that would allow blogs and other websites to steer customers to buy books through Google, earning a marketing commission for traffic that they send to Google. The Google e-bookstore will go well beyond trade books, including scientific, technical, medical, scholarly and professional reference books that might more typically be read on a desktop or laptop computer. For some books, if the publisher allows it, customers will be able to cut and paste text, a feature that made some publishers balk. Some industry specialists said they were waiting to see if Google — which has far more experi-

NEWS OF RECORD DEEDS Deschutes County

Edward L. and Karen C. Brown to James Abing, Northwest Townsite Co.’s Second Addition, Lot 1, Block 27, $157,050 Sterling Savings Bank to Eriksen Properties LLC, Island Park excepting therefrom Lots 1, 2 and Tract X, $412,500 Federal National Mortgage Association to Scott D. Smith, Bluffs at River Bend Phases 3 & 4, Lot 37, $173,500 Dylan McMahon to William and Karen McMahon, River Bend Estates Replat, Lot 82-A, $202,000 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Village at Cold Springs, Lot 21, $333,629.27 First American Title Insurance Co., trustee to Federal National Mortgage Association, Chestnut Park Phase 1, Lot 3, $164,191 Cal-Western Reconveyance Corp. to PNC Bank NA, Maplewood Phase 2, Lot 39, $150,000 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Cascade View Estates Phase I, Lot 211, $159,000

LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC, trustee to Wells Fargo Bank NA, Partition Plat 199867, Parcel 1, $468,500 LSI Title Company of Oregon LLC, trustee to GMAC Mortgage LLC, River Terrace, Lot 1, Block 11, $165,125 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to RMS Residential Properties LLC, Cascade Vista Planned Unit Development, Lot 2, $160,337 Northwest Trustee Services Inc., trustee to Wachovia Mortgage Corp., T 16, R 11, Section 22, $640,199 Wendy L. E. Girard, representative for the estate of John W. Homan to TDAP LLC, Bend Park, Lots 1-2, Block 26, $150,000 Henry M. Meyer to Michael Cranmer and Tracy Dula, Providence Phase 6, Lot 22, Block 4, $166,500 William T. Jr. and Sherriel L. Hill as tenants by the entirety and as trustees of the Hill Trust to Gordon and Jeris Clark, Partition Plat 2004-84, Parcel 1, $425,000 Kelly D. Sutherland, trustee to Charles Schwab Bank NA, Diamond A Addition, Lot 7, Block 1, $265,000 Geoffrey M. Groener and Bethany Flint to Joseph L. and Susan H. Reinhart, Pinelyn Park, Lots 6-7, Block 6, $804,000

com, Target Corp. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc. And both have said they are relying for growth on electronic books and readers, a still-small arena where another giant, Google Inc., launched its own bookstore Monday. The financing from Ackman, who owns 37 percent of Borders’ outstanding shares, would let Borders make a “quantum leap” in the e-book space, Morningstar analyst Peter Wahlstrom said. “It’s is a sign Borders is looking to catch up,” Wahlstrom

ence in search than in sales — could create a site that is as simple to use for e-commerce as Amazon.com, and whether large numbers of consumers would shift their buying loyalties from well-known national book chains to Google or local bookstores. “Everything depends on execution,” said Mike Shatzkin, founder and chief executive of the Idea Logical Co., which advises book publishers on digital change. “They don’t have a lot of experience in retail or merchandising.”

Broad reach It is difficult to say what Google’s addition to the market means for the wider penetration of e-books, said Tim McCall, the director for online sales and marketing for the Penguin Group USA. “Obviously Google has a very broad reach, so I would say that at the very least, our books and our e-books should be more discoverable,” McCall said. “It’s interesting that the newest partners who are selling books are as much technology companies as they are traditional retailers.” David Steinberger, the chief executive of the Perseus Books Group, said Google’s dominance in the search business could raise the profile of books in general. “They have the ability to bring book content up through search, and now they’ll have the ability to consummate a sale,” Steinberger said. “That feels like it will grow the market.” The Google e-bookstore is an outgrowth of the Google books project, an effort that began in 2004 to scan all 130 million books in the world, by Google’s estimate. Scott Dougall, Google’s director for product management, said the company had scanned about 15 million books so far. Google executives said they were trying to replicate the freedom with which consumers have bought printed books for centuries.

Citigroup Continued from B1 The deal was expected to be priced at $4.35 a share, a 2 percent discount, according to a person briefed on the transaction who asked for anonymity because the deal had not yet closed. All told, that means that taxpayers will reap about a $12 billion profit on the Treasury’s multibillion-dollar investment in Citigroup. While the final accounting of the government’s broader bailouts will not be known for years, major banks and the Detroit automakers have emerged from the rescues far faster than many had expected. The government remains deeply entangled in the mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, but officials are mapping out plans to wind down the investment in the American International Group, possibly through a stock offering early next year. Proceeds from the Citigroup sale would be the single biggest profit yet from the government bailout programs. Few saw such a quick windfall two years ago. Many doubted the wisdom of using taxpayers’ money to rescue Citigroup, which was devastated when the home mortgage market imploded. Citigroup was the biggest user of several of emergency support programs that the Federal Reserve put in place during the crisis. But federal officials, worried that the failure of Citigroup might cascade through the financial system, ended up injecting $45 billion into the company in the autumn of 2008, and creating an enormous insurance policy covering potential losses on more than $301 billion of real estate assets. In return, the government assumed ownership of nearly a third of Citigroup. It also secured a small piece of potential profits through securities known as warrants. After several big banks repaid their bailout funds, Citigroup officials began pressing the Treasury to allow their company to do the same. Last December, Citigroup was allowed to return $20 billion of its bailout funds, and the government announced plans to unwind its remaining $25 billion common stock investment. A bungled stock sale forced the Treasury Department to delay its initial offering for Citigroup until April, when the government began to sell its nearly 7.7 billion shares. Through October, the government had sold about 5.3 billion shares to private investors, at an average price of just over $4 apiece. With dividends and other payments, that meant the government had fully recouped its initial $45 billion investment. As interest in the Citigroup shares picked up, Treasury officials began plotting a larger stock offering for several months but kept bank officials in the dark about their plans. On Monday morning, the Treasury informed Citigroup that it planned to sell the remaining 2.4 billion shares all at once. Morgan Stanley, which had handled the previous stock sales, is leading the offering.


B USI N ESS

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 B3

T F Rabbit ears perk up as people ditch cable for free programming By Matt Richtel and Jenna Wortham New York Times News Service

New York Times News Service

Microsoft took the concept of the Wii to its natural culmination — controlling games with nothing but body movements. Sony also introduced a motion-based controller for its PlayStation 3 that works in much the same way as the Wii, but the PlayStation’s graphics are far superior.

Xbox, PlayStation pose threat to Wii New motion-based controller add-ons make Nintendo’s console less appealing By Seth Schiesel New York Times News Service

The question can now be asked: Does it make sense to buy a Nintendo Wii anymore? For four years, there has been no question. No product has been more important than the Wii in leading video games’ return to the cultural mainstream. Since its debut in 2006, the Wii has reshaped living room entertainment by making simple, intuitive games accessible to millions of people who never felt comfortable with a typical two-handed game controller covered with buttons and sticks. For all their sophistication and power, the competing consoles — the Microsoft Xbox 360 and Sony PlayStation 3 — have remained largely the province of serious gamers. Neither brand offered the sorts of controls that could truly appeal to a mass audience, and particularly to families that want to have fun together at home. Until now. Nintendo should feel some heat at the moment, because Microsoft and Sony, which outstrip Nintendo in sheer technical resources, have finally caught up with the Wii’s lead in engineering and its ingenious human interface. Put another way, for almost four years, the Wii offered a unique home entertainment experience. But now, after the introductions this fall of the Move system from Sony for the PS3 and the brilliant Kinect from Microsoft for the Xbox 360, the Wii no longer does anything important that the PS3 or Xbox 360 cannot do even better.

Sony’s Move On the one hand (so to speak), the Move basically copies the Wii’s wandlike controller, although it feels slightly more accurate. As with the Wii, you wave the Move’s controller around and swing and twist it in space to bowl or throw or evoke some other action on the screen. The difference is that the Wii’s graphics, while cute, are of low resolution and inferior detail. The PS3 is a high-definition powerhouse. When you compare golf on the Wii to golf on the PS3 with Move, you realize that there really is no competition. On the Wii, golf looks like a video game. On the PS3, golf looks like a golf course. I cannot wait to see how Sony incorporates the Move into its “Major League Baseball” series next year. Done properly, it should be as close to standing in the batter’s box and trying to hit a professional curveball as most of us will ever come. Moreover, the PS3 plays Blu-ray movie discs and can display 3-D images, two things the Wii cannot do. And the PS3 has a full lineup of great traditional games if you want to pick up a real controller. So with the Move, Sony gets zero points for creativity but full marks

for successful imitation. Still, legitimate reasons to buy the Wii remain. Of course, there is price. The Wii costs $200 and now comes with both the Wii Sports and Wii Sports Resort compilations. (A second controller costs around $40.) The PS3 with Move costs twice as much, $400, and comes with only one game compilation, called “Sports Champions.” A second Move controller costs around $50. The least expensive version of the PlayStation 3, which does not include Move, costs $300. The other potential reason to buy the Wii is the games available on that system and nowhere else. If playing “Mario,” “Donkey Kong” or “Zelda” games is important to you or yours, the Wii is the only choice. If you must play “Disney Epic Mickey,” you need a Wii. (Likewise, if you must play “Gran Turismo 5” or “God of War III,” you need a PS3.) So you have Nintendo and Sony offering comparable controllers rigged to machines with far different technical power and with quite different prices.

Taking it further Then you have what deserves, as far as I am concerned, to be the technology hit of the year: the Kinect from Microsoft. If you have not heard by now, Kinect takes the concept of the Wii (and the Move) and pursues it to its natural culmination, getting rid of the electronic game controller altogether. The Wii rescued gaming from being in a perpetual niche by introducing a controller that was simple to use. Kinect is driving gaming into the future by literally seeing and listening to you. Want to highlight a menu item? Wave your hand or just say, “Xbox, play music,” for example. Want to kick a ball? Kick. Want to bowl? Swing your arm as though you are bowling. That’s it. As with any trailblazing new technology, the right question is, “Sounds good, but does it really work?” Kinect really works. Without Kinect, the least expensive version of the Xbox 360 now costs $200, the same as the Wii. But without Kinect, the Xbox 360 is not competing with the Wii for the affection of mothers and children. With Kinect, the Xbox 360 costs $300 with four gigabytes of storage or $400 with a 250-gigabyte hard drive, which is primarily for those who will download a lot of movies or store a lot of music. Like the PS3, the Xbox 360 can display 3-D. (Very few games support it now, though, and you need a television capable of 3-D and special glasses.) And the Xbox Live Internet service is the class of the console gaming industry. So the real threat to Nintendo and the Wii is not Sony, it is Microsoft and Kinect. Kinect is even

Panasonic to enter video game market TOKYO — Long after failing to challenge Sony and Nintendo game consoles, Panasonic Corp. is preparing to re-enter the market as early as next year in North America by releasing a portable game player that provides users with online gaming on the go, according to sources. Panasonic, which marketed its first home video game 3DO Real in 1994 but pulled out from the game industry only three years later, hopes to capitalize on a booming popularity of online gaming with the release of a handheld console provisionally named “Jungle.” The new online game player is foldable and equipped with a keyboard and a touch pad, enabling users to exchange messages with other gamers online. According to U.S. media reports, Panasonic has already started offering the products to U.S. consumers for testing. After analyzing consumers’ impressions of the game device, the home electrical appliance giant will decide when to put it on the market and at what price. It has not yet been determined if Panasonic will release the game player in Japan. While online gaming has gained much popularity worldwide, conventional portable game players have been considered to be at a disadvantage because they are not outfitted with keyboards. It has been extremely difficult for Panasonic to penetrate the game software market when video game console manufacturing giants, such as Sony Corp. and Nintendo Co., have already built extensive distribution networks. Industry sources said Panasonic judged that it could have a chance to make inroads into the online game market, where software can be sold easily on the Internet, by taking advantage of its name recognition as a consumer electronics giant. — McClatchy-Tribune News Service

easier to use than the Wii, and it brings your whole body into an electronic entertainment experience in a way that has never existed before. Does it make sense to buy a Wii anymore? If price really matters or you just need your Nintendo fix, then sure. But there are more innovative and exciting options these days.

Julie and Anthony Bayerl of St. Paul, Minn., love watching prime-time shows on the sleek 50-inch television in their bedroom. They also love that they pay nothing for the programming. The only thing they do not love is how a low-flying plane, heavy rain or just a little too much movement in the room can wipe out the picture. “If someone is changing in there, it messes up your reception,” said Julie Bayerl, a legislative assistant. “We try to stay very still when we watch television.” The Bayerls are using an old technology that some people are giving a second chance. They pull free TV signals out of the air with the modern equivalent of the classic rabbit-ear antenna. Some viewers who have decided that they are no longer willing or able to pay for cable or satellite service, including younger ones, are buying antennas and tuning in to a surprising number of free broadcast channels. These often become part of a video diet that includes the fast-growing menu of options available online. The antenna reception has also led many of these converts to discover — or rediscover — the frustration of weak and spotty signals. But its fans argue that it is tough to beat the price. “My husband’s best friend thinks we’re big dorks for having rabbit ears and not cable,” Julie Bayerl said. But when their introductory price for cable TV and Internet access expired this year and the bill soared to $150, the couple halved it by cutting TV. “It wasn’t something we were willing to pay for,” she said.

Ben Garvin / New York Times News Service

Anthony and Julie Bayerl replaced their cable subscription with a digital television antenna at their home in St. Paul, Minn. From April to September, cable and satellite companies had a net loss of 330,000 customers. Many pay-TV customers are making the same decision. From April to September, cable and satellite companies had a net loss of about 330,000 customers. Craig Moffett, a longtime cable analyst with Sanford C. Bernstein, said the consensus of the industry executives he had talked to was that most of these cord-cutters were turning to over-the-air TV. “It looks like they’re leaving for the antenna,” he said. Last month, Time Warner Cable fought back with a lowercost package that it said might appeal to people who are feeling the economic squeeze. For $40 in New York, or $30 in Ohio, customers can get a slimmed-down set of channels. To be sure, around 90 percent of American households still pay for cable or satellite television — a figure that in recent years has been slowly and steadily rising. But Americans’ relationship with television has recently been in flux, in part because of the

switch in June to digital broadcast signals. That initially gave pay TV providers a group of new subscribers who had worried that their old sets would not pick up the new signals. But analysts say some of those subscribers have since gone back to free signals. Another big change is the rise of Internet video, which can ease the pain of losing favorite cable channels. Bradley Lautenback, 28, who recently moved to Los Angeles to work at Disney, found enough alternatives to allow him to turn back the technological clock on his TV. “I’ve always had cable. It’s the thing you do when you move to a new place: call the company and set it up,” he said. Not this time. Instead, he got an antenna and now watches over-the-air news and sports, complemented by episodes of shows like “Entourage” that he buys from iTunes. “I don’t miss cable at all,” he said.

Tickets available at: Newport Avenue Market Front row & premier seating available only at Saxon’s Fine Jewelers Fine Art Illustrated By: John Hiller


B USI N ESS

B4 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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D 1.40 80.15 +.29 1.44 46.59 -.14 261.91 -3.29 19.64 -.16 0.07 26.85 +.30 3.57 114.40 -.04 3.86 -.12 0.80 39.99 +.14 4.67 +.19 14.67 +.13 33.34 +.22 0.88 29.28 -.05 2.76 +.16 0.84 36.64 -.09 0.68 13.03 +.03 0.60 24.55 -.16 0.68 12.10 +.06 1.83 35.09 +.04 37.79 +.26 0.48 7.94 +.01 1.74 88.73 +.06 1.74 76.96 +.35 38.03 -.12 46.89 -.27 .98 +.03 45.73 -.19 42.81 +1.32 4.45 -.06 1.50 43.69 +.01 0.10 15.82 -.27 3.88 -.12 24.70 -.12 110.23 +1.00 0.60 55.41 +.35 0.68 63.26 0.40 67.97 -.88 1.41 +.04 42.46 +.45 0.57 10.36 -.44 0.82 20.25 -.15 0.80 10.85 -.38 0.33 13.21 -.11 0.88 13.91 +.13 0.04 11.64 -.22 2.05 24.92 6.75 -.13 2.41 -.07 2.16 25.13 -.01 1.80 45.28 +.30 1.04 2.16 +.32 2.80 59.35 -.44 0.36 27.99 -.01 1.96 55.87 +.35 .83 +.03 0.04 1.72 -.01 3.19 +.15 46.67 +.03 25.13 -.04 32.45 +.18 0.28 16.69 -.38 40.55 -.75 68.02 -.61 0.72 86.05 -.28 1.00 14.69 +1.41 0.48 54.83 +.83 16.10 +.41 1.24 49.49 -.35 .24 +.02 17.72 -.03 4.71 +.18 0.10 6.51 +.18 0.76 57.94 -.54 1.64 80.85 -.68 45.79 -.16 0.20 36.22 -.50 6.40 +.24 0.92 32.51 -.24 0.28 26.86 +.12 80.38 -.52 0.30 40.67 +.47 0.60 42.59 -.24 28.57 -.93 40.68 +.33 1.81 +.01 1.64 +.25 66.71 -.29 27.31 -.09 0.68 17.65 -.15 1.43 -.02 4.50 -.04 7.98 +.35 1.44 29.62 -.47 1.28 11.91 +.05 42.55 +.05 4.00 171.48 -.87 0.12 18.01 -.12 0.32 3.90 -.02 1.36 10.77 -.01 0.40 13.96 +.11 0.60 13.02 -.14 16.14 28.88 +1.47 54.71 -1.23 2.06 30.69 -.58 1.68 66.59 +.05 0.40 7.73 +.01 .73 +.02 18.99 -.04 1.39 +.31 66.27 -.16 0.04 5.64 +.10 2.00 86.41 +.22 6.68 -.15 19.52 +.07 9.88 +.11 0.72 32.00 +.57 0.60 11.07 -.08 1.56 20.18 +.09 0.44 19.26 +.04 27.60 +.61 8.50 -.10 1.80 -.02 0.56 21.71 +.06 0.40 26.14 -.03 1.28 25.89 -.02 0.32 45.57 -.19 0.60 22.04 -.12 24.44 -.63 1.99 +.06 5.29 -.05 20.55 +.34 0.52 31.08 +.12 0.56 17.15 +.11 0.34 10.48 +.13 8.17 +.17 0.32 23.14 -.30 0.28 14.28 -.03 1.28 70.02 -.32 16.12 -.31 0.05 17.63 +.30 6.89 +.30 0.16 19.91 -.14 0.80 38.04 +.38 0.10 89.31 +.06 0.46 53.32 +.15 46.78 +1.18 7.65 -.26 0.92 64.36 +.42 0.16 24.13 -.02 19.98 +.06 6.28 +.01 0.80 17.51 +.02 0.20 17.63 +.10 3.85 -.36 23.39 +.48 0.40 125.25 -1.58 1.00 75.94 -.41 0.04 37.56 -.42 41.65 -.24 4.60 312.83 +1.81 0.84 18.63 +.01 27.12 -.28 6.30 +.05 5.28 235.26 +5.53 0.26 16.99 +.21 18.63 -.13 1.04 64.00 -.41 0.52 24.76 +.09 0.34 8.19 +.16 12.74 +.16 0.35 32.52 +.10 22.28 0.50 32.94 +.34 0.12 37.37 -.32 8.15 -.06 5.64 +.02 0.30 12.63 +.19 0.63 9.13 -.03 14.77 +.38 17.33 -.46 6.03 +.04 15.48 +.25 0.04 8.19 +.34 6.08 +.12 12.83 +.17 3.01 -.06 1.80 52.30 +.04 0.28 37.79 +.28 22.91 -.40 50.82 -.54 1.16 34.07 +.01 12.94 -.01 3.48 76.34 -1.82 1.08 66.57 -.29 0.30 42.54 +.72 1.08 65.56 -.41 13.80 +.20 4.86 +.05 0.20 38.52 -.24 0.04 6.71 -.03 2.00 23.61 +.03 0.24 6.07 -.04 1.66 12.10 -.04 .77 +.01 5.13 +.59 1.48 -.03 0.78 37.17 -.07 .40 -.03 17.05 +.16 23.34 +.34 18.67 -.09 0.68 38.79 +.51 34.45 -.10 0.40 42.99 -.30 0.72 39.02 -.29 32.79 +1.33 32.33 -.25 0.54 41.14 +.40 1.76 89.20 -.18 0.04 14.51 -.21 39.56 +.26 .92 +.14 0.20 39.49 +.01 6.05 +.14 9.26 55.64 -4.95 .38 -.00 4.21 +.09 0.43 9.88 +.16 0.86 17.61 -.22 0.80 32.21 +.61

Nm Centene CenterPnt CnElBrasil CentEuro CEurMed CFCda g CentAl CntryLink Cenveo Cephln Cepheid Cerner CerusCp ChRvLab ChrmSh ChartInds ChkPoint Checkpnt Cheesecake ChelseaTh Chemtura n CheniereEn ChesEng Chevron ChicB&I Chicos ChildPlace Chimera ChinAgri s ChinaArc h ChinaAuto ChinaBAK ChinaDigtl ChinaDir ChinaEd ChiGengM ChinaIntEn ChinaLife ChinaLdg n ChinaMM ChinaMda ChinaMed ChinaMble ChinaNepst ChNBorun n ChinNEPet ChinaPet ChinaPStl ChinaSecur ChinaShen ChinaUni ChiValve ChiXFash n ChinaYuch ChipMOS Chipotle Chiquita ChrisBnk Chubb ChungTel ChurchDwt CIBER CienaCorp Cimarex CinciBell CinnFin Cinemark Cintas Cirrus Cisco Citigp pfJ Citigrp CitzRepB h CitrixSys CityTlcm Clarient h ClaudeR g CleanEngy ClearEFd n Clearwire ClevBioL h CliffsNRs Clorox CloudPeak Coach CobaltIEn n CocaCE CocaCl Coeur CogentC CognizTech Cogo Grp CohStQIR Coinstar ColdwtrCrk ColgPal CollctvBrd ColonPT ColumLabs Comcast Comc spcl Comerica CmcBMO CmclMtls CmclVehcl CmwReit rs ComScop CmtyHlt CommVlt CBD-Pao s CompssMn Compellent CompPrdS CompSci Compuwre ComstkRs Comtech Con-Way ConAgra Concepts ConchoRes ConcurTch Conexant Conns ConocPhil ConsolEngy ConEd ConstantC ConstellA ConstellEn ContlRes Cnvrgys ConvOrg h CooperCo Cooper Ind CooperTire CopaHold Copart Corcept CoreLab s CoreLogic CorinthC CornPdts Corning CorpOffP CorrectnCp Cosan Ltd CostPlus Costamre n Costco Cott Cp CousPrp Covance CovantaH CoventryH Covidien CowenGp CrackerB Credicp CredSuiss CrSuiHiY Cree Inc CrimsnEx n Crocs Crossh glf CrosstexE CrwnCstle CrownHold Crystallx g Ctrip.com s CubistPh CullenFr Cummins CurEuro CyberDef lf Cyclacel Cymer CypSemi CypSharp CytRx h Cytec Cytokinet Cytori DCT Indl DDi Corp DG FastCh DHT Hldgs DPL DR Horton DST Sys DSW Inc DTE DanaHldg Danaher s Darden Darling DaVita DeVry DeanFds DeckOut s Deere DejourE g DelMnte Delcath Dell Inc DeltaAir DeltaPtr h Deluxe DenburyR Dndreon DenisnM g Dennys Dentsply Depomed DeutschBk DB Cap pf DB AgriDL DBGoldDL DBGoldDS DevelDiv DevonE Dex One n DexCom Diageo DiamondF DiaOffs DiamRk DianaShip DiceHldg DicksSptg Diebold

D 23.97 0.78 15.66 -.24 1.56 14.31 +.08 26.94 -.10 20.22 +.24 0.01 20.44 +.42 15.15 +.09 2.90 43.81 +.38 5.90 +.15 65.49 -.43 21.80 +.51 91.91 +.69 2.39 -.01 33.86 +.19 3.60 +.02 33.10 -.08 44.95 -.23 20.05 +.02 32.76 +.14 5.39 -.03 14.69 -.04 5.43 -.08 0.30 22.55 +.39 2.88 84.95 +.06 31.38 +.78 0.16 12.53 +.05 52.38 +.51 0.69 4.08 -.02 11.80 +.22 .50 +.01 15.06 +.25 1.70 -.01 2.00 8.50 +.04 1.34 +.07 3.25 -.20 1.84 +.27 7.80 +.04 1.54 64.25 -.57 21.79 -.62 3.12 -.22 16.51 +1.71 11.39 +.20 1.85 50.33 -.07 0.28 3.37 -.25 11.77 +.23 6.20 -.08 2.79 92.43 -2.03 1.51 -.01 5.16 -.03 3.75 +.67 0.23 13.53 -.21 10.04 +.69 10.70 -.02 0.25 29.13 +1.65 1.47 +.02 241.06 +5.11 12.56 +.52 0.24 5.51 +.15 1.48 58.75 +.12 1.27 24.34 +.01 0.68 67.40 +1.13 3.60 +.14 15.92 -.01 0.32 87.28 +.45 2.53 +.01 1.60 30.65 -.04 0.84 18.40 -.20 0.49 28.10 -.39 16.21 +.06 19.43 +.36 2.13 26.48 -.08 4.45 .63 -.01 69.56 -.70 0.52 15.50 -.15 4.99 1.58 -.02 13.98 +.21 1.40 21.29 -.31 6.19 +.16 7.20 +.16 0.56 73.63 +.05 2.20 62.06 -.43 21.02 -.56 0.60 55.91 -.70 12.78 +.33 0.48 25.32 -.17 1.76 63.99 -.51 26.92 +1.02 12.35 -.14 69.80 +.49 7.73 +.13 0.72 8.99 -.01 65.68 +1.46 3.22 -.04 2.12 77.74 -.21 19.99 -.38 0.60 18.55 -.11 1.69 +.18 0.38 20.60 -.11 0.38 19.51 -.08 0.40 39.42 -.16 0.94 37.86 -.18 0.48 16.73 +.08 16.18 +.39 2.00 25.38 +.08 31.22 -.47 31.90 -.26 31.01 +1.52 0.36 41.46 -.31 1.56 87.28 +.41 28.62 +1.11 31.66 +.20 0.60 47.06 -.04 11.05 -.03 26.00 -.40 1.00 31.28 +.31 0.40 36.13 -.10 0.92 21.91 -.17 13.10 -.21 87.01 +1.10 54.20 +.33 1.47 +.01 4.48 -.17 2.20 64.18 +.26 0.40 45.94 +.52 2.38 48.89 -.13 28.52 +1.40 21.65 -.15 0.96 28.39 -.41 57.91 +1.30 13.31 -.14 .35 +.03 0.06 53.50 -.05 1.08 56.41 +.30 0.42 23.32 +.81 1.09 58.32 +.43 33.51 +.11 4.06 -.03 0.24 89.91 +1.10 18.73 -.13 4.24 -.19 0.56 44.92 -.67 0.20 18.69 -.05 1.65 34.34 -.23 25.77 +.21 13.57 -.07 9.44 +.26 11.77 -.19 0.82 69.19 +.80 8.29 -.11 0.12 7.71 46.87 -.47 1.50 15.99 -.03 26.29 -.21 0.80 42.87 -.07 4.46 -.15 0.88 54.08 +.38 1.70 127.14 +.50 1.85 38.61 -1.18 0.32 2.96 -.03 67.61 -.27 3.70 +.15 17.82 -.01 .39 +.04 0.28 9.51 -.01 42.75 +.47 31.97 -.34 .33 +.01 44.33 +.07 21.50 -.04 1.80 56.37 +.02 1.05 104.96 +2.12 0.01 132.64 -.94 2.45 -.46 1.68 -.16 41.65 -.11 17.59 -.02 2.40 14.03 +.14 1.04 -.01 0.05 50.99 -.16 2.52 +.34 5.20 +.28 0.28 5.15 +.05 0.40 11.66 +.93 27.82 +.63 0.40 4.46 +.08 1.21 25.49 -.13 0.15 11.25 +.14 0.60 44.22 +.12 38.74 -1.18 2.24 45.30 -.28 16.16 0.08 44.74 +.16 1.28 50.11 -.21 12.65 +.11 73.40 -.69 0.24 43.88 +.12 7.26 -.05 83.11 +.23 1.40 79.04 +.73 .32 -.00 0.36 18.73 -.01 10.71 +.81 13.70 +.01 13.48 -.15 .77 +.04 1.00 21.78 -.24 19.59 +.07 38.07 -.86 3.45 +.12 3.71 -.01 0.20 32.32 -.13 5.43 -.04 0.93 50.73 -1.47 1.90 25.67 +.04 12.45 -.10 43.16 +.61 7.95 -.13 0.08 13.56 +.14 0.64 73.93 +.02 6.26 -.44 12.00 +.20 2.38 71.92 -.75 0.18 45.96 -1.35 0.50 65.72 -.51 0.03 11.01 +.04 13.22 +.07 11.47 +.51 35.53 -.42 1.08 30.56 -.44

Nm

D

DigitalRlt DigRiver Dillards DineEquity DirecTV A DrxTcBll s DrxEMBll s DrSCBear rs DREBear rs DrxEBear rs DirEMBr rs DirFnBear DrxFBull s Dir30TrBear DrxREBll s DirxSCBull DirxLCBear DirxLCBull DirxEnBull Discover DiscCm A DiscCm C DiscvLab h DishNetwk Disney DrReddy Dolan Co DolbyLab DoleFood DollarGen DllrTree s DomRescs Dominos Domtar grs DonlleyRR DoralFncl DEmmett Dover DowChm DrPepSnap DragonW g DrmWksA DressBarn DresserR DryHYSt Dril-Quip drugstre DryShips DuPont DuPFabros DukeEngy DukeRlty Dycom Dynavax Dynegy rs

2.12 53.89 -.47 36.86 +.18 0.16 35.48 +.72 55.12 +.83 40.34 -.28 6.26 43.06 +.06 5.68 38.91 -.13 17.29 -.34 0.20 19.50 -.08 25.35 -.31 21.73 +.08 10.95 +.05 24.35 -.09 7.35 41.58 -1.84 3.41 53.52 +.19 4.77 66.09 +1.20 9.60 +.02 8.06 65.56 -.18 5.06 52.33 +.52 0.08 19.04 +.20 42.89 -.03 37.40 -.02 .18 +.00 18.42 -.16 0.40 37.56 -.03 0.24 41.12 +.09 14.80 +.82 66.44 +.51 10.01 +.11 30.99 -2.44 55.04 -1.50 1.83 42.04 -.38 14.84 -.01 1.00 81.69 -.15 1.04 16.98 +.25 1.38 -.01 0.40 17.16 +.37 1.10 57.46 -.33 0.60 33.53 +.17 1.00 36.88 -.76 8.10 +.16 31.05 -.19 25.88 +.17 41.93 -.27 0.52 4.57 81.66 +1.52 1.74 -.02 6.21 +.33 1.64 48.93 -.31 0.48 22.89 -.17 0.98 17.68 -.11 0.68 11.33 -.08 13.75 +.03 2.01 +.02 5.24 -.03

E-F-G-H E-House ETrade rs eBay EDAP TMS eHealth EMC Cp EMCOR ENI EOG Res EQT Corp eResrch EagleBulk EagleMat EaglRkEn ErthLink EstWstBcp EastChm EKodak EasyLkSInt Eaton EatnVan EV LtdDur EVRiskMgd EV TxDiver EVTxMGlo EVTxGBW Ebix Inc s EchelonC EchoStar Ecolab Ecopetrol EdisonInt EducMgmt EdwLfSci s 8x8 Inc ElPasoCp ElPasoPpl Elan EldorGld g ElectArts EBrasAero Emcore EMS EmersonEl EmmisCm EmpIca Emulex EnCana g s EndvSilv g EndoPhrm EndurSpec EndWve Ener1 EnerNOC Energen Energizer EngyConv EnrgyRec EngyTsfr EgyXXI rs EnergySol Enerpls g Enersis EnerSys EnPro ENSCO Entegris Entergy EntPrPt EnterPT EntreeGold EntropCom EpicorSft Equifax Equinix EqtyOne EqtyRsd EricsnTel EssexPT EsteeLdr EtfSilver EthanAl Eurand Euronet EvergE rs EvrgrSlr h ExactSci h ExcelM ExcoRes Exelixis Exelon ExeterR gs ExideTc Expedia ExpdIntl ExpScrip s Express-1 ExterranH ExtraSpce ExtrmNet ExxonMbl EZchip Ezcorp F5 Netwks FEI Co FLIR Sys FMC Corp FMC Tech FNBCp PA FSI Intl FTI Cnslt FX Ener FXCM n FairchldS FamilyDlr Fastenal FedExCp FedRlty FedSignl FedInvst FelCor Ferrellgs Ferro FiberTw rs FibriaCelu FidlNFin FidNatInfo FifthStFin FifthThird FinEngin n Finisar FinLine FstAFin n FstBcpPR FstCwlth FstHorizon FstInRT FMidBc FstNiagara FstSolar FTNDXTc FT Fincl FT RNG FirstEngy FstMerit Fiserv FiveStar FlagstB rs Flextrn Flotek h FlowInt FlowrsFds Flowserve Fluor FocusMda FEMSA FootLockr ForcePro FordM FordM wt ForestCA ForestLab ForestOil FormFac Fortinet Fortress FortuneBr Fossil Inc FosterWhl FranceTel FrankRes FMCG FresKabi rt FreshMkt n

0.25 14.11 -.09 15.64 +.05 29.49 -.13 3.93 +.10 15.18 -.08 21.99 -.14 28.33 +.20 2.51 42.06 -.27 0.62 94.38 +.64 0.88 43.10 +.31 6.01 +.06 5.31 +.15 0.40 26.55 -.35 0.10 8.23 +.04 0.64 8.99 +.01 0.04 18.43 +.05 1.88 82.15 +.09 4.67 -.06 4.50 +.04 2.32 99.75 +.11 0.72 30.90 -.29 1.39 16.24 -.07 1.80 13.41 -.02 1.62 11.63 +.03 1.53 10.83 +.03 1.56 12.92 -.01 22.55 +.74 10.19 +.25 20.58 +.08 0.70 47.04 -.55 0.97 43.17 +1.29 1.26 38.23 +.16 14.04 +.21 68.55 +.38 2.36 -.25 0.04 13.80 -.06 1.64 33.34 +.06 5.59 +.42 0.05 18.83 +.05 15.43 +.25 0.38 29.65 -.11 1.57 +.23 53.14 +.22 1.38 56.91 +.07 .49 +.03 10.52 -.10 11.57 +.07 0.80 28.85 +.30 7.29 +.42 36.08 -.42 1.00 45.44 -.05 2.12 -.27 4.21 -.02 26.00 +.46 0.52 45.31 -.69 72.38 -.47 4.67 +.09 3.79 +.04 3.58 51.14 +.03 25.93 -.15 5.36 -.11 2.16 30.37 +.10 0.61 23.79 -.25 32.10 +.06 39.29 +.07 1.40 49.81 -.27 6.74 -.26 3.32 71.33 -1.06 2.33 41.12 2.60 47.47 +.26 2.93 -.01 10.10 +.08 10.09 +.11 0.64 35.41 -.09 83.90 +1.31 0.88 17.56 -.16 1.35 51.85 -.15 0.28 10.75 -.21 4.13 114.37 +.39 0.75 77.89 +.56 30.14 +.98 0.20 18.53 +.38 11.80 -.03 17.19 -.15 .61 -.07 .84 +.05 5.38 -.17 6.01 +.16 0.16 18.55 +.08 5.87 -.03 2.10 39.78 -.27 6.16 +.05 8.67 +.12 0.28 27.19 +.14 0.40 55.19 -.41 53.99 -.21 2.24 -.05 23.53 +.29 0.33 16.77 +.20 2.90 +.08 1.76 71.31 +.12 28.81 +.98 26.75 +.14 139.80 +.52 24.61 -.36 28.05 -.34 0.50 80.40 +.18 89.12 +.26 0.48 9.35 +.04 4.13 +.07 36.99 -.20 6.74 +.44 14.95 -.05 15.31 +.29 0.62 50.92 -.15 0.84 57.86 +.08 0.48 93.29 -1.71 2.68 77.75 -.41 0.24 6.80 -.14 0.96 24.81 +.07 6.56 +.04 2.00 26.57 -.14 15.06 +.26 4.34 -.05 16.72 -.18 0.72 13.84 -.04 0.20 28.02 -.46 1.28 11.57 +.11 0.04 13.02 -.25 16.77 -.05 24.08 +.07 0.16 18.67 -.14 0.24 14.73 -.20 .30 +.04 0.04 6.83 +.14 0.72 10.28 8.26 +.25 0.04 10.26 +.16 0.60 12.97 -.01 134.05 +3.01 0.03 25.72 -.06 0.11 14.21 -.03 0.08 19.09 +.15 2.20 35.45 -.18 0.64 18.72 +.05 57.51 -.70 6.96 +.39 1.36 +.03 7.74 +.26 4.52 -.19 3.52 +.12 0.80 25.92 -.54 1.16 113.64 +2.32 0.50 61.62 -.15 23.80 -.13 0.64 56.60 -.64 0.60 19.33 -.31 5.21 -.02 16.65 -.15 7.99 -.15 15.94 +.02 32.14 -.17 36.48 +.05 9.85 +.05 32.91 -.35 4.94 +.02 0.76 61.45 -.05 72.90 +.64 30.74 -.37 1.77 20.93 -.42 0.88 119.12 -.90 2.00 109.90 +.95 .04 +.00 37.96 -.23

Nm

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Sou ce The Assoc a ed P ess and L ppe Nm Fronteer g FrontierCm FrontierOil Frontline FuelSysSol FuelCell FultonFncl Fuqi Intl lf FurnBrds FushiCopp GFI Grp GMX Rs GSI Cmmrc GT Solar G-III GabelliET GabGldNR Gafisa s Gallaghr GameStop GamGld g Gannett Gap GardDenv Garmin Gartner GascoEngy Gastar grs GaylrdEnt GenProbe GencoShip GenCorp GnCable GenDynam GenElec GenGrPr n GenMarit GenMills s GenMoly GenMot n GM cvpfB GenSteel GenesisEn GenOn En Genpact Gentex Gentiva h GenuPrt GenVec h Genworth Genzyme GeoGrp GaGulf Gerdau GeronCp GiantIntac GigaMed Gildan GileadSci GlacierBc GlaxoSKln Gleacher GlimchRt GlobalCash GloblInd GlobPay GlbShipLs GblX Uran GlbXSilvM GloblOptns Globalstr h GlbSpcMet GolLinhas GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GoldStr g GoldS60 n GoldmanS Goodrich GoodrPet Goodyear Google GovPrpIT vjGrace Graco GrafTech Graingr Gramrcy GranTrra g GraphPkg GrtAtlPac GrtBasG g GrLkDrge GtPlainEn GreenMtC s GreenPlns GrnHCmdty Group1 GrpoFin GpTelevisa Guess GugChinSC GugGTimb GugInsidr GugMultAs GugSolar GulfRes GulfportE HCC Ins HCP Inc HSBC HSBC Cap2 HSN Inc Hallibrtn Halozyme Hanesbrds HangrOrth HanmiFncl HanoverIns HansenMed HansenNat HarbinElec HarleyD Harman Harmonic HarmonyG HarrisCorp HarrisInt h Harsco HartfdFn HarvNRes Hasbro HatterasF HawaiiEl HawHold Headwatrs HltCrREIT HlthCSvc s HltMgmt HlthcrRlty HealthNet HlthSouth HlthSprg Healthwys HrtlndEx Heckmann HeclaM Heelys Heinz HelenTroy HelixEn HelmPayne HSchein Herbalife HercOffsh HercTGC Hersha Hershey Hertz Hess HewlettP Hexcel hhgregg Hibbett HighwdPrp Hill-Rom HillenInc HimaxTch HiSoft n HollyCp Hollysys Hologic HomeDp Home Inns HomeProp HomexDev Honda HonwllIntl HooperH HorMan Hormel Hornbeck HorsehdH Hospira HospPT HostHotls

D 10.96 +.26 9.47 +.01 16.82 +.27 1.90 25.71 -.34 36.55 +.96 1.34 +.12 0.12 9.15 +.07 6.68 +.29 4.58 +.05 9.47 -.07 0.20 4.90 5.26 +.21 24.05 -.10 8.17 +.21 30.58 +1.00 0.68 5.67 +.02 1.68 18.59 +.19 0.14 14.35 -.25 1.28 28.59 -.30 21.25 -.08 7.82 +.03 0.16 14.95 +.30 0.40 21.41 -.03 0.20 69.24 -.19 1.50 31.68 -.16 33.02 -.11 .33 -.00 5.27 -.02 35.96 +.33 53.60 -.15 15.40 +.13 5.18 -.02 35.25 +.12 1.68 67.63 +.05 0.48 16.70 -.08 16.07 +.13 0.04 3.82 +.03 1.12 35.23 -.38 5.86 +.22 34.48 -.07 2.38 51.32 +.01 2.57 +.10 1.55 24.85 +.38 3.72 +.10 0.18 14.84 +.03 0.44 27.39 +.50 21.45 -.71 1.64 50.53 +.47 .48 +.02 12.41 -.14 70.71 -.20 25.61 21.89 +.10 0.32 12.85 +.08 6.12 +.11 0.18 7.09 -.08 1.54 0.30 28.67 -.20 36.71 -.54 0.52 13.57 -.03 2.00 39.08 -.11 2.68 +.09 0.40 8.80 +.09 2.75 +.22 6.47 +.01 0.08 42.16 -.60 5.15 -.15 20.15 +.14 26.83 +.74 2.52 +.02 1.50 -.02 0.15 17.27 +.04 0.40 16.69 -.30 0.16 18.13 +.01 0.36 47.83 +.76 4.68 +.13 1.53 23.88 1.40 162.65 +.34 1.16 85.95 -.51 15.91 +.41 10.42 +.49 578.36 +5.36 1.64 26.89 +.11 34.71 0.84 38.41 +.23 20.42 -.19 2.16 131.95 +.36 2.84 +.58 7.90 +.05 4.00 +.01 3.32 +.11 2.91 +.02 0.07 7.51 -.05 0.83 19.44 +.12 35.15 -1.13 10.84 -.16 31.38 +.18 0.40 39.26 -.18 16.77 +.36 0.52 24.78 +.39 0.80 47.38 +.38 0.03 32.05 -.30 0.05 20.73 -.10 0.28 31.88 +.05 0.93 19.92 -.06 7.51 +.14 11.80 +.63 21.02 +.76 0.58 28.32 -.38 1.86 33.52 -.06 1.70 52.37 -.21 2.00 27.11 -.11 30.27 +.31 0.36 40.82 -.33 7.45 +.16 27.16 -.21 20.00 +.50 .95 1.00 46.37 +.15 1.35 -.01 52.94 +.19 16.41 +.14 0.40 33.42 +.17 47.40 -.21 6.99 +.09 0.07 12.69 +.28 1.00 45.48 -.09 1.10 +.07 0.82 26.29 +.56 0.20 23.99 +.05 13.80 +.16 1.00 49.28 -.11 4.60 31.63 +.17 1.24 22.09 -.11 8.30 +.23 4.52 +.25 2.76 45.63 -.17 0.62 16.37 +.14 8.66 -.36 1.20 20.54 -.22 27.00 -.24 17.89 -.51 28.74 -.01 10.00 -.10 0.08 16.40 -.06 4.26 +.06 11.01 +.51 3.42 +.27 1.80 48.78 -.03 23.41 -.24 13.57 -.28 0.24 47.89 -.40 59.29 -.56 1.00 69.86 -.93 2.70 +.05 0.80 10.14 +.14 0.20 6.51 +.17 1.28 46.43 -.32 13.34 +.13 0.40 74.00 -.30 0.32 42.85 -.18 17.90 +.22 25.46 -.10 35.11 -.65 1.70 30.98 +.04 0.41 42.77 -.85 0.76 19.44 -.21 0.25 2.10 -.02 31.70 -.43 0.60 37.48 +.61 14.05 -.29 17.55 -.24 0.95 33.34 -.14 45.57 -1.49 2.32 54.88 -.22 34.49 -.01 37.95 -.25 1.21 51.17 -.28 .68 0.32 17.03 -.01 1.02 49.69 +.01 23.22 -.17 12.74 +.36 55.61 -1.25 1.80 22.60 -.02 0.04 17.00 +.11 0.75

Nm HotTopic HovnanE HHughes n HubGroup HubbelB HudsCity HumGen Humana HuntJB HuntBnk Huntsmn HuronCon HutchT Hyatt Hypercom Hyperdyn

D 0.28

1.44 0.60 0.48 0.04 0.40

6.24 4.16 +.10 45.30 +.96 36.27 +.81 59.78 -.56 12.04 -.05 25.27 -.33 56.41 -.63 39.05 -.09 6.46 +.05 15.75 -.02 25.66 +1.69 2.91 -.23 44.25 +.10 8.58 -.02 3.09 +.07

I-J-K-L IAC Inter 30.52 +.29 IAMGld g 0.06 17.11 +.36 ICICI Bk 0.53 50.91 -2.40 IDT Corp 0.22 23.42 -.36 iGateCorp 0.26 20.04 +.09 ING GRE 0.54 7.77 +.07 ING GlbDv 1.20 11.34 -.11 ING 9.81 -.22 INGPrRTr 0.31 5.72 -.01 ION Geoph 8.08 +.43 iShGold s 13.94 +.12 iShGSCI 32.99 -.08 iSAstla 0.81 24.90 -.15 iShBraz 2.58 77.69 -.46 iSCan 0.42 30.56 +.06 iShEMU 0.96 34.84 -.46 iShGer 0.30 24.07 -.17 iSh HK 0.48 19.22 -.17 iShJapn 0.16 10.69 +.05 iSh Kor 0.39 57.19 -.12 iSMalas 0.25 13.94 -.02 iShMex 0.75 60.89 +.21 iShSing 0.38 13.71 -.02 iSPacxJpn 1.37 46.35 -.44 iShSoAfr 1.36 72.26 +.39 iSSpain 2.26 37.64 -.86 iSTaiwn 0.21 14.92 +.14 iSh UK 0.44 17.10 +.02 iShChile 0.68 77.63 -.76 iShTurkey 1.22 70.81 +.15 iShSilver 29.51 +.91 iShS&P100 1.08 55.06 -.07 iShDJDv 1.69 49.02 -.05 iShBTips 2.53 108.97 +.43 iShAsiaexJ 0.87 63.48 -.22 iShChina25 0.68 43.84 -.58 iShDJTr 1.01 91.39 -.38 iSSP500 2.34 123.13 -.15 iShBAgB 3.90 106.65 +.39 iShEMkts 0.59 47.06 -.08 iShiBxB 5.27 109.66 +.76 iShEMBd 5.67 109.35 +.44 iShIndones 0.08 29.82 +.13 iSSPGth 1.13 64.79 -.06 iSSPGlbEn 0.82 37.78 +.16 iShNatRes 0.36 40.77 +.28 iShSPLatA 1.22 53.21 +.04 iSSPVal 1.24 57.46 -.09 iShNMuBd 3.74 101.48 -.13 iShB20 T 3.86 96.23 +1.34 iShB7-10T 3.26 96.50 +.60 iShB1-3T 0.88 84.22 +.05 iS Eafe 1.38 57.15 -.26 iSRusMCV 0.83 43.88 iSRusMCG 0.52 55.73 iShRsMd 1.42 99.55 +.02 iSSPMid 0.99 88.73 +.04 iShiBxHYB 7.85 89.37 -.05 iShs SOX 0.44 55.98 -.03 iShNifty50 0.12 30.61 -.04 iShNsdqBio 88.94 -.44 iShC&SRl 1.85 64.83 +.06 iShBFxBd 6.22 106.36 +.31 iShBarcGv 2.47 109.03 +.51 iSR1KV 1.28 62.74 -.06 iSMCGth 0.57 99.17 +.01 iSR1KG 0.72 56.41 -.01 iSRus1K 1.11 68.20 -.03 iSR2KV 1.06 69.05 +.45 iShBarIntC 4.53 106.44 +.25 iShBarc1-3 3.11 104.64 +.04 iSR2KG 0.47 85.29 +.58 iShR2K 0.79 76.14 +.47 iShBar3-7 2.51 116.87 +.44 iShBShtT 0.08 110.23 +.01 iShUSPfd 2.87 39.01 -.08 iSRus3K 1.19 73.15 -.01 iShDJTel 0.67 22.65 +.06 iShREst 1.88 55.35 +.03 iShFnSc 0.59 55.01 -.03 iShSPSm 0.58 66.79 +.38 iShBasM 0.91 74.64 +.29 iShPeru 0.89 50.41 +.41 iShEur350 1.02 38.48 -.39 iSMsciV 1.54 49.87 -.28 iStar 6.05 -.07 ITT Corp 1.00 49.25 +.37 ITT Ed 59.89 +.15 Icon PLC 19.72 -.15 IconixBr 18.85 -.27 IDEX 0.60 38.87 -.41 Ikanos 1.30 +.01 ITW 1.36 50.23 -.18 Illumina 62.90 +.04 Imax Corp 26.46 +.18 ImunoGn 8.35 +.01 Imunmd 3.49 +.14 ImpaxLabs 18.38 +.27 Incyte 15.91 +.26 IndoTel 1.25 36.40 -.06 Inergy 2.82 38.50 +.34 Infinera 9.31 +.40 Informat 43.33 -.48 InfoSvcs wt .01 +.00 InfosysT 0.90 69.48 +.15 IngerRd 0.28 43.02 +.11 IngrmM 18.39 -.01 Inhibitex 2.81 +.06 InlandRE 0.57 8.72 +.02 InovioPhm 1.12 +.01 Insmed h .64 -.01 InspPhar 6.96 -.03 IntgDv 6.86 -.19 ISSI 8.27 +.02 IntegrysE 2.72 48.03 +.22 Intel 0.72 21.70 +.01 InteractBrk 1.79 19.12 -.12 interClick 6.31 +.09 IntcntlEx 117.94 +1.18 IntCtlHtl 0.42 19.38 +.13 InterDig 35.54 +.42 Intrface 0.08 14.46 +.08 Interline 21.71 +.16 InterMune 12.77 +.03 IBM 2.60 144.99 -.39 Intl Coal 8.14 +.14 IntFlav 1.08 54.71 -.32 IntlGame 0.24 17.12 +.79 IntPap 0.50 26.39 +.15 IntlRectif 29.54 +.05 IntTower g 9.59 -.01 IntntHTr 0.20 72.58 +.52 InterOil g 79.39 +.83 Interpublic 10.96 +.14 Intersil 0.48 14.67 +.14 IntraLks n 20.43 -.44 IntPotash 32.86 +.47 Intuit 46.81 -.12 IntSurg 270.19 -1.13 Invacare 0.05 28.13 +.08 Invesco 0.44 22.82 -.17 InvMtgCap 3.57 23.26 +.12 InvVKMOT 1.03 13.50 -1.60 InVKSrInc 0.29 4.75 -.06 IridiumCm 9.29 +.05 IronMtn 0.25 23.14 -.23 IsilonSys 33.82 +.06 Isis 9.51 -.01 ItauUnibH 0.60 23.54 -.24 Itron 54.20 +.36 IvanhoeEn 2.37 IvanhM g 28.02 +1.05 Ixia 14.88 +.13 JCrew 44.04 -.09 j2Global 29.92 +1.90 JA Solar 7.57 +.20 JDS Uniph 12.85 +.12 JPMorgCh 0.20 39.91 +.29 JPMAlerian 1.81 35.79 +.05 Jabil 0.28 16.35 +.19 JackHenry 0.38 28.58 +.14 JackInBox 21.14 +.09 JacksnHew .77 JacobsEng 41.67 +.39 Jaguar g 7.45 +.31 Jamba 2.20 -.02 JamesRiv 23.62 +.61 JanusCap 0.04 11.59 -.01

nc Sa es gu es a e uno c a

Nm Jarden JazzPhrm Jefferies JetBlue JinkoSol n JoAnnStrs JoesJeans JohnJn JohnsnCtl JonesGrp JonesLL JonesSoda JosABnk s JournalCm JoyGlbl JnprNtwk KB Home KBR Inc KKR n KKR Fn KLA Tnc KT Corp KaiserAlu KC Southn KapStone KA MLP Kellogg KellySA Kemet rs Kennamtl KeryxBio KeyEngy Keycorp KilroyR KimberR g KimbClk Kimco KindME KindredHlt KineticC KingPhrm Kinross g KirbyCp Kirklands KnghtCap KnightTr KnightT KodiakO g Kohls KopinCp Koppers KoreaElc Kraft KratonPP n KrispKrm Kroger Ku6Media Kulicke L&L Egy n L-1 Ident L-3 Com LDK Solar LG Display LHC Grp LJ Intl LKQ Corp LML Pay LPL Inv n LSI Corp LTXCrd rs LaZBoy LabCp LaBrnch LamResrch LamarAdv Landstar LVSands LaSalleH Lattice LawsnSft Lazard LeapWirlss LeapFrog LearCorp LeggMason LeggPlat LenderPS LennarA Lennox LeucNatl Level3 h LexiPhrm LexRltyTr Lexmark LbtyASE LibGlobA LibGlobC LibtyMIntA LibMCapA LibStarzA LibtProp LifeTech LifeTFit LifePtH Lihua Intl LillyEli LimelghtN Limited Lincare s LincNat Lindsay LinearTch LinnEngy Lionbrdg LionsGt g Liquidity LiveNatn LivePrsn LizClaib LloydBkg Local.com LockhdM LodgeNet Loews Logitech LongtopFn LongweiPI Lorillard LaPac Lowes Lubrizol LucasEngy lululemn g LumberLiq LyonBas A

D 0.33 31.20 -.43 18.57 +.59 0.30 26.09 +.12 7.10 +.20 23.66 -.04 47.01 +.07 1.60 +.01 2.16 62.20 -.36 0.64 39.50 +.31 0.20 14.80 +.09 0.20 84.14 -.90 1.21 +.06 42.83 +.02 4.70 -.01 0.70 80.50 +1.02 34.15 -.17 0.25 12.76 +.33 0.20 29.76 +.11 0.23 12.89 +.12 0.56 9.38 +.05 1.00 39.81 -.35 20.92 +.23 0.96 50.81 +.81 48.97 -.32 14.89 -.27 1.92 28.94 -.01 1.62 49.30 -.20 19.53 +.73 14.22 +.26 0.48 37.08 +.28 4.94 -.02 11.25 +.21 0.04 8.18 -.02 1.40 33.80 +.06 1.62 +.09 2.64 61.68 -.33 0.72 17.53 +.25 4.44 70.79 +.16 16.92 -.11 41.43 +.22 14.21 0.10 19.20 +.45 44.99 -.40 13.67 -.22 13.75 -.01 0.24 19.72 +.01 1.70 23.31 +.30 5.37 +.18 55.00 -.01 4.10 +.09 0.88 30.05 +.44 12.50 -.10 1.16 30.29 -.03 28.23 +.05 7.22 -.08 0.42 20.63 -.48 7.14 -.86 7.41 +.29 13.13 +.69 11.85 +.01 1.60 72.49 -.76 11.25 +.56 18.23 +.42 24.25 -.49 3.95 -.07 22.52 +.48 3.55 +.07 35.38 +.67 5.96 -.01 7.40 -1.05 8.49 +.15 83.08 -.65 3.18 +.03 49.49 +.27 39.54 +.20 0.20 39.58 +.29 49.02 -.22 0.44 24.86 +.20 5.22 +.21 9.05 -.02 0.50 38.18 +.27 10.94 -.61 6.27 +.31 94.20 +.17 0.24 35.05 1.08 21.80 -.01 0.40 29.23 -1.79 0.16 17.41 +.15 0.60 46.45 +.23 27.54 +.37 .98 -.00 1.36 +.04 0.46 8.21 -.04 37.41 -.43 0.29 4.80 -.03 36.98 +1.52 34.87 +1.07 16.03 +.08 60.32 +1.26 64.36 -.55 1.90 31.10 -.04 53.22 +.14 38.98 -.22 34.97 11.77 +.26 1.96 33.97 -.17 7.00 +.28 0.60 31.81 -.02 0.80 25.49 -.22 0.20 25.07 -.14 0.34 64.71 +2.63 0.92 34.13 -.21 2.64 36.97 +.31 3.56 +.13 7.25 -.11 15.13 +.42 11.61 +.19 10.50 +.66 7.61 1.45 4.16 -.04 5.07 -.41 3.00 68.78 -.40 3.91 +.40 0.25 38.03 -.10 20.41 -.19 38.60 -1.15 2.65 -.19 4.50 81.90 +.15 9.14 -.08 0.44 24.82 -.04 1.44 109.60 -.23 2.55 -.15 55.26 +1.88 25.88 +.80 31.08 +.56

M-N-O-P M&T Bk MAG Slv g MBIA MCG Cap MDC MDU Res MELA Sci MEMC MER Tel rs MF Global MFA Fncl MIN h MGIC MGM Rsts MIPS Tech MKS Inst MPG OffTr MSCI Inc Macerich MackCali Macys MadCatz g MSG n MagelMPtr MagicSft Magma MagnaI gs MagHRes MAKO Srg Manitowoc MannKd ManpwI Manulife g MarathonO MktVGold MkVStrMet MktVRus MktVJrGld MktV Agri MkVBrzSC MktV Viet MktVCoal MarkWest MarIntA MarshM MarshIls Martek MarvellT Masco

2.80 79.64 -1.22 12.24 +.47 10.05 -.31 0.37 7.11 -.07 1.00 26.95 +.01 0.65 20.50 -.22 3.33 -.07 11.95 +.06 2.90 +.19 7.97 -.13 0.90 8.19 -.01 0.57 6.70 -.01 9.34 +.03 13.27 -.23 13.82 -.18 20.94 -.36 2.42 +.01 36.38 -.22 2.00 47.96 -.28 1.80 31.15 -.34 0.20 25.18 +.12 .90 +.02 24.48 +.72 2.98 55.45 +.13 0.50 6.56 +.47 4.28 -.12 0.72 51.44 -.06 5.94 -.07 12.20 +.26 0.08 12.65 +.72 6.56 +.22 0.74 59.95 +.39 0.52 15.17 +.22 1.00 34.78 -.33 0.11 63.80 +1.09 21.01 +.14 0.08 36.95 +.24 43.94 +.98 0.42 51.55 -.13 0.45 60.67 -.53 0.04 27.70 +.69 0.31 45.66 +.66 2.56 41.87 +.32 0.35 41.00 +.01 0.84 26.24 +.15 0.04 5.59 -.01 23.63 +.53 20.24 -.20 0.30 11.99

Nm Masimo MasseyEn Mastec MasterCrd Mattel Mattson MaximIntg McClatchy McCorm McDrmInt s McDnlds McGrwH McKesson McMoRn McAfee MeadJohn MeadWvco Mechel Mechel pf MecoxL n MedAssets MedcoHlth Mediacom MedicActn MedProp Medicis Medifast Medtrnic MelcoCrwn Mellanox MensW MentorGr MercadoL MercerIntl Merck MercGn Meredith Mesab Metalico Metalline Methanx MetLife MetroPCS MetroHlth Micrel Microchp Micromet MicronT MicroSemi Microsoft Micrvisn MdwGold g Millicom MincoG g MindrayM Mindspeed Minefnd g MinesMgt MitsuUFJ MizuhoFn MobileTel s Modine ModusLink Mohawk Molex MolsCoorB Molycorp n Momenta MonPwSys Monotype Monsanto MonstrWw Montpelr Moodys Moog A MorgStan MorgHtl Mosaic Motorola Motricity n Movado Move Inc MuellerWat MurphO Mylan MyriadG NCR Corp NETgear NFJDvInt NGAS Rs h NIC Inc NII Hldg NIVS IntT NPS Phm NRG Egy NV Energy NXP Sem n NYSE Eur Nabors NalcoHld Nanomtr NasdOMX NBkGreece NatlBevrg NatFuGas NatGrid NOilVarco NatPenn NatRetPrp NatSemi NatwHP Navios Navistar NektarTh NeoStem Net1UEPS NetLogic s NetApp Netease Netflix Netlist NtScout NetSolTch NetSuite NetwkEng NeuStar NeutTand Nevsun g NDragon NGenBiof h NwGold g NewOriEd NY CmtyB NY Times NewAlliBc Newcastle NewellRub NewfldExp NewmtM NewpkRes Newport NewsCpA NewsCpB Nexen g NextEraEn NiSource Nicor NikeB 99 Cents NipponTT NoahHld n NobleCorp NobleEn NokiaCp Nomura Noranda n NordicAm Nordstrm NorflkSo NoAmEn g NA Pall g NoestUt NDynMn g NthnO&G NorTrst NthgtM g NorthropG NStarRlt NwstBcsh NwstNG NovaMeas NovaGld g Novartis NovtlWrls Novavax Novell Novlus NSTAR NuVasive NuanceCm Nucor NutriSyst NvIMO NuvMuVal NvMSI&G2 NuvPI2

D 2.75 31.58 -.38 0.24 51.63 +1.21 14.93 +.32 0.60 253.16 +4.08 0.83 25.74 -.28 3.04 +.05 0.84 24.31 -.04 3.55 +.20 1.12 46.14 -.12 19.40 +.07 2.44 79.58 -.18 0.94 35.79 +.10 0.72 66.56 -.45 15.80 +.46 46.93 +.02 0.90 62.11 +.07 1.00 26.52 -.34 26.76 -.34 8.23 +.10 6.90 -.90 19.60 +.12 63.11 -.31 8.48 -.02 7.97 +.01 0.80 10.47 -.04 0.24 26.97 -.23 29.40 +1.95 0.90 33.94 -.27 6.01 -.04 25.27 -.07 0.36 28.64 -.05 11.98 +.07 69.80 +.44 7.03 -.05 1.52 35.25 -.05 2.40 44.36 -.13 0.92 34.34 +.16 2.39 53.18 +3.36 5.08 +.22 1.05 +.09 0.62 29.85 -1.05 0.74 40.75 +.61 12.42 +.06 4.39 +.04 0.14 13.40 +.06 1.38 35.49 -.17 7.87 +.34 7.96 +.04 24.03 +.08 0.64 26.84 -.18 1.79 +.22 .91 +.04 7.24 88.91 +.05 2.17 +.03 0.20 26.74 +.16 6.59 +.10 10.74 +.46 3.58 +.70 4.86 -.01 3.31 +.02 21.11 -.18 15.60 +.45 6.99 +.15 56.94 +.92 0.70 22.03 -.06 1.12 49.01 -.35 32.86 +5.06 15.47 -.25 17.29 -.14 11.06 +.16 1.12 62.50 -.32 23.23 +.03 0.40 19.90 -.20 0.42 26.71 -.33 39.84 +.39 0.20 25.54 -.10 8.27 +.55 0.20 69.32 +.22 8.19 -.05 24.80 +1.12 16.25 +.35 2.85 +.16 0.07 3.69 -.03 1.10 70.92 +.01 20.16 +.26 21.63 -.03 14.30 -.16 33.17 +.53 0.60 16.14 +.05 .41 -.06 0.30 8.81 +.09 41.58 +.02 2.31 -.06 6.38 +.06 19.09 -.06 0.48 13.90 -.02 15.94 -.20 1.20 28.94 -.11 23.83 +.24 0.14 31.15 +.24 12.56 +.04 22.81 +.18 0.29 1.83 2.30 14.74 +.78 1.38 64.45 -.84 7.04 43.88 -.47 0.44 63.31 +.31 0.04 7.46 +.40 1.52 27.11 -.08 0.40 14.70 -.07 1.88 35.30 -.12 0.24 5.54 +.10 57.98 -.67 13.48 +.18 1.64 +.13 12.48 -.06 33.43 +.38 53.27 -.80 39.77 +.15 193.47 +8.02 2.45 -.06 22.99 -.17 1.54 +.04 26.70 -.41 1.59 +.04 26.15 -.06 15.46 +.20 6.84 +.35 .03 +.00 .09 +.00 10.14 +.03 101.73 -1.43 1.00 17.50 +.20 9.38 +.22 0.28 13.92 -.03 6.09 +.18 0.20 17.58 -.11 70.87 +.74 0.60 63.45 +1.24 6.21 +.10 16.53 -.01 0.15 14.22 -.09 0.15 16.06 -.08 0.20 22.22 +.17 2.00 50.91 -.19 0.92 16.94 -.02 1.86 46.76 +1.90 1.24 87.73 +.20 16.10 +.09 22.92 +.06 18.00 -1.07 0.90 33.85 +.26 0.72 85.32 -.30 0.56 9.93 -.07 5.93 -.01 11.59 +.09 1.70 26.08 +.48 0.80 42.62 +.80 1.44 62.71 -.17 9.64 -.21 6.42 +.08 1.03 31.52 -.12 9.90 -.13 24.38 -.06 1.12 52.64 -.18 3.17 +.09 1.88 63.72 +.51 0.40 4.36 +.09 0.40 10.81 -.11 1.74 45.90 -1.08 7.86 +.22 16.19 +1.27 1.99 54.50 -.25 9.56 +.15 2.23 -.01 5.96 +.02 31.75 -.46 1.70 41.77 -.03 22.34 -.66 18.18 +.09 1.44 39.74 -.17 0.70 19.77 +.56 0.86 13.46 -.14 0.47 9.30 -.08 0.70 8.96 +.04 0.89 13.50

D

NuvQInc 0.95 13.56 -.10 NuvQPf2 0.66 8.02 -.06 Nvidia 14.51 -.28 NxStageMd 23.14 OGE Engy 1.50 45.08 OReillyA h 61.19 -.42 OasisPet n 27.11 -.49 OcciPet 1.52 93.05 +1.31 Oceaneer 72.86 -.01 OceanFr rs 1.04 +.04 Oclaro rs 11.71 -.47 OcwenFn 9.21 +.07 OfficeDpt 4.84 -.05 OfficeMax 18.74 +.15 OilSvHT 2.54 137.74 +.15 OilStates 62.83 +.49 Oilsands g .42 +.00 OldDomF s 30.85 +.20 OldNBcp 0.28 10.97 -.08 OldRepub 0.69 12.87 +.01 Olin 0.80 19.30 +.22 OmegaHlt 1.48 21.15 -.22 Omncre 0.13 22.95 -.21 Omnicom 0.80 47.51 +.20 OmniVisn 31.49 +.37 Omnova 8.94 -.02 OnSmcnd 9.13 -.09 Oncolyt g 5.84 +.77 ONEOK 1.92 53.25 +.27 OnyxPh 29.34 -.03 OpenTxt 44.66 +.64 OpenTable 73.72 +1.44 OpnwvSy 2.29 +.02 Opnext 1.56 -.01 optXprs 4.50 20.07 +.98 Oracle 0.20 28.73 -.08 OrbitalSci 17.19 +.17 Orbitz 5.76 +.12 Orbotch 11.82 +.25 Orexigen 4.76 -.05 OrientEH 11.70 -.20 OrienPap n 6.53 -.12 OrientFn 0.20 11.84 -.11 OriginAg 9.19 +.34 Oritani s 0.40 11.55 +.12 Orthovta 1.99 +.02 OshkoshCp 32.41 +.51 OvShip 1.75 35.96 +.64 OwensM s 0.71 28.00 -.18 OwensCorn 27.73 +.34 OwensIll 28.89 -.02 Oxigene h .21 +.01 PDL Bio 1.00 5.82 -.05 PF Chng 0.63 51.67 +.43 PG&E Cp 1.82 47.63 -.50 PHH Corp 21.30 -.17 Pim15TIPS 1.45 55.75 +.54 PMC Sra 8.38 +.06 PMI Grp 3.46 +.06 PNC 0.40 57.31 +.05 PNM Res 0.50 12.05 -.10 POSCO 1.43 103.94 -.14 PPG 2.20 79.95 -.85 PPL Corp 1.40 25.96 +.05 PSS Wrld 21.51 +.29 Paccar 0.48 55.73 -.53 PacerIntl 6.01 +.33 PacBiosci n 13.25 +.28 PacCapB h .32 +.01 PacEth h .64 -.04 PacSunwr 6.31 +.07 PackAmer 0.60 26.48 -.28 PaetecHld 3.85 +.06 PallCorp 0.64 48.34 +.74 vjPalmHH .13 +.01 PanASlv 0.10 40.92 +.97 PaneraBrd 102.51 -.34 ParPharm 37.69 +.69 ParagShip 0.20 3.58 +.05 ParamTch 22.54 +.05 ParaG&S 1.81 +.01 Parexel 18.60 +.33 ParkDrl 4.22 +.14 ParkerHan 1.16 84.70 +.48 PrtnrCm 3.99 21.15 -.06 PartnerRe 2.20 77.81 -.42 PatriotCoal 18.25 +.75 Patterson 0.40 30.02 -.50 PattUTI 0.20 22.30 +.40 Paychex 1.24 29.48 -.20 PeabdyE 0.34 63.15 -.13 Pengrth g 0.84 13.12 +.04 PnnNGm 36.43 -.27 PennVa 0.23 18.39 +1.05 PennWst g 1.08 21.82 -.25 Penney 0.80 34.42 +.64 PenRE 0.60 14.42 +.42 Penske 16.13 -.05 Pentair 0.76 34.27 +.23 PeopUtdF 0.62 13.03 +.07 PepBoy 0.12 12.96 +.33 PepcoHold 1.08 18.63 +.03 PepsiCo 1.92 64.73 -.44 PerfectWld 23.60 +.20 PerkElm 0.28 24.42 -.35 Perrigo 0.28 64.31 +.19 PetMed 0.50 18.01 +.03 PetChina 3.97 128.95 -.20 Petrohawk 19.24 -.37 PetrbrsA 1.12 31.28 +.14 Petrobras 1.12 34.62 +.23 PetroDev 38.73 +.63 PtroqstE 7.46 +.02 PetsMart 0.50 39.06 -.28 Pfizer 0.72 16.81 +.09 PhrmAth 3.67 -.04 PhmHTr 2.36 63.99 -.15 PharmPdt 0.60 25.64 -.24 Pharmacyc 5.41 -.37 Pharmasset 48.83 +1.63 PhilipMor 2.56 58.53 +.41 PhilipsEl 0.95 29.56 -.69 PhlVH 0.15 69.38 -.62 PhnxCos 2.33 +.06 PhotrIn 6.88 +.06 PiedNG 1.12 28.20 -.88 PiedmOfc n 1.26 19.80 +.05 Pier 1 10.64 +.34 PilgrmsP n 6.63 -.11 PimCpOp 1.38 17.10 +.03 PimcoHiI 1.46 13.26 +.05 PimcoMu2 0.78 10.28 -.11 PinnclEnt 13.85 -.19 PinnaclFn 11.02 +.24 PinWst 2.10 40.93 -.07 PionDrill 7.52 +.18 PioNtrl 0.08 84.79 +.74 PitnyBw 1.46 22.69 +.02 PlainsAA 3.80 61.60 +.13 PlainsEx 30.81 +.24 PlatGpMet 2.19 -.05 Plexus 28.29 +.08 PlugPwr h .40 -.00 PlumCrk 1.68 37.43 -.18 Polo RL 0.40 111.25 -.87 Polycom 38.59 -.25 PolyMet g 2.22 +.12 PolyOne 12.87 -.12 Polypore 42.02 +5.90 Popular 2.89 -.04 PortGE 1.04 21.83 -.06 PostPrp 0.80 34.38 -.06 Potash 0.40 143.97 -.19 PwrInteg 0.20 40.88 -.99 Power-One 10.39 -.18 PwshDB 26.33 -.03 PS Agri 30.47 +.11 PS BasMet 22.48 -.03 PS USDBull 22.99 +.11 PwSClnEn 10.24 +.16 PwSWtr 0.11 18.62 +.13 PSTechLdr 0.02 23.38 -.02 PSFinPf 1.31 17.77 +.02 PSETecLd 0.11 18.53 -.10 PSHYCpBd 1.49 18.23 -.01 PwShPfd 1.01 14.27 +.02 PShEMSov 1.60 27.32 +.01 PShGClnEn 0.01 13.71 +.02 PwShs QQQ 0.33 53.85 -.03 PSS&PBW 0.26 22.05 +.01 Powrwav 2.45 +.24 Praxair 1.80 93.80 -.40 PrecCastpt 0.12 142.44 -.32 PrecDrill 9.19 +.10 PremGlbSv 6.97 -.19 PrmWBc h .41 -.00 Prestige 11.79 -.11 PriceTR 1.08 61.58 +.26 priceline 417.16 +3.05 PrideIntl 32.56 +.33 Primerica n 0.04 23.55 +.34 PrinctnR 1.20 -.01 PrinFncl 0.55 30.02 +.34 PrisaA n 7.30 PrisaB n 9.04 +.05 PrivateB 0.04 13.23 +.25 ProShtQQQ 35.19 +.03 ProShtS&P 45.23 +.06 PrUShS&P 25.27 +.07 ProUltDow 0.40 52.40 -.12 PrUlShDow 21.62 +.07 ProUltQQQ 79.31 -.07 PrUShQQQ 11.97 +.02 ProUltSP 0.43 45.28 -.10 ProUShL20 36.04 -.99 PrUSCh25 rs 29.55 +.70 ProUSRE rs 19.03 -.04 ProUSOG rs 40.33 -.32 ProUSBM rs 20.92 -.15 ProUltRE rs 0.41 48.53 +.09 ProUShtFn 17.38 +.03 ProUFin rs 0.09 60.28 -.06 PrUPShQQQ 32.57 +.04 ProUltO&G 0.23 42.68 +.26 ProUBasM 0.10 46.79 +.39 ProUShEur 15.27 +.26 ProShtR2K 33.27 -.25 ProUltPQQQ 142.08 -.25 ProUSR2K 13.45 -.14 ProUltR2K 0.01 40.14 +.49 ProUSSP500 21.24 +.04 ProUltSP500 0.48 187.62 -.61 ProUltCrude 11.96 -.04 ProSUltGold 71.51 +1.10 ProUSGld rs 27.85 -.47 ProUSSlv rs 10.55 -.69 ProUShCrude 10.70 +.04 ProSUltSilv 153.40 +8.83 ProUShEuro 20.52 +.31 ProctGam 1.93 62.06 -.27 ProgrssEn 2.48 43.76 -.21 ProgsvCp 1.16 20.78 -.07 ProLogis 0.45 13.87 +.13 ProspctCap 1.21 10.03 +.08 Protalix 8.84 +.06 ProtLife 0.56 25.07 -.09 ProvET g 0.72 7.81 +.07 ProvidFS 0.44 14.39 +.14 Prudentl 1.15 53.45 -.19 PsychmCp 0.48 7.48 -.61 PSEG 1.37 31.44 +.05

Nm PubStrg PudaCoal PulteGrp PMMI PMIIT PPrIT

D 3.20 98.94 15.72 6.68 0.53 6.96 0.52 5.90 0.71 6.46

Nm -.24 +.31 -.03 -.04 -.04 -.03

Q-R-S-T QEP Res n 0.08 37.36 +.35 QIAGEN 18.78 -.30 QiaoXing 2.01 +.16 QlikTech n 23.35 +.45 Qlogic 17.94 -.10 Qualcom 0.76 48.32 -.50 QltyDistr 8.58 +.16 QuanexBld 0.16 18.21 -.14 QuantaSvc 19.00 +.27 QntmDSS 3.82 -.09 QuantFu h .50 -.01 QstDiag 0.40 50.10 QuestSft 27.29 +.12 Questar s 0.56 17.99 +.17 Questcor 14.00 -.08 QuickLog 6.25 +.04 QksilvRes 15.02 +.08 Quidel 13.67 +.31 Quiksilvr 4.65 +.02 QwestCm 0.32 7.18 +.06 RAIT Fin 1.85 +.03 RF MicD 7.36 +.01 RLI Cp 1.16 58.30 +.39 RPC 0.28 32.01 +1.30 RPM 0.84 20.45 -.63 RSC Hldgs 8.60 +.11 RXi Phrm 3.83 +.35 Rackspace 30.49 +.29 RadianGrp 0.01 7.41 -.10 RadntSys 18.94 -.17 RadientPh .34 -.06 RadioShk 0.25 19.04 -.52 Radware 39.77 +7.01 Ralcorp 61.64 -.70 Rambus 21.30 +.65 Randgold 0.17 93.45 -.14 RangeRs 0.16 45.49 -.15 RaptorPhm 3.78 +.11 RareEle g 11.20 +1.38 RJamesFn 0.52 30.86 -.04 Rayonier 2.16 52.41 -.53 Raytheon 1.50 47.20 -.23 RealD n 28.19 -1.21 RealNwk 3.73 +.04 RealPage n 25.85 -2.19 RltyInco 1.73 33.84 -.18 RedHat 46.92 -.53 Rdiff.cm 4.39 -.10 RedwdTr 1.00 14.41 +.10 RegalBel 0.68 62.23 +.57 RegalEnt 0.84 14.94 +.08 RgcyCtrs 1.85 41.95 +.40 RegncyEn 1.78 26.52 +.05 Regenrn 30.14 +.16 RegionsFn 0.04 6.07 -.01 Regis Cp 0.16 18.55 -.11 ReinsGrp 0.48 51.16 -.08 RelStlAl 0.40 49.74 +.22 ReneSola 9.36 +.31 RentACt 0.24 28.61 -.22 Rentech 1.26 +.01 Repsol 1.15 26.25 -.38 RepubAir 7.61 +.01 RepubSvc 0.80 28.79 RschMotn 63.33 +.68 ResMed s 33.40 -.14 ResoluteEn 13.58 +.10 ResrceCap 1.00 6.93 +.13 ResConn 0.16 17.77 +.30 RetailHT 1.79 105.12 +.04 RexEnergy 12.91 +.43 RexahnPh 1.10 +.02 ReynAm s 1.96 32.58 +.23 RigelPh 8.30 +.04 RightNow 24.95 RioTinto s 0.90 70.31 +.23 RitchieBr 0.42 20.48 +.31 RiteAid .94 Riverbed s 35.57 +.75 RobbMyer 0.17 33.24 +.28 RobtHalf 0.52 29.63 -.13 RockTen 0.80 56.05 +.15 RockwlAut 1.40 68.76 +.37 RockColl 0.96 58.30 +.16 RockwdH 39.60 -.17 RodmanR 2.42 +.02 RogCm gs 1.28 35.09 +.14 Roper 0.38 75.93 +.64 RosettaR 37.65 -.05 RossStrs 0.64 64.74 -.39 Rovi Corp 55.93 +.03 Rowan 32.03 -.17 RoyalBk g 2.00 52.10 -1.07 RBScotlnd 12.97 -.16 RylCarb 42.42 -.22 RoyDShllB 3.36 63.48 -.07 RoyDShllA 3.36 63.84 -.03 RoyGld 0.44 53.62 +.92 Rubicon g 5.93 +.10 RubiconTc 23.58 +.21 RubyTues 13.73 +.45 Ruddick 0.52 37.87 +.02 Rural/Met 11.97 RushEntA 20.34 +.79 RuthsHosp 5.00 -.10 Ryanair 2.29 30.55 -.69 Ryder 1.08 45.37 +.17 RdxSPEW 0.62 46.05 -.03 RdxMCGth 0.04 78.67 +.18 Ryland 0.12 16.07 +.13 SAIC 15.77 -.11 SAP AG 0.67 48.83 -.18 SBA Com 40.05 +.19 SCANA 1.90 41.12 -.06 SEI Inv 0.20 23.85 +.01 SK Tlcm 18.92 +.26 SLGreen 0.40 67.03 +1.14 SLM Cp 11.88 -.24 SM Energy 0.10 53.68 +1.03 SpdrDJIA 2.57 113.74 -.20 SpdrGold 139.11 +1.04 SpdrIntlSC 0.42 29.77 +.11 SP Mid 1.54 161.31 +.07 S&P500ETF 2.31 122.76 -.13 Spdr Div 1.68 51.16 -.25 SpdrHome 0.12 16.89 +.09 SpdrKbwBk 0.11 23.78 -.11 SpdrKbwIns 0.43 41.00 SpdrLehHY 4.13 40.00 -.04 SpdrNuBST 0.43 24.05 +.03 SpdrNuBMu 0.88 22.48 -.16 SpdrLe1-3bll 45.85 -.01 SpdrKbw RB 0.30 24.18 +.21 SpdrRetl 0.57 48.04 -.04 SpdrOGEx 0.20 50.95 +.28 SpdrOGEq 0.12 36.42 +.13 SpdrMetM 0.35 66.60 +1.01 SPX Cp 1.00 70.75 +1.14 STEC 16.90 +.04 STMicro 0.28 10.11 +.09 STR Hldgs 19.34 +.23 SVB FnGp 49.75 +.41 SWS Grp 0.04 4.81 -.44 SXC Hlth s 45.36 -.01 SABESP 0.84 49.88 +.20 Safeway 0.48 21.46 -.34 StJoe 18.49 -.14 StJude 40.54 +.07 Saks 11.43 -.15 Salesforce 145.23 +2.42 SalixPhm 44.57 +.24 SallyBty n 14.11 +.32 SamsO&G 1.18 +.01 SanderFm 0.60 40.94 -.11 SanDisk 47.72 -.59 SandRdge 5.95 +.32 SangBio 5.53 +.31 Sanmina 11.27 +.04 Sanofi 1.63 31.93 -.19 Santarus 2.75 -.13 Sapient 0.35 13.00 +.08 SaraLee 0.46 15.47 +.23 Satcon h 4.04 +.06 SavientPh 11.95 -.06 Savvis 27.80 +.26 Schlmbrg 0.84 82.86 +.12 Schnitzer 0.07 60.38 +.93 SchwUSMkt 0.38 29.64 +.00 SchUSSmC 0.27 33.34 +.16 Schwab 0.24 16.21 +.08 SchMau 0.60 58.20 +1.24 SciGames 8.81 +.17 Scotts 1.00 51.41 -.22 ScrippsNet 0.30 52.06 -.08 SeabGld g 29.00 -.05 SeacorHld 15.00 113.29 +.99 SeadrillLtd 2.31 34.04 -.01 SeagateT 14.85 -.13 SeahawkDr 7.14 +.01 SealAir 0.52 24.14 -.14 SearsHldgs 69.10 +1.04 SeattGen 15.23 -.64 SelCmfrt 9.11 +.14 SelMedHld 6.44 -.01 SemGrp n 27.10 +.85 SemiHTr 0.55 32.61 -.04 SempraEn 1.56 50.94 -.05 Semtech 23.68 -.45 SenHous 1.48 22.04 -.22 Sensata n 29.00 +.91 Sequenom 6.52 +.06 ServiceCp 0.16 8.24 +.12 7DaysGrp 24.74 -.23 ShandaGm 6.07 +.30 ShawGrp 33.21 -.44 Sherwin 1.44 76.97 -.06 ShipFin 1.44 22.42 -.06 Shire 0.34 69.96 -.80 ShoreTel 7.53 Shutterfly 35.27 +.22 SiderNac s 0.58 16.54 +.17 Siemens 3.72 119.95 -.55 SifyTech 1.92 -.13 SigaTech h 12.61 -.09 SigmaDsg 12.39 -.17 SigmaAld 0.64 65.12 -.40 SignetJwlrs 41.21 -.18 SilicGrIn 8.62 +.46 SilicnImg 7.34 -.21 SilcnLab 46.59 +1.23 Slcnware 0.41 5.48 -.02 SilvStd g 29.32 +1.33 SilvWhtn g 40.84 +1.53 SilvrcpM g 0.08 13.14 -.45 SimonProp 2.40 101.90 -.18 Sina 69.25 +.19 Sinclair 0.43 8.25 +.19 SinoCkg n 10.28 +.48 SiriusXM 1.38 +.01 SironaDent 39.68 -.11 Skechers 21.76 -.62 SkilldHcre 6.43 +.18 SkywksSol 27.62 +.05

SmartBal SmartM SmartT gn SmartHeat SmithWes SmithAO s SmithMicro SmithfF Smucker SnapOn SocQ&M SodaStrm n Sohu.cm Solarfun SolarWinds Solera Solutia Somaxon SonicAut SonicCorp SonicSolu SonocoP Sonus SonyCp Sothebys Sourcefire SouthnCo SthnCopper SoUnCo SwstAirl SwstnEngy Spansion n SpectraEn SpectraEP SpectPh SpiritAero Spreadtrm SprintNex SprottSilv SprottGld n SprottRL g StancrpFn SP Matls SP HlthC SP CnSt SP Consum SP Engy SPDR Fncl SP Inds SP Tech SP Util StdPac StanBlkDk StanFur rt Staples StarBulk StarScient Starbucks StarwdHtl StateStr Statoil ASA StealthGas StlDynam Steelcse SteinMrt StemCells Stericycle SterlBcsh Sterlite SMadden s StillwtrM StoneEngy StratHotels Stryker SuccessF SulphCo SunHlth n SunLfFn g Suncor gs SunesisP h Sunoco SunOpta SunPowerA SunPwr B SunstnHtl Suntech SunTrst SuperGen SupEnrgy SuperMda n Supvalu support.cm SusqBnc SwRCmATR SwERCmTR SwftEng Sycamre rs Symantec Symetra n Synaptics Synchron Synergetc Syngenta Syniverse Synopsys Synovus SyntaPhm Syntel Sysco TAM SA TBS IntlA TCF Fncl TD Ameritr TECO TFS Fncl THQ TICC Cap TIM Partic TJX TRWAuto TTM Tch tw telecom TaiwSemi TakeTwo Talbots TalecrisBio TalismE g Tanger TanzRy g TargaRes Target Taseko TASER TataMotors Taubmn TechData TeckRes g Teekay TeekOffsh TeekayTnk Tekelec TlCmSys TelNorL TlcmArg TelcmNZ TelItalia Teleflex TelefEsp TelMexL Telestone TeleTech Telik h Tellabs Telular Telvent TempleInld TmpGlb TempurP Tenaris TenetHlth Tengsco Tenneco Teradata Teradyn Terex Ternium Terremk TeslaMot n Tesoro TesseraT TetraTc TetraTech TevaPhrm TxCapBsh TexInst TexRdhse Textron ThermoFis ThmBet ThomCrk g ThomsonR Thor Inds Thoratec 3M Co 3SBio TibcoSft Tidwtr Tiffany Timberlnd TimberlnR TW Cable TimeWarn Timken Titan Intl TitanMet TiVo Inc TollBros Trchmrk Toreador Toro Co TorDBk g TortMLP n Total SA TotalSys TowerSemi Toyota TractSup s TrCda g TransAtlH TrnsatlPt n TransGlb TransitnT g Transocn TravelCtrs Travelers TriValley TridentM h TriMas h TrimbleN TrinaSol s Trinity TriQuint TrueRelig TrstNY Trustmk Tsakos TuesMrn Tuppwre Turkcell TutorPerini TwoHrbInv

D

0.56 1.60 1.28 0.73

0.30 0.10 1.12 0.28 0.20 1.82 1.68 0.60 0.02 1.00 1.76

0.86 1.05 0.58 0.77 0.43 1.00 0.16 0.60 0.31 1.27 1.36 0.36 0.20 0.52 0.30 0.04 1.02 0.30 0.16 0.50 0.06 0.08

0.60

1.44 0.40 0.60

0.04

0.35 0.04

6.50 0.20

1.13 0.04 0.24 1.04 0.92 0.20 0.20 0.82 0.96 0.71 0.60

0.47

0.25 1.55 2.15 1.00 0.32 1.66 0.60 1.27 1.90 1.28 1.65 0.90 0.77 0.68 1.36 5.25 1.35

0.08 0.40 0.44 0.54 0.68

0.50

0.75 0.52 0.08

1.16 0.40 2.10 1.00 1.00 1.60 0.85 0.72 0.02

0.64 0.20 2.44 0.36 3.13 0.28 1.05 0.28 1.60 0.84

1.44

0.32 0.26 0.92 0.60 1.20 0.66 1.00 1.34

Nm 3.94 +.02 6.29 +.27 9.38 -.06 4.63 +.18 4.14 42.02 +.72 14.74 -.23 17.85 -.25 64.74 -.21 55.10 -.43 54.10 +.18 35.00 +1.68 76.71 +2.21 8.92 +.19 18.71 +.03 49.97 -.03 22.84 -.16 2.81 +.05 13.26 +.02 9.93 +.43 10.71 +.01 32.84 -.32 2.78 +.06 36.57 +.25 41.94 -.47 27.94 -.12 38.08 -.04 45.34 +.88 24.05 -.10 13.01 -.19 37.36 -.55 20.65 +.44 24.59 -.11 32.60 +.21 5.41 +.46 20.47 +.12 17.39 -.08 4.17 +.25 12.87 +.56 12.66 +.19 1.81 +.03 43.33 -.22 37.07 +.06 30.89 -.20 28.74 -.07 37.46 +.04 66.04 +.22 15.16 -.03 34.02 -.02 24.81 +.01 31.19 -.09 4.01 +.07 62.20 -.17 .03 -.01 22.39 -.26 3.07 +.05 1.77 -.02 32.72 60.08 +1.24 45.76 +.05 21.88 +.24 6.15 +.39 16.68 +.20 9.90 +.05 9.02 -.18 1.17 +.06 77.38 +.26 6.49 +.01 15.27 +.28 45.21 -.93 22.46 +.66 22.78 +.95 4.87 51.53 -.58 31.16 +.07 .19 10.59 +.69 28.84 -.36 35.72 -.37 .41 +.01 39.75 +.17 7.20 +.05 12.84 -.07 12.45 -.12 10.26 +.06 9.04 +.76 25.59 -.15 2.72 +.06 34.52 +.08 6.08 -.71 8.36 -.04 6.67 +.03 8.53 +.21 10.03 8.82 +.03 40.65 +.50 25.58 +.49 17.01 -.08 12.28 +.05 30.03 +.50 27.67 -.39 4.10 +.61 57.42 +.12 30.79 +.05 26.36 +.11 2.27 +.01 5.04 +.16 48.03 -.25 29.25 -.05 25.23 -.62 3.25 -.20 14.37 +.03 18.29 +.21 17.04 +.02 8.34 -.06 5.57 +.08 11.21 +.31 34.20 +.01 44.99 -.30 51.55 +.30 14.08 -.05 16.88 +.02 11.89 -.08 12.04 +.05 11.39 -.29 22.22 -.29 20.16 +.16 49.54 +.13 6.91 +.19 30.95 +.45 59.23 +.11 4.63 -.01 4.13 +.03 30.62 -1.03 49.84 +.13 45.76 -.24 56.21 +1.48 32.70 -.04 27.84 +.04 12.16 +.05 11.99 -.05 4.40 -.23 14.58 -.21 25.31 +.68 8.37 +.02 13.05 -.23 51.22 +.69 68.02 -1.43 16.46 -.17 11.79 +.46 20.95 +.33 .67 -.02 6.59 +.05 5.90 +.18 25.46 +.65 22.01 -.32 10.72 37.40 +.54 46.12 +.06 4.24 -.05 .61 +.08 41.10 +1.20 41.85 +.30 13.48 +.75 27.41 +.20 38.05 +.59 12.94 +.08 30.31 -1.18 17.38 -.01 20.36 +.11 24.43 +.05 11.22 +.02 49.11 -.17 20.43 +.24 32.95 +.13 17.87 +.07 23.23 -.47 52.42 -.43 49.52 -.18 13.70 +.58 37.24 +.12 31.11 +.16 25.67 -.04 86.88 -.06 14.14 -.88 20.89 +.10 50.23 +.01 63.07 -.23 25.01 -.09 1.16 -.01 66.11 +.03 31.10 +.46 46.91 +.28 16.83 +.27 18.24 -.29 8.79 +.17 18.91 +.05 60.89 +.14 15.67 +.20 62.41 -.88 70.52 -1.54 24.40 +.00 51.52 +.18 15.42 -.14 1.42 +.01 79.14 +.09 46.02 +.04 37.33 +.16 51.98 +.37 3.18 19.38 +.64 2.03 -.21 70.93 +.42 4.01 -.04 55.02 +.16 .42 -.02 1.83 +.02 21.48 +.47 39.85 -.18 24.15 +.44 24.82 +.57 12.97 +.25 22.16 +.23 5.76 -.06 23.03 +.08 10.34 +.18 5.79 +.34 47.44 -.60 17.22 +.17 20.28 +.43 10.00 +.01

D

TycoElec TycoIntl Tyson

0.64 32.81 -.24 0.85 40.91 -.27 0.16 16.92 +.02

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8.61 -.05 15.77 -.36 0.74 22.71 -.08 1.00 32.16 +.18 1.73 29.89 +.13 2.15 +.16 42.18 -.12 11.15 +.11 1.15 +.03 7.54 +.38 4.10 +.11 1.04 -.03 6.20 +.24 14.31 +.23 0.06 19.38 +.44 2.08 -.06 34.08 -1.14 49.26 +.42 0.20 11.10 +.03 59.55 +.52 1.56 36.46 +.07 1.11 30.10 +.10 1.11 29.43 +.07 1.52 94.42 -.13 24.67 +.11 2.00 27.04 -.69 0.08 3.16 -.12 37.00 0.40 6.70 -.05 1.88 71.69 -.11 21.63 +.22 0.20 24.65 -.11 6.18 +.24 38.22 -.09 0.20 52.40 +1.35 1.70 78.41 -.33 63.16 +.69 0.50 37.29 -.53 1.92 37.79 -.34 29.12 +.15 0.20 41.12 -.61 0.37 22.40 -.10 2.25 +.02 3.50 +.08 6.30 -.40 3.74 +.24 37.88 -.38 22.71 +.01 2.52 85.52 +.56 7.34 -.61 49.09 +1.30 34.10 +.44 0.76 34.26 -.06 0.76 30.35 -.01 0.38 28.07 -.25 1.21 +.02 0.20 20.98 -.10 0.88 29.28 -.12 0.72 13.43 +.04 0.64 33.73 -.19 16.53 +.26 38.88 -.07 1.87 81.28 +.06 2.91 81.52 +.27 0.67 60.47 -.05 1.08 56.23 -.04 0.71 73.55 +.05 0.65 71.21 +.34 0.23 76.19 +.51 1.25 63.32 -.02 1.32 51.58 -.07 0.28 61.41 +.07 1.83 54.78 +.11 0.99 51.78 -.13 0.86 47.42 -.18 0.55 47.79 -.02 1.91 49.98 -


C OV ER S T OR I ES

Pine Tavern

replaced with a table and four lounge-style chairs. It opens up the front of the restaurant. In February, the Pine Tavern will close for two weeks to update the upholstery, carpets and bathrooms, which can be accessed via a short hallway off the dining room, but are actually located in a separately owned building. Bender Bennett also hopes to replace the windows in the garden room, where the ponderosa pines extend through the roof, and remove the stairs leading to the patio and make it accessible to the handicapped. New Executive Chef Skye Elder began in May and has offered some new dishes, such as crab-stuffed arctic char, Bender Bennett said, but she plans no big changes for the menu. “I think slowly we’ll make some changes, but the menu’s been honed and fine-tuned over many, many years,” she said. Chiefly, she hopes to reintroduce locals to the Pine Tavern and let them know it offers value through events such as “Where were you in ’82?” held in Novem-

Continued from B1 They are the fifth owners, counting individuals and partnerships, of the Pine Tavern, founded in 1936 by Maren Gribskov, who sold it in the 1960s and died in 1984. Bert Bender and Joe Cenarussa bought the Pine Tavern in 1982. Cenarussa died in 1997 in a plane crash, and Bert Bender died in June 2009, his daughter said. Bender Bennett, who moved to Bend from Portland with her husband, Gordon Bennett, and children, ages 1 and 3, to run the Pine Tavern, previously operated a jewelry store, and has worked in every position at a restaurant except chef and owner, at least until recently. She has made some interior changes and plans to close the restaurant in mid-February to make some more. One change can be seen immediately upon entering the Pine Tavern. A booth that had walled off part of the lounge, to the right of the bar, has been removed and

Mortgage

ber. The restaurant rolled back prices to 1982 levels for items including prime rib, fried chicken, baby-back ribs and pan-fried trout. Also new: Five Buck Burgers on Wednesdays. Bender Bennett agreed to answer a few additional questions from The Bulletin.

a very different animal. They all (have) their very own distinct demographic. Sit-down dining appeals to older business people, retirees and old-time locals who have been coming here for years. So to change the garden room is unthinkable. The lounge is more adult, appealing to people about town. It’s not a party bar. The patio (mainly appeals to) tourists.

Q: A:

What made you want to own the Pine Tavern? It’s dear to my heart. My dad put a lot of time into this with his partners. I love it. It’s a part of my childhood.

Q: A:

You’ve mentioned reaching out to locals several times. Why is that? Right now, so many people are struggling (financially). We’re trying to let people know that the Pine Tavern is not the most expensive choice. (Previously), they focused much more on the summertime and the tourists. We’re really focusing on how do we endear ourselves to locals. I think we do that with good value and fun events.

Q: A:

Why did you open up the lounge area? The industry trend is for lounge dining more than sit-down dining, so we decided to open things up by removing a very large booth and adding some high tables.

Q: A:

You referred to the Pine Tavern as three businesses in one. Can you explain? We have the patio, and we have the garden room. They are sit-down dining. The lounge is

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

policy and communications manager for Housing and Community Services. Within the state, Deschutes County has had some of the highest foreclosure rates, and so far this year, the number of default notices continues to outpace 2009, which saw an 82 percent increase over 2008. For the first 11 months of this year, 3,520 notices of default were filed in Deschutes County, compared with 3,187 for the same period in 2009, according to the Deschutes County Clerk’s Office electronic recording system. However, the number of notices filed in November fell compared with filings in October and in November 2009, by about 28 percent and 14 percent, respectively. A notice of default initiates foreclosure proceedings and is generally filed by a lender after a borrower’s mortgage is 90 days delinquent. Not all notices of default end up in foreclosure. Deschutes County does not track actual foreclosures.

“We know that there is a segment of homeowners we have missed. We think we are going to make a significant difference in 5,000 lives.”

Continued from B1 Michael Kaplan, administrator of the stabilization initiative, expects the other three programs to launch early next year. They will provide financial help to homeowners in the process of modifying their loans, help others who have lost their homes find affordable housing, and help homeowners who have found work or recovered financially ensure their loans remain affordable. Applications for the Mortgage Payment Assistance Program will be taken until Jan. 14, Kaplan said, to ensure those interested have enough time to apply. After completing the application, homeowners will meet in person with an adviser at intake agencies set up in each county. For Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties, NeighborImpact has been selected. To qualify for mortgage assistance, household income must be below 120 percent of state median income, which for a family of four is $74,160, according to information provided by state officials. The homeowner must be un-

— Michael Kaplan, administrator of the stabilization initiative employed or have experienced a verifiable loss of income of 25 percent or more, have liquid assets equal to, or less than, four months of mortgage payments, excluding retirement accounts, and the current, first-lien mortgage must have originated before Jan. 1, 2009, according to program information. Mortgage delinquency is not required to participate. The program is open to those who are making payments. Other requirements also apply. For those selected, the payments will be five-year, forgivable, interest-free loans, according to program information. The state will defer all payments and forgive 20 percent of the balance each year. If participants sell or refinance their homes within five years, they have to repay some of the assistance. State officials realize the program will not help all those in Oregon who need it, nor can it help

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 B5

the thousands who have already lost their homes in foreclosure. But many still need help, Kaplan said. “We know that there is a segment of homeowners we have missed,” he said. “We think we are going to make a significant difference in 5,000 lives.” Those not selected will still receive information from the agencies most able to help, such as NeighborImpact, he said. Participants will be selected in a random drawing, with rules that ensure homeowners from all 36 counties get help but which also will steer 80 percent of the funding to 20 counties using a formula that weighted rates of foreclosure, delinquency, unemployment, change in housing price levels and a county’s share of the state’s delinquencies. Oregon has had the fastest rate of people entering foreclosure in the country, said Lisa Joyce,

Tim Doran can be reached at 541-383-0360 or at tdoran@ bendbulletin.com.

Coffee Continued from B1 Starbucks offered Kraft $750 million in August to terminate the partnership, according to the court filing, but Kraft declined. Under the contract, Starbucks can walk away if it pays Kraft fair market value for the business, plus a premium of as much as 35 percent, Kraft said in its legal papers. Analysts have estimated that fair market value alone could be well over $1 billion.

Costly breakup Robert Moskow, a senior analyst for Credit Suisse, said a breakup was inevitable — the only question was how big the settlement would be. “Kraft knows the thing is over,” he said. “They’re going to go to arbitration and try to get as much value out of it as they can, and the way to do that is to get your lawyers out there and say Starbucks violated the agreement.” Kraft, maker of the wellknown Maxwell House brand of coffee, is the largest food manufacturer in the country, with $48 billion in annual revenue. The Starbucks deal involves about $128 million in yearly profits split evenly between the partners, according to an estimate by Credit Suisse. As a result, Moskow said, executives at Kraft were not likely to lose much sleep over the loss of the deal. But supermarket sales are an important area for expansion for Starbucks, whose once-exponential growth in signature coffeehouses has slowed in recent years. The company has already had unexpected success this year with its new instant coffee line, VIA. Starbucks said it managed its own relationships with retailers for VIA sales, in coordination with a national distributor, Acosta. The company now wants to use those relationships to

‘High-stakes poker’ At an investor conference in New York City last week, the chief executive of Starbucks, Howard Schultz, said the company would aggressively look to push sales of its products in grocery stores, including whole beans, ground coffee and VIA. He said the company was confident it could get out of the deal. In a news release on Monday, Starbucks dismissed the Kraft court filing as a delay tactic. “Starbucks has repeatedly said that we have terminated our agreement with Kraft and we continue to look forward to assuming full responsibility for the sales and distribution of our packaged coffee products,” the company said. Starbucks, which is based in Seattle, said it planned to take over distribution of its supermarket packaged coffee sales March 1. Kraft said in a statement that Starbucks was “proceeding with flagrant indifference to the terms of the contract.” It asked the court to stop Starbucks from taking steps to terminate the agreement on its own and to bar Starbucks from communicating with retailers about a change in the coffee distribution deal. The supermarket sales deal between Kraft and Starbucks began in 1998, when Kraft says Starbucks was selling its coffee in just 4,000 food stores in 12 states, with annual sales of about $50 million. Now, Kraft says, sales have grown to about $500 million a year, and Starbucks packaged coffee is found in 40,000 stores in all 50 states and Canada. Starbucks had total revenue of $10.7 billion in the fiscal year that ended Oct. 3. “It’s high-stakes poker here, and there’s a lot financially that is going to be hanging in the balance,” said Jim Hertel, a managing partner of Willard Bishop, a food retail consultant in Chicago.

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Sewing & Vacuum Center

(541) 647-1646

541-389-9252

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peddle ground coffee and beans directly, cutting out Kraft as a middleman.

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304 N.E. 3rd St. •Bend

Market update Northwest stocks Name

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

AlskAir Avista BkofAm BarrettB Boeing CascdeB rs CascdeCp ColSprtw Costco CraftBrew FLIR Sys HewlettP HmFedDE Intel Keycorp Kroger Lattice LaPac MDU Res MentorGr Microsoft

... 1.00 .04 .36f 1.68 ... .40f .80a .82 ... ... .32 .22 .72f .04 .42f ... ... .65f ... .64f

10 14 17 25 14 ... ... 26 24 48 19 11 ... 12 ... 12 12 ... 16 ... 7

56.04 +.15 +62.2 21.83 -.10 +1.1 11.64 -.22 -22.7 16.04 -.02 +30.5 66.59 +.05 +23.0 6.60 +.10 -2.9 46.21 +1.38 +68.1 56.41 -.08 +44.5 69.19 +.80 +16.9 6.65 -.06 +177.1 28.05 -.34 -14.3 42.85 -.18 -16.8 11.77 +.10 -11.6 21.70 +.01 +6.4 8.18 -.02 +47.4 20.63 -.48 +.5 5.22 +.21 +93.3 9.14 -.08 +30.9 20.50 -.22 -13.1 11.98 +.07 +35.7 26.84 -.18 -11.9

Name NikeB Nordstrm NwstNG OfficeMax Paccar PlanarSy PlumCrk PrecCastpt Safeway Schnitzer Sherwin StancrpFn Starbucks TriQuint Umpqua US Bancrp WashFed WellsFargo WstCstB Weyerh

Precious metals Metal NY HSBC Bank US NY Merc Gold NY Merc Silver

Price (troy oz.) $1420.00 $1415.30 $29.705

Pvs Day $1405.00 $1405.40 $29.241

Market recap

Div

PE

YTD Last Chg %Chg

1.24f .80 1.74f ... .48f ... 1.68 .12 .48 .07 1.44 .86f .52 ... .20 .20 .20 .20 ... .20a

22 17 16 26 61 ... 35 21 ... 25 18 10 26 13 ... 16 14 11 ... ...

87.73 +.20 +32.8 42.62 +.80 +13.4 45.90 -1.08 +1.9 18.74 +.15 +47.7 55.73 -.53 +53.7 2.11 +.01 -24.9 37.43 -.18 -.9 142.44 -.32 +29.1 21.46 -.34 +.8 60.38 +.93 +26.6 76.97 -.06 +24.8 43.33 -.22 +8.3 32.72 ... +41.9 12.97 +.25 +116.2 11.10 +.03 -17.2 24.65 -.11 +9.5 15.14 -.12 -21.7 28.74 -.31 +6.5 2.66 -.04 +26.7 17.70 ... +11.7

Prime rate Time period

Percent

Last Previous day A week ago

3.25 3.25 3.25

NYSE

Amex

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Citigrp BkofAm SprintNex S&P500ETF iShSilver

3271791 4.45 ... 1287056 11.64 -.22 1110706 4.17 +.25 925219 122.76 -.13 562339 29.51 +.91

Last Chg

Gainers ($2 or more) Name Gramrcy Molycorp n BkIrelnd Polypore Grmrcy pfA

Last

Chg %Chg

2.84 +.58 +25.7 32.86 +5.06 +18.2 2.16 +.32 +17.4 42.02 +5.90 +16.3 21.73 +2.89 +15.3

Losers ($2 or more) Name InvVKMOT SWS Grp WNS Hldg VaalcoE DollarGen

Last

Indexes

Chg %Chg

13.50 -1.60 -10.6 4.81 -.44 -8.4 11.73 -1.03 -8.1 7.34 -.61 -7.7 30.99 -2.44 -7.3

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

NovaGld g RareEle g ChinaShen CheniereEn NA Pall g

Last Chg

90133 16.19 +1.27 58237 11.20 +1.38 47570 3.75 +.67 42678 5.43 -.08 37436 6.42 +.08

Gainers ($2 or more) Name MinesMgt ChinaShen RareEle g CaracoP YM Bio g

Last

3.58 +.70 +24.3 3.75 +.67 +21.8 11.20 +1.38 +14.1 5.13 +.59 +13.0 2.22 +.22 +11.0

Name AdcareH wt LongweiPI UraniumEn ASpecRlt s LucasEngy

Last

Most Active ($1 or more) Name

Vol (00)

Cisco DryShips Microsoft PwShs QQQ Intel

Name

Last

Verigy Radware ZionO&G wt Cytokinet Aegerion n

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Last Chg 19.43 6.21 26.84 53.85 21.70

+.36 +.33 -.18 -.03 +.01

Chg %Chg

12.95 +3.81 +41.7 39.77 +7.01 +21.4 3.08 +.48 +18.5 2.52 +.34 +15.6 12.57 +1.58 +14.4

Name

Last

-6.8 -6.7 -6.0 -5.7 -5.6

CyberDef lf CDC Soft GenFin un LTXCrd rs MecoxL n

2.45 -.46 -15.8 6.07 -1.04 -14.6 2.20 -.32 -12.5 7.40 -1.05 -12.4 6.90 -.90 -11.5

222 265 40 527 27 5

Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Diary 1,499 1,507 115 3,121 259 10

772691 503378 347793 341924 301519

Losers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

2.05 -.15 2.65 -.19 6.30 -.40 16.50 -1.00 2.55 -.15

52-Week High Low Name

Gainers ($2 or more)

Chg %Chg

Losers ($2 or more)

Diary Advanced Declined Unchanged Total issues New Highs New Lows

Nasdaq

Chg %Chg

Diary 1,530 1,120 141 2,791 240 29

11,451.53 9,614.32 Dow Jones Industrials 5,076.18 3,742.01 Dow Jones Transportation 413.75 346.95 Dow Jones Utilities 7,817.25 6,355.83 NYSE Composite 2,177.58 1,689.19 Amex Index 2,593.68 2,061.14 Nasdaq Composite 1,227.08 1,010.91 S&P 500 13,011.99 10,596.20 Wilshire 5000 757.52 567.98 Russell 2000

World markets

Last

Net Chg

11,362.19 5,050.92 397.35 7,740.69 2,106.17 2,594.92 1,223.12 12,998.41 760.86

-19.90 -17.89 -1.68 -10.89 +1.04 +3.46 -1.59 -3.70 +4.44

YTD %Chg %Chg -.17 -.35 -.42 -.14 +.05 +.13 -.13 -.03 +.59

52-wk %Chg

+8.96 +23.20 -.17 +7.73 +15.41 +14.36 +9.69 +12.55 +21.66

+9.36 +24.41 +1.24 +8.17 +17.77 +18.51 +10.87 +14.68 +26.06

Currencies

Here is how key international stock markets performed Monday.

Key currency exchange rates Monday compared with late Friday in New York.

Market

Dollar vs:

Amsterdam Brussels Paris London Frankfurt Hong Kong Mexico Milan New Zealand Tokyo Seoul Singapore Sydney Zurich

Close

Change

342.34 2,611.41 3,749.23 5,770.28 6,954.38 23,237.69 37,737.13 19,930.29 3,293.18 10,167.23 1,953.64 3,181.41 4,779.40 5,766.56

+.04 s -.14 t -.04 t +.43 s +.10 s -.36 t +.94 s -.95 t +.30 s -.11 t -.19 t +.28 s -.01 t -.30 t

Exchange Rate

Australia Dollar Britain Pound Canada Dollar Chile Peso China Yuan Euro Euro Hong Kong Dollar Japan Yen Mexico Peso Russia Ruble So. Korea Won Sweden Krona Switzerlnd Franc Taiwan Dollar

Pvs Day

.9906 1.5721 .9960 .002087 .1504 1.3322 .1289 .012106 .080717 .0320 .000882 .1461 1.0189 .0332

.9903 1.5741 .9955 .002082 .1500 1.3375 .1288 .012062 .080906 .0320 .000882 .1464 1.0228 .0330

Selected mutual funds YTD Name NAV Chg %Ret Amer Beacon Inv: LgCap Inv 18.11 -0.02 +10.3 Amer Century Inv: EqInc 7.07 -0.01 +10.1 GrowthI 25.41 +0.01 +15.3 Ultra 22.33 +0.05 +14.7 American Funds A: AmcpA p 18.42 -0.03 +11.5 AMutlA p 24.92 -0.04 +9.7 BalA p 17.66 +0.01 +10.8 BondA p 12.31 +0.04 +8.1 CapIBA p 49.74 -0.03 +6.8 CapWGA p 35.23 -0.16 +5.6 CapWA p 20.69 +0.01 +5.9 EupacA p 41.20 -0.17 +7.5 FdInvA p 35.86 -0.04 +10.8 GovtA p 14.56 +0.05 +6.5 GwthA p 30.00 -0.01 +9.8 HI TrA p 11.24 +0.01 +13.6 IncoA p 16.51 -0.01 +10.0 IntBdA p 13.56 +0.03 +5.6 ICAA p 27.59 -0.04 +8.0 NEcoA p 25.02 -0.07 +11.2 N PerA p 28.27 -0.04 +10.3 NwWrldA 54.90 +0.04 +16.3 SmCpA p 38.57 +0.01 +22.3 TxExA p 12.06 +3.8 WshA p 26.67 -0.05 +10.2 Artio Global Funds: IntlEqI r 30.53 -0.08 +8.1 IntlEqA 29.73 -0.08 +7.8 IntEqII I r 12.66 -0.03 +7.5 Artisan Funds: Intl 21.66 -0.16 +4.8 MidCap 33.16 +29.7 MidCapVal 20.34 -0.03 +13.1 Baron Funds: Growth 49.18 +0.22 +19.1 Bernstein Fds: IntDur 13.99 +0.04 +9.6 DivMu 14.51 +0.01 +3.7 TxMgdIntl 15.68 -0.04 +2.6 BlackRock A:

EqtyDiv 17.11 -0.02 +9.7 GlAlA r 19.26 +0.01 +8.0 BlackRock B&C: GlAlC t 17.95 +0.01 +7.2 BlackRock Instl: EquityDv 17.15 -0.02 +10.1 GlbAlloc r 19.37 +0.02 +8.3 Calamos Funds: GrwthA p 52.51 +0.21 +18.1 Columbia Class A: Acorn t 29.29 +0.08 +22.2 DivEqInc 9.78 -0.01 +12.2 Columbia Class Z: Acorn Z 30.22 +0.08 +22.6 AcornIntZ 40.31 +0.04 +19.9 ValRestr 48.77 +0.12 +15.2 DFA Funds: IntlCorEq 10.97 -0.02 +10.2 USCorEq2 10.67 +0.01 +17.8 Davis Funds A: NYVen A 33.37 +8.9 Davis Funds C & Y: NYVenY 33.71 +9.2 NYVen C 32.30 +8.2 Delaware Invest A: Diver Inc p 9.63 +0.03 +8.0 Dimensional Fds: EmMCrEq 21.72 +0.07 +20.6 EmMktV 36.85 +0.13 +18.3 IntSmVa 16.72 +0.02 +12.0 LargeCo 9.68 -0.02 +11.7 USLgVa 19.30 -0.01 +14.6 US Small 20.82 +0.13 +26.9 US SmVa 24.70 +0.15 +26.0 IntlSmCo 16.64 +0.04 +18.5 Fixd 10.37 +1.2 IntVa 17.94 -0.09 +7.3 Glb5FxInc 11.57 +0.03 +6.7 2YGlFxd 10.24 +0.01 +1.8 Dodge&Cox: Balanced 68.72 -0.03 +9.3 Income 13.39 +0.04 +7.1 IntlStk 35.60 -0.11 +11.8 Stock 104.38 -0.16 +9.7 Eaton Vance A:

LgCpVal 17.65 NatlMunInc 9.32 Eaton Vance I: GblMacAbR 10.30 LgCapVal 17.70 FMI Funds: LgCap p 15.20 FPA Funds: NwInc 11.00 FPACres 26.80 Fairholme 35.19 Federated Instl: KaufmnK 5.39 Fidelity Advisor A: NwInsgh p 19.88 StrInA 12.77 Fidelity Advisor I: NwInsgtI 20.10 Fidelity Freedom: FF2010 13.69 FF2015 11.42 FF2020 13.84 FF2020K 13.22 FF2025 11.52 FF2030 13.75 FF2035 11.41 FF2040 7.97 Fidelity Invest: AllSectEq 12.94 AMgr50 15.27 Balanc 18.02 BalancedK 18.02 BlueChGr 44.84 Canada 57.29 CapAp 25.14 CpInc r 9.43 Contra 67.70 ContraK 67.75 DisEq 22.12 DivIntl 29.62 DivrsIntK r 29.59 DivGth 27.60 EmrMk 26.00 Eq Inc 42.77 EQII 17.61

-0.02 +6.3 +2.9 +0.01 +4.7 -0.02 +6.6 -0.04 +8.3 +0.01 +3.4 +9.6 -0.04 +16.9 -0.01 +15.7 +0.02 +15.5 +0.02 +9.4 +0.02 +15.8 +0.02 +10.1 +0.02 +10.3 +0.02 +11.0 +0.02 +11.2 +0.01 +11.6 +0.01 +11.7 +0.01 +11.9 +12.0 +13.1 +0.02 +11.8 +0.02 +11.9 +0.02 +12.0 +0.04 +18.2 +0.39 +20.0 +0.06 +17.4 +0.02 +15.4 +0.06 +16.4 +0.06 +16.5 -0.01 +6.3 -0.06 +7.4 -0.06 +7.6 +0.06 +17.2 +0.03 +16.6 -0.03 +10.6 -0.01 +9.0

Fidel 31.33 FltRateHi r 9.78 GNMA 11.68 GovtInc 10.66 GroCo 82.59 GroInc 17.84 GrowthCoK 82.66 HighInc r 8.96 Indepn 24.21 IntBd 10.68 IntmMu 10.21 IntlDisc 32.46 InvGrBd 11.60 InvGB 7.44 LgCapVal 12.07 LatAm 57.92 LevCoStk 27.28 LowP r 37.45 LowPriK r 37.45 Magelln 70.28 MidCap 27.95 MuniInc 12.52 NwMkt r 16.03 OTC 53.76 100Index 8.63 Ovrsea 31.79 Puritn 17.71 SCmdtyStrt 12.03 SrsIntGrw 11.14 SrsIntVal 9.83 StIntMu 10.69 STBF 8.50 SmllCpS r 19.13 StratInc 11.39 StrReRt r 9.48 TotalBd 10.91 USBI 11.48 Value 66.61 Fidelity Selects: Gold r 58.90 Fidelity Spartan: ExtMkIn 37.58 500IdxInv 43.46 IntlInxInv 35.08

+0.01 +11.1 +0.01 +6.9 +0.04 +8.0 +0.04 +6.2 +0.23 +19.7 +11.6 +0.23 +19.9 +0.01 +12.6 +0.01 +21.5 +0.04 +8.7 +0.01 +3.8 -0.05 +8.9 +0.05 +8.2 +0.02 +9.0 +7.3 +0.12 +14.2 +0.09 +19.2 +0.04 +17.5 +0.04 +17.7 +0.12 +10.2 +0.07 +19.7 +4.3 +0.01 +12.1 +0.19 +17.6 +8.8 -0.12 +4.3 +0.02 +12.2 +0.05 +10.4 -0.01 +14.3 -0.05 +1.2 +2.6 +0.01 +4.1 +0.06 +20.0 +0.01 +9.7 +0.03 +11.9 +0.04 +9.0 +0.05 +7.3 -0.01 +18.6 +0.80 +38.7 +0.11 +24.9 -0.05 +11.7 -0.15 +5.0

TotMktInv 35.87 -0.02 +14.0 Fidelity Spart Adv: 500IdxAdv 43.46 -0.06 +11.7 TotMktAd r 35.88 -0.02 +14.1 First Eagle: GlblA 46.14 +0.02 +15.4 OverseasA 22.69 +0.07 +16.6 Frank/Temp Frnk A: FedTFA p 11.62 +3.1 FoundAl p 10.39 -0.02 +7.6 HYTFA p 9.91 +5.3 IncomA p 2.13 +10.3 USGovA p 6.80 +0.03 +6.7 Frank/Tmp Frnk Adv: GlbBdAdv p +11.9 IncmeAd 2.12 +10.5 Frank/Temp Frnk C: IncomC t 2.15 +9.7 Frank/Temp Mtl A&B: SharesA 20.36 -0.05 +7.8 Frank/Temp Temp A: ForgnA p 6.87 -0.02 +4.9 GlBd A p 13.64 +0.01 +11.6 GrwthA p 17.55 -0.05 +4.4 WorldA p 14.59 -0.03 +4.5 Frank/Temp Tmp B&C: GlBdC p 13.67 +0.02 +11.2 GE Elfun S&S: S&S PM 39.80 -0.02 +8.0 GMO Trust III: Quality 19.73 -0.04 +3.0 GMO Trust VI: EmgMkts r 14.50 +0.04 +18.3 Quality 19.74 -0.03 +3.2 Goldman Sachs Inst: HiYield 7.25 +0.01 +12.3 Harbor Funds: Bond 13.02 +0.07 +8.9 CapApInst 36.58 -0.06 +10.9 IntlInv t 58.90 -0.29 +8.3 Intl r 59.62 -0.30 +8.7 Hartford Fds A: CpAppA p 33.64 -0.12 +9.6 Hartford Fds Y: CapAppI 33.64 -0.12 +9.9

Hartford HLS IA : CapApp 41.36 -0.10 +13.1 Div&Gr 19.15 -0.03 +9.3 Advisers 19.17 -0.02 +9.9 TotRetBd 11.35 +0.05 +7.8 Hussman Funds: StrGrowth 12.66 -0.06 -0.9 Invesco Funds A: Chart p 15.75 -0.04 +4.9 CmstkA 15.21 -0.01 +11.8 EqIncA 8.38 +9.6 GrIncA p 18.58 +8.9 HYMuA 9.22 -0.01 +6.7 Ivy Funds: AssetSC t 23.86 -0.03 +9.6 AssetStA p 24.58 -0.04 +10.3 AssetStrI r 24.80 -0.03 +10.6 JPMorgan A Class: CoreBd A 11.60 +0.04 +7.9 JPMorgan Sel Cls: CoreBd 11.59 +0.03 +8.1 HighYld 8.13 +0.02 +13.2 IntmTFBd 10.91 +3.1 ShtDurBd 11.03 +0.01 +3.3 USLCCrPls 20.07 -0.01 +10.4 Janus T Shrs: OvrseasT r 49.97 -0.22 +17.6 PrkMCVal T 22.12 -0.03 +11.7 Twenty T 64.12 -0.38 +4.1 John Hancock Cl 1: LSBalanc 13.00 +0.02 +12.0 LSGrwth 12.94 +0.01 +13.0 Lazard Instl: EmgMktI 21.67 +0.09 +20.8 Lazard Open: EmgMkO p 22.00 +0.09 +20.4 Legg Mason A: WAMgMu p 15.52 +2.5 Longleaf Partners: Partners 27.55 +14.4 Loomis Sayles: LSBondI 14.28 +0.02 +12.9 StrInc C 14.86 +0.02 +11.9 LSBondR 14.23 +0.02 +12.6 StrIncA 14.79 +0.02 +12.8

Loomis Sayles Inv: InvGrBdY 12.45 +0.04 +11.5 Lord Abbett A: AffilA p 11.15 -0.01 +9.8 BdDebA p 7.77 +0.01 +11.9 ShDurIncA p 4.64 +6.4 Lord Abbett C: ShDurIncC t 4.67 +5.6 MFS Funds A: TotRA 13.89 +0.02 +8.1 ValueA 22.14 -0.01 +7.7 MFS Funds I: ValueI 22.24 -0.02 +7.9 Manning&Napier Fds: WldOppA 8.65 -0.04 +7.2 Matthews Asian: AsianGIInv 18.23 +0.01 +17.0 PacTgrInv 23.29 +0.04 +21.1 MergerFd 16.08 +3.5 Metro West Fds: TotRetBd 10.63 +0.03 +12.0 TotRtBdI 10.63 +0.03 +12.3 MorganStanley Inst: MCapGrI 37.07 +0.14 +31.6 Mutual Series: GblDiscA 29.08 -0.04 +8.9 GlbDiscZ 29.49 -0.05 +9.1 QuestZ 18.47 -0.01 +7.2 SharesZ 20.57 -0.04 +8.2 Neuberger&Berm Inv: GenesInst 44.56 +0.13 +18.0 Neuberger&Berm Tr: Genesis 46.19 +0.13 +17.7 Northern Funds: HiYFxInc 7.26 NA Oakmark Funds I: EqtyInc r 27.37 +0.03 +7.2 Intl I r 18.95 -0.10 +12.5 Oakmark r 40.92 -0.04 +10.5 Old Westbury Fds: GlobOpp 8.07 +0.01 +14.1 GlbSMdCap 15.43 +0.01 +20.8 Oppenheimer A: CapApA p 42.66 -0.08 +6.8 DvMktA p 35.49 +0.10 +23.4

GlobA px 59.09 -1.33 +13.2 GblStrIncA 4.28 +0.01 +15.2 Gold p 56.31 +0.84 +56.7 IntBdA p 6.60 +7.1 MnStFdA 31.48 -0.09 +12.5 RisingDivA 15.22 -0.03 +10.5 S&MdCpVl 31.09 -0.04 +17.0 Oppenheimer B: RisingDivB 13.79 -0.04 +9.6 S&MdCpVl 26.69 -0.03 +16.1 Oppenheimer C&M: RisingDvC p 13.75 -0.03 +9.7 Oppenheimer Roch: RcNtMuA 6.91 +0.01 +4.9 Oppenheimer Y: DevMktY 35.19 +0.10 +23.8 IntlBdY 6.60 +7.4 PIMCO Admin PIMS: TotRtAd 11.50 +0.06 +9.3 PIMCO Instl PIMS: AlAsetAut r 11.08 +0.06 +11.1 AllAsset 12.59 +0.06 +13.4 ComodRR 9.08 +0.06 +18.8 HiYld 9.26 +0.01 +13.2 InvGrCp 11.66 +0.06 +12.2 LowDu 10.64 +0.04 +5.3 RealRtnI 11.55 +0.07 +9.3 ShortT 9.93 +2.0 TotRt 11.50 +0.06 +9.6 TR II 11.11 +0.06 +8.7 PIMCO Funds A: LwDurA 10.64 +0.04 +5.0 RealRtA p 11.55 +0.07 +8.8 TotRtA 11.50 +0.06 +9.1 PIMCO Funds C: TotRtC t 11.50 +0.06 +8.4 PIMCO Funds D: TRtn p 11.50 +0.06 +9.3 PIMCO Funds P: TotRtnP 11.50 +0.06 +9.5 Perm Port Funds: Permannt 45.45 +0.11 +17.5 Pioneer Funds A: PionFdA p 39.85 -0.07 +12.3 Price Funds:

BlChip 37.92 CapApp 20.13 EmMktS 35.49 EqInc 22.87 EqIndex 33.06 Growth 31.97 HlthSci 29.02 HiYield 6.77 IntlBond 10.02 IntlStk 14.12 MidCap 59.74 MCapVal 23.28 N Asia 19.37 New Era 51.25 N Horiz 33.36 N Inc 9.64 R2010 15.49 R2015 11.94 R2020 16.44 R2025 12.00 R2030 17.17 R2040 17.25 ShtBd 4.87 SmCpStk 34.64 SmCapVal 35.81 SpecIn 12.37 Value 22.80 Putnam Funds A: GrInA p 13.06 VoyA px 23.25 Royce Funds: PennMuI r 11.42 PremierI r 19.97 TotRetI r 12.94 Schwab Funds: 1000Inv r 37.20 S&P Sel 19.37 Scout Funds: Intl 31.89 Selected Funds: AmShD 40.26 AmShS p 40.30 Sequoia 128.92 Templeton Instit: ForEqS 20.02

+15.7 -0.01 +10.8 +0.14 +17.9 -0.02 +10.6 -0.04 +11.5 +0.05 +16.2 -0.19 +10.9 +0.01 +13.1 -0.03 +3.9 -0.03 +12.1 +0.02 +25.8 -0.02 +12.4 +20.0 +0.20 +17.5 +0.14 +30.4 +0.04 +7.7 +0.01 +11.0 +0.01 +11.9 +0.01 +12.6 +13.1 +13.6 +13.9 +3.4 +0.16 +28.6 +0.17 +21.5 +0.02 +9.0 -0.01 +11.3 -0.02 +9.7 -0.09 +18.3 +0.04 +20.8 +0.06 +22.4 +0.03 +21.0 -0.04 +12.8 -0.02 +11.7 -0.15 +10.4 +0.03 +9.8 +0.03 +9.4 -0.10 +19.1 -0.08 +4.0

Third Avenue Fds: ValueInst 51.14 Thornburg Fds: IntValA p 27.59 IntValue I 28.21 Tweedy Browne: GblValue 23.46 Vanguard Admiral: CAITAdm 10.91 CpOpAdl 75.79 EMAdmr r 39.67 Energy 122.30 500Adml 113.03 GNMA Ad 11.05 HlthCr 52.01 HiYldCp 5.69 InfProAd 26.19 ITBdAdml 11.51 ITsryAdml 11.78 IntGrAdm 61.53 ITAdml 13.50 ITGrAdm 10.24 LtdTrAd 11.07 LTGrAdml 9.35 LT Adml 10.92 MCpAdml 91.02 MuHYAdm 10.32 PrmCap r 67.52 STsyAdml 10.89 ShtTrAd 15.90 STFdAd 10.94 STIGrAd 10.83 TtlBAdml 10.76 TStkAdm 30.83 WellslAdm 52.77 WelltnAdm 52.96 Windsor 44.13 WdsrIIAd 44.48 Vanguard Fds: AssetA 24.19 DivdGro 14.12 Energy 65.10 EqInc 19.92 Explr 71.48

-0.20 +10.4 -0.07 +11.9 -0.07 +12.3 +0.01 +10.7 +0.01 +4.3 -0.11 +9.2 +0.11 +16.5 +0.50 +9.1 -0.14 +11.8 +0.03 +7.6 -0.28 +3.6 +11.8 +0.15 +7.6 +0.06 +11.5 +0.05 +9.5 -0.14 +13.9 +0.01 +3.7 +0.04 +11.7 +2.5 +0.10 +10.5 +3.5 +0.02 +22.6 +4.5 -0.15 +9.5 +0.02 +3.3 +1.2 +0.01 +4.0 +0.02 +5.6 +0.04 +7.4 -0.01 +13.9 +0.12 +10.0 +0.02 +8.7 -0.13 +10.5 -0.07 +7.0 +0.02 +13.4 -0.04 +8.3 +0.26 +9.1 -0.04 +11.5 +0.30 +24.7

GNMA 11.05 GlobEq 17.80 HYCorp 5.69 HlthCre 123.20 InflaPro 13.33 IntlGr 19.32 IntlVal 32.13 ITIGrade 10.24 LifeCon 16.37 LifeGro 21.85 LifeMod 19.57 LTIGrade 9.35 Morg 17.80 MuInt 13.50 PrecMtls r 27.83 PrmcpCor 13.55 Prmcp r 65.04 SelValu r 18.54 STAR 19.10 STIGrade 10.83 StratEq 18.25 TgtRetInc 11.36 TgRe2010 22.63 TgtRe2015 12.54 TgRe2020 22.20 TgtRe2025 12.63 TgRe2030 21.61 TgtRe2035 13.04 TgtRe2040 21.38 TgtRe2045 13.50 USGro 18.05 Wellsly 21.78 Welltn 30.66 Wndsr 13.08 WndsII 25.06 Vanguard Idx Fds: 500 113.00 Balanced 21.19 EMkt 30.13 Extend 40.44 Growth 31.11 ITBnd 11.51 MidCap 20.04 REIT r 18.19

+0.03 +7.5 -0.01 +13.6 +11.6 -0.65 +3.5 +0.08 +7.4 -0.04 +13.7 -0.10 +5.0 +0.04 +11.6 +0.02 +10.1 -0.01 +12.4 +0.02 +11.5 +0.10 +10.4 -0.01 +16.6 +0.01 +3.6 +0.32 +36.2 -0.02 +11.9 -0.15 +9.4 -0.02 +16.2 +0.02 +10.0 +0.02 +5.5 +0.03 +19.4 +0.03 +9.0 +0.04 +10.3 +0.01 +10.9 +0.02 +11.2 +11.6 +11.9 -0.01 +12.2 -0.01 +12.2 -0.01 +12.3 -0.01 +9.7 +0.05 +9.9 +0.01 +8.6 -0.04 +10.5 -0.04 +7.0 -0.14 +11.6 +0.02 +11.5 +0.08 +16.3 +0.12 +23.8 -0.02 +14.8 +0.06 +11.4 +22.5 +0.02 +25.7

SmCap

34.08 +0.15 +24.0

SmlCpGth

21.39 +0.13 +27.1

SmlCpVl

15.79 +0.04 +21.0

STBnd

10.67 +0.02 +4.6

TotBnd

10.76 +0.04 +7.3

TotlIntl

15.57 -0.05 +8.0

TotStk

30.82 -0.01 +13.8

Vanguard Instl Fds: DevMkInst ExtIn

9.99 -0.06

NS

40.51 +0.12 +24.0

FTAllWldI r

93.36 -0.24 +8.9

GrwthIst

31.12 -0.03 +15.0

InfProInst

10.67 +0.06 +7.6

InstIdx

112.29 -0.14 +11.8

InsPl

112.29 -0.15 +11.8

InsTStPlus

27.86 -0.01 +13.9

MidCpIst

20.12

SCInst

34.15 +0.15 +24.2

TBIst

10.76 +0.04 +7.5

TSInst

30.83 -0.02 +13.9

+22.7

Vanguard Signal: 500Sgl

93.37 -0.11 +11.8

STBdIdx

10.67 +0.02 +4.7

TotBdSgl

10.76 +0.04 +7.4

TotStkSgl

29.76 -0.01 +13.9

Western Asset: CorePlus I

10.87 +0.03 +12.3


B6 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

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L

Inside

Judge signs off on man’s Awesome name, see Page C6.

OBITUARIES Ex-Marquette basketball coach Hank Raymonds, see Page C5. www.bendbulletin.com/local

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010

Attention, photographers! Submit your own photography at www.bendbulletin.com/wellshoot and we’ll pick the best for publication next week in this space. No doctored photos, please!

Picture-taking advice from The Bulletin’s professional photographers

Well, sh ot!

Installment 33: Flame

Crook County offering its first haven from dropping temperatures

Bend city councilor proposes 2 vacant structures be razed

By Lauren Dake The Bulletin

Use caution to minimize fire hazards over holidays Bulletin staff report With the holidays comes an increased risk of fire, which can cause property damage, injury and death. To avoid blazes this holiday season, the Bend Fire Department recommends that Central Oregonians take precautions when it comes to Christmas trees, holiday decorations and cooking. Residents can minimize the risk of fire posed by Christmas trees by choosing a tree that is fresh with green needles. Once the tree is brought home, residents should cut an inch off the bottom of the tree’s trunk before immersing it in water. The Fire Department recommends keeping your tree watered at all times to keep it from drying out, and that you keep it away from any heat sources such as heater vents, fireplaces and wood stoves to minimize fire hazards. See Fire / C5

By Nick Grube The Bulletin

Photos by Pete Erickson

Redmond firefighter J.W. Roberts drags a hose around a burning building in 2002. I was at a different assignment about a mile away and saw the telltale column of black smoke rising in the distance. I raced firefighters to the scene to get the shot.

By Pete Erickson The Bulletin

My first published photo was of a massive church fire in San Francisco in 1994. I was driving to work early on a Sunday morning and saw black smoke rising over the hill. It was an amazing feeling being on scene with a camera. The fires we see and photograph don’t necessarily have to be the five-alarm structure variety. They can be campfires, birthday candles or forest fires from a distance.

The keys to successful photos of fires are to use the fire as your light source and to watch your camera’s white balance so you won’t ruin the warm fire color of the photo. Including the fire in the picture helps explain to the viewer the crazy colors that will appear on faces. I usually set the ISO to a very high number to use the fire as the light source and adjust the camera’s white balance to either a manual setting of around 5000K or to the flash setting, which is the same thing. If you are forced to use a flash, a colored sheet

of plastic, called a gel, covering the flash, can mimic the light produced from fire. The gel needs to be orange to balance the light. Try not to use a flash on firefighters, because the reflective stripes on the turnouts look like an exploding bomb in flashed pictures. You won’t get anywhere near a real forest fire if the agencies covering it beat you there, so try this: Find a vantage point, wait until after the sun goes down and do long exposures of the fire and the smoke. The results will be amazing.

Bend City Councilor Oran Teater might be leaving office soon, but he has some big plans for the city before he goes. He wants to demolish some buildings. In particular, Teater, who is being replaced on the council by Scott Ramsay in January, wants to raze two vacant structures on the corner of Northeast Division Street and Revere Avenue. The boarded-up buildings, which used to be home to propane distributor AmeriGas, sit on a little less than an acre of land. They have been empty for years. To Teater, they’ve become eyesores that reflect poorly on Bend. They need to be eliminated, he said. “Right now it’s just an ugly corner,” he said. “It just looks awful.” Teater would like to see the lot “scraped” clean of the buildings. This, he said, would not only remove the blighted structures, but would also make the lot more desirable to potential developers. “What I’m looking at is just having a vacant lot there — a skinned, vacant lot,” Teater said. “I’m just trying to figure out a way to get it removed reasonably.” See Demolition / C5

Proposed Butler Mark et Rd . demolition Site of two buildings Bend City Councilor Oran Teater wants the city to raze

Bend Parkway

Division St.

For years, Crook County officials worried about their homeless population as temperatures dropped. In one week, the county’s first homeless shelter will be finished. “It’s a small house, but at least it gives Prineville and Crook County something it hasn’t had,” said Crook County Commissioner Ken Fahlgren. There is already one man More info who is sleeping in the home and For more another man information, could be staycontact Crook ing there before County at the shelter is of541-447-6555. ficially open. “It seems to be the word of mouth is getting around quickly,” Fahlgren said. “We’re going to be limited by how many people we’ll have space for. But we’ll have an option.” The shelter will have room for about five men. They will be housed in an old, county-owned home next to the Crook County Sheriff’s Office. For several years, the county had been using the home for storage. Community members volunteered their time and completely remodeled the space. Faith-based organizations helped, materials were donated, and electricians, plumbers and contractors volunteered their time. Fahlgren said it won’t serve as long-term housing, but more of a steppingstone. A nonprofit, Lutheran Community Services, has partnered with the county to oversee the shelter and provide mental health care services. The annual count organized by the Homeless Leadership Coalition, which came out in March, actually found an 11 percent drop in the county’s number of homeless people, from 275 the year before to 244. Fahlgren said this shelter will really aim at helping the chronically homeless population, which he estimates is about 10 people. See Shelter / C5

Teater wants to clear ‘ugly corner’

Revere Ave. Third St.

Homeless shelter opening soon in Prineville

C

OREGON Native Somalian arrested in bomb plot led double life, see Page C3.

97

Olney Ave.

BUS 97

Andy Zeigert / The Bulletin

Grainne Carroll celebrates her birthday in Dublin, Ireland, a couple of years ago. You have to pump up the ISO on the camera to use the light from birthday candles to light the face.

Light from a fireplace silhouettes a glass of wine. The warm colors of fire can be used to creatively light a subject.

St. Luke’s Lutheran Church in San Francisco goes up in flames in 1994. I arrived with the first firetrucks and shot four rolls of film in 15 minutes. The massive church was gone that fast.

Equipment corner FOR BEGINNERS

FOR INTERMEDIATES

FOR ADVANCED

Experiment with the white balance while doing pictures of candles and campfires. See for yourself what a difference small changes can make in the picture.

Go to McMenamins and do pictures of your friends around a fire. If they’re looking at you, pay attention to the light on their faces and watch the shadows, which will go black. Check your white balance and ISO setting. Maybe invest in a gel to balance the light of a flash.

Learn how to hand-hold the camera with very long shutter speeds when doing pictures of birthday cakes and campfires. Next time we have a big fire in Central Oregon, find a place you can see it at night and do a long exposure from a distance using a tripod.

Here’s the lineup

Aug. 17 Cars

Aug. 31 Going rustic

Each installment will feature tips from The Bulletin’s photographers, followed the next week by the best of readers’ submitted photos.

Nov. 9 Nov. 23 Today Dec. 21 Oct. 12 Oct. 26 Sept. 14 Sept. 28 Halloween The desert Cycling Flame Winter Horses Nature’s Fall abstracts color

County targets road law changes By Hillary Borrud The Bulletin

Pushing through major changes to a state transportation rule will be Deschutes County officials’ top priority during the 2011 state legislative session. Many local officials say the rule, which requires road improvements before allowing more businesses near busy roads, has stymied development. The state’s transportation requirements have held up a couple of local projects: Juniper Ridge in north Bend and land in Redmond that Deschutes County owns and wants to rezone and sell for industrial use. Deschutes County Commissioners discussed their legislative priorities with their Salem lobbyist, Mark Nelson, in a conference call Monday afternoon. See Changes / C5


C2 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

N  R POLICE LOG The Bulletin will update items in the Police Log when such a request is received. Any new information, such as the dismissal of charges or acquittal, must be verifiable. For more information, call 541-383-0358. Bend Police Department

Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 6:55 a.m. Dec. 2, in the 800 block of Northwest Brooks Street. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:09 a.m. Dec. 2, in the 500 block of Southwest Industrial Way. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:20 a.m. Dec. 2, in the 20000 block of Elizabeth Lane. Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 12:32 p.m. Dec. 2, in the 500 block of Southwest Industrial Way. Criminal mischief — Graffiti was reported at 1:49 p.m. Dec. 2, in the 400 block of Southwest Powerhouse Drive. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and an arrest made at 1:56 a.m. Dec. 3, in the area of Southeast 15th Street and Southeast Wilson Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:39 a.m. Dec. 3, in the 60900 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:05 a.m. Dec. 3, in the 200 block of Southeast Yew Lane. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 11:16 a.m. Dec. 3, in the 3000 block of Northeast Weddell Road. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 4:16 p.m. Dec. 3, in the 20700 block of High Desert Court. DUII — Eric Dwayne Hull, 37, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 5:28 p.m. Dec. 3, in the area of Northeast Third Street and Northeast Greenwood Avenue. Theft — A tailgate was reported stolen at 10:05 p.m. Dec. 3, in the 2700 block of Northeast U.S. Highway 20. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:07 a.m. Dec. 4, in the 1400 block of Northwest Harmon Boulevard. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:52 a.m. Dec. 4, in the 800 block of Northeast Sixth Street. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and wallet and iPod stolen at 4:52 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 1800 block of Northeast Lotus Drive. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 8:47 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 2500 block of U.S. Highway 20. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 9:39 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 20600 block of Redwing Lane. Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered and GPS and camera stolen at 10:33 a.m. Dec. 5, in the 2200 block of Northeast Pheasant Lane. Theft — Jewelry was reported stolen at 7:17 p.m. Dec. 5, in the 61200 block of Benham Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:28 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Southeast

Third and Southeast Division streets. Burglary — Bicycles were reported stolen at 12:08 a.m. Dec. 6, in the 800 block of Northeast Third Street. Redmond Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 9:41 p.m. Dec. 3, in the 1400 block of Northwest Sixth Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 3:52 p.m. Dec. 3, in the 2000 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:53 a.m. Dec. 3, in the area of Southwest Eighth Street and Southwest Highland Avenue. Theft — Christmas lights were reported stolen at 10:22 a.m. Dec. 3, in the 2300 block of Northwest Canyon Drive. DUII — Alan M. Pachtman, 65, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:43 a.m. Dec. 3, in the 700 block of Southwest Sixth Street. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:57 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 3000 block of Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 7:34 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 3100 block of Southwest Volcano Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:59 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 3600 block of Southwest 21st Place. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 3:22 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 300 block of Northwest Quince Avenue. Theft — A theft was reported at 2:56 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 1700 block of South U.S. Highway 97. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:42 p.m. Dec. 4, in the area of Southwest Canal Boulevard and Southwest Umatilla Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 9:44 a.m. Dec. 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Highland Avenue. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:42 a.m. Dec. 4, in the 800 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:36 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Southwest 36th Street and Southwest Reservoir Drive. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:02 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Southwest Highland Avenue and Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:07 p.m. Dec. 5, in the 900 block of Southwest Rimrock Way. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:01 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Southwest Highland Avenue and Southwest Rimrock Way. Theft — A theft was reported at 1:14 a.m. Dec. 5, in the 3000 block of Southwest Juniper Avenue. Prineville Police Department

Criminal mischief — An act of criminal mischief was reported at 8:23 a.m. Dec. 3, in the area of Northwest Studebaker Road. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:36 a.m. Dec. 3, in the area of Northeast Third Street. Theft — A theft was reported at 11:42 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Northeast Third Street.

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:45 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Rimrock Road. Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:19 p.m. Dec. 3, in the 53700 block of Big Timber Drive in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 8:03 p.m. Dec. 3, in the 3800 block of Northwest Way in Redmond. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 4:37 p.m. Dec. 3, in the 63800 block of North U.S. Highway 97 in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:29 a.m. Dec. 3, in the area of Bear Creek Road and U.S. Highway 20 in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported at 8:10 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 400 block of West U.S. Highway 20 in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 7:07 p.m. Dec. 4, in the 300 block of West Cascade Avenue in Sisters. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 2:59 p.m. Dec. 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 146 in Sunriver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 1:57 p.m. Dec. 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 146 in Sunriver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:06 p.m. Dec. 4, in the area of Southwest 61st Street and Young Avenue in Redmond. DUII — John Charles Nelson, 67, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 11:13 a.m. Dec. 4, in the area of River Woods Drive and Ute Lane in Bend. DUII — Jason Kauhiwi Kelliher, 29, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:36 a.m. Dec. 4, in the area of Southwest Bond Street and Southwest Mill View Way in Bend. DUII — Brandon Lawrence Wilcox, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 12:25 a.m. Dec. 4, in the area of Brinson Boulevard and Peerless Court in Bend. Burglary — A burglary was reported at 10:27 p.m. Dec. 5, in the 19300 block of Cherokee Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:41 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Burgess and Dorrance Meadow roads in La Pine. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 12:53 p.m. Dec. 5, in the 60400 block of Lakeview Drive in Bend. Theft — A theft was reported and an arrest made at 12:20 p.m. Dec. 5, in the 60100 block of Agate Road in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:41 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 147 in Sunriver. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11:25 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 147 in Sunriver. Criminal mischief — Damage to a vehicle was reported at 9:11 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Alfalfa Market Road and Powell Butte Highway in Bend.

L B   Theft — A theft was reported at 8:42 a.m. Dec. 5, in the 1300 block of Highland View Loop in Redmond. DUII — William Wayne Rowton, 30, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 1:28 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of South U.S. Highway 97 and Southwest Yew Avenue in Redmond. Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

Unlawful entry — A vehicle was reported entered at 11:35 p.m. Nov. 27, in the 4900 block of Southwest Franklin Street in Metolius. Unauthorized use — A vehicle was reported stolen and recovered at 4:12 p.m. Dec. 2, in the 400 block of Southeast Crestview Lane in Madras. Oregon State Police

Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5:10 p.m. Dec. 3, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 133. DUII — Aaron A. Agostinalli, 25, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:02 p.m. Dec. 3, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 near milepost 168. DUII — Joene Phyllis Rosso, 74, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 8:42 p.m. Dec. 3, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 West and Old Bend-Redmond Highway. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 5 p.m. Dec. 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 East near milepost 44. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 10:50 p.m. Dec. 4, in the area of U.S. Highway 97 and Powers Road in Bend. DUII — Christopher Champion, 44, was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of intoxicants at 2:56 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of Wall Street and Portland Avenue in Bend. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 11 a.m. Dec. 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 West near milepost 89. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:14 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 East and Byrum Road. Vehicle crash — An accident was reported at 6:23 p.m. Dec. 5, in the area of U.S. Highway 20 near milepost 90.

PETS The following animals have been turned in to the Humane Society of the Ochocos in Prineville or the Humane Society of Redmond animal shelters. You may call the Humane Society of the Ochocos — 541-447-7178 — or check the website at www. humanesocietyochocos.com for pets being held at the shelter and presumed lost. The Redmond shelter’s telephone number is 541923-0882 — or refer to the website at www.redmondhumane.org. The Bend shelter’s website is www.hsco.org. Redmond

Labrador Retriever — Older female, yellow and gold; found near Smith Rock Way. Basset Hound — Adult male, tri-color, with collar; found near Smith Rock Way.

Delaware first to ratify Constitution in 1787 The Associated Press Today is Tuesday, Dec. 7, the 341st day of 2010. There are 24 days left in the year. TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY On Dec. 7, 1941, Imperial Japanese warplanes attacked the U.S. Navy base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii, as well as other American and British bases in the Pacific; the raids prompted the United States to enter World War II. ON THIS DATE In 1787, Delaware became the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution. In 1796, electors chose John Adams to be the second president of the United States. In 1808, electors chose James Madison to be the fourth president of the United States. In 1836, Martin Van Buren was elected the eighth president of the United States. In 1909, chemist Leo H. Baekeland received a U.S. patent for Bakelite, the first synthetic plastic. In 1946, fire broke out at the Winecoff Hotel in Atlanta; the blaze killed 119 people, including hotel founder W. Frank Winecoff. In 1970, cartoonist Rube Goldberg, known for drawing wacky, convoluted contraptions meant to perform simple tasks, died in New York at age 87. In 1972, America’s last moon

T O D AY I N H I S T O R Y mission to date was launched as Apollo 17 blasted off from Cape Canaveral. In 1985, retired Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart died in Hanover, N.H., at age 70. In 1987, 43 people were killed after a gunman aboard a Pacific Southwest Airlines jetliner in California apparently opened fire on a fellow passenger, the two pilots and himself, causing the plane to crash. TEN YEARS AGO Al Gore’s lawyer, David Boies, pleaded with the Florida Supreme Court to order vote recounts and revive Gore’s presidential campaign. Republican attorneys called George W. Bush the certified, rightful victor. FIVE YEARS AGO Federal air marshals shot and killed an airline passenger, Rigoberto Alpizar, at Miami International Airport after he claimed to have a bomb. (Alpizar, who suffered from bipolar disorder, had no bomb.) ONE YEAR AGO The Obama administration took a major step toward imposing the first federal limits on pollution from cars, power plants and factories the same day an international conference on climate change opened in

Copenhagen, Denmark. Manager Whitey Herzog and umpire Doug Harvey were elected to the baseball Hall of Fame by the Veterans Committee. TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS Actor Eli Wallach is 95. Linguist and political philosopher Noam Chomsky is 82. Bluegrass singer Bobby Osborne is 79. Actress Ellen Burstyn is 78. Sen. Thad Cochran (R-Miss.) is 73. Broadcast journalist Carole Simpson is 70. Baseball Hall of Famer Johnny Bench is 63. Actor-director-producer James Keach is 63. Country singer Gary Morris is 62. Singer-songwriter Tom Waits is 61. Sen. Susan M. Collins (R-Maine) is 58. Basketball Hall of Famer Larry Bird is 54. Actress Priscilla Barnes is 53. Former “Tonight Show� announcer Edd Hall is 52. Rock musician Tim Butler (The Psychedelic Furs) is 52. Actor Jeffrey Wright is 45. Actor C. Thomas Howell is 44. NFL player Terrell Owens is 37. Pop singer Nicole Appleton (All Saints) is 35. Country singer Sunny Sweeney is 34. Actress Shiri Appleby is 32. Poprock singer Sara Bareilles is 31. Singer Aaron Carter is 23. THOUGHT FOR TODAY “Any frontal attack on ignorance is bound to fail because the masses are always ready to

Where Buyers And Sellers Meet 1000’s Of Ads Every Day

defend their most precious possession — their ignorance.� — Hendrik Willem van Loon, Dutch-American journalist and lecturer (1882-1944)

Compiled from Bulletin staff reports

Santa Express to visit neighborhoods today The Santa Express, featuring a fire engine carrying Santa, will visit three Bend neighborhoods this evening as part of the Bend Fire Department’s holiday drive, according to a news release. From 6 to 8 p.m., Santa and volunteers from the Fire Department and the Salvation Army will visit the Larkspur, Foxborough and Sun Meadow Neighborhoods. The Santa Express will collect nonperishable food, clothing and toys for needy families in Bend and Central Oregon. A map of tomorrow evening’s route can be viewed at www.ci.bend.or.us/Santa_ press_2010.html. Donated items can also be dropped off at several locations in Bend, including Bend Fire Department fire stations, Bend Memorial Clinic sites and the Salvation Army.

Volunteers sought for Bend girls basketball The Bend Park & Recreation District is seeking volunteers to be coaches for its middle school girls’ basketball program, according to a news release. Volunteer coaches donate between four and five hours a

week throughout the season, which runs from Jan. 11 to March 2. Practices and games are held evenings during the middle of the week at area schools. To apply, volunteers should have some basketball experience and must fill out an application. Applicants must also pass a criminal background test. Preseason training for the coaching positions will be Jan. 3. Those interested should visit www.bendparksandrec.org for more information and to download application forms.

Bend High seeking old shoes for project Bend High students are asking the community to donate old shoes to help the school win new athletic gear as part of Nike’s Reuse-A-Shoe program. The high school’s sports marketing program is participating in the Nike recycling program, in which worn-out shoes donated by members of the community are recycled into sports surfaces such as tracks, basketball courts and playgrounds. The program offers students a chance at winning new sports gear for their school. Drop-off bins are located at Bend High School, and worn shoes will be accepted until Dec. 15.

Parole hearing nears for convicted child killer Diane Downs The Associated Press SALEM — A prosecutor wants the state parole board to use a new law lengthening the gap between parole hearings to keep convicted child killer Diane Downs from coming before the board again for a decade. Downs, whose conviction for shooting her three children and killing one outside Springfield in 1984 inspired the Ann Rule book “Small Sacrifices,� is scheduled for a parole hearing Friday. The 55-year-old has been locked up more than 25 years for the shootings. State law had required release hearings every two years for more than 1,500 prison inmates eligible for parole consideration, but a new law that took effect last January lengthened that time to up to 10 years on a case-by-case basis. Lane County District Attorney Alex Gardner singled her out in a recent letter to the parole board, saying that “offenders such as Downs are precisely why� the law was amended by the 2009 Legislature, the Statesman Journal reported. “Downs is well aware of the likelihood that she will never be paroled. As such, she has used the parole hearings process as a means of publicizing her latest revelations and conspiracy

accusations, rather than as a means of seeking rehabilitation,� he said. At her first parole hearing in December 2008, Downs provided baffling testimony, portraying herself as the victim of conspirators out to get her and her family. The board ruled that she still posed a danger to society and must remain in prison. Gardner is urging the board to refuse parole for Downs again and suspend any further parole consideration for a decade. “As the board is well aware, Downs has made absolutely no progress over the past 26 years in her acknowledgment and understanding of the factors which motivated her to shoot her three young children,� Gardner wrote in the letter. “To the contrary, she continues to fabricate new bizarre versions of the murder and attempted murders,� he said. The parole law was changed after prosecutors, crime-victim advocates and family members of violent crime victims successfully lobbied legislators last year to limit parole hearings. They said, in part, that it was too painful for victims and relatives to attend parole hearings every two years.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 C3

O Changing climate a factor in fire plans By Paul Fattig (Medford) Mail Tribune

MEDFORD — You won’t see a squadron of air tankers poised to scramble out of the Medford airport or vast swaths clear-cut from public forestlands to protect rural communities against wildfires come next summer. But that doesn’t mean agencies working on public forests in Jackson and Josephine counties aren’t preparing for the chance of bigger and more destructive wildfires if climate-change predictions hold true. “There won’t be instant sweeping changes like six tankers based in Medford, but climate change is one of our long-range topics when we talk about management now,” said Brian Ballou, a veteran firefighter who is spokesman for the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Southwest Oregon District, which blankets the two counties. The goal is to plant or encourage the growth of native trees that tolerate drought and are fire-resistant, he said. ODF foresters provide silviculture expertise to private forest landowners and provides wildfire protection for the U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s lands, as well as other public and private lands. “Climate change is being looked at from a number of different fronts,” he said, adding, “and we will still be looking at fire as a management tool.” When and where fire will be employed to reduce forest fuels while preserving big trees depends on the future climate, he observed. “The whole issue of climate change is important we are definitely following it very closely,” said Jim Whittington, spokesman for the BLM’s Medford district. “One of the goals we have over the next several years is to treat our forests so they can improve their natural fire resiliency,” he added, referring to thinning brush and younger trees in overgrown forests. “In the short term, we need to improve fire resiliency,” he said of current dry summers that already create extreme fire conditions. “But the longterm climate change and how we respond to that is also an issue. “If we do the short-term fire resiliency, that has to help the long-term climate-change issue,” he added. “We know we have a problem now. The goal is to reduce the parameters of that problem.”

PORTLAND BOMBING PLOT

Arrested Somalian led double life Mohamud described as quiet teen who liked gin, video games By Nigel Duara and Jeff Barnard The Associated Press

CORVALLIS — The plot described by the FBI was horrific: a 19-year-old Somali-born Muslim with a grudge against the West, ready to kill and maim thousands at a busy Portland Christmas tree lighting ceremony. But while the FBI describes Mohamed Osman Mohamud as a would-be terrorist, there were few hints of that hidden life to Mohamud’s friends, who knew him as “Mo,” a quiet, suburban teen who liked to drink gin and play video games. The teen who allegedly thought he was going to kill thousands of people the day after Thanksgiving in the name of Islamic radicalism is the same one who, three days earlier, wrote and read a Kwanzaa poem about unity with two Christian college students. Court documents and Mohamud’s friends describe the slender Somali-American as juggling contradictory lives — that of an immigrant struggling to fit in and a Muslim who had become radicalized and was bent on holy war. In a cell phone video obtained and aired by Portland station KPTV last week, Mohamud rants against the West. “You know what the whole West thing is? They want to insult our religion,” he says in the video, which the station says was recorded May 22 in an Oregon State University dorm room. “They want to take our lands. They want to rape our women.” KPTV won’t reveal how it obtained the video, which lasts less than a minute. It is not known who recorded the video, clips of which were provided to KPTV, or what led up to Mohamud’s words. His attorney, the police and the FBI have refused to comment about it. The words don’t make sense to friends, who recognized Mohamud in the video. Shelby Turner, a former OSU classmate, said she remembers “Mo Mo” as a funny if awkward student. “I remember him always saying ‘hi’ and giving me nicknames like ‘Shelbs,’ ” Turner told the AP. “He was smart when he wanted to be. But socially, he never fit except with a few other kids like him.”

Born in Mogadishu Mohamud was born in Mogadishu, Somalia, in 1991. His family was torn apart by the civil war, and his father, Osman Barre, a computer engineering professor at the University of Mogadishu, ended up in the Kenyan refugee camp, unsure if his family was alive. Portland pastor Sylvia Eagan helped Barre and about 20 family members resettle in the Portland area in 1993. He told her about his struggle to find his wife, Mariam, a businesswoman, and toddler son. A

The FBI had begun to monitor Mohamud’s e-mail, acting on a tip. Officials have not revealed who turned him in, but in a video Mohamud recorded several days before his arrest, he complained that his parents “held me back from Jihad.”

Offer to go to Pakistan

KPTV via The Associated Press

This recent, undated photo taken from a cell phone video obtained and aired by Portland television station KPTV, shows 19year-old Somali-born Mohamed Osman Mohamud. In the video, which the station says was recorded May 22, in an Oregon State University dorm room, Mohamud rants against the West. year or two later, Eagan said she took an “overjoyed” Barre to the airport to pick up his wife. The boy, then about 5 years old, was shy; he hadn’t seen his father in years. Eagan said she did not know what the family may have gone through in Africa before their arrival in Portland. Mohamud’s parents have refused to comment to media. They split up while Mohamud was in high school, according to a neighbor who was also a family friend, though they remained married. By age 15, Mohamud had already started talking about engaging in a holy war, according to the FBI affidavit. During Ramadan in 2006, someone told him about the virtues of martyrdom and he decided then he was willing to sacrifice for the cause, he later told undercover FBI agents. During his senior year, in 2009, while he was writing for a school magazine and interested in poetry, he also was writing articles for an online magazine called “Jihad Recollections” under the pen name Ibn al-Mubarak, the FBI said. The articles advise holy warriors how they can outlast the enemy — including tips for staying fit in faraway places. That September, Mohamud started attending Oregon State University, taking classes that could lead him to be an engineer, like his father. Those who lived in his dorm said Mohamud spent his freshman year studying, play-

ing basketball and partying. He seemed to have two groups of friends: one composed of African students, the other of older, white students with whom he played video games and the collecting-card game “Magic: The Gathering.”

He was developing a rapport with a former friend who had moved from the U.S. to Pakistan’s Northwest Frontier Province, a haven for fundamentalist Muslims who cross the PakistanAfghanistan border to fight U.S. and NATO forces. In August, the friend, who isn’t named in the FBI affidavit, sent Mohamud a link to a religious school — a coded invitation for Mohamud to join him in Pakistan, the FBI said. “That would be wonderful,” Mohamud said, according to the affidavit. “Just tell me what I need to do.” Mohamud was capable of subterfuge, but still shockingly innocent. When he wanted to board a flight to Alaska in June 2010, he was turned away and interviewed by the FBI. In that interview with FBI agents, he mentioned his friend in Pakistan by name. He said he was going to Alaska for a summer fishing job, but also said he had wanted to go to Yemen. Federal officials have not said how Mohamud got onto the no-fly list. Less than two weeks later, FBI undercover agents set up the first in a series of meetings with Mohamud, who began to talk about a dream in which he led a group of fighters into Afghanistan against “the infidels.” The agent suggested Mohamud consider prayer, study or fundraising, but also offered the option for Mohamud to “become operational.” In a July 30 meeting, Moham-

ud told the agent he wanted to kill, the FBI says. Mohamud later picked the place and time for an explosion: Portland’s Christmas tree lighting. “It’s gonna be a spectacular fireworks show,” Mohamud said in a covert recording. “New York Times will give it two thumbs up.” By Oct. 6, Mohamud had dropped out of Oregon State. But many friends didn’t even know he had dropped out — he even participated in a poem-reading at the university’s student union ballroom on Nov. 23. On Nov. 4, undercover FBI agents took Mohamud to a remote site in Lincoln County, where he pressed a button on a cell phone and watched an explosion — a supposed test for what was to come. The whole event was set up; the explosion was remotely triggered by the FBI. They returned to Corvallis, where Mohamud recorded a video statement: “A dark day is coming your way. For as long as you threaten our security, your people will not remain safe.” On Nov. 26, in the seconds before 5:40 p.m., Mohamud’s secret life was about to unravel. At Portland’s Union Station, he pressed a button on a cell phone. Sixteen blocks away, thousands of people gathered on the bricks of a downtown plaza, cheering on the appearance of Santa Claus and the illuminating of a tall Douglas fir tree laced with 50,000 tiny lights. There was no explosion. Agents from the FBI arrested Mohamud after he pressed the cell phone button a second time, and the teen — whom friends described as more likely to be seen playing basketball on campus than praying at a Corvallis mosque — was taken to a waiting car as he kicked at authorities, shouting “Allahu Akhbar” — “God is great.”

O  B 2 men cited for theft Dems want recount after ESPN prop found in close Senate race CORVALLIS — Two Oregon men have been cited on theft charges after an ESPN Lee Corso Game Day mascot head was reported stolen at the annual “Civil War” game between Oregon and Oregon State last weekend. Oregon State Police said Monday that 26-year-old August Cuneo of Eugene and 25-yearold Alexander Westerberg of Harrisburg were cited Monday afternoon. Troopers said the two men reportedly had attended the University of Oregon. An Oregon State University employee found the prop Monday near his home in Harrisburg, nearly 30 miles from the Oregon State campus in Corvallis. ESPN employees clearing the Game Day set noted the prop — valued at $5,000 — was missing Saturday from a large container box. Arrangements were being made to return the property to ESPN.

SALEM — Oregon Democrats are asking for a recount in a close state Senate race that could tip control of the chamber. Democratic incumbent Martha Schrader trails Republican Alan Olsen by 227 votes in the Clackamas County district south of Portland. Senate Democrats requested the recount in three precincts. The caucus campaign director, Ben Unger, said the precincts were chosen because they cast a lot of votes and will provide a good indication of any larger problems with vote counting. Unger said Democrats will request a full recount if the partial one shows a significant change in the results. Republicans last week requested a full recount in a close southern Oregon Senate race.

More fail to appear in Klamath Falls court KLAMATH FALLS — The number of people who fail to ap-

pear in court in Klamath Falls is increasing. The Herald and News reported that budget cuts at the Klamath County Sheriff’s Office that reduced jail capacity from 152 beds to 64 is part of the problem. And many people keep missing their court dates as the number of offenders charged with multiple counts of failure to appear has become increasingly common on the jail’s booking sheets. Some have more than six failure to appear charges at a time.

6-year-old with lighter starts $800,000 fire PORTLAND — Firefighters say a Portland apartment fire that caused about $800,000 damage was started by a 6-year-old playing with a lighter. KATU reports the fire started Saturday night in a closet. No one was injured, but the fire displaced a mother and three children in one unit and a mother and teen in another unit. — From wire reports

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C4 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

E

The Bulletin

AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER

BETSY MCCOOL GORDON BLACK JOHN COSTA ERIK LUKENS

Chairwoman Publisher Editor-in-chief Editor of Editorials

Fishy regulation

T

he average Oregonian would probably suffer an aneurysm if he suddenly faced a tenfold increase in his tax rate. So it’s no surprise that members of the Oregon Cattlemen’s

Association are saying “holy cow” at the prospect of a tenfold increase in a significant regulatory burden, which is essentially a tax by another name. Within a few months, we suspect many more Oregonians will be echoing the sentiment. The legal engine driving the controversy is the federal Clean Water Act, which requires states to develop water quality standards that are then approved or deep-sixed by the Environmental Protection Agency. The standards Oregon submitted in 2004 included a component called a fish consumption rate (FCR), according to Mary Lou Soscia, the EPA’s Columbia River coordinator. The FCR is a number that gets plugged into equations for pollutants. These equations, says Soscia, “estimate how many pollutants can be discharged based upon an assumption of how much fish is consumed.” If you assume that people eat a small amount of fish, then it’s not a big deal if each fish contains a (relatively) high concentration of pollutants. But if you assume that people eat a lot of fish, then the pollutant level per fish must be much lower. And that means the pollutant levels in water bodies must be much lower, too, which is where the Clean Water Act comes in. In 2004, Oregon assumed an FCR of 17.5 grams per day, which represents the 90th percentile of the national population, according to a 2008 report by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality. But both the EPA and tribal governments argued that the consumption rate in Oregon is much higher, particularly among tribal members. So the state, with the help of tribes and the EPA, has recommended boosting the rate tenfold, to 175 grams per day, which, according to state documents, represents the 90th to 95th percentile of “fish-consuming populations,” not of Oregonians at large. The new rate assumes the consumption of a half pound of fish 23 days per month. Though the EPA is essentially forcing Oregon to adopt the new consumption rate, other states will get off

easier. That’s because, as the EPA’s Soscia notes, regulators can require states to use local data in setting the fish-consumption rate if such data exists. And it does in this case, thanks to tribal studies developed with the assistance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. States in which people eat less fish — or in which less comprehensive data exists — will surely be held to lower clean water standards. How many states would that be? So far, all of them. The consumption rate here “is going to be the highest rate in the nation,” says Soscia, “and (that) has a lot of issues associated with it.” Such as the cost and difficulty of compliance. Many of the objectionable substances are “legacy toxics,” meaning they’re already in the environment. These include arsenic, which occurs naturally, as well as mercury and PCBs. Meanwhile, according to a 2008 state report on the proposed consumption rate, “traditional technology treatments that would be needed to meet more stringent water quality standards if only an end-of-pipe (factory-focused) approach is used have not yet been proven to be effective.” Thus, the state will have to rely upon “innovative regulatory approaches.” To this end, the state rules also will focus on “non-point” sources, according to Soscia. These include agriculture, forestry operations and stormwater runoff. In the end, the stringent regulations required by Oregon’s tops-inthe-nation fish consumption rate will affect everyone, from paper mills to cattle ranchers, and the results — to say the least — won’t enhance the state’s economic competitiveness. The state Department of Environmental Quality intends to trot out the new rules for review and comment in mid-January.

Kitzhaber’s good pick E

ver since Gov. Kulongoski pulled Oregon from the federal Race to the Top competition and promised “to address the underlying issues that are serving as barriers to K-12 reforms,” we’ve wondered whether the political will existed in Salem to do anything of the sort. We’re pleased to say that it might, at least if Gov.-elect John Kitzhaber intended to send a message by appointing Ron Saxton to his transitional team on educational issues. Saxton, a 2006 Republican candidate for governor, is not a status-quo choice for the position. Saxton is no bomb thrower, of course. During his 2006 campaign, in fact, he referred frequently to his

ability to work with the teachers union during his stint on the Portland School Board. But the issue that came to define Saxton is the state’s expensive retirement system for public employees, which he sought to reform. Saxton also argued that teachers should be paid according to their performance, which is one of the pillars of the Race to the Top initiative. It’s also a concept the state teachers union doesn’t like much. Ron Saxton surely wouldn’t be the Oregon Education Association’s first pick to co-chair Kitzhaber’s transition team on primary and secondary education. But as a signal to Oregonians, the choice couldn’t be more encouraging.

My Nickel’s Worth Fixing the shortfall

fact, the construction accelerated after it received the letter, ceasing only when a code enforcement officer visited the site and issued a stop-work order. Although those of us who have been involved in this dispute were not happy with the hearings officer’s ruling, we found it well thought out and fair. We assumed the ruling would be appealed and were not surprised when it was. We believe it should have been appealed to the Land Use Board of Appeals and not the county commissioners because we did not want this to become a political football. Your editorial only reinforces that belief. Suzanne Michaels Redmond

I was reading in the Bulletin how elected legislators from your area, Rep.-elect Jason Conger, Rep. Gene Whisnant and Sen. Chris Telfer, plan to close the $3.5 billion shortfall in the state budget. Maybe their cohorts from the Valley should live over here for a while and learn what “belt-tightening” is all about. It doesn’t involve raising taxes to cover runaway spending, but cutting corners to make ends meet. All of you representatives from the Valley, listen to your fellow legislators from this side of the Cascades. You might learn a thing or two about economics. Randy Avery Prineville

Flawed contract

Outward Bound wrong

A recent article in The Bulletin described negotiations between the newly organized Deschutes County deputy district attorneys union and the county. The county is ready to sign a contract that includes a “just cause” provision. I’m confused and concerned about the actions of the county commissioners and long-term implications for our community. Why a “just cause” provision? Deputy DAs are professionals. They chose to accept positions working for an elected official. They should be astute enough to recognize the potential for changes in management. They did not sign up for a guaranteed, lifelong position — a position where they can “retire on the job.” There are no other counties in Oregon with “just cause” for DDAs. Legally, the county has a year to negotiate a contract. There is considerable to lose and little, if nothing, to gain by signing the contract

I’d like to respond to the editorial “Let nonprofit keep its cabins” that was published Friday, Nov. 26. I am the one you referred to in your article as the “owner of a neighboring property who blew the whistle” on the construction of the cabins on the Deschutes River by the Outward Bound organization. Your portrayal of the facts of this case is one-sided and misleading. This is not just about the eagle nesting site. Outward Bound’s 45-acre site is zoned agricultural, is in a land management zone, as well as a sensitive bird and mammal habitat zone. Outward Bound leaders’ claim that they didn’t know they needed permits is ridiculous. Outward Bound continued construction of the 13 cabins along the river even after receiving a certified letter from the county code enforcement folks. In

with a “just cause” provision. The commissioners are opening the door for future costly lawsuits and dissension. In May, an overwhelming majority of voters asked for change in the DA’s office. It appears the commissioners are acting in a knee-jerk manner by rushing to sign a contract that is not in our best interest. Why are they so willing and anxious to sign a contract with the union that will bind us for years into the future? Why are they in such haste to tie us to our past? Why are they so willing to grant the new union all its wishes? Where is their backbone? Judith Hassoun Bend

Bulletin biased In The Bulletin’s Dec. 1 editorial regarding wage freezes, you were comparing federal employees’ salaries in Deschutes County to private-sector salaries in the county. In doing your report, you pulled out the top 20 percent of federal employees’ salaries and then compared that to the average private-sector salary. In this editorial, as in many others in the recent past, The Bulletin would appear to have a notso-hidden agenda regarding state and federal employes. If the deficits at both state and federal levels are to be reduced, as we can all agree they must be, it is critical that we receive accurate, unbiased information to base decisions on. I suspect with that type of analysis you find the averages in both federal/state salaries and private-sector salaries are the same, not so outrageously different. John Godlove Bend

Letters policy

In My View policy

Submissions

We welcome your letters. Letters should be limited to one issue, contain no more than 250 words and include the writer’s signature, phone number and address for verification. We edit letters for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject poetry, personal attacks, form letters, letters submitted elsewhere and those appropriate for other sections of The Bulletin. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

In My View submissions should be between 600 and 800 words, signed and include the writer’s phone number and address for verification. We edit submissions for brevity, grammar, taste and legal reasons. We reject those published elsewhere. In My View pieces run routinely in the space below, alternating with national columnists. Writers are limited to one letter or Op-Ed piece every 30 days.

Please address your submission to either My Nickel’s Worth or In My View and send, fax or e-mail them to The Bulletin. WRITE: My Nickel’s Worth OR In My View P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-385-5804 E-MAIL: bulletin@bendbulletin.com

WikiLeaks cables suggest American power waning O

K. I admit it. I enjoy reading other people’s mail as much as the next guy, so going through the WikiLeaks cables has made for some fascinating reading. What’s between the lines in those cables, though, is another matter. It is a rather sobering message. America is leaking power. Let’s start, though, with what’s in the cables. I think I’ve figured it out: Saudi Arabia and its Arab neighbors want the U.S. to decapitate the Iranian regime and destroy its nuclear facilities so they can celebrate in private this triumph over the hated Persians, while publicly joining with their people in the streets in burning Uncle Sam in effigy, after we carry out such an attack on Iran — which will make the Arab people furious at us. The reason the Arab people will be furious at us, even though many of them don’t like the Persians either, is that they dislike their own unelected leaders even more, and protesting against the Americans, who help to keep their leaders in power, is a way of sticking it to both of us. Are you with me? While the Saudis are urging us to take out Iran’s nuclear capability, we

learn from the cables that private Saudi donors today still constitute the most significant source of funding to Sunni terrorist groups worldwide — not to mention the fundamentalist mosques, charities and schools that spawn the Taliban in Pakistan and Afghanistan. So basically, our oil payments are cycled through Saudi Arabia and end up funding the very militants whom our soldiers are fighting. But don’t think we don’t have allies. … The cables tell us about Ahmed Zia Massoud, an Afghan vice president from 2004 to 2009, who now owns a palatial home in Dubai, where, according to one cable, he was caught by customs officials carrying $52 million in unexplained cash. It seems from these cables that the United States often has to pay leaders in Pakistan and Afghanistan to be two-faced — otherwise they would just be one-faced and against the United States in both public and private. Are you still with me? Yes, these are our allies — people whose values we do not and never will share. “OK,” our Saudi, Gulf, Afghan and Pakistani allies tell us, “we may not be perfect, but the guys who would

THOMAS FRIEDMAN replace us would be much worse. The Taliban and al-Qaida are one-faced. They say what they mean in public and private: They hate America.” That’s true, but if we are stuck supporting bad regimes because only worse would follow, why can’t we do anything to make them reform? That brings us to the sobering message in so many of these cables: America lacks leverage. America lacks leverage in the Middle East because we are addicted to oil. We are the addicts and they are the pushers, and addicts never tell the truth to their pushers. When we import $28 billion a month in oil, we can’t say to the Saudis: “We know the guys who would come after you would be much worse, but why do we have to choose between your misrule and corruption and their brutality and intolerance?” We’re just stuck support-

ing a regime that, sure, fights al-Qaida at home, but uses our money to fund a religious ideology, schools, mosques and books that ensure that al-Qaida will always have a rich pool of recruits in Saudi Arabia and abroad. We also lack leverage with the Chinese on North Korea, or with regard to the value of China’s currency, because we’re addicted to their credit. Geopolitics is all about leverage. We cannot make ourselves safer abroad unless we change our behavior at home. But our politics never connects the two. Think how different our conversations with Saudi Arabia would be if we were in the process of converting to electric cars powered by nuclear, wind, domestic natural gas and solar power? We could tell them that if we detect one more dollar of Saudi money going to the Taliban then they can protect themselves from Iran. Think how different our conservations with China would be if we had had a different savings rate the past 30 years and China was not holding $900 billion in U.S. Treasury securities — but was still dependent on the U.S. economy and technology. We would not be begging them to

revalue their currency, and maybe our request that China prevent North Korea from shipping ballistic missile parts to Iran via Beijing airport (also in the cables) wouldn’t be rebuffed so brusquely. And think how much more leverage our sanctions would have on Iran if oil were $20 a barrel and not $80 — and Iran’s mullah-dictators were bankrupt? Fifty years ago, the world was shaped in a certain way, to promote certain values, because America had the leverage to shape it that way. We have been steadily losing that leverage because of our twin addictions to Middle East oil and Chinese credit — and the WikiLeaks documents show just what crow we have to eat because of that. I know, some problems — like how we deal with a failing state like Pakistan that also has nukes — are innately difficult, and ending our oil and credit addictions alone will not solve them. But it sure would give us more leverage to do so — and more insulation from the sheer madness of the Middle East if we can’t. Thomas Friedman is a columnist for The New York Times.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 C5

O D

N   Jeannine Harrelson, of Sunriver Oct. 8, 1945 - Dec. 3, 2010 Arrangements: Baird Funeral Home of Bend (541) 382-0903 www.bairdmortuaries.com Services: A celebration of Jeannine's life will be held on Saturday, December 11, 2010 at 1:00 PM at 61125 Ladera Road, Bend, Oregon 97702. Contributions may be made to:

Partners In Care Hospice, 2075 NE Wyatt Court, Bend, Oregon 97701, www.partnersbend.org

Muriel Alice Morsch, of Prineville Feb. 21, 1916 - Dec. 3, 2010 Arrangements: Whispering Pines Funeral Home, 185 N.E. 4th Street, Prineville, OR 97754. Services: The family will hold a private service to celebrate the life of their beloved family Matriarch. Contributions may be made to:

Blind & Visually Impaired Center, 225 Laurel Avenue, Pacific Grove, CA 93950.

Obituary Policy Death Notices are free and will be run for one day, but specific guidelines must be followed. Local obituaries are paid advertisements submitted by families or funeral homes. They may be submitted by phone, mail, e-mail or fax. The Bulletin reserves the right to edit all submissions. Please include contact information in all correspondence. For information on any of these services or about the obituary policy, contact 541-617-7825. DEADLINES: Death notices are accepted until noon Monday through Friday for next-day publication and noon on Saturday. Obituaries must be received by 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday for publication on the second day after submission, by 1 p.m. Friday for Sunday or Monday publication, and by 9 a.m. Monday for Tuesday publication. Deadlines for display ads vary; please call for details. PHONE: 541-617-7825 MAIL: Obituaries P.O. Box 6020 Bend, OR 97708 FAX: 541-322-7254 E-MAIL: obits@bendbulletin.com

James R. Anderson March 28, 1950 - Dec. 2, 2010 James "Jim" Anderson of Redmond, OR, died December 2, 2010, at his home. He was born March 28, 1950, in Chehalis, WA, to Robert and Betty (Neer) Anderson. His family moved to Redmond shortly after his birth where he grew up and attended he Jim Anderson school, graduated from Redmond High school in 1968. Jim served in the United States Navy from 1969 to 1973, stationed in Vietnam. He was a mill worker for DAW and Clear Pine Mouldings. He married Deborah Heisler in 1991. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and going to the casino. Jim was survived by his wife, Deborah Anderson, mother, Betty Anderson, a daughter, Valerie Dickinson, step-son, Charles Heisler, and sisters, Donna Morgans and Dianne Chambers, and seven grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his father. A funeral will be held Thursday, December 9, 2010, at 1:30 p.m. at Redmond Memorial Chapel. Memorial contributions may be made to National Alliance of Mentally Ill (NAMI). Please sign our guest book at redmondmemorial.com

Demolition Continued from C1 The buildings and the lot are bank-owned property, and Teater said he doesn’t want the city to spend any money on the project if it doesn’t have to. He said he’s exploring the idea of having inmate crews, such as the ones that pull weeds in the summer, do the demolition. He also wants to see if any of the materials, such as wood, can be salvaged or recycled. Robert Raimondi, the Compass Commercial broker who is selling the property, said the property is in a good location, but added that anyone who bought it would likely have to remove the buildings regardless of use. The property, with structures, is currently on the market for $292,000. “The term we use in the real estate business is that they’re beyond their economic life,” Raimondi said. “Without question,

Shelter Continued from C1 The goal, he said, is to help homeless people stop the cycle and find permanent homes. The county has spearheaded the effort, but it’s been an entire community push to make it a reality. The local soup kitchen, Oasis Soup Kitchen, will help feed the house’s occupants. And an account is being set up, through money that has come from churches and other faith-based organizations, to help with maintenance and day-to-day operations. The City of Prineville has donated water and sewer service to the project. Fahlgren said, all told, the county spent about $3,000 on ma-

Fire Continued from C1 The Fire Department also recommends that residents take care when it comes to holiday lights and decorations, as they can also pose fire hazards. Strings of lights should be inspected for frayed wires, cracked sockets, loose plugs or worn insulation before being displayed. String lights should always bear the UL (Underwriters Laboratories Inc.) mark, and should always be unplugged when you leave the house or go to bed. Also, to avoid electrocution or fire, only lights

Changes Continued from C1 The commission’s other top priorities included monitoring a possible bill related to Deschutes, Crook and Jefferson counties’ effort to form a regional health authority, and fighting a proposal for the state to begin collecting local court fees and redistributing them. Many local officials view the state’s transportation rule as an impediment to economic development. The trouble for Juniper Ridge has been that Bend does not have money for road work until it can sell land to businesses. Similarly, Deschutes County’s plan is stalled because the state would require the county to spend millions of dollars to improve roads in the area, before the rezone and land sale could proceed. The state Legislature passed a bill in its 2009 session to give local governments options to deal with the state planning rules that halted these and other projects, but some officials believe it is inadequate. “We definitely need something with more scripted language that spells out the needs to be addressed,” Deschutes County Commissioner Tammy Baney said. Commissioners also said it was a top priority for them to monitor any proposed laws related to creating a health authority. Crook, Deschutes and Jefferson counties already have the ability to form a health authority, Deschutes County Administrator Dave Kanner wrote in an e-mail. “Our concern is that a new statute might implement new rules or regulations that we had not anticipated,” Kanner wrote. Baney, who has advocated for the formation of the health au-

if we could remove the blighted buildings, it should appeal to investors. It’s obviously in close proximity to the (Bend) Parkway and has high traffic counts from Revere and Division Street. You just don’t find those kind of corners vacant very often.” From the city’s perspective, Division Street is in need of some revitalization as it is considered an entrance into the city and its downtown from the parkway. City Recorder Patty Stell, who is working with Teater to see what, if anything, the city can do to help with his project, said that many years ago Division Street was considered a “commercial corridor” and had a more vibrant business district than it has today. “There used to be all kinds of businesses down there,” Stell said, reminiscing about longgone pizza joints and restaurants. “We’d like to be able to help, and there are several property owners down there that would like to

see that brought back.” She said Teater’s idea is in its infancy, and many factors need to be considered. One of the glaring issues, she said, has to deal with whether there is any asbestos in the two buildings. If so, that would complicate the city’s efforts to clean up the property and would likely require special permits. Ultimately, Stell said the burden of the project and how it proceeds is on Teater, especially considering the city doesn’t have much money in its budget for special projects. Teater said he doesn’t mind the responsibility. He said he will continue to work on the demolition project well after he leaves the council. “I’m happy to stay on this one,” Teater said. “It’s one that I’ve had my eye on for a while.”

terials for the project. In years past, churches have housed people in their basements or found families who were willing to have people stay with them. St. Vincent de Paul, a nonprofit, has also played an important role in housing the homeless, often giving the person in need a voucher to stay in a hotel. Fahlgren said the county is still working on a women’s shelter. Lou Haehnlen, who is a retired building inspector with the county, was the project supervisor on the shelter project. “I know how the guys are,” Haehnlen said of the volunteers on the remodel. “All the guys I’ve had come down, they are willing to help out whatever way they can. They know it’s something really

needed here in the community.” Haehnlen said the project has taken about a month to complete. “I just got in and got it done quickly as I could because I knew the cold season was coming on,” he said. Fahlgren said this has already been a learning process for the county and it will be interesting to see how it evolves. “If someone doesn’t have a shelter over their head, it’s a danger to (him or her), and it’s important we cover the need,” Fahlgren said. “I’m not sure there’s a law that says we have to do it. But we feel like we need to.”

that are specifically designated as outdoor lights should be used outside. Holiday decorations should always be kept away from heat sources. In addition, the Fire Department recommends taking care where holiday plants are placed within the house, as plants such as holly, mistletoe and poinsettia leaves can be poisonous to humans and pets. Candles are another source of fire danger, and should always be kept out of the reach of children and pets. Candles should never be left unattended, and should be kept at least 12 inches away from

thority, noted that it will not cost the state money. “We’re not asking for money,” Baney said. “I think that’s something to underscore.” Commissioners have also said recently that they’re concerned about the court fine redistribution proposal from the Joint Committee on State Justice System Revenues. The state Legislature tasked the committee with developing recommendations to simplify Oregon’s Judicial Department revenue structure and find new revenue and collection methods, according to its charter. In a report to the committee in October, the National Center for State Courts found that Oregon court fee structure is more complex and fees are generally higher than in similar states. State law allows county commissioners to impose fees on domestic relations cases, such as divorces, and Deschutes County collects a fee of $169 for plaintiffs and $169 for respondents, said county Court Administrator Ernest Mazorol. Approximately 60 percent of the fee revenue pays for a mediator, who attempts to resolve disputes before they make their way into the courts.

Nick Grube can be reached at 541-633-2160 or at ngrube@bendbulletin.com.

Lauren Dake can be reached at 541-419-8074 or at ldake@bendbulletin.com.

any combustible material, such as curtains or greenery. Fires caused by cooking are more common during the holiday season, so the department recommends residents keep all combustible materials away from toasters, coffee makers and burners. In addition, cooking should never be left unattended on the stove. The department recommends that residents have a home fire escape plan and practice it. And as always, smoke alarms and should be in good working order to prevent fire from breaking out and to ensure a safe and happy holiday.

Nearly 40 percent helps pay for a supervised visitation and exchange center, known as Mary’s Place, in Bend. Mary’s Place provides an opportunity for certain parents who lose custody of their children to visit them, if the courts approve. Baney said she believes if the state gets to collect local court fees, it will keep some of the money. “What I have yet to see the state do is take local funds and disburse them out at the same amount,” Baney said. “It isn’t necessarily a broken process right now, but it is a way for the state to garner funds.” Commissioners also want to keep track of a proposal to allow small-scale destination resorts, which various interest groups are working on at the state level. Deschutes County has the most destination resorts of any county in the state. The concept would allow one small resort per county, with no single-family homes and 20 to 100 overnight lodging units, such as hotel rooms. Hillary Borrud can be reached at 541-617-7829 or at hborrud@bendbulletin.com.

Former Marquette basketball coach Hank Raymonds, 86 The Associated Press MILWAUKEE — Former Marquette basketball coach Hank Raymonds died early Monday after a long battle with cancer, the school said. He was 86. Raymonds, a former assistant coach under Al McGuire, took over as head coach after McGuire’s departure in 1977 and coached until 1983, compiling a career record of 126-50. “The Marquette family has lost a champion today,” said Boston Celtics coach and former Marquette player Doc Rivers. “A true ‘Warrior.’ For me, I’ve lost a mentor. Coach was more than a basketball coach. He was my life coach. I’m saddened with his passing and lucky he came into my life.” Raymonds joined Marquette’s coaching staff in 1961 under then-head coach Eddie Hickey, who was Raymond’s coach at Saint Louis University. Raymonds stayed on when McGuire took over as head coach in 1964, and became known as the sharp basketball tactician behind McGuire’s charismatic personality. Marquette won the NCAA national championship in 1977, and Raymonds took over as head coach after McGuire retired from coaching to go into broadcasting.

6 trips to postseason All six of his Marquette teams advanced to postseason play, including five trips to the NCAA Tournament. Five of his players were All-America honorees and 16 players were selected in the NBA Draft. Former Marquette player Bo Ellis said Raymonds was as important to Marquette as McGuire.

The Associated Press ile photo

Former Marquette University basketball coach Hank Raymonds, seen here in 1981, died early Monday after a long battle with cancer at age 86. “And coach McGuire would be the first to say that,” Ellis said. “He gave us more than anyone could imagine every day. We were a family and coach Raymonds treated us like his sons. Without him I wouldn’t have a college degree. I had no father when I got to Marquette but I left Marquette with one, coach Raymonds. He did so much for so many. I will miss him dearly.” Current Marquette coach Buzz Williams said he saw Raymonds for the last time on Friday. “His spirit was as vibrant as it always was,” Williams said. “He was selfless and his passion was for the people of our institution and of our department. I am grateful for his willingness to share his wisdom and we will continue to work to honor the totality of what he was about on and off the floor.”

Maria Ester Gatti de Islas, 92, Uruguayan activist By Charles Newbery New York Times News Service

BUENOS AIRES — Maria Ester Gatti de Islas, a Uruguayan teacher who became a human rights activist while helping to find people lost to political repression in South America, died Sunday in Montevideo. She was 92. Her death was confirmed by the organization she founded, Uruguayan Mothers and Families of Disappeared Prisoners. Gatti began what would become a lifelong search for

her only daughter and granddaughter in 1976, when they disappeared in Argentina during the military dictatorship there that ended in 1983. Gatti’s daughter, Maria Emilia Islas, and her husband, Jorge Zaffaroni, had helped found Uruguay’s left-leaning People’s Victory Party in Buenos Aires in 1975, weeks after their daughter, Mariana Zaffaroni, was born. They had fled to Argentina when they became targets of Uruguay’s civic-military dictatorship.


WE

C6 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

A T H ER

THE BULLETIN WEATHER FORECAST

Maps and national forecast provided by Weather Central LLC ©2010.

TODAY, DECEMBER 7

HIGH Ben Burkel

39

Bob Shaw

FORECASTS: LOCAL

STATE Western

39/32

Warm Springs 39/35

35/29

Willowdale Mitchell

Madras

37/34

Camp Sherman 34/29 Redmond Prineville 39/32 Cascadia 38/33 38/33 Sisters 37/31 Bend Post  39/32

36/31

27/20

Mostly cloudy with periods of rain today. Rain likely tonight. Central

41/38 36/33

Oakridge Elk Lake

35/34

34/34



34/29

Marion Forks

Ruggs

Condon

Maupin

Government Camp

36/28

35/30

39/28

Hampton

Crescent

Crescent Lake

39/27

34/29

Fort Rock

Chemult 39/26

Vancouver Calgary 27/16

Seattle

City

49/43

Eugene

Chance of rain and snow showers today. Rain and snow likely tonight. Eastern



49/40

Missoula 31/23

39/34

Grants Pass 50/45

36/31

34/19

Boise

39/32

58/48

Helena



Bend

Idaho Falls Elko



33/24

40/25

Reno

Crater Lake 35/27

51/33

San Francisco 60/51





Sunrise today . . . . . . 7:27 a.m. Sunset today . . . . . . 4:27 p.m. Sunrise tomorrow . . 7:27 a.m. Sunset tomorrow. . . 4:27 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . 9:17 a.m. Moonset today . . . . 6:31 p.m.

Salt Lake City 40/29

Yesterday Hi/Lo/Pcp

Mainly cloudy, mixed showers.

LOW

HIGH

47 32

Moon phases First

Full

Last

New

Dec. 13 Dec. 21 Dec. 27 Jan. 4

LOW

HIGH

Wed. Hi/Lo/W

Astoria . . . . . . . . 53/42/0.01 . . . . . . 50/43/r. . . . . . 50/42/sh Baker City . . . . . . 38/30/0.10 . . . . . . 35/31/c. . . . . . 36/25/rs Brookings . . . . . . 55/50/0.22 . . . . . 57/50/sh. . . . . . 54/47/sh Burns. . . . . . . . . . 39/32/0.13 . . . . . .37/30/rs. . . . . . 37/29/rs Eugene . . . . . . . . 46/37/0.02 . . . . . . 49/40/r. . . . . . 47/39/sh Klamath Falls . . . 46/34/0.10 . . . . . . 40/33/c. . . . . . 40/30/sh Lakeview. . . . . . . 37/32/0.01 . . . . . . 38/30/c. . . . . . 38/29/rs La Pine . . . . . . . . 42/23/0.13 . . . . . 39/28/sh. . . . . . 40/28/sh Medford . . . . . . . 59/40/0.03 . . . . . . 50/41/r. . . . . . 49/40/sh Newport . . . . . . . 55/45/0.01 . . . . . . 52/45/r. . . . . . 50/40/sh North Bend . . . . . 61/46/0.01 . . . . . . 56/47/r. . . . . . 53/46/sh Ontario . . . . . . . . 37/20/0.12 . . . . . 34/32/sh. . . . . . 34/31/sh Pendleton . . . . . . 32/26/0.00 . . . . . . 35/33/c. . . . . . 44/33/sh Portland . . . . . . . 46/38/0.09 . . . . . . 46/41/r. . . . . . . 46/42/r Prineville . . . . . . . 36/23/0.18 . . . . . 38/33/sh. . . . . . 41/32/sh Redmond. . . . . . . 36/25/0.13 . . . . . . 37/33/c. . . . . . 41/30/sh Roseburg. . . . . . . 52/42/0.10 . . . . . 52/43/sh. . . . . . 52/44/sh Salem . . . . . . . . . 48/39/0.05 . . . . . . 48/40/r. . . . . . 47/40/sh Sisters . . . . . . . . . 33/25/0.01 . . . . . 37/31/sh. . . . . . 44/28/sh The Dalles . . . . . . 40/33/0.00 . . . . . . 38/32/c. . . . . . 40/36/sh

TEMPERATURE

SKI REPORT

The higher the UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Index is for solar at noon.

LOW 0

MEDIUM 2

4

HIGH

V.HIGH

6

PRECIPITATION

Yesterday’s weather through 4 p.m. in Bend High/Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36/25 24 hours ending 4 p.m.. . . . . . . . 0.29” Record high . . . . . . . . . . . . .66 in 1937 Month to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.39” Record low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 in 1972 Average month to date. . . . . . . . 0.30” Average high . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Year to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.11” Average low. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Average year to date. . . . . . . . . 10.25” Barometric pressure at 4 p.m.. . . 30.20 Record 24 hours . . . . . . . 2.26 in 1981 *Melted liquid equivalent

Tomorrow Rise Set Mercury . . . . . .9:02 a.m. . . . . . .5:39 p.m. Venus . . . . . . . .3:48 a.m. . . . . . .2:28 p.m. Mars. . . . . . . . .8:38 a.m. . . . . . .5:18 p.m. Jupiter. . . . . . .12:47 p.m. . . . . .12:27 a.m. Saturn. . . . . . . .2:08 a.m. . . . . . .1:43 p.m. Uranus . . . . . .12:49 p.m. . . . . .12:42 a.m.

1

LOW

45 34

ULTRAVIOLET INDEX

Tuesday Hi/Lo/W

Mostly cloudy, rain showers.

43 32

PLANET WATCH

OREGON CITIES

49/45

Portland

Mostly cloudy today. Mostly cloudy with a chance of snow tonight.

HIGH

BEND ALMANAC

Redding

38/31

LOW

45 31

SUN AND MOON SCHEDULE

Christmas Valley Silver Lake

HIGH

32

SATURDAY

Mainly cloudy, rain showers, warmer.

NORTHWEST

38/30

30/22

LOW

Yesterday’s regional extremes • 61° North Bend • 18° Joseph

FRIDAY

Mainly cloudy, mixed showers, warmer.

Tonight: Mainly cloudy, mixed showers.

46/41

Burns

La Pine

THURSDAY

A storm system will produce rain and higher elevation snow over western portions of the region today.

31/29

Brothers

38/29

Today: Patchy freezing fog early, mainly cloudy, showers developing late.

Paulina

35/30

Sunriver

WEDNESDAY

8

10

ROAD CONDITIONS Snow level and road conditions representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday. Key: T.T. = Traction Tires. Pass Conditions I-5 at Siskiyou Summit . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires I-84 at Cabbage Hill . . . . . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 20 at Santiam Pass . . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Government Camp. . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 26 at Ochoco Divide . . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 58 at Willamette Pass . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 138 at Diamond Lake . . . . . Carry chains or T. Tires Hwy. 242 at McKenzie Pass . . . . . . . . .Closed for season

Ski report from around the state, representing conditions at 5 p.m. yesterday: Snow accumulation in inches Ski area Last 24 hours Base Depth Anthony Lakes . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . . . 31 Hoodoo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 38-40 Mt. Ashland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 32-48 Mt. Bachelor . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3-0 . . . . . . 52-57 Mt. Hood Meadows . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . . . 54 Mt. Hood Ski Bowl . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 36-43 Timberline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0-0 . . . . . . 68-75 Warner Canyon . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . no report Willamette Pass . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 . . . . . . 30-47 Aspen, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Mammoth Mtn., California 12-16 Park City, Utah . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Squaw Valley, California . . . .8-10 Sun Valley, Idaho. . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Taos, New Mexico . . . . . . . . . . 0.0 Vail, Colorado . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0.0

. . . . . . 21-23 . . . . . . 50-96 . . . . . . . . 46 . . . . . . 51-90 . . . . . . 20-36 . . . . . . 12-15 . . . . . . 20-23

For links to the latest ski conditions visit: www.skicentral.com/oregon.html

For up-to-minute conditions turn to: www.tripcheck.com or call 511

Legend:W-weather, Pcp-precipitation, s-sun, pc-partial clouds, c-clouds, h-haze, sh-showers, r-rain, t-thunderstorms, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, rs-rain-snow mix, w-wind, f-fog, dr-drizzle, tr-trace

TRAVELERS’ FORECAST NATIONAL

NATIONAL WEATHER SYSTEMS Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are high for the day.

S

S

S

Yesterday’s U.S. extremes

S

S

Vancouver 49/45

S

S

Calgary 27/16

S

Saskatoon 13/3

Seattle 49/43

S Winnipeg 15/0

S

S

Thunder Bay 16/-1

S

S

S

S S

Quebec 29/21

Halifax 37/28 P ortland Billings To ronto P ortland (in the 48 35/22 39/22 27/21 46/41 St. Paul Green Bay contiguous states): Bismarck Boston 16/3 25/7 21/11 Boise 38/27 Buffalo Detroit 39/34 26/19 New York • 82° Rapid City 29/20 37/27 Des Moines 38/17 Tucson, Ariz. Cheyenne Philadelphia Columbus 25/16 Chicago 44/27 23/15 38/24 20/10 Omaha • -10° San Francisco 32/20 Washington, D. C. Cut Bank, Mont. 59/53 Salt Lake 36/23 Las City Denver Louisville Kansas City • 1.56” Vegas 40/29 51/25 28/14 37/21 St. Louis 64/43 Mt. Shasta, Calif. Charlotte 28/15 36/17 Albuquerque Los Angeles Oklahoma City Nashville Little Rock 55/28 67/51 48/26 33/18 46/28 Phoenix Atlanta 75/47 Honolulu 39/22 Birmingham 82/69 Tijuana 42/21 72/51 Dallas New Orleans 58/35 53/38 Orlando 55/32 Houston Chihuahua 60/44 73/35 Miami 62/43 Monterrey La Paz 77/48 84/59 Mazatlan Anchorage 85/54 22/19 Juneau 33/21

FRONTS

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Abilene, TX . . . . .50/22/0.00 . 59/26/pc . . . 58/34/s Akron . . . . . . . . .25/21/0.10 . .26/18/sn . . 27/15/sn Albany. . . . . . . . .28/23/0.00 . .31/19/sn . . 28/14/sn Albuquerque. . . .57/32/0.00 . . .55/28/s . . . 56/30/s Anchorage . . . . .23/10/0.01 . . .22/19/c . . . 25/16/s Atlanta . . . . . . . .40/27/0.00 . . .39/22/s . . 41/24/pc Atlantic City . . . .38/30/0.00 . . .37/25/c . . 36/30/pc Austin . . . . . . . . .56/30/0.00 . 64/37/pc . . . 61/31/s Baltimore . . . . . .37/28/0.00 . . .36/22/c . . 35/18/pc Billings. . . . . . . . .31/13/0.00 . 39/22/pc . . 47/28/pc Birmingham . . . .41/27/0.00 . . .42/21/s . . 43/23/pc Bismarck . . . . . . . . 5/-8/0.00 . . . .25/7/s . . 22/18/pc Boise . . . . . . . . . .42/26/0.25 . . .39/34/c . . . 38/33/c Boston. . . . . . . . .35/27/0.00 . . .38/27/c . . 37/22/pc Bridgeport, CT. . .35/30/0.00 . . .38/19/c . . 35/19/pc Buffalo . . . . . . . .27/24/0.42 . .26/19/sn . . 26/17/sn Burlington, VT. . .27/21/0.16 . .30/15/sn . . 25/11/sn Caribou, ME . . . .38/28/0.48 . .30/20/sn . . 24/10/sn Charleston, SC . .46/28/0.00 . . .47/24/s . . 47/27/pc Charlotte. . . . . . .38/21/0.00 . . .36/17/s . . 40/20/pc Chattanooga. . . .38/28/0.00 . . .37/18/s . . 40/22/pc Cheyenne . . . . . .49/19/0.00 . 44/27/pc . . 46/30/pc Chicago. . . . . . . . .19/8/0.00 . 20/10/pc . . 23/11/pc Cincinnati . . . . . .23/16/0.00 . 23/11/pc . . 29/14/pc Cleveland . . . . . .28/25/0.05 . .29/23/sn . . 29/18/sn Colorado Springs 48/20/0.00 . 46/25/pc . . 55/32/pc Columbia, MO . .31/15/0.00 . 31/14/pc . . . 39/25/s Columbia, SC . . .43/25/0.00 . . .43/20/s . . . 43/22/s Columbus, GA. . .46/30/0.00 . . .44/24/s . . 43/25/pc Columbus, OH. . .25/19/0.01 . .23/15/sn . . . 25/15/c Concord, NH . . . .30/22/0.00 . . .33/17/c . . 31/13/pc Corpus Christi. . .60/47/0.00 . 66/46/pc . . 64/39/pc Dallas Ft Worth. .50/30/0.00 . 58/35/pc . . . 56/38/s Dayton . . . . . . . .55/12/0.00 . .23/12/sn . . 27/12/pc Denver. . . . . . . . .50/20/0.00 . 51/25/pc . . 59/33/pc Des Moines. . . . .27/12/0.00 . 25/16/pc . . 35/24/pc Detroit. . . . . . . . .29/24/0.00 . .29/20/sn . . 29/19/sn Duluth . . . . . . . . . .16/7/0.00 . . .14/0/pc . . . 15/6/pc El Paso. . . . . . . . .63/33/0.00 . . .68/34/s . . . 65/32/s Fairbanks. . . . . -12/-23/0.00 . -18/-30/s . . -17/-29/s Fargo. . . . . . . . . . 13/-1/0.00 . . 16/-2/pc . . 14/10/pc Flagstaff . . . . . . .55/27/0.00 . . .51/16/s . . . 56/19/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Grand Rapids . . .29/25/0.00 . .27/17/sn . . 28/18/pc Green Bay. . . . . .25/20/0.00 . 21/11/pc . . 22/12/pc Greensboro. . . . .35/26/0.00 . . .36/17/s . . . 39/19/s Harrisburg. . . . . .34/30/0.00 . . .36/24/c . . 36/22/pc Hartford, CT . . . .33/24/0.00 . . .37/22/c . . 36/18/pc Helena. . . . . . . . . .16/2/0.00 . 34/19/pc . . . 39/27/c Honolulu . . . . . . .80/64/0.00 . . .82/69/s . . 82/70/sh Houston . . . . . . .57/35/0.00 . 60/44/pc . . . 60/40/s Huntsville . . . . . .39/28/0.00 . . .38/18/s . . 39/19/pc Indianapolis . . . . .19/7/0.00 . . . .21/9/s . . 27/15/pc Jackson, MS . . . .44/26/0.00 . . .50/29/s . . . 46/26/s Madison, WI . . . . .19/6/0.00 . . .18/9/pc . . . 20/9/pc Jacksonville. . . . .50/28/0.00 . . .51/23/s . . 53/28/pc Juneau. . . . . . . . .35/28/0.00 . .33/21/sn . . 31/18/sn Kansas City. . . . .38/13/0.00 . 37/21/pc . . . 43/30/s Lansing . . . . . . . .27/22/0.00 . .27/14/sn . . 27/16/pc Las Vegas . . . . . .62/47/0.10 . . .64/43/s . . . 64/44/s Lexington . . . . . .22/15/0.00 . 24/10/pc . . 28/20/pc Lincoln. . . . . . . . . .40/6/0.00 . 35/19/pc . . 39/26/pc Little Rock. . . . . .45/25/0.00 . 46/28/pc . . . 49/30/s Los Angeles. . . . .64/52/0.30 . . .67/51/s . . . 66/50/s Louisville . . . . . . .25/18/0.00 . 28/14/pc . . 32/23/pc Memphis. . . . . . .38/24/0.00 . . .43/26/s . . . 48/32/s Miami . . . . . . . . .63/51/0.00 . . .62/43/s . . 68/46/pc Milwaukee . . . . .24/13/0.00 . 22/11/pc . . 22/14/pc Minneapolis . . . .21/14/0.00 . . .16/3/pc . . 17/10/pc Nashville . . . . . . .32/24/0.00 . . .33/18/s . . 37/20/pc New Orleans. . . .51/37/0.00 . . .53/38/s . . . 56/37/s New York . . . . . .35/30/0.00 . . .37/27/c . . 35/25/pc Newark, NJ . . . . .36/30/0.00 . . .36/25/c . . 37/23/pc Norfolk, VA . . . . .40/29/0.00 . 38/23/pc . . . 37/22/s Oklahoma City . .45/22/0.00 . 48/26/pc . . . 52/31/s Omaha . . . . . . . .33/13/0.00 . 32/20/pc . . . 34/24/s Orlando. . . . . . . .54/38/0.00 . . .55/32/s . . . 56/34/s Palm Springs. . . .77/56/0.00 . . .74/49/s . . . 73/49/s Peoria . . . . . . . . .19/10/0.00 . . .21/10/s . . 26/17/pc Philadelphia . . . .37/31/0.00 . . .38/24/c . . 36/23/pc Phoenix. . . . . . . .78/52/0.00 . . .75/47/s . . . 76/46/s Pittsburgh . . . . . .27/21/0.00 . .26/17/sn . . 27/16/sn Portland, ME. . . .32/24/0.00 . . .35/22/c . . 34/17/pc Providence . . . . .33/25/0.00 . . .38/24/c . . 37/19/pc Raleigh . . . . . . . .38/25/0.00 . . .36/18/s . . . 39/20/s

Yesterday Tuesday Wed. Yesterday Tuesday Wed. City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W City Hi/Lo/Pcp Hi/Lo/W Hi/Lo/W Rapid City . . . . . .40/10/0.00 . . .38/17/s . . . 41/25/c Savannah . . . . . .47/26/0.00 . . .49/22/s . . 48/25/pc Reno . . . . . . . . . .54/39/0.03 . . .51/33/s . . . 53/41/c Seattle. . . . . . . . 49/38/trace . . .49/43/r . . . .49/41/r Richmond . . . . . .40/26/0.00 . 37/19/pc . . . 36/18/s Sioux Falls. . . . . .27/15/0.00 . . .29/14/s . . 24/21/pc Rochester, NY . . .26/23/0.02 . .26/20/sn . . 26/17/sn Spokane . . . . . . .30/16/0.00 . . .32/31/c . . . .36/31/i Sacramento. . . . .64/52/0.62 . . .61/49/s . . . 58/51/c Springfield, MO. .37/15/0.00 . 37/17/pc . . . 44/26/s St. Louis. . . . . . . .32/17/0.00 . . .28/15/s . . . 36/26/s Tampa . . . . . . . . .54/38/0.00 . . .57/37/s . . . 59/35/s Salt Lake City . . .45/30/0.04 . 40/29/pc . . . 42/34/c Tucson. . . . . . . . .82/50/0.00 . . .74/40/s . . . 76/39/s San Antonio . . . .59/36/0.00 . 63/42/pc . . . 64/37/s Tulsa . . . . . . . . . .44/19/0.00 . . .44/24/c . . . 52/34/s San Diego . . . . . .66/55/0.00 . . .66/49/s . . . 65/50/s Washington, DC .39/31/0.00 . . .36/23/c . . 36/22/pc San Francisco . . .62/53/0.12 . 60/51/pc . . . 59/51/c Wichita . . . . . . . .45/15/0.00 . . .42/24/c . . 49/32/pc San Jose . . . . . . .65/52/0.20 . . .64/49/s . . . 59/50/c Yakima . . . . . . . .38/31/0.00 . . .33/31/c . . . .34/30/i Santa Fe . . . . . . .57/25/0.00 . 49/22/pc . . . 52/26/s Yuma. . . . . . . . . .78/49/0.00 . . .75/49/s . . . 76/48/s

INTERNATIONAL Amsterdam. . . . .34/28/0.00 . . .34/28/s . . 36/30/sn Athens. . . . . . . . .60/42/0.00 . 66/53/pc . . 69/55/pc Auckland. . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . 71/59/pc . . 66/53/sh Baghdad . . . . . . .75/48/0.00 . . .73/40/s . . . 73/42/s Bangkok . . . . . . .90/81/0.00 . . .88/76/t . . 88/74/pc Beijing. . . . . . . . .39/34/0.00 . . .41/22/s . . 40/20/pc Beirut. . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.73 . 73/59/pc . . 75/58/pc Berlin. . . . . . . . . .34/21/0.00 . 30/21/pc . . 28/22/sn Bogota . . . . . . . .64/43/0.00 . .70/49/sh . . 66/51/sh Budapest. . . . . . .46/30/0.00 . .51/41/sh . . 55/43/sh Buenos Aires. . . .90/68/0.00 . 89/64/pc . . . 81/58/s Cabo San Lucas .86/57/0.00 . . .84/60/s . . . 83/61/s Cairo . . . . . . . . . .70/61/0.00 . . .69/53/s . . 70/51/pc Calgary . . . . . . . . .37/3/0.00 . . .27/16/s . . 35/18/pc Cancun . . . . . . . 79/NA/0.00 . . .75/58/s . . 74/58/pc Dublin . . . . . . . . .34/19/0.00 . . 34/26/rs . . .37/30/rs Edinburgh . . . . . .34/10/0.00 . . 31/24/sf . . 33/26/pc Geneva . . . . . . . .48/34/1.56 . .50/39/sh . . 50/40/sh Harare . . . . . . . . .79/64/0.31 . . .68/62/r . . . .65/60/r Hong Kong . . . . .82/72/0.00 . 72/60/pc . . 73/62/pc Istanbul. . . . . . . .54/45/0.00 . 65/51/pc . . 65/52/pc Jerusalem . . . . . .57/53/0.58 . 70/51/pc . . 71/51/pc Johannesburg . . .81/57/0.00 . .75/57/sh . . 77/59/sh Lima . . . . . . . . . .72/64/0.00 . .68/63/sh . . 68/62/sh Lisbon . . . . . . . . .64/63/0.00 . . .65/56/r . . 64/53/sh London . . . . . . . .30/27/0.00 . 33/26/pc . . 34/26/pc Madrid . . . . . . . .63/46/0.45 . . .58/52/t . . 60/46/sh Manila. . . . . . . . .90/79/0.00 . . .91/76/t . . . .89/75/t

Mecca . . . . . . . . .93/68/0.00 . . .95/67/s . . . 95/68/s Mexico City. . . . .68/32/0.00 . . .71/39/s . . . 73/39/s Montreal. . . . . . .27/23/0.03 . . 26/18/sf . . .21/10/sf Moscow . . . . . . . .21/9/0.00 . .27/20/sn . . 28/18/sn Nairobi . . . . . . . .82/63/0.66 . . .76/58/t . . . .73/59/t Nassau . . . . . . . .79/66/0.00 . . .73/59/s . . 72/60/pc New Delhi. . . . . .55/50/0.00 . . .74/50/s . . . 74/51/s Osaka . . . . . . . . .63/57/0.00 . .56/41/sh . . 54/44/sh Oslo. . . . . . . . . . . 12/-2/0.00 . . .24/9/pc . . .27/15/sf Ottawa . . . . . . . .25/18/0.05 . . 25/16/sf . . . . 21/8/sf Paris. . . . . . . . . . .36/34/0.14 . . 37/30/rs . . .35/26/rs Rio de Janeiro. . .86/77/0.00 . . .86/76/t . . . .88/76/t Rome. . . . . . . . . .63/52/0.02 . 62/51/pc . . 60/55/sh Santiago . . . . . . .72/50/0.00 . 83/51/pc . . . 79/48/s Sao Paulo . . . . . .82/68/0.00 . . .83/69/t . . . .88/71/t Sapporo. . . . . . . .46/43/0.00 . . 38/30/rs . . .36/29/rs Seoul . . . . . . . . . .50/23/0.00 . 35/21/pc . . .40/28/rs Shanghai. . . . . . .55/41/0.00 . . .51/35/s . . . 55/39/s Singapore . . . . . .91/77/0.31 . . .89/77/t . . . .88/76/t Stockholm. . . . . .30/27/0.00 . . 26/16/sf . . 28/19/pc Sydney. . . . . . . . .79/68/0.00 . 78/65/pc . . . .78/69/t Taipei. . . . . . . . . .77/66/0.00 . .68/59/sh . . . 70/60/s Tel Aviv . . . . . . . .70/61/0.11 . 71/57/pc . . 72/55/pc Tokyo. . . . . . . . . .61/50/0.00 . 60/47/pc . . 55/44/pc Toronto . . . . . . .27/23/60.00 . . 27/21/sf . . 24/14/pc Vancouver. . . . . .45/30/0.00 . . .49/45/r . . . .48/43/r Vienna. . . . . . . . .30/16/0.00 . .44/34/sh . . 35/27/pc Warsaw. . . . . . . .32/28/0.01 . 27/15/pc . . 29/20/sn

Captain Awesome, formerly known as Douglas Allen Smith Jr., shows his identification card in Eugene on Nov. 25. Awesome obtained legal authorization to sign his name as a right arrow, a smiley face and a left arrow. Brian Davies The (Eugene) Register-Guard

His signature is a smile; he is Captain Awesome Lane County man inspired by character from TV show ‘Chuck’ By Karen McCowan The (Eugene) Register- Guard

EUGENE — Eugene-Springfield, meet Captain Awesome. Not that the former Douglas Allen Smith Jr. is a newcomer to Lane County. He was born here in 1983. He graduated from Willamette High School in 2002. But he officially became Captain Awesome only last month, when a Lane County Circuit Court judge approved his name change petition. And his new first name is no title, he made clear in a recent interview. “Hi! I’m Captain,” he said, making this story even more fun to write. Journalists refer to subjects by last name only on second and subsequent references. So, that’s Awesome! Any reader who — like Awesome — watches the television

show “Chuck,” will not be surprised to know how he chose his new moniker. It was, indeed, inspired by a character on the NBC action/drama series: Dr. Devon “Captain Awesome” Woodcomb. “I just thought it was really funny that Devon’s father always called him Captain Awesome because a poor nickname builds good character?” said the local Awesome, an out-of-work cabinet installer. Awesome said he had to jump through an extra hoop to legally change his name. Most such requests are approved in informal “ex-parte” hearings with Lane County judges. In Awesome’s case, however, the judge who considered his name change in that setting balked at granting it. That judge — whose name Awesome cannot remember and who is not identified in Awesome’s court records — questioned his seriousness. The judge also advised him to hire an attorney to represent him in a formal oral argument for the change. But Awesome decided to go it

Weekly Arts & Entertainment Fridays In

alone. He felt confident after researching name change precedents at the University of Oregon Law School library. He hadn’t counted on Lane County Circuit Judge Douglas Mitchell hearing his case, however. “The first thing he said to me was that he thought Douglas was a perfectly honorable first name,” said Awesome (nee Douglas Smith). After that, he thought the judge was going to turn down his request. But Mitchell simply made him raise his right hand, swear that he wasn’t changing his name for fraudulent reasons, and proclaimed him Captain Awesome. Mitchell also allowed Awesome to change his official signature to a right-pointing arrow, a smiley face and a left-pointing arrow. The state Department of Motor Vehicles actually accepted the cheerful new signature. But alas, his bank refused to honor it, Awesome said. “They said it was too easily forgeable,” he explained.

Darrel Wisseman Prineville, OR • 541-447-7013

Mark A. Schang

Danielle Baptist

Bend, OR • 541-617-8861

Bend, OR • 541-389-0100


S

Football Inside Former football player, personality “Dandy Don” Meredith dies at age 72, see Page D4.

www.bendbulletin.com/sports

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010

RUNNING

2010-11 PREP BOYS BASKETBALL PREVIEW

Bend’s King wins third XTERRA trail world championship

Carrying the heavy load

KUALOA RANCH, Hawaii — Bend’s Max King raced to victory Sunday in the 2010 XTERRA Trail Run World Championship. It was King’s third consecutive victory in the annual race. King completed the 12.9-mile course on the island of Oahu Max King in 1 hour, 16 minutes, 36 seconds, earning $2,000 for the win. Will Christian, of California, Md., finished second in 1:17:56, and another Oregon runner, Rivers Puzey, of Hermiston, placed third in 1:20:54. King, 30, reportedly battled flulike symptoms to win the world championship, which included more than 1,500 runners from around the globe. In the women’s race, Sally Meyerhoff, of Maricopa, Ariz., claimed the victory in her first try at the XTERRA Trail Run World Championship. The event was the culmination of the XTERRA trail run season. In September, King won the XTERRA Trail Run National Championship in Bend for the third straight time. — Bulletin staff report

Mountain View still a state-title contender with James Reid back By Beau Eastes The Bulletin

Last season, Mountain View point guard James Reid helped guide the Cougars to their most successful boys basketball campaign in school history. With Reid — the son of longtime Mountain View head coach Craig Reid — running the offense, the Cougars went 26-2 and placed second at the Class 5A state tournament, coming within nine points of knocking off nationally ranked Jefferson High of Portland. While Reid was not asked to

score a ton last year — he averaged 7.8 points per game, fourth on the team — he was still arguably Mountain View’s most valuable player. He averaged a teamhigh five assists per game during the 2009-10 season, running his dad’s offense like a coach on the floor. “Last year he was a facilitator,” Craig Reid says about James. “He made sure we ran the system we wanted to run.” This year, though, James Reid will take on a different role. Now a 6-foot-2-inch junior, Reid — who

is averaging 18.5 points through the Cougars’ first two games this season — will be counted on to be much more of a scorer this season for the Cougars, who are starting four new players around their returning all-league point guard. “Obviously we’ll be counting on James to score a little more,” says Craig Reid, who graduated seven of his top eight players from a year ago. “But this year’s team will be extremely different. We’re young, but we’ll have some depth and we’re athletic.” See Basketball / D4 Pete Erickson / The Bulletin

Point guard James Reid is the lone starter back from the Cougars’ 2010 state runner-up squad.

COLLEGE FOOTBALL

Beavers put an eye on 2011 season By Anne M. Peterson The Associated Press

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Oregon’s Kelly receives coach of the year honor NEW YORK — One day after his team was selected to play in the BCS championship game, University of Oregon head coach Chip Kelly was presented with the Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year award by the Football Writers Association of America. The Chip Kelly Ducks’ secondyear skipper, who was also a finalist for the honor last season, became the second Oregon head coach to receive the award named for Grambling’s legendary mentor, joining 1994 winner Rich Brooks. On Saturday, Kelly’s Ducks wrapped up a perfect 12-0 regular season and their second straight Pac-10 title by defeating rival Oregon State, 37-20, in the 114th Civil War. The reigning Pac-10 coach of the year has a career mark of 22-3 while going 17-1 in conference play. — From wire reports

CORRECTION The “If you go” box accompanying a story headlined “Yoga for cyclists” that appeared in The Bulletin on Monday, Dec. 6, on Page D1, contained an incorrect fee for a yoga class. The fee for the class — Yoga & Myofascial Release for Optimal Performance — is $50. (See the complete entry in today’s Community Sports Calendar, Page D6.) The Bulletin regrets the error.

INDEX Scoreboard ................................D2 NBA ..........................................D3 NHL ...........................................D3 Baseball .....................................D3 Football .................................... D4 College basketball .....................D5 Community Sports ........... D5, D6

D

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Ice skating instructor Ashley Bedford, left, teaches Bulletin reporter Amanda Miles how to keep her balance during an ice skating lesson at Seventh Mountain Resort on Wednesday.

WELCOME TO WINTER WONDERLAND

Ice skating New to Central Oregon, Bulletin reporter begins to learn winter sports Reporter’s prelude: So here’s the deal: I move to Bend from the Portland area right as autumn begins to become the new Community Sports coordinator at The Bulletin. Just as I start to get my bearings here in Central Oregon, check out the trails and develop workout routines, the snow hits. And stays. Now, I face a conundrum: Just what, exactly, is a summer-sport girl supposed to do until the sun shines again with regu-

COMMUNITY SPORTS larity and I can go outside with a bit more epidermis showing than just my face? As it turns out, I can play in the snow. So over the next couple of months, I will be exploring Central Oregon’s winter playgrounds and trying a number of the region’s popular sports and recreational activities — many for the first time. If you are new to the area, or new to snow and ice sports, I hope this series will help inform you about what you can do this winter, where you can do it, how

much it costs, and the basics you need to succeed. And even if you are a longtime local resident or winter sports enthusiast, perhaps you will learn something new or decide to give a new sport a chance based on my experiences. —Amanda Miles —————

By Amanda Miles The Bulletin

Ice skating is a classic wintertime activity: You can’t help but see images of the sport this time of year, whether it be on TV — figure skating specials, or shots of the ice rink at New York City’s Rockefeller Plaza — or in holiday movies. See Skating / D5

Five locals cash at National Finals Rodeo Bulletin staff report LAS VEGAS — Five of the six Central Oregon competitors at the National Finals Rodeo earned paychecks in the fifth goround on Monday night, led by Prineville’s Jason Havens and his second-place finish in bareback riding. Havens tied for second in bareback with an 86-point ride on Deuces Night at Thomas & Mack Center, earning a check worth $12,145.43. Will Lowe won the round with a ride of 87 points. Three-time world champion Bobby Mote,

of Culver, also earned a check in bareback, placing sixth for the round. He had an 83point ride and earned $2,824.52. Redmond’s Steven Peebles had an 81-point ride. Mote remained fifth in the world standings, about $50,000 behind current world leader Steven Dent, with five rounds to go in the 10-round NFR. Mote is also currently fifth in the average for the NFR, with 411.5 points on five head. Justin McDaniel leads the average with 420/5. Charly Crawford, of Prineville, and Russell Cardoza, of Terrebonne, finished

sixth in the team roping go-round, earning $2,824.52 each with a time of 4.7 seconds. JoJo LeMond and Cory Petska stopped the clock in 3.6 seconds to take the round. Terrebonne’s Brenda Mays finished fifth in barrel racing with a time of 13.84 seconds, taking home a check of $4,519.23. Lisa Lockhart won in 13.62 seconds. Other winners on Monday included Ethen Thouvenell in steer wrestling (3.7 seconds); Jesse Wright in saddle bronc riding (89.5 points); and J.W. Harris in bull riding (89 points).

CORVALLIS — Oregon State’s season will likely be remembered for how it ended, when national championship gamebound Oregon shut the Beavers out of the postseason for the first time since 2005. But Oregon State (5-7, 4-5 Pac10) was thwarted by an unbelievably tough schedule, one key injury and unrealistically high expectations. “I know it’s not exactly where we want to be with the record, but as far as what they’ve been through — the schedule ... how they’ve competed, how they’ve had some real clunkers but stayed together and not played the blame game, pulled themselves up off the mat time and again, come back and played good football,” Beavers coach Mike Riley said. “They just kept doing that.” The Beavers opened the season ranked No. 24 with new quarterback Ryan Katz and dynamic brothers James and Jacquizz Rodgers leading the offense. Jacquizz Rodgers, known as Quizz, was considered an early Heisman Trophy candidate. Oregon State had a daunting opener on national television against TCU at Cowboys Stadium. Although they lost 30-21, the Beavers were praised because they held their own against the Horned Frogs, who finished the season 12-0 and ranked third. After a week off, a 35-28 victory over Louisville provided a shot of confidence before what many considered a considerable challenge at Boise State. See Beavers / D4

Oregon’s James among Heisman Trophy finalists Auburn quarterback Cam Newton and Oregon running back LaMichael James will meet up in New York before heading to Arizona for next month’s national championship game. Newton and James have been announced as finalists for the Heisman Trophy and will be joined by Stanford’s Andrew Luck and Kellen Moore of Boise State for Saturday’s announcement. Newton overcame a pay-to-play scandal with a superb season on the field, piling up nearly 4,000 combined yards and 48 touchdowns in leading the topranked Tigers into the Jan. 10 national championship game. The dynamic James had more yards and touchdowns than anyone else in FBS, helping the second-ranked Ducks into their first national championship game. — The Associated Press


D2 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

O  A

SCOREBOARD

TELEVISION TODAY

ON DECK

SOCCER

Today Girls basketball: Summit at Sisters, 5:30 p.m.; Henley at La Pine, 7 p.m.; Bend at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Culver at Grant Union, 5:30 p.m. Boys basketball: Mountain View at Madras, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Henley 7 p.m.; Summit at Sisters, 7:15 p.m.; Redmond at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at Grant Union, 7 p.m.

11:30 a.m. — UEFA Champions League, teams TBA, FSNW.

BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Jimmy V Classic, Kansas vs. Memphis, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Georgia at Georgia Tech, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Jimmy V Classic, Michigan State vs. Syracuse, ESPN. 7 p.m. — NBA, Phoenix Suns at Portland Trail Blazers, Comcast SportsNet Northwest.

HOCKEY 4:30 p.m. — NHL, Buffalo Sabres at Boston Bruins, VS. network.

RODEO 7 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 6, ESPN2.

WEDNESDAY BASKETBALL 4 p.m. — NBA, Denver Nuggets at Boston Celtics, ESPN. 4 p.m. — Men’s college, Seton Hall at Arkansas, ESPN2. 6 p.m. — Men’s college, Bradley at Duke, ESPN2. 6:30 p.m. — Men’s college, SEC/Big East Invitational, Kentucky vs. Notre Dame, ESPN. 8 p.m. — Men’s college, Gonzaga at Washington State, FSNW.

HOCKEY 4 p.m. — NHL, San Jose Sharks at Philadelphia Flyers, VS. network.

RODEO 7 p.m. — National Finals Rodeo, round 7, ESPN Classic.

RADIO TODAY BASKETBALL 7 p.m. — NBA, Phoenix Suns at Portland Trail Blazers, KBND-AM 1110, KRCO-AM 690. Listings are the most accurate available. The Bulletin is not responsible for late changes made by TV or radio stations.

S   B Football • Broncos fire McDaniels: The Denver Broncos have fired coach Josh McDaniels, whose nearly two-year stint was marred by the Spygate II videotape scandal, a series of personnel blunders and the franchise’s worst skid in four decades. Running backs coach Eric Studesville will serve as interim coach for the final month, succeeding McDaniels, 34, whose hiring by team owner Pat Bowlen in January 2009 is now viewed as a monumental mistake. • Auburn’s Malzahn named Broyles Award winner: Auburn offensive coordinator Gus Malzahn won the annual Broyles Award given to the nation’s top college assistant coach on Monday. Malzahn is also the quarterbacks coach for the top-ranked Tigers, who will play for the national championship next month against Oregon. • Enforcement chief: NCAA falls on athlete’s side: The NCAA’s enforcement chief says punishing athletes for violations they didn’t even know about would be a major shift in philosophy for the organization. Days after the NCAA cleared Auburn quarterback Cam Newton to play despite finding his father broke the organization’s rules, Julie Roe Lach told The Associated Press on Monday that college sports’ governing body traditionally has preferred to “fall on the side of the student-athlete.” In the wake of the Newton decision, some conference commissioners expressed concern more adults will shop around recruits now that they’ve realized the player won’t be suspended if he wasn’t aware of the scheme. • Colorado names Embree as new football coach: Jon Embree has been introduced as the new University of Colorado football coach after accepting a five-year deal. Embree left his position as the tight ends coach of the Washington Redskins following their game against the New York Giants on Sunday to take over his dream job at his alma mater.

Golf • Langer wins player of the year: Bernhard Langer was voted player of the year on the Champions Tour for winning five times, including back-to-back majors against the 50-and-older set. Langer became the first Champions Tour member to win player of the year and lead the money list for three straight years. The two-time Masters champion from Germany had the most wins in a season since Craig Stadler won five times in 2004. Langer had top 10s on the circuit in 15 of 23 tournaments. Fred Couples was voted Champions Tour rookie of the year, while Ken Green was comeback player of the year for returning to competition after losing his left leg in a crash that killed his girlfriend and brother. • Bramlett earns historic PGA Tour card: Joseph Bramlett has earned a historic PGA Tour card by passing through the final stage of qualifying school, becoming only the second golfer of black heritage on tour. The other is Tiger Woods. Bramlett shot a 4-under 68 on the Crooked Cat Course at Orange County National on Monday to sneak inside the cutoff for a tour card next year. He finished at 11 under at the grueling, six-round final stage of qualifying school to tie for 16th. He also passed through two previous stages. Billy Mayfair shot a 2-under 70 to win the final stage, one shot ahead of William McGirt (68). Mayfair finished 18 under for the tournament, earning $50,000 for first place. Those at 9 under or better received a PGA Tour card, including four Nationwide players who qualified earlier and were seeking to improve their position. Among the notables who did not qualify out of Q-school: Brett Waldman (68), the caddie for Camilo Villegas; Erik Compton (73), a two-time heart transplant recipient; and Briny Baird (71), who lost his card on the final hole of the year at Disney to finish No. 127 on the money list.

Basketball • Stern confirms league takeover of Hornets: NBA Commissioner David Stern says the league is proceeding with its plan to buy the New Orleans Hornets from majority owner George Shinn and minority owner Gary Chouest. Stern confirms that the league has recruited New Orleans native Jac Sperling to be the NBA’s administrator of the team. Sperling is a sports attorney and the vice chairman of the NHL’s Minnesota Wild. The Hornets will be the first NBA team owned by the league. — From wire reports

IN THE BLEACHERS

December 28 Champ Sports Bowl West Virginia 1.5 1.5 Insight Bowl Missouri PK PK

Maryland

December 29 Eagle Bank Bowl 8 8 Texas Bowl 2 2 Alamo Bowl 5.5 5.5

Thursday Swimming: Redmond, Summit, Sisters at Madras, 3 p.m.

Baylor

Friday Girls basketball: Mountain View at South Medford, 7 p.m., Cascade at Sisters, 5:30 p.m.; La Pine at Grant Union tournament, TBA; Gilchrist tournament, 3:30 p.m.; Madras at Mazama, 7 p.m.; West Salem at Redmond, 7 p.m.; Bend at North Medford, 7 p.m.; Culver at Heppner Tournament, TBA. Boys basketball: South Medford at Mountain View, 7 p.m.; La Pine at Grant Union tournament, TBA; Cascade at Sisters, 7 p.m.; Mazama at Madras, 7 p.m.; North Eugene at Summit, 7 p.m.; Redmond at West Salem, 7 p.m.; North Medford at Bend, 7 p.m.; Culver at Heppner tournament, TBA; Gilchrist Tournament, 3:30 p.m. Wrestling: Bend at La Grande Tournament, TBA; Redmond, Crook County at Coast Classic in North Bend, noon; Madras, La Pine, Sisters, Gilchrist at Culver Tournament, 2 p.m.; Mountain View at Glencoe Tournament in Hillsboro, 3 p.m.

December 30 Armed Forces Bowl 7 7 Pinstripe Bowl Kansas St 3 3 Music City Bowl North Carolina 1 1 Holiday Bowl Nebraska 13.5 13.5

Saturday Girls basketball: Mountain View at North Medford, 12:45 p.m.; La Pine at Grant Union tournament, TBA; Gilchrist tournament, 12 p.m.; Madras at Henley, TBA; Crook County at Mazama, 7 p.m.; Summit at North Eugene, 5:30 p.m.; Bend at South Medford, 12:45 p.m.; Culver at Heppner Tournament. Boys basketball: North Medford at Mountain View, 12:45 p.m.; La Pine at Grant Union tournament, TBA; Mazama at Crook County, 7 p.m.; South Medford at Bend, 12:45 p.m.; Culver at Heppner Tournament, TBA; Gilchrist Tournament, noon. Wrestling: Bend at La Grande Tournament, TBA; Redmond, Crook County at Coast Classic in North Bend, 9 a.m.; Madras, La Pine, Sisters, Gilchrist at Culver Tournament, 8 a.m. Swimming: Ashland, Bend and Mountain View at Juniper Swim & Fitness Center in Bend, TBA

RODEO NFR NATIONAL FINALS RODEO Monday At Thomas & Mack Center Las Vegas Round Five Bareback riding 1. Will Lowe, Canyon, Texas, 87 points on Kesler Rodeo’s Street Dance, $17,512; 2. (tie) Kelly Timberman, Mills, Wyo., and Jason Havens, Prineville, Ore., 86, $12,145 each; 4. Wes Stevenson, Lubbock, Texas, 85.5, $7,344; 5. Justin McDaniel, Porum, Okla., 85, $4,519; 6. Bobby Mote, Culver, Ore., 83.0, $2,825; 7. Steven Dent, Mullen, Neb., 82; 8. (tie) Dusty LaValley, Bezanson, Alberta; Steven Peebles, Redmond, Ore., and Joe Gunderson, Agar, S.D., 81; 11. Clint Cannon, Waller, Texas, 73; 12. (tie) Kaycee Feild, Payson, Utah; Matt Bright, Azle, Texas, and D.V. Fennell, Neosho, Mo., NS. Average: 1. Justin McDaniel, 420 points on five head; 2. Steven Dent, 419; 3. Will Lowe, 413.5; 4. (tie) Bobby Mote and Kelly Timberman, 411.5; 6. Dusty LaValley, 406; 7. (tie) Wes Stevenson and Joe Gunderson, 403.5; 9. Jason Havens, 401.5; 10. Steven Peebles, 399; 11. Clint Cannon, 398; 12. Kaycee Feild, 337 on four; 13. D.V. Fennell, 302; 14. Matt Bright, 243 on three; 15. Ryan Gray, 76.5 on one. Steer wrestling 1. Ethen Thouvenell, Napa, Calif., 3.7 seconds, $17,512; 2. Dean Gorsuch, Gering, Neb., 3.8, $13,840; 3. Cody Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta, 3.9, $10,451; 4. Trevor Knowles, Mount Vernon, Ore., 4.1, $7,344; 5. Dane Hanna, Berthold, N.D., 4.3, $4,519; 6. Nick Guy, Sparta, Wis., 4.4, $2,825; 7. Kyle Hughes, Olney Springs, Colo., 4.6; 8. Todd Suhn, Hermosa, S.D., 4.7; 9. Billy Bugenig, Ferndale, Calif., 5.4; 10. Matt Reeves, Cross Plains, Texas, 5.5; 11. Josh Peek, Pueblo, Colo., 6.0; 12. Wade Sumpter, Fowler, Colo., 13.7; 13. Luke Branquinho, Los Alamos, Calif., 14.2; 14. (tie) Curtis Cassidy, Donalda, Alberta, and Jule Hazen, Ashland, Kan., NT. Average: 1. Trevor Knowles, 21.6 seconds on five head; 2. Billy Bugenig, 22.1; 3. Dane Hanna, 23.8; 4. Cody Cassidy, 24.1; 5. Dean Gorsuch, 24.3; 6. Todd Suhn, 31.6; 7. Luke Branquinho, 32.2; 8. Nick Guy, 37.3; 9. Ethen Thouvenell, 15.8 on four; 10. Kyle Hughes, 21.3; 11. Josh Peek, 21.9; 12. Matt Reeves, 22.2; 13. Wade Sumpter, 28.7; 14. Jule Hazen, 30.5 on three; 15. Curtis Cassidy, 9.7 on two. Team roping 1. JoJo LeMond, Andrews, Texas/Cory Petska, Marana, Ariz., 3.6 seconds, $17,512 each; 2. Keven Daniel, Franklin, Tenn./Caleb Twisselman, Santa Margarita, Calif., 3.7, $13,840; 3. Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas/Patrick Smith, Midland, Texas, 3.8, $10,451; 4. (tie) Chad Masters, Clarksville, Tenn./Jade Corkill, Fallon, Nev., and Travis Tryan, Billings, Mont./Rich Skelton, Llano, Texas, 4.0, $5,931 each; 6. Charly Crawford, Prineville, Ore./Russell Cardoza, Terrebonne, Ore., 4.7, $2,825; 7. Luke Brown, Rock Hill, S.C./Martin Lucero, Stephenville, Texas, 9.0; 8. Clay Tryan, Billings, Mont./Travis Graves, Jay, Okla., 13.9; 9. (tie) Turtle Powell, Stephenville, Texas/ Broc Cresta, Santa Rosa, Calif.; Britt Williams, Hammond, Mont./Bobby Harris, Gillette, Wyo.; Brady Tryan, Huntley, Mont./Jake Long, Coffeyville, Kan.; Colby Lovell, Madisonville, Texas/Kory Koontz, Sudan, Texas; Derrick Begay, Seba Dalkai, Ariz./Cesar de la Cruz, Tucson, Ariz.; Ty Blasingame, Ramah, Colo./Cody Hintz, Spring Creek, Nev.; and Nick Sartain, Yukon, Okla./Kollin VonAhn, Durant, Okla., NT. Average: 1. Trevor Brazile/Patrick Smith, 21.4 seconds on five head; 2. Luke Brown/Martin Lucero, 32.6; 3. Clay Tryan/Travis Graves, 35.3; 4. Charly Crawford/Russell Cardoza, 36.3; 5. Chad Masters/Jade Corkill, 41.4; 6. Turtle Powell/Broc Cresta, 22.3 seconds on four head; 7. Brady Tryan/Jake Long, 26.5; 8. Derrick Begay/Cesar de la Cruz, 27.1; 9. Keven Daniel/Caleb Twisselman, 28.4; 10. JoJo LeMond/Cory Petska, 30.7; 11. Britt Williams/Bobby Harris, 19.0 seconds on three head; 12. Travis Tryan/Rich Skelton, 7.9 seconds on two head; 13. Colby Lovell/Kory Koontz, 13.5; 14. Ty Blasingame/Cody Hintz, 19.2; 15. Nick Sartain/Kollin VonAhn, 29.7. Saddle bronc riding 1. Jesse Wright, Millford, Utah, 89.5 points on Burch Rodeo’s Lunitic Fringe, $17,512; 2. Cody DeMoss, Heflin, La., 88.5, $13,840; 3. Cort Scheer, Elsmere, Neb., 86, $10,451; 4. Heith DeMoss, Heflin, La., 85.5, $7,344; 5. J.J. Elshere, Quinn, S.D., 85, $4,519; 6. Wade Sundell, Boxholm, Iowa, 84.0, $2,825; 7. (tie) Jesse Kruse, Great Falls, Mont.; Jeff Willert, Belvidere, S.D., and Scott Miller, Boise, Idaho, 83.5; 10. Dustin Flundra, Pincher Creek, Alberta, 82.5; 11. (tie) Cody Wright, Milford, Utah, and Taos Muncy, Corona, N.M., 81.5; 13. (tie) Bradley Harter, Weatherford, Texas; Shaun Stroh, Dickinson, N.D., and Sam Spreadborough, Snyder, Texas, NS. Average: 1. Cody Wright, 422.5 points on five head; 2. Wade Sundell, 421; 3. Cody DeMoss, 405; 4. J.J. Elshere, 404.5; 5. Dustin Flundra, 394; 6. Jesse Wright, 343.5 on four; 7. Jesse Kruse, 330; 8. Cort Scheer, 324; 9. Taos Muncy, 320.5; 10. Shaun Stroh, 318.5; 11. Jeff Willert, 315.5; 12. Scott Miller, 315; 13. Heith DeMoss, 247.5 on three; 14. Bradley Harter, 232; 15. Sam Spreadborough, 153.5 on two. Tie-down roping 1. (tie) Trevor Brazile, Decatur, Texas, and Cody Ohl, Hico, Texas, 6.9 seconds, $15,676 each; 3. Stran Smith, Childress, Texas, 7.4, $10,451; 4. Jerrad Hofstetter, Portales, N.M., 7.5, $7,344; 5. Fred Whitfield, Hockley, Texas, 7.6, $4,519; 6. Shane Hanchey, Sulphur, La., 7.8, $2,825; 7. Tuf Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 7.9; 8. Joseph Parsons, Marana, Ariz., 8.1; 9. Ryan Jarrett, Summerville, Ga., 8.4; 10. Jerome Schneeberger, Ponca City, Okla., 9.3; 11. Scott Kormos, Teague, Texas, 11.1; 12. Trent Creager, Stillwater, Okla., 11.8; 13. Clif Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 13.3; 14. Tyson Durfey, Colbert, Wash., 15.6; 15. Clint Cooper, Decatur, Texas, 30.6. Average: 1. Fred Whitfield, 41.5 seconds on five head; 2. Tuf Cooper, 43.4; 3. Trevor Brazile, 45.8; 4. Shane Hanchey, 47.7; 5. Trent Creager, 49.7; 6. Joseph Parsons, 56.0; 7. Cody Ohl, 58.6; 8. Scott Kormos, 59.6; 9. Tyson Durfey, 63.0; 10. Jerome Schneeberger, 63.4; 11. Clint Cooper, 83.0; 12. Jerrad Hofstetter, 32.4 on four; 13. Ryan Jarrett, 33.8; 14. Stran Smith, Childress, Texas, 42.7; 15. Clif Cooper, 43.1. Barrel racing 1. Lisa Lockhart, Oelrichs, S.D., 13.62 seconds, $17,512; 2. Jill Moody, Letcher, S.D., 13.63, $13,840; 3. Sherry Cervi, Marana, Ariz., 13.70, $10,451; 4. Benette Barrington, Lubbock, Texas, 13.79, $7,344; 5. Brenda Mays, Terrebonne, Ore., 13.84, $4,519; 6. Sydni Blanchard, Albuquerque, N.M., 13.86, $2,825; 7. Nellie Williams, Cottonwood, Calif., 13.97; 8. Sherrylynn Johnson, Henryetta, Okla., 13.99; 9. Kelli Tolbert, Hooper, Utah, 14.03; 10. Lindsay Sears, Nanton, Alberta, 14.09; 11. (tie) Christina Richman, Glendora, Calif., and Tana Poppino, Big Cabin, Okla., 14.13; 13. Jeanne Anderson, White City, Kan., 14.21; 14. Angie Meadors, Blanchard, Okla., 18.93; 15. Brittany Pozzi, Victoria, Texas, 19.25. Average: 1. Jill Moody, 69.01 seconds on five runs; 2. Lisa Lockhart, 69.32; 3. Sherry Cervi, 69.64; 4. Sydni Blanchard, 69.65; 5. Nellie Williams, 69.83; 6. Christina Richman, 70.15; 7. Lindsay Sears, 74.32; 8. Benette Barrington, 74.80; 9. Brittany Pozzi, 75.90; 10. Kelli Tolbert, 79.18; 11. Brenda Mays, 79.70; 12. Sherrylynn Johnson, 79.87; 13. Angie Meadors, 84.42; 14. Jeanne Anderson, 85.71; 15. Tana Poppino, 61.04 on four. Bull riding 1. J.W. Harris, Mullin, Texas, 89 points on Burch

Oklahoma St

NC State Iowa

East Carolina Illinois Arizona

Smu

Army Syracuse Tennessee Washington

December 31 Meineke Car Care Bowl Clemson 4.5 4.5 South Florida Sun Bowl Miami (Fla.) 2.5 2.5 Notre Dame Liberty Bowl Georgia 7 7 Central Florida Chick-Fil-A Bowl South Carolina 3 3 Florida St

Stanford

January 1 Rose Bowl 2.5 2.5 Fiesta Bowl 17 17 January 3 Orange Bowl 3 3

Virginia Tech

Ohio State

January 4 Sugar Bowl 3.5 3.5

Arkansas

January 10 BCS National Championship 2.5 2.5

Oregon

Tcu Oklahoma

Rodeo’s Velvet Revolver, $17,512; 2. Clayton Williams, Carthage, Texas, 85.5, $13,840; 3. Corey Navarre, Weatherford, Okla., 84, $10,451; no other qualified rides. Average: 1. J.W. Harris, 354.5 points on four head; 2. Cody Whitney, 334.5; 3. Kanin Asay, 261 points on three head; 4. Clayton Williams, 253; 5. D.J. Domangue, 176 points on two head; 6. Corey Navarre, 169.5; 7. Wesley Silcox, 166; 8. Chad Denton, 162.5; 9. Dustin Elliott, 158; 10. Bobby Welsh, 87 points on one head; 11. Steve Woolsey, 86; 12. Shawn Hogg, 85.5; 13. Seth Glause, 85; 14. Tyler Smith, 80.5; 15. Ardie Maier, 80.

FOOTBALL NFL National Football League ALl Times PST ——— AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct New England 10 2 0 .833 N.Y. Jets 9 3 0 .750 Miami 6 6 0 .500 Buffalo 2 10 0 .167 South W L T Pct Jacksonville 7 5 0 .583 Indianapolis 6 6 0 .500 Houston 5 7 0 .417 Tennessee 5 7 0 .417 North W L T Pct Pittsburgh 9 3 0 .750 Baltimore 8 4 0 .667 Cleveland 5 7 0 .417 Cincinnati 2 10 0 .167 West W L T Pct Kansas City 8 4 0 .667 Oakland 6 6 0 .500 San Diego 6 6 0 .500 Denver 3 9 0 .250 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct N.Y. Giants 8 4 0 .667 Philadelphia 8 4 0 .667 Washington 5 7 0 .417 Dallas 4 8 0 .333 South W L T Pct Atlanta 10 2 0 .833 New Orleans 9 3 0 .750 Tampa Bay 7 5 0 .583 Carolina 1 11 0 .083 North W L T Pct Chicago 9 3 0 .750 Green Bay 8 4 0 .667 Minnesota 5 7 0 .417 Detroit 2 10 0 .167 West W L T Pct Seattle 6 6 0 .500 St. Louis 6 6 0 .500 San Francisco 4 8 0 .333 Arizona 3 9 0 .250 ——— Monday’s Game New England 45, N.Y. Jets 3 Thursday’s Game Indianapolis at Tennessee, 5:20 p.m. Sunday’s Games N.Y. Giants at Minnesota, 10 a.m. Tampa Bay at Washington, 10 a.m. Cleveland at Buffalo, 10 a.m. Green Bay at Detroit, 10 a.m. Oakland at Jacksonville, 10 a.m. Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 10 a.m. Atlanta at Carolina, 10 a.m. Seattle at San Francisco, 1:05 p.m. St. Louis at New Orleans, 1:05 p.m. Kansas City at San Diego, 1:15 p.m. Denver at Arizona, 1:15 p.m. New England at Chicago, 1:15 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1:15 p.m. Philadelphia at Dallas, 5:20 p.m. Monday, Dec. 13 Baltimore at Houston, 5:30 p.m.

PF 379 267 215 243

PA 269 232 238 333

PF 257 317 288 263

PA 300 290 321 235

PF 267 260 229 255

PA 191 201 239 322

PF 295 283 323 256

PA 237 269 253 333

PF 308 344 222 294

PA 247 281 293 336

PF 304 299 243 154

PA 233 227 251 307

PF 246 303 227 278

PA 192 182 253 306

PF 240 232 203 200

PA 289 237 259 338

——— Saturday, Dec. 18 New Mexico Bowl: UTEP (6-6) vs. BYU (6-6), 11 a.m. (ESPN) Humanitarian Bowl: Northern Illinois (10-3) vs. Fresno State (8-4), 2:30 p.m. (ESPN) New Orleans Bowl: Ohio (8-4) vs. Troy (7-5), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 21 Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl: Louisville (6-6) vs. Southern Mississippi (8-4), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 22 MAACO Bowl: Utah (10-2) vs. Boise State (11-1), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 23 Poinsettia Bowl: San Diego State (8-4) vs. Navy (8-3), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl: Hawaii (10-3) vs. Tulsa (9-3), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl: Toledo (8-4) vs. Florida International (6-6), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN2) Monday, Dec. 27 Independence Bowl: Georgia Tech (6-6) vs. Air Force (8-4), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Dec. 28 Champs Sports Bowl: North Carolina State (8-4) vs. West Virginia (9-3), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Insight Bowl: Missouri (10-2) vs. Iowa (7-5), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Wednesday, Dec. 29 Military Bowl: East Carolina (6-6) vs. Maryland (8-4), 11:30 a.m. (ESPN) Texas Bowl: Baylor (7-5) vs. Illinois (6-6), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl: Arizona (7-5) vs. Oklahoma State (10-2), 3 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Dec. 30 Armed Forces Bowl: SMU (7-6) vs. Army (6-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Pinstripe Bowl: Syracuse (7-5) vs. Kansas State (7-5), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Music City Bowl: North Carolina (7-5) vs. Tennessee (6-6), 3:30 p.m. (ESPN) Holiday Bowl: Nebraska (10-3) vs. Washington (6-6), 7 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Dec. 31 Meineke Bowl: Clemson (6-6) vs. South Florida (7-5), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sun Bowl: Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 11 a.m. (CBS) Liberty Bowl: Georgia (6-6) vs. UCF (10-3), 12:30 p.m. (ESPN) Chick-fil-A Bowl: South Carolina (9-4) vs. Florida State (9-4), 4:30 p.m. (ESPN) Saturday, Jan. 1 TicketCity Bowl: Northwestern (7-5) vs. Texas Tech (75), 9 a.m. (ESPNU) Capital One Bowl: Michigan State (11-1) vs. Alabama (9-3), 10 a.m. (ESPN) Outback Bowl: Florida (7-5) vs. Penn State (7-5), 10 a.m. (ABC) Gator Bowl: Michigan (7-5) vs. Mississippi State (8-4), 10:30 a.m. (ESPN2) Rose Bowl: TCU (12-0) vs. Wisconsin (11-1), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Fiesta Bowl: Connecticut (8-4) vs. Oklahoma (11-2), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 3 Orange Bowl: Stanford (11-1) vs. Virginia Tech (11-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Tuesday, Jan. 4 Sugar Bowl: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Thursday, Jan. 6 GoDaddy.com Bowl: Miami (Ohio) (9-4) vs. Middle Tennessee (6-6), 5 p.m. (ESPN) Friday, Jan. 7 Cotton Bowl: Texas A&M (9-3) vs. LSU (10-2), 5 p.m. (Fox) Saturday, Jan. 8 BBVA Compass Bowl: Pittsburgh (7-5) vs. Kentucky (6-6), 9 a.m. (ESPN) Sunday, Jan. 9 Fight Hunger Bowl: Boston College (7-5) vs. Nevada (12-1), 6 p.m. (ESPN) Monday, Jan. 10 BCS National Championship: Auburn (13-0) vs. Oregon (12-0), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN)

Betting Line

Monday’s Summary

Patriots 45, Jets 3

Favorite

N.Y. Jets 0 New England 17

Colts

3 0 0 — 3 7 7 14 — 45 First Quarter NE—FG Graham 41, 10:57. NE—Green-Ellis 1 run (Graham kick), 4:02. NE—Branch 25 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 1:01. Second Quarter NYJ—FG Folk 39, 12:14. NE—Tate 4 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 8:15. Third Quarter NE—Welker 18 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 4:40. Fourth Quarter NE—Hernandez 1 pass from Brady (Graham kick), 14:57. NE—Green-Ellis 5 run (Graham kick), 9:20. A—68,756. ——— NYJ NE First downs 18 23 Total Net Yards 301 405 Rushes-yards 31-152 26-101 Passing 149 304 Punt Returns 2-26 1-13 Kickoff Returns 8-158 2-42 Interceptions Ret. 0-0 3-33 Comp-Att-Int 17-33-3 21-29-0 Sacked-Yards Lost 1-15 3-22 Punts 3-30.7 3-46.7 Fumbles-Lost 1-0 0-0 Penalties-Yards 4-56 1-10 Time of Possession 28:59 31:01 ——— INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS RUSHING—N.Y. Jets: Greene 13-64, Tomlinson 10-47, Sanchez 4-20, McKnight 3-19, B.Smith 1-2. New England: Green-Ellis 18-72, Woodhead 2-11, Taylor 49, Tate 1-6, Brady 1-3. PASSING—N.Y. Jets: Sanchez 17-33-3-164. New England: Brady 21-29-0-326. RECEIVING—N.Y. Jets: Holmes 7-72, Keller 327, Edwards 2-39, Tomlinson 2-14, Cotchery 2-9, Greene 1-3. New England: Welker 7-80, Woodhead 4-104, Branch 3-64, Hernandez 3-51, Gronkowski 1-12, GreenEllis 1-7, Morris 1-4, Tate 1-4. MISSED FIELD GOALS—N.Y. Jets: Folk 53 (SH).

College BOWLS Subject to Change All Times PST

JAGUARS STEELERS BEARS BILLS VIKINGS Packers Falcons Buccaneers SAINTS 49ERS JETS Broncos CHARGERS Eagles Ravens

p-Navy

NFL (Home teams in Caps) Opening Current Underdog Thursday 2.5 2.5 TITANS Sunday 4.5 4.5 Raiders 9 9 Bengals NL NL Patriots 1 1 Browns NL NL Giants 7 7 LIONS 7 7 PANTHERS 3 3 REDSKINS 9 9 Rams 4.5 4.5 Seahawks NL NL Dolphins NL NL CARDINALS 7 7 Chiefs 3 3 COWBOYS Monday 3 3 TEXANS College Saturday 7.5 7.5

Army

Troy

December 18 New Mexico Bowl 12 12 Humanitarian Bowl 3 3 New Orleans Bowl PK PK

Louisville

December 21 St. Petersburg Bowl 3 3 Southern Miss

Byu N. Illinois

Utep Fresno St Ohio U

Boise St

December 22 Las Vegas Bowl 16.5 16.5

Utah

San Diego St

December 23 Poinsettia Bowl 1.5 1.5

Navy

Hawaii

December 24 Hawaii Bowl 12.5 12.5

Tulsa

Toledo

Air Force

December 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl 2 2 Florida Int’l December 27 Independence Bowl 1.5 1.5 Georgia Tech

Auburn

Wisconsin Connecticut

SOCCER Men’s college NCAA Division I All Times PST ——— Semifinals Friday, Dec. 10 At Santa Barbara, Calif. North Carolina vs. Louisville, 5:30 p.m. Akron vs. Michigan, 8 p.m. Championship Sunday, Dec. 12 At Santa Barbara, Calif. North Carolina-Louisville winner vs. Akron-Michigan winner, 1 p.m.

BASKETBALL Men’s college Monday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Washington 94, Portland 72 SOUTHWEST Arkansas St. 85, Lyon 42 Houston 64, Nevada 61 MIDWEST Iowa St. 85, SE Missouri 58 Kansas St. 89, Alcorn St. 55 Michigan 86, Concordia, Mich. 65 SOUTH Furman 81, UNC Greensboro 68 The Citadel 72, St. Mary’s, Md. 64 EAST Delaware St. 75, Maine 56 Lafayette 76, Sacred Heart 71 Providence 91, Brown 64 Yale 74, Albany, N.Y. 53 POLLS The Top Twenty Five The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 5, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Duke (65) 8-0 1,625 1 2. Ohio St. 6-0 1,534 2 3. Pittsburgh 9-0 1,494 3 4. Kansas 7-0 1,403 4 5. Kansas St. 7-1 1,291 5 6. Connecticut 7-0 1,285 7 7. Michigan St. 6-2 1,168 6 8. Syracuse 8-0 1,126 8 9. Georgetown 8-0 1,011 16 10. Baylor 6-0 990 11 11. Tennessee 6-0 914 13 12. Villanova 6-1 870 12 13. Memphis 7-0 802 14 14. San Diego St. 7-0 759 17 15. Missouri 6-1 726 9 16. Illinois 8-1 715 20 17. Kentucky 5-2 557 10 18. BYU 8-0 515 21 19. Purdue 7-1 432 22 20. UNLV 8-0 426 24 21. Washington 5-2 302 23 22. Minnesota 7-1 294 15 23. Notre Dame 8-0 291 25 24. Louisville 6-0 162 — 25. Texas 6-2 146 19 Others receiving votes: Florida 72, Vanderbilt 52, North Carolina 43, Arizona 38, UCF 28, Cleveland St. 13, Gonzaga 9, Texas A&M 9, Cincinnati 6, Northwestern 6, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 5, Temple 3, Wichita St. 3. USA Today/ESPN Top 25 Poll The top 25 teams in the USA Today-ESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 5, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Duke (31) 8-0 775 1 2. Ohio State 6-0 734 2 3. Pittsburgh 9-0 715 3 4. Kansas 7-0 685 4 5. Kansas State 7-1 589 5 6. Connecticut 7-0 587 9 7. Syracuse 8-0 581 7 8. Michigan State 6-2 558 6 9. Baylor 6-0 487 10 10. Georgetown 8-0 481 14 11. Missouri 6-1 417 8 12. Villanova 6-1 396 12 13. Tennessee 6-0 376 17 14. Memphis 7-0 332 15 15. San Diego State 8-0 315 19 16. Kentucky 5-2 284 11 17. Illinois 8-1 280 21 18. Purdue 7-1 259 18 19. UNLV 8-0 233 23 20. Minnesota 7-1 222 13 21. Brigham Young 8-0 162 25 22. Washington 5-2 151 22 23. Notre Dame 8-0 109 NR 24. Florida 6-2 92 16 25. Texas 6-2 85 20 Others receiving votes: Louisville 37; West Virginia 27; Vanderbilt 20; North Carolina 14; Wisconsin 12; Arizona 9; Northwestern 9; Cleveland State 7; New Mexico 7; Temple 7; Gonzaga 5; Texas A&M 5; Central Florida 4; Richmond 3; Wichita State 2; Virginia Tech 1; Washington State 1.

Women’s college Monday’s Games ——— FAR WEST Utah 78, Westminster, Utah 36 SOUTHWEST Cent. Arkansas 76, Central Baptist 35 Sam Houston St. 67, Grambling St. 55 MIDWEST IPFW 60, UMKC 58 IUPUI 76, Centenary 46 Miami (Ohio) 89, Marshall 63 Temple 75, Ohio 48 Wis.-Green Bay 68, E. Michigan 44 SOUTH Duke 61, Texas A&M 58 Manhattan 61, Md.-Eastern Shore 49 Memphis 50, Chicago St. 49 Virginia 76, Radford 52 EAST Duquesne 67, Buffalo 53 Fairleigh Dickinson 59, Yale 57 Northeastern 67, Boston U. 55 Syracuse 69, Albany, N.Y. 38 POLLS

The Women’s Top Twenty Five The top 25 teams in the The Associated Press’ women’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Dec. 5, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and last week’s ranking: Record Pts Pvs 1. Connecticut (40) 8-0 1,000 1 2. Baylor 9-1 943 2 3. Stanford 5-0 929 3 4. Xavier 8-0 851 4 5. Duke 8-0 841 5 6. Ohio St. 7-0 805 6 7. Texas A&M 6-0 738 7 8. Tennessee 8-1 700 9 9. West Virginia 8-0 698 10 10. UCLA 7-0 595 13 11. Georgetown 7-1 591 12 12. North Carolina 8-0 570 14 13. Oklahoma 7-1 548 11 14. Kentucky 5-1 467 8 15. Michigan St. 7-1 386 25 16. Iowa St. 6-1 337 19 17. Florida St. 7-1 333 15 18. Notre Dame 6-3 313 16 19. Iowa 8-1 289 18 20. St. John’s 7-1 254 20 21. Texas 4-2 216 17 22. Maryland 7-1 206 22 23. Wis.-Green Bay 7-0 146 — 24. DePaul 8-1 70 — 25. Georgia 6-2 53 21 Others receiving votes: Nebraska 31, Kansas St. 23, Boston College 16, Kansas 11, Georgia Tech 8, Arkansas 7, Oklahoma St. 7, Bowling Green 5, Northwestern 4, Southern Cal 3, Alabama 2, Louisville 2, Florida 1, Purdue 1.

HOCKEY NHL NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE All Times PST ——— EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 29 19 8 2 40 91 67 Philadelphia 28 17 7 4 38 95 69 N.Y. Rangers 29 16 12 1 33 83 77 New Jersey 27 8 17 2 18 50 81 N.Y. Islanders 25 5 15 5 15 53 83 Northeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Montreal 27 17 8 2 36 71 53 Boston 25 14 8 3 31 72 50 Ottawa 28 12 14 2 26 61 81 Buffalo 27 11 13 3 25 68 73 Toronto 26 10 12 4 24 59 76 Southeast Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Washington 29 18 8 3 39 96 79 Tampa Bay 27 15 9 3 33 84 94 Atlanta 28 15 10 3 33 88 80 Carolina 26 11 12 3 25 75 84 Florida 25 11 14 0 22 64 66 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Detroit 25 17 5 3 37 86 67 Chicago 29 15 12 2 32 90 84 Columbus 26 15 10 1 31 70 71 St. Louis 26 13 9 4 30 67 72 Nashville 26 12 8 6 30 65 68 Northwest Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Vancouver 25 14 8 3 31 80 64 Colorado 26 13 10 3 29 91 82 Minnesota 26 11 11 4 26 63 76 Edmonton 26 10 12 4 24 70 93 Calgary 27 11 14 2 24 74 82 Pacific Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Dallas 26 16 8 2 34 76 69 Phoenix 26 13 7 6 32 74 72 Los Angeles 25 15 10 0 30 69 61 San Jose 26 13 9 4 30 78 73 Anaheim 29 13 13 3 29 71 87 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s Games Toronto 5, Washington 4, SO Columbus 3, Dallas 2, SO Pittsburgh 2, New Jersey 1 Atlanta 3, Nashville 2, OT San Jose 5, Detroit 2 Today’s Games Ottawa at Montreal, 4 p.m. Buffalo at Boston, 4:30 p.m. Colorado at Florida, 4:30 p.m. Tampa Bay at Calgary, 6:30 p.m. Anaheim at Edmonton, 6:30 p.m.

DEALS Transactions BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES—Acquired 3B Mark Reynolds and a player to be named or cash from Arizona for RHP David Hernandez and RHP Kam Mickolio. BOSTON RED SOX—Acquired 1B Adrian Gonzalez from San Diego for OF Reymond Fuentes, RHP Casey Kelly, 1B Anthony Rizzo and a player to be named. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Acquired 2B Brett Lawrie from Milwaukee for RHP Shaun Marcum. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Agreed to terms with INF Melvin Mora on a one-year contract. CHICAGO CUBS—Named Mark Riggins pitching coach. NEW YORK METS—Agreed to terms with INF Russ Adams and C Dusty Ryan on minor league contracts. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Agreed to terms with RHP Aaron Harang on a one-year contract. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL LEAGUES MINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL—Named Scott Poley senior vice president, legal affairs; Tim Brunswick vice president, baseball & business operations; Brian Earle vice president, BIRCO & Business Services; Tina Gust vice president, business development; Rod Meadows vice president, Sales & Marketing; Steve Densa executive director, communications; Sandie Hebert director, licensing; Scott Kravchuk director, business development; Noreen Brantner senior assistant director, exhibition services and sponsorships; Kelly Butler senior assistant director, event services; Melissa Agee assistant director, sales & marketing; Lou Brown assistant director, legal affairs; Jill Rusinko general manager, Durham Athletic Park & MiLB Charities and Darryl Henderson coordinator, affiliate programs, effective Jan. 3, 2011. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA—Suspended Los Angeles Clippers F Brian Cook two games for his flagrant foul, penalty two against Portland C Joel Przybilla and Portland G Andre Miller for one game for making excessive and unnecessary contact with Los Angeles F Blake Griffin during a Dec. 5 game. FOOTBALL National Football League NFL—Fined Baltimore LB Jameel McClain $40,000 for his helmet hit on Pittsburgh TE Heath Miller and Baltimore NT Haloti Ngata $15,000 for hitting Ben Roethlisberger’s helmet and breaking his nose during Sunday’s game. DENVER BRONCOS—Fired coach Josh McDaniels. Named running backs coach Eric Studesville interim coach for the final month. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—Placed CB Aqib Talib and C Jeff Faine on injured reserve. HOCKEY National Hockey League CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS—Assigned F Jeremy Morin to Rockford (AHL). DALLAS STARS—Recalled LW Francis Wathier from the Texas (AHL). NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Sent D Dylan Reese to Bridgeport (AHL). PITTSBURGH PENGUINS—F Bill Guerin announced his retirement. WASHINGTON CAPITALS—Recalled C Mathieu Perreault from Hershey (AHL). COLLEGE COLORADO—Named Jon Embree football coach and signed him to a five-year contract. DUQUESNE—Agreed to terms with football coach Jerry Schmitt on a contract extension through 201314. LONGWOOD—Fired women’s basketball coach Kristin Caruso. Named Bill Reinson women’s interim basketball coach. LOUISIANA TECH—Announced sophomore F Darius Redding has been declared academically ineligible for the winter quarter. SAN DIEGO STATE—Signed football coach Brady Hoke to a two-year contract extension through 2015. TEXAS—Announced the resignation of offensive coordinator Greg Davis. Announced the retirement of offensive line coach Mac McWhorter and defensive line coach-special teams coordinator Mike Tolleson. VASSAR—Named John Cox men’s tennis coach. VILLANOVA—Suspended freshman F JayVaughn Pinkston for the rest of the season after he was charged with assault.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 D3

NHL ROUNDUP

MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Shootout goal lifts Jackets over Stars

Players begin to make moves during winter meetings

The Associated Press

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — Adrian Gonzalez, Mark Reynolds and Shaun Marcum switched leagues Monday as teams started trading at baseball’s winter meetings. Cliff Lee’s agent showed up, too, but said there’s no telling when his prize pitcher might sign. To Pat Gillick, this was truly the biggest deal of the day, and of his career: The 73-year-old executive whose moves helped build three World Series champions was elected to the Hall of Fame. Often, it takes a few days at this annual gathering for any real action. This time, it was brisk from the get-go. “Now that everybody is here in the same facility, the atmosphere is ripe to push through some things,” Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said. The Boston Red Sox completed their trade for Gonzalez, getting the All-Star first baseman from San Diego for minor league pitcher Casey Kelly, first baseman Anthony Rizzo, outfielder Reymond Fuentes and a player to be named. Baltimore added a big bat — and a bunch of strikeouts — by acquiring Reynolds from Arizona for right-handed relievers David Hernandez and Kam Mickolio. The Milwaukee Brewers boosted their rotation, getting right-hander Shaun Marcum from the Toronto Blue Jays for Canadian infield prospect Brett Lawrie. “A lot of agents are claiming that their players are going to sign this week. Some will and some won’t,” Mets GM Sandy Alderson said. “There could be a run on starting pitching this week.” Whether Lee is among the pitchers who make that decision remains uncertain. Agent Darek Braunecker met with Cashman — the Yankees hope to lure the ace lefty, while Texas is trying to re-sign him. Other teams are interested, but their pursuits aren’t nearly so public. “There’s always clubs that kind of lay in the weeds,” Braunecker said. “To me, you’re talking about the best player on the market. There’s still, certainly, a need for starting pitching that stems beyond the clubs that have been mentioned so far.” At an interview session, Texas manager Ron Washington was asked to name his five starters for 2011. “Cliff Lee,” he said, laughing. A day after Washington gave free agent outfielder Jayson Werth a whopping $126 million, seven-year deal, several teams took the trade route. The Red Sox got the 28-yearold Gonzalez, a three-time AllStar and two-time Gold Glover. He hit .298 with 31 homers and 101 RBIs last season. “I’m very excited to be in Boston and ready to beat the Yanks,” Gonzalez said at Fenway Park. San Diego general manager Jed Hoyer, who previously worked for the Red Sox under GM Theo Epstein, said the Padres were sure they wouldn’t have been able to sign Gonzalez after 2011. So, they decided to make a deal now, rather than risk waiting until next summer. “There’s plenty of examples of trades at the deadline where

COLUMBUS, Ohio — With the final seconds of regulation running out, two streaks hung in the balance. It was time for a big player to make a big play, and that’s exactly what Rick Nash did. Nash scored in the final minute to force overtime, and rookie Kyle Wilson had a goal on his first career shootout attempt to help the Columbus Blue Jackets end a five-game losing skid with a 3-2 victory over the Dallas Stars on Monday night. The loss snapped the Stars’ winning streak at six, one short of tying a franchise record. “It was big,” Nash, the Blue Jackets captain, said of the victory. “We’d been in a bit of a losing streak here. It’s been tough to find goals.” Nash, who also scored in the shootout, tied the game with 46.1 seconds left in regulation with his 14th goal. “It’s what we need to get over a slump like this,” said Wilson, signed as a free agent over the summer after rising through the Washington Capitals’ system. “You need the big players to make big plays, and that’s what he did. He was our biggest player and that was one of the biggest plays of the year for us.” After Nash and Dallas’ Brad Richards had canceled each other out with goals in the shootout, Wilson went third and used a hard forehand to beat Kari Lehtonen on the stick side with his lefthanded shot. He earned his spot in the rotation because he won a shootout competition in practice earlier in the season. “I knew he was a good shooter, so I really wasn’t surprised to see him there,” said Mathieu Garon, who had 16 saves through overtime and stopped two of three attempts in the shootout. “He took the same shot as Nasher took. It was good to see that.” Garon then made a right toe save on Jamie Benn to seal the win. Also on Monday: Penguins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Devils . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 PITTSBURGH — Sidney Crosby scored a goal and set up another, and Pittsburgh matched the second-longest winning streak in franchise history, winning its 10th in a row by beating New Jersey. Sharks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Red Wings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 DETROIT — Logan Couture scored twice, including the go-ahead goal 8 seconds after Niclas Wallin’s goal, to lift San Jose over Detroit. Maple Leafs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Capitals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 WASHINGTON — Mikhail Grabovski scored the lone shootout goal and Toronto rallied from three goals down in the third period to beat Washington. Thrashers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Predators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 ATLANTA — Zach Bogosian scored 2:11 into overtime, Ondrej Pavelec made 27 saves, and Atlanta rallied from a two-goal deficit to top Nashville.

By Ben Walker The Associated Press

Charles Rex Arbogast / The Associated Press

Oklahoma City Thunder forward Nick Collison, left, battles teammate Eric Maynor, center, and Chicago Bulls guard C.J. Watson for a lose ball during Monday’s game in Chicago. The Bulls won 99-90.

Boozer leads Bulls to win The Associated Press

Terry Gilliam / The Associated Press

12 boards apiece as Chicago outrebounded the Thunder 52-39 and enjoyed a 19-11 edge in second-chance points. “Going into the game, we were very concerned with their offensive rebounding,” Oklahoma City coach Scott Brooks said. “They present a lot of problems.” In other games on Monday: Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Grizzlies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 SALT LAKE CITY — Deron Williams had 27 points and eight assists to power Utah to the win. Hawks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Magic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .74 ORLANDO, Fla. — Josh Smith had 19 points and 13 rebounds, Mike Bibby made a critical 3pointer in the final minute and Atlanta beat Orlando. Al Horford added 16 points and 10 rebounds for the Hawks, winners of six of seven. Jamal Crawford had 15 points and Bibby finished with 13. Knicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Timberwolves . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 NEW YORK — Amare Stoudemire scored 34 points to lead surging New York to its fifth

straight victory. Wilson Chandler added 21 points and Raymond Felton had 18 points and 11 assists for the Knicks. Pacers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Raptors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 INDIANAPOLIS — Brandon Rush scored a season-high 26 points, Danny Granger had 21 and the Pacers put seven players in double figures. Rush, a reserve, was 10 for 18 from the field, including six for eight from 3-point range. Indiana shot 55 percent overall, led by a 13-for-26 effort from behind the arc. Clippers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Kings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 LOS ANGELES — Eric Gordon scored 29 points, hitting a go-ahead 3-pointer with 47 seconds left to lift the Los Angeles Clippers to a victory over Sacramento. Heat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Bucks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 MILWAUKEE — Dwyane Wade had 25 points and a career-high 14 rebounds back in the city where his career took off and Miami beat Milwaukee for its fifth straight win.

NBA SCOREBOARD SUMMARIES

EASTERN CONFERENCE

Monday’s Games

Jazz 94, Grizzlies 85 MEMPHIS (85) Gay 8-22 1-2 18, Randolph 8-17 1-3 17, Gasol 4-6 5-5 13, Conley 5-10 9-10 19, Henry 0-2 2-2 2, Mayo 3-9 0-1 6, Arthur 4-7 0-0 8, Vasquez 1-6 0-0 2, Thabeet 0-0 0-0 0, Young 0-0 0-0 0, Allen 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 33-79 1823 85. UTAH (94) Kirilenko 1-10 6-7 8, Millsap 3-11 1-2 7, Jefferson 5-13 2-2 12, Williams 11-21 4-4 27, Bell 5-7 0-0 14, Watson 1-2 0-0 2, Miles 7-14 3-3 20, Price 0-1 0-0 0, Fesenko 0-1 0-0 0, Elson 1-1 2-2 4. Totals 34-81 18-20 94. Memphis 16 24 25 20 — 85 Utah 20 21 29 24 — 94 3-Point Goals—Memphis 1-11 (Gay 1-4, Randolph 0-1, Conley 0-1, Mayo 0-2, Vasquez 0-3), Utah 8-22 (Bell 4-5, Miles 3-7, Williams 17, Price 0-1, Kirilenko 0-1, Watson 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Memphis 52 (Randolph 14), Utah 48 (Jefferson 10). Assists—Memphis 15 (Conley, Gasol 5), Utah 18 (Williams 8). Total Fouls—Memphis 19, Utah 20. Technicals—Gasol. A—19,131 (19,911).

Atlantic Division Boston New York Toronto Philadelphia New Jersey

W 16 13 8 6 6

Orlando Atlanta Miami Charlotte Washington

W 15 14 14 7 6

OKLAHOMA CITY (90) Durant 7-18 14-14 29, Green 1-9 5-5 7, Krstic 8-12 2-2 18, Westbrook 7-18 1-1 15, Sefolosha 1-6 0-0 3, Ibaka 1-2 0-0 2, Harden 3-12 6-9 13, Collison 0-1 0-0 0, Maynor 1-4 0-0 3, Mullens 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 29-82 28-31 90. CHICAGO (99) Deng 9-16 0-2 19, Boozer 13-21 3-4 29, Noah 3-8 0-0 6, Rose 3-13 4-4 11, Bogans 4-7 0-0 9, Asik 1-1 0-2 2, Brewer 2-3 2-2 6, Gibson 2-5 0-2 4, Watson 0-2 0-0 0, Korver 5-11 1-1 13. Totals 42-87 10-17 99. Oklahoma City 22 26 18 24 — 90 Chicago 24 29 29 17 — 99 3-Point Goals—Oklahoma City 4-19 (Maynor 1-2, Sefolosha 1-3, Harden 1-4, Durant 1-5, Westbrook 0-1, Green 0-4), Chicago 5-11 (Korver 2-4, Rose 1-2, Bogans 1-2, Deng 1-2, Gibson 0-1). Fouled Out—Noah. Rebounds—Oklahoma City 50 (Sefolosha 8), Chicago 58 (Boozer, Noah 12). Assists—Oklahoma City 13 (Westbrook 7), Chicago 25 (Rose 9). Total Fouls—Oklahoma City 19, Chicago 24. Technicals—Sefolosha, Boozer, Chicago defensive three second 2. A—21,184 (20,917).

MIAMI (88) James 7-16 2-4 17, Bosh 8-17 0-0 16, Ilgauskas 0-3 0-0 0, Arroyo 6-6 4-4 18, Wade 9-20 7-10 25, Howard 1-1 0-0 2, Dampier 1-2 0-0 2, Jones 2-3 0-0 6, Chalmers 1-3 0-0 2, Anthony 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 35-72 13-18 88. MILWAUKEE (78) Mbah a Moute 2-4 0-0 4, Sanders 5-12 00 10, Bogut 4-12 3-4 11, Jennings 5-16 1-2 13, Salmons 2-11 3-4 7, Ilyasova 1-5 2-2 4, Maggette 6-12 7-9 20, Dooling 0-4 2-2 2, Douglas-Roberts 2-2 2-2 7, Boykins 0-0 0-0 0, Brockman 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 27-78 20-25 78. Miami 25 21 23 19 — 88 Milwaukee 21 14 24 19 — 78 3-Point Goals—Miami 5-8 (Arroyo 2-2, Jones 2-3, James 1-3), Milwaukee 4-15 (Jennings 2-6, Maggette 1-1, Douglas-Roberts 1-1, Dooling 0-1, Ilyasova 0-2, Salmons 0-4). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 52 (Wade 14), Milwaukee 46 (Bogut 13). Assists—Miami 20 (James 6), Milwaukee 17 (Salmons 4). Total Fouls—Miami 26, Milwaukee 20. A—17,167 (18,717).

Knicks 121, T’wolves 114

L 4 9 13 14 15 L 6 8 8 13 13

Chicago Indiana Cleveland Milwaukee Detroit

W 11 10 7 7 7

L 8 9 13 13 14

Pct .800 .591 .381 .300 .286

GB — 4 8½ 10 10½

L10 8-2 9-1 6-4 4-6 2-8

Str W-7 W-5 L-2 W-1 L-4

Home 9-1 4-5 6-5 5-4 4-6

Away 7-3 9-4 2-8 1-10 2-9

Conf 13-2 8-4 6-8 5-11 3-11

Away 6-3 8-3 4-5 3-8 0-10

Conf 12-4 10-5 12-4 4-9 3-12

Away 4-6 5-4 3-7 2-8 2-9

Conf 2-4 6-4 6-9 6-5 4-8

Southeast Division Pct .714 .636 .636 .350 .316

GB — 1½ 1½ 7½ 8

L10 7-3 6-4 6-4 4-6 3-7

Str L-2 W-1 W-5 L-1 L-1

Home 9-3 6-5 10-3 4-5 6-3

Central Division Pct .579 .526 .350 .350 .333

GB — 1 4½ 4½ 5

L10 5-5 6-4 2-8 2-8 3-7

Str W-2 W-1 L-4 L-1 W-1

Home 7-2 5-5 4-6 5-5 5-5

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

Bulls 99, Thunder 90

Heat 88, Bucks 78

Columbus Blue Jackets’ Samuel Pahisson (26) reaches to take the puck from Dallas Stars’ Brad Richards (91) during the second period of Monday’s game in Columbus, Ohio.

NBA ROUNDUP

CHICAGO — Carlos Boozer is gaining confidence with each game with his new team. Boozer scored 13 of his 29 points in Chicago’s big third quarter and the Bulls beat the Oklahoma City Thunder 99-90 on Monday night. “We want to be an insideout team,” Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau said. “It’s important what Carlos brings to the team. He is such a threat in every aspect of transition.” Boozer got a big free-agent deal from Chicago in the offseason, but missed the team’s first 15 games with a broken right hand. He appears to be picking up steam since he returned in Wednesday night’s 107-78 loss to Orlando, scoring five, 12 and 25 points in his first three outings before taking down the Thunder. “Our goal is to improve every game,” Boozer said. “We don’t look too far ahead.” Luol Deng added 19 points for Chicago (11-8), which outscored the Thunder 29-18 in the pivotal third. Derrick Rose had 11 points and nine assists, but shot three for 13 from the field. Boozer and Joakim Noah had

San Antonio Dallas New Orleans Memphis Houston

W 17 16 13 8 7

L 3 4 7 14 13

Utah Denver Oklahoma City Portland Minnesota

W 16 13 14 9 5

L 6 6 8 11 16

L.A. Lakers Phoenix Golden State L.A. Clippers Sacramento

W 14 11 8 5 4

L 6 9 12 17 15

Pct .850 .800 .650 .364 .350

GB — 1 4 10 10

L10 8-2 9-1 4-6 4-6 4-6

Str W-2 W-9 L-2 L-4 L-1

Home 9-2 8-3 8-2 6-5 4-4

Away 8-1 8-1 5-5 2-9 3-9

Conf 11-3 10-3 8-6 6-8 5-8

Away 7-2 3-5 7-4 4-8 1-11

Conf 8-6 9-4 7-5 5-6 2-10

Away 5-4 5-6 3-8 0-10 2-6

Conf 10-5 8-5 5-8 5-13 1-10

Northwest Division Pct .727 .684 .636 .450 .238

GB — 1½ 2 6 10½

L10 8-2 8-2 6-4 3-7 2-8

Str W-1 W-7 L-1 W-1 L-1

Home 9-4 10-1 7-4 5-3 4-5

Paciic Division Pct .700 .550 .400 .227 .211

GB — 3 6 10 9½

L10 Str 6-4 W-1 5-5 W-3 2-8 L-3 4-6 W-1 1-9 L-8 ——— Monday’s Games

Indiana 124, Toronto 100 New York 121, Minnesota 114 Miami 88, Milwaukee 78 L.A. Clippers 98, Sacramento 91

Home 9-2 6-3 5-4 5-7 2-9

Atlanta 80, Orlando 74 Chicago 99, Oklahoma City 90 Utah 94, Memphis 85 Today’s Games

New Jersey at Atlanta, 4 p.m. Cleveland at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Detroit at Houston, 5:30 p.m. Washington at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.

Denver at Charlotte, 4 p.m. Golden State at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Phoenix at Portland, 7 p.m. Wednesday’s Games

Denver at Boston, 4 p.m. Toronto at New York, 4:30 p.m. Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 5 p.m. Golden State at San Antonio, 5:30 p.m. Miami at Utah, 6 p.m. L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

Chicago at Cleveland, 4 p.m. Indiana at Milwaukee, 5 p.m. Detroit at New Orleans, 5 p.m. Memphis at Phoenix, 6 p.m. Washington at Sacramento, 7 p.m. All Times PST

MINNESOTA (114) Beasley 10-18 4-4 25, Love 10-18 10-10 33, Milicic 4-4 2-2 10, Ridnour 6-9 1-1 16, Johnson 2-6 0-0 5, Brewer 3-7 0-0 7, Pekovic 0-3 1-2 1, Telfair 3-6 4-8 11, Ellington 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 41-78 22-27 114. NEW YORK (121) Chandler 7-12 5-6 21, Gallinari 6-11 3-4 17, Stoudemire 15-23 4-5 34, Fields 1-7 0-0 2,

Felton 6-13 1-2 18, Turiaf 1-2 2-2 4, Douglas 4-7 2-2 11, Williams 5-9 0-0 13, Mozgov 0-1 1-2 1. Totals 45-85 18-23 121. Minnesota 36 32 18 28 — 114 New York 32 29 31 29 — 121 3-Point Goals—Minnesota 10-21 (Ridnour 3-4, Love 3-5, Brewer 1-2, Beasley 1-2, Telfair 1-3, Johnson 1-4, Ellington 0-1), New York 13-30 (Felton 5-8, Williams 3-4, Gallinari 2-5, Chandler 2-6, Douglas 1-3, Fields 0-4). Fouled

Out—Beasley. Rebounds—Minnesota 49 (Love 15), New York 38 (Fields 10). Assists—Minnesota 16 (Ridnour 4), New York 25 (Felton 11). Total Fouls—Minnesota 24, New York 22. Technicals—Felton. A—19,763 (19,763).

Hawks 80, Magic 74 ATLANTA (80) Smith 9-17 0-0 19, Horford 7-14 2-2 16, Collins 2-5 0-0 4, Bibby 4-11 2-3 13, M.Williams 1-6 0-1 2, Ja.Crawford 6-17 2-2 15, Evans 0-3 0-0 0, Pachulia 0-1 0-0 0, Wilkins 1-3 0-0 2, Powell 3-8 2-2 8, Thomas 0-0 1-2 1. Totals 33-85 9-12 80. ORLANDO (74) Richardson 0-4 0-0 0, Lewis 3-11 2-2 10, Howard 5-11 4-8 14, Duhon 3-6 0-0 7, Carter 816 2-3 18, Bass 4-11 2-2 10, Redick 3-6 4-6 11, Gortat 1-1 0-0 2, J.Williams 1-5 0-0 2, Pietrus 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 28-74 14-21 74. Atlanta 19 17 18 26 — 80 Orlando 19 15 19 21 — 74 3-Point Goals—Atlanta 5-14 (Bibby 3-4, Ja.Crawford 1-2, Smith 1-4, M.Williams 0-2, Evans 0-2), Orlando 4-22 (Lewis 2-7, Redick 1-2, Duhon 1-4, Carter 0-1, Richardson 0-2, J.Williams 0-3, Pietrus 0-3). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Atlanta 53 (Smith 13), Orlando 55 (Howard 13). Assists—Atlanta 17 (Bibby 7), Orlando 9 (Carter 3). Total Fouls—Atlanta 21, Orlando 19. Technicals—Atlanta defensive three second. A—18,846 (18,500).

Pacers 124, Raptors 100 TORONTO (100) Weems 3-10 2-2 8, Johnson 7-13 1-3 15, Bargnani 5-11 2-3 12, Calderon 8-12 3-4 21, DeRozan 3-9 1-2 7, Davis 3-8 0-0 6, Barbosa 5-14 0-0 12, Bayless 2-10 0-0 5, Kleiza 5-12 1-1 12, Wright 1-1 0-0 2, Dorsey 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 42-100 10-15 100. INDIANA (124) Granger 9-16 1-2 21, McRoberts 4-11 3-4 12, Hibbert 6-9 1-1 13, Collison 6-7 5-5 17, Dunleavy 5-7 0-0 11, Rush 10-18 0-0 26, Posey 4-8 0-0 11, Ford 1-3 2-2 4, S.Jones 2-5 1-2 5, Hansbrough 0-0 4-4 4, D.Jones 0-0 0-0 0, Price 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 47-85 17-20 124. Toronto 18 26 23 33 — 100 Indiana 31 37 21 35 — 124 3-Point Goals—Toronto 6-18 (Calderon 2-2, Barbosa 2-5, Bayless 1-3, Kleiza 1-4, Bargnani 0-4), Indiana 13-26 (Rush 6-8, Posey 3-7, Granger 2-5, Dunleavy 1-1, McRoberts 1-4, Ford 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Toronto 53 (Johnson 9), Indiana 51 (Granger 9). Assists— Toronto 16 (Calderon 4), Indiana 33 (Hibbert, McRoberts, Ford 6). Total Fouls—Toronto 23, Indiana 15. A—11,930 (18,165).

Josh Reynolds / The Associated Press

New Boston Red Sox first baseman Adrian Gonzalez speaks to reporters during a news conference at Fenway Park in Boston, Monday. The Red Sox acquired him from the San Diego Padres in exchange for three prospects and a player to be named later. a team didn’t get nearly what they thought they’d get simply because the market didn’t develop or because of injuries,” Hoyer said. “With that in mind, I felt like this was the right time to do it.” Reynolds is taking his big swings to Baltimore. There is no doubt the third baseman can hit the ball a long way — when he hits it, that is. Reynolds has averaged nearly 35 homers for the last three years. He’s also struck out over 200 times in each of those seasons — those are the three highest strikeout totals in major league history. “He brings some things we don’t have,” Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. “You can find negatives on any player. We certainly like his contactto-damage ratio. We’re going to dwell on all the positive things he does.” The Brewers were thrilled to get Marcum, who started for the Blue Jays on opening day last season and went 13-8 with a 3.64 ERA. The trade certainly carried a Canadian theme — Milwaukee GM Doug Melvin and Toronto counterpart Alex Anthopoulos both were born north of the border. Though he traded away Lawrie, a member of the 2008 Canadian Olympic team, Melvin kidded he held onto some valuable things from his country. “I still have my Justin Bieber posters on the wall,” Melvin said, a nod to the Canadian teen pop star. Other names in circulation: San Francisco might become interested in Tampa Bay’s Jason Bartlett to fill their shortstop hole, the Cubs hired Mark Riggans as their pitching coach and the New York Mets interviewed Andy Van Slyke as a possible hitting coach. Gillick built World Series champions in Toronto in 199293 and won another crown with Philadelphia in 2008. At 73, he’s spent a half-century in baseball. “I never felt I had a job. I love going to work every day,” he said. Former players’ union head Marvin Miller fell one vote short. George Steinbrenner finished far behind — “some people thought it’s too early,” Hall of Famer Johnny Bench, a member of the committee, said of the late New York Yankees owner.

Clippers 98, Kings 91 SACRAMENTO (91) Greene 0-4 0-0 0, Thompson 2-4 1-2 5, Cousins 6-15 3-4 15, Udrih 1-10 0-0 2, Evans 5-19 5-5 16, Dalembert 2-5 2-4 6, Landry 4-9 7-8 15, Casspi 8-11 3-3 21, Garcia 0-2 0-0 0, Jeter 3-6 5-6 11. Totals 31-85 26-32 91. L.A. CLIPPERS (98) Aminu 1-3 0-0 3, Griffin 5-12 3-4 13, Jordan 1-1 2-4 4, Bledsoe 4-12 5-6 15, Gordon 10-17 7-7 29, Gomes 7-12 2-2 17, Davis 2-8 0-0 4, Collins 2-3 0-0 4, Smith 0-1 0-0 0, Butler 4-12 0-0 9. Totals 36-81 19-23 98. Sacramento 20 24 19 28 — 91 L.A. Clippers 16 34 29 19 — 98 3-Point Goals—Sacramento 3-16 (Casspi 2-4, Evans 1-4, Jeter 0-1, Garcia 0-2, Greene 0-2, Udrih 0-3), L.A. Clippers 7-18 (Gordon 2-3, Bledsoe 2-5, Aminu 1-2, Gomes 1-2, Butler 1-5, Davis 0-1). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds— Sacramento 57 (Dalembert 11), L.A. Clippers 52 (Griffin 11). Assists—Sacramento 15 (Udrih, Evans, Cousins 3), L.A. Clippers 23 (Davis 8). Total Fouls—Sacramento 25, L.A. Clippers 24. A—14,964 (19,060).

Roberto Gonzalez / The Associated Press

Pat Gillick, whose teams won three World Series titles in 27 years as a major league general manager, smiles during a news conference in Lake Buena Vista, Fla., after being elected to baseball’s Hall of Fame, Monday.


D4 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

NFL Boys basketball, at a glance A look at local high school teams competing this fall:

Meredith dies at age 72

C LASS 6 A REDMOND Head coach: Dusty Porter (third season) 2009-10 record: 10-15 overall, 6-6 Central Valley Conference (third); lost in first round of Class 6A state playoffs Returning all-league player: Tanner Manselle, jr. Special District 1 opener: Lincoln at Redmond, Jan. 21

CLASS 5A MOUNTAIN VIEW Head coach: Craig Reid (11th season) 2009-10 record: 26-2 overall, 13-1 Intermountain Conference (first); lost in Class 5A state championship game Returning all-league player: James Reid, jr. IMC opener: Mountain View at Summit, Jan. 11

By Jaime Aron The Associated Press

DALLAS — Don Meredith was the happiest, most funloving guy wherever he went, whether crooning country tunes in the huddle as quarterback of the Dallas Cowboys or jawing with Howard Cosell in the broadcast booth as analyst on the groundbreaking “Monday Night Football.” His irreverent personality made him one of the most beloved figures in sports and entertainment in the 1970s and 1980s, helping turn the Cowboys Don Meredith and “Monday Night Football” into national sensations. “Dandy Don” died Sunday after suffering a brain hemorrhage and lapsing into a coma in Santa Fe, N.M., where he lived out of the limelight with his wife, Susan, for the last 25 years. He was 72. A folksy foil to Cosell’s tell-itlike-it-is pomposity, Meredith was at his best with unscripted one-liners — often aimed at his broadcast partners. His trademark, though, came when one team had the game locked up. Meredith would warble, “Turn out the lights, the party’s over” — from a song by his pal Willie Nelson. Meredith played for the Cowboys from 1960-68, taking them from winless expansion team to the brink of a championship. He was only 31 when he retired before training camp in 1969, and a year later wound up alongside Cosell in the broadcast booth for the oddity of a prime-time, weeknight NFL game. The league pitched the idea to ABC, the lowest-rated network, after CBS and NBC tried occasional games on Monday nights and didn’t think it would click. It became a hit largely because of how much viewers enjoyed the contrast of Meredith’s Texas flair and Cosell’s East Coast braggadocio. Friends in real life, they took opposite stances to liven up broadcasts with their bickering. Meredith usually took the majority opinion, Cosell the minority. Cosell was playing a role, while Meredith was just being himself. “Watching him on TV was like being in the huddle with Don again,” former teammate Dan Reeves said. “He just made the game fun.” Blowouts were their playground. Folks kept watching because of them. In a 1970 game from Dallas, the Cowboys were headed to a 38-0 loss to St. Louis when fans chanted, “We Want Meredith!” Said Meredith, “No way you’re getting me down there.” The Houston Oilers were on their way to a 34-0 loss to the Oakland Raiders in 1972 when a camera zoomed in on a disgruntled fan at the Astrodome. He made a one-finger salute and Meredith quipped, “He thinks they’re No. 1.” Meredith was the life of the party in the “Monday Night” booth from 1970 through 1984, except for a three-year stint playing a detective on NBC’s “Police Story.” He spent 11 of those years teamed with another former star player, Frank Gifford, a friend before they became broadcast partners. “To say that Don was an instant success would be a gross understatement,” Gifford said in a statement. “For millions of football fans, he would always be the one who topped Howard Cosell with one-liners or a simple ‘Come on, Howard.’ ” Meredith also appeared in more than a dozen made-for-TV movies, specials or dramas. He once filled in for Johnny Carson on the “Tonight Show,” and was a popular pitchman for Lipton tea. He was the inspiration for the carousing quarterback in the book and movie “North Dallas Forty,” written by Pete Gent, a former Cowboys teammate and good friend. “He loved life, he loved people, God bless him,” former teammate Walt Garrison said. “When he walked into a room, he took it over. ... You couldn’t be sad around Joe Don very long. When you left, you’d come away laughing.”

BEND Head coach: Don Hayes (21st season) 2009-10 record: 7-18 overall, 5-9 Intermountain Conference (sixth) Returning all-league players: Taylor Raterman, sr.; Seth Platsman, sr. IMC opener: Bend at Summit, Jan. 7 Stephan Savoia / The Associated Press

New England Patriots running back BenJarvus Green-Ellis (42) celebrates with teammate Aaron Hernandez (85) after Green-Ellis scored a rushing touchdown against the Jets during the first quarter of Monday’s game in Foxborough, Mass.

Patriots rout Jets Tom Brady throws four TD passes as New England rolls By Barry Wilner The Associated Press

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Tom Brady turned this anticipated classic into a classic rout. Brady doesn’t lose many big games, certainly not at home and definitely not with so much on the line. He threw for four touchdowns and 326 yards Monday night in New England’s 45-3 romp past the New York Jets for his NFL-record 26th straight regular-season home victory. In surpassing Brett Favre’s mark for consecutive wins in the comforts of his own stadium, Brady also lifted the Patriots (10-2) to the best record in the AFC. If this was for bragging rights in the conference, Rex Ryan and the Jets (9-3) will have to be silent for a while. “We don’t listen to the hype,” Brady said. “I don’t think we ever have. We really take after our coach and he says ‘When you win, say little. When you lose, say less.’” It was a mismatch from the start. The Jets, who had won eight successive road games, five this season, came in with a vaunted defense and an offense that had come alive behind second-year quarterback Mark Sanchez and big-play receiver Santonio Holmes. But Brady didn’t have to sweat anything in his second straight game with four TD passes and no interceptions — and 12th such game of his career. He hasn’t been picked off in seven consecutive games. New York couldn’t produce a pass rush and its blitzes were fruitless most of the night. With 4:40 remaining in the third quarter, the Patriots already were over their 30.4 points per game average that leads the league. And when the star quarterback wasn’t doing the damage, former Jets running back Danny Woodhead was. He turned a shovel pass into a 50-yard gain, had a 35-yard jaunt with another short pass and made Ryan even more regretful to have let him escape earlier this season. “This is where I am. I’m a New England Patriot,” Woodhead added. “Was I over there? Yeah. But that’s not something I dwell on because I’m a New England Patriot, and I’m going to do my best for this team.” Brady moved into 13th place all-time

SUMMIT Head coach: Dan Munson (fourth season) 2009-10 record: 15-15 overall, 8-6 Intermountain Conference (third); lost in Class 5A state tournament consolation finals Key returners: Mitchell Wettig, sr.; Austin Michalski, sr. IMC opener: Bend at Summit, Jan. 7

CLASS 4A with 252 TD passes; he has thrown for 27 TDs and been intercepted only four times as the three-time Super Bowl winner makes a strong case for his second league MVP award. “He’s Tom Brady. He’s been able to do some pretty good things throughout his career,” Woodhead said. “I don’t know if stuff like that surprises anybody.” The Jets gave the Patriots plenty of help all night. Nick Folk’s missed field goal came before BenJarvus Green-Ellis’ 1-yard run, and Steve Weatherford’s 12-yard punt led to Deion Branch’s 25yard TD. New England’s 32nd-ranked pass defense intercepted three of Sanchez’s passes in snapping the Jets’ four-game winning streak, all against teams with losing records. Indeed, every Jets victory this season except the one against New England in Week 2 is over a team currently with a .500 or worse record. “We couldn’t afford to lose to them again,” Brady said. “You can’t lose to the same team twice; I don’t think it’s happened here too often since I got here in 2000. If you want to win division, can’t lose to same team twice.” Conversely, the Patriots own wins over the Steelers, Ravens and Jets — by far the best teams in the conference thus far. And they are even with Atlanta, the NFC leader at 10-2. New England moved swiftly downfield on the opening series before stalling on three straight incompletions — none close to hitting the target — from the Jets 23. It was the only time Brady struggled. Shayne Graham’s 41-yard field goal made it 3-0. Then the gambling began, with New York going on fourth-and-1 from its 46 and converting on Shonn Greene’s 2yard run. But when Ryan took a chance on a 53-yard field goal, Folk came up well short. The Patriots didn’t come up short after taking over at their 43. Helped greatly by a 36-yard pass interference penalty on safety Eric Smith, who was replacing regular Jim Leonhard (broken shin), New England needed just six plays to take a 10point lead on Green-Ellis’ 1-yard plunge. The expected classic was turning ugly early. “All in all it was a fun night,” Brady said. Weatherford didn’t help New York’s case, either, with his shank on the Jets’ next possession. He angrily pushed a chain gang member on the sideline after the kick, perhaps sensing Brady wouldn’t waste the opportunity from the New York 32.

Beavers Continued from D1 Oregon State drew national attention in the week before the game by painting their practice field blue, but ultimately the Beavers lost 37-24 to a team that went 11-1. After beating Arizona State at home, the Beavers upset Arizona 29-27 in Tucson. But the win was costly. James Rodgers made a fingertip catch of a deep pass but was hit hard by Arizona’s Adam Hall and had to be helped off the field, unable to put weight on his left knee. He needed surgery and missed the rest of the season. At the time, James Rodgers ranked sixth in the nation with an average of 176.75 allpurpose yards. He was averaging 18.33 yards on punt returns and 28.67 yards on kickoff returns. He had the second-most career all-purpose yards among active players this season with 5,784. More than a playmaker, James Rodgers was a respected and enthusiastic leader of the Beavers. Oregon State went on to drop five of its last seven games, including a double-overtime loss at Washington and a humbling loss at home to lowly Washington State. The

“It was just an up-and-down season. We had some really good times and some really bad times. We need to find ways to be consistent, find ways to get the ball in the end zone.” — OSU quarterback Ryan Katz

only real bright spot was a 36-7 rout of USC on Nov. 20. Oregon State’s schedule included seven ranked teams, five of those ranked in the top 10 when they faced the Beavers. “We had such a tough schedule,” said cornerback James Dockery. “It seemed like we were right there in so many games. There were so many games where just a few inches could have turned the game around.” Quizz acknowledged the week before the Civil War that his season had fallen below expectations. He finished his junior season with 1,184 yards rushing, for an average of 98.6 yards a game — off last season’s numbers of

CROOK COUNTY Head coach: Jeff Lowenbach (seventh season) 2009-10 record: 0-23 overall, 0-14 Intermountain Conference (eighth) Returning all-league player: Jordan Reeher, sr. Special District 1 opener: Crook County at Roosevelt, Jan. 14 MADRAS Head coach: Allen Hair (fourth season) 2009-10 record: 14-10 overall, 7-7 Intermountain Conference (fifth) Key returners: Bobby Ahern, jr.; Justin QueaphamaMehlberg, jr. Tri-Valley Conference opener: Madras at Gladstone, Jan. 18 SISTERS Head coach: Rand Runco (14th season) 2009-10 record: 13-12 overall, 7-5 Sky-Em League (fourth); lost in second round of Sky-Em playoffs Returning all-league players: John Erickson, jr.; Jalen Miller, jr. Sky-Em opener: Sisters at Sweet Home, Jan. 14 LA PINE Head coach: Kyle Kalmbach (fifth season) 2009-10 record: 9-15 overall, 2-10 Sky-Em League (seventh) Key returners: Jaron Kuehn, sr.; Austin Pierce, jr.; Austin Manley, sr. Sky-Em opener: Cottage Grove at La Pine, Jan. 14

CLASS 2A CULVER Head coach: James Macy (second season in this tenure; sixth overall) 2009-10 record: 11-14 overall, 9-7 Tri-River Conference (fourth); lost in Tri-River playoffs Key returners: Eddie Calderon, sr.; Gerson Gonzalez, so. Tri-River opener: Western Mennonite at Culver, Dec. 14

CLASS 1A GILCHRIST Head coach: Brian Stock (third season) 2009-10 record: 5-15 overall, 4-10 Mountain Valley League (sixth) Key returning player: Tyler Shuey, so. MVL opener: Gilchrist at Hosanna Christian, Jan. 7 CENTRAL CHRISTIAN Head coach: Jason Riste (fourth season) 2009-10 record: 9-12 overall, 3-12 Big Sky League (fifth) Key returners: Isaac Staples, jr.; Corwin Eells, jr. Big Sky opener: Central Christian at Echo, Dec. 17

1,440 yards for an average of 110.8. But he climbed to sixth on the Pac-10’s career rushing list with 3,877 yards, passing Arizona’s Trung Candidate and former Beaver Yvenson Bernard. Quizz said he plans to be back next season. Oregon State is petitioning the NCAA for another year of eligibility for his older brother James, who never had a redshirt year. Katz showed promise but, like the rest of the Beavers, he lacked consistency. He threw for 18 touchdowns and ran for two more, but he was intercepted 11 times. “It was just an up-and-down season,” Katz said. “We had some really good times and some really bad times. We need to find ways to be consistent, find ways to get the ball in the end zone.” All that was left for the Beavers after the 37-20 loss to the Ducks in the Civil War was to look forward to next season. “I know it looked like we blinked a few times, but they never did,” Riley said. “They worked hard, they had good practices. We didn’t always play well, but when we didn’t play well we picked ourselves back up and usually had a good game. I think it’s a group that has been resilient. I knew every day when I went out to practice what they were going to give, and we can’t ask for any more than that.”

Basketball Continued from D1 Champions or co-champions of the Intermountain Conference in each of the past six seasons, the Cougars are expected to again have a target on their backs, even with Reid as their only returning varsity player. Mountain View again will be one of the taller teams in Central Oregon, with 6-6 sophomore David Larson and 6-4 junior Blake Bosch, among others, expected to start alongside Reid. “That’s one of the fun parts of high school basketball,” Craig Reid says. “Every year you get a different batch of kids. We like tweaking our system year to year and make it fit the kids we have. The constant for us is fundamentals on offense and defense.” While Mountain View will be breaking in a host of new varsity players, Bend High welcomes back the majority of a squad that went 5-15 last season. Seniors Taylor Raterman and Seth Platsman, both all-league players in 2009-10, return for the Lava Bears, as do junior guard Hayden Crook and senior post Joey Apodaca, whose junior year was cut short by injury. Through two games this season — both road wins for the Lava Bears — Crook in particular has been impressive, torching Eagle Point for 29 points on Friday before posting 18 points against Grants Pass on Saturday. “On paper, based on returners, they’re the team to watch out for,” Craig Reid says about Bend High. “They’ve got their top six or seven guys back.” Senior Mitchell Wettig returns for Summit, which caught fire late last season, winning four consecutive games to advance to the state tournament for the first time in school history. Wettig, a 6-4 wing who came off the bench last year, will be expected to lead Summit offensively, at least early on this season, as the Storm lost all five of their starters from last year to graduation. Senior Blake Soto is expected to start at point guard for the Storm, and junior Dylan Cramer should see time at one of Summit’s wing positions. Sophomore Sam Stelk, a 64 forward who saw varsity minutes last year as a freshman, was expected to be a key cog for the Storm this year. But he will miss most, if not all, of the season after suffering a shoulder injury during football season. “We’re definitely very young,” says Summit coach Dan Munson, who expects several freshmen to contend for varsity playing time this year. “I think last year showed the kids in our program and community, though, that what we’re doing works. … If you come to work every day, you will get better.” Redmond High will be working to get back to the playoffs this season as well. The Panthers, who lost in the first round of the Class 6A state playoffs last season, return a trio of big men in 6-7 senior Brad Carter, 6-4 senior Mitch Dahlen and 6-4 junior Tanner Manselle. Beau Eastes can be reached at 541-383-0305 or at beastes@bendbulletin.com.

2011 Oregon State football schedule A look at the Beavers’ 2011 football schedule: Sept. 3

Open

Sept. 10

at Wisconsin

Sept. 17

Open

Sept. 24

UCLA*

Oct. 1

at Arizona State*

Oct. 8

Arizona*

Oct. 15

BYU

Oct. 22

at Washington State*

Oct. 29

at Utah*

Nov. 5

Stanford*

Nov. 12

at California*

Nov. 19

Washington*

Nov. 26 Dec. 3

at Oregon* Pac-12 Championship

* Pac-10 game


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 D5

COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

Ice skating instructor Ashley Bedford, right, shows Bulletin reporter Amanda Miles the different blades ice skates can have and their purposes prior to a lesson at Seventh Mountain Resort on Wednesday.

Washington pulls away from Portland The Associated Press

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Skating Continued from D1 Right now also happens to be prime ice skating time for Central Oregon, as the region has no year-round, indoor facility. But two local rinks opened for the season on Thanksgiving, and a third rink, a brand-new facility in Redmond, is scheduled to open at the end of this month, providing skaters of all ages the opportunity to get their chance to jump like Evan Lysacek or twirl like Tara Lipinski. “When you step on the ice and glide, it’s like flying,” says Ashley Bedford, the ice skating director at Seventh Mountain Resort. “It gets you high like that. Minimal effort with maximum output is what it feels like.” The rinks at Seventh Mountain, which is about seven miles southwest of Bend along Century Drive, and at the Village at Sunriver, provide something for skating enthusiasts of all skill levels. Both locations offer open-session ice skating at least most days of the week. Be sure to check each rink’s website (www.villageatsunriver.com or www.seventhmountain.com) or call the rink for the most current information on session times, as they can be adjusted over the course of the season. At Sunriver, the price for open skating varies by the age of the skater. Admission for children from ages 6 through 12 is $8, which includes skate rental, while the cost for individuals 13 or older is $12. Children under 6 are admitted free with an accompanying adult. At Seventh Mountain, admission is $7 and skate rental is $5. Open-session skating offers the chance for an outing with family or friends, or even a date night. “It’s like a Christmas movie when you’re out there skating in the snow,” Bedford says. “That’s like the most romantic thing ever.” If you reach the point at which you would like to learn some new moves, perhaps some lessons would be in order. The rinks at Seventh Mountain and Sunriver both offer instruction. At Seventh Mountain, for example, classes are offered for children as young as preschool age all the way through adults, and for individuals ranging from being so new to ice skating that they just want to stay on their feet to those who are trying to master difficult jumps and intricate spins. Private lessons are also available. “Seeing (students) light up when you skate with them, there’s nothing quite like it,” says Bedford, 23, who has been involved in the sport for more than 17 years, first as a skater and then as an instructor. You do not need special apparel or equipment to go ice skating, besides some figure or ice hockey skates, of course. If you would like to purchase your own pair of

Gear guide: Skates Have you ever wondered what makes hockey skates different from figure skates? Seventh Mountain ice skating director Ashley Bedford has the blades breakdown. Figure skates have a longer blade with a toe pick at the front for moves such as jumps, Bedford explains. They also have a “rocker,” which is a portion of the blade — only about half an inch long — right behind the toe pick that is used for precision moves like spins. Hockey skates, Bedford notes, have a shorter blade that rounds more at both the front and the back than does a figure skate blade. The boots of the skate also tend to be bulkier and have more cushioning. The blades on both types of skates are only about an eighth of an inch thick. So which type of skate is easier to learn on? “I personally think (figure skates),” says Bedford, who feels they are more stable, “but you could talk to a hockey player and they’ll tell you the opposite.”

Quick tips: The essentials 1. Take care of your feet. “The rental skates will give you blisters,” Seventh Mountain Resort ice skating director Ashley Bedford says. “Wear thick socks. It also is freezing and your toes freeze, so thick socks is the way to go.” 2. Maintain good posture. “Posture is a big one,” Bedford explains. “You want to have your back upright and your arms out where you can still see your fingers move. So many people look at the ice, and that just brings your weight forward. It’s like driving: If you’re looking at something, you’re going to end up going that way.” 3. Just walk at first. “It starts with walking,” Bedford says. “People get on the ice, and they just try to take off and push themselves around, but you can’t do that unless you know where your balance is. So even if you have great balance, it takes you a minute to figure out where it is on a blade, especially because sometimes it’s not right down the middle of your foot.” 4. Embrace the fall. “Falling is a sign that you’re actually getting better,” Bedford explains. “It’s that you’re allowing yourself to move more freely or you’re getting more confidence. It’s a sign of improvement. That’s what I’ve always learned, that falling isn’t failure.”

skates, a number of online retailers sell them, and you may also have success finding them at garage sales and thrift shops. One important consideration to remember about the rinks in Central Oregon is that they are outside, though the rink at Seventh Mountain does have a roof and a warming hut. Given that, make sure you are prepared to face the elements. Wearing comfortable, nonrestrictive clothing that will keep you warm and dry will help make your trip to the rink a more pleasant experience. Gloves, a hat, and toe or leg warmers may also be useful to keep the extremities nice and toasty. Also remember that safety is important. Be aware of your surroundings and your fellow skaters, and do not try to skate above your ability level. And keep your skating confined to the rinks. The Bend Parks & Recreation District used to offer skating and rentals at the pond at Shevlin Park, just west of town, but that activity was shelved a number of years ago. As the temperatures drop, it may be tempting to venture out onto a nearby lake or pond that has iced over, but paying the money to skate at a supervised rink is a much safer and smarter alternative. And, quite possibly, even a magical one. “The moment stops and you just kind of get lost in it,” Bedford says of being out on the ice. “It’s awesome to have those types of things that stop you and make you realize the moment, because so often we’re somewhere else.” My turn: OK, I am not such a wintersport neophyte (though I am pretty darn close) that I have never been ice skating, though I think I could count on one

If you go SEVENTH MOUNTAIN RESORT 541-693-9124 Where: About seven miles southwest of Bend along Century Drive Cost: $7 admission, $5 skate rental (figure skates and hockey skates available) Season: Currently open seven days per week; season lasts through the end of March, weather permitting Lessons: Group and private lessons available

hand the number of times I have donned skates. And I never had any sort of instruction prior to last week. My most recent ice skating experience occurred about 18 months ago in Eugene while I was in graduate school, and it was a bit unpleasant. I felt like I could barely move around the rink, I could never get my balance, and I took a tumble once to boot. Most of the time I was out there, I just felt uncomfortable and uneasy. So I was a little nervous when I showed up at the ice rink at Seventh Mountain Resort last week for my first-ever ice skating lesson. But Bedford helped me get fitted with a pair of rental skates (make sure they’re snug and the laces are tied tightly) and we stepped out onto the ice. A wave of fear and paralysis hit me almost immediately, but Bedford took my mind off my emotions by getting me to walk on the ice. The steps I took felt tiny, but before I knew it, I was actually marching across the rink. Early in the lesson, Bedford also taught me two important skating fundamentals: how to fall, and how to stop. To fall properly, I bent my knees more, brought my torso lower to the ground and drew my arms in toward my crouched body and knees, and then I leaned to one side and tried to land on the more padded part of my, ahem, backside. I found that falling this way is more comfortable and safer than diving headfirst or landing on my wrists, arms or shoulders. And this technique helped me a few times when I felt as though I were starting to fall; getting into the proper position helped me regain my balance, and I managed to go the entire lesson without hitting the ice except for

when I was “practicing.” To get back up whenever I practiced falling, I placed my hands and knees on the ice, put one skate at a time underneath my body and slowly stood up. Of the multiple stops that Bedford taught me, my favorite is called a “plow stop.” To execute a plow stop, I started with both skates centered beneath my body about shoulder-width apart, and then I pushed them straight outward along the ice while keeping my knees together (make sure you squeeze the muscles on the insides of your thighs together to keep your upper legs from following your feet and resulting in an attempt at the splits or a spread-eagle landing). As the lesson progressed, I worked on techniques such as gliding on one foot, a two-footed turn, and a move called a “swizzle” that Bedford says makes you skate faster, propels you forward and is good for the leg muscles: I began with my feet together and my toes turned out, and then I pushed my legs forward and outward before pulling them back together again. As the lesson progressed, I felt increasingly balanced and more comfortable on the ice. Bedford offered a number of useful techniques and tips, and she was helpful at explaining how to perform the skills, such as which muscles I should use and when. By the end of the lesson, my speed across the ice had greatly improved and I was enjoying myself. I left feeling much more confident in my abilities and — even though I’m not going to be the next Michelle Kwan — I actually look forward to the next time I go skating. Amanda Miles can be reached at 541-383-0393 or at amiles@ bendbulletin.com.

Noteworthy: Rink is outside and uncovered, so dress for the conditions

Noteworthy: Rink is outside but roofed and also has a warming hut; dress appropriately

THE VILLAGE AT SUNRIVER

REDMOND

541-593-5948 Where: Near Sunriver Resort in Sunriver Cost: $8 ages 6 to 12, $12 ages 13 and older, children 5 and under free with accompanying adult Season: Open Sunday through Tuesday and Thursday through Saturday; season lasts through spring break, weather permitting Lessons: Available

Where: Centennial Park Cost: Free, though there will likely be a skate rental fee Season: Scheduled to open at the end of the month; hours still to be determined Noteworthy: Funding for the rink will come from urban renewal money dedicated to the area of downtown Redmond

SEATTLE — Isaiah Thomas and Justin Holiday both scored 20 points, reserve Scott Suggs hit two key 3-pointers midway through the second half, and No. 21 Washington held off a strong challenge from Portland in a 94-72 victory Monday night. For the first time this season the Huskies were challenged at home in the second half, watching Portland trim a 16-point deficit down to six with 8:25 remaining. But Suggs answered with a 3-pointer to start an 11-0 run. Suggs added another 3 after Matthew Bryan-Amaning dived to keep a loose ball alive and Bryan-Amaning punctuated the run with a fastbreak dunk. Bryan-Amaning added 15 points for Washington (6-2). Nemanja Mitrovic led Portland (7-3) with 15 points, all on 3-pointers. Luke Sikma, son of former Seattle SuperSonics star Jack Sikma, had 13 points and 16 rebounds for the Pilots. Jared Stohl, Portland’s leading scorer, finished with 12 points on 5-of-14 shooting.

Calendar Continued from D6 FUNCTIONAL FITNESS WORKOUT FOR RUNNERS: Thursdays starting at 6 p.m. at FootZone of Bend, 845 Wall St.; personal trainer Kyle Will will help participants strengthen muscle groups to help avoid common injury; $5; 541-330-0985. RUNS WITH CENTRAL OREGON RUNNING KLUB (CORK): 8 a.m. on Saturdays at Drake Park in Bend; runs of various lengths; free; runsmts@gmail.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Mondays; locations vary; group accommodates seven- to 11-minute mile pace; Jenny@ footzonebend.com. BABY BOOTCAMP: Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave; bridget. cook@babybootcamp.com.

SNOW SPORTS LEARN TO SKI DAY: Dec. 18, 1-4 p.m. (a second Learn to Ski day will be held Jan. 15); Virginia Meissner Sno-park, about 15 miles southwest of Bend; come early to register and be assigned a coach; for nordic skiing newcomers only; free, but donations for trail grooming accepted; bring own equipment or rent beforehand; sno-park parking permit required; hosted by the Tumalo Langlauf Club and the Bend Endurance Academy; info@tumalolanglauf.com. WAFFLE FEED: Dec. 26, 10 a.m.noon; Virginia Meissner Sno-park; nordic ski to Meissner Shelter for some wood stove-cooked waffles with all the toppings and hot chocolate; free, but donations for trail grooming accepted; info@tumalolanglauf.com. CRESCENT LAKE CHALLENGE: A 22-kilometer freestyle nordic ski race and citizens tour; Jan. 16, 2011, at 10 a.m.; open to all competitors, but skiers should be prepared for a course with rolling hills around the lake; $45 if registration is completed online by noon on Jan. 12; $55 day of race; prize money for top five male finishers and top five female finishers; www.crescentlakechallenge. com; 541-345-9623. COCC/BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING CLUB: Open to all COCC students with some crosscountry skiing experience who are taking at least six credits during winter term; Jan. 3 to March 20; free for COCC students; Tuesday, Thursday and Friday afternoons, and Saturday and Sunday mornings; skate and classic techniques; meeting held at Mazama Gym Classroom 101 on Bend COCC campus, 6 p.m. on Dec. 1; Brenna Warburton; 541-678-3865; brenna@ bendenduranceacademy.org. COCC BEGINNING SKATE SKI CLASS: Beginners class focused on fun and fitness; taught by experienced instructors at Mt. Bachelor on groomed nordic trails; students provide own equipment; class meets Sundays through Dec. 19 from 8:30-10 a.m.; $109 or $89 with own pass; 541-3837270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu. COCC BEGINNING SNOWSHOEING CLASS: Snowshoeing basics for beginners, including trail selection, safety, technique, etiquette, clothing and gear; classroom session Dec. 1 from 3-5 p.m.; field sessions Dec. 2, 9 and 16 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. though return times vary; $85; held rain or shine; 541-3837270; http://noncredit.cocc.edu. SKI CONDITIONING CLASS: For adults ages 55 and older; Tuesdays and Thursdays through Dec. 21 from 6:30-7:30 a.m.; Therapeutic Associates Bend

The rare Monday night game created a mellow atmosphere at normally buzzing Hec Edmundson Pavilion, but that didn’t slow down the Huskies’ scoring pace very much. Washington, the highest scoring and best 3-point shooting team in the country, hadn’t scored less than 98 points in any of its previous four home games this season — all blowouts decided early in the second half. But they were asked to respond in the closing minutes for the first time since their losses to Kentucky and Michigan State at the Maui Invitational. In other games on Monday: No. 5 Kansas State . . . . . . . . . 89 Alcorn State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 MANHATTAN, Kan. — Jacob Pullen scored 24 points, his season high against a Division I opponent, to lead Kansas State to a victory over Alcorn State. Jamar Samuels had 16 points and Curtis Kelly added 15 for the Wildcats (8-1), who had 10 players see at least 12 minutes. But Samuels and Kelly were a combined nine of 26 from the field, the Wildcats made just 23 of 40 free throws and committed 23 fouls.

Physical Therapy; 2200 N.E. Neff Road, Suite 202; 541-388-7738; therapeuticassociates.com/Bend. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC MASTERS: Technique group and training group options; for adults ages 20 and older with intermediate to advanced nordic skiing abilities; weekday and weekend options through Feb. 23; portion of proceeds will go to Meissner Nordic Community Ski Trails; enrollments vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3864. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION FREERIDE SKI AND SNOWBOARD WINTER PROGRAMS: Enrollment for ages 8 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION ALPINE FALL DRYLAND TRAINING: For ages 13 and older; through November; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC WINTER SKIING: Enrollment for ages 7 and older; at Mt. Bachelor; 541-388-0002; mbsef@mbsef. org; www.mbsef.org. MT. BACHELOR SPORTS EDUCATION FOUNDATION NORDIC FALL DRYLAND TRAINING AND CONDITIONING PROGRAM: For ages 11 through high school age; through November; 541-388-0002; mbsef@ mbsef.org; www.mbsef.org. BEND ENDURANCE ACADEMY NORDIC SKIING: Programs conducted at Virginia Meissner Snopark on Century Drive west of Bend; transportation provided from Bend; Development Team for ages 11-18; Youth Club for ages 7-11; times vary; www.bendenduranceacademy. org; 541-678-3865.

SOCCER SPRING CENTRAL OREGON SOCCER LEAGUE: For all players, boys and girls, ages 5-13; eight games in April and May; teams or groups of players from previous COSL or recreational league may stay together; $85, includes full uniform; register at oregonrush.com before Feb. 21; keith@oregonrush.com. SOCCER OPEN PLAY (ADULT): Ages 14 and older; no cleats, but shinguards required; $5; every Friday night; coed 6-8 p.m., men 8-10 p.m.; Cascade Indoor Soccer, Bend; 541-330-1183; callie@ cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www. cascadeindoorsports.com.

SWIMMING REDMOND AREA PARK AND RECREATION DISTRICT FAMILY SWIM NIGHT: 7:25 to 8:25 p.m., Tuesdays, Cascade Swim Center, Redmond; adult must accompany anyone under age 18; $10 per family, $3 per adult, $2 per child; RAPRD, 541-548-7275, www.raprd.org.

VOLLEYBALL YOUTH VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays; 4:30-6:30 p.m.; $5; www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183. ADULT VOLLEYBALL OPEN PLAY: Drop in and play; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 8:30-10:30 p.m.; $5 www.cascadeindoorsports. com; 541-330-1183.


D6 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

C  S  C Please e-mail sports event information to sports@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event� on our website at bendbulletin.com. Items are published on a space-availability basis, and should be submitted at least 10 days before the event.

BASEBALL MOUNTAIN VIEW JR. COUGAR TRYOUTS: For boys ages 8-12 who plan to attend Mountain View High School; Sunday, Dec. 19, at the Bend Fieldhouse next to Vince Genna Stadium; free; 10&U tryouts at 2:30 p.m., 12&U tryouts at 4 p.m., 14&U informational meeting at 4:15 p.m.; Wynn Malikowski; Wmali@bendbroadband.com; Nick Dean; 541-848-2277. PRIVATE LESSONS: With Ryan Jordan, a graduate of Bend High School and a former Bend Elk who played at Lane Community College and the University of La Verne; specifically for catching and hitting, but also for all positions; available after 3 p.m. on weekdays, open scheduling on weekends; at the Bend Fieldhouse or an agreed upon location; $30 per half hour or $55 per hour; discounts for multiple players in a single session, referrals or booking multiple sessions; cash only; 541-7882722; ryan.jordan@bend.k12.or.us. BEND ELKS HOLIDAY CAMP: Dec. 16-20; work on pitching, catching, hitting and defensive skills with a number of Pacific Northwest college and high school coaches; cost varies based on components chosen; for players 8-18; Bend Fieldhouse at Vince Genna Stadium; www.bendelks.com. WINTER WORKOUTS WITH DEAN STILES: Work in defense, pitching, catching, hitting, and speed and agility with Dean Stiles, former Bend Elks coach; Dec. 11-12, Jan. 8-9 and Jan. 22-23; $179; www.bendelks.com.

BASKETBALL RAPRD REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Dec. 16; for Redmond Area Park and Recreation District leagues, including men’s city league basketball (completed rosters and full payments), girls youth hoops, boys youth hoops (7th and 8th grade), and cheerleading for hoops; 541-548-7275; www.raprd.org. HAPPY FEET BASKETBALL CLASS: For children ages 3-4; built around learning new skills and participation; Wednesday, Dec. 8 from 11-11:30 a.m.; parent participation required; RAPRD Activity Center; $5; 541548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

BIKING BEND BIKE & BREW WEEKEND: Three days of mountain biking on area trails, beer, meals and accommodations in downtown Bend; eight three-day options from June through October, 2011; $575 through Dec. 31, $625 otherwise; 541-3857002; www.cogwild.com/MultiDay-Tours/Bike-Brew-Weekend. WEEKLY RIDE: Saturdays, 11 a.m.; weekly group road rides starting from Nancy P’s Baking Co., 1054 Milwaukee Ave. in Bend; Glen Bates, glenbates@ bendcable.com, 541-382-4675.

MISCELLANEOUS YOGA & MYOFASCIAL RELEASE FOR OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE: Wednesday; 3-5 p.m.; FreshAirSports Pilates, 520 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Suite 627, Bend; $50, includes BikeYoga book and myofascial release massage ball. TOP PIN ARCHERY: 2011 KickOff and Outlaw Station Shoot-up tournament; Dec. 11; begins at 2 p.m.; $10; 300 Vegas score to determine bracket must be posted prior to start of shoot-up; barbecue at 11 a.m. and elk call seminar from 12:30-1:30 p.m.; 625 Arrowleaf Trail, Suite 106 in Sisters; 541-588-6339; www.toppinarcheryproshop.com. MULTISPORT CLUB MEETING: Dec. 9, 6:15 p.m.; Sagebrush Cycles, 35 S.W. Century Drive, suite 110 in Bend; meeting for new club for athletes interested in learning more about multisport with an emphasis on nonelite athletes; 541-389-4224. ICE SKATING: Outdoor ice skating rink at Seventh Mountain Resort open to resort guests and members of the public; $7 for admission and $5 for skate rental; lessons available; 4:30-6:30 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Mondays and Tuesdays; 1:30-3:30 p.m. on Wednesdays; 2-4 p.m. and 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to noon, 12:302:30 p.m., 3-5 p.m., 5:30-7:30 p.m. and 8-10 p.m. on weekends and holidays; Vanessa; 541-693-9107; vanessab@seventhmountain.com. PROJECT HEALING WATERS: Fly fishing and fly tying program for disabled active military service personnel and veterans; meetings held the second Wednesday of each month; 6 p.m.; Orvis Company Store; 320 S.W. Powerhouse Dr., Bend; outings begin in the spring; Brad at 541-536-5799; bdemery1@aol.com. FENCING: High Desert Fencing in Bend welcomes newcomers and former fencers; Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m.; free first session; Randall at 541-3894547 or Jeff at 541-419-7087. OPEN ROLLER SKATING: For all ages and ability levels; $5 per skater (includes skate rental), children under 5 are free; Tuesdays, 12:303:30 p.m.; Wednesdays, 1-4 p.m.; Fridays, 2-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Sundays, 1-4 p.m. 541-330-1183; callie@cascadeindoorsoccer.com; www.cascadeindoorsports.com.

COWBOY ACTION SHOOTING: Pistols, rifles, shotguns; hosted by Horse Ridge Pistoleros at Central Oregon Shooting Sports Association, U.S. Highway 20 at milepost 24; on the first and third Sundays of each month at 10 a.m.; 541-9233000 or www.hrp-sass.com. BEND TABLE TENNIS CLUB: Evening play every Monday; 6-9 p.m. (setup half an hour before); beginner classes available; cost for beginner classes $96; at Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; drop-in fee, $5; Jeff at 541-480-2834; Don at 541-318-0890; Sean at 267-6146477; bendtabletennis@yahoo. com; www.bendtabletennis.com. AMERICAN POOLPLAYERS ASSOCIATION LEAGUE: Nineball play Monday and Wednesday nights; eight-ball on Thursdays; 7 p.m.; amateurs of all ability levels encouraged; Randee Lee at rlee973@comcast.net or Marshall Fox at Fox’s Billiard Lounge, 937 N.W. Newport Ave., 541-6471363; www.foxsbilliards.com. YOGA FOR ATHLETES: Wednesdays, 7-8 p.m.; Fleet Feet Sports, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave., Bend; vinyasa yoga tailored for athletes to enhance their performance; $5; 541-3891601; www.fleetfeetbend.com. PRACTICE WITH LAVA CITY ROLLER DOLLS ALL-FEMALE ROLLER DERBY TEAM: 3-5 p.m. on Sundays and 8-10 p.m. on Tuesdays; Central Oregon Indoor Sports Center, corner of Empire Avenue and High Desert Lane, Bend; $6 per session, $40 per month; deemoralizer@lavacityrollerdolls. com, 541-306-7364. RENEGADE ROLLER DERBY PRACTICES: For men and women of all skill levels; Midtown Ballroom, 51 N.W. Greenwood, Bend; 7 p.m., Sundays; first practice is free, $7 thereafter; skates available for beginners; nicholecp@ hotmail.com or 415-336-0142.; www.renegadesor.com. URBAN GPS ECO-CHALLENGE: Trips on paths and trails along Deschutes River in Bend through Old Mill District shops and Farewell Bend Park daily at 9 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; like a scavenger hunt with clues and checkpoints; $65, includes guide, GPS and instruction, water, materials; 541-389-8359, 800-9622862; www.wanderlusttours.com.

PADDLING KAYAK ROLL SESSIONS: At Juniper Swim & Fitness Center, Bend; Sundays through the end of May; indoor pool available Sundays, 4:15–6 p.m.; space is limited to 12 boats; registration is available beginning the Monday before each roll session at https://register.bendparksandrec. org; boats must be clean and paddles padded and taped to prevent damage to the pool; no instruction is provided; $8-$10 per boat. WHITE WATER RAFTING: Ages 6 and up; Thursday, Dec. 23; raft the McKenzie River rapids; guides, gear, transportation and lunch provided; $75; 541-548-7275 or www.raprd.org.

RUNNING REDMOND OREGON RUNNING KLUB: Four-to-eight-mile weekly run starting at 8 a.m.; runners of all ages and abilities welcome; follow “Redmond Oregon Running Klub� on Facebook for weekly meeting place or e-mail Dan Edwards; dedwards@bendbroadband.com. FOOTZONE WOMEN’S RUNNING GROUP: Sundays at 9 a.m.; distances and locations vary; paces between seven and 11 minutes per mile; free; no registration necessary; Jenny; 541-314-3568; jenny@footzonebend.com. GOOD FORM CLINIC: Tuesdays at 7 p.m., and Saturdays at 8:30 a.m.; learn the basics of good running form and what it can do to improve efficiency, reduce injury and make you faster; at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; limited to 12 spots, sign up at FootZone; free; 541317-3568; Teague@footzonebend. com; footzonebend.com. LEARN TO RUN WORKSHOP: First Monday of each month, 6 p.m.; instruction on how to choose the correct running gear, proper running/walking form, goal setting, and creating your own training plan; paid event; $45; FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; 541317-3568; conzaustin@gmail. com; www.footzonebend.com. STRENGTH TRAINING FOR ATHLETES: 6:30 p.m. on Mondays at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 Galveston Ave.; Cynthia Ratzman from Accelerated Fitness leads workout; $5; 541-389-1601. PERFORMANCE RUNNING GROUP: 5:30 p.m. on Tuesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; local running standout Max King leads workout; mking@reboundspl.com. FOOTZONE NOON RUNS: Noon on Wednesdays at FootZone of Bend, 845 N.W. Wall St.; run up to seven-mile loop with shorter options; free; 541-317-3568. WEEKLY RUNS: 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, at Fleet Feet Sports Bend, 1320 N.W. Galveston Ave.; three to five miles; two groups, different paces; 541-389-1601.

See Ca lendar / D5

C O M M U N I T Y S P ORT S

I B Baseball • Mountain View Jr. Cougars tryouts slated: Tryouts are being conducted later this month for boys ages 8 to 12 who plan to attend Mountain View High School and want to participate in the Mountain View Jr. Cougars baseball program. Tryouts will take place on Sunday, Dec. 19, at the Bend Fieldhouse at Vince Genna Stadium. Tryouts for the 10-and-under age group will begin at 2:30 p.m., and tryouts for the 12-and-under age group will start at 4 p.m. A meeting will also take place at 4:15 p.m. for the 14-and-under age group. The tryouts are free. For more information, e-mail Wynn Malikowski at Wmali@ bendbroadband.com or call Nick Dean at 541-848-2277.

Snow Sports • Ski patrol evaluation on tap: The Mt. Bachelor National Ski Patrol is holding its annual evaluation later this week for those interested in joining the organization. The patrol is recruiting for all disciplines: nordic patrol, alpine patrol and auxiliary patrol (indoor clinical work). The alpine patrol includes alpine skiing, snowboarding and alpine touring (AT)/telemark skiing techniques. The evaluation will be held on Saturday, Dec. 11, beginning at 9 a.m. Participants should gather at the Mt. Bachelor “sprungâ€? — the large white tent in the West Village parking lot just west of the ticket sales building.

Participants are asked to provide their own equipment and should plan to spend most of the day on the mountain. For more information, contact Rob Weiss at mt.bnsp.training@ gmail.com. • Learn to Ski day on deck: Tumalo Langlauf Club and the Bend Endurance Academy are co-hosting a Learn to Ski day next week at Virginia Meissner Sno-park, off Century Drive southwest of Bend. The event, which is for individuals new to the sport of nordic skiing, will be held on Saturday, Dec. 18, from 1 to 4 p.m. New skiers should arrive early to register and be assigned to a coach, from either the club or the academy, who will assist in teaching the basics of classic or skate skiing techniques. Participants can provide their own equipment or can rent in advance from one of the local shops; quantities may be limited. Organizers say that because of high demand at the Learn to Ski day last winter, a second Learn to Ski day will be held this winter on Jan. 15, 2011. For more information, send an e-mail to info@tumalolanglauf. com. • Crescent Lake Challenge accepting entries: Registration is open for the 2011 Crescent Lake Challenge, a freestyle nordic ski race and citizens tour held at Crescent Lake in the central Cascades. The 22-kilometer race, now in its second year, will be held on Sunday, Jan. 16, at 10 a.m.

The race is open to all, but skiers should be prepared to traverse rolling hills. The start is at the Crescent Lake Sno-park on the north side of the lake just off Crescent Lake Road. State sno-park permits are required for parking. Cost is $45 if registration is completed online by noon on Jan. 12 or $55 on the day of the race. Registration will not be accepted online after the Jan. 12 deadline. Entry fee includes a SportHill graphic race T-shirt, a hot lunch at Crescent Lake Lodge and prizes. Race volunteers will also receive lunch from the lodge. Prize money will be awarded to the top five male finishers and top five female finishers. For more information, visit www.crescentlakechallenge. com or call 541-345-9623. • Bend Endurance Academy club receives grant: The Bend Endurance Academy’s Nordic Youth Club recently was awarded a Young Skier Development Grant by the American Bierkebeiner Ski Foundation. The $500 grant is designated to assist the academy in developing youth cross-country skiers. The ABSF awarded a total of $15,000 to 20 programs throughout the country this year. The grants help in the creation or expansion of youth crosscountry ski teams; the purchase of “loanerâ€? equipment, ski hats and uniforms for participants; and scholarships for the support of young skiers. For more information about the Bend Nordic Youth Club,

visit www.bendenduranceacademy.com or call Brenna Warburton at 541-678-3865. • Free nordic ski lessons and rentals: The Central Oregon Nordic Club and Pine Mountain Sports are teaming up to offer free nordic ski lessons and rentals to Central Oregon residents. Participants will be assigned to an experienced CONC volunteer for arrangement of the date and time of the lesson. Instruction will include basic technique, such as gliding, slowing down, and stopping on a downhill. To sign up for a lesson, send an e-mail to bendskibuddy@ gmail.com.

Soccer • Deadline for youth soccer registration approaches: Registration ends later this week for the Bend Parks & Recreation District’s youth winter indoor soccer program for children in kindergarten through second grade. The deadline for registration is Friday, Dec. 10, and registration may be completed in person at the district office, 799 S.W. Columbia St., or online at www. bendparksandrec.org. Cost is $60 for district residents, $75 otherwise. Practices and games will be held on Sundays from Jan. 15 through March 5. Volunteer coaches are also still needed. For more information, contact Kevin Collier, district sports coordinator, at 541-389-7275 or at kevin@bendparksandrec.org. — Bulletin staff reports

COMMUNITY SCOREBOARD BASKETBALL CENTRAL OREGON BASKETBALL ORGANIZATION Week 1 - Dec. 5 Boys Fifth grade division Redmond 35, Madras 29 Mountain View 40, Crook County 19 Redmond 34, Tumalo 13 Summit 54, Tumalo 12 Summit 45, Madras 25 Bend 68, Crook County 16 Summit B (6th) 31, Sisters (6th) 28 Summit B (6th) 57, Redmond B (6th) 17 Sisters (6th) 38, Mountain View 36 Bend 41, Redmond B (6th) 24 Sixth grade division Redmond 37, Crook County 27 Summit 53, Redmond 13 Summit 75, Madras 15 Bend 51, Mountain View 49 Crook County 31, Madras 10

Bend 29, Redmond B (7th) 26 Bend B (7th) 40, Redmond B (7th) 18 Bend B (7th) 34, Mountain View 27 Seventh grade division Mountain View 47, Madras 20 Mountain View 56, Summit 37 Bend Parks & Recreation District Adult Basketball League Week 4 Standings and Results (Wins-Losses) Men’s A Division Standings: 1. Furnish, 3-0. 2. Riverside Market, 3-1. 3. COCC Bobcats, 2-1. 3. Olson Heating, 2-1. 5. Hustlaz, 2-2. 6. Country Catering, 0-3. 7. Team Sizzle, 0-4. Results: COCC Bobcats 82, Team Sizzle 51. Furnish 78, Riverside Market 61. Olson Heating 85, Hustlaz 79. Men’s B Division Standings: 1. Cojs Knightryderz, 4-0. 1. Uniballers, 4-0. 3. Antioch, 3-1. 3. Bend Basketball Club, 3-1. 3. Court Vision, 3-1. 6. Tailblazers, 1-2. 7. John Holpuch Dentistry, 1-3. 7. The Ballers, 1-3. 9. Bri, 0-3. 9. Eye of the Chicken, 0-3. 9. Smokin’ Aces, 0-3. Results: Bend Basketball Club 79, Eye of the Chicken 75. Uniballers 72, Smokin’ Aces 63. Antioch 71, The Ballers 60.

Tailblazers 80, John Holpuch Dentistry 45. Cojs Knightryderz 96, Court Vision 43. Men’s Over 35 Division Standings: 1. Athletic Club of Bend, 3-1. 1. Southwest Hoodies, 3-1. 1. Swish, 3-1. 4. Widgi Creek, 2-2. 4. You Know My Name, 2-2. 6. Cabinet Cures, 1-3. 6. N the Zone, 1-3. 6. Newman Brothers, 1-3. Results: Southwest Hoodies 100, Newman Brothers 80. Cabinet Cures 69, Swish 64. You Know My Name 66, Widgi Creek 65. Athletic Club of Bend 86, N The Zone 58. Women’s Division Standings: 1. Cedar Creek Landscaping, 3-1. 2. Kozak Company Realtors, 2-2. 2. Redmond, 2-2. 4. Warm Springs, 1-3. Results: Kozak Company Realtors 66, Redmond 53. Cedar Creek Landscaping forfeit win over Warm Springs.

BOWLING LEAGUE STANDINGS AND HIGH SCORES Lava Lanes, Bend Nov. 23-28 Casino Fun — All in The Family; Josiah Ohlde, 243/616; Krystal

Highsmith, 192/540. Win, Lose or Draw — Damn Splits; Dennis Patterson, 176/498; JoAnne Merris, 162/479. His and Hers — Bound to Get One; Travis Holmes, 256/722; Patti Sundita, 212/605. Greased Lightning — Strikers; Bret Borovec, 231/651; Amy Mombert, 201/486. Jack and Jill — Bend Cyclery; Kawika Warren, 254/670; Sue Jones, 212/528. Guys and Gals — Holiday Early Risers — Holiday Rejects — Holiday Lava Lanes Classic — Go Duck’s; Dieryel Wade, 285/741; Bonni Reeves, 190/504. Wednesday Inc. — @ Your Site Storage; Bret Borovec, 300/758; Jeff Kaser, 268/765. Tea Timers — Holiday Afternoon Delight — Holiday Latecomers — Holiday Progressive — Holiday Free Breathers — Holiday T.G.I.F. — Holiday Adult/Junior Bowlopolis — Holiday


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FACES AND PLACES OF THE HIGH DESERT ‘Wishful Drinking’

Inside

Carrie Fisher turns memoir into one-woman show, Page E2

COMMUNITY LIFE

E

• Television • Comics • Calendar • LAT crossword • Sudoku • Horoscope

www.bendbulletin.com/communitylife

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010

PETS

Paws for a cause Ornament fundraiser for Spay and Neuter Project By Linda Weiford For The Bulletin

One ornament says “Whiskers.” Another says “Winnie.” Though animal lovers bought them to hang on their Christmas trees, they are more than decorations. They are ornaments with a cause. Bend Pet Express started selling them three years ago during the holiday season as a fundraiser for the Bend Spay and Neuter Project, or SNIP. Each time one of the personalized crystal ornaments is sold, the store donates all proceeds to the nonprofit agency, said store co-owner and manager Lorna Hickerson. “The Spay and Neuter Project helps dogs and cats in a big way, particularly now with the economy the way it is,” said Hickerson. “The people who work there put in a lot of their own time to do it. It’s a fantastic human resource, and it’s our way of supporting their effort.” See Ornaments / E6

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Lynda Beauchamp, from left, Summer Baird, Amy Anderson and Renee Owens show off pieces of clothing made form garbage Dec. 3 in downtown Bend while promoting the Rubbish Renewed Eco-Fashion Show.

HAUTETRASH REALMS school puts environmental awareness on the runway By Penny Nakamura

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Samples of the personalized crystal ornaments Bend Pet Express is selling for the nonprofit Bend Spay and Neuter Project.

YOUR PETS

For The Bulletin

Bringing peace in Prineville

P

eople on Wall Street may have thought Lady Gaga dropped into Bend during Friday’s Art Walk, but it was really local ecological fashion designer Renee Owen, who wore a daring garment made completely of discarded bubble wrap and packing paper. Like a pro, Owen waved to gawkers and signed autographs as the crowd got its first glimpse of haute couture, garbage style. Not to be outdone, math teacher Lynda Beauchamp, from Rimrock Expeditionary Alternative Learning Middle School, donned a bustier made of bottle caps and a skirt stitched with old magazines. She was joined by REALMS teaching intern Summer Baird, sporting a bold tank top and miniskirt ensemble made solely of recycled newspaper and tire bags. Rounding out the models was REALMS administrative coordinator Amy Anderson, who flashed bare shoulders with her recycled pillowcase evening dress. With the grace and style of seasoned runway models, they sauntered the chilly streets of downtown Bend wearing only garbage. While the project launch definitely wasn’t from the house of

SPOTLIGHT

Say hello to Frank. The 9-year-old cat was adopted from the Humane Society by Bob and Teresa Coates, of Prineville, when he was only 6 weeks old. They call him Buddha Cat because he spends a great deal of time relaxing in this Buddha pose. Submitted photo Frank is very lovable and keeps his owners laughing. To submit a photo for publication, e-mail a high-resolution image along with your animal’s name, age and species or breed, your name, age, city of residence and contact information, and a few words about what makes your pet special. Send photos to pets@bendbulletin.com, drop them off at 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. in Bend, or mail them to The Bulletin Pets section, P.O. Box 6020, Bend, OR 97708. Contact: 541-383-0358.

A small crowd gathered to take a closer look at several fashion garment entries made from trash that were on display at tbd loft in downtown Bend on Dec. 3. The garments will be a part of the Rubbish Renewed Eco-Fashion Show on Thursday. Coco Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld or Christian Dior, these transformative clothes came from the studios of local artists and students who wanted to send a clear message: reduce, reuse, recycle. See Fashion / E6

If you go Wh a t: Rubbish Renewed Eco-Fashion Show When: Thursday • 5 p.m. doors, 6 p.m. all ages show • 8 p.m., adults 21 and older only

Dutch Bros. sales on Friday to help Boys & Girls Clubs

plete list of locations, visit www.dutchbros. com.

Dutch Bros. Coffee of Central Oregon will donate proceeds from beverage sales Friday to benefit the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Oregon. The event is called Buck for Kids Day. Last year, the company raised nearly $68,000 for kids’ organizations during the event. Seven locally owned stores in Bend and Redmond will be participating. For a com-

Organist to host Christmas concerts in Bend, Redmond Organist Mark Oglesby will lead two free performances of a combination organ concert and Christmas carol sing-a-long, a program he describes as a “collaborative musical journey through Advent, Christmas and Epiphany using keyboards, pipes and

Where: Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend Co st: $10 per ticket Contact: http://realmschool.org

voices,” according to a press release. The first concert will take place Friday at 7 p.m. at St. Francis Catholic Church, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend (541-382-3631). The second performance will be held Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. at Community Presbyterian Church, 529 N.W. 19th St., Redmond (541-548-3367). Everyone is invited, particularly those who enjoy singing old-fashioned carols in a group setting. Donations will be accepted. — From staff reports

ADOPT ME Great warrior kitty This is Hercules, a big Siamese mix whose name fits him perfectly. He is easygoing around people, most cats and friendly dogs. His owner had to give him up because of a housing situation, and he would love to have a family again. If you Submitted photo would like to visit Hercules, or any other pet available for adoption through the Cat Rescue, Adoption and Foster Team, contact the organization at 541-389-8420 or info@craftcats.org, or visit www.craftcats.org.


T EL EV ISION

E2 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Writers say friend whose hand was hurt deserves recompense Dear Abby: “Hand-ed a Challenge” (Oct. 28) was visiting her friend “Rosemary” when one of “Hand-ed’s” sons accidentally slammed a car door on Rosemary’s hand, breaking two fingers. Rosemary, a massage therapist, asked to be reimbursed for lost wages because of the mishap — and you agreed. Abby, I find Rosemary’s request absurd. Kids play. Accidents happen, and people think they deserve cash for it. Sending the boy to help Rosemary with chores would have been a given, but not after she demanded money. “Hand-ed” should tell her “friend” that asking for money to save a friendship is extortion. I cannot imagine one single friend of mine who would not accept the injury with a certain amount of grace. “Hand-ed” needs to find more laid-back friends. — Windy in Massachusetts Dear Windy: Thank you for offering a different perspective. While I received varied responses from readers, most agreed with me that “Hand-ed” is responsible for the damage her sons had caused. Read on: Dear Abby: Your advice to “Hand-ed” was on target. As a teacher for many years, I know the difference between what is ordinary mischief and what is a more serious matter. Anyone old enough to think of hiding behind a car door and opening it from the outside is old enough to know better. As long as his parents fail to recognize this, continue to make excuses for him and allow him to avoid the consequences of his behavior, he’ll continue to misbehave and will not be welcome in anyone’s home. — Anne in Texas Dear Abby: If “Hand-ed” and her husband have homeowner’s or renter’s insurance, their child is insured under the policy. “Hand-ed” should inform her insurance company of the accident and ask the company to pay for

D E AR ABBY these damages. Having the carrier indemnify the insured for this type of unforeseen accident is the reason for paying an insurance premium. — An Attorney in Rutland, Vt. Dear Abby: As parents, we are responsible not only for our own actions, but also the actions of our children, who are rarely wise enough to predict the outcome of their poor judgments. A true friend would have made certain all aspects of the results stemming from the “unfortunate accident” were completely covered before ending the visit. This would include assisting with errands or household chores, monetary reimbursement for medical charges incurred and lost wages, so the injured person would not lose sleep over the pain or worry about how to approach requesting assistance. — Judy in Coal Valley, Ill. Dear Abby: I empathize with “Hand-ed” when she said “accidents happen,” but to say the accident could have happened whether her boys were there or not is a cop-out. I taught my sons to be mindful of other people’s property. The fact that they got so close to Rosemary’s car as to open the door shows a lack of respect for her property. I had a friend who was a massage therapist. Her hands were her livelihood. Not only does Rosemary have to wait for her fingers to heal, it will take time for her fingers to regain all their strength. I hope “Hand-ed” sees the error of her ways and will try to make amends with her friend. — Ruth in California Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at www.DearAbby .com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

541.383.3668 Bend | Redmond | Prineville

By Luaine Lee

Carrie Fisher, right, shown with her mother, Debbie Reynolds, stars in a one-woman show, “Wishful Drinking,” based on her memoir. “I think I have a way with words, and I enjoy it and I always have, but I can’t really take credit for it, in a way,” said Fisher.

McClatchy-Tribune News Service

BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — Many people resolutely chase fame. Writer-performer Carrie Fisher spent her life eluding it. “My whole thing was I didn’t GO into show business. The bigger trick would’ve been to stay out of it. I was IN and I wanted out, but there were no other options. “Talk about a high-class problem. But it’s all I was ever exposed to,” she said, her bare feet curled under her as she perches on a leather couch in a hotel room here. Fisher, known for her iconic role as Princess Leia of the “Star Wars” films, is the daughter of actress Debbie Reynolds and crooner Eddie Fisher. It was a life she was born into, but to which she never belonged. “It made me always feel like an outsider. You think of show business like this elite, little club. Now I’m an outsider on the inside. Why am I in here? I didn’t do anything. I didn’t have a gift that put me in this situation that earned me these privileges. I just am a by-product of people with gifts,” she said. “I knew I didn’t look like my mom. The whole thing didn’t make sense to me. It was like we were play-acting or something because my mother and my father both had been very poor. We lived in this really nice house and there was a butler in a coat and it was like William Powell’s idea of wealth and how to be. You’re going to be this idea of a way that celebrities would act. And my mother was taught that way. She speaks that way. She dresses just so. And I just knew I couldn’t do it. I felt clumsy beside her and dark and way too introspective for the whole business. I never have fit in the commu-

HBO via McClatchy-Tribune News Service

nity. I still don’t. I never will.” Fisher, 54, was 11 when her mother plopped her on Reynolds’ TV special. She was 13 when her mother made her part of her nightclub act. “And I dropped out of school, and that’s what I did. I did it because it was what my family did — like other people go on a picnic, we go to Vegas. I did one movie as a goof. It was one day on ‘Shampoo.’ My mother made me go to drama college in England, which I’m glad about, ’cause that was a fun thing to do even though acting has never been a passion of mine. I’m not that good at it. I’m OK. I’m one of those people that my personality comes through and I’m very relaxed about my personality.” Where she really excels is writing. She’s written several books, including “Postcards

When: 9 p.m. Sunday Where: HBO

from the Edge” and her memoir, “Wishful Drinking,” which is the basis of her one-woman show that premieres Sunday on HBO. She’s also known as a coveted script doctor who rejuvenates moribund scripts with her edgy wit and keen intelligence. “I think I have a way with words, and I enjoy it, and I always have, but I can’t really take credit for it, in a way,” she said. “It’s not like I studied and became articulate, but I always was a very voracious reader, and from an early age, writing was like therapy for me. There was

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‘Wishful Drinking’

a percussive, particularly with alliteration; it was very soothing for me. “Reading was my first drug and writing almost became an extension to that because I would read it and it would put all the words of the book inside me. Then it would come out another way, organized by me. When I would read books I would underline lines I thought were great or words I didn’t know. I’m an autodidact.” Though she never really rebelled against her parents, she defied herself. She became addicted to painkillers, suffered from bipolar disease and spent time in a mental institution. She discovered the father of her daughter was gay, and he left her for a man. Her best friend, a high-stakes international campaign negotiator, died in her bed from sleep apnea and an overdose. She’s learned from these experiences, she said. “What it does, it’s like, OK, once you can clear it — which takes a while — you’re stronger from having endured all this stuff. The one thing I do know now, I can do anything.” She can do anything but be famous. “Why people want (fame) is they confuse this with approval and acceptance. But what it is, is attention. It is kind of mass approval, but you personalize that somehow. “I did not want to be an actress because I knew the moment I became a celebrity, inadvertently that it was an end. So all I did, once I became famous, I just watched my watch, watched the clock. I knew. So I couldn’t really full-on enjoy it because I had no illusions about it. And it’s a world of illusions.”

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Carrie Fisher considers herself a writer first

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541.382.5882 www.partnersbend.org

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Å Raw Nature ’ ‘14’ Å Weird, True Weird, True River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ River Monsters: Unhooked ’ ‘PG’ 68 50 12 38 Raw Nature ’ ‘14’ Å The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ Inside the Actors Studio (N) Å The Millionaire Matchmaker (N) ‘14’ Real Housewives/Beverly The Millionaire Matchmaker ’ ‘14’ 137 44 Cribs ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ The Dukes of Hazzard ’ CMT Artists of the Year 2010 ’ ‘PG’ Larry the Cable Guy-Christmas Extravaganza 190 32 42 53 (4:00) ››› “Pure Country” (1992) George Strait. ’ Biography on CNBC Marijuana: America’s Pot Industry Mad Money Coca-Cola: The Real Story Biography on CNBC Wealth-Risk Paid Program 51 36 40 52 Coca-Cola: The Real Story Larry King Live Singer Susan Boyle. Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å Larry King Live Singer Susan Boyle. 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(Live) Å NFL Live (N) NBA Tonight 2010 Poker 2010 World Series of Poker Å 22 24 21 24 College Basketball Boxing From July 28, 1996. (N) Boxing: 2001 Augustus vs. Ward Boxing: Cobb vs. Shavers Can’t Blame Rodeo Wrangler National Finals, Sixth Round From Las Vegas. Å 23 25 123 25 College Football SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter SportsCenter Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express Highlight Express 24 63 124 Winnie Pooh Winnie the Pooh Xmas Carol Crnb Christmas Frosty’s ›› “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York” (1992, Comedy) Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci. Å The 700 Club ‘PG’ Å 67 29 19 41 Gilmore Girls ’ ‘PG’ Å Hannity (N) On the Record, Greta Van Susteren The O’Reilly Factor Hannity On the Record, Greta Van Susteren Glenn Beck 54 61 36 50 The O’Reilly Factor (N) Å Down Home Home Cooking 30-Minute Meals Good Eats Unwrapped Challenge Edible decorations. 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Å How I Met How I Met 138 39 20 31 Unsolved Mysteries ‘14’ Å The Rachel Maddow Show (N) The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann The Rachel Maddow Show The Last Word Countdown With Keith Olbermann 56 59 128 51 Countdown With Keith Olbermann That ’70s Show That ’70s Show That ’70s Show True Life I Can’t Have Sex ’ 16 and Pregnant Air Force. ’ ‘14’ 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant (N) ’ ‘14’ Å 16 and Pregnant ’ ‘14’ Å 192 22 38 57 The Seven SpongeBob Big Time Rush ’ ‘G’ Å iCarly iKiss ‘G’ SpongeBob My Wife and Kids My Wife and Kids Hates Chris Hates Chris George Lopez ’ George Lopez ’ The Nanny ‘PG’ The Nanny ‘PG’ 82 46 24 40 SpongeBob Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Ways to Die Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Auction Hunters Jail ’ ‘14’ Å Jail ’ ‘14’ Å 132 31 34 46 Ways to Die ›› “National Treasure” (2004) Nicolas Cage. A man tries to steal the Declaration of Independence. 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Å 178 34 32 34 The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple The Little Couple Law & Order Thrill ’ ‘PG’ Bones The Killer in the Concrete ‘14’ Bones Spaceman in a Crater ’ ‘14’ › “10,000 B.C.” (2008, Adventure) Steven Strait, Camilla Belle. Å Southland U-Boat ’ ‘14’ Å 17 26 15 27 Law & Order Red Ball ’ ‘14’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Johnny Test ‘Y7’ Total Drama Adventure Time ›› “Underdog” (2007, Adventure) Voices of Jason Lee, Jim Belushi. Tower Prep Field Trip (N) ‘PG’ King of the Hill King of the Hill Family Guy ‘PG’ Family Guy ‘14’ 84 Bizarre Foods/Zimmern Man v. Food ‘G’ Man v. Food ‘G’ Mysteries at the Museum ‘G’ Å Mysteries at the Museum (N) ‘G’ Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å Ghost Adventures ‘PG’ Å 179 51 45 42 Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations All in the Family All in the Family Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Sanford & Son Love-Raymond Love-Raymond (10:12) Everybody Loves Raymond Love-Raymond (11:19) Roseanne 65 47 29 35 Good Times ‘PG’ The Jeffersons Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Psych Dual Spires ‘PG’ Å 15 30 23 30 Law & Order: Special Victims Unit Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å Don’t Forget Don’t Forget VH1 Divas: Salute the Troops ’ Brandy & Ray J ››› “Freedom Writers” (2007) Hilary Swank. ’ 191 48 37 54 Saturday Night Live ’ ‘14’ Å PREMIUM CABLE CHANNELS

(4:30) ›› “The Juror” 1996 Demi Moore. ’ ‘R’ Å ›› “G-Force” 2009, Action Bill Nighy. ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Maid in Manhattan” 2002 Jennifer Lopez. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å (9:50) ››› “About Last Night...” 1986 Rob Lowe. ‘R’ Casualties-War ›› “Paradise Road” 1997, Drama Glenn Close, Pauline Collins. ‘R’ Å ›› “Hitler’s SS: Portrait in Evil” 1985, Drama John Shea, Bill Nighy. ›››› “Patton” 1970, Biography George C. Scott. Gen. George S. Patton fights World War II. ‘PG’ Å Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo Danny & Dingo The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Stnd. Snowboard Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Danny & Dingo Stnd. Snowboard Insane Cinema The Daily Habit Big Break Dominican Republic Bobby Jones’ Year to Remember Haney Project Haney Project 12 Nights Golf Central Bobby Jones’ Year to Remember Haney Project Haney Project GolfNow The Golf Fix Little House on the Prairie ‘G’ Å “Our First Christmas” (2008) John Ratzenberger, Julie Warner. ‘PG’ Å “Fallen Angel” (2003, Drama) Gary Sinise, Joely Richardson. ‘PG’ Å ››› “Off Season” (2001) Sherilyn Fenn, Hume Cronyn. ‘PG’ Å (4:15) › “Street Fighter: The Legend of › “All About Steve” 2009 Sandra Bullock. A smitten woman fol- (7:45) Inside Game In Treatment ’ In Treatment ’ In Treatment (N) ’ In Treatment (N) ’ Wartorn 1861-2010 ’ ‘14’ Å Preview to 24/7 Boardwalk Empire HBO 425 501 425 10 Chun-Li” 2009 Kristin Kreuk. lows a news cameraman around the country. of Thrones ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å ‘MA’ Å Penguins ‘MA’ Å (4:45) ››› “Heathers” 1989, Comedy Winona Ryder. ‘R’ Arrested Dev. Todd Margaret Todd Margaret ›› “Lord of War” 2005 Nicolas Cage. A relentless Interpol agent tracks an arms dealer. ‘R’ ››› “Heathers” 1989 ‘R’ IFC 105 105 (4:45) › “Half Baked” 1998, Comedy (6:10) ›› “Species” 1995, Science Fiction Ben Kingsley, Michael Madsen. A geneti- ››› “WarGames” 1983, Suspense Matthew Broderick, Dabney Coleman. A teenage ›› “Jennifer’s Body” 2009, Horror Megan Fox, Amanda Sey- (11:45) Lingerie ’ MAX 400 508 7 Dave Chappelle. ’ ‘R’ Å cally engineered creature may destroy mankind. ’ ‘R’ Å computer whiz nearly begins World War III. ’ ‘PG’ Å fried, Johnny Simmons. ’ ‘R’ Å ‘MA’ Å Eyewitness Crime Stories (N) ‘PG’ Nazi Scrapbooks From Hell ‘14’ Explorer ‘14’ Eyewitness Crime Stories ‘PG’ Nazi Scrapbooks From Hell ‘14’ Explorer ‘14’ Who Really Killed Jesus? ‘PG’ NGC 157 157 Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Zevo-3 ‘Y7’ Å Avatar-Last Air Avatar-Last Air The Troop ’ ‘G’ Invader ZIM ‘Y7’ Invader Zim ‘Y7’ Rocko’s Life NTOON 89 115 189 Inside Outdoors Ted Nugent Hunting, Country Truth Hunting Wildlife Dream Season Hunting TV Elk Chronicles Truth Hunting Wildlife Bow Madness Steve’s Outdoor Wild Outdoors Lethal Cody OUTD 37 307 43 › “Punisher: War Zone” 2008, Action Ray (4:45) “Prom Wars” 2008, Comedy Ricky (6:15) ›› “New York, I Love You” 2009, Drama Shia LaBeouf, Blake Lively. iTV. Sev- ›› “Valkyrie” 2008, Historical Drama Tom Cruise, Kenneth Branagh. iTV. Col. Claus Dexter Hop a Freighter Dexter must do SHO 500 500 Ullman. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Å eral love stories take place throughout the city. ’ ‘R’ Å von Stauffenberg attempts to assassinate Hitler. ’ ‘PG-13’ Å damage control. ’ ‘MA’ Å Stevenson. iTV. ’ ‘R’ Monster Jam Monster Jam Hollywood’s Hottest Car Chases Monster Jam Monster Jam Hollywood’s Hottest Car Chases Auto Racing Auto Racing SPEED 35 303 125 (3:50) Pandorum (5:40) › “Did You Hear About the Morgans?” 2009 Hugh Grant. ‘PG-13’ (7:25) ›› “Planet 51” 2009, Comedy ’ ‘PG’ Å ›› “Brooklyn’s Finest” 2009, Crime Drama Richard Gere. ’ ‘R’ Å (11:15) › “Pandorum” 2009 ’ ‘R’ STARZ 300 408 300 (4:35) ›› “Ira and Abby” 2006 Chris Messina. An indecisive › “I Hate Valentine’s Day” 2009 Nia Vardalos. A florist and a “Nobel Son” 2007, Suspense Alan Rickman, Bryan Greenberg, Shawn Hatosy. A ›› “Tennessee” 2008 Adam Rothenberg. Two brothers go in “Zack and Miri Make TMC 525 525 neurotic and a free spirit meet and marry. ‘R’ restaurateur try dating without commitment. prize-winning scientist’s son is kidnapped. ’ ‘R’ search of their estranged father. ‘R’ Å a Porno” (4:30) NHL Hockey Buffalo Sabres at Boston Bruins (Live) Hockey Central The T.Ocho Show NHL Overtime WEC WrekCage ‘14’ Å Sports Soup The T.Ocho Show NHL Overtime VS. 27 58 30 Bridezillas Where Are They Now? Bridezillas Karen & Ladrienna ‘14’ Bridezillas Karen & Natasha ‘14’ Bridezillas ‘14’ Å Jilted? (N) ‘PG’ Jilted? (N) ‘PG’ Ghost Whisperer The Gathering ‘PG’ Amazing Wedding Cakes ‘PG’ Å WE 143 41 174 ENCR 106 401 306 FMC 104 204 104 FUEL 34 GOLF 28 301 27 HALL 66 33 18 33


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 E3

CALENDAR TODAY COUNTRY CHRISTMAS: Featuring hayrides, children’s play area, a petting zoo and more; daily through Dec. 23; $3 hayrides, $3.50 play area; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1432 or www.ddranch.net. TOTALLY AWESOME ’80S HOLIDAY PARTY: Dress up in ’80s fashions, with music, dancing, food, a costume contest and more; registration recommended; proceeds benefit the Serendipity West Foundation; $30; 6-9 p.m.; Deschutes Brewery Mountain Room, 901 S.W. Simpson Ave., Bend; 541-350-8201. GREEN TEAM MOVIE NIGHT: Featuring a screening of “Blue Gold: World Water Wars,” an award-winning film about the world water crisis and the privatization of water; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; First Presbyterian Church, 230 N.E. Ninth St., Bend; 541-815-6504.

WEDNESDAY COUNTRY CHRISTMAS: Featuring hayrides, children’s play area, a petting zoo and more; daily through Dec. 23; $3 hayrides, $3.50 play area; 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; DD Ranch, 3836 N.E. Smith Rock Way, Terrebonne; 541-548-1432 or www.ddranch.net. HANUKKAH ACTIVITY TIME: Books, songs and crafts to celebrate Hanukkah; for ages 3-6; 4 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-633-7991. MOVIE NIGHT AND POTLUCK: A screening of “Food Fight,” with a dessert potluck; free; 6:30-8 p.m.; Grandview Hall, Central Oregon Community College, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-504-4040 or slowfoodhighdesert@gmail.com. BELA FLECK & THE FLECKTONES: The bluegrass-jazz fusion act performs a holiday concert, with Alash; proceeds benefit KPOV; $33$47, with fees in advance; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Mountain View High School, 2755 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-322-0863 or www.kpov.org. SURGERY AND RECOVERY PRESENTATION: Hear about Adam Craig’s ACL surgery and rehabilitation, with Q&A with elite cycling racers; proceeds benefit NeighborImpact; $5 or three cans of food; 7 p.m.; Rebound Physical Therapy, 155 S.W. Century Drive , Bend; 541-585-2540. YAMN: The trance-fusion band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org.

THURSDAY RUBBISH RENEWED ECO FASHION SHOW: Sustainable fashion show fusing environmental responsibility and funky fashion; proceeds benefit REALMS Charter School’s arts program; $10; 5 p.m. doors, 6 p.m. all ages, 8 p.m. ages 21 and older; Century Center, 70 S.W. Century Drive, Bend; www.realmschool.org. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. SPOKE-N-WORD: Storytelling forum as part of the Cross Culture arts festival celebrating bikes and

art in Bend; free; 8:30 p.m.; portello winecafe, 2754 N.W. Crossing Drive, Bend; 541-647-2233.

FRIDAY BICYCLE ART WALK: An art walk featuring businesses displaying bike-themed art; 5-9 p.m.; downtown Bend; www.visitbend.com. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboard mysteries.com. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; SOLD OUT; 7 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. GOSPEL CHOIR OF THE CASCADES: The community choir performs a Christmas concert, with The Granneys; $5-$10 suggested donation; 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-390-2441 or www .bendgospel.webs.com. HIGH DESERT CHORALE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Concert features the choir performing traditional, classical and gospel selections; free; 7 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-1037 or www.sisterschorale.com. HOLIDAY MAGIC CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Cascade Chorale performs under the direction of James Knox with soloist Lindy Gravelle; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living; $15; 7 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-3888103 or www.coril.org. HOLIDAY ORGAN CONCERT: Musician Mark Oglesby plays a holiday concert and Christmas carol singalong; donations accepted; 7 p.m.; St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church & School, 2450 N.E. 27th St., Bend; 541-382-3631. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org. “TETRO”: A screening of the 2009 R-rated movie directed by Francis Ford Coppola; free; 7:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St., Madras; 541-475-3351.

SATURDAY “THE METROPOLITAN OPERA, DON CARLO”: Starring Roberto Alagna, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova, Simon Keenlyside and Ferruccio Furlanetto in a presentation of Verdi’s masterpiece; opera performance transmitted live in high definition; $24, $22 seniors, $18 children; 9:30 a.m.; Regal Old Mill Stadium 16, 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; 541-382-6347. NORTHWEST CROSSING HOLIDAY PARTY: Featuring holiday cookie decorating, crafts for kids and a visit from Santa; $5; 10 a.m.-2 p.m.; NorthWest Crossing, Mt. Washington and Northwest Crossing drives, Bend; www.northwestcrossing.com. TEDDY BEAR TEA: Mrs. Claus leads a story time accompanied by holiday tea party; each child receives a teddy bear; proceeds benefit Camp Sunrise; $8.50, $12.50 children; 10 a.m. and noon; Juniper Golf Course, 1938 S.W. Elkhorn Ave., Redmond; 541-548-7483. PET PHOTOS WITH SANTA: Take a photo of Santa Claus with your pet; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Redmond; free with donation to the Humane Society; 11 a.m.-3 p.m.;

Please e-mail event information to communitylife@bendbulletin.com or click on “Submit an Event” on our website at bendbulletin.com. Allow at least 10 days before the desired date of publication. Ongoing listings must be updated monthly. Contact: 541-383-0351.

Humane Society of Redmond Thrift & Gifts, 1776 S. Highway 97; 541-923-8558. MOTORCYCLISTS OF CENTRAL OREGON TOY RUN: Toy drive featuring kid games, arm wrestling competition, raffles and a holiday motorcycle ride through Bend; proceeds to benefit Bend Elks and Central Oregon charities; donations of money and toys accepted; noon-4 p.m.; Cascade Harley-Davidson of Bend, 63028 Sherman Road; 541-280-0478. RING NOEL: Ring in the season with handbell choir the Bells of Sunriver, as they play familiar holiday tunes; free; noon; Sunriver Area Public Library, 56855 Venture Lane; 541-312-1080. “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. RING NOEL: Ring in the season with handbell choir the Bells of Sunriver, as they play familiar holiday tunes; free; 3 p.m.; Bend Public Library, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1037. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 6:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. BEND COMMUNITY CONTRADANCE: Featuring caller Ron Bell-Roemer and music by the High Country Dance Band; $7; 7 p.m. beginner’s workshop, 7:30 p.m. dance; Boys & Girls Club of Bend, 500 N.W. Wall St.; 541-330-8943. WEBCYCLERY MOVIE NIGHT: “Where Are You Go” showcases the Tour d’Afrique, the world’s longest bicycle race; proceeds benefit the Central Oregon Trail Alliance; $10; 7 p.m., doors open 6 p.m.; Tower Theatre, 835 N.W. Wall St., Bend; 541-318-6188. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www.cascadestheatrical.org. MISTY RIVER: The Portland-based acoustic Americana band performs a holiday concert, with Quincy Street; $16 plus fees in advance, $20 day of show; 7:30 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Old Stone Church, 157 N.W. Franklin Ave., Bend; 541-344-7433 or www .bendticket.com. CROSS NATS BLOWOUT BASH: Celebration benefits Bend’s Community BikeShed; $5; 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; Deschutes Brewery’s lower warehouse, 399 S.W. Shevlin Hixon Drive, Bend; 541-385-8606 or www .deschutesbrewery.com.

SUNDAY “A BEND CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION”: Music, storytelling and carols with Michael John; $10, $5 ages 12 and younger, $25 families; 2 p.m.; Bend Performing Arts Center, 1155 S.W. Division St.; 541-504-6721 or http://bendpac.org. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 2 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www. cascadestheatrical.org. MISTY RIVER: The Portland-based acoustic Americana band performs a holiday concert; a portion of proceeds benefits the library; $15 or $12 for two or more in advance, $20 at the door; 2 p.m., doors open 1:30 p.m.; Jefferson County Library, Rodriguez Annex, 134 S.E. E St.,

Madras; 541-475-6397 or www .mistyriverband.com. SECOND SUNDAY: Alan Contreras discusses his lifetime of birding and reads a selection from his book; free; 2 p.m.; Bend Public Library, Brooks Room, 601 N.W. Wall St.; 541-312-1034. HIGH DESERT CHORALE HOLIDAY CONCERT: Concert features the choir performing traditional, classical and gospel selections; free; 2:30 p.m.; Sisters Community Church, 1300 W. McKenzie Highway; 541-549-1037 or www.sisterschorale.com. HOLIDAY MAGIC CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Cascade Chorale performs under the direction of James Knox with soloist Lindy Gravelle; proceeds benefit Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living; $15; 3 p.m.; Summit High School, 2855 N.W. Clearwater Drive, Bend; 541-3888103 or www.coril.org. “MURDER ON THE MENU”: Buckboard Mysteries presents an interactive murder mystery dinner theater event; $49, $45 seniors, $39 ages 2-12; 3:30 p.m.; Cascade Village Shopping Center, 63455 N. U.S. Highway 97, Bend; 541-350-0018 or www.buckboardmysteries.com. HIMALAYAN HOLIDAY: Featuring Nepali food, beverages, live music, Nepali gifts and more; proceeds benefit Ten Friends’ Himalayan Education Center; free admission; 4-8 p.m.; Aspen Hall, 18920 N.W. Shevlin Park Road, Bend; 541-4803114 or www.tenfriends.org. “LIGHT UP A LIFE”: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; free; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; Redmond-Sisters Hospice, 732 S.W. 23rd St.; 541-5487483 or brvhospice@ bendbroadband.com. HOW THE GROUCH STOLE CHRISTMAS TOUR: Hip-hop show featuring Brother Ali with DJ Snuggles, The Grouch with DJ Fresh, Eligh and Los Rakas; $20 plus fees in advance, $23 at the door; 8 p.m., doors open 7 p.m.; Domino Room, 51 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-788-2989 or www.randompresents.com.

MONDAY JAZZ CONCERT: The Central Oregon Community College Big Band Jazz performs a holiday concert under the direction of Andy Warr; $10, $8 students and seniors; 7:30 p.m.; Central Oregon Community College, Pinckney Center for the Arts, 2600 N.W. College Way, Bend; 541-383-7260.

WEDNESDAY Dec. 15 THE NORTHSTAR SESSION: The California-based roots-rock band performs; free; 7 p.m.; McMenamins Old St. Francis School, 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend; 541-382-5174 or www.mcmenamins.com. “MOON OVER BUFFALO”: Cascades Theatrical Company presents Ken Ludwig’s comedy about two fading stars hoping to stage a comeback; $20, $15 seniors, $12 students; 7:30 p.m.; Greenwood Playhouse, 148 N.W. Greenwood Ave., Bend; 541-389-0803 or www .cascadestheatrical.org.

THURSDAY

REGAL PILOT BUTTE 6 2717 N.E. U.S. Highway 20, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 4:20, 7:20 FAIR GAME (PG-13) 4:30, 7:15 THE GIRL WHO KICKED THE HORNET’S NEST (R) 4, 7:05 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 4:10, 7:10 RED (PG-13) 4:25, 6:50 SECRETARIAT (PG) 4:15, 7

REGAL OLD MILL STADIUM 16 680 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend 541-382-6347

BURLESQUE (PG-13) 12:55, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45 DUE DATE (R) 2:05, 5:10, 8, 10:25 FASTER (R) 1:55, 5:05, 7:55, 10:20 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1

(PG-13) 12:15, 3:20, 6:30, 9:40 HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (DP — PG-13) 12:40, 1:10, 3:50, 4:20, 7, 7:30, 10:10, 10:35 LOVE AND OTHER DRUGS (R) 1:35, 4:35, 7:45, 10:30 MEGAMIND (PG) 2, 4:30, 7:15, 9:55 MEGAMIND 3-D (PG) 1, 3:35, 6:20, 9:15 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 1:20, 4:10, 6:45, 9:30 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG13) 12:45, 3:40, 6:40, 10 SECRETARIAT (PG) 12:30, 3:30, 6:35, 9:25 TANGLED (PG) 12:25, 4:05, 7:10, 9:35 TANGLED 3-D (PG) 1:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:05 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 1:40, 5, 7:50, 10:15 THE WARRIOR’S WAY (R) 1:30, 4:40, 7:20, 9:50 EDITOR’S NOTE: Movie Times in bold are open-captioned showtimes.

EDITOR’S NOTE: There is an additional $3.50 fee for 3-D movies. EDITOR’S NOTE: Digitally projected shows (marked as DP) use one of several different technologies to provide maximum fidelity. The result is a picture with clarity, brilliance and color and a lack of scratches, fading and flutter.

MCMENAMINS OLD ST. FRANCIS SCHOOL 700 N.W. Bond St., Bend 541-330-8562

(After 7 p.m. shows 21 and over only. Under 21 may attend screenings before 7 p.m. if accompanied by a legal guardian.) THE TOWN (R) 6 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13) 9:30

REDMOND CINEMAS 1535 S.W. Odem Medo Road, Redmond, 541-548-8777

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY

Kate Gosselin finds drama even in Alaska wilderness By Frazier Moore The Associated Press

NEW YORK — Kate Gosselin is not a happy camper. On this week’s edition of “Sarah Palin’s Alaska,” she and her brood make a much-anticipated guest appearance. But don’t expect it to reveal her inner Daniel Boone. “How would you like to go camping with Kate and her eight kids — that TV show you watch?” Sarah Palin asks her daughter Piper at the start of the episode. Piper squeals with delight at the idea of hanging with these stars of another TLC series. As things develop, the camping trip in the Alaskan wilds will be no day at the beach for Kate. But it makes for a hilarious hour of Palin’s show, which airs on TLC Sunday at 9 p.m. Read no further if you don’t want spoiler details of Kate’s stab at roughing it. For a few fleeting moments, it seems she will savor her visit with the Palin family. She instantly bonds with Sarah, as they compare notes on the predatory nature of the media. “There’s not a whole lot of people that I run into that can understand the scrutiny (by) the media and beyond,” said Kate, whose crumbling marriage to Jon was documented on “Jon & Kate Plus 8” while it spurred a feeding frenzy from the tabloid press. Now, single mom Kate and her kids just happened to be in Alaska taping one of her “Kate Plus 8” specials, which occasioned their guest spot with the Palins. The first stop: Sarah takes

Kate to a bear safety class to prepare her for their camping expedition. On the road from Wasilla to the class in Anchorage, Sarah sort-of jokes that, in case of a bear attack, “You need a partner with you who’s slower than you.” “Oh, my gosh!” replied Kate, who already was spooked by the bear rug in the Palins’ home. “Sacrifice your friends?” The day of the camping trip, it’s pouring rain. Out in the middle of nowhere by a stream and surrounded by mountains, Sarah is smiling. “Rain or shine, Alaskans still camp. We still find a way to have fun,” she chirped. Then Kate and her kids land at the campsite. Quickly, Kate proves to be a bigger pill than a horse tranquilizer. “The kids are having fun, so I’m tolerating it, but this is my new home,” grumbled Kate. Sarah, ever gung-ho, announces to the group, “This is the most luxurious camping spot I’ve ever seen!” Cut to Kate, who tells the camera, “It just kills me that people, like, willingly do this.” Soon everybody else is enjoying hamburgers, hot-dogs and s’mores from the campfire. Maybe it was finding out the hot dogs are moose. About that time, Kate loses it. “I don’t see a table, I don’t see utensils, I don’t see hand-cleansing materials,” she whimpered. “This is not ideal conditions. I am freezing to the bone, I have 19 layers on, my hands are frigid. I held it together as long as I could and I’m done now!”

Dec. 16 “LIGHT UP A LIFE”: Light a candle in honor of loved ones; followed by a reception; donations accepted; 5-6 p.m.; Sisters Art Works, 204 W. Adams St.; 541-548-7483 or brvhospice@bendbroadband.com. “JOY TO YOU & ME”: A presentation of the play, which features a series of classic theater vignettes; proceeds benefit Toys for Tots; donation of unwrapped toys encouraged; 7 p.m.; Elton Gregory Middle School, 1220 N.W. Upas Ave., Redmond; 541-526-6440.

P C  GENERAL PET LOSS GROUP: Drop-in support group for anyone experiencing or anticipating the loss of a pet; free; 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; Partners in Care, 2075 N.E. Wyatt Court, Bend; Sharon Myers at 541-382-5882.

DOGS

M T For Tuesday, Dec. 7

Seeking friendly duplicate bridge? Go to www.bendbridge.org Five games weekly

HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 5:30, 9 MEGAMIND (PG) 4:30, 6:30, 8:30 TANGLED (PG) 4, 6:15, 8:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 4:45, 7, 9:15

SISTERS MOVIE HOUSE 720 Desperado Court, Sisters 541-549-8800

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 6 MORNING GLORY (PG-13) 4:30, 6:45 THE NEXT THREE DAYS (PG-13) 4:15 TANGLED (PG) 4:15, 6:30 UNSTOPPABLE (PG-13) 6:45

PINE THEATER 214 N. Main St., Prineville, 541-416-1014

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 1 (PG-13) 7

PUPPY 101: Puppies ages 8 to 13 weeks may join any week; teaches socialization, confidencebuilding skills, playtime, handling exercises and more; $85; 6-7 p.m. Thursdays; Dancin’ Woofs, 63027 N.E. Lower Meadow Drive, Suite D, Bend; Mare Shey at 541-3123766 or www.dancinwoofs.com. OBEDIENCE FOR AGILITY: Agility is a great way to connect with your dog; $95; 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays; Desert Sage Agility, 24035 Dodds Road, Bend; Stephanie Morris at 541-6336774 or www.desertsageagility.com. BEHAVIORAL TRAINING: Private lessons to help with your dog’s manners and with problems; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-5361418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. AKC RING-READY COACHING: Private lessons to get your dog ready to show in AKC obedience trials; cost by quotation; times by appointment; Wednesdays; Lin’s School for Dogs, 63378 Nels Anderson Road, Suite 7, Bend; Lin Neumann at 541-536-1418 or linsschoolfordogs.com. YAPPY HOUR: Allyson’s Kitchen offers treats and time to mingle for pets and

owners, 5-7 p.m. Wednesdays; 375 S.W. Powerhouse Drive, Bend; benefits the Humane Society of Central Oregon; 541-749-9974 or www.hsco.org. OBEDIENCE CLASSES: Six-week drop-in classes; $99.95; 9 and 10 a.m. and 7 and 8 p.m. Mondays, 9 and 10 a.m. Wednesdays, 9 and 10 a.m. and 7 and 8 p.m. Fridays, 1 and 2 p.m. Saturdays; Petco, 3197 N. Highway 97, Bend; Loel Jensen at 541-382-0510.

HORSES ROLLING RANCH IN SISTERS: Open for trail-course practice and shows with instructors available; $10 per horse; 69516 Hinkle Butte Drive, Sisters; Shari at 541-549-6962. COW WORK WITH INSTRUCTION: Develop confidence and cow sense in your horse, while learning to control and move the cow; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo; Stephanie at 541-2806622 or Victoria at 541-280-2782. MINI REINING CLINIC: Alternating beginning and advanced sessions focus on refinement of reining maneuvers and skills for showing; $45 per person; 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursdays; 3 Peaks Ranch, 19275 Innes Market Road, Tumalo; Stephanie at 541-280-6622 or Victoria at 541-280-2782. BARREL RACING: Oregon Barrel Racing Association sponsored event; free to spectators; 10 a.m. Dec. 18; Crook County Fairgrounds, 1280 S. Main St., Prineville; Rhonda Kingsbury at 541-410-9737 or www.Superturbopony@aol.com.


E4 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN TUNDRA

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE

HEART OF THE CITY

SALLY FORTH

FRAZZ

ROSE IS ROSE

STONE SOUP

LUANN

MOTHER GOOSE AND GRIMM

DILBERT

DOONESBURY

PICKLES

ADAM

WIZARD OF ID

B.C.

SHOE

GARFIELD

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE

PEANUTS

MARY WORTH


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 E5 BIZARRO

DENNIS THE MENACE

SUDOKU Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively. SOLUTION TO YESTERDAY’S SUDOKU

CANDORVILLE

H BY JACQUELINE BIGAR

GET FUZZY

NON SEQUITUR

SAFE HAVENS

SIX CHIX

ZITS

HERMAN

HAPPY BIRTHDAY for Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2010: This year, you’ll be exposed to many new opportunities. Some of your choices might test your value of the status quo and traditional thought. You must make a decision. Can you walk down the untrodden path? Honor who you are, and let go of what doesn’t work. If you are single, new doors open, especially after the new year. Realize that no commitment is appropriate until you get to know each other. A second person could enter your life out of the blue. If you are attached, a new aspect to your bond arises, adding Super Glue and excitement. Flow with changes. CAPRICORN’s opinions on finance might not be right for you. The Stars Show the Kind of Day You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive; 3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult ARIES (March 21-April 19) HHHH Get a grip on a situation before you need to make a major change. By catching this problem at the seedling stage, you’ll prevent a big headache, for you and for others. If you’re feeling limited, don’t blame others. It is the value you put on their opinions. Tonight: Burning the candle at both ends. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) HHHHH Challenges can be interesting, as long as you use them to exercise your creativity and intelligence. The only limitation you could experience is from yourself. Fatigue marks the late day. Tonight: Let your body relax to a good movie or music.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20) HHHH Dealing with a partner, associate or loved one takes all the energy you have. You not only think this is no fun, but you are concerned with the long-term ramifications. You are clearly off and cannot change the immediate situation. Tonight: Forget today; rest. CANCER (June 21-July 22) HHHH Others are determined to have their way. Listen to what is being shared. If you want a high peace factor, you will go along with the request. Otherwise, be ready for a battle of wills, where no one really wins. Tonight: Take suggestions, but do what you want. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) HHH Keep your intent clear, but others still might react. Understand that what triggers one person might not even bother another. Don’t wonder so much about the situation. Recognize your frustration and fatigue. Tonight: Take care of yourself first. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) HHHH The unexpected carries a kick, which isn’t surprising. In some ways, a key partner or associate has the ability to debilitate you. Understanding evolves, but you might have to look past a feeling of insecurity and/or financial tightness. Tonight: Let go of your worries. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) HHH Is it possible that you are making a situation a lot harder than necessary? If this is the case, loosen up and see what happens. Sometimes you only get wound tighter and tighter, causing yourself an abundance of

problems. Tonight: Head home. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) HHHH Communication makes a difference. What seems like it’s too good to be true probably is. Understanding evolves to a new dimension. A child or new friend could be full of surprises. Tonight: Out and about. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) HHHH Examine any offers or risks with care. An unforeseen element lies within. Frustration builds in a meeting, which could involve an older person or someone you consider a stick in the mud. Tonight: In the thick of things. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) HHHH You could be more in touch with the goals of a project than someone who has a more vested interest. You cannot change this person, so do as much as you can on your own. A surprise communication heads your way. Tonight: Only what you want. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) HH Moaning and groaning won’t change the state of affairs, but it might be necessary for you. Listen to a wild scheme that involves an innate gift or finances. Decide if you really can walk this path. Tonight: Go where you feel good. Talk to a responsive pal. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) HHHH You might want to venture forward and try another approach. Your unexpected actions could send many into a tizzy, especially a boss or associate. Understanding evolves as a discussion occurs. Tonight: Leave a grumpy person alone. © 2010 by King Features Syndicate


C OV ER S T OR I ES

E6 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

P reparing for social gatherings can help ease party shyness

Ornaments

Fashion

Contra Costa Times

Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Supporters of the Bend Spay and Neuter Project, from left, Darlene Anderson, Debbie Sironen, Judy Niedzwiecke and Lorna Hickerson hold personalized crystal Christmas tree ornaments that the organization is selling as a fundraiser this holiday season. while many others are feral cats. “They’re everywhere,” she said, “around ranches and trailer parks, apartment buildings, shopping centers, neighborhoods; you name it.” While many feral cats are born into the wild, others find themselves homeless when abandoned by owners who can’t afford to care for them or are forced from their homes, said Wellinghoff. “It’s a myth that it’s better to let a domestic cat go than to take it to a shelter. Many of these cats don’t last long and die traumatic deaths.” Furthermore, an unspayed cat can give birth to new litters every six months, she said, meaning

To order the ornaments Bend Pet Express is selling them at its two stores through Dec. 20. Each costs $15 and all proceeds go to the Bend SNIP. Payment is expected when the ornaments are ordered, and it takes three to five days for them to be engraved and ready for pickup. The stores are

that the number of cats competing for food and water and seeking warmth in winter multiplies quickly. The agency has no hard and fast statistics, but Wellinghoff is confident the snip-’em-whereit-counts approach has greatly

“We had the community write pledges on pieces of trash about how they can personally make a difference through recycling and what they’ll do to change habits, and then they put these trash pledges on the dress form.” — Amy Anderson, administrative coordinator at REALMS and director of the Rubbish Renewed Eco-Fashion Show “I used part of an old nightgown and part of an old ballet dance recital costume, and made a new party dress from both of these things,” Bella explained in the REALMS art room, where she pulled up a photo of herself modeling the piece on the computer screen. “It took three to four hours of sewing, and five or six tries before I got something I really, really liked, and I also designed a necklace to go with it.” Transforming old clothes into new clothes is something Bella saw some of her teachers doing at REALMS. Holm embraces the radical chic statement made by her long vest coat stitched from old vintage ties, and Anderson emerged with a knitted skirt made from an old sweater. Garments like these, Bella says, are what helped inspire her own repurposing creativity. REALMS student Ben Largent, 12, says his family has always been environmentally aware, but since going on a school field trip following Bend’s recycled materials all the way to Portland, he’s become even more diligent about recycling and composting. “It’s really so simple. If you just take a few minutes to rinse out that plastic bottle and take off the cap, it can be recycled. So either you recycle it or it spends a thousand years in a landfill,” said Ben. Since going on that field trip, he said, he’s even put recycling bins in his bedroom. The Container Recycling Institute reports that 29.5 billion plastic bottles are used every year in the United States, and that eight out of every 10 of these bottles will end up in the landfill. Shocking statistics like these motivated students like Ben and Bella to work hard to promote the school’s first eco-fashion show. “If we don’t clean up our environment, we’re going to end up living in the trash,” said Bella. “We can’t keep throwing things in the landfill, because we’re going to run out of space for all this trash,” added Ben. Students throughout the local school district were encouraged to design and create some of the

Find Your Dream Home In

Real Estate Every Saturday

eco-fashions, and local artists and designers were also invited to submit garments. Sara Wiener, of Sara Bella Upcycled, started her business by making colorful purses, bags and wallets out of plastic bags that were headed for the landfill. She credits her young friend, Ryan Griffith, 12, a former REALMS student, for teaching her how to make a pliable textile out of the plastic bags. “I saw Ryan had this coolest bag ever, and he explained how he made it. So he taught me how to make it, and I just took it to a new level,” said Wiener, 50, in her work studio and shop in Bend’s Old Mill District. “In just one year, I’ve probably saved about 13,000 bags from entering the landfill, and about 300 pounds of plastic banner signs from going there, too.” For this debut eco-fashion show, Wiener designed a new way to rework these discarded plastic bags into a colorful and wearable full-length trench coat, complete





FERTILIZERS



open daily from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. • West-side store: 133 S.W. Century Drive; 541-389-4620. • East-side store: 420 N.E. Windy Knolls Drive; 541-385-5298. Contact: Bend Spay and Neuter Project at 541-617-1010, info@ bendsnip.org or www.bendsnip.org. reduced the feral cat population and kept many loved pets from being killed in the streets and euthanized at animal shelters. “I’d call it plain humane.” Linda Weiford can be reached at ldweiford@gmail.com.

with epaulets and snaps. “I think the education of this fashion show is so important. More people need to teach that we can’t keep filling the landfill or polluting the ocean with our trash. This is about the environment,” Wiener said. “We’re really late to get on this, but we must prevent it from growing further out of control. The day I go out of business will be a great day for the environment.” Anderson and Holm expect this school fundraiser to be an annual event, and hope next year they receive more entries from Central Oregon students and the community. Holm even dreams of inviting fashion-forward First Lady Michelle Obama to next year’s eco-fashion show, and she has already knitted a formal dress, made exclusively with repurposed Obama/Biden election banners. “I really did do quite a bit of research on her size, and what would look good on her, so this should be a good fit,” says Holm, pointing to a photo of the custommade dress she hopes to have the First Lady wear. “It’s all done, so all we need now is to get her here for next year’s fashion show. I really think she would like what we’re doing here, teaching environmentalism and social responsibility through these fashions.” Penny Nakamura can be reached at halpen1@aol.com.

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Continued from E1 “What we’re trying to do is make people aware of just how much we throw away and how much we could be recycling,” said REALMS teacher and haute couture garbage designer Karen Holm, who has been teaching her students about caring for the environment. “We throw away a million plastic bags a minute. Two million plastic beverage bottles are thrown out every five minutes in the U.S. One million plastic airline beverage cups are used on U.S. flights every six hours. We need to change habits.” The Flash Fashion Show that was paraded on the streets of downtown Bend last week was only a preview of the Rubbish Renewed Eco-Fashion Show the REALMS school will be hosting Thursday evening (see “If you go” on Page E1). In addition to the Flash Fashion Show, the community was invited to look at a few other fashion garment entries at tbd loft in downtown Bend and to contribute to a community-designed, trash-fashion outfit, which will be used in Thursday’s show. “We had the community write pledges on pieces of trash about how they can personally make a difference through recycling and what they’ll do to change habits, and then they put these trash pledges on the dress form,” said Anderson, 38, who came up with the idea of bringing trash and recycling awareness to the public, and is directing the eco-fashion show. “I confess one of my guilty pleasures, is ‘Project Runway,’ and I thought we could do a school fundraiser that ties in with what we believe in as a school: transforming trash into fashion, while inspiring our community for a sustainable Earth. In other words, we’re taking what we’ve been learning out of the classroom and into the community to educate.” Anderson said the actual Rubbish Renewed Eco-Fashion Show will showcase 25 outfits in two categories. The first category of garments will be made of at least 90 percent trash, items that were destined for the landfill. An example is a cocktail dress Holm made from four 60-minute cassette tapes, which she meticulously knitted into the sparkling garment. “Everyone of a certain age has probably kept a stash of obsolete cassette tapes,” said Holm, 48, laughing. “I just took out the tape, which can be super delicate, and started knitting. It was a little tricky because cassette tape doesn’t stretch.” The second category will be what Anderson calls, “refashioning” or repurposing fabrics for other useful garments. REALMS student Bella Robles, 11, has designed a statement piece under this category.

By Jessica Yadegaran

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Continued from E1 SNIP provides low-cost spay and neuter surgeries, along with vaccinations and identification microchips, said board president Debbie Sironen. In some cases, they also offer inexpensive veterinary care. On this snowy early December day, a yellow Labrador was recovering after having a “large fatty cyst” removed from its neck. “His owners had lost their jobs, were evicted and found themselves living outside in a tent. Not only did they not want to give up their dog, but they needed to get it help,” said Sironen. With just three paid staff members — a receptionist/manager, a veterinarian and a veterinary technician — and 30 volunteers, donations are crucial for the agency to carry out its work, said Sironen. “The ornament sales help offset our expenses. We’re really grateful to have the contribution.” Pet Express customers can choose from three ornaments: one with a dog paw print; another with the face of a cat; and one with the outline of a horse. The pet’s name is engraved into the crystal, with the option of adding other engraved words on a line below. “Lots of people buy them to honor their own pets, but they also buy them as gifts for others who have pets,” said Hickerson. Still others buy them as memorials to cats, dogs or horses who have passed away, she said. SNIP has performed more than 23,000 spay and neuter surgeries since it opened in 2005, said Megan Wellinghoff, a former manager who now serves on the board. Many of the animals belong to low-income people,

 PLANTERS 

Ingrid Mayorca wasn’t a shy child. In her native Nicaragua, she was known for her social, outgoing personality. But since moving to the United States in 2003, the petite brunette has lost a bit of her spunk. “I’m shy because of my accent, so I don’t really talk that much,” said Mayorca, 24, of Walnut Creek, Calif. “When I’m in a big group at a party, I feel uncomfortable because I don’t think people can understand me. I feel more confident one-on-one because I feel more in control.” Many people suffer from some degree of shyness. And with the holiday party season in full swing, the thought of sipping eggnog and making small talk with strangers isn’t exactly a shy person’s idea of a good time. Luckily, psychologists and experts have tips shy people can use to not only survive the barrage of parties, but perhaps even come out of their shells and enjoy the festivities. Mayorca plans to instigate conversations in small groups and be the one to ask the questions so she has more control, she says. According to Menlo Park, Calif., marriage and family therapist Nancy Zucconi, lack of control is a contributor to shyness. So it’s important to feel prepared and have a game plan. “A shy person could decide in advance which people are the safe ones to talk to,” she said. “Or, if the party is at the office or in a home, use photographs on desks and refrigerators to strike up conversations. Ask, ‘How was Bora Bora? How old are your kids?’ ” Another pre-party technique is to scan the newspaper or evening news before you head out for the night, so you’ve got current events and movies that you can talk about, says Lynne Henderson, a Berkeley, Calif., psychologist and director of the Shyness Institute, a research and educational nonprofit in Palo Alto, Calif. Henderson has been researching shyness for 30 years and does not believe in pathologizing it, she says. “Shyness is a normal personality trait,” she said. “Some people are just slower to warm up and sensitive to the needs and wants of others.” Henderson explains that problematic shyness, like social anxiety disorder, occurs when you’re so concerned with other people’s evalua-

tions of you that it prevents you from doing what you want. Still, nobody has perfect social skills, she says. But anybody can develop them. As a consultant at the Shyness Clinic, an outgrowth of the Shyness Institute, also located in Palo Alto, Henderson has developed techniques to help shy people shift their thinking patterns, behaviors, emotions and states of physical arousal in social situations. “If you’re at the holiday food table, you can always make a comment about the food or ask someone, ‘Have you had that? Is it good?’ Another easy thing that we often forget is compliments. Sincere ones. Something like, ‘Those are cute shoes. Where did you get them?’ ” According to Zucconi, people who are shy often have low self-esteem and can be hard on themselves. “Sometimes people project their thoughts onto others,” she said. “They think people are saying things about them, and they’re not. So it’s important to shift those behaviors.” For starters, take a friend or spouse to a party with you. When that’s not an option, consider your timing. If you really don’t like large crowds, arrive in the beginning of a party, Zucconi says. Here’s another easy behavior switch. “Shy people have a lot of problems with eye contact,” Zucconi says. “So just giving a firm handshake, smiling, and looking someone in the eye can be all the tools you need.” That worked wonders for Al Remp, of Berkeley. Remp says he was painfully shy for the first half of his life. At parties, he used to stand in corners and try to look inconspicuous. Now, at 57, Remp’s social life is fully charged. In addition to the smile and eye contact, he credits a Chicago Cubs jacket he began wearing about 20 years ago. “A multitude of people began approaching me telling me that they were from Chicago,” Remp said. “It was so exhilarating to see the excitement etched across their faces. I literally could not leave the house without some stranger commenting on my jacket. I met so many interesting people just by wearing it.” The beauty of it all, Remp says, is that he didn’t have to do a thing to initiate any of it. The jacket was his entrance into that large intimidating world of parties. His advice for the holiday season? “If you are shy, just find something that is a flag to wear, a provocative button or a ‘Kiss a Whale’ shirt,” he said. “You will ineluctably find someone that is eager to salute.”


HOME S, GA RDE NS A ND FOOD IN C E NTRA L ORE GON

A H

F

Craving cashmere? Martha Stewart tells you what you need to know, Page F6

AT HOME

www.bendbulletin.com/athome

THE BULLETIN • TUESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2010

FOOD

Easy snacks at the drop of a cheese ball By Jan Roberts-Dominguez For The Bulletin

Since it’s a strong possibility that you’ll be hosting holiday guests at some point over the next few weeks, there’s something you need to face: They’re going to want food the moment they step through your door. The polite word for such frenzied feedings is appetizers. The concept, however, is anything but genteel if in the offering you are overwhelmed by the preparations. Indeed, the idea of carving piles and piles of vegetables into miniature flowers, and spoon-feeding hundreds of baby cream puffs with homemade paté is way beyond most folks’ realm of reality. But store-bought munchies aren’t ideal either. In most cases, they are overpriced and under-flavored. So, during this hectic time of year, I call upon some simple make-ahead specialties that are stress-free on two levels. First of all, there’s that simpleness factor. And secondly, they can keep for weeks in the refrigerator, so I can start the party rolling at a moment’s notice — and at a fraction of the cost for their supermarket knockoffs. Take marinated olives. Store-bought “olive bar” varieties are stratospheric price-wise, often as high as $8 and $9 per pound. But it doesn’t take much to transform plain ol’ canned or bottled olives straight off the grocery store shelf into great olives — just a few of your own seasonings, vinegar and olive oil. See Appetizers / F2

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Dennis Oliphant and Traci Porterfield designed and decorated their home to have an “urban rustic” look.

& decor HOME

His her Courtesy Karl Maasdam

Romesco sauce with hazelnuts can add a rich dimension to even a simple appetizer of fresh ciabatta bread and extra-aged Gouda.

GARDEN

’Tis freezin’, but water anyway By Leon Pantenburg For The Bulletin

So what if it’s been snowing and freezing for a while now? Central Oregon is still the High Desert, and if you want your trees and shrubs to thrive next spring, you must continue watering. Odd as it may seem to new residents, watering trees and shrubs during the dead of winter is not only a good idea, says Gary English of Landsystems Nursery in Bend, but also may be vital to keeping your new plants alive. “If you have newly planted trees or shrubs (since September), you need to keep watering them,” English said. “Their roots are still in a ball and haven’t expanded. If there isn’t moisture, the roots won’t grow out.” See Watering / F5

Rustic touches, urban accoutrements combine to create a home in harmony By Penny Nakamura • For The Bulletin

W

hat happens when you bring together a man who’s spent his entire life on or near Oregon rivers and a woman who’s never met a Chinese Chippendale chair she hasn’t loved? You get a fabulous mix of old Oregon outdoors combined with modern urban chic, and if you don’t think the two can mix, you’ve never seen the home on the Deschutes River belonging to Sun

Country Raft Tours founder Dennis Oliphant and Circa Interiors co-owner and designer Traci Porterfield. The busy couple have a synergy within their home that allows Oliphant to be comfortable in his leather and chrome Bauhaus chair, while Porterfield can take pleasure in centuries-old Tibetan painted panels.

T O DAY ’ S R E C I P E S • BRAISED POMEGRANATE CHICKEN WITH WALNUTS, F2 • CITRUS, GARLIC AND ROSEMARY OLIVES, F2 • OREGON FOUR-CHEESE BALL, F2 • ROMESCO SAUCE, F2 • FOLEY STATION GREEN OLIVE PESTO, F2 • GINGER- AND LEMONGRASS-CURED SABLE FISH, F3 • HOT-SMOKED RAINBOW TROUT, F3 • GIN- AND CHIVE-CURED SALMON, F3 • APRICOT NUT BREAD, F6

Porterfield and Oliphant made their dining room table from recycled timber.

Oliphant and Porterfield came to their home on the river just as it was about to be repossessed by the bank. An entire counter in the kitchen had been torn out, fixtures had been removed and even the stove vent had been ripped from the wall and One of the four bathrooms in the Oliphant-Porterfield home combines reclaimed wood for the sink area with elegant touches — such as the hanging, modern globe light.

ceiling. See Decor / F4


F2 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

F COVER STORY

Braised pomegranate chicken with walnuts is best served with basmati rice.

For a quick, elegant, oh-so-simple collection of appetizers, prepare the following recipes and store them in your refrigerator for the rest of this month.

Appetizers

Charles Mostoller Miami Herald

Use pomegranate to flavor chicken By Carole Kotkin McClatchy-Tribune News Service

This time of the year, supermarket produce departments are overflowing with pomegranates, leathery-skinned globes filled with ruby-colored kernels that are a gorgeous addition to your holiday repertoire. Selection is simple because pomegranates are harvested only when ripe. Choose a fruit that’s heavy for its size and looks fresh, as if bursting through its skin. Color doesn’t matter, but avoid any with shriveled skin or soft spots. Whole pomegranates will keep in an airtight bag in the refrigerator for a month or more. These ancient fruits conceal their kernels (called arils)

in a web of honeycomb-like membranes. A friend with more pomegranate experience showed me the proper way to prepare one: She cut off the crown end and scored the skin in quarters from stem to crown. She then immersed the fruit in a large bowl of cold water and broke the sections apart, separating seed clusters from membranes and skin. After a few minutes’ work, the pomegranate seeds lay neatly at the bottom of the bowl, and the skin and membrane floated on top. Whether used as a garnish, as in the chicken dish below, pomegranates are a delightful addition to your seasonal table.

BRAISED POMEGRANATE CHICKEN WITH WALNUTS

Continued from F1 You can keep the cost reasonable and go all out on flavors. They also make terrific gifts to take along to a party, by the way. And then there’s my flavorful Romesco sauce, which does double duty as both a lovely spread to put out on the appetizer table, along with a sliced baguette, and as something to toss with pasta. So, for a quick, elegant, ohso-simple collection of appe-

tizers, prepare the following recipes and store them in your refrigerator for the rest of this month. When guests appear at your door, spoon a portion of each into appropriate crocks or bowls. Snuggle a small spoon, fork or paté knife into each, and center them on a platter or two, surrounded by piles of fresh baguette slices, crisp vegetables, and special meats and cheeses. Jan Roberts-Dominguez is a Corvallis food writer, cookbook author and artist. Readers can contact her by e-mail at janrd@ proaxis.com.

Special cheese and wine combo During the holiday season, I make sure my refrigerator is stocked with at least a pound of Huntsman cheese and a bottle of late-harvest Gewurztraminer. The roasted hazelnuts, of course, are always close at hand in the pantry. It’s a great combo for last-minute gatherings and very special drop-in guests. For the blue cheese and sharp-cheddar fans in your group, this is the ultimate experience, since it’s a layering of English Stilton (a blue cheese) and double Gloucester, which has the creamyyet-powerful character of a sharp cheddar. Partnering such a complex and bold cheese with roasted hazelnuts and a late-harvest Gewurztraminer is a brilliant maneuver. The hazelnuts act as a bridge between the rich, earthy cheese and the complex wine, which has a classic Gewurztraminer nose of spice and floral, along with a flavor combination of apricot, pineapple, brown sugar and honey. But even with all those sweet notes, a late-harvest Gewurztraminer usually boasts plenty of acidity for balance. So you can see where those hazelnuts come into play. Then build the flavors to the next level by surrounding the cheese and nuts with thinly sliced rounds of sourdough baguette and some fresh grapes. Wowie! — Jan Roberts-Dominguez

Makes 4 servings. 1 tsp kosher salt, plus more if needed ½ tsp freshly ground pepper, plus more if needed 1 whole chicken (about 3½ lbs), cut into 8 pieces, or 4 chicken quarters 2 TBS extra-virgin olive oil 1 med onion, sliced 2 garlic cloves, minced ½ tsp ground cardamom or cinnamon 2 TBS all-purpose flour

2 C pure pomegranate juice (unsweetened) 1 TBS granulated sugar (optional) 1 TBS finely grated lemon zest 1 TBS freshly squeezed lemon juice, plus more if needed ½ C unsalted walnuts or pistachios, lightly toasted and coarsely chopped Pomegranate seeds for garnish

Sprinkle the salt and pepper evenly over the chicken pieces. In a large sauté pan, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Working in batches, brown the chicken well on both sides. Remove it from the pan and set aside. Discard all but 2 tablespoons of the liquid remaining in the pan. Reduce the heat to medium, add the onion and sauté, stirring occasionally, until golden brown, 7 to 8 minutes. Add the garlic, cardamom and flour; cook, stirring continuously, 1 minute. Stir in the pomegranate juice, sugar, zest and lemon juice. Cook 2 minutes, scraping any brown bits from the bottom of the pan. Return the chicken and any juices to the pan, spooning some of the sauce on top. Bring the liquid just to a boil, reduce the heat, cover the pan and simmer until the chicken is tender and cooked through, 35 to 40 minutes. Transfer chicken to a serving platter, and pour the sauce over it. Sprinkle with the nuts and pomegranate seeds, and serve immediately.

CITRUS, GARLIC AND ROSEMARY OLIVES Makes 3 cups. Start with canned or bottled olives, keeping them all the same or mixing two or three varieties, then combine with a zesty marinade. In just 24 hours, you’ll have a delicious appetizer that will keep for weeks and weeks in your refrigerator. ¼ C fresh lemon juice ¼ C white or red wine vinegar 2 TBS coarsely minced fresh garlic 2 TBS minced fresh rosemary

1 TBS grated fresh lemon peel 1 tsp dried hot pepper flakes 3 C assorted olives (or all green, or all black) ½ C extra-virgin olive oil

In a container large enough to hold the olives, combine the lemon juice, garlic, rosemary, lemon peel and pepper flakes. (Note: I like to marinate my olives in resealable plastic bags because it’s very easy to give the mixture a quick stir every now and then to redistribute the marinade just by squishing the bag). Stir well to combine. Lightly crush the olives without breaking them, then add them to the marinade along with the olive oil, and stir again to mix. Marinate the olive mixture, covered, in the refrigerator, stirring occasionally, for at least 1 day before serving. To store for longer periods (several weeks or more), transfer the olives to jars with tight-fitting lids and keep refrigerated. Speedy variation: Dilute 1 cup of your favorite bottled vinaigrette with ¼ cup of red or white wine vinegar and ¼ cup of extra-virgin olive oil, and pour this mixture over the 3 cups of lightly crushed olives.

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OREGON FOUR-CHEESE BALL Makes about 2 cups. You can shape the cheese mixture into a ball so you can roll it the roasted nuts, but I find it easier to serve it in a bowl. 8 oz (1 C) softened cream cheese with chives 4 oz (½ C) crumbled Oregon blue cheese 12 oz shredded (about 3 C) extra-sharp cheddar

4 oz (about ¾ C) shredded Parmesan 1 TBS Worcestershire sauce About ½ C chopped darkly roasted and skinned hazelnuts

Combine the cream cheese, blue cheese, cheddar, Parmesan and Worcestershire in the work bowl of a food processor. Blend until the cheeses are thoroughly pureed. Scrape into a container and chill until firm. To form into a ball, scrape the mixture out onto a large piece of plastic wrap and gather up the edges of the plastic so that it’s always between you and the cheese (less messy this way). When it’s formed to your liking, spread the nuts out onto a work surface and roll the cheese around on top of them until the cheese is thoroughly coated. Transfer to an attractive bowl and refrigerate until needed. Serve with crackers and toasted baguette slices.

ROMESCO SAUCE Makes about 3 cups. With the consistency of pesto and the reddish hue of a Tuscan sunset, this classic Catalan sauce does Spain proud. It’s a melange of roasted tomatoes and peppers, olive oil, roasted hazelnuts and fried bread, and enhances the delicate flavors of grilled prawns and vegetables, looks and tastes fabulous when tossed with creamywhite pasta, and adds a rich dimension to a simple appetizer of fresh ciabatta bread and extra-aged Gouda. When stirred into a seafood stew or spooned over freshly grilled halibut or scallops, it elevates the flavor profile in an elegant, understated way. It keeps for several weeks in the refrigerator and freezes very well. About 2 TBS of olive oil, divided 1 lb of Roma tomatoes (4 med) 1 red sweet bell pepper (see note) 2 (1-inch thick) slices of an Italian-style bread (measuring approximately 6-by-3 inches in diameter), such as ciabatta or pugliese 1 C roasted and skinned hazelnuts

3 garlic cloves, crushed and peeled 1 to 2 tsp red pepper flakes 1 tsp Spanish paprika ½ tsp ground chipotle chili pepper (McCormick sells one in the spice aisle) ½ tsp salt ¼ tsp freshly ground black pepper ¼ C red wine or sherry vinegar ½ C extra-virgin olive oil Hot water, if needed

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Pool one tablespoon of olive oil on a baking sheet and place it in the oven while it is preheating. Halve the tomatoes lengthwise, cut out the core from each half. When the oven is hot, remove the baking sheet from the oven and place the tomato halves in the oil, cut-side up. Coat the surface of each tomato half with a bit more oil, which will help with browning. Cook for about 15 minutes, then turn the tomatoes over, cut-side down and continue roasting until the tomato skins begin to darken, crack and pull away from the flesh. Remove from oven and set aside until they’re cool enough to handle. Pierce the pepper in several places with a sharp knife to avoid bursting, then place it on the baking sheet. Place the pepper under a broiler and broil, turning several times, until it has blackened over most of its surface. Alternatively, you could blacken the pepper over a gas flame on your stove top, or in a grill. Meanwhile, heat the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a heavybottomed skillet (you can use a nonstick skillet, but it won’t impart quite as much toasted flavor to the bread). Fry the bread until golden brown and crisp on both sides. Remove from skillet and let cool. Pluck the peel and core from the cooled tomatoes, reserving the juices. Place the flesh and juice in the food processor. Peel, core and seed the pepper, reserving the juice. Place the flesh and juice in the food processor. Add the bread, toasted hazelnuts, garlic, red pepper flakes, paprika, ground chipotle chili pepper, salt and black pepper. Process until smooth (it will have a somewhat grainy appearance because of the nuts). With the machine running, add the vinegar. Let the motor run for a moment, then stop it and scrape down the sides of the bowl. Turn the motor back on and add the ½ cup of extra-virgin olive oil in a slow, steady, very thin stream. The sauce will thicken slightly and hold together in a rich, rusty-colored orange/red. If the sauce seems too thick (it should have a soft pesto consistency), then with the machine running, drizzle in some hot water. Taste and make sure the sauce has plenty of piquancy and enough salt. If desired, with the machine running, add additional vinegar and salt. Romesco sauce can be prepared and refrigerated for at least a week (I’ve even used batches of it at the end of 2 weeks). Bring to room temperature before using. Note on roasted red peppers: If you want to trim a bit of labor from the project, you could use a store-bought roasted and peeled red pepper if you determine the quality is recipe-worthy. I’ve done just that and been satisfied with the results. More uses for your romesco sauce: Serve over grilled lamb, fish and vegetables, or in a bowl alongside bread and roasted spring onions. Also delicious as a sandwich spread or a dipping sauce for asparagus. Stir it into seafood stews and vegetable soups. — From “Oregon Hazelnut Country — the Food, the Drink, the Spirit” by Jan Roberts-Dominguez

FOLEY STATION GREEN OLIVE PESTO Makes a generous 2 cups. Here’s a wonderful recipe from Chef Merlyn Baker, owner of Foley Station in La Grande. Chef Baker uses this mostly as a pasta sauce, but it’s also a great appetizer, served alongside a thinly sliced baguette. And it keeps for weeks in the refrigerator. 1 C oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained well 1 C grated Parmesan cheese 1 C roasted and skinned hazelnuts

¾ C coarsely chopped green olives 3 TBS minced garlic 1 ⁄3 C olive oil

Combine the sun-dried tomatoes, Parmesan, hazelnuts, olives and garlic in the work bowl of a food processor. Process until the mixture is finely chopped. With the motor running, slowly add the olive oil. If the mixture seems too thick after you have added the oil, add a small amount of water to reach a pesto-like consistency. Adjust seasonings, adding salt or additional Parmesan as desired. As an appetizer, spoon the mixture into a small bowl or crock and place it on a larger platter, surrounded by crackers, baguette slices and a few fresh vegetables. — From “Oregon Hazelnut Country — the Food, the Drink, the Spirit” by Jan Roberts-Dominguez


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 F3

F For delicious fish, cure it at home By Noelle Carter

GIN- AND CHIVE-CURED SALMON

Los Angeles Times

There is an old road in Japan that runs from Wakasa Bay to the city of Kyoto, known as the Saba Kaido, or Mackerel Road. For centuries, the road was used to carry fresh mackerel roughly 50 miles south from the sea to the former imperial capital. Because there was no refrigeration, the prized fish were salted to preserve them for the journey. It’s been said that if one transported the fish in a single trip, without sleeping, the brilliant blue fish arrived in Kyoto fresh and perfectly seasoned. The art of curing is an ancient technique, born of necessity and found the world over. Almost lost with the dawn of modern preservation methods such as refrigeration and canning, curing is making a comeback — and in a big way. Restaurants and chefs everywhere are touting cured meats, house-smoked specialties and homemade sausages. And, increasingly, cured fish. Curing fish takes very little active time, and it can be completed in days rather than the weeks it might take to cure other meats. Since it requires no special equipment, it’s just as easily done at home as it is in a restaurant. “We’re taking preserving techniques and starting to love the flavor,” says Marcus Samuelsson, founding chef of New York’s Aquavit restaurant. He notes that the increasing popularity of regional cuisines, such as Swedish, are opening eyes to the possibilities with cured fish. Also, with the increasing popularity of sushi, people are starting to welcome different textures of fish rather than simply cooked. “We’re getting used to it.”

How to cure The process is simple: Combine salt, sugar and/or smoke to gently draw moisture from a food to preserve it over an extended period. And the possibilities seem endless. A quick online search yields recipes calling for not only the more traditional gravlax and smoked salmon or trout, but also fish you might never have considered curing, including halibut, mahi mahi, striped bass and even tai snapper. The flavorings include classic dill, grappa and even kombu. Try curing fish with a tasso rub for Cajun-style flavor or take inspiration from a cocktail, combining rum and mint for a mojito-style cure. Though almost any fish can be cured, make sure the fish is fresh and of the best quality. Be sure to buy from a reputable seller — the

Makes 8 to 12 servings. ½ C coarse sea salt ¼ C plus 2 TBS honey 2 TBS black peppercorns, toasted and cracked

In a medium bowl, combine the salt, honey, peppercorns and chives. Set aside. Brush the top of the salmon fillet generously with the gin. Spread the cure mix over the top (flesh side) of the fillet, then wrap the fish tightly with plastic wrap. Place the salmon, skin-side down, in a large baking dish or a large, rimmed, nonreactive baking sheet to catch any juices. Refrigerate the fillet until it is firm to the touch, about 48 hours (timing will vary depending on the thickness and size of the fillet). Uncover the fillet, rinse and dry off. The cured salmon will keep for up to several days, wrapped in dry parchment and refrigerated.

Photos by Glenn Koenig / Los Angeles Times

Toss bright red cubes of your cured salmon with avocado and quick-pickled onion, dressed with a bright sherry vinaigrette as a take on ceviche. act of curing will not make a bad fish better or safer to eat. Salmon, in particular, should be bought previously frozen — salmon is anadromous, living in both salt and fresh water, and can pick up worms that other ocean fish don’t; though curing can kill bacteria, only proper freezing can kill these parasites. Keep the fish refrigerated at all times, even after it is cured. Home curing works to “denature” the protein in the fish, in essence cooking it, but should not be counted on to render it safe left at room temperature. If you’re new to curing fish, start with a basic, traditional recipe, such as gravlax. Unlike the earliest versions of gravlax, in which the fish was buried in the sand by fishermen to cure (“grav” meaning grave, and “lax” meaning salmon), modern methods are much simpler. A fillet is coated with a basic blend of salt and sugar, with dill and liquor sometimes added for

GINGER- AND LEMONGRASS-CURED SABLE FISH Makes 8 to 12 servings. ¼ C plus 2 TBS coarse sea salt ½ C sugar 1 TBS grated ginger 1 stalk lemongrass, dry outer leaves removed, inner stalk crushed (to release the

oils) and coarsely chopped 2 TBS pink peppercorns, crushed 1 (1¼- to 1½-lb) sable fillet, skin on and any pinbones removed About 3 TBS sake

In a medium bowl, combine the salt, sugar, ginger, lemongrass and peppercorns. Set aside. Brush the top of the sable fillet generously with the sake. Spread the cure mix over the top (flesh side) of the fillet, then wrap the fish tightly with cheesecloth. Place the wrapped sable, skin-side down, on a rack over a rimmed baking sheet to catch any juices. Refrigerate the fillet until it is firm to the touch, about 48 hours (timing will vary depending on the thickness and size of the fillet). Uncover the fillet, rinse and dry off. The cured sable will keep for up to several days, wrapped in dry parchment and refrigerated.

HOT-SMOKED RAINBOW TROUT Makes 6 servings. Note: This recipe requires the use of a smoker, a stove-top smoker or a grill or roasting rack converted to a smoker. 2 qts water 1 C kosher salt 1 ⁄3 C sugar 2 shallots, thinly sliced 3 cloves garlic, crushed Zest of 2 lemons

½ C finely chopped chives 1 (1 ½-lb) salmon fillet, skin on and pinbones removed 3 to 4 TBS gin

1 lg (or 2 sm) bay leaf, crushed 6 (½-lb) whole trout, cleaned Wood shavings for smoking, preferably alder or applewood

In a large, nonreactive container, combine the water, salt, sugar, shallots, garlic, lemon zest and bay leaf, stirring until the salt and sugar dissolve to create a brine. Add the trout to the container, using a plate or weight to keep the trout under water. Place the container in the refrigerator for 6 hours. Remove the trout from the brine and discard the brine. Rinse and dry the trout, and place them on a rack over a rimmed sheet pan. Refrigerate the trout, uncovered, overnight to dry the surface. The next day, prepare the hot smoker. Smoke the trout over low heat (about 225 degrees) until firm and fully cooked, about 1 hour.

flavor. The fish is then wrapped and refrigerated until it is firm to the touch, generally two to three days. Follow the recipe exactly; if the measurements or timing are off, the fish might over-cure, rendering it too salty and tough, or it may under-cure, leaving the fish raw in places. Wrap the fish, making sure to place it in a rimmed container before refrigerating to catch any juices that might drain out. Feel the fish for firmness to gauge the progress, and flip the fish if called for (some larger fillets are halved and sandwiched before curing; flipping redistributes the cure). The fish will be done when it is firm throughout; the timing will vary depending on the thickness of the fillet and type of fish.

New flavors After you’ve cured your first fish, experiment a little. Keep the basic cure ratio (salt and sugar) the same, but substitute a different herb or liquor to vary the flavor. Substitute chives for the dill in gravlax and brush the fillet with gin instead of aquavit. The chives are a nice complement to the salmon, the notes of onion and garlic apparent but not overly assertive. As moisture is drawn from the fish, the flavor concentrates. Because of this, cured fish is best used as an accent, adding but one flavor to a larger harmony in a dish. The chive-cured gravlax is excellent on a bagel with cream cheese but works equally well diced into a composed salad or perhaps shaved over a simple warm pasta. Toss bright red cubes of the gravlax with avocado and quick-pickled onion, dressed with a bright sherry vinaigrette as a take on ceviche. Or stir a little gravlax into a bean or lentil dish to give it extra depth. For a more creative cure, try a ginger-lemongrass cure on a sable, or black cod, fillet. The fresh, clean flavors of ginger and lemongrass are a perfect complement to the rich buttery notes of the fish; tossed with crushed pink peppercorns, the final cure gives the fish a bright, delicate tang. Try the sable sliced thin and served on its own as a sashimi course. Combine it with a seasoned panko mix and fry it like crab cakes, served with a lemon aioli. Or toss it with a salad of peppery greens for a contrast in flavors and texture. As you become more comfortable with the curing process, continue to branch out. Ken Oringer, chef-owner of the restaurants Clio and Uni in Boston, cures and dries sea urchin as one would tuna or mullet roe in Italian bottarga. He grew excited when he discussed the possibili-

ties of cured fish, rattling off suggestions, including a tuna belly prosciutto. “If you’ve got the time, it’s amazing cured!” Masaharu Morimoto, chefpartner of Morimoto Napa and Morimoto NYC, cures yellowtail for a “yellowtail pastrami” that he serves with togarashi spice as a coating. He says it’s one of the most popular dishes on the menu. Samuelsson also cures yellowtail, which he uses in mini tacos at his restaurant, C-House, in Chicago. Like many cured foods, cured fish are sometimes smoked to complete the process or add fla-

vor, as with smoked salmon and trout. Smoking lends a nice depth of flavor to fish — a richness — similar to that of meat.

Smoked trout For quick-smoked trout, submerge a half-dozen trout for several hours in the refrigerator in a brine flavored with a little garlic, shallot and bay leaf. Drain the trout and dry them on a rack overnight in the fridge to form a pellicle (a sticky surface to which the smoke will adhere). The next day, hot-smoke the trout over al-

der or applewood chips for about an hour, until cooked through. If you don’t have a smoker, the trout can be smoked using a converted charcoal or gas grill, or smoke indoors using a stove-top smoker or converted roasting pan. The trout are rich, with a wonderful depth of flavor, and are perfect added to a breakfast hash or cold pasta salad. Flake the trout and use it in a dip, or make a quick rillette, combining the flaked trout with butter, capers, a little lemon juice and cracked black pepper. Perhaps add the smoked fish to a sandwich. Chris Phelps and Zak Walters of Salt’s Cure in West Hollywood mention doing a club sandwich with house-smoked black cod as a twist on the classic turkey version. Sometimes the fish isn’t cured all of the way, but a similar seasoning mixture is added to infuse with flavor and partially denature the fish — as with a marinade. Michael Cimarusti, chef and owner of the restaurant Providence in Los Angeles, recently mentioned the Mackerel Road as he explained some of the common Japanese quick-curing methods that he learned while he was working in Kyoto. In the back of the restaurant’s kitchen, Cimarusti removed a beautiful piece of halibut that he had quickly cured in salt. After an hour, the salt is rinsed from the fish, which is then refrigerated until it forms a pellicle. The halibut is then quickly seared in a hot pan and is set aside to rest and cool before serving. The quick curing allows the fish to be cooked to a lower temperature, making for an extramoist piece that flakes into large, luscious chunks.


F4 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

H

Next week: Wreaths Go beyond the ordinary with new shapes and materials.

COVER STORY “It was Tracy’s mom, a Realtor, who first saw this house and said, ‘Dennis this house has your name on it.’ She was right.”

Decor Continued from F1 While others may have been discouraged, Porterfield saw only the potential, and as a designer she had bigger and better plans for this house, situated perfectly along the river’s edge.

— Dennis Oliphant

Getting started To start with, the couple added an additional bedroom and bathroom. They tore out old carpet and cheap tiles and had a concrete floor poured on the first floor, which was later stained a rich caramel color. “Cement Elegance poured out a half-inch-thick layer of concrete, as we wanted one surface throughout the house,” explains Porterfield, who says the cost for a concrete floor like this is comparable to hardwood floors, but is much easier to care for. “I really like the concrete floors because it is able to hold in the heat during the winter,” adds Oliphant. But native Oregonian Oliphant wanted wood in the house to honor the wood industry of the neighborhood’s past (the home is located near the Old Mill District). Porterfield agreed that wood would add not only natural texture to the modern home, but could also soften up the oftensharp contrasts of modernism. “We used reclaimed wood for this ceiling in the entryway, and also reclaimed wood for the bathroom sink,” says Porterfield, pointing to the guest bathroom, which is the perfect amalgam of old and new. Sitting on top of the reclaimed wood sink area is a raised, bright yellow sink bowl, with an elegant, modern white ball light above. The effect of combining antique and modernism styling is stunning. The 3,300-square-foot home now has four bedrooms and four bathrooms, making it big enough to accommodate the couple’s blended family. They closed off an open upstairs sky bridge to create the additional bedroom, while still allowing the upstairs hall to have an open view over the living room and out to the river.

Photos by Ryan Brennecke / The Bulletin

Centuries-old painted Tibetan panels — Traci Porterfield’s favorite antique find ever — serve as the headboard in the master bedroom. To the right is Dennis Oliphant’s redwood desk, overlooking the Deschutes River. Artwork covers the walls of the stairway leading to the upstairs bedrooms. Porterfield and Oliphant closed off an open upstairs sky bridge to create an additional bedroom, giving the home four.

Traci Porterfield’s children learned to play on this 1869 piano. When entering the cozy home, the first thing one notices is the floor-to-cathedral-ceiling windows in the living room that overlook the Deschutes River and Old Mill area. These tall, narrow windows sealed the deal for Oliphant, who says he never wants to be far from the water. “It was Tracy’s mom, a Realtor, who first saw this house and said, ‘Dennis, this house has your name on it,’” recalls Oliphant. “She was right. I love being on

the river — we see so many birds, and we can take out our stand-up paddle boards and access the river from here. This is the launch point in the backyard.”

Back to nature

‘Urban rustic’ Porterfield experimented with using steel panels in the living room. She didn’t want shiny silver metal panels; so she did the patina work herself, using copper sulfate and a muriatic

place warms the room. There were times, Oliphant admits, he wasn’t sure how something would look, but he says he was completely confident in Porterfield’s skills. “When she was explaining the metal wall, I wasn’t sure how it would turn out,” confesses Oliphant smiling. “But every step along the way, I’ve been thoroughly impressed how she’s been able to make things work. It always amazes me.” Porterfield says she worked toward a look that brought the outdoors into the home, but without making the house have the mountain-lodge look, which she says has become all too commonplace in Central Oregon. “I lean toward the more eclectic, the urban rustic. I’m not a one-trick pony in design,” explains Porterfield, as she views the open living room. “I’m turning down work if people tell me they want the mountain lodge or Tuscan look. What you see here is a casual and comfortable and a cozy place.” Porterfield says she likes a simple look, and she adds that the same goes for Christmas decor, which she feels often gets out of hand. Porterfield does display some Christmas decorations in the home, but it’s so subtle, it takes a while to realize the trio of natural bark cones in varying heights on the table is actually shaped like a Christmas tree. Over her mantle and fireplace she has draped a garland of faux fruit, but interspersed between the fruits are twigs, which she collected along the river. “My philosophy is to keep it simple. You don’t want a house that is garbed in so much holiday decoration that it’s overdone. There’s so much (holiday) product out there right now. I try to keep it natural,” advises Porterfield. “For me, the holidays are about family being together, not all the decorations and stuff.”

acid compound. “By using these steel panels along this wall, I think it gives this area a modern, organic feel that certainly ties in with the Old Mill theme, of big timber and boiler rooms,” says Porterfield. “I would call it urban rustic.” When Porterfield was putting up these large steel panels, she did it herself late one night as Oliphant slept. “You use a compound to get it to stick, but it wasn’t setting and the panels kept sliding down, so I used a glue gun to get it to stick while the compound dried. A glue gun is a girl’s best friend,” quipped Porterfield. Porterfield has a natural feel for colors and points out how much color can change a room. She used two tones in the living room, to bring down the cathedral ceilings. “When we first bought the house, everything was beige,” says Porterfield, who used Devine paints, a brand manufactured specifically for the Northwest, throughout the house. “In the living room, we used a wall color called pistachio. If I had kept the ceilings in here white, it would’ve looked like we were in a gymnasium; by keeping it a darker brown up here, the darker color humanizes the space.” Going up the stairs, Porterfield points out another area where a bold paint color was used along with the Venetian plastering. Though the stairwell area is not a large area, using a bold blue color gives the area a focal point as a background color to a painting she has hanging there. The open floor plan of the downstairs allows for an open

dining area, where the couple show off their favorite piece in the house. It is a simple wooden dining table they made together from big reclaimed timbers, each piece at least 8 inches thick. The simple design of this long, solid wood table allows the entire family — plus many friends — to dine together. The counter that had been torn out before the couple purchased the house has been replaced by a piece Porterfield also designed. This new long counter separates the kitchen area from the dining area. Porterfield used a recycled countertop that looks similar to granite, and underneath she incorporated what looks like antique cupboards with reproduction pulls. The area also serves as an eating bar.

Modernism and antique styling Porterfield takes us into her master bedroom, where she points out her favorite antique find of all time. “These are centuries-old painted Tibetan panels that I found in Portland at Antiquities and Oddities, and we actually found two of these panels and were able to use them as a headboard for the bed,” says Porterfield. In the master bedroom suite, Porterfield has once again found the right balance between modern and antique styling. Near the Tibetan panels is Oliphant’s ultra-modern, solid redwood desk that overlooks the river. In the corner of the master bedroom suite is a cozy sitting area, where a small beehive fire-

Her feel for the natural beauty that surrounds the home is evident in the pieces that she places inside the home. Many of these pieces never cost a cent. An example of this is a 4-foot piece of rugged driftwood sitting near the fireplace. Porterfield oiled the wood, but before that, she had to attach it to her standup paddle board with her leash and paddle it back home. “I go to these designer shows, and there’s actual companies that sell these types of things as natural sculptures, and they charge $2,000,” says an incredulous Porterfield, who points to a smaller piece of driftwood on the counter. A trio of burning candles in hurricane lamps surrounds this smaller driftwood piece, which Oliphant found. The two often talk about all the natural wildlife they gaze upon when they’re sitting in their living room or riverside backyard. This area of the Deschutes River is an ever-changing portrait of a landscape that the couple adores. “Last winter, when it was really cold, we saw this bald eagle flying up and down the river, and all the ducks were giving the eagle plenty of space,” recalls Oliphant. “We see the ducks nesting, too.” Porterfield looks out toward the river from the upstairs and seems mesmerized by the slowmoving water. “The sunset light on the river reflects off the water, and it is so beautiful. And in the morning, when it’s cold, the fog coming up from the river is — well, it looks just magical.” Penny Nakamura can be reached at halpen1@aol.com.

Find Your Dream Home In Real Estate Every Saturday In


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 F5

G

Next week: Greenhouse 101 What you need to know before you commit.

‘Edible Landscaping’ pioneer reworks her yard and her book

COVER STORY

By Ad rian Higgins

Gardener Rosalind Creasy’s work has helped highlight the value of vegetables as ornamental plants. Creasy’s bestselling 1982 book, recently reissued and substantially reworked, introduced a new style of vegetable gardening while rejecting the prevailing model of the garden as a male-dominated holdover from the farm.

The Washington Post

The Bulletin ile photo

Leaves make good mulching material. Though mulching should have been done in late October, it’s not too late to do some good. Apply at the base of plants to insulate from cold and help trap needed water.

Watering Continued from F1 Central Oregon has all sorts of gardening challenges, he said. In the winter, these include wildly fluctuating day and nighttime temperatures, poor, sandy soil that drains quickly, and bright, sunny days with gusty winds that dehydrate all plants in their path. It doesn’t take long for these conditions to dry out the soil, English said, and seriously injure new or young trees and shrubs. Older, established plants also need moisture over the winter, he added. A common mistake, English said, is to quit watering when the lawn sprinklers are blown out and winterized for the season. Most people have stopped watering their lawns by Thanksgiving, he added, but then they also quit watering their trees. “Most evergreens and shrubs go dormant during the cold weather, and it’s a common misconception that dormant plants don’t need water,” English said. “But evergreens will continue to put out roots throughout the winter.” One rule of thumb is that the plant should go into the winter with damp roots, English added. Don’t overwater — just keep the root system moist. But regular watering of your plants can also create a new problem called frost heave, says Linda Stephenson, owner of L&S Gardens in La Pine. “You might have a bright winter day where it gets really warm, and then the temperature goes below freezing that night,” she said. “This can cause the water to sink down around the roots and freeze, and the cycle of warm and cold can cause the plant to work its way out of the ground.” One way to lessen or alleviate this problem is by mulching around the base of the tree or shrub, Stephenson said, with compost, pine needles, leaf mulch or wood chips. This mulch helps insulate the roots against the cold, as well as holding in moisture. Mulching should have already been done by the end of October, she added, but it can still benefit the plant throughout the winter if it is done now. Another consideration for plant watering, Stephenson said, is the plant’s location and type. It’s very common to have plants in the same area with very different moisture needs. A sunny, rock outcropping, she said, will dry out more quickly than an area on the north side of the house in the shade. But regardless of where the tree or shrub is located, it can’t be allowed to dry out.

Watering trees during winter Trees need to be watered during the winter as well as during the summer, and the best area to put the watering hose is at the drip line around the tree. The drip line is at the outer edge of the canopy. Canopy of tree

LOS ALTOS, Calif. — The yard needs work. You think: I’ll stick in some azaleas and reseed the lawn. Rosalind Creasy is here to put you straight. Forget the lawn; think Swiss chard and blueberries, apple trees, arugula, beets, wheat. Don’t mow it. Eat it. Creasy, 71, was a demure New Englander who came of age in Northern California in the 1960s. She became a rebel. Her causes? The environment. Organic gardening. Veggies. She has gone from being an eccentric voice in the wilderness to an omniscient earth mother. She didn’t merely anticipate the wild embrace of growing your own food, she was a key voice in its resurgence. After railing for four decades against environmentally destructive gardening practices and showing the way with fruits and vegetables, she has lived long enough to temper her zeal with a sense of satisfaction. “It was such a struggle for so long. And now it doesn’t feel like a struggle anymore.” For Creasy, reinventing the American yard was always more than just an armchair rant. This month, she is putting the finishing touches to what she calls a “change-out” in her front garden. Out go the old whiskey barrel planters, the small pretty pots, the stepping-stones. In go a new brick patio, planter boxes, fresh containers. The trellis gets a new lick of dark green paint. The last of the peppers and tomatoes are pulled to make way for an array of lettuce and other winter greens.

‘The final one’

Drip line

Water tree along the drip line The Bulletin file graphic

The experts agree that if the temperature is above freezing, you should water new plants deeply about once a week. For older trees or shrubs, you may need to water only about once a month. “Use buckets or hoses,” English advises. “But make sure you disconnect the hose from the faucet after you’re done. Otherwise, you could freeze that connection.” Snow on the ground is a good insulator, he added, and it also provides moisture. But if your lawn is bare, and there is one of those January thaws where the sun shines, the temperatures heat up and the wind blows, he said, consider watering the grass. “There is some competition from some trees, because the tree canopy may shield the ground underneath from the moisture, and the tree roots might be sucking the moisture out from around it,” English said. “An arid zone might develop.” Stephenson recommends that no fertilizing be done over the winter. While some trees put out new root growth in the winter months, she said, new growth on top is not good because a cold snap will probably affect it and may end up killing the tree. While growing anything around Central Oregon is a challenge, winter watering will give your new and older, established plants a fighting chance to thrive next spring. Leon Pan ten b u rg can be reached at survivalsenselp@ gmail.com.

Creasy’s quarter-acre suburban garden changes dramatically every six months. What used to be the front yard of her California ranch has become a parade of landscape ideas, each revolving around the radical concept that vegetables are pretty. The current reworking is Creasy’s 50th since 1984. “I have decided,” Creasy said, “that this is the final one. I have made my point to the world.” Author, photographer, landscape designer and environmentalist, Creasy has widely influenced domestic gardening over the past 30 years. She kept the then barely flickering flame burning in her best-selling 1982 book, “Edible Landscaping.” Newly reissued and substantially reworked, the book introduced a new style of vegetable gardening while rejecting the prevailing model of the garden as a male-dominated holdover from the farm, with discrete crops in rows. “The romance of gardening somehow didn’t stretch into the vegetable garden,” said Ethne Clarke, editor of Organic Gardening magazine, “until Ros came along.” The notion of edible landscaping “has taken off like a rocket,” said Clarke. Its disciples are legion, and extol the nutrition of organically cultivated homegrown produce, or see the veggie plot as a riposte to industrial agriculture or as a way to preserve and savor rare varieties of tomatoes, beans and melons. All along, Creasy saw the beauty: the dark, crinkled ostrich plumes of the black Tuscan kale; the neon stalks of the Swiss chard; the electric blue thistles of the cardoon. The unexpected ornament became a metaphor for all the attendant virtues of the lowly vegetable, how it could heal the planet by teaching us to feed ourselves. “I think it’s the highest and noblest use of the soil,” Creasy says of the type of lush gardens that today sur-

Randi Lynn Beach For The Washington Post

round her home. Her aesthetic approach expands the image of the vegetable garden to include vines, shrubs, trees, herbs and this crazy idea: incorporating them into a decorative landscape. In one bed, she is letting a red-leaved green named orach go to seed. “It was so beautiful with the dahlias a month ago,” she said. Deep purple figs are ripening in a container-grown tree. A border is edged in pineapple sage; elsewhere, the silver rosettes of artichoke leaves are beginning to bulk up. Creasy applauds Michelle Obama’s garden at the White House, and reflects on how parents of her generation and a decade or so younger were so busy raising children while building careers that they lost that vital link to the land. “It was the first time probably in the history of the world where a whole generation didn’t know how to grow their own food. That’s a profound statement.” In Creasy’s scrumptious outdoor trial gardens, the integration of edibles with ornamentals brings a paradisiacal feeling to the late afternoon. Her back garden is formed into three basic sub-gardens, the central one enveloped by wings of the house and softened by vines and fruit trees. The silence is broken by the sound of a startling thud in a perimeter bed. A plump navel orange has detached itself from its large, groomed mother tree. Creasy chuckles. “This is actually a food studio. Some things stay on too ripe, but I need them for the photography.” A cozy, elevated terrace is framed with an old pear tree, a grapefruit in flower and fruit at the same time — the fruits take 18 months to ripen — and a pomegranate tree. In addi-

tion to its orbed fruit, the pomegranate produces jaw-dropping scarlet red flowers. After the initial success of “Edible Landscaping,” she wrote “Cooking from the Garden” but had run out of places to grow, test and photograph her edibles. The front yard offered a precious 2,000 square feet of space. Thus, she decided to take on the most sacred icon of suburbia: the front lawn.

‘Next to the Clampetts’ As radical as a front-yard cornucopia might be in most quiet suburban cul-de-sacs, Creasy’s is in the heart of Silicon Valley, five minutes from Stanford University and in one of the nation’s priciest real estate markets. “If you can do it in this ZIP code, you can do it anyplace,” said Creasy. When the lawn was replaced with raw garden beds, a new neighbor came running over. “I think he thought he was moving in next to the Clampetts,” she

said. “He asked me what I was doing, and I said, ‘I’m putting in a vegetable garden.’ He said, ‘What do the neighbors think?’ I said, ‘Because I always have very beautiful gardens, I’m sure they’ll be happy.’” She pauses. “It worked out fine.” A few years later, she added a chicken coop to house a rooster that she and her late husband, Robert Creasy, had raised from an egg. The chicken, Mr. X, died in 2009, but the coop now separately houses six hens. Neighborhood children stop by to feed them and take the eggs. Creasy sometimes grows wheat in her front yard so the kids can make bread. “You don’t get that by growing flowers and grasses,” she said. “There’s a lot more soul to edible plants.” Creasy grew up in Needham, Mass., where the homes were on half-acre lots. As a child, she preferred raising vegetables to picking Japanese beetles off the roses. “My dad gave me my first garden, and it was all vegetables.” The reworked book took six years. She stopped after Robert was killed in a 2005 motorcycle accident. The neighbors took her to the movies or invited her over for a drink. “We call it an assisted-living street,” she said. Then she got back to work. “The book in some ways saved me.” Much has changed since the original edition. Organic gardening and recycling practices have advanced, gardeners have embraced fruit trees as ornamentals, ethnic vegetables have become mainstream, and people are aware of heirloom varieties. There is still much to be done, she says, but the cause has been advanced significantly. “My goal is when people buy a house and think about changing the yard, they don’t say, ‘Where do I put the lawn?’ and instead say, ‘Where do I put the edibles?’” In her 50th garden makeover, the last piece of front lawn has been replaced with brick and planters. It was a panel of turf just 8 feet by 12. The dragon has been slain.

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F6 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

Apricot bread ideal for holidays By Julie Rothman The Baltimore Sun

Leda Hoffman, of Sonoma, Calif., was looking for a recipe she has lost for making apricot nut bread. She says she especially liked to make this bread around the holidays. Gladys Wilt, of Lothian, Md., sent in two recipes from her collection for apricot nut bread. I tested the one from “The Ladies’ Home Journal Cookbook,” published in 1960, because it sounded like what Hoffman was looking for. This recipe makes a very hearty and dense tea bread that is full of nuts and dried fruit.

Calif., would like to have a recipe for making pickled peaches. Her grandmother, who lived to be 102 and came to America in the first decade of the 1900s from England, made the peaches and served them at their family’s Christmas dinner. If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request, write to Julie Rothman, Recipe Finder, The Baltimore Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. If you send more than one recipe, please put each on a separate piece of paper with your name, address and daytime phone number. Please list the ingredients in order of use and note the number of servings each recipe makes.

RECIPE FINDER

RECIPE REQUEST: Gloria Garrett, of Cloverdale,

APRICOT NUT BREAD Makes 1 loaf. 1½ C dried apricots ¾ C sugar 4 tsp baking powder ½ tsp salt ½ tsp baking soda

2¾ C flour 1 egg 1 C buttermilk 1 TBS melted shortening 1 C chopped nuts

Wash and drain the apricots and cut into thin strips. Sift the sugar, baking powder, salt and baking soda with the flour. Save about 1 tablespoon of the flour to dredge the apricots. Mix wellbeaten egg with buttermilk and add to the dry ingredients with the melted shortening or oil, stirring only until mixed. Do not overmix. Fold in the nuts and the apricots that have been dredged with the reserved tablespoon of flour. Pour into greased 9-by-5-by2¾-inch loaf pan. Bake in a 350-degree oven for about 1 hour or until tester inserted in center comes out clean. Turn finished loaf out and cool on rack. Wrap in aluminum foil. Bread slices better the second day.

Swap those cookies! Chicago Tribune Three books offer tips and recipes for cookie swaps: “The Cookie Party Cookbook” by Robin L. Olson (St. Martin’s Press, $18.99): Use parchment paper to line cookie sheets to keep cookies from sticking or overbrowning. “Very Merry Cookie Party” by Barbara Grunes and Virginia

Van Vynckt (Chronicle Books, $19.95): Tubes of icings can be hard to squeeze at room temperature, so put them in hot water briefly to thin the icing. “Cookie Swap!” by Lauren Chattman (Workman, $14.95): Test your baking powder freshness. Mix 1 teaspoon with ½ cup water. If it bubbles vigorously, it’s still good.

Cashmere: Worth the cost? A highly coveted material for centuries, cashmere has long been associated with special occasions.

MARTHA STEWART

Tony Cenicola New York Times News Service

Q:

My daughter has asked for a cashmere sweater for Christmas. How can I ensure I purchase a well-made one? Like today’s holiday shoppers, 18th-century Western explorers coveted cashmere. The fine wool owes its softness to the animal from which it’s shorn — Capra hircus laniger, a goat native to Kashmir that’s now bred in China, Mongolia and central Asia for its wool. What distinguishes this goat is its two layers of fleece. Rough fibers blanket the softer insulating filaments that are used to create cashmere yarn. For all of cashmere’s allure, it possesses two drawbacks: It pills, and it’s expensive. Often there’s a correlation. Pricier cashmere is less likely to pill because it’s made with the best fibers. These come from breeds in inner Mongolia that produce the finest hair. This hair is light and long enough so that fewer strands stick out of the yarn once it has been spun — thus the finished sweater doesn’t pill as easily. A simple test will yield clues about fiber quality. Bunch the sweater in your fist and then let it go. “It should come back to life,” says Karl Spilhaus, president of the Cashmere and Camel Hair Manufacturers Institute. “A good product will have a certain loft.” Avoid scratchy sweaters with fibers sticking out, which may foreshadow excessive pilling due to the short and lower-quality fibers. Another factor is ply: the number of yarn strands twisted together. Overall, two-ply cashmere (two entwined yarn strands) is more durable than single, and therefore less likely to pill or lose its shape, says Ingrid Johnson, professor of textile development and marketing at New York’s Fashion Institute of Technology. But single-ply is softer and lighter; it’s ideal for cool summer evenings. Plies greater than two aren’t necessar-

A:

ily more durable; they’re heavier and warmer. Although blends — cashmere twisted with wool, silk and so on — can be a sneaky way to sell consumers a watered-down version of the prized wool, don’t reject them out of hand. A blend of silk and cashmere is shiny and smooth, yet soft, says textile designer Beatrice Wong. Because cashmere will inevitably pill regardless of quality, buy a sweater comb to safely remove the rolled fibers. When it comes time to clean the sweater, dry clean or hand wash it. To do the latter, agitate the sweater gently in lukewarm, sudsy water and rinse it thoroughly. Lay it flat on a towel, roll them up together and then squeeze gently to remove water. Let the garment dry on a flat surface for 24 hours. Before storing your cashmere for a long period, be sure to clean it and place cedar blocks in the drawer to protect the sweater from moths.

Q:

The buds on my Christmas cactus fall off before opening. What causes this problem and how do I remedy it? The masses of orchidlike flowers that Christmas cacti (Schlumbergera sp.) produce during the holidays make them popular houseplants. The cactus is easy to grow under the right conditions, but its buds often fall off before they bloom. Exposure to heat or cold is a major culprit: If the plant sits near a radiator or in the path of a drafty window, it will almost certainly drop its buds. In cold areas of the country, damage may also occur between the store and your home as the plant moves through a broad range of temperatures in a short period of time. (Make sure the salesperson wraps the cactus in paper and places it in a bag. Then take it home right away.) Watering too much or too little also causes bud drop, as does fertilizing the plant as it buds and

A:

flowers. Finally, gas from ripening fruit can knock off the buds of many plants, not just Christmas cacti, so don’t keep them in the kitchen or anywhere produce is displayed. For the best results, place the plant in a cool (64 to 68 degrees), draft-free location, with evenly moist soil and bright, indirect light; it should hold on to its buds, which will unfurl on schedule. Once the blooms fade, you can move the plant to a warmer location. Questions should be addressed to Ask Martha, c/o Letters Department, Martha Stewart Living, 601 W. 26th St., 9th floor, New York, NY 10001. Questions may also be sent by e-mail to: mslletters@marthastewart.com. Please include your name, address and daytime telephone number. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column; Martha Stewart regrets that unpublished letters cannot be answered individually.


THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 G1

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Boxer Puppies, AKC, 7 wks, 2 males @$400 ea; 6 females @$500 ea. 541-408-5230

WANTED: Cars, Trucks, Motorcycles, Boats, Jet Skis, ATVs - RUNNING or NOT! 541-280-7959. Wanted: $$$Cash$$$ paid for old vintage costume, scrap, silver & gold Jewelry. Top dollar paid, Estate incl. Honest Artist. Elizabeth 633-7006 Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

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Items for Free FREE TV & VCR, 27” Samsung, 5 miles east of Bend. 541-389-5071 Horse Manure, large loads, perfect for gardening, will load, FREE. 541-390-6570.

208

Pets and Supplies The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to fraud. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Aussie/Shepherd pups 6 wks, (3) 2 are Blue Merle. $100 each. Call 541-536-4440, or 503-310-2514

Carmel had been abandoned & was rescued just days before giving birth to one tiny kitten, Bosco. They are now ready for a new inside home, and we would love to have them stay together. Both are social, altered, vaccinated & ID chipped. Reduced adoption fee if they stay together. www.craftcats.org, 541 389 8420, or visit them & the other CRAFT kitties Sat/Sun 1-4 @ 65480 78th, Bend. Cat rescue group remains buried in cats/kittens since the big local shelters are refusing cats - we need YOUR help! We're nonprofit, all-volunteer, with no govt. funding or subsidies. We're trying to help the animals that have been abandoned or are most at risk, but need good quality kitten & cat food, litter, cleaning items, etc. & funds for vet bills. Also need volunteers to help a little or a lot, and of course great new homes for the cats & kittens. www.craftcats.org, e-mail info@craftcats.org, call 541 389 8420, 598 5488, or visit the sanctuary Sat/Sun 1-4, 65480 78th St., Bend; call re: other days. Thanks for supporting your local kitten/cat rescue group & the forgotten animals of this area!

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppies, Blenheim & tricolor, 8 wks old. AKC reg., champion lines. Parents heart/eye certified annually. Aussie Toy Sheltie mix small 541-410-1066; 541-480-4426 male pup. 15 weeks, very www.djcavalierkennels.com cute. $125. 541-390-8875. Beagle Puppies - 10 weeks, 1st/2nd shots. Great with kids. $175 (541)419-4960.

Border Collie x Golden Retriever puppies, mostly black 7 wks ready. 541-281-4047 Boston Terrier, AKC 12-wk male, family raised, 1st/2nd shots, $400. 541-610-8525

Chihuahua Puppies, unique colors, great with kids, $300. 541-977-4817 Email jesse1215@gmail.com

Chinchilla for sale. Handled, friendly. Cage included. Needs friendly home. $125. Gray, 3 yrs. 541-593-2960

Chocolate

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Pups, 7 weeks old, all big males,purebred no papers $150. each (541)948-2678

English Bulldog AKC male, “Cooper” is 8 mo. old, all shots, $1200. 541-325-3376. English Bulldog puppies, AKC, Grand sire by Champion Cherokee Legend Rock, #1 Bulldog in USA ‘06, ‘07 and ‘08, ready to go! $1300/ea. 541-306-0372 ENGLISH BULLDOG PUPPY Female, AKC Registered 6 months old, all shots & microchipped . $800. (541) 416-0375

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Aussies - Toys & Minis, will hold for Christmas, prices start $500, 541-548-6672 or www.cattlecalltoyaussies.com

Black Lab/Walker Hound Pups. Super Healthy. 1st shots & dewormed. $100 382-7567

Chihuahua- absolutely adorable teacups, wormed, 1st shots, $250, 541-977-4686. Chihuahua, Applehead, male, last one! $200, 541-593-0223.

Chesapeake Pups AKC, shots, dew claws, great disposition, $500-$600 ea. 541-259-4739 CHIHUAHUA, 10 weeks, 2 females. $200 each. 541-678-8760.

English Mastiff puppies, registered. 8 months, 1 female, 1 male, Brindle. $600 ea including Spay/Neuter. Willow Farms Mastiff 541-279-1437.

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German Shorthair Puppies, AKC 9 wks old, 6 males, shots/ wormed. 5 dogs in the GSP Hall of Fame in their pedigree; excellent hunt/show or family dogs. Well socialized, $500. Also 1 4-yr male, $800; and 1 4-month female, $800. 541-923-8377; 541-419-6638 German Wirehaired Pointer, male pup. $300 or trade for guns. 541-548-3408 Golden Retriever English Cream AKC, Christmas pups! males, 12 wks, $700. 541-852-2991 Great Pyrenees purebred pups ready week of Christmas. 3 F 3M, $500-$600. Ranch raised, parents on site. 541-576-2564 Griffin Wirehaired Pointer, male pup, 6 mo., both parents AKC, good hunters, great hunting potential & good natured, $500, loreencooper@centurytel.net 541-934-2423. LAB PUPS AKC, titled parents, FC/AFC, Blackwater Rudy is grand sire. Deep pedigreed performance/titles, OFA hips & elbows. 541-771-2330 www.royalflush retrievers.com Labradoodles, Australian Imports - 541-504-2662 www.alpen-ridge.com

Scottish Terrier purebred puppies, 7 wks, 1 Wheaten male, 1 black male, 1st shots, wormed. $250 541-408-2628

Pro-grade stainless refer, range, micro, dishwasher; Washer & dryer. 10 mos use. Storage cabs. $2400. 541-678-1963 Recliner, Brown, microfiber, good shape, $75; Loveseat recliner, tan microfiber, w/ console, exc. shape, $200, 541-548-0324.

Guns & Hunting and Fishing

S H I H - T Z U, 8 mo., male. $350. 541-678-8760.

Shih Tzu/Poodle mix, 14-week male, $250. Great Christmas present! 541-233-8202 Shih Tzu puppies, 3 girls, 2 boys, 1 very small female, $450-$750. 541-788-0090

ROLL TOP DESK - $950 (obo) Solid Oak. BEAUTIFUL! 541-504-7189. Sponsors needed to help with the cost of surgery for sweet little Tallulah, who was abandoned at a dumpster. We thought she had a huge abscess on her side, but the vet said it was a hernia. Her kidney was protruding & this could only have happened if she was kicked very hard. She had surgery to put everything where it belongs & will be adoptable after recovery. 541 389 8420, 598 5488, Box 6441, Bend 97708, info@craftcats.org, or visit www.craftcats.org. Thanks for your support during these difficult economic times. Toy Poodle Puppies for sale at an affordable price. Call Cindy at 541 771-0522.

Labrador pups, quality purebred English, beautiful yellow & rare fox-red yellow, home raised, happy, $550-$600 ea 541-461-1133; 541-510-0495

Labs, English yellow, AKC, dewclaws, vaccinations & microchipped. $600. 541-884-2742

We have a beautiful 12-wk -old white German Shepherd for sale. First 2 sets of shots, worming and vet check. All kinds of stuff to go with her, too. $400. If interested please call Rayna at (619) 971-8795. White German Shepard Pups, AKC, absolutely gorgeous, 1 male, 1 female, born 10/1, $1500 w/papers, $999 without, 541-536-6167.

Second Hand Mattresses, sets & singles, call

541-598-4643. The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D . For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Wanted washers and dryers, working or not, cash paid, 541-280-7959.

212

Antiques & Collectibles Antique Dressmaker’s Dummy, great for clothing display? Excellent condition, $350. 541-317-4985; 541-280-0112

Malamute/Lab puppies for sale! 8wks old, ready now. Need loving homes! 5 males 1 female $100 each, COWGIRL RESALE 541-923-1180 call between Yorkie Mix pups, very tiny & Gently Used Western Wear cute, 10 weeks old, $180 the hours of 4pm and 8pm Turquoise, Old Pawn cash. 541-678-7599 Squash Blossoms, Cuffs Male Malamute Puppy. 7 weeks 541-549-6950 old. He has beautiful mark- Yorkie Pups, ready for good homes, parents on-site, 1st ings and loves to cuddle and The Bulletin reserves the right shots, $450, 541-536-3108 play. He has everything you to publish all ads from The would need for a new puppy. Bulletin newspaper onto The 210 I am so sad to have to get rid Bulletin Internet website. of him but I am allergic Furniture & Appliances $400 call/text 541-508-8191 #1 Appliances • Dryers Miniature Schnauzer pups, • Washers purebred, salt & pepper, 215 black, ready for Christmas, $300-$350, 541-771-1830. Coins & Stamps Min-Pin pups, Adorable pure WANTED TO BUY bred, 8 weeks old, Black & US & Foreign Coin & Currency Tan, 4 males $400/ea and 1 Start at $99 collections, accum. Pre-1964 female $500. up-to-date, on FREE DELIVERY! silver coins, bars, rounds, shots. Pics available. Lifetime Warranty sterling flatware. Gold coins, 541-633-6148 (leave msg) Also, Wanted Washers, bars, jewelry, scrap & dental Dryers, Working or Not Papillon pups just in time gold. Diamonds, Rolex & Call 541-280-7959 for St Nick to put under tree. vintage watches. No collec$300. Taking deposits. Call !Appliances! A-1 Quality & Honesty! tion too large or small. Bed541-504-9958 A-1 Washers & Dryers rock Rare Coins 541-549-1658 $125 each. Full Warranty. Poodle Puppies, purebred, 246 Free Del. Also wanted W/D’s small Toy, black males, 4 mo, dead or alive. 541-280-7355. Guns & Hunting shots, pre-spoiled! $225. 541-567-3150; 503-779-3844 Appliances, new & recondiand Fishing POODLES AKC Toy. Also tioned, guaranteed. OverPom-a-Poos. Home raised. stock sale. Lance & Sandy’s 10 ga Ithaca semi auto shotgun w/26” bbl; $150 ammo 541-475-3889 541-325-6212 Maytag, 541-385-5418 incl. All $575. 541-419-5565 Furniture

Poodles Standard - AKC, browns & blacks, AKC champ sired, health & tempermant guaranteed, raw fed, parti pups soon, 877-385-9120 or marsanpoodles@gmail.com

Visit our HUGE home decor consignment store. New items arrive daily! 930 SE Textron & 1060 SE 3rd St., Bend • 541-318-1501 www.redeuxbend.com

Portuguese Podengos,very rare breed, small 10” size, 10-12 GENERATE SOME excitement in lbs, 2 females & 1 male; can your neigborhood. Plan a gahold for Christmas! Call rage sale and don't forget to Free to good home male pit541-389-2636. See photos at advertise in classified! bull, brown and white, about www.bodeankennels.com 385-5809. 10 mo. old. Moving and canQueensland Heelers not take him with us. We are Standards & mini,$150 & up. in Redmond. Call Mike (541) MODEL HOME stag541-280-1537 598-4565. ing warehouse sale JUST http://rightwayranch.spaces.live.com IN TIME FOR CHRISTMAS Free to seniors, companion cats, Rescued kittens still avail. for with like-new furnishings, social, fixed, shots, ID chip, adoption! Social, altered, art & accessories at great ready for you! 541-389-8420 shots, ID chip, more. Playful prices! Sat./Sun., 12/11 & www.craftcats.org 'teenage' kittens & nice adult 12/12, 9-4 both days. German Shepherd Pups, 3 cats, too! 65489 78th, Bend, 615 SE Glenwood Dr., near white, 1 dark mahogany, 1 Sat/Sun 1-4, other days by Bend High . Cash, Visa or white donated to Sisters appt. See www.craftcats.org MC only. Delivery appts. Wrestling team, $500 ea., for map/photos. Info: 541 available for a fee. 541-610-5785. 389 8420, 598-5488, lv. msg.

1911 .45CAP Clone Rock Island Emory Serial #R1A857299. Shot 1,000 rounds, good condition, no mods, iron sights w/wood grips. $450.OBO w/2 mags; 5 mags extra $$. Call or txt 541-306-7126. 1911 Colt 45, A1, with holster, excellent condition, $900. Call 541-815-3619 45 ACP, Springfield Armory 1911-A1, mags, box & ammo, $725. 541-647-8931

AUCTION

Sun. Dec. 12 at 10am 121 Deady Crossing – Sutherlin Equipment, Trucks, Trailers, Pickups, Cars, ATVs, Firearms, Tools & More.

www.I-5auctions.com (541) 643-0552 Browning Gold Hunter 12 ga. semi-automatic, shoots 3½”, $500. Scott, 541-508-6327 CASH!! For Guns, Ammo & Reloading Supplies. 541-408-6900.

Custom Enfield Model 19-17 375 H&H, heavy barrel, $850 OBO. Uberti 1848 3rd gen dragoon black powder pistol, MSRP $409, & holster $70; asking $400 both, OBO. 541-390-1010 GUNS Buy, Sell, Trade 541-728-1036. Ruger #1 22-250 varmitter $699. Taurus .44 mag SS, 8” barrel $369. 541-419-5830 Look at: Bendhomes.com for Complete Listings of Area Real Estate for Sale Ruger 338 M-77 S/S, synthetic stock, Nikon 4.5-14 scope, $675 OBO. 541-420-9063 Ruger P345 .45 acp, 2 clips, as new in box. Including K&D holster. $475 cash. Call 541-598-4467

Tama drum set complete in excellent used condition, $325 541-281-4047

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SELL FOR $500 OR LESS?

260

Misc. Items Bedrock Gold & Silver BUYING DIAMONDS & R O L E X ’ S For Cash 541-549-1592

Find exactly what you are looking for in the CLASSIFIEDS BUYING AND SELLING All gold jewelry, silver and gold coins, bars, rounds, wedding sets, class rings, sterling silver, coin collect, vintage watches, dental gold. Bill Fleming, 541-382-9419.

Buying Diamonds /Gold for Cash

SAXON'S FINE JEWELERS

541-389-6655

N o n-c o m m e r cial a d v e r ti s e r s c a n place an ad for our "Quick Cash Special" 1 week 3 lines $10 bucks or 2 weeks $16 bucks! Ad must include price of item

www.bendbulletin.com or Call Classifieds at 541-385-5809 Large solid metal Giraffes, Mom & Baby, from Pier 1, $200 for both. 541-388-7555 Advertise your car! Add A Picture! Reach thousands of readers!

S&W 44 Mag Model 629

Call 541-385-5809 BUYING The Bulletin Classifieds Lionel/American Flyer trains, accessories. 541-408-2191. Open/Close sign for a business, very nice with remote conWanted: Collector seeks high Chainsaws, like new! Run extrol; hydraulic styling chair in quality fishing items. Call cellent! Stihl MS-460, $695! very good condition; nice 541-678-5753, 503-351-2746 MS-390, $395! 026 20” $269! built-in hair drying chair, all Husqavarna 395XP, $595! Winchester Model 70 XTR 7 $275. Call 541-325-9476 281XP, $595! 372XP, $595! mm Magnum with 3x9 Tasco 55XP, 20”, $295! 445XP, 20”, Santa Suit, used 1x/yr, 6 yrs., Pronghorn Scope $450 Call $295! 541-280-5006 exc. cond, w/accessories, new 541-923-4196 $275, sell $150 OBO, 420-5381 Christmas Village,Porcelain, sep247 erate lighted units, 8 for $70, Wanted - paying cash for Hi-fi or $10 ea., 541-317-2890. Sporting Goods audio & studio equip. McIntosh, JBL, Marantz, Dynaco, Coca Cola Collectibles, many - Misc. Heathkit, Sansui, Carver, items, excellent condition. NAD, etc. Call 541-261-1808 $200 for all. 541-388-7555 Sage Fly Rod, Z-AXIS490-4 9’ 4-piece, 4 weight, Sage 2540 Reel, extra spool, line, BEND’S HOMELESS NEED OUR HELP new, $625, 541-884-6440 The cold weather is upon us and sadly there are still over 2,000 folks in our community without permanent shelter, liv255 ing in cars, makeshift camps, getting by as best they can.

$665. Colt Mark V .357 Mag $495. Dan 541-410- 5444.

Computers Inkjet Printer, HP 7210 All-InOne, w/3 extra new ink cartridges, $65, 541-330-5467 THE BULLETIN requires computer advertisers with multiple ad schedules or those selling multiple systems/ software, to disclose the name of the business or the term "dealer" in their ads. Private party advertisers are defined as those who sell one computer.

The following items are badly needed to help them get through the winter: d CAMPING GEAR of any sort: d Used tents, sleeping bags, tarps, blankets.

d

WARM CLOTHING d Rain Gear, Boots

Please drop off your donations at the BEND COMMUNITY CENTER 1036 NE FIFTH STREET (312-2069)

Questions: Call Ken Boyer, 389-3296, or Don Auxier, 383-0448 PLEASE HELP. YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE.


G2 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

541-385-5809 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD

AD PLACEMENT DEADLINES

PLACE AN AD

Edited by Will Shortz

Monday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. Tuesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Mon. Wednesday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Tues. Thursday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Wed. Friday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Thurs. Saturday Real Estate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11:00am Fri. Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3:00 Fri. Sunday. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon Sat. PRIVATE PARTY RATES Starting at 3 lines *UNDER $500 in total merchandise 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16.00

Place a photo in your private party ad for only $15.00 per week.

Garage Sale Special

OVER $500 in total merchandise 4 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17.50 7 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $23.00 14 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $32.50 28 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $60.50

4 lines for 4 days. . . . . . . . . $20.00

(call for commercial line ad rates)

A Payment Drop Box is available at Bend City Hall. CLASSIFICATIONS BELOW MARKED WITH AN (*) REQUIRE PREPAYMENT as well as any out-of-area ads. The Bulletin reserves the right to reject any ad at any time.

CLASSIFIED OFFICE HOURS: MON.-FRI. 7:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. SATURDAY by telephone 10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

*Must state prices in ad

is located at: 1777 S.W. Chandler Ave. Bend, Oregon 97702 PLEASE NOTE: Check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Please call us immediately if a correction is needed. We will gladly accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. The publisher reserves the right to accept or reject any ad at anytime, classify and index any advertising based on the policies of these newspapers. The publisher shall not be liable for any advertisement omitted for any reason. Private Party Classified ads running 7 or more days will publish in the Central Oregon Marketplace each Tuesday. 264

267

Snow Removal Equipment

Fuel and Wood SPLIT, DRY LODGEPOLE DELIVERY INCLUDED! $175/CORD. Call for half-cord prices! Leave message, 541-923-6987

SNOW PLOW, Boss 8 ft. with power turn , excellent condition $3,000. 541-385-4790.

265

Building Materials Bend Habitat RESTORE Building Supply Resale Quality at LOW PRICES 740 NE 1st 312-6709 Open to the public .

266

Heating and Stoves JOTUL Gas stove GF600DV Firelight, like new, black in color. $1000. 541-504-4666 NOTICE TO ADVERTISER Since September 29, 1991, advertising for used woodstoves has been limited to models which have been certified by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having met smoke emission standards. A certified woodstove can be identified by its certification label, which is permanently attached to the stove. The Bulletin will not knowingly accept advertising for the sale of uncertified woodstoves.

267

Fuel and Wood

WHEN BUYING FIREWOOD...

269

Gardening Supplies & Equipment

SUPER TOP SOIL www.hersheysoilandbark.com Screened, soil & compost mixed, no rocks/clods. High humus level, exc. for flower beds, lawns, gardens, straight screened top soil. Bark. Clean fill. Deliver/you haul. 541-548-3949.

270

Lost and Found Found Key: 11/29, On Greenwood between 5th & 6th, call to ID, 541-480-5851. Found keys for Dodge + house keys? NW 19th & Ivy, Redmond, 11/30. 541-526-7246 LOST Black/White Shih Tzu female “Bailey” Thanksgiving morning, Eagle Crest. Needs meds. Reward. 360-518-2126 Lost: Grey & White large Cat, male,12 yrs, Cauliflower ears, N. Redmond, 541-548-7624.

name, phone, price and kind of wood purchased.

All Year Dependable Firewood: SPLIT dry Lodgepole, $150 for 1 cord or $290 for 2, Bend del. Cash Check Visa/MC 541-420-3484 CASH price: Rounds $119; 2 cords/more $115 ea. Split, $149; 2 cords/more, $145 ea. (Visa/MC: $129 or Split $159 ea) Deliv avail. 541-771-8534

CRUISE THROUGH classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

421

Schools and Training

Trucks: 2 1-ton flatbed pickups, 1 Dodge 1/2-ton, & 1 Toyota Diesel pickup, 2 rubber tired backhoes, 2 Crawler tractors & 2 semi trucks with trailers, evenings 541-382-7995

325

Hay, Grain and Feed 1st Quality Grass Hay Barn stored, 2 string, no weeds 65 lb. bales, $160/ton; 5+ tons, $150/ton. Patterson Ranch in Sisters, 541-549-3831 Bluegrass Straw mid-size 3x3, $25/bale; Orchard grass hay mid-size 3x3 $45/bale. Volume discounts; delivery available. 541-480-8648.

341

Horses and Equipment

Precious stone found around SE duplex near Ponderosa Park. Identify 541-382-8893.

200 ACRES BOARDING Indoor/outdoor arenas, stalls, & pastures, lessons & kid’s programs. 541-923-6372 www.clinefallsranch.com

CAUTION

READERS:

Ads published in "Employment Opportunities" include employee and independent positions. Ads for positions that require a fee or upfront investment must be stated. With any independent job opportunity, please investigate thoroughly. Use extra caution when applying for jobs online and never provide personal information to any source you may not have researched and deemed to be reputable. Use extreme caution when responding to ANY online employment ad from out-of-state. We suggest you call the State of Oregon Consumer Hotline at 1-503-378-4320 For Equal Opportunity Laws: Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industry, Civil Rights Division, 503-731-4075 If you have any questions, concerns or comments, contact: Shawn Antoni, Classified Dept , The Bulletin

HH FREE HH Garage Sale Kit Place an ad in The Bulletin for your garage sale and receive a Garage Sale Kit FREE!

292

Sales Other Areas

ASPC Shetland Ponies: Palomino Gelding, gentle and ready to start, $150; Palomino Stallion halter champion $300. Hold until Christmas. 541-548-2887/788-1649

READY FOR A CHANGE? Don't just sit there, let the Classified Help Wanted column find a new challenging job for you. www.bendbulletin.com Retiring, young quarterhorses for sale, Very gentle, 541-382-7995.

358

Farmers Column A farmer that does it right & is on time. Power no till seeding, disc, till, plow & plant new/older fields, haying services, cut, rake, bale, Gopher control. 541-419-4516 Orchard Grass, $165/ton, Alfalfa, $150/ton, Mix Hay, $160/ton, Feeder Hay, $100/ton, cheap delivery avail., 541-891-4087.

383

Produce and Food Wild Alaskan Salmon Fresh-Frozen Coho and Sockeye Sockeye $13.50/lb Coho $12.00/lb available for delivery From the fisherman to you! Kelvin Vaughan 907.209.2055

476

Employment Opportunities

Customer Support Advisors - Technical We Offer our employees: •Full Time Hours w/ a variety of schedules, including split shifts •Paid Time Off & Benefits •Paid Training & Incentives •Positive team environment

General DO YOU NEED A GREAT EMPLOYEE RIGHT NOW? Call The Bulletin before noon and get an ad in to publish the next day! 385-5809. VIEW the Classifieds at: www.bendbulletin.com

General-

We are seeking candidates with the following: •Excellent Communication Skills w/ the Desire to Provide Superior Customer Service •Typing speed of 25 + wpm w/ working knowledge of computers, smart phones and other popular electronic devices •Min. 18 years of age w/ HS Diploma or GED Please apply on-line for immediate consideration www.trgcs.com/joinus.html 541-647-6682 DENTAL ASSISTANT Our busy practice is looking for a dental assistant who is a team player with a great attitude. Xray certification and some experience preferred. Great staff and benefits. Call 541-504-0880 between 10 am and 4pm. or evenings before 8pm - 541-548-9997.

Need Help? We Can Help! REACH THOUSANDS OF POTENTIAL EMPLOYEES EVERY DAY! Call the Classified Department for more information: 541-385-5809

Sell Sunday editions of the Newspaper in popular street corners in Bend. You work Sundays ONLY from 9am till 3pm-4pm. You get paid cash that same day at the end of the shift. We are looking for motivated and charismatic individuals. Call 541-306-6346 for a phone interview. -Independent Contractor-

EMPLOYMENT 410 - Private Instruction 421 - Schools and Training 454 - Looking for Employment 470 - Domestic & In-Home Positions 476 - Employment Opportunities 486 - Independent Positions

FINANCE AND BUSINESS 507 - Real Estate Contracts 514 - Insurance 528 - Loans and Mortgages 543 - Stocks and Bonds 558 - Business Investments 573 - Business Opportunities

476

476

Employment Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Remember.... Add your web address to your ad and readers on The Bulletin's web site will be able to click through automatically to your site.

The Bulletin Classifieds is your Employment Marketplace Call 541-385-5809 today!

The Bulletin Recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Sales

Nurses

Full & part-time, LPNs welcome! Call Kim Carpenter, Ochoco Care Center, Prineville, 541-447-7667. OPTICAL - We are seeking a Dispensing Optician for our primary care, independent optometric office. Experience required. Applicant must possess excellent customer service skills, and frame adjustment and dispensing skills. 4-5 days per week; no weekends. Competitive benefits. Apply to DRKC@iebend.com or fax to 541-382-5702.

Flatbed Driver – Doubles Central Oregon Truck Company has an opening for a Maxi driver. Home most weekends. At least 2 years OTR Exp., clean MVR, DAC & no recent felonies. COTC offers Full benefits after 90 days, vacation pay & a great team to Work with. Apply today, www.centraloregontruck.com or 866-394-1944 ext. 117 or ext. 123.

The Bulletin's classified ads include publication on our Internet site. Our site is currently receiving over 1,500,000 page views every month. Place your employment ad with The Bulletin and reach a world of potential applicants through the Internet....at no extra cost!

Independent Contractor

H Supplement Your Income H

FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF

Newspaper Delivery Independent Contractor Join The Bulletin as an independent contractor!

& Call Today & We are looking for independent contractors to service home delivery routes in:

H Bend, Prineville & Madras H

507

Real Estate Contracts LOCAL MONEY We buy secured trust deeds & note, some hard money loans. Call Pat Kelley 541-382-3099 extension 13.

WORK PART TIME HOURS, FULL TIME PAY

Wanna Make Bank??? AND HAVE FUN?

Loans and Mortgages

528

541-322-7253

No Experience Necessary No Car, No Problem, Only 30 Hours Per Week PM Shifts & Weekends Available

Call Right Now 541-306-6346 Independent Contractor

Sales

NEED A JOB? If You Can Answer YES To These Questions, WE WANT YOU 1. Do you talk too much? 2. Do you like to have fun? 3. Do you want to make a lot of $$? 4. Are you available Wed.-Fri., 4pm-9pm & all day Sat. & Sun.?

Work part time with full time pay! DON'T LAG, CALL NOW! 541-306-6346

Need Seasonal help? Need Part-time help? Need Full-time help? Advertise your open positions. The Bulletin Classifieds

SALES - Part-time position. Seeking salesperson who is self-motivated, familiar with computers and physically able to lift 50-100 lbs. Must be able to fill a flexible schedule. Knowledge of firearms, tools, electronics or jewelry is a plus. Please fax resume to 541-318-0808.

The Bulletin

Must be available 7 days a week, early morning hours. Must have reliable, insured vehicle.

is your Employment Marketplace Call

Please call 541.385.5800 or 800.503.3933 during business hours

541-385-5809

apply via email at online@bendbulletin.com

500 To Subscribe call 541-385-5800 or go to www.bendbulletin.com

Independent Contractor

Operate Your Own Business

Finance & Business

The Bulletin

ATTENTION

PIANO PLAYER wanted, Dec. Dental -Front Office 18th, for 3 hrs @ $50/hr. 4 Days a week, dental assisCall Christina, 541-279-9492 tant preferred. Drop off resume at 2078 NE Professional Ct., Bend. ATTENTION: 541-382-2281. Recruiters and Jack Miller, DMD Branden Ferguson, DDS Businesses -

CRUISE THROUGH Classified when you're in the market for a new or used car.

Sales Northeast Bend

DON'T FORGET to take your signs down after your garage sale and be careful not to place signs on utility poles! www.bendbulletin.com

Log Splitter, very powerful, works great, nice Christmas present! $500. 541-389-9844

476

Employment Opportunities

Caregiver: Dependable caregiver needed for spinal injured female, Part-time transportation & refs., req. 541-610-2799.

286

PICK UP YOUR GARAGE SALE KIT AT: 1777 SW Chandler Ave. Bend, OR 97702

Dry Lodgepole For Sale $170per cord rounds; $190 per cord split. 35 years’ service to Central Oregon. Call 541-480-5601

TRUCK SCHOOL www.IITR.net Redmond Campus Student Loans/Job Waiting Toll Free 1-888-438-2235

541-617-7825

REMEMBER: If you have lost an animal don't forget to check The Humane Society in Bend, 382-3537 or Redmond, 923-0882 or Prineville, 447-7178

KIT INCLUDES: • 4 Garage Sale Signs • $1.00 Off Coupon To Use Toward Your Next Ad • 10 Tips For “Garage Sale Success!” • And Inventory Sheet

Dry Lodgepole: $150/cord rounds, $175/cord split, Free Delivery, please call 541-610-6713.

308

Tractor, Case 22 hp., fewer than 50 hrs. 48 in. mower deck, bucket, auger, blade, move forces sale $11,800. 541-325-1508.

476

Employment Opportunities

NOW HIRING!

Farm Equipment and Machinery

Premium Orchard grass, & Premium Oat grass mix. 3x3 midsize bales, no rain, no weeds. Orchard @$65/bale; Lost Ring: Heirloom, green stone Oat @$50/bale 541-419-2713 w/small diamonds around it, Redmond/Bend area, early as Wheat Straw: Certified & BedSept., 541-447-5389 ding Straw & Garden Straw; Kentucky Bluegrass; Compost; 541-546-6171.

• A cord is 128 cu. ft. 4’ x 4’ x 8’

Employment

300 400

BarkTurfSoil.com Instant Landscaping Co. PROMPT DELIVERY 541-389-9663

To avoid fraud, The Bulletin recommends payment for Firewood only upon delivery & inspection.

• Receipts should include,

Farm Market

to advertise! www.bendbulletin.com

Looking for your next employee? Place a Bulletin help wanted ad today and reach over 60,000 readers each week. Your classified ad will also appear on bendbulletin.com which currently receives over 1.5 million page views every month at no extra cost. Bulletin Classifieds Get Results! Call 385-5809 or place your ad on-line at bendbulletin.com

WARNING The Bulletin recommends you use caution when you provide personal information to companies offering loans or credit, especially those asking for advance loan fees or companies from out of state. If you have concerns or questions, we suggest you consult your attorney or call CONSUMER HOTLINE, 1-877-877-9392.

BANK TURNED YOU DOWN? Private party will loan on real estate equity. Credit, no problem, good equity is all you need. Call now. Oregon Land Mortgage 388-4200.

What are you looking for? You’ll find it in The Bulletin Classifieds

541-385-5809


To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

RENTALS 603 - Rental Alternatives 604 - Storage Rentals 605 - Roommate Wanted 616 - Want To Rent 627 - Vacation Rentals & Exchanges 630 - Rooms for Rent 631 - Condo/Townhomes for Rent 632 - Apt./Multiplex General 634 - Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 636 - Apt./Multiplex NW Bend 638 - Apt./Multiplex SE Bend 640 - Apt./Multiplex SW Bend 642 - Apt./Multiplex Redmond 646 - Apt./Multiplex Furnished 648 - Houses for Rent General 650 - Houses for Rent NE Bend 652 - Houses for Rent NW Bend 654 - Houses for Rent SE Bend 656 - Houses for Rent SW Bend 658 - Houses for Rent Redmond 659 - Houses for Rent Sunriver 660 - Houses for Rent La Pine 661 - Houses for Rent Prineville 662 - Houses for Rent Sisters 663 - Houses for Rent Madras 664 - Houses for Rent Furnished 671 - Mobile/Mfd. for Rent 675 - RV Parking 676 - Mobile/Mfd. Space

682 - Farms, Ranches and Acreage 687 - Commercial for Rent/Lease 693 - Office/Retail Space for Rent REAL ESTATE 705 - Real Estate Services 713 - Real Estate Wanted 719 - Real Estate Trades 726 - Timeshares for Sale 732 - Commercial/Investment Properties for Sale 738 - Multiplexes for Sale 740 - Condo/Townhomes for Sale 744 - Open Houses 745 - Homes for Sale 746 - Northwest Bend Homes 747 - Southwest Bend Homes 748 - Northeast Bend Homes 749 - Southeast Bend Homes 750 - Redmond Homes 753 - Sisters Homes 755 - Sunriver/La Pine Homes 756 - Jefferson County Homes 757 - Crook County Homes 762 - Homes with Acreage 763 - Recreational Homes and Property 764 - Farms and Ranches 771 - Lots 773 - Acreages 775 - Manufactured/Mobile Homes 780 - Mfd. /Mobile Homes with Land 634

Rentals

600 605

Roommate Wanted Seeking responsible roommate, no smoking/drugs. $300/mo + $200 deposit and ½ utilities. Call 541-279-0779

Apt./Multiplex NE Bend Bend's Finest $200 off 1st month with 1 yr. lease on select apts.

2Bdrm 1 Bath $700 2Bdrm 2 Bath $750

W/D in each apt. Paid W/S/G Covered Parking, Billiards, Free DVD Rentals 2 Recreation Centers 24 hr. fitness, computer labs with internet & more! Call STONEBRIAR APTS.

541-330-5020 Share 2bdrm 2½ bath home Stone.briar.apts@gmail.com near Broken Top, fully furn. Managed by Norris & Stevens $550+ ½ util. 949-940-6748 Share House in DRW, Close to downtown & shops, 2 $400/mo incl. utils, $200 Bdrm 1 bath in triplex. Quiet dep., 541-420-5546. neighborhood, fenced yd, gas stove, W/S & hot water paid. 630 $520. Cat OK. 541-419-4520

Rooms for Rent STUDIOS & KITCHENETTES Furnished room, TV w/ cable, micro. & fridge. Util. & linens, new owners, $145-$165/wk. 541-382-1885

631

** Pick your Special **

2 bdrm, 1 bath as low as $495

Carports & Heat Pumps. Pet Friendly & No App. Fee!

Fox Hollow Apts. (541) 383-3152

Condo / Townhomes For Rent A Westside Condo at Fireside Lodge, 2 bdrm, 1 bath, $595/mo. Wood stove, W/S/G paid. W/D hookup 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 Long term townhomes/homes for rent in Eagle Crest. Appl. included, Spacious 2 & 3 bdrm., with garages, 541-504-7755.

632

Apt./Multiplex General

Cascade Rental Mgmt. Co.

HOSPITAL AREA Clean quiet AWESOME townhouse. 2 Master Bdrms, 2.5 bath, all kitchen appli., W/D hookup, garage w/opener, gas heat & A/C. $645/mo. + dep. S/W/G pd. No Dogs. 541-382-2033

650

671

Houses for Rent NE Bend

Mobile/Mfd. for Rent

3/2 House, large kitchen, great room 1500 sq.ft., large yard with sprinklers. Pets neg. 21336 Pelican Dr. $950 + deposit. Call 541-322-0708

On 10 acres, between Sisters & Bend, 3 Bdrm., 2 bath, 1484 sq.ft., mfd., family room w/ wood stove, all new carpet & paint, + 1800 sq.ft. shop, fenced for horses, $1295. 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803

3 Bdrm, 2.5 bath, 2 car garage, bonus room, deck, fridge, gas stove, new paint, carpet & vinyl. $1000/mo. Pets neg. Mike 541-408-8330.

687

Houses for Rent SE Bend

Office/Warehouse Space, 6400 sq.ft., (3) 12x14 doors, on Boyd Acres Rd, 541-382-8998.

$1385/mo 2456 sq.ft., 3/2.5 Super clean home in Sunmeadow Hot tub, Pool, walk The Bulletin offers a LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Rental to park & Jewell school. 3 car rate! If you have a home to gar Avail 12/10 $1400 derent, call a Bulletin Classified posit pets ok w/deposit Rep. to get the new rates and Keith 771-0475 get your ad started ASAP! 656 541-385-5809

Houses for Rent SW Bend

Apt./Multiplex SW Bend Happy holidays! Enjoy living at 179 SW Hayes Ave. Spacious 2 Bdrm townhouses, 1.5 baths, W/D hookups, fenced yard. NO PETS. W/S/G pd. Rent starts at $525 mo. 541-382-0162; 541-420-2133

642

Apt./Multiplex Redmond ASK ABOUT OUR HOLIDAY SPECIAL! 2 bdrm., 1 bath, $550 mo. includes storage unit & carport. Close to schools, parks & shopping. On-site laundry, no-smoking units, dog run. Pet Friendly. OBSIDIAN APARTMENTS 541-923-1907 www.redmondrents.com Need help ixing stuff around the house? Call A Service Professional and ind the help you need. www.bendbulletin.com

Clean, energy efficient smoking & non- smoking units, w/patios, 2 on-site laundry rooms, storage units available. Close to schools, pools, skateboard park and, shopping center. Large dog run, some large breeds okay with mgr. approval. & dep. 244 SW RIMROCK WAY

10th Fairway Eagle Crest behind the gates 3 Bdrm + den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, O/S garage, W/D, deck, views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + sec. Possible lease option, owner will carry w/down, $349,000. 541-923-0908

Ofice/Retail Space

Real Estate For Sale

700

Terrebonne 3 Bedroom, 1 Bath in private, treed setting. Has deck, detached garage and storage, $725/month. Call 541-419-8370; 541-548-4727

850

Snowmobiles

Yamaha 2008 Nitro 1049cc, 4 stroke, bought new Feb 2010, still under warranty, 550 miles, too much power for wife! $6000. Call 541-430-5444

860

Motorcycles And Accessories

Health forces sale, 1900 mi., 1K mi. service done, black on black, detachable windshield, back rest & luggage rack, $13,900, Mario, 541-549-4949, 619-203-4707

Harley Davidson Heritage Soft Tail 2009, 400 mi., extras incl. pipes, lowering kit, chrome pkg., $16,900 OBO. 541-944-9753

103” motor, 2-tone, candy teal, 18,000 miles, exc. cond. $19,999 OBO, please call 541-480-8080.

Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 2008, clean, lots of upgrades, custom exhaust, dual control heated gloves & vest, luggage access. 15K, $17,000 OBO 541-693-3975.

Drywall Complete Drywall Services Remodels & Repairs No Job Too Small. Free Exact Quotes. 541-408-6169 CCB# 177336

762

Homes with Acreage Beautiful Prineville home, wood and tile throughout, 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath, master on main level, bonus room, office, 6.87 acres, conveniently located between town & lake, $415,000. 541-771-3093

COMPUTERIZED PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 541-382-0053

Barns

Excavating More Than Service Peace Of Mind.

M. Lewis Construction, LLC "POLE BARNS" Built Right!

Garages, shops, hay sheds, arenas, custom decks, fences, interior finish work, & concrete. Free estimates CCB#188576•541-604-6411

Building/Contracting NOTICE: Oregon state law requires anyone who contracts for construction work to be licensed with the Construction Contractors Board (CCB). An active license means the contractor is bonded and insured. Verify the contractor’s CCB license through the CCB Consumer Website www.hirealicensedcontractor.com

or call 503-378-4621. The Bulletin recommends checking with the CCB prior to contracting with anyone. Some other trades also require additional licenses and certifications.

Debris Removal JUNK BE GONE

l Haul Away FREE For Salvage. Also Cleanups & Cleanouts Mel 541-389-8107

Landscaping, Yard Care Landscaping, Yard Care

Hourly Excavation & Dump Truck Service. Site Prep Land Clearing, Demolition, Utilities, Asphalt Patching, Grading, Land & Agricultural Development. Work Weekends. Alex541-419-3239CCB#170585

Handyman

I DO THAT!

Remodeling, Handyman, Professional & Honest Work. Help w/pre-holiday projects. CCB#151573 Dennis 317-9768

ERIC REEVE HANDY SERVICES

Home & Commercial Repairs, Carpentry-Painting, Pressure-washing, Honey Do's. Small or large jobs. On-time promise. Senior Discount. All work guaranteed. 541-389-3361 or 541-771-4463 Bonded & Insured CCB#181595 Margo Construction LLC Since 1992 •Pavers •Carpentry •Remodeling •Decks •Window/Door Replacement •Int/Ext Paint CCB 176121 • 541-480-3179

Snow Removal

Reliable 24 Hour Service • Driveways • Walkways • Parking Lots • Roof tops • De-icing Have plow & shovel crew awaiting your call!

Holiday Lighting Multiple Options • Interior • Exterior • Landscape

Christmas Tree Delivery EXPERIENCED Commercial & Residential Free Estimates Senior Discounts

541-390-1466 Same Day Response

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

NOTICE: OREGON Landscape Contractors Law (ORS 671) requires all businesses that advertise to perform Land scape Construction which in cludes: planting, decks, fences, arbors, water-fea tures, and installation, repair of irrigation systems to be li censed with the Landscape Contractors Board. This 4-digit number is to be in cluded in all advertisements which indicate the business has a bond, insurance and workers compensation for their employees. For your protection call 503-378-5909 or use our website: www.lcb.state.or.us to check license status before con tracting with the business. Persons doing landscape maintenance do not require a LCB license. FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT! The Bulletin Classiieds

Nelson Landscape Maintenance Serving Central Oregon Residential & Commercial

Fall Cleanup and Snow removal •Flower bed clean up •Irrigation repair •Senior Discounts •Landscape Maintenance

Bonded & Insured 541-815-4458 LCB#8759

882

Fifth Wheels

20.5’ Seaswirl Spyder 1989 H.O. 302, 285 hrs., exc. cond., stored indoors for life $11,900 OBO. 541-379-3530 Ads published in the "Boats" classification include: Speed, fishing, drift, canoe, house and sail boats. For all other types of watercraft, please see Class 875. 541-385-5809

GENERATE SOME excitement in your neigborhood. Plan a garage sale and don't forget to advertise in classified! 385-5809.

Winnebago Class C 28’ 2003, Ford V10, 2 slides, 44k mi., A/C, awning, good cond., 1 owner. $37,000. 541-815-4121

Malibu Skier 1988, w/center pylon, low hours, always garaged, new upholstery, great fun. $9500. OBO. 541-389-2012.

885

Canopies and Campers Winnebago Itasca Horizon 2002, 330 Cat, 2 slides, loaded with leather. 4x4 Chevy Tracker w/tow bar available, exc. cond. $65,000 OBO. 509-552-6013.

881

Travel Trailers

Masonry Chad L. Elliott Construction

MASONRY

JAYCO 31 ft. 1998 slideout, upgraded model, exc. cond. $10,500. 1-541-454-0437.

875

Brick * Block * Stone Small Jobs/Repairs Welcome L#89874.388-7605/385-3099

Painting, Wall Covering MARTIN JAMES European Professional Painter Repaint Specialist Oregon License #186147 LLC. 541-388-2993

Snow Removal d SNOW REMOVAL! d d LARGE OR SMALL, d

Boats & Accessories 17½’ 2006 BAYLINER 175 XT Ski Boat, 3.0L Merc, mint condition, includes ski tower w/2 racks - everything we have, ski jackets adult and kids several, water skis, wakeboard, gloves, ropes and many other boating items. $11,300 OBO . 541-417-0829

18’ Geary Sailboat, trailer, classic little boat, GREAT WINTER PROJECT. $400 OBO. 541-647-7135 19’ Blue Water Executive Overnighter 1988, very low hours, been in dry storage for 12 years, new camper top, 185HP I/O Merc engine, all new tires on trailer, $7995 OBO, 541-447-8664.

WE DO IT ALL! 541-388-0158 • 541-420-0426 d www.bblandscape.com d

Tile, Ceramic Steve Lahey Construction Tile Installation Over 20 Yrs. Exp. Call For Free Estimate 541-977-4826•CCB#166678

2 Wet-Jet personal water crafts, new batteries & covers, “SHORE“ trailer, incl spare & lights, $1995 for all. Bill 541-480-7930.

Springdale 29’ 2007, slide, Bunkhouse style, sleeps 7-8, exc. cond., $13,900 or take over payments, 541-390-2504

900 908

Weekend Warrior Toy Hauler 28’ 2007, Gen, fuel station,exc.

Aircraft, Parts and Service

cond. sleeps 8, black/gray interior, used 3X, $29,900. 541-389-9188.

882

Waverider Trailer, 2-place, new paint, rail covers, & wiring, good cond., $495, 541-923-3490.

880

Motorhomes

Beaver Patriot 2000, Walnut cabinets, solar, Bose, Corian, tile, 4 door fridge., 1 slide, w/d, $99,000. 541-215-0077

Alpha “See Ya” 30’ 1996, 2 slides, A/C, heat pump, exc. cond. for Snowbirds, solid oak cabs day & night shades, Corian, tile, hardwood. $14,900. 541-923-3417. Cedar Creek 2006, RDQF. Loaded, 4 slides, 37.5’, king bed, W/D, 5500W gen., fireplace, Corian countertops, skylight shower, central vac, much more, like new, $43,000, please call 541-330-9149.

Bounder 34’ 1994, only 18K miles, 1 owner, garage kept, rear walk round queen island bed, TV’s,leveling hyd. jacks, backup camera, awnings, non smoker, no pets, must see to appreciate, too many options to list, won’t last long, $18,950, 541-389-3921,503-789-1202

1/3 interest in Columbia 400, located at Sunriver. $150,000. Call 541-647-3718

1982 PIPER SENECA III Gami-injectors, KFC200 Flight Director, radar altimeter, certified known ice, LoPresti speed mods, complete logs, always hangared, no damage history, exc. cond. $175,000, at Roberts Field, Redmond. 541-815-6085. Beechcraft A36 BDN 1978 3000TT, 1300 SRMAN, 100 TOP, Garmins, Sandel HSI, 55X A/P, WX 500, Leather, Bose, 1/3 share - $50,000 OBO/terms, 541-948-2126. Powertow for Single Engine, $850, 541-420-0211 skywagon@chamberscable.com

COLLINS 18’ 1981, gooseneck hitch, sleeps 4, good condition, $1950. Leave message. 541-325-6934

Redmond Airport hangar, heated, 55’ x 75’ x 18’, 12’ x 24’ office, bath with shower, $229,500. 20-year lease. Call 503-803-2051

916

Trucks and Heavy Equipment Dutch Star DP 39 ft. 2001, 2 slides, Cat engine, many options, very clean, PRICE REDUCED! 541-388-7552. Gulfstream Scenic Cruiser 36 ft. 1999, Cummins 330 hp. diesel, 42K, 1 owner, 13 in. kitchen slide out, new tires, under cover, hwy. miles only, 4 door fridge/freezer icemaker, W/D combo, Interbath tub & shower, 50 amp. propane gen & more! $55,000. 541-948-2310.

Houseboat 38X10, w/triple axle trailer, incl. private moorage w/24/7 security at Prinville resort. PRICE REDUCED, $21,500. 541-788-4844.

Everest 2006 35' 3 slides/ awnings, island king bed, W/D, 2 roof air, built-in vac, pristine, $37,500/OBO. (541) 610-4472 • 1-541-689-1351

Marathon V.I.P. Prevost H3-40 Luxury Coach. Like new after $132,000 purchase & $130,000 in renovations. Only 129k orig. mi. 541-601-6350. Rare bargain at just $122,000. Look at : www.SeeThisRig.com

Southwind Class A 30’ 1994, twin rear beds, loaded, generator, A/C, 2 TV’s, all wood cabinets, basement storage, very clean, $14,999 or trade for smaller one. 541-279-9445/541-548-3350 Call The Bulletin At 541-385-5809. Place Your Ad Or E-Mail At: www.bendbulletin.com

Case 780 CK Extend-a-hoe, 120 HP, 90% tires, cab & extras, 11,500 OBO, 541-420-3277

Everest 32’ 2004, 3 slides, island kitchen, air, surround sound, micro., full oven, more, in exc. cond., 2 trips on it, 1 owner, like new, REDUCED NOW $26,000. 541-228-5944 Fleetwood Wilderness 2004 36½’, 4 slide-outs, fireplace, A/C, TV, used 3 times. Like new! List $52,000, sell $22,950. 541-390-2678, Madras

International 1981,T-axle-300 13 spd.Cummins/Jake Brake,good tires/body paint;1993 27’ stepdeck trailer, T-axle, Dove tail, ramps. $7950, 541-350-3866

Wabco 666 Grader - New tires, clean, runs good -$8,500. Austin Western Super 500 Grader - All wheel drive, low hours on engine - $10,500. 1986 Autocar cement truck Cat engine, 10 yd mixer $10,000. Call 541-771-4980

925 Hitchhiker II 2000 32’ 2 slides, very clean and in excellent condition. Only $18,000! (541) 410-9423, (541) 536-6116.

Hitchiker II 32’ 1998 w/solar system, awnings, Arizona rm. great shape! $15,500 541-589-0767, in Burns.

KOMFORT 27’ 5th wheel 2000 trailer: fiberglass with 12’ slide, stored inside, in excellent condition. Only $13,500 firm. Call 541-536-3916.

Utility Trailers

Big Tex Landscaping/ ATV Trailer, dual axle flatbed, 7’x16’, 7000 lb. GVW, all steel, $1400. 541-382-4115, or 541-280-7024.

931

Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories (4) Lexus RX300 16” factory wheels, 1998 thru 2002, $150 obo. 541-815-5000. Michelin X-Treme weather/ All season studless. 225/60-R16 4 for $150. 541-617-8850. Tires, 4 Brand New cond., Les Schwab Winter Cat XT Studded, 91T 205/55R16 for 16” rims, $200, 541-617-0940. TIRES: 4 Schwab 225/60R18, Studless snow tires, used, 2 seasons, $225. 541-447-1668

Travel Queen 34’ 1987 65K miles, oak cabinets, exc interior. Great extra bdrm! Reduced to $5000. 541-480-3286

“WANTED” RV Consignments

20.5’ 2004 Bayliner 205 Run About, 220 HP, V8, open bow, exc. cond., very fast w/very low hours, lots of extras incl. tower, Bimini & custom trailer, $19,500. 541-389-1413

Lance 1010 10’1” 1999.Micro, A/C, gen, awnings, TV, stereo, elec jacks, reduced to $7950. 541-410-8617

Autos & Transportation

Fifth Wheels

Yamaha YFZ450 2006, very low hrs., exc. cond., reduced to $3000, also boots, helmet, tires, avail., 541-410-0429

870

2003 Lance 1030 Camper, satellite dish, 3600 gen, pullout pantry, remote elec jacks, Qn bed, all weather pkg, solar, AC, $17,500. 2007 Dodge 6.7 Cummins Diesel 3500 4x4 long bed, sway bar, airbags, canopy, bedliner, gooseneck, 58K mi, $34,900. Or buy as unit, $48,500. 541-331-1160

the bells & whistles, sleeps 8, 4 queen beds, reduced to $17,000, 541-536-8105

Watercraft

Honda Shadow Deluxe American Classic Edition. 2002, black, perfect, garaged, 5,200 mi. $3495. 541-610-5799.

KTM 400 EXC Enduro 2006, like new cond, low miles, street legal, hvy duty receiver hitch basket. $4500. 541-385-4975

TERRY 27’ 5th wheel 1995 with big slide-out, generator and extras. Great condition and hunting rig, $9,900 OBO. 541-923-0231 days.

Gearbox 30’ 2005, all

Ads published in "Watercraft" include: Kayaks, rafts and motorized personal watercrafts. For "boats" please see Class 870. 541-385-5809

Call 541-385-5809 to promote your service • Advertise for 28 days starting at $140 (This special package is not available on our website)

Adult Care

880

Motorhomes

750

personals

Experienced Male Caregiver offering assistance with medical & non-medical tasks & activities. Refs. avail. upon request, 541-548-3660.

870

Harley Davidson Police Bike 2001, low mi., custom bike very nice.Stage 1, new tires & brakes, too much to list! A Must See Bike $10,500 OBO. 541-383-1782

Harley Davidson Screamin’ Eagle Electric-Glide 2005,

AUTOS & TRANSPORTATION 908 - Aircraft, Parts and Service 916 - Trucks and Heavy Equipment 925 - Utility Trailers 927 - Automotive Trades 929 - Automotive Wanted 931 - Automotive Parts, Service and Accessories 932 - Antique and Classic Autos 933 - Pickups 935 - Sport Utility Vehicles 940 - Vans 975 - Automobiles

Boats & Accessories

HARLEY Davidson Fat Boy - LO 2010,

•Cute Apt. in Central Location - 1 Bdrm/1 bath with private fenced back yard & patio. No pets. $425 includes WSG. • Near Downtown. Large 2 Bdrm/1 Bath Apt. W/D hookups. Motorcycle Trailer Newer Duplex 2/2, close to Small fenced yard. End Unit. Pets considered. $495 WST inKendon stand-up motorHospital & Costco, garage, cluded. cycle trailer, torsion bar yard maint., fireplace, W/D, •Close to Pioneer Park - NW Side. Private 2 Bdrm/1 bath suspension, easy load and W/S, pet? 1025 Rambling Upstairs Apt. w/Balcony. On-Site Laundry. Off Street Parking. unload, used seldom and Ln. #1, $695. 541-420-0208 $495/mo. Includes WSG. only locally. $1700 OBO. • Near Old Mill Dist. Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 Bath upstairs unit Call 541-306-3010. Chaparral, 541-923-5008 The Bulletin is now offering a 636 w/balcony. On-site laundry. $495 mo. incl. CABLE + WST. www.redmondrents.com MORE AFFORDABLE Rental •1/2 Off Move-in Rent! Spacious Hillside Apt. Floor-level Apt./Multiplex NW Bend People Look for Information rate! If you have a home or with balcony & fireplace. 2 Bdrm/1 bath. Laundry facilities on Call about Our Specials! apt. to rent, call a Bulletin About Products and Services site. Central Location. $495 includes WST & Basic Cable. Studios to 3 bedroom 1 Bdrm. $420+dep. Studio Classified Rep. to get the Hide-a-way. Bright. Cheerful 2 bdrm/1bath Apt. Every Day through units from $395 to $550 • Adorable $385+dep. No pets/smoknew rates and get your ad above garage in NE. $500 includes WS. ing, W/S/G paid. Apply at 38 • Lots of amenities. The Bulletin Classifieds started ASAP! 541-385-5809 •Spacious 2 Bdrm/1 bath apts. Off-street parking. Nice shade NW Irving #2, near down- • Pet friendly • W/S/G paid trees. Onsite laundry. Near hospital. $525 includes w/s/g THE BLUFFS APTS. town Bend. 541-389-4902. 865 634 • Townhome Near Downtown & River. 2 Bdrm/1.5 Bath. 340 Rimrock Way, Redmond ATVs Apt./Multiplex NE Bend 1 Month Rent Free W/D Hook-Ups. Lg. Private Enclosed Deck w/extra storage. 541-548-8735 ONLY $550 includes WST. 1550 NW Milwaukee. managed by 1 & 2 bdrms Available W/D included! • Furnished Mt. Bachelor Condo - 1 Bdrm/1 bath + Murphy GSL Properties starting at $575. Reserve $595/mo. Large 2 Bdrm, bed. $550 includes WST/wireless Now! Limited Availability. 1 Bath, Gas heat. Clean 2 Bdrm, 1.5 Bath duplex • Cheerful SE Townhome - Vaulted ceilings, 2 Bdrm/2 bath. POLARIS PHOENIX W/S/G Pd. No Pets. W/D included. No Pets. $550 w/s Included. Alpine Meadows for rent. Fenced backyard, Call us at 382-3678 or 2005, 2X4, 200cc, new single car garage, Small pet • Charming, cozy 2 Bdrm/1 Bath cottage in central location. 541-330-0719 Professionally managed by Visit us at www.sonberg.biz ok upon approval. $660 per Fenced backyard. Country kitchen. $625 per month. rear end, new tires, runs Norris & Stevens, Inc. month plus deposit. 1620 SW • Cute NE Duplex w/ Vaulted Ceilings. 2 Bdrm/2 Bath. Gas excellent, $1800 OBO, Absolutely beautiful, 1 Bdrm. 2 Rimrock Way #A. 541-932-4919. Fireplace. W/D Hook-ups. Sgl. Garage. Private Deck off master. 1st Mo. Free w/ 12 mo. lease bath, fully furnished Condo, 541-480-7783 for showings. Fenced yard. Pets? $675 includes WS. Beautiful 2 bdrms in quiet $695, $400 dep, near down•Sweet Cedar Creek Condo - 2 master Bdrm Suites + ½ bath Polaris Sportsman 500X2 2007, complex, park-like setting, town & college, completely DUPLEX SW Redmond 2 bdrm downstairs. W/D incl. Huge kitchen and dbl. garage. Wood covered parking, w/d hookfully equip., 825 mi., w/Big 2 bath, garage w/opener. renovated, 2 Verandas, no burning fireplace. Small pets only. $750 includes WST. ups, near St. Charles. $550Tex 4X8 Trailer w/drive on 1300 sq. ft., w/d hookup, • LOTS OF SPACE IN & OUT. 3 Bdrm/2.5 Bath SE Home on pets/smoking, avail. now, all $595/mo. 541-385-6928. tailgate, $4950, 541-549-4303 fenced yard, deck, w/s/g pd. amenities and 1/2 acre. EFA. Fireplace in formal Living Room. Dbl. garage. $700 dep. 541-604-0338 W/S/G/elec./A/C/Cable 2 bdrm, 2 bath near hospital, 1700 sq. ft. $845 per mo. YAMAHA 1998 230CC moincl., 541-279-0590 or open floorplan, w/s/g paid. • Very Private NE Home in cul-de-sac. Close to Costco. 3 tor, 4WD, used as utility 648 cheritowery@yahoo.com Extra storage. $630 mo. Call Bdrm/2 Bath. Large lot. Triple car garage. 1515 sq. ft. No vehicle. excellent running Katie Kelley at Kelley Realty fridge. Large pantry. $925 per mo. Houses for condition. $2000 OBO. Fully furnished loft apt. 541-408-3220. •Sun Meadow. 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath. With media room down541-923-4161, Rent General on Wall Street in Bend. All stairs and extra space upstairs. Garage and access to commu541-788-3896. utilities paid and parking. Call nity pool. W/D included. $995 per mo. The Bulletin is now offering a 541-389-2389 for appt. • Nice 3 bdrm, 2 bath NE home off Boyd Acres. Corner lot. LOWER, MORE AFFORDABLE Double car garage. Mtn. views. Gas dryer HU. 2300 sq. ft. apRental rate! If you have a Whatever happened to Jim River & Mtn. Views, 930 NW prox., $1150. Pet? home to rent, call a Bulletin Carlon St., 2 bdrm., 1.5 bath, Zerbo’s screenplays: “The Classified Rep. to get the W/S/G paid, W/D hook-up, ***** FOR ADD’L PROPERTIES ***** Fighting Nurses” & “Aviation new rates and get your ad Yamaha 350 Big Bear $650/mo. $600 dep. No pets. CALL 541-382-0053 or See Website Story”? Both Overdue at the started ASAP! 541-385-5809 1999, 4X4, 4 stroke, racks 541-280-7188. www.computerizedpropertymanagement.com box office. 541-318-7260. front & rear, strong machine, excellent condition. $2,200 541-382-4115,541-280-7024 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex. NEW CARPET & PAINT throughout. W/D incl. no smoking. No pets. Sewer/ Lawncare paid. 1 yr. lease. $795 mo. + $945 sec. 20076 Beth Ave. in Bend. 541-382-3813

BOATS & RVs 805 - Misc. Items 850 - Snowmobiles 860 - Motorcycles And Accessories 865 - ATVs 870 - Boats & Accessories 875 - Watercraft 880 - Motorhomes 881 - Travel Trailers 882 - Fifth Wheels 885 - Canopies and Campers 890 - RV’s for Rent

Redmond Homes

1 Bdrm, 1 bath, 547 1/2 NW 7th, 10th Fairway Eagle Crest $550; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, 626 1/2 behind the gates 3 Bdrm + SW 8th, $595; 2 bdrm, 1 bath, den, 3.5 bath, 2400 sq ft, 135 NW 10th St., $650, O/S garage, W/D, deck, 541-815-1709, CopperDog PM. views quiet low maint. Year round pool, tennis golf. No 4/2 Mfd 1605 sq.ft., family smkg, pet w/dep. $1400 + room, w/woodstove, new sec. Possible lease option, carpet/paint, single garage owner will carry w/down, w/opener. $795/mo. $349,000. 541-923-0908 541-480-3393,541-610-7803 A Beautiful 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath duplex in Canyon Rim Village, Redmond, all appliances, includes gardener. $795 mo. 541-408-0877.

800

693

658

Houses for Rent Redmond

Boats & RV’s

Commercial for

Rent/Lease 900 sq ft 1 Bdrm 1 bath, single car garage, all utils incl, W/D hkup, in country, very quiet. Light Industrial, various sizes, North and South Bend locaNo smkg/pets. $675/mo. 1st tions, office w/bath from + $300 dep. 541-480-9041 $400/mo. 541-317-8717 A newer 3/2 mfd. home, 1755 sq.ft., living room, family Office / Warehouse room, on private .5 acre lot near Sunriver, $895. space • 1792 sq ft 541-480-3393, 541-610-7803. 827 Business Way, Bend 30¢/sq ft; 1st mo + $200 dep 654 Paula, 541-678-1404

2 Bdrm 1 Bath mnfd. home on for Rent quiet cul-de-sac, with heat 638 pump, fenced yard. W/S/G An Office with bath, various Apt./Multiplex SE Bend paid. $595/mo + security sizes and locations from deposit. 541-382-8244. $250 per month, including 2 Bdrm. in 4-Plex, 1 bath, new utilities. 541-317-8717 carpet/paint, W/D hookups, Elkhorn, Avail. now, 1200 sq.ft, 3 bdrm., 2.5 bath, dbl. storage, deck, W/S paid, $525 Downtown Redmond garage, fenced, forced air, Retail/Office space, 947 sq ft. + $600 dep. 541-480-4824 gas fireplace, all appl., $850, 1-Month Free Option! $650/mo + utils; $650 secu541-389-1416. rity deposit. 425 SW Sixth 640 St. Call Norb, 541-420-9848

Looking for 1, 2 or 3 bedroom? $99 First mo. with 6 month lease & deposit $99 MOVES YOU IN !!! Limited numbers available Chaparral & 1, 2 and 3 bdrms. W/D hookups, patios or decks, Rimrock Apartments Mountain Glen, 541-383-9313 Professionally managed by Norris & Stevens, Inc.

THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 G3

All Years-Makes-Models Free Appraisals! We Get Results! Consider it Sold! We keep it small & Beat Them All!

Randy’s Kampers & Kars 541-923-1655

Tires, 4 Studded, 215/70R16, on 16” Toyota 5-lug alloy wheels, good tread, $475, Mobile Suites, 2007, 36TK3 541-388-8841. with 3 slide-outs, king bed, ultimate living comfort, large 932 kitchen, fully loaded, well insulated, hydraulic jacks and Antique and so much more. Priced to sell Classic Autos at $59,500! 541-317-9185

MONTANA 2000 36’

3 slides, washer and dryer, new A/C. Very nice & livable! $12,500. 541-923-7351.

Cadillac El Dorado 1977, very beautiful blue, real nice inside & out, low mileage, $2500, please call 541-383-3888 for more information.


G 4Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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THE BULLETIN • Tuesday, December 7, 2010 G5

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809 932

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Antique and Classic Autos

Pickups

Sport Utility Vehicles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

Automobiles

SUBARUS!!!

Chevrolet Nova, 1976 2-door, 20,200 mi. New tires, seat covers, windshield & more. $5800. 541-330-0852. Chevy Corvette 1979, 30K mi., glass t-top, runs & looks great, $12,500,541-280-5677

Dodge 2500 Laramie 2008 4x4 6.7 Diesel automatic, 23K mi, 6.5’ Proline flatbed. Below Bluebk $35,500 541-447-3393

DODGE D-100 1962 ½ Ton, rebuilt 225 slant 6 engine. New glass, runs good, needs good home. $2700. 541-322-6261

Chevy Suburban 1969, classic 3-door, very

Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited 1998, like new, low mi., just in time for the snow, great cond., $7000, 541-536-6223.

Honda Civic LX 2006, 4-door, 45K miles, Ford Focus SE Wagon 2007 4-dr, 8800 mi, 30+ mpg, brand new cond, $12,500 obo cash. 541-475-1165 aft 6

Jeep Wrangler 2004, right hand drive, 51K, auto., A/C, 4x4, AM/FM/CD, exc. cond., $11,500. 541-408-2111

Chrysler 300 Coupe 1967, 440 Dodge Ram 2001, short bed, nice wheels & tires, 86K, $5500 OBO, call 541-410-4354.

FORD 350 LARIAT 2002 4x4 crewcab, 7.3 diesel 135k, dually, matching canopy, towing special, gooseneck, too! Orig. 63-year-old construction owner needs money, will trade, $18,500. (541) 815-3639 or (541) 508-8522

Corvette 1956, rebuilt 2006, 3 spd.,

2, 4 barrel, 225 hp. Matching numbers $62,500, 541-280-1227. Ford F-150 2006, Triton STX, X-cab, 4WD, tow pkg., V-8, auto, reduced to $15,999 obo 541-554-5212,702-501-0600 FIAT 1800 1978 5-spd., door panels w/flowers & hummingbirds, white soft top & hard top, Reduced to $5,500, 541-317-9319,541-647-8483

Ford Mustang Cobra 2003, SVT, perfect, super charged, 1700 mi., $25,000/trade for newer RV+cash,541-923-3567

Ford T-Bird 1955, White soft & hard tops, new paint, carpet, upholstery, rechromed, nice! $32,000. 541-912-1833 Mercedes 380SL 1983, Convertible, blue color, new tires, cloth top & fuel pump, call for details 541-536-3962

Mercedes-Benz 280c 1975 145k, good body & mechanical, fair interior, can email pics. $3350. 541-548-3628

OLDS 98 1969 2 door hardtop, $1600. 541-389-5355

Porsche 914, 1974 Always garaged, family owned. Runs good. $5500. 541-550-8256

Have an item to sell quick? If it’s under $500 you can place it in The Bulletin Classiieds for $ 10 - 3 lines, 7 days $ 16 - 3 lines, 14 days (Private Party ads only) VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Ford F250 1986, 4x4, X-Cab, 460, A/C, 4-spd., exc. shape, low miles, $3250 OBO, 541-419-1871.

Ford F-250 XLT 1986, X-Cab, 4x4, everything works, runs good, $1250 OBO, please call 541-815-5618.

Ford F-350 Crew 4x4 2002. Triton V-10, 118k, new tires, wheels, brakes. Very nice. Just $14,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

FORD pickup 1977, step side, 351 Windsor, 115,000 miles, MUST SEE! $4500. 541-350-1686

Honda Ridgeline 2006 AWD 48K miles, local, 1 owner, loaded w/options. $21,999. 541-593-2651 541-815-5539

International Flat Bed Pickup 1963, 1 ton dually, 4 spd. trans., great MPG, could be exc. wood hauler, runs great, new brakes, $2500. 541-419-5480.

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Sport Utility Vehicles CHEVY BLAZER 2000, ZR2 LS 4x4, 130k miles, 90% tread left on $2000 worth of tires. Under KBB at $4995. Can be seen at Redmond’s Hwy 97 Park & Sell. 541-546-6838. Ford Bronco 1990 4WD w/1998 motor; engine & trans good cond, new brakes & exhaust sys; $1600 in improvements. $2250 OBO 541-323-1872

Ford Excursion 4x4 2000. Nice Red, like new, only 68k, seats 9. Just $16,700. 541-601-6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

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Chevy Silverado 1500 1988, 4x4, step side, tow pkg., low mi. at 98K, A/C, great tries, brakes, new rear end, runs extra super, $4000 OBO, 541-548-7396 Chevy Silverado 1500 4x4, 2000, full size, Reg cab w/ long bed, white, V6, 4.3L, 20 mpg, auto trans, ABS, AC, dual airbags, tow pkg, runs & drives excellent, maint’d extremely well; non-smoker. Recent brks, bearing, tune- up, tires, trans & coolant flush. 183K mi. $4700 obo. 541-633-6953

mileage, full pwr., all leather, auto, 4 captains chairs, fold down bed, fully loaded, $4500 OBO, call 541-536-6223.

Chrysler 1999 AWD Town & Country LXI, 109k; 1998 Town & Country 7 passenger, leather, used but not abused. I’ll keep the one that doesn’t sell. Takes $3500 and up to buy. Bob, as you can see, likes mini vans. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

PRICE REDUCED TO $800 Cash! Dodge Van 3/4 ton 1986, Rebuilt tranny, 2 new tires and battery, newer timing chain. 541-410-5631.

VW Eurovan MV 1993, seats 7, fold-out bed & table, 5-cyl 2.5L, 137K mi, newly painted white/gray, reblt AT w/warr, AM/FM CD Sirius Sat., new fr brks, plus mntd stud snows. $8500 obo. 541-330-0616

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Audi A4 Nearly New 2009 Only 8,000 miles & many premium options on this A4 sedan including heated leather seats, Bluetooth, iPod dock & sunroof. The Quattro all-wheel drive system performs amazingly well in all weather conditions. Asking $2500 below Kelley Blue Book! $28,995. 541-350-3502

Audi S4 2005, 4.2 Avant Quattro, tiptronic, premium & winter wheels & tires, Bilstein shocks, coil over springs, HD anti sway, APR exhaust, K40 radar, dolphin gray, ext. warranty, 56K, garaged, $30,000. 541-593-2227 BMW 328IX Wagon 2009, 4WD, white w/chestnut leather interior, loaded, exc. cond., premium pkg., auto, Bluetooth & iPad connection, 42K mi., 100K transferrable warranty & snow tires, $28,500, 541-915-9170.

BMW M3 COUPE E36 1998, mint condition, adult owned, low miles, needs nothing, $12,500. 541-419-2181

Buick LeSabre 2004,

Ford Expedition 2000, 4WD, 131K mi., exc. cond., new traction tires, 3rd seat, $4995. 541-480-3286

GMC Jimmy 4x4 UT 1986, 2-Dr, Auto, Tow Chevy Colorado 2004, LS, 4x4, 5 cyl., 4 spd., auto, A/C, ps, pl, pw, CD, 60K mi., $8925. 541-598-5111.

Chevy Gladiator 1993, great shape, great

Automobiles

Pickups

Chevy 1/2 Ton 1995, 4X4, 350 engine, auto, cold A/C, new tires, brakes, shocks, & muffler, w/ camper shell, runs great. $4000. 541-706-1568

Toyota Land Cruiser 1970, 350 Chevy engine, ps, auto, electric winch, new 16” tires and wheels, $12,000. 541-932-4921.

Ford Mustang Convertible LX 1989, V8 engine, white w/red interior, 44K mi., exc. cond., $6995, 541-389-9188.

Honda Accord EX 1990, in great cond., 109K original mi., 5 spd., 2 door, black, A/C, sun roof, snow tires incl., $3500. 541-548-5302

The Bulletin Classiieds

Jeep Cherokee Laredo, 2003, 135K miles, fully loaded, excellent condition. $6500. Call 541-749-0316

Kia Spectra LS, 2002 96K miles, black, 5-speed, runs good, $2600. Phone 541-749-0316

Pontiac Grand Am 2004 FWD

541-322-7253

$3,950

541-923-8627

MAZDA MIATA 1992, black, 81k miles, new top, stock throughout. See craigslist. $4,990. 541-610-6150. Mercedes V-12 Limousine. Hand crafted for Donald Trump. Cost: $1/2 million. Just $27k. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

Mazda Miata MX5 2003, silver w/black interior, 4-cyl., 5 spd., A/C, cruise, new tires, 23K, $10,500, 541-410-8617.

Mercury Grand Marquis 1984. Grandpa’s car! Like new, all lthr, loaded, garaged, 40K mi, $3495. 541-382-8399

Mercedes 320SL 1995, mint. cond., 69K, CD, A/C, new tires, soft & hard top, $12,500. Call 541-815-7160.

Subaru Forester 2007 AWD, man. trans, immac cond, 55K auto chk, reduced to $15,750 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

The Bulletin recommends extra caution when purchasing products or services from out of the area. Sending cash, checks, or credit information may be subjected to F R A U D. For more information about an advertiser, you may call the Oregon State Attorney General’s Office Consumer Protection hotline at 1-877-877-9392.

Mitsubishi 3000 GT 1999, auto., pearl white, very low mi. $9500. 541-788-8218.

Subaru Outback 2005 AWD, 4cyl, auto, lthr htd seats, 89K mi, reduced to $14,750 OBO 541-508-0214; 541-554-5212

VOLKSWAGEN BUG 1965 Black , Excellent condition. Runs good. $6995. 541-416-0541.

1998 Dodge Ram Wagon SE 2500, Mark III conversion, 100k miles, 4 captains chairs, rear fold-down bed, hitch, $4000 and worth it! Travel in luxury. 541-318-9999 or 541-508-8522.

VW Super Beetle 1974 New: 1776 CC engine, dual Dularto Carbs, trans, studded tires, brakes, shocks, struts, exhaust, windshield, tags & plates; has sheepskin seatcovers, Alpine stereo w/ subs, black on black, 25 mpg, extra tires. Only $3000 541-388-4302. Partial Trade.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo 2008, AWD, 500HP, 21k mi., exc. cond, meteor gray, 2 sets of wheels and new tires, fully loaded, $69,000 OBO. 541-480-1884

FIND IT! BUY IT! SELL IT!

Pontiac Firebird T-Top 1998 mint, 125K,custom wheels/tires HO V6, 4 spd auto, 29 mpg reg. $5700 OBO. 541-475-3984

3.4L V-6 4 door, all power, 158k hwy miles. Excellent condition.

Honda S 2000, 2002. Truly like new, 9K original owner miles. Black on Black. This is Honda’s true sports machine. I bought it with my wife in mind but she never liked the 6 speed trans. Bought it new for $32K. It has never been out of Oregon. Price $17K. Call 541-546-8810 8am-8pm.

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Mercury Monterrey 1965, Exc. All original, 4-dr. sedan, in storage last 15 yrs., 390 High Compression engine, new tires & license, reduced to $4850, 541-410-3425. MUST SELL due to death. 1970 Monte Carlo, all original, many extras. Sacrifice $6000. 541-593-3072

Nissan XTerra SE 2001 $5900 Auto, CD, Sun, Tow, 131K, V6, 4WD, Must See 541-617-8454

Ford Mustang Convertible 2000, V6 with excellent maintenance records, 144K miles. Asking $4500, call for more information or to schedule a test drive, 208-301-4081.

Mercedes AMG, Formula One V-12. Very Rare. Only 99k miles. Ultimate in safety, luxury & performance. Cost $135,000 to fully hand-build. Just $13,500. 541.601.6350 Look: www.SeeThisRig.com

Vans

Ford Mustang Coupe 1966, original owner, V8, automatic, great shape, $9000 OBO. 530-515-8199 Just bought a new boat? Sell your old one in the classiieds! Ask about our Super Seller rates! 541-385-5809

Lincoln Continental 2000, loaded, all pwr, sunroof, A/C, exc. cond. 87K, $6250 OBO/ trade for comparable truck, 541-408-2671,541-408-7267

Honda Pilot 2006, orig. owner, 42k mi., remote starter, 8-passenger, fully loaded. $21,000. Call 541-504-2627.

clean, all original good condition, $5500, call 541-536-2792.

engine, auto. trans, ps, air, frame on rebuild, repainted original blue, original blue interior, original hub caps, exc. chrome, asking $10,000 or make offer. 541-385-9350.

automatic, 34-mpg, exc. cond., $12,480, please call 541-419-4018.

Nice clean and fully serviced . Most come with 3 year, 36,000 mile warranty. Call The Guru: 382-6067 or visit us at www.subaguru.com

package, Good condition, $1200 OBO, 541-815-9939.

Jeep CJ7 1986 Classic, 6-cyl, 5-spd., 4x4, good cond, price reduced to $7950, 541-593-4437.

JEEP COMPASS, 2009 13,200 miles, 4x4, 5 speed. Asking $16,000. 541-280-5866.

541-385-5809

custom, 113k hwy miles, white, looks/drives perfect. $5950; also 1995 Limited LeSabre, 108k, leather, almost perfect, you’ll agree. $2900. Call 541-508-8522, or 541-318-9999.

Buick LeSabre Limited Edition 1985, 1 owner, always garaged, clean, runs great, 90K, $1895, 541-771-3133.

CHEVY CORVETTE 1998, 66K mi., 20/30 m.p.g., exc. cond., $16,000. 541- 379-3530

Chrysler Cordoba 1978, 360 cu. in. engine, $400. Lincoln Continental Mark VII 1990, HO engine, SOLD. 541-318-4641.

Check out the classiieds online www.bendbulletin.com Updated daily

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-09-310201-SH

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE T.S. No.: OR-10-336548-SH

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, Troy E. Grant as Grantor to Amerititle, as trustee in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for First Horizon Home Loans, a division of First Tennessee Bank, N.A., as Beneficiary, dated 8/29/2007, recorded 8/31/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. XXX at page No. XXX, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-48053 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 251692 Lot Ninety-Eight (98), Huntington Meadows Phases 5 and 6, Deschutes County, Oregon Commonly known as: 16447 Riley Drive La Pine, OR 97739. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installment of principal and interest which became due on 5/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustees fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising form or associated with beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $1,420.81 Monthly Late Charge $57.25 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $177,723.78 together with interest thereon at the rate of 7.2500 per annum from 4/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, First American Title Insurance Company, the undersigned trustee will on 3/16/2011 at the hour of 1:00:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at At the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by First American Title Insurance Company. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 3/16/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL December 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER December 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 2/14/2011 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 11/8/2010 First American Title Insurance Company, as Trustee 3 First American Way Santa Ana, CA 92707 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-545-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

Reference is made to that certain deed made by, David A. McKinney & Rebecca L. McKinney as Grantor to First American Title Insurance, as trustee in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for First Horizon Home Loan Corporation, as Beneficiary, dated 2/27/2007, recorded 3/6/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. - at page No. -, fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-13517, covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 155167 Lot 6 in Block 3 of Tetherow Crossing Phase VII, Deschutes County, Oregon. Commonly known as: 6360 NW 61st Street Redmond, OR 97756. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: The installment of principal and interest which became due on 10/1/2009, and all subsequent installments of principal and interest through the date of this Notice, plus amounts that are due for late charges, delinquent property taxes, insurance premiums, advances made on senior liens, taxes and/or insurance, trustees fees, and any attorney fees and court costs arising form or associated with beneficiaries efforts to protect and preserve its security, all of which must be paid as a condition of reinstatement, including all sums that shall accrue through reinstatement or pay-off. Nothing in this notice shall be construed as a waiver of any fees owing to the Beneficiary under the Deed of Trust pursuant to the terms of the loan documents. Monthly Payment $2,112.06 Monthly Late Charge $95.68 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $312,768.02 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.8750 per annum from 9/1/2009 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that, LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 3/16/2011 at the hour of 1:00 PM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187,110, Oregon Revised Statutes, at the front entrance to the Deschutes County Courthouse, 1164 NW Bond St., Bend, OR County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. For Sale Information Call: 714-573-1965 or Login to: www.priorityposting.com In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Pursuant to Oregon Law, this sale will not be deemed final until the Trustee's deed has been issued by LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC. If there are any irregularities discovered within 10 days of the date of this sale, that the trustee will rescind the sale, return the buyer's money and take further action as necessary. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee's Attorney. NOTICE TO RESIDENTIAL TENANTS The property in which you are living is in foreclosure. A foreclosure sale is scheduled for 3/16/2011. Unless the lender who is foreclosing on this property is paid, the foreclosure will go through and someone new will own this property. The following information applies to you only if you occupy and rent this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The information does not apply to you if you own this property or if you are not a residential tenant. If the foreclosure goes through, the business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale has the right to require you to move out. The buyer must first give you an eviction notice in writing that specifies the date by which you must move out. The buyer may not give you this notice until after the foreclosure sale happens. If you do not leave before the move-out date, the buyer can have the sheriff remove you from the property after a court hearing. You will receive notice of the court hearing. FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES YOU TO BE NOTIFIED IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THIS PROPERTY AS A RESIDENTIAL DWELLING UNDER A LEGITIMATE RENTAL AGREEMENT, FEDERAL LAW REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU A NOTICE IN WRITING A CERTAIN NUMBER OF DAYS BEFORE THE BUYER CAN REQUIRE YOU TO MOVE OUT. THE FEDERAL LAW THAT REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU THIS NOTICE IS EFFECTIVE UNTIL December 31, 2012. Under federal law, the buyer must give you at least 90 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If you are renting this property under a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), you may stay until the end of your lease term. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 90 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 90 days left. STATE LAW NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS IF THE FEDERAL LAW DOES NOT APPLY, STATE LAW STILL REQUIRES THE BUYER TO GIVE YOU NOTICE IN WRITING BEFORE REQUIRING YOU TO MOVE OUT IF YOU ARE OCCUPYING AND RENTING THE PROPERTY AS A TENANT IN GOOD FAITH. EVEN IF THE FEDERAL LAW REQUIREMENT IS NO LONGER EFFECTIVE AFTER December 31, 2012, THE REQUIREMENT UNDER STATE LAW STILL APPLIES TO YOUR SITUATION. Under state law, if you have a fixed-term lease (for example, a six-month or one-year lease), the buyer must give you at least 60 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. If the buyer wants to move in and use this property as the buyer's primary residence, the buyer can give you written notice and require you to move out after 30 days, even if you have a fixed-term lease with more than 30 days left. If you are renting under a month-to-month or week-to-week rental agreement, the buyer must give you at least 30 days' notice in writing before requiring you to move out. IMPORTANT: For the buyer to be required to give you a notice under state law, you must prove to the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale that you are occupying and renting this property as a residential dwelling under a legitimate rental agreement. The name and address of the business or individual who is handling the foreclosure sale is shown on this notice under the heading "TRUSTEE". You must mail or deliver your proof not later than 5/22/2010 (30 days before the date first set for the foreclosure sale). Your proof must be in writing and should be a copy of your rental agreement or lease. If you do not have a written rental agreement or lease, you can provide other proof, such as receipts for rent paid. ABOUT YOUR SECURITY DEPOSIT Under state law, you may apply your security deposit and any rent you paid in advance against the current rent you owe your landlord. To do this, you must notify your landlord in writing that you want to subtract the amount of your security deposit or prepaid rent from your rent payment. You may do this only for the rent you owe your current landlord. If you do this, you must do so before the foreclosure sale. The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale is not responsible to you for any deposit or prepaid rent you paid to your landlord. ABOUT YOUR TENACY AFTER THE FORECLOSURE SALE The business or individual who buys this property at the foreclosure sale may be willing to allow you to stay as a tenant instead of requiring you to move out. You should contact the buyer to discuss that possibility if you would like to stay. Under state law, if the buyer accepts rent from you, signs a new residential rental agreement with you or does not notify you in writing within 30 days after the date of the foreclosure sale that you must move out, the buyer becomes your new landlord and must maintain the property. Otherwise, the buyer is not your landlord and is not responsible for maintaining the property on your behalf and you must move out by the date the buyer specifies in a notice to you. YOU SHOULD CONTINUE TO PAY RENT TO YOUR LANDLORD UNTIL THE PROPERTY IS SOLD TO ANOTHER BUSINESS OR INDIVIDUAL OR UNTIL A COURT OR A LENDER TELLS YOU OTHERWISE. IF YOU DO NOT PAY RENT, YOU CAN BE EVICTED. AS EXPLAINED ABOVE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO APPLY A DEPOSIT OR RENT YOU PREPAID AGAINST YOUR CURRENT RENT OBLIGATION. BE SURE TO KEEP PROOF OF ANY PAYMENTS YOU MAKE AND OF ANY NOTICE YOU GIVE OR RECEIVE CONCERNING THE APPLICATION OF YOUR DEPOSIT OR PREPAID RENT. IT IS UNLAWFUL FOR ANY PERSON TO TRY TO FORCE YOU TO LEAVE YOUR HOME WITHOUT FIRST GOING TO COURT TO EVICT YOU. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT YOUR RIGHTS, YOU MAY WISH TO CONSULT A LAWYER. If you believe you need legal assistance, contact the Oregon State Bar and ask for the lawyer referral service. Contact information for the Oregon State Bar is included with this notice. If you do not have enough money to pay a lawyer or are otherwise eligible, you may be able to receive legal assistance for free. Information about whom to contact for free legal assistance is included with this notice. Oregon State Bar: (503) 684-3763; (800) 452-7636 Legal assistance: www.lawhelp.org/or/index.cfm Dated: 11/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, as trustee 3220 El Camino Real Irvine, CA 92602 Signature By: Angelica Castillo, Assistant Secretary Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington as agent for LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For Non-Sale Information Quality Loan Service Corp. of Washington 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-545-7711 Fax: 619-645-7716 If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder's rights against the real property only. THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations.

ASAP# FNMA3812505 11/23/2010, 11/30/2010, 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010

ASAP# FNMA3812502 11/23/2010, 11/30/2010, 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010


G6 Tuesday, December 7, 2010 • THE BULLETIN

To place an ad call Classiied • 541-385-5809

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LEGAL NOTICE City of Bend Request for Proposals Information Technology Assessment The City of Bend requests proposals for an Information Technology (IT) Assessment, including an IT organizational assessment component and an IT needs assessment component. Sealed proposals must be submitted by January 6, 2010, 3:00 PM, at City Hall, 710 NW Wall Street, 2nd Floor, Bend, Oregon, 97701, Attn: Gwen Chapman, Purchasing Manager. Proposals will not be accepted after deadline. The outside of the package containing the proposal shall identify the project: "Information Technology Assessment". Solicitation packets may be obtained from Central Oregon Builder's Exchange (COBE) at www.plansonfile.com (click on Public Works) or 1902 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. Proposers must register with COBE as a document holder to receive notice of addenda. This can be done on the COBE website or by phone at 541-389-0123. Proposers are responsible for checking the website for the issuance of any addenda prior to submitting a proposal. Proposal results are available from COBE. The City of Bend reserves the right to: 1) reject any or all proposal not in compliance with public solicitation procedures and requirements, 2) reject any or all proposals in accordance with ORS 279B.100, 3) select consultant on the basis of the proposals or to conduct interviews with the highest qualified proposers after scoring, 4) seek clarifications of any or all proposals, and 5) to select the proposal which appears to be in the best interest of the City. Dated: December 7, 2010 Gwen Chapman Purchasing Manager 541-385-6677 LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE STATE OF OREGON IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff, v. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS OF WILLIAM MARK HAMILTON; ANGELA CERIS HAMILTON; HOMEOWNERS OF NOTTINGHAM SQUARE ASSOCIATION; SHANE GROSHONG; OREGON DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES; and Occupants of the Premises, Defendants. Case No. 10CV0492AB SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION 1. TO THE DEFENDANTS: The Unknown Heirs of William Mark Hamilton and Occupants of the Premises: 2. In the name of the State of Oregon, you are hereby required to appear and answer the complaint filed against you in the above-entitled Court and cause on or before the expiration of 30 days from the date of the first publication of this summons. The date of first publication in this matter is November 23, 2010. If you fail timely to appear and answer, Plaintiff will apply to the above-entitled court for the relief prayed for in its complaint. This is a judicial foreclosure of a deed of trust in which the Plaintiff requests that the Plaintiff be allowed to foreclose your interest in the following described real property: LOT 28, BLOCK 7, NOTTINGHAM SQUARE FIRST ADDITION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 61284 Robin Hood Lane, Bend, Oregon 97702. 3. NOTICE TO DEFENDANTS: READ THESE PAPERS CAREFULLY! A lawsuit has been started against you in the above-entitled court by BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing LP, its successors in interest and/or assigns, Plaintiff. Plaintiff's claims are stated in the written complaint, a copy of which was filed with the above-entitled Court. 4. You must "appear" in this case or the other side will win automatically. To "appear" you must file with the court a legal paper called a "motion" or "answer." The "motion" or "answer" must be given to the court clerk or administrator within 30 days of the date of first publication specified herein along with the required filing fee. It must be in proper form and have proof of service on

the Plaintiff's attorney or, if the Plaintiff does not have an attorney, proof of service on the Plaintiff. 5. If you have any questions, you should see an attorney immediately. If you need help in finding an attorney, you may call the Oregon State Bar's Lawyer Referral Service at (503) 684-3763 or toll-free in Oregon at (800) 452-7636. 6. This summons is issued pursuant to ORCP 7. ROUTH CRABTREE OLSEN, P.S. By Janaya L. Carter, OSB # 032830 Attorneys for Plaintiff 13555 SE 36th St., Ste 300 Bellevue, WA 98006 (425) 586-1991; Fax (425) 283-5991 jcarter@rcolegal.com LEGAL NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE STATE OF OREGON FOR THE COUNTY OF DESCHUTES Probate Department In the Matter of the Estate of Charles Raymond Gilpin, Deceased. Case No. 10PB0119MA NOTICE TO INTERESTED PERSONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above captioned estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present them, with vouchers attached, to the undersigned Personal Representative at: 250 NW Franklin Avenue, Suite 402, Bend, Oregon 97701, within four months after the date of first publication of this notice, or the claims may be barred. All persons whose rights may be affected by the proceedings may obtain additional information from the records of the court, the Personal Representative, or the lawyer for the Personal Representative, Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. Dated and first published on November 23, 2010. South Valley Bank & Trust, Personal Representative Personal Representative: South Valley Bank and Trust Marc Henderson, Vice President Klamath Falls, OR 97061 Tel: (541) 880-5217 Fax: (541) 880-5252 Attorney For Personal Representative: Patricia Heatherman, OSB #932990 Patricia L. Heatherman, P.C. 250 NW Franklin Avenue Suite 402 Bend, OR 97701 Tel: (541) 389-4646 Fax: (541) 389-4644 E-mail: patricia@heathermanlaw.com LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0602145681 T.S. No.: OR-256583-F Reference is made to that certain deed made by, BRENT E HARDING as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR SYDION FINANCIAL, LLC, as Beneficiary, dated 9/19/2008, recorded 9/24/2008, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2008-39042 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 205255 LOT FIFTEEN (15), TASMAN RISE, PHASES I AND II, RECORDED JANUARY 15, 2002, IN CABINET F, PAGE 1, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 3417 NE WILD RIVERS LOOP BEND, OR 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $378,441.91; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 4/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $2,607.88 Monthly Late Charge $104.31 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $378,441.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.25% per annum from 3/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late

charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 2/7/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 9/17/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3742400 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010, 11/30/2010, 12/07/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0475559225 T.S. No.: OR-257792-C Reference is made to thai certain deed made by, DAVID L. YORK as Grantor to WESTERN TITLE AND ESCROW, as trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL, LLC (F/K/A HOMECOMINGS FINANCIAL NETWORK, INC.) A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 10/30/2007, recorded 11/9/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No., fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-58989 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 14-12-36- AO-02500 155297 LOT 1, BLOCK 2, TETHEROW CROSSING PHASE II, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 5600 NORTHWEST ZAMIA AVENUE REDMOND, Oregon 97756 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $401,964.93; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 7/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $3,838.01 Monthly Late Charge $134.26 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $401,964.93 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.75% per annum from 6/1/2010 until paid: plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OR-

EGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 2/25/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM. Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any lime prior to live days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 10/7/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# FNMA3768605 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010, 12/21/2010, 12/28/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0601427842 T.S. No.: OR-223878-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, CAROL A. GOODENOUGH as Grantor to AMERITITLE INSURANCE CO, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC BANK A CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, dated 12/2/2005, recorded 12/8/2005, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2005-84399 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 176420 Unit No. 35, CEDAR CREEK TOWNHOMES, A CONDOMINIUM, described in and subject to that certain Supplemental Declaration submitting STAGE 3 of CEDAR CREEK TOWNHOMES, A CONDOMINIUM, to the Oregon Condominium Act, recorded February 23, 1990, in Book 203 Page 435, in the official records for Deschutes County, Oregon, and supplementing a Declaration of Unit Ownership for CEDAR CREEK TOWNHOMES, A CONDOMINIUM, STAGES 1 and II, recorded November 9, 1988, in Book 196, Page 801, in the official records for Deschutes County, Oregon, together with the limited and general common elements as set forth and described therein, appertaining to said unit. Commonly known as: 1050 NE BUTLER MARKET

ROAD #35 BEND, Oregon 97701 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $150,361.32; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 7/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,071.75 Monthly Late Charge $47.96 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $150,361.32 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6% per annum from 6/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 2/28/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 10/8/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3770974 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010, 12/21/2010, 12/28/2010

Find It in The Bulletin Classifieds! 541-385-5809

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0175752807 T.S. No.: OR-257651-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, LAWRENCE A. RUSSELL AND TAMARA P. RUSSELL, HUSBAND AND WIFE as Grantor to AMERITITLE, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 1/24/2007, recorded 1/31/2007, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2007-06453 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 107307 LOT THIRTY-NINE (39), BLOCK JJ, DESCHUTES RIVER WOODS, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 19409 INDIAN SUMMER ROAD BEND, Oregon 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $215,696.91; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 6/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,608.43 Monthly Late Charge $69.26 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $215,696.91 together with interest thereon at the rate of 6.25% per annum from 5/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 2/25/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the mas-

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

culine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 10/5/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3764888 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010, 12/21/2010, 12/28/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0073146797 T.S. No.: 10-11497-6 . Reference is made to that certain deed made by, SYDNEY E. DORRELL, A SINGLE PERSON as Grantor to FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INS CO, as trustee, in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, NA, as Beneficiary, recorded on February 15, 2007, as Instrument No. 2007-09710 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Deschutes County, OR to-wit: APN: 158647 LOT FORTY (40), BLOCK TWO (2), ROLLING HILLS, BEING A REPLAT OF LOTS FIVE (5), SIX (6), SEVEN (7) AND EIGHT (8), BLOCK TWO (2)OF ELLIS SUBDIVISION, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 2124 11TH PLACE, BEND, OR Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantors: failed to pay payments which became due; together with late charges due; Monthly Payment $1,202.63 Monthly Late Charge $50.41 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $ 219,973.78 together with interest thereon at the rate of 5.50000 % per annum from March 1, 2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, the undersigned trustee will on March 21, 2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at the front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, County of Deschutes , State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by

payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's or attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, 17592 E. 17th Street, Suite 300, Tustin, CA 92780 714-Â508-5100 SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ON LINE AT www.fidelityasap.com/ AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL 714-259-7850 In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and 'beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: November 29, 2010 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY Juan Enriquez ASAP# 3832525 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010, 12/21/2010, 12/28/2010 LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Loan No: 0599160801 T.S. No.: OR-221472-C Reference is made to that certain deed made by, HEATHER M. SMAILYS AND MICHAEL J. SMAILYS as Grantor to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY OF OREGON, as trustee, in favor of "MERS" MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC F/K/A GMAC MORTGAGE CORPORATION A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, as Beneficiary, dated 11/21/2006, recorded 11/29/2006, in official records of Deschutes County, Oregon in book/reel/volume No. at page No. , fee/file/instrument/microfile/reception No. 2006-78454 (indicated which), covering the following described real property situated in said County and State, to-wit: APN: 240430 LOT 53 OF RIDGEWATER II, P.U.D., CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. Commonly known as: 20914 LARSEN BROOK LANE BEND, OR 97702 Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and notice has been recorded pursuant to Section 86.735(3) of Oregon Revised Statutes: the default for which the foreclosure is made is the grantor's: Unpaid principal balance of $378,622.50; plus accrued interest plus impounds and / or advances which became due on 7/1/2010 plus late charges, and all subsequent installments of principal, interest, balloon payments, plus impounds and/or advances and late charges that become payable. Monthly Payment $1,966.20 Monthly Late Charge $79.18 By this reason of said default the beneficiary has declared all obligations secured by said deed of trust immediately due and payable, said sums being the following, to-wit: The sum of $378,622.50 together with interest thereon at the rate of 4% per annum from 6/1/2010 until paid; plus all accrued late charges thereon; and all trustee's

fees, foreclosure costs and any sums advanced by the beneficiary pursuant to the terms of said deed of trust. Whereof, notice hereby is given that LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC, the undersigned trustee will on 2/3/2011 at the hour of 11:00 AM, Standard of Time, as established by section 187.110, Oregon Revised Statues, at Front entrance of the Courthouse, 1164 N.W. Bond Street, Bend, Oregon County of Deschutes, State of Oregon, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the interest in the said described real property which the grantor had or had power to convey at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in Section 86.753 of Oregon Revised Statutes has the right to have the foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of said principal as would not then be due had no default occurred), together with the costs, trustee's and attorney's fees and curing any other default complained of in the Notice of Default by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for sale. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other persons owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, the words "trustee" and ‘beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Dated: 9/14/2010 LSI TITLE COMPANY OF OREGON, LLC C/O Executive Trustee Services, LLC at 2255 North Ontario Street, Suite 400 Burbank, California 91504-3120 Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Signature By: Karen Balsano Authorized Signatory ASAP# 3736667 11/16/2010, 11/23/2010, 11/30/2010, 12/07/2010

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Legal Notices

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. OR-USB-109639

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, CHAD J. HOUCHIN, as grantor, to FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, as Trustee, in favor of UMPQUA BANK, ITS SUCCESSORS AND/OR ASSIGNS, as beneficiary, dated 5/15/2003, recorded 5/20/2003, under Instrument No. 2003-33599, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by UMPQUA BANK. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: LOT 16 OF DESCHUTES RIVER CROSSING, PHASE I, CITY OF BEND, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON. The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 19804 DECOY COURT BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of November 16, 2010 Delinquent Payments from July 01, 2010 5 payments at $711.28 each $3,556.40 (07-01-10 through 11-16-10) Late Charges: $112.29 Beneficiary Advances: $0.00 Suspense Credit: $0.00 TOTAL: $3,668.69 ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid all senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee. By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $109,310.41, PLUS interest thereon at 6.250% per annum from 6/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on March 16, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at MAIN ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY JUSTICE CENTER, 1100 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying all costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors, in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. DATED: 11/16/2010 REGIONAL TRUSTEE SERVICES CORPORATION Trustee By: SAMANTHA COHEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT 616 1st Avenue, Suite 500, Seattle, WA 98104 Phone: (206) 340-2550 Sale Information: http://www.rtrustee.com

NOTICE TO BORROWER: YOU SHOULD BE AWARE THAT THE UNDERSIGNED IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND THAT ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Reference is made to that certain Deed of Trust made by, JENNIFER A. BRADY, (UNMARRIED), as grantor, to DAVID A. KUBAT, as Trustee, in favor of MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., as beneficiary, dated 6/15/2005, recorded 6/23/2005, under Instrument No. 2005-39327, records of DESCHUTES County, OREGON. The beneficial interest under said Trust Deed and the obligations secured thereby are presently held by MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC.. Said Trust Deed encumbers the following described real property situated in said county and state, to-wit: PARCEL 2 OF PARTITION PLAT NO. 2002-21, DESCHUTES COUNTY, OREGON The street address or other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 15 SEBENAIAH CIRCLE BEND, OR 97702 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the above street address or other common designation. Both the beneficiary and the trustee have elected to sell the said real property to satisfy the obligations secured by said trust deed and a notice of default has been recorded pursuant to Oregon Revised Statutes 86.735(3); the default for which the foreclosure is made is grantor's failure to pay when due, the following sums: Amount due as of November 24, 2010 Delinquent Payments from May 01, 2010 7 payments at $1,109.36 each $7,755.52 (05-01-10 through 11-24-10) Late Charges: $191.22 TOTAL: $7,956.74 FAILURE TO PAY INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS AND LATE CHARGES WHICH BECAME DUE 5/1/2010 TOGETHER WITH ALL SUBSEQUENT INSTALLMENTS OF PRINCIPAL, INTEREST, IMPOUNDS, LATE CHARGES, FORECLOSURE FEES AND EXPENSES; ANY ADVANCES WHICH MAY HEREAFTER BE MADE; ALL OBLIGATIONS AND INDEBTEDNESSES AS THEY BECOME DUE AND CHARGES PURSUANT TO SAID NOTE AND DEED OF TRUST. ALSO, if you have failed to pay taxes on the property, provide insurance on the property or pay other senior liens or encumbrances as required in the note and deed of trust, the beneficiary may insist that you do so in order to reinstate your account in good standing. The beneficiary may require as a condition to reinstatement that you provide reliable written evidence that you have paid ail senior liens or encumbrances, property taxes, and hazard insurance premiums. These requirements for reinstatement should be confirmed by contacting the undersigned Trustee.By reason of said default, the beneficiary has declared all sums owing on the obligation secured by said trust deed immediately due and payable, said sums being the following: UNPAID PRINCIPAL BALANCE OF $179,978.00, PLUS interest thereon at 5.375% per annum from 4/1/2010, until paid, together with escrow advances, foreclosure costs, trustee fees, attorney fees, sums required for the protection of the property and additional sums secured by the Deed of Trust. WHEREFORE, notice hereby is given that the undersigned trustee, will on March 28, 2011, at the hour of 11:00 AM, in accord with the standard of time established by ORS 187.110, at FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE DESCHUTES COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 1164 NW BOND STREET, BEND, County of DESCHUTES, State of OREGON, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, the interest in the said described property which the grantor had, or had the power to convey, at the time of the execution by him of the said trust deed, together with any interest which the grantor or his successors in interest acquired after the execution of said trust deed, to satisfy the foregoing obligations thereby secured and the costs and expenses of sale, including a reasonable charge by the trustee. Notice is further given that any person named in ORS 86.753 has the right, at any time prior to five days before the date last set for the sale, to have this foreclosure proceeding dismissed and the trust deed reinstated by payment to the beneficiary of the entire amount then due (other than such portion of the principal as would not then be due had no default occurred) and by curing any other default complained of herein that is capable of being cured by tendering the performance required under the obligation or trust deed, and in addition to paying said sums or tendering the performance necessary to cure the default, by paying al! costs and expenses actually incurred in enforcing the obligation and trust deed, together with trustee's and attorney's fees not exceeding the amounts provided by said ORS 86.753. In construing this notice, the masculine gender includes the feminine and the neuter, the singular includes the plural, the word "grantor" includes any successor in interest to the grantor as well as any other person owing an obligation, the performance of which is secured by said trust deed, and the words "trustee" and "beneficiary" include their respective successors in interest, if any. Anyone having any objection to the sale on any grounds whatsoever will be afforded an opportunity to be heard as to those objections if they bring a lawsuit to restrain the same. Sale Information Line: 714-730-2727 or Website: http://www.lpsasap.com DATED: 11/24/2010 LSI TITLE OF OREGON, LLC AS TRUSTEE By: Asset Foreclosure Services, Inc., as Agent for the Trustee 22837 Ventura Blvd., Suite 350, Woodland Hills, CA 91364 Phone: (877)237-7878 Sale Information Line: (714)730-2727 By: Norie Vergara, Sr. Trustee Sale Officer

ASAP# 3818772 11/23/2010, 11/30/2010, 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010

ASAP# 3828849 12/07/2010, 12/14/2010, 12/21/2010, 12/28/2010

LEGAL NOTICE TRUSTEE'S NOTICE OF SALE Pursuant to O.R.S. 86.705 et seq. and O.R.S. 79.5010, et seq. Trustee's Sale No. 09-UM-101592


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HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

*See store for details

541-382-3173

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 1/31/11. COUPON VOID 12/31/10.

Family & Cosmetic Dentistry

Jack R. Miller D.M.D. Branden Ferguson D.D.S.

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE • 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 388-4189

4 WHEEL ALIGNMENT $ 5595

541-550-5555 611 NE PURCELL

(REG. $79.95)

ACROSS FROM COSTCO

Check & Adjust Front & Rear Wheel Alignment Check Tire Wear & Pressure Check Steering & Suspension EXPIRES 12/31/10

ALL MAKES & MODELS!

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

FORD • CHEVY • CHRYSLER • DODGE • VW • GMC • KIA

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N • F O R D • C H E V Y • C H R Y S L E R • D O D G E • V W • G M C • K I A

S U B A R U • H O N D A • T O Y O TA • M A Z D A • N I S S A N • F O R D • C H E V Y • C H R Y S L E R • D O D G E • V W • G M C • K I A

TOUR WINNING HOME ONLY $85,400! WON 5 out of 8 Tour of Homes™ Awards including Best of Show Built for only $85,400 with coupon located on reverse side √ Guaranteed Build Time √ Price Lock Guarantee √ Customizable Floor Plans

See reverse for details

Independently Owned & Operated

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

$50 OFF ANY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE

20% OFF

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties

$

*6225

$

50 PURCHASE

1940 Sq. Ft. Home

Perfect for Ceramic, Porcelain, Slate, Granite and Travertine

Chem-Dry of Bend

SUPER C.E. LOVEJOY’S COUPON

It’s the best thing you can do for your Audi, BMW, Volkswagen, or Porsche. Our trained techs will inspect, adjust and replace parts according to manufacture recommended specifications, time and mileage intervals. Includes labor, part & fluids.

Tile, Stone & Grout Cleaning & Sealing 541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Offer valid with coupon only. Not valid with other offers. Minimums apply. Payment due at time of service. Expiration date: December 31, 2010

$100 OFF COMPLETE D E TA I L I N G SPECIAL Interior: Clean carpets & trim Refresh fabric protection on seats (when applicable) & Deodorize Exterior: Wash, wax & buff & Detail wheels

*Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through January 1, 2011.

M O T O R S

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES 1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

Excludes purchases of Alcohol, Tobacco, Postage, Lottery, Money Orders, Western Union and Gift Cards. Effective December 8 – December 14, 2010. Coupon valid at CE Lovejoy’s only. One coupon per family please. Value 1/20¢

Give Yourself the Gift of Good Health this Christmas!

$

45

Comprehensive exam & first treatment Offer expires 12/31/10 This offer does not apply to Federal Insurance Beneficiaries

Let our doctors help you with • Neck pain • Shoulder pain • Lower back pain • Headaches

• Leg pain • Arm pain

Feel Better Today! • (541) 312-4400 www.bendhealthsourcechiropractor.com


C

C THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

NEW PATIENTS

SPECIAL $

ALPINE DENTAL

95

49

$

COSTCO

PURCELL

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

HWY 20

2078 NE Professional Ct.

(541) 382-2281

SAVE $120

illi am so

nR d.

Offer expires 12/31/10

NE Pro

fession

al Ct.

27th St.

W

New customers only

OIL CHANGE* 541-550-5555

NE Williamson Blvd.

NE

Alpine Dental

21

*Excludes Diesel, 5 Quart Maximum. Expires 12/31/10

NE Neff Rd.

with this coupon $170 value!

95

611 NE PURCELL ACROSS FROM COSTCO

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! Coupon expires 12/31/10

Loyalty Key Tag $118.95

541-382-2222

murrayandholt.com

d Street and Fran Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

klin in Bend.

Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection That’s just $39.65 per Oil Change Retail Value $209.85! Savings $90.90

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Corner of Indian Ave. & SW 15th Redmond

REMOTE START SYSTEMS

SW 17th Street

DIESEL OIL CHANGE $39.65

STARTING @

$

of Central Oregon

541-593-1799

99

179

IICRC Certiied Technician

541-923-1636 www.intuneredmond.com

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

)

( (

)

(

)

(

Choose Your Coupon!

)

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care

COUPON

Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

800-970-0144

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets!

*Coupon not valid with any other offer or promotion. Home needs to be ordered by Dec. 31, 2010. Foundation poured by May 1, 2011. CCB# 181069

Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond

)

(

Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

$

2999

• Wash Exterior Front • Chassis Lube Window • New Oil Filter • Vacuum Front • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Top off most Fluids • Tire Rotation under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 12/31/10

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

11999 Bearing Repack Extra

Most cars & light trucks. Expires 12/31/10

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

PRIME RIB, SALMON OR PRAWNS DINNER

$17.95

FOR ONLY $14 EACH!

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 1/31/11. (Coupon void 12/31/10)

OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 1/31/11. COUPON VOID 12/31/10.

C.E.

• Includes up to 5 quarts of Napa Oil and oil filter • Vehicle safety inspection ALL FOR ... • FREE tire rotation

$

*

22.95

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires December 31, 2010.

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

LOVEJOY’S IS OPEN AND READY TO SERVE YOU. C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702

Friday Appointments Available

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

541-548-5105 646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

We Can Help! Call 541-312-4400 Donald A. Halcrow, DC

541-382-3173

Store in Oregon

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

Don’t let that nagging pain in your neck or that stabbing pain between your shoulders keep you from enjoying this Holiday Season with family and friends. Get rid of pain and celebrate instead.

Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 1/31/11. (Coupon void 12/31/10)

®

• Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

WITH FREE TIRE ROTATION

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE

Your newest

We Cater to Cowards

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

OPEN CHRISTMAS DAY AT 4 PM

Fish House

Full Service Auto Care Specialists Foreign & Domestic Mechanical Repair

www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

CCB# 181069

Artist conceptual drawings. Builder reserves the right to change plans, specifications & prices without notice. Plan number is approx. living square feet. © Copyright 1997 HiLine Homes: Modification or “derivative works” to Floor Plans/Blueprints without permission constitutes copyright infringement.

Chem-Dry of Bend

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

800-970-0144

CCB# 181069

(541) 312-4400 • 365 NE Greenwood Ave, Suite 2 • Bend

MK Nails & Spa Professional • Nails • Waxing & Facials

• Best Prices in town

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

• Beautiful & Relaxing Atmosphere

FREE INSPECTION We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts

• Friendly & Excellent Services *Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through January 1, 2011.

• We accept all competitor offers/coupons 541-318-9191 • 2115 NE Hwy 20, Ste. 104 In Tuscan Square • 2 blocks SW of Costco

M O T O R S

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES 1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com


C

C

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

THE BULLETIN • COMMUNITY SAVINGS

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

SAVE SOME MONEY & TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE GREAT DEALS OFFERED BY OUR LOCAL BUSINESSES!!

We Cater to Cowards

Full Service Auto Care Specialists Foreign & Domestic Mechanical Repair

• Complete Family Dentistry • Insurance Billing • We Offer Nitrous Oxide • We Place & Restore Implants • Root Canals

LUBE, OIL & FILTER SERVICE WITH FREE TIRE ROTATION • Includes up to 5 quarts of Napa Oil and oil filter • Vehicle safety inspection ALL FOR ... • FREE tire rotation

$

www.stevesautomotiveofbend.com

*

22.95

Friday Appointments Available

New Patients & Emergencies Welcome

MK Nails & Spa

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

Professional • Nails • Waxing & Facials

• Best Prices in town

of Central Oregon

• Beautiful & Relaxing Atmosphere

IICRC Certiied Technician

(

Loyalty Key Tag $118.95

541-382-2222

S SERVICE HOUR 5:30pm M–F 7:30am to

Includes: 3 complete oil change services, 10 Qts of synthetic blend oil & filter, 21-point vehicle inspection That’s just $39.65 per Oil Change Retail Value $209.85! Savings $90.90

)

( )

(

DIESEL OIL CHANGE $39.65 Bend. d Street and Franklin in Right on the Corner of Thir Right on the Price.

541-318-9191 • 2115 NE Hwy 20, Ste. 104 In Tuscan Square • 2 blocks SW of Costco

)

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE! murrayandholt.com

• We accept all competitor offers/coupons

(

646 S.W. RIMROCK • REDMOND, OR

Coupon expires 12/31/10

• Friendly & Excellent Services

)

REMOTE START SYSTEMS

SW 17th Street

Corner of Indian Ave. & SW 15th Redmond

541-548-5105

Dr. Brandon L. Turley D.M.D., P.C.

*Present coupon at time of service. Expires December 31, 2010.

902 SE Textron Dr • Bend • 541.382.7911

541-593-1799

• Cosmetic: - Fillings - Crowns - Veneers - Dentures - Partials - Teeth Whitening • Extractions Including Wisdom Teeth

STARTING @

$

17999

541-923-1636 www.intuneredmond.com

(

NEW PATIENTS

SPECIAL $

Comprehensive Exam Includes: • X-rays • Oral Cancer Screening • Tooth and Gum Evaluation

95

49

NE Neff Rd.

illi am so

nR d.

Offer expires 12/31/10

Your newest

l Ct.

27th St.

W

a fession NE Pro

NE Williamson Blvd.

NE

Alpine Dental

$

99

29

• Chassis Lube • Wash Exterior Front • New Oil Filter Window • Up to 5 Qts of 5W30 • Vacuum Front Kendall Synthetic Blend Floorboards • Tire Rotation • Top off most Fluids under the hood Most cars & light trucks. 3/4 & 1 Ton may require extra fee. Expires 12/31/10

(541) 382-2281

New customers only

C.E.

Lube, Oil, Filter & Tire Rotation

2078 NE Professional Ct.

SAVE $120 with this coupon $170 value!

MONEY-SAVING COUPONS! We Use Synthetic Oil Blend Motor Oil

ALPINE DENTAL

Install new disc pads/shoes, resurface drums/rotors. Most cars per axle. Ceramic or carbon metallic pads extra if required. Starting at

$

IS OPEN

119

Bearing Repack Extra

Most cars & light trucks. Expires 12/31/10

800-970-0144

800-970-0144 CCB# 181069

*Coupon not valid with any other offer or promotion. Home needs to be ordered by Dec. 31, 2010. Foundation poured by May 1, 2011. CCB# 181069

Central Oregon (800) 970-0153 Artist conceptual drawings. Builder reserves the right to change plans, specifications & prices without notice. Plan number is approx. living square feet. © Copyright 1997 HiLine Homes: Modification or “derivative works” to Floor Plans/Blueprints without permission constitutes copyright infringement.

FREE INSPECTION

We Can Help! Call 541-312-4400 Donald A. Halcrow, DC (541) 312-4400 • 365 NE Greenwood Ave, Suite 2 • Bend

FOR ONLY $14 EACH!

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 1/31/11. (Coupon void 12/31/10)

With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

COUPON VALID FOR PARTIES UP TO 6 PEOPLE Not valid with other offers, take-out or groups over 6. Please present coupon. Expires 1/31/11. (Coupon void 12/31/10)

OPEN CHRISTMAS DAY AT 4 PM

Fish House OFFERS VALID WITH COUPON ONLY. EXPIRES 1/31/11. COUPON VOID 12/31/10.

COSTCO

HWY 20

LUNCH 11:30–2:30, MON–FRI DINNER 4–9, MON–SAT

HIDDEN IN RED OAK SQUARE 1230 NE 3RD • BEND, OR

541-382-3173

$

95

21

OIL CHANGE* *Excludes Diesel, 5 Quart Maximum. Expires 12/31/10

541-550-5555 611 NE PURCELL ACROSS FROM COSTCO

G O T E A M K I A . C O M

C.E. Lovejoy’s Brookswood Market • 19530 Amber Meadow Drive • Bend OR 97702

Don’t let that nagging pain in your neck or that stabbing pain between your shoulders keep you from enjoying this Holiday Season with family and friends. Get rid of pain and celebrate instead.

$17.95 With choice of Soup, or Salad & Bread And either Baked Potato, French Fries, Rice or Vegetables

COUPON

CCB# 181069

YOU.

PRIME RIB, SALMON OR PRAWNS DINNER

PURCELL

Store in Oregon

STEAK, LOBSTER & PRAWNS COMBO

99

Choose Your Coupon!

LOVEJOY’S

TO SERVE

BRAKE MAINTENANCE

GOODYEAR AUTO CARE | 61343 S. HWY 97 • BEND • 541-388-4189

®

AND READY

)

We will visually inspect and report on: C.V. Joint Boots • Exhaust System • Fluid Levels • V-Belts Exterior Lights • Ball Joints & Tire Rods • Tire Wear & Air Pressure • Cooling System & Hoses FREE Estimate provided on needed Service & Parts *Please present offer at time of write up. Not to be combined with other offers. Not redeemable for advertised specials, previous purchases, or cash. Offer good through January 1, 2011.

M O T O R S

Superior Carpet and Tile & Stone Cleaning

Your Trusted Source for Floor Care Prolong the life of your carpet, stone and tile and keep them looking new with routine professional cleaning.

Trust ChemDry for a healthy home that is safe for kids and pets! Our carpet cleaning equipment and solutions have received the Carpet & Rug Institute’s Seal of Approval. Our new Tile & Stone Clean and Seal Service is perfect for ceramic, porcelain, slate, granite and travertine.

4 BRANDS, A THOUSAND POSSIBILITIES

Chem-Dry of Bend

1045 SE 3rd St • Bend • OR • 541-382-1711 www.carreramotors.com

541-388-7374 Bend • 541-923-3347 Redmond Serving Deschutes, Crook & Jefferson Counties • Independently Owned & Operated


Bulletin Daily Paper 12/07/10